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Sample records for shellfish geukensia demissa

  1. Latitudinal variation in protein expression after heat stress in the salt marsh mussel Geukensia demissa.

    PubMed

    Fields, Peter A; Cox, Kelly M; Karch, Kelly R

    2012-11-01

    Individuals of a broadly distributed species often experience significantly different environmental conditions depending on location. For example, the mussel Geukensia demissa occurs intertidally from the Gulf of St. Lawrence to central Florida; within this range, northern populations are exposed to temperatures cold enough to freeze the tissue, whereas southern populations can experience temperatures approaching the species' upper lethal limit. Thus, G. demissa provides an ideal system with which to study physiological variation in conspecifics occurring across a broad latitudinal range. We collected G. demissa at five sites from Maine to Florida, encompassing a range of 1900 km, and have used a proteomic approach to describe how protein expression varies in individuals from the different locations. We acclimated individuals from each site to common conditions (18°C) for 4 weeks, and exposed a subset of these to acute heat stress (40°C). We separated gill proteins using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and quantified abundances of the resulting protein spots. Among mussels acclimated to 18°C protein, expression profiles were more similar among individuals from the same site than among sites, but there was no discernible correlation with latitude. In contrast, after acute heat stress, protein expression among mussels from different locations varied substantially, with 31 of 448 proteins changing in abundance in the northernmost (Maine) group, compared with 5-11 proteins in the four southern groups. Identification of 27 of these proteins revealed five functional clusters: chaperones, cytoskeletal proteins, oxidative stress proteins, regulatory proteins, and a translation initiation factor. Across these functional categories, the two northernmost groups, Maine and New York, showed the greatest number of proteins that changed significantly in abundance, as well as the greatest fold-change in abundance for many of the proteins. We conclude that the northern populations of G. demissa are physiologically distinct from the southern groups, and that the differences in protein-expression profiles are consistent with greater sensitivity to heat stress to the north. PMID:22641835

  2. The introduced ribbed mussel (Geukensia demissa) in Estero de Punta Banda, Mexico: Interactions with the native cord grass, Spartina foliosa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Torchin, M.E.; Hechinger, R.F.; Huspeni, T.C.; Whitney, K.L.; Lafferty, K.D.

    2005-01-01

    Introduced populations of Guekensia demissa occur on the west coast of North America. They have been reported in San Francisco Bay, four southern California wetlands, and in Estero de Punta Banda (EPB), Baja California Norte, Mexico. We randomly sampled benthic invertebrates in four habitat types within EPB: marsh, channel, mudflat and pan. Geukensia demissa was the most abundant bivalve in the wetland at EPB. It was significantly associated with the native cordgrass, Spartina foliosa, and occurred at higher average densities in vegetated marsh sites (24/m2) and Spartina-dominated tidal channels (35/m2), compared to mudflat (0/m2), and pan (0/m 2) sites. We estimated that the total biomass of this invader was over four times that of the next most abundant bivalve, Tagelus spp., in EPB. We examined G. demissa for parasites and found that only a few native parasites colonized this introduced host at very low prevalences and intensities. We performed bird surveys to determine the habitat overlap and potential impact of this mussel on the EPB population of light-footed clapper rails (Rallus longirostrus levipes), an endangered species in the United States. The high abundance of G. demissa in EPB, its presence in clapper rail habitat, and its known effects on salt marsh habitat in it's native range, warrant further investigations of the impact of this invader in EPB and elsewhere. ?? Springer 2005.

  3. Particle selection in the ribbed mussel Geukensia demissa and the Eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica: Effect of microalgae growth stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pales Espinosa, Emmanuelle; Allam, Bassem; Ford, Susan E.

    2008-08-01

    We studied particle selection in the ribbed mussel Geukensia demissa, an important suspension-feeding inhabitant of estuaries and intertidal zones of salt marshes along the Atlantic coast of North America. Adult mussels were fed on several mixtures of microalgal cultures (1) in exponential or (2) in stationary phase of growth, and the proportional occurrence of algal species in pseudofeces was examined by flow cytometry. The Eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, was chosen as a reference. Results showed that both mussels and oysters were able to selectively ingest or reject our experimental microalgae. Moreover, the pre-ingestive particle selection was affected by microalgal growth phase, particularly in mussels. For instance, the sorting efficiency index increased significantly in mussels fed with a blend made of Nitzschia closterium, Isochrysis sp. and Tetraselmis suesica harvested in stationary growth phase, as compared to the same blend made with microalgae in exponential growth phase. Isochrysis sp. and T. suesica were preferentially ingested by both bivalves whereas N. closterium, was preferentially rejected in pseudofeces. These results demonstrate particle selection in ribbed mussel and underline the effect of algae growth phase on the sorting mechanisms.

  4. Changes in protein expression in the salt marsh mussel Geukensia demissa: evidence for a shift from anaerobic to aerobic metabolism during prolonged aerial exposure

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Peter A.; Eurich, Chris; Gao, William L.; Cela, Bekim

    2014-01-01

    During aerial exposure (emersion), most sessile intertidal invertebrates experience cellular stress caused by hypoxia, and the amount and types of hypoxia-induced stress will differ as exposure time increases, likely leading to altered metabolic responses. We examined proteomic responses to increasing emersion times and decreasing recovery (immersion) times in the mussel Geukensia demissa, which occurs in salt marshes along the east coast of North America. Individuals are found above mean tide level, and can be emersed for over 18 h during spring tides. We acclimated mussels to full immersion at 15°C for 4 weeks, and compared changes in gill protein expression between groups of mussels that were continually immersed (control), were emersed for 6 h and immersed during recovery for 18 h (6E/18R), were emersed for 12 h and recovered for 12 h (12E/12R), or were emersed for 18 h with a 6 h recovery (18E/6R). We found clear differences in protein expression patterns among the treatments. Proteins associated with anaerobic fermentation increased in abundance in 6E/18R but not in 12E/12R or 18E/6R. Increases in oxidative stress proteins were most apparent in 12E/12R, and in 18E/6R changes in cytoskeletal protein expression predominated. We conclude that G. demissa alters its strategy for coping with emersion stress over time, relying on anaerobic metabolism for short- to medium-duration exposure, but switching to an air-gaping strategy for long-term exposure, which reduces hypoxia stress but may cause structural damage to gill tissue. PMID:24501137

  5. Chemical and ancillary data associated with bed sediment, young of year Bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) tissue, and mussel (Mytilus edulis and Geukensia demissa) tissue collected after Hurricane Sandy in bays and estuaries of New Jersey and New York, 2013–14

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smalling, Kelly L.; Deshpande, Ashok D.; Blazer, Vicki; Galbraith, Heather S.; Dockum, Bruce W.; Romanok, Kristin M.; Colella, Kaitlyn; Deetz, Anna C.; Fisher, Irene J.; Imbrigiotta, Thomas E.; Sharack, Beth; Summer, Lisa; Timmons, DeMond; Trainor, John J.; Wieczorek, Daniel; Samson, Jennifer; Reilly, Timothy J.; Focazio, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Twenty three PCB congeners, 9 PBDE congeners, and 20 OCPs were detected in composite mussel samples collected throughout the study area. The co-eluting PCB congeners 153 and 132, PBDE 47, 99, and 100, and p,p’-DDE were detected in samples from each site. The highest median concentrations of PCBs and PBDEs were present in mussels from Raritan Bay, N.Y., whereas the highest median concentrations of OCPs were present in mussels from Fire Island Inlet, N.Y., and Shark River, N.J. Mytilus edulis (blue mussels) and Geukensia demissa (ribbed mussels) were thin-sectioned and aged. The blue mussels collected ranged in age from 4 to 13 years, and the ribbed mussels ranged in age from 3 to 12 years.

  6. RELATIONSHIPS AMONG TOTAL LIPID, LIPID CLASSES AND POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYL CONCENTRATIONS IN TWO INDIGENOUS POPULATIONS OF RIBBED MUSSELS (GUKENSIA DEMISSA) OVER AN ANNUAL CYCLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two indigenous ribbed mussel (Geukensia demissa) populations were sampled approximately every four weeks during 1997 to investigate the relationships among concentrations of total lipid, lipid classes, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). One population was located in a highly c...

  7. Particle selection in the ribbed mussel Geukensia demissa and the Eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica: Effect of microalgae growth stage

    E-print Network

    Allam, Bassem

    -ingestive particle selection was affected by microalgal growth phase, particularly in mussels. For instance, reduces turbidity, increases light in the bottom and as a result stimulates microalgae growth (Dame, 1996 virginica: Effect of microalgae growth stage Emmanuelle Pales Espinosa a , Bassem Allam a,*, Susan E. Ford b

  8. Shellfish Allergy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... can react to touching shellfish or breathing in vapors from cooking shellfish. Shellfish allergy can develop at ... hives red spots swelling a drop in blood pressure causing lightheadedness or loss of consciousness Your child ...

  9. Shellfish Allergy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... You Do? Reading Food Labels Managing Serious Reactions Peter had always loved seafood. So he was surprised ... enjoyed shellfish with no problem. The next time Peter ate shrimp, the reaction was more severe: His ...

  10. Shellfish contamination and spoilage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molluscan shellfish are prone to contamination by fecal and vibrio bacteria, fecal viruses, biotoxins, and chemical pollutants. In this book chapter, the problems and challenges for the shellfish industry are described and discussed. Basic regulatory frameworks, management strategies, critical cont...

  11. Is shellfish consumption safe?

    PubMed

    Diaz, James H

    2004-01-01

    Louisiana provides nearly 40% of domestic seafood production. America's commercial fisheries, especially coastal shellfish fisheries, now face crippling economic and environmental pressures from seafood imports, over-fishing, urban and agricultural wastewater runoff, harmful algal blooms, and coastal wetlands loss. As a result of these ecosystem stresses, seafood-borne disease now causes 37% of all foodborne illness in the United States. Louisiana and other coastal-state physicians can effectively curtail the rising threat of local shellfish-borne disease outbreaks by supporting responsible coastal restoration and regulation of commercial shell-fishing, especially oyster fishing, and by recommending careful selection and preparation of all shellfish and crustaceans. PMID:15366346

  12. Molluscan shellfish allergy.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Steve L

    2008-01-01

    Food allergies affect approximately 3.5-4.0% of the worldwide population. Immediate-type food allergies are mediated by the production of IgE antibodies to specific proteins that occur naturally in allergenic foods. Symptoms are individually variable ranging from mild rashes and hives to life-threatening anaphylactic shock. Seafood allergies are among the most common types of food allergies on a worldwide basis. Allergies to fish and crustacean shellfish are very common. Molluscan shellfish allergies are well known but do not appear to occur as frequently. Molluscan shellfish allergies have been documented to all classes of mollusks including gastropods (e.g., limpet, abalone), bivalves (e.g., clams, oysters, mussels), and cephalopods (e.g., squid, octopus). Tropomyosin, a major muscle protein, is the only well-recognized allergen in molluscan shellfish. The allergens in oyster (Cra g 1), abalone (Hal m 1), and squid (Tod p 1) have been identified as tropomyosin. Cross-reactivity to tropomyosin from other molluscan shellfish species has been observed with sera from patients allergic to oysters, suggesting that individuals with allergies to molluscan shellfish should avoid eating all species of molluscan shellfish. Cross-reactions with the related tropomyosin allergens in crustacean shellfish may also occur but this is less clearly defined. Occupational allergies have also been described in workers exposed to molluscan shellfish products by the respiratory and/or cutaneous routes. With food allergies, one man's food may truly be another man's poison. Individuals with food allergies react adversely to the ingestion of foods and food ingredients that most consumers can safely ingest (Taylor and Hefle, 2001). The allergens that provoke adverse reactions in susceptible individuals are naturally occurring proteins in the specific foods (Bush and Hefle, 1996). Molluscan shellfish, like virtually all foods that contain protein, can provoke allergic reactions in some individuals. PMID:18291306

  13. Amnesic Shellfish Poisoning

    MedlinePLUS

    ... be adversely affected by toxic or harmful marine algae. + Causative algae implicated, not confirmed. Medical Community Amnesic Shellfish Poisoning ... Contact Us | Related Links | Site Map The Harmful Algae Page is supported by a National Oceanic and ...

  14. Neurotoxic Shellfish Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Sharon M.; Reich, Andrew; Fleming, Lora E.; Hammond, Roberta

    2008-01-01

    Neurotoxic shellfish poisoning (NSP) is caused by consumption of molluscan shellfish contaminated with brevetoxins primarily produced by the dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis. Blooms of K. brevis, called Florida red tide, occur frequently along the Gulf of Mexico. Many shellfish beds in the US (and other nations) are routinely monitored for presence of K. brevis and other brevetoxin-producing organisms. As a result, few NSP cases are reported annually from the US. However, infrequent larger outbreaks do occur. Cases are usually associated with recreationally-harvested shellfish collected during or post red tide blooms. Brevetoxins are neurotoxins which activate voltage-sensitive sodium channels causing sodium influx and nerve membrane depolarization. No fatalities have been reported, but hospitalizations occur. NSP involves a cluster of gastrointestinal and neurological symptoms: nausea and vomiting, paresthesias of the mouth, lips and tongue as well as distal paresthesias, ataxia, slurred speech and dizziness. Neurological symptoms can progress to partial paralysis; respiratory distress has been recorded. Recent research has implicated new species of harmful algal bloom organisms which produce brevetoxins, identified additional marine species which accumulate brevetoxins, and has provided additional information on the toxicity and analysis of brevetoxins. A review of the known epidemiology and recommendations for improved NSP prevention are presented. PMID:19005578

  15. Paralytic shellfish poisoning.

    PubMed Central

    Acres, J.; Gray, J.

    1978-01-01

    Two cases of paralytic shellfish poisoning after ingestion of mussels occurred in October 1977 in Nova Scotia. The incidence of this type of poisoning is relatively high among persons living on the coast of the Bay of Fundy and the estuary of the St. Lawrence River. The causative organism, Gonyaulax tamarensis, elaborates an endotoxin, saxitoxin, that blocks neuromuscular transmission in the motor axon and muscle membrane while leaving the end-plate unaffected; it also suppresses conduction in the atrioventricular node and inhibits the respiratory centre. The clinical manifestations are unique and include numbness of the lips, tongue and fingertips within minutes of ingestion of the poisoned shellfish, then numbness of the legs, arms and neck, with general muscular incoordination, and finally respiratory distress and muscular paralysis. Treatment is symptomatic and prevention can only occur by public education. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:570450

  16. November 2012 Washington Shellfish Initiative

    E-print Network

    November 2012 Washington Shellfish Initiative Scientific Summary of Ocean Acidification Panel on Ocean Acidification #12;NOTICE from NOAA Mention of a commercial company or product does and Back Cover Graphic: Acknowledgments: Scientific Summary of Ocean Acidification in Washington State

  17. The Influence of Feral Horse Activity on Water and Shellfish (Gukensia demissa) Quality Along the Western Coast of Assateague Island National Seashore, Maryland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Feral horses (Equus caballus) inhabit portions of the Western United States and some barrier islands along the East Coast. Approximately 150 feral horses are located on Assateague Island National Seashore (ASIS), Maryland, a barrier island popular with tourists and recreational fishermen. This stu...

  18. Shellfish Allergy: a Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Pedrosa, María; Boyano-Martínez, Teresa; García-Ara, Carmen; Quirce, Santiago

    2015-10-01

    Shellfish allergy is of increasing concern, as its prevalence has risen in recent years. Many advances have been made in allergen characterization. B cell epitopes in the major allergen tropomyosin have been characterized. In addition to tropomyosin, arginine kinase, sarcoplasmic calcium-binding protein, and myosin light chain have recently been reported in shellfish. All are proteins that play a role in muscular contraction. Additional allergens such as hemocyanin have also been described. The effect of processing methods on these allergens has been studied, revealing thermal stability and resistance to peptic digestion in some cases. Modifications after Maillard reactions have also been addressed, although in some cases with conflicting results. In recent years, new hypoallergenic molecules have been developed, which constitute a new therapeutic approach to allergic disorders. A recombinant hypoallergenic tropomyosin has been developed, which opens a new avenue in the treatment of shellfish allergy. Cross-reactivity with species that are not closely related is common in shellfish-allergic patients, as many of shellfish allergens are widely distributed panallergens in invertebrates. Cross-reactivity with house dust mites is well known, but other species can also be involved in this phenomenon. PMID:24870065

  19. Effects of low and high salinity regimes on seasonal gametogenesis of the ribbed mussel Geukensia granosissima in coastal Louisiana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Honig, Aaron; LaPeyre, Megan K.; Supan, John

    2014-01-01

    Benthic intertidal bivalves play an essential role in estuarine ecosystems by contributing to habitat provision, water filtration, and host vegetation productivity. As such, ecosystem level changes that impact population distributions and persistence of local bivalve populations may have large ecosystem level consequences, making it important to better understand the population ecology of native bivalves. In order to determine potential impacts of shifting salinity and temperature regimes along the northern Gulf of Mexico, the seasonal timing of gametogenesis in the Gulf estuarine ribbed mussel, Geukensia granossisima, was examined across a salinity gradient in southeastern Louisiana, from July 2011 through October 2012. Ten mussels were randomly sampled monthly from low (~ 5) and high (~25) salinity marsh sites in southeastern Louisiana, and histologically processed to determine the seasonal progression of gametogenesis. Peak ripeness occurred at both sites between April and September, was positively correlated with temperature, and coincided with seasonal shifts in salinity. Mussels located in lower salinity waters demonstrated a shorter period of gametogenesis, and lower rates of ripeness indicating that changes in salinity regimes may impact long-term population dynamics.

  20. Risk Assessment of Shellfish Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Munday, Rex; Reeve, John

    2013-01-01

    Complex secondary metabolites, some of which are highly toxic to mammals, are produced by many marine organisms. Some of these organisms are important food sources for marine animals and, when ingested, the toxins that they produce may be absorbed and stored in the tissues of the predators, which then become toxic to animals higher up the food chain. This is a particular problem with shellfish, and many cases of poisoning are reported in shellfish consumers each year. At present, there is no practicable means of preventing uptake of the toxins by shellfish or of removing them after harvesting. Assessment of the risk posed by such toxins is therefore required in order to determine levels that are unlikely to cause adverse effects in humans and to permit the establishment of regulatory limits in shellfish for human consumption. In the present review, the basic principles of risk assessment are described, and the progress made toward robust risk assessment of seafood toxins is discussed. While good progress has been made, it is clear that further toxicological studies are required before this goal is fully achieved. PMID:24226039

  1. 7 CFR 60.133 - Wild fish and shellfish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Wild fish and shellfish. 60.133 Section 60.133... FOR FISH AND SHELLFISH General Provisions Definitions § 60.133 Wild fish and shellfish. Wild fish and shellfish means naturally-born or hatchery-originated fish or shellfish released in the wild, and...

  2. 7 CFR 60.133 - Wild fish and shellfish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Wild fish and shellfish. 60.133 Section 60.133... FOR FISH AND SHELLFISH General Provisions Definitions § 60.133 Wild fish and shellfish. Wild fish and shellfish means naturally-born or hatchery-originated fish or shellfish released in the wild, and...

  3. 7 CFR 60.133 - Wild fish and shellfish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Wild fish and shellfish. 60.133 Section 60.133... FOR FISH AND SHELLFISH General Provisions Definitions § 60.133 Wild fish and shellfish. Wild fish and shellfish means naturally-born or hatchery-originated fish or shellfish released in the wild, and...

  4. 7 CFR 60.133 - Wild fish and shellfish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Wild fish and shellfish. 60.133 Section 60.133... FOR FISH AND SHELLFISH General Provisions Definitions § 60.133 Wild fish and shellfish. Wild fish and shellfish means naturally-born or hatchery-originated fish or shellfish released in the wild, and...

  5. 7 CFR 60.133 - Wild fish and shellfish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Wild fish and shellfish. 60.133 Section 60...CONTINUED) COUNTRY OF ORIGIN LABELING FOR FISH AND SHELLFISH General Provisions Definitions § 60.133 Wild fish and shellfish. Wild fish and...

  6. 7 CFR 60.133 - Wild fish and shellfish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Wild fish and shellfish. 60.133 Section 60...CONTINUED) COUNTRY OF ORIGIN LABELING FOR FISH AND SHELLFISH General Provisions Definitions § 60.133 Wild fish and shellfish. Wild fish and...

  7. 7 CFR 60.133 - Wild fish and shellfish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Wild fish and shellfish. 60.133 Section 60...CONTINUED) COUNTRY OF ORIGIN LABELING FOR FISH AND SHELLFISH General Provisions Definitions § 60.133 Wild fish and shellfish. Wild fish and...

  8. 7 CFR 60.133 - Wild fish and shellfish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Wild fish and shellfish. 60.133 Section 60...CONTINUED) COUNTRY OF ORIGIN LABELING FOR FISH AND SHELLFISH General Provisions Definitions § 60.133 Wild fish and shellfish. Wild fish and...

  9. Enteric virus and vibrio contamination of shellfish: intervention strategies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    INTRODUCTION. Molluscan shellfish include oysters, clams, mussels, and cockles, which can cause illnesses from a variety of human pathogens. Enteric viruses, like norovirus and hepatitis A virus, are generally transmitted to shellfish through fecal contamination of shellfish harvesting areas, alth...

  10. Fish and Shellfish Associated Disease Outbreaks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, M.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of disease outbreaks related to fish and shellfish, covering publications of 1976-77. This review covers the chemical, bacterial, and viral diseases that are transmitted by fish and shellfish. A list of 50 references is also presented. (HM)

  11. CONTAMINATION OF ATLANTIC COAST COMMERCIAL SHELLFISH

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shellfish (oysters and/or clams) were obtained from 37 commercial harvesting sites in 12 Atlantic coast states from Maine to Florida and 1 site in New Brunswick, Canada. Gill washings from 25 shellfish at each site were examined by immunofluorescence microscopy (IFA) for oocysts of Cryptosporidium. ...

  12. Challenges for Norovirus Detection within Shellfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The GPTT method was developed for rapid extraction of viral RNA that contains a polyA tail from contaminated shellfish to facilitate RT-PCR-based detection methods. This is a four-step method that involves blending shellfish tissue in pH 9.5 glycine buffer, and concentrating the extracted virus by ...

  13. Detection of enteric viruses in shellfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Norovirus and hepatitis A virus contamination are significant threats to the safety of shellfish and other foods. Methods for the extraction and assay of these viruses from shellfish are complex, time consuming, and technically challenging. Here, we itemize some of the salient points in extracting...

  14. Diarrhetic Shellfish Poisoning, Washington, USA, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Duchin, Jeffrey S.; Borchert, Jerry; Quintana, Harold Flores; Robertson, Alison

    2013-01-01

    Diarrhetic shellfish poisoning is a gastrointestinal illness caused by consumption of bivalves contaminated with dinophysistoxins. We report an illness cluster in the United States in which toxins were confirmed in shellfish from a commercial harvest area, leading to product recall. Ongoing surveillance is needed to prevent similar illness outbreaks. PMID:23876232

  15. Red Tide and Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dale, Barrie; Yentsch, Clarice M.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the nature and cause of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP). Includes toxic dinoflagellate ecology, taxonomy and life history, and chemistry of the toxins. Recent work with trace metals and directions of future research are also given. (MA)

  16. Not all shellfish "allergy" is allergy!

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The popularity of shellfish has been increasing worldwide, with a consequent increase in adverse reactions that can be allergic or toxic. The approximate prevalence of shellfish allergy is estimated at 0.5-2.5% of the general population, depending on degree of consumption by age and geographic regions. The manifestations of shellfish allergy vary widely, but it tends to be more severe than most other food allergens. Tropomyosin is the major allergen and is responsible for cross-reactivity between members of the shellfish family, particularly among the crustacea. Newly described allergens and subtle differences in the structures of tropomyosin between different species of shellfish could account for the discrepancy between in vitro cross-antigenicity and clinical cross-allergenicity. The diagnosis requires a thorough medical history supported by skin testing or measurement of specific IgE level, and confirmed by appropriate oral challenge testing unless the reaction was life-threatening. Management of shellfish allergy is basically strict elimination, which in highly allergic subjects may include avoidance of touching or smelling and the availability of self-administered epinephrine. Specific immunotherapy is not currently available and requires the development of safe and effective protocols. PMID:22410209

  17. As required by the Interstate Shellfish Sanitation Conference, National Shellfish Sanita-tion Program, harvesting of bivalve (filter-feeding) shellfish is prohibited in an area

    E-print Network

    Florida, University of

    of killing fish, birds, and other marine animals. Brevetoxins may also cause health problems in humans cell concentrations and closing shellfish areas when K. bre- vis populations reach dangerous levels can kill fish, birds, marine mammals and shellfish and can cause Neurotoxic Shellfish Poisoning

  18. 48 CFR 852.270-3 - Purchase of shellfish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Purchase of shellfish. 852.270-3 Section 852.270-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS CLAUSES... Purchase of shellfish. As prescribed in 870.111-3, insert the following clause: Purchase of Shellfish...

  19. 48 CFR 852.270-3 - Purchase of shellfish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Purchase of shellfish. 852.270-3 Section 852.270-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS CLAUSES... Purchase of shellfish. As prescribed in 870.111-3, insert the following clause: Purchase of Shellfish...

  20. A Potential Mechanism of Virus Persistence within Bivalve Shellfish.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The process of enteric virus bioaccumulation by molluscan shellfish has been widely studied and documented. However, it is not understood why some human enteric viruses, which cannot replicate within shellfish, are selectively retained and remain viable within shellfish tissues for extended periods...

  1. BARATARIA/TERREBONNE SHELLFISH CHALLENGE INITATIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project provides the resources to the Barataria/Terrebonne National Estuary Program to work toward implementation of projects in the four general categories below that will allow the opening of closed shellfish growing waters to harvest. v Connecting poorly operating se...

  2. PARALYTIC SHELLFISH POISONING IN TENAKEE, SOUTHEASTERN ALASKA

    E-print Network

    of shellfish poisoning in humans occurred, very high bioluminescence was seen in Tenakee Harbor (lat. 57°48'N- ronmental Conservation, was in the area at the time, and curiosity about the bioluminescence prompted enough numbers to cause intense bioluminescence. We learned that on 25 September 1973, several families

  3. Sewage impact on shellfish microbial contamination.

    PubMed

    Pommepuy, M; Dumas, F; Caprais, M P; Camus, P; Le Mennec, C; Parnaudeau, S; Haugarreau, L; Sarrette, B; Vilagines, P; Pothier, P; Kholi, E; Le Guyader, F

    2004-01-01

    Coastal areas are frequently contaminated by microorganisms of human origin, due to high population density and low seawater renewal. To evaluate the impact of wastewater input on shellfish quality, a study was conducted in Brittany (France) over a period of 20 months. A hydrodynamic model was used to simulate wastewater impact on microbial water quality. To validate the model, wastewater from the three main sewage treatment plants and shellfish from three sites were sampled monthly. Bacterial indicators (E. coli), F-RNA phages were searched for by culture and noroviruses by RT-PCR and hybridisation. These microorganisms were detected in the three effluents and clams, with no marked seasonal variation. The microbial concentrations in the two oyster beds, distant from the effluent outfall, were low, and only three of the samples were positive for norovirus. For simulation, the winter wastewater inputs of E. coli and phages were calculated and an estimation for norovirus flux was made from the epidemic situation in the population. The microbial behaviour was included in the model by a decay-rate factor. Results from the model calculations were found to be very similar to E. coli and phage concentrations observed in shellfish. For noroviruses, the model indicated that shellfish distant from the wastewater input were under the detection limit of the RT-PCR method. This study demonstrated the use of modelisation to interpret norovirus contamination in various areas. PMID:15318496

  4. THE EVOLUTION OF MOLLUSCAN SHELLFISH SAFETY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molluscan shellfish represent one of the few animals frequently eaten raw or only lightly cooked. Since they are filter feeders, able to concentrate contaminants from the water within their edible tissues, they have been widely associated with outbreaks of illness. Heavy metals, petroleum hydrocar...

  5. Consumer Expenditure Patterns for Fish and Shellfish

    E-print Network

    system coordinates the pro- duction decisions of producers with the purchase decisions of consumers will insure a more uniform flow of raw products to the processing sector. The share of fish and shellfish) marital status of household head. 6) education 0/ household head. 7) occupation 0/ household head, 8

  6. Shellfish and House Dust Mite Allergies: Is the Link Tropomyosin?

    PubMed

    Wong, Lydia; Huang, Chiung Hui; Lee, Bee Wah

    2016-03-01

    Crustacean shellfish allergy is an important cause of food allergy and anaphylaxis in Asia. The major allergen in shellfish allergy is tropomyosin, a pan-allergen that is also found in house dust mites and cockroaches. Tropomyosins from house dust mites (HDMs) have a high sequence homology to shellfish tropomyosins, and cross-reactivity between HDM and shrimp tropomyosins has been demonstrated. Exposure to inhaled tropomyosins from house dust mites has been postulated to be the primary sensitizer for shellfish allergy, in a reaction analogous to the oral allergy (inhalant-food) syndrome. This notion is supported by indirect data from the effects of HDM immunotherapy on shellfish allergy, and strong correlations of shellfish and HDM sensitization. HDM immunotherapy has been reported to induce both shrimp allergy in non-allergic patients and shrimp tolerance in shrimp-allergic patients. Epidemiological surveys have also demonstrated a strong correlation between shellfish and HDM sensitization in both hospital-based and community-based studies. Unexposed populations have also been shown to develop sensitization-shellfish sensitization in orthodox Jews with no history of shellfish consumption was associated with HDM sensitization. Reciprocally, HDM sensitization in an Icelandic population living in a HDM-free environment was associated with shrimp sensitization. In vitro IgE inhibition studies on sera in shrimp-allergic Spanish patients indicate that mites are the primary sensitizer in shrimp-allergic patients living in humid and warm climates. Current data supports the hypothesis that tropomyosin is the link between HDM and shellfish allergies. The role of tropomyosin in HDM and shellfish allergies is a fertile field for investigation as it may provide novel immunotherapeutic strategies for shellfish allergy. PMID:26739402

  7. 76 FR 37815 - Cooperative Agreement To Support Shellfish Safety Assistance Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-28

    ...molluscan shellfish consumption, including Vibrio vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus...courses for medical professionals concerning Vibrio illness and shellfish consumption; 9...plant product sampling studies to examine Vibrios in molluscan shellfish that have...

  8. Complete genome sequence for the shellfish pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus RE98 isolated from a shellfish hatchery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vibrio coralliilyticus is a pathogen of corals and larval shellfish. Publications on strain RE98 list it as a Vibrio tubiashii; however, whole genome sequencing confirms RE98 as V. coralliilyticus containing a total of 6,037,824 bp consisting of two chromosomes (3,420,228 and 1,917,482 bp), and two...

  9. THE OXYGEN REQUIREMENTS OF SHELLFISH By Philip H. Mitchell

    E-print Network

    THE OXYGEN REQUIREMENTS OF SHELLFISH ~ By Philip H. Mitchell 2°7 #12;Blank page retained for pagination #12;THE OXYGEN REQUIREMENTS OF SHELLFISH. By PHILIP H. MITCHELL. J1, The respiratory exchanges to temperature changes, a smaller utili- zation of oxygen in proportion to the body weight with increase in size

  10. New targets for expedient detection of viruses within shellfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previously our laboratory developed an expedient method for extraction of viral RNA from food-borne virus contaminated bivalve shellfish, termed the GPTT protocol. This protocol utilizes either whole shellfish or dissected digestive diverticula. This four step protocol utilizes a high pH glycine or...

  11. Shellfish Toxins Targeting Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Xu, Xunxun; Li, Tingting; Liu, Zhonghua

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) play a central role in the generation and propagation of action potentials in excitable neurons and other cells and are targeted by commonly used local anesthetics, antiarrhythmics, and anticonvulsants. They are also common targets of neurotoxins including shellfish toxins. Shellfish toxins are a variety of toxic secondary metabolites produced by prokaryotic cyanobacteria and eukaryotic dinoflagellates in both marine and fresh water systems, which can accumulate in marine animals via the food chain. Consumption of shellfish toxin-contaminated seafood may result in potentially fatal human shellfish poisoning. This article provides an overview of the structure, bioactivity, and pharmacology of shellfish toxins that act on VGSCs, along with a brief discussion on their pharmaceutical potential for pain management. PMID:24287955

  12. 75 FR 13211 - Proposed Information Collection (Purchase of Shellfish) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-18

    ... Proposed Information Collection (Purchase of Shellfish) Activity: Comment Request AGENCY: Office of... information needed to ensure that shellfish purchased by VA are from a State- and Federal-approved and...-3, Purchase of Shellfish, requires a firm furnishing shellfish must ensure the item are packaged...

  13. Environmental Transmission of Human Noroviruses in Shellfish Waters

    PubMed Central

    Lees, David N.

    2014-01-01

    Human noroviruses (NoV) are the most common cause of epidemic gastroenteritis following consumption of bivalve shellfish contaminated with fecal matter. NoV levels can be effectively reduced by some sewage treatment processes such as activated sludge and membrane bioreactors. However, tertiary sewage treatment and substantial sewage dilution are usually required to achieve low concentrations of virus in shellfish. Most outbreaks have been associated with shellfish harvested from waters affected by untreated sewage from, for example, storm overflows or overboard disposal of feces from boats. In coastal waters, NoV can remain in suspension or associate with organic and inorganic matter and be accumulated by shellfish. Shellfish take considerably longer to purge NoV than fecal indicator bacteria when transferred from sewage-polluted estuarine waters to uncontaminated waters. The abundance and distribution of NoV in shellfish waters are influenced by the levels of sewage treatment, proximity of shellfish beds to sewage sources, rainfall, river flows, salinity, and water temperature. Detailed site-specific information on these factors is required to design measures to control the viral risk. PMID:24705321

  14. Comparison evaluation of liquid chromatographic and bioassay methods of analysis for determination of paralytic shellfish poisons in shellfish tissues.

    PubMed

    Salter, J E; Timperi, R J; Hennigan, L J; Sefton, L; Reece, H

    1989-01-01

    A liquid chromatographic (LC) method was compared with the AOAC mouse bioassay method (18.086-18.092) for determination of paralytic shellfish toxins in shellfish tissues. Shellfish samples were collected from Massachusetts coastal waters as part of a state surveillance program, and extracts of shellfish meat were analyzed for toxins by using both analytical methods. Overall correlation of the LC and bioassay methods is good (r = 0.943), but for samples with toxicities less than 100 micrograms saxitoxin/100 g shellfish meat, the correlation is significantly less (r = 0.531). Limits of detection are 10 micrograms saxitoxin/100 g shellfish meat and 40 micrograms saxitoxin/100 g shellfish meat for the LC and bioassay methods, respectively. Analytical capacity of the LC method is limited to 12 samples/person-day compared with 30 samples/person-day for the bioassay. Sampling capacity of the LC method could be increased by using a fluorescence detector with a wider response range, which would eliminate the need for dilution of concentrated samples. PMID:2759998

  15. Should I Be Concerned about Eating Fish and Shellfish?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... children and the elderly are at a greater health risk than others. Additionally, some individuals are at a ... academic community. ISSC Exit - provides information on the health risks from eating pathogen-contaminated shellfish. Women Children Elderly ...

  16. 36 CFR 242.28 - Subsistence taking of shellfish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...FOR PUBLIC LANDS IN ALASKA Subsistence Taking of Fish and Wildlife § 242.28 Subsistence taking of shellfish. (a) Covered...demonstrate that failure to report was due to loss in the mail, accident, sickness, or other unavoidable circumstances. (e)...

  17. 36 CFR 242.28 - Subsistence taking of shellfish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...FOR PUBLIC LANDS IN ALASKA Subsistence Taking of Fish and Wildlife § 242.28 Subsistence taking of shellfish. (a) Covered...demonstrate that failure to report was due to loss in the mail, accident, sickness, or other unavoidable circumstances. (e)...

  18. 36 CFR 242.28 - Subsistence taking of shellfish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...FOR PUBLIC LANDS IN ALASKA Subsistence Taking of Fish and Wildlife § 242.28 Subsistence taking of shellfish. (a...demonstrate that failure to report was due to loss in the mail, accident, sickness, or other unavoidable circumstances. (g)...

  19. 36 CFR 242.28 - Subsistence taking of shellfish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...FOR PUBLIC LANDS IN ALASKA Subsistence Taking of Fish and Wildlife § 242.28 Subsistence taking of shellfish. (a) Covered...demonstrate that failure to report was due to loss in the mail, accident, sickness, or other unavoidable circumstances. (e)...

  20. 36 CFR 242.28 - Subsistence taking of shellfish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...FOR PUBLIC LANDS IN ALASKA Subsistence Taking of Fish and Wildlife § 242.28 Subsistence taking of shellfish. (a) Covered...demonstrate that failure to report was due to loss in the mail, accident, sickness, or other unavoidable circumstances. (e)...

  1. The Shellfish Aquaculture Extension Program (SAEP) works with research

    E-print Network

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    projects for the state's shellfish aquaculture industry. In collaboration with industry, institutional quality monitoring; (3) animal health and (4) production technologies. Genetic Stock Improvement Using the use of triploidy to enhance clam production. Results from field trials conducted with industry

  2. Eggs Dairy Soya Wheat Shellfish Nuts Main Course

    E-print Network

    Bristol, University of

    Key Eggs Dairy Soya Wheat Shellfish Nuts Main Course Daily Menu Lemon Thyme Chicken Local butterfly chicken breast marinated in Lemon, thyme and chilli Salmon and Prawn Pie Tender pieces of salmon and pawns

  3. 48 CFR 852.270-3 - Purchase of shellfish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...prescribed in 870.111-3, insert the following clause: Purchase of Shellfish (APR 1984) The bidder certifies that oysters, clams, and mussels will be furnished only from plants approved by and operated under the supervision of...

  4. 48 CFR 852.270-3 - Purchase of shellfish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...prescribed in 870.111-3, insert the following clause: Purchase of Shellfish (APR 1984) The bidder certifies that oysters, clams, and mussels will be furnished only from plants approved by and operated under the supervision of...

  5. 48 CFR 852.270-3 - Purchase of shellfish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...prescribed in 870.111-3, insert the following clause: Purchase of Shellfish (APR 1984) The bidder certifies that oysters, clams, and mussels will be furnished only from plants approved by and operated under the supervision of...

  6. 48 CFR 852.270-3 - Purchase of shellfish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...prescribed in 870.111-3, insert the following clause: Purchase of Shellfish (APR 1984) The bidder certifies that oysters, clams, and mussels will be furnished only from plants approved by and operated under the supervision of...

  7. 48 CFR 852.270-3 - Purchase of shellfish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...prescribed in 870.111-3, insert the following clause: Purchase of Shellfish (APR 1984) The bidder certifies that oysters, clams, and mussels will be furnished only from plants approved by and operated under the supervision of...

  8. Expanding shellfish aquaculture: A review of the ecological services provided by and impacts of native and cultured bivalves in shellfish dominated ecosystems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aquaculture is making an increasing contribution to world-wide demand for bivalve shellfish at the same time that substantial efforts are being made to restore wild shellfish populations because they are declining. Impacts of shellfish culture to natural systems have been evaluated, but both native...

  9. Surveillance of Hepatitis E Virus Contamination in Shellfish in China

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shenyang; Li, Dandan; Zha, Enhui; Zhou, Tiezhong; Wang, Shen; Yue, Xiqing

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis E virus (HEV) has been confirmed to be a zoonotic virus of worldwide distribution. HEV contamination in the water environment has not been well examined in China. The objective of this study was to evaluate HEV contamination in shellfish in a coastal area of China. Such contamination would be significant for evaluating public health risks. Methods: samples of three species shellfish were collected from thirteen points of estuarine tidal flats around the Bohai Gulf and screened for HEV RNA using an in-house nested RT-PCR assay. The detected HEV-positive samples were further verified by gene cloning and sequencing analysis. Results: the overall HEV-positive detection rate is approximately 17.5% per kilogram of shellfish.  HEV was more common among S. subcrenata (28.2%), followed by A. granosa (14.3%) and R. philippinarum (11.5%). The phylogenetic analysis of the 13 HEV strains detected revealed that gene fragments fell into two known 4 sub-genotypes (4b/4d) groups and another unknown group. Conclusions: 13 different sub-genotype 4 HEVs were found in contaminated shellfish in the Bohai Gulf rim. The findings suggest that a health risk may exist for users of waters in the Bonhai area and to consumers of shellfish.  Further research is needed to assess the sources and infectivity of HEV in these settings, and to evaluate additional shellfish harvesting areas. PMID:25689991

  10. Profiles of paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins in shellfish from Portugal explained by carbamoylase activity.

    PubMed

    Artigas, Mireia Lara; Vale, Paulo João Vieira; Gomes, Susana Sousa; Botelho, Maria João; Rodrigues, Susana Margarida; Amorim, Ana

    2007-08-10

    The presence of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins has not been recorded in the Portuguese coast since 1995. A bloom of Gymnodinium catenatum occurred in the NW coast of Portugal in the autumn of 2005, and PSP profiles were determined in several inshore and offshore shellfish species by HPLC after pre-column oxidation. Most of the species studied contained a complex toxin profile, typically representative of contamination by G. catenatum. However, clams such as Spisula solida contained mainly decarbamoyl toxins, while less extensive transformation was found in Scrobicularia plana. In vitro incubation of S. solida digestive glands with PSP standards revealed a rapid transformation of carbamate and N-sulfocarbamoyl toxins into their corresponding decarbamate analogues. After 24 h, less than 5% of the carbamate or N-sulfocarbamoyl toxins tested remained. After a 24 h in vitro incubation of S. plana digestive glands, no decarbamate analogues were detected. Artificial toxification of S. plana with cultures of G. catenatum revealed the conversion into decarbamoyl analogues progressed slowly: initially dcGTX2+3 and dcSTX accounted only for 5% of total non N-1 hydroxilated toxins, after 6 days these toxins accounted for 41% of the toxin composition. In vitro incubations of digestive glands from other commercial bivalves did not reveal production of decarbamoyl analogues over a 24 h period. PMID:17481642

  11. HIGH HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE PROCESSING: A POTENTIAL SOLUTION FOR SHELLFISH-BORNE VIRUSES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molluscan shellfish bioconcentrate enteric viruses from human wastes that are present in the growing waters. Consequently, the consumption of raw shellfish poses considerable risk for contracting illnesses associated with these viruses. High hydrostatic pressure is a new nonthermal sanitizing proc...

  12. Norovirus and other human enteric viruses in moroccan shellfish.

    PubMed

    Benabbes, Laila; Ollivier, Joanna; Schaeffer, Julien; Parnaudeau, Sylvain; Rhaissi, Houria; Nourlil, Jalal; Le Guyader, Françoise S

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of human enteric viruses in shellfish collected along the Mediterranean Sea and Atlantic Coast of Morocco. A total of 77 samples were collected from areas potentially contaminated by human sewage. Noroviruses were detected in 30 % of samples, with an equal representation of GI and GII strains, but were much more frequently found in cockles or clams than in oysters. The method used, including extraction efficiency controls, allowed the quantification of virus concentration. As in previous reports, results showed levels of contamination between 100 and 1,000 copies/g of digestive tissues. Sapoviruses were detected in 13 % of samples mainly in oyster and clam samples. Hepatitis A virus was detected in two samples, with concentrations around 100 RNA copies/g of digestive tissues. Only two samples were contaminated with enterovirus and none with norovirus GIV or Aichi virus. This study highlights the interest of studying shellfish samples from different countries and different production areas. A better knowledge of shellfish contamination helps us to understand virus levels in shellfish and to improve shellfish safety, thus protecting consumers. PMID:23412717

  13. When enough is not enough: shorebirds and shellfishing.

    PubMed Central

    Goss-Custard, J. D.; Stillman, R. A.; West, A. D.; Caldow, R. W. G.; Triplet, P.; le V dit Durell, S. E. A.; McGrorty, S.

    2004-01-01

    In a number of extensive coastal areas in northwest Europe, large numbers of long-lived migrant birds eat shellfish that are also commercially harvested. Competition between birds and people for this resource often leads to conflicts between commercial and conservation interests. One policy to prevent shellfishing from harming birds is to ensure that enough food remains after harvesting to meet most or all of their energy demands. Using simulations with behaviour-based models of five areas, we show here that even leaving enough shellfish to meet 100% of the birds' demands may fail to ensure that birds survive in good condition. Up to almost eight times this amount is needed to protect them from being harmed by the shellfishery, even when the birds can consume other kinds of non-harvested prey. PMID:15058432

  14. 78 FR 22366 - Proposed Information Collection (Purchase of Shellfish) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ... Proposed Information Collection (Purchase of Shellfish) Activity: Comment Request AGENCY: Office of... information needed to ensure that shellfish purchased by VA are from a State- and Federal-approved and... a currently approved collection. Abstract: VAAR clause 852.270-3, Purchase of Shellfish, requires...

  15. AN RNA EXTRACTION PROTOCOL FOR SHELLFISH-BORNE VIRUSES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The GPTT virus RNA extraction method, originally developed for extraction of human norovirus and hepatitis A virus RNAs from contaminated shellfish, was evaluated for extraction of RNA from Aichi virus strain A846/88 (AiV), coxsackievirus strains A9 (CAV9) and B5 (CBV5), murine norovirus (strain MNV...

  16. 50 CFR 100.28 - Subsistence taking of shellfish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Subsistence taking of shellfish. 100.28 Section 100.28 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) NATIONAL WILDLIFE MONUMENTS SUBSISTENCE MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS FOR PUBLIC LANDS IN ALASKA Subsistence Taking of Fish and Wildlife...

  17. REVIEW Open Access Toxic marine microalgae and shellfish poisoning

    E-print Network

    Hays, Graeme

    hydrological conditions on Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) species around the world. However, there is very little and affecting a diverse range of molluscan shellfish and other marine organisms. We also show that the abundance species are also known as Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) species are present throughout the coastal regions

  18. Potential virus detection and intervention methods for molluscan shellfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Norovirus is the number one cause of foodborne illness in the Unites States, causing an estimated 9 million cases/yr. Hepatitis A is uncommon in the US but can result in serious illness. Bivalve shellfish are efficient bioconcentrators of these viruses from contaminated growing waters. Consequentl...

  19. Accumulation of sediment-associated viruses in shellfish

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, E.F.; Vaughn, J.M.; Vicale, T.J.; Mann, R.

    1983-01-01

    The present study focused on the importance of contaminated sediments in shellfish accumulation of human viruses. Epifaunal (Crassostrea virginica) and infanual (Mercenaria mercenaria) shellfish, placed on or in cores, were exposed to either resuspended or undisturbed sediments containing bound poliovirus type 1 (LSc 2ab). Consistent bioaccumulation by oysters (four of five trials) was only noted when sediment-bound viruses occurred in the water column. Virus accumulation was observed in a single instance where sediments remained in an undisturbed state. While the incidence of bioaccumulation was higher with resuspended rather than undisturbed contaminated sediment, the actual concentration of accumulated viruses was not significantly different from the accumulation of viruses from oysters residing on uninoculated sediments. When clams were exposed to undisturbed, virus-contaminated sediments, two of five shellfish pools yielded viral isolates. Bioaccumulation of undisturbed sediments by these bivalves was considered marginal when related to the concentration of virus in contaminated sediments; they would only represent a significant threat when suspended in the water column. Arguments were advanced for water-column sampling in the region of the water-sediment interface to provide an accurate determination of the virological quality of shellfish harvesting waters.

  20. 50 CFR 100.28 - Subsistence taking of shellfish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Subsistence taking of shellfish. 100.28 Section 100.28 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) NATIONAL WILDLIFE MONUMENTS SUBSISTENCE MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS FOR PUBLIC LANDS IN ALASKA Subsistence Taking of Fish and Wildlife...

  1. 50 CFR 100.28 - Subsistence taking of shellfish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Subsistence taking of shellfish. 100.28 Section 100.28 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) NATIONAL WILDLIFE MONUMENTS SUBSISTENCE MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS FOR PUBLIC LANDS IN ALASKA Subsistence Taking of Fish and Wildlife...

  2. Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Levels in Fishes and Shellfishes of the

    E-print Network

    Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Levels in Fishes and Shellfishes of the Northeastern Pacific Ocean Introduction Reports of excessive amounts of chlorinated hydrocarbons in fishery products have threatened the utilization by humans of the vast protein resources in the sea. Chlorinated hydrocarbons from both

  3. Eggs Dairy Soya Wheat Shellfish Nuts Main Course

    E-print Network

    Bristol, University of

    Key Eggs Dairy Soya Wheat Shellfish Nuts Main Course Daily Menu Sweet `n' Sour Pork Local Pork with a traditionally Chinese based sauce made from sugar or honey with a sour such as rice vinegar Chicken Chow Mein Quorn and Beansprouts with Egg fried Rice and Stir fried vegetables Served with Egg Fried Rice Vegetable

  4. Accumulation of sediment-associated viruses in shellfish

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, E.F.; Vaughn, J.M.; Vicale, T.J.; Mann, R.

    1983-01-01

    The present study focused on the importance of contaminated sediments in shellfish accumulation of human viruses. Epifaunal (Crassostrea virginica) and infaunal (Mercemaria mercenaria) shellfish, placed on or in cores, were exposed to either resuspended or undisturbed sediments containing bound poliovirus type 1 (LSc 2ab). Consistent bioaccumulation by oysters (four of five trials) was only noted when sediment-bound viruses occurred in the water column. Virus accumulation was observed in a single instance where sediments remained in an undisturbed state. While the incidence of bioaccumulation was higher with resuspended rather than undisturbed contaminated sediment, the actual concentration of accumulated viruses was not significantly different. The accumulation of viruses from oysters residing on uninoculated sediments. When clams were exposed to undisturbed, virus-contaminated sediments, two of five shellfish pools yielded viral isolates. Bioaccumulation of undisturbed sediments by these bivalves was considered marginal when related to the concentration of virus in contaminated sediments; they would only represent a significant threat when suspended in the water column. Arguments were advanced for water-column sampling in the region of the water-sediment interface to provide an accurate determination of the virological quality of shellfish harvesting waters.

  5. Adenovirus and Norovirus Contaminants in Commercially Distributed Shellfish.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Manzano, Jesus; Hundesa, Ayalkibet; Calgua, Byron; Carratala, Anna; Maluquer de Motes, Carlos; Rusiñol, Marta; Moresco, Vanessa; Ramos, Ana Paula; Martínez-Marca, Fernando; Calvo, Miquel; Monte Barardi, Celia Regina; Girones, Rosina; Bofill-Mas, Sílvia

    2013-11-29

    Shellfish complying with European Regulations based on quantification of fecal bacterial indicators (FIB) are introduced into markets; however, information on viruses, more stable than FIB, is not available in the literature. To assess the presence of noroviruses (NoVs) GI and GII and human adenoviruses (HAdV) in domestic and imported mussels and clams (n = 151) their presence was analyzed during winter seasons (2004-2008) in north-west Spanish markets through a routine surveillance system. All samples tested negative for NoV GI and 13 % were positive for NoV GII. The role of HAdV as viral indicator was evaluated in 20 negative and 10 positive NoV GII samples showing an estimated sensitivity and specificity of HAdV to predict the presence of NoV GII of 100 and 74 % (cut-off 0.5). The levels of HAdV and NoVs and the efficiency of decontamination in shellfish depuration plants (SDP) were evaluated analyzing pre- and post-depurated mussels collected in May-June 2010 from three different SDP. There were no statistically significant differences in the prevalence and quantification of HAdV between pre- and post-depurated shellfish and between seawater entering and leaving the depuration systems. Moreover, infectious HAdV were detected in depurated mussels. These results confirm previous studies showing that current controls and depuration treatments limiting the number of FIB do not guarantee the absence of viruses in shellfish. PMID:24293153

  6. Sterol composition shellfish species commonly consumed in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shellfish commonly consumed in the U.S. were sampled and analyzed to update nutrient data in the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference (SR), using a nationwide sampling plan and validated analytical methodology. In 2007-8, raw shrimp and se...

  7. Dinophysis Toxins: Causative Organisms, Distribution and Fate in Shellfish

    PubMed Central

    Reguera, Beatriz; Riobó, Pilar; Rodríguez, Francisco; Díaz, Patricio A.; Pizarro, Gemita; Paz, Beatriz; Franco, José M.; Blanco, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Several Dinophysis species produce diarrhoetic toxins (okadaic acid and dinophysistoxins) and pectenotoxins, and cause gastointestinal illness, Diarrhetic Shellfish Poisoning (DSP), even at low cell densities (<103 cells·L?1). They are the main threat, in terms of days of harvesting bans, to aquaculture in Northern Japan, Chile, and Europe. Toxicity and toxin profiles are very variable, more between strains than species. The distribution of DSP events mirrors that of shellfish production areas that have implemented toxin regulations, otherwise misinterpreted as bacterial or viral contamination. Field observations and laboratory experiments have shown that most of the toxins produced by Dinophysis are released into the medium, raising questions about the ecological role of extracelular toxins and their potential uptake by shellfish. Shellfish contamination results from a complex balance between food selection, adsorption, species-specific enzymatic transformations, and allometric processes. Highest risk areas are those combining Dinophysis strains with high cell content of okadaates, aquaculture with predominance of mytilids (good accumulators of toxins), and consumers who frequently include mussels in their diet. Regions including pectenotoxins in their regulated phycotoxins will suffer from much longer harvesting bans and from disloyal competition with production areas where these toxins have been deregulated. PMID:24447996

  8. Natural modulators of Vibrios in seawater and shellfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Naturally occurring marine bacteria, Vibrio parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus, are major threats to the safety of molluscan shellfish in the US and elsewhere. Illnesses range from mild gastrointestinal upset to septicemia and death. In studies on the uptake and persistence of V. parahaemolyticus ...

  9. Overview of zoonotic infections from fish and shellfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As aquaculture production and consumption of aquacultural products increases, the possibility of zoonotic infection from either handling or ingestion of these products also increases. The principal pathogens acquired topically from fish or shellfish through spine/pincer puncture or open wounds are ...

  10. Dinophysis toxins: causative organisms, distribution and fate in shellfish.

    PubMed

    Reguera, Beatriz; Riobó, Pilar; Rodríguez, Francisco; Díaz, Patricio A; Pizarro, Gemita; Paz, Beatriz; Franco, José M; Blanco, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Several Dinophysis species produce diarrhoetic toxins (okadaic acid and dinophysistoxins) and pectenotoxins, and cause gastointestinal illness, Diarrhetic Shellfish Poisoning (DSP), even at low cell densities (<103 cells·L?¹). They are the main threat, in terms of days of harvesting bans, to aquaculture in Northern Japan, Chile, and Europe. Toxicity and toxin profiles are very variable, more between strains than species. The distribution of DSP events mirrors that of shellfish production areas that have implemented toxin regulations, otherwise misinterpreted as bacterial or viral contamination. Field observations and laboratory experiments have shown that most of the toxins produced by Dinophysis are released into the medium, raising questions about the ecological role of extracelular toxins and their potential uptake by shellfish. Shellfish contamination results from a complex balance between food selection, adsorption, species-specific enzymatic transformations, and allometric processes. Highest risk areas are those combining Dinophysis strains with high cell content of okadaates, aquaculture with predominance of mytilids (good accumulators of toxins), and consumers who frequently include mussels in their diet. Regions including pectenotoxins in their regulated phycotoxins will suffer from much longer harvesting bans and from disloyal competition with production areas where these toxins have been deregulated. PMID:24447996

  11. Contribution of Shellfish Consumption to Lower Mercury Health Risk for Residents in Northern Jiaozhou Bay, China

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Fish and marine mammal consumption are an important pathway for human exposure to mercury. The low mercury content in shellfish poses a low mercury health risk to people who consume shellfish. The objectives of this study are to detect mercury concentrations in different species of shellfish and to calculate the mercury health risk from shellfish consumption among traditional residents near northern Jiaozhou Bay. A total of 356 shellfish samples, which comprised 7 species from 5 different places in northern Jiaozhou Bay, were collected from April to June in 2012. The average mercury content in the collected shellfish ranged from 0.024?mg·kg?1 to 0.452?mg·kg?1. A total of 44 shellfish samples (12.36%) had mercury levels exceeding the national pollution-free aquatic products limit (0.3?mg·kg?1). Generally, the viscus had the highest mercury content among all parts of the shellfish. A positive correlation between mercury content and total weight/edible part weight was found in most species of the collected shellfish. The results showed that shellfish consumption resulted in the lower risk of mercury exposure to residents based on the calculation of daily intake (DI) and target hazard quotient (THQ). PMID:26101470

  12. Contribution of Shellfish Consumption to Lower Mercury Health Risk for Residents in Northern Jiaozhou Bay, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Fish and marine mammal consumption are an important pathway for human exposure to mercury. The low mercury content in shellfish poses a low mercury health risk to people who consume shellfish. The objectives of this study are to detect mercury concentrations in different species of shellfish and to calculate the mercury health risk from shellfish consumption among traditional residents near northern Jiaozhou Bay. A total of 356 shellfish samples, which comprised 7 species from 5 different places in northern Jiaozhou Bay, were collected from April to June in 2012. The average mercury content in the collected shellfish ranged from 0.024?mg·kg(-1) to 0.452?mg·kg(-1). A total of 44 shellfish samples (12.36%) had mercury levels exceeding the national pollution-free aquatic products limit (0.3?mg·kg(-1)). Generally, the viscus had the highest mercury content among all parts of the shellfish. A positive correlation between mercury content and total weight/edible part weight was found in most species of the collected shellfish. The results showed that shellfish consumption resulted in the lower risk of mercury exposure to residents based on the calculation of daily intake (DI) and target hazard quotient (THQ). PMID:26101470

  13. Liquid Chromatographic Determination of Amnesic Shellfish Poison in Mussels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duxbury, Mark

    2000-10-01

    A simple, rapid, high-performance liquid chromatographic experiment suitable for undergraduate students is described for determining amnesic shellfish poison in mussels. The poison itself is an unusual naturally occurring amino acid, domoic acid, that has been found in seafood, particularly shellfish, worldwide. The symptoms of poisoning include amnesia (memory loss), loss of balance, mental confusion, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, coma, and in extreme cases death. The domoic acid is extracted from homogenized mussel tissue by boiling in water for 5 minutes. The homogenate is cooled and centrifuged, and an aliquot of the supernatant is diluted and analyzed by isocratic HPLC using a C18 column and an acetonitrile-water mobile phase at pH 2.5 with UV detection at 242 nm.

  14. Impact of Xynthia Tempest on Viral Contamination of Shellfish

    PubMed Central

    Grodzki, Marco; Ollivier, Joanna; Le Saux, Jean-Claude; Piquet, Jean-Côme; Noyer, Mathilde

    2012-01-01

    Viral contamination in oyster and mussel samples was evaluated after a massive storm with hurricane wind named “Xynthia tempest” destroyed a number of sewage treatment plants in an area harboring many shellfish farms. Although up to 90% of samples were found to be contaminated 2 days after the disaster, detected viral concentrations were low. A 1-month follow-up showed a rapid decrease in the number of positive samples, even for norovirus. PMID:22344664

  15. Impact of xynthia tempest on viral contamination of shellfish.

    PubMed

    Grodzki, Marco; Ollivier, Joanna; Le Saux, Jean-Claude; Piquet, Jean-Côme; Noyer, Mathilde; Le Guyader, Françoise S

    2012-05-01

    Viral contamination in oyster and mussel samples was evaluated after a massive storm with hurricane wind named "Xynthia tempest" destroyed a number of sewage treatment plants in an area harboring many shellfish farms. Although up to 90% of samples were found to be contaminated 2 days after the disaster, detected viral concentrations were low. A 1-month follow-up showed a rapid decrease in the number of positive samples, even for norovirus. PMID:22344664

  16. Comparative analysis of modeled nitrogen removal by shellfish farms.

    PubMed

    Rose, Julie M; Bricker, Suzanne B; Ferreira, Joao G

    2015-02-15

    The use of shellfish aquaculture for nutrient removal and reduction of coastal eutrophication has been proposed. Published literature has indicated that nitrogen contained in harvested shellfish can be accurately estimated from shell length:nitrogen content ratios. The range of nitrogen that could be removed by a typical farm in a specific estuarine or coastal setting is also of interest to regulators and planners. Farm Aquaculture Resource Management (FARM) model outputs of nitrogen removal at the shellfish farm scale have been summarized here, from 14 locations in 9 countries across 4 continents. Modeled nitrogen removal ranged from 105 lbs acre(-1) year(-1) (12 g m(-2) year(-1)) to 1356 lbs acre(-1) year(-1) (152 g m(-2) year(-1)). Mean nitrogen removal was 520 lbs acre(-1) year(-1) (58 g m(-2) year(-1)). These model results are site-specific in nature, but compare favorably to reported nitrogen removal effectiveness of agricultural best management practices and stormwater control measures. PMID:25534625

  17. N-Acetylcysteine boosts xenobiotic detoxification in shellfish.

    PubMed

    Peña-Llopis, Samuel; Serrano, Roque; Pitarch, Elena; Beltrán, Eduardo; Ibáñez, María; Hernández, Félix; Peña, Juan B

    2014-09-01

    Water pollution represents a threat of increasing importance to human health. Bivalve mollusks are filter-feeding organisms that can accumulate chemical and microbiological contaminants in their tissues from very low concentrations in the water or sediments. Consumption of contaminated shellfish is one of the main causes of seafood poisoning. Thus, marine bivalves are normally depurated in sterilized seawater for 48 h to allow the removal of bacteria. However, this depuration time might be insufficient to eliminate chemical contaminants from their tissues. We have developed a novel technology that accelerates up to fourfold the excretion rate of xenobiotics in bivalves by treatment with the antioxidant and glutathione (GSH) pro-drug N-acetylcysteine (NAC) during the depuration period. NAC improved dose-dependently the detoxification of the organophosphate (OP) pesticide fenitrothion in the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, diminishing its levels up to nearly a hundred fold compared to conventional depuration, by enhancing the glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity and inducing the GSH anabolism (GSH synthesis and reduction by glutathione reductase). Notably, this induction in GSH anabolism and GST activity was also observed in uncontaminated bivalves treated with NAC. As the GSH pathway is involved in the detoxification of many pollutants and biotoxins from harmful algal blooms, we validated this proof of principle in king scallops (Pecten maximus) that naturally accumulated the amnesic shellfish poisoning (ASP) toxin domoic acid. We illustrate here a method that enhances the elimination of organic contaminants in shellfish, opening new avenues of depuration of marine organisms. PMID:24880785

  18. Does traditional shellfishing affect foraging by waders? The case of the Tagus estuary (Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Maria P.; Peste, Filipa; Granadeiro, José P.; Palmeirim, Jorge M.

    2008-03-01

    Estuarine intertidal flats are often exploited by humans and waders since they provide food, particularly shellfish. This raises important conservation issues. Waders can be affected by shellfishing activities in multiple ways, such as a reduction of the available shellfish, disturbance by the presence of shellfishers on their feeding areas, and changes in micro-habitat, due to sediment reworking. In this study we quantified the impact of traditional shellfishing on waders in the Tagus estuary. Particular attention was given to hand-raking of clams Scrobicularia plana, which constitutes most of the consumed food by waders. Shellfishers did not cause a relevant depletion of clams for waders; they removed less than 0.3% of its total production and focused on size classes that were usually not taken by birds. Hand-raking caused temporary changes in the vertical distribution and availability of invertebrate prey in the sediment. However, this did not affect the bird's feeding rates, presumably because prey availability remained above the threshold at which intake rates are expected to decline. The presence of shellfishers in the birds foraging areas potentially affects waders by keeping them away from foraging areas, but even the most affected species lost less than 10% of their foraging grounds due to this factor. Overall, we conclude that the current low harvesting levels of shellfishing are compatible with the preservation of the estuary as a key site for waders. Nevertheless, simulations showed that traditional shellfishing could have much greater potential to affect waders through disturbance than through prey removal. The results for the Tagus show that even small harvest rates, representing a negligible loss of food for waders and potentially considered sustainable by shellfish managers, could have a great impact on waders due to increased disturbance. This effect of disturbance likely occurs in most estuaries and should be taken into consideration when planning shellfish harvesting in important wader feeding areas.

  19. Isolation of naturally occurring enteroviruses from a variety of shellfish species residing in Long Island and New Jersey marine embayments

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughn, J.M.; Landry, E.F.; Vicale, T.J.; Dahl, M.C.

    1980-02-01

    Shellfish and shellfish-raising waters from a variety of Long Island and New Jersey marine embayments were examined for the presence of human enteroviruses. Little difference in virological quality was noted between areas designated as being open or closed to shellfishing. Viral isolations could not be correlated with coliform counts from identical samples, indicating the need to re-evaluate the use of bacterial standards as indices of the overall sanitary quality of water and shellfish.

  20. 76 FR 65200 - Risk Assessment on Norovirus in Bivalve Molluscan Shellfish: Request for Comments and for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-20

    ... molluscan shellfish, by species, that undergo wet storage, relaying and depuration and the conditions (e.g... postmarkets (e.g., raw/cooked); 4. Experimental data and models that describe the impact of wet storage... SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Risk Assessment on Norovirus in Bivalve Molluscan Shellfish:...

  1. AN ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF SHELLFISH PRODUCTION ASSOCIATED WITH THE ADOPTION OF INTEGRATED

    E-print Network

    AN ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF SHELLFISH PRODUCTION ASSOCIATED WITH THE ADOPTION OF INTEGRATED MULTI of Resource Management Report Number: 516 Title of Research Project: AN ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF SHELLFISH PRODUCTION ASSOCIATED WITH THE ADOPTION OF INTEGRATED MULTI- TROPHIC AQUACULTURE IN BRITISH COLUMBIA Chair

  2. Estuarine Fish and Shellfish Species in U.S. Commercial and Recreational

    E-print Network

    is enhanced by the recreational fishing sector, whose 13 million recreational anglers caught 476 million fishEstuarine Fish and Shellfish Species in U.S. Commercial and Recreational Fisheries: Economic Value Fisheries Service NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS-F/SPO-90 #12;#12;Estuarine Fish and Shellfish Species in U

  3. MANUFACTURING-PLANT FOOD SERVICES AS MARKETS FOR FISH AND SHELLFISH

    E-print Network

    identifies and examines the market for fish and shellfish afforded the fishing industry by the food services343 MANUFACTURING-PLANT FOOD SERVICES AS MARKETS FOR FISH AND SHELLFISH SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC REPORT, Commissioner Bureau of Commercial Fisheries, Donald L. McKernan, Director MANUFACTURING-PLANT FOOD SERVICES

  4. Trophic transfer of paralytic shellfish toxins from clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) to gastropods

    E-print Network

    Yu, Peter K.N.

    Trophic transfer of paralytic shellfish toxins from clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) to gastropods Alexandrium tamarense (ATCI01), which predominantly produces C2 toxin, was fed to the clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) under laboratory conditions. Concentrations of paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) in the dosed

  5. Biological effects of shellfish harvesting on oyster reefs: resolving a fishery conflict by

    E-print Network

    86 Biological effects of shellfish harvesting on oyster reefs: resolving a fishery conflict a large-scale field experiment to test whether clam and oyster harvesting applied alone and in combination on intertidal oyster reefs have impacts on resident shellfish pop- ulations. This experiment was conducted

  6. Parallel Analyses of Alexandrium catenella Cell Concentrations and Shellfish Toxicity in the Puget Sound?

    PubMed Central

    Dyhrman, Sonya T.; Haley, Sheean T.; Borchert, Jerry A.; Lona, Bob; Kollars, Nicole; Erdner, Deana L.

    2010-01-01

    Alexandrium catenella is widespread in western North America and produces a suite of potent neurotoxins that cause paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) in humans and have deleterious impacts on public health and economic resources. There are seasonal PSP-related closures of recreational and commercial shellfisheries in the Puget Sound, but the factors that influence cell distribution, abundance, and relationship to paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) in this system are poorly described. Here, a quantitative PCR assay was used to detect A. catenella cells in parallel with state shellfish toxicity testing during the 2006 bloom season at 41 sites from April through October. Over 500,000 A. catenella cells liter?1 were detected at several stations, with two main pulses of cells driving cell distribution, one in June and the other in August. PSTs over the closure limit of 80 ?g of PST 100 per g of shellfish tissue were detected at 26 of the 41 sites. Comparison of cell numbers and PST data shows that shellfish toxicity is preceded by an increase in A. catenella cells in 71% of cases. However, cells were also observed in the absence of PSTs in shellfish, highlighting the complex relationship between A. catenella and the resulting shellfish toxicity. These data provide important information on the dynamics of A. catenella cells in the Puget Sound and are a first step toward assessing the utility of plankton monitoring to augment shellfish toxicity testing in this system. PMID:20495054

  7. Environmental links to interannual variability in shellfish toxicity in Cobscook Bay and eastern Maine, a strongly tidally mixed coastal region

    E-print Network

    Thomas, Andrew

    e i n f o Keywords: Harmful algal blooms Gulf of Maine Cobscook Bay Shellfish toxicity a b s t r a c t The Gulf of Maine experiences annual closures of shellfish harvesting due to the accumulation of toxins understanding of factors controlling interannual differences in eastern Gulf of Maine shellfish toxicity. & 2013

  8. A comparison of methods for diarrhoeic shellfish poison detection.

    PubMed

    Gucci, P M; Serse, A P; Coccia, A M; Tubaro, A; Della Loggia, R; Gianna, R; Bruno, M; Volterra, L

    1994-10-01

    Samples of diarrhoeic shellfish poison (DSP) mussels from several parts of the Italian Adriatic coastline were extracted and tested according to a number of different methods presently available, i.e. Yasumoto's mouse biotest, Kat's biotest, the ELISA test and the HPLC method. Results were compared for toxic levels detected in each sample. While a common qualitative result (toxic/non-toxic) was given by all the methods, no clear quantitative agreement was found. The differences between methods and consequent lack of agreement in results are discussed. PMID:8085273

  9. Enteric viruses in a mangrove lagoon, survival and shellfish incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez de Cardona, I.; Bermudez, M.; Billmire, E.; Hazen, T.C.

    1988-12-31

    Mangrove oysters (Crassostrea rhizophorae) were screened for enteric viruses. For 18 months oysters were collected from Cano Boqueron, a tropical mangrove lagoon on the southwest coast of Puerto Rico. This popular tourist resort has two primary sewage treatment plants which service 158 single family cabanas. In spite of the heavy seasonal input of sewage to Cano Boqueron and high densities of fecal coliform bacteria, enteric viruses were not detected in shellfish meat. Because no viruses were detected in the oysters, a virus survival study was performed. Poliovirus type 1 was placed in diffusion chambers in situ at two sites in Cano Boqueron. More than 95% of the poliovirus inactivation occurred within 24 h. Virus inactivation was significantly different by site, indicating different inactivation rates within the lagoon. Chamber studies done simultaneously with Escherichia coli did not reveal differences between sites. It is suggested that the sewage effluent had an antiviral effect in the absence of an antibacterial effect. This study demonstrates the importance for establishing microbial contamination standards for shellfish growing waters in the tropics based upon in situ studies with tropical species, e.g. mangrove oyster.

  10. Non-Traditional Vectors for Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Deeds, Jonathan R.; Landsberg, Jan H.; Etheridge, Stacey M.; Pitcher, Grant C.; Longan, Sara Watt

    2008-01-01

    Paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP), due to saxitoxin and related compounds, typically results from the consumption of filter-feeding molluscan shellfish that concentrate toxins from marine dinoflagellates. In addition to these microalgal sources, saxitoxin and related compounds, referred to in this review as STXs, are also produced in freshwater cyanobacteria and have been associated with calcareous red macroalgae. STXs are transferred and bioaccumulate throughout aquatic food webs, and can be vectored to terrestrial biota, including humans. Fisheries closures and human intoxications due to STXs have been documented in several non-traditional (i.e. non-filter-feeding) vectors. These include, but are not limited to, marine gastropods, both carnivorous and grazing, crustacea, and fish that acquire STXs through toxin transfer. Often due to spatial, temporal, or a species disconnection from the primary source of STXs (bloom forming dinoflagellates), monitoring and management of such non-traditional PSP vectors has been challenging. A brief literature review is provided for filter feeding (traditional) and non-filter feeding (non-traditional) vectors of STXs with specific reference to human effects. We include several case studies pertaining to management actions to prevent PSP, as well as food poisoning incidents from STX(s) accumulation in non-traditional PSP vectors. PMID:18728730

  11. Artificial Neural Network Prediction of Viruses in Shellfish

    PubMed Central

    Brion, Gail; Viswanathan, Chandramouli; Neelakantan, T. R.; Lingireddy, Srinivasa; Girones, Rosina; Lees, David; Allard, Annika; Vantarakis, Apostolos

    2005-01-01

    A database was probed with artificial neural network (ANN) and multivariate logistic regression (MLR) models to investigate the efficacy of predicting PCR-identified human adenovirus (ADV), Norwalk-like virus (NLV), and enterovirus (EV) presence or absence in shellfish harvested from diverse countries in Europe (Spain, Sweden, Greece, and the United Kingdom). The relative importance of numerical and heuristic input variables to the ANN model for each country and for the combined data was analyzed with a newly defined relative strength effect, which illuminated the importance of bacteriophages as potential viral indicators. The results of this analysis showed that ANN models predicted all types of viral presence and absence in shellfish with better precision than MLR models for a multicountry database. For overall presence/absence classification accuracy, ANN modeling had a performance rate of 95.9%, 98.9%, and 95.7% versus 60.5%, 75.0%, and 64.6% for the MLR for ADV, NLV, and EV, respectively. The selectivity (prediction of viral negatives) was greater than the sensitivity (prediction of viral positives) for both models and with all virus types, with the ANN model performing with greater sensitivity than the MLR. ANN models were able to illuminate site-specific relationships between microbial indicators chosen as model inputs and human virus presence. A validation study on ADV demonstrated that the MLR and ANN models differed in sensitivity and selectivity, with the ANN model correctly identifying ADV presence with greater precision. PMID:16151110

  12. The presence of genogroup II norovirus in retail shellfish from seven coastal cities in China.

    PubMed

    Ma, Li-ping; Zhao, Feng; Yao, Lin; Li, Xin-guang; Zhou, De-qing; Zhang, Rui-ling

    2013-06-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are commonly occurring pathogens that cause gastroenteritis. Outbreaks of viral diseases have often been ascribed to the consumption of contaminated shellfish. Our objective was to evaluate the presence and contamination levels of NoV in shellfish sold at seafood markets in China. We tested 840 shellfish samples (Crassostrea gigas, Mytilus edulis, Azumapecten farreri, SinoNoVacula constricta, Scapharca subcrenata, Ruditapes philippinarum) that were collected from seven cities around the Yellow and Bohai Seas in China between December 2009 and November 2011. We used real-time RT-PCR to detect NoV in purified concentrates from the stomach and digestive diverticula of these shellfish. NoV was detected in 19.35 % (N = 155), 16.67 % (N = 114), 5.70 % (N = 158), 8.82 % (N = 136), 13.74 % (N = 131), and 16.44 % (N = 146) of oyster, mussel, scallop, razor clam, ark shell, and clam samples, respectively. The average detection rate was 13.33 % (112/840). Nucleotide sequencing of the NoV RT-PCR products demonstrated that all strains belonged to NoV genotype GII.12, except two that belonged to GI.3. More than 10² copies of the NoV genome were detected in 69 of 112 positive shellfish samples. Our results suggest that ~13 % of shellfish harbor NoV, and GII.12 NoV is the primary strain in shellfish purchased at markets in seven coastal cities in China. PMID:23412724

  13. Microbiological quality of frozen breaded fish and shellfish products.

    PubMed Central

    Baer, E F; Duran, A P; Leininger, H V; Read, R B; Schwab, A H; Swartzentruber, A

    1976-01-01

    A survey was made of the microbiological quality of seven frozen, breaded, precooked fish and shellfish products and of frozen, breaded, uncooked shrimp at the retail level. Geometric mean aerobic plate counts per gram (and number of units examined) were as follows: fish sticks, 8,300 (1,539); fish cakes, 5,600 (1,378); crab cakes, 4,900 (1,226); scallops, 1,700 (1,392); clams, 450 (1,384); haddock, 15,000 (1,306); fish in fish and chips dinner, 7,200 (1,485); and uncooked shrimp, 220,000 (1,462). Geometric mean coliform, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus counts for all eight products ranged from 1 to 10/g. PMID:779643

  14. 77 FR 36260 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Puget Sound Recreational Shellfish Harvesting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-18

    ... support of the Partnership's pursuit of this goal, the Northwest Fisheries Science Center is undertaking... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Puget Sound Recreational Shellfish Harvesting Project AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric...

  15. PECONIC ESTUARY: AN ASSESSMENT OF SHELLFISH RESOURCES IN THE TRIBUTARIES AND EMBAYMENTS OF THE PECONIC ESTUARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Executive Summary Historically, the Peconic Estuary's shellfish resources have supported significant fisheries for a number of species including hard clams, oysters and bay scallops. However, distribution and abundance data for the tributaries and embayments within the Peconic Es...

  16. Fish & Shellfish Immunology (2001) 11, 593610 doi:10.1006/fsim.2001.0339

    E-print Network

    Burnett, Louis E.

    2001-01-01

    Fish & Shellfish Immunology (2001) 11, 593­610 doi:10.1006/fsim.2001.0339 Available online at http of Microbiology and Immunology, Medical University of South Carolina and 2 Grice Marine Laboratory, University

  17. Interannual variability in the timing of New England shellfish toxicity and relationships to environmental forcing

    E-print Network

    Thomas, Andrew

    Keywords: Harmful algal blooms Red tides Paralytic shellfish poisoning Cluster analysis CART modeling association between Alexandrium abundance and shell- fish toxicity. One possibility is that toxic cells abundance, but rather by variability in transport processes. Measurements of offshore Alexandrium biomass

  18. High pressure processing of bivalve shellfish and HPP's potential use as a virus intervention

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bivalve shellfish readily bioconcentrate pathogenic microbes and substance, such as algal and dinoflagulate toxins, fecal viruses and bacteria, and naturally present vibrio bacteria. High pressure processing (HPP) is currently used as an intervention for Vibrio vulnificus bacteria within molluscan ...

  19. Processing Strategies to Inactivate Enteric Viruses in Shellfish: Limitations of Surrogate Viruses and Molecular Methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Noroviruses, hepatitis A and E viruses, sapovirus, astrovirus, rotavirus, Aichi virus, enteric adenoviruses, poliovirus, and other enteroviruses enter shellfish through contaminated seawater or by contamination during handling and processing, resulting in outbreaks ranging from isolated to epidemic....

  20. Shellfish from Todos os Santos Bay, Bahia, Brazil: treat or threat?

    PubMed

    de Souza, Manuel M; Windmöller, Cláudia C; Hatje, Vanessa

    2011-10-01

    This study determined the concentrations of major and trace elements in shellfish (oysters, clams and mussels) and conducted an assessment of the health risks due to the consumption of contaminated seafood. Samples were collected at 34 sites along Todos os Santos Bay, Brazil. The elements were determined by ICP OES and Hg by Direct Mercury Analysis. Relatively high concentrations of trace elements (As, Zn, Se and Cu) were found in seafood tissues. Potential daily intake of As, Co, Se, Zn and Cu associated to shellfish consumption suggested relevant non-carcinogenic risk for all studied locations. Copper was the element that posed the greatest non-carcinogenic risk, while Pb posed the highest carcinogenic risk. Health risks for humans were greatest from the consumption of mussels. Contaminated shellfish offer the greatest risk for children, subsistence fishers and subsistence shellfish consumers. PMID:21803378

  1. Trends in the levels of Escherichia coli in commercially harvested bivalve shellfish from England and Wales, 1999-2008.

    PubMed

    Campos, Carlos J A; Acornley, Richard; Morgan, Owen C; Kershaw, Simon

    2013-02-15

    Temporal trends in Escherichia coli concentrations in bivalve shellfish were examined using data collected from 57 production areas around the coast of England and Wales during 1999-2008. Downward trends were detected in annual geometric means of E. coli in shellfish from 12% of the sampling points. The percentage of class B areas (E. coli ? 4600/100 g shellfish in 90% of samples) increased from 69% to 86% during the 10-year period. The improvement in the microbial quality of shellfish is associated with sewerage improvement schemes largely implemented during 2000-2005. Upward trends were detected in 9% of the points. The causes of these increases are not known. It is recommended that quantitative sanitary profiling of shellfish waters and cost-benefit appraisal over long-term planning horizons are considered as part of sewerage investment programmes under the Water Framework Directive. This would allow greater scope to secure protection and improvement of shellfish water quality. PMID:23260652

  2. Interannual variability in the timing of New England shellfish toxicity and relationships to environmental forcing

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Apurva; Thomas, Andrew C.; Borsuk, Mark E.

    2013-01-01

    Routine monitoring along the coast of the Gulf of Maine (GoM) reveals shellfish toxicity nearly every summer, but at varying times, locations, and magnitudes. The responsible toxin is known to be produced by the dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense, yet there is little apparent association between Alexandrium abundance and shellfish toxicity. One possibility is that toxic cells are persistent in offshore areas and variability in shellfish toxicity is caused not by changes in overall abundance, but rather by variability in transport processes. Measurements of offshore Alexandrium biomass are scarce, so we bypass cell abundance as an explanatory variable and focus instead on the relations between shellfish toxicity and concurrent metrics of GoM meteorology, hydrology, and oceanography. While this yields over two decades (1985–2005) of data representing a variety of interannual conditions, the toxicity data are gappy in spatial and temporal coverage. We address this through a combination of parametric curve fitting and hierarchical cluster analysis to reveal eight archetypical modes of seasonal toxicity timing. Groups of locations are then formed that have similar interannual patterns in these archetypes. Finally, the interannual patterns within each group are related to available environmental metrics using classification trees. Results indicate that a weak cross-shore sea surface temperature (SST) gradient in the summer is the strongest correlate of shellfish toxicity, likely by signifying a hydrological connection between offshore Alexandrium populations and near-shore shellfish beds. High cumulative downwelling wind strength early in the season is revealed as a precursor consistent with this mechanism. Although previous studies suggest that alongshore transport is important in moving Alexandrium from the eastern to western GoM, alongshore SST gradient is not an important correlate of toxicity in our study. We conclude by discussing the implications of our results for designing efficient and effective shellfish monitoring programs along the GoM coast. PMID:23391892

  3. Interannual variability in the timing of New England shellfish toxicity and relationships to environmental forcing.

    PubMed

    Nair, Apurva; Thomas, Andrew C; Borsuk, Mark E

    2013-03-01

    Routine monitoring along the coast of the Gulf of Maine (GoM) reveals shellfish toxicity nearly every summer, but at varying times, locations, and magnitudes. The responsible toxin is known to be produced by the dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense, yet there is little apparent association between Alexandrium abundance and shellfish toxicity. One possibility is that toxic cells are persistent in offshore areas and variability in shellfish toxicity is caused not by changes in overall abundance, but rather by variability in transport processes. Measurements of offshore Alexandrium biomass are scarce, so we bypass cell abundance as an explanatory variable and focus instead on the relations between shellfish toxicity and concurrent metrics of GoM meteorology, hydrology, and oceanography. While this yields over two decades (1985-2005) of data representing a variety of interannual conditions, the toxicity data are gappy in spatial and temporal coverage. We address this through a combination of parametric curve fitting and hierarchical cluster analysis to reveal eight archetypical modes of seasonal toxicity timing. Groups of locations are then formed that have similar interannual patterns in these archetypes. Finally, the interannual patterns within each group are related to available environmental metrics using classification trees. Results indicate that a weak cross-shore sea surface temperature (SST) gradient in the summer is the strongest correlate of shellfish toxicity, likely by signifying a hydrological connection between offshore Alexandrium populations and near-shore shellfish beds. High cumulative downwelling wind strength early in the season is revealed as a precursor consistent with this mechanism. Although previous studies suggest that alongshore transport is important in moving Alexandrium from the eastern to western GoM, alongshore SST gradient is not an important correlate of toxicity in our study. We conclude by discussing the implications of our results for designing efficient and effective shellfish monitoring programs along the GoM coast. PMID:23391892

  4. Removal of Paralytic Shellfish Toxins by Probiotic Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Vasama, Mari; Kumar, Himanshu; Salminen, Seppo; Haskard, Carolyn A.

    2014-01-01

    Paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) are non-protein neurotoxins produced by saltwater dinoflagellates and freshwater cyanobacteria. The ability of Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains GG and LC-705 (in viable and non-viable forms) to remove PSTs (saxitoxin (STX), neosaxitoxin (neoSTX), gonyautoxins 2 and 3 (GTX2/3), C-toxins 1 and 2 (C1/2)) from neutral and acidic solution (pH 7.3 and 2) was examined using HPLC. Binding decreased in the order of STX ~ neoSTX > C2 > GTX3 > GTX2 > C1. Removal of STX and neoSTX (77%–97.2%) was significantly greater than removal of GTX3 and C2 (33.3%–49.7%). There were no significant differences in toxin removal capacity between viable and non-viable forms of lactobacilli, which suggested that binding rather than metabolism is the mechanism of the removal of toxins. In general, binding was not affected by the presence of other organic molecules in solution. Importantly, this is the first study to demonstrate the ability of specific probiotic lactic bacteria to remove PSTs, particularly the most toxic PST-STX, from solution. Further, these results warrant thorough screening and assessment of safe and beneficial microbes for their usefulness in the seafood and water industries and their effectiveness in vivo. PMID:25046082

  5. Azaspiracid: first evidence of protein binding in shellfish.

    PubMed

    Nzoughet, K J; Hamilton, J T G; Floyd, S D; Douglas, A; Nelson, J; Devine, L; Elliott, C T

    2008-06-01

    The occurrence of azaspiracid (AZA) toxins in contaminated shellfish has been the focus of much research. The present study investigated the binding properties of these toxins in mussels of the species Mytilus edulis. The work involved extraction of proteins and AZAs from contaminated mussel hepatopancreas and examination of the extracts by isoelectric focusing (IEF), size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and sodium docecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry analysis (LC-MS/MS) was also performed in this study to identify AZAs. Blank mussels were subjected to the same purification and analytical procedures. AZAs were found to be weakly bound to a protein with a molecular weight of 45 kDa, in samples of contaminated mussels. This protein, which was abundant in contaminated mussels, was also present in blank mussels, albeit at much lower concentrations. It was further noted that a 22 kDa protein was also present only in contaminated mussel samples. PMID:18417183

  6. Development and Validation of a Novel Lateral Flow Immunoassay (LFIA) for the Rapid Screening of Paralytic Shellfish Toxins (PSTs) from Shellfish Extracts.

    PubMed

    Jawaid, Waqass; Campbell, Katrina; Melville, Karrie; Holmes, Stephen J; Rice, Jennifer; Elliott, Christopher T

    2015-05-19

    A single-step lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) was developed and validated for the rapid screening of paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) from a variety of shellfish species, at concentrations relevant to regulatory limits of 800 ?g STX-diHCl equivalents/kg shellfish meat. A simple aqueous extraction protocol was performed within several minutes from sample homogenate. The qualitative result was generated after a 5 min run time using a portable reader which removed subjectivity from data interpretation. The test was designed to generate noncompliant results with samples containing approximately 800 ?g of STX-diHCl/kg. The cross-reactivities in relation to STX, expressed as mean ± SD, were as follows: NEO: 128.9% ± 29%; GTX1&4: 5.7% ± 1.5%; GTX2&3: 23.4% ± 10.4%; dcSTX: 55.6% ± 10.9%; dcNEO: 28.0% ± 8.9%; dcGTX2&3: 8.3% ± 2.7%; C1&C2: 3.1% ± 1.2%; GTX5: 23.3% ± 14.4% (n = 5 LFIA lots). There were no indications of matrix effects from the different samples evaluated (mussels, scallops, oysters, clams, cockles) nor interference from other shellfish toxins (domoic acid, okadaic acid group). Naturally contaminated sample evaluations showed no false negative results were generated from a variety of different samples and profiles (n = 23), in comparison to reference methods (MBA method 959.08, LC-FD method 2005.06). External laboratory evaluations of naturally contaminated samples (n = 39) indicated good correlation with reference methods (MBA, LC-FD). This is the first LFIA which has been shown, through rigorous validation, to have the ability to detect most major PSTs in a reliable manner and will be a huge benefit to both industry and regulators, who need to perform rapid and reliable testing to ensure shellfish are safe to eat. PMID:25893460

  7. Exxon Valdez oil spill. State/federal natural resource damage assessment final report. Impacts of the Exxon Valdez oil spill on bottomfish and shellfish in Prince William Sound. Fish/shellfish study 18

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    Trawl surveys were conducted in Prince William Sound and adjacent waters in 1989 and 1990 to assess impacts of the Exxon Valdex oil spill on commercial species of bottomfish and shellfish. The surveys (1) determined abundance, distribution, and year-class strength of important bottomfish and shellfish species and (2) assessed the incidence and distribution of oil contamination in fish bile.

  8. Formation of a Volunteer Harmful Algal Bloom Network in British Columbia, Canada, Following an Outbreak of Diarrhetic Shellfish Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Lorraine; Cassis, David; Haigh, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Evidence for shellfish toxin illness in British Columbia (BC) on the west coast of Canada can be traced back to 1793. For over two hundred years, domestically acquired bivalve shellfish toxin illnesses in BC were solely ascribed to paralytic shellfish poisonings caused by algal blooms of Alexandrium. This changed in 2011, when BC experienced its first outbreak of diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP). As a result of this outbreak, Canada’s first DSP symposium was held in November, 2012, in North Vancouver, BC. Three of the objectives of the symposium were to provide a forum to educate key stakeholders on this emerging issue, to identify research and surveillance priorities and to create a DSP network. The purpose of this paper is to review what is known about shellfish poisoning in BC and to describe a novel volunteer network that arose following the symposium. The newly formed network was designed for industry shellfish growers to identify harmful algae bloom events, so that they may take actions to mitigate the effects of harmful blooms on shellfish morbidity. The network will also inform public health and regulatory stakeholders of potentially emerging issues in shellfish growing areas. PMID:24172211

  9. Interannual variability of shellfish toxicity in the Gulf of Maine: Time and space patterns and links to environmental variability

    E-print Network

    Xiu, Peng

    Interannual variability of shellfish toxicity in the Gulf of Maine: Time and space patterns of Marine Sciences, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469, USA 1. Introduction The Gulf of Maine (Fig. 1 Accepted 10 March 2010 Keywords: Gulf of Maine Harmful algal blooms Interannual variability Shellfish

  10. Prevalence and Characterization of Shiga Toxin-Producing and Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli in Shellfish-Harvesting Areas and Their Watersheds.

    PubMed

    Balière, Charlotte; Rincé, Alain; Blanco, Jorge; Dahbi, Ghizlane; Harel, Josée; Vogeleer, Philippe; Giard, Jean-Christophe; Mariani-Kurkdjian, Patricia; Gourmelon, Michèle

    2015-01-01

    more strains formed a strong biofilm at 18 than at 30°C. Finally, more than 85% of analyzed strains were found to be sensitive to the 16 tested antibiotics. These data suggest the low risk of human infection by STEC if shellfish from these shellfish-harvesting areas were consumed. PMID:26648928

  11. Prevalence and Characterization of Shiga Toxin-Producing and Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli in Shellfish-Harvesting Areas and Their Watersheds

    PubMed Central

    Balière, Charlotte; Rincé, Alain; Blanco, Jorge; Dahbi, Ghizlane; Harel, Josée; Vogeleer, Philippe; Giard, Jean-Christophe; Mariani-Kurkdjian, Patricia; Gourmelon, Michèle

    2015-01-01

    more strains formed a strong biofilm at 18 than at 30°C. Finally, more than 85% of analyzed strains were found to be sensitive to the 16 tested antibiotics. These data suggest the low risk of human infection by STEC if shellfish from these shellfish-harvesting areas were consumed. PMID:26648928

  12. Effect of the Clean Water Act on shellfish growing waters in the Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Broutman, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    This report examines the classification of shellfish growing waters in the Gulf of Mexico as an indicator of bacterial water quality. Information presented includes the status of classified waters, sources of pollution affecting waters that are not classified as approved, and trends in classification between 1971 and 1985. Data were collected by site visits to the five Gulf states, interviews with state personnel, and reference to written materials. Data are used to assess the effectiveness of national efforts to improve bacterial water quality in the past fifteen years since passage of the Clean Water Act. The hypothesis to be tested is that these efforts have not succeeded in reducing fecal coliform concentrations to levels required for approved harvest of shellfish, as established by the National Shellfish Sanitation Program.

  13. Relating the bivalve shellfish harvesting area classification criteria in the United States and European Union programmes.

    PubMed

    Lee, R J; Reese, R A

    2014-06-01

    Estimation of the level of risk of faecal contamination of shellfish harvesting areas is undertaken by monitoring faecal indicator bacteria in seawater samples under the United States programme and shellfish flesh samples under the European Union (EU) programme. Determining the relationship between the two approaches is important for assessing the relative level of public health protection and regulating international trade. The relationship was investigated using both statistical modelling and simple compliance assessment on large international data sets of paired seawater and shellfish samples. The two approaches yielded the same conclusions: EU class A is more stringent than the US Approved category for all species; the US Restrictive standard is more restrictive than EU class B for some bivalve species. Therefore, the classifications under the two programmes are not exactly equivalent. PMID:24937222

  14. Evaluation of mouse bioassay results in an inter-laboratory comparison for paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jijuan; Zheng, Jiang; Yu, Bing; Wang, Qiuyan; Xu, Junyi; Li, Aifeng

    2011-07-01

    An inter-laboratory comparison of the AOAC mouse bioassay for paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxicity in shellfish was carried out among 25 Chinese laboratories to examine the overall performance for PSP testing in China, and to analyze the main factors affecting the performance of this method. The toxic scallop Patinopecten yessoensis collected from coast of Bohai Sea, China, was used as a test sample in the comparison study. The results were reported and evaluated using robust statistical methods. The z scores showed that 80%, 8%, and 12% of laboratories reported satisfactory results, unsatisfactory results, and questionable results, respectively. This evaluation demonstrates that the PSP mouse bioassay is an appropriate method for screening and testing PSP toxicity in shellfish. However, it was found that the experience and skill of technicians, as well as the body weight and health status of mice being used significantly affected the accuracy of the method.

  15. Recent innovation in microbial source tracking using bacterial real-time PCR markers in shellfish.

    PubMed

    Mauffret, A; Mieszkin, S; Morizur, M; Alfiansah, Y; Lozach, S; Gourmelon, M

    2013-03-15

    We assessed the capacity of real-time PCR markers to identify the origin of contamination in shellfish. Oyster, cockles or clams were either contaminated with fecal materials and host-associated markers designed from Bacteroidales or Catellicoccus marimammalium 16S RNA genes were extracted from their intravalvular liquid, digestive tissues or shellfish flesh. Extraction of bacterial DNA from the oyster intravalvular liquid with FastDNA spin kit for soil enabled the selected markers to be quantified in 100% of artificially contaminated samples, and the source of contamination to be identified in 13 out of 38 naturally contaminated batches from European Class B and Class C areas. However, this protocol did not enable the origin of the contamination to be identified in cockle or clam samples. Although results are promising for extracts from intravalvular liquid in oyster, it is unlikely that a single protocol could be the best across all bacterial markers and types of shellfish. PMID:23398745

  16. Warm temperature acclimation impacts metabolism of paralytic shellfish toxins from Alexandrium minutum in commercial oysters.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Hazel; Seebacher, Frank; O'Connor, Wayne; Zammit, Anthony; Harwood, D Tim; Murray, Shauna

    2015-09-01

    Species of Alexandrium produce potent neurotoxins termed paralytic shellfish toxins and are expanding their ranges worldwide, concurrent with increases in sea surface temperature. The metabolism of molluscs is temperature dependent, and increases in ocean temperature may influence both the abundance and distribution of Alexandrium and the dynamics of toxin uptake and depuration in shellfish. Here, we conducted a large-scale study of the effect of temperature on the uptake and depuration of paralytic shellfish toxins in three commercial oysters (Saccostrea glomerata and diploid and triploid Crassostrea gigas, n = 252 per species/ploidy level). Oysters were acclimated to two constant temperatures, reflecting current and predicted climate scenarios (22 and 27 °C), and fed a diet including the paralytic shellfish toxin-producing species Alexandrium minutum. While the oysters fed on A. minutum in similar quantities, concentrations of the toxin analogue GTX1,4 were significantly lower in warm-acclimated S. glomerata and diploid C. gigas after 12 days. Following exposure to A. minutum, toxicity of triploid C. gigas was not affected by temperature. Generally, detoxification rates were reduced in warm-acclimated oysters. The routine metabolism of the oysters was not affected by the toxins, but a significant effect was found at a cellular level in diploid C. gigas. The increasing incidences of Alexandrium blooms worldwide are a challenge for shellfish food safety regulation. Our findings indicate that rising ocean temperatures may reduce paralytic shellfish toxin accumulation in two of the three oyster types; however, they may persist for longer periods in oyster tissue. PMID:26032975

  17. Diarrhetic Shellfish Toxins and Other Lipophilic Toxins of Human Health Concern in Washington State

    PubMed Central

    Trainer, Vera L.; Moore, Leslie; Bill, Brian D.; Adams, Nicolaus G.; Harrington, Neil; Borchert, Jerry; da Silva, Denis A. M.; Eberhart, Bich-Thuy L.

    2013-01-01

    The illness of three people in 2011 after their ingestion of mussels collected from Sequim Bay State Park, Washington State, USA, demonstrated the need to monitor diarrhetic shellfish toxins (DSTs) in Washington State for the protection of human health. Following these cases of diarrhetic shellfish poisoning, monitoring for DSTs in Washington State became formalized in 2012, guided by routine monitoring of Dinophysis species by the SoundToxins program in Puget Sound and the Olympic Region Harmful Algal Bloom (ORHAB) partnership on the outer Washington State coast. Here we show that the DSTs at concentrations above the guidance level of 16 ?g okadaic acid (OA) + dinophysistoxins (DTXs)/100 g shellfish tissue were widespread in sentinel mussels throughout Puget Sound in summer 2012 and included harvest closures of California mussel, varnish clam, manila clam and Pacific oyster. Concentrations of toxins in Pacific oyster and manila clam were often at least half those measured in blue mussels at the same site. The primary toxin isomer in shellfish and plankton samples was dinophysistoxin-1 (DTX-1) with D. acuminata as the primary Dinophysis species. Other lipophilic toxins in shellfish were pectenotoxin-2 (PTX-2) and yessotoxin (YTX) with azaspiracid-2 (AZA-2) also measured in phytoplankton samples. Okadaic acid, azaspiracid-1 (AZA-1) and azaspiracid-3 (AZA-3) were all below the levels of detection by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). A shellfish closure at Ruby Beach, Washington, was the first ever noted on the Washington State Pacific coast due to DSTs. The greater than average Fraser River flow during the summers of 2011 and 2012 may have provided an environment conducive to dinoflagellates and played a role in the prevalence of toxigenic Dinophysis in Puget Sound. PMID:23760013

  18. Trace metal content of fish and shellfishes of the Niger delta area of Nigeria

    SciTech Connect

    Kakulu, S.E.; Osibanjo, O.; Ajayi, S.O.

    1987-01-01

    The trace metal contents of various fish and shellfishes from the Niger delta area of Nigeria were determined. The levels in the shellfishes were higher than those in the fish, which could be due to their being bottom feeders. The levels of fish varied from <0.01-0.10 ..mu..g/g for Cd, < 0.05-3.69 ..mu..g/g for Cu, 0.49-16.52 ..mu..g/g for Fe, and 0.08-6.90 ..mu..g/g for Zn. 15 references, 1 figures, 2 tables.

  19. Shellfish allergy and relation to iodinated contrast media: United Kingdom survey

    PubMed Central

    Baig, Mudassar; Farag, Ahmad; Sajid, Jamal; Potluri, Rahul; Irwin, R Bruce; Khalid, Hafiz Mohammed Idrees

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess current practice of United Kingdom cardiologists with respect to patients with reported shellfish/iodine allergy, and in particular the use of iodinated contrast for elective coronary angiography. Moreover we have reviewed the current evidence-base and guidelines available in this area. METHODS: A questionnaire survey was send to 500 senior United Kingdom cardiologists (almost 50% cardiologists registered with British Cardiovascular Society) using email and first 100 responses used to analyze practise. We involved cardiologists performing coronary angiograms routinely both at secondary and tertiary centres. Three specific questions relating to allergy were asked: (1) History of shellfish/iodine allergy in pre-angiography assessment; (2) Treatments offered for shellfish/iodine allergy individuals; and (3) Any specific treatment protocol for shellfish/iodine allergy cases. We aimed to establish routine practice in United Kingdom for patients undergoing elective coronary angiography. We also performed comprehensive PubMed search for the available evidence of relationship between shellfish/iodine allergy and contrast media. RESULTS: A total of 100 responses were received, representing 20% of all United Kingdom cardiologists. Ninety-three replies were received from consultant cardiologists, 4 from non-consultant grades and 3 from cardiology specialist nurses. Amongst the respondents, 66% routinely asked about a previous history of shellfish/iodine allergy. Fifty-six percent would pre-treat these patients with steroids and anti-histamines. The other 44% do nothing, or do nonspecific testing based on their personal experience as following: (1) Skin test with 1 mL of subcutaneous contrast before intravenous contrast; (2) Test dose 2 mL contrast before coronary injection; (3) Close observation for shellfish allergy patients; and (4) Minimal evidence that the steroid and anti-histamine regime is effective but it makes us feel better. CONCLUSION: There is no evidence that allergy to shellfish alters the risk of reaction to intravenous contrast more than any other allergy and asking about such allergies in pre-angiogram assessment will not provide any additional information except propagating the myth. PMID:24669292

  20. Distribution of Marine Lipophilic Toxins in Shellfish Products Collected from the Chinese Market

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haiyan; Yao, Jianhua; Guo, Mengmeng; Tan, Zhijun; Zhou, Deqing; Zhai, Yuxiu

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of lipophilic marine biotoxins in shellfish from the Chinese market, we used hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to measure levels of okadaic acid (OA), azaspiracid (AZA1), pectenotoxin (PTX2), gymnodimine (GYM), and spirolide (SPX1). We collected and analyzed 291 shellfish samples from main production sites along a wide latitudinal transect along the Chinese coastline from December 2008 to December 2009. Results revealed a patchy distribution of the five toxins and highlighted the specific geographical distribution and seasonal and species variation of the putative toxigenic organisms. All five lipophilic marine biotoxins were found in shellfish samples. The highest concentrations of OA, AZA1, PTX2, GYM, and SPX1 were 37.3, 5.90, 16.4, 14.4, and 8.97 ?g/kg, respectively. These values were much lower than the legislation limits for lipophilic shellfish toxins. However, the value might be significantly underestimated for the limited detection toxins. Also, these toxins were found in most coastal areas of China and were present in almost all seasons of the year. Thus, these five toxins represent a potential threat to human health. Consequently, studies should be conducted and measures should be taken to ensure the safety of the harvested product. PMID:26184236

  1. New perspectives on virus detection in shellfish: hemocytes as a source of concentrated virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    USDA ARS research indicates that circulating phagocytic cells (hemocytes) within oysters retain virus particles. We find that persistence of hepatitis A virus (HAV) within oyster hemocytes correlates with the presence of virus within whole oysters. Since bivalve shellfish have no self-nonself immun...

  2. TOXICITY ASSESSMENT OF PARALYTIC SHELLFISH POISONS (PSPS) USING QUANTITATIVE STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The most significant harmful algal bloom (HAB) toxin in terms of public health is commonly known as paralytic shellfish poisons (PSPs, "red tides" toxins). PSPs are neurotoxins produced by marine dinoflagellates and some cyanobacteria. PSPs comprise of over 21 natural toxins wi...

  3. Fluorogenic membrane overlays to enumerate total coliforms, Escherichia coli, and total Vibrionaceae in shellfish and seawater

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three assays were developed to enumerate total coliforms, Escherichia coli, and total Vibrionaceae in shellfish and other foods and in seawater and other environmental samples. Assays involve membrane overlays of overnight colonies on non-selective agar plates to detect ß-glucuronidase and lysyl am...

  4. Occurrence of Lipophilic Marine Toxins in Shellfish from Galicia (NW of Spain) and Synergies among Them

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Laura P.; González, Virginia; Martínez, Aníbal; Paz, Beatriz; Lago, Jorge; Cordeiro, Victoria; Blanco, Lucía; Vieites, Juan Manuel; Cabado, Ana G.

    2015-01-01

    Lipophilic marine toxins pose a serious threat for consumers and an enormous economic problem for shellfish producers. Synergistic interaction among toxins may play an important role in the toxicity of shellfish and consequently in human intoxications. In order to study the toxic profile of molluscs, sampled during toxic episodes occurring in different locations in Galicia in 2014, shellfish were analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS), the official method for the detection of lipophilic toxins. The performance of this procedure was demonstrated to be fit for purpose and was validated in house following European guidelines. The vast majority of toxins present in shellfish belonged to the okadaic acid (OA) group and some samples from a particular area contained yessotoxin (YTX). Since these toxins occur very often with other lipophilic toxins, we evaluated the potential interactions among them. A human neuroblastoma cell line was used to study the possible synergies of OA with other lipophilic toxins. Results show that combination of OA with dinophysistoxin 2 (DTX2) or YTX enhances the toxicity triggered by OA, decreasing cell viability and cell proliferation, depending on the toxin concentration and incubation time. The effects of other lipophilic toxins as 13-desmethyl Spirolide C were also evaluated in vitro. PMID:25815891

  5. High pressure processing as an intervention for raw virus-contaminated shellfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over the past 7 years, the USDA ARS Seafood Safety Laboratory has evaluated the potential use of high pressure processing (HPP) as a processing strategy for virus-contaminated shellfish. HPP can inactivate hepatitis A virus, (HAV), the human norovirus surrogates feline calicivirus and murine norovi...

  6. Distribution of Marine Lipophilic Toxins in Shellfish Products Collected from the Chinese Market.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haiyan; Yao, Jianhua; Guo, Mengmeng; Tan, Zhijun; Zhou, Deqing; Zhai, Yuxiu

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the prevalence of lipophilic marine biotoxins in shellfish from the Chinese market, we used hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to measure levels of okadaic acid (OA), azaspiracid (AZA1), pectenotoxin (PTX2), gymnodimine (GYM), and spirolide (SPX1). We collected and analyzed 291 shellfish samples from main production sites along a wide latitudinal transect along the Chinese coastline from December 2008 to December 2009. Results revealed a patchy distribution of the five toxins and highlighted the specific geographical distribution and seasonal and species variation of the putative toxigenic organisms. All five lipophilic marine biotoxins were found in shellfish samples. The highest concentrations of OA, AZA1, PTX2, GYM, and SPX1 were 37.3, 5.90, 16.4, 14.4, and 8.97 ?g/kg, respectively. These values were much lower than the legislation limits for lipophilic shellfish toxins. However, the value might be significantly underestimated for the limited detection toxins. Also, these toxins were found in most coastal areas of China and were present in almost all seasons of the year. Thus, these five toxins represent a potential threat to human health. Consequently, studies should be conducted and measures should be taken to ensure the safety of the harvested product. PMID:26184236

  7. Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolated from retail shellfish in Shanghai

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a marine and estuarine bacterium that poses a large threat to human health worldwide. It has been the leading bacterial cause of seafood-borne illness. This study investigated the prevalence and drug resistance of V. parahaemolyticus isolated from retail shellfish in Shang...

  8. Shellfish-associated enteric virus illness: virus localization, disease outbreaks and prevention

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous outbreaks of shellfish-borne enteric virus illness have been reported worldwide. Most notable among the outbreaks are those involving norovirus illness and hepatitis A. Lessons learned from outbreak investigations indicate that most outbreaks are preventable. Anthropogenic sources of con...

  9. MOLECULAR DETECTION AND HIGH PRESSURE SANITIZATION OF SHELLFISH-BORNE VIRUSES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A highly sensitive virus RNA extraction method for shellfish, using Glycine buffer, Polyethylene glycol, Tri-reagent and poly dT magnetic beads, termed the GPTT procedure, has recently been developed which facilitates RT-PCR detection of hepatitis A (HAV), hepatitis E (HEV), and Norwalk-like viruses...

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of the Shellfish Larval Probiotic Bacillus pumilus RI06-95

    PubMed Central

    Hamblin, Meagan; Spinard, Edward; Gomez-Chiarri, Marta; Nelson, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus pumilus RI06-95 is a marine bacterium isolated in Narragansett, Rhode Island, which has shown probiotic activity against marine pathogens in larval shellfish. We report the genome of B. pumilus RI06-95, which provides insight into the microbe’s probiotic ability and may be used in future studies of the probiotic mechanism. PMID:26337873

  11. Metal Content in Four Shellfish Species from the Istrian Coast of Croatia.

    PubMed

    Bilandži?, Nina; Sedak, Marija; ?alopek, Bruno; Džafi?, Natalija; Ostoji?, Dijana Mišeti?; Poto?njak, Dalibor

    2015-11-01

    The concentrations of As, Cd, Cu, Hg, Pb and Zn were measured in four shellfish species (oysters, mussels, scallops, warty venus) collected along the Istria Peninsula coast during autumn 2013. Mean metal levels in shellfish ranged as follows (mg/kg): As 1.69-3.91, Cd 0.15-0.99, Hg 0.06-0.2, Pb 0.33-0.74, Cu 1.23-36.2, Zn 16.3-511. Statistical analysis showed a significant difference in As (p < 0.05), Cd, Pb, Hg, Cu and Zn (p < 0.01, all) levels among shellfish species. The highest metal concentrations were found in oysters (mg/kg): As 3.91, Cd 0.99, Cu 36.2 and Zn 511. The highest means of Pb and Hg were measured in (mg/kg): warty venus 0.74; scallops 0.12. The estimated daily intakes for oysters shown it as a good source of Cu and Zn. The higher contribution of Cd and As levels to the provisional tolerable weekly intake in shellfishes suggest a careful approach for consumption. PMID:26210827

  12. Hard clam aquaculture is the largest and most valuable of the shellfish

    E-print Network

    Florida, University of

    Hard clam aquaculture is the largest and most valuable of the shellfish aquaculture industries on the East Coast. It accounts for more than $50 million in economic value annually. Hard clams are bivalve or freshwater for an extend- ed period. Hard clams occur natural- ly all along the Atlantic coast from Nova

  13. Disease management strategies for shellfish aquaculture: the important role of hatcheries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disease management is a critical component of the successful production of bivalves. Infections by bacterial pathogens can cause rapid mortality of shellfish larvae with devastating consequences for both the hatcheries and the farmers that rely upon them. Furthermore, several bacterial and parasiti...

  14. Norovirus, hepatitis A virus and enterovirus presence in shellfish from high quality harvesting areas in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, João R; Vaz, Lisa; Cerqueira, Sónia; Castilho, Fernanda; Santos, Ricardo; Monteiro, Sílvia; Manso, Carmen F; Romalde, Jesus L; Nascimento, Maria São José

    2011-08-01

    This is the first report on the screening of shellfish from Portugal for the presence of human enteropathogenic viruses. Approximately 2000 shellfish (Curbicula fluminea, Ruditapes decussatus, Tellina crassa, Spisula solida, Dosinia exoleta, Ensis spp., Mytilus spp., Ostrea edulis and Cerastoderma edule), organized in 49 batches, were collected between March 2008 and February 2009. They were tested for norovirus (NoV), hepatitis A virus (HAV) and enterovirus (EV) by RT-PCR followed by nucleotide sequencing. Bacterial contamination was also evaluated by Escherichia coli counts. Viral contamination was detected throughout the year in all shellfish species and in all collection areas, independently of their harvesting areas classification. Overall, 67% of all analyzed batches were contaminated by at least one of the studied viruses while the simultaneous presence of two and three viruses was detected in 22% and 6% batches, respectively. Of the three viruses, NoV was detected in 37% of the batches, followed by EV in 35%, and HAV in 33%. Nucleotide sequencing of the NoV and HAV RT-PCR products demonstrated that all strains belonged to NoV genotype GII.4 and HAV subgenotype 1B. The presence of NoV and HAV in shellfish from "A class" harvesting areas of Portugal can represent a potential health risk. PMID:21569936

  15. MERCURY IN FISH AND SHELLFISH OF THE NORTHEAST PACIFIC. 1. PACIFIC HALIBUT, HIPPOGLOSSUS STENOLEPIS

    E-print Network

    MERCURY IN FISH AND SHELLFISH OF THE NORTHEAST PACIFIC. 1. PACIFIC HALIBUT, HIPPOGLOSSUS STENOLEPIS.! ABSTRACf A total of 1,227 Pacific halibut, Hippaglossus steoolepis, were analyzed for mercury content: the Bering Sea, Gulf of Alaska, southeast Alaska, British Columbia, and Washington-Oregon. Mercury was found

  16. MERCURY IN FISH AND SHELLFISH OF THE NORTHEAST PACIFIC. II. SABLEFISH, ANOPLOPOMA FIMBRIA

    E-print Network

    MERCURY IN FISH AND SHELLFISH OF THE NORTHEAST PACIFIC. II. SABLEFISH, ANOPLOPOMA FIMBRIA ALICE S several locations in Alaska, Washington, Oregon, and California were analyzed for their mercury content. Mean mercury level in this species varied with the geographical location of catch, showing a gradual

  17. Archaeofauna 17 (2008): 63-76 Intertidal shellfish use during the Middle

    E-print Network

    2008-01-01

    Archaeofauna 17 (2008): 63-76 Intertidal shellfish use during the Middle and Later Stone Age February 2008) ABSTRACT: Middle Stone Age (MSA; 250,000 to 50,000 years ago) and Later Stone Age (LSA; 50 are currently excavating Ysterfontein 1, a Middle Stone Age shell midden on the west coast. Analyses

  18. MODELING FISH AND SHELLFISH DISTRIBUTIONS IN THE MOBILE BAY ESTUARY, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estuaries in the Gulf of Mexico provide rich habitat for many fish and shellfish, including those that have been identified as economically and ecologically important. For the Mobile Bay estuary, we developed statistical models to relate distributions of individual species and sp...

  19. Risk assessment of heavy metals in shellfish for the population in Nha Trang City, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thuan Anh; Roudot, Alain-Claude; Massin, Dominique Parent

    2014-01-01

    The study described in this article was designed to estimate the dietary intake of lead, cadmium, and mercury due to the shellfish consumption of the population in Nha Trang City, Vietnam. The lead, cadmium, and mercury concentrations in the shellfish consumed popularly by the Nha Trang population were investigated by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry from May 2008 to January 2009. The lead, cadmium, and mercury concentration ranges in shellfish are equal to 0.008-0.083, 0.013-0.056, and 0.028-0.056 mg/kg, respectively. The dietary intake of these elements was determined by a total diet study. The heavy metals intake was estimated for six subpopulation groups: men and women aged 18-29, 30-54, and > or =55. The dietary intakes of lead, cadmium, and mercury by the Nha Trang population are currently well below the provisional tolerable weekly intakes of lead, cadmium, and mercury, respectively. Therefore, no risk exists concerning the levels of exposure of Nha Trang consumers to the contaminants studied due to shellfish consumption. PMID:24645414

  20. Spatial and temporal heterogeneity of bacteria across an intertidal shellfish bed: implications for regulatory monitoring of faecal indicator organisms.

    PubMed

    Clements, Katie; Quilliam, Richard S; Jones, David L; Wilson, James; Malham, Shelagh K

    2015-02-15

    Routine bacterial monitoring of shellfish beds using indicator species is a common global practice designed to prevent human consumption of contaminated shellfish products. However, current bacteriological monitoring procedures which focus on the quantification of faecal indicator organisms (FIOs) as a proxy for microbial pollution may not be representative of total bacterial contamination levels present in shellfish harvesting areas. The objective of this study was to critically assess the accuracy of current monitoring strategies by quantifying the spatial (lateral and longitudinal distance) and temporal (seasonality and tidal state) concentrations of FIOs (Escherichia coli and total coliforms) within a single intertidal commercially harvested shellfish bed. Spatial and temporal FIO dynamics, including the effects of tidal state and seasonality, were quantified in mussel flesh and sediment samples from a single intertidal mussel (Mytilus edulis) bed. Our results confirmed that FIO concentrations across a shellfish bed were heterogeneous over larger spatial and temporal scales, but showed no relation to the concentrations of autochthonous bacteria, such as Vibrio spp., or the physico-chemical parameters of the sediment. These results have important implications for both public health and the economic prosperity of the shellfish industry, and demonstrate the importance of accommodating both spatial and temporal fluctuations in routine bacteriological monitoring protocols. We conclude that current FIO monitoring procedures may not accurately represent levels of microbial contamination within shellfish harvesting areas and that more robust microbiological testing procedures need developing. PMID:25460933

  1. Fate of benzoate paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins from Gymnodinium catenatum in shellfish and fish detected by pre-column oxidation and liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Vale, Paulo

    2008-05-01

    Several cultured strains of Gymnodinium catenatum isolated worldwide have been shown to produce important proportions of the recently discovered benzoate paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins GC1 through GC3. These toxins pose a new challenge for the HPLC analysis of shellfish predating during blooms of this microalga because due to their hydrophobicity are retained along the C18 solid-phase extraction step employed to eliminate interferences. The production of GC toxins was confirmed in a clone of G.catenatum isolated from the Portuguese Northwest coast during the winter bloom of 2005, in addition to a clone from 1989 reported previously by other authors. The major peroxide oxidation products of GC1+2 and GC3 were, respectively, dcGTX2+3 and dcSTX. The search of benzoate analogues in bivalves contaminated during the winter 2005 bloom showed these analogues constituted a minor component of the N(1)-H containing toxins, as selectively detected by peroxide oxidation. While in G.catenatum GC1-3 were the major components after C1+2 and B1, in bivalves dcGTX2+3 and dcSTX were the major components after C1+2 and B1. Similar conclusions were later extended to more shellfish species naturally contaminated during the autumn bloom of 2007. In the gut content of sardines GC toxins were present, while in crabs predating upon shellfish, these were absent. A generalised conversion of GC toxins into decarbamoyl analogues was confirmed by in vitro incubations of bivalve's digestive glands with semi-purified GC toxins. This is the first report of widespread carbamoylase activity in shellfish, exclusively targeted at benzoate PSP analogues and that is heat-inactivated. Despite the high proportion of benzoate analogues produced by G.catenatum, analyses of bivalves contaminated with PSP toxins seem to be simplified due to the important conversion of benzoate into decarbamoyl analogues that occurs in bivalves. These last analogues are detected by common HPLC methods used for food protection. PMID:18371975

  2. Transformation of paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins in Crassostrea gigas and Pecten maximus reference materials.

    PubMed

    Turner, Andrew D; Lewis, Adam M; Hatfield, Robert G; Galloway, Angus W; Higman, Wendy A

    2012-11-01

    Matrix reference materials are an important requirement for the assessment of method performance characteristics and for routine quality control. In the field of marine toxin testing where biological assays have been used and where modern analytical testing methods are now becoming available, this requirement has become an urgent one. Various approaches are utilised for preparation of such materials in the absence of available naturally occurring toxic shellfish samples. Toxin-free shellfish may be artificially fortified through the addition of cultured toxic phytoplankton or shellfish may be incurred through natural feeding on toxic algae in a laboratory environment. Both of these approaches may be potentially affected by issues relating to the degradation or transformation of toxin analytes, so studies were conducted to assess these effects within our laboratory. A range of PSP-toxic shellfish tissues were prepared using the two approaches, in both Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) and king scallops (Pecten maximus). Additionally, sub-samples of incurred Pacific oyster tissue were further treated, through addition of artificial chemical stabilisers and gamma irradiation. Two separate month-long stability trials were conducted at +4 °C on each material. Results highlighted clear evidence for improved stability of materials following shellfish feeding experiments in comparison with the tissues which had been spiked with plankton. In addition, there were clear differences in stability of toxins between the two shellfish species studied. There was evidence for good stability of C1&2 toxins in both the incurred tissues and improved stability of some toxins in tissues which had been subjected to either gamma irradiation or treatment with chemical additives. The results therefore highlighted the benefits of conducting shellfish feeding if suitable stable reference materials are to be prepared containing a full range of PSP toxin analytes. The study also highlighted the benefits of post-production treatment to prolong the stability of the materials. Work is ongoing to assess the full characteristics of candidate reference materials prepared with these approaches with the aim of producing a homogenous and stable PSP reference material in Pacific oysters. PMID:22921579

  3. Occurrence and Antibiotic Resistance of Vibrio parahaemolyticus from Shellfish in Selangor, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Letchumanan, Vengadesh; Pusparajah, Priyia; Tan, Loh Teng-Hern; Yin, Wai-Fong; Lee, Learn-Han; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2015-01-01

    High consumer demand for shellfish has led to the need for large-scale, reliable shellfish supply through aquaculture or shellfish farming. However, bacterial infections which can spread rapidly among shellfish poses a major threat to this industry. Shellfish farmers therefore often resort to extensive use of antibiotics, both prophylactically and therapeutically, in order to protect their stocks. The extensive use of antibiotics in aquaculture has been postulated to represent a major contributing factor in the rising incidence of antimicrobial resistant pathogenic bacteria in shellfish. This study aimed to investigate the incidence of pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus and determine the antibiotic resistance profile as well as to perform plasmid curing in order to determine the antibiotic resistance mediation. Based on colony morphology, all 450 samples tested were positive for Vibrio sp; however, tox-R assay showed that only 44.4% (200/450) of these were V. parahaemolyticus. Out of these 200 samples, 6.5% (13/200) were trh-positive while none were tdh-positive. Antibiotic resistance was determined for all V. parahaemolyticus identified against 14 commonly used antibiotics and the multiple antibiotic resistance index (MAR) was calculated. The isolates demonstrated high resistance to several antibiotics tested- including second and third-line antibiotics- with 88% resistant to ampicillin, 81% to amikacin,70.5% to kanamycin, 73% to cefotaxime, and 51.5% to ceftazidime. The MAR index ranged from 0.00 to 0.79 with the majority of samples having an index of 0.36 (resistant to five antibiotics). Among the 13 trh-positive strains, almost 70% (9/13) demonstrated resistance to 4 or more antibiotics. Plasmid profiling for all V. parahaemolyticus isolates revealed that 86.5% (173/200) contained plasmids - ranging from 1 to 7 plasmids with DNA band sizes ranging from 1.2 kb to greater than 10 kb. 6/13 of the pathogenic V. pathogenic strains contained plasmid. After plasmid curing, the plasmid containing pathogenic strains isolated in our study have chromosomally mediated ampicillin resistance while the remaining resistance phenotypes are plasmid mediated. Overall, our results indicate that while the incidence of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus in shellfish in Selangor still appears to be at relatively reassuring levels, antibiotic resistance is a real concern and warrants ongoing surveillance. PMID:26697003

  4. Chlorinated and brominated organic pollutants in shellfish from the Yellow Sea and East China Sea.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ge; Asplund, Lillemor; Qiu, Yanling; Zhou, Yihui; Wang, Hua; Yao, Zongli; Jiang, Jianbin; Bergman, Åke

    2015-02-01

    The global contamination with persistent organic pollutants (POPs), or compounds with similar characteristics, is well known. Still there are data gaps for POP concentrations from many areas in the world. The aim of the present study is to assess several legacies POPs and also hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD) and methoxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (MeO-PBDEs) in shellfish from three locations in the Yellow Sea and East China Sea. The sources of the contaminants are discussed. Pooled samples were treated by liquid-liquid extraction and acid and column cleanup prior to analysis by gas chromatogram equipped with electron capture detector (GC-ECD) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The by far most abundant environmental contaminant originates from dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), independent of species analyzed or sampling site. The results indicate ongoing or at least recent discharges of DDT. The second highest concentrations were reported for HBCDD (21-40 ng/g fat) in the shellfish, independent of sampling sites. The two natural products, 6-MeO-BDE-47 and 2'-MeO-BDE-68, were also present in the shellfish (1.3-22 and 1-14 ng/g fat, respectively). The polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congener CB-153 (0.8-6.5 ng/g fat), hexachlorobenzene (HCB) (1.1-3.6 ng/g fat), and ?-hexachlorocyclohexane (?-HCH) (2.3-4.9 ng/g fat) were all higher than the concentrations of other HCH isomers, ?-endosulfan, PBDE congeners, and mirex. Apart from the DDTs and HBCDDs, it is evident that the pollution of shellfish was similar to, or lower than, the contamination of shellfish in other parts of the world. PMID:24958534

  5. ACUTE TOXICITY, SUBLETHAL EFFECTS AND BIOCONCENTRATION OF CHLORINATION PRODUCTS, VIRUSES, AND BACTERIA IN EDIBLE SHELLFISH: A REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report identifies, synthesizes, and summarizes published scientific data concerning toxicity, sublethal physiological effects, and uptake/depuration rates of chlorine, viruses, and bacteria in edible marine shellfish of the United States. The summary may provide environmental...

  6. RELATIONS OF FISH AND SHELLFISH DISTRIBUTIONS TO HABITAT AND WATER QUALITY IN THE MOBILE BAY ESTUARY, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Mobile Bay estuary provides rich habitat for many fish and shellfish, including those identified as economically and ecologically important. The National Estuary Program has focused on restoration of degraded estuarine habitat on which these species depend. To support this ...

  7. A new simple screening method for the detection of paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jinping; Pi, Shuaishuai; Ye, Shufeng; Gao, Haomin; Yao, Lei; Jiang, Zhenyi; Song, Yuling; Xi, Lei

    2012-09-01

    The current testing for paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) in shellfish is based on the mouse bioassay (MBA). To alleviate animal welfare concerns, we evaluated the utility of using sublethal indicators of toxicity as an alternative to measuring time to death. Live mice were injected with a PSP congener and the changes in neurotransmitter levels were measured 60, 90, and 120 min after injection. Acetylcholine (ACh) was the most sensitive marker for PSP toxicity. The changes in neurotransmitter levels were most pronounced in the blood. Thus, measurement of Ach levels in the blood may serve as a sensitive predictor for PSP that would not require sacrifice of the mice. This method was relatively simple, sensitive (less than 1 ?g/kg weight, equivalent to 20 ng/mL), low maintenance, and rapid (less than 60 min).

  8. Concentrations of some heavy metals in commercially important finfish and shellfish of the River Ganga.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Abhijit; Chowdhury, Ranju; Banerjee, Kakoli

    2012-04-01

    Heavy metals are dangerous to aquatic organisms and it can be bioaccumulated in the food chain leading to diseases in human. Cumulative effects of metals or chronic poisoning may occur as a result of long-term exposure even to low concentrations. The accumulation of heavy metals varies depending upon the species, environmental conditions, and inhibitory processes. Concentrations of zinc, copper, lead, and cadmium were determined in finfish and shellfish species in the Gangetic delta using a PerkinElmer Sciex ELAN 5000 ICP mass spectrometer and expressed as milligrams per kilogram of dry weight. In finfish and shellfish species the concentrations of Zn, Cu, Pb, and Cd were comparatively higher at stations 1 and 2 than the permissible level of WHO. The concentration of metals exhibited significant spatial variation and followed the order station 1 > station 2 > station 3 > station 4, which may be related to different degree of contamination in different location. The metal accumulation exhibited species specificity. PMID:21660552

  9. Fatal paralytic shellfish poisoning in Kittlitz's Murrelet (Brachyramphus brevirostris) nestlings, Alaska, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shearn-Bochsler, Valerie I.; Lance, Ellen W.; Corcoran, Robin; Piatt, John; Bodenstein, Barbara; Frame, Elizabeth; Lawonn, James

    2014-01-01

    Paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) is an acute toxic illness in humans resulting from ingestion of shellfish contaminated with a suite of neurotoxins (saxitoxins) produced by marine dinoflagellates, most commonly in the genus Alexandrium. Poisoning also has been sporadically suspected and, less often, documented in marine wildlife, often in association with an outbreak in humans. Kittlitz's Murrelet (Brachyramphus brevirostris) is a small, rare seabird of the Northern Pacific with a declining population. From 2008 to 2012, as part of a breeding ecology study, multiple Kittlitz's Murrelet nests on Kodiak Island, Alaska, were monitored by remote cameras. During the 2011 and 2012 breeding seasons, nestlings from several sites died during mild weather conditions. Remote camera observations revealed that the nestlings died shortly after consuming sand lance (Ammodytes hexapterus), a fish species known to biomagnify saxitoxin. High levels of saxitoxin were subsequently documented in crop content in 87% of nestling carcasses. Marine bird deaths from PSP may be underreported.

  10. Reevaluation of Production of Paralytic Shellfish Toxin by Bacteria Associated with Dinoflagellates of the Portuguese Coast

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Claudia A.; Alvito, Paula; Tavares, Maria João; Pereira, Paulo; Doucette, Gregory; Franca, Susana

    2003-01-01

    Paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) are potent neurotoxins produced by certain dinoflagellate and cyanobacterial species. The autonomous production of PSTs by bacteria remains controversial. In this study, PST production by two bacterial strains, isolated previously from toxic dinoflagellates, was evaluated using biological and analytical methods. Analyses were performed under conditions determined previously to be optimal for toxin production and detection. Our data are inconsistent with autonomous bacterial PST production under these conditions, thereby challenging previous findings for the same strains. PMID:12957964

  11. Multiple clusters of norovirus among shellfish consumers linked to symptomatic oyster harvesters.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Lorraine; Galanis, Eleni; Mattison, Kirsten; Mykytczuk, Oksana; Buenaventura, Enrico; Wong, Julie; Prystajecky, Natalie; Ritson, Mark; Stone, Jason; Moreau, Dan; Youssef, André

    2012-09-01

    We describe the investigation of a norovirus outbreak associated with raw oyster consumption affecting 36 people in British Columbia, Canada, in 2010. Several genotypes were found in oysters, including an exact sequence match to clinical samples in regions B and C of the norovirus genome (genogroup I genotype 4). Traceback implicated a single remotely located harvest site probably contaminated by ill shellfish workers during harvesting activities. This outbreak resulted in three recalls, one public advisory, and closure of the harvest site. PMID:22947481

  12. Detection of pathogenic Vibrio spp. in shellfish by using multiplex PCR and DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Panicker, Gitika; Call, Douglas R; Krug, Melissa J; Bej, Asim K

    2004-12-01

    This study describes the development of a gene-specific DNA microarray coupled with multiplex PCR for the comprehensive detection of pathogenic vibrios that are natural inhabitants of warm coastal waters and shellfish. Multiplex PCR with vvh and viuB for Vibrio vulnificus, with ompU, toxR, tcpI, and hlyA for V. cholerae, and with tlh, tdh, trh, and open reading frame 8 for V. parahaemolyticus helped to ensure that total and pathogenic strains, including subtypes of the three Vibrio spp., could be detected and discriminated. For DNA microarrays, oligonucleotide probes for these targeted genes were deposited onto epoxysilane-derivatized, 12-well, Teflon-masked slides by using a MicroGrid II arrayer. Amplified PCR products were hybridized to arrays at 50 degrees C and detected by using tyramide signal amplification with Alexa Fluor 546 fluorescent dye. Slides were imaged by using an arrayWoRx scanner. The detection sensitivity for pure cultures without enrichment was 10(2) to 10(3) CFU/ml, and the specificity was 100%. However, 5 h of sample enrichment followed by DNA extraction with Instagene matrix and multiplex PCR with microarray hybridization resulted in the detection of 1 CFU in 1 g of oyster tissue homogenate. Thus, enrichment of the bacterial pathogens permitted higher sensitivity in compliance with the Interstate Shellfish Sanitation Conference guideline. Application of the DNA microarray methodology to natural oysters revealed the presence of V. vulnificus (100%) and V. parahaemolyticus (83%). However, V. cholerae was not detected in natural oysters. An assay involving a combination of multiplex PCR and DNA microarray hybridization would help to ensure rapid and accurate detection of pathogenic vibrios in shellfish, thereby improving the microbiological safety of shellfish for consumers. PMID:15574946

  13. Indirect human impacts turn off reciprocal feedbacks and decrease ecosystem resilience.

    PubMed

    Bertness, Mark D; Brisson, Caitlin P; Crotty, Sinead M

    2015-05-01

    Creek bank salt marsh die-off is a conservation problem in New England, driven by predator depletion, which releases herbivores from consumer control. Many marshes, however, have begun to recover from die-off. We examined the hypothesis that the loss of the foundation species Spartina alterniflora has decreased facilitator populations, weakening reciprocal positive plant/animal feedbacks, resilience, and slowing recovery. Field surveys and experiments revealed that loss of Spartina leads to decreased biodiversity, and increased mortality and decreased growth of the ribbed mussel Geukensia demissa, a key facilitator of Spartina. Experimental addition of Geukensia facilitators to creek banks accelerated Spartina recovery, showing that their loss limits recovery and the reciprocal feedbacks that drive community resilience. Reciprocal positive feedbacks involving foundation species, often lost to human impacts, may be a common, but generally overlooked mechanism of ecosystem resilience, making their reestablishment a valuable restoration tool. PMID:25432574

  14. New insights into the causes of human illness due to consumption of azaspiracid contaminated shellfish

    PubMed Central

    Chevallier, O. P.; Graham, S. F.; Alonso, E.; Duffy, C.; Silke, J.; Campbell, K.; Botana, L. M.; Elliott, C. T.

    2015-01-01

    Azaspiracid (AZA) poisoning was unknown until 1995 when shellfish harvested in Ireland caused illness manifesting by vomiting and diarrhoea. Further in vivo/vitro studies showed neurotoxicity linked with AZA exposure. However, the biological target of the toxin which will help explain such potent neurological activity is still unknown. A region of Irish coastline was selected and shellfish were sampled and tested for AZA using mass spectrometry. An outbreak was identified in 2010 and samples collected before and after the contamination episode were compared for their metabolite profile using high resolution mass spectrometry. Twenty eight ions were identified at higher concentration in the contaminated samples. Stringent bioinformatic analysis revealed putative identifications for seven compounds including, glutarylcarnitine, a glutaric acid metabolite. Glutaric acid, the parent compound linked with human neurological manifestations was subjected to toxicological investigations but was found to have no specific effect on the sodium channel (as was the case with AZA). However in combination, glutaric acid (1mM) and azaspiracid (50nM) inhibited the activity of the sodium channel by over 50%. Glutaric acid was subsequently detected in all shellfish employed in the study. For the first time a viable mechanism for how AZA manifests itself as a toxin is presented. PMID:25928256

  15. Shellfish and residual chemical contaminants: hazards, monitoring, and health risk assessment along French coasts.

    PubMed

    Guéguen, Marielle; Amiard, Jean-Claude; Arnich, Nathalie; Badot, Pierre-Marie; Claisse, Didier; Guérin, Thierry; Vernoux, Jean-Paul

    2011-01-01

    In this review, we address the identification of residual chemical hazards in shellfish collected from the marine environment or in marketed shellfish. Data, assembled on the concentration of contaminants detected, were compared with the appropriate regulatory and food safety standards. Moreover, data on human exposure and body burden levels were evaluated in the context of potential health risks.Shellfish farming is a common industry along European coasts. The primary types of shellfish consumed in France are oysters, mussels, king scallops, winkles,whelks, cockles, clams, and other scallops. Shellfish filter large volumes of water to extract their food and are excellent bioaccumulators. Metals and other pollutants that exist in the marine environment partition into particular organs, according to their individual chemical characteristics. In shellfish, accumulation often occurs in the digestive gland, which plays a role in assimilation, excretion, and detoxification of contaminants. The concentrations of chemical contaminants in bivalve mollusks are known to fluctuate with the seasons.European regulations limit the amount and type of contaminants that can appear in foodstuffs. Current European standards regulate the levels of micro-biological agents, phycotoxins, and some chemical contaminants in food. Since 2006, these regulations have been compiled into the "Hygiene Package." Bivalve mollusks must comply with maximum levels of certain contaminants as follows:lead (1.5 mg kg-1), cadmium (1 mg kg-1), mercury (0.5 mg kg-1), dioxins (4 pg g-1 and dioxins + DL-PCBs 8 pg g-1), and benzo[a]pyrene (10 ?p.g kg-1).In this review, we identify the levels of major contaminants that exist in shellfish(collected from the marine environment and/or in marketed shellfish). The follow-ing contaminants are among those that are profiled: Cd, Pb, Hg, As, Ni, Cr, V,Mn, Cu, Zn, Co, Se, Mg, Mo, radionuclides, benzo[a]pyrene, PCBs, dioxins and furans, PAHs, TBT, HCB, dieldrin, DDT, lindane, triazines, PBDE, and chlorinated paraffins.In France, the results of contaminant monitoring have indicated that Cd, but not lead (< 0.26 mg kg-1) or mercury (< 0.003 mg kg-1), has had some non-compliances. Detections for PCBs and dioxins in shellfish were far below the regulatory thresholds in oysters (< 0.6 pg g-l), mussels (< 0.6 pg g-1), and king scallops (< 0.4 pg g-1). The benzo[a]pyrene concentration in marketed mussels and farmed shellfish does not exceed the regulatory threshold. Some monitoring data are available on shellfish flesh contamination for unregulated organic contaminants.Of about 100 existing organo stannic compounds, residues of the mono-, di-, and tributyltin (MBT, DBT, and TBT) and mono-, di-, and triphenyltin (MPT, DPT,and TPT) compounds are the most frequently detected in fishery products. Octyltins are not found in fishery products. Some bivalve mollusks show arsenic levels up to 15.8 mg kg-1. It seems that the levels of arsenic in the environment derive less from bioaccumulation, than from whether the arsenic is in an organic or an inorganic form. In regard to the other metals, levels of zinc and magnesium are higher in oysters than in mussels.To protect shellfish from chemical contamination, programs have been established to monitor water masses along coastal areas. The French monitoring network(ROCCH) focuses on environmental matrices that accumulate contaminants. These include both biota and sediment. Example contaminants were studied in a French coastal lagoon (Arcachon Bay) and in an estuary (Bay of Seine), and these were used to illustrate the usefulness of the monitoring programs. Twenty-one pesticidal and biocidal active substances were detected in the waters of Arcachon Bay during the summers from 1999 to 2003, at concentrations ranging from a few nanograms per liter to several hundred nanograms per liter. Most of the detected substances were herbicides, including some that are now banned. Organotin compounds have been detected in similarly semi-enclosed waters elsewhere (bays, estuaries, and ha

  16. Heat treatment and the use of additives to improve the stability of paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins in shellfish tissue reference materials for internal quality control and proficiency testing.

    PubMed

    Burrell, Stephen; Clion, Valentin; Auroy, Virginie; Foley, Barry; Turner, Andrew D

    2015-06-01

    The need for homogenous reference materials stable for paralytic shellfish toxins is vital for the monitoring and quality assurance of these potent neurotoxins in shellfish. Two stabilisation techniques were investigated, heat treatment through autoclaving and the addition of preserving additives into the tissue matrix. Short and long-term stability experiments as well as homogeneity determination were conducted on materials prepared by both techniques in comparison with an untreated control using two LC-FLD methods. Both techniques improved the stability of the matrix and the PSP toxins present compared to the controls. A material was prepared using the combined techniques of heat treatment followed by spiking with additives and data is presented from this optimised reference material as used over a two year period in the Irish national monitoring program and in a development exercise as part of a proficiency testing scheme operated by QUASIMEME (Quality Assurance of Information for Marine Environmental Monitoring in Europe) since 2011. The results were indicative of the long-term stability of the material as evidenced through consistent assigned values in the case of the proficiency testing scheme and a low relative standard deviation of 10.5% for total toxicity data generated over 24 months. PMID:25816999

  17. Single-Laboratory Validation of a Multitoxin Ultra-Performance LC-Hydrophilic Interaction LC-MS/MS Method for Quantitation of Paralytic Shellfish Toxins in Bivalve Shellfish.

    PubMed

    Turner, Andrew D; McNabb, Paul S; Harwood, D Tim; Selwood, Andrew I; Boundy, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    A single-laboratory validation study was conducted for the hydrophilic interaction-LC-MS/MS analysis of paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) in bivalve shellfish. The method was developed as an alternative to the precolumn oxidation AOAC 2005.06 and postcolumn oxidation AOAC 2011.02 LC with fluorescence detection methods, receptor binding assay AOAC 2011.27, as well as the mouse bioassay AOAC 959.08. PSTs assessed were saxitoxin, neosaxitoxin, deoxydecarbamoylsaxitoxin, decarbamoylsaxitoxin, decarbamoylneosaxitoxin, gonyautoxins 1-6, decarbamoylgonyautoxins 2-3, and N-sulfocarbamoyl gonyautoxins 2&3. The method also included the determination of decarbamoylgonyautoxins 1&4, N-sulfocarbamoyl gonyautoxins 1&4, and M toxins. Twelve commercially produced bivalve species from both New Zealand and the United Kingdom were assessed, including mussels, oysters, scallops, and clams. Validation studies demonstrated acceptable method performance characteristics for specificity, linearity, recovery, repeatability, and within-laboratory reproducibility. LOD and LOQ were significantly improved in comparison to current fluorescence-based detection methods, and the method was shown to be rugged. The method performed well in comparison to AOAC 2005.06, with evidence obtained from both comparative analysis of 1141 PST-contaminated samples and successful participation in proficiency testing schemes. The method is suitable for use in regulatory testing and will be submitted for an AOAC collaborative study. PMID:26024657

  18. On the Frontline: Tracking Ocean Acidification in an Alaskan Shellfish Hatchery

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Wiley; Mathis, Jeremy T.; Ramsay, Jacqueline; Hetrick, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The invasion of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) into the ocean is shifting the marine carbonate system such that saturation states of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) minerals are decreasing, and this is having a detrimental impact on early life stages of select shellfish species. The global, secular decrease in CaCO3 saturation states is occurring on top of a backdrop of large natural variability in coastal settings; progressively shifting the envelope of variability and leading to longer and more frequent exposure to adverse conditions. This is a great concern in the State of Alaska, a high-latitude setting vulnerable to rapid changes in the marine carbonate system, where an emerging shellfish industry plans major growth over the coming decades. Currently, the Alutiiq Pride Shellfish Hatchery (APSH) in Seward, Alaska is the only hatchery in the state, and produces many shellfish species with early life stages known to be sensitive to low CaCO3 saturation states. Here we present the first land-based OA measurements made in an Alaskan shellfish hatchery, and detail the trends in the saturation state of aragonite (?arag), the more soluble form of CaCO3, over a 10-month period in the APSH seawater supply. These data indicate the largest changes are on the seasonal time scale, with extended periods of sub-optimal ?arag levels (?arag < 1.5) in winter and autumn associated with elevated water column respiration and short-lived runoff events, respectively. The data pinpoint a 5-month window of reprieve with favorable ?arag conditions above the sub-optimal ?arag threshold, which under predicted upper-bound CO2 emissions trajectories is estimated to close by 2040. To date, many species in production at APSH remain untested in their response to OA, and the data presented here establish the current conditions at APSH as well as provide a framework for hatchery-based measurements in Alaska. The current and expected conditions seen at APSH are essential to consider for this developing Alaskan industry. PMID:26131723

  19. On the Frontline: Tracking Ocean Acidification in an Alaskan Shellfish Hatchery.

    PubMed

    Evans, Wiley; Mathis, Jeremy T; Ramsay, Jacqueline; Hetrick, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The invasion of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) into the ocean is shifting the marine carbonate system such that saturation states of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) minerals are decreasing, and this is having a detrimental impact on early life stages of select shellfish species. The global, secular decrease in CaCO3 saturation states is occurring on top of a backdrop of large natural variability in coastal settings; progressively shifting the envelope of variability and leading to longer and more frequent exposure to adverse conditions. This is a great concern in the State of Alaska, a high-latitude setting vulnerable to rapid changes in the marine carbonate system, where an emerging shellfish industry plans major growth over the coming decades. Currently, the Alutiiq Pride Shellfish Hatchery (APSH) in Seward, Alaska is the only hatchery in the state, and produces many shellfish species with early life stages known to be sensitive to low CaCO3 saturation states. Here we present the first land-based OA measurements made in an Alaskan shellfish hatchery, and detail the trends in the saturation state of aragonite (?arag), the more soluble form of CaCO3, over a 10-month period in the APSH seawater supply. These data indicate the largest changes are on the seasonal time scale, with extended periods of sub-optimal ?arag levels (?arag < 1.5) in winter and autumn associated with elevated water column respiration and short-lived runoff events, respectively. The data pinpoint a 5-month window of reprieve with favorable ?arag conditions above the sub-optimal ?arag threshold, which under predicted upper-bound CO2 emissions trajectories is estimated to close by 2040. To date, many species in production at APSH remain untested in their response to OA, and the data presented here establish the current conditions at APSH as well as provide a framework for hatchery-based measurements in Alaska. The current and expected conditions seen at APSH are essential to consider for this developing Alaskan industry. PMID:26131723

  20. Supplemental Feeding of Clam Seed in Land-based Nurseries Shellfish Algae Diet is a commercially available, super-concentrated mix of four marine micro-

    E-print Network

    Florida, University of

    Supplemental Feeding of Clam Seed in Land-based Nurseries Shellfish Algae Diet is a commercially available, super-concentrated mix of four marine micro- algae that provide a nutritional profile for shellfish. Although the algal cells are intact, the algae are not alive. The diet does not contain

  1. The ecological role of bivalve shellfish aquaculture in the estuarine environment: A review with application to oyster and clam culture in West Coast (USA) estuaries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aquaculture is viewed as a potential mechanism to meet the growing demand for seafood around the world. The future of bivalve shellfish aquaculture in the U.S. hinges on sustainable practices on the part of industry and a more consistent regulatory regime. Bivalve shellfish aquaculture is a recent...

  2. Uptake, transfer and elimination kinetics of paralytic shellfish toxins in common octopus (Octopus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Lopes, Vanessa M; Baptista, Miguel; Repolho, Tiago; Rosa, Rui; Costa, Pedro Reis

    2014-01-01

    Marine phycotoxins derived from harmful algal blooms are known to be associated with mass mortalities in the higher trophic levels of marine food webs. Bivalve mollusks and planktivorous fish are the most studied vectors of marine phycotoxins. However, field surveys recently showed that cephalopod mollusks also constitute potential vectors of toxins. Thus, here we determine, for the first time, the time course of accumulation and depuration of paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) in the common octopus (Octopus vulgaris). Concomitantly, the underlying kinetics of toxin transfer between tissue compartments was also calculated. Naturally contaminated clams were used to orally expose the octopus to PSTs during 6 days. Afterwards, octopus specimens were fed with non-contaminated shellfish during 10 days of depuration period. Toxins reached the highest concentrations in the digestive gland surpassing the levels in the kidney by three orders of magnitude. PSTs were not detected in any other tissue analyzed. Net accumulation efficiencies of 42% for GTX5, 36% for dcSTX and 23% for C1+2 were calculated for the digestive gland. These compounds were the most abundant toxins in both digestive gland and the contaminated shellfish diet. The small differences in relative abundance of each toxin observed between the prey and the cephalopod predator indicates low conversion rates of these toxins. The depuration period was better described using an exponential decay model comprising a single compartment - the entire viscera. It is worth noting that since octopuses' excretion and depuration rates are low, the digestive gland is able to accumulate very high toxin concentrations for long periods of time. Therefore, the present study clearly shows that O. vulgaris is a high-potential vector of PSTs during and even after the occurrence of these toxic algal blooms. PMID:24316438

  3. FishMicrosat: a microsatellite database of commercially important fishes and shellfishes of the Indian subcontinent

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Microsatellite DNA is one of many powerful genetic markers used for the construction of genetic linkage maps and the study of population genetics. The biological databases in public domain hold vast numbers of microsatellite sequences for many organisms including fishes. The microsatellite data available in these data sources were extracted and managed into a database that facilitates sequences analysis and browsing relevant information. The system also helps to design primer sequences for flanking regions of repeat loci for PCR identification of polymorphism within populations. Description FishMicrosat is a database of microsatellite sequences of fishes and shellfishes that includes important aquaculture species such as Lates calcarifer, Ctenopharyngodon idella, Hypophthalmichthys molitrix, Penaeus monodon, Labeo rohita, Oreochromis niloticus, Fenneropenaeus indicus and Macrobrachium rosenbergii. The database contains 4398 microsatellite sequences of 41 species belonging to 15 families from the Indian subcontinent. GenBank of NCBI was used as a prime data source for developing the database. The database presents information about simple and compound microsatellites, their clusters and locus orientation within sequences. The database has been integrated with different tools in a web interface such as primer designing, locus finding, mapping repeats, detecting similarities among sequences across species, and searching using motifs and keywords. In addition, the database has the ability to browse information on the top 10 families and the top 10 species, through record overview. Conclusions FishMicrosat database is a useful resource for fish and shellfish microsatellite analyses and locus identification across species, which has important applications in population genetics, evolutionary studies and genetic relatedness among species. The database can be expanded further to include the microsatellite data of fishes and shellfishes from other regions and available information on genome sequencing project of species of aquaculture importance. PMID:24047532

  4. Coliform risk assessment through use of the clam Anomalocardia brasiliana as animal sentinel for shellfish harvesting areas in Brazil's northeast.

    PubMed

    Lima-Filho, José Vitor; Interaminense, Juliana A; Batista, Jacqueline E; Vaz, Renata V; Ventura, Roberta F; Oliveira, Isabella B; Soares, Roberta B; Peixoto, Sílvio M

    2015-08-01

    Outbreaks of food-borne diseases related to consumption of contaminated shellfish have been reported in many countries, but not in Brazil, possibly due to deficient reporting. Here we investigated the suitability of the clam Anomalocardia brasiliana as an animal sentinel for coliform monitoring in shellfish harvesting areas of Brazil's northeast. Samples of shellfish meats (40 clams per sample; n?=?8 per collection) were collected at random from April 2009 through March 2010 in the bay area of Mangue Seco (state of Pernambuco). The numbers of thermotolerant coliforms were analyzed through the most probable number technique, and these contamination levels were tentatively correlated with the precipitation recorded on the day of sampling or 24 to 48 h beforehand. A. brasiliana shellfish meats from local retail shops (250 g per sample/ n?=?3 per market) sold frozen were also investigated from August 2010 through June 2011. We found that the highest coliform contamination levels were correlated with recent rainfall events, limited to 24 h before sampling. However, irrespective of the rainfall level, the mean contamination above the Brazilian legal threshold of shellfish harvesting areas ranged from 18.7 to 93.7 % of samples analyzed monthly. Additionally, a large number of samples obtained from retail shops were also highly contaminated by coliforms during rainy periods, and therefore were not proper for human consumption. We conclude that A. brasiliana can be successfully used to monitor the contamination levels of coliforms in shellfish harvesting areas in Brazil's northeast coast. PMID:26243967

  5. Onboard screening dockside testing as a new means of managing paralytic shellfish poisoning risks in federally closed waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGrasse, Stacey; Conrad, Stephen; DiStefano, Paul; Vanegas, Camilo; Wallace, David; Jensen, Pete; Hickey, J. Michael; Cenci, Florence; Pitt, Jaclyn; Deardorff, Dave; Rubio, Fernando; Easy, Dorothy; Donovan, Mary Anne; Laycock, Maurice; Rouse, Debbie; Mullen, John

    2014-05-01

    Paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) is the foodborne intoxication associated with the consumption of seafood contaminated with naturally occurring neurotoxins known as paralytic shellfish toxins. To protect public health from this potentially fatal syndrome, harvesting closures are implemented when toxins exceed the regulatory action level. Traditional monitoring programs established by state shellfish authorities allow for timely closures in state waters with minimal negative impacts on industry. However, such monitoring programs are not feasible in federal offshore waters given their distance from shore and the range of their spatial coverage. Thus innovative management strategies were investigated for these offshore resources. Georges Bank, an offshore resource with an estimated market value of more than 3 billion in Atlantic surfclams and ocean quahogs, has been closed to harvesting following a temporary ban in 1989 and a subsequent indefinite closure in 1990 due to the risk of PSP. As a means of managing this risk and allowing harvest of safe shellfish from this important resource, the Onboard Screening Dockside Testing Protocol (referred to as the Protocol) was developed by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), state shellfish control authorities, and industry. The Protocol, which sets forth control measures to ensure product safety and public health protection, was endorsed by the Interstate Shellfish Sanitation Conference (ISSC) for pilot testing. Briefly, the pilot study Protocol required that (1) the fishing vessel receive a permit from NMFS to harvest in closed waters, (2) a mini?m of five shellfish samples per intended harvest lot be tested for PSP toxins onboard, and (3) harvesting only occur when the samples tested from the intended fishing area are negative using the Jellett Rapid Tests or Abraxis Shipboard ELISA kits. Finally, product landed under the Protocol was confirmed to be safe for consumption using the mouse bioassay (MBA) prior to its introduction into commerce. This paper presents data from the pilot study, with primary focus on the advantages and challenges of the field kits employed onboard compared to the dockside MBA, which has served as the longstanding regulatory method for PSP toxins. In 2010 alone, the successful pilot study resulted in the safe harvest of over 2.7 million worth of surfclams in an area that has otherwise been unavailable for decades. Due to the success of this pilot study, the Protocol was adopted into the National Shellfish Sanitation Program Model Ordinance as an approved marine biotoxin control strategy for use in federal waters at the 2011 ISSC Biennial Meeting. In January 2013 a portion of Georges Bank was reopened for the harvest of Atlantic surfclams and ocean quahogs to fishermen following the Protocol.

  6. Detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts in green mussels (Perna viridis) from shell-fish markets of Thailand.

    PubMed

    Srisuphanunt, M; Wiwanitkit, Viroj; Saksirisampant, W; Karanis, P

    2009-09-01

    Mussels filter large volumes of water and can concentrate pathogenic organisms, which may act as potential vehicles of transmission to the consumer. A survey study was carried out to investigate the presence of Cryptosporidium protozoan parasites in green mussels (Perna viridis), the smussles pecies most destined for consumption in Thailand. In total, 56 samples were examined from Bangkok (n = 24) and Samut Prakan (n = 32) a wholesale shell-fish markets located at the mouth of the Chao Phraya River. The market for green mussels was closed to the mussel culture placed along the coastal line and this localization may have significant economical impact if the mussels' cultures are found contaminated. Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts were detected by the immunofluorescence antibody method (IFA) in 12.5% of the samples examined. The detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts in green mussels' population of Samut Prakan was higher (15.6%) than in Bangkok market (8.3%). These differences in positive samples from the two locations may be caused by physical, ecological and anthropogenic conditions. This could relay to different contamination levels of marine water by Cryptosporidium oocysts and consequently to contamination of harvested shellfish populations. The results demonstrate that the Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts were found indigenous in mussels from the coastal line of Thailand, indicating that mussels may act as a reservoir of Cryptosporidium foodborne infections for humans. PMID:19839271

  7. [Towards a dialogue of knowledge between subsistence fishermen, shellfish gatherers and environmental labor law].

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ingrid Gil Sales; Rêgo, Rita de Cássia Franco; Larrea-Killinger, Cristina; da Rocha, Júlio César de Sá; Pena, Paulo Gilvane Lopes; Machado, Louise Oliveira Ramos

    2014-10-01

    The dialogue of knowledge between subsistence fishermen and shellfish gatherers on the right to a healthy working environment is established as a new process for claims for an improvement in working conditions by populations affected by environmental problems, and especially in Todos os Santos Bay (BTS). The communities surrounding the BTS have complained to the State Public Prosecutor about the harmful effects to health and the environment caused by the Aratu Industrial Complex and the Port of Aratu. Researchers in the fields of, chemistry, toxicology, oceanography, biology and medicine from the Federal University of Bahia (UFBA) have demonstrated the effects of contamination on the BTS in sundry scientific publications. The scope of this article is to reflect on the contribution of that dialogue on environmental labor law (DAT) in Brazil. The methodology of this study involved semi-structured interviews, participant observation and document analysis. The conclusion reached is that environmental labor law in Brazil must include the dialogue of knowledge to ensure access to a healthy working environment for subsistence fishermen and shellfish gatherers. PMID:25272110

  8. Aquaculture: Incorporating risk assessment and risk management into public policies on genetically modified finfish and shellfish

    SciTech Connect

    Hallerman, E.M.; Kapuscinski, A.R.

    1995-12-31

    Genetically modified finfish and shellfish pose economic benefits to aquaculture, but also pose ecological and genetic risks to ecosystems receiving such organisms. Realization of benefits with minimization of risks posed by a new technology can be addressed through the processes of risk assessment and risk management. Public policies adopted by individual countries will reflect differences in the outocme of risk assessment and risk management processes resulting from differences among the receiving ecosystems and sets of human values at issue. A number of countries and international institutions have begun development of policies for oversight of genetically modified aquatic organisms. In the United States, a working group commissioned by the U.S. Department of Agriculture incorporated risk assessment and risk management principles into draft performance standards for safely conducting research with genetically modified finfish and shellfish. The performance standards address research with a broad range of aquatic GMO`s and compliance is intended to be voluntary. In contrast, the Canadian policy mandates adherence to specified guidelines for experiments with transgenic aquatic organisms; establishment as national policy is expended soon.

  9. Bioaccumulation efficiency, tissue distribution, and environmental occurrence of hepatitis E virus in bivalve shellfish from France.

    PubMed

    Grodzki, Marco; Schaeffer, Julien; Piquet, Jean-Côme; Le Saux, Jean-Claude; Chevé, Julien; Ollivier, Joanna; Le Pendu, Jacques; Le Guyader, Françoise S

    2014-07-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV), an enteric pathogen of both humans and animals, is excreted by infected individuals and is therefore present in wastewaters and coastal waters. As bivalve molluscan shellfish are known to concentrate viral particles during the process of filter feeding, they may accumulate this virus. The bioaccumulation efficiencies of oysters (Crassostrea gigas), flat oysters (Ostrea edulis), mussels (Mytilus edulis), and clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) were compared at different time points during the year. Tissue distribution analysis showed that most of the viruses were concentrated in the digestive tissues of the four species. Mussels and clams were found to be more sensitive to sporadic contamination events, as demonstrated by rapid bioaccumulation in less than 1 h compared to species of oysters. For oysters, concentrations increased during the 24-h bioaccumulation period. Additionally, to evaluate environmental occurrence of HEV in shellfish, an environmental investigation was undertaken at sites potentially impacted by pigs, wild boars, and human waste. Of the 286 samples collected, none were contaminated with hepatitis E virus, despite evidence that this virus is circulating in some French areas. It is possible that the number of hepatitis E viral particles discharged into the environment is too low to detect or that the virus may have a very short period of persistence in pig manure and human waste. PMID:24795382

  10. Lethal paralytic shellfish poisoning from consumption of green mussel broth, Western Samar, Philippines, August 2013

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Ruth Alma; de los Reyes, Vikki Carr; Sucaldito, Ma Nemia; Tayag, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Background In July 2013, the Philippines’ Event-Based Surveillance & Response Unit received a paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) report from Tarangnan, Western Samar. A team from the Department of Health conducted an outbreak investigation to identify the implicated source and risk factors in coastal villages known for green mussel production and exportation. Methods A case was defined as a previously well individual from Tarangan, Western Samar who developed gastrointestinal symptoms and any motor and/or sensory symptoms after consumption of shellfish from 29 June to 4 July 2013 in the absence of any known cause. The team reviewed medical records, conducted active case finding and a case-control study. Relatives of cases who died were interviewed. Sera and urine specimens, green mussel and seawater samples were tested for saxitoxin levels using high performance liquid chromatography. Results Thirty-one cases and two deaths were identified. Consumption of > 1 cup of green mussel broth was associated with being a case. Seawater sample was positive for Pyrodinium bahamense var. compressum and green mussel samples were positive for saxitoxin. Inspection revealed villagers practice open defecation and improper garbage disposal. Conclusion This PSP outbreak was caused by the consumption of the green mussel broth contaminated by saxitoxin. As a result of this outbreak, dinoflagellate and saxitoxin surveillance was established, and since the outbreak, there have been no harmful algal blooms event or PSP case reported since. A “Save Cambatutay Bay” movement, focusing on proper waste disposal practice and clean-up drives has been mobilized. PMID:26306212

  11. Bioaccumulation Efficiency, Tissue Distribution, and Environmental Occurrence of Hepatitis E Virus in Bivalve Shellfish from France

    PubMed Central

    Grodzki, Marco; Schaeffer, Julien; Piquet, Jean-Côme; Le Saux, Jean-Claude; Chevé, Julien; Ollivier, Joanna; Le Pendu, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV), an enteric pathogen of both humans and animals, is excreted by infected individuals and is therefore present in wastewaters and coastal waters. As bivalve molluscan shellfish are known to concentrate viral particles during the process of filter feeding, they may accumulate this virus. The bioaccumulation efficiencies of oysters (Crassostrea gigas), flat oysters (Ostrea edulis), mussels (Mytilus edulis), and clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) were compared at different time points during the year. Tissue distribution analysis showed that most of the viruses were concentrated in the digestive tissues of the four species. Mussels and clams were found to be more sensitive to sporadic contamination events, as demonstrated by rapid bioaccumulation in less than 1 h compared to species of oysters. For oysters, concentrations increased during the 24-h bioaccumulation period. Additionally, to evaluate environmental occurrence of HEV in shellfish, an environmental investigation was undertaken at sites potentially impacted by pigs, wild boars, and human waste. Of the 286 samples collected, none were contaminated with hepatitis E virus, despite evidence that this virus is circulating in some French areas. It is possible that the number of hepatitis E viral particles discharged into the environment is too low to detect or that the virus may have a very short period of persistence in pig manure and human waste. PMID:24795382

  12. Radioactive contamination of fish, shellfish, and waterfowl exposed to Hanford effluents: Annual summaries, 1945--1972

    SciTech Connect

    Hanf, R.W.; Dirkes, R.L.; Duncan, J.P.

    1992-07-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project (HEDR) is to estimate the potential radiation doses received by people living within the sphere of influence of the Hanford Site. A potential critical pathway for human radiation exposure is through the consumption of waterfowl that frequent onsite waste-water ponds or through eating of fish, shellfish, and waterfowl that reside in/on the Columbia River and its tributaries downstream of the reactors. This document summarizes information on fish, shellfish, and waterfowl radiation contamination for samples collected by Hanford monitoring personnel and offsite agencies for the period 1945 to 1972. Specific information includes the types of organisms sampled, the kinds of tissues and organs analyzed, the sampling locations, and the radionuclides reported. Some tissue concentrations are also included. We anticipate that these yearly summaries will be helpful to individuals and organizations interested in evaluating aquatic pathway information for locations impacted by Hanford operations and will be useful for planning the direction of future HEDR studies.

  13. Higher Water Temperature and Incubation under Aerobic and Microaerobic Conditions Increase the Recovery and Diversity of Arcobacter spp. from Shellfish

    PubMed Central

    Levican, Arturo; Collado, Luis; Yustes, Clara; Aguilar, Carme

    2014-01-01

    Some Arcobacter species are considered emerging food-borne and waterborne pathogens, and shellfish have been suggested as one of their reservoirs. However, only a few studies have investigated the presence of Arcobacter in this kind of food. This study assesses the prevalence and diversity of Arcobacter spp. in shellfish by multiplex PCR (m-PCR) and culturing methods (under different atmospheric conditions) and evaluates the possible influence of environmental parameters (temperature, salinity, and harvesting bay). Arcobacter was detected by m-PCR and/or culturing in 61 (29.9%) of 204 shellfish samples. Of the positive samples by culturing, 41.1% were obtained under only aerobic incubation conditions, while 23.2% were obtained under only microaerobic conditions. Of 476 investigated isolates, 118 belonged to different enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-PCR genotypes (strains) and to 11 different species. This study shows the highest diversity of Arcobacter species ever observed in samples from any origin. The most prevalent species was Arcobacter butzleri (60.2%), followed by Arcobacter molluscorum (21.2%). The prevalence of Arcobacter was significantly higher during the summer than in other seasons, being associated with an increase in water temperature. Results confirm that shellfish are a reservoir for a remarkable diversity of Arcobacter spp. PMID:24185851

  14. UTILIZING SHELLFISH RESPONSES TO SET TARGET WATER QUALITY CONDITIONS FOR THE RESTORATION OF OYSTER REEFS IN THE CALOOSAHATCHEE ESTUARY, FLORIDA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volety, Aswani K., S.G. Tolley and James T. Winstead. 2002. Utilizing Shellfish Responses to Set Target Water Quality Conditions for the Restoration of Oyster Reefs in the Caloosahatchee Estuary, Florida. Presented at the International Workshop on Restoration of Benthic Invertebr...

  15. COASTAL*FISH user's guide--a finfish/shellfish information base for Mississippi Sound and Mobile Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, B.; Benson, N.

    1982-01-01

    COASTAL *FISH is a computerized database that includes current information on spawning, nursery areas, migrations, distribution, and environmental requirements of finfish and shellfish. This User's Guide was prepared to access and query the finfish and shell fish database. It provides basic information required to query the database.

  16. Vitamin D levels in fish and shellfish determined by liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection and mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) levels were determined in finfish and shellfish using UV detection at 265nm (combined with auxiliary full scan UV detection) and selected ion monitoring (SIM) mass spectrometry (MS), using vitamin D2 (ergocalciferol) as an internal standard. Analysis of standard referen...

  17. BMAA in shellfish from two Portuguese transitional water bodies suggests the marine dinoflagellate Gymnodinium catenatum as a potential BMAA source.

    PubMed

    Lage, Sandra; Costa, Pedro Reis; Moita, Teresa; Eriksson, Johan; Rasmussen, Ulla; Rydberg, Sara Jonasson

    2014-07-01

    The neurotoxin ?-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) and its putative role in multiple neurodegenerative diseases have been intensely studied since 2005 when the toxin was discovered to be produced by worldwide-distributed cyanobacterial species inhabiting terrestrial, marine, brackish, and freshwater ecosystems. Recently, BMAA production was also associated with one eukaryotic group, namely, diatoms, raising questions about its production by other phytoplanktonic groups. To test for BMAA bioavailability in ecosystems where abundant phytoplanktonic blooms regularly occur, samples of filter-feeding shellfish were collected in two Portuguese transitional water bodies. BMAA content in cockles (Cerastoderma edule) collected weekly between September and November 2009 from Ria de Aveiro and at least once a month from May to November from Ria Formosa, fluctuated from 0.079±0.055 to 0.354±0.066?g/g DW and from below the limit of detection to 0.434±0.110?g/g DW, respectively. Simultaneously to BMAA occurrence in cockles, paralytic shellfish toxins were detected in shellfish as a result of Gymnodinium catenatum blooms indicating a possible link between this marine dinoflagellate and BMAA production. Moreover, considerable high BMAA levels, 0.457±0.186?g/g DW, were then determined in a laboratory grown culture of G. catenatum. This work reveals for the first time the presence of BMAA in shellfish from Atlantic transitional water bodies and consubstantiate evidences of G. catenatum as one of the main sources of BMAA in these ecosystems. PMID:24747603

  18. Ranking the contributions of commercial fish and shellfish varieties to mercury exposure in the United States: implications for risk communication.

    PubMed

    Groth, Edward

    2010-04-01

    Fish and shellfish have important nutritional benefits, and US per capita seafood consumption has increased substantially since 2002. Recent research has reinforced concerns about adverse effects of methylmercury exposure, suggesting that methylmercury doses associated with typical US rates of fish consumption may pose measurable risks, with no threshold. These converging trends create a need to improve risk communication about fish consumption and mercury. The analysis performed here identifies the relative importance of different fish and shellfish as sources of mercury in the US seafood supply and proposes improved consumer advice, so that the public can benefit from fish consumption while minimizing mercury exposure. I have quantified contributions to total mercury in the US seafood supply by 51 different varieties of fish and shellfish, then ranked and sorted the 51 varieties in terms of relative impact. Except for swordfish, most fish with the highest mercury levels are relatively minor contributors to total inputs. Tuna (canned light, canned albacore and fresh/frozen varieties) accounts for 37.4 percent of total mercury inputs, while two-thirds of the seafood supply and nine of the 11 most heavily consumed fish and shellfish are low or very low in mercury. Substantial improvement in risk communication about mercury in fish and seafood is needed; in particular, several population subsets need better guidance to base their seafood choices more explicitly on mercury content. I have sorted the 51 seafood varieties into six categories based on mercury levels, as a framework for improving risk communication in this regard. PMID:20116785

  19. Use of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polymyxin B-sucrose medium for isolation of Vibrio vulnificus from shellfish.

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, R G; Jarvis, J; Janda, J M

    1987-01-01

    The differential and selective sodium dodecyl sulfate-polymyxin B-sucrose medium (SPS) of Kitaura et al. (T. Kitaura, S. Doke, I. Azuma, M. Imaida, K. Miyano, K. Harada, and E. Yabuuchii, FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 17:205-209, 1983), which highlights alkylsulfatase activity, was evaluated for its potential use in the direct isolation and enumeration of Vibrio vulnificus from shellfish. V. vulnificus was detected by this method in six of nine shellfish samples collected from diverse geographic locales during the summer of 1986. Direct enumeration of V. vulnificus at 7.0 X 10(2) to 2.2 X 10(4) CFU/g of shellfish was achieved on SPS agar. All sample results were confirmed in parallel examinations by using conventional glucose-salt-Teepol (Shell Oil Co.) broth and alkaline peptone water enrichment with plating onto thiosulfate-citrate-bile salts-sucrose agar. Additionally, alkylsulfatase activity was evaluated in vitro for 97 strains representing 14 Vibrio spp. V. vulnificus and Vibrio cholerae-01 were the only species consistently found to possess this activity. The range of plating efficiencies for random V. vulnificus strains analyzed on SPS was 11 to 74% (mean, 39%). The use of SPS shows great promise for the study of shellfish and other environmental sources for V. vulnificus. Images PMID:3662506

  20. Environmental links to interannual variability in shellfish toxicity in Cobscook Bay and eastern Maine, a strongly tidally mixed coastal region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horecka, Hannah M.; Thomas, Andrew C.; Weatherbee, Ryan A.

    2014-05-01

    The Gulf of Maine experiences annual closures of shellfish harvesting due to the accumulation of toxins produced by dinoflagellates of the genus Alexandrium. Factors controlling the timing, location, and magnitude of these events in eastern Maine remain poorly understood. Previous work identified possible linkages between interannual variability of oceanographic variables and shellfish toxicity along the western Maine coastline but no such linkages were evident along the eastern Maine coast in the vicinity of Cobscook Bay, where strong tidal mixing tends to reduce seasonal variability in oceanographic properties. Using 21 years (1985-2005) of shellfish toxicity data, interannual variability in two metrics of annual toxicity, maximum magnitude and total annual toxicity, from stations in the Cobscook Bay region are examined for relationships to a suite of available environmental variables. Consistent with earlier work, no (or only weak) correlations were found between toxicity and oceanographic variables, even those very proximate to the stations such as local sea surface temperature. Similarly no correlations were evident between toxicity and air temperature, precipitation or relative humidity. The data suggest possible connections to local river discharge, but plausible mechanisms are not obvious. Correlations between toxicity and two variables indicative of local meteorological conditions, dew point and atmospheric pressure, both suggest a link between increased toxicity in these eastern Maine stations and weather conditions characterized by clearer skies/drier air (or less stormy/humid conditions). As no correlation of opposite sign was evident between toxicity and local precipitation, one plausible link is through light availability and its positive impact on phytoplankton production in this persistently foggy section of coast. These preliminary findings point to both the value of maintaining long-term shellfish toxicity sampling and a need for inclusion of weather variability in future modeling studies aimed at development of a more mechanistic understanding of factors controlling interannual differences in eastern Gulf of Maine shellfish toxicity.

  1. Shellfish Allergy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Epinephrine Emotional & Social Issues Find a Support Group Bullying Prevention Spread the Word True Stories Stay Informed ... Epinephrine Emotional & Social Issues Find a Support Group Bullying Prevention Spread the Word True Stories Stay Informed ...

  2. A comparative study of the mechanical properties of Mytilid byssal threads.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Trevor; Labarbera, Michael

    2009-05-01

    Mytilid bivalves employ a set of threads (the byssus) to attach themselves to both hard and soft substrates. In this study, we measured the mechanical properties of byssal threads from two semi-infaunal mytilids (Geukensia demissa Dillwyn and Modiolus modiolus Linnaeus) and two epifaunal mytilids (Mytilus californianus Conrad and Mytilus edulis Linnaeus). We compared material properties with and without the assumption that changes of length and area during tensile testing are insignificant, demonstrating that previous researchers have overestimated extensibility values by 30% and may also have underestimated strength values. We detected significant differences in thread properties among tested mytilid species, contrary to previous findings. Threads from semi-infaunal species were significantly thinner than those from epifaunal species, perhaps to allow the production of a greater number of threads, which form a dense network within the substrate. Geukensia demissa threads were weaker than those of the other species, and had a significantly lower stiffness at failure. Modiolus modiolus threads were significantly stiffer than M. edulis threads but also significantly less extensible, suggesting a trade-off between stiffness and extensibility. The only thread property that did not show significant differences across species was toughness - even when byssal threads differ in strength or stiffness, they seem to absorb similar amounts of energy per unit volume prior to failure. This study reveals notable differences between the byssal thread properties of different mytilid bivalves and provides a reliable and thorough methodology for future comparative studies. PMID:19411537

  3. Purification and partial characterization of paralytic shellfish poison-binding protein from Acanthocardia tuberculatum.

    PubMed

    Takati, Nadia; Mountassif, Driss; Taleb, Hamid; Lee, Kangmin; Blaghen, Mohamed

    2007-09-01

    A paralytic shellfish poison-binding protein (PSPBP) was purified 16.6-fold from the foot of the Moroccan cockles Acanthocardia tuberculatum. Using affinity chromatography, 2.5mg of PSPBP showing homogeneity on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was obtained from 93 mg of crude extract. The purified PSPBP exhibits a specific activity of about 2.78 mU/mg proteins and has estimated molecular weight of 181 kDa. Observation of a single band equivalent to 88 kDa on SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions suggested it to be a homodimer. The optimal temperature and pH for the purified PSPBP were respectively 30 degrees C and 7.0. PMID:17631374

  4. Long-Term Study of Vibrio parahaemolyticus Prevalence and Distribution in New Zealand Shellfish

    PubMed Central

    Hedderley, D.; Fletcher, G. C.

    2015-01-01

    The food-borne pathogen Vibrio parahaemolyticus has been reported as being present in New Zealand (NZ) seawaters, but there have been no reported outbreaks of food-borne infection from commercially grown NZ seafood. Our study determined the current incidence of V. parahaemolyticus in NZ oysters and Greenshell mussels and the prevalence of V. parahaemolyticus tdh and trh strains. Pacific (235) and dredge (21) oyster samples and mussel samples (55) were obtained from commercial shellfish-growing areas between December 2009 and June 2012. Total V. parahaemolyticus numbers and the presence of pathogenic genes tdh and trh were determined using the FDA most-probable-number (MPN) method and confirmed using PCR analysis. In samples from the North Island of NZ, V. parahaemolyticus was detected in 81% of Pacific oysters and 34% of mussel samples, while the numbers of V. parahaemolyticus tdh and trh strains were low, with just 3/215 Pacific oyster samples carrying the tdh gene. V. parahaemolyticus organisms carrying tdh and trh were not detected in South Island samples, and V. parahaemolyticus was detected in just 1/21 dredge oyster and 2/16 mussel samples. Numbers of V. parahaemolyticus organisms increased when seawater temperatures were high, the season when most commercial shellfish-growing areas are not harvested. The numbers of V. parahaemolyticus organisms in samples exceeded 1,000 MPN/g only when the seawater temperatures exceeded 19°C, so this environmental parameter could be used as a trigger warning of potential hazard. There is some evidence that the total V. parahaemolyticus numbers increased compared with those reported from a previous 1981 to 1984 study, but the analytical methods differed significantly. PMID:25616790

  5. Impact of heat processing on the detection of the major shellfish allergen tropomyosin in crustaceans and molluscs using specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Sandip D; Abdel Rahman, Anas M; Komoda, Toshikazu; Lopata, Andreas L

    2013-12-15

    The major heat-stable shellfish allergen, tropomyosin, demonstrates immunological cross-reactivity, making specific differentiation of crustaceans and molluscs for food labelling very difficult. The aim of this study was to evaluate the application of allergen-specific monoclonal antibodies in differential detection of shellfish-derived tropomyosin in 11 crustacean and 7 mollusc species, and to study the impact of heating on its detection. Cross-reactive tropomyosin was detected in all crustacean species, with partial detection in molluscs: mussels, scallops and snails but none in oyster, octopus and squid. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that heating of shellfish has a profound effect on tropomyosin detection. This was evident by the enhanced recognition of multiple tropomyosin variants in the analysed shellfish species. Specific monoclonal antibodies, targetting the N-terminal region of tropomyosin, must therefore be developed to differentiate tropomyosins in crustaceans and molluscs. This can help in correct food labelling practices and thus protection of consumers. PMID:23993581

  6. Most-probable-number loop-mediated isothermal amplification-based procedure enhanced with K antigen-specific immunomagnetic separation for quantifying tdh(+) Vibrio parahaemolyticus in molluscan Shellfish.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Natsuko; Iwade, Yoshito; Yamazaki, Wataru; Gondaira, Fumio; Vuddhakul, Varaporn; Nakaguchi, Yoshitsugu; Nishibuchi, Mitsuaki

    2014-07-01

    Although thermostable direct hemolysin-producing (tdh(+)) Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the leading cause of seafood-borne gastroenteritis, the enumeration of tdh(+) V. parahaemolyticus remains challenging due to its low densities in the environment. In this study, we developed a most-probable-number (MPN)-based procedure designated A-IS(1)-LAMP, in which an immunomagnetic separation (IMS) technique targeting as many as 69 established K antigens and a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay targeting the thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh) gene were applied in an MPN format. Our IMS employed PickPen, an eight-channel intrasolution magnetic particle separation device, which enabled a straightforward microtiter plate-based IMS procedure (designated as PickPen-IMS). The ability of the procedure to quantify a wide range of tdh(+) V. parahaemolyticus levels was evaluated by testing shellfish samples in Japan and southern Thailand, where shellfish products are known to contain relatively low and high levels of total V. parahaemolyticus, respectively. The Japanese and Thai shellfish samples showed, respectively, relatively low (< 3 to 11 MPN/10 g) and considerably higher (930 to 110,000 MPN/10 g) levels of tdh(+) V. parahaemolyticus, raising concern about the safety of Thai shellfish products sold to domestic consumers at local morning markets. LAMP showed similar or higher performance than conventional PCR in the detection and quantification of a wide range of tdh(+) V. parahaemolyticus levels in shellfish products. Whereas a positive effect of PickPen-IMS was not observed in MPN determination, PickPen-IMS was able to concentrate tdh(+) V. parahaemolyticus 32-fold on average from the Japanese shellfish samples at an individual tube level, suggesting a possibility of using PickPen-IMS as an optional tool for specific shellfish samples. The A-IS(1)-LAMP procedure can be used by any health authority in the world to measure the tdh(+) V. parahaemolyticus levels in shellfish products. PMID:24988012

  7. Gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry for the identification of organic sulfur compounds in shellfish and fish

    SciTech Connect

    Ogata, M.; Miyake, Y.

    1980-11-01

    The authors determined that the organic sulfur compounds usually contained in crude oil can be used as a marker of oil pollution in shellfish and fish. Short-necked clams and eels were maintained in a controlled laboratory environment in water with suspension of crude oil. Mass spectra and mass chromatograms of short-necked clam extract showed the presence of organic sulfur compounds. Capillary column gas chromatography-mass chromatograms of crude oil and extract from the soft body of a short-necked clam showed the presence of organic sulfur compounds. Besides sulfur components, various other compounds were contained in crude oil and short-necked clam. Mass chromatograms of crude oil and the extract from eel flesh showed the presence of alkyl benzothiophene, dibenzothiophene, naphthalene, and alkyl naphthalene. Data indicated that the organic sulfur compounds and polyaromatic compounds could serve as markers of oil pollution in shellfish and fish.

  8. Azaspiracid Shellfish Poisoning: A Review on the Chemistry, Ecology, and Toxicology with an Emphasis on Human Health Impacts

    PubMed Central

    Twiner, Michael J.; Rehmann, Nils; Hess, Philipp; Doucette, Gregory J.

    2008-01-01

    Azaspiracids (AZA) are polyether marine toxins that accumulate in various shellfish species and have been associated with severe gastrointestinal human intoxications since 1995. This toxin class has since been reported from several countries, including Morocco and much of western Europe. A regulatory limit of 160 ?g AZA/kg whole shellfish flesh was established by the EU in order to protect human health; however, in some cases, AZA concentrations far exceed the action level. Herein we discuss recent advances on the chemistry of various AZA analogs, review the ecology of AZAs, including the putative progenitor algal species, collectively interpret the in vitro and in vivo data on the toxicology of AZAs relating to human health issues, and outline the European legislature associated with AZAs. PMID:18728760

  9. Methyl mercury concentrations in edible fish and shellfish from Dunedin, and other regions around the South Island, New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Sadhu, Ashish K; Kim, Jonathan P; Furrell, Hamish; Bostock, Ben

    2015-12-15

    Methyl mercury (MeHg) concentrations were determined in edible fish and shellfish available in local markets in Dunedin, New Zealand. While most of the fish species were sourced in Dunedin, some specimens of fish were also collected from waters off Picton, around Stewart Island and also off-shore of the South Island in the Puysegur and Subantarctic regions. The concentrations of MeHg were analysed in 25 different fish species and shellfish (103 muscle tissue samples). Total mercury (HgT) levels were also analysed in a few (n=12) selected fish samples. Most of the Hg was in the form of MeHg (?96%). Higher MeHg concentrations were found in fish at higher trophic levels, particularly in predatory fish species such as ling, school shark, spiny dogfish and albacore tuna. Concentrations of MeHg in all samples ranged from 0.002 to 2.515?gMeHg/g. PMID:26478458

  10. Water pollution: Uptake of heavy metals by shellfish and marine plants. (Latest citations from Oceanic abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning heavy metal contamination of shellfish and marine plants. Toxicity levels and the long term effects on the ecology of the marine environment are discussed. The growth rate of marine life as a function of metal concentration and the long term effects on the food chain are also considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  11. Water pollution: Uptake of heavy metals by shellfish and marine plants. (Latest citations from Oceanic Abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning heavy metal contamination of shellfish and marine plants. Toxicity levels and the long term effects on the ecology of the marine environment are discussed. The growth rate of marine life as a function of metal concentration and the long term effects on the food chain are also considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  12. Trading green backs for green crabs: evaluating the commercial shellfish harvest at risk from European green crab invasion

    PubMed Central

    Mach, Megan E; Chan, Kai MA

    2014-01-01

    Nonnative species pose a threat to native biodiversity and can have immense impacts on biological communities, altering the function of ecosystems. How much value is at risk from high-impact invasive species, and which parameters determine variation in that value, constitutes critical knowledge for directing both management and research, but it is rarely available. We evaluated the value of the commercial shellfish harvest that is at risk in nearshore ecosystems of Puget Sound, Washington State, USA, from the invasive European green crab, Carcinus maenas. We assessed this value using a simple static ecological model combined with an economic model using data from Puget Sound’s shellfish harvest and revenue and the relationship between C. maenas abundance and the consumption rate of shellfish. The model incorporates a range in C. maenas diet preference, calories consumed per year, and crab densities. C. maenas is likely to prey on commercially harvested hardshell clams, oysters, and mussels, which would likely reduce additional revenue from processing and distribution, and the number of jobs associated with these fisheries. The model results suggest possible revenue losses of these shellfish ranging from $1.03-23.8 million USD year -1 (2.8-64% losses), with additional processing and distribution losses up to $17.6 million USD and 442 job positions each year associated with a range of plausible parameter values. The broad range of values reflects the uncertainty in key factors underlying impacts, factors that are highly variable across invaded regions and so not knowable a priori. However, future research evaluating species invasions can reduce the uncertainty of impacts by characterizing several key parameters: density of individuals, number of arrivals, predation and competition interactions, and economic impacts. This study therefore provides direction for research to inform more accurate estimates of value-at-risk, and suggests substantial motivation for strong measures to prevent, monitor, and manage the possible invasion of C. maenas. PMID:25408891

  13. Occurrence of dioxins (PCDDs, PCDFs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in wild, farmed and processed fish, and shellfish.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, A R; Mortimer, D N; Rose, M; Knowles, T G; White, S; Gem, M

    2009-01-01

    Forty-eight composite samples of the most commonly consumed fish and shellfish species were prepared from up to 60 individual subsamples of each species and analysed for chlorinated dioxins (PCDD/Fs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). These included 24 species of fresh wild fish, seven of farmed fish, seven of fresh shellfish, and ten processed fish and shellfish products. The ISO 17025-accredited analytical methodology used is consistent with the requirements given in European Commission Directive 2002/69/EC. Concentrations ranged from 0.03 ng kg(-1) PCDD/F plus PCB World Health Organization-toxic equivalent quantity (WHO-TEQ) for a sample of surimi, to approximately 6 ng kg(-1) for wild pilchards/sardines. The corresponding range for the ?ICES-6 PCBs was 0.04 ? g kg(-1) to approximately 47 ? g kg(-1). None of the samples showed concentrations above the European Union maximum permitted limits. Averaged PCDD/F and PCB concentrations for the two groups of farmed and wild fish show that there is little difference between the two categories, although individual species may show variations depending on factors such as the sampling location. PMID:24784962

  14. Characterization of organochlorine pesticides, brominated flame retardants and dioxin-like compounds in shellfish and eel from Fiji.

    PubMed

    Lal, Vincent; Bridgen, Phil; Votadroka, Waisea; Raju, Rupantri; Aalbersberg, William

    2014-09-01

    This article gives an overview of a range of persistent organic pollutant chemical levels in shellfish (Batissa violacea and Anadara antiquata) species and eel (Gymnothorax flavimarginatus) from Fiji. As there is limited data in published literature to date, this paper reports first data on a range of persistent organic pollutants and highlights the more prominent POP chemicals present in marine biota in Fiji. A significant number of POP chemicals were detected (e.g. 17 PCDD/PCDF, 12dl-PCBs, organochlorine pesticides and brominated flame retardants), the concentrations found were generally low (e.g. parts per billion level). The low levels of contamination are indicative of a low input from long range and short-range transport as well as few local point sources. Also concentrations of POPs in eel and shellfish from Fiji are low in comparison to wild species in other regions and are within acceptable limits for POP chemicals in fish and fishery products set by the European Union. It describes also results of early studies on basic POPs levels in shellfish in several Pacific Island Countries, which generally show relatively low levels. PMID:24568747

  15. Nutrients and Chemical Pollutants in Fish and Shellfish. Balancing Health Benefits and Risks of Regular Fish Consumption.

    PubMed

    Domingo, José L

    2014-12-01

    Dietary patterns and lifestyle factors are clearly associated with at least five of the ten leading causes of death, including coronary heart disease, certain types of cancer, stroke, non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, and atherosclerosis. Concerning specifically fish and seafood consumption, its beneficial health effects in humans are clearly supported by an important number of studies performed in the last 30 years. These studies have repeatedly linked fish consumption, especially those species whose contents in omega-3 fatty acids are high, with healthier hearts in the aging population. The nutritional benefits of fish and seafood are also due to the content of high-quality protein, vitamins, as well as other essential nutrients. However, a number of studies, particularly investigations performed in recent years, have shown that the unavoidable presence of environmental contaminants in fish and shellfish can also mean a certain risk for the health of some consumers. While prestigious international associations as the American Heart Association have recommended eating fish at least two times (two serving a week), based on our own experimental results, as well as in results from other laboratories, we cannot be in total agreement with that recommendation. Although a regular consumption of most fish and shellfish species should not mean adverse health effects for the consumers, the specific fish and shellfish species consumed, the frequency of consumption, as well as the meal size, are essential issues for adequately balancing the health benefits and risks of regular fish consumption. PMID:25486051

  16. Mathematical model for viral depuration kinetics in shellfish: an useful tool to estimate the risk for the consumers.

    PubMed

    Polo, David; Feal, Xabier; Romalde, Jesús L

    2015-08-01

    Enteric virus depuration from shellfish is a complex biological process that may be influenced by biological properties of the mollusc and/or virus species. On the basis of previous experimental data, a mathematical model was developed to characterize the kinetics of viral elimination during the depuration process. The experimental data consisted on twenty depuration trials, each with 60 kg of Manila clams (Venerupis philippinarum) and mediterranean mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) previously subjected to bioaccumulation with HAV or MNV-1 (as a surrogate for human norovirus), that were performed in an experimental depuration system during 7 days. It was observed that although viral loads decay along depuration, a residual viral load remains at the end of the process suggesting a decomposition of viral load in a diluted load (susceptible of depuration) and a non-diluted load (unavailable to depurate). The model yielded a general equation, which can predict the viral load at any depuration time knowing the specific filtration rate, dependent on the bivalve species, and specific viral properties. The mathematical model can be combined with quantitative risk assessment calculations to determine the safety of the depurated shellfish, which can be very helpful not only for shellfish producers but also to public health authorities. PMID:25846934

  17. Determination of toxic elements (mercury, cadmium, lead, tin and arsenic) in fish and shellfish samples. Risk assessment for the consumers.

    PubMed

    Olmedo, P; Pla, A; Hernández, A F; Barbier, F; Ayouni, L; Gil, F

    2013-09-01

    Although fish intake has potential health benefits, the presence of metal contamination in seafood has raised public health concerns. In this study, levels of mercury, cadmium, lead, tin and arsenic have been determined in fresh, canned and frozen fish and shellfish products and compared with the maximum levels currently in force. In a further step, potential human health risks for the consumers were assessed. A total of 485 samples of the 43 most frequently consumed fish and shellfish species in Andalusia (Southern Spain) were analyzed for their toxic elements content. High mercury concentrations were found in some predatory species (blue shark, cat shark, swordfish and tuna), although they were below the regulatory maximum levels. In the case of cadmium, bivalve mollusks such as canned clams and mussels presented higher concentrations than fish, but almost none of the samples analyzed exceeded the maximum levels. Lead concentrations were almost negligible with the exception of frozen common sole, which showed median levels above the legal limit. Tin levels in canned products were far below the maximum regulatory limit, indicating that no significant tin was transferred from the can. Arsenic concentrations were higher in crustaceans such as fresh and frozen shrimps. The risk assessment performed indicated that fish and shellfish products were safe for the average consumer, although a potential risk cannot be dismissed for regular or excessive consumers of particular fish species, such as tuna, swordfish, blue shark and cat shark (for mercury) and common sole (for lead). PMID:23792415

  18. Predictive mechanistic bioenergetics to model habitat suitability of shellfish culture in coastal lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldi, A.; Montalto, V.; Manganaro, A.; Mazzola, A.; Mirto, S.; Sanfilippo, M.; Sarà, G.

    2014-05-01

    Quantitative tools based on mechanistic modelling of functional traits able to enhance the sustainability of aquaculture and most other human activities (i.e. reducing the likelihood of detrimental impacts optimising productions), are especially important factors in the decision to site aquaculture facilities in coastal lakes, ponds and lagoons and, in the case of detrimental impact, to adopt mitigation measures. We tested the ability of mechanistic functional trait based models to predict life history traits of cultivable shellfish in shallow coastal lakes. Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) models were run to generate spatially explicit predictions of Mytilus galloprovincialis life history (LH) traits (e.g. body size and fecundity). Using fortnightly data of food supply and hourly data of body temperatures, and exploiting the power of mechanistic rules, we estimated the amount of faeces ejected by a fixed quantity of organisms cultivated in two shallow Southern Mediterranean (Sicily) lakes. These differed in terms of temperature and food density, implying large differences in life history traits of mussels in the two study areas. This information could help facilitate the selection of sites where environmental conditions are more suitable for aquaculture and contextually compatible with sustainability. The validation exercise obtained by comparing the predicted and observed data was nearly consistent. Therefore, a mechanistic functional traits-based model seems able to capture the link between habitat characteristics and functional traits of organisms, delineating the fundamental portion of an ecological niche, the possibility of predicting LH traits and potential ecological applications in the management of natural coastal resources.

  19. Susceptibility of different mice strains to okadaic acid, a diarrhetic shellfish poisoning toxin.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hodaka

    2012-08-01

    The mouse bioassay is widely used to detect diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) toxins. To the best of our knowledge, however, there have been no reports specifically on strain differences in susceptibility to DSP toxins. In this study, we investigated the susceptibility of different mice strains to okadaic acid (OA), one of the representative DSP toxins. A lethal dose of OA was injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) into mice. The mice were observed until 24 h after injection. Five inbred strains (A/J, BALB/c, C3H/He, C57BL/6, and DBA/2) and two non-inbred strains (ddY, and ICR) of mice were compared. All the mice were male, weighed 16-20 g, and were 4-5 weeks old. The lethality was 90-100% in the A/J, BALB/c, ddY, and ICR strains, 70-80% in the C3H/He and C57BL/6 strains, and 40% in DBA/2 strain. Survival analysis showed that the BALB/c, C57BL/6, ddY, and ICR strains died earlier and the A/J, C3H/He and DBA/2 strains survived longer. These results indicate that significant differences may exist in the susceptibility of mice strains to OA. PMID:22632464

  20. Role of shellfish hatchery as a reservoir of antimicrobial resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Claudio D; Rojas, Rodrigo; Garrido, Marcela; Geisse, Julieta; González, Gerardo

    2013-09-15

    The main aim of this study was to determine the occurrence of resistant bacteria in florfenicol-treated and untreated scallop larval cultures from a commercial hatchery and to characterize some selected florfenicol-resistant strains. Larval cultures from untreated and treated rearing tanks exhibited percentages of copiotrophic bacteria resistant to florfenicol ranging from 0.03% to 10.67% and 0.49-18.34%, respectively, whereas florfenicol resistance among oligotrophic bacteria varied from 1.44% to 35.50% and 3.62-95.71%, from untreated and treated larvae, respectively. Florfenicol resistant microbiota from reared scallop larvae mainly belonged to the Pseudomonas and Pseudoalteromonas genus and were mainly resistant to florfenicol, chloramphenicol, streptomycin and co-trimoxazole. This is the first study reporting antimicrobial resistant bacteria associated to a shellfish hatchery and the results suggest that a continuous surveillance of antimicrobial resistance even in absence of antibacterial therapy is urgently required to evaluate potential undesirable consequences on the surrounding environments. PMID:23880028

  1. DDT contamination in selected estuarine and coastal marine finfish and shellfish of New Jersey.

    PubMed

    Kennish, M J; Ruppel, B E

    1996-08-01

    Analysis of DDT contamination in selected finfish and shellfish species from estuarine and coastal marine waters of New Jersey (USA) reveals consistently highest organochlorine pesticide levels in samples from the north and northeast regions of the state. The mean concentrations of DDT and its metabolites, DDE and DDD, in bluefish, striped bass, weakfish, and blue crabs collected at 27 stations throughout the state between 1988 and 1991 ranged from <25 to >300 microg/kg wet weight (wet wt). Gas chromatographic analysis of 175 tissue samples from these four species showed that the highest levels of DDTs (DDT plus DDE and DDD), exceeding 300 microg/kg wet wt, occurred in blue crabs (hepatopancreas) from the Hudson-Newark-Raritan Bay complex in the northeast region. Lower mean concentrations of DDTs (<200 microg/kg wet wt) were recorded in tissue samples of these species from all other regions of the state. The lowest levels of DDT contamination (mean <110 microg/kg wet wt) were found in samples from the south coast region. The greatest impact of DDT contamination is nearby metropolitan areas of the state, although the total concentrations of DDT in tissue samples from these areas are far less than the U.S. Food and Drug Administration action level of 5,000 microg/kg wet wt for this contaminant. PMID:8781078

  2. Predator lipids induce paralytic shellfish toxins in bloom-forming algae

    PubMed Central

    Selander, Erik; Kubanek, Julia; Hamberg, Mats; Andersson, Mats X.; Cervin, Gunnar; Pavia, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Interactions among microscopic planktonic organisms underpin the functioning of open ocean ecosystems. With few exceptions, these organisms lack advanced eyes and thus rely largely on chemical sensing to perceive their surroundings. However, few of the signaling molecules involved in interactions among marine plankton have been identified. We report a group of eight small molecules released by copepods, the most abundant zooplankton in the sea, which play a central role in food webs and biogeochemical cycles. The compounds, named copepodamides, are polar lipids connecting taurine via an amide to isoprenoid fatty acid conjugate of varying composition. The bloom-forming dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum responds to pico- to nanomolar concentrations of copepodamides with up to a 20-fold increase in production of paralytic shellfish toxins. Different copepod species exude distinct copepodamide blends that contribute to the species-specific defensive responses observed in phytoplankton. The signaling system described here has far reaching implications for marine ecosystems by redirecting grazing pressure and facilitating the formation of large scale harmful algal blooms. PMID:25918403

  3. Intertidal Concentrations of Microplastics and Their Influence on Ammonium Cycling as Related to the Shellfish Industry.

    PubMed

    Cluzard, Melanie; Kazmiruk, Tamara N; Kazmiruk, Vasily D; Bendell, L I

    2015-10-01

    Microplastics are ubiquitous within the marine environment. The last 10 years have seen research directed at understanding the fate and effect of microplastics within the marine environment; however, no studies have yet addressed how concentrations of these particles could affect sedimentary processes such as nutrient cycling. Herein we first determine the concentration and spatial distribution of microplastics within Baynes Sound, a key shellfish-growing area within coastal British Columbia (BC). We also determined sediment grain size and % organic matter (OM) such that we could relate spatial patterns in sediment microplastic concentrations to sedimentary processes that determine zones of accretion and erosion. Using field-determined concentrations of microplastics, we applied laboratory microcosms studies, which manipulated sediment concentrations of microplastics, OM, and bivalves to determine the influence of sediment microplastics on ammonium cycling within intertidal sediments. Concentrations of microplastics determined within the intertidal sediment varied spatially and were similar to those found in other coastal regions of high urban use. Concentrations were independent of grain size and OM suggesting that physical processes other than those that govern natural sediment components determine the fate of microplastics within sediments. Under laboratory conditions, concentrations of ammonium were significantly greater in the overlying water of treatments with microplastics, clams, and OM compared with treatments without microplastics. These preliminary studies suggest that high concentrations of microplastics have the potential to alter key sedimentary processes such as ammonium flux. This could have serious implications, for example, contributing to eutrophication events in regions of the coast that are highly urbanized. PMID:25916196

  4. Helminth parasites of fish and shellfish from the Santa Gilla Lagoon in southern Sardinia, Italy.

    PubMed

    Culurgioni, J; Sabatini, A; De Murtas, R; Mattiucci, S; Figus, V

    2014-12-01

    An extensive survey of helminth parasites in fish and shellfish species from Santa Gilla, a brackish water lagoon in southern Sardinia (western Mediterranean), resulted in the identification of 69 helminth parasite taxa and/or species from 13 fish species (n= 515) and seven bivalve species (n= 2322) examined between September 2001 and July 2011. The list summarizes information on the helminth parasites harboured by fish and molluscs contained in the available literature. Digenea species (37), both adults and larvae, dominated the parasite fauna, whereas Cestoda were the least represented class (three species). Monogenea, Nematoda and Acanthocephala were present with 17, 6 and 6 species, respectively, which were mainly adults. The most widespread parasite species was the generalist Contracaecum rudolphii A (Nematoda). Other species, such as the Haploporidae and Ascocotyle (Phagicola) spp. 1 and 2 (Digenea), showed a high family specificity in Mugilidae. Importantly, the study recorded the occurrence of potential zoonotic agents, such as Heterophyes heterophyes, Ascocotyle (Phagicola) spp. and C. rudolphii A, the latter two reaching the highest indices of infection in the highly marketed fish grey mullet and sea bass, respectively. The highest parasite richness was detected in Dicentrarchus labrax, which harboured 17 helminth species, whereas the lowest value was observed in Atherina boyeri, infected by only three species. The list includes the first geographical record in Italian coastal waters of Robinia aurata and Stictodora sawakinensis, and 30 reports of new host-parasite complexes, including the larval stages of Ascocotyle (Ascocotyle) sp. and Southwellina hispida in D. labrax. PMID:23790066

  5. Purification and characterization of paralytic shellfish toxin transforming enzyme from Mactra chinensis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsi-Pin; Cho, Yuko; Yashiro, Hitoshi; Yamada, Tomoko; Oshima, Yasukatsu

    2004-11-01

    A carbamoylase, which catalyzes hydrolysis of the carbamoyl (or N-sulfocarbamoyl) moiety of paralytic shellfish toxins, was purified from the digestive glands of the Japanese clam Mactra chinensis. Using five steps of column chromatography, 290 microg of Carbamoylase I showing homogeneity on SDS-PAGE was obtained. Carbamoylase I was revealed to be a glycoprotein, having estimated molecular weight of 190 kDa. Observation of single band equivalent to 94 kDa on SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions suggested it to be a homodimer. The optimal temperature and pH were 20 degrees C and 7.0. Carbamoylase I did not require a divalent cation and its activity was inhibited by the serine proteinase inhibitors, benzenesulfonyl fluoride and 4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzenesulfonyl fluoride. Carbamoylase I hydrolyzed both carbamate and N-sulfocarbamate toxins. The presence or absence of a hydroxyl moiety at the N-1 position of the substrate toxins did not significantly alter the reaction rate, but the stereochemistry of sulfate esters at C-11 greatly affected it. The K(m) was 3.02 microM for saxitoxin as a substrate. Nineteen amino acids of the N-terminal sequence were identified by the Edman method. MALDI-TOF-MS/MS spectra of (18)O-labeled tryptic peptides indicated the possible internal amino acid sequences of five peptides. PMID:15501292

  6. Tissue-specific distribution and activity of glutathione S-transferases as biomarkers in bivalve shellfishes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoyong; Liu, Wei; Gou, Xiaojun

    2013-05-01

    In order to find the relationship between tissue-specific expressions of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) and their function in preventing effects of environmental toxicants, GSTs were primarily purified by GST-Sepharose 4B affinity chromatography from liver intestine, gill, mantle, and adductor muscle of Asaphis dichotoma, Amusium pleuronectes pleuronectes, and Atactodea striata. Determination of GSTs was also made in samples taken from the tissue muscle enshielding of A. dichotoma and A. striata. Dodecyl sulfate sodium salt polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed that each tissue has its own unique patterns of GSTs. Studies on tissue-specific activity toward 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB), 4-chloro-7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (NBD-CI), 4-nitrophthalic acid (4-NPA), and ethacrynic acid (ECA) indicated that GSTs from liver intestine exhibited the highest CDNB conjugation activity among all individual tissues from any of the three species sampled. Furthermore, liver intestine and its connected tissue (muscle enshielding) in these shellfishes accounted for more than 50% of the total detoxification toward the xenobiotic electrophile CDNB. PMID:23789570

  7. Purification and characterization of a lectin from the shellfish, Saxidomus purpuratus.

    PubMed

    Tatsumi, M; Arai, Y; Itoh, T

    1982-04-01

    A lectin was purified from a shellfish, Saxidomus purpuratus, using ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and affinity chromatography on N-acetylglucosamine-Sepharose. The lectin purified by affinity chromatography showed seven protein bands in polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The two major lectins (SPA-I and SPA-III) were purified by a second DEAE-cellulose column chromatography. The molecular weights of the lectins were almost the same and were estimated to be around 40,000 by gel filtration on a Sepharose 6B column. On SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol, the lectins showed molecular weights of 14,000. The isoelectric points of SPA-I and -III were estimated to be 4.4 and 4.1, respectively. The two lectins (SPA-I and -III) differed slightly in amino acid composition and were glycoproteins containing 2.1 and 3.8 mol of GlcNAc per 40,000 g of the lectin, respectively. The binding constant of SPA-I or SPA-III for methyl N-acetyl-a-D-glucosamide, the strongest inhibitor of hemagglutination in this experiment, was estimated to be 1.3 X 10(3) or 4.2 X 10(4) M-1, respectively, by the UV difference spectroscopy method. PMID:7096281

  8. Sea otter mortality in fish and shellfish traps: Estimating potential impacts and exploring possible solutions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatfield, B.B.; Ames, J.A.; Estes, J.A.; Tinker, M.T.; Johnson, A.B.; Staedler, M.M.; Harris, M.D.

    2011-01-01

    Sea otters Enhydra lutris can be bycaught and drowned in fishing pots and traps, which may pose a threat to the welfare of otter populations. We explored this potential problem and its solutions using a wide variety of analyses. We exposed live California (USA) sea otters to finfish traps, lobster traps, and mock Dungeness crab traps in captive trials and found that the animals attempted to enter the circular and rectangular fyke openings, with some becoming entrapped. Using both live and dead sea otters, we found that a 3 ?? 9 inch (7.6 ?? 22.9 cm) fyke opening (1 inch narrower than the 4 ?? 9 inch [10.2 ?? 22.9 cm] openings currently used in California's commercial Dungeness crab fishery) would exclude most free-living (i.e. weaned from their mothers) otters while permitting the undiminished capture of crabs. Observer programs do not currently exist in California for these fisheries, so we calculated the effort required by an observer program to document sea otter bycatch over a range of hypothetical levels and evaluated the impact of those mortality rates on population growth. These analyses demonstrate that significant mortality from bycatch might easily go undetected, even with seemingly high levels of observer effort. As sea otters reoccupy portions of their former habitat in California, co-occurrence with finfish and shellfish traps with relatively large fyke openings will increase. ?? Inter-Research 2011.

  9. Depuration of shellfish by irradiation: Final technical report, October 1, 1987--March 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Beghian, L.E.; Mallett, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    Studies by the University of Lowell Radiation Laboratory and the US National Marine Fisheries Service N.E. Laboratory in Gloucester, MA on softshelled clams (Mya arenaria) demonstrated the effectiveness of low to medium doses of Cobalt 60 source gamma irradiation in the inactivation of Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus faecalis. Post-irradiation survival and organoleptic studies when extended to hardshelled clams (Mercinaria mercenaria) and American oysters (Crassostrea virginica) showed no significant decline in consumer qualities or 6 day post irradiation survival in oysters at doses of up to 3.0 kGy. The capacities of the American oyster to sustain relatively high doses of gamma irradiation were demonstrated by 6 day post-exposure survivorship values of greater than 90% for samples receiving 3.0, 5.0 and 7.0 kGy. Initial studies of inactivation of Polio I virus and a simian rotavirus (SA-11) was conducted in both hardshelled clams and oysters. Of greatest interest was the behavior of Hepatitis A virus (HAV), in live, irradiated shellfish. The average log decrement value for HAV in oysters was calculated at 2.0 kGy. From these data it appears that doses of up to 2 kGy can be applied to: reduce or eliminate bacterial pathogens, reduce the infectivity of human viral pathogens by one or more orders of magnitude, and preserve market qualities of longevity, appearance, odor, taste and texture. 23 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Shellfish depuration by gamma irradiation: Final report for the period October 1, 1985-September 30, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Beghian, L.; Melnick, J.

    1986-11-01

    Irradiation of live bivalve molluscs is a promising new technique to reduce the public health threats of viral and bacterial pathogens in the consumption of raw shellfish. In studies conducted within the past year, live hardshelled clams and oysters were innoculated with Simian Rotavirus SA-11, Poliovirus I, and Hepatitis-A virus and treated with gamma ray ionizing radiation from University of Lowell/DOE 800,000 Curie /sup 60/Co source over a dose range of 0.5--10 kiloGray (50--1000 kilorad) to determine the effectiveness of the process in eliminating viral activity and thus easing the potential viral health threats associated with uncooked bivalves. Two viral strains, SA-11 and Poliovirus I, were employed as models to perfect laboratory technique and to estimate the most appropriate range of dose exposures necessary for optimal inactivation of the infectious pathogen, Hepatitis A. Post-irradiation survivorship of the oysters and quahogs was assessed over a range of exposures, and showed an exceptionally high degree of radioresistance for these molluscan species. 7 refs., 7 figs., 14 tabs.

  11. Metal concentrations in Maryland`s shellfish: 1970s--1990s

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, D.L.

    1995-12-31

    Maryland has been monitoring arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury and zinc in bivalve shellfish from state waters since the 1960s. The primary bivalve species monitored in Maryland waters are the oyster, Crassostrea virginica and the softshell clam, Mya arenaria. These data have been evaluated for temporal trends. In order to insure that temporal evaluations be based upon data produced using comparable analytical methods, the time period evaluated is not the same for all analytes. For example, while most evaluations are for the period 1974 through 1994, arsenic data were evaluated for the period 1980 through 1994. Data for oyster tissue indicate declines in levels of mercury, cadmium, arsenic, copper and zinc on the order of 70--90%. The major portion of these reductions occurred prior to 1985. These declines are evident from data collected from Maryland`s lower eastern shore, a relatively remote area, as well as from waters closer to larger population centers. Past detection levels for lead and chromium were insufficiently low to detect temporal changes.

  12. Fate of Human Noroviruses in Shellfish and Water Impacted by Frequent Sewage Pollution Events.

    PubMed

    Campos, Carlos J A; Avant, Justin; Gustar, Nicole; Lowther, James; Powell, Andy; Stockley, Louise; Lees, David N

    2015-07-21

    Knowledge of the fate of human noroviruses (NoV) in the marine environment is key to better controlling shellfish-related NoV gastroenteritis. We quantified NoV and Escherichia coli in sewage from storm tank discharges and treated effluent processed by a UV-disinfection plant following activated sludge treatment and studied the fate of these microorganisms in an oyster harvesting area impacted by frequent stormwater discharges and infrequent freshwater discharges. Oyster monitoring sites were positioned at intervals downstream from the wastewater treatment works (WwTW) outfall impacting the harvesting area. The decay rates of NoV in oysters as a function of the distance from the outfall were less rapid than those for E. coli that had concentrations of NoV of the same order of magnitude and were over 7 km away from the outfall. Levels of E. coli in oysters from more tidally influenced areas of the estuary were higher around high water than around low water, whereas tidal flows had no influence on NoV contamination in the oysters. The study provides comparative data on the contamination profiles and loadings of NoV and E. coli in a commercial oyster fishery impacted by a WwTW. PMID:26125679

  13. Prevalence of human noroviruses in frozen marketed shellfish, red fruits and fresh vegetables.

    PubMed

    Loutreul, Julie; Cazeaux, Catherine; Levert, Delphine; Nicolas, Aline; Vautier, Sandrine; Le Sauvage, Anne Laure; Perelle, Sylvie; Morin, Thierry

    2014-09-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs), currently recognised as the most common human food-borne pathogens, are ubiquitous in the environment and can be transmitted to humans through multiple foodstuffs. In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of human NoV genogroups I (GI) and II (GII) in 493 food samples including soft red fruits (n = 200), salad vegetables (n = 210) and bivalve mollusc shellfish (n = 83), using the Bovine Enterovirus type 1 as process extraction control for the first time. Viral extractions were performed by elution concentration and genome detection by TaqMan Real-Time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR). Experimental contamination using hepatitis A virus (HAV) was used to determine the limit of detection (LOD) of the extraction methods. Positive detections were obtained from 2 g of digestive tissues of oysters or mussels kept for 16 h in seawater containing 2.0-2.7 log10 plaque-forming units (PFU)/L of HAV. For lettuces and raspberries, the LOD was, respectively, estimated at 2.2 and 2.9 log10 PFU per 25 g. Of the molluscs tested, 8.4 and 14.4% were, respectively, positive for the presence of GI NoV and GII NoV RNA. Prevalence in GI NoVs varied from 11.9% for the salad vegetables samples to 15.5% for the red soft fruits. Only 0.5% of the salad and red soft fruits samples were positive for GII NoVs. These results highlight the high occurrence of human NoVs in foodstuffs that can be eaten raw or after a moderate technological processing or treatment. The determination of the risk of infection associated with an RT-qPCR positive sample remains an important challenge for the future. PMID:24923255

  14. Dinophysis caudata generated lipophilic shellfish toxins in bivalves from the Nanji Islands, East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Tao; Xu, Yixiao; Li, Yang; Qi, Yuzao; Jiang, Tianjiu; Wu, Feng; Zhang, Fan

    2014-01-01

    A 12-month program of monitoring potentially toxic microalgae (that produce lipophilic shellfish toxins; LSTs) and their toxins in bivalves was conducted from April 2006 to March 2007 in the Nanji Islands, East China Sea. Two Dinophysis species, D. caudata and D. acuminata, were identified, and D. caudata was found to be the dominant species. D. caudata was detected in water samples between April and June 2006, and between February and March 2007. It reached its highest abundances in May, with a mean abundance of 1.38×102 cells/L in surface water and 1.25×102 cells/L in bottom water (<10 m deep). The temporal distribution of D. caudata was associated with the occurrence of LSTs in bivalve samples, which mostly occurred at the same time as D. caudata blooms, between April and July 2006. All of the cultured bivalves sampled between April and June were contaminated with LSTs, with an average toxicity of 85 ?g okadaic acid (OA) eq./100 g meat, which was four times higher than the Chinese regulatory limit (20 ?g OA eq./100 g meat). Ten out of fifteen wild samples (66.7%) collected during the same period were positive for LSTs, and contained an average LST toxicity of 45 ?g OA eq./100 g meat (more than twice the regulatory value). Cultured Patinopecten yessoensis collected on 15 May 2006 had the highest toxicity, 320 ?g OA eq./100 g meat, and relatively high toxicities (80 to 160 ?g OA eq./100 g meat) were found in bivalves until the end of July.

  15. Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning Toxin-Producing Cyanobacterium Aphanizomenon gracile in Northeast Germany? †

    PubMed Central

    Ballot, Andreas; Fastner, Jutta; Wiedner, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Neurotoxic paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins, anatoxin-a (ATX), and hepatotoxic cylindrospermopsin (CYN) have been detected in several lakes in northeast Germany during the last 2 decades. They are produced worldwide by members of the nostocalean genera Anabaena, Cylindrospermopsis, and Aphanizomenon. Although no additional sources of PSP toxins and ATX have been identified in German water bodies to date, the observed CYN concentrations cannot be produced solely by Aphanizomenon flos-aquae, the only known CYN producer in Germany. Therefore, we attempted to identify PSP toxin, ATX, and CYN producers by isolating and characterizing 92 Anabaena, Aphanizomenon, and Anabaenopsis strains from five lakes in northeast Germany. In a polyphasic approach, all strains were morphologically and phylogenetically classified and then tested for PSP toxins, ATX, and CYN by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and screened for the presence of PSP toxin- and CYN-encoding gene fragments. As demonstrated by ELISA and LC-MS, 14 Aphanizomenon gracile strains from Lakes Melang and Scharmützel produced four PSP toxin variants (gonyautoxin 5 [GTX5], decarbamoylsaxitoxin [dcSTX], saxitoxin [STX], and neosaxitoxin [NEO]). GTX5 was the most prevalent PSP toxin variant among the seven strains from Lake Scharmützel, and NEO was the most prevalent among the seven strains from Lake Melang. The sxtA gene, which is part of the saxitoxin gene cluster, was found in the 14 PSP toxin-producing A. gracile strains and in 11 non-PSP toxin-producing Aphanizomenon issatschenkoi, A. flos-aquae, Anabaena planktonica, and Anabaenopsis elenkinii strains. ATX and CYN were not detected in any of the isolated strains. This study is the first confirming the role of A. gracile as a PSP toxin producer in German water bodies. PMID:20048055

  16. Phylogeography of Cylindrospermopsin and Paralytic Shellfish Toxin-Producing Nostocales Cyanobacteria from Mediterranean Europe (Spain)

    PubMed Central

    Cirés, Samuel; Wörmer, Lars; Ballot, Andreas; Agha, Ramsy; Wiedner, Claudia; Velázquez, David; Casero, María Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Planktonic Nostocales cyanobacteria represent a challenge for microbiological research because of the wide range of cyanotoxins that they synthesize and their invasive behavior, which is presumably enhanced by global warming. To gain insight into the phylogeography of potentially toxic Nostocales from Mediterranean Europe, 31 strains of Anabaena (Anabaena crassa, A. lemmermannii, A. mendotae, and A. planctonica), Aphanizomenon (Aphanizomenon gracile, A. ovalisporum), and Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii were isolated from 14 freshwater bodies in Spain and polyphasically analyzed for their phylogeography, cyanotoxin production, and the presence of cyanotoxin biosynthesis genes. The potent cytotoxin cylindrospermopsin (CYN) was produced by all 6 Aphanizomenon ovalisporum strains at high levels (5.7 to 9.1 ?g CYN mg?1 [dry weight]) with low variation between strains (1.5 to 3.9-fold) and a marked extracellular release (19 to 41% dissolved CYN) during exponential growth. Paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) neurotoxins (saxitoxin, neosaxitoxin, and decarbamoylsaxitoxin) were detected in 2 Aphanizomenon gracile strains, both containing the sxtA gene. This gene was also amplified in non-PSP toxin-producing Aphanizomenon gracile and Aphanizomenon ovalisporum. Phylogenetic analyses supported the species identification and confirmed the high similarity of Spanish Anabaena and Aphanizomenon strains with other European strains. In contrast, Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii from Spain grouped together with American strains and was clearly separate from the rest of the European strains, raising questions about the current assumptions of the phylogeography and spreading routes of C. raciborskii. The present study confirms that the nostocalean genus Aphanizomenon is a major source of CYN and PSP toxins in Europe and demonstrates the presence of the sxtA gene in CYN-producing Aphanizomenon ovalisporum. PMID:24334673

  17. Ancient Clam Gardens Increased Shellfish Production: Adaptive Strategies from the Past Can Inform Food Security Today

    PubMed Central

    Groesbeck, Amy S.; Rowell, Kirsten; Lepofsky, Dana; Salomon, Anne K.

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining food production while sustaining productive ecosystems is among the central challenges of our time, yet, it has been for millennia. Ancient clam gardens, intertidal rock-walled terraces constructed by humans during the late Holocene, are thought to have improved the growing conditions for clams. We tested this hypothesis by comparing the beach slope, intertidal height, and biomass and density of bivalves at replicate clam garden and non-walled clam beaches in British Columbia, Canada. We also quantified the variation in growth and survival rates of littleneck clams (Leukoma staminea) we experimentally transplanted across these two beach types. We found that clam gardens had significantly shallower slopes than non-walled beaches and greater densities of L. staminea and Saxidomus giganteus, particularly at smaller size classes. Overall, clam gardens contained 4 times as many butter clams and over twice as many littleneck clams relative to non-walled beaches. As predicted, this relationship varied as a function of intertidal height, whereby clam density and biomass tended to be greater in clam gardens compared to non-walled beaches at relatively higher intertidal heights. Transplanted juvenile L. staminea grew 1.7 times faster and smaller size classes were more likely to survive in clam gardens than non-walled beaches, specifically at the top and bottom of beaches. Consequently, we provide strong evidence that ancient clam gardens likely increased clam productivity by altering the slope of soft-sediment beaches, expanding optimal intertidal clam habitat, thereby enhancing growing conditions for clams. These results reveal how ancient shellfish aquaculture practices may have supported food security strategies in the past and provide insight into tools for the conservation, management, and governance of intertidal seascapes today. PMID:24618748

  18. Occurrence of legacy and emerging halogenated organic contaminants in marine shellfish along French coasts.

    PubMed

    Munschy, C; Olivier, N; Veyrand, B; Marchand, P

    2015-01-01

    Current contamination levels of selected legacy, currently-used and emerging halogenated contaminants were monitored in marine shellfish along French coastlines. The studied contaminants included polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDDs), 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE), decabromodiphenylethane (DBDPE), hexabromobenzene (HBB), 2,2?,4,4?,5,5?-hexabromobiphenyl (BB-153) and perfluorinated compounds (PFCs).BDE-47, BDE-209, BTBPE, HBB and ?-HBCDD were detected in 100% of the analyzed samples, whereas BB-153, DBDPE and PFOS were detected at frequencies of 97%, 90% and 55%, respectively. Concentrations were in the pg g?1 ww range and varied as follows: PFOS > BDE-47 ? ?-HBCDD > BDE-209 > BTBPE ? DBDPE > HBB ? BB-153. Overall, non-PBDE Brominated Flame Retardants (BFRs) revealed concentrations between 3 and 59 times lower than those of PBDEs.PBDE pattern was dominated by BDE-47, followed by BDE-99 > BDE-100 > BDE-49 > BDE-209 > BDE-154; these 6 congeners represented 94% of the summed ten PBDEs. PFC pattern determination revealed PFOS as the predominant PFC in samples from the English Channel and Atlantic, whereas perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) prevailed in Mediterranean samples. Temporal trend investigations on archived samples from the Mediterranean coast collected between 1981 and 2012 showed a prevalence of PFOS until 1998; PFCAs subsequently increased and became more abundant than PFOS. High levels of PFCAs were observed until 2008, followed by a decrease and stabilization in 2010–2012. Amongst PFCAs, perfluorotridecanoic acid (PFTrDA) and perfluoroundecanoic acid (PFUnA) were predominant and exhibited similar time trends, suggesting similar sources at the investigated site, home to major industrial activity. PMID:25463258

  19. Freeze-drying for the stabilisation of shellfish toxins in mussel tissue (Mytilus edulis) reference materials.

    PubMed

    McCarron, Pearse; Emteborg, Håkan; Hess, Philipp

    2007-04-01

    Two samples of mussels (Mytilus edulis) were collected from the southwest of Ireland. One sample contained domoic acid, the other sample contained okadaic acid, dinophysistoxin-2 and azaspiracid-1, -2 and -3. Wet and freeze-dried reference materials were prepared from each of the two samples to test for differences in homogeneity, stability and extractability of the analytes in either condition. Wet materials were homogenised, aliquoted and hermetically sealed under argon and subsequently frozen at -80 degrees C. Dry materials were similarly homogenised but frozen in flat cakes prior to freeze-drying. After grinding, sieving and further homogenisation, the resulting powder was aliquoted and hermetically sealed. Domoic acid materials were characterised using HPLC-UV, while LC-MS was used for the determination of lipophilic toxins. The extractabilities of all phycotoxins studied were comparable for wet and freeze-dried materials once a sonication step had been carried out for reconstitution of the freeze-dried materials prior to extraction. Homogeneity was assessed through replicate analysis of the phycotoxins (n = 10), and was found to be similar for wet and freeze-dried materials, for both hydrophilic and lipophilic toxins. Water contents were determined for both wet and freeze-dried materials, and particle size was determined for the freeze-dried materials. Stability was evaluated isochronously over eight months at four temperatures (-20, +4, +20 and +40 degrees C). The freeze-dried material containing domoic acid was stable over the whole duration at all temperatures, while in the wet material domoic acid degraded to some extent at all temperatures except -20 degrees C. In freeze-dried and wet materials containing lipophilic toxins, okadaic acid, dinophysistoxin-2, azaspiracid-1 and azaspiracid-2 were stable over the whole duration at all conditions, while concentrations of azaspiracid-3 changed significantly in both materials at some storage temperatures. Figure Aliquots of freeze-dried and wet mussel tissue reference materials containing the various shellfish toxins examined in the study. PMID:17256111

  20. Mercury in UK imported fish and shellfish and UK-farmed fish and their products.

    PubMed

    Knowles, T G; Farrington, D; Kestin, S C

    2003-09-01

    Total mercury concentrations were measured in fish and shellfish and their products imported into the UK and also in UK-produced farmed salmon and trout. Three hundred and thirty-six samples were collected using a two-stage sampling plan. The sample plan was weighted to reflect consumption, but with some bias towards fish that might accumulate higher levels of mercury, such as large predatory fish at the top of the food chain. The highest levels of total mercury were found in billfish (swordfish and marlin) and shark. Mercury concentrations in the five samples of fresh/frozen shark ranged from 1.006 to 2.200 mg kg(-1), all above the European Commission limit for the species, and concentrations in 20 samples of fresh/frozen billfish ranged from 0.153 to 2.706 mg kg(-1) with 13 samples above the 1.0 mg kg(-1) limit for the species. One sample of Antarctic ice fish was collected and had a mercury concentration of 0.664 mg kg(-1). The limit for this species was 0.5 mg kg(-1). One sample of fresh/frozen tuna out of the 20 collected had a mercury concentration above the limit of 1.0 mg kg(-1) (1.5 mg kg(-1)), but all other fresh tuna samples were well within the regulatory limit (average 0.4 mg kg(-1)). Mercury concentrations in canned tuna were lower with concentrations on average half that measured in fresh/frozen tuna. Mercury concentrations in UK-farmed salmon and trout were relatively low. The maximum concentration found in 46 samples of fresh/frozen or smoked trout and salmon was 0.103 mg kg(-1). PMID:13129776

  1. Temporal and Spatial Variation in the Abundance of Total and Pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus in Shellfish in China

    PubMed Central

    Han, Haihong; Li, Fengqin; Yan, Weixing; Guo, Yunchang; Li, Ning; Liu, Xiumei; Zhu, Jianghui; Xu, Jin; Chen, Yan; Li, Xiugui; Lv, Hong; Zhang, Yiqian; Cai, Te; Chen, Yuzhen

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the abundance of total and pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus in shellfish sampled from four provinces in China during May 2013 and March 2014 using the most probable number-polymerase chain reaction (MPN-PCR) method. Total V. parahaemolyticus was detected in 67.7% of 496 samples. A total of 38.1% and 10.1% of samples exceeded 1,000 MPN g-1 and 10,000 MPN g-1, respectively. V. parahaemolyticus densities followed a seasonal and geographical trend, with Guangxi and Sichuan shellfish possessing total V. parahaemolyticus levels that were 100-fold higher than those of the Liaoning and Shandong regions. Moreover, the levels of V. parahaemolyticus were at least 10-fold higher in the summer and autumn than in the cooler seasons. Pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus levels were generally lower than total V. parahaemolyticus levels by several log units and tended to be high in samples contaminated with high total V. parahaemolyticus levels. The aqua farms had a lower prevalence but higher abundance of total V. parahaemolyticus compared to retail markets. The catering markets showed the lowest levels of total V. parahaemolyticus, but 20.0% of samples exceeded 1,000 MPN g-1. The levels of both total and pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus in oysters were higher than in clams. The log-transformed abundance of V. parahaemolyticus was significantly correlated with both water temperature and air temperature but not water salinity. These results provide baseline contamination data of V. parahaemolyticus in shellfish in China, which can be applied to local risk assessments to prioritize risk control to key sectors and evaluate the effectiveness of future control measures. PMID:26061712

  2. Categorizing the severity of paralytic shellfish poisoning outbreaks in the Gulf of Maine for forecasting and management.

    PubMed

    Kleindinst, Judith L; Anderson, Donald M; McGillicuddy, Dennis J; Stumpf, Richard P; Fisher, Kathleen M; Couture, Darcie A; Hickey, J Michael; Nash, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    Development of forecasting systems for harmful algal blooms (HABs) has been a long-standing research and management goal. Significant progress has been made in the Gulf of Maine, where seasonal bloom forecasts are now being issued annually using Alexandrium fundyense cyst abundance maps and a population dynamics model developed for that organism. Thus far, these forecasts have used terms such as "significant", "moderately large" or "moderate" to convey the extent of forecasted paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) outbreaks. In this study, historical shellfish harvesting closure data along the coast of the Gulf of Maine were used to derive a series of bloom severity levels that are analogous to those used to define major storms like hurricanes or tornados. Thirty-four years of PSP-related shellfish closure data for Maine, Massachusetts and New Hampshire were collected and mapped to depict the extent of coastline closure in each year. Due to fractal considerations, different methods were explored for measuring length of coastline closed. Ultimately, a simple procedure was developed using arbitrary straight-line segments to represent specific sections of the coastline. This method was consistently applied to each year's PSP toxicity closure map to calculate the total length of coastline closed. Maps were then clustered together statistically to yield distinct groups of years with similar characteristics. A series of categories or levels was defined ("Level 1: Limited", "Level 2: Moderate", and "Level 3: Extensive") each with an associated range of expected coastline closed, which can now be used instead of vague descriptors in future forecasts. This will provide scientifically consistent and simply defined information to the public as well as resource managers who make decisions on the basis of the forecasts. PMID:25076815

  3. Categorizing the severity of paralytic shellfish poisoning outbreaks in the Gulf of Maine for forecasting and management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleindinst, Judith L.; Anderson, Donald M.; McGillicuddy, Dennis J.; Stumpf, Richard P.; Fisher, Kathleen M.; Couture, Darcie A.; Michael Hickey, J.; Nash, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    Development of forecasting systems for harmful algal blooms (HABs) has been a long-standing research and management goal. Significant progress has been made in the Gulf of Maine, where seasonal bloom forecasts are now being issued annually using Alexandrium fundyense cyst abundance maps and a population dynamics model developed for that organism. Thus far, these forecasts have used terms such as “significant”, “moderately large” or “moderate” to convey the extent of forecasted paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) outbreaks. In this study, historical shellfish harvesting closure data along the coast of the Gulf of Maine were used to derive a series of bloom severity levels that are analogous to those used to define major storms like hurricanes or tornados. Thirty-four years of PSP-related shellfish closure data for Maine, Massachusetts and New Hampshire were collected and mapped to depict the extent of coastline closure in each year. Due to fractal considerations, different methods were explored for measuring length of coastline closed. Ultimately, a simple procedure was developed using arbitrary straight-line segments to represent specific sections of the coastline. This method was consistently applied to each year’s PSP toxicity closure map to calculate the total length of coastline closed. Maps were then clustered together statistically to yield distinct groups of years with similar characteristics. A series of categories or levels was defined (“Level 1: Limited”, “Level 2: Moderate”, and “Level 3: Extensive”) each with an associated range of expected coastline closed, which can now be used instead of vague descriptors in future forecasts. This will provide scientifically consistent and simply defined information to the public as well as resource managers who make decisions on the basis of the forecasts.

  4. Effects of storage on microbial loads of two commercially important shellfish species, Crassostrea virginica and Mercenaria campechiensis.

    PubMed

    Hood, M A; Ness, G E; Rodrick, G E; Blake, N J

    1983-04-01

    The effects of storage on the microbial load in two commercially important species of shellfish were examined. Oysters (Crassostrea virginica) were stored as shellstock, shucked meats, and fully processed meats at four temperatures for up to 21 days, and clams (Mercenaria campechiensis) were stored only as shellstock. The concentrations of most microbiological groups of organisms increased with the duration and temperature of storage in both shellfish species, although the increases were significantly lower in claims. Concentrations of Vibrio cholerae rose by approximately 1 log in oysters stored as shellstock after 7 days at 2 degrees C, and Lac+ vibrios increased 2 logs at 8 degrees C. Total counts of bacteria, fungi, coliforms, fecal streptococci, Aeromonas hydrophila, and clostridia were significantly higher in shucked oysters than in those stored as shellstock. Fecal coliforms were statistically the same, but V. cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and the Lac+ vibrios were higher in oysters stored as shellstock. The concentrations of all microbial groups were higher in fully processed oysters than in shucked meats, with the exception of the vibrios, which showed no significant difference among the treatments. The results showed that although traditional methods of storing shellfish resulted in an overall increase in the microbial load, vibrio levels increased only in oysters stored as shellstock. Although fecal coliform and total bacterial counts did not correlate with those for vibrios in fresh oysters, strong correlations were observed in oysters stored for 7 days, suggesting that these indicators may be useful in monitoring oyster quality when meats are stored for a limited time as shellstock. PMID:6859844

  5. Use of genomic probes to detect hepatitis A virus and enterovirus RNAs in wild shellfish and relationship of viral contamination to bacterial contamination.

    PubMed Central

    Le Guyader, F; Apaire-Marchais, V; Brillet, J; Billaudel, S

    1993-01-01

    Genomic probes were used to investigate hepatitis A virus (HAV) and enterovirus RNAs in two types of shellfish from natural beds (Atlantic coast, France). After elution concentration, nucleic acid extracted by proteinase K and purified by phenol-chloroform and ethanol precipitation was assayed by dot blot hybridization. The probes used were a specific HAV probe corresponding to the 3' end (3D polymerase coding region) and an enterovirus probe corresponding to the 5' noncoding region. The method was first tested under experimental conditions by using virus-spiked shellfish before being applied under field conditions. Our results show that shellfish were highly contaminated: enterovirus and HAV RNAs were found in 63 and 67%, respectively, of samples examined with the riboprobes. On the same site, viral (HAV and enterovirus) RNAs were found in a larger fraction of cockles than mussels. Statistical tests of dependence showed no relationship between viral contamination and bacterial contamination (evaluated by fecal coliform counts). Images PMID:8285700

  6. Understanding interannual, decadal level variability in paralytic shellfish poisoning toxicity in the Gulf of Maine: the HAB Index

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Donald M.; Couture, Darcie A.; Kleindinst, Judith L.; Keafer, Bruce A.; McGillicuddy, Dennis J.; Martin, Jennifer L.; Richlen, Mindy L.; Hickey, J. Michael; Solow, Andrew R.

    2013-01-01

    A major goal in harmful algal bloom (HAB) research has been to identify mechanisms underlying interannual variability in bloom magnitude and impact. Here the focus is on variability in Alexandrium fundyense blooms and paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxicity in Maine, USA, over 34 years (1978 – 2011). The Maine coastline was divided into two regions -eastern and western Maine, and within those two regions, three measures of PSP toxicity (the percent of stations showing detectable toxicity over the year, the cumulative amount of toxicity per station measured in all shellfish (mussel) samples during that year, and the duration of measurable toxicity) were examined for each year in the time series. These metrics were combined into a simple HAB Index that provides a single measure of annual toxin severity across each region. The three toxin metrics, as well as the HAB Index that integrates them, reveal significant variability in overall toxicity between individual years as well as long-term, decadal patterns or regimes. Based on different conceptual models of the system, we considered three trend formulations to characterize the long-term patterns in the Index – a three-phase (mean-shift) model, a linear two-phase model, and a pulse-decline model. The first represents a “regime shift” or multiple equilibria formulation as might occur with alternating periods of sustained high and low cyst abundance or favorable and unfavorable growth conditions, the second depicts a scenario of more gradual transitions in cyst abundance or growth conditions of vegetative cells, and the third characterizes a ”sawtooth” pattern in which upward shifts in toxicity are associated with major cyst recruitment events, followed by a gradual but continuous decline until the next pulse. The fitted models were compared using both residual sum of squares and Akaike's Information Criterion. There were some differences between model fits, but none consistently gave a better fit than the others. This statistical underpinning can guide efforts to identify physical and/or biological mechanisms underlying the patterns revealed by the HAB Index. Although A. fundyense cyst survey data (limited to 9 years) do not span the entire interval of the shellfish toxicity records, this analysis leads us to hypothesize that major changes in the abundance of A. fundyense cysts may be a primary factor contributing to the decadal trends in shellfish toxicity in this region. The HAB Index approach taken here is simple but represents a novel and potentially useful tool for resource managers in many areas of the world subject to toxic HABs. PMID:24948849

  7. Understanding interannual, decadal level variability in paralytic shellfish poisoning toxicity in the Gulf of Maine: the HAB Index.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Donald M; Couture, Darcie A; Kleindinst, Judith L; Keafer, Bruce A; McGillicuddy, Dennis J; Martin, Jennifer L; Richlen, Mindy L; Hickey, J Michael; Solow, Andrew R

    2014-05-01

    A major goal in harmful algal bloom (HAB) research has been to identify mechanisms underlying interannual variability in bloom magnitude and impact. Here the focus is on variability in Alexandrium fundyense blooms and paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxicity in Maine, USA, over 34 years (1978 - 2011). The Maine coastline was divided into two regions -eastern and western Maine, and within those two regions, three measures of PSP toxicity (the percent of stations showing detectable toxicity over the year, the cumulative amount of toxicity per station measured in all shellfish (mussel) samples during that year, and the duration of measurable toxicity) were examined for each year in the time series. These metrics were combined into a simple HAB Index that provides a single measure of annual toxin severity across each region. The three toxin metrics, as well as the HAB Index that integrates them, reveal significant variability in overall toxicity between individual years as well as long-term, decadal patterns or regimes. Based on different conceptual models of the system, we considered three trend formulations to characterize the long-term patterns in the Index - a three-phase (mean-shift) model, a linear two-phase model, and a pulse-decline model. The first represents a "regime shift" or multiple equilibria formulation as might occur with alternating periods of sustained high and low cyst abundance or favorable and unfavorable growth conditions, the second depicts a scenario of more gradual transitions in cyst abundance or growth conditions of vegetative cells, and the third characterizes a "sawtooth" pattern in which upward shifts in toxicity are associated with major cyst recruitment events, followed by a gradual but continuous decline until the next pulse. The fitted models were compared using both residual sum of squares and Akaike's Information Criterion. There were some differences between model fits, but none consistently gave a better fit than the others. This statistical underpinning can guide efforts to identify physical and/or biological mechanisms underlying the patterns revealed by the HAB Index. Although A. fundyense cyst survey data (limited to 9 years) do not span the entire interval of the shellfish toxicity records, this analysis leads us to hypothesize that major changes in the abundance of A. fundyense cysts may be a primary factor contributing to the decadal trends in shellfish toxicity in this region. The HAB Index approach taken here is simple but represents a novel and potentially useful tool for resource managers in many areas of the world subject to toxic HABs. PMID:24948849

  8. Understanding interannual, decadal level variability in paralytic shellfish poisoning toxicity in the Gulf of Maine: The HAB Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Donald M.; Couture, Darcie A.; Kleindinst, Judith L.; Keafer, Bruce A.; McGillicuddy, Dennis J., Jr.; Martin, Jennifer L.; Richlen, Mindy L.; Hickey, J. Michael; Solow, Andrew R.

    2014-05-01

    A major goal in harmful algal bloom (HAB) research has been to identify mechanisms underlying interannual variability in bloom magnitude and impact. Here the focus is on variability in Alexandrium fundyense blooms and paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxicity in Maine, USA, over 34 years (1978-2011). The Maine coastline was divided into two regions - eastern and western Maine, and within those two regions, three measures of PSP toxicity (the percent of stations showing detectable toxicity over the year, the cumulative amount of toxicity per station measured in all shellfish (mussel) samples during that year, and the duration of measurable toxicity) were examined for each year in the time series. These metrics were combined into a simple HAB Index that provides a single measure of annual toxin severity across each region. The three toxin metrics, as well as the HAB Index that integrates them, reveal significant variability in overall toxicity between individual years as well as long-term, decadal patterns or regimes. Based on different conceptual models of the system, we considered three trend formulations to characterize the long-term patterns in the Index - a three-phase (mean-shift) model, a linear two-phase model, and a pulse-decline model. The first represents a “regime shift” or multiple equilibria formulation as might occur with alternating periods of sustained high and low cyst abundance or favorable and unfavorable growth conditions, the second depicts a scenario of more gradual transitions in cyst abundance or growth conditions of vegetative cells, and the third characterizes a ”sawtooth” pattern in which upward shifts in toxicity are associated with major cyst recruitment events, followed by a gradual but continuous decline until the next pulse. The fitted models were compared using both residual sum of squares and Akaike's Information Criterion. There were some differences between model fits, but none consistently gave a better fit than the others. This statistical underpinning can guide efforts to identify physical and/or biological mechanisms underlying the patterns revealed by the HAB Index. Although A. fundyense cyst survey data (limited to 9 years) do not span the entire interval of the shellfish toxicity records, this analysis leads us to hypothesize that major changes in the abundance of A. fundyense cysts may be a primary factor contributing to the decadal trends in shellfish toxicity in this region. The HAB Index approach taken here is simple but represents a novel and potentially useful tool for resource managers in many areas of the world subject to toxic HABs.

  9. Spatial distribution and multiannual trends of potentially toxic microalgae in shellfish farms along the Sardinian coast (NW Mediterranean Sea).

    PubMed

    Bazzoni, Anna Maria; Caddeo, Tiziana; Pulina, Silvia; Padedda, Bachisio M; Satta, Cecilia T; Sechi, Nicola; Lugliè, Antonella

    2015-03-01

    In this study, the geographical distribution and multiannual trends of potentially toxic harmful algal species (HAS) were analysed at 18 mussel farms in Sardinia (Italy, North-Western Mediterranean Sea) using data derived from the Sardinian Regional Monitoring Programme (1988-2012). The results showed an increasing number of potentially toxic microalgae over the study period. Alexandrium catenella and Alexandrium minutum were the most harmful species detected. From 2002 to 2009, these species caused eight paralytic shellfish poisoning-positive events which temporarily stopped commercial trade of mussels. The statistical analysis indicated that some taxa exhibited temporal increasing trends in their abundance (e.g. Pseudo-nitzschia spp.), significant decrements (e.g. Dinophysis sp.), or both increasing and decreasing significant trends (e.g. A. minutum) at different sites, indicating the necessity of further in-depth studies, especially on certain taxa. Overall, the statistical elaboration of the long-term data provided useful signals for early detection of shellfish contamination by different potentially toxic HAS in defined sites. These signals can be used to develop best management practices. PMID:25655125

  10. Fluorogenic Membrane Overlays to Enumerate Total and Fecal Escherichia coli and Total Vibrionaceae in Shellfish and Seawater.

    PubMed

    Richards, Gary P; Watson, Michael A

    2010-01-01

    Three assays were developed to enumerate total and fecal Escherichia coli and total Vibrionaceae in shellfish, seawater, and other foods and environmental samples. Assays involve membrane overlays of overnight colonies on nonselective agar plates to detect beta-glucuronidase and lysyl aminopeptidase activities for E. coli and Vibrionaceae, respectively. Cellulose membranes containing the substrates 4-methylumbeferyl-beta-D-glucuronide (MUG) produced a bright blue fluorescence when overlaid onto E. coli, while L-lysyl-7-amino-4-trifluoromethylcoumarin produced green fluorescent foci when overlaid onto Vibrionaceae family members. A multiplex assay was also developed for simultaneously enumerating total E. coli and total Vibrionaceae in oysters and seawater. Overall, 65% of overlaid E. coli (non-O157:H7) were MUG-positive, compared with 62% as determined by the most-probable-number-MUG assay. The overlays are rapid, simple, and cost effective for quantification purposes. This research provides practical alternatives for monitoring bacterial indicators and potential pathogens in complex samples, including molluscan shellfish. PMID:20396663

  11. Effects of past, present, and future ocean carbon dioxide concentrations on the growth and survival of larval shellfish

    PubMed Central

    Gobler, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    The combustion of fossil fuels has enriched levels of CO2 in the world’s oceans and decreased ocean pH. Although the continuation of these processes may alter the growth, survival, and diversity of marine organisms that synthesize CaCO3 shells, the effects of ocean acidification since the dawn of the industrial revolution are not clear. Here we present experiments that examined the effects of the ocean’s past, present, and future (21st and 22nd centuries) CO2 concentrations on the growth, survival, and condition of larvae of two species of commercially and ecologically valuable bivalve shellfish (Mercenaria mercenaria and Argopecten irradians). Larvae grown under near preindustrial CO2 concentrations (250 ppm) displayed significantly faster growth and metamorphosis as well as higher survival and lipid accumulation rates compared with individuals reared under modern day CO2 levels. Bivalves grown under near preindustrial CO2 levels displayed thicker, more robust shells than individuals grown at present CO2 concentrations, whereas bivalves exposed to CO2 levels expected later this century had shells that were malformed and eroded. These results suggest that the ocean acidification that has occurred during the past two centuries may be inhibiting the development and survival of larval shellfish and contributing to global declines of some bivalve populations. PMID:20855590

  12. Methods for routine control of irradiated food: Determination of the irradiation status of shellfish by thermoluminescence analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, G. A.; Hoffmann, A.; Helle, N.; Bögl, K. W.

    1994-06-01

    In some countries, clearance has been given for treating certain types of shellfish by ionizing radiation in order to increase the shelf-life and to reduce health hazards which might be caused by contaminating microorganisms. In the present study, thermoluminescence (TL) analysis was used to examine the irradiation status of shellfish products purchased from local suppliers. For analysis minerals were isolated from the guts of the animals. Although on none of the examined products an irradiation treatment prior to analysis could be shown, the results obtained on non-irradiated and irradiated products have revealed that irradiation within the commercially used dose range can clearly be detected. Already first glow TL intensities of minerald indicated irradiation treatments. Normalized TL signals of non-irradiated and irradiated samples were clearly separated. By calculation of differences of TL intensities and TL signals between non-irradiated and irradiated samples in dependency of integration temperature an optimized integration area for glow curves was determined. The result of this study agree well with results obtained by two large-scale intercomparisons between food control laboratories to detect irradiation treatment of spices and herbal products as well as of fruit and vegetables by TL analysis of contaminating minerals.

  13. Human health risk assessment of heavy metals in tropical fish and shellfish collected from the river Buriganga, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Md Kawser; Baki, Mohammad Abdul; Islam, Md Saiful; Kundu, Goutam Kumar; Habibullah-Al-Mamun, Md; Sarkar, Santosh Kumar; Hossain, Md Muzammel

    2015-10-01

    Although fish, crustacean, and shellfish are significant sources of protein, they are currently affected by rapid industrialization, resulting in increased concentrations of heavy metals. Accumulation of heavy metals (V, Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Mo, Ag, Cd, Sb, Ba, and Pb) and associated human health risk were investigated in three fish species, namely Ailia coila, Gagata youssoufi, and Mastacembelus pancalus; one crustacean (prawn), Macrobrachium rosenbergii; and one Gastropoda, Indoplanorbis exustus, collected from the Buriganga River, Bangladesh. Samples were collected from the professional fishermen. Cu was the most accumulated metal in M. rosenbergii. Ni, As, Ag, and Sb were in relatively lower concentrations, whereas relatively higher accumulation of Cr, Mn, Zn, and Se were recorded. Mn, Zn, and Pb were present in higher concentrations than the guidelines of various authorities. There were significant differences in metal accumulation among different fish, prawn, or shellfish species. Target hazard quotient (THQ) and target cancer risk (TR) were calculated to estimate the non-carcinogenic and carcinogenic health risks, respectively. The THQ for individual heavy metals were below 1 suggesting no potential health risk. But combined impact, estimated by hazard index (HI), suggested health risk for M. pancalus consumption. Although consumption of fish at current accumulation level is safe but continuous and excess consumption for a life time of more than 70 years has probability of target cancer risk. PMID:26044144

  14. Upwelling of Acidified Water: Not Just an Issue for Shellfish Hatcheries on the West Coast of the US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poach, M.; Munroe, D.; Abrahamsen, I.

    2014-12-01

    Periodic upwelling events are known to occur off the coast of New Jersey during the summer. As with upwelling off the US West Coast, these events can transport acidified water to the surface and shoreward. To determine if upwelling events have the potential to impact shellfish hatcheries in New Jersey, a monitoring study was conducted at the Aquaculture Innovation Center (AIC) of Rutgers University. The AIC is an important hatchery supporting the New Jersey oyster aquaculture industry through the production of disease resistant seed oysters. Starting in June of 2014, temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen and pH were continuously monitored at the AIC's intake pipe. Periodic grab samples were also collected at the intake and at locations within the facility. Grab samples were preserved and analyzed for pH and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). DIC and pH were used to calculate the aragonite saturation state of the sampled water. During an upwelling event in early July a drop in pH was measured at the intake. Grab samples showed that water of lower pH and aragonite saturation was entering the facility. These results show that hatcheries along the NJ coast need to be aware that upwelling events may bring conditions detrimental for shellfish production.

  15. [Modeling the occurrence of shellfish poisoning outbreaks caused by Gymnodinium catenatum (Dinophyceae) through electromagnetic signal triggering].

    PubMed

    Vale, Pulo

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins (PSTs) in bivalves attributed to Gymnodinium catenatum blooms at the NW Portuguese coast was previously associated with periods of low solar activity (measured by the radio flux [R]), or low geomagnetic A(a) index. It was also observed that reduction of R preceded the occurrence of toxin accumulation, while A(a) index increase could be related to its absence during periods of low activity. For modeling toxin accumulation, the monthly decrease in R was studied along the decade 2003-2012. A match that helped explaining the highly toxic years of 2007 and 2008 was obtained by plotting the formula: ?R = (R(n-1) - R(n))/(R(n) - 65)2, where 65 represented the lowest radio activity known to date. The complex denominator was required to take into account the sunspot cycle. A 1-2 month lag was observed between maximal relative decline and maximal PSTs accumulation. PSTs in bivalves from the Portuguese south coast were related with natural electromagnetic cycles for the first time, and were not statistically associated with low R. A statistically significant association with low A(a) index also was not achieved, due to the low number of occurrences, although the 25-75 percentile was restricted to low Aa indexes in a similar way to that found for the NW coast. PSTs accumulation outside solar minima could be triggered by a steep decline in the A(a) index (?A), but no lag was observed in this case. While ?R amplitude helped explaining the highly toxic years of 2007 and 2008 at the NW coast, the amplitude of ?A was not related to the severity of the accumulation. Other kind of local electromagnetic signaling was investigated resorting to the occurrence of seismologic phenomena, because these events can trigger electric activities. No statistical association was found between seism number or magnitude and PSTs at the south coast, located near the boundary between the African and Eurasian plates, and marked by moderate seismicity. PMID:25715602

  16. Temperature effects on kinetics of paralytic shellfish toxin elimination in Atlantic surfclams, Spisula solidissima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monica Bricelj, V.; Cembella, Allan D.; Laby, David

    2014-05-01

    Surfclams, Spisula solidissima, pose a particular health risk for human consumption as they are characterized by accumulation of extremely high levels of toxins associated with paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP), slow toxin elimination and an extremely high post-ingestive capacity for toxin bioconversion. Surfclam populations experience a wide range of temperatures along the NW Atlantic continental shelf, and are undergoing range contraction that has been attributed to global warming. In this study the influence of temperature (5, 12 and 21 °C) on detoxification kinetics of individual PSP toxins in two tissue compartments of juvenile surfclams (?35 mm shell length) was determined under controlled laboratory conditions, over prolonged (2.4 months) depuration. Clams were toxified with a representative regional Gulf of Maine isolate of the dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense of known toxin profile, allowing tracking of changes in toxin composition and calculated toxicity in surfclam tissues. The visceral mass detoxified at all temperatures, although toxin loss rate increased with increasing temperature. In contrast, total toxin content and calculated toxicities in other tissues remained constant or even increased during depuration, suggesting a physiological or biochemical toxin-retention mechanism in this tissue pool and temperature-independent detoxification. In vivo toxin compositional changes in surfclam tissues found in this study provide evidence of specific toxin conversion pathways, involving both reductive and decarbamoylation pathways. We conclude that such toxin biotransformations, especially in non-visceral tissues, may introduce a discrepancy in describing kinetics of total toxicity (in saxitoxin equivalents [STXeq]) of S. solidissima over prolonged detoxification. Nevertheless, use of total toxicity values generated by routine regulatory monitoring based upon mouse bioassays or calculated from chemical analytical determination of molar toxin concentrations is adequate for first-order modeling of toxin kinetics in this species. Furthermore, the differential detoxification response of viscera and other tissues in relation to temperature emphasizes the need for two-compartment modeling to describe the fate of PSP toxins in this species. Finally, key parameters were identified that may prove useful in hindcasting the timing of toxic blooms or new toxin input in deep offshore waters where routine monitoring of toxic phytoplankton is impractical.

  17. Development of a sensitive and selective liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method for high throughput analysis of paralytic shellfish toxins using graphitised carbon solid phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Boundy, Michael J; Selwood, Andrew I; Harwood, D Tim; McNabb, Paul S; Turner, Andrew D

    2015-03-27

    Routine regulatory monitoring of paralytic shellfish toxins (PST) commonly employs oxidative derivitisation and complex liquid chromatography fluorescence detection methods (LC-FL). The pre-column oxidation LC-FL method is currently implemented in New Zealand and the United Kingdom. When using this method positive samples are fractionated and two different oxidations are required to confirm the identity and quantity of each PST analogue present. There is a need for alternative methods that are simpler, provide faster turnaround times and have improved detection limits. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) HPLC-MS/MS analysis of PST has been used for research purposes, but high detection limits and substantial sample matrix issues have prevented it from becoming a viable alternative for routine monitoring purposes. We have developed a HILIC UPLC-MS/MS method for paralytic shellfish toxins with an optimised desalting clean-up procedure on inexpensive carbon solid phase extraction cartridges for reduction of matrix interferences. This represents a major technical breakthrough and allows sensitive, selective and rapid analysis of paralytic shellfish toxins from a variety of sample types, including many commercially produced bivalve molluscan shellfish species. Additionally, this analytical approach avoids the need for complex calculations to determine sample toxicity, as unlike other methods each PST analogue is able to be quantified as a single resolved peak. This article presents the method development and optimisation information. A thorough single laboratory validation study has subsequently been performed and this data will be presented elsewhere. PMID:25704772

  18. Possible influence of natural events on heavy metals exposure from shellfish consumption: a case study in the north-East of Italy.

    PubMed

    Losasso, Carmen; Bille, Laura; Patuzzi, Ilaria; Lorenzetto, Monica; Binato, Giovanni; Dalla Pozza, Manuela; Ferrè, Nicola; Ricci, Antonia

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was the estimation of the exposure over time to heavy metals (cadmium, mercury, and lead) due to shellfish consumption in the Veneto Region, Italy. Shellfish consumption was investigated by a food frequency consumption survey. Altogether, 1949 households, stratified into the five most populated areas of the Veneto Region, were involved in the study. Exposure estimation to heavy metals was carried out taking into account the level of metal measured in samples of Manila clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) and grooved carpet shell (Ruditapes decussatus), collected in the frame of the monitoring activities of mollusk production areas of Veneto Region, between January 2007 and December 2012. A general high contribution of the considered shellfish to the Tolerable Weekly Intake was noticed in the case of cadmium, especially in 2011, when a considerable increase in cadmium intake was estimated. This was probably due to a heavy rainfall event that triggered catastrophic flooding with high impact on shellfish capture areas in November 2010. The results strongly emphasize the importance of dealing with food safety in a holistic way, taking into account the potential impact of extraordinary natural events on food chain contamination, in order to identify food hazards at an early stage, before developing into a real risk for consumers. PMID:25699249

  19. Possible Influence of Natural Events on Heavy Metals Exposure from Shellfish Consumption: A Case Study in the North-East of Italy

    PubMed Central

    Losasso, Carmen; Bille, Laura; Patuzzi, Ilaria; Lorenzetto, Monica; Binato, Giovanni; Dalla Pozza, Manuela; Ferrè, Nicola; Ricci, Antonia

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was the estimation of the exposure over time to heavy metals (cadmium, mercury, and lead) due to shellfish consumption in the Veneto Region, Italy. Shellfish consumption was investigated by a food frequency consumption survey. Altogether, 1949 households, stratified into the five most populated areas of the Veneto Region, were involved in the study. Exposure estimation to heavy metals was carried out taking into account the level of metal measured in samples of Manila clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) and grooved carpet shell (Ruditapes decussatus), collected in the frame of the monitoring activities of mollusk production areas of Veneto Region, between January 2007 and December 2012. A general high contribution of the considered shellfish to the Tolerable Weekly Intake was noticed in the case of cadmium, especially in 2011, when a considerable increase in cadmium intake was estimated. This was probably due to a heavy rainfall event that triggered catastrophic flooding with high impact on shellfish capture areas in November 2010. The results strongly emphasize the importance of dealing with food safety in a holistic way, taking into account the potential impact of extraordinary natural events on food chain contamination, in order to identify food hazards at an early stage, before developing into a real risk for consumers. PMID:25699249

  20. As, Cd, Hg and Pb in four edible shellfish species from breeding and harvesting areas along the eastern Adriatic Coast, Croatia.

    PubMed

    Bogdanovi?, Tanja; Ujevi?, Ivana; Sedak, Marija; Listeš, Eddy; Simat, Vida; Petri?evi?, Sandra; Poljak, Vedran

    2014-03-01

    Four species of shellfish (Mytilus galloprovincialis, Ostrea edulis, Chlamis varia and Venus verrucosa) were collected during the autumn 2011 and spring 2012 along the eastern Adriatic coast from six shellfish harvesting areas (all species) and 13 breeding sampling areas (mussels) to assess As, Cd, Hg and Pb levels and the human risks of shellfish consumption. The mean metal concentrations (wet weight) in the examined species ranged from 1.420 to 9.575mg/kg for As, 0.034 to 1.270 for Cd, 0.005 to 0.680 for Hg and 0.140 to 2.072 for Pb. Examination of the spatial distribution of As, Cd, Hg and Pb revealed statistically significant differences among the studied areas. Since the concentrations were below the maximum prescribed by the laws of the EU and Croatia (the concentrations slightly exceeded the upper limits for three samples; Pb, Cd and Hg) and the hazard index, (HI) for Cd, Hg and Pb were below 1 and the target cancer risk (TR) for As was lower than 1×10(-6), there is no human health risk of consumption of shellfish from Croatian waters. PMID:24176332

  1. Paralytic shellfish toxins in clinical matrices: Extension of AOAC official method 2005.06 to human urine and serum and application to a 2007 case study in Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGrasse, Stacey; Rivera, Victor; Roach, John; White, Kevin; Callahan, John; Couture, Darcie; Simone, Karen; Peredy, Tamas; Poli, Mark

    2014-05-01

    Paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP), a potentially fatal foodborne illness, is often diagnosed anecdotally based on symptoms and dietary history. The neurotoxins responsible for PSP, collectively referred to as the saxitoxins or paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs), are natural toxins, produced by certain dinoflagellates, that may accumulate in seafood, particularly filter-feeding bivalves. Illnesses are rare because of effective monitoring programs, yet occasional poisonings occur. Rarely are contaminated food and human clinical samples (e.g., urine and serum) available for testing. There are currently few methods, none of which are validated, for determining PSTs in clinical matrices. This study evaluated AOAC (Association of Analytical Communities) Official Method of Analysis (OMA) 2005.06. [AOAC Official Method 2005.06 Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning Toxins in Shellfish: Prechormatographic Oxidation and Liquid Chromatography with Fluorescence Detection. In Official Methods of Analysis of AOAC International ], validated only for shellfish extracts, for its extension to human urine and serum samples. Initial assessment of control urine and serum matrices resulted in a sample cleanup modification when working with urine to remove hippuric acid, a natural urinary compound of environmental/dietary origin, which co-eluted with saxitoxin. Commercially available urine and serum matrices were then quantitatively spiked with PSTs that were available as certified reference materials (STX, dcSTX, B1, GTX2/3, C1/2, NEO, and GTX1/4) to assess method performance characteristics. The method was subsequently applied successfully to a PSP case study that occurred in July 2007 in Maine. Not only were PSTs identified in the patient urine and serum samples, the measured time series also led to the first report of human PST-specific urinary elimination rates. The LC-FD data generated from this case study compared remarkably well to results obtained using AOAC OMA 2011.27 [AOAC Official Method 2011.27 Paralytic Shellfish Toxins (PSTs) in Shellfish, Receptor Binding Assay. In Official Methods of Analysis of AOAC International ], further demonstrating successful extension of the LC-FD method to these clinical matrices. Moreover, data generated from this poisoning event reiterated that urine is a preferable clinical matrix, compared to serum, for diagnostic purposes due to higher accumulation and longer residence times in urine.

  2. Maternal fish and shellfish consumption and wheeze, eczema and food allergy at age two: a prospective cohort study in Brittany, France

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Environmental exposures, including dietary contaminants, may influence the developing immune system. This study assesses the association between maternal pre-parturition consumption of seafood and wheeze, eczema, and food allergy in preschool children. Fish and shellfish were studied separately as they differ according to their levels of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (which have anti-allergic properties) and their levels of contaminants. Methods The PELAGIE cohort included 3421 women recruited at the beginning of pregnancy. Maternal fish and shellfish intake was measured at inclusion by a food frequency questionnaire. Wheeze, eczema, and food allergy were evaluated by a questionnaire completed by the mother when the child was 2 years old (n?=?1500). Examination of the associations between seafood intake and outcomes took major confounders into account. Complementary sensitivity analyses with multiple imputation enabled us to handle missing data, due mostly to attrition. Results Moderate maternal pre-parturition fish intake (1 to 4 times a month) was, at borderline significance, associated with a lower risk of wheeze (adjusted OR?=?0.69 (0.45-1.05)) before age 2, compared with low intake (< once/month). This result was not, however, consistent: after multiple imputation, the adjusted OR was 0.86 (0.63-1.17). Shellfish intake at least once a month was associated with a higher risk of food allergy before age 2 (adjusted OR?=?1.62 (1.11-2.37)) compared to low or no intake (< once/month). Multiple imputation confirmed this association (adjusted OR?=?1.52 (1.05-2.21)). Conclusions This study suggests that maternal pre-parturition shellfish consumption may increase the risk of food allergy. Further large-scale epidemiologic studies are needed to corroborate these results, identify the contaminants or components of shellfish responsible for the effects observed, determine the persistence of the associations seen at age 2, and investigate potential associations with health effects observable at later ages, such as allergic asthma. PMID:24295221

  3. Determination of essential elements (copper, manganese, selenium and zinc) in fish and shellfish samples. Risk and nutritional assessment and mercury-selenium balance.

    PubMed

    Olmedo, P; Hernández, A F; Pla, A; Femia, P; Navas-Acien, A; Gil, F

    2013-12-01

    Fish and shellfish are an important source not only of toxic heavy metals, but also of essential elements in the diet. In this study, levels of Cu, Mn, Se and Zn have been determined in fresh, canned and frozen fish and shellfish products. A total of 485 samples of the 43 most frequently consumed fish and shellfish species in Andalusia (Southern Spain) were analyzed for essential elements content. The potential human health risks for the consumers and the nutritional value of the products analyzed were assessed. Furthermore, the mercury-selenium ratios and the selenium health benefit value (Se-HBVs) were calculated. The highest concentrations of Cu were found in crustaceans species (shrimp and prawn) as they have hemocyanin (a copper-containing protein) that functions as an oxygen-transport molecule. Mn levels were higher in canned bivalve molluscs, such as cockle and clam, and in fresh common sole. Concerning Se, two fresh predatory fish species (tuna and swordfish) presented the most remarkable concentrations of this element. The highest concentration of the essential metals analysed was found for Zn, especially in fresh and canned mussels. All the species analyzed showed beneficial Hg:Se ratios and Se-HBVs, except for the shark species (blue shark and cat shark) and gilt-head bream because of their high Hg levels and low Se content, respectively. Nevertheless, the biomagnification usually observed in hazardous metals such as Hg would not occur for the essential elements measured in predatory species. The estimated daily intakes of the elements studied represented very low percentages of their reference values, ranging from 0.1% (Se) to 3.9% (Cu) for person weighting 60 kg, so the intake of these elements through fish and shellfish would not pose any risk for the average consumer. Moreover, the contribution of fish and shellfish products to the recommended daily allowances and adequate intakes of these mineral elements ranges from 2.5% (Mn) to 25.4% (Se). PMID:24007738

  4. Synthesis of a tricyclic bisguanidine compound structurally related to saxitoxin and its identification in paralytic shellfish toxin-producing microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Shigeki; Cho, Yuko; Konoki, Keiichi; Nagasawa, Kazuo; Oshima, Yasukatsu; Yotsu-Yamashita, Mari

    2015-05-18

    We recently reported the chemical synthesis and identification of the genetically predicted biosynthetic intermediates of saxitoxin (STX), including a 2-aminoimidazole-bearing monoguanidine compound (Int-C'2) in two paralytic shellfish toxin (PST)-producing microorganisms. In this study, we achieved the direct conversion of Int-C'2 into a tricyclic bisguanidine compound (called Cyclic-C'), which is structurally related to STX, through oxidative intramolecular guanidine transfer to 2-aminoimidazole catalyzed by Pd/C under basic conditions in air. By using HPLC-MS analysis, Cyclic-C' was also identified in the PST-producing microorganisms, suggesting that Cyclic-C' is either another biosynthetic intermediate or a shunt product of PSTs. In addition, a weak inhibitory activity of Cyclic-C' to the voltage-gated sodium channels was detected by using a cell-based assay. PMID:25873235

  5. Validation of a confirmatory method for lipophilic marine toxins in shellfish using UHPLC-HR-Orbitrap MS.

    PubMed

    Orellana, Gabriel; Vanden Bussche, Julie; Van Meulebroek, Lieven; Vandegehuchte, Michiel; Janssen, Colin; Vanhaecke, Lynn

    2014-09-01

    Lipophilic marine toxins are produced by harmful microalgae and can accumulate in edible filter feeders such as shellfish, leading to an introduction of toxins into the human food chain, causing different poisoning effects. During the last years, analytical methods, based on liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), have been consolidated by interlaboratory validations. However, the main drawback of LC-MS/MS methods remains the limited number of compounds that can be analyzed in a single run. Due to the targeted nature of these methods, only known toxins, previously considered during method optimization, will be detected. Therefore in this study, a method based on ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HR-Orbitrap MS) was developed. Its quantitative performance was evaluated for confirmatory analysis of regulated lipophilic marine toxins in shellfish flesh according to Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. Okadaic acid (OA), dinophysistoxin-1 (DTX-1), pectenotoxin-2 (PTX-2), azaspiracid-1 (AZA-1), yessotoxin (YTX), and 13-desmethyl spirolide C (SPX-1) were quantified using matrix-matched calibration curves (MMS). For all compounds, the reproducibility ranged from 2.9 to 4.9 %, repeatability from 2.9 to 4.9 %, and recoveries from 82.9 to 113 % at the three different spiked levels. In addition, confirmatory identification of the compounds was effectively performed by the presence of a second diagnostic ion ((13)C). In conclusion, UHPLC-HR-Orbitrap MS permitted more accurate and faster detection of the target toxins than previously described LC-MS/MS methods. Furthermore, HRMS allows to retrospectively screen for many analogues and metabolites using its full-scan capabilities but also untargeted screening through the use of metabolomics software. PMID:24939136

  6. Quantitative Determination of Fatty Acids in Marine Fish and Shellfish from Warm Water of Straits of Malacca for Nutraceutical Purposes

    PubMed Central

    Abd Aziz, Nurnadia; Azlan, Azrina; Ismail, Amin; Mohd Alinafiah, Suryati; Razman, Muhammad Rizal

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to quantitatively determine the fatty acid contents of 20 species of marine fish and four species of shellfish from Straits of Malacca. Most samples contained fairly high amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), especially alpha-linolenic acid (ALA, C18:3 n3), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, C20:5 n3), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6 n3). Longtail shad, yellowstripe scad, and moonfish contained significantly higher (P < 0.05) amounts of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), respectively. Meanwhile, fringescale sardinella, malabar red snapper, black pomfret, Japanese threadfin bream, giant seaperch, and sixbar grouper showed considerably high content (537.2–944.1?mg/100g wet sample) of desirable omega-3 fatty acids. The polyunsaturated-fatty-acids/saturated-fatty-acids (P/S) ratios for most samples were higher than that of Menhaden oil (P/S = 0.58), a recommended PUFA supplement which may help to lower blood pressure. Yellowstripe scad (highest DHA, ? ? 3/? ? 6 = 6.4, P/S = 1.7), moonfish (highest ALA, ? ? 3/? ? 6 = 1.9, P/S = 1.0), and longtail shad (highest EPA, ? ? 3/? ? 6 = 0.8, P/S = 0.4) were the samples with an outstandingly desirable overall composition of fatty acids. Overall, the marine fish and shellfish from the area contained good composition of fatty acids which offer health benefits and may be used for nutraceutical purposes in the future. PMID:23509703

  7. Distribution of heavy metals in internal organs and tissues of Korean molluscan shellfish and potential risk to human health.

    PubMed

    Mok, Jong Soo; Kwon, Ji Young; Son, Kwang Tae; Choi, Woo Seok; Kim, Poong Ho; Lee, Tae Seek; Kim, Ji Hoe

    2015-09-01

    Molluscan shellfish (gastropods and bivalves) were collected from major fish markets on the Korean coast and analyzed for mercury by direct Hg analyzer and for other metals, such as cadmium, lead, chromium, silver, nickel, copper and zinc, using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Distribution of heavy metals in muscles, internal organs and whole tissues were determined and a potential risk assessment was conducted to evaluate their hazard for human consumption. Heavy metals were accumulated significantly higher (P < 0.05) in internal organs than in muscles for all species. The mean Cd level, which had the highest level of three hazardous metals (Cd, Pb, and Hg) in all internal-organ samples were above the regulatory limit of Korea and the mean level in whole tissue samples of the selected gastropod species, bay scallop and comb pen shell, exceeded the limit (except in a few cases). The sum of the estimated dietary intake of Cd, Pb and Hg for each part of all tested species accounted for 1.59-16.94, 0.02-0.36, and 0.07-0.16% respectively, of the provisional tolerable daily intake adopted by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives. The hazard index for each part of gastropods and bivalves was below 1.0, however, the maximum HI for internal organs of all analysed species was quite high (0.71). These results suggest that consumption of flesh after removing the internal organs of some molluscan shellfish (all gastropod species, bay scallop and comb pen shell) is a suitable way for reducing Cd exposure. PMID:26521561

  8. Minimal incorporation of Deepwater Horizon oil by estuarine filter feeders.

    PubMed

    Fry, Brian; Anderson, Laurie C

    2014-03-15

    Natural abundance carbon isotope analyses are sensitive tracers for fates and use of oil in aquatic environments. Use of oil carbon in estuarine food webs should lead to isotope values approaching those of oil itself, -27‰ for stable carbon isotopes reflecting oil origins and -1000‰ for carbon-14 reflecting oil age. To test for transfer of oil from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill into estuarine food webs, filter-feeding barnacles (Balanus sp.) and marsh mussels (Geukensia demissa) were collected from Louisiana estuaries near the site of the oil spill. Carbon-14 analyses of these animals from open waters and oiled marshes showed that oil use was <1% and near detection limits estimated at 0.3% oil incorporation. Respiration studies showed no evidence for enhanced microbial activity in bay waters. Results are consistent with low dietary impacts of oil for filter feeders and little overall impact on respiration in the productive Louisiana estuarine systems. PMID:24461698

  9. First Detection of Tetrodotoxin in Greek Shellfish by UPLC-MS/MS Potentially Linked to the Presence of the Dinoflagellate Prorocentrum minimum.

    PubMed

    Vlamis, Aristidis; Katikou, Panagiota; Rodriguez, Ines; Rey, Verónica; Alfonso, Amparo; Papazachariou, Angelos; Zacharaki, Thetis; Botana, Ana M; Botana, Luis M

    2015-05-01

    During official shellfish control for the presence of marine biotoxins in Greece in year 2012, a series of unexplained positive mouse bioassays (MBA) for lipophilic toxins with nervous symptomatology prior to mice death was observed in mussels from Vistonikos Bay-Lagos, Rodopi. This atypical toxicity coincided with (a) absence or low levels of regulated and some non-regulated toxins in mussels and (b) the simultaneous presence of the potentially toxic microalgal species Prorocentrum minimum at levels up to 1.89 × 103 cells/L in the area's seawater. Further analyses by different MBA protocols indicated that the unknown toxin was hydrophilic, whereas UPLC-MS/MS analyses revealed the presence of tetrodotoxins (TTXs) at levels up to 222.9 ?g/kg. Reviewing of official control data from previous years (2006-2012) identified a number of sample cases with atypical positive to asymptomatic negative MBAs for lipophilic toxins in different Greek production areas, coinciding with periods of P. minimum blooms. UPLC-MS/MS analysis of retained sub-samples from these cases revealed that TTXs were already present in Greek shellfish since 2006, in concentrations ranging between 61.0 and 194.7 ?g/kg. To our knowledge, this is the earliest reported detection of TTXs in European bivalve shellfish, while it is also the first work to indicate a possible link between presence of the toxic dinoflagellate P. minimum in seawater and that of TTXs in bivalves. Confirmed presence of TTX, a very heat-stable toxin, in filter-feeding mollusks of the Mediterranean Sea, even at lower levels to those inducing symptomatology to humans, indicates that this emerging risk should be seriously taken into account by the EU to protect the health of shellfish consumers. PMID:26008234

  10. First Detection of Tetrodotoxin in Greek Shellfish by UPLC-MS/MS Potentially Linked to the Presence of the Dinoflagellate Prorocentrum minimum

    PubMed Central

    Vlamis, Aristidis; Katikou, Panagiota; Rodriguez, Ines; Rey, Verónica; Alfonso, Amparo; Papazachariou, Angelos; Zacharaki, Thetis; Botana, Ana M.; Botana, Luis M.

    2015-01-01

    During official shellfish control for the presence of marine biotoxins in Greece in year 2012, a series of unexplained positive mouse bioassays (MBA) for lipophilic toxins with nervous symptomatology prior to mice death was observed in mussels from Vistonikos Bay–Lagos, Rodopi. This atypical toxicity coincided with (a) absence or low levels of regulated and some non-regulated toxins in mussels and (b) the simultaneous presence of the potentially toxic microalgal species Prorocentrum minimum at levels up to 1.89 × 103 cells/L in the area’s seawater. Further analyses by different MBA protocols indicated that the unknown toxin was hydrophilic, whereas UPLC-MS/MS analyses revealed the presence of tetrodotoxins (TTXs) at levels up to 222.9 ?g/kg. Reviewing of official control data from previous years (2006–2012) identified a number of sample cases with atypical positive to asymptomatic negative MBAs for lipophilic toxins in different Greek production areas, coinciding with periods of P. minimum blooms. UPLC-MS/MS analysis of retained sub-samples from these cases revealed that TTXs were already present in Greek shellfish since 2006, in concentrations ranging between 61.0 and 194.7 ?g/kg. To our knowledge, this is the earliest reported detection of TTXs in European bivalve shellfish, while it is also the first work to indicate a possible link between presence of the toxic dinoflagellate P. minimum in seawater and that of TTXs in bivalves. Confirmed presence of TTX, a very heat-stable toxin, in filter-feeding mollusks of the Mediterranean Sea, even at lower levels to those inducing symptomatology to humans, indicates that this emerging risk should be seriously taken into account by the EU to protect the health of shellfish consumers. PMID:26008234

  11. Transformation of paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins in UK surf clams (Spisula solida) for targeted production of reference materials.

    PubMed

    Turner, Andrew D; Lewis, Adam M; O'Neil, Alison; Hatfield, Robert G

    2013-04-01

    The periodic occurrence of Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning (PSP) toxins in UK surf clams and the recent move away from biological assays for PSP testing resulted in the need to determine method performance characteristics for the replacement analytical method in this species. With the requirement for laboratory reference materials to aid this validation together with known issues relating to toxin transformation in live clams and homogenised tissue, there was the need to assess the toxin transformation characteristics of PSP toxins in surf clam tissue. Initial work examined the rates of toxin transformation in UK surf clam tissue incubated with toxin standards, showing rapid transformation of N-sulfocarbamoyl toxins with slower transformation of carbamate toxins. Full transformational pathways were determined using a combination of three different analytical methods and confirmed the major expected transformations involving decarbamoylation, with some evidence for additional reaction pathways. Results obtained from the analysis of surf clam and oyster tissues incubated with varying concentrations of toxic Alexandrium algae highlighted expected transformation reactions, although significant differences were observed in the extent of the transformations amongst the range of toxins studied, with less efficient transformation of N-hydroxylated toxins as compared with other carbamate and N-sulfocarbamoyl toxins. Analysis of PSP-toxic incurred oyster, scallop and mussel tissues incubated with variable proportions of surf clam tissue showed large differences in the extent of the transformations. Total conversion of N-sulfocarbamoyl toxins was confirmed at low relative proportions of surf clam tissue in all three species, whereas transformation of carbamate toxins was found to occur only in the presence of higher proportions of surf clam tissue in oysters and mussels in comparison with scallops. Results enabled the production of three laboratory reference materials prepared following incubation of incurred homogenates with optimum proportions of surf clam tissue, resulting in materials containing a large number of PSP toxins. Stability experiments provided good preliminary evidence for the stability of these targeted materials under storage conditions. The work therefore provides both additional information relating to the transformational activity in UK surf clams and highlights a good potential method for the targeted production of reference materials which include a wider range of toxins than normally present in naturally incurred shellfish. PMID:23369833

  12. Stanols as a tool to track the origin of microbial contamination of oysters, Crassostrea gigas, in shellfish areas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrault, Loïc; Jardé, Emilie; Jeanneau, Laurent; Petitjean, Patrice

    2013-04-01

    Runoff of cattle manures (cows, pigs, sheeps) or discharge of effluent from wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) into aquatic ecosystems can lead to microbiological contamination of waters and living organisms. In coastal ecosystems and particularly in shellfish harvesting areas, the presence of pathogen microorganisms in waters induces fecal contamination of filter feeding bivalves (oysters, mussels, scallops…), therefore leading to human health risks associated to the consumption of these contaminated organisms. Watershed management plans that aim at limiting these risks require the development of tools able to identify fecal contamination sources. The fecal indicator bacteria used in the regulations to determine fecal contamination are not source specific since they are found in the feces of most warm-blooded animals. Thus, microbiological biomarkers have been developed in association with chemical biomarkers as Microbial Source Tracking (MST) methods. Fecal stanols, by-products of sterols obtained by human and animal microbial gut flora, are found in considerable amounts in feces with different relative proportions depending on their animal or human source. Recently, in association with microbiological biomarkers, the stanol fingerprint of contaminated waters has been successfully used to determine the main source of fecal contamination (cow, pig or human sources) in rural watersheds (Brittany, France). Up to now, the use of the stanol fingerprint to track the fecal contamination in shellfish tissues, especially bivalves, has been limited to the analysis of coprostanol, a stanol commonly associated to human contamination. Therefore, whether the stanol fingerprint can be used as a MST method in bivalves or not is still unknown. The first aim of this study was to compare several organic extraction procedures of stanols in the oyster Crassostrea gigas to determine a reliable method for stanol fingerprint analysis in bivalves. Solvent extraction and purification steps have been carried out with attention as they are critical for stanol quantification. Secondly, the evolution of the stanol fingerprint of oysters with time was evaluated during 6 days by artificially contaminating microcosms with two concentrations of a WWTP effluent. In the microcosms, the fingerprint of stanols as a chemical biomarkers of fecal (human) contamination was compared to counts of Escherichia coli, a commonly used microbial indicator. In association with microbial markers, the method developed from the two previous steps will be applied at the watershed scale in order to identify sources of fecal contamination in Brittany and Normandy (France).

  13. Rapid liquid chromatography for paralytic shellfish toxin analysis using superficially porous chromatography with AOAC Official Method 2005.06.

    PubMed

    Hatfield, Robert G; Turner, Andrew D

    2012-01-01

    The bioaccumulation of paralytic shellfish toxins in mussels, oysters, cockles, hard clams, razors, and king scallops is monitored in England, Scotland, and Wales by AOAC Official Method 2005.06 LC-with fluorescence detection (FLD). One of the commonly perceived disadvantages of using this method is the long turnaround time and low throughput in a busy laboratory environment. The chromatographic analysis of each sample typically utilizes a 15 min cycle time to achieve toxin oxidation product separation and column equilibration prior to subsequent analysis. A standard RP C18 analytical column, used successfully in recent years, achieves good separation with a long column lifetime. The analysis of a 40 sample qualitative screening batch takes approximately 18 h, including blanks, standards, and other QC samples. The availability of superficially porous column technology has offered the potential to reduce analysis time while retaining column performance on existing hardware. In this study, AOAC Official Method 2005.06 with LC-FLD was transferred to two different commercially available superficially porous columns, and the method performance characteristics were evaluated. Both columns separated all toxins adequately with cycle times less than half that of the existing method. Linearity for each toxin was acceptable up to two times the European maximum permitted limit of 800 microg di-HCl saxitoxin equivalent/kg flesh. LOD and LOQ values were substantially improved for the majority of toxins, with gonyautoxin 1&4 and neosaxitoxin showing up to a two- and fourfold improvement, respectively, depending on the column used. Quantification results obtained from parallel analysis of contaminated samples were acceptable on both columns. Comparative screen results gave a slight increase in the occurrence of contaminated samples, which was attributed to the improved detection limit for most toxins. Issues with rapidly increasing back pressure, however, were identified with both columns, with a limit of around 500 injections. This compares to the >3000 cycles routinely obtained with the standard RP-C18 HPLC columns currently in use. Overall, the gain achieved with these columns through shorter analysis time and improved analytical sensitivity is potentially of benefit in a high-throughput environment. For the routine high-throughput screening of shellfish samples, however, an improved column lifetime is desirable. PMID:22970577

  14. [Distribution of thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH)- and TDH-related hemolysin (TRH)-producing Vibrio parahaemolyticus in coastal Shimane Prefecture and TDH and TRH V parahaemolyticus contamination of retail shellfish].

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Hiroshi

    2007-03-01

    We studied distribution of thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH)- and TDH-related hemolysin (TRH)-producing Vibrio parahaemolyticus in coastal sea water, sediment, and shellfish and related retail shellfish contamination in Shimane Prefecture, Japan, between 2002 and 2004. V. parahaemolyticus was isolated from > 80% of sea water, sediment, and shellfish. The detection of TDH gene (tdh) and TRH gene (trh)-positive V parahaemolyticus in sea water was 11%, in sediment 16%, and in shellfish 26%. The number of genes and gene-related in seawater was 23 MPN/L, in sediment 29 MPN/100 g, and in shellfish 460 MPN/10 g. TDH- and TRH-producing V. parahaemolyticus detected in seawater was 5%, in sediment 11% and in shellfish 14%. The continuous distribution of TDH-producing O2:K28, O4:K88, O4:K37, and O4:KUT organisms on the western coast and TRH2-producing O5:k30, O5:K43, O10:K19, O10:KUT, O11:K40, O11:KUT, and OUT:KUT organisms on the Oki Island coast suggested the settlement of these organisms in these coastal environments. From 7 (12%) of 59 retail short-necked clam samples, we isolated TDH-producing O 1:KUT, O3:K6 (2 strains from 2 samples imported from Korea), O4:K12, OUT:K8, and TRH2-producing OUT:K40 and OUT:K51 organisms. These findings suggested that TDH- and TRH-producing V. parahaemolyticus are widely distributed along the coast of this prefecture and are transported by contaminated retail shellfish from other areas. PMID:17447472

  15. Persistent Contamination of Octopuses and Mussels with Lipophilic Shellfish Toxins during Spring Dinophysis Blooms in a Subtropical Estuary.

    PubMed

    Mafra, Luiz L; Lopes, Daiana; Bonilauri, Vanessa C; Uchida, Hajime; Suzuki, Toshiyuki

    2015-06-01

    This study investigates the occurrence of diarrhetic shellfish toxins (DSTs) and their producing phytoplankton species in southern Brazil, as well as the potential for toxin accumulation in co-occurring mussels (Perna perna) and octopuses (Octopus vulgaris). During the spring in 2012 and 2013, cells of Dinophysis acuminata complex were always present, sometimes at relatively high abundances (max. 1143 cells L-1), likely the main source of okadaic acid (OA) in the plankton (max. 34 ng L-1). Dinophysis caudata occurred at lower cell densities in 2013 when the lipophilic toxins pectenotoxin-2 (PTX-2) and PTX-2 seco acid were detected in plankton and mussel samples. Here, we report for the first time the accumulation of DSTs in octopuses, probably linked to the consumption of contaminated bivalves. Perna perna mussels were consistently contaminated with different DSTs (max. 42 µg kg-1), and all octopuses analyzed (n = 5) accumulated OA in different organs/tissues: digestive glands (DGs) > arms > gills > kidneys > stomach + intestine. Additionally, similar concentrations of 7-O-palmytoyl OA and 7-O-palmytoly dinophysistoxin-1 (DTX-1) were frequently detected in the hepatopancreas of P. perna and DGs of O. vulgaris. Therefore, octopuses can be considered a potential vector of DSTs to both humans and top predators such as marine mammals. PMID:26096277

  16. Graphene based pipette tip solid phase extraction of marine toxins in shellfish muscle followed by UPLC-MS/MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qing; Gong, Like; Baibado, Joewel T; Dong, Wei; Wang, Yixuan; Dai, Zhiyuan; Cheung, Hon-Yeung

    2013-11-15

    Graphene is a novel carbonic material with great potentials for the use as sorbent due to its ultrahigh surface area. Herein, we report the use of graphene as sorbent in solid-phase extraction (SPE) using pipette tip as cartridge namely GPT-SPE, together with ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS), for the analysis of lipophilic marine toxins (LMTs), including yessotoxins (YTX), okadaic acid (OA), dinophysistoxin-1 (DTX1), gymnodimine (GYM), spirolides-1 (SPX1), pectenotoxin-2 (PTX2) and azaspiracid-1 (AZA1) in shellfish. The GPT-SPE procedure was optimized and the performance of graphene was fully validated. Results with high-sensitivity and good reproducibility was obtained and compared with that of other sorbents like C18 silica, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), commercial Oasis HLB, and Strata-X for the extraction of LMTs, which showed superiority and advantages of graphene, such as good recoveries, stability and compatibility with various solvents. In order to exhibit the potentials of graphene as an excellent sorbent material, 67 mussel samples from six coastal cities of China were analyzed. OA was found to be the dominant contaminant, while YTX was also detected with low level. PMID:24148472

  17. Future Oceanic Warming and Acidification Alter Immune Response and Disease Status in a Commercial Shellfish Species, Mytilus edulis L.

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, Clara L.; Lynch, Sharon A.; Culloty, Sarah C.; Malham, Shelagh K.

    2014-01-01

    Increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide are leading to physical changes in marine environments including parallel decreases in ocean pH and increases in seawater temperature. This study examined the impacts of a six month exposure to combined decreased pH and increased temperature on the immune response and disease status in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis L. Results provide the first confirmation that exposure to future acidification and warming conditions via aquarium-based simulation may have parallel implications for bivalve health. Collectively, the data suggests that temperature more than pH may be the key driver affecting immune response in M. edulis. Data also suggests that both increases in temperature and/or lowered pH conditions may lead to changes in parasite abundance and diversity, pathological conditions, and bacterial incidence in M. edulis. These results have implications for future management of shellfish under a predicted climate change scenario and future sustainability of shellfisheries. Examination of the combined effects of two stressors over an extended exposure period provides key preliminary data and thus, this work represents a unique and vital contribution to current research efforts towards a collective understanding of expected near-future impacts of climate change on marine environments. PMID:24927423

  18. Analysis of paralytic shellfish toxins, potential chemical threat agents, in food using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Daniel; Åstot, Crister

    2015-10-23

    A novel method for determining paralytic shellfish toxin (PST) profiles in food was developed using a combination of silica and strong cation exchange (SCX) solid phase extraction (SPE) coupled to hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS/MS). Besides the risk for natural contamination of seafood and drinking water, PSTs also pose potent threats through intentional contamination of food, due to their high toxicity and the wide distributions of toxin-producing algae. The new preparation method aim to maintain the samples' original toxin profiles by avoiding conditions known to induce interconversion or degradation of the PSTs. The method was evaluated for PST extraction from water, milk, orange juice, apple purée, baby food, and blue mussels (Mytilus edulis). The extracts were found to produce reproducible retention times in HILIC-MS/MS analysis. When an authentic toxic mussel sample was analyzed using the novel method, saxitoxin and gonyautoxin-3 were identified, in agreement with data acquired using the Lawrence pre-column oxidation high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection (HPLC-FLD) method. Overall recoveries of the PSTs from tested foods by the novel method ranged from 36% to 111%. PMID:26404910

  19. Paralytic shellfish toxin content is related to genomic sxtA4 copy number in Alexandrium minutum strains

    PubMed Central

    Stüken, Anke; Riobó, Pilar; Franco, José; Jakobsen, Kjetill S.; Guillou, Laure; Figueroa, Rosa I.

    2015-01-01

    Dinoflagellates are microscopic aquatic eukaryotes with huge genomes and an unusual cell regulation. For example, most genes are present in numerous copies and all copies seem to be obligatorily transcribed. The consequence of the gene copy number (CPN) for final protein synthesis is, however, not clear. One such gene is sxtA, the starting gene of paralytic shellfish toxin (PST) synthesis. PSTs are small neurotoxic compounds that can accumulate in the food chain and cause serious poisoning incidences when ingested. They are produced by dinoflagellates of the genera Alexandrium, Gymnodium, and Pyrodinium. Here we investigated if the genomic CPN of sxtA4 is related to PST content in Alexandrium minutum cells. SxtA4 is the 4th domain of the sxtA gene and its presence is essential for PST synthesis in dinoflagellates. We used PST and genome size measurements as well as quantitative PCR to analyze sxtA4 CPN and toxin content in 15 A. minutum strains. Our results show a strong positive correlation between the sxtA4 CPN and the total amount of PST produced in actively growing A. minutum cells. This correlation was independent of the toxin profile produced, as long as the strain contained the genomic domains sxtA1 and sxtA4. PMID:25983733

  20. The sxt Gene and Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning Toxins as Markers for the Monitoring of Toxic Alexandrium Species Blooms.

    PubMed

    Penna, Antonella; Perini, Federico; Dell'Aversano, Carmela; Capellacci, Samuela; Tartaglione, Luciana; Giacobbe, Maria Grazia; Casabianca, Silvia; Fraga, Santiago; Ciminiello, Patrizia; Scardi, Michele

    2015-12-15

    Paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) is a serious human illness caused by the ingestion of seafood contaminated with saxitoxin and its derivatives (STXs). These toxins are produced by some species of marine dinoflagellates within the genus Alexandrium. In the Mediterranean Sea, toxic Alexandrium spp. blooms, especially of A. minutum, are frequent and intense with negative impact to coastal ecosystem, aquaculture practices and other economic activities. We conducted a large scale study on the sxt gene and toxin distribution and content in toxic dinoflagellate A. minutum of the Mediterranean Sea using both quantitative PCR (qPCR) and HILIC-HRMS techniques. We developed a new qPCR assay for the estimation of the sxtA1 gene copy number in seawater samples during a bloom event in Syracuse Bay (Mediterranean Sea) with an analytical sensitivity of 2.0 × 10° sxtA1 gene copy number per reaction. The linear correlation between sxtA1 gene copy number and microalgal abundance and between the sxtA1 gene and STX content allowed us to rapidly determine the STX-producing cell concentrations of two Alexandrium species in environmental samples. In these samples, the amount of sxtA1 gene was in the range of 1.38 × 10(5) - 2.55 × 10(8) copies/L and the STX concentrations ranged from 41-201 nmol/L. This study described a potential PSP scenario in the Mediterranean Sea. PMID:26580419

  1. Future oceanic warming and acidification alter immune response and disease status in a commercial shellfish species, Mytilus edulis L.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Clara L; Lynch, Sharon A; Culloty, Sarah C; Malham, Shelagh K

    2014-01-01

    Increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide are leading to physical changes in marine environments including parallel decreases in ocean pH and increases in seawater temperature. This study examined the impacts of a six month exposure to combined decreased pH and increased temperature on the immune response and disease status in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis L. Results provide the first confirmation that exposure to future acidification and warming conditions via aquarium-based simulation may have parallel implications for bivalve health. Collectively, the data suggests that temperature more than pH may be the key driver affecting immune response in M. edulis. Data also suggests that both increases in temperature and/or lowered pH conditions may lead to changes in parasite abundance and diversity, pathological conditions, and bacterial incidence in M. edulis. These results have implications for future management of shellfish under a predicted climate change scenario and future sustainability of shellfisheries. Examination of the combined effects of two stressors over an extended exposure period provides key preliminary data and thus, this work represents a unique and vital contribution to current research efforts towards a collective understanding of expected near-future impacts of climate change on marine environments. PMID:24927423

  2. Immunoassay of paralytic shellfish toxins by moving magnetic particles in a stationary liquid-phase lab-on-a-chip.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myoung-Ho; Choi, Suk-Jung

    2015-04-15

    In this study, we devised a stationary liquid-phase lab-on-a-chip (SLP LOC), which was operated by moving solid-phase magnetic particles in the stationary liquid phase. The SLP LOC consisted of a sample chamber to which a sample and reactants were added, a detection chamber containing enzyme substrate solution, and a narrow channel connecting the two chambers and filled with buffer. As a model system, competitive immunoassays of saxitoxin (STX), a paralytic shellfish toxin, were conducted in the SLP LOC using protein G-coupled magnetic particles (G-MPs) as the solid phase. Anti-STX antibodies, STX-horseradish peroxidase conjugate, G-MPs, and a STX sample were added to the sample chamber and reacted by shaking. While liquids were in the stationary state, G-MPs were transported from the sample chamber to the detection chamber by moving a magnet below the LOC. After incubation to allow the enzymatic reaction to occur, the absorbance of the detection chamber solution was found to be reciprocally related to the STX concentration of the sample. Thus, the SLP LOC may represent a novel, simple format for point-of-care testing applications of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays by eliminating complicated liquid handling steps. PMID:25460894

  3. Persistent Contamination of Octopuses and Mussels with Lipophilic Shellfish Toxins during Spring Dinophysis Blooms in a Subtropical Estuary

    PubMed Central

    Mafra, Luiz L.; Lopes, Daiana; Bonilauri, Vanessa C.; Uchida, Hajime; Suzuki, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the occurrence of diarrhetic shellfish toxins (DSTs) and their producing phytoplankton species in southern Brazil, as well as the potential for toxin accumulation in co-occurring mussels (Perna perna) and octopuses (Octopus vulgaris). During the spring in 2012 and 2013, cells of Dinophysis acuminata complex were always present, sometimes at relatively high abundances (max. 1143 cells L?1), likely the main source of okadaic acid (OA) in the plankton (max. 34 ng L?1). Dinophysis caudata occurred at lower cell densities in 2013 when the lipophilic toxins pectenotoxin-2 (PTX-2) and PTX-2 seco acid were detected in plankton and mussel samples. Here, we report for the first time the accumulation of DSTs in octopuses, probably linked to the consumption of contaminated bivalves. Perna perna mussels were consistently contaminated with different DSTs (max. 42 µg kg?1), and all octopuses analyzed (n = 5) accumulated OA in different organs/tissues: digestive glands (DGs) > arms > gills > kidneys > stomach + intestine. Additionally, similar concentrations of 7-O-palmytoyl OA and 7-O-palmytoly dinophysistoxin-1 (DTX-1) were frequently detected in the hepatopancreas of P. perna and DGs of O. vulgaris. Therefore, octopuses can be considered a potential vector of DSTs to both humans and top predators such as marine mammals. PMID:26096277

  4. Purification and characterization of paralytic shellfish toxin-transforming enzyme, sulfocarbamoylase I, from the Japanese bivalve Peronidia venulosa.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yuko; Ogawa, Noriyuki; Takahashi, Miyako; Lin, Hsi-Pin; Oshima, Yasukatsu

    2008-09-01

    The Japanese bivalve Peronidia venulosa contains paralytic shellfish toxin (PST)-transforming enzymes that convert the weakly toxic C-toxins to the more potent decarbamoyl toxins. The enzyme was purified 154-fold with a yield of 0.26% and was named sulfocarbamoylase I. It was found to be a protein with an estimated molecular weight of 300 kDa by gel filtration column chromatography. Observation of a single band equivalent to 150 kDa on SDS-PAGE with or without reducing agents suggested it to be a homodimer with ionically bound subunits. The enzyme catalyzes the hydrolysis of the carboxyl bond in the N-sulfocarbamoyl moiety of PSP-toxins. The sulfonyl moiety in the carbamoyl side chain of substrates is essential for enzyme recognition. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of nine tryptic peptides were determined by the Edman degradation method. In a database search using the BLAST program, no protein that shows remarkable homology was retrieved. Several characteristics of the enzyme were also compared with those of another PST-transforming enzyme, carbamoylase I, which was previously isolated from the Japanese clam Mactra chinensis. PMID:18599388

  5. Influence of Different Shellfish Matrices on the Separation of PSP Toxins Using a Postcolumn Oxidation Liquid Chromatography Method

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Verónica; Alfonso, Amparo; Botana, Luis M.; Botana, Ana M.

    2015-01-01

    The separation of PSP toxins using liquid chromatography with a post-column oxidation fluorescence detection method was performed with different matrices. The separation of PSP toxins depends on several factors, and it is crucial to take into account the presence of interfering matrix peaks to produce a good separation. The matrix peaks are not always the same, which is a significant issue when it comes to producing good, reliable results regarding resolution and toxicity information. Different real shellfish matrices (mussel, scallop, clam and oyster) were studied, and it was seen that the interference is not the same for each individual matrix. It also depends on the species, sampling location and the date of collection. It was proposed that separation should be accomplished taking into account the type of matrix, as well as the concentration of heptane sulfonate in both solvents, since the mobile phase varies regarding the matrix. Scallop and oyster matrices needed a decrease in the concentration of heptane sulfonate to separate GTX4 from matrix peaks, as well as dcGTX3 for oysters, with a concentration of 6.5 mM for solvent A and 6.25 mM for solvent B. For mussel and clam matrices, interfering peaks are not as large as they are in the other group, and the heptane sulfonate concentration was 8.25 mM for both solvents. Also, for scallops and oysters, matrix interferences depend not only on the sampling site but also on the date of collection as well as the species; for mussels and clams, differences are noted only when the sampling site varies. PMID:25884908

  6. Carcinogen adducts as an indicator for the public health risks of consuming carcinogen-exposed fish and shellfish

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, B.P. )

    1991-01-01

    A large variety of environmental carcinogens are metabolically activated to electrophilic metabolites that can bind to nucleic acids and protein, forming covalent adducts. The formation of DNA-carcinogen adducts is thought to be a necessary step in the action of most carcinogens. Recently, a variety of new fluorescence, immunochemical, and radioactive-postlabeling procedures have been developed that allow the sensitive measurement of DNA-carcinogen adducts in organisms exposed to environmental carcinogens. In some cases, similar procedures have been developed for protein-carcinogen adducts. In an organism with active metabolic systems for a given carcinogen, adducts are generally much longer lived than the carcinogens that formed them. Thus, the detection of DNA- or protein-carcinogen adducts in aquatic foodstuffs can act as an indicator of prior carcinogen exposure. The presence of DNA adducts would, in addition, suggest a mutagenic/carcinogenic risk to the aquatic organism itself. Vertebrate fish are characterized by high levels of carcinogen metabolism, low body burdens of carcinogen, the formation of carcinogen-macromolecule adducts, and the occurrence of pollution-related tumors. Shellfish, on the other hand, have low levels of carcinogen metabolism, high body burdens of carcinogen, and have little or no evidence of carcinogen-macromolecule adducts or tumors. The consumption of carcinogen adducts in aquatic foodstuffs is unlikely to represent a human health hazard. There are no metabolic pathways by which protein-carcinogen or DNA-carcinogen adducts could reform carcinogens. Incorporation via salvage pathways of preformed nucleoside-carcinogen adducts from foodstuffs into newly synthesized human DNA is theoretically possible.

  7. Paralytic shellfish poisoning due to ingestion of Gymnodinium catenatum contaminated cockles--application of the AOAC HPLC official method.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Susana Margarida; de Carvalho, Mamede; Mestre, Tiago; Ferreira, Joaquim J; Coelho, Miguel; Peralta, Rita; Vale, Paulo

    2012-04-01

    The potent paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) produced by Gymnodinium catenatum have appeared irregularly since the onset in 1986 of a monitoring program aimed at preventing contaminated bivalves from the Portuguese coast to reaching the consumer. In years where high contamination levels were attained, sporadic episodes of human poisonings were also recorded, as in 1994. The reappearance of high contamination led to the appearance of new cases during 2007. This study reports details of toxin ingestion, symptomatology and toxin presence in the fluids of one of these victims, an adult male who ingested several kilograms of cockles. In cockle samples collected the week before and during the week when the intoxication took place, the major PSTs detected by the HPLC method based on AOAC Official Method 2005.06 belonged to the sulfamate (81-68 molar percent) and decarbamoyl groups (19-32 molar percent), comprising GTX5, GTX6, C1,2, C3,4, dcNeo, and dcSTX. In the patient urine sample sulfamate and decarbamoyl derivatives were also found, comprising by GTX5 (28%), GTX6 (25%), dcSTX (24%) and dcNeo (22%), but no C toxins and no dcGTX2,3 were detected. Compared to the cockle samples, there was an increase in the proportion of dcSTX, dcNeo and GTX5 (molar percentage) in the urine sample, but not of GTX6. Overall, compounds which had the presence of an O-sulfate at C11 were absent in urine while being relatively abundant in the bivalve (36.5-47.0 molar percent). In blood plasma PSTs were not detected. PMID:22326725

  8. Accumulation trends of petroleum hydrocarbons in commercial shellfish from the Galician coast (NW Spain) affected by the Prestige oil spill.

    PubMed

    Viñas, L; Franco, M A; Soriano, J A; González, J J; Ortiz, L; Bayona, J M; Albaigés, J

    2009-04-01

    Aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons were determined in three species of commercial shellfish, namely razor shells (Ensis arcuatus and Ensis siliqua), goose barnacle (Pollicipes cornucopia) and sea urchin (Paracentrotus lividus), living in different habitats and exhibiting different feeding behaviors. The samples were collected monthly, from January 2003 to October 2004, in three stations of the Galicia coast (NW Spain), following the Prestige oil spill, with the aim of assessing their response to the spill and, therefore, their suitability for monitoring purposes. The aliphatic fractions were mostly dominated by biogenic hydrocarbons, reflecting the diet composition of the organisms and their low metabolic capacity. The presence of oil was assessed by the determination of chemical markers. The analysis of the aromatic fractions revealed the occurrence of 3-6 ring parent and alkylated PAHs, consistent with a mixed petrogenic-pyrolytic origin, with the common feature of the predominance of chrysene in all samples collected after the spill. However, the distributions exhibited both temporal and interspecies variations. The PAH concentrations (Sigma13) increased significantly after the spill and decreased 6-7 months later close to background levels for the region. One year after the accident, the median values were: 58 microg/kg for razor shells, 26 microg/kg for barnacles, and 25 microg/kg for sea urchins. The temporal evolution of the PAH concentrations along the survey period was used to estimate loss rates for bioavailable PAHs in barnacles and sea urchins after the spill. Half-life values were in the order of 30 and 60 d, respectively. The results of the study demonstrate that barnacles can be suitable species for oil spill monitoring. PMID:19150729

  9. Report on the development of the FAO/INFOODS user database for fish and shellfish (uFiSh) - Challenges and possible solutions.

    PubMed

    Rittenschober, Doris; Stadlmayr, Barbara; Nowak, Verena; Du, Juan; Charrondiere, U Ruth

    2016-02-15

    Reliable food composition data are required for virtually all nutrition-related programs and policies. In many food composition tables, fish are included to a limited extent. Therefore, FAO/INFOODS decided to compile and publish a user databases for fish and shellfish (uFiSh), considering the following main objectives: to develop a global database for fish, crustaceans and molluscs with raw, cooked and processed foods; to base the database preferable on analytical data; to include major as well as minor species consumed; and to capture intra-species variation due to habitat, edible part, season or region. The development of the uFiSh is based on FAO/INFOODS international standards and guidelines. The paper describes challenges and possible solution of data compilation specific to fish and shellfish, as well as the uFiSh in terms of its structure, including coverage of nutrients, documentation and format of publication. The first edition is intended to be published in 2015. PMID:26433296

  10. A tyrosine-containing analog of mu-conotoxin GIIIA as ligand in the receptor binding assay for paralytic shellfish poisons.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Aileen D L; Sombrito, Elvira Z; Cruz, Lourdes J

    2015-06-01

    Development of novel analytical tools to detect marine biotoxins has been warranted in view of the apparent global pervasiveness of algal-derived shellfish poisoning, and the limitations of existing methods. Here, we describe the initial phase in the development and evaluation of a tyrosine-containing analog of ?-conotoxin (?-CTX) GIIIA as an alternative to saxitoxin (STX) in a receptor binding assay (RBA) for paralytic shellfish poisons. The peptide analog was synthesized and characterized for structure and bioactivity. The major product of oxidation elicited paralytic symptoms in mice at a minimum dose of 1.31 mg kg(-1) (i.p.). Mass spectrometry analysis of the bioactive peptide gave a molecular mass of 2637.52 Da that was close to the predicted value. Iodination via chloramine-T produced non-, mono- and di-iodinated peptides (respectively, NIP, MIP and DIP). Competition assays against (3)H-STX revealed higher Ki and EC50 (P < 0.0001, ANOVA) indicating reduced affinity for the receptor, and limited displacement of receptor-bound STX. However, subsequent use of MIP may extend the application of RBA to detect small changes in toxin levels owing to its likely enhanced displacement by STX. This may be useful in analyzing samples with toxicities near the regulatory limit, or in establishing baseline values in high risk environments. PMID:25817004

  11. Radioactive contamination of fish, shellfish, and waterfowl exposed to Hanford effluents: Annual summaries, 1945--1972. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hanf, R.W.; Dirkes, R.L.; Duncan, J.P.

    1992-07-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project (HEDR) is to estimate the potential radiation doses received by people living within the sphere of influence of the Hanford Site. A potential critical pathway for human radiation exposure is through the consumption of waterfowl that frequent onsite waste-water ponds or through eating of fish, shellfish, and waterfowl that reside in/on the Columbia River and its tributaries downstream of the reactors. This document summarizes information on fish, shellfish, and waterfowl radiation contamination for samples collected by Hanford monitoring personnel and offsite agencies for the period 1945 to 1972. Specific information includes the types of organisms sampled, the kinds of tissues and organs analyzed, the sampling locations, and the radionuclides reported. Some tissue concentrations are also included. We anticipate that these yearly summaries will be helpful to individuals and organizations interested in evaluating aquatic pathway information for locations impacted by Hanford operations and will be useful for planning the direction of future HEDR studies.

  12. Development and Validation of a Lateral Flow Immunoassay for the Rapid Screening of Okadaic Acid and All Dinophysis Toxins from Shellfish Extracts.

    PubMed

    Jawaid, Waqass; Meneely, Julie P; Campbell, Katrina; Melville, Karrie; Holmes, Stephen J; Rice, Jennifer; Elliott, Christopher T

    2015-09-30

    A single-step lateral flow immunoassay was developed and validated to detect okadaic acid (OA) and dinophysis toxins (DTXs), which cause diarrhetic shellfish poisoning. The performance characteristics of the test were investigated, in comparison to reference methods (liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and/or bioassay), using both spiked and naturally contaminated shellfish. A portable reader was used to generate a qualitative result, indicating the absence or presence of OA-group toxins, at concentrations relevant to the maximum permitted level (MPL). Sample homogenates could be screened in 20 min (including extraction and assay time) for the presence of free toxins (OA, DTX1, DTX2). DTX3 detection could be included with the addition of a hydrolysis procedure. No matrix effects were observed from the species evaluated (mussels, scallops, oysters, and clams). Results from naturally contaminated samples (n = 72) indicated no false compliant results and no false noncompliant results at <50% MPL. Thus, the development of a new low-cost but highly effective tool for monitoring a range of important phycotoxins has been demonstrated. PMID:26287989

  13. Generation of a panel of high affinity antibodies and development of a biosensor-based immunoassay for the detection of okadaic acid in shellfish.

    PubMed

    Le Berre, Marie; Kilcoyne, Michelle; Kane, Marian

    2015-09-01

    Okadaic acid (OA) and its derivatives, DTX-1 and DTX-2, are marine biotoxins associated with diarrhetic shellfish poisoning. Routine monitoring of these toxins relies on the mouse bioassay. However, due to the technical unreliability and animal usage of this bioassay, there is always a need for convenient and reliable alternative assay methods. A panel of monoclonal antibodies against OA was generated and the most suitable was selected for biosensor-based assay development using surface plasmon resonance. The cross reactivity of the selected antibody with DTX-1 was found to be 73%, confirming the antibody suitability for both OA and DTX detection. The OA and derivative assay was designed as an inhibition assay covering the concentrations 1-75 ng/ml, with a sensitivity of 22.4 ng/ml. The assay was highly reproducible and preliminary validation showed no matrix interference from mussel extracts and good recovery of added standard in mussel extracts, with %CV of <9.3%. This assay could provide a useful and convenient screening tool for OA and its derivatives with a comprehensive extraction protocol for shellfish monitoring programmes. PMID:26169671

  14. Buying, Preparing, and Cooking Shellfish. Learning Activity Pack and Instructor's Guide 5.13c. Commercial Foods and Culinary Arts Competency-Based Series. Section 5: Basic Food Preparation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Studies in Vocational Education.

    This document consists of a learning activity packet (LAP) for the student and an instructor's guide for the teacher. The LAP is intended to acquaint occupational home economics students with the various market forms of shellfish and how to clean, prepare, and cook them. Illustrated information sheets and learning activities are provided in these…

  15. Poisoning - fish and shellfish

    MedlinePLUS

    ... contaminated waters. Scombroid poisoning usually occurs from large, dark meat fish such as tuna, mackerel, mahi mahi, and albacore. Because this poison develops after a fish is caught and dies, it does not matter where the fish is caught. The main factor ...

  16. Freezing Fish and Shellfish

    E-print Network

    Nickelson, Ranzell; Reddell, Annette

    1980-01-01

    them home. Place ice in the belly cavity of each fish and provide adequate ice between and around fish. The ice chest should have a false bottom to allow for drainage of melting ice and eliminate the possibility of fish floating in bloody, dirty... at about - 20 degrees F ( - 28 degrees C). Rapid freezing is important. In the initial stage of a slow freezing process, small ice crystals form within the tissue cells. As the freezing continues the size of the ice crystals increases until...

  17. Investigations into matrix components affecting the performance of the official bioassay reference method for quantitation of paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins in oysters.

    PubMed

    Turner, Andrew D; Dhanji-Rapkova, Monika; Algoet, Myriam; Suarez-Isla, Benjamin A; Cordova, Marco; Caceres, Catherine; Murphy, Cory J; Casey, Melanie; Lees, David N

    2012-02-01

    Significant differences previously observed in the determination of paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins (PSTs) in oysters using official method AOAC 2005.06 and 959.08 were investigated in detail with regard to possible matrix effects. Method AOAC 2005.06 gave results 2-3 times higher than the mouse bioassay method, 959.08, differences thought to be due to underestimation of PSTs by the mouse bioassay. In order to prove the cause of these large differences, work was conducted here to examine the presence and effects of matrix components on the performance of each of the two assays. A range of oyster, cockle and mussel samples were extracted using the AOAC 959.08 hydrochloric acid (HCl) extraction method and analysed for PSP by both MBA and LC-FLD. In addition, extracts were analysed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) for metals as well as being subjected to a range of nutritional testing methods. Whilst there was no evidence for effect of nutritional components on either assay, ICP-MS analysis revealed a relationship between samples exhibiting the largest differences in relative method performance, specifically those with the largest LC-FLD/MBA toxicity ratio, and samples containing the highest concentrations of zinc and manganese. In order to prove the potential effect of the metals on either the LC-FLD and/or MBA assays, HCl extracts of a range of shellfish were subjected to a number of matrix modifications. Firstly, a number of PSP-positive oyster samples were processed to reduce the concentrations of metals within the extracts, without significantly reducing the concentrations of PSTs. Secondly, a range of mussel and cockle extracts, plus a standard solution of saxitoxin di-hydrochloride were spiked at variable concentrations of zinc. All treated and non-treated extracts, plus a number of controls were subjected to ICP-MS, LC-FLD and MBA testing. Results proved the absence of any effect of metals on the performance of the LC-FLD, whilst showing a large suppressive effect of the metals on the MBA. As such, the results show the performance of the official MBA is potentially unsafe for application to the routine monitoring of PSP toxicity in oysters or in any other shellfish found to contain high concentrations of metal ions. PMID:22138287

  18. Inorganic carbon dynamics in the upwelling system off the Oregon coast and implications for commercial shellfish hatcheries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, J. M.; Hales, B. R.

    2010-12-01

    The increasing absorption of anthropogenic CO2 by the global ocean and concomitant decrease in pH will alter seawater carbonate chemistry in ways that may negatively impact calcifying organisms. In particular, the change in saturation state (?) of calcium carbonate minerals calcite and aragonite may be energetically unfavorable for shell formation while favoring shell dissolution. Eastern boundary upwelling systems may provide insights into how ecosystems respond to future conditions of ocean acidification when deep water with high dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), low pH and low ? is forced toward the surface. Mortality in commercial seed stock and reduced wild set of the oyster Crassostrea gigas in the northeast Pacific during 2005-2009 reinforced the need for understanding biological responses to acidified ocean water. In response, a long-term strategy to understand local carbonate chemistry dynamics, seasonal perturbations and the effects on development of calcifying bivalves was developed. At present, a time-series of pCO2 measurements was implemented in April 2010 in Netarts Bay, Oregon at Whiskey Creek Shellfish Hatchery (WCH). The intake sits at a depth of 0.5-8ft and water is pumped in at 100gpm. A line taken off the intake is run continuously through a thermosalinograph at approximately 1.5gpm into a showerhead style equilibrator in which the headspace is recirculated by aerating the water for enhanced gas exchange. CO2 in equilibrated air is analyzed by NDIR. Additionally two discrete samples of intake seawater were taken across tidal cycles weekly and analyzed for total CO2 (TCO2) according to the methods of Hales et al. (2004) and pCO2 for quality control. The pCO2 in the bay exhibits a diurnal cycle representative of daytime photosynthesis and nighttime respiration. However, the phasing and profiles of these cycles are dominated by tidal mixing and are affected by the introduction of high pCO2 water during upwelling events. Diurnal pCO2 during periods of low wind stress ranges from 100-700µatm. When strong equatorward winds induce upwelling, pCO2 levels exhibit a higher daily range of 300-2000µatm. The saturation state was calculated from the pCO2/TCO2 measurements of the discrete samples. The ? for calcite and aragonite ranged from 2.07 and 1.15 to 8.58 and 4.69 respectively from April through August. Increased pCO2 and decreased pH have been shown to negatively impact larval development in C. gigas (Kurihara, 2007). Periods of elevated pCO2 in May and June 2010 correlated with commercial losses at WCH. The use of precise pCO2 measurements in real time has proven to be a valuable tool for use in aquaculture. As a commercial practice WCH has elected to only use source water that is below empirical pCO2 thresholds for spawning and culturing larvae. This has resulted in continued production and cost saving in an industry crucial to coast economies. A continuous TCO2/pCO2 monitoring system will be integrated into this long time-series to constrain inorganic carbon providing insight into carbonate chemistry dynamics in Netarts Bay, effects of ocean acidification on bivalve development and possible water treatment approaches for commercial aquaculture.

  19. Effect of UV light on the inactivation of recombinant human adenovirus and murine norovirus seeded in seawater in shellfish depuration tanks.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Lucas A T; Nascimento, Mariana A; Barardi, Célia R M

    2015-03-01

    Shellfish depuration is a process that aims to eliminate pathogens from mollusk tissues. Seawater disinfection during the depuration process is important and ultraviolet (UV) light treatment is the most used method worldwide. Viral models are usually employed as surrogates of fastidious viruses in viability studies. The aim of this study was to employ methods based on green fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescence and plaque forming units to detect, respectively, recombinant adenovirus (rAdV-GFP) and murine norovirus (MNV) artificially seeded in environmental matrices. These assays were applied to assess the inactivation of rAdV-GFP and MNV in seawater in recirculation shellfish depuration tanks with and without UV light treatment. Kinetics of rAdV GFP-expression was previously measured by UV-spectrophotometer. Flow cytometry (FC), fluorescence microscopy (FM), and plaque assay were used to determine virus titer and detection limits. The influence of the environmental matrix on the performance of the methods was prior determined using either drinking water or filtered seawater seeded with rAdV-GFP. Disinfection of seeded seawater was evaluated with and without UV treatment. The time of 24-h post-infection was established as ideal for fluorescence detection on rAdV-GFP infected cells. FC showed lower sensitivity, when compared to FM, which was similar to plaque assay. Seawater disinfection on depuration tanks was promising and rAdV-GFP declined 99.99 % after 24 and 48 h with and without UV treatment, respectively. MNV was completely inactivated after 24 h in both treatments. As conclusion, the depuration tanks were effective to inactivate rAdV-GFP and MNV and the UV disinfection treatment accelerated the process. PMID:25528135

  20. [Can solar/geomagnetic activity restrict the occurrence of some shellfish poisoning outbreaks? The example of PSP caused by Gymnodinium catenatum at the Atlantic Portuguese coast].

    PubMed

    Vale, P

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic outbreaks of accumulation of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins in mussels attributed to Gymnodinium catenatum blooms displayed several of the highest inter-annual maxima coincidental with minima of the 11-year solar sunspot number (SSN) cycle. The monthly distribution of PSP was associated with low levels of the solar radio flux, a more quantitative approach than SSN for fluctuations in solar activity. A comparison between monthly distribution of PSP and other common biotoxins (okadaic acid (OA), dinophysistoxin-2 (DTX2) and amnesic shellfish poisoning (ASP) toxins) demonstrated that only PSP was significantly associated with low levels of radio flux (p < 0.01). PSP occurrence suggests a prior decline in solar activity could be required to act as a trigger, in a similar manner to a photoperiodic signal. The seasonal frequency increased towards autumn during the study period, which might be related to the progressive atmospheric cut-off of deleterious radiation associated with the seasonal change in solar declination, and might play an additional role in seasonal signal-triggering. PSP distribution was also associated with low levels of the geomagnetic index Aa. A comparison between monthly distribution of PSP and other common biotoxins, also demonstrated that only PSP was significantly associated with low levels of the Aa index (p < 0.01). In some years of SSN minima no significant PSP-outbreaks in mussels were detected. This was attributed to a steady rise in geomagnetic activity that could disrupt the triggering signal. Global distribution patterns show that hotspots for G. catenatum blooms are regions with deficient crustal magnetic anomalies. In addition to the variable magnetic field mostly of solar origin, static fields related to magnetized rocks in the crust and upper mantle might play a role in restricting worldwide geographic distribution. PMID:24455892

  1. COMPARISON OF GENKENSIA DEMISSA (DILLWYN) POPULATIONS IN RHODE ISLAND FRINGE MARSHES WITH VARYING NITROGEN LOADS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increased residential development in coastal watersheds has led to increases in anthropogenic nitrogen inputs into estuaries. Sessile bivalves are good candidate organisms to examine animal condition in nutrient-enriched areas because they contribute significantly to energy flow...

  2. Performance Characteristics of AOAC Method 2005.06 for the Determination of Paralytic Shellfish Toxins in Manila Clams, European Otter Clams, Grooved Carpet Shell Clams, Surf Clams, and Processed King Scallops.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Alison; Turner, Andrew D

    2015-01-01

    An approach was developed for the verification of method performance of the AOAC 2005.06 LC-fluorescence detector (FLD) method for determination of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins in bivalve shellfish. This was developed following advice published by the Analytical Laboratory Accreditation Criteria Committee and applied to shellfish species that had not been previously subjected to a full single-laboratory validation scheme. The refined approach was developed following the need to assess performance in a number of shellfish species infrequently monitored through the UK statutory monitoring program, while reducing the impact and cost of the studies, most notably in terms of the use of valuable reference standards. The species assessed were manila clams (Ruditapes philippinarum), European otter clams (Lutraria lutraria), grooved carpet shell clams (R. decussatus), surf clams (Spisula solida), and king scallops (Pecten maximus) presented as adductor only or adductor plus roe. The method was assessed for sensitivity in terms of LOD and LOQ, toxin recovery, and method precision in each species. It incorporated the PSP toxins deemed toxic and/or prevalent in UK samples and commercially available as certified reference standards. The toxins studied included GTX1-5, dcSTX, STX, C1&2, and NEO. The toxins dcGTX2&3 were included for surf clams due to the prevalence of these toxins in this species as a result of toxin decarbamoylation. Method performance targets were met for each of the characteristics investigated. Consequently, the method was deemed fit for purpose for the screening and quantification of these clam and scallop species for PSP toxins by AOAC Method 2005.06 LC-FLD. PMID:26024751

  3. [Analysis of the source, potential biological toxicity of heavy metals in the surface sediments from shellfish culture mudflats of Rudong Country, Jiangsu Province].

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Wang, Yun-long; Jiang, Mei; Yuan, Qi; Shen, Xin-qiang

    2012-08-01

    Concentrations of six heavy metals were measured in the surface sediments from shellfish culture mudflats of Rudong Country, Jiangsu Province in 2010. The geo-accumulation index (Igeo) was employed to evaluate the pollution level of heavy metals and the results showed that the heavy metal contamination could be divided into three groups: no contamination (Igeo), as in the case of Cu, Cd, Hg; light to moderate contamination (0 < Igeo, < 1), as in the case of Pb, As; and moderate contamination (1 < Igeo, < 2), as in the case of Zn. The pollution level of heavy metals followed the order of Zn > As > Pb > Cd > Cu > Hg. The potential biological toxicity was analyzed using sediment quality guidelines (SQG), as the guideline values, Cd showed no potential biological toxicity, As showed occasional potential biological toxicity in all sampling stations, Cu, Pb, Zn, Hg showed potential biological toxicity in some sampling stations, whereas Zn was the only one showing frequent potential biological toxicity in some sampling stations. Sigma TUs revealed that only one of the sampling stations showed significant acute toxicity, whereas the others showed no acute toxicity. Analysis of heavy metal contamination source through principal component analysis (PCA) revealed that the contribution rates of the top two principal components were 37.56% and 33.71%, respectively, indicating that the two main sources of heavy metals were industrial waste water and pollution from transportation and shipping. PMID:23213880

  4. Development of the analysis of fecal stanols in the oyster Crassostrea gigas and identification of fecal contamination in shellfish harvesting areas.

    PubMed

    Harrault, Loïc; Jardé, Emilie; Jeanneau, Laurent; Petitjean, Patrice

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this work was to study the effects of washing and purification steps on qualitative and quantitative analysis of fecal stanols in the oyster Crassostrea gigas using either single or a combination of lipid purification steps on silica gel or aminopropyl bonded silica gel (NH2) or a washing step. Among the three analytical pathways compared, the two including water extraction or NH2 purification did not lead to higher recoveries and decreased repeatabilities of extractions compared to the single purification on silica gel. This latter led to similar recoveries (ca. 80%) and repeatabilities (ca. 10%) for both spiked standards (coprostanol and sitostanol). This analytical pathway has been applied to oysters collected in a harvesting area in Brittany (France) where fecal contaminations are important and allowed to quantify eight stanols in oysters. The relative proportions of fecal stanols of these oysters were combined with principal component analysis in order to investigate the usefulness of their stanol fingerprints to record a fecal contamination and to distinguish its source between human, porcine and bovine contaminations. Oysters non-fecally contaminated by Escherichia coli did not present specific stanol fingerprints while oysters fecally contaminated had a bovine fingerprint, suggesting a contamination of these samples by bovine sources. As a consequence, the method developed here allows the use of stanol fingerprints of oysters as a microbial source tracking tool that can be applied to shellfish harvesting areas subjected to fecal contaminations in order to identify the different sources of contamination and improve watershed management. PMID:24771549

  5. Histopathological survey of potential biomarkers for the assessment of contaminant related biological effects in species of fish and shellfish collected from Kuwait Bay, Arabian Gulf.

    PubMed

    Stentiford, G D; Massoud, M S; Al-Mudhhi, S; Al-Sarawi, M A; Al-Enezi, M; Lyons, B P

    2014-07-01

    The marine environment in Kuwait is dominated by Kuwait Bay, a shallow, depositional habitat vital for the breeding and propagation of marine organisms. The bay receives effluent inputs from industrial centres, ports, sewage outflows along with discharges from power and desalination plants. The major classes of pollutant discharged into the bay include petroleum hydrocarbons, metals, nutrients, cooling water and hyper-saline water. Further, the bay has been historically impacted by a deliberate release of oil and contamination with ordnance and shipwrecks during the 1991 Gulf war. With an aim to establish an integrated pollution effects monitoring programme in Kuwait, this paper describes the application of a quality assured approach to conduct a histopathology baseline survey in oriental sole (Synaptura orientalis) and the large-toothed flounder (Pseudorhombus arsius), which are two potential sentinel flatfish species present in the Arabian Gulf. Liver and gonadal histopathology revealed a range of pathologies similar to those previously observed in European and American pollution effects surveys that utilise flatfish (including pathology markers indicative of possible carcinogenesis and endocrine disruption). Further, we extended these studies to invertebrates (Jinga prawn, Metapenaeus affinis and the grooved tiger prawn, Penaeus semisulcatus) found within the Arabian Gulf. Such baseline data is essential before attempts are made to develop integrated monitoring programmes that aim to assess the health of fish and shellfish in relation to chemical contamination. PMID:24680107

  6. Confirmation of Pinnatoxins and Spirolides in Shellfish and Passive Samplers from Catalonia (Spain) by Liquid Chromatography Coupled with Triple Quadrupole and High-Resolution Hybrid Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    García-Altares, María; Casanova, Alexis; Bane, Vaishali; Diogène, Jorge; Furey, Ambrose; de la Iglesia, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic imines are lipophilic marine toxins that bioaccumulate in seafood. Their structure comprises a cyclic-imino moiety, responsible for acute neurotoxicity in mice. Cyclic imines have not been linked yet to human poisonings and are not regulated in Europe, although the European Food Safety Authority requires more data to perform a conclusive risk assessment for consumers. This work presents the first detection of pinnatoxin G (PnTX-G) in Spain and 13-desmethyl spirolide C (SPX-1) in shellfish from Catalonia (Spain, NW Mediterranean Sea). Cyclic imines were found at low concentrations (2 to 60 µg/kg) in 13 samples of mussels and oysters (22 samples analyzed). Pinnatoxin G has been also detected in 17 seawater samples (out of 34) using solid phase adsorption toxin tracking devices (0.3 to 0.9 µg/kg-resin). Pinnatoxin G and SPX-1 were confirmed with both low and high resolution (<2 ppm) mass spectrometry by comparison of the response with that from reference standards. For other analogs without reference standards, we applied a strategy combining low resolution MS with a triple quadrupole mass analyzer for a fast and reliable screening, and high resolution MS LTQ Orbitrap® for unambiguous confirmation. The advantages and limitations of using high resolution MS without reference standards were discussed. PMID:24960460

  7. A Feedback Mechanism to Control Apoptosis Occurs in the Digestive Gland of the Oyster Crassostrea gigas Exposed to the Paralytic Shellfish Toxins Producer Alexandrium catenella

    PubMed Central

    Rolland, Jean-Luc; Medhioub, Walid; Vergnes, Agnes; Abi-khalil, Celina; Savar, Véronique; Abadie, Eric; Masseret, Estelle; Amzil, Zouher; Laabir, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the effect of Paralytic Shellfish Toxins (PSTs) accumulation in the digestive gland of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, we experimentally exposed individual oysters for 48 h to a PSTs producer, the dinoflagellate Alexandrium catenella. In comparison to the effect of the non-toxic Alexandrium tamarense, on the eight apoptotic related genes tested, Bax and BI.1 were significantly upregulated in oysters exposed 48 h to A. catenella. Among the five detoxification related genes tested, the expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP1A) was shown to be correlated with toxin concentration in the digestive gland of oysters exposed to the toxic dinoflagellate. Beside this, we observed a significant increase in ROS production, a decrease in caspase-3/7 activity and normal percentage of apoptotic cells in this tissue. Taken together, these results suggest a feedback mechanism, which may occur in the digestive gland where BI.1 could play a key role in preventing the induction of apoptosis by PSTs. Moreover, the expression of CYP1A, Bax and BI.1 were found to be significantly correlated to the occurrence of natural toxic events, suggesting that the expression of these genes together could be used as biomarker to assess the biological responses of oysters to stress caused by PSTs. PMID:25257788

  8. The interaction of human microbial pathogens, particulate material and nutrients in estuarine environments and their impacts on recreational and shellfish waters.

    PubMed

    Malham, Shelagh K; Rajko-Nenow, Paulina; Howlett, Eleanor; Tuson, Karen E; Perkins, Tracy L; Pallett, Denise W; Wang, Hui; Jago, Colin F; Jones, Davey L; McDonald, James E

    2014-09-20

    Anthropogenic activities have increased the load of faecal bacteria, pathogenic viruses and nutrients in rivers, estuaries and coastal areas through point and diffuse sources such as sewage discharges and agricultural runoff. These areas are used by humans for both commercial and recreational activities and are therefore protected by a range of European Directives. If water quality declines in these zones, significant economic losses can occur. Identifying the sources of pollution, however, is notoriously difficult due to the ephemeral nature of discharges, their diffuse source, and uncertainties associated with transport and transformation of the pollutants through the freshwater-marine interface. Further, significant interaction between nutrients, microorganisms and particulates can occur in the water column making prediction of the fate and potential infectivity of human pathogenic organisms difficult to ascertain. This interaction is most prevalent in estuarine environments due to the formation of flocs (suspended sediment) at the marine-freshwater interface. A range of physical, chemical and biological processes can induce the co-flocculation of microorganisms, organic matter and mineral particles resulting in pathogenic organisms becoming potentially protected from a range of biotic (e.g. predation) and abiotic stresses (e.g. UV, salinity). These flocs contain and retain macro- and micro- nutrients allowing the potential survival, growth and transfer of pathogenic organisms to commercially sensitive areas (e.g. beaches, shellfish harvesting waters). The flocs can either be transported directly to the coastal environment or can become deposited in the estuary forming cohesive sediments where pathogens can survive for long periods. Especially in response to storms, these sediments can be subsequently remobilised releasing pulses of potential pathogenic organisms back into the water column leading to contamination of marine waters long after the initial contamination event occurred. Further work, however, is still required to understand and predict the potential human infectivity of pathogenic organisms alongside the better design of early warning systems and surveillance measures for risk assessment purposes. PMID:25043898

  9. High Specificity of a Quantitative PCR Assay Targeting a Saxitoxin Gene for Monitoring Toxic Algae Associated with Paralytic Shellfish Toxins in the Yellow Sea.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan; Yu, Ren-Cheng; Murray, Shauna A; Chen, Jian-Hua; Kang, Zhen-Jun; Zhang, Qing-Chun; Kong, Fan-Zhou; Zhou, Ming-Jiang

    2015-10-15

    The identification of core genes involved in the biosynthesis of saxitoxin (STX) offers a great opportunity to detect toxic algae associated with paralytic shellfish toxins (PST). In the Yellow Sea (YS) in China, both toxic and nontoxic Alexandrium species are present, which makes it a difficult issue to specifically monitor PST-producing toxic algae. In this study, a quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay targeting sxtA4, a domain in the sxt gene cluster that encodes a unique enzyme involved in STX biosynthesis, was applied to analyze samples collected from the YS in spring of 2012. The abundance of two toxic species within the Alexandrium tamarense species complex, i.e., A. fundyense and A. pacificum, was also determined with TaqMan-based qPCR assays, and PSTs in net-concentrated phytoplankton samples were analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a fluorescence detector. It was found that the distribution of the sxtA4 gene in the YS was consistent with the toxic algae and PSTs, and the quantitation results of sxtA4 correlated well with the abundance of the two toxic species (r = 0.857). These results suggested that the two toxic species were major PST producers during the sampling season and that sxtA-based qPCR is a promising method to detect toxic algae associated with PSTs in the YS. The correlation between PST levels and sxtA-based qPCR results, however, was less significant (r = 0.552), implying that sxtA-based qPCR is not accurate enough to reflect the toxicity of PST-producing toxic algae. The combination of an sxtA-based qPCR assay and chemical means might be a promising method for monitoring toxic algal blooms. PMID:26231652

  10. Profiles of paralytic shellfish toxins in bivalves of low and elevated toxicities following exposure to Gymnodinium catenatum blooms in Portuguese estuarine and coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Botelho, Maria João; Vale, Carlos; Ferreira, João Gomes

    2015-11-01

    Profiles of paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) were examined in 405 composite samples of Mytilus spp., Cerastoderma edule, Donax trunculus and Spisula solida collected between 2007 and 2012 from natural production areas in two estuaries (Aveiro and Mondego), two coastal lagoons (Óbidos and Formosa), and three open coastal areas (Aguda, Comporta and Culatra). Toxin concentrations were obtained from the biotoxin monitoring programme database. Episodes of PST toxicity in Portugal have been associated with Gymnodinium catenatum blooms. Toxin profiles for each species showed no trend over the surveyed years. In general, profiles differ only slightly among areas, except for Óbidos. However, toxin profiles in bivalves varied between low and elevated toxicities, corresponding to below and above the PST regulatory limit, respectively. The ratio R1=(C1+2):B1, which were the main toxins produced by G. catenatum cells, decreased considerably between elevated and low toxicity cockles, indicating the elimination of C1+2 or conversion of compounds into B1. R2=[(dcSTX)+(dcGTX2+3)]:[(C1+2)+(B1)], which represents the ratio of minor to major toxins in G. catenatum cells, increased substantially in wedge clams (D. trunculus) of low toxicity and less markedly in cockles (C. edule) and mussels (Mytilus spp.). These differences are interpreted as the predominance of a biotransformation phase after exposure to the algal bloom. The toxin profile of surf clams (S. solida) was dominated by decarbamoyl compounds, reflecting intense biotransformation during exposure to blooms. The higher ratio R2 in low toxicity samples suggests that elimination of the produced decarbamoyl toxins was slower than biotransformation. PMID:25616737

  11. Development of a Reverse Transcription-PCR–DNA Enzyme Immunoassay for Detection of “Norwalk-Like” Viruses and Hepatitis A Virus in Stool and Shellfish

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Kellogg J.; Neill, Frederick H.; Le Guyader, Françoise; Estes, Mary K.; Atmar, Robert L.

    2001-01-01

    Outbreaks of food- and waterborne gastroenteritis are being increasingly reported throughout the world. The analysis of environmental samples by newer diagnostic techniques such as reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) amplification of nucleic acid has begun to identify human enteric viruses (predominantly “Norwalk-like” viruses [NLVs]) as the cause of many of these outbreaks. To streamline NLV detection from environmental samples such as shellfish, we have developed an RT-PCR–oligoprobe amplification and detection method using several new procedures that enable confirmed RT-PCR amplification and product detection in 1 day. The new steps include replacing reverse transcriptase and Taq polymerase with rTth polymerase, a heat-stable enzyme that functions as both a reverse transcriptase and DNA polymerase, in a single-tube, single-buffer, elevated temperature reaction. An internal standard Norwalk virus (NV) RNA control is added to each RT-PCR to identify sample inhibition, and thermolabile uracil N-glycosylase is incorporated into the reaction to prevent PCR product carryover contamination. Finally, RT-PCR-generated amplicons are detected in microtiter wells using virus-specific biotinylated oligoprobes in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based format. The DNA enzyme immunoassay is based on the capture of PCR product by biotinylated probes fixed onto individual streptavidin-coated wells. Using this method, low levels of NV were detected in stool and both NLV and hepatitis A virus were detected in bivalve mollusks following bioaccumulation. The method also successfully detected NLV in oysters implicated in an outbreak of NLV gastroenteritis. This method dramatically decreases the time needed for analysis and is amenable to automation. PMID:11157239

  12. Determining the Advantages, Costs, and Trade-Offs of a Novel Sodium Channel Mutation in the Copepod Acartia hudsonica to Paralytic Shellfish Toxins (PST)

    PubMed Central

    Finiguerra, Michael; Avery, David E.; Dam, Hans G.

    2015-01-01

    The marine copepod Acartia hudsonica was shown to be adapted to dinoflagellate prey, Alexandrium fundyense, which produce paralytic shellfish toxins (PST). Adaptation to PSTs in other organisms is caused by a mutation in the sodium channel. Recently, a mutation in the sodium channel in A. hudsonica was found. In this study, we rigorously tested for advantages, costs, and trade-offs associated with the mutant isoform of A. hudsonica under toxic and non-toxic conditions. We combined fitness with wild-type: mutant isoform ratio measurements on the same individual copepod to test our hypotheses. All A. hudsonica copepods express both the wild-type and mutant sodium channel isoforms, but in different proportions; some individuals express predominantly mutant (PMI) or wild-type isoforms (PWI), while most individuals express relatively equal amounts of each (EI). There was no consistent pattern of improved performance as a function of toxin dose for egg production rate (EPR), ingestion rate (I), and gross growth efficiency (GGE) for individuals in the PMI group relative to individuals in the PWI expression group. Neither was there any evidence to indicate a fitness benefit to the mutant isoform at intermediate toxin doses. No clear advantage under toxic conditions was associated with the mutation. Using a mixed-diet approach, there was also no observed relationship between individual wild-type: mutant isoform ratios and among expression groups, on both toxic and non-toxic diets, for eggs produced over three days. Lastly, expression of the mutant isoform did not mitigate the negative effects of the toxin. That is, the reductions in EPR from a toxic to non-toxic diet for copepods were independent of expression groups. Overall, the results did not support our hypotheses; the mutant sodium channel isoform does not appear to be related to adaptation to PST in A. hudsonica. Other potential mechanisms responsible for the adaptation are discussed. PMID:26075900

  13. Development of a reverse transcription-PCR-DNA enzyme immunoassay for detection of "Norwalk-like" viruses and hepatitis A virus in stool and shellfish.

    PubMed

    Schwab, K J; Neill, F H; Le Guyader, F; Estes, M K; Atmar, R L

    2001-02-01

    Outbreaks of food- and waterborne gastroenteritis are being increasingly reported throughout the world. The analysis of environmental samples by newer diagnostic techniques such as reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) amplification of nucleic acid has begun to identify human enteric viruses (predominantly "Norwalk-like" viruses [NLVs]) as the cause of many of these outbreaks. To streamline NLV detection from environmental samples such as shellfish, we have developed an RT-PCR-oligoprobe amplification and detection method using several new procedures that enable confirmed RT-PCR amplification and product detection in 1 day. The new steps include replacing reverse transcriptase and Taq polymerase with rTth polymerase, a heat-stable enzyme that functions as both a reverse transcriptase and DNA polymerase, in a single-tube, single-buffer, elevated temperature reaction. An internal standard Norwalk virus (NV) RNA control is added to each RT-PCR to identify sample inhibition, and thermolabile uracil N-glycosylase is incorporated into the reaction to prevent PCR product carryover contamination. Finally, RT-PCR-generated amplicons are detected in microtiter wells using virus-specific biotinylated oligoprobes in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based format. The DNA enzyme immunoassay is based on the capture of PCR product by biotinylated probes fixed onto individual streptavidin-coated wells. Using this method, low levels of NV were detected in stool and both NLV and hepatitis A virus were detected in bivalve mollusks following bioaccumulation. The method also successfully detected NLV in oysters implicated in an outbreak of NLV gastroenteritis. This method dramatically decreases the time needed for analysis and is amenable to automation. PMID:11157239

  14. Partitioning of paralytic shellfish toxins in sub-cellular fractions of the digestive gland of the cockle Cerastoderma edule: Changes under post-bloom natural conditions.

    PubMed

    Botelho, Maria João; Raimundo, Joana; Vale, Carlos; Ferreira, João Gomes

    2014-06-01

    Concentrations of paralytic shellfish toxins (C1+2, B1, dcGTX2+3, dcSTX, GTX2+3 and STX) were determined by LC-FLD in composite samples of digestive glands of the cockle Cerastoderma edule and in each sub-cellular particulate fractions obtained after differential centrifugation (nuclei+debris, mitochondria, lysosomes and microsomes). The specimens were sampled during the exposure to a bloom of Gymnodinium catenatum (day 0) and in the subsequent 8, 12, 14, 19, 21 and 25 days under natural depuration conditions. Toxin profiles of digestive glands were dominated by C1+2 followed by B1 and dcGTX2+3, although the proportion between C1+2 and B1 contents decreased with the time, indicating a slower elimination of B1. All toxins, except GTX2+3 and STX, were quantified in the four sub-cellular fractions. The content of the quantified toxins decreased most markedly in nuclei+debris and microsomal fractions, during the first eight and 12 days, respectively. Conversely, different patterns were observed among toxins in mitochondrial and lysosomal fractions. The less accentuated decreases of dcGTX2+3 and dcSTX contents in the mitochondrial fraction may have resulted from the conversion of other toxins, like C1+2 and B1, associated with enzymatic activities in that fraction. The largest discrepancy was registered in lysosomal fraction for B1, since its content increased after eight days of post-bloom conditions. Input of B1 may come from the conversion of other toxins, like the abundant B2 and C1+2. These transformations are associated to the major role of lysosomes in the intra-cellular digestive process of materials acquired through vesicular transport. PMID:24736027

  15. Photocatalytic properties of nanocrystalline titanium dioxide films in the degradation of domoic acid in aqueous solution: potential for use in molluscan shellfish biotoxin depuration facilities.

    PubMed

    Djaoued, Y; Robichaud, J; Thibodeau, M; Balaji, S; Tchoukanova, N; Bates, S S

    2009-02-01

    Domoic acid (DA) is a water-soluble marine neurotoxin produced and released by certain species of the diatom genus Pseudo-nitzschia. Present in coastal waters, it can be a threat to public health and marine life, and can result in severe economic losses to the molluscan shellfish and crustacean harvesting industries. Here we report on the efficiency of nanocrystalline (NC) titania (TiO(2)) thin films used as a photocatalyst in the ultraviolet light photodegradation of DA. Titanium dioxide thin films produced by a sol-gel dip-coating method in the presence of polyethylene glycol of different molecular weights (200, 400 and 600) were deposited on glass substrates and crystallised at 90 degrees C. The films were characterised using spectroscopic ellipsometry, Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. The photocatalytic activity measurements were carried out by immersing the NC TiO(2) films in a DA solution (2500 ng ml(-1)) and then exposing them for various times at room temperature to UVA irradiation (lambda = approximately 350 nm). The degradation of DA, quantified by HPLC analysis, was not significant when using daylight or ultraviolet light irradiation alone, whereas the NC TiO(2) films prepared at low temperature proved to be a very efficient photocatalyst when used in conjunction with UVA light. The effectiveness of the photodegradation was improved by increasing molecular weight of polyethylene glycol, which increased the thickness of the film. The presence, transformation and degradation of three DA isomers were observed. The approach may eventually be practical for destroying DA in seawater used by aquaculture industry depuration facilities. PMID:19680896

  16. Metal-organic framework UiO-66 modified magnetite@silica core-shell magnetic microspheres for magnetic solid-phase extraction of domoic acid from shellfish samples.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenmin; Yan, Zhiming; Gao, Jia; Tong, Ping; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Lan

    2015-06-26

    Fe3O4@SiO2@UiO-66 core-shell magnetic microspheres were synthesized and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, vibrating sample magnetometry, nitrogen adsorption porosimetry and zeta potential analyzer. The synthesized Fe3O4@SiO2@UiO-66 microspheres were first used for magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) of domoic acid (DA) in shellfish samples. Combined with high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS), a fast, simple and sensitive method for the determination of DA was established successfully. Under the optimized conditions, the developed method showed short analysis time, good linearity (r(2) = 0.9990), low limit of detection (1.45 pg mL(-1); S/N = 3:1), low limit of quantification (4.82 pg mL(-1); S/N = 10:1), and good extraction repeatability (RSD ? 5.0%; n = 5). Real shellfish samples were processed using the developed method, and trace level of DA was detected. The results demonstrate that Fe3O4@SiO2@UiO-66 core-shell magnetic microspheres are the promising sorbents for rapid and efficient extraction of polar analytes from complex biological samples. PMID:25997847

  17. Analysis of diarrhetic shellfish poisoning toxins and pectenotoxin-2 in the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhihong; Broadwater, Margaret H; Ramsdell, John S

    2015-10-16

    Toxins produced by harmful algae are associated with detrimental health effects and mass mortalities of marine mammals. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is generally used to confirm the presence of algal toxins in marine mammals. Sample preparation and LC-MS/MS methods for the determination of three diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) toxins (okadaic acid, OA; dinophysistoxin-1, DTX1; dinophysistoxin-2, DTX2) and pectenotoxin-2 (PTX2) in bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) urine and tissue samples were evaluated using spike-and-recovery tests. Sample clean-up with either reversed-phase silica or polymeric solid-phase extraction (SPE) reduced interference of sample matrices and improved toxin recoveries, with polymeric SPE showing higher sample loading capacity. LC separation on Xbridge C18 columns using acetonitrile/water gradient elutions with ammonia as the additive was chosen for its high detectivity and sensitivity in the MS detection of DSP toxins in negative ion mode. The retention times of OA, DTX1, and DTX2, separated as negative ions, increased with LC column temperature while the retention time of PTX2, separated as the neutral molecule, was weakly affected. At the same column temperature, retention times of OA, DTX1, and DTX2 gradually increased as the mobile phases aged while the retention time of PTX2 remained unchanged; higher column temperatures resulted in a greater increase in the retention time of each DSP toxin with mobile phase aging. Average recoveries of the 4 toxins in bottlenose dolphin samples ranged from 80% to 130% with relative standard deviations of less than 15% using the LC mobile phases prepared within one week at a column temperature of 30°C or 40°C. The preferred column temperature was 30°C, as the retention times of DSP toxins were less affected by mobile phase aging at this temperature. The limit of detection of each toxin analyzed in bottlenose dolphin samples was 2.8 ng/g or less in tissue samples and 0.7 ng/ml or less in urine. PMID:26381568

  18. Paralytic shellfish toxins in the sea scallop Placopecten magellanicus on Georges Bank: Implications for an offshore roe-on and whole scallop fishery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGrasse, Stacey; Vanegas, Camilo; Conrad, Stephen

    2014-05-01

    To protect public health from the potential risk of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) in sea scallops, Placopecten magellanicus, from the Atlantic offshore U.S. waters of Georges Bank, harvesting of roe-on or whole scallops is banned. Only adductor muscles may be sold if harvested from Georges Bank, Gulf of Maine, or the PSP closure areas as far west as 71° West Longitude. Given the limited toxicity data available for sea scallops from this region both prior to and subsequent to implementation of this management strategy, this study sought a more extensive spatial and temporal evaluation of sea scallop gonad and viscera toxicities that would inform management decisions related to the roe-on and whole scallop fishery. Both overall toxicity and toxin composition were measured for sea scallop gonads and viscera collected from 232 stations in 2007 and 23 in 2010. Overall toxicity was assessed using two screening methods: field-deployable Jellett Rapid Tests (JRT) and quantitative, laboratory-based receptor binding assays (in 2007). Additionally, a quantitative liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (LC-FD) method was used to determine toxin composition and overall toxicity (in 2010). The at-sea qualitative JRT screening tool results, whereby a positive indicated the sample contained at least 40 ?g saxitoxin (STX) equivalents 100 g-1, were often inconsistent with results obtained using the quantitative methods. Sea scallop viscera toxicity represented the majority of toxin load in the organism and was often in excess of the regulatory guidance level. Sea scallop gonads accounted for a small percentage of total toxicity, but at times reached unsafe levels. Toxin composition in both the gonads and viscera was dominated by STX and gonyautoxin 2/3, as has been reported in previous studies. No predictive indices of gonad toxicity were found. Results at this time do not support a roe-on or whole scallop fishery on Georges Bank. While access restrictions to whole scallops on Georges Bank are unlikely to change based on these results, it seems plausible that a management strategy requiring at-sea testing of scallop gonads for PSP may be necessary in order for a safe roe-on scallop fishery from this region to be feasible.

  19. AL ASK A SHELLFISH FISHERIES Alaska Shellfish Fisheries

    E-print Network

    king crab Pribilof Islands 0 0 1,179 Unknown Not overfishing Overfished Saint Lawrence Island 0 0 45 Unknown Not overfishing Undefined Saint Matthews Island 0 0 1,995 Unknown Not overfishing Rebuilding Not overfishing Undefined Bristol Bay 7,895 8,303 7,125 Unknown Not overfishing Not overfished Norton Sound 175

  20. Interspecific comparison of the mechanical properties of mussel byssus.

    PubMed

    Brazee, Shanna L; Carrington, Emily

    2006-12-01

    Byssally tethered mussels are found in a variety of habitats, including rocky intertidal, salt marsh, subtidal, and hydrothermal vents. One key to the survival of mussels in these communities is a secure attachment, achieved by the production of byssal threads. Although many studies have detailed the unique biomechanical properties of byssal threads, only a few prevalent species have been examined. This study assesses the variation in the mechanical properties of byssus in a broad range of mussel species from diverse environments, including intertidal and subtidal Mytilus edulis, Modiolus modiolus, Geukensia demissa, Bathymodiolus thermophilus, and Dreissena polymorpha. A tensometer was used to measure quasi-static and dynamic mechanical properties of individual threads, and several aspects of morphology were quantified. The results indicate that thread mechanical properties vary among mussel species, and several novel properties were observed. For example, of the species examined, D. polymorpha threads were the strongest, stiffest, least resilient, and fastest to recover after partial deformation. Threads of M. modiolus were characterized by the presence of two distinct yield regions prior to tensile failure. This comparative study not only provides insight into the ecological limitations and evolution of mussels, but also suggests new models for the design of novel biomimetic polymers. PMID:17179385

  1. Foundation species' overlap enhances biodiversity and multifunctionality from the patch to landscape scale in southeastern United States salt marshes.

    PubMed

    Angelini, Christine; van der Heide, Tjisse; Griffin, John N; Morton, Joseph P; Derksen-Hooijberg, Marlous; Lamers, Leon P M; Smolders, Alfons J P; Silliman, Brian R

    2015-07-22

    Although there is mounting evidence that biodiversity is an important and widespread driver of ecosystem multifunctionality, much of this research has focused on small-scale biodiversity manipulations. Hence, which mechanisms maintain patches of enhanced biodiversity in natural systems and if these patches elevate ecosystem multifunctionality at both local and landscape scales remain outstanding questions. In a 17 month experiment conducted within southeastern United States salt marshes, we found that patches of enhanced biodiversity and multifunctionality arise only where habitat-forming foundation species overlap--i.e. where aggregations of ribbed mussels (Geukensia demissa) form around cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora) stems. By empirically scaling up our experimental results to the marsh platform at 12 sites, we further show that mussels--despite covering only approximately 1% of the marsh surface--strongly enhance five distinct ecosystem functions, including decomposition, primary production and water infiltration rate, at the landscape scale. Thus, mussels create conditions that support the co-occurrence of high densities of functionally distinct organisms within cordgrass and, in doing so, elevate salt marsh multifunctionality from the patch to landscape scale. Collectively, these findings suggest that patterns in foundation species' overlap drive variation in biodiversity and ecosystem functioning within and across natural ecosystems.We therefore argue that foundation species should be integrated in our conceptual understanding of forces that moderate biodiversity--ecosystem functioning relationships, approaches for conserving species diversity and strategies to improve the multifunctionality of degraded ecosystems. PMID:26136442

  2. Hemigrapsus sanguineus in Long Island salt marshes: experimental evaluation of the interactions between an invasive crab and resident ecosystem engineers

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Alexa M.; Furman, Bradley T.; Carroll, John M.

    2014-01-01

    The invasive Asian shore crab, Hemigrapsus sanguineus, has recently been observed occupying salt marshes, a novel environment for this crab species. As it invades this new habitat, it is likely to interact with a number of important salt marsh species. To understand the potential effects of H. sanguineus on this ecosystem, interactions between this invasive crab and important salt marsh ecosystem engineers were examined. Laboratory experiments demonstrated competition for burrows between H. sanguineus and the native fiddler crab, Uca pugilator. Results indicate that H. sanguineus is able to displace an established fiddler crab from its burrow. Feeding experiments revealed that the presence of H. sanguineus has a significantly negative impact on the number as well as the biomass of ribbed mussels (Geukensia demissa) consumed by the green crab, Carcinus maenas, although this only occurred at high predator densities. In addition, when both crabs foraged together, there was a significant shift in the size of mussels consumed. These interactions suggests that H. sanguineus may have long-term impacts and wide-ranging negative effects on the saltmarsh ecosystem. PMID:25071995

  3. FISH AND SHELLFISH what's inside

    E-print Network

    the Fire, 3 Grilled Spiny Lobster Tails, 4 Whitefish in Foil, 4 Charcoal Grilled Red Snapper Steaks, 4 Savory Grilled Soft-Shell Crabs, 8 Sesame Rainbow Trout, 8 Boiled Lobster, 10 Charcoal Broiled Scallops and the fire is ready. Make the charcoal layer slightly wider than the food to be cooked on the grill. Wood

  4. MFR PAPER 1300 Shellfish Diseases

    E-print Network

    , and metazoan parasitic and infectious agents. In addition, predators, toxic agents, and fouling organisms produce seri- ous economic losses. The specialized problems ofshellfish hatcheries are discussed problems, some of which overlap with fish diseases. One problem is that the molluscan bivalves are filter

  5. Levels of total arsenic in edible fish and shellfish obtained from two coastal sectors of the Atacama Desert in the north of Chile: use of non-migratory marine species as bioindicators of sea environmental pollution.

    PubMed

    Cornejo-Ponce, Lorena; Lienqueo, Hugo H; Arriaza, Bernardo T

    2011-01-01

    The Camarones (CB) and Vitor (VB) Bays are situated in the middle of Atacama Desert, and their economies are based on activities entirely associated with the extraction of marine produce. The aim of this study was to determine the total arsenic content in three species of fish and seven species of shellfish from these two bays. The quantification of the total arsenic content in these products was performed by Hydride-Generation Atomic Absorption Spectrometry, HG-AAS. The results showed that marine species associated with the CB sector had higher total arsenic levels than the same species in the area of VB, a finding attributed to much higher total arsenic concentrations in the water and soils of CB than VB. The species with the highest total arsenic concentration was the Venus antique (7.50 mg kg (-1)) from the CB, and the lowest total arsenic content was found in Cheilodactylidae variegatus (0.34 mg kg(-1)) from VB. PMID:21879860

  6. An innovative method based on quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe extraction coupled to desorption electrospray ionization-high resolution mass spectrometry for screening the presence of paralytic shellfish toxins in clams.

    PubMed

    Mattarozzi, Monica; Bianchi, Federica; Milioli, Marco; Cavazza, Antonella; Careri, Maria

    2016-01-15

    The capabilities of desorption electrospray ionization-high resolution mass spectrometry (DESI-HRMS) were tested for screening the presence of some paralytic shellfish toxins in clams. A quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe (QuEChERS) approach is proposed for sample clean-up. QuEChERS extraction was optimized by using a full factorial design followed by the multicriteria method of the desirability functions. Quantitation limits in the microgram per kilogram range proved reliability of the method for the detection of the investigated toxins in accordance to the rules laid down by European legislation. The optimized QuEChERS-DESI-HRMS based-method allowed for a rapid reliable screening of the investigated compounds at levels of interest, thus being useful for high-throughput analyses. PMID:26592627

  7. Results of a European interlaboratory method validation study for the quantitative determination of lipophilic marine biotoxins in raw and cooked shellfish based on high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Part I: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    These, Anja; Klemm, Christine; Nausch, Ingo; Uhlig, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    A European interlaboratory collaborative study was conducted to validate a method for the quantitative determination of lipophilic marine biotoxins based on high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. During this study, the diarrhetic shellfish poisoning toxins okadaic acid, dinophysis toxin1 and 2 including their esters, the azaspiracids 1-3, pectenotoxin2, and the yessotoxins were investigated at concentration levels near the limit of quantification and near the legal limit. Naturally contaminated blue mussels, both raw and cooked and spiked extracts of clams and oysters were studied and results were obtained for 16 test samples from 16 laboratories representing eight different countries. This article summarizes the study outcome concerning validation key parameters like specificity, linearity, limit of detection, accuracy/recovery, and precision. Further, influences of cooking of mussels before homogenization or hydrolysis on method robustness have been evaluated. PMID:21107979

  8. Sensitive method for the determination of lipophilic marine biotoxins in extracts of mussels and processed shellfish by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry based on enrichment by solid-phase extraction.

    PubMed

    These, Anja; Scholz, Jana; Preiss-Weigert, Angelika

    2009-05-22

    A solid-phase extraction (SPE) method for the enrichment and clean-up of lipophilic marine biotoxins from extracts of different species of bivalve molluscs and processed shellfish products was developed. Okadaic acid (OA), pectenotoxin2 (PTX2), azaspiracid1 (AZA1) and yessotoxin (YTX) were determined by LC-MS/MS in hydrolyzed and non-hydrolyzed extracts. Applying a concentration factor of 10 the limit of quantification for the four toxins was determined to be 1 microg/kg. An organized in-house ring trial proved transferability of the method protocol and satisfactory results for all four toxins with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 5-12%. The precision of the whole method including LC-MS detection was determined by processing seven independent extractions analyzed in independent sequences. RSD ranged between 12% and 24%. This SPE method was tested within a concentration range corresponding to the range of the current European Union regulatory limits (up to 160 microg/kg for the OA group), but it would also be applicable to a lower microg/kg range which is important in view of a possible decrease of regulatory limits as proposed by a working group of the European Food Safety Authority. The potential of SPE as a cleaning tool to cope with matrix effects in LC-MS/MS was studied and compared to liquid-liquid portioning. PMID:19362722

  9. Database of radionuclide measurements in Columbia River water, fish, waterfowl, gamebirds, and shellfish downstream of Hanford`s single-pass production reactors, 1960--1970. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Thiede, M.E.; Duncan, J.P.

    1994-03-01

    This report is a result of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The goal of the HEDR Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received from radionuclide emissions since 1944 at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The HEDR Project is conducted by Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories. The time periods of greatest interest to the HEDR study vary depending on the type of environmental media concerned. Concentrations of radionuclides in Columbia River media from 1960--1970 provide the best historical data for validation of the Columbia River pathway computer models. This report provides the historical radionuclide measurements in Columbia River water (1960--1970), fish (1960--1967), waterfowl (1960--1970), gamebirds (1967--1970), and shellfish (1960--1970). Because of the large size of the databases (845 pages), this report is being published on diskette. A diskette of this report is available from the Technical Steering Panel (c/o K. CharLee, Office of Nuclear Waste Management, Department of Ecology, Technical Support and Publication Information Section, P.O. Box 47651, Olympia, Washington 98504-7651).

  10. Restricting Prey Dispersal Can Overestimate the Importance of Predation in Trophic Cascades

    PubMed Central

    Geraldi, Nathan R.; Macreadie, Peter I.

    2013-01-01

    Predators can affect prey populations and, via trophic cascades, predators can indirectly impact resource populations (2 trophic levels below the predator) through consumption of prey (density-mediated indirect effects; DMIEs) and by inducing predator-avoidance behavior in prey (trait-mediated indirect effects; TMIEs). Prey often employ multiple predator-avoidance behaviors, such as dispersal or reduced foraging activity, but estimates of TMIEs are usually on individual behaviors. We assessed direct and indirect predator effects in a mesocosm experiment using a marine food chain consisting of a predator (toadfish – Opsanus tau), prey (mud crab - Panopeus herbstii) and resource (ribbed mussel – Geukensia demissa). We measured dispersal and foraging activity of prey separately by manipulating both the presence and absence of the predator, and whether prey could or could not disperse into a predator-free area. Consumption of prey was 9 times greater when prey could not disperse, probably because mesocosm boundaries increased predator capture success. Although predator presence did not significantly affect the number of crabs that emigrated, the presence of a predator decreased resource consumption by prey, which resulted in fewer resources consumed for each prey that emigrated in the presence of a predator, and reduced the overall TMIE. When prey were unable to disperse, TMIEs on mussel survival were 3 times higher than the DMIEs. When prey were allowed to disperse, the TMIEs on resource survival increased to 11-times the DMIEs. We found that restricting the ability of prey to disperse, or focusing on only one predator-avoidance behavior, may be underestimating TMIEs. Our results indicate that the relative contribution of behavior and consumption in food chain dynamics will depend on which predator-avoidance behaviors are allowed to occur and measured. PMID:23408957

  11. American Journal of Botany 87(12): 113130. 2000. SPECIES AND SERIES BOUNDARIES OF SOLANUM SERIES

    E-print Network

    Spooner, David

    SERIES LONGIPEDICELLATA (SOLANACEAE) AND PHENETICALLY SIMILAR SPECIES IN SER. DEMISSA AND SER. TUBEROSA potato species are recognized. Key words: phenetics; potato; sect. Petota; Solanaceae; Solanum series

  12. Archaeological shellfish size and later human evolution in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Richard G.; Steele, Teresa E.

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 50 ka, one or more subgroups of modern humans expanded from Africa to populate the rest of the world. Significant behavioral change accompanied this expansion, and archaeologists commonly seek its roots in the African Middle Stone Age (MSA; ?200 to ?50 ka). Easily recognizable art objects and “jewelry” become common only in sites that postdate the MSA in Africa and Eurasia, but some MSA sites contain possible precursors, especially including abstractly incised fragments of ocher and perforated shells interpreted as beads. These proposed art objects have convinced most specialists that MSA people were behaviorally (cognitively) modern, and many argue that population growth explains the appearance of art in the MSA and its post-MSA florescence. The average size of rocky intertidal gastropod species in MSA and later coastal middens allows a test of this idea, because smaller size implies more intense collection, and more intense collection is most readily attributed to growth in the number of human collectors. Here we demonstrate that economically important Cape turban shells and limpets from MSA layers along the south and west coasts of South Africa are consistently and significantly larger than turban shells and limpets in succeeding Later Stone Age (LSA) layers that formed under equivalent environmental conditions. We conclude that whatever cognitive capacity precocious MSA artifacts imply, it was not associated with human population growth. MSA populations remained consistently small by LSA standards, and a substantial increase in population size is obvious only near the MSA/LSA transition, when it is dramatically reflected in the Out-of-Africa expansion. PMID:23776248

  13. 36 CFR 242.28 - Subsistence taking of shellfish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... fishing seasons for red king crab, blue king crab, or Tanner crab in the location; (E) The waters of the Pacific Ocean enclosed by the boundaries of Womens Bay, Gibson Cove, and an area defined by a...

  14. 36 CFR 242.28 - Subsistence taking of shellfish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... before and 14 days after State open commercial fishing seasons for red king crab, blue king crab, or Tanner crab in the location. (E) The waters of the Pacific Ocean enclosed by the boundaries of Womens...

  15. 50 CFR 100.28 - Subsistence taking of shellfish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) NATIONAL WILDLIFE MONUMENTS SUBSISTENCE MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS...ALASKA Subsistence Taking of Fish and Wildlife § 100.28 Subsistence taking of...report was due to loss in the mail, accident, sickness, or other unavoidable...

  16. 50 CFR 100.28 - Subsistence taking of shellfish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) NATIONAL WILDLIFE MONUMENTS SUBSISTENCE MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS...ALASKA Subsistence Taking of Fish and Wildlife § 100.28 Subsistence taking of...report was due to loss in the mail, accident, sickness, or other unavoidable...

  17. 50 CFR 100.28 - Subsistence taking of shellfish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) NATIONAL WILDLIFE MONUMENTS SUBSISTENCE MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS...ALASKA Subsistence Taking of Fish and Wildlife § 100.28 Subsistence taking of...report was due to loss in the mail, accident, sickness, or other unavoidable...

  18. 50 CFR 100.28 - Subsistence taking of shellfish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) NATIONAL WILDLIFE MONUMENTS SUBSISTENCE MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS...ALASKA Subsistence Taking of Fish and Wildlife § 100.28 Subsistence taking of...report was due to loss in the mail, accident, sickness, or other unavoidable...

  19. 50 CFR 100.28 - Subsistence taking of shellfish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) NATIONAL WILDLIFE MONUMENTS SUBSISTENCE MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS...ALASKA Subsistence Taking of Fish and Wildlife § 100.28 Subsistence taking of...report was due to loss in the mail, accident, sickness, or other unavoidable...

  20. Water quality and shellfish sanitation. [Patuxent and Choptank River watersheds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisenberg, M.

    1978-01-01

    The use of remote sensing techniques for collecting bacteriological, physical, and chemical water quality data, locating point and nonpoint sources of pollution, and developing hydrological data was found to be valuable to the Maryland program if it could be produced effectively and rapidly with a minimum amount of ground corroboration.

  1. Polychlorinated Biphenyls in Fish and Shellfish of the Chesapeake Bay

    E-print Network

    , hydraulic fluids, lubricants, sealants, and adhesives; as laminates in the fabrication of safety glass compounds are clear, vis- cous liquids, the viscosity increasing with increased chlorine content. Practi- cally, PCB's seldom appear as pure compounds, but rather as mixed iso- mers. The characteristics of PCB

  2. Biographic Memoir of Ernest Ingersoll: Naturalist, Shellfish Scientist, and Author

    E-print Network

    ). The museum was founded and administered by Professor Louis Agassiz, theeminent teacher-naturalist. Ingersoll of 1873 as a student ofProfessorAgassiz athis seasideschool on Penikese Island, near Woods Hole, Massachusetts (Ingersoll, 1933). Western Expeditions Thedeath ofAgassiz in 1873 ledInger soll indirectly

  3. FISH &SHELLFISH BUYING GUIDE and QUANTITY RECIPES for

    E-print Network

    or fruit juice may be counted to meet not more than 1/4 cup of this requirement. BREAD-I slice of whole-grain or enriched bread; or a serving of other bread such as cornbread, bis cutts, rolls, muffins, made of whole. This may be used as a spread on bread, as a seasoning, or in the preparation of other foods in the lunch

  4. Ocean Acidification Impacts on Shellfish Workshop: Findings and Recommendations

    E-print Network

    Dickson, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    adaptation, on species genetic diversity, on community structure, and ecosystem adaptation and mitigation  strategies to conserve marine organisms and marine ecosystems; modeling, and  ecosystem function.   Studies of adaptation 

  5. Archaeological shellfish size and later human evolution in Africa.

    PubMed

    Klein, Richard G; Steele, Teresa E

    2013-07-01

    Approximately 50 ka, one or more subgroups of modern humans expanded from Africa to populate the rest of the world. Significant behavioral change accompanied this expansion, and archaeologists commonly seek its roots in the African Middle Stone Age (MSA; ?200 to ?50 ka). Easily recognizable art objects and "jewelry" become common only in sites that postdate the MSA in Africa and Eurasia, but some MSA sites contain possible precursors, especially including abstractly incised fragments of ocher and perforated shells interpreted as beads. These proposed art objects have convinced most specialists that MSA people were behaviorally (cognitively) modern, and many argue that population growth explains the appearance of art in the MSA and its post-MSA florescence. The average size of rocky intertidal gastropod species in MSA and later coastal middens allows a test of this idea, because smaller size implies more intense collection, and more intense collection is most readily attributed to growth in the number of human collectors. Here we demonstrate that economically important Cape turban shells and limpets from MSA layers along the south and west coasts of South Africa are consistently and significantly larger than turban shells and limpets in succeeding Later Stone Age (LSA) layers that formed under equivalent environmental conditions. We conclude that whatever cognitive capacity precocious MSA artifacts imply, it was not associated with human population growth. MSA populations remained consistently small by LSA standards, and a substantial increase in population size is obvious only near the MSA/LSA transition, when it is dramatically reflected in the Out-of-Africa expansion. PMID:23776248

  6. Committed effective dose from naturally occuring radionuclides in shellfish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Wahib, Norfadira Binti; Amin, Yusoff Mohd.; Bradley, D. A.

    2013-07-01

    Recognizing their importance in the average Malaysian daily diet, the radioactivity concentrations in mollusc- and crustacean-based food have been determined for key naturally occuring radionuclides. Fresh samples collected from various maritime locations around peninsular Malaysia have been processed using standard procedures; the radionuclide concentrations being determined using an HPGe ?-ray spectrometer. For molluscs, assuming secular equilibrium, the range of activities of 238U (226Ra), 232Th (228Ra) and 40K were found to be 3.28±0.35 to 5.34±0.52, 1.20±0.21 to 2.44±0.21 and 118±6 to 281±14 Bq kg-1 dry weight, respectively. The respective values for crustaceans were 3.02±0.57 to 4.70±0.52, 1.38±0.21 to 2.40±0.35 and 216±11 to 316±15 Bq kg-1. The estimated average daily intake of radioactivity from consumption of molluscs are 0.37 Bq kg-1 for 238U (226Ra), 0.16 Bq kg-1 for 232Th (228Ra) and 18 Bq kg-1 for 40K; the respective daily intake values from crustaceans are 0.36 Bq kg-1, 0.16 Bq kg-1 and 23 Bq kg-1. Associated annual committed effective doses from molluscs are estimated to be in the range 21.3 to 34.7 ?Sv for 226Ra, 19.3 to 39.1 ?Sv for 228Ra and 17.0 to 40.4 ?Sv for 40K. For crustaceans, the respective dose ranges are 19.6 to 30.5 ?Sv, 22.0 to 38.4 ?Sv and 31.1 to 45.5 ?Sv, being some several times world average values.

  7. Beach and shellfish forecasts using integrated data from monitoring programs,

    E-print Network

    Hilderbrand, Robert H.

    New models from integrated data · Regression · Classification and Regression Trees (CART) · Ensemble Torrens, SCDHEC Shannon Berry, SCDHEC Charles Newell, SCDHEC (ret) Mike Pearson, SCDHEC Dr. Don Edwards

  8. FISH AND SHELLFISH CONSUMPTION IN PUBLIC EATING AND DRINKING

    E-print Network

    Special Scientific Report --Fisheries };o. 295 Washington, D. C, March 1959 #12;The Library of Congress (Series) [SHll.ASSo no. 218, 295] Int 59-20 r. S. Dept. of the Interior. Library for library of Congress The Library of Congress catalog card for the Fish and Vildlife Service series. Special Scientific Report

  9. Overview of zoonotic infections from fish and shellfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zoonosis refers to diseases that can be transferred from animals, whether wild or domesticated, to humans. Zoonotic infections can be divided into: 1) topically acquired infection caused by contact with aquatic animals or their products and 2) food borne infection caused by eating raw or undercooked...

  10. 50 CFR 14.21 - Shellfish and fishery products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... propagation, at any Customs port. (b) Pearls. Except for wildlife requiring a permit pursuant to part 17 or 23 of this subchapter, pearls imported or exported for commercial purposes may enter or exit the United... and fishery products will include pearls....

  11. 50 CFR 14.21 - Shellfish and fishery products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... propagation, at any Customs port. (b) Pearls. Except for wildlife requiring a permit pursuant to part 17 or 23 of this subchapter, pearls imported or exported for commercial purposes may enter or exit the United... and fishery products will include pearls....

  12. 50 CFR 14.21 - Shellfish and fishery products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... propagation, at any Customs port. (b) Pearls. Except for wildlife requiring a permit pursuant to part 17 or 23 of this subchapter, pearls imported or exported for commercial purposes may enter or exit the United... and fishery products will include pearls....

  13. 50 CFR 14.21 - Shellfish and fishery products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... propagation, at any Customs port. (b) Pearls. Except for wildlife requiring a permit pursuant to part 17 or 23 of this subchapter, pearls imported or exported for commercial purposes may enter or exit the United... and fishery products will include pearls....

  14. 50 CFR 14.21 - Shellfish and fishery products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... propagation, at any Customs port. (b) Pearls. Except for wildlife requiring a permit pursuant to part 17 or 23 of this subchapter, pearls imported or exported for commercial purposes may enter or exit the United... and fishery products will include pearls....

  15. 50 CFR 14.21 - Shellfish and fishery products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...permit pursuant to part 17 or part 23 of this subchapter, live aquatic invertebrates of the Class Pelecypoda (commonly known as oysters, clams, mussels, and scallops) and the eggs, larvae, or juvenile forms thereof may be exported for purposes of...

  16. 50 CFR 14.21 - Shellfish and fishery products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...permit pursuant to part 17 or part 23 of this subchapter, live aquatic invertebrates of the Class Pelecypoda (commonly known as oysters, clams, mussels, and scallops) and the eggs, larvae, or juvenile forms thereof may be exported for purposes of...

  17. 50 CFR 14.21 - Shellfish and fishery products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...permit pursuant to part 17 or part 23 of this subchapter, live aquatic invertebrates of the Class Pelecypoda (commonly known as oysters, clams, mussels, and scallops) and the eggs, larvae, or juvenile forms thereof may be exported for purposes of...

  18. 50 CFR 14.21 - Shellfish and fishery products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...permit pursuant to part 17 or part 23 of this subchapter, live aquatic invertebrates of the Class Pelecypoda (commonly known as oysters, clams, mussels, and scallops) and the eggs, larvae, or juvenile forms thereof may be exported for purposes of...

  19. 50 CFR 14.21 - Shellfish and fishery products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...permit pursuant to part 17 or part 23 of this subchapter, live aquatic invertebrates of the Class Pelecypoda (commonly known as oysters, clams, mussels, and scallops) and the eggs, larvae, or juvenile forms thereof may be exported for purposes of...

  20. Tracking responses to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill using trace elements in molluscan shells and tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roopnarine, P. D.; Anderson, L.; Roopnarine, D.; Gillikin, D. P.; Goodwin, D.

    2010-12-01

    Documenting the effects of modern stressors on coastal benthic marine communities requires a combination of baseline historical data and modern dynamic data. E.g., landfall of hydrocarbons from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon rig and well explosion in the Gulf of Mexico is impacting coastal areas long affected by natural seepage, as well as petroleum exploration and development. In Louisiana, exploration in coastal areas that began in the 1920s expanded greatly with the development of the first mobile drilling barge in 1933. In total nearly 50,000 wells have been drilled in the Gulf of Mexico since the 1930s. Given this historical context, we are assessing pathways and rates at which crude oil components from the 2010 spill are incorporated into northern Gulf of Mexico coastal food webs. Sclerochronological techniques are being used to unlock the high-resolution physical and chemical records preserved within mollusc shells. We are analyzing historical specimens collected from the late 19th through late 20th centuries, baseline specimens collected in May 2010 in Louisiana and Alabama before visible hydrocarbons were present, and specimens collected in August 2010 after hydrocarbons made landfall. We are examining changes in life history traits (growth rate, recruitment, mortality, reproduction) of the commercial oyster Crassostrea virginica, and other common, co-occurring molluscs that are primary and secondary consumers in Gulf of Mexico coastal food webs. The taxa include the marsh-dwelling gastropod Littoraria irrorata and mussel Geukensia demissa, and open-water species including the bivalves Ischadium recurvum and Tellina alternata. These consumers range from epifaunal, sessile, filter feeders; to infaunal, mobile, deposit feeders; to epifaunal, mobile, omnivorous grazers. In this way, multiple potential pathways into coastal food webs are being monitored. Because environmental perturbations of many scales are recorded by the accretionary growth of mollusc shells, we can monitor the sub-monthly incorporation of hydrocarbon components into shells, such as trace metals (e.g., V, Ni, Cu and Cr), while simultaneously measuring changes in shell growth rate. We will also measure concentrations of metals in soft tissues from specimens collected since May 2010. Trace metal concentrations will be determined using ICPMS. Annual and sub-annual growth rates will be calculated from ?13C and ?18O profiles derived from ontogentic sampling of the molluscs' shells. The comparisons between historic, baseline and post-landfall specimens will allow us to assess the changing conditions of these species and their food webs as drilling expanded in the Gulf during the 20th century, and therefore distinguish the immediate impact of the Deepwater Horizon spill from these background factors. In this way, we will also trace secondary impacts (not related to fouling by direct contact) of hydrocarbons through trophic levels of the coastal ecosystem.

  1. IDENTIFYING CLIMATIC FACTORS INFLUENCING COMMERCIAL FISH AND SHELLFISH LANDINGS IN MARYLAND!

    E-print Network

    114th Ave. BE., Bellevue, WA 98004. 6Martin Marietta Corporation, Environmental Center, Bal- timore to decide how to gear up for the coming sea- . son.8 Multiple linear regression has likewise been empl

  2. Rocky Intertidal Zonation Pattern in Antofagasta, Chile: Invasive Species and Shellfish Gathering

    PubMed Central

    Castilla, Juan Carlos; Manríquez, Patricio H.; Delgado, Alejandro; Ortiz, Verónica; Jara, María Elisa; Varas, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Background Biological invasions affecting rocky intertidal zonation patterns, yield information on species interactions. In the Bay of Antofagasta, northern Chile, the non-indigenous tunicate Pyura praeputialis, originally from Australia, has invaded (in the past century or so) and monopolized a major portion of the mid-intertidal rocky shore, displacing upshore the native mussel Perumytilus purpuratus. In Antofagasta the tunicate is subjected to intensive exploitation. Monitoring protocols show that in the past 10 years Antofagasta's tunicate population has experienced a drastic decline, affecting the intertidal zonation pattern. Methodology/Principal Findings A 12.5 km of coastline, on the southern eastern shore of the Bay of Antofagasta, was studied. Eight sites were systematically (1993–1994) or sporadically (2003–2014) monitored for the seaward-shoreward expansion or reduction of the tunicate Pyura praeputialis, and native mussel and barnacle bands. A notable reduction in the mid-intertidal band of P. praeputialis and a seaward expansion of the mussel, Perumytilus purpuratus, and barnacle bands was observed. We suggest that the major cause for the decline in the tunicate is due to its intensive exploitation by rocky shore Pyura-gathers. The rate of extraction of tunicates by professional Pyura-gathers ranged between 256–740 tunicates hour?1. Between 2009–2014 the density of professional Pyura-gather ranged between 0.5–4.5 km?1 per low tide. Hence, 10 professional Pyura-gathers working 1 h for 10 low tides per month, during 6 months, will remove between 307–888 m2 of tunicates. A drastic decline in tunicate recruitment was observed and several P. praeputialis ecosystems services have been lost. Conclusion and Significance In Antofagasta, the continuous and intensive intertidal gathering of the invasive tunicate Pyura praeputialis, has caused a drastic reduction of its population modifying the zonation pattern. Thereby, native mussel Perumytilus purpuratus has regained its ecological center in the intertidal zone. We recorded a Pyura recruitment failure and loss of ecosystem services. PMID:25338112

  3. Contaminant levels in fish and shellfish from the EMAP-Estuaries Louisiana Province

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, W.H.; O`Neal, J.M.; Allgood, J.C.; Summers, J.K.

    1994-12-31

    The Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program-Estuaries (EMAP-E) is a research program designed to assess the ecological condition of the nation`s near-coastal ecosystems. The program is specifically designed to assess changes in ecological condition over broad biogeographic regions and over long time periods. The authors examined approximately 150 sites in the Gulf of Mexico between Anclote Anchorage, FL and the Rio Grande, TX during the summer of 1993. Species collected for chemical analyses included Atlantic croaker, catfish and shrimp. Results will be presented for contaminant levels in edible flesh analyzed for organochlorine and organophosphate pesticides, PCB congeners, butlytins, and a suite of trace elements.

  4. Levels of polychlorinated biphenyls in fish and shellfish from the Adriatic Sea.

    PubMed

    Sagratini, G; Buccioni, M; Ciccarelli, C; Conti, P; Cristalli, G; Giardinà, D; Lambertucci, C; Marucci, G; Volpini, R; Vittori, S

    2008-01-01

    Levels of 18 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in some marine species, living both in the coastal area and in deeper seawater. In some species analysis was performed separately in edible parts (fillets) and in viscera. The existence and degree of bioaccumulation was assessed studying individual species of very different size, with the smaller being younger. Furthermore, with a multivariate statistical analysis, a correlation between PCB congeners and the feeding habits and habitat of the fish was demonstrated. The results show that fat from edible parts (fish fillets) had total PCB levels in the range 22.6-601.9 µg kg?¹ (with 601.9 µg kg?¹ in anchovies), while fat from viscera showed much higher concentrations (407.3-916.6 µg kg?¹). Bioaccumulation was confirmed, comparing PCB levels between younger and older individual hake, squid, and horned octopus. The total PCB concentration ratio (older/younger individuals) ranges from 2.11 (squid = 292.1/137.8 µg kg?¹) to 3.46 (hake = 546.0/158.0 µg kg?¹). PMID:24784539

  5. Diarrhoeic shellfish toxins in Adriatic Sea mussels evaluated by an ELISA method.

    PubMed

    Tubaro, A; Sosa, S; Bruno, M; Gucci, P M; Volterra, L; Della Loggia, R

    1992-01-01

    A competitive enzyme immunoassay (ELISA) was used to determine the presence of okadaic acid (OA) and/or dinophysistoxin-1 (DTX-1) in mussels. The accuracy and sensitivity of the ELISA method has been checked. The sensitivity of the method (100 ng/g of hepatopancreas) makes it possible to determine OA concentrations ten times lower than the tolerance limits established by the Health Authorities of many countries. For the first time, OA and/or DTX-1 were detected in mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) collected in different stations along the Adriatic Sea coasts. PMID:1519256

  6. 76 FR 65200 - Risk Assessment on Norovirus in Bivalve Molluscan Shellfish: Request for Comments and for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-20

    ...models describing norovirus or enteric viral...estuary, including inactivation by ultraviolet...conditions); 9. Inactivation rate of norovirus or enteric viral...address uptake, inactivation and elimination of norovirus or enteric...

  7. EDUCATION WORKSHOP FOR THE FLORIDA MEDICAL COMMUNITY ON THE RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH SHELLFISH CONSUMPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    People whose immune systems are compromised by liver disease, chemotherapy, etc. are at a substantial risk of contracting a fatal infection from the marine bacteria, Vibrio vulnificus to which they could potentially be exposed by eating raw oysters. It has proven difficult to ge...

  8. Inactivation of HAV and norovirus surrogates within raw shellfish and other foods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High pressure processing can inactivate hepatitis A virus, (HAV) and the human norovirus surrogates, feline calicivirus (FCV) and murine norovirus (MNV), in foods such as oysters, strawberries, and green onions. A 5-min 400-Megapascals (MPa) treatment at 5 degrees C and a 1–min 400-MPa treatment at ...

  9. RESTORATION OF 100 SQUARE MILES OF SHELLFISH HABITAT IN LAKE PONTCHARTRAIN MX974852

    EPA Science Inventory

    The project will document the adverse effects of episodic hypoxia on the biotic integrity of Lake Pontchartrain and provide quantitative data on environmental benefits derived from the restoration of 100 square miles of clam habitat in Lake Pontchartrain. This project will prov...

  10. Overfishing and the Replacement of Demersal Finfish by Shellfish: An Example from the English Channel

    PubMed Central

    Molfese, Carlotta; Beare, Doug; Hall-Spencer, Jason M.

    2014-01-01

    The worldwide depletion of major fish stocks through intensive industrial fishing is thought to have profoundly altered the trophic structure of marine ecosystems. Here we assess changes in the trophic structure of the English Channel marine ecosystem using a 90-year time-series (1920–2010) of commercial fishery landings. Our analysis was based on estimates of the mean trophic level (mTL) of annual landings and the Fishing-in-Balance index (FiB). Food webs of the Channel ecosystem have been altered, as shown by a significant decline in the mTL of fishery landings whilst increases in the FiB index suggest increased fishing effort and fishery expansion. Large, high trophic level species (e.g. spurdog, cod, ling) have been increasingly replaced by smaller, low trophic level fish (e.g. small spotted catsharks) and invertebrates (e.g. scallops, crabs and lobster). Declining trophic levels in fisheries catches have occurred worldwide, with fish catches progressively being replaced by invertebrates. We argue that a network of fisheries closures would help rebalance the trophic status of the Channel and allow regeneration of marine ecosystems. PMID:25010196

  11. Ocean Warming, More than Acidification, Reduces Shell Strength in a Commercial Shellfish Species during Food Limitation

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, Clara L.; Ormondroyd, Graham A.; Curling, Simon F.; Ball, Richard J.; Whiteley, Nia M.; Malham, Shelagh K.

    2014-01-01

    Ocean surface pH levels are predicted to fall by 0.3–0.4 pH units by the end of the century and are likely to coincide with an increase in sea surface temperature of 2–4°C. The combined effect of ocean acidification and warming on the functional properties of bivalve shells is largely unknown and of growing concern as the shell provides protection from mechanical and environmental challenges. We examined the effects of near-future pH (ambient pH –0.4 pH units) and warming (ambient temperature +4°C) on the shells of the commercially important bivalve, Mytilus edulis when fed for a limited period (4–6 h day?1). After six months exposure, warming, but not acidification, significantly reduced shell strength determined as reductions in the maximum load endured by the shells. However, acidification resulted in a reduction in shell flex before failure. Reductions in shell strength with warming could not be explained by alterations in morphology, or shell composition but were accompanied by reductions in shell surface area, and by a fall in whole-body condition index. It appears that warming has an indirect effect on shell strength by re-allocating energy from shell formation to support temperature-related increases in maintenance costs, especially as food supply was limited and the mussels were probably relying on internal energy reserves. The maintenance of shell strength despite seawater acidification suggests that biomineralisation processes are unaffected by the associated changes in CaCO3 saturation levels. We conclude that under near-future climate change conditions, ocean warming will pose a greater risk to shell integrity in M. edulis than ocean acidification when food availability is limited. PMID:24489785

  12. Genetic Diversity of Rotavirus Strains Circulating in Environmental Water and Bivalve Shellfish in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Kittigul, Leera; Panjangampatthana, Apinya; Rupprom, Kitwadee; Pombubpa, Kannika

    2014-01-01

    Rotavirus is a common cause of acute diarrhea in young children worldwide. This study investigated the prevalence and molecular characterization of rotavirus in environmental water and oyster samples in Thailand. A total of 114 water samples and 110 oyster samples were collected and tested for group A rotavirus using RT-nested PCR. Rotavirus genotype was identified by phylogenetic analysis of the VP7 genetic sequences. Group A rotavirus was detected in 21 water samples (18.4%) and six oyster samples (5.4%). Twenty five rotavirus strains were successfully sequenced and classified into four genotypes; G1, G2, G3, and G9. Rotavirus G1 (three strains), G2 (three strains), and G9 (two strains) demonstrated the genetic sequences similar to human strains (90%–99% nucleotide identity), whereas G3 (17 strains) was closely related to animal strains (84%–98% nucleotide identity). G1 strains belonged to lineages I (sub-lineage c) and II. G2 strains belonged to lineage II. G9 strains belonged to lineages III (sub-lineage b) and IV. G3 strains belonged to lineages I, III (sub-lineage c), and IV with a predominance of lineage I. The present study provides important information on the rotavirus strains circulating in the environment. PMID:24469269

  13. CONTAMINANT CONCENTRATIONS IN WHOLE-BODY FISH AND SHELLFISH FROM U.S. ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Persistent bioaccumulative and toxic (PBT) pollutants are chemical contaminants that pose risks to ecosystems and human health. For these reasons, available tissue contaminant data from the US EPA Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program's National Coastal Assessment were...

  14. Bioaccessibility of essential and non-essential metals in commercial shellfish from Western Europe and Asia.

    PubMed

    Amiard, Jean-Claude; Amiard-Triquet, Claude; Charbonnier, Laetitia; Mesnil, Aurélie; Rainbow, Philip S; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2008-06-01

    Maximum acceptable concentrations of metals in food - based on total concentrations - have been established in many countries. To improve risk assessment, it would be better to take into account bioaccessible concentrations. A total of seven species of molluscs from France, UK and Hong Kong was examined in this study including clams, mussels, oysters, scallops and gastropods. The species which have total metal concentrations higher than the most severe food security limits are mainly oysters (all of the three studied species), the gastropod Buccinum undatum for cadmium and zinc, and scallops for cadmium. The lowest bioaccessibility (in % extractability with gut juices) was observed for silver (median for all of the species: 14%), it was moderate for lead (median: 33%) and higher for cadmium, zinc and copper (medians were respectively 54%, 65%, and 70%). In most cases, bioaccessible concentrations remained higher than the safety limits, except for cadmium in scallops and zinc in B. undatum. The influence of feeding habit (masticated or swallowed, addition of vinegar or lemon) on metal bioaccessibility in oysters is limited. On the contrary, cooking the gastropods decreased the bioaccessibility of metals, except silver. PMID:18329777

  15. What You Need to Know about Mercury in Fish and Shellfish

    MedlinePLUS

    ... menu Learn the Issues Air Chemicals and Toxics Climate Change Emergencies Greener Living Health and Safety Land and Cleanup Pesticides Waste Water Science & Technology Air Climate Change Ecosystems Health Land, Waste and Cleanup Pesticides Substances ...

  16. Factors preventing the recovery of a historically overexploited shellfish species, Ostrea conchaphila

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The native oyster in estuaries along the Pacific coast of North America, Ostrea conchaphila (prev. Ostrea lurida, Olympia oyster), experienced overexploitation throughout its range in the late 1800’s, resulting in commercial extinction before 1930. Significant harvest restrictions and marine reserv...

  17. Genetic diversity of rotavirus strains circulating in environmental water and bivalve shellfish in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kittigul, Leera; Panjangampatthana, Apinya; Rupprom, Kitwadee; Pombubpa, Kannika

    2014-02-01

    Rotavirus is a common cause of acute diarrhea in young children worldwide. This study investigated the prevalence and molecular characterization of rotavirus in environmental water and oyster samples in Thailand. A total of 114 water samples and 110 oyster samples were collected and tested for group A rotavirus using RT-nested PCR. Rotavirus genotype was identified by phylogenetic analysis of the VP7 genetic sequences. Group A rotavirus was detected in 21 water samples (18.4%) and six oyster samples (5.4%). Twenty five rotavirus strains were successfully sequenced and classified into four genotypes; G1, G2, G3, and G9. Rotavirus G1 (three strains), G2 (three strains), and G9 (two strains) demonstrated the genetic sequences similar to human strains (90%-99% nucleotide identity), whereas G3 (17 strains) was closely related to animal strains (84%-98% nucleotide identity). G1 strains belonged to lineages I (sub-lineage c) and II. G2 strains belonged to lineage II. G9 strains belonged to lineages III (sub-lineage b) and IV. G3 strains belonged to lineages I, III (sub-lineage c), and IV with a predominance of lineage I. The present study provides important information on the rotavirus strains circulating in the environment. PMID:24469269

  18. 75 FR 28858 - Agency Information Collection (Purchase of Shellfish) Activities Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-24

    ... Acquisition and Logistics, Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: In compliance with the... describes the nature of the information collection and its expected cost and burden; it includes the...

  19. 36 CFR 242.25 - Subsistence taking of fish, wildlife, and shellfish: general regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Chionoecetes spp.), and Dungeness crab (Cancer magister). Cub bear means a brown...one place. Edible meat means the breast meat of ptarmigan and grouse and...ptarmigan; however, you may not use the breast meat of grouse and ptarmigan as...

  20. 36 CFR 242.25 - Subsistence taking of fish, wildlife, and shellfish: general regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Chionoecetes spp.), and Dungeness crab (Cancer magister). Cub bear means a brown...one place. Edible meat means the breast meat of ptarmigan and grouse and...ptarmigan; however, you may not use the breast meat of grouse and ptarmigan as...

  1. 50 CFR 100.25 - Subsistence taking of fish, wildlife, and shellfish: general regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Chionoecetes spp.), and Dungeness crab (Cancer magister). Cub bear means a brown...one place. Edible meat means the breast meat of ptarmigan and grouse and...ptarmigan; however, you may not use the breast meat of grouse and ptarmigan as...

  2. 50 CFR 100.25 - Subsistence taking of fish, wildlife, and shellfish: general regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Chionoecetes spp.), and Dungeness crab (Cancer magister). Cub bear means a brown...one place. Edible meat means the breast meat of ptarmigan and grouse and...ptarmigan; however, you may not use the breast meat of grouse and ptarmigan as...

  3. 50 CFR 100.25 - Subsistence taking of fish, wildlife, and shellfish: general regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Chionoecetes spp.), and Dungeness crab (Cancer magister ). Cub bear means a...one place. Edible meat means the breast meat of ptarmigan and grouse and...ptarmigan; however, you may not use the breast meat of grouse and ptarmigan as...

  4. 36 CFR 242.25 - Subsistence taking of fish, wildlife, and shellfish: general regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Chionoecetes spp.), and Dungeness crab (Cancer magister). Cub bear means a brown...one place. Edible meat means the breast meat of ptarmigan and grouse and...ptarmigan; however, you may not use the breast meat of grouse and ptarmigan as...

  5. Aquatic Toxicology 80 (2006) 8291 The uptake, distribution and elimination of paralytic shellfish

    E-print Network

    Yu, Peter K.N.

    2006-01-01

    : non-sulfated carbamate toxins, 11- hydroxysulfated carbamates and 21-N-sulfocarbamoyl toxins. On a molar basis, non-sulfated carbamate toxins, saxitoxin, and its N-1-hydroxy derivative neosaxitoxin (neoSTX), are the most potent toxins. The 11-hydroxysulfated carbamates, gonyautox- ins (GTXs), are about half as potent

  6. 50 CFR 100.25 - Subsistence taking of fish, wildlife, and shellfish: general regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... means all of the lands and waters comprising a watershed, including...lakes, which contribute to the water supply of the watershed...current or other means. Fresh water of streams and rivers means the line at which fresh water is separated from salt water at the mouth of...

  7. 50 CFR 100.25 - Subsistence taking of fish, wildlife, and shellfish: general regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... means all of the lands and waters comprising a watershed, including...lakes, which contribute to the water supply of the watershed...current or other means. Fresh water of streams and rivers means the line at which fresh water is separated from salt water at the mouth of...

  8. 36 CFR 242.25 - Subsistence taking of fish, wildlife, and shellfish: general regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... means all of the lands and waters comprising a watershed, including...lakes, which contribute to the water supply of the watershed...current or other means. Fresh water of streams and rivers means the line at which fresh water is separated from salt water at the mouth of...

  9. 36 CFR 242.25 - Subsistence taking of fish, wildlife, and shellfish: general regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... means all of the lands and waters comprising a watershed, including...lakes, which contribute to the water supply of the watershed...current or other means. Fresh water of streams and rivers means the line at which fresh water is separated from salt water at the mouth of...

  10. 76 FR 37815 - Cooperative Agreement To Support Shellfish Safety Assistance Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-28

    .... For Further Information and Additional Requirements Contact: For Programmatic and Technical Concerns... INFORMATION: I. Funding Opportunity Description RFA-FD-11-023, 93.103. A. Background The CFSAN Office of Food... will continue to: (1) Address the need to improve information exchange and transfer among...

  11. 50 CFR 100.25 - Subsistence taking of fish, wildlife, and shellfish: general regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... by 50 CFR 100.17 and 36 CFR 242.17. Regulatory year means July 1-June 30, except for fish and.... Handline means a hand-held and operated line, with one or more hooks attached. Hare or hares collectively refers to all species of hares (commonly called rabbits) in Alaska and includes snowshoe hare and...

  12. 36 CFR 242.25 - Subsistence taking of fish, wildlife, and shellfish: general regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... requests are received and/or are based on priorities as determined by 50 CFR 100.17 and 36 CFR 242.17... attached. Hare or hares collectively refers to all species of hares (commonly called rabbits) in Alaska and includes snowshoe hare and tundra hare. Harvest limit means the number of any one species permitted to...

  13. 50 CFR 100.25 - Subsistence taking of fish, wildlife, and shellfish: general regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... by 50 CFR 100.17 and 36 CFR 242.17. Regulatory year means July 1-June 30, except for fish and.... Handline means a hand-held and operated line, with one or more hooks attached. Hare or hares collectively refers to all species of hares (commonly called rabbits) in Alaska and includes snowshoe hare and...

  14. 50 CFR 100.25 - Subsistence taking of fish, wildlife, and shellfish: general regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... by 50 CFR 100.17 and 36 CFR 242.17. Regulatory year means July 1-June 30, except for fish and.... Handline means a hand-held and operated line, with one or more hooks attached. Hare or hares collectively refers to all species of hares (commonly called rabbits) in Alaska and includes snowshoe hare and...

  15. 36 CFR 242.25 - Subsistence taking of fish, wildlife, and shellfish: general regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... requests are received and/or are based on priorities as determined by 50 CFR 100.17 and 36 CFR 242.17... attached. Hare or hares collectively refers to all species of hares (commonly called rabbits) in Alaska and includes snowshoe hare and tundra hare. Harvest limit means the number of any one species permitted to...

  16. 50 CFR 100.25 - Subsistence taking of fish, wildlife, and shellfish: general regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... by 50 CFR 100.17 and 36 CFR 242.17. Regulatory year means July 1-June 30, except for fish and.... Handline means a hand-held and operated line, with one or more hooks attached. Hare or hares collectively refers to all species of hares (commonly called rabbits) in Alaska and includes snowshoe hare and...

  17. 36 CFR 242.25 - Subsistence taking of fish, wildlife, and shellfish: general regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... by 50 CFR 100.17 and 36 CFR 242.17. Regulatory year means July 1-June 30, except for fish and... operated line, with one or more hooks attached. Hare or hares collectively refers to all species of hares (commonly called rabbits) in Alaska and includes snowshoe hare and tundra hare. Harvest limit means...

  18. 50 CFR 100.25 - Subsistence taking of fish, wildlife, and shellfish: general regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... by 50 CFR 100.17 and 36 CFR 242.17. Regulatory year means July 1-June 30, except for fish and.... Handline means a hand-held and operated line, with one or more hooks attached. Hare or hares collectively refers to all species of hares (commonly called rabbits) in Alaska and includes snowshoe hare and...

  19. 36 CFR 242.25 - Subsistence taking of fish, wildlife, and shellfish: general regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... by 50 CFR 100.17 and 36 CFR 242.17. Regulatory year means July 1-June 30, except for fish and... operated line, with one or more hooks attached. Hare or hares collectively refers to all species of hares (commonly called rabbits) in Alaska and includes snowshoe hare and tundra hare. Harvest limit means...

  20. 36 CFR 242.25 - Subsistence taking of fish, wildlife, and shellfish: general regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... by 50 CFR 100.17 and 36 CFR 242.17. Regulatory year means July 1-June 30, except for fish and... operated line, with one or more hooks attached. Hare or hares collectively refers to all species of hares (commonly called rabbits) in Alaska and includes snowshoe hare and tundra hare. Harvest limit means...

  1. Overfishing and the replacement of demersal finfish by shellfish: an example from the English Channel.

    PubMed

    Molfese, Carlotta; Beare, Doug; Hall-Spencer, Jason M

    2014-01-01

    The worldwide depletion of major fish stocks through intensive industrial fishing is thought to have profoundly altered the trophic structure of marine ecosystems. Here we assess changes in the trophic structure of the English Channel marine ecosystem using a 90-year time-series (1920-2010) of commercial fishery landings. Our analysis was based on estimates of the mean trophic level (mTL) of annual landings and the Fishing-in-Balance index (FiB). Food webs of the Channel ecosystem have been altered, as shown by a significant decline in the mTL of fishery landings whilst increases in the FiB index suggest increased fishing effort and fishery expansion. Large, high trophic level species (e.g. spurdog, cod, ling) have been increasingly replaced by smaller, low trophic level fish (e.g. small spotted catsharks) and invertebrates (e.g. scallops, crabs and lobster). Declining trophic levels in fisheries catches have occurred worldwide, with fish catches progressively being replaced by invertebrates. We argue that a network of fisheries closures would help rebalance the trophic status of the Channel and allow regeneration of marine ecosystems. PMID:25010196

  2. The influence of fly ash and shell-fish on physical property of concrete cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauf, Nurlaela; Hasruddin, M.

    2012-06-01

    The waste fly ash and shell fish are added to base material of cement (clinker, gypsum, trash and lime stone), for environmental reason. The ratio fly ash and shell fish was varied respectively 375:125; 250:250; 125:375, in grams weight for 2500 grams of total material. The chemical composition of raw material was determined by using x-rays fluorescence (XRF). Physical properties of sample match with Standar Nasional Indonesia (SNI). The physical properties of the best sample is made from composition of fly ash and shell fish as a substitution material on cement was 10% in weight, with ratio 250:250 in grams weight.

  3. JOURNAL OF SHELLFISH RESEARCH IVOLUME 25, NUMBER 2 AUGUST ZOO6 1

    E-print Network

    Allam, Bassem

    mm, and stocked in pearl nets (34 x 34 cni) at densities ranging from 200-500 oysters per net. The pearl nets. in vertical arrays of 4 nets, were deployed at the adult growout site during July for 3 seed required to stock a significantly expanded adult grow- out system in West Harbor. JOD AT OYSTER

  4. Assessment of health risk from heavy metal contamination of shellfish from the Persian Gulf.

    PubMed

    Raissy, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    The present study assessed the risk of consumption of shrimp and lobster contaminated with mercury, arsenic, cadmium, and lead from the Persian Gulf. The concentrations of mercury, arsenic, lead, and cadmium in shrimp was 62.5, 178.2, 325.2, and 193.5 ?g kg(-1) and in lobsters was 53.2, 103.9, 640.6, and 163.1 ?g kg(-1), respectively. The maximum daily consumption of shrimp and lobster was calculated to estimate health risks associated with their consumption. The results showed that the maximum allowable consumption of shrimp and lobster was 18-140 g/day for mercury, 33-214 g/day for arsenic, 59-454 g/day for cadmium, and 72-916 g/day for lead. The concentration of metals was within recommended limits for human consumption with the exception of lead, which was found to be above acceptable levels and represents a health risk. PMID:26703978

  5. Mercury and selenium in fish and shellfish: occurrence, bioaccessibility and uptake by Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Calatayud, Marta; Devesa, Vicenta; Virseda, Juan Ramón; Barberá, Reyes; Montoro, Rosa; Vélez, Dinoraz

    2012-08-01

    This study evaluates Hg and Se concentrations and bioaccessibility (element solubilised after simulated gastrointestinal digestion) in 16 raw seafood species consumed in Spain. The concentrations varied greatly (Hg, 3.8-1621 ng/g wet weight, ww; Se, 84-1817 ng/g ww). Only one sample of swordfish exceeded the Hg limit permitted in Spain (1mg/kg), and for this sample the Hg/Se molar ratio and Se Health Benefit Value food safety criteria also indicated the presence of a risk. Bioaccessibility of Hg (35-106%) and Se (17-125%) was very variable and the Hg/Se molar ratio in the bioaccessible fraction was less than one for all samples. Transport by Caco-2 cells, an intestinal epithelium model, was also evaluated from the swordfish bioaccessible fraction. Hg and Se transport from the food was less than 14%, and cell retention was much greater for Hg (49-69%) than Se (8-12%). PMID:22634291

  6. POLLUTION-ASSOCIATED DISEASES AND ABNORMALITIES OF FISH AND SHELLFISH: A REVIEW

    E-print Network

    to potentially pathogenic micro- organisms, but disease results from imbalance of the interactive system which-caused by viruses, bacteria, fungi, pro- tozoa, and other pathogenic organisms-are usu- ally prime suspects between "infection" and "dis- ease" must be kept in mind. Most organisms are constantly hosts

  7. 78 FR 42820 - Agency Information Collection (Purchase of Shellfish) Activities Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-17

    ... any correspondence. For Further Information or a Copy of the Submission Contact: Crystal Rennie... 20420, (202) 632-7492 or email: crystal.rennie@va.gov . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-0589... Respondents: 25. Dated: July 11, 2013. By direction of the Secretary. Crystal Rennie, VA Clearance Officer,...

  8. Harvesting Shellfish: Unit F#2 Grade 4. Project COULD: Career Orientation Utilizing Language Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coos County Intermediate Education District, North Bend, OR.

    Project COULD (Career Orientation Utilizing Language Development) was developed as a means of building skills, knowledges, and attitudes on elementary children's previously acquired backgrounds. Children begin to speak the grammar and vocabulary characteristic of the language heard most frequently at home and in the immediate environment. A series…

  9. 77 FR 36260 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Puget Sound Recreational Shellfish Harvesting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-18

    ...recreational harvest opportunities. The Puget Sound Partnership (Partnership...facilitate the conservation and restoration of Puget Sound, has set a priority to reduce...undertaking an economics research project to assess the behavior of...

  10. Total and Inorganic Arsenic in Mid-Atlantic Marine Fish and Shellfish and Implications for Fish Advisories

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Richard; Crecelius, Eric A.

    2006-02-06

    Up to 33.3 metric tons of arsenic trioxide were spilled off the Middle Atlantic coast of the United States in January of 1992 during a shipping accident. Historical fish tissue data for samples collected in the Delaware Inland Bays before and after the spill reveal a prominent spike in total arsenic in summer flounder following the spill and a gradual decline ever since. In 2002, a small study was conducted to determine whether summer flounder migrating into the Delaware Inland Bays from the Continental Shelf in the spring contain higher body burdens of arsenic than summer flounder migrating out of the Inland Bays in the fall. Total arsenic was significantly higher in the incoming fish. Considering that summer flounder overwinter at the spill site, that arsenic trioxide is a dense powder of limited solubility that would tend to incorporate into the sediments, and that summer flounder are demersal fish, we conclude that summer flounder accumulate arsenic offshore and that the likely source of their extra body burden is the spilled arsenic. Speciation of arsenic in the summer flounder, as well as in Atlantic croaker, striped bass, and hard clam reveal low concentrations (0.5 ? 20 ug/kg ww) of toxic inorganic arsenic. DMA was more than an order of magnitude greater in hard clam meats than in the other species tested, a finding attributed to arsenic uptake by phytoplankton and subsequent dietary uptake by the clam. Risk assessment using the inorganic arsenic concentrations was used to conclude that a fish advisory is not warranted.

  11. A new method for preconcentration and determination of mercury in fish, shellfish and saliva by cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Valfredo Azevedo; dos Santos, Liz Oliveira

    2014-04-15

    The development of a method using solid phase extraction for preconcentration and determination of mercury by cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry is described. Hg (II) ions are sorbed on a minicolumn packed with Amberlite XAD-4 sorbent functionalised with 2-(2'-benzothiazolylazo)-p-cresol (BTAC). Then, a reducing solution was used for desorption and the transport of the analyte for subsequent detection. The assay presented a limit of detection of 0.011 ?g L?¹ (0.011 ?g g?¹, for solid samples), a limit of quantification of 0.038 ?g L?¹ (0.038 ?g g?¹, for solid samples), a precision of 0.50% (1.000 ?g L?¹ Hg solution) and an enrichment factor of 46. The proposed method was applied to the determination of mercury in human saliva (0.055-0.200 ?g L?¹). The following seafood collected in Todos os Santos Bay, Brazil was also analysed: bass (0.169-0.195 ?g g?¹), mullet (0.043-0.361 ?g g?¹), shrimp (0.075-0.374 ?g g?¹) and mussel (0.206-0.397 ?g g?¹). PMID:24295696

  12. Recruitment dynamics of two ecosystem engineers could drive shellfish populations in U.S. west coast estuaries

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two species of burrowing shrimp, Neotrypaea californiensis and Upogebia pugettensis are important members of intertidal mudflat communities in US West coast estuaries. Both species act as ecosystem engineers and influence the presence of other structured habitats and suspension ...

  13. Categorizing the severity of paralytic shellfish poisoning outbreaks in the Gulf of Maine for forecasting and management

    E-print Network

    McGillicuddy Jr., Dennis J.

    in algal abundance and distribution, and therefore also in toxicity (e.g., Anderson et al., 2014a; Horner 2013 Keywords: Alexandrium fundyense Harmful algal blooms HABs PSP Forecasts a b s t r a c t Development of forecasting systems for harmful algal blooms (HABs) has been a long-standing research

  14. Understanding interannual, decadal level variability in paralytic shellfish poisoning toxicity in the Gulf of Maine: The HAB Index

    E-print Network

    McGillicuddy Jr., Dennis J.

    Harmful algal blooms HABs PSP HAB Index a b s t r a c t A major goal in harmful algal bloom (HAB) research equilibria formulation as might occur with alternating periods of sustained high and low cyst abundance in cyst abundance or growth conditions of vegetative cells, and the third characterizes a "sawtooth

  15. Assessing Nation-wide Distributions of Contaminant Levels in Selected Finfish and Shellfish from the Estuaries of the United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxicity of mercury is well documented and has led to laws and regulations governing its use and disposal; however mercury contamination of coastal and estuarine biota continues to be of public concern. The U.S. EPA Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program provided da...

  16. Distribution of Vibrio species in Shellfish and Water Samples Collected from the Atlantic Coastline of South-East Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Eyisi, Onyedikachukwu A.L.; Nwodo, Uchechukwu U.

    2013-01-01

    Crayfish, lobster, and sea-water samples collected from five fishing islands on the Atlantic coast–Bight of Biafra (Bonny)–belonging to Ibaka Local Government Area of Akwa-Ibom State of Nigeria were bacteriologically evaluated on thiosulphate citrate bile-salt sucrose (TCBS) agar for Vibrio load and pathotypes. Mean log10 Vibrio counts of 7.64±2.78 cfu/g (in crayfish), 5.07±3.21 cfu/g (in lobster), and 3.06±2.27 cfu/mL (in sea-water) were obtained in rainy season (June-July) while counts in the dry season (November-December) were 6.25±1.93 cfu/g, 5.99±1.54 cfu/g, and 3.84±1.78 cfu/mL respectively. The physicochemical measurements (temperature, pH, and total dissolved solutes) of the sea-water did not vary significantly in the two seasons across all five islands. Vibrio species isolated were Vibrio cholerae (both O1 and non-O1 serotypes), V. parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus, V. mimicus, and V. fluvialis. Both Ogawa and Inaba subtypes of V. cholerae O1 serotype were found. In addition, the Hikojima subtype, which had not been previously reported in the region, was isolated in two samples. The results show that these Vibrio species are endemic in the area. PMID:24288944

  17. Cultivation of the benthic microalga Prorocentrum lima for the production of diarrhetic shellfish poisoning toxins in a vertical flat photobioreactor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Chen, Junhui; Li, Zhaoyong; Wang, Yanlong; Fu, Boqiang; Han, Xiaotian; Zheng, Li

    2015-03-01

    In this study, the cultivation conditions of Prorocentrum lima, including temperature, nutrient concentration, photoperiod, and salinity were observed, and then an effective method for the large-volume cultivation of P. lima using a vertical flat photobioreactor was developed for the first time. The maximum cell concentrations and toxin contents of P. lima cultured in the photobioreactor were reached after a 35 days cultivation. Moreover, a step-wise double-sedimentation centrifugation method was used to harvest the microalgae cells, with the harvest rate of 89%. Toxin analysis of dry microalgal powder indicated that OA and DTX1 contents were 15.2 and 21.6 mg g(-1), respectively. These results verify that the culture method using the proposed photobioreactor is effective to massively produce DSP toxin-containing P. lima. This study may serve as a guide for the large-scale production of toxin-producing red-tide benthic microalgae. PMID:25545093

  18. ANALYTICAL METHODOLOGY FOR THE DETERMINATION OF KEPONE (TRADEMARK) RESIDUES IN FISH, SHELLFISH, AND HI-VOL AIR FILTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The recent discovery of the pollution of the environment with Kepone has resulted in a tremendous interest in the development of residue methodology for the compound. Current multiresidue methods for the determination of the common organochlorinated pesticides do not yield good q...

  19. BOTHRIOCEPHALUS - CHAPTER IN SUGGESTED PROCEDURES FOR THE DETECTION AND IDENTIFICATION OF CERTAIN FIN FISH AND SHELLFISH PATHOGENS. 5TH EDITION.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Asian tapeworm Bothriocephalus acheilognathi is an exotic parasite of fish that probably came into the United States with the importation of grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella from Europe. It primarily infects minnows and carps (Cyprinidae) but also is found in fish from several other families....

  20. Shellfish Face Uncertain Future in High CO2 World: Influence of Acidification on Oyster Larvae Calcification and Growth in Estuaries

    PubMed Central

    Miller, A. Whitman; Reynolds, Amanda C.; Sobrino, Cristina; Riedel, Gerhardt F.

    2009-01-01

    Background Human activities have increased atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide by 36% during the past 200 years. One third of all anthropogenic CO2 has been absorbed by the oceans, reducing pH by about 0.1 of a unit and significantly altering their carbonate chemistry. There is widespread concern that these changes are altering marine habitats severely, but little or no attention has been given to the biota of estuarine and coastal settings, ecosystems that are less pH buffered because of naturally reduced alkalinity. Methodology/Principal Findings To address CO2-induced changes to estuarine calcification, veliger larvae of two oyster species, the Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica), and the Suminoe oyster (Crassostrea ariakensis) were grown in estuarine water under four pCO2 regimes, 280, 380, 560 and 800 µatm, to simulate atmospheric conditions in the pre-industrial era, present, and projected future concentrations in 50 and 100 years respectively. CO2 manipulations were made using an automated negative feedback control system that allowed continuous and precise control over the pCO2 in experimental aquaria. Larval growth was measured using image analysis, and calcification was measured by chemical analysis of calcium in their shells. C. virginica experienced a 16% decrease in shell area and a 42% reduction in calcium content when pre-industrial and end of 21st century pCO2 treatments were compared. C. ariakensis showed no change to either growth or calcification. Both species demonstrated net calcification and growth, even when aragonite was undersaturated, a result that runs counter to previous expectations for invertebrate larvae that produce aragonite shells. Conclusions and Significance Our results suggest that temperate estuarine and coastal ecosystems are vulnerable to the expected changes in water chemistry due to elevated atmospheric CO2 and that biological responses to acidification, especially calcifying biota, will be species-specific and therefore much more variable and complex than reported previously. PMID:19478855

  1. CONSOLIDATION OF BASELINE INFORMATION, DEVELOPMENT OF METHODOLOGY, AND INVESTIGATION OF THERMAL IMPACTS ON FRESHWATER SHELLFISH, INSECTS, AND OTHER BIOTA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A computerized information system was developed for storing, retrieving, and analyzing data collected during limnological surveys. To facilitate storage of information, a series of hierarchial codes was developed. These codes not only reduced storage requirements, but also helped...

  2. Culture and behavior of selected estuarine fish and shellfish in aquaria receiving effluent water from a power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, B.A.

    1981-01-01

    Sixteen species (2 molluscs, 2 crustaceans, and 12 fishes) were used as biological monitors in flow-through aquaria. The aquaria received effluent from Houston Lighting and Power Company's Cedar Bayou generating station located in Chambers County, Texas. Growth and survival of organisms were monitored in ambient and thermally regulated water (20, 25, and 30/sup 0/C). Behavior experiments were carried out with several of the monitor species, Cyprinodon variegatus, Mugil cephalus and Mugil curema. R. cuneata, C. virginica, L. xanthurus, M. undulatus, C. faber and M. cephalus were analyzed for heavy metals and pesticides and were evaluated according to current Food and Drug Administration (FDA) standards. All organisms were found to be within the established FDA tolerance levels and are therefore considered fit for human consumption. C. variegatus was tested at varius sex-ratios to determine whether a particular ratio could maximize the number of young produced. No statistically significant difference was found in the number of young produced; however, population density and sex-ratio significantly increased total adult mortality. The swimming and feeding behavior of M. cephalus and M. curema was observed and described. The number of food bites was significantly affected by the interactions of culture, species, and density. During polyculture situations there were significantly more food bites, long traverses and total traverses than in monoculture situations.

  3. 75 FR 18549 - In the Matter of Certain Non-Shellfish Derived Glucosamine and Products Containing Same; Notice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-12

    ..., 2009. 74 FR 9428 (March 4, 2009). The complaint alleged violations of section 337 of the Tariff Act of... Investigation as to Respondent Ethical Naturals, Inc. From the Investigation Based Upon a Settlement Agreement... Ethical Naturals, Inc. from the investigation based upon a settlement agreement. The investigation...

  4. 40 CFR 125.73 - Criteria and standards for the determination of alternative effluent limitations under section...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...balanced, indigenous community of shellfish, fish and wildlife in and...a balanced indigenous community of shellfish, fish and wildlife in and on...balanced, indigenous community of shellfish, fish and wildlife in and...

  5. 46 CFR 221.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., catching, taking, or harvesting of fish, shellfish, marine animals, pearls, shells, or marine vegetation or..., or harvesting of fish, shellfish, marine animals, pearls, shells, or marine vegetation. (g)...

  6. 46 CFR 221.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., catching, taking, or harvesting of fish, shellfish, marine animals, pearls, shells, or marine vegetation or..., or harvesting of fish, shellfish, marine animals, pearls, shells, or marine vegetation. (g)...

  7. 46 CFR 221.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., catching, taking, or harvesting of fish, shellfish, marine animals, pearls, shells, or marine vegetation or..., or harvesting of fish, shellfish, marine animals, pearls, shells, or marine vegetation. (g)...

  8. 46 CFR 221.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., catching, taking, or harvesting of fish, shellfish, marine animals, pearls, shells, or marine vegetation or..., or harvesting of fish, shellfish, marine animals, pearls, shells, or marine vegetation. (g)...

  9. 46 CFR 221.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., catching, taking, or harvesting of fish, shellfish, marine animals, pearls, shells, or marine vegetation or..., or harvesting of fish, shellfish, marine animals, pearls, shells, or marine vegetation. (g)...

  10. [Marine toxins].

    PubMed

    Lueger, A; Scherr, D; Lang, B; Brodmann, M; Stark, G

    1999-01-01

    The consumption of seafood, which is contaminated by toxines of red tides, is a common cause of disease in tropic regions. The most important diseases, which are caused by red tides are Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning (PSP), Diarrhetic Shellfish Poisoning (DSP), Neurotoxic Shellfish Poisoning (NSP), Amnesic Shellfish Poisoning (ASP), Ciguatera Fish Poisoning (CFP). PMID:11315409

  11. Journal of ShellfishResear~li,Vol. 24, No. 3, 761-765, 2005. A PROLONGED THERMAL STRESS EXPERIMENT ON THE AMERICAN LOBSTER,

    E-print Network

    Allam, Bassem

    ON THE AMERICAN LOBSTER, HOMARUS AMERICANUS ALISTAIR D. M. DOVE,'* BASSEM ALL AM,^ JASON J. POWERS~AND MARK S groups of lobsters were maintained for 31 days at temperatures environmentally realistic for Long Island Sound to investigate the effectsof prolonged thermal stress on the physiology of lobsters. One group

  12. Journal of Shellfish Research. Vol. 25, NO.3, 1051-1057, 2006. FLUOROMETRIC MEASUREMENT OF OXIDATIVE BURST IN LOBSTER HEMOCYTES AND

    E-print Network

    Allam, Bassem

    OF OXIDATIVE BURST IN LOBSTER HEMOCYTES AND INHIBITING EFFECT OF PATHOGENIC BACTERIA AND HYPOXIA BRANDON MOSS-diacetate(DCFH-DA)to measure H202production in lobster hemocytes. After oxidation by hydrogen peroxide, this molecule produces a fluorescent product that can be easily detected. The respiratory burst was successfully activated in lobster

  13. Journal of Shellfish Research Vol. 16, No. I , 187-203. 1997. THE EFFECTS OF DREISSENA POLYMORPHA (PALLAS) INVASION ON AQUATIC

    E-print Network

    Padilla, Dianna

    (Starobogatov and Andreeva 1994). The Caspian Sea, the Black Sea Basin, the Azov Sea, and lower parts of rivers shipping canals for transportation and commerce were de- veloped from the Black Sea basin to the Baltic Sea the Dnieprovsko-Nemansky route, which connected the Dnieper (Black Sea basin) and the Neman rivers (Baltic Sea

  14. Per capita use of commercial fish and shellfish is based on the supply of fishery products, both edible and nonedible (industrial), on a round weight equivalent basis, without

    E-print Network

    of fishery products, both edible and nonedible (industrial), on a round weight equivalent basis, without) meat weight consumption rather than round weight consumption. In addition, per capita consumption

  15. Beta-N-methylamino-l-alanine: LC-MS/MS Optimization, Screening of Cyanobacterial Strains and Occurrence in Shellfish from Thau, a French Mediterranean Lagoon

    PubMed Central

    Réveillon, Damien; Abadie, Eric; Séchet, Véronique; Brient, Luc; Savar, Véronique; Bardouil, Michèle; Hess, Philipp; Amzil, Zouher

    2014-01-01

    ?-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) is a neurotoxic non-protein amino acid suggested to be involved in neurodegenerative diseases. It was reported to be produced by cyanobacteria, but also found in edible aquatic organisms, thus raising concern of a widespread human exposure. However, the chemical analysis of BMAA and its isomers are controversial, mainly due to the lack of selectivity of the analytical methods. Using factorial design, we have optimized the chromatographic separation of underivatized analogues by a hydrophilic interaction chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS/MS) method. A combination of an effective solid phase extraction (SPE) clean-up, appropriate chromatographic resolution and the use of specific mass spectral transitions allowed for the development of a highly selective and sensitive analytical procedure to identify and quantify BMAA and its isomers (in both free and total form) in cyanobacteria and mollusk matrices (LOQ of 0.225 and 0.15 µg/g dry weight, respectively). Ten species of cyanobacteria (six are reported to be BMAA producers) were screened with this method, and neither free nor bound BMAA could be found, while both free and bound DAB were present in almost all samples. Mussels and oysters collected in 2009 in the Thau Lagoon, France, were also screened, and bound BMAA and its two isomers, DAB and AEG, were observed in all samples (from 0.6 to 14.4 µg/g DW), while only several samples contained quantifiable free BMAA. PMID:25405857

  16. Accumulation of organic and inorganic contaminants in shellfish collected in estuarine waters near Pensacola, Florida: contamination profiles and risks to human consumers.

    PubMed

    Karouna-Renier, Natalie K; Snyder, Richard A; Allison, Jeffrey G; Wagner, Matthew G; Ranga Rao, K

    2007-01-01

    We conducted a screening level assessment of contaminants in blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) and oysters (Crassostrea virginica) from bays and bayous in the Pensacola, FL area. Tissue samples were analyzed for 17 dioxins/furans, 12 dioxin-like PCB (DL-PCBs) congeners, mercury, and various metals. Contaminant levels were compared to screening values (SV) calculated using U.S. EPA recommendations for establishing consumption advisories. All sampling locations exceeded the SV (0.098pgg(-1)) for dioxins/furans/DL-PCBs, based on a Florida-specific consumption rate (46gday(-1)). Arsenic (inorganic), mercury, cadmium, and zinc levels exceeded SVs in samples from select locations, and with the exception of mercury, these locations were generally downstream of known contaminated areas. We also assessed potential human health risks from consumption of these species. Risks to human health were greatest from consumption of crab hepatopancreas, suggesting that consumption of hepatopancreas, whether directly or indirectly, from crabs collected anywhere in the Pensacola Bay region should be avoided. PMID:16872729

  17. Summary of the Surveillance Data Post Re-opening Grids C14-C16, C18, C20, C23-C25 (fish & shellfish)

    E-print Network

    performance liquid chromatography/fluorescence (HPLC-UVF) method developed by the FDA (http shrimp, which were analyzed by GC/MS. The HPLC-UVF method provides reliable estimates of PAH levels in seafood. A minor difference between the two methods is that the HPLC method has higher limits

  18. Effect of seawater salinity on pore-size distribution on a poly(styrene)-based HP20 resin and its adsorption of diarrhetic shellfish toxins.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lin; Sun, Geng; Qiu, Jiangbing; Ma, Qimin; Hess, Philipp; Li, Aifeng

    2014-12-19

    In the present study, okadaic acid (OA) and dinophysistoxin-1 (DTX1) were spiked into artificial seawater at low, medium and high estuarine salinities (9‰, 13.5‰ and 27‰). Passive samplers (HP20 resin) used for solid phase adsorption toxin tracking (SPATT) technology were exposed in these seawaters for 12-h periods. Adsorption curves well fitted a pseudo-secondary kinetics model. The highest initial sorption rates of both toxins occurred in the seawater of medium salinity, followed by seawater of low and high estuarine salinity. Pore volumes of micropores (<2 nm) and small mesopores (2 nm

  19. Beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine: LC-MS/MS optimization, screening of cyanobacterial strains and occurrence in shellfish from Thau, a French Mediterranean lagoon.

    PubMed

    Réveillon, Damien; Abadie, Eric; Séchet, Véronique; Brient, Luc; Savar, Véronique; Bardouil, Michèle; Hess, Philipp; Amzil, Zouher

    2014-11-01

    ?-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is a neurotoxic non-protein amino acid suggested to be involved in neurodegenerative diseases. It was reported to be produced by cyanobacteria, but also found in edible aquatic organisms, thus raising concern of a widespread human exposure. However, the chemical analysis of BMAA and its isomers are controversial, mainly due to the lack of selectivity of the analytical methods. Using factorial design, we have optimized the chromatographic separation of underivatized analogues by a hydrophilic interaction chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS/MS) method. A combination of an effective solid phase extraction (SPE) clean-up, appropriate chromatographic resolution and the use of specific mass spectral transitions allowed for the development of a highly selective and sensitive analytical procedure to identify and quantify BMAA and its isomers (in both free and total form) in cyanobacteria and mollusk matrices (LOQ of 0.225 and 0.15 µg/g dry weight, respectively). Ten species of cyanobacteria (six are reported to be BMAA producers) were screened with this method, and neither free nor bound BMAA could be found, while both free and bound DAB were present in almost all samples. Mussels and oysters collected in 2009 in the Thau Lagoon, France, were also screened, and bound BMAA and its two isomers, DAB and AEG, were observed in all samples (from 0.6 to 14.4 µg/g DW), while only several samples contained quantifiable free BMAA. PMID:25405857

  20. Effect of the industrial steaming on the toxicity, estimated by LC-MS/MS, of mussels exposed for a long time to diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) toxins.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Juan; Arévalo, Fabiola; Correa, Jorge; Porro, M Corina; Cabado, Ana G; Vieites, Juan M; Moroño, Angeles

    2015-06-15

    The effect of industrial steaming on mussels that had been naturally exposed to DSP toxins for a long time was studied using LC-MS/MS. The estimated toxicity increased with steaming by a percentage that cannot be explained by weight loss. The estimated toxin content per mussel increased substantially with the treatment, which can only be explained by an incorrect estimation by the technique (at the extraction or analytical level) or by the presence of unknown derivatives or analogues. Direct alkaline hydrolysis of the mussel meat yielded more toxin than the standard hydrolysis (hydrolysis of the methanolic extracts), suggesting that extraction was, at least in part, responsible for the increase of toxin content. In situations as the one described in this work, it can be expected that mussels with toxicities well below the regulatory limit could easily surpass that level after industrial steaming, thus producing important losses for food processors. PMID:25660882

  1. SOLE FOOD--SPECIALTY FOR SLIMMERS Diet time can be pleasure time with fish and shellfish on the menu. All fishery prod-

    E-print Network

    on the menu. All fishery prod- ucts offer high nutritive values and most of them are low in fat and calories the calorie content which is only an approximate 175 calories per serving. SAUCY SOLE 2 pounds sole fillets teaspoon dry mustard , 1 1 melted - teaspoon paprika "2 cup low calorie mayonnaise ~ 2 tablespoons chili

  2. COMMERCIAL LANDINGS OF FISH AND SHELLFISH BY U.S. FISHING CRAFT: BY SPECIES, BY DISTANCE CAUGHT OFF U.S. SHORES AND IN INTERNATIONAL WATERS, 1995 (1)

    E-print Network

    ,574 - - 65,904 123,694 Salmon: Chinook or king. . 18,935 24,540 5,798 9,899 - - 24,733 34,439 Chum or keta - - 1,859 2,195 White. . . . . . . 154 98 47 23 - - 201 121 Sharks: Dogfish. . . . . . 11,205 1,637 41

  3. 27 CFR 7.22a - Voluntary disclosure of major food allergens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...flounder, or cod), Crustacean shellfish (for example, crab, lobster, or shrimp), tree nuts (for example, almonds, pecans...the species of Crustacean shellfish (for example, crab, lobster, or shrimp); and (iii) The names “egg” and “peanuts”, as...

  4. 27 CFR 7.22a - Voluntary disclosure of major food allergens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...flounder, or cod), Crustacean shellfish (for example, crab, lobster, or shrimp), tree nuts (for example, almonds, pecans...the species of Crustacean shellfish (for example, crab, lobster, or shrimp); and (iii) The names “egg” and “peanuts”, as...

  5. 27 CFR 5.32a - Voluntary disclosure of major food allergens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...flounder, or cod), Crustacean shellfish (for example, crab, lobster, or shrimp), tree nuts (for example, almonds, pecans...the species of Crustacean shellfish (for example, crab, lobster, or shrimp); and (iii) The names “egg” and “peanuts”,...

  6. 27 CFR 7.22a - Voluntary disclosure of major food allergens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...flounder, or cod), Crustacean shellfish (for example, crab, lobster, or shrimp), tree nuts (for example, almonds, pecans...the species of Crustacean shellfish (for example, crab, lobster, or shrimp); and (iii) The names “egg” and “peanuts”, as...

  7. 27 CFR 5.32a - Voluntary disclosure of major food allergens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...flounder, or cod), Crustacean shellfish (for example, crab, lobster, or shrimp), tree nuts (for example, almonds, pecans...the species of Crustacean shellfish (for example, crab, lobster, or shrimp); and (iii) The names “egg” and “peanuts”,...

  8. 27 CFR 4.32a - Voluntary disclosure of major food allergens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...flounder, or cod), Crustacean shellfish (for example, crab, lobster, or shrimp), tree nuts (for example, almonds, pecans...the species of Crustacean shellfish (for example, crab, lobster, or shrimp); and (iii) The names “egg” and “peanuts”,...

  9. 27 CFR 4.32a - Voluntary disclosure of major food allergens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...flounder, or cod), Crustacean shellfish (for example, crab, lobster, or shrimp), tree nuts (for example, almonds, pecans...the species of Crustacean shellfish (for example, crab, lobster, or shrimp); and (iii) The names “egg” and “peanuts”,...

  10. 27 CFR 4.32a - Voluntary disclosure of major food allergens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...flounder, or cod), Crustacean shellfish (for example, crab, lobster, or shrimp), tree nuts (for example, almonds, pecans...the species of Crustacean shellfish (for example, crab, lobster, or shrimp); and (iii) The names “egg” and “peanuts”,...

  11. 27 CFR 5.32a - Voluntary disclosure of major food allergens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...flounder, or cod), Crustacean shellfish (for example, crab, lobster, or shrimp), tree nuts (for example, almonds, pecans...the species of Crustacean shellfish (for example, crab, lobster, or shrimp); and (iii) The names “egg” and “peanuts”,...

  12. 27 CFR 7.22a - Voluntary disclosure of major food allergens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...flounder, or cod), Crustacean shellfish (for example, crab, lobster, or shrimp), tree nuts (for example, almonds, pecans...the species of Crustacean shellfish (for example, crab, lobster, or shrimp); and (iii) The names “egg” and “peanuts”, as...

  13. 27 CFR 7.22a - Voluntary disclosure of major food allergens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...flounder, or cod), Crustacean shellfish (for example, crab, lobster, or shrimp), tree nuts (for example, almonds, pecans...the species of Crustacean shellfish (for example, crab, lobster, or shrimp); and (iii) The names “egg” and “peanuts”, as...

  14. 27 CFR 4.32a - Voluntary disclosure of major food allergens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...flounder, or cod), Crustacean shellfish (for example, crab, lobster, or shrimp), tree nuts (for example, almonds, pecans...the species of Crustacean shellfish (for example, crab, lobster, or shrimp); and (iii) The names “egg” and “peanuts”,...

  15. 27 CFR 4.32a - Voluntary disclosure of major food allergens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...flounder, or cod), Crustacean shellfish (for example, crab, lobster, or shrimp), tree nuts (for example, almonds, pecans...the species of Crustacean shellfish (for example, crab, lobster, or shrimp); and (iii) The names “egg” and “peanuts”,...

  16. 27 CFR 5.32a - Voluntary disclosure of major food allergens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...flounder, or cod), Crustacean shellfish (for example, crab, lobster, or shrimp), tree nuts (for example, almonds, pecans...the species of Crustacean shellfish (for example, crab, lobster, or shrimp); and (iii) The names “egg” and “peanuts”,...

  17. 27 CFR 5.32a - Voluntary disclosure of major food allergens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...flounder, or cod), Crustacean shellfish (for example, crab, lobster, or shrimp), tree nuts (for example, almonds, pecans...the species of Crustacean shellfish (for example, crab, lobster, or shrimp); and (iii) The names “egg” and “peanuts”,...

  18. 77 FR 61379 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-09

    ...30 minutes. Burden Hours: 538. Needs and Uses: This request is for a new collection of information. The Puget Sound estuary provides one of the most valuable shellfish habitats in the Pacific Northwest. Shellfish are important economically,...

  19. 46 CFR 356.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...taking, or harvesting of fish, shellfish, marine animals, pearls, shells, or marine vegetation or an activity that can reasonably...taking, or harvesting of fish, shellfish, marine animals, pearls, shells, or marine vegetation; (j) Fishing Industry...

  20. 46 CFR 356.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...taking, or harvesting of fish, shellfish, marine animals, pearls, shells, or marine vegetation or an activity that can reasonably...taking, or harvesting of fish, shellfish, marine animals, pearls, shells, or marine vegetation; (j) Fishing Industry...

  1. 46 CFR 356.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...taking, or harvesting of fish, shellfish, marine animals, pearls, shells, or marine vegetation or an activity that can reasonably...taking, or harvesting of fish, shellfish, marine animals, pearls, shells, or marine vegetation; (j) Fishing Industry...

  2. 46 CFR 356.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...taking, or harvesting of fish, shellfish, marine animals, pearls, shells, or marine vegetation or an activity that can reasonably...taking, or harvesting of fish, shellfish, marine animals, pearls, shells, or marine vegetation; (j) Fishing Industry...

  3. 27 CFR 4.32a - Voluntary disclosure of major food allergens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... shellfish (for example, crab, lobster, or shrimp), tree nuts (for example, almonds, pecans, or walnuts... shellfish (for example, crab, lobster, or shrimp); and (iii) The names “egg” and “peanuts”, as well as...

  4. 27 CFR 4.32a - Voluntary disclosure of major food allergens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... shellfish (for example, crab, lobster, or shrimp), tree nuts (for example, almonds, pecans, or walnuts... shellfish (for example, crab, lobster, or shrimp); and (iii) The names “egg” and “peanuts”, as well as...

  5. 27 CFR 4.32a - Voluntary disclosure of major food allergens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... shellfish (for example, crab, lobster, or shrimp), tree nuts (for example, almonds, pecans, or walnuts... shellfish (for example, crab, lobster, or shrimp); and (iii) The names “egg” and “peanuts”, as well as...

  6. Functional genomics of a non-toxic Alexandrium lusitanicum culture

    E-print Network

    Martins, Claudia A

    2007-01-01

    Paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) is a human intoxication associated with the consumption of shellfish contaminated with a family of neurotoxins called saxitoxins. Many species in the dinoflagellate genus Alexandrium ...

  7. 40 CFR 300.305 - Phase II-Preliminary assessment and initiation of action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS...including but not limited to fish, shellfish, wildlife...including, but not limited to fish, shellfish, wildlife...practicable as provided in the Fish and Wildlife and...

  8. states Department of the Interior, J. A. Krug, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Albert M. Day, Director

    E-print Network

    of the hundreds of kinds of fish, shellfish, and seaweed bas several vernacular names, the wide alsortment. Countless local vernacu- lar names for fish. shellfish. and seaweed are 1n use in various parts of Japan

  9. Mechanisms of viral persistence within bivalves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fecal bacteria and waterborne enteric viruses bioconcentrate within bivalve shellfish. However while bacteria are readily purged, viruses tend to be retained within shellfish when bivalves are depurated. The US. Department of Agriculture Seafood Safety Laboratory has recently demonstrated that pha...

  10. Fresh and Frozen Seafood: Selecting and Serving It Safely

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Español (Spanish) WATCH a VIDEO on Seafood Safety Fish and shellfish contain high quality protein and other ... well-balanced diet that includes a variety of fish and shellfish can contribute to heart health and ...

  11. EPARTMENT OF COMM NATIONALOCEA

    E-print Network

    and shellfish farming--and to help restore depleted wild stocks of fish, shellfish and other marine animals to use aquaculture to become more self-sufficient in the production of seafood--also known as fish-established in 2004, NOAA's Aquaculture Program addresses coastal and onshore marine shellfish and finfish farming

  12. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-print Network

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 346: 179­187, 2007 doi: 10.3354/meps07046 is the expansion of the shellfish aquaculture industry. Shellfish farming involves introducing struc- tures on shellfish farming structures to that of mussels from nearby intertidal areas, and considered the relevance

  13. Injury to salmon eggs and preemergent fry in Prince William Sound. Fish/shellfish study number 2. Exxon Valdez oil spill, state/federal natural resource damage assessment final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sharr, S.; Bue, B.G.; Moffitt, S.D.; Craig, A.K.; Evans, D.G.

    1994-04-01

    Pink salmon embryo mortality was elevated in oil contaminated streams during the falls of 1989, 1990, and 1991. Increased embryo mortality was detected in the lower intertidal zones in 1989 while elevated mortalities were observed at the highest intertidal zone in 1990. These findings were consistent with how stream oiling was expected to take place: all intertidal zones were contaminated in 1989 with the remaining oil being deposited in the highest intertidal zone in 1990. Embryo mortality was significantly higher in all zones for the oil contaminated streams in 1991. No difference in embryo to preemergent fry survival was detected for the 1989, 1990, or 1991 brood years.

  14. Per capita use of commercial fish and shellfish is based on the supply of fishery products, both edible and nonedible (industrial), on a round weight equivalent basis, without considering

    E-print Network

    of fishery products, both edible and nonedible (industrial), on a round weight equivalent basis, without) meat weight consumption rather than round weight consumption. In addition, per capita consumption and nonedible (industrial) fishery products on a round weight basis. "Total supply" is not adjusted

  15. Per capita use of commercial fish and shellfish is based on the supply of fishery products, both edible and nonedible (industrial), on a round weight equivalent basis, without considering the beginning or ending stocks,

    E-print Network

    edible and nonedible (industrial), on a round weight equivalent basis, without considering the beginning consumption data. Per capita consumption figures represent edible (for human use) meat weight consumption rather than round weight consumption. In addition, per capita consumption includes allowances

  16. Per capita use of commercial fish and shellfish is based on the supply of fishery products, both edible and nonedible (industrial), on a round weight equivalent basis, without considering

    E-print Network

    of fishery products, both edible and nonedible (industrial), on a round weight equivalent basis, without) meat weight consumption rather than round weight consumption. In addition, per capita consumption.S. commercial landings and imports of both edible and nonedible (industrial) fishery products on a round weight

  17. Imprudent fishing harvests and consequent trophic cascades on the West Florida shelf over the last half century: A harbinger of increased human deaths from paralytic shellfish poisoning along the southeastern United States, in response to oligotrophication?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. J.; Tomas, C. R.; Steidinger, K. A.; Lenes, J. M.; Chen, F. R.; Weisberg, R. H.; Zheng, L.; Landsberg, J. H.; Vargo, G. A.; Heil, C. A.

    2011-06-01

    Within the context of ubiquitous overfishing of piscivores, recent consequent increments of jellyfish and clupeids have occurred at the zooplanktivore trophic level in the eastern Gulf of Mexico (GOM), after overfishing of one of their predators, i.e. red snapper. Initiation of a local trophic cascade thence led to declines of herbivore stocks, documented here on the West Florida shelf. These exacerbating world-wide trophic cascades have resulted in larger harmful algal blooms (HABs), already present at the base of most coastal food webs. Impacts on human health have thus far been minimal within nutrient-rich coastal regions. To provide a setting for past morbidities, consideration is given to chronologies of other trophic cascades within eutrophic, cold water marine ecosystems of the Scotian Sea, in the Gulf of Alaska, off Southwest Africa, within the Barents, White, and Black Seas, in the Gulf of Maine, and finally in the North Sea. Next, comparison is now made here of recent ten-fold increments within Florida waters of both relatively benign and saxitoxic HABs, some of which are fatal to humans. These events are placed in a perspective of other warm shelf systems of the South China and Caribbean Seas to assess prior and possible future poison toxicities of oligotrophic coastal habitats. Past wide-spread kills of fishes and sea urchins over the Caribbean Sea and the downstream GOM are examined in relation to the potential transmission of dinoflagellate saxitoxin and other epizootic poison vectors by western boundary currents over larger "commons" than local embayments. Furthermore, since some HABs produce more potent saxitoxins upon nutrient depletion, recent decisions to ban seasonal fertilizer applications to Florida lawns may have unintended consequences. In the future, human-killing phytoplankton, rather than relatively benign fish-killing HABs of the past, may be dispersed along the southeastern United States seaboard.

  18. The NMFS research vessel 'Del aware II' sails from Woods Hole, Mass., to assess shellfish resources south of New Engl a nd. See c ruis e r eport page 9.

    E-print Network

    . --K. N. Baxter U.S. AND USSR STUDY SHRIMP IN GULF OF ALASKA The abundance and distribution of northern shrimp over a large part of the Gulf of Alaska is being studied in a cooperative U.S. - USSR research 1970 . Such meetings are provided for in U.S.-USSR agreements concerning North Pacific fisheries

  19. Pharmaceutical relationships : intersections of illness, fantasy, and capital in the age of direct-to-consumer marketing

    E-print Network

    Greenslit, Nathan P

    2007-01-01

    Blooms of toxic species within the algal dinoflagellate species complex Alexandrium tamarense may cause Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning, a significant and growing environmental threat worldwide. However, blooms of closely ...

  20. Vol. 54, No. 1APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, Jan. 1988, p. 1-9 0099-2240/88/010001-09$02.00/0

    E-print Network

    Hazen, Terry

    a source of bacterial contamination for fish and shellfish in this environment. The simultaneous monitoring microflora of most estuaries (8, 18). Considering the reports ofrecent outbreaks ofcholera traced

  1. 15 CFR 930.11 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...streams, lakes, aquifers, submerged aquatic vegetation, land, plants, trees, minerals, fish, shellfish, invertebrates, amphibians, birds, mammals, reptiles, and coastal resources of national significance. Coastal uses and resources also...

  2. 15 CFR 930.11 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...streams, lakes, aquifers, submerged aquatic vegetation, land, plants, trees, minerals, fish, shellfish, invertebrates, amphibians, birds, mammals, reptiles, and coastal resources of national significance. Coastal uses and resources also...

  3. 15 CFR 930.11 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...streams, lakes, aquifers, submerged aquatic vegetation, land, plants, trees, minerals, fish, shellfish, invertebrates, amphibians, birds, mammals, reptiles, and coastal resources of national significance. Coastal uses and resources also...

  4. It is with great pleasure that we present our 2015 Private Dining Menus. This year we have placed greater emphasis than ever before on the provenance and sustainability of ingredients. We

    E-print Network

    Lasenby, Joan

    , Cucumber & Watercress Verrine Warm Seaweed, Scallop & Prawn Sushi with Wasabi Caviar Pressed Salmon, Leek, Caper & Potato Terrine with Watercress Emulsion Devon Crab Salad with Lovage Vichyssoise and Shellfish

  5. RUTGERS IN YOUR DISTRICT FROM THE OFFICE OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS

    E-print Network

    Neimark, Alexander V.

    · Haskin Shellfish Laboratory · Rutgers Against Hunger · Rutgers' Cape Shore Laboratory · Rutgers and aquaculture science in the state. Rutgers Against Hunger (RAH) · Rutgers Against Hunger (RAH) is a university

  6. 77 FR 50085 - Rookery Bay, FL and Kachemak Bay, AK National Estuarine Research Reserve Management Plan Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ... including climate change and harvested species, such as salmon and shellfish. The reserve will continue... in stewardship, incompatible use by visitors, and ecological impacts of catastrophic change...

  7. Life cycle studies of the red tide dinoflagellate species complex Alexandrium tamarense

    E-print Network

    Brosnahan, Michael L. (Michael Lewis)

    2011-01-01

    Blooms of toxic species within the algal dinoflagellate species complex Alexandrium tamarense may cause Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning, a significant and growing environmental threat worldwide. However, blooms of closely ...

  8. Chalmersska huset Prices exclude VAT.

    E-print Network

    Svenningsson, Josef

    .- Manchego with herbs & garlic Grilled Mediterranean vegetables Charcuterie & cold cut deli's Seared tuna Shellfish sek 425.- Shrimps, langoustines, crab claws, steamed mussels Sourdough bread, crisp bread, garlic

  9. MFR PAPER 1345 Larval Nematodes Parasitic

    E-print Network

    MFR PAPER 1345 Larval Nematodes Parasitic in Shellfish THOMAS C. CHENG Thamas C. Cheng the standpoint of shellfish biologists, this interest stems primarily from the possible effects of parasites or barely cooked state, the potential of transmission of such parasites from mollusks to humans

  10. Pulsed ultraviolet light reduces immunoglobulin E binding to atlantic white shrimp (litopenaeus setiferus).

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To date, the only effective method to prevent allergic reactions to shellfish is complete avoidance; however, if processing methods could be employed to minimize shellfish allergens before products reach consumers, illness could be substantially lessened. Pulsed ultraviolet light (PUV), a novel food...

  11. MITIGATION OF HAV IN SHUCKED OYSTERS USING HIGH HYDROSTATIC PRESSURE TREATMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Viruses were epidemiologically-linked to more than half of the 2,100 illnesses due to the consumption of raw or partially cooked shellfish in the United States from 1991 to 1998. The majority of the implicated shellfish were traced back to growing areas in approved status which were thought to hav...

  12. Rapid extraction of virus-contaminated hemocytes from oysters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rapid viral detection methods are necessary to employ diagnostic testing for viral contamination in shellfish to prevent and control foodborne illness. Current shellfish viral RNA extraction methods, which are time-consuming and not applicable for routine monitoring, require the testing of whole or ...

  13. Inner Hempstead Harbor Report Card

    E-print Network

    Boynton, Walter R.

    (during low tide) Barge Closed and capped landfill Golf course Tidal flushing Marina Wastewater treatment and species Middle Harbor #12;Making sense of beach and shellfish closures NCDH monitors bacteria levels from 90­100% of the time, except for the northernmost site. Closures of shellfishing areas and swimming

  14. {m-takesi, kshirai}@jaist.ac.jp R 2.1.1 2.1.2 2

    E-print Network

    Shirai, Kiyoaki

    ,395 B 2,035 155 3,550 3 3 2 3.1 8 vegetable( ), mushroom( ), fruit( ), meat( ), fish( ), shellfish( ), seafood( ), condiment( ) 2 · 8 1 1 · 156 2 #12;1: vegetable 0677 , 0688 , 0678 , 0841 mushroom 0684 fruit: vegetable ... mushroom fruit meat ... fish shellfish seafood ... condiment ... 3.2 sphere( ), cube( ), oval

  15. ^e=^^ CONSERVATION NOTES Our Commercial Fisheries

    E-print Network

    with fins, permanent gills (used for breathing in water), a backbone, and a skull. A shellfish is an aquatic animal with a shell, but it lacks fins, skull, and vertebrae. Some fishing terms, --Fish are "commercial (used for breathing in water), a backbone, and a skull. A shellfish is an aquatic animal with a shell

  16. USDA food-borne virus research initiatives at Delaware State University

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA ARS Microbial Safety of Aquaculture Products Center of Excellence located on the campus of Delaware State University is conducting research geared toward; 1) improving detection methods for virus contamination of shellfish; 2) understanding how and why viruses persist within shellfish; and ...

  17. Food Allergy: Tips to Remember

    MedlinePLUS

    ... milk, eggs, peanuts, wheat, soy, fish, shellfish and tree nuts. In some food groups, especially tree nuts and seafood, an allergy to one member ... listed in common language (milk, egg, fish, shellfish, tree nuts, wheat, peanuts and soybeans). • Carry and know ...

  18. Hemocytes are sites of persistence for virus-contaminated oysters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Like fecal bacteria, waterborne enteric viruses are readily bioconcentrated by bivalve shellfish. However while many bacteria decline rapidly when bivalves are placed in uncontaminated water, viruses tend to be retained within shellfish. In this study, we offer evidence that phagocytic blood cells...

  19. THE EFFECTS OF E-BEAM IRRADIATION AND MICROWAVE ENERGY ON EASTERN OYSTERS (CROSSOSTREA VIRGINICA) EXPERIMENTALLY INFECTED WITH CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shellfish have been identified as a potential source of Cyptosporidium infection for humans. Inactivation of this parasite and other pathogens in raw molluscan shellfish would provide increased food safety for healthy and at-risk consumers. The present study examined two food processing treatments, ...

  20. AN OVERVIEW OF ENTERIC VIRUS EXTRACTION AND ASSAY METHODS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enteric viruses, particularly norovirus and hepatitis A virus, are major contaminants of molluscan shellfish, leading to outbreaks of viral illness. A host of procedures have been developed for the extraction and assay of viruses from shellfish. Early extraction and assay methods focused on the de...