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Sample records for shear flow dynamics

  1. Edge Sheared Flows and Blob Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myra, J. R.

    2012-10-01

    The dynamics of blob-filaments [S. I. Krasheninnikov, et al. J. Plasma Phys. 74, 679 (2008); D. A. D'Ippolito, et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 060501 (2011)] in the strongly radially inhomogeneous edge and scrape-off-layer (SOL) region of a tokamak plasma is considered, with emphasis on sheared flow generation and interaction. The work is motivated by the potential importance of edge sheared flows for turbulence regulation, (e.g. the L-H transition), and the influence of flows on the character of emitted blob-filament structures which ultimately contact plasma-facing components. To study the dynamics of blobs and sheared flows, we employ both numerical simulations and experimental data analysis. The simulations use the fluid-based 2D curvature-interchange model embedded in the SOLT (SOL turbulence) code [D. A. Russell, et al, Phys. Plasmas 16, 122304 (2009)]. A blob-tracking algorithm has also been developed and applied to NSTX and Alcator C-Mod data. The algorithm is based on 2D time-resolved images from the gas puff imaging (GPI) diagnostic [S. J. Zweben, et al. Phys. Plasmas 9, 1981 (2002)]. The algorithm is able to track the blob motion and changes in blob structure, such as elliptical deformations, that can be affected by sheared flows. Results of seeded blob simulations are compared with the experimental data to determine the role of plasma parameters on the blob tracks and to evaluate the exchange of momentum between the blobs and flows. Seeded blob simulations are shown to reproduce many qualitative and quantitative features of the data including size, scale and direction of perpendicular (approximately poloidal) flows and the inferred Reynolds forces, poloidal reversal of blob tracks, and blob trapping and/or ejection. Simulation and experimental data comparisons permit the inference of dynamical mechanisms associated with blob motion and sheared flow generation in these shots, and their relation to previous theoretical work.

  2. Dynamics of flexible fibers in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Słowicka, Agnieszka M.; Wajnryb, Eligiusz; Ekiel-JeŻewska, Maria L.

    2015-09-01

    Dynamics of flexible non-Brownian fibers in shear flow at low-Reynolds-number are analyzed numerically for a wide range of the ratios A of the fiber bending force to the viscous drag force. Initially, the fibers are aligned with the flow, and later they move in the plane perpendicular to the flow vorticity. A surprisingly rich spectrum of different modes is observed when the value of A is systematically changed, with sharp transitions between coiled and straightening out modes, period-doubling bifurcations from periodic to migrating solutions, irregular dynamics, and chaos.

  3. Dynamics of flexible fibers in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Słowicka, Agnieszka M; Wajnryb, Eligiusz; Ekiel-Jeżewska, Maria L

    2015-09-28

    Dynamics of flexible non-Brownian fibers in shear flow at low-Reynolds-number are analyzed numerically for a wide range of the ratios A of the fiber bending force to the viscous drag force. Initially, the fibers are aligned with the flow, and later they move in the plane perpendicular to the flow vorticity. A surprisingly rich spectrum of different modes is observed when the value of A is systematically changed, with sharp transitions between coiled and straightening out modes, period-doubling bifurcations from periodic to migrating solutions, irregular dynamics, and chaos. PMID:26429038

  4. Dynamics of flexible fibers in shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Słowicka, Agnieszka M.; Wajnryb, Eligiusz; Ekiel-Jeżewska, Maria L.

    2015-09-28

    Dynamics of flexible non-Brownian fibers in shear flow at low-Reynolds-number are analyzed numerically for a wide range of the ratios A of the fiber bending force to the viscous drag force. Initially, the fibers are aligned with the flow, and later they move in the plane perpendicular to the flow vorticity. A surprisingly rich spectrum of different modes is observed when the value of A is systematically changed, with sharp transitions between coiled and straightening out modes, period-doubling bifurcations from periodic to migrating solutions, irregular dynamics, and chaos.

  5. Shear flow behavior of a dynamically symmetric polymeric bicontinuous microemulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ning

    2005-03-01

    Soft materials with complex internal structure often exhibit fascinating rheological behavior. For example, under flow the poly (ethylethylene) (PEE)/poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS)/PEE-PDMS polymeric bicontinuous microemulsion (BμE) showed shear-induced macrophase separation.^ 1 This was tentatively attributed to the extreme dynamical asymmetry of the two homopolymers, i.e., their viscosities differed by three orders of magnitude. To understand the role of the dynamic symmetry of a BμE when subjected to shear flow, we have developed a new ternary polymer blend system poly(butylene oxide) (PBO)/ poly(ethylenepropylene) (PEP)/PEP-PBO, which is dynamically almost symmetric. We will report on the shear flow behavior of this new BμE. Reference: [1] Krishnan et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2001, 87, 098301

  6. Dynamics of prolate spheroidal elastic particles in confined shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villone, M. M.; D'Avino, G.; Hulsen, M. A.; Maffettone, P. L.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate through numerical simulations the dynamics of a neo-Hookean elastic prolate spheroid suspended in a Newtonian fluid under shear flow. Both initial orientations of the particle within and outside the shear plane and both unbounded and confined flow geometries are considered. In unbounded flow, when the particle starts on the shear plane, two stable regimes of motion are found, i.e., trembling, where the particle shape periodically elongates and compresses in the shear plane and the angle between its major semiaxis and the flow direction oscillates around a positive mean value, and tumbling, where the particle shape periodically changes and its major axis performs complete revolutions around the vorticity axis. When the particle is initially oriented out of the shear plane, more complex dynamics arise. Geometric confinement of the particle between the moving walls also influences its deformation and regime of motion. In addition, when the particle is initially located in an asymmetric position with respect to the moving walls, particle lateral migration is detected. The effects on the particle dynamics of the geometric and physical parameters that rule the system are investigated.

  7. Dynamics of poloidal flows in enhanced reverse shear bifurcation

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, R.; Avinash, K.

    2005-07-15

    A simple reduced enhanced reverse shear (RERS) model is constructed to study the dynamics of poloidal flows during the ERS transition. This model predicts that a reversal of poloidal flow shear occurs just prior to the transition, as seen in experiment [R. E. Bell et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 1429 (1998)]. This transition front propagates until the radial location where the safety factor (q) is minimum and becomes locked there due to insufficient input power to overcome the threshold requirement for the bifurcation. This study also reveals that there can be many routes to ERS transition depending upon various tunable parameters.

  8. Dynamic Rock Fragmentation in Grain Flow: Application to Geophysical Shearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, T. R.; McSaveney, M. J.

    2006-12-01

    Mechanical explanations for large-scale, hypermobile, geophysical phenomena (long-runout debris avalanches, low-angle blockslides, faulting) have had limited success. These phenomena all involve shearing of comminuted grain strata, but grain-flow mechanics provides no mechanism for reducing frictional resistance to grain shearing. We outline a mechanical explanation for increased debris mobility, based on the shearing grain strata in these situations being intensely comminuted by dynamic rock fragmentation, and fragmentation taking place throughout the motion. The work done in fragmentation is not lost to "fracture-surface energy": much of it is recycled to the motion of the grain mass as local isotropic dispersive pressure, which can be in the GPa range. We identify two classes of geological mass movement, in which grain fragmentation has different roles. In confined shear the fragmenting grain layer is thin and bounded by non-fragmenting material (fault motion, blocksliding, basal shear of volcanic debris avalanches, some laboratory experiments). Under high ambient stresses and strain rates, shear concentrates in thin "shear bands"; fragmentation reduces the confining stress in a band, and so reduces its effective intergranular direct stress and ability to resist boundary shear with a conventional friction coefficient. Thus we quantitatively explain the motion of the Waikaremoana blockslide and the Socompa volcanic debris avalanche; rupture stresses reported from the San Andreas fault; and data from laboratory rock friction experiments. In less confined shear (dry debris avalanches) the fragmenting layer is initially thin, but thickens in runout until it extends through the whole mass except for a ~ 10-m thick unfragmented surface carapace. The shear rate is lower and shear banding is less dominant than in confined shearing; motion is affected by reduced internal friction due to local, transient shear bands and by the isotropic dispersive pressure from

  9. Dynamics of model blood cells in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgorski, Thomas; Callens, Natacha; Minetti, Christophe; Coupier, Gwennou; Dubois, Frank; Misbah, Chaouqi

    The dynamics of a vesicle suspension in shear flow was investigated by digital holographic microscopy [1] in parabolic flights and in the MASER 11 sounding rocket. Vesicles are lipid membranes which mimic the mechanical behaviour of cells, such as red blood cells in flow. In a simple shear flow between parallel walls, a lift force of purely viscous origin pushes vesicles away from walls. Our parabolic flight experiments [2] reveal that the lift velocity in a dilute suspen-sion is well described by theoretical predictions by Olla. As vesicles gather near the center of the flow chamber due to lift forces from both walls, one expects hydrodynamic interactions of pairs of vesicles to result in shear induced diffusion in the suspension. The BIOMICS experi-ment in the MASER 11 sounding rocket revealed a complex spatial structure of a polydisperse vesicle suspension due to the interplay between lift forces from the walls and hydrodynamic interactions. These phenomena have a strong impact on the structure and rheology of blood in small vessels, and a precise knowledge of the dynamics of migration and diffusion of soft particles in flow can lead to alternative ways to separate and sort blood cells. 1. Dubois, F., Schockaert, C., Callens, N., Yourrassowsky, C., "Focus plane detection criteria in digital holography microscopy by amplitude analysis", Opt. Express, Vol. 14, pp 5895-5908, 2006 2. Callens, N., Minetti, C., Coupier, G., Mader, M.-A., Dubois, F., Misbah, C., Podgorski, T., "Hydrodynamics lift of vesicles under shear flow in microgravity", Europhys. Lett., Vol. 83, p. 24002, 2008

  10. Dynamic response of block copolymer wormlike micelles to shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonetti, B.; Kohlbrecher, J.; Willner, L.; Dhont, J. K. G.; Lettinga, M. P.

    2008-10-01

    The linear and nonlinear dynamic response to an oscillatory shear flow of giant wormlike micelles consisting of Pb-Peo block copolymers is studied by means of Fourier transform rheology. Experiments are performed in the vicinity of the isotropic-nematic phase transition concentration, where the location of isotropic-nematic phase transition lines is determined independently. Strong shear-thinning behaviour is observed due to critical slowing down of orientational diffusion as a result of the vicinity of the isotropic-nematic spinodal. This severe shear-thinning behaviour is shown to result in gradient shear banding. Time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering experiments are used to obtain an insight into the microscopic phenomena that underlie the observed rheological response. An equation of motion for the order parameter tensor and an expression of the stress tensor in terms of the order parameter tensor are used to interpret the experimental data, both in the linear and nonlinear regimes. Scaling of the dynamic behaviour of the orientational order parameter and the stress is found when critical slowing down due to the vicinity of the isotropic-nematic spinodal is accounted for.

  11. Dynamics of a polyelectrolyte in simple shear flow.

    PubMed

    Jayasree, Kandiledath; Manna, Raj Kumar; Banerjee, Debapriya; Kumar, P B Sunil

    2013-12-14

    The configurational dynamics of a polyelectrolyte (PE), subjected to a simple shear flow, is studied using Brownian dynamics (BD) and Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) simulations of a bead-spring model with explicit counterions. We explore the effect of counterion condensation on the tumbling and extension of PEs by varying the shear rates for a range of values of the electrostatic coupling parameter A (which is defined as the ratio of the Bjerrum length to the size of the monomer). In all cases, the power spectrum of Rs(t) (which characterizes the projected length of the PE in the flow direction as a function of time) exhibits a power law decay at high frequencies, similar to that for a dumbbell in shear flow. For lower values of A (A ~ 2), the tumbling of the PE is periodic and is always associated with folding and stretching, which is in contrast to the oscillatory transition between the extended and globular states seen at higher values of A (A ~ 15). We observe that for A ~ 2 the tumbling frequency decreases and the average tumbling time increases with hydrodynamic interaction (HI). For A > 15, we observe a critical shear rate γ[combining dot]c below which there is considerable counterion condensation and the PE remains in the globular state with a structure akin to that of a neutral polymer in poor solvent. The γ[combining dot]c and the behavior of the PE above the critical shear rate are dependent on the HI. For a given shear rate, when there is considerable condensed counterion fluctuation, the PE extends as a whole and then collapses by the formation of folds with no observable periodicity in tumbling. When the condensed counterion fluctuations are suppressed, the polymer exhibits periodic tumbling. Simulation artifacts resulting from the implicit nature of the solvent and that due to boundary conditions are discussed by comparing the BD results with that obtained from the DPD simulations incorporating Ewald summation for electrostatics. PMID:24329088

  12. Dynamics of vorticity defects in layered stratified shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulfield, C. P.; Roy, A.; Balmforth, N. J.

    2011-11-01

    Layered stratified flows, where relatively deep regions of weak stratification are separated by thinner interfacial layers of substantially stronger density gradient are commonly observed in nature. If such flows are subjected to vertical shear, it is well-known that a wide range of qualitatively different instabilities may develop. For example, the three-layer, two interface case is susceptible to a ``Taylor'' instability which, although superficially similar to the classic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, is actually qualitatively different in its growth mechanism. The investigation of the nonlinear dynamics of this instability, and to a lesser extent the single-interface ``Holmboe'' instability, has proved difficult, as the need to resolve the associated sharp density gradients places heavy demands on the required numerical resolutions for simulation. However, we show that it is possible to gain insight into the key nonlinear dynamics of such layered stratified shear flows by generalizing a reduced matched asymptotic ``vorticity defect'' model (N. J. Balmforth et al. J. Fluid Mech. 333, 197 [1997]) to include the dynamical effects of density variations. We particularly focus on investigating the finite amplitude structure of the saturated primary Taylor instability, and the properties of the secondary instabilities to which Taylor and Holmboe instabilities are susceptible.

  13. Zonal flow dynamics in the double tearing mode with antisymmetric shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Aohua; Li, Jiquan; Liu, Jinyuan; Kishimoto, Yasuaki

    2014-05-15

    The generation dynamics and the structural characteristics of zonal flows are investigated in the double tearing mode (DTM) with antisymmetric shear flows. Two kinds of zonal flow oscillations are revealed based on reduced resistive magnetohydrodynamics simulations, which depend on the shear flow amplitudes corresponding to different DTM eigen mode states, elaborated by Mao et al. [Phys. Plasmas 20, 022114 (2013)]. For the weak shear flows below an amplitude threshold, v{sub c}, at which two DTM eigen states with antisymmetric or symmetric magnetic island structure are degenerated, the zonal flows grow oscillatorily in the Rutherford regime during the nonlinear evolution of the DTMs. It is identified that the oscillation mechanism results from the nonlinear interaction between the distorted islands and the zonal flows through the modification of shear flows. However, for the medium shear flows above v{sub c} but below the critical threshold of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, an oscillatory growing zonal flow occurs in the linear phase of the DTM evolution. It is demonstrated that the zonal flow oscillation originates from the three-wave mode coupling or a modulation instability pumped by two DTM eigen modes with the same frequency but opposite propagating direction. With the shear flows increasing, the amplitude of zonal flow oscillation increases first and then decreases, whilst the oscillation frequency as twice of the Doppler frequency shift increases. Furthermore, impacts of the oscillatory zonal flows on the nonlinear evolution of DTM islands and the global reconnection are also discussed briefly.

  14. Zonal flow dynamics in the double tearing mode with antisymmetric shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Aohua; Li, Jiquan; Liu, Jinyuan; Kishimoto, Yasuaki

    2014-05-01

    The generation dynamics and the structural characteristics of zonal flows are investigated in the double tearing mode (DTM) with antisymmetric shear flows. Two kinds of zonal flow oscillations are revealed based on reduced resistive magnetohydrodynamics simulations, which depend on the shear flow amplitudes corresponding to different DTM eigen mode states, elaborated by Mao et al. [Phys. Plasmas 20, 022114 (2013)]. For the weak shear flows below an amplitude threshold, vc, at which two DTM eigen states with antisymmetric or symmetric magnetic island structure are degenerated, the zonal flows grow oscillatorily in the Rutherford regime during the nonlinear evolution of the DTMs. It is identified that the oscillation mechanism results from the nonlinear interaction between the distorted islands and the zonal flows through the modification of shear flows. However, for the medium shear flows above vc but below the critical threshold of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, an oscillatory growing zonal flow occurs in the linear phase of the DTM evolution. It is demonstrated that the zonal flow oscillation originates from the three-wave mode coupling or a modulation instability pumped by two DTM eigen modes with the same frequency but opposite propagating direction. With the shear flows increasing, the amplitude of zonal flow oscillation increases first and then decreases, whilst the oscillation frequency as twice of the Doppler frequency shift increases. Furthermore, impacts of the oscillatory zonal flows on the nonlinear evolution of DTM islands and the global reconnection are also discussed briefly.

  15. Shear thinning behavior of linear polymer melts under shear flow via nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaolei; Chen, Jizhong; An, Lijia

    2014-05-01

    The properties of both untangled and entangled linear polymer melts under shear flow are studied by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The results reveal that the dependence of shear viscosity η on shear rate dot{γ }, expressed by η ˜ dot{γ }^{-n}, exhibits three distinct regimes. The first is the well-known Newtonian regime, namely, η independent of shear rate at small shear rates dot{γ }<τ 0^{-1} (where τ0 is the longest polymer relaxation time at equilibrium). In the non-Newtonian regime (dot{γ }>τ 0^{-1}), the shear dependence of viscosity exhibits a crossover at a critical shear rate dot{γ }c dividing this regime into two different regimes, shear thinning regime I (ST-I) and II (ST-II), respectively. In the ST-I regime (τ ^{-1}_0dot{γ }c) a universal power law η ˜ dot{γ }^{-0.37} is found for considered chain lengths. Furthermore, the longer the polymer chain is, the smaller the shear viscosity for a given shear rate in the ST-II regime. The simulation also shows that a characteristic chain length, below which dot{γ }c will be equal to τ 0^{-1}, lies in the interval 30 < N < 50. For all considered chain lengths in the ST-II regime, we also find that the first and second normal stress differences N1 and N2 follow power laws of N1 ˜ dot{γ }^{2/3} and N2 ˜ dot{γ }^{0.82}, respectively; the orientation resistance parameter mG follows the relation mG ˜ dot{γ }^{0.75} and the tumbling frequency ftb follows f_{tb} ˜ dot{γ }^{0.75}. These results imply that the effects of entanglement on the shear dependences of these properties may be negligible in the ST-II regime. These findings may shed some light on the nature of shear thinning in flexible linear polymer melts.

  16. Dynamics of A Vortex Pair In Shear Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorshkov, K. A.; Soustova, I. A.

    The dynamics (more specifically, stability) of infinite sequences of such vortex pairs that initially have the form of a Karman street in a jet-type shear flow is investigated Such a geometry is most directly related to the wake behind a streamlined cylinder We assume that the characteristic scale of velocity variation in a shear flow is much larger than the sizes of vortex spots. This means that each vortex spot during its evolution is always in a flow with an almost linear velocity distribution and first of all undergoes general drift and weak (primarily elliptic due to its linear profile of the flow veloc- ity) deformation of its shape. In this formulation the problem can be solved using a previously developed perturbation theory for hydrodynamic vortices. It is shown that variations of the parameters of the chess structure and the value of the velocity of the jet are interdependent. For instance, at short times when the jet velocity is relative large , all vortices remain almost on the same line while in the late wake, when the jet slows down, the vortices form the chess structure.. Such vortex sheets were indeed observed in [[ Spedding G. R., Browand F. K., Fincham A. M. Turbulence, similar- ity scaling and vortex geometry in the wake of a towed sphere in a stably stratified fluid. J. Fluid Mech., 1996, v.31410]. Note that possible initial, short-lived large-scale perturbations were not realised under the experimental conditions of. , presumably because of the limited size of the tank. This in itself implies a concentration of flow in horizontal plane. Still, to make a positive conclusion, a more thorough analysis is needed including study of the effect of the vortex sheet onto the jet flow.

  17. Evolution of shear banding flows in metallic glasses characterized by molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Li; Luan, Yingwei

    2016-06-01

    To reveal the evolution of shear banding flows, one-dimensional nanostructure metallic glass composites have been studied with molecular dynamics. The inherent size determines the initial thickness of shear bands, and the subsequent broadening can be restricted to some extent. The vortex-like flows evoke the atomic motion perpendicular to the shear plane, which accelerates the interatomic diffusion. The reduction of local strain rate causes the flow softening for monolithic Cu-Zr glass, but the participation of Cu-atoms in the shear banding flow gradually leads to the shear hardening for the composites.

  18. Brownian dynamics simulations of confined tethered polymers in shear flow: the effect of attractive surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-García, Gabriel O; Goldstein, Patricia; Hanna, S

    2013-05-01

    Coarse grain Brownian dynamics simulations of the bead-spring model are used to investigate the effect of attractive surfaces on the stretching of confined tethered polymers under shear flow. The weak and strong adsorbed regimes have been addressed by means of a coarse grain van der Waals potential to simulate polymer substrate interactions. Different stationary cyclic dynamics are observed upon varying shear flow intensity and surface potential strength. Polymer stretching decreases as increasing the attractive potential strength, breaking down the scaling predictions for non-adsorbed polymers. We found that adsorption is enhanced by the shear flow strength in agreement to simulations of adsorbed non-tethered polymers. PMID:23715882

  19. Dynamic Deformation and Recovery Response of Red Blood Cells to a Cyclically Reversing Shear Flow: Effects of Frequency of Cyclically Reversing Shear Flow and Shear Stress Level

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Nobuo; Kataoka, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Toshitaka; Takatani, Setsuo

    2006-01-01

    Dynamic deformation and recovery responses of red blood cells (RBCs) to a cyclically reversing shear flow generated in a 30-μm clearance, with the peak shear stress of 53, 108, 161, and 274 Pa at the frequency of 1, 2, 3, and 5 Hz, respectively, were studied. The RBCs' time-varying velocity varied after the glass plate velocity without any time lag, whereas the L/W change, where L and W were the major and minor axes of RBCs' ellipsoidal shape, exhibited a rapid increase and gradual decay during the deformation and recovery phase. The time of minimum L/W occurrence lagged behind the zero-velocity time of the glass plate (zero stress), and the delay time normalized to the one-cycle duration remained constant at 8.0%. The elongation of RBCs at zero stress time became larger with the reversing frequency. A simple mechanical model consisting of an elastic linear element during a rapid elongation period and a parallel combination of elements such as a spring and dashpot during the nonlinear recovery phase was suggested. The dynamic response behavior of RBCs under a cyclically reversing shear flow was different from the conventional shape change where a steplike force was applied to and completely released from the RBCs. PMID:16766612

  20. Orientational dynamics of nematic liquid crystals under shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rienäcker, G.; Hess, S.

    The orientational dynamics of low molecular weight and polymeric nematic liquid crystals in a flow field is investigated, based on a nonlinear relaxation equation for the second rank alignment tensor. Various approximations are discussed: Assuming uniaxial alignment with a constant order parameter, the results of the Ericksen-Leslie theory are recovered. The detailed analysis to be presented here for plane Couette flow concerns (i) uniaxial alignment with a variable degree of order and (ii) the tensorial analysis involving the three symmetry-adapted components of the five components of the alignment tensor. The transitions between tumbling, wagging and aligning behavior observed in polymeric liquid crystals and described by the Doi theory of rod-like nematic polymers are recovered. Consequences for the rheological behavior are indicated.

  1. The effect of shear flow on nanoparticle agglomeration and deposition in in vitro dynamic flow models.

    PubMed

    Grabinski, Christin; Sharma, Monita; Maurer, Elizabeth; Sulentic, Courtney; Mohan Sankaran, R; Hussain, Saber

    2016-01-01

    Traditional in vitro toxicity experiments typically involve exposure of a mono- or co-culture of cells to nanoparticles (NPs) in static conditions with the assumption of 100% deposition (i.e. dose) of well-dispersed particles. However, cellular dose can be affected by agglomeration and the unique transport kinetics of NPs in biological media. We hypothesize that shear flow can address these issues and achieve more predictable dosage. Here, we compare the behavior of gold NPs with diameters of 5, 10 and 30 nm in static and dynamic in vitro models. We also utilize transport modeling to approximate the shear rate experienced by the cells in dynamic conditions to evaluate physiological relevance. The transport kinetics show that NP behavior is governed by both gravity and diffusion forces in static conditions and only diffusion in dynamic conditions. Our results reveal that dynamic systems are capable of producing a more predictable dose compared to static systems, which has strong implications for improving repeatability in nanotoxicity assessments. PMID:25961858

  2. Dynamics of flexible active Brownian dumbbells in the absence and the presence of shear flow.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Roland G

    2016-04-20

    The dynamical properties of a flexible dumbbell composed of active Brownian particles are analytically analyzed. The dumbbell is considered as a simplified description of a linear active polymer. The two beads are independently propelled in directions which change in a diffusive manner. The relaxation behavior of the internal degree of freedom is tightly coupled to the dumbbell activity. The latter dominates the dynamics for strong propulsion. As is shown, limitations in bond stretching strongly influence the relaxation behavior. Similarly, under shear flow, activity determines the relaxation and tumbling behavior at strong propulsion. Moreover, shear leads to a preferred alignment and consequently to shear thinning. Thereby, a different power-law dependence on the shear rate compared to passive dumbbells under flow is found. PMID:26980630

  3. Rheological properties of polymer melts in confined shear flow from dynamic Monte Carlo simulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorgan, John

    2007-03-01

    The viscoelastic properties of dense polymer melts in shear flow are examined using dynamic Monte Carlo simulation for plate spacings less than 10 times the molecular radius of gyration. The coarse graining methodology employed consists of the cooperative motion algorithm of Pakula and a derived biasing technique based on previous studies of Binder and Baushnagel. For relatively large plate spacings and slow flows, a uniform linear velocity profile is obtainable. Use of the Kramers form for entropic springs allows the calculation of stress in the simulation providing a means for exploring rheological properties including viscosity and normal stress differences. Results are in excellent agreement with well-established experimental facts; a shear thinning viscosity is obtained, the first normal stress difference increases with shear rate, and the first normal stress coefficient decreases with shear rate. Evidence of entanglements are present for longer chain lengths. For fast flows, the linear velocity profile is lost and shear banding is observed. A non-monotonic stress with shear rate is found in conjunction with the shear banding and mechanistically this is attributable to a cohesive failure with an excess of chain ends being found at the slip plane. Results for variable plate spacings shed some insight into novel confinement effects that are being exploited in emerging areas of nanotechnology.

  4. Steady shear rheometry of dissipative particle dynamics models of polymer fluids in reverse Poiseuille flow

    PubMed Central

    Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Karniadakis, George Em; Caswell, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Polymer fluids are modeled with dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) as undiluted bead-spring chains and their solutions. The models are assessed by investigating their steady shear-rate properties. Non-Newtonian viscosity and normal stress coefficients, for shear rates from the lower to the upper Newtonian regimes, are calculated from both plane Couette and plane Poiseuille flows. The latter is realized as reverse Poiseuille flow (RPF) generated from two Poiseuille flows driven by uniform body forces in opposite directions along two-halves of a computational domain. Periodic boundary conditions ensure the RPF wall velocity to be zero without density fluctuations. In overlapping shear-rate regimes the RPF properties are confirmed to be in good agreement with those calculated from plane Couette flow with Lees–Edwards periodic boundary conditions (LECs), the standard virtual rheometer for steady shear-rate properties. The concentration and the temperature dependence of the properties of the model fluids are shown to satisfy the principles of concentration and temperature superposition commonly employed in the empirical correlation of real polymer-fluid properties. The thermodynamic validity of the equation of state is found to be a crucial factor for the achievement of time-temperature superposition. With these models, RPF is demonstrated to be an accurate and convenient virtual rheometer for the acquisition of steady shear-rate rheological properties. It complements, confirms, and extends the results obtained with the standard LEC configuration, and it can be used with the output from other particle-based methods, including molecular dynamics, Brownian dynamics, smooth particle hydrodynamics, and the lattice Boltzmann method. PMID:20405981

  5. Dynamics and rheology of concentrated, finite-Reynolds-number suspensions in a homogeneous shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Kyongmin; Maxey, Martin R.

    2013-05-01

    We present the lubrication-corrected force-coupling method for the simulation of concentrated suspensions under finite inertia. Suspension dynamics are investigated as a function of the particle-scale Reynolds number Re_{dot{γ }} and the bulk volume fraction ϕ in a homogeneous linear shear flow, in which Re_{dot{γ }} is defined from the density ρf and dynamic viscosity μ of the fluid, particle radius a, and the shear rate dot{γ } as Re_{dot{γ }}= ρ _f dot{γ } a^2 / μ. It is shown that the velocity fluctuations in the velocity-gradient and vorticity directions decrease at larger Re_{dot{γ }}. However, the particle self-diffusivity is found to be an increasing function of Re_{dot{γ }} as the motion of the suspended particles develops a longer auto-correlation under finite fluid inertia. It is shown that finite-inertia suspension flows are shear-thickening and the particle stresses become highly intermittent as Re_{dot{γ }} increases. To study the detailed changes in the suspension microstructure and rheology, we introduce a particle-stress-weighted pair-distribution function. The stress-weighted pair-distribution function clearly shows that the increase of the effective viscosity at high Re_{dot{γ }} is mostly related to the strong normal lubrication interaction in the compressive principal axis of the shear flow.

  6. Simulating Fiber Ordering and Aggregation In Shear Flow Using Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stimatze, Justin T.

    We have developed a mesoscale simulation of fiber aggregation in shear flow using LAMMPS and its implementation of dissipative particle dynamics. Understanding fiber aggregation in shear flow and flow-induced microstructural fiber networks is critical to our interest in high-performance composite materials. Dissipative particle dynamics enables the consideration of hydrodynamic interactions between fibers through the coarse-grained simulation of the matrix fluid. Correctly simulating hydrodynamic interactions and accounting for fluid forces on the microstructure is required to correctly model the shear-induced aggregation process. We are able to determine stresses, viscosity, and fiber forces while simulating the evolution of a model fiber system undergoing shear flow. Fiber-fiber contact interactions are approximated by combinations of common pairwise forces, allowing the exploration of interaction-influenced fiber behaviors such as aggregation and bundling. We are then able to quantify aggregate structure and effective volume fraction for a range of relevant system and fiber-fiber interaction parameters. Our simulations have demonstrated several aggregate types dependent on system parameters such as shear rate, short-range attractive forces, and a resistance to relative rotation while in contact. A resistance to relative rotation at fiber-fiber contact points has been found to strongly contribute to an increased angle between neighboring aggregated fibers and therefore an increase in average aggregate volume fraction. This increase in aggregate volume fraction is strongly correlated with a significant enhancement of system viscosity, leading us to hypothesize that controlling the resistance to relative rotation during manufacturing processes is important when optimizing for desired composite material characteristics.

  7. Modeling Nanoparticle Targeting to a Vascular Surface in Shear Flow Through Diffusive Particle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Bei; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Yihua; Yang, Longxiang; Zhang, Guocheng; Liu, Yaling

    2015-05-01

    Nanoparticles are regarded as promising carriers for targeted drug delivery and imaging probes. A fundamental understanding of the dynamics of polymeric nanoparticle targeting to receptor-coated vascular surfaces is therefore of great importance to enhance the design of nanoparticles toward improving binding ability. Although the effects of particle size and shear flow on the binding of nanoparticles to a vessel wall have been studied at the particulate level, a computational model to investigate the details of the binding process at the molecular level has not been developed. In this research, dissipative particle dynamics simulations are used to study nanoparticles with diameters of several nanometers binding to receptors on vascular surfaces under shear flow. Interestingly, shear flow velocities ranging from 0 to 2000 s-1 had no effect on the attachment process of nanoparticles very close to the capillary wall. Increased binding energy between the ligands and wall caused a corresponding linear increase in bonding ability. Our simulations also indicated that larger nanoparticles and those of rod shape with a higher aspect ratio have better binding ability than those of smaller size or rounder shape.

  8. Shear flow and drift wave turbulence dynamics in a cylindrical plasma device

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Z.; Tynan, G. R.; Holland, C.; Xu, M.; Mueller, S. H.; Yu, J. H.

    2010-03-15

    The experimental observations of the dynamics of the coupled drift wave turbulence (DWT)/sheared zonal flow (ZF) system in a cylindrical plasma device using a combination of Langmuir probe and fast-framing imaging measurements are reported. The results show the presence of an azimuthal ZF that exhibits low frequency (approx250 Hz) fluctuations. The envelope of the higher frequency (above 5 kHz) floating potential fluctuations associated with the DWT, the density gradient, and the turbulent radial particle flux are all modulated out of phase with the strength of the ZF. The divergence of the turbulent Reynolds stress is also modulated at the same slow time scale in a phase-coherent manner consistent with a turbulent-driven shear flow sustained against the collisional and viscous damping. The radial turbulence correlation length and cross-field particle transport are reduced during periods of strong flow shear. The results are qualitatively consistent with theoretical expectations for coupled DWT-ZF dynamics.

  9. Dynamics of a semiflexible polymer or polymer ring in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Philipp S.; Obermayer, Benedikt; Frey, Erwin

    2014-02-01

    Polymers exposed to shear flow exhibit a remarkably rich tumbling dynamics. While rigid rods rotate on Jeffery orbits, a flexible polymer stretches and coils up during tumbling. Theoretical results show that in both of these asymptotic regimes the corresponding tumbling frequency fc in a linear shear flow of strength γ scales as a power law Wi2/3 in the Weissenberg number Wi=γτ, where τ is a characteristic time of the polymer's relaxational dynamics. For a flexible polymer these theoretical results are well confirmed by a large body of experimental single molecule studies. However, for the intermediate semiflexible regime, especially relevant for cytoskeletal filaments like F-actin and microtubules, the situation is less clear. While recent experiments on single F-actin filaments are still interpreted within the classical Wi2/3 scaling law, theoretical results indicated deviations from it. Here we perform extensive Brownian dynamics simulations to explore the tumbling dynamics of semiflexible polymers over a broad range of shear strength and the polymer's persistence length lp. We find that the Weissenberg number alone does not suffice to fully characterize the tumbling dynamics, and the classical scaling law breaks down. Instead, both the polymer's stiffness and the shear rate are relevant control parameters. Based on our Brownian dynamics simulations we postulate that in the parameter range most relevant for cytoskeletal filaments there is a distinct scaling behavior with fcτ*=Wi3/4f ̂c(x) with Wi =γτ* and the scaling variable x =(lp/L)(Wi)-1/3; here τ* is the time the polymer's center of mass requires to diffuse its own contour length L. Comparing these results with experimental data on F-actin we find that the Wi3/4 scaling law agrees quantitatively significantly better with the data than the classical Wi2/3 law. Finally, we extend our results to single ring polymers in shear flow, and find similar results as for linear polymers with slightly different

  10. Dynamic and Thermal Turbulent Time Scale Modelling for Homogeneous Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwab, John R.; Lakshminarayana, Budugur

    1994-01-01

    A new turbulence model, based upon dynamic and thermal turbulent time scale transport equations, is developed and applied to homogeneous shear flows with constant velocity and temperature gradients. The new model comprises transport equations for k, the turbulent kinetic energy; tau, the dynamic time scale; k(sub theta), the fluctuating temperature variance; and tau(sub theta), the thermal time scale. It offers conceptually parallel modeling of the dynamic and thermal turbulence at the two equation level, and eliminates the customary prescription of an empirical turbulent Prandtl number, Pr(sub t), thus permitting a more generalized prediction capability for turbulent heat transfer in complex flows and geometries. The new model also incorporates constitutive relations, based upon invariant theory, that allow the effects of nonequilibrium to modify the primary coefficients for the turbulent shear stress and heat flux. Predictions of the new model, along with those from two other similar models, are compared with experimental data for decaying homogeneous dynamic and thermal turbulence, homogeneous turbulence with constant temperature gradient, and homogeneous turbulence with constant temperature gradient and constant velocity gradient. The new model offers improvement in agreement with the data for most cases considered in this work, although it was no better than the other models for several cases where all the models performed poorly.

  11. Fully automated digital holographic processing for monitoring the dynamics of a vesicle suspension under shear flow

    PubMed Central

    Minetti, Christophe; Podgorski, Thomas; Coupier, Gwennou; Dubois, Frank

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a vesicle suspension under shear flow between plates using DHM with a spatially reduced coherent source. Holograms are grabbed at a frequency of 24 frames/sec. The distribution of the vesicle suspension is obtained after numerical processing of the digital holograms sequence resulting in a 4D distribution. Obtaining this distribution is not straightforward and requires special processing to automate the analysis. We present an original method that fully automates the analysis and provides distributions that are further analyzed to extract physical properties of the fluid. Details of the numerical implementation, as well as sample experimental results are presented. PMID:24877015

  12. Dynamics of a single red blood cell in simple shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Kushal; Graham, Michael D.

    2015-10-01

    This work describes simulations of a red blood cell (RBC) in simple shear flow, focusing on the dependence of the cell dynamics on the spontaneous curvature of the membrane. The results show that an oblate spheroidal spontaneous curvature maintains the dimple of the RBC during tank-treading dynamics as well as exhibits off-shear-plane tumbling consistent with the experimental observations of Dupire et al. [J. Dupire, M. Socol, and A. Viallat, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 109, 20808 (2012), 10.1073/pnas.1210236109] and their hypothesis of an inhomogeneous spontaneous shape. As the flow strength (capillary number Ca ) is increased at a particular viscosity ratio between inner and outer fluid, the dynamics undergo transitions in the following sequence: tumbling, kayaking or rolling, tilted tank-treading, oscillating-swinging, swinging, and tank-treading. The tilted tank-treading (or spinning frisbee) regime has been previously observed in experiments but not in simulations. Two distinct classes of regime are identified: a membrane reorientation regime, where the part of membrane that is at the dimple at rest moves to the rim and vice versa, is observed in motions at high Ca such as tilted tank-treading, oscillating-swinging, swinging, and tank-treading, and a nonreorientation regime, where the part of the membrane starting from the dimple stays at the dimple, is observed in motions at low Ca such as rolling, tumbling, kayaking, and flip-flopping.

  13. Dynamics of a single red blood cell in simple shear flow.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Kushal; Graham, Michael D

    2015-10-01

    This work describes simulations of a red blood cell (RBC) in simple shear flow, focusing on the dependence of the cell dynamics on the spontaneous curvature of the membrane. The results show that an oblate spheroidal spontaneous curvature maintains the dimple of the RBC during tank-treading dynamics as well as exhibits off-shear-plane tumbling consistent with the experimental observations of Dupire et al. [J. Dupire, M. Socol, and A. Viallat, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 109, 20808 (2012)] and their hypothesis of an inhomogeneous spontaneous shape. As the flow strength (capillary number Ca) is increased at a particular viscosity ratio between inner and outer fluid, the dynamics undergo transitions in the following sequence: tumbling, kayaking or rolling, tilted tank-treading, oscillating-swinging, swinging, and tank-treading. The tilted tank-treading (or spinning frisbee) regime has been previously observed in experiments but not in simulations. Two distinct classes of regime are identified: a membrane reorientation regime, where the part of membrane that is at the dimple at rest moves to the rim and vice versa, is observed in motions at high Ca such as tilted tank-treading, oscillating-swinging, swinging, and tank-treading, and a nonreorientation regime, where the part of the membrane starting from the dimple stays at the dimple, is observed in motions at low Ca such as rolling, tumbling, kayaking, and flip-flopping. PMID:26565275

  14. Dynamics of a double-stranded DNA segment in a shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panja, Debabrata; Barkema, Gerard T.; van Leeuwen, J. M. J.

    2016-04-01

    We study the dynamics of a double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) segment, as a semiflexible polymer, in a shear flow, the strength of which is customarily expressed in terms of the dimensionless Weissenberg number Wi. Polymer chains in shear flows are well known to undergo tumbling motion. When the chain lengths are much smaller than the persistence length, one expects a (semiflexible) chain to tumble as a rigid rod. At low Wi, a polymer segment shorter than the persistence length does indeed tumble as a rigid rod. However, for higher Wi the chain does not tumble as a rigid rod, even if the polymer segment is shorter than the persistence length. In particular, from time to time the polymer segment may assume a buckled form, a phenomenon commonly known as Euler buckling. Using a bead-spring Hamiltonian model for extensible dsDNA fragments, we first analyze Euler buckling in terms of the oriented deterministic state (ODS), which is obtained as the steady-state solution of the dynamical equations by turning off the stochastic (thermal) forces at a fixed orientation of the chain. The ODS exhibits symmetry breaking at a critical Weissenberg number Wic, analogous to a pitchfork bifurcation in dynamical systems. We then follow up the analysis with simulations and demonstrate symmetry breaking in computer experiments, characterized by a unimodal to bimodal transformation of the probability distribution of the second Rouse mode with increasing Wi. Our simulations reveal that shear can cause strong deformation for a chain that is shorter than its persistence length, similar to recent experimental observations.

  15. Proteins in a shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymczak, P.; Cieplak, Marek

    2007-10-01

    The conformational dynamics of a single protein molecule in a shear flow is investigated using Brownian dynamics simulations. A structure-based coarse grained model of a protein is used. We consider two proteins, ubiquitin and integrin, and find that at moderate shear rates they unfold through a sequence of metastable states—a pattern which is distinct from a smooth unraveling found in homopolymers. Full unfolding occurs only at very large shear rates. Furthermore, the hydrodynamic interactions between the amino acids are shown to hinder the shear flow unfolding. The characteristics of the unfolding process depend on whether a protein is anchored or not, and if it is, on the choice of an anchoring point.

  16. Adhesion dynamics of circulating tumor cells under shear flow in a bio-functionalized microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siu-Lun Cheung, Luthur; Zheng, Xiangjun; Wang, Lian; Baygents, James C.; Guzman, Roberto; Schroeder, Joyce A.; Heimark, Ronald L.; Zohar, Yitshak

    2011-05-01

    The adhesion dynamics of circulating tumor cells in a bio-functionalized microchannel under hydrodynamic loading is explored experimentally and analyzed theoretically. EpCAM antibodies are immobilized on the microchannel surface to specifically capture EpCAM-expressing target breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 from a homogeneous cell suspension in shear flow. In the cross-stream direction, gravity is the dominant physical mechanism resulting in continuous interaction between the EpCAM cell receptors and the immobilized surface anti-EpCAM ligands. Depending on the applied shear rate, three dynamic states have been characterized: firm adhesion, rolling adhesion and free rolling. The steady-state velocity under adhesion- and free-rolling conditions as well as the time-dependent velocity in firm adhesion has been characterized experimentally, based on video recordings of target cell motion in functionalized microchannels. A previously reported theoretical model, utilizing a linear spring to represent the specific receptor-ligand bonds, has been adopted to analyze adhesion dynamics including features such as the cell-surface binding force and separation gap. By fitting theoretical predictions to experimental measurements, a unified exponential decay function is proposed to describe the target cell velocity evolution during capture; the fitting parameters, velocity and time scales, depend on the particular cell-surface system.

  17. Laboratory Investigation of the Dynamics of Shear Flows in a Plasma Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Ami; Thomas, Edward; Amatucci, William; Ganguli, Gurudas

    2013-10-01

    For a wide variety of laboratory and space plasma environments, theoretical predictions state that plasmas are unstable to transverse and parallel inhomogeneous flows over a very broad frequency range. Specifically, for a velocity shear oriented perpendicular to a uniform background magnetic field, the shear scale length (LE) compared to the ion gyro-radius (ρi) determines the character of the shear driven instability that may prevail. An interpenetrating plasma configuration is used to create a transverse velocity shear profile in a magnetized plasma column. For the first time, the continuous variation of ρi/LE, and the associated transition of the instability regimes driven by the shear flow mechanism, is demonstrated in a single laboratory experiment under identical plasma conditions. This work characterizes the compression/relaxation of boundary layers often generated in a variety of space plasma processes. This project is supported with funding from the U.S. Dept. of Energy and DTRA.

  18. State diagram for adhesion dynamics of deformable capsules under shear flow.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zheng Yuan; Bai, Bo Feng

    2016-08-17

    Due to the significance of understanding the underlying mechanisms of cell adhesion in biological processes and cell capture in biomedical applications, we numerically investigate the adhesion dynamics of deformable capsules under shear flow by using a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic model. This model is based on the coupling of the front tracking-finite element method for elastic mechanics of the capsule membrane and the adhesion kinetics simulation for adhesive interactions between capsules and functionalized surfaces. Using this model, three distinct adhesion dynamic states are predicted, such as detachment, rolling and firm-adhesion. Specifically, the effects of capsule deformability quantified by the capillary number on the transitions of these three dynamic states are investigated by developing an adhesion dynamic state diagram for the first time. At low capillary numbers (e.g. Ca < 0.0075), whole-capsule deformation confers the capsule a flattened bottom in contact with the functionalized surface, which hence promotes the rolling-to-firm-adhesion transition. It is consistent with the observations from previous studies that cell deformation promotes the adhesion of cells lying in the rolling regime. However, it is surprising to find that, at relatively high capillary numbers (e.g. 0.0075 < Ca < 0.0175), the effect of capsule deformability on its adhesion dynamics is far more complex than just promoting adhesion. High deformability of capsules makes their bottom take a concave shape with no adhesion bond formation in the middle. The appearance of this specific capsule shape inhibits the transitions of both rolling-to-firm-adhesion and detachment-to-rolling, and it means that capsule deformation no longer promotes the capsule adhesion. Besides, it is interesting to note that, when the capillary number exceeds a critical value (e.g. Ca = 0.0175), the rolling state no longer appears, since capsules exhibit large deviation from the spherical shape

  19. The dynamics of a capsule in a wall-bounded oscillating shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, LaiLai; Rabault, Jean; Brandt, Luca

    2015-07-01

    The motion of an initially spherical capsule in a wall-bounded oscillating shear flow is investigated via an accelerated boundary integral implementation. The neo-Hookean model is used as the constitutive law of the capsule membrane. The maximum wall-normal migration is observed when the oscillation period of the imposed shear is of the order of the relaxation time of the elastic membrane; hence, the optimal capillary number scales with the inverse of the oscillation frequency and the ratio agrees well with the theoretical prediction in the limit of high-frequency oscillation. The migration velocity decreases monotonically with the frequency of the applied shear and the capsule-wall distance. We report a significant correlation between the capsule lateral migration and the normal stress difference induced in the flow. The periodic variation of the capsule deformation is roughly in phase with that of the migration velocity and normal stress difference, with twice the frequency of the imposed shear. The maximum deformation increases linearly with the membrane elasticity before reaching a plateau at higher capillary numbers when the deformation is limited by the time over which shear is applied in the same direction and not by the membrane deformability. The maximum membrane deformation scales as the distance to the wall to the power 1/3 as observed for capsules and droplets in near-wall steady shear flows.

  20. Numerical modelling of a healthy/malaria-infected erythrocyte in shear flow using dissipative particle dynamics method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Ting; Phan-Thien, Nhan; Cheong Khoo, Boo; Teck Lim, Chwee

    2014-06-01

    In the present paper, the dynamics of healthy and malaria-infected erythrocytes in the shear flow are investigated using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), a particle-based method. A discrete model is developed, where the computational domain is discretized into a set of particles to represent the suspending liquid, as well as erythrocytes as suspended deformable particles. The particles on an erythrocyte surface are connected into a triangular network to represent the membrane. The interaction between any two particles is modelled by the DPD method, which conserves both mass and momentum. In order to validate this model, the deformation of a spherical capsule in the shear flow is firstly simulated, and a good agreement is found with previously published works. Then, the dynamics of a healthy biconcave erythrocyte in a shear flow is investigated. The results demonstrate that a healthy erythrocyte undergoes a tank-treading motion at a high capillary number, and a tumbling motion at a low capillary number or at a high viscosity ratio, internal (erythrocyte) to external fluids. Two other types of trembling motions, breathing with tumbling and swinging with tank-treading, are also found at an intermediate capillary number or viscosity ratio. Finally, the dynamics of malaria-infected erythrocyte in a shear flow is studied. At the same shear rate, if the healthy erythrocyte undergoes a tumbling motion, the malaria-infected one will exhibit a tumbling motion only. If the healthy erythrocyte undergoes a trembling motion, the malaria-infected one cannot exhibit tank-treading motion. If the healthy erythrocyte undergoes a tank-treading motion, the malaria-infected one will exhibit one of three dynamic motions: tumbling, trembling or tank-treading motion.

  1. Non-equilibrium all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of free and tethered DNA molecules in nanochannel shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guan M.; Sandberg, William C.

    2007-04-01

    In order to gain insight into the mechanical and dynamical behaviour of free and tethered short chains of ss/ds DNA molecules in flow, and in parallel to investigate the properties of long chain molecules in flow fields, we have developed a series of quantum and molecular methods to extend the well developed equilibrium software CHARMM to handle non-equilibrium dynamics. These methods have been applied to cases of DNA molecules in shear flows in nanochannels. Biomolecules, both free and wall-tethered, have been simulated in the all-atom style in solvent-filled nanochannels. The new methods were demonstrated by carrying out NEMD simulations of free single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecules of 21 bases as well as double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules of 21 base pairs tethered on gold surfaces in an ionic water shear flow. The tethering of the linker molecule (6-mercapto-1-hexanol) to perfect Au(111) surfaces was parametrized based on density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Force field parameters were incorporated into the CHARMM database. Gold surfaces are simulated in a Lennard-Jones style model that was fitted to the Morse potential model of bulk gold. The bonding force of attachment of the DNA molecules to the gold substrate linker molecule was computed to be up to a few nN when the DNA molecules are fully stretched at high shear rates. For the first time, we calculated the relaxation time of DNA molecules in picoseconds (ps) and the hydrodynamic force up to a few nanoNewtons (nN) per base pair in a nanochannel flow. The velocity profiles in the solvent due to the presence of the tethered DNA molecules were found to be nonlinear only at high shear flow rates. Free ssDNA molecules in a shear flow were observed to behave differently from each other depending upon their initial orientation in the flow field. Both free and tethered DNA molecules are clearly observed to be stretching, rotating and relaxing. Methods developed in this initial work can be incorporated

  2. Experimental and numerical studies of tethered DNA dynamics in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lueth, Christopher A.

    Polymer physics has a rich tradition spanning nearly two centuries. In the 1830s, Henri Braconnot and coworkers were perhaps the first to work on what is today known as polymer science when they derived semi-synthetic materials from naturally occurring cellulose. However, the true nature of polymers, as long chain molecules, had not been proposed until 1910 by Pickles. It was not until the 1950's when polymer models were developed using statistical mechanics. Recently, the field has been revitalized by the ability to study individual polymer molecules for the first time. The development of DNA single molecule fluorescence microscopy coupled with ever increasing computational power has opened the door to molecular level understanding of polymer physics, resolving old disputes and uncovering new interesting phenomena. In this work, we use a combination of theoretical predictions and lambda-phage DNA single molecule fluorescence microscopy to study the behavior of polymers tethered to surfaces. Brownian dynamics simulations of a number of coarse-grained polymer models---dynamic and equilibrium Kratky-Porod chains as well as bead-spring chains---were completed and compared with analytical and experimental results. First, an expression is developed for the entropic exclusion force experienced by a tethered polymer chain. We propose that, for a freely jointed chain, a modification to the free entropic force of kBT/y is needed in the direction normal to the surface. Analogously, we propose that for a wormlike chain, a modification of 2kBT/y is needed, due to the finite curvature of the model. Then, the reliability of discretized bead spring simulations containing this modified entropic force are analyzed using Kratky-Porod simulations and are found to reproduce most statistics, except for those very near the surface, such as end-wall contact. Next, experiments of tethered lambda-phage DNA in shear flow are presented for the first time in the flow-gradient plane. The

  3. Effects of Gravity and Shear on the Dynamics and Stability of Particulate and Multiphase Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sangani, Ashor S.

    1996-01-01

    The main objectives of this project are to understand the differing particulate and multiphase flow behaviors that will occur in space and in Earth's gravity. More specifically, the project is concerned with understanding the effect of shear and gravity on two relatively ideal suspensions with significant inertial effects. The first is a gas-solid suspension at small Reynolds numbers and finite Stokes numbers. In this type of suspensions the inertia of the particle phase is significant while the hydrodynamic interactions are dominated by viscous forces in the suspending fluid. The other is a bubble suspension at small Weber and large Reynolds numbers. The hydrodynamic interactions in such suspensions are dominated by the inertial effects in the suspending fluid, but these inertial interactions can be described using potential flow theory. Our main objective is to examine the effects of shear and gravity on the average properties and stability of these two suspensions.

  4. Effect of bidirectional internal flow on fluid-structure interaction dynamics of conveying marine riser model subject to shear current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zheng-Shou; Kim, Wu-Joan

    2012-03-01

    This article presents a numerical investigation concerning the effect of two kinds of axially progressing internal flows (namely, upward and downward) on fluid-structure interaction (FSI) dynamics about a marine riser model which is subject to external shear current. The CAE technology behind the current research is a proposed FSI solution, which combines structural analysis software with CFD technology together. Efficiency validation for the CFD software was carried out first. It has been proved that the result from numerical simulations agrees well with the observation from relating model test cases in which the fluidity of internal flow is ignorable. After verifying the numerical code accuracy, simulations are conducted to study the vibration response that attributes to the internal progressive flow. It is found that the existence of internal flow does play an important role in determining the vibration mode (/dominant frequency) and the magnitude of instantaneous vibration amplitude. Since asymmetric curvature along the riser span emerges in the case of external shear current, the centrifugal and Coriolis accelerations owing to up- and downward internal progressive flows play different roles in determining the fluid-structure interaction response. The discrepancy between them becomes distinct, when the velocity ratio of internal flow against external shear current is relatively high.

  5. Parallel shear flow instabilities in strongly coupled Yukawa liquids: A comparison of generalized hydrodynamic model and molecular dynamics results

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwin, J.; Ganesh, R.

    2010-10-15

    Using a generalized hydrodynamic (GH) model, the growth rate spectra of Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability has been obtained analytically for a step shear profile in strongly coupled Yukawa liquids. The class of shear flows studied is assumed to be incompressible in nature. The growth rate spectra calculated exhibit viscous damping at high mode numbers, destabilization at stronger coupling, and in the limit {tau}{sub m} (viscoelastic relaxation time){yields}0, reduce to the regular Navier-Stokes growth rate spectra. A direct comparison is made with previous molecular dynamics (MD) simulations [Ashwin J. and R. Ganesh, Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 215003 (2010)] of KH instability. We find that for a given value of Reynolds number R and coupling parameter 1<{Gamma}<100, the GH and MD growth rates are in a qualitative agreement. The inclusion of the effect of shear heating as an effective coupling parameter {Gamma}{sub e} appears to improve the quantitative comparison as well.

  6. Lagrangian and Eulerian Statistics of Vorticity Dynamics in Turbulent Stratified Shear Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobitz, Frank; Schneider, Kai; Farge, Marie

    2015-11-01

    The Lagrangian and Eulerian time-rate of change statistics of vorticity in homogeneous turbulence with shear and stable stratification are studied. Direct numerical simulations are performed, in which the Richardson number is varied from Ri=0, corresponding to unstratified shear flow, to Ri=1, corresponding to strongly stratified shear flow. The probability density functions (pdfs) of both Lagrangian and Eulerian time-rates of change show a strong influence on the Richardson number. The Lagrangian time-rate of change pdf has a stretched-exponential shape due to the vortex stretching and tilting term in the equation for fluctuating vorticity. The shape of the Eulerian time-rate of change pdf was also observed to be stretched-exponential and the extreme values for the Eulerian time-rate of change are larger than those observed for the Lagrangian counterpart due to the nonlinear term in the vorticity equation. The Lagrangian and Eulerian acceleration pdfs are mainly determined by the pressure-gradient and nonlinear terms in the Navier-Stokes equation, respectively. The Lagrangian time-rate of change pdf of fluctuating density does not show a stretched exponential shape, while its Eulerian counterpart does due to the nonlinear term in the in the density advection-diffusion equation.

  7. Magnetorheological Shear Flow Near Jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vågberg, Daniel; Tighe, Brian

    2015-03-01

    Flow in magnetorheological (MR) fluids and systems near jamming both display hallmarks of complex fluid rheology, including yield stresses and shear thinning viscosities. They are also tunable, which means that both phenomena can be used as a switching mechanism in ``smart'' fluids, i.e. fluids where properties can be tuned rapidly and reversibly by changing external parameters. We use numerical simulations to investigate the rheological properties of MR fluids close to the jamming transition as a function of the applied field and volume fraction. We are especially interested in the crossover region where both phenomena are needed to describe the observed dynamics. Funded by the Dutch Organization for Scientific Research (NWO).

  8. Amphiphilic Systems under shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hongxia

    2008-03-01

    Phase behavior and the related physical and rheological properties of the amphiphilic systems including liquid crystals, diblock copolymers and surfactants are of wide-spread interest, e.g. in industrial processing of layered materials or biological applications of lipid membranes. For example, submitted to an applied shear flow, these lamellae show an interesting coupling of the layer orientation and the flow field. Despite an extensive literature dealing with the shear-induced transition, the underlying causes and mechanisms of the transition remain largely speculative. The experimental similarities between systems of different molecular constituents indicate, that the theoretical description of these reorientations can be constructed, from a common generic basis. Hence one can develop an efficient computer model which is able to reproduce the properties pertinent to real amphiphilic systems, and allows for a large-scale simulation. Here, I employed a simplified continuum amphiphilic computer model to investigate the shear--induced disorder-order, order-order and alignment flipping by large-scale parallelized (none) equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation

  9. Reaction front dynamics under shear flow for arbitrary Damköhler numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandopadhyay, Aditya; Méheust, Yves; Le Borgne, Tanguy

    2016-04-01

    Reaction fronts where two reactive fluids displace one another play an important role in a range of applications, including contaminant plume transport and reaction, soil and aquifer remediation, CO2 sequestration, geothermal dipoles and the development of hotspots of reaction in mixing zones. The background flow induces enhanced mixing, and therefore reaction, through interfacial shear. Hence the coupling of fluid flow with chemical reactions is pivotal in understanding and quantifying effective reaction kinetics in reaction fronts. While this problem has been addressed in the limit of fast reactions (e.g. de Simoni 2005, Le Borgne 2014), in natural systems reactions can span a large range of Damköhler numbers since their characteristic reaction times vary over a large range of typical values. Here the coupling of shear flow and reversible chemical reactions is studied for a reaction front with initially separated reactants at arbitrary Damköhler numbers. Approximate analytical expressions for the global production rate are derived based on a reactive lamella approach. We observe three distinct regimes, each of them characterized by different scalings of the global production rate and width of the reactive zone. We describe the dependency of these scalings and the associated characteristic transition times as a function of Damköhler and Péclet numbers. These results are validated against 2D numerical simulations. The study is expected to shed light on the inherently complex cases of reactive mixing with varying reaction rates under the influence of an imposed flow. de Simoni et al. (2005) Water Resour. Res., 41, W11410 Le Borgne et al. (2014) GRL, 41(22), 7898

  10. Quantitative analysis of the angular dynamics of a single spheroid in simple shear flow at moderate Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosén, Tomas; Nordmark, Arne; Aidun, Cyrus K.; Do-Quang, Minh; Lundell, Fredrik

    2016-08-01

    A spheroidal particle in simple shear flow shows surprisingly complicated angular dynamics; caused by effects of fluid inertia (characterized by the particle Reynolds number Rep) and particle inertia (characterized by the Stokes number St). Understanding this behavior can provide important fundamental knowledge of suspension flows with spheroidal particles. Up to now only qualitative analysis has been available at moderate Rep. Rigorous analytical methods apply only to very small Rep and numerical results lack accuracy due to the difficulty in treating the moving boundary of the particle. Here we show that the dynamics of the rotational motion of a prolate spheroidal particle in a linear shear flow can be quantitatively analyzed through the eigenvalues of the log-rolling particle (particle aligned with vorticity). This analysis provides an accurate description of stable rotational states in terms of Rep,St, and particle aspect ratio (rp). Furthermore we find that the effect on the orientational dynamics from fluid inertia can be modeled with a Duffing-Van der Pol oscillator. This opens up the possibility of developing a reduced-order model that takes into account effects from both fluid and particle inertia.

  11. Passive scalars chaotic dynamics induced by two vortices in a two-layer geophysical flow with shear and rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhov, Eugene

    2015-11-01

    Vortex motion in shear flows is of great interest from the point of view of nonlinear science, and also as an applied problem to predict the evolution of vortices in nature. Considering applications to the ocean and atmosphere, it is well-known that these media are significantly stratified. The simplest way to take stratification into account is to deal with a two-layer flow. In this case, vortices perturb the interface, and consequently, the perturbed interface transits the vortex influences from one layer to another. Our aim is to investigate the dynamics of two point vortices in an unbounded domain where a shear and rotation are imposed as the leading order influence from some generalized perturbation. The two vortices are arranged within the bottom layer, but an emphasis is on the upper-layer fluid particle motion. Point vortices induce singular velocity fields in the layer they belong to, however, in the other layers of a multi-layer flow, they induce regular velocity fields. The main feature is that singular velocity fields prohibit irregular dynamics in the vicinity of the singular points, but regular velocity fields, provided optimal conditions, permit irregular dynamics to extend almost in every point of the corresponding phase space.

  12. Dynamic flow localization in porous rocks under combined pressure and shear loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarushina, Viktoriya; Podladchikov, Yuri; Simon, Nina

    2015-04-01

    Flow localization occurs in deforming porous fluid saturated rocks. It exhibits itself as veins, pockmarks on the ocean floor or gas chimneys visible on seismic images from several chalk fields of the Central North Sea and from the Utsira formation at Sleipner in the Norwegian North Sea, which is one of the best documented CO2 storage sites. Porosity waves were repeatedly shown to be a viable mechanism of flow self-localization that does not require the pre-existence of a connected fracture network. Porosity waves result from an instability of the Darcy flow that occurs in porous rocks with time-dependent viscous or viscoelastoplastic rheology. Local fluid overpressure generated by fluid injection or chemical reactions aided by buoyancy force drives upward fluid migration. Viscous deformation delays pressure diffusion thus maintaining local overpressure for considerable periods of time. Development of an under-pressured region just below the over-pressured domain leads to separation of the fluid-filled high-porosity blob from the source and the background flow. The instability organizes the flow into separate vertical channels. Pressure distribution, shape and scaling of these channels are highly sensitive to the rheology of the porous rock. In this contribution, based on a micromechanical approach, we consider the complex rheology of brittle, ductile and transitional regimes of deformation of porous rocks in the presence of combined pressure and shear loading. Accurate description of transitional brittle-ductile deformation is a challenging task due to a large number of microscopic processes involved. We use elastoplastic and viscoplastic analytical solutions for the non-hydrostatic deformation of a singular cavity in the representative volume element in order to deduce expected behavior of the porous rock. The model provides micro-mechanisms for various failure modes (localized and homogeneous) and dilatancy onset. In particular, the model predicts that dilatancy

  13. Turbulence in homogeneous shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumir, Alain

    1996-11-01

    Homogeneous shear flows with an imposed mean velocity U=Syx̂ are studied in a period box of size Lx×Ly×Lz, in the statistically stationary turbulent state. In contrast with unbounded shear flows, the finite size of the system constrains the large-scale dynamics. The Reynolds number, defined by Re≡SL2y/ν varies in the range 2600⩽Re⩽11300. The total kinetic energy and enstrophy in the volume of numerical integration have large peaks, resulting in fluctuations of kinetic energy of order 30%-50%. The mechanism leading to these fluctuations is very reminiscent of the ``streaks'' responsible for the violent bursts observed in turbulent boundary layers. The large scale anisotropy of the flow, characterized by the two-point correlation tensor depends on the aspect ratio of the system. The probability distribution functions (PDF) of the components of the velocity are found to be close to Gaussian. The physics of the Reynolds stress tensor, uv, is very similar to what is found experimentally in wall bounded shear flows. The study of the two-point correlation tensor of the vorticity <ωiωj> suggests that the small scales become isotropic when the Reynolds number increases, as observed in high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layers. However, the skewness of the z component of vorticity is independent of the Reynolds number in this range, suggesting that some small scale anisotropy remains even at very high Reynolds numbers. An analogy is drawn with the problem of turbulent mixing, where a similar anisotropy is observed.

  14. Shear-flow trapped-ion-mode interaction revisited. II. Intermittent transport associated with low-frequency zonal flow dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ghizzo, A.; Palermo, F.

    2015-08-15

    We address the mechanisms underlying low-frequency zonal flow generation in turbulent system and the associated intermittent regime of ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) turbulence. This model is in connection with the recent observation of quasi periodic zonal flow oscillation at a frequency close to 2 kHz, at the low-high transition, observed in the ASDEX Upgrade [Conway et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 065001 (2011)] and EAST tokamak [Xu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett 107, 125001 (2011)]. Turbulent bursts caused by the coupling of Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) driven shear flows with trapped ion modes (TIMs) were investigated by means of reduced gyrokinetic simulations. It was found that ITG turbulence can be regulated by low-frequency meso-scale zonal flows driven by resonant collisionless trapped ion modes (CTIMs), through parametric-type scattering, a process in competition with the usual KH instability.

  15. Shear-flow trapped-ion-mode interaction revisited. II. Intermittent transport associated with low-frequency zonal flow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghizzo, A.; Palermo, F.

    2015-08-01

    We address the mechanisms underlying low-frequency zonal flow generation in turbulent system and the associated intermittent regime of ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) turbulence. This model is in connection with the recent observation of quasi periodic zonal flow oscillation at a frequency close to 2 kHz, at the low-high transition, observed in the ASDEX Upgrade [Conway et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 065001 (2011)] and EAST tokamak [Xu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett 107, 125001 (2011)]. Turbulent bursts caused by the coupling of Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) driven shear flows with trapped ion modes (TIMs) were investigated by means of reduced gyrokinetic simulations. It was found that ITG turbulence can be regulated by low-frequency meso-scale zonal flows driven by resonant collisionless trapped ion modes (CTIMs), through parametric-type scattering, a process in competition with the usual KH instability.

  16. The dynamics of inextensible capsules in shear flow under the effect of the natural state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Tsorng-Whay; Niu, Xiting; Glowinski, Roland

    2015-11-01

    The effect of the natural state on the motion of an inextensible capsule in two-dimensional shear flow has been studied numerically. The energy barrier based on such natural state plays a role for having the transition between two well-known motions, tumbling and tank-treading (TT) with the long axis oscillating about a fixed inclination angle (a swinging mode), when varying the shear rate. Between tumbling and TT with a swinging mode, the intermittent region has been obtained for the capsule with a biconcave rest shape. The estimated critical value of the swelling ratio for having the intermittent region is < 0 . 7 , i.e., the capsule with the rest shape closer to a full disk has no intermittent behavior. The capsule intermittent behavior is a mixture of tumbling and TT. Just like the TT with a swinging mode, which can be viewed as TT with an incomplete tumbling, the membrane tank-treads backward and forward within a small range while tumbling. The transition between tumbling and TT with a swinging mode has been studied. This work is supported by an NSF grant DMS-0914788.

  17. Layered Systems Under Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svenšek, Daniel; Brand, Helmut R.

    We discuss and review a generalization of the usual hydrodynamic description of smectic A liquid crystals motivated by the experimentally observed shear-induced destabilization and reorientation of smectic A like systems. We include both the smectic layering (via the layer displacement u and the layer normal hat{p}) and the director hat{n} of the underlying nematic order in our macroscopic hydrodynamic description and allow both directions to differ in non equilibrium situations. In a homeotropically aligned sample the nematic director couples to an applied simple shear, whereas the smectic layering stays unchanged. This difference leads to a finite (but usually small) angle between hat{n} and hat{p}, which we find to be equivalent to an effective dilatation of the layers. This effective dilatation leads, above a certain threshold, to an undulation instability of the layers with a wave vector parallel to the vorticity direction of the shear flow. We include the couplings of the velocity field with the order parameters for orientational and positional order and show how the order parameters interact with the undulation instability. We explore the influence of the magnitude of various material parameters on the instability. Comparing our results to available experimental results and molecular dynamic simulations, we find good qualitative agreement for the first instability. In addition, we discuss pathways to higher instabilities leading to the formation of onions (multilamellar vesicles) via cylindrical structures and/or the break-up of layers via large amplitude undulations.

  18. Dynamic blood flow and wall shear stress in pulmonary hypertensive disease.

    PubMed

    Postles, Arthur; Clark, Alys R; Tawhai, Merryn H

    2014-01-01

    This study provides new model of pulsatile flow in the pulmonary circulation in health and pulmonary hypertensive disease. Structural vascular remodeling typical of pulmonary hypertensive disease was implemented in the model by progressively altering the mechanical properties of the arterial geometry and progressively increasing the inlet pulse pressure (PP). The transmission of PP throughout the tree was shown to increase in advanced stages of disease, creating the potential for a `vicious-cycle' of damage to vasculature. Wall shear stress (WSS) was shown to be highest in the terminal arteries of the model and increased significantly with disease. A further trend observed in WSS results was that high WSS values began to `climb' the arterial tree towards the proximal vessels as disease progressed. This suggests a link between WSS and distal remodeling in pulmonary hypertensive disease, which initiates in the small muscular arteries and arterioles and spreads into larger arteries as the disease progresses. PMID:25571282

  19. Shear instabilities in granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfarb, David J.; Glasser, Benjamin J.; Shinbrot, Troy

    2002-01-01

    Unstable waves have been long studied in fluid shear layers. These waves affect transport in the atmosphere and oceans, in addition to slipstream stability behind ships, aeroplanes and heat-transfer devices. Corresponding instabilities in granular flows have not been previously documented, despite the importance of these flows in geophysical and industrial systems. Here we report that breaking waves can form at the interface between two streams of identical grains flowing on an inclined plane downstream of a splitter plate. Changes in either the shear rate or the angle of incline cause such waves to appear abruptly. We analyse a granular flow model that agrees qualitatively with our experimental data; the model suggests that the waves result from competition between shear and extensional strains in the flowing granular bed. We propose a dimensionless shear number that governs the transition between steady and wavy flows.

  20. Shear instabilities in granular flows.

    PubMed

    Goldfarb, David J; Glasser, Benjamin J; Shinbrot, Troy

    2002-01-17

    Unstable waves have been long studied in fluid shear layers. These waves affect transport in the atmosphere and oceans, in addition to slipstream stability behind ships, aeroplanes and heat-transfer devices. Corresponding instabilities in granular flows have not been previously documented, despite the importance of these flows in geophysical and industrial systems. Here we report that breaking waves can form at the interface between two streams of identical grains flowing on an inclined plane downstream of a splitter plate. Changes in either the shear rate or the angle of incline cause such waves to appear abruptly. We analyse a granular flow model that agrees qualitatively with our experimental data; the model suggests that the waves result from competition between shear and extensional strains in the flowing granular bed. We propose a dimensionless shear number that governs the transition between steady and wavy flows. PMID:11797003

  1. Dynamics of vesicle suspension in shear flow between walls by digital holographic microscopy with a spatially reduced coherent source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minetti, C.; Podgorski, T.; Coupier, G.; Dubois, F.

    2012-06-01

    Digital Holographic Microscopy (DHM) is a powerful tool that strongly increases the field of investigation of classical microscopy. It allows to be used as phase contrast microscopy with the additional information of the z position over a whole experimental volume by acquiring a single frame. The use of a spatially reduced coherent source strongly reduces the coherent noise. Vesicles are close lipid membranes enclosing a sugar-water solution. Those biomimetic deformable objects are good mechanical models of living cells such as Red Blood Cells. We investigate the dynamics of a vesicle suspension in shear flow between walls (with a gap of about 200 μm). When vesicles are placed in a shear flow, they undergo a lift force that pushes them away from the wall until they reach the centre of the channel where the effects of both walls are compensated. On the other hand, hydrodynamical interactions between vesicles and segregation effects tend to push small vesicles away from the centre of the channel. The final distribution is thus a compromise between both effects that structures the distribution and has strong impact on rheology. DHM with reduced coherence and specific related algorithms (phase compensation, best focus plane determination, segmentation, ...) provide a full description of each object in the experimental volume as a function of their size and shape. Results are provided and illustrate the quantification of the lift force and the hydrodynamical interactions (shear induced diffusion).

  2. Dynamics of a one-dimensional model for the emergence of the plasma edge shear flow layer with momentum-conserving Reynolds stress

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo, I.; Carreras, B. A.

    2007-10-15

    A one-dimensional version of the second-order transition model based on the sheared flow amplification by Reynolds stress and turbulence suppression by shearing is presented. The model discussed in this paper includes a form of the Reynolds stress which explicitly conserves momentum. A linear stability analysis of the critical point is performed. Then, it is shown that the dynamics of weakly unstable states is determined by a reduced equation for the shear flow. In the case in which the flow damping term is diffusive, the stationary solutions are those of the real Ginzburg-Landau equation.

  3. Brownian dynamics simulation of orientational behavior, flow-induced structure, and rheological properties of a suspension of oblate spheroid particles under simple shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takehiro; Suga, Takanori; Mori, Noriyasu

    2005-08-01

    Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations were carried out for suspensions of oblate spheroid particles interacting via the Gay-Berne (GB) potential. The oblate spheroid particles were applied as a model of disc-like particles and the system of suspension of the particles was considered. Numerically analyzed were both the change in phase with the number density of the particles at equilibrium state and the behavior of the particles in simple shear flows. The system changed from isotropic phase to nematic one with increasing the particle concentration. In the simulation of shear flows, the shear was imposed upon the systems in nematic phase at equilibrium. The systems exhibited various motions of the director depending on the shear rate, e.g. the continuous rotation of director at low shear rates, the wagging at moderate shear rates, and the flow aligning at high shear rates. Temporal change in inner structure of suspensions was also analyzed and collapse of initial particle configurations due to shear was found. Moreover, rheological properties of the suspension were investigated. The numerical simulation predicted the shear-thinning in viscosity, negative first normal stress difference, and positive second normal stress difference, and these results qualitatively agreed with the predictions using a constitutive equation for discotic nematics. The present study proved that the BD simulation using spheroid particles interacting via the GB potential is an effective approach for investigating the flow behavior and flow-induced structure of suspensions of disklike particles at a particulate level.

  4. Brownian dynamics simulation of orientational behavior, flow-induced structure, and rheological properties of a suspension of oblate spheroid particles under simple shear.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takehiro; Suga, Takanori; Mori, Noriyasu

    2005-08-01

    Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations were carried out for suspensions of oblate spheroid particles interacting via the Gay-Berne (GB) potential. The oblate spheroid particles were applied as a model of disc-like particles and the system of suspension of the particles was considered. Numerically analyzed were both the change in phase with the number density of the particles at equilibrium state and the behavior of the particles in simple shear flows. The system changed from isotropic phase to nematic one with increasing the particle concentration. In the simulation of shear flows, the shear was imposed upon the systems in nematic phase at equilibrium. The systems exhibited various motions of the director depending on the shear rate, e.g. the continuous rotation of director at low shear rates, the wagging at moderate shear rates, and the flow aligning at high shear rates. Temporal change in inner structure of suspensions was also analyzed and collapse of initial particle configurations due to shear was found. Moreover, rheological properties of the suspension were investigated. The numerical simulation predicted the shear-thinning in viscosity, negative first normal stress difference, and positive second normal stress difference, and these results qualitatively agreed with the predictions using a constitutive equation for discotic nematics. The present study proved that the BD simulation using spheroid particles interacting via the GB potential is an effective approach for investigating the flow behavior and flow-induced structure of suspensions of disklike particles at a particulate level. PMID:16196575

  5. Shear Instabilities in Granular Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinbrot, Troy

    2003-03-01

    Unstable waves have long been studied in fluid shear layers. These waves affect transport in the atmosphere and oceans as well as slipstream stability behind ships, planes, and heat transfer devices. Corresponding instabilities in granular flows have not previously been documented, despite the importance of these flows in geophysical and industrial systems. We report here that breaking waves can form at the interface between two streams of identical grains downstream of a splitter plate. These waves appear abruptly in flow down an inclined plane as either shear rate or angle of incline is changed, and we analyze a granular flow model that qualitatively agrees with our experimental data. The waves appear from the model to be a manifestation of a competition between shear and extensional strains in the flowing granular bed, and we propose a dimensionless group to govern the transition between steady and wavy flows.

  6. Flow fields, bed shear stresses, and suspended bed sediment dynamics in bifurcations of a large river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szupiany, R. N.; Amsler, M. L.; Hernandez, J.; Parsons, D. R.; Best, J. L.; Fornari, E.; Trento, A.

    2012-11-01

    Channel bifurcations associated with bars and islands are important nodes in braided rivers and may control flow partitioning and thus affect downstream confluences, as well as the formation and dynamics of bars. However, the morphodynamic processes associated with bar formation are poorly understood, and previous studies have largely concerned laboratory experiments, small natural streams, or numerical analyses with large Froude numbers, high slopes, and low Shields stresses. In these cases, the morphologic changes at bifurcations are relatively rapid, with predominant bed load transport and the suspended load playing a minor role. In this paper, the evolution of the flow structure and suspended bed sediment transport along four expansion-diffluence units in the Rio Paraná, Argentina, are described. The Rio Paraná is a large multichannel river with a bed composed of medium and fine sands and possesses low Froude numbers and high suspended bed material transport. Primary and secondary flow velocity components were measured with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) along the expansion-diffluence units, and the backscatter signal of the ADCP was calibrated to allow simultaneous measurements of suspended bed sediment concentrations. The interactions between these variables show that the cores of primary flow velocity and suspended bed sediment concentration do not necessarily follow the thalweg at the bifurcation and that inertial effects on the suspended bed sediment may influence the morphodynamics of bar formation. It is suggested that changes in flow stage, as well as the presence of vegetation, may further increase the deposition of suspended bed sediment at the bar head. This study suggests that the ratio of suspended bed material to bed load is an important factor controlling the morphodynamics of bifurcations in large sand bed braided rivers.

  7. Nonlinearity and slip behavior of n-hexadecane in large amplitude oscillatory shear flow via nonequilibrium molecular dynamic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chen-Chieh; Chang, Rong-Yeu

    2012-03-01

    Molecular dynamic simulation is used to investigate the viscoelastic properties of n-hexadecane under oscillatory shear flow. Rheometric simulations of an ultra-thin molecular film are studied and compared with the results of a bulk simulation. Strain amplitude sweep tests at a fixed frequency show that strain thinning (the dynamic modulus monotonically decreases with increasing strain amplitude) exists at extreme strain for both bulk and thin film systems. Fourier analysis is performed to characterize the nonlinear behavior of the viscoelasticity. No even harmonic was found in our study even though wall slip occurs. Furthermore, we show that a Fourier series with odd harmonics can be used to perfectly describe the simulation results by plotting Lissajous loops. Shear wave propagation appears when the frequency is larger than a certain value. Moreover, the molecular orientation and molecular potential energies, including those for bonding potential, intra- and intermolecular van der Waals interactions are plotted against the strain amplitude to examine the changes in the microscopic structures with respect to the macroscopic thermodynamic states.

  8. Grafted polymer under shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanjiv; Foster, Damien P.; Giri, Debaprasad; Kumar, Sanjay

    2016-04-01

    A self-attracting-self-avoiding walk model of polymer chain on a square lattice has been used to gain an insight into the behaviour of a polymer chain under shear flow in a slit of width L. Using exact enumeration technique, we show that at high temperature, the polymer acquires the extended state continuously increasing with shear stress. However, at low temperature the polymer exhibits two transitions: a transition from the coiled to the globule state and a transition to a stem-flower like state. For a chain of finite length, we obtained the exact monomer density distributions across the layers at different temperatures. The change in density profile with shear stress suggests that the polymer under shear flow can be used as a molecular gate with potential application as a sensor.

  9. Dynamic shear-stress-enhanced rates of nutrient consumption in gas-liquid semi-continuous-flow suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belfiore, Laurence A.; Volpato, Fabio Z.; Paulino, Alexandre T.; Belfiore, Carol J.

    2011-12-01

    The primary objective of this investigation is to establish guidelines for generating significant mammalian cell density in suspension bioreactors when stress-sensitive kinetics enhance the rate of nutrient consumption. Ultra-low-frequency dynamic modulations of the impeller (i.e., 35104 Hz) introduce time-dependent oscillatory shear into this transient analysis of cell proliferation under semi-continuous creeping flow conditions. Greater nutrient consumption is predicted when the amplitude A of modulated impeller rotation increases, and stress-kinetic contributions to nutrient consumption rates increase linearly at higher modulation frequency via an application of fluctuation-dissipation response. Interphase mass transfer is required to replace dissolved oxygen as it is consumed by aerobic nutrient consumption in the liquid phase. The theory and predictions described herein could be important at small length scales in the creeping flow regime where viscous shear is significant at the interface between the nutrient medium and isolated cells in suspension. Two-dimensional flow around spherically shaped mammalian cells, suspended in a Newtonian culture medium, is analyzed to calculate the surface-averaged magnitude of the velocity gradient tensor and modify homogeneous rates of nutrient consumption that are stimulated by viscous shear, via the formalism of stress-kinetic reciprocal relations that obey Curie's theorem in non-equilibrium thermodynamics. Time constants for stress-free free and stress-sensitive stress nutrient consumption are defined and quantified to identify the threshold (i.e., stress,threshold) below which the effect of stress cannot be neglected in accurate predictions of bioreactor performance. Parametric studies reveal that the threshold time constant for stress-sensitive nutrient consumption stress,threshold decreases when the time constant for stress

  10. ELECTROMAGNETISM, OPTICS, ACOUSTICS, HEAT TRANSFER, CLASSICAL MECHANICS, AND FLUID DYNAMICS: Deformation and Motion of a Red Blood Cell in a Shear Flow Simulated by a Lattice Boltzmann Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Juan; Qiu, Bing; Tan, Hui-Li

    2009-06-01

    A lattice Boltzmann model is presented to simulate the deformation and motions of a red blood cell (RBC) in a shear flow. The curvatures of the membrane of a static RBC with different chemical potential drops calculated by our model agree with those computed by a shooting method very well. Our simulation results show that in a shear flow, a biconcave RBC becomes highly flattened and undergoes tank-treading motion. With intrinsically parallel dynamics, this lattice Boltzmann method is expected to find wide applications to both single and multi-vesicles suspension as well as complex open membranes in various fluid flows for a wide range of Reynolds numbers.

  11. Shear fragmentation of unstable flux flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunchur, Milind N.; Ivlev, Boris I.; Knight, James M.

    2002-08-01

    When free flux flow is pushed beyond its instability, the homogeneous flow becomes spatially distorted leading to a new class of dynamic phases with steps in resistivity. At high-flux densities B, the relatively incompressible vortex matter fragments into domains of constant shear curvature, leading to a horizontal-sawtooth-shaped current-voltage characteristic. Measurements on Y1Ba2Cu3O7-δ films confirm this behavior and are quantitatively consistent with the model, which has no adjustable parameters.

  12. Red blood cell in simple shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Wei; Hew, Yayu; Chen, Yeng-Long

    2013-03-01

    The dynamics of red blood cells (RBC) in blood flow is critical for oxygen transport, and it also influences inflammation (white blood cells), thrombosis (platelets), and circulatory tumor migration. The physical properties of a RBC can be captured by modeling RBC as lipid membrane linked to a cytoskeletal spectrin network that encapsulates cytoplasm rich in hemoglobin, with bi-concave equilibrium shape. Depending on the shear force, RBC elasticity, membrane viscosity, and cytoplasm viscosity, RBC can undergo tumbling, tank-treading, or oscillatory motion. We investigate the dynamic state diagram of RBC in shear and pressure-driven flow using a combined immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method with a multi-scale RBC model that accurately captures the experimentally established RBC force-deformation relation. It is found that the tumbling (TU) to tank-treading (TT) transition occurs as shear rate increases for cytoplasm/outer fluid viscosity ratio smaller than 0.67. The TU frequency is found to be half of the TT frequency, in agreement with experiment observations. Larger viscosity ratios lead to the disappearance of stable TT phase and unstable complex dynamics, including the oscillation of the symmetry axis of the bi-concave shape perpendicular to the flow direction. The dependence on RBC bending rigidity, shear modulus, the order of membrane spectrin network and fluid field in the unstable region will also be discussed.

  13. Non-Newtonian behavior and molecular structure of Cooee bitumen under shear flow: A non-equilibrium molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemarchand, Claire A.; Bailey, Nicholas P.; Todd, Billy D.; Daivis, Peter J.; Hansen, Jesper S.

    2015-06-01

    The rheology and molecular structure of a model bitumen (Cooee bitumen) under shear are investigated in the non-Newtonian regime using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The shear viscosity, normal stress differences, and pressure of the bitumen mixture are computed at different shear rates and different temperatures. The model bitumen is shown to be a shear-thinning fluid at all temperatures. In addition, the Cooee model is able to reproduce experimental results showing the formation of nanoaggregates composed of stacks of flat aromatic molecules in bitumen. These nanoaggregates are immersed in a solvent of saturated hydrocarbon molecules. At a fixed temperature, the shear-shinning behavior is related not only to the inter- and intramolecular alignments of the solvent molecules but also to the decrease of the average size of the nanoaggregates at high shear rates. The variation of the viscosity with temperature at different shear rates is also related to the size and relative composition of the nanoaggregates. The slight anisotropy of the whole sample due to the nanoaggregates is considered and quantified. Finally, the position of bitumen mixtures in the broad literature of complex systems such as colloidal suspensions, polymer solutions, and associating polymer networks is discussed.

  14. Study of flow behaviors on single-cell manipulation and shear stress reduction in microfluidic chips using computational fluid dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Feng; Li, XiuJun; Li, Paul C. H.

    2014-01-01

    Various single-cell retention structures (SCRSs) were reported for analysis of single cells within microfluidic devices. Undesirable flow behaviors within micro-environments not only influence single-cell manipulation and retention significantly but also lead to cell damage, biochemical heterogeneity among different individual cells (e.g., different cell signaling pathways induced by shear stress). However, the fundamentals in flow behaviors for single-cell manipulation and shear stress reduction, especially comparison of these behaviors in different microstructures, were not fully investigated in previous reports. Herein, flow distribution and induced shear stress in two different single-cell retention structures (SCRS I and SCRS II) were investigated in detail to study their effects on single-cell trapping using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods. The results were successfully verified by experimental results. Comparison between these two SCRS shows that the wasp-waisted configuration of SCRS II has a better performance in trapping and manipulating long cylinder-shaped cardiac myocytes and provides a safer “harbor” for fragile cells to prevent cell damage due to the shear stress induced from strong flows. The simulation results have not only explained flow phenomena observed in experiments but also predict new flow phenomena, providing guidelines for new chip design and optimization, and a better understanding of the cell micro-environment and fundamentals of microfluidic flows in single-cell manipulation and analysis. PMID:24753729

  15. On acoustic wave generation in uniform shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoberidze, G.

    2016-07-01

    The linear dynamics of acoustic waves and vortices in uniform shear flow is studied. For flows with very low shear rates, the dynamics of perturbations is adiabatic and can be described by the WKB approximation. However, for flows with moderate and high shear rates the WKB approximation is not appropriate, and alternative analysis shows that two important phenomena occur: acoustic wave over-reflection and wave generation by vortices. The later phenomenon is a known linear mechanisms for sound generation in shear flows, a mechanism that is related to the continuous spectrum that arises in linear shear flow dynamics. A detailed analytical study of these phenomena is performed and the main quantitative and qualitative characteristics of the radiated acoustic field are obtained and analyzed.

  16. Ignition dynamics of a laminar diffusion flame in the field of a vortex embedded in a shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macaraeg, Michele G.; Jackson, T. L.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1994-01-01

    The role of streamwise-spanwise vorticity interactions that occur in turbulent shear flows on flame/vortex interactions is examined by means of asymptotic analysis and numerical simulation in the limit of small Mach number. An idealized model is employed to describe the interaction process. The model consists of a one-step, irreversible Arrhenius reaction between initially unmixed species occupying adjacent half-planes which are then allowed to mix and react in the presence of a streamwise vortex embedded in a shear flow. It is found that the interaction of the streamwise vortex with shear gives rise to small-scale velocity oscillations which increase in magnitude with shear strength. These oscillations give rise to regions of strong temperature gradients via viscous heating, which can lead to multiple ignition points and substantially decrease ignition times. The evolution in time of the temperature and mass-fraction fields is followed, and emphasis is placed on the ignition time and structure as a function of vortex and shear strength.

  17. Non-homogeneous flow profiles in sheared bacterial suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Devranjan; Cheng, Xiang

    Bacterial suspensions under shear exhibit interesting rheological behaviors including the remarkable ``superfluidic'' state with vanishing viscosity at low shear rates. Theoretical studies have shown that such ``superfluidic'' state is linked with non-homogeneous shear flows, which are induced by coupling between nematic order of active fluids and hydrodynamics of shear flows. However, although bulk rheology of bacterial suspensions has been experimentally studied, shear profiles within bacterial suspensions have not been explored so far. Here, we experimentally investigate the flow behaviors of E. coli suspensions under planar oscillatory shear. Using confocal microscopy and PIV, we measure velocity profiles across gap between two shear plates. We find that with increasing shear rates, high-concentration bacterial suspensions exhibit an array of non-homogeneous flow behaviors like yield-stress flows and shear banding. We show that these non-homogeneous flows are due to collective motion of bacterial suspensions. The phase diagram of sheared bacterial suspensions is systematically mapped as functions of shear rates an bacterial concentrations. Our experiments provide new insights into rheology of bacterial suspensions and shed light on shear induced dynamics of active fluids. Chemical Engineering and Material Science department.

  18. A dynamic jamming point for shear thickening suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Eric; Jaeger, Heinrich

    2008-11-01

    Densely packed suspensions can shear thicken, in which the viscosity increases with shear rate. We performed rheometry measurements on two model systems: corn starch in water and glass spheres in oils. In both systems we observed shear thickening up to a critical packing fraction φc (=0.55 for spherical grains) above which the flow abruptly transitions to shear thinning. The viscosity and yield stress diverge as power laws at φc. Extrapolating the dynamic ranges of shear rate and stress in the shear thickening regime up to φc suggests a finite change in shear stress with zero change in shear rate. This is a dynamic analog to the jamming point with a yield stress at zero shear rate.

  19. Turbulence Spreading through Shear Flow Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahm, T. S.; Diamond, P. H.; Lin, Z.

    2005-10-01

    A recent study of turbulence spreading [1] has shown that a significant level of turbulence can penetrate from the linearly unstable region to the region dominated by self-generated zonal flows. In this work, we study turbulence spreading through a mean ExB shear layer using both simple analytic model and nonlinear gyrokinetic particle (GTC) simulations. [1] T.S. Hahm, P.H. Diamond, Z. Lin et al., On the dynamics of edge-core coupling, To appear in Phys. Plasmas (2005).

  20. Organized motions underlying turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waleffe, F.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this project is to determine the nature and significance of the organized motions underlying turbulent shear flow. There is considerable experimental evidence for the existence of such motions. In particular, one consistently observes longitudinal streaks with a spacing of about 100 in wall units in the near-wall region of wall-bounded shear flows. Recently, an analysis based on the direct resonance mechanism has predicted the appearance of streaks with precisely such a spacing. Also, the minimum channel simulations of Jimenez and Moin have given a strong dynamical significance to that spanwise length scale. They have shown that turbulent-like flows can not be maintained when the spanwise wavelength of the motion is constrained to be less than about that critical number. A critical review of the direct resonance ideas and the non-linear theory of Benney and Gustavsson is presented first. It is shown how this leads to the later mean flow-first harmonic theory of Benney. Finally, we note that a different type of analysis has led to the prediction streaks with a similar spacing. This latter approach consists of looking for optimum fields and directly provides deep insights into why a particular structure or a particular scale should be preferred.

  1. Significance of thermal fluctuations and hydrodynamic interactions in receptor-ligand-mediated adhesive dynamics of a spherical particle in wall-bound shear flow.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, K V; Thaokar, R; Prakash, J Ravi; Prabhakar, R

    2015-02-01

    The dynamics of adhesion of a spherical microparticle to a ligand-coated wall, in shear flow, is studied using a Langevin equation that accounts for thermal fluctuations, hydrodynamic interactions, and adhesive interactions. Contrary to the conventional assumption that thermal fluctuations play a negligible role at high Péclet numbers, we find that for particles with low surface densities of receptors, rotational diffusion caused by fluctuations about the flow and gradient directions aids in bond formation, leading to significantly greater adhesion on average, compared to simulations where thermal fluctuations are completely ignored. The role of wall hydrodynamic interactions on the steady-state motion of a particle, when the particle is close to the wall, has also been explored. At high Péclet numbers, the shear induced force that arises due to the stresslet part of the Stokes dipole plays a dominant role, reducing the particle velocity significantly and affecting the states of motion of the particle. The coupling between the translational and rotational degrees of freedom of the particle, brought about by the presence of hydrodynamic interactions, is found to have no influence on the binding dynamics. On the other hand, the drag coefficient, which depends on the distance of the particle from the wall, plays a crucial role at low rates of bond formation. A significant difference in the effect of both the shear force and the position-dependent drag force on the states of motion of the particle is observed when the Péclet number is small. PMID:25768500

  2. Dynamic bulk and shear moduli due to grain-scale local fluid flow in fluid-saturated cracked poroelastic rocks: Theoretical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yongjia; Hu, Hengshan; Rudnicki, John W.

    2016-07-01

    Grain-scale local fluid flow is an important loss mechanism for attenuating waves in cracked fluid-saturated poroelastic rocks. In this study, a dynamic elastic modulus model is developed to quantify local flow effect on wave attenuation and velocity dispersion in porous isotropic rocks. The Eshelby transform technique, inclusion-based effective medium model (the Mori-Tanaka scheme), fluid dynamics and mass conservation principle are combined to analyze pore-fluid pressure relaxation and its influences on overall elastic properties. The derivation gives fully analytic, frequency-dependent effective bulk and shear moduli of a fluid-saturated porous rock. It is shown that the derived bulk and shear moduli rigorously satisfy the Biot-Gassmann relationship of poroelasticity in the low-frequency limit, while they are consistent with isolated-pore effective medium theory in the high-frequency limit. In particular, a simplified model is proposed to quantify the squirt-flow dispersion for frequencies lower than stiff-pore relaxation frequency. The main advantage of the proposed model over previous models is its ability to predict the dispersion due to squirt flow between pores and cracks with distributed aspect ratio instead of flow in a simply conceptual double-porosity structure. Independent input parameters include pore aspect ratio distribution, fluid bulk modulus and viscosity, and bulk and shear moduli of the solid grain. Physical assumptions made in this model include (1) pores are inter-connected and (2) crack thickness is smaller than the viscous skin depth. This study is restricted to linear elastic, well-consolidated granular rocks.

  3. Time accurate simulations of compressible shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, Peyman; Steinberger, Craig J.; Vidoni, Thomas J.; Madnia, Cyrus K.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of this research are to employ direct numerical simulation (DNS) to study the phenomenon of mixing (or lack thereof) in compressible free shear flows and to suggest new means of enhancing mixing in such flows. The shear flow configurations under investigation are those of parallel mixing layers and planar jets under both non-reacting and reacting nonpremixed conditions. During the three-years of this research program, several important issues regarding mixing and chemical reactions in compressible shear flows were investigated.

  4. Coexistence and transition between shear zones in slow granular flows.

    PubMed

    Moosavi, Robabeh; Shaebani, M Reza; Maleki, Maniya; Török, János; Wolf, Dietrich E; Losert, Wolfgang

    2013-10-01

    We report experiments on slow granular flows in a split-bottom Couette cell that show novel strain localization features. Nontrivial flow profiles have been observed which are shown to be the consequence of simultaneous formation of shear zones in the bulk and at the boundaries. The fluctuating band model based on a minimization principle can be fitted to the experiments over a large variation of morphology and filling height with one single fit parameter, the relative friction coefficient μ(rel) between wall and bulk. The possibility of multiple shear zone formation is controlled by μ(rel). Moreover, we observe that the symmetry of an initial state, with coexisting shear zones at both side walls, breaks spontaneously below a threshold value of the shear velocity. A dynamical transition between two asymmetric flow states happens over a characteristic time scale which depends on the shear strength. PMID:24138274

  5. Dynamics of Sheared Granular Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondic, Lou; Utter, Brian; Behringer, Robert P.

    2002-01-01

    characterize the transition region in an earth-bound experiment. In the DE modeling, we analyze dynamics of a sheared granular system in Couette geometry in two (2D) and three (3D) space dimensions. Here, the idea is to both better understand what we might encounter in a reduced-g environment, and at a deeper level to deduce the physics of sheared systems in a density regime that has not been addressed by past experiments or simulations. One aspect of the simulations addresses sheared 2D system in zero-g environment. For low volume fractions, the expected dynamics of this type of system is relatively well understood. However, as the volume fraction is increased, the system undergoes a phase transition, as explained above. The DES concentrate on the evolution of the system as the solid volume fraction is slowly increased, and in particular on the behavior of very dense systems. For these configurations, the simulations show that polydispersity of the sheared particles is a crucial factor that determines the system response. Figures 1 and 2 below, that present the total force on each grain, show that even relatively small (10 %) nonuniformity of the size of the grains (expected in typical experiments) may lead to significant modifications of the system properties, such as velocity profiles, temperature, force propagation, and formation shear bands. The simulations are extended in a few other directions, in order to provide additional insight to the experimental system analyzed above. In one direction, both gravity, and driving due to vibrations are included. These simulations allow for predictions on the driving regime that is required in the experiments in order to analyze the jamming transition. Furthermore, direct comparison of experiments and DES will allow for verification of the modeling assumptions. We have also extended our modeling efforts to 3D. The (preliminary) results of these simulations of an annular system in zero-g environment will conclude the presentation.

  6. Dynamics of Sheared Granular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondic, Lou; Utter, Brian; Behringer, Robert P.

    2002-11-01

    characterize the transition region in an earth-bound experiment. In the DE modeling, we analyze dynamics of a sheared granular system in Couette geometry in two (2D) and three (3D) space dimensions. Here, the idea is to both better understand what we might encounter in a reduced-g environment, and at a deeper level to deduce the physics of sheared systems in a density regime that has not been addressed by past experiments or simulations. One aspect of the simulations addresses sheared 2D system in zero-g environment. For low volume fractions, the expected dynamics of this type of system is relatively well understood. However, as the volume fraction is increased, the system undergoes a phase transition, as explained above. The DES concentrate on the evolution of the system as the solid volume fraction is slowly increased, and in particular on the behavior of very dense systems. For these configurations, the simulations show that polydispersity of the sheared particles is a crucial factor that determines the system response. Figures 1 and 2 below, that present the total force on each grain, show that even relatively small (10 %) nonuniformity of the size of the grains (expected in typical experiments) may lead to significant modifications of the system properties, such as velocity profiles, temperature, force propagation, and formation shear bands. The simulations are extended in a few other directions, in order to provide additional insight to the experimental system analyzed above. In one direction, both gravity, and driving due to vibrations are included. These simulations allow for predictions on the driving regime that is required in the experiments in order to analyze the jamming transition. Furthermore, direct comparison of experiments and DES will allow for verification of the modeling assumptions. We have also extended our modeling efforts to 3D. The (preliminary) results of these simulations of an annular system in zero-g environment will conclude the presentation.

  7. Application of Population Dynamics to Study Heterotypic Cell Aggregations in the Near-Wall Region of a Shear Flow

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yanping; Wang, Jiakou; Liang, Shile; Dong, Cheng; Du, Qiang

    2010-01-01

    Our research focused on the polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) tethering to the vascular endothelial cells (EC) and the subsequent melanoma cell emboli formation in a shear flow, an important process of tumor cell extravasation from the circulation during metastasis. We applied population balance model based on Smoluchowski coagulation equation to study the heterotypic aggregation between PMNs and melanoma cells in the near-wall region of an in vitro parallel-plate flow chamber, which simulates in vivo cell-substrate adhesion from the vasculatures by combining mathematical modeling and numerical simulations with experimental observations. To the best of our knowledge, a multiscale near-wall aggregation model was developed, for the first time, which incorporated the effects of both cell deformation and general ratios of heterotypic cells on the cell aggregation process. Quantitative agreement was found between numerical predictions and in vitro experiments. The effects of factors, including: intrinsic binding molecule properties, near-wall heterotypic cell concentrations, and cell deformations on the coagulation process, are discussed. Several parameter identification approaches are proposed and validated which, in turn, demonstrate the importance of the reaction coefficient and the critical bond number on the aggregation process. PMID:20428326

  8. Application of Population Dynamics to Study Heterotypic Cell Aggregations in the Near-Wall Region of a Shear Flow.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yanping; Wang, Jiakou; Liang, Shile; Dong, Cheng; Du, Qiang

    2010-03-01

    Our research focused on the polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) tethering to the vascular endothelial cells (EC) and the subsequent melanoma cell emboli formation in a shear flow, an important process of tumor cell extravasation from the circulation during metastasis. We applied population balance model based on Smoluchowski coagulation equation to study the heterotypic aggregation between PMNs and melanoma cells in the near-wall region of an in vitro parallel-plate flow chamber, which simulates in vivo cell-substrate adhesion from the vasculatures by combining mathematical modeling and numerical simulations with experimental observations. To the best of our knowledge, a multiscale near-wall aggregation model was developed, for the first time, which incorporated the effects of both cell deformation and general ratios of heterotypic cells on the cell aggregation process. Quantitative agreement was found between numerical predictions and in vitro experiments. The effects of factors, including: intrinsic binding molecule properties, near-wall heterotypic cell concentrations, and cell deformations on the coagulation process, are discussed. Several parameter identification approaches are proposed and validated which, in turn, demonstrate the importance of the reaction coefficient and the critical bond number on the aggregation process. PMID:20428326

  9. Coherent motion in excited free shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wygnanski, Israel J.; Petersen, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    The application of the inviscid instability approach to externally excited turbulent free shear flows at high Reynolds numbers is explored. Attention is given to the cases of a small-deficit plane turbulent wake, a plane turbulent jet, an axisymmetric jet, the nonlinear evolution of instabilities in free shear flows, the concept of the 'preferred mode', vortex pairing in turbulent mixing layers, and experimental results for the control of free turbulent shear layers. The special features often attributed to pairing or to the preferred mode are found to be difficult to comprehend; the concept of feedback requires further substantiation in the case of incompressible flow.

  10. Dynamics of the longitudinal and transverse modes in presence of equilibrium shear flow in a strongly coupled dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Garai, S.; Banerjee, D.; Janaki, M. S.; Chakrabarti, N.

    2014-02-11

    In strongly coupled limit the general hydrodynamic (GH) model shows that the dusty plasma, acquiring significant rigidity, is able to support the 'shear' like mode [P. K. Kaw and A. Sen, Phys. Plasmas 5, 3552 (1998)]. In presence of velocity shear, this shear like mode is coupled with the dust acoustic mode which is generated by the compressibility effect of the dust fluid due to the finite temperature of the dust, electron and ion fluids. Local dispersion shows the velocity shear is also responsible for the instabilities of the shear mode, acoustic mode, as well as the shear-acoustic coupled mode. The present work, carried out in GH visco-elastic formalism, also gives the clear insight of the instabilities of the coupled mode in non local regime with a hyperbolic tangent velocity shear profile over a finite width.

  11. Shear dispersion in dense granular flows

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Christov, Ivan C.; Stone, Howard A.

    2014-04-18

    We formulate and solve a model problem of dispersion of dense granular materials in rapid shear flow down an incline. The effective dispersivity of the depth-averaged concentration of the dispersing powder is shown to vary as the Péclet number squared, as in classical Taylor–Aris dispersion of molecular solutes. An extension to generic shear profiles is presented, and possible applications to industrial and geological granular flows are noted.

  12. Turbulent structures in Kolmogorovian shear flows: DNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuckerman, Laurette S.; Chantry, Matthew; Barkley, Dwight

    2015-11-01

    Patterns of turbulent and laminar flow form a vital step in the transition to turbulent in wall-bounded shear flows. In flows with two unconstrained directions these patterns form oblique bands, whereas in pipe flow the structures are streamwise-localized puffs. To understand these structures we examine Waleffe flow, a sinusoidal shear flow, Usinπ/2 y , driven by a body force and stress-free boundary conditions at y = +/- 1 . Introduced as a model for plane Couette flow we demonstrate the existence of turbulence bands which match those found in plane Couette flow, excluding the boundary layer regions of the latter flow. This agreement is reiterated in the studies of uniform turbulence and linear stability; highlighting the surprising unimportance of this region to transitional turbulence. Building upon this we consider two other canonical flows: plane Pouiseuille flow and pipe flow. Attacking these flows with the approach that succeeded in plane Couette flow we attempt to clarify the role of boundary layers to transitionally turbulent shear flows.

  13. Flow between eccentric cylinders: a shear-extensional controllable flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Guoqiang; Wang, Mengmeng; Wang, Xiaolin; Jin, Gang

    2016-05-01

    In this work the non-Newtonian fluid between eccentric cylinders is simulated with finite element method. The flow in the annular gap between the eccentric rotating cylinders was found to be a shear-extensional controllable flow. The influence of rotating speed, eccentricity as well as the radius ratio on the extensional flow in the vicinity of the minimum gap between the inner and outer cylinder was quantitatively investigated. It was found that both the strengths of shear flow and extensional flow could be adjusted by changing the rotating speed. In respect to extensional flow, it was also observed that the eccentricity and radius ratio exert significant influences on the ratio of extensional flow. And it should be noted that the ratio of extensional flow in the mix flow could be increased when increasing the eccentricity and the ratio of shear flow in the mix flow could be increased when increasing the radius ratio.

  14. Shear-flow Effects in Open Traps

    SciTech Connect

    Beklemishev, A. D.

    2008-11-01

    Interaction between shear flows and plasma instabilities and turbulence in open traps can lead to improved confinement both in experiments and in simulations. Shear flows, driven by biasing end-plates and limiters or by off-axis electron heating, in combination with the finite-larmor-radius (FLR) effects are shown to be efficient in confining plasmas even with unstable flute modes. Interpretation of the observed effects as the ''vortex confinement,'' i.e., confinement of the plasma core in the dead-flow zone of the driven vortex, is shown to agree well with simulations.

  15. Control of shear flows by artificial excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, E. J.; Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    1987-01-01

    Investigations involving artificial excitation of various shear flows are reviewed. Potential applications of excitation in flow control, e.g., in enhancing mixing, and in delaying transition and separation are discussed. An account is given of the current activities at NASA Lewis Research Center in this regard.

  16. The Radiation Hydrodynamics of Relativistic Shear Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, Eric R.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2016-07-01

    We present a method for analyzing the interaction between radiation and matter in regions of intense, relativistic shear that can arise in many astrophysical situations. We show that there is a simple velocity profile that should be manifested in regions of large shear that have “lost memory” of their boundary conditions, and we use this self-similar velocity profile to construct the surface of last scattering, or the τ ≃ 1 surface, as viewed from any comoving point within the flow. We demonstrate that a simple treatment of scattering from this τ ≃ 1 surface exactly conserves photon number, and we derive the rate at which the radiation field is heated due to the shear present in the flow. The components of the comoving radiation energy–momentum tensor are calculated, and we show that they have relatively simple, approximate forms that interpolate between the viscous (small shear) and streaming (large shear) limits. We put our expression for the energy–momentum tensor in a covariant form that does not depend on the explicit velocity profile within the fluid and, therefore, represents a natural means for analyzing general, radiation-dominated, relativistic shear flows.

  17. The MSU free shear flow facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Disimile, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    A free shear layer wind tunnel has been constructed in order to undertake detailed, high quality transverse vorticity measurements in an isothermal, single stream mixing layer. The large 50 x 80 cm primary flow and 3-m test section length allows the generation of large, isolated vortical motions in high Reynolds number flow. A uniformly developed, irrotational secondary flow is achieved by means of an entrainment module.

  18. Velocity shear induced phenomena in solar and astrophysical flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tevzadze, A. G.

    2006-04-01

    Velocity shear induced phenomena in solar and astrophysical flows This thesis has concentrated on a non-modal analysis of flows with velocity inhomogeneities. Various astrophysical applications have been considered. In Chapter 2 we have studied a simple shear flow in order to demonstrate the non-modal method as well as basic properties of flows with inhomogeneous velocity fields. We illustrated the mathematical formalism on a parallel flow with a constant linear velocity shear. The effect of the shearing background on the different types of modes was demonstrated separately. In Chapter 3 we studied linear mode conversion and sound production in uniform shear flows. The flows under consideration were two dimensional, planar, inviscid, unbounded, and had uniform density/pressure and constant shear of velocity. We studied the aerodynamic production of acoustic waves in inhomogeneous hydrodynamic flows. A qualitative analysis of the wave excitation amplitudes in wave-number space are followed by direct numerical simulations on the vortex package dynamics in shear flows. We have derived the formalism for the separation of linear modes in flows with constant velocity shear. Hence, we carried out numerical analysis to study the wave generation and confirm the theoretical results obtained with the non-modal method. In Chapter 4 we have extended the theory of Chapter 3 to the MHD waves. We have studied 2D linear perturbations in 3D unbounded ideal MHD shear flows. In this case the linear spectrum consists of the magnetosonic wave mode and two aperiodic modes with zero frequency. These modes are a vortex mode with intrinsic vortical perturbations and a magneto-mechanical mode which has transient vortical characteristics in the sheared medium. Both aperiodic modes are able to excite magnetosonic waves with similar wave-numbers when the wave-number in the direction of the velocity shear becomes zero. It turns out that the vortex modes are the main source of the waves in flows

  19. Numerical simulation of a compressible homogeneous, turbulent shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiereisen, W. J.; Reynolds, W. C.; Ferziger, J. H.

    1981-03-01

    A direct, low Reynolds number, numerical simulation was performed on a homogeneous turbulent shear flow. The full compressible Navier-Stokes equations were used in a simulation on the ILLIAC IV computer with a 64,000 mesh. The flow fields generated by the code are used as an experimental data base, to examine the behavior of the Reynols stresses in this simple, compressible flow. The variation of the structure of the stresses and their dynamic equations as the character of the flow changed is emphasized. The structure of the tress tensor is more heavily dependent on the shear number and less on the fluctuating Mach number. The pressure-strain correlation tensor in the dynamic uations is directly calculated in this simulation. These correlations are decomposed into several parts, as contrasted with the traditional incompressible decomposition into two parts. The performance of existing models for the conventional terms is examined, and a model is proposed for the 'mean fluctuating' part.

  20. Modeling of Turbulent Free Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoder, Dennis A.; DeBonis, James R.; Georgiadis, Nicolas J.

    2013-01-01

    The modeling of turbulent free shear flows is crucial to the simulation of many aerospace applications, yet often receives less attention than the modeling of wall boundary layers. Thus, while turbulence model development in general has proceeded very slowly in the past twenty years, progress for free shear flows has been even more so. This paper highlights some of the fundamental issues in modeling free shear flows for propulsion applications, presents a review of past modeling efforts, and identifies areas where further research is needed. Among the topics discussed are differences between planar and axisymmetric flows, development versus self-similar regions, the effect of compressibility and the evolution of compressibility corrections, the effect of temperature on jets, and the significance of turbulent Prandtl and Schmidt numbers for reacting shear flows. Large eddy simulation greatly reduces the amount of empiricism in the physical modeling, but is sensitive to a number of numerical issues. This paper includes an overview of the importance of numerical scheme, mesh resolution, boundary treatment, sub-grid modeling, and filtering in conducting a successful simulation.

  1. Chaotic Boundaries of Nematic Polymers in Mixed Shear and Extensional Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forest, M. Gregory; Zhou, Ruhai; Wang, Qi

    2004-08-01

    Chaotic orientational dynamics of sheared nematic polymers is documented in laboratory experiments and predicted by Doi-Hess kinetic theory for infinitely thin rods. We address robustness of rheochaos when simple shear is modified by a planar straining flow, and the macromolecules have finite aspect ratio. We predict persistence of sheared chaotic response up to a threshold straining flow strength and minimum aspect ratio, beyond which chaotic behavior is arrested. More intriguing, a straining component can induce chaos from periodic shear responses.

  2. Spatiotemporal dynamics of shear induced bands en route to rheochaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganapathy, R.; Majumdar, S.; Sood, A. K.

    2008-08-01

    We show experimentally that the route to rheochaos in shear rate relaxation measurements is via Type-III intermittency and mixed mode oscillations in the shear-thinning wormlike micellar system of cetyltrimethylammonium tosylate in the presence of salt sodium chloride. Depolarised small angle light scattering measurements performed during flow show that scattered intensity temporally follows the shear rate/stress dynamics and portrays the crucial role played by nematic ordering. Direct visualization of the gap of the Couette cell, illuminated by an unpolarised laser sheet, in the (vorticity, velocity gradient) plane shows that the spatiotemporal dynamics of the shear induced structures is closely related to the temporal behaviour of shear rate/stress fluctuations.

  3. Shear flow induced unfolding of collapsed polymers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander-Katz, Alfredo; Netz, Roland

    2006-03-01

    In the process of clotting in small vessels, platelets form a plug in an injured zone only in the presence of a protein known as the von Willebrand Factor (vWF). The absence or malfunction of the vWF leads to a bleeding disorder, the so-called von Willebrand disease. It is believed that the protein is collapsed (or globular) when released into the blood flow, and that it undergoes a transition at high shear rates that allows it to bind platelets. Using hydrodynamic simulations of a simple model of the vWF in shear flow, we show that a globular polymer undergoes a globule-stretch transition at a critical shear rate. Below this threshold shear rate the polymer remains collapsed and slightly deformed, while above it the chain displays strong elongations in the direction of the flow. Finally, we discuss the relevance of our results in the case of blood flow, and compare them to the physiological values present in the body.

  4. Zonal flow formation in the presence of ambient mean shear

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Pei-Chun; Diamond, P. H.

    2015-02-15

    The effect of mean shear flows on zonal flow formation is considered in the contexts of plasma drift wave turbulence and quasi-geostrophic turbulence models. The generation of zonal flows by modulational instability in the presence of large-scale mean shear flows is studied using the method of characteristics as applied to the wave kinetic equation. It is shown that mean shear flows reduce the modulational instability growth rate by shortening the coherency time of the wave spectrum with the zonal shear. The scalings of zonal flow growth rate and turbulent vorticity flux with mean shear are determined in the strong shear limit.

  5. Formation of a sheared flow Z pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golingo, R. P.; Shumlak, U.; Nelson, B. A.

    2005-06-01

    The ZaP Flow Z-Pinch project is experimentally studying the effect of sheared flows on Z-pinch stability. It has been shown theoretically that when dVz/dr exceeds 0.1kVA the kink (m =1) mode is stabilized. [U. Shumlak and C. W. Hartman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 3285 (1995).] Z pinches with an embedded axial flow are formed in ZaP with a coaxial accelerator coupled with a 1m assembly region. Long-lived, quiescent Z pinches are generated throughout the first half cycle of the current. During the initial plasma acceleration phase, the axial motion of the current sheet is consistent with snowplow models. Magnetic probes in the assembly region measure the azimuthal modes of the magnetic field. The amplitude of the m =1 mode is proportional to the radial displacement of the Z-pinch plasma current. The magnetic mode levels show a quiescent period which is over 2000 times the growth time of a static Z pinch. The axial velocity is measured along 20 chords through the plasma and deconvolved to provide a radial profile. Using data from multiple pulses, the time evolution of the velocity profile is measured during formation, throughout the quiescent period, and into the transition to instability. The evolution shows that a sheared plasma flow develops as the Z pinch forms. Throughout the quiescent period, the flow shear is greater than the theoretically required threshold for stability. As the flow shear decreases, the magnetic mode fluctuations increase. The coaxial accelerator provides plasma throughout the quiescent period and may explain the evolution of the velocity profile and the sustainment of the flow Z pinch.

  6. Excitation of vortex meandering in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröttle, Josef; Dörnbrack, Andreas; Schumann, Ulrich

    2015-06-01

    This paper investigates the evolution of a streamwise aligned columnar vortex with vorticity {\\boldsymbol{ ω }} in an axial background shear of magnitude Ω by means of linear stability analysis and numerical simulations. A long wave mode of vorticity normal to the plane spanned by the background shear vector {\\boldsymbol{ Ω }} and the vorticity of the vortex are excited by an instability. The stationary wave modes of the vertical and lateral vorticity are amplified. In order to form a helical vortex, the lateral and vertical vorticity can be phase shifted by half a wavelength. The linear and nonlinear evolutions of the vortex in the shear flow are studied numerically. Linearized simulations confirm the results of the stability analysis. The nonlinear simulations reveal further evolution of the helix in the shear flow. The linearly excited mode persists in co-existence with evolving smaller scale instabilities until the flow becomes fully turbulent at the time of O(100 {{Ω }-1}). Turbulent mixing dampens the amplifying mode. The described phenomenon of vortex meandering may serve as an alternative explanation for the excitation of wind turbine wake meandering in the atmospheric boundary layer.

  7. Multifractal spectra in homogeneous shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deane, A. E.; Keefe, L. R.

    1988-01-01

    Employing numerical simulations of 3-D homogeneous shear flow, the associated multifractal spectra of the energy dissipation, scalar dissipation and vorticity fields were calculated. The results for (128) cubed simulations of this flow, and those obtained in recent experiments that analyzed 1- and 2-D intersections of atmospheric and laboratory flows, are in some agreement. A two-scale Cantor set model of the energy cascade process which describes the experimental results from 1-D intersections quite well, describes the 3-D results only marginally.

  8. Buoyancy Driven Shear Flows of Bubble Suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, D. L.; Hill, R. J.; Chellppannair, T.; Zenit, R.; Zenit, R.; Spelt, P. D. M.

    1999-01-01

    In this work the gas volume fraction and the root-mean-squared fluid velocity are measured in buoyancy driven shear flows of bubble suspensions in a tall, inclined, rectangular channel. The experiments are performed under conditions where We << 1a nd Re >> 1, for which comparisons are made with kinetic theory and numerical simulations. Here Re = gamma(a(exp 2)/nu is the Reynolds number and We = rho(gamma(exp 2))a(exp 3)/sigma is the Weber number; gamma is the shear rate, a is the bubble radius, nu is the kinematic viscosity of the liquid, rho is the density of the liquid, and sigma is the surface tension of the gas/liquid interface. Kang et al. calculated the bubble phase pressure and velocity variance of sheared bubble suspensions under conditions where the bubbles are spherical and the liquid phase velocity field can be approximated using potential flow theory, i.e. We= 0 and Re >> 1. Such conditions can be achieved in an experiment using gas bubbles, with a radius of O(0.5mm), in water. The theory requires that there be no average relative motion of the gas and liquid phases, hence the motivation for an experimental program in microgravity. The necessity of performing preliminary, Earth based experiments, however, requires performing experiments where the gas phase rises in the liquid, which significantly complicates the comparison of experiments with theory. Rather than comparing experimental results with theory for a uniform, homogeneous shear flow, experiments can be compared directly with solutions of the averaged equations of motion for bubble suspensions. This requires accounting for the significant lift force acting on the gas phase when the bubbles rise parallel to the average velocity of the sheared suspension. Shear flows can be produced in which the bubble phase pressure gradient, arising from shear induced collisions amongst the bubbles, balances a body force (centrifugal or gravitational) on the gas phase. A steady, non-uniform gas volume fraction

  9. Buoyancy Driven Shear Flows of Bubble Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, R. J.; Zenit, R.; Chellppannair, T.; Koch, D. L.; Spelt, P. D. M.; Sangani, A.

    1998-11-01

    In this work the gas volume fraction and the root-mean-squared fluid velocity are measured in buoyancy driven shear flows of bubble suspensions in a tall, inclined, rectangular channel. The experiments are performed under conditions where We << 1 and Re >> 1 , so that the bubbles are relatively undeformed and the flow is inviscid and approximately irrotational. Nitrogen is introduced through an array of capillaries at the base of a .2x.02x2 m channel filled with an aqueous electrolyte solution (0.06 molL-1 MgSO_4). The rising bubbles generate a unidirectional shear flow, where the denser suspension at the lower surface of the channel falls, while the less dense suspension at the upper surface rises. Hot-film anemometry is used to measure the resulting gas volume fraction and fluid velocity profiles. The bubble collision rate with the sensor is related to the gas volume fraction and the mean and variance of the bubble velocity using an experimentally measured collision surface area for the sensor. Bubble collisions with the sensor are identified by the characteristic slope of the hot-film anemometer signal when bubbles collide with the sensor. It is observed that the steady shear flow develops a bubble phase pressure gradient across the channel gap as the bubbles interchange momentum through direct collisions. The discrete phase presssure gradient balances the buoyancy force driving bubbles toward the upper surface resulting in a steady void fraction profile across the gap width. The strength of the shear flow is controlled by the extent of bubble segregation and by the effective viscosity of the bubble phase. The measurements are compared with solutions of the averaged equations of motion (Kang et al. 1997; Spelt and Sangani, 1998), for a range of gas volume fractions and channel inclination angles.

  10. Dynamic shear deformation in high purity Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Cerreta, Ellen K; Bingert, John F; Trujillo, Carl P; Lopez, Mike F; Gray, George T

    2009-01-01

    The forced shear test specimen, first developed by Meyer et al. [Meyer L. et al., Critical Adiabatic Shear Strength of Low Alloyed Steel Under Compressive Loading, Metallurgical Applications of Shock Wave and High Strain Rate Phenomena (Marcel Decker, 1986), 657; Hartmann K. et al., Metallurgical Effects on Impact Loaded Materials, Shock Waves and High Strain rate Phenomena in Metals (Plenum, 1981), 325-337.], has been utilized in a number of studies. While the geometry of this specimen does not allow for the microstructure to exactly define the location of shear band formation and the overall mechanical response of a specimen is highly sensitive to the geometry utilized, the forced shear specimen is useful for characterizing the influence of parameters such as strain rate, temperature, strain, and load on the microstructural evolution within a shear band. Additionally, many studies have utilized this geometry to advance the understanding of shear band development. In this study, by varying the geometry, specifically the ratio of the inner hole to the outer hat diameter, the dynamic shear localization response of high purity Fe was examined. Post mortem characterization was performed to quantify the width of the localizations and examine the microstructural and textural evolution of shear deformation in a bcc metal. Increased instability in mechanical response is strongly linked with development of enhanced intergranular misorientations, high angle boundaries, and classical shear textures characterized through orientation distribution functions.

  11. Colloidal Suspensions in Shear Flow : a Real Space Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derks, D.

    2006-09-01

    We investigate the effect of shear flow on the microstructure of colloidal suspensions by means of microscopy. Systems of nearly equally sized particles are used, whose interactions and phase behavior are predominantly determined by their size and shape, and can further be tuned by the addition of polymers. Recently, a new type of shear cell was developed to study flowing suspensions in real space. The key property of this setup is the counter-rotating principle of the cone and plate, opening up the possibility to create a stationary layer in the bulk of the cell. In Chapter 2, we elaborate on the details of this setup and its performance. Fluorescence confocal microscopy is used to visualize the sheared suspension, and allows imaging of individual particles in the bulk in the stationary plane for a prolonged time. This way, the particle positions in a layer of, for example, a sheared colloidal crystal can be tracked. The particle dynamics in colloidal crystals in shear flow are the subject of Chapter 3. Here, the particles interact through a (nearly) hard sphere potential. Apart from the alignment of the crystal in the shear field and the collective zigzag motion, which had also been deduced from early scattering experiments, we find that random particle displacements increase with shear rate. Those increased fluctuations result in shear induced melting when their mean square displacement has reached about 13 % of the particle separation. Apart from hard spheres, we investigate mixtures of colloids and polymers in shear flow. The polymers cause an effective attraction between the spheres, leading to phase separation into a colloid rich (polymer poor) and a colloid poor (polymer rich) phase at sufficiently high colloid and polymer concentration. In Chapter 4, we study the demixing process in the (spinodal) two-phase region of the phase diagram. The system is quenched from an initially almost homogeneous state at very high shear rate to a low shear rate. A spinodal

  12. Propagation of sound through a sheared flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolley, J. P.; Smith, C. A.; Karamcheti, K.

    1978-01-01

    Sound generated in a moving fluid must propagate through a shear layer in order to be measured by a fixed instrument. These propagation effects were evaluated for noise sources typically associated with single and co-flowing subsonic jets and for subcritical flow over airfoils in such jets. The techniques for describing acoustic propagation fall into two categories: geometric acoustics and wave acoustics. Geometric acoustics is most convenient and accurate for high frequency sound. In the frequency range of interest to the present study (greater than 150 Hz), the geometric acoustics approach was determined to be most useful and practical.

  13. Waves in Turbulent Stably Stratified Shear Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobitz, F. G.; Rogers, M. M.; Ferziger, J. H.; Parks, John W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Two approaches for the identification of internal gravity waves in sheared and unsheared homogeneous stratified turbulence are investigated. First, the phase angle between the vertical velocity and density fluctuations is considered. It was found, however, that a continuous distribution of the phase angle is present in weakly and strongly stratified flow. Second, a projection onto the solution of the linearized inviscid equations of motion of unsheared stratified flow is investigated. It was found that a solution of the fully nonlinear viscous Navier-Stokes equations can be represented by the linearized inviscid solution. The projection yields a decomposition into vertical wave modes and horizontal vortical modes.

  14. Shear Flow Pumping in Open Micro- and Nanofluidic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauscher, Markus; Dietrich, S.; Koplik, Joel

    2007-06-01

    Based on a novel interplay of wetting adhesion and concurrent flow concepts, we propose to drive open microfluidic systems by shear in a covering fluid layer, e.g., oil covering water-filled chemical channels. The advantages are simpler forcing and prevention of evaporation of volatile components. We calculate the expected throughput for straight channels and show that devices can be built with off-the-shelf technology. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that this concept is scalable down to the nanoscale.

  15. Transport of micro-bubbles in turbulent shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualtieri, P.; Battista, F.; Casciola, C. M.

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of micro-bubbles, which are typical in many industrial applications, is addressed by means the Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of two prototypal flows, namely a homogeneous shear flow and a fully developed pipe flows. This preliminary study has a two-fold purpose. The homogenous turbulent shear flow is useful to characterize the bubble dynamics in terms of their eventual clustering properties which is expected to be controlled by the Stokes number. The time history of the fluid pressure experienced by the bubbles during their evolution is recorded and successively employed to force the Rayleigh-Plesset equation [1]. The ensuing data are used to address a posteriori the bubble diameter statistics in view of bubble collapse induced by strong and intermittent turbulent pressure fluctuations. The turbulent pipe flow simulations serve to address the bubble dynamics in wall bounded flows. Here the bubbles are observed to accumulate in the near-wall region with different intensity depending on the bubble dimensions.

  16. Shear flow promotes amyloid-{beta} fibrilization.

    PubMed

    Dunstan, Dave E; Hamilton-Brown, Paul; Asimakis, Peter; Ducker, William; Bertolini, Joseph

    2009-12-01

    The rate of formation of amyloid fibrils in an aqueous solution of amyloid-beta (Abeta) is greatly increased when the solution is sheared. When Abeta solution is stirred with a magnetic stirrer bar at 37 degrees C, a rapid increase in thioflavin T fluorescence is observed. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) images show the formation of aggregates, the growth of fibrils and the intertwining of the fibrils with time. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy of samples taken after stirring shows a transition from random coil to alpha-helix to beta-sheet secondary structure over 20 h at 37 degrees C. The fluorescence, AFM and CD measurements are all consistent with the formation of amyloid fibrils. Quiescent, non-stirred solutions incubated at 37 degrees C showed no evidence of amyloid formation over a period of 3 days. Couette flow was found to accelerate the formation of amyloid fibrils demonstrating that the primary effect of stirring is not mixing but shearing. Only very small shear forces are applied to individual molecules in our experiments. Simple calculation suggests that the force is too small to support a hypothesis that shearing promotes partial unfolding of the protein as is observed. PMID:19850675

  17. Effect of functionality on unentangled star polymers at equilibrium and under shear flow.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaolei; Chen, Jizhong

    2016-06-28

    The properties of unentangled star polymers with arm length Nf = 20 beads and functionality f (3 ≤ f ≤ 60) are investigated at equilibrium and under shear flow by coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. At equilibrium, the star polymer shows a crossover from a linear, freely penetrable, extremely soft object to a spherical, slightly hard object with an impenetrable center with increasing f. The results confirm that the arm relaxation is essentially independent of f and stars of large f form a liquid-like structure. In shear flow, the polymer deformation and alignment are calculated as well as the shear-induced rotational dynamics as function of shear rate. These properties are found to exhibit qualitative changes at an f-independent shear rate, γṗ, which is a consequence of competition between chain relaxation and imposed flow. Shear thinning is characterized by shear viscosity and normal stress differences. With increasing f, the critical shear rate for the onset of shear thinning decreases from γṗ for f = 3 to a smaller value. Our results also show that shear thinning of stars of large f arise from the collapse of liquid-like structures at low shear rates (γ̇≪γṗ), where chains have no deformation; at high shear rates (γ̇≫γṗ), shear thinning is mainly attributed to the chain stretching and orientation as linear polymers. PMID:27369542

  18. Effect of functionality on unentangled star polymers at equilibrium and under shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaolei; Chen, Jizhong

    2016-06-01

    The properties of unentangled star polymers with arm length Nf = 20 beads and functionality f (3 ≤ f ≤ 60) are investigated at equilibrium and under shear flow by coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. At equilibrium, the star polymer shows a crossover from a linear, freely penetrable, extremely soft object to a spherical, slightly hard object with an impenetrable center with increasing f. The results confirm that the arm relaxation is essentially independent of f and stars of large f form a liquid-like structure. In shear flow, the polymer deformation and alignment are calculated as well as the shear-induced rotational dynamics as function of shear rate. These properties are found to exhibit qualitative changes at an f-independent shear rate, γ p ˙ , which is a consequence of competition between chain relaxation and imposed flow. Shear thinning is characterized by shear viscosity and normal stress differences. With increasing f, the critical shear rate for the onset of shear thinning decreases from γ p ˙ for f = 3 to a smaller value. Our results also show that shear thinning of stars of large f arise from the collapse of liquid-like structures at low shear rates ( γ ˙ ≪ γ p ˙), where chains have no deformation; at high shear rates ( γ ˙ ≫ γ p ˙), shear thinning is mainly attributed to the chain stretching and orientation as linear polymers.

  19. Effects of dynamic shear and transmural pressure on wall shear stress sensitivity in collecting lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Kornuta, Jeffrey A; Nepiyushchikh, Zhanna; Gasheva, Olga Y; Mukherjee, Anish; Zawieja, David C; Dixon, J Brandon

    2015-11-01

    Given the known mechanosensitivity of the lymphatic vasculature, we sought to investigate the effects of dynamic wall shear stress (WSS) on collecting lymphatic vessels while controlling for transmural pressure. Using a previously developed ex vivo lymphatic perfusion system (ELPS) capable of independently controlling both transaxial pressure gradient and average transmural pressure on an isolated lymphatic vessel, we imposed a multitude of flow conditions on rat thoracic ducts, while controlling for transmural pressure and measuring diameter changes. By gradually increasing the imposed flow through a vessel, we determined the WSS at which the vessel first shows sign of contraction inhibition, defining this point as the shear stress sensitivity of the vessel. The shear stress threshold that triggered a contractile response was significantly greater at a transmural pressure of 5 cmH2O (0.97 dyne/cm(2)) than at 3 cmH2O (0.64 dyne/cm(2)). While contraction frequency was reduced when a steady WSS was applied, this inhibition was reversed when the applied WSS oscillated, even though the mean wall shear stresses between the conditions were not significantly different. When the applied oscillatory WSS was large enough, flow itself synchronized the lymphatic contractions to the exact frequency of the applied waveform. Both transmural pressure and the rate of change of WSS have significant impacts on the contractile response of lymphatic vessels to flow. Specifically, time-varying shear stress can alter the inhibition of phasic contraction frequency and even coordinate contractions, providing evidence that dynamic shear could play an important role in the contractile function of collecting lymphatic vessels. PMID:26333787

  20. Structure of a reattaching supersonic shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samimy, M.; Abu-Hijleh, B. A. K.

    1988-01-01

    A Mach 1.83 fully developed turbulent boundary layer with boundary layer thickness, free stream velocity, and Reynolds number of 7.5 mm, 476 m/s, and 6.2 x 10 to the 7th/m, respectively, was separated at a 25.4-mm backward step and formed a shear layer. Fast-response pressure transducers, schlieren photography, and LDV were used to study the structure of this reattaching shear flow. The preliminary results show that large-scale relatively organized structures with limited spanwise extent form in the free shear layer. Some of these structures appear to survive the recompression and reattachment processes, while others break down into smaller scales and the flow becomes increasingly three-dimensional. The survived large-scale structures lose their organization through recompression/reattachment, but regain it after reattachment. The structures after reattachment form a 40-45-degree angle relative to the free stream and deteriorate gradually as they move downstream.

  1. Particle Segregation in Collisional Shearing Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, J. T.; Louge, M. Y.

    1999-01-01

    The size segregation of flowing or shaken grains is a commonly observed phenomenon in industrial processes and in nature. In systems that do not involve much agitation of the grains, several mechanisms that involve gravity have been identified as leading to such segregation. In highly agitated flows, there is a mechanism independent of gravity that is available to drive separation of different grains. This is associated with spatial gradients in the energy of their velocity fluctuations. Because collisions between grains inevitably dissipate energy, collisional granular shear flows are usually of limited extent in the direction transverse to the flow. One consequence of this is that shear flows are strongly influenced by their boundaries. Because grains, on average, slip relative to boundaries, a bumpy or frictional boundary can convert slip energy into fluctuation energy. However, because each collision between a grain and the boundary dissipates fluctuation energy, there is a competition between production and dissipation. In principle, it is possible to design the geometry of the boundary - for example, the size and spacing of the bumps - so that the boundary either produces or dissipates fluctuation energy. This permits the control of the component of the spatial gradient of the fluctuation energy that is normal to the boundary. The gradients in fluctuation energy established by such boundaries may be exploited to drive the separation by size or other properties in a binary mixture of spherical grains. Microgravity makes the visual observations possible by permitting us to employ moderate rates of shear. On earth, the effects of gravity can be minimized by shearing so rapidly that the particle pressure overwhelms gravity. However, in this event, separation takes place too rapidly for visual observation, buoyancy and/or condensation associated with the centripetal acceleration must be accounted for, and the particles can be severely damaged. Because, in the

  2. Predicting bed shear stress and its role in sediment dynamics and restoration potential of the Everglades and other vegetated flow systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larsen, L.G.; Harvey, J.W.; Crimaldi, J.P.

    2009-01-01

    Entrainment of sediment by flowing water affects topography, habitat suitability, and nutrient cycling in vegetated floodplains and wetlands, impacting ecosystem evolution and the success of restoration projects. Nonetheless, restoration managers lack simple decision-support tools for predicting shear stresses and sediment redistribution potential in different vegetation communities. Using a field-validated numerical model, we developed state-space diagrams that provide these predictions over a range of water-surface slopes, depths, and associated velocities in Everglades ridge and slough vegetation communities. Diminished bed shear stresses and a consequent decrease in bed sediment redistribution are hypothesized causes of a recent reduction in the topographic and vegetation heterogeneity of this ecosystem. Results confirmed the inability of present-day flows to entrain bed sediment. Further, our diagrams showed bed shear stresses to be highly sensitive to emergent vegetation density and water-surface slope but less sensitive to water depth and periphyton or floating vegetation abundance. These findings suggested that instituting a pulsing flow regime could be the most effective means to restore sediment redistribution to the Everglades. However, pulsing flows will not be sufficient to erode sediment from sloughs with abundant spikerush, unless spikerush density first decreases by natural or managed processes. Our methods provide a novel tool for identifying restoration parameters and performance measures in many types of vegetated aquatic environments where sediment erosion and deposition are involved.

  3. Rotation-driven Shear Flow Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiueh, Tzihong

    1996-10-01

    A general treatment of stability is considered for an isentropic flow equilibrium against three-dimensional incompressible perturbations by taking into account the difference in the orientations of the system rotation and flow vorticity. It is shown that the aforementioned orientation difference can indeed generate a coupling that drives instabilities at the expense of the rotational energy. Two types of instability are identified, with one growing algebraically and the other growing exponentially; the parameter regimes for both instabilities are also located. The algebraically growing modes are destabilized more easily than the exponentially growing modes; for example, the former can be unstable when the angle between the rotation axis and the vorticity is beyond 70°.5, whereas the latter becomes unstable when this angle is greater than 90°. In addition, we find that even in the limit of small vorticity, the system may still be unstable algebraically at a considerable strength, in contrast to the case of exact zero vorticity, which is absolutely stable. This finding indicates the existence of structural instability for a rotating fluid. The present analysis is applied also to examination of the problem of shear mixing interior of an accreting white dwarf in the context of nova explosions. In order for the nuclear fuels to be blended deep inside the star and make the explosion, the high angular momentum accreted materials combined with the stellar materials should undergo shear flow instabilities. We find that the shear flow instabilities happen when the disk rotation axis is off by more than 900 from the star rotation axis. The instability has in general an exponential growth, on a timescale much shorter than that of the runaway nuclear burning.

  4. Direct observation of dynamic shear jamming in dense suspensions.

    PubMed

    Peters, Ivo R; Majumdar, Sayantan; Jaeger, Heinrich M

    2016-04-14

    Liquid-like at rest, dense suspensions of hard particles can undergo striking transformations in behaviour when agitated or sheared. These phenomena include solidification during rapid impact, as well as strong shear thickening characterized by discontinuous, orders-of-magnitude increases in suspension viscosity. Much of this highly non-Newtonian behaviour has recently been interpreted within the framework of a jamming transition. However, although jamming indeed induces solid-like rigidity, even a strongly shear-thickened state still flows and thus cannot be fully jammed. Furthermore, although suspensions are incompressible, the onset of rigidity in the standard jamming scenario requires an increase in particle density. Finally, whereas shear thickening occurs in the steady state, impact-induced solidification is transient. As a result, it has remained unclear how these dense suspension phenomena are related and how they are connected to jamming. Here we resolve this by systematically exploring both the steady-state and transient regimes with the same experimental system. We demonstrate that a fully jammed, solid-like state can be reached without compression and instead purely with shear, as recently proposed for dry granular systems. This state is created by transient shear-jamming fronts, which we track directly. We also show that shear stress, rather than shear rate, is the key control parameter. From these findings we map out a state diagram with particle density and shear stress as variables. We identify discontinuous shear thickening with a marginally jammed regime just below the onset of full, solid-like jamming. This state diagram provides a unifying framework, compatible with prior experimental and simulation results on dense suspensions, that connects steady-state and transient behaviour in terms of a dynamic shear-jamming process. PMID:27042934

  5. Direct observation of dynamic shear jamming in dense suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Ivo R.; Majumdar, Sayantan; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2016-04-01

    Liquid-like at rest, dense suspensions of hard particles can undergo striking transformations in behaviour when agitated or sheared. These phenomena include solidification during rapid impact, as well as strong shear thickening characterized by discontinuous, orders-of-magnitude increases in suspension viscosity. Much of this highly non-Newtonian behaviour has recently been interpreted within the framework of a jamming transition. However, although jamming indeed induces solid-like rigidity, even a strongly shear-thickened state still flows and thus cannot be fully jammed. Furthermore, although suspensions are incompressible, the onset of rigidity in the standard jamming scenario requires an increase in particle density. Finally, whereas shear thickening occurs in the steady state, impact-induced solidification is transient. As a result, it has remained unclear how these dense suspension phenomena are related and how they are connected to jamming. Here we resolve this by systematically exploring both the steady-state and transient regimes with the same experimental system. We demonstrate that a fully jammed, solid-like state can be reached without compression and instead purely with shear, as recently proposed for dry granular systems. This state is created by transient shear-jamming fronts, which we track directly. We also show that shear stress, rather than shear rate, is the key control parameter. From these findings we map out a state diagram with particle density and shear stress as variables. We identify discontinuous shear thickening with a marginally jammed regime just below the onset of full, solid-like jamming. This state diagram provides a unifying framework, compatible with prior experimental and simulation results on dense suspensions, that connects steady-state and transient behaviour in terms of a dynamic shear-jamming process.

  6. Tank-treading of swollen erythrocytes in shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodson, W. R., III; Dimitrakopoulos, P.

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate computationally the oscillatory tank-treading motion of healthy swollen human erythrocytes (owing to lower than physiological plasma osmolarity) in shear flows with capillary number Ca=O(1) and small to moderate viscosity ratios 0.01≤λ≤2.75. Swollen cells show similar shear flow dynamics with normal cells but with significantly higher inclination and tank-treading speed owing to the higher cell thickness. For a given viscosity ratio, as the flow rate increases, the steady-state erythrocyte length L (in the shear plane) increases logarithmically while its depth W (normal to the shear plane) decreases logarithmically; increase of the viscosity ratio results in lower cell deformation. The erythrocyte width S, which exists in the shear plane, is practically invariant in time, flow rate, and viscosity ratio and corresponds to a real cell thickness of about 2.5μm at physiological osmolarity (300mO) and 3.4μm at an osmolarity of 217 mO. The erythrocyte inclination decreases as the flow rate increases or as the surrounding fluid viscosity decreases, owing to the increased inner rotational flow which tends to align the cell toward the flow direction. The ektacytometry deformation of swollen cells increases logarithmically with the shear stress but with a slower slope than that for normal cells owing mainly to the higher orientation of the more swollen cells. As the cell swelling increases, the tank-treading period decreases owing to the higher thickness of the actual cell which overcomes the opposite action of the reduced shape-memory effects (i.e., the more spherical-like erythrocyte's reference shape of shearing resistance). The local area incompressibility tensions from the lipid bilayer increase with the cell swelling and cause a higher cytoskeleton prestress; this increased prestress results in smaller, but still measurable, local area changes on the spectrin skeleton of the more swollen erythrocytes. Our work provides insight on

  7. Precessive sand ripples in intense steady shear flows.

    PubMed

    Restrepo, Juan M; Moulton, Derek E; Uys, Hermann

    2011-03-01

    We describe experimental observations of fully developed, large-amplitude bars under the action of a shearing fluid. The experiments were performed in an annular tank filled with water and sheared above by a steady motor source. The same steady shearing flow can produce a variety of different erodible bed manifestations: advective or precessive bars, which refer to bar structures with global regularity and a near-steady precession velocity; interactive bars, the structure of which depends on local rearrangements, which are in turn a response to complex background topography; and dispersive bars, which are created when an initially isolated mound of sand evolves into a train of sand ripples. Of these, the most amenable to analysis are the precessive bars. For precession bars, we find that the skin depth, which is the nondimensionalized mean-field transport rate, grows exponentially as a function of the shear velocity. From this, we arrive at an analytical expression that approximates the precession speed of the bars as a function of shear velocity. We use this to obtain a formula for sediment transport rate. However, in intense flows, the bars can get large engendering boundary layer separation, leading to a different dynamic for bar formation and evolution. Numerical flow calculations over an experimentally obtained set of precessive bars are presented and show that classical parametrizations of mass flux in terms of bottom gradients have shortcomings. Within the range of shear rates considered, a quantity that does not change appreciably in time is the aspect ratio, which is defined as the ratio of the average bar amplitude, with respect to a mean depth, to the average bar length. PMID:21517492

  8. Precessive sand ripples in intense steady shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo, Juan M.; Moulton, Derek E.; Uys, Hermann

    2011-03-01

    We describe experimental observations of fully developed, large-amplitude bars under the action of a shearing fluid. The experiments were performed in an annular tank filled with water and sheared above by a steady motor source. The same steady shearing flow can produce a variety of different erodible bed manifestations: advective or precessive bars, which refer to bar structures with global regularity and a near-steady precession velocity; interactive bars, the structure of which depends on local rearrangements, which are in turn a response to complex background topography; and dispersive bars, which are created when an initially isolated mound of sand evolves into a train of sand ripples. Of these, the most amenable to analysis are the precessive bars. For precession bars, we find that the skin depth, which is the nondimensionalized mean-field transport rate, grows exponentially as a function of the shear velocity. From this, we arrive at an analytical expression that approximates the precession speed of the bars as a function of shear velocity. We use this to obtain a formula for sediment transport rate. However, in intense flows, the bars can get large engendering boundary layer separation, leading to a different dynamic for bar formation and evolution. Numerical flow calculations over an experimentally obtained set of precessive bars are presented and show that classical parametrizations of mass flux in terms of bottom gradients have shortcomings. Within the range of shear rates considered, a quantity that does not change appreciably in time is the aspect ratio, which is defined as the ratio of the average bar amplitude, with respect to a mean depth, to the average bar length.

  9. Adhesive dynamics simulations of the shear threshold effect for leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Caputo, Kelly E; Lee, Dooyoung; King, Michael R; Hammer, Daniel A

    2007-02-01

    Many experiments have measured the effect of force on the dissociation of single selectin bonds, but it is not yet clear how the force dependence of molecular dissociation can influence the rolling of cells expressing selectin molecules. Recent experiments using constant-force atomic force microscopy or high-resolution microscopic observations of pause-time distributions of cells in a flow chamber show that for some bonds, the dissociation rate is high at low force and initially decreases with force, indicating a catch bond. As the force continues to increase, the dissociation rate increases again, like a slip bond. It has been proposed that this catch-slip bond leads to the shear threshold effect, in which a certain level of shear rate is required to achieve rolling. We have incorporated a catch-slip dissociation rate into adhesive dynamics simulations of cell rolling. Using a relatively simple model for the shear-controlled association rate for selectin bonds, we were able to recreate characteristics of the shear threshold effect seen most prominently for rolling through L-selectin. The rolling velocity as a function of shear rate showed a minimum near 100 s-1. Furthermore, cells were observed to roll at a shear rate near the threshold, but detach and move more quickly when the shear rate was dropped below the threshold. Finally, using adhesive dynamics, we were able to determine ranges of parameters necessary to see the shear threshold effect in the rolling velocity. In summary, we found through simulation that the catch-slip behavior of selectin bonds can be responsible for the shear threshold effect. PMID:17085490

  10. Adhesive Dynamics Simulations of the Shear Threshold Effect for Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Caputo, Kelly E.; Lee, Dooyoung; King, Michael R.; Hammer, Daniel A.

    2007-01-01

    Many experiments have measured the effect of force on the dissociation of single selectin bonds, but it is not yet clear how the force dependence of molecular dissociation can influence the rolling of cells expressing selectin molecules. Recent experiments using constant-force atomic force microscopy or high-resolution microscopic observations of pause-time distributions of cells in a flow chamber show that for some bonds, the dissociation rate is high at low force and initially decreases with force, indicating a catch bond. As the force continues to increase, the dissociation rate increases again, like a slip bond. It has been proposed that this catch-slip bond leads to the shear threshold effect, in which a certain level of shear rate is required to achieve rolling. We have incorporated a catch-slip dissociation rate into adhesive dynamics simulations of cell rolling. Using a relatively simple model for the shear-controlled association rate for selectin bonds, we were able to recreate characteristics of the shear threshold effect seen most prominently for rolling through L-selectin. The rolling velocity as a function of shear rate showed a minimum near 100 s−1. Furthermore, cells were observed to roll at a shear rate near the threshold, but detach and move more quickly when the shear rate was dropped below the threshold. Finally, using adhesive dynamics, we were able to determine ranges of parameters necessary to see the shear threshold effect in the rolling velocity. In summary, we found through simulation that the catch-slip behavior of selectin bonds can be responsible for the shear threshold effect. PMID:17085490

  11. Asymptotic Sensitivity of Homogeneous Turbulent Shear Flow to the

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaza, Juan; Warhaft, Zellman; Collins, Lance

    2007-11-01

    Our recent numerical studies of homogeneous turbulent shear flow suggest the dynamics of the large and small scales are sensitive to the initial value of the shear parameter. In particular for initial values of S^* = S k /ɛ>=10, we find that the asymptotic state of the turbulence depends upon this parameter. Rapid distortion theory (RDT) predicts the dependence of both large- and small-scale statistics on S^* reasonably well, but the theory is applicable only for relatively short times (S t < 2). Direct numerical simulation (DNS) has a somewhat longer window, but it too eventually fails when the integral length scale becomes too large. Motivated by this earlier work, we performed experimental measurements of large- and small-scale velocity statistics in homogeneous turbulent shear flow in a wind tunnel. We are able to vary the initial shear parameter over the relevant range and observe the aforementioned asymptotic statistics. The experimental results will be presented, including detailed comparisons with earlier DNS and RDT.

  12. Final Report - Investigation of Intermittent Turbulence and Turbulent Structures in the Presence of Controlled Sheared Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, Mark A.

    2013-06-27

    Final Report for grant DE-FG02-06ER54898. The dynamics and generation of intermittent plasma turbulent structures, widely known as "blobs" have been studied in the presence of sheared plasma flows in a controlled laboratory experiment.

  13. Electroconvective Instability in Flow-shear-induced Transport Barrier: Threshold for Stable Vortices and Chaotic Eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Rhokyun; Pham, Van Sang; Han, Jongyoon

    2014-11-01

    Suppression of turbulence and transport by shear flow is a common process in plasma fluid dynamics, while it has been rarely observed in nonionized fluids. Here, we visualize this effect in microfluidic nonionized system with electroconvective instability (EC) initiated by ion concentration polarization on ion selective membrane. The membranes act as the source of both instability and flow shear (wall shear of Hagen-Poiseuille (HP) flow) simultaneously, fitting the requisite for this shear suppression effect; turbulence in the domain of flow shear. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first characterization of flow-shear-induced transport barrier in microfluidics, captured by scaling analysis, experiment, and numerical modeling. Selected by balancing flow shear and velocity fluctuation, which generated by HP flow and vortical EC, the threshold for shear suppression scales by EC thickness dec/ w < 0.618. Stable unidirectional EC occurs under the threshold, while chaotic EC occurs over the threshold by overcoming flow shear. It also has significant implications on the energy saving of electrochemical systems (e . g . electrodialysis) to prevent chaotic turbulences and corresponding energy dissipations. This work was supported by the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy Grant (DE-AR0000294).

  14. Molecular shear heating and vortex dynamics in thermostatted two dimensional Yukawa liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Akanksha; Ganesh, Rajaraman; Joy, Ashwin

    2016-07-01

    It is well known that two-dimensional macroscale shear flows are susceptible to instabilities leading to macroscale vortical structures. The linear and nonlinear fate of such a macroscale flow in a strongly coupled medium is a fundamental problem. A popular example of a strongly coupled medium is a dusty plasma, often modelled as a Yukawa liquid. Recently, laboratory experiments and molecular dynamics (MD) studies of shear flows in strongly coupled Yukawa liquids indicated the occurrence of strong molecular shear heating, which is found to reduce the coupling strength exponentially leading to the destruction of macroscale vorticity. To understand the vortex dynamics of strongly coupled molecular fluids undergoing macroscale shear flows and molecular shear heating, MD simulation has been performed, which allows the macroscopic vortex dynamics to evolve, while at the same time "removes" the microscopically generated heat without using the velocity degrees of freedom. We demonstrate that by using a configurational thermostat in a novel way, the microscale heat generated by shear flow can be thermostatted out efficiently without compromising the large scale vortex dynamics. In the present work, using MD simulations, a comparative study of shear flow evolution in Yukawa liquids in the presence and absence of molecular or microscopic heating is presented for a prototype shear flow, namely, Kolmogorov flow.

  15. Evolution of hairpin vortices in a shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hon, T.-L.; Walker, J. D. A.

    1988-01-01

    Recent experimental studies suggest that the hairpin vortex plays an important (and perhaps dominant) role in the dynamics of turbulent flows near walls. In this study a numerical procedure is developed to allow the accurate computation of the trajectory of a 3-D vortex having a small core radius. For hairpin vortices which are convected in a shear flow above a wall, the calculated results show that a 2-D vortex containing a small 3-D disturbance distorts into a complex shape with subsidiary hairpin vortices forming outboard of the original hairpin vortex. As the vortex moves above the wall, it induces unsteady motion in the viscous flow near the wall: numerical solutions suggest that the boundary-layer flow near the wall will ultimately erupt in response to the motion of the hairpin vortex and in the process a secondary hairpin vortex will be created. The computer results agree with recent experimental investigations.

  16. Dynamic shear jamming in granular suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Ivo; Majumdar, Sayantan; Jaeger, Heinrich

    2014-11-01

    Jamming by shear allows a frictional granular packing to transition from an unjammed state into a jammed state while keeping the system volume and average packing fraction constant. Shear jamming of dry granular media can occur quasi-statically, but boundaries are crucial to confine the material. We perform experiments in aqueous starch suspension where we apply shear using a rheometer with a large volume (400 ml) cylindrical Couette cell. In our suspensions the packing fraction is sufficiently low that quasi-static deformation does not induce a shear jammed state. Applying a shock-like deformation however, will turn the suspension into a jammed solid. A fully jammed state is reached within tens of microseconds, and can be sustained for at least several seconds. High speed imaging of the initial process reveals a jamming front propagating radially outward through the suspension, while the suspension near the outer boundary remains quiescent. This indicates that granular suspensions can be shear jammed without the need of confining solid boundaries. Instead, confinement is most likely provided by the dynamics in the front region.

  17. Vortex Formation in a High Speed Dust Flow with Large Velocity Shear in RF Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Iizuka, Satoru; Gohda, Takuma

    2008-09-07

    We have investigated a rotation of a dust cloud disc with strong velocity shear in a radio frequency (RF) plasma. The flow pattern of the dusts was evaluated by the Navier Stokes Equation with shear viscosity due to the Coulomb interactions. We have clarified dynamic behaviors of the dusts and observed generation of micro-vortices around rotational center, when the velocity shear is enhanced.

  18. Random shearing by zonal flows and transport reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Eun-jin; Diamond, P.H.

    2004-12-01

    The physics of random shearing by zonal flows and the consequent reduction of scalar field transport are studied. In contrast to mean shear flows, zonal flows have a finite autocorrelation time and can exhibit complex spatial structure. A random zonal flow with a finite correlation time {tau}{sub ZF} decorrelates two nearby fluid elements less efficiently than a mean shear flow does. The decorrelation time is {tau}{sub D}=({tau}{sub {eta}}/{tau}{sub ZF}{omega}{sub rms}{sup 2}){sup 1sol2} ({tau}{sub {eta}} is the turbulent scattering time, and {omega}{sub rms} is the rms shear), leading to larger scalar field amplitude with a slightly different scaling ({proportional_to}{tau}{sub D}/{omega}{sub rms}), as compared to the case of coherent shearing. In the strong shear limit, the flux scales as {proportional_to}{omega}{sub rms}{sup -1}.

  19. Resonance of Brownian vortices in viscoelastic shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laas, K.; Mankin, R.

    2015-10-01

    The dynamics of a Brownian particle in an oscillatory viscoelastic shear flow is considered using the generalized Langevin equation. The interaction with fluctuations of environmental parameters is modeled by an additive external white noise and by an internal Mittag-Leffer noise with a finite memory time. Focusing on the mean angular momentum of particles it is shown that the presence of memory has a profound effect on the behavior of the Brownian vortices. Particularly, if an external noise dominates over the internal noise, a resonance-like dependence of the mean angular momentum of "free" particles, trapped due to the cage effect, on the characteristic memory time is observed. Moreover, it is established that memory effects can induce two kinds of resonance peaks: one resonance peak is related to the presence of external noise and the other is related to the initial positional distribution of particles. The bona fide resonance versus the shear frequency is also discussed.

  20. Surface deformation and shear flow in ligand mediated cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sircar, Sarthok; Roberts, Anthony; Sarthok Sircar / Anthony Roberts Collaboration

    We present a unified, multiscale model to study the attachment/detachment dynamics of two deforming, near spherical cells, coated with binding ligands and subject to a slow, homogeneous shear flow in a viscous fluid medium. The binding ligands on the surface of the cells experience attractive and repulsive forces in an ionic medium and exhibit finite resistance to rotation via bond tilting. The microscale drag forces and couples describing the fluid flow inside the small separation gap between the cells, are calculated using a combination of methods in lubrication theory and previously published numerical results. For a select range of material and fluid parameters, a hysteretic transition of the sticking probability curves (i.e., the function g*) between the adhesion phase (when g*>0.5) and the fragmentation phase (when g*<0.5) is attributed to a nonlinear relation between the total nanoscale binding forces and the separation gap between the cells. We show that adhesion is favored in highly ionic fluids, increased deformability of the cells, elastic binders and a higher fluid shear rate (until a critical value). Continuation of the limit points (i.e., the turning points where the slope of the function g* changes sign within a select range of critical shear SS is supported by the Adelaide University startup funds and AR is supported by the Australian Research Council Discovery Grant DP150102385.

  1. Nonlinear dynamics and anisotropic structure of rotating sheared turbulence.

    PubMed

    Salhi, A; Jacobitz, F G; Schneider, K; Cambon, C

    2014-01-01

    Homogeneous turbulence in rotating shear flows is studied by means of pseudospectral direct numerical simulation and analytical spectral linear theory (SLT). The ratio of the Coriolis parameter to shear rate is varied over a wide range by changing the rotation strength, while a constant moderate shear rate is used to enable significant contributions to the nonlinear interscale energy transfer and to the nonlinear intercomponental redistribution terms. In the destabilized and neutral cases, in the sense of kinetic energy evolution, nonlinearity cannot saturate the growth of the largest scales. It permits the smallest scale to stabilize by a scale-by-scale quasibalance between the nonlinear energy transfer and the dissipation spectrum. In the stabilized cases, the role of rotation is mainly nonlinear, and interacting inertial waves can affect almost all scales as in purely rotating flows. In order to isolate the nonlinear effect of rotation, the two-dimensional manifold with vanishing spanwise wave number is revisited and both two-component spectra and single-point two-dimensional energy components exhibit an important effect of rotation, whereas the SLT as well as the purely two-dimensional nonlinear analysis are unaffected by rotation as stated by the Proudman theorem. The other two-dimensional manifold with vanishing streamwise wave number is analyzed with similar tools because it is essential for any shear flow. Finally, the spectral approach is used to disentangle, in an analytical way, the linear and nonlinear terms in the dynamical equations. PMID:24580333

  2. Microalga propels along vorticity direction in a shear flow.

    PubMed

    Chengala, Anwar; Hondzo, Miki; Sheng, Jian

    2013-05-01

    Using high-speed digital holographic microscopy and microfluidics, we discover that, when encountering fluid flow shear above a threshold, unicellular green alga Dunaliella primolecta migrates unambiguously in the cross-stream direction that is normal to the plane of shear and coincides with the local fluid flow vorticity. The flow shear drives motile microalgae to collectively migrate in a thin two-dimensional horizontal plane and consequently alters the spatial distribution of microalgal cells within a given suspension. This shear-induced algal migration differs substantially from periodic rotational motion of passive ellipsoids, known as Jeffery orbits, as well as gyrotaxis by bottom-heavy swimming microalgae in a shear flow due to the subtle interplay between torques generated by gravity and viscous shear. Our findings could facilitate mechanistic solutions for modeling planktonic thin layers and sustainable cultivation of microalgae for human nutrition and bioenergy feedstock. PMID:23767563

  3. Microalga propels along vorticity direction in a shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chengala, Anwar; Hondzo, Miki; Sheng, Jian

    2013-05-01

    Using high-speed digital holographic microscopy and microfluidics, we discover that, when encountering fluid flow shear above a threshold, unicellular green alga Dunaliella primolecta migrates unambiguously in the cross-stream direction that is normal to the plane of shear and coincides with the local fluid flow vorticity. The flow shear drives motile microalgae to collectively migrate in a thin two-dimensional horizontal plane and consequently alters the spatial distribution of microalgal cells within a given suspension. This shear-induced algal migration differs substantially from periodic rotational motion of passive ellipsoids, known as Jeffery orbits, as well as gyrotaxis by bottom-heavy swimming microalgae in a shear flow due to the subtle interplay between torques generated by gravity and viscous shear. Our findings could facilitate mechanistic solutions for modeling planktonic thin layers and sustainable cultivation of microalgae for human nutrition and bioenergy feedstock.

  4. Evaluation of Shear-Induced Platelet Activation Models Under Constant and Dynamic Shear Stress Loading Conditions Relevant to Devices

    PubMed Central

    Sheriff, Jawaad; Soares, João Silva; Xenos, Michalis; Jesty, Jolyon; Bluestein, Danny

    2013-01-01

    The advent of implantable blood-recirculating devices such as left ventricular assist devices and prosthetic heart valves provides a viable therapy for patients with end-stage heart failure and valvular disease. However, device-generated pathological flow patterns result in thromboembolic complications that require complex and lifelong anticoagulant therapy, which entails hemorrhagic risks and is not appropriate for certain patients. Optimizing the thrombogenic performance of such devices utilizing numerical simulations requires the development of predictive platelet activation models that account for variations in shear-loading rates characterizing blood flow through such devices. Platelets were exposed in vitro to both dynamic and constant shear stress conditions emulating those found in blood-recirculating devices in order to determine their shear-induced activation and sensitization response. Both these behaviors were found to be dependent on the shear loading rates, in addition to shear stress magnitude and exposure time. We then critically examined several current models and evaluated their predictive capabilities using these results. Shear loading rate terms were then included to account for dynamic aspects that are either ignored or partially considered by these models, and model parameters were optimized. Independent optimization for each of the two types of shear stress exposure conditions tested resulted in different sets of best-fit constants, indicating that universal optimization may not be possible. Inherent limitations of the current models require a paradigm shift from these integral-based discretized power law models to better address the dynamic conditions encountered in blood-recirculating devices. PMID:23400312

  5. Oscillatory tank-treading motion of erythrocytes in shear flows.

    PubMed

    Dodson, W R; Dimitrakopoulos, P

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate the oscillatory dynamics of the tank-treading motion of healthy human erythrocytes in shear flows with capillary number Ca = O(1) and small to moderate viscosity ratios 0.01 ≤ λ ≤ 1.5. These conditions correspond to a wide range of surrounding medium viscosities (4-600 m Pa s) and shear flow rates (2-560 s(-1)), and match those used in ektacytometry systems. For a given viscosity ratio, as the flow rate increases, the steady-state erythrocyte length L (in the shear plane) increases logarithmically while its depth W (normal to the shear plane) decreases logarithmically. In addition, the flow rate increase dampens the oscillatory erythrocyte inclination but not its length oscillations (which show relative variations of about 5-8%). For a given flow rate, as the viscosity ratio increases, the erythrocyte length L contracts while its depth W increases (i.e., the cell becomes less deformed) with a small decrease in the length variations. The average orientation angle of the erythrocyte shows a significant decrease with the viscosity ratio as does the angle oscillation while the oscillation period increases. These trends continue in higher viscosity ratios resulting eventually in the transition from a (weakly oscillatory) tank-treading motion to a tumbling motion. Our computations show that the erythrocyte width S, which exists in the shear plane, is practically invariant in time, capillary number, and viscosity ratio, and corresponds to a real cell thickness of about 2.5 μm. Comparison of our computational results with the predictions of (low degree-of-freedom) theoretical models and experimental findings, suggests that the energy dissipation due to the shape-memory effects is more significant than the energy dissipation due to the membrane viscosity. Our work shows that the oscillatory tank-treading motion can account for more than 50% of the variations found in ektacytometry systems; thus, researchers who wish to study inherent

  6. Free turbulent shear flows. Volume 2: Summary of data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birch, S. F.

    1973-01-01

    The proceedings of a conference on free turbulent shear flows are presented. Objectives of the conference are as follows: (1) collect and process data for a variety of free mixing problems, (2) assess present theoretical capability for predicting mean velocity, concentration, and temperature distributions in free turbulent flows, (3) identify and recommend experimental studies to advance knowledge of free shear flows, and (4) increase understanding of basic turbulent mixing process for application to free shear flows. Examples of specific cases of jet flow are included.

  7. Generation of shear flow in conical wire arrays with a center wire.

    SciTech Connect

    Wanex, L.; Neff, S.; Plechaty, C.; Ampleford, David J.; Wright, S.; Martinez, D.; Presura, R.

    2008-10-01

    At the Nevada Terawatt Facility we investigated the generation of a sheared plasma flow using conical wire arrays with an additional wire located on the axis of the pinch. The additional center wire generates axial current carrying plasma that serves as a target for the plasma accelerated from the outer wires, generating a sheared plasma flow which leads to the growth of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. These experiments were conducted on Zebra, a 2 TW pulse power device capable of delivering a 1 MA current in 100 ns. This paper will focus on the implosion dynamics that lead to shear flow and the development of the Kelvin Helmholtz instability.

  8. Self-organization in suspensions of end-functionalized semiflexible polymers under shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myung, Jin Suk; Winkler, Roland G.; Gompper, Gerhard

    2015-12-01

    The nonequilibrium dynamical behavior and structure formation of end-functionalized semiflexible polymer suspensions under flow are investigated by mesoscale hydrodynamic simulations. The hybrid simulation approach combines the multiparticle collision dynamics method for the fluid, which accounts for hydrodynamic interactions, with molecular dynamics simulations for the semiflexible polymers. In equilibrium, various kinds of scaffold-like network structures are observed, depending on polymer flexibility and end-attraction strength. We investigate the flow behavior of the polymer networks under shear and analyze their nonequilibrium structural and rheological properties. The scaffold structure breaks up and densified aggregates are formed at low shear rates, while the structural integrity is completely lost at high shear rates. We provide a detailed analysis of the shear- rate-dependent flow-induced structures. The studies provide a deeper understanding of the formation and deformation of network structures in complex materials.

  9. Suppression of turbulence and transport by sheared flow

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, P. W.

    2000-01-01

    The role of stable shear flow in suppressing turbulence and turbulent transport in plasmas and neutral fluids is reviewed. Localized stable flow shear produces transport barriers whose extensive and highly successful utilization in fusion devices has made them the primary experimental technique for reducing and even eliminating the rapid turbulent losses of heat and particles that characterize fusion-grade plasmas. These transport barriers occur in different plasma regions with disparate physical properties and in a range of confining configurations, indicating a physical process of unusual universality. Flow shear suppresses turbulence by speeding up turbulent decorrelation. This is a robust feature of advection whenever the straining rate of stable mean flow shear exceeds the nonlinear decorrelation rate. Shear straining lowers correlation lengths in the direction of shear and reduces turbulent amplitudes. It also disrupts other processes that feed into or result from turbulence, including the linear instability of important collective modes, the transport-producing correlations between advecting fluid and advectants, and large-scale spatially connected avalanchelike transport events. In plasmas, regions of stable flow shear can be externally driven, but most frequently are created spontaneously in critical transitions between different plasma states. Shear suppression occurs in hydrodynamics and represents an extension of rapid-distortion theory to a long-time-scale nonlinear regime in two-dimensional stable shear flow. Examples from hydrodynamics include the emergence of coherent vortices in decaying two-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence and the reduction of turbulent transport in the stratosphere. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  10. Hydrodynamic interaction of two deformable drops in confined shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yongping; Wang, Chengyao

    2014-09-01

    We investigate hydrodynamic interaction between two neutrally buoyant circular drops in a confined shear flow based on a computational fluid dynamics simulation using the volume-of-fluid method. The rheological behaviors of interactive drops and the flow regimes are explored with a focus on elucidation of underlying physical mechanisms. We find that two types of drop behaviors during interaction occur, including passing-over motion and reversing motion, which are governed by the competition between the drag of passing flow and the entrainment of reversing flow in matrix fluid. With the increasing confinement, the drop behavior transits from the passing-over motion to reversing motion, because the entrainment of the reversing-flow matrix fluid turns to play the dominant role. The drag of the ambient passing flow is increased by enlarging the initial lateral separation due to the departure of the drop from the reversing flow in matrix fluid, resulting in the emergence of passing-over motion. In particular, a corresponding phase diagram is plotted to quantitatively illustrate the dependence of drop morphologies during interaction on confinement and initial lateral separation.

  11. Feedback control of flow alignment in sheared liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Strehober, David A; Schöll, Eckehard; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2013-12-01

    Based on a continuum theory, we investigate the manipulation of the nonequilibrium behavior of a sheared liquid crystal via closed-loop feedback control. Our goal is to stabilize a specific dynamical state, that is, the stationary "flow alignment," under conditions where the uncontrolled system displays oscillatory director dynamics with in-plane symmetry. To this end we employ time-delayed feedback control (TDFC), where the equation of motion for the ith component q(i)(t) of the order parameter tensor is supplemented by a control term involving the difference q(i)(t)-q(i)(t-τ). In this diagonal scheme, τ is the delay time. We demonstrate that the TDFC method successfully stabilizes flow alignment for suitable values of the control strength K and τ; these values are determined by solving an exact eigenvalue equation. Moreover, our results show that only small values of K are needed when the system is sheared from an isotropic equilibrium state, contrary to the case where the equilibrium state is nematic. PMID:24483470

  12. Feedback control of flow alignment in sheared liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strehober, David A.; Schöll, Eckehard; Klapp, Sabine H. L.

    2013-12-01

    Based on a continuum theory, we investigate the manipulation of the nonequilibrium behavior of a sheared liquid crystal via closed-loop feedback control. Our goal is to stabilize a specific dynamical state, that is, the stationary "flow alignment," under conditions where the uncontrolled system displays oscillatory director dynamics with in-plane symmetry. To this end we employ time-delayed feedback control (TDFC), where the equation of motion for the ith component qi(t) of the order parameter tensor is supplemented by a control term involving the difference qi(t)-qi(t-τ). In this diagonal scheme, τ is the delay time. We demonstrate that the TDFC method successfully stabilizes flow alignment for suitable values of the control strength K and τ; these values are determined by solving an exact eigenvalue equation. Moreover, our results show that only small values of K are needed when the system is sheared from an isotropic equilibrium state, contrary to the case where the equilibrium state is nematic.

  13. Investigation of Compressibility Effect for Aeropropulsive Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramanyam, M. S.; Chen, C. P.

    2005-01-01

    Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) engines operate within a wide range of Mach numbers and altitudes. Fundamental fluid dynamic mechanisms involve complex choking, mass entrainment, stream mixing and wall interactions. The Propulsion Research Center at the University of Alabama in Huntsville is involved in an on- going experimental and numerical modeling study of non-axisymmetric ejector-based combined cycle propulsion systems. This paper attempts to address the modeling issues related to mixing, shear layer/wall interaction in a supersonic Strutjet/ejector flow field. Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solutions incorporating turbulence models are sought and compared to experimental measurements to characterize detailed flow dynamics. The effect of compressibility on fluids mixing and wall interactions were investigated using an existing CFD methodology. The compressibility correction to conventional incompressible two- equation models is found to be necessary for the supersonic mixing aspect of the ejector flows based on 2-D simulation results. 3-D strut-base flows involving flow separations were also investigated.

  14. Spontaneous formation of permanent shear bands in a mesoscopic model of flowing disordered matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, Kirsten; Bocquet, Lydéric; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    2012-02-01

    In this presentation we propose a coherent scenario of the formation of permanent shear bands in the flow of yield stress materials. Within a minimalistic mesoscopic model we investigate the spatial organisation of plasticity. The most important parameter is the typical time needed to regain the original structure after a local rearrangement. In agreement with a recent mean field study [Coussot et al., Eur. Phys. J. E, 2010, 33, 183] we observe a spontaneous formation of permanent shear bands, when this restructuring time is large compared to the typical stress release time in a rearrangement. This heterogeneous flow behaviour is different in nature from the transient dynamical heterogeneities that one observes in the small shear rate limit in flow without shear-banding [Martens et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2011, 106, 156001]. We analyse the dependence of the shear bands on system size, shear rate and restructuring time. Further we rationalise the scenario within a mean field version of the model, that explains the instability of the homogeneous flow below a critical shear rate. Our study therefore strongly supports the idea that the characteristic time scales involved in the local dynamics are at the physical origin of permanent shear bands.

  15. Bistability of Cell Adhesion in Shear Flow

    PubMed Central

    Efremov, Artem; Cao, Jianshu

    2011-01-01

    Cell adhesion plays a central role in multicellular organisms helping to maintain their integrity and homeostasis. This complex process involves many different types of adhesion proteins, and synergetic behavior of these proteins during cell adhesion is frequently observed in experiments. A well-known example is the cooperation of rolling and stationary adhesion proteins during the leukocytes extravasation. Despite the fact that such cooperation is vital for proper functioning of the immune system, its origin is not fully understood. In this study we constructed a simple analytic model of the interaction between a leukocyte and the blood vessel wall in shear flow. The model predicts existence of cell adhesion bistability, which results from a tug-of-war between two kinetic processes taking place in the cell-wall contact area—bond formation and rupture. Based on the model results, we suggest an interpretation of several cytoadhesion experiments and propose a simple explanation of the existing synergy between rolling and stationary adhesion proteins, which is vital for effective cell adherence to the blood vessel walls in living organisms. PMID:21889439

  16. Molecularly based criteria for shear banding in transient flow of entangled polymeric fluids.

    PubMed

    Mohagheghi, Mouge; Khomami, Bamin

    2016-06-01

    Dissipative particle dynamics simulations of polymeric melts in a start-up of shear flow as a function of ramp time to its steady state value is studied. Herein, we report the molecular findings showing the effect of ramp time on the formation of shear banded structures and chain relaxation behavior. Specifically, it is shown that shear banding emerges at a rapid start-up; however, homogeneous shear prevails when the deformation rate ramp time is sufficiently slow. This finding is in full consistency with prior continuum level linear stability analysis of shear banding in start-up of shear flows as well as experimental observations of entangled DNA and polymer solutions. Further, it has been revealed that the ratio of the longest chain orientation relaxation time to that of the time for the imposed deformation rate to reach its steady state value plays a central role in determining whether local strain inhomogeneities that lead to the formation of shear banded flow structures are created. In addition, we have shown that the gradient of the number of entanglements along the velocity gradient direction should reach a critical value for the creation of localized strain inhomogeneity. Moreover, the relation between the local process leading to shear banded flows and the relaxation mechanism of the chain is discussed. Overall, a molecular picture for the interrelation between the longest chain orientation and stress relaxation time, local inhomogeneities, and shear banding has been proposed and corroborated with extensive analysis. PMID:27415319

  17. Molecularly based criteria for shear banding in transient flow of entangled polymeric fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohagheghi, Mouge; Khomami, Bamin

    2016-06-01

    Dissipative particle dynamics simulations of polymeric melts in a start-up of shear flow as a function of ramp time to its steady state value is studied. Herein, we report the molecular findings showing the effect of ramp time on the formation of shear banded structures and chain relaxation behavior. Specifically, it is shown that shear banding emerges at a rapid start-up; however, homogeneous shear prevails when the deformation rate ramp time is sufficiently slow. This finding is in full consistency with prior continuum level linear stability analysis of shear banding in start-up of shear flows as well as experimental observations of entangled DNA and polymer solutions. Further, it has been revealed that the ratio of the longest chain orientation relaxation time to that of the time for the imposed deformation rate to reach its steady state value plays a central role in determining whether local strain inhomogeneities that lead to the formation of shear banded flow structures are created. In addition, we have shown that the gradient of the number of entanglements along the velocity gradient direction should reach a critical value for the creation of localized strain inhomogeneity. Moreover, the relation between the local process leading to shear banded flows and the relaxation mechanism of the chain is discussed. Overall, a molecular picture for the interrelation between the longest chain orientation and stress relaxation time, local inhomogeneities, and shear banding has been proposed and corroborated with extensive analysis.

  18. Collisionless Zonal Flow Saturation for Weak Magnetic Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhixin; Wang, Weixing; Diamond, Patrick; Ashourvan, Arash; Tynan, George

    2015-11-01

    The damping of the zonal flow, either collisional or collisionless, plays an important role in regulating the drift wave-zonal flow system, and can affect the transport and confinement. The tertiary instability, e.g., a generalized Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability driven by flow shear, has been suggested theoretically as a possible damping mechanism [Rogers 2000 PRL, Diamond 2005 PPCF]. The sensitivity of the tertiary mode to magnetic shear has not been quantified, especially in weak magnetic shear regimes. In this work, parametric scans using gyrokinetic simulation demonstrate that the zonal electric field energy normalized by the turbulence electric field energy decreases as magnetic shear decreases. With ITG drive artificially eliminated, the time evolution of the zonal structure indicates that the zonal electric field damps more rapidly at weak shear. This suggests larger collisionless zonal flow damping or larger effective turbulent viscosity at weak magnetic shear. The effects of the zonal components of specific variables, e.g., the parallel shear flow and the radial electric field, on tertiary instability, are also studied. Quantitative studies on the magnetic shear scaling of tertiary instability excitation and the collisionless zonal flow saturation are ongoing.

  19. Drop deformation and breakup in flows with and without shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kékesi, Tímea; Amberg, Gustav; Prahl Wittberg, Lisa

    2015-11-01

    The deformation and breakup of liquid drops in gaseous flows are studied numerically using the Volume of Fluid method. Fragmentation of fuel drops has a key role in combustion, determining the rate of mixing and the efficiency of the process. It is common to refer to Weber number 12 as the onset of breakup, and to define breakup mode regimes as a function of Weber number. These definitions are established for simple flows and do not take density and viscosity ratios into account. The main objective of this work is the dynamics of the drop leading to breakup. Fully developed uniform flows and flows with various shear rates are considered. A Weber number of 20, Reynolds numbers 20-200, density ratios 20-80, and viscosity ratios 0.5-50 were used. Results for uniform flows are presented in Kékesi T. et al. (2014). The final aim of the project is to extend existing atomization models for fuel sprays by accounting for density and viscosity ratios in addition to the Reynolds and Weber numbers already present in current models. Estimations for the lifetime of the drop are provided; furthermore, the history of the drag coefficient is compared for several cases. Examples of the observed phenomena and ideas for possible model modifications will be presented. This work is supported by the Swedish Research Council and the Linné FLOW Centre.

  20. Flow instability and wall shear stress variation in intracranial aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Baek, H.; Jayaraman, M. V.; Richardson, P. D.; Karniadakis, G. E.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the flow dynamics and oscillatory behaviour of wall shear stress (WSS) vectors in intracranial aneurysms using high resolution numerical simulations. We analyse three representative patient-specific internal carotid arteries laden with aneurysms of different characteristics: (i) a wide-necked saccular aneurysm, (ii) a narrower-necked saccular aneurysm, and (iii) a case with two adjacent saccular aneurysms. Our simulations show that the pulsatile flow in aneurysms can be subject to a hydrodynamic instability during the decelerating systolic phase resulting in a high-frequency oscillation in the range of 20–50 Hz, even when the blood flow rate in the parent vessel is as low as 150 and 250 ml min−1 for cases (iii) and (i), respectively. The flow returns to its original laminar pulsatile state near the end of diastole. When the aneurysmal flow becomes unstable, both the magnitude and the directions of WSS vectors fluctuate at the aforementioned high frequencies. In particular, the WSS vectors around the flow impingement region exhibit significant spatio-temporal changes in direction as well as in magnitude. PMID:20022896

  1. A note on laminar shear flow over impulsively started bodies.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Back, L. H.

    1971-01-01

    Prediction of the shear flow around bodies impulsively set into motion at a uniform velocity. Information is presented on the local wall shear stress, velocity distribution, steady flow times, and thermal response for wedge flows where local flow acceleration occurs. The essential features of the flow field are found to be describable by the approximate series expansion method of Goldstein and Rosenhead (1936). This method would appear to be useful in rapidly calculating the viscous drag on the forward face of various shaped bodies where local flow acceleration occurs.

  2. Application of Photon Correlation Spectroscopy to Uniform Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, Hyuk K.; Sur, Jeanman; Lee, Sangjun; Kim, Kipom

    1996-11-01

    We study the application of photon correlation spectroscopy to a system of randomly diffusing particles suspended in a uniform shear flow fluid. Unifrom shear flow is generated in Zimm viscometer type Taylor Couette cell. Detecting the scattered intensity from the diffusing particles through a single slit or multiple slit, one can not only study the uniform shear nature of Taylor-Couette flow but also transform the spatial information of the scattering volume into the time information using a photon correlation technique. We discuss useful applications of this technique.

  3. Stochastic resonance on the transverse displacement of swimmers in an oscillatory shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán-Lastra, Francisca; Soto, Rodrigo

    2012-09-01

    Self-propelled microorganisms, such as unicellular algae or bacteria, swim along their director relative to the fluid velocity. Under a steady shear flow the director rotates in close orbit, a periodic structure that is preserved under an oscillatory shear flow. If the shear flow is subjected to small fluctuations produced by small irregularities in the microchannel or by other swimmers nearby, the director dynamics becomes stochastic. Numerical integration of the swimmer motion shows that there is stochastic resonance: The displacement in the vorticity direction is maximized for a finite noise intensity. This transverse displacement resonance is observed when the displacement is coarse grained over several periods, although the director is preferentially oriented along the flow. The resonant noise intensity is proportional to the oscillation frequency and independent of the shear rate. The enhanced displacement can have effects on the transverse diffusion of swimmers and the rheology of the suspension.

  4. Influence of ExB shear flows on plasma edge turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Manz, P.; Ramisch, M.; Mahdizadeh, N.; Stroth, U.; Greiner, F.

    2008-03-19

    Poloidal ExB shear flows are widely accepted as a trigger mechanism of transport barriers in the edge of fusion plasmas. Strong ExB flows can act on turbulence and turbulent transport through the shear decorrelation mechanism, which can reduce the radial size of turbulent structures or change the phase relation between density and potential fluctuations. In this contribution the influence of ExB shear flows on the microscopic structure of turbulence is investigated. The experiments have been carried out on the toroidally confined low-temperature plasma of the torsatron TJ-K. The plasma is dimensionally similar to fusion edge plasmas and accessible throughout for Langmuir probes. Multi-probe arrays are used to resolve the turbulent dynamics perpendicular to the confining magnetic field in high detail.Strong ExB flows are externally generated by core plasma biasing. It is shown that the fluctuations are dominated by large-scale coherent structures even though strong flow shear is present. These structures reveal increased correlation lengths. It is found that these structures can contribute to improved confinement through inwards transport due to cross-phase modifications. Furthermore, the response of the turbulent Reynolds stress, which is supposed to drive zonal flows as internally ExB shear flows, is investigated. The externally generated flow shear leads to a redistribution of the Reynolds stress with increased poloidal symmetry.

  5. Deformation and breakup of viscoelastic droplets in confined shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, A.; Sbragaglia, M.

    2014-08-01

    The deformation and breakup of Newtonian and viscoelastic droplets are studied in confined shear flow. Our numerical approach is based on a combination of lattice-Boltzmann models and finite difference schemes, the former used to model two immiscible fluids with variable viscosity ratio and the latter used to model the polymer dynamics. The kinetics of the polymers is introduced using constitutive equations for viscoelastic fluids with finitely extensible nonlinear elastic dumbbells with Peterlin's closure. We quantify the droplet response by changing the polymer relaxation time τP, the maximum extensibility L of the polymers, and the degree of confinement, i.e., the ratio of the droplet diameter to wall separation. In unconfined shear flow, the effects of droplet viscoelasticity on the critical capillary number Cacr for breakup are moderate in all cases studied. However, in confined conditions a different behavior is observed: The critical capillary number of a viscoelastic droplet increases or decreases, depending on the maximum elongation of the polymers, the latter affecting the extensional viscosity of the polymeric solution. Force balance is monitored in the numerical simulations to validate the physical picture.

  6. Dynamic shear-influenced collagen self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Saeidi, Nima; Sander, Edward A; Ruberti, Jeffrey W

    2009-12-01

    The ability to influence the direction of polymerization of a self-assembling biomolecular system has the potential to generate materials with extremely high anisotropy. In biological systems where highly-oriented cellular populations give rise to aligned and often load-bearing tissue such organized molecular scaffolds could aid in the contact guidance of cells for engineered tissue constructs (e.g. cornea and tendon). In this investigation we examine the detailed dynamics of pepsin-extracted type I bovine collagen assembly on a glass surface under the influence of flow between two plates. Differential Interference Contrast (DIC) imaging (60x-1.4NA) with focal plane stabilization was used to resolve and track the growth of collagen aggregates on borosilicate glass for 4 different shear rates (500, 80, 20, and 9s(-1)). The detailed morphology of the collagen fibrils/aggregates was examined using Quick Freeze Deep Etch (QFDE) electron microscopy. Nucleation of fibrils on the glass was observed to occur rapidly (approximately 2 min) followed by continued growth of the fibrils. The growth rates were dependent on flow in a complex manner with the highest rate of axial growth (0.1 micro/s) occurring at a shear rate of 9s(-1). The lowest growth rate occurred at the highest shear. Fibrils were observed to both branch and join during the experiments. The best alignment of fibrils was observed at intermediate shear rates of 20 and 80s(-1). However, the investigation revealed that fibril directional growth was not stable. At high shear rates, fibrils would often turn downstream forming what we term "hooks" which are likely the combined result of monomer interaction with the initial collagen layer or "mat" and the high shear rate. Further, QFDE examination of fibril morphology demonstrated that the assembled fibrillar structure did not possess native D-periodicity. Instead, fibrils comprised a collection of generally aligned, monomers which were self-assembled to form a fibril

  7. Electromagnetic effects in the stabilization of turbulence by sheared flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, M. D. J.; Newton, S. L.; Cowley, S. C.; Loureiro, N. F.; Dickinson, D.; Roach, C.; Connor, J. W.

    2014-01-01

    We have extended our study of the competition between the drive and stabilization of plasma microinstabilities by sheared flow to include electromagnetic effects at low plasma β (the ratio of plasma to magnetic pressure). The extended system of characteristic equations is formulated, for a dissipative fluid model developed from the gyrokinetic equation, using a twisting mode representation in sheared slab geometry and focusing on the ion temperature gradient mode. Perpendicular flow shear convects perturbations along the field at the speed we denote as Mcs (where cs is the sound speed). M \\gt 1/ \\sqrt{\\beta} is required to make the system characteristics unidirectional and inhibit eigenmode formation, leaving only transitory perturbations in the system. This typically represents a much larger flow shear than in the electrostatic case, which only needs M > 1. Numerical investigation of the region M \\lt 1/\\sqrt{\\beta} shows the driving terms can conflict, as in the electrostatic case, giving low growth rates over a range of parameters. Also, at modest drive strengths and low β values typical of experiments, including electromagnetic effects does not significantly alter the growth rates. For stronger flow shear and higher β, geometry characteristic of the spherical tokamak mitigates the effect of an instability of the shear Alfvén wave, driven by the parallel flow shear.

  8. Performance testing of a Savonius windmill rotor in shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojola, O. O.; Onasanya, O. E.

    The effects of flow shear and/or unsteadiness on the power producing performance of a Savonius windmill rotor are studied. Measurements are made in two laboratory statistically-steady shear flows, and in the natural wind, which is both viscous and unsteady. The measurements were made of the speed, torque, and power of the rotor at a number of streamwise stations for each of four values of the bucket overlap ratio. Flow velocity profiles and graphs of wind shear variation are given. It is concluded that even in the presence of shear, the power coefficient of a Savonius windmill rotor is most strongly dependent on the tip speed ratio. As in inviscid flow, the power coefficient peaked at a tip speed ratio = 0.8. The major effect of shear was to reduce the power coefficient below the inviscid flow level, the magnitude of reduction depending on the magnitude of shear present. In field testing of the Savonius rotor, the unsteadiness of the wind proved to be a greater source of power loss than the wind shear.

  9. Nature of turbulent transport across sheared zonal flows: insights from gyro-kinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Raul; Newman, David E; Leboeuf, Jean-Noel; Decyk, Viktor

    2011-01-01

    The traditional view regarding the reduction of turbulence-induced transport across a stable sheared flow invokes a reduction of the characteristic length scale in the direction perpendicular to the flow as a result of the shearing and stretching of eddies caused by the differential pull exerted in the direction of the flow. A reduced effective transport coefficient then suffices to capture the reduction, that can then be readily incorporated into a transport model. However, recent evidence from gyrokinetic simulations of the toroidal ion-temperature-gradient mode suggests that the dynamics of turbulent transport across sheared flows changes in a more fundamental manner, and that the use of reduced effective transport coefficients fails to capture the full dynamics that may exhibit both subdiffusion and non-Gaussian statistics. In this contribution, after briefly reviewing these results, we propose some candidates for the physical mechanisms responsible for endowing transport with such non-diffusive characteristics, backing these proposals with new numerical gyrokinetic data

  10. Dynamics of edge dislocations in a sheared lamellar mesophase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumaran, V.

    2013-10-01

    The dynamics and interactions of edge dislocations in a nearly aligned sheared lamellar mesophase is analysed to provide insights into the relationship between disorder and rheology. First, the mesoscale permeation and momentum equations for the displacement field in the presence of external forces are derived from the model H equations for the concentration and momentum field. The secondary flow generated due to the mean shear around an isolated defect is calculated, and the excess viscosity due to the presence of the defect is determined from the excess energy dissipation due to the secondary flow. The excess viscosity for an isolated defect is found to increase with system size in the cross-stream direction as L3/2 for an isolated defect, though this divergence is cut-off due to interactions in a defect suspension. As the defects are sheared past each other due to the mean flow, the Peach-Koehler force due to elastic interaction between pairs of defects is found to cause no net displacement relative to each other as they approach from large separation to the distance of closest approach. The equivalent force due to viscous interactions is found to increase the separation for defects of opposite sign, and decrease the separation for defects of same sign. During defect interactions, we find that there is no buckling instability due to dilation of layers for systems of realistic size. However, there is another mechanism, which is the velocity difference generated across a slightly deformed bilayer due to the mean shear, which could result in the creation of new defects.

  11. Characteristics of laminar flow past a sphere in uniform shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongjoo; Choi, Hyungseok; Choi, Haecheon

    2005-10-01

    Numerical simulations are performed to investigate the characteristics of laminar flow past a sphere in uniform shear. The Reynolds numbers considered are Re =300, 425, and 480 based on the inlet center velocity uc and sphere diameter d. The nondimensional shear rate K of inlet uniform shear is varied from 0 to 0.15, where K =∣∇u∣d/uc (∣∇u∣) and ∣∇u∣ is the shear rate at inlet. For all Reynolds numbers investigated, the head of the hairpin vortex loop is always located on the high-velocity side in uniform shear. The flow maintains planar symmetry at Re =300. At Re =425 and 480, the temporal variation in the azimuthal angle of the hairpin vortex formation appearing in the uniform inlet flow is greatly reduced in uniform shear, but the flows still keep asymmetry for most inlet shear rates. However, in the cases of K =0.075 and 0.1, at Re =425, the flows become planar symmetric and their characteristics of formation and evolution of the hairpin vortex loops are different from those of asymmetric flows. In most cases, except the instances showing planar symmetry at Re =425, the Strouhal number and time-averaged drag and lift coefficients increase with increasing inlet shear rate. On the other hand, for K =0.075 and 0.1, showing planar symmetry at Re =425, three different vortices are shed in the wake, resulting in three distinct peak frequencies. Finally, a hysteresis phenomenon switching from planar symmetry to asymmetry (or vice versa) depending on the initial condition is observed at Re =425 and 450, implying that small variations in the flow or initial conditions change the flow field at these Reynolds numbers.

  12. Dynamic pore-pressure fluctuations in rapidly shearing granular materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, R.M.; LaHusen, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    Results from two types of experiments show that intergranular pore pressures fluctuated dynamically during rapid, steady shear deformation of water-saturated granular materials. During some fluctuations, the pore water locally supported all normal and shear stresses, while grain-contact stresses transiently fell to zero. Fluctuations also propagated outward from the shear zone; this process modifies grain-contact stresses in adjacent areas and potentially instigates shear-zone growth.

  13. Motion of a vortex ring in a simple shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, M.; Lou, J.; Lim, T. T.

    2009-08-01

    The motion and deformation of a vortex ring in a linear or simple shear flow have been simulated numerically by using the lattice Boltzmann method with multiple relaxation times. The study is motivated by a recent experiment [T. T. Lim, K. B. Lua, and K. Thet, Phys. Fluids 20, 051701 (2008)], which shows that a vortex ring propagating in a uniform cross flow does not experience Kutta lift and undergo tilting and deformation. The focus of the present study is to examine the effect of a simple shear in a cross flow on the motion of a vortex ring. Numerical approach is adopted here because a truly simple shear flow is difficult to generate experimentally. Our computation shows that a vortex ring tilts and deforms in a simple shear flow, and the tilting can be attributed to the modification of the vorticity distribution of the vortex ring as a result of the entrainment of background vorticity by the vortex core. It is further shown that although the shear in the flow has the tendency to elongate the vortex ring, the tilting angle of the ring increases with the shear ratio.

  14. Performance testing of a Savonius windmill rotor in shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojola, O. O.; Onasanya, O. E.

    The effects of flow shear and/or unsteady behavior on the power generation capability of a Savonius wind turbine rotor are assessed in view of measurements conducted, both in two statistically steady shear flows and in the wind, of rotor tip speed and torque at a number of streamwise stations for each of four values of the rotor bucket overlap ratio. It is found that, even in the absence of shear, the power coefficient of a Savonius wind turbine rotor is most strongly dependent on tip speed ratio.

  15. Scaling properties in the production range of shear dominated flows.

    PubMed

    Casciola, C M; Gualtieri, P; Jacob, B; Piva, R

    2005-07-01

    In large Reynolds number turbulence, isotropy is recovered as the scale is reduced and homogeneous-isotropic scalings are eventually observed. This picture is violated in many cases, e.g., wall bounded flows, where, due to the shear, different scaling laws emerge. This effect has been ascribed to the contamination of the inertial range by the larger anisotropic scales. The issue is addressed here by analyzing both numerical and experimental data for a homogeneous shear flow. In fact, under strong shear, the alteration of the scaling exponents is not induced by the contamination from the anisotropic sectors. Actually, the exponents are universal properties of the isotropic component of the structure functions of shear dominated flows. The implications are discussed in the context of turbulence near solid walls, where improved closure models would be advisable. PMID:16090687

  16. Determining Flow Type and Shear Rate in Magmas From Bubble Shapes and Orientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rust, A. C.; Manga, M.; Cashman, K. V.

    2001-12-01

    To compare bubble geometries in obsidian to bubbles deformed under known conditions, we measure the deformation of air bubbles in corn syrup in simple shear. We use these experimental data and results of theoretical, numerical and experimental studies to interpret the shear environments that formed the textures preserved in obsidian samples. In particular, we use the shapes and orientations of bubbles in obsidian to estimate shear rates and assess flow type (simple vs. pure shear). This technique can be used to determine shear rates in volcanic conduits, the origin of pyroclastic obsidian, and the emplacement history and dynamics of obsidian flows. The deformation of a bubble is governed by the competing stresses from shearing that deforms, and surface tension that rerounds. The ratio of these stresses is the capillary number, Ca. An initially spherical bubble placed in a low Reynolds number, steady flow field deforms with a time-dependent shape and orientation until it reaches a steady geometry or breaks into smaller bubbles. A useful measure of the magnitude of flow-induced bubble deformation is the dimensionless parameter, D=(l-b)/(l+b) where l and b are the semi-major and semi-minor axes of the sheared bubble. For small deformations (Ca<< 1), low Reynolds number flow and bubble viscosity << suspending fluid viscosity, D ~ 2 Ca in pure shear and D ~ Ca in simple shear. In pure shear flow, bubble elongations are parallel to the shear direction regardless of the magnitude of bubble deformation. However, in simple shear flow, the angle between the bubble elongation and the flow varies with Ca, which is proportional to bubble radius and shear rate. Because the relationships between Ca and bubble orientation and shape for pure and simple shear differ, we can distinguish between these flow types using bubble geometries preserved in obsidian. Furthermore, because Ca is a function of shear rate, we can use relationships between Ca and D to calculate shear rates when

  17. An integral turbulent kinetic energy analysis of free shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, C. E.; Phares, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    Mixing of coaxial streams is analyzed by application of integral techniques. An integrated turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) equation is solved simultaneously with the integral equations for the mean flow. Normalized TKE profile shapes are obtained from incompressible jet and shear layer experiments and are assumed to be applicable to all free turbulent flows. The shear stress at the midpoint of the mixing zone is assumed to be directly proportional to the local TKE, and dissipation is treated with a generalization of the model developed for isotropic turbulence. Although the analysis was developed for ducted flows, constant-pressure flows were approximated with the duct much larger than the jet. The axisymmetric flows under consideration were predicted with reasonable accuracy. Fairly good results were also obtained for the fully developed two-dimensional shear layers, which were computed as thin layers at the boundary of a large circular jet.

  18. Segregation dynamics in debris flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, K. M.; Fei, M.

    2014-12-01

    Debris flows are massive flows consisting of mixtures of particles of different sizes and interstitial fluids such as water and mud. In sheared mixtures of different-sized (same density) particles, it is well known that larger particles tend to go up (toward the free surface), and the smaller particles, down, commonly referred to as the "Brazil-nut problem" or "kinetic sieving". When kinetic sieving fluxes are combined with advection in flows, they can give rise to a spectacular range of segregation patterns. These segregation / advection dynamics are recognized as playing a role in the coarsening of a debris flow front (its "snout") and the coarsening of the self-formed channel sides or levees. Since particle size distribution influences the flow dynamics including entrainment of bed materials, modeling segregation dynamics in debris flows is important for modeling the debris flows themselves. In sparser systems, the Brazil-nut segregation is well-modeled using kinetic theory applied to dissipative systems, where an underlying assumption involves random, uncorrelated collisions. In denser systems, where kinetic theory breaks down we have recently developed a new mixture model that demonstrates the segregation fluxes are driven by two effects associated with the kinetic stress or granular temperature (the kinetic energy associated with velocity fluctuations): (1) the difference between the partitioning of kinetic and contact stresses among the species in the mixture and (2) a kinetic stress gradient. Both model frameworks involve the temperature gradient as a driving force for segregation, but kinetic theory sends larger particles toward lower temperatures, and our mixture model sends larger particles away from lower temperatures. Which framework works under what conditions appears to depend on correlations in the flow such as those manifested in clusters and force chains. We discuss the application of each theoretical framework to representing segregation dynamics

  19. Characterizations and Correlations of Wall Shear Stress in Aneurysmal Flow.

    PubMed

    Arzani, Amirhossein; Shadden, Shawn C

    2016-01-01

    Wall shear stress (WSS) is one of the most studied hemodynamic parameters, used in correlating blood flow to various diseases. The pulsatile nature of blood flow, along with the complex geometries of diseased arteries, produces complicated temporal and spatial WSS patterns. Moreover, WSS is a vector, which further complicates its quantification and interpretation. The goal of this study is to investigate WSS magnitude, angle, and vector changes in space and time in complex blood flow. Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) was chosen as a setting to explore WSS quantification. Patient-specific computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were performed in six AAAs. New WSS parameters are introduced, and the pointwise correlation among these, and more traditional WSS parameters, was explored. WSS magnitude had positive correlation with spatial/temporal gradients of WSS magnitude. This motivated the definition of relative WSS gradients. WSS vectorial gradients were highly correlated with magnitude gradients. A mix WSS spatial gradient and a mix WSS temporal gradient are proposed to equally account for variations in the WSS angle and magnitude in single measures. The important role that WSS plays in regulating near wall transport, and the high correlation among some of the WSS parameters motivates further attention in revisiting the traditional approaches used in WSS characterizations. PMID:26592536

  20. Instability of Stratified Shear Flow: Intermittency and Length Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ecke, Robert; Odier, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    The stability of stratified shear flows which occur in oceanic overflows, wind-driven thermoclines, and atmospheric inversion layers is governed by the Richardson Number Ri , a non-dimensional balance between stabilizing stratification and destabilizing shear. For a shear flow with velocity difference U, density difference Δρ and characteristic length H, one has Ri = g (Δρ / ρ) H /U2 . A more precise definition is the gradient Richardson Number Rig =N2 /S2 where the buoyancy frequency N =√{ (g / ρ) ∂ρ / ∂z } , the mean strain S = ∂U / ∂z with z parallel to gravity and with ensemble or time averages defining the gradients. We explore the stability and mixing properties of a wall-bounded shear flow for 0 . 1 < Rig < 1 using simultaneous measurements of density and velocity fields. The flow, confined from the top by a horizontal boundary, is a lighter alcohol-water mixture injected from a nozzle into quiescent heavier salt-water fluid. The injected flow is turbulent with Taylor Reynolds number about 75. We compare a set of length scales that characterize the mixing properties of our turbulent stratified shear flow including Thorpe Length LT, Ozmidov Length LO, and Ellison Length LE.

  1. Transport bifurcation induced by sheared toroidal flow in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Highcock, E. G.; Barnes, M.; Roach, C. M.; Cowley, S. C.

    2011-10-15

    First-principles numerical simulations are used to describe a transport bifurcation in a differentially rotating tokamak plasma. Such a bifurcation is more probable in a region of zero magnetic shear than one of finite magnetic shear, because in the former case the component of the sheared toroidal flow that is perpendicular to the magnetic field has the strongest suppressing effect on the turbulence. In the zero-magnetic-shear regime, there are no growing linear eigenmodes at any finite value of flow shear. However, subcritical turbulence can be sustained, owing to the existence of modes, driven by the ion temperature gradient and the parallel velocity gradient, which grow transiently. Nonetheless, in a parameter space containing a wide range of temperature gradients and velocity shears, there is a sizeable window where all turbulence is suppressed. Combined with the relatively low transport of momentum by collisional (neoclassical) mechanisms, this produces the conditions for a bifurcation from low to high temperature and velocity gradients. A parametric model is constructed which accurately describes the combined effect of the temperature gradient and the flow gradient over a wide range of their values. Using this parametric model, it is shown that in the reduced-transport state, heat is transported almost neoclassically, while momentum transport is dominated by subcritical parallel-velocity-gradient-driven turbulence. It is further shown that for any given input of torque, there is an optimum input of heat which maximises the temperature gradient. The parametric model describes both the behaviour of the subcritical turbulence (which cannot be modelled by the quasi-linear methods used in current transport codes) and the complicated effect of the flow shear on the transport stiffness. It may prove useful for transport modelling of tokamaks with sheared flows.

  2. Two-dimensional nonlinear cylindrical equilibria with reversed magnetic shear and sheared flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuiroukidis, Ap; Throumoulopoulos, G. N.; Throumoulopoulos

    2014-02-01

    Nonlinear translational symmetric equilibria with up to quartic flux terms in free functions, reversed magnetic shear, and sheared flow are constructed in two ways: (i) quasi-analytically by an ansatz, which reduces the pertinent generalized Grad-Shafranov equation to a set of ordinary differential equations and algebraic constraints which is then solved numerically, and (ii) completely numerically by prescribing analytically a boundary having an X-point. This latter case presented in Sec. 4 is relevant to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor project. The equilibrium characteristics are then examined by means of pressure, safety factor, current density, and electric field. For flows parallel to the magnetic field, the stability of the equilibria constructed is also examined by applying a sufficient condition. It turns out that the equilibrium nonlinearity has a stabilizing impact, which is slightly enhanced by the sheared flow. In addition, the results indicate that the stability is affected by the up-down asymmetry.

  3. Ballooning stability of axisymmetric plasmas with sheared equilibrium flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharjee, A.; Iacono, R.; Milovich, J. L.; Paranicas, C.

    1989-01-01

    A WKB theory is formulated for large-n ballooning modes in axisymmetric, toroidal plasmas with sheared equilibrium flows. The validity of the standard ballooning respresentation is severely restricted in the presence of sheared toroidal flow, despite the fact that to leading order in (1/n), where n is the azimuthal number, the eigenmode equation contains only derivatives along a field line. Necessary and sufficient conditions for stability are obtained in a high-beta ordering for rigid toroidal rotation as well as field-aligned flows.

  4. Significance of extensional stresses to red blood cell lysis in a shearing flow.

    PubMed

    Down, Linden A; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios V; O'Rear, Edgar A

    2011-06-01

    Traditionally, an empirical power-law model relating hemolysis to shear stress and exposure time has been used to estimate hemolysis related to flow--however, this basis alone has been insufficient in attempts to predict hemolysis through computational fluid dynamics. Because of this deficiency, we sought to re-examine flow features related to hemolysis in a shearing flow by computationally modeling a set of classic experiments performed in a capillary tube. Simulating 21 different flows of varying entrance contraction ratio, flowrate and viscosity, we identified hemolysis threshold streamlines and analyzed the stresses present. Constant damage thresholds for radial and axial extensional stresses of approximately 3000 Pa for exposure times on the order of microseconds were observed, while no such threshold was found for the maximum shear stress or gradient of the shear stress. The extensional flow seen at the entrance of the capillary appears to be most consistently related to hemolysis. An account of how extensional stresses can lead to lysis of a red cell undergoing tank-tread motion in a shearing flow is provided. This work shows that extensional components of the stress tensor are integral in causing hemolysis for some flows, and should be considered when attempting to predict hemolysis computationally. PMID:21298343

  5. Multi-Scale Investigation of Sheared Flows In Magnetized Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Edward, Jr., Thomas

    2014-09-19

    Flows parallel and perpendicular to magnetic fields in a plasma are important phenomena in many areas of plasma science research. The presence of these spatially inhomogeneous flows is often associated with the stability of the plasma. In fusion plasmas, these sheared flows can be stabilizing while in space plasmas, these sheared flows can be destabilizing. Because of this, there is broad interest in understanding the coupling between plasma stability and plasma flows. This research project has engaged in a study of the plasma response to spatially inhomogeneous plasma flows using three different experimental devices: the Auburn Linear Experiment for Instability Studies (ALEXIS) and the Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH) stellarator devices at Auburn University, and the Space Plasma Simulation Chamber (SPSC) at the Naval Research Laboratory. This work has shown that there is a commonality of the plasma response to sheared flows across a wide range of plasma parameters and magnetic field geometries. The goal of this multi-device, multi-scale project is to understand how sheared flows established by the same underlying physical mechanisms lead to different plasma responses in fusion, laboratory, and space plasmas.

  6. Tests Of Shear-Flow Model For Acoustic Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrot, Tony L.; Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.

    1992-01-01

    Tests described in report conducted to validate two-dimensional shear-flow analytical model for determination of acoustic impedance of acoustic liner in grazing-incidence, grazing-flow environment by use of infinite-waveguide method. Tests successful for both upstream and downstream propagations. Work has potential for utility in testing of engine ducts in commercial aircraft.

  7. Solution of the complete Curtiss-Bird model for polymeric liquids subjected to simple shear flow.

    PubMed

    Stephanou, Pavlos S; Kröger, Martin

    2016-03-28

    The complete kinetic theory model for concentrated polymer solutions and melts proposed by Curtiss and Bird is solved for shear flow: (a) analytically by providing a solution for the single-link (or configurational) distribution function as a real basis spherical harmonics expansion and then calculating the materials functions in shear flow up to second order in the dimensionless shear rate and, (b) numerically via the execution of Brownian dynamics simulations. These two methods are actually complementary to each other as the former is accurate only for small dimensionless shear rates where the latter produces results with increasingly large uncertainties. The analytical expansions of the material functions with respect to the dimensionless shear rate reduce to those of the extensively studied, simplified Curtiss-Bird model when ε' = 0, and to the rigid rod when ε' = 1. It is known that the power-law behavior at high shear rates is very different for these two extremal cases. We employ Brownian dynamics simulation to not only recover the limiting cases but to find a gradual variation of the power-law behaviors at large dimensionless shear rates upon varying ε'. The fact that experimental data are usually located between these two extremes strongly advocates the significance of studying the solution of the Curtiss-Bird model. This is exemplified in this work by comparing the solution of this model with available rheological data for semiflexible biological systems that are clearly not captured by the original Doi-Edwards or simplified Curtiss-Bird models. PMID:27036477

  8. Solution of the complete Curtiss-Bird model for polymeric liquids subjected to simple shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephanou, Pavlos S.; Kröger, Martin

    2016-03-01

    The complete kinetic theory model for concentrated polymer solutions and melts proposed by Curtiss and Bird is solved for shear flow: (a) analytically by providing a solution for the single-link (or configurational) distribution function as a real basis spherical harmonics expansion and then calculating the materials functions in shear flow up to second order in the dimensionless shear rate and, (b) numerically via the execution of Brownian dynamics simulations. These two methods are actually complementary to each other as the former is accurate only for small dimensionless shear rates where the latter produces results with increasingly large uncertainties. The analytical expansions of the material functions with respect to the dimensionless shear rate reduce to those of the extensively studied, simplified Curtiss-Bird model when ɛ' = 0, and to the rigid rod when ɛ' = 1. It is known that the power-law behavior at high shear rates is very different for these two extremal cases. We employ Brownian dynamics simulation to not only recover the limiting cases but to find a gradual variation of the power-law behaviors at large dimensionless shear rates upon varying ɛ'. The fact that experimental data are usually located between these two extremes strongly advocates the significance of studying the solution of the Curtiss-Bird model. This is exemplified in this work by comparing the solution of this model with available rheological data for semiflexible biological systems that are clearly not captured by the original Doi-Edwards or simplified Curtiss-Bird models.

  9. Evolution of forced shear flows in polytropic atmospheres: A comparison of forcing methods and energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witzke, V.; Silvers, L. J.; Favier, B.

    2016-08-01

    Shear flows are ubiquitous in astrophysical objects including planetary and stellar interiors, where their dynamics can have significant impact on thermo-chemical processes. Investigating the complex dynamics of shear flows requires numerical calculations that provide a long time evolution of the system. To achieve a sufficiently long lifetime in a local numerical model the system has to be forced externally. However, at present, there exist several different forcing methods to sustain large-scale shear flows in local models. In this paper we examine and compare various methods used in the literature in order to resolve their respective applicability and limitations. These techniques are compared during the exponential growth phase of a shear flow instability, such as the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability, and some are examined during the subsequent non-linear evolution. A linear stability analysis provides reference for the growth rate of the most unstable modes in the system and a detailed analysis of the energetics provides a comprehensive understanding of the energy exchange during the system's evolution. Finally, we discuss the pros and cons of each forcing method and their relation with natural mechanisms generating shear flows.

  10. Understanding the structural properties of clusters in sheared aggregating systems using Brownian dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markutsya, Sergiy; Fox, Rodney; Vigil, Dennis; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2009-11-01

    Nanoparticle synthesis in turbulent reactors subjects anoparticle aggregates to a homogeneous, time-varying shear flow. The shear flow results in anisotropic clusters and it is of interest to characterize the structural properties of these clusters and their effects on initiation and acceleration of aggregation, the restructuring of clusters, and their breakage. The anisotropic structure of a sheared cluster is characterized by the ratio of the major to minor axis length of the approximating ellipsoid oriented along the cluster moment of inertia tensor's principal axes. Brownian dynamics simulations show that shear flow dramatically changes the structure of aggregates by initiating the formation of more compact structures at smaller length scales perpendicular to the shear direction, and anisotropic, cigar--like structures along the shear direction. More compact clusters correspond to higher local volumetric potential energy density. Therefore, we classify the compactness and anisotropy of sheared clusters on a map of local volumetric potential energy density versus ratio of the principal values of the cluster's moment of inertia tensor. The effect of shear on breakage of clusters is characterized by the radius of gyration Rg^cr of the largest stable aggregate for a given value of the imposed steady shear rate (P'eclet number).

  11. Identification and Control of Separated Shear Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shao-Ching; Kim, John

    2002-11-01

    There has been increased interest in applying modern control theory to flow-control problems. For simple flows, such as turbulent channel and boundary layers, several investigators have constructed controllers based on linear optimal control theory, which requires certain information of the system to be controlled. However, for complex flows, such as separated flow past an airfoil, the required system information is not readily available, thus hindering the construction of controllers following the same procedure used for the simple flows. In this study, we use the system identification theory to construct a model of flow system for controller design. The model, as an approximation to the actual system, is based on the input-output relationship of the actual system. The locations of sensors and actuators are determined based on the spatial and temporal correlations of the flow field and practical measurement considerations. The system identification approach has been applied to both simple and complex flows. Linear and nonlinear disturbances to selected flow systems are considered to evaluate the performance of the constructed model. A series of numerical experiments have been performed to assess the validity of using linear approximations for nonlinear complex flows.

  12. Swinging of two-domains vesicles in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viallat, Annie; Tusch, Simon; Khelloufi, Kamel; Leonetti, Marc

    2014-11-01

    Giant lipid vesicles and red blood cells in shear flow at low shear rates tank tread (TT) at small viscosity ratio between the inner particle volume and the external fluid, and flip or tumble (T) at large viscosity ratio. The phase diagram of motion of red blood cells is however much more complex. Swinging superimposes to TT, cells wobble and roll rather than tumble with increasing shear rate and present a shear-rate driven transition between TT to T. These features are attributed to the shear elasticity and the non spherical stress-free shape of the cell membrane, which stores shear elastic energy as a function of the relative position of its elements. We have created vesicles with a phase diagram of motion comparable to that of red blood cells by preparing membranes with two lipids and cholesterol. These membranes present two domains separated by a contact line. The line has a tension energy that depends on its relative position on the vesicle. Similarly to red blood cells, two-domains vesicles swing and wobble. An analytical model where line tension energy is added to the Keller and Skalak's model fits our experimental data without any adjustable parameter. Our experiments and model shed light on the motion of deformable particles in shear flow.

  13. Coherent structures in compressible free-shear-layer flows

    SciTech Connect

    Aeschliman, D.P.; Baty, R.S.; Kennedy, C.A.; Chen, J.H.

    1997-08-01

    Large scale coherent structures are intrinsic fluid mechanical characteristics of all free-shear flows, from incompressible to compressible, and laminar to fully turbulent. These quasi-periodic fluid structures, eddies of size comparable to the thickness of the shear layer, dominate the mixing process at the free-shear interface. As a result, large scale coherent structures greatly influence the operation and efficiency of many important commercial and defense technologies. Large scale coherent structures have been studied here in a research program that combines a synergistic blend of experiment, direct numerical simulation, and analysis. This report summarizes the work completed for this Sandia Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project.

  14. A Rotary Flow Channel for Shear Stress Sensor Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Scott, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    A proposed shear sensor calibrator consists of a rotating wheel with the sensor mounted tangential to the rim and positioned in close proximity to the rim. The shear stress generated by the flow at the sensor position is simply tau(sub omega) = (mu)r(omega)/h, where mu is the viscosity of the ambient gas, r the wheel radius, omega the angular velocity of the wheel, and h the width of the gap between the wheel rim and the sensor. With numerical values of mu = 31 (mu)Pa s (neon at room temperature), r = 0.5 m, omega = 754 /s (7200 rpm), and h = 50.8 m, a shear stress of tau(sub omega) = 231 Pa can be generated. An analysis based on one-dimensional flow, with the flow velocity having only an angular component as a function of the axial and radial coordinates, yields corrections to the above simple formula for the curvature of the wheel, flatness of the sensor, and finite width of the wheel. It is assumed that the sensor mount contains a trough (sidewalls) to render a velocity release boundary condition at the edges of the rim. The Taylor number under maximum flow conditions is found to be 62.3, sufficiently low to obviate flow instability. The fact that the parameters entering into the evaluation of the shear stress can be measured to high accuracy with well-defined uncertainties makes the proposed calibrator suitable for a physical standard for shear stress calibration.

  15. Dynamic Shear Modulus of Polymers from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byutner, Oleksiy; Smith, Grant

    2001-03-01

    In this work we describe the methodology for using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations (MD) simulations to obtain the viscoelastic properties of polymers in the glassy regime. Specifically we show how the time dependent shear stress modulus and frequency dependent complex shear modulus in the high-frequency regime can be determined from the off-diagonal terms of the stress-tensor autocorrelation function obtained from MD trajectories using the Green-Kubo method and appropriate Fourier transforms. In order to test the methodology we have performed MD simulations of a low-molecular-weight polybutadiene system using quantum chemistry based potential functions. Values of the glassy modulus and the maximum loss frequency were found to be in good agreement with experimental data for polybutadiene at 298 K.

  16. Undulating membrane structure under mixed extensional-shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idziak, S. H. J.; Welch, S. E.; Kisilak, M.; Mugford, C.; Potvin, G.; Veldhuis, L.; Sirota, E. B.

    2001-10-01

    We report on studies using a new X-ray extensional flow cell to examine, for the first time, the structure of undulating lamellar lyotropic liquid crystal systems under extensional flow. The extensional component of the flow profile produced within this cell causes the lamellae to orient. We find that, although the intermembrane spacing does not change at low flow rates, it suddenly decreases after a critical flow rate has been attained due to the stretching and straightening of the lamellae. The effects of the shear component of flow on this oriented system have been examined in the context of a theoretical model developed by Ramaswamy.

  17. Modeling flow and shear stress fields over unsteady three dimensional dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Richard; Parsons, Dan; Ashworth, Phil; Reesink, Arjan; Best, Jim

    2014-05-01

    The flow field over dunes has been extensively measured in laboratory conditions and there is general understanding on the nature of the flow over dunes formed under equilibrium flow conditions. This has allowed an understanding of bed shear stress to be derived and the development of morpho-dynamic models. However, fluvial systems typically experience unsteady flow and therefore the sediment-water interface is constantly responding and reorganizing to these unsteady flows and stresses, over a range of both spatial and temporal scales. This is primarily through the adjustment of bed forms (including ripples, dunes and bar forms) which then subsequently alter the flow field. This paper investigates, through the application of a numerical model, the influence of these roughness elements on the overall flow and bed shear stress. A series of physical experiments were undertaken in a flume, 16m long and 2m wide, where a fine sand (D50 of 239µm) was water worked under a range of unsteady hydraulic conditions to generate a series of quasi-equilibrium three dimensional bed forms. During the experiments flow was measured with acoustic Doppler velocimeters, (aDv's). On four occasions the flume was drained and the bed topography measured with terrestrial LiDAR to create digital elevation models. This data provide the necessary boundary conditions and validation data for a numerical three dimensional flow model. The prediction of flow over the four static beds demonstrates the spatial distribution of shear stress and the potential sediment transport paths between the dune crests. These appear to be associated with coherent flow structures formed by localized shear flow. These flow predictions are currently being used to develop a fully three dimensional morphodynamic model to further understand dune dynamics under unsteady flow conditions.

  18. Modified ion-acoustic solitary waves in plasmas with field-aligned shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Saleem, H.; Haque, Q.

    2015-08-15

    The nonlinear dynamics of ion-acoustic waves is investigated in a plasma having field-aligned shear flow. A Korteweg-deVries-type nonlinear equation for a modified ion-acoustic wave is obtained which admits a single pulse soliton solution. The theoretical result has been applied to solar wind plasma at 1 AU for illustration.

  19. Tumbling of a rigid rod in a shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, J. M. J.; Blöte, H. W. J.

    2014-09-01

    The tumbling of a rigid rod in a shear flow is analyzed in the high viscosity limit. Following Burgers, the Master Equation is derived for the probability distribution of the orientation of the rod. The equation contains one dimensionless number, the Weissenberg number, which is the ratio of the shear rate and the orientational diffusion constant. The equation is solved for the stationary state distribution for arbitrary Weissenberg numbers, in particular for the limit of high Weissenberg numbers. The stationary state gives an interesting flow pattern for the orientation of the rod, showing the interplay between flow due to the driving shear force and diffusion due to the random thermal forces of the fluid. The average tumbling time and tumbling frequency is calculated as a function of the Weissenberg number. A simple crossover function is proposed which covers the whole regime from small to large Weissenberg numbers.

  20. Upward swimming of a sperm cell in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Omori, Toshihiro; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2016-03-01

    Mammalian sperm cells are required to swim over long distances, typically around 1000-fold their own length. They must orient themselves and maintain a swimming motion to reach the ovum, or egg cell. Although the mechanism of long-distance navigation is still unclear, one possible mechanism, rheotaxis, was reported recently. This work investigates the mechanism of the rheotaxis in detail by simulating the motions of a sperm cell in shear flow adjacent to a flat surface. A phase diagram was developed to show the sperm's swimming motion under different shear rates, and for varying flagellum waveform conditions. The results showed that, under shear flow, the sperm is able to hydrodynamically change its swimming direction, allowing it to swim upwards against the flow, which suggests that the upward swimming of sperm cells can be explained using fluid mechanics, and this can then be used to further understand physiology of sperm cell navigation. PMID:27078385

  1. Upward swimming of a sperm cell in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omori, Toshihiro; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2016-03-01

    Mammalian sperm cells are required to swim over long distances, typically around 1000-fold their own length. They must orient themselves and maintain a swimming motion to reach the ovum, or egg cell. Although the mechanism of long-distance navigation is still unclear, one possible mechanism, rheotaxis, was reported recently. This work investigates the mechanism of the rheotaxis in detail by simulating the motions of a sperm cell in shear flow adjacent to a flat surface. A phase diagram was developed to show the sperm's swimming motion under different shear rates, and for varying flagellum waveform conditions. The results showed that, under shear flow, the sperm is able to hydrodynamically change its swimming direction, allowing it to swim upwards against the flow, which suggests that the upward swimming of sperm cells can be explained using fluid mechanics, and this can then be used to further understand physiology of sperm cell navigation.

  2. Generalized transport coefficients for inelastic Maxwell mixtures under shear flow.

    PubMed

    Garzó, Vicente; Trizac, Emmanuel

    2015-11-01

    The Boltzmann equation framework for inelastic Maxwell models is considered to determine the transport coefficients associated with the mass, momentum, and heat fluxes of a granular binary mixture in spatially inhomogeneous states close to the simple shear flow. The Boltzmann equation is solved by means of a Chapman-Enskog-type expansion around the (local) shear flow distributions f(r)(0) for each species that retain all the hydrodynamic orders in the shear rate. Due to the anisotropy induced by the shear flow, tensorial quantities are required to describe the transport processes instead of the conventional scalar coefficients. These tensors are given in terms of the solutions of a set of coupled equations, which can be analytically solved as functions of the shear rate a, the coefficients of restitution α(rs), and the parameters of the mixture (masses, diameters, and composition). Since the reference distribution functions f(r)(0) apply for arbitrary values of the shear rate and are not restricted to weak dissipation, the corresponding generalized coefficients turn out to be nonlinear functions of both a and α(rs). The dependence of the relevant elements of the three diffusion tensors on both the shear rate and dissipation is illustrated in the tracer limit case, the results showing that the deviation of the generalized transport coefficients from their forms for vanishing shear rates is in general significant. A comparison with the previous results obtained analytically for inelastic hard spheres by using Grad's moment method is carried out, showing a good agreement over a wide range of values for the coefficients of restitution. Finally, as an application of the theoretical expressions derived here for the transport coefficients, thermal diffusion segregation of an intruder immersed in a granular gas is also studied. PMID:26651684

  3. Generalized transport coefficients for inelastic Maxwell mixtures under shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzó, Vicente; Trizac, Emmanuel

    2015-11-01

    The Boltzmann equation framework for inelastic Maxwell models is considered to determine the transport coefficients associated with the mass, momentum, and heat fluxes of a granular binary mixture in spatially inhomogeneous states close to the simple shear flow. The Boltzmann equation is solved by means of a Chapman-Enskog-type expansion around the (local) shear flow distributions fr(0 ) for each species that retain all the hydrodynamic orders in the shear rate. Due to the anisotropy induced by the shear flow, tensorial quantities are required to describe the transport processes instead of the conventional scalar coefficients. These tensors are given in terms of the solutions of a set of coupled equations, which can be analytically solved as functions of the shear rate a , the coefficients of restitution αr s, and the parameters of the mixture (masses, diameters, and composition). Since the reference distribution functions fr(0 ) apply for arbitrary values of the shear rate and are not restricted to weak dissipation, the corresponding generalized coefficients turn out to be nonlinear functions of both a and αr s. The dependence of the relevant elements of the three diffusion tensors on both the shear rate and dissipation is illustrated in the tracer limit case, the results showing that the deviation of the generalized transport coefficients from their forms for vanishing shear rates is in general significant. A comparison with the previous results obtained analytically for inelastic hard spheres by using Grad's moment method is carried out, showing a good agreement over a wide range of values for the coefficients of restitution. Finally, as an application of the theoretical expressions derived here for the transport coefficients, thermal diffusion segregation of an intruder immersed in a granular gas is also studied.

  4. Resolving electron scale turbulence in spherical tokamaks with flow shear

    SciTech Connect

    Guttenfelder, W.; Candy, J.

    2011-02-15

    This paper presents nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence based on spherical tokamak (ST) parameters. Most significantly the simulations include the strong toroidal flow and flow shear present in STs that suppress ion-scale turbulence while using kinetic ions at full mass ratio (m{sub i}/m{sub e}=3600). The flow shear provides a physical long-wavelength cutoff mechanism that aids saturation of the simulations, which has previously been demonstrated to be problematic depending on magnetic shear. As magnetic shear varies widely in STs we systematically demonstrate saturation and convergence of the ETG simulations with respect to grid resolution, physical domain size, and boundary conditions. While using reduced ion mass or adiabatic ions can lessen computational expense they do not always provide reliable results. The resulting spectra from converged simulations are anisotropic everywhere in contrast to previous ETG simulations without flow shear. These results have implications for interpreting turbulence measurements, and represent an important step in determining when and where ETG turbulence is expected to be relevant in ST plasmas. They are also important in the context of validating simulations with both experimental transport analysis and turbulence measurements.

  5. Chain extension of a confined polymer in steady shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Pinaki; Cherayil, Binny J.

    2012-11-01

    The growing importance of microfluidic and nanofluidic devices to the study of biological processes has highlighted the need to better understand how confinement affects the behavior of polymers in flow. In this paper we explore one aspect of this question by calculating the steady-state extension of a long polymer chain in a narrow capillary tube in the presence of simple shear. The calculation is carried out within the framework of the Rouse-Zimm approach to chain dynamics, using a variant of a nonlinear elastic model to enforce finite extensibility of the chain, and assuming that the only effect of the confining surface is to modify the pre-averaged hydrodynamic interaction. The results, along with results from the corresponding calculations of finitely extensible versions of both the Rouse and Rouse-Zimm models, are compared with data from experiments on the flow-induced stretching of λ-phage DNA near a non-adsorbing glass surface [L. Fang, H. Hu, and R. G. Larson, J. Rheol. 49, 127 (2005), 10.1122/1.1822930]. The comparison suggests that close to a surface hydrodynamic screening is significant, and causes the chains to become effectively free-draining.

  6. Discontinuous shear thickening in Brownian suspensions by dynamic simulation

    PubMed Central

    Mari, Romain; Seto, Ryohei; Morris, Jeffrey F.; Denn, Morton M.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic particle-scale numerical simulations are used to show that the shear thickening observed in dense colloidal, or Brownian, suspensions is of a similar nature to that observed in noncolloidal suspensions, i.e., a stress-induced transition from a flow of lubricated near-contacting particles to a flow of a frictionally contacting network of particles. Abrupt (or discontinuous) shear thickening is found to be a geometric rather than hydrodynamic phenomenon; it stems from the strong sensitivity of the jamming volume fraction to the nature of contact forces between suspended particles. The thickening obtained in a colloidal suspension of purely hard frictional spheres is qualitatively similar to experimental observations. However, the agreement cannot be made quantitative with only hydrodynamics, frictional contacts, and Brownian forces. Therefore, the role of a short-range repulsive potential mimicking the stabilization of actual suspensions on the thickening is studied. The effects of Brownian and repulsive forces on the onset stress can be combined in an additive manner. The simulations including Brownian and stabilizing forces show excellent agreement with experimental data for the viscosity η and the second normal stress difference N2. PMID:26621744

  7. Comminution of Ceramic Materials Under High-Shear Dynamic Compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homel, Michael; Loiseau, Jason; Higgins, Andrew; Herbold, Eric; Hogan, Jamie

    The post-failure ``granular flow'' response of high-strength lightweight ceramics has important implications on the materials' effectiveness for ballistic protection. We study the dynamic compaction and shear flow of ceramic fragments and powders using computational and experimental analysis of a collapsing thick-walled cylinder geometry. Using newly developed tools for mesoscale simulation of brittle materials, we study the effect of fracture, comminution, shear-enhanced dilatation, and frictional contact on the continuum compaction response. Simulations are directly validated through particle Doppler velocimetry measurements at the inner surface of the cylindrical powder bed. We characterize the size distribution and morphologies of the initial and compacted material fragments to both validate the computational model and to elucidate the dominant failure processes. A portion of this work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC. LLNL-ABS-678862.

  8. Effects of shear flow on phase nucleation and crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mura, Federica; Zaccone, Alessio

    2016-04-01

    Classical nucleation theory offers a good framework for understanding the common features of new phase formation processes in metastable homogeneous media at rest. However, nucleation processes in liquids are ubiquitously affected by hydrodynamic flow, and there is no satisfactory understanding of whether shear promotes or slows down the nucleation process. We developed a classical nucleation theory for sheared systems starting from the molecular level of the Becker-Doering master kinetic equation and we analytically derived a closed-form expression for the nucleation rate. The theory accounts for the effect of flow-mediated transport of molecules to the nucleus of the new phase, as well as for the mechanical deformation imparted to the nucleus by the flow field. The competition between flow-induced molecular transport, which accelerates nucleation, and flow-induced nucleus straining, which lowers the nucleation rate by increasing the nucleation energy barrier, gives rise to a marked nonmonotonic dependence of the nucleation rate on the shear rate. The theory predicts an optimal shear rate at which the nucleation rate is one order of magnitude larger than in the absence of flow.

  9. Energy dissipation in sheared granular flows

    SciTech Connect

    Karion, A.; Hunt, M.L.

    1999-11-01

    Granular material flows describe flows of solid particles in which the interstitial fluid plays a negligible role in the flow mechanics. Examples include the transport of coal, food products, detergents, pharmaceutical tablets, and toner particles in high-speed printers. Using a two-dimensional discrete element computer simulation of a bounded, gravity-free Couette flow of particles, the heat dissipation rate per unit area is calculated as a function of position in the flow as well as overall solid fraction. The computation results compare favorably with the kinetic theory analysis for rough disks. The heat dissipation rate is also measured for binary mixtures of particles for different small to large solid fraction ratios, and for diameter ratios of ten, five, and two. The dissipation rates increase significantly with overall solid fraction as well as local strain rates and granular temperatures. The thermal energy equation is solved for a Couette flow with one adiabatic wall and one at constant temperature. Solutions use the simulation measurements of the heat dissipation rate, solid fraction, and granular temperature to show that the thermodynamic temperature increases with solid fraction and decreases with particle conductivity. In mixtures, both the dissipation rate and the thermodynamic temperature increase with size ratio and with decreasing ratio of small to large particles.

  10. 'PK-4' - Laser-driven shear flow in a DC discharge complex plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kretschmer, M.; Hoefner, H.; Thoma, M.; Fink, M.; Ratynskaia, S.; Morfill, G.; Tarantik, K.; Fortov, V.; Petrov, O.; Usachev, A.; Zobnin, A.; Gerasimov, Yu.

    2005-10-31

    Flows, shear flows, laminar and turbulent flows on the microscopic scales are one of the fundamental issues in fluid dynamics. Due to their special properties, complex plasmas provide an excellent opportunity to study these flows, even on the scale of individual particles. To this end, experiments were conducted in the 'Plasmakristall 4' (PK-4) experimental device that uses the positive column of a high voltage DC discharge to produce complex (dusty) plasmas. The linear geometry of PK-4 provides the opportunity to study all these kinds of flow phenomena as well as waves and collisions. Since gravity distorts most of the effects to be studied with PK-4, the facility is planned to be operated onboard the International Space Station ISS from 2008. In order to generate a high-velocity shear flow PK-4 is now upgraded with a 20W manipulation laser system.

  11. Asymptotic persistence of collective modes in shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, S.M. |; Rogava, A.D. |

    1998-03-31

    A new nonasymptotic method is presented that reveals an unexpected richness in the spectrum of fluctuations sustained by a shear flow with nontrivial arbitrary mean kinematics. The vigor of the method is illustrated by analyzing a two-dimensional, compressible hydrodynamic shear flow. The temporal evolution of perturbations spans a wide range of nonexponential behavior from growth-cum oscillations to monotonic growth. The principal characteristic of the revealed exotic collective modes in their asymptotic persistence. {open_quotes}Echoing{close_quotes} as well as unstable (including parametrically-driven) solutions are displayed. Further areas of application, for both the method and the new physics, are outlined.

  12. Inference of dynamic shear modulus from Lotung downhole data

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.Y.; Mok, C.M.; Tang, H.T.

    1996-08-01

    Downhole ground motions recorded at the Lotung Large-Scale Seismic Test (LSST) site were used in this paper to infer in-situ dynamic soil properties. The purposes were (1) to provide field evidence of nonlinear soil behavior during earthquake excitation; and (2) to evaluate the accuracy of dynamic properties obtained from geophysical measurements and laboratory tests. For each horizontal component and event analyzed, representative shear-wave velocity and effective shear strain (defined as 65% of peak strain) between consecutive recording stations were estimated. The representative shear-wave velocities were estimated from fundamental resonant frequencies identifiable from the Fourier spectral ratios. The effective shear strains were estimated by linear ground response deconvolution analyses based on the inferred shear-wave velocity profiles. The inferred reduction in shear modulus with increasing effective shear strain was compared with laboratory test data. The degree of agreement between the inferred shear modulus reduction curves and the laboratory test data varied with different testing programs. The inferred low-strain shear-wave velocity profile agreed with geophysical measurements. These observations not only provide field evidence of nonlinear dynamic soil behavior during earthquakes, but also confirm the reasonableness of data provided by geophysical measurements and laboratory tests.

  13. Nonlinear Reynolds stress model for turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, J. Michael; Rubinstein, R.; Kirtley, K. R.

    1991-01-01

    A nonlinear algebraic Reynolds stress model, derived using the renormalization group, is applied to equilibrium homogeneous shear flow and fully developed flow in a square duct. The model, which is quadratically nonlinear in the velocity gradients, successfully captures the large-scale inhomogeneity and anisotropy of the flows studied. The ratios of normal stresses, as well as the actual magnitudes of the stresses are correctly predicted for equilibrium homogeneous shear flow. Reynolds normal stress anisotropy and attendant turbulence driven secondary flow are predicted for a square duct. Profiles of mean velocity and normal stresses are in good agreement with measurements. Very close to walls, agreement with measurements diminishes. The model has the benefit of containing no arbitrary constants; all values are determined directly from the theory. It seems that near wall behavior is influenced by more than the large scale anisotropy accommodated in the current model. More accurate near wall calculations may well require a model for anisotropic dissipation.

  14. Experimental assessment of wall shear flow in models.

    PubMed

    Affeld, K; Kertzscher, U; Goubergrits, L

    2002-01-01

    The blood flow immediately adjacent to the wall of a blood vessel or an artificial surface is of great interest. This flow defines the shear stress at the wall and is known to have a great physiological importance. The use of models is a viable method to investigate this flow. However, even in models the shear stress at the wall is difficult to assess. A new optical method is based on transparent models and uses particles in the model fluid, which are only visible near the wall. This is achieved with a model fluid having a defined opacity. This fluid obscures particles in the center of the models, but permits the observation and recording of particles close to the wall. The method has been applied for Hagen-Poiseuille flow and for the likewise well researched flow in a tube with a sudden expansion. PMID:12122270

  15. Direct Numerical Simulation of Surfactant-Stabilized Emulsions Morphology and Shear Viscosity in Starting Shear Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Roar Skartlien; Espen Sollum; Andreas Akselsen; Paul Meakin

    2012-07-01

    A 3D lattice Boltzmann model for two-phase flow with amphiphilic surfactant was used to investigate the evolution of emulsion morphology and shear stress in starting shear flow. The interfacial contributions were analyzed for low and high volume fractions and varying surfactant activity. A transient viscoelastic contribution to the emulsion rheology under constant strain rate conditions was attributed to the interfacial stress. For droplet volume fractions below 0.3 and an average capillary number of about 0.25, highly elliptical droplets formed. Consistent with affine deformation models, gradual elongation of the droplets increased the shear stress at early times and reduced it at later times. Lower interfacial tension with increased surfactant activity counterbalanced the effect of increased interfacial area, and the net shear stress did not change significantly. For higher volume fractions, co-continuous phases with a complex topology were formed. The surfactant decreased the interfacial shear stress due mainly to advection of surfactant to higher curvature areas. Our results are in qualitative agreement with experimental data for polymer blends in terms of transient interfacial stresses and limited enhancement of the emulsion viscosity at larger volume fractions where the phases are co-continuous.

  16. Modelling of peak-flow wall shear stress in major airways of the lung.

    PubMed

    Green, A S

    2004-05-01

    Some respiratory diseases result in the inflammation of the lung airway epithelium. An associated chronic cough, as found in many cases of asthma and in long-term smokers, can exacerbate damage to the epithelial layer. It has been proposed that wall shear stresses, created by peak expiratory flow-rates during a coughing episode, are responsible. The work here uses a computational fluid dynamics technique to model peak expiratory flow in the trachea and major lung bronchi. Calculated wall shear stress values are compared to a limited set of published measurements taken from a physical model. The measurements are discussed in the context of a flow study of a complex bronchial network. A more complete picture is achieved by the calculation method, indicating, in some cases, higher maximum wall shear stresses than measured, confirming the original findings of the experimental work. Recommendations are made as to where further work would be beneficial to medical applications. PMID:15046995

  17. Numerical simulation of a compressible homogeneous, turbulent shear flow. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiereisen, W. J.; Reynolds, W. C.; Ferziger, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    A direct, low Reynolds number, numerical simulation was performed on a homogeneous turbulent shear flow. The full compressible Navier-Stokes equations were used in a simulation on the ILLIAC IV computer with a 64,000 mesh. The flow fields generated by the code are used as an experimental data base, to examine the behavior of the Reynols stresses in this simple, compressible flow. The variation of the structure of the stresses and their dynamic equations as the character of the flow changed is emphasized. The structure of the tress tensor is more heavily dependent on the shear number and less on the fluctuating Mach number. The pressure-strain correlation tensor in the dynamic uations is directly calculated in this simulation. These correlations are decomposed into several parts, as contrasted with the traditional incompressible decomposition into two parts. The performance of existing models for the conventional terms is examined, and a model is proposed for the 'mean fluctuating' part.

  18. Shear stress related blood damage in laminar couette flow.

    PubMed

    Paul, Reinhard; Apel, Jörn; Klaus, Sebastian; Schügner, Frank; Schwindke, Peter; Reul, Helmut

    2003-06-01

    Artificial organs within the blood stream are generally associated with flow-induced blood damage, particularly hemolysis of red blood cells. These damaging effects are known to be dependent on shear forces and exposure times. The determination of a correlation between these flow-dependent properties and actual hemolysis is the subject of this study. For this purpose, a Couette device has been developed. A fluid seal based on fluorocarbon is used to separate blood from secondary external damage effects. The shear rate within the gap is controlled by the rotational speed of the inner cylinder, and the exposure time by the amount of blood that is axially pumped through the device per given time. Blood damage is quantified by the index of hemolysis (IH), which is calculated from photometric plasma hemoglobin measurements. Experiments are conducted at exposure times from texp=25 - 1250 ms and shear rates ranging from tau=30 up to 450 Pa ensuring Taylor-vortex free flow characteristics. Blood damage is remarkably low over a broad range of shear rates and exposure times. However, a significant increase in blood damage can be observed for shear stresses of tau>or= 425 Pa and exposure times of texp>or= 620 ms. Maximum hemolysis within the investigated range is IH=3.5%. The results indicate generally lower blood damage than reported in earlier studies with comparable devices, and the measurements clearly indicate a rather abrupt (i.e., critical levels of shear stresses and exposure times) than gradual increase in hemolysis, at least for the investigated range of shear rates and exposure times. PMID:12780506

  19. Precessing rotating flows with additional shear: Stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salhi, A.; Cambon, C.

    2009-03-01

    We consider unbounded precessing rotating flows in which vertical or horizontal shear is induced by the interaction between the solid-body rotation (with angular velocity Ω0 ) and the additional “precessing” Coriolis force (with angular velocity -ɛΩ0 ), normal to it. A “weak” shear flow, with rate 2ɛ of the same order of the Poincaré “small” ratio ɛ , is needed for balancing the gyroscopic torque, so that the whole flow satisfies Euler’s equations in the precessing frame (the so-called admissibility conditions). The base flow case with vertical shear (its cross-gradient direction is aligned with the main angular velocity) corresponds to Mahalov’s [Phys. Fluids A 5, 891 (1993)] precessing infinite cylinder base flow (ignoring boundary conditions), while the base flow case with horizontal shear (its cross-gradient direction is normal to both main and precessing angular velocities) corresponds to the unbounded precessing rotating shear flow considered by Kerswell [Geophys. Astrophys. Fluid Dyn. 72, 107 (1993)]. We show that both these base flows satisfy the admissibility conditions and can support disturbances in terms of advected Fourier modes. Because the admissibility conditions cannot select one case with respect to the other, a more physical derivation is sought: Both flows are deduced from Poincaré’s [Bull. Astron. 27, 321 (1910)] basic state of a precessing spheroidal container, in the limit of small ɛ . A Rapid distortion theory (RDT) type of stability analysis is then performed for the previously mentioned disturbances, for both base flows. The stability analysis of the Kerswell base flow, using Floquet’s theory, is recovered, and its counterpart for the Mahalov base flow is presented. Typical growth rates are found to be the same for both flows at very small ɛ , but significant differences are obtained regarding growth rates and widths of instability bands, if larger ɛ values, up to 0.2, are considered. Finally, both flow cases

  20. Working Principle Simulations of a Dynamic Resonant Wall Shear Stress Sensor Concept

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xu; Naughton, Jonathan W.; Lindberg, William R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses a novel dynamic resonant wall shear stress sensor concept based on an oscillating sensor operating near resonance. The interaction between the oscillating sensor surface and the fluid above it is modelled using the unsteady laminar boundary layer equations. The numerical experiment shows that the effect of the oscillating shear stress is well correlated by the Hummer number, the ratio of the steady shear force caused by the outside flow to the oscillating viscous force created by the sensor motion. The oscillating shear stress predicted by the fluid model is used in a mechanical model of the sensor to predict the sensor's dynamic motion. Static calibration curves for amplitude and frequency influences are predicted. These results agree with experimental results on some extent, and shows some expectation for further development of the dynamic resonant sensor concept.

  1. Structure formation of surfactant membranes under shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiba, Hayato; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Gompper, Gerhard

    2013-07-01

    Shear-flow-induced structure formation in surfactant-water mixtures is investigated numerically using a meshless-membrane model in combination with a particle-based hydrodynamics simulation approach for the solvent. At low shear rates, uni-lamellar vesicles and planar lamellae structures are formed at small and large membrane volume fractions, respectively. At high shear rates, lamellar states exhibit an undulation instability, leading to rolled or cylindrical membrane shapes oriented in the flow direction. The spatial symmetry and structure factor of this rolled state agree with those of intermediate states during lamellar-to-onion transition measured by time-resolved scatting experiments. Structural evolution in time exhibits a moderate dependence on the initial condition.

  2. Laboratory observation of magnetic field growth driven by shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Intrator, T. P. Feng, Y.; Sears, J.; Weber, T.; Dorf, L.; Sun, X.

    2014-04-15

    Two magnetic flux ropes that collide and bounce have been characterized in the laboratory. We find screw pinch profiles that include ion flow v{sub i}, magnetic field B, current density J, and plasma pressure. The electron flow v{sub e} can be inferred, allowing the evaluation of the Hall J×B term in a two fluid magnetohydrodynamic Ohm's Law. Flux ropes that are initially cylindrical are mutually attracted and compress each other, which distorts the cylindrical symmetry. Magnetic field is created via the ∇×v{sub e}×B induction term in Ohm's Law where in-plane (perpendicular) shear of parallel flow (along the flux rope) is the dominant feature, along with some dissipation and magnetic reconnection. We predict and measure the growth of a quadrupole out-of-plane magnetic field δB{sub z}. This is a simple and coherent example of a shear flow driven dynamo. There is some similarity with two dimensional reconnection scenarios, which induce a current sheet and thus out-of-plane flow in the third dimension, despite the customary picture that considers flows only in the reconnection plane. These data illustrate a general and deterministic mechanism for large scale sheared flows to acquire smaller scale magnetic features, disordered structure, and possibly turbulence.

  3. Dynamic response of micro-pillar sensors measuring fluctuating wall-shear-stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brücker, Ch.; Bauer, D.; Chaves, H.

    2007-05-01

    We present in this paper test results of flexible micro-pillars and pillar arrays for wall shear stress measurements in flows with fluctuating wall shear stress such as unsteady separated flows or turbulent flows. Previous papers reported on the sensing principle and fabrication process. Static calibrations have shown this sensor to have a maximum nonlinearity of 1% over two orders of wall-shear-stress. For measurements in flows with fluctuating wall shear stress the dynamic response has been experimentally verified in an oscillating pipe flow and compared to a calculated response based on Stokes’ and Oseen’s solution for unsteady flow around a cylinder. The results demonstrate good agreement under the given boundary conditions of cylindrical micro-pillars and the limit of viscous Stokes-flow around the pillar. Depending on the fluid and pillar geometry, different response curves result ranging from a flat low-pass filtered response to a strong resonant behavior. Two different methods are developed to detect the frequency content and the directional wall shear stress information from image processing of large sensor films with arrays of micro-pillars of different geometry. Design rules are given to achieve the optimal conditions with respect to signal-to-noise ratio, sensitivity and bandwidth for measurements in turbulent flows.

  4. Acceleration feature points of unsteady shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasten, Jens; Reininghaus, Jan; Hotz, Ingrid; Hege, Hans-Christian; Noack, Bernd R.; Daviller, Guillaume; Comte, Pierre; Morzyúski, Marek

    2012-11-01

    We generalize velocity topology with centers (vortices) and saddle points in a Galilean-invariant manner. In particular, a computationally robust (derivative-free) framework for their extraction of two-dimensional unsteady flows is presented. The key enabler is the definition of feature points based on the acceleration magnitude. The extracted feature points are tracked over time resulting in corresponding trajectories. Using homological persistence and lifetime of features, a spatiotemporal importance measure for vortex core lines is introduced that enables a hierarchical filtering. As example, homological persistence is shown to discriminate between hydrodynamic and aeroacoustic flow structures. Our framework is applied to analytic examples as well as simulations of a cylinder wake, of a two-dimensional mixing layer and of a jet. Partially supported by the ANR Chair of Excellence TUCOROM and the German Research Foundation.

  5. Shear flow effects on ion thermal transport in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, T.; Horton, W.; Dong, J.Q.; Kishimoto, Y.

    1995-03-01

    From various laboratory and numerical experiments, there is clear evidence that under certain conditions the presence of sheared flows in a tokamak plasma can significantly reduce the ion thermal transport. In the presence of plasma fluctuations driven by the ion temperature gradient, the flows of energy and momentum parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field are coupled with each other. This coupling manifests itself as significant off-diagonal coupling coefficients that give rise to new terms for anomalous transport. The authors derive from the gyrokinetic equation a set of velocity moment equations that describe the interaction among plasma turbulent fluctuations, the temperature gradient, the toroidal velocity shear, and the poloidal flow in a tokamak plasma. Four coupled equations for the amplitudes of the state variables radially extended over the transport region by toroidicity induced coupling are derived. The equations show bifurcations from the low confinement mode without sheared flows to high confinement mode with substantially reduced transport due to strong shear flows. Also discussed is the reduced version with three state variables. In the presence of sheared flows, the radially extended coupled toroidal modes driven by the ion temperature gradient disintegrate into smaller, less elongated vortices. Such a transition to smaller spatial correlation lengths changes the transport from Bohm-like to gyrobohm-like. The properties of these equations are analyzed. The conditions for the improved confined regime are obtained as a function of the momentum-energy deposition rates and profiles. The appearance of a transport barrier is a consequence of the present theory.

  6. Dynamic shear of granular material under variable gravity conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, B. R.; Klein, S. P.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes some experiments with granular materials which recently have been conducted aboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft during variable gravity maneuvers. The main experimental apparatus consisted of a small drum containing granular material which was rotated slowly while the angle assumed by the slip surface with respect to the horizontal was observed and recorded photographically. Conventional wisdom has held that this 'dynamic angle of response' was a material constant, independent of (among other things) gravitational level. The results presented here are quite contrary, suggesting instead an angle that varies with the reciprocal of the square root of gravity. This finding may have important consequences on the understanding of many active processes in Planetary Geology involving granular materials and may provide qualitative confirmation of some of the theoretical predictions of modern models of granular shear flows.

  7. Shearing flows of frictionless spheres over bumpy planes: slip velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berzi, Diego; Vescovi, Dalila

    2016-05-01

    Boundary conditions for the slip velocity of inelastic, frictionless spheres interacting with bumpy walls are derived via discrete element method simulations of Couette granular flows. The bumpiness is created by gluing spheres identical to those flowing in a regular hexagonal array to a flat plane. Depending on the particle inelasticity and bumpiness, the characteristics of the flow range from simple shearing to plug flow. At low bumpiness—small distance between the wall-particles—the ratio of particle shear stress to pressure is a non-linear function of the slip velocity and presents a maximum. At high bumpiness, the bumpy plane behaves as a flat, frictional surface and the stress ratio saturates to a constant value for large slip velocity.

  8. Statistical physics of shear flow: a non-equilibrium problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, R. M. L.

    2010-09-01

    Complex fluids are easily and reproducibly driven into non-equilibrium steady states by the action of shear flow. The statistics of the microstructure of non-equilibrium fluids is important to the material properties of every complex fluid that flows, e.g. axle grease on a rotating bearing; blood circulating in capillaries; molten plastic flowing into a mould; the non-equilibrium onion phase of amphiphiles used for drug delivery; the list is endless. Such states are as diverse and interesting as equilibrium states, but are not governed by the same statistics as equilibrium materials. I review some recently discovered principles governing the probabilities of various types of molecular re-arrangements taking place within a sheared fluid. As well as providing new foundations for the study of non-equilibrium matter, the principles are applied to some simple models of particles interacting under flow, showing that the theory exhibits physically convincing behaviour.

  9. Shear thinning and shear dilatancy of liquid n-hexadecane via equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations: Temperature, pressure, and density effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Huan-Chang; Wu, Jiann-Shing; Chang, Rong-Yeu

    2008-07-01

    Equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed in both isochoric-isothermal (NVT) and isobaric-isothermal (NPT) ensemble systems. Under steady state shearing conditions, thermodynamic states and rheological properties of liquid n-hexadecane molecules have been studied. Between equilibrium and nonequilibrium states, it is important to understand how shear rates (γ˙) affect the thermodynamic state variables of temperature, pressure, and density. At lower shear rates of γ˙<1×1011s-1, the relationships between the thermodynamic variables at nonequilibrium states closely approximate those at equilibrium states, namely, the liquid is very near its Newtonian fluid regime. Conversely, at extreme shear rates of γ˙>1×1011s-1, specific behavior of shear dilatancy is observed in the variations of nonequilibrium thermodynamic states. Significantly, by analyzing the effects of changes in temperature, pressure, and density on shear flow system, we report a variety of rheological properties including the shear thinning relationship between viscosity and shear rate, zero-shear-rate viscosity, rotational relaxation time, and critical shear rate. In addition, the flow activation energy and the pressure-viscosity coefficient determined through Arrhenius and Barus equations acceptably agree with the related experimental and MD simulation results.

  10. Similarity of organized structures in turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moin, Parviz

    1990-01-01

    Recent analysis of databases generated by direct numerical simulations of homogeneous turbulent shear flows have revealed the presence of coherent structures similar to those in turbulent boundary layers. In this paper these findings and tentative conclusions on their significance are discussed.

  11. Sensor for Boundary Shear Stress in Fluid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Chang, Zensheu; Trease, Brian P.; Kerenyi, Kornel; Widholm, Scott E.; Ostlund, Patrick N.

    2012-01-01

    The formation of scour patterns at bridge piers is driven by the forces at the boundary of the water flow. In most experimental scour studies, indirect processes have been applied to estimate the shear stress using measured velocity profiles. The estimations are based on theoretical models and associated assumptions. However, the turbulence flow fields and boundary layer in the pier-scour region are very complex and lead to low-fidelity results. In addition, available turbulence models cannot account accurately for the bed roughness effect. Direct measurement of the boundary shear stress, normal stress, and their fluctuations are attractive alternatives. However, most direct-measurement shear sensors are bulky in size or not compatible to fluid flow. A sensor has been developed that consists of a floating plate with folded beam support and an optical grid on the back, combined with a high-resolution optical position probe. The folded beam support makes the floating plate more flexible in the sensing direction within a small footprint, while maintaining high stiffness in the other directions. The floating plate converts the shear force to displacement, and the optical probe detects the plate s position with nanometer resolution by sensing the pattern of the diffraction field of the grid through a glass window. This configuration makes the sensor compatible with liquid flow applications.

  12. Studies of compressible shear flows and turbulent drag reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orszag, S. A.

    1981-01-01

    Compressible shear flows and drag reduction were examined and three methods are addressed: (1) the analytical and numerical aspects of conformal mapping were summarized and a new method for computation of these maps is presented; (2) the computer code SPECFD for solution of the three dimensional time dependent Navier-Stokes equations for compressible flow on the CYBER 203 computer is described; (3) results of two equation turbulence modeling of turbulent flow over wavy walls are presented. A modified Jones-Launder model is used in two dimensional spectral code for flow in general wavy geometries.

  13. Interfacial shear-stress effects on transient capillary wedge flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Song-Kai; Lai, Chun-Liang

    2004-06-01

    The effects on the transient capillary flow in a wedge due to the interfacial shear-stress distribution S along the flow direction z is studied theoretically. With the assumptions of a slender liquid column and negligible gravitational and inertia effects, the problem is reduced to finding the axial velocity distribution at any cross section. The propagation of the liquid column h(z,t) and the tip location l(t) are then solved with the aid of the continuity equation. When the half-wedge angle α, the contact angle θ, and the shear-stress distribution on the free surface S are constant, analytic solutions exist. Otherwise, numerical simulation has to be applied. The results indicate that when S(z) is acting in the flow direction, the flow is strengthened and the liquid column propagates faster. When S(z) is opposing the flow direction, reverse flow may exist near the free surface and the propagation speed of the liquid column is reduced. Moreover, for a capillary flow in a wedge with constant α, θ, and S, both the analytic solutions and the numerical simulation predict that l(t)∝t3/5 for the constant-flow-rate stage and l(t)∝t1/2 for the constant-height flow stage. When S is a function of the flow direction z, the above functional relationship between l and t becomes no longer valid; it varies as the liquid column propagates along the wedge.

  14. Generation of sound in turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.

    1983-01-01

    An alternative to the Lighthill acoustic analogy for jet noise is discussed. It involves calculating the unsteady flow that produces the sound along with its resulting sound field starting from a prescribed upstream state that, ideally, is specified just ahead of the region where the sound generation takes place. Sound generation by turbulence interacting with solid obstacles is considered. It is shown that the process can be described by linear theory. Sound generated by turbulence interacting with itself is discussed. The processes are nonlinear and the theory is incomplete. Theories of sound generation are compared with experiment and the inadequacies of each are indicated. Additional mechanisms that appear at supersonic speeds are discussed.

  15. Cavitation Inception in Immersed Jet Shear Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockett, R. D.; Ndamuso, N.; Price, R.

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation inception occurring in immersed jets was investigated in a purpose-built mechanical flow rig. The rig utilized custom-built cylindrical and conical nozzles to direct high-velocity jets of variable concentration n-octane-hexadecane mixtures into a fused silica optically accessible receiver. The fluid pressure upstream and down-stream of the nozzles were manually controlled. The study employed a variety of acrylic and metal nozzles. The results show that the critical upstream pressure to downstream pressure ratio for incipient cavitation decreases with increasing n-octane concentration for the cylindrical nozzles, and increases with increasing n-octane concentration for the conical nozzle.

  16. The importance of flow history in mixed shear and extensional flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Caroline; McKinley, Gareth

    2015-11-01

    Many complex fluid flows of experimental and academic interest exhibit mixed kinematics with regions of shear and elongation. Examples include flows through planar hyperbolic contractions in microfluidic devices and through porous media or geometric arrays. Through the introduction of a ``flow-type parameter'' α which varies between 0 in pure shear and 1 in pure elongation, the local velocity fields of all such mixed flows can be concisely characterized. It is tempting to then consider the local stress field and interpret the local state of stress in a complex fluid in terms of shearing or extensional material functions. However, the material response of such fluids exhibit a fading memory of the entire deformation history. We consider a dilute solution of Hookean dumbbells and solve the Oldroyd-B model to obtain analytic expressions for the entire stress field in any arbitrary mixed flow of constant strain rate and flow-type parameter α. We then consider a more complex flow for which the shear rate is constant but the flow-type parameter α varies periodically in time (reminiscent of flow through a periodic array or through repeated contractions and expansions). We show that the flow history and kinematic sequencing (in terms of whether the flow was initialized as shearing or extensional) is extremely important in determining the ensuing stress field and rate of dissipated energy in the flow, and can only be ignored in the limit of infinitely slow flow variations.

  17. Stick-slip instabilities in sheared granular flow: The role of friction and acoustic vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieou, Charles K. C.; Elbanna, Ahmed E.; Langer, James S.; Carlson, Jean M.

    We propose a theory of shear flow in dense granular materials. A key ingredient of the theory is an effective temperature that determines how the material responds to external driving forces such as shear stresses and vibrations. We show that, within our model, friction between grains produces stick-slip behavior at intermediate shear rates, even if the material is rate strengthening at larger rates. In addition, externally generated acoustic vibrations alter the stick-slip amplitude, or suppress stick-slip altogether, depending on the pressure and shear rate. We construct a phase diagram that indicates the parameter regimes for which stick-slip occurs in the presence and absence of acoustic vibrations of a fixed amplitude and frequency. These results connect the microscopic physics to macroscopic dynamics and thus produce useful information about a variety of granular phenomena, including rupture and slip along earthquake faults, the remote triggering of instabilities, and the control of friction in material processing.

  18. Flow induced protein nucleation: Insulin oligomerization under shear.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dexter, Andrew; Azadani, Ali; Sorci, Mirco; Belfort, Georges; Hirsa, Amir

    2007-11-01

    A large number of diseases are associated with protein aggregation and misfolding, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and human prion diseases such as Creutzveld-Jakob disease. Characteristic of these diseases is the presence of amyloid fibrils and their precursors, oligomers and protofibrils. Considerable evidence exists that a shearing flow strongly influences amyloid formation both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the stability of protein-based pharmaceuticals is essential for conventional therapeutic preparations and drug delivery systems. By studying the nucleation and growth of insulin fibrils in a well-defined flow system, we expect to identify the flow conditions that impact protein aggregation kinetics and which lead to protein destabilization. The present flow system consists of an annular region bounded by stationary inner and outer cylinders and is driven by rotation of the floor. Preliminary results indicate that a continuous shearing flow can accelerate the aggregation process. The interfacial shear viscosity was found to drastically increase during aggregation and appears to be a useful parameter to probe protein oligomerization and the effects of flow.

  19. Interplay between toroidal rotation and flow shear in turbulence stabilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camenen, Y.; Casson, F. J.; Manas, P.; Peeters, A. G.

    2016-02-01

    The interplay between toroidal rotation u, parallel flow shear u', and perpendicular flow shear γE in the stabilisation of tokamak turbulence is investigated in non-linear flux-tube gyrokinetic simulations. The simulations are performed for a reference L-mode DIII-D plasma (the so-called shortfall case) at r /a =0.8 , varying the flow parameters around their nominal values. Depending on the respective signs of u, u', and γE, turbulence is found to be enhanced, reduced, or unchanged. When the coupling is favorable, the overall effect on the non-linear heat fluxes can be very large, even at moderate flow values. The ion heat flux is, for instance, decreased by a factor of 3 when the direction of the parallel flow shear is reversed with respect to its nominal value. Even more surprising, keeping u' and γE at their nominal values, the ion heat flux decreases by more than 50% when the toroidal flow is reversed. The relevance of this mechanism in the experiments which depends on the ability to decouple u, u', and γE is discussed. The interplay between u and u' observed in the non-linear simulations qualitatively follows the linear stability results and is interpreted in the frame of a simple fluid model.

  20. Turbulent Sediment Suspension and Induced Ripple Dynamics Absent Mean Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. A.; Cowen, E.

    2014-12-01

    The uprush and backwash phases in the swash zone, the region of the beach that is alternately covered and uncovered by wave run-up, are fundamentally different events. Backwash is dominated by a growing boundary layer where the turbulence is set by the bed shear stress. In this phase traditional boundary layer turbulence models and Shields-type critical stress pickup functions work well. However, the uprush phase, while often viewed in the context of traditional boundary layer turbulence models, has little in common with the backwash phase. During uprush, the entire water column is turbulent, as it rapidly advects well-stirred highly turbulent flow generated offshore from breaking waves or collapsing bores. Turbulence levels in the uprush are several times higher than turbulent boundary layer theory would predict and hence the use of a boundary layer model to predict turbulence levels during uprush grossly under predicts the turbulence and subsequent sediment suspension in the swash zone. To study the importance of this advected turbulence to sediment suspension we conduct experiments in a water tank designed to generate horizontally homogeneous isotropic turbulence absent mean shear using randomly actuated synthetic jet arrays suspended above both a solid glass plate and a narrowly graded sediment bed. Using jet arrays with different jet spacings allows the generation of high Reynolds number turbulence with variable integral length scales, which we hypothesize control the characteristic length scales in the induced ripple field. Particle image velocimetry and acoustic Doppler velocimetry measurements are used to characterize the near-bed flow and this unique turbulent boundary layer. Metrics include the mean flow and turbulence intensities and stresses, temporal and spatial spectra, dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy, and integral length scales of the turbulence. We leverage our unique dataset to compare the flows over impermeable fixed and permeable mobile

  1. Instability of settling non-spherical particle in a vertical shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Dewei; Koch, Donald; Subramanian, Ganesh

    2010-11-01

    Two mechanisms are attributed to the cross-stream migration when fiber settles in a vertical shear flow. First, a particle may migrate toward streamlines of the imposed shear flow with smaller downward fluid velocities, due to relative translation of the particle and fluid, called the Saffman effect. Second, a non-spherical particle at finite Reynolds number will attempt to rotate with its long body along the horizontal direction due to inertial torque. On the other hand, the torque due to the imposed weak vertical shear flow rotates the non-spherical in the opposite direction. The dynamic balance between the two torques may lead to a small angle between the particle long body and horizontal plane and may drive the particle migrate toward the streamlines of the shear flow with the large downward fluid velocity. The second mechanism was recently proposed by Shin, Koch and Subramanian.A fiber with aspect ratio κ=2, 1.6, 1.2 1.1 and 0 is used to study the lateral migration. It is shown that at a given shear and aspect ratio, fiber lateral migration can be divided into three phases depending on the Reynolds number. The simulation results identified the lateral migration phase diagram and confirm the second mechanism.

  2. Investigations of coherent structures in free turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussain, A. K. M. F.

    1979-01-01

    The dynamics of large-scale coherent structures in general, and studies based on flow-visualization and phase-locked hot-wire measurements of the structures in the near fields of circular jets are considered. A study involving the nature of coherent structures under conditions of stable vortex pairing induced by controlled axisymmetric acoustic excitation reveals that azimuthal coherence initially enhanced by the excitation is lost before the end of the potential core through evolution of azimuthal lobe structures and turbulent breakdown. The evolution of a spark-induced spot in an axisymmetric turbulent mixing layer is also investigated, and the coherent Reynolds stress associated with the spot is found to be much higher than the background turbulence Reynolds stress. In addition, the state of organization in a high Reynolds number unperturbed axisymmetric mixing layer is examined, and it is shown that the shear layer is infrequently organized and the motions are intensely three-dimensional, while tearing and fractional pairing occur as frequently as complete pairing.

  3. Shear wave mapping of skeletal muscle using shear wave wavefront reconstruction based on ultrasound color flow imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakoshi, Yoshiki; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Kasahara, Toshihiro; Iijima, Tomohiro; Yuminaka, Yasushi

    2015-07-01

    We have proposed a quantitative shear wave imaging technique for continuous shear wave excitation. Shear wave wavefront is observed directly by color flow imaging using a general-purpose ultrasonic imaging system. In this study, the proposed method is applied to experiments in vivo, and shear wave maps, namely, the shear wave phase map, which shows the shear wave propagation inside the medium, and the shear wave velocity map, are observed for the skeletal muscle in the shoulder. To excite the shear wave inside the skeletal muscle of the shoulder, a hybrid ultrasonic wave transducer, which combines a small vibrator with an ultrasonic wave probe, is adopted. The shear wave velocity of supraspinatus muscle, which is measured by the proposed method, is 4.11 ± 0.06 m/s (N = 4). This value is consistent with those obtained by the acoustic radiation force impulse method.

  4. Nucleation of lamellar domains from a sponge phase under shear flow: Shape selection of nuclei in a nonequilibrium steady state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazawa, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Hajime

    2007-07-01

    It is a fundamental physical problem how a state is selected in a nonequilibrium steady state where the energy is continuously dissipated. This problem is common to phase transitions in liquids under shear flow and those in solids under deformation or electric current. In particular, soft matter often exhibits a strong nonlinear response to an external field, since its structural susceptibility to the external field is extremely large due to its softness and flexibility. Here we study the nucleation and growth process of the lamellar phase from the sponge phase under shear flow in a bilayer-forming surfactant system. We found an interesting shape selection of lamellar nuclei under shear flow between multilamellar vesicles (onions) and cylinders (leeks). These two types of behavior are separated sharply at a critical shear rate: a slight change of the shear rate is enough to switch one behavior to the other. We also found that, under a sufficiently strong shear flow, nucleated onions decrease their size with time, and eventually transform into leeks. This suggests that leeks may be the stable morphology under steady shear flow. However, the stability is limited only to the lamellar-sponge coexistence region. When a system enters into the lamellar phase region by further cooling, leeks lose their stability and break up into rather monodisperse onions, presumably via Rayleigh-like instability of a fluid tube. On the basis of these results, we draw a dynamic state diagram of smectic membrane organization under shear flow.

  5. Calculation of turbulent shear stress in supersonic boundary layer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, C. C.; Childs, M. E.

    1974-01-01

    An analysis of turbulent boundary layer flow characteristics and the computational procedure used are discussed. The integrated mass and momentum flux profiles and differentials of the integral quantities are used in the computations so that local evaluation of the streamwise velocity gradient is not necessary. The computed results are compared with measured shear stress data obtained by using hot wire anemometer and laser velocimeter techniques. The flow measurements were made upstream and downstream of an adiabatic unseparated interaction of an oblique shock wave with the turbulent boundary layer on the flat wall of a two dimensional wind tunnel. A comparison of the numerical analysis and actual measurements is made and the effects of small differences in mean flow profiles on the computed shear stress distributions are discussed.

  6. Renormalization group analysis of anisotropic diffusion in turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, Robert; Barton, J. Michael

    1991-01-01

    The renormalization group is applied to compute anisotropic corrections to the scalar eddy diffusivity representation of turbulent diffusion of a passive scalar. The corrections are linear in the mean velocity gradients. All model constants are computed theoretically. A form of the theory valid at arbitrary Reynolds number is derived. The theory applies only when convection of the velocity-scalar correlation can be neglected. A ratio of diffusivity components, found experimentally to have a nearly constant value in a variety of shear flows, is computed theoretically for flows in a certain state of equilibrium. The theoretical value is well within the fairly narrow range of experimentally observed values. Theoretical predictions of this diffusivity ratio are also compared with data from experiments and direct numerical simulations of homogeneous shear flows with constant velocity and scalar gradients.

  7. Optical propagation through a homogeneous turbulent shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truman, C. Randall; Lee, Moon J.

    1988-01-01

    Effects of organized turbulent structures on the propagation of an optical beam in a homogeneous shear flow were studied. A passive-scalar field in a computed turbulent shear flow is used to represent index-of-refraction fluctuations, and phase errors induced in a coherent optical beam by turbulent fluctuations are computed. The organized vortical structures produce a scalar distribution with elongated regions of intense fluctuations which have an inclination with respect to the mean flow similar to that of the characteristic hairpin eddies. It is found that r.m.s. phase error is minimized by propagating approximately normal to the inclined vortical structures. Two-point correlations of vorticity and scalar fluctuation suggest that the regions of intense scalar fluctuation are produced primarily by the hairpin eddies.

  8. Relativistic thermal electron scale instabilities in sheared flow plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Evan D.; Rogers, Barrett N.

    2016-04-01

    > The linear dispersion relation obeyed by finite-temperature, non-magnetized, relativistic two-fluid plasmas is presented, in the special case of a discontinuous bulk velocity profile and parallel wave vectors. It is found that such flows become universally unstable at the collisionless electron skin-depth scale. Further analyses are performed in the limits of either free-streaming ions or ultra-hot plasmas. In these limits, the system is highly unstable in the parameter regimes associated with either the electron scale Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (ESKHI) or the relativistic electron scale sheared flow instability (RESI) recently highlighted by Gruzinov. Coupling between these modes provides further instability throughout the remaining parameter space, provided both shear flow and temperature are finite. An explicit parameter space bound on the highly unstable region is found.

  9. Relativistic thermal electron scale instabilities in sheared flow plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Evan D.; Rogers, Barrett N.

    2016-02-01

    > The linear dispersion relation obeyed by finite-temperature, non-magnetized, relativistic two-fluid plasmas is presented, in the special case of a discontinuous bulk velocity profile and parallel wave vectors. It is found that such flows become universally unstable at the collisionless electron skin-depth scale. Further analyses are performed in the limits of either free-streaming ions or ultra-hot plasmas. In these limits, the system is highly unstable in the parameter regimes associated with either the electron scale Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (ESKHI) or the relativistic electron scale sheared flow instability (RESI) recently highlighted by Gruzinov. Coupling between these modes provides further instability throughout the remaining parameter space, provided both shear flow and temperature are finite. An explicit parameter space bound on the highly unstable region is found.

  10. Shape oscillations of elastic particles in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Dhananjay Radhakrishnan; Gee, David J

    2016-09-01

    Particle suspensions are common to biological fluid flows; for example, flow of red- and white-blood cells, and platelets. In medical technology, current and proposed methods for drug delivery use membrane-bounded liquid capsules for transport via the microcirculation. In this paper, we consider a 3D linear elastic particle inserted into a Newtonian fluid and investigate the time-dependent deformation using a numerical simulation. Specifically, a boundary element technique is used to investigate the motion and deformation of initially spherical or spheroidal particles in bounded linear shear flow. The resulting deformed shapes reveal a steady-state profile that exhibits a 'tank-treading' motion for initially spherical particles. Wall effects on particle trajectory are seen to include a modified Jeffrey׳s orbit for spheroidal inclusions with a period that varies inversely with the strength of the shear flow. Alternately, spheroidal inclusions may exhibit either a 'tumbling' or 'trembling' motion depending on the initial particle aspect ratio and the capillary number (i.e., ratio of fluid shear to elastic restoring force). We find for a capillary number of 0.1, a tumbling mode transitions to a trembling mode at an aspect ratio of 0.87 (approx.), while for a capillary number of 0.2, this transition takes place at a lower aspect ratio. These oscillatory modes are consistent with experimental observations involving similarly shaped vesicles and thus serves to validate the use of a simple elastic constitutive model to perform relevant physiological flow calculations. PMID:27294284