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Sample records for shared electronic medical

  1. Information sharing: transparency, nursing ethics, and practice implications with electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Milton, Constance L

    2009-07-01

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 has spurred national and international debate over possible ethical implications for a mandated electronic database for medical records. What role(s) will the discipline of nursing assume and what policy statements will the discipline of nursing articulate with regard to the need for enhancing privacy and confidentiality with access to medical and nursing documentation found in the electronic database? In this column the author provides an ethical discussion on information sharing and human freedom, and the need for transparency as specified in the humanbecoming leadership model. PMID:19567726

  2. Risk mitigation of shared electronic records system in campus institutions: medical social work practice in singapore.

    PubMed

    Ow Yong, Lai Meng; Tan, Amanda Wei Li; Loo, Cecilia Lay Keng; Lim, Esther Li Ping

    2014-10-01

    In 2013, the Singapore General Hospital (SGH) Campus initiated a shared electronic system where patient records and documentations were standardized and shared across institutions within the Campus. The project was initiated to enhance quality of health care, improve accessibility, and ensure integrated (as opposed to fragmented) care for best outcomes in our patients. In mitigating the risks of ICT, it was found that familiarity with guiding ethical principles, and ensuring adherence to regulatory and technical competencies in medical social work were important. The need to negotiate and maneuver in a large environment within the Campus to ensure proactive integrative process helped. PMID:25321932

  3. Disease Risk Factors Identified through Shared Genetic Architecture and Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Ruau, David J.; Patel, Chirag J.; Weber, Susan C.; Chen, Rong; Tatonetti, Nicholas P.; Dudley, Joel T.; Butte, Atul J.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) have identified genetic variants for thousands of diseases and traits. In this study, we evaluated the relationships between specific risk factors (for example, blood cholesterol level) and diseases on the basis of their shared genetic architecture in a comprehensive human disease-SNP association database (VARIMED), analyzing the findings from 8,962 published association studies. Similarity between traits and diseases was statistically evaluated based on their association with shared gene variants. We identified 120 disease-trait pairs that were statistically similar, and of these we tested and validated five previously unknown disease-trait associations by searching electronic medical records (EMR) from 3 independent medical centers for evidence of the trait appearing in patients within one year of first diagnosis of the disease. We validated that mean corpuscular volume is elevated before diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia; both have associated variants in the gene IKZF1. Platelet count is decreased before diagnosis of alcohol dependence; both are associated with variants in the gene C12orf51. Alkaline phosphatase level is elevated in patients with venous thromboembolism; both share variants in ABO. Similarly, we found prostate specific antigen and serum magnesium levels were altered before the diagnosis of lung cancer and gastric cancer, respectively. Disease-trait associations identifies traits that can potentially serve a prognostic function clinically; validating disease-trait associations through EMR can whether these candidates are risk factors for complex diseases. PMID:24786325

  4. Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence and Use of an Electronic Shared Medical Record Among People Living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Saberi, Parya; Catz, Sheryl L; Leyden, Wendy A; Stewart, Christine; Ralston, James D; Horberg, Michael A; Grothaus, Louis; Silverberg, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    Electronic shared medical records (SMR) are emerging healthcare technologies that allow patients to engage in their healthcare by communicating with providers, refilling prescriptions, scheduling appointments, and viewing portions of medical records. We conducted a pre-post cohort study of HIV-positive adults who used and did not use SMR in two integrated healthcare systems. We compared the difference in antiretroviral refill adherence between SMR users and age- and sex-frequency matched non-users from the 12-month period prior to SMR useto the 12-month period starting 6 months after initiation of SMR use. High adherence was maintained among SMR users (change = -0.11 %) but declined among non-users (change = -2.05 %; p = 0.003). Among SMR users, there was a steady improvement in adherence as monthly frequency of SMR use increased (p = 0.009). SMR use, particularly more frequent use, is associated with maintaining high adherence and non-use is associated with declines in adherence over time among patients with access to these online services. PMID:25572829

  5. A model approach to sharing electronic medical records between and within the state hospitals in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Güler, I; Müldür, S

    2001-11-01

    It has always been a research interest to solve hospital management problems with systematic approach by using modern management tools. Almost all the Hospital Information System (HIS) software packages in Turkey keep track of local transactions in administrative activities and material flow. In state hospitals in Turkey, very little medical information is processed and most of the records are still kept manually and archived on papers. In this paper, a cost-effective, flexible and easy-to-use Hospital Information System model is proposed in order to give better diagnostic and treatment services. It is also demonstrated that this model makes it possible to exchange information between and within the hospitals over Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) network. User needs are taken into consideration during model development and the benefits of model implementation to the hospital administration are stated. According to the model proposed in this paper, only a single health care record number (HCRN) is required for a patient to access all her/his medical records stored in different locations, from any state hospital in Turkey. PMID:11604155

  6. Medical high-resolution image sharing and electronic whiteboard system: A pure-web-based system for accessing and discussing lossless original images in telemedicine.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Liang; Li, Ying; Chen, Xin; Yang, Sheng; Gao, Peng; Liu, Hongjun; Feng, Zhengquan; Nian, Yongjian; Qiu, Mingguo

    2015-09-01

    There are various medical image sharing and electronic whiteboard systems available for diagnosis and discussion purposes. However, most of these systems ask clients to install special software tools or web plug-ins to support whiteboard discussion, special medical image format, and customized decoding algorithm of data transmission of HRIs (high-resolution images). This limits the accessibility of the software running on different devices and operating systems. In this paper, we propose a solution based on pure web pages for medical HRIs lossless sharing and e-whiteboard discussion, and have set up a medical HRI sharing and e-whiteboard system, which has four-layered design: (1) HRIs access layer: we improved an tile-pyramid model named unbalanced ratio pyramid structure (URPS), to rapidly share lossless HRIs and to adapt to the reading habits of users; (2) format conversion layer: we designed a format conversion engine (FCE) on server side to real time convert and cache DICOM tiles which clients requesting with window-level parameters, to make browsers compatible and keep response efficiency to server-client; (3) business logic layer: we built a XML behavior relationship storage structure to store and share users' behavior, to keep real time co-browsing and discussion between clients; (4) web-user-interface layer: AJAX technology and Raphael toolkit were used to combine HTML and JavaScript to build client RIA (rich Internet application), to meet clients' desktop-like interaction on any pure webpage. This system can be used to quickly browse lossless HRIs, and support discussing and co-browsing smoothly on any web browser in a diversified network environment. The proposal methods can provide a way to share HRIs safely, and may be used in the field of regional health, telemedicine and remote education at a low cost. PMID:26093385

  7. To Share or Not to Share: Ethical Acquisition and Use of Medical Data.

    PubMed

    Hollis, Kate Fultz

    2016-01-01

    The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act proposes the meaningful use of interoperable electronic health records throughout the United States health care delivery system as a critical national goal. As we have moved from medical records on paper to interoperable electronic health records, the rapid and easy sharing of medical data through the Internet makes medical data insecure. Electronic data is easy to share but many steps to ensure security of the data need to be taken. Beyond medical data security, we need to ethically acquire, use and manage data so that all people involved with the data from producer to data manager are recognized and respected. This paper advocates that sharing medical data can be ethically the right choice for everyone in health care if data sharing guidelines are available for people to use, modify and strengthen for specific purposes. PMID:27570683

  8. To Share or Not to Share: Ethical Acquisition and Use of Medical Data

    PubMed Central

    Hollis, Kate Fultz

    2016-01-01

    The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act proposes the meaningful use of interoperable electronic health records throughout the United States health care delivery system as a critical national goal. As we have moved from medical records on paper to interoperable electronic health records, the rapid and easy sharing of medical data through the Internet makes medical data insecure. Electronic data is easy to share but many steps to ensure security of the data need to be taken. Beyond medical data security, we need to ethically acquire, use and manage data so that all people involved with the data from producer to data manager are recognized and respected. This paper advocates that sharing medical data can be ethically the right choice for everyone in health care if data sharing guidelines are available for people to use, modify and strengthen for specific purposes. PMID:27570683

  9. Sharing Physician Notes Through an Electronic Portal is Associated With Improved Medication Adherence: Quasi-Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Darer, Jonathan; Tang, Xiaoqin; Thompson, Jason; Tusing, Lorraine; Fossa, Alan; Delbanco, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Background In surveys, interviews, and focus groups, patients taking medications and offered Web portal access to their primary care physicians’ (PCPs) notes report improved adherence to their regimens. However, objective confirmation has yet to be reported. Objective To evaluate the association between patient Internet portal access to primary care physician visit notes and medication adherence. Methods This study is a retrospective comparative analysis at one site of the OpenNotes quasi-experimental trial. The setting includes primary care practices at the Geisinger Health System (GHS) in Danville, Pennsylvania. Participants include patients 18 years of age or older with electronic portal access, GHS primary care physicians, and Geisinger health plan insurance, and taking at least one antihypertensive or antihyperlipidemic agent from March 2009 to June 2011. Starting in March 2010, intervention patients were invited and reminded to read their PCPs' notes. Control patients also had Web portal access throughout, but their PCPs' notes were not available. From prescription claims, adherence was assessed by using the proportion of days covered (PDC). Patients with a PDC ≥.80 were considered adherent and were compared across groups using generalized linear models. Results A total of 2147 patients (756 intervention participants, 35.21%; 1391 controls, 64.79%) were included in the analysis. Compared to those without access, patients invited to review notes were more adherent to antihypertensive medications—adherence rate 79.7% for intervention versus 75.3% for control group; adjusted risk ratio, 1.06 (95% CI 1.00-1.12). Adherence was similar among patient groups taking antihyperlipidemic agents—adherence rate 77.6% for intervention versus 77.3% for control group; adjusted risk ratio, 1.01 (95% CI 0.95-1.07). Conclusions Availability of notes following PCP visits was associated with improved adherence by patients prescribed antihypertensive, but not

  10. Secure medical information sharing in cloud computing.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhiyi; Yang, Bo; Zhang, Wenzheng; Zhao, Yi; Wu, Zhenqiang; Miao, Meixia

    2015-01-01

    Medical information sharing is one of the most attractive applications of cloud computing, where searchable encryption is a fascinating solution for securely and conveniently sharing medical data among different medical organizers. However, almost all previous works are designed in symmetric key encryption environment. The only works in public key encryption do not support keyword trapdoor security, have long ciphertext related to the number of receivers, do not support receiver revocation without re-encrypting, and do not preserve the membership of receivers. In this paper, we propose a searchable encryption supporting multiple receivers for medical information sharing based on bilinear maps in public key encryption environment. In the proposed protocol, data owner stores only one copy of his encrypted file and its corresponding encrypted keywords on cloud for multiple designated receivers. The keyword ciphertext is significantly shorter and its length is constant without relation to the number of designated receivers, i.e., for n receivers the ciphertext length is only twice the element length in the group. Only the owner knows that with whom his data is shared, and the access to his data is still under control after having been put on the cloud. We formally prove the security of keyword ciphertext based on the intractability of Bilinear Diffie-Hellman problem and the keyword trapdoor based on Decisional Diffie-Hellman problem. PMID:26410315

  11. 38 CFR 17.241 - Sharing medical information services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sharing medical... AFFAIRS MEDICAL Sharing of Medical Facilities, Equipment, and Information § 17.241 Sharing medical... Under Secretary for Health shall prescribe, Directors of Department of Veterans Affairs medical...

  12. 38 CFR 17.241 - Sharing medical information services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sharing medical... AFFAIRS MEDICAL Sharing of Medical Facilities, Equipment, and Information § 17.241 Sharing medical... Under Secretary for Health shall prescribe, Directors of Department of Veterans Affairs medical...

  13. 38 CFR 17.241 - Sharing medical information services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sharing medical... AFFAIRS MEDICAL Sharing of Medical Facilities, Equipment, and Information § 17.241 Sharing medical... Under Secretary for Health shall prescribe, Directors of Department of Veterans Affairs medical...

  14. The shared medical appointment: a proposed model of medical appointments.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Eugene; Baum, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Today's healthcare providers are struggling more than ever with providing high-quality care and while controlling the spiraling costs of healthcare. The demands of an aging population, combined with a shrinking pool of medical personnel, have brought challenges to the medical office where doctors are saddled with the need of improving access to medical care. Recruiting new partners, using physician assistants and nurse practitioners, and seeing more patients in a workday are some ways doctors are trying to meet these challenges. For the most part, that does not solve the problems afflicting most physicians and practices. This article will discuss the concept of the shared medical appointment and how it might be applied to most medical practices. PMID:24765735

  15. Electronic Procedures for Medical Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    Electronic procedures are replacing text-based documents for recording the steps in performing medical operations aboard the International Space Station. S&K Aerospace, LLC, has developed a content-based electronic system-based on the Extensible Markup Language (XML) standard-that separates text from formatting standards and tags items contained in procedures so they can be recognized by other electronic systems. For example, to change a standard format, electronic procedures are changed in a single batch process, and the entire body of procedures will have the new format. Procedures can be quickly searched to determine which are affected by software and hardware changes. Similarly, procedures are easily shared with other electronic systems. The system also enables real-time data capture and automatic bookmarking of current procedure steps. In Phase II of the project, S&K Aerospace developed a Procedure Representation Language (PRL) and tools to support the creation and maintenance of electronic procedures for medical operations. The goal is to develop these tools in such a way that new advances can be inserted easily, leading to an eventual medical decision support system.

  16. [Shared electronic health record in Catalonia, Spain].

    PubMed

    Marimon-Suñol, Santiago; Rovira-Barberà, María; Acedo-Anta, Mateo; Nozal-Baldajos, Montserrat A; Guanyabens-Calvet, Joan

    2010-02-01

    Under the law adopted by its Parliament, the Government of Catalonia has developed an electronic medical record system for its National Health System (NHS). The model is governed by the following principles: 1) The citizen as owner of the data: direct access to his data and right to exercise his opposition's privileges; 2) Generate confidence in the system: security and confidentiality strength; 3) Shared model of information management: publishing system and access to organized and structured information, keeping in mind that the NHS of Catalonia is formally an "Integrated system of healthcare public use" (catalan acronym: SISCAT) with a wide variety of legal structures within its healthcare institutions; 4) Use of communication standards and catalogs as a need for technological and functional integration. In summary: single system of medical records shared between different actors, using interoperability tools and whose development is according to the legislation applicable in Catalonia and within its healthcare system. The result has been the establishment of a set of components and relation rules among which we highlight the following: 1) Display of information that collects sociodemographic data of the citizen, documents or reports (radiology, laboratory, therapeutic procedures, hospital release, emergency room), diagnostic health, prescription and immunization plus a summary screen with the most recent and relevant references; 2) Set of tools helping the user and direct messaging between professionals to facilitate their cooperation; 3) Model designed for supranational connections which will allow adding later, with ad hoc rules, clinical data provided by the private health sector or the proper citizen. PMID:20211353

  17. 12 CFR 222.32 - Sharing medical information with affiliates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sharing medical information with affiliates... FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM FAIR CREDIT REPORTING (REGULATION V) Medical Information § 222.32 Sharing medical... exclusions from the term “consumer report” in section 603(d)(2) of the Act that allow the sharing...

  18. Electronic information sharing in air quality management

    SciTech Connect

    Handel, E.D.; Mitro, S.; Smith, E.C.; Tropea, L.C. Jr.; Koorse, S.J.; Cox, E.; Ahladas, J.

    1997-12-31

    The State Advisory Board on Air Pollution (SAB) was asked by the Virginia State Air Pollution Control Board to explore issues related to electronic information sharing in air quality management and to advise the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) on ways to set the scope, priority and long-term goals for electronic information sharing in air quality management.

  19. 38 CFR 17.240 - Sharing specialized medical resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... medical resources. 17.240 Section 17.240 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Sharing of Medical Facilities, Equipment, and Information § 17.240 Sharing specialized medical resources. Subject to such terms and conditions as the Under Secretary for Health shall...

  20. 38 CFR 17.240 - Sharing specialized medical resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... medical resources. 17.240 Section 17.240 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Sharing of Medical Facilities, Equipment, and Information § 17.240 Sharing specialized medical resources. Subject to such terms and conditions as the Under Secretary for Health shall...

  1. 38 CFR 17.240 - Sharing specialized medical resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... medical resources. 17.240 Section 17.240 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Sharing of Medical Facilities, Equipment, and Information § 17.240 Sharing specialized medical resources. Subject to such terms and conditions as the Under Secretary for Health shall...

  2. Applying XDS for sharing CDA-based medical records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joong Il; Jang, Bong Mun; Han, Dong Hoon; Yang, Keon Ho; Kang, Won-Suk; Jung, Haijo; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2006-03-01

    Many countries have set long-term objectives for establishing an Electronic Healthcare Records system(EHRs). Various IT Strategies note that integration of EHR systems has a high priority. Because the EHR systems are based on different information models and different technology platforms, one of the key integration problems in the realization of the EHRs for the continuity of patient care, is the inability to share patient records between various institutions. Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) committee has defined the detailed implementations of existing standards such as DICOM, HL7, in a publicly available document called the IHE technical framework (IHE-TF). Cross-enterprise document sharing (XDS), one of IHE technical frameworks, is describing how to apply the standards into the information systems for the sharing of medical documents among hospitals. This study aims to design Clinical Document Architecture (CDA) schema based on HL7, and to apply implementation strategies of XDS using this CDA schema.

  3. Shared medical appointments in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rahaghi, Franck F; Chastain, Veronica L; Benavides, Rosanna; Ferrer, Gustavo; Ramirez, Jose; Mehta, Jinesh; Oliveira, Eduardo; Smolley, Laurence

    2014-03-01

    We aimed to adapt the shared medical appointment (SMA) model to the care of pulmonary hypertension (PH) patients and evaluate patient satisfaction. Our SMA team included a PH specialist, a PH nurse, and one research fellow. Eight to twelve PH patients with a family member were invited during office visits and by phone calls. Attendance was verified and encouraged by phone calls and informational letters. The meetings started with a 30-minute presentation on various PH topics, which was followed by each patient's individual visit and a focused examination in front of the group, allowing group questions and interaction. Of the total number of patients (n = 53), 84% stated that they would attend a future SMA. The care provided was rated excellent to very good by 98% of the patients. Ninety-two percent stated that they improved their understanding of the disease and treatment options, and 59% acknowledged a preference for the group visit over the private visit. Twenty-five percent of patients stated that they were very likely to likely to some extent to agree to change or seek a change in treatment modality on the basis of conversation with other patients in the SMA. The majority of our patients expressed no privacy concerns before the meeting (76%), and even more expressed no such concerns afterward (88%). In conclusion, the SMA model allows PH patients to increase understanding of their disease process while integrating peer support, promoting social interaction, and addressing patients' emotional needs. Other (rare) pulmonary diseases may benefit from this model. PMID:25006421

  4. Shared medical appointments: An innovative approach to patient care.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Cora A

    2015-09-13

    This article provides an overview of shared medical appointments, an innovative approach to managing patients with chronic conditions. The Diabetes Shared Medical Appointment of the Veterans Affairs Loma Linda Healthcare System, conducted by an interprofessional team and led by a nurse practitioner, is described. PMID:26274879

  5. Medical narratives in electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Tange, H J; Hasman, A; de Vries Robbé, P F; Schouten, H C

    1997-08-01

    In this article, we describe the state of the art and directions of current development and research with respect to the inclusion of medical narratives in electronic medical-record systems. We used information about 20 electronic medical-record systems as presented in the literature. We divided these systems into 'classical' systems that matured before 1990 and are now used in a broad range of medical domains, and 'experimental' systems, more recently developed and, in general, more innovative. In the literature, three major challenges were addressed: facilitation of direct data entry, achieving unambiguous understandability of data, and improvement of data presentation. Promising approaches to tackle the first and second challenge are the use of dynamic data-entry forms that anticipate sensible input, and free-text data entry followed by natural-language interpretation. Both these approaches require a highly expressive medical terminology. How to facilitate the access to medical narratives has not been studied much. We found facilitating examples of presenting this information as fluent prose, of optimising the screen design with fixed position cues, and of imposing medical narratives with a structure of indexable paragraphs that can be used in flowsheets. We conclude that further study is needed to develop an optimal searching structure for medical narratives. PMID:9476152

  6. Shared medical appointments: facilitating interdisciplinary care for midlife women.

    PubMed

    Thacker, Holly L; Maxwell, Richard; Saporito, Jennifer; Bronson, David

    2005-11-01

    Shared medical appointments (SMAs) are a new way to deliver woman-focused interdisciplinary care for midlife women. SMAs are a series of one physician to one patient encounters with other patient observers. The women's health physician addresses each woman's unique medical needs individually but in the context of a shared setting. The major focus is on delivering individual medical care with the benefits of additional time spent educating women patients and answering questions. PMID:16313217

  7. 38 CFR 17.240 - Sharing specialized medical resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... medical resources. 17.240 Section 17.240 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... medical resources. Subject to such terms and conditions as the Under Secretary for Health shall prescribe, agreements may be entered into for sharing medical resources with other hospitals, including State or...

  8. Shared medical appointments save money for capitated groups.

    PubMed

    2003-02-01

    Shared medical appointments aren't money-makers for Palo Alto Medical Foundation, but they do cut expenses, improve patient healing and free up physician schedules. The group nature of the encounters also encourages patients to follow medical orders. Find out more. PMID:12635482

  9. Prescription Medication Sharing: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Beyene, Kebede A.; Sheridan, Janie; Aspden, Trudi

    2014-01-01

    We reviewed the literature on nonrecreational prescription medication sharing. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and a customized multidatabase for all relevant articles published through 2013; our final sample comprised 19 studies from 9 countries with 36 182 participants, ranging in age from children to older adults, and published between 1990 and 2011. The prevalence rate for borrowing someone’s prescription medication was 5% to 51.9% and for lending prescription medication to someone else was 6% to 22.9%. A wide range of medicines were shared between family members, friends, and acquaintances. Sharing of many classes of prescription medication was common. Further research should explore why people share, how they decide to lend or borrow, whether they are aware of the risks, and how they assess the relevance of those risks. PMID:24524496

  10. ["MonDossierMedical.ch": an efficient tool for sharing medical data between patients and doctors].

    PubMed

    Rosemberg, Aurélie; Plaut, Olivier; Sepulchre, Xavier; Spahni, Stéphane

    2015-05-13

    "MonDossierMedical.ch" is a project led by the canton of Geneva, making it possible for every patient to access his own electronic health record (EHR) and to share the medical files with his doctors. It was introduced across the canton in mid-2013, and provided to all patients free of charge. it is based on the first Swiss-wide e-health-compliant pilot project "e-toile". The canton of Geneva developed "e-toile" as a public-private partnership together with Swiss Post and it was launched in 2009 in some of the canton's municipalities. Back then, Geneva's EHR represented the first Swiss attempt to link all healthcare professionals in the treatment chain. Today, it serves more than 4,600 patients and 380 physicians. This number is growing regularly, as well as the health care institutions (physicians, private hospitals, labs) joining the community. Added value tools, such as a shared care plan and a shared medication list will make the platform even more attractive. PMID:26118230

  11. 12 CFR 7.5010 - Shared electronic space.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Shared electronic space. 7.5010 Section 7.5010 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BANK ACTIVITIES AND OPERATIONS Electronic Activities § 7.5010 Shared electronic space. National banks that share electronic space,...

  12. 12 CFR 7.5010 - Shared electronic space.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Shared electronic space. 7.5010 Section 7.5010 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BANK ACTIVITIES AND OPERATIONS Electronic Activities § 7.5010 Shared electronic space. National banks that share electronic space,...

  13. 12 CFR 7.5010 - Shared electronic space.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Shared electronic space. 7.5010 Section 7.5010 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BANK ACTIVITIES AND OPERATIONS Electronic Activities § 7.5010 Shared electronic space. National banks that share electronic space,...

  14. 12 CFR 7.5010 - Shared electronic space.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Shared electronic space. 7.5010 Section 7.5010 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BANK ACTIVITIES AND OPERATIONS Electronic Activities § 7.5010 Shared electronic space. National banks that share electronic space,...

  15. 12 CFR 7.5010 - Shared electronic space.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Shared electronic space. 7.5010 Section 7.5010 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BANK ACTIVITIES AND OPERATIONS Electronic Activities § 7.5010 Shared electronic space. National banks that share electronic space,...

  16. Electronic Medical Business Operations System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-04-16

    Electronic Management of medical records has taken a back seat both in private industry and in the government. Record volumes continue to rise every day and management of these paper records is inefficient and very expensive. In 2005, the White House announced support for the development of electronic medical records across the federal government. In 2006, the DOE issued 10 CFR 851 requiring all medical records be electronically available by 2015. The Y-12 National Securitymore » Complex is currently investing funds to develop a comprehensive EMR to incorporate the requirements of an occupational health facility which are common across the Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC). Scheduling, workflow, and data capture from medical surveillance, certification, and qualification examinations are core pieces of the system. The Electronic Medical Business Operations System (EMBOS) will provide a comprehensive health tool solution to 10 CFR 851 for Y-12 and can be leveraged to the Nuclear Weapon Complex (NWC); all site in the NWC must meet the requirements of 10 CFR 851 which states that all medical records must be electronically available by 2015. There is also potential to leverage EMBOS to the private4 sector. EMBOS is being developed and deployed in phases. When fully deployed the EMBOS will be a state-of-the-art web-enabled integrated electronic solution providing a complete electronic medical record (EMR). EMBOS has been deployed and provides a dynamic electronic medical history and surveillance program (e.g., Asbestos, Hearing Conservation, and Respirator Wearer) questionnaire. Table 1 below lists EMBOS capabilities and data to be tracked. Data to be tracked: Patient Demographics – Current/Historical; Physical Examination Data; Employee Medical Health History; Medical Surveillance Programs; Patient and Provider Schedules; Medical Qualification/Certifications; Laboratory Data; Standardized Abnormal Lab Notifications; Prescription Medication Tracking and Dispensing

  17. Electronic Medical Business Operations System

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, D. T.; Metcalf, J. R.; North, M. P.; Richardson, T. L.; Underwood, S. A.; Shelton, P. M.; Ray, W. B.; Morrell, M. L.; Caldwell, III, D. C.

    2012-04-16

    Electronic Management of medical records has taken a back seat both in private industry and in the government. Record volumes continue to rise every day and management of these paper records is inefficient and very expensive. In 2005, the White House announced support for the development of electronic medical records across the federal government. In 2006, the DOE issued 10 CFR 851 requiring all medical records be electronically available by 2015. The Y-12 National Security Complex is currently investing funds to develop a comprehensive EMR to incorporate the requirements of an occupational health facility which are common across the Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC). Scheduling, workflow, and data capture from medical surveillance, certification, and qualification examinations are core pieces of the system. The Electronic Medical Business Operations System (EMBOS) will provide a comprehensive health tool solution to 10 CFR 851 for Y-12 and can be leveraged to the Nuclear Weapon Complex (NWC); all site in the NWC must meet the requirements of 10 CFR 851 which states that all medical records must be electronically available by 2015. There is also potential to leverage EMBOS to the private4 sector. EMBOS is being developed and deployed in phases. When fully deployed the EMBOS will be a state-of-the-art web-enabled integrated electronic solution providing a complete electronic medical record (EMR). EMBOS has been deployed and provides a dynamic electronic medical history and surveillance program (e.g., Asbestos, Hearing Conservation, and Respirator Wearer) questionnaire. Table 1 below lists EMBOS capabilities and data to be tracked. Data to be tracked: Patient Demographics – Current/Historical; Physical Examination Data; Employee Medical Health History; Medical Surveillance Programs; Patient and Provider Schedules; Medical Qualification/Certifications; Laboratory Data; Standardized Abnormal Lab Notifications; Prescription Medication Tracking and Dispensing; Allergies

  18. Patient cost sharing and medical expenditures for the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Kazuya; Mizuoka, Sou; Yamamoto, Shunsuke; Iizuka, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Despite the rapidly aging population, relatively little is known about how cost sharing affects the elderly's medical spending. Exploiting longitudinal claims data and the drastic reduction of coinsurance from 30% to 10% at age 70 in Japan, we find that the elderly's demand responses are heterogeneous in ways that have not been previously reported. Outpatient services by orthopedic and eye specialties, which will continue to increase in an aging society, are particularly price responsive and account for a large share of the spending increase. Lower cost sharing increases demand for brand-name drugs but not for generics. These high price elasticities may call for different cost-sharing rules for these services. Patient health status also matters: receiving medical services appears more discretionary for the healthy than the sick in the outpatient setting. Finally, we found no evidence that additional medical spending improved short-term health outcomes. PMID:26603160

  19. Access Control Model for Sharing Composite Electronic Health Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jing; Ahn, Gail-Joon; Covington, Michael J.; Zhang, Xinwen

    The adoption of electronically formatted medical records, so called Electronic Health Records (EHRs), has become extremely important in healthcare systems to enable the exchange of medical information among stakeholders. An EHR generally consists of data with different types and sensitivity degrees which must be selectively shared based on the need-to-know principle. Security mechanisms are required to guarantee that only authorized users have access to specific portions of such critical record for legitimate purposes. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for modelling access control scheme for composite EHRs. Our model formulates the semantics and structural composition of an EHR document, from which we introduce a notion of authorized zones of the composite EHR at different granularity levels, taking into consideration of several important criteria such as data types, intended purposes and information sensitivities.

  20. Factors influencing physicians' knowledge sharing on web medical forums.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tung Cheng; Lai, Ming Cheng; Yang, Shu Wen

    2016-09-01

    Web medical forums are relatively unique as knowledge-sharing platforms because physicians participate exclusively as knowledge contributors and not as knowledge recipients. Using the perspective of social exchange theory and considering both extrinsic and intrinsic motivations, this study aims to elicit the factors that significantly influence the willingness of physicians to share professional knowledge on web medical forums and develops a research model to explore the motivations that underlie physicians' knowledge-sharing attitudes. This model hypothesizes that constructs, including shared vision, reputation, altruism, and self-efficacy, positively influence these attitudes and, by extension, positively impact knowledge-sharing intention. A conventional sampling method and the direct recruitment of physicians at their outpatient clinic gathered valid data from a total of 164 physicians for analysis in the model. The empirical results support the validity of the proposed model and identified shared vision as the most significant factor of influence on knowledge-sharing attitudes, followed in descending order by knowledge-sharing self-efficacy, reputation, and altruism. PMID:25888432

  1. Medical Electronics and Physiological Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochrane, T.

    1989-01-01

    Described are developments in medical electronics and physiological measurement. Discussed are electrocardiology, audiology, and urology as mature applications; applied potential tomography, magnetic stimulation of nerves, and laser Doppler flowmetry as new techniques; and optical sensors, ambulatory monitoring, and biosensors as future…

  2. 12 CFR 41.32 - Sharing medical information with affiliates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... activities described in section 18B of the model Privacy of Consumer Financial and Health Information... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sharing medical information with affiliates. 41.32 Section 41.32 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY...

  3. 12 CFR 571.32 - Sharing medical information with affiliates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... activities described in section 18B of the model Privacy of Consumer Financial and Health Information... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sharing medical information with affiliates. 571.32 Section 571.32 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY...

  4. 12 CFR 571.32 - Sharing medical information with affiliates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... activities described in section 18B of the model Privacy of Consumer Financial and Health Information... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Sharing medical information with affiliates. 571.32 Section 571.32 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY...

  5. 12 CFR 571.32 - Sharing medical information with affiliates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... activities described in section 18B of the model Privacy of Consumer Financial and Health Information... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2014-01-01 2012-01-01 true Sharing medical information with affiliates. 571.32 Section 571.32 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY...

  6. 12 CFR 717.32 - Sharing medical information with affiliates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... activities described in section 18B of the model Privacy of Consumer Financial and Health Information... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sharing medical information with affiliates. 717.32 Section 717.32 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS...

  7. 12 CFR 222.32 - Sharing medical information with affiliates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... in section 18B of the model Privacy of Consumer Financial and Health Information Regulation issued by... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sharing medical information with affiliates. 222.32 Section 222.32 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF...

  8. 12 CFR 717.32 - Sharing medical information with affiliates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... activities described in section 18B of the model Privacy of Consumer Financial and Health Information... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Sharing medical information with affiliates. 717.32 Section 717.32 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS...

  9. 12 CFR 571.32 - Sharing medical information with affiliates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... activities described in section 18B of the model Privacy of Consumer Financial and Health Information... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sharing medical information with affiliates. 571.32 Section 571.32 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY...

  10. 12 CFR 334.32 - Sharing medical information with affiliates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... in section 18B of the model Privacy of Consumer Financial and Health Information Regulation issued by... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sharing medical information with affiliates. 334.32 Section 334.32 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS...

  11. 12 CFR 717.32 - Sharing medical information with affiliates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... activities described in section 18B of the model Privacy of Consumer Financial and Health Information... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sharing medical information with affiliates. 717.32 Section 717.32 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS...

  12. 12 CFR 222.32 - Sharing medical information with affiliates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... (including the activities described in section 18B of the model Privacy of Consumer Financial and Health... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Sharing medical information with affiliates. 222.32 Section 222.32 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF...

  13. 12 CFR 717.32 - Sharing medical information with affiliates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... activities described in section 18B of the model Privacy of Consumer Financial and Health Information... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Sharing medical information with affiliates. 717.32 Section 717.32 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS...

  14. 12 CFR 41.32 - Sharing medical information with affiliates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... activities described in section 18B of the model Privacy of Consumer Financial and Health Information... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sharing medical information with affiliates. 41.32 Section 41.32 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY...

  15. 12 CFR 571.32 - Sharing medical information with affiliates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... activities described in section 18B of the model Privacy of Consumer Financial and Health Information... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Sharing medical information with affiliates. 571.32 Section 571.32 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY...

  16. 12 CFR 41.32 - Sharing medical information with affiliates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... activities described in section 18B of the model Privacy of Consumer Financial and Health Information... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Sharing medical information with affiliates. 41.32 Section 41.32 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY...

  17. 12 CFR 717.32 - Sharing medical information with affiliates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... activities described in section 18B of the model Privacy of Consumer Financial and Health Information... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Sharing medical information with affiliates. 717.32 Section 717.32 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS...

  18. 12 CFR 41.32 - Sharing medical information with affiliates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... activities described in section 18B of the model Privacy of Consumer Financial and Health Information... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Sharing medical information with affiliates. 41.32 Section 41.32 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY...

  19. Continuity of Care: Sharing the Medication Treatment Plan.

    PubMed

    Spahni, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    The shared medication treatment plan is a key element for supporting the continuity of care. Indeed a substantial amount of emergency hospitalization is linked to medication - 5% to 10% according to some studies. Methods and tools helping all healthcare providers to have a better knowledge of the complete medication plan are therefore required in order to limit side effects linked to an insufficient knowledge of what the patient is taking. The workshop intends to present various initiatives and open the discussion about the limits, pros and cons of various initiatives. PMID:27332315

  20. Secure public cloud platform for medical images sharing.

    PubMed

    Pan, Wei; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Bouslimi, Dalel; Prigent, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Cloud computing promises medical imaging services offering large storage and computing capabilities for limited costs. In this data outsourcing framework, one of the greatest issues to deal with is data security. To do so, we propose to secure a public cloud platform devoted to medical image sharing by defining and deploying a security policy so as to control various security mechanisms. This policy stands on a risk assessment we conducted so as to identify security objectives with a special interest for digital content protection. These objectives are addressed by means of different security mechanisms like access and usage control policy, partial-encryption and watermarking. PMID:25991144

  1. Shared medical appointments: increasing patient access without increasing physician hours.

    PubMed

    Bronson, David L; Maxwell, Richard A

    2004-05-01

    Shared medical visits are a new concept in patient care. Doctors perform a series of one-on-one patient encounters in a group setting during a 90-minute visit and manage and advise each patient in front of the others. Patients benefit from improved access to their physician and significantly increased education, while providers can boost their access and productivity without increasing hours. Such group visits are voluntary and for established patients only. PMID:15195773

  2. Overcoming challenges to adoption of shared medical appointments.

    PubMed

    McCuistion, Mary Honodel; Stults, Cheryl D; Dohan, Daniel; Frosch, Dominick L; Hung, Dorothy Y; Tai-Seale, Ming

    2014-04-01

    Although research has shown many benefits of Shared Medical Appointments (SMAs) or group visits, uptake by physicians has been quite limited. The objective of this study was to explore the facilitators and barriers to implementing SMAs in a large multispecialty medical group. This was a comparative analysis of SMAs at 3 geographically distinct, semiautonomous divisions of the medical group based on qualitative themes identified in audio recorded key informant interviews with medical and administrative staff (n=12) involved with the implementation of SMAs. Data were collected by conducting key informant interviews focusing on the SMA implementation process, including motivations, history, barriers, and facilitators. Uptake at the 3 divisions was predicated by differing motivations, facilitators, and barriers. Divisions 1 and 2 allocated necessary resources including management support, a physician champion, expert consults, and support staff. These divisions also overcame physician reluctance and financial sustainability challenges. Despite early interest, Division 3 did not devote the time or resources to overcome initial resistance. Without the impetus of management mandate or a champion's enthusiasm, early attempts of SMA implementation faltered and were abandoned. In these cases, a physician champion, management support, and financial sustainability were judged to be the primary enablers of successful implementations of SMAs. Without these enablers and other contributing factors, implementing SMAs was challenging. PMID:24156662

  3. Electronic Media: A Motif for Shared Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lightner, Stanley L.; Johnson, W. C.

    2000-01-01

    A survey of trade and industrial education supervisors from 10 states determined the degree of use of electronic education methods. Instructors in these states used presentation software and web-based exercises most often; fewer used video, CD-ROM, and distance technologies; 70% had been taught electronic presentation methods in preservice or…

  4. Comprehensive Healthcare module: medical and pharmacy students’ shared learning experiences

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Chai-Eng; Jaffar, Aida; Tong, Seng-Fah; Hamzah, Majmin Sheikh; Mohamad, Nabishah

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The Comprehensive Healthcare (CHC) module was developed to introduce pre-clinical medical and pharmacy students to the concept of comprehensive healthcare. This study aims to explore their shared learning experiences within this module. Methodology During this module, medical and pharmacy students conducted visits to patients’ homes and to related community-based organisations in small groups. They were required to write a reflective journal on their experiences regarding working with other professions as part of their module assessment. Highly scored reflective journals written by students from the 2011/2012 academic session were selected for analysis. Their shared learning experiences were identified via thematic analysis. We also analysed students’ feedback regarding the module. Results Analysis of 25 selected reflective journals revealed several important themes: ‘Understanding of impact of illness and its relation to holistic care’, ‘Awareness of the role of various healthcare professions’ and ‘Generic or soft skills for inter-professional collaboration’. Although the primary objective of the module was to expose students to comprehensive healthcare, the students learnt skills required for future collaborative practice from their experiences. Discussion The CHC module provided early clinical exposure to community-based health issues and incorporated some elements of inter-professional education. The students learnt about the roles of other healthcare professions and acquired soft skills required for future collaborative practice during this module. PMID:25327980

  5. A patient-centric distribution architecture for medical image sharing.

    PubMed

    Constantinescu, Liviu; Kim, Jinman; Kumar, Ashnil; Haraguchi, Daiki; Wen, Lingfeng; Feng, Dagan

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, rapid development of imaging technologies has resulted in the introduction of improved imaging devices, such as multi-modality scanners that produce combined positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) images. The adoption of picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) in hospitals have dramatically improved the ability to digitally share medical image studies via portable storage, mobile devices and the Internet. This has in turn led to increased productivity, greater flexibility, and improved communication between hospital staff, referring physicians, and outpatients. However, many of these sharing and viewing capabilities are limited to proprietary vendor-specific applications. Furthermore, there are still interoperability and deployment issues which reduce the rate of adoption of such technologies, thus leaving many stakeholders, particularly outpatients and referring physicians, with access to only traditional still images with no ability to view or interpret the data in full. In this paper, we present a distribution architecture for medical image display across numerous devices and media, which uses a preprocessor and an in-built networking framework to improve compatibility and promote greater accessibility of medical data. Our INVOLVE2 system consists of three main software modules: 1) a preprocessor, which collates and converts imaging studies into a compressed and distributable format; 2) a PACS-compatible workflow for self-managing distribution of medical data, e.g. via CD USB, network etc; 3) support for potential mobile and web-based data access. The focus of this study was on cultivating patient-centric care, by allowing outpatient users to comfortably access and interpret their own data. As such, the image viewing software included on our cross-platform CDs was designed with a simple and intuitive user-interface (UI) for use by outpatients and referring physicians. Furthermore, digital image access via

  6. Shared medical appointments: balancing efficiency with patient satisfaction and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Shelly P; Elias, Beth L

    2016-07-01

    The shared medical appointment (SMA) is one model of care that holds promise for achieving the goal of balancing efficiency, cost, and quality. The results of recent studies of SMAs suggest that improved physiologic health, self-efficacy, and patient education and feasibility emerge as positive outcomes. In order to discover the potential applicability of the SMA format to otolaryngology, a pilot nasal symptoms SMA (NSSMA) model was implemented. The NSSMA was piloted in a private otolaryngology practice serving a metropolitan area in the Mid-Atlantic region. The Wilcoxon Signed Rank test demonstrated a significant improvement in the SNOT-20 score (T = -2.073; P = .019). Descriptive analyses for patient satisfaction results indicate high levels of patient satisfaction with the NSSMA. Also, Wilcoxon Signed Rank test for posttest knowledge scores were significantly higher than pretest scores (T = 1.667; P = .048). For busy practices managing large panels, the SMA serves as an opportunity to balance cost and quality. PMID:27442205

  7. Implementation of electronic medical records

    PubMed Central

    Greiver, Michelle; Barnsley, Jan; Glazier, Richard H.; Moineddin, Rahim; Harvey, Bart J.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To apply the diffusion-of-innovations theory to the examination of factors that are perceived by family physicians as influencing the implementation of electronic medical records (EMRs). Design Qualitative study with 2 focus groups 18 months after EMR implementation; participants also took part in a concurrent quantitative study examining EMR implementation and preventive services. Setting Toronto, Ont. Participants Twelve community-based family physicians. Methods We employed a semistructured interview guide. The interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim; 2 researchers independently categorized and coded the transcripts and then met to compare and contrast their findings, category mapping, and interpretations. Findings were then mapped to an existing theoretical framework. Main findings Multiple barriers to EMR implementation were described. These included lack of relative advantage for many processes, high complexity of the system, low compatibility with physician needs and past experiences, difficulty with adaptation of the EMR to the organization and adaptation of the organization to the EMR, and lack of organizational slack. Positive factors were the presence of a champion and relative advantages for some processes. Conclusion Early EMR implementation experience is consistent with theoretical concepts associated with implementation of innovations. A problematic implementation process helps to explain, at least in part, the lack of improvement in preventive services in our quantitative results. PMID:21998247

  8. The "nuts and bolts" of implementing shared medical appointments: the Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates experience.

    PubMed

    Berger-Fiffy, Jill

    2012-01-01

    Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates (Harvard Vanguard) decided to develop a Shared Medical Appointment (SMA) program in 2007 for a variety of reasons. The program has launched 86 SMAs in 17 specialties at 12 sites and has exceeded 13 000 patient visits. Currently, the practice offers 54 SMAs and is believed to be the largest program in the country. This article provides an overview regarding staffing, space and equipment, project planning, promotional materials, training programs, workflow development, and the use of quality improvement (ie, LEAN) tools used to monitor the work to be completed and the metrics to date. PMID:22668614

  9. Medical Data GRIDs as approach towards secure cross enterprise document sharing (based on IHE XDS).

    PubMed

    Wozak, Florian; Ammenwerth, Elske; Breu, Micheal; Penz, Robert; Schabetsberger, Thomas; Vogl, Raimund; Wurz, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    Quality and efficiency of health care services is expected to be improved by the electronic processing and trans-institutional availability of medical data. A prototype architecture based on the IHE-XDS profile is currently being developed. Due to legal and organizational requirements specific adaptations to the IHE-XDS profile have been made. In this work the services of the health@net reference architecture are described in details, which have been developed with focus on compliance to both, the IHE-XDS profile and the legal situation in Austria. We expect to gain knowledge about the development of a shared electronic health record using Medical Data Grids as an Open Source reference implementation and how proprietary Hospital Information systems can be integrated in this environment. PMID:17108551

  10. Electronic Medical Consultation: A New Zealand Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Brebner, Campbell; Jones, Raymond; Marshall, Wendy; Parry, Graham

    2001-01-01

    Electronic medical consultation is available worldwide through access to the World Wide Web (WWW). This article outlines a research study on the adoption of electronic medical consultation as a means of health delivery. It focuses on the delivery of healthcare specifically for New Zealanders, by New Zealanders. It is acknowledged that the WWW is a global marketplace and that it is therefore difficult to identify New Zealanders' use of such a global market; nevertheless, we attempt to provide a New Zealand perspective on electronic medical consultation. PMID:11720955

  11. Courseware Development Center: Electronic Sharing of Instructional Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rusk, Mike D.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the Courseware Development Center at Tulsa Junior College (Oklahoma), which serves as a network hub for statewide sharing of locally developed audiovisual and microcomputer software. Considers the center's three major components: an electronic bulletin board, a courseware database, and a newsletter for instructional designers. (DMM)

  12. Designing an electronic medication reconciliation system.

    PubMed

    Hamann, Claus; Poon, Eric; Smith, Sandra; Coley, Christopher; Graydon-Baker, Erin; Gandhi, Tejal; Chueh, Henry C; Poikonen, John; Hallisey, Robert K; Van Putten, Cheryl; Broverman, Carol; Blumenfeld, Barry; Middleton, Blackford

    2005-01-01

    Unintended medication discrepancies at hospital admission and discharge potentially harm patients. Explicit medication reconciliation (MR) can prevent unintended discrepancies among care settings and is mandated by JCAHO for 2005. Enterprise-wide, we are linking pre-admission and discharge medication lists in our outpatient electronic health records (EHR) with our inpatient order entry applications (OE) - currently not interoperable - to support MR and inform the development of comprehensive MR among hospitalized patients. PMID:16779263

  13. Designing an Electronic Medication Reconciliation System

    PubMed Central

    Hamann, Claus; Poon, Eric; Smith, Sandra; Coley, Christopher; Graydon-Baker, Erin; Gandhi, Tejal; Chueh, Henry C.; Poikonen, John; Hallisey, Robert K.; Van Putten, Cheryl; Broverman, Carol; Blumenfeld, Barry; Middleton, Blackford

    2005-01-01

    Unintended medication discrepancies at hospital admission and discharge potentially harm patients. Explicit medication reconciliation (MR) can prevent unintended discrepancies among care settings and is mandated by JCAHO for 2005. Enterprise-wide, we are linking pre-admission and discharge medication lists in our outpatient electronic health records (EHR) with our inpatient order entry applications (OE) - currently not interoperable - to support MR and inform the development of comprehensive MR among hospitalized patients. PMID:16779263

  14. Access Scheme for Controlling Mobile Agents and its Application to Share Medical Information.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yu-Ting; Chen, Tzer-Shyong; Chen, Tzer-Long; Chung, Yu-Fang; Chen, Yu- Xin; Hwang, Jen-Hung; Wang, Huihui; Wei, Wei

    2016-05-01

    This study is showing the advantage of mobile agents to conquer heterogeneous system environments and contribute to a virtual integrated sharing system. Mobile agents will collect medical information from each medical institution as a method to achieve the medical purpose of data sharing. Besides, this research also provides an access control and key management mechanism by adopting Public key cryptography and Lagrange interpolation. The safety analysis of the system is based on a network attacker's perspective. The achievement of this study tries to improve the medical quality, prevent wasting medical resources and make medical resources access to appropriate configuration. PMID:27010391

  15. Comparison of consumers’ views on electronic data sharing for healthcare and research

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Jill G; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2015-01-01

    New models of healthcare delivery such as accountable care organizations and patient-centered medical homes seek to improve quality, access, and cost. They rely on a robust, secure technology infrastructure provided by health information exchanges (HIEs) and distributed research networks and the willingness of patients to share their data. There are few large, in-depth studies of US consumers’ views on privacy, security, and consent in electronic data sharing for healthcare and research together. Objective This paper addresses this gap, reporting on a survey which asks about California consumers’ views of data sharing for healthcare and research together. Materials and Methods The survey conducted was a representative, random-digit dial telephone survey of 800 Californians, performed in Spanish and English. Results There is a great deal of concern that HIEs will worsen privacy (40.3%) and security (42.5%). Consumers are in favor of electronic data sharing but elements of transparency are important: individual control, who has access, and the purpose for use of data. Respondents were more likely to agree to share deidentified information for research than to share identified information for healthcare (76.2% vs 57.3%, p < .001). Discussion While consumers show willingness to share health information electronically, they value individual control and privacy. Responsiveness to these needs, rather than mere reliance on Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), may improve support of data networks. Conclusion Responsiveness to the public’s concerns regarding their health information is a pre-requisite for patient-centeredness. This is one of the first in-depth studies of attitudes about electronic data sharing that compares attitudes of the same individual towards healthcare and research. PMID:25829461

  16. Electron beam sterilisation of heterogeneous medical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadat, T.; Morisseau, MrD.; Ross, MissA.

    1993-07-01

    Electron beam radiation is used in the sterilisation of medical disposable devices. High energy, 10 MeV, electron beam linear accelerators are in use worldwide for this purpose. The dose distribution achieved in the products treated influences the efficiency of treatment. This paper looks at the dose distribution achieved with such machines and the methods used to define it in heterogeneous products.

  17. Using clinically nuanced cost sharing to enhance consumer access to specialty medications.

    PubMed

    Buxbaum, Jason; de Souza, Jonas; Fendrick, A Mark

    2014-06-01

    With specialty pharmaceutical prices on the rise, patients are often expected to pay anywhere from 30% to 50% of the specialty-tier drug price through co-insurance-based cost sharing. As these prices continue to climb, patients may choose lower-value medications for their medical needs or become nonadherent for cost-related reasons. Value-based insurance design implementations for specialty medications connect cost sharing and clinical value by moving high-value medications into lower-priced tiers, adjusting cost-sharing based on patient-specific variables, applying the "reward the good soldier" strategy, and encouraging patients to seek high-performing providers. PMID:25180506

  18. Privacy, confidentiality, and electronic medical records.

    PubMed Central

    Barrows, R C; Clayton, P D

    1996-01-01

    The enhanced availability of health information in an electronic format is strategic for industry-wide efforts to improve the quality and reduce the cost of health care, yet it brings a concomitant concern of greater risk for loss of privacy among health care participants. The authors review the conflicting goals of accessibility and security for electronic medical records and discuss nontechnical and technical aspects that constitute a reasonable security solution. It is argued that with guiding policy and current technology, an electronic medical record may offer better security than a traditional paper record. PMID:8653450

  19. Consultation of medical narratives in the electronic medical record.

    PubMed

    Tange, H J

    1999-12-01

    This article presents an overview of a research project concerning the consultation of medical narratives in the electronic medical record (EMR). It describes an analysis of user needs, the design and implementation of a prototype EMR system, and the evaluation of the ease of consultation of medical narratives when using this system. In a questionnaire survey, 85 hospital physicians judged the quality of their paper-based medical record with respect to data entry, information retrieval and some other aspects. Participants were more positive about the paper medical record than the literature suggests. They wished to maintain the flexibility of data entry but indicated the need to improve the retrieval of information. A prototype EMR system was developed to facilitate the consultation of medical narratives. These parts were divided into labeled segments that could be arranged source-oriented and problem-oriented. This system was used to evaluate the ease of information retrieval of 24 internists and 12 residents at a teaching hospital when using free-text medical narratives divided at different levels of detail. They solved, without time pressure, some predefined problems concerning three voluminous, inpatient case records. The participants were randomly allocated to a sequence that was balanced by patient case and learning effect. The division of medical narratives affected speed, but not completeness of information retrieval. Progress notes divided into problem-related segments could be consulted 22% faster than when undivided. Medical history and physical examination divided into segments at organ-system level could be consulted 13% faster than when divided into separate questions and observations. These differences were statistically significant. The fastest divisions were also appreciated as the best combination of easy searching and best insight in the patient case. The results of our evaluation study suggest a trade-off between searching and reading: too much

  20. Effect of Cost-Sharing on Use of Asthma Medication in Children

    PubMed Central

    Ungar, Wendy J.; Kozyrskyj, Anita; Paterson, Michael; Ahmad, Fida

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of cost-sharing on the use of asthma medications in asthmatic children. According to asthma guidelines, children with asthma may require treatment with multiple medications, including controllers and relievers, to achieve optimal control. Although families may be enrolled in drug benefit plans, impediments to access persist in the form of cost-sharing. Design Population-based retrospective cohort study of children by analysis of administrative medication insurance claims data. Setting Ontario, Canada. Participants A cohort of 17 046 Ontario children with asthma enrolled in private drug plans. Main Exposure We used data on out-of-pocket expenses and reimbursement for medications to classify children as having zero, low (<20%), or high (≥20%) levels of cost-sharing. Main Outcome Measures We examined use of bronchodilators, inhaled corticosteroids, leukotriene receptor antagonists, oral corticosteroids, and combination agents. Multiple linear and logistic regressions compared medication use between cost-sharing groups, controlling for age and sex. Results The annual number of asthma medication claims per child was significantly lower in the high cost-sharing group (6.6) compared with the zero (7.0) and low (7.2) cost-sharing groups (P<.001). Children in the high cost-sharing group were less likely to purchase bronchodilators, inhaled corticosteroids, and leukotriene receptor antagonists compared with the low cost-sharing group (odds ratio, 0.76; 95% confidence interval, 0.67–0.86) and were less likely to purchase dual agents compared with the low cost-sharing group (odds ratio, 0.70; 95% confidence interval, 0.66–0.75). Conclusion The cost-sharing level affected the use of asthma medication, with the highest cost-sharing group exhibiting significantly lower use of maintenance medications and newer dual agents. PMID:18250232

  1. Time-Shared Computing Implications for Medical Libraries *

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Charles J.

    1969-01-01

    Many library data processing systems are unresponsive to the needs of librarians because of the necessity to batch-process transactions in a computer center. Such systems tend to be reportoriented rather than information-oriented with resultant problems in the timeliness of information. Time-shared computing permits multiple users to process jobs simultaneously through on-line interaction with the computer. Such systems offer to the librarian the advantages of immediate access to information, costs shared with other users, and direct man-machine interaction. This tutorial paper describes time-shared systems with applications in the library. Problems concerning the cost and present state-of-the-art of time-sharing are discussed. PMID:5778721

  2. Electronic medical record and glaucoma medications: connecting the medication reconciliation with adherence

    PubMed Central

    Bacon, Thomas S; Fan, Kenneth C; Desai, Manishi A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate consistency in documentation of glaucoma medications in the electronic medical record and identify which regimen patients adhere to when inconsistencies exist. Factors contributing to medication nonadherence are also explored. Methods Retrospective chart review of medication adherence encompassing 200 patients from three glaucoma physicians at a tertiary referral center over a 1-month period. Adherence was determined by the consistency between a patients stated medication regimen and either the active medication list in the electronic medical record, or the physicians planned medication regimen in the preceding clinic visit. Patient charts were also reviewed for patient sex, age, primary language, race, and total number of medications. Results A total of 160 charts showed consistency in documentation between the physician note and electronic medication reconciliation. Of those patients, 83.1% reported adherence with their glaucoma medication schedule. When there was a discrepancy in documentation (40 charts), 72.5% patients followed the physician-stated regimen vs 20% who followed neither vs 7.5% who followed the medical record (P<0.01). No difference in adherence was observed based on sex (P=0.912) or total number of medications taken (P=0.242). Language, both English- (P=0.075) and Haitian (P=0.10) -speaking populations, as well as race, Caucasian (P=0.31), African-American (P=0.54), and Hispanic (P=0.58), had no impact on medication adherence. Patients over 80 years of age were more nonadherent as compared to other decades (P=0.04). Conclusion Inconsistent documentation between the electronic medical record physician note and medication regimen may contribute to patient medication nonadherence. Patients over 80 years of age were associated with higher rates of nonadherence, while sex, total number of medications, race, and language had no interaction with medication adherence. PMID:26869756

  3. [Vitalink: a digital platform to share patient health records in primary care. Report of the pilot projects for sharing medication schemes].

    PubMed

    Zwaenepoel, L; Hulshagen, L

    2014-03-01

    Vitalink is a digital platform to share health patient data among health care professionals in primary care. The Flemish community started the development of this platform in collaboration with representatives of professional associations primary care. Sharing medication charts online was the first Vitalink project. In December 2012 four pilot regions in Flanders (Turnhout, Limburg, Aalst and Halle) tested medication chart sharing through Vitalink. Due to difficulties with software development effective sharing started only in April 2013. The test phase was ended in October 2013. Each pilot region made an evaluation report. Conclusions were similar: the realization business cases were limited. Integration in end user software was insufficiently performant. Moreover, interpretation of downloaded medication charts was found out to differ among participating software applications. Because of these problems exchange of patient records among primary care actors was limited. Therefore research questions could not be conclusively answered. Nevertheless the Vitalink pilot project can be considered successful in some ways. Collaboration and communication among health care professionals and their associations was ameliorated. The awareness of digital data sharing in primary care is growing. Pilot projects created buy in among patients, physicians, pharmacists and nurses. Uniform lay-out guidelines were established in deliberation with all participating actors. Since November 2013 Vitalink is in production. Medication charts, summarized electronic health records and vaccination data can be uploaded to the platform and health care professionals that are registered can consult them. End user software must still be developed to make broad use of the platform feasible. Meanwhile further deliberation with software vendors and professional associations can be organized in order to achieve the implementation and integration of user friendly Vitalink modules. PMID:24804390

  4. [A distributed storage architecture for regional medical image sharing and cooperation based on HDFS].

    PubMed

    LI, Peng-jun; CHEN, Guang-jie; GUO, Wen-ming

    2011-03-01

    Given the importance of regional centers for medical image sharing and cooperation is important for resource balancing, healthcare service enhancement and medical expense reduction, building such regional medical image sharing and cooperation centers faces huge challenges. In this paper we analyze the advantages and weakness of two storage architectures, and designed a hybrid storage architecture combining FC SAN and Hadoop HDFS. A HDFS suitable medical image file format, called S-DICOM, and a set of S-DICOM operating middleware, SDFO (S-DICOM File Operator), was developed. The results of performance testing indicated that this hybrid storage architecture is suitable for storing and managing large volume of medical images. PMID:21421491

  5. Gated electron sharing within dynamic naphthalene diimide-based oligorotaxanes.

    PubMed

    Avestro, Alyssa-Jennifer; Gardner, Daniel M; Vermeulen, Nicolaas A; Wilson, Eleanor A; Schneebeli, Severin T; Whalley, Adam C; Belowich, Matthew E; Carmieli, Raanan; Wasielewski, Michael R; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2014-04-22

    The controlled self-assembly of well-defined and spatially ordered π-systems has attracted considerable interest because of their potential applications in organic electronics. An important contemporary pursuit relates to the investigation of charge transport across noncovalently coupled components in a stepwise fashion. Dynamic oligorotaxanes, prepared by template-directed methods, provide a scaffold for directing the construction of monodisperse one-dimensional assemblies in which the functional units communicate electronically through-space by way of π-orbital interactions. Reported herein is a series of oligorotaxanes containing one, two, three and four naphthalene diimide (NDI) redox-active units, which have been shown by cyclic voltammetry, and by EPR and ENDOR spectroscopies, to share electrons across the NDI stacks. Thermally driven motions between the neighboring NDI units in the oligorotaxanes influence the passage of electrons through the NDI stacks in a manner reminiscent of the conformationally gated charge transfer observed in DNA. PMID:24623608

  6. Do Continuing Medical Education Articles Foster Shared Decision Making?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labrecque, Michel; Lafortune, Valerie; Lajeunesse, Judith; Lambert-Perrault, Anne-Marie; Manrique, Hermes; Blais, Johanne; Legare, France

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Defined as reviews of clinical aspects of a specific health problem published in peer-reviewed and non-peer-reviewed medical journals, offered without charge, continuing medical education (CME) articles form a key strategy for translating knowledge into practice. This study assessed CME articles for mention of evidence-based…

  7. 38 CFR 17.240 - Sharing specialized medical resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... one of the following purposes: (1) It will secure the use of a specialized medical resource which... medical resources when such an agreement will obviate the need for a similar resource to be installed or... Secretary of Health and Human Services, after consultation with the Secretary of Veterans Affairs, and...

  8. A web service for enabling medical image retrieval integrated into a social medical image sharing platform.

    PubMed

    Niinimäki, Marko; Zhou, Xin; de la Vega, Enrique; Cabrer, Miguel; Müller, Henning

    2010-01-01

    Content-based visual image access is in the process from a research domain towards real applications. So far, most image retrieval applications have been in one specialized domain such as lung CTs as diagnosis aid or for classification of general images based on anatomic region, modality, and view. This article describes the use of a content-based image retrieval system in connection with the medical image sharing platform MEDTING, so a data set with a very large variety. Similarity retrieval is possible for all cases of the social image sharing platform, so cases can be linked by either visual similarity or similarity in keywords. The visual retrieval search is based on the GIFT (GNU Image Finding Tool). The technology for updating the index with new images added by users employs RSS (Really Simple Syndication) feeds. The ARC (Advanced Resource Connector) middleware is used for the implementation of a web service for similarity retrieval, simplifying the integration of this service. Novelty of this article is the application/integration and image updating strategy. Retrieval methods themselves employ existing techniques that are all open source and can easily be reproduced. PMID:20841889

  9. [Looking for a more participative healthcare: sharing medical decision making].

    PubMed

    Bravo, Paulina; Contreras, Aixa; Perestelo-Pérez, Lilisbeth; Pérez-Ramos, Jeanette; Málaga, Germán

    2013-01-01

    The healthcare model is shifting from a paternalistic towards a more inclusive and participative approach, such as shared decision making (SDM). SDM considers patients as autonomous and responsible agents. SDM is a therapeutic approach where healthcare providers and patients share the best evidence available to make a decision according to the values and preferences of the patient. Decision aids are tools that can facilitate this information exchange. These tools help patients to increase knowledge about options, reduce decisional conflict and improve satisfaction. Additionally, communication skills play a key role within the professional-patient relationship, as they facilitate sharing information and preferences in an effective and respectful manner. This therapeutic approach could support the reduction of health inequalities that affect Latin America, as it promotes an active and informed participation of patients in their healthcare process. PMID:24448951

  10. 38 CFR 17.241 - Sharing medical information services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... information services. (a) Agreements for exchange of information. Subject to such terms and conditions as the...) Purpose of sharing agreements. Agreements for the exchange of information shall be used to the maximum... such an agreement, an environment of academic medicine which will help the hospital attract and...

  11. 38 CFR 17.241 - Sharing medical information services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... information services. (a) Agreements for exchange of information. Subject to such terms and conditions as the...) Purpose of sharing agreements. Agreements for the exchange of information shall be used to the maximum... such an agreement, an environment of academic medicine which will help the hospital attract and...

  12. The Electronic Medical Record: Promises and Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hersh, William R.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the state of electronic medical records, their advantage over existing paper records, the problems impeding their implementation, and concerns over their security and confidentiality. Topics include challenges for the new health care era, including managed care systems, cost benefits, lack of standards, and future possibilities.…

  13. Implementation methods of medical image sharing for collaborative health care based on IHE XDS-I profile.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianguo; Zhang, Kai; Yang, Yuanyuan; Sun, Jianyong; Ling, Tonghui; Wang, Mingqing; Bak, Peter

    2015-10-01

    IHE XDS-I profile proposes an architecture model for cross-enterprise medical image sharing, but there are only a few clinical implementations reported. Here, we investigate three pilot studies based on the IHE XDS-I profile to see whether we can use this architecture as a foundation for image sharing solutions in a variety of health-care settings. The first pilot study was image sharing for cross-enterprise health care with federated integration, which was implemented in Huadong Hospital and Shanghai Sixth People's Hospital within the Shanghai Shen-Kang Hospital Management Center; the second pilot study was XDS-I-based patient-controlled image sharing solution, which was implemented by the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) team in the USA; and the third pilot study was collaborative imaging diagnosis with electronic health-care record integration in regional health care, which was implemented in two districts in Shanghai. In order to support these pilot studies, we designed and developed new image access methods, components, and data models such as RAD-69/WADO hybrid image retrieval, RSNA clearinghouse, and extension of metadata definitions in both the submission set and the cross-enterprise document sharing (XDS) registry. We identified several key issues that impact the implementation of XDS-I in practical applications, and conclude that the IHE XDS-I profile is a theoretically good architecture and a useful foundation for medical image sharing solutions across multiple regional health-care providers. PMID:26835497

  14. Ethical Questions in Medical Electronic Adherence Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jeffrey I; Eyal, Nir; Musiimenta, Angella; Haberer, Jessica E

    2016-03-01

    Electronic adherence monitors (EAMs) record and report an array of health behaviors, ranging from taking daily medications to wearing medical devices. EAMs are utilized in research worldwide and are being investigated for clinical use. However, there is also growing popular concern about the extent to which electronic devices may be used to monitor individuals, including allegations in the media that EAMs represent a move towards "Big Brother" in medicine. Here, we highlight the unique benefits as well as the potential ethical challenges that electronic adherence monitoring generates. These challenges surround autonomy, privacy and confidentiality, trust, and ancillary care obligations. We describe key questions within each of these domains that warrant further investigation, and present potential solutions to many of the concerns raised. PMID:26358284

  15. The role of medical schools in promoting social accountability through shared decision-making.

    PubMed

    Karnieli-Miller, Orit; Zisman-Ilani, Yaara; Meitar, Dafna; Mekori, Yoseph

    2014-01-01

    Reducing health inequalities and enhancing the social accountability of medical students and physicians is a challenge acknowledged by medical educators and professionals. It is usually perceived as a macro-level, community type intervention. This commentary suggests a different approach, an interpersonal way to decrease inequality and asymmetry in power relations to improve medical decisions and care. Shared decision-making practices are suggested as a model that requires building partnership, bi-directional sharing of information, empowering patients and enhancing tailored health care decisions. To increase the implementation of shared decision-making practices in Israel, an official policy needs to be established to encourage the investment of resources towards helping educators, researchers, and practitioners translate and integrate it into daily practice. Special efforts should be invested in medical education initiatives to train medical students and residents in SDM practices. PMID:25075274

  16. A shared electronic health record: lessons from the coalface.

    PubMed

    Silvester, Brett V; Carr, Simon J

    2009-06-01

    A shared electronic health record system has been successfully implemented in Australia by a Division of General Practice in northern Brisbane. The system grew out of coordinated care trials that showed the critical need to share summary patient information, particularly for patients with complex conditions who require the services of a wide range of multisector, multidisciplinary health care professionals. As at 30 April 2008, connected users of the system included 239 GPs from 66 general practices, two major public hospitals, three large private hospitals, 11 allied health and community-based provider organisations and 1108 registered patients. Access data showed a patient's shared record was accessed an average of 15 times over a 12-month period. The success of the Brisbane implementation relied on seven key factors: connectivity, interoperability, change management, clinical leadership, targeted patient involvement, information at the point of care, and governance. The Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care is currently evaluating the system for its potential to reduce errors relating to inadequate information transfer during clinical handover. PMID:19485857

  17. Integration services to enable regional shared electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Ilídio C; Cunha, João P S

    2011-01-01

    eHealth is expected to integrate a comprehensive set of patient data sources into a coherent continuum, but implementations vary and Portugal is still lacking on electronic patient data sharing. In this work, we present a clinical information hub to aggregate multi-institution patient data and bridge the information silos. This integration platform enables a coherent object model, services-oriented applications development and a trust framework. It has been instantiated in the Rede Telemática de Saúde (www.RTSaude.org) to support a regional Electronic Health Record approach, fed dynamically from production systems at eight partner institutions, providing access to more than 11,000,000 care episodes, relating to over 350,000 citizens. The network has obtained the necessary clearance from the Portuguese data protection agency. PMID:21893763

  18. Enhancing Practice Efficiency and Patient Care by Sharing Electronic Health Records.

    PubMed

    Keller, Megan E; Kelling, Sarah E; Cornelius, Douglas C; Oni, Hafusat A; Bright, David R

    2015-01-01

    One primary function of community pharmacies is to dispense medications to patients. In doing so, pharmacists frequently communicate with physicians' offices to clarify prescription orders and obtain additional information to ensure the safe and accurate dispensing of medications. Such communication is often done by telephone or fax, which is inefficient for both the pharmacy and the physician's office. This problem was highlighted in a recent American Medical Association resolution defining certain pharmacy inquiries as "interference with the practice of medicine and unwarranted." As a result, many are seeking to understand how to balance the needs of the patient care process with the need for operational efficiency in the physician's office and pharmacy. This study presents one example of a health information technology-based solution involving shared access to an electronic health record (EHR), and describes a case in which a physician's office and a community pharmacy experimented with this model to promote practice efficiency while also providing enhanced access to clinical information in both directions. The rationale behind the process change, a brief description of how the new process came into existence, and a description of how information sharing can be helpful in related clinical situations are provided. Similar models that involve sharing of EHRs may create valuable opportunities for collaboration between physicians and pharmacists to enhance patient care and improve workflow efficiency. PMID:26604871

  19. Intelligent consumer-centric electronic medical record.

    PubMed

    Luo, Gang; Thomas, Selena B; Tang, Chunqiang

    2009-01-01

    Web-based, consumer-centric electronic medical records (CEMRs) are currently undergoing widespread deployment. Existing CEMRs, however, have limited intelligence and cannot satisfy users' many needs. This paper proposes the concept of intelligent CEMR. We introduce and extend expert system and web search technology into the CEMR domain. The resulting intelligent CEMRs can automatically provide users with personalized healthcare information to facilitate their daily activities. We use automatic home medical product recommendation as a concrete application to demonstrate the benefits offered by intelligent CEMRs. PMID:19745280

  20. Interactive electronic whiteboards in the medical classroom.

    PubMed Central

    Jain, N. L.; Murphy, J. F.; Hassan, S. W.; Cunnius, E. L.; Metcalfe, E. S.; Schnase, J. L.; Schoening, P. A.; Spooner, S. A.; Frisse, M. E.

    1994-01-01

    Most research on computer-assisted instruction has concentrated on developing systems to be used outside the teaching environment to supplement or complement in-class teaching. We believe that interactive large-screen computers can be used effectively in the classroom as electronic whiteboards to more effectively teach select medical school courses. We describe our experience with one such device, the Xerox LiveBoard, to teach a course on computer-assisted clinical decision analysis to a group of first-year medical students. Images Figure 1 PMID:7949986

  1. Recent perspectives of electronic medical record systems

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, XIAO-YING; ZHANG, PEIYING

    2016-01-01

    Implementation of electronic medical record (EMR) systems within developing contexts as part of efforts to monitor and facilitate the attainment of health-related aims has been on the increase. However, these efforts have been concentrated on urban hospitals. Recent findings showed that development processes of EMR systems are associated with various discrepancies between protocols and work practices. These discrepancies were mainly caused by factors including high workload, lack of medical resources, misunderstanding of the protocols by health workers, and client/patient practices. The present review focused on the effects of EMRs on patient care work, and on appropriate EMR designs principles and strategies to ameliorate these systems. PMID:27284289

  2. Electronic medical records and quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Carter, Jonathan T

    2015-04-01

    Widespread adoption of electronic medical records (EMRs) in the United States is transforming the practice of medicine from a paper-based cottage industry into an integrated health care delivery system. Most physicians and institutions view the widespread use of EMRs to be inevitable. But the transformation has not been painless. Many have questioned whether the substantial investment in electronic health records has really been justified by improved patient outcomes or quality of care. This article describes historical and recent efforts to use EMRs to improve the quality of patient care, and provides a roadmap of EMR uses for the foreseeable future. PMID:25771280

  3. Guaranteeing anonymity when sharing medical data, the Datafly System.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, L

    1997-01-01

    We present a computer program named Datafly that maintains anonymity in medical data by automatically generalizing, substituting, and removing information as appropriate without losing many of the details found within the data. Decisions are made at the field and record level at the time of database access, so the approach can be used on the fly in role-based security within an institution, and in batch mode for exporting data from an institution. Often organizations release and receive medical data with all explicit identifiers, such as name, address and phone number, removed in the incorrect belief that patient confidentiality is maintained because the resulting data look anonymous; however, we show the remaining data can often be used to re-identify individuals by linking or matching the data to other databases or by looking at unique characteristics found in the fields and records of the database itself. When these less apparent aspects are taken into account, each released record can be made to ambiguously map to many possible people, providing a level of anonymity determined by the user. PMID:9357587

  4. Medical electronics: A need and a challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimeoff, J.

    1973-01-01

    Space programs have led to the development of telemetry pills for diagnosis of diseases of the digestive tract, reusable X-ray image storage plates that require no chemical processing, and muscular augmentation systems for the handicapped. These examples, together with countless other examples of technological innovation that can be drawn from research and development programs supported by government funds, offer a potential opportunity to stimulate growth and to control rising costs in medical electronics.

  5. Patients want granular privacy control over health information in electronic medical records

    PubMed Central

    Caine, Kelly; Hanania, Rima

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess patients’ desire for granular level privacy control over which personal health information should be shared, with whom, and for what purpose; and whether these preferences vary based on sensitivity of health information. Materials and methods A card task for matching health information with providers, questionnaire, and interview with 30 patients whose health information is stored in an electronic medical record system. Most patients’ records contained sensitive health information. Results No patients reported that they would prefer to share all information stored in an electronic medical record (EMR) with all potential recipients. Sharing preferences varied by type of information (EMR data element) and recipient (eg, primary care provider), and overall sharing preferences varied by participant. Patients with and without sensitive records preferred less sharing of sensitive versus less-sensitive information. Discussion Patients expressed sharing preferences consistent with a desire for granular privacy control over which health information should be shared with whom and expressed differences in sharing preferences for sensitive versus less-sensitive EMR data. The pattern of results may be used by designers to generate privacy-preserving EMR systems including interfaces for patients to express privacy and sharing preferences. Conclusions To maintain the level of privacy afforded by medical records and to achieve alignment with patients’ preferences, patients should have granular privacy control over information contained in their EMR. PMID:23184192

  6. Electronics Signal Processing for Medical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchetta, Renato

    This paper describes the way the signal coming from a radiation detector is conditioned and processed to produce images useful for medical applications. First of all, the small signal produce by the radiation is processed by analogue electronics specifically designed to produce a good signal-over-noise ratio. The optimised analogue signal produced at this stage can then be processed and transformed into digital information that is eventually stored in a computer, where it can be further processed as required. After an introduction to the general requirements of the processing electronics, we will review the basic building blocks that process the `tiny' analogue signal coming from a radiation detector. We will in particular analyse how it is possible to optimise the signal-over-noise ratio of the electronics. Some exercises, developed in the tutorial, will help to understand this fundamental part. The blocks needed to process the analogue signal and transform it into a digital code will be described. The description of electronics systems used for medical imaging systems will conclude the lecture.

  7. Electronic medical records in colorectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Turina, Matthias; Kiran, Ravi P

    2013-03-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) are being widely implemented today, either as stand-alone applications in smaller practices or as systems-based integrated network solutions in larger health care organizations. Advantages include rapid accessibility, worldwide availability, ease of storage, and secure transfer of protected health information (PHI). Computerized physician order entry (CPOE) and decision-support capabilities such as the triggering of an alarm when multiple medications with known interactions are ordered, as well as the seemingly endless possibilities for electronic integration and extraction of PHI for clinical and research purposes, have created opportunities and pitfalls alike. Risks include breaches of confidentiality with a need to implement tighter measures for electronic security. These measures contrast efforts required for the realization of common data formats that have national and even international compatibility. EMRs provide a common platform that could potentially allow for the integration and administration of clinical care, research, and quality metrics, thus promoting optimal outcomes for patients. Technical and medicolegal difficulties need to be overcome in the years to come so that the safe use of PHI can be ensured while still maintaining the benefits and convenience of modern EMR systems. PMID:24436643

  8. Effects of Shared Electronic Health Record Systems on Drug-Drug Interaction and Duplication Warning Detection

    PubMed Central

    Rinner, Christoph; Grossmann, Wilfried; Sauter, Simone Katja; Wolzt, Michael; Gall, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Shared electronic health records (EHRs) systems can offer a complete medication overview of the prescriptions of different health care providers. We use health claims data of more than 1 million Austrians in 2006 and 2007 with 27 million prescriptions to estimate the effect of shared EHR systems on drug-drug interaction (DDI) and duplication warnings detection and prevention. The Austria Codex and the ATC/DDD information were used as a knowledge base to detect possible DDIs. DDIs are categorized as severe, moderate, and minor interactions. In comparison to the current situation where only DDIs between drugs issued by a single health care provider can be checked, the number of warnings increases significantly if all drugs of a patient are checked: severe DDI warnings would be detected for 20% more persons, and the number of severe DDI warnings and duplication warnings would increase by 17%. We show that not only do shared EHR systems help to detect more patients with warnings but DDIs are also detected more frequently. Patient safety can be increased using shared EHR systems. PMID:26682218

  9. The electronic medical office: optimizing solutions.

    PubMed

    Kirschenbaum, Ira H; Mabrey, Jay D; Wood, George W; Alexander, A Herbert; Rhoades, Charles E; Alexander, Ian J; Golladay, Gregory J; Wheeless, Clifford

    2008-01-01

    Optimizing the care for patients in the orthopaedic clinical setting involves a wide range of issues. Surgical techniques, preoperative and postoperative care, long-term outcomes follow-up, continuing education, and patient communication are a few of the important areas that surgeons deal with on a regular basis. Successful management of this information has an impact on clinical outcomes, direct patient care, financial decisions, and management of the surgeon's time. The development of a comprehensive electronic medical office is a powerful and probably necessary tool to successfully manage such information and achieve the goals of an effective and safe orthopaedic practice. PMID:18399621

  10. mEducator: A Best Practice Network for Repurposing and Sharing Medical Educational Multi-type Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamidis, Panagiotis D.; Kaldoudi, Eleni; Pattichis, Costas

    Although there is an abundance of medical educational content available in individual EU academic institutions, this is not widely available or easy to discover and retrieve, due to lack of standardized content sharing mechanisms. The mEducator EU project will face this lack by implementing and experimenting between two different sharing mechanisms, namely, one based one mashup technologies, and one based on semantic web services. In addition, the mEducator best practice network will critically evaluate existing standards and reference models in the field of e-learning in order to enable specialized state-of-the-art medical educational content to be discovered, retrieved, shared, repurposed and re-used across European higher academic institutions. Educational content included in mEducator covers and represents the whole range of medical educational content, from traditional instructional teaching to active learning and experiential teaching/studying approaches. It spans the whole range of types, from text to exam sheets, algorithms, teaching files, computer programs (simulators or games) and interactive objects (like virtual patients and electronically traced anatomies), while it covers a variety of topics. In this paper, apart from introducing the relevant project concepts and strategies, emphasis is also placed on the notion of (dynamic) user-generated content, its advantages and peculiarities, as well as, gaps in current research and technology practice upon its embedding into existing standards.

  11. Physical understanding through variational reasoning: electron sharing and covalent bonding.

    PubMed

    Ruedenberg, Klaus; Schmidt, Michael W

    2009-03-12

    Energy changes of stationary states resulting from geometric parameter changes in the Hamiltonian can be understood by variational reasoning in terms of the physical attributes of the kinetic and the potential energy functionals. In atoms as well as molecules, the energy minimization determines the ground state as the optimal compromise between the potential pull of the nuclear attractions and the localization-resisting kinetic pressure of the electron cloud. This variational competition is analyzed for the exact ab initio ground-state wave function of the hydrogen molecule ion to elucidate the formation of the bond. Its electronic wave function is shown to differ from the ground-state wave function of the hydrogen atom by polarization, sharing, and contraction, and the corresponding contributions to the binding energy are examined in detail. All told, the critical feature is that a molecular orbital, contracting (in the variational context) toward two nuclei simultaneously, can lower its potential energy while maintaining a certain degree of delocalization. As a consequence, its kinetic energy functional has a lower value than that of an orbital contracting toward a single nucleus equally closely. By contrast, the potential energy functional is lowered equally effectively whether the orbital contracts toward one nucleus or simultaneously toward two nuclei. Because of this weaker kinetic energy pressure, the electrostatic potential pull of the nuclei in the molecule is able to attach the orbital more tightly to each of the nuclei than the pull of the single nucleus in the atom is able to do. The role of the virial theorem is clarified. Generalizations to other molecules are discussed. PMID:19228050

  12. Can or can not? Electronic information sharing influence the participation behavior of the employees

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammed, M. A. Eman, Y. Huda, I. Thamer, A.

    2015-12-11

    Information sharing refers to information being shared between employees inside or outside an agency, or by providing accessibility of their information and data to other agencies so as to allow effective decision making. Electronic information sharing is a key to effective government. This study is conducted to investigate the factors of electronic information sharing that influence the participation behavior so as to augment it amongst the employees in public organizations. Eleven domains of factors that are considered in this study are benefits, risk, social network, Information stewardship, information quality, trust, privacy, reciprocity. The paper proposes electronic information sharing factors in public sector to increase the participation.

  13. Can or can not? Electronic information sharing influence the participation behavior of the employees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, M. A.; Eman, Y.; Huda, I.; Thamer, A.

    2015-12-01

    Information sharing refers to information being shared between employees inside or outside an agency, or by providing accessibility of their information and data to other agencies so as to allow effective decision making. Electronic information sharing is a key to effective government. This study is conducted to investigate the factors of electronic information sharing that influence the participation behavior so as to augment it amongst the employees in public organizations. Eleven domains of factors that are considered in this study are benefits, risk, social network, Information stewardship, information quality, trust, privacy, reciprocity. The paper proposes electronic information sharing factors in public sector to increase the participation.

  14. Sharing Medical Data for Health Research: The Early Personal Health Record Experience

    PubMed Central

    Kaci, Liljana; Mandl, Kenneth D

    2010-01-01

    Background Engaging consumers in sharing information from personally controlled health records (PCHRs) for health research may promote goals of improving care and advancing public health consistent with the federal Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act. Understanding consumer willingness to share data is critical to advancing this model. Objective The objective was to characterize consumer willingness to share PCHR data for health research and the conditions and contexts bearing on willingness to share. Methods A mixed method approach integrating survey and narrative data was used. Survey data were collected about attitudes toward sharing PCHR information for health research from early adopters (n = 151) of a live PCHR populated with medical records and self-reported behavioral and social data. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and logistic regression to characterize willingness, conditions for sharing, and variations by sociodemographic factors. Narrative data were collected through semistructured focus group and one-on-one interviews with a separate sample of community members (n = 30) following exposure to PCHR demonstrations. Two independent analysts coded narrative data for major and minor themes using a shared rubric of a priori defined codes and an iterative inductive process. Findings were triangulated with survey results to identify patterns. Results Of PHCR users, 138 out of 151 (91%) were willing to share medical information for health research with 89 (59%) favoring an opt-in sharing model. Willingness to share was conditioned by anonymity, research use, engagement with a trusted intermediary, transparency around PCHR access and use, and payment. Consumer-determined restrictions on content and timing of sharing may be prerequisites to sharing. Select differences in support for sharing under different conditions were observed across social groups. No gender differences were observed; however differences

  15. How to conduct a workshop on medical writing: Tips, advice and experience sharing.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Farooq Azam; Mansoor, Sahibzada Nasir

    2015-06-01

    Medical writing has become an essential skill for anybody in academia and engaged in teaching. Workshops on medical writing are an effective way to teach the essential skills of medical writing to students and faculty members. There is a huge demand for these workshops all around the globe. Usually there is no curriculum of medical writing for the undergraduates or dedicated structured training sessions for the faculty members. One of the authors won an Author AID grant to conduct a series of workshops on medical writing. Eight workshops were conducted in three months, benefitting more than 200 students and faculty staff. We share our experience of holding this successful series of workshops with the aim that it might serve as a guide for researchers and faculty members who are eager to share and transfer their skills and knowledge. We also offer lessons learnt during this educational activity, tips to improve the quality and delivery of the content with limited resources and maximizing the impact. Experienced medical writers need to conduct these workshops to transfer their skills and to facilitate their colleagues and students to become better medical writers. Planning, rehearsal, motivation, resource management, good team work, audience analysis and feedback can make a workshop successful. Well prepared workshop content delivered in an interactive way with a variety of activities makes the workshop an engaging and interesting educational activity. PMID:26060168

  16. Effectiveness of Shared Medical Appointments Versus Traditional Clinic Visits for Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Everest, Erica; Akhtar, Sara; Sumego, Marianne; Zeizoun, Alaa; Worley, Sarah; Tang, Anne S; Dorsey, Allison; Smith, Ann; Schweiger, Bahareh

    2016-01-01

    Shared medical appointments began in the United States in 1996 to advance quality of care and enhance patients' ability to self-manage. Group visits gather patients with the same diagnosis for individual examinations followed by group education sessions taught by the provider. This leads to the opportunity to learn from the experiences of others. The Cleveland Clinic Department of Pediatric Endocrinology offers a shared medical appointment group for pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes called the ESCALAIT clinic (Enrichment Services and Care for Adolescents Living with Autoimmune Insulin Dependent Type 1 Diabetes). The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of traditional clinic visits with shared medical appointments for adolescents with type 1 diabetes in terms of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) improvement. Eighty ESCALAIT patients, aged 11 to 19 years were compared with 516 clinic controls of the same age. Visits were approximately 3 months apart for both patient groups. Changes in HbA1c between groups were calculated from the first to fourth visits. There was a statistically significant difference between the ESCALAIT clinic patients and the control patients. Our results revealed that the group visit patients had less improvement in HbA1c values at the last visit approximately 1 year later, but we would argue that the difference is not clinically significant. However, there were many benefits to shared medical appointment visits including increased access to care as well as peer support. Shared medical appointments are therefore a valid alternative to traditional clinic visits in this patient population. PMID:27367219

  17. The Medical Free Electron Laser Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houston, Charles L.

    1989-08-01

    We owe the development of the free electron laser (FEL) to Dr. John M.J. Madey, formerly of Stanford University, and now at Duke University. In the early years of the research that lead ultimately to the device that actually produced coherent light, Dr. Madey had to work diligently to procure adequate funding for his FEL project. Sometimes it is much more difficult to find the appropriate funding source then it is to actually perform the research. After working with various basic research organizations, the Office of Naval Research, the Army Research Organization, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, and others, to develop and test the basic scientific principles of the FEL, Dr. Madey looked to the future of the device. The FEL is indeed one of the principal defensive directed energy weapons under development in the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI). However, Dr. Madey felt that the FEL could and should be used in the medical arena. The unique capabilities of the FEL certainly lend themselves to enhancing the practice of medicine which already uses lasers in the treatment of disease and in surgery. Dr. Madey and several physicians who also felt that the FEL belonged at least in medical research traveled to Washington, D.C., to visit the Congress and acquaint them with the potential of the FEL.

  18. Gauging the feasibility of cost-sharing and medical student interest groups to reduce interview costs.

    PubMed

    Lieber, Bryan A; Wilson, Taylor A; Bell, Randy S; Ashley, William W; Barrow, Daniel L; Wolfe, Stacey Quintero

    2014-11-01

    Indirect costs of the interview tour can be prohibitive. The authors sought to assess the desire of interviewees to mitigate these costs through ideas such as sharing hotel rooms and transportation, willingness to stay with local students, and the preferred modality to coordinate this collaboration. A survey link was posted on the Uncle Harvey website and the Facebook profile page of fourth-year medical students from 6 different medical schools shortly after the 2014 match day. There were a total of 156 respondents to the survey. The majority of the respondents were postinterview medical students (65.4%), but preinterview medical students (28.2%) and current residents (6.4%) also responded to the survey. Most respondents were pursuing a field other than neurosurgery (75.0%) and expressed a desire to share a hotel room and/or transportation (77.4%) as well as stay in the dorm room of a medical student at the program in which they are interviewing (70.0%). Students going into neurosurgery were significantly more likely to be interested in sharing hotel/transportation (89.2% neurosurgery vs 72.8% nonneurosurgery; p = 0.040) and in staying in the dorm room of a local student when on interviews (85.0% neurosurgery vs 57.1% nonneurosurgery; p = 0.040) than those going into other specialties. Among postinterview students, communication was preferred to be by private, email identification-only chat room. Given neurosurgery resident candidates' interest in collaborating to reduce interview costs, consideration should be given to creating a system that could allow students to coordinate cost sharing between interviewees. Moreover, interviewees should be connected to local students from neurosurgery interest groups as a resource. PMID:25363428

  19. Proposal for a European Public Health Research Infrastructure for Sharing of health and Medical administrative data (PHRIMA).

    PubMed

    Burgun, Anita; Oksen, Dina V; Kuchinke, Wolfgang; Prokosch, Hans-Ulrich; Ganslandt, Thomas; Buchan, Iain; van Staa, Tjeerd; Cunningham, James; Gjerstorff, Marianne L; Dufour, Jean-Charles; Gibrat, Jean-Francois; Nikolski, Macha; Verger, Pierre; Cambon-Thomsen, Anne; Masella, Cristina; Lettieri, Emanuele; Bertele, Paolo; Salokannel, Marjut; Thiebaut, Rodolphe; Persoz, Charles; Chêne, Geneviève; Ohmann, Christian

    2015-01-01

    In Europe, health and medical administrative data is increasingly accumulating on a national level. Looking further than re-use of this data on a national level, sharing health and medical administrative data would enable large-scale analyses and European-level public health projects. There is currently no research infrastructure for this type of sharing. The PHRIMA consortium proposes to realise the Public Health Research Infrastructure for Sharing of health and Medical Administrative data (PHRIMA) which will enable and facilitate the efficient and secure sharing of healthcare data. PMID:26262306

  20. Electron-nuclear energy sharing in above-threshold multiphoton dissociative ionization of H2.

    PubMed

    Wu, J; Kunitski, M; Pitzer, M; Trinter, F; Schmidt, L Ph H; Jahnke, T; Magrakvelidze, M; Madsen, C B; Madsen, L B; Thumm, U; Dörner, R

    2013-07-12

    We report experimental observation of the energy sharing between electron and nuclei in above-threshold multiphoton dissociative ionization of H2 by strong laser fields. The absorbed photon energy is shared between the ejected electron and nuclei in a correlated fashion, resulting in multiple diagonal lines in their joint energy spectrum governed by the energy conservation of all fragment particles. PMID:23889391

  1. Electronic business in the home medical equipment industry.

    PubMed

    Wei, June; Graham, Michael J; Liu, Lai C

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims at developing electronic business solutions to increase value for the home medical equipment industry. First, an electronic strategic value chain model was developed for the home medical equipment industry. Second, electronic business solutions were mapped from this model. Third, the top 20 dominant companies in the home medical equipment industry were investigated to see the current adoption patterns of these electronic business solutions. The solutions will be beneficial to decision-makers in the information technology adoptions in the home medical equipment industry to increase the business values. PMID:22189178

  2. Diabetes and cancer II: role of diabetes medications and influence of shared risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Jessica M.; Glurich, Ingrid; Stankowski, Rachel V.; Williams, Gail M.; Doi, Suhail A.

    2014-01-01

    An association between type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and cancer has long been postulated, but the biological mechanism responsible for this association has not been defined. In part one of this review, we discussed the epidemiological evidence for increased risk of cancer, decreased cancer survival, and decreased rates of cancer screening in diabetic patients. Here we review the risk factors shared by cancer and DM and how DM medications play a role in altering cancer risk. Hyperinsulinemia stands out as a major factor contributing to the association between DM and cancer, and modulation of circulating insulin levels by DM medications appears to play an important role in altering cancer risk. Drugs that increase circulating insulin, including exogenous insulin, insulin analogs, and insulin secretagogues, are generally associated with an increased cancer risk. In contrast, drugs that regulate insulin signaling without increasing levels, especially metformin, appear to be associated with a decreased cancer risk. In addition to hyperinsulinemia, the effect of DM medications on other shared risk factors including hyperglycemia, obesity, and oxidative stress as well as demographic factors that may influence the use of certain DM drugs in different populations are described. Further elucidation of the mechanisms behind the association between DM, cancer, and the role of DM medications in modulating cancer risk may aid in the development of better prevention and treatment options for both DM and cancer. Additionally, incorporation of DM medication use into cancer prediction models may lead to the development of improved risk assessment tools for diabetic patients. PMID:22527174

  3. The use of shared medical appointments in the care of the elderly.

    PubMed

    Cherniack, E Paul

    2014-01-01

    The shared medical appointment is a model of delivering outpatient care in which several patients interact simultaneously with 1 or several providers. These appointments were developed as an efficient means of delivering education about chronic medical conditions to elderly individuals. In several, but not all trials, chronically ill elderly and younger patients have achieved better general and disease-specific outcomes. However, because the studies have compared these appointments with conventional care, it is not clear whether advantages occur because of the unique characteristics of such an outpatient visit or because of more time spent or greater numbers of providers interacting with patients. PMID:24309393

  4. The annual wellness visit shared medical appointment: innovative delivery of preventive care to the elderly.

    PubMed

    Kainkaryam, Vasanth

    2013-01-01

    The Hartford HealthCare Medical Group instituted 3 types of shared medical appointments (SMAs) in 2013, one being for the Medicare Annual Wellness Visit (AWV). While traditionally there have been 2 types of SMAs-either a chronic disease follow-up model or an annual physical examination model, the SMA AWV offers a preventive care focus in a dedicated visit for the elderly population, without co-pays and without logistics of conducting a physical examination. This article reviews the benefits and challenges of SMAs, including those specific to conducting the AWV, as well as the overall patient experience with the AWV SMA. PMID:24402075

  5. Data discipline in electronic medical records

    PubMed Central

    Barber, David; Williamson, Tyler; Biro, Suzanne; Barber, Karen Hall; Martin, Danyal; Kinsella, Lorne; Morkem, Rachael

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the transformation in smoking status documentation after implementing a standardized intake tool as part of a primary care smoking cessation program. Design A before-and-after evaluation of smoking status documentation was conducted following implementation of a smoking assessment tool. To evaluate the effect of the intervention, the Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network was used to extract aggregate smoking data on the study cohort. Setting Academic primary care clinic in Kingston, Ont. Participants A total of 7312 primary care patients. Interventions As the first phase in a primary care smoking cessation program, a standardized intake tool was developed as part of a vital signs screening process. Main outcome measures Documented smoking status of patients before implementation of the intake tool and documented smoking status of patients in the 6 months after its implementation. Results Following the implementation of the standardized intake tool, there was a 55% (P < .001; 95% CI 0.53 to 0.56) increase in the proportion of patients with a completed smoking status; more than 1100 former smokers were identified and the documented smoking rate in this cohort increased from 4.4% to 16.2%. Conclusion This study shows that the implementation of an intake tool, integrated into existing clinical operational structures, is an effective way to standardize clinical documentation and promotes the optimization of electronic medical records. PMID:27035007

  6. [Design and Implementation of a Mobile Operating Room Information Management System Based on Electronic Medical Record].

    PubMed

    Liu, Baozhen; Liu, Zhiguo; Wang, Xianwen

    2015-06-01

    A mobile operating room information management system with electronic medical record (EMR) is designed to improve work efficiency and to enhance the patient information sharing. In the operating room, this system acquires the information from various medical devices through the Client/Server (C/S) pattern, and automatically generates XML-based EMR. Outside the operating room, this system provides information access service by using the Browser/Server (B/S) pattern. Software test shows that this system can correctly collect medical information from equipment and clearly display the real-time waveform. By achieving surgery records with higher quality and sharing the information among mobile medical units, this system can effectively reduce doctors' workload and promote the information construction of the field hospital. PMID:26485982

  7. Technology Acceptance of Electronic Medical Records by Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocker, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Technology Acceptance Model's (TAM) relevance of the intention of nurses to use electronic medical records in acute health care settings. The basic technology acceptance research of Davis (1989) was applied to the specific technology tool of electronic medical records (EMR) in a specific setting…

  8. Predictors of Difficulty in Medication Intake in Europe: a Cross-country Analysis Based on SHARE

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Daniela; Teixeira, Laetitia; Poveda, Veronica; Paúl, Constança; Santos-Silva, Alice; Costa, Elísio

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the prevalence and the predictors of difficulty in medication intake across Europe, using a cross-sectional design. We used data from all participants in the wave 4 of the SHARE (Survey of Health, Ageing, and Retirement in Europe) database, which is a cross national European survey. The difficulty in take medication was evaluated using an item from the “Limitations with activities of daily living”. Clinical and sociodemographic variables were evaluated as potential predictors. A total of 58 124 individual have been included in this work (mean age=64.9 ± 10.4 years; 43.3% male). The rate of difficulty in taking medication across the 16 European evaluated countries was 2.1%, presenting Spain the highest rate (5.7%) and Switzerland the lowest (0.6%). Increasing age, physical inactivity, physical limitations (mobility, arms function and fine motor limitations, and difficulties in picking up a small coin from a table), a poor sense of meaning in life, and losses in memory and concentration are independent and significant variables associated with difficulty in medication intake across Europe. Predictors of difficulties in medication intake are multicausal, including factors related to physical, cognitive and psychological conditions. Interventions aiming to optimize adherence to medication, particularly in elderly population, need to consider this diversity of determinants. PMID:27330839

  9. Sharing decisions in consultations involving anti-psychotic medication: a qualitative study of psychiatrists' experiences.

    PubMed

    Seale, Clive; Chaplin, Robert; Lelliott, Paul; Quirk, Alan

    2006-06-01

    In psychiatry, and in treating people with a diagnosis of schizophrenia in particular, there are obstacles to achieving concordant, shared decision making and in building a co-operative therapeutic alliance where mutual honesty is the norm. Studies of people with a diagnosis of schizophrenia have revealed critical views of medical authority, particularly over the issue of enforced compliance with antipsychotic medication. Psychiatrists are known to place particular value on such medication. This qualitative study reports the views of 21 general adult psychiatrists working in UK about their experiences of consultations involving discussion of antipsychotic medication. Interviewees reported a general commitment to achieving concordant relationships with patients and described a number of strategies they used to promote this. In this respect, their self-perception differs from the picture of authoritarian practice painted by critics of psychiatry, and by some studies reporting patients' views. Interviewees also described obstacles to achieving concordance, including adverse judgements of patients' competence and honesty about their medication use. Explaining the adverse effects of medication was perceived to discourage some patients from accepting this treatment. Moments of strategic dishonesty were reported. Psychiatrists perceived that trust could be damaged by episodes of coercion, or by patients' perception of coercive powers. We conclude that a self-perception of patient-centredness may not preclude psychiatrists from fulfilling a social control function. PMID:16343722

  10. Predictors of Difficulty in Medication Intake in Europe: a Cross-country Analysis Based on SHARE.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Daniela; Teixeira, Laetitia; Poveda, Veronica; Paúl, Constança; Santos-Silva, Alice; Costa, Elísio

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the prevalence and the predictors of difficulty in medication intake across Europe, using a cross-sectional design. We used data from all participants in the wave 4 of the SHARE (Survey of Health, Ageing, and Retirement in Europe) database, which is a cross national European survey. The difficulty in take medication was evaluated using an item from the "Limitations with activities of daily living". Clinical and sociodemographic variables were evaluated as potential predictors. A total of 58 124 individual have been included in this work (mean age=64.9 ± 10.4 years; 43.3% male). The rate of difficulty in taking medication across the 16 European evaluated countries was 2.1%, presenting Spain the highest rate (5.7%) and Switzerland the lowest (0.6%). Increasing age, physical inactivity, physical limitations (mobility, arms function and fine motor limitations, and difficulties in picking up a small coin from a table), a poor sense of meaning in life, and losses in memory and concentration are independent and significant variables associated with difficulty in medication intake across Europe. Predictors of difficulties in medication intake are multicausal, including factors related to physical, cognitive and psychological conditions. Interventions aiming to optimize adherence to medication, particularly in elderly population, need to consider this diversity of determinants. PMID:27330839

  11. Medical education in the electronic medical record (EMR) era: benefits, challenges, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Michael J; Pageler, Natalie M; Kahana, Madelyn; Pantaleoni, Julie L; Longhurst, Christopher A

    2013-06-01

    In the last decade, electronic medical record (EMR) use in academic medical centers has increased. Although many have lauded the clinical and operational benefits of EMRs, few have considered the effect these systems have on medical education. The authors review what has been documented about the effect of EMR use on medical learners through the lens of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's six core competencies for medical education. They examine acknowledged benefits and educational risks to use of EMRs, consider factors that promote their successful use when implemented in academic environments, and identify areas of future research and optimization of EMRs' role in medical education. PMID:23619078

  12. [Sharing information of urological cancer patient in terminal stage using Cybozulive® for home medical care].

    PubMed

    Yumura, Yasushi; Hattori, Yusuke; Gobara, Ayako; Takamoto, Daiji; Yasuda, Kengo; Nakamura, Masafumi; Noguchi, Kazumi; Asahina, Kan; Kamijo, Takeo

    2014-09-01

    It is very important to share patient information because home patient care involves several different specialties of care. We introduced Cybozulive ® , a cloud-based free groupware, for 14 terminal-stage patients with urological cancer to share information among doctors and co-medical staff. This system enables access to patient information regardless of time and place. Of the 14 patients (mean age 74.4 years), 11 died of cancer. The average period in which Cybozulive® was used for the patients was 210 days. The average number of entries to the electronic bulletin board in this period was 88.4. We were able to obtain more information about the patients from the website. There was no difference in the average number of times that the patient consulted the out patient clinic before and after the introduction of Cybozulive® (before 7.0 ; after 6.3). After introduction of this system, eleven patients were hospitalized in our department 21 times. Eighteen of these 21 times, since we had acquired patient information from the website beforehand, there was a quick response for management of the emergency admission. This system could be used to construct a network for home care and may be helpful for sharing patient information in homecare. PMID:25293794

  13. Multi-Institutional Sharing of Electronic Health Record Data to Assess Childhood Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, L. Charles; Milov, David E.; Kelleher, Kelly; Kahn, Michael G.; Del Beccaro, Mark; Yu, Feliciano; Richards, Thomas; Forrest, Christopher B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the validity of multi-institutional electronic health record (EHR) data sharing for surveillance and study of childhood obesity. Methods We conducted a non-concurrent cohort study of 528,340 children with outpatient visits to six pediatric academic medical centers during 2007–08, with sufficient data in the EHR for body mass index (BMI) assessment. EHR data were compared with data from the 2007–08 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Results Among children 2–17 years, BMI was evaluable for 1,398,655 visits (56%). The EHR dataset contained over 6,000 BMI measurements per month of age up to 16 years, yielding precise estimates of BMI. In the EHR dataset, 18% of children were obese versus 18% in NHANES, while 35% were obese or overweight versus 34% in NHANES. BMI for an individual was highly reliable over time (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.90 for obese children and 0.97 for all children). Only 14% of visits with measured obesity (BMI ≥95%) had a diagnosis of obesity recorded, and only 20% of children with measured obesity had the diagnosis documented during the study period. Obese children had higher primary care (4.8 versus 4.0 visits, p<0.001) and specialty care (3.7 versus 2.7 visits, p<0.001) utilization than non-obese counterparts, and higher prevalence of diverse co-morbidities. The cohort size in the EHR dataset permitted detection of associations with rare diagnoses. Data sharing did not require investment of extensive institutional resources, yet yielded high data quality. Conclusions Multi-institutional EHR data sharing is a promising, feasible, and valid approach for population health surveillance. It provides a valuable complement to more resource-intensive national surveys, particularly for iterative surveillance and quality improvement. Low rates of obesity diagnosis present a significant obstacle to surveillance and quality improvement for care of children with obesity. PMID:23823186

  14. Electronic Medical Records and Their Impact on Resident and Medical Student Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keenan, Craig R.; Nguyen, Hien H.; Srinivasan, Malathi

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Electronic medical records (EMRs) are becoming prevalent and integral tools for residents and medical students. EMRs can integrate point-of-service information delivery within the context of patient care. Though it may be an educational tool, little is known about how EMR technology is currently used for medical learners. Method: The…

  15. Truthful Channel Sharing for Self Coexistence of Overlapping Medical Body Area Networks.

    PubMed

    Fang, Gengfa; Orgun, Mehmet A; Shankaran, Rajan; Dutkiewicz, Eryk; Zheng, Guanglou

    2016-01-01

    As defined by IEEE 802.15.6 standard, channel sharing is a potential method to coordinate inter-network interference among Medical Body Area Networks (MBANs) that are close to one another. However, channel sharing opens up new vulnerabilities as selfish MBANs may manipulate their online channel requests to gain unfair advantage over others. In this paper, we address this issue by proposing a truthful online channel sharing algorithm and a companion protocol that allocates channel efficiently and truthfully by punishing MBANs for misreporting their channel request parameters such as time, duration and bid for the channel. We first present an online channel sharing scheme for unit-length channel requests and prove that it is truthful. We then generalize our model to settings with variable-length channel requests, where we propose a critical value based channel pricing and preemption scheme. A bid adjustment procedure prevents unbeneficial preemption by artificially raising the ongoing winner's bid controlled by a penalty factor λ. Our scheme can efficiently detect selfish behaviors by monitoring a trust parameter α of each MBAN and punish MBANs from cheating by suspending their requests. Our extensive simulation results show our scheme can achieve a total profit that is more than 85% of the offline optimum method in the typical MBAN settings. PMID:26844888

  16. Truthful Channel Sharing for Self Coexistence of Overlapping Medical Body Area Networks

    PubMed Central

    Dutkiewicz, Eryk; Zheng, Guanglou

    2016-01-01

    As defined by IEEE 802.15.6 standard, channel sharing is a potential method to coordinate inter-network interference among Medical Body Area Networks (MBANs) that are close to one another. However, channel sharing opens up new vulnerabilities as selfish MBANs may manipulate their online channel requests to gain unfair advantage over others. In this paper, we address this issue by proposing a truthful online channel sharing algorithm and a companion protocol that allocates channel efficiently and truthfully by punishing MBANs for misreporting their channel request parameters such as time, duration and bid for the channel. We first present an online channel sharing scheme for unit-length channel requests and prove that it is truthful. We then generalize our model to settings with variable-length channel requests, where we propose a critical value based channel pricing and preemption scheme. A bid adjustment procedure prevents unbeneficial preemption by artificially raising the ongoing winner’s bid controlled by a penalty factor λ. Our scheme can efficiently detect selfish behaviors by monitoring a trust parameter α of each MBAN and punish MBANs from cheating by suspending their requests. Our extensive simulation results show our scheme can achieve a total profit that is more than 85% of the offline optimum method in the typical MBAN settings. PMID:26844888

  17. Medical guidelines, physician density, and quality of care: evidence from German SHARE data.

    PubMed

    Jürges, Hendrik; Pohl, Vincent

    2012-10-01

    We use German SHARE data to study the relationship between district general practitioner density and the quality of preventive care provided to older adults. We measure physician quality of care as the degree of adherence to medical guidelines (for the management of risk factors for cardiovascular disease and the prevention of falls) as reported by patients. Contrary to theoretical expectations, we find only weak and insignificant effects of physician density on quality of care. Our results shed doubt on the notion that increasing physician supply will increase the quality of care provided in Germany's present health care system. PMID:22203268

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF IT TRIAGE SYSTEM (TRACY) TO SHARE REGIONAL DISASTER MEDICAL INFORMATION

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Numada, Muneyoshi; Hada, Yasunori; Ohara, Miho; Meguro, Kimiro

    We developed an IT triage system for collecting disaster medical information in real time. FeliCa cards and card readers are used to obtain the number and cond ition of patients. The system is composed of two elements. First, the number of patie nts for each triage level and the accepted number of patients in each diagnosis and treatment department are obtained in real time, including response for changing triage level. Second, this information can be shared among hospitals, the administration, and residents in real time who are searching for their family. A disaster drill utiliz ing this system was held at the University of Yamanashi Hospital with 450 participants.

  19. Development of Mobile Platform Integrated with Existing Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Kim, YoungAh; Kang, Simon; Kim, Kyungduk; Kim, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This paper describes a mobile Electronic Medical Record (EMR) platform designed to manage and utilize the existing EMR and mobile application with optimized resources. Methods We structured the mEMR to reuse services of retrieval and storage in mobile app environments that have already proven to have no problem working with EMRs. A new mobile architecture-based mobile solution was developed in four steps: the construction of a server and its architecture; screen layout and storyboard making; screen user interface design and development; and a pilot test and step-by-step deployment. This mobile architecture consists of two parts, the server-side area and the client-side area. In the server-side area, it performs the roles of service management for EMR and documents and for information exchange. Furthermore, it performs menu allocation depending on user permission and automatic clinical document architecture document conversion. Results Currently, Severance Hospital operates an iOS-compatible mobile solution based on this mobile architecture and provides stable service without additional resources, dealing with dynamic changes of EMR templates. Conclusions The proposed mobile solution should go hand in hand with the existing EMR system, and it can be a cost-effective solution if a quality EMR system is operated steadily with this solution. Thus, we expect this example to be shared with hospitals that currently plan to deploy mobile solutions. PMID:25152837

  20. Integrated secure solution for electronic healthcare records sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yehong; Zhang, Chenghao; Sun, Jianyong; Jin, Jin; Zhang, Jianguo

    2007-03-01

    The EHR is a secure, real-time, point-of-care, patient-centric information resource for healthcare providers. Many countries and regional districts have set long-term goals to build EHRs, and most of EHRs are usually built based on the integration of different information systems with different information models and platforms. A number of hospitals in Shanghai are also piloting the development of an EHR solution based on IHE XDS/XDS-I profiles with a service-oriented architecture (SOA). The first phase of the project targets the Diagnostic Imaging domain and allows seamless sharing of images and reports across the multiple hospitals. To develop EHRs for regional coordinated healthcare, some factors should be considered in designing architecture, one of which is security issue. In this paper, we present some approaches and policies to improve and strengthen the security among the different hospitals' nodes, which are compliant with the security requirements defined by IHE IT Infrastructure (ITI) Technical Framework. Our security solution includes four components: Time Sync System (TSS), Digital Signature Manage System (DSMS), Data Exchange Control Component (DECC) and Single Sign-On (SSO) System. We give a design method and implementation strategy of these security components, and then evaluate the performance and overheads of the security services or features by integrating the security components into an image-based EHR system.

  1. The use of electronic medication reconciliation to establish the predictors of validity of computerized medication records.

    PubMed

    Turchin, Alexander; Gandhi, Tejal K; Coley, Christopher M; Shubina, Maria; Broverman, Carol

    2007-01-01

    Medication records in clinical information systems (CIS) are frequently inaccurate, leading to potentially incorrect clinical decisions and preventing valid decision support interventions. It is not known what characteristics of electronic medication records are predictive of their validity. We studied a dataset of 136,351 electronic medication records of patients admitted to two academic hospitals that were individually validated by admitting providers using novel medication reconciliation software. We analyzed the relationship between characteristics of individual medication records and the probability of record validation using a multivariable linear regression model. Electronic medication records were less likely to be validated if more time had passed since their last update (14.6% for every 6 months), if they represented an antiinfective (61.6%) or a prn (50.9%) medication, or if they were in an outpatient CIS rather than on an inpatient discharge medication list (18.1%); p<0.0001 for all. Several characteristics of electronic medication records are strongly associated with their validity. These findings could be incorporated in the design of CIS software to alert providers to medication records less likely to be accurate. PMID:17911870

  2. Medical Applications of Remote Electronic Browsing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chadwick, Joseph

    The purposes of this study are to identify and define viable remote browsing techniques and the requirements for an interactive medical information system that would permit the use of such techniques. The main emphasis is in the areas of: (1) remote viewing of page material; and (2) remote interrogation of fact banks with question-answering…

  3. Good Neighbors: Shared Challenges and Solutions Toward Increasing Value at Academic Medical Centers and Universities.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Gerard P

    2015-12-01

    Academic medical centers (AMCs) and universities are experiencing increasing pressure to enhance the value they offer at the same time that they are facing challenges related to outcomes, controlling costs, new competition, and government mandates. Yet, rarely do the leaders of these academic neighbors work cooperatively to enhance value. In this Perspective the author, a former university regional campus president with duties in an AMC as an academic physician, shares his insights into the shared challenges these academic neighbors face in improving the value of their services in complex environments. He describes the successes some AMCs have had in generating revenues from new clinical programs that reduce the overall cost of care for larger populations. He also describes how several universities have taken a comprehensive approach to reduce overhead and administrative costs. The author identifies six themes related to successful value improvement efforts and provides examples of successful strategies used by AMCs and their university neighbors to improve the overall value of their programs. He concludes by encouraging leaders of AMCs and universities to share information about their successes in value improvements with each other, to seek additional joint value enhancement efforts, and to market their value improvements to the public. PMID:26266460

  4. Electron sharing and anion-π recognition in molecular triangular prisms.

    PubMed

    Schneebeli, Severin T; Frasconi, Marco; Liu, Zhichang; Wu, Yilei; Gardner, Daniel M; Strutt, Nathan L; Cheng, Chuyang; Carmieli, Raanan; Wasielewski, Michael R; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2013-12-01

    Stacking on a full belly: Triangular molecular prisms display electron sharing among their triangularly arranged naphthalenediimide (NDI) redox centers. Their electron-deficient cavities encapsulate linear triiodide anions, leading to the formation of supramolecular helices in the solid state. Chirality transfer is observed from the six chiral centers of the filled prisms to the single-handed helices. PMID:24227594

  5. Medication adherence and older renal transplant patients' perceptions of electronic medication monitoring.

    PubMed

    Russell, Cynthia L; Owens, Sarah; Hamburger, Karen Q; Thompson, Denise A; Leach, Rebecca R; Cetingok, Muammer; Hathaway, Donna; Conn, Vicki S; Ashbaugh, Catherine; Peace, Leanne; Madsen, Richard; Winsett, Rebecca P; Wakefield, Mark R

    2009-10-01

    This study evaluated older renal transplant recipients' perceptions of electronic medication monitoring and the influence of these perceptions on medication adherence. A sample of 73 older adult renal transplant recipients who used the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS(®)) TrackCaps for 12 months provided their perceptions of device use. Participants perceived that the MEMS had a neutral effect on their medication-taking routine (65%), believed the MEMS was practical (56%), and could not describe any instances in which using the MEMS was difficult (56%). No significant difference in medication adherence was found between those who perceived the MEMS's influence negatively/neutrally and those who perceived the MEMS positively (p = 0.22). Medication adherence data from older adult renal transplant recipients can be used regardless of their perceptions of the MEMS's influence on their medication taking without biasing medication adherence data. PMID:19772223

  6. Medical imaging document sharing solutions for various kinds of healthcare services based on IHE XDS/XDS-I profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianguo; Yang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Kai; Sun, Jianyong; Ling, Tonghui; Wang, Tusheng; Wang, Mingqing; Bak, Peter

    2014-03-01

    One key problem for continuity of patient care is identification of a proper method to share and exchange patient medical records among multiple hospitals and healthcare providers. This paper focuses in the imaging document component of medical record. The XDS-I (Cross- Enterprise Document Sharing - Image) Profile based on the IHE IT-Infrastructure extends and specializes XDS to support imaging "document" sharing in an affinity domain. We present three studies about image sharing solutions based on IHE XDS-I Profile. The first one is to adopt the IHE XDS-I profile as a technical guide to design image and report sharing mechanisms between hospitals for regional healthcare service in Shanghai. The second study is for collaborating image diagnosis in regional healthcare services. The latter study is to investigate the XDS-I based clearinghouse for patient controlled image sharing in the RSNA Image Sharing Network Project. We conclude that the IHE XDS/XDS-I profiles can be used as the foundation to design medical image document sharing for Various Healthcare Services.

  7. Data-driven approach for creating synthetic electronic medical records

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background New algorithms for disease outbreak detection are being developed to take advantage of full electronic medical records (EMRs) that contain a wealth of patient information. However, due to privacy concerns, even anonymized EMRs cannot be shared among researchers, resulting in great difficulty in comparing the effectiveness of these algorithms. To bridge the gap between novel bio-surveillance algorithms operating on full EMRs and the lack of non-identifiable EMR data, a method for generating complete and synthetic EMRs was developed. Methods This paper describes a novel methodology for generating complete synthetic EMRs both for an outbreak illness of interest (tularemia) and for background records. The method developed has three major steps: 1) synthetic patient identity and basic information generation; 2) identification of care patterns that the synthetic patients would receive based on the information present in real EMR data for similar health problems; 3) adaptation of these care patterns to the synthetic patient population. Results We generated EMRs, including visit records, clinical activity, laboratory orders/results and radiology orders/results for 203 synthetic tularemia outbreak patients. Validation of the records by a medical expert revealed problems in 19% of the records; these were subsequently corrected. We also generated background EMRs for over 3000 patients in the 4-11 yr age group. Validation of those records by a medical expert revealed problems in fewer than 3% of these background patient EMRs and the errors were subsequently rectified. Conclusions A data-driven method was developed for generating fully synthetic EMRs. The method is general and can be applied to any data set that has similar data elements (such as laboratory and radiology orders and results, clinical activity, prescription orders). The pilot synthetic outbreak records were for tularemia but our approach may be adapted to other infectious diseases. The pilot synthetic

  8. Constraints on Biological Mechanism from Disease Comorbidity Using Electronic Medical Records and Database of Genetic Variants

    PubMed Central

    Bagley, Steven C.; Sirota, Marina; Chen, Richard; Butte, Atul J.; Altman, Russ B.

    2016-01-01

    Patterns of disease co-occurrence that deviate from statistical independence may represent important constraints on biological mechanism, which sometimes can be explained by shared genetics. In this work we study the relationship between disease co-occurrence and commonly shared genetic architecture of disease. Records of pairs of diseases were combined from two different electronic medical systems (Columbia, Stanford), and compared to a large database of published disease-associated genetic variants (VARIMED); data on 35 disorders were available across all three sources, which include medical records for over 1.2 million patients and variants from over 17,000 publications. Based on the sources in which they appeared, disease pairs were categorized as having predominant clinical, genetic, or both kinds of manifestations. Confounding effects of age on disease incidence were controlled for by only comparing diseases when they fall in the same cluster of similarly shaped incidence patterns. We find that disease pairs that are overrepresented in both electronic medical record systems and in VARIMED come from two main disease classes, autoimmune and neuropsychiatric. We furthermore identify specific genes that are shared within these disease groups. PMID:27115429

  9. Shared medical appointments: improving access, outcomes, and satisfaction for patients with chronic cardiac diseases.

    PubMed

    Bartley, Kelly Bauer; Haney, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    Improving access to care, health outcomes, and patient satisfaction are primary objectives for healthcare practices. This article outlines benefits, concerns, and possible challenges of shared medical appointments (SMAs) for patients and providers. The SMA model was designed to support providers' demanding schedules by allowing patients with the same chronic condition to be seen in a group setting. By concentrating on patient education and disease management, interactive meetings provide an opportunity for patients to share both successes and struggles with others experiencing similar challenges. Studies demonstrated that SMAs improved patient access, enhanced outcomes, and promoted patient satisfaction. This article describes the potential benefits of SMAs for patients with chronic heart disease, which consumes a large number of healthcare dollars related to hospital admissions, acute exacerbations, and symptom management. Education for self-management of chronic disease can become repetitive and time consuming. The SMA model introduces a fresh and unique style of healthcare visits, allowing providers to devote more time and attention to patients and improve productivity. The SMA model provides an outstanding method for nurse practitioners to demonstrate their role as a primary care provider, by leading patients in group discussions and evaluating their current health status. Patient selection, preparation, and facilitation of an SMA are discussed to demonstrate the complementary nature of an SMA approach in a healthcare practice. PMID:20134280

  10. Shared medical appointments: facilitating care for children with asthma and their caregivers.

    PubMed

    Wall-Haas, Constance L; Kulbok, Pamela; Kirchgessner, John; Rovnyak, Virginia

    2012-01-01

    As important members of the health care team, patients and caregivers must be empowered to recognize their asthma status and to act accordingly. Education about asthma, complications, and successful management of asthma provide the best way to empower children and their caregivers. A Shared Medical Appointment (SMA) is a unique health care delivery approach that integrates disease management and patient education. The SMA described here is a 90-minute group appointment for four to nine patients who share a diagnosis of asthma, bronchospasm, or wheeze and their caregivers. The appointment includes a brief individual examination, health education delivered to the group, and the opportunity for interaction between group members. Because a supporting theoretic framework is not identified in the original design proposals for the SMA model or in the literature on its use, for the purposes of this project, Social Cognitive Theory is identified as the theoretical framework that best explains and reinforces the benefits of the SMA. The theoretic framework is important to direct the development and continued success of this treatment model. This project report describes the first nurse practitioner-led SMA as a tool for improving quality of care and service for children with asthma and their caregivers. PMID:22153142

  11. Building a national electronic medical record exchange system - experiences in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Chuan Jack; Yen, Ju-Chuan; Chiu, Wen-Ta; Jian, Wen-Shan; Syed-Abdul, Shabbir; Hsu, Min-Huei

    2015-08-01

    There are currently 501 hospitals and about 20,000 clinics in Taiwan. The National Health Insurance (NHI) system, which is operated by the NHI Administration, uses a single-payer system and covers 99.9% of the nation's total population of 23,000,000. Taiwan's NHI provides people with a high degree of freedom in choosing their medical care options. However, there is the potential concern that the available medical resources will be overused. The number of doctor consultations per person per year is about 15. Duplication of laboratory tests and prescriptions are not rare either. Building an electronic medical record exchange system is a good method of solving these problems and of improving continuity in health care. In November 2009, Taiwan's Executive Yuan passed the 'Plan for accelerating the implementation of electronic medical record systems in medical institutions' (2010-2012; a 3-year plan). According to this plan, a patient can, at any hospital in Taiwan, by using his/her health insurance IC card and physician's medical professional IC card, upon signing a written agreement, retrieve all important medical records for the past 6 months from other participating hospitals. The focus of this plan is to establish the National Electronic Medical Record Exchange Centre (EEC). A hospital's information system will be connected to the EEC through an electronic medical record (EMR) gateway. The hospital will convert the medical records for the past 6 months in its EMR system into standardized files and save them on the EMR gateway. The most important functions of the EEC are to generate an index of all the XML files on the EMR gateways of all hospitals, and to provide search and retrieval services for hospitals and clinics. The EEC provides four standard inter-institution EMR retrieval services covering medical imaging reports, laboratory test reports, discharge summaries, and outpatient records. In this system, we adopted the Health Level 7 (HL7) Clinical Document

  12. Influence of Shared Medical Appointments on Patient Satisfaction: A Retrospective 3-Year Study

    PubMed Central

    Heyworth, Leonie; Rozenblum, Ronen; Burgess, James F.; Baker, Errol; Meterko, Mark; Prescott, Debra; Neuwirth, Zeev; Simon, Steven R.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Shared medical appointments (SMAs) are becoming popular, but little is known about their association with patient experience in primary care. We performed an exploratory analysis examining overall satisfaction and patient-centered care experiences across key domains of the patient-centered medical home among patients attending SMAs vs usual care appointments. METHODS We undertook a cross-sectional study using a mailed questionnaire measuring levels of patient satisfaction and other indicators of patient-centered care among 921 SMA and 921 usual care patients between 2008 and 2010. Propensity scores adjusted for potential case mix differences between the groups. Multivariate logistic regression assessed propensity-matched patients’ ratings of care. Generalized estimating equations accounted for physician-level clustering. RESULTS A total of 40% of SMA patients and 31% of usual care patients responded. In adjusted analyses, SMA patients were more likely to rate their overall satisfaction with care as “very good” when compared with usual care counterparts (odds ratio = 1.26; 95% CI, 1.05–1.52). In the analysis of patient-centered medical home elements, SMA patients rated their care as more accessible and more sensitive to their needs, whereas usual care patients reported greater satisfaction with physician communication and time spent during their appointment. CONCLUSIONS Overall, SMA patients appear more satisfied with their care relative to patients receiving usual care. SMAs may also improve access to care and deliver care that patients find to be sensitive to their needs. Further research should focus on enhancing patient-clinician communication within an SMA as this model of care becomes more widely adopted. PMID:25024240

  13. Real and imagined barriers to an electronic medical record.

    PubMed

    Rind, D M; Safran, C

    1993-01-01

    We developed an electronic medical record for ambulatory patients as part of the integrated clinical information system at Beth Israel Hospital. During the four years since it was installed, clinicians have entered 76,060 patient problems, 137,713 medications, and 33,938 notes. Residents, who had to type notes in themselves, entered 49.5% of their notes into OMR. Several factors that we had predicted would be barriers to an electronic medical record, such as clinician reluctance to type or perform data entry, have not proved to be significant problems. Other anticipated barriers, such as difficulties with dual charting on paper during transition to an electronic medical record, have been realized. The major unexpected barrier that has been encountered is increased clinician concern about the privacy and security of full text notes relative to other data elements in the clinical information system. We have attempted to modify the electronic medical record so as to overcome some of these barriers. PMID:8130574

  14. Physician Sensemaking and Readiness for Electronic Medical Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riesenmy, Kelly Rouse

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore physician sensemaking and readiness to implement electronic medical records (EMR) as a first step to finding strategies that enhance EMR adoption behaviors. Design/methodology/approach: The case study approach provides a detailed analysis of individuals within an organizational unit. Using a…

  15. The electronic, 'paperless' medical office; has it arrived?

    PubMed

    Gates, P; Urquhart, J

    2007-02-01

    Modern information technology offers efficiencies in medical practice, with a reduction in secretarial time in maintaining, filing and retrieving the paper medical record. Electronic requesting of investigations allows tracking of outstanding results. Less storage space is required and telephone calls from pharmacies, pathology and medical imaging service providers to clarify the hand-written request are abolished. Voice recognition software reduces secretarial typing time per letter. These combined benefits can lead to significantly reduced costs and improved patient care. The paperless office is possible, but requires commitment and training of all staff; it is preferable but not absolutely essential that at least one member of the practice has an interest and some expertise in computers. More importantly, back-up from information technology providers and back-up of the electronic data are absolutely crucial and a paperless environment should not be considered without them. PMID:17229253

  16. Shared medical appointments to screen for geriatric syndromes: preliminary data from a quality improvement initiative.

    PubMed

    May, Suepattra G; Cheng, Peter H; Tietbohl, Caroline K; Trujillo, Laurel; Reilly, Kelly; Frosch, Dominick L; Lin, Grace A

    2014-12-01

    Older adults are at greater risk of developing conditions that affect health outcomes, quality of life, and costs of care. Screening for geriatric conditions such as memory loss, fall risk, and depression may contribute to the prevention of adverse physical and mental comorbidities, unnecessary hospitalizations, and premature nursing home admissions. Because screening is not consistently performed in primary care settings, a shared medical appointment (SMA) program was developed to fill this gap in care. The goals of the program were to improve early identification of at-risk individuals and ensure appropriate follow-up for memory loss, fall risk, and depression; facilitate discussion about prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of these conditions; implement strategies to reduce risks for these conditions; and increase access to screening and expand preventive health services for older adults. Between August 2011 and May 2013, 136 individuals aged 60 and older participated in the program. Three case studies highlighting the psychosocial and physiological findings of participation in the program are presented. Preliminary data suggest that SMAs are an effective model of regularly screening at-risk older adults that augments primary care practice by facilitating early detection and referral for syndromes that may otherwise be missed or delayed. PMID:25440111

  17. Shared Medical Appointments: Impact on Clinical and Quality Outcomes in Veterans With Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Harris, Marianne D; Kirsh, Susan; Higgins, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    Managing diabetes poses substantial challenges to the over 29.1 million Americans afflicted, and is financially overwhelming to the US health care system. One potential strategy is utilizing a group approach to care delivery or shared medical appointment (SMA). The purpose of this 3-year retrospective VA study was to investigate differences in clinical and quality outcome measures in veterans with type 2 diabetes who used SMAs and those who received only usual care (UC) one-on-one with their doctor. This observational, 2-group cohort study used abstracted medical records from a large Midwestern Veterans Administration hospital. Clinical outcome metrics included hemoglobin A1c (hbA1c), systolic blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and emergency department (ED) visits. Quality outcomes included Veterans' Administration (VA) Department of Defense clinical practice guidelines for the management of diabetes. A total of 988 total VA cases were examined retrospectively over 3 years: 371 cases had used SMAs and 617 were in the UC cohort, and had never attended a diabetes SMA. The study period used abstracted VA medical records from 2008 to 2010. There were no statistically significant differences in HbA1c, systolic blood pressure, and ED visits between groups; however, hbA1c for individuals who attended SMAs was 8.55 (standard deviation [SD] = 1.72) and UC was 7.49 (SD = 1.28) (P < .001). All clinical outcomes were worse at baseline for the SMA cohort. UC had mean ED visits/3 years (mean = 18.62, SD = 13.53, P < .001) versus SMA participants (mean = 27.97, SD = 14.00, P <. 001), revealing a propensity for high health care utilization. SMA providers had statistically significant differences over UC cases on quality measures, including ordering annual ophthalmology and podiatry examinations (P < .001) and prescribing aspirin and angiotension-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I). SMAs may provide a venue for assessing and delivering quality care for patients

  18. How pressure is applied in shared decisions about antipsychotic medication: a conversation analytic study of psychiatric outpatient consultations.

    PubMed

    Quirk, Alan; Chaplin, Rob; Lelliott, Paul; Seale, Clive

    2012-01-01

    The professional identity of psychiatry depends on it being regarded as one amongst many medical specialties and sharing ideals of good practice with other specialties, an important marker of which is the achievement of shared decision-making and avoiding a reputation for being purely agents of social control. Yet the interactions involved in trying to achieve shared decision-making are relatively unexplored in psychiatry. This study analyses audiotapes of 92 outpatient consultations involving nine consultant psychiatrists focusing on how pressure is applied in shared decisions about antipsychotic medication. Detailed conversation analysis reveals that some shared decisions are considerably more pressured than others. At one end of a spectrum of pressure are pressured shared decisions, characterised by an escalating cycle of pressure and resistance from which it is difficult to exit without someone losing face. In the middle are directed decisions, where the patient cooperates with being diplomatically steered by the psychiatrist. At the other extreme are open decisions where the patient is allowed to decide, with the psychiatrist exerting little or no pressure. Directed and open decisions occurred most frequently; pressured decisions were rarer. Patient risk did not appear to influence the degree of pressure applied in these outpatient consultations. PMID:21812791

  19. The comparison of different medical electronic endoscope systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Wei; Wang, Liqiang; Duan, Huilong

    2011-11-01

    This paper presents a miniaturized CMOS camera for high-definition (HD) medical electronic endoscope system with resolution of 1.3 MegaPixel. LVDS technology is used for image data stream transmission between the sensor and the HD image workstation to realize a long distance, high speed, high signal integrity and low noise system. Considering the real-time video image processing and the complexity of the design of HD image workstation, four solutions for medical electronic endoscope systems, namely USB based image acquisition system, PCIe acquisition data board based method, ARM embedded system based solution and DSP based electronic endoscope system have been proposed, analyzed and compared with each other. We found that the four solutions have their own advantages and disadvantages. Taking into account the strong control capacity of ARM, powerful data processing ability and high operating speed of DSP, good portability and other factors, we decided to use ARM + DSP embedded based system.

  20. Issues and Structures for Sharing Medical Knowledge Among Decision-Making Systems: The 1989 Arden Homestead Retreat

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Paul D.; Pryor, T. Allan; Wigertz, Ove B.; Hripcsak, George

    1989-01-01

    To address the issue of facilitating transfer and integration of the variety of computer-based programs which contain medical expertise, a retreat was held at Columbia University's Arden Homestead conference center June 16-18, 1989. The focus of this retreat was to explore ways in which the medical expertise contained in knowledge-based systems could be shared and expanded. During the three day meeting, the eighteen attendees from ten institutions discussed: (a) the need for better ways of mapping terminology used in one setting or program to terms with similar meaning that have been used in other programs, (b) the need for catalogues which list the variety of programs which are available, (c) a representational syntax and format for sharing modular medical knowledge, (d) the possibility of developing standards for interfacing program modules so that they could be “snapped” into place in a variety of systems, (e) methods for evaluating, validating and testing knowledge based systems, and (f) the legal and financial aspects of sharing systems which influence the care that is given to a patient. We emerged from the retreat with a feeling that there was an enthusiastic but not unanimous consensus that sharing should occur in order to advance the field of medical information systems. We accepted an initial version of a working document for the representation of Medical Logic Modules (MLM's), appointed leaders for subcommittees to address the issues which had surfaced and settled upon an approach for dealing with the legal and financial aspects of the sharing process.

  1. The politics of healthcare informatics: knowledge management using an electronic medical record system.

    PubMed

    Bar-Lev, Shirly

    2015-03-01

    The design and implementation of an electronic medical record system pose significant epistemological and practical complexities. Despite optimistic assessments of their potential contribution to the quality of care, their implementation has been problematic, and their actual employment in various clinical settings remains controversial. Little is known about how their use actually mediates knowing. Employing a variety of qualitative research methods, this article attempts an answer by illustrating how omitting, editing and excessive reporting were employed as part of nurses' and physicians' political efforts to shape knowledge production and knowledge sharing in a technologically mediated healthcare setting. PMID:25581280

  2. Report on audit of fire and emergency medical services cost sharing between the Department of Energy and Los Alamos County

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-02

    Los Alamos County was created in 1964 as a response to a Congressional mandate, promulgated in the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. Because the county came into existence via the Atomic Energy Act, the Department provided fire and emergency medical services. In the intervening years, however, the Department and the county have worked toward making the county self-sufficient. The contract for fire and emergency medical services represented a step in the direction of self-sufficiency by requiring the county to begin paying for its share of the related costs. The purpose of the audit was to determine if the costs for fire and emergency medical services were shared appropriately commensurate with the use of the services.

  3. Condition Self-Management in Pediatric Spina Bifida: A Longitudinal Investigation of Medical Adherence, Responsibility-Sharing, and Independence Skills

    PubMed Central

    Psihogios, Alexandra M.; Kolbuck, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate rates of medical adherence, responsibility, and independence skills across late childhood and adolescence in youth with spina bifida (SB) and to explore associations among these disease self-management variables. Method 111 youth with SB, their parents, and a health professional participated at two time points. Informants completed questionnaires regarding medical adherence, responsibility-sharing, and child independence skills. Results Youth gained more responsibility and independence skills across time, although adherence rates did not follow a similar trajectory. Increased child medical responsibility was related to poorer adherence, and father-reported independence skills were associated with increased child responsibility. Conclusions This study highlights medical domains that are the most difficult for families to manage (e.g., skin checks). Although youth appear to gain more autonomy across time, ongoing parental involvement in medical care may be necessary to achieve optimal adherence across adolescence. PMID:26002195

  4. Views of Ethical Best Practices in Sharing Individual-Level Data From Medical and Public Health Research

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Nia; Parker, Michael

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing support for sharing individual-level data generated by medical and public health research. This scoping review of empirical research and conceptual literature examined stakeholders’ perspectives of ethical best practices in data sharing, particularly in low- and middle-income settings. Sixty-nine empirical and conceptual articles were reviewed, of which, only five were empirical studies and eight were conceptual articles focusing on low- and middle-income settings. We conclude that support for sharing individual-level data is contingent on the development and implementation of international and local policies and processes to support ethical best practices. Further conceptual and empirical research is needed to ensure data sharing policies and processes in low- and middle-income settings are appropriately informed by stakeholders’ perspectives. PMID:26297745

  5. Electronic monitoring and counseling to improve medication adherence.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Marc I; Rigsby, Michael O; Salahi, Jamelah T; Ryan, Caitlin E; Cramer, Joyce A

    2004-04-01

    Electronic caps, pill caps that record the date and time of pill bottle opening provide an objective measure of adherence to prescribed medication. A promising intervention to improve adherence, cue-dose training, involves reviewing patients' pill cap-generated reports concerning their medication-taking and offering individualized recommendations for remembering to take medications at specific times of day. In this preliminary study, 79 patients prescribed the antihyperglycemic medication metformin had adherence assessed during a 4-week baseline period. Adherence, defined as proportion of prescribed doses taken within a predetermined 4-h window, was measured using electronic MEMS caps. Those who had less than 80% baseline adherence (n = 33) were randomly assigned to either receive 4 months of cue-dose training (n = 16) or to a control group (n = 17). Cue-dose training was associated with significantly better adherence to metformin (mean improvement of 15%). The effects of cue-dose training on adherence to other antihyperglycemic medication did not reach statistical significance. Glycosylated hemoglobin (a measure of blood sugar control) did not differ between groups. Data from nine patients who reviewed pill cap-generated data with their primary care providers suggested that both patients and providers found the discussion moderately helpful and not at all uncomfortable. PMID:14998735

  6. An algorithm to identify medication nonpersistence using electronic pharmacy databases

    PubMed Central

    Moffet, Howard H; Adams, Alyce; Karter, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Objective Identifying patients who are medication nonpersistent (fail to refill in a timely manner) is important for healthcare operations and research. However, consistent methods to detect nonpersistence using electronic pharmacy records are presently lacking. We developed and validated a nonpersistence algorithm for chronically used medications. Materials and Methods Refill patterns of adult diabetes patients (n = 14,349) prescribed cardiometabolic therapies were studied. We evaluated various grace periods (30-300 days) to identify medication nonpersistence, which is defined as a gap between refills that exceeds a threshold equal to the last days’ supply dispensed plus a grace period plus days of stockpiled medication. Since data on medication stockpiles are typically unavailable for ongoing users, we compared nonpersistence to rates calculated using algorithms that ignored stockpiles. Results When using grace periods equal to or greater than the number of days’ supply dispensed (i.e., at least 100 days), this novel algorithm for medication nonpersistence gave consistent results whether or not it accounted for days of stockpiled medication. The agreement (Kappa coefficients) between nonpersistence rates using algorithms with versus without stockpiling improved with longer grace periods and ranged from 0.63 (for 30 days) to 0.98 (for a 300-day grace period). Conclusions Our method has utility for health care operations and research in prevalent (ongoing) and new user cohorts. The algorithm detects a subset of patients with inadequate medication-taking behavior not identified as primary nonadherent or secondary nonadherent. Healthcare systems can most comprehensively identify patients with short- or long-term medication underutilization by identifying primary nonadherence, secondary nonadherence, and nonpersistence. PMID:26078413

  7. Web-based Electronic Sharing and RE-allocation of Assets

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2002-09-09

    The Electronic Asses Sharing Program is a web-based application that provides the capability for complex-wide sharing and reallocation of assets that are excess, under utilized, or un-utilized. through a web-based fron-end and supporting has database with a search engine, users can search for assets that they need, search for assets needed by others, enter assets they need, and enter assets they have available for reallocation. In addition, entire listings of available assets and needed assetsmore » can be viewed. The application is written in Java, the hash database and search engine are in Object-oriented Java Database Management (OJDBM). The application will be hosted on an SRS-managed server outside the Firewall and access will be controlled via a protected realm. An example of the application can be viewed at the followinig (temporary) URL: http://idgdev.srs.gov/servlet/srs.weshare.WeShare« less

  8. Public trust in health information sharing: implications for biobanking and electronic health record systems.

    PubMed

    Platt, Jodyn; Kardia, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Biobanks are made all the more valuable when the biological samples they hold can be linked to health information collected in research, electronic health records, or public health practice. Public trust in such systems that share health information for research and health care practice is understudied. Our research examines characteristics of the general public that predict trust in a health system that includes researchers, health care providers, insurance companies and public health departments. We created a 119-item survey of predictors and attributes of system trust and fielded it using Amazon's MTurk system (n = 447). We found that seeing one's primary care provider, having a favorable view of data sharing and believing that data sharing will improve the quality of health care, as well as psychosocial factors (altruism and generalized trust) were positively and significantly associated with system trust. As expected, privacy concern, but counterintuitively, knowledge about health information sharing were negatively associated with system trust. We conclude that, in order to assure the public's trust, policy makers charged with setting best practices for governance of biobanks and access to electronic health records should leverage critical access points to engage a diverse public in joint decision making. PMID:25654300

  9. Public Trust in Health Information Sharing: Implications for Biobanking and Electronic Health Record Systems

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Jodyn; Kardia, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Biobanks are made all the more valuable when the biological samples they hold can be linked to health information collected in research, electronic health records, or public health practice. Public trust in such systems that share health information for research and health care practice is understudied. Our research examines characteristics of the general public that predict trust in a health system that includes researchers, health care providers, insurance companies and public health departments. We created a 119-item survey of predictors and attributes of system trust and fielded it using Amazon’s MTurk system (n = 447). We found that seeing one’s primary care provider, having a favorable view of data sharing and believing that data sharing will improve the quality of health care, as well as psychosocial factors (altruism and generalized trust) were positively and significantly associated with system trust. As expected, privacy concern, but counterintuitively, knowledge about health information sharing were negatively associated with system trust. We conclude that, in order to assure the public’s trust, policy makers charged with setting best practices for governance of biobanks and access to electronic health records should leverage critical access points to engage a diverse public in joint decision making. PMID:25654300

  10. RF-Medisys: a radio frequency identification-based electronic medical record system for improving medical information accessibility and services at point of care.

    PubMed

    Ting, Jacky S L; Tsang, Albert H C; Ip, Andrew W H; Ho, George T S

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an innovative electronic medical records (EMR) system, RF-MediSys, which can perform medical information sharing and retrieval effectively and which is accessible via a 'smart' medical card. With such a system, medical diagnoses and treatment decisions can be significantly improved when compared with the conventional practice of using paper medical records systems. Furthermore, the entire healthcare delivery process, from registration to the dispensing or administration of medicines, can be visualised holistically to facilitate performance review. To examine the feasibility of implementing RF-MediSys and to determine its usefulness to users of the system, a survey was conducted within a multi-disciplinary medical service organisation that operates a network of medical clinics and paramedical service centres throughout Hong Kong Island, the Kowloon Peninsula and the New Territories. Questionnaires were distributed to 300 system users, including nurses, physicians and patients, to collect feedback on the operation and performance of RF-MediSys in comparison with conventional paper-based medical record systems. The response rate to the survey was 67%. Results showed a medium to high level of user satisfaction with the radiofrequency identification (RFID)-based EMR system. In particular, respondents provided high ratings on both 'user-friendliness' and 'system performance'. Findings of the survey highlight the potential of RF-MediSys as a tool to enhance quality of medical services and patient safety. PMID:21430306

  11. Medical free-electron laser: fact or fiction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, James P.; Ponikvar, Donald R.

    1994-07-01

    The free electron laser (FEL) has long been proposed as a flexible tool for a variety of medical applications, and yet the FEL has not seen widespread acceptance in the medical community. The issues have been the laser's size, cost, and complexity. Unfortunately, research on applications of FELs has outpaced the device development efforts. This paper describes the characteristics of the FEL, as they have been demonstrated in the U.S. Army's FEL technology development program, and identifies specific medical applications where demonstrated performance levels would suffice. This includes new photodynamic therapies for cancer and HIV treatment, orthopedic applications, tissue welding applications, and multiwavelength surgical techniques. A new tunable kilowatt class FEL device is described, which utilizes existing hardware from the U.S. Army program. An assessment of the future potential, based on realistic technology scaling is provided.

  12. Materials Advances for Next-Generation Ingestible Electronic Medical Devices.

    PubMed

    Bettinger, Christopher J

    2015-10-01

    Electronic medical implants have collectively transformed the diagnosis and treatment of many diseases, but have many inherent limitations. Electronic implants require invasive surgeries, operate in challenging microenvironments, and are susceptible to bacterial infection and persistent inflammation. Novel materials and nonconventional device fabrication strategies may revolutionize the way electronic devices are integrated with the body. Ingestible electronic devices offer many advantages compared with implantable counterparts that may improve the diagnosis and treatment of pathologies ranging from gastrointestinal infections to diabetes. This review summarizes current technologies and highlights recent materials advances. Specific focus is dedicated to next-generation materials for packaging, circuit design, and on-board power supplies that are benign, nontoxic, and even biodegradable. Future challenges and opportunities are also highlighted. PMID:26403162

  13. National electronic medical records integration on cloud computing system.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Hebah; El-Masri, Samir

    2013-01-01

    Few Healthcare providers have an advanced level of Electronic Medical Record (EMR) adoption. Others have a low level and most have no EMR at all. Cloud computing technology is a new emerging technology that has been used in other industry and showed a great success. Despite the great features of Cloud computing, they haven't been utilized fairly yet in healthcare industry. This study presents an innovative Healthcare Cloud Computing system for Integrating Electronic Health Record (EHR). The proposed Cloud system applies the Cloud Computing technology on EHR system, to present a comprehensive EHR integrated environment. PMID:23920993

  14. Implementing electronic medication management at an Australian teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Day, Richard O; Roffe, David J; Richardson, Katrina L; Baysari, Melissa T; Brennan, Nicholas J; Beveridge, Sandy; Melocco, Teresa; Ainge, John; Westbrook, Johanna I

    2011-11-01

    We describe the implementation of an electronic medication management system (eMMS) in an Australian teaching hospital, to inform future similar exercises. The success of eMMS implementation depends on: a positive workplace culture (leadership, teamwork and clinician ownership); acceptance of the major impact on work practices by all staff; timely system response to user feedback; training and support for clinicians; a usable system; adequate decision support. PMID:22060071

  15. Physicians’ Attitudes regarding Patient Access to Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Dorr, David A.; Rowan, Belle; Weed, Matt; James, Brent; Clayton, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Prior to the implementation of Electronic Medical Record (EMR) web access for patients at a large integrated delivery systems, we surveyed physicians’ attitudes. Our web based questionnaire revealed largely positive attitudes about access. The exceptions included abnormal reports, progress notes, and e-care. A factor analysis identified the group of physicians who didn’t view patients as partners felt most negative about the process. PMID:14728337

  16. Data-Driven Information Extraction from Chinese Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tianwan; Ge, Chen; Gao, Weiguo; Wei, Jia; Zhu, Kenny Q.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aims to propose a data-driven framework that takes unstructured free text narratives in Chinese Electronic Medical Records (EMRs) as input and converts them into structured time-event-description triples, where the description is either an elaboration or an outcome of the medical event. Materials and Methods Our framework uses a hybrid approach. It consists of constructing cross-domain core medical lexica, an unsupervised, iterative algorithm to accrue more accurate terms into the lexica, rules to address Chinese writing conventions and temporal descriptors, and a Support Vector Machine (SVM) algorithm that innovatively utilizes Normalized Google Distance (NGD) to estimate the correlation between medical events and their descriptions. Results The effectiveness of the framework was demonstrated with a dataset of 24,817 de-identified Chinese EMRs. The cross-domain medical lexica were capable of recognizing terms with an F1-score of 0.896. 98.5% of recorded medical events were linked to temporal descriptors. The NGD SVM description-event matching achieved an F1-score of 0.874. The end-to-end time-event-description extraction of our framework achieved an F1-score of 0.846. Discussion In terms of named entity recognition, the proposed framework outperforms state-of-the-art supervised learning algorithms (F1-score: 0.896 vs. 0.886). In event-description association, the NGD SVM is superior to SVM using only local context and semantic features (F1-score: 0.874 vs. 0.838). Conclusions The framework is data-driven, weakly supervised, and robust against the variations and noises that tend to occur in a large corpus. It addresses Chinese medical writing conventions and variations in writing styles through patterns used for discovering new terms and rules for updating the lexica. PMID:26295801

  17. A pilot study: reports of benefits from a 6-month, multidisciplinary, shared medical appointment approach for heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Lin, Andrew; Cavendish, Jeffrey; Boren, Denise; Ofstad, Trish; Seidensticker, Daniel

    2008-12-01

    ABSTRACT Heart failure continues to be the leading cause of hospitalization among older adults. Noncompliance with medications, dietary indiscretion, failure to recognize symptoms, and failed social support systems contribute to increased morbidity. Multidisciplinary medical approaches have proven successful for heart failure. In 2004, the Naval Medical Center San Diego started a multidisciplinary shared medical appointment for patients with complicated cases of heart failure. Patients enrolled in the heart failure clinic were monitored prospectively for 6 months. Validated questionnaires concerning satisfaction with care, self-care management, depression, and quality-of-life measures were administered at baseline and 6 months after enrollment. Thirty-nine individuals were enrolled in the clinic, with 33 completing 6 months of follow-up monitoring to date. Hospital admissions for any cause decreased from 11 to eight, whereas congestive heart failure-related admissions decreased from four to two. There was a total of six deaths. During the 6 months of enrollment, use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta-receptor blockers had absolute increases of 20% and 19%, respectively. Statistically significant improvements were seen in the Beck Depression Inventory and Self-Care Management Index results. A multidisciplinary approach to heart failure patients using the shared medical appointment model can improve patient satisfaction, enhance quality of life, and help reduce hospitalizations while improving provider efficiency. PMID:19149341

  18. A qualitative analysis of information sharing for children with medical complexity within and across health care organizations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Children with medical complexity (CMC) are characterized by substantial family-identified service needs, chronic and severe conditions, functional limitations, and high health care use. Information exchange is critically important in high quality care of complex patients at high risk for poor care coordination. Written care plans for CMC are an excellent test case for how well information sharing is currently occurring. The purpose of this study was to identify the barriers to and facilitators of information sharing for CMC across providers, care settings, and families. Methods A qualitative study design with data analysis informed by a grounded theory approach was utilized. Two independent coders conducted secondary analysis of interviews with parents of CMC and health care professionals involved in the care of CMC, collected from two studies of healthcare service delivery for this population. Additional interviews were conducted with privacy officers of associated organizations to supplement these data. Emerging themes related to barriers and facilitators to information sharing were identified by the two coders and the research team, and a theory of facilitators and barriers to information exchange evolved. Results Barriers to information sharing were related to one of three major themes; 1) the lack of an integrated, accessible, secure platform on which summative health care information is stored, 2) fragmentation of the current health system, and 3) the lack of consistent policies, standards, and organizational priorities across organizations for information sharing. Facilitators of information sharing were related to improving accessibility to a common document, expanding the use of technology, and improving upon a structured communication plan. Conclusions Findings informed a model of how various barriers to information sharing interact to prevent optimal information sharing both within and across organizations and how the use of technology to

  19. Neuroinformatics Software Applications Supporting Electronic Data Capture, Management, and Sharing for the Neuroimaging Community.

    PubMed

    Nichols, B Nolan; Pohl, Kilian M

    2015-09-01

    Accelerating insight into the relation between brain and behavior entails conducting small and large-scale research endeavors that lead to reproducible results. Consensus is emerging between funding agencies, publishers, and the research community that data sharing is a fundamental requirement to ensure all such endeavors foster data reuse and fuel reproducible discoveries. Funding agency and publisher mandates to share data are bolstered by a growing number of data sharing efforts that demonstrate how information technologies can enable meaningful data reuse. Neuroinformatics evaluates scientific needs and develops solutions to facilitate the use of data across the cognitive and neurosciences. For example, electronic data capture and management tools designed to facilitate human neurocognitive research can decrease the setup time of studies, improve quality control, and streamline the process of harmonizing, curating, and sharing data across data repositories. In this article we outline the advantages and disadvantages of adopting software applications that support these features by reviewing the tools available and then presenting two contrasting neuroimaging study scenarios in the context of conducting a cross-sectional and a multisite longitudinal study. PMID:26267019

  20. A Pharmacy Blueprint for Electronic Medical Record Implementation Success

    PubMed Central

    Bach, David S.; Risko, Kenneth R.; Farber, Margo S.; Polk, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Implementation of an integrated, electronic medical record (EMR) has been promoted as a means of improving patient safety and quality. While there are a few reports of such processes that incorporate computerized prescriber order entry, pharmacy verification, an electronic medication administration record (eMAR), point-of-care barcode scanning, and clinical decision support, there are no published reports on how a pharmacy department can best participate in implementing such a process across a multihospital health care system. Method: This article relates the experience of the design, build, deployment, and maintenance of an integrated EMR solution from the pharmacy perspective. It describes a 9-month planning and build phase and the subsequent rollout at 8 hospitals over the following 13 months. Results: Key components to success are identified, as well as a set of guiding principles that proved invaluable in decision making and dispute resolution. Labor/personnel requirements for the various stages of the process are discussed, as are issues involving medication workflow analysis, drug database considerations, the development of clinical order sets, and incorporation of bar-code scanning of medications. Recommended implementation and maintenance strategies are presented, and the impact of EMR implementation on the pharmacy practice model and revenue analysis are examined. Conclusion: Adherence to the principles and practices outlined in this article can assist pharmacy administrators and clinicians during all medication-related phases of the development, implementation, and maintenance of an EMR solution. Furthermore, review and incorporation of some or all of practices presented may help ease the process and ensure its success. PMID:26405340

  1. [Study on network architecture of a tele-medical information sharing platform].

    PubMed

    Pan, Lin; Yu, Lun; Chen, Jin-xiong

    2006-07-01

    In the article,a plan of network construction which satisfies the demand of applications for a telemedical information sharing platform is proposed. We choice network access plans in view of user actual situation, through the analysis of the service demand and many kinds of network access technologies. Hospital servers that locate in LAN link sharing platform with node servers, should separate from the broadband network of sharing platform in order to ensure the security of the internal hospital network and the administration management. We use the VPN technology to realize the safe transmission of information in the platform network. Preliminary experiments have proved the plan is practicable. PMID:17039943

  2. Quality improvement and practice-based research in neurology using the electronic medical record

    PubMed Central

    Frigerio, Roberta; Kazmi, Nazia; Meyers, Steven L.; Sefa, Meredith; Walters, Shaun A.; Silverstein, Jonathan C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We describe quality improvement and practice-based research using the electronic medical record (EMR) in a community health system–based department of neurology. Our care transformation initiative targets 10 neurologic disorders (brain tumors, epilepsy, migraine, memory disorders, mild traumatic brain injury, multiple sclerosis, neuropathy, Parkinson disease, restless legs syndrome, and stroke) and brain health (risk assessments and interventions to prevent Alzheimer disease and related disorders in targeted populations). Our informatics methods include building and implementing structured clinical documentation support tools in the EMR; electronic data capture; enrollment, data quality, and descriptive reports; quality improvement projects; clinical decision support tools; subgroup-based adaptive assignments and pragmatic trials; and DNA biobanking. We are sharing EMR tools and deidentified data with other departments toward the creation of a Neurology Practice-Based Research Network. We discuss practical points to assist other clinical practices to make quality improvements and practice-based research in neurology using the EMR a reality. PMID:26576324

  3. Vibrationally resolved electron-nuclear energy sharing in above-threshold multiphoton dissociation of CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xufei; Li, Min; Shao, Yun; Liu, Ming-Ming; Xie, Xiguo; Deng, Yongkai; Wu, Chengyin; Gong, Qihuang; Liu, Yunquan

    2016-07-01

    We study the photon energy sharing between the photoelectron and the nuclei in the process of above-threshold multiphoton dissociative ionization of CO molecules by measuring the joint energy spectra. The experimental observation shows that the electron-nuclear energy sharing strongly depends on the vibrational state. The experimental observation shows that both the energy deposited to the nuclei of C O+ and the emitted photoelectron decrease with increasing the vibrational level. Through studying the vibrationally resolved nuclear kinetic energy release and photoelectron energy spectra at different laser intensities, for each vibrational level of C O+ , the nuclei always tend to take the same amount of energy in every vibrational level regardless of the laser intensity, while the energy deposited to the photoelectron varies with respect to the laser intensity because of the ponderomotive shifted energy and the distinct dissociative ionization mechanisms.

  4. Diffusion of Electronic Medical Record Based Public Hospital Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyoung Won; Kim, Seong Min; An, Chang-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to evaluate the adoption behavior of a newly developed Electronic Medical Record (EMR)-based information system (IS) at three public hospitals in Korea with a focus on doctors and nurses. Methods User satisfaction scores from four performance layers were analyzed before and two times after the newly develop system was introduced to evaluate the adoption process of the IS with Rogers' diffusion theory. Results The 'intention to use' scores, the most important indicator for determining whether or not to adopt the IS in Rogers' confirmation stage for doctors, were very high in the third survey (4.21). In addition, the scores for 'reduced medication errors', which is the key indicator for evaluating the success of the IS, increased in the third survey for both doctors and nurses. The factors influencing 'intention to use' with a high odds ratio (>1.5) were the 'frequency of attendance of user training sessions', 'mandatory use of system', 'reduced medication errors', and 'reduced medical record documentation time' for both doctors and nurses. Conclusions These findings show that the new EMR-based IS was well accepted by doctors. Both doctors and nurses also positively considered the effects of the new IS on their clinical environments. PMID:26279954

  5. Cardiovascular disease documentation and counseling in electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jaeyong; Huerta, Timothy R; Ford, Eric W

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between clinical reminders generated by electronic medical record (EMR) systems and providers giving prevention counseling to patients at-risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Data were extracted from the 2012 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS). Results indicate that the providers routinely using clinical reminders are significantly more likely to document height and weight data to determine risk and provide the recommended counseling to patients that merit the intervention. The findings are important for policymakers and managers that have been promoting the adoption of more sophisticated EMR decision support functionalities across the care delivery spectrum. In particular, the ability to intervene prior to negative health events is an important feature of the movement to improve care quality and reduce costs. PMID:27002255

  6. Special requirements for electronic medical records in neurology

    PubMed Central

    Longhurst, Christopher A.; Hahn, Jin S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Electronic medical records (EMRs) are being rapidly adapted in the United States with goals of improving patient care, increasing efficiency, and reducing costs. Neurologists must become knowledgeable about the utility and effectiveness of the important parts of these systems specifically needed for care of neurology patients. The field of neurology encompasses complex disorders whose diagnosis and management heavily relies on detailed medical documentation of history and physical examination, and often on specialty-specific ancillary tests and extensive neuroimaging. Small discrepancies in documentation or absence of an in-hand ancillary test result can drastically change the current workup or treatment decision of a complex patient with neurologic disease. We describe current models and opportunities for improvements to EMRs that provide utility and efficiency in the care of neurology patients. PMID:25717421

  7. Sustainability and shared smart and mutual--green growth (SSaM-GG) in Korean medical waste management.

    PubMed

    Koo, Ja-Kong; Jeong, Seung-Ik

    2015-05-01

    Since medical insurance was introduced in the Republic of Korea, there have been several increases concerning medical waste. In order to solve these problems, we have applied life cycle assessment and life cycle cost. But these methods cannot be a perfect decision-making tool because they can only evaluate environmental and economic burdens. Thus, as one of many practical methods the shared smart and mutual - green growth considers economic growth, environmental protection, social justice, science technology and art, and mutual voluntarism when applied to medical waste management in the Republic of Korea. Four systems were considered: incineration, incineration with heat recovery, steam sterilisation, and microwave disinfection. This research study aimed to assess pollutant emissions from treatment, transport, and disposal. Global warming potential, photochemical oxidant creation potential, acidifications potential, and human toxicity are considered to be environmental impacts. Total investment cost, transport cost, operation, and maintenance cost for the medical waste are considered in the economy evaluations though life cycle cost. The social development, science technology and art, and mutual voluntarism are analysed through the Delphi-method conducted by expert groups related to medical waste. The result is that incineration with heat recovery is the best solution. However, when heat recovery is impossible, incineration without heat recovery becomes the next best choice. That is why 95% of medical waste is currently treated by both incineration and incineration with heat recovery within the Republic of Korea. PMID:25762566

  8. SU-E-E-03: Shared Space Fosters Didactic and Professional Learning Across Professions for Medical and Physics Residents

    SciTech Connect

    Dieterich, S; Perks, J; Fragoso, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Medical Physicists and Radiation Oncologists are two professions who should be working as a team for optimal patient care, yet lack of mutual understanding about each others respective role and work environment creates barriers To improve collaboration and learning, we designed a shared didactic and work space for physics and radiation oncology residents to maximize interaction throughout their professional training. Methods: Physician and Physics residents are required to take the same didactic classes, including journal clubs and respective seminars. The residents also share an office environment among the seven physician and two physic residents. Results: By maximizing didactic overlap and sharing office space, the two resident groups have developed a close professional relationship and supportive work environment. Several joint research projects have been initiated by the residents. Awareness of physics tasks in the clinic has led to a request by the physician residents to change physics didactics, converting the physics short course into a lab-oriented course for the medical residents which is in part taught by the physics residents. The physics seminar is given by both residency groups; increased motivation and interest in learning about physics has led to several medical resident-initiated topic selections which generated lively discussion. The physics long course has changed toward including more discussion among residents to delve deeper into topics and study beyond what passing the boards would require. A supportive work environment has developed, embedding the two physics residents into a larger residents group, allowing them to find mentor and peers more easily. Conclusion: By creating a shared work and didactic environment, physician and physics residents have improved their understanding of respective professional practice. Resident-initiated changes in didactic practice have led to improved learning and joint research. A strong social

  9. The Cooperative Sharing of Audiovisual Materials in Medical Schools; a Network Approach. Case Study 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Medical Audiovisual Center of the National Library of Medicine, Atlanta, GA.

    The evolution of medical schools from their post-Renaissance Italian prototypes to present modern facilities has been marked by a variety of philosophies, methodologies, and pedagogical styles. Pressures to improve medical curriculum led to the educational media movement of the 1950's. By 1970, the Association of Professors of Gynecology and…

  10. Application of an Electronic Medical Record in Space Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGinnis, Patrick J.

    2000-01-01

    Electronic Medical Records (EMR) have been emerging over the past decade. Today, they are replacing the paper chart in clinics throughout the nation. Approximately three years ago, the NASA-JSC Flight Medicine Clinic initiated an assessment of the EMRs available on the market. This assessment included comparing these products with the particular scope of practice at JSC. In 1998, the Logician EMR from Medicalogic was selected for the JSC Flight Medicine Clinic. This presentation reviews the process of selection and implementation of the EMR into the unique practice of aerospace medicine at JSC.

  11. Leakage neutron radiation in a medical electron accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes, Lydia; Balcazar, Miguel; Genis, Roberto; Ortiz, Raúl

    2001-10-01

    A simple method was used for the calculation of neutron yield produced by main components of medical electron accelerator head, using a simplified geometric model with spherical-shell for the head shielding made of different materials. The leakage neutron radiation on the patient plane and outside the patient plane at one meter from the x-ray target for a Varian accelerator model Clinac 2100C was evaluated experimentally, using Panasonic UD-802 and UD-809 thermoluminescent dosimeters and CR-39 nuclear track dosimeters. The measured values of leakage neutron radiation were lower than the limits specified in the NCRP-102 and IEC 60601-2-1-Ed.2.0 reports.

  12. The effect of the electronic medical record on nurses' work.

    PubMed

    Robles, Jane

    2009-01-01

    The electronic medical record (EMR) is a workplace reality for most nurses. Its advantages include a single consolidated record for each person; capacity for data interfaces and alerts; improved interdisciplinary communication; and evidence-based decision support. EMRs can add to work complexity, by forcing better documentation of previously unrecorded data and/or because of poor design. Well-designed and well-implemented computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems can streamline nurses' work. Generational differences in acceptance of and facility with EMRs can be addressed through open, healthy communication. PMID:19343848

  13. Using agent-based technology to create a cost effective, integrated, multimedia view of the electronic medical record.

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, H. J.; Walker, W. K.; Vries, J. K.

    1995-01-01

    Image Engine is multi-user, client-server database for the storage, retrieval and sharing of a wide range of digitized biomedical images under development at the University of Pittsburgh. This paper provides an overview of the system and describes the use of agent-based technology to integrate clinical information from the Image Engine database and the MARS clinical information system at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Agent-mediated links provide a mechanism for combining clinical data from multiple databases to create a unified, multimedia view of the electronic medical record. Images Figure 1 PMID:8563320

  14. Patient clustering with uncoded text in electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Henao, Ricardo; Murray, Jared; Ginsburg, Geoffrey; Carin, Lawrence; Lucas, Joseph E

    2013-01-01

    We propose a mixture model for text data designed to capture underlying structure in the history of present illness section of electronic medical records data. Additionally, we propose a method to induce bias that leads to more homogeneous sets of diagnoses for patients in each cluster. We apply our model to a collection of electronic records from an emergency department and compare our results to three other relevant models in order to assess performance. Results using standard metrics demonstrate that patient clusters from our model are more homogeneous when compared to others, and qualitative analyses suggest that our approach leads to interpretable patient sub-populations when applied to real data. Finally, we demonstrate an example of our patient clustering model to identify adverse drug events. PMID:24551361

  15. Patient Clustering with Uncoded Text in Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Henao, Ricardo; Murray, Jared; Ginsburg, Geoffrey; Carin, Lawrence; Lucas, Joseph E.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a mixture model for text data designed to capture underlying structure in the history of present illness section of electronic medical records data. Additionally, we propose a method to induce bias that leads to more homogeneous sets of diagnoses for patients in each cluster. We apply our model to a collection of electronic records from an emergency department and compare our results to three other relevant models in order to assess performance. Results using standard metrics demonstrate that patient clusters from our model are more homogeneous when compared to others, and qualitative analyses suggest that our approach leads to interpretable patient sub-populations when applied to real data. Finally, we demonstrate an example of our patient clustering model to identify adverse drug events. PMID:24551361

  16. Use of Electronic Medication Administration Records to Reduce Perceived Stress and Risk of Medication Errors in Nursing Homes.

    PubMed

    Alenius, Malin; Graf, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Concerns have been raised about the effects of current medication administration processes on the safety of many of the aspects of medication administration. Keeping electronic medication administration records could decrease many of these problems. Unfortunately, there has not been much research on this topic, especially in nursing homes. A prospective case-control survey was consequently performed at two nursing homes; the electronic record system was introduced in one, whereas the other continued to use paper records. The personnel were asked to fill in a questionnaire of their perceptions of stress and risk of medication errors at baseline (n = 66) and 20 weeks after the intervention group had started recording medication administration electronically (n = 59). There were statistically significant decreases in the perceived risk of omitting a medication, of medication errors occurring because of communication problems, and of medication errors occurring because of inaccurate medication administration records in the intervention group (all P < .01 vs the control group). The perceived overall daily stress levels were also reduced in the intervention group (P < .05). These results indicate that the utilization of electronic medication administration records will reduce many of the concerns regarding the medication administration process. PMID:27270628

  17. Shared medical appointments after cardiac surgery-the process of implementing a novel pilot paradigm to enhance comprehensive postdischarge care.

    PubMed

    Harris, Marianne D

    2010-01-01

    To facilitate the physical and emotional needs of patients undergoing cardiac surgery and their families, our Cardiac Surgery Outpatient Clinic at Cleveland Clinic, a nonprofit multispecialty academic medical center in Cleveland, Ohio, decided to implement a trial of a novel care delivery paradigm called Shared Medical Appointments (SMAs). The purpose of this venture was to facilitate timely access to care 3 to 5 days after hospital discharge, include family members in the education process and the care of the patient, and provide a forum for support and shared learning among patients who have been through like surgical experiences. The clinic system, which performed 3,597 open heart surgeries and 213 robotically assisted cardiac surgeries in 2008, already used family education classes to provide instruction to the patients and family prior to surgery. Because this medium was an effective way to disseminate knowledge, we theorized that using an SMA would be an effective strategy to provide timely medical care after discharge and garner support, education, and increased access to timely medical care after discharge. Although there were many physicians in subspecialties performing these types of clinic visits at our institution since 2002, by the spring of 2007, a group of cardiothoracic nurses decided to perform a trial on this model in this cohort of patients and be a fully nurse-led SMA to provide comprehensive care after discharge. Preliminary patient satisfaction surveys have revealed that 92% of post-cardiac surgery patients rated the experience as good or excellent, and 82% would prefer an SMA for their next clinic visit rather than an individual visit. These data are consistent with physician-led SMA satisfaction surveys in our organization to date. Although still in its relative infancy, an SMA for this cohort appears to have merit in enhancing the support and education as well as providing for the complex medical needs of these patients. PMID:20168192

  18. A Requirement Engineering Framework for Electronic Data Sharing of Health Care Data Between Organizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xia; Peyton, Liam; Kuziemsky, Craig

    Health care is increasingly provided to citizens by a network of collaboration that includes multiple providers and locations. Typically, that collaboration is on an ad-hoc basis via phone calls, faxes, and paper based documentation. Internet and wireless technologies provide an opportunity to improve this situation via electronic data sharing. These new technologies make possible new ways of working and collaboration but it can be difficult for health care organizations to understand how to use the new technologies while still ensuring that their policies and objectives are being met. It is also important to have a systematic approach to validate that e-health processes deliver the performance improvements that are expected. Using a case study of a palliative care patient receiving home care from a team of collaborating health organizations, we introduce a framework based on requirements engineering. Key concerns and objectives are identified and modeled (privacy, security, quality of care, and timeliness of service). And, then, proposed business processes which use new technologies are modeled in terms of these concerns and objectives to assess their impact and ensure that electronic data sharing is well regulated.

  19. Shared responsibility for managing electronic waste: A case study of Maine, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Travis P.

    2009-12-15

    Based on high disposal and low recycling rates of electronic waste (e-waste) and continued exportation to developing countries, reliance on municipal responsibility for e-waste management has been unsuccessful in the United States. This case study examines Maine's program, which was the first US state to mandate producer responsibility for recycling household e-waste. Maine's program established a shared cost responsibility among producers, municipalities, and consumers. The study found that Maine's program resulted in a significant reduction in disposal and a corresponding increase in environmentally sound recycling. In the first 3 years of the program, 6.406 million kg of household e-waste was collected and recycled for a population of 1.32 million. The new program, implemented in 2006, increased the number of e-waste items collected and recycled by 108% in the first year, 170% in the second year, and 221% in the third year. The program decreased direct economic costs to municipalities and households because of the shared cost approach and for the first time established costs for producers. There was no empirical evidence indicating that producers have or will improve the recyclability of electronic products to reduce recycling costs. While other weaknesses were that found potentially limit the adoption of Maine's program, its positive aspects warrant consideration by other governments.

  20. Considering Point-of-Care Electronic Medical Resources in Lieu of Traditional Textbooks for Medical Education.

    PubMed

    Hale, LaDonna S; Wallace, Michelle M; Adams, Courtney R; Kaufman, Michelle L; Snyder, Courtney L

    2015-09-01

    Selecting resources to support didactic courses is a critical decision, and the advantages and disadvantages must be carefully considered. During clinical rotations, students not only need to possess strong background knowledge but also are expected to be proficient with the same evidence-based POC resources used by clinicians. Students place high value on “real world” learning and therefore may place more value on POC resources that they know practicing clinicians use as compared with medical textbooks. The condensed nature of PA education requires students to develop background knowledge and information literacy skills over a short period. One way to build that knowledge and those skills simultaneously is to use POC resources in lieu of traditional medical textbooks during didactic training. Electronic POC resources offer several advantages over traditional textbooks and should be considered as viable options in PA education. PMID:26309211

  1. Top 10 Lessons Learned from Electronic Medical Record Implementation in a Large Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Rizer, Milisa K.; Kaufman, Beth; Sieck, Cynthia J.; Hefner, Jennifer L.; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2015-01-01

    Electronic medical record (EMR) implementation efforts face many challenges, including individual and organizational barriers and concerns about loss of productivity during the process. These issues may be particularly complex in large and diverse settings with multiple specialties providing inpatient and outpatient care. This case report provides an example of a successful EMR implementation that emphasizes the importance of flexibility and adaptability on the part of the implementation team. It also presents the top 10 lessons learned from this EMR implementation in a large midwestern academic medical center. Included are five overarching lessons related to leadership, initial approach, training, support, and optimization as well as five lessons related to the EMR system itself that are particularly important elements of a successful implementation. PMID:26396558

  2. Top 10 Lessons Learned from Electronic Medical Record Implementation in a Large Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Rizer, Milisa K; Kaufman, Beth; Sieck, Cynthia J; Hefner, Jennifer L; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2015-01-01

    Electronic medical record (EMR) implementation efforts face many challenges, including individual and organizational barriers and concerns about loss of productivity during the process. These issues may be particularly complex in large and diverse settings with multiple specialties providing inpatient and outpatient care. This case report provides an example of a successful EMR implementation that emphasizes the importance of flexibility and adaptability on the part of the implementation team. It also presents the top 10 lessons learned from this EMR implementation in a large midwestern academic medical center. Included are five overarching lessons related to leadership, initial approach, training, support, and optimization as well as five lessons related to the EMR system itself that are particularly important elements of a successful implementation. PMID:26396558

  3. In-silico bonding schemes to encode chemical bonds involving sharing of electrons in molecular structures.

    PubMed

    Punnaivanam, Sankar; Sathiadhas, Jerome Pastal Raj; Panneerselvam, Vinoth

    2016-05-01

    Encoding of covalent and coordinate covalent bonds in molecular structures using ground state valence electronic configuration is achieved. The bonding due to electron sharing in the molecular structures is described with five fundamental bonding categories viz. uPair-uPair, lPair-uPair, uPair-lPair, vPair-lPair, and lPair-lPair. The involvement of lone pair electrons and the vacant electron orbitals in chemical bonding are explained with bonding schemes namely "target vacant promotion", "source vacant promotion", "target pairing promotion", "source pairing promotion", "source cation promotion", "source pairing double bond", "target vacant occupation", and "double pairing promotion" schemes. The bonding schemes are verified with a chemical structure editor. The bonding in the structures like ylides, PCl5, SF6, IF7, N-Oxides, BF4(-), AlCl4(-) etc. are explained and encoded unambiguously. The encoding of bonding in the structures of various organic compounds, transition metals compounds, coordination complexes and metal carbonyls is accomplished. PMID:27041446

  4. Policy Challenges in Building the Medical Home: Do We Have a Shared Blueprint?

    PubMed Central

    Stenger, Robert J.; DeVoe, Jennifer E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The notion of a patient-centered medical home features prominently in policy reform initiatives across the country, with both state and federal legislation focusing on this new model. We sought to understand the views of key stakeholders and to examine the challenging landscape facing policymakers and practitioners as they attempt to translate the medical home concept into widespread practice change. Methods We reviewed legislative documents from state legislative sessions in the year 2007 to identify pieces of legislation that included the medical home concept. Concurrently we conducted an in-depth qualitative analysis of de-identified field notes from a purposeful sample of semistructured interviews conducted with key stakeholders in Oregon after the passage of health reform legislation in 2007. Results Legislation that further defined and expounded on the medical home concept was introduced in states across the country in 2007, and some federal and state demonstration projects were already underway. However, we identified a number of barriers to widespread implementation of the medical home, most notably lack of a clear operational definition. Key stakeholders had widely disparate views about elements central to the success of medical home demonstrations, including delivery system reform, payment reform, and performance incentives for providers. Conclusions Since 2007 the concept of the medical home has gained increasing attention in health care reform debates. Our findings suggest that translating this concept into successful, widespread reform will require that policymakers build further consensus among key stakeholders and require them to address critical barriers to avoid repeating pitfalls of past reform efforts. PMID:20453185

  5. Image Engine: an object-oriented multimedia database for storing, retrieving and sharing medical images and text.

    PubMed

    Lowe, H J

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes Image Engine, an object-oriented, microcomputer-based, multimedia database designed to facilitate the storage and retrieval of digitized biomedical still images, video, and text using inexpensive desktop computers. The current prototype runs on Apple Macintosh computers and allows network database access via peer to peer file sharing protocols. Image Engine supports both free text and controlled vocabulary indexing of multimedia objects. The latter is implemented using the TView thesaurus model developed by the author. The current prototype of Image Engine uses the National Library of Medicine's Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) vocabulary (with UMLS Meta-1 extensions) as its indexing thesaurus. PMID:8130596

  6. Diversion of methadone and buprenorphine from opioid substitution treatment: patients who regularly sell or share their medication.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Björn; Richert, Torkel

    2015-01-01

    Diversion-the practice of patients selling or sharing their medication-is a much debated problem of opioid substitution treatment. Regular diversion by patients was studied at 11 opioid substitution treatment programs in the south of Sweden. Using quantitative and qualitative data, it was investigated whether those patients differ from other patients, their motives for and means of diversion, and who the recipients are. Regular diverters are a small, yet heterogeneous group. Continued illicit drug use, however, stands out as a common risk factor. Pecuniary need and a desire to help friends are other important motives. The client base mainly consists of people from the regular diverters' own drug milieus. PMID:25496247

  7. Publication trends of shared decision making in 15 high impact medical journals: a full-text review with bibliometric analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Shared Decision Making (SDM) is increasingly advocated as a model for medical decision making. However, there is still low use of SDM in clinical practice. High impact factor journals might represent an efficient way for its dissemination. We aimed to identify and characterize publication trends of SDM in 15 high impact medical journals. Methods We selected the 15 general and internal medicine journals with the highest impact factor publishing original articles, letters and editorials. We retrieved publications from 1996 to 2011 through the full-text search function on each journal website and abstracted bibliometric data. We included publications of any type containing the phrase “shared decision making” or five other variants in their abstract or full text. These were referred to as SDM publications. A polynomial Poisson regression model with logarithmic link function was used to assess the evolution across the period of the number of SDM publications according to publication characteristics. Results We identified 1285 SDM publications out of 229,179 publications in 15 journals from 1996 to 2011. The absolute number of SDM publications by journal ranged from 2 to 273 over 16 years. SDM publications increased both in absolute and relative numbers per year, from 46 (0.32% relative to all publications from the 15 journals) in 1996 to 165 (1.17%) in 2011. This growth was exponential (P < 0.01). We found fewer research publications (465, 36.2% of all SDM publications) than non-research publications, which included non-systematic reviews, letters, and editorials. The increase of research publications across time was linear. Full-text search retrieved ten times more SDM publications than a similar PubMed search (1285 vs. 119 respectively). Conclusion This review in full-text showed that SDM publications increased exponentially in major medical journals from 1996 to 2011. This growth might reflect an increased dissemination of the SDM concept to the

  8. A context-aware approach for progression tracking of medical concepts in electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Chang, Nai-Wen; Dai, Hong-Jie; Jonnagaddala, Jitendra; Chen, Chih-Wei; Tsai, Richard Tzong-Han; Hsu, Wen-Lian

    2015-12-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) for diabetic patients contain information about heart disease risk factors such as high blood pressure, cholesterol levels, and smoking status. Discovering the described risk factors and tracking their progression over time may support medical personnel in making clinical decisions, as well as facilitate data modeling and biomedical research. Such highly patient-specific knowledge is essential to driving the advancement of evidence-based practice, and can also help improve personalized medicine and care. One general approach for tracking the progression of diseases and their risk factors described in EMRs is to first recognize all temporal expressions, and then assign each of them to the nearest target medical concept. However, this method may not always provide the correct associations. In light of this, this work introduces a context-aware approach to assign the time attributes of the recognized risk factors by reconstructing contexts that contain more reliable temporal expressions. The evaluation results on the i2b2 test set demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed approach, which achieved an F-score of 0.897. To boost the approach's ability to process unstructured clinical text and to allow for the reproduction of the demonstrated results, a set of developed .NET libraries used to develop the system is available at https://sites.google.com/site/hongjiedai/projects/nttmuclinicalnet. PMID:26432355

  9. Medical Data Management in Time-Sharing: Findings of the DIRAC Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludwig, Herbert; Vallee, Jacques

    In terms of examples drawn from clinical and research data files, one of the objectives of this study is to illustrate several factors that have combined to delay the implementation of medical data bases. A primary factor has been inherent in the design of computer software. The languages currently on the market are procedural in nature: they…

  10. Measuring the success of electronic medical record implementation using electronic and survey data.

    PubMed Central

    Keshavjee, K.; Troyan, S.; Holbrook, A. M.; VanderMolen, D.

    2001-01-01

    Computerization of physician practices is increasing. Stakeholders are demanding demonstrated value for their Electronic Medical Record (EMR) implementations. We developed survey tools to measure medical office processes, including administrative and physician tasks pre- and post-EMR implementation. We included variables that were expected to improve with EMR implementation and those that were not expected to improve, as controls. We measured the same processes pre-EMR, at six months and 18 months post-EMR. Time required for most administrative tasks decreased within six months of EMR implementation. Staff time spent on charting increased with time, in keeping with our anecdotal observations that nurses were given more responsibility for charting in many offices. Physician time to chart increased initially by 50%, but went down to original levels by 18 months. However, this may be due to the drop-out of those physicians who had a difficult time charting electronically. PMID:11825201

  11. Development of medical electronic devices in the APL space department

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, A. L.

    1985-01-01

    Several electronic devices for automatically correcting specific defects in a body's physiologic regulation and allowing approximately normal functioning are described. A self-injurious behavior inhibiting system (SIBIS) is fastened to the arm of a person with chronic self-injurious behavior patterns. An electric shock is delivered into the arm whenever the device senses above-threshold acceleration of the head such as occur with head-bangers. Sounding a buzzer tone with the shock eventually allows transference of the aversive stimulus to the buzzer so shocks are no longer necessary. A programmable implantable medication system features a solenoid pump placed beneath the skin and refueled by hypodermic needle. The pump functions are programmable and can deliver insulin, chemotherapy mixes and/or pain killers according to a preset schedule or on patient demand. Finally, an automatic implantible defibrillator has four electrodes attached directly to the heart for sensing electrical impulses or emitting them in response to cardiac fibrillation.

  12. Implementing electronic medical record systems in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Hamish S F; Biondich, Paul; Moodley, Deshen; Choi, Sharon; Mamlin, Burke W; Szolovits, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The developing world faces a series of health crises including HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis that threaten the lives of millions of people. Lack of infrastructure and trained, experienced staff are considered important barriers to scaling up treatment for these diseases. In this paper we explain why information systems are important in many healthcare projects in the developing world. We discuss pilot projects demonstrating that such systems are possible and can expand to manage hundreds of thousands of patients. We also pass on the most important practical lessons in design and implementation from our experience in doing this work. Finally, we discuss the importance of collaboration between projects in the development of electronic medical record systems rather than reinventing systems in isolation, and the use of open standards and open source software. PMID:15992493

  13. Role prediction using Electronic Medical Record system audits.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Gunter, Carl A; Liebovitz, David; Tian, Jian; Malin, Bradley

    2011-01-01

    Electronic Medical Records (EMRs) provide convenient access to patient data for parties who should have it, but, unless managed properly, may also provide it to those who should not. Distinguishing the two is a core security challenge for EMRs. Strategies proposed to address these problems include Role Based Access Control (RBAC), which assigns collections of privileges called roles to users, and Experience Based Access Management (EBAM), which analyzes audit logs to determine access rights. In this paper, we integrate RBAC and EBAM through an algorithm, called Roll-Up, to manage roles effectively. In doing so, we introduce the concept of "role prediction" to identify roles from audit data. We apply the algorithm to three months of logs from Northwestern Memorial Hospital's Cerner system with approximately 8000 users and 140 roles. We demonstrate that existing roles can be predicted with 50% accuracy and intelligent grouping of roles through Roll-Up can facilitate 65% accuracy. PMID:22195144

  14. Forward secure digital signature for electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yao-Chang; Huang, To-Yeh; Hou, Ting-Wei

    2012-04-01

    The Technology Safeguard in Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Title II has addressed a way to maintain the integrity and non-repudiation of Electronic Medical Record (EMR). One of the important cryptographic technologies is mentioned in the ACT is digital signature; however, the ordinary digital signature (e.g. DSA, RSA, GQ...) has an inherent weakness: if the key (certificate) is updated, than all signatures, even the ones generated before the update, are no longer trustworthy. Unfortunately, the current most frequently used digital signature schemes are categorized into the ordinary digital signature scheme; therefore, the objective of this paper is to analyze the shortcoming of using ordinary digital signatures in EMR and to propose a method to use forward secure digital signature to sign EMR to ensure that the past EMR signatures remain trustworthy while the key (certificate) is updated. PMID:20703711

  15. Analysis Of Electronic Medication Orders With Large Overdoses

    PubMed Central

    Kirkendall, E.S.; Kouril, M.; Minich, T.; Spooner, SA.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Users of electronic health record (EHR) systems frequently prescribe doses outside recommended dose ranges, and tend to ignore the alerts that result. Since some of these dosing errors are the result of system design flaws, analysis of large overdoses can lead to the discovery of needed system changes. Objectives To develop database techniques for detecting and extracting large overdose orders from our EHR. To identify and characterize users’ responses to these large overdoses. To identify possible causes of large-overdose errors and to mitigate them. Methods We constructed a data mart of medication-order and dosing-alert data from a quaternary pediatric hospital from June 2011 to May 2013. The data mart was used along with a test version of the EHR to explain how orders were processed and alerts were generated for large (>500%) and extreme (>10,000%) overdoses. User response was characterized by the dosing alert salience rate, which expresses the proportion of time users take corrective action. Results We constructed an advanced analytic framework based on workflow analysis and order simulation, and evaluated all 5,402,504 medication orders placed within the 2 year timeframe as well as 2,232,492 dose alerts associated with some of the orders. 8% of orders generated a visible alert, with ¼ of these related to overdosing. Alerts presented to trainees had higher salience rates than those presented to senior colleagues. Salience rates were low, varying between 4–10%, and were lower with larger overdoses. Extreme overdoses fell into eight causal categories, each with a system design mitigation. Conclusions Novel analytic systems are required to accurately understand prescriber behavior and interactions with medication-dosing CDS. We described a novel analytic system that can detect apparent large overdoses (≥500%) and explain the sociotechnical factors that drove the error. Some of these large overdoses can be mitigated by system changes. EHR

  16. Factors in Medical Student Beliefs about Electronic Health Record Use

    PubMed Central

    Harle, Christopher A.; Gruber, Laura A.; Dewar, Marvin A.

    2014-01-01

    Healthcare providers’ ongoing investment in electronic health records (EHRs) necessitates an understanding of physicians’ expectations about using EHRs. Such understanding may aid educators and administrators when utilizing scarce resources during EHR training and implementation activities. This study aimed to link individual medical student characteristics to their perceptions of EHRs’ ease of use and usefulness. This study employed a cross-sectional survey of 126 third-year medical students at a large southeastern university. Using a questionnaire designed for this study and containing previously validated items, the study team measured and related students’ expectations about EHR ease of use and usefulness to their computer self-efficacy, openness to change, personality traits, and demographic characteristics. On a seven-point scale, men reported, on average, ease-of-use scores that were 0.71 higher than women's (p < .001). Also, increased computer self-efficacy related to higher expectations of EHR ease of use (p < .01) and usefulness (p < .05). Openness-to-change scores were also associated with higher expectations of EHR ease of use (p < .01) and usefulness (p < .001). Finally, a more conscientious personality was positively associated with EHR ease of use (p < .01). Our findings suggest that medical educators and administrators may consider targeting EHR management strategies on the basis of individual differences. Enhanced training and support interventions may be helpful to women or to clinicians with lower computer self-efficacy, lower openness to change, or less conscientious personalities. Also, current and future physicians who rate higher in terms of self-efficacy, openness to change, or conscientiousness may be useful as champions of EHR use among their peers. PMID:24808813

  17. Identifying phenotypic signatures of neuropsychiatric disorders from electronic medical records

    PubMed Central

    Lyalina, Svetlana; Percha, Bethany; LePendu, Paea; Iyer, Srinivasan V; Altman, Russ B; Shah, Nigam H

    2013-01-01

    Objective Mental illness is the leading cause of disability in the USA, but boundaries between different mental illnesses are notoriously difficult to define. Electronic medical records (EMRs) have recently emerged as a powerful new source of information for defining the phenotypic signatures of specific diseases. We investigated how EMR-based text mining and statistical analysis could elucidate the phenotypic boundaries of three important neuropsychiatric illnesses—autism, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. Methods We analyzed the medical records of over 7000 patients at two facilities using an automated text-processing pipeline to annotate the clinical notes with Unified Medical Language System codes and then searching for enriched codes, and associations among codes, that were representative of the three disorders. We used dimensionality-reduction techniques on individual patient records to understand individual-level phenotypic variation within each disorder, as well as the degree of overlap among disorders. Results We demonstrate that automated EMR mining can be used to extract relevant drugs and phenotypes associated with neuropsychiatric disorders and characteristic patterns of associations among them. Patient-level analyses suggest a clear separation between autism and the other disorders, while revealing significant overlap between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. They also enable localization of individual patients within the phenotypic ‘landscape’ of each disorder. Conclusions Because EMRs reflect the realities of patient care rather than idealized conceptualizations of disease states, we argue that automated EMR mining can help define the boundaries between different mental illnesses, facilitate cohort building for clinical and genomic studies, and reveal how clear expert-defined disease boundaries are in practice. PMID:23956017

  18. Introduction of shared electronic records: multi-site case study using diffusion of innovation theory

    PubMed Central

    Stramer, Katja; Bratan, Tanja; Byrne, Emma; Mohammad, Yara; Russell, Jill

    2008-01-01

    Objective To explore the introduction of a centrally stored, shared electronic patient record (the summary care record (SCR)) in England and draw wider lessons about the implementation of large scale information technology projects in health care. Design Multi-site, mixed method case study applying utilisation focused evaluation. Setting Four early adopter sites for the SCR in England—three in urban areas of relative socioeconomic deprivation and the fourth in a relatively affluent rural area. Data sources and analysis Data included 250 staff interviews, 1500 hours of ethnographic observation, interviews and focus groups with 170 patients and carers, 2500 pages of correspondence and documentary evidence, and incorporation of relevant surveys and statistics produced by others. These were analysed by using a thematic approach drawing on (and extending) a theoretical model of complex change developed in a previous systematic review. Main findings The mixed fortunes of the SCR programme in its first year were largely explained by eight interacting influences. The first was the SCR’s material properties (especially technical immaturity and lack of interoperability) and attributes (especially the extent to which potential adopters believed the benefits outweighed the risks). The second was adopters’ concerns (especially about workload and the ethicality of sharing “confidential” information on an implied consent model). The third influence was interpersonal influence (for example, opinion leaders, champions, facilitators), and the fourth was organisational antecedents for innovation (for example past experience with information technology projects, leadership and management capacity, effective data capture systems, slack resources). The fifth was organisational readiness for the SCR (for example, innovation-system fit, tension for change, power balances between supporters and opponents, baseline data quality). The sixth was the implementation process (including

  19. Medical Device Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Medical Devices Home Medical Devices Medical Device Safety Medical Device Safety Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ...

  20. Evaluation of a hybrid paper-electronic medication management system at a residential aged care facility.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Rohan A; Lee, Cik Yin; Hussainy, Safeera Y

    2016-06-01

    Objectives The aims of the study were to investigate discrepancies between general practitioners' paper medication orders and pharmacy-prepared electronic medication administration charts, back-up paper charts and dose-administration aids, as well as delays between prescribing, charting and administration, at a 90-bed residential aged care facility that used a hybrid paper-electronic medication management system. Methods A cross-sectional audit of medication orders, medication charts and dose-administration aids was performed to identify discrepancies. In addition, a retrospective audit was performed of delays between prescribing and availability of an updated electronic medication administration chart. Medication administration records were reviewed retrospectively to determine whether discrepancies and delays led to medication administration errors. Results Medication records for 88 residents (mean age 86 years) were audited. Residents were prescribed a median of eight regular medicines (interquartile range 5-12). One hundred and twenty-five discrepancies were identified. Forty-seven discrepancies, affecting 21 (24%) residents, led to a medication administration error. The most common discrepancies were medicine omission (44.0%) and extra medicine (19.2%). Delays from when medicines were prescribed to when they appeared on the electronic medication administration chart ranged from 18min to 98h. On nine occasions (for 10% of residents) the delay contributed to missed doses, usually antibiotics. Conclusion Medication discrepancies and delays were common. Improved systems for managing medication orders and charts are needed. What is known about the topic? Hybrid paper-electronic medication management systems, in which prescribers' orders are transcribed into an electronic system by pharmacy technicians and pharmacists to create medication administration charts, are increasingly replacing paper-based medication management systems in Australian residential aged care

  1. Towards an ontology for sharing medical images and regions of interest in neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Temal, Lynda; Dojat, Michel; Kassel, Gilles; Gibaud, Bernard

    2008-10-01

    The goal of the NeuroBase project is to facilitate collaborative research in neuroimaging through a federated system based on semantic web technologies. The cornerstone and focus of this paper is the design of a common semantic model providing a unified view on all data and tools to be shared. For this purpose, we built a multi-layered and multi-components formal ontology. This paper presents two major contributions. The first is related to the general methodology we propose for building an application ontology based on consistent conceptualization choices provided by the DOLCE foundational ontology and core ontologies of domains that we reuse; the second concerns the domain ontology we designed for neuroimaging, which encompasses both the objective nature of image data and the subjective nature of image content, through annotations based on regions of interest made by agents (humans or computer programs). We report on realistic domain use-case queries referring to our application ontology. PMID:18440282

  2. Towards improved knowledge sharing: assessment of the HL7 Reference Information Model to support medical logic module queries.

    PubMed

    Jenders, R A; Sujansky, W; Broverman, C A; Chadwick, M

    1997-01-01

    Because clinical databases vary in structure, access methods and vocabulary used to represent data, the Arden Syntax does not define a standard model for querying databases. Consequently, database queries are encoded in ad hoc ways and enclosed in "curly braces" in Medical Logic Modules (MLMs). However, the nonstandard representation of queries impairs sharing of MLMs, an impediment that has come to be known as the "curly braces problem." As a first step in solving this problem, we evaluated the proposed HL7 Reference Information Model (RIM) as a foundation for a standard query model for the Arden Syntax. Specifically, we analyzed the MLM knowledge base at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center and compared the queries in these MLMs to the RIM. We studied 488 queries in 104 MLMs, identifying 674 total query data elements. Laboratory tests accounted for 45.8% of these elements, while demographic and ADT data accounted for 37.6%. Pharmacy orders accounted for 10.5%, medical problems for 4.3% and MLM output messages for 1.6%. We found that the RIM encompasses all but those data elements signifying MLM output (1.6% of the total). We conclude that the majority of queries in the CPMC knowledge base access a relatively small set of data elements and that the RIM encompasses these elements. We propose extensions of this analysis to continue construction of an Arden query model capable of solving the "curly braces problem." PMID:9357638

  3. DRUG-DRUG INTERACTION PROFILES OF MEDICATION REGIMENS EXTRACTED FROM A DE-IDENTIFIED ELECTRONIC MEDICAL RECORDS SYSTEM.

    PubMed

    Butkiewicz, Mariusz; Restrepo, Nicole A; Haines, Jonathan L; Crawford, Dana C

    2016-01-01

    With age, the number of prescribed medications increases and subsequently raises the risk for adverse drug-drug interactions. These adverse effects lower quality of life and increase health care costs. Quantifying the potential burden of adverse effects before prescribing medications can be a valuable contribution to health care. This study evaluated medication lists extracted from a subset of the Vanderbilt de-identified electronic medical record system. Reported drugs were cross-referenced with the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes DRUG database to identify known drug-drug interactions. On average, a medication regimen contained 6.58 medications and 2.68 drug-drug interactions. Here, we quantify the burden of potential adverse events from drug-drug interactions through drug-drug interaction profiles and include a number of alternative medications as provided by the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification System. PMID:27570646

  4. Osteoporosis guideline implementation in family medicine using electronic medical records

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Janet; Karampatos, Sarah; Ioannidis, George; Adachi, Jonathan; Thabane, Lehana; Nash, Lynn; Mehan, Upe; Kozak, Joseph; Feldman, Sid; Hirsch, Steve; Jovaisas, Algis V.; Cheung, Angela; Lohfeld, Lynne; Papaioannou, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To identify family physicians’ learning needs related to osteoporosis care; determine family physicians’ preferred modes of learning; and identify barriers to using electronic medical records (EMRs) to implement osteoporosis guidelines in practice. Design Web-based survey. Setting Ontario. Participants Family physicians. Main outcome measures Quantitative and qualitative data about learning needs related to osteoporosis diagnosis and management; preferred mode of learning about guidelines; and barriers to using EMRs to implement guidelines. Results Of the 12 332 family physicians invited to participate in the survey, 8.5% and 7.0% provided partial or fully completed surveys, respectively. More than 80% of respondents agreed that the priority areas for education were as follows: selecting laboratory tests for secondary osteoporosis and interpreting the test results; interpreting bone mineral density results; determining appropriate circumstances for ordering anterior-posterior lumbar spine x-ray scans; and understanding duration, types, and adverse effects of pharmacotherapy. Qualitative analysis revealed that managing moderate-risk patients was a learning need. Continuing medical education was the preferred mode of learning. Approximately 80% of respondents agreed that the scarcity of EMR tools to aid in guideline implementation was a barrier to using guidelines, and 50% of respondents agreed that if EMR-embedded tools were available, time would limit their ability to use them. Conclusion This survey identified key diagnostic- and treatment-related topics in osteoporosis care that should be the focus of future continuing professional development for family physicians. Developers of EMR tools, physicians, and researchers aiming to implement guidelines to improve osteoporosis care should consider the potential barriers indicated in this study.

  5. Voluntary Electronic Reporting of Medical Errors and Adverse Events

    PubMed Central

    Milch, Catherine E; Salem, Deeb N; Pauker, Stephen G; Lundquist, Thomas G; Kumar, Sanjaya; Chen, Jack

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the rate and types of events reported in acute care hospitals using an electronic error reporting system (e-ERS). DESIGN Descriptive study of reported events using the same e-ERS between January 1, 2001 and September 30, 2003. SETTING Twenty-six acute care nonfederal hospitals throughout the U.S. that voluntarily implemented a web-based e-ERS for at least 3 months. PARTICIPANTS Hospital employees and staff. INTERVENTION A secure, standardized, commercially available web-based reporting system. RESULTS Median duration of e-ERS use was 21 months (range 3 to 33 months). A total of 92,547 reports were obtained during 2,547,154 patient-days. Reporting rates varied widely across hospitals (9 to 95 reports per 1,000 inpatient-days; median=35). Registered nurses provided nearly half of the reports; physicians contributed less than 2%. Thirty-four percent of reports were classified as nonmedication-related clinical events, 33% as medication/infusion related, 13% were falls, 13% as administrative, and 6% other. Among 80% of reports that identified level of impact, 53% were events that reached a patient (“patient events”), 13% were near misses that did not reach the patient, and 14% were hospital environment problems. Among 49,341 patient events, 67% caused no harm, 32% temporary harm, 0.8% life threatening or permanent harm, and 0.4% contributed to patient deaths. CONCLUSIONS An e-ERS provides an accessible venue for reporting medical errors, adverse events, and near misses. The wide variation in reporting rates among hospitals, and very low reporting rates by physicians, requires investigation. PMID:16390502

  6. Linking human anatomy to knowledge bases: a visual front end for electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Stewart; Pouchard, Line; Ward, Richard; Atkins, Gary; Cole, Martin; Lorensen, Bill; Ade, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    A new concept of a visual electronic medical record is presented based on developments ongoing in the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency Virtual Soldier Project. This new concept is based on the holographic medical electronic representation (Holomer) and on data formats being developed to support this. The Holomer is being developed in two different visualization environments, one of which is suitable for prototyping the visual electronic medical record. The advantages of a visual approach as a front end for electronic medical records are discussed and specific implementations are presented. PMID:15718802

  7. Infectious Cognition: Risk Perception Affects Socially Shared Retrieval-Induced Forgetting of Medical Information.

    PubMed

    Coman, Alin; Berry, Jessica N

    2015-12-01

    When speakers selectively retrieve previously learned information, listeners often concurrently, and covertly, retrieve their memories of that information. This concurrent retrieval typically enhances memory for mentioned information (the rehearsal effect) and impairs memory for unmentioned but related information (socially shared retrieval-induced forgetting, SSRIF), relative to memory for unmentioned and unrelated information. Building on research showing that anxiety leads to increased attention to threat-relevant information, we explored whether concurrent retrieval is facilitated in high-anxiety real-world contexts. Participants first learned category-exemplar facts about meningococcal disease. Following a manipulation of perceived risk of infection (low vs. high risk), they listened to a mock radio show in which some of the facts were selectively practiced. Final recall tests showed that the rehearsal effect was equivalent between the two risk conditions, but SSRIF was significantly larger in the high-risk than in the low-risk condition. Thus, the tendency to exaggerate consequences of news events was found to have deleterious consequences. PMID:26502746

  8. Electronic Resource Sharing in Community Colleges: A Snapshot of Florida, Wisconsin, Texas, and Louisiana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Brian D.

    2000-01-01

    States that several states are establishing networks for resource sharing. Florida offers these resources through the Florida Distance Learning Library Initiative, Wisconsin has BadgerLink and WISCAT, TexShare provides library resource sharing in Texas, and Louisiana has LOUIS and LLN. These are some of the states successfully demonstrating…

  9. Consumers' Perceptions of Patient-Accessible Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Vaughon, Wendy L; Czaja, Sara J; Levy, Joslyn; Rockoff, Maxine L

    2013-01-01

    Background Electronic health information (eHealth) tools for patients, including patient-accessible electronic medical records (patient portals), are proliferating in health care delivery systems nationally. However, there has been very limited study of the perceived utility and functionality of portals, as well as limited assessment of these systems by vulnerable (low education level, racial/ethnic minority) consumers. Objective The objective of the study was to identify vulnerable consumers’ response to patient portals, their perceived utility and value, as well as their reactions to specific portal functions. Methods This qualitative study used 4 focus groups with 28 low education level, English-speaking consumers in June and July 2010, in New York City. Results Participants included 10 males and 18 females, ranging in age from 21-63 years; 19 non-Hispanic black, 7 Hispanic, 1 non-Hispanic White and 1 Other. None of the participants had higher than a high school level education, and 13 had less than a high school education. All participants had experience with computers and 26 used the Internet. Major themes were enhanced consumer engagement/patient empowerment, extending the doctor’s visit/enhancing communication with health care providers, literacy and health literacy factors, improved prevention and health maintenance, and privacy and security concerns. Consumers were also asked to comment on a number of key portal features. Consumers were most positive about features that increased convenience, such as making appointments and refilling prescriptions. Consumers raised concerns about a number of potential barriers to usage, such as complex language, complex visual layouts, and poor usability features. Conclusions Most consumers were enthusiastic about patient portals and perceived that they had great utility and value. Study findings suggest that for patient portals to be effective for all consumers, portals must be designed to be easy to read, visually

  10. Progress in electronic medical record adoption in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Feng; Gupta, Nishi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the rate of adoption of electronic medical records (EMRs) by physicians across Canada, provincial incentives, and perceived benefits of and barriers to EMR adoption. Data sources Data on EMR adoption in Canada were collected from CINAHL, MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, the Health Council of Canada, Canada Health Infoway, government websites, regional EMR associations, and health professional association websites. Study selection After removal of duplicate articles, 236 documents were found matching the original search. After using the filter Canada, 12 documents remained. Additional documents were obtained from each province’s EMR website and from the Canada Health Infoway website. Synthesis Since 2006, Canadian EMR adoption rates have increased from about 20% of practitioners to an estimated 62% of practitioners in 2013, with substantial regional disparities ranging from roughly 40% of physicians in New Brunswick and Quebec to more than 75% of physicians in Alberta. Provincial incentives vary widely but appear to have only a weak relationship with the rate of adoption. Many adopters use only a fraction of their software’s available functions. User-cited benefits to adoption include time savings, improved record keeping, heightened patient safety, and confidence in retrieved data when EMRs are used efficiently. Barriers to adoption include financial and time constraints, lack of knowledgeable support personnel, and lack of interoperability with hospital and pharmacy systems. Conclusion Canadian physicians remain at the stage of EMR adoption. Progression in EMR use requires experienced, knowledgeable technical support during implementation, and financial support for the transcription of patient data from paper to electronic media. The interoperability of EMR offerings for hospitals, pharmacies, and clinics is the rate-limiting factor in achieving a unified EMR solution for Canada. PMID:27035020

  11. Shared Medical Appointments: A Promising Innovation to Improve Patient Engagement and Ease the Primary Care Provider Shortage.

    PubMed

    Stults, Cheryl D; McCuistion, Mary H; Frosch, Dominick L; Hung, Dorothy Y; Cheng, Peter H; Tai-Seale, Ming

    2016-02-01

    The Affordable Care Act has extended coverage for uninsured and underinsured Americans, but it could exacerbate existing problems of access to primary care. Shared medical appointments (SMAs) are one way to improve access and increase practice productivity, but few studies have examined the patient's perspective on participation in SMAs. To understand patient experiences, 5 focus group sessions were conducted with a total of 30 people in the San Francisco Bay Area. The sessions revealed that most participants felt that they received numerous tangible and intangible benefits from SMAs, particularly enhanced engagement with other patients and physicians, learning, and motivation for health behavior change. Most importantly, participants noted changes in the power dynamic during SMA visits as they increasingly saw themselves empowered to impart information to the physician. Although SMAs improve access, engagement with physicians and other patients, and knowledge of patients' health, they also help to ease the workload for physicians. PMID:26090793

  12. A critical pathway for electronic medical record selection.

    PubMed Central

    Holbrook, A.; Keshavjee, K.; Langton, K.; Troyan, S.; Millar, S.; Olantunji, S.; Pray, M.; Tytus, R.; Ford, P. T.

    2001-01-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) are increasingly becoming a necessary tool in health care. Given their potential to influence every aspect of health care, there has been surprisingly little rigorous research applied to this important piece of emerging health technology. An initial phase of the COMPETE study, which is examining the impact of EMRs on efficiency, quality of care and privacy concerns, involved a rigorous "critical pathway" approach to EMR selection for the study. A multidisciplinary team with clinical, technical and research expertise led an 8-stage evaluation process with direct input from user physicians at each stage. An iterative sequence of review of EMR specifications and features, live product demonstrations, site visits, and negotiations with vendors led to a progressive narrowing of the field of eligible EMR systems. Final scoring was based on 3 main themes of clinical usability, data quality and support/vendor issues. We believe that a rigorous, multidisciplinary process such as this is required to maximize success of any EMR implementation project. PMID:11825192

  13. Electronic medical records: a practitioner's perspective on evaluation and implementation.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Edward; French, Kim; Gronkiewicz, Cynthia; Borkgren, Marilyn

    2010-09-01

    This article describes the initial and ongoing efforts of our pulmonary medicine practice to deploy an electronic medical records (EMR) system. Key factors in the vendor selection and implementation process included (1) identification and commitment to long-term goals for EMR; (2) dedicated resources, including both physician and nonphysician champions to lead the design and implementation teams; and (3) ample patience and time allotted to achieve the desired results: a fully functional system that enhances quality, improves operational efficiency, and reduces costs. An EMR scorecard including multiple system attributes was designed to facilitate vendor comparisons. Perseverance, patience, and compromise were necessary to overcome the challenge of changing the behavior of providers and support staff. We have accomplished improvements in workflow automation and reductions in staff hours, office supplies, file space, and transcription costs. Our system lacks pulmonary-specific templates and prompts for work flow and clinical decision making. We have directed internal resources and outsourced professional support to design these features as our practice strives to enhance our quality of care with pulmonary disease management that conforms to national guidelines. PMID:20822993

  14. The Genetic Intersection of Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Shared Medical Comorbidities – Relations that Translate from Bench to Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Plummer, Jasmine T.; Gordon, Alexis J.; Levitt, Pat

    2016-01-01

    Most psychiatric disorders are considered neurodevelopmental, and the associated genes often are expressed in tissues outside of the brain. This suggests a biological relatedness with medical co-occurrences that could have broad clinical implications for diagnosis and patient management over a lifetime. A qualitative integration of public data from genetic consortia of psychiatric disorders and medical comorbidities explores the question of whether genetically associated psychiatric illnesses present with co-occurring disturbances can be used to define specific mental–physical health relations. Novel patterns of gene-disorder relations appear with approximately one-third of conservatively defined, consortia-generated candidate risk genes with multiple psychiatric diagnoses. Moreover, nearly as many genes overlap with non-psychiatric phenotypes, including cardiovascular, renal, respiratory, and metabolic disturbances. While the landscape of genetic risk will change as study populations are expanded and biological confirmations accrue, the current relationships suggest that a mostly siloed perspective of gene relatedness to one categorical psychiatric diagnosis is not clinically useful. The future holds the promise that once candidates are fully validated, genome screening and mutation identification will bring more precision for predicting the risk for complex health conditions. Our view is that as genetic data are refined, continuing to decipher a shared pattern of genetic risk for brain and peripheral organ pathophysiology is not simply an academic exercise. Rather, determining relatedness will impact predictions of multifaceted health risks, patient treatment, and management. PMID:27597832

  15. The Genetic Intersection of Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Shared Medical Comorbidities - Relations that Translate from Bench to Bedside.

    PubMed

    Plummer, Jasmine T; Gordon, Alexis J; Levitt, Pat

    2016-01-01

    Most psychiatric disorders are considered neurodevelopmental, and the associated genes often are expressed in tissues outside of the brain. This suggests a biological relatedness with medical co-occurrences that could have broad clinical implications for diagnosis and patient management over a lifetime. A qualitative integration of public data from genetic consortia of psychiatric disorders and medical comorbidities explores the question of whether genetically associated psychiatric illnesses present with co-occurring disturbances can be used to define specific mental-physical health relations. Novel patterns of gene-disorder relations appear with approximately one-third of conservatively defined, consortia-generated candidate risk genes with multiple psychiatric diagnoses. Moreover, nearly as many genes overlap with non-psychiatric phenotypes, including cardiovascular, renal, respiratory, and metabolic disturbances. While the landscape of genetic risk will change as study populations are expanded and biological confirmations accrue, the current relationships suggest that a mostly siloed perspective of gene relatedness to one categorical psychiatric diagnosis is not clinically useful. The future holds the promise that once candidates are fully validated, genome screening and mutation identification will bring more precision for predicting the risk for complex health conditions. Our view is that as genetic data are refined, continuing to decipher a shared pattern of genetic risk for brain and peripheral organ pathophysiology is not simply an academic exercise. Rather, determining relatedness will impact predictions of multifaceted health risks, patient treatment, and management. PMID:27597832

  16. Assessing accuracy of an electronic provincial medication repository

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Jurisdictional drug information systems are being implemented in many regions around the world. British Columbia, Canada has had a provincial medication dispensing record, PharmaNet, system since 1995. Little is known about how accurately PharmaNet reflects actual medication usage. Methods This prospective, multi-centre study compared pharmacist collected Best Possible Medication Histories (BPMH) to PharmaNet profiles to assess accuracy of the PharmaNet profiles for patients receiving a BPMH as part of clinical care. A review panel examined the anonymized BPMHs and discrepancies to estimate clinical significance of discrepancies. Results 16% of medication profiles were accurate, with 48% of the discrepant profiles considered potentially clinically significant by the clinical review panel. Cardiac medications tended to be more accurate (e.g. ramipril was accurate >90% of the time), while insulin, warfarin, salbutamol and pain relief medications were often inaccurate (80–85% of the time). 1215 sequential BPMHs were collected and reviewed for this study. Conclusions The PharmaNet medication repository has a low accuracy and should be used in conjunction with other sources for medication histories for clinical or research purposes. This finding is consistent with other, smaller medication repository accuracy studies in other jurisdictions. Our study highlights specific medications that tend to be lower in accuracy. PMID:22621690

  17. Anonymization of DICOM electronic medical records for radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Newhauser, Wayne; Jones, Timothy; Swerdloff, Stuart; Newhauser, Warren; Cilia, Mark; Carver, Robert; Halloran, Andy; Zhang, Rui

    2014-10-01

    Electronic medical records (EMR) and treatment plans are used in research on patient outcomes and radiation effects. In many situations researchers must remove protected health information (PHI) from EMRs. The literature contains several studies describing the anonymization of generic Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM) files and DICOM image sets but no publications were found that discuss the anonymization of DICOM radiation therapy plans, a key component of an EMR in a cancer clinic. In addition to this we were unable to find a commercial software tool that met the minimum requirements for anonymization and preservation of data integrity for radiation therapy research. The purpose of this study was to develop a prototype software code to meet the requirements for the anonymization of radiation therapy treatment plans and to develop a way to validate that code and demonstrate that it properly anonymized treatment plans and preserved data integrity. We extended an open-source code to process all relevant PHI and to allow for the automatic anonymization of multiple EMRs. The prototype code successfully anonymized multiple treatment plans in less than 1min/patient. We also tested commercial optical character recognition (OCR) algorithms for the detection of burned-in text on the images, but they were unable to reliably recognize text. In addition, we developed and tested an image filtering algorithm that allowed us to isolate and redact alpha-numeric text from a test radiograph. Validation tests verified that PHI was anonymized and data integrity, such as the relationship between DICOM unique identifiers (UID) was preserved. PMID:25147130

  18. Relevance of the electronic computer to hospital medical records*

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, J. H.

    1969-01-01

    During the past 30 years an “information explosion” has completely changed patterns of illness. Unit files of individual patients have become so large that they are increasingly difficult both to store physically and to assimilate mentally. We have reached a communications barriers which poses a major threat to the efficient practice of clinical medicine. At the same time a new kind of machine, the electronic digital computer, which was invented only 26 years ago, has already come to dominate large areas of military, scientific, commercial, and industrial activity. Its supremacy rests on its ability to perform any data procedure automatically and incredibly quickly. Computers are being employed in clinical medicine in hospitals for various purposes. They can act as arithmetic calculators, they can process and analyse output from recording devices, and they can make possible the automation of various machine systems. However, in the field of case records their role is much less well defined, for here the organization of data as a preliminary to computer input is the real stumbling-block. Data banks of retrospective selected clinical information have been in operation in some centres for a number of years. Attempts are now being made to design computerized “total information systems” to replace conventional paper records, and the possibility of automated diagnosis is being seriously discussed. In my view, however, the medical profession is in danger of being dazzled by optimistic claims about the usefulness of computers in case record processing. The solution to the present problems of record storage and handling is very simple, and does not involve computerization. PMID:4898564

  19. Anonymization of DICOM Electronic Medical Records for Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Newhauser, Wayne; Jones, Timothy; Swerdloff, Stuart; Newhauser, Warren; Cilia, Mark; Carver, Robert; Halloran, Andy; Zhang, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Electronic medical records (EMR) and treatment plans are used in research on patient outcomes and radiation effects. In many situations researchers must remove protected health information (PHI) from EMRs. The literature contains several studies describing the anonymization of generic Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM) files and DICOM image sets but no publications were found that discuss the anonymization of DICOM radiation therapy plans, a key component of an EMR in a cancer clinic. In addition to this we were unable to find a commercial software tool that met the minimum requirements for anonymization and preservation of data integrity for radiation therapy research. The purpose of this study was to develop a prototype software code to meet the requirements for the anonymization of radiation therapy treatment plans and to develop a way to validate that code and demonstrate that it properly anonymized treatment plans and preserved data integrity. We extended an open-source code to process all relevant PHI and to allow for the automatic anonymization of multiple EMRs. The prototype code successfully anonymized multiple treatment plans in less than 1 minute per patient. We also tested commercial optical character recognition (OCR) algorithms for the detection of burned-in text on the images, but they were unable to reliably recognize text. In addition, we developed and tested an image filtering algorithm that allowed us to isolate and redact alpha-numeric text from a test radiograph. Validation tests verified that PHI was anonymized and data integrity, such as the relationship between DICOM unique identifiers (UID) was preserved. PMID:25147130

  20. Electronic teaching materials for inter-professional education in a college of medical professionals.

    PubMed

    Toyama, Hinako; Inoue, Rie; Ito, Yumi; Sakamoto, Chieko; Ishikawa, Toru; Eda, Tetsuya; Saito, Keiichi

    2013-01-01

    In order to promote the utilization of digital clinical information among medical professionals, an education program and electronic teaching materials involving fictitious model patients were developed for students in a health and welfare college. The purposes of this program were for students to learn the role of each medical professional and to understand the medical records written by each medical staff member in interdisciplinary medicine (a collaborative approach to medicine). The materials for fictitious patients, including medical records, study results, medical images and the associated documents, were stored in a database on a virtual private network. The electronic medical records were easily modified according to the specialty of the students in each class. Fictional medical records of patients with lacunar infarction, fracture of the distal radius, fracture of the femur, diabetes mellitus and breast cancer were generated and evaluated in inter-professional education classes. PMID:23920893

  1. Self-Care Communication during Medical Encounters: Implications for Future Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Arar, Nedal H; Wang, Chen-Pin; Pugh, Jacqueline A

    2006-01-01

    Objective The growing importance of electronic medical records (EMRs) to healthcare systems is evident, yet the debate concerning their impact on patient-provider communication during encounters remains unresolved. For this study, we hypothesize that providers' use of the EMR will improve patientprovider communication concerning self-care during the medical encounter. Design Cross-sectional, observational study. Setting A primary-care outpatient clinic of the South Texas Veterans Health Care System in San Antonio, TX, USA. Methods A convenience sample of 50 patient/physician encounters was videotaped, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed to determine the time that the physician spent using the EMR and self-care topics discussed. Self-care topics included medication use, recognition of disease symptoms, diet, exercise, management of physical and emotional distress, self-monitoring activities, cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, and family support/community resources. Two observers independently coded for the kind of self-care topics (kappa = 0.91) using the Atlas.ti software package. Results Encounters averaged 22.6 minutes (range: 5–47, SD = 8.9). We identified two encounter types based on EMR usage: low use (n = 13), with EMR use of two minutes or less, and moderate to high EMR use (n = 37), with EMR use of five minutes or more. Average time for encounters was 25 minutes for moderate to high EMR use encounters and 16 minutes for low EMR use encounters (t test, p < 0.001). Issues pertaining to facets of self-care management were discussed in every physician-patient interaction (100 percent). The most frequently discussed self-care topics were medication use (100 percent), physical distress (76 percent), and disease symptoms (76 percent). Self-monitoring activities, exercise, and diet were discussed in 62 percent, 60 percent, and 46 percent of the 50 encounters respectively. Emotional distress (26 percent), smoking (30 percent), family support

  2. Putting the Medical Library Online: Electronic Bulletin Boards. . . and Beyond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kittle, Paul W.

    1985-01-01

    Describes use of microcomputers with system called "TBBS" ("The Bread Board System") at Loma Linda University Medical Center to allow users enhanced services from home, whether library facilities are open or not. Flexibility and security, dialing into medical library, and suggestions for setting up similar computerized information centers are…

  3. Development of electronic progress tables for multidisciplinary medical education in a university.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Rie; Toyama, Hinako; Ishikawa, Toru; Eda, Tetsuya; Kuroda, Fumihiro; Saito, Keiichi

    2013-01-01

    In the education of medical professionals, imitation medical records and associated documents were developed as electronic teaching materials for students in order to teach collaboration among medical professionals such as nurses, therapists and medical social workers. The roles of each medical professional and the flow of clinical practice were taught using progress tables, including medical treatment, clinical examination, and the contents of care, so that the contents of medical examination were understood based on a time series. Students' understanding of the flow of medical practice was evaluated based on the amount of description in the table before and after explanation of the important points of the clinical process concerning each medical professional. The comments of students who received the lessons suggested that this approach was useful for understanding actual clinical practice and how to utilize a progress table and to prepare information. PMID:23920820

  4. Software engineering risk factors in the implementation of a small electronic medical record system: the problem of scalability.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Michael F; Starren, Justin B

    2002-01-01

    The successful implementation of clinical information systems is difficult. In examining the reasons and potential solutions for this problem, the medical informatics community may benefit from the lessons of a rich body of software engineering and management literature about the failure of software projects. Based on previous studies, we present a conceptual framework for understanding the risk factors associated with large-scale projects. However, the vast majority of existing literature is based on large, enterprise-wide systems, and it unclear whether those results may be scaled down and applied to smaller projects such as departmental medical information systems. To examine this issue, we discuss the case study of a delayed electronic medical record implementation project in a small specialty practice at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. While the factors contributing to the delay of this small project share some attributes with those found in larger organizations, there are important differences. The significance of these differences for groups implementing small medical information systems is discussed. PMID:12463804

  5. Shared Medical Appointments: A Portal for Nutrition and Culinary Education in Primary Care—A Pilot Feasibility Project

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Michelle E.; Burgess, Jonathan D.; Eisenberg, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Diseases linked to obesity such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, degenerative joint disease, gastroesophageal reflux, and sleep apnea constitute a large portion of primary care visits. Patients with these conditions often lack knowledge, skills, and support needed to maintain health. Shared medical appointments (SMAs) that include culinary skills and nutrition education offer a novel, cost-effective way to address these diseases in primary care. Methods: Adult patients in a primary care practice at a large academic hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, who had at least 1 cardiovascular risk factor were invited to participate in SMAs that included cooking demonstrations and teaching about nutrition in addition to medical management of their conditions. Sessions were conducted by a physician and an assistant in a conference room of a traditional primary care practice as part of a pilot feasibility project. Results: Seventy patients, contributing a total of 156 patient visits, attended 17 nutrition-focused SMAs over a 4-year period. Patients were surveyed after each visit and indicated that they enjoyed the SMAs, would consider alternating SMAs with traditional one-on-one visits, and would recommend SMAs to others. Half would pay out of pocket or a higher copay to attend SMAs. Financially, the practice broke even compared with traditional one-onone office visits. Conclusion: In this feasibility study, chronic disease SMAs conducted with a culinary/nutrition focus were feasible, cost-effective, and well received by patients. Follow-up studies are needed to evaluate short- and long-term outcomes of this SMA model on obesity-related diseases. PMID:26665019

  6. An Electronic Pillbox for Continuous Monitoring of Medication Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Tamara. L.; Hunt, John M.; Adami, Andre; Kaye, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed an instrumented pillbox, called a MedTracker, which allows monitoring of medication adherence on a continuous basis. This device improves on existing systems by providing mobility, frequent and automatic data collection, more detailed information about nonadherence and medication errors, and the familiar interface of a 7-day drug store pillbox. We report on the design of the MedTracker, and on the results of a field trial in 39 homes to evaluate the device. PMID:17946369

  7. A Strategy for Reusing the Data of Electronic Medical Record Systems for Clinical Research.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Yasushi; Hattori, Atsushi; Manabe, Shiro; Tsuda, Tsutomu; Takeda, Toshihiro; Okada, Katsuki; Murata, Taizo; Mihara, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    There is a great need to reuse data stored in electronic medical records (EMR) databases for clinical research. We previously reported the development of a system in which progress notes and case report forms (CRFs) were simultaneously recorded using a template in the EMR in order to exclude redundant data entry. To make the data collection process more efficient, we are developing a system in which the data originally stored in the EMR database can be populated within a frame in a template. We developed interface plugin modules that retrieve data from the databases of other EMR applications. A universal keyword written in a template master is converted to a local code using a data conversion table, then the objective data is retrieved from the corresponding database. The template element data, which are entered by a template, are stored in the template element database. To retrieve the data entered by other templates, the objective data is designated by the template element code with the template code, or by the concept code if it is written for the element. When the application systems in the EMR generate documents, they also generate a PDF file and a corresponding document profile XML, which includes important data, and send them to the document archive server and the data sharing saver, respectively. In the data sharing server, the data are represented by an item with an item code with a document class code and its value. By linking a concept code to an item identifier, an objective data can be retrieved by designating a concept code. We employed a flexible strategy in which a unique identifier for a hospital is initially attached to all of the data that the hospital generates. The identifier is secondarily linked with concept codes. The data that are not linked with a concept code can also be retrieved using the unique identifier of the hospital. This strategy makes it possible to reuse any of a hospital's data. PMID:27577391

  8. Validation of electronic medical record-based phenotyping algorithms: results and lessons learned from the eMERGE network

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Katherine M; Peissig, Peggy L; Kho, Abel Ngo; Bielinski, Suzette J; Berg, Richard L; Choudhary, Vidhu; Basford, Melissa; Chute, Christopher G; Kullo, Iftikhar J; Li, Rongling; Pacheco, Jennifer A; Rasmussen, Luke V; Spangler, Leslie; Denny, Joshua C

    2013-01-01

    Background Genetic studies require precise phenotype definitions, but electronic medical record (EMR) phenotype data are recorded inconsistently and in a variety of formats. Objective To present lessons learned about validation of EMR-based phenotypes from the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) studies. Materials and methods The eMERGE network created and validated 13 EMR-derived phenotype algorithms. Network sites are Group Health, Marshfield Clinic, Mayo Clinic, Northwestern University, and Vanderbilt University. Results By validating EMR-derived phenotypes we learned that: (1) multisite validation improves phenotype algorithm accuracy; (2) targets for validation should be carefully considered and defined; (3) specifying time frames for review of variables eases validation time and improves accuracy; (4) using repeated measures requires defining the relevant time period and specifying the most meaningful value to be studied; (5) patient movement in and out of the health plan (transience) can result in incomplete or fragmented data; (6) the review scope should be defined carefully; (7) particular care is required in combining EMR and research data; (8) medication data can be assessed using claims, medications dispensed, or medications prescribed; (9) algorithm development and validation work best as an iterative process; and (10) validation by content experts or structured chart review can provide accurate results. Conclusions Despite the diverse structure of the five EMRs of the eMERGE sites, we developed, validated, and successfully deployed 13 electronic phenotype algorithms. Validation is a worthwhile process that not only measures phenotype performance but also strengthens phenotype algorithm definitions and enhances their inter-institutional sharing. PMID:23531748

  9. Current status and trends in performance-based risk-sharing arrangements between healthcare payers and medical product manufacturers.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Josh J; Gries, Katharine S; Yeung, Kai; Sullivan, Sean D; Garrison, Louis P

    2014-06-01

    Our objective was to identify and characterize publicly available cases and related trends for performance-based risk-sharing arrangements (PBRSAs). We performed a review of PBRSAs over the past 20 years (1993-2013) using available databases and reports from colleagues and healthcare experts. These were categorized according to a previously published taxonomy of scheme types and assessed in terms of the underlying product and market attributes for each scheme. Macro-level trends were identified related to the timing of scheme adoption, countries involved, types of arrangements, and product and market factors. Our search yielded 148 arrangements. From this set, 65 arrangements included a coverage with an evidence development component, 20 included a conditional treatment continuation component, 54 included a performance-linked reimbursement component, and 42 included a financial utilization component. Each type of scheme addresses fundamental uncertainties that exist when products enter the market. The pace of adoption appears to be slowing, but new countries continue to implement PBRSAs. Over this 20-year period, there has been a consistent movement toward arrangements that minimize administrative burden. In conclusion, the pace of PBRSA adoption appears to be slowing but still has traction in many health systems. These remain a viable coverage and reimbursement mechanism for a wide range of medical products. The long-term viability and growth of these arrangements will rest in the ability of the parties to develop mutually beneficial arrangements that entail minimal administrative burden in their development and implementation. PMID:24664994

  10. The Affordable Care Act and the Burden of High Cost Sharing and Utilization Management Restrictions on Access to HIV Medications for People Living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Zamani-Hank, Yasamean

    2016-08-01

    The HIV/AIDS epidemic continues to be a critical public health issue in the United States, where an estimated 1.2 million individuals live with HIV infection. Viral suppression is one of the primary public health goals for People Living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). A crucial component of this goal involves adequate access to health care, specifically anti-retroviral HIV medications. The enactment of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in 2010 raised hopes for millions of PLWHA without access to health care coverage. High cost-sharing requirements enacted by health plans place a financial burden on PLWHA who need ongoing access to these life-saving medications. Plighted with poverty, Detroit, Michigan, is a center of attention for examining the financial burden of HIV medications on PLWHA under the new health plans. From November 2014 to January 2015, monthly out-of-pocket costs and medication utilization requirements for 31 HIV medications were examined for the top 12 insurance carriers offering Qualified Health Plans on Michigan's Health Insurance Marketplace Exchange. The percentage of medications requiring quantity limits and prior authorization were calculated. The average monthly out-of-pocket cost per person ranged from $12 to $667 per medication. Three insurance carriers placed all 31 HIV medications on the highest cost-sharing tier, charging 50% coinsurance. High out-of-pocket costs and medication utilization restrictions discourage PLWHA from enrolling in health plans and threaten interrupted medication adherence, drug resistance, and increased risk of viral transmission. Health plans inflicting high costs and medication restrictions violate provisions of the ACA and undermine health care quality for PLWHA. (Population Health Management 2016;19:272-278). PMID:26565514

  11. Medical Content Searching, Retrieving, and Sharing Over the Internet: Lessons Learned From the mEducator Through a Scenario-Based Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Spachos, Dimitris; Mylläri, Jarkko; Giordano, Daniela; Dafli, Eleni; Mitsopoulou, Evangelia; Schizas, Christos N; Pattichis, Constantinos; Nikolaidou, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background The mEducator Best Practice Network (BPN) implemented and extended standards and reference models in e-learning to develop innovative frameworks as well as solutions that enable specialized state-of-the-art medical educational content to be discovered, retrieved, shared, and re-purposed across European Institutions, targeting medical students, doctors, educators and health care professionals. Scenario-based evaluation for usability testing, complemented with data from online questionnaires and field notes of users’ performance, was designed and utilized for the evaluation of these solutions. Objective The objective of this work is twofold: (1) to describe one instantiation of the mEducator BPN solutions (mEducator3.0 - “MEdical Education LINnked Arena” MELINA+) with a focus on the metadata schema used, as well as on other aspects of the system that pertain to usability and acceptance, and (2) to present evaluation results on the suitability of the proposed metadata schema for searching, retrieving, and sharing of medical content and with respect to the overall usability and acceptance of the system from the target users. Methods A comprehensive evaluation methodology framework was developed and applied to four case studies, which were conducted in four different countries (ie, Greece, Cyprus, Bulgaria and Romania), with a total of 126 participants. In these case studies, scenarios referring to creating, sharing, and retrieving medical educational content using mEducator3.0 were used. The data were collected through two online questionnaires, consisting of 36 closed-ended questions and two open-ended questions that referred to mEducator 3.0 and through the use of field notes during scenario-based evaluations. Results The main findings of the study showed that even though the informational needs of the mEducator target groups were addressed to a satisfactory extent and the metadata schema supported content creation, sharing, and retrieval from an end

  12. The Emerging Role of Electronic Medical Records in Pharmacogenomics

    PubMed Central

    Wilke, RA; Xu, H; Denny, JC; Roden, DM; Krauss, RM; McCarty, CA; Davis, RL; Skaar, T; Lamba, J; Savova, G

    2011-01-01

    Healthcare information technology and genotyping technology are both advancing rapidly, creating new opportunities for medical and scientific discovery. The convergence of these two technologies is now facilitating genetic association studies of unprecedented size within the context of routine clinical care. As a result, the medical community will soon be presented with a number of novel opportunities to bring functional genomics to the bedside in the area of pharmacotherapy. By linking biological material to comprehensive medical records, large multi-institutional biobanks are now poised to advance the field of pharmacogenomics through three distinct mechanisms: (1) retrospective assessment of previously known findings in a clinical practice-based setting, (2) discovery of new associations in huge observational cohorts, and (3) prospective application in a setting capable of providing real-time decision support. The current review explores each of these translational mechanisms within an historical framework. PMID:21248726

  13. Views of Ethical Best Practices in Sharing Individual-Level Data From Medical and Public Health Research: A Systematic Scoping Review.

    PubMed

    Bull, Susan; Roberts, Nia; Parker, Michael

    2015-07-01

    There is increasing support for sharing individual-level data generated by medical and public health research. This scoping review of empirical research and conceptual literature examined stakeholders' perspectives of ethical best practices in data sharing, particularly in low- and middle-income settings. Sixty-nine empirical and conceptual articles were reviewed, of which, only five were empirical studies and eight were conceptual articles focusing on low- and middle-income settings. We conclude that support for sharing individual-level data is contingent on the development and implementation of international and local policies and processes to support ethical best practices. Further conceptual and empirical research is needed to ensure data sharing policies and processes in low- and middle-income settings are appropriately informed by stakeholders' perspectives. PMID:26297745

  14. Subdermal Flexible Solar Cell Arrays for Powering Medical Electronic Implants.

    PubMed

    Song, Kwangsun; Han, Jung Hyun; Lim, Taehoon; Kim, Namyun; Shin, Sungho; Kim, Juho; Choo, Hyuck; Jeong, Sungho; Kim, Yong-Chul; Wang, Zhong Lin; Lee, Jongho

    2016-07-01

    A subdermally implantable flexible photovoltatic (IPV) device is proposed for supplying sustainable electric power to in vivo medical implants. Electric properties of the implanted IPV device are characterized in live animal models. Feasibility of this strategy is demonstrated by operating a flexible pacemaker with the subdermal IPV device which generates DC electric power of ≈647 μW under the skin. PMID:27139339

  15. Organizational Learning and Large-Scale Change: Adoption of Electronic Medical Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chavis, Virginia D.

    2010-01-01

    Despite implementation of electronic medical record (EMR) systems in the United States and other countries, there is no organizational development model that addresses medical professionals' attitudes toward technology adoption in a learning organization. The purpose of this study was to assess whether a model would change those attitudes toward…

  16. Urban Alabama Physicians and the Electronic Medical Record: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiggle, Michele

    2012-01-01

    The electronic medical record (EMR) is an information technology tool supporting the examination, treatment, and care of a patient. The EMR allows physicians to view a patient's record showing current medications, a history of visits from health care providers with notes from those visits, a problem list, a functional status assessment, a…

  17. Factors Influencing Electronic Clinical Information Exchange in Small Medical Group Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kralewski, John E.; Zink, Therese; Boyle, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify the organizational factors that influence electronic health information exchange (HIE) by medical group practices in rural areas. Methods: A purposive sample of 8 small medical group practices in 3 experimental HIE regions were interviewed to determine the extent of clinical information exchange…

  18. Medical faculty's use of print and electronic journals: changes over time and in comparison with scientists

    PubMed Central

    Tenopir, Carol; King, Donald W.; Bush, Amy

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: The objectives are to determine how medical faculty members use scholarly journals, whether print or electronic journals are read more, whether there is a pattern among types of users, and what similarities and differences there are between the use of journals by medical faculty and faculty in other disciplines. Methods: Medical faculty of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC) multi-campus system were surveyed, and their responses estimated using critical incident technique to characterize the different aspects of their use of print and electronic journals. Results: Medical faculty read a great deal, especially compared to scientists. The most frequently reported principal purpose of reading is to support their primary research (30% of reading). The majority of reading comes from recently published articles, mostly from personal subscriptions. Medical faculty continue to rely on print journals (approximately 70% of readings) versus electronic journals. Age of faculty does not appear to influence the choice of print or electronic format. Medical faculty read more articles than others on average and need information digested and verified in a way to save them time. Convenience and currency are highly valued attributes. Conclusions: It can be asserted that librarians and publishers must find ways to provide the attributes of convenience and currency and match the portability of personal subscriptions in an electronic journal format for medical faculty. PMID:15098053

  19. Electronic Medical Record and Quality Ratings of Long Term Care Facilities Long-Term Care Facility Characteristics and Reasons and Barriers for Adoption of Electronic Medical Record

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Cheryl Andrea

    2013-01-01

    With the growing elderly population, compounded by the retirement of the babyboomers, the need for long-term care (LTC) facilities is expected to grow. An area of great concern for those that are seeking a home for their family member is the quality of care provided by the nursing home to the residents. Electronic medical records (EMR) are often…

  20. World Bank's Global Development Learning Network: Sharing Knowledge Electronically between Nations To "Fight Poverty."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorenzo, George

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Global Development Learning Network (GDLN), a satellite-driven global communication system developed by the World Bank to help developing countries fight poverty and share in a global exchange of information. Explains Distance Learning Centers that are used by private and public organizations and institutions for distance education…

  1. Electronic medication ordering with integrated drug database and clinical decision support system.

    PubMed

    Cufar, Andreja; Droljc, Anže; Orel, Andrej

    2012-01-01

    Medication errors have been identified as one of the most important causes of adverse drug events. Computerized physician order-entry (CPOE) systems, coupled with decision support (Medication allergy checking, drug interactions, and dose calculations), are considered to be appropriate solutions for reducing medication errors and standardizing care. It is quite useful if clinical information system (CIS) supports order sets, which help with standardizing care, preventing omission errors, and expediting the ordering process. Order sets are predefined groups of orders pertinent to one or more specific clinical conditions or diagnoses. The article describes how a clinical information system can be used to support medication process (prescribing, ordering, dispensing, administration and monitoring) and offer participating medical teams real time warnings and key information regarding medications and patient status, thus reducing medication errors. Integrated electronic prescribing support system benefits for total parenteral nutrition (TPN) are discussed at the end. PMID:22874280

  2. Trials and tribulations with electronic medication adherence monitoring in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Williams, Allison; Low, Jac Kee; Manias, Elizabeth; Dooley, Michael; Crawford, Kimberley

    2016-01-01

    Medication adherence in kidney transplantation is critical to prevent graft rejection. Testing interventions designed to support patients to take their prescribed medications following a kidney transplant require an accurate measure of medication adherence. In research, the available methods for measuring medication adherence include self-report, pill counts, prescription refill records, surrogate measures of medication adherence and medication bottles with a microchip-embedded cap to record bottle openings. Medication bottles with a microchip-embedded cap are currently regarded as the gold standard measure. This commentary outlines the challenges in measuring medication adherence using electronic medication monitoring of kidney transplant patients recruited from five sites. The challenges included obtaining unanimous stakeholder support for using this method, agreement on an index medication to measure, adequate preparation of the patient and training of pharmacy staff, and how to analyze data when periods of time were not recorded using the electronic adherence measure. Provision of this information will enable hospital and community pharmacists to implement approaches that promote the effective use of this adherence measure for optimal patient outcomes. PMID:26616159

  3. Effects of shared medical appointments on quality of life and cost-effectiveness for patients with a chronic neuromuscular disease. Study protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Shared medical appointments are a series of one-to-one doctor-patient contacts, in presence of a group of 6-10 fellow patients. This group visits substitute the annual control visits of patients with the neurologist. The same items attended to in a one-to- one appointment are addressed. The possible advantages of a shared medical appointment could be an added value to the present management of neuromuscular patients. The currently problem-focused one-to-one out-patient visits often leave little time for the patient's psychosocial needs, patient education, and patient empowerment. Methods/design A randomized, prospective controlled study (RCT) with a follow up of 6 months will be conducted to evaluate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of shared medical appointments compared to usual care for 300 neuromuscular patients and their partners at the Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center. Every included patient will be randomly allocated to one of the two study arms. This study has been reviewed and approved by the medical ethics committee of the region Arnhem-Nijmegen, the Netherlands. The primary outcome measure is quality of life as measured by the EQ-5D, SF-36 and the Individualized neuromuscular Quality of Life Questionnaire. The primary analysis will be an intention-to-treat analysis on the area under the curve of the quality of life scores. A linear mixed model will be used with random factor group and fixed factors treatment, baseline score and type of neuromuscular disease. For the economic evaluation an incremental cost-effectiveness analysis will be conducted from a societal perspective, relating differences in costs to difference in health outcome. Results are expected in 2012. Discussion This study will be the first randomized controlled trial which evaluates the effect of shared medical appointments versus usual care for neuromuscular patients. This will enable to determine if there is additional value of shared medical appointments to the

  4. University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences electronic health record and medical informatics training for undergraduate health professionals*

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Jan K; Newton, Bruce W; Boone, Steven E

    2010-01-01

    The University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) is planning interprofessional training in electronic health records (EHRs) and medical informatics. Training will be integrated throughout the curricula and will include seminars on broad concepts supplemented with online modules, didactic lectures, and hands-on experiences. Training will prepare future health professionals to use EHRs, evidence-based medicine, medical decision support, and point-of-care tools to reduce errors, improve standards of care, address Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act requirements and accreditation standards, and promote appropriate documentation to enable data retrieval for clinical research. UAMS will ensure that graduates are ready for the rapidly evolving practice environment created by the HITECH Act. PMID:20648253

  5. Electron-impact ionization of helium for equal-energy-sharing kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Stelbovics, A.T.; Bray, I.; Fursa, D.V.; Bartschat, K.

    2005-05-15

    The close-coupling approach to electron-helium single ionization is analyzed and several ways of defining the scattering amplitudes are determined, for both equal- and unequal-energy outgoing electrons. Nevertheless, the various definitions all lead to the same cross section. The convergent close-coupling (CCC) method with Laguerre (CCC-L) and box-based (CCC-B) target functions is applied to calculate electron-impact ionization of helium for the cases where the two outgoing electrons have equal energy. Excellent absolute agreement with experiment is obtained for all available cases of comparison.

  6. Why Does Electron Sharing Lead to Covalent Bonding? A Variational Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ruedenberg, K.; Schmidt, M.

    2006-07-20

    Ground state energy differences between related systems can be elucidated by a comparative variational analysis of the energy functional, in which the concepts of variational kinetic pressure and variational electrostatic potential pull are found useful. This approach is applied to the formation of the bond in the hydrogen molecule ion. A highly accurate wavefunction is shown to be the superposition of two quasiatomic orbitals, each of which consists to 94% of the respective atomic 1s orbital, the remaining 6% deformation being 73% spherical and 27% nonspherical in character. The spherical deformation can be recovered to 99.9% by scaling the 1s orbital. These results quantify the conceptual metamorphosis of the free-atom wavefunction into the molecular wavefunction by orbital sharing, orbital contraction, and orbital polarization. Starting with the 1s orbital on one atom as the initial trial function, the value of the energy functional of the molecule at the equilibrium distance is stepwise lowered along several sequences of wavefunction modifications, whose energies monotonically decrease to the ground state energy of H{sub 2}{sup +}. The contributions of sharing, contraction and polarization to the overall lowering of the energy functional and their kinetic and potential components exhibit a consistent pattern that can be related to the wavefunction changes on the basis of physical reasoning, including the virial theorem. It is found that orbital sharing lowers the variational kinetic energy pressure and that this is the essential cause of covalent bonding in this molecule.

  7. Why does electron sharing lead to covalent bonding? A variational analysis.

    PubMed

    Ruedenberg, Klaus; Schmidt, Michael W

    2007-01-15

    Ground state energy differences between related systems can be elucidated by a comparative variational analysis of the energy functional, in which the concepts of variational kinetic pressure and variational electrostatic potential pull are found useful. This approach is applied to the formation of the bond in the hydrogen molecule ion. A highly accurate wavefunction is shown to be the superposition of two quasiatomic orbitals, each of which consists to 94% of the respective atomic 1s orbital, the remaining 6% deformation being 73% spherical and 27% nonspherical in character. The spherical deformation can be recovered to 99.9% by scaling the 1s orbital. These results quantify the conceptual metamorphosis of the free-atom wavefunction into the molecular wavefunction by orbital sharing, orbital contraction, and orbital polarization. Starting with the 1s orbital on one atom as the initial trial function, the value of the energy functional of the molecule at the equilibrium distance is stepwise lowered along several sequences of wavefunction modifications, whose energies monotonically decrease to the ground state energy of H2+. The contributions of sharing, contraction and polarization to the overall lowering of the energy functional and their kinetic and potential components exhibit a consistent pattern that can be related to the wavefunction changes on the basis of physical reasoning, including the virial theorem. It is found that orbital sharing lowers the variational kinetic energy pressure and that this is the essential cause of covalent bonding in this molecule. PMID:17143869

  8. Physician Interaction with Electronic Medical Records: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noteboom, Cherie Bakker

    2010-01-01

    The integration of EHR (Electronic Health Records) in IT infrastructures supporting organizations enable improved access to and recording of patient data, enhanced ability to make better and more-timely decisions, and improved quality and reduced errors. Despite these benefits, there are mixed results as to the use of EHR. The literature suggests…

  9. Medical marijuana

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000899.htm Medical marijuana To use the sharing features on this page, ... have legalized marijuana for medical use. How Does Medical Marijuana Work? Medical marijuana may be: Smoked Vaporized Eaten ...

  10. Analysis of an electronic medication reconciliation and information at discharge programme for frail elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Moro Agud, Marta; Menéndez Colino, Rocío; Mauleón Ladrero, María Del Coro; Ruano Encinar, Margarita; Díez Sebastián, Jesús; Villamañán Bueno, Elena; Herrero Ambrosio, Alicia; González Montalvo, Juan Ignacio

    2016-08-01

    Background During care transitions, discrepancies and medication errors often occur, putting patients at risk, especially older patients with polypharmacy. Objective To assess the results of a medication reconciliation and information programme for discharge of geriatric patients conducted through hospital information systems. Setting A 1300-bed university hospital in Madrid, Spain. Method A prospective observational study. Geriatricians selected candidates for medication reconciliation at discharge, and sent an electronic inter-consultation request to the pharmacy department. Pharmacists reviewed the medication list, comparing it with electronic prescriptions, medication previously prescribed by primary care physicians and other medical records, and resolved any discrepancies. An individualized and tailored drug information at discharge sheet was sent to geriatricians and made available to primary care physicians. Main outcome measure The number and type of discrepancies, the number, type and severity of errors, and the main pharmacological groups involved. Results Medication reconciliation was performed for 118 patients with a mean age of 87 years (SD 5.9), involving a total of 2054 medications, or 17.4 per patient. Discrepancies were found in 723 (35 %) drugs, 105 of which were considered medication errors (15 %); 66 patients (56 %) had at least one error. This gave 0.9 reconciliation errors per patient reviewed and 1.6 per patient with errors. Of the 105 errors, 14 (13 %) were considered serious. The most frequent errors were incomplete prescriptions (40 %) and omissions (35 %). Conclusion An electronic medication reconciliation programme helps pharmacists detect serious medication errors in frail elderly patients and provides complete and up-to-date written information to prevent additional errors at home. PMID:27306652

  11. Surgeons' perspective of a newly initiated electronic medical record

    PubMed Central

    Harmon, Laura; Papaconstantinou, Harry T.

    2016-01-01

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act mandates “meaningful use” of an electronic health record (EHR) to receive current financial incentives and to avoid future financial penalties. Surgeons' ongoing adoption of an EHR nationally will be influenced by the early experiences of institutions that have made the transition from paper to electronic records. We conducted a survey to query surgeons at our institution regarding their perception of the EHR 3 months after institutional implementation. A total of 59 surveys were obtained from 24 senior staff and 35 residents. Results showed that surgeons believed the EHR was more effective as a billing tool than as a form of clinical documentation and believed the billing was more complete and accurate with the EHR. Surgeons also expressed concern that the EHR would negatively impact patient satisfaction, but in spite of this, they indicated that their personal quality of life was not negatively impacted. PMID:26722158

  12. Modulating Electron Sharing in Ion-π-Receptors via Substitution and External Electric Field: A Route toward Bond Strengthening.

    PubMed

    Novák, Martin; Foroutan-Nejad, Cina; Marek, Radek

    2016-08-01

    Substituted coronenes, a family of ion-π receptors whose ion-affinities can be explained exclusively neither via ion-quadrupole nor induction/polarization mechanisms, are studied. The best descriptors of ion-affinity among these species are those characterizing charge-transfer between ions and the π-systems, e.g. vertical ionization potential, electron affinity, and the relative energies of charge-transfer excited-states (CTESs). The variation of the electric multipole moments, polarizability, binding energy, and relative energy of CTESs in the presence of an external electric field (EEF) is evaluated. The results indicate that the EEF has a negligible effect on the polarizability and quadrupole moment of the systems. However, it significantly affects the binding energies, CTES energies, and the dipole moments of the receptors. Contrary to the changes in the dipole moment, the variation pattern of the binding energy is more consistent with the pattern observed for the CTES energy changes. Finally, by analyzing the exchange-correlation component of the binding energy we demonstrate that the increased binding energy, i.e. bond strengthening, originates from enhanced electron sharing and multicenter covalency between the ions and the π-systems as a result of the state-mixing between the ground-state and the CTESs. According to our findings, we hypothesize that the electron sharing and in extreme cases the multicenter covalency are the main driving forces for complexation of ions with extended π-receptors such as carbon nanostructures. PMID:27359252

  13. [Electronic medical records: medical and legal aspects, privacy, safety, and legal validity].

    PubMed

    Ravizza, P; Pasini, E

    2001-03-01

    Medical records must collect all data concerning in-hospital management of patients: data have to be verified and easily retrievable. Clinicians are responsible for both format and content of medical records. Respect of patient's privacy must be made sure both during on-line management and long-term storage of records. Computerization can offer many advantages to clinicians, but needs some significant adjustments: training and motivation of operators, arrangement of clinical processes and of administrative rules to technological developments. Nevertheless, some important results can be afforded: standardization of procedures, distribution of univocal, verified and ubiquitous data to all concerned operators, protection against undesired retrieval, reliability of effective reports. Preliminary condition is a clinical local area network, widespread into the institution. Database implementation must follow well accepted methodology: flow chart design of data dictionary, standardization of data coding, input of verified data, effective reporting. Access to data must be controlled by sophisticated and sure password system. Back-up of data must be automatically available with adequate timing and methodology. Respect of rules on patient's privacy must be realized whenever possible. Complex clinical records should be made available, containing data, signals and images (both single frames and dynamic sequences), due to continuous technical progress of diagnostic tools. Medical records must be available for long periods of time: database engine and managing tools must be selected among well accepted and largely available producers; informatic assistance must be assured for management and evolution of systems over the years. PMID:11307785

  14. Survey of electronic veterinary medical record adoption and use by independent small animal veterinary medical practices in Massachusetts

    PubMed Central

    Krone, Lauren M.; Brown, Catherine M.; Lindenmayer, Joann M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To estimate the proportion of independent small animal veterinary medical practices in Massachusetts that use electronic veterinary medical records (EVMRs), determine the purposes for which EVMRs are used, and identify perceived barriers to their use. Design Survey. Sample 100 veterinarians. Procedures 213 of 517 independent small animal veterinary practices operating in Massachusetts were randomly chosen for study recruitment. One veterinarian at each practice was invited by telephone to answer a hardcopy survey regarding practice demographics, medical records type (electronic, paper, or both), purposes of EVMR use, and perceived barriers to adoption. Surveys were mailed to the first 100 veterinarians who agreed to participate. Practices were categorized by record type and size (large [≥ 5 veterinarians], medium [3 to 4 veterinarians], or small [1 to 2 veterinarians]). Results 84 surveys were returned; overall response was 84 of 213 (39.4%). The EVMRs were used alone or together with paper records in 66 of 82 (80.5%) practices. Large and medium-sized practices were significantly more likely to use EVMRs combined with paper records than were small practices. The EVMRs were most commonly used for ensuring billing, automating reminders, providing cost estimates, scheduling, recording medical and surgical information, and tracking patient health. Least common uses were identifying emerging infectious diseases, research, and insurance. Eleven veterinarians in paper record–only practices indicated reluctance to change, anticipated technological problems, time constraints, and cost were barriers to EVMR use. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance Results indicated EVMRs were underutilized as a tool for tracking and improving population health and identifying emerging infectious diseases. Efforts to facilitate adoption of EVMRs for these purposes should be strengthened by the veterinary medical, human health, and public health professions. PMID:25029312

  15. Gaps in primary healthcare electronic medical record research and knowledge: findings of a pan-Canadian study.

    PubMed

    Terry, Amanda L; Stewart, Moira; Fortin, Martin; Wong, Sabrina T; Kennedy, Maureen; Burge, Fred; Birtwhistle, Richard; Grava-Gubins, Inese; Webster, Greg; Thind, Amardeep

    2014-01-01

    While the barriers to electronic medical record (EMR) adoption by physicians are well-known, we have much less knowledge about the broader challenges regarding EMR use faced by primary healthcare (PHC) EMR stakeholders in Canada. Therefore, we conducted interviews (from June 2009 to September 2010) and consultation sessions (in October and November 2009) with these stakeholders, as well as carrying out a research capacity assessment, to identify, describe and prioritize gaps in PHC EMR knowledge and research. Twelve thematic gaps emerged; four were identified as the most important: the need to ascertain the value of EMRs, the need to better understand elements of EMR implementation and adoption, the need to develop innovative data entry and extraction procedures, and a lack of agreement and understanding of data sharing. To advance EMR use, Canada needs to address these gaps; yet, we currently have a lack of research capacity with which to accomplish this. PMID:25410695

  16. Patient experiences with electronic medical records: Lessons learned

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Dale; Richter, Louiseann T; Kapustin, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To describe the lived experience of patients communicating with their nurse practitioners and physicians while using paper health records (PHRs) and electronic health records (EHRs) in the examination rooms. The significance of the study lies in the salience of communication between the patient and provider in promoting optimal clinical outcomes and the highest level of patient satisfaction. Data sources The study used a qualitative, phenomenological design. Audio-taped focus group interviews were conducted with 21 patients from a diabetes clinic in Baltimore, Maryland. Patients had visits with the provider before and after implementation of EHRs in the clinic. Conclusions The four themes that emerged from the three focus groups included communication issues, patient preferences for electronic records, safety and security concerns, and transition problems with implementation of EHRs. Implications for practice Potential benefits for nurse practitioners implementing the recommendations in this study include enhanced communication between patients and providers while using EHRs, increased patient satisfaction, higher levels of nurse practitioner and physician satisfaction, and avoidance of communication issues during implementation of EHR systems. PMID:25234112

  17. Inferring Clinical Workflow Efficiency via Electronic Medical Record Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, You; Xie, Wei; Gunter, Carl A; Liebovitz, David; Mehrotra, Sanjay; Zhang, He; Malin, Bradley

    2015-01-01

    Complexity in clinical workflows can lead to inefficiency in making diagnoses, ineffectiveness of treatment plans and uninformed management of healthcare organizations (HCOs). Traditional strategies to manage workflow complexity are based on measuring the gaps between workflows defined by HCO administrators and the actual processes followed by staff in the clinic. However, existing methods tend to neglect the influences of EMR systems on the utilization of workflows, which could be leveraged to optimize workflows facilitated through the EMR. In this paper, we introduce a framework to infer clinical workflows through the utilization of an EMR and show how such workflows roughly partition into four types according to their efficiency. Our framework infers workflows at several levels of granularity through data mining technologies. We study four months of EMR event logs from a large medical center, including 16,569 inpatient stays, and illustrate that over approximately 95% of workflows are efficient and that 80% of patients are on such workflows. At the same time, we show that the remaining 5% of workflows may be inefficient due to a variety of factors, such as complex patients. PMID:26958173

  18. Photon momentum sharing between an electron and an ion in photoionization: from one-photon (photoelectric effect) to multiphoton absorption.

    PubMed

    Chelkowski, Szczepan; Bandrauk, André D; Corkum, Paul B

    2014-12-31

    We investigate photon-momentum sharing between an electron and an ion following different photoionization regimes. We find very different partitioning of the photon momentum in one-photon ionization (the photoelectric effect) as compared to multiphoton processes. In the photoelectric effect, the electron acquires a momentum that is much greater than the single photon momentum ℏω/c [up to (8/5) ℏω/c] whereas in the strong-field ionization regime, the photoelectron only acquires the momentum corresponding to the photons absorbed above the field-free ionization threshold plus a momentum corresponding to a fraction (3/10) of the ionization potential Ip. In both cases, due to the smallness of the electron-ion mass ratio, the ion takes nearly the entire momentum of all absorbed N photons (via the electron-ion center of mass). Additionally, the ion takes, as a recoil, the photoelectron momentum resulting from mutual electron-ion interaction in the electromagnetic field. Consequently, the momentum partitioning of the photofragments is very different in both regimes. This suggests that there is a rich, unexplored physics to be studied between these two limits which can be generated with current ultrafast laser technology. PMID:25615323

  19. Injectable 3-D Fabrication of Medical Electronics at the Target Biological Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chao; Zhang, Jie; Li, Xiaokang; Yang, Xueyao; Li, Jingjing; Liu, Jing

    2013-12-01

    Conventional transplantable biomedical devices generally request sophisticated surgery which however often causes big trauma and serious pain to the patients. Here, we show an alternative way of directly making three-dimensional (3-D) medical electronics inside the biological body through sequential injections of biocompatible packaging material and liquid metal ink. As the most typical electronics, a variety of medical electrodes with different embedded structures were demonstrated to be easily formed at the target tissues. Conceptual in vitro experiments provide strong evidences for the excellent performances of the injectable electrodes. Further in vivo animal experiments disclosed that the formed electrode could serve as both highly efficient ECG (Electrocardiograph) electrode and stimulator electrode. These findings clarified the unique features and practicability of the liquid metal based injectable 3-D fabrication of medical electronics. The present strategy opens the way for directly manufacturing electrophysiological sensors or therapeutic devices in situ via a truly minimally invasive approach.

  20. Injectable 3-D Fabrication of Medical Electronics at the Target Biological Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Chao; Zhang, Jie; Li, Xiaokang; Yang, Xueyao; Li, Jingjing; Liu, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Conventional transplantable biomedical devices generally request sophisticated surgery which however often causes big trauma and serious pain to the patients. Here, we show an alternative way of directly making three-dimensional (3-D) medical electronics inside the biological body through sequential injections of biocompatible packaging material and liquid metal ink. As the most typical electronics, a variety of medical electrodes with different embedded structures were demonstrated to be easily formed at the target tissues. Conceptual in vitro experiments provide strong evidences for the excellent performances of the injectable electrodes. Further in vivo animal experiments disclosed that the formed electrode could serve as both highly efficient ECG (Electrocardiograph) electrode and stimulator electrode. These findings clarified the unique features and practicability of the liquid metal based injectable 3-D fabrication of medical electronics. The present strategy opens the way for directly manufacturing electrophysiological sensors or therapeutic devices in situ via a truly minimally invasive approach. PMID:24309385

  1. The role of frontline RNs in the selection of an electronic medical record business partner.

    PubMed

    Wilhoit, Kathryn; Mustain, Jane; King, Marjorie

    2006-01-01

    Frontline RNs knowledgeable in the strategic objectives of their organization made a difference in the selection of an electronic medical record business partner for a large, complex healthcare system. Their impact was significant because of the chief nurse executive's personal articulation of the organization's strategic goals and of her investment in their education. These factors provided the frontline RNs with a foundational base of knowledge about a variety of electronic medical record systems. The preparation and exposure enabled the frontline RNs to make a valuable contribution to the selection of an electronic medical record business partner. The RNs were a major force in affecting philosophical change from the organization's original pursuit of "best-of-breed" interfaced systems to a fully integrated, "best-of-class" vendor business partner. The learning experiences of the frontline RNs are explored to answer the following question: Why must frontline RNs play a key role in this process? PMID:16849913

  2. Hyperspherical partial-wave theory applied to electron-hydrogen-atom ionization calculation for equal-energy-sharing kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Das, J.N.; Paul, S.; Chakrabarti, K.

    2003-04-01

    Hyperspherical partial-wave theory has been applied here in a new way in the calculation of the triple differential cross sections for the ionization of hydrogen atoms by electron impact at low energies for various equal-energy-sharing kinematic conditions. The agreement of the cross section results with the recent absolute measurements of [J. Roeder, M. Baertschy, and I. Bray, Phys. Rev. A 45, 2951 (2002)] and with the latest theoretical results of the ECS and CCC calculations [J. Roeder, M. Baertschy, and I. Bray, Phys. Rev. A (to be published)] for different kinematic conditions at 17.6 eV is very encouraging. The other calculated results, for relatively higher energies, are also generally satisfactory, particularly for large {theta}{sub ab} geometries. In view of the present results, together with the fact that it is capable of describing unequal-energy-sharing kinematics [J. N. Das, J. Phys. B 35, 1165 (2002)], it may be said that the hyperspherical partial-wave theory is quite appropriate for the description of ionization events of electron-hydrogen-type systems. It is also clear that the present approach in the implementation of the hyperspherical partial-wave theory is very appropriate.

  3. Memorandum: "Cost Sharing" for the Dissemination of Government Information in Electronic Formats.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zagami, Anthony J.

    1991-01-01

    It is not legally permissible for depository libraries to impose user fees upon library patrons who want government information which is available in electronic format. Publishing federal agency is responsible for costs of furnishing access to the database, and Government Printing Office is obligated to pay the costs of conveying that information…

  4. User Preferences in the Classification of Electronic Bookmarks: Implications for a Shared System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottlieb, Lisa; Dilevko, Juris

    2001-01-01

    Using the financial industry as a context, this study addresses the issue of the classification of electronic bookmarks in a multi-user system by investigating the factors that influence how individuals develop categories for bookmarks and how they choose to classify bookmarks within those organizational categories. Sample participant…

  5. Design and implementation of web-based mobile electronic medication administration record.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Sung-Huai; Hou, I-Ching; Cheng, Po-Hsun; Tan, Ching-Ting; Shen, Po-Chao; Hsu, Kai-Ping; Hsieh, Sheau-Ling; Lai, Feipei

    2010-10-01

    Patients' safety is the most essential, critical issue, however, errors can hardly prevent, especially for human faults. In order to reduce the errors caused by human, we construct Electronic Health Records (EHR) in the Health Information System (HIS) to facilitate patients' safety and to improve the quality of medical care. During the medical care processing, all the tasks are based upon physicians' orders. In National Taiwan University Hospital (NTUH), the Electronic Health Record committee proposed a standard of order flows. There are objectives of the standard: first, to enhance medical procedures and enforce hospital policies; secondly, to improve the quality of medical care; third, to collect sufficient, adequate data for EHR in the near future. Among the proposed procedures, NTUH decides to establish a web-based mobile electronic medication administration record (ME-MAR) system. The system, build based on the service-oriented architecture (SOA) as well as embedded the HL7/XML standard, is installed in the Mobile Nursing Carts. It also implement accompany with the advanced techniques like Asynchronous JavaScript and XML (Ajax) or Web services to enhance the system usability. According to researches, it indicates that medication errors are highly proportion to total medical faults. Therefore, we expect the ME-MAR system can reduce medication errors. In addition, we evaluate ME-MAR can assist nurses or healthcare practitioners to administer, manage medication properly. This successful experience of developing the NTUH ME-MAR system can be easily applied to other related system. Meanwhile, the SOA architecture of the system can also be seamless integrated to NTUH or other HIS system. PMID:20703613

  6. Neurophysiological analytics for all! Free open-source software tools for documenting, analyzing, visualizing, and sharing using electronic notebooks.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, David M; Horn, Charles C

    2016-08-01

    Neurophysiology requires an extensive workflow of information analysis routines, which often includes incompatible proprietary software, introducing limitations based on financial costs, transfer of data between platforms, and the ability to share. An ecosystem of free open-source software exists to fill these gaps, including thousands of analysis and plotting packages written in Python and R, which can be implemented in a sharable and reproducible format, such as the Jupyter electronic notebook. This tool chain can largely replace current routines by importing data, producing analyses, and generating publication-quality graphics. An electronic notebook like Jupyter allows these analyses, along with documentation of procedures, to display locally or remotely in an internet browser, which can be saved as an HTML, PDF, or other file format for sharing with team members and the scientific community. The present report illustrates these methods using data from electrophysiological recordings of the musk shrew vagus-a model system to investigate gut-brain communication, for example, in cancer chemotherapy-induced emesis. We show methods for spike sorting (including statistical validation), spike train analysis, and analysis of compound action potentials in notebooks. Raw data and code are available from notebooks in data supplements or from an executable online version, which replicates all analyses without installing software-an implementation of reproducible research. This demonstrates the promise of combining disparate analyses into one platform, along with the ease of sharing this work. In an age of diverse, high-throughput computational workflows, this methodology can increase efficiency, transparency, and the collaborative potential of neurophysiological research. PMID:27098025

  7. Extracting Cancer Quality Indicators from Electronic Medical Records: Evaluation of an Ontology-Based Virtual Medical Record Approach

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wei-Nchih; Tu, Samson W.; Das, Amar K.

    2009-01-01

    Measuring quality in clinical care is a time-consuming manual task. The vast amounts of clinical data collected through electronic medical records (EMRs) create an opportunity to develop tools that automatically assess quality indicators; however, the diversity of EMR implementations limits the ability to implement general, reusable methods. We evaluate an ontology-based virtual medical record (VMR) approach as a standardized, sharable methodology for defining data abstractions needed for quality of care assessment. Using a set of cancer quality indicators, we conducted a requirements analysis for modeling these abstractions with an OWL-based VMR. We found that the VMR approach needs to be extended to support population-based aggregations of clinical events, models of intended versus completed actions, and models of workflow and delivery systems. Incorporating the patient perspective on quality also requires additional extension of the VMR. We are using these results to create a virtual quality record based on EMR data. PMID:20351878

  8. Workflow and Electronic Health Records in Small Medical Practices

    PubMed Central

    Ramaiah, Mala; Subrahmanian, Eswaran; Sriram, Ram D; Lide, Bettijoyce B

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes the workflow and implementation of electronic health record (EHR) systems across different functions in small physician offices. We characterize the differences in the offices based on the levels of computerization in terms of workflow, sources of time delay, and barriers to using EHR systems to support the entire workflow. The study was based on a combination of questionnaires, interviews, in situ observations, and data collection efforts. This study was not intended to be a full-scale time-and-motion study with precise measurements but was intended to provide an overview of the potential sources of delays while performing office tasks. The study follows an interpretive model of case studies rather than a large-sample statistical survey of practices. To identify time-consuming tasks, workflow maps were created based on the aggregated data from the offices. The results from the study show that specialty physicians are more favorable toward adopting EHR systems than primary care physicians are. The barriers to adoption of EHR systems by primary care physicians can be attributed to the complex workflows that exist in primary care physician offices, leading to nonstandardized workflow structures and practices. Also, primary care physicians would benefit more from EHR systems if the systems could interact with external entities. PMID:22737096

  9. Risk factors for medication errors in the electronic and manual prescription 1

    PubMed Central

    Volpe, Cris Renata Grou; de Melo, Eveline Maria Magalhães; de Aguiar, Lucas Barbosa; Pinho, Diana Lúcia Moura; Stival, Marina Morato

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to compare electronic and manual prescriptions of a public hospital of Brasilia, identifying risk factors for the occurrence of medication errors. Method: descriptive-exploratory, comparative and retrospective study. Data collection occurred from July 2012 to January 2013, using an instrument for the review of the information contained in medical records related to the medication process. A total of 190 manual and 199 electronic records composed the sample, with 2027 prescriptions each. Results: compared to the manual prescription, a significant reduction was observed in the risk factors after implantation of the electronic prescription, in items such as "lack of the form of dilution" (71.1% to 22.3%) and "prescription with brand name" (99.5% to 31.5%). Conversely, the risk factors "no check" and "lack of CRM of the prescriber" increased. The lack of the allergy registration and the occurrences related to medication were the same for both groups. Conclusion: generally, the use of the electronic prescription system was associated with a significant reduction in risk factors for medication errors, concerning the following aspects: illegibility, prescription with brand name and presence of essential items that provide a safe and effective prescription. PMID:27508913

  10. The evolution of office notes and the electronic medical record: The CAPS note.

    PubMed

    Styron, Joseph F; Evans, Peter J

    2016-07-01

    The advent of the electronic medical record (EMR) combined with an expansion of information required by medicolegal and billing departments has transformed the progress note from a succinct note into an often unwieldy data-dump unable to concisely convey the physician's medical reasoning. We describe a new note format--CAPS, which stands for concern, assessment, plan, and supporting data--to streamline the communication of the patient's problem, the practitioner's assessment and plan, and the medical reasoning to support the plan. PMID:27399867

  11. Architecture of portable electronic medical records system integrated with streaming media.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Shih, Chien-Chou

    2012-02-01

    Due to increasing occurrence of accidents and illness during business trips, travel, or overseas studies, the requirement for portable EMR (Electronic Medical Records) has increased. This study proposes integrating streaming media technology into the EMR system to facilitate referrals, contracted laboratories, and disease notification among hospitals. The current study encoded static and dynamic medical images of patients into a streaming video format and stored them in a Flash Media Server (FMS). Based on the Taiwan Electronic Medical Record Template (TMT) standard, EMR records can be converted into XML documents and used to integrate description fields with embedded streaming videos. This investigation implemented a web-based portable EMR interchanging system using streaming media techniques to expedite exchanging medical image information among hospitals. The proposed architecture of the portable EMR retrieval system not only provides local hospital users the ability to acquire EMR text files from a previous hospital, but also helps access static and dynamic medical images as reference for clinical diagnosis and treatment. The proposed method protects property rights of medical images through information security mechanisms of the Medical Record Interchange Service Center and Health Certificate Authorization to facilitate proper, efficient, and continuous treatment of patients. PMID:20703752

  12. Fast Model Adaptation for Automated Section Classification in Electronic Medical Records.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jian; Delaney, Brian; Florian, Radu

    2015-01-01

    Medical information extraction is the automatic extraction of structured information from electronic medical records, where such information can be used for improving healthcare processes and medical decision making. In this paper, we study one important medical information extraction task called section classification. The objective of section classification is to automatically identify sections in a medical document and classify them into one of the pre-defined section types. Training section classification models typically requires large amounts of human labeled training data to achieve high accuracy. Annotating institution-specific data, however, can be both expensive and time-consuming; which poses a big hurdle for adapting a section classification model to new medical institutions. In this paper, we apply two advanced machine learning techniques, active learning and distant supervision, to reduce annotation cost and achieve fast model adaptation for automated section classification in electronic medical records. Our experiment results show that active learning reduces the annotation cost and time by more than 50%, and distant supervision can achieve good model accuracy using weakly labeled training data only. PMID:26262005

  13. Health Information Technology: Meaningful Use and Next Steps to Improving Electronic Facilitation of Medication Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Granger, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of health information technology (HIT) may improve medication adherence, but challenges for implementation remain. Objective The aim of this paper is to review the current state of HIT as it relates to medication adherence programs, acknowledge the potential barriers in light of current legislation, and provide recommendations to improve ongoing medication adherence strategies through the use of HIT. Methods We describe four potential HIT barriers that may impact interoperability and subsequent medication adherence. Legislation in the United States has incentivized the use of HIT to facilitate and enhance medication adherence. The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) was recently adopted and establishes federal standards for the so-called "meaningful use" of certified electronic health record (EHR) technology that can directly impact medication adherence. Results The four persistent HIT barriers to medication adherence include (1) underdevelopment of data reciprocity across clinical, community, and home settings, limiting the capture of data necessary for clinical care; (2) inconsistent data definitions and lack of harmonization of patient-focused data standards, making existing data difficult to use for patient-centered outcomes research; (3) inability to effectively use the national drug code information from the various electronic health record and claims datasets for adherence purposes; and (4) lack of data capture for medication management interventions, such as medication management therapy (MTM) in the EHR. Potential recommendations to address these issues are discussed. Conclusion To make meaningful, high quality data accessible, and subsequently improve medication adherence, these challenges will need to be addressed to fully reach the potential of HIT in impacting one of our largest public health issues. PMID:26980270

  14. Application of Traditional and Nanostructure Materials for Medical Electron Beams Collimation: Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloichikova, I. A.; Stuchebrov, S. G.; Zhaksybayeva, G. K.; Wagner, A. R.

    2015-11-01

    Nowadays, the commercial application of the electron accelerators grows in the industry, in the research investigations, in the medical diagnosis and treatment. In this regard, the electron beam profile modification in accordance with specific purposes is an actual task. In this paper the model of the TPU microtron extracted electron beam developed in the program “Computer Laboratory (PCLab)” is described. The internal beam divergence influence for the electron beam profile and depth dose distribution in the air is considered. The possibility of using the nanostructure materials for the electron beam formation was analyzed. The simulation data of the electron beam shape collimated by different materials (lead, corund- zirconia nanoceramic, gypsum) are shown. The collimator material influence for the electron beam profile and shape are analyzed.

  15. Pharmacological Prophylaxis for Venous Thromboembolism Among Hospitalized Patients With Acute Medical Illness: An Electronic Medical Records Study.

    PubMed

    Rosenman, Marc; Liu, Xianchen; Phatak, Hemant; Qi, Rong; Teal, Evgenia; Nisi, Daniel; Liu, Larry Z; Ramacciotti, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Patients hospitalized with acute medical illness have an elevated risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). American College of Chest Physicians guidelines list various chronic illnesses, sepsis, advanced age, history of VTE, and immobility as risk factors and recommend prophylactic anticoagulation using fondaparinux, low-molecular weight heparin, or low-dose unfractionated heparin. The objectives of this study were to examine pharmacological prophylaxis against VTE among hospitalized medically ill patients and to assess demographic and clinical correlates related to VTE prophylaxis. A retrospective (1999-2010) electronic medical records study included patients aged 40 years and older hospitalized for at least 3 days, with significant medical illness or with a VTE hospitalization 30-365 days before admission. Each patient's first qualifying hospitalization was analyzed. Exclusions were if VTE treatment was started within 1 day of admission, or if warfarin (and not heparin or enoxaparin) was used. Prophylaxis was defined if the first inpatient dose of subcutaneous heparin or enoxaparin was at prophylaxis levels (lower than treatment levels). Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine factors associated with VTE prophylaxis. Among 12,980 patients, 22.1% received prophylaxis (11.8% with enoxaparin, 10.3% with heparin). VTE prophylaxis was positively associated with year of hospitalization, subcutaneous heparin in the month before admission, aspirin, self-pay status, age, and sepsis. VTE prophylaxis was negatively associated with smoking, alcohol, warfarin in the past 30 days, and primary diagnoses of stroke, infectious disease, or inflammatory bowel disease. Pharmacological VTE prophylaxis has increased significantly over the past 12 years but is still largely underused in patients hospitalized with acute medical illness. Multiple demographic, behavioral, and clinical factors are associated with inpatient VTE prophylaxis. PMID:26720163

  16. Integrating Client and Clinician Perspectives on Psychotropic Medication Decisions: Developing a Communication-Centered Epistemic Model of Shared Decision Making for Mental Health Contexts.

    PubMed

    Mikesell, Lisa; Bromley, Elizabeth; Young, Alexander S; Vona, Pamela; Zima, Bonnie

    2016-06-01

    Shared decision making (SDM) interventions aim to improve client autonomy, information sharing, and collaborative decision making, yet implementation of these interventions has been variably perceived. Using interviews and focus groups with clients and clinicians from mental health clinics, we explored experiences with and perceptions about decision support strategies aimed to promote SDM around psychotropic medication treatment. Using thematic analysis, we identified themes regarding beliefs about participant involvement, information management, and participants' broader understanding of their epistemic expertise. Clients and clinicians highly valued client-centered priorities such as autonomy and empowerment when making decisions. However, two frequently discussed themes revealed complex beliefs about what that involvement should look like in practice: (a) the role of communication and information exchange and (b) the value and stability of clinician and client epistemic expertise. Complex beliefs regarding these two themes suggested a dynamic and reflexive approach to information management. Situating these findings within the Theory of Motivated Information Management, we discuss implications for conceptualizing SDM in mental health services and adapt Siminoff and Step's Communication Model of Shared Decision Making (CMSDM) to propose a Communication-centered Epistemic Model of Shared Decision Making (CEM-SDM). PMID:26529605

  17. Electronic Documentation Support Tools and Text Duplication in the Electronic Medical Record

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wrenn, Jesse

    2010-01-01

    In order to ease the burden of electronic note entry on physicians, electronic documentation support tools have been developed to assist in note authoring. There is little evidence of the effects of these tools on attributes of clinical documentation, including document quality. Furthermore, the resultant abundance of duplicated text and…

  18. SynapticDB, effective web-based management and sharing of data from serial section electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Shi, Bitao; Bourne, Jennifer; Harris, Kristen M

    2011-03-01

    Serial section electron microscopy (ssEM) is rapidly expanding as a primary tool to investigate synaptic circuitry and plasticity. The ultrastructural images collected through ssEM are content rich and their comprehensive analysis is beyond the capacity of an individual laboratory. Hence, sharing ultrastructural data is becoming crucial to visualize, analyze, and discover the structural basis of synaptic circuitry and function in the brain. We devised a web-based management system called SynapticDB (http://synapses.clm.utexas.edu/synapticdb/) that catalogues, extracts, analyzes, and shares experimental data from ssEM. The management strategy involves a library with check-in, checkout and experimental tracking mechanisms. We developed a series of spreadsheet templates (MS Excel, Open Office spreadsheet, etc) that guide users in methods of data collection, structural identification, and quantitative analysis through ssEM. SynapticDB provides flexible access to complete templates, or to individual columns with instructional headers that can be selected to create user-defined templates. New templates can also be generated and uploaded. Research progress is tracked via experimental note management and dynamic PDF forms that allow new investigators to follow standard protocols and experienced researchers to expand the range of data collected and shared. The combined use of templates and tracking notes ensures that the supporting experimental information is populated into the database and associated with the appropriate ssEM images and analyses. We anticipate that SynapticDB will serve future meta-analyses towards new discoveries about the composition and circuitry of neurons and glia, and new understanding about structural plasticity during development, behavior, learning, memory, and neuropathology. PMID:21181305

  19. Electronic Medical Records Adoption and Usage among Osteopathic Physicians in New York State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Jon I.

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology reported a slow rate of adoption of electronic medical records. The present research sought to explore possible reasons for this situation by examining factors that distinguished between users and nonusers of electronic…

  20. Evolution of Medication Administration Workflow in Implementing Electronic Health Record System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Yuan-Han

    2013-01-01

    This study focused on the clinical workflow evolutions when implementing the health information technology (HIT). The study especially emphasized on administrating medication when the electronic health record (EHR) systems were adopted at rural healthcare facilities. Mixed-mode research methods, such as survey, observation, and focus group, were…

  1. Developing a Systematic Architecture Approach for Designing an Enhanced Electronic Medical Record (EEMR) System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldukheil, Maher A.

    2013-01-01

    The Healthcare industry is characterized by its complexity in delivering care to the patients. Accordingly, healthcare organizations adopt and implement Information Technology (IT) solutions to manage complexity, improve quality of care, and transform to a fully integrated and digitized environment. Electronic Medical Records (EMR), which is…

  2. Organizational Leader Sensemaking in Healthcare Process Changes: The Development of the Electronic Medical Records Expectation Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riesenmy, Kelly Rouse

    2011-01-01

    Physicians play a unique role in the adoption of electronic medical records (EMR) within the healthcare organization. As leaders, they are responsible for setting the standards for this new technology within their sphere of influence while concurrently being required to learn and integrate EMR into their own workflow and process as the recipients…

  3. An Evaluation of Authentic Learning in an Electronic Medical Records System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Sandra L.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined participants' perceptions of the effectiveness of a new job-training program designed to enhance the authentic learning in adult learners using an electronic medical records system at a naval health clinic. This job-training program lacked data about participants' perceptions of this learning process by which to gauge its…

  4. Health Care Professionals' Perceptions of the Use of Electronic Medical Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adeyeye, Adebisi

    2015-01-01

    Electronic medical record (EMR) use has improved significantly in health care organizations. However, many barriers and factors influence the success of EMR implementation and adoption. The purpose of the descriptive qualitative single-case study was to explore health care professionals' perceptions of the use of EMRs at a hospital division of a…

  5. Are In-Bed Electronic Weights Recorded in the Medical Record Accurate?

    PubMed

    Gerl, Heather; Miko, Alexandra; Nelson, Mandy; Godaire, Lori

    2016-01-01

    This study found large discrepancies between in-bed weights recorded in the medical record and carefully obtained standing weights with a calibrated, electronic bedside scale. This discrepancy appears to be related to inadequate bed calibration before patient admission and having excessive linen, clothing, and/or equipment on the bed during weighing by caregivers. PMID:27522846

  6. Novel multi-beam X-ray source for vacuum electronics enabled medical imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neculaes, V. Bogdan

    2013-10-01

    For almost 100 of years, commercial medical X-ray applications have relied heavily on X-ray tube architectures based on the vacuum electronics design developed by William Coolidge at the beginning of the twentieth century. Typically, the Coolidge design employs one hot tungsten filament as the electron source; the output of the tube is one X-ray beam. This X-ray source architecture is the state of the art in today's commercial medical imaging applications, such as Computed Tomography. Recently, GE Global Research has demonstrated the most dramatic extension of the Coolidge vacuum tube design for Computed Tomography (CT) in almost a century: a multi-beam X-ray source containing thirty two cathodes emitting up to 1000 mA, in a cathode grounded - anode at potential architecture (anode up to 140 kV). This talk will present the challenges of the X-ray multi-beam vacuum source design - space charge electron gun design, beam focusing to compression ratios needed in CT medical imaging applications (image resolution is critically dependent on how well the electron beam is focused in vacuum X-ray tubes), electron emitter choice to fit the aggressive beam current requirements, novel electronics for beam control and focusing, high voltage and vacuum solutions, as well as vacuum chamber design to sustain the considerable G forces typically encountered on a CT gantry (an X-ray vacuum tube typically rotates on the CT gantry at less than 0.5 s per revolution). Consideration will be given to various electron emitter technologies available for this application - tungsten emitters, dispenser cathodes and carbon nano tubes (CNT) - and their tradeoffs. The medical benefits potentially enabled by this unique vacuum multi-beam X-ray source are: X-ray dose reduction, reduction of image artifacts and improved image resolution. This work was funded in part by NIH grant R01EB006837.

  7. Compliance with an oral asthma medication: a pilot study using an electronic monitoring device.

    PubMed

    Chung, K F; Naya, I

    2000-09-01

    Compliance with prescribed asthma medication is commonly estimated from tablet counts for oral medications and canister weights for inhaled medications. Recently, electronic medication monitoring devices, developed to evaluate numerical compliance as well as drug use patterns, were used to assess compliance with inhaled steroids and beta2-agonists. This was the first study to electronically assess compliance with an oral asthma medication. Fifty-seven asthmatic patients, stable on inhaled beta2-agonists only with a mean FEV1 of 77% predicted (+/- 13%, SD) began 12 weeks of treatment with zafirlukast 20 mg twice daily. The monitoring device, an electronic TrackCap, recorded the date and time on each occasion that patients removed and replaced their medication bottle caps. Patients were told that compliance would be assessed as part of the study, but patients were not told about the specifics of the TrackCap. Compliance was defined: 1. as the number of TrackCap events per number of prescribed tablets; and 2. as the difference between number of tablets dispensed and number returned per number prescribed. Adherence was defined as the number of days with two TrackCap events at least 8 h apart per the total number of days' dosing. Forty-seven patients completed the study with a median compliance of 89% (mean. 80%) and a median adherence of 71% (mean, 64%) as measured by TrackCap events. Compliance as estimated from return-tablet count was slightly higher (median, 92%). High rates of compliance were maintained throughout the trial. These results show that compliance with and adherence to a treatment of an oral, twice-daily, maintenance asthma medication, such as zafirlukast, is high. PMID:11001076

  8. Transforming XML-based electronic patient records for use in medical case based reasoning systems.

    PubMed

    Abidi, S S; Manickam, S

    2000-01-01

    Electronic patient records (EPR) can be regarded as an implicit source of clinical behaviour and problem-solving knowledge, systematically compiled by clinicians. We present an approach, together with its computational implementation, to pro-actively transform XML-based EPR into specialised Clinical Cases (CC) in the realm of Medical Case Base Systems. The 'correct' transformation of EPR to CC involves structural, terminological and conceptual standardisation, which is achieved by a confluence of techniques and resources, such as XML, UMLS (meta-thesaurus) and medical knowledge ontologies. We present below the functional architecture of a Medical Case-Base Reasoning Info-Structure (MCRIS) that features two distinct, yet related, functionalities: (1) a generic medical case-based reasoning system for decision-support activities; and (2) an EPR-CC transformation system to transform typical EPR's to CC. PMID:11187645

  9. A SWOT Analysis of the Various Backup Scenarios Used in Electronic Medical Record Systems

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hwa Jeong; Kim, Hye Hyeon

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Electronic medical records (EMRs) are increasingly being used by health care services. Currently, if an EMR shutdown occurs, even for a moment, patient safety and care can be seriously impacted. Our goal was to determine the methodology needed to develop an effective and reliable EMR backup system. Methods Our "independent backup system by medical organizations" paradigm implies that individual medical organizations develop their own EMR backup systems within their organizations. A "personal independent backup system" is defined as an individual privately managing his/her own medical records, whereas in a "central backup system by the government" the government controls all the data. A "central backup system by private enterprises" implies that individual companies retain control over their own data. A "cooperative backup system among medical organizations" refers to a networked system established through mutual agreement. The "backup system based on mutual trust between an individual and an organization" means that the medical information backup system at the organizational level is established through mutual trust. Results Through the use of SWOT analysis it can be shown that cooperative backup among medical organizations is possible to be established through a network composed of various medical agencies and that it can be managed systematically. An owner of medical information only grants data access to the specific person who gave the authorization for backup based on the mutual trust between an individual and an organization. Conclusions By employing SWOT analysis, we concluded that a linkage among medical organizations or between an individual and an organization can provide an efficient backup system. PMID:22084811

  10. Memory Accessibility and Medical Decision-Making for Significant Others: The Role of Socially Shared Retrieval-Induced Forgetting

    PubMed Central

    Coman, Dora; Coman, Alin; Hirst, William

    2013-01-01

    Medical decisions will often entail a broad search for relevant information. No sources alone may offer a complete picture, and many may be selective in their presentation. This selectivity may induce forgetting for previously learned material, thereby adversely affecting medical decision-making. In the study phase of two experiments, participants learned information about a fictitious disease and advantages and disadvantages of four treatment options. In the subsequent practice phase, they read a pamphlet selectively presenting either relevant (Experiment 1) or irrelevant (Experiment 2) advantages or disadvantages. A final cued recall followed and, in Experiment 2, a decision as to the best treatment for a patient. Not only did reading the pamphlet induce forgetting for related and unmentioned information, the induced forgetting adversely affected decision-making. The research provides a cautionary note about the risks of searching through selectively presented information when making a medical decision. PMID:23785320

  11. ChRIS--A web-based neuroimaging and informatics system for collecting, organizing, processing, visualizing and sharing of medical data.

    PubMed

    Pienaar, Rudolph; Rannou, Nicolas; Bernal, Jorge; Hahn, Daniel; Grant, P Ellen

    2015-01-01

    The utility of web browsers for general purpose computing, long anticipated, is only now coming into fruition. In this paper we present a web-based medical image data and information management software platform called ChRIS ([Boston] Children's Research Integration System). ChRIS' deep functionality allows for easy retrieval of medical image data from resources typically found in hospitals, organizes and presents information in a modern feed-like interface, provides access to a growing library of plugins that process these data - typically on a connected High Performance Compute Cluster, allows for easy data sharing between users and instances of ChRIS and provides powerful 3D visualization and real time collaboration. PMID:26736236

  12. Using a medical simulation center as an electronic health record usability laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Landman, Adam B; Redden, Lisa; Neri, Pamela; Poole, Stephen; Horsky, Jan; Raja, Ali S; Pozner, Charles N; Schiff, Gordon; Poon, Eric G

    2014-01-01

    Usability testing is increasingly being recognized as a way to increase the usability and safety of health information technology (HIT). Medical simulation centers can serve as testing environments for HIT usability studies. We integrated the quality assurance version of our emergency department (ED) electronic health record (EHR) into our medical simulation center and piloted a clinical care scenario in which emergency medicine resident physicians evaluated a simulated ED patient and documented electronically using the ED EHR. Meticulous planning and close collaboration with expert simulation staff was important for designing test scenarios, pilot testing, and running the sessions. Similarly, working with information systems teams was important for integration of the EHR. Electronic tools are needed to facilitate entry of fictitious clinical results while the simulation scenario is unfolding. EHRs can be successfully integrated into existing simulation centers, which may provide realistic environments for usability testing, training, and evaluation of human–computer interactions. PMID:24249778

  13. Shared Agency and Collaboration between the Family and Professionals in Medical Rehabilitation of Children with Severe Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvikoski, Aila; Martin, Marjatta; Autti-Ramo, Ilona; Harkapaa, Kristiina

    2013-01-01

    Implementation of medical rehabilitation for children with severe disabilities, arranged by the Social Insurance Institution of Finland, is based on collaboration of the family with several professionals and organizations providing the necessary services. Therefore, it sets special challenges for service provision. Parents' experiences of…

  14. Technology Transfer: Learning from Lost Opportunities and Sharing Best Practices--Experiences at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, USA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vari, Sandor G.; Laur, James D.

    2006-01-01

    One significant aspect of Cedars-Sinai Medical Center's charitable mission is to ensure that its research results benefit society at large. This is accomplished through researcher education, securing appropriate intellectual property protection and licensing so that inventions are developed into useful products. The Swan-Ganz and Barath balloon…

  15. Assessment of the Need to Integrate Academic Electronic Medical Records Into the Undergraduate Clinical Practicum: A Focus Group Interview.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mona; Park, Joon Ho; Lee, Hyeong Suk

    2016-06-01

    As healthcare systems demand that nurses be competent in using electronic medical records for patient care, the integration of electronic medical records into nursing curricula has become necessary. The purpose of this study was to explore how students, new nurses, clinical instructors, and faculty perceive the integration of academic electronic medical records into the undergraduate clinical practicum. From January to February 2014, four focus group interviews with 18 participants were conducted based on purposive sampling. Content analysis was used on the unabridged transcripts to extract themes and develop meaningful categories. Three major themes and eight subthemes were revealed from the focus group interviews. The major themes were "electronic medical record as a learning tool for clinical practicum," "essential functions of academic electronic medical records," and "expected outcomes of academic electronic medical record." Participants expected academic electronic medical records to enhance students' nursing informatics competencies. The findings of this study can inform the process of developing academic electronic medical records for clinical practicum, which will then augment students' informatics competencies. PMID:27081757

  16. The Determination of a Technical Core Curriculum for a Two Year Technical Program in Bio-Medical Electronics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, William G., Sr.

    The major concerns of this study were to determine the extent of need for bio-medical electronic technicians and to determine what would constitute a functional technical core curriculum for training to fill that need. Following a review of medical and electronic literature, a survey instrument was developed and sent to hospitals, manufacturers,…

  17. Healthcare Reimbursement and Quality Improvement: Integration Using the Electronic Medical Record

    PubMed Central

    Britton, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Reimbursement for healthcare has utilized a variety of payment mechanisms with varying degrees of effectiveness. Whether these mechanisms are used singly or in combination, it is imperative that the resulting systems remunerate on the basis of the quantity, complexity, and quality of care provided. Expanding the role of the electronic medical record (EMR) to monitor provider practice, patient responsiveness, and functioning of the healthcare organization has the potential to not only enhance the accuracy and efficiency of reimbursement mechanisms but also to improve the quality of medical care. PMID:26340397

  18. Library use and information-seeking behavior of veterinary medical students revisited in the electronic environment.

    PubMed Central

    Pelzer, N L; Wiese, W H; Leysen, J M

    1998-01-01

    Veterinary medical students at Iowa State University were surveyed in January of 1997 to determine their general use of the Veterinary Medical Library and how they sought information in an electronic environment. Comparisons were made between this study and one conducted a decade ago to determine the effect of the growth in electronic resources on student library use and information-seeking behavior. The basic patterns of student activities in the library, resources used to find current information, and resources anticipated for future education needs remained unchanged. The 1997 students used the library most frequently for photocopying, office supplies, and studying coursework; they preferred textbooks and handouts as sources of current information. However, when these students went beyond textbooks and handouts to seek current information, a major shift was seen from the use of print indexes and abstracts in 1987 towards the use of computerized indexes and other electronic resources in 1997. Almost 60% of the students reported using the Internet for locating current information. Overall use of electronic materials was highest among a group of students receiving the problem-based learning method of instruction. Most of the students surveyed in 1997 indicated that electronic resources would have some degree of importance to them for future education needs. The electronic environment has provided new opportunities for information professionals to help prepare future veterinarians, some of whom will be practicing in remote geographical locations, to access the wealth of information and services available on the Internet and Web. PMID:9681170

  19. A survey of the use of electronic scientific information resources among medical and dental students

    PubMed Central

    Romanov, Kalle; Aarnio, Matti

    2006-01-01

    Background To evaluate medical and dental students' utilization of electronic information resources. Methods A web survey sent to 837 students (49.9% responded). Results Twenty-four per cent of medical students and ninteen per cent of dental students searched MEDLINE 2+ times/month for study purposes, and thiry-two per cent and twenty-four per cent respectively for research. Full-text articles were used 2+ times/month by thirty-three per cent of medical and ten per cent of dental students. Twelve per cent of respondents never utilized either MEDLINE or full-text articles. In multivariate models, the information-searching skills among students were significantly associated with use of MEDLINE and full-text articles. Conclusion Use of electronic resources differs among students. Forty percent were non-users of full-text articles. Information-searching skills are correlated with the use of electronic resources, but the level of basic PC skills plays not a major role in using these resources. The student data shows that adequate training in information-searching skills will increase the use of electronic information resources. PMID:16684347

  20. The Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) Network: past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    Gottesman, Omri; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Tromp, Gerard; Faucett, W. Andrew; Li, Rongling; Manolio, Teri A.; Sanderson, Saskia C.; Kannry, Joseph; Zinberg, Randi; Basford, Melissa A.; Brilliant, Murray; Carey, David J.; Chisholm, Rex L.; Chute, Christopher G.; Connolly, John J.; Crosslin, David; Denny, Joshua C.; Gallego, Carlos J.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Harley, John; Jarvik, Gail P.; Kohane, Isaac; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Larson, Eric B.; McCarty, Catherine; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Roden, Dan M.; Smith, Maureen E.; Böttinger, Erwin P.; Williams, Marc S.

    2013-01-01

    The Electronic Medical Records and Genomics Network is a National Human Genome Research Institute–funded consortium engaged in the development of methods and best practices for using the electronic medical record as a tool for genomic research. Now in its sixth year and second funding cycle, and comprising nine research groups and a coordinating center, the network has played a major role in validating the concept that clinical data derived from electronic medical records can be used successfully for genomic research. Current work is advancing knowledge in multiple disciplines at the intersection of genomics and health-care informatics, particularly for electronic phenotyping, genome-wide association studies, genomic medicine implementation, and the ethical and regulatory issues associated with genomics research and returning results to study participants. Here, we describe the evolution, accomplishments, opportunities, and challenges of the network from its inception as a five-group consortium focused on genotype–phenotype associations for genomic discovery to its current form as a nine-group consortium pivoting toward the implementation of genomic medicine. Genet Med 15 10, 761–771. PMID:23743551

  1. A practical procedure to prevent electromagnetic interference with electronic medical equipment.

    PubMed

    Hanada, Eisuke; Takano, Kyoko; Antoku, Yasuaki; Matsumura, Kouji; Watanabe, Yoshiaki; Nose, Yoshiaki

    2002-02-01

    Problems involving electromagnetic interference (EMI) with electronic medical equipment are well-documented. However, no systematic investigation of EMI has been done. We have systematically investigated the causes of EMI. The factors involved in EMI were determined as follows: 1) Electric-field intensity induced by invasive radio waves from outside a hospital. 2) Residual magnetic-flux density at welding points in a building. 3) Electric-field intensity induced by conveyance systems with a linear motor. 4) The shielding capacity of hospital walls. 5) The shielding capacity of commercial shields against a wide range frequency radio waves. 6) The immunity of electronic medical equipment. 7) EMI by cellular telephone and personal handy-phone system handsets. From the results of our investigation, we developed a following practical procedure to prevent EMI. 1) Measurement of electric-field intensity induced by invasive radio waves from outside the hospital and industrial systems in the hospital. 2) Measurement of residual magnetic-flux density at electric welding points of hospital buildings with steel frame structures. 3) Control of the electromagnetic environment by utilizing the shielding capacity of walls. 4) Measurement of the immunity of electronic medical equipment. And 5) Installation of electronic gate equipment at the building entrance to screen for handsets. PMID:11777312

  2. The Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) Network: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Gottesman, Omri; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Tromp, Gerard; Faucett, W Andrew; Li, Rongling; Manolio, Teri A; Sanderson, Saskia C; Kannry, Joseph; Zinberg, Randi; Basford, Melissa A; Brilliant, Murray; Carey, David J; Chisholm, Rex L; Chute, Christopher G; Connolly, John J; Crosslin, David; Denny, Joshua C; Gallego, Carlos J; Haines, Jonathan L; Hakonarson, Hakon; Harley, John; Jarvik, Gail P; Kohane, Isaac; Kullo, Iftikhar J; Larson, Eric B; McCarty, Catherine; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Roden, Dan M; Smith, Maureen E; Böttinger, Erwin P; Williams, Marc S

    2013-10-01

    The Electronic Medical Records and Genomics Network is a National Human Genome Research Institute-funded consortium engaged in the development of methods and best practices for using the electronic medical record as a tool for genomic research. Now in its sixth year and second funding cycle, and comprising nine research groups and a coordinating center, the network has played a major role in validating the concept that clinical data derived from electronic medical records can be used successfully for genomic research. Current work is advancing knowledge in multiple disciplines at the intersection of genomics and health-care informatics, particularly for electronic phenotyping, genome-wide association studies, genomic medicine implementation, and the ethical and regulatory issues associated with genomics research and returning results to study participants. Here, we describe the evolution, accomplishments, opportunities, and challenges of the network from its inception as a five-group consortium focused on genotype-phenotype associations for genomic discovery to its current form as a nine-group consortium pivoting toward the implementation of genomic medicine. PMID:23743551

  3. A study of general practitioners’ perspectives on electronic medical records systems in NHSScotland

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Primary care doctors in NHSScotland have been using electronic medical records within their practices routinely for many years. The Scottish Health Executive eHealth strategy (2008-2011) has recently brought radical changes to the primary care computing landscape in Scotland: an information system (GPASS) which was provided free-of-charge by NHSScotland to a majority of GP practices has now been replaced by systems provided by two approved commercial providers. The transition to new electronic medical records had to be completed nationally across all health-boards by March 2012. Methods We carried out 25 in-depth semi-structured interviews with primary care doctors to elucidate GPs’ perspectives on their practice information systems and collect more general information on management processes in the patient surgical pathway in NHSScotland. We undertook a thematic analysis of interviewees’ responses, using Normalisation Process Theory as the underpinning conceptual framework. Results The majority of GPs’ interviewed considered that electronic medical records are an integral and essential element of their work during the consultation, playing a key role in facilitating integrated and continuity of care for patients and making clinical information more accessible. However, GPs expressed a number of reservations about various system functionalities – for example: in relation to usability, system navigation and information visualisation. Conclusion Our study highlights that while electronic information systems are perceived as having important benefits, there remains substantial scope to improve GPs’ interaction and overall satisfaction with these systems. Iterative user-centred improvements combined with additional training in the use of technology would promote an increased understanding, familiarity and command of the range of functionalities of electronic medical records among primary care doctors. PMID:23688255

  4. Implementation of a Cloud-Based Electronic Medical Record to Reduce Gaps in the HIV Treatment Continuum in Rural Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Haskew, John; Rø, Gunnar; Turner, Kenrick; Kimanga, Davies; Sirengo, Martin; Sharif, Shahnaaz

    2015-01-01

    Background Electronic medical record (EMR) systems are increasingly being adopted to support the delivery of health care in developing countries and their implementation can help to strengthen pathways of care and close gaps in the HIV treatment cascade by improving access to and use of data to inform clinical and public health decision-making. Methods This study implemented a novel cloud-based electronic medical record system in an HIV outpatient setting in Western Kenya and evaluated its impact on reducing gaps in the HIV treatment continuum including missing data and patient eligibility for ART. The impact of the system was assessed using a two-sample test of proportions pre- and post-implementation of EMR-based data verification and clinical decision support. Results Significant improvements in data quality and provision of clinical care were recorded through implementation of the EMR system, helping to ensure patients who are eligible for HIV treatment receive it early. A total of 2,169 and 764 patient records had missing data pre-implementation and post-implementation of EMR-based data verification and clinical decision support respectively. A total of 1,346 patients were eligible for ART, but not yet started on ART, pre-implementation compared to 270 patients pre-implementation. Conclusion EMR-based data verification and clinical decision support can reduce gaps in HIV care, including missing data and eligibility for ART. A cloud-based model of EMR implementation removes the need for local clinic infrastructure and has the potential to enhance data sharing at different levels of health care to inform clinical and public health decision-making. A number of issues, including data management and patient confidentiality, must be considered but significant improvements in data quality and provision of clinical care are recorded through implementation of this EMR model. PMID:26252212

  5. Development of a clinical information tool for the electronic medical record: a case study*

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Barbara A; Wessel, Charles B; Yarger, Frances; LaDue, John; Fiorillo, Anthony B

    2010-01-01

    Question: What is the process of developing a clinical information tool to be embedded in the electronic health record of a very large and diverse academic medical center? Setting: The development took place at the University of Pittsburgh Health Sciences Library System. Method: The clinical information tool developed is a search box with subject tabs to provide quick access to designated full-text information resources. Each subject tab offers a federated search of a different pool of resources. Search results are organized “on the fly” into meaningful categories using clustering technology and are directly accessible from the results page. Results: After more than a year of discussion and planning, a clinical information tool was embedded in the academic medical center's electronic health record. Conclusion: The library successfully developed a clinical information tool, called Clinical-e, for use at the point of care. Future development will refine the tool and evaluate its impact and effectiveness. PMID:20648256

  6. The urban underserved: Attitudes toward gaining full access to electronic medical records

    PubMed Central

    Dhanireddy, Shireesha; Walker, Jan; Reisch, Lisa; Oster, Natalia; Delbanco, Thomas; Elmore, Joann

    2012-01-01

    Background As the use of electronic medical records (EMRs) spreads, health care organizations are increasingly offering patients online access to their medical records. Studies evaluating patient attitudes toward viewing elements of their records through secure, electronic patient portals have generally not included medically underserved patients or those with HIV/AIDS. The goal of this study was to gain insight into such patients’ attitudes toward online access to their medical records, including their doctors’ visit notes. Methods Qualitative study of four focus groups with adult patients in general adult medicine and HIV clinics at a large county hospital. Transcripts were analyzed for themes using an immersion/crystallization approach. Results Patients’ baseline understanding of the health record was limited. Perceived benefits of online access were improved patient understanding of health and disease, convenience, empowerment, and a stronger relationship with their provider. Concerns included threats to privacy, worries about being unable to understand their record, fear that the computer would replace direct provider contact, and hesitancy about potential demands on a provider’s time. Patients also recommended providing online visit reminders, links to credible health information, and assistance for paying bills. Conclusion Despite their initial lack of knowledge of the health record, focus group participants were overwhelmingly positive about the prospect of online access to medical records. However, they worried about potential loss of privacy and interference with the patient-provider relationship. As EMRs increasingly offer patients open access to their medical records, vulnerable patient groups will likely join others in desiring and adopting such change, but may need targeted support during times of transition. PMID:22738155

  7. Two-photon double ionization of helium: Evolution of the joint angular distribution with photon energy and two-electron energy sharing

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Zheng; Peng Liangyou; Xu Minghui; Gong Qihuang; Starace, Anthony F.; Morishita, Toru

    2011-10-15

    Ab initio calculations of two-photon double ionization of helium with photon energies varying from the nonsequential regime to well above the double-ionization threshold are presented. A systematic study of the joint angular distributions of the two ionized electrons at different energy sharing shows that the role of electron correlations is imprinted in the joint angular distribution. In particular, a rather general pattern is identified in the nonsequential regime that is independent of photon energy, pulse length, and energy sharing between the two electrons. Interestingly, the same distribution pattern is found for the equal-energy-sharing case, even when the photon energy is well above the double-ionization threshold. In the case of an extremely uneven energy sharing, the distribution pattern changes drastically as the photon energy is increased. In particular, when the photon energy is greater than the second-ionization threshold, the dominant emission mode of the two electrons switches gradually from ''back to back'' to ''side by side.'' Finally, the joint angular distribution is found to provide clear evidence of the role of electron correlations in the initial state.

  8. Evaluation of Electromagnetic Fields in a Hospital for Safe Use of Electronic Medical Equipment.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Kai; Fujioka, Tomomi; Endo, Tetsuo; Hosokawa, Ren; Fujisaki, Tetsushi; Yoshino, Ryoji; Hirose, Minoru

    2016-03-01

    Establishment of electromagnetic compatibility is important in use of electronic medical equipment in hospitals. To evaluate the electromagnetic environment, the electric field intensity induced by electromagnetic radiation in broadcasting spectra coming from outside the hospital was measured in a new hospital building before any patients visited the hospital and 6 months after the opening of the hospital. Various incoming radio waves were detected on the upper floors, with no significant difference in measured levels before and after opening of the hospital. There were no cellphone terminal signals before the hospital opened, but these signals were strongly detected at 6 months thereafter. Cellphone base stations signals were strongly detected on the upper floors, but there were no signals at most locations in the basement and in the center of the building on the lower floors. A maximum electrical intensity of 0.28 V/m from cellphone base stations (2.1 GHz) was detected at the south end of the 2nd floor before the hospital opened. This value is lower than the EMC marginal value for general electronic medical equipment specified in IEC 60601-1-2 (3 V/m). Therefore, electromagnetic interference with electronic medical equipment is unlikely in this situation. However, cellphone terminal signals were frequently detected in non-base station signal areas. This is a concern, and understanding signal strength from cellphone base stations at a hospital is important for promotion of greater safety. PMID:26643076

  9. Characterization of patients who suffer asthma exacerbations using data extracted from electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Himes, Blanca E; Kohane, Isaac S; Ramoni, Marco F; Weiss, Scott T

    2008-01-01

    The increasing availability of electronic medical records offers opportunities to better characterize patient populations and create predictive tools to individualize health care. We determined which asthma patients suffer exacerbations using data extracted from electronic medical records of the Partners Healthcare System using Natural Language Processing tools from the "Informatics for Integrating Biology to the Bedside" center (i2b2). Univariable and multivariable analysis of data for 11,356 patients (1,394 cases, 9,962 controls) found that race, BMI, smoking history, and age at initial observation are predictors of asthma exacerbations. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) corresponding to prediction of exacerbations in an independent group of 1,436 asthma patients (106 cases, 1,330 controls) is 0.67. Our findings are consistent with previous characterizations of asthma patients in epidemiological studies, and demonstrate that data extracted by natural language processing from electronic medical records is suitable for the characterization of patient populations. PMID:18999057

  10. 76 FR 65133 - Sharing Information Between the Department of Veterans Affairs and the Department of Defense

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-20

    ... condition. In contrast, having a fully developed medical record will ensure that VA and DoD clinicians avoid... allergy data and for the electronic sharing of order entry and results retrieval of chemistry,...

  11. A pragmatic method for electronic medical record-based observational studies: developing an electronic medical records retrieval system for clinical research

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Keiichi; Sumi, Eriko; Yamazaki, Toru; Asai, Keita; Yamori, Masashi; Teramukai, Satoshi; Bessho, Kazuhisa; Yokode, Masayuki; Fukushima, Masanori

    2012-01-01

    Objective The use of electronic medical record (EMR) data is necessary to improve clinical research efficiency. However, it is not easy to identify patients who meet research eligibility criteria and collect the necessary information from EMRs because the data collection process must integrate various techniques, including the development of a data warehouse and translation of eligibility criteria into computable criteria. This research aimed to demonstrate an electronic medical records retrieval system (ERS) and an example of a hospital-based cohort study that identified both patients and exposure with an ERS. We also evaluated the feasibility and usefulness of the method. Design The system was developed and evaluated. Participants In total, 800 000 cases of clinical information stored in EMRs at our hospital were used. Primary and secondary outcome measures The feasibility and usefulness of the ERS, the method to convert text from eligible criteria to computable criteria, and a confirmation method to increase research data accuracy. Results To comprehensively and efficiently collect information from patients participating in clinical research, we developed an ERS. To create the ERS database, we designed a multidimensional data model optimised for patient identification. We also devised practical methods to translate narrative eligibility criteria into computable parameters. We applied the system to an actual hospital-based cohort study performed at our hospital and converted the test results into computable criteria. Based on this information, we identified eligible patients and extracted data necessary for confirmation by our investigators and for statistical analyses with our ERS. Conclusions We propose a pragmatic methodology to identify patients from EMRs who meet clinical research eligibility criteria. Our ERS allowed for the efficient collection of information on the eligibility of a given patient, reduced the labour required from the investigators and

  12. Information partnerships--shared data, shared scale.

    PubMed

    Konsynski, B R; McFarlan, F W

    1990-01-01

    How can one company gain access to another's resources or customers without merging ownership, management, or plotting a takeover? The answer is found in new information partnerships, enabling diverse companies to develop strategic coalitions through the sharing of data. The key to cooperation is a quantum improvement in the hardware and software supporting relational databases: new computer speeds, cheaper mass-storage devices, the proliferation of fiber-optic networks, and networking architectures. Information partnerships mean that companies can distribute the technological and financial exposure that comes with huge investments. For the customer's part, partnerships inevitably lead to greater simplification on the desktop and more common standards around which vendors have to compete. The most common types of partnership are: joint marketing partnerships, such as American Airline's award of frequent flyer miles to customers who use Citibank's credit card; intraindustry partnerships, such as the insurance value-added network service (which links insurance and casualty companies to independent agents); customer-supplier partnerships, such as Baxter Healthcare's electronic channel to hospitals for medical and other equipment; and IT vendor-driven partnerships, exemplified by ESAB (a European welding supplies and equipment company), whose expansion strategy was premised on a technology platform offered by an IT vendor. Partnerships that succeed have shared vision at the top, reciprocal skills in information technology, concrete plans for an early success, persistence in the development of usable information for all partners, coordination on business policy, and a new and imaginative business architecture. PMID:10107083

  13. Characterization of a nuclear compartment shared by nuclear bodies applying ectopic protein expression and correlative light and electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, Karsten; Reichenzeller, Michaela; Goerisch, Sabine M.; Schmidt, Ute; Scheuermann, Markus O.; Herrmann, Harald; Lichter, Peter . E-mail: m.macleod@dkfz.de

    2005-02-01

    To investigate the accessibility of interphase nuclei for nuclear body-sized particles, we analyzed in cultured cells from human origin by correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy (EM) the bundle-formation of Xenopus-vimentin targeted to the nucleus via a nuclear localization signal (NLS). Moreover, we investigated the spatial relationship of speckles, Cajal bodies, and crystalline particles formed by Mx1 fused to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), with respect to these bundle arrays. At 37 deg C, the nucleus-targeted, temperature-sensitive Xenopus vimentin was deposited in focal accumulations. Upon shift to 28 deg C, polymerization was induced and filament arrays became visible. Within 2 h after temperature shift, arrays were found to be composed of filaments loosely embedded in the nucleoplasm. The filaments were restricted to limited areas of the nucleus between focal accumulations. Upon incubation at 28 deg C for several hours, NLS vimentin filaments formed bundles looping throughout the nuclei. Speckles and Cajal bodies frequently localized in direct neighborhood to vimentin bundles. Similarly, small crystalline particles formed by YFP-tagged Mx1 also located next to vimentin bundles. Taking into account that nuclear targeted vimentin locates in the interchromosomal domain (ICD), we conclude that nuclear body-sized particles share a common nuclear space which is controlled by higher order chromatin organization.

  14. Identifying patients with medically unexplained physical symptoms in electronic medical records in primary care: a validation study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background When medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS) become persistent, it may have major implications for the patient, the general practitioner (GP) and for society. Early identification of patients with MUPS in electronic medical records (EMRs) might contribute to prevention of persistent MUPS by creating awareness among GPs and providing an opportunity to start stepped care management. However, procedures for identification of patients with MUPS in EMRs are not well established yet. In this validation study we explore the test characteristics of an EMR screening method to identify patients with MUPS. Methods The EMR screening method consists of three steps. First, all patients ≥18 years were included when they had five or more contacts in the last 12 months. Second, patients with known chronic conditions were excluded. Finally, patients were included with a MUPS syndrome or when they had three or more complaints suggestive for MUPS. We compared the results of the EMR screening method with scores on the Patient Health Questionnaire-15 (PHQ-15), which we used as reference test. We calculated test characteristics for various cut-off points. Results From the 1223 patients in our dataset who completed the PHQ-15, 609 (49/8%) scored ≥5 on the PHQ-15. The EMR screening method detected 131/1223 (10.7%) as patients with MUPS. Of those, 102 (77.9%) scored ≥5 on the PHQ-15 and 53 (40.5%) scored ≥10. When compared with the PHQ-15 cut-off point ≥10, sensitivity and specificity were 0.30 and 0.93 and positive and negative predictive values were 0.40 and 0.89, respectively. Conclusions The EMR screening method to identify patients with MUPS has a high specificity. However, many potential MUPS patients will be missed. Before using this method as a screening instrument for selecting patients who might benefit from structured care, its sensitivity needs to be improved while maintaining its specificity. PMID:24903850

  15. Patients' satisfaction with primary heath care in kuwait after electronic medical record implementation.

    PubMed

    Al-Azmi, Saadoun F; Mohammed, Aida M; Hanafi, Manal I

    2006-01-01

    This study aimed at assessing the level of patients' satisfaction with primary heath care services after implementation of the electronic medical record system (EMR). Also, to explore the relationship of some participants' characteristics with satisfaction which are of importance in planning, managing and evaluation. A descriptive cross-sectional approach was adopted. Ten primary health care centers (out of total 78) related to the five health regions in Kuwait were randomly selected. A random sample of 200 people (at age of 18 years and above) attending the two-shift periods of the chosen centers were included. Through an exit interview, a well trained investigator interviewed them about their satisfaction with the primary heath care services provided after implementation of electronic medical record system. A structured questionnaire for measuring satisfaction was used. The response rate was 93.02% of whom 47.5% were males and 52.5% were females. The mean overall satisfaction percent score as reported by subjects was 85.6% (SD 4.9). There were statistically significant associations between mean percent satisfaction score of the participants and their age, level of education visiting the center at morning shift, and waiting less than 10 minutes before the examination. The vast majority of participants indicated that overall service at the center had greatly improved after EMR implementation. The system also helped in improvement of the physician performance, arrangement of patient's turn, dispense medication from pharmacy, written guidance of medication, accuracy and easiness of follow up for health status, time spent to retrieve medical record and that for receiving medication. However, it didn't achieve much improvement in physician selection or waiting time. The majority of interviewees (96.5%) were totally satisfied with the overall quality of service at the center, location of the center (96.5%), hours when the center is open (96.5%), thoroughness of

  16. Enhanced Identification of Eligibility for Depression Research Using an Electronic Medical Record Search Engine

    PubMed Central

    Seyfried, Lisa; Hanauer, David; Nease, Donald; Albeiruti, Rashad; Kavanagh, Janet; Kales, Helen C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Electronic medical records (EMR) have become part of daily practice for many physicians. Attempts have been made to apply electronic search engine technology to speed EMR review. This was a prospective, observational study to compare the speed and accuracy of electronic search engine vs. manual review of the EMR. Methods Three raters reviewed 49 cases in the EMR to screen for eligibility in a depression study using the electronic search engine (EMERSE). One week later raters received a scrambled set of the same patients including 9 distractor cases, and used manual EMR review to determine eligibility. For both methods, accuracy was assessed for the original 49 cases by comparison with a gold standard rater. Results Use of EMERSE resulted in considerable time savings; chart reviews using EMERSE were significantly faster than traditional manual review (p=0.03). The percent agreement of raters with the gold standard (e.g. concurrent validity) using either EMERSE or manual review was not significantly different. Conclusions Using a search engine optimized for finding clinical information in the free-text sections of the EMR can provide significant time savings while preserving reliability. The major power of this search engine is not from a more advanced and sophisticated search algorithm, but rather from a user interface designed explicitly to help users search the entire medical record in a way that protects health information. PMID:19560962

  17. An electronic health record driven algorithm to identify incident antidepressant medication users

    PubMed Central

    Bobo, William V; Pathak, Jyotishman; Kremers, Hilal Maradit; Yawn, Barbara P; Brue, Scott M; Stoppel, Cynthia J; Croarkin, Paul E; St Sauver, Jennifer; Frye, Mark A; Rocca, Walter A

    2014-01-01

    Objective We validated an algorithm designed to identify new or prevalent users of antidepressant medications via population-based drug prescription records. Patients and methods We obtained population-based drug prescription records for the entire Olmsted County, Minnesota, population from 2011 to 2012 (N=149 629) using the existing electronic medical records linkage infrastructure of the Rochester Epidemiology Project (REP). We selected electronically a random sample of 200 new antidepressant users stratified by age and sex. The algorithm required the exclusion of antidepressant use in the 6 months preceding the date of the first qualifying antidepressant prescription (index date). Medical records were manually reviewed and adjudicated to calculate the positive predictive value (PPV). We also manually reviewed the records of a random sample of 200 antihistamine users who did not meet the case definition of new antidepressant user to estimate the negative predictive value (NPV). Results 161 of the 198 subjects electronically identified as new antidepressant users were confirmed by manual record review (PPV 81.3%). Restricting the definition of new users to subjects who were prescribed typical starting doses of each agent for treating major depression in non-geriatric adults resulted in an increase in the PPV (90.9%). Extending the time windows with no antidepressant use preceding the index date resulted in only modest increases in PPV. The manual abstraction of medical records of 200 antihistamine users yielded an NPV of 98.5%. Conclusions Our study confirms that REP prescription records can be used to identify prevalent and incident users of antidepressants in the Olmsted County, Minnesota, population. PMID:24780720

  18. Study of the sharing/purchasing method of providing radiation therapy services at Dwight David Eisenhower Medical Center, Fort Gordon, Georgia. Master's thesis, July 1981-August 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, C.H.

    1982-08-01

    In 1982 Dwight David Eisenhower Army Medical Center (DDEAMC) was providing radiation therapy support to authorized beneficiaries by referral to a local civilian proprietary firm. This was financed by supplemental care funds for active duty personnel and through CHAMPUS for other authorized beneficiaries. The establishment of an in-house radiation therapy center at DDEAMC was being considered when Congress directed the Department of Defense to implement a program to test the sharing of specialized services. This study devises a methodology for the analysis of costs associated with purchasing radiation-therapy services, and compares them with the costs for providing the cancer treatments in-house. The utilization of a decision matrix showed that the establishment of an in-house capability at DDEAMC which provides radiation therapy services for the surrounding region (26 military hospitals and clinics) is the alternative of choice.

  19. Laser-driven electron beam and radiation sources for basic, medical and industrial sciences.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    To date active research on laser-driven plasma-based accelerators have achieved great progress on production of high-energy, high-quality electron and photon beams in a compact scale. Such laser plasma accelerators have been envisaged bringing a wide range of applications in basic, medical and industrial sciences. Here inheriting the groundbreaker's review article on "Laser Acceleration and its future" [Toshiki Tajima, (2010)],(1)) we would like to review recent progress of producing such electron beams due to relativistic laser-plasma interactions followed by laser wakefield acceleration and lead to the scaling formulas that are useful to design laser plasma accelerators with controllability of beam energy and charge. Lastly specific examples of such laser-driven electron/photon beam sources are illustrated. PMID:26062737

  20. Laser-driven electron beam and radiation sources for basic, medical and industrial sciences

    PubMed Central

    NAKAJIMA, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    To date active research on laser-driven plasma-based accelerators have achieved great progress on production of high-energy, high-quality electron and photon beams in a compact scale. Such laser plasma accelerators have been envisaged bringing a wide range of applications in basic, medical and industrial sciences. Here inheriting the groundbreaker’s review article on “Laser Acceleration and its future” [Toshiki Tajima, (2010)],1) we would like to review recent progress of producing such electron beams due to relativistic laser-plasma interactions followed by laser wakefield acceleration and lead to the scaling formulas that are useful to design laser plasma accelerators with controllability of beam energy and charge. Lastly specific examples of such laser-driven electron/photon beam sources are illustrated. PMID:26062737

  1. Shared component modelling as an alternative to assess geographical variations in medical practice: gender inequalities in hospital admissions for chronic diseases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Small area analysis is the most prevalent methodological approach in the study of unwarranted and systematic variation in medical practice at geographical level. Several of its limitations drive researchers to use disease mapping methods -deemed as a valuable alternative. This work aims at exploring these techniques using - as a case of study- the gender differences in rates of hospitalization in elderly patients with chronic diseases. Methods Design and study setting: An empirical study of 538,358 hospitalizations affecting individuals aged over 75, who were admitted due to a chronic condition in 2006, were used to compare Small Area Analysis (SAVA), the Besag-York-Mollie (BYM) modelling and the Shared Component Modelling (SCM). Main endpoint: Gender spatial variation was measured, as follows: SAVA estimated gender-specific utilization ratio; BYM estimated the fraction of variance attributable to spatial correlation in each gender; and, SCM estimated the fraction of variance shared by the two genders, and those specific for each one. Results Hospitalization rates due to chronic diseases in the elderly were higher in men (median per area 21.4 per 100 inhabitants, interquartile range: 17.6 to 25.0) than in women (median per area 13.7 per 100, interquartile range: 10.8 to 16.6). Whereas Utilization Ratios showed a similar geographical pattern of variation in both genders, BYM found a high fraction of variation attributable to spatial correlation in both men (71%, CI95%: 50 to 94) and women (62%, CI95%: 45 to 77). In turn, SCM showed that the geographical admission pattern was mainly shared, with just 6% (CI95%: 4 to 8) of variation specific to the women component. Conclusions Whereas SAVA and BYM focused on the magnitude of variation and on allocating where variability cannot be due to chance, SCM signalled discrepant areas where latent factors would differently affect men and women. PMID:22188979

  2. Global application of disorders of sex development-related electronic resources: e-learning, e-consultation and e-information sharing.

    PubMed

    Muscarella, Miriam; Kranenburg-van Koppen, Laura; Grijpink-van den Biggelaar, Kalinka; Drop, Stenvert L S

    2014-01-01

    The past 20 years have seen proliferation of electronic (e) resources that promote improved understanding of disorders of sex development (DSD): e-learning for physicians and trainees, e-consultation between clinicians, and e-information for families and affected individuals. Recent e-learning advances have emerged from the European Society for Pediatric Endocrinology's online learning portal for current physicians and trainees. Developed with attention to developing clinical competencies incorporating learning theory, and presenting material that represents international best practice, this e-learning portal offers advances in training, making information more accessible for clinicians and trainees. Multiple levels of instruction, authentic case examples, collaborative forums for physicians and trainees, individualized feedback and user-friendly tools represent advances in trainee and physician learning that can take place in any location. e-consultation is an emerging tool that aims to connect physicians with specialists experienced in DSD care. Although it faces logistical challenges, e-consultation carries the potential to improve DSD care, especially in remote areas with limited access to DSD specialists. e-information for families and patients of all ages is widely accessible online, often with focus on DSD biology, medical care, and psychological and social support. e-information tools aid self-management and support of those affected by DSD. Efforts to improve these resources should aim to map information to individual users, incorporate optimally clear nomenclature, and continue as a 'shared enterprise' of clinicians, affected individuals, families and researchers. Improving the quality of DSD-related e-learning and e-information and developing e-consultation carries the potential to transform DSD care and support for patients, families and physicians worldwide. PMID:25247662

  3. The impact of university provided nurse electronic medical record training on health care organizations: an exploratory simulation approach.

    PubMed

    Abrahamson, Kathleen; Anderson, James G; Borycki, Elizabeth M; Kushniruk, Andre W; Malovec, Shannon; Espejo, Angela; Anderson, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    Training providers appropriately, particularly early in their caregiving careers, is an important aspect of electronic medical record (EMR) implementation. Considerable time and resources are needed to bring the newly hired providers 'up to speed' with the actual use practices of the organization. Similarly, universities lose valuable clinical training hours when students are required to spend those hours learning organization-specific EMR systems in order to participate in care during clinical rotations. Although there are multiple real-world barriers to university/health care organization training partnerships, the investment these entities share in training care providers, specifically nurses, to use and understand EMR technology encourages a question: What would be the cumulative effect of integrating a mutually agreed upon EMR system training program in to nursing classroom training on downstream hospital costs in terms of hours of direct caregiving lost, and benefits in terms of number of overall EMR trained nurses hired? In order to inform the development of a large scale study, we employed a dynamic systems modeling approach to simulate the theoretical relationships between key model variables and determine the possible effect of integrating EMR training into nursing classrooms on hospital outcomes. The analysis indicated that integrating EMR training into the nursing classroom curriculum results in more available time for nurse bedside care. Also, the simulation suggests that efficiency of clinical training can be potentially improved by centralizing EMR training within the nursing curriculum. PMID:25676937

  4. ClinicalCodes: An Online Clinical Codes Repository to Improve the Validity and Reproducibility of Research Using Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Springate, David A.; Kontopantelis, Evangelos; Ashcroft, Darren M.; Olier, Ivan; Parisi, Rosa; Chamapiwa, Edmore; Reeves, David

    2014-01-01

    Lists of clinical codes are the foundation for research undertaken using electronic medical records (EMRs). If clinical code lists are not available, reviewers are unable to determine the validity of research, full study replication is impossible, researchers are unable to make effective comparisons between studies, and the construction of new code lists is subject to much duplication of effort. Despite this, the publication of clinical codes is rarely if ever a requirement for obtaining grants, validating protocols, or publishing research. In a representative sample of 450 EMR primary research articles indexed on PubMed, we found that only 19 (5.1%) were accompanied by a full set of published clinical codes and 32 (8.6%) stated that code lists were available on request. To help address these problems, we have built an online repository where researchers using EMRs can upload and download lists of clinical codes. The repository will enable clinical researchers to better validate EMR studies, build on previous code lists and compare disease definitions across studies. It will also assist health informaticians in replicating database studies, tracking changes in disease definitions or clinical coding practice through time and sharing clinical code information across platforms and data sources as research objects. PMID:24941260

  5. Security of electronic medical information and patient privacy: what you need to know.

    PubMed

    Andriole, Katherine P

    2014-12-01

    The responsibility that physicians have to protect their patients from harm extends to protecting the privacy and confidentiality of patient health information including that contained within radiological images. The intent of HIPAA and subsequent HIPAA Privacy and Security Rules is to keep patients' private information confidential while allowing providers access to and maintaining the integrity of relevant information needed to provide care. Failure to comply with electronic protected health information (ePHI) regulations could result in financial or criminal penalties or both. Protected health information refers to anything that can reasonably be used to identify a patient (eg, name, age, date of birth, social security number, radiology examination accession number). The basic tools and techniques used to maintain medical information security and patient privacy described in this article include physical safeguards such as computer device isolation and data backup, technical safeguards such as firewalls and secure transmission modes, and administrative safeguards including documentation of security policies, training of staff, and audit tracking through system logs. Other important concepts related to privacy and security are explained, including user authentication, authorization, availability, confidentiality, data integrity, and nonrepudiation. Patient privacy and security of medical information are critical elements in today's electronic health care environment. Radiology has led the way in adopting digital systems to make possible the availability of medical information anywhere anytime, and in identifying and working to eliminate any risks to patients. PMID:25467897

  6. Contribution of Electronic Medical Records to the Management of Rare Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bremond-Gignac, Dominique; Lewandowski, Elisabeth; Copin, Henri

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Electronic health record systems provide great opportunity to study most diseases. Objective of this study was to determine whether electronic medical records (EMR) in ophthalmology contribute to management of rare eye diseases, isolated or in syndromes. Study was designed to identify and collect patients' data with ophthalmology-specific EMR. Methods. Ophthalmology-specific EMR software (Softalmo software Corilus) was used to acquire ophthalmological ocular consultation data from patients with five rare eye diseases. The rare eye diseases and data were selected and collected regarding expertise of eye center. Results. A total of 135,206 outpatient consultations were performed between 2011 and 2014 in our medical center specialized in rare eye diseases. The search software identified 29 congenital aniridia, 6 Axenfeld/Rieger syndrome, 11 BEPS, 3 Nanophthalmos, and 3 Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome. Discussion. EMR provides advantages for medical care. The use of ophthalmology-specific EMR is reliable and can contribute to a comprehensive ocular visual phenotype useful for clinical research. Conclusion. Routinely EMR acquired with specific software dedicated to ophthalmology provides sufficient detail for rare diseases. These software-collected data appear useful for creating patient cohorts and recording ocular examination, avoiding the time-consuming analysis of paper records and investigation, in a University Hospital linked to a National Reference Rare Center Disease. PMID:26539543

  7. A randomized trial comparing in person and electronic interventions for improving adherence to oral medications in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Velligan, Dawn; Mintz, Jim; Maples, Natalie; Xueying, Li; Gajewski, Stephanie; Carr, Heather; Sierra, Cynthia

    2013-09-01

    Poor adherence to medication leads to symptom exacerbation and interferes with the recovery process for patients with schizophrenia. Following baseline assessment, 142 patients in medication maintenance at a community mental health center were randomized to one of 3 treatments for 9 months: (1) PharmCAT, supports including pill containers, signs, alarms, checklists and the organization of belongings established in weekly home visits from a PharmCAT therapist; (2) Med-eMonitor (MM), an electronic medication monitor that prompts use of medication, cues the taking of medication, warns patients when they are taking the wrong medication or taking it at the wrong time, record complaints, and, through modem hookup, alerts treatment staff of failures to take medication as prescribed; (3) Treatment as Usual (TAU). All patients received the Med-eMonitor device to record medication adherence. The device was programmed for intervention only in the MM group. Data on symptoms, global functioning, and contact with emergency services and police were obtained every 3 months. Repeated measures analyses of variance for mixed models indicated that adherence to medication was significantly better in both active conditions than in TAU (both p<0.0001). Adherence in active treatments ranged from 90-92% compared to 73% in TAU based on electronic monitoring. In-person and electronic interventions significantly improved adherence to medication, but that did not translate to improved clinical outcomes. Implications for treatment and health care costs are discussed. PMID:23086987

  8. Automated extraction of clinical traits of multiple sclerosis in electronic medical records

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Mary F; Sriram, Subramaniam; Bush, William S; Denny, Joshua C; Haines, Jonathan L

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The clinical course of multiple sclerosis (MS) is highly variable, and research data collection is costly and time consuming. We evaluated natural language processing techniques applied to electronic medical records (EMR) to identify MS patients and the key clinical traits of their disease course. Materials and methods We used four algorithms based on ICD-9 codes, text keywords, and medications to identify individuals with MS from a de-identified, research version of the EMR at Vanderbilt University. Using a training dataset of the records of 899 individuals, algorithms were constructed to identify and extract detailed information regarding the clinical course of MS from the text of the medical records, including clinical subtype, presence of oligoclonal bands, year of diagnosis, year and origin of first symptom, Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) scores, timed 25-foot walk scores, and MS medications. Algorithms were evaluated on a test set validated by two independent reviewers. Results We identified 5789 individuals with MS. For all clinical traits extracted, precision was at least 87% and specificity was greater than 80%. Recall values for clinical subtype, EDSS scores, and timed 25-foot walk scores were greater than 80%. Discussion and conclusion This collection of clinical data represents one of the largest databases of detailed, clinical traits available for research on MS. This work demonstrates that detailed clinical information is recorded in the EMR and can be extracted for research purposes with high reliability. PMID:24148554

  9. Risk factor detection for heart disease by applying text analytics in electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Torii, Manabu; Fan, Jung-Wei; Yang, Wei-Li; Lee, Theodore; Wiley, Matthew T; Zisook, Daniel S; Huang, Yang

    2015-12-01

    In the United States, about 600,000 people die of heart disease every year. The annual cost of care services, medications, and lost productivity reportedly exceeds 108.9 billion dollars. Effective disease risk assessment is critical to prevention, care, and treatment planning. Recent advancements in text analytics have opened up new possibilities of using the rich information in electronic medical records (EMRs) to identify relevant risk factors. The 2014 i2b2/UTHealth Challenge brought together researchers and practitioners of clinical natural language processing (NLP) to tackle the identification of heart disease risk factors reported in EMRs. We participated in this track and developed an NLP system by leveraging existing tools and resources, both public and proprietary. Our system was a hybrid of several machine-learning and rule-based components. The system achieved an overall F1 score of 0.9185, with a recall of 0.9409 and a precision of 0.8972. PMID:26279500

  10. Identification of global data and partitioning scheme for modeling biological data within the electronic medical record.

    PubMed Central

    Doller, H.; Peterson, L. L.

    2000-01-01

    Using "Black Box" theory we analyzed human physiology. The major physiological means of communication are the vascular and nervous systems. The fundamental partitions of physiology are the vascular capillary fields and efferent and afferent fields of the nervous system. These fields are generally associated with organs and organ systems. Such analysis leads to the conclusion that the global biological data are information carried within the vascular and nervous systems. Data elements and processes within organs are important to other organs only through their effects on these global elements. Incorporation of these concepts into medical databases would allow the partitioning of the software around physiological systems. As a result of partitioning the utility of the electronic medical record, software could be greatly expanded. PMID:11079872

  11. Electronic prescribing in pediatrics: toward safer and more effective medication management.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kevin B; Lehmann, Christoph U

    2013-04-01

    This technical report discusses recent advances in electronic prescribing (e-prescribing) systems, including the evidence base supporting their limitations and potential benefits. Specifically, this report acknowledges that there are limited but positive pediatric data supporting the role of e-prescribing in mitigating medication errors, improving communication with dispensing pharmacists, and improving medication adherence. On the basis of these data and on the basis of federal statutes that provide incentives for the use of e-prescribing systems, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends the adoption of e-prescribing systems with pediatric functionality. This report supports the accompanying policy statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics recommending the adoption of e-prescribing by pediatric health care providers. PMID:23530183

  12. The "epic" challenge of optimizing antimicrobial stewardship: the role of electronic medical records and technology.

    PubMed

    Kullar, Ravina; Goff, Debra A; Schulz, Lucas T; Fox, Barry C; Rose, Warren E

    2013-10-01

    Antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) are established means for institutions to improve patient outcomes while reducing the emergence of resistant bacteria. With the increased adoption and evolution of electronic medical records (EMRs), there is a need to assimilate the tools of ASPs into EMRs, using decision support and feedback. Third-party software vendors provide the mainstay for integration of individual institutional EMR and ASP efforts. Epic is the leading implementer of EMR technology in the United States. A collaboration of physicians and pharmacists are working closely with Epic to provide a more comprehensive platform of ASP tools that may be institutionally individualized. We review the historical relationship between ASPs and the EMR, cite examples of Epic stewardship tools from 3 academic medical centers' ASPs, discuss limitations of these Epic tools, and conclude with the current process in evolution to integrate ASP tools and decision support capacities directly into Epic's EMR. PMID:23667260

  13. Image-based electronic patient records for secured collaborative medical applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianguo; Sun, Jianyong; Yang, Yuanyuan; Liang, Chenwen; Yao, Yihong; Cai, Weihua; Jin, Jin; Zhang, Guozhen; Sun, Kun

    2005-01-01

    We developed a Web-based system to interactively display image-based electronic patient records (EPR) for secured intranet and Internet collaborative medical applications. The system consists of four major components: EPR DICOM gateway (EPR-GW), Image-based EPR repository server (EPR-Server), Web Server and EPR DICOM viewer (EPR-Viewer). In the EPR-GW and EPR-Viewer, the security modules of Digital Signature and Authentication are integrated to perform the security processing on the EPR data with integrity and authenticity. The privacy of EPR in data communication and exchanging is provided by SSL/TLS-based secure communication. This presentation gave a new approach to create and manage image-based EPR from actual patient records, and also presented a way to use Web technology and DICOM standard to build an open architecture for collaborative medical applications. PMID:17282930

  14. Developing image-based electronic patient records for collaborative medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianguo; Sun, Jianyong; Yong, Yuanyuan; Chen, Xiaomeng; Yu, Fenghai; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Lian, Ping; Sun, Kun; Huang, H. K.

    2004-04-01

    We developed a Web-based system to interactively display image-based electronic patient records (EPR) for intranet and Internet collaborative medical applications. The system consists of four major components: EPR DICOM gateway (EPR-GW), Image-based EPR repository server (EPR-Server), Web Server and EPR DICOM viewer (EPR-Viewer). We have successfully used this system two times for the teleconsultation on Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in Shanghai Xinhua Hospital and Shanghai Infection Hospital. During the consultation, both the physicians in infection control area and the experts outside the control area could interactively study, manipulate and navigate the EPR of the SARS patients to make more precise diagnosis on images with this system assisting. This presentation gave a new approach to create and manage image-based EPR from actual patient records, and also presented a way to use Web technology and DICOM standard to build an open architecture for collaborative medical applications.

  15. Dynamic consent: a possible solution to improve patient confidence and trust in how electronic patient records are used in medical research.

    PubMed

    Williams, Hawys; Spencer, Karen; Sanders, Caroline; Lund, David; Whitley, Edgar A; Kaye, Jane; Dixon, William G

    2015-01-01

    With one million people treated every 36 hours, routinely collected UK National Health Service (NHS) health data has huge potential for medical research. Advances in data acquisition from electronic patient records (EPRs) means such data are increasingly digital and can be anonymised for research purposes. NHS England's care.data initiative recently sought to increase the amount and availability of such data. However, controversy and uncertainty following the care.data public awareness campaign led to a delay in rollout, indicating that the success of EPR data for medical research may be threatened by a loss of patient and public trust. The sharing of sensitive health care data can only be done through maintaining such trust in a constantly evolving ethicolegal and political landscape. We propose that a dynamic consent model, whereby patients can electronically control consent through time and receive information about the uses of their data, provides a transparent, flexible, and user-friendly means to maintain public trust. This could leverage the huge potential of the EPR for medical research and, ultimately, patient and societal benefit. PMID:25586934

  16. Patients' consent preferences for research uses of information in electronic medical records: interview and survey data

    PubMed Central

    Willison, Donald J; Keshavjee, Karim; Nair, Kalpana; Goldsmith, Charlie; Holbrook, Anne M

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To assess patients' preferred method of consent for the use of information from electronic medical records for research. Design Interviews and a structured survey of patients in practices with electronic medical records. Setting Family practices in southern Ontario, Canada. Participants 123 patients: 17 were interviewed and 106 completed a survey. Main outcome measures Patients' opinions and concerns on use of information from their medical records for research and their preferences for method of consent. Results Most interviewees were willing to allow the use of their information for research purposes, although the majority preferred that consent was sought first. The seeking of consent was considered an important element of respect for the individual. Most interviewees made little distinction between identifiable and anonymised data. Research sponsored by private insurance firms generated the greatest concern, and research sponsored by foundation the least. Sponsorship by drug companies evoked negative responses during interview and positive responses in the survey. Conclusions Patients are willing to allow information from their medical records to be used for research, but most prefer to be asked for consent either verbally or in writing. What is already known on this topicLegislation is being introduced worldwide to restrict the circumstances under which personal information may be used for secondary purposes without consentLittle empirical information exists about patients' concerns over privacy and preferences for consent for use of such information for researchWhat this study addsPatients are willing to allow personal information to be used for research purposes but want to be actively consulted firstPatients make little distinction between identifiable and non-identifiable informationMost patients prefer a time limit for their consent PMID:12586673

  17. Development of Electron Tracking Compton Camera using micro pixel gas chamber for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabuki, Shigeto; Hattori, Kaori; Kohara, Ryota; Kunieda, Etsuo; Kubo, Atsushi; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Miuchi, Kentaro; Nakahara, Tadaki; Nagayoshi, Tsutomu; Nishimura, Hironobu; Okada, Yoko; Orito, Reiko; Sekiya, Hiroyuki; Shirahata, Takashi; Takada, Atsushi; Tanimori, Toru; Ueno, Kazuki

    2007-10-01

    We have developed the Electron Tracking Compton Camera (ETCC) with reconstructing the 3-D tracks of the scattered electron in Compton process for both sub-MeV and MeV gamma rays. By measuring both the directions and energies of not only the recoil gamma ray but also the scattered electron, the direction of the incident gamma ray is determined for each individual photon. Furthermore, a residual measured angle between the recoil electron and scattered gamma ray is quite powerful for the kinematical background rejection. For the 3-D tracking of the electrons, the Micro Time Projection Chamber (μ-TPC) was developed using a new type of the micro pattern gas detector. The ETCC consists of this μ-TPC (10×10×8 cm 3) and the 6×6×13 mm 3 GSO crystal pixel arrays with a flat panel photo-multiplier surrounding the μ-TPC for detecting recoil gamma rays. The ETCC provided the angular resolution of 6.6° (FWHM) at 364 keV of 131I. A mobile ETCC for medical imaging, which is fabricated in a 1 m cubic box, has been operated since October 2005. Here, we present the imaging results for the line sources and the phantom of human thyroid gland using 364 keV gamma rays of 131I.

  18. eDrug: a dynamic interactive electronic drug formulary for medical students

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Simon R J; McQueen, Daniel S; Ellaway, Rachel

    2006-01-01

    What is already known about this subject Delivering education about an ever-increasing number of prescribable drugs to medical students represents a major challenge. Drug names are generally not logical or intuitive, and many students find learning them akin to learning a foreign language. Pharmacology and therapeutics teaching is struggling for visibility in some integrated medical curricula. What this study adds Development of electronic tools allowing web delivery of a restricted student formulary facilitates dynamic access to core learning materials, improves the profile of this aspect of the curriculum and is highly appreciated by students. Aims Prescribing drugs is a key responsibility of a doctor and requires a solid grounding in the relevant scientific disciplines of pharmacology and therapeutics (PT). The move away from basic science disciplines towards a more system-based and integrated undergraduate curriculum has created difficulties in the delivery of PT teaching in some medical schools. We aimed to develop a web-based strategy to overcome these problems and improve the PT learning experience. Methods We designed and introduced ‘eDrug’, a dynamic interactive web-based student formulary, as an aid to teaching and learning of PT throughout a 5-year integrated medical curriculum in a UK medical school of 1300 students. This was followed by a prospective observational study of student-reported views about its impact on their PT learning experience. Results eDrug was rated highly by students and staff, with the main benefits being increased visibility of PT in the curriculum, clear identification of core drugs, regular sourcing of drug information via direct links to accredited sources including the British National Formulary, prioritization of learning, immediate access and responsiveness. It has also served as a focus of discussion concerning core PT learning objectives amongst staff and students. Conclusions Web-based delivery of PT learning

  19. Nursing Students' Satisfaction with Mobile Academic Electronic Medical Records for Undergraduate Clinical Practicum.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mona; Park, Joon Ho; Lee, Hyeong Suk

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of study was to evaluate satisfaction with and usability of mobile academic electronic medical records (AEMR) for undergraduate nursing students' clinical practicum. After an AEMR application on mobile devices was applied to the experimental group while a PC-based EMR system was used for the control group as usual in the fall semester, 2014. Two items of practicum satisfaction such as preparation of lab test and understanding of the results, and nursing intervention and documentation were significantly higher in the experiment group. The findings of usability survey showed that students in the experiment group consider the use of mobile AEMR in their job would increase their productivity. PMID:27332454

  20. A Probabilistic Reasoning Method for Predicting the Progression of Clinical Findings from Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Travis; Harabagiu, Sanda M.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a probabilistic reasoning method capable of generating predictions of the progression of clinical findings (CFs) reported in the narrative portion of electronic medical records. This method benefits from a probabilistic knowledge representation made possible by a graphical model. The knowledge encoded in the graphical model considers not only the CFs extracted from the clinical narratives, but also their chronological ordering (CO) made possible by a temporal inference technique described in this paper. Our experiments indicate that the predictions about the progression of CFs achieve high performance given the COs induced from patient records. PMID:26306238

  1. Evaluation of a commercial electronic medical record (EMR) by primary care physicians 5 years after implementation.

    PubMed

    Kaelber, David; Greco, Peter; Cebul, Randall D

    2005-01-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) are gaining increasing prominence in the delivery of healthcare, although the focus is primarily on deploying EMRs. Relatively little research has studied the post-implementation of commercial EMRs. Here we present the results of a web-based survey of all the primary care clinicians in our university affiliated, tertiary care health system. The survey evaluated primary care clinician demographics, usage, and ideas for enhancement of the EpicCare EMR, five year after its initial deployment throughout our healthcare system. PMID:16779289

  2. Evaluation of a Commercial Electronic Medical Record (EMR) by Primary Care Physicians 5 Years after Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Kaelber, David; Greco, Peter; Cebul, Randall D

    2005-01-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) are gaining increasing prominence in the delivery of healthcare, although the focus is primarily on deploying EMRs. Relatively little research has studied the post-implementation of commercial EMRs. Here we present the results of a web-based survey of all the primary care clinicians in our university affiliated, tertiary care health system. The survey evaluated primary care clinician demographics, usage, and ideas for enhancement of the EpicCare EMR, five year after its initial deployment throughout our healthcare system. PMID:16779289

  3. Task and error analysis balancing benefits over business of electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Carstens, Deborah Sater; Rodriguez, Walter; Wood, Michael B

    2014-01-01

    Task and error analysis research was performed to identify: a) the process for healthcare organisations in managing healthcare for patients with mental illness or substance abuse; b) how the process can be enhanced and; c) if electronic medical records (EMRs) have a role in this process from a business and safety perspective. The research question is if EMRs have a role in enhancing the healthcare for patients with mental illness or substance abuse. A discussion on the business of EMRs is addressed to understand the balancing act between the safety and business aspects of an EMR. PMID:25161108

  4. Stepwise approach to establishing multiple outreach laboratory information system-electronic medical record interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Pantanowitz, Liron; LaBranche, Wayne; Lareau, William

    2010-01-01

    Clinical laboratory outreach business is changing as more physician practices adopt an electronic medical record (EMR). Physician connectivity with the laboratory information system (LIS) is consequently becoming more important. However, there are no reports available to assist the informatician with establishing and maintaining outreach LIS–EMR connectivity. A four-stage scheme is presented that was successfully employed to establish unidirectional and bidirectional interfaces with multiple physician EMRs. This approach involves planning (step 1), followed by interface building (step 2) with subsequent testing (step 3), and finally ongoing maintenance (step 4). The role of organized project management, software as a service (SAAS), and alternate solutions for outreach connectivity are discussed. PMID:20805958

  5. Stepwise approach to establishing multiple outreach laboratory information system-electronic medical record interfaces.

    PubMed

    Pantanowitz, Liron; Labranche, Wayne; Lareau, William

    2010-01-01

    Clinical laboratory outreach business is changing as more physician practices adopt an electronic medical record (EMR). Physician connectivity with the laboratory information system (LIS) is consequently becoming more important. However, there are no reports available to assist the informatician with establishing and maintaining outreach LIS-EMR connectivity. A four-stage scheme is presented that was successfully employed to establish unidirectional and bidirectional interfaces with multiple physician EMRs. This approach involves planning (step 1), followed by interface building (step 2) with subsequent testing (step 3), and finally ongoing maintenance (step 4). The role of organized project management, software as a service (SAAS), and alternate solutions for outreach connectivity are discussed. PMID:20805958

  6. Quality of Co-Prescribing NSAID and Gastroprotective Medications for Elders in The Netherlands and Its Association with the Electronic Medical Record

    PubMed Central

    Opondo, Dedan; Visscher, Stefan; Eslami, Saeid; Verheij, Robert A.; Korevaar, Joke C.; Abu-Hanna, Ameen

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess guideline adherence of co-prescribing NSAID and gastroprotective medications for elders in general practice over time, and investigate its potential association with the electronic medical record (EMR) system brand used. Methods We included patients 65 years and older who received NSAIDs between 2005 and 2010. Prescription data were extracted from EMR systems of GP practices participating in the Dutch NIVEL Primary Care Database. We calculated the proportion of NSAID prescriptions with co-prescription of gastroprotective medication for each GP practice at intervals of three months. Association between proportion of gastroprotection, brand of electronic medical record (EMR), and type of GP practice were explored. Temporal trends in proportion of gastroprotection between electronic medical records systems were analyzed using a random effects linear regression model. Results We included 91,521 patient visits with NSAID prescriptions from 77 general practices between 2005 and 2010. Overall proportion of NSAID prescriptions to the elderly with co-prescription of gastroprotective medication was 43%. Mean proportion of gastroprotection increased from 27% (CI 25–29%) in the first quarter of 2005 with a rate of 1.2% every 3 months to 55%(CI 52–58%) at the end of 2010. Brand of EMR and type of GP practice were independently associated with co-prescription of gastroprotection. Conclusion Although prescription of gastroprotective medications to elderly patients who receive NSAIDs increased in The Netherlands, they are not co-prescribed in about half of the indicated cases. Brand of EMR system is associated with differences in prescription of gastroprotective medication. Optimal design and utilization of EMRs is a potential area of intervention to improve quality of prescription. PMID:26110650

  7. An Electronic Medical Record system to support HIV treatment in rural Haiti.

    PubMed

    Jazayeri, Darius; Farmer, Paul; Nevil, Patrice; Mukherjee, Joia S; Leandre, Fernet; Fraser, Hamish S F

    2003-01-01

    HIV-AIDS has become the world's leading infectious cause of adult deaths. Approximately 5% of Haiti's adult population is infected with HIV, making it the most affected nation in the western hemisphere[1]. The non-governmental organization Zanmi Lasante (ZL) launched an innovative program 5 years ago to treat HIV patients in the very impoverished central plateau with highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART)[1]. ZL currently follows more than 4000 HIV-positive patients, over 10% of whom are already on HAART, and was recently awarded funds from the Haitian grant from the Global Fund to fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. Expanding treatment in a region with few doctors and virtually no roads, electricity, or electronic communication is a major challenge requiring careful coordination of clinical care, investigations and drug supplies. We describe a prototype Electronic Medical Record system to support treatment of HIV and tuberculosis in remote and impoverished areas. PMID:14728383

  8. Solid-state pulse modulator using Marx generator for a medical linac electron-gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Heuijin; Hyeok Jeong, Dong; Lee, Manwoo; Lee, Mujin; Yi, Jungyu; Yang, Kwangmo; Ro, Sung Chae

    2016-04-01

    A medical linac is used for the cancer treatment and consists of an accelerating column, waveguide components, a magnetron, an electron-gun, a pulse modulator, and an irradiation system. The pulse modulator based on hydrogen thyratron-switched pulse-forming network is commonly used in linac. As the improvement of the high power semiconductors in switching speed, voltage rating, and current rating, an insulated gate bipolar transistor has become the more popular device used for pulsed power systems. We propose a solid-state pulse modulator to generator high voltage by multi-stacked storage-switch stages based on the Marx generator. The advantage of our modulator comes from the use of two semiconductors to control charging and discharging of the storage capacitor at each stage and it allows to generate the pulse with various amplitudes, widths, and shapes. In addition, a gate driver for two semiconductors is designed to reduce the control channels and to protect the circuits. It is developed for providing the pulsed power to a medical linac electron-gun that requires 25 kV and 1 A as the first application. In order to improve the power efficiency and achieve the compactness modulator, a capacitor charging power supply, a Marx pulse generator, and an electron-gun heater isolated transformer are constructed and integrated. This technology is also being developed to extend the high power pulsed system with > 1 MW and also other applications such as a plasma immersed ion implantation and a micro pulse electrostatic precipitator which especially require variable pulse shape and high repetition rate > 1 kHz. The paper describes the design features and the construction of this solid-state pulse modulator. Also shown are the performance results into the linac electron-gun.

  9. The VA Hypertension Primary Care Longitudinal Cohort: Electronic medical records in the post-genomic era.

    PubMed

    Salem, Rany M; Pandey, Braj; Richard, Erin; Fung, Maple M; Garcia, Erin P; Brophy, Victoria H; Schork, Nicholas J; O'Connor, Daniel T; Bhatnagar, Vibha

    2010-12-01

    The Veterans Affairs Hypertension Primary Care Longitudinal Cohort (VAHC) was initiated in 2003 as a pilot study designed to link the VA electronic medical record system with individual genetic data. Between June 2003 and December 2004, 1,527 hypertensive participants were recruited. Protected health information (PHI) was extracted from the regional VA data warehouse. Differences between the clinic and mail recruits suggested that clinic recruitment resulted in an over-sampling of African Americans. A review of medical records in a random sample of study participants confirmed that the data warehouse accurately captured most selected diagnoses. Genomic DNA was acquired non-invasively from buccal cells in mouthwash; ~ 96.5 per cent of samples contained DNA suitable for genotyping, with an average DNA yield of 5.02 ± 0.12 micrograms, enough for several thousand genotypes. The coupling of detailed medical databases with genetic information has the potential to facilitate the genetic study of hypertension and other complex diseases. PMID:21216807

  10. Should medical students track former patients in the electronic health record? An emerging ethical conflict.

    PubMed

    Brisson, Gregory E; Neely, Kathy Johnson; Tyler, Patrick D; Barnard, Cynthia

    2015-08-01

    Medical students are increasingly using electronic health records (EHRs) in clerkships, and medical educators should seek opportunities to use this new technology to improve training. One such opportunity is the ability to "track" former patients in the EHR, defined as following up on patients in the EHR for educational purposes for a defined period of time after they have left one's direct care. This activity offers great promise in clinical training by enabling students to audit their diagnostic impressions and follow the clinical history of illness in a manner not possible in the era of paper charting. However, tracking raises important questions about the ethical use of protected health information, including concerns about compromising patient autonomy, resulting in a conflict between medical education and patient privacy. The authors offer critical analysis of arguments on both sides and discuss strategies to balance the ethical conflict by optimizing outcomes and mitigating harms. They observe that tracking improves training, thus offering long-lasting benefits to society, and is supported by the principle of distributive justice. They conclude that students should be permitted to track for educational purposes, but only with defined limits to safeguard patient autonomy, including obtaining permission from patients, having legitimate educational intent, and self-restricting review of records to those essential for training. Lastly, the authors observe that this conflict will become increasingly important with completion of the planned Nationwide Health Information Network and emphasize the need for national guidelines on tracking patients in an ethically appropriate manner. PMID:25565261

  11. Pharmacologic Prophylaxis for Venous Thromboembolism Among Patients With Total Joint Replacement: An Electronic Medical Records Study.

    PubMed

    Rosenman, Marc; Liu, Xianchen; Phatak, Hemant; Qi, Rong; Teal, Evgenia; Nisi, Daniel; Liu, Larry Z; Parr, J Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Patients who have total hip (THR) or knee (TKR) replacement have an elevated risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). The American College of Chest Physicians guidelines recommend prophylactic anticoagulation. The aim of the study was to examine pharmacologic prophylaxis against VTE among patients with THR or TKR and to assess demographic and clinical correlates related to VTE prophylaxis. Using 15 years of data (1995-2009) from an electronic medical record system for an inner-city public hospital in the United States, we examined pharmacologic prophylaxis against VTE and associated factors in patients after THR (n = 242) and TKR (n = 317). Before the early 2000s, aspirin was the most common prophylaxis agent (THR, 61% and TKR, 65%), and 26% of patients with THR and 19% of patients with TKR did not receive prophylaxis. Enoxaparin use has increased since 2000, and warfarin is now the most common prophylaxis agent (THR, 70% and TKR, 61%). After controlling for time period, factors associated with prophylaxis pattern included obesity, hip fracture, and the surgeon's number of years in practice. VTE prophylaxis medications in patients with total joint replacement have changed over 15 years, in trends generally consistent with the evolution of guidelines. Obesity, history of hip fracture, and physician's experience are associated with the prescription of VTE prophylaxis medications. PMID:26736015

  12. Leading change: introducing an electronic medical record system to a paramedic service.

    PubMed

    Baird, Shawn; Boak, George

    2016-05-01

    Purpose Leaders in health-care organizations introducing electronic medical records (EMRs) face implementation challenges. The adoption of EMR by the emergency medical and ambulance setting is expected to provide wide-ranging benefits, but there is little research into the processes of adoption in this sector. The purpose of this study is to examine the introduction of EMR in a small emergency care organization and identify factors that aided adoption. Design/methodology/approach Semi-structured interviews with selected paramedics were followed up with a survey issued to all paramedics in the company. Findings The user interfaces with the EMR, and perceived ease of use, were important factors affecting adoption. Individual paramedics were found to have strong and varied preferences about how and when they integrated the EMR into their practice. As company leadership introduced flexibility of use, this enhanced both individual and collective ability to make sense of the change and removed barriers to acceptance. Research limitations/implications This is a case study of one small organization. However, there may be useful lessons for other emergency care organizations adopting EMR. Practical implications Leaders introducing EMR in similar situations may benefit from considering a sense-making perspective and responding promptly to feedback. Originality/value The study contributes to a wider understanding of issues faced by leaders who seek to implement EMRs in emergency medical services, a sector in which there has been to date very little research on this issue. PMID:27198703

  13. Use of the Electronic Medical Record to Assess Pancreas Size in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Virostko, John; Hilmes, Melissa; Eitel, Kelsey; Moore, Daniel J.; Powers, Alvin C.

    2016-01-01

    Aims This study harnessed the electronic medical record to assess pancreas volume in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and matched controls to determine whether pancreas volume is altered in T1D and identify covariates that influence pancreas volume. Methods This study included 25 patients with T1D and 25 age-, sex-, and weight-matched controls from the Vanderbilt University Medical Center enterprise data warehouse. Measurements of pancreas volume were made from medical imaging studies using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT). Results Patients with T1D had a pancreas volume 47% smaller than matched controls (41.16 ml vs. 77.77 ml, P < 0.0001) as well as pancreas volume normalized by subject body weight, body mass index, or body surface area (all P < 0.0001). Pancreatic volume was smaller with a longer duration of T1D across the patient population (N = 25, P = 0.04). Additionally, four individual patients receiving multiple imaging scans displayed progressive declines in pancreas volume over time (~ 6% of volume/year), whereas five controls scanned a year apart did not exhibit a decline in pancreas size (P = 0.03). The pancreas was uniformly smaller on the right and left side of the abdomen. Conclusions Pancreas volume declines with disease duration in patients with T1D, suggesting a protracted pathological process that may include the exocrine pancreas. PMID:27391588

  14. Systematically Improving Tobacco Cessation Patient Services Through Electronic Medical Record Integration.

    PubMed

    Karn, Shelley; Fernandez, Alejandra; Grossberg, Lou Ann; Robertson, Trina; Sharp, Barry; Huang, Philip; Loukas, Alexandra

    2016-07-01

    The Health Information Act of 2010 has presented an opportunity to discuss, establish, and promote innovative ways to incorporate tobacco cessation assistance to patients in the health care setting. This article provides an overview of the development and implementation of an electronic tobacco cessation protocol (the eTobacco protocol), into an electronic medical record (EMR) system, while evaluating the barriers and benefits encountered. The protocol was developed to facilitate the process of electronically referring patients to a state-funded quitline service by establishing a one-click connect for providers to use within the EMR system. While evaluating the implementation of the protocol, findings indicate that several barriers were encountered including disruption of clinic workflow, EMR limitations, and training complications. In spite of the barriers, the protocol shows promising results by increasing referrals to the quitline from 7 patients the year prior to implementation to 1,254 patients after the implementation of the electronic solution. Health care systems that have the ability to modify their EMR system can help lower tobacco use rates among their patients while meeting Meaningful Use requirements. Future research should examine if referrals through the eTobacco protocol are directly associated with patients' tobacco cessation rates. PMID:27199147

  15. Discovering Disease Associations by Integrating Electronic Clinical Data and Medical Literature

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Antony B.; Hawson, Alexander; Liu, Feng; Friedman, Carol; Khiabanian, Hossein; Rabadan, Raul

    2011-01-01

    Electronic health record (EHR) systems offer an exceptional opportunity for studying many diseases and their associated medical conditions within a population. The increasing number of clinical record entries that have become available electronically provides access to rich, large sets of patients' longitudinal medical information. By integrating and comparing relations found in the EHRs with those already reported in the literature, we are able to verify existing and to identify rare or novel associations. Of particular interest is the identification of rare disease co-morbidities, where the small numbers of diagnosed patients make robust statistical analysis difficult. Here, we introduce ADAMS, an Application for Discovering Disease Associations using Multiple Sources, which contains various statistical and language processing operations. We apply ADAMS to the New York-Presbyterian Hospital's EHR to combine the information from the relational diagnosis tables and textual discharge summaries with those from PubMed and Wikipedia in order to investigate the co-morbidities of the rare diseases Kaposi sarcoma, toxoplasmosis, and Kawasaki disease. In addition to finding well-known characteristics of diseases, ADAMS can identify rare or previously unreported associations. In particular, we report a statistically significant association between Kawasaki disease and diagnosis of autistic disorder. PMID:21731656

  16. Interconnection of electronic medical record with clinical data management system by CDISC ODM.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Yasushi; Hattori, Atsushi; Manabe, Shiro; Takeda, Toshihiro; Takahashi, Daiyo; Yamamoto, Yuichiro; Murata, Taizo; Mihara, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    EDC system has been used in the field of clinical research. The current EDC system does not connect with electronic medical record system (EMR), thus a medical staff has to transcribe the data in EMR to EDC system manually. This redundant process causes not only inefficiency but also human error. We developed an EDC system cooperating with EMR, in which the data required for a clinical research form (CRF) is transcribed automatically from EMR to electronic CRF (eCRF) and is sent via network. We call this system as "eCRF reporter". The interface module of eCRF reporter can retrieves the data in EMR database including patient biography data, laboratory test data, prescription data and data entered by template in progress notes. The eCRF reporter also enables users to enter data directly to eCRF. The eCRF reporter generates CDISC ODM file and PDF which is a translated form of Clinical data in ODM. After storing eCRF in EMR, it is transferred via VPN to a clinical data management system (CDMS) which can receive the eCRF files and parse ODM. We started some clinical research by using this system. This system is expected to promote clinical research efficiency and strictness. PMID:25160311

  17. Efficient Queries of Stand-off Annotations for Natural Language Processing on Electronic Medical Records.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuan; Szolovits, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In natural language processing, stand-off annotation uses the starting and ending positions of an annotation to anchor it to the text and stores the annotation content separately from the text. We address the fundamental problem of efficiently storing stand-off annotations when applying natural language processing on narrative clinical notes in electronic medical records (EMRs) and efficiently retrieving such annotations that satisfy position constraints. Efficient storage and retrieval of stand-off annotations can facilitate tasks such as mapping unstructured text to electronic medical record ontologies. We first formulate this problem into the interval query problem, for which optimal query/update time is in general logarithm. We next perform a tight time complexity analysis on the basic interval tree query algorithm and show its nonoptimality when being applied to a collection of 13 query types from Allen's interval algebra. We then study two closely related state-of-the-art interval query algorithms, proposed query reformulations, and augmentations to the second algorithm. Our proposed algorithm achieves logarithmic time stabbing-max query time complexity and solves the stabbing-interval query tasks on all of Allen's relations in logarithmic time, attaining the theoretic lower bound. Updating time is kept logarithmic and the space requirement is kept linear at the same time. We also discuss interval management in external memory models and higher dimensions. PMID:27478379

  18. Business process improvement: an electronic system to monitor compliance with medical resident work hours.

    PubMed

    Landesman, Linda Young; Markowitz, Forest; Conde, Nelson

    2010-01-01

    The limitation of medical intern and resident work hours, known as the Bell 405 regulations, was initiated in New York State in 1989 with a modification to the state hospital code. The Bell 405 regulations were strengthened in 2000, and facilities would now be fined for noncompliance. Monitoring systems in place at that time were insufficient to provide an adequate level of review for the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC) with more than 7,000 medical residents whose training is based at or who rotate through these public hospitals. A "simple to use," yet comprehensive, method of monitoring compliance needed to be developed to ensure that residents and interns complied with laws regulating working hours. The subsequent development of national accreditation standards increased the stakes for reliable scrutiny. HHC developed and implemented a Web-based Structured Query Language (SQL) application that facilitated easy access to work hour surveys captured through electronic time sheets. The time sheet data automatically entered a database that provided instant analysis of conformance to state law. The development of an electronic on-line application accessible from anywhere allowed HHC to efficiently identify nonconformance and pinpoint corrective action. Since the inception of the application and its expansion allowing access through the intranet, 26,000 individual time sheets have been submitted for evaluation. With the national movement regulating work hours, other hospitals still at the pencil and manual computation stage would greatly benefit by developing a similar application. PMID:20150790

  19. Efficient Queries of Stand-off Annotations for Natural Language Processing on Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yuan; Szolovits, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In natural language processing, stand-off annotation uses the starting and ending positions of an annotation to anchor it to the text and stores the annotation content separately from the text. We address the fundamental problem of efficiently storing stand-off annotations when applying natural language processing on narrative clinical notes in electronic medical records (EMRs) and efficiently retrieving such annotations that satisfy position constraints. Efficient storage and retrieval of stand-off annotations can facilitate tasks such as mapping unstructured text to electronic medical record ontologies. We first formulate this problem into the interval query problem, for which optimal query/update time is in general logarithm. We next perform a tight time complexity analysis on the basic interval tree query algorithm and show its nonoptimality when being applied to a collection of 13 query types from Allen’s interval algebra. We then study two closely related state-of-the-art interval query algorithms, proposed query reformulations, and augmentations to the second algorithm. Our proposed algorithm achieves logarithmic time stabbing-max query time complexity and solves the stabbing-interval query tasks on all of Allen’s relations in logarithmic time, attaining the theoretic lower bound. Updating time is kept logarithmic and the space requirement is kept linear at the same time. We also discuss interval management in external memory models and higher dimensions. PMID:27478379

  20. Pilot Trial of an Electronic Family Medical History in US Faith-Based Communities.

    PubMed

    Newcomb, Patricia; Canclini, Sharon; Cauble, Denise; Raudonis, Barbara; Golden, Paulette

    2014-02-25

    In spite of the acknowledged importance of collecting family health information, methods of collecting, organizing, and storage of pedigree data are not uniformly utilized in practice, though several electronic tools have been developed for the purpose. Using electronic tools to gather health information may empower individuals to take responsibility in managing their family health history. The purpose of this study was to describe the feasibility and outcomes of introducing small groups to the My Family Health Portrait tool in faith-based communities using faith community nurses (FCNs). This pilot project adopted a mixed methods approach to assess the potential of an educational intervention delivered by FCNs for increasing the use of electronic technologies for organizing and storing family health histories among the general public. Treatment and control groups were recruited from four faith-based communities in north Texas using a parallel-groups quasi-experimental design. Qualitative data were gleaned from field notes made by investigators interacting with FCNs and observing their teaching. A majority of respondents believed that knowing one's health history and passing it on to family and medical personnel is important. Those receiving face-to-face instruction on the electronic tool were significantly more likely to have written down family health information than the control group who received only an informational handout (χ(2) = 5.96, P = .015). Barriers to teaching about and using the electronic tool included FCNs' lack of facility with computers in the educational context and FCN and respondent mistrust of electronic storage for family health information. PMID:24569130

  1. Predictors and Intensity of Online Access to Electronic Medical Records Among Patients With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, David E.; Laccetti, Andrew L.; Chen, Beibei; Yan, Jingsheng; Cai, Jennifer; Gates, Samantha; Xie, Yang; Lee, Simon J. Craddock

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Electronic portals are secure Web-based servers that provide patients with real-time access to their personal health record (PHR). These applications are now widely used at cancer centers nationwide, but their impact has not been well studied. This study set out to determine predictors and patterns of use of a Web-based portal for accessing PHRs and communicating with health providers among patients with cancer. Methods: Retrospective analysis of enrollment in and use of MyChart, a PHR portal for the Epic electronic medical record system, among patients seen at a National Cancer Institute–designated cancer center. Predictors of MyChart use were analyzed through univariable and multivariable regression models. Results: A total of 6,495 patients enrolled in MyChart from 2007 to 2012. The median number of log-ins over this period was 57 (interquartile range 17-137). The most common portal actions were viewing test results (37%), viewing and responding to clinic messages (29%), and sending medical advice requests (6.4%). Increased portal use was significantly associated with younger age, white race, and an upper aerodigestive malignancy diagnosis. Thirty-seven percent of all log-ins and 31% of all medical advice requests occurred outside clinic hours. Over the study period, the average number of patient log-ins per year more than doubled. Conclusions: Among patients with cancer, PHR portal use is frequent and increasing. Younger patients, white patients, and patients with upper aerodigestive malignancies exhibit the heaviest portal use. Understanding the implications of this new technology will be central to the delivery of safe and effective care. PMID:25006222

  2. Postgraduate medical students’ acceptance and understanding of scientific information databases and electronic resources

    PubMed Central

    Azami, Mohammad; Khajouei, Reza; Rakhshani, Safiyeh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The significance and validity of web-based scientific databases are increasing dramatically in the scientific community. Moreover, a great number of students use these resources without having sufficient and accurate knowledge and understanding. In order for students to use these databases and electronic resources optimally, identifying the factors that affect the understanding and acceptance of these resources seems necessary. The aim of this study was to determine postgraduate medical students’ acceptance and understanding of these resources. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted on 311 postgraduate medical students from Kerman University of Medical Science (KMU) in 2013. Data were collected using a researcher-made questionnaire, and the data were analyzed using SPSS. In order to design the model (i.e., the interaction between study variables and to determine the relationships between them in an integrated pattern), LISREL version 8.7 and a structural equation model were used. Descriptive statistics and t-tests also were used in data analysis. Results The results showed that the average components of the perception of usefulness, perception of ease of use, attitude towards use, decision to use, using to perform duties, and using to increase knowledge were 4.31, 4.14, 4.24, 16.27, 20.85, and 16.13 respectively. Accordingly, the average of all these indicators was significantly higher than the assumed amount (p < 0.01). Moreover, the results obtained from factor analysis and the structural equation model indicated that the model of the present study fit the data perfectly. Conclusions Based on the findings of this study, the more these databases are considered useful and easy to use, the more they are used. Therefore, designers of databases and electronic resources can design systems that are both useful and easy to learn by considering the components of the research model. PMID:27123213

  3. Key role of social work in effective communication and conflict resolution process: Medical Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment (MOLST) Program in New York and shared medical decision making at the end of life.

    PubMed

    Bomba, Patricia A; Morrissey, Mary Beth; Leven, David C

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors review the development of the Medical Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment (MOLST) Program and recent landmark legislation in New York State in the context of advance care planning and shared medical decision making at the end of life. Social workers are central health care professionals in working with patients, families, practitioners, health care agents, and surrogates in the health systems and in the communication and conflict resolution process that is integral to health care decision making. The critical importance of ethics and end-of-life training and education for social workers is also addressed. Data from a pilot study evaluating interdisciplinary ethics training on legal and ethical content in communication and conflict resolution skills in health care decision making are reported. Recommendations are made for research on education and training of social workers, and investigation of the role and influence of systems in shaping social work involvement in end-of-life and palliative care. PMID:21391078

  4. Implementing change in primary care practices using electronic medical records: a conceptual framework

    PubMed Central

    Nemeth, Lynne S; Feifer, Chris; Stuart, Gail W; Ornstein, Steven M

    2008-01-01

    Background Implementing change in primary care is difficult, and little practical guidance is available to assist small primary care practices. Methods to structure care and develop new roles are often needed to implement an evidence-based practice that improves care. This study explored the process of change used to implement clinical guidelines for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease in primary care practices that used a common electronic medical record (EMR). Methods Multiple conceptual frameworks informed the design of this study designed to explain the complex phenomena of implementing change in primary care practice. Qualitative methods were used to examine the processes of change that practice members used to implement the guidelines. Purposive sampling in eight primary care practices within the Practice Partner Research Network-Translating Researching into Practice (PPRNet-TRIP II) clinical trial yielded 28 staff members and clinicians who were interviewed regarding how change in practice occurred while implementing clinical guidelines for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease and strokes. Results A conceptual framework for implementing clinical guidelines into primary care practice was developed through this research. Seven concepts and their relationships were modelled within this framework: leaders setting a vision with clear goals for staff to embrace; involving the team to enable the goals and vision for the practice to be achieved; enhancing communication systems to reinforce goals for patient care; developing the team to enable the staff to contribute toward practice improvement; taking small steps, encouraging practices' tests of small changes in practice; assimilating the electronic medical record to maximize clinical effectiveness, enhancing practices' use of the electronic tool they have invested in for patient care improvement; and providing feedback within a culture of improvement, leading to an

  5. DICOM image integration into an electronic medical record using thin viewing clients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Brent K.; Langer, Steven G.; Taira, Ricky K.

    1998-07-01

    Purpose -- To integrate radiological DICOM images into our currently existing web-browsable Electronic Medical Record (MINDscape). Over the last five years the University of Washington has created a clinical data repository combining in a distributed relational database information from multiple departmental databases (MIND). A text-based view of this data called the Mini Medical Record (MMR) has been available for three years. MINDscape, unlike the text based MMR, provides a platform independent, web browser view of the MIND dataset that can easily be linked to other information resources on the network. We have now added the integration of radiological images into MINDscape through a DICOM webserver. Methods/New Work -- we have integrated a commercial webserver that acts as a DICOM Storage Class Provider to our, computed radiography (CR), computed tomography (CT), digital fluoroscopy (DF), magnetic resonance (MR) and ultrasound (US) scanning devices. These images can be accessed through CGI queries or by linking the image server database using ODBC or SQL gateways. This allows the use of dynamic HTML links to the images on the DICOM webserver from MINDscape, so that the radiology reports already resident in the MIND repository can be married with the associated images through the unique examination accession number generated by our Radiology Information System (RIS). The web browser plug-in used provides a wavelet decompression engine (up to 16-bits per pixel) and performs the following image manipulation functions: window/level, flip, invert, sort, rotate, zoom, cine-loop and save as JPEG. Results -- Radiological DICOM image sets (CR, CT, MR and US) are displayed with associated exam reports for referring physician and clinicians anywhere within the widespread academic medical center on PCs, Macs, X-terminals and Unix computers. This system is also being used for home teleradiology application. Conclusion -- Radiological DICOM images can be made available

  6. Development and validation of a continuous measure of patient condition using the Electronic Medical Record.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Michael J; Rothman, Steven I; Beals, Joseph

    2013-10-01

    Patient condition is a key element in communication between clinicians. However, there is no generally accepted definition of patient condition that is independent of diagnosis and that spans acuity levels. We report the development and validation of a continuous measure of general patient condition that is independent of diagnosis, and that can be used for medical-surgical as well as critical care patients. A survey of Electronic Medical Record data identified common, frequently collected non-static candidate variables as the basis for a general, continuously updated patient condition score. We used a new methodology to estimate in-hospital risk associated with each of these variables. A risk function for each candidate input was computed by comparing the final pre-discharge measurements with 1-year post-discharge mortality. Step-wise logistic regression of the variables against 1-year mortality was used to determine the importance of each variable. The final set of selected variables consisted of 26 clinical measurements from four categories: nursing assessments, vital signs, laboratory results and cardiac rhythms. We then constructed a heuristic model quantifying patient condition (overall risk) by summing the single-variable risks. The model's validity was assessed against outcomes from 170,000 medical-surgical and critical care patients, using data from three US hospitals. Outcome validation across hospitals yields an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve(AUC) of ≥0.92 when separating hospice/deceased from all other discharge categories, an AUC of ≥0.93 when predicting 24-h mortality and an AUC of 0.62 when predicting 30-day readmissions. Correspondence with outcomes reflective of patient condition across the acuity spectrum indicates utility in both medical-surgical units and critical care units. The model output, which we call the Rothman Index, may provide clinicians with a longitudinal view of patient condition to help address known

  7. Leveraging electronic health records to study pleiotropic effects on bipolar disorder and medical comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Prieto, M L; Ryu, E; Jenkins, G D; Batzler, A; Nassan, M M; Cuellar-Barboza, A B; Pathak, J; McElroy, S L; Frye, M A; Biernacka, J M

    2016-01-01

    Patients with bipolar disorder (BD) have a high prevalence of comorbid medical illness. However, the mechanisms underlying these comorbidities with BD are not well known. Certain genetic variants may have pleiotropic effects, increasing the risk of BD and other medical illnesses simultaneously. In this study, we evaluated the association of BD-susceptibility genetic variants with various medical conditions that tend to co-exist with BD, using electronic health records (EHR) data linked to genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data. Data from 7316 Caucasian subjects were used to test the association of 19 EHR-derived phenotypes with 34 SNPs that were previously reported to be associated with BD. After Bonferroni multiple testing correction, P<7.7 × 10(-5) was considered statistically significant. The top association findings suggested that the BD risk alleles at SNP rs4765913 in CACNA1C gene and rs7042161 in SVEP1 may be associated with increased risk of 'cardiac dysrhythmias' (odds ratio (OR)=1.1, P=3.4 × 10(-3)) and 'essential hypertension' (OR=1.1, P=3.5 × 10(-3)), respectively. Although these associations are not statistically significant after multiple testing correction, both genes have been previously implicated with cardiovascular phenotypes. Moreover, we present additional evidence supporting these associations, particularly the association of the SVEP1 SNP with hypertension. This study shows the potential for EHR-based analyses of large cohorts to discover pleiotropic effects contributing to complex psychiatric traits and commonly co-occurring medical conditions. PMID:27529678

  8. Numerical Simulation of the Medical Linear Accelerator Electron Beams Absorption by ABS-Plastic doped with Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuchebrov, S. G.; Miloichikova, I. A.; Krasnykh, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper the numerical simulation results of the dose spatial distribution of the medical electron beams in ABS-plastic doped with different concentrations of lead and zinc are shown. The dependences of the test material density on the lead and zinc mass concentrations are illustrated. The depth dose distributions of the medical electron beams in the modified ABS-plastic for three energies 6 MeV, 12 MeV and 20 MeV are tested. The electron beam shapes in the transverse plane in ABS-plastic doped with different concentrations of lead and zinc are presented.

  9. Principle for possible memory structures with extra high density by using the electron sharing mechanisms of atoms in an inflective orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengor, T.

    2014-10-01

    Both of the qualitative and quantitative knowledge of electromagnetic fields in the inter-atomic scale bring useful applications. From this point of view, bringing some possible new sights and solutions to atom-electron-photon-atom and/or molecule interactions is aimed in the near-field at inter atomic scale and their potential applications. The electron sharing processes between neighbor atoms are considered as an inflective surface system and an inflective guiding processes. The critical pass and transition structures are derived. The structures involving trigging that transition mechanisms may be suitable to design extra high density and fast data storage processes. The electron sharing processes between two near atomic system are modelled with gate mechanisms involving two distinct passages: continuous pass and discontinuous pass. Even if the stochastic processes are applicable at these cases theoretical approach putting an influence like inner and external dipole mechanisms fits best to the situation and provides almost deterministic scheme, which has potential to estimate some processes being able to design new electronics structures and devices. We call orbitron all of such structures and/or devices. The boundary value problem of atomic system sharing an electron in the way of electron passage model is formulated in inflective spherical coordinate system. The wave phenomenon is studied near spherically inflection points. The analytical essentials are derived for the solution of Helmholtz's equation when inflective boundaries are included. The evaluation is obtained by the extracted separation method. The results are given by using the spherically inflective wave series. The method is reshaped for the solution of Schrödinger equation.

  10. Defusing Complexity in Intermetallics: How Covalently Shared Electron Pairs Stabilize the FCC Variant Mo2Cu(x)Ga(6-x) (x ≈ 0.9).

    PubMed

    Kilduff, Brandon J; Yannello, Vincent J; Fredrickson, Daniel C

    2015-08-17

    Simple sphere packings of metallic atoms are generally assumed to exhibit highly delocalized bonding, often visualized in terms of a lattice of metal cations immersed in an electron gas. In this Article, we present a compound that demonstrates how covalently shared electron pairs can, in fact, play a key role in the stability of such structures: Mo2Cu(x)Ga(6-x) (x ≈ 0.9). Mo2Cu(x)Ga(6-x) adopts a variant of the common TiAl3 structure type, which itself is a binary coloring of the fcc lattice. Electronic structure calculations trace the formation of this compound to a magic electron count of 14 electrons/T atom (T = transition metal) for the TiAl3 type, for which the Fermi energy coincides with an electronic pseudogap. This count is one electron/T atom lower than the electron concentration for a hypothetical MoGa3 phase, making this structure less competitive relative to more complex alternatives. The favorable 14 electron count can be reached, however, through the partial substitution of Ga with Cu. Using DFT-calibrated Hückel calculations and the reversed approximation Molecular Orbital (raMO) method, we show that the favorability of the 14 electron count has a simple structural origin in terms of the 18 - n rule of T-E intermetallics (E = main group element): the T atoms of the TiAl3 type are arranged into square nets whose edges are bridged by E atoms. The presence of shared electron pairs along these T-T contacts allows for 18 electron configurations to be achieved on the T atoms despite possessing only 18 - 4 = 14 electrons/T atom. This bonding scheme provides a rationale for the observed stability range of TiAl3 type TE3 phases of ca. 13-14 electrons/T atom, and demonstrates how the concept of the covalent bond can extend even to the most metallic of structure types. PMID:26214504

  11. Cost-effectiveness of a shared computerized decision support system for diabetes linked to electronic medical records

    PubMed Central

    Holbrook, Anne; Blackhouse, Gordon; Troyan, Sue; Goeree, Ron

    2011-01-01

    Background Computerized decision support systems (CDSSs) are believed to enhance patient care and reduce healthcare costs; however the current evidence is limited and the cost-effectiveness remains unknown. Objective To estimate the long-term cost-effectiveness of a CDSS linked to evidence-based treatment recommendations for type 2 diabetes. Methods Using the Ontario Diabetes Economic Model, changes in factors (eg, HbA1c) from a randomized controlled trial were used to estimate cost-effectiveness. The cost of implementation, development, and maintenance of the core dataset, and projected diabetes-related complications were included. The base case assumed a 1-year treatment effect, 5% discount rate, and 40-year time horizon. Univariate, one-way sensitivity analyses were carried out by altering different parameter values. The perspective was the Ontario Ministry of Health and costs were in 2010 Canadian dollars. Results The cost of implementing the intervention was $483 699. The one-year intervention reduced HbA1c by 0.2 and systolic blood pressure by 3.95 mm Hg, but increased body mass index by 0.02 kg/m2, resulting in a relative risk reduction of 14% in the occurrence of amputation. The model estimated that the intervention resulted in an additional 0.0117 quality-adjusted life year; the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was $160 845 per quality-adjusted life-year. Conclusion The web-based prototype decision support system slightly improved short-term risk factors. The model predicted moderate improvements in long-term health outcomes. This disease management program will need to develop considerable efficiencies in terms of costs and processes or improved effectiveness to be considered a cost-effective intervention for treating patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:22052900

  12. Cognitive analyses of a paper medical record and electronic medical record on the documentation of two nursing tasks: patient education and adherence assessment of insulin administration.

    PubMed Central

    Rinkus, Susan M.; Chitwood, Ainsley

    2002-01-01

    The incorporation of electronic medical records into busy physician clinics has been a major development in the healthcare industry over the past decade. Documentation of key nursing activities, especially when interacting with patients who have chronic diseases, is often lacking or missing from the paper medical record. A case study of a patient with diabetes mellitus was created. Well established methods for the assessment of usability in the areas of human-computer interaction and computer supported cooperative work were employed to compare the nursing documentation of two tasks in a commercially available electronic medical record (eRecord) and in a paper medical record. Overall, the eRecord was found to improve the timeliness and quality of nursing documentation. With certain tasks, the number of steps to accomplish the same task was higher, which may result in the perception by the end user that the tool is more complex and therefore difficult to use. Recommendations for the eRecord were made to expand the documentation of patient teaching and adherence assessment and to incorporate web technology for patient access to medical records and healthcare information. PMID:12463905

  13. Teaching Vocabulary to Preschoolers with Disabilities Using Adult-Child Shared Bookreading: A Comparison of Traditional and Electronic Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodehouse, Sara Bernice

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to validate adult-child shared storybook reading as a method for teaching target vocabulary words to preschool children with disabilities. The Vocabulary Learning through Books (VLTB) instructional procedure incorporates, adult-child book reading, questioning during reading requiring the child to answer with a target word, and…

  14. Nurses' perceptions of and attitudes toward an electronic medical record system at Seoul National University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Tae-Sa; Park, Ihn Sook; You, Ock-Su; Shin, Hyeon-Ju; Woo, Kyung-Shun; Jo, Eun-Mee

    2006-01-01

    In an effort to investigate nurses' perceptions of and attitudes toward the use of electronic medical record (EMR) systems, 904 nurses in a university hospital were surveyed for demographic data and their perceptions of and attitudes toward an EMR system 6 months after its implementation. The questionnaire consisted of demographic information, perception statements relating to the effect of an EMR system, and attitude statements toward an EMR system (assessed on 4-point Likert scales, Cronbach's alpha = 0.979). Nurses' perceptions and attitudes were generally positive and correlated with the type of nursing unit, and their age, years of nursing experience, and job title. This result reinforces that nurses are generally accepting of the implementation of a new EMR system. However, strategies are needed for improving the satisfaction of nurses who have a negative perception of and attitude toward EMR systems. It is recommended that the findings of our study be implemented in other hospitals with ongoing EMR projects. PMID:17102423

  15. Dynamic Estimation of the Probability of Patient Readmission to the ICU using Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Caballero, Karla; Akella, Ram

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a framework to dynamically estimate the probability that a patient is readmitted after he is discharged from the ICU and transferred to a lower level care. We model this probability as a latent state which evolves over time using Dynamical Linear Models (DLM). We use as an input a combination of numerical and text features obtained from the patient Electronic Medical Records (EMRs). We process the text from the EMRs to capture different diseases, symptoms and treatments by means of noun phrases and ontologies. We also capture the global context of each text entry using Statistical Topic Models. We fill out the missing values using a Expectation Maximization based method (EM). Experimental results show that our method outperforms other methods in the literature terms of AUC, sensitivity and specificity. In addition, we show that the combination of different features (numerical and text) increases the prediction performance of the proposed approach. PMID:26958282

  16. Electronic Medical Records (EMRs), Epidemiology, and Epistemology: Reflections on EMRs and Future Pediatric Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Wasserman, Richard C.

    2011-01-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) are increasingly common in pediatric patient care. EMR data represent a relatively novel and rich resource for clinical research. The fact, however, that pediatric EMR data are collected for the purposes of clinical documentation and billing rather than research creates obstacles to their use in scientific investigation. Particular issues include accuracy, completeness, comparability between settings, ease of extraction, and context of recording. Although these problems can be addressed through standard strategies for dealing with partially accurate and incomplete data, a longer term solution will involve work with pediatric clinicians to improve data quality. As research becomes one of the explicit purposes for which pediatricians collect EMR data, the pediatric clinician will play a central role in future pediatric clinical research. PMID:21622040

  17. Chaplain Documentation and the Electronic Medical Record: A Survey of ACPE Residency Programs.

    PubMed

    Tartaglia, Alexander; Dodd-McCue, Diane; Ford, Timothy; Demm, Charles; Hassell, Alma

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the extent to which chaplaincy departments at ACPE-accredited residency programs make use of the electronic medical record (EMR) for documentation and training. Survey data solicited from 219 programs with a 45% response rate and interview findings from 11 centers demonstrate a high level of usage of the EMR as well as an expectation that CPE residents document each patient/family encounter. Centers provided considerable initial training, but less ongoing monitoring of chaplain documentation. Centers used multiple sources to develop documentation tools for the EMR. One center was verified as having created the spiritual assessment component of the documentation tool from a peer reviewed published model. Interviews found intermittent use of the student chart notes for educational purposes. One center verified a structured manner of monitoring chart notes as a performance improvement activity. Findings suggested potential for the development of a standard documentation tool for chaplain charting and training. PMID:26168408

  18. Modeling drug exposure data in electronic medical records: an application to warfarin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mei; Jiang, Min; Kawai, Vivian K; Stein, Charles M; Roden, Dan M; Denny, Joshua C; Xu, Hua

    2011-01-01

    Identification of patients' drug exposure information is critical to drug-related research that is based on electronic medical records (EMRs). Drug information is often embedded in clinical narratives and drug regimens change frequently because of various reasons like intolerance or insurance issues, making accurate modeling challenging. Here, we developed an informatics framework to determine patient drug exposure histories from EMRs by combining natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning (ML) technologies. Our framework consists of three phases: 1) drug entity recognition - identifying drug mentions; 2) drug event detection - labeling drug mentions with a status (e.g., "on" or "stop"); and 3) drug exposure modeling - predicting if a patient is taking a drug at a given time using the status and temporal information associated with the mentions. We applied the framework to determine patient warfarin exposure at hospital admissions and achieved 87% precision, 79% recall, and an area under the receiver-operator characteristic curve of 0.93. PMID:22195139

  19. Best practices: The electronic medical record is an invaluable clinical tool: let's start using it.

    PubMed

    Vrieze, Scott I; Docherty, Anna; Thuras, Paul; Arbisi, Paul; Iacono, William G; Sponheim, Scott; Erbes, Christopher R; Siegel, Wayne; Leskela, Jennie

    2013-10-01

    This column describes the potential of an enhanced electronic medical record (EMR) to advance best practices by displaying patient history, measuring progress, and facilitating clinical research. To create a graphical, single-page display of patient history, the authors examined data in the Minneapolis Department of Veterans Affairs EMR system, including 1.8 million encounters for 50,000 mental health patients. The prototype dashboard presents information on a patient's current and past providers, diagnoses, therapeutic interventions, prescriptions, dosages, and outcomes. To provide needed outcome data to monitor patient progress, the authors tested two questions with 212 patients. Patient and clinician responses to the questions provide reliable and clinically useful data that can be used in the EMR to track patient change over time. Use of EMRs can bridge gaps between science and practice to inform diagnosis and treatment decisions and permit more accurate prognoses. PMID:23946012

  20. Experience using radio frequency laptops to access the electronic medical record in exam rooms.

    PubMed Central

    Dworkin, L. A.; Krall, M.; Chin, H.; Robertson, N.; Harris, J.; Hughes, J.

    1999-01-01

    Kaiser Permanente, Northwest, evaluated the use of laptop computers to access our existing comprehensive Electronic Medical Record in exam rooms via a wireless radiofrequency (RF) network. Eleven of 22 clinicians who were offered the laptops successfully adopted their use in the exam room. These clinicians were able to increase their exam room time with the patient by almost 4 minutes (25%), apparently without lengthening their overall work day. Patient response to exam room computing was overwhelmingly positive. The RF network response time was similar to the hardwired network. Problems cited by some laptop users and many of the eleven non-adopters included battery issues, different equipment layout and function, and inadequate training. IT support needs for the RF laptops were two to four times greater than for hardwired desktops. Addressing the reliability and training issues should increase clinician acceptance, making a successful general roll-out for exam room computing more likely. PMID:10566458

  1. Calculation of electron Dose Point Kernel in water with GEANT4 for medical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimarães, C. C.; Moralles, M.; Sene, F. F.; Martinelli, J. R.; Okuno, E.

    2009-06-01

    The rapid insertion of new technologies in medical physics in the last years, especially in nuclear medicine, has been followed by a great development of faster Monte Carlo algorithms. GEANT4 is a Monte Carlo toolkit that contains the tools to simulate the problems of particle transport through matter. In this work, GEANT4 was used to calculate the dose-point-kernel (DPK) for monoenergetic electrons in water, which is an important reference medium for nuclear medicine. The three different physical models of electromagnetic interactions provided by GEANT4—Low Energy, Penelope and Standard—were employed. To verify the adequacy of these models, the results were compared with references from the literature. For all energies and physical models, the agreement between calculated DPKs and reported values is satisfactory.

  2. Applying the clinical adoption framework to evaluate the impact of an ambulatory electronic medical record.

    PubMed

    Lau, Francis; Partridge, Colin; Randhawa, Gurprit; Bowen, Mike

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the application of the Clinical Adoption (CA) Framework to evaluate the impact of a recently deployed electronic medical record (EMR) in a Canadian healthcare organization. The CA Framework dimensions evaluated were EMR quality, use and net benefits at the micro level; and people, organization and implementation at the meso level. The study involved clinical and support staff from two ambulatory care clinics, and managers and technical staff from the organization. A number of issues were identified at both levels of the CA Framework that had affected EMR adoption in the two clinics. Some perceived benefits in care coordination and efficiency were reported despite challenges that arose from early deployment decisions. There were five lessons that could be applied to other ambulatory care settings. The CA Framework has proved useful in making sense of ways that EMR can add value to the organization. PMID:23388247

  3. Developing a multivariate electronic medical record integration model for primary health care.

    PubMed

    Lau, Francis; Price, Morgan; Lesperance, Mary

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a multivariate electronic medical record (EMR) integration model for the primary health care setting. Our working hypothesis is that an integrated EMR is associated with high quality primary health care. Our assumption is that EMR integration should be viewed as a form of complex intervention with multiple interacting components that can impact the quality of care. Depending on how well the EMR is integrated in the practice setting, one can expect a corresponding change in the quality of care as measured through a set of primary health care quality indicators. To test the face validity of this model, a Delphi study is being planned where health care providers and information technology professionals involved with EMR adoption are polled for their feedback. This model has the potential to quantify and explain the factors that influence successful EMR integration to improve primary health care. PMID:23388317

  4. Investment subsidies and the adoption of electronic medical records in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Dranove, David; Garthwaite, Craig; Li, Bingyang; Ody, Christopher

    2015-12-01

    In February 2009 the U.S. Congress unexpectedly passed the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (HITECH). HITECH provides up to $27 billion to promote adoption and appropriate use of Electronic Medical Records (EMR) by hospitals. We measure the extent to which HITECH incentive payments spurred EMR adoption by independent hospitals. Adoption rates for all independent hospitals grew from 48 percent in 2008 to 77 percent by 2011. Absent HITECH incentives, we estimate that the adoption rate would have instead been 67 percent in 2011. When we consider that HITECH funds were available for all hospitals and not just marginal adopters, we estimate that the cost of generating an additional adoption was $48 million. We also estimate that in the absence of HITECH incentives, the 77 percent adoption rate would have been realized by 2013, just 2 years after the date achieved due to HITECH. PMID:26596789

  5. Development and Preliminary Evaluation of a Prototype of a Learning Electronic Medical Record System

    PubMed Central

    King, Andrew J.; Cooper, Gregory F.; Hochheiser, Harry; Clermont, Gilles; Visweswaran, Shyam

    2015-01-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) are capturing increasing amounts of data per patient. For clinicians to efficiently and accurately understand a patient’s clinical state, better ways are needed to determine when and how to display EMR data. We built a prototype system that records how physicians view EMR data, which we used to train models that predict which EMR data will be relevant in a given patient. We call this approach a Learning EMR (LEMR). A physician used the prototype to review 59 intensive care unit (ICU) patient cases. We used the data-access patterns from these cases to train logistic regression models that, when evaluated, had AUROC values as high as 0.92 and that averaged 0.73, supporting that the approach is promising. A preliminary usability study identified advantages of the system and a few concerns about implementation. Overall, 3 of 4 ICU physicians were enthusiastic about features of the prototype. PMID:26958296

  6. Physicians' and nurses' reactions to electronic medical records. Managerial and occupational implications.

    PubMed

    Darr, Asaf; Harrison, Michael I; Shakked, Leora; Shalom, Nira

    2003-01-01

    Aims to understand the managerial implications of the perceptions hospital physicians and nurses hold toward the introduction of electronic medical records (EMRS). In-depth interviews were used with 18 hospital physicians and eight nurses from several different hospital wards at a large government-run, university-affiliated hospital in Israel, where EMRs were gradually introduced over the last 20 years. Physicians identified six different domains of impact. Senior physicians, most of whom held managerial roles, tended to emphasise managerial outcomes and to view these as positively affecting their organisations. Junior doctors emphasised mostly negative occupational effects of the EMR on their work--including limits to professional autonomy, heavier administrative burdens, and reinforcement of existing professional hierarchies. Nurses identified different domains and saw benefits for quality and administration of patient care. PMID:14628488

  7. Beyond information retrieval and electronic health record use: competencies in clinical informatics for medical education

    PubMed Central

    Hersh, William R; Gorman, Paul N; Biagioli, Frances E; Mohan, Vishnu; Gold, Jeffrey A; Mejicano, George C

    2014-01-01

    Physicians in the 21st century will increasingly interact in diverse ways with information systems, requiring competence in many aspects of clinical informatics. In recent years, many medical school curricula have added content in information retrieval (search) and basic use of the electronic health record. However, this omits the growing number of other ways that physicians are interacting with information that includes activities such as clinical decision support, quality measurement and improvement, personal health records, telemedicine, and personalized medicine. We describe a process whereby six faculty members representing different perspectives came together to define competencies in clinical informatics for a curriculum transformation process occurring at Oregon Health & Science University. From the broad competencies, we also developed specific learning objectives and milestones, an implementation schedule, and mapping to general competency domains. We present our work to encourage debate and refinement as well as facilitate evaluation in this area. PMID:25057246

  8. Building national electronic medical record systems via the World Wide Web.

    PubMed Central

    Kohane, I S; Greenspun, P; Fackler, J; Cimino, C; Szolovits, P

    1996-01-01

    Electronic medical record systems (EMRSs) currently do not lend themselves easily to cross-institutional clinical care and research. Unique system designs coupled with a lack of standards have led to this difficulty. The authors have designed a preliminary EMRS architecture (W3-EMRS) that exploits the multiplatform, multiprotocol, client-server technology of the World Wide Web. The architecture abstracts the clinical information model and the visual presentation away from the underlying EMRS. As a result, computation upon data elements of the EMRS and their presentation are no longer tied to the underlying EMRS structures. The architecture is intended to enable implementation of programs that provide uniform access to multiple, heterogeneous legacy EMRSs. The authors have implemented an initial prototype of W3-EMRS that accesses the database of the Boston Children's Hospital Clinician's Workstation. PMID:8723610

  9. Cost-Benefit Analysis of Electronic Medical Record System at a Tertiary Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jong Soo; Lee, Woo Baik

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Although Electronic Medical Record (EMR) systems provide various benefits, there are both advantages and disadvantages regarding its cost-effectiveness. This study analyzed the economic effects of EMR systems using a cost-benefit analysis based on the differential costs of managerial accounting. Methods Samsung Medical Center (SMC) is a general hospital in Korea that developed an EMR system for outpatients from 2006 to 2008. This study measured the total costs and benefits during an 8-year period after EMR adoption. The costs include the system costs of building the EMR and the costs incurred in smoothing its adoption. The benefits included cost reductions after its adoption and additional revenues from both remodeling of paper-chart storage areas and medical transcriptionists' contribution. The measured amounts were discounted by SMC's expected interest rate to calculate the net present value (NPV), benefit-cost ratio (BCR), and discounted payback period (DPP). Results During the analysis period, the cumulative NPV and the BCR were US$3,617 thousand and 1.23, respectively. The DPP was about 6.18 years. Conclusions Although the adoption of an EMR resulted in overall growth in administrative costs, it is cost-effective since the cumulative NPV was positive. The positive NPV was attributed to both cost reductions and additional revenues. EMR adoption is not so attractive to management in that the DPP is longer than 5 years at 6.18 and the BCR is near 1 at 1.23. However, an EMR is a worthwhile investment, seeing that this study did not include any qualitative benefits and that the paper-chart system was cost-centric. PMID:24175119

  10. Primary Care Physicians’ Use of an Electronic Medical Record System: A Cognitive Task Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hadas-Dayagi, Michal; Ziv, Amitai; Reis, Shmuel

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe physicians’ patterns of using an Electronic Medical Record (EMR) system; to reveal the underlying cognitive elements involved in EMR use, possible resulting errors, and influences on patient–doctor communication; to gain insight into the role of expertise in incorporating EMRs into clinical practice in general and communicative behavior in particular. DESIGN Cognitive task analysis using semi-structured interviews and field observations. PARTICIPANTS Twenty-five primary care physicians from the northern district of the largest health maintenance organization (HMO) in Israel. RESULTS The comprehensiveness, organization, and readability of data in the EMR system reduced physicians’ need to recall information from memory and the difficulty of reading handwriting. Physicians perceived EMR use as reducing the cognitive load associated with clinical tasks. Automaticity of EMR use contributed to efficiency, but sometimes resulted in errors, such as the selection of incorrect medication or the input of data into the wrong patient’s chart. EMR use interfered with patient–doctor communication. The main strategy for overcoming this problem involved separating EMR use from time spent communicating with patients. Computer mastery and enhanced physicians’ communication skills also helped. CONCLUSIONS There is a fine balance between the benefits and risks of EMR use. Automaticity, especially in combination with interruptions, emerged as the main cognitive factor contributing to errors. EMR use had a negative influence on communication, a problem that can be partially addressed by improving the spatial organization of physicians’ offices and by enhancing physicians’ computer and communication skills. PMID:19130148

  11. Extracting Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma from Electronic Medical Records for Genetic Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo, Nicole A.; Farber-Eger, Eric; Goodloe, Robert; Haines, Jonathan L.; Crawford, Dana C.

    2015-01-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) are being widely implemented for use in genetic and genomic studies. As a phenotypic rich resource, EMRs provide researchers with the opportunity to identify disease cohorts and perform genotype-phenotype association studies. The Epidemiologic Architecture for Genes Linked to Environment (EAGLE) study, as part of the Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) I study, has genotyped more than 15,000 individuals of diverse genetic ancestry in BioVU, the Vanderbilt University Medical Center’s biorepository linked to a de-identified version of the EMR (EAGLE BioVU). Here we develop and deploy an algorithm utilizing data mining techniques to identify primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) in African Americans from EAGLE BioVU for genetic association studies. The algorithm described here was designed using a combination of diagnostic codes, current procedural terminology billing codes, and free text searches to identify POAG status in situations where gold-standard digital photography cannot be accessed. The case algorithm identified 267 potential POAG subjects but underperformed after manual review with a positive predictive value of 51.6% and an accuracy of 76.3%. The control algorithm identified controls with a negative predictive value of 98.3%. Although the case algorithm requires more downstream manual review for use in large-scale studies, it provides a basis by which to extract a specific clinical subtype of glaucoma from EMRs in the absence of digital photographs. PMID:26061293

  12. Wound emergencies: the importance of assessment, documentation, and early treatment using a wound electronic medical record.

    PubMed

    Golinko, Michael S; Clark, Sunday; Rennert, Robert; Flattau, Anna; Boulton, Andrew J M; Brem, Harold

    2009-05-01

    Chronic wounds such as diabetic foot ulcers, venous ulcers, and pressure ulcers are a major source of morbidity and mortality. To describe wound characteristics associated with a wound emergency, the Wound Electronic Medical Records (WEMR) of 200 consecutive admissions (139 patients, average number of admissions 1.4) to a dedicated inpatient wound healing unit over a period of 5 months were retrospectively reviewed. Patient mean age was 62 +/- 16 years, 59% were men, 27% had a foot ulcer and diabetes mellitus, and 29% had venous ulcers. Presenting signs and symptoms included wound pain, cellulitis, nonpurulent drainage, and undermining, but few presented with classic local clinical signs of infection. Treatment consisted of sharp debridement with deep tissue culture and pathology from the wound base and/or systemic antibiotics. Twenty-percent (20%) of patients had pathology-confirmed and 38% had pathology- or radiology-confirmed osteomyelitis on admission, supporting that new or increasing wound pain, cellulitis, and/or nonpurulent drainage or presence of significant undermining may be indicative of an invasive infection and that patients presenting with these signs and symptoms require an immediate treatment plan and consideration of hospital admission. Use of an objective documentation system such as the WEMR may help alert clinicians to subtle wound changes that require aggressive treatment; thereby, avoiding emergency room visits and hospital admissions. Future research is needed utilizing the WEMR across multiple medical centers to further define criteria for a chronic wound emergency. PMID:19471049

  13. E-junk is no joke: National lab shares award-winning strategies for electronics lifecycle management

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, Kami L.; Story, Sean E.; Jagelski, John C.

    2008-06-13

    Nomatter how big or small an enterprise is, electronics represent potentially serious environmental and financial costs if not managed properly. Comprehensive lifecycle management can be a strategic asset to any organization that uses electronics, and the benefits are far-reaching. In addition to the end goal of protecting the environment, lifecycle management offers opportunities for an organization to o demonstrate leadership by taking responsibility for electronic equipment o receive recognition for P2 efforts o save money by implementing smarter purchasing strategies o more effectively track assets. The experience of the Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory offers an example of how one organization is addressing the electronics challenge. This article offers a brief description of what PNNL is doing to address the issues of electronic waste, plus some practical tips for dealing with electronic waste through responsible lifecycle management.

  14. Identification of a potential fibromyalgia diagnosis using random forest modeling applied to electronic medical records

    PubMed Central

    Emir, Birol; Masters, Elizabeth T; Mardekian, Jack; Clair, Andrew; Kuhn, Max; Silverman, Stuart L

    2015-01-01

    Background Diagnosis of fibromyalgia (FM), a chronic musculoskeletal condition characterized by widespread pain and a constellation of symptoms, remains challenging and is often delayed. Methods Random forest modeling of electronic medical records was used to identify variables that may facilitate earlier FM identification and diagnosis. Subjects aged ≥18 years with two or more listings of the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, (ICD-9) code for FM (ICD-9 729.1) ≥30 days apart during the 2012 calendar year were defined as cases among subjects associated with an integrated delivery network and who had one or more health care provider encounter in the Humedica database in calendar years 2011 and 2012. Controls were without the FM ICD-9 codes. Seventy-two demographic, clinical, and health care resource utilization variables were entered into a random forest model with downsampling to account for cohort imbalances (<1% subjects had FM). Importance of the top ten variables was ranked based on normalization to 100% for the variable with the largest loss in predicting performance by its omission from the model. Since random forest is a complex prediction method, a set of simple rules was derived to help understand what factors drive individual predictions. Results The ten variables identified by the model were: number of visits where laboratory/non-imaging diagnostic tests were ordered; number of outpatient visits excluding office visits; age; number of office visits; number of opioid prescriptions; number of medications prescribed; number of pain medications excluding opioids; number of medications administered/ordered; number of emergency room visits; and number of musculoskeletal conditions. A receiver operating characteristic curve confirmed the model’s predictive accuracy using an independent test set (area under the curve, 0.810). To enhance interpretability, nine rules were developed that could be used with good predictive probability of

  15. Tailoring an intervention to the context and system redesign related to the intervention: A case study of implementing shared medical appointments for diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kirsh, Susan R; Lawrence, Renée H; Aron, David C

    2008-01-01

    Background Incorporating shared medical appointments (SMAs) or group visits into clinical practice to improve care and increase efficiency has become a popular intervention, but the processes to implement and sustain them have not been well described. The purpose of this study was to describe the process of implementation of SMAs in the local context of a primary care clinic over time. Methods The setting was a primary care clinic of an urban academic medical center of the Veterans Health Administration. We performed an in-depth case analysis utilizing both an innovations framework and a nested systems framework approach. This analysis helped organize and summarize implementation and sustainability issues, specifically: the pre-SMA local context; the processes of tailoring and implementation of the intervention; and the evolution and sustainability of the intervention and its context. Results Both the improvement intervention and the local context co-adapted and evolved during implementation, ensuring sustainability. The most important promoting factors were the formation of a core team committed to quality and improvement, and the clinic leadership that was supported strongly by the team members. Tailoring had to also take into account key innovation-hindering factors, including limited resources (such as space), potential to alter longstanding patient-provider relationships, and organizational silos (disconnected groups) with core team members reporting to different supervisors. Conclusion Although interventions must be designed to meet the needs of the sites in which they are implemented, specific guidance tailored to the practice environment was lacking. SMAs require complex changes that impact on care routines, collaborations, and various organizational levels. Although the SMA was not envisioned originally as a form of system redesign that would alter the context in which it was implemented, it became clear that tailoring the intervention alone would not

  16. Anonymity Versus Privacy: Selective Information Sharing in Online Cancer Communities

    PubMed Central

    Vermeulen, Ivar E; Beekers, Nienke

    2014-01-01

    Background Active sharing in online cancer communities benefits patients. However, many patients refrain from sharing health information online due to privacy concerns. Existing research on privacy emphasizes data security and confidentiality, largely focusing on electronic medical records. Patient preferences around information sharing in online communities remain poorly understood. Consistent with the privacy calculus perspective adopted from e-commerce research, we suggest that patients approach online information sharing instrumentally, weighing privacy costs against participation benefits when deciding whether to share certain information. Consequently, we argue that patients prefer sharing clinical information over daily life and identity information that potentially compromises anonymity. Furthermore, we explore whether patients’ prior experiences, age, health, and gender affect perceived privacy costs and thus willingness to share information. Objective The goal of the present study is to document patient preferences for sharing information within online health platforms. Methods A total of 115 cancer patients reported sharing intentions for 15 different types of information, demographics, health status, prior privacy experiences, expected community utility, and privacy concerns. Results Factor analysis on the 15 information types revealed 3 factors coinciding with 3 proposed information categories: clinical, daily life, and identity information. A within-subject ANOVA showed a strong preference for sharing clinical information compared to daily life and identity information (F 1,114=135.59, P=.001, η2=.93). Also, adverse online privacy experiences, age, and health status negatively affected information-sharing intentions. Female patients shared information less willingly. Conclusions Respondents’ information-sharing intentions depend on dispositional and situational factors. Patients share medical details more willingly than daily life or identity

  17. Improving venous thromboembolism risk assessment compliance using the electronic tool in admitted medical patients

    PubMed Central

    Taha, Haytham; Raji, Salama J.; Ellahham, Samer; Bashir, Nihal; Al hanaee, Manar; Boharoon, Hessa; AlFalahi, May

    2015-01-01

    Sheikh Khalifa Medical City (SKMC) in Abu Dhabi is the main tertiary care referral hospital in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) with 560 bed capacity that is fully occupied most of the time. SKMC senior management has made a commitment to make quality and patient safety a top priority. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk assessment has been identified as a critical patient safety measure and key performance indicator. The electronic VTE risk assessment form a computerized decision support tool was introduced to improve adherence with deep venous thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis recommendations. A multidisciplinary task force team was formed and led this quality improvement project. The purpose of this publication is to indicate the quality improvement interventions implemented to enhance compliance with VTE risk assessment and the outcomes of those interventions. We chose to conduct the pilot study in General Medicine as it is the busiest department in the hospital. The study period was from April 2014 till August 2015.The lessons learned were disseminated throughout the hospital. Our aim was to improve VTE risk assessment compliance by using the electronic form in order to ensure patient safety and reduce preventable harm. VTE risk assessment compliance improved in general medicine from 4% to 98%, and overall SKMC compliance from 21% to above 90%. PMID:26734399

  18. Improving venous thromboembolism risk assessment compliance using the electronic tool in admitted medical patients.

    PubMed

    Taha, Haytham; Raji, Salama J; Ellahham, Samer; Bashir, Nihal; Al Hanaee, Manar; Boharoon, Hessa; AlFalahi, May

    2015-01-01

    Sheikh Khalifa Medical City (SKMC) in Abu Dhabi is the main tertiary care referral hospital in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) with 560 bed capacity that is fully occupied most of the time. SKMC senior management has made a commitment to make quality and patient safety a top priority. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk assessment has been identified as a critical patient safety measure and key performance indicator. The electronic VTE risk assessment form a computerized decision support tool was introduced to improve adherence with deep venous thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis recommendations. A multidisciplinary task force team was formed and led this quality improvement project. The purpose of this publication is to indicate the quality improvement interventions implemented to enhance compliance with VTE risk assessment and the outcomes of those interventions. We chose to conduct the pilot study in General Medicine as it is the busiest department in the hospital. The study period was from April 2014 till August 2015.The lessons learned were disseminated throughout the hospital. Our aim was to improve VTE risk assessment compliance by using the electronic form in order to ensure patient safety and reduce preventable harm. VTE risk assessment compliance improved in general medicine from 4% to 98%, and overall SKMC compliance from 21% to above 90%. PMID:26734399

  19. Restructuring the electronic medical record to incorporate full digital signature capability.

    PubMed

    Zuckerman, A E

    2001-01-01

    The security of Electronic Medical Records can be enhanced by the addition of digital signatures that guarantee data integrity, authenticate the signer, and establish non-repudiation through the use of public key encryption. The task is complicated by the contribution of multiple providers to an encounter and the entry of data at multiple points in time Dividing encounters into an episode of care and redesigning the data model of the EMR will facilitate full signature capabilities. Generation of digital signatures is best accomplished using microprocessors on smart cards that control visibility of the private keys and assist in user authentication. The Java Programming Language including cryptography extensions and a smart card API is a useful tool for adding digital signature to an EMR. Inter-operability of signatures and continuity of signature will require attention to standards and preservation of cryptography and authentication certificate archives. Digital signatures will need to accommodate changes in data storage formats when information is transported between EMR systems using XML or other transaction standards because the original signatures will not validate if the data storage format changes. The costs of adding digital signature to EMR mandates serious examination of the business case for digital signature within an EMR as compared with transactions such as electronic prescriptions. At present, there is no regulatory requirement for digital signature of an EMR. PMID:11825294

  20. Silicon Ultra fast Cameras for electron and γ sources In Medical Applications: a progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgheroni, A.; Badano, L.; Berst, D.; Bianchi, C.; Bol, J.; Caccia, M.; Cappellini, C.; Claus, G.; Colledani, C.; Conte, L.; Czermak, A.; Deptuch, G.; de Boer, W.; Domanski, K.; Dulinski, W.; Dulny, B.; Ferrando, O.; Grigoriev, E.; Grabiec, P.; Grodner, M.; Lorusso, R.; Jaroszewicz, B.; Jastrzab, M.; Jungermann, L.; Klatka, T.; Kociubinski, A.; Koziel, M.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharski, K.; Kuta, S.; Marczewski, J.; Mozzanica, A.; Niemec, H.; Novario, R.; Paolucci, L.; Popowski, Y.; Prest, M.; Przykutta, A.; Riester, J.-L.; Rovere, M.; Sapor, M.; Schweickert, H.; Sowicki, B.; Spanò, B.; Szelezniak, M.; Tomaszewski, D.; Zalewska, A.

    2006-01-01

    SUCIMA (Silicon Ultra fast Cameras for electron and γ sources In Medical Applications) is a project approved by the European Commission within the Fifth Framework Programme, with the primary goal of developing a real time dosimeter based on direct detection of ionising particles in a position sensitive Silicon sensor. The main applications of this device are imaging of intravascular brachytherapy radioactive sources with activities up to 3 GBq and real time monitoring of hadrontherapy beams. In order to perform a feasibility study, during the first two years a real time dosimeter has been engineered using Silicon microstrip detectors read out by an integrating dead-timeless front-end electronics. The prototypes have been qualified as relative dosimeter with respect to certified secondary standards; moreover, further measurements are on going in order to investigate the possibility to use the sensors as absolute dosimeters. Since the final device is supposed to provide a two dimensional image, two different Monolithic Active Pixel dosimeters have been designed and produced by the collaboration based on CMOS and Silicon On Insulator technologies. The main features of the two sensors are presented in this paper.

  1. Medical Treatments for Fibroids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Medical Treatments for Fibroids Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... suggest medical treatments to reduce the symptoms of fibroids or to stop the growth of fibroids. These ...

  2. Multiple-source models for electron beams of a medical linear accelerator using BEAMDP computer code

    PubMed Central

    Jabbari, Nasrollah; Barati, Amir Hoshang; Rahmatnezhad, Leili

    2012-01-01

    Aim The aim of this work was to develop multiple-source models for electron beams of the NEPTUN 10PC medical linear accelerator using the BEAMDP computer code. Background One of the most accurate techniques of radiotherapy dose calculation is the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of radiation transport, which requires detailed information of the beam in the form of a phase-space file. The computing time required to simulate the beam data and obtain phase-space files from a clinical accelerator is significant. Calculation of dose distributions using multiple-source models is an alternative method to phase-space data as direct input to the dose calculation system. Materials and methods Monte Carlo simulation of accelerator head was done in which a record was kept of the particle phase-space regarding the details of the particle history. Multiple-source models were built from the phase-space files of Monte Carlo simulations. These simplified beam models were used to generate Monte Carlo dose calculations and to compare those calculations with phase-space data for electron beams. Results Comparison of the measured and calculated dose distributions using the phase-space files and multiple-source models for three electron beam energies showed that the measured and calculated values match well each other throughout the curves. Conclusion It was found that dose distributions calculated using both the multiple-source models and the phase-space data agree within 1.3%, demonstrating that the models can be used for dosimetry research purposes and dose calculations in radiotherapy. PMID:24377026

  3. Barriers to the acceptance of electronic medical records by physicians from systematic review to taxonomy and interventions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The main objective of this research is to identify, categorize, and analyze barriers perceived by physicians to the adoption of Electronic Medical Records (EMRs) in order to provide implementers with beneficial intervention options. Methods A systematic literature review, based on research papers from 1998 to 2009, concerning barriers to the acceptance of EMRs by physicians was conducted. Four databases, "Science", "EBSCO", "PubMed" and "The Cochrane Library", were used in the literature search. Studies were included in the analysis if they reported on physicians' perceived barriers to implementing and using electronic medical records. Electronic medical records are defined as computerized medical information systems that collect, store and display patient information. Results The study includes twenty-two articles that have considered barriers to EMR as perceived by physicians. Eight main categories of barriers, including a total of 31 sub-categories, were identified. These eight categories are: A) Financial, B) Technical, C) Time, D) Psychological, E) Social, F) Legal, G) Organizational, and H) Change Process. All these categories are interrelated with each other. In particular, Categories G (Organizational) and H (Change Process) seem to be mediating factors on other barriers. By adopting a change management perspective, we develop some barrier-related interventions that could overcome the identified barriers. Conclusions Despite the positive effects of EMR usage in medical practices, the adoption rate of such systems is still low and meets resistance from physicians. This systematic review reveals that physicians may face a range of barriers when they approach EMR implementation. We conclude that the process of EMR implementation should be treated as a change project, and led by implementers or change managers, in medical practices. The quality of change management plays an important role in the success of EMR implementation. The barriers and

  4. Design and characterization of electron beam focusing for X-ray generation in novel medical imaging architecturea

    PubMed Central

    Bogdan Neculaes, V.; Zou, Yun; Zavodszky, Peter; Inzinna, Louis; Zhang, Xi; Conway, Kenneth; Caiafa, Antonio; Frutschy, Kristopher; Waters, William; De Man, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    A novel electron beam focusing scheme for medical X-ray sources is described in this paper. Most vacuum based medical X-ray sources today employ a tungsten filament operated in temperature limited regime, with electrostatic focusing tabs for limited range beam optics. This paper presents the electron beam optics designed for the first distributed X-ray source in the world for Computed Tomography (CT) applications. This distributed source includes 32 electron beamlets in a common vacuum chamber, with 32 circular dispenser cathodes operated in space charge limited regime, where the initial circular beam is transformed into an elliptical beam before being collected at the anode. The electron beam optics designed and validated here are at the heart of the first Inverse Geometry CT system, with potential benefits in terms of improved image quality and dramatic X-ray dose reduction for the patient. PMID:24826066

  5. Design and characterization of electron beam focusing for X-ray generation in novel medical imaging architecturea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdan Neculaes, V.; Zou, Yun; Zavodszky, Peter; Inzinna, Louis; Zhang, Xi; Conway, Kenneth; Caiafa, Antonio; Frutschy, Kristopher; Waters, William; De Man, Bruno

    2014-05-01

    A novel electron beam focusing scheme for medical X-ray sources is described in this paper. Most vacuum based medical X-ray sources today employ a tungsten filament operated in temperature limited regime, with electrostatic focusing tabs for limited range beam optics. This paper presents the electron beam optics designed for the first distributed X-ray source in the world for Computed Tomography (CT) applications. This distributed source includes 32 electron beamlets in a common vacuum chamber, with 32 circular dispenser cathodes operated in space charge limited regime, where the initial circular beam is transformed into an elliptical beam before being collected at the anode. The electron beam optics designed and validated here are at the heart of the first Inverse Geometry CT system, with potential benefits in terms of improved image quality and dramatic X-ray dose reduction for the patient.

  6. Ascertaining Problems with Medication Histories

    PubMed Central

    Halapy, Henry; Kertland, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Background: Accurate and complete medication histories are not always obtained in clinical practice. Objective: This qualitative research study was undertaken to explore the barriers to and facilitators of obtaining accurate medication histories. Methods: Individual interviews, based on a structured interview guide, were conducted with 25 patients from both inpatient and ambulatory care clinic settings. Focus groups, based on a semistructured interview guide, were conducted with pharmacists, medical residents, and nurses. Transcribed data were analyzed by forming coded units and assessing these units for emerging themes. Results: Major themes that emerged from the patient interviews included patient ownership of health and medication knowledge (with knowledge of medications and their side effects and how to take medications being seen as important), patient-specific strategies to improve medication histories (e.g., use of regularly updated medication lists), and suggestions for system-level facilitators to improve medication histories (e.g., centralized databases of medication histories, increased patient education regarding the use and purpose of medications). Major themes also emerged from focus groups with health care professionals, including shared responsibility for medication history-taking among all 3 health care professions, perceptions about the barriers to medication history-taking (including patients not knowing their medications and not bringing their medication lists), and suggestions to improve medication histories (e.g., educating patients to bring medication vials to hospital admissions and appointments, using a centralized computer database for medication histories). Conclusions: Key recommendations resulting from this study include using standardized documentation techniques for medication histories, recording of medication history information in centralized electronic databases, educating patients to bring medications to every health care visit

  7. Automated semantic indexing of imaging reports to support retrieval of medical images in the multimedia electronic medical record.

    PubMed

    Lowe, H J; Antipov, I; Hersh, W; Smith, C A; Mailhot, M

    1999-12-01

    This paper describes preliminary work evaluating automated semantic indexing of radiology imaging reports to represent images stored in the Image Engine multimedia medical record system at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. The authors used the SAPHIRE indexing system to automatically identify important biomedical concepts within radiology reports and represent these concepts with terms from the 1998 edition of the U.S. National Library of Medicine's Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) Metathesaurus. This automated UMLS indexing was then compared with manual UMLS indexing of the same reports. Human indexing identified appropriate UMLS Metathesaurus descriptors for 81% of the important biomedical concepts contained in the report set. SAPHIRE automatically identified UMLS Metathesaurus descriptors for 64% of the important biomedical concepts contained in the report set. The overall conclusions of this pilot study were that the UMLS metathesaurus provided adequate coverage of the majority of the important concepts contained within the radiology report test set and that SAPHIRE could automatically identify and translate almost two thirds of these concepts into appropriate UMLS descriptors. Further work is required to improve both the recall and precision of this automated concept extraction process. PMID:10805018

  8. MEDICAL "DEPRIVATION."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SUCHMAN, EDWARD A.

    THE SOCIAL AND MEDICAL PROBLEM TODAY HAS SHIFTED FROM PROVIDING FOR THE EMERGENCY MEDICAL NEEDS OF THE INDIGENT SICK TO RAISING THE LEVEL OF LOWER CLASS PARTICIPATION IN THE BENEFITS OF MODERN MEDICINE. GREATER ATTENTION IS BEING FOCUSED ON MEDICAL DEPRIVATION SUFFERED BY LARGE SEGMENTS OF THE POPULATION WHO DO NOT SHARE EQUALLY IN MEDICAL…

  9. Improving the power of genetic association tests with imperfect phenotype derived from electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Sinnott, Jennifer A; Dai, Wei; Liao, Katherine P; Shaw, Stanley Y; Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N; Gainer, Vivian S; Karlson, Elizabeth W; Churchill, Susanne; Szolovits, Peter; Murphy, Shawn; Kohane, Isaac; Plenge, Robert; Cai, Tianxi

    2014-11-01

    To reduce costs and improve clinical relevance of genetic studies, there has been increasing interest in performing such studies in hospital-based cohorts by linking phenotypes extracted from electronic medical records (EMRs) to genotypes assessed in routinely collected medical samples. A fundamental difficulty in implementing such studies is extracting accurate information about disease outcomes and important clinical covariates from large numbers of EMRs. Recently, numerous algorithms have been developed to infer phenotypes by combining information from multiple structured and unstructured variables extracted from EMRs. Although these algorithms are quite accurate, they typically do not provide perfect classification due to the difficulty in inferring meaning from the text. Some algorithms can produce for each patient a probability that the patient is a disease case. This probability can be thresholded to define case-control status, and this estimated case-control status has been used to replicate known genetic associations in EMR-based studies. However, using the estimated disease status in place of true disease status results in outcome misclassification, which can diminish test power and bias odds ratio estimates. We propose to instead directly model the algorithm-derived probability of being a case. We demonstrate how our approach improves test power and effect estimation in simulation studies, and we describe its performance in a study of rheumatoid arthritis. Our work provides an easily implemented solution to a major practical challenge that arises in the use of EMR data, which can facilitate the use of EMR infrastructure for more powerful, cost-effective, and diverse genetic studies. PMID:25062868

  10. Cost-effectiveness analysis of a hospital electronic medication management system

    PubMed Central

    Gospodarevskaya, Elena; Li, Ling; Richardson, Katrina L; Roffe, David; Heywood, Maureen; Day, Richard O; Graves, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Objective To conduct a cost–effectiveness analysis of a hospital electronic medication management system (eMMS). Methods We compared costs and benefits of paper-based prescribing with a commercial eMMS (CSC MedChart) on one cardiology ward in a major 326-bed teaching hospital, assuming a 15-year time horizon and a health system perspective. The eMMS implementation and operating costs were obtained from the study site. We used data on eMMS effectiveness in reducing potential adverse drug events (ADEs), and potential ADEs intercepted, based on review of 1 202 patient charts before (n = 801) and after (n = 401) eMMS. These were combined with published estimates of actual ADEs and their costs. Results The rate of potential ADEs following eMMS fell from 0.17 per admission to 0.05; a reduction of 71%. The annualized eMMS implementation, maintenance, and operating costs for the cardiology ward were A$61 741 (US$55 296). The estimated reduction in ADEs post eMMS was approximately 80 actual ADEs per year. The reduced costs associated with these ADEs were more than sufficient to offset the costs of the eMMS. Estimated savings resulting from eMMS implementation were A$63–66 (US$56–59) per admission (A$97 740–$102 000 per annum for this ward). Sensitivity analyses demonstrated results were robust when both eMMS effectiveness and costs of actual ADEs were varied substantially. Conclusion The eMMS within this setting was more effective and less expensive than paper-based prescribing. Comparison with the few previous full economic evaluations available suggests a marked improvement in the cost–effectiveness of eMMS, largely driven by increased effectiveness of contemporary eMMs in reducing medication errors. PMID:25670756

  11. A Simple and Portable Algorithm for Identifying Atrial Fibrillation in the Electronic Medical Record.

    PubMed

    Khurshid, Shaan; Keaney, John; Ellinor, Patrick T; Lubitz, Steven A

    2016-01-15

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is common and increases stroke risk and mortality. Many knowledge gaps remain with respect to practice patterns and outcomes. Electronic medical records (EMRs) may serve as powerful research tools if AF status can be properly ascertained. We sought to develop an algorithm for identifying subjects with and without AF in the EMR and compare it to previous methods. Using a hospital network EMR (n = 5,737,846), we randomly selected 8,200 subjects seen at a large academic medical center in January 2014 to derive and validate 7 AF classification schemas (4 cases and 3 controls) to construct a composite AF algorithm. In an independent sample of 172,138 subjects, we compared this algorithm against published AF classification methods. In total, we performed manual adjudication of AF in 700 subjects. Three AF schemas (AF1, AF2, and AF4) achieved positive predictive value (PPV) >0.9. Two control schemas achieved PPV >0.9 (control 1 and control 3). A combination algorithm AF1, AF2, and AF4 (PPV 88%; 8.2% classified) outperformed published classification methods including >1 outpatient International Statistical Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision code or 1 outpatient code with an electrocardiogram demonstrating AF (PPV 82%; 5.9% classified), ≥ 1 inpatient International Statistical Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision code or electrocardiogram demonstrating AF (PPV 88%; 6.1% classified), or the intersection of these (PPV 84%; 7.4% classified). When applied simultaneously, the case and control algorithms classified 98.4% of the cohort with zero disagreement. In conclusion, we derived a parsimonious and portable algorithm to identify subjects with and without AF with high sensitivity. If broadly applied, this algorithm can provide optimal power for EMR-based AF research. PMID:26684516

  12. Personalized Mortality Prediction Driven by Electronic Medical Data and a Patient Similarity Metric

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joon; Maslove, David M.; Dubin, Joel A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical outcome prediction normally employs static, one-size-fits-all models that perform well for the average patient but are sub-optimal for individual patients with unique characteristics. In the era of digital healthcare, it is feasible to dynamically personalize decision support by identifying and analyzing similar past patients, in a way that is analogous to personalized product recommendation in e-commerce. Our objectives were: 1) to prove that analyzing only similar patients leads to better outcome prediction performance than analyzing all available patients, and 2) to characterize the trade-off between training data size and the degree of similarity between the training data and the index patient for whom prediction is to be made. Methods and Findings We deployed a cosine-similarity-based patient similarity metric (PSM) to an intensive care unit (ICU) database to identify patients that are most similar to each patient and subsequently to custom-build 30-day mortality prediction models. Rich clinical and administrative data from the first day in the ICU from 17,152 adult ICU admissions were analyzed. The results confirmed that using data from only a small subset of most similar patients for training improves predictive performance in comparison with using data from all available patients. The results also showed that when too few similar patients are used for training, predictive performance degrades due to the effects of small sample sizes. Our PSM-based approach outperformed well-known ICU severity of illness scores. Although the improved prediction performance is achieved at the cost of increased computational burden, Big Data technologies can help realize personalized data-driven decision support at the point of care. Conclusions The present study provides crucial empirical evidence for the promising potential of personalized data-driven decision support systems. With the increasing adoption of electronic medical record (EMR) systems, our

  13. Enhancing Uterine Fibroid Research Through Utilization of Biorepositories Linked to Electronic Medical Record Data

    PubMed Central

    Feingold-Link, Lani; Edwards, Todd L.; Jones, Sarah; Hartmann, Katherine E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Uterine leiomyomata (fibroids) affect up to 77% of women by menopause and account for $9.4 billion in yearly healthcare costs. Most studies rely on self-reported diagnosis, which may result in misclassification of controls since as many as 50% of cases are asymptomatic and thus undiagnosed. Our objective was to evaluate the performance and accuracy of a fibroid phenotyping algorithm constructed from electronic medical record (EMR) data, limiting to subjects with pelvic imaging. Methods: Our study population includes women from a clinical population at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (2008–2012). Analyses were restricted to women 18 years and older with at least one fibroid diagnosis confirmed by imaging for cases or at least two separate pelvic imaging procedures without a diagnosis for controls. We randomly reviewed 218 records to evaluate the accuracy of our algorithm and assess the indications for pelvic imaging. Participant characteristics and indications for imaging were compared between cases and controls in unadjusted and adjusted logistic regression analyses. Results: Our algorithm had a positive predictive value of 96% and negative predictive value of 98%. Increasing age (odds ratio=1.05, 95% confidence interval 1.03–1.08) and Black race (odds ratio=2.15, 95% confidence interval 1.18–3.94) were identified as risk factors for fibroids. The most common indications for imaging in both cases and controls were pain, bleeding, and reproductive factors, and the most common imaging modality was a pelvic ultrasound. Conclusions: These data suggest that using biorepositories linked to EMR data is a feasible way to identify populations of imaged women that facilitate investigations of fibroid risk factors. PMID:25495367

  14. Gastrointestinal Disease Outbreak Detection Using Multiple Data Streams from Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jie; Abrams, Allyson M.; Gilliss, Debra; Reed, Mary; Platt, Richard; Huang, Susan S.; Kulldorff, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background: Passive reporting and laboratory testing delays may limit gastrointestinal (GI) disease outbreak detection. Healthcare systems routinely collect clinical data in electronic medical records (EMRs) that could be used for surveillance. This study's primary objective was to identify data streams from EMRs that may perform well for GI outbreak detection. Methods: Zip code-specific daily episode counts in 2009 were generated for 22 syndromic and laboratory-based data streams from Kaiser Permanente Northern California EMRs, covering 3.3 million members. Data streams included outpatient and inpatient diagnosis codes, antidiarrheal medication dispensings, stool culture orders, and positive microbiology tests for six GI pathogens. Prospective daily surveillance was mimicked using the space-time permutation scan statistic in single and multi-stream analyses, and space-time clusters were identified. Serotype relatedness was assessed for isolates in two Salmonella clusters. Results: Potential outbreaks included a cluster of 18 stool cultures ordered over 5 days in one zip code and a Salmonella cluster in three zip codes over 9 days, in which at least five of six cases had the same rare serotype. In all, 28 potential outbreaks were identified using single stream analyses, with signals in outpatient diagnosis codes most common. Multi-stream analyses identified additional potential outbreaks and in one example, improved the timeliness of detection. Conclusions: GI disease-related data streams can be used to identify potential outbreaks when generated from EMRs with extensive regional coverage. This process can supplement traditional GI outbreak reports to health departments, which frequently consist of outbreaks in well-defined settings (e.g., day care centers and restaurants) with no laboratory-confirmed pathogen. Data streams most promising for surveillance included microbiology test results, stool culture orders, and outpatient diagnoses. In particular

  15. Identifying patients with asthma in primary care electronic medical record systems

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Nancy; Wallace, Rebecca; Agarwal, Gina; Chan, David; Gershon, Andrea; Gupta, Samir

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop and test a variety of electronic medical record (EMR) search algorithms to allow clinicians to accurately identify their patients with asthma in order to enable improved care. Design A retrospective chart analysis identified 5 relevant unique EMR information fields (electronic disease registry, cumulative patient profile, billing diagnostic code, medications, and chart notes); asthma-related search terms were designated for each field. The accuracy of each term was tested for its ability to identify the asthma patients among all patients whose charts were reviewed. Increasingly sophisticated search algorithms were then designed and evaluated by serially combining individual searches with Boolean operators. Setting Two large academic primary care clinics in Hamilton, Ont. Participants Charts for 600 randomly selected patients aged 16 years and older identified in an initial EMR search as likely having asthma (n = 150), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n = 150), other respiratory conditions (n = 150), or nonrespiratory conditions (n = 150) were reviewed until 100 patients per category were identified (or until all available names were exhausted). A total of 398 charts were reviewed in full and included. Main outcome measures Sensitivity and specificity of each search for asthma diagnosis (against the reference standard of a physician chart review–based diagnosis). Results Two physicians reviewed the charts identified in the initial EMR search using a standardized data collection form and ascribed the following diagnoses in 398 patients: 112 (28.1%) had asthma, 81 (20.4%) had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, 104 (26.1%) had other respiratory conditions, and 101 (25.4%) had nonrespiratory conditions. Concordance between reviewers in chart abstraction diagnosis was high (κ = 0.89, 95% CI 0.80 to 0.97). Overall, the algorithm searching for patients who had asthma in their cumulative patient profiles or for whom an asthma billing code

  16. The Study of Electronic Medical Record Adoption in a Medicare Certified Home Health Agency Using a Grounded Theory Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Joy L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative grounded theory study was to examine the experiences of clinicians in the adoption of Electronic Medical Records in a Medicare certified Home Health Agency. An additional goal for this study was to triangulate qualitative research between describing, explaining, and exploring technology acceptance. The experiences…

  17. Examining the Role of Electronic Medical Record Generated Provider Reminders on Provider Offering of Breast Cancer Screening Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beverley, Charles St. Clare, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Breast cancer affects the lives of millions of women each year in the United States. Early detection by mammography screening can reduce the risk for advanced stages of breast cancer and improve the probability of long-term survival in women. Electronic medical records (EMRs) have been identified as a successful approach for…

  18. A Qualitative Study to Evaluate the Effectiveness of Simulation as a Training Method in Implementation of Electronic Medical Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chelton, Barbara S.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Adoption of electronic medical records has been gradual in part due to physician concerns that its use in the exam room will interfere with the physician-patient relationship. Studies demonstrate their concern to be loss of eye contact with the patient and that entering information into the computer in the presence of the patient will…

  19. Prehospital Electronic Patient Care Report Systems: Early Experiences from Emergency Medical Services Agency Leaders

    PubMed Central

    Landman, Adam B.; Lee, Christopher H.; Sasson, Comilla; Van Gelder, Carin M.; Curry, Leslie A.

    2012-01-01

    Background As the United States embraces electronic health records (EHRs), improved emergency medical services (EMS) information systems are also a priority; however, little is known about the experiences of EMS agencies as they adopt and implement electronic patient care report (e-PCR) systems. We sought to characterize motivations for adoption of e-PCR systems, challenges associated with adoption and implementation, and emerging implementation strategies. Methods We conducted a qualitative study using semi-structured in-depth interviews with EMS agency leaders. Participants were recruited through a web-based survey of National Association of EMS Physicians (NAEMSP) members, a didactic session at the 2010 NAEMSP Annual Meeting, and snowball sampling. Interviews lasted approximately 30 minutes, were recorded and professionally transcribed. Analysis was conducted by a five-person team, employing the constant comparative method to identify recurrent themes. Results Twenty-three interviewees represented 20 EMS agencies from the United States and Canada; 14 EMS agencies were currently using e-PCR systems. The primary reason for adoption was the potential for e-PCR systems to support quality assurance efforts. Challenges to e-PCR system adoption included those common to any health information technology project, as well as challenges unique to the prehospital setting, including: fear of increased ambulance run times leading to decreased ambulance availability, difficulty integrating with existing hospital information systems, and unfunded mandates requiring adoption of e-PCR systems. Three recurring strategies emerged to improve e-PCR system adoption and implementation: 1) identify creative funding sources; 2) leverage regional health information organizations; and 3) build internal information technology capacity. Conclusion EMS agencies are highly motivated to adopt e-PCR systems to support quality assurance efforts; however, adoption and implementation of e

  20. Improving the work efficiency of healthcare-associated infection surveillance using electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Lo, Yu-Sheng; Lee, Wen-Sen; Chen, Guo-Bin; Liu, Chien-Tsai

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we developed an integrated hospital-associated urinary tract infection (HAUTI) surveillance information system (called iHAUTISIS) based on existing electronic medical records (EMR) systems for improving the work efficiency of infection control professionals (ICPs) in a 730-bed, tertiary-care teaching hospital in Taiwan. The iHAUTISIS can automatically collect data relevant to HAUTI surveillance from the different EMR systems, and provides a visualization dashboard that helps ICPs make better surveillance plans and facilitates their surveillance work. In order to measure the system performance, we also created a generic model for comparing the ICPs' work efficiency when using existing electronic culture-based surveillance information system (eCBSIS) and iHAUTISIS, respectively. This model can demonstrate a patient's state (unsuspected, suspected, and confirmed) and corresponding time spent on surveillance tasks performed by ICPs for the patient in that state. The study results showed that the iHAUTISIS performed better than the eCBSIS in terms of ICPs' time cost. It reduced the time by 73.27 s, when using iHAUTISIS (114.26 s) and eCBSIS (187.53 s), for each patient on average. With increased adoption of EMR systems, the development of the integrated HAI surveillance information systems would be more and more cost-effective. Moreover, the iHAUTISIS adopted web-based technology that enables ICPs to online access patient's surveillance information using laptops or mobile devices. Therefore, our system can further facilitate the HAI surveillance and reduce ICPs' surveillance workloads. PMID:25154644

  1. Use of an Electronic Medication Administration Record (eMAR) for Surveillance of Medication Omissions: Results of a One Year Study of Antimicrobials in the Inpatient Setting

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Bruce R.; Sabuda, Deana M.; Bresee, Lauren C.; Conly, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Medication administration omissions (MAO) are usually considered medication errors but not all MAO are clinically relevant. We determined the frequency of clinically relevant MAO of antimicrobial drugs in adult hospitals in Calgary, Alberta, Canada based on electronic medication administration record (eMAR). Methods We examined 2011 data from eMAR records on medical wards and developed a reproducible assessment scheme to categorize and determine clinical relevance of MAO. We applied this scheme to records from 2012 in a retrospective cohort study to quantify clinically relevant MAO. Significant predictors of clinically relevant MAO were identified. Results A total of 294,718 dose records were assessed of which 10,282 (3.49%) were for doses not administered. Among these 4903 (1.66% of total); 47.68% of MAO were considered clinically relevant. Significant positive predictors of clinically relevant MAO included inhaled (OR 4.90, 95% CI 3.54-6.94) and liquid oral (OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.18-1.47) route of medication compared to solid oral and irregular dose schedules. Evening nursing shift compared to night shift (OR 0.77 95% CI 0.70-0.85) and parenteral (OR 0.50, 95% CI 0.46-0.54) were negative predictors, The commonest reasons for relevant MAO were patient preference, unspecified reason, administration access issues, drug not available or patient condition. Conclusion Assessment of MAO by review of computer records provides a greater scope and sample size than directly observed medication administration assessments without “observer” effect. We found that MAO of antimicrobials in inpatients were uncommon but were seen more frequently with orally administered antimicrobials which may have significance to antimicrobial stewardship initiatives. PMID:25856373

  2. Evaluation of use of electronic patient controlled analgesia pumps to improve patient safety in an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Kumiko; Dykes, Patricia; Mcintosh, Kathleen; Buckley, Elizabeth; Yoon, Catherine; Luppi, Carol; Bane, Anne; Bates, David W

    2014-01-01

    Patient controlled analgesia (PCA) and Patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) pumps are methods of pain control with complex smart infusion devices and are widely used in hospitals. Smart PCA/PCEA pumps can be programmed with the dose and rate of medications within pre-set ranges. However, adverse effects have been reported associated with these pumps' use. In this paper, we describe a prevalence observational study where observers used an electronic data collection tool to record pump settings and medications with PCA pumps, corresponding medication orders to identify errors. The results showed that there were many labeling and tubing change tag errors, which were a violation of hospital policy. A few potential harmful medication errors were identified but no critical errors. Study results suggest the importance of a standard process of PCA pump use. Next steps include implementing a safety bundle for improving PCA practice to support safe and effective pain management. PMID:24943538

  3. Epidemic Surveillance Using an Electronic Medical Record: An Empiric Approach to Performance Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hongzhang; Gaff, Holly; Smith, Gary; DeLisle, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    Backgrounds Electronic medical records (EMR) form a rich repository of information that could benefit public health. We asked how structured and free-text narrative EMR data should be combined to improve epidemic surveillance for acute respiratory infections (ARI). Methods Eight previously characterized ARI case detection algorithms (CDA) were applied to historical EMR entries to create authentic time series of daily ARI case counts (background). An epidemic model simulated influenza cases (injection). From the time of the injection, cluster-detection statistics were applied daily on paired background+injection (combined) and background-only time series. This cycle was then repeated with the injection shifted to each week of the evaluation year. We computed: a) the time from injection to the first statistical alarm uniquely found in the combined dataset (Detection Delay); b) how often alarms originated in the background-only dataset (false-alarm rate, or FAR); and c) the number of cases found within these false alarms (Caseload). For each CDA, we plotted the Detection Delay as a function of FAR or Caseload, over a broad range of alarm thresholds. Results CDAs that combined text analyses seeking ARI symptoms in clinical notes with provider-assigned diagnostic codes in order to maximize the precision rather than the sensitivity of case-detection lowered Detection Delay at any given FAR or Caseload. Conclusion An empiric approach can guide the integration of EMR data into case-detection methods that improve both the timeliness and efficiency of epidemic detection. PMID:25006878

  4. Usability of Academic Electronic Medical Record Application for Nursing Students' Clinical Practicum

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeong Suk; Park, Joon Ho

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Nursing curricula for undergraduate nursing students need to reflect the information technology used in current nursing practice. A smart-device Academic Electronic Medical Record (AEMR) application can help nursing students access and document records for the clinical practicum. We conducted a pilot study to evaluate the usability of an AEMR application before applying it to the clinical nursing practicum. Methods A previously developed EMR application was modified as an AEMR to access patient information at bedside and to practice documentation. We added several features to the current EMR application to create an AEMR environment. We created a series of document forms and several useful scales on an external application, which included nursing admission notes, vital signs, and intake/output. The case scenarios and tasks were created by a research team to evaluate aspects of AEMRs, including their usability and functionality. Five nursing students completed 15 tasks using a think-aloud method with a tablet device. Results Minor usability issues were identified and rectified. All participants indicated that they became familiar with the application with little effort. They said that the application icons were intuitive, which helped them find patient information more quickly and accurately. Conclusions The application will improve timely access to patient data and documentation for nursing students. We are confident that this AEMR application will enhance nursing students' experience with their clinical practicum, and help them to better understand patient conditions and document them with ideal accessibility. PMID:26279956

  5. Application of electronic medical record data for health outcomes research: a review of recent literature.

    PubMed

    Lin, Junji; Jiao, Tianze; Biskupiak, Joseph E; McAdam-Marx, Carrie

    2013-04-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) have become a common source of data for outcomes research. This review discusses trends in EMR data use for outcomes research as well as strengths and limitations, and likely future developments to help optimize value and use of EMR data for outcomes research. EMR-based studies reporting treatment outcomes published between 2007 and 2012 were predominantly from the USA and Europe. There has been a substantial increase in the number of EMR-based outcomes studies published from 2007-2008 (n = 28) to 2010-2011 (n = 55). Many studies evaluated biometric and laboratory test outcomes in common chronic conditions. However, researchers are expanding the scope of evaluated diseases and outcomes using advanced techniques, such as natural language processing and linking EMRs to other patient-level data to overcome issues with missing data or data that cannot be accessed using standard queries. These advances will help to expand the scope and sophistication of outcomes research in the coming years. PMID:23570430

  6. Automated Physician Order Recommendations and Outcome Predictions by Data-Mining Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jonathan H.; Altman, Russ B.

    2014-01-01

    The meaningful use of electronic medical records (EMR) will come from effective clinical decision support (CDS) applied to physician orders, the concrete manifestation of clinical decision making. CDS development is currently limited by a top-down approach, requiring manual production and limited end-user awareness. A statistical data-mining alternative automatically extracts expertise as association statistics from structured EMR data (>5.4M data elements from >19K inpatient encounters). This powers an order recommendation system analogous to commercial systems (e.g., Amazon.com’s “Customers who bought this…”). Compared to a standard benchmark, the association method improves order prediction precision from 26% to 37% (p<0.01). Introducing an inverse frequency weighted recall metric demonstrates a quantifiable improvement from 3% to 17% (p<0.01) in recommending more specifically relevant orders. The system also predicts clinical outcomes, such as 30 day mortality and 1 week ICU intervention, with ROC AUC of 0.88 and 0.78 respectively, comparable to state-of-the-art prognosis scores. PMID:25717414

  7. Automated physician order recommendations and outcome predictions by data-mining electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jonathan H; Altman, Russ B

    2014-01-01

    The meaningful use of electronic medical records (EMR) will come from effective clinical decision support (CDS) applied to physician orders, the concrete manifestation of clinical decision making. CDS development is currently limited by a top-down approach, requiring manual production and limited end-user awareness. A statistical data-mining alternative automatically extracts expertise as association statistics from structured EMR data (>5.4M data elements from >19K inpatient encounters). This powers an order recommendation system analogous to commercial systems (e.g., Amazon.com's "Customers who bought this…"). Compared to a standard benchmark, the association method improves order prediction precision from 26% to 37% (p<0.01). Introducing an inverse frequency weighted recall metric demonstrates a quantifiable improvement from 3% to 17% (p<0.01) in recommending more specifically relevant orders. The system also predicts clinical outcomes, such as 30 day mortality and 1 week ICU intervention, with ROC AUC of 0.88 and 0.78 respectively, comparable to state-of-the-art prognosis scores. PMID:25717414

  8. Building a Diabetes Screening Population Data Repository Using Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Tuan, Wen-Jan; Sheehy, Ann M; Smith, Maureen A

    2011-01-01

    There has been a rapid advancement of information technology in the area of clinical and population health data management since 2000. However, with the fast growth of electronic medical records (EMRs) and the increasing complexity of information systems, it has become challenging for researchers to effectively access, locate, extract, and analyze information critical to their research. This article introduces an outpatient encounter data framework designed to construct an EMR-based population data repository for diabetes screening research. The outpatient encounter data framework is developed on a hybrid data structure of entity–attribute–value models, dimensional models, and relational models. This design preserves a small number of subject-specific tables essential to key clinical constructs in the data repository. It enables atomic information to be maintained in a transparent and meaningful way to researchers and health care practitioners who need to access data and still achieve the same performance level as conventional data warehouse models. A six-layer information processing strategy is developed to extract and transform EMRs to the research data repository. The data structure also complies with both Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act regulations and the institutional review board's requirements. Although developed for diabetes screening research, the design of the outpatient encounter data framework is suitable for other types of health service research. It may also provide organizations a tool to improve health care quality and efficiency, consistent with the “meaningful use” objectives of the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act. PMID:21722567

  9. Spin electronic magnetic sensor based on functional oxides for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solignac, A.; Kurij, G.; Guerrero, R.; Agnus, G.; Maroutian, T.; Fermon, C.; Pannetier-Lecoeur, M.; Lecoeur, Ph.

    2015-09-01

    To detect magnetic signals coming from the body, in particular those produced by the electrical activity of the heart or of the brain, the development of ultrasensitive sensors is required. In this regard, magnetoresistive sensors, stemming from spin electronics, are very promising devices. For example, tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) junctions based on MgO tunnel barrier have a high sensitivity. Nevertheless, TMR also often have high level of noise. Full spin polarized materials like manganite La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 (LSMO) are attractive alternative candidates to develop such sensors because LSMO exhibits a very low 1/f noise when grown on single crystals, and a TMR response has been observed with values up to 2000%. This kind of tunnel junctions, when combined with a high Tc superconductor loop, opens up possibilities to develop full oxide structures working at liquid nitrogen temperature and suitable for medical imaging. In this work, we investigated on LSMO-based tunnel junctions the parameters controlling the overall system performances, including not only the TMR ratio, but also the pinning of the reference layer and the noise floor. We especially focused on studying the effects of the quality of the barrier, the interface and the electrode, by playing with materials and growth conditions.

  10. Evaluation of neutron dose in the maze of medical electron accelerators.

    PubMed

    Carinou, E; Kamenopoulou, V; Stamatelatos, I E

    1999-12-01

    MCNP code was used to simulate neutron and prompt gamma ray transport for a range of maze geometrical parameters, wall composition, and wall surface lining. Verification measurements were performed at two medical electron accelerator facilities. A very good agreement was observed between the results of the measurements and the MCNP simulation. MCNP code results were compared with the results of analytical equations used for the calculation of maze effectiveness, derived by Kersey and McCall. A good agreement exists between the simulation results and the results of the analytical methods for maze lengths longer than 8.5 m. However, the results of the present study showed that for shorter maze lengths, Kersey's method tended to overestimate neutron dose at the door entrance, whereas McCall's method with the neutron room scattered correction applied, showed an underestimation of neutron dose. Furthermore, according to MCNP simulation results, the use of barytes concrete instead of standard concrete as room shielding material, reduced neutron dose at the door entrance by about 20%. Finally, it was shown that lining with layers of wood and borated polyethylene significantly reduced the neutron dose at the door entrance by 45% and 65%, respectively. PMID:10619233

  11. Building a diabetes screening population data repository using electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Tuan, Wen-Jan; Sheehy, Ann M; Smith, Maureen A

    2011-05-01

    There has been a rapid advancement of information technology in the area of clinical and population health data management since 2000. However, with the fast growth of electronic medical records (EMRs) and the increasing complexity of information systems, it has become challenging for researchers to effectively access, locate, extract, and analyze information critical to their research. This article introduces an outpatient encounter data framework designed to construct an EMR-based population data repository for diabetes screening research. The outpatient encounter data framework is developed on a hybrid data structure of entity-attribute-value models, dimensional models, and relational models. This design preserves a small number of subject-specific tables essential to key clinical constructs in the data repository. It enables atomic information to be maintained in a transparent and meaningful way to researchers and health care practitioners who need to access data and still achieve the same performance level as conventional data warehouse models. A six-layer information processing strategy is developed to extract and transform EMRs to the research data repository. The data structure also complies with both Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act regulations and the institutional review board's requirements. Although developed for diabetes screening research, the design of the outpatient encounter data framework is suitable for other types of health service research. It may also provide organizations a tool to improve health care quality and efficiency, consistent with the "meaningful use" objectives of the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act. PMID:21722567

  12. Meeting the security requirements of electronic medical records in the ERA of high-speed computing.

    PubMed

    Alanazi, H O; Zaidan, A A; Zaidan, B B; Kiah, M L Mat; Al-Bakri, S H

    2015-01-01

    This study has two objectives. First, it aims to develop a system with a highly secured approach to transmitting electronic medical records (EMRs), and second, it aims to identify entities that transmit private patient information without permission. The NTRU and the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) cryptosystems are secured encryption methods. The AES is a tested technology that has already been utilized in several systems to secure sensitive data. The United States government has been using AES since June 2003 to protect sensitive and essential information. Meanwhile, NTRU protects sensitive data against attacks through the use of quantum computers, which can break the RSA cryptosystem and elliptic curve cryptography algorithms. A hybrid of AES and NTRU is developed in this work to improve EMR security. The proposed hybrid cryptography technique is implemented to secure the data transmission process of EMRs. The proposed security solution can provide protection for over 40 years and is resistant to quantum computers. Moreover, the technique provides the necessary evidence required by law to identify disclosure or misuse of patient records. The proposed solution can effectively secure EMR transmission and protect patient rights. It also identifies the source responsible for disclosing confidential patient records. The proposed hybrid technique for securing data managed by institutional websites must be improved in the future. PMID:25481568

  13. Repurpose terbutaline sulfate for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis using electronic medical records

    PubMed Central

    Paik, Hyojung; Chung, Ah-Young; Park, Hae-Chul; Park, Rae Woong; Suk, Kyoungho; Kim, Jihyun; Kim, Hyosil; Lee, KiYoung; Butte, Atul J.

    2015-01-01

    Prediction of new disease indications for approved drugs by computational methods has been based largely on the genomics signatures of drugs and diseases. We propose a method for drug repositioning that uses the clinical signatures extracted from over 13 years of electronic medical records from a tertiary hospital, including >9.4 M laboratory tests from >530,000 patients, in addition to diverse genomics signatures. Cross-validation using over 17,000 known drug–disease associations shows this approach outperforms various predictive models based on genomics signatures and a well-known “guilt-by-association” method. Interestingly, the prediction suggests that terbutaline sulfate, which is widely used for asthma, is a promising candidate for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis for which there are few therapeutic options. In vivo tests using zebrafish models found that terbutaline sulfate prevents defects in axons and neuromuscular junction degeneration in a dose-dependent manner. A therapeutic potential of terbutaline sulfate was also observed when axonal and neuromuscular junction degeneration have already occurred in zebrafish model. Cotreatment with a β2-adrenergic receptor antagonist, butoxamine, suggests that the effect of terbutaline is mediated by activation of β2-adrenergic receptors. PMID:25739475

  14. Tissue Banking, Bioinformatics, and Electronic Medical Records: The Front-End Requirements for Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Suh, K. Stephen; Sarojini, Sreeja; Youssif, Maher; Nalley, Kip; Milinovikj, Natasha; Elloumi, Fathi; Russell, Steven; Pecora, Andrew; Schecter, Elyssa; Goy, Andre

    2013-01-01

    Personalized medicine promises patient-tailored treatments that enhance patient care and decrease overall treatment costs by focusing on genetics and “-omics” data obtained from patient biospecimens and records to guide therapy choices that generate good clinical outcomes. The approach relies on diagnostic and prognostic use of novel biomarkers discovered through combinations of tissue banking, bioinformatics, and electronic medical records (EMRs). The analytical power of bioinformatic platforms combined with patient clinical data from EMRs can reveal potential biomarkers and clinical phenotypes that allow researchers to develop experimental strategies using selected patient biospecimens stored in tissue banks. For cancer, high-quality biospecimens collected at diagnosis, first relapse, and various treatment stages provide crucial resources for study designs. To enlarge biospecimen collections, patient education regarding the value of specimen donation is vital. One approach for increasing consent is to offer publically available illustrations and game-like engagements demonstrating how wider sample availability facilitates development of novel therapies. The critical value of tissue bank samples, bioinformatics, and EMR in the early stages of the biomarker discovery process for personalized medicine is often overlooked. The data obtained also require cross-disciplinary collaborations to translate experimental results into clinical practice and diagnostic and prognostic use in personalized medicine. PMID:23818899

  15. Annotation methods to develop and evaluate an expert system based on natural language processing in electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Gicquel, Quentin; Tvardik, Nastassia; Bouvry, Côme; Kergourlay, Ivan; Bittar, André; Segond, Frédérique; Darmoni, Stefan; Metzger, Marie-Hélène

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the SYNODOS collaborative project was to develop a generic IT solution, combining a medical terminology server, a semantic analyser and a knowledge base. The goal of the project was to generate meaningful epidemiological data for various medical domains from the textual content of French medical records. In the context of this project, we built a care pathway oriented conceptual model and corresponding annotation method to develop and evaluate an expert system's knowledge base. The annotation method is based on a semi-automatic process, using a software application (MedIndex). This application exchanges with a cross-lingual multi-termino-ontology portal. The annotator selects the most appropriate medical code proposed for the medical concept in question by the multi-termino-ontology portal and temporally labels the medical concept according to the course of the medical event. This choice of conceptual model and annotation method aims to create a generic database of facts for the secondary use of electronic health records data. PMID:26262366

  16. Can computer autoacquisition of medical information meet the needs of the future? A feasibility study in direct computation of the fine grained electronic medical record.

    PubMed Central

    Warren, J. R.; Posey, B.; Thornton, T.; Parang, P.

    1999-01-01

    The project describes feasibility testing of a two-year clinical deployment of an electronic record keeping system for primary care medicine that allowed financial medical management and clinical disease study without the encumbrance of human encoding. The software used an expert system for acquisition of historical information and automatic database encoding of each independent fact. The historical acquisition system was combined with a screen-based physician data entry system to create a fine-grained medical record. Fine-grained data allowed direct computer processing to mimic the ends that presently require human encoding--gatekeeping, disease characterization and remote disease surveillance. The project demonstrated the possibility of real time gatekeeping through direct analysis of data. Detection and characterization of disease states using statistical methods within the database was possible, however, limited in this study because of the large numbers of patient interviews required. The possibilities for remote disease monitoring and clinical studies are also discussed. PMID:10566398

  17. Impact of a Cost Visibility Tool in the Electronic Medical Record on Antibiotic Prescribing in an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Fargo, Kelly L.; Johnston, Jessica; Stevenson, Kurt B.; Deutscher, Meredith

    2015-01-01

    Background: Studies evaluating the impact of passive cost visibility tools on antibiotic prescribing are lacking. Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate whether the implementation of a passive antibiotic cost visibility tool would impact antibiotic prescribing and decrease antibiotic spending. Methods: An efficiency and effectiveness initiative (EEI) was implemented in October 2012. To support the EEI, an antibiotic cost visibility tool was created in June 2013 displaying the relative cost of antibiotics. Using an observational study of interrupted time series design, 3 time frames were studied: pre EEI, post EEI, and post cost visibility tool implementation. The primary outcome was antibiotic cost per 1,000 patient days. Secondary outcomes included case mix index (CMI)–adjusted antibiotic cost per 1,000 patient days and utilization of the cost visibility tool. Results: Initiation of the EEI was associated with a $4,675 decrease in antibiotic cost per 1,000 patient days (P = .003), and costs continued to decrease in the months following EEI (P = .009). After implementation of the cost visibility tool, costs remained stable (P = .844). Despite CMI increasing over time, adjustment for CMI had no impact on the directionality or statistical significance of the results. Conclusion: Our study demonstrated a significant and sustained decrease in antibiotic cost per 1,000 patient days when focused medication cost reduction efforts were implemented, but passive cost visibility tool implementation was not associated with additional cost reduction. Antibiotic cost visibility tools may be of most benefit when prior medication cost reduction efforts are lacking or when an active intervention is incorporated. PMID:26405341

  18. Integration of multiple DICOM Web servers into an enterprise-wide Web-based electronic medical record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Brent K.; Langer, Steven G.; Martin, Kelly P.

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to integrate multiple DICOM image webservers into the currently existing enterprises- wide web-browsable electronic medical record. Over the last six years the University of Washington has created a clinical data repository combining in a distributed relational database information from multiple departmental databases (MIND). A character cell-based view of this data called the Mini Medical Record (MMR) has been available for four years, MINDscape, unlike the text-based MMR. provides a platform independent, dynamic, web browser view of the MIND database that can be easily linked with medical knowledge resources on the network, like PubMed and the Federated Drug Reference. There are over 10,000 MINDscape user accounts at the University of Washington Academic Medical Centers. The weekday average number of hits to MINDscape is 35,302 and weekday average number of individual users is 1252. DICOM images from multiple webservers are now being viewed through the MINDscape electronic medical record.

  19. The Electronic Medical Record at the Medical University of South Carolina: Successful Integration of Multiple Commercial “Best of Breed” Systems

    PubMed Central

    Afrin, Lawrence B.; Northrup, David J.; Daniels, Mark R.; Irving, Michael G.

    1999-01-01

    Over a 15 year period, MUSC has implemented an evolving set of commercially available “best of breed” clinical information systems throughout the enterprise. Successful systems integration efforts allow users to enter and retrieve information across a wide array of systems. Careful assessments of human impact and aggressive efforts to involve stakeholding users beginning early in systems design and implementation processes have been instrumental in securing widespread acceptance and effective use of new systems. The MUSC Electronic Medical Record (EMR) will be demonstrated, focusing particularly on its applications on the clinical “front lines.”

  20. A genome-wide association study of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia using an electronic medical record.

    PubMed

    Karnes, Jason H; Cronin, Robert M; Rollin, Jerome; Teumer, Alexander; Pouplard, Claire; Shaffer, Christian M; Blanquicett, Carmelo; Bowton, Erica A; Cowan, James D; Mosley, Jonathan D; Van Driest, Sara L; Weeke, Peter E; Wells, Quinn S; Bakchoul, Tamam; Denny, Joshua C; Greinacher, Andreas; Gruel, Yves; Roden, Dan M

    2015-04-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is an unpredictable, potentially catastrophic adverse effect of heparin treatment resulting from an immune response to platelet factor 4 (PF4)/heparin complexes. No genome-wide evaluations have been performed to identify potential genetic influences on HIT. Here, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) and candidate gene study using HIT cases and controls identified using electronic medical records (EMRs) coupled to a DNA biobank and attempted to replicate GWAS associations in an independent cohort. We subsequently investigated influences of GWAS-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on PF4/heparin antibodies in non-heparin treated individuals. In a recessive model, we observed significant SNP associations (odds ratio [OR] 18.52; 95% confidence interval [CI] 6.33-54.23; p=3.18×10(-9)) with HIT near the T-Cell Death-Associated Gene 8 (TDAG8). These SNPs are in linkage disequilibrium with a missense TDAG8 SNP. TDAG8 SNPs trended toward an association with HIT in replication analysis (OR 5.71; 0.47-69.22; p=0.17), and the missense SNP was associated with PF4/heparin antibody levels and positive PF4/heparin antibodies in non-heparin treated patients (OR 3.09; 1.14-8.13; p=0.02). In the candidate gene study, SNPs at HLA-DRA were nominally associated with HIT (OR 0.25; 0.15-0.44; p=2.06×10(-6)). Further study of TDAG8 and HLA-DRA SNPs is warranted to assess their influence on the risk of developing HIT. PMID:25503805

  1. A genome-wide association study of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia using an electronic medical record

    PubMed Central

    Karnes, Jason H; Cronin, Robert M; Rollin, Jerome; Teumer, Alexander; Pouplard, Claire; Shaffer, Christian M; Blanquicett, Carmelo; Bowton, Erica A; Cowan, James D; Mosley, Jonathan D; Van Driest, Sara L; Weeke, Peter E; Wells, Quinn S; Bakchoul, Tamam; Denny, Joshua C; Greinacher, Andreas; Gruel, Yves; Roden, Dan M

    2015-01-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is an unpredictable, potentially catastrophic adverse effect of heparin treatment resulting from an immune response to platelet factor 4 (PF4)/heparin complexes. No genome-wide evaluations have been performed to identify potential genetic influences on HIT. Here, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) and candidate gene study using HIT cases and controls identified using electronic medical records (EMRs) coupled to a DNA biobank and attempted to replicate GWAS associations in an independent cohort. We subsequently investigated influences of GWAS-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on PF4/heparin antibodies in non-heparin treated individuals. In a recessive model, we observed significant SNP associations (OR 18.52 [6.33–54.23], p=3.18×10−9) with HIT near the T-Cell Death-Associated Gene 8 (TDAG8). These SNPs are in linkage disequilibrium with a missense TDAG8 SNP. TDAG8 SNPs trended toward an association with HIT in replication analysis (OR 5.71 [0.47–69.22], p=0.17), and the missense SNP was associated with PF4/heparin antibody levels and positive PF4/heparin antibodies in non-heparin treated patients (OR 3.09 [1.14–8.13], p=0.02). In the candidate gene study, SNPs at HLA-DRA were nominally associated with HIT (OR 0.25 [0.15–0.44], p=2.06×10−6). Further study of TDAG8 and HLA-DRA SNPs is warranted to assess their influence on the risk of developing HIT. PMID:25503805

  2. Predicting Risk of Suicide Attempt Using History of Physical Illnesses From Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wei; Tran, Truyen; Berk, Michael; Venkatesh, Svetha

    2016-01-01

    Background Although physical illnesses, routinely documented in electronic medical records (EMR), have been found to be a contributing factor to suicides, no automated systems use this information to predict suicide risk. Objective The aim of this study is to quantify the impact of physical illnesses on suicide risk, and develop a predictive model that captures this relationship using EMR data. Methods We used history of physical illnesses (except chapter V: Mental and behavioral disorders) from EMR data over different time-periods to build a lookup table that contains the probability of suicide risk for each chapter of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th Revision (ICD-10) codes. The lookup table was then used to predict the probability of suicide risk for any new assessment. Based on the different lengths of history of physical illnesses, we developed six different models to predict suicide risk. We tested the performance of developed models to predict 90-day risk using historical data over differing time-periods ranging from 3 to 48 months. A total of 16,858 assessments from 7399 mental health patients with at least one risk assessment was used for the validation of the developed model. The performance was measured using area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Results The best predictive results were derived (AUC=0.71) using combined data across all time-periods, which significantly outperformed the clinical baseline derived from routine risk assessment (AUC=0.56). The proposed approach thus shows potential to be incorporated in the broader risk assessment processes used by clinicians. Conclusions This study provides a novel approach to exploit the history of physical illnesses extracted from EMR (ICD-10 codes without chapter V-mental and behavioral disorders) to predict suicide risk, and this model outperforms existing clinical assessments of suicide risk. PMID:27400764

  3. Understanding Electronic Medical Record Adoption in the United States: Communication and Sociocultural Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kreps, Gary L; Polit, Stan

    2013-01-01

    Background This paper adopts a communication and sociocultural perspective to analyze the factors behind the lag in electronic medical record (EMR) adoption in the United States. Much of the extant research on this topic has emphasized economic factors, particularly, lack of economic incentives, as the primary cause of the delay in EMR adoption. This prompted the Health Information Technology on Economic and Clinical Health Act that allow financial incentives through the Centers of Medicare and Medicaid Services for many health care organizations planning to adopt EMR. However, financial incentives alone have not solved the problem; many new innovations do not diffuse even when offered for free. Thus, this paper underlines the need to consider communication and sociocultural factors to develop a better understanding of the impediments of EMR adoption. Objective The objective of this paper was to develop a holistic understanding of EMR adoption by identifying and analyzing the impact of communication and sociocultural factors that operate at 3 levels: macro (environmental), meso (organizational), and micro (individual). Methods We use the systems approach to focus on the 3 levels (macro, meso, and micro) and developed propositions at each level drawing on the communication and sociocultural perspectives. Results Our analysis resulted in 10 propositions that connect communication and sociocultural aspects with EMR adoption. Conclusions This paper brings perspectives from the social sciences that have largely been missing in the extant literature of health information technology (HIT) adoption. In doing so, it implies how communication and sociocultural factors may complement (and in some instances, reinforce) the impact of economic factors on HIT adoption. PMID:23612390

  4. Electronic medical records and physician stress in primary care: results from the MEMO Study

    PubMed Central

    Babbott, Stewart; Manwell, Linda Baier; Brown, Roger; Montague, Enid; Williams, Eric; Schwartz, Mark; Hess, Erik; Linzer, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Background Little has been written about physician stress that may be associated with electronic medical records (EMR). Objective We assessed relationships between the number of EMR functions, primary care work conditions, and physician satisfaction, stress and burnout. Design and participants 379 primary care physicians and 92 managers at 92 clinics from New York City and the upper Midwest participating in the 2001–5 Minimizing Error, Maximizing Outcome (MEMO) Study. A latent class analysis identified clusters of physicians within clinics with low, medium and high EMR functions. Main measures We assessed physician-reported stress, burnout, satisfaction, and intent to leave the practice, and predictors including time pressure during visits. We used a two-level regression model to estimate the mean response for each physician cluster to each outcome, adjusting for physician age, sex, specialty, work hours and years using the EMR. Effect sizes (ES) of these relationships were considered small (0.14), moderate (0.39), and large (0.61). Key results Compared to the low EMR cluster, physicians in the moderate EMR cluster reported more stress (ES 0.35, p=0.03) and lower satisfaction (ES −0.45, p=0.006). Physicians in the high EMR cluster indicated lower satisfaction than low EMR cluster physicians (ES −0.39, p=0.01). Time pressure was associated with significantly more burnout, dissatisfaction and intent to leave only within the high EMR cluster. Conclusions Stress may rise for physicians with a moderate number of EMR functions. Time pressure was associated with poor physician outcomes mainly in the high EMR cluster. Work redesign may address these stressors. PMID:24005796

  5. Physicians' perception about electronic medical record system in Makkah Region, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Shaker, Hani Abdulsattar; Farooq, Mian Usman; Dhafar, Khalid Obeid

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The study was done to determine the physicians' perception about electronic medical record system (EMRS) in the context of its productivity in order to improve its functionality and advantages. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional survey was performed from July to August 2009 with structured questionnaire of 15 closed-ended questions with five points Likert scaling starting from strongly disagree to strongly agree as 1–5, reflecting the perception of physicians about EMRS. The physicians of the Makkah region working in six different hospitals were selected. “Positive” response means if percent of responses were rated 4 or 5 (agree/strongly agree), “neutral” if rated 3, and negative if rated 1 or 2 (strongly disagree/disagree). Descriptive data analysis techniques were used. Results: We selected 317 completed questionnaires. Majority of subjects were from King Fahd Hospital, Jeddah (83, 26.3%), residents (147, 46.4%), male (200,63.1%), expatriates (207, 65%), and age group 36–45 years (133, 42%) were dominant. The stem regarding importance of computers for practicing medicine and EMRS to improve quality of practice was appreciated by majority, that is, 77.7 and 71.2%, respectively. However, “It does not disrupt the workflow” (35.1%) and “EMRS is comfortable while entering the data instead of writing” (34.8%) were appreciated negatively. Consultants (53.9%), male (53.4%), expatriates (56.7%), physicians of King Abdul Aziz Hospital, Ta'if (56.9%), and age group of 46–55 years (53.8%) appreciated EMRS positively. Overall perception of EMRS was found positive by 52.8%. Conclusion: Majority appreciated the EMRS, but specific concerns about its usage easiness and workflow disturbance were opposed by them also. PMID:25625082

  6. Developing an Algorithm to Identify History of Cancer Using Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Christina L.; Feigelson, Heather S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction/Objective: The objective of this study was to develop an algorithm to identify Kaiser Permanente Colorado (KPCO) members with a history of cancer. Background: Tumor registries are used with high precision to identify incident cancer, but are not designed to capture prevalent cancer within a population. We sought to identify a cohort of adults with no history of cancer, and thus, we could not rely solely on the tumor registry. Methods: We included all KPCO members between the ages of 40–75 years who were continuously enrolled during 2013 (N=201,787). Data from the tumor registry, chemotherapy files, inpatient and outpatient claims were used to create an algorithm to identify members with a high likelihood of cancer. We validated the algorithm using chart review and calculated sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) for occurrence of cancer. Findings: The final version of the algorithm achieved a sensitivity of 100 percent and specificity of 84.6 percent for identifying cancer. If we relied on the tumor registry alone, 47 percent of those with a history of cancer would have been missed. Discussion: Using the tumor registry alone to identify a cohort of patients with prior cancer is not sufficient. In the final version of the algorithm, the sensitivity and PPV were improved when a diagnosis code for cancer was required to accompany oncology visits or chemotherapy administration. Conclusion: Electronic medical record (EMR) data can be used effectively in combination with data from the tumor registry to identify health plan members with a history of cancer. PMID:27195308

  7. An electronic medical record system with treatment recommendations based on patient similarity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Tian, Yu; Tian, Li-Li; Qian, Yang-Ming; Li, Jing-Song

    2015-05-01

    As the core of health information technology (HIT), electronic medical record (EMR) systems have been changing to meet health care demands. To construct a new-generation EMR system framework with the capability of self-learning and real-time feedback, thus adding intelligence to the EMR system itself, this paper proposed a novel EMR system framework by constructing a direct pathway between the EMR workflow and EMR data. A prototype of this framework was implemented based on patient similarity learning. Patient diagnoses, demographic data, vital signs and structured lab test results were considered for similarity calculations. Real hospitalization data from 12,818 patients were substituted, and Precision @ Position measurements were used to validate self-learning performance. Our EMR system changed the way in which orders are placed by establishing recommendation order menu and shortcut applications. Two learning modes (EASY MODE and COMPLEX MODE) were provided, and the precision values @ position 5 of both modes were 0.7458 and 0.8792, respectively. The precision performance of COMPLEX MODE was better than that of EASY MODE (tested using a paired Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test, p < 0.001). Applying the proposed framework, the EMR data value was directly demonstrated in the clinical workflow, and intelligence was added to the EMR system, which could improve system usability, reliability and the physician's work efficiency. This self-learning mechanism is based on dynamic learning models and is not limited to a specific disease or clinical scenario, thus decreasing maintenance costs in real world applications and increasing its adaptability. PMID:25762458

  8. Validation of a nurses' views on electronic medical record systems (EMR) questionnaire in Turkish health system.

    PubMed

    Top, Mehmet; Yilmaz, Ali; Karabulut, Erdem; Otieno, Ochieng George; Saylam, Melahat; Bakır, Sevgi; Top, Sümbül

    2015-06-01

    Using of EMR in health services and organizations is steadily increasing for quality improvement, cost effectiveness and performance development. However, no validated national and international instruments (scale, questionnaire, index, and inventory) have assessed the effectiveness, satisfaction, health care savings, patient safety and cost minimization of electronic medical and health systems from the viewpoint and perceptions of nurses in Turkish health services. The perceptions of health care professionals especially physicians and nurses can contribute important information that may predict their acceptance of EMR and desired mode of use for EMR, evaluation performance of EMR thus guiding EMR implementation in hospitals. This article is a report of validation of the instrument to measure nurses' views on the use, quality and user satisfaction with EMR in Turkish health system. Items in the questionnaire were designed and obtained following O.G. Otieno, H. Toyama, M. Asonuma, M. Kanai-Pak, K. Naitoh's questionnaire about Use, Quality and User Satisfaction with EMR systems. Reliability and validity were examined and investigated in terms of responses from 487 nurses from one education hospital in Ankara, Turkey. This study was planned and conducted at a university hospital. The validation process was based on construct validity in this study. The response rate was 74.92%. Cronbach's alphas of three factors (use, quality and satisfaction of EMR) ranged from 0.78 to 0.94. Goodness-of-fit indices from the confirmatory factor analysis showed a reasonable model fit. Results of confirmatory factor analysis showed that χ2 statistic indicated significant result (p < 0.001) and model fit was acceptable according to relative χ2 statistic (χ2/df = 2.8 < 5). Further validation of the instrument could yield positive results in health systems in the different countries. Also further validation and reliability studies could be planned on physicians and other

  9. Developing a sustainable electronic portfolio (ePortfolio) program that fosters reflective practice and incorporates CanMEDS competencies into the undergraduate medical curriculum.

    PubMed

    Hall, Pippa; Byszewski, Anna; Sutherland, Stephanie; Stodel, Emma J

    2012-06-01

    The University of Ottawa (uOttawa) Faculty of Medicine in 2008 launched a revised undergraduate medical education (UGME) curriculum that was based on the seven CanMEDS roles (medical expert, communicator, collaborator, health advocate, manager, scholar, and professional) and added an eighth role of person to incorporate the dimension of mindfulness and personal well-being. In this article, the authors describe the development of an electronic Portfolio (ePortfolio) program that enables uOttawa medical students to document their activities and to demonstrate their development of competence in each of the eight roles. The ePortfolio program supports reflective practice, an important component of professional competence, and provides a means for addressing the "hidden curriculum." It is bilingual, mandatory, and spans the four years of UGME. It includes both an online component for students to document their personal development and for student-coach dialogue, as well as twice-yearly, small-group meetings in which students engage in reflective discussions and learn to give and receive feedback.The authors reflect on the challenges they faced in the development and implementation of the ePortfolio program and share the lessons they have learned along the way to a successful and sustainable program. These lessons include switching from a complex information technology system to a user-friendly, Web-based blog platform; rethinking orientation sessions to ensure that faculty and students understand the value of the ePortfolio program; soliciting student input to improve the program and increase student buy-in; and providing faculty development opportunities and recognition. PMID:22534601

  10. Automated discovery of drug treatment patterns for endocrine therapy of breast cancer within an electronic medical record

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Janet E; Murphy, Sean P; Cafourek, Victoria L; Couch, Fergus J; Goetz, Matthew P; Ingle, James N; Suman, Vera J; Chute, Christopher G; Weinshilboum, Richard M

    2011-01-01

    Objective To develop an algorithm for the discovery of drug treatment patterns for endocrine breast cancer therapy within an electronic medical record and to test the hypothesis that information extracted using it is comparable to the information found by traditional methods. Materials The electronic medical charts of 1507 patients diagnosed with histologically confirmed primary invasive breast cancer. Methods The automatic drug treatment classification tool consisted of components for: (1) extraction of drug treatment-relevant information from clinical narratives using natural language processing (clinical Text Analysis and Knowledge Extraction System); (2) extraction of drug treatment data from an electronic prescribing system; (3) merging information to create a patient treatment timeline; and (4) final classification logic. Results Agreement between results from the algorithm and from a nurse abstractor is measured for categories: (0) no tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitor (AI) treatment; (1) tamoxifen only; (2) AI only; (3) tamoxifen before AI; (4) AI before tamoxifen; (5) multiple AIs and tamoxifen cycles in no specific order; and (6) no specific treatment dates. Specificity (all categories): 96.14%–100%; sensitivity (categories (0)–(4)): 90.27%–99.83%; sensitivity (categories (5)–(6)): 0–23.53%; positive predictive values: 80%–97.38%; negative predictive values: 96.91%–99.93%. Discussion Our approach illustrates a secondary use of the electronic medical record. The main challenge is event temporality. Conclusion We present an algorithm for automated treatment classification within an electronic medical record to combine information extracted through natural language processing with that extracted from structured databases. The algorithm has high specificity for all categories, high sensitivity for five categories, and low sensitivity for two categories. PMID:22140207

  11. Shared Intentionality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomasello, Michael; Carpenter, Malinda

    2007-01-01

    We argue for the importance of processes of shared intentionality in children's early cognitive development. We look briefly at four important social-cognitive skills and how they are transformed by shared intentionality. In each case, we look first at a kind of individualistic version of the skill--as exemplified most clearly in the behavior of…

  12. The EHR-ARCHE project: Satisfying clinical information needs in a Shared Electronic Health Record System based on IHE XDS and Archetypes☆

    PubMed Central

    Duftschmid, Georg; Rinner, Christoph; Kohler, Michael; Huebner-Bloder, Gudrun; Saboor, Samrend; Ammenwerth, Elske

    2013-01-01

    Purpose While contributing to an improved continuity of care, Shared Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems may also lead to information overload of healthcare providers. Document-oriented architectures, such as the commonly employed IHE XDS profile, which only support information retrieval at the level of documents, are particularly susceptible for this problem. The objective of the EHR-ARCHE project was to develop a methodology and a prototype to efficiently satisfy healthcare providers’ information needs when accessing a patient's Shared EHR during a treatment situation. We especially aimed to investigate whether this objective can be reached by integrating EHR Archetypes into an IHE XDS environment. Methods Using methodical triangulation, we first analysed the information needs of healthcare providers, focusing on the treatment of diabetes patients as an exemplary application domain. We then designed ISO/EN 13606 Archetypes covering the identified information needs. To support a content-based search for fine-grained information items within EHR documents, we extended the IHE XDS environment with two additional actors. Finally, we conducted a formative and summative evaluation of our approach within a controlled study. Results We identified 446 frequently needed diabetes-specific information items, representing typical information needs of healthcare providers. We then created 128 Archetypes and 120 EHR documents for two fictive patients. All seven diabetes experts, who evaluated our approach, preferred the content-based search to a conventional XDS search. Success rates of finding relevant information was higher for the content-based search (100% versus 80%) and the latter was also more time-efficient (8–14 min versus 20 min or more). Conclusions Our results show that for an efficient satisfaction of health care providers’ information needs, a content-based search that rests upon the integration of Archetypes into an IHE XDS-based Shared EHR system is

  13. Electronic medical records and the transgender patient: recommendations from the World Professional Association for Transgender Health EMR Working Group

    PubMed Central

    Deutsch, Madeline B; Green, Jamison; Keatley, JoAnne; Mayer, Gal; Hastings, Jennifer; Hall, Alexandra M

    2013-01-01

    Transgender patients have particular needs with respect to demographic information and health records; specifically, transgender patients may have a chosen name and gender identity that differs from their current legally designated name and sex. Additionally, sex-specific health information, for example, a man with a cervix or a woman with a prostate, requires special attention in electronic health record (EHR) systems. The World Professional Association for Transgender Health (WPATH) is an international multidisciplinary professional association that publishes recognized standards for the care of transgender and gender variant persons. In September 2011, the WPATH Executive Committee convened an Electronic Medical Records Working Group comprised of both expert clinicians and medical information technology specialists, to make recommendations for developers, vendors, and users of EHR systems with respect to transgender patients. These recommendations and supporting rationale are presented here. PMID:23631835

  14. Computerized medication administration records decrease medication occurrences.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A L; Hill, J J; Wilson, R G; Nipper, K; Kwon, I W

    1997-04-01

    Studies have demonstrated that medication errors occur at a number of locations in the continuum between ordering of drug therapy and administration of the medication. Computer management of patient medication profiles offers the opportunity to enhance communication between pharmacists and nurses, and to decrease medication errors and delays in delivery of therapy. A number of authors have postulated that computerization of medication profiles would enhance medication delivery accuracy and timeliness, but no study has demonstrated this improvement. We report the results of a retrospective analysis undertaken to assess the improvements resulting from sharing a computerized medication record. We used a broader definition of medication occurrences that includes the more traditional definition, and averted errors, delays in delivery of medications and information, and disagreements between pharmacy and nursing medication profiles. We compared medication occurrences reported through an existing internal system between two periods; the first when separate pharmacy and nursing medication records were used, and the second period when a shared medication record was used by pharmacy and nursing. Average medication occurrences per admission decreased from 0.1084 to 0.0658 (p < 0.01). Medication occurrences per dose decreased from 0.0005 to 0.0003 (p < 0.01). The use of a shared medication record by pharmacy and nursing led to a statistically significant decrease in medication occurrences. Information shared between the two professions allowed timely resolution of discrepancies in medication orders, leading to better execution of drug therapy, decreased medication occurrences, and increased efficiency. PMID:10166241

  15. Enabling collaborative medical diagnosis over the Internet via peer-to-peer distribution of electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Maglogiannis, Ilias; Constantinos, Delakouridis; Kazatzopoulos, Leonidas

    2006-04-01

    Recent developments in networking and computing technologies and the expansion of the electronic health record system have enabled the possibility of online collaboration between geographically distributed medical personnel. In this context, the paper presents a Web-based application, which implements a collaborative working environment for physicians by enabling the peer-to-peer exchange of electronic health records. The paper treats technological issues such as Video, Audio and Message Communication, Workspace Management, Distributed Medical Data Management and exchange, while it emphasizes on the Security issues arisen, due to the sensitive and private nature of the medical information. In the paper, we present initial results from the system in practice and measurements regarding transmission times and bandwidth requirements. A wavelet based image compression scheme is also introduced for reducing network delays. A number of physicians were asked to use the platform for testing purposes and for measuring user acceptance. The system was considered by them to be very useful, as they found that the platform simulated very well the personal contact between them and their colleagues during medical meetings. PMID:16705995

  16. Adherence to hydroxyurea medication by children with sickle cell disease (SCD) using an electronic device: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Susumu; Kodjebacheva, Gergana; Scherrer, Tammy; Rice, Gary; Grigorian, Matthew; Blankenship, Jeremy; Onwuzurike, Nkechi

    2016-08-01

    Adherence to hydroxyurea (HU) is a significant modifying factor in sickle cell vaso-occlusive pain. We conducted a study using an electronic medication container-monitor-reminder device (GlowCap™) to track adherence and determine whether use of this device affected rates of HU adherence. Subjects were regular attendees to our clinic. They were given a 37-item questionnaire and were asked to use a GlowCap containing HU. When the device cap is opened, it makes a remote "medication taken" record. The device also provides usage reminder in the form of lights and alarm sounds if the cap opening is delayed. Nineteen subjects participated in the survey, and 17 in the intervention phase. Of the 17, 12 had reliable adherence data. Seventeen caregivers of patients and two patients completed the survey. Two most common barriers to adherence identified were lack of reminders and absence of medicine home delivery. The intervention component of this study, which used both the electronic (GlowCap) method and medication possession ratio showed that the median adherence rate for the 12 patients evaluated was 85 %. The GlowCap device accurately kept a record of adherence rates. This device may be an effective tool for increasing HU medication adherence. PMID:27225236

  17. Shared Attention.

    PubMed

    Shteynberg, Garriy

    2015-09-01

    Shared attention is extremely common. In stadiums, public squares, and private living rooms, people attend to the world with others. Humans do so across all sensory modalities-sharing the sights, sounds, tastes, smells, and textures of everyday life with one another. The potential for attending with others has grown considerably with the emergence of mass media technologies, which allow for the sharing of attention in the absence of physical co-presence. In the last several years, studies have begun to outline the conditions under which attending together is consequential for human memory, motivation, judgment, emotion, and behavior. Here, I advance a psychological theory of shared attention, defining its properties as a mental state and outlining its cognitive, affective, and behavioral consequences. I review empirical findings that are uniquely predicted by shared-attention theory and discuss the possibility of integrating shared-attention, social-facilitation, and social-loafing perspectives. Finally, I reflect on what shared-attention theory implies for living in the digital world. PMID:26385997

  18. Mobile Electronic Medical Records Promote Workflow: Physicians’ Perspective From a Survey

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Sein; Hupperts, Hagen; Brandt, Stephan A

    2016-01-01

    Background As a result of demographic changes, physicians are required to deliver needed services with limited resources. Research suggests that tablet PCs with access to patient data may streamline clinical workflow. A recent study found tablets with mobile electronic medical records (EMRs) can facilitate data retrieval and produce time savings across the clinical routine within hospital settings. However, the reasons for these time savings, including details on how tablets were being used, remain unclear. The same applies to physicians’ perceptions of this tool within an inpatient setting. Objective This study examined physicians’ perception of tablets with EMRs in an inpatient setting. The rationale was to identify both subjective and objective factors that impacted the successful implementation and use of tablets running an EMR. Methods We developed a 57-item survey questionnaire designed to examine users’ perception of and attitude toward tablets, which was administered to 14 participating physicians following 7 weeks of tablet use. Five participants volunteered to participate in a second study that investigated physicians’ patterns of tablet use within the EMR environment by digitally tracking and storing usage behavior. Statistical analyses of questionnaire results included mean values with their bootstrapped 95% confidence intervals and multivariate analysis of variance to identify predictors of tablet use. Results Physicians reported high degrees of satisfaction with the tablets. There was a general consensus among physicians that tablet use streamlined clinical workflow through optimized data retrieval (rated 0.69, 0.23-1.15 points better than control) and improved communication with patients and other physicians (rated 0.85, 0.54-1.15 and 0.77, 0.38-1.15 points better than control, respectively). Age (F3,11=3.54, P=.04), occupational group (F1,11=7.17, P=.04), and attitude toward novel technologies (F1,11=10.54, P=.02) predicted physicians

  19. Maternity patients' access to their electronic medical records: use and perspectives of a patient portal.

    PubMed

    Megan Forster, Megan; Dennison, Kerrie; Callen, Joanne; Andrew, Andrew; Westbrook, Johanna I

    2015-01-01

    Patients have been able to access clinical information from their paper-based health records for a number of years. With the advent of Electronic Medical Records (EMRs) access to this information can now be achieved online using a secure electronic patient portal. The purpose of this study was to investigate maternity patients' use and perceptions of a patient portal developed at the Mater Mothers' Hospital in Brisbane, Australia. A web-based patient portal, one of the first developed and deployed in Australia, was introduced on 26 June 2012. The portal was designed for maternity patients booked at Mater Mothers' Hospital, as an alternative to the paper-based Pregnancy Health Record. Through the portal, maternity patients are able to complete their hospital registration form online and obtain current health information about their pregnancy (via their EMR), as well as access a variety of support tools to use during their pregnancy such as tailored public health advice. A retrospective cross-sectional study design was employed. Usage statistics were extracted from the system for a one year period (1 July 2012 to 30 June 2013). Patients' perceptions of the portal were obtained using an online survey, accessible by maternity patients for two weeks in February 2013 (n=80). Descriptive statistics were employed to analyse the data. Between July 2012 and June 2013, 10,892 maternity patients were offered a patient portal account and access to their EMR. Of those 6,518 created one (60%; 6,518/10,892) and 3,104 went on to request access to their EMR (48%; 3,104/6,518). Of these, 1,751 had their access application granted by 30 June 2013. The majority of maternity patients submitted registration forms online via the patient portal (56.7%). Patients could view their EMR multiple times: there were 671 views of the EMR, 2,781 views of appointment schedules and 135 birth preferences submitted via the EMR. Eighty survey responses were received from EMR account holders, (response

  20. ePhenotyping for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) Network: Algorithm Development and Konstanz Information Miner Workflow

    PubMed Central

    Borthwick, Kenneth M; Smelser, Diane T; Bock, Jonathan A; Elmore, James R; Ryer, Evan J; Ye, Zi; Pacheco, Jennifer A.; Carrell, David S.; Michalkiewicz, Michael; Thompson, William K; Pathak, Jyotishman; Bielinski, Suzette J; Denny, Joshua C; Linneman, James G; Peissig, Peggy L; Kho, Abel N; Gottesman, Omri; Parmar, Harpreet; Kullo, Iftikhar J; McCarty, Catherine A; Böttinger, Erwin P; Larson, Eric B; Jarvik, Gail P; Harley, John B; Bajwa, Tanvir; Franklin, David P; Carey, David J; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Tromp, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective We designed an algorithm to identify abdominal aortic aneurysm cases and controls from electronic health records to be shared and executed within the “electronic Medical Records and Genomics” (eMERGE) Network. Materials and methods Structured Query Language, was used to script the algorithm utilizing “Current Procedural Terminology” and “International Classification of Diseases” codes, with demographic and encounter data to classify individuals as case, control, or excluded. The algorithm was validated using blinded manual chart review at three eMERGE Network sites and one non-eMERGE Network site. Validation comprised evaluation of an equal number of predicted cases and controls selected at random from the algorithm predictions. After validation at the three eMERGE Network sites, the remaining eMERGE Network sites performed verification only. Finally, the algorithm was implemented as a workflow in the Konstanz Information Miner, which represented the logic graphically while retaining intermediate data for inspection at each node. The algorithm was configured to be independent of specific access to data and was exportable (without data) to other sites. Results The algorithm demonstrated positive predictive values (PPV) of 92.8% (CI: 86.8-96.7) and 100% (CI: 97.0-100) for cases and controls, respectively. It performed well also outside the eMERGE Network. Implementation of the transportable executable algorithm as a Konstanz Information Miner workflow required much less effort than implementation from pseudo code, and ensured that the logic was as intended. Discussion and conclusion This ePhenotyping algorithm identifies abdominal aortic aneurysm cases and controls from the electronic health record with high case and control PPV necessary for research purposes, can be disseminated easily, and applied to high-throughput genetic and other studies. PMID:27054044

  1. Accuracy of patient-reported adherence to glaucoma medications on a visual analog scale as compared with electronic monitors

    PubMed Central

    Sayner, Robyn; Carpenter, Delesha M.; Blalock, Susan J.; Robin, Alan L.; Muir, Kelly W.; Hartnett, Mary Elizabeth; Giangiacomo, Annette L.; Tudor, Gail; Sleath, Betsy

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Glaucoma medications can reduce intraocular pressure and improve clinical outcomes when patients adhere to their medication regimen. Providers often ask glaucoma patients to self-report their adherence, but the accuracy of this self-report method has received little scientific attention. Our purpose was to compare a self-report medication adherence measure with adherence data collected from Medication Event Monitoring Systems (MEMS) electronic monitors. Additionally, we sought to identify which patient characteristics were associated with over-reporting adherence on the self-reported measure. Methods English-speaking adult glaucoma patients were recruited for this observational cohort study from six ophthalmology practices. Patients were interviewed immediately after a baseline medical visit and were given MEMS containers, which were used to record adherence over a 60-day period. MEMS data were used to calculate percent adherence, which measured the percentage of the prescribed number of doses taken, and timing adherence, which assessed the percent doses taken on time. Patients self-reported adherence to their glaucoma medications on a visual analog scale (VAS) approximately 60 days following the baseline visit. Bivariate analyses and logistic regressions were used to analyze the data. Self-reported medication adherence on the VAS was plotted against MEMS adherence to illustrate the level of discrepancy between self-reported and electronically-monitored adherence. Findings The analyses included 240 patients who returned their MEMS containers and who self-reported medication adherence at the 60-day follow-up visit. When compared with MEMS-measured percent adherence, 31% of patients (n=75) over-estimated their adherence on the VAS. When compared with MEMS-measured timing adherence, 74% (n=177) of patients over-estimated their adherence on the VAS. For the MEMS-measured percent adherence, logistic regression revealed that patients who were newly prescribed

  2. FRR: fair remote retrieval of outsourced private medical records in electronic health networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huaqun; Wu, Qianhong; Qin, Bo; Domingo-Ferrer, Josep

    2014-08-01

    Cloud computing is emerging as the next-generation IT architecture. However, cloud computing also raises security and privacy concerns since the users have no physical control over the outsourced data. This paper focuses on fairly retrieving encrypted private medical records outsourced to remote untrusted cloud servers in the case of medical accidents and disputes. Our goal is to enable an independent committee to fairly recover the original private medical records so that medical investigation can be carried out in a convincing way. We achieve this goal with a fair remote retrieval (FRR) model in which either t investigation committee members cooperatively retrieve the original medical data or none of them can get any information on the medical records. We realize the first FRR scheme by exploiting fair multi-member key exchange and homomorphic privately verifiable tags. Based on the standard computational Diffie-Hellman (CDH) assumption, our scheme is provably secure in the random oracle model (ROM). A detailed performance analysis and experimental results show that our scheme is efficient in terms of communication and computation. PMID:24560680

  3. Introduction of an electronic medical record system into physician practice offices: why is it so #%!&-ing hard for everybody?-Part II.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Joseph P; Klasko, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Medical practice offices are experiencing a revolutionary change in the microprocesses that have been the norm for documenting and communicating patient care for decades. While this revolution is welcome for dozens of good reasons, migration of data storage from the paper-based record to electronic form often causes considerable stress for all involved. This three-part series looks at electronic medical record implementations from organizational and sociological perspectives, and draws attention to the often unappreciated aspects of medical work that give rise to the stress. In addition, IT professionals' perspectives are also addressed to highlight how medical /IT professional differences affect the experience of implementation. PMID:21815548

  4. Automated evaluation of electronic discharge notes to assess quality of care for cardiovascular diseases using Medical Language Extraction and Encoding System (MedLEE)

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jou-Wei; Yang, Chen-Wei

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and validate an automated acquisition system to assess quality of care (QC) measures for cardiovascular diseases. This system combining searching and retrieval algorithms was designed to extract QC measures from electronic discharge notes and to estimate the attainment rates to the current standards of care. It was developed on the patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and tested on the patients with unstable angina/non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, both diseases sharing almost the same QC measures. The system was able to reach a reasonable agreement (κ value) with medical experts from 0.65 (early reperfusion rate) to 0.97 (β-blockers and lipid-lowering agents before discharge) for different QC measures in the test set, and then applied to evaluate QC in the patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting surgery. The result has validated a new tool to reliably extract QC measures for cardiovascular diseases. PMID:20442141

  5. Genomic data in the electronic medical record: perspectives from a biobank community advisory board.

    PubMed

    Kimball, Brittany C; Nowakowski, Katherine E; Maschke, Karen J; McCormick, Jennifer B

    2014-12-01

    A proof of principle pharmacogenomic translational study was used as a case example to explore Biobank Community Advisory Board (CAB) member views about placing genomic information into the medical record and to establish how CAB input could affect research design. CAB members expressed enthusiasm for the potential benefit of the research discussed, yet voiced concerns regarding the recruitment and consent materials. They discussed the value of genomic research and its clinical utility; the risk of genetic discrimination; and personal ownership of genomic data. Members distinguished between indirect benefits to future generations and individual risk to research participants. Feedback was used to revise the recruitment and consent materials. Results highlight tensions reported between the public's support for genomic research and concerns with genomic information in the medical record and its use in medical decision-making. PMID:25747687

  6. Assessment of risks of EMI for personal medical electronic devices (PMEDs) from emissions of millimeter-wave security screening systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witters, Donald; Bassen, Howard; Guag, Joshua; Addissie, Bisrat; LaSorte, Nickolas; Rafai, Hazem

    2013-06-01

    This paper describes research and testing of a representative group of high priority body worn and implantable personal medical electronic devices (PMEDs) for exposure to millimeter wave (MMW) advanced imaging technology (AIT) security systems used at airports. The sample PMEDs included in this study were implantable cardiac pacemakers, ICDs, neurostimulators and insulin pumps. These PMEDs are designed and tested for susceptibility to electromagnetic interference (EMI) under the present standards for medical device electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). However, the present standards for medical equipment do not address exposure to the much higher frequency fields that are emitted by MMW security systems. Initial AIT emissions measurements were performed to assess the PMED and passenger exposures. Testing protocols were developed and testing methods were tailored to the type of PMED. In addition, a novel exposure simulation system was developed to allow controlled EMC testing without the need of the MMW AIT system. Methodology, test results, and analysis are presented, along with an assessment of the human exposure and risks for PMED users. The results on this study reveal no effects on the medical devices from the exposure to the MMW security system. Furthermore, the human exposure measurements and analysis showed levels well below applicable standard, and the risks for PMED users and others we assessed to be very low. These findings apply to the types of PMEDs used in the study though these findings might suggest that the risks for other, similar PMEDs would likely be similar.

  7. Does the implementation of an electronic prescribing system create unintended medication errors? A study of the sociotechnical context through the analysis of reported medication incidents

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Even though electronic prescribing systems are widely advocated as one of the most effective means of improving patient safety, they may also introduce new risks that are not immediately obvious. Through the study of specific incidents related to the processes involved in the administration of medication, we sought to find out if the prescribing system had unintended consequences in creating new errors. The focus of this study was a large acute hospital in the Midlands in the United Kingdom, which implemented a Prescribing, Information and Communication System (PICS). Methods This exploratory study was based on a survey of routinely collected medication incidents over five months. Data were independently reviewed by two of the investigators with a clinical pharmacology and nursing background respectively, and grouped into broad types: sociotechnical incidents (related to human interactions with the system) and non-sociotechnical incidents. Sociotechnical incidents were distinguished from the others because they occurred at the point where the system and the professional intersected and would not have occurred in the absence of the system. The day of the week and time of day that an incident occurred were tested using univariable and multivariable analyses. We acknowledge the limitations of conducting analyses of data extracted from incident reports as it is widely recognised that most medication errors are not reported and may contain inaccurate data. Interpretation of results must therefore be tentative. Results Out of a total of 485 incidents, a modest 15% (n = 73) were distinguished as sociotechnical issues and thus may be unique to hospitals that have such systems in place. These incidents were further analysed and subdivided into categories in order to identify aspects of the context which gave rise to adverse situations and possible risks to patient safety. The analysis of sociotechnical incidents by time of day and day of week indicated a trend

  8. Use of single scatter electron monte carlo transport for medical radiation sciences

    DOEpatents

    Svatos, Michelle M.

    2001-01-01

    The single scatter Monte Carlo code CREEP models precise microscopic interactions of electrons with matter to enhance physical understanding of radiation sciences. It is designed to simulate electrons in any medium, including materials important for biological studies. It simulates each interaction individually by sampling from a library which contains accurate information over a broad range of energies.

  9. Evaluating the impact and costs of deploying an electronic medical record system to support TB treatment in Peru.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Hamish S F; Blaya, Joaquin; Choi, Sharon S; Bonilla, Cesar; Jazayeri, Darius

    2006-01-01

    The PIH-EMR is a Web based electronic medical record that has been in operation for over four years in Peru supporting the treatment of drug resistant TB. We describe here the types of evaluations that have been performed on the EMR to assess its impact on patient care, reporting, logistics and observational research. Formal studies have been performed on components for drug order entry, drug requirements prediction tools and the use of PDAs to collect bacteriology data. In addition less formal data on the use of the EMR for reporting and research are reviewed. Experience and insights from porting the PIH-EMR to the Philippines, and modifying it to support HIV treatment in Haiti and Rwanda are discussed. We propose that additional data of this sort is valuable in assessing medical information systems especially in resource poor areas. PMID:17238344

  10. Cell signaling (mechanism and reproductive toxicity): redox chains, radicals, electrons, relays, conduit, electrochemistry, and other medical implications.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Peter; Pozos, Robert S

    2006-12-01

    reproductive toxicity are characterized by the electron transfer-reactive oxygen species-oxidative stress (ET-ROS-OS) scheme. This article also incorporates representative examples of the extensive investigations dealing with various medical implications. There is considerable literature pointing to a role for cell communication in a wide variety of illnesses. PMID:17315245

  11. Cognitive performance-altering effects of electronic medical records: An application of the human factors paradigm for patient safety

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    According to the human factors paradigm for patient safety, health care work systems and innovations such as electronic medical records do not have direct effects on patient safety. Instead, their effects are contingent on how the clinical work system, whether computerized or not, shapes health care providers' performance of cognitive work processes. An application of the human factors paradigm to interview data from two hospitals in the Midwest United States yielded numerous examples of the performance-altering effects of electronic medical records, electronic clinical documentation, and computerized provider order entry. Findings describe both improvements and decrements in the ease and quality of cognitive performance, both for interviewed clinicians and for their colleagues and patients. Changes in cognitive performance appear to have desirable and undesirable implications for patient safety as well as for quality of care and other important outcomes. Cognitive performance can also be traced to interactions between work system elements, including new technology, allowing for the discovery of problems with “fit” to be addressed through design interventions. PMID:21479125

  12. Development and Evaluation of an Interactive Electronic Laboratory Manual for Cooperative Learning of Medical Histology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khalil, Mohammed K.; Kirkley, Debbie L.; Kibble, Jonathan D.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the development of an interactive computer-based laboratory manual, created to facilitate the teaching and learning of medical histology. The overarching goal of developing the manual is to facilitate self-directed group interactivities that actively engage students during laboratory sessions. The design of the manual…

  13. Mobile health (mHealth) based medication adherence measurement – a pilot trial using electronic blisters in diabetes patients

    PubMed Central

    Brath, Helmut; Morak, Jürgen; Kästenbauer, Thomas; Modre-Osprian, Robert; Strohner-Kästenbauer, Hermine; Schwarz, Mark; Kort, Willem; Schreier, Günter

    2013-01-01

    Aims The aim of the present study was to evaluate a mobile health (mHealth) based remote medication adherence measurement system (mAMS) in elderly patients with increased cardiovascular risk treated for diabetes, high cholesterol and hypertension. Cardiovascular risk was defined as the presence of at least two out of the three risk factors: type 2 diabetes, hypercholesterolaemia and hypertension. Methods For treatment of diabetes, hypercholesterolaemia and hypertension, four predefined routinely used drugs were selected. Drug adherence was investigated in a controlled randomized doctor blinded study with crossover design. The mAMS was used to measure and improve objectively the adherence by means of closed-loop interactions. Results The mean age of the 53 patients (30 female) was 69.4 ± 4.8 years. A total of 1654 electronic blisters were handed out. A statistically significant difference (P = 0.04) between the monitoring and the control phase was observed for the diabetes medication only. In a post-study questionnaire twenty-nine patients appreciated that their physician knew if and when they had taken their medications and 13 asked for more or automated communication with their physicians. Only one subject withdrew from the study because of technical complexity. Conclusions The results indicate that mHealth based adherence management is feasible and well accepted by patients with increased cardiovascular risk. It may help to increase adherence, even in patients with high baseline adherence and, subsequently, lead to improved control of indicators including blood pressure and cholesterol concentrations. Electronic blisters can be used in a multi-medication regimen but need to be carefully designed for day-to-day application. PMID:24007452

  14. Photo-induced regeneration of hormones by electron transfer processes: Potential biological and medical consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getoff, Nikola; Hartmann, Johannes; Schittl, Heike; Gerschpacher, Marion; Quint, Ruth Maria

    2011-08-01

    Based on the previous results concerning electron transfer processes in biological substances, it was of interest to investigate if hormone transients resulting by e.g. electron emission can be regenerated. The presented results prove for the first time that the hormone transients originating by the electron emission process can be successfully regenerated by the transfer of electrons from a potent electron donor, such as vitamin C (VitC). Investigations were performed using progesterone (PRG), testosterone (TES) and estrone (E1) as representatives of hormones. By irradiation with monochromatic UV light (λ=254 nm) in a media of 40% water and 60% ethanol, the degradation as well as the regeneration of the hormones was studied with each hormone individually and in the mixture with VitC as a function of the absorbed UV dose, using HPLC. Calculated from the obtained initial yields, the determined regeneration of PRG amounted to 52.7%, for TES to 58.6% and for E1 to 90.9%. The consumption of VitC was determined in the same way. The reported results concerning the regeneration of hormones by the transfer of electrons from an electron donor offer a new, promising method for the therapy with hormones. As a consequence of the regeneration of hormones, a decreased formation of carcinogenic metabolites is expected.

  15. Shared Cataloguing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westby, Barbara M.

    The National Program for Acquisition and Cataloging (NPAC) authorized under Title IIC of the Higher Education Act of 1965 is called the Shared Cataloging Program. Under this Act the Library of Congress is authorized to: (1) acquire for its own collections all materials currently published throughout the world that are of value to scholarship and…

  16. Radioactive isotope production for medical applications using Kharkov electron driven subcritical assembly facility.

    SciTech Connect

    Talamo, A.; Gohar, Y.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-05-15

    Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine has a plan to construct an accelerator driven subcritical assembly. The main functions of the subcritical assembly are the medical isotope production, neutron thereby, and the support of the Ukraine nuclear industry. Reactor physics experiments and material research will be carried out using the capabilities of this facility. The United States of America and Ukraine have started collaboration activity for developing a conceptual design for this facility with low enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel. Different conceptual designs are being developed based on the facility mission and the engineering requirements including nuclear physics, neutronics, heat transfer, thermal hydraulics, structure, and material issues. Different fuel designs with LEU and reflector materials are considered in the design process. Safety, reliability, and environmental considerations are included in the facility conceptual design. The facility is configured to accommodate future design improvements and upgrades. This report is a part of the Argonne National Laboratory Activity within this collaboration for developing and characterizing the subcritical assembly conceptual design. In this study, the medical isotope production function of the Kharkov facility is defined. First, a review was carried out to identify the medical isotopes and its medical use. Then a preliminary assessment was performed without including the self-shielding effect of the irradiated samples. Finally, more detailed investigation was carried out including the self-shielding effect, which defined the sample size and irradiation location for producing each medical isotope. In the first part, the reaction rates were calculated as the multiplication of the cross section with the unperturbed neutron flux of the facility. Over fifty isotopes were considered and all transmutation channels are used including (n,{gamma}), (n,2n), (n,p), and ({gamma},n). In the second part

  17. BION microstimulators: a case study in the engineering of an electronic implantable medical device.

    PubMed

    Kane, Michael J; Breen, Paul P; Quondamatteo, Fabio; ÓLaighin, Gearóid

    2011-01-01

    The BION (Bionic Neuron) is a single channel implantable neurostimulator of unique design that can be delivered by injection. The development of the BION injectable neurostimulators exemplifies a challenging, but well posed medical design problem addressed with a successful strategy for prioritizing and resolving the biomedical and technological challenges. Though some performance requirements required post-evaluation revision, all fundamental goals were realized. A small number of significant design corrections occurred because the device requirements did not include the full scope of environmental demands. The design has spawned a number of variants optimized for diverse biomedical applications, and its clinical applications continue to evolve. The BION development history demonstrates design successes worth emulating and design pitfalls that may be avoidable for future medical device development teams. This paper serves as an introduction to the BION microstimulator technology and as an analysis of the design process used to develop the early clinical devices. PMID:21087890

  18. Monte Carlo simulation for Neptun 10 PC medical linear accelerator and calculations of output factor for electron beam

    PubMed Central

    Bahreyni Toossi, Mohammad Taghi; Momennezhad, Mehdi; Hashemi, Seyed Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Aim Exact knowledge of dosimetric parameters is an essential pre-requisite of an effective treatment in radiotherapy. In order to fulfill this consideration, different techniques have been used, one of which is Monte Carlo simulation. Materials and methods This study used the MCNP-4Cb to simulate electron beams from Neptun 10 PC medical linear accelerator. Output factors for 6, 8 and 10 MeV electrons applied to eleven different conventional fields were both measured and calculated. Results The measurements were carried out by a Wellhofler-Scanditronix dose scanning system. Our findings revealed that output factors acquired by MCNP-4C simulation and the corresponding values obtained by direct measurements are in a very good agreement. Conclusion In general, very good consistency of simulated and measured results is a good proof that the goal of this work has been accomplished. PMID:24377010

  19. Electronic medical records and genomics (eMERGE) network exploration in cataract: Several new potential susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Shefali S.; Hall, Molly A.; Goodloe, Robert J.; Berg, Richard L.; Carrell, Dave S.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Chen, Lin; Crosslin, David R.; Denny, Joshua C.; Jarvik, Gail; Li, Rongling; Linneman, James G.; Pathak, Jyoti; Peissig, Peggy; Rasmussen, Luke V.; Ramirez, Andrea H.; Wang, Xiaoming; Wilke, Russell A.; Wolf, Wendy A.; Torstenson, Eric S.; Turner, Stephen D.; McCarty, Catherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Cataract is the leading cause of blindness in the world, and in the United States accounts for approximately 60% of Medicare costs related to vision. The purpose of this study was to identify genetic markers for age-related cataract through a genome-wide association study (GWAS). Methods In the electronic medical records and genomics (eMERGE) network, we ran an electronic phenotyping algorithm on individuals in each of five sites with electronic medical records linked to DNA biobanks. We performed a GWAS using 530,101 SNPs from the Illumina 660W-Quad in a total of 7,397 individuals (5,503 cases and 1,894 controls). We also performed an age-at-diagnosis case-only analysis. Results We identified several statistically significant associations with age-related cataract (45 SNPs) as well as age at diagnosis (44 SNPs). The 45 SNPs associated with cataract at p<1×10−5 are in several interesting genes, including ALDOB, MAP3K1, and MEF2C. All have potential biologic relationships with cataracts. Conclusions This is the first genome-wide association study of age-related cataract, and several regions of interest have been identified. The eMERGE network has pioneered the exploration of genomic associations in biobanks linked to electronic health records, and this study is another example of the utility of such resources. Explorations of age-related cataract including validation and replication of the association results identified herein are needed in future studies. PMID:25352737

  20. Technology Mediated Information Sharing (Monitor Sharing) in Primary Care Encounters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asan, Onur

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this dissertation study was to identify and describe the use of electronic health records (EHRs) for information sharing between patients and clinicians in primary-care encounters and to understand work system factors influencing information sharing. Ultimately, this will promote better design of EHR technologies and effective training…