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Sample records for shear stress measurement

  1. Interfacial shear stress measurement using high spatial resolution multiphase PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Matthieu A.; Bardet, Philippe M.

    2015-06-01

    In multiphase flows, form drag and viscous shear stress transfer momentum between phases. For numerous environmental and man-made flows, it is of primary importance to predict this transfer at a liquid-gas interface. In its general expression, interfacial shear stress involves local velocity gradients as well as surface velocity, curvature, and surface tension gradients. It is therefore a challenging quantity to measure experimentally or compute numerically. In fact, no experimental work to date has been able to directly resolve all the terms contributing to the shear stress in the case of curved and moving surfaces. In an attempt to fully resolve the interface shear stress when surface tension gradients are negligible, high-resolution particle image velocimetry (PIV) data are acquired simultaneously on both sides of a water-air interface. The flow consists of a well-conditioned uniform and homogeneous water jet discharging in quiescent air, which exhibits two-dimensional surface waves as a result of a shear layer instability below the surface. PIV provides velocity fields in both phases, while planar laser-induced fluorescence is used to track the interface and obtain its curvature. To compute the interfacial shear stress from the data, several processing schemes are proposed and compared, using liquid and/or gas phase data. Vorticity at the surface, which relates to the shear stress through the dynamic boundary condition at the surface, is also computed and provides additional strategies for estimating the shear. The various schemes are in agreement within the experimental uncertainties, validating the methodology for experimentally resolving this demanding quantity.

  2. Measurement of cavitation induced wall shear stress Rory Dijkink

    E-print Network

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    Measurement of cavitation induced wall shear stress Rory Dijkink Faculty of Science, Physics of Fluids, University of Twente, 7500 AE Enschede, The Netherlands. Claus-Dieter Ohl Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

  3. Wall shear stress measurements using a new transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vakili, A. D.; Wu, J. M.; Lawing, P. L.

    1986-01-01

    A new instrument has been developed for direct measurement of wall shear stress. This instrument is simple and symmetric in design with small moving mass and no internal friction. Features employed in the design of this instrument eliminate most of the difficulties associated with the traditional floating element balances. Vibration problems associated with the floating element skin friction balances have been found to be minimized by the design features and optional damping provided. The unique design of this instrument eliminates or reduces the errors associated with conventional floating-element devices: such as errors due to gaps, pressure gradient, acceleration, heat transfer and temperature change. The instrument is equipped with various sensing systems and the output signal is a linear function of the wall shear stress. Measurement made in three different tunnels show good agreement with theory and data obtained by the floating element devices.

  4. Colors Of Liquid Crystals Used To Measure Surface Shear Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reda, D. C.; Muratore, J. J., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Developmental method of mapping shear stresses on aerodynamic surfaces involves observation, at multiple viewing angles, of colors of liquid-crystal surface coats illuminated by white light. Report describing method referenced in "Liquid Crystals Indicate Directions Of Surface Shear Stresses" (ARC-13379). Resulting maps of surface shear stresses contain valuable data on magnitudes and directions of skin friction forces associated with surface flows; data used to refine mathematical models of aerodynamics for research and design purposes.

  5. Shear wave transducer for stress measurements in boreholes

    DOEpatents

    Mao, Nai-Hsien (Castro Valley, CA)

    1987-01-01

    A technique and apparatus for estimating in situ stresses by measuring stress-induced velocity anisotropy around a borehole. Two sets each of radially and tangentially polarized transducers are placed inside the hole with displacement directions either parallel or perpendicular to the principal stress directions. With this configuration, relative travel times are measured by both a pulsed phase-locked loop technique and a cross correlation of digitized waveforms. The biaxial velocity data is used to back-calculate the applied stress.

  6. Research on measurement of bed shear stress under wave-current interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hua; Xia, Yun-feng; Ma, Bing-he; Hao, Si-yu; Zhang, Shi-zhao; Du, De-jun

    2015-06-01

    The movement of sediment in estuary and on coast is directly restricted by the bed shear stress. Therefore, the research on the basic problem of sediment movement by the bed shear stress is an important way to research the theory of sediment movement. However, there is not a measuring and computing method to measure the bed shear stress under a complicated dynamic effect like wave and current. This paper describes the measurement and test research on the bed shear stress in a long launder of direct current by the new instrument named thermal shearometer based on micro-nanotechnology. As shown by the research results, the thermal shearometer has a high response frequency and strong stability. The measured results can reflect the basic change of the bed shear stress under wave and wave-current effect, and confirm that the method of measuring bed shear stress under wave-current effect with thermal shearometer is feasible. Meanwhile, a preliminary method to compute the shear stress compounded by wave-current is put forward according to the tested and measured results, and then a reference for further study on the basic theory of sediment movement under a complicated dynamic effect is provided.

  7. Oscillatory motion based measurement method and sensor for measuring wall shear stress due to fluid flow

    DOEpatents

    Armstrong, William D. (Laramie, WY); Naughton, Jonathan (Laramie, WY); Lindberg, William R. (Laramie, WY)

    2008-09-02

    A shear stress sensor for measuring fluid wall shear stress on a test surface is provided. The wall shear stress sensor is comprised of an active sensing surface and a sensor body. An elastic mechanism mounted between the active sensing surface and the sensor body allows movement between the active sensing surface and the sensor body. A driving mechanism forces the shear stress sensor to oscillate. A measuring mechanism measures displacement of the active sensing surface relative to the sensor body. The sensor may be operated under periodic excitation where changes in the nature of the fluid properties or the fluid flow over the sensor measurably changes the amplitude or phase of the motion of the active sensing surface, or changes the force and power required from a control system in order to maintain constant motion. The device may be operated under non-periodic excitation where changes in the nature of the fluid properties or the fluid flow over the sensor change the transient motion of the active sensor surface or change the force and power required from a control system to maintain a specified transient motion of the active sensor surface.

  8. Measurement of turbulent wall shear stress in air using micro-pillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanamanickam, Ebenezer; Kevin, Kevin; Monty, Jason; Hutchins, Nicholas

    2013-11-01

    The measurement of unsteady wall shear stress in a turbulent boundary layer, especially when the working medium is air, has been a historically challenging problem in experimental fluid mechanics. Recently the micro-pillar shear stress sensor (MPS3) has shown promise in this regard. The MPS3 is an array of micro-pillar mounted on the wall of a model. These micro-pillars deflect an amount proportional to the drag force it experiences. This drag force is proportional to the wall shear stress. The micro-pillar tip deflection is thus tracked using high-speed imaging to yield the unsteady wall shear stress. Here, the MPS3 is used to carry out unsteady wall shear stress measurements in a fully developed channel flow. Both static and dynamic calibrations of the sensor are presented. The wall shear stress statistics obtained in the fully developed channel flow are compared with those obtained from Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) to provide an assessment of the sensor capabilities. Exemplary measurements such as two-dimensional temporal distribution of the wall shear stress are presented to highlight the capabilities of the sensor.

  9. Visualization and Measurement of Surface Shear Stress Vector Distributions Using Liquid Crystal Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reda, Daniel C.; Wilder, Michael C.

    1998-01-01

    When a shear-sensitive liquid crystal coating is illuminated from the normal direction by white light and observed from an oblique above-plane view angle, its color-change response to shear depends on both shear stress vector magnitude and the direction of the applied shear vector relative to the observer's in-plane line of sight. At any point, the maximum color change is always seen or measured when the local shear vector is aligned with, and directed away from, the observer; the magnitude of the color change at this vector/observer aligned orientation scales directly with shear stress magnitude. Conversely, any point exposed to a shear vector with a component directed toward the observer exhibits a noncolor-change response, always characterized by a rusty red or brown color, independent of both shear magnitude and direction. Based on this knowledge, full-surface shear stress vector visualization and measurement methodologies were formulated and successfully demonstrated. The present paper reviews the observations and measurements that led to the development of these methodologies and applications of both are discussed.

  10. Estimating shear stress from moving boat acoustic Doppler velocity measurements in a large gravel bed river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sime, Louise C.; Ferguson, Robert I.; Church, Michael

    2007-03-01

    Moving boat acoustic Doppler current profiling (ADCP) is increasingly used to measure discharge in large rivers. We investigate whether useful information about bed shear stress can be recovered from such data. Alternative ways to estimate local bed shear stress using the logarithmic law of the wall and spatial averaging are tested using ADCP transects across lower Fraser River, Canada. Repeatability is assessed by comparing estimates from outward and return boat tracks. The most precise method uses the vertically averaged mean velocity and a zero-velocity height based on bed grain size information. The accuracy of the assumed zero-velocity height can be judged by consistency between estimates using mean velocity and near-bed velocity. Shear stress estimates from unconstrained log-law fits are less repeatable and tend to overpredict, and mean shear stress estimates using the depth-slope product are unreliable in this river because of nonuniform flow.

  11. Calculation of turbulent shear stress, heat flux, mass flux, and mixing length from mean flow measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, R. L.; Crouse, R. F.; Borek, G. T.

    1992-05-01

    A numerical technique to calculate the turbulent mass flux, shear stress, heat flux, and mixing length directly from measurable mean flow quantities is presented. The development of this technique was motivated by the desire to make aero-optical calculations based directly on experimentally obtained mean flow data. The technique is based upon the direct integration of the Navier-Stokes equations of compressible turbulent flow. The results of the integrations are the shear stress, heat flux, mass flux and mixing length distributions (i.e., all data that are necessary for application of the Aero-Optical Quality Code (AOQ).

  12. Silicon micromachined sensors and sensor arrays for shear-stress measurements in aerodynamic flows

    E-print Network

    Padmanabhan, Aravind

    In this thesis we report on a new micromachined floating-element shear-stress sensor for turbulent boundary layer research. Applications in low shear-stress environments such as turbulent boundary layers require extremely ...

  13. Direct Measurement Sensor of the Boundary Shear Stress in Fluid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badescu, Mircea; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Chang, Zensheu; Kerenyi, Kornel; Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Sherrit, Stewart; Trease, Brian P.; Widholm, Scott

    2010-01-01

    The flow fields and boundary erosion that are associated with scour at bridge piers are very complex. Direct measurement of the boundary shear stress and boundary pressure fluctuations in experimental scour research has always been a challenge and high spatial resolution and fidelity have been almost impossible. Most researchers have applied an indirect process to determine shear stress using precise measured velocity profiles. Laser Doppler Anemometry and Particle Image Velocimetry are common techniques used to accurately measure velocity profiles. These methods are based on theoretical assumptions to estimate boundary shear stress. In addition, available turbulence models cannot very well account for the effect of bed roughness which is fundamentally important for any CFD simulation. The authors have taken on the challenge to advance the magnitude level to which direct measurements of the shear stress in water flow can be performed. This paper covered the challenges and the efforts to develop a higher accuracy and small spatial resolution sensor. Also, preliminary sensor designs and test results are presented.

  14. Direct measurement sensor of the boundary shear stress in fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badescu, Mircea; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Chang, Zensheu; Kerenyi, Kornel; Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Sherrit, Stewart; Trease, Brian P.; Chen, Beck; Widholm, Scott

    2010-04-01

    The flow fields and boundary erosion that are associated with scour at bridge piers are very complex. Direct measurement of the boundary shear stress and boundary pressure fluctuations in experimental scour research has always been a challenge and high spatial resolution and fidelity have been almost impossible. Most researchers have applied an indirect process to determine shear stress using precise measured velocity profiles. Laser Doppler Anemometry and Particle Image Velocimetry are common techniques used to accurately measure velocity profiles. These methods are based on theoretical assumptions to estimate boundary shear stress. In addition, available turbulence models cannot very well account for the effect of bed roughness which is fundamentally important for any CFD simulation. The authors have taken on the challenge to advance the magnitude level to which direct measurements of the shear stress in water flow can be performed. This paper covered the challenges and the efforts to develop a higher accuracy and small spatial resolution sensor. Also, preliminary sensor designs and test results are presented.

  15. Dynamic pressure and shear stress measurements on the stator wall of whirling annular seals 

    E-print Network

    Winslow, Robert Bradley

    1994-01-01

    Dynamic pressure and shear stress measurements on the stator wall of whirling annular seals are presented. Two flow conditions (Re=12,000 & 24,000), two seal speeds (Ta=3,300 & 6,600) and three eccentricity ratios (0, 10, & 50% of the clearance...

  16. Measurement of the wall pressure and shear stress distribution using molecular tagging diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, D. A.; Naguib, A. M.; Koochesfahani, M. M.

    2015-08-01

    A new non-intrusive surface pressure and shear stress diagnostics technique is introduced in the present work. The technique is enabled by the unique ability of one-component molecular tagging velocimetry (1c-MTV) to provide measurements at very high spatial resolution (at every pixel along a tagged line of molecules) in the immediate proximity of surfaces. The utility of the new method to provide accurate measurements of the wall pressure and shear stress is demonstrated in an experiment involving a cylinder in cross flow at a Reynolds number of 6000. These measurements agree very well with experimental and computational data published in literature. The new technique is particularly advantageous in situations where embedding sensor arrays in the wall is impractical or cost/time prohibitive.

  17. Sensor for Direct Measurement of the Boundary Shear Stress in Fluid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Badescu, Mircea; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Sherrit, Stewart; Chang, Zensheu; Chen, Beck; Widholm, Scott; Ostlund, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    The formation of scour patterns at bridge piers is driven by the forces at the boundary of the water flow. In most experimental scour studies, indirect processes have been applied to estimate the shear and normal stress using measured velocity profiles. The estimations are based on theoretical models and associated assumptions. However, the turbulence flow fields and boundary layer in the pier-scour region are very complex. In addition, available turbulence models cannot account accurately for the bed roughness effect. Direct measurement of the boundary shear and normal stress and their fluctuations are attractive alternatives. However, this approach is a challenging one especially for high spatial resolution and high fidelity measurements. The authors designed and fabricated a prototype miniature shear stress sensor including an EDM machined floating plate and a high-resolution laser optical encoder. Tests were performed both in air as well as operation in water with controlled flow. The sensor sensitivity, stability and signal-to-noise level were measured and evaluated. The detailed test results and a discussion of future work will be presented in this paper.

  18. Estimates of Shear Stress and Measurements of Water Levels in the Lower Fox River near Green Bay, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Westenbroek, Stephen M.

    2006-01-01

    Turbulent shear stress in the boundary layer of a natural river system largely controls the deposition and resuspension of sediment, as well as the longevity and effectiveness of granular-material caps used to cover and isolate contaminated sediments. This report documents measurements and calculations made in order to estimate shear stress and shear velocity on the Lower Fox River, Wisconsin. Velocity profiles were generated using an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) mounted on a moored vessel. This method of data collection yielded 158 velocity profiles on the Lower Fox River between June 2003 and November 2004. Of these profiles, 109 were classified as valid and were used to estimate the bottom shear stress and velocity using log-profile and turbulent kinetic energy methods. Estimated shear stress ranged from 0.09 to 10.8 dynes per centimeter squared. Estimated coefficients of friction ranged from 0.001 to 0.025. This report describes both the field and data-analysis methods used to estimate shear-stress parameters for the Lower Fox River. Summaries of the estimated values for bottom shear stress, shear velocity, and coefficient of friction are presented. Confidence intervals about the shear-stress estimates are provided.

  19. Shear and Normal Stress Measurements in Non-Colloidal Monodisperse and Bidisperse Suspensions

    E-print Network

    Chaiwut Gamonpilas; Jeffrey F. Morris; Morton M. Denn

    2015-09-26

    We have measured the viscometric functions of mono- and bimodal non-colloidal suspensions of PMMA spheres in a density-matched aqueous Newtonian suspending fluid using parallel-plate and cone-and-plate rheometry for particle volume fractions in the range 0.20 to 0.50. Cone-and-plate normal stress measurements employed the method of Marsh and Pearson, in which there is a finite gap between the cone tip and the plate. The monodisperse suspensions showed an unexpected particle size dependence, in which the viscosity increased with decreasing particle size, that was not observed in suspensions of glass spheres in a Newtonian corn syrup/glycerine suspending fluid. Normal stresses were very small in magnitude and difficult to measure at volume fractions below 0.30. At higher concentrations, $N_2$ was negative and much larger in magnitude than $N_1$, for which the algebraic sign was positive over most of the shear rate range for the monodisperse suspensions but indeterminate and possibly negative for the bimodal suspensions. The normal stresses were insensitive to polydispersity when plotted as functions of the shear stress at each volume fraction.

  20. Fluid wall shear stress measurements in a model of the human abdominal aorta: oscillatory behavior and relationship to atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Moore, J E; Xu, C; Glagov, S; Zarins, C K; Ku, D N

    1994-10-01

    Clinically significant atherosclerosis in the human aorta is most common in the infrarenal segment. This study was initiated to test the hypothesis that flowfield properties are closely related to the localization of plaques in this segment of the arterial system. Wall shear stress was calculated from magnetic resonance velocity measurements of pulsatile flow in an anatomically accurate model of the human abdominal aorta. The wall shear stress values were compared with intimal thickening from 15 post-mortem aortas measured by quantitative morphometry of histological cross sections obtained at standard locations. Wall shear stress oscillated in direction throughout most of the infrarenal aorta, most prominently in the distal region. The time-averaged mean wall shear stress (-1.7 to 1.4 dyn/cm2) was lowest near the posterior wall in this region. These hemodynamic parameters coincided with the locations of maximal intimal thickening. Statistical correlation between oscillatory shear and intimal thickness yielded r = 0.79, P < 0.00001. Low mean shear stresses correlated nearly as well (r = -0.75, P < 0.00005). Comparison of our data with surface maps of Sudan Red staining and early lesions as reported by others revealed similar conclusions. In contrast, pulse and maximum shear stresses did not correlate with plaque localization as has been shown for other sites of selective involvement by atherosclerosis (r < 0.345). Simulated exercise conditions markedly changed the magnitude and pattern of wall shear stress in the distal abdominal aorta. These results demonstrate that in the infrarenal aorta, regions of low mean and oscillating wall shear stresses are predisposed to the development of plaque while regions of relatively high wall shear stress tend to be spared. PMID:7848371

  1. Recent Developments in the Use of Liquid Crystal Coatings for Full-Surface Shear Stress Vector Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reda, D. C.; Wilder, M. C.; Zilliac, G.; Hu, K. C.; Whitney, D. J.; Deardorff, D. G.; Moffat, R. J.; Farina, D. J.; Danek, C.; Martinez, R.; Davis, Sanford S. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Under normal white-light illumination and oblique observation, liquid crystal coating (LCC) color-change response to shear depends on both shear stress magnitude as well as the direction of the applied shear relative to the observer's line of sight. These color-change responses were quantified by subjecting a LCC to a wall-jet shear flow and measuring scattered-light spectra using a fiber optic probe and spectrophotometer. At any fixed shear stress magnitude, the maximum color change was measured when the shear vector was aligned with and directed away from the observer; changes in the relative in-plane view angle to either side of this vector/observer aligned position resulted in symmetric Gaussian reductions in measured color change. For this vector/observer aligned orientation, color change was found to scale linearly with increasing shear stress magnitude over an eight-fold range. Based on these results, a surface shear stress vector measurement methodology, involving multiple oblique-view observations of the test surface, was formulated. In the present paper, the experimental approach and data analysis procedure required to extend this vector measurement methodology to full-surface applications will be outlined and progress towards demonstrating this areal capability will be reviewed.

  2. Aeolian Shear Stress Ratio Measurements within Mesquite-Dominated Landscapes of the Chihuahuan Desert, New Mexico, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, James; Nickling, W. G.; Gilliles, J. A.

    2006-01-01

    A field study was conducted to ascertain the amount of protection that mesquite-dominated communities provide to the surface from wind erosion. The dynamics of the locally accelerated evolution of a mesquite/coppice dune landscape and the undetermined spatial dependence of potential erosion by wind from a shear stress partition model were investigated. Sediment transport and dust emission processes are governed by the amount of protection that can be provided by roughness elements. Although shear stress partition models exist that can describe this, their accuracy has only been tested against a limited dataset because instrumentation has previously been unable to provide the necessary measurements. This study combines the use of meteorological towers and surface shear stress measurements with Irwin sensors to measure the partition of shear stress in situ. The surface shear stress within preferentially aligned vegetation (within coppice dune development) exhibited highly skewed distributions, while a more homogenous surface stress was recorded at a site with less developed coppice dunes. Above the vegetation, the logarithmic velocity profile deduced roughness length (based on 10-min averages) exhibited a distinct correlation with compass direction for the site with vegetation preferentially aligned, while the site with more homogenously distributed vegetation showed very little variation in the roughness length. This distribution in roughness length within an area, defines a distribution of a resolved shear stress partitioning model based on these measurements, ultimately providing potential closure to a previously uncorrelated model parameter.

  3. Watershed Scale Shear Stress From Tethersonde Wind Profile Measurements Under Near Neutral and Unstable Atmospheric Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parlange, M. B.; Katul, G. G.

    1995-04-01

    Mean wind speed profiles were measured in the atmospheric surface layer, using a tethersonde system, above the Ojai Valley Watershed in southern California. The valley is mainly planted with mature avocado and orange trees. The surface shear stress and latent and sensible heat fluxes were measured above the trees which are up to 9 m in height. Near-neutral wind speed profile measurements allowed the determination of the watershed surface roughness (z0 = 1.4 m) and the momentum displacement height (d0 = 7.0 m). The wind speed measurements obtained under unstable atmospheric stability were analyzed using Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. New stability correction functions proposed based on theory and experiments of Kader-Yaglom as well as the now classic Businger-Dyer type functions were tested. The watershed shear stress values calculated using the surface layer wind speed profiles with the new Monin-Obukhov stability functions were found to be improved in comparison with the values obtained with the Businger-Dyer functions under strongly unstable stability conditions. The Monin-Obukhov model with the Businger-Dyer stability correction function underpredicted the momentum flux by 25% under strongly unstable stability conditions, while the new Kader-Yaglom formulation compared well on average (R2 = 0.77) with the surface eddy correlation measurements for all atmospheric stability conditions. The unstable 100-m drag coefficient was found to be u*2/V1002 = 0.0182.

  4. Method for measuring surface shear stress magnitude and direction using liquid crystal coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reda, Daniel C. (inventor.)

    1995-01-01

    A method is provided for determining surface shear magnitude and direction at every point on a surface. The surface is covered with a shear stress sensitive liquid crystal coating and illuminated by white light from a normal direction. A video camera is positioned at an oblique angle above the surface to observe the color of the liquid crystal at that angle. The shear magnitude and direction are derived from the color information. A method of calibrating the device is also provided.

  5. Wall shear stress as measured in vivo: consequences for the design of the arterial system

    PubMed Central

    Hoeks, Arnold P. G.

    2008-01-01

    Based upon theory, wall shear stress (WSS), an important determinant of endothelial function and gene expression, has been assumed to be constant along the arterial tree and the same in a particular artery across species. In vivo measurements of WSS, however, have shown that these assumptions are far from valid. In this survey we will discuss the assessment of WSS in the arterial system in vivo and present the results obtained in large arteries and arterioles. In vivo WSS can be estimated from wall shear rate, as derived from non-invasively recorded velocity profiles, and whole blood viscosity in large arteries and plasma viscosity in arterioles, avoiding theoretical assumptions. In large arteries velocity profiles can be recorded by means of a specially designed ultrasound system and in arterioles via optical techniques using fluorescent flow velocity tracers. It is shown that in humans mean WSS is substantially higher in the carotid artery (1.1–1.3 Pa) than in the brachial (0.4–0.5 Pa) and femoral (0.3–0.5 Pa) arteries. Also in animals mean WSS varies substantially along the arterial tree. Mean WSS in arterioles varies between about 1.0 and 5.0 Pa in the various studies and is dependent on the site of measurement in these vessels. Across species mean WSS in a particular artery decreases linearly with body mass, e.g., in the infra-renal aorta from 8.8 Pa in mice to 0.5 Pa in humans. The observation that mean WSS is far from constant along the arterial tree implies that Murray’s cube law on flow-diameter relations cannot be applied to the whole arterial system. Because blood flow velocity is not constant along the arterial tree either, a square law also does not hold. The exponent in the power law likely varies along the arterial system, probably from 2 in large arteries near the heart to 3 in arterioles. The in vivo findings also imply that in in vitro studies no average shear stress value can be taken to study effects on endothelial cells derived from different vascular areas or from the same artery in different species. The cells have to be studied under the shear stress conditions they are exposed to in real life. PMID:18324431

  6. Friction ridges in cockroach climbing pads: anisotropy of shear stress measured on transparent, microstructured substrates.

    PubMed

    Clemente, Christofer J; Dirks, Jan-Henning; Barbero, David R; Steiner, Ullrich; Federle, Walter

    2009-09-01

    The contact of adhesive structures to rough surfaces has been difficult to investigate as rough surfaces are usually irregular and opaque. Here we use transparent, microstructured surfaces to investigate the performance of tarsal euplantulae in cockroaches (Nauphoeta cinerea). These pads are mainly used for generating pushing forces away from the body. Despite this biological function, shear stress (force per unit area) measurements in immobilized pads showed no significant difference between pushing and pulling on smooth surfaces and on 1-microm high microstructured substrates, where pads made full contact. In contrast, on 4-mum high microstructured substrates, where pads made contact only to the top of the microstructures, shear stress was maximal during a push. This specific direction dependence is explained by the interlocking of the microstructures with nanometre-sized "friction ridges" on the euplantulae. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy revealed that these ridges are anisotropic, with steep slopes facing distally and shallow slopes proximally. The absence of a significant direction dependence on smooth and 1-microm high microstructured surfaces suggests the effect of interlocking is masked by the stronger influence of adhesion on friction, which acts equally in both directions. Our findings show that cockroach euplantulae generate friction using both interlocking and adhesion. PMID:19568755

  7. Measurement of wall shear stress in chick embryonic heart using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhenhe; Dou, Shidan; Zhao, Yuqian; Wang, Yi; Suo, Yanyan; Wang, Fengwen

    2015-03-01

    The cardiac development is a complicated process affected by genetic and environmental factors. Wall shear stress (WSS) is one of the components which have been proved to influence the morphogenesis during early stages of cardiac development. To study the mechanism, WSS measurement is a step with significant importance. WSS is caused by blood flow imposed on the inner surface of the heart wall and it can be determined by calculating velocity gradients of blood flow in a direction perpendicular to the wall. However, the WSS of the early stage embryonic heart is difficult to measure since the embryonic heart is tiny and beating fast. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive imaging modality with high spatial and temporal resolution, which is uniquely suitable for the study of early stage embryonic heart development. In this paper, we introduce a method to measure the WSS of early stage chick embryonic heart based on high speed spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT). 4D (x,y,z,t) scan was performed on the outflow tract (OFT) of HH18 (~3 days of incubation) chick embryonic heart. After phase synchronization, OFT boundary segmentation, and OFT center line calculation, Doppler angle of the blood flow in the OFT can be achieved (This method has been described in previous publications). Combining with the Doppler OCT results, we calculate absolute blood flow velocity distribution in the OFT. The boundary of the OFT was segmented at each cross-sectional structural image, then geometrical center of the OFT can be calculated. Thus, the gradients of blood flow in radial direction can be calculated. This velocity gradient near the wall is termed wall shear rate and the WSS value is proportional to the wall shear rate. Based on this method, the WSS at different heart beating phase are compare. The result demonstrates that OCT is capable of early stage chicken embryonic heart WSS study.

  8. Lateral Stress Measurements in a Shock Loaded Silicon Carbide: Shear Strength and Delayed Failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eatwell, M.; Millett, J. C. F.; Bourne, N. K.

    2004-07-01

    The shock response of a silicon carbide has been investigated using the methods of plate impact. Results show the presence of failure at the impact face, in common with other brittle materials, including glasses, alumina and other silicon carbides. Analysis of the measured shear strengths, both ahead of and behind the failure front, shows close agreement with the measured shear strengths in other silicon carbides. There is also close agreement with those values determined using a simple elastic analysis.

  9. High-Resolution Measurements of Velocity and Shear Stress in Leakage Jets From Bileaflet Mechanical Heart Valve Hinge Models.

    PubMed

    Klusak, Ewa; Bellofiore, Alessandro; Loughnane, Sarah; Quinlan, Nathan J

    2015-11-01

    In flow through cardiovascular implants, hemolysis, and thrombosis may be initiated by nonphysiological shear stress on blood elements. To enhance understanding of the small-scale flow structures that stimulate cellular responses, and ultimately to design devices for reduced blood damage, it is necessary to study the flow-field at high spatial and temporal resolution. In this work, we investigate flow in the reverse leakage jet from the hinge of a bileaflet mechanical heart valve (BMHV). Scaled-up model hinges are employed, enabling measurement of the flow-field at effective spatial resolution of 167??m and temporal resolution of 594??s using two-component particle image velocimetry (PIV). High-velocity jets were observed at the hinge outflow, with time-average velocity up to 5.7?m/s, higher than reported in previous literature. Mean viscous shear stress is up to 60?Pa. For the first time, strongly unsteady flow has been observed in the leakage jet. Peak instantaneous shear stress is up to 120?Pa, twice as high as the average value. These high-resolution measurements identify the hinge leakage jet as a region of very high fluctuating shear stress which is likely to be thrombogenic and should be an important target for future design improvement. PMID:26291041

  10. Development of a wall-shear-stress sensor and measurements in mini-channels with partial blockages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afara, Samer; Medvescek, James; Mydlarski, Laurent; Baliga, Bantwal R.; MacDonald, Mark

    2014-05-01

    The design, construction, operation and validation of a wall-shear-stress sensor, and measurements obtained using this sensor in air flows downstream of partial blockages in a mini-channel are presented. The sensor consisted of a hot wire mounted over a small rectangular slot and operated using a constant-temperature anemometer. It was used to investigate flows similar to those within the mini-channels inside notebook computers. The overall goal of the present work was to develop a sensor suitable for measurements of the wall-shear stress in such flows, which can be used to validate corresponding numerical simulations, as the latter are known to be often surprisingly inaccurate. To this end, measurements of the wall-shear stress, and the corresponding statistical moments and power spectral densities, were obtained at different distances downstream of the partial blockage, with blockage ratios of 39.7, 59.2, and 76.3 %. The Reynolds number (based on average velocity and hydraulic diameter) ranged from 100 to 900. The results confirmed the presence of unsteadiness, separation, reattachment, and laminar-turbulent transition in the ostensibly laminar flow of air in mini-channels with partial blockages. The present results demonstrate why accurate numerical predictions of cooling air flows in laptop and notebook computers remain a challenging task.

  11. In situ measurements of erosion shear stress and geotechnical shear strength of the intertidal sediments of the experimental managed realignment scheme at Tollesbury, Essex, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, C. W.; Tolhurst, T. J.; Black, K. S.; Whitmore, A. P.

    2003-11-01

    Managed realignment is one of several 'soft' engineering options which may reduce the costs of coastal defence, provide a more 'natural' response to the problem of rising sea levels and at the same time deliver environmental, specifically nature conservation, benefits. The success of this technique depends on the ability of the soils and sediments within the site to resist the erosive action of waves and tidal currents and allow sediment accretion to occur, at least at a rate equal to mean sea-level rise. Once a critical shear stress, ?0 crt exerted by the moving fluids over the bed, is exceeded erosion will occur. A cohesive strength meter (CSM) and the fall-cone method were used to gather data, in situ on the strength and stability of sediments from an experimental managed realignment site and an adjacent, established saltmarsh in south-east England. Following six years of regular tidal cover, the underlying agricultural soil appeared both very strong (mean surface shear strength, ? f=228 kPa) and highly resistant to erosion ( ? 0 crt=6.23 N m -2). During this period much of the site had been covered by sediment, and saltmarsh plants ( Salicornia europaea) had become established above the mean high water neap tide (MHWN) level. Above MHWN level (tidal cover time <15%) sediments had greater bulk densities and lower water contents which resulted in a moderate shear strength (? f=11.6 kPa) and resistance to erosion (? 0 crt=2.45 N m -2) . Below MHWN, where sediment accretion rates were greatest, poor consolidation resulted in very high water contents and low bulk densities. These areas were at the highest potential risk of erosion (? 0 crt=1.5 N m -2) and had very low shear strengths (? f=0.33 kPa) . Where sediment exceeded 25 cm depth, gullies formed allowing their banks and adjacent margins to drain faster than the surrounding sediment. This led to a significant increase in bed strength (? f=10.8 kPa) and stability (? 0 crt=4.3 N m -2) . These gullies were probably the early stages of the complex creek patterns characteristic of the adjacent, established saltmarsh. The established saltmarsh was rich in plants and had a well-developed (aggregated) soil structure. These soils had a moderate to high resistance to erosion (? 0 crt=2.45 N m -2) and shear strength (? f=25.6 kPa) . Undrained sediment shear strength, ?f, obtained with the fall-cone apparatus can also provide a useful indication of critical erosion shear stress, ?0 crt . Values of ?0 crt , measured across this site were all relatively large compared with computed bed stresses arising from locally generated waves. Thus this experimental managed realignment site was found to be primarily depositional and was thus successfully achieving the twin aims of protecting the coast from erosion and extending a rich ecosystem.

  12. Shear stress in magnetorheological finishing for glasses.

    PubMed

    Miao, Chunlin; Shafrir, Shai N; Lambropoulos, John C; Mici, Joni; Jacobs, Stephen D

    2009-05-01

    We report in situ, simultaneous measurements of both drag and normal forces in magnetorheological finishing (MRF) for what is believed to be the first time, using a spot taking machine (STM) as a test bed to take MRF spots on stationary parts. The measurements are carried out over the entire area where material is being removed, i.e., the projected area of the MRF removal function/spot on the part surface, using a dual force sensor. This approach experimentally addresses the mechanisms governing material removal in MRF for optical glasses in terms of the hydrodynamic pressure and shear stress, applied by the hydrodynamic flow of magnetorheological fluid at the gap between the part surface and the STM wheel. This work demonstrates that the volumetric removal rate shows a positive linear dependence on shear stress. Shear stress exhibits a positive linear dependence on a material figure of merit that depends upon Young's modulus, fracture toughness, and hardness. A modified Preston's equation is proposed that better estimates MRF material removal rate for optical glasses by incorporating mechanical properties, shear stress, and velocity. PMID:19412219

  13. Development of Hybrid Sensor Arrays for Sensor Arrays for Simultaneous Measurement of Pressure and Shear Stress Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This document reports on the progress in developing hybrid sensors for the simultaneous measurement of pressure and shear stress. The key feature for the success of the proposed hybrid sensor array is the ability to deposit Cu-Ni alloy with proper composition (55 - 45) on a silicon wafer to form a strain gage. This alloy strain gage replaces the normally used Si strain gages in MEMS, which are highly nonlinear and temperature dependent. The copper nickel, with proper composition (55 - 45), was successfully deposited on a silicon wafer with a few trials during this period of the project. Pictures of the Cu-Ni alloy strain gage and the x-ray spectra indicating the composition are shown. The planned tests are also reviewed.

  14. Two-Phase Shear Band Structures at Uniform Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britton, Melanie M.; Callaghan, Paul T.

    1997-06-01

    Using NMR microscopy we measure the velocity distribution for a wormlike surfactant solution in the gap of a small angle cone-and-plate rheometer. This system, cetylpyridinium chloride/sodium salicylate 100 mM/60 mM, exhibits biphasic shear band structure when the applied shear rate exceeds the critical rate of strain beyond which a plateau is observed in the shear stress. The structure is characterized by two low/high shear interfaces and the region of high shear evolves by increasing width as the average gap shear is increased.

  15. Shear Stress Sensing using Elastomer Micropillar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohl, Christopher J.; Palmieri, Frank L.; Lin, Yi; Jackson, Allen M.; Cissoto, Alexxandra; Sheplak, Mark; Connell, John W.

    2013-01-01

    The measurement of shear stress developed as a fluid moves around a solid body is difficult to measure. Stresses at the fluid-solid interface are very small and the nature of the fluid flow is easily disturbed by introducing sensor components to the interface. To address these challenges, an array of direct and indirect techniques have been investigated with various advantages and challenges. Hot wire sensors and other indirect sensors all protrude significantly into the fluid flow. Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices, although facilitating very accurate measurements, are not durable, are prone to contamination, and are difficult to implement into existing model geometries. One promising approach is the use of engineered surfaces that interact with fluid flow in a detectable manner. To this end, standard lithographic techniques have been utilized to generate elastomeric micropillar arrays of various lengths and diameters. Micropillars of controlled length and width were generated in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer using a soft-lithography technique. The 3D mold for micropillar replication was fabricated using laser ablative micromachining and contact lithography. Micropillar dimensions and mechanical properties were characterized and compared to shear sensing requirements. The results of this characterization as well as shear stress detection techniques will be discussed.

  16. A model of Barchan dunes including lateral shear stress.

    PubMed

    Schwämmle, V; Herrmann, H J

    2005-01-01

    Barchan dunes are found where sand availability is low and wind direction quite constant. The two dimensional shear stress of the wind field and the sand movement by saltation and avalanches over a barchan dune are simulated. The model with one dimensional shear stress is extended including surface diffusion and lateral shear stress. The resulting final shape is compared to the results of the model with a one dimensional shear stress and confirmed by comparison to measurements. We found agreement and improvements with respect to the model with one dimensional shear stress. Additionally, a characteristic edge at the center of the windward side is discovered which is also observed for big barchans. Diffusion effects reduce this effect for small dunes. PMID:15688141

  17. Relative contributions of interface pressure, shear stress, and temperature on ischemic-induced, skin-reactive hyperemia in healthy volunteers: a repeated measures laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Lachenbruch, Charlie; Tzen, Yi-Ting; Brienza, David; Karg, Patricia E; Lachenbruch, Peter A

    2015-02-01

    Although the primary risk factors for pressure ulcer development - pressure, shear, skin temperature, moisture, and friction - have been identified for decades, the relative contribution of each to this risk remains unclear. To confirm the results of and expand upon earlier research into the relative contributions of interface pressures, shear stress, and skin temperature among 4 healthy volunteers, a study involving 6 additional healthy 40- to 75-year-old volunteers was conducted and results of the 2 studies were pooled. All 3 variables (interface pressures, shear stress, and skin temperature) were systematically and randomly varied. In the prone position, volunteers each underwent 18 test conditions representing different combinations of temperature (28? C, 32? C, 36? C), pressure (8.0 and 13.3 kPa), and shear (0, 6.7, and 14.0 kPa) using a computer-controlled indenter applied to the sacrum for 20 minutes exerting weights of 100 g and 200 g to induce 0.98 N and 1.96 N of shear force, respectively. Each condition was tested twice, resulting in a total of 360 trials. Magnitude of postload reactive hyperemia as an index of ischemia was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry. Fixed effects regression models were used to predict 3 different indices of reactive hyperemic magnitude. Friedman tests were performed to compare the reactive hyperemia among 3 different skin temperatures or shear stresses under the same amount of localized pressure. In all regression models, pressure and temperature were highly significant predictors of the extent of reactive hyperemia (P <0.0001 and P <0.0001, respectively); the contributions of shear stress were not statistically significant (P = 0.149). With higher temperature, reactive hyperemia increased significantly, especially at greater localized pressure and shear stress, and the difference was more profound between 32? C and 36? C than between 28? C and 32? C. These results confirm that, in laboratory settings, temperature is an important factor in tissue ischemia. Additional studies examining the relative importance of pressure, shear, and temperature and potential effects of lowering temperature on tissue ischemia in healthy volunteers and patients at risk for pressure ulcer development are warranted. Because deformation at weight-bearing areas often results in blood flow occlusion, actively lowering the temperature may reduce the severity of ischemia and lower pressure ulcer risk. In this study, shear did not appear to contribute to ischemia in the dermal tissues when assessed using laser Doppler; further work is needed to examine its effect on deeper layers, particularly with regard to nonischemic mechanisms. PMID:25654778

  18. Time-resolved particle image velocimetry measurements with wall shear stress and uncertainty quantification for the FDA benchmark nozzle model

    E-print Network

    Raben, Jaime S; Robinson, Ronald; Malinauskas, Richard; Vlachos, Pavlos P

    2014-01-01

    We present validation of benchmark experimental data for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses of medical devices using advanced Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) processing and post-processing techniques. This work is an extension of a previous FDA-sponsored multi-laboratory study, which used a medical device mimicking geometry referred to as the FDA benchmark nozzle model. Time-resolved PIV analysis was performed in five overlapping regions of the model for Reynolds numbers in the nozzle throat of 500, 2,000, 5,000, and 8,000. Images included a two-fold increase in spatial resolution in comparison to the previous study. Data was processed using ensemble correlation, dynamic range enhancement, and phase correlations to increase signal-to-noise ratios and measurement accuracy, and to resolve flow regions with large velocity ranges and gradients, which is typical of many blood-contacting medical devices. Parameters relevant to device safety, including shear stress at the wall and in bulk flow, were comput...

  19. Determining Shear Stress Distribution in a Laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Aboudi, Jacob; Yarrington, Phillip W.

    2010-01-01

    A "simplified shear solution" method approximates the through-thickness shear stress distribution within a composite laminate based on an extension of laminated beam theory. The method does not consider the solution of a particular boundary value problem; rather, it requires only knowledge of the global shear loading, geometry, and material properties of the laminate or panel. It is thus analogous to lamination theory in that ply-level stresses can be efficiently determined from global load resultants at a given location in a structure and used to evaluate the margin of safety on a ply-by-ply basis. The simplified shear solution stress distribution is zero at free surfaces, continuous at ply boundaries, and integrates to the applied shear load. The method has been incorporated within the HyperSizer commercial structural sizing software to improve its predictive capability for designing composite structures. The HyperSizer structural sizing software is used extensively by NASA to design composite structures. In the case of through-thickness shear loading on panels, HyperSizer previously included a basic, industry-standard, method for approximating the resulting shear stress distribution in sandwich panels. However, no such method was employed for solid laminate panels. The purpose of the innovation is to provide an approximation of the through-thickness shear stresses in a solid laminate given the through-thickness shear loads (Qx and Qy) on the panel. The method was needed for implementation within the HyperSizer structural sizing software so that the approximated ply-level shear stresses could be utilized in a failure theory to assess the adequacy of a panel design. The simplified shear solution method was developed based on extending and generalizing bi-material beam theory to plate-like structures. It is assumed that the through-thickness shear stresses arise due to local bending of the laminate induced by the through-thickness shear load, and by imposing equilibrium both vertically and horizontally, the through-thickness shear stress distribution can be calculated. The resulting shear stresses integrate to the applied shear load, are continuous at the ply interfaces, and are zero at the laminate-free surfaces. If both Qx and Qy shear loads are present, it is assumed that they act independently and that their effects can be superposed. The calculated shear stresses can be rotated within each ply to the principal material coordinates for use in a ply-level failure criterion. The novelty of the simplified shear solution method is its simplicity and the fact that it does not require solution of a particular boundary value problem. The advantages of the innovation are that an approximation of the though-thickness shear stress distribution can be quickly determined for any solid laminate or solid laminate region within a stiffened panel.

  20. Continuum stress characteristics inside shear bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tordesillas, Antoinette; Peters, John F.; Shi, Jingyu

    2013-06-01

    A defining aspect of the large strain, fully developed plastic flow regime, or "critical state", for granular materials undergoing localized failure is the continual growth of new force chains amidst collapse by buckling of old force chains in the persistent shear band. This paper explores the constitutive response inside shear bands, in particular, the birth-death evolution of force chains for a Cosserat medium, whereby closure relationships for stresses and couple stresses satisfy the isostatic condition, albeit in a spatiotemporal average sense only. The continuum stress-equilibrium relations comprise a hyperbolic system of partial differential equations giving rise to characteristic lines referred to in the literature as stress chains.

  1. Wall shear stress in collapsed tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naili, S.; Ribreau, C.

    1999-01-01

    A small flexural wall rigidity brings unique features to cross-sectional shapes and blood flow within veins, which are characterised by a non-uniform hemodynamical environment acting upon endothelial cells. Velocity fields and related wall shear stress were numerically determined for a large number of conditions, assuming a fully developed, steady, incompressible laminar flow through an uniform smooth pipe with a constant cross-section. It was shown that the flatness greatly influences the resulting distribution of the wall shear stresses along the lumen perimeter. For instance, under a steady longitudinal pressure gradient at about 500 Pascal per meter inside a constant oval-shaped tube, with a lumen perimeter of the order of 5 × 10^{-2} meter, the maximum wall shear stress is found at about 2 Pascal where the local curvature is minimal. On the other hand, the minimal wall shear stress of the order of 1 Pascal is found where the local curvature is maximal. Clear indications have been reported showing that the hemodynamical wall shear stress does alter endothelial cell morphology and orientation. These results are being used for developing an experimental set-up in order to locally map out the characteristic shear stresses looking for endothelial shape modifications whenever a viscous fluid flow is applied.

  2. Quantification of Shear-Induced Platelet Activation: High Shear Stresses for Short Exposure Time.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jun; Chen, Zengsheng; Niu, Shuqiong; Zhang, Jiafeng; Mondal, Nandan K; Griffith, Bartley P; Wu, Zhongjun J

    2015-07-01

    Thrombosis and thromboembolism are the life-threatening clinical complications for patients supported or treated with prosthetic cardiovascular devices. The high mechanical shear stress within these devices is believed to be the major contributing factor to cause platelet activation (PA) and function alteration, leading to thrombotic events. There have been limited quantitative data on how the high mechanical shear stress causes platelet activation. In this study, shear-induced PA in the ranges of well-defined shear stress and exposure time relevant to cardiovascular devices was quantitatively characterized for human blood using two novel flow-through Couette-type blood shearing devices. Four markers of platelet activation-surface P-selectin (CD62p), platelet-derived microparticles (PMPs), platelet-monocyte aggregation (PMA), and soluble P-selectin-were measured by flow cytometry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. The results indicated that PA induced by high shear stresses with short exposure time could be reliably detected with surface P-selectin, and, to a lesser extent, PMPs rather than soluble P-selectin. It was also verified that PMA can be a highly sensitive indirect marker of platelet activation. The quantitative relationship between percentage of activated platelets indicated by surface P-selectin expression and shear stress/exposure time follows well the power law functional form. The coefficients of the power law models of PA based on surface P-selectin expression were derived. PMID:25808300

  3. Time-dependent polymer rheology under constant stress and under constant shear conditions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. H.; Brodkey, R. S.

    1971-01-01

    A kinetic rate theory previously presented for describing non-Newtonian phenomena has been further modified to predict the flow behavior of viscoelastic materials under constant stress conditions. The thixotropic shear stress or shear rate is predicted by the kinetic theory, and the experimental stress or shear rate is obtained by modifying the thixotropic value by a stress or shear rate retardation term. The retardation term stems from a Maxwellian approach for stress retardation. In order to test the validity of this approach, transient and steady-state data were obtained for two solutions of polymethylmethacrylate in diethylphthalate. Both constant stress measurements and constant shear rate data were taken over a broad range.

  4. Adjustable shear stress erosion and transport flume

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, Jesse D. (Carlsbad, NM); Jepsen, Richard A. (Carlsbad, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring the total erosion rate and downstream transport of suspended and bedload sediments using an adjustable shear stress erosion and transport (ASSET) flume with a variable-depth sediment core sample. Water is forced past a variable-depth sediment core sample in a closed channel, eroding sediments, and introducing suspended and bedload sediments into the flow stream. The core sample is continuously pushed into the flow stream, while keeping the surface level with the bottom of the channel. Eroded bedload sediments are transported downstream and then gravitationally separated from the flow stream into one or more quiescent traps. The captured bedload sediments (particles and aggregates) are weighed and compared to the total mass of sediment eroded, and also to the concentration of sediments suspended in the flow stream.

  5. The Concept of Shear Stress in a Solid Material

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culpin, M. F.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses problems encountered in explaining shear stress of a solid in terms of forces on a "pack of cards". Suggest the use of "pure" shear stress rather than "simple" shear stress in presentation to secure a better understanding. Included is an example illustration E occurrence of pure stress. (CC)

  6. ESTIMATION OF EFFECTIVE SHEAR STRESS WORKING ON FLAT SHEET MEMBRANE USING FLUIDIZED MEDIA IN MBRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaw, Hlwan Moe; Li, Tairi; Nagaoka, Hiroshi; Mishima, Iori

    This study was aimed at estimating effective shear stress working on flat sheet membrane by the addition of fluidized media in MBRs. In both of laboratory-scale aeration tanks with and without fluidized media, shear stress variations on membrane surface and water phase velocity variations were measured and MBR operation was conducted. For the evaluation of the effective shear stress working on membrane surface to mitigate membrane surface, simulation of trans-membrane pressure increase was conducted. It was shown that the time-averaged absolute value of shear stress was smaller in the reactor with fluidized media than without fluidized media. However, due to strong turbulence in the reactor with fluidized media caused by interaction between water-phase and media and also due to the direct interaction between membrane surface and fluidized media, standard deviation of shear stress on membrane surface was larger in the reactor with fluidized media than without media. Histograms of shear stress variation data were fitted well to normal distribution curves and mean plus three times of standard deviation was defined to be a maximum shear stress value. By applying the defined maximum shear stress to a membrane fouling model, trans-membrane pressure curve in the MBR experiment was simulated well by the fouling model indicting that the maximum shear stress, not time-averaged shear stress, can be regarded as an effective shear stress to prevent membrane fouling in submerged flat-sheet MBRs.

  7. Determination of surface shear stress with the naphthalene sublimation technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. A.; Greeley, Ronald

    1987-01-01

    Aeolian entrainment and transport are functions of surface shear stress and particle characteristics. Measuring surface shear stress is difficult, however, where logarithmic wind profiles are not found, such as regions around large roughness elements. An outline of a method whereby shear stress can be mapped on the surface around an object is presented. The technique involves the sublimation of naphthalene (C10H8) which is a function of surface shear stress and surface temperature. This technique is based on the assumption that the transfer of momentum, heat and mass are analogous (Reynolds analogy). If the Reynolds analogy can be shown to be correct for a given situation, then knowledge of the diffusion of one property allows the determination of the others. The analytical framework and data acquisition for the method are described. The technique was tested in the Planetary Geology Wind Tunnel. Results show that the naphthalene sublimation technique is a reasonably accurate method for determining shear stress, particularly around objects where numerous point values are needed.

  8. BOUNDARY SHEAR STRESS ALONG VEGETATED STREAMBANKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research is intended to improve our understanding of the role of riparian vegetation in stream morphology by evaluating the effects of vegetation on boundary shear stress, providing insight to the type and density of vegetation required for streambank stability. The resu...

  9. In Vitro Shear Stress Measurements Using Particle Image Velocimetry in a Family of Carotid Artery Models: Effect of Stenosis Severity, Plaque Eccentricity, and Ulceration

    PubMed Central

    Kefayati, Sarah; Milner, Jaques S.; Holdsworth, David W.; Poepping, Tamie L.

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerotic disease, and the subsequent complications of thrombosis and plaque rupture, has been associated with local shear stress. In the diseased carotid artery, local variations in shear stress are induced by various geometrical features of the stenotic plaque. Greater stenosis severity, plaque eccentricity (symmetry) and plaque ulceration have been associated with increased risk of cerebrovascular events based on clinical trial studies. Using particle image velocimetry, the levels and patterns of shear stress (derived from both laminar and turbulent phases) were studied for a family of eight matched-geometry models incorporating independently varied plaque features – i.e. stenosis severity up to 70%, one of two forms of plaque eccentricity, and the presence of plaque ulceration). The level of laminar (ensemble-averaged) shear stress increased with increasing stenosis severity resulting in 2–16 Pa for free shear stress (FSS) and approximately double (4–36 Pa) for wall shear stress (WSS). Independent of stenosis severity, marked differences were found in the distribution and extent of shear stress between the concentric and eccentric plaque formations. The maximum WSS, found at the apex of the stenosis, decayed significantly steeper along the outer wall of an eccentric model compared to the concentric counterpart, with a 70% eccentric stenosis having 249% steeper decay coinciding with the large outer-wall recirculation zone. The presence of ulceration (in a 50% eccentric plaque) resulted in both elevated FSS and WSS levels that were sustained longer (?20 ms) through the systolic phase compared to the non-ulcerated counterpart model, among other notable differences. Reynolds (turbulent) shear stress, elevated around the point of distal jet detachment, became prominent during the systolic deceleration phase and was widely distributed over the large recirculation zone in the eccentric stenoses. PMID:25007248

  10. Fragility of abnormal erythrocytes evaluated by response to shear stress.

    PubMed

    MacCallum, R N; Lynch, E C; Hellums, J D; Alfrey, C P

    1975-01-01

    Shear stress is a potential cause of erythrocyte fragmentation and hemolysis in flowing blood. In this study, the response of abnormal human erythrocytes to shear stress in virto was evaluated using a concentric cylinder viscometer. Compared to normal red cells, deoxygenated erythrocytes from persons with sicle cell anemia were particularly susceptible to fragmentation and hemolysis by shear stress. Oxygenation of sicke cell blood improved the resistance of those red cells to shear stress; they remain, however, more susceptible to shear stress than normal erythrocytes. Erythrocytes from patients with iron deficiency, thalassemia minor, and erythrocyte pyruvate kinase deficiency showed fragmentation and hemolysis at threshold shear stresses intermediate between those ovserved for blood from patients with sickle cell anemia and normal persons. Blood samples from patients with hereditary spherocytosis were more resistant to shear stress than normal blood. These results indicate that there are important differences in the response of various red cells to shear stress. PMID:1141731

  11. Yield stress and shear-banding in granular suspensions

    E-print Network

    Abdoulaye Fall; Francois Bertrand; Guillaume Ovarlez; Daniel Bonn

    2009-07-13

    We study the emergence of a yield stress in dense suspensions of non-Brownian particles, by combining local velocity and concentration measurements using Magnetic Resonance Imaging with macroscopic rheometric experiments. We show that the competition between gravity and viscous stresses is at the origin of the development of a yield stress in these systems at relatively low volume fractions. Moreover, it is accompanied by a shear banding phenomenon that is the signature of this competition. However, if the system is carefully density matched, no yield stress is encountered until a volume fraction of 62.7 0.3%.

  12. Yield Stress and Shear Banding in Granular Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fall, Abdoulaye; Bertrand, François; Ovarlez, Guillaume; Bonn, Daniel

    2009-10-01

    We study the emergence of a yield stress in dense suspensions of non-Brownian particles by combining local velocity and concentration measurements using magnetic resonance imaging with macroscopic rheometric experiments. We show that the competition between gravity and viscous stresses is at the origin of the development of a yield stress in these systems at relatively low volume fractions. Moreover, it is accompanied by a shear-banding phenomenon that is the signature of this competition. However, if the system is carefully density matched, no yield stress is encountered until a volume fraction of 62.7±0.3%.

  13. A Rotary Flow Channel for Shear Stress Sensor Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Scott, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    A proposed shear sensor calibrator consists of a rotating wheel with the sensor mounted tangential to the rim and positioned in close proximity to the rim. The shear stress generated by the flow at the sensor position is simply tau(sub omega) = (mu)r(omega)/h, where mu is the viscosity of the ambient gas, r the wheel radius, omega the angular velocity of the wheel, and h the width of the gap between the wheel rim and the sensor. With numerical values of mu = 31 (mu)Pa s (neon at room temperature), r = 0.5 m, omega = 754 /s (7200 rpm), and h = 50.8 m, a shear stress of tau(sub omega) = 231 Pa can be generated. An analysis based on one-dimensional flow, with the flow velocity having only an angular component as a function of the axial and radial coordinates, yields corrections to the above simple formula for the curvature of the wheel, flatness of the sensor, and finite width of the wheel. It is assumed that the sensor mount contains a trough (sidewalls) to render a velocity release boundary condition at the edges of the rim. The Taylor number under maximum flow conditions is found to be 62.3, sufficiently low to obviate flow instability. The fact that the parameters entering into the evaluation of the shear stress can be measured to high accuracy with well-defined uncertainties makes the proposed calibrator suitable for a physical standard for shear stress calibration.

  14. ON THE FUNDAMENTAL FLUCTUATING WALL-SHEAR-STRESS Olivier Cabrit

    E-print Network

    Marusic, Ivan

    of this fundamental wall-shear-stress in three different configura- tions: boundary layer, pipe, and channel flowsON THE FUNDAMENTAL FLUCTUATING WALL-SHEAR-STRESS Olivier Cabrit Department of Mechanical) and Mathis et al. (2013) suggest the existence of a fundamental wall- shear-stress in any wall

  15. Strain stiffening and stress heterogeneities in sheared collagen networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbach, Jeffrey

    2014-03-01

    Disordered networks of stiff or semi-flexible filaments display unusual mechanical properties, including dramatic stiffening when sheared, but little is known about the spatial distribution of stresses. This talk will introduce the technique of Boundary Stress Microscopy, which adapts the approach of traction force microscopy to rheological measurements in order to quantify the non-uniform surface stresses in sheared soft materials. Our results on networks of the biopolymer collagen, a major component of the extracellular matrix, show stress variations over length scales much larger than the network mesh size. We find that the heterogeneity increases with strain stiffening, with stresses at high strains exceeding average stresses by an order of magnitude. The strain stiffening behavior over a wide range of mesh sizes can be parameterized by a single characteristic strain and associated stress, which describes both the strain stiffening regime and network yielding. The characteristic stress is approximately proportional to network density, but the peak stress at both the characteristic strain and at yielding are remarkably insensitive to concentration. These results show the power of Boundary Stress Microscopy to reveal the nature of stress propagation in disordered soft materials, which is critical for understanding many important mechanical properties, including the ultimate strength of a material and the nature of appropriate microscopic constitutive equations. Supported by the AFOSR (FA9550-10-1-0473) and the NSF (DMR-0804782).

  16. Estimation of bed shear stresses in the pearl river estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huan; Wu, Jia-xue

    2015-03-01

    Mean and fluctuating velocities were measured by use of a pulse coherent acoustic Doppler profiler (PC-ADP) and an acoustic Doppler velocimeter in the tidal bottom boundary layer of the Pearl River Estuary. The bed shear stresses were estimated by four different methods: log profile (LP), eddy correlation (EC), turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), and inertial dissipation (ID). The results show that (a) all four methods for estimating bed stresses have advantages and disadvantages, and they should be applied simultaneously to obtain reliable frictional velocity and to identify potential sources of errors; (b) the LP method was found to be the most suitable to estimate the bed stresses in non-stratified, quasi-steady, and homogeneous flows; and (c) in the estuary where the semi-diurnal tidal current is dominant, bed shear stresses exhibit a strong quarter-diurnal variation.

  17. Applying Shear Stress to Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Russell P; Guidry, Julia B; Messina, Stephanie L; Ahsan, Tabassum

    2016-01-01

    Thorough understanding of the effects of shear stress on stem cells is critical for the rationale design of large-scale production of cell-based therapies. This is of growing importance as emerging tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications drive the need for clinically relevant numbers of both pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) and cells derived from PSCs. Here, we describe the use of a custom parallel plate bioreactor system to impose fluid shear stress on a layer of PSCs adhered to protein-coated glass slides. This system can be useful both for basic science studies in mechanotransduction and as a surrogate model for bioreactors used in large-scale production. PMID:25762292

  18. Effects of dynamic shear and transmural pressure on wall shear stress sensitivity in collecting lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Kornuta, Jeffrey A; Nepiyushchikh, Zhanna; Gasheva, Olga Y; Mukherjee, Anish; Zawieja, David C; Dixon, J Brandon

    2015-11-01

    Given the known mechanosensitivity of the lymphatic vasculature, we sought to investigate the effects of dynamic wall shear stress (WSS) on collecting lymphatic vessels while controlling for transmural pressure. Using a previously developed ex vivo lymphatic perfusion system (ELPS) capable of independently controlling both transaxial pressure gradient and average transmural pressure on an isolated lymphatic vessel, we imposed a multitude of flow conditions on rat thoracic ducts, while controlling for transmural pressure and measuring diameter changes. By gradually increasing the imposed flow through a vessel, we determined the WSS at which the vessel first shows sign of contraction inhibition, defining this point as the shear stress sensitivity of the vessel. The shear stress threshold that triggered a contractile response was significantly greater at a transmural pressure of 5 cmH2O (0.97 dyne/cm(2)) than at 3 cmH2O (0.64 dyne/cm(2)). While contraction frequency was reduced when a steady WSS was applied, this inhibition was reversed when the applied WSS oscillated, even though the mean wall shear stresses between the conditions were not significantly different. When the applied oscillatory WSS was large enough, flow itself synchronized the lymphatic contractions to the exact frequency of the applied waveform. Both transmural pressure and the rate of change of WSS have significant impacts on the contractile response of lymphatic vessels to flow. Specifically, time-varying shear stress can alter the inhibition of phasic contraction frequency and even coordinate contractions, providing evidence that dynamic shear could play an important role in the contractile function of collecting lymphatic vessels. PMID:26333787

  19. A Two-Axis Direct Fluid Shear Stress Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adcock, Edward E.; Scott, Michael A.; Bajikar, Sateesh S.

    2010-01-01

    This innovation is a miniature or micro sized semiconductor sensor design that provides two axis direct non-intrusive measurement of skin friction or wall shear stress in fluid flow. The sensor is fabricated by micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) technology, enabling small size and low cost reproductions. The sensors have been fabricated by utilizing MEMS fabrication processes to bond a sensing element wafer to a fluid coupling wafer. This layering technique provides for an out of plane dimension that is on the same order of length as the inplane dimensions. The sensor design has the following characteristics: a shear force collecting plate with dimensions that can be tailored to various application specific requirements such as spatial resolution, temporal resolution and shear force range and resolution. This plate is located coplanar to both the sensor body and flow boundary, and is connected to a dual axis gimbal structure by a connecting column or lever arm. The dual axis gimbal structure has torsional hinges with embedded piezoresistive torsional strain gauges which provide a voltage output that is correlated to the applied shear stress (and excitation current) on force collection plate that is located on the flow boundary surface (hence the transduction method). This combination of design elements create a force concentration and resolution structure that enables the generation of a large stress on the strain gauge from the small shear stress on the flow boundary wall. This design as well as the use of back side electrical contacts establishes a non-intrusive method to quantitatively measure the shear force vector on aerodynamic bodies.

  20. Sensor for Boundary Shear Stress in Fluid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Chang, Zensheu; Trease, Brian P.; Kerenyi, Kornel; Widholm, Scott E.; Ostlund, Patrick N.

    2012-01-01

    The formation of scour patterns at bridge piers is driven by the forces at the boundary of the water flow. In most experimental scour studies, indirect processes have been applied to estimate the shear stress using measured velocity profiles. The estimations are based on theoretical models and associated assumptions. However, the turbulence flow fields and boundary layer in the pier-scour region are very complex and lead to low-fidelity results. In addition, available turbulence models cannot account accurately for the bed roughness effect. Direct measurement of the boundary shear stress, normal stress, and their fluctuations are attractive alternatives. However, most direct-measurement shear sensors are bulky in size or not compatible to fluid flow. A sensor has been developed that consists of a floating plate with folded beam support and an optical grid on the back, combined with a high-resolution optical position probe. The folded beam support makes the floating plate more flexible in the sensing direction within a small footprint, while maintaining high stiffness in the other directions. The floating plate converts the shear force to displacement, and the optical probe detects the plate s position with nanometer resolution by sensing the pattern of the diffraction field of the grid through a glass window. This configuration makes the sensor compatible with liquid flow applications.

  1. Imaging shear stress distribution and evaluating the stress concentration factor of the human eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph Antony, S.

    2015-03-01

    Healthy eyes are vital for a better quality of human life. Historically, for man-made materials, scientists and engineers use stress concentration factors to characterise the effects of structural non-homogeneities on their mechanical strength. However, such information is scarce for the human eye. Here we present the shear stress distribution profiles of a healthy human cornea surface in vivo using photo-stress analysis tomography, which is a non-intrusive and non-X-ray based method. The corneal birefringent retardation measured here is comparable to that of previous studies. Using this, we derive eye stress concentration factors and the directional alignment of major principal stress on the surface of the cornea. Similar to thermometers being used for monitoring the general health in humans, this report provides a foundation to characterise the shear stress carrying capacity of the cornea, and a potential bench mark for validating theoretical modelling of stresses in the human eye in future.

  2. Application and improvement of Raupach's shear stress partitioning model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, B. A.; Lehning, M.; Gromke, C.

    2012-12-01

    Aeolian processes such as the entrainment, transport and redeposition of sand, soil or snow are able to significantly reshape the earth's surface. In times of increasing desertification and land degradation, often driven by wind erosion, investigations of aeolian processes become more and more important in environmental sciences. The reliable prediction of the sheltering effect of vegetation canopies against sediment erosion, for instance, is a clear practical application of such investigations to identify suitable and sustainable counteractive measures against wind erosion. This study presents an application and improvement of a theoretical model presented by Raupach (Boundary-Layer Meteorology, 1992, Vol.60, 375-395 and Journal of Geophysical Research, 1993, Vol.98, 3023-3029) which allows for quantifying the sheltering effect of vegetation against sediment erosion. The model predicts the shear stress ratios ?S'/? and ?S''/?. Here, ?S is the part of the total shear stress ? that acts on the ground beneath the plants. The spatial peak ?S'' of the surface shear stress is responsible for the onset of particle entrainment whereas the spatial mean ?S' can be used to quantify particle mass fluxes. The precise and accurate prediction of these quantities is essential when modeling wind erosion. Measurements of the surface shear stress distributions ?S(x,y) on the ground beneath live vegetation canopies (plant species: lolium perenne) were performed in a controlled wind tunnel environment to determine the model parameters and to evaluate the model performance. Rigid, non-porous wooden blocks instead of the plants were additionally tested for the purpose of comparison, since previous wind tunnel studies used exclusively artificial plant imitations for their experiments on shear stress partitioning. The model constant c, which is needed to determine the total stress ? for a canopy of interest and which remained rather unspecified to date, was found to be c ? 0.27. It was also found that the model parameter m, which relates ?S'' with ?S' and which is needed to determine the peak surface shear stress ?S'', is rather impractically defined in the original model formulation, because m is identified to be a function of the wind velocity, the roughness element shape and the roughness density. We propose an alternative, more universal definition of an a-parameter as a substitute for the m-parameter simply linearly relating ?S'' with ?S'. This strong linear relation is supported by the measurements and can be made plausible with simple fluid dynamical arguments. The advantage of a over m is that a is solely a function of the roughness element shape. Finally, a method is presented to determine the new a-parameter for different kinds of roughness elements with relatively simple experimental methods.

  3. Effects of shear stress on the microalgae Chaetoceros muelleri

    PubMed Central

    van der Goot, Atze J.; Norsker, Niels-Henrik; Wijffels, René H.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of shear stress on the viability of Chaetoceros muelleri was studied using a combination of a rheometer and dedicated shearing devices. Different levels of shear stress were applied by varying the shear rates and the medium viscosities. It was possible to quantify the effect of shear stress over a wide range, whilst preserving laminar flow conditions through the use of a thickening agent. The threshold value at which the viability of algae was negatively influenced was between 1 and 1.3 Pa. Beyond the threshold value the viability decreased suddenly to values between 52 and 66%. The effect of shear stress was almost time independent compared to normal microalgae cultivation times. The main shear stress effect was obtained within 1 min, with a secondary effect of up to 8 min. PMID:20191365

  4. Shear stress induced stimulation of mammalian cell metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintire, L. V.; Frangos, J. A.; Eskin, S. G.

    1988-01-01

    A flow apparatus was developed for the study of the metabolic response of anchorage dependent cells to a wide range of steady and pulsatile shear stresses under well controlled conditions. Human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers were subjected to steady shear stresses of up to 24 dynes/sq cm, and the production of prostacyclin was determined. The onset of flow led to a burst in prostacyclin production which decayed to a long term steady state rate (SSR). The SSR of cells exposed to flow was greater than the basal release level, and increased linearly with increasing shear stress. It is demonstrated that shear stresses in certain ranges may not be detrimental to mammalian cell metabolism. In fact, throughout the range of shear stresses studied, metabolite production is maximized by maximizing shear stress.

  5. Wall shear stress estimates in coronary artery constrictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Back, L. H.; Crawford, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    Wall shear stress estimates from laminar boundary layer theory were found to agree fairly well with the magnitude of shear stress levels along coronary artery constrictions obtained from solutions of the Navier Stokes equations for both steady and pulsatile flow. The relatively simple method can be used for in vivo estimates of wall shear stress in constrictions by using a vessel shape function determined from a coronary angiogram, along with a knowledge of the flow rate.

  6. Bottom Shear Stresses in Runnels Flanking a Mudflat Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagherazzi, S.; Mariotti, G.

    2010-12-01

    Mudflats are dissected by flow-parallel runnels separated by ridges. These bedforms are usually equispaced with a depth of tens of centimeters. The most accepted hypothesis for runnels formation is the presence of stream-wise helical flows above the mudflat surface. Here we explore an alternative mechanism for the formation and maintenance of runnels that arises near tidal channels draining a mudflat. To this end we present a novel numerical model that determines the distribution of shear stresses inside a runnel. The model is validated with data of tidal velocity and sediment concentration measured in mudflat runnels in Willapa Bay, Washington State, USA. Results show that very shallow flows draining the mudflat platform during ebb are concentrated in the runnels. The corresponding shear stresses are strong enough to erode bottom sediments and keep the runnel flushed. Similar shallow flows during flood might lead to sediment resuspension and further runnel incision. Mudflat runnels in Willapa Bay, WA, USA

  7. Inverse method for estimating shear stress in machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, T. J.; Mates, S. P.; Rhorer, R. L.; Whitenton, E. P.; Basak, D.

    2016-01-01

    An inverse method is presented for estimating shear stress in the work material in the region of chip-tool contact along the rake face of the tool during orthogonal machining. The method is motivated by a model of heat generation in the chip, which is based on a two-zone contact model for friction along the rake face, and an estimate of the steady-state flow of heat into the cutting tool. Given an experimentally determined discrete set of steady-state temperature measurements along the rake face of the tool, it is shown how to estimate the corresponding shear stress distribution on the rake face, even when no friction model is specified.

  8. Determining ow type, shear rate and shear stress in magmas from bubble shapes and orientations

    E-print Network

    Manga, Michael

    the shear environments that produced bubble textures in obsidian samples using the results of theoretical the shapes and orientations of bubbles (vesicles) in obsidian to estimate shear rates and shear stresses conduits, the origin of pyroclastic obsidian, and the emplacement history and dynamics of obsidian flows

  9. In vitro measurements of velocity and wall shear stress in a novel sequential anastomotic graft design model under pulsatile flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Kabinejadian, Foad; Ghista, Dhanjoo N; Su, Boyang; Nezhadian, Mercedeh Kaabi; Chua, Leok Poh; Yeo, Joon Hock; Leo, Hwa Liang

    2014-10-01

    This study documents the superior hemodynamics of a novel coupled sequential anastomoses (SQA) graft design in comparison with the routine conventional end-to-side (ETS) anastomoses in coronary artery bypass grafts (CABG). The flow fields inside three polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) models of coronary artery bypass grafts, including the coupled SQA graft design, a conventional ETS anastomosis, and a parallel side-to-side (STS) anastomosis, are investigated under pulsatile flow conditions using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The velocity field and distributions of wall shear stress (WSS) in the models are studied and compared with each other. The measurement results and WSS distributions, computed from the near wall velocity gradients reveal that the novel coupled SQA design provides: (i) a uniform and smooth flow at its ETS anastomosis, without any stagnation point on the artery bed and vortex formation in the heel region of the ETS anastomosis within the coronary artery; (ii) more favorable WSS distribution; and (iii) a spare route for the blood flow to the coronary artery, to avoid re-operation in case of re-stenosis in either of the anastomoses. This in vitro investigation complements the previous computational studies of blood flow in this coupled SQA design, and is another necessary step taken toward the clinical application of this novel design. At this point and prior to the clinical adoption of this novel design, in vivo animal trials are warranted, in order to investigate the biological effects and overall performance of this anastomotic configuration in vivo. PMID:25103345

  10. A High shear stress segment along the San Andreas Fault: Inferences based on near-field stress direction and stress magnitude observations in the Carrizo Plain Area

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, D. A.,; Younker, L.W.

    1997-01-30

    Nearly 200 new in-situ determinations of stress directions and stress magnitudes near the Carrizo plain segment of the San Andreas fault indicate a marked change in stress state occurring within 20 km of this principal transform plate boundary. A natural consequence of this stress transition is that if the observed near-field ``fault-oblique`` stress directions are representative of the fault stress state, the Mohr-Coulomb shear stresses resolved on San Andreas sub-parallel planes are substantially greater than previously inferred based on fault-normal compression. Although the directional stress data and near-hydrostatic pore pressures, which exist within 15 km of the fault, support a high shear stress environment near the fault, appealing to elevated pore pressures in the fault zone (Byerlee-Rice Model) merely enhances the likelihood of shear failure. These near-field stress observations raise important questions regarding what previous stress observations have actually been measuring. The ``fault-normal`` stress direction measured out to 70 km from the fault can be interpreted as representing a comparable depth average shear strength of the principal plate boundary. Stress measurements closer to the fault reflect a shallower depth-average representation of the fault zone shear strength. If this is true, only stress observations at fault distances comparable to the seismogenic depth will be representative of the fault zone shear strength. This is consistent with results from dislocation monitoring where there is pronounced shear stress accumulation out to 20 km of the fault as a result of aseismic slip within the lower crust loading the upper locked section. Beyond about 20 km, the shear stress resolved on San Andreas fault-parallel planes becomes negligible. 65 refs., 15 figs.

  11. Basal shear stress of debris flow in the runout phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agostino, V.; Bettella, F.; Cesca, M.

    2013-11-01

    A laboratory device is proposed to assess the basal shear stresses generated by debris-flow mixtures during their runout phase. The device consists of an inclinable box with a gate facing a deposition plane. The box is filled with a selected debris-flow mixture, and after sudden opening of the gate, the features of the dam-break deposit can be measured. Based on some simplified assumptions of the energy balance, a methodology is proposed to assess basal shear stresses. The device has been tested using sediment samples from debris-flow deposits generated by two catchments of the Dolomites (Cortina d'Ampezzo, Belluno, Italy) by carrying out runout tests for different sediment concentrations by volume. The results show how the static Coulomb friction law is valid in the runout phase, with friction angles on the order of the angle of repose of the same material in dry conditions. The data elaboration also yields an innovative constitutive equation for shear stresses. This relation merges the Coulomb mixture approach with the concept of a one-phase flow with a certain rheology. This integration offers a useful insight into the weaknesses of the rheological approach if it is not properly scaled up to the ambient pressure of interest.

  12. Two-axis direct fluid shear stress sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bajikar, Sateesh (Inventor); Scott, Michael A. (Inventor); Adcock, Edward E. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A micro sized multi-axis semiconductor skin friction/wall shear stress induced by fluid flow. The sensor design includes a shear/strain transduction gimble connected to a force collecting plate located at the flow boundary surface. The shear force collecting plate is interconnected by an arm to offset the tortional hinges from the fluid flow. The arm is connected to the shear force collecting plate through dual axis torsional hinges with piezoresistive torsional strain gauges. These gauges are disposed on the tortional hinges and provide a voltage output indicative of applied shear stress acting on the force collection plate proximate the flow boundary surface. Offsetting the torsional hinges creates a force concentration and resolution structure that enables the generation of a large stress on the strain gauge from small shear stress, or small displacement of the collecting plate. The design also isolates the torsional sensors from exposure to the fluid flow.

  13. Prediction of Shear Stress in Cerebral Julia Mikhal

    E-print Network

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    Prediction of Shear Stress in Cerebral Aneurysms Julia Mikhal Multiscale Modeling & Simulation ­ University of Twente PhD-TW Colloquium ­ April 08, 2010 #12;Cerebral Aneurysm This presentation: Aneurysm for model vessels and aneurysms J.Mikhal: Prediction of Shear Stress in Cerebral Aneurysms #12;Cerebral

  14. Temporal oscillations of the shear stress and scattered light in a shear-banding--shear-thickening micellar solution.

    PubMed

    Azzouzi, H; Decruppe, J P; Lerouge, S; Greffier, O

    2005-08-01

    The results of optical and rheological experiments performed on a viscoelastic solution (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide + sodium salicylate in water) are reported. The flow curve has a horizontal plateau extending between two critical shear rates characteristic of heterogeneous flows formed by two layers of fluid with different viscosities. These two bands which also have different optical anisotropy are clearly seen by direct observation in polarized light. At the end of the plateau, apparent shear thickening is observed in a narrow range of shear rates; in phase oscillations of the shear stress and of the first normal stress difference are recorded in a shearing device operating under controlled strain. The direct observation of the annular gap of a Couette cell in a direction perpendicular to a plane containing the vorticity shows that the turbidity of the whole sample also undergoes time dependent variations with the same period as the shear stress. However no banding is observed during the oscillations and the flow remains homogeneous. PMID:16132153

  15. Dimensionless critical shear stress in gravel-bed rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, François; Houbrechts, Geoffrey; Peeters, Alexandre; Hallot, Eric; Van Campenhout, Jean; Denis, Anne-Cécile

    2015-12-01

    This paper first compiles critical shear stress values from 26 studies of gravel-bed rivers (GBRs) worldwide. The most frequently proposed value of the Shields criterion (?c) is 0.045, but three major groups with ?c values ranging from < 0.030 to > 0.100 were identified. Second, dimensionless critical shear stresses (the Shields criterion) were evaluated for 14 GBRs (18 sites) with watershed areas ranging from 12 to 3000 km2. Different approaches were used to identify the initial movement of the bed material: painted and PIT-tag pebbles, sediment traps, and bedload samplers. The Shields criterion (?c) was estimated using the total shear stress (?) and the grain shear stress (??). Several shear stresses were also estimated using shear velocities. For bedload transport, we obtained an average Shields criterion (?c) of 0.040. The values were higher in small rivers (> 0.050) than larger rivers (< 0.030) because of more significant bedform shear stresses. The Shields criterion (??c) was lower when the grain shear stress (??) was used and only reached 0.019. Different values are also proposed in relation to the type of mobilization: the ?c value for partial transport was ~ 0.025 and exceeded 0.040 for full transport (usually reached in association with discharges with a 10-year return period). The values based on the results of sediment traps and a bedload sampler were greater than those obtained using tracers, but these differences are smaller than those usually reported in the literature.

  16. Red blood cell damage by shear stress for different blood types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arwatz, Gilad; Bedkowski, Katherine; Smits, Alexander

    2011-11-01

    In surgical practice, blood damage caused by medical devices is often a limiting factor in the duration of an acute procedure or in chronic exposures such as hemodialysis. In order to establish guidelines for designing medical devices, a study was conducted to determine the relationship between shear stress and damage to red blood cells using a concentric Couette device. By measuring the hemolysis level for various shear stresses and exposure times, a non-dimensional relationship between shear stress and blood damage for different blood types was established. Funding provided by Princeton University's Project X.

  17. Hemodynamic shear stress and the endothelium in cardiovascular pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Peter F

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Endothelium lining the cardiovascular system is highly sensitive to hemodynamic shear stresses that act at the vessel luminal surface in the direction of blood flow. Physiological variations of shear stress regulate acute changes in vascular diameter and when sustained induce slow, adaptive, structural-wall remodeling. Both processes are endothelium-dependent and are systemically and regionally compromised by hyperlipidemia, hypertension, diabetes and inflammatory disorders. Shear stress spans a range of spatiotemporal scales and contributes to regional and focal heterogeneity of endothelial gene expression, which is important in vascular pathology. Regions of flow disturbances near arterial branches, bifurcations and curvatures result in complex spatiotemporal shear stresses and their characteristics can predict atherosclerosis susceptibility. Changes in local artery geometry during atherogenesis further modify shear stress characteristics at the endothelium. Intravascular devices can also influence flow-mediated endothelial responses. Endothelial flow-induced responses include a cell-signaling repertoire, collectively known as mechanotransduction, that ranges from instantaneous ion fluxes and biochemical pathways to gene and protein expression. A spatially decentralized mechanism of endothelial mechanotransduction is dominant, in which deformation at the cell surface induced by shear stress is transmitted as cytoskeletal tension changes to sites that are mechanically coupled to the cytoskeleton. A single shear stress mechanotransducer is unlikely to exist; rather, mechanotransduction occurs at multiple subcellular locations. PMID:19029993

  18. Shear-Sensitive Liquid Crystal Coating Method: Surface-Inclination Effects on Shear Vector Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reda, Daniel C.; Wilder, Michael C.; Nixon, David (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The shear-sensitive liquid crystal coating (SSLCC) method is an image-based technique for both visualizing dynamic surface-flow phenomena, such as transition and separation, and for measuring the continuous shear-stress vector distribution acting on an aerodynamic surface. Under proper lighting and viewing conditions (discussed below), the coating changes color in response to an applied aerodynamic shear. This color-change response is continuous and reversible, with a response time of milliseconds, and is a function of both the shear magnitude and the shear vector orientation relative to the observer. The liquid crystal phase of matter is a weakly-ordered, viscous, non-Newtonian fluid state that exists between the nonuniform liquid phase and the ordered solid phase of certain organic compounds. Cholesteric liquid crystal compounds possess a helical molecular arrangement that selectively scatters white light, incident along the helical axis, as a three-dimensional spectrum. This property is linked to the helical pitch length, which is within the range of wavelengths in the visible spectrum. The pitch length, and hence the wavelength of the scattered light, is influenced by shear stress normal to the helical axis. This unique optical property produces a measurable color change in response to an applied shearing force. The full-surface shear stress vector measurement method, developed at NASA-Ames, is schematically illustrated. As with the visualization method, the coated test surface is illuminated from the normal direction with white light and the camera is positioned at an above-plane view angle of approximately 30 deg. Experiments have been initiated at NASA Ames to begin the process of quantifying surface-inclination (surface-curvature) effects on shear vector measurement accuracy. In preliminary experiments, surface-inclination angles theta(sub x), theta(sub y) of 0, +/-5, +/-10, and +/-15 deg were employed. In this arrangement, white-light illumination was positioned normal to the untilted test surface, and the camera above-plane view angle was set at 30 deg relative to the untilted test surface. As can be seen, vector-aligned lambda(sub d) values showed no dependence on theta(sub x) or theta(sub y) for absolute values of these tilt angles is less than or equal to 15 deg. Acquisition and analyses of full-surface color images are presently underway to definitively document the insensitivity limits of the shear vector measurement methodology to surface-slope variations.

  19. Torsional bridge setup for the characterization of integrated circuits and microsensors under mechanical shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, M.; Gieschke, P.; Ruther, P.; Paul, O.

    2011-12-01

    We present a torsional bridge setup for the electro-mechanical characterization of devices integrated in the surface of silicon beams under mechanical in-plane shear stress. It is based on the application of a torsional moment to the longitudinal axis of the silicon beams, which results in a homogeneous in-plane shear stress in the beam surface. The safely applicable shear stresses span the range of ±50 MPa. Thanks to a specially designed clamping mechanism, the unintended normal stress typically stays below 2.5% of the applied shear stress. An analytical model is presented to compute the induced shear stress. Numerical computations verify the analytical results and show that the homogeneity of the shear stress is very high on the beam surface in the region of interest. Measurements with piezoresistive microsensors fabricated using a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor process show an excellent agreement with both the computational results and comparative measurements performed on a four-point bending bridge. The electrical connection to the silicon beam is performed with standard bond wires. This ensures that minimal forces are applied to the beam by the electrical interconnection to the external instrumentation and that devices with arbitrary bond pad layout can be inserted into the setup.

  20. Shear Stress Drives Local Variation in Invertebrate Drift in a Large River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muehlbauer, J. D.; Kennedy, T.; Yackulic, C. B.

    2013-12-01

    Recent advances in physical stream flow measurements using acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) have yielded important insights in hydrology and geomorphology related to discharge and processes such as bed sediment incipient motion. These measurements also have underappreciated potential for use in ecological studies. For example, invertebrate drift, or the downstream transport of benthic-derived invertebrates, is a fundamental process in streams and rivers: it is both critical to the maintenance of benthic invertebrate populations and provides a key mechanism of resource delivery to drift-feeding fishes. However, there is substantial uncertainty regarding the factors that drive spatial variation in invertebrate drift, particularly in large rivers. While laboratory studies in flumes have demonstrated the importance of shear stress in initiating invertebrate drift (similar to studies of bed sediment critical shear stress in fluvial geomorphology), field-based evaluations of the relationship between shear stress and drift would be beneficial. Such field studies, however, are rare. Here, we evaluate the relationship between localized shear stress (N/m2) and invertebrate drift concentrations (#/m3) for the Colorado River downstream of Glen Canyon Dam (steady discharge of 228 m3/s during study). Invertebrate drift was quantified at 25 stations throughout the 25 km long Glen Canyon tailwater segment. We link these drift measurements to empirical measurements of water column shear stress derived from ADCP data, taken at the location of each drift sample and 250 m upstream of each drift sampling location (50 total profiles). Invertebrate drift concentrations varied strongly throughout the 25 km reach, and much of this variation can be explained by localized differences in shear stress. Species composition in the drift also varied with shear stress, suggesting that shear stress exerts a differential control on drift initiation for individual taxa. These results indicate that shear stress is an important physical control on benthic macroinvertebrate drift, even at shear stress values lower than those required for bed sediment mobilization. This empirical relationship between shear stress and drift can aid in the prediction of drift concentrations at different discharges and may inform habitat-specific prey density estimates used in bioenergetics models for drift-feeding trout.

  1. Production of functional proteins: balance of shear stress and gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas John (Inventor); Hammond, Timothy Grant (Inventor); Kaysen, James Howard (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for production of functional proteins including hormones by renal cells in a three dimensional co-culture process responsive to shear stress using a rotating wall vessel. Natural mixture of renal cells expresses the enzyme 1-a-hydroxylase which can be used to generate the active form of vitamin D: 1,25-diOH vitamin D3. The fibroblast cultures and co-culture of renal cortical cells express the gene for erythropoietin and secrete erythropoietin into the culture supernatant. Other shear stress response genes are also modulated by shear stress, such as toxin receptors megalin and cubulin (gp280). Also provided is a method of treating in-need individual with the functional proteins produced in a three dimensional co-culture process responsive to shear stress using a rotating wall vessel.

  2. Production of functional proteins: balance of shear stress and gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas John (Inventor); Hammond, Timothy Grant (Inventor); Kaysen, James Howard (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method for the production of functional proteins including hormones by renal cells in a three dimensional culturing process responsive to shear stress uses a rotating wall vessel. Natural mixture of renal cells expresses the enzyme 1-.alpha.-hydroxylase which can be used to generate the active form of vitamin D: 1,25-diOH vitamin D.sub.3. The fibroblast cultures and co-culture of renal cortical cells express the gene for erythropoietin and secrete erythropoietin into the culture supernatant. Other shear stress response genes are also modulated by shear stress, such as toxin receptors megalin and cubulin (gp280). Also provided is a method of treating an in-need individual with the functional proteins produced in a three dimensional co-culture process responsive to shear stress using a rotating wall vessel.

  3. Production of functional proteins: balance of shear stress and gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas John (Inventor); Hammond, Timothy Grant (Inventor); Kaysen, James Howard (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for production of functional proteins including hormones by renal cells in a three dimensional co-culture process responsive to shear stress using a rotating wall vessel. Natural mixture of renal cells expresses the enzyme 1-a-hydroxylase which can be used to generate the active form of vitamin D: 1,25-diOH vitamin D3. The fibroblast cultures and co-culture of renal cortical cells express the gene for erythropoietin and secrete erythropoietin into the culture supernatant. Other shear stress response genes are also modulated by shear stress, such as toxin receptors megalin and cubulin (gp280). Also provided is a method of treating in-need individual with the functional proteins produced in a three dimensional co-culture process responsive to shear stress using a rotating wall vessel.

  4. Quantification of Interfibrillar Shear Stress in Aligned Soft Collagenous Tissues via Notch Tension Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczesny, Spencer E.; Caplan, Jeffrey L.; Pedersen, Pal; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2015-10-01

    The mechanical function of soft collagenous tissues is largely determined by their hierarchical organization of collagen molecules. While collagen fibrils are believed to be discontinuous and transfer load through shearing of the interfibrillar matrix, interfibrillar shear stresses have never been quantified. Scaling traditional shear testing procedures down to the fibrillar length scale is impractical and would introduce substantial artifacts. Here, through the use of a novel microscopic variation of notch tension testing, we explicitly demonstrate the existence of interfibrillar shear stresses within tendon fascicles and provide the first measurement of their magnitude. Axial stress gradients along the sample length generated by notch tension testing were measured and used to calculate a value of 32?kPa for the interfibrillar shear stress. This estimate is comparable to the interfibrillar shear stress predicted by previous multiscale modeling of tendon fascicles, which supports the hypothesis that fibrils are discontinuous and transmit load through interfibrillar shear. This information regarding the structure-function relationships of tendon and other soft collagenous tissues is necessary to identify potential causes for tissue impairment with degeneration and provide the foundation for developing regenerative repair strategies or engineering biomaterials for tissue replacement.

  5. Quantification of Interfibrillar Shear Stress in Aligned Soft Collagenous Tissues via Notch Tension Testing

    PubMed Central

    Szczesny, Spencer E.; Caplan, Jeffrey L.; Pedersen, Pal; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical function of soft collagenous tissues is largely determined by their hierarchical organization of collagen molecules. While collagen fibrils are believed to be discontinuous and transfer load through shearing of the interfibrillar matrix, interfibrillar shear stresses have never been quantified. Scaling traditional shear testing procedures down to the fibrillar length scale is impractical and would introduce substantial artifacts. Here, through the use of a novel microscopic variation of notch tension testing, we explicitly demonstrate the existence of interfibrillar shear stresses within tendon fascicles and provide the first measurement of their magnitude. Axial stress gradients along the sample length generated by notch tension testing were measured and used to calculate a value of 32?kPa for the interfibrillar shear stress. This estimate is comparable to the interfibrillar shear stress predicted by previous multiscale modeling of tendon fascicles, which supports the hypothesis that fibrils are discontinuous and transmit load through interfibrillar shear. This information regarding the structure-function relationships of tendon and other soft collagenous tissues is necessary to identify potential causes for tissue impairment with degeneration and provide the foundation for developing regenerative repair strategies or engineering biomaterials for tissue replacement. PMID:26469396

  6. The Micro-Pillar Shear-Stress Sensor MPS3 for Turbulent Flow

    PubMed Central

    Große, Sebastian; Schröder, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Wall-shear stress results from the relative motion of a fluid over a body surface as a consequence of the no-slip condition of the fluid in the vicinity of the wall. To determine the two-dimensional wall-shear stress distribution is of utter importance in theoretical and applied turbulence research. In this article, characteristics of the Micro-Pillar Shear-Stress Sensor MPS3, which has been shown to offer the potential to measure the two-directional dynamic wall-shear stress distribution in turbulent flows, will be summarized. After a brief general description of the sensor concept, material characteristics, possible sensor-structure related error sources, various sensitivity and distinct sensor performance aspects will be addressed. Especially, pressure-sensitivity related aspects will be discussed. This discussion will serve as ‘design rules’ for possible new fields of applications of the sensor technology. PMID:22574010

  7. Surface flow visualization with shear stress sensitivive liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pengel, K.

    The use of non-capsulated liquid crystals, which react directly to wall shear forces, for surface flow visualization, is presented. The temperature sensitivity is avoided by producing a mixture with an event temperature (first red indication temperature) above the expected investigation temperature range. Below the event temperature the liquid crystals are only sensitive to shear stress, resulting in a wavelength variation of the reflected light. The analysis of video pictures from a low speed wind tunnel lead to information about the wall shear stress distribution on an Airbus wing, and in particular about the detection of the laminar to turbulent boundary layer transition.

  8. Simplified Shear Solution for Determination of the Shear Stress Distribution in a Composite Panel from the Applied Shear Resultant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Aboudi, Jacob; Yarrington, Phillip W.; Collier, Craig S.

    2008-01-01

    The simplified shear solution method is presented for approximating the through-thickness shear stress distribution within a composite laminate or panel based on laminated beam theory. The method does not consider the solution of a particular boundary value problem; rather it requires only knowledge of the global shear loading, geometry, and material properties of the laminate or panel. It is thus analogous to lamination theory in that ply level stresses can be efficiently determined from global load resultants (as determined, for instance, by finite element analysis) at a given location in a structure and used to evaluate the margin of safety on a ply by ply basis. The simplified shear solution stress distribution is zero at free surfaces, continuous at ply boundaries, and integrates to the applied shear load. Comparisons to existing theories are made for a variety of laminates, and design examples are provided illustrating the use of the method for determining through-thickness shear stress margins in several types of composite panels and in the context of a finite element structural analysis.

  9. Determination of the Shear Stress Distribution in a Laminate from the Applied Shear Resultant--A Simplified Shear Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Aboudi, Jacob; Yarrington, Phillip W.

    2007-01-01

    The simplified shear solution method is presented for approximating the through-thickness shear stress distribution within a composite laminate based on laminated beam theory. The method does not consider the solution of a particular boundary value problem, rather it requires only knowledge of the global shear loading, geometry, and material properties of the laminate or panel. It is thus analogous to lamination theory in that ply level stresses can be efficiently determined from global load resultants (as determined, for instance, by finite element analysis) at a given location in a structure and used to evaluate the margin of safety on a ply by ply basis. The simplified shear solution stress distribution is zero at free surfaces, continuous at ply boundaries, and integrates to the applied shear load. Comparisons to existing theories are made for a variety of laminates, and design examples are provided illustrating the use of the method for determining through-thickness shear stress margins in several types of composite panels and in the context of a finite element structural analysis.

  10. Shear strengths of sandstone fractures under true triaxial stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapang, Piyanat; Walsri, Chaowarin; Sriapai, Tanapol; Fuenkajorn, Kittitep

    2013-03-01

    True triaxial shear tests have been performed to determine the peak shear strengths of tension-induced fractures in three Thai sandstones. A polyaxial load frame is used to apply mutually perpendicular lateral stresses (?p and ?o) to the 76 × 76 × 126 mm rectangular block specimens. The normal to the fracture plane makes an angle of 59.1° with the axial (major principal) stress. Results indicate that the lateral stress that is parallel to the fracture plane (?p) can significantly reduce the peak shear strength of the fractures. Under the same normal stress (?n) the fractures under high ?p dilate more than those under low ?p. According to the Coulomb criterion, the friction angle decreases exponentially with increasing ?p/?o ratio and the cohesion decreases with increasing ?p. The lateral stress ?p has insignificant effect on the basic friction angle of the smooth saw-cut surfaces. The fracture shear strengths under ?p = 0 correlate well with those obtained from the direct shear tests. It is postulated that when the fractures are confined laterally by ?p, their asperities are strained into the aperture, and are sheared off more easily compared to those under unconfined condition.

  11. Avalanches, and evolution of stress and fabric for a cyclically sheared granular material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dengming; Bares, Jonathan; Wang, Dong; Behringer, Bob

    2015-03-01

    Granular materials yield for large enough shear stress, leading to avalanches. We seek to understand the relation between macroscopic avalanches and the the microscopic granular structure. We present an experimental study of a 2D granular material subjected to cyclic pure shear, which we visualized by a photo-elastic technique. We start from a stress-free sample of frictional particles in the shear-jamming regime (?S <= ? <=?J). We apply multiple cycles of pure shear: shear in one direction, followed by a reversal to the original boundary configuration. The strain is made in small quasi-static steps: after each small step, we obtain polarized and unpolarized images yielding particle-scale forces and locations. Statistical measures of the avalanches are in reasonable agreement with recent mean-field avalanche models by Dahmen et al. (Nature Physics 7, 554 (2011)) The system structure evolves slowly to reduce the stress at the extrema of strain, similar to the relaxation observed by Ren et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 018302 (2013)) in a simple shear experiment. To understand how this relaxation occurs, we track the stress and fabric tensors and measures of the strain field over many cycles of shear. Supported by NASA Grant NNX10AU01G, and NSF Grants DMR1206351 and DMS1248071.

  12. Measurement of shear impedances of viscoelastic fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, Shuh-Haw; Chien, Hual-Te; Raptis, A.C.

    1996-12-31

    Shear-wave reflection coefficients from a solid/fluid interface are derived for non-Newtonian fluids that can be described by Maxwell, Voigt, and power-law fluid models. Based on model calculations, we have identified the measurable effects on the reflection coefficients due to fluid non-Newtonian behavior. The models are used to interpret the viscosity data obtained by a technique based on shear impedance measurement.

  13. Role of cytoplasmic and releasable ADP in platelet aggregation induced by laminar shear stress

    SciTech Connect

    Moritz, M.W.; Reimers, R.C.; Baker, R.K.; Sutera, S.P.; Joist, J.H.

    1983-04-01

    We examined the extent of lytic and sublytic platelet injury after exposure of platelets to shear stress and the role in shear-induced PAG of ADP liberated from platelets as a result of shear-induced platelet dense body release and/or platelet damage. Platelets in C-PRP or TAS were subjected to well-defined, laminar shear stress in a rotational viscometer, and PAG (loss of single, nonaggregated platelets), /sup 14/C-serotonin release, and loss from platelets of LDH and /sup 51/Cr were determined. Increased PAG with increasing shear stresses was associated with progressive loss of LDH and /sup 51/Cr. Loss of /sup 51/Cr was consistently in excess of that of LDH, indicating sublytic platelet injury, which was confirmed by electron microscopy. At the lowest shear stress used (50 dynes/cm2), PAG in C-PRP was observed in the absence of detectable loss of /sup 51/Cr or LDH. When platelets in TAS were sheared in the presence of CP/CPK, an enzyme system capable of removing extracellular ADP, PAG was only partially (approximately 40%) inhibited. However, when platelets were preincubated with CP/CPK and ATP (to saturate platelet ADP receptors), shear-induced PAG was almost completely suppressed. Similar results were obtained with PAG induced by collagen in the aggregometer. The findings indicate that (1) shear-induced PAG in this system may occur without measurable lytic or sublytic platelet damage and (2) ADP liberated from platelets as a result of shear-induced release or damage may represent the major if not sole mediator of shear-induced PAG.

  14. Elevated Shear Stress in Arteriovenous Fistulae: Is There Mechanical Homeostasis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGah, Patrick; Leotta, Daniel; Beach, Kirk; Aliseda, Alberto

    2011-11-01

    Arteriovenous fistulae are created surgically to provide access for dialysis in patients with renal failure. The current hypothesis is that the rapid remodeling occurring after the fistula creation is in part a process to restore the mechanical stresses to some preferred level (i.e. mechanical homeostasis). Given that nearly 50% of fistulae require an intervention after one year, understanding the altered hemodynamic stress is important in improving clinical outcomes. We perform numerical simulations of four patient-specific models of functioning fistulae reconstructed from 3D Doppler ultrasound scans. Our results show that the vessels are subjected to `normal' shear stresses away from the anastomosis; about 1 Pa in the veins and about 2.5 Pa in the arteries. However, simulations show that part of the anastomoses are consistently subjected to very high shear stress (>10Pa) over the cardiac cycle. These elevated values shear stresses are caused by the transitional flows at the anastomoses including flow separation and quasiperiodic vortex shedding. This suggests that the remodeling process lowers shear stress in the fistula but that it is limited as evidenced by the elevated shear at the anastomoses. This constant insult on the arterialized venous wall may explain the process of late fistula failure in which the dialysis access become occluded after years of use. Supported by an R21 Grant from NIDDK (DK081823).

  15. Arrest stress of uniformly sheared wet granular matter

    E-print Network

    S. H. Ebrahimnazhad Rahbari; M. Brinkmann; J. Vollmer

    2015-06-21

    We conduct extensive independent numerical experiments considering frictionless disks without internal degrees of freedom (rotation etc.) in two dimensions. We report here that for a large range of the packing fractions below random-close packing, all components of the stress tensor of wet granular materials remain finite in the limit of zero shear rate. This is direct evidence for a fluid-to-solid arrest transition. The offset value of the shear stress characterizes plastic deformation of the arrested state {which corresponds to {\\em dynamic yield stress} of the system}. {Based on an analytical line of argument, we propose that the mean number of capillary bridges per particle, $\

  16. Accurate shear measurement with faint sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Luo, Wentao; Foucaud, Sebastien

    2015-01-01

    For cosmic shear to become an accurate cosmological probe, systematic errors in the shear measurement method must be unambiguously identified and corrected for. Previous work of this series has demonstrated that cosmic shears can be measured accurately in Fourier space in the presence of background noise and finite pixel size, without assumptions on the morphologies of galaxy and PSF. The remaining major source of error is source Poisson noise, due to the finiteness of source photon number. This problem is particularly important for faint galaxies in space-based weak lensing measurements, and for ground-based images of short exposure times. In this work, we propose a simple and rigorous way of removing the shear bias from the source Poisson noise. Our noise treatment can be generalized for images made of multiple exposures through MultiDrizzle. This is demonstrated with the SDSS and COSMOS/ACS data. With a large ensemble of mock galaxy images of unrestricted morphologies, we show that our shear measurement method can achieve sub-percent level accuracy even for images of signal-to-noise ratio less than 5 in general, making it the most promising technique for cosmic shear measurement in the ongoing and upcoming large scale galaxy surveys.

  17. A PZT-based smart aggregate for seismic shear stress monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, S.; Zhang, H. B.; Ou, J. P.

    2013-06-01

    A lead zirconate titanate (PZT)-based smart aggregate (SA) is proposed for seismic shear stress monitoring in concrete structures. This SA uses a d15-mode PZT as the sensing element. A calibration test is designed in which a cyclic shear stress with a dominant frequency of the earthquake response spectrum is applied on the two opposite sides of the proposed SA using a specially designed loading mold. The test is repeated on six copies of the proposed SA. The maximum applied shear stress is larger than the shear strength of ordinary concrete to allow measurements during failure. The output voltage of the SA is experimentally verified as varying linearly with the applied stress in the loading range. The sensitivity of the proposed SA to the applied stress under the given boundary conditions is examined. The calibrated sensitivity value is then compared with the calculated value, which is obtained by computing the stress distribution in the SA using finite element analysis (FEA). The calculated values and the calibrated values are approximately the same, indicating that the established finite element (FE) model is reliable. Monotonic loading is also applied on the proposed SA to induce cracks between the SA and the loading mold, and the SA’s response to cracking processes is examined. It is found that the proposed SA underestimates the cracking process. This study demonstrates that the proposed SA can be used in monitoring the overall shear stress development process in concrete during a seismic event.

  18. Magnetic field effects on shear and normal stresses in magnetorheological finishing.

    PubMed

    Lambropoulos, John C; Miao, Chunlin; Jacobs, Stephen D

    2010-09-13

    We use a recent experimental technique to measure in situ shear and normal stresses during magnetorheological finishing (MRF) of a borosilicate glass over a range of magnetic fields. At low fields shear stresses increase with magnetic field, but become field-independent at higher magnetic fields. Micromechanical models of formation of magnetic particle chains suggest a complex behavior of magnetorheological (MR) fluids that combines fluid- and solid-like responses. We discuss the hypothesis that, at higher fields, slip occurs between magnetic particle chains and the immersed glass part, while the normal stress is governed by the MRF ribbon elasticity. PMID:20940866

  19. Gyrokinetic Simulation of Residual Stress from Diamagnetic Velocity Shears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltz, R. E.; Staebler, G. M.; Solomon, W. M.

    2010-11-01

    Residual stress refers to the remaining toroidal angular momentum (TAM) flux (divided by major radius) when the shear in the parallel velocity (and parallel velocity itself) vanishes. Previously [1] we demonstrated with gyrokinetic (GYRO) simulations that TAM pinching from the diamagnetic level shear in the ExB velocity could provide the residual stress needed for spontaneous toroidal rotation. Here we show that the shear in the diamagnetic velocities themselves provide comparable residual stress (and level of stabilization). The sign of the residual stress, quantified by the ratio of TAM flow to ion power flow (M/P), depends on the signs of the various velocity shears as well as ion (ITG) versus electron (TEM) mode directed turbulence. The residual stress from these temperature and density gradient diamagnetic velocity shears is demonstrated in global gyrokinetic simulation of ``null'' rotation DIIID discharges by matching M/P profiles within experimental error. 8pt [1] R.E. Waltz, G.M. Staebler, J. Candy, and F.L. Hinton, Phys. Plasmas 14, 122507 (2007); errata 16, 079902 (2009).

  20. Radial artery remodeling in response to shear stress increase within arteriovenous fistula for hemodialysis access.

    PubMed

    Ene-Iordache, Bogdan; Mosconi, Lidia; Antiga, Luca; Bruno, Simona; Anghileri, Abramo; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Remuzzi, Andrea

    2003-01-01

    It is known that changes in blood flow induce vascular remodeling and that shear stress, the tractive force acting on the vessel wall due to blood flowing, influences endothelial cell function. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relation between changes in pulsatile shear forces and arterial remodeling in response to chronic elevation in blood flow within the radial artery. The authors studied vessel diameter, flow rate, and shear stress in the radial artery of uremic patients before and after surgical creation of a native arteriovenous fistula for hemodialysis access. For this purpose, the authors used echo-color-Doppler ultrasound to perform diameter and blood velocity measurements. Time-function blood flow rate and wall shear stress were calculated based on arterial diameter, center-line velocity wave-form, and blood viscosity, using a numerical method developed according to Womersley's theory for unsteady flow in tubes. The results confirmed that the radial artery diameter increases in response to a chronic increase in blood flow in uremic patients. Moreover, it seems that the radial artery dilates in such a way as to maintain the peak wall shear stress constant, suggesting that endothelial cells sense the maximum rather than the time-averaged wall shear stress. This finding may lead to further understanding of the mechanisms responsible for endothelial response to physical stimulation by flowing blood. PMID:12791517

  1. Effect of shear stress on water and LDL transport through cultured endothelial cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hongyan; Cancel, Limary M; Tarbell, John M

    2014-04-01

    Previous animal experiments have shown that the transport of LDL into arterial walls is shear stress dependent. However, little work has probed shear effects on LDL transport in vitro where conditions are well defined and mechanisms are more easily explored. Therefore, we measured shear induced water and LDL fluxes across cultured bovine aortic endothelial (BAEC) monolayers in vitro and developed a three-pore model to describe the transport dynamics. Cell apoptosis was quantified by TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. We also examined the role of nitric oxide (NO) in shear induced water and LDL fluxes by incubating BAEC monolayers with an NO synthase inhibitor, NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA). Our results show that direct exposure of endothelial monolayers to 12 dyn/cm2 shear stress for 3 h elicited a 2.37-fold increase in water flux (Jv), a 3.00-fold increase in LDL permeability (Pe), a 1.32-fold increase in LDL uptake, and a 1.68-fold increase in apoptotic rate. L-NMMA treatment of BAEC monolayers blocked shear induced Jv response, but had no significant effect on shear responses of Pe and cell apoptosis. A long time shear exposure (12 h) of endothelial monolayers reduced Pe and apoptotic rate close to the baseline. These results suggest that an acute change in shear stress from a static baseline state induces increases in water flux that are mediated by an NO dependent mechanism. On the other hand, the permeability of endothelial monolayers to LDL is enhanced by a short term-shear application and reduced nearly to the baseline level by a longer time shear exposure, positively correlated to the leaky junctions forming around apoptotic cells. PMID:24583416

  2. Effect of shear stress on water and LDL transport through cultured endothelial cell monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hongyan; Cancel, Limary M.; Tarbell, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Previous animal experiments have shown that the transport of LDL into arterial walls is shear stress dependent. However, little work has probed shear effects on LDL transport in vitro where conditions are well defined and mechanisms are more easily explored. Therefore, we measured shear induced water and LDL fluxes across cultured bovine aortic endothelial (BAEC) monolayers in vitro and developed a three-pore model to describe the transport dynamics. Cell apoptosis was quantified by TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. We also examined the role of nitric oxide (NO) in shear induced water and LDL fluxes by incubating BAEC monolayers with a NO synthase inhibitor, NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA). Our results show that direct exposure of endothelial monolayers to 12 dyn/cm2 shear stress for 3 hours elicited a 2.37-fold increase in water flux (Jv), a 3.00-fold increase in LDL permeability (Pe), a 1.32-fold increase in LDL uptake, and a 1.68-fold increase in apoptotic rate. L-NMMA treatment of BAEC monolayers blocked shear induced Jv response, but had no significant effect on shear responses of Pe and cell apoptosis. A long time shear exposure (12 h) of endothelial monolayers reduced Pe and apoptotic rate close to the baseline. These results suggest that an acute change in shear stress from a static baseline state induces increases in water flux that are mediated by a NO dependent mechanism. On the other hand, the permeability of endothelial monolayers to LDL is enhanced by a short term-shear application and reduced nearly to the baseline level by a longer time shear exposure, positively correlated to the leaky junctions forming around apoptotic cells. PMID:24583416

  3. Pulsed laser Doppler measurements of wind shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimarzio, C.; Harris, C.; Bilbro, J. W.; Weaver, E. A.; Burnham, D. C.; Hallock, J. N.

    1979-01-01

    There is a need for a sensor at the airport that can remotely detect, identify, and track wind shears near the airport in order to assure aircraft safety. To determine the viability of a laser wind-shear system, the NASA pulsed coherent Doppler CO2 lidar (Jelalian et al., 1972) was installed in a semitrailer van with a rooftop-mounted hemispherical scanner and was used to monitor thunderstorm gust fronts. Wind shears associated with the gust fronts at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) between 5 July and 4 August 1978 were measured and tracked. The most significant data collected at KSC are discussed. The wind shears were clearly visible in both real-time velocity vs. azimuth plots and in postprocessing displays of velocities vs. position. The results indicate that a lidar system cannot be used effectively when moderate precipitation exists between the sensor and the region of interest.

  4. Measuring shear modulus of individual fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behlow, Herbert; Saini, Deepika; Oliviera, Luciana; Skove, Malcolm; Rao, Apparao

    2014-03-01

    Fiber technology has advanced to new heights enabling tailored mechanical properties. For reliable fiber applications their mechanical properties must be well characterized at the individual fiber level. Unlike the tensile modulus, which can be well studied in a single fiber, the present indirect and dynamic methods of measuring the shear properties of fibers suffer from various disadvantages such as the interaction between fibers and the influence of damping. In this talk, we introduce a quasi-static method to directly measure the shear modulus of a single micron-sized fiber. Our simple and inexpensive setup yields a shear modulus of 16 and 2 GPa for a single IM7 carbon fiber and a Kevlar fiber, respectively. Furthermore, our setup is also capable of measuring the creep, hysteresis and the torsion coefficient, and examples of these will be presented.

  5. On determining wall shear stress in spatially developing two-dimensional wall-bounded flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdi, Faraz; Johansson, T. Gunnar; White, Christopher M.; Naughton, Jonathan W.

    2014-01-01

    A full momentum integral-based method for determining wall shear stress is presented. The method is mathematically exact and has the advantage of having no explicit streamwise gradient terms. It is applicable for flows that change rapidly in the streamwise direction and, in particular, to flows with ill-defined outer boundary conditions or when the measurement grid does not extend over the whole boundary layer thickness. The method is applied to two different experimental plane turbulent wall jet data sets for which independent estimates of wall shear stress were known, and the different results compare favorably. Complications owing to experimental limitations and measurement error in determining wall shear stress from the proposed method are presented, and mitigating strategies are described.

  6. An evaluation of the Iosipescu specimen for composite materials shear property measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morton, J.; Ho, H.; Tsai, M. Y.; Farley, G. L.

    1992-01-01

    A detailed evaluation of the suitability of the Iosipescu specimen tested in the modified Wyoming fixture is presented. A linear finite element model of the specimen is used to assess the uniformity of the shear stress field in the vicinity of the notch, and demonstrate the effect of the nonuniform stress field upon strain gage measurements used for the determination of composite shear moduli. Based upon test results from graphite-epoxy laminates, the proximity of the load introduction point to the test section and the material orthotropy greatly influence the individual gage readings, however, shear modulus determination is not significantly affected by the lack of pure shear. Correction factors are needed to allow for the nonuniformity of the strain field and the use of the average shear stress in the shear modulus evaluation. The correction factors are determined for the region occupied by the strain gage rosette. A comparison of the strain gage readings from one surface of a specimen with corresponding data from moire interferometry on the opposite face documented an extreme sensitivity of some fiber orientations to eccentric loading which induced twisting and spurious shear stress-strain curves. The discovery of specimen twisting explains the apparently inconsistent shear property data found in the literature. Recommendations for improving the reliability and accuracy of the shear modulus values are made, and the implications for shear strength measurement discussed.

  7. Relationship between Concentration Difference of Different Density Lipoproteins and Shear Stress in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Wei; Yu, Fengxu; Chen, Huaiqing; Zhang, Jianmin; Zhang, Eryong; Guo, Yingqiang; Shi, Yingkang

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has observed concentration polarization in LDL and HDL in the arterial system. However, there is no report that links this concentration polarization to the development of vascular atherosclerosis (AS). Therefore, the purpose of this study is to establish the relationship between concentration difference of LDL and HDL and shear stress using a carotid bifurcation vascular model. PTFE was employed to create the carotid bifurcation model. Endothelial cells were coated on the inner wall of the graft. In a recirculation system, HDL and LDL concentration were measured under two different ICA flow velocities at 5 different locations within our model. We report the following: (1) LDL and HDL concentration difference was observed in both high flow and low flow environments; (2) the degree of LDL and HDL concentration polarization varied depending of high flow and low flow environment; (3) absolute values of concentration difference between LDL and HDL at the inner wall surface decreased with the increase in shear stress when shear stress was more than 1.5?Pa. This variation trend would be more pronounced if shear stress were less than 0.5?Pa. Our study suggests that under the action of shear stress, concentration differences of LDL or HDL create a disturbance in the balance of atherogenic factors and anti-As factors, resulting in the occurrence of AS. PMID:22481972

  8. Development of a new contact-type piezoresistive micro-shear-stress sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, M. C.; Fang, Yean-Kuen; Ju, M. S.; Ho, Jyh-Jier; Ting, S. F.

    2002-04-01

    A prototype contact type micro piezoresistive shear-stress sensor that can be utilized to measure the shear stress between skin of stump and socket of Above-Knee (AK) prosthesis was designed, fabricated and tested. Micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) technology has been chosen for the design because of the low cost, small size and adaptability to this application. In this paper, the Finite Element Method (FEM) package ANSYS has been employed for the stress analysis of the micro shear-stress sensors. The sensors contain two X-ducers that will transform the stresses into an output voltage. In the developed sensor, a 3000X3000X3000 micrometers (superscript 3/ square membrane is formed by bulk micromachining of an n-type <100> monolithic silicon. The piezoresistive strain gauges were implanted with boron ions with a dose of 10(superscript 15/ atoms/cm(superscript 2/. Static characteristics of the shear sensor were determined through a series of calibration tests. The fabricated sensor exhibits a sensitivity of 0.13mV/mA-Mpa for a 1.4N full scales shear force range and the overall mean hysteresis error is than 3.5%. In addition, the results simulated by FEM are validated by comparison with experimental investigations.

  9. Calculation of Near-Bank Velocity and Boundary Shear Stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Detailed knowledge of the flow and boundary shear stress fields near the banks of natural channels is essential for making accurate calculations of rates of near-bank sediment transport and geomorphic adjustment. This paper presents a test of a relatively simple, fully predictive, numerical method f...

  10. Liquid Crystals Indicate Directions Of Surface Shear Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reda, Daniel C.

    1996-01-01

    Report consisting of main text of U.S. Patent 5,394,752 presents detailed information on one aspect of method of using changes in colors of liquid-crystal coatings to indicate instantaneous directions of flow-induced shear stresses (skin friction) on aerodynamic surfaces.

  11. A fluidized bed technique for estimating soil critical shear stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil erosion models, depending on how they are formulated, always have erodibilitiy parameters in the erosion equations. For a process-based model like the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model, the erodibility parameters include rill and interrill erodibility and critical shear stress. Thes...

  12. Production of Functional Proteins: Balance of Shear Stress and Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas John (Inventor); Hammond, Timothy Grant (Inventor); Haysen, James Howard (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention provides for a method of culturing cells and inducing the expression of at least one gene in the cell culture. The method provides for contacting the cell with a transcription factor decoy oligonucleotide sequence directed against a nucleotide sequence encoding a shear stress response element.

  13. WAVE ACTION AND BOTTOM SHEAR STRESSES IN LAKE ERIE

    EPA Science Inventory

    For Lake Erie, the amplitudes and periods of wind-driven, surface gravity waves were calculated by means of the SMB hindcasting method. Bottom orbital velocities and bottom shear stresses were then calculated using linear wave theory and Kajiura's (1968) turbulent oscillating bou...

  14. Micromachined Nickel Floating Element Shear Stress Sensor Array , J. Gallmanb

    E-print Network

    White, Robert D.

    Micromachined Nickel Floating Element Shear Stress Sensor Array Z. Zhaoa , J. Gallmanb , R. Whitea (Technic Copper FB) and patterned lithographically. A Nickel structural layer with varied thickness is deposited from a nickel sulfamate plating solution (Technic Nickel Sulfamate SemiBright) and patterned

  15. Estimation of the bed shear stress in vegetated and bare channels

    E-print Network

    Yang, Qingjun (Judy Qingjun)

    2015-01-01

    The shear stress at the bed of a channel influences important benthic processes such as sediment transport. Several methods exist to estimate the bed shear stress in bare channels without vegetation, but most of these are ...

  16. Estimation of the bed shear stress in vegetated and bare channels with smooth beds

    E-print Network

    Yang, Judy Q.

    The shear stress at the bed of a channel influences important benthic processes such as sediment transport. Several methods exist to estimate the bed shear stress in bare channels without vegetation, but most of these are ...

  17. Influence of inherent structure shear stress of supercooled liquids on their shear moduli

    E-print Network

    Ingo Fuereder; Patrick Ilg

    2015-04-13

    Configurations of supercooled liquids residing in their local potential minimum (i.e. in their inherent structure, IS) were found to support a non-zero shear stress. This IS stress was attributed to the constraint to the energy minimization imposed by boundary conditions, which keep size and shape of the simulation cell fixed. In this paper we further investigate the influence of these boundary conditions on the IS stress. We investigate its importance for the computation of the low frequency shear modulus of a glass obtaining a consistent picture for the low- and high frequency shear moduli over the full temperature range. Hence, we find that the IS stress corresponds to a non-thermal contribution to the fluctuation term in the Born-Green expression. This leads to an unphysical divergence of the moduli in the low temperature limit if no proper correction for this term is applied. Furthermore, we clarify the IS stress dependence on the system size and put its origin on a more formal basis.

  18. Influence of inherent structure shear stress of supercooled liquids on their shear moduli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuereder, Ingo; Ilg, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    Configurations of supercooled liquids residing in their local potential minimum (i.e., in their inherent structure, IS) were found to support a non-zero shear stress. This IS stress was attributed to the constraint to the energy minimization imposed by boundary conditions, which keep size and shape of the simulation cell fixed. In this paper, we further investigate the influence of these boundary conditions on the IS stress. We investigate its importance for the computation of the low frequency shear modulus of a glass obtaining a consistent picture for the low- and high frequency shear moduli over the full temperature range. Hence, we find that the IS stress corresponds to a non-thermal contribution to the fluctuation term in the Born-Green expression. This leads to an unphysical divergence of the moduli in the low temperature limit if no proper correction for this term is applied. Furthermore, we clarify the IS stress dependence on the system size and put its origin on a more formal basis.

  19. Effects of fluid shear stress on polyelectrolyte multilayers by neutron scattering studies.

    PubMed

    Singh, Saurabh; Junghans, Ann; Watkins, Erik; Kapoor, Yash; Toomey, Ryan; Majewski, Jaroslaw

    2015-03-10

    The structure of layer-by-layer (LbL) deposited nanofilm coatings consists of alternating polyethylenimine (PEI) and polystyrenesulfonate (PSS) films deposited on a single crystal quartz substrate. LbL-deposited nanofilms were investigated by neutron reflectomery (NR) in contact with water in the static and fluid shear stress conditions. The fluid shear stress was applied through a laminar flow of the liquid parallel to the quartz/polymer interface in a custom-built solid-liquid interface cell. The scattering length density profiles obtained from NR results of these polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEM), measured under different shear conditions, showed proportional decrease of volume fraction of water hydrating the polymers. For the highest shear rate applied (ca. 6800 s(-1)) the water volume fraction decreased by approximately 7%. The decrease of the volume fraction of water was homogeneous through the thickness of the film. Since there were not any significant changes in the total polymer thickness, it resulted in negative osmotic pressures in the film. The PEM films were compared with the behavior of thin films of thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAM) deposited via spin-coating. The PEM and pNIPAM differ in their interactions with water molecules, and they showed opposite behaviors under the fluid shear stress. In both cases the polymer hydration was reversible upon the restoration of static conditions. A theoretical explanation is given to explain this difference in the effect of shear on hydration of polymeric thin films. PMID:25689755

  20. The Role of Shear Failure on Stress Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, A. W.; Hauser, M.; Couzens-Schultz, B. A.; Gray, G.

    2014-09-01

    Leak-off pressure and lost circulation data are generally thought to be reflective of minimum stress. We propose an alternative interpretation should be considered where the data may reflect a shear failure along zones of pre-existing weakness rather than opening of tensile fractures against the minimum stress. This mechanism has been discussed in a small number of borehole stability and hydraulic fracture papers, but has not been widely applied to leak-off test or lost circulation interpretation. In this paper, we will revisit and expand the concept introduced recently by Couzens-Schultz and Chan (J Struct Geol, doi: 10.1016/j.jsg.2010.06.013, 2010) based on abnormally low leak-off tests in an active thrust belt to the analysis of lost circulation observations in modern-day deltaic environments. In the Gulf of Mexico, lost circulations historically are interpreted as a representation of the minimum horizontal stress due to initiating or reopening of a fracture in tensile mode. However, shear failure or fault reactivation can occur at pressures well below the minimum far-field stress that is typically considered a safe upper bound for mud pressure if pre-existing planes of weakness such as faults or fracture networks exist. We demonstrated a mud loss event is shown to be inconsistent with the tensile failure mode in a normal stress environment, but in good agreement with expectations for shear failure along pre-existing faults.

  1. Arrest stress of uniformly sheared wet granular matter.

    PubMed

    Rahbari, S H Ebrahimnazhad; Brinkmann, M; Vollmer, J

    2015-06-01

    We conduct extensive independent numerical experiments considering frictionless disks without internal degrees of freedom (rotation, etc.) in two dimensions. We report here that for a large range of the packing fractions below random-close packing, all components of the stress tensor of wet granular materials remain finite in the limit of zero shear rate. This is direct evidence for a fluid-to-solid arrest transition. The offset value of the shear stress characterizes plastic deformation of the arrested state which corresponds to dynamic yield stress of the system. Based on an analytical line of argument, we propose that the mean number of capillary bridges per particle, ?, follows a nontrivial dependence on the packing fraction, ?, and the capillary energy, ?. Most noticeably, we show that ? is a generic and universal quantity which does not depend on the driving protocol. Using this universal quantity, we calculate the arrest stress, ?(a), analytically based on a balance of the energy injection rate due to the external force driving the flow and the dissipation rate accounting for the rupture of capillary bridges. The resulting prediction of ?(a) is a nonlinear function of the packing fraction, ?, and the capillary energy, ?. This formula provides an excellent, parameter-free prediction of the numerical data. Corrections to the theory for small and large packing fractions are connected to the emergence of shear bands and of contributions to the stress from repulsive particle interactions, respectively. PMID:26172699

  2. CRITICAL SHEAR STRESSES FOR EROSION AND DEPOSITION OF FINE SUSPENDED SEDIMENTS IN THE FRASER RIVER

    E-print Network

    #12;CRITICAL SHEAR STRESSES FOR EROSION AND DEPOSITION OF FINE SUSPENDED SEDIMENTS IN THE FRASER C T I V E Models of cohesive sediment transport require parameters describing the erosion and deposition rate functions which, at present, can only be obtained by measurements in laboratory flumes using

  3. Shear Stress in Smooth Rectangular Open-Channel Flows and Pierre Y. Julien2

    E-print Network

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    Shear Stress in Smooth Rectangular Open-Channel Flows Junke Guo1 and Pierre Y. Julien2 Abstract: The average bed and sidewall shear stresses in smooth rectangular open-channel flows are determined after solving the continuity and momentum equations. The analysis shows that the shear stresses are function

  4. Direct measurement of shear properties of microfibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behlow, H.; Saini, D.; Oliveira, L.; Durham, L.; Simpson, J.; Serkiz, S. M.; Skove, M. J.; Rao, A. M.

    2014-09-01

    As novel fibers with enhanced mechanical properties continue to be synthesized and developed, the ability to easily and accurately characterize these materials becomes increasingly important. Here we present a design for an inexpensive tabletop instrument to measure shear modulus (G) and other longitudinal shear properties of a micrometer-sized monofilament fiber sample, such as nonlinearities and hysteresis. This automated system applies twist to the sample and measures the resulting torque using a sensitive optical detector that tracks a torsion reference. The accuracy of the instrument was verified by measuring G for high purity copper and tungsten fibers, for which G is well known. Two industrially important fibers, IM7 carbon fiber and Kevlar® 119, were also characterized with this system and were found to have G = 16.5 ± 2.1 and 2.42 ± 0.32 GPa, respectively.

  5. Direct measurement of shear properties of microfibers.

    PubMed

    Behlow, H; Saini, D; Oliveira, L; Durham, L; Simpson, J; Serkiz, S M; Skove, M J; Rao, A M

    2014-09-01

    As novel fibers with enhanced mechanical properties continue to be synthesized and developed, the ability to easily and accurately characterize these materials becomes increasingly important. Here we present a design for an inexpensive tabletop instrument to measure shear modulus (G) and other longitudinal shear properties of a micrometer-sized monofilament fiber sample, such as nonlinearities and hysteresis. This automated system applies twist to the sample and measures the resulting torque using a sensitive optical detector that tracks a torsion reference. The accuracy of the instrument was verified by measuring G for high purity copper and tungsten fibers, for which G is well known. Two industrially important fibers, IM7 carbon fiber and Kevlar(®) 119, were also characterized with this system and were found to have G = 16.5 ± 2.1 and 2.42 ± 0.32 GPa, respectively. PMID:25273783

  6. Direct measurement of shear properties of microfibers

    SciTech Connect

    Behlow, H.; Saini, D.; Durham, L.; Simpson, J.; Skove, M. J.; Rao, A. M.; Oliveira, L.; Serkiz, S. M.

    2014-09-15

    As novel fibers with enhanced mechanical properties continue to be synthesized and developed, the ability to easily and accurately characterize these materials becomes increasingly important. Here we present a design for an inexpensive tabletop instrument to measure shear modulus (G) and other longitudinal shear properties of a micrometer-sized monofilament fiber sample, such as nonlinearities and hysteresis. This automated system applies twist to the sample and measures the resulting torque using a sensitive optical detector that tracks a torsion reference. The accuracy of the instrument was verified by measuring G for high purity copper and tungsten fibers, for which G is well known. Two industrially important fibers, IM7 carbon fiber and Kevlar{sup ®} 119, were also characterized with this system and were found to have G = 16.5 ± 2.1 and 2.42 ± 0.32 GPa, respectively.

  7. Mode selective generation of guided waves by systematic optimization of the interfacial shear stress profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdanpanah Moghadam, Peyman; Quaegebeur, Nicolas; Masson, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Piezoelectric transducers are commonly used in structural health monitoring systems to generate and measure ultrasonic guided waves (GWs) by applying interfacial shear and normal stresses to the host structure. In most cases, in order to perform damage detection, advanced signal processing techniques are required, since a minimum of two dispersive modes are propagating in the host structure. In this paper, a systematic approach for mode selection is proposed by optimizing the interfacial shear stress profile applied to the host structure, representing the first step of a global optimization of selective mode actuator design. This approach has the potential of reducing the complexity of signal processing tools as the number of propagating modes could be reduced. Using the superposition principle, an analytical method is first developed for GWs excitation by a finite number of uniform segments, each contributing with a given elementary shear stress profile. Based on this, cost functions are defined in order to minimize the undesired modes and amplify the selected mode and the optimization problem is solved with a parallel genetic algorithm optimization framework. Advantages of this method over more conventional transducers tuning approaches are that (1) the shear stress can be explicitly optimized to both excite one mode and suppress other undesired modes, (2) the size of the excitation area is not constrained and mode-selective excitation is still possible even if excitation width is smaller than all excited wavelengths, and (3) the selectivity is increased and the bandwidth extended. The complexity of the optimal shear stress profile obtained is shown considering two cost functions with various optimal excitation widths and number of segments. Results illustrate that the desired mode (A0 or S0) can be excited dominantly over other modes up to a wave power ratio of 1010 using an optimal shear stress profile.

  8. Critical shear stress for erosion of cohesive soils subjected to temperatures typical of wildfires

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moody, J.A.; Dungan, Smith J.; Ragan, B.W.

    2005-01-01

    [1] Increased erosion is a well-known response after wildfire. To predict and to model erosion on a landscape scale requires knowledge of the critical shear stress for the initiation of motion of soil particles. As this soil property is temperature-dependent, a quantitative relation between critical shear stress and the temperatures to which the soils have been subjected during a wildfire is required. In this study the critical shear stress was measured in a recirculating flume using samples of forest soil exposed to different temperatures (40??-550??C) for 1 hour. Results were obtained for four replicates of soils derived from three different types of parent material (granitic bedrock, sandstone, and volcanic tuffs). In general, the relation between critical shear stress and temperature can be separated into three different temperature ranges (275??C), which are similar to those for water repellency and temperature. The critical shear stress was most variable (1.0-2.0 N m-2) for temperatures 2.0 N m-2) between 175?? and 275??C, and was essentially constant (0.5-0.8 N m-2) for temperatures >275??C. The changes in critical shear stress with temperature were found to be essentially independent of soil type and suggest that erosion processes in burned watersheds can be modeled more simply than erosion processes in unburned watersheds. Wildfire reduces the spatial variability of soil erodibility associated with unburned watersheds by eliminating the complex effects of vegetation in protecting soils and by reducing the range of cohesion associated with different types of unburned soils. Our results indicate that modeling the erosional response after a wildfire depends primarily on determining the spatial distribution of the maximum soil temperatures that were reached during the wildfire. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. Surface Shear Stress Around a Single Flexible Live Plant and a Rigid Cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, B. A.; Gromke, C.; Leonard, K. C.; Clifton, A.; Lehning, M.

    2010-12-01

    The sheltering effect of vegetation against soil erosion and snow transport has direct implications on land degradation and local water storage as snow in many arid and semi arid regions. Plants influence the erosion, transport and redeposition of soil and snow by the wind through momentum absorption, local stress concentration, trapping particles in motion and reducing the area of sediment exposed to the wind. The shear stress distributions on the ground beneath plant canopies determine the onset and magnitude of differential soil and snow erosion on rough or vegetated surfaces, but this has been studied exclusively with artificial and rigid vegetation elements thus far. Real plants have highly irregular structures that can be extremely flexible and porous. They align with the flow at higher wind speeds, resulting in considerable changes to the drag and flow regimes relative to rigid imitations of comparable size. We present measurements in the SLF atmospheric boundary layer wind tunnel of the surface shear stress distribution around a live grass plant (Lolium Perenne) and a solid cylinder of comparable size. Irwin sensors are used to measure pressure differences close to the surface which can be calibrated with surface shear stress velocities. The basal to frontal area index of the plant and the cylinder as well as the Reynolds number of the two experimental setups have been checked for similarity and show good agreement. Distinctive differences between the shear stress pattern around the plant and the cylinder can be attributed to the influence of the plant’s porosity and flexibility. The sheltered zone behind the plant is narrower in cross-stream and longer in streamwise direction than that of the cylinder. For the plant, the lowest shear stresses in the sheltered zone are 50% lower than the mean surface shear stress (? = 0.15 N/m2) in the undisturbed flow. The sheltering was higher behind the cylinder with values reduced by 70% relative to background. “Speed-up” zones on both sides of the roughness elements experienced peak shear stress values 60% above background for the plant and almost 130% higher for the cylinder. While the integral sheltering effect of the plant is smaller in size and magnitude than that of the cylinder, the peak shear stresses in the lateral speed up zones are significantly lower. Since the onset of soil erosion occurs when a critical threshold shear stress is experienced, the lower peak shear stress means that plants provide better protection against soil erosion than rigid elements. This result suggests that parameterizations of flow over vegetated surfaces based on measurements of rigid elements may be incorrect. Further work will investigate sheltering and shear stress concentrations as a function of cylinder / plant density using real canopies instead of single objects.

  10. Stress-structure relation in dense colloidal melt under forward and instantaneous reversal of shear

    E-print Network

    Amit Kumar Bhattacharjee

    2015-06-16

    Dense supercooled colloidal melt in forward shear from a quiescent state shows overshoot in shear stress at 10% strain with an unchanged fluid structure at equal stress before and after overshoot. In addition, we find overshoot in normal stress with a monotonic increase in osmotic pressure at an identical strain. The first and second normal stress become comparable in magnitude and opposite in sign. Functional dependence of the steady state stress and osmotic pressure with Peclet number demonstrate signature of crossover between Newtonian and nearly- Newtonian regime. Moreover, instantaneous shear reversal from steady state exhibit Bauschinger effect, where strong history dependence is observed depending on the time of flow reversal. The distribution of particulate stress and osmotic pressure at the point of flow reversal is shown to be a signature of the subsequent response. We link the history dependence of the stress-strain curves to changes in the fluid structure measured through the angular components of the radial distribution function. A uniform compression in transition from forward to reversed flowing state is found.

  11. Structure-Enhanced Yield Shear Stress in Electrorheological Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, R.; Lan, Y. C.; Xu, X.

    A new technology, compression-assisted aggregation, is developed to enhance the strength of electrorheological (ER) fluids. The yield shear stress of ER fluids depends on the fluid microstructure. The unassisted electric-field induced ER structure mainly consists of single chains, whose weak points are at their ends. This new technology produces a structure consisting of robust thick columns with strong ends. As the weak points of the original ER structure are greatly enforced, the new structure makes ER fluids super-strong: At a moderate electric field and moderate pressure the yield shear stress of ER fluids at 35% volume fraction exceeds 100 kPa, well above any requirement for major industrial applications.

  12. Mathematical Modeling of Intravascular Blood Coagulation under Wall Shear Stress

    PubMed Central

    Rukhlenko, Oleksii S.; Dudchenko, Olga A.; Zlobina, Ksenia E.; Guria, Georgy Th.

    2015-01-01

    Increased shear stress such as observed at local stenosis may cause drastic changes in the permeability of the vessel wall to procoagulants and thus initiate intravascular blood coagulation. In this paper we suggest a mathematical model to investigate how shear stress-induced permeability influences the thrombogenic potential of atherosclerotic plaques. Numerical analysis of the model reveals the existence of two hydrodynamic thresholds for activation of blood coagulation in the system and unveils typical scenarios of thrombus formation. The dependence of blood coagulation development on the intensity of blood flow, as well as on geometrical parameters of atherosclerotic plaque is described. Relevant parametric diagrams are drawn. The results suggest a previously unrecognized role of relatively small plaques (resulting in less than 50% of the lumen area reduction) in atherothrombosis and have important implications for the existing stenting guidelines. PMID:26222505

  13. Wind waves on a mudflat: The influence of fetch and depth on bed shear stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariotti, Giulio; Fagherazzi, Sergio

    2013-06-01

    Wind waves were measured in the Willapa Bay mudflats, Washington State, USA, for two months. Wave height, period, and bed shear stresses were modulated by water depth (0-3.5m), wind speed (0-20m/s), and fetch (1-5km). Good agreement was found between the measured waves and predictions of the wave spectral model SWAN using either simplified 1D flat bottom or 2D geometries. The relationship between bed shear stress and water depth shows a dependence on fetch: the decay of bed shear stress with increasing water depth is gradual for long fetch and rapid for short fetch. This difference is explained by the coupled effects of water depth, wave height and wave period. Due to the fetch-dependent bed shear stress, different morphological consequences for tidal flats of different size are predicted. In small (˜2km) and sheltered tidal flats, waves cause the largest sediment resuspension when water levels are near mean sea level. In extensive tidal flats (˜20km) or in flats exposed to waves propagating from deep water, waves also are effective in causing substrate erosion during high tides or large storm surges.

  14. Wind waves on a mudflat: The influence of fetch and depth on bed shear stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariotti, Giulio; Fagherazzi, Sergio

    2013-06-01

    Wind waves were measured in the Willapa Bay mudflats, Washington State, USA, for two months. Wave height, period, and bed shear stresses were modulated by water depth (0-3.5 m), wind speed (0-20 m/s), and fetch (1-5 km). Good agreement was found between the measured waves and predictions of the wave spectral model SWAN using either simplified 1D flat bottom or 2D geometries. The relationship between bed shear stress and water depth shows a dependence on fetch: the decay of bed shear stress with increasing water depth is gradual for long fetch and rapid for short fetch. This difference is explained by the coupled effects of water depth, wave height and wave period. Due to the fetch-dependent bed shear stress, different morphological consequences for tidal flats of different size are predicted. In small (˜2 km) and sheltered tidal flats, waves cause the largest sediment resuspension when water levels are near mean sea level. In extensive tidal flats (˜20 km) or in flats exposed to waves propagating from deep water, waves also are effective in causing substrate erosion during high tides or large storm surges.

  15. Development of a MEMS dual-axis differential capacitance floating element shear stress sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, Casey; Griffin, Benjamin

    2015-09-01

    A single-axis MEMS wall shear stress sensor with differential capacitive transduction method is produced. Using a synchronous modulation and demodulation interface circuit, the system is capable of making real time measurements of both mean and fluctuating wall shear stress. A sensitivity of 3.44 mV/Pa is achieved, with linearity in response demonstrated up to testing limit of 2 Pa. Minimum detectable signals of 340 ?Pa at 100 Hz and 120 ?Pa at 1 kHz are indicated, with a resonance of 3.5 kHz. Multiple full scale wind tunnel tests are performed, producing spectral measurements of turbulent boundary layers in wind speeds ranging up to 0.5 Ma (18 Pa of mean wall shear stress). The compact packaging allows for minimally invasive installation, and has proven relatively robust over multiple testing events. Temperature sensitivity, likely due to poor CTE matching of packaged materials, is an ongoing concern being addressed. These successes are being directly leveraged into a development plan for a dual-axis wall shear stress sensor, capable of producing true vector estimates at the wall.

  16. Application of multiple levels of fluid shear stress to endothelial cells plated on polyacrylamide gels†

    PubMed Central

    Galie, P. A.; van Oosten, A.; Chen, C. S.

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of endothelial cell response to fluid shear stress have previously been performed on unphysiologically rigid substrates. We describe the design and implementation of a microfluidic device that applies discrete levels of shear stress to cells plated on hydrogel-based substrates of physiologicallyrelevant stiffness. The setup allows for measurements of cell morphology and inflammatory response to the combined stimuli, and identifies mechanisms by which vascular stiffening leads to pathological responses to blood flow. We found that the magnitude of shear stress required to affect endothelial cell morphology and inflammatory response depended on substrate stiffness. Endothelial cells on 100 Pa substrates demonstrate a greater increase in cell area and cortical stiffness and decrease in NF-?B nuclear translocation in response to TNF-? treatment compared to controls than cells plated on 10 kPa substrates. The response of endothelial cells on soft substrates to shear stress depends on the presence of hyaluronan (HA). These results emphasize the importance of substrate stiffness on endothelial function, and elucidate a means by which vascular stiffening in aging and disease can impact the endothelium. PMID:25573790

  17. Characterizations and Correlations of Wall Shear Stress in Aneurysmal Flow.

    PubMed

    Arzani, Amirhossein; Shadden, Shawn C

    2016-01-01

    Wall shear stress (WSS) is one of the most studied hemodynamic parameters, used in correlating blood flow to various diseases. The pulsatile nature of blood flow, along with the complex geometries of diseased arteries, produces complicated temporal and spatial WSS patterns. Moreover, WSS is a vector, which further complicates its quantification and interpretation. The goal of this study is to investigate WSS magnitude, angle, and vector changes in space and time in complex blood flow. Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) was chosen as a setting to explore WSS quantification. Patient-specific computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were performed in six AAAs. New WSS parameters are introduced, and the pointwise correlation among these, and more traditional WSS parameters, was explored. WSS magnitude had positive correlation with spatial/temporal gradients of WSS magnitude. This motivated the definition of relative WSS gradients. WSS vectorial gradients were highly correlated with magnitude gradients. A mix WSS spatial gradient and a mix WSS temporal gradient are proposed to equally account for variations in the WSS angle and magnitude in single measures. The important role that WSS plays in regulating near wall transport, and the high correlation among some of the WSS parameters motivates further attention in revisiting the traditional approaches used in WSS characterizations. PMID:26592536

  18. Non-volcanic tremor driven by large transient shear stresses.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, Justin L; Vidale, John E; Gomberg, Joan; Bodin, Paul; Creager, Kenneth C; Malone, Stephen D

    2007-08-01

    Non-impulsive seismic radiation or 'tremor' has long been observed at volcanoes and more recently around subduction zones. Although the number of observations of non-volcanic tremor is steadily increasing, the causative mechanism remains unclear. Some have attributed non-volcanic tremor to the movement of fluids, while its coincidence with geodetically observed slow-slip events at regular intervals has led others to consider slip on the plate interface as its cause. Low-frequency earthquakes in Japan, which are believed to make up at least part of non-volcanic tremor, have focal mechanisms and locations that are consistent with tremor being generated by shear slip on the subduction interface. In Cascadia, however, tremor locations appear to be more distributed in depth than in Japan, making them harder to reconcile with a plate interface shear-slip model. Here we identify bursts of tremor that radiated from the Cascadia subduction zone near Vancouver Island, Canada, during the strongest shaking from the moment magnitude M(w) = 7.8, 2002 Denali, Alaska, earthquake. Tremor occurs when the Love wave displacements are to the southwest (the direction of plate convergence of the overriding plate), implying that the Love waves trigger the tremor. We show that these displacements correspond to shear stresses of approximately 40 kPa on the plate interface, which suggests that the effective stress on the plate interface is very low. These observations indicate that tremor and possibly slow slip can be instantaneously induced by shear stress increases on the subduction interface-effectively a frictional failure response to the driving stress. PMID:17671500

  19. FOXC2 and fluid shear stress stabilize postnatal lymphatic vasculature.

    PubMed

    Sabine, Amélie; Bovay, Esther; Demir, Cansaran Saygili; Kimura, Wataru; Jaquet, Muriel; Agalarov, Yan; Zangger, Nadine; Scallan, Joshua P; Graber, Werner; Gulpinar, Elgin; Kwak, Brenda R; Mäkinen, Taija; Martinez-Corral, Inés; Ortega, Sagrario; Delorenzi, Mauro; Kiefer, Friedemann; Davis, Michael J; Djonov, Valentin; Miura, Naoyuki; Petrova, Tatiana V

    2015-10-01

    Biomechanical forces, such as fluid shear stress, govern multiple aspects of endothelial cell biology. In blood vessels, disturbed flow is associated with vascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis, and promotes endothelial cell proliferation and apoptosis. Here, we identified an important role for disturbed flow in lymphatic vessels, in which it cooperates with the transcription factor FOXC2 to ensure lifelong stability of the lymphatic vasculature. In cultured lymphatic endothelial cells, FOXC2 inactivation conferred abnormal shear stress sensing, promoting junction disassembly and entry into the cell cycle. Loss of FOXC2-dependent quiescence was mediated by the Hippo pathway transcriptional coactivator TAZ and, ultimately, led to cell death. In murine models, inducible deletion of Foxc2 within the lymphatic vasculature led to cell-cell junction defects, regression of valves, and focal vascular lumen collapse, which triggered generalized lymphatic vascular dysfunction and lethality. Together, our work describes a fundamental mechanism by which FOXC2 and oscillatory shear stress maintain lymphatic endothelial cell quiescence through intercellular junction and cytoskeleton stabilization and provides an essential link between biomechanical forces and endothelial cell identity that is necessary for postnatal vessel homeostasis. As FOXC2 is mutated in lymphedema-distichiasis syndrome, our data also underscore the role of impaired mechanotransduction in the pathology of this hereditary human disease. PMID:26389677

  20. FOXC2 and fluid shear stress stabilize postnatal lymphatic vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Sabine, Amélie; Bovay, Esther; Demir, Cansaran Saygili; Kimura, Wataru; Jaquet, Muriel; Agalarov, Yan; Zangger, Nadine; Scallan, Joshua P.; Graber, Werner; Gulpinar, Elgin; Kwak, Brenda R.; Mäkinen, Taija; Martinez-Corral, Inés; Ortega, Sagrario; Delorenzi, Mauro; Kiefer, Friedemann; Davis, Michael J.; Djonov, Valentin; Miura, Naoyuki; Petrova, Tatiana V.

    2015-01-01

    Biomechanical forces, such as fluid shear stress, govern multiple aspects of endothelial cell biology. In blood vessels, disturbed flow is associated with vascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis, and promotes endothelial cell proliferation and apoptosis. Here, we identified an important role for disturbed flow in lymphatic vessels, in which it cooperates with the transcription factor FOXC2 to ensure lifelong stability of the lymphatic vasculature. In cultured lymphatic endothelial cells, FOXC2 inactivation conferred abnormal shear stress sensing, promoting junction disassembly and entry into the cell cycle. Loss of FOXC2-dependent quiescence was mediated by the Hippo pathway transcriptional coactivator TAZ and, ultimately, led to cell death. In murine models, inducible deletion of Foxc2 within the lymphatic vasculature led to cell-cell junction defects, regression of valves, and focal vascular lumen collapse, which triggered generalized lymphatic vascular dysfunction and lethality. Together, our work describes a fundamental mechanism by which FOXC2 and oscillatory shear stress maintain lymphatic endothelial cell quiescence through intercellular junction and cytoskeleton stabilization and provides an essential link between biomechanical forces and endothelial cell identity that is necessary for postnatal vessel homeostasis. As FOXC2 is mutated in lymphedema-distichiasis syndrome, our data also underscore the role of impaired mechanotransduction in the pathology of this hereditary human disease. PMID:26389677

  1. Mechanical properties of jammed packings of frictionless spheres under an applied shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao; Tong, Hua; Xu, Ning

    2014-11-01

    By minimizing a thermodynamic-like potential, we unbiasedly sample the potential energy landscape of soft and frictionless spheres under a constant shear stress. We obtain zero-temperature jammed states under desired shear stresses and investigate their mechanical properties as a function of the shear stress. As a comparison, we also obtain the jammed states from the quasistatic-shear sampling in which the shear stress is not well-controlled. Although the yield stresses determined by both samplings show the same power-law scaling with the compression from the jamming transition point J at zero temperature and shear stress, for finite size systems the quasistatic-shear sampling leads to a lower yield stress and a higher critical volume fraction at point J. The shear modulus of the jammed solids decreases with increasing shear stress. However, the shear modulus does not decay to zero at yielding. This discontinuous change of the shear modulus implies the discontinuous nature of the unjamming transition under nonzero shear stress, which is further verified by the observation of a discontinuous jump in the pressure from the jammed solids to the shear flows. The pressure jump decreases upon decompression and approaches zero at the critical-like point J, in analogy with the well-known phase transitions under an external field. The analysis of the force networks in the jammed solids reveals that the force distribution is more sensitive to the increase of the shear stress near point J. The force network anisotropy increases with increasing shear stress. The weak particle contacts near the average force and under large shear stresses it exhibit an asymmetric angle distribution.

  2. Mechanical properties of jammed packings of frictionless spheres under applied shear stress

    E-print Network

    Hao Liu; Hua Tong; Ning Xu

    2015-02-03

    By minimizing a thermodynamic-like potential, we unbiasedly sample the potential energy landscape of soft and frictionless spheres under constant shear stress. We obtain zero-temperature jammed states under desired shear stresses and investigate their mechanical properties as a function of the shear stress. As a comparison, we also obtain jammed states from the quasistatic-shear sampling in which the shear stress is not well-controlled. Although the yield stresses determined by both samplings show the same power-law scaling with the compression from point $J$, i.e.~the jamming transition point at zero temperature and shear stress, for finite size systems, the quasistatic-shear sampling leads to a lower yield stress and a higher critical volume fraction of point $J$. The shear modulus of jammed solids decreases when increasing the shear stress. However, the shear modulus does not decay to zero at yielding. This discontinuous change of the shear modulus implies the discontinuous nature of the unjamming transition under nonzero shear stress, which is further verified by the observation of a discontinuous jump of the pressure from jammed solids to shear flows. The pressure jump decreases upon decompression and approaches zero at the critical-like point $J$, in analogy with well-known phase transitions under external field. The analysis of force networks in jammed solids reveals that the force distribution is more sensitive to the increase of the shear stress near point $J$. The force network anisotropy increases with the shear stress. Weak particle contacts near the average force and under large shear stresses exhibit asymmetric angle distribution.

  3. Mechanisms for three kinds of limiting shear stresses appearing in the traction modes of viscous, viscoelastic, and glassy states of lubricants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, H.; Fujita, Y.

    2014-06-01

    We present that the tractional flow of a lubricant shows three kinds of limiting shear stresses at which the shear stresses take place independently of the shear rates in its viscous, viscoelastic, and glassy states. We propose three models on the mechanisms for the limiting shear stresses, based on the data of Brillouin spectra and viscosity of viscoelastic liquids previously reported by us and based on the data of the deformation of glassy polymers referred from others. The Brillouin spectra of a viscoelastic lubricant measured at up to 5 GPa at 25 and 80 °C show that we could not observe a frequency dispersion in sound waves below 0.8 GPa at 80 °C, while we can observe the frequency dispersion above 0.1 MPa at 25 °C owing to the viscosity of the lubricant. This result predicts the viscous limiting shear stress in the viscous state owing to the disappearance of meso-structures by heating and shearing under pressure. The viscosity of a polymer measured around the glass transition temperature (Tg) shows that Tg determined by the viscosity measurement is 27 K lower than that determined by calorimetry. This result predicts the elastic limiting shear stress in the viscoelastic state near the glass transition pressure (Pg) owing to the shear thinning effect by shearing a lubricant film. In addition, there is the plastic limiting shear stress in the glassy state owing to the yield stress at which the tractional flow of a glassy lubricant behaves as a plastic solid.

  4. An Evaluation of the Iosipescu Specimen for Composite Materials Shear Property Measurement. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Henjen

    1991-01-01

    A detailed evaluation of the suitability of the Iosipescu specimen tested in the modified Wyoming fixture is presented. An experimental investigation using conventional strain gage instrumentation and moire interferometry is performed. A finite element analysis of the Iosipescu shear test for unidirectional and cross-ply composites is used to assess the uniformity of the shear stress field in the vicinity of the notch, and demonstrate the effect of the nonuniform stress field upon the strain gage measurements used for the determination of composite shear moduli. From the test results for graphite-epoxy laminates, it is shown that the proximity of the load introduction point to the test section greatly influences the individual gage readings for certain fiber orientations but the effect upon shear modulus measurement is relatively unimportant. A numerical study of the load contact effect shows the sensitivity of some fiber configurations to the specimen/fixture contact mechanism and may account for the variations in the measured shear moduli. A comparison of the strain gage readings from one surface of a specimen with corresponding data from moire interferometry on the opposite face documented an extreme sensitivity of some fiber orientations to eccentric loading which induced twisting and yielded spurious shear stress-strain curves. In the numerical analysis, it is shown that the Iosipescu specimens for different fiber orientations have to be modeled differently in order to closely approximate the true loading conditions. Correction factors are needed to allow for the nonuniformity of the strain field and the use of the average shear stress in the shear modulus evaluation. The correction factors, which are determined for the region occupied by the strain gage rosette, are found to be dependent upon the material orthotropic ratio and the finite element models. Based upon the experimental and numerical results, recommendations for improving the reliability and accuracy of the shear modulus values are made, and the implications for shear strength measurement discussed. Further application of the Iosipescu shear test to woven fabric composites is presented. The limitations of the traditional strain gage instrumentation on the satin weave and high tow plain weave fabrics is discussed. Test results of a epoxy based aluminum particulate composite is also presented. A modification of the Iosipescu specimen is proposed and investigated experimentally and numerically. It is shown that the proposed new specimen design provides a more uniform shear stress field in the test section and greatly reduces the normal and shear stress concentrations in the vicinity of the notches. While the fabrication and the material cost of the proposed specimen is tremendously reduced, it is shown the accuracy of the shear modulus measurement is not sacrificed.

  5. Validity of Measurement of Shear Modulus by Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography in Human Pennate Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Naokazu; Hirata, Kosuke; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Yoshitake, Yasuhide

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound shear wave elastography is becoming a valuable tool for measuring mechanical properties of individual muscles. Since ultrasound shear wave elastography measures shear modulus along the principal axis of the probe (i.e., along the transverse axis of the imaging plane), the measured shear modulus most accurately represents the mechanical property of the muscle along the fascicle direction when the probe’s principal axis is parallel to the fascicle direction in the plane of the ultrasound image. However, it is unclear how the measured shear modulus is affected by the probe angle relative to the fascicle direction in the same plane. The purpose of the present study was therefore to examine whether the angle between the principal axis of the probe and the fascicle direction in the same plane affects the measured shear modulus. Shear modulus in seven specially-designed tissue-mimicking phantoms, and in eleven human in-vivo biceps brachii and medial gastrocnemius were determined by using ultrasound shear wave elastography. The probe was positioned parallel or 20° obliquely to the fascicle across the B-mode images. The reproducibility of shear modulus measurements was high for both parallel and oblique conditions. Although there was a significant effect of the probe angle relative to the fascicle on the shear modulus in human experiment, the magnitude was negligibly small. These findings indicate that the ultrasound shear wave elastography is a valid tool for evaluating the mechanical property of pennate muscles along the fascicle direction. PMID:25853777

  6. Internal wave stress-shear correlations: A choice of reference frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, David C.; Cox, Charles S.

    1987-01-01

    A numerical simulation of internal waves using an eikonal approach is analyzed for a relation between the short wavelength, relatively high frequency waves, and the velocity and shear resulting from a background of low vertical wavenumber waves through which the short waves propagate. The background consists predominantly of quasi-inertial motions. The results indicate a strong correlation between the horizontal group velocity of the short waves and the shear of the background when the short waves have been refracted to 10 meters or less in vertical wavelength. It appears that rapid refraction of the short waves to dissipative scales (< 5 m) then occurs as they become oriented with the shear. The directional anisotropy of the short high frequency waves at dissipation scales suggests an average u-w correlation. Thus the high Reynolds stresses predicted by Müller [1976] are primarily associated with the shear of long wave inertial motions. In nature, the u-w correlation would only be seen if the averaging is done in a reference frame that is allowed to rotate with the shear. A fixed frame averaging would give a near zero result, thus accounting for the absence of stress-shear correlations in the fixed frame measurements of Ruddick and Joyce [1978]. Vertical profiler data of horizontal velocity are also examined for indications of a correlation in the short wave velocity field relative to the long wave shear and velocity fields. These observations are dominated by low frequency, quasi inertial oscillations. There is no consistent evidence of a directional anisotropy in the short wave field which is dependent on the long wave shear, but weak evidence of velocity polarization such that the long and short waves are polarized in the same direction.

  7. Miniature Laser Doppler Velocimeter for Measuring Wall Shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gharib, Morteza; Modarress, Darius; Forouhar, Siamak; Fourguette, Dominique; Taugwalder, Federic; Wilson, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    A miniature optoelectronic instrument has been invented as a nonintrusive means of measuring a velocity gradient proportional to a shear stress in a flow near a wall. The instrument, which can be mounted flush with the wall, is a variant of a basic laser Doppler velocimeter. The laser Doppler probe volume can be located close enough to the wall (as little as 100 micron from the surface) to lie within the viscosity-dominated sublayer of a turbulent boundary layer. The instrument includes a diode laser, the output of which is shaped by a diffractive optical element (DOE) into two beams that have elliptical cross sections with very high aspect ratios.

  8. The influence of surface micro-structure on endothelialization under supraphysiological wall shear stress

    E-print Network

    Daraio, Chiara

    Adhesion Vascular endothelial cadherin Wall shear stress a b s t r a c t Interaction between plateletsThe influence of surface micro-structure on endothelialization under supraphysiological wall shear, altogether defined as the process of endo- thelialization. Supraphysiological wall shear stress (WSS) levels

  9. Nature of stress accommodation in sheared granular material: Insights from 3D numerical modeling

    E-print Network

    Mair, Karen

    Nature of stress accommodation in sheared granular material: Insights from 3D numerical modeling distinct accumulations of granular wear material. During shear, this granular material accommodates stress the nature of contact force distributions during 3D granular shear. Our 3D discrete numerical models consist

  10. A New Model to Calculate Friction Coefficients and Shear Stresses in Thermal Drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Jun; Blau, Peter Julian

    2008-01-01

    A new analytical model for thermal drilling (also known as friction drilling) has been developed. The model distinguishes itself from recent work of other investigators by improving on two aspects: (1) the new model defines material plastic flow in terms of the yield in shear rather than the yield in compression, and (2) it uses a single, variable friction coefficient instead of assuming two unrelated friction coefficients in fixed values. The time dependence of the shear stress and friction coefficient at the hole walls, which cannot be measured directly in thermal drilling, can be calculated using this model from experimentally-measured values of the instantaneous thrust force and torque. Good matches between the calculated shear strengths and the handbook values for thermally drilling low carbon steel confirm the model's validity.

  11. Dual shear wave induced laser speckle contrast signal and the improvement in shear wave speed measurement.

    PubMed

    Li, Sinan; Cheng, Yi; Eckersley, Robert J; Elson, Daniel S; Tang, Meng-Xing

    2015-06-01

    Shear wave speed is quantitatively related to tissue viscoelasticity. Previously we reported shear wave tracking at centimetre depths in a turbid optical medium using laser speckle contrast detection. Shear wave progression modulates displacement of optical scatterers and therefore modulates photon phase and changes the laser speckle patterns. Time-resolved charge-coupled device (CCD)-based speckle contrast analysis was used to track shear waves and measure the time-of-flight of shear waves for speed measurement. In this manuscript, we report a new observation of the laser speckle contrast difference signal for dual shear waves. A modulation of CCD speckle contrast difference was observed and simulation reproduces the modulation pattern, suggesting its origin. Both experimental and simulation results show that the dual shear wave approach generates an improved definition of temporal features in the time-of-flight optical signal and an improved signal to noise ratio with a standard deviation less than 50% that of individual shear waves. Results also show that dual shear waves can correct the bias of shear wave speed measurement caused by shear wave reflections from elastic boundaries. PMID:26114021

  12. Dual shear wave induced laser speckle contrast signal and the improvement in shear wave speed measurement

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sinan; Cheng, Yi; Eckersley, Robert J; Elson, Daniel S; Tang, Meng-Xing

    2015-01-01

    Shear wave speed is quantitatively related to tissue viscoelasticity. Previously we reported shear wave tracking at centimetre depths in a turbid optical medium using laser speckle contrast detection. Shear wave progression modulates displacement of optical scatterers and therefore modulates photon phase and changes the laser speckle patterns. Time-resolved charge-coupled device (CCD)-based speckle contrast analysis was used to track shear waves and measure the time-of-flight of shear waves for speed measurement. In this manuscript, we report a new observation of the laser speckle contrast difference signal for dual shear waves. A modulation of CCD speckle contrast difference was observed and simulation reproduces the modulation pattern, suggesting its origin. Both experimental and simulation results show that the dual shear wave approach generates an improved definition of temporal features in the time-of-flight optical signal and an improved signal to noise ratio with a standard deviation less than 50% that of individual shear waves. Results also show that dual shear waves can correct the bias of shear wave speed measurement caused by shear wave reflections from elastic boundaries. PMID:26114021

  13. Dynamic and shear stress rheological properties of guar galactomannans and its hydrolyzed derivatives.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Majid; Bakalis, Serafim; Gouseti, Ourania; Zahoor, Tahir; Anjum, Faqir Muhammad; Shahid, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Guar galactomannan from seed of Cyamopsis tetragonolobus was hydrolyzed using acid (HCl), base [Ba(OH)2] and enzyme (mannanase) method to obtain depolymerized substances with possible functional applications as soluble dietary fiber. Rheological behavior of crude, purified, and depolymerized guar gum solutions was studied at 25 °C, using shear stress and dynamic oscillatory measurements, performed with controlled stress rheometer Bohlin CVO (Malvern Instruments) fitted with cone-and-plate geometry. The various guar gums solutions with different viscosities exhibited shear-thinning behavior at high shear rate and Newtonian behavior at low shear rate. At low shear rate, sigma crude guar gum (SCGG), crude guar gum (CGG), acid hydrolyzed guar gum (AHGG) and enzyme hydrolyzed guar gum (EHGG) exhibited viscosities of 18.59, 1.346, 0.149 and 0.022 Pas, respectively. Oscillatory experiments (G", G') of gums solutions showed typical behavior of weak viscoelastic gel. All investigated guar gums were further used for glucose bio-accessibility using a novel in vitro small intestinal model (SIM). All gums solutions resulted in 20% reduction in simulated glucose absorption, indicating a non-significant functionality difference between various guar gums. So, it can be concluded that hydrolyzed guar gums without disturbing their rheological and physiological behavior would be useful for incorporation in various food products as soluble dietary fiber. PMID:25256551

  14. Role of xanthine oxidoreductase and NAD(P)H oxidase in endothelial superoxide production in response to oscillatory shear stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNally, J. Scott; Davis, Michael E.; Giddens, Don P.; Saha, Aniket; Hwang, Jinah; Dikalov, Sergey; Jo, Hanjoong; Harrison, David G.

    2003-01-01

    Oscillatory shear stress occurs at sites of the circulation that are vulnerable to atherosclerosis. Because oxidative stress contributes to atherosclerosis, we sought to determine whether oscillatory shear stress increases endothelial production of reactive oxygen species and to define the enzymes responsible for this phenomenon. Bovine aortic endothelial cells were exposed to static, laminar (15 dyn/cm2), and oscillatory shear stress (+/-15 dyn/cm2). Oscillatory shear increased superoxide (O2.-) production by more than threefold over static and laminar conditions as detected using electron spin resonance (ESR). This increase in O2*- was inhibited by oxypurinol and culture of endothelial cells with tungsten but not by inhibitors of other enzymatic sources. Oxypurinol also prevented H2O2 production in response to oscillatory shear stress as measured by dichlorofluorescin diacetate and Amplex Red fluorescence. Xanthine-dependent O2*- production was increased in homogenates of endothelial cells exposed to oscillatory shear stress. This was associated with decreased xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) protein levels and enzymatic activity resulting in an elevated ratio of xanthine oxidase (XO) to XDH. We also studied endothelial cells lacking the p47phox subunit of the NAD(P)H oxidase. These cells exhibited dramatically depressed O2*- production and had minimal XO protein and activity. Transfection of these cells with p47phox restored XO protein levels. Finally, in bovine aortic endothelial cells, prolonged inhibition of the NAD(P)H oxidase with apocynin decreased XO protein levels and prevented endothelial cell stimulation of O2*- production in response to oscillatory shear stress. These data suggest that the NAD(P)H oxidase maintains endothelial cell XO levels and that XO is responsible for increased reactive oxygen species production in response to oscillatory shear stress.

  15. Proposal of a novel evaluation index for the effects of shear stress and exposure time on hepatocyte damage.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Toshitaka; Obara, Hiromichi; Hsu, Huai-Che; Mizunuma, Hiroshi; Matsuno, Naoto; Enosawa, Shin

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to propose a novel evaluation index for the effects of shear stress level and exposure time on hepatocyte damage. Suspensions of rat hepatocytes (0.5 mL) were subjected to shear stress from 1.2 to 3.1 Pa for 10 min (n = 3) using a rheoscope. We counted living and dead cells in photographs taken at 1-min intervals using a digital camera attached to the microscope. Living and dead cells were distinguished using a Trypan blue exclusion test. Under each level of shear stress, at each 1-min time interval, we measured the viability [living-cell number (t)/countable cell number (t)] and the ratio of living cells [RLC: living-cell number (t)/countable cell number in the initial condition]. The effects of shear stress and exposure time on viability and RLC were assessed by multiple regression analysis. As expected, we observed an increase in the number of dead cells and little change in the number of living cells when shear stress was increased. The coefficient of determination (R (2)) to predict the effectiveness of viability and RLC indicated a low to moderate correlation. Viability correlated with shear stress and exposure time (p < 0.001); however, RLC only correlated with exposure time of shear stress (p < 0.001). In this test condition, viability was strongly related not to living-cell damage but to dead-cell damage. Therefore, we propose RLC as a novel and effective index for investigating the effect of shear stress on living hepatocytes. PMID:25833037

  16. Shear stress activation of nuclear receptor PXR in endothelial detoxification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohong; Fang, Xi; Zhou, Jing; Chen, Zhen; Zhao, Beilei; Xiao, Lei; Liu, Ao; Li, Yi-Shuan J; Shyy, John Y-J; Guan, Youfei; Chien, Shu; Wang, Nanping

    2013-08-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are constantly exposed to xenobiotics and endobiotics or their metabolites, which perturb EC function, as well as to shear stress, which plays a crucial role in vascular homeostasis. Pregnane X receptor (PXR) is a nuclear receptor and a key regulator of the detoxification of xeno- and endobiotics. Here we show that laminar shear stress (LSS), the atheroprotective flow, activates PXR in ECs, whereas oscillatory shear stress, the atheroprone flow, suppresses PXR. LSS activation of PXR in cultured ECs led to the increased expression of a PXR target gene, multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1). An in vivo study using rats showed that the expression of MDR1 was significantly higher in the endothelium from the descending thoracic aorta, where flow is mostly laminar, than from the inner curvature of aortic arch, where flow is disturbed. Functionally, LSS-activated PXR protects ECs from apoptosis triggered by doxorubicin via the induction of MDR1 and other detoxification genes. PXR also suppressed the expression of proinflammatory adhesion molecules and monocyte adhesion in response to TNF-? and lipopolysaccharide. Overexpression of a constitutively active PXR in rat carotid arteries potently attenuated proinflammatory responses. In addition, cDNA microarray revealed a large number of the PXR-activated endothelial genes whose products are responsible for major steps of detoxification, including phase I and II metabolizing enzymes and transporters. These detoxification genes in ECs are induced by LSS in ECs in a PXR-dependent manner. In conclusion, our results indicate that PXR represents a flow-activated detoxification system to protect ECs against damage by xeno- and endobiotics. PMID:23878263

  17. Deformation measurements of composite multi-span beam shear specimens by Moire interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, D.; Czarnek, R.; Joh, D.; Wood, J.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental analyses were performed for determination of in plane deformations and shear strains in unidirectional and quasi-isotropic graphite-epoxy beams. Forty-eight ply beams were subjected to 5 point and 3 point flexure. Whole field measurements were recorded at load levels from about 20% to more than 90% of failure loads. Contour maps of U and W displacement fields were obtained by moire interferometry, using reference gratings of 2400 lines/mm. Clearly defined fringes with fringe orders exceeding 1000 were obtained. Whole field contour maps of shear strains were obtained by a method developed for these tests. Various anomalous effects were detected in the displacement fields. Their analysis indicated excess shear strains in resin rich zones in regions of shear tractions; free edge shear strains in quasi-isotropic specimens in regions of normal stresses; and shear stresses associated with cyclic shear compliances of quasi-isotropic plies in regions of shear tractions. Their contributions could occur independently or in superposition. Qualitative analyses addressed questions of relaxation; influence of contact stress distribution; specimen failure; effect of specimen overhang; nonlinearity; and qualities of 5 and 3 point flexure tests.

  18. Two-Axis Direct Fluid Shear Stress Sensor for Aerodynamic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bajikar, Sateesh S.; Scott, Michael A.; Adcock, Edward E.

    2011-01-01

    This miniature or micro-sized semiconductor sensor design provides direct, nonintrusive measurement of skin friction or wall shear stress in fluid flow situations in a two-axis configuration. The sensor is fabricated by microelectromechanical system (MEMS) technology, enabling small size and multiple, low-cost reproductions. The sensors may be fabricated by bonding a sensing element wafer to a fluid-coupling element wafer. Using this layered machine structure provides a truly three-dimensional device.

  19. Shear-band arrest and stress overshoots during inhomogeneous flow in a metallic glass

    E-print Network

    Giger, Christine

    Shear-band arrest and stress overshoots during inhomogeneous flow in a metallic glass R. Maaß, D-band arrest and stress overshoots during inhomogeneous flow in a metallic glass R. Maaß,1,a),b) D. Klaumu regime of a shear band in bulk metallic glasses, stress transients in terms of overshoots are observed

  20. Shear wave measurements in shock-induced, high-pressure phases

    SciTech Connect

    Aidun, J.B.

    1993-01-01

    Structural phase transformations under shock loading are of considerable interest for understanding the response of solids under nonhydrostatic stresses and at high strain-rates. Examining shock-induced transformations from continuum level measurements is fundamentally constrained by the inability to directly identify microscopic processes, and also by the limited number of material properties that can be directly measured. ne latter limitation can be reduced by measuring both shear and compression waves using Lagrangian gauges in combined, compression and shear loading. The shear wave serves as an important, real-time probe of the shocked state and unloading response. Using results from a recent study of CaCO[sub 3], the unique information obtained from the shear wave speed and the detailed structure of the shear wave are shown to be useful for distinguishing the effects of phase transformations from yielding, as well as in characterizing the high-pressure phases and the yielding process under shock loading.

  1. Shear wave measurements in shock-induced, high-pressure phases

    SciTech Connect

    Aidun, J.B.

    1993-07-01

    Structural phase transformations under shock loading are of considerable interest for understanding the response of solids under nonhydrostatic stresses and at high strain-rates. Examining shock-induced transformations from continuum level measurements is fundamentally constrained by the inability to directly identify microscopic processes, and also by the limited number of material properties that can be directly measured. ne latter limitation can be reduced by measuring both shear and compression waves using Lagrangian gauges in combined, compression and shear loading. The shear wave serves as an important, real-time probe of the shocked state and unloading response. Using results from a recent study of CaCO{sub 3}, the unique information obtained from the shear wave speed and the detailed structure of the shear wave are shown to be useful for distinguishing the effects of phase transformations from yielding, as well as in characterizing the high-pressure phases and the yielding process under shock loading.

  2. Analysis of bonded joints. [shear stress and stress-strain diagrams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivas, S.

    1975-01-01

    A refined elastic analysis of bonded joints which accounts for transverse shear deformation and transverse normal stress was developed to obtain the stresses and displacements in the adherends and in the bond. The displacements were expanded in terms of polynomials in the thicknesswise coordinate; the coefficients of these polynomials were functions of the axial coordinate. The stress distribution was obtained in terms of these coefficients by using strain-displacement and stress-strain relations. The governing differential equations were obtained by integrating the equations of equilibrium, and were solved. The boundary conditions (interface or support) were satisfied to complete the analysis. Single-lap, flush, and double-lap joints were analyzed, along with the effects of adhesive properties, plate thicknesses, material properties, and plate taper on maximum peel and shear stresses in the bond. The results obtained by using the thin-beam analysis available in the literature were compared with the results obtained by using the refined analysis. In general, thin-beam analysis yielded reasonably accurate results, but in certain cases the errors were high. Numerical investigations showed that the maximum peel and shear stresses in the bond can be reduced by (1) using a combination of flexible and stiff bonds, (2) using stiffer lap plates, and (3) tapering the plates.

  3. Microvascular Endothelial Cells Migrate Upstream and Align Against the Shear Stress Field Created by Impinging Flow

    PubMed Central

    Ostrowski, Maggie A.; Huang, Ngan F.; Walker, Travis W.; Verwijlen, Tom; Poplawski, Charlotte; Khoo, Amanda S.; Cooke, John P.; Fuller, Gerald G.; Dunn, Alexander R.

    2014-01-01

    At present, little is known about how endothelial cells respond to spatial variations in fluid shear stress such as those that occur locally during embryonic development, at heart valve leaflets, and at sites of aneurysm formation. We built an impinging flow device that exposes endothelial cells to gradients of shear stress. Using this device, we investigated the response of microvascular endothelial cells to shear-stress gradients that ranged from 0 to a peak shear stress of 9–210 dyn/cm2. We observe that at high confluency, these cells migrate against the direction of fluid flow and concentrate in the region of maximum wall shear stress, whereas low-density microvascular endothelial cells that lack cell-cell contacts migrate in the flow direction. In addition, the cells align parallel to the flow at low wall shear stresses but orient perpendicularly to the flow direction above a critical threshold in local wall shear stress. Our observations suggest that endothelial cells are exquisitely sensitive to both magnitude and spatial gradients in wall shear stress. The impinging flow device provides a, to our knowledge, novel means to study endothelial cell migration and polarization in response to gradients in physical forces such as wall shear stress. PMID:24461011

  4. Experimental Quantification of Resolved Shear Stresses for Dislocation Motion in TiN.

    PubMed

    Li, N; Misra, A; Shao, S; Wang, J

    2015-07-01

    Experimental quantification of the critical resolved shear stress (CRSS) at the level of unit dislocation glide is still a challenge. By using in situ nanoindentation in a high-resolution transmission electron microscope and strain analysis of the acquired structural images, the CRSS for the motion of individual dislocations on {110}?011? slip system and glide dislocation re-emission from a tilt grain boundary in TiN are quantified. This work offers an approach to measure the local stresses associated with dislocation motion in high-strength materials. PMID:26065576

  5. Sitting and endothelial dysfunction: the role of shear stress.

    PubMed

    Thosar, Saurabh S; Johnson, Blair D; Johnston, Jeanne D; Wallace, Janet P

    2012-12-01

    Sedentary activity is a modifiable life-style behavior and a key component in the etiology of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ACVD). US adults and children spend more than half their waking time in sedentary pursuits. Sedentary activity has been shown to result in impaired insulin sensitivity, impaired metabolic function and attenuated endothelial function, which are classic markers of ACVD. Sedentary activity is defined as 'sitting without otherwise being active.' This behavior promotes reduced muscular activity of the lower extremities which decreases leg blood flow, increases blood pooling in the calf, augments mean arterial pressure, and deforms arterial segments resulting in low mean shear stress (SS). SS activates distinct physiological mechanisms which have been proposed to be protective against ACVD; specifically through a SS-induced endothelium-derived nitric oxide mechanism. Reduced bioavailability of nitric oxide creates a pro-oxidant milieu resulting in increased oxidative stress. There is sufficient evidence which demonstrates that endothelial function is attenuated in the presence of oxidative stress. Sedentary activity results in low SS in the lower extremities which may result in increased oxidative stress and impaired endothelial function. This review furthers the use of sitting as model to study the effects of inactivity, discusses possible physiological mechanisms and suggests future directions. PMID:23197245

  6. Magnetically applied pressure-shear : a new technique for direct strength measurement at high pressure (final report for LDRD project 117856).

    SciTech Connect

    Lamppa, Derek C.; Haill, Thomas A.; Alexander, C. Scott; Asay, James Russell

    2010-09-01

    A new experimental technique to measure material shear strength at high pressures has been developed for use on magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) drive pulsed power platforms. By applying an external static magnetic field to the sample region, the MHD drive directly induces a shear stress wave in addition to the usual longitudinal stress wave. Strength is probed by passing this shear wave through a sample material where the transmissible shear stress is limited to the sample strength. The magnitude of the transmitted shear wave is measured via a transverse VISAR system from which the sample strength is determined.

  7. Shear stress reduces protease activated receptor-1 expression in human endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, K. T.; Eskin, S. G.; Patterson, C.; Runge, M. S.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Shear stress has been shown to regulate several genes involved in the thrombotic and proliferative functions of endothelial cells. Thrombin receptor (protease-activated receptor-1: PAR-1) increases at sites of vascular injury, which suggests an important role for PAR-1 in vascular diseases. However, the effect of shear stress on PAR-1 expression has not been previously studied. This work investigates effects of shear stress on PAR-1 gene expression in both human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs). Cells were exposed to different shear stresses using a parallel plate flow system. Northern blot and flow cytometry analysis showed that shear stress down-regulated PAR-1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels in both HUVECs and HMECs but with different thresholds. Furthermore, shear-reduced PAR-1 mRNA was due to a decrease of transcription rate, not increased mRNA degradation. Postshear stress release of endothelin-1 in response to thrombin was reduced in HUVECs and HMECs. Moreover, inhibitors of potential signaling pathways applied during shear stress indicated mediation of the shear-decreased PAR-1 expression by protein kinases. In conclusion, shear stress exposure reduces PAR-1 gene expression in HMECs and HUVECs through a mechanism dependent in part on protein kinases, leading to altered endothelial cell functional responses to thrombin.

  8. XIAP is essential for shear stress-enhanced Tyr-576 phosphorylation of FAK

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Sunyoung; Park, Heonyong

    2010-08-20

    Research highlights: {yields} Laminar shear stress phosphorylates Tyr-576 in FAK. {yields} XIAP is essential for shear stress-induced phosphorylation of Tyr-576. {yields} XIAP knockdown induces shear stress-triggered translocation of FAK into nucleus. {yields} XIAP regulates ERK activation by maintaining the Src-accessible location of FAK. -- Abstract: In endothelial cells, X-chromosome linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) regulates cell survival, migration and adhesion. We have recently found that XIAP recruits focal adhesion kinase (FAK) into integrin-associated focal adhesions, controlling cell migration. However, little is understood about the molecular mechanisms by which FAK modulation is controlled by XIAP. In this study, we show that XIAP modulates FAK activity through the control of FAK phosphorylation. In bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC), phosphorylation of Tyr-576 in FAK is elevated by laminar shear stress. This elevated phosphorylation appears to be responsible for shear stress-stimulated ERK activation. We found that XIAP knockdown reduces shear stress-enhanced phosphorylation of Tyr-576 and induces shear stress-triggered translocation of FAK into nucleus. Nuclear translocation of FAK reduces contact between FAK and Src, a kinase which phosphorylates Tyr-576. This spatial segregation of FAK from Src decreases Tyr-576 phosphorylation and thus shear-stimulated ERK activation. Taken together, our results demonstrate that XIAP plays a key role in shear stress-stimulated ERK activation by maintaining the Src-accessible location of FAK.

  9. Interlaminar shear stress effects on the postbuckling response of graphite-epoxy panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelstad, S. P.; Knight, N. F., Jr.; Reddy, J. N.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of shear flexibility on overall postbuckling response was assessed, and transverse shear stress distributions in relation to panel failure were examined. Nonlinear postbuckling results are obtained for finite element models based on classical laminated plate theory and first-order shear deformation theory. Good correlation between test and analysis is obtained. The results presented analytically substantiate the experimentally observed failure mode.

  10. Pressure and shear stress in trabecular bone marrow during whole bone loading.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Thomas A; Schwaner, Stephen A; LaNeve, Anthony J; Kreipke, Tyler C; Niebur, Glen L

    2015-09-18

    Skeletal adaptation to mechanical loading is controlled by mechanobiological signaling. Osteocytes are highly responsive to applied strains, and are the key mechanosensory cells in bone. However, many cells residing in the marrow also respond to mechanical cues such as hydrostatic pressure and shear stress, and hence could play a role in skeletal adaptation. Trabecular bone encapsulates marrow, forming a poroelastic solid. According to the mechanical theory, deformation of the pores induces motion in the fluid-like marrow, resulting in pressure and velocity gradients. The latter results in shear stress acting between the components of the marrow. To characterize the mechanical environment of trabecular bone marrow in situ, pore pressure within the trabecular compartment of whole porcine femurs was measured with miniature pressure transducers during stress-relaxation and cyclic loading. Pressure gradients ranging from 0.013 to 0.46kPa/mm were measured during loading. This range was consistent with calculated pressure gradients from continuum scale poroelastic models with the same permeability. Micro-scale computational fluid dynamics models created from computed tomography images were used to calculate the micromechanical stress in the marrow using the measured pressure differentials as boundary conditions. The volume averaged shear stress in the marrow ranged from 1.67 to 24.55Pa during cyclic loading, which exceeds the mechanostimulatory threshold for mesenchymal lineage cells. Thus, the loading of bone through activities of daily living may be an essential component of bone marrow health and mechanobiology. Additional studies of cell-level interactions during loading in healthy and disease conditions will provide further incite into marrow mechanobiology. PMID:26283413

  11. Distinct roles for the small GTPases Cdc42 and Rho in endothelial responses to shear stress

    PubMed Central

    Li, Song; Chen, Benjamin P.C.; Azuma, Nobuyoshi; Hu, Ying-Li; Wu, Steven Z.; Sumpio, Bauer E.; Shyy, John Y.-J.; Chien, Shu

    1999-01-01

    Shear stress, the tangential component of hemodynamic forces, plays an important role in endothelial remodeling. In this study, we investigated the role of Rho family GTPases Cdc42 and Rho in shear stress–induced signal transduction and cytoskeleton reorganization. Our results showed that shear stress induced the translocation of Cdc42 and Rho from cytosol to membrane. Although both Cdc42 and Rho were involved in the shear stress–induced transcription factor AP-1 acting on the 12-O-tetradecanoyl-13-phorbol-acetate–responsive element (TRE), only Cdc42 was sufficient to activate AP-1/TRE. Dominant-negative mutants of Cdc42 and Rho, as well as recombinant C3 exoenzyme, attenuated the shear stress activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinases (JNKs), suggesting that Cdc42 and Rho regulate the shear stress induction of AP-1/TRE activity through JNKs. Shear stress–induced cell alignment and stress fiber formation were inhibited by the dominant-negative mutants of Rho and p160ROCK, but not by the dominant-negative mutant of Cdc42, indicating that the Rho-p160ROCK pathway regulates the cytoskeletal reorganization in response to shear stress. PMID:10207166

  12. Modeling the relation between suction, effective stress and shear strength in partially saturated granular media

    E-print Network

    Toker, Nabi Kartal, 1979-

    2007-01-01

    Decades of geotechnical research firmly established that the mechanical properties (shear strength and deformation characteristics) of soils are related to soil's "effective stress", i.e. the stress carried by the solid ...

  13. Effects of Shear Stress in Teletaction and Human Perception by Gabriel Moy

    E-print Network

    Moy, Gabe

    Effects of Shear Stress in Teletaction and Human Perception by Gabriel Moy Research Project.1 Previous Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1.2 Human Stress Profile from Displacement Profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 2.4 Modulation Index

  14. Stress measurement in thick plates using nonlinear ultrasonics

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasi, Zeynab E-mail: dozevin@uic.edu; Ozevin, Didem E-mail: dozevin@uic.edu

    2015-03-31

    In this paper the interaction between nonlinear ultrasonic characteristics and stress state of complex loaded thick steel plates using fundamental theory of nonlinear ultrasonics is investigated in order to measure the stress state at a given cross section. The measurement concept is based on phased array placement of ultrasonic transmitter-receiver to scan three angles of a given cross section using Rayleigh waves. The change in the ultrasonic data in thick steel plates is influenced by normal and shear stresses; therefore, three measurements are needed to solve the equations simultaneously. Different thickness plates are studied in order to understand the interaction of Rayleigh wave penetration depth and shear stress. The purpose is that as the thickness becomes smaller, the shear stress becomes negligible at the angled measurement. For thicker cross section, shear stress becomes influential if the depth of penetration of Rayleigh wave is greater than the half of the thickness. The influences of plate thickness and ultrasonic frequency on the identification of stress tensor are numerically studied in 3D structural geometry and Murnaghan material model. The experimental component of this study includes uniaxial loading of the plate while measuring ultrasonic wave at three directions (perpendicular, parallel and angled to the loading direction). Instead of rotating transmitter-receiver pair for each test, a device capable of measuring the three angles is designed.

  15. Forced free-shear layer measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leboeuf, Richard L.

    1994-01-01

    Detailed three-dimensional three-component phase averaged measurements of the spanwise and streamwise vorticity formation and evolution in acoustically forced plane free-shear flows have been obtained. For the first time, phase-averaged measurements of all three velocity components have been obtained in both a mixing layer and a wake on three-dimensional grids, yielding the spanwise and streamwise vorticity distributions without invoking Taylor's hypothesis. Initially, two-frequency forcing was used to phase-lock the roll-up and first pairing of the spanwise vortical structures in a plane mixing layer. The objective of this study was to measure the near-field vortical structure morphology in a mixing layer with 'natural' laminar initial boundary layers. For the second experiment the second and third subharmonics of the fundamental roll-up frequency were added to the previous two-frequency forcing in order to phase-lock the roll-up and first three pairings of the spanwise rollers in the mixing layer. The objective of this study was to determine the details of spanwise scale changes observed in previous time-averaged measurements and flow visualization of unforced mixing layers. For the final experiment, single-frequency forcing was used to phase-lock the Karman vortex street in a plane wake developing from nominally two-dimensional laminar initial boundary layers. The objective of this study was to compare measurements of the three-dimensional structure in a wake developing from 'natural' initial boundary layers to existing models of wake vortical structure.

  16. Longitudinal Patterns of Shear Stress, Grain Size and Mobility in Sedimentary Links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davey, C. E.; Lapointe, M.

    2004-05-01

    In gravel-bed rivers, large scale longitudinal trends of grain size tend to show a steady decrease downstream. When examining grain size patterns at intermediate (10 km) scales, a step-like pattern can be observed, where inputs of coarser grained sediment by tributaries and lateral sediment sources disrupts the general downstream fining process. These unique `sedimentary links' provide a natural unit of riverscape to predict downstream changes in sediment size distribution. Studies have shown that longitudinal trends of decreasing shear stress and increasing surface grain mobility also exist within a sedimentary link scale. However, these studies were limited to river systems with highly concave bed-profiles and rapid sediment recruitment. In response, the link concept is applied to four separate links in the Sainte Marguerite River, Quebec, where coarse sediment recruitment is low and bed profiles exhibit minimal concavity. Tracer rocks, bed-load traps and maximum stage recorders were installed to measure downstream trends in surface grain mobility and shear stress for each link. Results indicate longitudinal increases in surface grain mobility and subsurface sand content, while shear stress tended to decrease down links. Since surface and subsurface sediment distribution characteristics are integral in assessing the suitability of Atlantic salmon spawning substrate juvenile rearing habitat, the utility of sedimentary links for sectioning life-stage specific habitats is proposed.

  17. Surface temperatures and glassy state investigations in tribology, part 3. [limiting shear stress rheological model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bair, S.; Winer, W. O.

    1980-01-01

    Research related to the development of the limiting shear stress rheological model is reported. Techniques were developed for subjecting lubricants to isothermal compression in order to obtain relevant determinations of the limiting shear stress and elastic shear modulus. The isothermal compression limiting shear stress was found to predict very well the maximum traction for a given lubricant. Small amounts of side slip and twist incorporated in the model were shown to have great influence on the rising portion of the traction curve at low slide-roll ratio. The shear rheological model was also applied to a Grubin-like elastohydrodynamic inlet analysis for predicting film thicknesses when employing the limiting shear stress model material behavior.

  18. Periodontal Treatment Elevates Carotid Wall Shear Stress in the Medium Term

    PubMed Central

    Carallo, Claudio; Franceschi, Maria Serena De; Tripolino, Cesare; Iovane, Claudio; Catalano, Serena; Giudice, Amerigo; Crispino, Antonio; Figliuzzi, Michele; Irace, Concetta; Fortunato, Leonzio; Gnasso, Agostino

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Periodontal disease is associated with endothelial dysfunction of the brachial artery and hemodynamic alterations of the common carotid artery. Periodontal therapy improves endothelial function. It is not known if it is able also to improve the hemodynamics of the carotid artery. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the efficacy of 2 different periodontal treatments on carotid hemodynamics: scaling and root planing (SRP) alone or together with low-level laser therapy (LLLT). Forty patients were recruited and randomly treated with SRP (n?=?20) or SRP?+?LLLT (n?=?20). Periodontal indices (plaque, gingival, and probing depth indices) were measured before and 5 months after treatment. Blood viscosity, common carotid wall shear stress, circumferential wall tension, and Peterson elastic modulus were evaluated before, soon after and 5 months after treatment. It was found that the periodontal indices improved in both groups, but significantly more so for SRP?+?LLLT than for SRP (decrease in gingival index 69.3% versus 45.4%, respectively, P?=?0.04). In the SRP?+?LLLT group, after a transient reduction by 5% immediately after therapy, shear stress increased by 11% after 5 months. In SRP only group, however, shear stress variations were less marked. No significant changes were found for the other hemodynamic parameters in either of the groups. Periodontal disease treatment by SRP?+?LLLT can therefore be said to improve common carotid wall shear stress. This suggests a possible mechanism by which the treatment of periodontal disease has beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system. PMID:26496285

  19. Wrinkling Phenomena of Thin Flat Plates Subjected to Shear Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bollenrath, F

    1931-01-01

    This report covers a series of tests on thin flat elastic strips restrained at two parallel edges and subjected to shear by conversely directed stresses. Theoretical treatments, particularly those of Lilly, Southwell and Skan, and Timoshenko are briefly outlined. The problem to be solved by these tests was to find out whether, and to what extent the conditions and assumptions upon which the calculations are based are complied with in the tests. Three materials were used: celluloid, duralumin, brass. Owing to the high elastic deformability of celluloid, it was not only possible to observe the beginning but also to ascertain the type of deflection. The test data on celluloid was affirmed by the experiments with duralumin and brass.

  20. A new multiphysics model for the physiological responses of vascular endothelial cells to fluid shear stress.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyun Goo; Shim, Eun Bo; Chang, Keun-Shik

    2007-10-01

    Vascular endothelial cell (VEC) responds to wall shear stress that has not only spatial variation, but also temporal gradient. To simplify the problem, we first studied how the calcium dynamics of VEC responded to the steady wall shear stress of varying magnitude in a stenosed artery. We then studied how the VEC responded to the periodic shear stress that had temporal variation, as in the pulsatile blood flow. To investigate the multiphysics model of VEC in vitro, we used a mathematical model for intracellular calcium dynamics and a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method for arterial wall shear stress, either steady or periodic. The CFD results showed that for the steady stenotic flow, the wall shear stress in the recirculating flow was lower than the threshold value, 4 dyne/cm(2), at two particular points: flow separation and flow reattachment. For these subthreshold shear stresses, the peak value of the transient calcium response did not hit the normal saturated level, but reached a reduced magnitude. We investigated the effect of severity of stenosis (SOS) of the stenosed artery. For the pulsatile flow, the so-called shear stress slew rate or the temporal gradient of the first upsurge of the periodic flow was an important factor for the VEC calcium dynamics. The calcium response had a finite range of parameter for SOS and shear stress slew rate in which the calcium response was more sensitive than elsewhere, showing a sigmoid pattern. PMID:17963593

  1. Shear stress magnitude and directionality modulate growth factor gene expression in

    E-print Network

    Passerini, Tony

    Shear stress magnitude and directionality modulate growth factor gene expression in preconditioned levels of 12 endothelial growth factor genes in response to alterations in wall shear stress (WSS) under nitric oxide synthase (NOS3), platelet-derived growth factor A, platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGFB

  2. Serial Analysis of the Vascular Endothelial Transcriptome Under Static and Shear Stress Conditions

    E-print Network

    Spirtes, Peter

    the response of human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) to laminar shear stress (LSS). PrimarySerial Analysis of the Vascular Endothelial Transcriptome Under Static and Shear Stress Conditions David G. Peters1,2 , Tianjiao Chu3 and Clark Glymour3,4 Department of Human Genetics1 , Graduate School

  3. Development of In-Fiber Reflective Bragg Gratings as Shear Stress Monitors in Aerodynamic Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmar, Devendra S.; Sprinkle, Danny R.; Singh, Jag J.

    1998-01-01

    Bragg gratings centered at nominal wavelengths of 1290 nm and 1300 run were inscribed in a 9/125 microns germano-silicate optical fiber, using continuous wave frequency doubled Ar+ laser radiation at 244 nm. Such gratings have been used extensively as temperature and strain monitors in smart structures. They have, however, never been used for measuring aerodynamic shear stresses. As a test of their sensitivity as shear stress monitors, a Bragg fiber attached to a metal plate was subjected to laminar flows in a glass pipe. An easily measurable large flow-induced wavelength shift (Delta Lambda(sub B)) was observed in the Bragg reflected wavelength. Thereafter, the grating was calibrated by making one time, simultaneous measurements of Delta Lambda(sub B) and the coefficient of skin friction (C(sub f)) with a skin friction balance, as a function of flow rates in a subsonic wind tunnel. Onset of fan-induced transition in the tunnel flow provided a unique flow rate for correlating Delta Lambda(sub B) and (C(sub f) values needed for computing effective modulus of rigidity (N(sub eff)) of the fiber attached to the metal plate. This value Of N(sub eff) is expected to remain constant throughout the elastic stress range expected during the Bragg grating aerodynamic tests. It has been used for calculating the value of Cf at various tunnel speeds, on the basis of measured values of Bragg wavelength shifts at those speeds.

  4. Response of hot element wall shear stress gages in laminar oscillating flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, W. J.; Murphy, J. D.; Giddings, T. A.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the time-dependent response of hot element wall shear stress gages in unsteady periodic air flows is reported. The study has focused on wall shear stress in laminar oscillating flows produced on a flat plate by a free stream velocity composed of a mean component and a superposed sinusoidal variation. Two types of hot element gages, platinum film and flush wire, were tested for values of reduced frequency ranging from 0.14 to 2.36. Values of the phase angle of the wall shear stress variation relative to the free stream velocity, as indicated by the hot element gages, are compared with numerical prediction. The comparisons show that the gages indicate a wall shear stress variation that lags the true variation, and that the gages will also not indicate the correct wall shear stress variation in periodic turbulent flows.

  5. Fluid shear stress sensitizes cancer cells to receptor-mediated apoptosis via trimeric death receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Michael J.; King, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer metastasis, the process of cancer cell migration from a primary to distal location, typically leads to a poor patient prognosis. Hematogenous metastasis is initiated by intravasation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) into the bloodstream, which are then believed to adhere to the luminal surface of the endothelium and extravasate into distal locations. Apoptotic agents such as tumor necrosis factor apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), whether in soluble ligand form or expressed on the surface of natural killer cells, have shown promise in treating CTCs to reduce the probability of metastasis. The role of hemodynamic shear forces in altering the cancer cell response to apoptotic agents has not been previously investigated. Here, we report that human colon cancer COLO 205 and prostate cancer PC-3 cells exposed to a uniform fluid shear stress in a cone-and-plate viscometer become sensitized to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Shear-induced sensitization directly correlates with the application of fluid shear stress, and TRAIL-induced apoptosis increases in a fluid shear stress force- and time-dependent manner. In contrast, TRAIL-induced necrosis is not affected by the application fluid shear stress. Interestingly, fluid shear stress does not sensitize cancer cells to apoptosis when treated with doxorubicin, which also induces apoptosis in cancer cells. Caspase inhibition experiments reveal that shear stress-induced sensitization to TRAIL occurs via caspase-dependent apoptosis. These results suggest that physiological fluid shear forces can modulate receptor-mediated apoptosis of cancer cells in the presence of apoptotic agents.

  6. Experimental and CFD simulation studies of wall shear stress for different impeller configurations and MBR activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Ratkovich, N; Chan, C C V; Bentzen, T R; Rasmussen, M R

    2012-01-01

    Membrane bioreactors (MBRs) have been used successfully in biological wastewater treatment for effective solids-liquid separation. However, a common problem encountered with MBR systems is fouling of the membrane resulting in frequent membrane cleaning and replacement which makes the system less appealing for full-scale applications. It has been widely demonstrated that the filtration performances in MBRs can be improved by understanding the shear stress over the membrane surface. Modern tools such as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can be used to diagnose and understand the shear stress in an MBR. Nevertheless, proper experimental validation is required to validate CFD simulation. In this work experimental measurements of shear stress induced by impellers at a membrane surface were made with an electrochemical approach and the results were used to validate CFD simulations. As good results were obtained with the CFD model (<9% error), it was extrapolated to include the non-Newtonian behaviour of activated sludge. PMID:22592479

  7. Effect of state of stress on velocity of low-amplitude shear waves propagating along principal stress directions in dry sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knox, D. P.; Stokoe, K. H., II; Kopperman, S. E.

    1982-03-01

    The effect of state of stress on shear wave velocity was examined for shear waves propagated as body waves through a sand mass. Testing was performed in a triaxial testing device, which was designed to hold a cubic soil sample measuring 7 ft (2.1 m) on a side and which was used to apply an isotropic, biaxial or triaxial state of stress to the sample. The triaxial device is essentially a steel box, constructed of reinforced steel, which uses rubber membranes to apply a confining pressure along each of the principal axes.

  8. Studies on stress distribution in pavements subjected to surface shear forces

    PubMed Central

    KIMURA, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    It has been pointed out by some researchers1,2) that road pavements are subjected to vertical stress due to vehicles on them as well as shear stress at the time of braking or acceleration of vehicles. In this paper, the results of elastic analysis to obtain the rigorous solution for an elastic two-layer system subjected to surface shear stress are described and it is shown that the effect of shear stresses applied at the surface gives rise to fairly large stresses in the system. On the basis of these findings, the author attempts to explain why pavement failure takes place frequently at places such as crossings and curved parts where pavements are subjected to high magnitude of surface shear stresses. PMID:24522154

  9. Conductivity measurements in a shear-banding wormlike micellar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Photinos, Panos J.; López-González, M. R.; Hoven, Corey V.; Callaghan, Paul T.

    2010-07-01

    Shear banding in the cetylpyridinium chloride/sodium salicylate micellar system is investigated using electrical conductivity measurements parallel to the velocity and parallel to the vorticity in a cylindrical Couette cell. The measurements show that the conductivity parallel to the velocity (vorticity) increases (decreases) monotonically with applied shear rate. The shear-induced anisotropy is over one order of magnitude lower than the anisotropy of the Nc nematic phase. The steady-state conductivity measurements indicate that the anisotropy of the shear induced low-viscosity (high shear rate) phase is not significantly larger than the anisotropy of the high viscosity (low shear rate) phase. We estimate that the micelles in the shear induced low viscosity band are relatively short, with a characteristic length to diameter ratio of 5-15. The relaxation behavior following the onset of shear is markedly different above and below the first critical value ??1 , in agreement with results obtained by other methods. The transient measurements show that the overall anisotropy of the sample decreases as the steady state is approached, i.e., the micellar length/the degree of order decrease.

  10. Critical shear stress for mass erosion of organic-rich fine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Ashish J.; Hwang, Kyu-Nam; Khare, Yogesh P.

    2015-11-01

    In shallow lakes of Florida laden with low-strength organic-rich sediments, wind-induced water movement is believed to actuate bed surface erosion as well as mass erosion. Experiments in hydraulic flumes to measure the critical shear stress for mass erosion tend to be lengthy and require large quantities of sediment. For bottom sediment from Lake Okeechobee at naturally occurring values of the floc volume fraction, a comparison of the viscoplastic yield stress, readily obtained from rheometry, with the mass erosion critical stress from flume tests indicates that it may be permissible to consider the yield stress as a surrogate for the critical stress. This inference appears to be supported by ancillary observations from Lake Apopka and Newnans Lake. Interestingly enough, the variation of yield stress with the floc volume fraction of the organic-rich bed is found to conform to fractal characterization commonly invoked for mineral sediment flocs, consistent with a representative constant value of 2.55 of the fractal dimension. Pending fuller investigations with a wide range of organic-rich sediments, recourse to rheometry in lieu of flume experiments holds promise as a means to simplify testing requirements for estimating the mass erosion critical stress.

  11. Interfacial shear stress distribution in model composites. I - A Kevlar 49 fibre in an epoxy matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Jahankhani, H.; Galiotis, C. )

    1991-05-01

    The technique of Laser Raman Spectroscopy has been applied in the study of aramid fibers, such as Kevlar 49, and aramid/epoxy interfaces. A linear relationship has been found between Raman frequencies and strain upon loading a single Kevlar 49 filament in air. Model composites of single Kevlar 49 fibers embedded in epoxy resins have been fabricated and subjected to various degrees of mechanical deformation. The transfer lengths for reinforcement have been measured at various levels of applied tensile load and the dependence of transfer length upon applied matrix strain has been established. Finally, by balancing the tensile and the shear forces acting along the interface, the interfacial shear stress (ISS) distribution along the embedded fiber was obtained. 52 refs.

  12. Lateral Stress Measurements in Pure Tungsten during Shock Loading

    SciTech Connect

    Millett, J. C. F.; Gray, G. T. III; Bourne, N. K.

    2006-07-28

    Longitudinal and lateral stresses during the shock loading of pure tungsten have been measured using manganin stress gauges. The Hugoniot has been compared to the previous work of others and shown to be in close agreement. Lateral stresses have been shown to increase behind the shock front, implying that the shear strength decreases. Whilst this is similar to results in tantalum, comparison with recovery experiments in the literature suggests that this may be due in part to a brittle failure process.

  13. Stress Measurement by Geometrical Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. S.; Rossnagel, S. M.

    1986-01-01

    Fast, simple technique measures stresses in thin films. Sample disk bowed by stress into approximately spherical shape. Reflected image of disk magnified by amount related to curvature and, therefore, stress. Method requires sample substrate, such as cheap microscope cover slide, two mirrors, laser light beam, and screen.

  14. Effect of shear stress on adhering polyelectrolyte capsules.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Ana L; Coelho, Manuel; Sukhorukov, Gleb B; Dubreuil, Frédéric; Möhwald, Helmuth

    2004-12-01

    A parallel plate flow chamber was implemented to study the deformation and adhesion of individual spherical hollow polyelectrolyte multilayered shells adhering to a coated surface. The device provides a well-defined laminar flow allowing the determination of the shear stress to which the capsules are being exposed up to 15 N/m(2). The results of the investigations indicate a strong dependence of the adhesion and mechanical resistance on the capsule size and wall thickness. Thin walled capsules, constituted of 8 polyelectrolyte layers (thickness congruent with 12 nm), are immediately deformed when exposed to flow while thick capsules, constituted of 16 layers (thickness congruent with 24 nm), of equal dimensions are detached from the surface for drag forces below 50 nN. It was observed that adhering capsules exposed to flow undergo an increase in their adhesion area in the direction of flow, resulting in rolling of the capsules. It was also found that the resistance of the capsules decreases after acetone treatment, indicating a weakening of the polyelectrolyte multilayer structure in the presence of this solvent. PMID:15476775

  15. Radial artery wall shear stress evaluation in patients with arteriovenous fistula for hemodialysis access.

    PubMed

    Remuzzi, Andrea; Ene-Iordache, Bogdan; Mosconi, Lidia; Bruno, Simona; Anghileri, Abramo; Antiga, Luca; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2003-01-01

    It has been extensively documented that changes in blood flow induce vascular remodeling and this phenomenon seems to be correlated to the shear forces imposed on the vessel wall by motion of blood. Wall shear stress, the tractive force that acts on the endothelium, has been shown to influence endothelial cell function. To study changes in wall shear stress that develop on the vessel wall upon changes of blood flow, we set up a technique that allows estimation of shear stress in the radial artery of patients on chronic hemodialysis therapy. The technique is based on color-flow Doppler examination of the radial artery before and after surgical creation of radiocephalic fistula for hemodialysis. Calculation of time function wall shear stress and blood flow rate in the radial artery is performed on the basis of arterial diameter, center-line velocity waveform and blood viscosity, using a numerical method developed according to Womersley's theory for pulsatile flow in tubes. The results presented confirm that the model developed is suitable for calculation of the wall shear stress that develops in the radial artery of patients before and after surgical creation of an arteriovenous fistula for hemodialysis. This methodology was developed for characterization of wall shear stress in the radial artery but may be well applied to other vessels that can be examined by echo-Doppler technique. PMID:12454436

  16. Method for measuring biaxial stress in a body subjected to stress inducing loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clotfelter, W. N. (inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A method is described for measuring stress in test articles including the steps of obtaining for a calibrating specimen a series of transit time differentials between the second wave echo for a longitudinal wave and the first wave echo for each of a pair of shear waves propagated through the specimen as it is subjected to known stress load of a series of stress loads for thus establishing a series of indications of the magnitudes for stress loads induced in the specimen, and thereafter obtaining a transit time differential between the second wave echo for a longitudinal wave and the first wave echo for each of a pair of shear waves propagated in the planes of the stress axes of a test article and comparing the transit time differential thus obtained to the series of transit time differentials obtained for the specimen to determine the magnitude of biaxial stress in the test article.

  17. Interlaminar shear stress effects on the postbuckling response of graphite-epoxy panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelstad, S. P.; Reddy, J. N.; Knight, N. F., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of the study are to assess the influence of shear flexibility on overall postbuckling response, and to examine transverse shear stress distributions in relation to panel failure. Nonlinear postbuckling results are obtained for finite element models based on classical laminated plate theory and first-order shear deformation theory. Good correlation between test and analysis is obtained. The results presented in this paper analytically substantiate the experimentally observed failure mode.

  18. Frictional Response of Molecularly Thin Liquid Polymer Films Subject to Constant Shear Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschirhart, Charles; Troian, Sandra

    2014-03-01

    Measurements of the frictional response of nanoscale viscous films are typically obtained using the surface force apparatus in which a fluid layer is confined between smooth solid substrates approaching at constant speed or force. The squeezing pressure causes lateral flow from which the shear viscosity can be deduced. Under these conditions however, molecularly thin films tend to solidify wholly or partially and estimates of the shear viscosity can exceed those in macroscale films by many orders of magnitude. This problem can be avoided altogether by examining the response of an initially flat, supported, free surface film subject to comparable values of surface shear stress by application of an external inert gas stream. This method was first conceived by Derjaguin in 1944; more recent studies by Mate et al. at IBM Almaden on complex polymeric systems have uncovered fluid layering and other interesting behaviors. The only drawback is that this alternative technique requires an accurate model for interface distortion. We report on ellipsometric measurements of ultrathin polymeric films in efforts to determine whether the usual interface equations for free surface films based purely on continuum models can be properly extended to nanoscale films. Supported by a Fred and Jean Felberg Fellowship and G. W. Housner Student Discovery Fund.

  19. FLOCCULATION OF FINE-GRAINED LAKE SEDIMENTS DUE TO A UNIFORM SHEAR STRESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experiments were performed to investigate the effects of fluid shear on the flocculation of fine-grained lake sediments in fresh water. In these experiments, a Couette viscometer was used to apply a uniform shear stress to a sediment suspension. he sediments were from the Detroit...

  20. Figure 1: Multiplex logarithmic microfluidic perfusion array for probing shear stress effects on stem cells. (A)

    E-print Network

    Voldman, Joel

    on stem cells. (A) Microfluidic perfusion systems exhibit more defined shear stress profiles and consume) for a typical soluble factor (MW~20 kDa) secreted by mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) investigated EMBRYONIC STEM CELLS Y.C. Toh1 and J. Voldman1* 1 Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA ABSTRACT Shear

  1. Frequency-dependent response of the vascular endothelium to pulsatile shear stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most cells of the circulatory system are exposed to shear forces that occur at the frequency of the heartbeat. However, as a result of the complicated blood flow patterns that occur at arterial branches, small regions of the arterial wall experience fluctuations in shear stress that are dominated by...

  2. Measuring Environmental Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, John E.; Dahm, Douglas B.

    1975-01-01

    Infrared remote sensors, plus photometric interpretation and digital data analysis are being used to record the stresses on air, water, vegetation and soil. Directly recorded photographic information has been the most effective recording media for remote sensing. (BT)

  3. Gyrokinetic simulation of momentum transport with residual stress from diamagnetic level velocity shears

    SciTech Connect

    Waltz, R. E.; Staebler, G. M.; Solomon, W. M.

    2011-04-15

    Residual stress refers to the remaining toroidal angular momentum (TAM) flux (divided by major radius) when the shear in the equilibrium fluid toroidal velocity (and the velocity itself) vanishes. Previously [Waltz et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 122507 (2007); errata 16, 079902 (2009)], we demonstrated with GYRO [Candy and Waltz, J. Comp. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] gyrokinetic simulations that TAM pinching from (ion pressure gradient supported or diamagnetic level) equilibrium ExB velocity shear could provide some of the residual stress needed to support spontaneous toroidal rotation against normal diffusive loss. Here we show that diamagnetic level shear in the intrinsic drift wave velocities (or ''profile shear'' in the ion and electron density and temperature gradients) provides a comparable residual stress. The individual signed contributions of these small (rho-star level) ExB and profile velocity shear rates to the turbulence level and (rho-star squared) ion energy transport stabilization are additive if the rates are of the same sign. However because of the additive stabilization effect, the contributions to the small (rho-star cubed) residual stress is not always simply additive. If the rates differ in sign, the residual stress from one can buck out that from the other (and in some cases reduce the stabilization.) The residual stress from these diamagnetic velocity shear rates is quantified by the ratio of TAM flow to ion energy (power) flow (M/P) in a global GYRO core simulation of a ''null'' toroidal rotation DIII-D [Mahdavi and Luxon, Fusion Sci. Technol. 48, 2 (2005)] discharge by matching M/P profiles within experimental uncertainty. Comparison of global GYRO (ion and electron energy as well as particle) transport flow balance simulations of TAM transport flow in a high-rotation DIII-D L-mode quantifies and isolates the ExB shear and parallel velocity (Coriolis force) pinching components from the larger ''diffusive'' parallel velocity shear driven component and the much smaller profile shear residual stress component.

  4. Gyrokinetic simulation of momentum transport with residual stress from diamagnetic level velocity shears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltz, R. E.; Staebler, G. M.; Solomon, W. M.

    2011-04-01

    Residual stress refers to the remaining toroidal angular momentum (TAM) flux (divided by major radius) when the shear in the equilibrium fluid toroidal velocity (and the velocity itself) vanishes. Previously [Waltz et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 122507 (2007); errata 16, 079902 (2009)], we demonstrated with GYRO [Candy and Waltz, J. Comp. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] gyrokinetic simulations that TAM pinching from (ion pressure gradient supported or diamagnetic level) equilibrium E ×B velocity shear could provide some of the residual stress needed to support spontaneous toroidal rotation against normal diffusive loss. Here we show that diamagnetic level shear in the intrinsic drift wave velocities (or "profile shear" in the ion and electron density and temperature gradients) provides a comparable residual stress. The individual signed contributions of these small (rho-star level) E ×B and profile velocity shear rates to the turbulence level and (rho-star squared) ion energy transport stabilization are additive if the rates are of the same sign. However because of the additive stabilization effect, the contributions to the small (rho-star cubed) residual stress is not always simply additive. If the rates differ in sign, the residual stress from one can buck out that from the other (and in some cases reduce the stabilization.) The residual stress from these diamagnetic velocity shear rates is quantified by the ratio of TAM flow to ion energy (power) flow (M/P) in a global GYRO core simulation of a "null" toroidal rotation DIII-D [Mahdavi and Luxon, Fusion Sci. Technol. 48, 2 (2005)] discharge by matching M/P profiles within experimental uncertainty. Comparison of global GYRO (ion and electron energy as well as particle) transport flow balance simulations of TAM transport flow in a high-rotation DIII-D L-mode quantifies and isolates the E ×B shear and parallel velocity (Coriolis force) pinching components from the larger "diffusive" parallel velocity shear driven component and the much smaller profile shear residual stress component.

  5. Experimental studies of shear stress and flow separation in low Reynolds number flows

    E-print Network

    Weldon, Matthew J. (Matthew Jacob)

    2007-01-01

    Presented here is an experimental investigation of the kinematic theory of separation in unsteady two-dimensional flows, and an evaluation of a novel optical shear stress sensor. Fixed separation in the rotor-oscillator ...

  6. Theory to Predict Shear Stress on Cells in Turbulent Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Morshed, Khandakar Niaz; Bark Jr., David; Forleo, Marcio; Dasi, Lakshmi Prasad

    2014-01-01

    Shear stress on blood cells and platelets transported in a turbulent flow dictates the fate and biological activity of these cells. We present a theoretical link between energy dissipation in turbulent flows to the shear stress that cells experience and show that for the case of physiological turbulent blood flow: (a) the Newtonian assumption is valid, (b) turbulent eddies are universal for the most complex of blood flow problems, and (c) shear stress distribution on turbulent blood flows is possibly universal. Further we resolve a long standing inconsistency in hemolysis between laminar and turbulent flow using the theoretical framework. This work demonstrates that energy dissipation as opposed to bulk shear stress in laminar or turbulent blood flow dictates local mechanical environment of blood cells and platelets universally. PMID:25171175

  7. RESEARCH ARTICLE Flow visualization and wall shear stress of a flapping model

    E-print Network

    Mohseni, Kamran

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Flow visualization and wall shear stress of a flapping model hummingbird wing Erik. The flapping kinematics and wing shape were selected for dynamic similarity to a hummingbird during hovering

  8. Influence of polymer charge on the shear yield stress of silica aggregated with adsorbed cationic polymers.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying; Yu, Hai; Wanless, Erica J; Jameson, Graeme J; Franks, George V

    2009-08-15

    Flocs were produced by adding three cationic polymers (10% charge density, 3.0x10(5) g/mol molecular weight; 40% charge density, 1.1x10(5) g/mol molecular weight; and 100% charge density, 1.2x10(5) g/mol molecular weight) to 90 nm diameter silica particles. The shear yield stresses of the consolidated sediment beds from settled and centrifuged flocs were determined via the vane technique. The polymer charge density plays an important role in influencing the shear yield stresses of sediment beds. The shear yield stresses of sediment beds from flocs induced by the 10% charged polymer were observed to increase with an increase in polymer dose, initial solid concentration and background electrolyte concentration at all volume fractions. In comparison, polymer dose has a marginal effect on the shear yield stresses of sediment beds from flocs induced by the 40% and 100% charged polymers. The shear yield stresses of sediments from flocs induced by the 40% charged polymer are independent of salt concentration whereas the addition of salt decreases the shear yield stresses of sediments from flocs induced by the 100% charged polymer. When flocculated at the optimum dose for each polymer (12 mg/g silica for the 10% charged polymer at 0.03 M NaCl, 12 mg/g for 40% and 2 mg/g for 100%), shear yield stress increases as polymer charge increases. The effects observed are related to the flocculation mechanism (bridging, patch attraction or charge neutralisation) and the magnitude of the adhesive force. Comparison of shear and compressive yield stresses show that the network is only slightly weaker in shear than in compression. This is different than many other systems (mainly salt and pH coagulation) which have shear yield stress much less than compressive yield stress. The existing models relating the power law exponent of the volume fraction dependence of the shear yield stress to the network fractal structure are not satisfactory to predict all the experimental behaviour. PMID:19414185

  9. Fabrication of simulated plate fuel elements: Defining role of out-of-plane residual shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakesh, R.; Kohli, D.; Sinha, V. P.; Prasad, G. J.; Samajdar, I.

    2014-02-01

    Bond strength and microstructural developments were investigated during fabrication of simulated plate fuel elements. The study involved roll bonding of aluminum-aluminum (case A) and aluminum-aluminum + yttria (Y2O3) dispersion (case B). Case B approximated aluminum-uranium silicide (U3Si2) 'fuel-meat' in an actual plate fuel. Samples after different stages of fabrication, hot and cold rolling, were investigated through peel and pull tests, micro-hardness, residual stresses, electron and micro-focus X-ray diffraction. Measurements revealed a clear drop in bond strength during cold rolling: an observation unique to case B. This was related to significant increase in 'out-of-plane' residual shear stresses near the clad/dispersion interface, and not from visible signatures of microstructural heterogeneities.

  10. Shear Stress Influences Spatial Variations in Vascular Mn-SOD Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Lisong; Rouhanizadeh, Mahsa; Wu, Joseph C.; Takabe, Wakako; Yu, Hongyu; Alavi, Mohammad; Chu, Yi; Miller, Jordan; Heistad, Donald D.; Hsiai, Tzung K.

    2010-01-01

    Fluid shear stress modulates vascular production of endothelial superoxide anion (O2?) and nitric oxide (?NO). Whether the characteristics of shear stress influence the spatial variations in mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) expression in vasculatures is not well-defined. We constructed a 3-D Computational Fluid Dynamics model simulating spatial variations in shear stress at the arterial bifurcation. In parallel, explants of arterial bifurcations were sectioned from the human left main coronary bifurcation and right coronary arteries for immunohisto-localization of Mn-SOD expression. We demonstrated that Mn-SOD staining was prominent in the athero-protective regions, but was nearly absent in the lateral wall of arterial bifurcation. Pulsatile shear stress (PSS: mean shear stress ?ave= 23 dyn·cm?2) up-regulated Mn-SOD mRNA expression at a higher level than did oscillatory shear stress (OSS: ?ave= 0.02 dyn·cm?2 ± 3.0 dyn·cm?2·s?1 at 1 Hz) in cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (PSS by 11.3±0.4-fold versus OSS by 5.0±0.5-fold. p < 0.05, n=4). Furthermore, PSS decreased the extent of Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) nitration, whereas OSS increased by Liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (P < 0.05, n=4). Treatment with Mn-SOD siRNA significantly increased intracellular nitrotyrosine level in presence of LDL (n=4, p < 0.5). Our findings indicate that shear stress in the athero-prone versus athero-protective regions regulates spatial variations in mitochondrial Mn-SOD expression. Shear stress modulated LDL protein nitration via Mn-SOD expression. PMID:18434620

  11. Bonded joint and method. [for reducing peak shear stress in adhesive bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sainsbury-Carter, J. B. (inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An improved joint is described for reducing the peak shear stress in adhesive bonds when adhesives are used to bond two materials which are in a lapped relationship and which differ in value of modulus of elasticity. An insert placed between the adhesive and one of the two materials acts to cushion the discontinuity of material stiffness thereby reducing the peak shear stress in the adhesive bond.

  12. Hemodynamic Shear Stress and Endothelial Dysfunction in Hemodialysis Access

    PubMed Central

    Fitts, Michelle K.; Pike, Daniel B.; Anderson, Kasey; Shiu, Yan-Ting

    2014-01-01

    Surgically-created blood conduits used for chronic hemodialysis, including native arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) and synthetic AV grafts (AVGs), are the lifeline for kidney failure patients. Unfortunately, each has its own limitations: AVFs often fail to mature to become useful for dialysis and AVGs often fail due to stenosis as a result of neointimal hyperplasia, which preferentially forms at the graft-venous anastomosis. No clinical therapies are currently available to significantly promote AVF maturation or prevent neointimal hyperplasia in AVGs. Central to devising strategies to solve these problems is a complete mechanistic understanding of the pathophysiological processes. The pathology of arteriovenous access problems is likely multi-factorial. This review focuses on the roles of fluid-wall shear stress (WSS) and endothelial cells (ECs). In arteriovenous access, shunting of arterial blood flow directly into the vein drastically alters the hemodynamics in the vein. These hemodynamic changes are likely major contributors to non-maturation of an AVF vein and/or formation of neointimal hyperplasia at the venous anastomosis of an AVG. ECs separate blood from other vascular wall cells and also influence the phenotype of these other cells. In arteriovenous access, the responses of ECs to aberrant WSS may subsequently lead to AVF non-maturation and/or AVG stenosis. This review provides an overview of the methods for characterizing blood flow and calculating WSS in arteriovenous access and discusses EC responses to arteriovenous hemodynamics. This review also discusses the role of WSS in the pathology of arteriovenous access, as well as confounding factors that modulate the impact of WSS. PMID:25309636

  13. Macro-scale Topology Optimization for Controlling Internal Shear Stress in a Porous Scaffold Bioreactor

    E-print Network

    K. Youssef; J. J. Mack; M. L. Iruela-Arispe; L. -S. Bouchard

    2012-01-09

    Shear stress is an important physical factor that regulates proliferation, migration and morphogenesis. In particular, the homeostasis of blood vessels is dependent on shear stress. To mimic this process ex vivo, efforts have been made to seed scaffolds with vascular and other cell types in the presence of growth factors and under pulsatile flow conditions. However, the resulting bioreactors lack information on shear stress and flow distributions within the scaffold. Consequently, it is difficult to interpret the effects of shear stress on cell function. Such knowledge would enable researchers to improve upon cell culture protocols. Recent work has focused on optimizing the microstructural parameters of the scaffold to fine tune the shear stress. In this study, we have adopted a different approach whereby flows are redirected throughout the bioreactor along channels patterned in the porous scaffold to yield shear stress distributions that are optimized for uniformity centered on a target value. A topology optimization algorithm coupled to computational fluid dynamics simulations was devised to this end. The channel topology in the porous scaffold was varied using a combination of genetic algorithm and fuzzy logic. The method is validated by experiments using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) readouts of the flow field.

  14. Orbital fluid shear stress promotes osteoblast metabolism, proliferation and alkaline phosphates activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Aisha, M D; Nor-Ashikin, M N K; Sharaniza, A B R; Nawawi, H; Froemming, G R A

    2015-09-10

    Prolonged disuse of the musculoskeletal system is associated with reduced mechanical loading and lack of anabolic stimulus. As a form of mechanical signal, the multidirectional orbital fluid shear stress transmits anabolic signal to bone forming cells in promoting cell differentiation, metabolism and proliferation. Signals are channeled through the cytoskeleton framework, directly modifying gene and protein expression. For that reason, we aimed to study the organization of Normal Human Osteoblast (NHOst) cytoskeleton with regards to orbital fluid shear (OFS) stress. Of special interest were the consequences of cytoskeletal reorganization on NHOst metabolism, proliferation, and osteogenic functional markers. Cells stimulated at 250 RPM in a shaking incubator resulted in the rearrangement of actin and tubulin fibers after 72 h. Orbital shear stress increased NHOst mitochondrial metabolism and proliferation, simultaneously preventing apoptosis. The ratio of RANKL/OPG was reduced, suggesting that orbital shear stress has the potential to inhibit osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast activity. Increase in ALP activity and OCN protein production suggests that stimulation retained osteoblast function. Shear stress possibly generated through actin seemed to hold an anabolic response as osteoblast metabolism and functional markers were enhanced. We hypothesize that by applying orbital shear stress with suitable magnitude and duration as a non-drug anabolic treatment can help improve bone regeneration in prolonged disuse cases. PMID:26163894

  15. Effect of Varying Fluid Shear Stress on Cancer Stem Cell Viability & Protein Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domier, Ria; Kim, Yonghyun; Dozier, David; Triantafillu, Ursula

    2013-11-01

    Cancer stem cells cultured in vitro in stirred bioreactors are exposed to shear stress. By observing the effect of shear stress on cancer stem cell viability, laboratory cell growth could be optimized. In addition, metastasized cancer stem cells in vivo are naturally exposed to shear stress, a factor influencing stem cell differentiation, while circulating in the bloodstream. Changes in protein expression after exposure to shear stress could allow for identification and targeting of circulating cancer cells. In this study, blood flow through capillaries was simulated by using a syringe pump to inject suspensions of Kasumi-1 leukemia stem cells into model blood vessels composed of PEEK tubing 125 microns in diameter. The Hagen-Poisseuille equation was used to solve for operating flow rates based on specified amounts of shear stress. After exposure, cell counts and viabilities were observed using an optical microscope and proteins were analyzed using Western blotting. It was observed that at a one minute exposure to stress, cell viability increased as the amount of shear was increased from 10 to 60 dynes per square centimeter. Results from this research are applicable to optimization of large-scale stem cell growth in bioreactors as well as to the design of targeted cancer therapies. Funding from NSF REU grant #1062611 is gratefully acknowledged.

  16. Activation and shedding of platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa under non-physiological shear stress.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zengsheng; Mondal, Nandan K; Ding, Jun; Koenig, Steven C; Slaughter, Mark S; Griffith, Bartley P; Wu, Zhongjun J

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of non-physiological high shear stress on activation and shedding of platelet GP IIb/IIIa receptors. The healthy donor blood was exposed to three levels of high shear stresses (25, 75, 125 Pa) from the physiological to non-physiological status with three short exposure time (0.05, 0.5, 1.5 s), created by a specific blood shearing system. The activation and shedding of the platelet GPIIb/IIIa were analyzed using flow cytometry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In addition, platelet P-selectin expression of sheared blood, which is a marker for activated platelets, was also analyzed. The results from the present study showed that the number of activated platelets, as indicated by the surface GPIIb/IIIa activation and P-selectin expression, increased with increasing the shear stress level and exposure time. However, the mean fluorescence of GPIIb/IIIa on the platelet surface, decreased with increasing the shear stress level and exposure time. The reduction of GPIIb/IIIa on the platelet surface was further proved by the reduction of further activated platelet GPIIb/IIIa surface expression induced by ADP and the increase in GPIIb/IIIa concentration in microparticle-free plasma with increasing the applied shear stress and exposure time. It is clear that non-physiological shear stress induce a paradoxical phenomenon, in which both activation and shedding of the GPIIb/IIIa on the platelet surface occur simultaneously. This study may offer a new perspective to explain the reason of both increased thrombosis and bleeding events in patients implanted with high shear blood-contacting medical devices. PMID:26160282

  17. Flow visualization and wall shear stress of a flapping model hummingbird wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanton, Erik W. M.; Vanier, Blake A.; Mohseni, Kamran

    2010-09-01

    The unsteady low Reynolds number aerodynamics of flapping flight was investigated experimentally through flow visualization by suspended particle imagery and wall shear stress measurement from micro-array hot-film anemometry. In conjunction, a mechanism was developed to create a flapping motion with three degrees of freedom and adjustable flapping frequency. The flapping kinematics and wing shape were selected for dynamic similarity to a hummingbird during hovering flight. Flow visualization was used to validate the anemometry observations of leading edge vortex (LEV) characteristics and to investigate the necessity of spanwise flow in LEV stability. The shear sensors determined LEV characteristics throughout the translation section of the stroke period for various wing speeds. It was observed that a minimum frequency between 2 and 3.5 Hz is required for the formation and stabilization of a LEV. The vortex strength peaked around 30% of the flapping cycle (corresponding to just past the translation midpoint), which agrees with results from previous studies conducted by others. The shear sensors also indicated a mild growth in LEV size during translation sections of the wing’s motion. This growth magnitude was nearly constant through a range of operating frequencies.

  18. Acute shear stress direction dictates adherent cell remodeling and verifies shear profile of spinning disk assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, Alexander; Engler, Adam J.

    2015-02-01

    Several methods have been developed to quantify population level changes in cell attachment strength given its large heterogeneity. One such method is the rotating disk chamber or ‘spinning disk’ in which a range of shear forces are applied to attached cells to quantify detachment force, i.e. attachment strength, which can be heterogeneous within cell populations. However, computing the exact force vectors that act upon cells is complicated by complex flow fields and variable cell morphologies. Recent observations suggest that cells may remodel their morphology and align during acute shear exposure, but contrary to intuition, shear is not orthogonal to the radial direction. Here we theoretically derive the magnitude and direction of applied shear and demonstrate that cells, under certain physiological conditions, align in this direction within minutes. Shear force magnitude is also experimentally verified which validates that for spread cells shear forces and not torque or drag dominate in this assay, and demonstrates that the applied force per cell area is largely independent of initial morphology. These findings suggest that direct quantified comparison of the effects of shear on a wide array of cell types and conditions can be made with confidence using this assay without the need for computational or numerical modeling.

  19. Shear stress modulates endothelial KLF2 through activation of P2X4.

    PubMed

    Sathanoori, R; Rosi, F; Gu, B J; Wiley, J S; Müller, C E; Olde, B; Erlinge, D

    2015-03-01

    Vascular endothelial cells that are in direct contact with blood flow are exposed to fluid shear stress and regulate vascular homeostasis. Studies report endothelial cells to release ATP in response to shear stress that in turn modulates cellular functions via P2 receptors with P2X4 mediating shear stress-induced calcium signaling and vasodilation. A recent study shows that a loss-of-function polymorphism in the human P2X4 resulting in a Tyr315>Cys variant is associated with increased pulse pressure and impaired endothelial vasodilation. Although the importance of shear stress-induced Krüppel-like factor 2 (KLF2) expression in atheroprotection is well studied, whether ATP regulates KLF2 remains unanswered and is the objective of this study. Using an in vitro model, we show that in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), apyrase decreased shear stress-induced KLF2, KLF4, and NOS3 expression but not that of NFE2L2. Exposure of HUVECs either to shear stress or ATP?S under static conditions increased KLF2 in a P2X4-dependent manner as was evident with both the receptor antagonist and siRNA knockdown. Furthermore, transient transfection of static cultures of human endothelial cells with the Tyr315>Cys mutant P2X4 construct blocked ATP-induced KLF2 expression. Also, P2X4 mediated the shear stress-induced phosphorylation of extracellular regulated kinase-5, a known regulator of KLF2. This study demonstrates a major physiological finding that the shear-induced effects on endothelial KLF2 axis are in part dependent on ATP release and P2X4, a previously unidentified mechanism. PMID:25563726

  20. Stress response and structural transitions in sheared gyroidal and lamellar amphiphilic mesophases: lattice-Boltzmann simulations

    E-print Network

    Nelido Gonzalez-Segredo; Jens Harting; Giovanni Giupponi; Peter V. Coveney

    2006-01-20

    We report on the stress response of gyroidal and lamellar amphiphilic mesophases to steady shear simulated using a bottom-up lattice-Boltzmann model for amphiphilic fluids and sliding periodic (Lees-Edwards) boundary conditions. We study the gyroid per se (above the sponge-gyroid transition, of high crystallinity) and the molten gyroid (within such a transition, of shorter-range order). We find that both mesophases exhibit shear-thinning, more pronounced and at lower strain rates for the molten gyroid. At late times after the onset of shear, the skeleton of the crystalline gyroid becomes a structure of interconnected irregular tubes and toroidal rings, mostly oriented along the velocity ramp imposed by the shear, in contradistinction with free-energy Langevin-diffusion studies which yield a much simpler structure of disentangled tubes. We also compare the shear stress and deformation of lamellar mesophases with and without amphiphile when subjected to the same shear flow applied normal to the lamellae. We find that the presence of amphiphile allows (a) the shear stress at late times to be higher than in the case without amphiphile, and (b) the formation of rich patterns on the sheared interface, characterised by alternating regions of high and low curvature.

  1. Sand Shear Band Thickness Measurements by Digital Imaging Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alshibli, Khalid A.; Sture, Stein

    1998-01-01

    Digital imaging analysis was used to study localized deformations in granular materials tested under plane strain condition. Two independent techniques were applied and compared. In the first, the digitized optical images of a grid printed on the latex membrane were used to measure the shear band orientation angle and thickness, and were found to be 54.5' and 3.01 mm respectively. The second technique involved introducing an ultra-low viscosity resin into the specimen in preparation for thin- sectioning and microscopic study of the internal fabric. A total of 24 microscopic images obtained from four thin sections were analyzed and void ratio variation was measured. The shear band thickness measurements from images located along the shear band axis (at two locations) were equal to 3.19 mm and 3.29 mm which are very close to the average value obtained from surface analysis. The study was then extended to investigate the effects of sand grain-size and properties, specimen density, and confining pressure on shear band thickness. It was found that the normalized shear band thickness decreases as grain-size and confining pressure increase and as density decreases. Finally, shear band thickness is highly influenced by the specimen dilatancy.

  2. The SDSS Coadd: Cosmic Shear Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Huan; Dodelson, Scott; Seo, Hee-Jong; Soares-Santos, Marcelle; Annis, James; Hao, Jiangang; Johnston, David; Kubo, Jeffrey M.; Reis, Ribamar R.R.; Simet, Melanie; /Chicago U., EFI /Chicago U., KICP

    2011-11-01

    Stripe 82 in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey was observed multiple times, allowing deeper images to be constructed by coadding the data. Here we analyze the ellipticities of background galaxies in this 275 square degree region, searching for evidence of distortions due to cosmic shear. The E-mode is detected in both real and Fourier space with > 5-{sigma} significance on degree scales, while the B-mode is consistent with zero as expected. The amplitude of the signal constrains the combination of the matter density {Omega}{sub m} and fluctuation amplitude {sigma}{sub 8} to be {Omega}{sub m}{sup 0.7} {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.276{sub -0.050}{sup +0.036}.

  3. Shear stress regulates endothelial cell autophagy via redox regulation and Sirt1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, J; Bi, X; Chen, T; Zhang, Q; Wang, S-X; Chiu, J-J; Liu, G-S; Zhang, Y; Bu, P; Jiang, F

    2015-01-01

    Disturbed cell autophagy is found in various cardiovascular disease conditions. Biomechanical stimuli induced by laminar blood flow have important protective actions against the development of various vascular diseases. However, the impacts and underlying mechanisms of shear stress on the autophagic process in vascular endothelial cells (ECs) are not entirely understood. Here we investigated the impacts of shear stress on autophagy in human vascular ECs. We found that shear stress induced by laminar flow, but not that by oscillatory or low-magnitude flow, promoted autophagy. Time-course analysis and flow cessation experiments confirmed that this effect was not a transient adaptive stress response but appeared to be a sustained physiological action. Flow had no effect on the mammalian target of rapamycin-ULK pathway, whereas it significantly upregulated Sirt1 expression. Inhibition of Sirt1 blunted shear stress-induced autophagy. Overexpression of wild-type Sirt1, but not the deacetylase-dead mutant, was sufficient to induce autophagy in ECs. Using both of gain- and loss-of-function experiments, we showed that Sirt1-dependent activation of FoxO1 was critical in mediating shear stress-induced autophagy. Shear stress also induced deacetylation of Atg5 and Atg7. Moreover, shear stress-induced Sirt1 expression and autophagy were redox dependent, whereas Sirt1 might act as a redox-sensitive transducer mediating reactive oxygen species-elicited autophagy. Functionally, we demonstrated that flow-conditioned cells are more resistant to oxidant-induced cell injury, and this cytoprotective effect was abolished after inhibition of autophagy. In summary, these results suggest that Sirt1-mediated autophagy in ECs may be a novel mechanism by which laminar flow produces its vascular-protective actions. PMID:26181207

  4. Glycocalyx acting as a mechanotransducer of fluid shear stress

    E-print Network

    Yao, Yu, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2005-01-01

    It is widely recognized that fluid shearing forces acting on endothelial cells (ECs) have a profound effect on EC morphology, structure and function. Recent investigations in vivo have indicated the presence of a thick ...

  5. Working Principle Simulations of a Dynamic Resonant Wall Shear Stress Sensor Concept

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xu; Naughton, Jonathan W.; Lindberg, William R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses a novel dynamic resonant wall shear stress sensor concept based on an oscillating sensor operating near resonance. The interaction between the oscillating sensor surface and the fluid above it is modelled using the unsteady laminar boundary layer equations. The numerical experiment shows that the effect of the oscillating shear stress is well correlated by the Hummer number, the ratio of the steady shear force caused by the outside flow to the oscillating viscous force created by the sensor motion. The oscillating shear stress predicted by the fluid model is used in a mechanical model of the sensor to predict the sensor's dynamic motion. Static calibration curves for amplitude and frequency influences are predicted. These results agree with experimental results on some extent, and shows some expectation for further development of the dynamic resonant sensor concept.

  6. An analysis of riverbed shear stress in the context of plugging in bank filtration systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbs, S.

    2003-04-01

    The Louisville Water Company (LWC) has investigated the alluvial aquifer upstream of the Falls of the Ohio River since the late 1940's, with an interest in securing an adequate volume of high quality water. A high-yield horizontal bank filtration collection well was put into operation at the B.E.Payne Water Treatment Plant in 1999, with a design capacity of 57,000 cubic meters/day and an initial yield of greater than 87,000 cubic meters/day. In the first 3 years of operation, the yield has decreased to a stable yield of 68,000 cubic meters/day. LWC desired a better understanding of the factors that affect long-term yield from riverbank filtation systems, and initiated a research program to provide data for better modeling and prediction of yield from such systems. Data were assembled from various agencies having information on flow, velocity profiles, slope, and sediment transport on the river, and particle size distribution of riverbed sediments and the aquifer. These data were used to calculate shear velocity, boundary shear stress, and friction slope. Riverbed shear stress was calculated at 7.5 Newtons/square meter at maximum river flow, and less than 1 Newton/square meter under average flow conditions. These data, along with aquifer characteristics and well yield, were used as a baseline for comparison with other river systems. Additional work is planned that will provide a direct measure of flux in the riverbed. This will allow the mapping of riverbed hydraulic conductivity in the vicinity of the well, and allow a spatial and temporal comparison to piezometric and well yield data.

  7. On the expected relationships among apparent stress, static stress drop, effective shear fracture energy, and efficiency

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeler, N.M.; Wong, T.-F.; Hickman, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    We consider expected relationships between apparent stress ??a and static stress drop ????s using a standard energy balance and find ??a = ????s (0.5 - ??), where ?? is stress overshoot. A simple implementation of this balance is to assume overshoot is constant; then apparent stress should vary linearly with stress drop, consistent with spectral theories (Brune, 1970) and dynamic crack models (Madariaga, 1976). Normalizing this expression by the static stress drop defines an efficiency ??sw = ??sa/????s as follows from Savage and Wood (1971). We use this measure of efficiency to analyze data from one of a number of observational studies that find apparent stress to increase with seismic moment, namely earthquakes recorded in the Cajon Pass borehole by Abercrombie (1995). Increases in apparent stress with event size could reflect an increase in seismic efficiency; however, ??sw for the Cajon earthquakes shows no such increase and is approximately constant over the entire moment range. Thus, apparent stress and stress drop co-vary, as expected from the energy balance at constant overshoot. The median value of ??sw for the Cajon earthquakes is four times lower than ??sw for laboratory events. Thus, these Cajon-recorded earthquakes have relatively low and approximately constant efficiency. As the energy balance requires ??sw = 0.5 - ??, overshoot can be estimated directly from the Savage-Wood efficiency; overshoot is positive for Cajon Pass earthquakes. Variations in apparent stress with seismic moment for these earthquakes result primarily from systematic variations in static stress drop with seismic moment and do not require a relative decrease in sliding resistance with increasing event size (dynamic weakening). Based on the comparison of field and lab determinations of the Savage-Wood efficiency, we suggest the criterion ??sw > 0.3 as a test for dynamic weakening in excess of that seen in the lab.

  8. Bed shear stress in the southern North Sea as an important driver for suspended sediment dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanev, Emil Vassilev; Dobrynin, Mikhail; Pleskachevsky, Andrey; Grayek, Sebastian; Günther, Heinz

    2009-04-01

    This paper addresses the spatial and temporal patterns of drivers for sediment dynamics in coastal areas. The basic assumption is that local processes are dominating. The focus is put on the bed shear stress in the southern part of North Sea giving the basic control for deposition-sedimentation and resuspension-erosion. The wave-induced bed shear stress is formulated using a model based on the concept that the turbulent kinetic energy associated with surface waves is a function of orbital velocity, the latter depending on the wave height and period, as well as on the water depth. Parameters of surface waves are taken from simulations with the wave spectrum model WAM (wave model). Bed shear stress associated with currents is simulated with a 3D primitive equation model, Hamburg Shelf Ocean Model. Significant wave height, bed shear stress due to waves and currents, is subjected to empirical orthogonal functions (EOF) analysis. It has been found that the EOF-1 of significant wave height represents the decrease of significant wave height over the shallows and, due to fetch limitation, along the coastlines. Higher order modes are seesaw-like and, in combination, display a basin-scale rotational pattern centred approximately in the middle of the basin. Similar types of variability is also observed in the second and third EOF of bed shear stress. Surface concentrations of suspended matter derived from MERIS satellite data are analysed and compared against statistical characteristics of bed shear stress. The results show convincingly that the horizontal distribution of sediment can, to a larger extent, be explained by the local shear stress. However, availability of resuspendable sediments on the bottom is quite important in some areas like the Dogger Bank.

  9. Shear stress-induced mitochondrial biogenesis decreases the release of microparticles from endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Seok; Kim, Boa; Lee, Hojun; Thakkar, Sunny; Babbitt, Dianne M; Eguchi, Satoru; Brown, Michael D; Park, Joon-Young

    2015-08-01

    The concept of enhancing structural integrity of mitochondria has emerged as a novel therapeutic option for cardiovascular disease. Flow-induced increase in laminar shear stress is a potent physiological stimulant associated with exercise, which exerts atheroprotective effects in the vasculature. However, the effect of laminar shear stress on mitochondrial remodeling within the vascular endothelium and its related functional consequences remain largely unknown. Using in vitro and in vivo complementary studies, here, we report that aerobic exercise alleviates the release of endothelial microparticles in prehypertensive individuals and that these salutary effects are, in part, mediated by shear stress-induced mitochondrial biogenesis. Circulating levels of total (CD31(+)/CD42a(-)) and activated (CD62E(+)) microparticles released by endothelial cells were significantly decreased (?40% for both) after a 6-mo supervised aerobic exercise training program in individuals with prehypertension. In cultured human endothelial cells, laminar shear stress reduced the release of endothelial microparticles, which was accompanied by an increase in mitochondrial biogenesis through a sirtuin 1 (SIRT1)-dependent mechanism. Resveratrol, a SIRT1 activator, treatment showed similar effects. SIRT1 knockdown using small-interfering RNA completely abolished the protective effect of shear stress. Disruption of mitochondrial integrity by either antimycin A or peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-? coactivator-1? small-interfering RNA significantly increased the number of total, and activated, released endothelial microparticles, and shear stress restored these back to basal levels. Collectively, these data demonstrate a critical role of endothelial mitochondrial integrity in preserving endothelial homeostasis. Moreover, prolonged laminar shear stress, which is systemically elevated during aerobic exercise in the vessel wall, mitigates endothelial dysfunction by promoting mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:26024684

  10. NUMERICAL STUDIES OF BOTI'OM SHEAR STRESS AND SEDIMENT DISTRIBUTION ON THE AMAZON

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Cari

    NUMERICAL STUDIES OF BOTI'OM SHEAR STRESS AND SEDIMENT DISTRIBUTION ON THE AMAZON CONTINENTAL SHELF bottomshear stress and the distribution of bottom sediments on the Amazon continental sheff has been studied of the observedsedimentolngicalfeatures of the Amazon continental shelf. High concentrationsof snspendedsediment in the Amazon Riverare

  11. The FASEB Journal Research Communication Fluid shear stress primes mouse embryonic stem cells

    E-print Network

    Voldman, Joel

    The FASEB Journal · Research Communication Fluid shear stress primes mouse embryonic stem cells stress is a ubiquitous environmen- tal cue experienced by stem cells when they are being differentiated or expanded in perfusion cultures. How- ever, its role in modulating self-renewing stem cell phenotypes

  12. Forsterite to wadsleyite phase transformation under shear stress and consequences for the Earth's mantle transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demouchy, S.; Mainprice, D.; Tommasi, A.; Couvy, H.; Barou, F.; Frost, D. J.; Cordier, P.

    2011-01-01

    We have studied the phase transformation of forsterite to wadsleyite under shear stress at the Earth's transition zone pressure and temperature conditions. Two-step experiments were performed using a multi-anvil press. First, we hot pressed iron-free forsterite at 6 or 11 GPa and 1100 °C. Then we deformed a slab of this starting material using a direct simple shear assembly at 16 GPa and 1400 °C for 1, 15, 35, 40, or 60 min. Both the starting material and the deformed samples were characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopy including measurements of crystal preferred orientations (CPO) by electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The phase transformation occurs very rapidly, in less than 1 min, and metastable forsterite relics are not observed after deformation. The grain size of wadsleyite is slightly smaller than the forsterite starting material. The water contents obtained from FTIR analyses in forsterite and wadsleyite are 65-124 wt ppm H 2O and 114-736 wt ppm H 2O, respectively, which are well below water solubility at similar conditions in the presence of free water. Wadsleyite aggregates display weak CPO patterns with [1 0 0] axes concentrated at low angle to the shear direction, [0 1 0] axes perpendicular to the shear plane and nearly random [0 0 1] axes. Only a few dislocations were observed in wadsleyite with TEM. This observation is consistent with the assumption that most dislocations formed during the initial high-stress stages of these stress-relaxation experiments, were consumed in the phase transformation, probably enhancing the transformation rate. CPO patterns vary as a function of the water content: with increasing water content the density of [1 0 0] axes parallel to the shear direction decreases, and the density of [0 0 1] axes increases. Viscoplastic self-consistent modeling of CPO evolution using previously reported glide systems for wadsleyite, i.e., [1 0 0]{0 k l} and 1/2 <1 1 1>{1 0 1}, cannot reproduce the measured CPO, unless the [0 0 1](0 1 0) system, for which dislocations have not been observed by TEM, is also activated. In addition, wadsleyite grain growth suggests the participation of diffusion-assisted processes in deformation. Calculated anisotropies for P and S-waves using measured CPO are always below 1%. This very low anisotropy is due to both the low finite strain achieved in the experiments, which leads to weak wadsleyite CPO, and to the diluting effect of added majorite. The present experiments emphasize the importance of stress, grain size evolution and water content in the forsterite to wadsleyite phase transformation and subsequent deformation in the transition zone.

  13. A flexible micromachined optical sensor for simultaneous measurement of pressure and shear force distribution on foot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei-Chih; Panergo, Reynold R.; Galvanin, Christopher M.; Ledoux, William; Sangeorzan, Bruce; Reinhall, Per G.

    2003-07-01

    Lower limb complications associated with diabetes include the development of plantar ulcers that can lead to infection and subsequent amputation. While it is known from force plate analyses that there are medial/lateral and anterior/posterior shear components of the ground reaction force, there is little known about the actual distribution of this force during daily activities, nor about the role that shear plays in causing plantar ulceration. Furthermore, one critical reason why these data have not been obtained previously is the lack of a validated, widely used, commercially available shear sensor, in part because of the various technical issues associated with shear measurement. Here we have developed novel means of tranducing plantar shear and pressure stress via a new microfabricated optical system. The pressure/shear sensor consists of an array of optical waveguides lying in perpendicular rows and columns separated by elastomeric pads. A map of pressure and shear stress is constructed based on observed macro bending through the intensity attenuation from the physical deformation of two adjacent perpendicular optical waveguides. The uniqueness of the sensor is in its batch fabrication process, which involves injection molding and embossing techniques with Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) as the optical medium. Here we present the preliminary results of the prototype. The sensor has been shown to have low noise and responds linearly to applied loads. The smallest detectable force on each sensor element based on the current setup is ~0.1 N. The smallest area we have resolved in our mesh sensor is currently 950x950?m2

  14. Suppression of endothelial t-PA expression by prolonged high laminar shear stress

    SciTech Connect

    Ulfhammer, Erik; Carlstroem, Maria; Bergh, Niklas; Larsson, Pia; Karlsson, Lena; Jern, Sverker

    2009-02-06

    Primary hypertension is associated with an impaired capacity for acute release of endothelial tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA), which is an important local protective response to prevent thrombus extension. As hypertensive vascular remodeling potentially results in increased vascular wall shear stress, we investigated the impact of shear on regulation of t-PA. Cultured human endothelial cells were exposed to low ({<=}1.5 dyn/cm{sup 2}) or high (25 dyn/cm{sup 2}) laminar shear stress for up to 48 h in two different experimental models. Using real-time RT-PCR and ELISA, shear stress was observed to time and magnitude-dependently suppress t-PA transcript and protein secretion to approximately 30% of basal levels. Mechanistic experiments revealed reduced nuclear protein binding to the t-PA specific CRE element (EMSA) and an almost completely abrogated shear response with pharmacologic JNK inhibition. We conclude that prolonged high laminar shear stress suppresses endothelial t-PA expression and may therefore contribute to the enhanced risk of arterial thrombosis in hypertensive disease.

  15. Measurement of mechanical properties of homogeneous tissue with ultrasonically induced shear waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenleaf, James F.; Chen, Shigao

    2007-03-01

    Fundamental mechanical properties of tissue are altered by many diseases. Regional and systemic diseases can cause changes in tissue properties. Liver stiffness is caused by cirrhosis and fibrosis. Vascular wall stiffness and tone are altered by smoking, diabetes and other diseases. Measurement of tissue mechanical properties has historically been done with palpation. However palpation is subjective, relative, and not quantitative or reproducible. Elastography in which strain is measured due to stress application gives a qualitative estimate of Young's modulus at low frequency. We have developed a method that takes advantage of the fact that the wave equation is local and shear wave propagation depends only on storage and loss moduli in addition to density, which does not vary much in soft tissues. Our method is called shearwave dispersion ultrasonic velocity measurement (SDUV). The method uses ultrasonic radiation force to produce repeated motion in tissue that induces shear waves to propagate. The shear wave propagation speed is measured with pulse echo ultrasound as a function of frequency of the shear wave. The resulting velocity dispersion curve is fit with a Voight model to determine the elastic and viscous moduli of the tissue. Results indicate accurate and precise measurements are possible using this "noninvasive biopsy" method. Measurements in beef along and across the fibers are consistent with the literature values.

  16. Cultivation of shear stress sensitive microorganisms in disposable bag reactor systems.

    PubMed

    Jonczyk, Patrick; Takenberg, Meike; Hartwig, Steffen; Beutel, Sascha; Berger, Ralf G; Scheper, Thomas

    2013-09-20

    Technical scale (?5l) cultivations of shear stress sensitive microorganisms are often difficult to perform, as common bioreactors are usually designed to maximize the oxygen input into the culture medium. This is achieved by mechanical stirrers, causing high shear stress. Examples for shear stress sensitive microorganisms, for which no specific cultivation systems exist, are many anaerobic bacteria and fungi, such as basidiomycetes. In this work a disposable bag bioreactor developed for cultivation of mammalian cells was investigated to evaluate its potential to cultivate shear stress sensitive anaerobic Eubacterium ramulus and shear stress sensitive basidiomycetes Flammulina velutipes and Pleurotus sapidus. All cultivations were compared with conventional stainless steel stirred tank reactors (STR) cultivations. Good growth of all investigated microorganisms cultivated in the bag reactor was found. E. ramulus showed growth rates of ?=0.56 h?¹ (bag) and ?=0.53 h?¹ (STR). Differences concerning morphology, enzymatic activities and growth in fungal cultivations were observed. In the bag reactor growth in form of small, independent pellets was observed while STR cultivations showed intense aggregation. F. velutipes reached higher biomass concentrations (21.2 g l?¹ DCW vs. 16.8 g l?¹ DCW) and up to 2-fold higher peptidolytic activities in comparison to cell cultivation in stirred tank reactors. PMID:23892193

  17. Nature's rheologists: Lymphatic endothelial cells control migration in response to shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Gerald; Dunn, Alex; Surya, Vinay

    2015-03-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) line the inner surface of blood and lymphatic vessels and are sensitive to fluid flow as part of their physiological function. EC organization, migration and vessel development are profoundly influenced by shear stresses, with important implications in cardiovascular disease and tumor metastasis. How ECs sense fluid flow is a central and unanswered question in cardiovascular biology. We developed a high-throughput live-cell flow chamber that models the gradients in wall shear stress experienced by ECs in vivo. Live-cell imaging allows us to probe cellular responses to flow, most notably EC migration, which has a key role in vessel remodeling. We find that most EC subtypes, including ECs from the venous, arterial, and microvascular systems, migrate in the flow direction. In contrast, human lymphatic microvascular ECs (hLMVECs) migrate against flow and up spatial gradients in wall shear stress. Further experiments reveal that hLMVECs are sensitive to the magnitude, direction, and the local spatial gradients in wall shear stress. Lastly, recent efforts have aimed to link this directional migration to spatial gradients in cell-mediated small molecule emission that may be linked to the gradient in wall shear stress.

  18. Microscopic origins of shear stress in dense fluid-grain mixtures

    E-print Network

    Donia Marzougui; Bruno Chareyre; Julien Chauchat

    2015-04-14

    A numerical model is used to simulate rheometer experiments at constant normal stress on dense suspensions of spheres. The complete model includes sphere-sphere contacts using a soft contact approach, short range hydrodynamic interactions defined by frame-invariant expressions of forces and torques in the lubrication approximation, and drag forces resulting from the poromechanical coupling computed with the DEM-PFV technique. Series of simulations in which some of the coupling terms are neglected highlight the role of the poromechanical coupling in the transient regimes. They also reveal that the shear component of the lubrication forces, though frequently neglected in the literature, has a dominant effect in the volume changes. On the other hand, the effects of lubrication torques are much less significant. The bulk shear stress is decomposed into contact stress and hydrodynamic stress terms whose dependency on a dimensionless shear rate - the so called viscous number $I_v$ - are examined. Both contributions are increasing functions of $I_v$, contacts contribution dominates at low viscous number ($I_v$ 0.15, consistently with a phenomenological law infered by other authors. Statistics of microstructural variables highlight a complex interplay between solid contacts and hydrodynamic interactions. In contrast with a popular idea, the results suggest that lubrication may not necessarily reduce the contribution of contact forces to the bulk shear stress. The proposed model is general and applies directly to sheared immersed granular media in which pore pressure feedback plays a key role (triggering of avalanches, liquefaction).

  19. Statistics of acoustic emissions and stress drops during granular shearing using a stick-slip fiber bundle mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, D.; Michlmayr, G.; Or, D.

    2012-04-01

    Shearing of dense granular materials appears in many engineering and Earth sciences applications. Under a constant strain rate, the shearing stress at steady state oscillates with slow rises followed by rapid drops that are linked to the build up and failure of force chains. Experiments indicate that these drops display exponential statistics. Measurements of acoustic emissions during shearing indicates that the energy liberated by failure of these force chains has power-law statistics. Representing force chains as fibers, we use a stick-slip fiber bundle model to obtain analytical solutions of the statistical distribution of stress drops and failure energy. In the model, fibers stretch, fail, and regain strength during deformation. Fibers have Weibull-distributed threshold strengths with either quenched and annealed disorder. The shape of the distribution for drops and energy obtained from the model are similar to those measured during shearing experiments. This simple model may be useful to identify failure events linked to force chain failures. Future generalizations of the model that include different types of fiber failure may also allow identification of different types of granular failures that have distinct statistical acoustic emission signatures.

  20. A Novel Shear Reduction Insole Effect on the Thermal Response to Walking Stress, Balance, and Gait

    PubMed Central

    Ammanath, Peethambaran; Le, Tima; Luring, Christopher; Wensman, Jeffrey; Grewal, Gurtej S.; Najafi, Bijan; Pop-Busui, Rodica

    2014-01-01

    Shear stresses have been implicated in the formation of diabetes-related foot ulcers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a novel shear-reducing insole on the thermal response to walking, balance, and gait. Twenty-seven diabetes peripheral neuropathy patients were enrolled and asked to take 200 steps in both intervention and standard insoles. Thermal foot images of the feet were taken at baseline (1) following a 5-minute temperature acclimatization and (2) after walking. Testing order was randomized, and a 5-minute washout period was used between testing each insole condition. Sudomotor function was also assessed. Gait and balance were measured under single and dual task conditions using a validated body worn sensor system. The mean age was 65.1 years, height was 67.3 inches, weight was 218 pounds, and body mass index was 33.9, 48% were female, and 82% had type 2 diabetes. After walking in both insole conditions, foot temperatures increased significantly in standard insoles. The intervention insole significantly reduced forefoot and midfoot temperature increases (64.1%, P = .008; 48%, P = .046) compared to standard insoles. There were significant negative correlations with sudomotor function and baseline temperatures (r = .53-.57). The intervention demonstrated 10.4% less gait initiation double support time compared to standard insoles (P = .05). There were no differences in static balance measures. We found significantly lower forefoot and midfoot temperature increases following walking with shear-reducing insoles compared to standard insoles. We also found improvements in gait. These findings merit future study for the prevention of foot ulcer. PMID:25107709

  1. Bi-crystallographic lattice structure directs grain boundary motion under shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Liang; Han, Weizhong; Chen, Kai

    2015-08-01

    Shear stress driven grain boundary (GB) migration was found to be a ubiquitous phenomenon in small grained polycrystalline materials. Here we show that the GB displacement shift complete (DSC) dislocation mechanism for GB shear coupled migration is still functioning even if the geometry orientation of the GBs deviates a few degrees from the appropriate coincidence site lattice (CSL) GBs. It means that any large angle GB can have a considerable chance to be such a “CSL-related GB” for which the shear coupled GB migration motion can happen by the GB DSC dislocation mechanism. We conclude that the CSL-DSC bi-crystallographic lattice structure in GB is the main reason that GB can migrate under shear stress.

  2. Bi-crystallographic lattice structure directs grain boundary motion under shear stress

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Liang; Han, Weizhong; Chen, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Shear stress driven grain boundary (GB) migration was found to be a ubiquitous phenomenon in small grained polycrystalline materials. Here we show that the GB displacement shift complete (DSC) dislocation mechanism for GB shear coupled migration is still functioning even if the geometry orientation of the GBs deviates a few degrees from the appropriate coincidence site lattice (CSL) GBs. It means that any large angle GB can have a considerable chance to be such a “CSL-related GB” for which the shear coupled GB migration motion can happen by the GB DSC dislocation mechanism. We conclude that the CSL-DSC bi-crystallographic lattice structure in GB is the main reason that GB can migrate under shear stress. PMID:26304553

  3. Composite Interlaminar Shear Fracture Toughness, G(sub 2c): Shear Measurement of Sheer Myth?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, T. Kevin

    1997-01-01

    The concept of G2c as a measure of the interlaminar shear fracture toughness of a composite material is critically examined. In particular, it is argued that the apparent G2c as typically measured is inconsistent with the original definition of shear fracture. It is shown that interlaminar shear failure actually consists of tension failures in the resin rich layers between plies followed by the coalescence of ligaments created by these failures and not the sliding of two planes relative to one another that is assumed in fracture mechanics theory. Several strain energy release rate solutions are reviewed for delamination in composite laminates and structural components where failures have been experimentally documented. Failures typically occur at a location where the mode 1 component accounts for at least one half of the total G at failure. Hence, it is the mode I and mixed-mode interlaminar fracture toughness data that will be most useful in predicting delamination failure in composite components in service. Although apparent G2c measurements may prove useful for completeness of generating mixed-mode criteria, the accuracy of these measurements may have very little influence on the prediction of mixed-mode failures in most structural components.

  4. Localized shear deformation and softening of bulk metallic glass: stress or temperature driven?

    PubMed

    Ketov, S V; Louzguine-Luzgin, D V

    2013-01-01

    Metallic glasses due to their unique combination of physical and chemical properties have a great potential in various applications: materials for construction, medical, MEMs devices and so on. The deformation mechanism in metallic glasses is very much different from that in conventional crystalline materials and not yet fully understood. Here we are trying to find out what drives shear deformation in metallic glasses. The compression experiments of the bulk metallic glassy (BMG) samples coated with tin, Rose metal and indium were performed. There were no melting sites of the coating observed near individual shear bands. Melting occurred only near fracture surface, near microcracks and in the places of shear band concentrations. The results indicate that shear banding is rather a stress driven process while the temperature rise that was observed takes place due to friction forces in the viscous supercooled liquid thin layer in the shear bands. PMID:24100784

  5. Estimation of in-situ stresses in concrete members using polarized ultrasonic shear waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Andrew; Schumacher, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    Ultrasonic testing is commonly used to detect flaws, estimate geometries, and characterize properties of materials and structures. Acoustoelasticity refers to the dependency of stress wave velocity with applied stresses and is a phenomenon that has been known by geophysicists since the 1960s. A way to capitalize on this effect for concrete applications is by using ultrasonic shear waves which are particularly sensitive to applied stresses when polarized in the direction of the applied stress. The authors conducted an experiment on a 150 mm (6 in.) diameter concrete cylinder specimen with a length of 305 mm (12 in.) that was loaded in discrete load steps to failure. At each load step two ultrasonic shear waves were transmitted through the specimen, one with the polarization perpendicular and the other transverse to the applied stress. The velocity difference between the two sets of polarized shear waves was found to correlate with the applied stress in the specimen. Two potential applications for this methodology include estimation of stresses in pre-stressed concrete bridge girders and investigation of load redistribution in structural support elements after extreme events. This paper introduces the background of the methodology, presents an analysis of the collected data, and discusses the relationship between the recorded signals and the applied stress.

  6. The Effects of Static Coulomb, Normal and Shear Stress Changes on Earthquake Occurrence in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strader, A. E.; Jackson, D. D.

    2011-12-01

    Deng & Sykes (1997) found a strong correlation between receiver earthquake location and positive increase in Coulomb stress (?CFF). Assuming a coefficient of friction of 0.6, and resolving stresses onto assumed fault planes with uniform orientation parallel to average Pacific-North American plate motion, they found that only 15% of receiver earthquakes occur in "stress shadows" where the Coulomb stress change should impede faulting. We extended their study by adding two source earthquakes (Hector Mine, 1999 and El Mayor-Cucupah, 2010), and calculating the stress changes at the locations of 134 receiver earthquakes with magnitude 4.4 and greater after 1999. We examined shear stress, normal stress, and Coulomb stress, resolving stresses onto four different hypothetical fault planes: smoothed seismicity-based planes, a weighted average of nearby fault-plane orientations, and the two nodal planes of weighed average moment tensors of nearby earthquakes. We also computed shear, normal, and Coulomb stress histories oriented according to the four choices of fault orientation, and tested the effect of total stress change on receiver earthquake magnitude. Our chi square test results indicate that, with 95% confidence, receiver earthquakes do not tend to avoid stress shadows, and that the choice of plane onto which stress is resolved does not affect the result. On average, 39% of earthquakes occur at the time of maximum stress at the event location, with no significant variation depending on the choice of rupture plane or type of stress change. We found no correlation between earthquake magnitude and total stress change at the events' locations. These results suggest that instantaneous cumulative Coulomb stress, as we and Deng & Sykes modeled it, does not strongly control the locations of future earthquakes. The lack of correlation between Coulomb stress change and magnitude suggests that modeled Coulomb stress change does not control the size of earthquakes once they nucleate.

  7. Influence of thickness and permeability of endothelial surface layer on transmission of shear stress in capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, SongPeng; Zhang, XiangJun; Tian, Yu; Meng, YongGang; Lipowsky, Herbert

    2015-07-01

    The molecular coating on the surface of microvascular endothelium has been identified as a barrier to transvascular exchange of solutes. With a thickness of hundreds of nanometers, this endothelial surface layer (ESL) has been treated as a porous domain within which fluid shear stresses are dissipated and transmitted to the solid matrix to initiate mechanotransduction events. The present study aims to examine the effects of the ESL thickness and permeability on the transmission of shear stress throughout the ESL. Our results indicate that fluid shear stresses rapidly decrease to insignificant levels within a thin transition layer near the outer boundary of the ESL with a thickness on the order of ten nanometers. The thickness of the transition zone between free fluid and the porous layer was found to be proportional to the square root of the Darcy permeability. As the permeability is reduced ten-fold, the interfacial fluid and solid matrix shear stress gradients increase exponentially two-fold. While the interfacial fluid shear stress is positively related to the ESL thickness, the transmitted matrix stress is reduced by about 50% as the ESL thickness is decreased from 500 to 100 nm, which may occur under pathological conditions. Thus, thickness and permeability of the ESL are two main factors that determine flow features and the apportionment of shear stresses between the fluid and solid phases of the ESL. These results may shed light on the mechanisms of force transmission through the ESL and the pathological events caused by alterations in thickness and permeability of the ESL.

  8. Integrating satellite observations with modelling: basal shear stress of the Filcher-Ronne ice streams, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Joughin, Ian; Bamber, Jonathan L; Scambos, Ted; Tulaczyk, Slawek; Fahnestock, Mark; MacAyeal, Douglas R

    2006-07-15

    Using inverse methods constrained by recent satellite observations, we have produced a comprehensive estimate of the basal shear stress beneath the Filchner-Ronne ice streams. The inversions indicate that a weak bed (approx. 4-20kPa) underlies much of these ice streams. Compared to the Ross ice streams, the distribution of weak subglacial till is more heterogeneous, with 'sticky spots' providing much of the resistance to flow. A weak bed beneath Recovery ice stream extends several hundred kilometres inland with flow. Along this ice stream, discrepancies between thickness measurements and flux estimates suggest the existence of a deep (-1400m) trough not resolved by existing maps of subglacial topography. We hypothesize that the presence of this and other deep troughs is a major influence on this sector of the ice sheet that is not fully incorporated in current models of ice-sheet evolution. PMID:16782610

  9. Analyses of Failure Mechanisms and Residual Stresses in Graphite/Polyimide Composites Subjected to Shear Dominated Biaxial Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumosa, M.; Predecki, P. K.; Armentrout, D.; Benedikt, B.; Rupnowski, P.; Gentz, M.; Kumosa, L.; Sutter, J. K.

    2002-01-01

    This research contributes to the understanding of macro- and micro-failure mechanisms in woven fabric polyimide matrix composites based on medium and high modulus graphite fibers tested under biaxial, shear dominated stress conditions over a temperature range of -50 C to 315 C. The goal of this research is also to provide a testing methodology for determining residual stress distributions in unidirectional, cross/ply and fabric graphite/polyimide composites using the concept of embedded metallic inclusions and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements.

  10. Sensor for Viscosity and Shear Strength Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, J.; Moore, J.E. Jr.; Ebadian, M.A.; Jones, W.K.

    1998-10-20

    Measurement of the physical properties (viscosity and density) of waste slurries is critical in evaluating transport parameters to ensure turbulent flow through transport pipes. The environment for measurement and sensor exposure is extremely harsh; therefore, reliability and ruggedness are critical in the sensor design. The work for this project will be performed in three phases. The first phase, carried out in FY96, involved (1) an evaluation of acoustic and other methods for viscosity measurement; (2) measurement of the parameters of slurries over the range of percent solids found in tanks and transport systems; (3) a comparison of physical properties (e.g., viscosity and density) to percent solids found composition; and (4) the design of a prototype sensor. The second phase (FY97) will involve the fabrication of a prototype hybrid sensor to measure the viscosity and mechanical properties of slurries in remote, high-radiation environments. Two different viscometer designs are being investigated in this study: a magnetostrictive pulse wave guide viscometer; an oscillating cylinder viscometer. In FY97, the Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University (FIU), which has printed circuit, thick film, thin film, and co-fired ceramic fabrication capability, will fabricate five probes for demonstration after technology selection and evaluation.

  11. Lamin A/C deficiency reduces circulating tumor cell resistance to fluid shear stress.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Michael J; Denais, Celine; Chan, Maxine F; Wang, Zhexiao; Lammerding, Jan; King, Michael R

    2015-12-01

    Metastasis contributes to over 90% of cancer-related deaths and is initiated when cancer cells detach from the primary tumor, invade the basement membrane, and enter the circulation as circulating tumor cells (CTCs). While metastasis is viewed as an inefficient process with most CTCs dying within the bloodstream, it is evident that some CTCs are capable of resisting hemodynamic shear forces to form secondary tumors in distant tissues. We hypothesized that nuclear lamins A and C (A/C) act as key structural components within CTCs necessary to resist destruction from elevated shear forces of the bloodstream. Herein, we show that, compared with nonmalignant epithelial cells, tumor cells are resistant to elevated fluid shear forces in vitro that mimic those within the bloodstream, as evidenced by significant decreases in cellular apoptosis and necrosis. Knockdown of lamin A/C significantly reduced tumor cell resistance to fluid shear stress, with significantly increased cell death compared with parental tumor cell and nontargeting controls. Interestingly, lamin A/C knockdown increased shear stress-induced tumor cell apoptosis, but did not significantly affect cellular necrosis. These data demonstrate that lamin A/C is an important structural component that enables tumor cell resistance to fluid shear stress-mediated death in the bloodstream, and may thus facilitate survival and hematogenous metastasis of CTCs. PMID:26447202

  12. Measurement of Oblique Impact-generated Shear Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, J. M.; Schultz, P. H.

    2001-01-01

    Experimental strain measurements reveal that oblique impacts can generate shear waves with displacements as large as those in the P-wave. Large oblique impacts may thus be more efficient sources of surface disruption than vertical impacts. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  13. Shear Strength Measurement Benchmarking Tests for K Basin Sludge Simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Carolyn A.; Daniel, Richard C.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Luna, Maria; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2009-06-10

    Equipment development and demonstration testing for sludge retrieval is being conducted by the K Basin Sludge Treatment Project (STP) at the MASF (Maintenance and Storage Facility) using sludge simulants. In testing performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (under contract with the CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company), the performance of the Geovane instrument was successfully benchmarked against the M5 Haake rheometer using a series of simulants with shear strengths (?) ranging from about 700 to 22,000 Pa (shaft corrected). Operating steps for obtaining consistent shear strength measurements with the Geovane instrument during the benchmark testing were refined and documented.

  14. Field measurements of the linear and nonlinear shear moduli of cemented alluvium using dynamically loaded surface footings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kwangsoo

    In this dissertation, a research effort aimed at development and implementation of a direct field test method to evaluate the linear and nonlinear shear modulus of soil is presented. The field method utilizes a surface footing that is dynamically loaded horizontally. The test procedure involves applying static and dynamic loads to the surface footing and measuring the soil response beneath the loaded area using embedded geophones. A wide range in dynamic loads under a constant static load permits measurements of linear and nonlinear shear wave propagation from which shear moduli and associated shearing strains are evaluated. Shear wave velocities in the linear and nonlinear strain ranges are calculated from time delays in waveforms monitored by geophone pairs. Shear moduli are then obtained using the shear wave velocities and the mass density of a soil. Shear strains are determined using particle displacements calculated from particle velocities measured at the geophones by assuming a linear variation between geophone pairs. The field test method was validated by conducting an initial field experiment at sandy site in Austin, Texas. Then, field experiments were performed on cemented alluvium, a complex, hard-to-sample material. Three separate locations at Yucca Mountain, Nevada were tested. The tests successfully measured: (1) the effect of confining pressure on shear and compression moduli in the linear strain range and (2) the effect of strain on shear moduli at various states of stress in the field. The field measurements were first compared with empirical relationships for uncemented gravel. This comparison showed that the alluvium was clearly cemented. The field measurements were then compared to other independent measurements including laboratory resonant column tests and field seismic tests using the spectral-analysis-of-surface-waves method. The results from the field tests were generally in good agreement with the other independent test results, indicating that the proposed method has the ability to directly evaluate complex material like cemented alluvium in the field.

  15. On investigating wall shear stress in two-dimensional plane turbulent wall jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdi, Faraz; Johansson, Gunnar; White, Christopher; Naughton, Jonathan

    2012-11-01

    Mehdi & White [Exp Fluids 50:43-51(2011)] presented a full momentum integral based method for determining wall shear stress in zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers. They utilized the boundary conditions at the wall and at the outer edge of the boundary layer. A more generalized expression is presented here that uses just one boundary condition at the wall. The method is mathematically exact and has an advantage of having no explicit streamwise gradient terms. It is successfully applied to two different experimental plane turbulent wall jet datasets for which independent estimates of wall shear stress were known. Complications owing to experimental inaccuracies in determining wall shear stress from the proposed method are also discussed.

  16. On pressure-shear plate impact for studying the kinetics of stress-induced phase transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar, Joanne C.; Clifton, Rodney J.

    1992-07-01

    Pressure-shear plate impact experiments are proposed for studying the kinetics of stress-induced phase transformations. The purpose of this paper is to determine loading conditions and specimen orientations which can be expected to activate a single habit plane variant parallel to the impact plane, thereby simplifying the study of the kinetics of the transformation through monitoring the wave profiles associated with the propagating phase boundary. The Wechsler Lieberman-Read phenomenological theory was used to determine habit plane indices and directions of shape deformation for a Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloy which undergoes a martensitic phase transformation under stress. Elastic waves generated by pressure-shear impact were analyzed for wave propagation in the direction of the normal to a habit plane. A critical resolved shear stress criterion was used to predict variants which are expected to be activated for a range of impact velocities and relative magnitudes of the normal and transverse components of the impact velocity.

  17. Relating accretion and erosion at an exposed tidal wetland to the bottom shear stress of combined current-wave action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, B. W.; Yang, S. L.; Wang, Y. P.; Bouma, T. J.; Zhu, Q.

    2012-02-01

    Sediment dynamics have an important influence on the morphological evolution of tidal wetlands, which consist of mudflats and salt marshes. To understand the nature of sediment behavior under combined current-wave action at an exposed tidal wetland, we measured the waves, currents, water depths, bed-level changes, and sediment properties at a mudflat-salt marsh transition on the Yangtze Delta, China, during five consecutive tides under onshore winds of ~ 8 m/s, and calculated the bed shear stresses due to currents ( ?c), waves ( ?w), combined current-wave action ( ?cw), and the critical shear stress for erosion of the bottom sediment ( ?ce). The bed shear stresses under combined current-wave action ( ?cw) were approximately five times higher on the mudflat (up to 1.11 N/m 2; average 0.27 N/m 2) than on the salt marsh (up to 0.14 N/m 2; average, 0.06 N/m 2). On the mudflat, ?cw was larger than the critical erosion shear stress ( ?ce = 0.103 N/m 2) for 70% of the period of submergence, whereas ?cw was always lower than ?ce at the salt marsh site ( ?ce = 0.116 N/m 2). This result indicates that the sediment dynamics on the mudflat were dominated by erosion, whereas at the salt marsh they were governed by deposition, which is in agreement with the observed bed-level change during the study period (- 3.3 mm/tide on the mudflat and 3.0 mm/tide on the salt marsh). A comparison of ?cw values calculated using the van Rijn (1993) and Soulsby (1995) models for bed shear stresses under combined current-wave action indicates that both models are applicable to the present case and effectively predict the bottom shear stress under combined current-wave action. Overall, we conclude that ?cw in combination with ?ce is useful in assessing the hydrodynamic mechanisms that underlie the morphological evolution of exposed tidal wetlands.

  18. Vascular endothelial cell membranes differentiate between stretch and shear stress through transitions in their lipid phases.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kimiko; Ando, Joji

    2015-10-01

    Vascular endothelial cells (ECs) respond to the hemodynamic forces stretch and shear stress by altering their morphology, functions, and gene expression. However, how they sense and differentiate between these two forces has remained unknown. Here we report that the plasma membrane itself differentiates between stretch and shear stress by undergoing transitions in its lipid phases. Uniaxial stretching and hypotonic swelling increased the lipid order of human pulmonary artery EC plasma membranes, thereby causing a transition from the liquid-disordered phase to the liquid-ordered phase in some areas, along with a decrease in membrane fluidity. In contrast, shear stress decreased the membrane lipid order and increased membrane fluidity. A similar increase in lipid order occurred when the artificial lipid bilayer membranes of giant unilamellar vesicles were stretched by hypotonic swelling, indicating that this is a physical phenomenon. The cholesterol content of EC plasma membranes significantly increased in response to stretch but clearly decreased in response to shear stress. Blocking these changes in the membrane lipid order by depleting membrane cholesterol with methyl-?-cyclodextrin or by adding cholesterol resulted in a marked inhibition of the EC response specific to stretch and shear stress, i.e., phosphorylation of PDGF receptors and phosphorylation of VEGF receptors, respectively. These findings indicate that EC plasma membranes differently respond to stretch and shear stress by changing their lipid order, fluidity, and cholesterol content in opposite directions and that these changes in membrane physical properties are involved in the mechanotransduction that activates membrane receptors specific to each force. PMID:26297225

  19. Magnetoacoustic stress measurements in steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, M.; Utrata, D.; Allison, S. G.; Heyman, J. S.

    1985-01-01

    Uniaxial stress effects on the low-field magnetoacoustic interaction have been studied using bulk compressional waves and Rayleigh surface waves in numerous steel samples having various impurity concentrations (Namkung et al., 1984). The results invariably showed that the initial slope of acoustic natural velocity variations, with respect to net induced magnetization parallel to the stress axis, is positive under tension and negative under compression. The results of current measurements in railroad rail steel having about 0.68 wt percent carbon content are typical for medium range carbon steels. The low-field natural velocity slope in this particular type of steel, which is almost zero when unstressed, becomes steeper with increased magnitude of stress in both directions. Hence, the nondestructive determination of the sign of residual stress in railroad wheels and rails is possible using this technique. This paper discusses the basic physical mechanism underlying the experimental observations and presents the results obtained in railroad rail steel.

  20. Bottom shear stress and SSC control on the morphological evolution of estuarine intertidal mudflats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deloffre, Julien; Verney, Romaric; Lafite, Robert

    2014-05-01

    The supply and fate of fine-grained suspended sediment is of primary importance to the functioning and evolution of estuaries. Intertidal mudflats are habitats of high ecological value: feeding ground for birds, fish species and other biota. Estuarine intertidal mudflats can also contain buried contaminants that can be potentially released in the estuarine system. Thus physical processes such as erosion and sedimentation are fundamental from both applied and environmental viewpoint. Sedimentation and erosion rates/fluxes are mainly driven by hydrodynamics, particles/sediment properties, bedforms and sediment supply. Few high-frequency field-investigation studies compared tidal scale processes simultaneously in the water column and on the mudflat surface. The aim of this paper is to determine the thresholds values (bottom shear stress and SSC) that control the morphological evolution of estuarine intertidal mudflats (< 10% of sand) on semi-diurnal tidal scale. This field-based study combines high-resolution and high-frequency measurements of turbulence and SSC in the water column (using ADV) and bed height (using altimeter) on intertidal mudflat surface in three macrotidal estuaries. Such approach on semi-diurnal scale permitted to accurately understand relationships between hydrodynamics in the boundary layer and sedimentary processes above intertidal mudflats. Results emphasize the role of waves, sediment supply and consolidation state of surface sediments on sedimentary processes over intertidal mudflats. Bottom shear stresses on studied intertidal mudflats were recorded always sufficiently low (<1N.m-2) to permit settling of fine particles during flood tide and/or high-water slack. Sedimentation occurrence and rate on studied intertidal mudflat was found to be driven by (i) the SSC near the bed (if > 0.1g.l-1) and (ii) the absence of significant waves. Wind-generated waves can prevent sedimentation or induce erosion if the bottom shear stress exceeds 1N.m-2. Further inspections demonstrate that the occurrence and the amplitude of erosion are also governed by consolidation state of the surface sediment and water level on the mudflat.

  1. Method and apparatus for measuring stress

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, R.B.

    1983-07-28

    A method and apparatus for determining stress in a material independent of micro-structural variations and anisotropies. The method comprises comparing the velocities of two horizontally polarized and horizontally propagating ultrasonic shear waves with interchanged directions of propagation and polarization. The apparatus for carrying out the method comprises periodic permanent magnet-electromagnetic acoustic transducers for generating and detecting the shear waves and means for determining the wave velocities.

  2. Method and apparatus for measuring stress

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, R. Bruce (Ames, IA)

    1985-06-11

    A method and apparatus for determining stress in a material independent of micro-structural variations and anisotropies. The method comprises comparing the velocities of two horizontally polarized and horizontally propagating ultrasonic shear waves with interchanged directions of propagation and polarization. The apparatus for carrying out the method comprises periodic permanent magnet-electromagnetic acoustic transducers for generating and detecting the shear waves and means for determining the wave velocities.

  3. Evaluation of the interfacial shear strength and residual stress of TiAlN coating on ZIRLOTM fuel cladding using a modified shear-lag model

    E-print Network

    Motta, Arthur T.

    Evaluation of the interfacial shear strength and residual stress of TiAlN coating on ZIRLOTM fuel cladding using a modified shear-lag model approach Y. Liu a, * , I. Bhamji a , P.J. Withers a , D.E. Wolfe modelling Metal-coating interface Fission Zirconium Accident tolerant fuels (ATF) a b s t r a c t This paper

  4. Rac1 and Cdc42 GTPases regulate shear stress-driven ?-catenin signaling in osteoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Qiaoqiao; Cho, Eunhye; Yokota, Hiroki; Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 ; Na, Sungsoo

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Shear stress increased TCF/LEF activity and stimulated ?-catenin nuclear localization. •Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA displayed distinct dynamic activity patterns under flow. •Rac1 and Cdc42, but not RhoA, regulate shear stress-driven TCF/LEF activation. •Cytoskeleton did not significantly affect shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activation. -- Abstract: Beta-catenin-dependent TCF/LEF (T-cell factor/lymphocyte enhancing factor) is known to be mechanosensitive and an important regulator for promoting bone formation. However, the functional connection between TCF/LEF activity and Rho family GTPases is not well understood in osteoblasts. Herein we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying oscillatory shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity in MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells using live cell imaging. We employed fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based and green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based biosensors, which allowed us to monitor signal transduction in living cells in real time. Oscillatory (1 Hz) shear stress (10 dynes/cm{sup 2}) increased TCF/LEF activity and stimulated translocation of ?-catenin to the nucleus with the distinct activity patterns of Rac1 and Cdc42. The shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity was blocked by the inhibition of Rac1 and Cdc42 with their dominant negative mutants or selective drugs, but not by a dominant negative mutant of RhoA. In contrast, constitutively active Rac1 and Cdc42 mutants caused a significant enhancement of TCF/LEF activity. Moreover, activation of Rac1 and Cdc42 increased the basal level of TCF/LEF activity, while their inhibition decreased the basal level. Interestingly, disruption of cytoskeletal structures or inhibition of myosin activity did not significantly affect shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity. Although Rac1 is reported to be involved in ?-catenin in cancer cells, the involvement of Cdc42 in ?-catenin signaling in osteoblasts has not been identified. Our findings in this study demonstrate that both Rac1 and Cdc42 GTPases are critical regulators in shear stress-driven ?-catenin signaling in osteoblasts.

  5. Significance of electrically induced shear stress in drainage of thin aqueous films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketelaar, Christiaan; Ajaev, Vladimir S.

    2015-05-01

    We develop a novel model of drainage of microscale thin aqueous film separating a gas bubble and a solid wall. In contrast to previous studies, the electrostatic effects are accounted for not only in the normal but also in the shear stress balance at the liquid-gas interface. We show that the action of the tangential component of the electric field leads to potentially strong spatially variable shear stress at the deforming charged interface. This previously overlooked effect turns out to be essential for correctly estimating the long-time drainage rates. Comparison of time-dependent fluid interface shapes predicted by our model with the experimental data is discussed.

  6. Development of a shear measurement sensor for measuring forces at human-machine interfaces.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young Kuen; Kim, Seong Guk; Kim, Donghyun; Kim, Hyung Joo; Ryu, Jeicheong; Lim, Dohyung; Ko, Chang-Yong; Kim, Han Sung

    2014-12-01

    Measuring shear force is crucial for investigating the pathology and treatment of pressure ulcers. In this study, we introduced a bi-axial shear transducer based on strain gauges as a new shear sensor. The sensor consisted of aluminum and polyvinyl chloride plates placed between quadrangular aluminum plates. On the middle plate, two strain gauges were placed orthogonal to one another. The shear sensor (54 mm × 54 mm × 4.1 mm), which was validated by using standard weights, displayed high accuracy and precision (measurement range, -50 to 50 N; sensitivity, 0.3N; linear relationship, R(2)=0.9625; crosstalk error, 0.635% ± 0.031%; equipment variation, 4.183). The shear force on the interface between the human body and a stand-up wheelchair was measured during sitting or standing movements, using two mats (44.8 cm × 44.8 cm per mat) that consisted of 24 shear sensors. Shear forces on the sacrum and ischium were almost five times higher (15.5 N at last posture) than those on other sites (3.5 N on average) during experiments periods. In conclusion, the proposed shear sensor may be reliable and useful for measuring the shear force on human-machine interfaces. PMID:25445984

  7. Sensor for viscosity and shear strength measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Ebadian, M.A.; Dillion, J.; Moore, J.; Jones, K.

    1998-01-01

    Measurement of the physical properties (viscosity and density) of waste slurries is critical in evaluating transport parameters to ensure turbulent flow through transport pipes. The environment for measurement and sensor exposure is extremely harsh; therefore, reliability and ruggedness are critical in the sensor design. Two different viscometer techniques are being investigated in this study, based on: magnetostrictive pulse generated acoustic waves; and an oscillating cylinder. Prototype sensors have been built and tested which are based on both techniques. A base capability instrumentation system has been designed, constructed, and tested which incorporates both of these sensors. It requires manual data acquisition and off-line calculation. A broad range of viscous media has been tested using this system. Extensive test results appear in this report. The concept for each technique has been validated by these test results. This base capability system will need to be refined further before it is appropriate for field tests. The mass of the oscillating system structure will need to be reduced. A robust acoustic probe assembly will need to be developed. In addition, in March 1997 it was made known for the first time that the requirement was for a deliverable automated viscosity instrumentation system. Since then such a system has been designed, and the hardware has been constructed so that the automated concept can be proved. The rest of the hardware, which interfaced to a computer, has also been constructed and tested as far as possible. However, for both techniques the computer software for automated data acquisition, calculation, and logging had not been completed before funding and time ran out.

  8. The SDSS Co-add: Cosmic Shear Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Huan; Dodelson, Scott; Seo, Hee-Jong; Soares-Santos, Marcelle; Annis, James; Hao, Jiangang; Johnston, David; Kubo, Jeffrey M.; Reis, Ribamar R. R.; Simet, Melanie

    2012-12-01

    Stripe 82 in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey was observed multiple times, allowing deeper images to be constructed by co-adding the data. Here, we analyze the ellipticities of background galaxies in this 275 deg2 region, searching for evidence of distortions due to cosmic shear. We do so using measurements of both the shear-shear correlation function and power spectrum, with the latter determined using both "quadratic" and "pseudo" estimation techniques. We show how we verified these methods using mock catalogs. We also describe our methods for modeling and correcting for the effects of the point-spread function (PSF) in our shape measurements, and we also describe our prescription for estimating photometric redshifts (photo-z's) for our galaxy sample. In particular, we assess the impact of potential systematic effects due to the PSF and to photo-z's, and show that these are under control in our analysis. We find consistent correlation function and power spectrum results, where the E-mode cosmic shear signal is detected in both real and Fourier space with >5? significance on degree scales, while the B-mode is consistent with zero as expected. The amplitude of the signal constrains the combination of the matter density ? m and fluctuation amplitude ?8 to be ?0.7 m ?8 = 0.252+0.032 - 0.052.

  9. Stress Analysis of Beams with Shear Deformation of the Flanges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Paul

    1937-01-01

    This report discusses the fundamental action of shear deformation of the flanges on the basis of simplifying assumptions. The theory is developed to the point of giving analytical solutions for simple cases of beams and of skin-stringer panels under axial load. Strain-gage tests on a tension panel and on a beam corresponding to these simple cases are described and the results are compared with analytical results. For wing beams, an approximate method of applying the theory is given. As an alternative, the construction of a mechanical analyzer is advocated.

  10. Theory and Practice of Shear/Stress Strain Gage Hygrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Fenner, Ralph L.

    2006-01-01

    Mechanical hygrometry has progressed during the last several decades from crude hygroscopes to state-of-the art strain-gage sensors. The strain-gage devices vary from different metallic beams to strain-gage sensors using cellulose crystallite elements, held in full shear restraint. This old technique is still in use but several companies are now actively pursuing development of MEMS miniaturized humidity sensors. These new sensors use polyimide thin film for water vapor adsorption and desorption. This paper will provide overview about modern humidity sensors.

  11. Absolute Measurement Of Laminar Shear Rate Using Photon Correlation Spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Elliot Jenner; Brian D'Urso

    2015-05-11

    An absolute measurement of the components of the shear rate tensor $\\mathcal{S}$ in a fluid can be found by measuring the photon correlation function of light scattered from particles in the fluid. Previous methods of measuring $\\mathcal{S}$ involve reading the velocity at various points and extrapolating the shear, which can be time consuming and is limited in its ability to examine small spatial scale or short time events. Previous work in Photon Correlation Spectroscopy has involved only approximate solutions, requiring free parameters to be scaled by a known case, or different cases, such as 2-D flows, but here we present a treatment that provides quantitative results directly and without calibration for full 3-D flow. We demonstrate this treatment experimentally with a cone and plate rheometer.

  12. Bicuspid aortic valves are associated with increased wall and turbulence shear stress levels compared to trileaflet aortic valves.

    PubMed

    Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Mirabella, Lucia; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2015-06-01

    Congenital bicuspid aortic valves (BAVs) are associated with accelerated disease progression, such as leaflet calcification and ascending aorta dilatation. Although common underlying genetic factors have been implicated in accelerated disease in BAV patients, several studies have suggested that altered hemodynamics also play a role in this disease process. The present study compares turbulence and wall shear stress (WSS) measurements between various BAV and trileaflet aortic valve (TAV) models to provide information for mechanobiological models of BAV disease. BAV and TAV models were constructed from excised porcine aortic valves to simulate parametric variations in BAV stenosis, hemodynamics and geometry. Particle image velocimetry experiments were conducted at physiological pressure conditions to characterize velocity fields in the ascending aorta. The velocity fields were post-processed to calculate turbulence, viscous and wall shear stresses in the ascending aorta. Stenosed BAV models showed the presence of eccentric systolic jets, causing increased WSS. Lower cardiac output resulted in a narrower jet, lower turbulence and lower viscous shear stress (VSS). The specific severe stenosis BAV model studied here showed reduced WSS due to reduction in non-fused leaflet mobility. Dilation of the aorta did not affect any turbulence or VSS, but reduced the WSS. In comparison with BAVs, TAVs have similar VSS values, but much smaller WSS and turbulence levels. These increased turbulence  and WSS levels in BAVs may play a key role in amplifying the biological responses of the ascending aorta wall and valvular leaflets, and support the hemodynamic underpinnings of BAV disease processes. PMID:25262451

  13. Stabilizing Mechanism of Siple Coast Ice Streams Margins from a Thermomechanically Derived Triple-Valued Lateral Shear Stress Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perol, T.; Rice, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Modeling efforts supported by the few field observations available show that intense straining at the margins of Siple Coast ice streams (SCIS) can heat, and even partially melt, the ice adjacent to the bed. This enhances deformation in the margins and lowers the lateral resistance to ice stream flow. Combining a steady state 1D thermal model for a uniformly sheared column of ice with a temperature dependent ice rheology we solve for the average lateral shear stress in the column, showing that this stress has a triple-valued dependence on lateral strain rate. Using measured strain rates from Joughin et al. [2002] we show that for nearly all active SCIS margins the inferred shear stress sits in the low-strength valley of the triple-valued curve. This means that the margins support a lower lateral stress than the adjacent ice of the more rapidly moving stream, and thus the basal resistance must be enhanced near the margin. Such an enhancement could come from a channelized drainage system that develops to accommodate the melt generated within the temperate margin. To study this we develop a simple model for the subglacial hydrology in which water flows laterally in a thin film between the ice and till towards a channel that operates at a lower water pressure [Rothlisberger, 1972]. The resulting pore pressure profile is then used to calculate the basal resistance near the margin assuming a Coulomb plastic rheology for the till. We predict strengthening within 2 km of the margin. Finally we use a path-independent integral (Rice [1968]) to quantify how this additional basal resistance lowers the stress concentrated on the locked portion of the bed adjacent to the stream. We find that for realistic values of the film thickness the additional basal resistance can strongly reduce the stress concentration, allowing for a smooth transition from a deforming to an undeforming bed at the margin.

  14. Evolution of shear stress, protein expression, and vessel area in an animal model of arterial dilatation in hemodialysis grafts

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Sanjay; Fu, Alex A.; Misra, Khamal D.; Glockner, James F.; Mukhopadyay, Debabrata

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the wall shear stress, protein expression of matrix metalloproteinases-2 (MMP-2), -9 (MMP-9), and the inhibitors (tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1), and -2 (TIMP-2)), and vessel area over time in a porcine model for hemodialysis polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) grafts. Materials and methods In 21 pigs, subtotal renal infarction was performed and 28 days later, a PTFE graft was placed to connect the carotid artery to the ipsilateral jugular vein. Phase contrast MR was used to measure blood flow and vessel area at 1, 3, 7, and 14 days after graft placement. Wall shear stress was estimated from Poiseuille’s law. Animals were sacrificed at day 3 (N=7), day 7 (N=7), and day 14 (N=7) and expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 were determined at the grafted and control arteries. Results The mean wall shear stress of the grafted artery was higher than the control artery at all time points (P<0.05). It peaked by day 3 and decreased by days 7–14 as the vessel area nearly doubled. By days 7–14, there was a significant increase in active MMP-2 followed by a significant increase in pro and active MMP-9 by day 14 (P<0.05, grafted artery versus control). TIMP-1 expression peaked by day 7 and then decreased while TIMP-2 expression was decreased at days 7–14. Conclusions The wall shear stress of the grafted artery peaks by day 3 with increased MMP-2 activity by days 7–14 followed by pro and active MMP-9 by day 14 and the vessel area nearly doubled. PMID:20123196

  15. Atrial Fibrillation Pacing Decreases Intravascular Shear Stress in a New Zealand White Rabbit Model: Implications in Endothelial Function

    PubMed Central

    Jen, Nelson; Yu, Fei; Lee, Juhyun; Wasmund, Steve; Dai, Xiaohu; Chen, Christina; Chawareeyawong, Pai; Yang, Yongmo; Li, Rongsong; Hamdan, Mohamed H.; Hsiai, Tzung

    2012-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is characterized by multiple rapid and irregular atrial depolarization leading to rapid ventricular responses exceeding 100 beats per minute (bpm). We hypothesized that rapid and irregular pacing reduced intravascular shear stress (ISS) with implication to modulating endothelial responses. To simulate AF, we paced the left atrial appendage of New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits (n=4) at rapid and irregular intervals. Surface electrical cardiograms (ECG) were recorded for atrial and ventricular rhythm, and intravascular convective heat transfer was measured by micro thermal sensors, from which ISS was inferred. Rapid and irregular pacing decreased arterial systolic and diastolic pressures (baseline: 99/75 mmHg; rapid regular pacing: 92/73; rapid irregular pacing: 90/68; P < 0.001, n=4), temporal gradients (??/?t from 1275 ± 80 to 1056 ± 180 dyne/cm2·s), and reduced ISS (from baseline at 32.0 ± 2.4 to 22.7 ± 3.5 dyne/cm2). Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code demonstrated that experimentally inferred ISS provided a close approximation to the computed wall shear stress (WSS) at a given catheter to vessel diameter ratio, shear stress range, and catheter position. In an in vitro flow system in which time-averaged shear stress was maintained at ?avg=23 ±4 dyn·cm?2·s?1, we further demonstrated that rapid pulse rates at 150 bpm down-regulated endothelial nitric oxide (NO), promoted superoxide (O2·?) production, and increased monocyte binding to endothelial cells. These findings suggest that rapid pacing reduces ISS and ??/?t, and rapid pulse rates modulate endothelial responses. PMID:22983703

  16. Proteomic analysis of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm cells grown under physiologically relevant fluid shear stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The biofilm forming bacterium Staphylococcus aureus is responsible for maladies ranging from severe skin infection to major diseases such as bacteremia, endocarditis and osteomyelitis. A flow displacement system was used to grow S. aureus biofilms in four physiologically relevant fluid shear rates (50, 100, 500 and 1000 s-1) to identify proteins that are associated with biofilm. Results Global protein expressions from the membrane and cytosolic fractions of S. aureus biofilm cells grown under the above shear rate conditions are reported. Sixteen proteins in the membrane-enriched fraction and eight proteins in the cytosolic fraction showed significantly altered expression (p?shear. These 24 proteins were identified using nano-LC-ESI-MS/MS. They were found to be associated with various metabolic functions such as glycolysis / TCA pathways, protein synthesis and stress tolerance. Increased fluid shear stress did not influence the expression of two important surface binding proteins: fibronectin-binding and collagen-binding proteins. Conclusions The reported data suggest that while the general metabolic function of the sessile bacteria is minimal under high fluid shear stress conditions, they seem to retain the binding capacity to initiate new infections. PMID:24855455

  17. E ects of Shear Stress in Teletaction and Human Perception G. Moy and R.S. Fearing

    E-print Network

    Fearing, Ron

    E ects of Shear Stress in Teletaction and Human Perception G. Moy and R.S. Fearing Department of EE the e ect of shear stress information on perception of static stimuli. Wax gratings in two di erent ori- entations and various spatial frequencies were used as stimuli. Elastic layers, which represent the anti

  18. Free convection in parallelogram-shaped enclosures with isothermal active walls: viscous shear stress in active systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baïri, A.; Zarco-Pernia, E.; García de María, J.-M.; Laraqi, N.

    2012-10-01

    Thermocouples are often used for thermoregulation of active thermal systems. When the junctions of these sensors are under a natural convection flow, it is necessary to take into account the viscous stress that can affect the measurement of temperature and therefore the regulation set points. The main objective of this work is to study the viscous shear stress taking place close to the active hot wall in closed air-filled cavities of parallelogrammic shape. The influence of shear stress is examined for different inclination angles of the cavity and large Rayleigh numbers which are usual in thermal applications. The local stress distributions are presented for the steady state for all the geometric configurations considered. The Nusselt number at the hot wall as well as the temperature and stream function distributions in the cavities are also included. The findings obtained from the numerical simulation using the finite volume method are validated by thermal measurements on an experimental cavity. This study confirms the need to properly choose the location of thermocouples in the reference cell used for controlling the active system.

  19. Dipole shear anisotropy logging

    SciTech Connect

    Esmersoy, C.; Kane, M.; Koster, K.; Williams, M.; Boyd, A.

    1994-12-31

    Sonic-scale shear anisotropy of formations are obtained from dipole-shear measurements acquired by orthogonal source and receiver pairs. These measurements resemble miniature 4-component shear VSP surveys inside the borehole. Data from two orthogonal sources and an array of orthogonal receivers are processed providing three main logs; the fast and slow shear slownesses, and the fast shear polarization angle. Potential applications include: shale anisotropy for better seismic models, maximum stress and fracture/microcrack strike direction for horizontal well drilling and fracture height and azimuth determination in hydraulic fracturing.

  20. Cosmic Shear Measurements with DES Science Verification Data

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, M. R.

    2015-07-20

    We present measurements of weak gravitational lensing cosmic shear two-point statistics using Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data. We demonstrate that our results are robust to the choice of shear measurement pipeline, either ngmix or im3shape, and robust to the choice of two-point statistic, including both real and Fourier-space statistics. Our results pass a suite of null tests including tests for B-mode contamination and direct tests for any dependence of the two-point functions on a set of 16 observing conditions and galaxy properties, such as seeing, airmass, galaxy color, galaxy magnitude, etc. We use a large suite of simulations to compute the covariance matrix of the cosmic shear measurements and assign statistical significance to our null tests. We find that our covariance matrix is consistent with the halo model prediction, indicating that it has the appropriate level of halo sample variance. We also compare the same jackknife procedure applied to the data and the simulations in order to search for additional sources of noise not captured by the simulations. We find no statistically significant extra sources of noise in the data. The overall detection significance with tomography for our highest source density catalog is 9.7?. Cosmological constraints from the measurements in this work are presented in a companion paper (DES et al. 2015).

  1. Endothelial cell responses to atheroprone flow are driven by two separate flow components: low time-average shear stress and fluid flow reversal

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Daniel E.; Williams, Marcie R.; Eskin, Suzanne G.

    2010-01-01

    To simulate the effects of shear stress in regions of the vasculature prone to developing atherosclerosis, we subjected human umbilical vein endothelial cells to reversing shear stress to mimic the hemodynamic conditions at the wall of the carotid sinus, a site of complex, reversing blood flow and commonly observed atherosclerosis. We compared the effects of reversing shear stress (time-average: 1 dyn/cm2, maximum: +11 dyn/cm2, minimum: ?11 dyn/cm2, 1 Hz), arterial steady shear stress (15 dyn/cm2), and low steady shear stress (1 dyn/cm2) on gene expression, cell proliferation, and monocyte adhesiveness. Microarray analysis revealed that most differentially expressed genes were similarly regulated by all three shear stress regimens compared with static culture. Comparisons of the three shear stress regimens to each other identified 138 genes regulated by low average shear stress and 22 genes regulated by fluid reversal. Low average shear stress induced increased cell proliferation compared with high shear stress. Only reversing shear stress exposure induced monocyte adhesion. The adhesion of monocytes was partially inhibited by the incubation of endothelial cells with ICAM-1 blocking antibody. Increased heparan sulfate proteoglycan expression was observed on the surface of cells exposed to reversing shear stress. Heparinase III treatment significantly reduced monocyte adhesion. Our results suggest that low steady shear stress is the major impetus for differential gene expression and cell proliferation, whereas reversing flow regulates monocyte adhesion. PMID:19915176

  2. Spatial heterogeneities in tectonic stress in Kyushu, Japan and their relation to a major shear zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Satoshi; Nakao, Shigeru; Ohkura, Takahiro; Miyazaki, Masahiro; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Abe, Yuki; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Nakamoto, Manami; Yoshikawa, Shin; Yamashita, Yusuke

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the spatial variation in the stress fields of Kyushu Island, southwestern Japan. Kyushu Island is characterized by active volcanoes (Aso, Unzen, Kirishima, and Sakurajima) and a shear zone (western extension of the median tectonic line). Shallow earthquakes frequently occur not only along active faults but also in the central region of the island, which is characterized by active volcanoes. We evaluated the focal mechanisms of the shallow earthquakes on Kyushu Island to determine the relative deviatoric stress field. Generally, the stress field was estimated by using the method proposed by Hardebeck and Michael (2006) for the strike-slip regime in this area. The minimum principal compression stress ( ?3), with its near north-south trend, is dominant throughout the entire region. However, the ? 3 axes around the shear zone are rotated normal to the zone. This result is indicative of shear stress reduction at the zone and is consistent with the right-lateral fault behavior along the zone detected by a strain-rate field analysis with global positioning system data. Conversely, the stress field of the normal fault is dominant in the Beppu-Shimabara area, which is located in the central part of the island. This result and the direction of ?3 are consistent with the formation of a graben structure in the area.

  3. Effect of shear stress on cell cultures and other reactor problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schleier, H.

    1981-01-01

    Anchorage dependent cell cultures in fluidized beds are tested. Feasibility calculations indicate the allowed parameters and estimate the shear stresses therein. In addition, the diffusion equation with first order reaction is solved for the spherical shell (double bubble) reactor with various constraints.

  4. On the stabilization of the Friedmann Big Bang by the shear stresses

    E-print Network

    V. A. Belinski

    2013-10-18

    The window is found in the space of the free parameters of the theory of viscoelastic matter for which the Friedmann singularity is stable. Under stability we mean that in the presence of the shear stresses the \\textit{generic} solution of the equations of relativistic gravity possessing the isotropic, homogeneous and thermally equilibrated cosmological singularity exists.

  5. Combined effects of pulsatile flow and dynamic curvature on wall shear stress in a coronary artery

    E-print Network

    Laidlaw, David

    ;1 Introduction Histology studies have shown that atherosclerosis is likely to develop in preferred locations shown that intimal thickening that leads to atherosclerosis is often observed at bifurcations correlation between atherosclerosis lesion locations and low and oscillating wall shear stresses [2, 4

  6. Microflow-induced shear stress on biomaterial wall by ultrasound-induced encapsulated microbubble oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ji-Wen; Qian, Sheng-You; Sun, Jia-Na; Lü, Yun-Bin; Hu, Ping

    2015-09-01

    A model of an ultrasound-driven encapsulated microbubble (EMB) oscillation near biomaterial wall is presented and used for describing the microflow-induced shear stress on the wall by means of a numerical method. The characteristic of the model lies in the explicit treatment of different types of wall for the EMB responses. The simulation results show that the radius-time change trends obtained by our model are consistent with the existing models and experimental results. In addition, the effect of the elastic wall on the acoustic EMB response is stronger than that of the rigid wall, and the shear stress on the elastic wall is larger than that of the rigid wall. The closer the EMB to the wall, the greater the shear stress on the wall. The substantial shear stress on the wall surface occurs inside a circular zone with a radius about two-thirds of the bubble radius. This paper may be of interest in the study of potential damage mechanisms to the microvessel for drug and gene delivery due to sonoporation. Projects supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11174077 and 11474090), the Natural Science Foundation of Hunan Province, China (Grant No. 13JJ3076), the Science Research Program of Education Department of Hunan Province, China (Grant No. 14A127), and the Doctoral Fund of University of South China (Grant No. 2011XQD46).

  7. Quantitative morphodynamics of endothelial cells within confluent cultures in response to fluid shear stress.

    PubMed Central

    Dieterich, P; Odenthal-Schnittler, M; Mrowietz, C; Krämer, M; Sasse, L; Oberleithner, H; Schnittler, H J

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate shear stress-induced effects on cultured cells we have extended the mechanical setup of a multichannel in vitro rheological system and developed software allowing entire processing control and image data analysis. The values of cell motility, degree of orientation (alignment), and cell elongation were correlated as a function of time (morphodynamics). Collective and individual endothelial cells within confluent cultures displayed a shear stress-dependent characteristic phase behavior of the following time course: resting conditions (phase I), change of motility (phase II), onset of alignment (phase III), and finally cell elongation (phase IV). Especially cell motility was characterized by a randomized zigzag movement around mean trajectories (fluctuations) together with mean cell locomotion. Onset of shear stress caused a down-regulation of fluctuations of 30% within <10 min and simultaneously increased locomotion velocities preferring the flow direction (phase II). After a lag period of 10 to 20 min cells orientated in the direction of flow (phase III) without significant cell elongation, which finally occurs within hours (phase IV). These data provide first evidence that cells within confluent endothelial monolayers respond to shear stress with a characteristic phase behavior. PMID:10968992

  8. Shear wave splitting in the crust in North China: stress, faults and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yuan; Wu, Jing; Fukao, Yoshio; Shi, Yutao; Zhu, Ailan

    2011-11-01

    This paper uses data from the Capital Area Seismograph Network in North China (NC), currently the largest regional seismograph network in China to investigate the compressional stress orientations from the polarizations of faster shear waves (PFS), a parameter of shear wave velocity anisotropy. Data are restricted to earthquakes deeper than 5 km to reduce the influence of the heterogeneous uppermost few kilometres of the crust. The results show that the regional compressional stress direction is ENE-WSW to nearly EW in NC, which agrees with seismic mechanisms and drilling and GPS data. Predominantly, PFS are also nearly EW in NC and are influenced by faults, geology and tectonics. PFS orientations at stations on seismically active faults are consistent with the strike of strike-slip faults and indicate large seismically active faults breaking, or nearly breaking, the free surface. PFS orientations are influenced by both regional compressional stress and by nearby faults. It is an effective way to study detailed spatial distribution of crustal compressional stress by shear wave anisotropy with dense seismograph network. Shear wave splitting may also be used to indicate hitherto unknown faults.

  9. SHEAR STRENGTH MEASURING EQUIPMENT EVALUATION AT THE COLD TEST FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    MEACHAM JE

    2009-09-09

    Retrievals under current criteria require that approximately 2,000,000 gallons of double-shell tank (DST) waste storage space not be used to prevent creating new tanks that might be susceptible to buoyant displacement gas release events (BDGRE). New criteria are being evaluated, based on actual sludge properties, to potentially show that sludge wastes do not exhibit the same BDGRE risk. Implementation of the new criteria requires measurement of in situ waste shear strength. Cone penetrometers were judged the best equipment for measuring in situ shear strength and an A.P. van den berg Hyson 100 kN Light Weight Cone Penetrometer (CPT) was selected for evaluation. The CPT was procured and then evaluated at the Hanford Site Cold Test Facility. Evaluation demonstrated that the equipment with minor modification was suitable for use in Tank Farms.

  10. A Wafer-Bonded, Floating Element Shear-Stress Sensor Using a Geometric Moire Optical Transduction Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, Stephen; Chen, Tai-An; Chandrasekaran, Venkataraman; Tedjojuwono, Ken; Cattafesta, Louis; Nishida, Toshikazu; Sheplak, Mark

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a geometric Moir optical-based floating-element shear stress sensor for wind tunnel turbulence measurements. The sensor was fabricated using an aligned wafer-bond/thin-back process producing optical gratings on the backside of a floating element and on the top surface of the support wafer. Measured results indicate a static sensitivity of 0.26 microns/Pa, a resonant frequency of 1.7 kHz, and a noise floor of 6.2 mPa/(square root)Hz.

  11. X-ray Scattering Measurements of Particle Orientation in a Sheared Polymer/Clay Dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Pujari, Saswati; Dougherty, Leah; Mobuchon, Christoph; Carreau, Pierre J.; Heuzey, Marie-Claude; Burghardt, Wesley R.

    2012-01-20

    We report steady and transient measurements of particle orientation in a clay dispersion subjected to shear flow. An organically modified clay is dispersed in a Newtonian polymer matrix at a volume fraction of 0.02, using methods previously reported by Mobuchon et al. (Rheol Acta 46: 1045, 2007). In accord with prior studies, mechanical rheometry shows yield stress-like behavior in steady shear, while time dependent growth of modulus is observed following flow cessation. Measurements of flow-induced orientation in the flow-gradient plane of simple shear flow using small-angle and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS and WAXS) are reported. Both SAXS and WAXS reveal increasing particle orientation as shear rate is increased. Partial relaxation of nanoparticle orientation upon flow cessation is well correlated with time-dependent changes in complex modulus. SAXS and WAXS data provide qualitatively similar results; however, some quantitative differences are attributed to differences in the length scales probed by these techniques.

  12. Measuring stress: Uses and limitations

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, G.W. II

    1994-12-31

    The topic of the uses and limitations of measuring stress in the oceans is addressed. The use of the term stress in this context is ambiguous. Rather than assuming that stress is an actual measurable property of oceans, one may assume that the term refers to the complex of harmful things that is going on in the oceans. that is, it is a cover term for a complex of processes and states, many of which are unknown or undefined. The appeal of the term stress used in that way is very tempting. Considerable complexity results from the fact that the ocean consists of numerous and diverse species and ecosystems each of which have various properties that have some claim to protection. Another source of complexity is the diversity of factors which constitute threats to the environment. In evaluating the concepts of ecological risk assessment, there are sources of hazardous agents, there are receptors that are affected, and there is a process by which these interact termed exposure. As a result of exposure there is some probability that the actions of the sources have caused or will cause some effect on the receptor, the risk. Assessments may be source driven; they may attempt to determine the risks associated with a waste outfall. Assessments may also be effects driven; they may attempt to determine the cause of a die-off of marine mammals or determine the likelihood of a particular rise in sea-level. Finally, they may be exposure driven. Each of these components of the causal chain might serve as measures of stress.

  13. Basal shear stress under alpine glaciers: Insights from experiments using the iSOSIA and Elmer/ICE models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brædstrup, C. F.; Egholm, D. L.; Ugelvig, S. V.; Pedersen, V. K.

    2015-10-01

    Shear stress at the base of glaciers controls basal sliding and is therefore immensely important for glacial erosion and landscape evolution in arctic and high-altitude areas. However, the inaccessible nature of glacial beds complicates empirical studies of basal shear stress, and little is therefore known of its spatial and temporal distribution. In this study we seek to improve our understanding of basal shear stress using a higher-order numerical ice model (iSOSIA). In order to test the validity of the higher-order model, we first compare the detailed distribution of basal shear stress in iSOSIA and in a three-dimensional full-Stokes model (Elmer/ICE). We find that iSOSIA and Elmer/ICE predict similar first-order stress and velocity patterns, and that differences are restricted to local variations over length-scales on the order of the grid resolution. In addition, we find that subglacial shear stress is relatively uniform and insensitive to suble changes in local topographic relief. Following these initial stress benchmark experiments, we use iSOSIA to investigate changes in basal shear stress as a result of landscape evolution by glacial erosion. The experiments with landscape evolution show that subglacial shear stress decreases as glacial erosion transforms preglacial V-shaped valleys into U-shaped troughs. These findings support the hypothesis that glacial erosion is most efficient in the early stages of glacial landscape development.

  14. Shear wave automatic picking and splitting measurements at Ruapehu volcano, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellazzi, Claire; Savage, Martha K.; Walsh, Ernestynne; Arnold, Richard

    2015-05-01

    Automatic shear wave picking and shear wave splitting measurement tools (Multiple Filter Automatic Splitting Technique (MFAST)) are combined to build a near-real time application for monitoring local stress around volcanoes. We use an adapted version of Diehl et al. (2009) on seismograms provided by the New Zealand GeoNet network and having an origin time and location based only on P picks. The best automatic picks are processed by MFAST, which computes the corresponding shear wave fast direction ?, and splitting delay time ?t, interpreted, respectively, as the principal direction of stress underneath the station and the amount of anisotropy integrated along the wave raypath. We applied our system to 9 years of local earthquakes recorded at seven stations around Ruapehu volcano, New Zealand. Results are compared against MFAST measurements from manual S picks when available and show less than 10° difference for 90% of ? measurements and less than 0.05 s difference for 95% of ?t measurements. Shear wave splitting from automatic S arrival times are slightly more consistent than those from manual arrival times. At some stations, two populations of delay times occur, which depend upon computed initial polarization. This may be caused in part by cycle skipping, an artifact usually associated with monochromatic signals. However, spatial consistency in the behavior suggests a physical cause as well, such as focal mechanisms varying with earthquake source location or a spatially varying near-source anisotropic region. The numbers of events in each population group vary over time, possibly related to activity at Ruapehu volcano.

  15. Mean wall shear stress in the femoral arterial bifurcation is low and independent of age at rest.

    PubMed

    Kornet, L; Hoeks, A P; Lambregts, J; Reneman, R S

    2000-01-01

    In elastic arteries, mean wall shear stress appears to be close to 1. 5 Pa, the value predicted by the theory of minimal energy loss. This finding in elastic arteries does not necessarily represent the situation in muscular arteries. Elastic arteries have to store potential energy, while muscular arteries have mainly a conductive function. Therefore, we determined wall shear stress and its age dependency in the common and superficial femoral arteries, 2-3 cm from the flow divider in 54 presumed healthy volunteers between 21 and 74 years of age, using a non-invasive ultrasound system. Prior to the study, the reliability of this system was determined in terms of intrasubject variation. Mean wall shear stress was significantly lower in the common femoral artery (0.35 +/- 0.18 Pa) than in the superficial femoral artery (0.49 +/- 0.15 Pa). In all age categories, peak systolic wall shear stress and the maximal cyclic change in wall shear stress were not significantly different in the common and the superficial femoral arteries. Peak systolic wall shear stress in the common and the superficial femoral arteries was not significantly different from the value previously determined in the common carotid artery, but mean wall shear stress was lower in the common and superficial femoral arteries than in the common carotid artery by a factor of 2-4. In both the common and the superficial femoral arteries, mean, peak systolic and maximal cyclic change in wall shear stress did not change significantly with age, nor did diameter. We conclude that, as compared to elastic arteries, mean wall shear stress is low in the conductive arteries of a resting leg, due to backflow during the first part of the diastolic phase of the cardiac cycle and the absence of flow during the rest of the diastolic phase. Mean wall shear stress is lower in the common than in the superficial femoral artery due to additional reflections from the deep femoral artery. PMID:10754396

  16. Effects of wall shear stress and its gradient on tumor cell adhesion in curved microvessels.

    PubMed

    Yan, W W; Cai, B; Liu, Y; Fu, B M

    2012-05-01

    Tumor cell adhesion to vessel walls in the microcirculation is one critical step in cancer metastasis. In this paper, the hypothesis that tumor cells prefer to adhere at the microvessels with localized shear stresses and their gradients, such as in the curved microvessels, was examined both experimentally and computationally. Our in vivo experiments were performed on the microvessels (post-capillary venules, 30-50 ?m diameter) of rat mesentery. A straight or curved microvessel was cannulated and perfused with tumor cells by a glass micropipette at a velocity of ~1mm/s. At less than 10 min after perfusion, there was a significant difference in cell adhesion to the straight and curved vessel walls. In 60 min, the averaged adhesion rate in the curved vessels (n = 14) was ~1.5-fold of that in the straight vessels (n = 19). In 51 curved segments, 45% of cell adhesion was initiated at the inner side, 25% at outer side, and 30% at both sides of the curved vessels. To investigate the mechanical mechanism by which tumor cells prefer adhering at curved sites, we performed a computational study, in which the fluid dynamics was carried out by the lattice Boltzmann method , and the tumor cell dynamics was governed by the Newton's law of translation and rotation. A modified adhesive dynamics model that included the influence of wall shear stress/gradient on the association/dissociation rates of tumor cell adhesion was proposed, in which the positive wall shear stress/gradient jump would enhance tumor cell adhesion while the negative wall shear stress/gradient jump would weaken tumor cell adhesion. It was found that the wall shear stress/gradient, over a threshold, had significant contribution to tumor cell adhesion by activating or inactivating cell adhesion molecules. Our results elucidated why the tumor cell adhesion prefers to occur at the positive curvature of curved microvessels with very low Reynolds number (in the order of 10(-2)) laminar flow. PMID:21818636

  17. Sox18 preserves the pulmonary endothelial barrier under conditions of increased shear stress

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Christine M.; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Kumar, Sanjiv; Tian, Jing; Kasa, Anita; Bogatcheva, Natalia; Datar, Sanjeev A.; Verin, Alexander D.; Fineman, Jeffrey R.; Black, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    Shear stress secondary to increased pulmonary blood flow (PBF) is elevated in some children born with congenital cardiac abnormalities. However, the majority of these patients do not develop pulmonary edema, despite high levels of permeability inducing factors. Previous studies have suggested that laminar fluid shear stress can enhance pulmonary vascular barrier integrity. However, little is known about the mechanisms by which this occurs. Using microarray analysis, we have previously shown that Sox18, a transcription factor involved in blood vessel development and endothelial barrier integrity, is up-regulated in an ovine model of congenital heart disease with increased PBF (shunt). By subjecting ovine pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAEC) to laminar flow (20 dyn/cm2), we identified an increase in trans-endothelial resistance (TER) across the PAEC monolayer that correlated with an increase in Sox18 expression. Further, the TER was also enhanced when Sox18 was over-expressed and attenuated when Sox18 expression was reduced, suggesting that Sox18 maintains the endothelial barrier integrity in response to shear stress. Further, we found that shear stress up-regulates the cellular tight junction protein, Claudin-5, in a Sox18 dependent manner, and Claudin-5 depletion abolished the Sox18 mediated increase in TER in response to shear stress. Finally, utilizing peripheral lung tissue of 4 week old shunt lambs with increased PBF, we found that both Sox18 and Claudin-5 mRNA and protein levels were elevated. In conclusion, these novel findings suggest that increased laminar flow protects endothelial barrier function via Sox18 dependent up-regulation of Claudin-5 expression. PMID:24677020

  18. Association Between Shear Stress and Platelet-derived TGF-?1 Release and Activation in Animal Models of Aortic Valve Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Vootukuri, Spandana; Meyer, Alexander; Ahamed, Jasimuddin; Coller, Barry S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Aortic valve stenosis (AS) is characterized by fibrosis and calcification of valves leading to aortic valve (AV) narrowing, resulting in high wall shear stress (WSS) across the valves. We previously demonstrated that high shear stress can activate platelet-derived transforming growth factor-?1 (TGF-?1), a cytokine implicated inducing fibrosis and calcification. The aim of this study was to invest the role of shear-induced platelet release of TGF-?1 and its activation in AS. Approach and Results We studied hypercholesterolemic Ldlr?/?Apob100/100/Mttpfl/fl/Mx1Cre+/+ (Reversa) mice that develop AS on western diet (WD) and a surgical ascending aortic constriction (AAC) mouse model that acutely simulates the hemodynamics of AS to study shear-induced platelet TGF-?1 release and activation. Reversa mice on WD for 6 months had thickening of the AVs, increased WSS and increased plasma TGF-?1 levels. There were weak and moderate correlations between WSS and TGF-?1 levels in the progression and reversed Reversa groups, and a stronger correlation in the AAC model in WT mice, but not in mice with a targeted deletion of megakaryocyte and platelet TGF-?1 (Tgfb1flox). Plasma total TGF-?1 levels correlated with collagen deposition in the stenotic valves in Reversa mice. Although active TGF-?1 levels were too low to be measured directly, we found: 1. canonical TGF-?1 (p-Smad2/3) signaling in the leukocytes and canonical and non-canonical (p-Erk1/2) TGF-?1 signaling in AVs of Reversa mice on a WD, and 2. TGF-?1 signaling of both pathways in the AAC stenotic area in WT, but not Tgfb1flox mice. Conclusions Shear-induced, platelet-derived TGF-?1 activation may contribute to AS. PMID:24903096

  19. Comparison of erythrocyte dynamics in shear flow under different stress-free configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordasco, Daniel; Yazdani, Alireza; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2014-04-01

    An open question that has persisted for decades is whether the cytoskeleton of a red blood cell is stress-free or under a stress. This question is important in the context of theoretical modeling of cellular motion under a flowing condition where it is necessary to make an assumption about the stress-free state. Here, we present a 3D numerical study to compare the cell dynamics in a simple shear flow under two different stress-free states, a biconcave discocyte representing the resting shape of the cell, and a nearly spherical oblate shape. We find that whether the stress-free states make a significant difference or not depends on the viscosity of the suspending medium. If the viscosity is close to that of blood plasma, the two stress-free states do not show any significant difference in cell dynamics. However, when the suspending medium viscosity is well above that of the physiological range, as in many in vitro studies, the shear rate separating the tank-treading and tumbling dynamics is observed to be higher for the biconcave stress-free state than the spheroidal state. The former shows a strong shape oscillation with repeated departures from the biconcave shape, while the latter shows a nearly stable biconcave shape. It is found that the cell membrane in the biconcave stress-free state is under a compressive stress and a weaker bending force density, leading to a periodic compression of the cell. The shape oscillation then leads to a higher energy barrier against membrane tank-tread leading to an early transition to tumbling. However, if the cells are released with a large off-shear plane angle, the oscillations can be suppressed due to an azimuthal motion of the membrane along the vorticity direction leading to a redistribution of the membrane points and lowering of the energy barrier, which again results in a nearly similar behavior of the cells under the two different stress-free states. A variety of off-shear plane dynamics is observed, namely, rolling, kayaking, precession, and a new dynamics termed "hovering." For the physiological viscosity range, the shear-plane tumbling appears to be relatively less common, while the rolling is observed to be more stable.

  20. Cell shape-dependent shear stress on adherent cells in a micro-physiologic system as revealed by FEM.

    PubMed

    Pfister, C; Bozsak, C; Wolf, P; Demmel, F; Brischwein, M

    2015-05-01

    Flow-induced shear stress on adherent cells leads to biochemical signaling and mechanical responses of the cells. To determine the flow-induced shear stress on adherent cells cultured in a micro-scaled reaction chamber, we developed a suitable finite element method model. The influence of the most important parameters-cell shape, cell density, shear modulus and fluid velocity-was investigated. Notably, the cell shape strongly influences the resulting shear stress. Long and smooth cells undergo lower shear stress than more rounded cells. Changes in the curvature of the cells lead to stress peaks and single cells experience higher shear stress values than cells of a confluent monolayer. The computational results of the fluid flow simulation were validated experimentally. We also analyzed the influence of flow-induced shear stress on the metabolic activity and shape of L929, a mouse fibroblast cell line, experimentally. The results indicate that threshold stress values for continuous flow conditions cannot be transferred to quasi static flow conditions interrupted by short fluid exchange events. PMID:25856467

  1. Microbial adhesion capacity. Influence of shear and temperature stress.

    PubMed

    Fink, Rok; Oder, Martina; Rangus, Dušan; Raspor, Peter; Bohinc, Klemen

    2015-12-01

    Environmental parameters dictate the conditions for both biofilm formation and deconstruction. The aim of this study is to analyse the impact of hydrodynamic and thermodynamic effects on bacterial detachment. Escherichia coli grown on two stainless steel metal surfaces with different roughness (brushed with roughness of 0.05 ?m and electropolished with roughness of 0.29 ?m) are exposed to laminar and turbulent (shower) flows of phosphate buffered saline media at temperatures of 8, 20 and 37 °C. Results show that the turbulent flow removes significantly more bacterial cells than laminar flow (p <0.05) on both materials. This indicates that the shear force determines the rate of detached bacteria. It is also observed that detachment of cells is more efficient on brushed than on electropolished contact surfaces because on the latter surface, fewer cells were attached before exposure. Moreover, we demonstrate that the temperature of the washing agent has an impact on bacterial detachment. At the same flow conditions, the exposure to higher temperature results in greater detachment rate. PMID:25693913

  2. The role of von Willebrand factor and fibrinogen in platelet aggregation under varying shear stress.

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Y; Handa, M; Kawano, K; Kamata, T; Murata, M; Araki, Y; Anbo, H; Kawai, Y; Watanabe, K; Itagaki, I

    1991-01-01

    Exposure of platelets to shear stress leads to aggregation in the absence of exogenous agonists. We have now found that different adhesive proteins and platelet membrane glycoproteins are involved in aggregation depending on the shear stress conditions and the concentration of divalent cations in the medium. When blood is collected with trisodium citrate as anticoagulant, which causes a decrease in the levels of external ionized calcium ([Ca2+]o), platelet aggregation can be induced under low shear force (12 dyn/cm2) and is mediated by fibrinogen binding to the glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex. Aggregates formed under these conditions are not stable, and when shear force is increased to 68 dyn/cm2, disaggregation results. By contrast, platelets from blood collected with hirudin as anticoagulant, wherein [Ca2+]o is within normal plasma levels, do not undergo low shear-induced aggregation; however, after exposure to a shear force above 80 dyn/cm2, aggregation is observed but only when von Willebrand factor is present and can interact with both its platelet binding sites, glycoprotein Ib-IX and glycoprotein IIb-IIIa. Fibrinogen is not involved in high shear-induced aggregation which, in fact, occurs normally in patients with severe afibrinogenemia. Thus, von Willebrand factor in the absence of exogenous agonists can mediate platelet aggregation in experimental conditions that may mimic the hemorheological situation of partially occluded arteries. This pathway of platelet aggregation involving only one adhesive ligand and two membrane adhesion receptors may play a relevant role in thrombogenesis. PMID:2010539

  3. A microfluidic device to apply shear stresses to polarizing ciliated airway epithelium using air flow

    PubMed Central

    Trieu, Dennis; Waddell, Thomas K.; McGuigan, Alison P.

    2014-01-01

    Organization of airway epithelium determines ciliary beat direction and coordination for proper mucociliary clearance. Fluidic shear stresses have the potential to influence ciliary organization. Here, an in vitro fluidic flow system was developed for inducing long-term airflow shear stresses on airway epithelium with a view to influencing epithelial organization. Our system consists of a fluidic device for cell culture, integrated into a humidified airflow circuit. The fluidic device has a modular design and is made from a combination of polystyrene and adhesive components incorporated into a 6-well filter membrane insert. We demonstrate the system operates within physiologically relevant shear and pressure ranges and estimate the shear stress exerted on the epithelial cell layer as a result of air flow using a computational model. For both the bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS2B and primary human tracheal airway epithelial cells, we demonstrate that cells remain viable within the device when exposed to airflow for 24?h and that normal differentiation and cilia formation occurs. Furthermore, we demonstrate the utility of our device for exploring the impact of exposing cells to airflow: our tool enables quantification of cytoskeletal organization, and is compatible with in situ bead assays to assess the orientation of cilia beating. PMID:25553181

  4. A microfluidic device to apply shear stresses to polarizing ciliated airway epithelium using air flow.

    PubMed

    Trieu, Dennis; Waddell, Thomas K; McGuigan, Alison P

    2014-11-01

    Organization of airway epithelium determines ciliary beat direction and coordination for proper mucociliary clearance. Fluidic shear stresses have the potential to influence ciliary organization. Here, an in vitro fluidic flow system was developed for inducing long-term airflow shear stresses on airway epithelium with a view to influencing epithelial organization. Our system consists of a fluidic device for cell culture, integrated into a humidified airflow circuit. The fluidic device has a modular design and is made from a combination of polystyrene and adhesive components incorporated into a 6-well filter membrane insert. We demonstrate the system operates within physiologically relevant shear and pressure ranges and estimate the shear stress exerted on the epithelial cell layer as a result of air flow using a computational model. For both the bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS2B and primary human tracheal airway epithelial cells, we demonstrate that cells remain viable within the device when exposed to airflow for 24?h and that normal differentiation and cilia formation occurs. Furthermore, we demonstrate the utility of our device for exploring the impact of exposing cells to airflow: our tool enables quantification of cytoskeletal organization, and is compatible with in situ bead assays to assess the orientation of cilia beating. PMID:25553181

  5. Wave-current interaction in coastal waters: Effects on the bottom-shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosales, P.; Ocampo-Torres, F. J.; Osuna, P.; Monbaliu, J.; Padilla-Hernández, R.

    Computer simulations of wave and current fields in the southern North Sea were made with a coupled-models system to study the influence of wave-current interactions on the bottom-shear stress in coastal waters. A third-generation wave-spectral model is coupled with a tide-surge model, which provides current and water level information to take into account wave-current interactions, to calculate the bottom stress. Two different expressions for bottom friction are used; one derived from the JONSWAP experiment, and a second given by Christoffersen and Jonsson that takes into account wave-current interaction at the bottom. The coupled-models system is applied to four nested grids to achieve fine spatial resolution near the Belgium coast. Two events of moderate to high waves are analyzed. Those two events are associated with different wind regimes; SW winds for the first period and NW for the second. The calculations of bottom-shear stress when taking into account wave-current interactions are compared with reference runs where only waves are considered to calculate the energy dissipation at the bottom. Small differences in the bottom-shear stress results are observed mainly related to the water-level variation caused by tides, when coupled and uncoupled runs using the JONSWAP expression were compared. However, when wave-current interactions are taken into account using the expression of Christoffersen and Jonsson, the calculated maximum bottom stress is usually doubled for coupled-model runs compared to the reference runs. The results clearly show that the formulation of the bottom-friction dissipation that accounts for the effect of wave-current interaction has quite a significant effect on the determination of the bottom-shear stress.

  6. [Effect of fluid shear stress on the cellular morphology and tight junction of laryngeal squamous carcinoma Hep2 cells].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fating; Yin, Hongmei; Liu, Shuangfeng; Shen, Yang; Hong, Jinyong; Xia, Qing; Liu, Xiaocheng

    2015-02-01

    This paper is aimed to investigate the effect of fluid shear stress on the tight junction of laryngeal squamous carcinoma (Hep2) cells and to explore the potential molecular mechanism. Hep2 cells were selected and subjected to the fluid shear stress of 1.4 dyn/cm2 for different time, respectively. The morphological changes of Hep2 cells under shear stress were observed using inverted microscope. The cell-cell junctions were examined by transmission electron microscope (TEM). The expressions of tight junction proteins (including Occludin, Claudin-5 and ZO-1) and the distribution of Claudin-5 were examined by Western blot assay and laser scanning confocal microscope, respectively. The results indicated that Hep2 cells turned to spindle-like shapes after exposed to shear stress, and showed the trend of the recovering to original shapes when the shear stress was cancelled. The cell-cell junctions were tight under the shear flow condition, and the permeability was reduced under the condition of 1.4 dyn/cm shear flow. The expressions of tight junction proteins were enhanced with increased duration of shear flow, but reduced after removing shear flow. The result of Claudin-5 expression by immufluorescence assay was consistent with that by Western blot. The Claudin-5 mainly distributed in the cytoplasm under static condition, while it located at the intercellular after shear flow stimulation, and it appeared intercellular and cytoplasm after stopping shear flow stimulation. Therefore, it can be concluded that shear stress changes the morphology of laryngeal squamous carcinoma Hep2 cells, and upregulates the tight junction. PMID:25997275

  7. Effect of simulated microgravity on osteocytes responding to fluid shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiao; Sun, Lian-Wen; Wu, Xin-Tong; Wang, Xiao-Nan; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2013-03-01

    Osteocytes, as most abundant cells and major mechanical sensor in bone, play an important role in the mechanism of microgravity-induced bone loss. The response of osteocytes to fluid flow stress under simulated microgravity was investigated in this study. MLO-Y4, an osteocyte-like cell line, was cultured under simulated microgravity condition for 5 days. Then cells were sheared at 15 dyn/cm2 in flow chamber. After 15 min shear, nitric oxide (NO) was examined by Griess Reagent and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) by ELISA. After 6 h shear, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was examined by PNPP, osteocalcin (OC) and procollagen type I N propeptide (PINP) by ELISA. Cells were divided into four groups: CON (1 G with no shear), CON-S (1 G with shear), SM (simulated microgravity with no shear) and SM-S (simulated microgravity with shear). The results showed that (1) NO, ALP activity, OC and PINP increased significantly while PGE2 showed no change in SM compared with CON. (2) NO, PGE2, ALP activity and PINP increased significantly while OC decreased significantly in CON-S compared with CON. (3) NO in SM-S had no significant difference compared to SM, PGE2 and OC increased while ALP activity and PINP decreased significantly in SM-S compared with SM. (4) The increasing amplitude of PGE2 and OC, the decreasing amplitude of ALP activity in SM-S to SM was lower than that in CON-S to CON. In addition, some changes of F-actin cytoskeleton were observed by confocal microscopy. All results indicated that the response induced by fluid shear in osteocytes could be inhibited by simulated microgravity, namely the mechanosensibility of osteocytes decreased under simulated microgravity. This may partly contribute to the mechanism of microgravity-induced osteoporosis and will be helpful to find out effective description.

  8. Turbulence spectra, shear stress and turbulent kinetic energy budgets above two beech forest sites in Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mammarella, Ivan; Dellwik, Ebba; Jensen, Niels O.

    2008-04-01

    The focus of this study is the combined influence of the roughness sublayer (RSL) found above tall vegetation and the internal boundary layer (IBL) on the near-neutral flow above two forest sites. Measurements of the 3-D wind field from masts about twice the forest height were analysed. For both sites, influence from upwind conditions was detected for a short-fetch sector. For one of the sites, an additional long-fetch sector without significant IBL influence is presented. Spectral analysis, dissipation length scale analysis and evaluation of the most important terms in the turbulent kinetic energy and shear stress budgets, were performed. For all selected sectors, RSL influence was detected close to the canopy top: the dissipation length scale was greater than the height above the displacement height of the forest, and the turbulent transport terms were significant. For the short-fetch sectors, the spectral analysis of measurements taken in the RSL and in the IBL (above the RSL) showed that scaling by fixed length and velocity scales resulted in a good collapse of the spectral peaks. For the long-fetch sector, the RSL influence disappeared at greater heights, and the flow is nearly adjusted with the new surface.

  9. FBG sensor networks for the estimation of boundary shear stress around the novel piers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Chengang; Zhang, Ruifeng; Li, Kejia; Wu, Xing; Ge, Chunfeng

    2010-10-01

    The paper reports results obtained from a field test site in structural monitoring-a "test-to-failure," measuring strain using Fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) sensor networks on a novel drilled concrete test pier in Huaihe river zone,Anhui province,China. To undertake the study, FBG-based sensors were chosen ,metallic recoated ,steel-tube packaged , and incorporated with steel rebars in this concrete structure. The sensors were interrogated using a compact system based on wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) and F-P scanning approach. Throughout the test, the FBG sensors were continuously monitored, the incremental increases in the strain caused by boundary shear stress could be seen. The sensors were able to follow the resulting induced changes in load of over a range in excess of 2.5M Newton just prior to failure of the pier and representing extreme levels of strain for such a novel mechanical structure. The measurements made with the FBG-based system were found to be in agreement with the changes expected in the structure, produced by the self-balanced loading applied. The study has demonstrated the successful use of FBG sensor networks used in a test of this root type pier foundation, consequently made assessment about the health and security of the highway bridge.

  10. Resolved shear stress intensity coefficient and fatigue crack growth in large crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, QI; Liu, Hao-Wen

    1988-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth in large grain Al alloy was studied. Fatigue crack growth is caused primarily by shear decohesion due to dislocation motion in the crack tip region. The crack paths in the large crystals are very irregular and zigzag. The crack planes are often inclined to the loading axis both in the inplane direction and the thickness direction. The stress intensity factors of such inclined cracks are approximated from the two dimensional finite element calculations. The plastic deformation in a large crystal is highly anisotropic, and dislocation motion in such crystals are driven by the resolved shear stress. The resolved shear stress intensity coefficient in a crack solid, RSSIC, is defined, and the coefficients for the slip systems at a crack tip are evaluated from the calculated stress intensity factors. The orientations of the crack planes are closely related to the slip planes with the high RSSIC values. If a single slip system has a much higher RSSIC than all the others, the crack will follow the slip plane, and the slip plane becomes the crack plane. If two or more slip systems have a high RSSIC, the crack plane is the result of the decohesion processes on these active slip planes.

  11. Sensitive skin is a highly desired device for biomechanical devices, wearable computing, human-computer interfaces, exoskeletons, and, most pertinent to this paper, for lower limb prosthetics. The measurement of shear stress is very

    E-print Network

    Mamishev, Alexander

    ABSTRACT Sensitive skin is a highly desired device for biomechanical devices, wearable computing of a sensitive skin is simulated and characterized in this paper. Conventional tactile sensors are designed conditions. The sensitive skin discussed here is a flexible array capable of sensing shear and normal forces

  12. Shear stress-driven refreshing capability of plastic deformation in nanolayered metals.

    PubMed

    Yan, J W; Zhu, X F; Yang, B; Zhang, G P

    2013-04-12

    Severely localized deformation within shear bands can occur much more easily in a metal with nanoscale microstructures, such as nanograined and nanolayered materials. Based on atomic-scale observations, here we show that such locally large deformation (the continuous thinning of the layers) within the indentation-induced shear bands of the Cu/Au nanolayers is essentially attributed to the large shear stress component along the interface, which can refresh the capability of the interface to absorb incoming dislocations through unlocking the product of the dislocation-interface reaction. The results have implications for understanding the interface-mediated mechanisms of plastic deformation and for the engineering application of severe plastic deformation processing of metals at nanoscales. PMID:25167284

  13. Characterizing wave- and current- induced bottom shear stress: U.S. middle Atlantic continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalyander, P. Soupy; Butman, Bradford; Sherwood, Christopher R.; Signell, Richard P.; Wilkin, John L.

    2013-01-01

    Waves and currents create bottom shear stress, a force at the seabed that influences sediment texture distribution, micro-topography, habitat, and anthropogenic use. This paper presents a methodology for assessing the magnitude, variability, and driving mechanisms of bottom stress and resultant sediment mobility on regional scales using numerical model output. The analysis was applied to the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB), off the U.S. East Coast, and identified a tidally-dominated shallow region with relatively high stress southeast of Massachusetts over Nantucket Shoals, where sediment mobility thresholds are exceeded over 50% of the time; a coastal band extending offshore to about 30 m water depth dominated by waves, where mobility occurs more than 20% of the time; and a quiescent low stress region southeast of Long Island, approximately coincident with an area of fine-grained sediments called the “Mud Patch”. The regional high in stress and mobility over Nantucket Shoals supports the hypothesis that fine grain sediment winnowed away in this region maintains the Mud Patch to the southwest. The analysis identified waves as the driving mechanism for stress throughout most of the MAB, excluding Nantucket Shoals and sheltered coastal bays where tides dominate; however, the relative dominance of low-frequency events varied regionally, and increased southward toward Cape Hatteras. The correlation between wave stress and local wind stress was lowest in the central MAB, indicating a relatively high contribution of swell to bottom stress in this area, rather than locally generated waves. Accurate prediction of the wave energy spectrum was critical to produce good estimates of bottom shear stress, which was sensitive to energy in the long period waves.

  14. Measurement of Stress Redistribution in Flowing Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmond, Kenneth W.; Weeks, Eric R.

    2015-08-01

    We study how local rearrangements alter droplet stresses within flowing dense quasi-two-dimensional emulsions at area fractions ? ?0.88 . Using microscopy, we measure droplet positions while simultaneously using their deformed shape to measure droplet stresses. We find that rearrangements alter nearby stresses in a quadrupolar pattern: stresses on neighboring droplets tend to either decrease or increase depending on location. The stress redistribution is more anisotropic with increasing ? . The spatial character of the stress redistribution influences where subsequent rearrangements occur. Our results provide direct quantitative support for rheological theories of dense amorphous materials that connect local rearrangements to changes in nearby stress.

  15. Probing the adhesion of particles to responsive polymer coatings with hydrodynamic shear stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toomey, Ryan; Efe, Gulnur

    2015-03-01

    Lower critical solution temperature (LCST) polymers in confined geometries have found success in applications that benefit from reversible modulation of surface properties, including drug delivery, separations, tissue cultures, and chromatography. In this talk, we present the adhesion of polystyrene microspheres to cross-linked poly(N-isopropylacrylamide), or poly(NIPAAm) coatings, as studied with a spinning disk method. This method applies a linear range of hydrodynamic shear forces to physically adsorbed microspheres along the radius of a coated disk. Quantification of detachment is accomplished by optical microscopy to evaluate the minimum shear stress to remove adherent particles. Experiments were performed to assess the relationship between the surface chemistry of the microsphere, the thickness and cross-link density of the poly(NIPAAm) coating, the adsorption (or incubation) time, and the temperature on the detachment profiles of the microspheres. Results show that both the shear modulus and slow dynamic processes in the poly(NIPAAm) films strongly influence the detachment shear stresses. Moreover, whether an adsorbed microsphere can be released (through a modulation in the swelling of the poly(NIPAAm) coating by temperature) depends on both the surface chemistry of the microsphere and the extent of the adsorption time. Finally, the results show that the structure of the poly(NIPAAm) coating can significantly affect performance, which may explain several of the conflicting findings that have been reported in the literature.

  16. Propose a Wall Shear Stress Divergence to Estimate the Risks of Intracranial Aneurysm Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y.; Takao, H.; Murayama, Y.; Qian, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Although wall shear stress (WSS) has long been considered a critical indicator of intracranial aneurysm rupture, there is still no definite conclusion as to whether a high or a low WSS results in aneurysm rupture. The reason may be that the effect of WSS direction has not been fully considered. The objectives of this study are to investigate the magnitude of WSS (|WSS|) and its divergence on the aneurysm surface and to test the significance of both in relation to the aneurysm rupture. Patient-specific computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to compute WSS and wall shear stress divergence (WSSD) on the aneurysm surface for nineteen patients. Our results revealed that if high |WSS| is stretching aneurysm luminal surface, and the stretching region is concentrated, the aneurysm is under a high risk of rupture. It seems that, by considering both direction and magnitude of WSS, WSSD may be a better indicator for the risk estimation of aneurysm rupture (154). PMID:24191140

  17. Cantilever stress measurements of ferromagnetic monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sander, D.; Kirschner, J.

    2007-06-01

    This overview summarizes important aspects of the cantilever stress measurement technique and its application to measurements of adsorbate-induced surface stress changes and magnetization-induced magnetoelastic stress (also called magnetostrictive stress) of ferromagnetic monolayers. The application of the cantilever technique as a torque magnetometer with monolayer sensitivity is demonstrated. The stress measurements indicate a correlation between surface stress changes and surface reconstruction, and they also identify the often decisive role of the magnetoelastic anisotropy for the non-bulklike magnetic anisotropy of ferromagnetic monolayers.

  18. Measuring Autophagy in Stressed Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sharifi, Marina N.; Mowers, Erin E.; Drake, Lauren E; Macleod, Kay F

    2015-01-01

    Macro-autophagy is a major catabolic process in the cell used to degrade protein aggregates, dysfunctional organelles and intracellular pathogens that would otherwise become toxic. Autophagy also generates energy and metabolites for the cell through recycling of degraded autophagosomal cargo, which can be particularly important for cell viability under stress. The significance of changes in the rates of autophagic flux for cellular function and disease is being increasingly appreciated, and interest in measuring autophagy in different experimental systems is growing accordingly. Here, we describe key methodologies used in the field to measure autophagic flux, including monitoring LC3 processing by western blot, fluorescent cell staining, and flow cytometry, in addition to changes in the levels or posttranslational modifications of other autophagy markers, such as p62/Sqstm1 and the Atg5–Atg12 conjugate. We also describe what cellular stresses may be used to induce autophagy and how to control for changes in the rates of autophagic flux as opposed to inhibition of flux. Finally, we detail available techniques to monitor autophagy in vivo. PMID:25804753

  19. Association of Early Atherosclerosis with Vascular Wall Shear Stress in Hypercholesterolemic Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Joon; Choi, Woorak; Seo, Eunseok; Yeom, Eunseop

    2015-01-01

    Although atherosclerosis is a multifactorial disease, the role of hemodynamic information has become more important. Low and oscillating wall shear stress (WSS) that changes its direction is associated with the early stage of atherosclerosis. Several in vitro and in vivo models were proposed to reveal the relation between the WSS and the early atherosclerosis. However, these models possess technical limitations in mimicking real physiological conditions and monitoring the developmental course of the early atherosclerosis. In this study, a hypercholesterolaemic zebrafish model is proposed as a novel experimental model to resolve these limitations. Zebrafish larvae are optically transparent, which enables temporal observation of pathological variations under in vivo condition. WSS in blood vessels of 15 days post-fertilisation zebrafish was measured using a micro particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique, and spatial distribution of lipid deposition inside the model was quantitatively investigated after feeding high cholesterol diet for 10 days. Lipids were mainly deposited in blood vessel of low WSS. The oscillating WSS was not induced by the blood flows in zebrafish models. The present hypercholesterolaemic zebrafish would be used as a potentially useful model for in vivo study about the effects of low WSS in the early atherosclerosis. PMID:26561854

  20. Investigations of the wall-shearing stress in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwieg, Hubert; Tillmann, W

    1950-01-01

    Because of the unsatisfactory state of knowledge concerning the surface shearing stress of boundary layers with pressure gradients, the problem is re-examined. It is found that for general turbulent boundary layers in wall proximity, that is, in the laminar sublayer, in the transition zone and in the part of the completely turbulent zone near the wall, the same universal law applies as for the plate flow.

  1. Low-Shear modeled microgravity alters the Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium stress response in an RpoS-independent manner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, James W.; Ott, C. Mark; Ramamurthy, Rajee; Porwollik, Steffen; McClelland, Michael; Pierson, Duane L.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2002-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that low-shear modeled microgravity (low-shear MMG) serves to enhance the virulence of a bacterial pathogen, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. The Salmonella response to low-shear MMG involves a signaling pathway that we have termed the low-shear MMG stimulon, though the identities of the low-shear MMG stimulon genes and regulatory factors are not known. RpoS is the primary sigma factor required for the expression of genes that are induced upon exposure to different environmental-stress signals and is essential for virulence in mice. Since low-shear MMG induces a Salmonella acid stress response and enhances Salmonella virulence, we reasoned that RpoS would be a likely regulator of the Salmonella low-shear MMG response. Our results demonstrate that low-shear MMG provides cross-resistance to several environmental stresses in both wild-type and isogenic rpoS mutant strains. Growth under low-shear MMG decreased the generation time of both strains in minimal medium and increased the ability of both strains to survive in J774 macrophages. Using DNA microarray analysis, we found no evidence of induction of the RpoS regulon by low-shear MMG but did find that other genes were altered in expression under these conditions in both the wild-type and rpoS mutant strains. Our results indicate that, under the conditions of these studies, RpoS is not required for transmission of the signal that induces the low-shear MMG stimulon. Moreover, our studies also indicate that low-shear MMG can be added to a short list of growth conditions that can serve to preadapt an rpoS mutant for resistance to multiple environmental stresses.

  2. Shear-wave velocity variation in jointed rock: an attempt to measure tide-induced variations

    SciTech Connect

    Beem, L.I.

    1987-08-01

    The use of the perturbation of seismic wave velocities by solid earth tides as a possible method of exploration for fractured media is discussed. Velocity of compressional seismic waves in fractured homogeneous rock has been observed to vary through solid earth tide cycles by a significant 0.5-0.9%. This variation of seismic velocities may be attributed to the opening and closing of joints by tidal stresses. In an attempt to see if shear-wave velocities show a similar velocity variation, a pneumatic shear-wave generator was used for the source. The 5 receivers, 3-component, 2.0 Hz, moving-coil geophones, were connected to a GEOS digital recorder. The two receivers located 120 m and 110 m from the source showed large shear-to-compression amplitude ratio and a high signal-to-noise ratio. A glaciated valley was chosen for the experiment site, since topography is flat and the granodiorite is jointed by a set of nearly orthogonal vertical joints, with superimposed horizontal sheeting joints. A slight velocity variation was noted in the first 200 consecutive firings; after which, the amplitude of the shear-wave begun to increase. This increase has been attributed to the compacting of the soil beneath the shear-wave generator (SWG). In the future, the soil will be compacted prior to placing the SWG or the SWG will be coupled directly to the rock to alleviate the amplitude fluctuation problem. This research may have application in exploration for fracture permeability in the rock mass between existing wells, by measuring seismic velocities from well to well through the tidal cycle.

  3. Stress intensity factors in bonded half planes containing inclined cracks and subjected to antiplane shear loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bassani, J. L.; Erdogan, F.

    1978-01-01

    The antiplane shear problem for two bonded dissimilar half planes containing a semi-infinite crack or two arbitrarily located collinear cracks was considered. For the semi-infinite crack the problem was solved for a concentrated wedge load and the stress intensity factor and the angular distribution of stresses were calculated. For finite cracks the problem was reduced to a pair of integral equations. Numerical results were obtained for cracks fully imbedded in a homogeneous medium, one crack tip touching the interface, and a crack crossing the interface for various crack angles.

  4. Assessment of pulsatile wall shear stress in compliant arteries: numerical model, validation and experimental data.

    PubMed

    Salvucci, Fernando P; Perazzo, Carlos A; Barra, Juan G; Armentano, Ricardo L

    2009-01-01

    There is evidence that wall shear stress (WSS) is associated with vascular disease. In particular, it is widely accepted that vascular segments with low or oscillatory values of WSS are more probable to develop vascular disease. It is then necessary to establish a realistic model of the blood flow in blood vessels in order to determine precisely WSS. We proposed a numerical 1D model which takes into account the pulsatile nature of blood flow, the elasticity of the vessel, and its geometry. The model allows the calculation of shear stress. It was validated for stationary situations. Then, we computed the time-dependent WSS distribution from experimental data in the sheep thoracic aorta. Results showed that mean WSS calculated through steady flow and rigid walls models is overestimated. Peak WSS values for pulsatile flow must be considered since they resulted to be at least one order higher than mean values. Oscillations in shear stress in a period showed to be approximately of 40%. These findings show that the proposed model is suitable for estimating time-dependent WSS distributions, and confirm the need of using this kind of model when trying to evaluate realistic WSS in blood vessels. PMID:19964274

  5. Steady and transient fluid shear stress stimulate NO release in osteoblasts through distinct biochemical pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAllister, T. N.; Frangos, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    Fluid flow has been shown to be a potent stimulus in osteoblasts and osteocytes and may therefore play an important role in load-induced bone remodeling. The objective of this study was to investigate the characteristics of flow-activated pathways. Previously we reported that fluid flow stimulates rapid and continuous release of nitric oxide (NO) in primary rat calvarial osteoblasts. Here we demonstrate that flow-induced NO release is mediated by shear stress and that this response is distinctly biphasic. Transients in shear stress associated with the onset of flow stimulated a burst in NO production (8.2 nmol/mg of protein/h), while steady flow stimulated sustained NO production (2.2 nmol/mg of protein/h). Both G-protein inhibition and calcium chelation abolished the burst phase but had no effect on sustained production. Activation of G-proteins stimulated dose-dependent NO release in static cultures of both calvarial osteoblasts and UMR-106 osteoblast-like cells. Pertussis toxin had no effect on NO release. Calcium ionophore stimulated low levels of NO production within 15 minutes but had no effect on sustained production. Taken together, these data suggest that fluid shear stress stimulates NO release by two distinct pathways: a G-protein and calcium-dependent phase sensitive to flow transients, and a G-protein and calcium-independent pathway stimulated by sustained flow.

  6. Characterizaton of the Vessel Geometry, Flow Mechanics and Wall Shear Stress in the Great Arteries of Wildtype Prenatal Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Choon Hwai; Liu, Xiaoqin; Pekkan, Kerem

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Abnormal fluid mechanical environment in the pre-natal cardiovascular system is hypothesized to play a significant role in causing structural heart malformations. It is thus important to improve our understanding of the prenatal cardiovascular fluid mechanical environment at multiple developmental time-points and vascular morphologies. We present such a study on fetal great arteries on the wildtype mouse from embryonic day 14.5 (E14.5) to near-term (E18.5). Methods Ultrasound bio-microscopy (UBM) was used to measure blood velocity of the great arteries. Subsequently, specimens were cryo-embedded and sectioned using episcopic fluorescent image capture (EFIC) to obtain high-resolution 2D serial image stacks, which were used for 3D reconstructions and quantitative measurement of great artery and aortic arch dimensions. EFIC and UBM data were input into subject-specific computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for modeling hemodynamics. Results In normal mouse fetuses between E14.5–18.5, ultrasound imaging showed gradual but statistically significant increase in blood velocity in the aorta, pulmonary trunk (with the ductus arteriosus), and descending aorta. Measurement by EFIC imaging displayed a similar increase in cross sectional area of these vessels. However, CFD modeling showed great artery average wall shear stress and wall shear rate remain relatively constant with age and with vessel size, indicating that hemodynamic shear had a relative constancy over gestational period considered here. Conclusion Our EFIC-UBM-CFD method allowed reasonably detailed characterization of fetal mouse vascular geometry and fluid mechanics. Our results suggest that a homeostatic mechanism for restoring vascular wall shear magnitudes may exist during normal embryonic development. We speculate that this mechanism regulates the growth of the great vessels. PMID:24475188

  7. Fatigue surviving, fracture resistance, shear stress and finite element analysis of glass fiber posts with different diameters.

    PubMed

    Wandscher, Vinícius Felipe; Bergoli, César Dalmolin; de Oliveira, Ariele Freitas; Kaizer, Osvaldo Bazzan; Souto Borges, Alexandre Luiz; Limberguer, Inácio da Fontoura; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2015-03-01

    This study evaluated the shear stress presented in glass fiber posts with parallel fiber (0°) and different coronal diameters under fatigue, fracture resistance and FEA. 160 glass-fiber posts (N=160) with eight different coronal diameters were used (DT=double tapered, number of the post=coronal diameter and W=Wider - fiber post with coronal diameter wider than the conventional): DT1.4; DT1.8W; DT1.6; DT2W; DT1.8; DT2.2W; DT2; DT2.2. Eighty posts were submitted to mechanical cycling (3×10(6) cycles; inclination: 45°; load: 50N; frequency: 4Hz; temperature: 37°C) to assess the surviving under intermittent loading and other eighty posts were submitted to fracture resistance testing (resistance [N] and shear-stress [MPa] values were obtained). The eight posts types were 3D modeled (Rhinoceros 4.0) and the shear-stress (MPa) evaluated using FEA (Ansys 13.0). One-way ANOVA showed statistically differences to fracture resistance (DT2.2W and DT2.2 showed higher values) and shear stress values (DT1.4 showed lower values). Only the DT1.4 fiber posts failed after mechanical cycling. FEA showed similar values of shear stress between the groups and these values were similar to those obtained by shear stress testing. The failure analysis showed that 95% of specimens failed by shear. Posts with parallel fiber (0°) may suffer fractures when an oblique shear load is applied on the structure; except the thinner group, greater coronal diameters promoted the same shear stresses. PMID:25553557

  8. Effect of surface shear stress on the attachment of Pseudomonas fluorescens to stainless steel under defined flow conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Duddridge, J.E.; Kent, C.A.; Laws, J.F.

    1982-01-01

    The ease with which microorganisms grow on submerged surfaces is the cause of certain industrial problems (i.e. fouling and corrosion of pipelines, heat exchangers, cooling towers, etc.). Application of the radical-flow growth chamber to the study of the initial stages of bacterial adhesion to surfaces under flowing conditions is reported. The adhesive properties of the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens (NCIB9046) to stainless steel (type AISI 316 were found to highly dependent on surface shear stress and the time and concentration of cells used in the incubation procedure. Maximum levels of adhesion occurred in zones of lowest surface shear stress, particularly less than 6-8 Nm/sup -2/, Adhesion was still noticeable to shear stresses even up to 130 Nm/sup -2/. Significant detachment of cells from a monolayer attached under static conditions was found to occur at surface shear stresses in excess of 10-12 Nm/sup -2/. (JMT)

  9. Poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) elution from polysulfone dialysis membranes by varying solvent and wall shear stress.

    PubMed

    Namekawa, Koki; Matsuda, Masato; Fukuda, Makoto; Kaneko, Ami; Sakai, Kiyotaka

    2012-06-01

    Some dialysis patients are treated with post-hemodiafiltration (HDF); the blood viscosity of the patients who undergo post-HDF is higher than that of the patients who undergo conventional hemodialysis. This study aims to evaluate poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) (PVP) elution from PSf dialysis membranes by varying solvents and high wall shear stress caused by blood viscosity. We tested three commercial membranes: APS-15SA (Asahi Kasei Kuraray), CX-1.6U (Toray) and FX140 (Fresenius). Dialysate and blood sides of the dialyzers were primed with reverse osmosis (RO) water and saline. RO water, saline and dextran solution (2.9 and 5.8 mPa s) were circulated in the blood side. The amount of eluted PVP was determined by 0.02 N iodometry. The hardness and adsorption force of human serum albumin (HSA) on the membrane surfaces were measured by the atomic force microscope. When wall shear stress was increased using dextran, the amount of PVP eluted by the 2.9 mPa s solution equaled that eluted by the 5.8 mPa s solution with APS-15SA and CX-1.6U sterilized by gamma rays. The amount of PVP eluted by the 5.8 mPa s solution was higher than that eluted by the 2.9 mPa s solution with FX140 sterilized by autoclaving. The wall shear stress increased the PVP elution from the surface, hardness and adsorption force of HSA. Sufficient gamma-ray irradiation is effective in decreasing PVP elution. PMID:22311608

  10. Parallel-plate Flow Chamber and Continuous Flow Circuit to Evaluate Endothelial Progenitor Cells under Laminar Flow Shear Stress

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Whitney O.; Jantzen, Alexandra E.; Carlon, Tim A.; Jamiolkowski, Ryan M.; Grenet, Justin E.; Ley, Melissa M.; Haseltine, Justin M.; Galinat, Lauren J.; Lin, Fu-Hsiung; Allen, Jason D.; Truskey, George A.; Achneck, Hardean E.

    2012-01-01

    The overall goal of this method is to describe a technique to subject adherent cells to laminar flow conditions and evaluate their response to well quantifiable fluid shear stresses1. Our flow chamber design and flow circuit (Fig. 1) contains a transparent viewing region that enables testing of cell adhesion and imaging of cell morphology immediately before flow (Fig. 11A, B), at various time points during flow (Fig. 11C), and after flow (Fig. 11D). These experiments are illustrated with human umbilical cord blood-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and porcine EPCs2,3. This method is also applicable to other adherent cell types, e.g. smooth muscle cells (SMCs) or fibroblasts. The chamber and all parts of the circuit are easily sterilized with steam autoclaving. In contrast to other chambers, e.g. microfluidic chambers, large numbers of cells (> 1 million depending on cell size) can be recovered after the flow experiment under sterile conditions for cell culture or other experiments, e.g. DNA or RNA extraction, or immunohistochemistry (Fig. 11E), or scanning electron microscopy5. The shear stress can be adjusted by varying the flow rate of the perfusate, the fluid viscosity, or the channel height and width. The latter can reduce fluid volume or cell needs while ensuring that one-dimensional flow is maintained. It is not necessary to measure chamber height between experiments, since the chamber height does not depend on the use of gaskets, which greatly increases the ease of multiple experiments. Furthermore, the circuit design easily enables the collection of perfusate samples for analysis and/or quantification of metabolites secreted by cells under fluid shear stress exposure, e.g. nitric oxide (Fig. 12)6. PMID:22297325

  11. Beef Longissimus Slice Shear Force Measurement Among Steak Locations and Institutions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were 1) to evaluate slice shear force on every longissimus thoracis et lumborum steak to determine which steaks were appropriate for slice shear force measurement and 2) to train six other institutions to conduct slice shear force and then determine the among and within ...

  12. On the yielding behaviour in magnetorheology using ultrasounds, shear and normal stresses, and optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-López, Jaime; Castro Blázquez, Pedro; Elvira, Luis; Montero de Espinosa, Francisco; Ramírez, Javier; de Vicente, Juan

    2015-11-01

    The yielding behaviour of magnetorheological fluids has been investigated by videomicroscopy, ultrasonic and rheometry techniques simultaneously. Particularly, the effect of different factors such as, the magnetic field strength, particle size, surface chemistry of the particles, particle concentration and carrier fluid viscosity has been studied. Special attention has been paid to correlate the yielding information obtained by acoustical, optical and mechanical techniques. As a general trend, independently of the particular field strength and suspension formulation, the steady shear flow curve exhibits three well differentiated regions. In the first region, at small stresses, field-induced structures remain quasistatic and all magnitudes remain constant. For larger stresses the number of aggregates decreases but their size increases. This is identified with the onset of flow, and corresponds to the classical static yield stress and a decrease in time-of-flight and normal stresses. For even larger stress values, the suspensions fully flow. This stress value corresponds to the classical dynamic yield stress and is associated to a minimum in the time-of-flight and normal stresses.

  13. Effect of shear stress on intrinsic CHO culture state and glycosylation of recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator protein.

    PubMed

    Senger, Ryan S; Karim, M Nazmul

    2003-01-01

    Shear stress in suspension culture was investigated as a possible manipulative parameter for the control of glycosylation of the recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator protein (r-tPA) produced by recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell culture, grown in protein-free media. Resulting fractions of partially glycosylated, Type II, and fully glycosylated, Type I, r-tPA protein were monitored as a direct function of the shear characteristics of the culture environment. The shear-induced response of CHO culture to levels of low shear stress, where exponential growth was not obtained, and to higher levels of shear stress, which resulted in extensive cell death, were examined through manipulation of the bioreactor stirring velocity. Both apparent and intrinsic cell growth, metabolite consumption, byproduct and r-tPA production, and r-tPA glycosylation, from a variable site-occupancy standpoint, were monitored throughout. Kinetic analyses revealed a shear-stress-induced alteration of cellular homeostasis resulting in a nonlinear dependency of metabolic yield coefficients and an intrinsic cell lysis kinetic constant on shear stress. Damaging levels of shear stress were used to investigate the shear dependence of cell death and lysis, as well as the effects on the intrinsic growth rate of the culture. Kinetic models were also developed on the basis of the intrinsic state of the culture and compared to traditional models. Total r-tPA production was maximized under moderate shear conditions, as was the viable CHO cell density of the culture. However, Type II r-tPA production and the fraction of Type II glycoform production ratio was maximized under damaging levels of shear stress. Analyses of biomass production yield coefficients coupled with a plug-flow reactor model of glycan addition in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) were used to propose an overall mechanism of decreased r-tPA protein site-occupancy glycosylation with increasing shear stress. Decreased residence time of r-tPA in the ER as a result of increased protein synthesis related to shear protection mechanisms is proposed to limit contact of site Asn184 with the membrane-bound oligosaccharyltransferase enzyme in the ER. PMID:12892482

  14. Differential regulation of protease activated receptor-1 and tissue plasminogen activator expression by shear stress in vascular smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadaki, M.; Ruef, J.; Nguyen, K. T.; Li, F.; Patterson, C.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.; Runge, M. S.

    1998-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that vascular smooth muscle cells are responsive to changes in their local hemodynamic environment. The effects of shear stress on the expression of human protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) mRNA and protein were investigated in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). Under conditions of low shear stress (5 dyn/cm2), PAR-1 mRNA expression was increased transiently at 2 hours compared with stationary control values, whereas at high shear stress (25 dyn/cm2), mRNA expression was decreased (to 29% of stationary control; P<0.05) at all examined time points (2 to 24 hours). mRNA half-life studies showed that this response was not due to increased mRNA instability. tPA mRNA expression was decreased (to 10% of stationary control; P<0.05) by low shear stress after 12 hours of exposure and was increased (to 250% of stationary control; P<0.05) after 24 hours at high shear stress. The same trends in PAR-1 mRNA levels were observed in rat smooth muscle cells, indicating that the effects of shear stress on human PAR-1 were not species-specific. Flow cytometry and ELISA techniques using rat smooth muscle cells and HASMCs, respectively, provided evidence that shear stress exerted similar effects on cell surface-associated PAR-1 and tPA protein released into the conditioned media. The decrease in PAR-1 mRNA and protein had functional consequences for HASMCs, such as inhibition of [Ca2+] mobilization in response to thrombin stimulation. These data indicate that human PAR-1 and tPA gene expression are regulated differentially by shear stress, in a pattern consistent with their putative roles in several arterial vascular pathologies.

  15. Laboratory measurements of compressional and shear wave speeds through methane hydrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waite, W.F.; Helgerud, M.B.; Nur, A.; Pinkston, J.C.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    2000-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements of compressional and shear wave speeds through polycrystalline methane hydrate have been made. Methane hydrate, grown directly in a wave speed measurement chamber, was uniaxially compacted to a final porosity below 2%. At 277 K, the compacted material had a compressional wave speed of 3650 ?? 50 m/s. The shear wave speed, measured simultaneously, was 1890 ?? 30 m/s. From these wave speed measurements, we derive V(p)/V(s), Poisson's ratio, bulk, shear, and Young's moduli.

  16. Caveolin-1 regulates shear stress-dependent activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, H.; Go, Y. M.; Darji, R.; Choi, J. W.; Lisanti, M. P.; Maland, M. C.; Jo, H.

    2000-01-01

    Fluid shear stress activates a member of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase family, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), by mechanisms dependent on cholesterol in the plasma membrane in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). Caveolae are microdomains of the plasma membrane that are enriched with cholesterol, caveolin, and signaling molecules. We hypothesized that caveolin-1 regulates shear activation of ERK. Because caveolin-1 is not exposed to the outside, cells were minimally permeabilized by Triton X-100 (0.01%) to deliver a neutralizing, polyclonal caveolin-1 antibody (pCav-1) inside the cells. pCav-1 then bound to caveolin-1 and inhibited shear activation of ERK but not c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase. Epitope mapping studies showed that pCav-1 binds to caveolin-1 at two regions (residues 1-21 and 61-101). When the recombinant proteins containing the epitopes fused to glutathione-S-transferase (GST-Cav(1-21) or GST-Cav(61-101)) were preincubated with pCav-1, only GST-Cav(61-101) reversed the inhibitory effect of the antibody on shear activation of ERK. Other antibodies, including m2234, which binds to caveolin-1 residues 1-21, had no effect on shear activation of ERK. Caveolin-1 residues 61-101 contain the scaffolding and oligomerization domains, suggesting that binding of pCav-1 to these regions likely disrupts the clustering of caveolin-1 or its interaction with signaling molecules involved in the shear-sensitive ERK pathway. We suggest that caveolae-like domains play a critical role in the mechanosensing and/or mechanosignal transduction of the ERK pathway.

  17. Shear stress enhances microcin B17 production in a rotating wall bioreactor, but ethanol stress does not

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Q.; Fang, A.; Pierson, D. L.; Mishra, S. K.; Demain, A. L.

    2001-01-01

    Stress, including that caused by ethanol, has been shown to induce or promote secondary metabolism in a number of microbial systems. Rotating-wall bioreactors provide a low stress and simulated microgravity environment which, however, supports only poor production of microcin B17 by Escherichia coli ZK650, as compared to production in agitated flasks. We wondered whether the poor production is due to the low level of stress and whether increasing stress in the bioreactors would raise the amount of microcin B17 formed. We found that applying shear stress by addition of a single Teflon bead to a rotating wall bioreactor improved microcin B17 production. By contrast, addition of various concentrations of ethanol to such bioreactors (or to shaken flasks) failed to increase microcin B17 production. Ethanol stress merely decreased production and, at higher concentrations, inhibited growth. Interestingly, cells growing in the bioreactor were much more resistant to the growth-inhibitory and production-inhibitory effects of ethanol than cells growing in shaken flasks.

  18. An In Vitro Comparative Study of Intracanal Fluid Motion and Wall Shear Stress Induced by Ultrasonic and Polymer Rotary Finishing Files in a Simulated Root Canal Model

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Jon; Borg, John; Mattson, Abby; Olsen, Kris; Bahcall, James

    2012-01-01

    Objective. This in vitro study compared the flow pattern and shear stress of an irrigant induced by ultrasonic and polymer rotary finishing file activation in an acrylic root canal model. Flow visualization analysis was performed using an acrylic canal filled with a mixture of distilled water and rheoscopic fluid. The ultrasonic and polymer rotary finishing file were separately tested in the canal and activated in a static position and in a cyclical axial motion (up and down). Particle movement in the fluid was captured using a high-speed digital camera and DaVis 7.1 software. The fluid shear stress analysis was performed using hot film anemometry. A hot-wire was placed in an acrylic root canal and the canal was filled with distilled water. The ultrasonic and polymer rotary finishing files were separately tested in a static position and in a cyclical axial motion. Positive needle irrigation was also tested separately for fluid shear stress. The induced wall shear stress was measured using LabVIEW 8.0 software. PMID:22461994

  19. Modeling effects of bank friction and woody bank vegetation on channel flow and boundary shear stress in the Rio Puerco, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffin, E.R.; Kean, J.W.; Vincent, K.R.; Smith, J.D.; Friedman, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    [1] We have applied a physically based model for steady, horizontally uniform flow to calculate reach-averaged velocity and boundary shear-stress distributions in a natural stream with woody vegetation on the channel banks. The model calculates explicitly the form drag on woody plant stems and includes the effects of vegetation on the boundary shear stress, velocity, and turbulence fields. Average channel shapes, bed gradients, and shrub characteristics were determined for four long, internally similar reaches covering an 81 -km segment of the lower Rio Puerco, in north-central New Mexico. Hydraulic geometries for each of three flow events were determined from reach-average channel shapes, slopes, and measured silt-line heights above the bed. Model results show that friction on the lateral boundaries reduced the boundary shear stress in the center of the Rio Puerco channel by as much as 20%. In reaches with moderate to dense bank shrubs, perimeter-averaged boundary shear stresses were reduced by almost 40% during near bankfull flows. Model-calculated discharges for all three flow events indicate there was a loss of about 40% of the upstream discharge through the 81-km river segment. Infiltration rates estimated from discharge losses during the quasi-steady peak flows and areas of the bed and banks suggest rates of flow loss into the silty sand of the upper banks are about 8 times greater than rates of loss into the clayey silt-covered bed and lower banks.

  20. Shear birefringence measurements on polymer thin films deposited on quartz resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domack, Arno; Johannsmann, Diethelm

    1998-02-01

    We have measured the second-order stress birefringence in a 2 ?m film of poly-(methyl-methacrylate) sandwiched between the top electrode of a quartz resonator and a second, semitransparent gold layer. The gold-film-gold system forms an optical Fabry-Perot resonator with characteristic dips of reflectivity at certain angles of incidence, which are the coupling angles of the different optically resonant modes. When modulating the driving voltage of the quartz resonator with a frequency in the kHz range and referencing the detection electronics to the modulation, shifts in the coupling angle in the range of 10-3° are easily detected. They result from a pseudo-dc component in the stress-optic signal, which is proportional to the square of the shear strain. This second-order stress birefringence is related to normal stresses in the film via the stress-optic law. We compare our findings to predictions from the theory of finite elasticity.

  1. Effects of shear stress pattern and magnitude on mesenchymal transformation and invasion of aortic valve endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Mahler, Gretchen J.; Frendl, Christopher M.; Cao, Qingfeng; Butcher, Jonathan T.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the role of mechanical forces on cell behavior is critical for tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and disease initiation studies. Current hemodynamic bioreactors are largely limited to 2D substrates or the application of general flow conditions at a tissue level, which eliminates the investigation of some essential physiological and pathological responses. One example is the mesenchymal transformation of endothelial cells in response to shear stress. Endothelial to mesenchymal transformation (EndMT) is a valve morphogenic mechanism associated with aortic valve disease initiation. The aortic valve experiences oscillatory shear on the disease-susceptible fibrosa, and the role of hemodynamics on adult EndMT is unknown. The goal of this work was to develop and characterize a microfluidic bioreactor that applies physiologically relevant laminar or oscillatory shear stresses to endothelial cells and permits the quantitative analysis of 3D cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions. In this study, porcine aortic valve endothelial cells were seeded onto 3D collagen I gels and exposed to different magnitudes of steady or oscillatory shear stress for 48 hours. Cells elongated and aligned perpendicular to laminar, but not oscillatory shear. Low steady shear stress (2 dyne/cm2) and oscillatory shear stress upregulated EndMT- (ACTA2, Snail, TGFB1) and inflammation- (ICAM1, NFKB1) related gene expression, EndMT-related (?SMA) protein expression, and matrix invasion when compared with static controls or cells exposed to high steady shear (10 and 20 dyne/cm2). Our system enables direct testing of the role of shear stress on endothelial cell mesenchymal transformation in a dynamic, 3D environment and shows that hemodynamics regulate EndMT in adult valve endothelial cells. PMID:24898772

  2. The effects of normal and shear stress wave phasing on coseismic landslide displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brain, Matthew J.; Rosser, Nick J.; Sutton, Jerry; Snelling, Karl; Tunstall, Neil; Petley, David N.

    2015-06-01

    Predictive models used to assess the magnitude of coseismic landslide strain accumulation in response to earthquake ground shaking typically consider slope-parallel ground accelerations only and ignore both the influence of coseismic slope-normal ground accelerations and the phase relationship between dynamic slope-normal and slope-parallel accelerations. We present results of a laboratory study designed to assess the significance of the phase offset between slope-normal and slope-parallel cyclic stresses on the generation of coseismic landslide displacements. Using a dynamic back-pressured shearbox that is capable of simulating variably phased slope-normal and slope-parallel dynamic loads, we subjected sediment samples to a range of dynamic loading scenarios indicative of earthquake-induced ground shaking. We detail the variations in strain accumulation observed when slope-normal and slope-parallel stresses occur independently and simultaneously, both in and out of phase, using a range of dynamic stress amplitudes. Our results show that the instantaneous phasing of dynamic stresses is critical in determining the amount of coseismic landslide displacement, which may vary by up to an order of magnitude based solely on wave-phasing effects. Instantaneous strain rate is an exponential function of the distance normal to the Mohr Coulomb failure envelope in plots of shear stress against normal effective stress. This distance is strongly controlled by the phase offset between dynamic normal and shear stresses. Our results demonstrate that conditions considered by conventional coseismic slope stability models can either overestimate or underestimate earthquake-induced landslide displacement by up to an order of magnitude. This has important implications for accurate assessment of coseismic landslide hazard.

  3. Transient displacement induced in shear wave elastography: comparison between analytical results and ultrasound measurements.

    PubMed

    Elkateb Hachemi, M; Callé, S; Remenieras, J P

    2006-12-22

    It is now accepted that an effective way to investigate the elastic properties of soft tissues is to generate a localized transient acoustic radiation force and to follow the associated displacements in the time/space domain. Shear waves induced by this stress field are particularly interesting in this kind of medium because they are governed by the shear elastic modulus mu, which is directly linked to the Young modulus, and spatial distribution and temporal evolution of the transient motion induced must therefore be obtained in detail. We report here a model based on the elastodynamic Green's function formalism to describe these displacements. 3D simulation of radiation force in homogenous elastic media was performed and the displacement curves computed at different radial distances for different temporal force profiles. Amplitude and duration of displacement were found to be reliable parameters to characterize the elastic properties of the medium. Experimental measurements were performed in a homogeneous agar-gelatin tissue-mimicking phantom, and two transducers were used to generate the radiation force and follow the induced displacements. Displacements obtained from different lateral locations around the applied force axis were then used to reconstruct the shear-wave propagation in a scan plane as a function of time. The experimental displacements/curves agreed with the theoretical profiles obtained by the elastodynamic Green's function formalism. PMID:16843510

  4. Evaluation of bioprosthetic heart valve failure using a matrix-fibril shear stress transfer approach.

    PubMed

    Anssari-Benam, Afshin; Barber, Asa H; Bucchi, Andrea

    2016-02-01

    A matrix-fibril shear stress transfer approach is devised and developed in this paper to analyse the primary biomechanical factors which initiate the structural degeneration of the bioprosthetic heart valves (BHVs). Using this approach, the critical length of the collagen fibrils l c and the interface shear acting on the fibrils in both BHV and natural aortic valve (AV) tissues under physiological loading conditions are calculated and presented. It is shown that the required critical fibril length to provide effective reinforcement to the natural AV and the BHV tissue is l c  = 25.36 µm and l c  = 66.81 µm, respectively. Furthermore, the magnitude of the required shear force acting on fibril interface to break a cross-linked fibril in the BHV tissue is shown to be 38 µN, while the required interfacial force to break the bonds between the fibril and the surrounding extracellular matrix is 31 µN. Direct correlations are underpinned between these values and the ultimate failure strength and the failure mode of the BHV tissue compared with the natural AV, and are verified against the existing experimental data. The analyses presented in this paper explain the role of fibril interface shear and critical length in regulating the biomechanics of the structural failure of the BHVs, for the first time. This insight facilitates further understanding into the underlying causes of the structural degeneration of the BHVs in vivo. PMID:26715134

  5. Predicting equilibrium states with Reynolds stress closures in channel flow and homogeneous shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abid, R.; Speziale, C. G.

    1992-01-01

    Turbulent channel flow and homogeneous shear flow have served as basic building block flows for the testing and calibration of Reynolds stress models. A direct theoretical connection is made between homogeneous shear flow in equilibrium and the log-layer of fully-developed turbulent channel flow. It is shown that if a second-order closure model is calibrated to yield good equilibrium values for homogeneous shear flow it will also yield good results for the log-layer of channel flow provided that the Rotta coefficient is not too far removed from one. Most of the commonly used second-order closure models introduce an ad hoc wall reflection term in order to mask deficient predictions for the log-layer of channel flow that arise either from an inaccurate calibration of homogeneous shear flow or from the use of a Rotta coefficient that is too large. Illustrative model calculations are presented to demonstrate this point which has important implications for turbulence modeling.

  6. Impact of blood rheology on wall shear stress in a model of the middle cerebral artery

    PubMed Central

    Bernabeu, Miguel O.; Nash, Rupert W.; Groen, Derek; Carver, Hywel B.; Hetherington, James; Krüger, Timm; Coveney, Peter V.

    2013-01-01

    Perturbations to the homeostatic distribution of mechanical forces exerted by blood on the endothelial layer have been correlated with vascular pathologies, including intracranial aneurysms and atherosclerosis. Recent computational work suggests that, in order to correctly characterize such forces, the shear-thinning properties of blood must be taken into account. To the best of our knowledge, these findings have never been compared against experimentally observed pathological thresholds. In this work, we apply the three-band diagram (TBD) analysis due to Gizzi et al. (Gizzi et al. 2011 Three-band decomposition analysis of wall shear stress in pulsatile flows. Phys. Rev. E 83, 031902. (doi:10.1103/PhysRevE.83.031902)) to assess the impact of the choice of blood rheology model on a computational model of the right middle cerebral artery. Our results show that, in the model under study, the differences between the wall shear stress predicted by a Newtonian model and the well-known Carreau–Yasuda generalized Newtonian model are only significant if the vascular pathology under study is associated with a pathological threshold in the range 0.94–1.56 Pa, where the results of the TBD analysis of the rheology models considered differs. Otherwise, we observe no significant differences. PMID:24427534

  7. Impact of blood rheology on wall shear stress in a model of the middle cerebral artery.

    PubMed

    Bernabeu, Miguel O; Nash, Rupert W; Groen, Derek; Carver, Hywel B; Hetherington, James; Krüger, Timm; Coveney, Peter V

    2013-04-01

    Perturbations to the homeostatic distribution of mechanical forces exerted by blood on the endothelial layer have been correlated with vascular pathologies, including intracranial aneurysms and atherosclerosis. Recent computational work suggests that, in order to correctly characterize such forces, the shear-thinning properties of blood must be taken into account. To the best of our knowledge, these findings have never been compared against experimentally observed pathological thresholds. In this work, we apply the three-band diagram (TBD) analysis due to Gizzi et al. (Gizzi et al. 2011 Three-band decomposition analysis of wall shear stress in pulsatile flows. Phys. Rev. E 83, 031902. (doi:10.1103/PhysRevE.83.031902)) to assess the impact of the choice of blood rheology model on a computational model of the right middle cerebral artery. Our results show that, in the model under study, the differences between the wall shear stress predicted by a Newtonian model and the well-known Carreau-Yasuda generalized Newtonian model are only significant if the vascular pathology under study is associated with a pathological threshold in the range 0.94-1.56 Pa, where the results of the TBD analysis of the rheology models considered differs. Otherwise, we observe no significant differences. PMID:24427534

  8. Local shear stress and its correlation with local volume fraction in concentrated non-Brownian suspensions: Lattice Boltzmann simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young Ki; Ahn, Kyung Hyun; Lee, Seung Jong

    2014-12-01

    The local shear stress of non-Brownian suspensions was investigated using the lattice Boltzmann method coupled with the smoothed profile method. Previous studies have only focused on the bulk rheology of complex fluids because the local rheology of complex fluids was not accessible due to technical limitations. In this study, the local shear stress of two-dimensional solid particle suspensions in Couette flow was investigated with the method of planes to correlate non-Newtonian fluid behavior with the structural evolution of concentrated particle suspensions. Shear thickening was successfully captured for highly concentrated suspensions at high particle Reynolds number, and both the local rheology and local structure of the suspensions were analyzed. It was also found that the linear correlation between the local particle stress and local particle volume fraction was dramatically reduced during shear thickening. These results clearly show how the change in local structure of suspensions influences the local and bulk rheology of the suspensions.

  9. Local shear stress and its correlation with local volume fraction in concentrated non-Brownian suspensions: lattice Boltzmann simulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Ki; Ahn, Kyung Hyun; Lee, Seung Jong

    2014-12-01

    The local shear stress of non-Brownian suspensions was investigated using the lattice Boltzmann method coupled with the smoothed profile method. Previous studies have only focused on the bulk rheology of complex fluids because the local rheology of complex fluids was not accessible due to technical limitations. In this study, the local shear stress of two-dimensional solid particle suspensions in Couette flow was investigated with the method of planes to correlate non-Newtonian fluid behavior with the structural evolution of concentrated particle suspensions. Shear thickening was successfully captured for highly concentrated suspensions at high particle Reynolds number, and both the local rheology and local structure of the suspensions were analyzed. It was also found that the linear correlation between the local particle stress and local particle volume fraction was dramatically reduced during shear thickening. These results clearly show how the change in local structure of suspensions influences the local and bulk rheology of the suspensions. PMID:25615103

  10. A control systems approach to quantify wall shear stress normalization by flow-mediated dilation in the brachial artery.

    PubMed

    van Bussel, Frank C G; van Bussel, Bas C T; Hoeks, Arnold P G; Op 't Roodt, Jos; Henry, Ronald M A; Ferreira, Isabel; Vanmolkot, Floris H M; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Reesink, Koen D

    2015-01-01

    Flow-mediated dilation is aimed at normalization of local wall shear stress under varying blood flow conditions. Blood flow velocity and vessel diameter are continuous and opposing influences that modulate wall shear stress. We derived an index FMDv to quantify wall shear stress normalization performance by flow-mediated dilation in the brachial artery. In 22 fasting presumed healthy men, we first assessed intra- and inter-session reproducibilities of two indices pFMDv and mFMDv, which consider the relative peak and relative mean hyperemic change in flow velocity, respectively. Second, utilizing oral glucose loading, we evaluated the tracking performance of both FMDv indices, in comparison with existing indices [i.e., the relative peak diameter increase (%FMD), the peak to baseline diameter ratio (Dpeak/Dbase), and the relative peak diameter increase normalized to the full area under the curve of blood flow velocity with hyperemia (FMD/shearAUC) or with area integrated to peak hyperemia (FMD/shearAUC_peak)]. Inter-session and intra-session reproducibilities for pFMDv, mFMDv and %FMD were comparable (intra-class correlation coefficients within 0.521-0.677 range). Both pFMDv and mFMDv showed more clearly a reduction after glucose loading (reduction of ~45%, p?0.001) than the other indices (% given are relative reductions): %FMD (~11%, p?0.074); Dpeak/Dbase (~11%, p?0.074); FMD/shearAUC_peak (~20%, p?0.016) and FMD/shearAUC (~38%, p?0.038). Further analysis indicated that wall shear stress normalization under normal (fasting) conditions is already far from ideal (FMDv < 1), which (therefore) does not materially change with glucose loading. Our approach might be useful in intervention studies to detect intrinsic changes in shear stress normalization performance in conduit arteries. PMID:25693114

  11. NO-mediated regulation of NAD(P)H oxidase by laminar shear stress in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Duerrschmidt, Nicole; Stielow, Claudia; Muller, Gregor; Pagano, Patrick J; Morawietz, Henning

    2006-01-01

    The flowing blood generates shear stress at the endothelial cell surface. In endothelial cells, NAD(P)H oxidase complexes have been identified as major sources of superoxide anion (·O2?) formation. In this study, we analysed the effect of laminar shear stress on ·O2? formation by cytochrome c reduction assay and on NAD(P)H oxidase subunit expression by standard calibrated competitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot in human endothelial cells. Primary cultures of human umbilical vein endothelial cells were exposed to laminar shear stress in a cone-and-plate viscometer for up to 24 h. Short-term application of shear stress transiently induced ·O2? formation. This was inhibited by NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitor gp91ds-tat, but NAD(P)H oxidase subunit expression was unchanged. Long-term arterial laminar shear stress (30 dyne cm?2, 24 h) down-regulated ·O2? formation, and mRNA and protein expression of NAD(P)H oxidase subunits Nox2/gp91phox and p47phox. In parallel, endothelial NO formation and eNOS, but not Cu/Zn SOD, protein expression was increased. Down-regulation of ·O2? formation, gp91phox and p47phox expression by long-term laminar shear stress was blocked by l-NAME. NO donor DETA-NO down-regulates ·O2? formation, gp91phox and p47phox expression in static cultures. In conclusion, our data suggest a transient activation of ·O2? formation by short-term shear stress, followed by a down-regulation of endothelial NAD(P)H oxidase in response to long-term laminar shear stress. NO-mediated down-regulation by shear stress preferentially affects the gp91phox/p47phox-containing NAD(P)H oxidase complex. This mechanism might contribute to the regulation of endothelial NO/·O2? balance and the vasoprotective potential of physiological levels of laminar shear stress. PMID:16873416

  12. Deposit membrane fouling: influence of specific cake layer resistance and tangential shear stresses.

    PubMed

    Charfi, A; Harmand, J; Ben Amar, N; Grasmick, A; Heran, M

    2014-01-01

    Cake fouling is the leading cause of membrane permeability decrease when filtering mixed liquor suspension containing high suspended solid concentrations. A simple model is proposed to simulate the cake resistance evolution with time by considering a macro-scale fouling linked only to the accumulation of particles on the membrane surface. This accumulation appears as the difference between the flux of deposited particles due to the filtration and the flux of particles detached from the membrane surface due to the tangential shear stresses caused by recirculation flow in the sidestream membrane bioreactor (MBR) or gas sparging close to the membrane surface for submerged MBR configuration. Two determining parameters were then highlighted: the specific cake resistance and the 'shear parameter'. Based on these parameters it is possible to predict model outputs as cake resistance and permeate flux evolution for short-time filtration periods. PMID:25026577

  13. Biological effects of dynamic shear stress in cardiovascular pathologies and devices

    PubMed Central

    Girdhar, Gaurav; Bluestein, Danny

    2010-01-01

    Altered and highly dynamic shear stress conditions have been implicated in endothelial dysfunction leading to cardiovascular disease, and in thromboembolic complications in prosthetic cardiovascular devices. In addition to vascular damage, the pathological flow patterns characterizing cardiovascular pathologies and blood flow in prosthetic devices induce shear activation and damage to blood constituents. Investigation of the specific and accentuated effects of such flow-induced perturbations on individual cell-types in vitro is critical for the optimization of device design, whereby specific design modifications can be made to minimize such perturbations. Such effects are also critical in understanding the development of cardiovascular disease. This review addresses limitations to replicate such dynamic flow conditions in vitro and also introduces the idea of modified in vitro devices, one of which is developed in the authors' laboratory, with dynamic capabilities to investigate the aforementioned effects in greater detail. PMID:18331179

  14. Purinergic Signaling is Required for Fluid Shear Stress-Induced NF-kB Translocation in Osteoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Genetos, Damian C.; Karin, Norman J.; Geist, Derik J.; Donahue, Henry J.; Duncan, Randall L.

    2011-04-01

    Fluid shear stress regulates gene expression in osteoblasts, in part by activation of the transcription factor NF-kB. We examined whether this process was under control of purinoceptor activation. MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts under static conditions expressed the NF-kB inhibitory protein IkB alpha and exhibited cytosolic localization of NF-kB. Under fluid shear stress, I?B? levels decreased, and concomitant nuclear localization of NF-kB was observed. Cells exposed to fluid shear stress in ATP-depleted medium exhibited no significant reduction in I?B?, and NF-kB remained within the cytosol. Similar results were found using oxidized ATP or Brilliant Blue G, P2X7 receptor antagonists, indicating that the P2X7 receptor is responsible for fluid shear-stress-induced I?B? degradation and nuclear accumulation of NF-kB. Pharmacologic blockage of the P2Y6 receptor also prevented shear-induced IkB alpha degradation. These phenomena involved neither ERK1/2 signaling nor autocrine activation by P2X7-generated lysophosphatidic acid. Our results suggest that fluid shear stress regulates NF-kB activity through the P2Y6 and P2X7 receptor.

  15. Purinergic signaling is required for fluid shear stress-induced NF-{kappa}B translocation in osteoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Genetos, Damian C.; Karin, Norman J.; Geist, Derik J.; Donahue, Henry J.; Duncan, Randall L.

    2011-04-01

    Fluid shear stress regulates gene expression in osteoblasts, in part by activation of the transcription factor NF-{kappa}B. We examined whether this process was under the control of purinoceptor activation. MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts under static conditions expressed the NF-{kappa}B inhibitory protein I{kappa}B{alpha} and exhibited cytosolic localization of NF-{kappa}B. Under fluid shear stress, I{kappa}B{alpha} levels decreased, and concomitant nuclear localization of NF-{kappa}B was observed. Cells exposed to fluid shear stress in ATP-depleted medium exhibited no significant reduction in I{kappa}B{alpha}, and NF-{kappa}B remained within the cytosol. Similar results were found using oxidized ATP or Brilliant Blue G, P2X{sub 7} receptor antagonists, indicating that the P2X{sub 7} receptor is responsible for fluid shear-stress-induced I{kappa}B{alpha} degradation and nuclear accumulation of NF-{kappa}B. Pharmacologic blockage of the P2Y6 receptor also prevented shear-induced I{kappa}B{alpha} degradation. These phenomena involved neither ERK1/2 signaling nor autocrine activation by P2X{sub 7}-generated lysophosphatidic acid. Our results suggest that fluid shear stress regulates NF-{kappa}B activity through the P2Y{sub 6} and P2X{sub 7} receptor.

  16. Correlation of predicted and measured thermal stresses on an advanced aircraft structure with similar materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    A laboratory heating test simulating hypersonic heating was conducted on a heat-sink type structure to provide basic thermal stress measurements. Six NASTRAN models utilizing various combinations of bar, shear panel, membrane, and plate elements were used to develop calculated thermal stresses. Thermal stresses were also calculated using a beam model. For a given temperature distribution there was very little variation in NASTRAN calculated thermal stresses when element types were interchanged for a given grid system. Thermal stresses calculated for the beam model compared similarly to the values obtained for the NASTRAN models. Calculated thermal stresses compared generally well to laboratory measured thermal stresses. A discrepancy of signifiance occurred between the measured and predicted thermal stresses in the skin areas. A minor anomaly in the laboratory skin heating uniformity resulted in inadequate temperature input data for the structural models.

  17. Determination of Rheological and Magnetic Properties for Magnetorheological Composites Via Shear Magnetization Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, A. T.; Klingenberg, D. J.; Shkel, Y. M.

    Anisotropic solid-state magnetorheological (MR) composites are prepared by applying magnetic fields to isotropic suspensions in polymer melts and preserved by cross-linking the melts. The composities are studied through a continuum-level perspective at various magnetic field strengths under oscillatory shear. The minimum number of constraints are applied in the derivation of the magnetic and rheological invariants, which relate the measured macroscopic magnetostriction coefficients to the discrete parameters of any microscopic model. The field-induced stress is defined by magnetostriction coefficients, which are material parameters that describe the strain dependence of the magnetization tensor. A comparison of the independently measured rheological and magnetic properties allow for the determination of the magnetostriction coefficients.

  18. Measurement of shear strength for HOPG with scanning tunneling microscopy by thermal excitation method.

    PubMed

    Ding, X D; Wang, Y Z; Xiong, X M; Du, X S; Zhang, J X

    2012-04-01

    An experimental observation of force interactions in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is presented. A technique for measuring force interactions between a conventional STM probe and a sample by spectra analysis of its thermal fluctuations from tunneling current in STM is developed theoretically and experimentally. Thermally excited fluctuation of the STM probe is exactly discerned in air and then force gradient is determined from its corresponding eigen-frequency with a formula similar to that for a small-amplitude atomic force microscopy (AFM). The observed force interactions are consistent with forces in dynamic AFM. Shear strength of 7 GPa for highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) under compressive stress is obtained from the experiment and using the elastic theory. We believe that this technique is of scientific significance as it enables accurate measurement of short-range force interactions at atomic scale under true STM conditions. PMID:22446198

  19. Design and Validation of a Novel Bioreactor to Subject Aortic Valve Leaflets to Side-Specific Shear Stress

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ling; Rajamannan, Nalini M.; Sucosky, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Hemodynamic stresses are presumed to play an important role in the development of calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD). The elucidation of the shear stress mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of CAVD has been hampered by the complexity of the native unsteady and side-specific valvular flow environment. To address this gap, this article describes the design and validation of a novel device to expose leaflet samples to time-dependent side-specific shear stress. The device built on a double cone-and-plate geometry was dimensioned based on our previous single-sided shear stress device that minimizes secondary flow effects inherent to this geometry. A fluid–structure interaction (FSI) model was designed to predict the actual shear stress produced on a tissue sample mounted in the new device. Staining was performed on porcine leaflets conditioned in the new bioreactor to assess endothelial integrity and cellular apoptosis. The FSI results demonstrated good agreement between the target (native) and the actual side-specific shear stress produced on a tissue sample. No significant difference in endothelial integrity and cellular apoptosis was detected between samples conditioned for 96 h and fresh controls. This new device will enable the investigation of valvular response to normal and pathologic hemodynamics and the potential mechano-etiology of CAVD. PMID:21455792

  20. Shear stress induces cell apoptosis via a c-Src-phospholipase D-mTOR signaling pathway in cultured podocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chunfa; Department of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University; Rammelkamp Center for Research and Education, MetroHealth System Campus, Cleveland, OH 44106 ; Bruggeman, Leslie A.; Rammelkamp Center for Research and Education, MetroHealth System Campus, Cleveland, OH 44106 ; Hydo, Lindsey M.; Miller, R. Tyler; Department of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University; Rammelkamp Center for Research and Education, MetroHealth System Campus, Cleveland, OH 44106

    2012-06-10

    The glomerular capillary wall, composed of endothelial cells, the glomerular basement membrane and the podocytes, is continually subjected to hemodynamic force arising from tractional stress due to blood pressure and shear stress due to blood flow. Exposure of glomeruli to abnormal hemodynamic force such as hyperfiltration is associated with glomerular injury and progressive renal disease, and the conversion of mechanical stimuli to chemical signals in the regulation of the process is poorly understood in podocytes. By examining DNA fragmentation, apoptotic nuclear changes and cytochrome c release, we found that shear stress induced cell apoptosis in cultured podocytes. Meanwhile, podocytes exposed to shear stress also stimulated c-Src phosphorylation, phospholipase D (PLD) activation and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling. Using the antibodies against c-Src, PLD{sub 1}, and PLD{sub 2} to perform reciprocal co-immunoprecipitations and in vitro PLD activity assay, our data indicated that c-Src interacted with and activated PLD{sub 1} but not PLD{sub 2}. The inhibition of shear stress-induced c-Src phosphorylation by PP{sub 2} (a specific inhibitor of c-Src kinase) resulted in reduced PLD activity. Phosphatidic acid, produced by shear stress-induced PLD activation, stimulated mTOR signaling, and caused podocyte hypertrophy and apoptosis.

  1. Expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 in human endothelial cells: regulation by fluid shear stress

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Daniel E.; Sakurai, Yumiko; Weiss, Daiana; Vega, J. David; Taylor, W. Robert; Jo, Hanjoong; Eskin, Suzanne G.; Marcus, Craig B.; McIntire, Larry V.

    2009-01-01

    Aims CYP1A1 and CYP1B1, members of the cytochrome P450 protein family, are regulated by fluid shear stress. This study describes the effects of duration, magnitude and pattern of shear stress on CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expressions in human endothelial cells, towards the goal of understanding the role(s) of these genes in pro-atherogenic or anti-atherogenic endothelial cell functions. Methods and results We investigated CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expressions under different durations, levels, and patterns of shear stress. CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 mRNA, protein, and enzymatic activity were maximally up-regulated at ?24 h of arterial levels of shear stress (15–25 dynes/cm2). Expression of both genes was significantly attenuated by reversing shear stress when compared with 15 dynes/cm2 steady shear stress. Small interfering RNA knockdown of CYP1A1 resulted in significantly reduced CYP1B1 and thrombospondin-1 expression, genes regulated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Immunostaining of human coronary arteries showed constitutive CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 protein expressions in endothelial cells. Immunostaining of mouse aorta showed nuclear localization of AhR and increased expression of CYP1A1 in the descending thoracic aorta, whereas reduced nuclear localization of AhR and attenuated CYP1A1 expression were observed in the lesser curvature of the aortic arch. Conclusion CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 gene and protein expressions vary with time, magnitude, and pattern of shear stress. Increased CYP1A1 gene expression modulates AhR-regulated genes. Based on our in vitro reversing flow data and in vivo immunostained mouse aorta, we suggest that increased expression of both genes reflects an anti-atherogenic endothelial cell phenotype. PMID:19126602

  2. Numerical design and optimization of hydraulic resistance and wall shear stress inside pressure-driven microfluidic networks.

    PubMed

    Damiri, Hazem Salim; Bardaweel, Hamzeh Khalid

    2015-11-01

    Microfluidic networks represent the milestone of microfluidic devices. Recent advancements in microfluidic technologies mandate complex designs where both hydraulic resistance and pressure drop across the microfluidic network are minimized, while wall shear stress is precisely mapped throughout the network. In this work, a combination of theoretical and modeling techniques is used to construct a microfluidic network that operates under minimum hydraulic resistance and minimum pressure drop while constraining wall shear stress throughout the network. The results show that in order to minimize the hydraulic resistance and pressure drop throughout the network while maintaining constant wall shear stress throughout the network, geometric and shape conditions related to the compactness and aspect ratio of the parent and daughter branches must be followed. Also, results suggest that while a "local" minimum hydraulic resistance can be achieved for a geometry with an arbitrary aspect ratio, a "global" minimum hydraulic resistance occurs only when the aspect ratio of that geometry is set to unity. Thus, it is concluded that square and equilateral triangular cross-sectional area microfluidic networks have the least resistance compared to all rectangular and isosceles triangular cross-sectional microfluidic networks, respectively. Precise control over wall shear stress through the bifurcations of the microfluidic network is demonstrated in this work. Three multi-generation microfluidic network designs are considered. In these three designs, wall shear stress in the microfluidic network is successfully kept constant, increased in the daughter-branch direction, or decreased in the daughter-branch direction, respectively. For the multi-generation microfluidic network with constant wall shear stress, the design guidelines presented in this work result in identical profiles of wall shear stresses not only within a single generation but also through all the generations of the microfluidic network under investigation. The results obtained in this work are consistent with previously reported data and suitable for a wide range of lab-on-chip applications. PMID:26351133

  3. Lymphatic Endothelial Cells Adapt Their Barrier Function in Response to Changes in Shear Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, Kristine M.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Lymphatic endothelial cells form an important barrier necessary for normal lymph formation and propulsion. However, little is known about how physical forces within lymphatic vessels affect endothelial barrier function. The purpose of this study was to characterize how laminar flow affects lymphatic endothelial barrier function and to test whether endothelial cells respond to flow changes by activating the intracellular actin cytoskeleton to enhance barrier function. Methods and Results Cultured adult human dermal microlymphatic endothelial cells (HMLEC-d) were grown on small gold electrodes arranged within a flow channel, and transendothelial electrical resistance (TER), an index of barrier function, was determined. Laminar flow was applied to the cells at a baseline shear stress of 0.5?dynes/cm2, and was increased to 2.5, 5.0, or 9.0?dynes/cm2, causing a magnitude-dependent increase in barrier function that was reversed 30?min later when the shear stress was returned to baseline. This response was abolished by blockade of actin dynamics with 10??M phalloidin, and significantly inhibited by blockade of Rac1 activity with 50??M NSC23766. Blockade of protein kinase A (10??M H-89) did not inhibit the response. Mathematical modeling based on our impedance data showed that the flow-induced changes in TER were primarily due to altered current flow between cells and not beneath cells. Conclusions These results suggest that lymphatic endothelial cells dynamically alter their morphology and barrier function in response to changes in shear stress by a mechanism dependent upon Rac1-mediated actin dynamics. PMID:20143922

  4. Effect of simulated microgravity on nitric oxide synthase activity of osteocyte-like cell line MLO-Y4 in response to fluid shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lian-Wen; Yang, Xiao; Fan, Yu-Bo

    It is well known that microgravity could induce bone loss. However, the mechanism remains poorly understood. Osteocytes are extremely sensitive to fluid shear stress, even more than osteobleasts. The effect of simulated microgravity on osteocytes in response to fluid shear was investigated in this study in order to see if the mechanosensibility of osteocytes changed under simulated microgravity. The osteocyte-like cell line, MLO-Y4, was cultured and divided into four groups, including control (CON), control and shear (CONS), rotary (RT), rotary and shear (RTS). In RT and RTS, the cells were cultured in the rotary cell culture system to simulate microgravity condition. After 5 days, the cells in RTS and CONS were subjected to flow shear for 15 min. Then nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity in the cells was measured using assay kit. The results showed that NOS activity in respond to fluid shear decreased significantly in RTS compared with CONS. In addition, there was significant difference in NOS activity between CONS and CON while no significant difference between RTS and RT. These indicates that the mechanosensibility of osteocytes decreased under simulated microgravity and this maybe the partly causes of the poor effect of exercise to counter microgravity-induced-bone loss. However, further research need to be done to support this finding.

  5. Investigation of high-speed free shear flows using improved pressure-strain correlated Reynolds stress turbulence model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Lakshmanan, B.

    1993-01-01

    A high-speed shear layer is studied using compressibility corrected Reynolds stress turbulence model which employs newly developed model for pressure-strain correlation. MacCormack explicit prediction-corrector method is used for solving the governing equations and the turbulence transport equations. The stiffness arising due to source terms in the turbulence equations is handled by a semi-implicit numerical technique. Results obtained using the new model show a sharper reduction in growth rate with increasing convective Mach number. Some improvements were also noted in the prediction of the normalized streamwise stress and Reynolds shear stress. The computed results are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  6. Shear stresses in cemented and bonded optics due to temperature changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, P. R.; Vukobratovich, D.

    2015-09-01

    This paper applies analytical means previously published by Chen and Nelson (1979) to estimate the shear stresses developed within the joints between typical cemented optical components and within opto-mechanical subassemblies made of materials with significantly different coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) when exposed to extreme ambient temperatures. Two cemented doublet examples, one involving glasses with a large CTE mismatch and another with more equal CTEs, are analyzed. An example involving a prism made of fused silica bonded with epoxy to a titanium base also is considered.

  7. Use of fault striations and dislocation models to infer tectonic shear stress during the 1995 Hyogo-Ken Nanbu (Kobe) earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spudich, P.; Guatteri, Mariagiovanna; Otsuki, K.; Minagawa, J.

    1998-01-01

    Dislocation models of the 1995 Hyogo-ken Nanbu (Kobe) earthquake derived by Yoshida et al. (1996) show substantial changes in direction of slip with time at specific points on the Nojima and Rokko fault systems, as do striations we observed on exposures of the Nojima fault surface on Awaji Island. Spudich (1992) showed that the initial stress, that is, the shear traction on the fault before the earthquake origin time, can be derived at points on the fault where the slip rake rotates with time if slip velocity and stress change are known at these points. From Yoshida's slip model, we calculated dynamic stress changes on the ruptured fault surfaces. To estimate errors, we compared the slip velocities and dynamic stress changes of several published models of the earthquake. The differences between these models had an exponential distribution, not gaussian. We developed a Bayesian method to estimate the probability density function (PDF) of initial stress from the striations and from Yoshida's slip model. Striations near Toshima and Hirabayashi give initial stresses of about 13 and 7 MPa, respectively. We obtained initial stresses of about 7 to 17 MPa at depths of 2 to 10 km on a subset of points on the Nojima and Rokko fault systems. Our initial stresses and coseismic stress changes agree well with postearthquake stresses measured by hydrofracturing in deep boreholes near Hirabayashi and Ogura on Awaji Island. Our results indicate that the Nojima fault slipped at very low shear stress, and fractional stress drop was complete near the surface and about 32% below depths of 2 km. Our results at depth depend on the accuracy of the rake rotations in Yoshida's model, which are probably correct on the Nojima fault but debatable on the Rokko fault. Our results imply that curved or cross-cutting fault striations can be formed in a single earthquake, contradicting a common assumption of structural geology.

  8. On the correct interpretation of measured force and calculation of material stress in biaxial tests.

    PubMed

    Nolan, D R; McGarry, J P

    2016-01-01

    Biaxial tests are commonly used to investigate the mechanical behaviour of soft biological tissues and polymers. In the current paper we uncover a fundamental problem associated with the calculation of material stress from measured force in standard biaxial tests. In addition to measured forces, localised unmeasured shear forces also occur at the clamps and the inability to quantify such forces has significant implications for the calculation of material stress from simplified force-equilibrium relationships. Unmeasured shear forces are shown to arise due to two distinct competing contributions: (1) negative shear force due to stretching of the orthogonal clamp, and (2) positive shear force as a result of material Poisson-effect. The clamp shear force is highly dependent on the specimen geometry and the clamp displacement ratio, as consequently, is the measured force-stress relationship. Additionally in this study we demonstrate that commonly accepted formulae for the estimation of material stress in the central region of a cruciform specimen are highly inaccurate. A reliable empirical correction factor for the general case of isotropic materials must be a function of specimen geometry and the biaxial clamp displacement ratio. Finally we demonstrate that a correction factor for the general case of non-linear anisotropic materials is not feasible and we suggest the use of inverse finite element analysis as a practical means of interpreting experimental data for such complex materials. PMID:26327453

  9. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis to Determine Shear Stresses and Rates in a Centrifugal Left Ventricular Assist Device

    PubMed Central

    Selgrade, Brian Paul; Truskey, George A.

    2014-01-01

    Axial flow left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are a significant improvement in mechanical circulatory support. However, patients with these devices experience degradation of large von Willebrand factor (vWF) multimers, which is associated with bleeding and may be caused by high shear stresses within the LVAD. In this study, we used computational fluid mechanics to determine the wall shear stresses, shear rates, and residence times in a centrifugal LVAD and assess the impact on these variables caused by changing impeller speed and changing from a shrouded to a semi-open impeller. In both LVAD types, shear rates were well over 10 000/s in several regions. This is high enough to degrade vWF, but it is unclear if residence times, which were below 5 ms in high-shear regions, are long enough to allow vWF cleavage. Additionally, wall shear stresses were below the threshold stress of 10 Pa only in the outlet tube so it is feasible to endothelialize this region to enhance its biocompatibility. PMID:22360826

  10. Homework Stress: Construct Validation of a Measure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Idit; Buzukashvili, Tamara; Feingold, Liat

    2012-01-01

    This article presents 2 studies aimed at validating a measure of stress experienced by children and parents around the issue of homework, applying Benson's program of validation (Benson, 1998). Study 1 provides external validity of the measure by supporting hypothesized relations between stress around homework and students' and parents' positive…

  11. Accuracy evaluation of residual stress measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Yerman, J.A.; Kroenke, W.C.; Long, W.H.

    1996-05-01

    The accuracy of residual stress measurement techniques is difficult to assess due to the lack of available reference standards. To satisfy the need for reference standards, two specimens were designed and developed to provide known stress magnitudes and distributions: one with a uniform stress distribution and one with a nonuniform linear stress distribution. A reusable, portable load fixture was developed for use with each of the two specimens. Extensive bench testing was performed to determine if the specimens provide desired known stress magnitudes and distributions and stability of the known stress with time. The testing indicated that the nonuniform linear specimen and load fixture provided the desired known stress magnitude and distribution but that modifications were required for the uniform stress specimen. A trial use of the specimens and load fixtures using hole drilling was successful.

  12. On Measuring the Third Dimension of Cultured Endothelial Cells in Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S. Q.; Yen, Morris; Fung, Y. C.

    1994-09-01

    The stress in the endothelial cells induced by blood flow depends on the waviness of the blood-endothelium interface and the slopes at the junctions of neighboring cells in the direction of flow. The height and slope in the third dimension of the living endothelial cells cannot be measured by ordinary optical and electron microscopy. Here we show that interference microscopy meets the challenge. We measured the geometry of cultured confluent human vascular endothelial cells in a flow, and we found that in a normal section parallel to the flow, the absolute values of the surface slopes at the cell junctions were 0.70 ± 0.02 (SE) and 0.80 ± 0.02 (SE) at the leading and trailing edges of the cells, respectively, in a culture medium of osmolarity 310 mosM with a shear stress of approximately 1 N/m^2. A reversal of the flow direction led to a reversal of the slope pattern. An increase in medium osmolarity above 310 mosM induced an initial decrease in the slopes followed by a return to normal, whereas a decrease in the osmolarity had a reversed effect. These results, in light of our previous theoretical analyses, show that tensile stress exists in the endothelial cell membrane, and that the mechanism of tension accumulation is a reality. The accumulation is not 100% because the membranes are not smooth at the cell junctions.

  13. Shear Stress induced Stretching of Red Blood Cells by Oscillating Bubbles within a Narrow Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fenfang; Mohammadzadeh, Milad; Ohl, Claus-Dieter; Claus-Dieter Ohl Team

    2013-11-01

    The flow pattern, especially the boundary layer caused by the expanding/contracting bubble in a narrow gap (15 ?m) and the resultant stretching of red blood cells is investigated in this work. High speed recordings show that a red blood cell (biconcave shape, thickness of 1-2 ?m) can be elongated to five times its original length by a laser-induced cavitation bubble within the narrow gap. However, flexible cancer cells in suspension (RKO, spherical shape, diameter of 10-15 ?m) are hardly elongated under the same experimental condition. We hypothesize that the shear stress at the boundary layer is crucial for this elongation to occur. Therefore, in order to resolve the related fluid dynamics, we conducted numerical simulations using the finite element method (Fluent). The rapidly expanding/contracting vapor bubble is successfully modeled by employing viscosity and surface tension. The transient pressure inside the bubble and the velocity profile of the flow is obtained. We observe strong shear near the upper and lower boundary during the bubble oscillation. The flow fields are compared with analytical solutions to transient and pulsating flows in 2D. In the experiment the red blood cells sit within the lower boundary layer, thus are probably elongated by this strong shear flow. In contrast, the spherical cancer cells are of comparable size to the gap height so that they are lesser affected by this boundary layer flow.

  14. Fine-tuning of DDES and IDDES formulations to the k-? shear stress transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritskevich, M. S.; Garbaruk, A. V.; Menter, F. R.

    2013-06-01

    Modifications are proposed of two recently developed hybrid CFD (computational fluid dynamics) strategies, Delayed Detached Eddy Simulation (DDES), and DDES with Improved wall-modeling capability (IDDES). The modifications are aimed at fine-tuning of these approaches to the k-? SST (shear stress transport) background RANS (Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes) model. The first one includes recalibrated empirical constants in the shielding function of the Spalart-Allmaras (SA) based DDES which are shown to be suboptimal (not providing a needed level of elimination of the Model Stress Depletion (MSD)) for the SST-based DDES model. For the SST-IDDES variant, in addition to that, a simplification of the original SA-based formulation is proposed, which does not cause any visible degradation of the model performance. Both modifications are extensively tested on a range of attached and separated flows (developed channel, backward-facing step, periodic hills, wall-mounted hump, and hydrofoil with trailing edge separation).

  15. Evaluation of aneurysm-associated wall shear stress related to morphological variations of circle of Willis using a microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Nam, Seong-Won; Choi, Samjin; Cheong, Youjin; Kim, Yeon-Hee; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2015-01-21

    Although microfluidic systems have been important tools in analytical chemistry, life sciences, and medical research, their application was rather limited for drug-screening and biosensors. Here, we described a microfluidic device consisting of a multilayer micro-channel system that represented the hemodynamic cerebral vascular system. We analyzed wall shear stresses related to aneurysm formation in the circle of Willis (CoW) and their morphological variations using this system. This device was controlled by pneumatic valves, which occluded various major arteries by closing the associated channels. The hemodynamic analysis indicated that higher degrees of shear stress occurred in an anterior communicating artery (ACoA), particularly in the hypoplastic region of the posterior communicating artery (PCoA) and the P1 segment. Furthermore, occlusion of a common carotid artery (CCA) or a middle cerebral artery (MCA) increased the shear stress, whereas occlusion of a vertebral artery (VA) decreased the shear stress. These results indicate that the morphological variation of the CoW may affect aneurysm formation resulting from increased wall shear stress. Therefore, the technique described in this paper provides a novel method to investigate the hemodynamics of complex cerebral vascular systems not accessible from previous clinical studies. PMID:25497378

  16. Shear thickening of cornstarch suspensions

    E-print Network

    Abdoulaye Fall; François Bertrand; Guillaume Ovarlez; Daniel Bonn

    2012-06-08

    We study the rheology of cornstarch suspensions, a non-Brownian particle system that exhibits discontinuous shear thickening. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the local properties of the flow are obtained by the determination of local velocity profiles and concentrations in a Couette cell. For low rotational rates, we observe shear localization characteristic of yield stress fluids. When the overall shear rate is increased, the width of the sheared region increases. The discontinuous shear thickening is found to set in at the end of this shear localization regime when all of the fluid is sheared: the existence of a nonflowing region, thus, seems to prevent or delay shear thickening. Macroscopic observations using different measurement geometries show that the smaller the gap of the shear cell, the lower the shear rate at which shear thickening sets in. We, thus, propose that the discontinuous shear thickening of cornstarch suspensions is a consequence of dilatancy: the system under flow attempts to dilate but instead undergoes a jamming transition, because it is confined. This proposition is confirmed by an independent measurement of the dilation of the suspension as a function of the shear rate. It is also explains the MRI observations: when flow is localized, the nonflowing region plays the role of a "dilatancy reservoir" which allows the material to be sheared without jamming.

  17. Shear thickening of cornstarch suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fall, Abdoulaye; Bertrand, François; Ovarlez, Guillaume; Bonn, Daniel

    We study the rheology of cornstarch suspensions, a non-Brownian particle system that exhibits discontinuous shear thickening. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the local properties of the flow are obtained by the determination of local velocity profiles and concentrations in a Couette cell. For low rotational rates, we observe shear localization characteristic of yield stress fluids. When the overall shear rate is increased, the width of the sheared region increases. The discontinuous shear thickening is found to set in at the end of this shear localization regime when all of the fluid is sheared: the existence of a nonflowing region, thus, seems to prevent or delay shear thickening. Macroscopic observations using different measurement geometries show that the smaller the gap of the shear cell, the lower the shear rate at which shear thickening sets in. We, thus, propose that the discontinuous shear thickening of cornstarch suspensions is a consequence of dilatancy: the system under flow attempts to dilate but instead undergoes a jamming transition, because it is confined. This proposition is confirmed by an independent measurement of the dilation of the suspension as a function of the shear rate. It is also explains the MRI observations: when flow is localized, the nonflowing region plays the role of a "dilatancy reservoir" which allows the material to be sheared without jamming.

  18. Cantilever measurements of surface stress, surface reconstruction, film stress and magnetoelastic stress of monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Sander, Dirk; Tian, Zhen; Kirschner, Jürgen

    2008-01-01

    We review the application of cantilever-based stress measurements in surface science and magnetism. The application of thin (thickness appr. 0.1 mm) single crystalline substrates as cantilevers has been used successfully to measure adsorbate-induced surface stress changes, lattice misfit induced film stress, and magneto-elastic stress of ferromagnetic monolayers. Surface stress changes as small as 0.01 N/m can be readily measured, and this translates into a sensitivity for adsorbate-coverage well below 0.01 of one layer. Stress as large as several GPa, beyond the elasticity limits of high strength materials, is measured, and it is ascribed to the lattice misfit between film and substrate. Our results point at the intimate relation between surface stress and surface reconstruction, stress-induced structural changes in epitaxially strained films, and strain-induced modifications of the magneto-elastic coupling in ferromagnetic monolayers.

  19. Criterion validation of a stress measure: the Stress Overload Scale.

    PubMed

    Amirkhan, James H; Urizar, Guido G; Clark, Sarah

    2015-09-01

    Validating stress scales poses problems beyond those of other psychological measures. Here, 3 studies were conducted to address those problems and assess the criterion validity of scores from a new theory-derived measure, the Stress Overload Scale (SOS; Amirkhan, 2012). In Study 1, the SOS was tested for its ability to predict postsemester illness in a sample of college students (n = 127). Even with precautions to minimize criterion contamination, scores were found to predict health problems in the month following a final exam on all of 5 different criteria. In Study 2, a community sample (n = 231) was used to test the SOS' ability to differentiate people in stressful circumstances from those in more relaxed contexts. SOS scores demonstrated excellent sensitivity (96%) and specificity (100%) in this general population application. In Study 3, the SOS was tested for its ability to differentiate salivary cortisol responses to a laboratory stressor in a group of pregnant women (n = 40). High scores were found to be associated with a blunted cortisol response, which is indicative of HPA-axis overload and typical of persons suffering chronic stress and stress-related pathology. Across all 3 studies, despite variations in the stressor, criterion, population, and methods, SOS scores emerged as valid indicators of stress. However, each study also introduced new problems that beg additional corrective steps in future stress-scale validity tests. These strategies, and the SOS' utility as a research and diagnostic tool in varied applications and populations, are discussed. PMID:25642927

  20. Primary cilia respond to fluid shear stress and mediate flow-induced calcium deposition in osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Delaine-Smith, Robin M.; Sittichokechaiwut, Anuphan; Reilly, Gwendolen C.

    2014-01-01

    Bone turnover in vivo is regulated by mechanical forces such as shear stress originating from interstitial oscillatory fluid flow (OFF), and bone cells in vitro respond to mechanical loading. However, the mechanisms by which bone cells sense mechanical forces, resulting in increased mineral deposition, are not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the primary cilium in mechanosensing by osteoblasts. MLO-A5 murine osteoblasts were cultured in monolayer and subjected to two different OFF regimens: 5 short (2 h daily) bouts of OFF followed by morphological analysis of primary cilia; or exposure to chloral hydrate to damage or remove primary cilia and 2 short bouts (2 h on consecutive days) of OFF. Primary cilia were shorter and there were fewer cilia per cell after exposure to periods of OFF compared with static controls. Damage or removal of primary cilia inhibited OFF-induced PGE2 release into the medium and mineral deposition, assayed by Alizarin red staining. We conclude that primary cilia are important mediators of OFF-induced mineral deposition, which has relevance for the design of bone tissue engineering strategies and may inform clinical treatments of bone disorders causes by load-deficiency.—Delaine-Smith, R. M., Sittichokechaiwut, A., Reilly, G. C. Primary cilia respond to fluid shear stress and mediate flow-induced calcium deposition in osteoblasts. PMID:24097311

  1. Recalibration of the Shear Stress Transport Model to Improve Calculation of Shock Separated Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Yoder, Dennis A.

    2013-01-01

    The Menter Shear Stress Transport (SST) k . turbulence model is one of the most widely used two-equation Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes turbulence models for aerodynamic analyses. The model extends Menter s baseline (BSL) model to include a limiter that prevents the calculated turbulent shear stress from exceeding a prescribed fraction of the turbulent kinetic energy via a proportionality constant, a1, set to 0.31. Compared to other turbulence models, the SST model yields superior predictions of mild adverse pressure gradient flows including those with small separations. In shock - boundary layer interaction regions, the SST model produces separations that are too large while the BSL model is on the other extreme, predicting separations that are too small. In this paper, changing a1 to a value near 0.355 is shown to significantly improve predictions of shock separated flows. Several cases are examined computationally and experimental data is also considered to justify raising the value of a1 used for shock separated flows.

  2. Impact of Wall Shear Stress and Pressure Variation on the Stability of Atherosclerotic Plaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taviani, V.; Li, Z. Y.; Sutcliffe, M.; Gillard, J.

    Rupture of vulnerable atheromatous plaque in the carotid and coronary arteries often leads to stroke and heart attack respectively. The mechanism of blood flow and plaque rupture in stenotic arteries is still not fully understood. A three dimensional rigid wall model was solved under steady and unsteady conditions assuming a time-varying inlet velocity profile to investigate the relative importance of axial forces and pressure drops in arteries with asymmetric stenosis. Flow-structure interactions were investigated for the same geometry and the results were compared with those retrieved with the corresponding one dimensional models. The Navier-Stokes equations were used as the governing equations for the fluid. The tube wall was assumed linearly elastic, homogeneous isotropic. The analysis showed that wall shear stress is small (less than 3.5%) with respect to pressure drop throughout the cycle even for severe stenosis. On the contrary, the three dimensional behavior of velocity, pressure and wall shear stress is in general very different from that predicted by one dimensional models. This suggests that the primary source of mistakes in one dimensional studies comes from neglecting the three dimensional geometry of the plaque. Neglecting axial forces only involves minor errors.

  3. Constitutive model for shear yield stress of magnetorheological fluid based on the concept of state transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela-Jiménez, M. I.; Vargas Luna, J. L.; Cortés-Ramírez, J. A.; Song, G.

    2015-04-01

    Magnetorheological fluid (MRF) is a smart material whose rheological properties can be varied by a magnetic field; it has been applied in the development of semiactive dampers for a variety of applications. The material essentially consists of a suspension of magnetic particles in a nonmagnetic carrier fluid. It is important to understand the magnetic response of MRF and its dependence on several parameters for improving and designing MRF devices. The purpose of this work is to develop a constitutive model that describes the behavior of the shear yield stress of the material as function of the magnetic field and composition. Taking into account that the material changes its rheology and apparent viscosity according to magnetic field, a magnetically induced state transition is proposed; by the use of a state transition equation, a constitutive model for shear yield stress is defined, consisting of an expression that relates composition of the material and the stimulus applied, it also associates the volume fraction of particles, magnetic field and the material that composes the particles.

  4. Scaffold-free cartilage subjected to frictional shear stress demonstrates damage by cracking and surface peeling

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, G. Adam; Jayaraman, Karthik; Dennis, James E.; Mansour, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    Scaffold-free engineered cartilage is being explored as a treatment for osteoarthritis. In this study, frictional shear stress was applied to determine the friction and damage behavior of scaffold-free engineered cartilage, and tissue composition was investigated as it relates to damage. Scaffold-free engineered cartilage frictional shear stress was found to exhibit a time-varying response similar to that of native cartilage. However, damage occurred which was not seen in native cartilage, manifesting primarily as tearing through the central plane of the constructs. In engineered cartilage, cells occupied a significantly larger portion of the tissue in the central region where damage was most prominent (18 ± 3% of tissue was comprised of cells in the central region vs. 5 ± 1% in the peripheral region, p < 0.0001). In native cartilage, cells comprised between 1% and 4% of tissue for all regions. Average bulk cellularity of engineered cartilage was also greater (68 × 103 ± 4 × 103 vs. 52 × 103 ± 22 × 103 cells/mg), though this difference was not significant. Bulk tissue comparisons showed significant differences between engineered and native cartilage in hydroxyproline content (8 ± 2 vs. 45 ± 3 ?g HYP/mg dry weight), solid content (12.5 ± 0.4% vs. 17.9 ± 1.2%), shear modulus (0.06 ± 0.02 vs. 0.15 ± 0.07 MPa), and aggregate modulus (0.12 ± 0.03 vs. 0.32 ± 0.14 MPa respectively). These data indicate that enhanced collagen content and more uniform extracellular matrix distribution are necessary to reduce damage susceptibility. PMID:24965503

  5. A Microfluidic-Based Multi-Shear Device for Investigating the Effects of Low Fluid-Induced Stresses on Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Weiliang; Qu, Hong; Hu, Guoqing; Zhang, Qian; Song, Kui; Guan, Haijie; Liu, Tingjiao; Qin, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    Interstitial fluid flow (IFF) within the extracellular matrix (ECM) produces low magnitude shear stresses on cells. Fluid flow-induced stress (FSS) plays an important role during tissue morphogenesis. To investigate the effect of low FSS generated by IFF on cells, we developed a microfluidic-based cell culture device that can generate multiple low shear stresses. By changing the length and width of the flow-in channels, different continuous low level shear stresses could be generated in individual cell culture chambers. Numerical calculations demonstrate uniform shear stress distributions of the major cell culture area of each chamber. This calculation is further confirmed by the wall shear stress curves. The effects of low FSS on MC3T3-E1 proliferation and differentiation were studied using this device. It was found that FSS ranging from 1.5 to 52.6 µPa promoted MC3T3-E1 proliferation and differentiation, but FSS over 412 µPa inhibited the proliferation and differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells. FSS ranging from 1.5 to 52.6 µPa also increased the expression of Runx2, a key transcription factor regulating osteoblast differentiation. It is suggested that Runx2 might be an important regulator in low FSS-induced MC3T3-E1 differentiation. This device allows for detailed study of the effect of low FSS on the behaviors of cells; thus, it would be a useful tool for analysis of the effects of IFF-induced shear stresses on cells. PMID:24587156

  6. Surface morphology of platelet adhesion influenced by activators, inhibitors and shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Melanie Groan

    Platelet activation involves multiple events, one of which is the generation and release of nitric oxide (NO), a platelet aggregation inhibitor. Platelets simultaneously send and receive various agents that promote a positive and negative feedback control system during hemostasis. Although the purpose of platelet-derived NO is not fully understood, NO is known to inhibit platelet recruitment. NO's relatively large diffusion coefficient allows it to diffuse more rapidly than platelet agonists. It may thus be able to inhibit recruitment of platelets near the periphery of a growing thrombus before agonists have substantially accumulated in those regions. Results from two studies in our laboratory differed in the extent to which platelet-derived NO decreased platelet adhesion. Frilot studied the effect of L-arginine (L-A) and NG-Methyl-L-arginine acetate salt (L-NMMA) on platelet adhesion to collagen under static conditions in a Petri dish. Eshaq examined the percent coverage on collagen-coated and fibrinogen-coated microchannels under shear conditions with different levels of L-A and Adenosine Diphosphate (ADP). Frilot's results showed no effect of either L-A or L-NMMA on surface coverage, thrombus size or serotonin release, while Eshaq's results showed a decrease in surface coverage with increased levels of L-A. A possible explanation for these contrasting results is that platelet-derived NO may be more important under flow conditions than under static conditions. For this project, the effects of L-A. ADP and L-NMMA on platelet adhesion were studied at varying shear stresses on protein-coated glass slides. The surface exposed to platelet-rich-plasma in combination with each chemical solution was observed under AFM, FE-SEM and fluorescence microscopy. Quantitative and qualitative comparisons of images obtained with these techniques confirmed the presence of platelets on the protein coatings. AFM images of fibrinogen and collagen-coated slides presented characteristic differences. Adhered platelets were identified, particularly with the AFM. The effects of chemical additives were examined under the same microscopy techniques. The resulting fluorescent microscopy data suggests statistical differences between the percent surface coverage of different shear regions on the glass slides. No statistically significant change in surface coverage was found with the addition of ADP on fibrinogen-coated slides, but showed differences on collagen with all chemicals. However, in high shear regions. L-A produced a significant decrease in platelet adhesion and L-NMMA produced a statistically significant increase in platelet adhesion on fibrinogen and collagen-coated slides. The AFM images of the chemical additives provided no differences between one another except with ADP. The no shear and low shear conditions provided no variations between AFM images via visual confirmation and statistical significance. The only AFM image shear region differences were obtained from low to high shear regions and static to high shear regions comparisons. The objective of this project was to determine whether the static conditions used by Frilot and the dynamic conditions used by Eshaq could explain the different effects of L-A observed in those studies. In addition, the ability of the fluorescent imaging technique to quantify platelet adhesion was examined by comparison of fluorescent imaging to AFM and FE-SEM. The results of this study were consistent with both the lack of an effect of chemical additives under static conditions reported by Frilot and the reduction of platelet adhesion in response to L-A reported by Eshaq.

  7. Endothelin receptor B-mediated induction of c-jun and AP-1 in response to shear stress in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Morawietz, H; Wagner, A H; Hecker, M; Goettsch, W

    2008-08-01

    In vivo, endothelial cells are constantly exposed to shear stress by flowing blood. Short-term exposure of endothelial cells to shear stress has been shown to induce endothelin-1 release. It is currently unknown, however, whether this shear stress-dependent endothelin-1 release affects the expression and activity of transcription factors. In this study, primary cultures of human endothelial cells from the umbilical vein were exposed to laminar shear stress in a cone-and-plate viscometer. Laminar shear stress for 30 min induced a 2-fold increase in mRNA expression of c-jun , but not c-fos, in human endothelial cells. Blockade of endothelin receptor subtype B (ET B) with BQ788 prevented this shear stress-dependent induction of c-jun expression. The induction of c-jun by shear stress involved protein kinase C and endothelial NO synthase. In addition, exposure of endothelial cells to arterial laminar shear stress for 1 h increased the binding of transcription factor AP-1 to its consensus sequence by 1.7-fold in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. This induction was also mediated by an ET B-dependent pathway. Supershift analysis supports an AP-1 complex containing c-jun, but not c-fos, in human endothelial cells. In conclusion, our data suggest endothelin-1-mediated induction of c-jun expression and activation of AP-1 (possibly as a c-jun homodimer) by laminar shear stress in human endothelial cells. PMID:18758496

  8. Evaluation of the interfacial shear strength and residual stress of TiAlN coating on ZIRLO™ fuel cladding using a modified shear-lag model approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Bhamji, I.; Withers, P. J.; Wolfe, D. E.; Motta, A. T.; Preuss, M.

    2015-11-01

    This paper investigates the residual stresses and interfacial shear strength of a TiAlN coating on Zr-Nb-Sn-Fe alloy (ZIRLO™) substrate designed to improve corrosion resistance of fuel cladding used in water-cooled nuclear reactors, both during normal and exceptional conditions, e.g. a loss of coolant event (LOCA). The distribution and maximum value of the interfacial shear strength has been estimated using a modified shear-lag model. The parameters critical to this analysis were determined experimentally. From these input parameters the interfacial shear strength between the TiAlN coating and ZIRLO™ substrate was inferred to be around 120 MPa. It is worth noting that the apparent strength of the coating is high (?3.4 GPa). However, this is predominantly due to the large compressive residuals stress (3 GPa in compression), which must be overcome for the coating to fail in tension, which happens at a load just 150 MPa in excess of this.

  9. Measuring the Shear-Tension Coupling of Engineering Fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdiwi, F.; Harrison, P.; Guo, Z.; Potluri, P.; Yu, W. R.

    2011-05-01

    Modelling the forming process of engineering fabrics and textile composites using a mechanical approach, such as FEM, requires characterisation of material behaviour. Using Picture Frame (PF) tests, several previous studies have reported a coupling between in-plane tension and fabric shear compliance. However, characterising this behaviour accurately has proven problematic due to the sensitivity of the PF test to small fabric misalignments in the test rig, prompting innovative solutions such as the use of load-cells mounted on the side bars of the PF rig to measure in-plane tension during testing. This paper focuses on an alternative testing technique, the Biaxial Bias Extension test, as a means to investigate this coupling. The approach has several benefits including simple equipment requirements, the ability to vary sample dimensions and boundary conditions. The main difficulty lies in extracting the material contribution to the recorded signal. To do this, an experimental method is demonstrated using two very different textiles; glass fabric and self-reinforced polypropylene both plain weaves. The latter is challenging to characterise and was chosen due to its high propensity to wrinkle at room temperature.

  10. Measuring the Shear-Tension Coupling of Engineering Fabrics

    SciTech Connect

    Abdiwi, F.; Harrison, P.; Guo, Z.; Yu, W. R.; Potluri, P.

    2011-05-04

    Modelling the forming process of engineering fabrics and textile composites using a mechanical approach, such as FEM, requires characterisation of material behaviour. Using Picture Frame (PF) tests, several previous studies have reported a coupling between in-plane tension and fabric shear compliance. However, characterising this behaviour accurately has proven problematic due to the sensitivity of the PF test to small fabric misalignments in the test rig, prompting innovative solutions such as the use of load-cells mounted on the side bars of the PF rig to measure in-plane tension during testing. This paper focuses on an alternative testing technique, the Biaxial Bias Extension test, as a means to investigate this coupling. The approach has several benefits including simple equipment requirements, the ability to vary sample dimensions and boundary conditions. The main difficulty lies in extracting the material contribution to the recorded signal. To do this, an experimental method is demonstrated using two very different textiles; glass fabric and self-reinforced polypropylene both plain weaves. The latter is challenging to characterise and was chosen due to its high propensity to wrinkle at room temperature.

  11. Stress Measurements in Shock-Loaded PBX 9501 with Embedded Longitudinal and Lateral Piezoresistive Ytterbium Gauges

    SciTech Connect

    D.E. Hooks

    2004-12-15

    A series of light gas gun impact experiments were performed with piezoresistive ytterbium (Yb) gauges in longitudinal and lateral orientations embedded in the plastic bonded explosive PBX 9501. These experiments were performed to evaluate the feasibility of using this method to measure lateral stresses and shear strength dynamically in PBX 9501. Ytterbium was chosen as a gauge material based on its high piezoresistance changes at low stress levels. Experiments were performed at longitudinal impact stresses of approximately 0.6 GPa, which is above the yield point of Yb, near the dynamic yield point of PBX 9501, at a level that is comparable with other impact data, and relevant to several multidimensional safety tests. Results show that PBX 9501 does maintain strength throughout compression. Because of poor reproducibility observed in the experiments presented, it appears unlikely that stress extraction from these gauge results would yield an estimate of shear strength at this impact stress with acceptable error.

  12. Dynamic Jamming Point for Shear Thickening Suspensions Eric Brown and Heinrich M. Jaeger

    E-print Network

    Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    when the shear is removed. Reported shear thickening fluids are usually densely packed colloids measured in some shear thickening fluids [9], no link has been established between such yield stress and the observed shear thickening behav- ior. Some shear thickening fluids have been reported to exhibit seemingly

  13. Microbioreactors to manipulate oxygen tension and shear stress in the microenvironment of vascular stem and progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Abaci, Hasan E; Devendra, Raghavendra; Soman, Rohan; Drazer, German; Gerecht, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of dissolved oxygen (DO) and shear stress in the vasculature microenvironment play a major role in determining the fate of stem cells in adults and during early embryonic development. In this study, we present a microbioreactor (MBR) that provides independent control over oxygen tension and shear stress in cultures of stem and progenitor cell types. We first describe the design principles and use a model-driven approach for the optimization of the MBR geometry and operating conditions prior to its fabrication and assembly. We then demonstrate the utilization of the MBR for culturing adult human endothelial progenitors, human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and human embryonic stem cell-derived smooth muscle cells under different DO and shear stress levels. PMID:23586790

  14. Error propagation for velocity and shear stress prediction using 2D models for environmental management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasternack, Gregory B.; Gilbert, Andrew T.; Wheaton, Joseph M.; Buckland, Evan M.

    2006-08-01

    SummaryResource managers, scientists, government regulators, and stakeholders are considering sophisticated numerical models for managing complex environmental problems. In this study, observations from a river-rehabilitation experiment involving gravel augmentation and spawning habitat enhancement were used to assess sources and magnitudes of error in depth, velocity, and shear velocity predictions made at the 1-m scale with a commercial two-dimensional (depth-averaged) model. Error in 2D model depth prediction averaged 21%. This error was attributable to topographic survey resolution, which at 1 pt per 1.14 m 2, was inadequate to resolve small humps and depressions influencing point measurements. Error in 2D model velocity prediction averaged 29%. More than half of this error was attributable to depth prediction error. Despite depth and velocity error, 56% of tested 2D model predictions of shear velocity were within the 95% confidence limit of the best field-based estimation method. Ninety percent of the error in shear velocity prediction was explained by velocity prediction error. Multiple field-based estimates of shear velocity differed by up to 160%, so the lower error for the 2D model's predictions suggests such models are at least as accurate as field measurement. 2D models enable detailed, spatially distributed estimates compared to the small number measurable in a field campaign of comparable cost. They also can be used for design evaluation. Although such numerical models are limited to channel types adhering to model assumptions and yield predictions only accurate to ˜20-30%, they can provide a useful tool for river-rehabilitation design and assessment, including spatially diverse habitat heterogeneity as well as for pre- and post-project appraisal.

  15. MiR-21 is induced in endothelial cells by shear stress and modulates apoptosis and eNOS activity

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Martina; Baker, Meredith B.; Moore, Jeffrey P.; Searles, Charles D.

    2010-03-19

    Mechanical forces associated with blood flow play an important role in regulating vascular signaling and gene expression in endothelial cells (ECs). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of noncoding RNAs that posttranscriptionally regulate the expression of genes involved in diverse cell functions, including differentiation, growth, proliferation, and apoptosis. miRNAs are known to have an important role in modulating EC biology, but their expression and functions in cells subjected to shear stress conditions are unknown. We sought to determine the miRNA expression profile in human ECs subjected to unidirectional shear stress and define the role of miR-21 in shear stress-induced changes in EC function. TLDA array and qRT-PCR analysis performed on HUVECs exposed to prolonged unidirectional shear stress (USS, 24 h, 15 dynes/cm{sup 2}) identified 13 miRNAs whose expression was significantly upregulated (p < 0.05). The miRNA with the greatest change was miR-21; it was increased 5.2-fold (p = 0.002) in USS-treated versus control cells. Western analysis demonstrated that PTEN, a known target of miR-21, was downregulated in HUVECs exposed to USS or transfected with pre-miR-21. Importantly, HUVECs overexpressing miR-21 had decreased apoptosis and increased eNOS phosphorylation and nitric oxide (NO{sup {center_dot}}) production. These data demonstrate that shear stress forces regulate the expression of miRNAs in ECs, and that miR-21 influences endothelial biology by decreasing apoptosis and activating the NO{sup {center_dot}} pathway. These studies advance our understanding of the mechanisms by which shear stress forces modulate vascular homeostasis.

  16. The production of nitric oxide and prostaglandin E(2) by primary bone cells is shear stress dependent.

    PubMed

    Bakker, A D; Soejima, K; Klein-Nulend, J; Burger, E H

    2001-05-01

    Loading-induced flow of interstitial fluid through the lacuno-canalicular network is a likely signal for bone cell adaptive responses. However, the nature of the stimulus that activates the cell is debated. Candidate stimuli include wall shear stress, streaming potentials, and chemotransport. We have addressed the nature of the flow-derived cell stimulus by comparing variations in fluid transport with variations in wall shear stress, using nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) production as a parameter of bone cell activation. Adult mouse long bone cell cultures were treated for 15min with or without pulsating fluid flow using the following regimes: Low PFF, mean flow rate 0.20 cm(3)/s, 3 Hz, shear stress 0.4+/-0.12 Pa; Medium PFF, 0.33 cm(3)/s, 5 Hz, 0.6+/-0.27 Pa; and High PFF, 0.63 cm(3)/s, 9Hz, 1.2+/-0.37 Pa. In some Low PFF experiments, 2.8% neutral dextran (mol. wt. 4.98x10(4)) was added to the flow medium to increase the viscosity, thereby increasing the wall shear stress 3-fold to a level similar of the High PFF stimulus, but without affecting streaming potentials or chemotransport. NO and PGE(2) production were stimulated by Low, Medium, and High PFF in a dose-dependent manner. Application of Low PFF using dextran-supplemented medium, enhanced both the NO and PGE(2) response by 3-fold, to a level mimicking the response to High PFF at normal viscosity. These results show that the production of NO and PGE(2) by bone cells can be enhanced in a dose-dependent manner by fluid flow of increasing wall shear stress. Therefore, the stimulus leading to NO and PGE(2) production is the flow-derived shear stress, and not streaming potentials or chemotransport. PMID:11311708

  17. The auto-correlation function of the extragalactic background light. I. Measuring gravitational shear.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Waerbeke, L.; Mellier, Y.; Schneider, P.; Fort, B.; Mathez, G.

    1997-01-01

    A new method for measuring the shear induced by gravitational light deflection is proposed. It is based on analyzing the anisotropy induced in the auto-correlation function of the extragalactic background light which is produced by very faint distant galaxies. The auto-correlation function can be measured `locally', and its anisotropy is caused by the tidal gravitational field of the deflecting mass distribution in the foreground of these faint background galaxies. Since the method does not require individual galaxy detection, it can be used to measure the shear of extremely faint galaxies which are not detectable individually, but are present in the noise. The shear estimated from the auto-correlation function of the image provides an independent measurement which can be compared to the shear obtained from the distortion of individual galaxy images. Combining these two independent estimates clearly increases the sensitivity of shear measurements. In addition, our new method may allow to determine the local magnification caused by the deflector if the auto-correlation function is caused by a large number density of faint galaxies; in this case, the intrinsic auto-correlation function may provide a `standard source' with respect to which shear and magnification can be obtained. Applications to real and synthetic data are shown and the feasibility of our new method is demonstrated. In particular, we present the shear maps obtained with our new method for the double QSO 2345+007 and the cluster Cl0024+16 and compare them to published shear maps.

  18. Scaling of viscous shear zones with depth-dependent viscosity and power-law stress-strain-rate dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, James D. P.; Parsons, Barry

    2015-07-01

    One of the unresolved questions concerning fault deformation is the degree and cause of localization of shear at depth beneath a fault. Geologic observations of exhumed shear zones indicate that while the motion is no longer planar, it can still be localized near the down-dip extension of the fault; however, the degree of localization is uncertain. We employ simple analytic and numerical models to investigate the structural form of distributed shear beneath a strike-slip fault, and the relative importance of the physical mechanisms that have the potential to localize a shear zone. For a purely depth dependent viscosity, ? = ?0 exp (-z/z0), we find that a shear zone develops with a half-width ? _w˜ ?{z_0} for small z0 at the base of the layer, where lengths are non-dimensionalized by the layer thickness (d km). Including a non-linear stress-strain-rate relation (dot{? }? ? ^n) scales ?w by 1/?{n}, comparable to deformation length scales in thin viscous sheet calculations. We find that the primary control on the shear-zone width is the depth dependence of viscosity that arises from the temperature dependence of viscosity and the increase in temperature with depth. As this relationship is exponential, scaling relations give a dimensional half-width that scales approximately as tilde{?}_w? T_{1/2}?{Rd/nQ? } km, where T_{1/2} (K) is the temperature at the midpoint of the layer, R (J mol-1 K-1) the gas constant, Q (J mol-1) the activation energy and ? (K km-1) the geothermal gradient. This relation predicts the numerical results for the parameter range consistent with continental rheologies to within 2-5 per cent and shear-zone half-widths from 2 to 6 km. The inclusion of shear-stress heating reduces ?w by only an additional 5-25 per cent, depending on the initial width of the shear zone. While the width of the shear zone may not decrease significantly, local temperature increases from shear-stress heating range from 50 to 300 °C resulting in a reduction in viscosities beneath the fault of several orders of magnitude and a concomitant reduction in the stresses needed to drive the motion.

  19. An Intriguing Empirical Rule for Computing The First Normal Stress Difference from Steady Shear Viscosity Data for Polymer Solutions and Melts

    E-print Network

    shear rate viscosity. The Cox-Merz rule often fails for complex fluids that exhibit deformation/yielding materials as well as shear thickening materials (Doraiswamy et al. 1991, Gleissle and Hochstein 20031 An Intriguing Empirical Rule for Computing The First Normal Stress Difference from Steady Shear

  20. Rock Joint Surfaces Measurement and Analysis of Aperture Distribution under Different Normal and Shear Loading Using GIS

    E-print Network

    Sharifzadeh, Mostafa; Esaki, Tetsuro

    2009-01-01

    Geometry of the rock joint is a governing factor for joint mechanical and hydraulic behavior. A new method of evaluating aperture distribution based on measurement of joint surfaces and three dimensional characteristics of each surface is developed. Artificial joint of granite surfaces are measured,processed, analyzed and three dimensional approaches are carried out for surface characterization. Parameters such as asperity's heights, slope angles, and aspects distribution at micro scale,local concentration of elements and their spatial localization at local scale are determined by Geographic Information System (GIS). Changes of aperture distribution at different normal stresses and various shear displacements are visualized and interpreted. Increasing normal load causes negative changes in aperture frequency distribution which indicates high joint matching. However, increasing shear displacement causes a rapid increase in the aperture and positive changes in the aperture frequency distribution which could be ...

  1. Ultrasonics used to measure residual stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Ultrasonic method is used to measure residual stress in metal structures. By using this method, various forms of wave propagation in metals are possible, and more thorough analysis of complex geometric structures may be had.

  2. Simulation of two- and three-dimensional dense-fluid shear flows via nonequilibrium molecular dynamics: Comparison of time-and-space-averaged stresses from homogeneous Doll's and Sllod shear algorithms with those from boundary-driven shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Wm. G.; Hoover, Carol G.; Petravic, Janka

    2008-10-01

    Homogeneous shear flows (with constant strainrate dvx/dy ) are generated with the Doll’s and Sllod algorithms and compared to corresponding inhomogeneous boundary-driven flows. We use one-, two-, and three-dimensional smooth-particle weight functions for computing instantaneous spatial averages. The nonlinear normal-stress differences are small, but significant, in both two and three space dimensions. In homogeneous systems the sign and magnitude of the shearplane stress difference, Pxx-Pyy , depend on both the thermostat type and the chosen shearflow algorithm. The Doll’s and Sllod algorithms predict opposite signs for this normal-stress difference, with the Sllod approach definitely wrong, but somewhat closer to the (boundary-driven) truth. Neither of the homogeneous shear algorithms predicts the correct ordering of the kinetic temperatures: Txx>Tzz>Tyy .

  3. Stress state in the upper crust around the source region of the 1891 Nobi earthquake through shear wave polarization anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiramatsu, Yoshihiro; Iidaka, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    We investigate shear wave polarization anisotropy in the upper crust around the source region of the 1891 Nobi earthquake, central Japan. At most stations, the orientation of the faster polarized shear wave is parallel to the axes of the maximum horizontal compressional strain rate and stress, indicating that stress-induced anisotropy is dominant in the analyzed region. Furthermore, near the source faults, the orientation of the faster polarized shear wave is oblique to the strike of the source faults. This suggests that microcracks parallel to the strike of the source fault, which would be produced by the fault movement of the Nobi earthquake, have healed with the healing of the faults. For stress-induced anisotropy, time delays normalized by path length in the anisotropic upper crust as a function of the differential strain rate are coincident with those in the inland high strain rate zone, Japan. These data, together with those of a previous study, show that the variation in the stressing rate, estimated from shear wave splitting, is close to that estimated from geodetic observation. This implies that the variation in the stressing rate in the brittle upper crust is linked to that in the strain rate on the ground surface.

  4. A Multi-scale Refined Zigzag Theory for Multilayered Composite and Sandwich Plates with Improved Transverse Shear Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iurlaro, Luigi; Gherlone, Marco; Di Sciuva, Marco; Tessler, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The Refined Zigzag Theory (RZT) enables accurate predictions of the in-plane displacements, strains, and stresses. The transverse shear stresses obtained from constitutive equations are layer-wise constant. Although these transverse shear stresses are generally accurate in the average, layer-wise sense, they are nevertheless discontinuous at layer interfaces, and thus they violate the requisite interlaminar continuity of transverse stresses. Recently, Tessler applied Reissner's mixed variational theorem and RZT kinematic assumptions to derive an accurate and efficient shear-deformation theory for homogeneous, laminated composite, and sandwich beams, called RZT(m), where "m" stands for "mixed". Herein, the RZT(m) for beams is extended to plate analysis, where two alternative assumptions for the transverse shear stresses field are examined: the first follows Tessler's formulation, whereas the second is based on Murakami's polynomial approach. Results for elasto-static simply supported and cantilever plates demonstrate that Tessler's formulation results in a powerful and efficient structural theory that is well-suited for the analysis of multilayered composite and sandwich panels.

  5. The role of the glycocalyx in reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton under fluid shear stress: a "bumper-car" model.

    PubMed

    Thi, Mia M; Tarbell, John M; Weinbaum, Sheldon; Spray, David C

    2004-11-23

    We propose a conceptual model for the cytoskeletal organization of endothelial cells (ECs) based on a major dichotomy in structure and function at basal and apical aspects of the cells. Intracellular distributions of filamentous actin (F-actin), vinculin, paxillin, ZO-1, and Cx43 were analyzed from confocal micrographs of rat fat-pad ECs after 5 h of shear stress. With intact glycocalyx, there was severe disruption of the dense peripheral actin bands (DPABs) and migration of vinculin to cell borders under a uniform shear stress (10.5 dyne/cm2; 1 dyne = 10 microN). This behavior was augmented in corner flow regions of the flow chamber where high shear stress gradients were present. In striking contrast, no such reorganization was observed if the glycocalyx was compromised. These results are explained in terms of a "bumper-car" model, in which the actin cortical web and DPAB are only loosely connected to basal attachment sites, allowing for two distinct cellular signaling pathways in response to fluid shear stress, one transmitted by glycocalyx core proteins as a torque that acts on the actin cortical web (ACW) and DPAB, and the other emanating from focal adhesions and stress fibers at the basal and apical membranes of the cell. PMID:15545600

  6. Ultrasound velocimetry in a shear-thickening wormlike micellar solution: Evidence for the coexistence of radial and vorticity shear bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herle, V.; Manneville, S.; Fischer, P.

    2008-05-01

    We carried out pointwise local velocity measurements on 40mM cetylpyridinium chloride-sodium salicylate (CPyCl-NaSal) wormlike micellar solution using high-frequency ultrasound velocimetry in a Couette shear cell. The studied wormlike solution exhibits Newtonian, shear-thinning and shear-thickening rheological behavior in a stress-controlled environment. Previous rheology, flow visualization and small-angle light/neutron scattering experiments in the shear-thickening regime of this system showed the presence of stress-driven alternating transparent and turbid rings or vorticity bands along the axis of the Couette geometry. Through local velocity measurements we observe a homogeneous flow inside the 1mm gap of the Couette cell in the shear-thinning (stress-plateau) region. Only when the solution is sheared beyond the critical shear stress (shear-thickening regime) in a stress-controlled experiment, we observe inhomogeneous flow characterized by radial or velocity gradient shear bands with a highly sheared band near the rotor and a weakly sheared band near the stator of the Couette geometry. Furthermore, fast measurements performed in the shear-thickening regime to capture the temporal evolution of local velocities indicate coexistence of both radial and vorticity shear bands. However the same measurements carried out in shear rate controlled mode of the rheometer do not show such rheological complexity.

  7. Measurement of the shear strength of pure tungsten during one-dimensional shock loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millett, J. C. F.; Gray, G. T.; Bourne, N. K.

    2007-02-01

    The behavior of a pure tungsten under conditions of one-dimensional shock loading has been monitored using Manganin stress gauges, in longitudinal and lateral orientations. The shock induced equation of state, in terms of stress and particle velocity (from the longitudinal gauges), shows that the Hugoniot of this pure material agrees with the results of previous workers, both in pure tungsten and tungsten alloys. Lateral stress traces show an increase in stress (and hence decrease in shear strength) behind the shock front, in a manner similar to that observed in a tungsten heavy alloy and pure tantalum. It has been proposed that this is due to the high Peierl's stress initially restricting dislocation generation, followed by a later increased in dislocation density. However, the brittle manner in which tungsten fails under shock loading indicates that other mechanisms are in operation. It has been suggested that the shock front nucleates cracking, which progressively grows behind it, which in combination with the proposed dislocation mechanisms reduces shear strength. Finally, we show that the variation of shear strength with shock stress is in agreement with a number of other workers until a stress level of ˜10GPa, where it is significantly higher. We have suggested that this is due to the higher strength of pure tungsten compared to the liquid phase sintered materials studied previously.

  8. A dynamic jamming point for shear thickening suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Eric; Jaeger, Heinrich

    2008-11-01

    Densely packed suspensions can shear thicken, in which the viscosity increases with shear rate. We performed rheometry measurements on two model systems: corn starch in water and glass spheres in oils. In both systems we observed shear thickening up to a critical packing fraction ?c (=0.55 for spherical grains) above which the flow abruptly transitions to shear thinning. The viscosity and yield stress diverge as power laws at ?c. Extrapolating the dynamic ranges of shear rate and stress in the shear thickening regime up to ?c suggests a finite change in shear stress with zero change in shear rate. This is a dynamic analog to the jamming point with a yield stress at zero shear rate.

  9. Residual stresses in silicon carbide-zircon composites from thermal expansion measurements and fiber pushout tests

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, S.K.; Kumar, S.; Singh, R.N. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1994-12-01

    Coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) in the axial direction of two types of SiC fibers, monolithic zircon, monolithic SiC, and several SiC[sub f]-zircon composites were measured in the temperature range of 50 to 1,380 C. The measured CTE values of composites were compared with values predicted by the rule-of-mixtures approach, and a small difference in measured and calculated values was ascribed to the nature of interfacial bonding and assumptions implicit in the rule-of-mixture approach. Fiber pushout tests were performed on these composites and the residual stresses were extracted from the analysis of the load-displacement plots in terms of the shear-lag and progressive debonding models. The radial and axial residual stresses arising from the mismatch in CTE were calculated and compared with values obtained from the fiber pushout tests. The fiber pushout tests in general produced lower values of the residual stresses, but the residual stresses obtained using shear-lag analysis were in good agreement with the calculated values based on the CTE mismatch in composites with lower values of the interfacial shear stress. The influence of anisotropic fiber expansion in the radial and axial directions on the radial and axial residual stresses in composites were also examined.

  10. Drive current enhancement in p-type metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors under shear uniaxial stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shifren, L.; Wang, X.; Matagne, P.; Obradovic, B.; Auth, C.; Cea, S.; Ghani, T.; He, J.; Hoffman, T.; Kotlyar, R.; Ma, Z.; Mistry, K.; Nagisetty, R.; Shaheed, R.; Stettler, M.; Weber, C.; Giles, M. D.

    2004-12-01

    Recent attention has been given to metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) device designs that utilize stress to achieve performance gain in both n-type MOSFETs (NMOS) and p-type MOSFETs (PMOS). The physics behind NMOS gain is better understood than that of PMOS gain, which has received less attention. In this letter, we describe the warping phenomena which is responsible for the gain seen in [110] uniaxially stressed PMOS devices on [100] orientated wafers. We also demonstrate that shear uniaxial stress in PMOS is better suited to MOSFET applications than biaxial stress as it is able to maintain gain at high vertical and lateral fields.

  11. Bone morphogenic protein 4 produced in endothelial cells by oscillatory shear stress stimulates an inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Sorescu, George P; Sykes, Michelle; Weiss, Daiana; Platt, Manu O; Saha, Aniket; Hwang, Jinah; Boyd, Nolan; Boo, Yong C; Vega, J David; Taylor, W Robert; Jo, Hanjoong

    2003-08-15

    Atherosclerosis is now viewed as an inflammatory disease occurring preferentially in arterial regions exposed to disturbed flow conditions, including oscillatory shear stress (OS), in branched arteries. In contrast, the arterial regions exposed to laminar shear (LS) are relatively lesion-free. The mechanisms underlying the opposite effects of OS and LS on the inflammatory and atherogenic processes are not clearly understood. Here, through DNA microarrays, protein expression, and functional studies, we identify bone morphogenic protein 4 (BMP4) as a mechanosensitive and pro-inflammatory gene product. Exposing endothelial cells to OS increased BMP4 protein expression, whereas LS decreased it. In addition, we found BMP4 expression only in the selective patches of endothelial cells overlying foam cell lesions in human coronary arteries. The same endothelial patches also expressed higher levels of intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) protein compared with those of non-diseased areas. Functionally, we show that OS and BMP4 induced ICAM-1 expression and monocyte adhesion by a NFkappaB-dependent mechanism. We suggest that BMP4 is a mechanosensitive, inflammatory factor playing a critical role in early steps of atherogenesis in the lesion-prone areas. PMID:12766166

  12. Bone morphogenic protein 4 produced in endothelial cells by oscillatory shear stress stimulates an inflammatory response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorescu, George P.; Sykes, Michelle; Weiss, Daiana; Platt, Manu O.; Saha, Aniket; Hwang, Jinah; Boyd, Nolan; Boo, Yong C.; Vega, J. David; Taylor, W. Robert; Jo, Hanjoong

    2003-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is now viewed as an inflammatory disease occurring preferentially in arterial regions exposed to disturbed flow conditions, including oscillatory shear stress (OS), in branched arteries. In contrast, the arterial regions exposed to laminar shear (LS) are relatively lesion-free. The mechanisms underlying the opposite effects of OS and LS on the inflammatory and atherogenic processes are not clearly understood. Here, through DNA microarrays, protein expression, and functional studies, we identify bone morphogenic protein 4 (BMP4) as a mechanosensitive and pro-inflammatory gene product. Exposing endothelial cells to OS increased BMP4 protein expression, whereas LS decreased it. In addition, we found BMP4 expression only in the selective patches of endothelial cells overlying foam cell lesions in human coronary arteries. The same endothelial patches also expressed higher levels of intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) protein compared with those of non-diseased areas. Functionally, we show that OS and BMP4 induced ICAM-1 expression and monocyte adhesion by a NFkappaB-dependent mechanism. We suggest that BMP4 is a mechanosensitive, inflammatory factor playing a critical role in early steps of atherogenesis in the lesion-prone areas.

  13. Predicting bed shear stress and its role in sediment dynamics and restoration potential of the Everglades and other vegetated flow systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larsen, Laurel G.; Harvey, Judson; John P. Crimaldi

    2009-01-01

    Entrainment of sediment by flowing water affects topography, habitat suitability, and nutrient cycling in vegetated floodplains and wetlands, impacting ecosystem evolution and the success of restoration projects. Nonetheless, restoration managers lack simple decision-support tools for predicting shear stresses and sediment redistribution potential in different vegetation communities. Using a field-validated numerical model, we developed state-space diagrams that provide these predictions over a range of water-surface slopes, depths, and associated velocities in Everglades ridge and slough vegetation communities. Diminished bed shear stresses and a consequent decrease in bed sediment redistribution are hypothesized causes of a recent reduction in the topographic and vegetation heterogeneity of this ecosystem. Results confirmed the inability of present-day flows to entrain bed sediment. Further, our diagrams showed bed shear stresses to be highly sensitive to emergent vegetation density and water-surface slope but less sensitive to water depth and periphyton or floating vegetation abundance. These findings suggested that instituting a pulsing flow regime could be the most effective means to restore sediment redistribution to the Everglades. However, pulsing flows will not be sufficient to erode sediment from sloughs with abundant spikerush, unless spikerush density first decreases by natural or managed processes. Our methods provide a novel tool for identifying restoration parameters and performance measures in many types of vegetated aquatic environments where sediment erosion and deposition are involved.

  14. Stress analysis of the cracked lap shear specimens: An ASTM round robin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1986-01-01

    This ASTM Round Robin was conducted to evaluate the state of the art in stress analysis of adhesively bonded joint specimens. Specifically, the participants were asked to calculate the strain-energy-release rate for two different geometry cracked lap shear (CLS) specimens at four different debond lengths. The various analytical techniques consisted of 2- and 3-dimensional finite element analysis, beam theory, plate theory, and a combination of beam theory and finite element analysis. The results were examined in terms of the total strain-energy-release rate and the mode I to mode II ratio as a function of debond length for each specimen geometry. These results basically clustered into two groups: geometric linear or geometric nonlinear analysis. The geometric nonlinear analysis is required to properly analyze the CLS specimens. The 3-D finite element analysis gave indications of edge closure plus some mode III loading. Each participant described his analytical technique and results. Nine laboratories participated.

  15. Stress analysis of the cracked-lap-shear specimen - An ASTM round-robin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1987-01-01

    This ASTM Round Robin was conducted to evaluate the state of the art in stress analysis of adhesively bonded joint specimens. Specifically, the participants were asked to calculate the strain-energy-release rate for two different geometry cracked lap shear (CLS) specimens at four different debond lengths. The various analytical techniques consisted of 2- and 3-dimensional finite element analysis, beam theory, plate theory, and a combination of beam theory and finite element analysis. The results were examined in terms of the total strain-energy-release rate and the mode I to mode II ratio as a function of debond length for each specimen geometry. These results basically clustered into two groups: geometric linear or geometric nonlinear analysis. The geometric nonlinear analysis is required to properly analyze the CLS specimens. The 3-D finite element analysis gave indications of edge closure plus some mode III loading. Each participant described his analytical technique and results. Nine laboratories participated.

  16. Laminar shear stress induces the expression of aquaporin 1 in endothelial cells involved in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Mun, Gyeong In; Jang, Sue Im; Boo, Yong Chool

    2013-01-11

    Laminar shear stress (LSS) due to blood flow contributes to the maintenance of endothelial health by multiple mechanisms including promotion of wound healing. The present study examined the hypothesis that the induction of water channel aquaporin 1 (AQP1) expression by LSS might be functionally associated with endothelial wound healing. When human umbilical vein endothelial cells were exposed to LSS at 12 dyn cm(-2) for 24h, significant increases in AQP1 expression were observed at the mRNA and protein levels as compared with static control. In the in vitro scratch wound healing assay, LSS treatments before and after wound creation enhanced endothelial wound healing and this effect was significantly attenuated by selective suppression of AQP1 expression using small interfering RNA. Ectopic expression of AQP1 enhanced wound healing in the absence of LSS. This study demonstrated that LSS stimulates the endothelial expression of AQP1 that plays a role in wound healing. PMID:23220481

  17. Wall Shear Stress Characteristics for the Progression of the Disease, Atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, P.; Mandal, D. K.; Manna, N. K.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2014-12-01

    Wall shear stress (WSS) characteristics of a stenosed artery which are the important physiological parameters for the progression of the arterial diseases atherosclerosis, are studied and compared for different Reynolds numbers and different Womersley numbers. Numerical simulations of physiological pulsatile flow through a model stenotic artery are performed by finite volume method. From this study, it is revealed that the chance of formation of atherosclerosis increases with increase in Reynolds number and decreases with increase in Womersley number. The phenomenon of mass transportation across arterial wall is more in case of increase in Womersley number rather than Reynolds number. The chance of formation of atheromatous plaque will be high with higher Reynolds number and Womersley number. In the low WSS region, high magnitude of Womersley number indicates high chance of progression of the disease atherosclerosis. High magnitude of Womersley number with low Reynolds number is more dangerous for the progression of the disease in the low WSS region.

  18. Joint Cosmic Shear Measurements with the Keck and William Herschel Telescopes

    E-print Network

    David Bacon; Richard Massey; Alexandre Refregier; Richard Ellis

    2002-03-20

    The recent measurements of weak lensing by large-scale structure present significant new opportunities for studies of the matter distribution in the universe. Here, we present a new cosmic shear survey carried out with the Echelle Spectrograph and Imager on the Keck II telescope. This covers a total of 0.6 square degrees in 173 fields probing independent lines of sight, hence minimising the impact of sample variance. We also extend our measurements of cosmic shear with the William Herschel Telescope (Bacon, Refregier & Ellis 2000) to a survey area of 1 square degree. The joint measurements with two independent telescopes allow us to assess the impact of instrument-specific systematics, one of the major difficulties in cosmic shear measurements. For both surveys, we carefully account for effects such as smearing by the point spread function and shearing due to telescope optics. We find negligible residuals in both cases and recover mutually consistent cosmic shear signals, significant at the 5.1 sigma level. We present a simple method to compute the statistical error in the shear correlation function, including non-gaussian sample variance and the covariance between different angular bins. We measure shear correlation functions for all fields and use these to ascertain the amplitude of the matter power spectrum, finding sigma_8 (Omega_m/0.3)^0.68 = 0.97 \\pm 0.13 with 0.14shear measurement method. The results from our two independent surveys are both consistent with measurements of cosmic shear from other groups. We discuss how our results compare with current normalisation from cluster abundance.

  19. Rayleigh-Taylor instability under a shear stress free top boundary condition and its relevance to removal

    E-print Network

    Kraus, Mary

    weakly constrained. Citation: Harig, C., P. Molnar, and G. A. Houseman (2008), Rayleigh-TaylorRayleigh-Taylor instability under a shear stress free top boundary condition and its relevance of the Sierra Nevada suggests a relatively large wavelength ($500 km) of unstable growth, but Rayleigh-Taylor

  20. EFFECTS OF SHEAR STRESS IN TELETACTION AND HUMAN PERCEPTION \\Lambda G. Moy and R.S. Fearing

    E-print Network

    Moy, Gabe

    transmission improved perception compared to standard elastic layers. Spatial resolution differences dueEFFECTS OF SHEAR STRESS IN TELETACTION AND HUMAN PERCEPTION \\Lambda G. Moy and R.S. Fearing on the perception of static stimuli applied normal to the surface. Wax gratings in two different orientations

  1. Vorticity Alignment and Negative Normal Stresses in Sheared Attractive Emulsions Alberto Montesi, Alejandro A. Pen~a,* and Matteo Pasquali

    E-print Network

    Natelson, Douglas

    and retard coalescence and other destabilizing mechanisms. Emulsions can be regarded as repulsive water-in-oil emulsions with increasing vol- ume fraction of the dispersed (water) phase . EmulsionsVorticity Alignment and Negative Normal Stresses in Sheared Attractive Emulsions Alberto Montesi

  2. Physiological mechanisms of vascular response induced by shear stress and effect of exercise in systemic and placental circulation

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Iván; González, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    Physiological vascular function regulation is essential for cardiovascular health and depends on adequate control of molecular mechanisms triggered by endothelial cells in response to mechanical and chemical stimuli induced by blood flow. Endothelial dysfunction is one of the main risk factors of cardiovascular pathology, where the imbalance between the synthesis of vasodilator and vasoconstrictor molecules is common in the development of vascular disorders in systemic and placental circulation. In the placenta, an organ without autonomic innervations, the local control of vascular tone is critical for maintenance of fetal growth and mechanisms that underlie shear stress response induced by blood flow are essential during pregnancy. In this field, shear stress induced by moderate exercise is one of the most important mechanisms to improve vascular function through nitric oxide synthesis and stimulation of mechanical response of endothelial cells triggered by ion channels, caveolae, endothelial NO synthase, and vascular endothelial growth factor, among others. The demand for oxygen and nutrients by tissues and organs, especially in placentation and pregnancy, determines blood flow parameters, and physiological adaptations of vascular beds for covering metabolic requirements. In this regard, moderate exercise versus sedentarism shows potential benefits for improving vascular function associated with the enhancement of molecular mechanisms induced by shear stress. In this review, we collect evidence about molecular bases of physiological response to shear stress in order to highlight the relevance of moderate exercise-training for vascular health in adult and fetal life. PMID:25278895

  3. Wall Shear stress measurements in the atmosperhic surface layer

    E-print Network

    Marusic, Ivan

    that these conditions were present throughout the night. From extensive sonic anemometer mea- surements under. Beyond sonic anemometery, the present work followed on from that of Heuer & Marusic [3] who developed

  4. True Shear Parallel Plate Viscometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethridge, Edwin; Kaukler, William

    2010-01-01

    This viscometer (which can also be used as a rheometer) is designed for use with liquids over a large temperature range. The device consists of horizontally disposed, similarly sized, parallel plates with a precisely known gap. The lower plate is driven laterally with a motor to apply shear to the liquid in the gap. The upper plate is freely suspended from a double-arm pendulum with a sufficiently long radius to reduce height variations during the swing to negligible levels. A sensitive load cell measures the shear force applied by the liquid to the upper plate. Viscosity is measured by taking the ratio of shear stress to shear rate.

  5. Aging, rejuvenation and thixotropy in complex fluids. Time-dependence of the viscosity at rest and under constant shear rate or shear stress

    E-print Network

    Daniel Quemada

    2008-08-25

    Complex fluids exhibit time-dependent changes in viscosity that have been ascribed to both thixotropy and aging. However, there is no consensus for which phenomenon is the origin of which changes. A novel thixotropic model is defined that incorporates aging. Conditions under which viscosity changes are due to thixotropy and aging are unambiguously defined. Viscosity changes in a complex fluid during a period of rest after destructuring exhibit a bifurcation at a critical volume fraction PHIc2. For volume fractions less than PHIc2, the viscosity remains finite in the limit t => infinite. For volume fractions above critical the viscosity grows without limit, so aging occurs at rest. At constant shear rate there is no bifurcation, whereas under constant shear stress the model predicts a new bifurcation in the viscosity at a critical stress sB, identical to the yield stress sy observed under steady conditions. The divergence of the viscosity for stress s sB is best defined as aging. However, for s > sB, where the viscosity remains finite, it seems preferable to use the concepts of restructuring and destructuring, rather than aging and rejuvenation. Nevertheless, when a stress sA (sB) is applied during aging, slower aging is predicted and discussed as true rejuvenation. Plastic behaviour is predicted under steady conditions when s > sB. The Herschel-Bulkley model fits the flow curve for stresses close to sB, whereas the Bingham model gives a better fit for s >> sB. Finally, the model's predictions are shown to be consistent with experimental data from the literature for the transient behaviour of laponite gels.

  6. Computational simulations predict a key role for oscillatory fluid shear stress in de novo valvular tissue formation.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Manuel; Ramaswamy, Sharan

    2014-11-01

    Previous efforts in heart valve tissue engineering demonstrated that the combined effect of cyclic flexure and steady flow on bone marrow derived stem cell-seeded scaffolds resulted in significant increases in engineered collagen formation [Engelmayr et al. Cyclic flexure and laminar flow synergistically accelerate mesenchymal stem cell-mediated engineered tissue formation: Implications for engineered heart valve tissues. Biomaterials 2006; 27(36): 6083-95]. Here, we provide a new interpretation for the underlying reason for this observed effect. In addition, another related investigation demonstrated the impact of fluid flow on DNA content and quantified the fluid-induced shear stresses on the engineered heart valve tissue specimens [Engelmayr et al. A Novel Flex-Stretch-Flow Bioreactor for the Study of Engineered Heart Valve Tissue Mechanobiology]. Annals of Biomedical Engineering 2008, 36, 1-13]. In this study, we performed more advanced CFD analysis with an emphasis on oscillatory wall shear stresses imparted on specimens when mechanically conditioned by a combination of cyclic flexure and steady flow. Specifically, we hypothesized that the dominant stimulatory regulator of the bone marrow stem cells is fluid-induced and depends on both the magnitude and temporal directionality of surface stresses, i.e., oscillatory shear stresses (OSS) acting on the developing tissues. Therefore, we computationally quantified the (i) magnitude of fluid-induced shear stresses as well as (ii) the extent of temporal fluid oscillations in the flow field using the oscillatory shear index (OSI) parameter. Noting that sample cyclic flexure induces a high degree of OSS, we incorporated moving boundary computational fluid dynamic simulations of samples housed within a bioreactor to consider the effects of: (1) No Flow, No Flexure (control group), (2) Steady Flow-alone, (3) Cyclic Flexure-alone and (4) Combined Steady flow and Cyclic Flexure environments. Indeed we found that the coexistence of both OSS and appreciable shear stress magnitudes explained the high levels of engineered collagen previously observed from combining cyclic flexure and steady flow states. On the other hand, each of these metrics on its own showed no association. This finding suggests that cyclic flexure and steady flow synergistically promote engineered heart valve tissue production via OSS, so long as the oscillations are accompanied by a critical magnitude of shear stress. PMID:25262874

  7. High shear rate characterization of magnetorheological fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becnel, Andrew C.; Hu, Wei; Wereley, Norman M.

    2012-04-01

    Shear mode or rotary drum-type magnetorheological energy absorbers (MREAS) are an attractive option for use in occupant or payload protection systems that operate at shear rates well over 25,000 s-1. However, their design is still performed using material properties measured using low-shear rate (<1,000 s-1) characterization techniques. This paper details a method for characterizing MR fluids at high shear rates, and presents characterization results for three commercially available MR fluids. It is proposed to utilize the perspective of apparent viscosity (the ratio of shear stress over shear rate) vs. shear rate to describe the behavior of the fluid at these shear rates. Good agreement between the measured data and predictions of MR fluid behavior are achieved using this framework. By expanding the knowledge of MR fluid behavior to these high shear strain rates, the design of MREAs is enabled for occupant protection systems for crash and mine blast events.

  8. Thickness Measurement of Fracture Fluid Gel Filter Cake after Static Build Up and Shear Erosion 

    E-print Network

    Xu, Ben

    2011-08-08

    tested as an effective tool to measure the filter cake thickness. A correlation for crosslinked guar fracture fluid filter cake thickness was produced. An experiment setup used to shear erode the filter cake was built and tested. The results showed...

  9. The study of shear and longitudinal velocity measurements of sands and cohesive soils

    E-print Network

    Marjanovic, Jana

    2012-01-01

    This thesis evaluates some methods for the measurement of stiffness parameters of soils, with an emphasis on the use of bender element technology in obtaining the shear modulus. The experimental program consisted two primary ...

  10. Scaling of Viscous Shear Zones with Depth Dependent Viscosity and Power Law Stress-strain Rate Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. D. P.; Parsons, B.

    2014-12-01

    One of the unresolved questions concerning fault deformation is the degree and cause of localisation of shear at depth beneath a fault. Geologic observations of exhumed shear zones indicate that whilst the motion is no longer planar, it can still be localised near the down-dip extension of the fault; however, the degree of localisation is uncertain. We employ simple analytic and numerical models to investigate the structural form of distributed shear beneath a strike-slip fault, and the relative importance of the physical mechanisms that have the potential to localise a shear zone. As we are concerned with long-term structure the model is time-averaged across the earthquake cycle, consisting of an idealised strike-slip fault within a rigid lid over a viscous layer. For a depth dependent viscosity, ? = ?0 exp (-z/z0), we find a shear zone develops with a half-width ?w ?z0 for small z0, where lengths are non-dimensionalised by the layer thickness (d km). Including a non-linear stress-strain rate relation (? ? ? ?n) scales ?w by 1/?n, comparable to deformation length scales in thin viscous sheet calculations. We find that the primary control on ?w is the depth dependence of viscosity arising from the increase in temperature with depth. As this relationship is exponential, scaling relations give a half-width that scales approximately as ?w?T(z=1/2)RdnQ?-----?km,delta_wapprox T(z=1/2){sqrtfrac{Rd}{nQbeta}} km, with T (K), gas constant R (J/mol K), activation energy Q (J/mol), and geotherm ? (K/km). Figure illustrates shear zones for a dry olivine composition. For n = 1 the shear zone half-width is ?w = 4 km, which reduces to ?w = 2.3 km when n = 3; other parameter choices consistent with laboratory-derived rheological properties give ?wfrom 2-6 km. The inclusion of shear-stress heating only reduces ?w by an additional 5-25%, depending on the initial width of the shear zone; in the case of dry olivine with n = 3 we get ?w = 1.8 km. This reduction in width occurs over a thermal diffusion timescale of 5Ma; hence the full effect will only occur if the fault location is stationary relative to the viscous layer. Whilst the width of the shear zone may not decrease significantly, local temperature increases range from 50-300?C with a viscosity reduction of up to 5 orders of magnitude and a concomitant reduction in driving stresses.

  11. Triboluminescent Fiber-Optic Sensors Measure Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogowski, Robert S.

    1994-01-01

    Triboluminescence exploited in fiber-optic sensor system for measuring changes in pressures, strains, vibrations, and acoustic emissions, in structural members. Sensors embedded in members for in situ monitoring of condition of structure. System passive in sense no source of radiation required to interrogate optical fiber. Technique has potential for wide range of applications in which detection and measurement of structural stress required.

  12. The mechanical triggers of plaque rupture: shear stress vs pressure gradient.

    PubMed

    Li, Z-Y; Taviani, V; Tang, T; Sadat, U; Young, V; Patterson, A; Graves, M; Gillard, J H

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the mechanical triggers that may cause plaque rupture. Wall shear stress (WSS) and pressure gradient are the direct mechanical forces acting on the plaque in a stenotic artery. Their influence on plaque stability is thought to be controversial. This study used a physiologically realistic, pulsatile flow, two-dimensional, cine phase-contrast MRI sequence in a patient with a 70% carotid stenosis. Instead of considering the full patient-specific carotid bifurcation derived from MRI, only the plaque region has been modelled by means of the idealised flow model. WSS reached a local maximum just distal to the stenosis followed by a negative local minimum. A pressure drop across the stenosis was found which varied significantly during systole and diastole. The ratio of the relative importance of WSS and pressure was assessed and was found to be less than 0.07% for all time phases, even at the throat of the stenosis. In conclusion, although the local high WSS at the stenosis may damage the endothelium and fissure plaque, the magnitude of WSS is small compared with the overall loading on plaque. Therefore, pressure may be the main mechanical trigger for plaque rupture and risk stratification using stress analysis of plaque stability may only need to consider the pressure effect. PMID:20348535

  13. Measurements of Shear Lift Force on a Bubble in Channel Flow in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Motil, Brian J.; Skor, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Under microgravity conditions, the shear lift force acting on bubbles, droplets or solid particles in multiphase flows becomes important because under normal gravity, this hydrodynamic force is masked by buoyancy. This force plays an important role in furnishing the detachment process of bubbles in a setting where a bubble suspension is needed in microgravity. In this work, measurements of the shear lift force acting on a bubble in channel flow are performed. The shear lift force is deduced from the bubble kinematics using scaling and then compared with predictions from models in literature that address different asymptotic and numerical solutions. Basic trajectory calculations are then performed and the results are compared with experimental data of position of the bubble in the channel. A direct comparison of the lateral velocity of the bubbles is also made with the lateral velocity prediction from investigators, whose work addressed the shear lift on a sphere in different two-dimensional shear flows including Poiseuille flow.

  14. Shear stress stimulates phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser(635) by a protein kinase A-dependent mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boo, Yong Chool; Hwang, Jinah; Sykes, Michelle; Michell, Belinda J.; Kemp, Bruce E.; Lum, Hazel; Jo, Hanjoong

    2002-01-01

    Shear stress stimulates nitric oxide (NO) production by phosphorylating endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) at Ser(1179) in a phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K)- and protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent manner. The eNOS has additional potential phosphorylation sites, including Ser(116), Thr(497), and Ser(635). Here, we studied these potential phosphorylation sites in response to shear, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and 8-bromocAMP (8-BRcAMP) in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). All three stimuli induced phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser(635), which was consistently slower than that at Ser(1179). Thr(497) was rapidly dephosphorylated by 8-BRcAMP but not by shear and VEGF. None of the stimuli phosphorylated Ser(116). Whereas shear-stimulated Ser(635) phosphorylation was not affected by phosphoinositide-3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin and LY-294002, it was blocked by either treating the cells with a PKA inhibitor H89 or infecting them with a recombinant adenovirus-expressing PKA inhibitor. These results suggest that shear stress stimulates eNOS by two different mechanisms: 1) PKA- and PI3K-dependent and 2) PKA-dependent but PI3K-independent pathways. Phosphorylation of Ser(635) may play an important role in chronic regulation of eNOS in response to mechanical and humoral stimuli.

  15. The average stress in a suspension of cube-shaped magnetic particles subject to shear and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallavajula, Rajesh K.; Archer, Lynden A.; Koch, Donald L.

    2015-09-01

    The effect of a homogeneous magnetic field (H) on the bulk stress in a dilute suspension of weakly Brownian, magnetic cubes suspended in a Newtonian fluid subjected to a linear shear flow is studied. The stresslet on each cube is anisotropic and depends on its orientation. Application of a magnetic field results in anisotropy in the orientation distribution. The steady-state orientation distribution is derived as a function of the angle between the directions of the magnetic field and the fluid vorticity vector and the ratio of the magnetic torque to the viscous torque. Knowledge of the distribution function is used to derive a general expression for the bulk stress in a general linear flow field and a magnetic field. Specific numerical results are obtained for the intrinsic viscosity in a simple shear flow when the magnetic field is either parallel or perpendicular to the vorticity. When the magnetic field is perpendicular to vorticity, we find that the intrinsic viscosity increases at first with increasing shear rate passes through a maximum and then shear thins. The intrinsic viscosity can vary from 3.25 to 5.5 in response to changes in the relative strengths of the shear and magnetic fields. The maximum value of 5.5 is obtained when the magnetic moment of the cube, which is assumed to be parallel to the normal of one of the faces, lies in the flow gradient plane at an angle of ?/4 from the flow direction.

  16. Observations of Laminar Surface Shear Stress Patterns on the Sidewall of a Rectangular, Mach 3 Quiet Tunnel Using Liquid Crystal Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reda, D.; King, L.

    1994-01-01

    A shear-stress--sensitive liquid crystal coating (LCC) was used to visualize the surface shear stress distribution on the flat sidewall of the MSU quiet supersonic tunnel as a function of flow stagnation pressure. Under conditions of quiet operation, the LCC color-change response indicated the existence of a nonuniform surface shear stress distribution. This shear pattern was characterized by an elongated, down st ream-point ing triangular region of relatively low shear, with its apex on and its axis coincident with, the sidewall centerline. This low-shear zone was bounded symmetrically by two regions of relatively higher shear; these high-shear zones originated within the concave-curvature portion of the nozzle, in the corners between the flat sidewall and the contoured upper and lower nozzle surfaces. A 3-D Navier-Stokes code was used to compute the pressure and surface shear distributions on the sidewall. Flow-expansion-induced transverse pressure gradients on the nozzle sidewall generated symmetric inflows from the corners towards the sidewall centerline; these inflows caused a thickening of the sidewall boundary layer along the centerline, resulting in lower shear stresses consistent with the liquid crystal results. Peripherally nonuniform laminar boundary layer development, and the associated stability of such complex 3-D flows, must be considered in quiet-tunnel applications using rectangular nozzles. A color video will be shown.

  17. Measurement of Elastic Properties of Tissue by Shear Wave Propagation Generated by Acoustic Radiation Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marie Tabaru,; Takashi Azuma,; Kunio Hashiba,

    2010-07-01

    Acoustic radiation force (ARF) imaging has been developed as a novel elastography technology to diagnose hepatic disease and breast cancer. The accuracy of shear wave speed estimation, which is one of the applications of ARF elastography, is studied. The Young’s moduli of pig liver and foie gras samples estimated from the shear wave speed were compared with those measured the static Young’s modulus measurement. The difference in the two methods was 8%. Distance attenuation characteristics of the shear wave were also studied using finite element method (FEM) analysis. We found that the differences in the axial and lateral beam widths in pressure and ARF are 16 and 9% at F-number=0.9. We studied the relationship between two branch points in distance attenuation characteristics and the shape of ARF. We found that the maximum measurable length to estimate shear wave speed for one ARF excitation was 8 mm.

  18. Measurement of Elastic Properties of Tissue by Shear Wave Propagation Generated by Acoustic Radiation Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabaru, Marie; Azuma, Takashi; Hashiba, Kunio

    2010-07-01

    Acoustic radiation force (ARF) imaging has been developed as a novel elastography technology to diagnose hepatic disease and breast cancer. The accuracy of shear wave speed estimation, which is one of the applications of ARF elastography, is studied. The Young's moduli of pig liver and foie gras samples estimated from the shear wave speed were compared with those measured the static Young's modulus measurement. The difference in the two methods was 8%. Distance attenuation characteristics of the shear wave were also studied using finite element method (FEM) analysis. We found that the differences in the axial and lateral beam widths in pressure and ARF are 16 and 9% at F-number=0.9. We studied the relationship between two branch points in distance attenuation characteristics and the shape of ARF. We found that the maximum measurable length to estimate shear wave speed for one ARF excitation was 8 mm.

  19. The Effects of Low-Shear Mechanical Stress on Yersinia pestis Virulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawal, Abidat; Jejelowo, Olufisayo A.; Rosenzweig, Jason A.

    2010-11-01

    Manned space exploration has created a need to evaluate the effects of spacelike stress on pathogenic and opportunistic microbes astronauts could carry with them to the International Space Station and beyond. Yersinia pestis (YP) causes bubonic, septicemic, and pneumonic plague and is capable of killing infected patients within 3-7 days. In this study, low-shear modeled microgravity (LSMMG), a spacelike stress, was used to physically stress YP; and its effects on proliferation, cold growth, and type III secretion system (T3SS) function were evaluated. YP was grown to saturation in either LSMMG or normal gravity (NG) conditions prior to being used for RAW 246.7 cell infections, HeLa cell infections, and Yop secretion assays. A mutant strain of YP (?yopB) that lacks the ability to inject Yersinia outer membrane proteins (Yops) into the host cell was used as a negative control in cell infection experiments. Our experimental results indicate that YP cultivated under LSMMG resulted in reduced YopM production and secretion compared to its NG-grown counterpart. Similarly, NG-grown YP induced more cell rounding in HeLa cells than did the LSMMG-grown YP, which suggests that LSMMG somehow impairs T3SS optimum function. Also, LSMMG-grown YP used to infect cultured RAW 246.7 cells showed a similar pattern of dysfunction in that it proliferated less than did its NG-grown counterpart during an 8-hour infection period. This study suggests that LSMMG can attenuate bacterial virulence contrary to previously published data that have demonstrated LSMMG-induced hypervirulence of other Gram-negative enterics.

  20. Stress measurement with non-indentation

    SciTech Connect

    Jakus, K.; Evans, N.D.; Hay, J.C.

    1998-11-01

    The feasibility of using nano-indentation to measure residual stress in glasses was studied. Indents were placed on the side of flexure specimens at four different distances from the neutral axis while the specimens were under load in four-point-bending. Three different glasses (soda-lime, boro-silicate, and fused silica) were indented with a cube-corner indenter using 2 to 30 mN indentation loads. A high resolution scanning electron microscope was used to measure the length of the cracks emanating from the corners of the indents while the specimen remained under load. The measured crack lengths were correlated to the local stress using indentation theory. For the correlation, elastic beam theory was used to calculate the magnitude of the local stress at the indentation sites. Results derived from crack lengths were in good agreement with local stress within experimental scatter. However, this scatter was found to be rather large as a result of the stochastic nature of crack formation. It can be concluded from this study that nano-indentation can be used to measure residual surface stresses with high spatial resolution provided that a sufficient number of indents are used to assure good statistical accuracy.

  1. Bending and Shear Stresses Developed by the Instantaneous Arrest of the Root of a Moving Cantilever Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowell, Elbridge, Z; Schwartz, Edward B; Houbolt, John C

    1945-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation has been made of the behavior of a cantilever beam in transverse motion when its root is suddenly brought to rest. Equations are given for determining the stresses, the deflections, and the accelerations that arise in the beam as a result of the impact. The theoretical equations, which have been confirmed experimentally, reveal that, at a given percentage of the distance from root to tip, the bending stresses for a particular mode are independent of the length of the beam, whereas the shear stresses vary inversely with the length.

  2. Nonlinear stresses and temperatures in transient adiabatic and shear flows via nonequilibrium molecular dynamics: Three definitions of temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Wm. G.; Hoover, C. G.

    2009-04-01

    We compare nonlinear stresses and temperatures for adiabatic-shear flows, using up to 262 144 particles, with those from corresponding homogeneous and inhomogeneous flows. Two varieties of kinetic temperature tensors are compared to the configurational temperatures. This comparison of temperatures led us to two findings beyond our original goal of analyzing shear algorithms. First, we found an improved form for local instantaneous velocity fluctuations, as calculated with smooth-particle weighting functions. Second, we came upon the previously unrecognized contribution of rotation to the configurational temperature.

  3. Experimental study on pressure, stress state, and temperature-dependent dynamic behavior of shear thickening fluid subjected to laser induced shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xianqian; Yin, Qiuyun; Huang, Chenguang

    2015-11-01

    The dynamic response of the 57 vol./vol. % dense spherical silica particle-polyethylene glycol suspension at high pressure was investigated through short pulsed laser induced shock experiments by measuring the back free surface velocities of aluminum-shear thickening fluid (STF)-aluminum assembled targets. The results showed that the attenuation behavior of shock wave in the STF was dependent on shock pressure, stress state, and test temperature. The measured back free particle velocities of the targets and shock wave velocities in the STF decreased with the decrease in shock pressure while shocked at the same stress state and the same test temperature. In addition, two types of dragging mechanisms in the STF were observed while shocked at different stress states. For a uniaxial strain state, the impact induced jamming behavior in the STF is the dragging mechanism for the attenuation of shock wave, and a critical shock pressure was required for the impact induced thickening behavior. However, while the shock wave transformed from a uniaxial strain state to a dilatation state after transmitted to a certain distance, beside the dragging effect of impact induced jamming behavior, a strong dragging effect, induced by shear induced thickening behavior, was also observed.

  4. A vapor barrier Couette shear cell for small angle neutron scattering measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porcar, L.; Hamilton, W. A.; Butler, P. D.; Warr, G. G.

    2002-06-01

    We describe the design and operation of a temperature controlled Couette shear cell for small angle neutron scattering (SANS) studies of complex fluids under flow. This design incorporates a vapor barrier, which prevents sample evaporation to relatively high shear rates. This cell enables the investigation of systems which are highly sensitive to evaporation. Over the duration of a Couette SANS measurement composition phase transitions due to evaporation can be misinterpreted as true shear-induced transformations. We give a brief report of recent experiments performed on one such system: bicontinuous L3 sponge phases for which the surfactant membrane constituents are Cetylpyridinium chloride and hexanol. These clearly demonstrate the limitations of previous designs and the utility of the vapor barrier in measurements of a predicted shear induced sponge to lamellar phase transition. Using this cell we also describe and test a simple and effective way to put SANS data taken in the tangential Couette configuration on an absolute scale.

  5. System and method for measuring residual stress

    DOEpatents

    Prime, Michael B. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention is a method and system for determining the residual stress within an elastic object. In the method, an elastic object is cut along a path having a known configuration. The cut creates a portion of the object having a new free surface. The free surface then deforms to a contour which is different from the path. Next, the contour is measured to determine how much deformation has occurred across the new free surface. Points defining the contour are collected in an empirical data set. The portion of the object is then modeled in a computer simulator. The points in the empirical data set are entered into the computer simulator. The computer simulator then calculates the residual stress along the path which caused the points within the object to move to the positions measured in the empirical data set. The calculated residual stress is then presented in a useful format to an analyst.

  6. Infection of Vascular Endothelial Cells with Human Cytomegalovirus under Fluid Shear Stress Reveals Preferential Entry and Spread of Virus in Flow Conditions Simulating Atheroprone Regions of the Artery

    PubMed Central

    DuRose, Jenny B.; Li, Julie; Chien, Shu

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a major pathogenic factor in cardiovascular diseases, which are the leading cause of mortality in developed countries. While risk factors for atherosclerosis tend to be systemic, the distribution of atherosclerotic plaques within the vasculature is preferentially located at branch points and curves where blood flow is disturbed and shear stress is low. It is now widely accepted that hemodynamic factors can modulate endothelial gene expression and function and influence the pathophysiological changes associated with atherosclerosis. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a ubiquitous pathogen, has long been proposed as a risk factor for atherosclerosis. To date, the role of HCMV in atherogenesis has been explored only in static conditions, and it is not known how HCMV infection is influenced by the physiological context of flow. In this study, we utilized a parallel-plate flow system to simulate the effects of shear stresses in different regions of the vasculature in vitro. We found that endothelial cells cultured under low shear stress, which simulates the flow condition of atheroprone regions in vivo, are more permissive to HCMV infection than cells experiencing high shear stress or static conditions. Cells exposed to low shear stress show increased entry of HCMV compared to cells exposed to high shear stress or static conditions. Viral structural gene expression, viral titers, and viral spread are also enhanced in endothelial cells exposed to low shear stress. These results suggest that hemodynamic factors modulate HCMV infection of endothelial cells, thus providing new insights into the induction/acceleration of atherosclerosis by HCMV. PMID:23055562

  7. Flow shear stress regulates endothelial barrier function and expression of angiogenic factors in a 3D microfluidic tumor vascular model

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Cara F; Verbridge, Scott S; Vlachos, Pavlos P; Rylander, Marissa Nichole

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial cells lining blood vessels are exposed to various hemodynamic forces associated with blood flow. These include fluid shear, the tangential force derived from the friction of blood flowing across the luminal cell surface, tensile stress due to deformation of the vessel wall by transvascular flow, and normal stress caused by the hydrodynamic pressure differential across the vessel wall. While it is well known that these fluid forces induce changes in endothelial morphology, cytoskeletal remodeling, and altered gene expression, the effect of flow on endothelial organization within the context of the tumor microenvironment is largely unknown. Using a previously established microfluidic tumor vascular model, the objective of this study was to investigate the effect of normal (4 dyn/cm2), low (1 dyn/cm2), and high (10 dyn/cm2) microvascular wall shear stress (WSS) on tumor-endothelial paracrine signaling associated with angiogenesis. It is hypothesized that high WSS will alter the endothelial phenotype such that vascular permeability and tumor-expressed angiogenic factors are reduced. Results demonstrate that endothelial permeability decreases as a function of increasing WSS, while co-culture with tumor cells increases permeability relative to mono-cultures. This response is likely due to shear stress-mediated endothelial cell alignment and tumor-VEGF-induced permeability. In addition, gene expression analysis revealed that high WSS (10 dyn/cm2) significantly down-regulates tumor-expressed MMP9, HIF1, VEGFA, ANG1, and ANG2, all of which are important factors implicated in tumor angiogenesis. This result was not observed in tumor mono-cultures or static conditioned media experiments, suggesting a flow-mediated paracrine signaling mechanism exists with surrounding tumor cells that elicits a change in expression of angiogenic factors. Findings from this work have significant implications regarding low blood velocities commonly seen in the tumor vasculature, suggesting high shear stress-regulation of angiogenic activity is lacking in many vessels, thereby driving tumor angiogenesis. PMID:25482628

  8. The detection and measurement of microburst wind shear by an airborne lidar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Paul A.; Bowles, Roland L.; Targ, Russell

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Lockheed Missiles and Space Company (LMSC) Coherent Lidar Airborne Shear Sensor (CLASS) employs coherent lidar technology as a basis for a forward-looking predictive wind shear detection system. Line of sight wind velocities measured ahead of the aircraft are combined with aircraft state parameters to relate the measured wind change (or shear) ahead of an aircraft to its performance loss or gain. In this way the system can predict whether a shear detected ahead of the aircraft poses a significant threat to the aircraft and provide an advance warning to the flight crew. Installed aboard NASA's Boeing 737 research aircraft, the CLASS system is flown through convective microburst wind shears in Denver, Co., and Orlando, Fl. Some preliminary flight test results are presented. It is seen that the system was able to detect and measure wind shears ahead of the aircraft in the relatively dry Denver environment, but its performance was degraded in the high humidity and heavy rain in Orlando.

  9. Effect of shear stress and free radicals induced by ultrasound on erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, T.; Fukushima, Y.; Kon, H.; Riesz, P.

    1989-03-01

    The present study was undertaken to elucidate the mechanism of hemolysis induced by ultrasound. Ar or N2O gas was used to distinguish between cavitation with or without free radical formation (hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen atoms). Free radical formation was examined by the method of spin trapping combined with ESR. After sonication of erythrocyte suspensions, several structural and functional parameters of the erythrocyte membrane--hemolysis, membrane fluidity, membrane permeability, and membrane deformability--were examined. Although free radical formation was observed in the erythrocyte suspensions sonicated in the presence of Ar, no free radical formation was observed in the presence of N2O. However, the hemolysis behavior induced by ultrasound was similar in the presence of Ar or N2O. The membrane fluidity, permeability, and deformability of the remaining unlysed erythrocytes after sonication in the presence of Ar or N2O were unchanged and identical to those of the control cells. On the other hand, after gamma irradiation (700 Gy), the hemolysis behavior was quite different from that after sonication, and the membrane properties were significantly changed. These results suggest that hemolysis induced by sonication was due to mechanical shearing stress arising from cavitation, and that the membrane integrity of the remaining erythrocytes after sonication was the same as that of control cells without sonication. The triatomic gas, N2O, may be useful for ultrasonically disrupting cells without accompanying free radical formation.

  10. Fluid shear stress promotes proprotein convertase-dependent activation of MT1-MMP.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hojin; Duran, Camille L; Abbey, Colette A; Kaunas, Roland R; Bayless, Kayla J

    2015-05-01

    During angiogenesis, endothelial cells (ECs(1)) initiate new blood vessel growth and invade into the extracellular matrix (ECM). Membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) facilitates this process and translocates to the plasma membrane following activation to promote ECM cleavage. The N-terminal pro-domain within MT1-MMP must be processed for complete activity of the proteinase. This study investigated whether MT1-MMP activation was altered by sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and wall shear stress (WSS), which combine to stimulate EC invasion in three dimensional (3D) collagen matrices. MT1-MMP was activated rapidly and completely by WSS but not S1P. Proprotein convertases (PCs) promoted MT1-MMP processing, prompting us to test whether WSS or S1P treatments increased PC activity. Like MT1-MMP, PC activity increased with WSS, while S1P had no effect. A pharmacological PC inhibitor completely blocked S1P- and WSS-induced EC invasion and MT1-MMP translocation to the plasma membrane. Further, a recombinant PC inhibitor reduced MT1-MMP activation and decreased lumen formation in invading ECs, a process known to be controlled by MT1-MMP. Thus, we conclude that PC and MT1-MMP activation are mechanosensitive events that are required for EC invasion into 3D collagen matrices. PMID:25800869

  11. Recapitulating physiological and pathological shear stress and oxygen to model vasculature in health and disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abaci, Hasan Erbil; Shen, Yu-I.; Tan, Scott; Gerecht, Sharon

    2014-05-01

    Studying human vascular disease in conventional cell cultures and in animal models does not effectively mimic the complex vascular microenvironment and may not accurately predict vascular responses in humans. We utilized a microfluidic device to recapitulate both shear stress and O2 levels in health and disease, establishing a microfluidic vascular model (?VM). Maintaining human endothelial cells (ECs) in healthy-mimicking conditions resulted in conversion to a physiological phenotype namely cell elongation, reduced proliferation, lowered angiogenic gene expression and formation of actin cortical rim and continuous barrier. We next examined the responses of the healthy ?VM to a vasotoxic cancer drug, 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU), in comparison with an in vivo mouse model. We found that 5-FU does not induce apoptosis rather vascular hyperpermeability, which can be alleviated by Resveratrol treatment. This effect was confirmed by in vivo findings identifying a vasoprotecting strategy by the adjunct therapy of 5-FU with Resveratrol. The ?VM of ischemic disease demonstrated the transition of ECs from a quiescent to an activated state, with higher proliferation rate, upregulation of angiogenic genes, and impaired barrier integrity. The ?VM offers opportunities to study and predict human ECs with physiologically relevant phenotypes in healthy, pathological and drug-treated environments.

  12. Pulsatile Shear Stress Increased Mitochondrial Membrane Potential: Implication of Mn-SOD

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rongsong; Beebe, Tyler; Cui, Jeff; Rouhanizadeh, Mahsa; Ai, Lisong; Wang, Pin; Gundersen, Martin; Takabe, Wakako; Hsiai, Tzung K.

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is intimately involved in cardiovascular diseases. Mitochondrial membrane potential (??m) is coupled with oxidative phosphorylation to drive ATP synthesis. In this study, we examined the effect of physiological pulsatile shear stress (PSS) on ??m and the role of Mn-SOD expression on ??m. Confluent human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) were exposed to PSS, and ??m was monitored using tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester (TMRM+), a mitochondrial membrane potential probe. PSS significantly increased ??m and the change in ??m was a dynamic process. ??m returned to baseline level after PSS for 2 hours followed by static state for 4 hours. Mitochondrial Mn-SOD expression and activities were also significantly up-regulated in response to PSS. Silencing Mn-SOD attenuated PSS-mediated ??m increase while adding Mn-SOD mimetic, MnTMPyP, increased ??m to the similar extent as induced by PSS. Our findings suggest that PSS increased mitochondrial ??m, in part, via Mn-SOD up-regulation. PMID:19666009

  13. Redox Signaling in an In Vivo Murine Model of Low Magnitude Oscillatory Wall Shear Stress

    PubMed Central

    Willett, Nick J.; Kundu, Kousik; Knight, Sarah F.; Dikalov, Sergey; Murthy, Niren

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Wall Shear Stress (WSS) has been identified as an important factor in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. We utilized a novel murine aortic coarctation model to acutely create a region of low magnitude oscillatory WSS in vivo. We employed this model to test the hypothesis that acute changes in WSS in vivo induce upregulation of inflammatory proteins, mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Superoxide generation and VCAM-1 expression both increased in regions of low magnitude oscillatory WSS. WSS-dependent superoxide formation was attenuated by tempol treatment, but was unchanged in p47 phox knockout (ko) mice. However, in both the p47 phox ko mice and the tempol-treated mice, low magnitude oscillatory WSS produced an increase in VCAM-1 expression comparable to control mice. Additionally, this same VCAM-1 expression was observed in ebselen-treated mice and catalase overexpressing mice. These results suggest that although the redox state is important to the overall pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, the initial WSS-dependent inflammatory response leading to lesion localization is not dependent on ROS. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 1369–1378. PMID:20712414

  14. Shear stress, energy losses, and costs: a resolved dilemma of pulsatile cardiac assist devices.

    PubMed

    Nour, Sayed; Liu, Jia; Dai, Gang; Carbognani, Daniel; Yang, Daya; Wu, Guifu; Wang, Qinmei; Chachques, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac assist devices (CAD) cause endothelial dysfunction with considerable morbidity. Employment of pulsatile CAD remains controversial due to inadequate perfusion curves and costs. Alternatively, we are proposing a new concept of pulsatile CAD based on a fundamental revision of the entire circulatory system in correspondence with the physiopathology and law of physics. It concerns a double lumen disposable tube device that could be adapted to conventional cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and/or CAD, for inducing a homogenous, downstream pulsatile perfusion mode with lower energy losses. In this study, the device's prototypes were tested in a simulated conventional pediatric CPB circuit for energy losses and as a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) in ischemic piglets model for endothelial shear stress (ESS) evaluations. In conclusion and according to the study results the pulsatile tube was successfully capable of transforming a conventional CPB and/or CAD steady flow into a pulsatile perfusion mode, with nearly physiologic pulse pressure and lower energy losses. This represents a cost-effective promising method with low mortality and morbidity, especially in fragile cardiac patients. PMID:24511541

  15. Disturbed shear stress reduces Klf2 expression in arterial-venous fistulae in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kota; Protack, Clinton D; Kuwahara, Go; Tsuneki, Masayuki; Hashimoto, Takuya; Hall, Michael R; Assi, Roland; Brownson, Kirstyn E; Foster, Trenton R; Bai, Hualong; Wang, Mo; Madri, Joseph A; Dardik, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Laminar shear stress (SS) induces an antiproliferative and anti-inflammatory endothelial phenotype and increases Klf2 expression. We altered the diameter of an arteriovenous fistula (AVF) in the mouse model to determine whether increased fistula diameter produces disturbed SS in vivo and if acutely increased disturbed SS results in decreased Klf2 expression. The mouse aortocaval fistula model was performed with 22, 25, or 28 gauge needles to puncture the aorta and the inferior vena cava. Duplex ultrasound was used to examine the AVF and its arterial inflow and venous outflow, and SS was calculated. Arterial samples were examined with western blot, immunohistochemistry, and immunofluorescence analysis for proteins and qPCR for RNA. Mice with larger diameter fistulae had diminished survival but increased AVF patency. Increased SS magnitudes and range of frequencies were directly proportional to the needle diameter in the arterial limb proximal to the fistula but not in the venous limb distal to the fistula, with 22-gauge needles producing the most disturbed SS in vivo. Klf2 mRNA and protein expression was diminished in the artery proximal to the fistula in proportion to increasing SS. Increased fistula diameter produces increased SS magnitude and frequency, consistent with disturbed SS in vivo. Disturbed SS is associated with decreased mRNA and protein expression of Klf2. Disturbed SS and reduced Klf2 expression near the fistula are potential therapeutic targets to improve AVF maturation. PMID:25780089

  16. Ferroelectric phase transitions and electromechanical properties of barium titanate and lead titanate crystals under uniaxial and shear stresses: a thermodynamic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Junjie; Li, Fei; Xu, Zhuo; Zhang, Chonghui; Liu, Yi; Liu, Gaomin; Zhang, Tao; He, Hongliang

    2013-05-01

    Ferroelectric phase transitions and electromechanical properties of BaTiO3 (BT) and PbTiO3 (PT) crystals under uniaxial and shear stresses are investigated using the Landau-Devonshire phenomenological approach. The results show that (1) the Curie temperature of BT and PT crystals increases with increasing stress; (2) at room temperature, no ferroelectric-ferroelectric phase transition is induced by uniaxial stress along the [1?0?0]c direction for the PT crystal, while the orthorhombic phase is the ultimate stable state for BT and PT crystals under uniaxial stress along the [0?0?1]c direction and shear stress; (3) shear stress induces a temperature-independent morphotropic phase boundary in tetragonal phase BT and PT crystals; (4) the dielectric and piezoelectric properties are closely related to the phase transition induced by external stresses, where nonlinearity is observed owing to higher order terms of free energy.

  17. STRESS ETHYLENE PRODUCTION - A MEASURE OF PLANT RESPONSE TO STRESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contents: Introduction to the symposium; Environmental data acquisition; Plant organ chambers in plant physiology field research; Interpreting the metabolic responses of plants to water stress; Stress ethylene production.

  18. The effect of copper doping on martensite shear stress in porous TiNi(Mo,Fe,Cu) alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodorenko, V. N.; Kaftaranova, M. I.; Gunther, V. E.

    2015-03-01

    The properties of alloys based on porous nickel-titanium (TiNi) with copper additives have been studied. It is established that the copper doping of porous TiNi(Mo,Fe,Cu) alloys fabricated by the method of self-propagating high-temperature synthesis leads to a significant decrease in the martensite shear stress (below 30 MPa). Low values of the martensite shear stress (?min) in copper-doped TiNi-based alloys allows medical implants of complex shapes to be manufactured for various purposes, including oral surgery. The optimum concentration of copper additives (within 3-6 at %) has been determined that ensures high performance characteristics of TiNi-based porous alloys for medical implants.

  19. Fluid shear stress as a regulator of gene expression in vascular cells: possible correlations with diabetic abnormalities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadaki, M.; Eskin, S. G.; Ruef, J.; Runge, M. S.; McIntire, L. V.

    1999-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with increased frequency, severity and more rapid progression of cardiovascular diseases. Metabolic perturbations from hyperglycemia result in disturbed endothelium-dependent relaxation, activation of coagulation pathways, depressed fibrinolysis, and other abnormalities in vascular homeostasis. Atherosclerosis is localized mainly at areas of geometric irregularity at which blood vessels branch, curve and change diameter, and where blood is subjected to sudden changes in velocity and/or direction of flow. Shear stress resulting from blood flow is a well known modulator of vascular cell function. This paper presents what is currently known regarding the molecular mechanisms responsible for signal transduction and gene regulation in vascular cells exposed to shear stress. Considering the importance of the hemodynamic environment of vascular cells might be vital to increasing our understanding of diabetes.

  20. Glucose depletion enhances sensitivity to shear stress-induced mechanical damage in red blood cells by rotary blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Sakota, Daisuke; Sakamoto, Ryuki; Yokoyama, Naoyuki; Kobayashi, Mariko; Takatani, Setsuo

    2009-09-01

    The metabolic process in red blood cells (RBCs) is anaerobic. The life-dependent adenosine triphosphate (ATP) for survival of cells is produced through glycolytic process. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of the glucose level on the mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, and hemolysis rate during hemolysis study by rotary blood pumps. The shear stress generated by rotary blood pumps may enhance glucose utilization by RBCs with depletion of glucose affecting ATP production and, consequently, cell size, shape, and morphology. The shear stress increases metabolism of RBCs consuming more energy ATP which is produced anaerobically from glycolytic process. Hence, in the closed circuit testing of rotary blood pumps, depletion of glucose might occur after prolonged pumping, which in turn affects metabolic process of RBCs by changing their size, shape, and morphology. It is thus suggested to monitor and control the glucose level of the fluid that suspends RBCs depending on the study duration. PMID:19775265

  1. Quantitative Measurement of Density in a Shear Band of Metallic Glass Monitored Along its Propagation Direction.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Vitalij; Rösner, Harald; Peterlechner, Martin; Wilde, Gerhard; Voyles, Paul M

    2015-07-17

    Quantitative density measurements from electron scattering show that shear bands in deformed Al88Y7Fe5 metallic glass exhibit alternating high and low density regions, ranging from -9% to +6% relative to the undeformed matrix. Small deflections of the shear band from the main propagation direction coincide with switches in density from higher to lower than the matrix and vice versa, indicating that faster and slower motion (stick slip) occurs during the propagation. Nanobeam diffraction analyses provide clear evidence that the density changes are accompanied by structural changes, suggesting that shear alters the packing of tightly bound short- or medium-range atomic clusters. This bears a striking resemblance to the packing behavior in granular shear bands formed upon deformation of granular media. PMID:26230801

  2. Evaluation of Package Stress during Temperature Cycling using Metal Deformation Measurement and FEM Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeglauer, J.; Bohm, C.; Otremba, R.; Maerz, J.; Nelle, P.; Stecher, M.; Alpern, P.

    2006-02-07

    Plastic encapsulated devices that are exposed to Temperature Cycling (TC) tests undergo an excessive mechanical stress due to different Coefficients of Thermal Expansion (CTE) of the various materials used in the system. Especially in the corners of the die, passivation cracks and shifted metal lines can be observed, which demonstrates an increasing mechanical stress from chip center to the corners of the die. This effect has been known for a long time. This paper presents a simple measurement technique to quantify the mechanical shear stress at the chip-Mold Compound (MC) interface by measuring the deformation of a periodical metal structure. Based on this deformation measurement, we evaluated the stress distribution within the package, and the influence of different parameters such as number of cycles and chip size. Furthermore, these experimental results were compared with FEM simulation, and showed good agreement but could not account in all cases for the total amount of observed shift.

  3. Lateral-shearing, delay-dithering Mach-Zehnder interferometer for spatial coherence measurement.

    PubMed

    Efimov, Anatoly

    2013-11-15

    An image-shearing interferometer of Mach-Zehnder type with corner cubes is introduced for the purpose of measuring spatial coherence at the output of inhomogeneous optical sources, such as multimode fibers (MMFs). One arm of the interferometer is modulated in optical delay to produce dynamic interference fringes. Fringe visibility and the two individual intensities are measured nearly simultaneously to allow direct calculation of the modulus of the complex degree of coherence as a function of the lateral shear between the two interferometer arms. Spatial degree of coherence is measured for a step-index MMF pumped with monochromatic and broadband optical sources. PMID:24322064

  4. Measurement of shear-wave velocity by ultrasound critical-angle reflectometry (UCR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, S.; Antich, P.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    There exists a growing body of research that relates the measurement of pressure-wave velocity in bone to different physiological conditions and treatment modalities. The shear-wave velocity has been less studied, although it is necessary for a more complete understanding of the mechanical properties of bone. Ultrasound critical-angle reflectometry (UCR) is a noninvasive and nondestructive technique previously used to measure pressure-wave velocities both in vitro and in vivo. This note describes its application to the measurement of shear-wave velocity in bone, whether directly accessible or covered by soft tissue.

  5. In vitro quantification of time dependent thrombus size using magnetic resonance imaging and computational simulations of thrombus surface shear stresses.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Joshua O; Witmer, Kory P; Neuberger, Thomas; Craven, Brent A; Meyer, Richard S; Deutsch, Steven; Manning, Keefe B

    2014-07-01

    Thrombosis and thromboembolization remain large obstacles in the design of cardiovascular devices. In this study, the temporal behavior of thrombus size within a backward-facing step (BFS) model is investigated, as this geometry can mimic the flow separation which has been found to contribute to thrombosis in cardiac devices. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used to quantify thrombus size and collect topographic data of thrombi formed by circulating bovine blood through a BFS model for times ranging between 10 and 90 min at a constant upstream Reynolds number of 490. Thrombus height, length, exposed surface area, and volume are measured, and asymptotic behavior is observed for each as the blood circulation time is increased. Velocity patterns near, and wall shear stress (WSS) distributions on, the exposed thrombus surfaces are calculated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Both the mean and maximum WSS on the exposed thrombus surfaces are much more dependent on thrombus topography than thrombus size, and the best predictors for asymptotic thrombus length and volume are the reattachment length and volume of reversed flow, respectively, from the region of separated flow downstream of the BFS. PMID:24805351

  6. Psychological stress measure in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Trovato, G M; Catalano, D; Martines, G F; Spadaro, D; Di Corrado, D; Crispi, V; Garufi, G; Di Nuovo, S

    2006-01-01

    Psychological stress has been implicated as a cause of several psychosomatic disorders, but also as a factor that can unfavourably influence many diseases including diabetes mellitus. Measure of psychological stress in diabetes was performed by Psychological Stress Measure (PSM), a validated instrument, designed using 49 items drawn from descriptors generated by focus groups on stress. Clinical and psychological framework was assessed in a cohort of 100 type 2 diabetic patients (30 m, 70 f), aged 66.99 +/- 13.68 years considering disease grade, complications and level of instruction. Three other questionnaires were administered concurrently to all patients: Sickness Impact Profile (SIP), Functional Living Index (FLI) and SF-36 QOL. ANOVA statistical testing and Spearman correlation matrix were used also vs socio-cultural and clinical profile. Gender, obesity, diet compliance, smoking do not affect PSM response. Hypertensive patients and those with family history of diabetes show lower PSM scores, according to a sort of moderator effect on stress of concurrent and/or previous experience with chronic disease. Neuromuscular ailments are more prevalent in women; men vs women experience severe limitations of their working capacities and relational possibilities, with severe discomfort. In the whole, higher scores of PSM (greater stress p < 0.01) and lower scores of FLI (fair well-being perception; p < 0.01) are reciprocally related inside any school instruction level. Despite the great reciprocal association of the PSM vs FLI and SIP, no significant correlation is found between PSM vs SF-36 QOL. Socio-cultural elements interfere, and particularly instruction level quantified as school grades achieved, with the manner of living their disease. Interventions on psychological distress of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients is warranted, specially in the groups with lower levels of instruction which may need an attentive strategy for achieving a satisfactory coping with this disease. PMID:16705951

  7. Intracellular pH changes in human aortic smooth muscle cells in response to fluid shear stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stamatas, G. N.; Patrick, C. W. Jr; McIntire, L. V.

    1997-01-01

    The smooth muscle cell (SMC) layers of human arteries may be exposed to blood flow after endothelium denudation, for example, following balloon angioplasty treatment. These SMCs are also constantly subjected to pressure driven transmural fluid flow. Flow-induced shear stress can alter SMC growth and metabolism. Signal transduction mechanisms involved in these flow effects on SMCs are still poorly understood. In this work, the hypothesis that shear stress alters the intracellular pH (pHi) of SMC is examined. When exposed to venous and arterial levels of shear stress, human aortic smooth muscle cells (hASMC) undergo alkalinization. The alkalinization plateau persisted even after 20 min of cell exposure to flow. Addition of amiloride (10 micromoles) or its 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl) analog (EIPA, 10 micromoles), both Na+/H+ exchanger inhibitors, attenuated intracellular alkalinization, suggesting the involvement of the Na+/H+ exchanger in this response. The same concentrations of these inhibitors did not show an effect on pHi of hASMCs in static culture. 4-Acetamido-4'-isothio-cyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (SITS, 1 mM), a Cl-/HCO3- exchange inhibitor, affected the pHi of hASMCs both in static and flow conditions. Our results suggest that flow may perturb the Na+/H+ exchanger leading to an alkalinization of hASMCs, a different response from the flow-induced acidification seen with endothelial cells at the same levels of shear stress. Understanding the flow-induced signal transduction pathways in the vascular cells is of great importance in the tissue engineering of vascular grafts. In the case of SMCs, the involvement of pHi changes in nitric oxide production and proliferation regulation highlights further the significance of such studies.

  8. Study on the high temperature deformation measurement using the mark shearing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huaixi; Xie, Huimin; Dai, Xianglu; Wu, Lifu

    2015-09-01

    The mark shearing technique has been successfully utilized for room-temperature strain measurement in solid mechanics research. However, when the method is applied to deformation measurement at high temperature, some new issues will occur. From our experience, we have found that an inevitable thermal radiation will emit from the oven in the measurement and may lead to a distortion of the measuring system. As a result, an undesired measurement error will arise; furthermore, the oxidation resistance marker is crucial to obtain an ideal result. In order to solve the abovementioned issues, the mark shearing techniques for high-temperature deformation measurement are studied in this work, and a novel method for fabricating the marker pattern is proposed, which can be utilized to fabricate a deformation carrier for high temperature on a different specimen surface. In combination with this marker with our self-developed mark shearing system, the high-temperature (1000?°C) mechanical properties of the high-temperature nickel alloy (GH4037) was measured. In order to characterize the thermal deformation caused by the oven during the high temperature experiment, the surface temperature distribution of the mark shearing system is measured by an infrared camera. On the basis of this result, the corresponding thermal deformation is analyzed by the finite element analysis (FEM) method. From the analysis result, we can conclude that the virtual strain of the system incurred by thermal radiation cannot be ignored for a long-time measurement.

  9. Measuring work stress among Dutch dentists.

    PubMed

    Gorter, R C; Albrecht, G; Hoogstraten, J; Eijkman, M A

    1999-06-01

    Individual differences among dentists determine to a large degree what is experienced as work stress, but assessment of specific areas is necessary to be able to act preventively. The aim of this study was to develop an instrument to be used to monitor the experience of work stress in detail, to measure its levels, and to relate those levels to job (dis-) satisfaction. A questionnaire was developed, the Dentists' Experienced Work Stress Scale (DEWSS), covering widespread aspects of dental work, which was completed by 709 dentists, forming a highly representative sample of Dutch general dental practitioners. Factorial, correlational, and reliability analyses were conducted, after which seven areas of stress emerged: Work Pressure, Financial Aspects, Patient Contacts, Work Contents, Career Aspects, Team Aspects, and Professional and Private Life. Of these, Patient Contacts and Work Contents showed highest mean scores, as did the specific items: 'defaulters', 'governmental instructions', and 'unreasonable or demanding patients'. A strong inverse relationship was found between work stress, in particular lack of career perspective, and job satisfaction. The questionnaire is a valuable instrument to monitor pressure at work as felt by Dutch general dental practitioners. Patient contacts, work pressure, and career perspective clearly need preventive attention in the Dutch situation. PMID:10858747

  10. High glucose induced NF-kappaB DNA-binding activity in HAEC is maintained under low shear stress but inhibited under high shear stress: role of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Sumathy; Hamuro, Masao; Koyoma, Koichi; Sorescu, George P; Jo, Hanjoong; Natarajan, Mohan

    2003-12-01

    In the present study, we investigated whether low shear (LS, 2 dyn/cm2) favors high glucose (HG, 30 mM) induced nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) activity by regulating NO release in human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC). The results show that (i) under LS, the NF-kappaB activity of HAEC exposed to HG was significantly higher than HAEC in normal glucose (NG, 5.5mM) (P < 0.05). In contrast, under HS, the activation of NF-kappaB in HAEC exposed to HG showed no significant difference compared to that of NG. (ii) The NF-kappaB activity induced by HG is suppressed by high shear (HS) in the absence of a NO synthase inhibitor, Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) but restored in its presence, while LS + HG induced NF-kappaB activity remains the same in the presence or absence of L-NAME. (iii) Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) protein expression and quantitative detection of NO indicated that high shear stress significantly induced higher eNOS expression and NO production compared to low shear stress condition. Collectively, these data suggest that HS exerts a protective effect on HG induced NF-kappaB activity through NO mediated signaling. LS, on the other hand, may down-regulate eNOS expression resulting in reduced NO release, and thereby maintain high glucose induced NF-kappaB DNA-binding activity. These observations explain, in part, the mechanism by means of which hyperglycemia accelerates the focal development of atherosclerotic lesions in low shear (lesion prone) areas of the arterial tree. PMID:14644391

  11. The orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 inhibits low shear stress-induced carotid artery remodeling in mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ying; Cai, Zhaohua; Cui, Mingli; Nie, Peng; Sun, Zhe; Sun, Shiqun; Chu, Shichun; Wang, Xiaolei; Hu, Liuhua; Yi, Jing; Shen, Linghong; He, Ben

    2015-12-01

    Shear stress, particularly low and oscillatory shear stress, plays a critical pathophysiological role in vascular remodeling-related cardiovascular diseases. Growing evidence suggests that the orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 [also known as TR3 or nuclear receptor subfamily 4, group A, member 1 (NR4A1)] is expressed in diseased human vascular tissue and plays an important role in vascular physiology and pathology. In the present study, we used a mouse model of flow-dependent remodeling by partial ligation of the left common carotid artery (LCCA) to define the exact role of Nur77 in vascular remodeling induced by low shear stress. Following vascular remodeling, Nur77 was highly expressed in neointimal vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in the ligated carotid arteries. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were elevated in the remodeled arteries in vivo and in primary rat VSMCs in vitro following stimulation with platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). Further in vitro experiments revealed that Nur77 expression was rapidly increased in the VSMCs following stimulation with PDGF and H2O2, whereas treatment with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC, a ROS scavenger) reversed the increase in the protein level of Nur77 induced by H2O2. Moreover, Nur77 overexpression markedly inhibited the proliferation and migration of VSMCs, induced by PDGF. Finally, to determine the in vivo role of Nur77 in low shear stress-induced vascular remodeling, wild-type (WT) and Nur77-deficient mice were subjected to partial ligation of the LCCA. Four weeks following surgery, in the LCCAs of the Nur77?deficient mice, a significant increase in the intima-media area and carotid intima-media thickness was noted, as well as more severe elastin disruption and collagen deposition compared to the WT mice. Immunofluorescence staining revealed an increase in VSMC proliferation [determined by the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)] and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) production in the Nur77-deficient mice. There was no difference in the number of intimal apoptotic cells between the groups. Taken together, our results indicate that Nur77 may be a sensor of oxidative stress and an inhibitor of vascular remodeling induced by low shear stress. Nur77, as well as its downstream cell signals, may thus be a potential therapeutic target for the suppression of vascular remodeling. PMID:26498924

  12. The orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 inhibits low shear stress-induced carotid artery remodeling in mice

    PubMed Central

    YU, YING; CAI, ZHAOHUA; CUI, MINGLI; NIE, PENG; SUN, ZHE; SUN, SHIQUN; CHU, SHICHUN; WANG, XIAOLEI; HU, LIUHUA; YI, JING; SHEN, LINGHONG; HE, BEN

    2015-01-01

    Shear stress, particularly low and oscillatory shear stress, plays a critical pathophysiological role in vascular remodeling-related cardiovascular diseases. Growing evidence suggests that the orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 [also known as TR3 or nuclear receptor subfamily 4, group A, member 1 (NR4A1)] is expressed in diseased human vascular tissue and plays an important role in vascular physiology and pathology. In the present study, we used a mouse model of flow-dependent remodeling by partial ligation of the left common carotid artery (LCCA) to define the exact role of Nur77 in vascular remodeling induced by low shear stress. Following vascular remodeling, Nur77 was highly expressed in neointimal vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in the ligated carotid arteries. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were elevated in the remodeled arteries in vivo and in primary rat VSMCs in vitro following stimulation with platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). Further in vitro experiments revealed that Nur77 expression was rapidly increased in the VSMCs following stimulation with PDGF and H2O2, whereas treatment with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC, a ROS scavenger) reversed the increase in the protein level of Nur77 induced by H2O2. Moreover, Nur77 overexpression markedly inhibited the proliferation and migration of VSMCs, induced by PDGF. Finally, to determine the in vivo role of Nur77 in low shear stress-induced vascular remodeling, wild-type (WT) and Nur77-deficient mice were subjected to partial ligation of the LCCA. Four weeks following surgery, in the LCCAs of the Nur77-deficient mice, a significant increase in the intima-media area and carotid intima-media thickness was noted, as well as more severe elastin disruption and collagen deposition compared to the WT mice. Immunofluorescence staining revealed an increase in VSMC proliferation [determined by the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)] and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) production in the Nur77-deficient mice. There was no difference in the number of intimal apoptotic cells between the groups. Taken together, our results indicate that Nur77 may be a sensor of oxidative stress and an inhibitor of vascular remodeling induced by low shear stress. Nur77, as well as its downstream cell signals, may thus be a potential therapeutic target for the suppression of vascular remodeling. PMID:26498924

  13. Effect of initial stress on propagation behaviors of shear horizontal waves in piezoelectric/piezomagnetic layered cylinders.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X; Qian, Z H; Zhang, S; Liu, J X

    2015-12-01

    An analytical approach is taken to investigate shear horizontal wave (SH wave) propagation in layered cylinder with initial stress, where a piezomagnetic (PM) material thin layer is bonded to a piezoelectric (PE) cylinder. Two different material combinations are taken into account, and the phase velocities of the SH waves are numerically calculated for the magnetically open and short cases, respectively. It is found that the initial stress, the thickness ratio and the material performance have a great influence on the phase velocity. The results obtained in this paper can offer fundamental significance to the application of PE/PM composite media or structure for the acoustic wave and microwave technologies. PMID:26138596

  14. Effects of unidirectional flow shear stresses on the formation, fractal microstructure and rigidity of incipient whole blood clots and fibrin gels.

    PubMed

    Badiei, N; Sowedan, A M; Curtis, D J; Brown, M R; Lawrence, M J; Campbell, A I; Sabra, A; Evans, P A; Weisel, J W; Chernysh, I N; Nagaswami, C; Williams, P R; Hawkins, K

    2015-10-12

    Incipient clot formation in whole blood and fibrin gels was studied by the rheometric techniques of controlled stress parallel superposition (CSPS) and small amplitude oscillatory shear (SAOS). The effects of unidirectional shear stress on incipient clot microstructure, formation kinetics and elasticity are reported in terms of the fractal dimension (df) of the fibrin network, the gel network formation time (TGP) and the shear elastic modulus, respectively. The results of this first haemorheological application of CSPS reveal the marked sensitivity of incipient clot microstructure to physiologically relevant levels of shear stress, these being an order of magnitude lower than have previously been studied by SAOS. CSPS tests revealed that exposure of forming clots to increasing levels of shear stress produces a corresponding elevation in df, consistent with the formation of tighter, more compact clot microstructures under unidirectional flow. A corresponding increase in shear elasticity was recorded. The scaling relationship established between shear elasticity and df for fibrin clots and whole blood confirms the fibrin network as the dominant microstructural component of the incipient clot in terms of its response to imposed stress. Supplementary studies of fibrin clot formation by rheometry and microscopy revealed the substantial additional network mass required to increase df and provide evidence to support the hypothesis that microstructural changes in blood clotted under unidirectional shear may be attributed to flow enhanced thrombin generation and activation. CSPS also identified a threshold value of unidirectional shear stress above which no incipient clot formation could be detected. CSPS was shown to be a valuable haemorheological tool for the study of the effects of physiological and pathological levels of shear on clot properties. PMID:25624413

  15. The effect of shear stress on human endothelial cells seeded on cylindrical viscoelastic conduits: an investigation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Vara, Dina S; Punshon, Geoffrey; Sales, Kevin M; Hamilton, George; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2006-11-01

    The present study assesses the effect of physiological shear stress on gene expression from human ECs (endothelial cells) seeded on a small-diameter cylindrical bypass graft constructed from nanocomposite based on poly(carbonate-silsesquioxane-bridge-urea)urethane. ECs were seeded on to 5-mm-diameter conduits, placed in a physiological flow circuit and exposed to 1 or 4 h of shear stress at 1.4+/-0.3 Pa. Subsets of conduits were incubated at 37 degrees C and 5% CO2/95% O2 for a further 4 h to determine if gene expression returned to basal levels. PCR was conducted for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, TGFbeta-1 (transforming growth factor beta-1), COL-1 (collagen-1) and PECAM-1 (platelet/EC adhesion molecule-1). Increases in gene expression were seen following flow in nanocomposite conduits. These were significant at 4 h for TGFbeta-1, COL-1 and PECAM-1. After a 4 h recovery period, there were no significant differences in gene intensity, suggesting that this change is transient. These data prove that mRNA can be obtained from ECs seeded on tubular conduits and exposed to shear stress and that gene-expression studies can be successfully carried out. We believe this is a substantial improvement on studies based on flat sheets. PMID:16756513

  16. Measurement of the Dynamic Shear Modulus of Mouse Brain Tissue In Vivo By Magnetic Resonance Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Atay, Stefan M.; Kroenke, Christopher D.; Sabet, Arash; Bayly, Philip V.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) technique was used to estimate the dynamic shear modulus of mouse brain tissue in vivo. The technique allows visualization and measurement of mechanical shear waves excited by lateral vibration of the skull. Quantitative measurements of displacement in three dimensions (3-D) during vibration at 1200 Hz were obtained by applying oscillatory magnetic field gradients at the same frequency during an MR imaging sequence. Contrast in the resulting phase images of the mouse brain is proportional to displacement. To obtain estimates of shear modulus, measured displacement fields were fitted to the shear wave equation. Validation of the procedure was performed on gel characterized by independent rheometry tests and on data from finite element simulations. Brain tissue is, in reality, viscoelastic and nonlinear. The current estimates of dynamic shear modulus are strictly relevant only to small oscillations at a specific frequency, but these estimates may be obtained at high frequencies (and thus high deformation rates), non-invasively throughout the brain. These data complement measurements of nonlinear viscoelastic properties obtained by others at slower rates, either ex vivo or invasively. PMID:18412500

  17. Transverse shear effects on the stress-intensity factor for a circumferentially cracked, specially orthotropic cylindrical shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.; Erdogan, F.

    1977-01-01

    The problem of a cylindrical shell containing a circumferential through crack is considered by taking into account the effect of transverse shear deformations. The formulation is given for a specially orthotropic material within the confines of a linearized shallow shell theory. The particular theory used permits the consideration of all five boundary conditions regarding moment and stress resultants on the crack surface. Consequently, aside from multiplicative constants representing the stress intensity factors, the membrane and bending components of the asymptotic stress fields near the crack tip are found to be identical. The stress intensity factors are calculated separately for a cylinder under a uniform membrane load, and that under a uniform bending moment. Sample results showing the nature of the out-of-plane crack surface displacement and the effect of the Poisson's ratio are presented.

  18. Thin-Capped Atheromata With Reduced Collagen Content in Pigs Develop in Coronary Arterial Regions Exposed to Persistently Low Endothelial Shear Stress

    E-print Network

    Koskinas, Konstantinos C.

    Objective—The mechanisms promoting the focal formation of rupture-prone coronary plaques in vivo remain incompletely understood. This study tested the hypothesis that coronary regions exposed to low endothelial shear stress ...

  19. Augmented Expression and Activity of Extracellular Matrix-Degrading Enzymes in Regions of Low Endothelial Shear Stress Colocalize With Coronary Atheromata With Thin Fibrous Caps in Pigs

    E-print Network

    Chatzizisis, Yiannis S.

    Background—The molecular mechanisms that determine the localized formation of thin-capped atheromata in the coronary arteries remain unknown. This study tested the hypothesis that low endothelial shear stress augments the ...

  20. Hydroide Storage Vessel wall stress measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.A.; Pechersky, M.J.

    1997-07-31

    Holographic Interferometry and strain gauge measurements were used to determine whether a prototype Hydride Storage Vessel (HSV) swelled while it was loaded in eleven stages with hydrogen. Bed swelling is inferred from deformation of the surface of the HSV. No swelling was detected, even after saturating the hydride material inside the HSV. The large chunky morphology of the titanium is likely responsible for the lack of wall stress. This morphology also implies that decay helium that remains in the titanium hydride (that is, helium that is not released as gas to the free volume) should not cause significant wall stresses when the HSV is used for long-term tritium storage. Holographic interferometry proved to be an extremely sensitive technique to measure swelling, having a detection limit of about 3 microns surface displacement.

  1. The Influence of Salmonid Spawning on Grain Architecture, Critical Bed Shear Stress, and Bed Load Transport in Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxton, T.; Buffington, J. M.; Yager, E. M.; Fremier, A. K.; Hassan, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Salmonid spawning occurs in many high to mid-order streams in North America and Europe, but the detailed mechanics of this disturbance on stream bed mobility is not well studied. We calculated and measured spawning effects on incipient bed mobility and sediment transport in a laboratory flume and found that the tailspill portion of simulated spawning nests ("redds") are less stable than unspawned beds. This result agrees with field research by others, but counters prior calculations of tailspill stability that used grain architecture relationships derived from unspawned beds. Redds have coarser and better sorted surfaces, which reduce grain exposure and protrusion compared to unspawned beds, but load cell measurements of the total resistance to movement of grains on redds were lower despite deeper grain pockets and larger pivot angles. This is because the redd-building process flushed fine sediment that had previously cemented bed material, resulting in a looser bed structure and more mobile grains. These observations are supported by force balance calculations of critical shear stress on redds being lower on average than on unspawned beds. Computational results are supported by visual observations and measurements of bed load transport from redds and unspawned beds in the flume, where redds mobilized sooner and exhibited a higher sediment transport rate than unspawned beds. Redds were observed to erode by translating, then dispersing and evacuating downstream, before grains on the unspawned bed mobilized. Further increase in discharge mobilized greater proportions of the unspawned bed but did not scour the deeper portion of redds where spawners deposit their eggs. Our results suggest both an evolutionary trade-off and advantage to large spawning populations. Namely, the structurally loose tailspill likely increases intragravel flow to eggs at the expense of tailspill instability, which may sufficiently elevate sediment yields in streams with high spawner densities to increase the resilience of fish habitats to sedimentation by landscape disturbance.

  2. A mechanical model of the San Andreas fault and SAFOD Pilot Hole stress measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chery, J.; Zoback, M.D.; Hickman, S.

    2004-01-01

    Stress measurements made in the SAFOD pilot hole provide an opportunity to study the relation between crustal stress outside the fault zone and the stress state within it using an integrated mechanical model of a transform fault loaded in transpression. The results of this modeling indicate that only a fault model in which the effective friction is very low (<0.1) through the seismogenic thickness of the crust is capable of matching stress measurements made in both the far field and in the SAFOD pilot hole. The stress rotation measured with depth in the SAFOD pilot hole (???28??) appears to be a typical feature of a weak fault embedded in a strong crust and a weak upper mantle with laterally variable heat flow, although our best model predicts less rotation (15??) than observed. Stress magnitudes predicted by our model within the fault zone indicate low shear stress on planes parallel to the fault but a very anomalous mean stress, approximately twice the lithostatic stress. Copyright 2004 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Channel adjustment of an unstable coarse-grained stream: Opposing trends of boundary and critical shear stress, and the applicability of extremal hypotheses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simon, A.; Thorne, C.R.

    1996-01-01

    Channel adjustments in the North Fork Toutle River and the Toutle River main stem were initiated by deposition of a 2.5km3 debris avalanche and associated lahars that accompanied the catastrophic eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington on 18 May 1980. Channel widening was the dominant process. In combination, adjustments caused average boundary shear stress to decrease non-linearly with time and critical shear stress to increase non-linearly with time. At the discharge that is equalled or exceeded 1 per cent of the time, these trends converged by 1991-1992 so that excess shear stress approached minimum values. Extremal hypotheses, such as minimization of unit stream power and minimization of the rate of energy dissipation (minimum stream power), are shown to be applicable to dynamic adjustments of the Toutle River system. Maximization of the Darcy-Weisbach friction factor did not occur, but increases in relative bed roughness, caused by the concomitant reduction in hydraulic depths and bed-material coarsening, were documented. Predictions of stable channel geometries using the minimum stream power approach were unsuccessful when compared to the 1991-1992 geometries and bed-material characteristics measured in the field. It is concluded that the predictions are not applicable because the study reaches are not truly stable and cannot become so until a new floodplain has been formed by renewed channel incision, retreat of stream-side hummocks, and establishment of riparian vegetation to limit the destabilizing effects of large floods. Further, prediction of energy slope (and consequently stream power) by the sediment transport equations is inaccurate because of the inability of the equations to account for significant contributions of finer grained (sand and gravel) bank materials (relative to the coarsened channel bed) from bank retreat and from upstream terrace erosion.

  4. Describing and prescribing the constitutive response of yield stress fluids using large amplitude oscillatory shear stress (LAOStress)

    E-print Network

    Dimitriou, Christopher J.

    Large amplitude oscillatory shear (LAOS) is used as a tool to probe the nonlinear rheological response of a model elasto-viscoplastic material (a Carbopol microgel). In contrast to most recent studies, these large amplitude ...

  5. Capillary tone: cyclooxygenase, shear stress, luminal glycocalyx, and hydraulic conductivity (Lp)

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Donna A; Flood, Mary H

    2015-01-01

    Control of capillary hydraulic conductivity (Lp) is the physiological mechanism that underpins systemic hydration. Capillaries form the largest surface of endothelial cells in any species with a cardiovascular system and all capillaries are exposed to the flow-induced force, shear stress (?). Vasoactive molecules such as prostacyclin (cyclooxygenase product, COX) are released from endothelial cells in response to ?. Little is known about how COX activity impacts capillary Lp. The purpose here was to assess Lp in situ following an acute ?? stimulus and during COX1/COX2 inhibition. Mesenteric true capillaries (TC) of Rana pipiens (pithed) were cannulated for Lp assessment using the modified Landis technique. Rana were randomized into Control and Test groups. Two capillaries per animal were used (perfusate, 10 mg·mL?1 BSA/frog Ringer's; superfusate, frog Ringer's or indomethacin (10?5 mol·L?1) mixed in frog Ringer's solution). Three distinct responses of Lp to indomethacin (TC2) were demonstrated (TC1 and TC2 medians: Test Subgroup 1, 3.0 vs. 1.8; Test Subgroup 2, 18.2 vs. 2.2; Test Subgroup 3, 4.2 vs. 10.2 × 10?7 cm·sec?1·cm H2O?1). Multiple regression analysis revealed a relationship between capillary Lp and systemic red blood cell concentration or hematocrit, plasma protein concentration, and ?? (Test Subgroup 1, R2 = 0.59, P < 0.0001; Test Subgroup 2, R2 = 0.96, P = 0.002), but only during COX inhibition. Maintaining red blood cell and plasma protein levels within a normal range may control barrier function in a healthy state. Recovering barrier function may be an unrecognized benefit of transfusions during blood loss or edema formation. PMID:25896981

  6. Capillary tone: cyclooxygenase, shear stress, luminal glycocalyx, and hydraulic conductivity (Lp).

    PubMed

    Williams, Donna A; Flood, Mary H

    2015-04-01

    Control of capillary hydraulic conductivity (Lp) is the physiological mechanism that underpins systemic hydration. Capillaries form the largest surface of endothelial cells in any species with a cardiovascular system and all capillaries are exposed to the flow-induced force, shear stress (?). Vasoactive molecules such as prostacyclin (cyclooxygenase product, COX) are released from endothelial cells in response to ?. Little is known about how COX activity impacts capillary Lp. The purpose here was to assess Lp in situ following an acute ?? stimulus and during COX1/COX2 inhibition. Mesenteric true capillaries (TC) of Rana pipiens (pithed) were cannulated for Lp assessment using the modified Landis technique. Rana were randomized into Control and Test groups. Two capillaries per animal were used (perfusate, 10 mg·mL(-1) BSA/frog Ringer's; superfusate, frog Ringer's or indomethacin (10(-5) mol·L(-1)) mixed in frog Ringer's solution). Three distinct responses of Lp to indomethacin (TC2) were demonstrated (TC1 and TC2 medians: Test Subgroup 1, 3.0 vs. 1.8; Test Subgroup 2, 18.2 vs. 2.2; Test Subgroup 3, 4.2 vs. 10.2 × 10(-7) cm·sec(-1)·cm H2O(-1)). Multiple regression analysis revealed a relationship between capillary Lp and systemic red blood cell concentration or hematocrit, plasma protein concentration, and ?? (Test Subgroup 1, R(2) = 0.59, P < 0.0001; Test Subgroup 2, R(2) = 0.96, P = 0.002), but only during COX inhibition. Maintaining red blood cell and plasma protein levels within a normal range may control barrier function in a healthy state. Recovering barrier function may be an unrecognized benefit of transfusions during blood loss or edema formation. PMID:25896981

  7. The role of wa