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  1. Toxic shock syndrome in Canada.

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, A. J.; Peacocke, J. E.; Ewan, P. E.

    1982-01-01

    Since 1976, 53 confirmed or suspected cases of toxic shock syndrome (TSS) have been reported in Canada. Twenty-two cases occurred in 1980, and by October 1981 another 21 had been reported. In Canada, like the United States, where nearly 1200 cases have been recorded, TSS appears to be associated with tampon use, although a few cases have occurred in males and in nonmenstruating women. Of the 53 patients 3 died. The enterotoxin produced by Staphylococcus aureus is probably responsible for TSS. Manufacturers of tampons have now placed warning labels on tampon boxes and information on TSS in the instruction inserts. Women should select tampons of appropriate absorbency for the various stages of menstruation. PMID:7042059

  2. Toxic Shock Syndrome (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Problems Talking to Your Child About Menstruation Cellulitis MRSA Staph Infections What Are Germs? Why Is Hand ... in? Feeling Fresh All About Menstruation Staph Infections MRSA Toxic Shock Syndrome Contact Us Print Resources Send ...

  3. Toxic shock syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... by a toxin produced by some types of Staphylococcus bacteria. A similar problem, called toxic shock-like ... men. Risk factors include: Recent childbirth Infection with Staphylococcus aureus ( S. aureus ), commonly called a Staph infection Foreign ...

  4. [Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome after breast surgery].

    PubMed

    Pelissier, A; Dumesnil, J; Levy, R; Charron, C; Rouzier, R

    2014-09-01

    The surgical site infection occurs within 30 days after surgery. It is the most common complication of surgery, with a rate of 1 to 5% without antibiotic prophylaxis and less than 1% with antibiotic prophylaxis. The toxic shock syndrome (TSS) is a dramatic complication. We report the case 39-year-old woman who presented a life-threatening TSS acquired after breast surgery. We describe the signs and symptoms of this condition as well as treatment principles. PMID:24636869

  5. Toxic shock syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... kidneys and liver) Redness of eyes, mouth, throat Seizures Widespread red rash that looks like a sunburn -- skin peeling occurs 1 or 2 weeks after the rash, particularly on the palms of the hand or bottom of the feet

  6. Myelodysplastic Syndrome Occurring in a Patient with Gorlin Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mull, Jamie L; Madden, Lisa M; Bayliss, Susan J

    2016-07-01

    We report a case of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) occurring in an African American boy with Gorlin syndrome with a novel PTCH1 mutation. Before developing MDS, the patient had been treated with chemotherapy and radiation for a medulloblastoma. He received a bone marrow transplant for the MDS and eventually died of treatment complications. Secondary hematologic malignancies are a known complication of certain chemotherapeutics, although whether a patient with Gorlin syndrome has a greater propensity for the development of such malignancies is unclear. PMID:27241746

  7. Lemierre's syndrome presenting with septic shock.

    PubMed

    Marulasiddappa, Vinay; Tejesh, C A

    2013-11-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is a rare condition characterized by septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein and metastatic abscesses following oropharyngeal infection. Though classically caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum, a number of other causative organisms have been reported in literature. We report a case of Lemierre's syndrome following parapharyngeal abscess due to staphylococcus aureus which progressed to septic shock. PMID:24501493

  8. Lemierre's syndrome presenting with septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Marulasiddappa, Vinay; Tejesh, C. A.

    2013-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is a rare condition characterized by septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein and metastatic abscesses following oropharyngeal infection. Though classically caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum, a number of other causative organisms have been reported in literature. We report a case of Lemierre's syndrome following parapharyngeal abscess due to staphylococcus aureus which progressed to septic shock. PMID:24501493

  9. Toxic Shock Syndrome: An Unusual Organism.

    PubMed

    Young, Katie; Luni, Faraz Khan; Yoon, Youngsook

    2016-07-01

    Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome is a rapidly fatal disease causing hypotension with multi organ dysfunction (MODS) early in the course of infection, which by definition is caused by Group A streptococcus (GAS). We describe a case of Toxic Shock like Syndrome (TSLS) in which the causative organism was not a GAS. A 71-year-old woman with hepatitis C and primary biliary cirrhosis had sudden onset of slurred speech and left arm and facial numbness. She had bilateral erythematous macular rash present on the flanks and legs. She was started on empiric antibiotics but her condition rapidly deteriorated 6 hours after admission. During this time, the development of multiple large reddish-pink areas of ecchymosis with bullae on her lower extremities, flanks, and groin were noted. She also developed multiorgan dysfunction (MODS) with renal dysfunction, coagulopathy and liver involvement. Patient expired before surgery could be performed and the time from presentation to the time of death was 16 hours. The blood and bullae fluid cultures grew Streptococcus dysgalactiae equisimilis. Streptococcus dysgalactiae equisimilis is a rare cause of TSLS which typically affects elderly or immunocompromised patients and only a few cases have been described in the literature. Our patient met criteria for TSLS which caused rapid shock and MODS. We review the literature of the cases describing the clinical characteristics of TSLS cause by non-GAS. Group G Streptococci is a rare but lethal cause of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. PMID:27432040

  10. Risk factors in dengue shock syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thein, S; Aung, M M; Shwe, T N; Aye, M; Zaw, A; Aye, K; Aye, K M; Aaskov, J

    1997-05-01

    Despite a growing body of evidence predominantly, but not exclusively, from Thailand suggesting that the risk of developing dengue shock syndrome (DSS) is greatest following an anamnestic dengue infection, particularly if the most recent infection was with dengue 2 virus, there continues to be debate about the justification for these claims. This report describes a five-year, prospective study in two townships (suburbs) in Yangon (Rangoon) Myanmar (Burma) in which attempts were made to confirm the data from an earlier prospective study in Thailand and to address some of the criticism of earlier studies. This investigation found the incidence of anamnestic dengue infections in DSS patients to be significantly higher than in the community from which they were drawn and a significantly higher risk of developing DSS following an anamnestic infection (particularly with dengue 2 virus) than following a primary infection with any serotype. PMID:9180609

  11. Dialysis disequilibrium syndrome occurring during continuous renal replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tuchman, Shamir; Khademian, Zarir P.; Mistry, Kirtida

    2013-01-01

    The dialysis disequilibrium syndrome (DDS) is characterized by progressive neurological symptoms and signs attributable to cerebral edema that occurs due to fluid shifts into the brain following a relatively rapid decrease in serum osmolality during hemodialysis (HD). Since continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is less efficient at solute clearance than intermittent HD, it seems logical that this mode of therapy is less likely to cause DDS. This entity has not been previously reported to occur with this modality. Here, we report two cases of DDS associated with CRRT that provide insights into its pathophysiological mechanisms and suggest strategies for its prevention. PMID:26120445

  12. Infectious Shock and Toxic Shock Syndrome Diagnoses in Hospitals, Colorado, USA

    PubMed Central

    Smit, Michael A.; Nyquist, Ann-Christine

    2013-01-01

    In Colorado, USA, diagnoses coded as toxic shock syndrome (TSS) constituted 27.3% of infectious shock cases during 1993–2006. The incidence of staphylococcal TSS did not change significantly overall or in female patients 10–49 years of age but increased for streptococcal TSS. TSS may be underrecognized among all ages and both sexes. PMID:24188357

  13. Recurrent undifferentiated shock: Idiopathic Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Aroney, Nicholas; Ure, Stewart; White, Hayden; Sane, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Idiopathic Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome is a potentially fatal disorder that is under diagnosed. It commonly presents as recurrent undifferentiated shock with hypotension, hypoalbuminemia and hemoconcentration. There are three distinct phases that define the syndrome; Prodromal, Extravasation and Recovery. PMID:26273434

  14. Panayiotopoulos syndrome in a child masquerading as septic shock.

    PubMed

    Zaki, Syed Ahmed; Verma, Devendra Kumar; Tayde, Pavan

    2016-06-01

    Panayiotopoulos syndrome (PS) is a benign childhood epilepsy with predominant autonomic symptoms. The syndrome can have varied presentations resulting in diagnostic dilemma. We herein describe a 3-year-old boy with PS, who had manifestations similar to septic shock. His investigations were normal and had a complete recovery. Through this case, we wish to highlight the unusual presentation of PS as septic shock. Physicians should be aware of the different ways in which this syndrome can present to ensure its early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27390462

  15. Panayiotopoulos syndrome in a child masquerading as septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, Syed Ahmed; Verma, Devendra Kumar; Tayde, Pavan

    2016-01-01

    Panayiotopoulos syndrome (PS) is a benign childhood epilepsy with predominant autonomic symptoms. The syndrome can have varied presentations resulting in diagnostic dilemma. We herein describe a 3-year-old boy with PS, who had manifestations similar to septic shock. His investigations were normal and had a complete recovery. Through this case, we wish to highlight the unusual presentation of PS as septic shock. Physicians should be aware of the different ways in which this syndrome can present to ensure its early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27390462

  16. Heat-shock-induced cellular responses to temperature elevations occurring during orthopaedic cutting.

    PubMed

    Dolan, E B; Haugh, M G; Tallon, D; Casey, C; McNamara, L M

    2012-12-01

    Severe heat-shock to bone cells caused during orthopaedic procedures can result in thermal damage, leading to cell death and initiating bone resorption. By contrast, mild heat-shock has been proposed to induce bone regeneration. In this study, bone cells are exposed to heat-shock for short durations occurring during surgical cutting. Cellular viability, necrosis and apoptosis are investigated immediately after heat-shock and following recovery of 12, 24 h and 4 days, in osteocyte-like MLO-Y4 and osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells, using flow cytometry. The regeneration capacity of heat-shocked Balb/c mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and MC3T3-E1s has been investigated following 7 and 14 day's recovery, by quantifying proliferation, differentiation and mineralization. An immediate necrotic response to heat-shock was shown in cells exposed to elevated temperatures (45°C, 47°C and most severe at 60°C). A longer-term apoptotic response is induced in MLO-Y4s and, to a lesser extent, in MC3T3-E1s. Heat-shock-induced differentiation and mineralization by MSCs. These findings indicate that heat-shock is more likely to induce apoptosis in osteocytes than osteoblasts, which might reflect their role as sensors detecting and communicating damage within bone. Furthermore, it is shown for the first time that mild heat-shock (less than equal to 47°C) for durations occurring during surgical cutting can positively enhance osseointegration by osteoprogenitors. PMID:22915633

  17. [Maternal-fetal staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome with chorioamniotitis].

    PubMed

    Lacoste, A; Torregrosa, A; Dubois, S; Apéré, H; Oyharçabal, V; Carré, M; Cayla-Embarek, C; Hernandoréna, X; Jouvencel, P

    2006-08-01

    We report a rare case of mother-infant pair with Staphylococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome (TSS). A term neonate was born by caesarean section for maternal septic syndrome during per-partum. He presented with respiratory distress complicated by pulmonary hypertension, skin rash, and multiple organ system involvement. Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from placenta, surface swabs and gastric aspirate. He received adapted antibiotics, respiratory support by high frequency ventilation and NO. The mother had shock, skin rash and inflammatory syndrome. Outcome was good in both cases. The isolate produced enterotoxin C and L. Shock, exanthematous disease and multi-organ involvement complicating a staphylococcal infection in neonate must lead to suspect a TSS. PMID:16797947

  18. Toxic shock syndrome related to Streptococcus equi subsp zooepidemicus

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Mohamed; Vialette, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    We describe a documented streptococcal toxic shock syndrome linked to horse-to-man transmission of Streptococcus equi subsp zooepidemicus. The patient was treated successfully with respiratory and haemodynamic support in conjunction with antibiotic treatment associated with polyvalent human immunoglobulin and high-volume venovenous haemofiltration. PMID:24014562

  19. Treatment of recurrent toxic shock syndrome with oral contraceptive agents.

    PubMed

    McIvor, M E; Levin, M L

    1982-09-01

    The case of a 20-year old woman who was hospitalized for toxic shock syndrome (TSS) for 4 consecutive months despite use of conventional therapy for prevention of recurrence is described. Following discharge after the 4th episode she was started on oral contraceptives (OCs), and her next 8 menstrual cycles were uneventful despite continued use of tampons. She since discontinued use of tampons and remains asymptomatic. TSS recurrences occur in 30-64% of patients and can follow the initial episode by up to 41 months. The experience of this patient demonstrates the limitations of using antistaphyloccal antibiotics at the end of each menstrual cycle but suggests that hormonal manipulation may be an effective alternative therapy for TSS recurrences. Epidemiological studies show TSS patients use OCs less frequently than controls. Whether OCs suppress the vaginal flora, as some evidence suggests, or make conditions less favorable for the development of TSS in some other way is unknown. OC therapy for recurrences of TSS should receive further study. PMID:7144265

  20. A fatal postpartum Clostridium sordellii associated toxic shock syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Bitti, A; Mastrantonio, P; Spigaglia, P; Urru, G; Spano, A I; Moretti, G; Cherchi, G B

    1997-01-01

    Clostridium sordellii is an infrequent human pathogen. It has been demonstrated to be occasionally responsible for myonecrosis or gas gangrene. Interestingly, in the obstetric literature, some cases of postpartum maternal deaths have been associated with C sordellii infection causing a rapidly lethal toxin mediated syndrome. This is the first reported case of postpartum death in a 29 year old woman, in which a toxigenic C sordellii was isolated from the patient's blood antemortem during the fatal toxic shock, strongly indicating its role in this rare syndrome. PMID:9155682

  1. Recurrent SDSE bacteraemia resulting in streptococcal toxic shock syndrome in a patient with Noonan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kei; Nakamura, Akiko; Ishikura, Ken; Imai, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    A 19-year-old man with chronic lymphoedema due to Noonan syndrome presented at our hospital with septic shock and pain in his lower leg. Blood cultures were positive for Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp equisimilis (SDSE), resulting in a diagnosis of cellulitis with toxic involvement. He was treated with ampicillin for 3 weeks. Although he did well for 6 weeks, septic shock recurred. Blood culture again revealed SDSE, with the strain being identical to the first episode, suggesting that this infection had relapsed. He was treated with ampicillin for 6 weeks and prophylactically with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole for 12 months. Although SDSE bacteraemia occurs commonly in elderly patients, findings in this patient showed that it can also develop in younger persons with predisposing factors. This case also indicates that SDSE has the potential to recur, despite generally sufficient antibiotic administration, and that patients who experience recurrent episodes may require prolonged treatment with antibiotics, including prophylaxis. PMID:27485878

  2. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy occurring with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    England, J D; Hsu, C Y; Garen, P D; Goust, J M; Biggs, P J

    1984-08-01

    A 33-year-old homosexual man with symptoms and signs of a focal brain process was subsequently found to have an acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) with biopsy-proven progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. This report reemphasizes the association of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy with AIDS and probably is best viewed as another example of an opportunistic CNS infection complicating deficient cell-mediated immunity. PMID:6540476

  3. Testicular trauma resulting in shock and systemic inflammatory response syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Okonkwo, Kingsley C; Wong, Kristin G; Cho, Cheng T; Gilmer, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Acute painful scrotum in children may be associated with torsion of the testis, hematocele, epididymitis and direct testicular injury with hematoma formation. More frequently, however, acute scrotum occurs without a precipitating factor. While most traumatic testicular injuries resolve with conservative management, many require surgical exploration and some are life-threatening. Case presentation A 13-year-old boy with a history of testicular trauma presented with severe scrotal swelling and shock. This case study examines the presentation and possible role of cytokines in the development of systemic inflammatory response syndrome in a child with acute traumatic epididymitis. Conclusion Post-traumatic epididymitis presenting as shock in boys is rarely reported. We advocate early recognition of the chain of events leading to clinical presentation of shock and prompt treatment to preserve testicular viability. PMID:18577243

  4. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome Occurring After Uterine Artery Embolization for Uterine Myoma

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Satoshi Tanigawa, Noboru; Kariya, Syuji; Komemushi, Atsushi; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Tokuda, Takanori; Kishimoto, Masanobu; Tomino, Atsutoshi; Fujioka, Masayuki; Kitazawa, Yasuhide; Sawada, Satoshi

    2011-02-15

    This case report describes posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) occurring after uterine artery embolization (UAE) for uterine myoma. This is the first report of PRES occurring after uterine vascular radiologic intervention. The mechanism by which UAE induced PRES is unclear.

  5. Anaphylactic Shock: Kounis Hypersensitivity-Associated Syndrome Seems to be the Primary Cause.

    PubMed

    Kounis, Nicholas G; Soufras, George D; Hahalis, George

    2013-11-01

    Experiments have shown that anaphylaxis decreases cardiac output; increases left ventricular end diastolic pressure; induces severe early acute increase in respiratory resistance with pulmonary interstitial edema; and decreases splanchnic, cerebral, and myocardial blood flow more than what would be expected from severe arterial dilation and hypotension. This is attributed to the constrictive action of inflammatory mediators released during anaphylactic shock. Inflammatory mediators such as histamine, neutral proteases, arachidonic acid products, platelet-activating factor (PAF), and a variety of cytokines and chemokines constitute the pathophysiologic basis of Kounis hypersensitivity-associated acute coronary syndrome. Although the mechanisms of anaphylactic shock still remain to be elucidated, myocardial involvement due to vasospasm-induced coronary blood flow reduction manifesting as Kounis syndrome should be always considered. Searching current experimental and clinical literature on anaphylactic shock pathophysiology, causality, clinical appearance, and treatment via PubMed showed that differentiating global hypoperfusion from primary tissue suppression due to mast cell mediator constrictive action on systemic arterial vasculature is a challenging procedure. Combined tissue suppression from arterial involvement and peripheral vasodilatation, perhaps, occur simultaneously. In cases of anaphylactic shock treatment targeting the primary cause of anaphylaxis together with protection of coronary vasculature and subsequently the cardiac tissue seems to be of paramount importance. PMID:24404540

  6. Anaphylactic Shock: Kounis Hypersensitivity-Associated Syndrome Seems to be the Primary Cause

    PubMed Central

    Kounis, Nicholas G; Soufras, George D; Hahalis, George

    2013-01-01

    Experiments have shown that anaphylaxis decreases cardiac output; increases left ventricular end diastolic pressure; induces severe early acute increase in respiratory resistance with pulmonary interstitial edema; and decreases splanchnic, cerebral, and myocardial blood flow more than what would be expected from severe arterial dilation and hypotension. This is attributed to the constrictive action of inflammatory mediators released during anaphylactic shock. Inflammatory mediators such as histamine, neutral proteases, arachidonic acid products, platelet-activating factor (PAF), and a variety of cytokines and chemokines constitute the pathophysiologic basis of Kounis hypersensitivity-associated acute coronary syndrome. Although the mechanisms of anaphylactic shock still remain to be elucidated, myocardial involvement due to vasospasm-induced coronary blood flow reduction manifesting as Kounis syndrome should be always considered. Searching current experimental and clinical literature on anaphylactic shock pathophysiology, causality, clinical appearance, and treatment via PubMed showed that differentiating global hypoperfusion from primary tissue suppression due to mast cell mediator constrictive action on systemic arterial vasculature is a challenging procedure. Combined tissue suppression from arterial involvement and peripheral vasodilatation, perhaps, occur simultaneously. In cases of anaphylactic shock treatment targeting the primary cause of anaphylaxis together with protection of coronary vasculature and subsequently the cardiac tissue seems to be of paramount importance. PMID:24404540

  7. Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Toxic Shock Syndrome in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Stach, Christopher S; Schlievert, Patrick M

    2016-01-01

    Enhancement of susceptibility to lipopolysaccharide (LPS; endotoxin) is a defining characteristic of Staphylococcus aureus superantigens. At the time of this publication, there are 24 identified staphylococcal superantigens (SAgs), some of which have yet to be fully characterized. Testing the capacity of superantigens to potentiate LPS sensitivity is essential to characterize the role of these proteins in disease development. Here we describe how to perform studies of the enhancement of LPS-induced toxic shock syndrome in rabbits. This protocol also provides information on a second important activity of superantigens: the production of fever. PMID:26676037

  8. Rely and Toxic Shock Syndrome: A Technological Health Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Vostral, Sharra L.

    2011-01-01

    This essay examines factors leading to the identification of Toxic Shock Syndrome with the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus in 1978 and the specific role of Rely tampons in generating a technologically rooted health crisis. The concept biologically incompatible technology is offered to explain the relationship between constituent bacteria, women’s menstrual cycles, and a reactive technology that converged to create the ideal environment for the S. aureus bacteria to live and flourish in some women. The complicated and reactive relationship of the Rely tampon to emergent disease, corporate interests, public health, and injury law reveals the dangers of naturalizing technologies. PMID:22180682

  9. Hospitalized dogs recovery from naturally occurring heatstroke; does serum heat shock protein 72 can provide prognostic biomarker?

    PubMed

    Bruchim, Yaron; Segev, Gilad; Kelmer, Efrat; Codner, Carolina; Marisat, Ahmad; Horowitz, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Heatstroke is a serious illness in dogs characterized by core temperatures above 41°C with central nervous system dysfunction. Experimental heatstroke models have tried to correlate biomarker levels with the severity of the syndrome. Serum heat shock protein (eHSP70) levels were recently evaluated as a biomarker of heat tolerance and acclimation, their role as a marker of heatstroke is inconclusive. Here, we monitored eHSP70 levels in correlation with systemic biomarkers in 30 naturally occurring canine heatstroke cases. Thirty dogs diagnosed with environmental (33%) or exertional (66%) heatstroke admitted to hospital (0-14 h post-injury) were tested for biomarkers of organ damage and coagulation parameters. eHSP70 levels were measured upon admission and 4, 12, and 24 h later (T1, T2, and T3, respectively). No differences were found between exertional and environmental heatstroke cases. The eHSP profile demonstrated an inverted bell shape, with the lowest levels at the 12 h time point. A positive correlation between eHSP70, lactate, and aPPT was also noted at T2 in all the dogs in the study. Twenty-four h after presentation, eHSP70 levels returned to those measured upon admission, this change was only significant in the survivors. The obtained results suggest that eHSP72 level profile may be predictive of survival. PMID:26441274

  10. [Septic shock Fusobacterium necrophorum from origin gynecological at complicated an acute respiratory distress syndrome: a variant of Lemierre's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Huynh-Moynot, Sophie; Commandeur, Diane; Danguy des Déserts, Marc; Drouillard, Isabelle; Leguen, Patrick; Ould-Ahmed, Mehdi

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of a female patient of 47 years old who presents in a state of septic shock with acute insufficient respiratory complicated with syndrome of acute respiratory distress, together with a list of abdominal pain and polyarthralgia too. In her case of medical history, it is retained that she has had a intra-uterine device since 6 years without medical follow up. The initial thoraco-abdomino-pelvic scan shows a left ovarian vein thrombosis, as well as the opaqueness alveolus diffused interstitiel bilaterally and an aspect of ileitis. The IUD is taken off because of sudden occuring of purulent leucorrhoea. This results in a clinical and paraclinical improvement, whereas aminopenicillin was administered to the patient since 1 week. The microbiological blood test allows to put in evidence Fusobacterium necrophorum found in a blood culture and is sensitive to the amoxicilline-acide clavulanique and metronidazole. Isolation of this bacteria, classically found in Lemierre's syndrome, allowed to explain the multilfocalization of the symtoms and the list of pain. The whole concerns about a variant of Lemierre's syndrom: a state of septic shock secondary then caused by the anaerobic Gram negative bacilli, which is a commensal bacteria of the female genital tractus, complicated of septic emboli typical. PMID:21464014

  11. Ecology of toxic shock syndrome: amplification of toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 by materials of medical interest.

    PubMed

    Tierno, P M; Hanna, B A

    1989-01-01

    Historically, the literature suggests that staphylococcal exoproteins, including enterotoxins, are stimulated by various physicochemical ecologic factors, many of which have been shown to stimulate production of toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1). The propensity of different fibers and other substances to amplify TSST-1 production in toxic shock syndrome-associated strains of Staphylococcus aureus, as well as a comparative analysis of the underlying mechanisms of TSST-1 production, are reported. Two hundred twenty intravaginal devices or other products and materials and 60 experimental controls were examined for their propensity to induce TSST-1 production. Certain materials are superior to unaltered cotton in providing a more absorbent fiber--nutrients are efficiently drawn in, concentrating protein between fibers, and thereby creating an ideal physicochemical environment for the amplification of TSST-1 and other toxins. The greatest stimulation of TSST-1 was observed with (in decreasing order): polyester and carboxymethyl cellulose, polyacrylates, viscose rayon, gelatin foam, polyurethane, and cotton. No toxin was found with nasal tampons (polymer of polyvinyl acetal) or with vaginal cups (an elastomeric polymer). Results are discussed in terms of specific ecologic parameters from historical as well as recent perspectives. PMID:2928635

  12. Bacterial phenotype variants in group B streptococcal toxic shock syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sendi, Parham; Johansson, Linda; Dahesh, Samira; Van-Sorge, Nina M; Darenberg, Jessica; Norgren, Mari; Sjölin, Jan; Nizet, Victor; Norrby-Teglund, Anna

    2009-02-01

    We conducted genetic and functional analyses of isolates from a patient with group B streptococcal (GBS) necrotizing fasciitis and toxic shock syndrome. Tissue cultures simultaneously showed colonies with high hemolysis (HH) and low hemolysis (LH). Conversely, the HH and LH variants exhibited low capsule (LC) and high capsule (HC) expression, respectively. Molecular analysis demonstrated that the 2 GBS variants were of the same clonal origin. Genetic analysis found a 3-bp deletion in the covR gene of the HH/LC variant. Functionally, this isolate was associated with an increased growth rate in vitro and with higher interleukin-8 induction. However, in whole blood, opsonophagocytic and intracellular killing assays, the LH/HC phenotype demonstrated higher resistance to host phagocytic killing. In a murine model, LH/HC resulted in higher levels of bacteremia and increased host mortality rate. These findings demonstrate differences in GBS isolates of the same clonal origin but varying phenotypes. PMID:19193266

  13. A confirmed case of toxic shock syndrome associated with the use of a menstrual cup.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Michael A; Bisch, Steve; Arntfield, Shannon; Hosseini-Moghaddam, Seyed M

    2015-01-01

    Menstrual cups have been reported to be an acceptable substitute for tampons. These flexible cups have also been reported to provide a sustainable solution to menstrual management, with modest cost savings and no significant health risk. The present article documents the first case of toxic shock syndrome associated with the use of a menstrual cup in a woman 37 years of age, using a menstrual cup for the first time. Toxic shock syndrome and the literature on menstrual cups is reviewed and a possible mechanism for the development of toxic shock syndrome in the patient is described. PMID:26361491

  14. Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome: superantigen-mediated enhancement of endotoxin shock and adaptive immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Kulhankova, Katarina; King, Jessica; Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara

    2014-08-01

    Infectious diseases caused by Staphylococcus aureus present a significant clinical and public health problem. S. aureus causes some of the most severe hospital-associated and community-acquired illnesses. Specifically, it is the leading cause of infective endocarditis and osteomyelitis, and the second leading cause of sepsis in the USA. While pathogenesis of S. aureus infections is at the center of current research, many questions remain about the mechanisms underlying staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome (TSS) and associated adaptive immune suppression. Both conditions are mediated by staphylococcal superantigens (SAgs)-secreted staphylococcal toxins that are major S. aureus virulence factors. Toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1) is the SAg responsible for almost all menstrual TSS cases in the USA. TSST-1, staphylococcal enterotoxin B and C are also responsible for most cases of non-menstrual TSS. While SAgs mediate all of the hallmark features of TSS, such as fever, rash, hypotension, and multi-organ dysfunction, they are also capable of enhancing the toxic effects of endogenous endotoxin. This interaction appears to be critical in mediating the severity of TSS and related mortality. In addition, interaction between SAgs and the host immune system has been recognized to result in a unique form of adaptive immune suppression, contributing to poor outcomes of S. aureus infections. Utilizing rabbit models of S. aureus infective endocarditis, pneumonia and sepsis, and molecular genetics techniques, we aim to elucidate the mechanisms of SAg and endotoxin synergism in the pathogenesis of TSS, and examine the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying SAg-mediated immune dysfunction. PMID:24816557

  15. Evidence of staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome caused by MRSA in a mother-newborn pair.

    PubMed

    Rostad, Christina A; Philipsborn, Rebecca Pass; Berkowitz, Frank E

    2015-04-01

    A neonate and his mother presented with fever and erythroderma. The mother met full diagnostic criteria for staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome, whereas the neonate lacked hypotension and multiorgan dysfunction. A wound culture from the neonate's circumcision site grew methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus containing the tst gene. This provides evidence of the first reported case of toxic shock syndrome caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a mother-newborn pair. PMID:25260039

  16. Streptococcus suis toxic-shock syndrome and meningitis.

    PubMed

    Leelarasamee, A; Nilakul, C; Tien-Grim, S; Srifuengfung, S; Susaengrat, W

    1997-01-01

    Three cases with S. suis bacteremia and meningitis were reported. The first case was a 23-year-old butcher who was a regular drinker of alcohol for two years and developed streptococcal toxic-shock syndrome. The organism was transmitted to him through a minor cut in his right arm. The second cases was a 49-year-old female laborer who had been consuming locally produced alcohol for 20 years and developed fever and meningitis. Unfortunately, she succumbed in seven days despite intensive supportive and cefotaxime treatments. The third case was a 45-year-old regular alcoholic drinker and car painter who was seen at a private hospital due to contusion at his left lateral chest wall. However, fever and confusion due to meningitis was detected upon admission. Irreversible deafness developed within 48 hours of ceftriaxone therapy for meningitis. He finally recovered with deafness. S. suis was isolated from blood and cerebrospinal fluid cultures in all three cases though initially reported to be viridans group of streptococci. PMID:9078819

  17. Hypothesis: new concepts concerning the pathophysiology of the sudden infant death syndrome due to magnesium deficiency shock.

    PubMed

    Caddell, J L

    1992-09-01

    There appear to be many contributing factors to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). One final common pathway that may explain some cases of SIDS is presented as a hypothesis: SIDS occurs as a shock-like event in a stressed infant with congenital or acquired magnesium deficiency with respect to calcium, or with genetically determined high magnesium requirements. Increased calcium and stress-related catecholamines favour platelet aggregation and release of mediators, chief of which appears to be thromboxane A2 (TXA2). TXA2, a major vasoconstrictor, bronchoconstrictor, and platelet aggregator is relatively unopposed during shock by prostacyclin, a vasodilator, bronchodilator, and platelet disaggregator which normally counterbalances its effects. The shock episode is self-limited. Infants who recover have suffered an apparent life threatening event (ALTE); those who die have insufficient pathology to explain the cause of death; the diagnosis is SIDS. PMID:1467153

  18. Tachyarrhythmia Cycle Length in Appropriate versus Inappropriate Defibrillator Shocks in Brugada Syndrome, Early Repolarization Syndrome, or Idiopathic Ventricular Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woo Seok; Kwon, Chang-Hee; Choi, Jin Hee; Jo, Uk; Kim, Yoo Ri; Nam, Gi-Byoung; Choi, Kee-Joon; Kim, You-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Implantable cardioverter–defibrillators (ICDs) are indicated in patients with Brugada syndrome (BS), early repolarization syndrome (ERS), or idiopathic ventricular fibrillation (IVF) who are at high risk for sudden cardiac death. The optimal ICD programming for reducing inappropriate shocks in these patients remains to be determined. We investigated the difference in the mean cycle length of tachyarrhythmias that activated either appropriate or inappropriate ICD shocks in these three patient groups to determine the optimal ventricular fibrillation (VF) zone for minimizing inappropriate ICD shocks. Subjects and Methods We selected 41 patients (35 men) (mean age±standard deviation=42.6±13.0 year) who received ICD shocks between April 1996 and April 2014 to treat BS (n=24), ERS (n=9), or IVF (n=8). Clinical and ICD interrogation data were retrospectively collected and analyzed for all events with ICD shocks. Results Of the 244 episodes, 180 (73.8%) shocks were appropriate and 64 (26.2%) were inappropriate. The mean cycle lengths of the tachyarrhythmias that activated appropriate and inappropriate shocks were 178.9±28.7 ms and 284.8±24.4 ms, respectively (p<0.001). The cutoff value with the highest sensitivity and specificity for discriminating between appropriate and inappropriate shocks was 235 ms (sensitivity, 98.4%; specificity, 95.6%). When we programmed a single VF zone of ≤270 ms, inappropriate ICD shocks were reduced by 70.5% and appropriate shocks were missed in 1.7% of these patients. Conclusion Programming of a single VF zone of ≤270 ms in patients with BS, ERS, or IVF could reduce inappropriate ICD shocks, with a low risk of missing appropriate shocks. PMID:27014348

  19. Plantar Purpura as the Initial Presentation of Viridians Streptococcal Shock Syndrome Secondary to Streptococcus gordonii Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chen-Yi; Su, Kuan-Jen; Lin, Cheng-Hui; Huang, Shu-Fang; Chin, Hsien-Kuo; Chang, Chin-Wen; Kuo, Wu-Hsien; Ben, Ren-Jy; Yeh, Yen-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Viridians streptococcal shock syndrome is a subtype of toxic shock syndrome. Frequently, the diagnosis is missed initially because the clinical features are nonspecific. However, it is a rapidly progressive disease, manifested by hypotension, rash, palmar desquamation, and acute respiratory distress syndrome within a short period. The disease course is generally fulminant and rarely presents initially as a purpura over the plantar region. We present a case of a 54-year-old female hospital worker diagnosed with viridians streptococcal shock syndrome caused by Streptococcus gordonii. Despite aggressive antibiotic treatment, fluid hydration, and use of inotropes and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, the patient succumbed to the disease. Early diagnosis of the potentially fatal disease followed by a prompt antibiotic regimen and appropriate use of steroids are cornerstones in the management of this disease to reduce the risk of high morbidity and mortality. PMID:27366188

  20. Sulphoraphane, a naturally occurring isothiocyanate induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells by targeting heat shock proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Ruma; Mukherjee, Sutapa; Biswas, Jaydip; Roy, Madhumita

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HSPs (27, 70 and 90) and HSF1 are overexpressed in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sulphoraphane, a natural isothiocyanate inhibited HSPs and HSF1 expressions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of HSPs and HSF1 lead to regulation of apoptotic proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alteration of apoptotic proteins activate of caspases particularly caspase 3 and 9 leading to induction of apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alteration of apoptotic proteins induce caspases leading to induction of apoptosis. -- Abstract: Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are involved in protein folding, aggregation, transport and/or stabilization by acting as a molecular chaperone, leading to inhibition of apoptosis by both caspase dependent and/or independent pathways. HSPs are overexpressed in a wide range of human cancers and are implicated in tumor cell proliferation, differentiation, invasion and metastasis. HSPs particularly 27, 70, 90 and the transcription factor heat shock factor1 (HSF1) play key roles in the etiology of breast cancer and can be considered as potential therapeutic target. The present study was designed to investigate the role of sulphoraphane, a natural isothiocyanate on HSPs (27, 70, 90) and HSF1 in two different breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells expressing wild type and mutated p53 respectively, vis-a-vis in normal breast epithelial cell line MCF-12F. It was furthermore investigated whether modulation of HSPs and HSF1 could induce apoptosis in these cells by altering the expressions of p53, p21 and some apoptotic proteins like Bcl-2, Bax, Bid, Bad, Apaf-1 and AIF. Sulphoraphane was found to down-regulate the expressions of HSP70, 90 and HSF1, though the effect on HSP27 was not pronounced. Consequences of HSP inhibition was upregulation of p21 irrespective of p53 status. Bax, Bad, Apaf-1, AIF were upregulated followed by down-regulation of Bcl-2 and this effect was prominent

  1. Contraception and toxic-shock syndrome: a reanalysis.

    PubMed

    Shelton, J D; Higgins, J E

    1981-12-01

    A nonstratified reanalysis of data from 2 recent studies of toxic-shock syndrome (TSS) from Wisconsin and from the Center for Disease Control (CDC) was done to confirm the studies' claim of a protective effect of contraception against TSS. The analysis lumped together all spermicide-containing contraceptive methods and made reference comparisons of risks for users of various methods of contraception vs. the risk for women using no contraceptive method. Despite the small number involved, the spermicide-containing contraceptive methods exhibited a significant protective effect in the Wisconsin study and a borderline significant protective effect in the CDC study. The Mantel-Haenszel odds ratio across both studies was 0.23 (Taylor-series 95% confidence interval 0.09-0.61) for spermicide-containing methods. The Wisconsin study exhibited a significant protective effect for oral contraceptives. Although the CDC study showed a similar protective effect (odds ratio 0.38), pill use in this population was very low and the effect was not statistically significant. The Mantel-Haenszel odds ratio across the 2 studies was 0.27 (95% confidence interval 0.12-0.63). The protective effect of spermicides against TSS was related to an antimicrobial action of spermicidal ingredients in vaginal contraceptives against Staph. aureus. Possible protective mechanisms for oral contraceptive against TSS included reduced menstrual flow and duration, alterations to the cervical mucus, and the effects of contraceptive steroids on the vaginal flora. The studies suggest that women using vaginal methods of contraceptives can allay their fears that the increased risk of TSS associated with vaginal tampons extends to vaginal contraceptives. PMID:7326935

  2. Comment on "Electrostatic compressive and rarefactive shocks and solitons in relativistic plasmas occurring in polar regions of pulsar"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafez, M. G.; Talukder, M. R.; Hossain Ali, M.

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this comment is to show the solution of the KdVB equation used by Shah et al. (Astrophys. Space Sci. 335:529-537, 2011, doi: 10.1007/s10509-011-0766-y) is not correct. So, the numerical results that are predicted in this manuscript should not be helpful for further investigations in a plasma laboratory. For this reason, we have employed the Bernoulli's equation method to obtain the correct form of analytical solution to this equation, which is appropriate for the study of electrostatic compressive and rarefactive shocks and solitons in relativistic plasmas occurring in polar regions of pulsar.

  3. Detection of human papillomavirus type 10 DNA in eccrine syringofibroadenomatosis occurring in Clouston's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Carlson, J A; Rohwedder, A; Daulat, S; Schwartz, J; Schaller, J

    1999-02-01

    Syringofibroadenomatosis is often associated with an underlying condition such as diabetes mellitus or hidrotic ectodermal dysplasia. By reason of these associations, a reactive or hamartomatous cause is suspected. We report a case of a 71-year-old woman with Clouston's syndrome in whom progressive multiple palmoplantar syringofibroadenomas developed over a 10-year period. The syringofibroadenomas formed flat-topped papules simulating verruca plana; the widespread distribution and chronic progressive course resembled epidermodysplasia verruciformis. Contiguous with the syringofibroadenoma's characteristic epithelial-stromal proliferation were epidermal changes of verruca plana. Evidence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection was verified by immunolabeling with antibodies to bovine papillomavirus type 1 and detection of HPV 10 viral DNA by means of polymerase chain reaction. Rather than a hamartomatous process, these findings suggest that syringofibroadenomas occurring in the setting of Clouston's syndrome could represent an HPV-induced epithelial proliferation. PMID:10025758

  4. Nephrotic syndrome due to focal segmental glomerulosclerosis occurring in early pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, A; Wall, C A

    2011-01-01

    Physiological proteinuria is common during pregnancy, but pathological proteinuria may also occur. Nephrotic range proteinuria most commonly occurs due to preeclampsia, but primary renal disease may also occur. We present a case of a woman who presented with nephrotic range proteinuria and nephrotic syndrome at an early stage of her second pregnancy. Due to proteinuria, haematuria, progressive symptoms and high need for medical treatment, renal biopsy was performed and she was noted to have focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). She commenced immunosuppression but remained nephrotic during pregnancy. She delivered a healthy baby boy at 35 weeks gestation. Postpartum she remained nephrotic, and developed further complications requiring renal replacement therapy. Despite a successful pregnancy, this case of FSGS highlights that despite aggressive treatment FSGS in pregnancy is often associated with adverse renal outcome. We discuss investigations, including renal biopsy and empiric treatment options in this report.

  5. Abdominal Compartment Syndrome and Necrotizing Pancreatitis Following Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S; Scambia, J; Gandillon, C; Aversano, F; Batista, R

    2016-09-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is a common procedure in the treatment of renal calculi. There have been major complications reported with ESWL such as acute pancreatitis, bower perforation, venous thrombosis, and biliary obstruction. There are few reports in the literature of necrotizing pancreatitis secondary to ESWL. We have a case report of a 29-year-old female that developed an abdominal compartment syndrome with an acute necrotizing pancreatitis hours after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. PMID:27462545

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptococcus mitis Strain SVGS_061 Isolated from a Neutropenic Patient with Viridans Group Streptococcal Shock Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Petrosyan, Varduhi; Holder, Michael; Ajami, Nadim J; Petrosino, Joseph F; Sahasrabhojane, Pranoti; Thompson, Erika J; Kalia, Awdhesh; Shelburne, Samuel A

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mitisfrequently causes invasive infections in neutropenic cancer patients, with a subset of patients developing viridans group streptococcal (VGS) shock syndrome. We report here the first complete genome sequence ofS. mitisstrain SVGS_061, which caused VGS shock syndrome, to help elucidate the pathogenesis of severe VGS infection. PMID:27056234

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptococcus mitis Strain SVGS_061 Isolated from a Neutropenic Patient with Viridans Group Streptococcal Shock Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Petrosyan, Varduhi; Holder, Michael; Ajami, Nadim J.; Petrosino, Joseph F.; Sahasrabhojane, Pranoti; Thompson, Erika J.; Kalia, Awdhesh

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mitis frequently causes invasive infections in neutropenic cancer patients, with a subset of patients developing viridans group streptococcal (VGS) shock syndrome. We report here the first complete genome sequence of S. mitis strain SVGS_061, which caused VGS shock syndrome, to help elucidate the pathogenesis of severe VGS infection. PMID:27056234

  8. Renal-type Clear Cell Carcinoma Occurring in the Prostate With Zinner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yuichi; Kataoka, Masao; Hata, Junya; Akaihata, Hidenori; Ogawa, Soichiro; Kojima, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of clear cell carcinoma occurring in the prostate with Zinner syndrome in a 64-year-old man. Based on the immunohistochemical findings, it was concluded that this tumor represented primary renal-type clear cell carcinoma arising in the prostate. After receiving radical cystoprostatectomy, he was treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy for local recurrence in accordance with the protocol of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) treatment, because microarray cluster analysis using a resected sample demonstrated that the present case belonged to the cluster group of RCC. PMID:26793589

  9. Renal-type Clear Cell Carcinoma Occurring in the Prostate With Zinner Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuichi; Kataoka, Masao; Hata, Junya; Akaihata, Hidenori; Ogawa, Soichiro; Kojima, Yoshiyuki

    2016-03-01

    We report a case of clear cell carcinoma occurring in the prostate with Zinner syndrome in a 64-year-old man. Based on the immunohistochemical findings, it was concluded that this tumor represented primary renal-type clear cell carcinoma arising in the prostate. After receiving radical cystoprostatectomy, he was treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy for local recurrence in accordance with the protocol of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) treatment, because microarray cluster analysis using a resected sample demonstrated that the present case belonged to the cluster group of RCC. PMID:26793589

  10. Shock

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems) Hypovolemic shock (caused by too little blood volume) Anaphylactic shock (caused by allergic reaction) Septic shock ( ... as heart attack or heart failure ) Low blood volume (as with heavy bleeding or dehydration ) Changes in ...

  11. Shock

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergencies A-Z Share this! Home » Emergency 101 Shock Shock is a serious, often life-threatening medical condition ... of death for critically ill or injured people. Shock results when the body is not getting enough ...

  12. [IgG antibodies against toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 in human immunoglobulins].

    PubMed

    Dickgiesser, N; Kustermann, B

    1986-07-15

    IgG antibodies against toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 in human immunoglobulins were determined using the ELISA technique. Of the drugs for intramuscular application, hemogamma and beriglobin contained the highest amount of antibodies. The highest concentration of antibodies in drugs for intravenous application was found in Pseudomonas polyglobin and in Venimmun. PMID:3762013

  13. Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome: Life Saving Role of Peritoneal Lavage and Drainage

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Minako; Oyama, Fumie; Ito, Asami; Yokota, Megumi; Matsukura, Daisuke; Tsutsumi, Shinji; Kasai, Tomonori; Nitobe, Yohshiro; Morikawa, Akiko; Ozaki, Takashi; Yokoyama, Yoshihito

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We encountered a case where an infection with group A streptococcus (GAS; ie, Streptococcus pyogenes) initially caused primary peritonitis and then subsequently caused streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. The patient’s life was likely saved by an emergency laparotomy followed by extensive peritoneal lavage and drainage. CASE PRESENTATION A 40-year-old woman was admitted to the Emergency Department for lower abdominal pain and numbness in the extremities. She presented with systemic inflammatory response syndrome. An emergency laparotomy was performed, and ascites that resembled pus and general peritonitis were noted. Peritoneal lavage and drainage were performed, and GAS was isolated from peritoneal fluid. Gram staining of cervical polyp specimens revealed Gram-positive bacteria. CONCLUSIONS The patient was diagnosed with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome due to an ascending GAS infection originating from vagina. PMID:27579001

  14. Effects of viscosity on the behavior of entropy change in the shock wave that occurred after the December 13, 2006 coronal mass ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çavuş, H.; Kurt, A.

    2015-04-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and the solar wind are the two main demonstrations of solar activity. These events can drive a shock wave. The shock wave occurs where the solar wind changes from being supersonic (with respect to the surrounding interplanetary medium) to subsonic. The main purpose of this study is to apply the algorithm and the results given in our recent papers to the shock wave that happened after the December 13, 2006 CME, and evaluate the behavior of entropy during this solar activity.

  15. Heat shock proteins and chronic fatigue in primary Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bårdsen, Kjetil; Nilsen, Mari Mæland; Kvaløy, Jan Terje; Norheim, Katrine Brække; Jonsson, Grete; Omdal, Roald

    2016-04-01

    Fatigue occurs frequently in patients with cancer, neurological diseases and chronic inflammatory diseases, but the biological mechanisms that lead to and regulate fatigue are largely unknown. When the innate immune system is activated, heat shock proteins (HSPs) are produced to protect cells. Some extracellular HSPs appear to recognize cellular targets in the brain, and we hypothesize that fatigue may be generated by specific HSPs signalling through neuronal or glial cells in the central nervous system. From a cohort of patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome, 20 patients with high and 20 patients with low fatigue were selected. Fatigue was evaluated with a fatigue visual analogue scale. Plasma concentrations of HSP32, HSP60, HSP72 and HSP90α were measured and analysed to determine if there were associations with the level of fatigue. Plasma concentrations of HSP90α were significantly higher in patients with high fatigue compared with those with low fatigue, and there was a tendency to higher concentrations of HSP72 in patients with high fatigue compared with patients with low fatigue. There were no differences in concentrations of HSP32 and HSP60 between the high- and low-fatigue groups. Thus, extracellular HSPs, particularly HSP90α, may signal fatigue in chronic inflammation. This supports the hypothesis that fatigue is generated by cellular defence mechanisms. PMID:26921255

  16. Heat shock proteins and chronic fatigue in primary Sjögren’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bårdsen, Kjetil; Nilsen, Mari Mæland; Kvaløy, Jan Terje; Norheim, Katrine Brække; Jonsson, Grete

    2016-01-01

    Fatigue occurs frequently in patients with cancer, neurological diseases and chronic inflammatory diseases, but the biological mechanisms that lead to and regulate fatigue are largely unknown. When the innate immune system is activated, heat shock proteins (HSPs) are produced to protect cells. Some extracellular HSPs appear to recognize cellular targets in the brain, and we hypothesize that fatigue may be generated by specific HSPs signalling through neuronal or glial cells in the central nervous system. From a cohort of patients with primary Sjögren’s syndrome, 20 patients with high and 20 patients with low fatigue were selected. Fatigue was evaluated with a fatigue visual analogue scale. Plasma concentrations of HSP32, HSP60, HSP72 and HSP90α were measured and analysed to determine if there were associations with the level of fatigue. Plasma concentrations of HSP90α were significantly higher in patients with high fatigue compared with those with low fatigue, and there was a tendency to higher concentrations of HSP72 in patients with high fatigue compared with patients with low fatigue. There were no differences in concentrations of HSP32 and HSP60 between the high- and low-fatigue groups. Thus, extracellular HSPs, particularly HSP90α, may signal fatigue in chronic inflammation. This supports the hypothesis that fatigue is generated by cellular defence mechanisms. PMID:26921255

  17. Compartment Syndrome of the Gluteus Medius Occurred without Bleeding or Trauma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Gyu-Min; Park, Jun-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Compartment syndrome is an ischemic change resulting from an increase in compartment pressure. Initially, patients present with direct tenderness and swelling, and the weak circulation secondary to compartment syndrome can eventually lead to motor and sensory impairment. If the increase in pressure results in neurological impairment, emergency intervention is required to decompress the compartment. Typically, compartment syndrome develops on forearms or lower legs. The gluteal compartment is rarely the location of compartment syndrome and only a few cases have been presented in the literature with trauma or hematoma. We have treated a patient with gluteal compartment syndrome who presented with no history of trauma or hemorrhage and present that case report here.

  18. Hitch-hiker taken for a ride: an unusual cause of myocarditis, septic shock and adult respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kushawaha, Anurag; Brown, Mark; Martin, Ismael; Evenhuis, Walther

    2013-01-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a serious tick-borne illness caused by Rickettsia rickettsii that is endemic in southeastern USA. Although RMSF has been described as causing the classic clinical triad of fever, headache and a characteristic rash, serious and potentially life-threatening manifestations can occur. Cardiopulmonary involvement, although infrequent, may occur with severe cases of RMSF. Rickettsial myocarditis is an uncommon occurrence. We present a case of a previously healthy 26-year-old man, who was hitch-hiking across the southeastern USA, with serologically proven RMSF causing adult respiratory distress syndrome, septic shock and myocarditis manifested by elevated cardiac enzymes and decrease in myocardial function. After treatment with antibiotics, the myocarditis resolved. Therefore, although unusual, clinicians should be aware of possible myocardial involvement in patients with appropriate tick-exposure histories or other clinical signs of RMSF. PMID:23314875

  19. Saline breast implant fluid collection and reactive arthritis in a patient with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kohannim, Omid; Rubin, Zachary; Taylor, Mihaela

    2011-03-01

    Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome is a potentially lethal condition with an increasing incidence over the last 30 years. We present the case of a 55-year-old patient with signs and symptoms of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. This patient's presentation was unique in that it was followed by an accumulation of fluid at her breast implant in addition to a polyarticular reactive arthritis. We propose that the patient's reactive arthritis is consistent with the diagnosis of post-streptococcal reactive arthritis, a variant of acute rheumatic fever, which similarly to its variant is immunologically driven. We hypothesize that the fluid collection around the patient's breast implant was triggered by her infection and was also immunologically mediated. PMID:21325958

  20. Toxic shock syndrome after functional endonasal sinus surgery: an all or none phenomenon?

    PubMed

    Abram, A C; Bellian, K T; Giles, W J; Gross, C W

    1994-08-01

    Reported cases of toxic shock syndrome (TSS) following nasal surgery or functional endonasal sinus surgery (FESS) are uncommon. Classic TSS is a serious multisystem disorder resulting from Staphylococcus aureus phage I toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1), and it is characterized by fever, rash, hypotension, mucosal hyperemia, vomiting, diarrhea, and laboratory evidence of multisystem organ dysfunction. TSS cases following nasal surgery have been associated with nasal packing, mucosal barrier violation, prior S aureus phage I colonization, as well as low antitoxin antibody levels. Of the 1700 FESS procedures performed at our institution, 3 cases were complicated by classic TSS, with 2 additional patients having a postsurgical course compromised by a milder degree of TSS. Diagnostic criteria, clinical presentation, management, and etiology are discussed, and the possibility of a continuum from mild-to-classic TSS is addressed. PMID:8052075

  1. Unusual staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome presenting as a scarlet-like fever

    PubMed Central

    Andrey, D.O.; Ferry, T.; Siegenthaler, N.; Fletcher, C.; Calmy, A.; Lina, G.; Emonet, S.

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis of nonmenstrual staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome (TSS) is often challenging. A female medical colleague had a rare entity, a staphylococcal pharyngitis complicated by TSS. The diagnosis was confirmed by isolation of tst-positive Staphylococcus aureus in throat culture and by identification of a specific Vβ2 expansion pattern of her T lymphocytes. Recent improvements in microbiology can be of great help for the diagnosis of nonmenstrual TSS. PMID:26543563

  2. Immune reconstitution syndrome in a human immunodeficiency virus infected child due to giardiasis leading to shock.

    PubMed

    Nandy, Sneha; Shah, Ira

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome has been reported in association with tuberculosis, herpes zoster (shingles), Cryptococcus neoformans, Kaposi's sarcoma, Pneumocystis pneumonia, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, herpes simplex virus, Histoplasma capsulatum, human papillomavirus, and Cytomegalovirus. However, it has never been documented with giardiasis. We present a 7-year-old HIV infected girl who developed diarrhea and shock following the initiation of antiretroviral therapy, and her stool showed the presence of giardiasis. PMID:26985424

  3. Unusual staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome presenting as a scarlet-like fever.

    PubMed

    Andrey, D O; Ferry, T; Siegenthaler, N; Fletcher, C; Calmy, A; Lina, G; Emonet, S

    2015-11-01

    Diagnosis of nonmenstrual staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome (TSS) is often challenging. A female medical colleague had a rare entity, a staphylococcal pharyngitis complicated by TSS. The diagnosis was confirmed by isolation of tst-positive Staphylococcus aureus in throat culture and by identification of a specific Vβ2 expansion pattern of her T lymphocytes. Recent improvements in microbiology can be of great help for the diagnosis of nonmenstrual TSS. PMID:26543563

  4. Immune reconstitution syndrome in a human immunodeficiency virus infected child due to giardiasis leading to shock

    PubMed Central

    Nandy, Sneha; Shah, Ira

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome has been reported in association with tuberculosis, herpes zoster (shingles), Cryptococcus neoformans, Kaposi's sarcoma, Pneumocystis pneumonia, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, herpes simplex virus, Histoplasma capsulatum, human papillomavirus, and Cytomegalovirus. However, it has never been documented with giardiasis. We present a 7-year-old HIV infected girl who developed diarrhea and shock following the initiation of antiretroviral therapy, and her stool showed the presence of giardiasis. PMID:26985424

  5. Fluid replacement protection of rabbits challenged subcutaneous with toxic shock syndrome toxins.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, P K; Deringer, J R; Kreiswirth, B N; Novick, R P; Schlievert, P M

    1991-01-01

    Toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1) and streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin A (SPE A) belong to a family of pyrogenic toxins produced by Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes, respectively. Both toxins are responsible for causing toxic shock syndrome (TSS) and related illnesses, clinically characterized by multiorgan involvement. The most severe TSS symptom is acute hypotension and shock after the initial febrile response. In this study, we examined possible mechanisms of shock development in TSS, particularly the role of T-cell proliferation, endotoxin enhancement by toxins, and capillary leakage. American Dutch belted rabbits, with subcutaneously implanted miniosmotic pumps filled with either TSST-1 or SPE A, served as the animal model. For both TSST-1 and SPE A-treated rabbits, administration of cyclosporin A prevented toxin-induced T-cell proliferation but failed to protect the rabbits. Polymyxin B treatment of rabbits, to neutralize endogenous endotoxin, partially protected rabbits from challenge with either exotoxin; two of six rabbits survived on day 2 when treated with only TSST-1, whereas six of six animals survived after challenge with TSST-1 and polymyxin B. Similarly, with SPE A-treated rabbits, only 1 of 10 animals without polymyxin B treatment survived on day 8, but 4 of 6 rabbits survived on day 8 when given polymyxin B. Fluid replacement was successful in preventing lethality. Twelve of 14 rabbits survived when given TSST-1 with fluid, and all rabbits treated with SPE A and fluid survived. Finally, by using miniosmotic pumps, staphylococcal exfoliative toxin A and concanavalin A were administered to rabbits in an attempt to induce lethality. These two T-cell mitogens caused T-cell proliferation but failed to induce lethality in rabbits. The data suggest that toxin interactions causing vascular leakage and to some extent endotoxin enhancement are of major importance in development of hypotension and shock in TSS. It appears that T

  6. A Case Report of Idiopathic Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome That Occurred During the Postoperative Period of Abdominoperineal Resection for Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Tsuyoshi; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Saito, Shinsuke; Ishihara, Soichiro; Sunami, Eiji; Kitayama, Joji; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    A 57-year-old woman without any past medical history underwent abdominoperineal resection for rectal cancer in our department. On postoperative day 15, the patient complained of sudden abdominal pain, and high fever was noted in addition to the appearance of erythema around the stoma. The diagnosis of phlegmon was made, and antibiotic infusion was started. However, a few days later, the patient developed hypovolemic shock with hypoalbuminemia and hemoconcentration. Fasciotomy was performed to exclude the necrotizing fasciitis, though all cultures were negative. Upon exclusion of the differential diagnoses, idiopathic systemic capillary leak syndrome (ISCLS) was diagnosed. She was successfully treated with massive fluid infusion under ventilation and continuous hemodiafiltration. Here, we report the first case of ISCLS that occurred during the postoperative period of colorectal surgery. PMID:25594640

  7. Clinical Audit of Gastrointestinal Conditions Occurring among Adults with Down Syndrome Attending a Specialist Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Robyn A.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Adults with Down syndrome (DS) are predisposed to syndromic and environmental gastrointestinal conditions. Method: In a hospital-based clinic for adults with DS, a chart audit was conducted to assess the range and frequency of gastrointestinal conditions. Results: From January 2003 to March 2005, 57 patients attended the clinic,…

  8. Bilateral Giant Coronary Artery Aneurysms Complicated by Acute Coronary Syndrome and Cardiogenic Shock.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Peter; Lynch, Donald; Jahanayar, Jama; Rogers, Ian S; Tremmel, Jennifer; Boyd, Jack

    2016-04-01

    Giant coronary aneurysms are rare. We present a 25-year-old woman with a known history of non-Kawasaki/nonatherosclerotic bilateral coronary aneurysms. She was transferred to our facility with acute coronary syndrome complicated by cardiogenic shock. Angiography demonstrated giant bilateral coronary aneurysms and complete occlusion of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery. Emergent coronary artery bypass grafting was performed. Coronary artery bypass grafting is the preferred approach for addressing giant coronary aneurysms. Intervention on the aneurysm varies in the literature. Aggressive revascularization is recommended in the non-Kawasaki/nonatherosclerotic aneurysm patient, and ligation should be performed in patients with thromboembolic phenomena. PMID:27000621

  9. T cell activation and cytokine release in streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nadal, D; Lauener, R P; Braegger, C P; Kaufhold, A; Simma, B; Lütticken, R; Seger, R A

    1993-05-01

    A 5-year-old girl with streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome during varicella infection had high levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-6 but no interleukin-1 or interleukin-2 in the serum. Intravenous administration of gamma-globulin coincided with clinical improvement and with reduction of the levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-6. The data suggest that streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxins trigger synthesis of tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-6 in vivo; intravenously administered gamma-globulin may down-regulate the cytokine response. PMID:8496751

  10. Intrauterine device infection causing concomitant streptococcal toxic shock syndrome and pelvic abscess with Actinomyces odontolyticus bacteraemia.

    PubMed

    Wu, Carolyn M Yu; Noska, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Intrauterine devices (IUDs) are rarely associated with serious infections. We report an unusual concomitant infection of group A Streptococcus (GAS) causing toxic shock syndrome and pelvic abscess with Actinomyces odontolyticus associated with an IUD in a healthy 50-year-old patient. The IUD was subsequently removed and the patient recovered on the appropriate antibiotics. This case highlights the importance of clinicians' high index of suspicion of an IUD infection and prompt removal of the infected foreign body to obtain source control. PMID:26965406

  11. Group G streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome in three cats.

    PubMed

    Taillefer, Mylène; Dunn, Marilyn

    2004-01-01

    Three 8-week-old kittens were presented with a history of acute, generalized weakness and severe fever. One cat was dead upon presentation, and necropsy findings were supportive of a group G Streptococcus spp. septicemia. During their clinical courses, two of the three kittens developed a progressive, marked swelling of one or more limbs. One moribund and severely hypothermic cat was euthanized a few hours after presentation, and necropsy was also supportive of a group G Streptococcus spp. septicemia. One kitten recovered. Group G streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome was suspected because of the fulminant progression of the septicemia. PMID:15347623

  12. A case of Lemierre's syndrome with septic shock and complicated parapneumonic effusions requiring intrapleural fibrinolysis

    PubMed Central

    Croft, Daniel P.; Philippo, Sean M.; Prasad, Paritosh

    2015-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is a septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein, which can lead to severe systemic illness. We report a case of an otherwise healthy 26-year-old man who suffered from pharyngitis followed by septic shock requiring intubation and vasopressor support from Fusobacterium necrophorum bacteremia. The septic emboli to his lungs caused complicated bilateral parapneumonic effusions, which recurred after initial drainage. He required bilateral chest tubes and intrapleural tPA to successfully drain his effusions. His fever curve and overall condition improved with the resolution of his effusions and after a 33-day hospitalization, he recovered without significant disability. The severity of his illness and difficult to manage complicated parapneumonic effusions were the unique facets of this case. Using an evidence-based approach of tPA and DNase for complicated parapneumonic effusions in Lemierre's syndrome can be safe and effective. PMID:26744664

  13. A case of Lemierre's syndrome with septic shock and complicated parapneumonic effusions requiring intrapleural fibrinolysis.

    PubMed

    Croft, Daniel P; Philippo, Sean M; Prasad, Paritosh

    2015-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is a septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein, which can lead to severe systemic illness. We report a case of an otherwise healthy 26-year-old man who suffered from pharyngitis followed by septic shock requiring intubation and vasopressor support from Fusobacterium necrophorum bacteremia. The septic emboli to his lungs caused complicated bilateral parapneumonic effusions, which recurred after initial drainage. He required bilateral chest tubes and intrapleural tPA to successfully drain his effusions. His fever curve and overall condition improved with the resolution of his effusions and after a 33-day hospitalization, he recovered without significant disability. The severity of his illness and difficult to manage complicated parapneumonic effusions were the unique facets of this case. Using an evidence-based approach of tPA and DNase for complicated parapneumonic effusions in Lemierre's syndrome can be safe and effective. PMID:26744664

  14. Moyamoya syndrome occurred in a girl with an inactive systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yun-Jin; Yeon, Gyu Min; Nam, Sang Ook

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a 17-year-old Korean girl with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who presented with sudden weakness of the right-sided extremities and dysarthria. Oral prednisolone was being taken to control SLE. Results of clinical and laboratory examinations did not show any evidence of antiphospholipid syndrome or thromboembolic disease nor SLE activity. Cerebral angiography showed stenosis of the left internal carotid artery and right anterior cerebral artery with accompanying collateral circulation (moyamoya vessels). After the patient underwent bypass surgery on the left side, she recovered from the neurological problems and did not experience any additional ischemic attack during the 14-month follow-up period. This case represents an unusual association between moyamoya syndrome and inactive SLE (inactive for a relatively long interval of 2 years) in a young girl. PMID:24416051

  15. Clinical Characteristics of Dengue Shock Syndrome in Vietnamese Children: A 10-Year Prospective Study in a Single Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Phung Khanh; Tam, Dong Thi Hoai; Diet, Tran Vinh; Tam, Cao Thi; Tien, Nguyen Thi Hanh; Kieu, Nguyen Tan Thanh; Simmons, Cameron; Farrar, Jeremy; Nga, Nguyen Thi Ngoc; Qui, Phan Tu; Dung, Nguyen Minh; Wolbers, Marcel; Wills, Bridget

    2013-01-01

    Background. Dengue shock syndrome (DSS) is a severe manifestation of dengue virus infection that particularly affects children and young adults. Despite its increasing global importance, there are no prospective studies describing the clinical characteristics, management, or outcomes of DSS. Methods. We describe the findings at onset of shock and the clinical evolution until discharge or death, from a comprehensive prospective dataset of 1719 Vietnamese children with laboratory-confirmed DSS managed on a single intensive care unit between 1999 and 2009. Results. The median age of patients was 10 years. Most cases had secondary immune responses, with only 6 clear primary infections, and all 4 dengue virus serotypes were represented during the 10-year study. Shock occurred commonly between days 4 and 6 of illness. Clinical signs and symptoms were generally consistent with empirical descriptions of DSS, although at presentation 153 (9%) were still febrile and almost one-third had no bleeding. Overall, 31 (2%) patients developed severe bleeding, primarily from the gastrointestinal tract, 26 of whom required blood transfusion. Only 8 patients died, although 123 of 1719 (7%) patients had unrecordable blood pressure at presentation and 417 of the remaining 1596 (26%) were hypotensive for age. The majority recovered well with standard crystalloid resuscitation or following a single colloid infusion. All cases were classified as severe dengue, while only 70% eventually fulfilled all 4 criteria for the 1997 World Health Organization classification of dengue hemorrhagic fever. Conclusions. With prompt intervention and assiduous clinical care by experienced staff, the outcome of this potentially fatal condition can be excellent. PMID:24046311

  16. Septic shock

    MedlinePlus

    Septic shock is a serious condition that occurs when a body-wide infection leads to dangerously low blood ... Septic shock occurs most often in the very old and the very young. It may also occur in ...

  17. Exercise-induced acute compartment syndrome in a young man, occurring after a short race.

    PubMed

    Basnet, Bibhusan; Matar, Mousa; Vaitilingham, Siddharthan; Chalise, Shyam; Irooegbu, Nkem; Bang, Jane

    2016-04-01

    We describe a case of exercise-induced acute compartment syndrome (ACS) in a 23-year-old man who presented to his primary care physician 48 hours after he attempted to run a 5K race. He noticed searing pain in his left leg after the first half mile but had no other symptoms. He was referred to the emergency department and diagnosed with ACS, and a fasciotomy was done. A presentation of limb pain that is out of proportion to a known or suspected injury should prompt consideration of ACS. Early recognition and surgical management are essential to achieving the best possible outcome. PMID:27034546

  18. Acute compartment syndrome occurring in forearm with relatively small amount of hematoma following transradial coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Atsuhiko; Iwamoto, Jotaro; Tsumuraya, Naoko; Nagaoka, Masakazu; Ikari, Yuji

    2016-04-01

    A 59-year-old female with angina pectoris successfully underwent percutaneous coronary intervention via the right radial artery. She complained of right forearm pain and numbness 4.5 h after the procedure. Though the swelling in her right arm seemed relatively mild, pressure measurement showed significant increase of internal forearm pressure. She developed acute compartment syndrome in the right forearm, and fasciotomy was performed immediately. The weight of subcutaneous hematoma in her right arm was approximately 100 g. Symptoms of paralysis and the impairment of perception remained for some time, but had completely recovered 4 months post-surgery. PMID:25855327

  19. Exercise-induced acute compartment syndrome in a young man, occurring after a short race

    PubMed Central

    Matar, Mousa; Vaitilingham, Siddharthan; Chalise, Shyam; Irooegbu, Nkem; Bang, Jane

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of exercise-induced acute compartment syndrome (ACS) in a 23-year-old man who presented to his primary care physician 48 hours after he attempted to run a 5K race. He noticed searing pain in his left leg after the first half mile but had no other symptoms. He was referred to the emergency department and diagnosed with ACS, and a fasciotomy was done. A presentation of limb pain that is out of proportion to a known or suspected injury should prompt consideration of ACS. Early recognition and surgical management are essential to achieving the best possible outcome. PMID:27034546

  20. Influence of the Vaginal Microbiota on Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin 1 Production by Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    MacPhee, Roderick A.; Miller, Wayne L.; Gloor, Gregory B.; McCormick, John K.; Hammond, Jo-Anne; Burton, Jeremy P.

    2013-01-01

    Menstrual toxic shock syndrome (TSS) is a serious illness that afflicts women of premenopausal age worldwide and arises from vaginal infection by Staphylococcus aureus and concurrent production of toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1). Studies have illustrated the capacity of lactobacilli to reduce S. aureus virulence, including the capacity to suppress TSST-1. We hypothesized that an aberrant microbiota characteristic of pathogenic bacteria would induce the increased production of TSST-1 and that this might represent a risk factor for the development of TSS. A S. aureus TSST-1 reporter strain was grown in the presence of vaginal swab contents collected from women with a clinically healthy vaginal status, women with an intermediate status, and those diagnosed with bacterial vaginosis (BV). Bacterial supernatant challenge assays were also performed to test the effects of aerobic vaginitis (AV)-associated pathogens toward TSST-1 production. While clinical samples from healthy and BV women suppressed toxin production, in vitro studies demonstrated that Streptococcus agalactiae and Enterococcus spp. significantly induced TSST-1 production, while some Lactobacillus spp. suppressed it. The findings suggest that women colonized by S. aureus and with AV, but not BV, may be more susceptible to menstrual TSS and would most benefit from prophylactic treatment. PMID:23315732

  1. Clostridium sordellii as a Cause of Fatal Septic Shock in a Child with Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Beyers, Rebekah; Baldwin, Michael; Dalabih, Sevilay; Dalabih, Abdallah

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium sordellii is a toxin producing ubiquitous gram-positive anaerobe, mainly associated with trauma, soft tissue skin infections, and gynecologic infection. We report a unique case of a new strain of Clostridium sordellii (not present in the Center for Disease Control (CDC) database) infection induced toxic shock syndrome in a previously healthy two-year-old male with colitis-related hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The patient presented with dehydration, vomiting, and bloody diarrhea. He was transferred to the pediatric critical care unit (PICU) for initiation of peritoneal dialysis (PD). Due to increased edema and intolerance of PD, he was transitioned to hemodialysis through a femoral vascular catheter. He subsequently developed severe septic shock with persistent leukocytosis and hypotension, resulting in subsequent death. Stool culture confirmed Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli 0157:H7. A blood culture was positively identified for Clostridium sordellii. Clostridium sordelli is rarely reported in children; to our knowledge this is the first case described in a pediatric patient with HUS. PMID:24891968

  2. Refractory Toxic Shock-Like Syndrome from Streptococcus dysgalactiae ssp. equisimilis and Intravenous Immunoglobulin as Salvage Therapy: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Islam, Marjan; Karter, Dennis; Altshuler, Jerry; Altshuler, Diana; Schwartz, David; Torregrossa, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Infections from Streptococcus dysgalactiae ssp. equisimilis (SDSE) can cause a wide variety of infections, ranging from mild cellulitis to invasive disease, such as endocarditis and streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome (TSLS). Despite prompt and appropriate antibiotics, mortality rates associated with shock have remained exceedingly high, prompting the need for adjunctive therapy. IVIG has been proposed as a possible adjunct, given its ability to neutralize a wide variety of superantigens and modulate a dysregulated inflammatory response. We present the first reported cases of successful IVIG therapy for reversing shock in the treatment of SDSE TSLS. PMID:27597908

  3. Refractory Toxic Shock-Like Syndrome from Streptococcus dysgalactiae ssp. equisimilis and Intravenous Immunoglobulin as Salvage Therapy: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Karter, Dennis; Altshuler, Jerry; Altshuler, Diana; Schwartz, David; Torregrossa, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Infections from Streptococcus dysgalactiae ssp. equisimilis (SDSE) can cause a wide variety of infections, ranging from mild cellulitis to invasive disease, such as endocarditis and streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome (TSLS). Despite prompt and appropriate antibiotics, mortality rates associated with shock have remained exceedingly high, prompting the need for adjunctive therapy. IVIG has been proposed as a possible adjunct, given its ability to neutralize a wide variety of superantigens and modulate a dysregulated inflammatory response. We present the first reported cases of successful IVIG therapy for reversing shock in the treatment of SDSE TSLS. PMID:27597908

  4. Shock.

    PubMed

    Wacker, David A; Winters, Michael E

    2014-11-01

    Critically ill patients with undifferentiated shock are complex and challenging cases in the ED. A systematic approach to assessment and management is essential to prevent unnecessary morbidity and mortality. The simplified, systematic approach described in this article focuses on determining the presence of problems with cardiac function (the pump), intravascular volume (the tank), or systemic vascular resistance (the pipes). With this approach, the emergency physician can detect life-threatening conditions and implement time-sensitive therapy. PMID:25441032

  5. Case of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome caused by rapidly progressive group A hemolytic streptococcal infection during postoperative chemotherapy for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Nogami, Yuya; Tsuji, Kousuke; Banno, Kouji; Umene, Kiyoko; Katakura, Satomi; Kisu, Iori; Tominaga, Eiichiro; Aoki, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) is a severe infectious disease caused by group A hemolytic streptococcus (Streptococcus pyogenes). This condition is a serious disease that involves rapidly progressive septic shock. We experienced a case of STSS caused by primary peritonitis during treatment with paclitaxel and cisplatin (TP therapy) as postoperative chemotherapy for cervical cancer. STSS mostly develops after extremity pain, but initial influenza-like symptoms of fever, chill, myalgia and gastrointestinal symptoms may also occur. TP therapy is used to treat many cancers, including gynecological cancer, but may cause adverse reactions of neuropathy and nephrotoxicity and sometimes fever, arthralgia, myalgia, abdominal pain and general malaise. The case reported here indicates that development of STSS can be delayed after chemotherapy and that primary STSS symptoms may be overlooked because they may be viewed as adverse reactions to chemotherapy. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a case of STSS during chemotherapy. PMID:23937219

  6. Guillain-Barré syndrome: report of two rare clinical cases occurring after allergenic bone grafting in oral maxillofacial surgery.

    PubMed

    Cicciù, Marco; Herford, Alan Scott; Bramanti, Ennio; Maiorana, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Guillaine-Barré Syndrome (GBS), also known as post-infectious polyneuropathy or acute idiopathic polyneuritis, is an infrequent disorder of the peripheral nervous system. The cause of GBS is unknown. It has been associated in the past with microbial infections, vaccinations, surgical procedures and debilitation of the patient. The classic signs of GBS occurring in the two patients being reported here are muscle weakness, motor and sensory impairment and ascending paralysis with respiratory involvement. The documented cases involved GBS syndrome following oral and maxillofacial surgery in which allogeneic-banked freeze-dried bone have been utilized along with autogenous grafting. There were no incidents of viral infection, vaccination or the other prodromal incidents involved in these cases. It is believed that the description of these two cases would be of interest in that it may stimulate the reporting of similar anecdotal occurrences by other surgeons. Both patients fully recovered from the GBS and are presently alive and well. PMID:26261679

  7. Ultrastructural findings in lymph nodes from pigs suffering from naturally occurring postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Cariño, C; Segalés, J

    2009-07-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate ultrastructural lesions in lymph nodes from postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS)-affected pigs and to correlate these alterations with detection of viral-like particles (VLPs). Samples of lymph nodes were taken from 4 PMWS-affected pigs and 2 healthy animals and processed by transmission electron microscopy. Significant ultrastructural alterations were only noted in PMWS-affected pigs, mainly in histiocytes and rarely in other cell types. Histiocytes showed severe swelling and proliferation of mitochondria, and proliferation and dilation of rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex. Infected histiocytes contained large numbers of intracytoplasmic inclusion (ICI) bodies with VLPs; some histiocytes also had intranuclear inclusions (INIs). Small inclusions were surrounded by double membrane, with a granular appearance or containing paracrystalline arrays; icosahedral VLPs were 8-17 nm in diameter. Large ICIs were double-membrane bounded or not and contained VLPs usually forming paracrystalline arrays. ICIs were often found next to mitochondria with severe swelling, and also inside them. INIs were not surrounded by membranes and contained virions of 10-13 nm diameter. Lymphocyte depletion was a striking finding of lymph nodes from PMWS-affected pigs. The inclusion bodies containing VLPs referred to in the present study should be classified as viral factories, suggesting that viral replication is probably a frequent event in macrophages, in which mitochondria might play a role. PMID:19276043

  8. Enterococcus faecalis inhibits superantigen toxic shock syndrome toxin-1-induced interleukin-8 from human vaginal epithelial cells through tetramic acids.

    PubMed

    Brosnahan, Amanda J; Merriman, Joseph A; Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara; Ford, Bradley; Schlievert, Patrick M

    2013-01-01

    The vaginal mucosa can be colonized by many bacteria including commensal organisms and potential pathogens, such as Staphylococcus aureus. Some strains of S. aureus produce the superantigen toxic shock syndrome toxin-1, which can penetrate the vaginal epithelium to cause toxic shock syndrome. We have observed that a female was mono-colonized with Enterococcus faecalis vaginally as tested in aerobic culture, even upon repeated culture for six months, suggesting this organism was negatively influencing colonization by other bacteria. In recent studies, we demonstrated an "outside-in" mechanism of cytokine signaling and consequent inflammation that facilitates the ability of potential pathogens to initiate infection from mucosal surfaces. Thus, we hypothesized that this strain of E. faecalis may make anti-inflammatory factors which block disease progression of more pathogenic organisms. E. faecalis MN1 inhibited interleukin-8 production from human vaginal epithelial cells in response to the vaginal pathogens Candida albicans, Gardnerella vaginalis, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae, as well as to toxic shock syndrome toxin-1. We further demonstrated that this organism secretes two tetramic acid compounds which appear responsible for inhibition of interleukin-8 production, as well as inhibition of T cell proliferation due to toxic shock syndrome toxin-1. Microbicides that include anti-inflammatory molecules, such as these tetramic acid compounds naturally produced by E. faecalis MN1, may be useful in prevention of diseases that develop from vaginal infections. PMID:23613823

  9. Streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome as an unusual complication of laparoscopic tubal ligation. A case report.

    PubMed

    Nyirjesy, P; Jones, R S; Chatwani, A; Zinner, E S; Axelrod, P

    1994-08-01

    Toxic shock-like syndrome due to Streptococcus pyogenes is an unusual occurrence. Previously reported cases have been the result of focal infections with S pyogenes. We present a case in which manipulation of a colonized mucosal surface during laparoscopic tubal ligation was the presumed cause of the sepsis syndrome. Whereas other reports of this syndrome have all noted concurrent infections with S pyogenes, in this instance it was unclear if toxin-mediated disease was initiated by mild endometritis or iatrogenic manipulation of a colonized mucosal surface. PMID:7996532

  10. Guillain–Barré Syndrome (42 Cases) Occurring During a Zika Virus Outbreak in French Polynesia

    PubMed Central

    Watrin, Louise; Ghawché, Frédéric; Larre, Philippe; Neau, Jean-Philippe; Mathis, Stéphane; Fournier, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Zika virus (transmitted by mosquitoes) reached French Polynesia for the first time in 2013, leading to an epidemic affecting 10% of the total population. So far, it has not been known to induce any neurological complications, but, a few weeks after the outbreak, an unexpectedly high number of 42 patients presented with Guillain–Barré syndrome. We report the clinical and electrophysiological characteristics of this series. Males predominated with a sex ratio of 2.82 (mean age: 46). All patients (except 2) were native Polynesian. At admission, 55% were able to walk unaided against 38% at nadir, 24% had swallowing troubles (nadir: 45%), 74% had motor weakness of the limbs (nadir: 86%) and deep tendon reflexes were diminished or not found in the vast majority of patients. Mean duration of the progressive phase and of the plateau phase was respectively 7 and 9 days. Thirty-eight percent of the patients were admitted in intensive care unit and 10 patients underwent tracheotomy. Nerve electrophysiological studies at admission showed marked distal motor conduction alterations, which had almost completely disappeared at the 4th month; this pattern was more suggestive of acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN) than of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP). Lumbar puncture showed elevated proteins in 90% of the cases, with cell count always inferior to 50/μL. This epidemic raises several questions, such as the potential existence of interactions between Zika virus and Polynesian HLA system and/or the consequences of several recombination events of this virus. This situation should call for increased vigilance, especially in countries where Aedes mosquitoes are present. PMID:27057874

  11. Fumarate Hydratase-deficient Uterine Leiomyomas Occur in Both the Syndromic and Sporadic Settings.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Wesley J; Andrici, Juliana; Maclean, Fiona; Madadi-Ghahan, Raha; Farzin, Mahtab; Sioson, Loretta; Toon, Christopher W; Clarkson, Adele; Watson, Nicole; Pickett, Justine; Field, Michael; Crook, Ashley; Tucker, Katherine; Goodwin, Annabel; Anderson, Lyndal; Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Grossmann, Petr; Martinek, Petr; Ondič, Ondrej; Hes, Ondřej; Trpkov, Kiril; Clifton-Bligh, Roderick J; Dwight, Trisha; Gill, Anthony J

    2016-05-01

    Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma (HLRCC) syndrome secondary to germline fumarate hydratase (FH) mutation presents with cutaneous and uterine leiomyomas, and a distinctive aggressive renal carcinoma. Identification of HLRCC patients presenting first with uterine leiomyomas may allow early intervention for renal carcinoma. We reviewed the morphology and immunohistochemical (IHC) findings in patients with uterine leiomyomas and confirmed or presumed HLRCC. IHC was also performed on a tissue microarray of unselected uterine leiomyomas and leiomyosarcomas. FH-deficient leiomyomas underwent Sanger and massively parallel sequencing on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue. All 5 patients with HLRCC had at least 1 FH-deficient leiomyoma: defined as completely negative FH staining with positive internal controls. One percent (12/1152) of unselected uterine leiomyomas but 0 of 88 leiomyosarcomas were FH deficient. FH-deficient leiomyoma patients were younger (42.7 vs. 48.8 y, P=0.024) and commonly demonstrated a distinctive hemangiopericytomatous vasculature. Other features reported to be associated with FH-deficient leiomyomas (hypercellularity, nuclear atypia, inclusion-like nucleoli, stromal edema) were inconstantly present. Somatic FH mutations were identified in 6 of 10 informative unselected FH-deficient leiomyomas. None of these mutations were found in the germline. We conclude that, while the great majority of patients with HLRCC will have FH-deficient leiomyomas, 1% of all uterine leiomyomas are FH deficient usually due to somatic inactivation. Although IHC screening for FH may have a role in confirming patients at high risk for hereditary disease before genetic testing, prospective identification of FH-deficient leiomyomas is of limited clinical benefit in screening unselected patients because of the relatively high incidence of somatic mutations. PMID:26574848

  12. Fumarate Hydratase–deficient Uterine Leiomyomas Occur in Both the Syndromic and Sporadic Settings

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Wesley J.; Andrici, Juliana; Maclean, Fiona; Madadi-Ghahan, Raha; Farzin, Mahtab; Sioson, Loretta; Toon, Christopher W.; Clarkson, Adele; Watson, Nicole; Pickett, Justine; Field, Michael; Crook, Ashley; Tucker, Katherine; Goodwin, Annabel; Anderson, Lyndal; Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Grossmann, Petr; Martinek, Petr; Ondič, Ondrej; Hes, Ondřej; Trpkov, Kiril; Clifton-Bligh, Roderick J.; Dwight, Trisha

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma (HLRCC) syndrome secondary to germline fumarate hydratase (FH) mutation presents with cutaneous and uterine leiomyomas, and a distinctive aggressive renal carcinoma. Identification of HLRCC patients presenting first with uterine leiomyomas may allow early intervention for renal carcinoma. We reviewed the morphology and immunohistochemical (IHC) findings in patients with uterine leiomyomas and confirmed or presumed HLRCC. IHC was also performed on a tissue microarray of unselected uterine leiomyomas and leiomyosarcomas. FH-deficient leiomyomas underwent Sanger and massively parallel sequencing on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue. All 5 patients with HLRCC had at least 1 FH-deficient leiomyoma: defined as completely negative FH staining with positive internal controls. One percent (12/1152) of unselected uterine leiomyomas but 0 of 88 leiomyosarcomas were FH deficient. FH-deficient leiomyoma patients were younger (42.7 vs. 48.8 y, P=0.024) and commonly demonstrated a distinctive hemangiopericytomatous vasculature. Other features reported to be associated with FH-deficient leiomyomas (hypercellularity, nuclear atypia, inclusion-like nucleoli, stromal edema) were inconstantly present. Somatic FH mutations were identified in 6 of 10 informative unselected FH-deficient leiomyomas. None of these mutations were found in the germline. We conclude that, while the great majority of patients with HLRCC will have FH-deficient leiomyomas, 1% of all uterine leiomyomas are FH deficient usually due to somatic inactivation. Although IHC screening for FH may have a role in confirming patients at high risk for hereditary disease before genetic testing, prospective identification of FH-deficient leiomyomas is of limited clinical benefit in screening unselected patients because of the relatively high incidence of somatic mutations. PMID:26574848

  13. Postoperative toxic shock syndrome after excision of a ganglion cyst from the ankle.

    PubMed

    Strenge, K Brandon; Mangan, Douglas B; Idusuyi, O B

    2006-01-01

    Postoperative toxic shock syndrome (PTSS) after orthopedic surgery is rare, but early recognition and prompt intervention are essential to minimize morbidity and potential mortality. The diagnosis should be considered in all postoperative patients presenting with fever, hypotension, and systemic illness. The treating surgeon must have not only knowledge of the clinical entity, but also an extremely high index of suspicion, because the diagnosis can be elusive with surgical wounds appearing deceptively benign. Treatment consists of antibiotics, surgical wound debridement, and, more importantly, aggressive supportive care with intravenous fluids and intensive care surveillance. To date, the literature contains relatively few case reports of PTSS after orthopedic procedures, with even fewer cases encountered after foot and ankle surgery. This report describes a patient who developed the rare complication of PTSS after an elective ganglion cyst excision from the ankle. PMID:16818157

  14. Suppression of starvation-induced autophagy by recombinant toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Asano, Krisana; Asano, Yoshiya; Ono, Hisaya K; Nakane, Akio

    2014-01-01

    Toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1), a superantigen produced from Staphylococcus aureus, has been reported to bind directly to unknown receptor(s) and penetrate into non-immune cells but its function is unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that recombinant TSST-1 suppresses autophagosomal accumulation in the autophagic-induced HeLa 229 cells. This suppression is shared by a superantigenic-deficient mutant of TSST-1 but not by staphylococcal enterotoxins, suggesting that autophagic suppression of TSST-1 is superantigenic-independent. Furthermore, we showed that TSST-1-producing S. aureus suppresses autophagy in the response of infected cells. Our data provides a novel function of TSST-1 in autophagic suppression which may contribute in staphylococcal persistence in host cells. PMID:25402468

  15. Staphylococcus aureus toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 endocarditis with muscular metastatic abscesses.

    PubMed

    Tinelli, Marco; Monaco, Monica; Maffezzini, Elena; Cerri, Maria Chiara; Piazza, Manuela; Minoli, Lorenzo; Anesi, Adriano; Pantosti, Annalisa

    2014-01-01

    A 42-year-old woman, living in a nursing home for the mentally disabled, with congenital ventricular septal defect and multiple comorbidities, developed endocarditis with vegetations of the interventricular septum and the right coronary aortic leaflet. The main feature of this case was the metastatic embolism leading to multiple and muscular abscesses. Methicillin-sensitive S. aureus, spa type 253 and ST30, producing toxin shock syndrome toxin-1 was isolated from blood cultures. The patient was initially treated with beta-lactam antibiotics without showing clinical response and subsequently with daptomycin and linezolid that improved the patient's clinical symptoms. The effectiveness of treatment with daptomycin and linezolid was partly due to the ability of linezolid to reduce TSST-1 secretion. The portal of entry of the infection was not recognized. TSST-1 production by the strain might have favoured the formation of large cardiac vegetations and the subsequent metastatic dissemination to the muscles. PMID:24531180

  16. Hypotensive shock syndrome associated with acute Babesia canis infection in a dog.

    PubMed

    Freeman, M J; Kirby, B M; Panciera, D L; Henik, R A; Rosin, E; Sullivan, L J

    1994-01-01

    A Doberman Pinscher contracted babesiosis after receiving a fresh blood transfusion from a Greyhound blood donor. Hypotensive shock syndrome was suspected on the basis of arterial hypotension, weakness, and pyrexia in the absence of detectable hemolysis and within hours of detection of low numbers of circulating Babesia canis organisms. Treatment with imidocarb dipropionate appears to have been effective in eliminating circulating B canis organisms and clinical disease. The blood donor, recently acquired from a race track, was healthy and lacked any abnormalities on initial laboratory evaluation; however, its serum antibody titer for B canis was > 1:5,000; B canis organisms were later identified on blood smears after the dog had been splenectomized and treated with corticosteroids at an immunosuppressive dosage. This case draws attention to a potential problem in current screening practices for infectious diseases of retired racing Greyhounds intended for use as blood donors. PMID:8125828

  17. Death due to fulminant toxic-shock syndrome: differential diagnosis of a multilayered clinical picture.

    PubMed

    De Ridder, M; Dissmann, W

    1991-03-01

    Reported is the case study of a 27-year-old top-performance sportswoman who died of a fulminant illness with multiple organ failure. Long-term polypragmatic therapy and pharmacotherapy as well as acute analgesic and non-steroid antirheumatic treatment due to lumbago led to the diagnosis of a "complex toxic-allergic process". Numerous pathologic-anatomical findings, including the absence of septic spleen reaction and the demonstration of hyperacute polyradiculitis, supported this diagnosis. The present article discusses the possible differential diagnoses of the illness with the conclusion that its symptoms, clinical course, laboratory constellation and pathologic-anatomical findings better correspond to infection-caused toxic-shock syndrome (TSS) than to a toxic-allergic process. PMID:1861478

  18. Antagonistic antibody prevents toll-like receptor 2–driven lethal shock-like syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Guangxun; Rutz, Mark; Schiemann, Matthias; Metzger, Jochen; Grabiec, Alina; Schwandner, Ralf; Luppa, Peter B.; Ebel, Frank; Busch, Dirk H.; Bauer, Stefan; Wagner, Hermann; Kirschning, Carsten J.

    2004-01-01

    Hyperactivation of immune cells by bacterial products through toll-like receptors (TLRs) is thought of as a causative mechanism of septic shock pathology. Infections with Gram-negative or Gram-positive bacteria provide TLR2-specific agonists and are the major cause of severe sepsis. In order to intervene in TLR2-driven toxemia, we raised mAb’s against the extracellular domain of TLR2. Surface plasmon resonance analysis showed direct and specific interaction of TLR2 and immunostimulatory lipopeptide, which was blocked by T2.5 in a dose-dependent manner. Application of mAb T2.5 inhibited cell activation in experimental murine models of infection. T2.5 also antagonized TLR2-specific activation of primary human macrophages. TLR2 surface expression by murine macrophages was surprisingly weak, while both intra- and extracellular expression increased upon systemic microbial challenge. Systemic application of T2.5 upon lipopeptide challenge inhibited release of inflammatory mediators such as TNF-α and prevented lethal shock-like syndrome in mice. Twenty milligrams per kilogram of T2.5 was sufficient to protect mice, and administration of 40 mg/kg of T2.5 was protective even 3 hours after the start of otherwise lethal challenge with Bacillus subtilis. These results indicate that epitope-specific binding of exogenous ligands precedes specific TLR signaling and suggest therapeutic application of a neutralizing anti-TLR2 antibody in acute infection. PMID:15146245

  19. Co-Occurring ODD and GAD Symptom Groups: Source-Specific Syndromes and Cross-Informant Comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Drabick, Deborah A. G.; Gadow, Kenneth D.; Loney, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Despite important clinical and nosological implications, the comorbidity of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) has received little attention. A clinic-based sample of 243 boys (ages 6–10 years), their parents, and teachers participated in an evaluation that involved assessments of behavioral, academic, and family functioning. ODD and GAD symptom groups were defined using various combinations of mother and teacher reports. ODD symptom groups were associated with conduct disorder symptoms, and GAD symptom groups with major depressive disorder symptoms, regardless of rater. Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms were associated with ODD and GAD symptom groups; however, covarying ADHD symptoms altered few findings. The ODD+GAD symptom groups were associated with higher rates of co-occurring symptoms and risk factors within (source-specific syndromes) and across (cross-informant comorbidity) informants. PMID:18470769

  20. Effect of extracorporeal shock wave therapy on the treatment of patients with carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vahdatpour, Babak; Kiyani, Abolghasem; Dehghan, Farnaz

    2016-01-01

    Background: The carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common neuropathy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a new and noninvasive treatment including extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) in the treatment of CTS. Materials and Methods: This study is a clinical trial conducted on 60 patients with moderate CTS in selected health centers of Isfahan Medical University from November 2014 to April 2015. Patients with CTS were randomly divided into two groups. Conservative treatment including wrist splint at night for 3 months, consumption of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for 2 weeks, and oral consumption of Vitamin B1 for a month was recommended for both groups. The first group was treated with ESWT, one session per week for 4 weeks. Focus probe with 0.05, 0.07, 0.1, and 0.15 energy and shock numbers 800, 900, 1000, and 1100 were used from the first session to the fourth, respectively. The evaluated parameters were assessed before treatment and after 3 and 6 months. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 19, Student’s t-test, and Chi-square test. Results: All parameters were significantly decreased in the ESWT group after 3 months. These results remained almost constant after 6 months compared with 3 months after treatment. However, only two parameters considerably improved after 3 months of treatment in the control group. The entire indexes in the control group implicated the regression of results in long-term period. Conclusion: It is recommended to use ESWT as a conservative treatment in patients with CTS. PMID:27563630

  1. Study of instabilities in geoelectric time series measured during the preparation process of a main shock occurred in Mexico by means of the multifractal analysis and Tsallis statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez-Rojas, Alejandro; Flores-Márquez, Elsa Leticia

    2016-04-01

    In [1] has been shown that the q-value that appears in Tsallis statistics is related to the extremes αmax and αmin of the multifractal spectrum f(α). This relationship has been used in order to study the underlying statistics describing properly the fully developed turbulence. One of the features for those systems indicates that the underlying statistics is not extensive. In this work we study the fluctuations, like a Seismo Electrical Signals, observed in geoelectric time series measured prior a main shock in México with M = 6. 6, occurred on 24 October 1993. For this time series we obtain the multifractal spectrum and then we can calculate the q-values of the Tsalliśstatistics. Our findings indicate a possible measure of the correlation between the preparation processes and the instability of the system. [1] Lyra M L and Tsallis C 1998 Phys. Rev. Lett. 80 53

  2. Klebsiella pneumoniae invasive liver abscess syndrome with purulent meningitis and septic shock: A case from mainland China

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Yun; Wong, Chi-Chun; Lai, San-Chuan; Lin, Zheng-Hua; Zheng, Wei-Liang; Zhao, Hui; Pan, Kong-Han; Chen, Shu-Jie; Si, Jian-Min

    2016-01-01

    We present a rare case of invasive liver abscess syndrome due to Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) with metastatic meningitis and septic shock. A previously healthy, 55-year-old female patient developed fever, liver abscess, septic shock, purulent meningitis and metastatic hydrocephalus. Upon admission, the clinical manifestations, laboratory and imaging examinations were compatible with a diagnosis of K. pneumoniae primary liver abscess. Her distal metastasis infection involved meningitis and hydrocephalus, which could flare abruptly and be life threatening. Even with early adequate drainage and antibiotic therapy, the patient’s condition deteriorated and she ultimately died. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of K. pneumoniae invasive liver abscess syndrome with septic meningitis reported in mainland China. Our findings reflect the need for a better understanding of the epidemiology, risk factors, complications, comorbid medical conditions and treatment of this disease. PMID:26973425

  3. Klebsiella pneumoniae invasive liver abscess syndrome with purulent meningitis and septic shock: A case from mainland China.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yun; Wong, Chi-Chun; Lai, San-Chuan; Lin, Zheng-Hua; Zheng, Wei-Liang; Zhao, Hui; Pan, Kong-Han; Chen, Shu-Jie; Si, Jian-Min

    2016-03-01

    We present a rare case of invasive liver abscess syndrome due to Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) with metastatic meningitis and septic shock. A previously healthy, 55-year-old female patient developed fever, liver abscess, septic shock, purulent meningitis and metastatic hydrocephalus. Upon admission, the clinical manifestations, laboratory and imaging examinations were compatible with a diagnosis of K. pneumoniae primary liver abscess. Her distal metastasis infection involved meningitis and hydrocephalus, which could flare abruptly and be life threatening. Even with early adequate drainage and antibiotic therapy, the patient's condition deteriorated and she ultimately died. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of K. pneumoniae invasive liver abscess syndrome with septic meningitis reported in mainland China. Our findings reflect the need for a better understanding of the epidemiology, risk factors, complications, comorbid medical conditions and treatment of this disease. PMID:26973425

  4. Low Level of TSST-1 Antibody in Burn Patients With Toxic Shock Syndrome Caused by Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Asako; Kuroki, Yuich; Nakajima, Shinji; Sakai, Tomohiko; Kojima, Hiroki; Ueyama, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Toxic shock syndrome (TSS) caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) nosocomial infection is a growing concern in both adult and pediatric patients. The reason why TSS appears in only some patients with MRSA infection remains unclear. In this study, we analyzed serial TSS toxin-1 (TSST-1) antibody in patients with burn injury to investigate the mechanisms of TSS caused by MRSA nosocomial infection. This study comprised of patients with burn injury in our burn care unit from September, 2010 to August, 2011. Serum samples were collected serially on admission, at 48 to 72 hours after injury, on the day MRSA infection appeared, and on the day MRSA infection resolved. TSST-1 antibody was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). TSS was diagnosed according to the criteria of the Centers for Disease Control. Serial serum samples were collected from 24 patients and nosocomial MRSA infection was detected in 12 patients. In these 12 patients, TSS occurred in five patients (TSS+ group) but did not occur in the other seven patients (TSS- group). TSST-1 antibody level was significantly lower in the TSS+ group than TSS- group on admission and on the day MRSA infection appeared. All patients in the TSS+ group received intravenous immune globulin when TSS was diagnosed, and no patients died of TSS. Patients suffering from TSS had a lower level of TSST-1 antibody than patients not suffering from TSS. Testing for TSST-1 antibody in the clinical setting might help to predict and prevent the appearance of TSS caused by nosocomial MRSA infection. PMID:25094005

  5. Combined etiology of anaphylactic cardiogenic shock: Amiodarone, epinephrine, cardioverter defibrillator, left ventricular assist devices and the Kounis syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kounis, Nicholas G.; Soufras, George D.; Davlouros, Periklis; Tsigkas, Grigorios; Hahalis, George

    2015-01-01

    Anaphylactic shock is a life-threatening condition which needs detailed and mediculous clinical assessment and thoughtful treatment. Several causes can join forces in order to degranulate mast cells. Amiodarone which is an iodine-containing highly lipophilic benzofuran can induce allergic reactions and anaphylactic shock in sensitized patients. Epinephrine is a life saving drug, but in sulfite allergic patients it should be given with caution due its metabisulfite preservative. Metals covering cardiac defibrillators and pacemakers can act as antigens attached to serum proteins and induce allergic reactions. In anaphylactic shock, myocardial involvement due to vasospasm-induced coronary blood flow reduction manifesting as Kounis syndrome should be always considered. Clinically, combined treatment targeting the primary cause of anaphylaxis together with protection of cardiac tissue seems to be of paramount importance. PMID:25849705

  6. Electrophysiological correlates of reinforcement learning in young people with Tourette syndrome with and without co-occurring ADHD symptoms.

    PubMed

    Shephard, Elizabeth; Jackson, Georgina M; Groom, Madeleine J

    2016-06-01

    Altered reinforcement learning is implicated in the causes of Tourette syndrome (TS) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). TS and ADHD frequently co-occur but how this affects reinforcement learning has not been investigated. We examined the ability of young people with TS (n=18), TS+ADHD (N=17), ADHD (n=13) and typically developing controls (n=20) to learn and reverse stimulus-response (S-R) associations based on positive and negative reinforcement feedback. We used a 2 (TS-yes, TS-no)×2 (ADHD-yes, ADHD-no) factorial design to assess the effects of TS, ADHD, and their interaction on behavioural (accuracy, RT) and event-related potential (stimulus-locked P3, feedback-locked P2, feedback-related negativity, FRN) indices of learning and reversing the S-R associations. TS was associated with intact learning and reversal performance and largely typical ERP amplitudes. ADHD was associated with lower accuracy during S-R learning and impaired reversal learning (significantly reduced accuracy and a trend for smaller P3 amplitude). The results indicate that co-occurring ADHD symptoms impair reversal learning in TS+ADHD. The implications of these findings for behavioural tic therapies are discussed. PMID:27103231

  7. A Glimpse of Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome from Comparative Genomics of S. suis 2 Chinese Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Zheng, Feng; Pan, Xiuzhen; Liu, Di; Li, Ming; Song, Yajun; Zhu, Xinxing; Sun, Haibo; Feng, Tao; Guo, Zhaobiao; Ju, Aiping; Ge, Junchao; Dong, Yaqing; Sun, Wen; Jiang, Yongqiang; Wang, Jun; Yan, Jinghua; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Xiaoning; Gao, George F.; Yang, Ruifu; Wang, Jian; Yu, Jun

    2007-01-01

    Background Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (SS2) is an important zoonotic pathogen, causing more than 200 cases of severe human infection worldwide, with the hallmarks of meningitis, septicemia, arthritis, etc. Very recently, SS2 has been recognized as an etiological agent for streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), which was originally associated with Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS) in Streptococci. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying STSS are poorly understood. Methods and Findings To elucidate the genetic determinants of STSS caused by SS2, whole genome sequencing of 3 different Chinese SS2 strains was undertaken. Comparative genomics accompanied by several lines of experiments, including experimental animal infection, PCR assay, and expression analysis, were utilized to further dissect a candidate pathogenicity island (PAI). Here we show, for the first time, a novel molecular insight into Chinese isolates of highly invasive SS2, which caused two large-scale human STSS outbreaks in China. A candidate PAI of ∼89 kb in length, which is designated 89K and specific for Chinese SS2 virulent isolates, was investigated at the genomic level. It shares the universal properties of PAIs such as distinct GC content, consistent with its pivotal role in STSS and high virulence. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first PAI candidate from S. suis worldwide. Our finding thus sheds light on STSS triggered by SS2 at the genomic level, facilitates further understanding of its pathogenesis and points to directions of development on some effective strategies to combat highly pathogenic SS2 infections. PMID:17375201

  8. Toxic shock syndrome toxin-1, not α-toxin, mediated Bundaberg fatalities.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Elizabeth A; Merriman, Joseph A; Schlievert, Patrick M

    2015-12-01

    The 1928 Bundaberg disaster is one of the greatest vaccine tragedies in history. Of 21 children immunized with a diphtheria toxin-antitoxin preparation contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus, 18 developed life-threatening disease and 12 died within 48  h. Historically, the deaths have been attributed to α-toxin, a secreted cytotoxin produced by most S. aureus strains, yet the ability of the Bundaberg contaminant microbe to produce the toxin has never been verified. For the first time, the ability of the original strain to produce α-toxin and other virulence factors is investigated. The study investigates the genetic and regulatory loci mediating α-toxin expression by PCR and assesses production of the cytotoxin in vitro using an erythrocyte haemolysis assay. This analysis is extended to other secreted virulence factors produced by the strain, and their sufficiency to cause lethality in New Zealand white rabbits is determined. Although the strain possesses a wild-type allele for α-toxin, it must have a defective regulatory system, which is responsible for the strain's minimal α-toxin production. The strain encodes and produces staphylococcal superantigens, including toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1), which is sufficient to cause lethality in patients. The findings cast doubt on the belief that α-toxin is the major virulence factor responsible for the Bundaberg fatalities and point to the superantigen TSST-1 as the cause of the disaster. PMID:26432699

  9. Spontaneous mutations in Streptococcus pyogenes isolates from streptococcal toxic shock syndrome patients play roles in virulence.

    PubMed

    Ikebe, Tadayoshi; Matsumura, Takayuki; Nihonmatsu, Hisako; Ohya, Hitomi; Okuno, Rumi; Mitsui, Chieko; Kawahara, Ryuji; Kameyama, Mitsuhiro; Sasaki, Mari; Shimada, Naomi; Ato, Manabu; Ohnishi, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus; GAS) is a widespread human pathogen and causes streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS). STSS isolates have been previously shown to have high frequency mutations in the csrS/csrR (covS/covR) and/or rgg (ropB) genes, which are negative regulators of virulence. However, these mutations were found at somewhat low frequencies in emm1-genotyped isolates, the most prevalent STSS genotype. In this study, we sought to detect causal mutations of enhanced virulence in emm1 isolates lacking mutation(s) in the csrS/csrR and rgg genes. Three mutations associated with elevated virulence were found in the sic (a virulence gene) promoter, the csrR promoter, and the rocA gene (a csrR positive regulator). In vivo contribution of the sic promoter and rocA mutations to pathogenicity and lethality was confirmed in a GAS mouse model. Frequency of the sic promoter mutation was significantly higher in STSS emm1 isolates than in non-invasive STSS isolates; the rocA gene mutation frequency was not significantly different among STSS and non-STSS isolates. STSS emm1 isolates possessed a high frequency mutation in the sic promoter. Thus, this mutation may play a role in the dynamics of virulence and STSS pathogenesis. PMID:27349341

  10. Spontaneous mutations in Streptococcus pyogenes isolates from streptococcal toxic shock syndrome patients play roles in virulence

    PubMed Central

    Ikebe, Tadayoshi; Matsumura, Takayuki; Nihonmatsu, Hisako; Ohya, Hitomi; Okuno, Rumi; Mitsui, Chieko; Kawahara, Ryuji; Kameyama, Mitsuhiro; Sasaki, Mari; Shimada, Naomi; Ato, Manabu; Ohnishi, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus; GAS) is a widespread human pathogen and causes streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS). STSS isolates have been previously shown to have high frequency mutations in the csrS/csrR (covS/covR) and/or rgg (ropB) genes, which are negative regulators of virulence. However, these mutations were found at somewhat low frequencies in emm1-genotyped isolates, the most prevalent STSS genotype. In this study, we sought to detect causal mutations of enhanced virulence in emm1 isolates lacking mutation(s) in the csrS/csrR and rgg genes. Three mutations associated with elevated virulence were found in the sic (a virulence gene) promoter, the csrR promoter, and the rocA gene (a csrR positive regulator). In vivo contribution of the sic promoter and rocA mutations to pathogenicity and lethality was confirmed in a GAS mouse model. Frequency of the sic promoter mutation was significantly higher in STSS emm1 isolates than in non-invasive STSS isolates; the rocA gene mutation frequency was not significantly different among STSS and non-STSS isolates. STSS emm1 isolates possessed a high frequency mutation in the sic promoter. Thus, this mutation may play a role in the dynamics of virulence and STSS pathogenesis. PMID:27349341

  11. Veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for Streptococcus pyogenes toxic shock syndrome in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Imaeda, Taro; Nakada, Taka-Aki; Abe, Ryuzo; Tateishi, Yoshihisa; Oda, Shigeto

    2016-06-01

    Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), an invasive Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A streptococcus) infection with hypotension and multiple organ failure, is quite rare in pregnancy but is characterized by rapid disease progression and high fatality rates. We present a case of STSS with infection-induced cardiac dysfunction in a pregnant woman who was treated with veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA-ECMO). A 24-year-old multiparous woman in the third trimester had early symptoms of high fever and diarrhea 1 day prior to admission to the hospital emergency department. On admission, she had multiple organ failure including circulatory failure. Due to fetal distress, emergency Cesarean section was carried out and transferred to intensive care units. She had refractory circulatory failure with depressed myocardial contractility with progressive multiple organ failure, despite receiving significant hemodynamic supports including high-dose catecholamine. Thus, VA-ECMO was initiated 18 h after intensive care unit admission. Consequently, ECMO provided extra time to recover from infection and myocardial depression. She was successfully weaned from VA-ECMO on day 7 and was discharged home on day 53. VA-ECMO can be a therapeutic option for refractory circulatory failure with significant myocardial depression in STSS. PMID:26758056

  12. Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage in rheumatoid arthritis: antibody response to toxic shock syndrome toxin-1.

    PubMed Central

    Tabarya, D; Hoffman, W L

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage and to compare antibody responses to two superantigens, staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1) and staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA), in rheumatoid arthritis patients and normal subjects. METHODS: 88 rheumatoid arthritis patients and 110 control subjects were cultured for nasal carriage of S aureus; 62 isolates were bacteriophage typed. Twenty five patients and 11 spouses were tested for antibodies to TSST-1, SEA, and sonicate extracts of Bacteroides fragilis and Escherichia coli; 19 patients were HLA-DR typed. RESULTS: 50% of patients and 33% of normal subjects were S aureus carriers. Bacteriophage typing of isolates suggested significant differences between strains isolated from the two groups. Patients showed higher IgG (P = 0.0025) and IgA (P = 0.0372) antibody levels to TSST-1 than normal spouses and these responses were not related to rheumatoid factor titres or HLA-DR type. CONCLUSION: When compared to normals, rheumatoid arthritis patients more often carry S aureus in their nasal vestibule, carry a distinct subpopulation of S aureus strains, and have higher average antibody levels to TSST-1. PMID:8976639

  13. Propensity of Tampons and Barrier Contraceptives to Amplify Staphylococcus aureusToxic Shock Syndrome Toxin-I

    PubMed Central

    Tierno, Philip M.

    1994-01-01

    Objective: Although the incidence of reported cases of toxic shock syndrome (TSS) has declined in recent years, the disease continues to occur in menstruating women using the newer, less-absorbent tampons or barrier contraceptives. Extant tampons and other vaginal devices were tested for the ability to induce TSS toxin-1 (TSST-1) by a TSS strain of Staphylococcus aureus MN8, a known high-toxin producer. Tested for the first time were 20 varieties of tampons, including 2 all-cotton brands newly introduced in the United States, a polyurethane contraceptive sponge, a latex diaphragm, and a polymer menstrual collection cup. Methods: All products were washed in sterile distilled water prior to use to reduce the effect of leachable chemicals. Duplicate experiments with unwashed products were also performed. Entire tampons and other test products were immersed in brain heart infusion broth plus yeast extract (BHIY) and inoculated with S. aureus MN8, a known TSST-1 producer. After incubation, the culture supernatants were assayed for TSST-1 by gel immunodiffusion. Results: Except for all-cotton tampons, greater amounts of TSST-1 were detected in the supernatant fluid of washed tampons than detected in those which were not washed. While TSST-1 levels in unwashed non-cotton tampons ranged from 0.5 to 8 μg/ml, when these products were washed, TSST-1 levels increased to 2–32 μg/ml. In all-cotton tampons, whether washed or not, there was no detectable TSST-1. Conclusions: The propensity for all-cotton tampons not to amplify TSST-1 in vitro suggests they would lower the risk for tampon-associated TSS. PMID:18475381

  14. Association of phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of invasive Streptococcus pyogenes isolates with clinical components of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Talkington, D F; Schwartz, B; Black, C M; Todd, J K; Elliott, J; Breiman, R F; Facklam, R R

    1993-01-01

    Sixty-two invasive Streptococcus pyogenes strains, including 32 strains isolated from patients with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), were analyzed for the following phenotypic and genotypic characteristics: M-protein type, serum opacity factor production, protease production, the presence of streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin (Spe) genes A, B, and C, and in vitro production of SpeA and SpeB. These characteristics were analyzed for possible associations with each other as well as with clinical components of STSS. M-type 1, the most commonly isolated M-type, was significantly associated with protease production. Protease activity was significantly associated with the clinical sign of soft tissue necrosis. M-type 1 and 3 strains from STSS patients were significantly associated with the clinical signs of shock and organ involvement as well as with SpeA production in vitro. Finally, the production of SpeA was significantly associated with the clinical component of shock and organ involvement as well as with rash. These data suggest that STSS does not make up a single syndrome but, rather, that the multiple STSS clinical criteria probably reflect different phenotypic characteristics of individual S. pyogenes isolates. PMID:8335368

  15. The Role of Heat Shock Protein 90B1 in Patients with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Yongxian; Peng, Xiuhong; Luo, Xiping

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogenetic disorder in women that is characterized by arrested follicular growth and anovulatory infertility. The altered protein expression levels in the ovarian tissues reflect the molecular defects in folliculogenesis. To identify aberrant protein expression in PCOS, we analyzed protein expression profiles in the ovarian tissues of patients with PCOS. We identified a total of 18 protein spots that were differentially expressed in PCOS compared with healthy ovarian samples. A total of 13 proteins were upregulated and 5 proteins were downregulated. The expression levels of heat shock protein 90B1 (HSP90B1) and calcium signaling activator calmodulin 1 (CALM1) were increased by at least two-fold. The expression levels of HSP90B1 and CALM1 were positively associated with ovarian cell survival and negatively associated with caspase-3 activation and apoptosis. Knock-down of HSP90B1 with siRNA attenuated ovarian cell survival and increased apoptosis. In contrast, ovarian cell survival was improved and cell apoptosis was decreased in cells over-expressing HSP90B1. These results demonstrated the pivotal role of HSP90B1 in the proliferation and survival of ovarian cells, suggesting a critical role for HSP90B1 in the pathogenesis of PCOS. We also observed a downregulation of anti-inflammatory activity-related annexin A6 (ANXA6) and tropomyosin 2 (TPM2) compared with the normal controls, which could affect cell division and folliculogenesis in PCOS. This is the first study to identify novel altered gene expression in the ovarian tissues of patients with PCOS. These findings may have significant implications for future diagnostic and treatment strategies for PCOS using molecular interventions. PMID:27046189

  16. Prevalence of Antibody to Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin-1 in Burn Patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji-Young

    2015-01-01

    Background Burn wounds lack normal barriers that protect against pathogenic bacteria, and burn patients are easily colonized and infected by Staphylococcus aureus. Toxic shock syndrome (TSS) is a rare but fatal disease caused by S. aureus. A lack of detectable antibodies to TSS toxin-1 (TSST-1) in serum indicates susceptibility to TSS. Methods A total of 207 patients (169 men and 38 women; median age, 42.5 yr) admitted to a burn center in Korea were enrolled in this study. The serum antibody titer to TSST-1 was measured by sandwich ELISA. S. aureus isolates from the patients' nasal swab culture were tested for TSST-1 toxin production by PCR-based detection of the TSST-1 toxin gene. Results One hundred seventy-four (84.1%) patients showed positive results for antibody against TSST-1. All patients aged ≥61 yr (n=28) and <26 months (n=7) were positive for the anti-TSST-1 antibody. S. aureus was isolated from 70 patients (33.8%), and 58.6% of the isolates were methicillin resistant. Seventeen patients were colonized with TSST-1-producing S. aureus. The antibody positivity in these 17 carriers was 88.2%, and the positivity in the non-carriers was 83.7%. Conclusions Most burn patients had antibody to TSST-1, and nasal colonization with TSST-1-producing S. aureus was associated with positive titers of anti-TSST-1 antibody. Additionally, patients with negative titers of anti-TSST-1 antibody might be susceptible to TSS. PMID:25553286

  17. The Role of Heat Shock Protein 90B1 in Patients with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Mo, Hui; Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Yongxian; Peng, Xiuhong; Luo, Xiping

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogenetic disorder in women that is characterized by arrested follicular growth and anovulatory infertility. The altered protein expression levels in the ovarian tissues reflect the molecular defects in folliculogenesis. To identify aberrant protein expression in PCOS, we analyzed protein expression profiles in the ovarian tissues of patients with PCOS. We identified a total of 18 protein spots that were differentially expressed in PCOS compared with healthy ovarian samples. A total of 13 proteins were upregulated and 5 proteins were downregulated. The expression levels of heat shock protein 90B1 (HSP90B1) and calcium signaling activator calmodulin 1 (CALM1) were increased by at least two-fold. The expression levels of HSP90B1 and CALM1 were positively associated with ovarian cell survival and negatively associated with caspase-3 activation and apoptosis. Knock-down of HSP90B1 with siRNA attenuated ovarian cell survival and increased apoptosis. In contrast, ovarian cell survival was improved and cell apoptosis was decreased in cells over-expressing HSP90B1. These results demonstrated the pivotal role of HSP90B1 in the proliferation and survival of ovarian cells, suggesting a critical role for HSP90B1 in the pathogenesis of PCOS. We also observed a downregulation of anti-inflammatory activity-related annexin A6 (ANXA6) and tropomyosin 2 (TPM2) compared with the normal controls, which could affect cell division and folliculogenesis in PCOS. This is the first study to identify novel altered gene expression in the ovarian tissues of patients with PCOS. These findings may have significant implications for future diagnostic and treatment strategies for PCOS using molecular interventions. PMID:27046189

  18. Factors Associated with Dengue Shock Syndrome: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Thuy, Dinh Ha Duy; Kikuchi, Mihoko; Hien, Tran Tinh; Zamora, Javier; Hirayama, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of dengue shock syndrome (DSS, grade 3 and 4) is not yet completely understood. Several factors are reportedly associated with DSS, a more severe form of dengue infection that reportedly causes 50 times higher mortality compared to that of dengue patients without DSS. However, the results from these reports remain inconclusive. To better understand the epidemiology, clinical manifestation, and pathogenesis of DSS for development of new therapy, we systematically reviewed and performed a meta-analysis of relevant studies that reported factors in both DSS and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF, grade 1 and 2) patients. Methods and Findings PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, Google Scholar, Dengue Bulletin, Cochrane Library, Virtual Health Library, and a manual search of reference lists of articles published before September 2010 were used to retrieve relevant studies. A meta-analysis using fixed- or random-effects models was used to calculate pooled odds ratios (OR) or event rate with corresponding 95% confidence intervals. Assessment of heterogeneity and publication bias, meta-regression analysis, subgroup analysis, sensitivity analysis, and analysis of factor-specific relationships were further performed. There were 198 studies constituting 203 data sets that met our eligibility criteria. Our meta-regression analysis showed a sustained reduction of DSS/dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) ratio over a period of 40 years in Southeast Asia, especially in Thailand. The meta-analysis revealed that age, female sex, neurological signs, nausea/vomiting, abdominal pain, gastrointestinal bleeding, hemoconcentration, ascites, pleural effusion, hypoalbuminemia, hypoproteinemia, hepatomegaly, levels of alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase, thrombocytopenia, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, fibrinogen level, primary/secondary infection, and dengue virus serotype-2 were significantly associated with DSS when pooling all original relevant

  19. Genome-wide association study identifies susceptibility loci for Dengue shock syndrome at MICB and PLCE1

    PubMed Central

    Khor, Chiea Chuen; Bich, Chau Tran Nguyen; Pang, Junxiong; Davila, Sonia; Long, Hoang Truong; Ong, Rick T.H.; Dunstan, Sarah J.; Wills, Bridget; Farrar, Jeremy; Van Tram, Ta; Gan, Tran Thi; Binh, Nguyen Thi Nguyet; Tri, Le Trung; Lien, Le Bich; Tuan, Nguyen Minh; Tham, Nguyen Thi Hong; Lanh, Mai Ngoc; Nguyet, Nguyen Minh; Hieu, Nguyen Trong; Van Vinh Chau, Nguyen; Thuy, Tran Thi; Tan, Dennis E.K.; Sakuntabhai, Anavaj; Teo, Yik-Ying; Hibberd, Martin L; Simmons, Cameron P.

    2011-01-01

    Hypovolemic shock (Dengue shock syndrome (DSS)), is the commonest life-threatening complication of dengue. We conducted a genome-wide association study of 2,008 pediatric cases treated for DSS and 2,018 controls from Vietnam. Replication of the most significantly associated markers was carried out in an independent Vietnamese follow-up sample of 1,737 cases and 2,934 controls. Polymorphisms within two genes showed genome-wide significant association with DSS (Pmeta = 4.41 × 10−11, per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.34 for MICB rs3132468 located within the broad MHC region and Pmeta = 3.08 × 10−10, per-allele OR = 0.80 for PLCE1 rs3765524). Our data implicates MICB is an important determinant in early immune control of dengue virus infection and PLCE1 a factor in vascular endothelial dysfunction and circulatory hypovolemia. PMID:22001756

  20. Association between the 65-kilodalton heat shock protein, Streptococcus sanguis, and the corresponding antibodies in Behçet's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Lehner, T; Lavery, E; Smith, R; van der Zee, R; Mizushima, Y; Shinnick, T

    1991-01-01

    The etiology of Behcet's syndrome (BS) is unknown, but a number of streptococcal species have been implicated. A hypothesis was postulated that a shared antigen, such as a stress protein, might account for some of these findings. Indeed, a rabbit antiserum against a 65-kDa heat shock protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis revealed a corresponding 65-kDa band with all six Streptococcus sanguis strains examined and S. pyogenes but not with S. salivarius. By applying a panel of nine monoclonal antibodies to the mycobacterial 65-kDa heat shock protein, an approximately 65-kDa antigen was identified in the uncommon serotypes of S. sanguis ST3 and H.83 and one with a different Mr was identified in KTH-1 and S. pyogenes. Monoclonal antibodies Y1.2, C1.1, II H9, and ML30, which reacted with these streptococci, recognize residues 11 to 27, 88 to 123, 107 to 122, and 276 to 297 of the 65-kDa heat shock protein, respectively, suggesting that these residues are conserved among some uncommon serotypes of S. sanguis and S. pyogenes. Immunoblot analyses of sera from patients with BS for immunoglobulin A (IgA) and IgG antibodies revealed bands of 65 to 70 kDa with the mycobacterial heat shock protein, S. sanguis strains, and S. pyogenes, although these reactivities were also found to a lesser extent in controls. A 65- to 70-kDa band was found more frequently with S. sanguis KTH-2 or KTH-3 and IgA in serum from patients with BS than with serum from controls (P less than 0.02). Antibodies in serum were then studied by a radioimmunoassay, and in patients with BS this revealed significantly raised IgA antibodies to the recombinant 65-kDa mycobacterial heat shock protein and to soluble protein extracts of S. sanguis ST3, KTH-1, KTH-2, and KTH-3. Whereas significant anti-65-kDa heat shock protein and anti-S. sanguis ST3 antibodies were also found in sera from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and recurrent oral ulcers, the anti-S. sanguis KTH-1, KTH-2, and KTH-3 antibodies were confined

  1. Induction of nitric oxide synthase activity by toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 in a macrophage-monocyte cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Zembowicz, A; Vane, J R

    1992-01-01

    Toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1) is a Mr 22,000 protein produced by Staphylococcus aureus. It is thought to be the cause of toxic shock syndrome. We investigated the hypothesis that TSST-1 induces nitric oxide (NO) synthase and that the NO formed may be involved in the pathogenesis of toxic shock syndrome. We used the murine monocyte-macrophage cell line J744.2 that responds to TSST-1 and also expresses NO synthase activity upon immunological stimulation. J774.2 macrophages stimulated with TSST-1 (10-100 nM) generated nitrite, a breakdown product of NO, and induced concentration-dependent elevations of cGMP in the pig kidney epithelial cell line (LLC-PK1). This latter effect was due to the generation of L-arginine-derived NO for it was (i) abolished by oxyhemoglobin (10 microM), a scavenger of NO, or by methylene blue (10 microM), an inhibitor of NO-activated guanylate cyclase; (ii) potentiated by superoxide dismutase (100 units/ml), which prolongs the life of NO; (iii) inhibited by NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (0.3 mM), an inhibitor of NO synthase; (iv) significantly decreased when L-arginine (0.4 mM) in the medium was replaced by D-arginine (0.4 mM). Moreover, TSST-1 (100 nM) enhanced the activity of cytosolic NO synthase in J774.2 cells. Hydrocortisone (1 microM) but not indomethacin (5 micrograms/ml) or salicylic acid (5 micrograms/ml) prevented the generation of NO2- and the increases in cGMP levels in LLC-PK1 cells induced by J774.2 cells stimulated with TSST-1. The effects of hydrocortisone were partially reversed by coincubation with RU 486 (1 microM), an antagonist of glucocorticoid receptors. Thus, TSST-1 and perhaps other exotoxins produced by Gram-positive bacteria induce NO synthase and the increased NO formation may contribute to toxic shock syndrome and possibly to changes in the immune responses that accompany infection. PMID:1372433

  2. A Case Report of Churg-Strauss Syndrome Presenting With Cardiogenic Shock Treated With Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Na; Su, Longxiang; Wang, Hao; Long, Yun; Pang, Cheng; Yang, Fei; Liu, Dawei

    2015-10-01

    Churg-Strauss Syndrome (CSS) complicated with cardiogenic shock is rare. Few case reports have described successful treatment of this rare disease. However, no one has reported on the application of mechanical life support with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) to treat this life-threatening disease.A 36-year-old female with limb numbness for >10 days, chest tightness for 2 days, and worsening dyspnea for 5 h presented in the emergency room. Vital signs showed a low blood pressure (104/60 mm Hg), increased heart rate (158 bpm), and respiration rate (28 bpm). Laboratory tests revealed that eosinophil was significantly increased (WBC: 34.46 × 10/L, neutrophil: 7.56 × 10/L[21.9%], eosinophil: 23.84 × 10/L[69.2%]), and serum myocardial enzymes was abnormal (CK 1049U/L, CKMB-mass 145.1 μg/L, cTnI 16.24 μg/L). Myocardial injury (tachycardia with ST elevation) and poor heart function (LVEF 31%) were found by electrocardiogram and transthoracic echocardiography. On the next day, cardiogenic shock had been developed as demonstrated by deteriorating the perfusion index.Churg-Strauss Syndrome with cardiogenic shock.A series of conservative therapy with drugs such as corticosteroids, anticoagulant, antiplatelet, nitrates, calcium antagonists, inotrope, and vasopressors were initiated on the day of admission. The treatment was ineffective and a cardiogenic shock developed on the next day. Thus, ECMO was initiated immediately to stabilize circulation and perfusion. At the same time, high-dose corticosteroids combined with immunosuppressive therapy were continuously used.Symptoms of cardiogenic shock were gradually improved after ECMO treatment. Elevated values of cardiac enzymes were decreased and the dose of vasoactive drugs was reduced. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was discontinued after 8 days, and the patient was eventually weaned off the ventilator. The patient was discharged after 40 days treatment.Once a CSS develops into a

  3. Toxic shock syndrome toxin-1-mediated toxicity inhibited by neutralizing antibodies late in the course of continual in vivo and in vitro exposure.

    PubMed

    Stich, Norbert; Model, Nina; Samstag, Aysen; Gruener, Corina S; Wolf, Hermann M; Eibl, Martha M

    2014-06-01

    Toxic shock syndrome (TSS) results from the host's overwhelming inflammatory response and cytokine storm mainly due to superantigens (SAgs). There is no effective specific therapy. Application of immunoglobulins has been shown to improve the outcome of the disease and to neutralize SAgs both in vivo and in vitro. However, in most experiments that have been performed, antiserum was either pre-incubated with SAg, or both were applied simultaneously. To mirror more closely the clinical situation, we applied a multiple dose (over five days) lethal challenge in a rabbit model. Treatment with toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1) neutralizing antibody was fully protective, even when administered late in the course of the challenge. Kinetic studies on the effect of superantigen toxins are scarce. We performed in vitro kinetic studies by neutralizing the toxin with antibodies at well-defined time points. T-cell activation was determined by assessing T-cell proliferation (3H-thymidine incorporation), determination of IL-2 release in the cell supernatant (ELISA), and IL-2 gene activation (real-time PCR (RT-PCR)). Here we show that T-cell activation occurs continuously. The application of TSST-1 neutralizing antiserum reduced IL-2 and TNFα release into the cell supernatant, even if added at later time points. Interference with the prolonged stimulation of proinflammatory cytokines is likely to be in vivo relevant, as postexposure treatment protected rabbits against the multiple dose lethal SAg challenge. Our results shed new light on the treatment of TSS by specific antibodies even at late stages of exposure. PMID:24887085

  4. Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin-1-Mediated Toxicity Inhibited by Neutralizing Antibodies Late in the Course of Continual in Vivo and in Vitro Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Stich, Norbert; Model, Nina; Samstag, Aysen; Gruener, Corina S.; Wolf, Hermann M.; Eibl, Martha M.

    2014-01-01

    Toxic shock syndrome (TSS) results from the host’s overwhelming inflammatory response and cytokine storm mainly due to superantigens (SAgs). There is no effective specific therapy. Application of immunoglobulins has been shown to improve the outcome of the disease and to neutralize SAgs both in vivo and in vitro. However, in most experiments that have been performed, antiserum was either pre-incubated with SAg, or both were applied simultaneously. To mirror more closely the clinical situation, we applied a multiple dose (over five days) lethal challenge in a rabbit model. Treatment with toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1) neutralizing antibody was fully protective, even when administered late in the course of the challenge. Kinetic studies on the effect of superantigen toxins are scarce. We performed in vitro kinetic studies by neutralizing the toxin with antibodies at well-defined time points. T-cell activation was determined by assessing T-cell proliferation (3H-thymidine incorporation), determination of IL-2 release in the cell supernatant (ELISA), and IL-2 gene activation (real-time PCR (RT-PCR)). Here we show that T-cell activation occurs continuously. The application of TSST-1 neutralizing antiserum reduced IL-2 and TNFα release into the cell supernatant, even if added at later time points. Interference with the prolonged stimulation of proinflammatory cytokines is likely to be in vivo relevant, as postexposure treatment protected rabbits against the multiple dose lethal SAg challenge. Our results shed new light on the treatment of TSS by specific antibodies even at late stages of exposure. PMID:24887085

  5. Effect of Radial Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy on Hemiplegic Shoulder Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy (rESWT) on hemiplegic shoulder pain (HSP) syndrome. Methods In this monocentric, randomized, patient-assessor blinded, placebo-controlled trial, patients with HSP were randomly divided into the rESWT (n=17) and control (n=17) groups. Treatment was administered four times a week for 2 weeks. The visual analogue scale (VAS) score and Constant-Murley score (CS) were assessed before and after treatment, and at 2 and 4 weeks. The Modified Ashworth Scale and Fugl-Meyer Assessment scores and range of motion of the shoulder were also assessed. Results VAS scores improved post-intervention and at the 2-week and 4-week follow-up in the intervention group (p<0.05). Respective differences in VAS scores between baseline and post-intervention in the intervention and control groups were –1.69±1.90 and –0.45±0.79, respectively (p<0.05), between baseline and 2-week follow-up in the intervention and control groups were –1.60±1.74 and –0.34±0.70, respectively (p<0.05), and between baseline and 4-week follow-up in the intervention and control groups were –1.61±1.73 and –0.33±0.71, respectively (p<0.05). Baseline CS improved from 19.12±11.02 to 20.88±10.37 post-intervention and to 20.41±10.82 at the 2-week follow-up only in the intervention group (p<0.05). Conclusion rESWT consisting of eight sessions could be one of the effective and safe modalities for pain management in people with HSP. Further studies are needed to generalize and support these results in patients with HSP and a variety conditions, and to understand the mechanism of rESWT for treating HSP. PMID:27446789

  6. Globodontia in the Otodental Syndrome: A Rare Defect of Tooth Morphology Occurring with Hearing Loss in an Eight-Year-Old.

    PubMed

    Enright, Sinead; Humphrys, A Karen; Rea, Gillian; James, Jacqueline A

    2015-12-01

    Otodental syndrome is a hereditary disorder comprising globodontia and sensorineural hearing loss. Globodontia is characterized by distinctively bulbous, enlarged crowns of molar and primary canine teeth. Anomalies including taurodontism and hypodontia also occur. We report on the dental treatment and multidisciplinary management of an eight-year-old girl with this rare condition. Referral to Clinical Genetics and Oral Pathology was instrumental in establishing a diagnosis of otodental syndrome for this young patient and her mother, who had similar dental defects. CPD/Clinical Relevance: To increase awareness among practitioners of this rare dental disorder and highlight the need for multidisciplinary management of such cases. PMID:26855998

  7. Staphylococcus aureus toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 and Streptococcus pyogenes erythrogenic toxin A modulate inflammatory mediator release from human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Hensler, T; Köller, M; Geoffroy, C; Alouf, J E; König, W

    1993-01-01

    We studied the influence of staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 and streptococcal erythrogenic (pyrogenic) toxin A (ETA) on intact and digitonin-permeabilized human polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMNs). As was shown by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography analysis, toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 or ETA alone, in the absence of any additional stimulus, did not induce the generation of the chemoattractant leukotriene B4 (LTB4) from PMNs in a wide range of concentrations. In addition, pretreatment of intact PMNs with either toxin potentiated formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP)- and washed Staphylococcus aureus cell-induced generation of LTB4 in a time- and dose-dependent manner. This increase included LTB4 as well as its inactive omega-oxidated compounds. Further studies revealed evidence that toxin exposure was accompanied by enhanced cellular receptor expression for fMLP as well as for LTB4. The intrinsic GTPase activity of membrane fractions was modulated by both toxins. Short-term incubation with ETA increased the GTPase activity of PMNs up to 141%. Inhibitory effects were obtained when GTP-binding protein functions were stimulated with sodium fluoride (NaF). In addition, specific binding of Gpp(NH)p to GTP-binding protein was inhibited by both toxins during the first 10 min of incubation and was restored at later times of incubation. Our data therefore suggest that both toxins significantly affect the signal transduction pathways of human PMNs, which results in immunomodulatory functions. PMID:8381770

  8. Staphylococcus aureus toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 and Streptococcus pyogenes erythrogenic toxin A modulate inflammatory mediator release from human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Hensler, T; Köller, M; Geoffroy, C; Alouf, J E; König, W

    1993-03-01

    We studied the influence of staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 and streptococcal erythrogenic (pyrogenic) toxin A (ETA) on intact and digitonin-permeabilized human polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMNs). As was shown by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography analysis, toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 or ETA alone, in the absence of any additional stimulus, did not induce the generation of the chemoattractant leukotriene B4 (LTB4) from PMNs in a wide range of concentrations. In addition, pretreatment of intact PMNs with either toxin potentiated formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP)- and washed Staphylococcus aureus cell-induced generation of LTB4 in a time- and dose-dependent manner. This increase included LTB4 as well as its inactive omega-oxidated compounds. Further studies revealed evidence that toxin exposure was accompanied by enhanced cellular receptor expression for fMLP as well as for LTB4. The intrinsic GTPase activity of membrane fractions was modulated by both toxins. Short-term incubation with ETA increased the GTPase activity of PMNs up to 141%. Inhibitory effects were obtained when GTP-binding protein functions were stimulated with sodium fluoride (NaF). In addition, specific binding of Gpp(NH)p to GTP-binding protein was inhibited by both toxins during the first 10 min of incubation and was restored at later times of incubation. Our data therefore suggest that both toxins significantly affect the signal transduction pathways of human PMNs, which results in immunomodulatory functions. PMID:8381770

  9. Release of tumor necrosis factor alpha by human peritoneal macrophages in response to toxic shock syndrome toxin-1.

    PubMed

    Buyalos, R P; Rutanen, E M; Tsui, E; Halme, J

    1991-08-01

    We examined the release in vitro of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) by peritoneal macrophages and peripheral blood monocytes following incubation with toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1). We obtained peritoneal macrophages from 22 women at laparoscopy and peripheral blood monocytes from four healthy women during both the midfollicular and midluteal phases of the menstrual cycle. The samples were incubated for 24 hours at 37 C with 10(-2)-10(4) ng/mL of TSST-1 or 10(4) ng/mL of bacterial endotoxin. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha activity was determined with a bioassay using an actinomycin D-sensitized WEHI-164 murine fibrosarcoma cell line. Twenty-four-hour incubation with TSST-1 resulted in a dose-dependent release of TNF-alpha by both peritoneal macrophages (maximal response 554 +/- 97 U of activity) and peripheral blood monocytes (maximal response 478 +/- 81 U of activity). We observed enhanced TNF-alpha release by peritoneal macrophages from women with endometriosis, compared with those without endometriosis, at a concentration of 10(4) ng/mL of TSST-1 (704 +/- 134 versus 354 +/- 103 U of activity; P less than .05). These data support the theory that the metabolic and physiologic derangements of perimenstrual toxic shock syndrome may be partially mediated by TNF-alpha released by peritoneal macrophages as a result of exposure to TSST-1. PMID:2067760

  10. Local Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Signaling Mediates the Systemic Pathogenic Effects of Staphylococcus aureus Toxic Shock Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gillman, Aaron N.; Stach, Christopher S.; Schlievert, Patrick M.; Peterson, Marnie L.

    2016-01-01

    Secreted factors of Staphylococcus aureus can activate host signaling from the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The superantigen toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1) contributes to mucosal cytokine production through a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM)-mediated shedding of EGFR ligands and subsequent EGFR activation. The secreted hemolysin, α-toxin, can also induce EGFR signaling and directly interacts with ADAM10, a sheddase of EGFR ligands. The current work explores the role of EGFR signaling in menstrual toxic shock syndrome (mTSS), a disease mediated by TSST-1. The data presented show that TSST-1 and α-toxin induce ADAM- and EGFR-dependent cytokine production from human vaginal epithelial cells. TSST-1 and α-toxin also induce cytokine production from an ex vivo porcine vaginal mucosa (PVM) model. EGFR signaling is responsible for the majority of IL-8 production from PVM in response to secreted toxins and live S. aureus. Finally, data are presented demonstrating that inhibition of EGFR signaling with the EGFR-specific tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG1478 significantly increases survival in a rabbit model of mTSS. These data indicate that EGFR signaling is critical for progression of an S. aureus exotoxin-mediated disease and may represent an attractive host target for therapeutics. PMID:27414801

  11. First Generation Gene Expression Signature for Early Prediction of Late Occurring Hematological Acute Radiation Syndrome in Baboons.

    PubMed

    Port, M; Herodin, F; Valente, M; Drouet, M; Lamkowski, A; Majewski, M; Abend, M

    2016-07-01

    We implemented a two-stage study to predict late occurring hematologic acute radiation syndrome (HARS) in a baboon model based on gene expression changes measured in peripheral blood within the first two days after irradiation. Eighteen baboons were irradiated to simulate different patterns of partial-body and total-body exposure, which corresponded to an equivalent dose of 2.5 or 5 Gy. According to changes in blood cell counts the surviving baboons (n = 17) exhibited mild (H1-2, n = 4) or more severe (H2-3, n = 13) HARS. Blood samples taken before irradiation served as unexposed control (H0, n = 17). For stage I of this study, a whole genome screen (mRNA microarrays) was performed using a portion of the samples (H0, n = 5; H1-2, n = 4; H2-3, n = 5). For stage II, using the remaining samples and the more sensitive methodology, qRT-PCR, validation was performed on candidate genes that were differentially up- or down-regulated during the first two days after irradiation. Differential gene expression was defined as significant (P < 0.05) and greater than or equal to a twofold difference above a H0 classification. From approximately 20,000 genes, on average 46% appeared to be expressed. On day 1 postirradiation for H2-3, approximately 2-3 times more genes appeared up-regulated (1,418 vs. 550) or down-regulated (1,603 vs. 735) compared to H1-2. This pattern became more pronounced at day 2 while the number of differentially expressed genes decreased. The specific genes showed an enrichment of biological processes coding for immune system processes, natural killer cell activation and immune response (P = 1 × E-06 up to 9 × E-14). Based on the P values, magnitude and sustained differential gene expression over time, we selected 89 candidate genes for validation using qRT-PCR. Ultimately, 22 genes were confirmed for identification of H1-3 classifications and seven genes for identification of H2-3 classifications using qRT-PCR. For H1-3 classifications, most genes were

  12. Systemic leukopenia, evaluation of laminar leukocyte infiltration and laminar lesions in horses with naturally occurring colic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Laskoski, Luciane Maria; Locatelli-Dittrich, Rosangela; Valadão, Carlos Augusto Araújo; Deconto, Ivan; Gonçalves, Kamila Alcala; Montiani-Ferreira, Fabiano; Brum, Juliana Sperotto; de Brito, Harald Fernando Vicente; de Sousa, Renato Silva

    2015-08-01

    The present study was aimed at identifying laminar lesions and leukocyte infiltration in hoof laminar tissue of horses with colic syndrome and its correlation with the total leukocyte count before death. Six healthy horses were used as control group (CG), and eighteen horses with lethal gastrointestinal disease were divided into two groups: leukopenic group (LG) with seven leukopenic horses, and non-leukopenic group (NLG) with 11 horses with total leukocyte count within reference range for the species. Leukocyte infiltration was examined by immunohistochemistry. Laminar lesions were observed in both LG and NLG, with no differences in severity between them. LG showed increase of the leukocyte infiltration in the hoof laminar tissue, when compared to CG and NLG. Horses with severe colic syndrome (LG and NLG) developed intense laminar lesions without clinical signs of laminitis, with increased leukocyte infiltration. However, the LG demonstrated an even higher increase of leukocyte infiltration compared to both CG and NLG. PMID:26267083

  13. Treatment of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome that Occurred in a Patient with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus by Plasmapheresis.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Zehra İpek; Turna, Canan Kamile; Özerdem, Çiğdem Yasemin; Yavuz, Sara; Baykara, Nur; Solak, Mine

    2015-08-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is characterized by visual and mental disturbances, nausea and vomiting and generalized or focal convulsions and often represents itself with parietal and occipital oedema formation. We want to report the treatment of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome with plasmapheresis, which developed in a 35-year-old woman with systemic lupus erythematosus diagnosed by renal biopsy 3 years ago. She has been followed up in the intensive care unit three times. However, she had been transferred to the nephrology department of our university hospital because of her uncontrolled blood pressure. Oral antihypertensive therapy, corticosteroid 500 mg 1 × 1 and cyclophosphamide were started for the activation of lupus. After the detection of low complement levels, systemic lupus erythematosus activation was suspected. She developed mental deterioration after her first plasmapheresis treatment and was then consulted by the neurology and intensive care unit doctors. Diffusion cranial magnetic resonance imaging was found compatible with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. The patient was transferred to our intensive care unit. The patient gained consciousness after her second plasmapheresis. After 5 days of follow-up in our intensive care unit and after significant regression was observed in the magnetic resonance imaging analysis, the patient was transferred to the nephrology service conscious, cooperated and orientated. At the nephrology service, after a total of 13 times of plasmapheresis, complement levels were increased and she was discharged with corticosteroid therapy. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome can be observed in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and intensive care unit treatment may be required. To control the hypertension, plasmapheresis should be kept in mind in addition to the multiple antihypertensive therapy in these patients. PMID:27366515

  14. Treatment of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome that Occurred in a Patient with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus by Plasmapheresis

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Zehra İpek; Turna, Canan Kamile; Özerdem, Çiğdem Yasemin; Yavuz, Sara; Baykara, Nur; Solak, Mine

    2015-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is characterized by visual and mental disturbances, nausea and vomiting and generalized or focal convulsions and often represents itself with parietal and occipital oedema formation. We want to report the treatment of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome with plasmapheresis, which developed in a 35-year-old woman with systemic lupus erythematosus diagnosed by renal biopsy 3 years ago. She has been followed up in the intensive care unit three times. However, she had been transferred to the nephrology department of our university hospital because of her uncontrolled blood pressure. Oral antihypertensive therapy, corticosteroid 500 mg 1 × 1 and cyclophosphamide were started for the activation of lupus. After the detection of low complement levels, systemic lupus erythematosus activation was suspected. She developed mental deterioration after her first plasmapheresis treatment and was then consulted by the neurology and intensive care unit doctors. Diffusion cranial magnetic resonance imaging was found compatible with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. The patient was transferred to our intensive care unit. The patient gained consciousness after her second plasmapheresis. After 5 days of follow-up in our intensive care unit and after significant regression was observed in the magnetic resonance imaging analysis, the patient was transferred to the nephrology service conscious, cooperated and orientated. At the nephrology service, after a total of 13 times of plasmapheresis, complement levels were increased and she was discharged with corticosteroid therapy. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome can be observed in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and intensive care unit treatment may be required. To control the hypertension, plasmapheresis should be kept in mind in addition to the multiple antihypertensive therapy in these patients. PMID:27366515

  15. Characterization of Five Zoonotic Streptococcus suis Strains from Germany, Including One Isolate from a Recent Fatal Case of Streptococcal Toxic Shock-Like Syndrome in a Hunter.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Tobias; Hudemann, Christoph; Hossain, Hamid M; Hewer, Angela; Tello, Khodr; Bandorski, Dirk; Rohde, Manfred; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Baums, Christoph Georg

    2015-12-01

    A Streptococcus suis isolate from a German hunter with streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome (STSLS) and four additional zoonotic isolates were genotyped as mrp(+) epf* (variant 1890) sly(+) cps2(+). All five zoonotic German strains were characterized by high multiplication in human blood samples ex vivo, but induction of only low levels of proinflammatory cytokines compared to a Chinese STSLS strain. PMID:26424844

  16. Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome (DRESS) syndrome associated with azithromycin presenting like septic shock: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome is a potentially life-threatening cutaneous hypersensitivity reaction characterized by extensive mucocutaneous eruption, fever, hematologic abnormalities including eosinophilia and/or atypical lymphocytosis, and extensive organ involvement. The drugs most often responsible for causing drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome are anticonvulsants, antimicrobial agents and antipyretic or anti-inflammatory analgesics. Although azithromycin is widely prescribed in clinical practice, serious cutaneous reactions from this agent have been rarely described. We report the first adult case of drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome associated with azithromycin. Case presentation A 44-year-old previously healthy Caucasian man with history of tobacco use presented to his primary care physician with fever and productive cough. He was prescribed azithromycin, promethazine hydrochloride and dextromethorphan hydrobromide syrup. One week later, he developed a blistering erythematous rash over both hands, which over the next two weeks spread to involve nearly his entire body surface, sparing only his face. He was admitted to an outside hospital with signs of systemic inflammatory response syndrome and severe sepsis, presumably from a skin infection. Despite aggressive therapy he deteriorated, with worsening diffuse erythema, and was transferred to our institution. He developed multiple organ failure requiring ventilatory and hemodynamic support. Pertinent laboratory studies included a leukocytosis with a white blood cell count of 17.6×109/L and 47% eosinophils. A skin biopsy showed evidence of spongiotic lichenoid dermatitis with eosinophils and neutrophils, compatible with a systemic drug-induced hypersensitivity reaction. Our patient was started on high-dose steroids and showed dramatic improvement within 48 hours. Conclusions We report the first adult case of

  17. [Toxic shock syndrome by group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus. Study of clonal relationship between a case and its contacts].

    PubMed

    Fernández, J; Fica, A; Caorsi, B; Contreras, J; Luppi, M; Heitmann, I

    1998-08-01

    Group A Streptococcal infections have increased in severity and frequency worldwide. We report a female patient that was admitted by Group A Streptococcal lethal toxic shock syndrome due to pharyngitis as the primary focus and without cutaneous involvement. Streptococcus pyogenes was isolated from blood cultures and case definition fulfilled standard recommendations. Epidemiological studies among family members showed, that two children (aged 5 and 12 years) harbored the same strain in their pharynxes as confirmed by arbitrarily primed PCR (AP-PCR) using primers ERIC and Pn-1. Control strains were included in the analysis. None of three health care workers involved in intubation and laryngoscopic procedures with the patient carried S pyogenes. AP-PCR appears to be a useful and rapid procedure to demonstrate clonal relatedness among S pyogenes strains. PMID:9830749

  18. Swift Intrahepatic Accumulation of Granulocytic Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells in a Humanized Mouse Model of Toxic Shock Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Peter A; Goswami, Ankur; Memarnejadian, Arash; Mallett, Christiane L; Foster, Paula J; McCormick, John K; Haeryfar, S M Mansour

    2016-06-15

    Toxic shock syndrome (TSS) and other superantigen-mediated illnesses are associated with 'systemic' immunosuppression that jeopardizes the host's ability to fight pathogens. Here, we define a novel mechanism of 'local' immunosuppression that may benefit the host. Systemic exposure to staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) rapidly and selectively recruited CD11b(+)Gr-1(high)Ly-6C(+) granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) to the liver of HLA-DR4 transgenic mice. Hepatic MDSCs inhibited SEB-triggered T cell proliferation in a reactive oxygen species-dependent manner, and ex vivo-generated human MDSCs also similarly attenuated the proliferative response of autologous T cells to SEB. We propose a role for MDSCs in mitigating excessive tissue injury during TSS. PMID:26908735

  19. Increased prevalence of group A streptococcus isolates in streptococcal toxic shock syndrome cases in Japan from 2010 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Ikebe, T; Tominaga, K; Shima, T; Okuno, R; Kubota, H; Ogata, K; Chiba, K; Katsukawa, C; Ohya, H; Tada, Y; Okabe, N; Watanabe, H; Ogawa, M; Ohnishi, M

    2015-03-01

    Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) is a severe invasive infection characterized by the sudden onset of shock, multi-organ failure, and high mortality. In Japan, appropriate notification measures based on the Infectious Disease Control law are mandatory for cases of STSS caused by β-haemolytic streptococcus. STSS is mainly caused by group A streptococcus (GAS). Although an average of 60-70 cases of GAS-induced STSS are reported annually, 143 cases were recorded in 2011. To determine the reason behind this marked increase, we characterized the emm genotype of 249 GAS isolates from STSS patients in Japan from 2010 to 2012 and performed antimicrobial susceptibility testing. The predominant genotype was found to be emm1, followed by emm89, emm12, emm28, emm3, and emm90. These six genotypes constituted more than 90% of the STSS isolates. The number of emm1, emm89, emm12, and emm28 isolates increased concomitantly with the increase in the total number of STSS cases. In particular, the number of mefA-positive emm1 isolates has escalated since 2011. Thus, the increase in the incidence of STSS can be attributed to an increase in the number of cases associated with specific genotypes. PMID:25703404

  20. The impact of Staphylococcus aureus-associated molecular patterns on staphylococcal superantigen-induced toxic shock syndrome and pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Tilahun, Ashenafi Y; Karau, Melissa; Ballard, Alessandro; Gunaratna, Miluka P; Thapa, Anusa; David, Chella S; Patel, Robin; Rajagopalan, Govindarajan

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is capable of causing a spectrum of human illnesses. During serious S. aureus infections, the staphylococcal pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) such as peptidoglycan, lipoteichoic acid, and lipoproteins and even intact S. aureus, are believed to act in conjunction with the staphylococcal superantigens (SSAg) to activate the innate and adaptive immune system, respectively, and cause immunopathology. However, recent studies have shown that staphylococcal PAMPs could suppress inflammation by several mechanisms and protect from staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome, a life-threatening systemic disease caused by toxigenic S. aureus. Given the contradictory pro- and anti-inflammatory roles of staphylococcal PAMPs, we examined the effects of S. aureus-derived molecular patterns on immune responses driven by SSAg in vivo using HLA-DR3 and HLA-DQ8 transgenic mice. Our study showed that neither S. aureus-derived peptidoglycans (PGN), lipoteichoic acid (LTA), nor heat-killed Staphylococcus aureus (HKSA) inhibited SSAg-induced T cell proliferation in vitro. They failed to antagonize the immunostimulatory effects of SSAg in vivo as determined by their inability to attenuate systemic cytokine/chemokine response and reduce SSAg-induced T cell expansion. These staphylococcal PAMPs also failed to protect HLA-DR3 as well as HLA-DQ8 transgenic mice from either SSAg-induced toxic shock or pneumonia induced by a SSAg-producing strain of S. aureus. PMID:25024509

  1. Highly frequent mutations in negative regulators of multiple virulence genes in group A streptococcal toxic shock syndrome isolates.

    PubMed

    Ikebe, Tadayoshi; Ato, Manabu; Matsumura, Takayuki; Hasegawa, Hideki; Sata, Tetsutaro; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Watanabe, Haruo

    2010-04-01

    Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) is a severe invasive infection characterized by the sudden onset of shock and multiorgan failure; it has a high mortality rate. Although a number of studies have attempted to determine the crucial factors behind the onset of STSS, the responsible genes in group A Streptococcus have not been clarified. We previously reported that mutations of csrS/csrR genes, a two-component negative regulator system for multiple virulence genes of Streptococcus pyogenes, are found among the isolates from STSS patients. In the present study, mutations of another negative regulator, rgg, were also found in clinical isolates of STSS patients. The rgg mutants from STSS clinical isolates enhanced lethality and impaired various organs in the mouse models, similar to the csrS mutants, and precluded their being killed by human neutrophils, mainly due to an overproduction of SLO. When we assessed the mutation frequency of csrS, csrR, and rgg genes among S. pyogenes isolates from STSS (164 isolates) and non-invasive infections (59 isolates), 57.3% of the STSS isolates had mutations of one or more genes among three genes, while isolates from patients with non-invasive disease had significantly fewer mutations in these genes (1.7%). The results of the present study suggest that mutations in the negative regulators csrS/csrR and rgg of S. pyogenes are crucial factors in the pathogenesis of STSS, as they lead to the overproduction of multiple virulence factors. PMID:20368967

  2. Highly Frequent Mutations in Negative Regulators of Multiple Virulence Genes in Group A Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Ikebe, Tadayoshi; Ato, Manabu; Matsumura, Takayuki; Hasegawa, Hideki; Sata, Tetsutaro; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Watanabe, Haruo

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) is a severe invasive infection characterized by the sudden onset of shock and multiorgan failure; it has a high mortality rate. Although a number of studies have attempted to determine the crucial factors behind the onset of STSS, the responsible genes in group A Streptococcus have not been clarified. We previously reported that mutations of csrS/csrR genes, a two-component negative regulator system for multiple virulence genes of Streptococcus pyogenes, are found among the isolates from STSS patients. In the present study, mutations of another negative regulator, rgg, were also found in clinical isolates of STSS patients. The rgg mutants from STSS clinical isolates enhanced lethality and impaired various organs in the mouse models, similar to the csrS mutants, and precluded their being killed by human neutrophils, mainly due to an overproduction of SLO. When we assessed the mutation frequency of csrS, csrR, and rgg genes among S. pyogenes isolates from STSS (164 isolates) and non-invasive infections (59 isolates), 57.3% of the STSS isolates had mutations of one or more genes among three genes, while isolates from patients with non-invasive disease had significantly fewer mutations in these genes (1.7%). The results of the present study suggest that mutations in the negative regulators csrS/csrR and rgg of S. pyogenes are crucial factors in the pathogenesis of STSS, as they lead to the overproduction of multiple virulence factors. PMID:20368967

  3. Activation of heat shock gene transcription by heat shock factor 1 involves oligomerization, acquisition of DNA-binding activity, and nuclear localization and can occur in the absence of stress.

    PubMed Central

    Sarge, K D; Murphy, S P; Morimoto, R I

    1993-01-01

    The existence of multiple heat shock factor (HSF) genes in higher eukaryotes has promoted questions regarding the functions of these HSF family members, especially with respect to the stress response. To address these questions, we have used polyclonal antisera raised against mouse HSF1 and HSF2 to examine the biochemical, physical, and functional properties of these two factors in unstressed and heat-shocked mouse and human cells. We have identified HSF1 as the mediator of stress-induced heat shock gene transcription. HSF1 displays stress-induced DNA-binding activity, oligomerization, and nuclear localization, while HSF2 does not. Also, HSF1 undergoes phosphorylation in cells exposed to heat or cadmium sulfate but not in cells treated with the amino acid analog L-azetidine-2-carboxylic acid, indicating that phosphorylation of HSF1 is not essential for its activation. Interestingly, HSF1 and HSF2 overexpressed in transfected 3T3 cells both display constitutive DNA-binding activity, oligomerization, and transcriptional activity. These results demonstrate that HSF1 can be activated in the absence of physiological stress and also provide support for a model of regulation of HSF1 and HSF2 activity by a titratable negative regulatory factor. Images PMID:8441385

  4. Cardiogenic shock and nutrition: safe?

    PubMed

    Thibault, Ronan; Pichard, Claude; Wernerman, Jan; Bendjelid, Karim

    2011-01-01

    Cardiogenic shock is a common diagnosis in patients in the intensive care unit (ICU), and is characterized by a decreased cardiac output in the presence of adequate intravascular volume associated with an inadequate tissue perfusion including a physiological reduction in the splanchnic territory. It may occur in isolation as a reflection of cardiac pathology, or it may be part of a shock syndrome involving other pathogenic mechanisms. As the use of enteral nutrition (EN) is associated with an increase in mesenteric arterial output, EN could be deleterious by overwhelming the mechanisms of mesenteric adaptation. Accordingly, EN has been suspected to increase the risk of mesenteric ischaemia, bacterial translocation and sepsis in ICU patients with cardiogenic shock. International guidelines recommend a cautious use of EN within 72 h following cardiogenic shock. Recent evidence indicates that mesenteric arterial output may decrease during parenteral nutrition administration, suggesting that parenteral nutrition could have a protective effect on splanchnic organs in ICU patients with cardiogenic shock. Contrary to former beliefs, several meta-analyses have shown that parenteral nutrition is not associated with increased mortality. Exclusive EN is associated with negative energy balance and the combination of EN with supplemental parenteral nutrition during the first days following ICU admission has been proposed to prevent negative energy balance. Such a nutritional strategy could also be beneficial for the mesenteric circulation in cardiogenic shock, and consequently may improve the clinical outcome of patients with cardiogenic shock. Clinical trials are warranted to verify these hypotheses. PMID:21086113

  5. Oxaliplatin Immune-Induced Syndrome Occurs With Cumulative Administration and Rechallenge: Single Institution Series and Systematic Review Study.

    PubMed

    Bencardino, Katia; Mauri, Gianluca; Amatu, Alessio; Tosi, Federica; Bonazzina, Erica; Palmeri, Laura; Querques, Marialuisa; Ravera, Federica; Menegotto, Alberto; Boiani, Elisa; Sartore-Bianchi, Andrea; Siena, Salvatore

    2016-09-01

    Oxaliplatin immune-induced syndrome (OIIS) is an uncommon, potentially life-threatening, side effect associated with oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. The present study reports 5 original cases of OIIS and systematically reviewed the available published cases. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical archives of the Niguarda Cancer Center from 2009 to 2015 and conducted a search for OIIS using the PubMed database, followed by deeper investigation of the references of the recorded studies. We pooled our series with other reported cases for systematic review in accordance with the recommendations of the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement using only English language as the selection criterion. A total of 61 OIIS cases were analyzed, the largest series reported to date. Of the 61 patients, 56 (91.8%) had received oxaliplatin for metastatic colorectal cancer. In 32 of the 61 patients (52.5%), OIIS was associated with grade 4 thrombocytopenia and in 4 (6.6%) with grade 4 anemia. OIIS was fatal in 4 patients. In 49 patients, oxaliplatin-induced immune system activation was tested using the Coombs test or by detection of antiplatelet antibodies and was positive in 87.7% of the patients. The average number of oxaliplatin cycles until the onset of OIIS was 16.7, and the number was significantly lower when oxaliplatin was administered as a rechallenge after a period of vacancy of treatment with this agent (4.6 cycles as rechallenge vs. 13.6 as first-time exposure; P < .00001). OIIS is triggered by cumulative administration of oxaliplatin, characteristically with a threefold earlier onset when the drug is administered as a rechallenge. Prompt identification of OIIS can be expected to reduce the risk of iatrogenic morbidity and mortality. PMID:26979913

  6. Dynamic Angular Petrissage as Treatment for Axillary Web Syndrome Occurring after Surgery for Breast Cancer: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Paul A.; Cunningham, Joan E.

    2016-01-01

    Background In the context of breast cancer, axillary web syndrome (AWS), also called lymphatic cording, typically presents in the weeks after axillary surgery. This painful condition, likely lymphofibrotic in origin, restricts upper extremity range of motion (ROM). There is no established treatment, although physical therapy and other approaches have been used to variable effect. This report describes treatment of a female client with AWS, who had recently undergone a unilateral simple mastectomy with sentinel node biopsy plus axillary dissection. Methods The client presented with pain upon movement (self-reported as 5 on the 0–10 Oxford Pain Scale), visible cording and restricted use of the ipsilateral upper extremity. Clinical assessment included determining the extent of AWS cording (taut, from axilla to wrist) and measuring glenohumeral joint ROM (140° flexion by goniometer). A therapeutic massage with movement protocol, termed dynamic angular petrissage, was administered over two sessions: Swedish massage combined with dynamically taking the limb through all possible angles of movement (passive ROM), controlling stretch and tension while simultaneously and segmentally applying petrissage and non-petrissage techniques to the underlying soft tissue. Careful attention was taken to not break the cord. Home care consisted of prescribed exercises performed by the patient. Results After Session One, pain was reduced (to 0/10), ROM improved (to 170° flexion), and cording was visibly reduced. After Session Two the cord was residually apparent only on hyperextension, with no ROM restrictions in glenohumeral joint flexion. Follow-up at three months revealed absence of visual or palpable evidence of cording, unrestricted glenohumeral joint ROM, and absence of movement-associated pain. Conclusion The signs and symptoms of AWS were quickly and effectively eliminated, without causing any pain or discomfort to the client. We propose that dynamic angular petrissage may be

  7. Toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1) production by staphylococci isolated from goats and presence of specific antibodies to TSST-1 in serum and milk.

    PubMed Central

    Valle, J; Vadillo, S; Piriz, S; Gomez-Lucia, E

    1991-01-01

    The ability of staphylococcal strains isolated from different anatomical sites in 133 healthy goats to produce toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1) and the presence of antibodies to this toxin in serum and milk were studied. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method was used to detect both the toxin and the presence of antibodies. Of a total of 342 staphylococcal strains studied, 86 (25.2%) were found to produce TSST-1. Specific antibodies to TSST-1 were found in the serum of 57 (42.9%) of the animals studied and the milk of 63 (47.4%) of the animals. These results suggest that goats are frequently in contact with staphylococci that produce TSST-1, a toxin usually associated with Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from cases of toxic shock syndrome in humans. PMID:2039240

  8. Role of cognitive parameters in dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Dengue is becoming recognized as one of the most important vector-borne human diseases. It is predominant in tropical and subtropical zones but its geographical distribution is progressively expanding, making it an escalating global health problem of today. Dengue presents with spectrum of clinical manifestations, ranging from asymptomatic, undifferentiated mild fever, dengue fever (DF), to dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) with or without shock (DSS), a life-threatening illness characterized by plasma leakage due to increased vascular permeability. Currently, there are no antiviral modalities or vaccines available to treat and prevent dengue. Supportive care with close monitoring is the standard clinical practice. The mechanisms leading to DHF/DSS remains poorly understood. Multiple factors have been attributed to the pathological mechanism, but only a couple of these hypotheses are popular in scientific circles. The current discussion focuses on underappreciated factors, temperature, natural IgM, and endotoxin, which may be critical components playing roles in dengue pathogenesis. PMID:24305068

  9. Role of cognitive parameters in dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jih-Jin; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Chen, Po-Chih; Liu, Li-Teh; Hsiao, Hui-Mien; Lo, Yu-Chih; Perng, Guey Chuen

    2013-01-01

    Dengue is becoming recognized as one of the most important vector-borne human diseases. It is predominant in tropical and subtropical zones but its geographical distribution is progressively expanding, making it an escalating global health problem of today. Dengue presents with spectrum of clinical manifestations, ranging from asymptomatic, undifferentiated mild fever, dengue fever (DF), to dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) with or without shock (DSS), a life-threatening illness characterized by plasma leakage due to increased vascular permeability. Currently, there are no antiviral modalities or vaccines available to treat and prevent dengue. Supportive care with close monitoring is the standard clinical practice. The mechanisms leading to DHF/DSS remains poorly understood. Multiple factors have been attributed to the pathological mechanism, but only a couple of these hypotheses are popular in scientific circles. The current discussion focuses on underappreciated factors, temperature, natural IgM, and endotoxin, which may be critical components playing roles in dengue pathogenesis. PMID:24305068

  10. Effect of radial shock wave therapy for carpal tunnel syndrome: A prospective randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yung-Tsan; Ke, Ming-Jen; Chou, Yu-Ching; Chang, Chih-Ya; Lin, Ching-Yueh; Li, Tsung-Ying; Shih, Feng-Mei; Chen, Liang-Cheng

    2016-06-01

    Three recent studies demonstrated the positive effect of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) for treating carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). However, none have entirely proved the effects of ESWT on CTS because all studies had a small sample size and lacked a placebo-controlled design. Moreover, radial ESWT (rESWT) has not been used to treat CTS. We conducted a prospective randomized, controlled, double-blinded study to assess the effect of rESWT for treating CTS. Thirty-four enrolled patients (40 wrists) were randomized into intervention and control groups (20 wrists in each). Participants in the intervention group underwent three sessions of rESWT with nightly splinting, whereas those in the control group underwent sham rESWT with nightly splinting. The primary outcome was visual analog scale (VAS), whereas the secondary outcomes included the Boston Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Questionnaire (BCTQ), cross-sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve, sensory nerve conduction velocity of the median nerve, and finger pinch strength. Evaluations were performed before treatment and at 1, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after the third rESWT session. A significantly greater improvement in the VAS, BCTQ scores, and CSA of the median nerve was noted in the intervention group throughout the study as compared to the control group (except for BCTQ severity at week 12 and CSA at weeks 1 and 4) (p < 0.05). This is the first study to assess rESWT in a randomized placebo-controlled trial and demonstrate that rESWT is a safe and effective method for relieving pain and disability in patients with CTS. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:977-984, 2016. PMID:26610183

  11. Comparative observations of fever and associated clinical hematological and blood biochemical changes after intravenous administration of staphylococcal enterotoxins B and F (toxic shock syndrome toxin-1) in goats.

    PubMed Central

    Van Miert, A S; Van Duin, C T; Schotman, A J

    1984-01-01

    The present investigation was undertaken to examine the characteristics of purified toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (staphylococcal enterotoxin F) given intravenously to dwarf goats (dose, 0.02 to 20 micrograms kg-1). Rectal temperature, heart rate, rumen motility, plasma zinc and iron concentrations, and certain other blood biochemical and hematological values were studied and compared with the changes seen after intravenous administration of staphylococcal enterotoxin B (dose, 0.02 to 0.5 micrograms kg-1). Similar changes such as fever, tachycardia, inhibition of rumen contractions, drop in plasma zinc and iron concentrations, lymphopenia, and a decrease in serum alkaline phosphatase activity were observed. In contrast to the effects of toxic shock syndrome toxin-1, staphylococcal enterotoxin B induced colic, watery diarrhea with pseudomembranes, hemoconcentration, and a more pronounced increase in blood urea nitrogen. The results obtained demonstrate that (i) in the goat staphylococcal enterotoxin B is much more potent than toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 and (ii) the goat is a useful model to study the gastro-intestinal effects caused by staphylococcal enterotoxin B. The present finding that no clear relationship could be found between the temperature response and the alterations in zinc and iron levels in plasma support the theory that the febrile reactions and the changes in plasma trace metals are mediated by different polypeptides released by activated macrophages. PMID:6500695

  12. In silico transcriptional regulation and functional analysis of dengue shock syndrome associated SNPs in PLCE1 and MICB genes.

    PubMed

    Taqi, Malik Mumtaz; Waseem, Durdana; Ismatullah, Humaira; Haider, Syed Aleem; Faisal, Muhammad

    2016-05-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in PLCE1 and MICB genes increase risk for the development of dengue shock syndrome (DSS). We used Bioinformatics tools to predict alterations at the transcriptional and posttranslational levels driven by PLCE1 and MICB SNPs associated with DSS. Functional and phenotypic analysis conducted to determine deleterious SNPs and impact of amino acid substitution on the structure and function of proteins identified rs2274223 (H1619R) as deleterious to protein coding as it induces structural change in the C2 domain of PLCε, with the mutant residue more positively charged than the wild-type residue (RMSD score, 1.75 Å). Moreover, rs2274223 condenses the chromatin-repressing PLCε expression in DSS. Briefly, this study presents the impact of a single nucleotide transition at SNPs associated with DSS on differential protein binding patterns with PLCE1 and MICB genes and on protein structure modification and their possible role in the pathogenesis of DSS. PMID:27038471

  13. Vaccination with non-toxic mutant toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 induces IL-17-dependent protection against Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    PubMed

    Narita, Kouji; Hu, Dong-Liang; Asano, Krisana; Nakane, Akio

    2015-06-01

    Toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1) is one of superantigens produced by Staphylococcus aureus. We have previously demonstrated that vaccination with non-toxic mutant TSST-1 (mTSST-1) develops host protection to lethal S. aureus infection in mice. However, the detailed mechanism underlying this protection is necessary to elucidate because the passive transfer of antibodies against TSST-1 fails to provide complete protection against S. aureus infection. In this study, the results showed that interleukin-17A (IL-17A)-producing cells were increased in the spleen cells of mTSST-1-vaccinated mice. The main source of IL-17A in mTSST-1-vaccinated mice was T-helper 17 (Th17) cells. The protective effect of vaccination was induced when the vaccinated wild type but not IL-17A-deficient mice were challenged with S. aureus. Gene expression of chemokines, CCL2 and CXCL1, and infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages were increased in spleens and livers of vaccinated mice after infection. The IL-17A-dependent immune response was TSST-1 specific because TSST-1-deficient S. aureus failed to induce the response. The present study suggests that mTSST-1 vaccination is able to provide the IL-17A-dependent host defense against S. aureus infection which promotes chemokine-mediated infiltration of phagocytes into the infectious foci. PMID:25857736

  14. Latent polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type 2 case diagnosed during a shock manifestation.

    PubMed

    Gürkan, Eren; Çetinarslan, Berrin; Güzelmansur, İsmail; Kocabaş, Beyza

    2016-07-01

    There are many types of polyglandular autoimmune syndrome (PAS). PAS type 2 is the most common type among adults. For PAS type 2 (PAS-2) diagnosis, detection of Addison's disease with autoimmune thyroid disease and/or type 1 diabetes mellitus are required. Premature ovarian insufficiency, pernicious anemia, vitiligo, alopecia, myasthenia gravis, celiac disease and autoimmune diabetes insipidus may be comorbidities of this condition. Contrary to the common belief, latent PAS is more common than the manifest forms. Here, we present a PAS-2 case diagnosed via adrenal crisis. At the time of diagnosis, the case was observed to have thyroid, adrenal and ovarian involvement. Therefore, PAS-2 and possible immunologic disorders were discussed. PMID:26806667

  15. Relevance of spontaneous fabT mutations to a streptococcal toxic shock syndrome to non-streptococcal toxic shock syndrome transition in the novel-type Streptococcus pyogenes isolates that lost a salRK.

    PubMed

    Tatsuno, Ichiro; Okada, Ryo; Matsumoto, Masakado; Hata, Nanako; Matsui, Hideyuki; Zhang, Yan; Isaka, Masanori; Hasegawa, Tadao

    2016-05-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a causative agent of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS). Mutations in covR/S or rgg, negative regulators, can reportedly modulate the severity of infection in this pathogen. Recently, we showed that the regions encoding the SalR-SalK, a two-component regulatory system, were deleted in some emm 1-type isolates (named as 'novel-type'). In this study, the two novel 'STSS' isolates 10-85stss and 11-171stss were more virulent than the two novel 'non-STSS' isolates 11O-2non and 11T-3non when examined using a mouse model of invasive infection. Genome-sequencing experiments using the three strains 10-85stss , 11-171stss , and 11O-2non detected only one single nucleotide polymorphism that causes a non-synonymous mutation in fabT encoding a transcriptional regulator in strain 11O-2non . Loss of fabT reduced the high level of virulence observed in the STSS isolates to that in the non-STSS isolates, and introduction of an intact fabT compensated the lower virulence of 11O-2non , suggesting that the mutation in fabT, but not in covR/S or rgg, is involved in the differential virulence among the novel-type clinical isolates. This type of non-synonymous fabT mutation was also identified in 12 non-STSS isolates (including 11O-2non and 11T-3non ), and most of those 12 isolates showed impaired FabT function. PMID:26861052

  16. EFFECT OF RENAL SHOCK WAVE LITHOTRIPSY ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF METABOLIC SYNDROME IN A JUVENILE SWINE MODEL: A PILOT STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Handa, Rajash K.; Liu, Ziyue; Connors, Bret A.; Evan, Andrew P.; Lingeman, James E.; Basile, David P.; Tune, Johnathan D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose A pilot study was conducted to assess whether renal shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) influences the onset and severity of metabolic syndrome (MetS). Materials and Methods Three-month-old juvenile female Ossabaw miniature pigs were treated with SWL (2000 SWs, 24 kV, 120 SWs/min using the HM3 lithotripter; n=2) or sham-SWL (no SWs; n=2). SWs were targeted to the upper pole of the left kidney so as to model treatment that would also expose the pancreatic tail to SWs. Pigs were then instrumented for direct measurement of arterial blood pressure via an implanted radiotelemetry device, and later fed a hypercaloric atherogenic diet for ~7 months. The development of MetS was assessed from intravenous glucose tolerance tests (IVGTTs). Results The progression and severity of MetS was similar in the sham-treated and SWL-treated groups. The only exception was with respect to arterial blood pressure, which remained relatively constant in the sham-treated pigs but began to rise at ~2 months towards hypertensive levels in SW-treated pigs. Metabolic data from both groups were pooled to provide a more complete assessment of the development and progression of MetS in this juvenile pig model. IVGTTs revealed substantial insulin resistance with impaired glucose tolerance within 2 months on the hypercaloric atherogenic diet with signs of further metabolic impairment at 7 months. Conclusions These preliminary results suggest that renal SWL is not a risk factor for worsening of glucose tolerance or the onset of diabetes mellitus, but does appear to be a risk factor for early onset hypertension in MetS. PMID:25245490

  17. Systemic inflammatory response elicited by superantigen destabilizes T regulatory cells, rendering them ineffective during toxic shock syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tilahun, Ashenafi Y; Chowdhary, Vaidehi R; David, Chella S; Rajagopalan, Govindarajan

    2014-09-15

    Life-threatening infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus, particularly the community-acquired methicillin-resistant strains of S. aureus, continue to pose serious problems. Greater virulence and increased pathogenicity of certain S. aureus strains are attributed to higher prevalence of exotoxins. Of these exotoxins, the superantigens (SAg) are likely most pathogenic because of their ability to rapidly and robustly activate the T cells even in extremely small quantities. Therefore, countering SAg-mediated T cell activation using T regulatory cells (Tregs) might be beneficial in diseases such as toxic shock syndrome (TSS). As the normal numbers of endogenous Tregs in a typical host are insufficient, we hypothesized that increasing the Treg numbers by administration of IL-2/anti-IL-2 Ab immune complexes (IL2C) or by adoptive transfer of ex vivo expanded Tregs might be more effective in countering SAg-mediated immune activation. HLA-DR3 transgenic mice that closely recapitulate human TSS were treated with IL2C to increase endogenous Tregs or received ex vivo expanded Tregs. Subsequently, they were challenged with SAg to induce TSS. Analyses of various parameters reflective of TSS (serum cytokine/chemokine levels, multiple organ pathology, and SAg-induced peripheral T cell expansion) indicated that increasing the Tregs failed to mitigate TSS. On the contrary, serum IFN-γ levels were increased in IL2C-treated mice. Exploration into the reasons behind the lack of protective effect of Tregs revealed IL-17 and IFN-γ-dependent loss of Tregs during TSS. In addition, significant upregulation of glucocorticoid-induced TNFR family-related receptor on conventional T cells during TSS could render them resistant to Treg-mediated suppression, contributing to failure of Treg-mediated immune regulation. PMID:25092888

  18. Comparison of the nucleotide sequences of 16S rRNA, 444 Ep-ank, and groESL heat shock operon genes in naturally occurring Ehrlichia equi and human granulocytic ehrlichiosis agent isolates from Northern California.

    PubMed

    Chae, J S; Foley, J E; Dumler, J S; Madigan, J E

    2000-04-01

    We examined 11 naturally occurring isolates of Ehrlichia equi in horses and two human granulocytic ehrlichiosis agent isolates in California for sequence diversity in three genes. Ehrlichia equi isolates were from Sierra (n = 6), Mendocino (n = 3), Sonoma (n = 1), and Marin (n = 1) counties, and human granulocytic ehrlichiosis (HGE) agent isolates were obtained from Humboldt county. PCR with specific primers for 16S rRNA, 444 Ep-ank and groESL heat shock operon genes successfully produced amplicons for all 13 clinical samples. The 444 Ep-ank gene of the HGE agent and E. equi isolates from northern California is different from the eastern U.S. isolates BDS and USG3. The translated amino acid sequence of the groESL heat shock operon gene fragment is identical among E. equi, the HGE agent, and E. phagocytophila, with the exception of the northern Californian equine CASOLJ isolate. Microheterogeneity was observed in the 16S rRNA gene sequences of HGE agent and E. equi isolates from northern California. These results suggest that E. equi and the HGE agent found in California are similar or identical but may differ from the isolates of equine and human origin found in the eastern United States. PMID:10747108

  19. The more allergens an atopic patient is exposed to, the easier and quicker anaphylactic shock and Kounis syndrome appear: Clinical and therapeutic paradoxes.

    PubMed

    Kounis, N G; Mazarakis, A; Almpanis, G; Gkouias, K; Kounis, G N; Tsigkas, G

    2014-07-01

    Kounis syndrome is a condition that combines allergic, hypersensitivity, anaphylactic or anaphylactoid reactions with acute coronary syndromes including vasospastic angina, acute myocardial infarction and stent thrombosis. This syndrome is a ubiquitous disease affecting patients of any age, involving numerous and continuously increasing causes, with broadening clinical manifestations and covering a wide spectrum of mast cell activation disorders. Drugs, environmental exposures and various conditions are the main offenders. Clinical and therapeutic paradoxes concerning Kounis syndrome therapy, pathophysiology, clinical course and causality have been encountered during its clinical course. Drugs that counteract allergy, such as H2-antihistamines, can induce allergy and Kounis syndrome. The more drugs an atopic patient is exposed to, the easier and quicker anaphylaxis and Kounis syndrome can occur. Every anesthetized patient is under the risk of multiple drugs and substances that can induce anaphylactic reaction and Kounis syndrome. The heart and the coronary arteries seem to be the primary target in severe anaphylaxis manifesting as Kounis syndrome. Commercially available adrenaline saves lives in anaphylaxis but it contains as preservative sodium metabisulfite and should be avoided in the sulfite allergic patients. Thus, careful patient past history and consideration for drug side effects and allergy should be taken into account before use. The decision to prescribe a drug where there is a history of previous adverse reactions requires careful assessment of the risks and potential benefits. PMID:25097390

  20. Persistence survey of Toxic Shock Syndrome toxin-1 producing Staphylococcus aureus and serum antibodies to this superantigen in five groups of menstruating women

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Menstrual Toxic Shock Syndrome (mTSS) is thought to be associated with the vaginal colonization with specific strains of Staphylococcus aureus TSST-1 in women who lack sufficient antibody titers to this toxin. There are no published studies that examine the seroconversion in women with various colonization patterns of this organism. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the persistence of Staphylococcus aureus colonization at three body sites (vagina, nares, and anus) and serum antibody to toxic shock syndrome toxin-producing Staphylococcus aureus among a small group of healthy, menstruating women evaluated previously in a larger study. Methods One year after the completion of that study, 311 subjects were recalled into 5 groups. Four samples were obtained from each participant at several visits over an additional 6-11 month period: 1) an anterior nares swab; 2) an anal swab; 3) a vagina swab; and 4) a blood sample. Gram stain, a catalase test, and a rapid S. aureus-specific latex agglutination test were performed to phenotypically identify S. aureus from sample swabs. A competitive ELISA was used to quantify TSST-1 production. Human TSST-1 IgG antibodies were determined from the blood samples using a sandwich ELISA method. Results We found only 41% of toxigenic S. aureus and 35.5% of non-toxigenic nasal carriage could be classified as persistent. None of the toxigenic S. aureus vaginal or anal carriage could be classified as persistent. Despite the low persistence of S. aureus colonization, subjects colonized with a toxigenic strain were found to display distributions of antibody titers skewed toward higher titers than other subjects. Seven percent (5/75) of subjects became seropositive during recall, but none experienced toxic shock syndrome-like symptoms. Conclusions Nasal carriage of S. aureus appears to be persistent and the best predicator of subsequent colonization, whereas vaginal and anal carriage appear to be more transient. From these

  1. Guillain–Barré syndrome occurring synchronously with systemic lupus erythematosus as initial manifestation treated successfully with low-dose cyclophosphamide

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Naveed; Rampure, Ritesh; Malik, Faizan; Jafri, Syed Imran Mustafa; Amberker, Deepa

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) is frequently encountered in clinical practice; a widespread immunological response can involve any organ system, sometimes leading to rare and diagnostically challenging presentations. We describe a 38-year-old female who presented with symmetric numbness and tingling of the hands and feet, and cervical pain. Imaging studies were not diagnostic of any serious underlying pathology. The patient developed ascending paresis involving lower extremities and cranial muscles (dysphagia and facial weakness). Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS) was diagnosed on the basis of electromyography and lumbar puncture showing albuminocytologic dissociation. Intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) were administered for 5 days. Supported by anti-dsDNA antibody, oral ulcers, proteinuria of 0.7 g in 24 h, and neurological manifestation, she was diagnosed with lupus. After completion of IVIG, she received pulse-dose corticosteroids and one dose of low-dose cyclophosphamide. Her neurological symptoms improved and she had complete neurological recovery several months after her initial presentation. Literature search provides evidence of co-occurrence of lupus and GBS occurring mostly later in the course of the disease. However, GBS as initial manifestation of SLE is exceedingly rare and less understood. The association of GBS with lupus is important to recognize for rapid initiation of appropriate therapy and for consideration of immunosuppressive therapy which may affect the outcome. PMID:27124163

  2. Acute Radiation Hypotension in the Rabbit: a Model for the Human Radiation Shock Syndrome.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makale, Milan Theodore

    This study has shown that total body irradiation (TBI) of immature (40 to 100 day old) rabbits leads to an acute fall in mean arterial pressure (MAP) 30 to 90 minutes after exposure, which takes no more than about three minutes, and often results in pressures which are less than 50% of the lowest pre-exposure MAP. This is termed acute cardiovascular collapse (ACC). ACC is often accompanied by ECG T-wave elevation, a sharp rise in ear temperature, labored breathing, pupillary constriction, bladder emptying, and loss of abdominal muscle tone. About 73% of 40 to 100 day rabbits exhibit ACC; the others and most older rabbits display gradual pressure reductions (deliberate hypotension) which may be profound, and which may be accompanied by the same changes associated with ACC. ACC and deliberate hypotension occurred in rabbits cannulated in the dorsal aorta, and in non-operated animals. The decline in MAP for all 40 to 100 day cannulated rabbits (deliberate and ACC responders) is 55.4%. The experiments described below only involved 40 to 100 day cannulated TBI rabbits. Heart region irradiation resulted in an average MAP decline of 29.1%, with 1/15 rabbits showing ACC. Heart shielding during TBI reduced the decline in MAP to 19%, with 1/10 rabbits experiencing ACC. These results imply that the heart region, which includes the heart, part of the lungs, neural receptors, roots of the systemic vessels, and the blood, is a sensitive target. Bilateral vagotomy reduced the decline in MAP to 24.9%, and abolished ACC. Atropine (6 mg/kg) reduced the frequency of ACC to 26%, and the decline in MAP to 41.4%. In 11/13 rabbits the voltage generated by left vagal transmission rose after TBI. The vagi appear to participate in radiation hypotension. Heart shielding together with bilateral vagotomy reduced the decline in MAP to only 9.9%, with no ACC responders. The mean right ventricular pressure (MRVP) rose after TBI in 8/10 rabbits. In animals which displayed either ACC or steep

  3. Temperature variability analysis using wavelets and multiscale entropy in patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome, sepsis, and septic shock

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Even though temperature is a continuous quantitative variable, its measurement has been considered a snapshot of a process, indicating whether a patient is febrile or afebrile. Recently, other diagnostic techniques have been proposed for the association between different properties of the temperature curve with severity of illness in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), based on complexity analysis of continuously monitored body temperature. In this study, we tried to assess temperature complexity in patients with systemic inflammation during a suspected ICU-acquired infection, by using wavelets transformation and multiscale entropy of temperature signals, in a cohort of mixed critically ill patients. Methods Twenty-two patients were enrolled in the study. In five, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS, group 1) developed, 10 had sepsis (group 2), and seven had septic shock (group 3). All temperature curves were studied during the first 24 hours of an inflammatory state. A wavelet transformation was applied, decomposing the signal in different frequency components (scales) that have been found to reflect neurogenic and metabolic inputs on temperature oscillations. Wavelet energy and entropy per different scales associated with complexity in specific frequency bands and multiscale entropy of the whole signal were calculated. Moreover, a clustering technique and a linear discriminant analysis (LDA) were applied for permitting pattern recognition in data sets and assessing diagnostic accuracy of different wavelet features among the three classes of patients. Results Statistically significant differences were found in wavelet entropy between patients with SIRS and groups 2 and 3, and in specific ultradian bands between SIRS and group 3, with decreased entropy in sepsis. Cluster analysis using wavelet features in specific bands revealed concrete clusters closely related with the groups in focus. LDA after wrapper-based feature selection was able to classify

  4. What Causes Cardiogenic Shock?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Cardiogenic Shock? Immediate Causes Cardiogenic shock occurs if the heart suddenly can't pump ... to the body. The most common cause of cardiogenic shock is damage to the heart muscle from a ...

  5. Inhaled nitric oxide in acute respiratory distress syndrome with and without septic shock requiring norepinephrine administration: a dose–response study

    PubMed Central

    Mourgeon, Eric; Puybasset, Louis; Law-Koune, Jean-Dominique; Lu, Qin; Abdennour, Lamine; Gallart, Lluis; Malassine, Patrick; Rao, GS Umamaheswara; Cluzel, Philippe; Bennani, Abdelhai; Coriat, Pierre; Rouby, Jean-Jacques

    1997-01-01

    Background: The aim of this prospective study was to assess whether the presence of septic shock could influence the dose response to inhaled nitric oxide (NO) in NO-responding patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Results: Eight patients with ARDS and without septic shock (PaO2 = 95 ± 16 mmHg, PEEP = 0, FiO2 = 1.0), and eight patients with ARDS and septic shock (PaO2 = 88 ± 11 mmHg, PEEP = 0, FiO2 = 1.0) receiving exclusively norepinephrine were studied. All responded to 15 ppm inhaled NO with an increase in PaO2 of at least 40 mmHg, at FiO2 1.0 and PEEP 10 cmH2O. Inspiratory intratracheal NO concentrations were recorded continuously using a fast response time chemiluminescence apparatus. Seven inspiratory NO concentrations were randomly administered: 0.15, 0.45, 1.5, 4.5, 15, 45 and 150 ppm. In both groups, NO induced a dose-dependent decrease in mean pulmonary artery pressure (MPAP), pulmonary vascular resistance index (PVRI), and venous admixture (QVA/QT), and a dose-dependent increase in PaO2/FiO2 (P ≤ 0.012). Dose-response of MPAP and PVRI were similar in both groups with a plateau effect at 4.5 ppm. Dose-response of PaO2/FiO2 was influenced by the presence of septic shock. No plateau effect was observed in patients with septic shock and PaO2/FiO2 increased by 173 ± 37% at 150 ppm. In patients without septic shock, an 82 ± 26% increase in PaO2/FiO2 was observed with a plateau effect obtained at 15 ppm. In both groups, dose-response curves demonstrated a marked interindividual variability and in five patients pulmonary vascular effect and improvement in arterial oxygenation were dissociated. Conclusion: For similar NOinduced decreases in MPAP and PVRI in both groups, the increase in arterial oxygenation was more marked in patients with septic shock. PMID:11056694

  6. Molecular typing of toxic shock syndrome toxin-1- and Enterotoxin A-producing methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus isolates from an outbreak in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Layer, Franziska; Sanchini, Andrea; Strommenger, Birgit; Cuny, Christiane; Breier, Ann-Christin; Proquitté, Hans; Bührer, Christoph; Schenkel, Karl; Bätzing-Feigenbaum, Jörg; Greutelaers, Benedikt; Nübel, Ulrich; Gastmeier, Petra; Eckmanns, Tim; Werner, Guido

    2015-10-01

    Outbreaks of Staphylococcus aureus are common in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Usually they are documented for methicillin-resistant strains, while reports involving methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) strains are rare. In this study we report the epidemiological and molecular investigation of an MSSA outbreak in a NICU among preterm neonates. Infection control measures and interventions were commissioned by the Local Public Health Authority and supported by the Robert Koch Institute. To support epidemiological investigations molecular typing was done by spa-typing and Multilocus sequence typing; the relatedness of collected isolates was further elucidated by DNA SmaI-macrorestriction, microarray analysis and bacterial whole genome sequencing. A total of 213 neonates, 123 healthcare workers and 205 neonate parents were analyzed in the period November 2011 to November 2012. The outbreak strain was characterized as a MSSA spa-type t021, able to produce toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 and Enterotoxin A. We identified seventeen neonates (of which two died from toxic shock syndrome), four healthcare workers and three parents putatively involved in the outbreak. Whole-genome sequencing permitted to exclude unrelated cases from the outbreak and to discuss the role of healthcare workers as a reservoir of S. aureus on the NICU. Genome comparisons also indicated the presence of the respective clone on the ward months before the first colonized/infected neonates were detected. PMID:26321006

  7. Surfactants, Aromatic and Isoprenoid Compounds, and Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Inhibitors Suppress Staphylococcus aureus Production of Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin 1▿

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Peter J.; Syverson, Rae Ellen; Milligan-Myhre, Kathy; Frolova, Olga; Schroeder, Sarah; Kidder, Joshua; Hoang, Thanh; Proctor, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    Menstrual toxic shock syndrome is a rare but potentially life-threatening illness manifest through the actions of Staphylococcus aureus toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1). Previous studies have shown that tampon additives can influence staphylococcal TSST-1 production. We report here on the TSST-1-suppressing activity of 34 compounds that are commonly used additives in the pharmaceutical, food, and perfume industries. Many of the tested chemicals had a minimal impact on the growth of S. aureus and yet were potent inhibitors of TSST-1 production. The TSST-1-reducing compounds included surfactants with an ether, amide, or amine linkage to their fatty acid moiety (e.g., myreth-3-myristate, Laureth-3, disodium lauroamphodiacetate, disodium lauramido monoethanolamido, sodium lauriminodipropionic acid, and triethanolamine laureth sulfate); aromatic compounds (e.g. phenylethyl and benzyl alcohols); and several isoprenoids and related compounds (e.g., terpineol and menthol). The membrane-targeting and -altering effects of the TSST-1-suppressing compounds led us to assess the activity of molecules that are known to inhibit fatty acid biosynthesis (e.g., cerulenin, triclosan, and hexachlorophene). These compounds also reduced S. aureus TSST-1 production. This study suggests that more additives than previously recognized inhibit the production of TSST-1. PMID:19223628

  8. Comparison of shock wave therapy and nutraceutical composed of Echinacea angustifolia, alpha lipoic acid, conjugated linoleic acid and quercetin (perinerv) in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Notarnicola, Angela; Maccagnano, Giuseppe; Tafuri, Silvio; Fiore, Alessandra; Pesce, Vito; Moretti, Biagio

    2015-06-01

    Even though the initial treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is conservative, knowledge of the clinical effects of supplements and of some methods of physiotherapy is still preliminary. Many biological mechanisms can support the administration of shock wave therapy (ESWT) or of alpha lipoic acid (ALA) based nutraceutical, conjugated linoleic acid (GLA), anti-oxidants and Echinacea angustifolia for CTS. The shock waves reduce the nerve compression, produce an anti-inflammatory action, and accelerate the regeneration of neuropathy. ALA and GLA induce antioxidant protective actions, reduce inflammation, promote neuroregeneration, and decrease pain. The Echinacea modulates the endogenous cannabinoid system.The aim of study is to verify the efficiency of shock wave therapy versus nutraceutical composed of ALA, GLA, and Echinacea in CTS. Sixty patients were enrolled in this study and they were randomly assigned to one of two treatments. Both groups showed significant improvements in pain, symptoms' severity and functional scores, and electrodiagnostic results until the sixth month. We verified a trend to a better pain regression in the nutraceutical group. The presence of the medicinal Echinacea represents an added value to the antioxidant effect in ALA and GLA, which can justify this result. ESWT or the association of ALA, GLA, and Echinacea proved to be two effective treatments for controlling symptoms and improving the evolution of CTS. PMID:25953494

  9. Toxic Shock Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... isn't strictly related to tampons. The contraceptive sponge and the diaphragm , two types of birth control ... associated with TSS (such as diaphragms and contraceptive sponges). What Do Doctors Do? TSS is a medical ...

  10. Characterization of SEMA3A-Encoded Semaphorin as a Naturally Occurring Kv4.3 Protein Inhibitor and its Contribution to Brugada Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Boczek, Nicole J.; Ye, Dan; Johnson, Eric K.; Wang, Wei; Crotti, Lia; Tester, David J.; Dagradi, Federica; Mizusawa, Yuka; Torchio, Margherita; Alders, Marielle; Giudicessi, John R.; Wilde, Arthur A.; Schwartz, Peter J.; Nerbonne, Jeanne M.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Rational SEMA3A-encoded semaphorin is a chemorepellent that disrupts neural patterning in the nervous and cardiac systems. In addition, SEMA3A has an amino acid motif that is analogous to hanatoxin, an inhibitor of voltage-gated K+ channels. SEMA3A knockout mice exhibit an abnormal ECG pattern and are prone to ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Objective To determine whether SEMA3A is a naturally occurring protein inhibitor of Kv4.3 (Ito) channels and its potential contribution to Brugada syndrome (BrS). Methods and Results Kv4.3, Nav1.5, Cav1.2, or Kv4.2 were co-expressed or perfused with SEMA3A in HEK293 cells and electrophysiological properties were examined via whole-cell patch clamp technique. SEMA3A selectively altered Kv4.3 by significantly reducing peak current density without perturbing Kv4.3 cell-surface protein expression. SEMA3A also reduced Ito current density in cardiomyocytes derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells. Disruption of a putative toxin binding domain on Kv4.3 was used to assess physical interactions between SEMA3A and Kv4.3. These findings in combination with co-immunoprecipitations of SEMA3A and Kv4.3 revealed a potential direct binding interaction between these proteins. Comprehensive mutational analysis of SEMA3A was performed on 198 unrelated SCN5A-genotype negative patients with BrS and two rare SEMA3A missense mutations were identified. The SEMA3A mutations disrupted SEMA3A’s ability to inhibit Kv4.3 channels, resulting in a significant gain of Kv4.3 current compared to WT-SEMA3A. Conclusions This study is the first to demonstrate semaphorin3A as a naturally occurring protein that selectively inhibits Kv4.3 and SEMA3A as a possible BrS-susceptibility gene through a Kv4.3 gain-of-function mechanism. PMID:24963029

  11. Detection of New Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clones Containing the Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin 1 Gene Responsible for Hospital- and Community-Acquired Infections in France

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Geraldine; Bes, Michèle; Meugnier, Helene; Enright, Mark C.; Forey, Françoise; Liassine, Nadia; Wenger, Aline; Kikuchi, Ken; Lina, Gerard; Vandenesch, François; Etienne, Jerome

    2006-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clones harboring the toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (tst) gene have been detected in France and in Switzerland since 2002. During a passive survey conducted between 2002 and 2003, we collected 103 tst-positive S. aureus isolates from 42 towns in France, of which 27 were resistant to methicillin. The tst-positive MRSA belonged to two clones: a major clone comprising 25 isolates of sequence type (ST) 5 and agr group 2 and a minor clone comprising two isolates of ST30 and agr3. The tst-positive MRSA clones were associated with both hospital-acquired (12 cases) and community-acquired (8 cases) infections. The MRSA clones were mainly isolated from children (overall median age, 3 years). They caused a variety of clinical syndromes, including toxic shock syndrome and suppurative infections. Both clones were found to harbor a type IV staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec (SCCmec) and to have similar antibiotic resistance profiles (usually resistant to oxacillin, kanamycin, and tobramycin and with intermediate resistance to fusidic acid). The origin of these clones is unclear. The tst-positive agr2 MRSA clone has the same sequence type (ST5) of two pandemic nosocomial MRSA clones, namely, the Pediatric clone and the New York/Japan clone. These findings suggest that all these clones are phylogenetically related. The pulsotype of the tst-positive MRSA clones differed from that of methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) clones by a single band involving the SCCmec element. These findings suggest that the tst-positive MRSA clones may have emerged from their respective MSSA counterparts. PMID:16517865

  12. The Staphylococcus aureus lineage-specific markers collagen adhesin and toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 distinguish multilocus sequence typing clonal complexes within spa clonal complexes.

    PubMed

    Deurenberg, Ruud H; Rijnders, Michelle I A; Sebastian, Silvie; Welling, Maaike A; Beisser, Patrick S; Stobberingh, Ellen E

    2009-10-01

    Spa typing/based upon repeat pattern (BURP) sometimes cannot differentiate multilocus sequence typing (MLST) clonal complexes (CCs) within spa-CCs. It has been observed previously that virulence factors, such as collagen adhesin (CNA) and toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1), are associated with certain Staphylococcus aureus lineages. Analysis of methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant S. aureus by spa typing/BURP and detection of CNA and TSST-1 observed an association between CNA and MLST CC1, 12, 22, 30, 45, 51, and 239 and between TSST-1 and MLST CC30. In spa-CC 012, associated with MLST CC7, CC15, and CC30, MLST CC30 could be distinguished from MLST CC7 and CC15 with CNA and TSST-1 as lineage-specific markers. Lineage-specific markers can overcome clustering of nonrelated MLST CCs into 1 spa-CC. PMID:19748421

  13. Molecular epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains causing neonatal toxic shock syndrome-like exanthematous disease in neonatal and perinatal wards.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Ken; Takahashi, Naoto; Piao, Chuncheng; Totsuka, Kyoichi; Nishida, Hiroshi; Uchiyama, Takehiko

    2003-07-01

    Neonatal toxic shock syndrome-like exanthematous disease (NTED) is a new neonatal disease caused by toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1). We conducted a prospective surveillance study and characterized the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains isolated from patients with NTED and compared them with the strains from patients with other MRSA infections and asymptomatic carriers. The study was performed in the neonatal intensive care unit and a general neonatal and maternal ward in the Tokyo Women's Medical University Hospital (TWMUH) from September to December 1998. Among 103 patients eligible for the study, MRSA was detected in 62 (60.2%) newborns; of these 62 newborns, 8 (12.9%) developed NTED, 1 (1.6%) had another MRSA infection, and 53 (85.5%) were asymptomatic MRSA carriers. Sixty-nine MRSA strains were obtained from the 62 newborns. DNA fingerprinting by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed two clusters: clone A with 8 subtypes and clone B. Sixty-seven of the 69 MRSA strains (97.1%) belonged to clone A, and type A1 was the most predominant (42 of 69 strains; 60.9%) in every neonatal and perinatal ward. All but one of the clone A strains had the TSST-1 and staphylococcal enterotoxin C genes. We also analyzed eight MRSA strains from eight NTED patients in five hospitals in Japan other than TWMUH. All the MRSA strains from NTED patients also belonged to clone A. These results suggest that a single clone that predominated in the neonatal wards of six hospitals might have caused NTED. However, the occurrence of NTED might not be dependent on the presence of an NTED-specific strain. PMID:12843033

  14. Salmonella Typhi–Induced Septic Shock and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Previously Healthy Teenage Patient Treated With High-Dose Dexamethasone

    PubMed Central

    Ugas, Melissa Brosset; Carroll, Timothy; Kovar, Lacey; Chavez-Bueno, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Typhoid fever is commonly characterized by fever and abdominal pain. Rare complications include intestinal hemorrhage, bowel perforation, delirium, obtundation, and septic shock. Herein we describe the case of a previously healthy 16-year-old male without history of travel, diagnosed with typhoid fever complicated by septic shock and acute respiratory distress syndrome treated with high-dose dexamethasone. This case details severe complications of typhoid fever that are uncommonly seen in developed countries, and the successful response to high-dose dexamethasone as adjunct therapy. High-dose dexamethasone treatment has reportedly decreased Salmonella Typhi mortality, but controlled studies specifically performed in children are lacking, and most reports of its use are over 30 years old and all have originated in developing countries. Providers should include Salmonella Typhi in the differential diagnosis of the pediatric patient with fever, severe abdominal pain, and enteritis, and be aware of its potentially severe complications and the limited data on safety and efficacy of adjunctive therapies that can be considered in addition to antibiotics. PMID:27294165

  15. Salmonella Typhi-Induced Septic Shock and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Previously Healthy Teenage Patient Treated With High-Dose Dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Ugas, Melissa Brosset; Carroll, Timothy; Kovar, Lacey; Chavez-Bueno, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Typhoid fever is commonly characterized by fever and abdominal pain. Rare complications include intestinal hemorrhage, bowel perforation, delirium, obtundation, and septic shock. Herein we describe the case of a previously healthy 16-year-old male without history of travel, diagnosed with typhoid fever complicated by septic shock and acute respiratory distress syndrome treated with high-dose dexamethasone. This case details severe complications of typhoid fever that are uncommonly seen in developed countries, and the successful response to high-dose dexamethasone as adjunct therapy. High-dose dexamethasone treatment has reportedly decreased Salmonella Typhi mortality, but controlled studies specifically performed in children are lacking, and most reports of its use are over 30 years old and all have originated in developing countries. Providers should include Salmonella Typhi in the differential diagnosis of the pediatric patient with fever, severe abdominal pain, and enteritis, and be aware of its potentially severe complications and the limited data on safety and efficacy of adjunctive therapies that can be considered in addition to antibiotics. PMID:27294165

  16. Particle Acceleration in Shock-Shock Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanotani, Masaru; Matsukiyo, Shuichi; Hada, Tohru

    2015-04-01

    Collisionless shock waves play a crucial role in producing high energy particles. One of the most plausible acceleration mechanisms is the first order Fermi acceleration in which non-thermal particles statistically gain energy while scattered by MHD turbulence both upstream and downstream of a shock. Indeed, X-ray emission from energetic particles accelerated at supernova remnant shocks is often observed [e.g., Uchiyama et al., 2007]. Most of the previous studies on shock acceleration assume the presence of a single shock. In space, however, two shocks frequently come close to or even collide with each other. For instance, it is observed that a CME (coronal mass ejection) driven shock collides with the earth's bow shock [Hietala et al., 2011], or interplanetary shocks pass through the heliospheric termination shock [Lu et al., 1999]. Colliding shocks are observed also in high power laser experiments [Morita et al., 2013]. It is expected that shock-shock interactions efficiently produce high energy particles. A previous work using hybrid simulation [Cargill et al., 1986] reports efficient ion acceleration when supercritical two shocks collide. In the hybrid simulation, however, the electron dynamics cannot be resolved so that electron acceleration cannot be discussed in principle. Here, we perform one-dimensional full Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations to examine colliding two symmetric oblique shocks and the associated electron acceleration. In particular, the following three points are discussed in detail. 1. Energetic electrons are observed upstream of the two shocks before their collision. These energetic electrons are efficiently accelerated through multiple reflections at the two shocks (Fermi acceleration). 2. The reflected electrons excite large amplitude upstream waves. Electron beam cyclotron instability [Hasegawa, 1975] and electron fire hose instability [Li et al., 2000] appear to occur. 3. The large amplitude waves can scatters energetic electrons in

  17. Characterisation of the Bacterial and Fungal Communities Associated with Different Lesion Sizes of Dark Spot Syndrome Occurring in the Coral Stephanocoenia intersepta

    PubMed Central

    Sweet, Michael; Burn, Deborah; Croquer, Aldo; Leary, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The number and prevalence of coral diseases/syndromes are increasing worldwide. Dark Spot Syndrome (DSS) afflicts numerous coral species and is widespread throughout the Caribbean, yet there are no known causal agents. In this study we aimed to characterise the microbial communities (bacteria and fungi) associated with DSS lesions affecting the coral Stephanocoenia intersepta using nonculture molecular techniques. Bacterial diversity of healthy tissues (H), those in advance of the lesion interface (apparently healthy AH), and three sizes of disease lesions (small, medium, and large) varied significantly (ANOSIM R  = 0.052 p<0.001), apart from the medium and large lesions, which were similar in their community profile. Four bacteria fitted into the pattern expected from potential pathogens; namely absent from H, increasing in abundance within AH, and dominant in the lesions themselves. These included ribotypes related to Corynebacterium (KC190237), Acinetobacter (KC190251), Parvularculaceae (KC19027), and Oscillatoria (KC190271). Furthermore, two Vibrio species, a genus including many proposed coral pathogens, dominated the disease lesion and were absent from H and AH tissues, making them candidates as potential pathogens for DSS. In contrast, other members of bacteria from the same genus, such as V. harveyii were present throughout all sample types, supporting previous studies where potential coral pathogens exist in healthy tissues. Fungal diversity varied significantly as well, however the main difference between diseased and healthy tissues was the dominance of one ribotype, closely related to the plant pathogen, Rhytisma acerinum, a known causal agent of tar spot on tree leaves. As the corals’ symbiotic algae have been shown to turn to a darker pigmented state in DSS (giving rise to the syndromes name), the two most likely pathogens are R. acerinum and the bacterium Oscillatoria, which has been identified as the causal agent of the colouration in Black

  18. Simulations of Relativistic Collisionless Shocks: Shock Structure and Particle Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Spitkovsky, Anatoly; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-04-10

    We discuss 3D simulations of relativistic collisionless shocks in electron-positron pair plasmas using the particle-in-cell (PIC) method. The shock structure is mainly controlled by the shock's magnetization (''sigma'' parameter). We demonstrate how the structure of the shock varies as a function of sigma for perpendicular shocks. At low magnetizations the shock is mediated mainly by the Weibel instability which generates transient magnetic fields that can exceed the initial field. At larger magnetizations the shock is dominated by magnetic reflections. We demonstrate where the transition occurs and argue that it is impossible to have very low magnetization collisionless shocks in nature (in more than one spatial dimension). We further discuss the acceleration properties of these shocks, and show that higher magnetization perpendicular shocks do not efficiently accelerate nonthermal particles in 3D. Among other astrophysical applications, this may pose a restriction on the structure and composition of gamma-ray bursts and pulsar wind outflows.

  19. Heat shock factor 2 is a stress-responsive mediator of neuronal migration defects in models of fetal alcohol syndrome

    PubMed Central

    El Fatimy, Rachid; Miozzo, Federico; Le Mouël, Anne; Abane, Ryma; Schwendimann, Leslie; Sabéran-Djoneidi, Délara; de Thonel, Aurélie; Massaoudi, Illiasse; Paslaru, Liliana; Hashimoto-Torii, Kazue; Christians, Elisabeth; Rakic, Pasko; Gressens, Pierre; Mezger, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is a frequent cause of mental retardation. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying brain development defects induced by maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy are unclear. We used normal and Hsf2-deficient mice and cell systems to uncover a pivotal role for heat shock factor 2 (HSF2) in radial neuronal migration defects in the cortex, a hallmark of fetal alcohol exposure. Upon fetal alcohol exposure, HSF2 is essential for the triggering of HSF1 activation, which is accompanied by distinctive post-translational modifications, and HSF2 steers the formation of atypical alcohol-specific HSF1–HSF2 heterocomplexes. This perturbs the in vivo binding of HSF2 to heat shock elements (HSEs) in genes that control neuronal migration in normal conditions, such as p35 or the MAPs (microtubule-associated proteins, such as Dclk1 and Dcx), and alters their expression. In the absence of HSF2, migration defects as well as alterations in gene expression are reduced. Thus, HSF2, as a sensor for alcohol stress in the fetal brain, acts as a mediator of the neuronal migration defects associated with FASD. Subject Categories Development & Differentiation; Neuroscience PMID:25027850

  20. Heat shock factor 2 is a stress-responsive mediator of neuronal migration defects in models of fetal alcohol syndrome.

    PubMed

    El Fatimy, Rachid; Miozzo, Federico; Le Mouël, Anne; Abane, Ryma; Schwendimann, Leslie; Sabéran-Djoneidi, Délara; de Thonel, Aurélie; Massaoudi, Illiasse; Paslaru, Liliana; Hashimoto-Torii, Kazue; Christians, Elisabeth; Rakic, Pasko; Gressens, Pierre; Mezger, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is a frequent cause of mental retardation. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying brain development defects induced by maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy are unclear. We used normal and Hsf2-deficient mice and cell systems to uncover a pivotal role for heat shock factor 2 (HSF2) in radial neuronal migration defects in the cortex, a hallmark of fetal alcohol exposure. Upon fetal alcohol exposure, HSF2 is essential for the triggering of HSF1 activation, which is accompanied by distinctive post-translational modifications, and HSF2 steers the formation of atypical alcohol-specific HSF1-HSF2 heterocomplexes. This perturbs the in vivo binding of HSF2 to heat shock elements (HSEs) in genes that control neuronal migration in normal conditions, such as p35 or the MAPs (microtubule-associated proteins, such as Dclk1 and Dcx), and alters their expression. In the absence of HSF2, migration defects as well as alterations in gene expression are reduced. Thus, HSF2, as a sensor for alcohol stress in the fetal brain, acts as a mediator of the neuronal migration defects associated with FASD. PMID:25027850

  1. [Historical vision of shock].

    PubMed

    Dosne Pasqualini, C

    1998-01-01

    The concept of shock and its close relationship with that of stress dates back to the experiments of Hans Selye initiated in 1936 at McGill University in Montreal, with whom I collaborated between 1939 and 1942. It was demonstrated that the General Adaptation Syndrome begins with an Alarm Reaction, which consists of a Stage of Shock and one of Counter-Shock, followed by a Stage of Adaptation and finally a Stage of Exhaustion. My Ph.D. thesis concluded that shock was due to an adrenal insufficiency postulating that active metabolic processes drain the body of certain essential compounds the lack of which causes shock. My interest in the role of the glucose metabolism in shock led me to work with Bernardo Houssay in 1942 at the Institute of Physiology of the University of Buenos Aires and in 1944 with C.N.H. Long at Yale University. There I developed a method for the induction of hemorrhagic shock in the guinea pig with 94% lethality; curiously, the administration of 200 mg of ascorbic acid prevented death. Upon my return to Buenos Aires, these results were confirmed and moreover, it was demonstrated that the administration of cortisone led to 40% survival of the animals while desoxycorticosterone had no effect. At the time, no explanation was available but to-day, half a century later, this Symposium should be able to explain the mechanisms leading to death by hemorrhagic shock. PMID:9816693

  2. Coagulase-negative staphylococci isolated from two cases of toxic shock syndrome lack superantigenic activity, but induce cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Lina, G; Fleer, A; Etienne, J; Greenland, T B; Vandenesch, F

    1996-01-01

    Two strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis isolated from patients with toxic shock symptoms have been reported to carry genes related to S. aureus enterotoxins B and C by dot-blot hybridisation, although the corresponding superantigenic toxins were not detected immunologically. We here show that these strains produce no superantigens capable of stimulating proliferation of human mononuclear leukocytes or rabbit splenocytes, and that no DNA homologous to the seb or sec genes can be detected by PCR. However, stimulation of human monocytes by whole killed bacteria induced dose-dependent production of the cytokines TNF alpha, IL-1 beta and IL-6, which may be responsible for the clinical symptoms in these patients. PMID:8821402

  3. Mutant forms of tumour necrosis factor receptor I that occur in TNF-receptor-associated periodic syndrome retain signalling functions but show abnormal behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Ian; Radford, Paul M; Draper-Morgan, Kelly-Ann; McIntosh, Richard; Bainbridge, Susan; Dickinson, Peter; Jamhawi, Lama; Sansaridis, Marios; Huggins, Mary L; Tighe, Patrick J; Powell, Richard J

    2004-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is a hereditary autoinflammatory disorder involving autosomal-dominant missense mutations in TNF receptor superfamily 1A (TNFRSF1A) ectodomains. To elucidate the molecular effects of TRAPS-related mutations, we transfected HEK-293 cells to produce lines stably expressing high levels of either wild-type (WT) or single mutant recombinant forms of TNFRSF1A. Mutants with single amino acid substitutions in the first cysteine-rich domain (CRD1) were produced both as full-length receptor proteins and as truncated forms lacking the cytoplasmic signalling domain (Δsig). High-level expression of either WT or mutant full-length TNFRSF1A spontaneously induced apoptosis and interleukin-8 production, indicating that the mutations in CRD1 did not abrogate signalling. Consistent with this, WT and mutant full-length TNFRSF1A formed cytoplasmic aggregates that co-localized with ubiquitin and chaperones, and with the signal transducer TRADD, but not with the inhibitor, silencer of death domain (SODD). Furthermore, as expected, WT and mutant Δsig forms of TNFRSF1A did not induce apoptosis or interleukin-8 production. However, whereas the WT full-length TNFRSF1A was expressed both in the cytoplasm and on the cell surface, the mutant receptors showed strong cytoplasmic expression but reduced cell-surface expression. The WT and mutant Δsig forms of TNFRSF1A were all expressed at the cell surface, but a proportion of the mutant receptors were also retained in the cytoplasm and co-localized with BiP. Furthermore, the mutant forms of surface-expressed Δsig TNFRSF1A were defective in binding TNF-α. We conclude that TRAPS-related CRD1 mutants of TNFRSF1A possess signalling properties associated with the cytoplasmic death domain, but other behavioural features of the mutant receptors are abnormal, including intracellular trafficking and TNF binding. PMID:15312137

  4. Heliospheric shocks and catastrophe theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.

    1990-01-01

    Various configurations of forward and reverse shocks that occur in the outer heliosphere can be classified using catastrophe theory. The existence of a forward shock is associated with a local maximum of a polynomial, and the existence of a reverse shock is associated with a local minimum of a polynomial. A configuration with N forward shocks and N reverse shocks corresponds to a polynomial with N maxima and N minima. The formation of forward and reverse shocks corresponds to the creation of maxima and minima of a polynomial, which is described by the separatrices of the catastrophes. The coalescence of two forward (reverse) shocks corresponds to the situation when two maxima (minima) of a polynomial have equal values, and the interaction of a forward shock with a reverse shock corresponds to a polynomial with a local maximum equal to a local minimum; these situations are described by the Maxwell sets of the appropriate catastrophes.

  5. The pathogenesis of experimental toxic shock syndrome: the role of interleukin-2 in the induction of hypotension and release of cytokines.

    PubMed

    Tokman, M G; Carey, K D; Quimby, F W

    1995-02-01

    Toxic shock syndrome (TSS) is a multisystem disorder characterized by fever, hypotension, and involvement of three other organ systems. The etiologic agent is a toxigenic strain of Staphylococcus aureus which secretes the exotoxin, TSST-1. The toxin is a superantigen which stimulates the immune system to produce interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-2, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF). We hypothesized that TSST-1 induces the release of IL-2 which in turn is either directly involved or acts via an additional mediator to produce hypotension. We submitted four pairs of normal anesthetized adult female baboons to intravenous boluses of TSST-1. One baboon in each pair received anti-IL-2 intravenously and anti-IL-2 receptor intrathyroidally 15 min prior to TSST-1. The other baboon received the same dose and placement of anti-sheep red blood cell antibody. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure was recorded continuously and mean arterial pressure was calculated and plotted. IL-1, IL-2, IL-6, and TNF were measured in serum at varying times before and after toxin administration. Systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressure were significantly lower in the sham-treated group versus the experimental (anti-IL-2/IL-2R) group (p < .05 for all variables). In addition no differences were seen in any of the measurements between experimentally treated baboons and those receiving no TSST-1.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7749941

  6. Staphylococcus aureus toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1) production and Lactobacillus species growth in a defined medium simulating vaginal secretions.

    PubMed

    Stingley, Robin L; Liu, Huanli; Mullis, Lisa B; Elkins, Christopher A; Hart, Mark E

    2014-11-01

    Lactobacillus species are commensal with the healthy vaginal environment and inhibit the growth of many pathogenic bacteria in the vaginal tract by a variety of mechanisms, such as the production of hydrogen peroxide, organic acids, and antimicrobial substances. Simulation of the vaginal environment is crucial for proper investigation of the effects of Lactobacillus species on pathogenic bacteria. In this study, we modified a medium used to simulate vaginal secretions to improve the growth of toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1)-producing Staphylococcus aureus clinical strains and Lactobacillus species so that interactions between these bacteria may be examined. A medium consisting of basal salts, vitamins, albumin, glycogen, mucin, urea, sodium bicarbonate, polyoxyethylene sorbitan monolaurate, and amino acids supported the growth of S. aureus and the production of TSST-1 as determined by Western analysis. Improved growth of the Lactobacillus species was seen when this same medium was supplemented with manganese chloride, sodium acetate, and an increase in glucose concentration. However, growth of S. aureus in the supplemented medium resulted in reduced levels of TSST-1. Production of TSST-1 was not detected in a medium routinely used for the growth of Lactobacillus species although S. aureus growth was not inhibited. The development of an improved genital tract secretion medium provides a more authentic environment in which to study the interactions of Lactobacillus species and vaginal pathogens, such as S. aureus. PMID:25135489

  7. Preinduction of heat shock protein 70 protects mice against post-infection irritable bowel syndrome via NF-κB and NOS/NO signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuchun; Dong, Liwei; Yang, Bo; He, Zhoutao; Chen, Yiyao; Deng, Taozhi; Huang, Baili; Lan, Cheng

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the protective effects of preinduction of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) on Trichinella spiralis infection-induced post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS) in mice. Trichinella spiralis infection significantly reduced HSP70 abundance, ileal villus height and crypt depth, expression of tight junctions, serum lysine and arginine concentrations, and ileal SCL7A6 and SCL7A7 mRNA levels, induced inflammatory response, and activated NF-κB signaling pathway. Meanwhile, the heat treatment upregulated HSP70 expression, and then reversed intestinal dysfunction and inflammatory response. Preinduction of HSP70 enhanced serum arginine and intestinal SCL7A7 expression and inhibited NF-κB activation compared with PI-IBS model. Treatment with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC, an NF-κB inhibitor) and N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, NOS) further demonstrated that preinduction of HSP70 might inhibit NF-κB and activated NOS/nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathways. In conclusion, preinduction of HSP70 by heat treatment may confer beneficial effects on Trichinella spiralis infection-induced PI-IBS in mice, and the protective effect of HSP70 may be associated with inhibition of NF-κB and stimulation of NOS/NO signaling pathways. PMID:26215736

  8. Anesthesia & Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur in individuals with Down syndrome than their peers without Down syndrome. An awareness of these more ... of the eyes, ears, and joints - just like peers without Down syndrome. What About Down Syndrome Is ...

  9. Acute Biliary Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Forty-seven cases of biliary tract infection with septic shock are presented. The sepsis was caused by empyema of the gallbladder in 23 cases and by cholangitis in the remainder. Gallstones were most frequently the cause of the sepsis. An appropriate diagnostic description of the syndrome of biliary tract infection and septic shock should therefore include a description of the underlying biliary disease as well as the term acute biliary shock. In this series, emergency surgical management by removal of gallstones and drainage of suppuration was felt to be the most appropriate treatment. There was a high incidence of gallbladder rupture (10.6%) and intrahepatic stones (53.2%). Of the 13 patients who died, 8 might have survived if early operation had been performed after the diagnosis of acute biliary septic shock was established. PMID:2278914

  10. When shock waves collide

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Martinez, D.; Hartigan, P.; Frank, A.; Hansen, E.; Yirak, K.; Liao, A. S.; Graham, P.; Foster, J.; Wilde, B.; Blue, B.; et al

    2016-06-01

    Supersonic outflows from objects as varied as stellar jets, massive stars, and novae often exhibit multiple shock waves that overlap one another. When the intersection angle between two shock waves exceeds a critical value, the system reconfigures its geometry to create a normal shock known as a Mach stem where the shocks meet. Mach stems are important for interpreting emission-line images of shocked gas because a normal shock produces higher postshock temperatures, and therefore a higher-excitation spectrum than does an oblique shock. In this paper, we summarize the results of a series of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments designed tomore » quantify how Mach stems behave in supersonic plasmas that are the norm in astrophysical flows. The experiments test analytical predictions for critical angles where Mach stems should form, and quantify how Mach stems grow and decay as intersection angles between the incident shock and a surface change. While small Mach stems are destroyed by surface irregularities and subcritical angles, larger ones persist in these situations and can regrow if the intersection angle changes to become more favorable. Furthermore, the experimental and numerical results show that although Mach stems occur only over a limited range of intersection angles and size scales, within these ranges they are relatively robust, and hence are a viable explanation for variable bright knots observed in Hubble Space Telescope images at the intersections of some bow shocks in stellar jets.« less

  11. When Shock Waves Collide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartigan, P.; Foster, J.; Frank, A.; Hansen, E.; Yirak, K.; Liao, A. S.; Graham, P.; Wilde, B.; Blue, B.; Martinez, D.; Rosen, P.; Farley, D.; Paguio, R.

    2016-06-01

    Supersonic outflows from objects as varied as stellar jets, massive stars, and novae often exhibit multiple shock waves that overlap one another. When the intersection angle between two shock waves exceeds a critical value, the system reconfigures its geometry to create a normal shock known as a Mach stem where the shocks meet. Mach stems are important for interpreting emission-line images of shocked gas because a normal shock produces higher postshock temperatures, and therefore a higher-excitation spectrum than does an oblique shock. In this paper, we summarize the results of a series of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments designed to quantify how Mach stems behave in supersonic plasmas that are the norm in astrophysical flows. The experiments test analytical predictions for critical angles where Mach stems should form, and quantify how Mach stems grow and decay as intersection angles between the incident shock and a surface change. While small Mach stems are destroyed by surface irregularities and subcritical angles, larger ones persist in these situations and can regrow if the intersection angle changes to become more favorable. The experimental and numerical results show that although Mach stems occur only over a limited range of intersection angles and size scales, within these ranges they are relatively robust, and hence are a viable explanation for variable bright knots observed in Hubble Space Telescope images at the intersections of some bow shocks in stellar jets.

  12. Mesenchymal stromal (stem) cells suppress pro-inflammatory cytokine production but fail to improve survival in experimental staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Toxic shock syndrome (TSS) is caused by an overwhelming host-mediated response to bacterial superantigens produced mainly by Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. TSS is characterized by aberrant activation of T cells and excessive release of pro-inflammatory cytokines ultimately resulting in capillary leak, septic shock, multiple organ dysfunction and high mortality rates. No therapeutic or vaccine has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for TSS, and novel therapeutic strategies to improve clinical outcome are needed. Mesenchymal stromal (stem) cells (MSCs) are stromal cells capable of self-renewal and differentiation. Moreover, MSCs have immunomodulatory properties, including profound effects on activities of T cells and macrophages in specific contexts. Based on the critical role of host-derived immune mediators in TSS, we hypothesized that MSCs could modulate the host-derived proinflammatory response triggered by Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) and improve survival in experimental TSS. Methods Effects of MSCs on proinflammatory cytokines in peripheral blood were measured in wild-type C57BL/6 mice injected with 50 μg of SEB. Effects of MSCs on survival were monitored in fatal experimental TSS induced by consecutive doses of D-galactosamine (10 mg) and SEB (10 μg) in HLA-DR4 transgenic mice. Results Despite significantly decreasing serum levels of IL-2, IL-6 and TNF induced by SEB in wild-type mice, human MSCs failed to improve survival in experimental TSS in HLA-DR4 transgenic mice. Similarly, a previously described downstream mediator of human MSCs, TNF-stimulated gene 6 (TSG-6), did not significantly improve survival in experimental TSS. Furthermore, murine MSCs, whether unstimulated or pre-treated with IFNγ, failed to improve survival in experimental TSS. Conclusions Our results suggest that the immunomodulatory effects of MSCs are insufficient to rescue mice from experimental TSS, and that mediators other than

  13. Shock waves data for minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.; Johnson, Mary L.

    1994-01-01

    Shock compression of the materials of planetary interiors yields data which upon comparison with density-pressure and density-sound velocity profiles constrain internal composition and temperature. Other important applications of shock wave data and related properties are found in the impact mechanics of terrestrial planets and solid satellites. Shock wave equation of state, shock-induced dynamic yielding and phase transitions, and shock temperature are discussed. In regions where a substantial phase change in the material does not occur, the relationship between the particle velocity, U(sub p), and the shock velocity, U(sub s), is given by U(sub s) = C(sub 0) + S U(sub p), where C(sub 0) is the shock velocity at infinitesimally small particle velocity, or the ambient pressure bulk sound velocity. Numerical values for the shock wave equation of state for minerals and related materials of the solar system are provided.

  14. High prevalence of toxic shock syndrome toxin-producing epidemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus 15 (EMRSA-15) strains in Kuwait hospitals.

    PubMed

    Udo, E E; Boswihi, S S; Al-Sweih, N

    2016-07-01

    This study characterized EMRSA-15 isolates obtained from patients in Kuwait hospitals for their genotypic relatedness, antibiotic resistance and carriage of virulence genes using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), coagulase serotyping, SCCmec subtyping, spa typing, multilocus sequence typing and DNA microarray. The isolates were resistant to trimethoprim (75.6%), ciprofloxacin (29.7%), erythromycin and clindamycin (24.3%), tetracycline (19.0%), and gentamicin and kanamycin (21.6%). All 37 isolates belonged to sequence type (ST) 22, coagulase type XI, three PFGE types and eight subtypes, ten spa types including t223 (51.3%), t852 (13.5%), t032 (8.1%), t790 (8.1%), t3107 (5.4%) and one each of t309, t2251, t3935, t5708 and t5983. Twenty-six isolates (70.2%) carried SCCmec IVa, eight isolates carried SCCmec IV and three isolates carried SCCmec IVh. All isolates carried agr1, cap5 and egc gene cluster (seg, sei, selm, seln, selo, and selu). tst (toxic shock syndrome toxin) was detected in 23 isolates. Eight isolates (21.6%) were positive for Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL). Genotypic analysis revealed that 62.1% of the isolates comprising ST22-IVa-t223 (51.3%) and ST22-IVa-t309/t2251/t3935/t5708 (10.8%) were CC22-[tst1(+)] UK EMRSA-15/Middle Eastern variant, 21.6% were CC22-PVL(+) EMRSA-15 variant and 16.2% were CC22-UK EMRSA-15/Barnim clone. These results show that the tst1 positive-ST22-IVa-t223 (Middle Eastern variant) and the CC22-PVL(+) EMRSA-15 variant were the dominant EMRSA-15 variants in Kuwait hospitals. PMID:27222714

  15. The innate immune system is activated by stimulation of vaginal epithelial cells with Staphylococcus aureus and toxic shock syndrome toxin 1.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Marnie L; Ault, Kevin; Kremer, Mary J; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J; Davis, Catherine C; Squier, Christopher A; Schlievert, Patrick M

    2005-04-01

    Despite knowledge of the effects of toxic shock syndrome (TSS) toxin 1 (TSST-1) on the adaptive immune system, little is known about stimulation of the innate immune system, particularly epithelial cells. This study investigated the interactions of TSS Staphylococcus aureus and TSST-1 with human vaginal epithelial cells (HVECs) and porcine mucosal surfaces. When cocultured with HVECs for 6 h, TSS S. aureus MN8 proliferated, formed aggregates on the HVEC surfaces, and produced exotoxins. Receptor binding studies showed that 35S-TSST-1 bound to 5 x 10(4) receptors per HVEC, with saturation at 15 min. Affymetrix Human GeneChip U133A microarray analysis determined S. aureus MNSM (100 bacteria/HVEC) caused at least twofold up- or down-regulation of 410 HVEC genes by 6 h; these data were also confirmed with S. aureus MN8. TSST-1 (100 microg/ml) caused up- or down-regulation of 2,386 HVEC genes by 6 h. In response to S. aureus, the HVEC genes most up-regulated compared to those in controls were those coding for chemokines or cytokines--MIP-3alpha, 478-fold; GRO-alpha, 26-fold; GRO-beta, 14-fold; and GRO-gamma, 30-fold--suggesting activation of innate immunity. TSST-1 also caused up-regulation of chemokine/cytokine genes. Chemokine/cytokine gene up-regulation was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays measuring the corresponding proteins induced by S. aureus and TSST-1. S. aureus MN8, when incubated with porcine vaginal tissue, increased the flux of 35S-TSST-1 across the mucosal surface. This was accompanied by influx of lymphocytes into the upper layers of the tissue. These data suggest innate immune system activation through epithelial cells, reflected in chemokine/cytokine production and influx of lymphocytes, may cause changes in vaginal mucosa permeability, facilitating TSST-1 penetration. PMID:15784559

  16. Use of porcine vaginal tissue ex-vivo to model environmental effects on vaginal mucosa to toxic shock syndrome toxin-1.

    PubMed

    Davis, Catherine C; Baccam, Mekhine; Mantz, Mary J; Osborn, Thomas W; Hill, Donna R; Squier, Christopher A

    2014-01-15

    Menstrual toxic shock syndrome (mTSS) is a rare, recognizable, and treatable disease that has been associated with tampon use epidemiologically. It involves a confluence of microbial risk factors (Staphylococcus aureus strains that produce the superantigen-TSST-1), as well as environmental characteristics of the vaginal ecosystem during menstruation and host susceptibility factors. This paper describes a series of experiments using the well-characterized model of porcine vaginal mucosa ex-vivo to assess the effect of these factors associated with tampon use on the permeability of the mucosa. The flux of radiolabeled TSST-1 and tritiated water ((3)H2O) through porcine vaginal mucosa was determined at various temperatures, after mechanical disruption of the epithelial surface by tape stripping, after treatment with surfactants or other compounds, and in the presence of microbial virulence factors. Elevated temperatures (42, 47 and 52°C) did not significantly increase flux of (3)H2O. Stripping of the epithelial layers significantly increased the flux of labeled toxin in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of benzalkonium chloride (0.1 and 0.5%) and glycerol (4%) significantly increased the flux of (3)H2O but sodium lauryl sulfate at any concentration tested did not. The flux of the labeled toxin was significantly increased in the presence of benzalkonium chloride but not Pluronic® L92 and Tween 20 and significantly increased with addition of α-hemolysin but not endotoxin. These results show that the permeability of porcine vagina ex-vivo to labeled toxin or water can be used to evaluate changes to the vaginal environment and modifications in tampon materials, and thus aid in risk assessment. PMID:24333258

  17. The Innate Immune System Is Activated by Stimulation of Vaginal Epithelial Cells with Staphylococcus aureus and Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin 1

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Marnie L.; Ault, Kevin; Kremer, Mary J.; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J.; Davis, Catherine C.; Squier, Christopher A.; Schlievert, Patrick M.

    2005-01-01

    Despite knowledge of the effects of toxic shock syndrome (TSS) toxin 1 (TSST-1) on the adaptive immune system, little is known about stimulation of the innate immune system, particularly epithelial cells. This study investigated the interactions of TSS Staphylococcus aureus and TSST-1 with human vaginal epithelial cells (HVECs) and porcine mucosal surfaces. When cocultured with HVECs for 6 h, TSS S. aureus MN8 proliferated, formed aggregates on the HVEC surfaces, and produced exotoxins. Receptor binding studies showed that 35S-TSST-1 bound to 5 × 104 receptors per HVEC, with saturation at 15 min. Affymetrix Human GeneChip U133A microarray analysis determined S. aureus MNSM (100 bacteria/HVEC) caused at least twofold up- or down-regulation of 410 HVEC genes by 6 h; these data were also confirmed with S. aureus MN8. TSST-1 (100 μg/ml) caused up- or down-regulation of 2,386 HVEC genes by 6 h. In response to S. aureus, the HVEC genes most up-regulated compared to those in controls were those coding for chemokines or cytokines—MIP-3α, 478-fold; GRO-α, 26-fold; GRO-β, 14-fold; and GRO-γ, 30-fold—suggesting activation of innate immunity. TSST-1 also caused up-regulation of chemokine/cytokine genes. Chemokine/cytokine gene up-regulation was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays measuring the corresponding proteins induced by S. aureus and TSST-1. S. aureus MN8, when incubated with porcine vaginal tissue, increased the flux of 35S-TSST-1 across the mucosal surface. This was accompanied by influx of lymphocytes into the upper layers of the tissue. These data suggest innate immune system activation through epithelial cells, reflected in chemokine/cytokine production and influx of lymphocytes, may cause changes in vaginal mucosa permeability, facilitating TSST-1 penetration. PMID:15784559

  18. The Early Whole-Blood Transcriptional Signature of Dengue Virus and Features Associated with Progression to Dengue Shock Syndrome in Vietnamese Children and Young Adults▿ † ‡

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Long Truong; Lynn, David J.; Henn, Matt; Birren, Bruce W.; Lennon, Niall J.; Le, Phuong Thi; Duong, Kien Thi Hue; Nguyen, Tham Thi Hong; Mai, Lanh Ngoc; Farrar, Jeremy J.; Hibberd, Martin L.; Simmons, Cameron P.

    2010-01-01

    Dengue is a pantropic public health problem. In children, dengue shock syndrome (DSS) is the most common life-threatening complication. The ability to predict which patients may develop DSS may improve triage and treatment. To this end, we conducted a nested case-control comparison of the early host transcriptional features in 24 DSS patients and 56 sex-, age-, and virus serotype-matched uncomplicated (UC) dengue patients. In the first instance, we defined the “early dengue” profile. The transcriptional signature in acute rather than convalescent samples (≤72 h post-illness onset) was defined by an overabundance of interferon-inducible transcripts (31% of the 551 overabundant transcripts) and canonical gene ontology terms that included the following: response to virus, immune response, innate immune response, and inflammatory response. Pathway and network analyses identified STAT1, STAT2, STAT3, IRF7, IRF9, IRF1, CEBPB, and SP1 as key transcriptional factors mediating the early response. Strikingly, the only difference in the transcriptional signatures of early DSS and UC dengue cases was the greater abundance of several neutrophil-associated transcripts in patients who progressed to DSS, a finding supported by higher plasma concentrations of several canonical proteins associated with neutrophil degranulation (bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein [BPI], elastase 2 [ELA2], and defensin 1 alpha [DEF1A]). Elevated levels of neutrophil-associated transcripts were independent of the neutrophil count and also of the genotype of the infecting virus, as genome-length sequences of dengue virus serotype 1 (DENV-1) (n = 15) and DENV-2 (n = 3) sampled from DSS patients were phylogenetically indistinguishable from those sampled from uncomplicated dengue patients (32 DENV-1 and 9 DENV-2 sequences). Collectively, these data suggest a hitherto unrecognized association between neutrophil activation, pathogenesis, and the development of DSS and point to future

  19. Cardiogenic shock

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000185.htm Cardiogenic shock To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cardiogenic shock is when the heart has been damaged so ...

  20. Shock effects in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoeffler, D.; Bischoff, A.; Buchwald, V.; Rubin, A. E.

    1988-01-01

    The impacts that can occur between objects on intersecting solar system orbits can generate shock-induced deformations and transformations, creating new mineral phases or melting old ones. These shock-metamorphic effects affect not only the petrography but the chemical and isotopic properties and the ages of primordial meteoritic materials. A fuller understanding of shock metamorphism and breccia formation in meteorites will be essential not only in the study of early accretion, differentiation, and regolith-evolution processes, but in the characterization of the primordial composition of the accreted material itself.

  1. Atrial and ventricular lead insulation defects with resulting inappropriate shocks and end-of-life of the ICD pulse generator in a young bodybuilder with congenital long-QT-syndrome.

    PubMed

    Diez, Claudius; Hofmann, Hans-Stefan; Börgermann, Jochen

    2009-01-01

    We report on a 19-year-old male with a congenital Long-QT syndrome who was admitted to our hospital because of insulation defects of both atrial and ventricular ICD leads resulting in inappropriate delivered shocks and a non-responding pulse generator during telemetrical evaluation. The insulation defects led to multiple arc marks within the ICD pocket and there was a short circuit between denuded leads and the electrically active pulse generator. The high current flow generated sufficient heat to damage several circuits of the generator. A new ICD system was implanted successfully and the postoperative course has been remained uneventful for almost 6 years. PMID:18776999

  2. Interaction between perpendicular magnetohydrodynamic shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Y. Q.; Habbal, S. R.

    1993-01-01

    A general analysis is made of the collision and merging of perpendicular shocks as well as the interaction between a shock and a tangential discontinuity. It is found that two head-on shocks diminish both in strength after collisions and a tangential discontinuity forms between them. The property of the discontinuity depends on the relative strength of the two shocks. No discontinuity occurs if the shocks are equal in strength. The emerging of two shocks propagating in the same direction results in a strong shock followed by a tangential discontinuity and a reverse wave. The reverse wave is a rarefaction wave if one or both of the shocks are strong. If the shocks are both weak, a critical adiabatic index (CAI) exists. The reverse wave is a rarefaction wave if the wavelength is less than the CAI and a shock exists if the wavelength is greater than the CAI. As a wake shock enters from a medium of higher wave impedance into that of lower wave impedance, the reflected wave is a rarefaction wave and the total pressure ratio decreases and the velocity jump increases after the shock passes through the border.

  3. Dumping Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Organizations​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Dumping Syndrome Page Content On this page: What is ... Nutrition Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is dumping syndrome? Dumping syndrome occurs when food, especially sugar, ...

  4. Down syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Down syndrome is a genetic condition in which a person has 47 chromosomes instead of the usual 46. ... In most cases, Down syndrome occurs when there is an extra copy of chromosome 21. This form of Down syndrome is called trisomy 21. ...

  5. Suppressive and Facilitative Effects of Shock Intensity and Interresponse Times Followed by Shock

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everly, Jessica B.; Perone, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Although response-dependent shock often suppresses responding, response facilitation can occur. In two experiments, we examined the suppressive and facilitative effects of shock by manipulating shock intensity and the interresponse times that produced shock. Rats' lever presses were reinforced on a variable-interval 40-s schedule of food…

  6. Use of porcine vaginal tissue ex-vivo to model environmental effects on vaginal mucosa to toxic shock syndrome toxin-1

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Catherine C.; Baccam, Mekhine; Mantz, Mary J.; Osborn, Thomas W.; Hill, Donna R.; Squier, Christopher A.

    2014-01-15

    Menstrual toxic shock syndrome (mTSS) is a rare, recognizable, and treatable disease that has been associated with tampon use epidemiologically. It involves a confluence of microbial risk factors (Staphylococcus aureus strains that produce the superantigen—TSST-1), as well as environmental characteristics of the vaginal ecosystem during menstruation and host susceptibility factors. This paper describes a series of experiments using the well-characterized model of porcine vaginal mucosa ex-vivo to assess the effect of these factors associated with tampon use on the permeability of the mucosa. The flux of radiolabeled TSST-1 and tritiated water ({sup 3}H{sub 2}O) through porcine vaginal mucosa was determined at various temperatures, after mechanical disruption of the epithelial surface by tape stripping, after treatment with surfactants or other compounds, and in the presence of microbial virulence factors. Elevated temperatures (42, 47 and 52 °C) did not significantly increase flux of {sup 3}H{sub 2}O. Stripping of the epithelial layers significantly increased the flux of labeled toxin in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of benzalkonium chloride (0.1 and 0.5%) and glycerol (4%) significantly increased the flux of {sup 3}H{sub 2}O but sodium lauryl sulfate at any concentration tested did not. The flux of the labeled toxin was significantly increased in the presence of benzalkonium chloride but not Pluronic® L92 and Tween 20 and significantly increased with addition of α-hemolysin but not endotoxin. These results show that the permeability of porcine vagina ex-vivo to labeled toxin or water can be used to evaluate changes to the vaginal environment and modifications in tampon materials, and thus aid in risk assessment. - Highlights: • Model assessed local effects of tampon use on vaginal mucosa. • Risks were evaluated using two tracers to assess permeability in an ex vivo model. • Mechanical damage to the epithelial surface increased tracer penetration.

  7. MRSA Clonal Complex 22 Strains Harboring Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin (TSST-1) Are Endemic in the Primary Hospital in Gaza, Palestine

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liang; Abdelateef, Nahed; Elamreen, Farid Abu; Ginocchio, Christine C.; Pierard, Denis; Becker, Karsten; Kreiswirth, Barry N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important pathogen in both community and healthcare-related settings worldwide. Current knowledge regarding the epidemiology of S. aureus and MRSA in Gaza is based on a single community-based carriage study. Here we describe a cross-sectional analysis of 215 clinical isolates collected from Al-Shifa Hospital in Gaza during 2008 and 2012. Methods All isolates were characterized by spa typing, SCCmec typing, and detection of genes encoding Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) and toxic shock syndrome toxin (TSST-1). Representative genotypes were also subjected to multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed using VITEK2 and MicroScan. Results MRSA represented 56.3% of all S. aureus strains, and increased in frequency from 2008 (54.8%) to 2012 (58.4%). Aside from beta-lactams, resistance was observed to tetracycline, erythromycin, clindamycin, gentamicin, and fluoroquinolones. Molecular typing identified 35 spa types representing 17 MLST clonal complexes (CC), with spa 998 (Ridom t223, CC22) and spa 70 (Ridom t044, CC80) being the most prevalent. SCCmec types I, III, IV, V and VI were identified among MRSA isolates, while type II was not detected. PVL genes (lukF/S-PV) were detected in 40.0% of all isolates, while the TSST-1 gene (tst) was detected in 27.4% of all isolates, with surprisingly high frequency within CC22 (70.4%). Both PVL and TSST-1 genes were found in several isolates from 2012. Conclusions Molecular typing of clinical isolates from Gaza hospitals revealed unusually high prevalence of TSST-1 genes among CC22 MRSA, which is noteworthy given a recent community study describing widespread carriage of a CC22 MRSA clone known as the ‘Gaza strain’. While the latter did not address TSST-1, tst-positive spa 998 (Ridom t223) has been detected in several neighboring countries, and described as endemic in an Italian NICU, suggesting international spread of a

  8. Turbulence in electrostatic ion acoustic shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Means, R. W.; Coroniti, F. V.; Wong, A. Y.; White, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    Three types of collisionless electrostatic ion acoustic shocks are investigated using a double plasma (DP) device: (1) laminar shocks; (2) small amplitude turbulent shocks in which the turbulence is confined to be upstream of the shock potential jump; and (3) large amplitude turbulent shocks in which the wave turbulence occurs throughout the shock transition. The wave turbulence is generated by ions which are reflected from the shock potential; linear theory spatial growth increments agree with experimental values. The experimental relationship between the shock Mach number and the shock potential is shown to be inconsistent with theoretical shock models which assume that the electrons are isothermal. Theoretical calculations which assume a trapped electron equation of a state and a turbulently flattened velocity distrubution function for the reflected ions yields a Mach number vs potential relationship in agreement with experiment.

  9. Gilles de la Tourette syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... cannot control. The condition is commonly called Tourette syndrome. ... Tourette syndrome ... fewer people have more severe forms of Tourette syndrome. Tourette syndrome is four times as likely to occur ...

  10. Quasiperpendicular High Mach Number Shocks.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, A H; Masters, A; Dougherty, M K; Burgess, D; Fujimoto, M; Hospodarsky, G B

    2015-09-18

    Shock waves exist throughout the Universe and are fundamental to understanding the nature of collisionless plasmas. Reformation is a process, driven by microphysics, which typically occurs at high Mach number supercritical shocks. While ongoing studies have investigated this process extensively both theoretically and via simulations, their observations remain few and far between. In this Letter we present a study of very high Mach number shocks in a parameter space that has been poorly explored and we identify reformation using in situ magnetic field observations from the Cassini spacecraft at 10 AU. This has given us an insight into quasiperpendicular shocks across 2 orders of magnitude in Alfvén Mach number (M_{A}) which could potentially bridge the gap between modest terrestrial shocks and more exotic astrophysical shocks. For the first time, we show evidence for cyclic reformation controlled by specular ion reflection occurring at the predicted time scale of ~0.3τ_{c}, where τ_{c} is the ion gyroperiod. In addition, we experimentally reveal the relationship between reformation and M_{A} and focus on the magnetic structure of such shocks to further show that for the same M_{A}, a reforming shock exhibits stronger magnetic field amplification than a shock that is not reforming. PMID:26430997

  11. Quasiperpendicular High Mach Number Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulaiman, A. H.; Masters, A.; Dougherty, M. K.; Burgess, D.; Fujimoto, M.; Hospodarsky, G. B.

    2015-09-01

    Shock waves exist throughout the Universe and are fundamental to understanding the nature of collisionless plasmas. Reformation is a process, driven by microphysics, which typically occurs at high Mach number supercritical shocks. While ongoing studies have investigated this process extensively both theoretically and via simulations, their observations remain few and far between. In this Letter we present a study of very high Mach number shocks in a parameter space that has been poorly explored and we identify reformation using in situ magnetic field observations from the Cassini spacecraft at 10 AU. This has given us an insight into quasiperpendicular shocks across 2 orders of magnitude in Alfvén Mach number (MA ) which could potentially bridge the gap between modest terrestrial shocks and more exotic astrophysical shocks. For the first time, we show evidence for cyclic reformation controlled by specular ion reflection occurring at the predicted time scale of ˜0.3 τc , where τc is the ion gyroperiod. In addition, we experimentally reveal the relationship between reformation and MA and focus on the magnetic structure of such shocks to further show that for the same MA , a reforming shock exhibits stronger magnetic field amplification than a shock that is not reforming.

  12. Selfsimilar time dependent shock structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, R.; Drury, L. O.

    1985-01-01

    Diffusive shock acceleration as an astrophysical mechanism for accelerating charged particles has the advantage of being highly efficient. This means however that the theory is of necessity nonlinear; the reaction of the accelerated particles on the shock structure and the acceleration process must be self-consistently included in any attempt to develop a complete theory of diffusive shock acceleration. Considerable effort has been invested in attempting, at least partially, to do this and it has become clear that in general either the maximum particle energy must be restricted by introducing additional loss processes into the problem or the acceleration must be treated as a time dependent problem (Drury, 1984). It is concluded that stationary modified shock structures can only exist for strong shocks if additional loss processes limit the maximum energy a particle can attain. This is certainly possible and if it occurs the energy loss from the shock will lead to much greater shock compressions. It is however equally possible that no such processes exist and we must then ask what sort of nonstationary shock structure develops. The ame argument which excludes stationary structures also rules out periodic solutions and indeed any solution where the width of the shock remains bounded. It follows that the width of the shock must increase secularly with time and it is natural to examine the possibility of selfsimilar time dependent solutions.

  13. Selfsimilar time dependent shock structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, R.; Drury, L. O.

    1985-08-01

    Diffusive shock acceleration as an astrophysical mechanism for accelerating charged particles has the advantage of being highly efficient. This means however that the theory is of necessity nonlinear; the reaction of the accelerated particles on the shock structure and the acceleration process must be self-consistently included in any attempt to develop a complete theory of diffusive shock acceleration. Considerable effort has been invested in attempting, at least partially, to do this and it has become clear that in general either the maximum particle energy must be restricted by introducing additional loss processes into the problem or the acceleration must be treated as a time dependent problem (Drury, 1984). It is concluded that stationary modified shock structures can only exist for strong shocks if additional loss processes limit the maximum energy a particle can attain. This is certainly possible and if it occurs the energy loss from the shock will lead to much greater shock compressions. It is however equally possible that no such processes exist and we must then ask what sort of nonstationary shock structure develops. The ame argument which excludes stationary structures also rules out periodic solutions and indeed any solution where the width of the shock remains bounded. It follows that the width of the shock must increase secularly with time and it is natural to examine the possibility of selfsimilar time dependent solutions.

  14. Shaken baby syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Shaken baby syndrome is a severe form of child abuse caused by violently shaking an infant or child. ... Shaken baby syndrome can occur from as little as 5 seconds of shaking. Shaken baby injuries most often occur ...

  15. Barberry treatment reduces serum anti-heat shock protein 27 and 60 antibody titres and high-sensitivity c-reactive protein in patients with metabolic syndrome: a double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Zilaee, Marzie; Kermany, Tayyebeh; Tavalaee, Shima; Salehi, Maryam; Ghayour-Mobarhan, Majid; Ferns, Gordon A A

    2014-08-01

    Metabolic syndrome is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). The heat shock proteins (HSPs) are associated with risk factors for CVD. The aim of the present study was to survey the effect of barberry on antibody titres to HSPs and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in patients with metabolic syndrome. In our study, subjects (N=106, 79 women and 27 men, 18-65 years old) with metabolic syndrome were randomized into two groups: a group of patients who received three capsules of barberry and a control group who received three capsules of placebo for 6 weeks. Antibodies against HSPs 27, 60/65 and 70, hs-CRP and lipid profile were determined in patients before (week 0) and after (week 6) intervention. spss software (version 16.0; Inc, Chicago, IL) was used for data analysis. Results showed that barberry had no significant effect on serum level of anti-HSPs 65 and 70. But there was a significant decrease in anti-HSP 27 in both case and control groups (p=0.001 and p<0.001, respectively, in the case and control groups). Barberry decreased significantly anti-HSP 60 in the case group (p=0.03). High-sensitivity CRP was decreased non-significantly (p=0.17) in the case group and increased significantly (p=0.04) in the control group. Barberry decreased significantly low-density lipoprotein and total cholesterol and increased significantly high-density cholesterol (p<0.05). Results of the present study suggested that barberry supplementation in patients with metabolic syndrome decreased significantly anti-HSPs 27 and 60 and hs-CRP levels and improved lipid profile. PMID:24536039

  16. Basic Shock Physiology and Critical Care.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Brian K

    2016-05-01

    Veterinarians practicing emergency medicine and/or working with exotic animals must be well versed in the pathophysiology of shock because many exotic pets present with an acute crisis or an acute manifestation of a chronic process causing poor organ perfusion. This article discusses the pathophysiology of shock and the systemic inflammatory response syndrome, which may lead to organ dysfunction, organ failure, sepsis, and death. The physiology of perfusion, perfusion measurements, categories of shock, and altered function of the immune system, gastrointestinal barrier, and coagulation system are discussed. Veterinarians providing emergency care to patients with shock must also be aware of comorbidities. PMID:27131156

  17. Hypovolemic shock

    MedlinePlus

    ... clammy skin Confusion Decreased or no urine output General weakness Pale skin color (pallor) Rapid breathing Sweating , moist skin Unconsciousness The greater and more rapid the blood loss, the more severe the symptoms of shock.

  18. Growth hormone release of interleukin-1 alpha, interferon-gamma and interleukin-4 from murine splenocytes stimulated with staphylococcal protein A, toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 and streptococcal lysin S.

    PubMed

    Galdiero, M; Vitiello, M; Scarfogliero, P; Sommese, L

    1997-03-01

    We investigated changes in the IL-1 alpha, IFN-gamma and IL-4 release from splenocytes in the presence of growth hormone (GH). Splenocytes were stimulated with Protein A (PA), Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin-1 (TSST-1) and Streptolysin S (SLS). In the presence of GH, splenocytes stimulated with PA, induced a 40% and 50% drop in IL-1 alpha and IFN-gamma release respectively, compared to controls, while no changes were shown in IL-4 release. The release of IFN-gamma by TSST-1-stimulated splenocytes fell by 30%, while no changes were shown in IL-1 alpha and IL-4 release after GH. The release of IL-1 alpha by SLS-stimulated splenocytes increased by 50% in the presence of GH. No changes were shown in IFN-gamma and IL-4 release. The results are discussed in terms of the possibility of an expanding function for these endocrine peptides within the immune system. PMID:9110153

  19. Naturally occurring chemical carcinogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural products are chemicals found in nature which have unique pharmacological effects. Humans are exposed to many of these bioactive naturally occurring chemicals via the air breathed, the water drunk and the food eaten. Exposure also occurs in clinical settings. Naturally occurring chemicals ...

  20. Lessons Learned for the Resuscitation of Traumatic Hemorrhagic Shock.

    PubMed

    Spinella, Philip C; Perkins, Jeremy G; Cap, Andrew P

    2016-01-01

    The lessons learned regarding the resuscitation of traumatic hemorrhagic shock are numerous and come from a better understanding of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and experience in this population over 10-plus years of combat operations. We have now come to better understand that the greatest benefit in survival can come from improved treatment of hemorrhage in the prehospital phase of care. We have learned that there is an endogenous coagulopathy that occurs with severe traumatic injury secondary to oxygen debt and that classic resuscitation strategies for severe bleeding based on crystalloid or colloid solutions exacerbate coagulopathy and shock for those with life-threatening hemorrhage. We have relearned that a whole blood-based resuscitation strategy, or one that at least recapitulates the functionality of whole blood, may reduce death from hemorrhage and reduce the risks of excessive crystalloid administration which include acute lung injury, abdominal compartment syndrome, cerebral edema, and anasarca. Appreciation of the importance of shock and coagulopathy management underlies the emphasis on early hemostatic resuscitation. Most importantly, we have learned that there is still much more to understand regarding the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and the resuscitation strategies required to improve outcomes for casualties with hemorrhagic shock. PMID:27215864

  1. Early changes in lung water after haemorrhagic shock in pigs and dogs.

    PubMed

    Noble, W H

    1975-01-01

    This study has demonstrated a 34 per cent rise in lung water after shock and retransfusion of blood. This extra lung water was associated with increased pulmonary artery pressure, increased plumonary vascular resistance and reduced myocardial performance. These findings occurred despite the failure of arterial pressure to return to normal after retransfusion blood. Although this increased lung water is less than anything which can be detected clinically it may represent the beginnings of the shock lung syndrome as oedema progresses over period of weeks. A reasonable approach to the problem should include attempts to reduce the elevated plumonary vascular resistance. NaHCO3 should be infused before or during administration of the first bottle of blood in an attempt to improve myocardial function and reduce pulmonary vascular resistance. Fluids should not be infused simply to return arterial pressures in the pulmonary vascular bed. Pulmonary artery and wedge pressure monitoring with Swan Ganz catheters may improve the management of shock patients. PMID:1109705

  2. Co-Occurring Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Care of You Top Ten Freshman Year Issues Alcohol, Substance Abuse and Depression Winter Break Survival Tips for College Students Implementing ... supporters and consumers in the mental health field. Alcohol and Drug Abuse, Addiction and Co-occurring Disorders: Co-occurring ... In Crisis? Call ...

  3. PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN SHOCK-SHOCK INTERACTION: MODEL TO DATA COMPARISON

    SciTech Connect

    Hietala, H.; Vainio, R.; Sandroos, A.

    2012-05-20

    Shock-shock interaction is a well-established particle acceleration mechanism in astrophysical and space plasmas, but difficult to study observationally. Recently, the interplanetary shock collision with the bow shock of the Earth on 1998 August 10 was identified as one of the rare events where detailed in situ observations of the different acceleration phases can be made. Due to the advantageous spacecraft and magnetic field configurations, in 2011, Hietala et al. were able to distinguish the seed population and its reacceleration at the bow shock, as well as the Fermi acceleration of particles trapped between the shocks. They also interpreted their results as being the first in situ evidence of the release of particles from the trap as the two shocks collided. In the present study we use a global 2.5D test-particle simulation to further study particle acceleration in this event. We concentrate on the last phases of the shock-shock interaction, when the shocks approach and pass through each other. The simulation results verify that the main features of the measurements can be explained by shock-shock interaction in this magnetic geometry, and are in agreement with the previous interpretation of particle release. Shock-shock collisions of this type occur commonly in many astrophysical locations such as stellar coronae, planetary and cometary bow shocks, and the distant heliosphere.

  4. [Obstructive shock].

    PubMed

    Pich, H; Heller, A R

    2015-05-01

    An acute obstruction of blood flow in central vessels of the systemic or pulmonary circulation causes the clinical symptoms of shock accompanied by disturbances of consciousness, centralization, oliguria, hypotension and tachycardia. In the case of an acute pulmonary embolism an intravascular occlusion results in an acute increase of the right ventricular afterload. In the case of a tension pneumothorax, an obstruction of the blood vessels supplying the heart is caused by an increase in extravascular pressure. From a hemodynamic viewpoint circulatory shock caused by obstruction is closely followed by cardiac deterioration; however, etiological and therapeutic options necessitate demarcation of cardiac from non-cardiac obstructive causes. The high dynamics of this potentially life-threatening condition is a hallmark of all types of obstructive shock. This requires an expeditious and purposeful diagnosis and a rapid and well-aimed therapy. PMID:25994928

  5. Compartment syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... caused by repetitive activities, such as running. The pressure in a compartment only increases during that activity. Compartment syndrome is most common in the lower leg and forearm. It can also occur in the hand, foot, thigh, and upper arm.

  6. Down syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... their limitations, they may also feel frustration and anger. Many different medical conditions are seen in people ... syndrome and their families deal with the frustration, anger, and compulsive behavior that often occur. Parents and ...

  7. Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Replicase - Isoforms of Nonstructural Protein 2 and Interaction with Heat Shock 70kDa Protein 5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nsp2 replicase protein of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), when expressed independently, was recently demonstrated to be processed from its precursor by the PL2 protease at or near the G**1196|G**1197 dipeptide in transfected CHO cells. The proteolytic cleavage of nsp...

  8. [Neurogenic shock].

    PubMed

    Meister, Rafael; Pasquier, Mathieu; Clerc, David; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas

    2014-08-13

    The neurogenic shock is a common complication of spinal cord injury, especially when localized at the cervical level. Characterized by a vasoplegia (hypotension) and bradycardia, the neurogenic shock is secondary to the damage of the sympathetic nervous system. The clinical presentation often includes tetraplegia, with or without respiratory failure. Early treatment aims to minimize the occurrence of secondary spinal cord lesions resulting from systemic ischemic injuries. Medical management consists in a standardized ABCDE approach, in order to stabilize vital functions and immobilize the spine. The hospital care includes performing imaging, further measures of neuro-resuscitation, and coordinated surgical assessment and treatment of any other injury. PMID:25199226

  9. Shock drift mechanism for Forbush decreases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Andrew F.; Sarris, E. T.; Dodopoulos, C.

    1990-01-01

    Consideration is given to the way in which Forbush decreases can arise from variable drifts in nonuniform shocks, where the variation in shock strength along the shock front causes both the shock drift distance and the energy gain to become variable. More particles can then be transported out of a given region of space and energy interval than were transported in, so a spacecraft passing through this region can observe a Forbush decrease in this energy interval despite shock energization and compression. A simple example of how this can occur is presented.

  10. Shock drift mechanism for Forbush decreases

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, A.F.; Sarris, E.T.; Dodopoulos, C. Thrace Democritus Univ., Xanthe )

    1990-02-01

    Consideration is given to the way in which Forbush decreases can arise from variable drifts in nonuniform shocks, where the variation in shock strength along the shock front causes both the shock drift distance and the energy gain to become variable. More particles can then be transported out of a given region of space and energy interval than were transported in, so a spacecraft passing through this region can observe a Forbush decrease in this energy interval despite shock energization and compression. A simple example of how this can occur is presented. 20 refs.

  11. Interstellar shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckee, C. F.; Hollenbach, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    The structure of interstellar shocks driven by supernova remnants and by expanding H II regions around early-type stars is discussed. Jump conditions are examined, along with shock fronts, post-shock relaxation layers, collisional shocks, collisionless shocks, nonradiative shocks, radiative atomic shocks, and shock models of observed nebulae. Effects of shock waves on interstellar molecules are examined, with reference to the chemistry behind shock fronts, infrared and vibrational-rotational cooling by molecules, and observations of shocked molecules. Some current problems and applications of the study of interstellar shocks are summarized, including the initiation of star formation by radiative shock waves, interstellar masers, the stability of shocks, particle acceleration in shocks, and shocks in galactic nuclei.

  12. Cellular Alterations in Shock and Ischemia and Their Correction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaudry, Irshad H.

    1985-01-01

    Reviews recent advances in cellular alterations in shock to help physicians and physiologists keep abreast of current research. Specifically addresses changes occurring as a result of hemorrhagic shock and possible ways such lesions could be corrected. (DH)

  13. Ruptured spinal arteriovenous malformation: Presenting as stunned myocardium and neurogenic shock

    PubMed Central

    Mehesry, Tasneem H.; Shaikh, Nissar; Malmstrom, Mohammad F.; Marcus, Marco A. E.; Khan, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) is a clinical syndrome usually defined as an acute pulmonary edema occurring shortly after a central neurologic insult. NPE was identified 100 years ago, but it is still underappreciated in the clinical setup. NPE usually appears within minutes to hours after the injury. It has a high mortality rate if not recognized early and treated appropriately. Similarly, neurogenic shock is a known complication of spinal cord injury reported incidence is more than 20% in isolated upper cervical spinal injury. But NPE is rare to occur, and stunned myocardium (SM) is not reported in spinal arteriovenous malformation (AVM) rupture. SM is a reversible cardiomyopathy resulting in transient left ventricular dysfunction which has been described to occur in the setting of catecholamine release during situations of physiologic stress. We report a case of high spinal AVM rupture presenting as SM, NPE, and neurogenic shock. Case Description: A 32-year-old male who presented with sudden onset of pain and weakness in upper limbs. Imaging studies showed AVM rupture by imaging techniques. Initially, the patient had severe hypertension, respiratory distress requiring intubation and ventilation, then he developed hypotension, bradycardia, and asystole, which required immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation and atropine. He remained with quadriplegia and suffered from frequent episodes of bradycardia and asystole. Conclusions: Spinal AVM rupture can present as neurogenic shock, stunned myocardium, and pulmonary edema. Early recognition of AVM rupture and prompt surgical intervention, as well as aggressive treatment of shock, may enhance recovery and decrease the long-term morbidity. PMID:26539315

  14. [A new case of food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome].

    PubMed

    Chaabane, M; Bidat, E; Chevallier, B

    2010-05-01

    We report a case of food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) with milk whose signs of milk intolerance began in the 1st days of life, consisting in minor and nonspecific symptoms. The 3 foods in question were cow's milk, soja, and wheat. The diagnosis of FPIES was suspected at the age of 9 months, after 3 hospitalizations for vomiting, sometimes associated with lethargy and hypotension, which occurred around 2h after cow's milk ingestion. Symptoms were not associated with positive specific IgE and cutaneous tests. Signs then occurred with soja and wheat. Because of the late diagnosis, 3 anaphylactic shock episodes occurred. FPIES is an uncommon cell-mediated food allergy reaction. This syndrome is characterized by gastrointestinal symptoms, especially severe vomiting, sometimes associated with anaphylactic shock. Usually signs occur 2h after ingestion. These reactions begin early, in the 1st months of life, and regress by the age of 3 years in 38-100% of cases depending on the responsible food. They are usually induced by cow's milk and soy proteins. Diagnosis is difficult and delayed because of nonspecific symptoms. Oral food challenge is the only examination that confirms the diagnosis. Treatment involves the exclusion of the specific food involved. Severe reactions require treatment of shock and adjunction of corticosteroids. PMID:20346636

  15. Magnetic field overshoots in the Venus blow shock

    SciTech Connect

    Tatrallyay, M.; Luhmann, J.G.; Russell, C.T.

    1984-01-01

    An examination of Pioneer Venus Orbiter fluxgate magnetometer data has shown that magnetic field overshoots occur not only behind quasi-perpendicular bow shocks but also behind quasi-parallel shocks. Overshoots are assocciated only with supercritical shocks. Their amplitudes increase with increasing fast Mach number. Solar wind beta has a lesser effect. The thickness of the overshoot increases with decreasing Theta-BN. The thickness of apparent overshoots detected behind 4 strong fast interplanetary shocks (M greater than M/crit) is about 3 orders of magnitude larger. Multiple crossings of the Venus bow shock were observed mainly at turbulent shocks. Their occurence is not influenced by Theta-BN. 15 references.

  16. Antiphospholipids Syndrome Complicated by a Systemic Capillary Leak-Like Syndrome Treated With Steroids and Intravenous Immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Prete, Marcella; Urso, Livio; Fatone, Maria Celeste; Pinto, Vincenzo; Perosa, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This report describes the onset of systemic capillary leak (SCL)-like syndrome in a 30-year-old woman with antiphospholipids syndrome (APS) during puerperium. Twelve hours after a cesarean section, she presented a sudden fever and abdominal pains followed by dyspnea, severe edema of the limbs and pelvis. Computer tomography shows congestion of interstitial pulmonary parenchyma, pericardial and pleural effusion, edema of intestinal wall and of perivisceral adipose tissue, and periportal lymphedema. Laboratory tests showed neutrophilic leukocytosis, hypoalbuminemia, and an increase of erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein. Because fever and raised inflammation parameters are not observed in idiopathic capillary leak syndrome (SCLS; Clarkson disease), a diagnosis of SCL-like syndrome was made. Albumin solution, high-dose methylprednisolone and intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) infusion were administered with a rapid improvement of her clinical condition. The prompt treatment with steroids and IVIG likely prevented the life-threatening shock syndrome that can occur in SCLS, with acute hypotensive attacks, and severe limbs edema requiring fasciotomy. All clinical and laboratory findings supported autoinflammation as the underlying pathogenic mechanism of the syndrome. The data indicate that SCL-like syndrome can be considered a novel clinical syndrome, which can complicate APS. PMID:26844485

  17. “DK Crush” Technique for a Tightly Stenosed Conjoined SVG Lesion in a Patient with Acute Coronary Syndrome and Cardiogenic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuan-Ju; Lee, Wen-Lieng; Liu, Tsun-Jui; Chang, Wei-Chun; Wang, Kuo-Yang; Su, Chieh-Shou

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery bifurcation disease of saphenous venous graft (SVG) is extremely rare. SVG disease remains a challenging lesion to treat because of increased morbidity and mortality with repeated coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG), high rates of periprocedural complications, and in-stent restenosis or occlusion requiring repeat revascularization with percutaneous coronary intervention. Herein, we present the first reported case of using the “DK crush” technique to treat an inverted Y-shaped SVG bifurcation disease in a patient with a prior CABG and new-onset acute coronary syndrome. Arising from our treatment, favorable immediate and mid-term angiographic and clinical outcomes were obtained. PMID:27122880

  18. Chondrule destruction in nebular shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquet, Emmanuel; Thompson, Christopher

    2014-12-10

    Chondrules are millimeter-sized silicate spherules ubiquitous in primitive meteorites, but whose origin remains mysterious. One of the main proposed mechanisms for producing them is melting of solids in shock waves in the gaseous protoplanetary disk. However, evidence is mounting that chondrule-forming regions were enriched in solids well above solar abundances. Given the high velocities involved in shock models, destructive collisions would be expected between differently sized grains after passage of the shock front as a result of differential drag. We investigate the probability and outcome of collisions of particles behind a one-dimensional shock using analytic methods as well as a full integration of the coupled mass, momentum, energy, and radiation equations. Destruction of protochondrules seems unavoidable for solid/gas ratios ε ≳ 0.1, and possibly even for solar abundances because of 'sandblasting' by finer dust. A flow with ε ≳ 10 requires much smaller shock velocities (∼2 versus 8 km s{sup –1}) in order to achieve chondrule-melting temperatures, and radiation trapping allows slow cooling of the shocked fragments. Initial destruction would still be extensive; although re-assembly of millimeter-sized particles would naturally occur by grain sticking afterward, the compositional heterogeneity of chondrules may be difficult to reproduce. We finally note that solids passing through small-scale bow shocks around few kilometer-sized planetesimals might experience partial melting and yet escape fragmentation.

  19. Chondrule Destruction in Nebular Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquet, Emmanuel; Thompson, Christopher

    2014-12-01

    Chondrules are millimeter-sized silicate spherules ubiquitous in primitive meteorites, but whose origin remains mysterious. One of the main proposed mechanisms for producing them is melting of solids in shock waves in the gaseous protoplanetary disk. However, evidence is mounting that chondrule-forming regions were enriched in solids well above solar abundances. Given the high velocities involved in shock models, destructive collisions would be expected between differently sized grains after passage of the shock front as a result of differential drag. We investigate the probability and outcome of collisions of particles behind a one-dimensional shock using analytic methods as well as a full integration of the coupled mass, momentum, energy, and radiation equations. Destruction of protochondrules seems unavoidable for solid/gas ratios epsilon >~ 0.1, and possibly even for solar abundances because of "sandblasting" by finer dust. A flow with epsilon >~ 10 requires much smaller shock velocities (~2 versus 8 km s-1) in order to achieve chondrule-melting temperatures, and radiation trapping allows slow cooling of the shocked fragments. Initial destruction would still be extensive; although re-assembly of millimeter-sized particles would naturally occur by grain sticking afterward, the compositional heterogeneity of chondrules may be difficult to reproduce. We finally note that solids passing through small-scale bow shocks around few kilometer-sized planetesimals might experience partial melting and yet escape fragmentation.

  20. Prader-Willi syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... chromosome 15 and none from the father These genetic changes occur randomly. Persons who have this syndrome ... Genetic testing is available to test children for Prader-Willi syndrome. As the child grows older, lab ...

  1. Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Hyaline membrane disease (HMD); Infant respiratory distress syndrome; Respiratory distress syndrome in infants; RDS - infants ... Neonatal RDS occurs in infants whose lungs have not yet fully ... disease is mainly caused by a lack of a slippery substance in ...

  2. Immune Reconstitution Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... RECONSTITUTION SYNDROME? Some people who start antiretroviral therapy (ART) get health problems even though their HIV comes ... may occur in about 20% of people starting ART. HOW WAS THE SYNDROME IDENTIFIED? Several patients developed ...

  3. "Naturally occurring asbestos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagnard, F.; Lahondère, D.; Blein, O.; Lahfid, A.; Wille, G.

    2012-04-01

    The term asbestos refers to six silicate minerals from amphibole and serpentine groups. By definition, it consists in bundles of thin and flexible long fibers, with high-tensile strength, and chemical and heat resistance. In contrast to asbestos found within commercial products and mining, the specific term ''naturally occurring asbestos'' (NOA) refers to asbestiform minerals occurring within rocks or soils that can be released by human activities or weathering processes. The fact that the exposure to asbestos is related to lung pathologies is now widely demonstrated (e.g. asbestosis, mesothelioma and lung cancer). However, if health risks associated with exposure to NOA exist, they are not yet well documented. The crystallization of natural asbestos occurs in specific Mg-rich lithologies associated with peculiar structural and metamorphic conditions. By recognizing and combining such specific geologic criteria, the presence or the absence of asbestos in bedrock terrains can be reasonably predicted and maps of NOA hazard can be drawn. We present here new results of geological mapping and petrological study concerning the evaluation of the NOA hazard in the Alps and Corsica, in France. The three folds approach consists in (1) a determination of lithologies with potential NOA from a bibliographic compilation and extraction of target zones from a geological geodatabase (2) a geological mapping of the target zones followed by a petrological characterization of sampled asbestiform minerals in the laboratory (optical microscopy, TEM, SEM, and Raman spectroscopy technics), and (3) the drawing of the final map of NOA hazard, at regional-scale. Occurrence criteria can be retained as follows: 1. NOA are abundant in the internal zones of the Alps and Corsica, especially within ophiolitic complexes. Natural asbestos are mostly concentrated within ultramafic rocks but can also occur within basic lithologies such as Mg-metagabbros, metabasalts and meta-pillow-lavas, 2. Asbestos

  4. Mutations in the heat-shock protein A9 (HSPA9) gene cause the EVEN-PLUS syndrome of congenital malformations and skeletal dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Royer-Bertrand, Beryl; Castillo-Taucher, Silvia; Moreno-Salinas, Rodrigo; Cho, Tae-Joon; Chae, Jong-Hee; Choi, Murim; Kim, Ok-Hwa; Dikoglu, Esra; Campos-Xavier, Belinda; Girardi, Enrico; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Bonafé, Luisa; Rivolta, Carlo; Unger, Sheila; Superti-Furga, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    We and others have reported mutations in LONP1, a gene coding for a mitochondrial chaperone and protease, as the cause of the human CODAS (cerebral, ocular, dental, auricular and skeletal) syndrome (MIM 600373). Here, we delineate a similar but distinct condition that shares the epiphyseal, vertebral and ocular changes of CODAS but also included severe microtia, nasal hypoplasia, and other malformations, and for which we propose the name of EVEN-PLUS syndrome for epiphyseal, vertebral, ear, nose, plus associated findings. In three individuals from two families, no mutation in LONP1 was found; instead, we found biallelic mutations in HSPA9, the gene that codes for mHSP70/mortalin, another highly conserved mitochondrial chaperone protein essential in mitochondrial protein import, folding, and degradation. The functional relationship between LONP1 and HSPA9 in mitochondrial protein chaperoning and the overlapping phenotypes of CODAS and EVEN-PLUS delineate a family of “mitochondrial chaperonopathies” and point to an unexplored role of mitochondrial chaperones in human embryonic morphogenesis. PMID:26598328

  5. Dehydration kinetics of shocked serpentine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyburczy, James A.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental rates of dehydration of shocked and unshocked serpentine were determined using a differential scanning calorimetric technique. Dehydration rates in shocked serpentine are enhanced by orders of magnitude over corresponding rates in unshocked material, even though the impact experiments were carried out under conditions that inhibited direct impact-induced devolatilization. Extrapolation to temperatures of the Martian surface indicates that dehydration of shocked material would occur 20 to 30 orders of magnitude more rapidly than for unshocked serpentine. The results indicate that impacted planetary surfaces and associated atmospheres would reach chemical equilibrium much more quickly than calculations based on unshocked material would indicate, even during the earliest, coldest stages of accretion. Furthermore, it is suggested that chemical weathering of shocked planetary surfaces by solid-gas reactions would be sufficiently rapid that true equilibrium mineral assemblages should form.

  6. Shock compression of liquid hydrazine

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, B.O.; Chavez, D.J.

    1996-05-01

    Liquid hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}) is a propellant used for aerospace propulsion and power systems. Because the propellant modules can be subject to debris impacts during their use, the shock states that can occur in the hydrazine need to be characterized to safely predict its response. Several shock compression experiments have been conducted to investigate the shock detonability of liquid hydrazine; however, the experiments{close_quote} results disagree. Therefore, in this study, we reproduced each experiment numerically to evaluate in detail the shock wave profiles generated in the liquid hydrazine. This paper presents the results of each numerical simulation and compares the results to those obtained in experiment. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Insulin regulates IL-1alpha, Ifn-y and IL-4 release from murine splenocytes stimulated with staphylococcal protein A, toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 and streptococcal lysin S.

    PubMed

    Sommese, L; Scarfogliero, P; Vitiello, M; Gorga, F; Galdiero, M

    1998-01-01

    In this study, changes were investigated in release of IL-1alpha, IFN-gamma and IL-4 from mouse splenocytes stimulated with staphylococcal protein A (SpA), toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1) or streptococcal lysin S (SLS) in the presence of insulin. The results show that insulin-treated splenocytes stimulated by SpA had a 25% increase in IFN-gamma release and a 50% decrease in IL-4 compared with splenocytes treated with SpA alone. IL-1alpha release was unchanged compared with controls. Insulintreated splenocytes stimulated with TSST-1 had a 30% fall in IL-1alpha and IFN-gamma release compared with controls. There were no changes in IL-4 release. Splenocytes stimulated with SLS after insulin treatment increased their release of IL-1alpha and IFN-gamma by 50%, whereas IL-4 release was unchanged. The data suggest that the insulin may have important functional implications in immunoregulation. PMID:17657628

  8. Exploratory study of reactivity in organic compounds subjected to shock loading. [Diphenylhexadiyne

    SciTech Connect

    Dodson, B.W.

    1981-01-01

    An exploratory study of chemical reactions occurring in organic compounds under shock loading has been carried out. Early results on shock reactivity of the organic compounds acrylamide, adamantane, hexamethylenetetramine, naphthalene, and 1,6-diphenyl-2,4-hexadiyne have established two points: (1) organic reactions occur under shock loading; and (2) chemical structure strongly influences shock reactivity.

  9. Culture Shock as a Barrier to Intercultural Business Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waltman, John L.

    The phenomenon of culture shock as it affects intercultural business communication is examined. The symptoms of the syndrome and its effects on the business traveler and his/her business are discussed. Flaws in current training that increase rather than reduce the impact of culture shock are explored. It is suggested that much training prepares…

  10. [DRESS syndrome].

    PubMed

    Adamcová, Monika; Šturdík, Igor; Koller, Tomáš; Payer, Juraj

    2016-04-01

    DRESS syndrome (Drug Rash with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms) is severe drug-induced allergic-type reaction which occurs few days to weeks after taking a drug in a predisposed patient. Organ damage, eosinophilia and skin rash are typical at presentation. Corticotherapy is often necessary in severe cases. In this report we describe a case of 56-year old female with fever, elevated liver tests and skin rash. DRESS syndrome was diagnosed and allopurinol was indentified as a causative drug. Due to possible fatal outcome, DRESS syndrome should be considered in a differential diagnosis of all patients presenting with similar signs and symptoms. PMID:27250614

  11. Shock Prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The electrician pictured is installing a General Electric Ground Fault Interrupter (GFI), a device which provides protection against electrical shock in the home or in industrial facilities. Shocks due to defective wiring in home appliances or other electrical equipment can cause severe burns, even death. As a result, the National Electrical Code now requires GFIs in all new homes constructed. This particular type of GFI employs a sensing element which derives from technology acquired in space projects by SCI Systems, Inc., Huntsville, Alabama, producer of sensors for GE and other manufacturers of GFI equipment. The sensor is based on the company's experience in developing miniaturized circuitry for space telemetry and other spacecraft electrical systems; this experience enabled SCI to package interruptor circuitry in the extremely limited space available and to produce sensory devices at practicable cost. The tiny sensor measures the strength of the electrical current and detects current differentials that indicate a fault in the functioning of an electrical system. The sensing element then triggers a signal to a disconnect mechanism in the GFI, which cuts off the current in the faulty circuit.

  12. Naturally occurring cardiac glycosides.

    PubMed

    Radford, D J; Gillies, A D; Hinds, J A; Duffy, P

    1986-05-12

    Cardiac glycoside poisoning from the ingestion of plants, particularly of oleanders, occurs with reasonable frequency in tropical and subtropical areas. We have assessed a variety of plant specimens for their cardiac glycoside content by means of radioimmunoassays with antibodies that differ in their specificity for cardiac glycosides. Significant amounts of immunoreactive cardiac glycoside were found to be present in the ornamental shrubs: yellow oleander (Thevetia peruviana); oleander (Nerium oleander); wintersweet (Carissa spectabilis); bushman's poison (Carissa acokanthera); sea-mango (Cerbera manghas); and frangipani (Plumeria rubra); and in the milkweeds: redheaded cotton-bush (Asclepias curassavica); balloon cotton (Asclepias fruiticosa); king's crown (Calotropis procera); and rubber vine (Cryptostegia grandifolia). The venom gland of the cane toad (Bufo marinus) also contained large quantities of cardiac glycosides. The competitive immunoassay method permits the rapid screening of specimens that are suspected to contain cardiac glycosides. Awareness of the existence of these plant and animal toxins and their dangers allows them to be avoided and poisoning prevented. The method is also useful for the confirmation of the presence of cardiac glycosides in serum in cases of poisoning. PMID:3086679

  13. Naturally Occurring Food Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Dolan, Laurie C.; Matulka, Ray A.; Burdock, George A.

    2010-01-01

    Although many foods contain toxins as a naturally-occurring constituent or, are formed as the result of handling or processing, the incidence of adverse reactions to food is relatively low. The low incidence of adverse effects is the result of some pragmatic solutions by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and other regulatory agencies through the creative use of specifications, action levels, tolerances, warning labels and prohibitions. Manufacturers have also played a role by setting limits on certain substances and developing mitigation procedures for process-induced toxins. Regardless of measures taken by regulators and food producers to protect consumers from natural food toxins, consumption of small levels of these materials is unavoidable. Although the risk for toxicity due to consumption of food toxins is fairly low, there is always the possibility of toxicity due to contamination, overconsumption, allergy or an unpredictable idiosyncratic response. The purpose of this review is to provide a toxicological and regulatory overview of some of the toxins present in some commonly consumed foods, and where possible, discuss the steps that have been taken to reduce consumer exposure, many of which are possible because of the unique process of food regulation in the United States. PMID:22069686

  14. What Is Cardiogenic Shock?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cardiogenic Shock? Cardiogenic (kar-dee-oh-JE-nik) shock is ... treated right away. The most common cause of cardiogenic shock is damage to the heart muscle from a ...

  15. Smoother Turbine Blades Resist Thermal Shock Better

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czerniak, Paul; Longenecker, Kent; Paulus, Don; Ullman, Zane

    1991-01-01

    Surface treatment increases resistance of turbine blades to low-cycle fatigue. Smoothing removes small flaws where cracks start. Intended for blades in turbines subject to thermal shock of rapid starting. No recrystallization occurs at rocket-turbine operating temperatures.

  16. CONSTIPATION IN RETT SYNDROME

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gastrointestinal problems occur frequently in girls with Rett syndrome. Constipation is a common problem in girls with Rett syndrome because of their neurological abnormalities. Research studies to better understand the abnormalities of large bowel function in our girls with Rett syndrome have not b...

  17. Shock-induced crystalline instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravelo, Ramon; Holian, Brad Lee; Germann, Timothy C.

    2007-03-01

    Uniaxial deformations of single crystals such as those produced under planar shock loading can produce structural instabilities which compete with defect nucleation mechanisms. In fcc single crystals under (110) shock loading, the resulting body-centered orthorhombic crystal structure develops a long-wavelength dynamical instability associated with tetragonal shear distortions, which occurs at lower strains (pressures) than those predicted by the vanishing of the elastic constants at finite pressure (stiffness coefficients). The criterion for these instabilities is derived and verified by equilibrium and non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations [2]J. Wang, S. Yip, S.R. Phillpot, D. Wolf, Phys. Rev. Lett. 71, 4182 (1993)

  18. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Lemierre's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hein, Paul N.; Soghikian, Maida V.; Bhangoo, Munveer S.

    2014-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is an infectious disease defined by the presence of septic thrombophlebitis with associated embolic phenomenon, most commonly to the lungs. Here we present two cases from a single institution of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) developing as a result of Lemierre's syndrome in previously healthy young adult men. ARDS can occur as a consequence of pulmonary septic emboli and sepsis, both of which are well-described consequences of Lemierre's syndrome. We describe important diagnostic and management considerations in the care of patients with hypoxemic respiratory failure and Lemierre's syndrome. Essential components of management include prompt antibiotic therapy, lung-protective ventilation strategies, and supportive care. PMID:25143837

  19. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Lemierre's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hein, Paul N; Soghikian, Maida V; Bhangoo, Munveer S

    2014-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is an infectious disease defined by the presence of septic thrombophlebitis with associated embolic phenomenon, most commonly to the lungs. Here we present two cases from a single institution of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) developing as a result of Lemierre's syndrome in previously healthy young adult men. ARDS can occur as a consequence of pulmonary septic emboli and sepsis, both of which are well-described consequences of Lemierre's syndrome. We describe important diagnostic and management considerations in the care of patients with hypoxemic respiratory failure and Lemierre's syndrome. Essential components of management include prompt antibiotic therapy, lung-protective ventilation strategies, and supportive care. PMID:25143837

  20. Shock compression of liquid hydrazine

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, B.O.; Chavez, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    Liquid hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}) is a propellant used by the Air Force and NASA for aerospace propulsion and power systems. Because the propellant modules that contain the hydrazine can be subject to debris impacts during their use, the shock states that can occur in the hydrazine need to be characterized to safely predict its response. Several shock compression experiments have been conducted in an attempt to investigate the detonability of liquid hydrazine; however, the experiments results disagree. Therefore, in this study, we reproduced each experiment numerically to evaluate in detail the shock wave profiles generated in the liquid hydrazine. This paper presents the results of each numerical simulation and compares the results to those obtained in experiment. We also present the methodology of our approach, which includes chemical kinetic experiments, chemical equilibrium calculations, and characterization of the equation of state of liquid hydrazine.

  1. Cardiogenic shock in a neonate

    PubMed Central

    Viveiros, Eulália; Aveiro, Ana Cristina; Costa, Edite; Nunes, José Luis

    2013-01-01

    We describe a case of a healthy male full-term neonate, 21 days old, admitted to the emergency room, presenting a severe cardiovascular collapse with an initial sinus rhythm. The first diagnostic hypothesis was of septic shock, having antibiotics, fluid resuscitation, inotropic drugs and ventilatory support started immediately. After achieving haemodynamic stability, a new cardiovascular collapse occurred with supraventricular tachycardia (SVT). The latter was successfully treated and the neonate did not suffer any organ damage. Cardiogenic shock should be considered despite being a much rarer cause of shock in neonates. SVT is promptly diagnosed when a cardiorespiratory monitor is available; however, the intermittent occurrence of the tachycardia episodes makes this diagnosis more difficult to recognise and manage. PMID:23737567

  2. Shock finding on a moving mesh - I. Shock statistics in non-radiative cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaal, Kevin; Springel, Volker

    2015-02-01

    Cosmological shock waves play an important role in hierarchical structure formation by dissipating and thermalizing kinetic energy of gas flows, thereby heating the Universe. Furthermore, identifying shocks in hydrodynamical simulations and measuring their Mach number accurately are critical for calculating the production of non-thermal particle components through diffusive shock acceleration. However, shocks are often significantly broadened in numerical simulations, making it challenging to implement an accurate shock finder. We here introduce a refined methodology for detecting shocks in the moving-mesh code AREPO, and show that results for shock statistics can be sensitive to implementation details. We put special emphasis on filtering against spurious shock detections due to tangential discontinuities and contacts. Both of them are omnipresent in cosmological simulations, for example in the form of shear-induced Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities and cold fronts. As an initial application of our new implementation, we analyse shock statistics in non-radiative cosmological simulations of dark matter and baryons. We find that the bulk of energy dissipation at redshift zero occurs in shocks with Mach numbers around M≈ 2.7. Furthermore, almost 40 per cent of the thermalization is contributed by shocks in the warm hot intergalactic medium, whereas ≈60 per cent occurs in clusters, groups, and smaller haloes. Compared to previous studies, these findings revise the characterization of the most important shocks towards higher Mach numbers and lower density structures. Our results also suggest that regions with densities above and below δb = 100 should be roughly equally important for the energetics of cosmic ray acceleration through large-scale structure shocks.

  3. Dumping syndrome (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Dumping syndrome occurs when the contents of the stomach empty too quickly into the small intestine. The ... causing nausea, cramping, diarrhea, sweating, faintness, and palpitations. Dumping usually occurs after the consumption of too much ...

  4. Cardiovascular devices; reclassification of intra-aortic balloon and control systems for acute coronary syndrome, cardiac and non-cardiac surgery, or complications of heart failure; effective date of requirement for premarket approval for intra-aortic balloon and control systems for septic shock or pulsatile flow generation. Final order.

    PubMed

    2013-12-30

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final order to reclassify intra-aortic balloon and control system (IABP) devices when indicated for acute coronary syndrome, cardiac and non-cardiac surgery, or complications of heart failure, a preamendments class III device, into class II (special controls), and to require the filing of a premarket approval application (PMA) or a notice of completion of a product development protocol (PDP) for IABPs when indicated for septic shock or pulsatile flow generation. PMID:24383147

  5. Radiative Shock Waves In Emerging Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, R. Paul; Doss, F.; Visco, A.

    2011-05-01

    In laboratory experiments we produce radiative shock waves having dense, thin shells. These shocks are similar to shocks emerging from optically thick environments in astrophysics in that they are strongly radiative with optically thick shocked layers and optically thin or intermediate downstream layers through which radiation readily escapes. Examples include shocks breaking out of a Type II supernova (SN) and the radiative reverse shock during the early phases of the SN remnant produced by a red supergiant star. We produce these shocks by driving a low-Z plasma piston (Be) at > 100 km/s into Xe gas at 1.1 atm. pressure. The shocked Xe collapses to > 20 times its initial density. Measurements of structure by radiography and temperature by several methods confirm that the shock wave is strongly radiative. We observe small-scale perturbations in the post-shock layer, modulating the shock and material interfaces. We describe a variation of the Vishniac instability theory of decelerating shocks and an analysis of associated scaling relations to account for the growth of these perturbations, identify how they scale to astrophysical systems such as SN 1993J, and consider possible future experiments. Collaborators in this work have included H.F. Robey, J.P. Hughes, C.C. Kuranz, C.M. Huntington, S.H. Glenzer, T. Doeppner, D.H. Froula, M.J. Grosskopf, and D.C. Marion ________________________________ * Supported by the US DOE NNSA under the Predictive Sci. Academic Alliance Program by grant DE-FC52-08NA28616, the Stewardship Sci. Academic Alliances program by grant DE-FG52-04NA00064, and the Nat. Laser User Facility by grant DE-FG03-00SF22021.

  6. Effect of leading edge sweep on shock-shock interference at Mach 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, Christopher E.; Wieting, Allan R.; Holden, Michael S.

    1989-01-01

    These Mach 8 experimental results are applicable to the details of a shock-shock interference that may occur on an engine inlet of a hypersonic vehicle from a swept forebody shock interacting with a swept cowl leading edge bow shock or from a swept splitter plate shock interacting with a swept fuel injection strut bow shock. Peak surface pressure and heat transfer rate on the cylinder were about 10 and 30 times the undisturbed flow stagnation point value, respectively, for the 0 deg sweep test. A comparison of the 15 deg and 30 deg swept results with the 0 deg swept results shows that peak pressure was reduced about 13 percent and 44 percent, respectively, and peak heat transfer rate was reduced about 7 percent and 27 percent, respectively.

  7. Analysis of shock-wave propagation in aqueous foams using shock tube experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourdan, G.; Mariani, C.; Houas, L.; Chinnayya, A.; Hadjadj, A.; Del Prete, E.; Haas, J.-F.; Rambert, N.; Counilh, D.; Faure, S.

    2015-05-01

    This paper reports experimental results of planar shock waves interacting with aqueous foams in a horizontal conventional shock tube. Four incident shock wave Mach numbers are considered, ranging from 1.07 to 1.8, with two different foam columns of one meter thickness and expansion ratios of 30 and 80. High-speed flow visualizations are used along with pressure measurements to analyse the main physical mechanisms that govern shock wave mitigation in foams. During the shock/foam interaction, a precursor leading pressure jump was identified as the trace of the liquid film destruction stage in the foam fragmentation process. The corresponding pressure threshold is found to be invariant for a given foam. Regarding the mitigation effect, the results show that the speed of the shock is drastically reduced and that wetter is the foam, slower are the transmitted waves. The presence of the foam barrier attenuates the induced pressure impulse behind the transmitted shock, while the driest foam appears to be more effective, as it limits the pressure induced by the reflected shock off the foam front. Finally, it was found that the pressure histories in the two-phase gas-liquid mixture are different from those previously obtained within a cloud of droplets. The observed behavior is attributed to the process of foam fragmentation and to the modification of the flow topology past the shock. These physical phenomena occurring during the shock/foam interaction should be properly accounted for when elaborating new physical models.

  8. Gut as source of sepsis after hemorrhagic shock

    SciTech Connect

    Sori, A.J.; Rush, B.F. Jr.; Lysz, T.W.; Smith, S.; Machiedo, G.W.

    1988-02-01

    In a model of severe hemorrhagic shock in rats, blood culture findings became positive within 2 to 4 hours of shock. The organisms cultured were primarily gram-negative. To test the hypothesis that the gut was the source of the bacteria, E. coli labeled with carbon-14 oleic acid were fed to rats undergoing hemorrhagic shock. Their plasma was then assayed for carbon-14 activity. Seven of the 14 shocked animals demonstrated increased plasma carbon-14 activity during or after shock. The mortality rate was 100 percent 80 hours postshock, and all animals had E. coli on subsequent blood culture. The seven rats without increased plasma carbon-14 activity had a survival rate of 83 percent postshock. Sham-shocked animals did not exhibit plasma carbon-14 levels greater than the background levels. These data suggest that bacterial translocation occurs during hemorrhagic shock and that the gut is the source of the bacteremia seen during hemorrhagic shock.

  9. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Estenssoro, Elisa; Dubin, Arnaldo

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is an acute respiratory failure produced by an inflammatory edema secondary to increased lung capillary permeability. This causes alveolar flooding and subsequently deep hypoxemia, with intrapulmonary shunt as its most important underlying mechanism. Characteristically, this alteration is unresponsive to high FIO2 and only reverses with end-expiratory positive pressure (PEEP). Pulmonary infiltrates on CXR and CT are the hallmark, together with decreased lung compliance. ARDS always occurs within a week of exposition to a precipitating factor; most frequently pneumonia, shock, aspiration of gastric contents, sepsis, and trauma. In CT scan, the disease is frequently inhomogeneous, with gravitational infiltrates coexisting with normal-density areas and also with hyperaerated parenchyma. Mortality is high (30-60%) especially in ARDS associated with septic shock and neurocritical diseases. The cornerstone of therapy lies in the treatment of the underlying cause and in the use mechanical ventilation which, if inappropriately administered, can lead to ventilator-induced lung injury. Tidal volume = 6 ml/kg of ideal body weight to maintain an end-inspiratory (plateau) pressure = 30 cm H2O ("protective ventilation") is the only variable consistently associated with decreased mortality. Moderate-to-high PEEP levels are frequently required to treat hypoxemia, yet no specific level or titration strategy has improved outcomes. Recently, the use of early prone positioning in patients with PaO2/FIO2 = 150 was associated with increased survival. In severely hypoxemic patients, it may be necessary to use adjuvants of mechanical ventilation as recruitment maneuvers, pressure-controlled modes, neuromuscular blocking agents, and extracorporeal-membrane oxygenation. Fluid restriction appears beneficial. PMID:27576283

  10. A new class of solutions for interstellar magnetohydrodynamic shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberge, W. G.; Draine, B. T.

    1990-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the equations of motion for steady MHD shock waves proopagating in interstellar clouds, for boundary conditions that preclude C shocks. In addition to J shocks, in which the neutral fluid component becomes subsonic at an adiabatic jump front, the equations admit a new class of solutions, called C-asterisk shocks, in which the transition to subsonic flow occurs continuously at a sonic point. Numerical methods are developed for computing the structure of J and C-asterisk shocks propagating in diffuse interstellar clouds. The effects of chemical, ionization, and recombination processes are included in this treatment. An alternative numerical method, which uses artificial viscosity to facilitate integration through sonic points, is analyzed and shown to be invalid. A set of exemplary solutions, computed for realistic shock parameters, shows that C-asterisk shocks occur for a broad range of conditions relevant to diffuse interstellar clouds.

  11. A new class of solutions for interstellar magnetohydrodynamic shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Roberge, W.G.; Draine, B.T. Princeton Univ. Observatory, NJ )

    1990-02-01

    An analysis is presented of the equations of motion for steady MHD shock waves propagating in interstellar clouds, for boundary conditions that preclude C shocks. In addition to J shocks, in which the neutral fluid component becomes subsonic at an adiabatic jump front, the equations admit a new class of solutions, called C-asterisk shocks, in which the transition to subsonic flow occurs continuously at a sonic point. Numerical methods are developed for computing the structure of J and C-asterisk shocks propagating in diffuse interstellar clouds. The effects of chemical, ionization, and recombination processes are included in this treatment. An alternative numerical method, which uses artificial viscosity to facilitate integration through sonic points, is analyzed and shown to be invalid. A set of exemplary solutions, computed for realistic shock parameters, shows that C-asterisk shocks occur for a broad range of conditions relevant to diffuse interstellar clouds. 27 refs.

  12. Impact angle control of interplanetary shock geoeffectiveness: A statistical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Denny M.; Raeder, Joachim

    2015-06-01

    We present a survey of interplanetary (IP) shocks using Wind and ACE satellite data from January 1995 to December 2013 to study how IP shock geoeffectiveness is controlled by IP shock impact angles. A shock list covering one and a half solar cycle is compiled. The yearly number of IP shocks is found to correlate well with the monthly sunspot number. We use data from SuperMAG, a large chain with more than 300 geomagnetic stations, to study geoeffectiveness triggered by IP shocks. The SuperMAG SML index, an enhanced version of the familiar AL index, is used in our statistical analysis. The jumps of the SML index triggered by IP shock impacts on the Earth's magnetosphere are investigated in terms of IP shock orientation and speed. We find that, in general, strong (high speed) and almost frontal (small impact angle) shocks are more geoeffective than inclined shocks with low speed. The strongest correlation (correlation coefficient R = 0.78) occurs for fixed IP shock speed and for varied IP shock impact angle. We attribute this result, predicted previously with simulations, to the fact that frontal shocks compress the magnetosphere symmetrically from all sides, which is a favorable condition for the release of magnetic energy stored in the magnetotail, which in turn can produce moderate to strong auroral substorms, which are then observed by ground-based magnetometers.

  13. Shock experiments on maskelynite-bearing anorthosite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, P.; Grieve, R. A. F.

    1984-01-01

    A series of shock recovery experiments over 9.9-60.4 GPa have been carried out on naturally shocked anorthosite from the Mistastin impact structure in Labrador consisting primarily of diaplectic plagioclase glass or maskelynite, An(50), and pyroxene. Petrographic observations of the experimental products indicate that the component minerals and diaplectic glasses generally retained their initial character throughout, the only exception being the increase in fracturing which occurred in the 9.9 GPa shot. Reshocking at pressures higher than the initial shock tends to lower the refractive index of maskelynite. The increase in refractive index of maskelynite reshocked to pressures lower than the initial pressure is interpreted as due to shock densification of the diaplectic glass above the Hugoniot elastic limit and below the mixed phase regime. The data suggest that the low-high-low density transition of maskelynite occurs about 8 GPa below that of the crystal of corresponding composition.

  14. Shock Initiation of Damaged Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Chidester, S K; Vandersall, K S; Tarver, C M

    2009-10-22

    Explosive and propellant charges are subjected to various mechanical and thermal insults that can increase their sensitivity over the course of their lifetimes. To quantify this effect, shock initiation experiments were performed on mechanically and thermally damaged LX-04 (85% HMX, 15% Viton by weight) and PBX 9502 (95% TATB, 5% Kel-F by weight) to obtain in-situ manganin pressure gauge data and run distances to detonation at various shock pressures. We report the behavior of the HMX-based explosive LX-04 that was damaged mechanically by applying a compressive load of 600 psi for 20,000 cycles, thus creating many small narrow cracks, or by cutting wedge shaped parts that were then loosely reassembled, thus creating a few large cracks. The thermally damaged LX-04 charges were heated to 190 C for long enough for the beta to delta solid - solid phase transition to occur, and then cooled to ambient temperature. Mechanically damaged LX-04 exhibited only slightly increased shock sensitivity, while thermally damaged LX-04 was much more shock sensitive. Similarly, the insensitive explosive PBX 9502 was mechanically damaged using the same two techniques. Since PBX 9502 does not undergo a solid - solid phase transition but does undergo irreversible or 'rachet' growth when thermally cycled, thermal damage to PBX 9502 was induced by this procedure. As for LX-04, the thermally damaged PBX 9502 demonstrated a greater shock sensitivity than mechanically damaged PBX 9502. The Ignition and Growth reactive flow model calculated the increased sensitivities by igniting more damaged LX-04 and PBX 9502 near the shock front based on the measured densities (porosities) of the damaged charges.

  15. DNA fragmentation in mouse organs during endotoxic shock.

    PubMed Central

    Bohlinger, I.; Leist, M.; Gantner, F.; Angermüller, S.; Tiegs, G.; Wendel, A.

    1996-01-01

    The systemic inflammatory response syndrome has still an unpredictable outcome, and patients often die of multiple organ failure despite circulatory stabilization therapy. The still incompletely understood pathophysiological mechanisms include organ damage due to direct toxic actions of cytokines elicited by overactivation of the host response. To study this process of organ failure in experimental septic shock, we injected mice with a lethal dose of endotoxin and examined apoptotic and necrotic tissue damage biochemically, histologically, and ultrastructurally. Endotoxin administration caused oligonucleosomal as well as random DNA fragmentation in liver, lung, kidney, and intestine. In the liver, DNA fragmentation was not restricted to hepatocytes but also occurred in nonparenchymal cells. The DNA fragmentation was mediated by tumor necrosis factor and attenuated by endogenous nitric oxide release. Unlike the situation in D-galactosamine-sensitized mice, in which injection or release of tumor necrosis factor causes massive hepatocyte apoptosis, liver failure due to high doses of endotoxin was characterized by single-cell necrosis, a low incidence of apoptosis, and simultaneous damage to nonparenchymal cells. We conclude that, even though endotoxin causes cytokine-mediated DNA fragmentation in several organs including the liver, hepatocyte apoptosis itself seems to be a minor phenomenon in high-dose endotoxic shock in mice. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8863685

  16. Thermal shock resistance of ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carper, D. M.; Nied, H. F.

    1993-01-01

    The experimental and analytical investigation of the thermal shock phenomena in ceramic matrix composites is detailed. The composite systems examined were oxide-based, consisting of an aluminosilicate matrix with either polycrystalline aluminosilicate or single crystal alumina fiber reinforcement. The program was divided into three technical tasks; baseline mechanical properties, thermal shock modeling, and thermal shock testing. The analytical investigation focused on the development of simple expressions for transient thermal stresses induced during thermal shock. The effect of various material parameters, including thermal conductivity, elastic modulus, and thermal expansion, were examined analytically for their effect on thermal shock performance. Using a simple maximum stress criteria for each constituent, it was observed that fiber fracture would occur only at the most extreme thermal shock conditions and that matrix fracture, splitting parallel to the reinforcing fiber, was to be expected for most practical cases. Thermal shock resistance for the two material systems was determined experimentally by subjecting plates to sudden changes in temperature on one surface while maintaining the opposite surface at a constant temperature. This temperature change was varied in severity (magnitude) and in number of shocks applied to a given sample. The results showed that for the most severe conditions examined that only surface matrix fracture was present with no observable fiber fracture. The impact of this damage on material performance was limited to the matrix dominated properties only. Specifically, compression strength was observed to decrease by as much as 50 percent from the measured baseline.

  17. Precursors to Interstellar Shocks of Solar Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Stone, E. C.; Cummings, A. C.; Krimigis, S. M.; Decker, R. B.; Ness, N. F.; Burlaga, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    On or about 2012 August 25, the Voyager 1 spacecraft crossed the heliopause into the nearby interstellar plasma. In the nearly three years that the spacecraft has been in interstellar space, three notable particle and field disturbances have been observed, each apparently associated with a shock wave propagating outward from the Sun. Here, we present a detailed analysis of the third and most impressive of these disturbances, with brief comparisons to the two previous events, both of which have been previously reported. The shock responsible for the third event was first detected on 2014 February 17 by the onset of narrowband radio emissions from the approaching shock, followed on 2014 May 13 by the abrupt appearance of intense electron plasma oscillations generated by electrons streaming outward ahead of the shock. Finally, the shock arrived on 2014 August 25, as indicated by a jump in the magnetic field strength and the plasma density. Various disturbances in the intensity and anisotropy of galactic cosmic rays were also observed ahead of the shock, some of which are believed to be caused by the reflection and acceleration of cosmic rays by the magnetic field jump at the shock, and/or by interactions with upstream plasma waves. Comparisons to the two previous weaker events show somewhat similar precursor effects, although differing in certain details. Many of these effects are very similar to those observed in the region called the "foreshock" that occurs upstream of planetary bow shocks, only on a vastly larger spatial scale.

  18. Precursors To Interstellar Shocks of Solar Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Stone, E. C.; Cummings, A. C.; Krimigis, S. M.; Decker, R. B.; Ness, N. F.; Burlaga, L. F.

    2015-08-01

    On or about 2012 August 25, the Voyager 1 spacecraft crossed the heliopause into the nearby interstellar plasma. In the nearly three years that the spacecraft has been in interstellar space, three notable particle and field disturbances have been observed, each apparently associated with a shock wave propagating outward from the Sun. Here, we present a detailed analysis of the third and most impressive of these disturbances, with brief comparisons to the two previous events, both of which have been previously reported. The shock responsible for the third event was first detected on 2014 February 17 by the onset of narrowband radio emissions from the approaching shock, followed on 2014 May 13 by the abrupt appearance of intense electron plasma oscillations generated by electrons streaming outward ahead of the shock. Finally, the shock arrived on 2014 August 25, as indicated by a jump in the magnetic field strength and the plasma density. Various disturbances in the intensity and anisotropy of galactic cosmic rays were also observed ahead of the shock, some of which are believed to be caused by the reflection and acceleration of cosmic rays by the magnetic field jump at the shock, and/or by interactions with upstream plasma waves. Comparisons to the two previous weaker events show somewhat similar precursor effects, although differing in certain details. Many of these effects are very similar to those observed in the region called the “foreshock” that occurs upstream of planetary bow shocks, only on a vastly larger spatial scale.

  19. Modeling and Laboratory Investigations of Radiative Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grun, Jacob; Laming, J. Martin; Manka, Charles; Moore, Christopher; Jones, Ted; Tam, Daniel

    2001-10-01

    Supernova remnants are often inhomogeneous, with knots or clumps of material expanding in ambient plasma. This structure may be initiated by hydrodynamic instabilities occurring during the explosion, but it may plausibly be amplified by instabilities of the expanding shocks such as, for example, corrugation instabilities described by D’yakov in 1954, Vishniac in 1983, and observed in the laboratory by Grun et al. in 1991. Shock instability can occur when radiation lowers the effective adiabatic index of the gas. In view of the difficulty of modeling radiation in non-equilibrium plasmas, and the dependence of shock instabilities on such radiation, we are performing a laboratory experiment to study radiative shocks. The shocks are generated in a miniature, laser-driven shock tube. The gas density inside the tube at any instant in time is measured using time and space-resolved interferometry, and the emission spectrum of the gas is measured with time-resolved spectroscopy. We simulate the experiment with a 1D code that models time dependent post-shock ionization and non-equilibrium radiative cooling. S. P. D’yakov, Zhurnal Eksperimentalnoi Teoreticheskoi Fiziki 27, 288 (1954); see also section 90 in L.D. Landau and E.M. Lifshitz, Fluid Mechanics (Butterworth-Heinemann 1987); E.T. Vishniac, Astrophys. J. 236, 880 (1983); J. Grun, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 66, 2738 (1991)

  20. Neptune inbound bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, Adam; Lepping, Ronald P.

    1995-01-01

    Voyager 2 crossed the inbound or upstream Neptunian bow shock at 1430 spacecraft event time on August 24 in 1989 (Belcher et al., 1989). The plasma and magnetic field measurements allow us to study the solar wind interaction with the outermost gas giant. To fully utilize all of the spacecraft observations, an improved nonlinear least squares, 'Rankine-Hugoniot' magnetohydrodynamic shock-fitting technique has been developed (Szabo, 1994). This technique is applied to the Neptunian data set. We find that the upstream bow shock normal points nearly exactly toward the Sun consistent with any reasonable large-scale model of the bow shock for a near subsolar crossing. The shock was moving outward with a speed of 14 +/- 12 km/s. The shock can be characterized as a low beta, high Mach number, strong quasi-perpendicular shock. Finally, the shock microstructure features are resolved and found to scale well with theoretical expectations.

  1. Radio-Loud Coronal Mass Ejections without Shocks near Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, S.; Gopalswamy, N.; Xie, H.; Yashiro, S.; Makela, P. A.; St Cyr, O. C.; MacDowall, R. J.; Kaiser, M. L.

    2010-12-01

    Type II radio bursts are produced by low energy electrons accelerated in shocks driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). One can infer shocks near the Sun, in the Interplanetary medium, and near Earth depending on the wavelength range in which the type II bursts are produced. In fact, type II bursts are good indicators of CMEs that produce solar energetic particles. If the type II burst occurs from a source on the Earth-facing side of the solar disk, it is highly likely that a shock arrives at Earth in 2-3 days and hence can be used to predict shock arrival at Earth. However, a significant fraction of CMEs producing type II bursts were not associated shocks at Earth, even though the CMEs originated close to the disk center. There are several reasons for the lack of shock at 1 AU. CMEs originating at large central meridian distances (CMDs) may be driving a shock, but the shock may not be extended sufficiently to reach to the Sun-Earth line. Another possibility is CME cannibalism because of which shocks merge and one observes a single shock at Earth. Finally, the CME-driven shock may become weak and dissipate before reaching 1 AU. We examined a set of 30 type II bursts observed by the Wind/WAVES experiment that had the solar sources very close to the disk center (within a CMD of 15 degrees), but did not have shock at Earth. We find that the near-Sun speeds of the associated CMEs average to ~600 km/s, only slightly higher than the average speed of CMEs associated with radio-quiet shocks. However, the fraction of halo CMEs is only ~28%, compared to 40% for radio-quiet shocks and 72% for all radio-loud shocks. We conclude that the disk-center radio loud CMEs with no shocks at 1 AU are generally of lower energy and they drive shocks only close to the Sun.

  2. Vasoplegia in septic shock (review).

    PubMed

    Gamcrlidze, M M; Intskirveli, N A; Vardosanidze, K D; Chikhladze, Kh E; Goliadze, L Sh; Ratiani, L R

    2015-02-01

    Vasoplegia is considered as a key factor responsible for the death of patients with septic shock, due to persistent and irreversible hypotension. The latter associated with vascular hyporeactivity to vasoconstrictors is a significant independent prognostic factor of mortality in severe sepsis. Loss of control of the vascular tone occurs through the complex, multifactorial mechanism and implicates deeply disrupted balance between vasoconstrictors and vasodilators. The aim of this review is to discuss in detail the recent suggested alternative mechanisms of vasoplegia in severe sepsis: Overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) by activation of inducible form of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS); up-regulation of prostacyclin (PG12); vasopressin deficiency; significantly elevated levels of circulating endothelin; increased concentrations of vasodilator peptides such as adrenomedulin (AM) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP); oxidative stress inducing endothelial dysfunction and vascular hyporeactivity to vasoconstrictors; inactivation of catecholamines by oxidation; over-activation of ATP-sensitive potassium channels (KATP channels) during septic shock and their involvement in vascular dysfunction. The review also discusses some therapeutic approaches based on pathogenetic mechanisms of severe sepsis and their efficacy in treatment of patients with septic shock. The loss of vascular tone control occurs through the complex, multifactorial mechanism and implicates deeply disrupted balance between vasoconstrictors and vasodilators in the pathogenesis of septic shock. Overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) by the inducible form of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS); up-regulation of prostacyclin (PG12); vasopressin deficiency; elevated levels of circulating endothelin; increased concentrations of vasodilator peptides such as adrenomedulin (AM) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP); oxidative stress inducing endothelial dysfunction and vascular hyporeactivity to vasoconstrictors

  3. Biomass shock pretreatment

    DOEpatents

    Holtzapple, Mark T.; Madison, Maxine Jones; Ramirez, Rocio Sierra; Deimund, Mark A.; Falls, Matthew; Dunkelman, John J.

    2014-07-01

    Methods and apparatus for treating biomass that may include introducing a biomass to a chamber; exposing the biomass in the chamber to a shock event to produce a shocked biomass; and transferring the shocked biomass from the chamber. In some aspects, the method may include pretreating the biomass with a chemical before introducing the biomass to the chamber and/or after transferring shocked biomass from the chamber.

  4. Heat Shock Memory in Preimplantation Mouse Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yanwei; Hartshorn, Cristina; Hartung, Odelya; Wangh, Lawrence J.

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the consequences of possible physiological stress to embryos caused by the in vitro fertilization procedures, we used as a model heat shock response in preimplantation mouse embryos. A heat shock “memory” was discovered that renders cleavage-stage embryos more responsive at the transcriptional level to secondary perturbation with very low doses of heat, even several cell cycles after the initial stress has occurred. PMID:20378108

  5. A possible shock effect associated with seaquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quann, J.; Eberstein, I.; Curtis, S.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of earthquakes felt on board vessels at sea are discussed along with the possibility of cohesive shock wave propagating through the ocean. The large earthquake of shallow focus which occurred on 29 April 1970, in the Guatemala Basin is analyzed. The thermal information recorded by ITOS-1 spacecraft showed an anomalous temperature enhancement of +3 K in the immediate vicinity, indicating a thermal effect attributed to shock waves.

  6. Compartment syndromes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mubarak, S. J.; Pedowitz, R. A.; Hargens, A. R.

    1989-01-01

    The compartment syndrome is defined as a condition in which high pressure within a closed fascial space (muscle compartment) reduces capillary blood perfusion below the level necessary for tissue viability'. This condition occurs in acute and chronic (exertional) forms, and may be secondary to a variety of causes. The end-result of an extended period of elevated intramuscular pressure may be the development of irreversible tissue injury and Volkmann's contracture. The goal of treatment of the compartment syndrome is the reduction of intracompartmental pressure thus facilitating reperfusion of ischaemic tissue and this goal may be achieved by decompressive fasciotomy. Controversy exists regarding the critical pressure-time thresholds for surgical decompression and the optimal diagnostic methods of measuring intracompartmental pressures. This paper will update and review some current knowledge regarding the pathophysiology, aetiology, diagnosis, and treatment of the acute compartment syndrome.

  7. Ebolavirus and Haemorrhagic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Matua, Gerald A.; Van der Wal, Dirk M.; Locsin, Rozzano C.

    2015-01-01

    The Ebola virus is a highly virulent, single-stranded ribonucleic acid virus which affects both humans and apes and has fast become one of the world’s most feared pathogens. The virus induces acute fever and death, with haemorrhagic syndrome occurring in up to 90% of patients. The known species within the genus Ebolavirus are Bundibugyo, Sudan, Zaïre, Reston and Taï Forest. Although endemic in Africa, Ebola has caused worldwide anxiety due to media hype and concerns about its international spread, including through bioterrorism. The high fatality rate is attributed to unavailability of a standard treatment regimen or vaccine. The disease is frightening since it is characterised by rapid immune suppression and systemic inflammatory response, causing multi-organ and system failure, shock and often death. Currently, disease management is largely supportive, with containment efforts geared towards mitigating the spread of the virus. This review describes the classification, morphology, infective process, natural ecology, transmission, epidemic patterns, diagnosis, clinical features and immunology of Ebola, including management and epidemic containment strategies. PMID:26052448

  8. Shock, Post-Shock Annealing, and Post-Annealing Shock in Ureilites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Alan E.

    2006-01-01

    The thermal and shock histories of ureilites can be divided into four periods: 1) formation, 2) initial shock, 3) post-shock annealing, and 4) post-annealing shock. Period 1 occurred approx.4.55 Ga ago when ureilites formed by melting chondritic material. Impact events during period 2 caused silicate darkening, undulose to mosaic extinction in olivines, and the formation of diamond, lonsdaleite, and chaoite from indigenous carbonaceous material. Alkali-rich fine-grained silicates may have been introduced by impact injection into ureilites during this period. About 57% of the ureilites were unchanged after period 2. During period 3 events, impact-induced annealing caused previously mosaicized olivine grains to become aggregates of small unstrained crystals. Some ureilites experienced reduction as FeO at the edges of olivine grains reacted with C from the matrix. Annealing may also be responsible for coarsening of graphite in a few ureilites, forming euhedral-appearing, idioblastic crystals. Orthopyroxene in Meteorite Hills (MET) 78008 may have formed from pigeonite by annealing during this period. The Rb-Sr internal isochron age of approx.4.0 Ga for MET 78008 probably dates the annealing event. At this late date, impacts are the only viable heat source. About 36% of ureilites experienced period 3 events, but remained unchanged afterwards. During period 4, approx.7% of the ureilites were shocked again, as is evident in the polymict breccia, Elephant Moraine (EET) 83309. This rock contains annealed mosaicized olivine aggregates composed of small individual olivine crystals that exhibit undulose extinction. Ureilites may have formed by impact-melting chondritic material on a primitive body with heterogeneous O isotopes. Plagioclase was preferentially lost from the system due to its low impedance to shock compression. Brief melting and rapid burial minimized the escape of planetary-type noble gases from the ureilitic melts. Incomplete separation of metal from silicates

  9. Dengue shock syndrome in an infant.

    PubMed

    Aurpibul, Linda; Khumlue, Punyawee; Issaranggoon na ayuthaya, Satja; Oberdorfer, Peninnah

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne infection affecting children and adults worldwide. In newborn infants, the dengue virus can cause diseases, especially in infants born to pregnant women hospitalised with dengue or postpartum women with fever. The authors report a case of a term newborn infant who presented with haemodynamic instability and thrombocytopaenia at the age of 7 days, without a history of clinical dengue infection in the mother. The physical examination revealed an afebrile and drowsy infant with a petechial rash all over the body and ecchymosis on both palms and soles. The authors confirmed the diagnosis using the dengue NS1 antigen on the first day of admission. The treatment included fluid management and platelet transfusion. The patient recovered well and was discharged from the hospital on the 10th day of hospitalisation. PMID:25073530

  10. Dengue shock syndrome in an infant

    PubMed Central

    Aurpibul, Linda; Khumlue, Punyawee; Issaranggoon na ayuthaya, Satja; Oberdorfer, Peninnah

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne infection affecting children and adults worldwide. In newborn infants, the dengue virus can cause diseases, especially in infants born to pregnant women hospitalised with dengue or postpartum women with fever. The authors report a case of a term newborn infant who presented with haemodynamic instability and thrombocytopaenia at the age of 7 days, without a history of clinical dengue infection in the mother. The physical examination revealed an afebrile and drowsy infant with a petechial rash all over the body and ecchymosis on both palms and soles. The authors confirmed the diagnosis using the dengue NS1 antigen on the first day of admission. The treatment included fluid management and platelet transfusion. The patient recovered well and was discharged from the hospital on the 10th day of hospitalisation. PMID:25073530

  11. Twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome is a rare condition that occurs only in identical twins while they are in the womb. ... Twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) occurs when the blood supply of 1 twin moves to the ...

  12. Flammer syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The new term Flammer syndrome describes a phenotype characterized by the presence of primary vascular dysregulation together with a cluster of symptoms and signs that may occur in healthy people as well as people with disease. Typically, the blood vessels of the subjects with Flammer syndrome react differently to a number of stimuli, such as cold and physical or emotional stress. Nearly all organs, particularly the eye, can be involved. Although the syndrome has some advantages, such as protection against the development of atherosclerosis, Flammer syndrome also contributes to certain diseases, such as normal tension glaucoma. The syndrome occurs more often in women than in men, in slender people than in obese subjects, in people with indoor rather than outdoor jobs, and in academics than in blue collar workers. Affected subjects tend to have cold extremities, low blood pressure, prolonged sleep onset time, shifted circadian rhythm, reduced feeling of thirst, altered drug sensitivity, and increased general sensitivity, including pain sensitivity. The plasma level of endothelin-1 is slightly increased, and the gene expression in lymphocytes is changed. In the eye, the retinal vessels are stiffer and their spatial variability larger; the autoregulation of ocular blood flow is decreased. Glaucoma patients with Flammer syndrome have an increased frequency of the following: optic disc hemorrhages, activated retinal astrocytes, elevated retinal venous pressure, optic nerve compartmentalization, fluctuating diffuse visual field defects, and elevated oxidative stress. Further research should lead to a more concise definition, a precise diagnosis, and tools for recognizing people at risk. This may ultimately lead to more efficient and more personalized treatment. PMID:25075228

  13. Colliding Two Shocks: 1-D full Particle-in-Cell Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanotani, Masaru; Hada, T.; Matsukiyo, Shuichi; Mazelle, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Shock-shock interactions occur on various places in space and the interaction can produce high energy particles. A coronal mass ejection driven shock can collide with the Earth's bow shock [Hietala et al., 2011]. This study reported that ions are accelerated by the first Fermi acceleration between the two shocks before the collision. An electron acceleration through an interplanetary shock-Earth's bow shock interaction was also reported [Terasawa et al., 1997]. Shock-shock interactions can occur in astrophysical phenomena as well as in the heliosphere. For example, a young supernova shock can collide with the wind termination shock of a massive star if they are close to each other [Bykov et al., 2013]. Although hybrid simulations (ions and electrons treated as super-particles and mass-less fluid, respectively) were carried out to understand the kinetic nature of a shock-shock interaction [Cargill et al., 1986], hybrid simulations cannot resolve electron dynamics and non-thermal electrons. We, therefore, use one-dimensional full particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations to investigate a shock-shock interaction in which two shocks collide head-on. In a case of quasi-perpendicular shocks, electrons are accelerated by the mirror reflection between the two shocks before the collision (Fermi acceleration). On the other hand, because ions cannot go back upstream, the electron acceleration mechanism does not occur for ions. In a case of quasi-parallel shocks, ions can go back upstream and are accelerated at the shocks. The accelerated ions have great effect on the shock structure.

  14. Relative frequencies of seismic main shocks after strong shocks in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasperini, Paolo; Lolli, Barbara; Vannucci, Gianfranco

    2016-07-01

    We analyzed a catalog of Italian earthquakes, covering 55 years of data from 1960 to 2014 with magnitudes homogeneously converted to Mw, to compute the time-dependent relative frequencies with which strong seismic shocks (4.0≤Mw<5.0), widely felt by the population, have been followed by main shocks (Mw≥5.0) that threatened the health and the properties of the persons living in the epicentral area. Assuming the stationarity of the seismic release properties, such frequencies are estimates of the probabilities of potentially destructive shocks after the occurrence of future strong shocks. We compared them with the time-independent relative frequencies of random occurrence in terms of the frequency gain that is the ratio between the time-dependent and time-independent relative frequencies. The time-dependent relative frequencies vary from less than 1% to about 20%, depending on the magnitudes of the shocks and the time windows considered (ranging from minutes to years). They remain almost constant for a few hours after the strong shock and then decrease with time logarithmically. Strong earthquakes (with Mw≥6.0) mainly occurred within two or three months of the strong shock. The frequency gains vary from about 10000 for very short time intervals to less than 10 for a time interval of two years. Only about one-third of main shocks were preceded by at least a strong shock in the previous day and about one-half in the previous month.

  15. Simulating radiative shocks in nozzle shock tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Holst, B.; Tóth, G.; Sokolov, I. V.; Daldorff, L. K. S.; Powell, K. G.; Drake, R. P.

    2012-06-01

    We use the recently developed Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics (CRASH) code to numerically simulate laser-driven radiative shock experiments. These shocks are launched by an ablated beryllium disk and are driven down xenon-filled plastic tubes. The simulations are initialized by the two-dimensional version of the Lagrangian Hyades code which is used to evaluate the laser energy deposition during the first 1.1 ns. Later times are calculated with the CRASH code. CRASH solves for the multi-material hydrodynamics with separate electron and ion temperatures on an Eulerian block-adaptive-mesh and includes a multi-group flux-limited radiation diffusion and electron thermal heat conduction. The goal of the present paper is to demonstrate the capability to simulate radiative shocks of essentially three-dimensional experimental configurations, such as circular and elliptical nozzles. We show that the compound shock structure of the primary and wall shock is captured and verify that the shock properties are consistent with order-of-magnitude estimates. The synthetic radiographs produced can be used for comparison with future nozzle experiments at high-energy-density laser facilities.

  16. Laser Driven Radiative Shocks in High Energy Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manka, C.; Lunsford, R.; Nikitin, S.; Laming, M.; Zabatakis, D.; Grun, J.

    2008-03-01

    The long time over which oscillations associated with radiative shocks within the interstellar medium occur makes direct observation of these instabilities highly problematic. A velocity dependant cooling instability is thought to cause fluctuations in the propagation velocity of such shocks. An experiment at NRL investigates and perhaps validates the applicability of present analytic models to various multidimensional radiative shock instabilities. The PHAROS laser at NRL is used to create the relevant shock front by ablative acceleration of an aluminized Mylar foil that covers a small gas filled tunnel in a PMMA block. As this shock propagates along the tunnel, a secondary shock is launched into the walls of the tunnel and the progress of this shock into the PMMA block preserves a continuous record of the primary shock's velocity as it travels the length of the tunnel. The density gradient associated with the shock in the PMMA is recorded using dark field shadowgraphy on a SIM-8 multi-channel high speed framing camera. The tunnel shock velocity is determined from the shape of the shock launched into the PMMA block for any time prior to the instant at which the image frame was taken, providing documentation of any oscillations in the velocity of the shock.

  17. Shock waves in luminous early-type stars

    SciTech Connect

    Castor, J.I.

    1986-07-01

    Shock waves that occur in stellar atmospheres have their origin in some hydrodynamic instability of the atmosphere itself or of the stellar interior. In luminous early-type stars these two possibilities are represented by shocks due to an unstable radiatively-accelerated wind, and to shocks generated by the non-radial pulsations known to be present in many or most OB stars. This review is concerned with the structure and development of the shocks in these two cases, and especially with the mass loss that may be due specifically to the shocks. Pulsation-produced shocks are found to be very unfavorable for causing mass loss, owing to the great radiation efficiency that allows them to remain isothermal. The situation regarding radiatively-driven shocks remains unclear, awaiting detailed hydrodynamics calculations. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Interaction of an interplanetary shock with the heliospheric plasma sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odstrčil, D.; Dryer, M.; Smith, Z.

    1996-07-01

    The interaction of an interplanetary shock with the heliospheric plasma sheet (HPS) is simulated using the 2 12D MHD model in the meridional plane. The shock structure is generated by a velocity pulse and consists of a strong broad forward shock (FS) with a concave shape and a much weaker and narrower reverse shock (RS) with a convex shape. The flat equatorial HPS, with its larger mass density and slower flow velocity, modifies this shock structure. A dimple is formed at the FS and a reverse dimple is formed at the RS. A large distortion of the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) occurs when the velocity pulse is introduced outside the HPS. The interaction of a shock with the HPS leads to very large southward values of the interplanetary magnetic field due to an effect of shock compression, field-line draping, and deflection of the HCS.

  19. Antidiuretic hormone replacement therapy to prevent or ameliorate vasodilatory shock.

    PubMed

    Singh Ranger, Gurpreet

    2002-09-01

    Vasodilatory shock is a syndrome with high mortality. It is becoming evident that depletion of antidiuretic hormone (ADH) after cardiac surgery or during sepsis plays an important role in the pathogenesis of this condition. Established vasodilatory shock responds well to exogenous ADH infusion. It is possible that preventing ADH depletion at an earlier stage may abrogate the onset of vasodilatory shock, or at least reduce its severity. This paper examines the evidence supporting this concept, and the potential areas of concern in considering this particular type of hormone replacement therapy. PMID:12208165

  20. Shock-implanted noble gases. II - Additional experimental studies and recognition in naturally shocked terrestrial materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogard, D.; Horz, F.; Johnson, P.

    1989-06-01

    The process by which ambient gases can be implanted into silicates by shocks was investigated by analyzing the noble-gas content of several experimentally and naturally shocked silicate samples. The retentivity of shock-implanted gas during stepwise heating in the laboratory was defined in terms of two parameters, namely, the activation energy for diffusion and the extraction temperature at which 50 percent of the gas is released, both of which correlate with the shock pressure. The experiments indicate that, with increasing shock pressure, gas implantation occurs through an increasing production of microcracks/defects in the silicate lattice. The degree of annealing of these defects control the degree of diffusive loss of implanted gas.

  1. Impaired Fracture Healing after Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Kobbe, Philipp; Pfeifer, Roman; Campbell, Graeme C.; Tohidnezhad, Mersedeh; Bergmann, Christian; Kadyrov, Mamed; Fischer, Horst; Glüer, Christian C.; Pape, Hans-Christoph; Pufe, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Impaired fracture healing can occur in severely injured patients with hemorrhagic shock due to decreased soft tissue perfusion after trauma. We investigated the effects of fracture healing in a standardized pressure controlled hemorrhagic shock model in mice, to test the hypothesis that bleeding is relevant in the bone healing response. Male C57/BL6 mice were subjected to a closed femoral shaft fracture stabilized by intramedullary nailing. One group was additionally subjected to pressure controlled hemorrhagic shock (HS, mean arterial pressure (MAP) of 35 mmHg for 90 minutes). Serum cytokines (IL-6, KC, MCP-1, and TNF-α) were analyzed 6 hours after shock. Fracture healing was assessed 21 days after fracture. Hemorrhagic shock is associated with a significant increase in serum inflammatory cytokines in the early phase. Histologic analysis demonstrated a significantly decreased number of osteoclasts, a decrease in bone quality, and more cartilage islands after hemorrhagic shock. μCT analysis showed a trend towards decreased bone tissue mineral density in the HS group. Mechanical testing revealed no difference in tensile failure. Our results suggest a delay in fracture healing after hemorrhagic shock. This may be due to significantly diminished osteoclast recruitment. The exact mechanisms should be studied further, particularly during earlier stages of fracture healing. PMID:26106256

  2. Collective osmotic shock in ordered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala-Rivera, Paul; Channon, Kevin; Nguyen, Vincent; Sivaniah, Easan; Kabra, Dinesh; Friend, Richard H.; Nataraj, S. K.; Al-Muhtaseb, Shaheen A.; Hexemer, Alexander; Calvo, Mauricio E.; Miguez, Hernan

    2012-01-01

    Osmotic shock in a vesicle or cell is the stress build-up and subsequent rupture of the phospholipid membrane that occurs when a relatively high concentration of salt is unable to cross the membrane and instead an inflow of water alleviates the salt concentration gradient. This is a well-known failure mechanism for cells and vesicles (for example, hypotonic shock) and metal alloys (for example, hydrogen embrittlement). We propose the concept of collective osmotic shock, whereby a coordinated explosive fracture resulting from multiplexing the singular effects of osmotic shock at discrete sites within an ordered material results in regular bicontinuous structures. The concept is demonstrated here using self-assembled block copolymer micelles, yet it is applicable to organized heterogeneous materials where a minority component can be selectively degraded and solvated whilst ensconced in a matrix capable of plastic deformation. We discuss the application of these self-supported, perforated multilayer materials in photonics, nanofiltration and optoelectronics.

  3. Condensed matter at high shock pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Nellis, W.J.; Holmes, N.C.; Mitchell, A.C.; Radousky, H.B.; Hamilton, D.

    1985-07-12

    Experimental techniques are described for shock waves in liquids: Hugoniot equation-of-state, shock temperature and emission spectroscopy, electrical conductivity, and Raman spectroscopy. Experimental data are reviewed and presented in terms of phenomena that occur at high densities and temperatures in shocked He, Ar, N/sub 2/, CO, SiO/sub 2/-aerogel, H/sub 2/O, and C/sub 6/H/sub 6/. The superconducting properties of Nb metal shocked to 100 GPa (1 Mbar) and recovered intact are discussed in terms of prospects for synthesizing novel, metastable materials. Ultrahigh pressure data for Cu is reviewed in the range 0.3 to 6TPa (3 to 60 Mbar). 56 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Collective osmotic shock in ordered materials.

    PubMed

    Zavala-Rivera, Paul; Channon, Kevin; Nguyen, Vincent; Sivaniah, Easan; Kabra, Dinesh; Friend, Richard H; Nataraj, S K; Al-Muhtaseb, Shaheen A; Hexemer, Alexander; Calvo, Mauricio E; Miguez, Hernan

    2012-01-01

    Osmotic shock in a vesicle or cell is the stress build-up and subsequent rupture of the phospholipid membrane that occurs when a relatively high concentration of salt is unable to cross the membrane and instead an inflow of water alleviates the salt concentration gradient. This is a well-known failure mechanism for cells and vesicles (for example, hypotonic shock) and metal alloys (for example, hydrogen embrittlement). We propose the concept of collective osmotic shock, whereby a coordinated explosive fracture resulting from multiplexing the singular effects of osmotic shock at discrete sites within an ordered material results in regular bicontinuous structures. The concept is demonstrated here using self-assembled block copolymer micelles, yet it is applicable to organized heterogeneous materials where a minority component can be selectively degraded and solvated whilst ensconced in a matrix capable of plastic deformation. We discuss the application of these self-supported, perforated multilayer materials in photonics, nanofiltration and optoelectronics. PMID:22120413

  5. Malabsorption Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome, your small intestine cannot absorb nutrients from foods. Causes of malabsorption syndromes include Celiac disease Lactose intolerance Short bowel syndrome. This happens after surgery to ...

  6. Ion heating and energy redistribution across supercritical perpendicular shocks: Application to planetary and interplanetary shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z.; Liu, Y. D.; Richardson, J. D.; Parks, G. K.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate how the ion dissipative process across supercritical perpendicular shocks depends on the shock front micro-structures. At a collisionless plasma shock, the dissipation and micro-structure of the shock font are dominated by wave-particle interactions. Comparison of the ion thermalization at different kinds of shocks, e.g., planetary and interplanetary shocks, can quantify how much interaction is occurring at the shock boundary. Investigation of this problem for diverse solar wind (SW) conditions will yield important information on the dependences of the ion thermalization and energy redistribution on plasma parameters. With the aid of a successful automatic separation method [Yang et al., 2009], the incident ions at the shock can be divided into two parts: reflected (R) ions and directly transmitted (DT) ions. Corresponding heating efficiency of each population of ions at the shock can be calculated respectively. Wilkinson & Schwartz [1990] have theorized that the amount of reflected ions at perpendicular shocks depends on plasma parameters. Based on the Rankine-Hugoniot (R-H) conservation laws, they found that the fraction reflected is strongly dependent on the magnitude of the ratio of specific heat capacities γ chosen in the R-H relations. The main goal of this work is to investigate how the plasma parameters, e.g. the particle velocity distribution, the plasma beta value, seed populations, etc. (from a particle dynamic point of view), control the amount of reflected ions by using one-dimensional (1-D) full-particle-cell simulations. The simulation results may help to explain the ion heating efficiency and energy redistribution at shocks observed by Cluster, Wind, Voyager, etc.

  7. Fetal alcohol syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Fetal alcohol syndrome is growth, mental, and physical problems that may occur in a baby when a mother drinks ... A baby with fetal alcohol syndrome may have the following symptoms: Poor growth while the baby is in the womb and after birth Decreased muscle ...

  8. New radiative shocks experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leygnac, S.; Bouquet, S.; Stehlé, C.; Benuzzi, A.; Boireau, J.-P.; Chièze, J.-P.; Grandjouan, N.; Huser, G.; Koenig, M.; Malka, V.; Merdji, H.; Michaut, C.; Thais, F.; Vinci, T.

    2002-06-01

    An experimental study of shocks with astrophysical relevance is performed with the high energy density laser of the LULI, at the Ecole Polytechnique. The peculiarity of these shocks is the strong coupling between radiation and hydrodynamics which leads to a structure governed by a radiative precursor. A new experiment has been performed this year where we have observed shocks identified as radiative shocks. We study them in various experimental configurations (several speeds and geometries of the medium where the shock propagates, allowing a quasi-planar or a quasi-spherical expansion). From the measurements it is possible to infer several features of the shock such as the speed, the electronic density, the geometrical shape and spectroscopic informations. The results will be studied with numerical simulations.

  9. Three-dimensional shock-shock interactions on the scramjet inlet

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, D.J.; Tiwari, S.N.; Kumar, A.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of shock impingement on the inlet of a scramjet engine are investigated numerically. The impinging shock is caused by the vehicle forebody. The interaction of this forebody shock with the inlet leading edge shock results in a very complex fully three-dimensional flowfield containing local regions of high pressure and intense heating. In the present investigation, this complex flowfield is calculated by solving the thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations using a finite-volume flux splitting technique due to van Leer. For zero or small sweep angles a Type IV interaction occurs while for moderate sweep of about 25 deg, a Type V interaction occurs. Both Type IV and Type V interactions are investigated. 25 refs.

  10. A Journey with Klinefelter Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cover, Virginia Isaacs

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author shares her experience having a son with Klinefelter Syndrome. Klinefelter Syndrome, also known as 47,XXY, is estimated to occur in 1 out of 600 males, making it the most common chromosomal disorder. Babies with Klinefelter Syndrome rarely have any physical differences that are detectable, which is the reason that so few…

  11. Generation of Cylindrical Converging Shock Waves in a Conventional Shock Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biamino, L.; Jourdan, G.; Mariani, C.; Houas, L.; Vandenboomgaerde, M.; Souffland, D.

    For ever two decades, the IUSTI laboratory has been known for its investigations [1] dealing with the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI). Experiments concerning the RMI have been performed in conventional shock tubes [2, 3, 4, 5]. All these experiments use a planar shock wave to generate the instability as perfectly as possible. However, the RMI also occurs in the spherical case where the convergence effects must be taken into account. As far as we know, no conventional (straight section) shock tube facility has been used to experimentally study the RMI in a spherical geometry.

  12. Anti-Shock Garment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Ames Research Center developed a prototype pressure suit for hemophiliac children, based on research of astronauts' physiological responses in microgravity. Zoex Corporation picked up the design and patents and developed an anti-shock garment for paramedic use. Marketed by Dyna Med, the suit reverses the effect of shock on the body's blood distribution by applying counterpressure to the legs and abdomen, returning blood to vital organs and stabilizing body pressure until the patient reaches a hospital. The DMAST (Dyna Med Anti-Shock Trousers) employ lower pressure than other shock garments, and are non-inflatable.

  13. Weak shock reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, John K.; Brio, Moysey

    2000-05-01

    We present numerical solutions of a two-dimensional inviscid Burgers equation which provides an asymptotic description of the Mach reflection of weak shocks. In our numerical solutions, the incident, reflected, and Mach shocks meet at a triple point, and there is a supersonic patch behind the triple point, as proposed by Guderley for steady weak-shock reflection. A theoretical analysis indicates that there is an expansion fan at the triple point, in addition to the three shocks. The supersonic patch is extremely small, and this work is the first time it has been resolved.

  14. [Refeeding syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ševela, Stanislav; Novák, František; Kazda, Antonín; Brodská, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Despite being known more than 60 years, refeeding syndrome (RS) still bears many uncertainties. For example, its definition is not clear and definite, and the attitude to it varies from the complete neglect to over-prevention.The term "refeeding syndrome" refers to electrolyte and metabolic changes occurring in malnourished patients after the readministration of nutrition. These changes concern especially to phosphates and ions. Potassium, magnesium, naturism and fluids balance are involved. The changes lead to cell energetic metabolism and electric potential disturbances, with related clinical symptoms.Fully developed refeeding syndrome is quite rare; nevertheless it can be fatal for the patient. However, even its development can lead to many complications increasing the patient's morbidity and the length of stay in the hospital. Yet the refeeding syndrome is more or less predictable and if kept in mind also preventable.The aim of this article is to get the reader to know more about this metabolic phenomenon and possible attitudes towards it. PMID:27088791

  15. [SAPHO syndrome].

    PubMed

    Heldmann, F; Kiltz, U; Baraliakos, X; Braun, J

    2014-10-01

    The SAPHO syndrome, an acronym for synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis, is a rare disease which affects bones, joints and the skin. The main osteoarticular features are hyperostosis and osteitis. Osteoarticular symptoms predominantly occur on the anterior chest wall but the spine and the peripheral skeleton can also be involved. The most important skin affections are palmoplantar pustulosis and severe acne. The etiology of this syndrome remains unclear but infectious, immunological and genetic factors are involved. The diagnostic features of SAPHO syndrome are clinical and radiological. The most important diagnostic procedure is Tc-99 m bone scintigraphy but conventional x-rays as well as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can also contribute to the final diagnosis. Bone histology and positron emission tomography CT (PET-CT) may help to differentiate SAPHO syndrome from malignancies and infectious osteomyelitis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the cornerstone of treatment. The results obtained using antibiotics and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), such as sulfasalazine and methotrexate are inconsistent. Bisphosphonates and anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) drugs have shown promising results in small studies but further research is still necessary. PMID:25260820

  16. Impingement syndrome (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... arch of the shoulder blade, it can cause shoulder pain called impingement syndrome. The tendons become compressed, damaged, and inflamed leading to rotator cuff tendonitis. This can occur ... use of the shoulder like baseball pitching, or from an injury.

  17. Blind loop syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Blind loop syndrome occurs when digested food slows or stops moving through part of the intestines. This ... The name of this condition refers to the "blind loop" formed by part of the intestine that ...

  18. Isaac's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome (also known as neuromyotonia, Isaacs-Mertens syndrome, continuous muscle fiber activity syndrome, and quantal squander syndrome) is a rare neuromuscular disorder caused by hyperexcitability and continuous firing of ... which include progressive muscle stiffness, continuously contracting ...

  19. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (Gorlin Syndrome).

    PubMed

    Bresler, Scott C; Padwa, Bonnie L; Granter, Scott R

    2016-06-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, or basal cell nevus syndrome (Gorlin syndrome), is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that is characterized by development of basal cell carcinomas from a young age. Other distinguishing clinical features are seen in a majority of patients, and include keratocystic odontogenic tumors (formerly odontogenic keratocysts) as well as dyskeratotic palmar and plantar pitting. A range of skeletal and other developmental abnormalities are also often seen. The disorder is caused by defects in hedgehog signaling which result in constitutive pathway activity and tumor cell proliferation. As sporadic basal cell carcinomas also commonly harbor hedgehog pathway aberrations, therapeutic agents targeting key signaling constituents have been developed and tested against advanced sporadically occurring tumors or syndromic disease, leading in 2013 to FDA approval of the first hedgehog pathway-targeted small molecule, vismodegib. The elucidation of the molecular pathogenesis of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome has resulted in further understanding of the most common human malignancy. PMID:26971503

  20. Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry and spectroscopy of laser shocked materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bolme, Cynthia A; Mc Grane, Shawn D; Dang, Nhan C; Whitley, Von H; Moore, David S.

    2011-01-20

    Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry is used to measure the material motion and changes in the optical refractive index of laser shock compressed materials. This diagnostic has shown us that the ultrafast laser driven shocks are the same as shocks on longer timescales and larger length scales. We have added spectroscopic diagnostics of infrared absorption, ultra-violet - visible transient absorption, and femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering to begin probing the initiation chemistry that occurs in shock reactive materials. We have also used the femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering to measure the vibrational temperature of materials using the Stokes gain to anti-Stokes loss ratio.

  1. Interaction of interplanetary shocks with nonuniform ambient solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, J. K.; Sheu, J. H.

    1987-01-01

    Three interplanetary shock wave events are selected from the plasma and magnetic field data of Helios 1 and 2, IMP-8, and Voyagers 1 and 2 for study of the interactions of a weak interplantary shock with a nonuniform ambient solar wind. These events occurred during the periods 22-26 November 1977, 1-7 January 1978, and 2-5 April 1979, respectively. It is found that the shock surfaces of these events are highly distorted. In addition, a portion of the shock surface may be degenerated into a disturbance which does not satisfy the Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions.

  2. How Is Cardiogenic Shock Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Cardiogenic Shock Treated? Cardiogenic shock is life threatening and requires emergency medical treatment. ... arrive. The first goal of emergency treatment for cardiogenic shock is to improve the flow of blood and ...

  3. Astrospheres and Stellar Bow shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Marle, Allard Jan

    2016-07-01

    As stars evolve, they deliver feedback to the surrounding medium in the form of stellar wind and radiation. These shape the surrounding matter, forming what is called an astrosphere, a sphere of influence in which the star dominates the morphology and composition of the surrounding medium. Astrospheres are fascinating objects. Because they are formed through the interaction between the stellar feedback and the interstellar gas, they can tell us a great deal about both. Furthermore, because they are shaped over time they provide us with a window into the past. This is of particular interest for the study of stellar evolution, because the astrosphere reflects changes in the properties of the stellar wind, which relate directly to the properties of the star. A special sub-class of astrospheres, the stellar bow shocks, occur when the progenitor star moves through the surrounding medium at supersonic speed. Because the properties of the bow shock relate directly to both the stellar wind and the interstellar medium, the shape and size of the bow shock can be used to determine these properties. Using state-of-the-art numerical codes, it is possible to simulate the interaction between the stellar wind and radiation and the interstellar medium. These results can then be compared to observations. They can also be used to predict the type of observations that are best suited to study these objects. In this fashion computational and observational astronomy can support each other in their efforts to gain a better understanding of stars and their environment.

  4. Massive Organ Inflammation in Experimental and in Clinical Meningococcal Septic Shock.

    PubMed

    Hellerud, Bernt C; Olstad, Ole K; Nielsen, Erik W; Trøseid, Anne-Marie S; Skadberg, Øyvind; Thorgersen, Ebbe B; Vege, Åshild; Mollnes, Tom E; Brandtzæg, Petter

    2015-11-01

    Fulminant meningococcal sepsis is characterized by a massive growth of bacteria in the circulation, regarded as the primary inflammatory site, with no specific solid organ focus. Here we aimed to study the local inflammatory response in organs using a porcine model of fulminant meningococcal septic shock challenged with exponentially increasing doses of heat inactivated Neisseria meningitidis. The results were compared with those obtained in organs post mortem from three patients with lethal meningococcal septic shock. Nine patients with lethal pneumococcal disease and 14 patients with sudden infant death syndrome served as controls. Frozen tissue were thawed, homogenized and prepared for quantification of bacterial DNA by real-time polymerase chain reaction, and key inflammatory mediators were measured by ELISA in the pig material and by multiplex in the human material. In addition, gene expression assayed by Affymetrix gene expression profiling was performed in the pig study. The porcine model revealed a major influx of N. meningitidis in lungs, liver, spleen, and kidneys accompanied with major production of cardinal inflammatory mediators including tumor necrosis factor, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-8, far exceeding the amount detected in blood. Genes encoding for these mediators revealed a similar profile. By comparing the wild-type with a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) deficient meningococcal strain, we documented that LPS was the dominant group of molecules inducing organ inflammation and was required for IL-8 production. IL-10 production was predominantly stimulated by non-LPS molecules. The massive organ inflammation in the porcine model was present in the three patients dying of meningococcal shock and differed markedly from the patients with lethal pneumococcal infections and sudden infant death syndrome. In conclusion, in meningococcal sepsis, a massive local inflammatory response occurs in specific organs. PMID:26473439

  5. Mechanical Properties of Shock-Damaged Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Hongliang; Ahrens, T. J.

    1994-01-01

    Stress-strain tests were performed both on shock-damaged gabbro and limestone. The effective Young's modulus decreases with increasing initial damage parameter value, and an apparent work-softening process occurs prior to failure. To further characterize shock-induced microcracks, the longitudinal elastic wave velocity behavior of shock-damaged gabbro in the direction of compression up to failure was measured using an acoustic transmission technique under uniaxial loading. A dramatic increase in velocity was observed for the static compressive stress range of 0-50 MPa. Above that stress range, the velocity behavior of lightly damaged (D(sub 0) less than 0.1) gabbro is almost equal to unshocked gabbro. The failure strength of heavily-damaged (D(sub 0) greater than 0.1) gabbro is approx. 100-150 MPa, much lower than that of lightly damaged and unshocked gabbros (approx. 230-260 MPa). Following Nur's theory, the crack shape distribution was analyzed. The shock-induced cracks in gabbro appear to be largely thin penny-shaped cracks with c/a values below 5 x 10(exp -4). Moreover, the applicability of Ashby and Sammis's theory relating failure strength and damage parameter of shock-damaged rocks was examined and was found to yield a good estimate of the relation of shock-induced deficit in elastic modulus with the deficit in compressive strength.

  6. Shock properties of high-strength ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D.E.

    1994-12-31

    A broad class of brittle solids subjected to large amplitude shock waves can support substantial shear stress (of order 2-10 GPa) without failing due to the very limited slip systems in these materials. When failure occurs under sufficiently intense shock loading, the effect is usually observed as a wave splitting in the compressive shock front. Because of the high confining stress state associated with the failure event in the shock compression environment, it is no longer certain whether the microstructural processes of deformation are brittle or ductile. Some, although by no means sufficient, evidence supports a brittle deformation mechanism in the materials of interest. The present short paper focuses on two aspects of the transition regime neighboring the HEL in the compressive shock process. First, issues of rate dependence associated with prompt yield under shock compression are not well understood. We report here on observations of wave profile data on ceramics, examining he issue of elastic precursor decay. Also in this study, a number of the experimental observations of failure waves in ceramic materials (principally glass) are surveyed. Some of the principal results are summarized and dynamic failure mechanisms consistent with these results are discussed.

  7. Shock Demagnetization of Pyrrhotite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Louzada, K. L.; Stewart, S. T.; Weiss, b. P.

    2005-01-01

    Maps of the remanent magnetic field of Mars show demagnetized zones within and around giant impact basins. It is likely that vast regions of the Martian crust were demagnetized due to a shock-induced phase change or magnetic transition of magnetic minerals in the crust. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that around the Hellas and Argyre basins, the edges of the unmagnetized zones roughly correspond with peak shock pressure contour lines of a few GPa. Although pyrrhotite is not a major carrier of magnetization in the Earth s crust, it is a common phase in Martian meteorites and may be an important carrier in the Martian crust. Understanding the effects of shock waves on magnetic minerals is critical for determining the origin of the demagnetized zones in impact basins and possibly for identifying the major magnetic carrier phases. Here we present the results of the first controlled shock demagnetization measurements on pyrrhotite. Previous experiments: Shock demagnetization

  8. Cardiorenal Syndrome in Acute Heart Failure Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Sarraf, Mohammad; Schrier, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    Impaired cardiac function leads to activation of the neurohumoral axis, sodium and water retention, congestion and ultimately impaired kidney function. This sequence of events has been termed the Cardiorenal Syndrome. This is different from the increase in cardiovascular complications which occur with primary kidney disease, that is, the so-called Renocardiac Syndrome. The present review discusses the pathogenesis of the Cardiorenal Syndrome followed by the benefits and potential deleterious effects of pharmacological agents that have been used in this setting. The agents discussed are diuretics, aquaretics, natriuretic peptides, vasodilators, inotropes and adenosine α1 receptor antagonists. The potential role of ultrafiltration is also briefly discussed. PMID:21423563

  9. Monte Carlo Simulations of Nonlinear Particle Acceleration in Parallel Trans-relativistic Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Donald C.; Warren, Donald C.; Bykov, Andrei M.

    2013-10-01

    We present results from a Monte Carlo simulation of a parallel collisionless shock undergoing particle acceleration. Our simulation, which contains parameterized scattering and a particular thermal leakage injection model, calculates the feedback between accelerated particles ahead of the shock, which influence the shock precursor and "smooth" the shock, and thermal particle injection. We show that there is a transition between nonrelativistic shocks, where the acceleration efficiency can be extremely high and the nonlinear compression ratio can be substantially greater than the Rankine-Hugoniot value, and fully relativistic shocks, where diffusive shock acceleration is less efficient and the compression ratio remains at the Rankine-Hugoniot value. This transition occurs in the trans-relativistic regime and, for the particular parameters we use, occurs around a shock Lorentz factor γ0 = 1.5. We also find that nonlinear shock smoothing dramatically reduces the acceleration efficiency presumed to occur with large-angle scattering in ultra-relativistic shocks. Our ability to seamlessly treat the transition from ultra-relativistic to trans-relativistic to nonrelativistic shocks may be important for evolving relativistic systems, such as gamma-ray bursts and Type Ibc supernovae. We expect a substantial evolution of shock accelerated spectra during this transition from soft early on to much harder when the blast-wave shock becomes nonrelativistic.

  10. MONTE CARLO SIMULATIONS OF NONLINEAR PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN PARALLEL TRANS-RELATIVISTIC SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, Donald C.; Warren, Donald C.; Bykov, Andrei M. E-mail: ambykov@yahoo.com

    2013-10-10

    We present results from a Monte Carlo simulation of a parallel collisionless shock undergoing particle acceleration. Our simulation, which contains parameterized scattering and a particular thermal leakage injection model, calculates the feedback between accelerated particles ahead of the shock, which influence the shock precursor and 'smooth' the shock, and thermal particle injection. We show that there is a transition between nonrelativistic shocks, where the acceleration efficiency can be extremely high and the nonlinear compression ratio can be substantially greater than the Rankine-Hugoniot value, and fully relativistic shocks, where diffusive shock acceleration is less efficient and the compression ratio remains at the Rankine-Hugoniot value. This transition occurs in the trans-relativistic regime and, for the particular parameters we use, occurs around a shock Lorentz factor γ{sub 0} = 1.5. We also find that nonlinear shock smoothing dramatically reduces the acceleration efficiency presumed to occur with large-angle scattering in ultra-relativistic shocks. Our ability to seamlessly treat the transition from ultra-relativistic to trans-relativistic to nonrelativistic shocks may be important for evolving relativistic systems, such as gamma-ray bursts and Type Ibc supernovae. We expect a substantial evolution of shock accelerated spectra during this transition from soft early on to much harder when the blast-wave shock becomes nonrelativistic.

  11. Magnetized collisionless shock studies using high velocity plasmoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Thomas; Intrator, Thomas; Gao, Kevin

    2012-10-01

    Magnetized collisionless shocks are ubiquitous throughout the cosmos and are observed to accelerate particles to relativistic velocities, amplify magnetic fields, transport energy, and create non-thermal distributions. They exhibit transitional scale lengths much shorter than the collisional mean free path and are mediated by collective interactions rather than Coulomb collisions. The Magnetized Shock Experiment (MSX) leverages advances in Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasmoid formation and acceleration to produce highly supersonic and super-Alfvènic supercritical shocks with pre-existing magnetic field at perpendicular, parallel or oblique angles to the direction of propagation. Adjustable shock speed, density, and magnetic field provide unique access to a range of parameter space relevant to a variety of naturally occurring shocks. This effort examines experimentally, analytically, and numerically the physics of collisionless shock formation, structure, and kinetic effects in a laboratory setting and draw comparisons between experimental data and astronomical observations. Approved for Public Release: LA-UR-12-22886

  12. A second-generation constrained reaction volume shock tube.

    PubMed

    Campbell, M F; Tulgestke, A M; Davidson, D F; Hanson, R K

    2014-05-01

    We have developed a shock tube that features a sliding gate valve in order to mechanically constrain the reactive test gas mixture to an area close to the shock tube endwall, separating it from a specially formulated non-reactive buffer gas mixture. This second-generation Constrained Reaction Volume (CRV) strategy enables near-constant-pressure shock tube test conditions for reactive experiments behind reflected shocks, thereby enabling improved modeling of the reactive flow field. Here we provide details of the design and operation of the new shock tube. In addition, we detail special buffer gas tailoring procedures, analyze the buffer/test gas interactions that occur on gate valve opening, and outline the size range of fuels that can be studied using the CRV technique in this facility. Finally, we present example low-temperature ignition delay time data to illustrate the CRV shock tube's performance. PMID:24880416

  13. Shock system of February 2, 1969. [solar wind observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unti, T.; Neugebauer, M.; Wu, C.-S.

    1973-01-01

    The shock system observed in the solar wind by Pioneer 9 and Ogo 5 on Feb. 2, 1969, consisted of the following major discontinuities: a forward slow shock; a forward fast shock; a tangential discontinuity at which the density dropped sharply and the flow direction changed; a tangential discontinuity at which the magnetic field strength jumped to an unusually high value; two closely spaced tangential discontinuities that bracketed a region of even greater field strength and that fronted a region of very cool, very dense, helium-enriched plasma; a reverse fast shock of low Mach number; and a second reverse fast shock of very low Mach number. The event had aspects of both corotating and flare-induced shock systems; it is suggested that the source of the disturbances was a flare occurring at or near an M region.

  14. Sotos syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Baujat, Geneviève; Cormier-Daire, Valérie

    2007-01-01

    Sotos syndrome is an overgrowth condition characterized by cardinal features including excessive growth during childhood, macrocephaly, distinctive facial gestalt and various degrees of learning difficulty, and associated with variable minor features. The exact prevalence remains unknown but hundreds of cases have been reported. The diagnosis is usually suspected after birth because of excessive height and occipitofrontal circumference (OFC), advanced bone age, neonatal complications including hypotonia and feeding difficulties, and facial gestalt. Other inconstant clinical abnormalities include scoliosis, cardiac and genitourinary anomalies, seizures and brisk deep tendon reflexes. Variable delays in cognitive and motor development are also observed. The syndrome may also be associated with an increased risk of tumors. Mutations and deletions of the NSD1 gene (located at chromosome 5q35 and coding for a histone methyltransferase implicated in transcriptional regulation) are responsible for more than 75% of cases. FISH analysis, MLPA or multiplex quantitative PCR allow the detection of total/partial NSD1 deletions, and direct sequencing allows detection of NSD1 mutations. The large majority of NSD1 abnormalities occur de novo and there are very few familial cases. Although most cases are sporadic, several reports of autosomal dominant inheritance have been described. Germline mosaicism has never been reported and the recurrence risk for normal parents is very low (<1%). The main differential diagnoses are Weaver syndrome, Beckwith-Wiedeman syndrome, Fragile X syndrome, Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome and 22qter deletion syndrome. Management is multidisciplinary. During the neonatal period, therapies are mostly symptomatic, including phototherapy in case of jaundice, treatment of the feeding difficulties and gastroesophageal reflux, and detection and treatment of hypoglycemia. General pediatric follow-up is important during the first years of life to allow detection

  15. Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM)

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, P.

    1997-02-01

    This paper discusses the broad problems presented by Naturally Occuring Radioactive Materials (NORM). Technologically Enhanced naturally occuring radioactive material includes any radionuclides whose physical, chemical, radiological properties or radionuclide concentration have been altered from their natural state. With regard to NORM in particular, radioactive contamination is radioactive material in an undesired location. This is a concern in a range of industries: petroleum; uranium mining; phosphorus and phosphates; fertilizers; fossil fuels; forestry products; water treatment; metal mining and processing; geothermal energy. The author discusses in more detail the problem in the petroleum industry, including the isotopes of concern, the hazards they present, the contamination which they cause, ways to dispose of contaminated materials, and regulatory issues. He points out there are three key programs to reduce legal exposure and problems due to these contaminants: waste minimization; NORM assesment (surveys); NORM compliance (training).

  16. Particle acceleration at shocks in the inner heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Linda Neergaard

    This dissertation describes a study of particle acceleration at shocks via the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism. Results for particle acceleration at both quasi-parallel and quasi-perpendicular shocks are presented to address the question of whether there are sufficient particles in the solar wind thermal core, modeled as either a Maxwellian or kappa- distribution, to account for the observed accelerated spectrum. Results of accelerating the theoretical upstream distribution are compared to energetic observations at 1 AU. It is shown that the particle distribution in the solar wind thermal core is sufficient to explain the accelerated particle spectrum downstream of the shock, although the shape of the downstream distribution in some cases does not follow completely the theory of diffusive shock acceleration, indicating possible additional processes at work in the shock for these cases. Results show good to excellent agreement between the theoretical and observed spectral index for one third to one half of both quasi-parallel and quasi-perpendicular shocks studied herein. Coronal mass ejections occurring during periods of high solar activity surrounding solar maximum can produce shocks in excess of 3-8 shocks per day. During solar minimum, diffusive shock acceleration at shocks can generally be understood on the basis of single independent shocks and no other shock necessarily influences the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism. In this sense, diffusive shock acceleration during solar minimum may be regarded as Markovian. By contrast, diffusive shock acceleration of particles at periods of high solar activity (e.g. solar maximum) see frequent, closely spaced shocks that include the effects of particle acceleration at preceding and following shocks. Therefore, diffusive shock acceleration of particles at solar maximum cannot be modeled on the basis of diffusive shock acceleration as a single, independent shock and the process is essentially non-Markovian. A

  17. Comparison of shock severity measures

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, T.J.

    1989-01-01

    In an effort to clarify the issues associated with quantifying shock severity, this paper compares the merits of two measures of shock severity. The first measure is the widely used absolute acceleration shock response spectrum (SAA). The second measure of shock severity is relatively new and is known as the shock intensity spectrum (SIS). Overall information content of SAA and SIS spectra are compared and discussed in the context of two shock excitations having known amplitude, duration, and frequency content. The first is a burst of band-limited white noise and the second is a classical haversine pulse. After describing both the SAA and SIS shock measures, numerous examples are described which emphasize the strengths and limitations of each shock characterization method. This discussion reveals how the use of different shock measures may alter an engineer's conclusions about relative shock severity between two shock environments. 8 refs., 15 figs.

  18. Shock-induced CO2 loss from CaCO3 - Implications for early planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, M. A.; Ahrens, T. J.

    1986-01-01

    Recovered samples from shock recovery experiments on single crystal calcite were subjected to thermogravimetric analysis to determine the amount of post-shock CO2, the decarbonization interval and the activation energy, for the removal of remaining CO2 in shock-loaded calcite. Comparison of post-shock CO2 with that initially present determines shock-induced CO2 loss as a function of shock pressure. Incipient to complete CO2 loss occurs over a pressure range of approximately 10 to approximately 70 GPa. Optical and scanning electron microscopy reveal structural changes which are related to the shock-loading. The occurrence of dark, diffuse areas, which can be resolved as highly vesticular areas as observed with a scanning electron microscope are interpreted as representing quenched partial melts, into which shock-released CO2 was injected. The experimental results are used to constrain models of shock-produced, primary CO2 atmospheres on the accreting terrestrial planets.

  19. Shock-induced CO2 loss from CaCO3: Implications for early planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, M. A.; Ahrens, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    Recovered samples from shock recovery experiments on single crystal calcite were subjected to thermogravimetric analysis to determine the amount of post-shock CO2, the decarbonization interval and the activation energy, for the removal of remaining CO2 in shock-loaded calcite. Comparison of post-shock CO2 with that initially present determines shock-induced CO2 loss as a function of shock pressure. Incipient to complete CO2 loss occurs over a pressure range of approximately 10 to approximately 70 GPa. Optical and scanning electron microscopy reveal structural changes, which are related to the shock-loading. The occurrence of dark, diffuse areas, which can be resolved as highly vesicular areas as observed with a scanning electron microscope are interpreted as representing quenched partial melts, into which shock-released CO2 was injected. The experimental results are used to constrain models of shock-produced, primary CO2 atmospheres on the accreting terrestrial planets.

  20. Termination Shock Surfing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrows, R. H.; Zank, G. P.; Webb, G. M.

    2009-11-01

    The recent Voyager 2 (V2) observations of the termination shock (TS) indicate that it is a plasma shock like no other in the heliosphere with dynamics and structure heavily influenced by the presence of an energized population of pickup ions (PUIs). The `unexpected' finding of a cold plasma in the heliosheath with very little heating of the solar wind suggests that the energy dissipated by the shock could be dominated by the acceleration of PUIs at the TS. We examine the 'shock surfing' mechanism at the test particle level, where multiply reflected ions (MRIs) gain energy from the motional electric field as a consequence of reflection from the cross-shockpotential, for a specific model of the TS3 (the third TS crossing measured by V2). The energization of PUI shell distributions at a stationary, perpendicular model of the TS3 indicate that shock surfing can provide substantial PUI acceleration and a dissipation mechanism at the TS. For a strong enough cross-shock potential and sufficiently narrow shock ramp MRI acceleration can account for the `missing' energy of the downstream solar wind plasma.

  1. Echocardiography in shock management.

    PubMed

    McLean, Anthony S

    2016-01-01

    Echocardiography is pivotal in the diagnosis and management of the shocked patient. Important characteristics in the setting of shock are that it is non-invasive and can be rapidly applied.In the acute situation a basic study often yields immediate results allowing for the initiation of therapy, while a follow-up advanced study brings the advantage of further refining the diagnosis and providing an in-depth hemodynamic assessment. Competency in basic critical care echocardiography is now regarded as a mandatory part of critical care training with clear guidelines available. The majority of pathologies found in shocked patients are readily identified using basic level 2D and M-mode echocardiography. A more comprehensive diagnosis can be achieved with advanced levels of competency, for which practice guidelines are also now available. Hemodynamic evaluation and ongoing monitoring are possible with advanced levels of competency, which includes the use of colour Doppler, spectral Doppler, and tissue Doppler imaging and occasionally the use of more recent technological advances such as 3D or speckled tracking.The four core types of shock-cardiogenic, hypovolemic, obstructive, and vasoplegic-can readily be identified by echocardiography. Even within each of the main headings contained in the shock classification, a variety of pathologies may be the cause and echocardiography will differentiate which of these is responsible. Increasingly, as a result of more complex and elderly patients, the shock may be multifactorial, such as a combination of cardiogenic and septic shock or hypovolemia and ventricular outflow obstruction.The diagnostic benefit of echocardiography in the shocked patient is obvious. The increasing prevalence of critical care physicians experienced in advanced techniques means echocardiography often supplants the need for more invasive hemodynamic assessment and monitoring in shock. PMID:27543137

  2. Visualization of shock-wave formation processes during shock reflection at obstacles with multiple steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Susumu; Adachi, Takashi

    According to standard textbooks on compressible fluid dynamics, a shock wave is formed by an accumulation of compression waves. However, the process by which an accumulated compression wave grows into a shock wave has never been visualized. In the present paper, the authors tried to visualize this process using a model wedge with multiple steps. This model is useful for generating a series of compression waves and can simulate a compression process that occurs in a shock tube. By estimating the triple-point trajectory angle, we demonstrated visually that an accumulated compression wave grows into a shock wave. Further reflection experiments over a rough-surface wedge confirmed the tendency for the triple point trajectory angle χ to reach the asymptotic value χs in the end.

  3. Anthrax-associated shock.

    PubMed

    Goldman, David L; Casadevall, Arturo

    2008-01-01

    Recent events have brought attention to the potential of Bacillus anthracis as an agent of bioterrorism. The shock like state of anthrax is invariably associated with high mortality, despite anti-microbial and supportive therapy. Multi-system dysfunction is typical, including: enhanced vascular permeability, hemorrhage and inflammation. Important questions concerning the pathophysiology of anthrax-associated shock remain unanswered, including the effects of B. anthracis infection on cardiac function. This review discusses the current state of knowledge regarding the pathophysiology of anthrax-associated shock. PMID:18508494

  4. Shocks near Jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Leopoldo R.; Turner, Ari M.; van Hecke, Martin; Vitelli, Vincenzo

    2012-02-01

    Nonlinear sound is an extreme phenomenon typically observed in solids after violent explosions. But granular media are different. Right when they jam, these fragile and disordered solids exhibit a vanishing rigidity and sound speed, so that even tiny mechanical perturbations form supersonic shocks. Here, we perform simulations in which two-dimensional jammed granular packings are dynamically compressed and demonstrate that the elementary excitations are strongly nonlinear shocks, rather than ordinary phonons. We capture the full dependence of the shock speed on pressure and impact intensity by a surprisingly simple analytical model.

  5. Nonstandard Analysis and Jump Conditions for Converging Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baty, Roy S.; Farassat, Fereidoun; Tucker, Don H.

    2008-01-01

    Nonstandard analysis is an area of modern mathematics which studies abstract number systems containing both infinitesimal and infinite numbers. This article applies nonstandard analysis to derive jump conditions for one-dimensional, converging shock waves in a compressible, inviscid, perfect gas. It is assumed that the shock thickness occurs on an infinitesimal interval and the jump functions in the thermodynamic and fluid dynamic parameters occur smoothly across this interval. Predistributions of the Heaviside function and the Dirac delta measure are introduced to model the flow parameters across a shock wave. The equations of motion expressed in nonconservative form are then applied to derive unambiguous relationships between the jump functions for the flow parameters.

  6. Oblique shock dynamics in nonextensive magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bains, A. S.; Tribeche, M.

    2014-05-01

    A study is presented for the oblique propagation of low-frequency ion-acoustic ( IA) shock waves in a magnetized plasma having cold viscous ion fluid and nonextensively distributed electrons. A weakly nonlinear analysis is carried out to derive a Korteweg de-Vries-Burger like equation. Dependence of the shock wave characteristics (height, width and nature) on plasma parameters is then traced and studied in details. We hope that our results will aid to explain and interpret the nonlinear oscillations occurring in magnetized space plasmas.

  7. Life shocks and homelessness.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Marah A; Corman, Hope; Noonan, Kelly; Reichman, Nancy E

    2013-12-01

    We exploited an exogenous health shock-namely, the birth of a child with a severe health condition-to investigate the effect of a life shock on homelessness in large cities in the United States as well as the interactive effects of the shock with housing market characteristics. We considered a traditional measure of homelessness, two measures of housing instability thought to be precursors to homelessness, and a combined measure that approximates the broadened conceptualization of homelessness under the 2009 Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing Act (2010). We found that the shock substantially increases the likelihood of family homelessness, particularly in cities with high housing costs. The findings are consistent with the economic theory of homelessness, which posits that homelessness results from a conjunction of adverse circumstances in which housing markets and individual characteristics collide. PMID:23868747

  8. Testing bow shock models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alrefay, Thamer; Meziane, Karim; Hamza, A. M.

    2016-07-01

    Space plasmas studies of bow shock dynamics, given the fundamental transport role and impact natural transition boundaries, have continued to attract much interest. With the overwhelming availability of data collected by various space science missions, several empirical models have been put forward to account for the location of the Earth's bow shock. Various solar wind and IMF measured parameters are used to constrain the proposed models published in the literature. For each of these empirical models, the bow shock nose velocity, at the standoff distance, is computed; each of these velocities is then compared with the observed shock speed as determined from a multipoint measurement provided by the Cluster quartet. The present study reveals to what extent the model parameters used are significant and determinant, and suggests that some empirical models are more accurate than others are.

  9. "Smart" Electromechanical Shock Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, Lebarian; Glenn, Dean C.; Carroll, Monty B.

    1989-01-01

    Shock-absorbing apparatus includes electromechanical actuator and digital feedback control circuitry rather than springs and hydraulic damping as in conventional shock absorbers. Device not subject to leakage and requires little or no maintenance. Attenuator parameters adjusted in response to sensory feedback and predictive algorithms to obtain desired damping characteristic. Device programmed to decelerate slowly approaching vehicle or other large object according to prescribed damping characteristic.

  10. Attosecond shock waves.

    PubMed

    Zhokhov, P A; Zheltikov, A M

    2013-05-01

    Shock-wave formation is a generic scenario of wave dynamics known in nonlinear acoustics, fluid dynamics, astrophysics, seismology, and detonation physics. Here, we show that, in nonlinear optics, remarkably short, attosecond shock transients can be generated through a strongly coupled spatial and temporal dynamics of ultrashort light pulses, suggesting a pulse self-compression scenario whereby multigigawatt attosecond optical waveforms can be synthesized. PMID:23683197

  11. Heat shock response of murine Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed Central

    Engel, J N; Pollack, J; Perara, E; Ganem, D

    1990-01-01

    We have investigated the heat shock response in the mouse pneumonitis strain of Chlamydia trachomatis. The kinetics of the chlamydial heat shock response resembled that of other procaryotes: the induction was rapid, occurring over a 5- to 10-min time period, and was regulated at the level of transcription. Immunoblot analysis and immunoprecipitations with heterologous antisera to the heat shock proteins DnaK and GroEL demonstrated that the rate of synthesis, but not the absolute amount of these two proteins, increased after heat shock. Using a general screen for genes whose mRNAs are induced by heat shock, we identified and cloned two of these. DNA sequence analysis demonstrated that one of the genes is a homolog of dnaK. Further sequence analysis of the region upstream of the dnaK gene revealed that the chlamydial homolog of the grpE gene is located just adjacent to the dnaK gene. The second locus encoded three potential nonoverlapping open reading frames. One of the open reading frames was 52% homologous to the ribosomal protein S18 of Escherichia coli and thus presumably encodes the chlamydial homolog. Interestingly, this ribosomal protein is not known to be induced by heat shock in E. coli. S1 nuclease and primer extension analyses located the start site of the dnaK transcript to the last nucleotide of the grpE coding sequence, suggesting that these two genes, although tandemly arranged, are transcribed separately. No promoter sequences resembling the E. coli consensus heat shock promoter could be identified upstream of either the C. trachomatis dnaK, grpE, or S18 gene. The induction of the dnaK and S18 mRNAs by heat shock occurred at a transcriptional level; their induction could be blocked by rifampin. The mechanisms of induction for these two loci were not the same, however; they were differentially sensitive to chloramphenicol. Whereas the induction of dnaK mRNA required de novo protein synthesis, the induction of the S18 mRNA did not. Thus, C. trachomatis

  12. AOTV bow shock location

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desautel, D.

    1985-01-01

    Hypersonic bow-shock location and geometry are of central importance to the aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics of aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles (AOTVs), but they are difficult to predict for a given vehicle configuration. This paper reports experimental measurements of shock standoff distance for the 70 deg cone AOTV configuration in shock-tunnel-test flows at Mach numbers of 3.8 to 7.9 and for angles of attack from 0 deg to 20 deg. The controlling parameter for hypersonic bow-shock standoff distance (for a given forebody shape) is the mean normal-shock density ratio. Values for this parameter in the tests reported are in the same range as those of the drag-brake AOTV perigee regime. Results for standoff distance are compared with those previously reported in the literature for this AOTV configuration. It is concluded that the AOTV shock standoff distance for the conical configuration, based on frustrum (base) radius, is equivalent to that of a sphere with a radius about 35 percent greater than that of the cone; the distance is, therefore, much less than reported in previous studies. Some reasons for the discrepancies between the present and previous are advanced. The smaller standoff distance determined here implies there will be less radiative heat transfer than was previously expected.

  13. Experimental shock metamorphism of maximum microcline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, P. B.

    1975-01-01

    A series of recovery experiments are conducted to study the behavior of single-crystal perthitic maximum microcline shock-loaded to a peak pressure of 417 kbar. Microcline is found to deform in a manner similar to quartz and other alkali feldspars. It is observed that shock-induced cleavages occur initially at or slightly below the Hugoniot elastic limit (60-85 kbar), that shock-induced rather than thermal disordering begins above the Hugoniot elastic limit, and that all types of planar elements form parallel to crystallographic planes of low Miller indices. When increasing pressure, it is found that bulk density, refractive indices, and birefringence of the recovered material decrease and approach diaplectic glass values, whereas disappearance and weakening of reflections in Debye-Sherrer patterns are due to disordering of the feldspar lattice.

  14. Shock Scattering in a Multiphase Flow Model

    SciTech Connect

    Klem, D

    2003-04-08

    Multiphase flow models have been proposed for use in situations which have combined Rayleigh-Taylor (RTI) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RMI) instabilities. Such an approach work poorly for the case of a heavy to light shock incidence on a developed interface. The physical original of this difficulty is traced to an inadequate model of the interfacial pressure term as it appears in the momentum and turbulence kinetic energy equations. Constraints on the form of a better model from a variety of sources are considered. In this context it is observed that a new constraint on closures arises. This occurs because of the discontinuity within the shock responsible for the RMI. The proposed model (Shock Scattering) is shown to give useful results.

  15. Shocks generate crossover behavior in lattice avalanches.

    PubMed

    Burridge, James

    2013-11-22

    A spatial avalanche model is introduced, in which avalanches increase stability in the regions where they occur. Instability is driven globally by a driving process that contains shocks. The system is typically subcritical, but the shocks occasionally lift it into a near- or supercritical state from which it rapidly retreats due to large avalanches. These shocks leave behind a signature-a distinct power-law crossover in the avalanche size distribution. The model is inspired by landslide field data, but the principles may be applied to any system that experiences stabilizing failures, possesses a critical point, and is subject to an ongoing process of destabilization that includes occasional dramatic destabilizing events. PMID:24313528

  16. Plane shock waves and Haff's law in a granular gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Lakshminarayana; Alam, Meheboob

    2015-11-01

    The Riemann problem of planar shock waves is analyzed for a dilute granular gas by solving Euler- and Navier-Stokes-order equations numerically. The density and temperature profiles are found to be asymmetric, with the maxima of both density and temperature occurring within the shock-layer. The density-peak increases with increasing Mach number and inelasticity, and is found to propagate at a steady speed at late times. The granular temperature at the upstream end of the shock decay according to Haff's law [ θ (t) ~t-2 ], but the downstream temperature decays faster than its upstream counterpart. The Haff's law seems to hold inside the shock up-to a certain time for weak shocks, but deviations occur for strong shocks. The time at which the maximum temperature deviates from Haff's law follows a power-law scaling with upstream Mach number and the restitution coefficient. The continual build-up of density inside the shock is discussed, the origin of which seems to be tied to a pressure instability in granular gases. It is shown that the granular energy equation must be `regularized' to arrest the maximum density, and the regularized hydrodynamic equations should be used for shock calculations (Reddy & Alam, 2015, J. Fluid Mech., to be published).

  17. Sudden Death Syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sudden death syndrome (SDS) is an important disease of soybean in North and South America. SDS first occurred in South America in the early 1990s. In the U.S.A., SDS was first detected in AK in 1971. Now SDS occurs in most soybean production areas of the U.S. The SDS pathogen is a soil-borne fungu...

  18. Simulation of shock-initiated ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melguizo-Gavilanes, J.; Rezaeyan, N.; Lopez-Aoyagi, M.; Bauwens, L.

    2010-12-01

    The scenario of detonative ignition in shocked mixture is significant because it is a contributor to deflagration to detonation transition, for example following shock reflections. However, even in one dimension, simulation of ignition between a contact surface or a flame and a shock moving into a combustible mixture is difficult because of the singular nature of the initial conditions. Initially, as the shock starts moving into reactive mixture, the region filled with reactive mixture has zero thickness. On a fixed grid, the number of grid points between the shock and the contact surface increases as the shock moves away from the latter. Due to initial lack of resolution in the region of interest, staircasing may occur, whereby the resulting plots consist of jumps between few values a few grid points, and these numerical artifacts are amplified by the chemistry which is very sensitive to temperature, leading to unreliable results. The formulation is transformed, replacing time and space by time and space over time as the independent variables. This frame of reference corresponds to the self-similar formulation in which the non-reactive problem remains stationary, and the initial conditions are well-resolved. Additionally, a solution obtained from short time perturbation is used as initial condition, at a time still short enough for the perturbation to be very accurate, but long enough so that there is sufficient resolution. The numerical solution to the transformed problem is obtained using an essentially non-oscillatory algorithm, which is adequate not only for the early part of the process, but also for the latter part, when chemistry leads to appearance of a shock and eventually a detonation wave is formed. A validation study was performed and the results were compared with the literature, for single step Arrhenius chemistry. The method and its implementation were found to be effective. Results are presented for values of activation energy ranging from mild to

  19. Compaction shock dissipation in low density granular explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Pratap T.; Gonthier, Keith A.; Chakravarthy, Sunada

    2016-06-01

    The microstructure of granular explosives can affect dissipative heating within compaction shocks that can trigger combustion and initiate detonation. Because initiation occurs over distances that are much larger than the mean particle size, homogenized (macroscale) theories are often used to describe local thermodynamic states within and behind shocks that are regarded as the average manifestation of thermodynamic fields at the particle scale. In this paper, mesoscale modeling and simulation are used to examine how the initial packing density of granular HMX (C4H8N8O8) C4H8N8O8 having a narrow particle size distribution influences dissipation within resolved, planar compaction shocks. The model tracks the evolution of thermomechanical fields within large ensembles of particles due to pore collapse. Effective shock profiles, obtained by averaging mesoscale fields over space and time, are compared with those given by an independent macroscale compaction theory that predicts the variation in effective thermomechanical fields within shocks due to an imbalance between the solid pressure and a configurational stress. Reducing packing density is shown to reduce the dissipation rate within shocks but increase the integrated dissipated work over shock rise times, which is indicative of enhanced sensitivity. In all cases, dissipated work is related to shock pressure by a density-dependent power law, and shock rise time is related to pressure by a power law having an exponent of negative one.

  20. Ion transport in circulatory and/or septic shock

    SciTech Connect

    Sayeed, M.M.

    1987-05-01

    This review surveys investigations of membrane ion transport in animals in hemorrhagic, endotoxic, or bacteremic shock. The focus of the review is on ion transport studies in the skeletal muscle and liver. Skeletal muscle Na/sup +/-K/sup +/ transport alterations have been shown during the induction of shock via hemorrhage, endotoxin, or live Gram-negative bacteria in the rodent, canine, and primate species. These alterations include impairment of active cellular K/sup +/ accumulation, increased permeability to /sup 24/Na/sup +/ and Cl/sup -/, and membrane depolarization. The ion transport alterations in the skeletal muscle are compatible with movement of extracellular fluid into the intracellular compartment. Such fluid movements can potentially lead to decreases in circulating plasma volume and thus to circulatory deficits in shock. Studies in the liver of rats subjected to hemorrhagic or endotoxic shock indicated the failure of electrogenic Na/sup +/ pump. Although the hepatic cellular membrane permeability to Na/sup +/ relative to permeability to K/sup +/ appeared unaltered in hemorrhagic shock, endotoxic shock caused an increase in permeability to Na/sup +/. Hepatic cellular /sup 45/Ca/sup +/ regulation also appeared to be adversely affected during endotoxic shock. Alterations in hepatic Na/sup +/-K/sup +/ transport and Ca/sup +/ regulation could contribute to impairment in hepatic glucose production during shock. Although mechanisms of altered membrane ion transport during shock states remain unknown, such changes could occur prior to any substantial loss of cellular metabolic energy.

  1. Early organ-specific endothelial activation during hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation.

    PubMed

    van Meurs, Matijs; Wulfert, Francis M; Knol, Ageeth J; De Haes, Ann; Houwertjes, Martin; Aarts, Leon P H J; Molema, Grietje

    2008-02-01

    Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) is a complication of hemorrhagic shock (HS) and related to high morbidity and mortality. Interaction of activated neutrophils and endothelial cells is considered to play a prominent role in the pathophysiology of MODS. Insight in the nature and molecular basis of endothelial cell activation during HS can assist in identifying new rational targets for early therapeutic intervention. In this study, we examined the kinetics and organ specificity of endothelial cell activation in a mouse model of HS. Anesthetized male mice were subjected to controlled hemorrhage to a MAP of 30 mmHg. Mice were killed after 15, 30, 60, or 90 min of HS. After 90 min of hemorrhagic shock, a group of mice was resuscitated with 6% hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4. Untreated mice and sham shock mice that underwent instrumentation and 90 min of anesthesia without shock served as controls. Gene expression levels of inflammatory endothelial cell activation (P-selectin, E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, and intercellular adhesion molecule 1) and hypoxia-responsive genes (vascular endothelial growth factor and hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha) were quantified in kidney, liver, lung, brain, and heart tissue by quantitative reverse-transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Furthermore, we examined a selection of these genes with regard to protein expression and localization using immunohistochemical analysis. Induction of inflammatory genes occurred early during HS and already before resuscitation. Expression of adhesion molecules was significantly induced in all organs, albeit to a different extent depending on the organ. Endothelial genes CD31 and VE-cadherin, which function in endothelial cell homeostasis and integrity, were not affected during the shock phase except for VE-cadherin in the liver, which showed increased mRNA levels. The rapid inflammatory activation was not paralleled by induction of hypoxia-responsive genes. This study demonstrated

  2. Phase transformations in shock compacted magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrenberg, Christopher

    Shock compaction experiments were performed on soft magnetic phases Fe 4N and Fe16N2, and hard magnetic phases Nd 2Fe14B and Sm2Fe17N3 in order to determine their thermo-mechanical stability during shock loading and explore the possibility of fabricating a textured nanocomposite magnet. Gas gun experiments performed on powders pressed in a three capsule fixture showed phase transformations occurring in Fe4N, Fe16N 2, and Nd2Fe14B, while Sm2Fe17 N3 was observed to be relatively stable. Shock compaction of FCC Fe4N resulted in a partial transformation to HCP Fe3N, consistent with previous reports of the transition occurring at a static pressure of ~3 GPa. Shock compaction of Fe16N 2 produced decomposition products α-Fe, Fe4N, and FeN due to a combination of thermal effects associated with dynamic void collapse and plastic deformation. Decomposition of Nd-Fe-B, producing α-Fe and amorphous Nd-Fe-B, was observed in several shock consolidated samples and is attributed to deformation associated with shock compaction, similar to decomposition reported in ball milled Nd-Fe-B. No decomposition was observed in shock compacted samples of Sm-Fe-N, which is consistent with literature reports showing decomposition occurring only in samples compacted at a pressure above ~15 GPa. Nd-Fe-B and Sm-Fe-N were shown to accommodate deformation primarily by grain size reduction, especially in large grained materials. Hard/Soft composite magnetic materials were formed by mixing single crystal particles of Nd-Fe-B with iron nanoparticles, and the alignment-by-magnetic-field technique was able to introduce significant texture into green compacts of this mixture. While problems with decomposition of the Nd2Fe14B phase prevented fabricating bulk magnets from the aligned green compacts, retention of the nanoscale morphology of the α-Fe particles and the high alignment of the green compacts shows promise for future development of textured nanocomposite magnets through shock compaction.

  3. Detecting change as it occurs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radok, Uwe; Brown, Timothy J.

    1992-01-01

    Traditionally climate changes have been detected from long series of observations and long after they have happened. Our 'inverse sequential' procedure, for detecting change as soon as it occurs, describes the existing or most recent data by their frequency distribution. Its parameter(s) are estimated both from the existing set of observations and from the same set augmented by 1,2,....j new observations. Individual-value probability products ('likelihoods') are used to form ratios which yield two probabilities for erroneously accepting the existing parameter(s) as valid for the augmented data set, and vice versa. A genuine parameter change is signaled when these probabilities (or a more stable compound probability) show a progressive decrease. New parameter values can then be estimated from the new observations alone using standard statistical techniques. The inverse sequential procedure will be illustrated for global annual mean temperatures (assumed normally distributed), and for annual numbers of North Atlantic hurricanes (assumed to represent Poisson distributions). The procedure was developed, but not yet tested, for linear or exponential trends, and for chi-squared means or degrees of freedom, a special measure of autocorrelation.

  4. Dravet Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... NINDS Dravet Syndrome Information Page Synonym(s): Severe Myoclonic Epilepsy of Infancy (SMEI) Table of Contents (click to ... Dravet Syndrome? Dravet syndrome, also called severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI), is a severe form of ...

  5. Williams syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Williams-Beuren syndrome ... Williams syndrome is a rare condition caused by missing a copy of several genes. Parents may not have ... history of the condition. However, a person with Williams syndrome has a 50% chance of passing the disorder ...

  6. Brown Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Does Brown syndrome cause eye problems besides abnormal eye movements? Some children with Brown syndrome have poor binocular ... In the congenital form of Brown syndrome, the eye movement problem is usually constant and unlikely to resolve ...

  7. Fahr's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Fahr's Syndrome Information Page Synonym(s): Familial Idiopathic Basal Ganglia ... is being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Fahr's Syndrome? Fahr's Syndrome is a rare, genetically dominant, ...

  8. Cushing syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cushing disease Cushing syndrome due to adrenal tumor Diabetes Ectopic Cushing syndrome Exogenous Cushing syndrome Kidney stones Pituitary tumor Rheumatoid arthritis Tumor Update Date 10/28/2015 Updated by: ...

  9. Radio-Loud Coronal Mass Ejections Without Shocks Near Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; SaintCyr, O. C.; MacDowall, R. J.; Kaiser, M. L.; Xie, H.; Makela, P.; Akiyama, S.

    2010-01-01

    Type II radio bursts are produced by low energy electrons accelerated in shocks driven by corona) mass ejections (CMEs). One can infer shocks near the Sun, in the Interplanetary medium, and near Earth depending on the wavelength range in which the type II bursts are produced. In fact, type II bursts are good indicators of CMEs that produce solar energetic particles. If the type 11 burst occurs from a source on the Earth-facing side of the solar disk, it is highly likely that a shock arrives at Earth in 2-3 days and hence can be used to predict shock arrival at Earth. However, a significant fraction of CMEs producing type II bursts were not associated shocks at Earth, even though the CMEs originated close to the disk center. There are several reasons for the lack of shock at 1 AU. CMEs originating at large central meridian distances (CMDs) may be driving a shock, but the shock may not be extended sufficiently to reach to the Sun-Earth line. Another possibility is CME cannibalism because of which shocks merge and one observes a single shock at Earth. Finally, the CME-driven shock may become weak and dissipate before reaching 1 AU. We examined a set of 30 type II bursts observed by the Wind/WAVES experiment that had the solar sources very close to the disk center (within a CMD of 15 degrees), but did not have shock at Earth. We find that the near-Sun speeds of the associated CMEs average to approx.600 km/s, only slightly higher than the average speed of CMEs associated with radio-quiet shocks. However, the fraction of halo CMEs is only approx.28%, compared to 40% for radio-quiet shocks and 72% for all radio-loud shocks. We conclude that the disk-center radio loud CMEs with no shocks at 1 AU are generally of lower energy and they drive shocks only close to the Sun.

  10. Storm Sudden Commencements Without Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Wooyeon; Lee, Jeongwoo; Yi, Yu; Ssessanga, Nicholas; Oh, Suyeon

    2015-09-01

    Storm sudden commencements (SSCs) occur due to a rapid compression of the Earth's magnetic field. This is generally believed to be caused by interplanetary (IP) shocks, but with exceptions. In this paper we explore possible causes of SSCs other than IP shocks through a statistical study of geomagnetic storms using SYM-H data provided by the World Data Center for Geomagnetism ? Kyoto and by applying a superposed epoch analysis to simultaneous solar wind parameters obtained with the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite. We select a total of 274 geomagnetic storms with minimum SYM-H of less than ?30nT during 1998-2008 and regard them as SSCs if SYM-H increases by more than 10 nT over 10 minutes. Under this criterion, we found 103 geomagnetic storms with both SSC and IP shocks and 28 storms with SSC not associated with IP shocks. Storms in the former group share the property that the strength of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), proton density and proton velocity increase together with SYM-H, implying the action of IP shocks. During the storms in the latter group, only the proton density rises with SYM-H. We find that the density increase is associated with either high speed streams (HSSs) or interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs), and suggest that HSSs and ICMEs may be alternative contributors to SSCs.

  11. Mixing and shocks in geophysical shallow water models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Tivon

    In the first section, a reduced two-layer shallow water model for fluid mixing is described. The model is a nonlinear hyperbolic quasilinear system of partial differential equations, derived by taking the limit as the upper layer becomes infinitely deep. It resembles the shallow water equations, but with an active buoyancy. Fluid entrainment is supposed to occur from the upper layer to the lower. Several physically motivated closures are proposed, including a robust closure based on maximizing a mixing entropy (also defined and derived) at shocks. The structure of shock solutions is examined. The Riemann problem is solved by setting the shock speed to maximize the production of mixing entropy. Shock-resolving finite-volume numerical models are presented with and without topographic forcing. Explicit shock tracking is required for strong shocks. The constraint that turbulent energy production be positive is considered. The model has geophysical applications in studying the dynamics of dense sill overflows in the ocean. The second section discusses stationary shocks of the shallow water equations in a reentrant rotating channel with wind stress and topography. Asymptotic predictions for the shock location, strength, and associated energy dissipation are developed by taking the topographic perturbation to be small. The scaling arguments for the asymptotics are developed by demanding integrated energy and momentum balance, with the result that the free surface perturbation is of the order of the square root of the topographic perturbation. Shock formation requires that linear waves be nondispersive, which sets a solvability condition on the mean flow and which leads to a class of generalized Kelvin waves. Two-dimensional shock-resolving numerical simulations validate the asymptotic expressions and demonstrate the presence of stationary separated flow shocks in some cases. Geophysical applications are considered. Overview sections on shock-resolving numerical methods

  12. Shock/shock interference on a transpiration cooled hemispherical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowak, Robert J.; Wieting, Allan R.; Holden, Michael S.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental results are presented which show the effectiveness of transpiration cooling in reducing the peak heat flux caused by an impinging shock on a bow shock of a hemispherical model. The 12-inch diameter hemispherical transpiration model with helium coolant was tested in the Calspan 48-inch Hypersonic Shock Tunnel at nominal Mach 12.1 and freestream unit Reynolds number of 0.33 x 10 to the 6th/ft. An incident shock wave, generated by a blunt flat-plate shock generator inclined at 10 deg to the freestream, intersected the bow shock of the model to produce shock/shock interference. The stagnation heat flux without coolant or shock/shock interference was about 1.6 times a smooth surface laminar prediction due to effective roughness of the coolant ejection slots. A coolant mass flux 31 percent of the freestream mass flux reduced the stagnation heat flux to zero without shock/shock interference. However, for the same coolant mass flux and with shock/shock interference the peak heat flux was only reduced 8.3 percent, even though the total integrated heat load was reduced.

  13. Shock structures of astrospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, K.; Fichtner, H.; Kleimann, J.; Wiengarten, T.; Bomans, D. J.; Weis, K.

    2016-02-01

    Context. The interaction between a supersonic stellar wind and a (super-)sonic interstellar wind has recently been viewed with new interest. We here first give an overview of the modeling, which includes the heliosphere as an example of a special astrosphere. Then we concentrate on the shock structures of fluid models, especially of hydrodynamic (HD) models. More involved models taking into account radiation transfer and magnetic fields are briefly sketched. Even the relatively simple HD models show a rich shock structure, which might be observable in some objects. Aims: We employ a single-fluid model to study these complex shock structures, and compare the results obtained including heating and cooling with results obtained without these effects. Furthermore, we show that in the hypersonic case valuable information of the shock structure can be obtained from the Rankine-Hugoniot equations. Methods: We solved the Euler equations for the single-fluid case and also for a case including cooling and heating. We also discuss the analytical Rankine-Hugoniot relations and their relevance to observations. Results: We show that the only obtainable length scale is the termination shock distance. Moreover, the so-called thin shell approximation is usually not valid. We present the shock structure in the model that includes heating and cooling, which differs remarkably from that of a single-fluid scenario in the region of the shocked interstellar medium. We find that the heating and cooling is mainly important in this region and is negligible in the regions dominated by the stellar wind beyond an inner boundary.

  14. Rapid, Simultaneous Detection of Clostridium sordellii and Clostridium perfringens in Archived Tissues by a Novel PCR-Based Microsphere Assay: Diagnostic Implications for Pregnancy-Associated Toxic Shock Syndrome Cases

    PubMed Central

    Bhatnagar, Julu; DeLeon-Carnes, Marlene; Kellar, Kathryn L.; Bandyopadhyay, Kakali; Antoniadou, Zoi-Anna; Shieh, Wun-Ju; Paddock, Christopher D.; Zaki, Sherif R.

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium sordellii and Clostridium perfringens are infrequent human pathogens; however, the case-fatality rates for the infections are very high, particularly in obstetric C. sordellii infections (>90%). Deaths from Clostridium sordellii and Clostridium perfringens toxic shock (CTS) are sudden, and diagnosis is often challenging. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues usually are the only specimens available for sudden fatal cases, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) for Clostridia is generally performed but it cannot identify species. A clear need exists for a rapid, species-specific diagnostic assay for FFPE tissues. We developed a duplex PCR-based microsphere assay for simultaneous detection of C. sordellii and C. perfringens and evaluated DNA extracted from 42 Clostridium isolates and FFPE tissues of 28 patients with toxic shock/endometritis (20 CTS, 8 non-CTS, as confirmed by PCR and sequencing). The microsphere assay correctly identified C. sordellii and C. perfringens in all known isolates and in all CTS patients (10 C. sordellii, 8 C. perfringens, 2 both) and showed 100% concordance with PCR and sequencing results. The microsphere assay is a rapid, specific, and cost-effective method for the diagnosis of CTS and offers the advantage of simultaneous testing for C. sordellii and C. perfringens in FFPE tissues using a limited amount of DNA. PMID:22536012

  15. Large scale motions of Neptune's bow shock: Evidence for control of the shock position by the rotation phase of Neptune's magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.; Smith, Charles W.; Kurth, William S.; Gurnett, Donald A.; Moses, Stewart L.

    1991-01-01

    The Voyager 2 spacecraft observed high levels of Langmuir waves before the inbound crossing of Neptune's bow shock, thereby signifying magnetic connection of the bow shock. The Langmuir waves occurred in multiple bursts throughout two distinct periods separated by an 85 minute absence of wave activity. The times of onsets, peaks, and disappearances of the waves were used together with the magnetic field directions and spacecraft position, to perform a 'remote-sensing' analysis of the shape and location of Neptune's bow shock prior to the inbound bow shock crossing. The bow shock is assumed to have a parabolidal shape with a nose location and flaring parameter determined independently for each wave event. The remote-sensing analysis give a shock position consistent with the time of the inbound shock crossing. The flaring parameter of the shock remains approximately constant throughout each period of wave activity but differs by a factor of 10 between the two periods. The absence of waves between two periods of wave activity coincides with a large rotation of the magnetic field and a large increase in the solar wind ram pressure' both these effects lead to magnetic disconnection of the spacecraft from shock. The planetwards motion of the shock's nose from 38.5 R(sub N) to 34.5 R(sub N) during the second time period occurred while the solar wind ram pressure remained constant to within 15 percent. This second period of planetwards motion of the shock is therefore strong evidence for Neptune's bow shock moving in response to the rotation of Neptune's oblique, tilted magnetic dipole. Normalizing the ram pressure, the remotely-sensed shock moves sunwards during the first wave period and planetwards in the second wave period. The maximum standoff distance occurs while the dipole axis is close to being perpendicular to the Sun-Neptune direction. The remote-sensing analysis provides strong evidence that the location of Neptune's bow shock is controlled by Neptune's rotation

  16. Serotonin Syndrome in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Roth, Cheryl K; Hering, Sandra L; Campos, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Millions of people take selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for depression and anxiety, so nurses and other clinicians need to be aware of the potential for serotonin toxicity and serotonin syndrome. These conditions can occur when women taking SSRIs are given additional medications in the labor and birth or postpartum settings. Symptoms can have an acute onset and can include delirium, fever and hypertension. Understanding the mechanism and symptoms of serotonin syndrome can lead to timely treatment of this unusual condition. PMID:26264799

  17. Syndrome In Question*

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado, Gabriela; Peruzzo, Juliano; Tubone, Mariana Quirino; Reinehr, Clarissa Prieto Herman; Escobar, Gabriela Fortes

    2015-01-01

    The authors describe a case of Cowden´s syndrome in a female patient with classic cutaneous lesions, plus papillomatous lesions in the gastrointestinal tract and a previous history of thyroid carcinoma. Mucocutaneous lesions occur in 90% of Cowden's syndrome cases and are characterized by facial trichilemmomas, oral mucosal papillomas and benign acral keratoses. Sites of extracutaneous involvement include: the thyroid, gastrointestinal tract, breast and endometrial tissue. There is risk of malignancies in these organs and they need to be monitored with imaging tests. The early diagnosis of the syndrome by a dermatologist through mucocutaneous lesions enables the investigation and diagnosis of extracutaneous involvement. PMID:25672315

  18. Shock Induced Separating Flows in Scramjet Intakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yufeng; Rincon, Daniel; Zheng, Yao

    Shock induced separating flows in a scramjet intake has been studied by using a computational fluid dynamics approach. A configuration of scramjet intake geometry consisting of two exterior compression ramps, followed by a subsequent inlet and interior isolator/diffuser assembly, is chosen. The flow conditions are incoming Mach 7 with free-stream static temperature of 46.3K and wall temperature of 300K, respectively. Consequently, oblique shock wave will be formed and its interaction with viscous boundary layers will lead to flow separation that is responsible for the loss of mass flow, total pressure and several other effects. Simulations confirmed that it is necessary to include the cowl wedge in order to predict wall pressure distributions along the lower surface of the intake walls. It is also shown that mesh topology has some influences on prediction results with structured mesh gives better predictions than that of hybrid mesh. A total of eight turbulence models have been applied and results have shown reasonably good agreement with the experimental measurements and other numerical predictions, with small differences occur in localized regions particularly after shock reflection inside the intake channel. Not surprisingly, shock induced flow separation occurs and it correlates well with higher wall pressure and heating downstream. This phenomenon will have significant impact on deteriorating boundary layer property and consequently the engine performance.

  19. LOW AMPLITUDE SINGLE AND MULTIPLE SHOCK INITIATION EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING OF LX-04

    SciTech Connect

    Vandersall, K S; Tarver, C M; Garcia, F; Chidester, S; Urtiew, P A; Forbes, J W

    2006-06-27

    Shock initiation experiments were performed on the plastic bonded explosive (PBX) LX-04 (85% HMX, 15% Viton binder) using single and multiple low amplitude shocks to obtain pressure history data for use in Ignition and Growth reactive flow modeling parameterization. A 100 mm diameter propellant driven gas gun was utilized to initiate the LX-04 explosive charges containing manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge packages placed between explosive discs. In the single shock experiments, the run distances to detonation at three shock pressures showed agreement with previously published data above 3 GPa. Even longer run distances to detonation were measured using 80 mm long by 145 mm diameter LX-04 charges impacted by low velocity projectiles from a 155 mm diameter gun. The minimum shock pressure required to cause low levels of exothermic reaction were determined for these large LX-04 charge dimensions. Multiple shocks were generated as double shocks by using a flyer plate with two materials and as reflected shocks by placing a high impedance material at the rear of the explosive charge. In both cases, the first shock pressure was not high enough to cause detonation of LX-04, and the second shock pressure, which would have been sufficient to cause detonation if generated by a single shock, failed to cause detonation. Thus LX-04 exhibited shock desensitization over a range of 0.6 to 1.4 GPa. The higher shock pressure LX-04 model was extended to accurately simulate these lower pressure and multiple shock gauge records. The shock desensitization effects observed with multiple shock compressions were partially accounted for in the model by using a critical compression corresponding to a shock pressure of 1.2 GPa. This shock desensitization effect occurs at higher pressures than those of other HMX-based PBX's containing higher HMX percentages.

  20. Shocks in fragile matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitelli, Vincenzo

    2012-02-01

    Non-linear sound is an extreme phenomenon typically observed in solids after violent explosions. But granular media are different. Right when they unjam, these fragile and disordered solids exhibit vanishing elastic moduli and sound speed, so that even tiny mechanical perturbations form supersonic shocks. Here, we perform simulations in which two-dimensional jammed granular packings are continuously compressed, and demonstrate that the resulting excitations are strongly nonlinear shocks, rather than linear waves. We capture the full dependence of the shock speed on pressure and compression speed by a surprisingly simple analytical model. We also treat shear shocks within a simplified viscoelastic model of nearly-isostatic random networks comprised of harmonic springs. In this case, anharmonicity does not originate locally from nonlinear interactions between particles, as in granular media; instead, it emerges from the global architecture of the network. As a result, the diverging width of the shear shocks bears a nonlinear signature of the diverging isostatic length associated with the loss of rigidity in these floppy networks.

  1. Extreme geomagnetic disturbances due to shocks within CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugaz, N.; Farrugia, C. J.; Huang, C.-L.; Spence, H. E.

    2015-06-01

    We report on features of solar wind-magnetosphere coupling elicited by shocks propagating through coronal mass ejections (CMEs) by analyzing the intense geomagnetic storm of 6 August 1998. During this event, the dynamic pressure enhancement at the shock combined with a simultaneous increase in the southward component of the magnetic field resulted in a large earthward retreat of Earth's magnetopause, which remained close to geosynchronous orbit for more than 4 h. This occurred despite the fact that both shock and CME were weak and relatively slow. Another similar example of a weak shock inside a slow CME resulting in an intense geomagnetic storm is the 30 September 2012 event, which strongly depleted the outer radiation belt. We discuss the potential of shocks inside CMEs to cause large geomagnetic effects at Earth, including magnetopause shadowing.

  2. Heat Shock-Independent Induction of Multidrug Resistance by Heat Shock Factor 1†

    PubMed Central

    Tchénio, Thierry; Havard, Marilyne; Martinez, Luis A.; Dautry, François

    2006-01-01

    The screening of two different retroviral cDNA expression libraries to select genes that confer constitutive doxorubicin resistance has in both cases resulted in the isolation of the heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) transcription factor. We show that HSF1 induces a multidrug resistance phenotype that occurs in the absence of heat shock or cellular stress and is mediated at least in part through the constitutive activation of the multidrug resistance gene 1 (MDR-1). This drug resistance phenotype does not correlate with an increased expression of heat shock-responsive genes (heat shock protein genes, or HSPs). In addition, HSF1 mutants lacking HSP gene activation are also capable of conferring multidrug resistance, and only hypophosphorylated HSF1 complexes accumulate in transduced cells. Our results indicate that HSF1 can activate MDR-1 expression in a stress-independent manner that differs from the canonical heat shock-activated mechanism involved in HSP induction. We further provide evidence that the induction of MDR-1 expression occurs at a posttranscriptional level, revealing a novel undocumented role for hypophosphorylated HSF1 in posttranscriptional gene regulation. PMID:16382149

  3. Multiple spacecraft observations of interplanetary shocks: Characteristics of the upstream ULF turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Smith, E. J.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Gosling, J. T.; Bame, S. J.

    1983-01-01

    All interplanetary shocks observed by ISEE-3 and either ISEE-1 or ISEE-2 or both in 1978 and 1979 are examined for evidence of upstream waves. In order to characterize the properties of these shocks it is necessary to determine accurate shock normals. An overdetermined set of equations were inverted to obtain shock normals, velocities and error estimates for all these shocks. Tests of the method indicate it is quite reliable. Using these normals the Mach number and angle were between the interplanetary magnetic field and the shock normal for each shock. The upstream waves were separated into two classes: whistler mode precursors which occur at low Mach numbers and upstream turbulence whose amplitude at Mach numbers greater than 1.5 is controlled by the angle of the field to the shock normal. The former waves are right hand circularly polarized and quite monochromatic. The latter waves are more linearly polarized and have a broadband featureless spectrum.

  4. Intense laser driven collision-less shock and ion acceleration in magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mima, K.; Jia, Q.; Cai, H. B.; Taguchi, T.; Nagatomo, H.; Sanz, J. R.; Honrubia, J.

    2016-05-01

    The generation of strong magnetic field with a laser driven coil has been demonstrated by many experiments. It is applicable to the magnetized fast ignition (MFI), the collision-less shock in the astrophysics and the ion shock acceleration. In this paper, the longitudinal magnetic field effect on the shock wave driven by the radiation pressure of an intense short pulse laser is investigated by theory and simulations. The transition of a laminar shock (electro static shock) to the turbulent shock (electromagnetic shock) occurs, when the external magnetic field is applied in near relativistic cut-off density plasmas. This transition leads to the enhancement of conversion of the laser energy into high energy ions. The enhancement of the conversion efficiency is important for the ion driven fast ignition and the laser driven neutron source. It is found that the total number of ions reflected by the shock increases by six time when the magnetic field is applied.

  5. Free boundary problems in shock reflection/diffraction and related transonic flow problems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gui-Qiang; Feldman, Mikhail

    2015-09-13

    Shock waves are steep wavefronts that are fundamental in nature, especially in high-speed fluid flows. When a shock hits an obstacle, or a flying body meets a shock, shock reflection/diffraction phenomena occur. In this paper, we show how several long-standing shock reflection/diffraction problems can be formulated as free boundary problems, discuss some recent progress in developing mathematical ideas, approaches and techniques for solving these problems, and present some further open problems in this direction. In particular, these shock problems include von Neumann's problem for shock reflection-diffraction by two-dimensional wedges with concave corner, Lighthill's problem for shock diffraction by two-dimensional wedges with convex corner, and Prandtl-Meyer's problem for supersonic flow impinging onto solid wedges, which are also fundamental in the mathematical theory of multidimensional conservation laws. PMID:26261363

  6. Transport of Solar Wind H+ and He++ Ions across Earth’s Bow Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, G. K.; Lee, E.; Fu, S. Y.; Kim, H. E.; Ma, Y. Q.; Yang, Z. W.; Liu, Y.; Lin, N.; Hong, J.; Canu, P.; Dandouras, I.; Rème, H.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated the dependence of mass, energy, and charge of solar wind (SW) transport across Earth’s bow shock. An examination of 111 crossings during quiet SW in both quasi-perpendicular and quasi-parallel shock regions shows that 64 crossings had various degrees of heating and thermalization of SW. We found 22 crossings where the SW speed was <400 km s‑1. The shock potential of a typical supercritical quasi-perpendicular shock estimated from deceleration of the SW and cutoff energy of electron flat top distribution is ˜50 Volts. We find that the temperatures of H+ and He++ beams that penetrate the shock can sometimes be nearly the same in the upstream and downstream regions, indicating little or no heating had occurred crossing the bow shock. None of the models predict that the SW can cross the bow shock without heating. Our observations are important constraints for new models of collisionless shocks.

  7. Free boundary problems in shock reflection/diffraction and related transonic flow problems

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gui-Qiang; Feldman, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    Shock waves are steep wavefronts that are fundamental in nature, especially in high-speed fluid flows. When a shock hits an obstacle, or a flying body meets a shock, shock reflection/diffraction phenomena occur. In this paper, we show how several long-standing shock reflection/diffraction problems can be formulated as free boundary problems, discuss some recent progress in developing mathematical ideas, approaches and techniques for solving these problems, and present some further open problems in this direction. In particular, these shock problems include von Neumann's problem for shock reflection–diffraction by two-dimensional wedges with concave corner, Lighthill's problem for shock diffraction by two-dimensional wedges with convex corner, and Prandtl-Meyer's problem for supersonic flow impinging onto solid wedges, which are also fundamental in the mathematical theory of multidimensional conservation laws. PMID:26261363

  8. Transport of Solar Wind H+ and He++ Ions across Earth’s Bow Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, G. K.; Lee, E.; Fu, S. Y.; Kim, H. E.; Ma, Y. Q.; Yang, Z. W.; Liu, Y.; Lin, N.; Hong, J.; Canu, P.; Dandouras, I.; Rème, H.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated the dependence of mass, energy, and charge of solar wind (SW) transport across Earth’s bow shock. An examination of 111 crossings during quiet SW in both quasi-perpendicular and quasi-parallel shock regions shows that 64 crossings had various degrees of heating and thermalization of SW. We found 22 crossings where the SW speed was <400 km s‑1. The shock potential of a typical supercritical quasi-perpendicular shock estimated from deceleration of the SW and cutoff energy of electron flat top distribution is ∼50 Volts. We find that the temperatures of H+ and He++ beams that penetrate the shock can sometimes be nearly the same in the upstream and downstream regions, indicating little or no heating had occurred crossing the bow shock. None of the models predict that the SW can cross the bow shock without heating. Our observations are important constraints for new models of collisionless shocks.

  9. High-speed helicopter rotor noise - Shock waves as a potent source of sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Lee, Yung-Jang; Tadghighi, H.; Holz, R.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the problem of high speed rotor noise prediction. In particular, we propose that from the point of view of the acoustic analogy, shocks around rotating blades are sources of sound. We show that, although for a wing at uniform steady rectilinear motion with shocks the volume quadrupole and shock sources cancel in the far field to the order of 1/r, this cannot happen for rotating blades. In this case, some cancellation between volume quadrupoles and shock sources occurs, yet the remaining shock noise contribution is still potent. A formula for shock noise prediction is presented based on mapping the deformable shock surface to a time independent region. The resulting equation is similar to Formulation 1A of Langley. Shock noise prediction for a hovering model rotor for which experimental noise data exist is presented. The comparison of measured and predicted acoustic data shows good agreement.

  10. The first MEMIN shock recovery experiments at low shock pressure (5-12.5 GPa) with dry, porous sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowitz, Astrid; Schmitt, Ralf T.; Uwe Reimold, W.; Hornemann, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    As part of the MEMIN research program this project is focused on shock deformation experimentally generated in dry, porous Seeberger sandstone in the low shock pressure range from 5 to 12.5 GPa. Special attention is paid to the influence of porosity on progressive shock metamorphism. Shock recovery experiments were carried out with a high-explosive set-up that generates a planar shock wave, and using the shock impedance method. Cylinders of sandstone of average grain size of 0.17 mm and porosity of about 19 vol%, and containing some 96 wt% SiO2, were shock deformed. Shock effects induced with increasing shock pressure include: (1) Already at 5 GPa the entire pore space is closed; quartz grains show undulatory extinction. On average, 134 fractures per mm are observed. Dark vesicular melt (glass) of the composition of the montmorillonitic phyllosilicate component of this sandstone occurs at an average amount of 1.6 vol%. (2) At 7.5 GPa, quartz grains show weak but prominent mosaicism and the number of fractures increases to 171 per millimeter. Two additional kinds of melt, both based on phyllosilicate precursor, could be observed: a light colored, vesicular melt and a melt containing large iron particles. The total amount of melt (all types) increased in this experiment to 2.4 vol%. Raman spectroscopy confirmed the presence of shock-deformed quartz grains near the surface. (3) At 10 and 12.5 GPa, quartz grains also show weak but prominent mosaicism, the number of fractures per mm has reached a plateau value of approximately 200, and the total amount of the different melt types has increased to 4.8 vol%. Diaplectic quartz glass could be observed locally near the impacted surface. In addition, local shock effects, most likely caused by multiple shock wave reflections at sandstone-container interfaces, occur throughout the sample cylinders and include locally enhanced formation of PDF, as well as shear zones associated with cataclastic microbreccia, diaplectic quartz

  11. TIMING OF SHOCK WAVES

    DOEpatents

    Tuck, J.L.

    1955-03-01

    This patent relates to means for ascertaining the instant of arrival of a shock wave in an exploslve charge and apparatus utilizing this means to coordinate the timing of two operations involving a short lnterval of time. A pair of spaced electrodes are inserted along the line of an explosive train with a voltage applied there-across which is insufficient to cause discharge. When it is desired to initiate operation of a device at the time the explosive shock wave reaches a particular point on the explosive line, the device having an inherent time delay, the electrodes are located ahead of the point such that the ionization of the area between the electrodes caused by the traveling explosive shock wave sends a signal to initiate operation of the device to cause it to operate at the proper time. The operated device may be photographic equipment consisting of an x-ray illuminating tube.

  12. Life Shocks and Homelessness

    PubMed Central

    Corman, Hope; Noonan, Kelly; Reichman, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    We exploited an exogenous health shock—namely, the birth of a child with a severe health condition—to investigate the effect of a life shock on homelessness in large cities in the United States as well as the interactive effects of the shock with housing market characteristics. We considered a traditional measure of homelessness, two measures of housing instability thought to be precursors to homelessness, and a combined measure that approximates the broadened conceptualization of homelessness under the 2009 Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing Act (2010). We found that the shock substantially increases the likelihood of family homelessness, particularly in cities with high housing costs. The findings are consistent with the economic theory of homelessness, which posits that homelessness results from a conjunction of adverse circumstances in which housing markets and individual characteristics collide. PMID:23868747

  13. Dusty Termination Shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Ip, W.H.

    2004-09-15

    In astrophysical settings, termination shocks where strong stellar wind outflows interact with the surrounding environments tend to take place in dusty regions. Just to name a few, star formation regions, planetary nebulae, supernova remnants and active galactic nuclei are all good examples. Dynamics and evolution of the associated dust clouds could have important influences on the acceleration and composition of energetic particles resulting from the diffusive shock acceleration at the termination shocks. In this note we provide a brief review of previous work predating the recent detection of ACR Mg, Na, Si and S ions which might have originated from the Kuiper belt dust. Their compositional abundance might be diagnostic of the collisional history of the Kupier belt objects.

  14. Principles and application of shock-tubes and shock tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ried, R. C.; Clauss, H. G., Jr.

    1963-01-01

    The principles, theoretical flow equations, calculation techniques, limitations and practical performance characteristics of basic and high performance shock tubes and shock tunnels are presented. Selected operating curves are included.

  15. DRESS Syndrome in the ICU: When a Patient Is Treated with Multiple Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Prothet, Johanne; Blaise, Benjamin J.; Ben Said, Benoit; Page, Mathieu; Ber, Charles-Eric; Crozon, Jullien; Rimmelé, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS) syndrome is life-threatening. It associates a skin condition with hematological and visceral disorders. The DRESS syndrome diagnosis in the intensive care unit (ICU) is difficult as clinical features are nonspecific. Furthermore, the need to treat patients with multiple drugs usually prevents the identification of the causative drug. We report the case of a patient who developed two bouts of DRESS caused by piperacillin-tazobactam, the first being complicated with a distributive shock. Cases of DRESS occurring inside ICU are seldom reported. However, any intensivist may encounter this situation during his career and should be aware of its diagnostic and management specific aspects. PMID:26904309

  16. [Traumatic neurogenic shock].

    PubMed

    Maurin, O; de Régloix, S; Caballé, D; Arvis, A-M; Perrochon, J-C; Tourtier, J-P

    2013-05-01

    Traumatic neurogenic shock is a rare but serious complication of spinal cord injury. It associates bradycardia and hypotension caused by a medullary trauma. It is life-threatening for the patient and it aggravates the neurological deficit. Strict immobilization and a quick assessment of the gravity of cord injury are necessary as soon as prehospital care has begun. Initial treatment requires vasopressors associated with fluid resuscitation. Steroids are not recommended. Early decompression is recommended for incomplete deficit seen in the first 6 hours. We relate the case of secondary spinal shock to a luxation C6/C7 treated in prehospital care. PMID:23566590

  17. Methods of Monitoring Shock

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Ednan K.; Malhotra, Atul; Thompson, B. Taylor

    2012-01-01

    Intensive monitoring is a crucial component of the management of shock. However, there is little consensus about optimal strategies for monitoring. Although the pulmonary artery catheter has been widely used, conflicting data exist about the utility of this device. A variety of other techniques have been developed in hopes of providing clinically useful information about myocardial function, intravascular volume, and indices of organ function. In addition, there is evolving evidence that targeting and monitoring certain physiological goals may be most important early in the course of shock. In this chapter, we examine many of the available monitoring techniques and the evidence supporting their use. PMID:16088506

  18. Shock destruction armor system

    DOEpatents

    Froeschner, Kenneth E.

    1993-01-01

    A shock destruction armor system is constructed and arranged to destroy the force of impact of a projectile by shock hydrodynamics. The armor system is designed to comprise a plurality of superimposed armor plates each preferably having a thickness less than five times the projectile's diameter and are preferably separated one-from-another by a distance at least equal to one-half of the projectile's diameter. The armor plates are effective to hydrodynamically and sequentially destroy the projectile. The armor system is particularly adapted for use on various military vehicles, such as tanks, aircraft and ships.

  19. Compression in radiative shocks: switch and intermediate properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. D.

    1993-05-01

    The degree of compression in radiative shocks (discontinuous jump followed by strong cooling) is crucial to the distribution of the phases of interstellar gas. The influence of the magnetic field, especially its direction, is studied here. In fact plane-parallel radiative shocks are switch type for a wide range of conditions. In such shocks, the magnetic field is turned through a large angle from being quasi-parallel. It is shown here that plane-parallel isothermal shocks are switch type for magnetic fields within an angle 1/A of the shock normal where A is the Alfvén number, with the stringent condition that the Alfvén speed exceeds the sound speed. The switch is usually located within the dense cooling layer rather than the shock front. Super-cooling, in which the downstream temperature drops below the pre-shock value, is often encountered. A super-cooling layer can be switch type even if the Alfvén speed is much less than the sound speed. The degree of compression is then still limited by the magnetic pressure rather than thermal pressure. Applications and predictions pertaining mainly to the interstellar medium are presented. Switch off and intermediate shocks are also studied. Supernova and super-bubble shell structures may then provide evidence for interstellar gas properties. The switch-off shock can be recognised by synchrotron radiation signatures. Also the switch-off temperature jump is shown to be closely related to the value of the ratio of Alfvén to sound speeds. Super-cooled intermediate shocks, existing when the plane-parallel assumption is relaxed, can also occur under an extended range of pre-shock states. Hence the "dimple" shell structures of some remnants do not provide evidence for high Alfvén speeds. Finally, torsional switches are presented as an alternative to intermediate waves in interpreting shell structures.

  20. Introduction to Plasma Dynamo, Reconnection and Shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Intrator, Thomas P.

    2012-08-30

    In our plasma universe, most of what we can observe is composed of ionized gas, or plasma. This plasma is a conducting fluid, which advects magnetic fields when it flows. Magnetic structure occurs from the smallest planetary to the largest cosmic scales. We introduce at a basic level some interesting features of non linear magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). For example, in our plasma universe, dynamo creates magnetic fields from gravitationally driven flow energy in an electrically conducting medium, and conversely magnetic reconnection annihilates magnetic field and accelerates particles. Shocks occur when flows move faster than the local velocity (sonic or Alfven speed) for the propagation of information. Both reconnection and shocks can accelerate particles, perhaps to gigantic energies, for example as observed with 10{sup 20} eV cosmic rays.

  1. Characteristics of Weak Interplanetary Shocks and Shock-like Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balogh, A.; Gloag, J. M.

    The variation of magnetic and plasma parameters across the discontinuity of a colli- sionless shock wave are clearly understood and presented in MHD theory. The anal- ysis of 116 shock waves appearing on the Ulysses shock list in the period mid 1996 to the end of 1999 show that in the cases of the stronger shock waves, measured by the ratio of downstream to upstream magnetic field magnitudes, this MHD descrip- tion is adequate. However in the case of many of the weaker shocks there are events which are not clearly characterised in MHD terms and in these cases plasma param- eters are particularly difficult to interpret. To explore the issues associated with these very weak shocks further, a set of shock-like events is considered which have shock characteristics in the high frequency wave data measured by the plasma wave inves- tigation(URAP) but are not considered to be clearly shock waves purely considering magnetic and plasma data. These shock-like events are thought to extend the spectrum of interplanetary shocks at the very weakest end and possibly beyond what should be considered a collisionless shock wave.

  2. Impact-shocked zircons: Discovery of shock-induced textures reflecting increasing degrees of shock metamorphism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohor, B. F.; Betterton, W. J.; Krogh, T. E.

    1993-01-01

    Textural effects specifically characteristic of shock metamorphism in zircons from impact environments have not been reported previously. However, planar deformation features (PDF) due to shock metamorphism are well documented in quartz and other mineral grains from these same environments. An etching technique was developed that allows scanning electron microscope (SEM) visualization of PDF and other probable shock-induced textural features, such as granular (polycrystalline) texture, in zircons from a variety of impact shock environments. These textural features in shocked zircons from K/T boundary distal ejecta form a series related to increasing degrees of shock that should correlate with proportionate resetting of the U-Pb isotopic system.

  3. Impact-shocked zircons: discovery of shock-induced textures reflecting increasing degrees of shock metamorphism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohor, B.F.; Betterton, W.J.; Krogh, T.E.

    1993-01-01

    Textural effects specifically characteristic of shock metamorphism in zircons from impact environments have not been reported previously. However, planar deformation features (PDF) due to shock metamorphism are well documented in quartz and other mineral grains from these same environments. An etching technique was developed that allows SEM visualization of PDF and other probable shock-induced textural features, such as granular (polycrystalline) texture, in zircons from a variety of impact shock environments. These textural features in shocked zircons from K/T boundary distal ejecta form a series related to increasing degrees of shock that should correlate with proportionate resetting of the UPb isotopic system. ?? 1993.

  4. Nonstandard jump functions for radially symmetric shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Baty, Roy S.; Tucker, Don H.; Stanescu, Dan

    2008-10-01

    Nonstandard analysis is applied to derive generalized jump functions for radially symmetric, one-dimensional, magnetogasdynamic shock waves. It is assumed that the shock wave jumps occur on infinitesimal intervals, and the jump functions for the physical parameters occur smoothly across these intervals. Locally integrable predistributions of the Heaviside function are used to model the flow variables across a shock wave. The equations of motion expressed in nonconservative form are then applied to derive unambiguous relationships between the jump functions for the physical parameters for two families of self-similar flows. It is shown that the microstructures for these families of radially symmetric, magnetogasdynamic shock waves coincide in a nonstandard sense for a specified density jump function

  5. Nonstandard jump functions for radically symmetric shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Baty, Roy S; Tucker, Don H; Stanescu, Dan

    2008-01-01

    Nonstandard analysis is applied to derive generalized jump functions for radially symmetric, one-dimensional, magnetogasdynamic shock waves. It is assumed that the shock wave jumps occur on infinitesimal intervals and the jump functions for the physical parameters occur smoothly across these intervals. Locally integrable predistributions of the Heaviside function are used to model the flow variables across a shock wave. The equations of motion expressed in nonconservative form are then applied to derive unambiguous relationships between the jump functions for the physical parameters for two families of self-similar flows. It is shown that the microstructures for these families of radially symmetric, magnetogasdynamic shock waves coincide in a nonstandard sense for a specified density jump function.

  6. Effect of heat shock on S6 phosphorylation during the development of Blastocladiella emersonii.

    PubMed

    da Silva, A M; Juliani, M H; Bonato, M C

    1987-11-01

    Changes in phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 during heat shock, induction of thermotolerance and recovery from heat shock at different stages of Blastocladiella emersonii development were investigated. Independently of the initial state of S6 phosphorylation (maximal or intermediate), a rapid and complete dephosphorylation of S6 is induced by heat shock and S6 remains unphosphorylated during the acquired thermotolerance. During recovery from heat shock rephosphorylation of S6 occurs always to the levels characteristic of that particular stage, coincidently with the turn off of heat shock protein synthesis. PMID:3454866

  7. Shock-induced separation of adiabatic turbulent boundary layers in supersonic axially symmetric internal flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, R. J.; Childs, M. E.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental investigation at Mach 4 of shock-induced turbulent boundary layer separation at the walls of axially symmetric flow passages is discussed, with particular emphasis placed on determining the shock strengths required for incipient separation. The shock waves were produced by interchangeable sting-mounted cones placed on the axes of the flow passages and aligned with the freestream flow. The interactions under study simulate those encountered in axially symmetric engine inlets of supersonic aircraft. Knowledges of the shock strengths required for boundary layer separation in inlets is important since for shocks of somewhat greater strength rather drastic alterations in the inlet flow field may occur.

  8. Calculation of hypersonic shock structure using flux-split algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppard, W. M.; Grossman, B.

    1991-01-01

    There exists an altitude regime in the atmosphere that is within the continuum domain, but wherein the conventional Navier-Stokes equations cease to be accurate. The altitude limits for this so called continuum transition regime depend on vehicle size and speed. Within this regime the thickness of the bow shock wave is no longer negligible when compared to the shock stand-off distance and the peak radiation intensity occurs within the shock wave structure itself. For this reason it is no longer valid to treat the shock wave as a discontinuous jump and it becomes necessary to compute through the shock wave itself. To accurately calculate hypersonic flowfields, the governing equations must be capable of yielding realistic profiles of flow variables throughout the structure of a hypersonic shock wave. The conventional form of the Navier-Stokes equations is restricted to flows with only small departures from translational equilibrium; it is for this reason they do not provide the capability to accurately predict hypersonic shock structure. Calculations in the continuum transition regime, therefore, require the use of governing equations other than Navier-Stokes. Several alternatives to Navier-Stokes are discussed; first for the case of a monatomic gas and then for the case of a diatomic gas where rotational energy must be included. Results are presented for normal shock calculations with argon and nitrogen.

  9. Shock compression and equation of state of C60 fullerite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milyavskiy, Vladimir; Khishchenko, Konstantin; Utkin, Alexander; Yakushev, Vladislav; Zhuk, Andrey; Fortov, Vladimir

    2007-06-01

    Recently, we have experimentally studied shock compressibility of C60 fullerite and sound velocity in shock-compressed fullerite [1]. The Hugoniot of C60 fullerite had a set of peculiarities. Appearance of a rather hard carbon phase was detected at shock pressure ˜ 9 GPa. We assume that it is a 2D-polymerized C60 phase. With increase of shock pressure, destruction of this phase and formation of a graphite-like carbon occurs. With further increase of shock pressure, the graphite- like carbon transforms to a diamond-like phase. If shock pressure is higher than ˜ 33 GPa, shock compressibility of C60 fullerite is determined by the thermodynamic properties of the diamond-like phase. The results of the shock-wave measurements were used for the description of thermodynamic properties of C60 fullerite and products of its transformations in a wide range of pressures and temperatures. A semiempirical equation of state for the simple cubic phase of C60 fullerite is proposed. The EOS we have developed for fullerite C60 provides a consistent representation of the available experimental data. The work was supported by RFBR. [1] Milyavskiy V.V., Utkin A.V., Zhuk A.Z., Yakushev V.V. and Fortov V.E. Diamond and Rel. Mat. 14 (2005) 1920.

  10. Acceleration of Solar Energetic Particle by CME induced shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chin-Chun; Liou, Kan; Dryer, Murray; Wu, Shitsan; Tylka, Allan J.

    Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) may play a major role on the Space Weather forecast since it only takes about 8 minutes (for an representative ion accelerated to 0.5c at a shock's COBPoint at roughly 0.5 AU) to propagate from the Sun to the Earth. COBPoint means Connection of interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) with Observer Point. It is well known that SEPs can be generated by interplanetary (IP) shocks which are driven by the coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Using both a 1.5D magnetohydrodynamic simulation and ACE's EPAM data analysis, "how SEPs are being accelerated by IP shocks?" will be presented. Three SEP events occurred during Halloween 2003 epoch will be presented in this study. We assume that the flares occur close enough to the the ecliptic plane to justify the use of the 1.5D approximation and, thus, the IMF connection from the shocks' COBPoint to ACE. We also assume, as a further "first-look" approximation, that the COBPoint is always on the Sun-Earth line. The correlation coefficient for "IP shock Mach number" vs. "SEPs enhancement" will be calculated to interpret "how SEPs are generated by IP shocks?" thus supporting the empirical and existing discussion concerning the need for a high shock compression ratio.

  11. Interplanetary shocks and foreshocks observed by STEREO during 2007-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Cano, X.; Kajdič, P.; Aguilar-Rodríguez, E.; Russell, C. T.; Jian, L. K.; Luhmann, J. G.

    2016-02-01

    Interplanetary shocks in the heliosphere modify the solar wind through which they pass. In particular, shocks play an important role in particle acceleration. During the extended solar minimum (2007-2010) STEREO observed 65 forward shocks driven by stream interactions (SI), with magnetosonic Mach numbers Mms ≈ 1.1-4.0 and shock normal angles θBN ~ 20-87°. We analyze the waves associated with these shocks and find that the region upstream can be permeated by whistler waves (f ~ 1 Hz) and/or ultra low frequency (ULF) waves (f ~ 10-2-10-1 Hz). While whistlers appear to be generated at the shock, the origin of ULF waves is most probably associated with local kinetic ion instabilities. We find that when the Mach number (Mms) is low and the shock is quasi-perpendicular (θBN > 45°) whistler waves remain close to the shock. As Mms increases, the shock profile changes and can develop a foot and overshoot associated with ion reflection and gyration. Whistler precursors can be superposed on the foot region, so that some quasi-perpendicular shocks have characteristics of both subcritical and supercritical shocks. When the shock is quasi-parallel (θBN < 45°) a large foreshock with suprathermal ions and waves can form. Upstream, there are whistler trains at higher frequencies whose characteristics can be slightly modified probably by reflected and/or leaked ions and by almost circularly polarized waves at lower frequencies that may be locally generated by ion instabilities. In contrast with planetary bow shocks, most of the upstream waves studied here are mainly transverse and no steepening occurs. Some quasi-perpendicular shocks (45° < θBN < 60°) are preceded by ULF waves and ion foreshocks. Fluctuations downstream of quasi-parallel shocks tend to have larger amplitudes than waves in the sheath of quasi-perpendicular shocks. We compare SI-driven shock properties with those of shocks generated by interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). During the same years

  12. [DRUG RELATED SYSTEMIC ANAPHYLAXES AND ANAPHYLACTIC SHOCK].

    PubMed

    Diot-Junique, Nathalie; Mullet, Christine; Mertes, Paul-Michel

    2015-09-01

    Anaphylactic shock is a systemic immediate hypersensitivity reaction involving 2 or more organs. Symptoms occur in the minutes after the administration of a drug, a food or after hymenoptera sting and are the consequence of the activation of tissue mast cells and blood basophils which release histamine and other inflammatory mediatars. This chapter, written by allergo-anesthesists, concerns mostly, but not exclusively, per-anesthetic anaphylaxis, its diagnosis, prevention and treatment. PMID:26619739

  13. Electron plasma oscillations upstream of the solar wind termination shock.

    PubMed

    Gurnett, D A; Kurth, W S

    2005-09-23

    Electron plasma oscillations have been detected upstream of the solar wind termination shock by the plasma wave instrument on the Voyager 1 spacecraft. These waves were first observed on 11 February 2004, at a heliocentric radial distance of 91.0 astronomical units, and continued sporadically with a gradually increasing occurrence rate for nearly a year. The last event occurred on 15 December 2004, at 94.1 astronomical units, just before the spacecraft crossed the termination shock. Since then, no further electron plasma oscillations have been observed, consistent with the spacecraft having crossed the termination shock into the heliosheath. PMID:16179470

  14. Interfacial Pressures and Shocks in a Multiphase Flow mix Model

    SciTech Connect

    Klem, D E

    2004-10-01

    Multiphase flow models have been proposed for use in situations which have combined Rayleigh-Taylor (RTI) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RMI) instabilities [2, 3]. Such an approach works poorly for the case of a heavy to light shock incidence on a developed interface. I suggest that this difficulty can be overcome by adding an additional source to the turbulence kinetic energy equation. A variety of constraints on such a source are considered. In this context it is observed that a new constraint on closures arises. This occurs because of the discontinuity within the shock responsible for the RMI. The proposed model (Shock Scattering) is shown to give useful results.

  15. A new configuration of irregular reflection of shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvozdeva, L. G.; Gavrenkov, S. A.

    2015-06-01

    A new configuration of shock waves has been found in the reflection of shock waves in a stationary supersonic gas flow in addition to the wellknown regular and Mach reflections. This new three-shock configuration occurs with a negative angle of reflection and Mach numbers greater than 3 and an adiabatic index smaller than 1.4. It has been shown that this new configuration is unstable and leads to a radical change of the total flow pattern. The emergence of this new kind of instability can negatively affect operation of aircraft and rocket engines due to the failure of the flow to be as conventionally predicted.

  16. Heat shock and herpes virus: enhanced reactivation without untargeted mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lytle, C.D.; Carney, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    Enhanced reactivation of Ultraviolet-irradiated virus has been reported to occur in heat-shocked host cells. Since enhanced virus reactivation is often accompanied by untargeted mutagenesis, we investigated whether such mutagenesis would occur for herpes simplex virus (HSV) in CV-1 monkey kidney cells subjected to heat shock. In addition to expressing enhanced reactivation, the treated cells were transiently more susceptible to infection by unirradiated HSV. No mutagenesis of unirradiated HSV was found whether infection occurred at the time of increased susceptibility to infection or during expression of enhanced viral reactivation.

  17. The sudden onset of mastocytosis in the course of venom-induced anaphylactic reaction in a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rybicka, Malwina; Helbig, Grzegorz; Woźniczka, Krzysztof; Kopera, Małgorzata; Pająk, Jacek; Kyrcz-Krzemień, Sławomira

    2015-01-01

    Mastocytosis is a disease resulting from a proliferation of clonal, abnormal mast cells in tissues and organs, defined as Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasm. We present a male patient with clinically, morphologically and immunohistochemically confirmed mastocytosis with preceding myelodysplastic syndrome, occurred after wasp bite in the course of anaphylactic reaction. The propensity to hymenoptera venom-induced anaphylaxis and the presence of an increased population of atypical mast cells in bone marrow found after anaphylactic shock may suggest the possible relationship between hymenoptera venom allergy and anaphylaxis and the development of mastocytosis of unusual course in a predisposed person. PMID:26181160

  18. Maskelynite: Formation by explosive shock

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milton, D.J.; De Carli, P. S.

    1963-01-01

    When high pressure (250 to 300 kilobars) was applied suddenly (shock-loading) to gabbro, the plagioclase was transformed to a noncrystalline phase (maskelynite) by a solid-state reaction at a low temperature, while the proxene remained crystalline. The shock-loaded gabbro resembles meteorites of the shergottite class; this suggests that the latter formed as a result of shock. The shock-loading of gabbro at 600 to 800 kilobars raised the temperature above the melting range of the plagioclase.

  19. Shock compression of polyvinyl chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neogi, Anupam; Mitra, Nilanjan

    2016-04-01

    This study presents shock compression simulation of atactic polyvinyl chloride (PVC) using ab-initio and classical molecular dynamics. The manuscript also identifies the limits of applicability of classical molecular dynamics based shock compression simulation for PVC. The mechanism of bond dissociation under shock loading and its progression is demonstrated in this manuscript using the density functional theory based molecular dynamics simulations. The rate of dissociation of different bonds at different shock velocities is also presented in this manuscript.

  20. Refractory cardiogenic shock in an infant with congenital hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Zaki, Syed Ahmed; Dolas, Amit

    2012-07-01

    Thyroid dysfunction causes remarkable cardiovascular derangements. Both systolic and diastolic dysfunction of the heart can occur in hypothyroidism leading to cardiac arrhythmia and congestive heart failure. Refractory cardiogenic shock and hypotension in congenital hypothyroidism is rare. We describe a 5-month-old female infant with congenital hypothyroidism and refractory cardiogenic shock. Cardiac function and hemodynamic stability were restored after starting levothyroxine therapy. PMID:23188956

  1. A Shocking New Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Hydro Dynamics, Inc. received a technical helping hand from NASA that made their Hydrosonic Pump (HPump) a reality. Marshall engineers resolved a bearing problem in the rotor of the pump and recommended new bearings, housings and mounting hardware as a solution. The resulting HPump is able to heat liquids with greater energy efficiency using shock waves to generate heat.

  2. Teleconnected food supply shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bren d'Amour, Christopher; Wenz, Leonie; Kalkuhl, Matthias; Steckel, Jan Christoph; Creutzig, Felix

    2016-03-01

    The 2008-2010 food crisis might have been a harbinger of fundamental climate-induced food crises with geopolitical implications. Heat-wave-induced yield losses in Russia and resulting export restrictions led to increases in market prices for wheat across the Middle East, likely contributing to the Arab Spring. With ongoing climate change, temperatures and temperature variability will rise, leading to higher uncertainty in yields for major nutritional crops. Here we investigate which countries are most vulnerable to teleconnected supply-shocks, i.e. where diets strongly rely on the import of wheat, maize, or rice, and where a large share of the population is living in poverty. We find that the Middle East is most sensitive to teleconnected supply shocks in wheat, Central America to supply shocks in maize, and Western Africa to supply shocks in rice. Weighing with poverty levels, Sub-Saharan Africa is most affected. Altogether, a simultaneous 10% reduction in exports of wheat, rice, and maize would reduce caloric intake of 55 million people living in poverty by about 5%. Export bans in major producing regions would put up to 200 million people below the poverty line at risk, 90% of which live in Sub-Saharan Africa. Our results suggest that a region-specific combination of national increases in agricultural productivity and diversification of trade partners and diets can effectively decrease future food security risks.

  3. Teleconnected food supply shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bren d’Amour, Christopher; Wenz, Leonie; Kalkuhl, Matthias; Steckel, Jan Christoph; Creutzig, Felix

    2016-03-01

    The 2008–2010 food crisis might have been a harbinger of fundamental climate-induced food crises with geopolitical implications. Heat-wave-induced yield losses in Russia and resulting export restrictions led to increases in market prices for wheat across the Middle East, likely contributing to the Arab Spring. With ongoing climate change, temperatures and temperature variability will rise, leading to higher uncertainty in yields for major nutritional crops. Here we investigate which countries are most vulnerable to teleconnected supply-shocks, i.e. where diets strongly rely on the import of wheat, maize, or rice, and where a large share of the population is living in poverty. We find that the Middle East is most sensitive to teleconnected supply shocks in wheat, Central America to supply shocks in maize, and Western Africa to supply shocks in rice. Weighing with poverty levels, Sub-Saharan Africa is most affected. Altogether, a simultaneous 10% reduction in exports of wheat, rice, and maize would reduce caloric intake of 55 million people living in poverty by about 5%. Export bans in major producing regions would put up to 200 million people below the poverty line at risk, 90% of which live in Sub-Saharan Africa. Our results suggest that a region-specific combination of national increases in agricultural productivity and diversification of trade partners and diets can effectively decrease future food security risks.

  4. Bow Shocks at Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coates, Andrew J.

    2009-11-01

    Comets provide a wonderful laboratory to study the interaction of a fast flowing plasma, the solar wind, with neutral gas from the comet. On ionization, the more massive newly-born cometary ions are assimilated into the solar wind flow, eventually causing its deceleration via this `mass loading'. One of the effects of this is the cometary bow shock. The exploration of comet Halley by an armada of spacecraft in 1986, as well as the in-situ exploration of comets Giacobini-Zinner (1985), Grigg-Skjellerup (1992) and Borrelly (2001), has revealed important results on the behavior of these weak shocks and showed that mass loading plays a key role. In 2014, the Rosetta mission will provide the first observations of the formation of the cometary bow shock as a comet, Churyumov-Gerasimenko, nears the Sun. Rosetta will also provide the first measurements of the collision-dominated near-nucleus region. Here, we briefly review what we know about cometary bow shocks, and we examine the prospects for Rosetta.

  5. STEREO interplanetary shocks and foreshocks

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco-Cano, X.; Kajdic, P.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Russell, C. T.; Jian, L. K.; Luhmann, J. G.

    2013-06-13

    We use STEREO data to study shocks driven by stream interactions and the waves associated with them. During the years of the extended solar minimum 2007-2010, stream interaction shocks have Mach numbers between 1.1-3.8 and {theta}{sub Bn}{approx}20-86 Degree-Sign . We find a variety of waves, including whistlers and low frequency fluctuations. Upstream whistler waves may be generated at the shock and upstream ultra low frequency (ULF) waves can be driven locally by ion instabilities. The downstream wave spectra can be formed by both, locally generated perturbations, and shock transmitted waves. We find that many quasiperpendicular shocks can be accompanied by ULF wave and ion foreshocks, which is in contrast to Earth's bow shock. Fluctuations downstream of quasi-parallel shocks tend to have larger amplitudes than waves downstream of quasi-perpendicular shocks. Proton foreshocks of shocks driven by stream interactions have extensions dr {<=}0.05 AU. This is smaller than foreshock extensions for ICME driven shocks. The difference in foreshock extensions is related to the fact that ICME driven shocks are formed closer to the Sun and therefore begin to accelerate particles very early in their existence, while stream interaction shocks form at {approx}1 AU and have been producing suprathermal particles for a shorter time.

  6. Compression Shocks of Detached Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggink

    1947-01-01

    It is known that compression shocks which lead from supersonic to subsonic velocity cause the flow to separate on impact on a rigid wall. Such shocks appear at bodies with circular symmetry or wing profiles on locally exceeding sonic velocity, and in Laval nozzles with too high a back pressure. The form of the compression shocks observed therein is investigated.

  7. [[CARDIORENAL SYNDROMES : DEFINITION AND CLASSIFICATION].

    PubMed

    Moulin, Bruno

    2016-06-01

    Cardiorenal syndromes refer to clinical and metabolic consequences of acute and chronic heart failure or kidney disease on other organ. Recent studies have further clarified the pathophysiological mechanisms behind the different types of cardiorenal syndromes and propose a new classification. The cardiorenal syndrome type 1 corresponds to an acute heart failure (cardiogenic shock, acute decompensated congestive heart failure) which induces acute renal dysfunction. In the cardiorenal syndrome type 2 heart failure is chronic (congestive heart failure) and induces chronic kidney damages in the long-term. Whereas the renocardiac syndrome type 3 (acute) or 4 (chronic) corresponds to either acute renal failure situation (acute renal failure with tubular necrosis secondary to acute collapsus...) responsible for acute heart failure (left ventricular failure and pulmonary edema) or chronic (chronic glomerulonephritis, polycystic...) leading to chronic heart alteration (left ventricular hypertrophy, heart failure, arrhythmias). Finally, the failure of both organs can be simultaneous and secondary to a systemic or a metabolic disease (amyloidosis, diabetes) and corresponds to cardiorenal syndrome type 5. Epidemiological studies highlight the high incidence of cardiorenal syndromes type 1 and 2 and particularly the deleterious impact of renal impairment on the short and medium-term prognosis of heart failure. This classification is of essential interest for better identification of patients and help for the development of therapeutic studies. PMID:27538311

  8. Nodding Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sejvar, James J.; Riek, Lul; Vandemaele, Katelijn A.H.; Lamunu, Margaret; Kuesel, Annette C.; Schmutzhard, Erich; Matuja, William; Bunga, Sudhir; Foltz, Jennifer; Nutman, Thomas B.; Winkler, Andrea S.; Mbonye, Anthony K.

    2013-01-01

    An epidemic illness characterized by head nodding associated with onchocerciasis has been described in eastern Africa since the early 1960s; we summarize published reports and recent studies. Onset of nodding occurs in previously healthy 5–15-year-old children and is often triggered by eating or cold temperatures and accompanied by cognitive impairment. Its incidence has increased in Uganda and South Sudan over the past 10 years. Four case–control studies identified modest and inconsistent associations. There were nonspecific lesions seen by magnetic resonance imaging, no cerebrospinal fluid inflammation, and markedly abnormal electroencephalography results. Nodding episodes are atonic seizures. Testing has failed to demonstrate associations with trypanosomiasis, cysticercosis, loiasis, lymphatic filariasis, cerebral malaria, measles, prion disease, or novel pathogens; or deficiencies of folate, cobalamin, pyridoxine, retinol, or zinc; or toxicity from mercury, copper, or homocysteine. There is a consistent enigmatic association with onchocerciasis detected by skin snip or serologic analysis. Nodding syndrome is an unexplained epidemic epilepsy. PMID:23965548

  9. Antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    George, Diane; Erkan, Doruk

    2009-01-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune systemic disease that is diagnosed when there is vascular thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity occurring with persistently positive antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) (lupus anticoagulant test, anticardiolipin antibodies, and/or anti-beta(2)-glycoprotein I antibodies). Although International APS Classification Criteria have been formulated to provide a uniform approach to APS research, aPL may cause a spectrum of clinical manifestations, some of which are not included in these criteria. The main aPL-related cardiac manifestations include valve abnormalities (vegetations and/or thickening), myocardial infarction (MI), intracardiac thrombi, and myocardial microthrombosis. In this article, we will review the definition, etiopathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of aPL-related clinical events with emphasis on cardiac manifestations. PMID:19732604

  10. Nodding syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dowell, Scott F; Sejvar, James J; Riek, Lul; Vandemaele, Katelijn A H; Lamunu, Margaret; Kuesel, Annette C; Schmutzhard, Erich; Matuja, William; Bunga, Sudhir; Foltz, Jennifer; Nutman, Thomas B; Winkler, Andrea S; Mbonye, Anthony K

    2013-01-01

    An epidemic illness characterized by head nodding associated with onchocerciasis has been described in eastern Africa since the early 1960s; we summarize published reports and recent studies. Onset of nodding occurs in previously healthy 5-15-year-old children and is often triggered by eating or cold temperatures and accompanied by cognitive impairment. Its incidence has increased in Uganda and South Sudan over the past 10 years. Four case-control studies identified modest and inconsistent associations. There were nonspecific lesions seen by magnetic resonance imaging, no cerebrospinal fluid inflammation, and markedly abnormal electroencephalography results. Nodding episodes are atonic seizures. Testing has failed to demonstrate associations with trypanosomiasis, cysticercosis, loiasis, lymphatic filariasis, cerebral malaria, measles, prion disease, or novel pathogens; or deficiencies of folate, cobalamin, pyridoxine, retinol, or zinc; or toxicity from mercury, copper, or homocysteine. There is a consistent enigmatic association with onchocerciasis detected by skin snip or serologic analysis. Nodding syndrome is an unexplained epidemic epilepsy. PMID:23965548

  11. Diffusive Shock Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baring, Matthew

    2003-04-01

    The process of diffusive acceleration of charged particles in shocked plasmas is widely invoked in astrophysics to account for the ubiquitous presence of signatures of non-thermal relativistic electrons and ions in the universe. This statistical energization mechanism, manifested in turbulent media, was first posited by Enrico Fermi in 1949 to explain the observed cosmic ray population, which exhibits an almost power-law distribution in rigidity. The absence of a momentum scale is a key characteristic of diffusive shock acceleration, and astrophysical systems generally only impose scales at the injection (low energy) and loss (high energy) ends of the particle spectrum. The existence of structure in the cosmic ray spectrum (the "knee") at around 3000 TeV has promoted contentions that there are at least two origins for cosmic rays, a galactic one supplying those up to the knee, and perhaps an extragalactic one that can explain even the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) seen at 1-300 EeV. Accounting for the UHECRs with familiar astrophysical sites of acceleration has historically proven difficult due to the need to assume high magnetic fields in order to reduce the shortest diffusive acceleration timescale, the ion gyroperiod, to meaningful values. Yet active galaxies and gamma-ray bursts remain strong and interesting candidate sources for UHECRs, turning the theoretical focus to relativistic shocks. This review summarizes properties of diffusive shock acceleration that are salient to the issue of UHECR generation. These include spectral indices, anisotropies, acceleration efficencies and timescales, as functions of the shock speed and mean field orientation, and also the degree of field turbulence. Astrophysical sites for UHECR production are also critiqued.

  12. Mechanism of shock unsteadiness in separated shock/boundary-layer interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, L.; Larchevêque, L.; Dupont, P.

    2015-12-01

    A large-eddy simulation-based study is presented and focuses on different unsteadiness-source features in a Mach 2.3 shock reflection with separation. The sources of unsteadiness are localized and the path taken by disturbance as it spreads out to the whole field is defined. It is shown that the phenomena arising inside the recirculation bubble govern the whole interaction, at both low and intermediate frequencies. Indeed, the shock motion appears to mirror phenomena found in the separated zone. Moreover, features of separated-flow unsteadiness bear some resemblance to those occurring in incompressible flows. An equivalent inviscid scheme of the unsteady interaction is established in order to describe the whole shock-system unsteadiness at low and intermediate frequencies and the downstream unsteady-pressure field.

  13. Decreased heat shock protein 27 expression and altered autophagy in human cells harboring A8344G mitochondrial DNA mutation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chin-Yi; Chen, Hsueh-Fu; Gi, Siao-Jhen; Chi, Tang-Hao; Cheng, Che-Kun; Hsu, Chi-Fu; Ma, Yi-Shing; Wei, Yau-Huei; Liu, Chin-Shan; Hsieh, Mingli

    2011-09-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are responsible for human neuromuscular diseases caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. Myoclonus epilepsy associated with ragged-red fibers (MERRF) is a maternally inherited mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with various syndromes involving both muscular and nervous systems. The most common mutation in MERRF syndrome, A8344G mutation in mtDNA, has been associated with severe defects in protein synthesis. This defect impairs assembly of complexes in electron transport chain and results in decreased respiratory function of mitochondria. In this study, we showed a significant decrease of the heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) in lymphoblastoid cells derived from a MERRF patient and in cybrid cells harboring MERRF A8344G mutation. However, normal cytoplasmic distributions of Hsp27 and normal heat shock responses were observed in both wild type and mutant cybrids. Furthermore, overexpression of wild type Hsp27 in mutant MERRF cybrids significantly decreased cell death under staurosporine (STS) treatment, suggesting a protective function of Hsp27 in cells harboring the A8344G mutation of mtDNA. Meanwhile, reverse transcriptase PCR showed no difference in the mRNA level between normal and mutant cybrids, indicating that alterations may occur at the protein level. Evidenced by the decreased levels of Hsp27 upon treatment with proteasome inhibitor, starvation and rapamycin and the accumulation of Hsp27 upon lysosomal inhibitor treatment; Hsp27 may be degraded by the autophagic pathway. In addition, the increased formation of LC3-II and autophagosomes was found in MERRF cybrids under the basal condition, indicating a constitutively-activated autophagic pathway. It may explain, at least partially, the faster turnover of Hsp27 in MERRF cybrids. This study provides information for us to understand that Hsp27 is degraded through the autophagic pathway and that Hsp27 may have a protective role in MERRF cells. Regulating Hsp27 and the autophagic pathway

  14. Peptide Bβ15-42 Preserves Endothelial Barrier Function in Shock

    PubMed Central

    Ignatyev, George; Matt, Ulrich; Knapp, Sylvia; Atrasheuskaya, Alena; Bukin, Eugenij; Friedl, Peter; Zinkl, Daniela; Hofer-Warbinek, Renate; Zacharowski, Kai; Petzelbauer, Peter; Reingruber, Sonja

    2009-01-01

    Loss of vascular barrier function causes leak of fluid and proteins into tissues, extensive leak leads to shock and death. Barriers are largely formed by endothelial cell-cell contacts built up by VE-cadherin and are under the control of RhoGTPases. Here we show that a natural plasmin digest product of fibrin, peptide Bß15-42 (also called FX06), significantly reduces vascular leak and mortality in animal models for Dengue shock syndrome. The ability of Bß15-42 to preserve endothelial barriers is confirmed in rats i.v.-injected with LPS. In endothelial cells, Bß15-42 prevents thrombin-induced stress fiber formation, myosin light chain phosphorylation and RhoA activation. The molecular key for the protective effect of Bß15-42 is the src kinase Fyn, which associates with VE-cadherin-containing junctions. Following exposure to Bß15-42 Fyn dissociates from VE-cadherin and associates with p190RhoGAP, a known antagonists of RhoA activation. The role of Fyn in transducing effects of Bß15-42 is confirmed in Fyn−/− mice, where the peptide is unable to reduce LPS-induced lung edema, whereas in wild type littermates the peptide significantly reduces leak. Our results demonstrate a novel function for Bß15-42. Formerly mainly considered as a degradation product occurring after fibrin inactivation, it has now to be considered as a signaling molecule. It stabilizes endothelial barriers and thus could be an attractive adjuvant in the treatment of shock. PMID:19401765

  15. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Jonathan A.; Sawaya, Ronald Andari; Friedenberg, Frank K.

    2013-01-01

    Coinciding with the increasing rates of cannabis abuse has been the recognition of a new clinical condition known as Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome is characterized by chronic cannabis use, cyclic episodes of nausea and vomiting, and frequent hot bathing. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome occurs by an unknown mechanism. Despite the well-established anti-emetic properties of marijuana, there is increasing evidence of its paradoxical effects on the gastrointestinal tract and CNS. Tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol, and cannabigerol are three cannabinoids found in the cannabis plant with opposing effects on the emesis response. The clinical course of Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome may be divided into three phases: prodromal, hyperemetic, and recovery phase. The hyperemetic phase usually ceases within 48 hours, and treatment involves supportive therapy with fluid resuscitation and anti-emetic medications. Patients often demonstrate the learned behavior of frequent hot bathing, which produces temporary cessation of nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. The broad differential diagnosis of nausea and vomiting often leads to delay in the diagnosis of Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome. Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome shares several similarities with CHS and the two conditions are often confused. Knowledge of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and natural course of Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome is limited and requires further investigation. PMID:22150623

  16. Revisiting HELLP syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dusse, Luci Maria; Alpoim, Patrícia Nessralla; Silva, Juliano Teixeira; Rios, Danyelle Romana Alves; Brandão, Augusto Henriques; Cabral, Antônio Carlos Vieira

    2015-12-01

    HELLP syndrome was first described in 1982 by Weinstein et al. and the term HELLP refers to an acronym used to describe the clinical condition that leads to hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelets. The syndrome frequency varies from 0.5 to 0.9% pregnancies and manifests preferentially between the 27th and 37th week of gestation. Approximately 30% of cases occur after delivery. Although the etiopathogenesis of this syndrome remains unclear, histopathologic findings in the liver include intravascular fibrin deposits that presumably may lead to hepatic sinusoidal obstruction, intrahepatic vascular congestion, and increased intrahepatic pressure with ensuing hepatic necrosis, intraparenchymal and subcapsular hemorrhage, and eventually capsular rupture. Typical clinical symptoms of HELLP syndrome are pain in the right upper quadrant abdomen or epigastric pain, nausea and vomiting. However, this syndrome can present nonspecific symptoms and the diagnosis may be difficult to be established. Laboratory tests and imaging exams are essential for differential diagnosis with other clinical conditions. Treatment of HELLP syndrome with corticosteroids, targeting both lung maturation of the fetus is still an uncertain clinical value. In conclusion, three decades after the tireless efforts of Dr. Weinstein to characterize HELLP syndrome, it remains a challenge to the scientific community and several questions need to be answered for the benefit of pregnant women. PMID:26525965

  17. Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Galli, Jonathan A; Sawaya, Ronald Andari; Friedenberg, Frank K

    2011-12-01

    Coinciding with the increasing rates of cannabis abuse has been the recognition of a new clinical condition known as Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome is characterized by chronic cannabis use, cyclic episodes of nausea and vomiting, and frequent hot bathing. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome occurs by an unknown mechanism. Despite the well-established anti-emetic properties of marijuana, there is increasing evidence of its paradoxical effects on the gastrointestinal tract and CNS. Tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol, and cannabigerol are three cannabinoids found in the cannabis plant with opposing effects on the emesis response. The clinical course of Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome may be divided into three phases: prodromal, hyperemetic, and recovery phase. The hyperemetic phase usually ceases within 48 hours, and treatment involves supportive therapy with fluid resuscitation and anti-emetic medications. Patients often demonstrate the learned behavior of frequent hot bathing, which produces temporary cessation of nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. The broad differential diagnosis of nausea and vomiting often leads to delay in the diagnosis of Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome. Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome shares several similarities with CHS and the two conditions are often confused. Knowledge of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and natural course of Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome is limited and requires further investigation. PMID:22150623

  18. Expanded Small-Scale Shock Reactivity Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granholm, Richard

    2005-07-01

    Explosives react from a strong shock, even in quantities too small for detonation. The potential for a new material to be an explosive can be evaluated from this shock reactivity. The recently developed small-scale shock reactivity test (SSRT)ootnotetextH. W. Sandusky, R. H. Granholm, D. G. Bohl, ``Small-Scale Shock Reactivity Test,'' NSWC Technical Report (in publication), Naval Surface Warfare Center, Indian Head, MD 20640 uses very high confinement to allow prompt reactions to occur in less than half-gram samples well below critical diameter, with the reactions quantified by a dent in a soft aluminum witness block. This test has been expanded to simultaneously measure both early and late-time reactions from a single sample subjected to the output from an RP-80 detonator. The sample apparatus is further confined within a small chamber instrumented with a pressure gage for internal air blast. This provides a measure of late-time reactions, such as from fuel/air combustion. Results are shown from several simultaneous early- and late-reaction measurements.

  19. Shock induced crystallization of amorphous Nickel powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherukara, Mathew; Strachan, Alejandro

    2015-06-01

    Recent experimental work has shown the efficacy of amorphous Ni/crystalline Al composites as energetic materials, with flame velocities twice that of a comparable crystalline Ni/crystalline Al system. Of further interest is the recrystallization mechanisms in the pure amorphous Ni powders, both thermally induced and mechanically induced. We present large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of shock-induced recrystallization in loosely packed amorphous Nickel powders. We study the time dependent nucleation and growth processes by holding the shocked samples at the induced pressures and temperatures for extended periods following the passage of the shock (up to 6 ns). We find that the nanostructure of the recrystallized Ni and time scales of recrystallization are dependent on the piston velocity. At low piston velocities, nucleation events are rare, leading to long incubation times and a relatively coarse nanostructure. At higher piston velocities, local variations in temperature due to jetting phenomena and void collapse, give rise to multiple nucleation events on time scales comparable to the passage of the shock wave, leading to the formation of a fine-grained nanostructure. Interestingly, we observe that the nucleation and growth process occurs in two steps, with the first nuclei crystallizing into the BCC structure, before evolving over time into the expected FCC structure. U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency, HDTRA1-10-1-0119 (Program Manager Suhithi Peiris).

  20. Evolution of turbulence through interplanetary shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitna, Alexander; Safrankova, Jana; Nemecek, Zdenek; Nemec, Frantisek; Prech, Lubomir; Chen, Christopher H. K.; Zastenker, Georgy N.

    2015-04-01

    The solar wind plasma is a turbulent medium in which Alfvenic MHD turbulence is assumed to be a prime candidate for a transfer of large scale variations into smaller spatial scales, up to the ion kinetic scale related to a thermal gyroradius or an ion inertial length. Interplanetary shocks are naturally occurring in the solar wind and provide a unique opportunity to compare a relatively quiet solar wind upstream with the shocked plasma downstream. The BMSW instrument onboard the Spektr-R spacecraft has detected tens of interplanetary (IP) shocks in a course of the 2011-2014 years. The high-time resolution (31 ms) of the ion flux, density and solar wind speed measurements allows us to study spectral properties in the transition region between MHD and kinetic scales. We have found that the overall power of the ion flow fluctuations at all spatial scales increases roughly ten times. The spectral slope of the power spectra in the kinetic range (3-8 Hz) is steeper downstream IP shocks than in the upstream solar wind. If the fluctuation level increases the power law decay of ion kinetic structures gradually changes to the exponential decay already reported for turbulence in interstellar plasmas.

  1. Clostridium Sordellii as an Uncommon Cause of Fatal Toxic Shock Syndrome in a Postpartum 33-Year-Old Asian Woman, and the Need for Antepartum Screening for This Clostridia Species in the General Female Population.

    PubMed

    Guzzetta, Melissa; Williamson, Alex; Duong, Scott

    2016-08-01

    Clostridium sordellii (C. sordellii) is an anaerobic gram-positive rod most commonly found in the soil and sewage but also as part of the normal flora of the gastrointestinal tract and vagina of a small percentage of healthy individuals. C. sordellii infection is considered to result from childbirth, abortion, and/or gynecological procedures. Although many strains of C. sordellii are nonpathogenic, virulent toxin-producing strains exist. Infection with this organism typically manifests as a patient experiencing septic shock rapidly followed by end-organ failure. Identification of C. sordelli has been successful by traditional culture, mass spectrometry methods, and via molecular methods. Herein, we present a fatal case of C. sordellii infection of a postpartum 33-year-old Asian woman. The organism was isolated by culture and identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) technology. With the advent of rapid detection methods, antepartum screening for the fatal Clostridium species should be implemented in the general female population. PMID:27371657

  2. Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... PDF, 66 KB) Mental health Menstruation and the menstrual cycle What is premenstrual syndrome (PMS)? What causes PMS? ... is a group of symptoms linked to the menstrual cycle. PMS symptoms occur 1 to 2 weeks before ...

  3. Prospects for management of gastrointestinal injury associated with the acute radiation syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, A.; Walker, R.I.

    1988-08-01

    The effect of total-body ionizing radiation on the digestive tract is dose-dependent and time-dependent. At low doses (1.5 Gy), one observes only a short prodromal syndrome consisting of nausea, vomiting, and gastric suppression. At doses greater than 6 Gy, the prodromal syndrome is more marked, and it is followed after a 2-5-day remission period by a subacute syndrome, characterized by diarrhea and hematochezia. This gastrointestinal syndrome is superimposed onto a radiation-induced bone marrow suppression. The combination of intestinal and hemopoietic syndromes results in dehydration, anemia, and infection, leading eventually to irreversible shock and death. The treatment of prodromal symptoms is based on the administration of antiemetics and gastrokinetics, although an effective treatment devoid of side effects is not yet available for human therapy. The treatment of the gastrointestinal subacute syndrome remains difficult and unsuccessful after exposure to total body doses greater than 8-10 Gy. Supportive therapy to prevent infection and dehydration may be effective if restoration or repopulation of the intestinal and bone marrow stem cells does occur. In addition, bone marrow transplantation may improve the prospect of treating the hemopoietic syndrome, although the experience gained in Chernobyl suggests that this treatment is difficult to apply in the case of nuclear accidents. Administration of radioprotectants before irradiation decreases damage to healthy cells, while not protecting cancerous tissues. In the future, stimulation of gastrointestinal and hemopoietic progenitor cells may be possible using cell growth regulators, but much remains to be done to improve the treatment of radiation damage to the gastrointestinal tract. 77 references.

  4. Prospects for management of gastrointestinal injury associated with the acute radiation syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, A.; Walker, R.I.

    1988-08-01

    The effect of total-body ionizing radiation on the digestive tract is dose-dependent and time-dependent. At low doses (1.5 Gy), one observes only a short prodromal syndrome consisting of nausea, vomiting, and gastric suppression. At doses>6 Gy, the prodromal syndrome is more marked, and it is followed after a 2-5-day remission period by a subacute syndrome, characterized by diarrhea and hematochezia. This gastrointestinal syndrome is superimposed onto a radiation-induced bone marrow suppression. The combination of intestinal and hemopoietic syndromes results in dehydration, anemia, and infection, leading eventually to irreversible shock and death. The treatment of prodromal symptoms is based on the administration of antiemetics and gastrokinetics, although an effective treatment devoid of side effects is not yet available for human therapy. The treatment of the gastrointestinal subacute syndrome remains difficult and unsuccessful after exposure to total-body doses >8-10 Gy. Supportive therapy to prevent infection and dehydration may be effective if restoration or repopulation of the intestinal and bone marrow stem cells does occur. In addition, bone marrow transplantation may improve the prospect of treating the hemopoietic syndrome, although the experience gained in Chernobyl suggests that this treatment is difficult to apply in the case of nuclear accidents. Administration of radioprotectants before irradiation decreases damage to healthy cells, while not protecting cancerous tissues. In the future, stimulation of gastrointestinal and hemopoietic progenitor cells may be possible using cell growth regulators, but much remains to be done to improve the treatment of radiation damage to the gastrointestinal tract.

  5. PHACE(S) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Heyer, Geoffrey L

    2015-01-01

    PHACE(S) syndrome is a neurocutaneous disorder of unknown etiology. The acronym refers to the commonest features of PHACE: posterior fossa malformations, large facial hemangiomas, cerebral arterial anomalies, cardiovascular anomalies, and eye anomalies. When ventral developmental defects such as sternal clefting or supraumbilical raphe occur, the PHACES acronym may be used. The hallmark feature of PHACE is the presence of one or more large facial infantile hemangiomas that occupy at least one facial segment. Infantile hemangiomas differ from the capillary malformation (port wine stain) of Sturge-Weber syndrome, and the arteriovenous malformation of Wyburn-Mason syndrome, distinguishing PHACE syndrome from other neurocutaneous disorders with red birthmarks. The true incidence of PHACE has not yet been established. Girls are more commonly affected than boys. Cerebral vascular anomalies are probably the most common extracutaneous feature. Given that several organ systems are involved, a multidisciplinary approach to disease surveillance and treatment is advised. PMID:26564079

  6. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy in neonates with septic shock.

    PubMed

    McCune, S; Short, B L; Miller, M K; Lotze, A; Anderson, K D

    1990-05-01

    Neonatal septic shock has significant morbidity and mortality with current therapeutic measures. At Children's National Medical Center, from June 1984 to October 1986, 10 of 100 patients treated with venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) had a documented diagnosis of septic shock. All of these infants fulfilled criteria consistent with 80% mortality using conventional intensive medical management. However, the survival rate for the septic neonates in this study was 100%. Compared with other groups of infants treated with ECMO, these septic neonates required significantly more ventilatory support after ECMO and had a higher incidence of chronic lung disease (30% v 12%). The septic neonates were also at higher risk for intracranial hemorrhage than the other infants treated with ECMO (40% v 26%). The necessity for prolonged intubation after ECMO for patients with septic shock suggests that this condition may be associated with additional structural damage not seen with meconium aspiration syndrome or respiratory distress syndrome. Nevertheless, for neonatal patients with septic shock unresponsive to conventional medical management, ECMO must be considered a viable alternative treatment. PMID:2352078

  7. Septic shock; current pathogenetic concepts from a clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Tsiotou, Adelais G; Sakorafas, George H; Anagnostopoulos, George; Bramis, John

    2005-03-01

    Sepsis is an infection-induced syndrome characterized by a generalized inflammatory state and represents a frequent complication in the surgical patient. The normal reaction to infection involves a series of complex immunologic processes. A potent, complex immunologic cascade ensures a prompt protective response to microbial invasion in humans. Although activation of the immune system during microbial invasion is generally protective, septic shock develops in a number of patients as a consequence of excessive or poorly regulated immune response to the offending organism (Gram-negative or Gram-positive bacteria, fungi, viruses, or microbial toxins). This unbalanced reaction may harm the host through a maladaptive release of endogenously generated inflammatory compounds. Many mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of septic shock, including the release of cytokines, the activation of neutrophils, monocytes, and microvascular endothelial cells, as well as the activation of neuroendocrine reflexes and plasma protein cascade systems, such as the complement system, the intrinsic (contact system) and extrinsic pathways of coagulation, and the fibrinolytic system. In critically ill patients, the gastrointestinal tract plays a central role in the pathogenesis of septic shock. The potential for complementary and synergistic interaction of the different components in this cascade highlights the difficulty encountered in trying to identify a single means of altering the progression of sepsis and septic shock to multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and multiple organ failure (MOF). PMID:15735579

  8. What is a Shock Wave to an Explosive Molecule?

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, C M

    2001-06-12

    An explosive molecule is a metastable chemical species that reacts exothermically given the correct stimulus. Impacting an explosive with a shock wave is a ''wake-up call'' or ''trigger'' which compresses and heats the molecule. The energy deposited by the shock wave must be distributed to the vibrational modes of the explosive molecule before chemical reaction can occur. If the shock pressure and temperature are high enough and last long enough, exothermic chemical decomposition can lead to the formation of a detonation wave. For gaseous, liquid, and perfect single crystal solid explosives, after an induction time, chemical reaction begins at or near the rear boundary of the charge. This induction time can be calculated by high pressure, high temperature transition state theory. A ''superdetonation'' wave travels through the preshocked explosive until it overtakes the initial shock wave and then slows to the steady state Chapman-Jouguet (C-J) velocity. In heterogeneous solid explosives, initiation of reaction occurs at ''hot spots'' created by shock compression. If there is a sufficient number of large and hot enough ''hot spots,'' these ignition sites grow creating a pressure pulse that overtakes the leading shock front causing detonation. Since the chemical energy is released well behind the leading shock front of a detonation wave, a mechanism is required for this energy to reinforce the leading shock front and maintain its overall constant velocity. This mechanism is the amplification of pressure wavelets in the reaction zone by the process of de-excitation of the initially highly vibrationally excited reaction product molecules. This process leads to the development of the three-dimensional structure of detonation waves observed for all explosives. In a detonation wave, the leading shock wave front becomes a ''burden'' for the explosive molecule to sustain by its chemical energy release.

  9. Weak-shock reflection factors

    SciTech Connect

    Reichenbach, H.; Kuhl, A.L.

    1993-09-07

    The purpose of this paper is to compare reflection factors for weak shocks from various surfaces, and to focus attention on some unsolved questions. Three different cases are considered: square-wave planar shock reflection from wedges; square-wave planar shock reflection from cylinders; and spherical blast wave reflection from a planar surface. We restrict ourselves to weak shocks. Shocks with a Mach number of M{sub O} < 1.56 in air or with an overpressure of {Delta}{sub PI} < 25 psi (1.66 bar) under normal ambient conditions are called weak.

  10. Fast-shock formation in line-tied magnetic reconnection models of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, T. G.

    1986-01-01

    In a previous study by the author, an approximately stationary fast shock was tentatively identified in a numerical experiment designed to study line-tied magnetic reconnection. Here the evidence for the occurrence of a stationary fast shock is reexamined, and the previous identification is confirmed. In the numerical experiment, line-tied reconnection is modeled by a configuration which produces two supermagnetosonic outflow jets - one directed upward, away from the photosphere, and one directed downward, toward an arcade of closed magnetic loops tied to the photosphere. The fast shock occurs when the downward-directed jet encounters the obstacle formed by the closed loops. Although the existence of a stationary, or nearly stationary, fast shock is confirmed, the transition from the supermagnetosonic flow region upstream of the shock to the nearly static region downstream of the shock is more complicated than was previously thought. Immediately downstream of the shock, there exists a deflection sheath in which the submagnetosonic flow coming out of the shock is diverted around the region of static closed loops. The MHD jump conditions are used to investigate the characteristics of the fast shock and to show that a stationary shock cannot exist unless accompanied by a deflection sheath. Analysis of the shock's location and dimensions suggests that such fast shocks may contribute to particle acceleration and to thermal condensation in flares.

  11. SELF-REGULATED SHOCKS IN MASSIVE STAR BINARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Parkin, E. R.; Sim, S. A. E-mail: s.sim@qub.ac.uk

    2013-04-20

    In an early-type, massive star binary system, X-ray bright shocks result from the powerful collision of stellar winds driven by radiation pressure on spectral line transitions. We examine the influence of the X-rays from the wind-wind collision shocks on the radiative driving of the stellar winds using steady-state models that include a parameterized line force with X-ray ionization dependence. Our primary result is that X-ray radiation from the shocks inhibits wind acceleration and can lead to a lower pre-shock velocity, and a correspondingly lower shocked plasma temperature, yet the intrinsic X-ray luminosity of the shocks, L{sub X}, remains largely unaltered, with the exception of a modest increase at small binary separations. Due to the feedback loop between the ionizing X-rays from the shocks and the wind driving, we term this scenario as self-regulated shocks. This effect is found to greatly increase the range of binary separations at which a wind-photosphere collision is likely to occur in systems where the momenta of the two winds are significantly different. Furthermore, the excessive levels of X-ray ionization close to the shocks completely suppress the line force, and we suggest that this may render radiative braking less effective. Comparisons of model results against observations reveal reasonable agreement in terms of log (L{sub X}/L{sub bol}). The inclusion of self-regulated shocks improves the match for kT values in roughly equal wind momenta systems, but there is a systematic offset for systems with unequal wind momenta (if considered to be a wind-photosphere collision).

  12. Multipoint study of interplanetary shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Cano, Xochitl; Kajdic, Primoz; Russell, Christopher T.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, Ernesto; Jian, Lan K.; Luhmann, Janet G.

    2016-04-01

    Interplanetary (IP) shocks are driven in the heliosphere by Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs) and Stream Interaction Regions (SIRs). These shocks perturb the solar wind plasma, and play an active role in the acceleration of ions to suprathermal energies. Shock fronts evolve as they move from the Sun. Their surfaces can be far from uniform and be modulated by changes in the ambient solar wind (magnetic field orientation, flow velocity), shocks rippling, and perturbations upstream and downstream from the shocks, i.e., electromagnetic waves. In this work we use multipoint observations from STEREO, WIND, and MESSENGER missions to study shock characteristics at different helio-longitudes and determine the properties of the waves near them. We also determine shock longitudinal extensions and foreshock sizes. The variations of geometry along the shock surface can result in different extensions of the wave and ion foreshocks ahead of the shocks, and in different wave modes upstream and downtream of the shocks. We find that the ion foreshock can extend up to 0.2 AU ahead of the shock, and that the upstream region with modified solar wind/waves can be very asymmetric.

  13. Shock metamorphism of deformed quartz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gratz, Andrew J.; Christie, John; Tyburczy, James; Ahrens, Thomas; Pongratz, Peter

    1988-01-01

    The effect produced by shock loading (to peak pressures of 12 and 24) on deformed synthetic quartz containing a dislocation and abundant bubbles and small inclusions was investigated, and the relationships between preexisting dislocation density shock lamellae in the target material were examined. The resultant material was found to be inhomogeneously deformed and extremely fractured. Results of TEM examinations indicate that no change in dislocation density was caused by shock loading except in regions containing shock lamellae, where the dislocation density was lowered. The shock-induced defects tend to nucleate on and be controlled by preexisting stress concentrators; shock lamellae, glassy veins, and most curviplanar defects form in tension, presumably during release. An extremely mobile silica fluid is formed and injected into fractures during release, which forcibly removes crystalline fragments from vein walls. It is concluded that shock deformation in quartz is dominated by fracture and melting.

  14. Role of shock-timing in two-shock platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasheninnikova, Natalia; Bradley, Paul; Olson, Rick; Kyrala, George; Peterson, Bob; Devolder, Barbara; Shah, Rahul

    2015-11-01

    In present work we discuss the role of shock-timing and location of shock coalescence in newly developed two-shock platform on NIF. It is generally believed that single-shell capsules perform better when the shocks coalesce in the gas due to lower shell entropy, larger convergence ratio, better hot-spot assembly, and mix. Using HYDRA and RAGE with BHR we investigated this hypothesis for the case of separated reactants capsule and found when shocks coalesced in the gas yield improved by ~ 50% while acceptance energy only increased by ~ 3%. This suggests that improving shock timing can increase the neutron yield without a significant increase in the drive. The picture of how the mix changes with variation in shock timing is not as crisp as the overall performance. In particular, according RAGE with BHR, the mix mass can be higher or lower depending on the strength of the first shock, even when the location of coalescence is the same. However, DT yield, which is a measure of mix, noticeably increases when the shock coalesce in the gas due to prevalence of higher temperatures in the mixed region. So perhaps the mix mass is more sensitive to the strength of the shocks rather than the location of their coalescence.

  15. Superdiffusive shock acceleration and short acceleration times at interplanetary shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perri, Silvia; Zimbardo, Gaetano

    2016-04-01

    The analysis of time profiles of particles accelerated at interplanetary shock waves has shown evidence for superdiffusive transport in the upstream region. Superdiffusive transport is characterized by a mean square displacement that grows faster than linearly in time and by non Gaussian statistics for the distribution of the particle jump lengths. In the superdiffusive framework it has been shown that particle time profiles upstream of a planar shock decay as power laws, at variance with exponential particle time profiles predicted in the case of diffusive transport. A large number of interplanetary shocks, including coronal mass ejection driven shocks, exhibit energetic particle time profiles that decay as power laws far upstream. In order to take this evidence into account, we have extended the standard theory of diffusive shock acceleration to the case of particle superdiffusive transport (superdiffusive shock acceleration). This has allowed us to derive both hard energy spectral indices and short acceleration times. This new theory has been tested for a number of interplanetary shock waves, observed by the Ulysses and the ACE spacecraft, and for the termination shock. The superdiffusive shock acceleration leads to a strong reduction of the acceleration times (even of about one order of magnitude) with respect to the diffusive shock acceleration. Thus, this new framework provides a substantial advancement in the understanding of the processes of particle acceleration and particle transport, which are among the main objectives of the new Solar Probe and Solar Orbiter space missions.

  16. Posterior ankle impingement syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maquirriain, Javier

    2005-10-01

    Posterior ankle impingement syndrome is a clinical disorder characterized by posterior ankle pain that occurs in forced plantar flexion. The pain may be acute as a result of trauma or chronic from repetitive stress. Pathology of the os trigonum-talar process is the most common cause of this syndrome, but it also may result from flexor hallucis longus tenosynovitis, ankle osteochondritis, subtalar joint disease, and fracture. Patients usually report chronic or recurrent posterior ankle pain caused or exacerbated by forced plantar flexion or push-off maneuvers, such as may occur during dancing, kicking, or downhill running. Diagnosis of posterior ankle impingement syndrome is based primarily on clinical history and physical examination. Radiography, scintigraphy, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging depict associated bone and soft-tissue abnormalities. Symptoms typically improve with nonsurgical management, but surgery may be required in refractory cases. PMID:16224109

  17. A scarlet pimpernel for the resolution of inflammation? The role of supra-therapeutic doses of cobalamin, in the treatment of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic or traumatic shock.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Carmen

    2006-01-01

    Cobalamin carrier proteins,the Transcobalamins (TCS), are elevated during trauma, infections and chronic inflammatory conditions. This remains un-explained. It is proposed that such TC elevations signal a need for cobalamin central to the resolution of inflammation. Thus Cobalamin may regulate the transcription factor, NFkappaB, activation or suppression of which determines the inflammatory response and its resolution. Such regulation may involve at least 5 separate mechanisms: (i) hormone-like regulation of TNFalpha, through reduction of excess NO by cobalamin, as well as through the selective inhibition, in tandem with glutathione, of inducible nitric oxide synthase; (ii) quenching of nitric oxide radicals and reactive oxygen species, enhanced by cobalamin's glutathione sparing effect; (iii) the promotion of acetylcholine synthesis, central to the neuro-immune cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway; (iv) the promotion of oxidative phosphorylation; (v) and a bacteriostatic role of the TCS released by neutrophil secondary granules during phagocytosis, which also appears to modulate the inflammatory response. TC elevations are dependent on NFkappaB activation, through crosstalk between NFkappaB and Sp1, another member of the helix-loop-helix protein family, which directly mediates transcription of the TCII gene. Sp1 also has binding sites on the TNFalpha and EGF gene promoters. NFkappaB may thus ensure sufficient cobalamin to determine its own eventual suppression. Cobalamin's established regulation of EGF may additionally preserve normal function of macrophages and the coagulation cascade in wound healing. By regulating NFkappaB, Cobalamin may also be the as yet unidentified mediator needed to potentiate the anti-inflammatory action of eicosanoids derived from omega-3 essential fatty acids. Moreover, animal and human clinical data suggests that high dose cobalamin may prove a promising approach to SIRS/sepsis/septic and traumatic shock. PMID:16545917

  18. Mortality of one-week-old chickens during naturally occurring Marek's disease virus infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease (MD) is a serious economic disease of chickens which occurs worldwide. MD can present as one of several forms, with the most commonly occurring forms being the lymphoproliferative diseases. Under experimental conditions, an early mortality syndrome has been recognized following infec...

  19. SUPERDIFFUSIVE SHOCK ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Perri, S.; Zimbardo, G.

    2012-05-10

    The theory of diffusive shock acceleration is extended to the case of superdiffusive transport, i.e., when the mean square deviation grows proportionally to t{sup {alpha}}, with {alpha} > 1. Superdiffusion can be described by a statistical process called Levy random walk, in which the propagator is not a Gaussian but it exhibits power-law tails. By using the propagator appropriate for Levy random walk, it is found that the indices of energy spectra of particles are harder than those obtained where a normal diffusion is envisaged, with the spectral index decreasing with the increase of {alpha}. A new scaling for the acceleration time is also found, allowing substantially shorter times than in the case of normal diffusion. Within this framework we can explain a number of observations of flat spectra in various astrophysical and heliospheric contexts, for instance, for the Crab Nebula and the termination shock of the solar wind.

  20. Shock Classication of Ordinary Chondrites: New Data and Interpretations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoffler, D.; Keil, K.; Scott, E. R. D.

    1992-07-01

    Introduction. The recently proposed classification system for shocked chondrites (1) is based on a microscopic survey of 76 non-Antarctic H, L, and LL chondrites. Obviously, a larger database is highly desirable in order to confirm earlier conclusions and to allow for a statistically relevant interpretation of the data. Here, we report the shock classification of an additional 54 ordinary chondrites and summarize implications based on a total of 130 samples. New observations on shock effects. Continued studies of those shock effects in olivine and plagioclase that are indicative of the shock stages S1 - S6 as defined in (1) revealed the following: Planar deformation features in olivine, considered typical of stage S5, occur occasionally in stage S3 and are common in stage S4. In some S4 chondrites plagioclase is not partially isotropic but still birefringent coexisting with a small fraction of S3 olivines. Opaque shock veins occur not only in shock stage S3 and above (1) but have now been found in a few chondrites of shock stage S2. Thermal annealing of shock effects. Planar fractures and planar deformation features in olivine persist up to the temperatures required for recrystallization of olivine (> ca. 900 degrees C). Shock history of breccias. In a number of petrologic types 3 and 4 chondrites without recognizable (polymict) breccia texture, we found chondrules and olivine fragments with different shock histories ranging from S1 to S3. Regolith and fragmental breccias are polymict with regard to lithology and shock. The intensity of the latest shock typically varies from S1 to S4 in the breccias studied so far. Frequency distribution of shock stages. A significant difference between H and L chondrites is emerging in contrast to our previous statistics (1), whereas the conspicuous lack of shock stages S5 and S6 in type 3 and 4 chondrites is clearly confirmed (Fig. 1). Correlation between shock and noble gas content. The concentration of radiogenic argon and of

  1. Incidence of cavitation in the fragmentation process of extracorporeal shock wave lithotriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rink, K.; Delacrétaz, G.; Pittomvils, G.; Boving, R.; Lafaut, J. P.

    1994-05-01

    The fragmentation mechanism occurring in extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is investigated using a fiber optic stress sensing technique. With our technique, we demonstrate that cavitation is a major cause of fragmentation in ESWL procedures. When a target is placed in the operating area of the lithotriptor, two shock waves are detected. The first detected shock wave corresponds to the incoming shock wave generated by the lithotriptor. The second shock wave, detected some hundreds of microseconds later, is generated in situ. It results from the collapse of a cavitation bubble, formed by the reflection of the incoming shock wave at the target boundary. This cavitation induced shock wave generates the largest stress in the target area according to our stress sensing measurements.

  2. Landing-shock Recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brevoort, M J

    1934-01-01

    A description of a special type of seismograph, called a "landing-shock recorder," to be used for measuring the acceleration during impacts such as are experienced in airplane landings, is given . The theory, together with the assumptions made, is discussed in its relation to calculating the acceleration experienced in impact. Calculations are given from records obtained for two impacts of known acceleration. In one case the impact was very severe and in the other it was only moderately severe.

  3. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    PubMed

    Morscher, J H

    1992-02-01

    Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is a cardiac conduction disorder that presents with potentially life-threatening consequences. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome-induced dysrhythmias account for 20% of all supraventricular tachycardias that occur in the general population. Clinical presentations range from no symptoms to a sudden cardiac arrest. The risk of sudden death is always present with WPW syndrome, and it is the motivating force in the evaluation and treatment of this syndrome. Current diagnostic modalities are accurate in identifying patients with WPW syndrome, but lack the sensitivity to predict sudden cardiac death. This article reviews the history of WPW syndrome, as well as its general characteristics, diagnostic criteria, treatment modalities, and nursing implications. PMID:1554559

  4. Paraneoplastic syndromes in olfactory neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Gabrych, Anna; Czapiewski, Piotr; Sworczak, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Olfactory neuroblastoma (ONB) is a rare malignant neoplasm of sinonasal tract, derived from olfactory epithelium. Unilateral nasal obstruction, epistaxis, sinusitis, and headaches are common symptoms. Olfactory neuroblastoma shows neuroendocrine differentiation and similarly to other neuroendocrine tumors can produce several types of peptic substances and hormones. Excess production of these substances can be responsible for different types of endocrinological paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS). Moreover, besides endocrinological, in ONB may also occur neurological PNS, caused by immune cross-reactivity between tumor and normal host tissues in the nervous system. Paraneoplastic syndromes in ONB include: syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion (SIADH), ectopic ACTH syndrome (EAS), humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy (HHM), hypertension due to catecholamine secretion by tumor, opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia (OMA) and paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Paraneoplastic syndromes in ONB tend to have atypical features, therefore diagnosis may be difficult. In this review, we described initial symptoms, patterns of presentation, treatment and outcome of paraneoplastic syndromes in ONB, reported in the literature. PMID:26199564

  5. Pseudoaminopterin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kraoua, Lilia; Capri, Yline; Perrin, Laurence; Benmansour, Abdelmajjid; Verloes, Alain

    2012-09-01

    Pseudoaminopterin syndrome or aminopterin syndrome-like sine aminopterin (ASSA syndrome--OMIM 600325] is a rare autosomal recessive syndrome defined by characteristic dysmorphic features, skeletal defects, limb anomalies, cryptorchidism, and growth retardation. The syndrome owes its name to the fact that patients resemble the children exposed to aminopterin or to methotrexate, two dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors used for chemotherapy, or as an abortificient in early pregnancy. Ten patients have been described with pseudoaminopterin syndrome. Their phenotype is variable, and differs from the phenotype resulting from folic acid deprivation, leading to the notion that the pathogenesis may be more complex than simple vitamin deficiency. We report on an Algerian patient with pseudoaminopterin syndrome, review the previously reported cases and confirm that pseudoaminopterin syndrome does not result from a detectable contiguous gene imbalance as high resolution CGH array was normal in this child. PMID:22811276

  6. Usher Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Usher syndrome is an inherited disease that causes serious hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa, an eye disorder ... hearing and vision. There are three types of Usher syndrome: People with type I are deaf from ...

  7. Morquio syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... to have children and who have a family history of Morquio syndrome. Counseling is also recommended for families who have a child with Morquio syndrome to help them understand the condition and possible treatments. Prenatal testing is available.

  8. Asperger syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001549.htm Asperger syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Asperger syndrome is often considered a high functioning form ...

  9. Piriformis syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... sciatica; Hip socket neuropathy; Pelvic outlet syndrome; Low back pain - piriformis References Joseph RL, Alleva JT, Hudgins TH. Piriformis syndrome. In: Frontera: Essentials of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap ...

  10. Pendred Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... thyroid gland. Pendred syndrome also can affect the vestibular system, which controls balance. Some people with Pendred syndrome will show vestibular weakness when their balance is tested. However, the ...

  11. Turner Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or ... t work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of ...

  12. Premenstrual syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2009;2:CD001396. Lentz GM. Primary and secondary dysmenorrhea, premenstrual syndrome, and premenstrual dysphoric disorder: etiology, diagnosis, management. In: Lentz GM, Lobo RA, Gershenson DM, Katz VL, eds. ...

  13. Cushing syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cushing syndrome is called exogenous Cushing syndrome . Prednisone, dexamethasone, and prednisolone are examples of this type of ... Blood cortisol levels Blood sugar Saliva cortisol levels Dexamethasone suppression test 24-hour urine for cortisol and ...

  14. Cushing's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cushing's syndrome, also called hypercortisolism , is a rare endocrine disorder caused by chronic exposure of the body's tissues ... removing the tumor while minimizing the chance of endocrine deficiency or long-term ... for Cushing's Syndrome Clinical Trials ...

  15. Hurler syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Hurler syndrome is a rare disease of metabolism in which a person cannot break down long chains of sugar molecules called glycosaminoglycans (formerly called mucopolysaccharides). Hurler syndrome belongs to a group of diseases called mucopolysaccharidosis, ...

  16. Bloom's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Glycogen Storage Disease, Type 1A Joubert Syndrome Maple Syrup Urine Disease and DLD Mucolipidosis IV (MLIV) Nemaline ... Glycogen Storage Disease, Type 1A Joubert Syndrome Maple Syrup Urine Disease and DLD Mucolipidosis IV (MLIV) Nemaline ...

  17. Angelman Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes developmental delay and neurological problems. The physician Harry Angelman first delineated the syndrome in 1965, when ... 202-534-3731 Prader-Willi Syndrome Association 8588 Potter Park Drive Suite 500 Sarasota, FL 34238 national@ ...

  18. Asperger syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Asperger syndrome is often considered a high functioning form of autism. It can lead to difficulty interacting socially, repeat behaviors, and clumsiness. Asperger syndrome is a part of the larger developmental disorder ...

  19. Rett Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Rett syndrome is a rare genetic disease that causes developmental and nervous system problems, mostly in girls. It's related to autism spectrum disorder. Babies with Rett syndrome seem to grow and develop normally at first. ...

  20. Short- and medium-range orders in Cu46Zr54 metallic glasses under shock compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, W. R.; Yao, X. H.; Wang, L.; Tang, X. C.; Luo, S. N.

    2015-07-01

    We investigate short- and medium-range orders in Cu46Zr54 metallic glasses, as represented by icosahedra and icosahedron networks, respectively, under shock compression with molecular dynamics simulations. Complementary isothermal compression and isobaric heating simulations reveal that compression below 60 GPa gives rise to increased coordination and thus high-coordination-number Voronoi polyhedra, such as icosahedra; however, pressure-induced collapse or thermal disintegration of icosahedra (and subsequently, icosahedron networks) occurs at pressures above 60 GPa or at melting, accompanied by free volume increase. The evolutions of the short- and medium-range orders upon shock loading are the effects of compression combined with shock-induced melting. The structural changes are partially reversible for weak shocks without melting (below 60 GPa) and irreversible for strong shocks. Crystallization does not occur under isothermal or shock compression at molecular dynamics scales.

  1. The Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umbreit, John; Ostrow, Lisa S.

    1980-01-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome is a pattern of altered growth and morphogenesis found in about half the offspring of severely and chronically alcoholic women who continue drinking throughout their pregnancy. Of children studied, mild to moderate mental retardation was the most common disorder, occurring in 44 percent of the cases. (PHR)

  2. Shock Initiation of Energetic Materials at Different Initial Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Urtiew, P A; Tarver, C M

    2005-01-14

    Shock initiation is one of the most important properties of energetic materials, which must transition to detonation exactly as intended when intentionally shocked and not detonate when accidentally shocked. The development of manganin pressure gauges that are placed inside the explosive charge and record the buildup of pressure upon shock impact has greatly increased the knowledge of these reactive flows. This experimental data, together with similar data from electromagnetic particle velocity gauges, has allowed us to formulate the Ignition and Growth model of shock initiation and detonation in hydrodynamic computer codes for predictions of shock initiation scenarios that cannot be tested experimentally. An important problem in shock initiation of solid explosives is the change in sensitivity that occurs upon heating (or cooling). Experimental manganin pressure gauge records and the corresponding Ignition and Growth model calculations are presented for two solid explosives, LX-17 (92.5 % triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) with 7.5 % Kel-F binder) and LX-04 (85 % octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazine (HMX) with 15 % Viton binder) at several initial temperatures.

  3. ON THE EXISTENCE OF SHOCKS IN IRRADIATED EXOPLANETARY ATMOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Heng, Kevin

    2012-12-10

    Supersonic flows are expected to exist in the atmospheres of irradiated exoplanets, but the question of whether shocks develop lingers. Specifically, it reduces to whether continuous flow in a closed loop may become supersonic and if some portions of the supersonic flow steepen into shocks. We first demonstrate that continuous, supersonic flow may exist in two flavors: isentropic and non-isentropic, with shocks being included in the latter class of solutions. Supersonic flow is a necessary but insufficient condition for shocks to develop. The development of a shock requires the characteristics of neighboring points in a flow to intersect. We demonstrate that the intersection of characteristics may be quantified via the knowledge of the Mach number. Finally, we examine three-dimensional simulations of hot Jovian atmospheres and demonstrate that shock formation is expected to occur mostly on the dayside hemisphere, upstream of the substellar point, because the enhanced temperatures near the substellar point provide a natural pressure barrier for the returning flow. Understanding the role of shocks in irradiated exoplanetary atmospheres is relevant to correctly modeling observables such as the peak offsets of infrared phase curves.

  4. Propagation of an interplanetary shock along the heliospheric plasma sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odstrčil, D.; Dryer, M.; Smith, Z.

    1996-09-01

    Propagation of an interplanetary shock along the heliospheric plasma sheet (HPS) is simulated using a high-resolution numerical MHD model in the meridional plane. The ambient solar wind contains two opposite orientations of the interplanetary magnetic field above and below the equatorial plane. These regions are separated by a thin transition layer that represents the heliospheric current sheet contained within the HPS. A pulse is introduced at the inner boundary (0.1 AU) into this steady state to initiate the interplanetary shock. The HPS with its weaker intensity of the magnetic field, larger mass density, and slower flow velocity modifies the global shock structure. A dimple is formed at the forward shock front, a reverse dimple is formed at the reverse shock, and the contact discontinuity is significantly distorted. Weak compression of the HPS occurs beyond the forward shock front due to the postshock increase of the azimuthal magnetic pressure. Although slight collimation of mass flow takes place toward the axis of the HPS, an antisunward protrusion (``pimple'') within the shock front's dimple did not form in our simulation.

  5. Destruction of Interstellar Dust in Evolving Supernova Remnant Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, Jonathan D.; Dwek, Eli; Jones, Anthony P.

    2015-01-01

    Supernova generated shock waves are responsible for most of the destruction of dust grains in the interstellar medium (ISM). Calculations of the dust destruction timescale have so far been carried out using plane parallel steady shocks, however that approximation breaks down when the destruction timescale becomes longer than that for the evolution of the supernova remnant (SNR) shock. In this paper we present new calculations of grain destruction in evolving, radiative SNRs. To facilitate comparison with the previous study by Jones et al. (1996), we adopt the same dust properties as in that paper. We find that the efficiencies of grain destruction are most divergent from those for a steady shock when the thermal history of a shocked gas parcel in the SNR differs significantly from that behind a steady shock. This occurs in shocks with velocities 200 km s(exp -1) for which the remnant is just beginning to go radiative. Assuming SNRs evolve in a warm phase dominated ISM, we find dust destruction timescales are increased by a factor of approximately 2 compared to those of Jones et al. (1996), who assumed a hot gas dominated ISM. Recent estimates of supernova rates and ISM mass lead to another factor of approximately 3 increase in the destruction timescales, resulting in a silicate grain destruction timescale of approximately 2-3 Gyr. These increases, while not able resolve the problem of the discrepant timescales for silicate grain destruction and creation, are an important step towards understanding the origin, and evolution of dust in the ISM.

  6. Velocardiofacial Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gothelf, Doron; Frisch, Amos; Michaelovsky, Elena; Weizman, Abraham; Shprintzen, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), also known as DiGeorge, conotruncal anomaly face, and Cayler syndromes, is caused by a microdeletion in the long arm of Chromosome 22. We review the history of the syndrome from the first clinical reports almost half a century ago to the current intriguing molecular findings associating genes from the…

  7. Shock-wave surfing

    SciTech Connect

    Laurence, Stuart J; Deiterding, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    A phenomenon referred to as shock-wave surfing , in which a body moves in such a way as to follow the shock wave generated by another upstream body, is investigated numerically and theoretically. This process can lead to the downstream body accumulating a significantly higher lateral velocity than would otherwise be possible, and thus is of importance in situations such as meteoroid fragmentation, in which the fragment separation behaviour following disruption is determined to a large extent by aerodynamic effects. The surfing effect is first investigated in the context of interactions between a sphere and a planar oblique shock. Numerical simulations are performed and a simple theoretical model is developed to determine the forces acting on the sphere. A phase-plane description is employed to elucidate features of the system dynamics. The theoretical model is then generalised to the more complex situation of aerodynamic interactions between two spheres, and, through comparisons with further computations, is shown to adequately predict, in particular, the final separation velocity of the surfing sphere in initially touching configurations. Both numerical simulations and theory indicate a strong influence of the body radius ratio on the separation process and predict a critical radius ratio for initially touching fragments that delineates entrainment of the smaller fragment within the larger fragment s shock from expulsion; this critical ratio also results in the most extended surfing. Further, these results show that an earlier prediction for the separation velocity to scale with the square root of the radius ratio does not accurately describe the separation behaviour. The theoretical model is then employed to investigate initial configurations with varying relative sphere positions and initial velocities. A phase-space description is also shown to be useful in elucidating the dynamics of the sphere-sphere system. With regard to meteoroid fragmentation, it is shown

  8. Effects of Interplanetary Shock Inclinations on Nightside Auroral Power Intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, D. M.; Raeder, J.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Gjerloev, J. W.

    2016-02-01

    We derive fast forward interplanetary (IP) shock speeds and impact angles to study the geoeffectiveness of 461 IP shocks that occurred from January 1995 to December 2013 using ACE and Wind spacecraft data. The geomagnetic activity is inferred from the SuperMAG project data. SuperMAG is a large chain which employs more than 300 ground stations to compute enhanced versions of the traditional geomagnetic indices. The SuperMAG auroral electroject SME index, an enhanced version of the traditional AE index, is used as an auroral power (AP) indicator. AP intensity jumps triggered by shock impacts are correlated with both shock speed and impact angle. It is found that high AP intensity events typically occur when high speed IP shocks impact the Earth's magnetosphere with the shock normal almost parallel to the Sun-Earth line. This result suggests that symmetric and strong magnetospheric compression leads to favorable conditions for intense auroral power release, as shown previously by simulations and observations. Some potential mechanisms will be discussed.

  9. Remotely triggered earthquakes following moderate main shocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hough, S.E.

    2007-01-01

    Since 1992, remotely triggered earthquakes have been identified following large (M > 7) earthquakes in California as well as in other regions. These events, which occur at much greater distances than classic aftershocks, occur predominantly in active geothermal or volcanic regions, leading to theories that the earthquakes are triggered when passing seismic waves cause disruptions in magmatic or other fluid systems. In this paper, I focus on observations of remotely triggered earthquakes following moderate main shocks in diverse tectonic settings. I summarize evidence that remotely triggered earthquakes occur commonly in mid-continent and collisional zones. This evidence is derived from analysis of both historic earthquake sequences and from instrumentally recorded M5-6 earthquakes in eastern Canada. The latter analysis suggests that, while remotely triggered earthquakes do not occur pervasively following moderate earthquakes in eastern North America, a low level of triggering often does occur at distances beyond conventional aftershock zones. The inferred triggered events occur at the distances at which SmS waves are known to significantly increase ground motions. A similar result was found for 28 recent M5.3-7.1 earthquakes in California. In California, seismicity is found to increase on average to a distance of at least 200 km following moderate main shocks. This supports the conclusion that, even at distances of ???100 km, dynamic stress changes control the occurrence of triggered events. There are two explanations that can account for the occurrence of remotely triggered earthquakes in intraplate settings: (1) they occur at local zones of weakness, or (2) they occur in zones of local stress concentration. ?? 2007 The Geological Society of America.

  10. Shocking signals of dark matter annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Jonathan H.; Silk, Joseph; BÅ`hm, Céline; Kotera, Kumiko; Norman, Colin

    2016-05-01

    We examine whether charged particles injected by self-annihilating dark matter (DM) into regions undergoing diffuse shock acceleration can be accelerated to high energies. We consider three astrophysical sites where shock acceleration is supposed to occur, namely the Galactic center and galaxy cluster mergers. For the Milky Way, we find that the acceleration of cosmic rays injected by dark matter could lead to a bump in the cosmic ray spectrum provided that the product of the efficiency of the acceleration mechanism and the concentration of DM particles is high enough. Within the Galaxy, we find that the Fermi bubbles are a potentially more efficient accelerator than supernovae remnants. However, both could in principle accelerate electrons and protons injected by dark matter to very high energies. At the extragalactic level, the acceleration of dark matter annihilation products could be responsible for enhanced radio emission from colliding clusters.

  11. Aftershock patterns and main shock faulting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mendoza, C.; Hartzell, S.H.

    1988-01-01

    We have compared aftershock patterns following several moderate to large earthquakes with the corresponding distributions of coseismic slip obtained from previous analyses of the recorded strong ground motion and teleseismic waveforms. Our results are consistent with a hypothesis of aftershock occurrence that requires a secondary redistribution of stress following primary failure on the earthquake fault. Aftershocks followng earthquakes examined in this study occur mostly outside of or near the edges of the source areas indicated by the patterns of main shock slip. The spatial distribution of aftershocks reflects either a continuation of slip in the outer regions of the areas of maximum coseismic displacement or the activation of subsidiary faults within the volume surrounding the boundaries of main shock rupture. -from Authors

  12. Shock wave structure in heterogeneous reactive media

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, M.R.

    1997-06-01

    Continuum mixture theory and mesoscale modeling are applied to describe the behavior of shock-loaded heterogeneous media. One-dimensional simulations of gas-gun experiments demonstrate that the wave features are well described by mixture theory, including reflected wave behavior and conditions where significant reaction is initiated. Detailed wave fields are resolved in numerical simulations of impact on a lattice of discrete explosive {open_quotes}crystals{close_quotes}. It is shown that rapid distortion first occurs at material contact points; the nature of the dispersive fields includes large amplitude fluctuations of stress over several particle pathlengths. Localization of energy causes {open_quotes}hot-spots{close_quotes} due to shock focusing and plastic work as material flows into interstitial regions.

  13. [Cardioversion for paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia during lung surgery in a patient with concealed Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome].

    PubMed

    Sato, Yoshiharu; Nagata, Hirofumi; Inoda, Ayako; Miura, Hiroko; Watanabe, Yoko; Suzuki, Kenji

    2014-10-01

    We report a case of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT) that occurred during video-assisted thoracoscopic (VATS) lobectomy in a patient with concealed Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome. A 59-year-old man with lung cancer was scheduled for VATS lobectomy under general anesthesia. After inserting a thoracic epidural catheter, general anesthesia was induced with intravenous administration of propofol. Anesthesia was maintained with inhalation of desfurane in an air/oxygen mixture and intravenous infusion of remifentanil. Recurrent PSVT occurred three times, and the last episode of PSVT continued for 50 minutes regardless of administration of antiarrhythmic drugs. Synchronized electric shock via adhesive electrode pads on the patient's chest successfully converted PSVT back to normal sinus rhythm. The remaining course and postoperative period were uneventful. An electrophysiological study performed after hospital discharge detected concealed WPW syndrome, which had contributed to the development of atrioventricular reciprocating tachycardia. Concealed WPW syndrome is a rare, but critical complication that could possibly cause lethal atrial tachyarrhythmias during the perioperative period. In the present case, cardioversion using adhesive electrode pads briefly terminated PSVT in a patient with concealed WPW syndrome. PMID:25693338

  14. Shock ignition of pyrotechnic heat powders. [Aluminium/ferric oxide mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Hornig, H.C.; Kury, J.W.; Simpson, R.L.; Helm, F.H.; Von Holle, W.G.

    1986-05-14

    Over a dozen pyrotechnic mixtures of alloy forming elements or solid oxidizers and fuels were subjected to shock pressures of from 2 to 35 GPa. More than half of these formulations were ignited by the shock. Visible and ir time resolved radiometry experiments using one of these mixtures, aluminum/ferric oxide, showed that this shock induced ignition occurred in less than 0.1 usec. 9 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Observational test of shock drift and Fermi acceleration on a seed particle population upstream of earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anagnostopoulos, G. C.; Sarris, E. T.; Krimigis, S. M.

    1988-01-01

    The efficiency of proposed shock acceleration mechanisms as they operate at the bow shock in the presence of a seed energetic particle population was examined using data from simultaneous observations of energetic solar-origin protons, carried out by the IMP 7 and 8 spacecraft in the vicinity of the quasi-parallel (dawn) and quasi-perpendicular (dusk) regions of the earth's bow shock, respectively. The results of observations (which include acceleration effects in the intensities of the energetic protons with energies as high as 4 MeV observed at the vicinity of the dusk bow shock, but no evidence for any particle acceleration at the energy equal to or above 50 keV at the dawn side of the bow shock) indicate that the acceleration of a seed particle population occurs only at the quasi-perpendicular bow shock through shock drift acceleration and that the major source of observed upstream ion populations is the leakage of magnetospheric ions of energies not less than 50 keV, rather than in situ acceleration.

  16. Explosive volcanism, shock metamorphism and the K-T boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desilva, S. L.; Sharpton, V. L.

    1988-01-01

    The issue of whether shocked quartz can be produced by explosive volcanic events is important in understanding the origin of the K-T boundary constituents. Proponents of a volcanic origin for the shocked quartz at the K-T boundary cite the suggestion of Rice, that peak overpressures of 1000 kbars can be generated during explosive volcanic eruptions, and may have occurred during the May, 1980 eruption of Mt. St. Helens. Attention was previously drawn to the fact that peak overpressures during explosive eruptions are limited by the strength of the rock confining the magma chamber to less than 8 kbars even under ideal conditions. The proposed volcanic mechanisms for generating pressures sufficient to shock quartz are further examined. Theoretical arguments, field evidence and petrographic data are presented showing that explosive volcanic eruptions cannot generate shock metamorphic features of the kind seen in minerals at the K-T boundary.

  17. Antiarrhythmic Drug Therapy to Avoid Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Shocks

    PubMed Central

    Abboud, Jaber

    2016-01-01

    Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are effective in the prevention of arrhythmic sudden cardiac death. Many patients receiving an ICD are affected by heart failure and are at risk of ventricular arrhythmias, which may lead to appropriate shocks. On the other hand, in this population the incidence of atrial fibrillation, giving rise to inappropriate ICD shocks, is high. Accordingly, ICD discharges occur frequently and many patients with an ICD will need concomitant antiarrhythmic drug therapy to avoid or reduce the frequency of shocks. Therapeutic agents such as β-blockers, class I or class III antiarrhythmic drugs effectively suppress arrhythmias, but may have side-effects. Some drugs could eventually influence the function of ICDs by altering defibrillation or pacing threshold. Few prospective randomised trials are available, but current data suggest that amiodarone is most effective for prevention of appropriate or inappropriate ICD shocks. This review article summarises current knowledge regarding the antiarrhythmic management of patients with ICDs.

  18. Antiarrhythmic Drug Therapy to Avoid Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Shocks.

    PubMed

    Abboud, Jaber; R Ehrlich, Joachim

    2016-08-01

    Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are effective in the prevention of arrhythmic sudden cardiac death. Many patients receiving an ICD are affected by heart failure and are at risk of ventricular arrhythmias, which may lead to appropriate shocks. On the other hand, in this population the incidence of atrial fibrillation, giving rise to inappropriate ICD shocks, is high. Accordingly, ICD discharges occur frequently and many patients with an ICD will need concomitant antiarrhythmic drug therapy to avoid or reduce the frequency of shocks. Therapeutic agents such as β-blockers, class I or class III antiarrhythmic drugs effectively suppress arrhythmias, but may have side-effects. Some drugs could eventually influence the function of ICDs by altering defibrillation or pacing threshold. Few prospective randomised trials are available, but current data suggest that amiodarone is most effective for prevention of appropriate or inappropriate ICD shocks. This review article summarises current knowledge regarding the antiarrhythmic management of patients with ICDs. PMID:27617090

  19. Shock Formation of Slow Magnetosonic Waves in Coronal Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuntz, Manfred; Suess, Steve; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the height of shock formation in coronal plumes for slow magnetosonic waves. The models take into account plume geometric spreading, heat conduction, and radiative damping. The wave parameters as well as the spreading functions of the plumes and the base magnetic field strengths are given by empirical constraints mostly from Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/ Ultraviolet Coronograph Spectrometer (UVCS), Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT), Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI), and Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO). Our models show that shock formation occurs at relatively low coronal heights, typically within 1.2 RsuN, depending on the model parameters. The shock formation is calculated using the well-established wave breaking criterion given by the intersection of C+ characteristics in the space-time plane. Our models show that shock heating by slow magnetosonic waves is expected to be relevant at most heights in solar coronal plumes, although such waves are probably not the main energy supply mechanism.

  20. Shock Formation of Slow Magnetosonic Waves in Coronal Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuntz, Manfred; Suess, Steven T.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the height of shock formation in coroner plumes for slow magnetosonic waves. The models take into account plume geometric spreading, heat conduction and radiative damping. The wave parameters as well as the spreading functions of the plumes and the base magnetic field strengths are given by empirical constraints mostly from Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (SOHO/UVCS). Our models show that shock formation occurs at low coronal heights, i.e., within 1.3 solar radius, depending on the model parameters. The shock formation is calculated using the well-established wave breaking condition given by the intersection of C+ characteristics in the space-time plane. Our models show that shock heating by slow magnetosonic waves is expected to be relevant at most heights in solar coronal plumes, although slow magnetosonic waves are most likely not a solely operating energy supply mechanism.