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Sample records for short fiber composites

  1. Thermal conductivity of hybrid short fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, M.L.; Taya, M.; Hatta, H.; Takei, T.; Nakajima, Y. Inst. of Space and Astronautical Science, Sagamihara Three-D Composites Research, Tsukuba Tohoku Univ., Sendai )

    1993-01-01

    A combined analytical/experimental study has been undertaken to investigate the effective thermal conductivity of hybrid composite materials. The analysis utilizes the equivalent inclusion approach for steady state heat conduction (Hatta and Taya, 1986) through which the interaction between the various reinforcing phases at finite concentrations is approximated by the Mori-Tanaka (1973) mean field approach. The multiple reinforcing phases of the composite are modeled as ellipsoidal in shape and thus can simulate a wide range of microstructural geometries ranging from thin platelet to continuous fiber reinforcement. The case when one phase of the composite is penny-shaped microcracks is studied in detail. Multiphase composites consisting of a Kerimid matrix and Al2O3 short fibers and Si3N4 whiskers were fabricated and, after a careful study of their microstructure, their thermal conductivities were measured. Analytical predictions are shown to be in good agreement with experimental results obtained for the Al2O3/Si3N4/Kerimid short fiber composites. 26 refs.

  2. Modeling of statistical tensile strength of short-fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Y.T.; Blumenthal, W.R.; Stout, M.G.; Lowe, T.C.

    1995-10-01

    This paper develops a statistical strength theory for three-dimensionally (3-D) oriented short-fiber reinforced composites. Short-fiber composites are usually reinforced with glass and ceramic short fibers and whiskers. These reinforcements are brittle and display a range of strength values, which can be statistically characterized by a Weibull distribution. This statistical nature of fiber strength needs to be taken into account in the prediction of composite strength. In this paper, the statistical nature of fiber strength is incorporated into the calculation of direct fiber strengthening, and a maximum-load composite failure criterion is adopted to calculate the composite strength. Other strengthening mechanisms such as residual thermal stress, matrix work hardening, and short-fiber dispersion hardening are also briefly discussed.

  3. Aligned, short-fiber composites by novel flow processing methods

    SciTech Connect

    Guell, D.C.; Graham, A.L.; Papathanasiou, T.; Petrovic, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    A hydrodynamic method has been employed to align short, reinforcing fibers in polymer matrix composite materials. Samples of composite materials were prepared and tested two at a time (one with randomly oriented fibers and the other with aligned fibers) to isolate and directly measure the effect on mechanical properties of aligning the fibers. Data were collected for the ultimate tensile strength, modulus of elasticity, and ultimate tensile strain of the composite samples prepared. Results show that the aligned fibers were approximately twice as effective (as randomly oriented fibers) at stiffening and strengthening the composite in the alignment direction. 5 figs, 20 refs.

  4. Aligned, short-fiber composites by novel flow processing methods

    SciTech Connect

    Guell, D.C.; Graham, A.L.; Papathanasiou, T.; Petrovic, J.J.

    1993-03-01

    A hydrodynamic method has been employed to align short, reinforcing fibers in polymer matrix composite materials. Samples of composite materials were prepared and tested two at a time (one with randomly oriented fibers and the other with aligned fibers) to isolate and directly measure the effect on mechanical properties of aligning the fibers. Data were collected for the ultimate tensile strength, modulus of elasticity, and ultimate tensile strain of the composite samples prepared. Results show that the aligned fibers were approximately twice as effective (as randomly oriented fibers) at stiffening and strengthening the composite in the alignment direction. 5 figs, 20 refs.

  5. Comparison of carbon fiber/epoxy composites reinforced by short aramid and carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, L.; Hu, X.Z.

    1999-08-20

    This study is designed to examine and compare the toughening effects of short aramid and carbon fibers in carbon fiber/epoxy composites. The primary objective being to identify the toughening mechanisms associated with the two different short fibers. The detailed information on toughening mechanisms will provide a general guide on the relationship between composite interlaminar design and composite performance. Composite design and processing, delamination testing and SEM study of fracture surfaces are used in conjunction in the current study for a better understanding of the short fiber interlaminar reinforcement technique.

  6. Creep of experimental short fiber-reinforced composite resin.

    PubMed

    Garoushi, Sufyan; Kaleem, Muhammad; Shinya, Akikazu; Vallittu, Pekka K; Satterthwaite, Julian D; Watts, David C; Lassila, Lippo V J

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the reinforcing effect of short E-glass fiber fillers oriented in different directions on composite resin under static and dynamic loading. Experimental short fiber-reinforced composite resin (FC) was prepared by mixing 22.5 wt% of short E-glass fibers, 22.5 wt% of resin, and 55 wt% of silane-treated silica fillers. Three groups of specimens (n=5) were tested: FC with isotropic fiber orientation, FC with anisotropic fiber orientation, and particulate-filled composite resin (PFC) as a control. Time-dependent creep and recovery were recorded. ANOVA revealed that after secondary curing in a vacuum oven and after storage in dry condition for 30 days, FC with isotropic fiber orientation (1.73%) exhibited significantly lower static creep value (p<0.05) than PFC (2.54%). For the different curing methods and storage conditions evaluated in this study, FC achieved acceptable static and dynamic creep values when compared to PFC. PMID:23037835

  7. Dynamic viscoelasticities for short fiber-thermoplastic elastomer composites

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Wuyun; Ashida, Michio . Graduate School of Science and Technology)

    1993-11-20

    Dynamic moduli, E[prime] and E[double prime], and loss tangent tan [delta] were investigated for thermoplastic elastomers (TPEs), styrene-isoprene-styrene copolymers (SISs), styrene-butadiene-styrene copolymer (SBS), and Hytrel and composites reinforced by poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) short fibers. The styrenic TPEs have a typical rubbery behavior and the Hytrel TPE has medial characteristics between rubber and plastic. Both E[prime] and E[double prime] of the composites depended on the matrix as well as the fiber loading and fiber length. Based on the viewpoint of different extensibility between the fiber and the matrix elastomer, a triblock model was considered for estimating the storage modulus of the short fiber-TPE composites as follows: E[sub c] = [alpha] V[sub f]E[sub f] + [beta](1 [minus] V[sub f])E[sub m], where [alpha] and [beta] are the effective deformation coefficients for the fiber and the matrix elastomer, respectively. They can be quantitatively represented by modulus ratio M (= E[sub m]/E[sub f]) and fiber length L: [alpha] = (L[sup n] + k)M/(L[sup n]M + k), [beta] = (1 [minus] [alpha]V[sub f])/(1 [minus] V[sub f]), where the constants n and k are obtained experimentally. When k = 0.0222 and n = 0.45, E[sub c] of the TPE composites agreed well with the prediction of the proposed model. The relaxation spectrum of the composites showed a distinct main peak ascribed to the matrix elastomer, but no peak to the PET fiber.

  8. Characterization of three dimensional fiber orientation in short-fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yuntian T.; Blumenthal, W.R.

    1995-05-01

    A mathematical procedure for recovering from image analysis the three dimensional nonsymmetric fiber-orientation distribution in short-fiber composites is proposed. Microphotographs from two orthogonal faces of a composite sample are needed to determine the three dimensional fiber orientation. A simple weighting function is derived to take into account the probability of intercepting fibers at varying inclination angles. The present procedure improves the previous works of other researchers in the following two aspects. First, it can obtain the single-angle fiber-orientation distribution from one micrograph in reference to the normal of the photographed surface. This distribution is often needed in predicting the mechanical and physical properties of short-fiber composites in this direction. Second, no symmetry in fiber-orientation distribution is assumed in the determination of the three dimensional fiber-orientation, which makes the present procedure more practical and versatile.

  9. Modeling of short fiber reinforced injection moulded composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, A.; Aswini, N.; Dandekar, C. R.; Makhe, S.

    2012-09-01

    A micromechanics based finite element model (FEM) is developed to facilitate the design of a new production quality fiber reinforced plastic injection molded part. The composite part under study is composed of a polyetheretherketone (PEEK) matrix reinforced with 30% by volume fraction of short carbon fibers. The constitutive material models are obtained by using micromechanics based homogenization theories. The analysis is carried out by successfully coupling two commercial codes, Moldflow and ANSYS. Moldflow software is used to predict the fiber orientation by considering the flow kinetics and molding parameters. Material models are inputted into the commercial software ANSYS as per the predicted fiber orientation and the structural analysis is carried out. Thus in the present approach a coupling between two commercial codes namely Moldflow and ANSYS has been established to enable the analysis of the short fiber reinforced injection moulded composite parts. The load-deflection curve is obtained based on three constitutive material model namely an isotropy, transversely isotropy and orthotropy. Average values of the predicted quantities are compared to experimental results, obtaining a good correlation. In this manner, the coupled Moldflow-ANSYS model successfully predicts the load deflection curve of a composite injection molded part.

  10. Innovative Composites Through Reinforcement Morphology Design - a Bone-Shaped-Short-Fiber Composite

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Y.T.; Valdez, J.A.; Beyerlain, I.J.; Stout, M.G.; Zhou, S.; Shi, N.; Lowe, T.C.

    1999-06-29

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project is to improve the strength and toughness of conventional short-fiber composites by using innovative bone-shaped-short (BSS) fibers as reinforcement. We fabricated a model polyethylene BSS fiber-reinforced polyester-matrix composite to prove that fiber morphology, instead of interfacial strength, solves the problem. Experimental tensile and fracture toughness test results show that BSS fibers can bridge matrix cracks more effectively, and consume many times more energy when pulled out, than conventional-straight-short (CSS) fibers. This leads to both higher strength and fracture toughness for the BSS-fiber composites. A computational model was developed to simulate crack propagation in both BSS- and CSS-fiber composites, accounting for stress concentrations, interface debonding, and fiber pullout. Model predictions were validated by experimental results and will be useful in optimizing BSS-fiber morphology and other material system parameters.

  11. Modeling of statistical tensile strength tensile of short-fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Y.T.; Blumenthal, W.R.; Stout, M.G.; Lowe, T.C.

    1995-10-05

    This Paper develops a statistical strength theory for three-dimensionally (3-D) oriented short-fiber reinforced composites. Short-fiber composites are usually reinforced with glass and ceramic short fibers and whiskers. These reinforcements are brittle and display a range of strength values, which can be statistically characterized by a Weibull distribution. This statistical nature of fiber strength needs to be taken into account in the prediction of composite strength. In this paper, the statistical nature of fiber strength is incorporated into the calculation of direct fiber strengthening, and a maximum-load composite failure criterion is adopted to calculate the composite strength. Other strengthening mechanisms such as residual thermal stress, matrix work hardening, and short-fiber dispersion hardening are also briefly discussed.

  12. Aging characteristics of short glass fiber reinforced ZA-27 alloy composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S. C.; Girish, B. M.; Satish, B. M.; Kamath, R.

    1998-12-01

    Aging characteristics of short glass fiber reinforced ZA-27 alloy composite materials have been evaluated in the present study. The liquid metallurgy technique was used to fabricate the composites, in which preheated short glass fibers were introduced into the ZA-27 alloy melt above its liquidus temperature. The aging temperature employed was 125 °C for 6, 12,18, and 24 h. The aged alloy (no fibers) reached the peak hardness after 18 h, while the composites (regardless of filler content) reached the same hardness in 12 h. It is hypothesized that the aging treatment of a composite improves the strength of the interface between the short fibers and the matrix. This is confirmed by the tensile fractograph analysis, which indicates that at a given aging temperature, the composites aged for 18 h exhibit short fibers that remain attached to the metal matrix, while those aged for 6 h undergo debonding.

  13. Continuum Damage Modeling of Short-Fiber Composites Subject to Matrix Cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Ahn, Byung K.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2002-09-01

    In this paper, a continuum damage mechanics approach proposed by Renard et al. for continuous fiber composites subject to matrix cracking is extended to misoriented short-fiber composites. First, the associated damage variable is defined as a measure of the crack density, then the model by Laws et al. is used to determine the stiffness reduction of an aligned short-fiber composite. Considering moderate microcrack densities and assuming completely random and planar orientations of microcracks and fibers, the stiffness of a cracked misoriented fiber layer is obtained by averaging that of a cracked aligned fiber composite over all possible orientations and weighted by an orientation distribution function. The damage evolution law is obtained using the concepts of thermodynamics of continuum media.

  14. Numerical simulation of fiber interaction in short-fiber injection-molded composite using different cavity geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thi, Thanh Binh Nguyen; Yokoyama, Atsushi; Hamanaka, Senji; Yamashita, Katsuhisa; Nonomura, Chisato

    2016-03-01

    The theoretical fiber-interaction model for calculating the fiber orientation in the injection molded short fiber/thermoplastic composite parts was proposed. The proposed model included the fiber dynamics simulation in order to obtain an equation of the global interaction coefficient and accurate estimate of the fiber interacts at all orientation states. The steps to derive the equation for this coefficient in short fiber suspension as a function of the fiber aspect ratio, volume fraction and general shear rate are delineated. Simultaneously, the high-resolution 3D X-ray computed tomography system XVA-160α was used to observe fiber distribution of short-glass-fiber-reinforced polyamide specimens using different cavity geometries. The fiber orientation tensor components are then calculated. Experimental orientation measurements of short-glass-fiber-reinforced polyamide is used to check the ability of present theory for predicting orientation. The experiments and predictions show a quantitative agreement and confirm the basic understanding of fiber orientation in injection-molded composites.

  15. Tough Block Copolymer Organogels and Elastomers as Short Fiber Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Edward J.

    2012-02-01

    The origins of the exceptional toughness and elastomeric properties of gels and elastomers from block copolymers with semicrystalline syndiotactic polypropylene blocks will be discussed. Using synchrotron X-radiation small angle (SAXS) and wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) experiments were simultaneously performed during step cycle tensile deformation of these elastomers and gels. From these results the toughness can be attributed to the formation, orientation and elongation of the crystalline fibrils along the tensile direction. The true stress and true strain ɛH during each cycle were recorded, including the true strain at zero load ɛH,p after each cycle that resulted from the plastic deformation of the sPP crystals in the gel or elastomer. The initial Young's modulus Einit and maximum tangent modulus Emax in each cycle undergo dramatic changes as a function of ɛH,p, with Einit decreasing for ɛH,p <= 0.1 and then increasing slowly as ɛH,p increases to 1 while Emax increases rapidly over the entire range of ɛH,p resulting in a ratio of Emax/Einit > 100 to 1000 at the highest maximum (nominal) strain. Based on SAXS patterns from the deformed and relaxed gels, as well as on previous results on deformation of semicrystalline random copolymers by Strobl and coworkers, we propose that the initial decrease in Einit and increase in Emax with ɛH,p are due to a breakup of the network of the original sPP crystal lamellae and the conversion of the sPP lamellae into fibrils whose aspect ratio increases with further plastic deformation, respectively. The gel elastic properties can be understood quantitatively as those of a short fiber composite with a highly deformable matrix. At zero stress the random copolymer midblock chains that connect the fibrils cause these to make all angles to the tensile axis (low Einit), while at the maximum strain the stiff, crystalline sPP fibrils align with the tensile axis producing a strong, relatively stiff gel. The evolution of the

  16. Numerical prediction of fiber orientation in injection-molded short-fiber/thermoplastic composite parts with experimental validation

    SciTech Connect

    Thi, Thanh Binh Nguyen; Morioka, Mizuki; Yokoyama, Atsushi; Hamanaka, Senji; Yamashita, Katsuhisa; Nonomura, Chisato

    2015-05-22

    Numerical prediction of the fiber orientation in the short-glass fiber (GF) reinforced polyamide 6 (PA6) composites with the fiber weight concentration of 30%, 50%, and 70% manufactured by the injection molding process is presented. And the fiber orientation was also directly observed and measured through X-ray computed tomography. During the injection molding process of the short-fiber/thermoplastic composite, the fiber orientation is produced by the flow states and the fiber-fiber interaction. Folgar and Tucker equation is the well known for modeling the fiber orientation in a concentrated suspension. They included into Jeffrey’s equation a diffusive type of term by introducing a phenomenological coefficient to account for the fiber-fiber interaction. Our developed model for the fiber-fiber interaction was proposed by modifying the rotary diffusion term of the Folgar-Tucker equation. This model was presented in a conference paper of the 29{sup th} International Conference of the Polymer Processing Society published by AIP conference proceeding. For modeling fiber interaction, the fiber dynamic simulation was introduced in order to obtain a global fiber interaction coefficient, which is sum function of the fiber concentration, aspect ratio, and angular velocity. The fiber orientation is predicted by using the proposed fiber interaction model incorporated into a computer aided engineering simulation package C-Mold. An experimental program has been carried out in which the fiber orientation distribution has been measured in 100 x 100 x 2 mm injection-molded plate and 100 x 80 x 2 mm injection-molded weld by analyzed with a high resolution 3D X-ray computed tomography system XVA-160α, and calculated by X-ray computed tomography imaging. The numerical prediction shows a good agreement with experimental validation. And the complex fiber orientation in the injection-molded weld was investigated.

  17. Numerical prediction of fiber orientation in injection-molded short-fiber/thermoplastic composite parts with experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thi, Thanh Binh Nguyen; Morioka, Mizuki; Yokoyama, Atsushi; Hamanaka, Senji; Yamashita, Katsuhisa; Nonomura, Chisato

    2015-05-01

    Numerical prediction of the fiber orientation in the short-glass fiber (GF) reinforced polyamide 6 (PA6) composites with the fiber weight concentration of 30%, 50%, and 70% manufactured by the injection molding process is presented. And the fiber orientation was also directly observed and measured through X-ray computed tomography. During the injection molding process of the short-fiber/thermoplastic composite, the fiber orientation is produced by the flow states and the fiber-fiber interaction. Folgar and Tucker equation is the well known for modeling the fiber orientation in a concentrated suspension. They included into Jeffrey's equation a diffusive type of term by introducing a phenomenological coefficient to account for the fiber-fiber interaction. Our developed model for the fiber-fiber interaction was proposed by modifying the rotary diffusion term of the Folgar-Tucker equation. This model was presented in a conference paper of the 29th International Conference of the Polymer Processing Society published by AIP conference proceeding. For modeling fiber interaction, the fiber dynamic simulation was introduced in order to obtain a global fiber interaction coefficient, which is sum function of the fiber concentration, aspect ratio, and angular velocity. The fiber orientation is predicted by using the proposed fiber interaction model incorporated into a computer aided engineering simulation package C-Mold. An experimental program has been carried out in which the fiber orientation distribution has been measured in 100 x 100 x 2 mm injection-molded plate and 100 x 80 x 2 mm injection-molded weld by analyzed with a high resolution 3D X-ray computed tomography system XVA-160α, and calculated by X-ray computed tomography imaging. The numerical prediction shows a good agreement with experimental validation. And the complex fiber orientation in the injection-molded weld was investigated.

  18. A constitutive function for the heat flux in short-fiber-reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Heiko

    2015-12-01

    A constitutive function for heat flux in short-fiber-reinforced composites is developed. The fiber orientation distribution is considered using second-order orientation tensor; therefore, the constitutive function for the heat flux will depend on the orientation tensor. The resulting orthotropic equation is discussed also in the context of energy efficiency of buildings.

  19. Study of fracture mechanisms of short fiber reinforced AS composite by acoustic emission technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kida, Sotoaki; Suzuki, Megumu

    1995-11-01

    The fracture mechanisms of short fiber reinforced AS composites are studied by acoustic emission technique for examining the effects of fiber contents. The loads P{sub b} and P{sub c} which the damage mechanisms change are obtained at the inflection points of the total AE energy curve the energy gradient method. The damages are generated by fiber breaking at the load point of P{sub b} and P{sub c} in B material, and by the fiber breaking and the debonding between resin and fiber at the load points of P{sub b} and P{sub c} in C material.

  20. Fracture Load of Tooth Restored with Fiber Post and Experimental Short Fiber Composite

    PubMed Central

    Bijelic, Jasmina; Garoushi, Sufyan; Vallittu, Pekka K; Lassila, Lippo V.J

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated the load bearing capacity of anatomically designed canines restored with FRC posts and experimental short fiber composite resin (FC). The effect of using three different types of tooth preparation and woven net on the fracture load was also investigated. Further aim was to evaluate the failure mode of each restoration. Material and methods: 80 maxillary frasaco-canines were divided into 10 groups (n=8). The anatomic crowns were cut perpendicular at CEJ of the tooth. Group 1 was composed of teeth with flattened surface. Groups 2, 3 & 4 were prepared of teeth with 2 mm ferrule. In the third group, everStick Net was applied above the ferrule. Group 5 was composed of teeth with large box type preparation. The root canals were enlarged, sandblasted and then surface treated with Stick resin for 5 min. Two types of FRC root canal posts were used. The crowns were prepared either with composite resin or with FC. A static load until failure was applied to the crowns at a 45 degrees angle. Failure modes were visually examined. Results: ANOVA revealed that use of FRC-post and tooth preparation (p<0.001) had significant effect on fracture load of FRC-crown. The crowns made from only FC gave comparable fracture load to groups with FRC-post. No significant difference was found in load-bearing capacity between restorations reinforced with FRC net-substructure and those without (p>0.001). Chi-square test revealed that both, crown design and existence of FRC-post effected significantly fracture types (p<0.001). Conclusion: FC demonstrated similar load bearing capacity with restorations reinforced with FRC post. The presence of ferrule around the tooth increased the load bearing capacity significantly. Abbreviations: EET – endodontically treated teeth; FRC – fiber-reinforced composite; semi-IPN – semi-interpenetrating network; CEJ – cementoenamel junction; FC – experimental short fiber composite; SiC – silicon carbide abrasive paper; N

  1. Preparation and properties of biodegradable films from Sterculia urens short fiber/cellulose green composites.

    PubMed

    Jayaramudu, J; Reddy, G Siva Mohan; Varaprasad, K; Sadiku, E R; Sinha Ray, S; Varada Rajulu, A

    2013-04-01

    The development of commercially viable "green products", based on natural resources for the matrices and reinforcements, in a wide range of applications, is on the rise. The present paper focuses on Sterculia urens short fiber reinforced pure cellulose matrix composite films. The morphologies of the untreated and 5% NaOH (alkali) treated S. urens fibers were observed by SEM. The effect of 5% NaOH treated S. urens fiber (5, 10, 15 and 20% loading) on the mechanical properties and thermal stability of the composites films is discussed. This paper presents the developments made in the area of biodegradable S. urens short fiber/cellulose (SUSF/cellulose) composite films, buried in the soil and later investigated by the (POM), before and after biodegradation has taken place. SUSF/cellulose composite films have great potential in food packaging and for medical applications. PMID:23499104

  2. Micromechanical analysis of thermo-inelastic multiphase short-fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aboudi, Jacob

    1994-01-01

    A micromechanical formulation is presented for the prediction of the overall thermo-inelastic behavior of multiphase composites which consist of short fibers. The analysis is an extension of the generalized method of cells that was previously derived for inelastic composites with continuous fibers, and the reliability of which was critically examined in several situations. The resulting three dimensional formulation is extremely general, wherein the analysis of thermo-inelastic composites with continuous fibers as well as particulate and porous inelastic materials are merely special cases.

  3. Mechanical properties and shape memory effect of short fiber reinforced SMP composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kai; Lv, Haibao; Yi, Guo; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2010-04-01

    By adding randomly distributed short fiber into a shape memory polymer (SMP) matrix, both the mechanical properties and the shape memory behavior are improved significantly, overcoming some traditional defects of SMP composite reinforced by long fiber and particles. In this paper, the short fiber reinforced SMP composite are developed for the improvement of the mechanical and thermal properties of styrene-based SMP bulk. The specimens with different chopped fiber weight fractions are prepared, and then their mechanical behavior and electrical properties are investigated. As a result, the resistance against mechanical and thermal mechanical loads in the developed materials increases due to the role of reinforcement fiber. For the conducting composite filled with short carbon fiber, not only the actuation of SMP composite can be driven by low voltage, but also its tensile, bending strength, glass transition temperature, storage modulus and thermal conductivity increase by a factor of filler content of carbon fiber increasing. The results show meaningful guidance for further design and the performance evaluation of such composite materials.

  4. Microstructures of short-carbon-fiber-reinforced SiC composites prepared by hot-pressing

    SciTech Connect

    He Xiulan Guo Yingkui; Zhou Yu; Jia Dechang

    2008-12-15

    Microstructures of short-carbon-fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composites, prepared by hot-pressing with MgO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} as sintering additives, were investigated by means of X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that the composites could be densified at a relatively low temperature of 1800 deg. C via the liquid-phase-sintering mechanism. The amorphous interphase in the composites not only avoided the direct contact of the fibers with the matrix, but also improved the fiber/matrix bonding, so they could improve the densification of the composites and avoid the degeneration of the carbon fiber. The nano silicon carbide derived from polycarbosilane, could play a role of improving the relative density of the composites.

  5. A Mechanistic Approach to Matrix Cracking Coupled with Fiber--Matrix Debonding in Short-Fiber Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Tucker, Brian J.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2005-07-01

    A micro-macro mechanistic approach to damage in short-fiber composites is developed in this paper. At the microscale, a reference aligned fiber composite is considered for the analysis of the damage mechanisms such as matrix cracking and fiber/matrix debonding using the modified Mori-Tanaka model. The associated damage variables are defined, and the stiffness reduction law dependent on these variables is established. The stiffness of a random fiber composite containing random matrix microcracks and imperfect interfaces is then obtained from that of the reference composite, which is averaged over all possible orientations and weighted by an orientation distribution function. The macroscopic response is determined using a continuum damage mechanics approach and finite element analysis. Final failure resulting from saturation of matrix microcracks, fiber pull-out and breakage is modeled by a vanishing element technique. The model is validated using the experimental data and results found in the literature as well as the results determined for a random chopped fiber glass/vinyl ester system.

  6. Short Fiber Reinforced Composite: a New Alternative for Direct Onlay Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Garoushi, Sufyan; Mangoush, Enas; Vallittu, Mangoush; Lassila, Lippo

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the static load-bearing capacity of direct composite onlay restorations made of novel filling composite resin system which combines short fiber-reinforced composite resin (FC) and conventional particulate filler composite resin (PFC). Methods: Three groups of onlay restorations were fabricated (n = 8/group); Group A: made from conventional particulate filler composite resin (Z250, 3M-ESPE, USA, control), Group B: made from short fiber-reinforced composite resin (EverX posterior, StickTeck Ltd, member of GC group, Turku, Finland) as substructure with 1 mm surface layer of PFC, Group C: made from FC composite resin. The specimens were incrementally polymerized with a hand-light curing unit for 80 s before they were statically loaded with two different sizes (3 & 6 mm) of steel ball until fracture. Failure modes were visually examined. Data were analyzed using ANOVA (p = 0.05). Results: ANOVA revealed that onlay restorations made from FC composite resin had statistically significantly higher load-bearing capacity (1733 N) ( p < 0.05) than the control PFC composite resin (1081 N). Onlays made of FC composite resin with a surface layer of PFC gave force values of 1405 N which was statistically higher than control group ( p < 0.05). No statistically significant difference was found in the load-bearing capacity between groups loaded by different ball sizes Significance: Onlay restorations combining base of short fiber reinforced composite resin as substructure and surface layer of conventional composite resin displayed promising performance in high load bearing areas. PMID:24511331

  7. Numerical and experimental studies of delamination detection in short fiber reinforced composites using Lamb waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudela, Pawel; Radzienski, Maciej; Ostachowicz, Wieslaw

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to present aspects of Lamb wave propagation in randomly oriented short fiber reinforce composites with delamination. Prediction of elastic constants is based on mechanics of composites, rule of mixture and total mass balance tailored to the spectral element mesh composed of 3D brick elements. Piezoelectric excitation as well as glue layer are taken into account. Complex full wave field includes multiple reflections at short fibers. This wave pattern is also obtained by the use of laser vibrometry confirming good quality of the model. Further studies are related to symmetrical and non-symmetrical delamination in respect to the thickness of the composite plate. Square delamination of the side length 10 mm is investigated. It has been found that reflections from delamination are mostly superimposed with reflections coming from short fibers. Hence, delamination detection by direct analysis of wave propagation pattern on the surface of the plate is ineffective. However, adaptive wavenumber filtering method overcome these difficulties and enables not only to detect the delamination but also is helpful for delamination size estimation. Moreover, the method is more effective if the full wavefield measurements are acquired on the surface of the plate which is closer to the delamination.

  8. Prediction of the overall moduli of a cylindrical short-fiber reinforced composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanyi, Du; Linzhi, Wu

    1993-02-01

    With respect to obtaining the effective elastic moduli of the composite, the present theory differs from both Eshelby's equivalent inclusion method and Hill's self-consistent one, both of which only consider the mechanical properties of the matrix and inclusions (fibers). In fact, the inclusion-inclusion interaction is more pronounced when the volume fraction of inclusions of the composite increases. Hence, in this paper the effective elastic moduli of the composite are derived by taking into account the shapes, sizes and distribution of inclusions, and the interactions between inclusions. In addition, it is more convincing to assume short-fibers as cylindrical inclusions as in the present paper than as ellipsoidal ones as in others[7,8]. Finally, numerical results are given.

  9. Dry sliding wear behavior of epoxy composite reinforced with short palmyra fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswal, Somen; Satapathy, Alok

    2016-02-01

    The present work explores the possibility of using palmyra fiber as a replacement for synthetic fiber in conventional polymer composites for application against wear. An attempt has been made in this work to improve the sliding wear resistance of neat epoxy by reinforcing it with short palmyra fibers (SPF). Epoxy composites with different proportions (0, 4, 8 and 12 wt. %) of SPF are fabricated by conventional hand lay-up technique. Dry sliding wear tests are performed on the composite samples using a pin-on-disc test rig as per ASTM G 99-05 standards under various operating parameters. Design of experiment approach based on Taguchi's L16 Orthogonal Arrays is used for the analysis of the wear. This parametric analysis reveals that the SPF content is the most significant factor affecting the wear process followed by the sliding velocity. The sliding wear behavior of these composites under an extensive range of test conditions is predicted by a model based on the artificial neural network (ANN). A well trained ANN has been used to predict the sliding wear response of epoxy based composites over a wide range.

  10. Preliminary Clinical Evaluation of Short Fiber-Reinforced Composite Resin in Posterior Teeth: 12-Months Report

    PubMed Central

    Garoushi, S; Tanner, J; Vallittu, PK; Lassila, L

    2012-01-01

    This preliminary clinical trial evaluated 12 month clinical performance of novel filling composite resin system which combines short fiber-reinforced composite resin and conventional particulate filler composite resin in high stress bearing applications. A total of 37 class I and II restorations (compound and complex type) were placed in 6 premolars and 31 molars. The restorations were reviewed clinically at 6 months (baseline) and 12 months using modified USPHS codes change criteria for marginal adaptation, post-operative sensitivity, pulpal pain and secondary caries criteria. Photographs and x-rays were obtained for restorative analysis. Results of 12 months evaluation showed 5 restorations having little marginal leakage (B score) and 1 patient had minor pulpal symptom and post-operative sensitivity (B score). No secondary caries or bulk fracture was detected. The majority of restorations exhibited A scores of the evaluated criteria. After 12 months, restorations combining base of short fiber reinforced composite resin as substructure and surface layer of hybrid composite resin displayed promising performance in high load bearing areas. PMID:22408696

  11. Fabrication of solid-phase-sintered SiC-based composites with short carbon fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xian-hui; Yan, Qing-zhi; Han, Yong-jun; Cao, Mei-qi; Ge, Chang-chun

    2014-11-01

    Solid-phase-sintered SiC-based composites with short carbon fibers (Csf/SSiC) in concentrations ranging from 0 to 10wt% were prepared by pressureless sintering at 2100°C. The phase composition, microstructure, density, and flexural strength of the composites with different Csf contents were investigated. SEM micrographs showed that the Csf distributed in the SSiC matrix homogeneously with some gaps at the fiber/matrix interfaces. The densities of the composites decreased with increasing Csf content. However, the bending strength first increased and then decreased with increasing Csf content, reaching a maximum value of 390 MPa at a Csf content of 5wt%, which was 60 MPa higher than that of SSiC because of the pull-out strengthening mechanism. Notably, Csf was graphitized and damaged during the sintering process because of the high temperature and reaction with boron derived from the sintering additive B4C; this graphitization degraded the fiber strengthening effect.

  12. Mechanical properties, volumetric shrinkage and depth of cure of short fiber-reinforced resin composite.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties, volumetric shrinkage and depth of cure of a short fiber-reinforced resin composite (SFRC) were investigated in this study and compared to both a bulk fill resin composite (BFRC) and conventional glass/ceramic-filled resin composite (CGRC). Fracture toughness, flexural properties, volumetric shrinkage and depth of cure of the SFRC, BFRC and CGRC were measured. SFRC had significantly higher fracture toughness than BFRCs and CGRCs. The flexural properties of SFRC were comparable with BFRCs and CGRCs. SFRC showed significantly lower volumetric shrinkage than the other tested resin composites. The depth of cure of the SFRC was similar to BFRCs and higher than CGRCs. The data from this laboratory investigation suggests that SFRC exhibits improvements in fracture toughness, volumetric shrinkage and depth of cure when compared with CGRC, but depth of cure of SFRC was similar to BFRC. PMID:27251997

  13. Irreversible deformation processes in PVC and its short glass fiber reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, J.Y.

    1985-01-01

    The tensile mechanical behavior of PVC and its short glass fiber reinforced composites under superimposed hydrostatic pressure was studied up to 3 x 10/sup 8/ Pa. For rigid PVC, the brittle-to-ductile transition was observed at a pressure between 1 x 10/sup 7/ Pa and 2 x 10/sup 7/ Pa. This pressure-induced brittle-to-ductile transition was controlled by the competitive microdeformation processes of crazing and shear banding. Deformation in the post-yield region occurred by neck formation and subsequent drawing to produce chain orientation. A strong environmental stress-cracking effect was observed when PVC samples were exposed to the pressure-transmitting fluid, silicone oil. Three types of pressure dependent deformation processes was observed for the short glass fiber reinforced composites of PVC. Type I behavior shows debonding at the interface between fiber and matrix followed by brittle fracture of the matrix. Type II behavior, which was observed for the first time, exhibits a sharp stress drop due to debonding at the interface followed by matrix shear yielding. In Type III behavior, only upper shear yielding of matrix was observed. The transitional behavior from Type I and Type II was controlled by the pressure induced brittle to ductile transition of the matrix, while the Type II-III transition was strongly affected by debonding at the interface.

  14. Experimental evaluation and simulation of volumetric shrinkage and warpage on polymeric composite reinforced with short natural fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Jonnathan D.; Fajardo, Jorge I.; Cuji, Alvaro R.; García, Jaime A.; Garzón, Luis E.; López, Luis M.

    2015-09-01

    A polymeric natural fiber-reinforced composite is developed by extrusion and injection molding process. The shrinkage and warpage of high-density polyethylene reinforced with short natural fibers of Guadua angustifolia Kunth are analyzed by experimental measurements and computer simulations. Autodesk Moldflow® and Solid Works® are employed to simulate both volumetric shrinkage and warpage of injected parts at different configurations: 0 wt.%, 20 wt.%, 30 wt.% and 40 wt.% reinforcing on shrinkage and warpage behavior of polymer composite. Become evident the restrictive effect of reinforcing on the volumetric shrinkage and warpage of injected parts. The results indicate that volumetric shrinkage of natural composite is reduced up to 58% with fiber increasing, whereas the warpage shows a reduction form 79% to 86% with major fiber content. These results suggest that it is a highly beneficial use of natural fibers to improve the assembly properties of polymeric natural fiber-reinforced composites.

  15. Continuous and Short Fiber Reinforced Composite in Root Post-Core System of Severely Damaged Incisors

    PubMed Central

    Garoushi, Sufyan; Vallittu, Pekka K; Lassila, Lippo V.J

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the static load-bearing capacity of endodontically treated maxillary incisors restored with post-core complex made of experimental fiber composite resin (FC) and complete crown made of particulate filler composite (PFC). Further aim was to evaluate the effect of FC resin on the failure mode of the restoration. Material and Methods: The experimental composite resin (FC) was prepared by mixing 22.5 wt% of short E-glass fibers (3 mm in length) and 22.5 wt% of semi-interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) resin with 55 wt% of silane treated silica fillers. Thirty extracted sound upper central incisors were used. Twenty teeth were prepared by cutting the clinical crown 2 mm above the cemento-enamel junction horizontally. Restorations were made by two techniques (n=10). Group A (control group) contained samples of sound incisor teeth. Group B had teeth restored using glass fiber post (everStick, Stick- Teck) and PFC (Filtek Z250, 3M-ESPE) to build up core and complete crown. In Group C, the teeth were restored with FC as post-core and complete crown of PFC. The root canals were prepared and posts were cemented with a dual cure resin cement. The restorations were polymerized with a hand-light curing unit. All restored teeth were stored in water at room temperature for 24 h before they were statically loaded with speed of 1.0 mm/min until fracture. Data were analyzed using ANOVA (p=0.05). Failure modes were visually examined. Results: ANOVA revealed that restored incisors (Group B and C) had a statistically significantly lower load-bearing capacity (p<0.05) than the control group. Restorations made from FC post-core and PFC coverage (Group C) gave force value of 363 N (112 SD), which was higher than the value of Group B (211 N, 50 SD). Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, the teeth restored with experimental fiber composite post-core demonstrated higher load bearing capacity than those with fiber post and PFC core

  16. Bonding performance and interfacial characteristics of short fiber-reinforced resin composite in comparison with other composite restoratives.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength (SBS) and surface free-energy (SFE) of short fiber-reinforced resin composite (SFRC), using different adhesive systems, in comparison with other composite restoratives. The resin composites used were everX Posterior (EP), Clearfil AP-X (CA), and Filtek Supreme Ultra Universal Restorative (FS). The adhesive systems used were Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SM), Clearfil SE Bond (CS), and G-Premio Bond (GB). Resin composite was bonded to dentin, and SBS was determined after 24 h of storage in distilled water and after 10,000 thermal cycles (TCs). The SFEs of the resin composites and the adhesives were determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids. The SFE values and SFE characteristics were not influenced by the type of resin composite, but were influenced by the type of adhesive system. The results of this study suggest that the bonding performance and interfacial characteristics of SFRC are the same as for other composite restoratives, but that these parameters are affected by the type of adhesive system. The bonding performance of SFRC was enhanced by thermal cycling in a manner similar to that for other composite restoratives. PMID:26954878

  17. Discrete meso-element simulation of the failure behavior of short-fiber composites under dynamic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenyan; Tang, Z. P.; Liu, Yunxin

    2000-04-01

    In recent years, more attention has been paid to a better understanding of the failure behavior and mechanism of heterogeneous materials at the meso-scale level. In this paper, the crack initiation and development in epoxy composites reinforced with short steel fibers under dynamic loading were simulated and analyzed with the 2D Discrete Meso-Element Dynamic Method. Results show that the damage process depends greatly on the binding property between matrix and fibers.

  18. Processing-microstructure models for short- and long-fiber thermoplastic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelps, Jay H.

    The research for this thesis has explored the important microstructural variables for injection-molded thermoplastic composites with discontinuous fiber reinforcement. Two variables, the distributions of fiber orientation and fiber length after processing, have proven to be not only important for correct material property prediction but also difficult to predict using currently available modeling and simulation techniques. In this work, we develop new models for the prediction of these two microstructural variables. Previously, the Folgar-Tucker model has been widely used to predict fiber orientation in injection molded SFT composites. This model accounts for the effects of both hydrodynamics and fiber-fiber interactions in order to give a prediction for a tensorial measure of fiber orientation. However, when applied to at least some classes of LFTs, this model does not match all components of experimental fiber orientation tensor data. In order to address this shortcoming of the model, we hypothesize that Folgar and Tucker's phenomenological treatment of the effects of fiber-fiber interactions with an isotropic rotary diffusion contribution to the rate of change of orientation is insufficient for materials with longer fibers. Instead, this work develops a fiber orientation model that incorporates anisotropic rotary diffusion (ARD). From kinetic theory we derive a general family of evolution equations for the second-order orientation tensor, correcting errors in earlier treatments, and identify a specific equation that is useful for predicting orientation in LFTs. The amount of diffusivity in this model used to approximate the effect of fiber-fiber interactions in each direction is assumed to depend on a second-order space tensor, which is taken to be a function of the orientation state and the rate of deformation. Also, concentrated fiber suspensions align more slowly with respect to strain than the Folgar-Tucker model predicts. Here, we borrow the technique of

  19. Mechanical properties of as-cast and heat-treated ZA-27 alloy/short glass fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, S.C.; Girish, B.M.; Satish, B.M.; Kamath, R.

    1998-02-01

    This paper reports on the mechanical properties of as-cast and heat-treated ZA-27 alloy composites reinforced with glass fibers from 1 to 5 wt%. The composites were fabricated using the Compocasting method, in which short glass fibers were introduced into the vortex created in the molten alloy through an impeller rotated at 500 rpm. The molten mass was thoroughly stirred and poured into permanent molds and squeezed under pressure. The specimens were heat treated at 320 C for 1, 2, 3, and 4 h. The tests on the as-cast composites revealed that as the glass content in the composites was increased, the ultimate tensile strength (UTS), compressive strength, and hardness of the composite increased, while the ductility and impact strength were decreased. Heat treatment was found to improve significantly the ductility, compressive strength, and impact strength, while the hardness and UTS were reduced. This paper discusses the behavior of these composites.

  20. Edge Delamination and Residual Properties of Drilled Carbon Fiber Composites with and without Short-Aramid-Fiber Interleaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhi; Hu, Xiaozhi; Shi, Shanshan; Guo, Xu; Zhang, Yupeng; Chen, Haoran

    2016-05-01

    Edge delamination is frequently observed in carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) laminates after machining, due to the low fracture toughness of the resin interfaces between carbon fiber plies. In this study, the effects of incorporating tough aramid fibers into the brittle CFRP system are quantified by measuring the residual properties of bolted CFRP. By adding short-aramid-fiber interleaves in CFRP laminates, the residual tensile strength have been substantially increased by 14 % for twill-weave laminates and 45 % for unidirectional laminates respectively. Moreover, tensile failure was observed as the major mode of toughened laminates, in contrast to shear failure of plain laminates. The qualitative FEM results agreed well with the experimental results that edge delamination would cause relatively higher shear stress and therefore alter the failure mode from tensile failure to shear failure.

  1. Effect of Forging Parameters on Low Cycle Fatigue Behaviour of Al/Basalt Short Fiber Metal Matrix Composites

    PubMed Central

    Karthigeyan, R.; Ranganath, G.

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with metal matrix composites (MMCs) of Al 7075 alloy containing different weight percentage (2.5, 5, 7.5, and 10) basalt short fiber reinforcement and unreinforced matrix alloy. The samples were produced by the permanent stir casting technique. The casting ingots were cut into blanks to be forged in single stage and double stage, using MN press and graphite-based lubricant. The microstructures and fatigue properties of the matrix alloy and MMC samples were investigated in the as cast state and in the single and double stage forging operations. The microstructure results showed that the forged sample had a uniform distribution of the basalt short fiber throughout the specimens. Evaluation of the fatigue properties showed that the forged samples had higher values than those of the as cast counterparts. After forging, the enhancement of the fatigue strength of the matrix alloy was so significant and high in the case of 2.5 and 5.0 wt. percentage basalt short fiber reinforced MMC, and there was no enhancement in 7.5 and 10 weight percentages short fiber reinforced MMCs. The fracture damage was mainly due to decohesion at the matrix-fiber interface. PMID:24298207

  2. Effect of forging parameters on low cycle fatigue behaviour of Al/basalt short fiber metal matrix composites.

    PubMed

    Karthigeyan, R; Ranganath, G

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with metal matrix composites (MMCs) of Al 7075 alloy containing different weight percentage (2.5, 5, 7.5, and 10) basalt short fiber reinforcement and unreinforced matrix alloy. The samples were produced by the permanent stir casting technique. The casting ingots were cut into blanks to be forged in single stage and double stage, using MN press and graphite-based lubricant. The microstructures and fatigue properties of the matrix alloy and MMC samples were investigated in the as cast state and in the single and double stage forging operations. The microstructure results showed that the forged sample had a uniform distribution of the basalt short fiber throughout the specimens. Evaluation of the fatigue properties showed that the forged samples had higher values than those of the as cast counterparts. After forging, the enhancement of the fatigue strength of the matrix alloy was so significant and high in the case of 2.5 and 5.0 wt. percentage basalt short fiber reinforced MMC, and there was no enhancement in 7.5 and 10 weight percentages short fiber reinforced MMCs. The fracture damage was mainly due to decohesion at the matrix-fiber interface. PMID:24298207

  3. Non-linear creep modeling of short-fiber composites using Hermite polynomials, hyperbolic trigonometric functions and power series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondali, Mehdi; Monfared, Vahid; Abedian, Ali

    2013-07-01

    A novel analytical model is presented for analyzing the steady-state creep in short-fiber composites under axial load utilizing the previous shear-lag theory, the imaginary fiber technique and also new approaches of Hermite polynomials, hyperbolic trigonometric functions and power series. The steady-state creep behavior of the matrix is described by an exponential law, while the fibers behave elastically. In this model, in spite of the previous researches, some unknowns such as shear stress, displacement rates, and creep strain rates are correctly determined in all regions of the unit cell without using any further assumptions. In comparison with previous analytical approaches, the results of the present work are closer to the FEM simulations. This strong method can be used in various problems in applied physics and mechanics such as elastic and plastic analysis of nano-composites.

  4. Processing-microstructure models for short- and long-fiber thermoplastic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelps, Jay H.

    The research for this thesis has explored the important microstructural variables for injection-molded thermoplastic composites with discontinuous fiber reinforcement. Two variables, the distributions of fiber orientation and fiber length after processing, have proven to be not only important for correct material property prediction but also difficult to predict using currently available modeling and simulation techniques. In this work, we develop new models for the prediction of these two microstructural variables. Previously, the Folgar-Tucker model has been widely used to predict fiber orientation in injection molded SFT composites. This model accounts for the effects of both hydrodynamics and fiber-fiber interactions in order to give a prediction for a tensorial measure of fiber orientation. However, when applied to at least some classes of LFTs, this model does not match all components of experimental fiber orientation tensor data. In order to address this shortcoming of the model, we hypothesize that Folgar and Tucker's phenomenological treatment of the effects of fiber-fiber interactions with an isotropic rotary diffusion contribution to the rate of change of orientation is insufficient for materials with longer fibers. Instead, this work develops a fiber orientation model that incorporates anisotropic rotary diffusion (ARD). From kinetic theory we derive a general family of evolution equations for the second-order orientation tensor, correcting errors in earlier treatments, and identify a specific equation that is useful for predicting orientation in LFTs. The amount of diffusivity in this model used to approximate the effect of fiber-fiber interactions in each direction is assumed to depend on a second-order space tensor, which is taken to be a function of the orientation state and the rate of deformation. Also, concentrated fiber suspensions align more slowly with respect to strain than the Folgar-Tucker model predicts. Here, we borrow the technique of

  5. Polyethylene fiber-reinforced composite resin used as a short post in severely decayed primary anterior teeth: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bayrak, Sule; Tunc, Emine Sen; Tuloglu, Nuray

    2009-05-01

    The case report presented here is of a 4-year-old girl with severely decayed maxillary anterior teeth. After root canal treatment, the primary maxillary central and lateral incisors were reinforced using polyethylene fiber-reinforced composite resin short posts and restored using celluloid strip crowns. The technique described here offers a simple and effective method for restoring severely decayed primary anterior teeth that reestablishes function, shape, and esthetics. PMID:19272811

  6. Discrete Meso-Element Simulation of Failure Behavior of Short-Fiber Composites under Shock Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Z. P.; Liu, Wenyan; Liu, Yunxin

    1999-06-01

    Recent years, it was paid more attention to better understanding the failure behavior and mechanism of heterogeneous materials at meso- scale level. In this paper, the crack initiation and development in epoxy composite reinforced with short steel fibre under dynamic loading were simulated and analyzed with 2D Discrete Meso-Element Dynamic Method. Results show that cracks initiate at the tips of fibres on the Loading side where stress concentrates. The effective strength of the composite sample is related to shape, orientation, weight percentage of the fibres, and particularly, the bonding strength between fibre and matrix. In the case of low bonding strength, the crack will propagate along the fibre and finally penetrate the whole sample. The differences compared with static loading are also discussed.

  7. Fracture toughness and fatigue crack propagation rate of short fiber reinforced epoxy composites for analogue cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Chong, Alexander C M; Miller, Forrest; Buxton, McKee; Friis, Elizabeth A

    2007-08-01

    Third-generation mechanical analogue bone models and synthetic analogue cortical bone materials manufactured by Pacific Research Laboratories, Inc. (PRL) are popular tools for use in mechanical testing of various orthopedic implants and biomaterials. A major issue with these models is that the current third-generation epoxy-short fiberglass based composite used as the cortical bone substitute is prone to crack formation and failure in fatigue or repeated quasistatic loading of the model. The purpose of the present study was to compare the tensile and fracture mechanics properties of the current baseline (established PRL "third-generation" E-glass-fiber-epoxy) composite analogue for cortical bone to a new composite material formulation proposed for use as an enhanced fourth-generation cortical bone analogue material. Standard tensile, plane strain fracture toughness, and fatigue crack propagation rate tests were performed on both the third- and fourth-generation composite material formulations using standard ASTM test techniques. Injection molding techniques were used to create random fiber orientation in all test specimens. Standard dog-bone style tensile specimens were tested to obtain ultimate tensile strength and stiffness. Compact tension fracture toughness specimens were utilized to determine plane strain fracture toughness values. Reduced thickness compact tension specimens were also used to determine fatigue crack propagation rate behavior for the two material groups. Literature values for the same parameters for human cortical bone were compared to results from the third- and fourth-generation cortical analogue bone materials. Tensile properties of the fourth-generation material were closer to that of average human cortical bone than the third-generation material. Fracture toughness was significantly increased by 48% in the fourth-generation composite as compared to the third-generation analogue bone. The threshold stress intensity to propagate the crack

  8. Hybrid matrix fiber composites

    DOEpatents

    Deteresa, Steven J.; Lyon, Richard E.; Groves, Scott E.

    2003-07-15

    Hybrid matrix fiber composites having enhanced compressive performance as well as enhanced stiffness, toughness and durability suitable for compression-critical applications. The methods for producing the fiber composites using matrix hybridization. The hybrid matrix fiber composites include two chemically or physically bonded matrix materials, whereas the first matrix materials are used to impregnate multi-filament fibers formed into ribbons and the second matrix material is placed around and between the fiber ribbons that are impregnated with the first matrix material and both matrix materials are cured and solidified.

  9. Modelling of fracture phenomenon in case of composite materials reinforced with short carbon fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caliman, R.

    2015-11-01

    The research work presented in this paper describes the composite materials in terms of formation and propagation of cracks using an algorithm that imposes disproportional loads to composite samples. The required parameters that describe the composites fracture demand inputs as: load intensity, geometry features and relative loading direction. In order to obtain reliable results, it should be a good correlation between the model which describes the facture propagation, the composition of the material and the structural homogeneity. The presented study is using a Functionally Graded Material with local homogeneity in fracture area, and a numerical model based on integration of interactions (Mori - Tanaka method). The parameters that describes the fracture behaviour, includes a factor of stress intensity which is important for establish the fracture direction. The model used in simulations is considering a composite sample with rectangular shape and 6 mm thickness. The sample is loaded with predefined stress σct (MPa) above and under the fracture line. σct represents the critical stress able to lead to fracture propagation. The main objective of this research work it was to generate a numerical model which describes the fracture behaviour of a composite material. The obtained model and its accuracy to describe the fracture behaviour of a composite material is presented in the final part of this paper.

  10. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites

    SciTech Connect

    2002-09-01

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites demonstrate the high-temperature stability of ceramics--with an increased fracture toughness resulting from the fiber reinforcement of the composite. The material optimization performed under the continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) included a series of systematic optimizations. The overall goals were to define the processing window, to increase the robustinous of the process, to increase process yield while reducing costs, and to define the complexity of parts that could be fabricated.

  11. Crack diffusion coefficient - A candidate fracture toughness parameter for short fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mull, M. A.; Chudnovsky, A.; Moet, A.

    1987-01-01

    In brittle matrix composites, crack propagation occurs along random trajectories reflecting the heterogeneous nature of the strength field. Considering the crack trajectory as a diffusive process, the 'crack diffusion coefficient' is introduced. From fatigue crack propagation experiments on a set of identical SEN polyester composite specimens, the variance of the crack tip position along the loading axis is found to be a linear function of the effective 'time'. The latter is taken as the effective crack length. The coefficient of proportionality between variance of the crack trajectory and the effective crack length defines the crack diffusion coefficient D which is found in the present study to be 0.165 mm. This parameter reflects the ability of the composite to deviate the crack from the energetically most efficient path and thus links fracture toughness to the microstructure.

  12. Carbon Fibers and Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pride, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    The basic nature of composite materials is considered. Carbon fiber composites and their area of current and planned application in civil aircraft are discussed, specifically within the framework of the various aspects of risk analysis.

  13. The effect of microstructure on residual-stress development in short-fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Eduljee, R.F.

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this study was the identification of the key processing and microstructural parameters that affect thermal residual stresses through a series of parametric analyses on an infinite-plate geometry. In these analyses polycarbonate was chosen as a representative amorphous resin while polyetheretherketone (PEEK) was used as an example of a semicrystalline resin. The residual stress model of Indenbom was used to investigate residual stresses in amorphous polymers. Due to the inapplicability of this model to semicrystalline polymers and composites where the material properties varied through the thickness of the specimen, a residual stress model based on incremental stress analysis was developed. The parametric analyses on the neat polymers showed that the thermal history and the thermoelastic properties played major roles in the residual stress development in both amorphous and semicrystalline polymers. Crystallization increased the level of residual stresses. The mechanisms for this increase are discussed.

  14. Microstructural design of fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Tsu-Wei

    1992-01-01

    The optimum performance design of composite microstructures is discussed. The forces driving progress in fiber composites are examined, and recent developments in the mechanics of laminated composites are surveyed, emphasizing thick laminates, hygrothermal effects, and thermal transient effects. The strength of continuous-fiber composites is discussed, presenting analyses of local load redistribution due to fiber breakages and treatments of statistical tensile strength theories. Modes of failure of laminated composites are examined. Elastic, physical, and viscoelastic properties as well as the strength and fracture behavior of short-fiber composites are studied, and it is shown how the performance of composites can be controlled by selecting material systems and their geometric distributions. 2D textile structural composites based on woven, knitted, and braided preforms are considered, and techniques for analyzing and modeling the thermomechanical behavior of 2D textile composites are presented. Recent developments in the processing of 3D textile preforms are introduced and the processing-microstructure relationship is demonstrated. Finite elastic deformation of flexible composites is addressed.

  15. On the failure mode in dry and hygrothermally aged short fiber-reinforced injection-molded polyarylamide composites by acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czigány, T.; Mohd Ishak, Z. A.; Karger-Kocsis, J.

    1995-09-01

    The failure mode in injection-molded short glass (GF) and carbon fiber (CF) reinforced polyarylamide (PAR) composites was studied on compact tension (CT) specimens in as-received (AR), hygrothermally aged (HA) and re-dried (RD) states, respectively, using acoustic emission (AE) and fractography. A significant difference was revealed in the failure manner characterized by the cumulative run, amplitude and energy distribution of the AE events as a function of the water content of the composites. Furthermore, a correlation was found between the cumulative AE events up to the maximum load and the fracture toughness of the composites. It was shown that the fracture response and thus the failure behavior of the water-saturated PAR composites can be restored by drying. This fact indicates that the water absorption and desorption are of a purely physical nature, i.e. they are reversible processes. It was established that chopped fiber-reinforced PAR composites fail by matrix deformation along with fiber/matrix debonding in the crack initiation, whereas fiber pull-out becomes dominant in the crack propagation range. Water uptake shifts both the AE amplitude and energy curves toward lower values, a phenomenon attributed to plastification of the PAR matrix by water.

  16. Nanotube composite carbon fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, R.; Jacques, D.; Rao, A. M.; Rantell, T.; Derbyshire, F.; Chen, Y.; Chen, J.; Haddon, R. C.

    1999-08-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were dispersed in isotropic petroleum pitch matrices to form nanotube composite carbon fibers with enhanced mechanical and electrical properties. We find that the tensile strength, modulus, and electrical conductivity of a pitch composite fiber with 5 wt % loading of purified SWNTs are enhanced by ˜90%, ˜150%, and 340% respectively, as compared to the corresponding values in unmodified isotropic pitch fibers. These results serve to highlight the potential that exits for developing a spectrum of material properties through the selection of the matrix, nanotube dispersion, alignment, and interfacial bonding.

  17. Probabilistic Fiber Composite Micromechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stock, Thomas A.

    1996-01-01

    Probabilistic composite micromechanics methods are developed that simulate expected uncertainties in unidirectional fiber composite properties. These methods are in the form of computational procedures using Monte Carlo simulation. The variables in which uncertainties are accounted for include constituent and void volume ratios, constituent elastic properties and strengths, and fiber misalignment. A graphite/epoxy unidirectional composite (ply) is studied to demonstrate fiber composite material property variations induced by random changes expected at the material micro level. Regression results are presented to show the relative correlation between predictor and response variables in the study. These computational procedures make possible a formal description of anticipated random processes at the intra-ply level, and the related effects of these on composite properties.

  18. The optimal fiber volume fraction and fiber-matrix property compatibility in fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, Ning

    1992-01-01

    Although the question of minimum or critical fiber volume fraction beyond which a composite can then be strengthened due to addition of fibers has been dealt with by several investigators for both continuous and short fiber composites, a study of maximum or optimal fiber volume fraction at which the composite reaches its highest strength has not been reported yet. The present analysis has investigated this issue for short fiber case based on the well-known shear lag (the elastic stress transfer) theory as the first step. Using the relationships obtained, the minimum spacing between fibers is determined upon which the maximum fiber volume fraction can be calculated, depending on the fiber packing forms within the composites. The effects on the value of this maximum fiber volume fraction due to such factors as fiber and matrix properties, fiber aspect ratio and fiber packing forms are discussed. Furthermore, combined with the previous analysis on the minimum fiber volume fraction, this maximum fiber volume fraction can be used to examine the property compatibility of fiber and matrix in forming a composite. This is deemed to be useful for composite design. Finally some examples are provided to illustrate the results.

  19. Fiber-Reinforced Composite Foam

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A two-phase method for making fiber-reinforced compositions was developed to achieve uniform fiber dispersion in a composite matrix. The first phase involved mixing together water, fibers, and a portion of a fiber dispersant to form a viscous composition. The high viscosity imparted by the dispersa...

  20. Carbon Fiber Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    HyComp(R), Inc. development a line of high temperature carbon fiber composite products to solve wear problems in the harsh environment of steel and aluminum mills. WearComp(R), self-lubricating composite wear liners and bushings, combines carbon graphite fibers with a polyimide binder. The binder, in conjunction with the fibers, provides the slippery surface, one that demands no lubrication, yet wears at a very slow rate. WearComp(R) typically lasts six to ten times longer than aluminum bronze. Unlike bronze, WearComp polishes the same surface and imparts a self-lube film for years of service. It is designed for continuous operation at temperatures of 550 degrees Fahrenheit and can operate under high compressive loads.

  1. Long-short fiber reinforced thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect

    Gore, C.R.; Cuff, G.; Cianelli, D.A.; Travis, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents information on a new family of fiber-reinforced thermoplastic compounds developed by ICI PLC and now produced by LNP under the trade mark ''Verton.'' Production is by a pultrusion process, rather than by the usual compounding extruder, which enables a high level of impregnation to be achieved without damaging the fibers. The result in molded parts is a 0.24-0.40 inch (6-10 mm) typical fiber length versus 0.008-0.016 inches (0.2-0.4 mm) for conventional short fiber products. Consequently, this enables fabricators to achieve typically a 10 to 20-fold increase in average fiber length in the finished component. These long-short fiber reinforced compounds exhibit substantial property improvements over short fiber system. Processing conditions are similar to corresponding short fiber compounds.

  2. Natural Fiber Composites: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Westman, Matthew P.; Fifield, Leonard S.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Laddha, Sachin; Kafentzis, Tyler A.

    2010-03-07

    The need for renewable fiber reinforced composites has never been as prevalent as it currently is. Natural fibers offer both cost savings and a reduction in density when compared to glass fibers. Though the strength of natural fibers is not as great as glass, the specific properties are comparable. Currently natural fiber composites have two issues that need to be addressed: resin compatibility and water absorption. The following preliminary research has investigated the use of Kenaf, Hibiscus cannabinus, as a possible glass replacement in fiber reinforced composites.

  3. Revolution in airplane construction? Grob G110: The first modern fiber glass composition airplane shortly before its maiden flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorpinghaus, R.

    1982-01-01

    A single engine two passenger airplane, constructed completely from fiber reinforced plastic materials is introduced. The cockpit, controls, wing profile, and landing gear are discussed. Development of the airframe is also presented.

  4. In vitro characterization of the impact of selected dietary fibers on fecal microbiota composition and short chain fatty acid production.

    PubMed

    Yang, Junyi; Martínez, Inés; Walter, Jens; Keshavarzian, Ali; Rose, Devin J

    2013-10-01

    The effects of six dietary fibers [pectin, guar gum, inulin, arabinoxylan, β-glucan, and resistant starch] on the human fecal microbiota during in vitro fermentation were determined. Bifidobacterium increased almost 25% on pectin compared with the control; a significant increase in Bifidobacterium adolescentis type-2 was observed on resistant starch. Bacteroides exhibited a positive correlation with propionate/short chain fatty acid (SCFA) production (r = 0.59, p < 0.01), while Ruminococcaceae and Faecalibacterium displayed positive correlations with butyrate/SCFA production (r = 0.39, 0.54, p < 0.01). A negative correlation was detected between inulin utilization and Subdoligranulum (r = -0.73, p ≤ 0.01), while strong positive relationships were found between β-glucan utilization and Firmicutes (r = 0.73, p ≤ 0.01) and resistant starch utilization and Blautia wexlerae (r = 0.82, p < 0.01). Dietary fibers have specific and unique impacts on intestinal microbiota composition and metabolism. These findings provide a rationale for the development of functional ingredients targeted towards a targeted modulation of the gut microbiota. PMID:23831725

  5. Damping behavior of Discontinuous Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastic Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haldar, Amit Kumar; Aggarwal, Ishan; Batra, N. K.

    2010-11-01

    Discontinuous fiber reinforced composites are being used in many antivibration applications due to their time and temperature dependent specific mechanical properties. For utilization of this material to specific engineering applications there is a need to understand the damping behavior of composites under dynamic loading. For this work, unreinforced and 20% long and short reinforced glass fiber polypropylene composite materials were tested for free transverse vibration damping characteristics under static as well as fatigue loading conditions. The damping characteristics are quantified by decay pattern and natural frequency. Presence of reinforced fibers increases the damping capacity. Among reinforcements, short fiber reinforced polypropylene shows increased damping capacity then long glass fiber reinforced polypropylene.

  6. Fiber composite flywheel rim

    DOEpatents

    Davis, D.E.; Ingham, K.T.

    1987-04-28

    A flywheel comprising a hub having at least one radially projecting disc, an annular rim secured to said disc and providing a surface circumferential to said hub, a first plurality of resin-impregnated fibers wound about said rim congruent to said surface, and a shell enclosing said first plurality of fibers and formed by a second plurality of resin-impregnated fibers wound about said rim tangentially to said surface. 2 figs.

  7. Fiber composite flywheel rim

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Donald E.; Ingham, Kenneth T.

    1987-01-01

    A flywheel 2 comprising a hub 4 having at least one radially projecting disc 6, an annular rim 14 secured to said disc and providing a surface circumferential to said hub, a first plurality of resin-impregnated fibers 22 wound about said rim congruent to said surface, and a shell 26 enclosing said first plurality of fibers and formed by a second plurality of resin-impregnated fibers wound about said rim tangentially to said surface.

  8. Composite-fiber hazards. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Seibert, J.F.

    1990-12-01

    This report reviews potential health hazards from carbon/graphite and boron composite materials used in aircraft. Carbon and boron fibers are used as reinforcement in an epoxy matrix to form composite material aircraft parts. There is increasing concern over the potential health effects of these fibers released during sanding and grinding of composite parts in structural repair shops, and during clean up operations following aircraft accidents involving fire and/or breakage of composite parts. With the demise of the term 'CORKER,' hazards from carbon composite materials were deemphasized. However, the CORKER annotation only addressed the electrical shorting hazards from airborne fibers following a fire and did not examine in detail potential health effects. Maintenance workers fear that carbon fibers are carcinogens. A review of the current literature on carbon fiber indicates it is relatively inert. Industrial hygiene evaluations should include sampling for total dust and comparing the levels to the ACGIH TLV for nuisance dust. Occupational health efforts should focus on problems with contact dermatitis from the resins systems and toxic effects of resin hardeners.

  9. Impact resistance of fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    Stress-strain curves are obtained for a variety of glass fiber and carbon fiber reinforced plastics in dynamic tension, over the stress-strain range of 0.00087-2070/sec. The test method is of the one-bar block-to-bar type, using a rotating disk or a pendulum as the loading apparatus and yielding accurate stress-strain curves up to the breaking strain. In the case of glass fiber reinforced plastic, the tensile strength, strain to peak impact stress, total strain and total absorbed energy all increase significantly as the strain rate increases. By contrast, carbon fiber reinforced plastics show lower rates of increase with strain rate. It is recommended that hybrid composites incorporating the high strength and rigidity of carbon fiber reinforced plastic with the high impact absorption of glass fiber reinforced plastics be developed for use in structures subjected to impact loading.

  10. Fabrication of Composite Material Using Gettou Fiber by Injection Molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setsuda, Roy; Fukumoto, Isao; Kanda, Yasuyuki

    This study investigated the mechanical properties of composite using gettou (shell ginger) fiber as reinforcement fabricated from injection molding. Gettou fiber is a natural fiber made from gettou, a subtropical plant that is largely abundant in Okinawa, Japan. We used the stem part of gettou plant and made the gettou fiber by crushing the stem. The composite using gettou fiber contributed to low shrinkage ratio, high bending strength and high flexural modulus. The mechanical strength of composite using long gettou fiber showed higher value than composite using short gettou fiber. Next, because gettou is particularly known for its anti-mold characteristic, we investigated the characteristic in gettou plastic composite. The composite was tested against two molds: aspergillius niger and penicillium funiculosum. The 60% gettou fiber plastic composite was found to satisfy the JISZ2801 criterion. Finally, in order to predict the flexural modulus of composite using gettou fiber by Halpin-Tsai equation, the tensile elastic modulus of single gettou fiber was measured. The tendency of the experimental results of composite using gettou fiber was in good agreement with Halpin-Tsai equation.

  11. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCC)

    SciTech Connect

    R. A. Wagner

    2002-12-18

    This report summarizes work to develop CFCC's for various applications in the Industries of the Future (IOF) and power generation areas. Performance requirements range from relatively modest for hot gas filters to severe for turbine combustor liners and infrared burners. The McDermott Technology Inc. (MTI) CFCC program focused on oxide/oxide composite systems because they are known to be stable in the application environments of interest. The work is broadly focused on dense and porous composite systems depending on the specific application. Dense composites were targeted at corrosion resistant components, molten aluminum handling components and gas turbine combustor liners. The development work on dense composites led to significant advances in fiber coatings for oxide fibers and matrix densification. Additionally, a one-step fabrication process was developed to produce low cost composite components. The program also supported key developments in advanced oxide fibers that resulted in an improved version of Nextel 610 fiber (commercially available as Nextel 650) and significant progress in the development of a YAG/alumina fiber. Porous composite development focused on the vacuum winding process used to produce hot gas filters and infrared burner components.

  12. Pitch-based short carbon fiber. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.S.

    1991-12-01

    Short carbon fiber manufactured from coal tar pitch by Osaka Gas Co. is examined by chemical composition analysis, X-ray powder diffraction, optical microscope, and electron spectroscopic techniques. The present analytical results are compared with the data obtainable from other sources. Owing to the low cost of the short fiber, it is recommended that the fiber could be used for a wide variety of reinforcement applications such as, cement/concrete mixtures, polymer composites, and high temperature materials. Processing includes the mechanical separation of mesophase microbeads of three to 30 micron diameters from crude coal tar during three heat treatment stages. The mesophases obtained are then subjected to solvent extraction, hydrogenation, and polymerization to yield isotropic and anisotropic pitches suitable for melt spinning. The short fiber is fabricated from isotropic pitch by the rotary gas jet method, and the process yields a higher quality fiber as compared to other melt spinning methods. The most important feature is that this process is highly cost effective.

  13. Fiber reinforced PMR polyimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavano, P. J.; Winters, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    Commercially obtained PMR-15 polyimide prepregs with S-glass and graphite fiber reinforcements were evaluated along with in-house prepared glass and graphite cloth PMR 2 materials. A novel autoclave approach was conceived and used to demonstrate that both the PMR systems respond to 1.4 MPa (200 psi) autoclave pressures to produce void free composites equivalent to die molded laminates. Isothermal gravimetric analysis and subsequent mechanical property tests indicated that the PMR 2 system was significantly superior in thermo-oxidative stability, and that S-glass reinforcements may contribute to the accelerated degradation of composites at 316 C (600 F) when compared to graphite fiber reinforced composites. Fully reversed bending fatigue experiments were conducted with a type of fixture unused for organic matrix composites. These studies indicated that the graphite fiber composites were clearly superior in fatigue resistance to the glass fiber reinforced material and that PMR matrix composite systems yield performance of the same order as composite materials employing other families of matrices.

  14. Numerical approach of the injection molding process of fiber-reinforced composite with considering fiber orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen Thi, T. B. E-mail: yokoyama@kit.ac.jp; Yokoyama, A. E-mail: yokoyama@kit.ac.jp; Ota, K. E-mail: katsuhiro-kodama@toyobo.jp E-mail: yumiko-isogai@toyobo.jp E-mail: chisato-nonomura@toyobo.jp; Kodama, K. E-mail: katsuhiro-kodama@toyobo.jp E-mail: yumiko-isogai@toyobo.jp E-mail: chisato-nonomura@toyobo.jp; Yamashita, K. E-mail: katsuhiro-kodama@toyobo.jp E-mail: yumiko-isogai@toyobo.jp E-mail: chisato-nonomura@toyobo.jp; Isogai, Y. E-mail: katsuhiro-kodama@toyobo.jp E-mail: yumiko-isogai@toyobo.jp E-mail: chisato-nonomura@toyobo.jp; Furuichi, K. E-mail: katsuhiro-kodama@toyobo.jp E-mail: yumiko-isogai@toyobo.jp E-mail: chisato-nonomura@toyobo.jp; Nonomura, C. E-mail: katsuhiro-kodama@toyobo.jp E-mail: yumiko-isogai@toyobo.jp E-mail: chisato-nonomura@toyobo.jp

    2014-05-15

    One of the most important challenges in the injection molding process of the short-glass fiber/thermoplastic composite parts is being able to predict the fiber orientation, since it controls the mechanical and the physical properties of the final parts. Folgar and Tucker included into the Jeffery equation a diffusive type of term, which introduces a phenomenological coefficient for modeling the randomizing effect of the mechanical interactions between the fibers, to predict the fiber orientation in concentrated suspensions. Their experiments indicated that this coefficient depends on the fiber volume fraction and aspect ratio. However, a definition of the fiber interaction coefficient, which is very necessary in the fiber orientation simulations, hasn't still been proven yet. Consequently, this study proposed a developed fiber interaction model that has been introduced a fiber dynamics simulation in order to obtain a global fiber interaction coefficient. This supposed that the coefficient is a sum function of the fiber concentration, aspect ratio, and angular velocity. The proposed model was incorporated into a computer aided engineering simulation package C-Mold. Short-glass fiber/polyamide-6 composites were produced in the injection molding with the fiber weight concentration of 30 wt.%, 50 wt.%, and 70 wt.%. The physical properties of these composites were examined, and their fiber orientation distributions were measured by micro-computed-tomography equipment μ-CT. The simulation results showed a good agreement with experiment results.

  15. Numerical approach of the injection molding process of fiber-reinforced composite with considering fiber orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen Thi, T. B.; Yokoyama, A.; Ota, K.; Kodama, K.; Yamashita, K.; Isogai, Y.; Furuichi, K.; Nonomura, C.

    2014-05-01

    One of the most important challenges in the injection molding process of the short-glass fiber/thermoplastic composite parts is being able to predict the fiber orientation, since it controls the mechanical and the physical properties of the final parts. Folgar and Tucker included into the Jeffery equation a diffusive type of term, which introduces a phenomenological coefficient for modeling the randomizing effect of the mechanical interactions between the fibers, to predict the fiber orientation in concentrated suspensions. Their experiments indicated that this coefficient depends on the fiber volume fraction and aspect ratio. However, a definition of the fiber interaction coefficient, which is very necessary in the fiber orientation simulations, hasn't still been proven yet. Consequently, this study proposed a developed fiber interaction model that has been introduced a fiber dynamics simulation in order to obtain a global fiber interaction coefficient. This supposed that the coefficient is a sum function of the fiber concentration, aspect ratio, and angular velocity. The proposed model was incorporated into a computer aided engineering simulation package C-Mold. Short-glass fiber/polyamide-6 composites were produced in the injection molding with the fiber weight concentration of 30 wt.%, 50 wt.%, and 70 wt.%. The physical properties of these composites were examined, and their fiber orientation distributions were measured by micro-computed-tomography equipment μ-CT. The simulation results showed a good agreement with experiment results.

  16. Intercalated hybrid graphite fiber composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The invention is directed to a highly conductive lightweight hybrid material and methods of producing the same. The hybrid composite is obtained by weaving strands of a high strength carbon or graphite fiber into a fabric-like structure, depositing a layer of carbon onto the structure, heat treating the structure to graphitize the carbon layer, and intercalating the graphitic carbon layer structure. A laminate composite material useful for protection against lightning strikes comprises at least one layer of the hybrid material over at least one layer of high strength carbon or graphite fibers. The composite material of the present invention is compatible with matrix compounds, has a coefficient of thermal expansion which is the same as underlying fiber layers, and is resistant to galvanic corrosion in addition to being highly conductive. These materials are useful in the aerospace industry, in particular as lightning strike protection for airplanes.

  17. ROLE OF FIBER MODIFICATION IN NATURAL FIBER COMPOSITE PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect

    Fifield, Leonard S.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Gutowska, Anna; Simmons, Kevin L.; Holbery, Jim

    2005-11-03

    The prediction and characterization of the adhesion between fiber, surface treatment, and polymer is critical to the success of large-scale natural fiber based polymer composites in automotive semi-structural application. The two primary factors limiting the use of natural fiber in polymer composites are fiber moisture uptake and fiber degradation during high-temperature processing. In this study, we have developed several fiber surface modification techniques and analyzed the fiber-polymer adhesion of modified fibers to more clearly understand the critical parameters controlling moisture uptake, swelling, and fiber degradation due to interfacial structure. We will present a overview of surface modification techniques we have applied to date for hemp fiber sources, and illustrate a path to characterize surface modification effects on natural fiber adhesion in thermoplastic composites.

  18. Fiber release from impacted graphite reinforced epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babinsky, T. C.

    1980-01-01

    Carbon fibers released from composites by aircraft fires and crashes can cause electrical shorts and consequent equipment damage. This report investigates less vigorous release mechanisms than that previously simulated by explosive burn/blast tests. When AS/3501-6 composites are impacted by various head and weight configurations of a pendulum impactor, less than 0.2 percent by weight of the original sample is released as single fibers. Other fiber release mechanisms studied were air blasts, constant airflow, torsion, flexural, and vibration of composite samples. The full significance of the low single fiber release rates found here is to be evaluated by NASA in their aircraft vulnerability studies.

  19. Cylindrical Piezoelectric Fiber Composite Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    The use of piezoelectric devices has become widespread since Pierre and Jacques Curie discovered the piezoelectric effect in 1880. Examples of current applications of piezoelectric devices include ultrasonic transducers, micro-positioning devices, buzzers, strain sensors, and clocks. The invention of such lightweight, relatively inexpensive piezoceramic-fiber-composite actuators as macro fiber composite (MFC) actuators has made it possible to obtain strains and displacements greater than those that could be generated by prior actuators based on monolithic piezoceramic sheet materials. MFC actuators are flat, flexible actuators designed for bonding to structures to apply or detect strains. Bonding multiple layers of MFC actuators together could increase force capability, but not strain or displacement capability. Cylindrical piezoelectric fiber composite (CPFC) actuators have been invented as alternatives to MFC actuators for applications in which greater forces and/or strains or displacements may be required. In essence, a CPFC actuator is an MFC or other piezoceramic fiber composite actuator fabricated in a cylindrical instead of its conventional flat shape. Cylindrical is used here in the general sense, encompassing shapes that can have circular, elliptical, rectangular or other cross-sectional shapes in the planes perpendicular to their longitudinal axes.

  20. Resin/graphite fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavano, P. J.; Jones, R. J.; Vaughan, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    High temperature resin matrices suitable for use in advanced graphite fiber composites for jet engine applications were evaluated. A series of planned, sequential screening experiments with resin systems in composite form were performed to reduce the number of candidates to a single A-type polyimide resin that repetitively produced void-free, high strength and modulus composites acceptable for use in the 550 F range for 1000 hours. An optimized processing procedure was established for this system. Extensive mechanical property studies characterized this single system, at room temperature, 500 F, 550 F and 600 F, for various exposure times.

  1. Fiber reinforced composite resin systems.

    PubMed

    Giordano, R

    2000-01-01

    The Targis/Vectris and Sculpture/FibreKor systems were devised to create a translucent maximally reinforced resin framework for fabrication of crowns, bridges, inlays, and onlays. These materials are esthetic, have translucency similar to castable glass-ceramics such as OPC and Empress, and have fits that are reported to be acceptable in clinical and laboratory trials. These restorations rely on proper bonding to the remaining tooth structure; therefore, careful attention to detail must be paid to this part of the procedure. Cementation procedures should involve silane treatment of the cleaned abraded internal restoration surface, application of bonding agent to the restoration as well as the etched/primed tooth, and finally use of a composite resin. Each manufacturer has a recommended system which has been tested for success with its resin system. These fiber reinforced resins are somewhat different than classical composites, so not all cementation systems will necessarily work with them. Polishing of the restoration can be accomplished using diamond or alumina impregnated rubber wheels followed by diamond paste. The glass fibers can pose a health risk. They are small enough to be inhaled and deposited in the lungs, resulting in a silicosis-type problem. Therefore, if fibers are exposed and ground on, it is extremely important to wear a mask. Also, the fibers can be a skin irritant, so gloves also should be worn. If the fibers become exposed intraorally, they can cause gingival inflammation and may attract plaque. The fibers should be covered with additional composite resin. If this cannot be accomplished, the restoration should be replaced. The bulk of these restorations are formed using a particulate filled resin, similar in structure to conventional composite resins. Therefore, concerns as to wear resistance, color stability, excessive expansion/contraction, and sensitivity remain until these materials are proven in long-term clinical trials. They do hold the

  2. Resin/graphite fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavano, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    Techniques were developed that provided thermo-oxidatively stable A-type polyimide/graphite fiber composites using the approach of in situ polymerization of monomeric reactants directly on reinforcing fibers, rather than employing separately prepared prepolymer varnish. This was accomplished by simply mixing methylene dianiline and two ester-acids and applying this solution to the fibers for subsequent molding. Five different formulated molecular weight resins were examined, and an optimized die molding procedure established for the 1500 formulated molecular weight system. Extensive ultrasonic inspection of composites was successfully utilized as a technique for monitoring laminate quality. Composite mechanical property studies were conducted with this polyimide resin at room temperature and after various time exposures in a thermo-oxidative environment at 561 K (550 F), 589 K (600 F) and 617 K (650 F). It was determined that such composites have a long term life in the temperature range of 561 K to 589 K. The final phase involved the fabrication and evaluation of a series of demonstration airfoil specimens.

  3. Multi-Fiber Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    Resin matrix composites having improved resistance to foreign object damage in gas turbine engine fan blade applications were developed. Materials evaluated include epoxy matrix graphite/glass and boron/glass hybrids, thermoplastic matrix boron/glass hybrids, and superhybrids consisting of graphite/epoxy, boron/aluminum, and titanium alloy sheets. Static, pendulum impact, and ballistic impact test results are reported for all materials. Superhybrid blade like specimens are shown to be capable of withstanding relatively severe ballistic impacts from gelatin spheres without fracture. The effects of ply configuration and projectile angle of incidence on impact behavior are described. Predictions of surface strains during ballistic impact are presented and shown to be in reasonable agreement with experimental measurements.

  4. Microstructural characterization of fiber-reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Summerscales, J.

    1998-12-31

    In the past 50 years, great progress has been made in developing artificial fiber-reinforced composite materials, generally using filaments with microscopic diameters. An array of reinforcement forms can be used in commercial applications--with the microstructure being a critical factor in realizing the required properties in a material. This book comprehensively examines the application of advanced microstructural characterization techniques to fiber-reinforced composites. Its contents include: (1) flexible textile composite microstructure; (2) 3-D confocal microscopy of glass fiber-reinforced composites; (3) geometric modeling of yarn and fiber assemblies; (4) characterization of yarn shape in woven fabric composites; (5) quantitative microstructural analysis for continuous fiber composites; (6) electron microscopy of polymer composites; (7) micromechanics of reinforcement using laser raman spectroscopy; and (8) acoustic microscopy of ceramic fiber composites.

  5. Dimensionally Stable Graphite-Fiber/Glass Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Robert; Bergen, George J.; Studer, Philip A.

    1992-01-01

    Method of making composites of glass matrices reinforced by graphite fibers provides for control of proportions, orientations, and distributions of fibers in matrices and for fused bonds between fibers and matrices. Enables fabrication of composites of high specific strength and dimensional stability. Method particularly suitable for making low-thermal-expansion platforms for optical instruments.

  6. The assessment of metal fiber reinforced polymeric composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Wenchiang R.

    1990-01-01

    Because of their low cost, excellent electrical conductivity, high specific strength (strength/density), and high specific modulus (modulus/density) short metal fiber reinforced composites have enjoyed a widespread use in many critical applications such as automotive industry, aircraft manufacturing, national defense, and space technology. However, little data has been found in the study of short metal fibrous composites. Optimum fiber concentration in a resin matrix and fiber aspect ratio (length-to-diameter ratio) are often not available to a user. Stress concentration at short fiber ends is the other concern when the composite is applied to a load-bearing application. Fracture in such composites where the damage will be initiated or accumulated is usually difficult to be determined. An experimental investigation is therefore carefully designed and undertaken to systematically evaluate the mechanical properties as well as electrical properties. Inconel 601 (nickel based) metal fiber with a diameter of eight microns is used to reinforce commercially available thermoset polyester resin. Mechanical testing such as tensile, impact, and flexure tests along with electrical conductivity measurements is conducted to study the feasibility of using such composites. The advantages and limitations of applying chopped metal fiber reinforced polymeric composites are also discussed.

  7. Waterproofing Nanostructured Aerogel-Ceramic Fiber Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan; Hsu, Ming Ta; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Aerogels are nanoporous materials which can be used to enhance the transport properties of ceramic fiber materials, to exploit their unique properties such as high porosity, large surface area, low density and low thermal conductivity. Numerous applications have been investigated. major obstacle to commercialization is that the structure of aerogels collapses due to the adsorption of water. simple and relatively cheap process has been developed to waterproof silica, alumina and alumina-silica and carbon aerogels and composites incorporating them. Previous waterproofing methods are short lived or expensive and time consuming.

  8. Mechanical properties of fiber reinforced lightweight concrete composites

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Pena, M. ); Mobasher, B. )

    1994-01-01

    Hybrid composites with variable strength/toughness properties can be manufactured using combinations of brittle or ductile mesh in addition to brittle and ductile matrix reinforcements. The bending and tensile properties of thin sheet fiber cement composites made from these mixtures were investigated. Composites consisted of a woven mesh of either polyvinyl chloride (PVC) coated E-glass or polypropylene (PP) fibers for the surface reinforcement. In addition, chopped polypropylene, acrylic, nylon, and alkali-resistant (AR) glass fibers were used for the core reinforcement. It is shown that by controlling fiber contents, types, and combinations, design objectives such as strength, stiffness and toughness, can be achieved. Superior post-cracking behavior was measured for composites reinforced both with glass mesh and PP mesh. Load carrying capacity of PP mesh composites can be increased with the use of 1% or higher chopped PP fibers. Glass mesh composites with short AR glass fibers as matrix reinforcement indicate an increased matrix cracking strength and modulus of rupture. Combinations of PP mesh/short AR glass did not show a substantial improvement in the matrix ultimate strength. An increased nylon fiber surface area resulted in improved post peak response.

  9. Resin/graphite fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavano, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    Processing techniques were developed for the fabrication of both polyphenylquinoxaline and polyimide composites by the in situ polymerization of monomeric reactants directly on the graphite reinforcing fibers, rather than using previously prepared prepolymer varnishes. Void-free polyphenylquinoxaline composites were fabricated and evaluated for room and elevated flexure and shear properties. The technology of the polyimide system was advanced to the point where the material is ready for commercial exploitation. A reproducible processing cycle free of operator judgment factors was developed for fabrication of void-free composites exhibiting excellent mechanical properties and a long time isothermal life in the range of 288 C to 316 C. The effects of monomer reactant stoichiometry and process modification on resin flow were investigated. Demonstration of the utility and quality of this polyimide system was provided through the successful fabrication and evaluation of four complex high tip speed fan blades.

  10. Reinforcing and Toughening Effects of Bamboo Pulp Fiber on Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) Fiber Composites.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV)/bamboo pulp fiber composites were melt-compounded and injection-molded. Tensile, impact and dynamic mechanical properties of the composites were studied. In contrast to many other short natural fiber reinforced biocomposites which demonstrate decre...

  11. Dynamic response of damaged angleplied fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.; Lark, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of low level damage induced by monotonic load, cyclic load and/or residual stresses on the vibration frequencies and damping factors of fiber composite angleplied laminates. Two different composite systems were studied - low modulus fiber and ultra high modulus fiber composites. The results obtained showed that the frequencies and damping factors of angleplied laminates made from low modulus fiber composites are sensitive to low level damage while those made from ultra high modulus composites are not. Also, vibration tests may not be sufficiently sensitive to assess concentrated local damage in angleplied laminates. And furthermore, dynamic response determined from low-velocity impact coupled with the Fast Fourier Transform and packaged in a minicomputer can be a convenient procedure for assessing low-level damage in fiber composite angleplied laminates.

  12. Morphology and properties of recycled polypropylene/bamboo fibers composites

    SciTech Connect

    Phuong, Nguyen Tri; Guinault, Alain; Sollogoub, Cyrille; Chuong, Bui

    2011-05-04

    Polypropylene (PP) is among the most widely used thermoplastics in many industrial fields. However, like other recycled polymers, its properties usually decrease after recycling process and sometimes are degraded to poor properties level for direct re-employment. The recycled products, in general, need to be reinforced to have competitive properties. Short bamboo fibers (BF) have been added in a recycled PP (RPP) with and without compatibilizer type maleic anhydride polypropylene (MAPP). Several properties of composite materials, such as helium gas permeability and mechanical properties before and after ageing in water, were examined. The effects of bamboo fiber content and fiber chemical treatment have been also investigated. We showed that the helium permeability increases if fiber content is higher than 30% because of a poor adhesion between untreated bamboo fiber and polymer matrix. The composites reinforced by acetylated bamboo fibers show better helium permeability due to grafting of acetyl groups onto cellulose fibers surface and thus improves compatibility between bamboo fibers and matrix, which has been shown by microscopic observations. Besides, mechanical properties of composite decrease with ageing in water but the effect is less pronounced with low bamboo fiber content.

  13. Homogenization of long fiber reinforced composites including fiber bending effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulios, Konstantinos; Niordson, Christian F.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a homogenization method, which accounts for intrinsic size effects related to the fiber diameter in long fiber reinforced composite materials with two independent constitutive models for the matrix and fiber materials. A new choice of internal kinematic variables allows to maintain the kinematics of the two material phases independent from the assumed constitutive models, so that stress-deformation relationships, can be expressed in the framework of hyper-elasticity and hyper-elastoplasticity for the fiber and the matrix materials respectively. The bending stiffness of the reinforcing fibers is captured by higher order strain terms, resulting in an accurate representation of the micro-mechanical behavior of the composite. Numerical examples show that the accuracy of the proposed model is very close to a non-homogenized finite-element model with an explicit discretization of the matrix and the fibers.

  14. The reflectivity of carbon fiber reinforced polymer short circuit illuminated by guided microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojovschi, A.; Scott, J.; Ghorbani, K.

    2013-09-01

    An investigation of the interaction between guided electromagnetic waves and carbon fibre reinforced polymer waveguide short circuits is presented. To determine the electromagnetic response of the composite waveguide short circuit, its anisotropic characteristics are considered. The reflection coefficients of the short circuit, at the reference plane, are about 0.98 over the whole 8 GHz to 12 GHz band. The results indicate the viability of carbon fiber based short circuits for lightweight waveguides.

  15. Bio-composites fabricated by sandwiching sisal fibers with polypropylene (PP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosiati, H.; Nahyudin, A.; Fauzi, I.; Wijayanti, D. A.; Triyana, K.

    2016-04-01

    Sisal fibers reinforced polypropylene (PP) composites were successfully fabricated using sandwiching sisal fibers with PP sheets. The ratio of fiber and polymer matrix was 50:50 (wt. %). Untreated short and long sisal fibers, and alkali treated short sisal fibers in 6% NaOH at 100°C for 1 and 3 h were used as reinforcement or fillers. A small amount (3 wt. %) of maleic anhydride grafted polypropylene (MAPP) was added as a coupling agent. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were used to characterize the surface morphology and chemical composition of the fibers, respectively. Flexural test of sisal/PP composites was done according to ASTM D 790-02. The results showed that flexural strength of untreated long fiber reinforced composite is much higher than that of the untreated and alkali treated short fibers reinforced composites with and without the addition of MAPP. Alkalization related to fiber surface modification, fiber length/fiber orientation and a composite fabrication technique are important factors in contributing to the fiber distribution within the matrix, the bonding between the fiber and the matrix and the enhancement of flexural strength of the bio-composite.

  16. Crystal Structure of Enteric Adenovirus Serotype 41 Short Fiber Head

    PubMed Central

    Seiradake, Elena; Cusack, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    Human enteric adenoviruses of species F contain two fibers in the same virion, a long fiber which binds to coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) and a short fiber of unknown function. We have determined the high-resolution crystal structure of the short fiber head of human adenovirus serotype 41 (Ad41). The short fiber head has the characteristic fold of other known fiber heads but has three unusual features. First, it has much shorter loops between the beta-strands. Second, one of the usually well-ordered beta-strands on the distal face of the fiber head is highly disordered and this same region is sensitive to digestion with pepsin, an enzyme occurring naturally in the intestinal tract, the physiological environment of Ad41. Third, the AB loop has a deletion giving it a distinct conformation incompatible with CAR binding. PMID:16254343

  17. Crystallization analysis for fiber/polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimo, Maria

    2016-05-01

    The peculiar nucleation behavior of low thermal conductivity polymer matrixes and the particular morphologies around fibers found in several composites, invalidate some assumptions invoked in the general description of the solidification kinetics of polycrystalline substances. The model of solidification universally adopted for polycrystalline substances, originally developed for metals, needs to be adapted also to account for large differences between polymers and fibers in thermoplastic composites. The extension of the classical phase transitions theory to fiber/polymer composites, in view of their specific thermal properties, allows to achieve reliable information on crystallization behavior and microstructure inside composites.

  18. Fiber coatings for ceramic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, H.W.; Bohlen, J.W.

    1992-08-01

    Two fiber coating concepts for ceramic matrix composites were successfully demonstrated in a preliminary study. These coatings were designed to promote toughness in composites and resist oxidation. The concepts were: (1) thin, multiple unbonded layers, and (2) a single porous layer that provided low interfacial strengths between the fiber and matrix. Chemical vapor deposited (CVD) SiC and sol-gel derived oxides were used to produce the fiber coatings. Specimens consisted of a single coated monofilament fiber and a sheath of CVD SiC to represent the matrix. Results from flexure tests showed that matrix cracks were deflected and that fibers debonded the same as in specimens made using carbon-coated fibers. Crack deflection and fiber debonding were also evident after exposure in air at elevated temperatures. 5 refs.

  19. The effects of embedded piezoelectric fiber composite sensors on the structural integrity of glass-fiber-epoxy composite laminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konka, Hari P.; Wahab, M. A.; Lian, K.

    2012-01-01

    Piezoelectric fiber composite sensors (PFCSs) made from micro-sized lead zirconate titanate (PZT) fibers have many advantages over the traditional bulk PZT sensors for embedded sensor applications. PFCSs as embedded sensors will be an ideal choice to continuously monitor the stress/strain levels and health conditions of composite structures. PFCSs are highly flexible, easily embeddable, have high compatibility with composite structures, and also provides manufacturing flexibility. This research is focused on examining the effects of embedding PFCS sensors (macro-fiber composite (MFC) and piezoelectric fiber composite (PFC)) on the structural integrity of glass-fiber-epoxy composite laminates. The strengths of composite materials with embedded PFCSs and conventional PZT sensors were compared, and the advantages of PFCS sensors over PZTs were demonstrated. Initially a numerical simulation study is performed to understand the local stress/strain field near the embedded sensor region inside a composite specimen. High stress concentration regions were observed near the embedded sensor corner edge. Using PFCS leads to a reduction of 56% in longitudinal stress concentration and 38% in transverse stress concentration, when compared to using the conventional PZTs as embedded sensors. In-plane tensile, in-plane tension-tension fatigue, and short beam strength tests are performed to evaluate the strengths/behavior of the composite specimens containing embedded PFCS. From the tensile test it is observed that embedding PFCS and PZT sensors in the composite structures leads to a reduction in ultimate strength by 3 and 6% respectively. From the fatigue test results it is concluded that both embedded PFCS and PZT sensors do not have a significant effect on the fatigue behavior of the composite specimens. From the short beam strength test it is found that embedding PFCS and PZT sensors leads to a reduction in shear strength by 7 and 15% respectively. Overall the pure PZT sensors

  20. Anisotropic fiber alignment in composite structures

    DOEpatents

    Graham, A.L.; Mondy, L.A.; Guell, D.C.

    1993-11-16

    High strength material composite structures are formed with oriented fibers to provide controlled anisotropic fibers. Fibers suspended in non-dilute concentrations (e.g., up to 20 volume percent for fibers having an aspect ratio of 20) in a selected medium are oriented by moving an axially spaced array of elements in the direction of desired fiber alignment. The array elements are generally perpendicular to the desired orientation. The suspension medium may also include sphere-like particles where the resulting material is a ceramic. 5 figures.

  1. Anisotropic fiber alignment in composite structures

    DOEpatents

    Graham, Alan L.; Mondy, Lisa A.; Guell, David C.

    1993-01-01

    High strength material composite structures are formed with oriented fibers to provide controlled anisotropic fibers. Fibers suspended in non-dilute concentrations (e.g., up to 20 volume percent for fibers having an aspect ratio of 20) in a selected medium are oriented by moving an axially spaced array of elements in the direction of desired fiber alignment. The array elements are generally perpendicular to the desired orientation. The suspension medium may also include sphere-like particles where the resulting material is a ceramic.

  2. Impact strength on fiber-reinforced hybrid composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firdaus, S. M.; Nurdina; Azmil Ariff, M.

    2013-12-01

    Acrylonitrile-Butadiene-Styrene (ABS) has been well known composite in automotive players to have light weight with high impact strength material compared to sheet metal material which has high impact strength but heavy in weight. In this project, the impact strength properties of fabricated pure ABS were compared to the eight samples of hybrid ABS composite with different weight percentages of short fibers and particle sizes of ground rubber. The objective was to improve the impact strength in addition of short fibers and ground rubber particles. These samples were then characterized using an un-notched Izod impact test. Results show that the increasing of filler percentage yielded an adverse effect on the impact strength of the hybrid composite. The effect of the ground rubber particulate sizes however are deemed to be marginal than the effect of varying filler percentage based on the collected impact strength data from all physically tested hybrid composites.

  3. Active-Transient Liquid Phase (A-TLP) Bonding of Pure Aluminum Matrix Composite Reinforced with Short Alumina Fiber Using Al-12Si-xTi Foils as Active Interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guifeng; Su, Wei; Suzumura, Akio

    2016-02-01

    To optimize both the interlayer composition design route and pressure for joining aluminum matrix composite reinforced with short alumina fiber (as-cast 30 vol pct Al2O3sf/Al), traditional transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding using Al-12Si and Cu interlayer and active-TLP (A-TLP) bonding using an active Ti-containing interlayer (Al-12Si-xTi, x = 0.1, 0.5, and 1 wt pct) under the same condition [883 K (610 °C) × 30 minutes × 1 or 0.015 MPa in flowing argon] were compared in terms of interfacial wettability, bond seam microstructure, shear strength, and fracture path. It was found that not only the Ti content but also the pressure are critical factors affecting interfacial wettability and bond seam microstructure. The improvement in wettability by adding Ti as an active element were confirmed by reduction of expulsion of liquid interlayer, elimination of interfacial gap, higher shear strength and favorable fracture path (partially through bond seam and the composite). Because of the incubation period for wetting, reducing the pressure after melting of the interlayer could further increase joint shear strength by thickening the remaining bond seam of solid-solution matrix and decreasing fraction of the in situ newly formed Al-Si-Ti IMC phase (short bar shape) within the bond seam. The maximum shear strength of 88.6 MPa (99 pct of the as-cast composite) was obtained by adding trace Ti content (0.5 Ti wt pct) addition and using low pressure (0.015 MPa). The results showed that suitable combination of Ti content and pressure pattern is required for improving both wettability and bond seam microstructure.

  4. Active-Transient Liquid Phase (A-TLP) Bonding of Pure Aluminum Matrix Composite Reinforced with Short Alumina Fiber Using Al-12Si- xTi Foils as Active Interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guifeng; Su, Wei; Suzumura, Akio

    2016-06-01

    To optimize both the interlayer composition design route and pressure for joining aluminum matrix composite reinforced with short alumina fiber (as-cast 30 vol pct Al2O3sf/Al), traditional transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding using Al-12Si and Cu interlayer and active-TLP (A-TLP) bonding using an active Ti-containing interlayer (Al-12Si- xTi, x = 0.1, 0.5, and 1 wt pct) under the same condition [883 K (610 °C) × 30 minutes × 1 or 0.015 MPa in flowing argon] were compared in terms of interfacial wettability, bond seam microstructure, shear strength, and fracture path. It was found that not only the Ti content but also the pressure are critical factors affecting interfacial wettability and bond seam microstructure. The improvement in wettability by adding Ti as an active element were confirmed by reduction of expulsion of liquid interlayer, elimination of interfacial gap, higher shear strength and favorable fracture path (partially through bond seam and the composite). Because of the incubation period for wetting, reducing the pressure after melting of the interlayer could further increase joint shear strength by thickening the remaining bond seam of solid-solution matrix and decreasing fraction of the in situ newly formed Al-Si-Ti IMC phase (short bar shape) within the bond seam. The maximum shear strength of 88.6 MPa (99 pct of the as-cast composite) was obtained by adding trace Ti content (0.5 Ti wt pct) addition and using low pressure (0.015 MPa). The results showed that suitable combination of Ti content and pressure pattern is required for improving both wettability and bond seam microstructure.

  5. Natural Fiber or Glass Reinforced Polypropylene Composites?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzi, W.; Di Landro, L.; Casiraghi, A.; Pagano, M. R.

    2008-08-01

    Problems related to the recycle of conventional composite materials are becoming always more relevant for many industrial fields. Natural fiber composites (NFC) have recently gained much attention due to their low cost, environmental gains (eco-compatibility), easy disposal, reduction in volatile organic emissions, and their potential to compete with glass fiber composites (GFC). Interest in natural fibers is not only based over ecological aspects. NFC have good mechanical performances in relation to their low specific weight and low price. A characterization of mechanical properties, dynamic behavior, and moisture absorption is presented.

  6. NATURAL FIBER OR GLASS REINFORCED POLYPROPYLENE COMPOSITES?

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenzi, W.; Di Landro, L.; Casiraghi, A.; Pagano, M. R.

    2008-08-28

    Problems related to the recycle of conventional composite materials are becoming always more relevant for many industrial fields. Natural fiber composites (NFC) have recently gained much attention due to their low cost, environmental gains (eco-compatibility), easy disposal, reduction in volatile organic emissions, and their potential to compete with glass fiber composites (GFC). Interest in natural fibers is not only based over ecological aspects. NFC have good mechanical performances in relation to their low specific weight and low price. A characterization of mechanical properties, dynamic behavior, and moisture absorption is presented.

  7. Strength Scaling in Fiber Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellas, Sotiris; Morton, John

    1990-01-01

    A research program was initiated to study and isolate the factors responsible for scale effects in the tensile strength of graphite/epoxy composite laminates. Four layups were chosen with appropriate stacking sequences so as to highlight individual and interacting failure modes. Four scale sizes were selected for investigation including full scale size, 3/4, 2/4, and 1/4, with n = to 4, 3, 2, and 1, respectively. The full scale specimen sizes was 32 piles thick as compared to 24, 16, and 8 piles for the 3/4, 2/4, and 1/4 specimen sizes respectively. Results were obtained in the form of tensile strength, stress-strain curves and damage development. Problems associated with strength degradation with increasing specimen sizes are isolated and discussed. Inconsistencies associated with strain measurements were also identified. Enhanced x ray radiography was employed for damage evaluation, following step loading. It was shown that fiber dominated layups were less sensitive to scaling effects compared to the matrix dominated layups.

  8. Strength scaling in fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellas, Sotiris; Morton, John

    1991-01-01

    A research program was initiated to study and isolate the factors responsible for scale effects in the tensile strength of graphite/epoxy composite laminates. Four layups were chosen with appropriate stacking sequences so as to highlight individual and interacting failure modes. Four scale sizes were selected for investigation including full scale size, 3/4, 2/4, and 1/4, with n = to 4, 3, 2, and 1, respectively. The full scale specimen sizes was 32 piles thick as compared to 24, 16, and 8 piles for the 3/4, 2/4, and 1/4 specimen sizes respectively. Results were obtained in the form of tensile strength, stress-strain curves and damage development. Problems associated with strength degradation with increasing specimen sizes are isolated and discussed. Inconsistencies associated with strain measurements were also identified. Enchanced X-ray radiography was employed for damage evaluation, following step loading. It was shown that fiber dominated layups were less sensitive to scaling effects compared to the matrix dominated layups.

  9. Carbon fiber composite molecular sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, T.D.; Rogers, M.R.; Williams, A.M.

    1996-06-01

    The removal of CO{sub 2} is of significance in several energy applications. The combustion of fossil fuels, such as coal or natural gas, releases large volumes of CO{sub 2} to the environment. Several options exist to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions, including substitution of nuclear power for fossil fuels, increasing the efficiency of fossil plants and capturing the CO{sub 2} prior to emission to the environment. All of these techniques have the attractive feature of limiting the amount of CO{sub 2} emitted to the atmosphere, but each has economic, technical, or societal limitations. In the production of natural gas, the feed stream from the well frequently contains contaminants and diluents which must be removed before the gas can enter the pipeline distribution system. Notable amongst these diluent gasses is CO{sub 2}, which has no calorific value. Currently, the pipeline specification calls for <2 mol % CO{sub 2} in the gas. Gas separation is thus a relevant technology in the field of energy production. A novel separation system based on a parametric swing process has been developed that utilizes the unique combination of properties exhibited by our carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS).

  10. Aligning carbon fibers in micro-extruded composite ink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Chaitanya G.

    Direct write processes include a wide range of additive manufacturing techniques with the ability to fabricate structures directly onto planar and non-planar surfaces. Most additive manufacturing techniques use unreinforced polymers to produce parts. By adding carbon fiber as a reinforcing material, properties such as mechanical strength, electrical conductivity, and thermal conductivity can be enhanced. Carbon fibers can be long and continuous, or short and discontinuous. The strength of carbon fiber composite parts is greatly increased when the fibers are preferentially aligned. This research focuses on increasing the strength of additively manufactured parts reinforced using discontinuous carbon fibers that have been aligned during the micro extrusion process. A design of experiments (DOE) approach was used to identify significant process parameters affecting fiber alignment. Factors such as the length of carbon fibers, nozzle diameter, fiber loading fraction, air pressure, translational speed and standoff distance were considered. A two dimensional Fast Fourier Transform (2D FFT) was used to quantify the degree of fiber alignment in the extruded composite inks. ImageJ software supported by an oval profile plugin was used with micrographs of printed samples to obtain the carbon fiber alignment values. The optimal value for the factors was derived by identifying the significant main and interaction effects. Based on the results of the DOE, tensile test samples were printed with fibers aligned parallel and perpendicular to the tensile axis. A standard test method for tensile properties of plastic revealed that the extruded parts with fibers aligned along the tensile axis were better in tensile strength and modulus.

  11. Use of optical fibers in composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surace, Giuseppe; Chiaradia, Agostino

    1997-06-01

    Following a number of essential considerations concerning smart materials and structures as well as the structural diagnostics issues involved with the use of optical fibers in composite materials, the paper builds on earlier theoretical study of the micromechanics of laminae reinforced with multidirectional fibers, proposing that optical fiber grids embedded in matrix material be used to improve strength and monitoring performance. The paper then addresses the static characterization of such laminae, detailing previously obtained results for multidirectional generic fiber grids. For any given percentage fiber content, a numerical application demonstrates that laminae reinforced with a right triangular grid of optical fibers show consistent improvement in their extension and bending stiffness characteristics as compared with laminae reinforced with unidirectional fibers.

  12. Fiber Optic Solutions for Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R; Dawson, J; Liao, Z; Jovanovic, I; Wattellier, B; Payne, S; Barty, C P

    2003-01-29

    For applications requiring high beam quality radiation from efficient, compact and rugged sources, diffraction limited fiber lasers are ideal, and to date have been demonstrated at average CW power levels exceeding 100 W with near diffraction limited: output. For conventional single-core step-index single-mode fibers, this power level represents the sealing limit because of nonlinear and laser damage considerations. Higher average powers would exceed nonlinear process thresholds such as the Raman and stimulated Brillouin scattering limit, or else damage the fiber due to the high intensity level in the fiber's core. The obvious way to increase the average power capability of fibers is to increase the area of their core. Simply expanding the core dimensions of the fiber allows a straightforward power sealing due to enhanced nonlinear and power handling characteristics that scale directly with the core area. Femtosecond, chirped-pulse, fiber lasers with pulse energies greater than 1mJ have been demonstrated in the literature [2] using this technique. This output energy was still limited by the onset of stimulated Raman scattering. We have pursued an alternative and complimentary approach which is to reduce the intensity of light propagating in the core by distributing it more evenly across the core area via careful design of the refractive index profile [3]. We have also sought to address the primary issue that results from scaling the core. The enhanced power handling capability comes at the expense of beam quality, as increasing the core diameter in standard step index fibers permits multiple transverse modes to lase simultaneously. Although this problem of multimode operation can be mitigated to some extent by appropriately designing the fiber's waveguide structure, limitations such as bend radius loss, sensitivity to thermally induced perturbations of the waveguide structure, and refractive index control, all become more stringent as the core diameter grows

  13. Fiber Reinforced Composites for Insulation and Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broughton, Roy M., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    The work involves two areas: Composites, optimum fiber placement with initial construction of a pressure vessel, and the general subject of insulation, a continual concern in harsh thermal environments. Insulation

  14. Second generation PMR polyimide/fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavano, P. J.

    1979-01-01

    A second generation polymerization monomeric reactants (PMR) polyimdes matrix system (PMR 2) was characterized in both neat resin and composite form with two different graphite fiber reinforcements. Three different formulated molecular weight levels of laboratory prepared PMR 2 were examined, in addition to a purchased experimental fully formulated PMR 2 precurser solution. Isothermal aging of graphite fibers, neat resin samples and composite specimens in air at 316 C were investigated. Humidity exposures at 65 C and 97 percent relative humidity were conducted for both neat resin and composites for eight day periods. Anaerobic char of neat resin and fire testing of composites were conducted with PMR 15, PMR 2, and an epoxy system. Composites were fire tested on a burner rig developed for this program. Results indicate that neat PMR 2 resins exhibit excellent isothermal resistance and that PMR 2 composite properties appear to be influenced by the thermo-oxidative stability of the reinforcing fiber.

  15. Fiber Laser Front Ends for High Energy, Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J; Messerly, M; Phan, H; Siders, C; Beach, R; Barty, C

    2007-06-21

    We are developing a fiber laser system for short pulse (1-10ps), high energy ({approx}1kJ) glass laser systems. Fiber lasers are ideal for these systems as they are highly reliable and enable long term stable operation.

  16. Process for preparing composite articles from composite fiber blends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMahon, Paul E. (Inventor); Chung, Tai-Shung (Inventor); Ying, Lincoln (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A composite article is prepared by forming a continuous tow of continuous carbon fibers, forming a continuous tow of thermoplastic polymer fibers, uniformly and continuously spreading the thermoplastic polymer fibers to a selected width, uniformly and continuously spreading the carbon fiber tow to a width that is essentially the same as the selected width for the thermoplastic polymer fiber tow, intermixing the tows intimately, uniformly and continuously, in a relatively tension-free state, continuously withdrawing the intermixed tow and applying the tow to a mold and heating the tow.

  17. Plastic matrix composites with continuous fiber reinforcement

    SciTech Connect

    1991-09-19

    Most plastic resins are not suitable for structural applications. Although many resins are extremely tough, most lack strength, stiffness, and deform under load with time. By mixing strong, stiff, fibrous materials into the plastic matrix, a variety of structural composite materials can be formed. The properties of these composites can be tailored by fiber selection, orientation, and other factors to suit specific applications. The advantages and disadvantages of fiberglass, carbon-graphite, aramid (Kevlar 49), and boron fibers are summarized.

  18. Design considerations for fiber composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1972-01-01

    An overview of the design methodology for designing structural components from fiber composites is presented. In particular, the need for new conceptual structural designs for the future is discussed and the evolution of conceptual design is illustrated. Sources of design data, analysis and design procedures, and the basic components of structural fiber composites are cited and described. Examples of tradeoff studies and optimum designs are discussed and a simple structure is described in some detail.

  19. Durability of pulp fiber-cement composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, Benjamin J.

    Wood pulp fibers are a unique reinforcing material as they are non-hazardous, renewable, and readily available at relatively low cost compared to other commercially available fibers. Today, pulp fiber-cement composites can be found in products such as extruded non-pressure pipes and non-structural building materials, mainly thin-sheet products. Although natural fibers have been used historically to reinforce various building materials, little scientific effort has been devoted to the examination of natural fibers to reinforce engineering materials until recently. The need for this type of fundamental research has been emphasized by widespread awareness of moisture-related failures of some engineered materials; these failures have led to the filing of national- and state-level class action lawsuits against several manufacturers. Thus, if pulp fiber-cement composites are to be used for exterior structural applications, the effects of cyclical wet/dry (rain/heat) exposure on performance must be known. Pulp fiber-cement composites have been tested in flexure to examine the progression of strength and toughness degradation. Based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM), environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), a three-part model describing the mechanisms of progressive degradation has been proposed: (1) initial fiber-cement/fiber interlayer debonding, (2) reprecipitation of crystalline and amorphous ettringite within the void space at the former fiber-cement interface, and (3) fiber embrittlement due to reprecipitation of calcium hydroxide filling the spaces within the fiber cell wall structure. Finally, as a means to mitigate kraft pulp fiber-cement composite degradation, the effects of partial portland cement replacement with various supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) has been investigated for their effect on mitigating kraft pulp fiber-cement composite mechanical property degradation (i.e., strength and toughness

  20. Advanced fiber placement of composite fuselage structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Robert L.; Grant, Carroll G.

    1991-01-01

    The Hercules/NASA Advanced Composite Technology (ACT) program will demonstrate the low cost potential of the automated fiber placement process. The Hercules fiber placement machine was developed for cost effective production of composite aircraft structures. The process uses a low cost prepreg tow material form and achieves equivalent laminate properties to structures fabricated with prepreg tape layup. Fiber placement demonstrations planned for the Hercules/NASA program include fabrication of stiffened test panels which represent crown, keel, and window belt segments of a typical transport aircraft fuselage.

  1. Vapor grown carbon fiber (VGCF) composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ciminelli, D.L.; Kearns, K.M.; Ragland, W.R.

    1996-12-31

    Vapor grown carbon fibers (VGCF) offer a unique opportunity for carbon fiber composites to expand into a multitude of new markets due to their low cost of only $3 to 5 per pound. Additionally, VGCFs are extremely graphitic and have demonstrated the highest thermal conductivity of any graphite material. Pyrograf-III{reg_sign}, a VGCF produced by Applied Sciences, Inc (ASI), is a small diameter (0.1 {mu}m) fiber with a high aspect ratio (100- 1000). The primary interest of the work is for thermal management applications. The focus of the work has been developing novel process methodologies for these unusual fibers using phenolic and epoxy resin to produce low cost composites. The development of VGCF composites is being performed through a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRDA) between ASI and the Materials Directorate (WL/ML), Wright Laboratory, United States Air Force.

  2. PLASTIC SHRINKAGE CONTROLLING EFFECT BY POLYPROPYLENE SHORT FIBER WITH HYDROPHILY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoda, Akira; Sadatsuki, Yoshitomo; Oshima, Akihiro; Ishii, Akina; Tsubaki, Tatsuya

    The aim of this research is to clarify the mechanism of controlling plastic shrinkage crack by adding small amout of synthetic short fiber, and to propose optimum polypropylene short fiber to control plastic shrinkage crack. In this research, the effect of the hydrophily of polypropylene fiber was investigated in the amount of plastic shrinkage of mortar, total area of plastic shrinkage crack, and bond properties between fiber and mortar. The plastic shrinkage test of morar was conducted under high temperature, low relative humidity, and constant wind velocity. When polypropylene fiber had hydrophily, the amount of plastic shrinkage of mortar was restrained, which was because cement paste in morar was captured by hydrophilic fiber and then bleeding of mortar was restrained. With hydrophily, plastic shrinkage of mortar was restrained and bridging effect was improved due to better bond, which led to remarkable reduction of plastic shrinkage crack. Based on experimental results, the way of developing optimum polypropylene short fiber for actual construction was proposed. The fiber should have large hydrophily and small diameter, and should be used in as small amount as possible in order not to disturb workability of concrete.

  3. Analysis and performance of fiber composites (2nd revised and enlarged edition)

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, B.D.; Broutman, L.J.

    1990-01-01

    A comprehensive introduction is presented to engineering practices in the field of fiber-reinforced thermosetting and thermoplastic polymer matrix composites. After discussing the characteristics of the glass fibers that constitute the most commonly encountered reinforcement for these materials, carbon/graphite, aramid, and boron reinforcements are treated and the polymer matrix properties of greatest significance for resulting composite mechanical behavior are discussed. Attention is then given to the behavior of unidirectional composites, the design of short-fiber composites, the analysis of orthotropic lamina and of laminated composites, and the fatigue, impact, and environmental susceptibility of composites, as well as the methods used for their characterization.

  4. [Fiber-reinforced composite in fixed prosthodontics].

    PubMed

    Pilo, R; Abu Rass, Z; Shmidt, A

    2010-07-01

    Fiber reinforced composite (FRC) is composed of resin matrix and fibers filler. Common types of fibers: polyethylene, carbon and glass. Fibers can be continuous and aligned, discontinuous and aligned, discontinuous and randomly oriented. The architecture of the fibers is unidirectional, woven or braided. The two main types are: dry fibers or impregnated. Inclusion of fibers to resin composite increased its average flexural strength in 100-200 MPa. FRC can be utilized by the dentist in direct approach (splinting, temporary winged bridge) or indirect approach (laboratory made fixed partial denture). Laboratory fixed partial denture (FPD) is made from FRC substructure and Hybrid/Microfill particulate composite veneer. Main indications: interim temporary FPD or FPD in cases of questionable abutment teeth, in aesthetic cases where All Ceram FPD is not feasible. Retention is attained by adhesive cementation to minimally prepared teeth or to conventionally prepared teeth; other options are inlay-onlay bridges or hybrid bridges. Contraindications are: poor hygiene, inability to control humidity, parafunction habits, and more than two pontics. Survival rate of FRC FPD over 5 years is 75%, lower compared to porcelain fused to metal FPD which is 95%. Main reasons for failure are: fracture of framework and delamination of the veneer. Part of the failures is repairable. PMID:21485555

  5. Interfacial microstructure and properties of carbon fiber composites modified with graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoqing; Fan, Xinyu; Yan, Chun; Li, Hongzhou; Zhu, Yingdan; Li, Xiaotuo; Yu, Liping

    2012-03-01

    The performance of carbon fiber-reinforced composites is dependent to a great extent on the properties of fiber-matrix interface. To improve the interfacial properties in carbon fiber/epoxy composites, we directly introduced graphene oxide (GO) sheets dispersed in the fiber sizing onto the surface of individual carbon fibers. The applied graphite oxide, which could be exfoliated to single-layer GO sheets, was verified by atomic force microscope (AFM). The surface topography of modified carbon fibers and the distribution of GO sheets in the interfacial region of carbon fibers were detected by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The interfacial properties between carbon fiber and matrix were investigated by microbond test and three-point short beam shear test. The tensile properties of unidirectional (UD) composites were investigated in accordance with ASTM standards. The results of the tests reveal an improved interfacial and tensile properties in GO-modified carbon fiber composites. Furthermore, significant enhancement of interfacial shear strength (IFSS), interlaminar shear strength (ILSS), and tensile properties was achieved in the composites when only 5 wt % of GO sheets introduced in the fiber sizing. This means that an alternative method for improving the interfacial and tensile properties of carbon fiber composites by controlling the fiber-matrix interface was developed. Such multiscale reinforced composites show great potential with their improved mechanical performance to be likely applied in the aerospace and automotive industries. PMID:22391332

  6. The Advantage of Lower Half Mean Length in Characterizing Short Fibers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Short fibers reduce textile processing efficiencies and product quality. There have been increasing interests in short fibers in recent years. Currently a common parameter for characterizing short fibers is Short Fiber Content (SFC). In this paper we discussed the SFC’s several known problems and e...

  7. LOW-COST COMPOSITES IN VEHICLE MANUFACTURE - Natural-fiber-reinforced polymer composites in automotive applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Holbery, Jim; Houston, Dan

    2006-11-01

    In the last decade, natural fiber composites have experienced rapid growth in the European automotive market, and this trend appears to be global in scale, provided the cost and performance is justified against competing technologies. However, mass reduction, recyclability, and performance requirements can be met today by competing systems such as injection-molded unreinforced thermoplastics; natural fiber composites will continue to expand their role in automotive applications only if such technical challenges as moisture stability, fiber-polymer interface compatibility, and consistent, repeatable fiber sources are available to supply automotive manufacturers. Efforts underway by Tier I and II automotive suppliers to explore hybrid glass-natural fiber systems, as well as applications that exploit such capabilities as natural fiber sound dampening characteristics, could very well have far-reaching effects. In addition, the current development underway of bio-based resins such as Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) biodegradable polyesters and bio-based polyols could provide fully bio-based composite options to future automotive designers. In short, the development of the natural fiber composite market would make a positive impact on farmers and small business owners on a global scale, reduce US reliance on foreign oil, improve environmental quality through the development of a sustainable resource supply chain, and achieve a better CO2 balance over the vehicle?s lifetime with near-zero net greenhouse gas emissions.

  8. Nano polypeptide particles reinforced polymer composite fibers.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiashen; Li, Yi; Zhang, Jing; Li, Gang; Liu, Xuan; Li, Zhi; Liu, Xuqing; Han, Yanxia; Zhao, Zheng

    2015-02-25

    Because of the intensified competition of land resources for growing food and natural textile fibers, there is an urgent need to reuse and recycle the consumed/wasted natural fibers as regenerated green materials. Although polypeptide was extracted from wool by alkaline hydrolysis, the size of the polypeptide fragments could be reduced to nanoscale. The wool polypeptide particles were fragile and could be crushed down to nano size again and dispersed evenly among polymer matrix under melt extrusion condition. The nano polypeptide particles could reinforce antiultraviolet capability, moisture regain, and mechanical properties of the polymer-polypeptide composite fibers. PMID:25647481

  9. Fiber Reinforced Composite Materials Used for Tankage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Christy

    2005-01-01

    The Nonmetallic Materials and Processes Group is presently working on several projects to optimize cost while providing effect materials for the space program. One factor that must be considered is that these materials must meet certain weight requirements. Composites contribute greatly to this effort. Through the use of composites the cost of launching payloads into orbit will be reduced to one-tenth of the current cost. This research project involved composites used for aluminum pressure vessels. These tanks are used to store cryogenic liquids during flight. The tanks need some type of reinforcement. Steel was considered, but added too much weight. As a result, fiber was chosen. Presently, only carbon fibers with epoxy resin are wrapped around the vessels as a primary source of reinforcement. Carbon fibers are lightweight, yet high strength. The carbon fibers are wet wound onto the pressure vessels. This was done using the ENTEC Filament Winding Machine. It was thought that an additional layer of fiber would aid in reinforcement as well as containment and impact reduction. Kevlar was selected because it is light weight, but five times stronger that steel. This is the same fiber that is used to make bullet-proof vests trampolines, and tennis rackets.

  10. Carbon fiber content measurement in composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiushi

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs) have been widely used in various structural applications in industries such as aerospace and automotive because of their high specific stiffness and specific strength. Their mechanical properties are strongly influenced by the carbon fiber content in the composites. Measurement of the carbon fiber content in CFRPs is essential for product quality control and process optimization. In this work, a novel carbonization-in-nitrogen method (CIN) is developed to characterize the fiber content in carbon fiber reinforced thermoset and thermoplastic composites. In this method, a carbon fiber composite sample is carbonized in a nitrogen environment at elevated temperatures, alongside a neat resin sample. The carbon fibers are protected from oxidization while the resin (the neat resin and the resin matrix in the composite sample) is carbonized under the nitrogen environment. The residue of the carbonized neat resin sample is used to calibrate the resin carbonization rate and calculate the amount of the resin matrix in the composite sample. The new method has been validated on several thermoset and thermoplastic resin systems and found to yield an accurate measurement of fiber content in carbon fiber polymer composites. In order to further understand the thermal degradation behavior of the high temperature thermoplastic polymer during the carbonization process, the mechanism and the kinetic model of thermal degradation behavior of carbon fiber reinforced poly (phenylene sulfide) (CPPS) are studied using thermogravimetry analysis (TGA). The CPPS is subjected to TGA in an air and nitrogen atmosphere at heating rates from 5 to 40°C min--1. The TGA curves obtained in air are different from those in nitrogen. This demonstrates that weight loss occurs in a single stage in nitrogen but in two stages in air. To elucidate this difference, thermal decomposition kinetics is analyzed by applying the Kissinger, Flynn-Wall-Ozawa, Coat-Redfern and

  11. Wear of short carbon-fiber-reinforced PAI and PPS

    SciTech Connect

    Behrens, W.W.; Jerina, K.L.; Hahn, H.T.

    1988-07-01

    Wear of short carbon-fiber-reinforced polyamide-imide and polyphenylene sulfide is described. Comparative data from thrust washer wear tests for both polymers are presented. Fiber orientation is shown to have a significant effect on wear rates. The wear mechanisms in both polymers are illustrated with optical and scanning electron micrographs. Wear is shown to be a nonlinear function of time and stress for both PPS and PAI. 15 references, 14 figures.

  12. Measurement of high-birefringent spun fiber parameters using short-length fiber Bragg gratings.

    PubMed

    Vasiliev, S A; Przhiyalkovsky, Ya V; Gnusin, P I; Medvedkov, O I; Dianov, E M

    2016-05-30

    Spectral polarization characteristics of short-length fiber Bragg gratings UV-written in a highly-birefringent spun-fiber have been investigated. Based on the analysis of the characteristics the technique for measuring the built-in linear phase birefringence as well as the spin period in this fiber type has been suggested. In this method the birefringence dispersion is excluded and therefore the built-in linear phase birefringence can be measured with an improved accuracy. PMID:27410060

  13. Ultra short pulse generation and reshaping using highly nonlinear fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, S.; Namiki, S.; Inoue, T.; Oguri, A.; Akutsu, T.; Shinozaki, J.; Ozeki, Y.; Takasaka, S.; Igarashi, K.; Sakano, M.; Yagi, T.

    2005-11-01

    We experimentally investigate the generation of a low-noise ultra short pulse train from 40GHz to160GHz by using Comb-like profiled fiber (CPF) for adiabatic soliton conversion and compression. Highly nonlinear fibers allow us to reduce total length of CPF as well as to utilize Kerr effect in the fiber effectively. We demonstrate generations of 160GHz soliton train of 750fs, the compression to 500fs of 40GHz externally-modulated pulse with wideband tunability over 30nm. Then we apply the CPF pulse compression technique to achieve the programmable repetition tunability from 5 to 500 MHz in low pedestral 300fs pulse train generation.

  14. Cyclic Fiber Push-In Test Monitors Evolution of Interfacial Behavior in Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    1998-01-01

    -reinforced barium strontium aluminosilicate showed no significant changes in fiber sliding behavior with continued short-term cycling in either room air or nitrogen. Although the composites with BN-coated fibers showed stable short-term cycling behavior in both environments, long-term (several-week) exposure of debonded fibers to room air resulted in dramatically increased fiber sliding distances and decreased frictional sliding stresses. These results indicate that although matrix cracks bridged by BNcoated fibers will show short-term stability, such cracks will show substantial growth with long-term exposure to moisture-containing environments. Newly formulated BN coatings, with higher moisture resistance, will be tested in the near future.

  15. Effects of Fiber Coating Composition on Mechanical Behavior of Silicon Carbide Fiber-Reinforced Celsian Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Elderidge, Jeffrey I.

    1998-01-01

    Celsian matrix composites reinforced with Hi-Nicalon fibers, precoated with a dual layer of BN/SiC by chemical vapor deposition in two separate batches, were fabricated. Mechanical properties of the composites were measured in three-point flexure. Despite supposedly identical processing, the composite panels fabricated with fibers coated in two batches exhibited substantially different mechanical behavior. The first matrix cracking stresses (sigma(sub mc)) of the composites reinforced with fibers coated in batch 1 and batch 2 were 436 and 122 MPa, respectively. This large difference in sigma(sub mc) was attributed to differences in fiber sliding stresses(tau(sub friction)), 121.2+/-48.7 and 10.4+/-3.1 MPa, respectively, for the two composites as determined by the fiber push-in method. Such a large difference in values of tau(sub friction) for the two composites was found to be due to the difference in the compositions of the interface coatings. Scanning Auger microprobe analysis revealed the presence of carbon layers between the fiber and BN, and also between the BN and SiC coatings in the composite showing lower tau(sub friction). This resulted in lower sigma(sub mc) in agreement with the ACK theory. The ultimate strengths of the two composites, 904 and 759 MPa, depended mainly on the fiber volume fraction and were not significantly effected by tau(sub friction) values, as expected. The poor reproducibility of the fiber coating composition between the two batches was judged to be the primary source of the large differences in performance of the two composites.

  16. High Average Power, High Energy Short Pulse Fiber Laser System

    SciTech Connect

    Messerly, M J

    2007-11-13

    Recently continuous wave fiber laser systems with output powers in excess of 500W with good beam quality have been demonstrated [1]. High energy, ultrafast, chirped pulsed fiber laser systems have achieved record output energies of 1mJ [2]. However, these high-energy systems have not been scaled beyond a few watts of average output power. Fiber laser systems are attractive for many applications because they offer the promise of high efficiency, compact, robust systems that are turn key. Applications such as cutting, drilling and materials processing, front end systems for high energy pulsed lasers (such as petawatts) and laser based sources of high spatial coherence, high flux x-rays all require high energy short pulses and two of the three of these applications also require high average power. The challenge in creating a high energy chirped pulse fiber laser system is to find a way to scale the output energy while avoiding nonlinear effects and maintaining good beam quality in the amplifier fiber. To this end, our 3-year LDRD program sought to demonstrate a high energy, high average power fiber laser system. This work included exploring designs of large mode area optical fiber amplifiers for high energy systems as well as understanding the issues associated chirped pulse amplification in optical fiber amplifier systems.

  17. Chemical microsensors based on polymer fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessick, Royal F.; Levit, Natalia; Tepper, Gary C.

    2005-05-01

    There is an urgent need for new chemical sensors for defense and security applications. In particular, sensors are required that can provide higher sensitivity and faster response in the field than existing baseline technologies. We have been developing a new solid-state chemical sensor technology based on microscale polymer composite fiber arrays. The fibers consist of an insulating polymer doped with conducting particles and are electrospun directly onto the surface of an interdigitated microelectrode. The concentration of the conducting particles within the fiber is controlled and is near the percolation threshold. Thus, the electrical resistance of the polymer fiber composite is very sensitive to volumetric changes produced in the polymer by vapor absorption. Preliminary results are presented on the fabrication and testing of the new microsensor. The objective is to take advantage of the very high surface to volume ratio, low thermal mass and linear geometry of the composite fibers to produce sensors exhibiting an extremely high vapor sensitivity and rapid response. The simplicity and low cost of a resistance-based chemical microsensor makes this sensing approach an attractive alternative to devices requiring RF electronics or time-of-flight analysis. Potential applications of this technology include battlespace awareness, homeland security, environmental surveillance, medical diagnostics and food process monitoring.

  18. Tensile failure criteria for fiber composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, B. W.; Zweben, C. H.

    1972-01-01

    The analysis provides insight into the failure mechanics of these materials and defines criteria which serve as tools for preliminary design material selection and for material reliability assessment. The model incorporates both dispersed and propagation type failures and includes the influence of material heterogeneity. The important effects of localized matrix damage and post-failure matrix shear stress transfer are included in the treatment. The model is used to evaluate the influence of key parameters on the failure of several commonly used fiber-matrix systems. Analyses of three possible failure modes were developed. These modes are the fiber break propagation mode, the cumulative group fracture mode, and the weakest link mode. Application of the new model to composite material systems has indicated several results which require attention in the development of reliable structural composites. Prominent among these are the size effect and the influence of fiber strength variability.

  19. CARBON FIBER COMPOSITES IN HIGH VOLUME

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Charles David; Das, Sujit; Jeon, Dr. Saeil

    2014-01-01

    Vehicle lightweighting represents one of several design approaches that automotive and heavy truck manufacturers are currently evaluating to improve fuel economy, lower emissions, and improve freight efficiency (tons-miles per gallon of fuel). With changes in fuel efficiency and environmental regulations in the area of transportation, the next decade will likely see considerable vehicle lightweighting throughout the ground transportation industry. Greater use of carbon fiber composites and light metals is a key component of that strategy. This paper examines the competition between candidate materials for lightweighting of heavy vehicles and passenger cars. A 53-component, 25 % mass reduction, body-in-white cost analysis is presented for each material class, highlighting the potential cost penalty for each kilogram of mass reduction and then comparing the various material options. Lastly, as the cost of carbon fiber is a major component of the elevated cost of carbon fiber composites, a brief look at the factors that influence that cost is presented.

  20. Continuous fiber-reinforced titanium aluminide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackay, R. A.; Brindley, P. K.; Froes, F. H.

    1991-01-01

    An account is given of the fabrication techniques, microstructural characteristics, and mechanical behavior of a lightweight, high service temperature SiC-reinforced alpha-2 Ti-14Al-21Nb intermetallic-matrix composite. Fabrication techniques under investigation to improve the low-temperature ductility and environmental resistance of this material system, while reducing manufacturing costs to competitive levels, encompass powder-cloth processing, foil-fiber-foil processing, and thermal-spray processing. Attention is given to composite microstructure problems associated with fiber distribution and fiber-matrix interfaces, as well as with mismatches of thermal-expansion coefficient; major improvements are noted to be required in tensile properties, thermal cycling effects, mechanical damage, creep, and environmental effects.

  1. Damping characteristics of damaged fiber composite components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberle, K.

    1986-01-01

    Defects in fiber composite components produce changes with respect to the vibrational characteristics of the material. These changes can be recognized in the form of a frequency shift or an alteration of the damping process. The present investigation is concerned with questions regarding the possibility of a utilization of the changes in suitable defect-detecting inspection procedures. A description is given of a method for measuring the damping characteristics of a specimen. This method provides a spectrum of the damping coefficients of the sample as a basis for a comprehensive evaluation of the damping behavior. The correlation between defects and change in the damping characteristics is demonstrated with the aid of results obtained in measurements involving specimens of carbon-fiber composites and a component consisting of glass-fiber-reinforced plastics.

  2. Research and Development of Fully Green Composites Reinforced with Natural Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goda, Koichi; Cao, Yong

    With looming environmental problems and the global energy crisis, fully green composites of natural fibers and biodegradable resin have increasingly attracted research interest because of their advantages of low cost, renewable resource usage, and biodegradability. Recent studies and developments are reviewed in this article, including short fiber green composites, unidirectional green composites, textile and cross-ply green composites, and technologies for improvement of natural fibers and these composites. Fabrication methods, molding conditions, and mechanical properties of the composites are discussed in detail. A key approach of natural fiber toughness improvement by chemical treatment along with its effect on the composites is reported as an excellent example. Finally, future development trends related to fully green composites are predicted.

  3. Bipolar Battery Using Conductive-Fiber Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rippel, Wally E.

    1989-01-01

    Improved version of lead/sulfuric acid battery, electrically-conducting fiber/polymer composite substrates used in place of metallic substrates. Sealing and corrosion problems reduced. Benefits include halving of weight, increased energy and power densities, and lower gassing rate. Important for electric-vehicle development.

  4. Fiber reinforced thermoplastic resin matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Robert J. (Inventor); Chang, Glenn E. C. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Polyimide polymer composites having a combination of enhanced thermal and mechanical properties even when subjected to service temperatures as high as 700.degree. F. are described. They comprise (a) from 10 to 50 parts by weight of a thermoplastic polyimide resin prepared from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane and (b) from 90 to 50 parts by weight of continuous reinforcing fibers, the total of (a) and (b) being 100 parts by weight. Composites based on polyimide resin formed from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane and pyromellitic dianhydride and continuous carbon fibers retained at least about 50% of their room temperature shear strength after exposure to 700.degree. F. for a period of 16 hours in flowing air. Preferably, the thermoplastic polyimide resin is formed in situ in the composite material by thermal imidization of a corresponding amide-acid polymer prepared from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane. It is also preferred to initially size the continuous reinforcing fibers with up to about one percent by weight of an amide-acid polymer prepared from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane. In this way imidization at a suitable elevated temperature results in the in-situ formation of a substantially homogeneous thermoplastic matrix of the polyimide resin tightly and intimately bonded to the continuous fibers. The resultant composites tend to have optimum thermo-mechanical properties.

  5. Method of forming composite fiber blends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMahon, Paul E. (Inventor); Chung, Tai-Shung (Inventor); Ying, Lincoln (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The instant invention involves a process used in preparing fibrous tows which may be formed into polymeric plastic composites. The process involves the steps of (a) forming a tow of strong filamentary materials; (b) forming a thermoplastic polymeric fiber; (c) intermixing the two tows; and (d) withdrawing the intermixed tow for further use.

  6. Numerical studies of fibrous composites from the view point of fiber-matrix interface and fiber-matrix bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Yahya Ilyas

    In the present research, the micromechanics of fibrous composites was studied numerically. The effects of the fiber/matrix interphase region and fiber/matrix bonding were the main goals of this research. Throughout the research NASTRAN finite element analyses were used. First we investigated the effect of the interphase region on the stress field by varying the thickness of the interphase region and the material properties in the interphase region. Second, we numerically simulated the bonding qualities between the fiber and the matrix by the implementation of the fiber/matrix interphase region. The change for bonding between the fiber and the matrix were simulated through a periodic material property change in the interphase region. Third, we developed a bi-dimensional concentric cylindrical model for stress transfer between the fiber and the matrix model in case of a broken fiber or short fiber composites. This model is unique in accounting for the real non-linear stress-strain relationship for the matrix material. The stress transfer between the fiber and the matrix was also analyzed by finite element models. Toward this end finite element analysis proved a useful tool to help us evaluate key model parameters, most importantly the radius of fiber influence. This parameter is also a key parameter of simple models upon which the new model is based. Finally we applied our stress transfer model to analyze single fiber fragmentation test data obtained at Kansas State University.

  7. Carbon fiber composite molecular sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, T.D.; Rogers, M.R.

    1997-12-01

    Monolithic adsorbents based on isotropic pitch fibers have been developed jointly by ORNL and the University of Kentucky, Center for Applied Energy Research. The monoliths are attractive for gas separation and storage applications because of their unique combination of physical properties and microporous structure. Currently at ORNL the monoliths are produced in billets that are 10 cm in diameter and 25 cm in length. The monolithic adsorbent material is being considered for guard bed applications on a natural gas (NG) powered device. In order for the material to be successful in this application, one must attain a uniform activation to modest micropore volumes throughout the large monoliths currently being produced. Here the authors report the results of a study directed toward attaining uniform activation in these billets.

  8. Manufacturing of Nanocomposite Carbon Fibers and Composite Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, Seng; Zhou, Jian-guo

    2013-01-01

    Pitch-based nanocomposite carbon fibers were prepared with various percentages of carbon nanofibers (CNFs), and the fibers were used for manufacturing composite structures. Experimental results show that these nanocomposite carbon fibers exhibit improved structural and electrical conductivity properties as compared to unreinforced carbon fibers. Composite panels fabricated from these nanocomposite carbon fibers and an epoxy system also show the same properties transformed from the fibers. Single-fiber testing per ASTM C1557 standard indicates that the nanocomposite carbon fiber has a tensile modulus of 110% higher, and a tensile strength 17.7% times higher, than the conventional carbon fiber manufactured from pitch. Also, the electrical resistance of the carbon fiber carbonized at 900 C was reduced from 4.8 to 2.2 ohm/cm. The manufacturing of the nanocomposite carbon fiber was based on an extrusion, non-solvent process. The precursor fibers were then carbonized and graphitized. The resultant fibers are continuous.

  9. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) fiber optic monitoring of composites during cure in an autoclave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Druy, Mark A.; Elandjian, Lucy; Stevenson, William A.; Driver, Richard D.; Leskowitz, Garett M.

    1990-01-01

    Real-time in situ monitoring of the chemical states of epoxy resins was investigated during cure in an autoclave using infrared evanescent spectroscopy. Fiber evanescent sensors were developed which may be sandwiched between the plies of the prepreg sample. A short length of sapphire fiber was used as the sensor cell portion of the fiber probe. Heavy metal fluoride glass optical fiber cables were designed for connecting the FTIR spectrometer to the sensor fiber within the autoclave. The sapphire fibers have outstanding mechanical thermal properties which should permit their use as an embedded link in all thermoset composites. The system is capable of operation at a temperature of 250 C for periods up to 8 hours without major changes to the fiber transmission. A discussion of the selection of suitable sensor fibers, the construction of a fiber-optic interface, and the interpretation of in situ infrared spectra of the curing process is presented.

  10. Size and myonuclear domains in Rhesus soleus muscle fibers: short-term spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, R. R.; Zhong, H.; Talmadge, R. J.; Bodine, S. C.; Fanton, J. W.; Koslovskaya, I.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2001-01-01

    The cross-sectional area (CSA), myonuclear number per mm of fiber length, and myonuclear domain (cytoplasmic volume/myonucleus) of mechanically isolated single fibers from biopsies of the soleus muscle of 5 vivarium control, 3 flight simulation and 2 flight (BION 11) Rhesus monkeys (Macaca [correction of Macacca] mulatta) were determined using confocal microscopy before and after a 14-day experimental period. Simulation monkeys were confined in chairs placed in capsules identical to those used during the flight. Fibers were classified as type I, type II or hybrid (containing both types I and II) based on myosin heavy chain (MHC) gel electrophoresis. A majority of the fibers sampled contained only type I MHC, i.e. 89, 62 and 68% for the control, simulation and flight groups, respectively. Most of the remaining fibers were hybrids, i.e. 8, 36 and 32% for the same groups. There were no significant pre-post differences in the fiber type composition for any of the experimental groups. There also were no significant pre-post differences in fiber CSA, myonuclear number or myonuclear domain. There was, however, a tendency for the fibers in the post-flight biopsies to have a smaller mean CSA and myonuclear domain (approximately 10%, p=0.07) than the fibers in the pre-flight biopsy. The combined mean cytoplasmic volume/myonucleus for all muscle fiber phenotypes in the Rhesus soleus muscle was approximately 25,000 micrometers3 and there were no differences in pre-post samples for the control and simulated groups. The cytoplasmic domains tended to be lower (p=0.08) after than before flight. No phenotype differences in cytoplasmic domains were observed. These data suggest that after a relatively short period of actual spaceflight, modest fiber atrophy occurs in the soleus muscle fibers without a concomitant change in myonuclear number.

  11. Fiber Composite Sandwich Thermostructural Behavior: Computational Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Aiello, R. A.; Murthy, P. L. N.

    1986-01-01

    Several computational levels of progressive sophistication/simplification are described to computationally simulate composite sandwich hygral, thermal, and structural behavior. The computational levels of sophistication include: (1) three-dimensional detailed finite element modeling of the honeycomb, the adhesive and the composite faces; (2) three-dimensional finite element modeling of the honeycomb assumed to be an equivalent continuous, homogeneous medium, the adhesive and the composite faces; (3) laminate theory simulation where the honeycomb (metal or composite) is assumed to consist of plies with equivalent properties; and (4) derivations of approximate, simplified equations for thermal and mechanical properties by simulating the honeycomb as an equivalent homogeneous medium. The approximate equations are combined with composite hygrothermomechanical and laminate theories to provide a simple and effective computational procedure for simulating the thermomechanical/thermostructural behavior of fiber composite sandwich structures.

  12. Computerized multilevel analysis for multilayered fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1972-01-01

    A FORTRAN 4 computer code for the micromechanics, macromechanics, and laminate analysis of multilayered fiber composite structural components is described. The code can be used either individually or as a subroutine within a complex structural analysis/synthesis program. The inputs to the code are constituent materials properties, composite geometry, and loading conditions. The outputs are various properties for ply and composite; composite structural response, including bending-stretching coupling; and composite stress analysis, including comparisons with failure criteria for combined stress. The code was used successfully in the analysis and structural synthesis of flat panels, in the buckling analysis of flat panels, in multilayered composite material failure studies, and lamination residual stresses analysis.

  13. Fiber Optic Thermal Health Monitoring of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Meng-Chou; Winfree, William P.; Moore, Jason P.

    2010-01-01

    A recently developed technique is presented for thermographic detection of flaws in composite materials by performing temperature measurements with fiber optic Bragg gratings. Individual optical fibers with multiple Bragg gratings employed as surface temperature sensors were bonded to the surfaces of composites with subsurface defects. The investigated structures included a 10-ply composite specimen with subsurface delaminations of various sizes and depths. Both during and following the application of a thermal heat flux to the surface, the individual Bragg grating sensors measured the temporal and spatial temperature variations. The data obtained from grating sensors were analyzed with thermal modeling techniques of conventional thermography to reveal particular characteristics of the interested areas. Results were compared with the calculations using numerical simulation techniques. Methods and limitations for performing in-situ structural health monitoring are discussed.

  14. Fiber Optic Thermal Detection of Composite Delaminations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Meng-Chou; Winfree, William P.

    2011-01-01

    A recently developed technique is presented for thermographic detection of delaminations in composites by performing temperature measurements with fiber optic Bragg gratings. A single optical fiber with multiple Bragg gratings employed as surface temperature sensors was bonded to the surface of a composite with subsurface defects. The investigated structure was a 10-ply composite specimen with prefabricated delaminations of various sizes and depths. Both during and following the application of a thermal heat flux to the surface, the individual Bragg grating sensors measured the temporal and spatial temperature variations. The data obtained from grating sensors were analyzed with thermal modeling techniques of conventional thermography to reveal particular characteristics of the interested areas. Results were compared and found to be consistent with the calculations using numerical simulation techniques. Also discussed are methods including various heating sources and patterns, and their limitations for performing in-situ structural health monitoring.

  15. Mechanics of advanced fiber reinforced lattice composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Hua-Lin; Zeng, Tao; Fang, Dai-Ning; Yang, Wei

    2010-12-01

    Fiber reinforced lattice composites are light-weight attractive due to their high specific strength and specific stiffness. In the past 10 years, researchers developed three-dimensional (3D) lattice trusses and two-dimensional (2D) lattice grids by various methods including interlacing, weaving, interlocking, filament winding and molding hot-press. The lattice composites have been applied in the fields of radar cross-section reduction, explosive absorption and heat-resistance. In this paper, topologies of the lattice composites, their manufacturing routes, as well as their mechanical and multifunctional applications, were surveyed.

  16. Graphite Fluoride Fiber Composites For Heat Sinking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh; Long, Martin; Stahl, Mark

    1989-01-01

    Graphite fluoride fiber/polymer composite materials consist of graphite fluoride fibers in epoxy, polytetrafluoroethylene, or polyimide resin. Combines high electrical resistivity with high thermal conductivity and solves heat-transfer problems of many electrical systems. Commercially available in powder form, for use as dry lubricant or cathode material in lithium batteries. Produced by direct fluorination of graphite powder at temperature of 400 to 650 degree C. Applications include printed-circuit boards for high-density power electronics, insulators for magnetic-field cores like those found in alternators and transformers, substrates for thin-film resistors, and electrical-protection layers in aircraft de-icers.

  17. Telescoping cylindrical piezoelectric fiber composite actuator assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G. (Inventor); Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Fox, Robert L. (Inventor); Fox, legal representative, Christopher L. (Inventor); Fox Chattin, legal representative, Melanie L. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A telescoping actuator assembly includes a plurality of cylindrical actuators in a concentric arrangement. Each cylindrical actuator is at least one piezoelectric fiber composite actuator having a plurality of piezoelectric fibers extending parallel to one another and to the concentric arrangement's longitudinal axis. Each cylindrical actuator is coupled to concentrically-adjacent ones of the cylindrical actuators such that the plurality of cylindrical actuators can experience telescopic movement. An electrical energy source coupled to the cylindrical actuators applies actuation energy thereto to generate the telescopic movement.

  18. Liquid crystal polyester-carbon fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, T. S.

    1984-01-01

    Liquid crystal polymers (LCP) have been developed as a thermoplastic matrix for high performance composites. A successful melt impregnation method has been developed which results in the production of continuous carbon fiber (CF) reinforced LCP prepreg tape. Subsequent layup and molding of prepreg into laminates has yielded composites of good quality. Tensile and flexural properties of LCP/CF composites are comparable to those of epoxy/CF composites. The LCP/CF composites have better impact resistance than the latter, although epoxy/CF composites possess superior compression and shear strength. The LCP/CF composites have good property retention until 200 F (67 % of room temperature value). Above 200 F, mechanical properties decrease significantly. Experimental results indicate that the poor compression and shear strength may be due to the poor interfacial adhesion between the matrix and carbon fiber as adequate toughness of the LCP matrix. Low mechanical property retention at high temperatures may be attributable to the low beta-transition temperature (around 80 C) of the LCP matrix material.

  19. Smart damping of laminated fuzzy fiber reinforced composite shells using 1-3 piezoelectric composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundalwal, S. I.; Kumar, R. Suresh; Ray, M. C.

    2013-10-01

    This paper deals with the investigation of active constrained layer damping (ACLD) of smart laminated continuous fuzzy fiber reinforced composite (FFRC) shells. The distinct constructional feature of a novel FFRC is that the uniformly spaced short carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are radially grown on the circumferential surfaces of the continuous carbon fiber reinforcements. The constraining layer of the ACLD treatment is considered to be made of vertically/obliquely reinforced 1-3 piezoelectric composite materials. A finite element (FE) model is developed for the laminated FFRC shells integrated with the two patches of the ACLD treatment to investigate the damping characteristics of the laminated FFRC shells. The effect of variation of the orientation angle of the piezoelectric fibers on the damping characteristics of the laminated FFRC shells has been studied when the piezoelectric fibers are coplanar with either of the two mutually orthogonal vertical planes of the piezoelectric composite layer. It is revealed that radial growth of CNTs on the circumferential surfaces of the carbon fibers enhances the attenuation of the amplitude of vibrations and the natural frequencies of the laminated FFRC shells over those of laminated base composite shells without CNTs.

  20. Fiber-optically sensorized composite wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Joannes M.; Black, Richard J.; Moslehi, Behzad; Oblea, Levy; Patel, Rona; Sotoudeh, Vahid; Abouzeida, Essam; Quinones, Vladimir; Gowayed, Yasser; Soobramaney, Paul; Flowers, George

    2014-04-01

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) immune and light-weight, fiber-optic sensor based Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) will find increasing application in aerospace structures ranging from aircraft wings to jet engine vanes. Intelligent Fiber Optic Systems Corporation (IFOS) has been developing multi-functional fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor systems including parallel processing FBG interrogators combined with advanced signal processing for SHM, structural state sensing and load monitoring applications. This paper reports work with Auburn University on embedding and testing FBG sensor arrays in a quarter scale model of a T38 composite wing. The wing was designed and manufactured using fabric reinforced polymer matrix composites. FBG sensors were embedded under the top layer of the composite. Their positions were chosen based on strain maps determined by finite element analysis. Static and dynamic testing confirmed expected response from the FBGs. The demonstrated technology has the potential to be further developed into an autonomous onboard system to perform load monitoring, SHM and Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) of composite aerospace structures (wings and rotorcraft blades). This platform technology could also be applied to flight testing of morphing and aero-elastic control surfaces.

  1. Interlayer toughening of fiber composite flywheel rotors

    DOEpatents

    Groves, S.E.; Deteresa, S.J.

    1998-07-14

    An interlayer toughening mechanism is described to mitigate the growth of damage in fiber composite flywheel rotors for long application. The interlayer toughening mechanism may comprise one or more tough layers composed of high-elongation fibers, high-strength fibers arranged in a woven pattern at a range from 0{degree} to 90{degree} to the rotor axis and bound by a ductile matrix material which adheres to and is compatible with the materials used for the bulk of the rotor. The number and spacing of the tough interlayers is a function of the design requirements and expected lifetime of the rotor. The mechanism has particular application in uninterruptable power supplies, electrical power grid reservoirs, and compulsators for electric guns, as well as electromechanical batteries for vehicles. 2 figs.

  2. Interlayer toughening of fiber composite flywheel rotors

    DOEpatents

    Groves, Scott E.; Deteresa, Steven J.

    1998-01-01

    An interlayer toughening mechanism to mitigate the growth of damage in fiber composite flywheel rotors for long application. The interlayer toughening mechanism may comprise one or more tough layers composed of high-elongation fibers, high-strength fibers arranged in a woven pattern at a range from 0.degree. to 90.degree. to the rotor axis and bound by a ductile matrix material which adheres to and is compatible with the materials used for the bulk of the rotor. The number and spacing of the tough interlayers is a function of the design requirements and expected lifetime of the rotor. The mechanism has particular application in uninterruptable power supplies, electrical power grid reservoirs, and compulsators for electric guns, as well as electromechanical batteries for vehicles.

  3. MICROMECHANICS IN CONTINOUS GRAPHITE FIBER/EPOXY COMPOSITES DURING CREEP

    SciTech Connect

    C. ZHOU; ET AL

    2001-02-01

    Micro Raman spectroscopy and classic composite shear-lag models were used to analyze the evolution with time of fiber and matrix strain/stress around fiber breaks in planar model graphite fiber-epoxy matrix composites. Impressive agreements were found between the model predictions and the experimental results. The local matrix creep leads to an increase in the load transfer length around the break under a constant load. This increases the chance of fiber breakage in the neighboring intact fibers.

  4. Composite structural materials. [fiber reinforced composites for aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberly, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    Physical properties of fiber reinforced composites; structural concepts and analysis; manufacturing; reliability; and life prediction are subjects of research conducted to determine the long term integrity of composite aircraft structures under conditions pertinent to service use. Progress is reported in (1) characterizing homogeneity in composite materials; (2) developing methods for analyzing composite materials; (3) studying fatigue in composite materials; (4) determining the temperature and moisture effects on the mechanical properties of laminates; (5) numerically analyzing moisture effects; (6) numerically analyzing the micromechanics of composite fracture; (7) constructing the 727 elevator attachment rib; (8) developing the L-1011 engine drag strut (CAPCOMP 2 program); (9) analyzing mechanical joints in composites; (10) developing computer software; and (11) processing science and technology, with emphasis on the sailplane project.

  5. Polyaniline coated cellulose fiber / polyvinyl alcohol composites with high dielectric permittivity and low percolation threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anju, V. P.; Narayanankutty, Sunil K.

    2016-01-01

    Cost effective, high performance dielectric composites based on polyvinyl alcohol, cellulose fibers and polyaniline were prepared and the dielectric properties were studied as a function of fiber content, fiber dimensions and polyaniline content over a frequency range of 40 Hz to 30 MHz. The short cellulose fibers were size-reduced to micro and nano levels prior to coating with polyaniline. Fiber surface was coated with Polyaniline (PANI) by an in situ polymerization technique in aqueous medium. The composites were then prepared by solution casting method. Short cellulose fiber composites showed a dielectric constant (DEC) of 2.3 x 105 at 40 Hz. For the micro- and nano- cellulose fiber composites the DEC was increased to 4.5 x 105 and 1.3 x 108, respectively. To gain insight into the inflection point of the dielectric data polynomial regression analysis was carried out. The loss tangent of all the composites remained at less than 1.5. Further, AC conductivity, real and imaginary electric moduli of all the composites were evaluated. PVA nanocomposite attained an AC conductivity of 3 S/m. These showed that by controlling the size of the fiber used, it was possible to tune the permittivity and dielectric loss to desired values over a wide range. These novel nanocomposites, combining high dielectric constant and low dielectric loss, can be effectively used in applications such as high-charge storage capacitors.

  6. PMR polyimide/graphite fiber composite fan blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavano, P. J.; Winters, W. E.

    1976-01-01

    Ultrahigh speed fan blades, designed in accordance with the requirements of an ultrahigh tip speed blade axial flow compressor, were fabricated from a high strength graphite fiber tow and a PMR polyimide resin. The PMR matrix was prepared by combining three monomeric reactants in methyl alcohol, and the solution was applied directly to the reinforcing fiber for subsequent in situ polymerization. Some of the molded blades were completely finished by secondary bonding of root pressure pads and an electroformed nickel leading edge sheath prior to final machining. The results of the spin testing of nine PMR fan blades are given. Prior to blade fabrication, heat resin tensile properties of the PMR resin were examined at four formulated molecular weight levels. Additionally, three formulated molecular weight levels were investigated in composite form with both a high modulus and a high strength fiber, both as-molded and postcured, in room temperature and 232 C transverse tensile, flexure and short beam shear. Mixed fiber orientation panels simulating potential blade constructions were also evaluated. Flexure tests, short beam shear tests, and tensile tests were conducted on these angle-plied laminates.

  7. Direct numerical simulation of active fiber composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung J.; Hwang, Joon S.; Paik, Seung H.

    2003-08-01

    Active Fiber Composites (AFC) possess desirable characteristics for smart structure applications. One major advantage of AFC is the ability to create anisotropic laminate layers useful in applications requiring off-axis or twisting motions. AFC is naturally composed of two different constituents: piezoelectric fiber and matrix. Therefore, homogenization method, which is utilized in the analysis of laminated composite material, has been used to characterize the material properties. Using this approach, the global behaviors of the structures are predicted in an averaged sense. However, this approach has intrinsic limitations in describing the local behaviors in the level of the constituents. Actually, the failure analysis of AFC requires the knowledge of the local behaviors. Therefore, microscopic approach is necessary to predict the behaviors of AFC. In this work, a microscopic approach for the analysis of AFC was performed. Piezoelectric fiber and matrix were modeled separately and finite element method using three-dimensional solid elements was utilized. Because fine mesh is essential, high performance computing technology was applied to the solution of the immense degree-of-freedom problem. This approach is called Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of structure. Through the DNS of AFC, local stress distribution around the interface of fiber and matrix was analyzed.

  8. Composite fiber structures for catalysts and electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrion, Christopher J.; Cahela, Donald R.; Ahn, Soonho; Tatarchuk, Bruce J.

    1993-01-01

    We have recently envisioned a process wherein fibers of various metals in the 0.5 to 15 micron diameter range are slurried in concert with cellulose fibers and various other materials in the form of particulates and/or fibers. The resulting slurry is cast via a wet-lay process into a sheet and dried to produce a free-standing sheet of 'composite paper.' When the 'preform' sheet is sintered in hydrogen, the bulk of the cellulose is removed with the secondary fibers and/or particulates being entrapped by the sinter-locked network provided by the metal fibers. The resulting material is unique, in that it allows the intimate contacting and combination of heretofore mutually exclusive materials and properties. Moreover, due to the ease of paper manufacture and processing, the resulting materials are relatively inexpensive and can be fabricated into a wide range of three-dimensional structures. Also, because cellulose is both a binder and a pore-former, structures combining high levels of active surface area and high void volume (i.e., low pressure drop) can be prepared as freestanding flow through monoliths.

  9. Fracture mechanics of model fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Chi.

    1992-01-01

    Fracture of matrix material caused by a tensile break in a fiber was investigated. A model was constructed, consisting of two inextensible fibers touching end-to-end and embedded in an elastic block. Energy release rates were calculated by FEA for a circular crack growing outwards from the point where the fiber ends separated as they were pulled apart. The results are compared with experimental observations on steel rod/silicone resin systems. It is found that, when a fiber breaks, a circular crack grows outward in a stable way under increasing load. After the crack reaches a certain size, approximately halfway to the edge of the resin block, the strain energy release reaches a minimum value and then increases, and the crack accelerates. The force required to propagate a crack is predicted successfully by linear elastic fracture mechanics at all stages of crack growth. In particular, good agreement was obtained with the maximum force that the system could support - the breaking load. Fracture of fiber composites under shear deformation was simulated by applying a tension to the rod in a bush mounting.

  10. Reinforcement of freeze-dried chitosan scaffolds with multiphasic calcium phosphate short fibers.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Zahra; Mesgar, Abdorreza Sheikh-Mehdi; Rasouli-Disfani, Fariba

    2016-08-01

    The composite scaffolds of the chitosan and multiphasic calcium phosphate (HW) short fibers were prepared by freeze drying and characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM and FE-SEM). The mechanical properties of the scaffolds were assessed by compression test. The incorporation of HW fibers consisting three phases of hydroxyapatite (HA), beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and calcium pyrophosphate (CPP) into the chitosan matrices was associated with an increase in pore size, density and compressive strength and modulus, and a decrease in porosity and swelling ratio of the scaffolds. The strongest composite scaffolds in this study with a chitosan: HW fibers weight ratio of 1:1 showed a mean porosity of 69% and a mean strength and modulus of 420kPa and 3.87MPa, respectively. The in vitro bioactivity of the composites was confirmed by the formation of a calcium phosphate rich layer on the surface of soaked scaffolds in simulated body fluid. The findings of this initial work indicate that the chitosan-multiphasic calcium phosphate short fibers may be a suitable material for bone scaffolding. PMID:27179144

  11. Atmospheric pressure plasma assisted calcination of composite submicron fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvecká, Veronika; Kováčik, Dušan; Tučeková, Zlata; Zahoranová, Anna; Černák, Mirko

    2016-08-01

    The plasma assisted calcination of composite organic/inorganic submicron fibers for the preparation of inorganic fibers in submicron scale was studied. Aluminium butoxide/polyvinylpyrrolidone fibers prepared by electrospinning were treated using low-temperature plasma generated by special type of dielectric barrier discharge, so called diffuse coplanar surface barrier discharge (DCSBD) at atmospheric pressure in ambient air, synthetic air, oxygen and nitrogen. Effect of plasma treatment on base polymer removal was investigated by using Attenuated total reflectance - Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. Influence of working gas on the base polymer reduction was studied by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and CHNS elemental analysis. Changes in fibers morphology were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). High efficiency of organic template removal without any degradation of fibers was observed after plasma treatment in ambient air. Due to the low-temperature approach and short exposure time, the plasma assisted calcination is a promising alternative to the conventional thermal calcination. Contribution to the topical issue "6th Central European Symposium on Plasma Chemistry (CESPC-6)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ester Marotta and Cristina Paradisi

  12. Resistance welding graphite-fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamoureux, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    High-strength joints are welded in seconds in carbon-reinfored thermoplastic beams. Resistance-welding electrode applies heat and pressure to joint and is spring-loaded to follow softening material to maintain contact; it also holds parts together for cooling and hardening. Both transverse and longitudinal configurations can be welded. Adhesive bonding and encapsulation are more time consuming methods and introduce additional material into joint, while ultrasonic heating can damage graphite fibers in composite.

  13. Design procedures for fiber composite box beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Cristos C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    1989-01-01

    Step-by-step procedures are described which can be used for the preliminary design of fiber composite box beams subjected to combined loadings. These procedures include a collection of approximate closed-form equations so that all the required calculations can be performed using pocket calculators. Included is an illustrative example of a tapered cantilever box beam subjected to combined loads. The box beam is designed to satisfy strength, displacement, buckling, and frequency requirements.

  14. Microbiologically influenced degradation of fiber-reinforced polymeric composites

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, P.A.; Ray, R.I.; Little, B.J. ); Tucker, W.C. )

    1994-04-01

    Two fiber-reinforced polymer composites were examined for susceptibility to microbiologically influenced degradation. Composites, resins, and fibers were exposed to sulfur/iron-oxidizing, calcareous-depositing, ammonium-producing, hydrogen-producing, and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in batch culture. Surfaces were uniformly colonized by all physiological types of bacteria. Epoxy and vinyl ester neat resins, carbon fibers, and epoxy composites were not adversely affected by microbiological species. SRB degraded the organic surfactant on glass fibers and preferentially colonized fiber-vinyl ester interfaces. Hydrogen-producing bacteria appeared to disrupt bonding between fibers and vinyl ester resin and to penetrate the resin at the interface.

  15. Microbiologically influenced degradation of fiber reinforced polymeric composites

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, P.A.; Ray, R.I.; Little, B.J.; Tucker, W.C.

    1994-12-31

    Two fiber reinforced polymer composites were examined for susceptibility to microbiologically influenced degradation. Composites, resins, and fibers were exposed to sulfur/iron-oxidizing, calcareous-depositing, ammonium-producing, hydrogen-producing and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in batch culture. Surfaces were uniformly colonized by all physiological types of bacteria. Epoxy and vinyl ester neat resins, carbon fibers, and epoxy composites were not adversely affected by microbial species. SRB degraded the organic surfactant on glass fibers and preferentially colonized fiber-vinyl ester interfaces. Hydrogen-producing bacteria appeared to disrupt bonding between fibers and vinyl ester resin and to penetrate the resin at the interface.

  16. Pendulum impact resistance of tungsten fiber/metal matrix composites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winsa, E. A.; Petrasek, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    The impact properties of copper, copper-10 nickel, and a superalloy matrix reinforced with tungsten fibers were studied. In most cases the following increased composite impact strength: increased fiber or matrix toughness, decreased fiber-matrix reaction, increased test temperature, hot working and heat treatment. Notch sensitivity was reduced by increasing fiber or matrix toughness. The effect of fiber content depended on the relative toughness of the fibers and matrix. Above 530 K a 60 volume per cent superalloy matrix composite had a greater impact strength than a turbine blade superalloy, whereas below 530 K a hot worked 56 volume per cent composite had a greater impact strength than the superalloy.

  17. RADIATION EFFECTS ON EPOXY CARBON FIBER COMPOSITE

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E

    2008-05-30

    Carbon fiber-reinforced bisphenol-A epoxy matrix composite was evaluated for gamma radiation resistance. The composite was exposed to total gamma doses of 50, 100, and 200 Mrad. Irradiated and baseline samples were tested for tensile strength, hardness and evaluated using FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) spectroscopy and DSC (differential scanning calorimetry) for structural changes. Scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate microstructural behavior. Mechanical testing of the composite bars revealed no apparent change in modulus, strain to failure, or fracture strength after exposures. However, testing of only the epoxy matrix revealed changes in hardness, thermal properties, and FTIR results with increasing gamma irradiation. The results suggest the epoxy within the composite can be affected by exposure to gamma irradiation.

  18. Continuous unidirectional fiber reinforced composites: Fabrication and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, M. D.; Spiegel, F. X.; West, Harvey A.

    1994-01-01

    The study of the anisotropic mechanical properties of an inexpensively fabricated composite with continuous unidirectional fibers and a clear matrix was investigated. A method has been developed to fabricate these composites with aluminum fibers and a polymer matrix. These composites clearly demonstrate the properties of unidirectional composites and cost less than five dollars each to fabricate.

  19. Improved fiber retention by the use of fillers in graphite fiber/resin matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gluyas, R. E.; Bowles, K. J.

    1980-01-01

    A variety of matrix fillers were tested for their ability to prevent loss of fiber from graphite fiber/PMR polyimide and graphite fiber/epoxy composites in a fire. The fillers tested included powders of boron, boron carbide lime glass, lead glass, and aluminum. Boron was the most effective and prevented any loss of graphite fiber during burning. Mechanical properties of composites containing boron filler were measured and compared to those of composites containing no filler.

  20. Effect of kenaf fiber age on PLLA composite properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The age of the kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) fiber dictates its pore architecture. The impact of increasing age of plant fiber on the corresponding composite can impact material selection for enhanced composite performance. Bast fibers stems of kenaf, a warm season tropical herbaceous annual plant ...

  1. Process of Making Boron-Fiber Reinforced Composite Tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, Harry L. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Johnston, Norman J. (Inventor); Marchello, Joseph M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The invention is an apparatus and method for producing a hybrid boron reinforced polymer matrix composition from powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles and a linear array of boron fibers. The boron fibers are applied onto the powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles and then are processed within a processing component having an impregnation bar assembly. After passing through variable-dimension forming nip-rollers, the powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles with the boron fibers become a hybrid boron reinforced polymer matrix composite tape. A driving mechanism pulls the powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles with boron fibers through the processing line of the apparatus and a take-up spool collects the formed hybrid boron-fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite tape.

  2. Mechanical properties of carbon fiber composites for environmental applications

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, R.; Grulke, E.

    1996-10-01

    Activated carbon fiber composites show great promise as fixed-bed catalytic reactors for use in environmental applications such as flue gas clean-up and ground water decontamination. A novel manufacturing process produces low density composites from chopped carbon fibers and binders. These composites have high permeability, can be activated to have high surface area, and have many potential environmental applications. This paper reports the mechanical and flow properties of these low density composites. Three point flexural strength tests were used to measure composite yield strength and flexural moduli. Composites containing over 10 pph binder had an adequate yield strength of about 200 psi at activations up to 40% weight loss. The composites were anisotropic, having along-fiber to cross-fiber yield strength ratios between 1.2 and 2.0. The friction factor for flow through the composites can be correlated using the fiber Reynolds number, and is affected by the composite bulk density.

  3. Composite Solid Electrolyte Containing Li+- Conducting Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, A. John; Wang, Chunsheng; Zhang, Xiangwu

    2006-01-01

    Improved composite solid polymer electrolytes (CSPEs) are being developed for use in lithium-ion power cells. The matrix components of these composites, like those of some prior CSPEs, are high-molecular-weight dielectric polymers [generally based on polyethylene oxide (PEO)]. The filler components of these composites are continuous, highly-Li(+)-conductive, inorganic fibers. PEO-based polymers alone would be suitable for use as solid electrolytes, were it not for the fact that their room-temperature Li(+)-ion conductivities lie in the range between 10(exp -6) and 10(exp -8) S/cm, too low for practical applications. In a prior approach to formulating a CSPE, one utilizes nonconductive nanoscale inorganic filler particles to increase the interfacial stability of the conductive phase. The filler particles also trap some electrolyte impurities. The achievable increase in conductivity is limited by the nonconductive nature of the filler particles.

  4. Fiber/matrix adhesion in graphite/PEKK composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bucher, R. A.; Hinkley, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments with poly ether ketone ketone (PEKK) resin and AS-4, IM-7, and G30-500 fibers showed excellent correlation between resin/fiber contact angle and composite transverse flexural strength as measures of resin/fiber interfacial strength. Both tests indicate the strongest interface for G30-500/PEKK followed by IM-7/PEKK and AS-4/PEKK. Also discussed are fiber effects on interlaminar fracture and on the in situ crystallization of the matrix during composite fabrication.

  5. Development of silicon nitride composites with continuous fiber reinforcement

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L.; Mohr, D.L.; Lackey, W.J.; Hanigofsky, J.A.

    1993-10-01

    The composites were fabricated using ultrafine Si powders prepared by attritor milling; the powders exhibits full conversion to Si nitride in < 3 h at {le} 1200 C (these conditions reduce degradation of the fibers compared to conventional). Effects of processing conditions on fiber properties and the use of fiber coatings to improve stability during processing as well as change the fiber-matrix interfacial properties were investigated. A duplex carbon-silicon carbide coating, deposited by CVD, reduced fiber degradation in processing, and it modified the fiber-matrix adhesion. Si nitride matrix composites were fabricated using reaction sintering, forming laminates, filament-wound plates, and tubes. In each case, an attritor milled Si powder slurry is infiltrated into ceramic fiber preforms or tows, which are then assembled to form a 3-D structure for reaction sintering. The resulting composites have properties comparable to chemical vapor infiltration densified composites, with reasonable strengths and graceful composite fracture behavior.

  6. Properties of antibacterial polypropylene/nanometal composite fibers.

    PubMed

    Gawish, S M; Avci, H; Ramadan, A M; Mosleh, S; Monticello, R; Breidt, F; Kotek, R

    2012-01-01

    Melt spinning of polypropylene fibers containing silver and zinc nanoparticles was investigated. The nanometals were generally uniformly dispersed in polypropylene, but aggregation of these materials was observed on fiber surface and in fiber cross-sections. The mechanical properties of the resulted composite fibers with low concentration of nanometal were comparable to those for the control PP yarns. Extruded composite fibers that contained 0.72% silver and 0.60% zinc nanoparticles had outstanding antibacterial efficacy as documented by the percentage count reduction growth of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Fibers containing silver particles had improved antistatic properties. PMID:21156104

  7. Metal matrix coated fiber composites and the methods of manufacturing such composites

    DOEpatents

    Weeks, Jr., Joseph K.; Gensse, Chantal

    1993-01-01

    A fiber coating which allows ceramic or metal fibers to be wetted by molten metals is disclosed. The coating inhibits degradation of the physical properties caused by chemical reaction between the fiber and the coating itself or between the fiber and the metal matrix. The fiber coating preferably includes at least a wetting layer, and in some applications, a wetting layer and a barrier layer between the fiber and the wetting layer. The wetting layer promotes fiber wetting by the metal matrix. The barrier layer inhibits fiber degradation. The fiber coating permits the fibers to be infiltrated with the metal matrix resulting in composites having unique properties not obtainable in pure materials.

  8. Method of producing a hybrid matrix fiber composite

    DOEpatents

    Deteresa, Steven J.; Lyon, Richard E.; Groves, Scott E.

    2006-03-28

    Hybrid matrix fiber composites having enhanced compressive performance as well as enhanced stiffness, toughness and durability suitable for compression-critical applications. The methods for producing the fiber composites using matrix hybridization. The hybrid matrix fiber composites comprised of two chemically or physically bonded matrix materials, whereas the first matrix materials are used to impregnate multi-filament fibers formed into ribbons and the second matrix material is placed around and between the fiber ribbons that are impregnated with the first matrix material and both matrix materials are cured and solidified.

  9. Environmental effects on the hybrid glass fiber/carbon fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yun-I.

    2009-12-01

    Fiber reinforced polymer composites (FRPCs) have been widely used to replace conventional metals due to the high specific strength, fatigue resistance, and light weight. In the power distribution industry, an advanced composites rod has been developed to replace conventional steel cable as the load-bearing core of overhead conductors. Such conductors, called aluminum conductor composite core (ACCC) significantly increases the transmitting efficiency of existing power grid system without extensive rebuilding expenses, while meeting future demand for electricity. In general, the service life of such overhead conductors is required to be at least 30 years. Therefore, the long-term endurance of the composite core in various environments must be well-understood. Accelerated aging by hygrothermal exposure was conducted to determine the effect of moisture on the glass fiber (GF)/carbon fiber (CF) hybrid composites. The influence of water immersion and humid air exposure on mechanical properties is investigated. Results indicated that immersion in water is the most severe environment for such hybrid GF/CF composites, and results in greater saturation and degradation of properties. When immersed directly in water, the hybrid GF/CF composites exhibit a moisture uptake behavior that is more complex than composite materials reinforced with only one type of fiber. The unusual diffusion behavior is attributed to a higher packing density of fibers at the annular GF/CF interface, which acts as a temporary moisture barrier. Moisture uptake leads to the mechanical and thermal degradation of such hybrid GF/CF composites. Findings presented here indicate that the degradation is a function of exposure temperature, time, and moisture uptake level. Results also indicate that such hybrid GF/CF composites recover short beam shear (SBS) strength and glass transition temperature (Tg) values comparable to pre-aged samples after removal of the absorbed moisture. In the hygrothermal environment

  10. Initial evaluation of continuous fiber reinforced NiAl composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noebe, R. D.; Bowman, R. R.; Eldridge, J. I.

    1990-01-01

    NiAl is being evaluated as a potential matrix material as part of an overall program to develop and understand high-temperature structural composites. Currently, continuous fiber composites have been fabricated by the powder cloth technique incorporating either W(218) or single crystal Al2O3 fibers as reinforcements in both binary NiAl and a solute strengthened NiAl(.05 at. pct Zr) matrix. Initial evaluation of these composite systems have included: fiber push-out testing to measure matrix/fiber bond strengths, bend testing to determine strength as a function of temperature and composite structure, and thermal cycling to establish the effect of matrix and fiber properties on composite life. The effect of matrix/fiber bond strength and matrix strength on several composite properties will be discussed.

  11. Carbon Fiber Foam Composites and Methods for Making the Same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leseman, Zayd Chad (Inventor); Atwater, Mark Andrew (Inventor); Phillips, Jonathan (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Exemplary embodiments provide methods and apparatus of forming fibrous carbon foams (FCFs). In one embodiment, FCFs can be formed by flowing a fuel rich gas mixture over a catalytic material and components to be encapsulated in a mold to form composite carbon fibers, each composite carbon fiber having a carbon phase grown to encapsulate the component in situ. The composite carbon fibers can be intertwined with one another to form FCFs having a geometry according to the mold.

  12. Nano-Fiber Reinforced Enhancements in Composite Polymer Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2009-01-01

    Nano-fibers are used to reinforce polymer matrices to enhance the matrix dependent properties that are subsequently used in conventional structural composites. A quasi isotropic configuration is used in arranging like nano-fibers through the thickness to ascertain equiaxial enhanced matrix behavior. The nano-fiber volume ratios are used to obtain the enhanced matrix strength properties for 0.01,0.03, and 0.05 nano-fiber volume rates. These enhanced nano-fiber matrices are used with conventional fiber volume ratios of 0.3 and 0.5 to obtain the composite properties. Results show that nano-fiber enhanced matrices of higher than 0.3 nano-fiber volume ratio are degrading the composite properties.

  13. Composite impact strength improvement through a fiber/matrix interphase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavano, P. J.; Winters, W. E.

    1975-01-01

    Research was conducted to improve the impact strength and toughness of fiber/resin composites by means of a fiber coating interphase. Graphite fiber/epoxy resin composites were fabricated with four different fiber coating systems introduced in a matrix-fiber interphase. Two graphite fibers, a high strength and a high modulus type, were studied with the following coating systems: chemical vapor deposited boron, electroless nickel, a polyamide-imide resin and a thermoplastic polysulfone resin. Evaluation methods included the following tests: Izod, flexure, shear fracture toughness, longitudinal and transverse tensile, and transverse and longitudinal compression. No desirable changes could be effected with the high strength fiber, but significant improvements in impact performance were observed with the polyamide-imide resin coated high modulus fiber with no loss in composite modulus.

  14. Structural response of fiber composite fan blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Minich, M. D.

    1975-01-01

    A fiber composite airfoil, typical for high-tip speed compressor applications, is subjected to load conditions anticipated to be encountered in such applications, and its structural response is theoretically investigated. The analysis method used consists of composite mechanics embedded in pre- and post-processors and coupled with NASTRAN. The load conditions examined include thermal due to aerodynamic heating, pressure due to aerodynamic forces, centrifugal, and combinations of these. The various responses investigated include root reactions due to various load conditions, average composite and ply stresses, ply delaminations, and the fundamental modes and the corresponding reactions. The results show that the thermal and pressure stresses are negligible compared to those caused by the centrifugal forces. Also, the core-shell concept for composite blades is an inefficient design (core plies not highly stressed) and appears to be sensitive to interply delaminations. The results are presented in graphical and tabular forms to illustrate the types and amount of data required for such an analysis, and to provide quantitative data of the various responses which can be helpful in designing such composite blades.

  15. Conductive polypyrrole/viscose fiber composites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Li, Guodong; Yu, Zhuo; Zhang, Xingxiang; Qi, Xiaoling

    2015-08-20

    Polypyrrole (PPy) was polymerized with pyrrole (Py) as the monomer, FeCl3 as an oxidant and sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) as the dopant on the surface of viscose fiber (VCF) to prepare the conductive PPy/VCF composites. Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS) proved that the interaction between PPy and VCF formed in the PPy/VCF composites. Three structures of N atoms (imine, amine and cationic atoms) were found in PPy of PPy/VCF composites. The influence of reaction conditions including reaction time, Py concentration, FeCl3 concentration and SDBS concentration on the morphology and the conductivity of PPy/VCF composites was investigated in detail. The orthogonal experiments were designed to determine the optimal reaction conditions: reaction time 5h, Py concentration 0.1 mol/L and FeCl3 concentration 0.25 mol/L. When PPy/VCF composite was washed 50 times in water, the conductivity still kept at 1.5S/cm, and this value was stable for more washing. PMID:25965491

  16. Fiber shape effects on metal matrix composite behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, H. C.; Lee, H.-J.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of different fiber shapes on the behavior of metal matrix composites is computationally simulated. A three-dimensional finite element model consisting of a group of nine unidirectional fibers in a three by three unit cell array of a SiC/Ti-15-3 metal matrix composite is used in the analysis. The model is employed to represent five fiber shapes that include a circle, an ellipse, a kidney, and two different cross shapes. The distribution of stresses and the composite material properties, such as moduli, coefficients of thermal expansion, and Poisson's ratios, are obtained from the finite element analysis using the various fiber shapes. Comparisons of these results are used to determine the sensitivity of the composite behavior to the different fiber shapes. In general, fiber dominated properties are not affected by fiber geometry and matrix dominated properties are only moderately affected.

  17. Fiber-Reinforced-Foam (FRF) Core Composite Sandwich Panel Concept for Advanced Composites Technologi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Fiber-Reinforced-Foam (FRF) Core Composite Sandwich Panel Concept for Advanced Composites Technologies Project - Preliminary Manufacturing Demonstration Articles for Ares V Payload Shroud Barrel Acreage Structure

  18. Transverse thermal expansion of carbon fiber/epoxy matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmer, J. F.; Diefendorf, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Thermal expansion coefficients and moduli of elasticity have been determined experimentally for a series of epoxy-matrix composites reinforced with carbon and Kevlar fibers. It is found that in the transverse direction the difference between the properties of the fiber and the matrix is not as pronounced as in the longitudinal direction, where the composite properties are fiber-dominated. Therefore, the pattern of fiber packing tends to affect transverse composite properties. The transverse properties of the composites tested are examined from the standpoint of the concept of homogeneity defined as the variation of packing (or lack thereof) throughout a sample.

  19. Fiber coatings and the fracture behavior of a continuous fiber ceramic composite

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.H.; Lowden, R.A.; Liaw, P.K.

    1995-10-01

    Fiber coatings have been used to modify fiber-matrix interfacial forces, and thus control mechanical properties of continuous fiber ceramic composites. It has been shown that the properties and thickness of the interlayer influence composite properties such as matrix cracking and ultimate strength, toughness and interlaminar shear. The effects of fiber coating properties and thickness on fiber-reinforced SiC matrix composites fabricated employing CVI techniques have been examined. Correlations between interface condition, mechanical properties and failure mechanisms have been made.

  20. Composites with improved fiber-resin interfacial adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cizmecioglu, Muzaffer (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The adhesion of fiber reinforcement such as high modulus graphite to a matrix resin such as polycarbonate is greatly enhanced by applying a very thin layer, suitably from 50 Angstroms to below 1000 Angstroms, to the surface of the fiber such as by immersing the fiber in a dilute solution of the matrix resin in a volatile solvent followed by draining to remove excess solution and air drying to remove the solvent. The thin layer wets the fiber surface. The very dilute solution of matrix resin is able to impregnate multifilament fibers and the solution evenly flows onto the surface of the fibers. A thin uniform layer is formed on the surface of the fiber after removal of the solvent. The matrix resin coated fiber is completely wetted by the matrix resin during formation of the composite. Increased adhesion of the resin to the fibers is observed at fracture. At least 65 percent of the surface of the graphite fiber is covered with polycarbonate resin at fracture whereas uncoated fibers have very little matrix resin adhering to their surfaces at fracture and epoxy sized graphite fibers exhibit only slightly higher coverage with matrix resin at fracture. Flexural modulus of the composite containing matrix resin coated fibers is increased by 50 percent and flexural strength by 37 percent as compared to composites made with unsized fibers.

  1. Fiber Reinforced Composite Cores and Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, Stephen W. (Inventor); Campbell, G. Scott (Inventor); Tilton, Danny E. (Inventor); Stoll, Frederick (Inventor); Sheppard, Michael (Inventor); Banerjee, Robin (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A fiber reinforced core panel is formed from strips of plastics foam helically wound with layers of rovings to form webs which may extend in a wave pattern or may intersect transverse webs. Hollow tubes may replace foam strips. Axial rovings cooperate with overlying helically wound rovings to form a beam or a column. Wound roving patterns may vary along strips for structural efficiency. Wound strips may alternate with spaced strips, and spacers between the strips enhance web buckling strength. Continuously wound rovings between spaced strips permit folding to form panels with reinforced edges. Continuously wound strips are helically wrapped to form annular structures, and composite panels may combine both thermoset and thermoplastic resins. Continuously wound strips or strip sections may be continuously fed either longitudinally or laterally into molding apparatus which may receive skin materials to form reinforced composite panels.

  2. Graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composites for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Bacon, J. F.; Dicus, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    The graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composite system is described. Although this composite is not yet a mature material, it possesses low density, attractive mechanical properties at elevated temperatures, and good environmental stability. Properties are reported for a borosilicate glass matrix unidirectionally reinforced with 60 volume percent HMS graphite fiber. The flexural strength and fatigue characteristics at room and elevated temperature, resistance to thermal cycling and continuous high temperature oxidation, and thermal expansion characteristics of the composite are reported. The properties of this new composite are compared to those of advanced resin and metal matrix composites showing that graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composites are attractive for aerospace applications.

  3. Direct Piezoelectricity of Soft Composite Electrospun Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Michael; Morvan, Jason; Diorio, Nick; Buyuktanir, Ebru; Harden, John; West, John; Jakli, Antal

    2013-03-01

    Recently soft fiber mats electrospun from solutions of Barium Titanate (BT) ferroelectric ceramics particles and poly lactic acid (PLA) were found to have large (d33 1nm/V) converse piezoelectric signals offering a myriad of applications ranging from active implants to smart textiles. Here we report direct piezoelectric measurements (electric signals due to mechanical stress) of the BT/PLA composite fiber mats at various BT concentrations. A testing apparatus was designed and constructed solely for these measurements involving AC stresses provided by a speaker in 10Hz-10kHz frequency range. The piezoelectric constant d33 ~1nC/N was found to be in agreement with the prior converse piezoelectric measurements. The largest signals were obtained with 6% BT/PLA composites, probably because the BT particles at higher concentrations could not be dispersed homogeneously. Importantly the direct piezoelectric signal is large enough to power a small LCD by simply pressing a 0.2mm thick 2 cm2 area mat by a finger. We expect to use these mats in active Braille cells and in liquid crystal writing tablets.

  4. Investigation of Polymer Resin/Fiber Compatibility in Natural Fiber Reinforced Composite Automotive Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fifield, Leonard S.; Huang, Cheng; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2010-01-01

    Natural fibers represent a lower density and potentially lower cost alternative to glass fibers for reinforcement of polymers in automotive composites. The high specific modulus and strength of bast fibers make them an attractive option to replace glass not only in non-structural automotive components, but also in semi-structural and structural components. Significant barriers to insertion of bast fibers in the fiber reinforced automotive composite market include the high moisture uptake of this lignocellulosic material relative to glass and the weak inherent interface between natural fibers and automotive resins. This work seeks to improve the moisture uptake and resin interfacing properties of natural fibers through improved fundamental understanding of fiber physiochemical architecture and development of tailored fiber surface modification strategies.

  5. Tungsten fiber reinforced copper matrix composites: A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdanels, David L.

    1989-01-01

    Tungsten fiber reinforced copper matrix (W/Cu) composites have served as an ideal model system with which to analyze the properties of metal matrix composites. A series of research programs were conducted to investigate the stress-strain behavior of W/Cu composites; the effect of fiber content on the strength, modulus, and conductivity of W/Cu composites; and the effect of alloying elements on the behavior of tungsten wire and of W/Cu composites. Later programs investigated the stress-rupture, creep, and impact behavior of these composites at elevated temperatures. Analysis of the results of these programs as allows prediction of the effects of fiber properties, matrix properties, and fiber content on the properties of W/Cu composites. These analyses form the basis for the rule-of-mixtures prediction of composite properties which was universally adopted as the criteria for measuring composite efficiency. In addition, the analyses allows extrapolation of potential properties of other metal matrix composites and are used to select candidate fibers and matrices for development of tungsten fiber reinforced superalloy composite materials for high temperature aircraft and rocket engine turbine applications. The W/Cu composite efforts are summarized, some of the results obtained are described, and an update is provided on more recent work using W/Cu composites as high strength, high thermal conductivity composite materials for high heat flux, elevated temperature applications.

  6. Monitoring Fiber Stress During Curing of Single Fiber Glass- and Graphite-Epoxy Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madhukar, Madhu S.; Kosuri, Ranga P.; Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1994-01-01

    The difference in thermal expansion characteristics of epoxy matrices and graphite fibers can produce significant residual stresses in the fibers during curing of composite materials. Tests on single fiber glass-epoxy and graphite-epoxy composite specimens were conducted in which the glass and graphite fibers were preloaded in tension, and the epoxy matrix was cast around the fibers. The fiber tension was monitored while the matrix was placed around the fiber and subjected to the temperature-time curing cycle. Two mechanisms responsible for producing stress in embedded fibers were identified as matrix thermal expansion and contraction and matrix cure shrinkage. A simple analysis based on the change in fiber tension during the curing cycle was conducted to estimate the produced stresses. Experimental results on single fiber glass- and graphite-epoxy composites show that the fiber was subjected to significant tensile stresses when the temperature was raised from the first to the second dwell period. When initial fiber pretension is about 60 percent of the fiber failure load, these curing-induced stresses can cause tensile fracture of the embedded fiber.

  7. Glass fiber addition strengthens low-density ablative compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, H. H.

    1974-01-01

    Approximately 15% of E-glass fibers was added to compositions under test and greatly improved char stability. Use of these fibers also reduced thermal strains which, in turn, minimized char shrinkage and associated cracks, subsurface voids, and disbonds. Increased strength allows honeycomb core reinforcement to be replaced by equivalent amount of glass fibers.

  8. Cellulose fiber/bentonite clay/biodegradable thermoplastic composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adding cellulose fiber reinforcement can improve mechanical properties of biodegradable plastics, but fiber must be well dispersed to achieve any benefit. Using gelatinized starch to disperse fiber is known to be effective, but starch greatly increases the moisture sensitivity of the composites and...

  9. Interfacial reactions in titanium/SCS fiber composites during fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warrier, S. G.; Lin, R. Y.

    1993-01-01

    The objectrive of the study was to determine the effect of titanium concentration and different pyrocarbon fiber coatings on the morphology and the extent of fiber-matrix reactions in Ti/SiC composites fabricated by rapid infrared forming (RIF). It is found that the extent of fiber-matrix reactions in Ti/SiC composites fabricated by the RIF technique is noticeably affected by both an increase in Ti content and by the processing temperature. Uncoated SiC fibers extensively react with the titanium alloy matrix at 1200 C, whereas no reaction occurs when coated SiC fibers are used.

  10. Study of Natural Fiber Breakage during Composite Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quijano-Solis, Carlos Jafet

    Biofiber-thermoplastic composites have gained considerable importance in the last century. To provide mechanical reinforcement to the polymer, fibers must be larger than a critical aspect ratio (length-to-width ratio). However, biofibers undergo breakage in length or width during processing, affecting their final aspect ratio in the composites. In this study, influence on biofiber breakage by factors related to processing conditions, fiber morphology and the flow type was investigated through: a) experiments using an internal mixer, a twin-screw extruder (TSE) or a capillary rheometer; and b) a Monte Carlo computer simulation. Composites of thermomechanical fibers of aspen or wheat straw mixed with polypropylene were studied. Internal mixer experiments analyzed wheat straw and two batches of aspen fibers, named AL and AS. AL fibers had longer average length. Processing variables included the temperature, rotors speed and fiber concentration. TSE experiments studied AL and AS fiber composites under various screws speeds, temperatures and feeding rates of the polymer and fibers. Capillary rheometers experiments determined AL fiber breakage in shear and elongational flows for composites processed at different concentrations, temperatures, and strain rates. Finally, the internal mixer experimental results where compared to Monte Carlo simulation predictions. The simulation focused on fiber length breakage due to fiber-polymer interactions. Internal mixer results showed that final fiber average length depended almost solely on processing conditions while final fiber average width depended on both processing conditions and initial fiber morphology. In the TSE, processing conditions as well as initial fiber length influenced final average length. TSE results showed that the fiber concentration regime seems to influence the effect of processing variables on fiber breakage. Capillary rheometer experiments demonstrated that biofiber breakage happens in both elongational and

  11. Computational simulation of intermingled-fiber hybrid composite behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mital, Subodh K.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1992-01-01

    Three-dimensional finite-element analysis and a micromechanics based computer code ICAN (Integrated Composite Analyzer) are used to predict the composite properties and microstresses of a unidirectional graphite/epoxy primary composite with varying percentages of S-glass fibers used as hydridizing fibers at a total fiber volume of 0.54. The three-dimensional finite-element model used in the analyses consists of a group of nine fibers, all unidirectional, in a three-by-three unit cell array. There is generally good agreement between the composite properties and microstresses obtained from both methods. The results indicate that the finite-element methods and the micromechanics equations embedded in the ICAN computer code can be used to obtain the properties of intermingled fiber hybrid composites needed for the analysis/design of hybrid composite structures. However, the finite-element model should be big enough to be able to simulate the conditions assumed in the micromechanics equations.

  12. Characterization of compressive and short beam shear strength of bamboo opened cell foam core sandwich composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setyawan, Paryanto Dwi; Sugiman, Saputra, Yudhi

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents the compressive and the short beam shear strength of a sandwich composite with opened cell foam made of bamboo fiber as the core and plywood as the skins. The core thickness was varied from 10 mm to 40 mm keeping the volume fraction of fiber constant. Several test s were carried out including the core density, flatwise compressive and the short beam shear testing in three point bending. The results show that the density of bamboo opened cell foam is comparable with commercial plastic foam, such as polyurethane foam. The compressive strength tends to increase linearly with increasing the core thickness. The short beam shear failure load of the sandwich composite increases with the increase of core thickness, however on the contrary, the short beam shear strength which tends to sharply decrease from the thickness of 10 mm to 30 mm and then becomes flat.

  13. Prediction of Damage in Randomly Oriented Short-Fibre Composites by means of A Mechanistic Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2004-05-01

    A micro-macro mechanistic approach to damage in short-fiber composites is developed in this paper. At the micro-scale, the damage mechanisms such as matrix cracking, fiber/matrix debonding are analyzed to define the associated damage variables. The stiffness reduction law dependent on these variables is then established using micromechanical models and average orientation distributions of fibers and microcracks. The macroscopic response is obtained by means of thermodynamics of continuous media, continuum damage mechanics and a finite element formulation.

  14. Prediction of Damage in Randomly Oriented Short-Fibre Composites by means of A Mechanistic Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba NGHIEP; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2004-03-01

    A micro-macro mechanistic approach to damage in short-fiber composites is developed in this paper. At the micro-scale, the damage mechanisms such as matrix cracking, fiber/matrix debonding are analyzed to define the associated damage variables. The stiffness reduction law dependent on these variables is then established using micromechanical models and average orientation distributions of fibers and microcracks. The macroscopic response is obtained by means of thermodynamics of continuous media, continuum damage mechanics and a finite element formulation.

  15. Crack initiation in borosilicate glass-SiC fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Dutton, R.E.; Pagano, N.J.; Kim, R.Y.

    1996-04-01

    The initiation of matrix microcracking was investigated in unidirectional glass matrix composites having controlled fiber spacing. Observations were taken from composites consisting of regular arrays of TiB{sub 2}-coated SIGMA 1240 and carbon-coated SCS-6 monofilament SiC fibers in a series of borosilicate glasses. The thermal expansion mismatch between the fibers and glass matrix was varied such that the resulting radial stresses after processing ranged from tensile to compressive. The glass strongly bonds to the TiB{sub 2}-coated SIGMA 1240 fiber but weakly bonds to the carbon coating of the SCS-6 fiber, allowing the investigation of the effects of bonding at the fiber/matrix interface. The observed crack initiation stresses of the various composites are compared to predictions based on a previously developed semiempirical model and used to study the influence of the volume fraction of fibers, residual stress state and interface strength.

  16. Mechanical properties of carbon fiber composites for environmental applications

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, R.; Grulke, E.; Kimber, G.

    1996-12-31

    Activated carbon fiber composites show great promise as fixed-bed catalytic reactors for use in environmental applications such as flue gas clean-up and ground water decontamination. A novel manufacturing process produces low density composites from chopped carbon fibers and binders. These composites have high permeability, can be activated to have high surface area, and have many potential environmental applications. This paper reports the mechanical and flow properties of these low density composites. Three point flexural strength tests were used to measure composite yield strength and flexural moduli. Composites containing over 10 pph binder had an adequate yield strength of about 200 psi at activations up to 40% weight loss. The composites were anisotropic, having along-fiber to cross-fiber yield strength ratios between 1.2 and 2.0. The pressure drop of air through the composites correlated with the gas velocity, and showed a dependence on sample density.

  17. Fatigue strength of woven kenaf fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, A. E.; Aziz, M. A. Che Abdul

    2015-12-01

    Nowadays, green composites provide alternative to synthetic fibers for non-bearing and load-bearing applications. According to literature review, lack of information is available on the fatigue performances especially when the woven fiber is used instead of randomly oriented fibers. In order to overcome this problem, this paper investigates the fatigue strength of different fiber orientations and number of layers of woven kenaf fiber reinforced composites. Four types of fiber orientations are used namely 0°, 15°, 30° and 45°. Additionally, two numbers of layers are also considered. It is revealed that the fatigue life has no strong relationship with the fiber orientations. For identical fiber orientations, the fatigue life can be predicted considerably using the normalized stress. However as expected, the fatigue life enhancement occur when the number of layer is increased.

  18. Novel approaches for alleviation of electrical hazards of graphite-fiber composites. [aircraft safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, K.

    1979-01-01

    Four basically different approaches were considered: gasification of fibers, retention in the matrix, clumping to prevent entrainment, and electrical insulation of fibers. The techniques used to achieve them are described in some detail. These involved surface treatment of fibers to improve the wettability of fibers and coating the fibers with the selected substances before laying them up for composite fabrication. Thermogravimetric analyses were performed on the plain and treated fibers in inert (nitrogen, argon) and reactive (air) atmospheres. The treated fibers embedded in epoxy were ignited in a Bunsen flame to determine the efficiency of these treatments. A simple apparatus was assembled to detect the time for the first short circuit (in a typical electrical circuit) when exposed to the combustion products from a graphite fiber composite fire. The state-of-the-art and treated fibers cast in typical epoxy were burned and ranked for potential success. It was inferred that the gasification schemes appear promising when reduction or oxidation is tried. It was also found that some very promising candidates were available for the clumping and for the electrical insulation of fibers.

  19. Reciprocating sliding wear characteristics of copper-carbon fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuniya, Keiichi; Arakawa, Hideo; Namekawa, Takashi

    1988-01-01

    The effect of fiber orientation and alloy composition on the reciprocating sliding wear behavior of Cu-C fiber composite was studied. The wear volume was smaller than that of Cu alloys. The wear volume increased with increasing sliding load and volume fraction of C fibers above 30 volume percent. The effectiveness of fiber orientation in decreasing the wear volume was the highest for random orientation, medium in the direction perpendicular to the fiber direction, and lowest in the fiber direction. The wear volume was decreased by the addition of Sn and Zr. However, the additions did not achieve isotropic wear characteristics of the composite. Isotropic wear was obtained by the addition of C powder. Isotropic and decreased composite wear were attained by adding Zr and C powder together.

  20. Studies on natural fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, R. H.; Kapatel, P. M.; Machchhar, A. D.; Kapatel, Y. A.

    2016-05-01

    Natural fiber reinforced composites show increasing importance in day to days applications because of their low cost, lightweight, easy availability, non-toxicity, biodegradability and environment friendly nature. But these fibers are hydrophilic in nature. Thus they have very low reactivity and poor compatibility with polymers. To overcome these limitations chemical modifications of the fibers have been carried out. Therefore, in the present work jute fibers have chemically modified by treating with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solutions. These treated jute fibers have been used to fabricate jute fiber reinforced epoxy composites. Mechanical properties like tensile strength, flexural strength and impact strength have been found out. Alkali treated composites show better properties compare to untreated composites.

  1. Process for preparing tows from composite fiber blends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMahon, Paul (Inventor); Chung, Tai-Shung (Inventor); Ying, Lincoln (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A continuous, substantially uniform tow useful in forming composite molded articles is prepared by forming a continuous tow of continuous carbon fibers, forming a continuous tow of thermoplastic polymer fibers to a selected width, uniformly and continuously spreading the carbon fiber two to a width that is essentially the same as the selected width for the thermoplastic polymer fiber tow, intermixing the tows intimately, uniformly and continuously, in a relatively tension-free state, and continuosuly withdrawing the intermixed tow.

  2. Structural monitoring of filamentary composites using embedded fiber optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cashon, John L.; Lehner, David L.; Bower, Mark V.; Gilbert, John A.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of monitoring overall integrity of structural components made of filamentary composites, by embedding optical fibers between lamina of a composite beam, is investigated using a beam constructed of Kevlar/epoxy cloth with embedded optical fibers aligned with the longitudinal axis of the beam. Phase changes were monitored in three different optical fibers as the composite beam was subjected to pure bending, and the strain response of the fibers was compared to the strain gage readings taken at the surface, showing a strong correlation between the phase change and the applied deformation.

  3. Design criteria for pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer composite columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yeol

    This dissertation investigated the behavior of pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite columns under extensive time-independent short-term and time-dependent long-term experiments. Based on the experimental results, analytical studies were performed to propose a design approach for pultruded FRP composite columns. In the time-independent short-term tests, a total of 100 tests on wide flange, I-shape and box section columns were selected to develop the empirical column strength equation. All column tests were performed with pinned-pinned end conditions using either a 30 feet reaction frame or a MTS machine depending on the column length. The experimental results from short-term column tests provided valuable realistic information, such as the ultimate column capacity, failure mode, and column strength equation for pultruded FRP composite columns subjected to axial compression. To develop empirical column strength equation, ultimate column capacity at failure may be examined by plotting of the ultimate compressive stress versus effective slenderness ratio, and then nondimensionalize the ultimate compressive stress and slenderness ratio to compare columns having different cross sections. Finally, a set of empirical column strength equations of FRP composite column was developed from the column strength curves using curve-fitting technique. In the time-dependent long-term creep tests, a total of 4 box and 4 wide flange section columns were tested to investigate time-dependent deformation of pultruded FRP composite columns. The cross-section used in the investigation is 4 in. x 4 in. x 1/4 in. (100 mm x 100 mm x 6.4 mm) and length is 4 feet (1.2 m) with box and wide flange sections. Creep tests were carried out at four different loading levels; 20, 30, 40 and 50 percents of the ultimate column strength from the short-term column tests. The axial time-dependent deformation under sustained loading was monitored for time duration up to 2,500 hours. The

  4. Interfacial debonding versus fiber fracture in fiber-reinforced ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Hsueh, C.H.; Becher, P.F.; He, M.Y.

    1998-11-01

    Toughening of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites by fiber pullout relies on debonding at the fiber/matrix interface prior to fiber fracture when composites are subjected to tensile loading. The criterion of interfacial debonding versus crack penetration has been analyzed for two semi-infinite elastic plates bonded at their interface. When a crack reaches the interface, the crack either deflects along the interface or penetrates into the next layer depending upon the ratio of the energy release rate for debonding versus that for crack penetration. This criterion has been used extensively to predict interfacial debonding versus fiber fracture for a crack propagating in a fiber-reinforced ceramic composite. Two modifications were considered in the present study to address the debonding/fracture problem. First, the authors derived the analysis for a strip of fiber, which had a finite width and was sandwiched between two semi-infinite plates of matrix. It was found that the criterion of interfacial debonding versus fiber fracture depended on the fiber width. Second, a bridging fiber behind the crack tip was considered where the crack tip initially circumvented the fiber. Subsequent to this, either the interface debonded or the fiber fractured. In this case, the authors have considered a bridging-fiber geometry to establish a new criterion.

  5. Effect of diameter of glass fibers on flexural properties of fiber-reinforced composites.

    PubMed

    Obukuro, Motofumi; Takahashi, Yutaka; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2008-07-01

    This study investigated the effect of the diameter of glass fibers on the flexural properties of fiber-reinforced composites. Bar-shaped test specimens of highly filled fiber-reinforced composites (FRCs) and FRC of 30 vol% fiber content were made from a light-cured dimethacrylate monomer liquid (mixture of urethane dimethacrylate and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate) with silanized E-glass fibers (7, 10, 13, 16, 20, 25, 30, and 45 microm in diameter). Flexural strength and elastic modulus were measured. The flexural strength of the highly filled FRCs increased with increasing fiber diameter. In particular, the strengths of highly filled FRCs with 20-, 25-, 30-, and 45-microm-diameter fibers was significantly higher than the others (p<0.05). The flexural strength of FRC of 30 vol% fiber content increased with increasing fiber diameter, except for the FRC with 45-microm-diameter fibers; FRCs with 20-, 25-, and 30-microm-diameter fibers were significantly stronger than the others (p<0.05). Therefore, it was revealed that the diameter of glass fibers significantly affected the flexural properties of fiber-reinforced composites. PMID:18833767

  6. Eddy-Current Inspection Of Graphite-Fiber Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, G. L.; Bryson, C. C.

    1993-01-01

    NASA technical memorandum describes initial research on, and proposed development of, automated system for nondestructive eddy-current inspection of parts made of graphite-fiber/epoxy-matrix composite materials. Sensors in system E-shaped or U-shaped eddy-current probes like those described in "Eddy-Current Probes For Inspecting Graphite-Fiber Composites" (MFS-26129).

  7. Properties study of cotton stalk fiber/gypsum composite

    SciTech Connect

    Li Guozhong; Yu Yanzhen; Zhao Zhongjian; Li Jianquan; Li Changchun

    2003-01-01

    This manuscript addresses treating cotton stalk fiber surface with styrene acrylic emulsion, which improves the interfacial combined state of cotton stalk fiber/gypsum composite effectively and improves its mechanical properties notably. Mixes less slag, ordinary Portland cement, etc., to modify gypsum base. The electron microscope was utilized to analyze and research on the effect on composite properties of the abovementioned mixtures.

  8. Renewable agricultural fibers as reinforcing fillers in plastics: Mechanical properties of Kenaf fiber-polpyropylene composites

    SciTech Connect

    Sanadi, A.R.; Caulfield, D.F.; Jacobson, R.E.

    1995-12-01

    Kenaf (Hibiscus Cannabinus) is a fast growing annual growth plant that is harvested for its bast fibers. These fibers have excellent specific properties and have potential to be outstanding reinforcing fillers in plastics. In our experiments, the fibers and polypropylene (PP) were blended in a thermokinetic mixer and then injection molded, with the fiber weight fractions varying to 60%. A maleated polypropylene was used to improve the interaction and adhesion between the non-polar matrix and the polar lignocellulosic fibers. The specific tensile and flexural moduli of a 50 % by volume (39 % by volume) of kenaf-PP composites compares favorably with a 40 % by weight of glass fiber-PP injection molded composites, These results suggest that kenaf fibers are a viable alternative to inorganic/mineral based reinforcing fibers as long as the right processing conditions are used and for applications where the higher water absorption is not critical.

  9. Renewable agricultural fibers as reinforcing fillers in plastics: Mechanical properties of kenaf fiber-polypropylene composites

    SciTech Connect

    Sanadi, A.R.; Caulfield, D.F.; Jacobson, R.E.; Rowell, R.M. |

    1995-05-01

    Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus) is a fast growing annual growth plant that is harvested for its bast fibers. These fibers have excellent specific properties and have potential to be outstanding reinforcing fillers in plastics. In these experiments, the fibers and polypropylene (PP) were blended in a thermokinetic mixer and then injection molded, with the fiber weight fractions varying to 60%. A maleated polypropylene was used to improve the interaction and adhesion between the nonpolar matrix and the polar lignocellulosic fibers. The specific tensile and flexural moduli of a 50% by weight (39% by volume) of kenaf-PP composite compare favorably with a 40% by weight of glass fiber-PP injection-molded composite. These results suggest that kenaf fibers are a viable alternative to inorganic/mineral-based reinforcing fibers as long as the right processing conditions are used and they are used in applications where the higher water absorption is not critical.

  10. Critical aspect ratio for tungsten fibers in copper-nickel matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jech, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    Stress-rupture and tensile tests were conducted at 816 C (1500 F) to determine the effect of matrix composition on the minimum fiber length to diameter ratio (critical aspect ratio) below which fibers in a tungsten fiber/copper-nickel alloy matrix composite could not be stressed to their ultimate load carrying capability. This study was intended to simulate some of the conditions that might be encountered with materials combinations used in high-temperature composites. The critical aspect ratio for stress-rupture was found to be greater than for short-time tension, and it increased as the time to rupture increased. The increase was relatively slight, and calculated fiber lengths for long service appear to be well within practical size limits for effective reinforcement and ease of fabrication of potential gas turbine components.

  11. Carbon fiber composites for cryogenic filament-wound vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, J. V.; Simon, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    Advanced unidirectional and bidirectional carbon fiber/epoxy resin composites were evaluated for physical and mechanical properties over a cryogenic to room temperature range for potential application to cryogenic vessels. The results showed that Courtaulds HTS carbon fiber was the superior fiber in terms of cryogenic strength properties in epoxy composites. Of the resin systems tested in ring composites, CTBN/ERLB 4617 exhibited the highest composite strengths at cryogenic temperatures, but very low interlaminar shear strengths at room temperature. Tests of unidirectional and bidirectional composite bars showed that the Epon 828/Empol 1040 resin was better at all test temperatures. Neither fatigue cycling nor thermal shock had a significant effect on composite strengths or moduli. Thermal expansion measurements gave negative values in the fiber direction and positive values in the transverse direction of the composites.

  12. Micromechanical simulation of the failure of fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landis, Chad M.; Beyerlein, Irene J.; McMeeking, Robert M.

    2000-03-01

    The strength of unidirectionally reinforced fiber composites is simulated using the three dimensional shear lag model of Landis, C. M., McGlockton, M. A. and McMeeking, R. M. (1999) (An improved shear lag model for broken fibers in composites. J. Comp. Mat. 33, 667-680) and Weibull fiber statistics. The governing differential equations for the fiber displacements and stresses are solved exactly for any configuration of breaks using an influence superposition technique. The model predicts the tensile strength of well bonded, elastic fiber/matrix systems with fibers arranged in a square array. Length and strength scalings are used which are relevant for elastic, local load sharing composites. Several hundred Monte Carlo simulations were executed to determine the statistical strength distributions of the composite for three values of the fiber Weibull modulus, m=5, 10 and 20. Stress-strain behavior and the evolution of fiber damage are studied. Bundle sizes of 10×10, 15×15, 20×20, 25×25, 30×30 and 35×35 fibers of various lengths are investigated to determine the dependence of strength on the composite size. The validity of weakest link statistics for composite strength is examined as well.

  13. Quantitative radiographic analysis of fiber reinforced polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Baidya, K P; Ramakrishna, S; Rahman, M; Ritchie, A

    2001-01-01

    X-ray radiographic examination of the bone fracture healing process is a widely used method in the treatment and management of patients. Medical devices made of metallic alloys reportedly produce considerable artifacts that make the interpretation of radiographs difficult. Fiber reinforced polymer composite materials have been proposed to replace metallic alloys in certain medical devices because of their radiolucency, light weight, and tailorable mechanical properties. The primary objective of this paper is to provide a comparable radiographic analysis of different fiber reinforced polymer composites that are considered suitable for biomedical applications. Composite materials investigated consist of glass, aramid (Kevlar-29), and carbon reinforcement fibers, and epoxy and polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) matrices. The total mass attenuation coefficient of each material was measured using clinical X-rays (50 kev). The carbon fiber reinforced composites were found to be more radiolucent than the glass and kevlar fiber reinforced composites. PMID:11261603

  14. Fiber-reinforced composites in fixed partial dentures

    PubMed Central

    Vallittu, Pekka

    2006-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced composite resin (FRC) prostheses offer the advantages of good aesthetics, minimal invasive treatment, and an ability to bond to the abutment teeth, thereby compensating for less-than-optimal abutment tooth retention and resistance form. These prostheses are composed of two types of composite materials: fiber composites to build the framework and hybrid or microfill particulate composites to create the external veneer surface. This review concentrates on the use of fiber reinforcement in the fabrication of laboratory or chairsidemade composite-fixed partial dentures of conventional preparation. Other applications of FRC in dentistry are briefly mentioned. The possibilities fiber reinforcement technology offers must be emphasized to the dental community. Rather than limiting discussion to whether FRC prostheses will replace metal-ceramic or full-ceramic prostheses, attention should be focused on the additional treatment options brought by the use of fibers. However, more clinical experience is needed. PMID:21526023

  15. Fibers And Composites Derived From Silsesquioxanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.; Hyatt, Lizbeth H.; Damore, Lisa, A.; Gorecki, Joy P.

    1988-01-01

    In new method, silsesquioxane powders blended to control ratio of carbon to silicon. Powders melted, and excess silanol groups condense with evolution of water. When melt attains suitable viscosity, extruded into fibers through die or drawn into fibers from melt at uniform rate. Fibers cured and heat treated. Enables easy fabrication of thermally stable fibers from inexpensive silsesquioxane precursors. Impregnation of fibers and preforms without solvent minimizes both shrinkage and formation of voids resulting from volatilization of trapped solvent.

  16. Damping properties of fiber reinforced composite suitable for stayed cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianzhi; Sun, Baochen; Du, Yanliang

    2011-11-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) cables were initially most investigated to replace steel cables. To further explore the advantages of FRP cables, the potential ability of vibration control is studied in this paper emphasizing the designable characteristic of hybrid FRP cables. Fiber reinforced vinyl ester composites and fiber reinforced epoxy composites were prepared by the pultrusion method. Due to the extensive application of fiber reinforced composites, the temperature spectrum and frequency spectrum of loss factor for the composite were tested using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) equipment. The damping properties and damping mechanism of the composite were investigated and discussed at different temperatures and frequencies. The result indicates that the loss factor of the composites is increasing with the increase of the frequency from 0.1Hz to 2 Hz and decreasing with the decrease of the temperature from -20°C to 60°C. The loss factor of the carbon fiber composite is higher than that of the glass fiber for the same matrix. The loss factor of the vinyl ester composite is higher than that of the epoxy composite for the same fiber.

  17. Damping properties of fiber reinforced composite suitable for stayed cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianzhi; Sun, Baochen; Du, Yanliang

    2012-04-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) cables were initially most investigated to replace steel cables. To further explore the advantages of FRP cables, the potential ability of vibration control is studied in this paper emphasizing the designable characteristic of hybrid FRP cables. Fiber reinforced vinyl ester composites and fiber reinforced epoxy composites were prepared by the pultrusion method. Due to the extensive application of fiber reinforced composites, the temperature spectrum and frequency spectrum of loss factor for the composite were tested using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) equipment. The damping properties and damping mechanism of the composite were investigated and discussed at different temperatures and frequencies. The result indicates that the loss factor of the composites is increasing with the increase of the frequency from 0.1Hz to 2 Hz and decreasing with the decrease of the temperature from -20°C to 60°C. The loss factor of the carbon fiber composite is higher than that of the glass fiber for the same matrix. The loss factor of the vinyl ester composite is higher than that of the epoxy composite for the same fiber.

  18. Fabrication and evaluation of low fiber content alumina fiber/aluminum composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hack, J. E.; Strempek, G. C.

    1980-01-01

    The mechanical fabrication of low volume percent fiber, polycrystalline alumina fiber reinforced aluminum composites was accomplished. Wire preform material was prepared by liquid-metal infiltration of alumina fiber bundles. The wires were subsequently encapsulated with aluminum foil and fabricated into bulk composite material by hot-drawing. Extensive mechanical, thermal and chemical testing was conducted on preform and bulk material to develop a process and material data base. In addition, a preliminary investigation of mechanical forming of bulk alumina fiber reinforced aluminum composite material was conducted.

  19. Accelerated stress rupture lifetime assessment for fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Groves, S.E.; DeTeresa, S.J.; Sanchez, R.J.; Zocher, M.A.; Christensen, R.M.

    1997-02-01

    Objective was to develop a theoretical and experimental framework for predicting stress rupture lifetime for fiber polymer composites based on short-term accelerated testing. Originally a 3-year project, it was terminated after the first year, which included stress rupture experiments and viscoelastic material characterization. In principle, higher temperature, stress, and saturated environmental conditions are used to accelerate stress rupture. Two types of specimens were to be subjected to long-term and accelerated static tensile loading at various temperatures, loads in order to quantify both fiber and matrix dominated failures. Also, we were to apply state-of-the-art analytical and experimental characterization techniques developed under a previous DOE/DP CRADA for capturing and tracking incipient degradation mechanisms associated with mechanical performance. Focus was increase our confidence to design, analyze, and build long-term composite structures such as flywheels and hydrogen gas storage vessels; other applications include advanced conventional weapons, infrastructures, marine and offshore systems, and stockpile stewardship and surveillance. Capabilities developed under this project, though not completed or verified, are being applied to NIF, AVLIS, and SSMP programs.

  20. Surface characterization of LDEF carbon fiber/polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grammer, Holly L.; Wightman, James P.; Young, Philip R.; Slemp, Wayne S.

    1995-01-01

    XPS (x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) and SEM (scanning electron microscopy) analysis of both carbon fiber/epoxy matrix and carbon fiber/polysulfone matrix composites revealed significant changes in the surface composition as a result of exposure to low-earth orbit. The carbon 1s curve fit XPS analysis in conjunction with the SEM photomicrographs revealed significant erosion of the polymer matrix resins by atomic oxygen to expose the carbon fibers of the composite samples. This erosion effect on the composites was seen after 10 months in orbit and was even more obvious after 69 months.

  1. Electrical anisotropy in multiscale nanotube/fiber hybrid composites

    SciTech Connect

    Thostenson, Erik T.; Gangloff, John J. Jr.; Li Chunyu; Byun, Joon-Hyung

    2009-08-17

    This letter reports an experimental and theoretical study on the electrical properties of carbon nanotube/glass fiber composites. Experimental measurements on unidirectional glass fiber composites with nanotubes dispersed in the polymer matrix show a high degree of anisotropy. The composites, manufactured with a vacuum infusion technique, do not show any significant process-induced anisotropy. Theoretical modeling reveals that the microstructure of the fiber composite plays a dominant role in the electrical behavior due to alteration of percolating paths in the carbon nanotube network.

  2. Electrical anisotropy in multiscale nanotube/fiber hybrid composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thostenson, Erik T.; Gangloff, John J.; Li, Chunyu; Byun, Joon-Hyung

    2009-08-01

    This letter reports an experimental and theoretical study on the electrical properties of carbon nanotube/glass fiber composites. Experimental measurements on unidirectional glass fiber composites with nanotubes dispersed in the polymer matrix show a high degree of anisotropy. The composites, manufactured with a vacuum infusion technique, do not show any significant process-induced anisotropy. Theoretical modeling reveals that the microstructure of the fiber composite plays a dominant role in the electrical behavior due to alteration of percolating paths in the carbon nanotube network.

  3. Carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites for future automotive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, K.

    2016-05-01

    After a brief introduction to polymer composite properties and markets, the state of the art activities in the field of manufacturing of advanced composites for automotive applications are elucidated. These include (a) long fiber reinforced thermoplastics (LFT) for secondary automotive components, and (b) continuous carbon fiber reinforced thermosetting composites for car body applications. It is followed by future possibilities of carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites for e.g. (i) crash elements, (ii) racing car seats, and (iii) production and recycling of automotive fenders.

  4. Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Weaver, Charles E.; Chilcoat, Bill R.; Derbyshire, Frank; Jagtoyen, Marit

    2001-01-01

    An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

  5. Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Weaver, Charles E.; Chilcoat, Bill R.; Derbyshire, Frank; Jagtoyen, Marit

    2000-01-01

    An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

  6. Oxidation-resistant interfacial coatings for continuous fiber ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Stinton, D.P.; Besmann, T.M.; Bleier, A.; Shanmugham, S.; Liaw, P.K.

    1995-08-01

    Continuous fiber ceramic composites mechanical behavior are influenced by the bonding characteristics between the fiber and the matrix. Finite modeling studies suggest that a low-modulus interfacial coating material will be effective in reducing the residual thermal stresses that are generated upon cooling from processing temperatures. Nicalon{trademark}/SiC composites with carbon, alumina and mullite interfacial coatings were fabricated with the SiC matrix deposited using a forced-flow, thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration process. Composites with mullite interfacial coatings exhibited considerable fiber pull-out even after oxidation and have potential as a composite system.

  7. Resin impregnation process for producing a resin-fiber composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Raymond J. (Inventor); Moore, William E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Process for vacuum impregnation of a dry fiber reinforcement with a curable resin to produce a resin-fiber composite, by drawing a vacuum to permit flow of curable liquid resin into and through a fiber reinforcement to impregnate same and curing the resin-impregnated fiber reinforcement at a sufficient temperature and pressure to effect final curing. Both vacuum and positive pressure, e.g. autoclave pressure, are applied to the dry fiber reinforcement prior to application of heat and prior to any resin flow to compact the dry fiber reinforcement, and produce a resin-fiber composite of reduced weight, thickness and resin content, and improved mechanical properties. Preferably both a vacuum and positive pressure, e.g. autoclave pressure, are also applied during final curing.

  8. Mechanical property evaluation of natural fiber coir composite

    SciTech Connect

    Harish, S.; Michael, D. Peter; Bensely, A. Lal, D. Mohan; Rajadurai, A.

    2009-01-15

    The fiber which serves as a reinforcement in reinforced plastics may be synthetic or natural. Past studies show that only artificial fibers such as glass, carbon etc., have been used in fiber-reinforced plastics. Although glass and other synthetic fiber-reinforced plastics possess high specific strength, their fields of application are very limited because of their inherent higher cost of production. In this connection, an investigation has been carried out to make use of coir, a natural fiber abundantly available in India. Natural fibers are not only strong and lightweight but also relatively very cheap. In the present work, coir composites are developed and their mechanical properties are evaluated. Scanning electron micrographs obtained from fractured surfaces were used for a qualitative evaluation of the interfacial properties of coir/epoxy and compared with glass fiber/epoxy. These results indicate that coir can be used as a potential reinforcing material for making low load bearing thermoplastic composites.

  9. Fiber shape effects on metal matrix composite behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, H. C.; Lee, H.-J.; Chamis, C. C.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of different fiber shapes on the behavior of a SiC/Ti-15 metal matrix composite is computationally simulated. A three-dimensional finite element model consisting of a group of nine unidirectional fibers is used in the analysis. The model is employed to represent five different fiber shapes: a circle, an ellipse, a kidney, and two different cross shapes. The distribution of microstresses and the composite material properties, such as moduli, coefficients of thermal expansion, and Poisson's ratios, are obtained from the finite element analysis for the various fiber shapes. Comparisons of these results are used to determine the sensitivity of the composite behavior to the different fiber shapes and assess their potential benefits. No clear benefits result from different fiber shapes though there are some increases/decreases in isolated properties.

  10. Short fiber tremolite free chrysotile mesothelioma cohort revealed.

    PubMed

    Egilman, David; Bird, Tess

    2016-03-01

    In 1995, Dell and Teta published a cohort mortality study of asbestos molding compound workers at a Union Carbide Corporation (UCC) plastics manufacturing plant in Bound Brook, New Jersey. They reported that the factory workers were exposed to "asbestos (mostly chrysotile)," implying that the asbestos used at the Bound Brook plant occasionally contained amphiboles. However, UCC statements and testimony from recent litigation indicate that the Bound Brook plant exclusively used short fiber chrysotile asbestos. These recent documents also point to lower exposures than those reported by Dell and Teta. This chrysotile-only cohort should be included in analyses of chrysotile potency. Am. J. Ind. Med. 59:196-199, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26725926

  11. The Effects of Fiber Surface Modification and Thermal Aging on Composite Toughness and Its Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.; Madhukar, Madhu; Papadopolous, Demetrios S.; Inghram, Linda; Mccorkle, Linda

    1995-01-01

    A detailed experimental study was conducted to establish the structure-property relationships between elevated temperature aging and fiber-matrix bonding, Mode 2 interlaminar fracture toughness, and failure modes of carbon fiber/PMR-15 composites. The fiber-matrix adhesion was varied by using carbon fibers with different surface treatments. Short beam shear tests were used to quantify the interfacial shear strength afforded by the use of the different fiber surface treatments. The results of the short beam shear tests showed that, for times up to 1000 hr, the aging process caused no changes in the bulk of the three composite materials that would degrade the shear properties of the material. Comparisons between the interlaminar shear strengths (ILSS) measured by the short beam shear tests and the GIIC test results, as measured by the ENF test, indicated that the differences in the surface treatments significantly affected the fracture properties while the effect of the aging process was probably limited to changes at the starter crack tip. The fracture properties changed due to a shift in the fracture from an interfacial failure to a failure within the matrix when the fiber was changed from AU-4 to AS-4 or AS-4G. There appears to be an effect of the fiber/matrix bonding on the thermo-oxidative stability of the composites that were tested. The low bonding afforded by the AU 1 fiber resulted in weight losses about twice those experienced by the AS 1 reinforced composites, the ones with the best TOS.

  12. The Effects of Fiber Surface Modification and Thermal Aging on Composite Toughness And its Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.; Madhukar, Madhu; Papadopoulos, Demetrios; Inghram, Linda; McCorkle, Linda

    1997-01-01

    A detailed experimental study was conducted to establish the structure-property relationships between elevated temperature aging and (I) fiber-matrix bonding, (2) Mode II interlaminar fracture toughness, and (3) failure modes of carbon fiber/PMR-15 composites. The fiber-matrix adhesion was varied by using carbon fibers with different surface treatments. Short beam shear tests were used to quantify the interfacial shear strength afforded by the use of the different fiber surface treatments. The results of the short beam shear tests definitely showed that, for aging times up to 1000 hr, the aging process caused no observable changes in the bulk of the three composite materials that---would degrade the shear properties of the material. Comparisons between the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) measured by the short beam shear tests and the GII c test results, as measured by the ENF test, indicated that the differences in the surface treatments significantly affected the fracture properties while the effect of the aging process was probably limited to changes at the starter crack tip. The fracture properties changed due to a shift in the fracture from an interfacial failure to a failure within the matrix when the fiber was changed from AU-4 to AS-4 or AS-4G. There appears to be an effect of the fiber/matrix bonding on the thermo-oxidative stability of the composites that were tested. The low bonding afforded by the AU-4 fiber resulted in weight losses about twice those experienced by the AS-4 reinforced composites, the ones with the best TOS.

  13. Surface modification of fiber reinforced polymer composites and their attachment to bone simulating material.

    PubMed

    Hautamäki, M P; Puska, M; Aho, A J; Kopperud, H M; Vallittu, P K

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of fiber orientation of a fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) made of poly-methyl-methacrylate (PMMA) and E-glass to the surface fabrication process by solvent dissolution. Intention of the dissolution process was to expose the fibers and create a macroporous surface onto the FRC to enhance bone bonding of the material. The effect of dissolution and fiber direction to the bone bonding capability of the FRC material was also tested. Three groups of FRC specimens (n = 18/group) were made of PMMA and E-glass fiber reinforcement: (a) group with continuous fibers parallel to the surface of the specimen, (b) continuous fibers oriented perpendicularly to the surface, (c) randomly oriented short (discontinuous) fibers. Fourth specimen group (n = 18) made of plain PMMA served as controls. The specimens were subjected to a solvent treatment by tetrahydrofuran (THF) of either 5, 15 or 30 min of time (n = 6/time point), and the advancement of the dissolution (front) was measured. The solvent treatment also exposed the fibers and created a surface roughness on to the specimens. The solvent treated specimens were embedded into plaster of Paris to simulate bone bonding by mechanical locking and a pull-out test was undertaken to determine the strength of the attachment. All the FRC specimens dissolved as function of time, as the control group showed no marked dissolution during the study period. The specimens with fibers along the direction of long axis of specimen began to dissolve significantly faster than specimens in other groups, but the test specimens with randomly oriented short fibers showed the greatest depth of dissolution after 30 min. The pull-out test showed that the PMMA specimens with fibers were retained better by the plaster of Paris than specimens without fibers. However, direction of the fibers considerably influenced the force of attachment. The fiber reinforcement increases significantly the

  14. Creep behavior of tungsten fiber reinforced niobium metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobstein, T. L.

    1989-01-01

    Tungsten fiber reinforced niobium metal matrix composites were evaluated for use in space nuclear power conversion systems. The composite panels were fabricated using the arc-spray monotape technique at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The creep behavior of W/Nb composite material was determined at 1400 and 1500 K in vacuum over a wide range of applied loads. The time to reach 1 percent strain, the time to rupture, and the minimum creep rate were measured. The W/Nb composites exceeded the properties of monolithic niobium alloys significantly even when compared on a strength to density basis. The effect of fiber orientation on the creep strength also was evaluated. Kirkendall void formation was observed at the fiber/matrix interface; the void distribution differed depending on the fiber orientation relative to the stress axis. A relationship was found between the fiber orientation and the creep strength.

  15. Glass matrix composites. I - Graphite fiber reinforced glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Bacon, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental program is described in which graphite fibers of Hercules HMS and HTS, Thornel 300, and Celanese DG-12 were used to reinforce, both uniaxially and biaxially, borosilicate pyrex glass. Composite flexural strength distribution, strength as a function of test temperature, fracture toughness and oxidative stability were determined and shown to be primarily a function of fiber type and the quality of fiber-matrix bond formed during composite fabrication. It is demonstrated that the graphite fiber reinforced glass system offers unique possibilities as a high performance structural material.

  16. Fatigue of continuous fiber reinforced titanium matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1991-01-01

    Several lay-ups of SCS-6/Ti-15-3 composites were investigated. Static and fatigue tests were conducted for both notched and unnotched specimens at room and elevated temperatures. Test results indicated that the stress in the 0 fibers is the controlling factor in fatigue life. The static and fatigue strength of these materials is shown to be dependent on the level of residual stresses and the fiber/ matrix interfacial strength. Fatigue tests of notched specimens showed that cracks can initiate and grow many fiber spacings in the matrix material without breaking fibers. These matrix cracks can significantly reduce the residual strength of notched composite.

  17. Investigation of fatigue strength of multilayer advanced fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, H. R.; Kozik, T. J.

    1974-01-01

    The analytical characterization of a multilayer fiber composite plate (without hole) was accomplished for both static and dynamic loading conditions using the finite difference technique. Thornel 300/5208 composites with and without holes were subjected to static and tensile fatigue testing. Five (5) fiber orientations were submitted to test. Tensile fatigue testing also included three (3) loading conditions and two (2) frequencies. The low-cycle test specimens demonstrated a shorter tensile fatigue life than the high-cycle test specimens. Failure surfaces demonstrated effect of testing conditions. Secondary failure mechanisms, such as: delamination, fiber breakage, and edge fiber delamination were present. Longitudinal delamination between plies also occurred in these specimens.

  18. Passive and Active Vibration Control With Piezoelectric Fiber Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Vigier, Yves; Agbossou, Amen; Richard, Claude

    2002-07-01

    The possibility of dissipating mechanical energy with piezoelectric fiber composites (PFC) is investigated. The techniques for manufacturing an active beam with integrated (PFC) are presented and applied to a cantilevered beam experiment. We evaluated experimentally the performances of the active beam in passive energy dissipation. Three vibration cases were analysed: electrodes of the PFCs are (i) in open circuit, (ii) short circuit and (iii) shunted with electrical impedance designed to dissipate the electrical energy, which has been converted from the beam mechanical energy by the PFCs. Then we presented numerical models to analyze the vibration of active beams connect to electrical impedance. The proposed models point out with an accurate order of magnitude the change in vibration amplitude of the analysed beam. Hence we validate experimentally and numerically the concept of vibration control with PFCs and point out some new contributions of PFCs in active or passive damping. (authors)

  19. Ohmic heating of composite candidate graphite-fiber/coating combinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, Phillip B.

    1993-01-01

    Graphite fibers were heated in a vacuum to test the adhesion of deposited films at elevated temperatures. Copper-clad fibers and fibers with bilayer coatings were resistance heated by a direct-current power supply. Where possible, peak temperatures were measured with a long-focal-length optical pyrometer. Fiber surface wetting or nonwetting behavior could be clearly observed after this relatively quick and simple procedure. These results are discussed in the context of creating composites of graphite fibers in a copper matrix.

  20. The influence of fiber waviness on the compressive behavior of unidirectional continuous fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Highsmith, Alton L.; Davis, John J.; Helms, Kayleen L. E.

    1992-01-01

    The influence of fiber waviness and matrix nonlinearity on the compressive behavior of continuous fiber composites is studied. A micromechanics model based on the kinematics of the fibers has been developed to predict the behavior of unidirectional composites with initially wavy fibers under compressive loads. The initial waviness has been idealized as sinusoidal. Nonlinear shear behavior of the matrix has been included. Because the shear strain in the matrix is a function of position, the deformed shape of the fibers differs from the initial shape. Therefore, the deformed fiber shape is represented by a sine series. Fiber waviness and matrix shear properties have been determined experimentally for T650-42/Radel C under several conditions. These experimental data have been used as input into the analytical model. Predicted compressive response is in reasonable agreement with experimental data.

  1. Natural Kenaf Fiber Reinforced Composites as Engineered Structural Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittenber, David B.

    The objective of this work was to provide a comprehensive evaluation of natural fiber reinforced polymer (NFRP)'s ability to act as a structural material. As a chemical treatment, aligned kenaf fibers were treated with sodium hydroxide (alkalization) in different concentrations and durations and then manufactured into kenaf fiber / vinyl ester composite plates. Single fiber tensile properties and composite flexural properties, both in dry and saturated environments, were assessed. Based on ASTM standard testing, a comparison of flexural, tensile, compressive, and shear mechanical properties was also made between an untreated kenaf fiber reinforced composite, a chemically treated kenaf fiber reinforced composite, a glass fiber reinforced composite, and oriented strand board (OSB). The mechanical properties were evaluated for dry samples, samples immersed in water for 50 hours, and samples immersed in water until saturation (~2700 hours). Since NFRPs are more vulnerable to environmental effects than synthetic fiber composites, a series of weathering and environmental tests were conducted on the kenaf fiber composites. The environmental conditions studied include real-time outdoor weathering, elevated temperatures, immersion in different pH solutions, and UV exposure. In all of these tests, degradation was found to be more pronounced in the NFRPs than in the glass FRPs; however, in nearly every case the degradation was less than 50% of the flexural strength or stiffness. Using a method of overlapping and meshing discontinuous fiber ends, large mats of fiber bundles were manufactured into composite facesheets for structural insulated panels (SIPs). The polyisocyanurate foam cores proved to be poorly matched to the strength and stiffness of the NFRP facesheets, leading to premature core shear or delamination failures in both flexure and compressive testing. The NFRPs were found to match well with the theoretical stiffness prediction methods of classical lamination

  2. Molecular Characterization of a Lizard Adenovirus Reveals the First Atadenovirus with Two Fiber Genes and the First Adenovirus with Either One Short or Three Long Fibers per Penton

    PubMed Central

    Pénzes, Judit J.; Menéndez-Conejero, Rosa; Condezo, Gabriela N.; Ball, Inna; Papp, Tibor; Doszpoly, Andor; Paradela, Alberto; Pérez-Berná, Ana J.; López-Sanz, María; Nguyen, Thanh H.; van Raaij, Mark J.; Marschang, Rachel E.; Harrach, Balázs; Benkő, Mária

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although adenoviruses (AdVs) have been found in a wide variety of reptiles, including numerous squamate species, turtles, and crocodiles, the number of reptilian adenovirus isolates is still scarce. The only fully sequenced reptilian adenovirus, snake adenovirus 1 (SnAdV-1), belongs to the Atadenovirus genus. Recently, two new atadenoviruses were isolated from a captive Gila monster (Heloderma suspectum) and Mexican beaded lizards (Heloderma horridum). Here we report the full genomic and proteomic characterization of the latter, designated lizard adenovirus 2 (LAdV-2). The double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genome of LAdV-2 is 32,965 bp long, with an average G+C content of 44.16%. The overall arrangement and gene content of the LAdV-2 genome were largely concordant with those in other atadenoviruses, except for four novel open reading frames (ORFs) at the right end of the genome. Phylogeny reconstructions and plesiomorphic traits shared with SnAdV-1 further supported the assignment of LAdV-2 to the Atadenovirus genus. Surprisingly, two fiber genes were found for the first time in an atadenovirus. After optimizing the production of LAdV-2 in cell culture, we determined the protein compositions of the virions. The two fiber genes produce two fiber proteins of different sizes that are incorporated into the viral particles. Interestingly, the two different fiber proteins assemble as either one short or three long fiber projections per vertex. Stoichiometry estimations indicate that the long fiber triplet is present at only one or two vertices per virion. Neither triple fibers nor a mixed number of fibers per vertex had previously been reported for adenoviruses or any other virus. IMPORTANCE Here we show that a lizard adenovirus, LAdV-2, has a penton architecture never observed before. LAdV-2 expresses two fiber proteins—one short and one long. In the virion, most vertices have one short fiber, but a few of them have three long fibers attached to the same penton

  3. Interphase properties of carbon fiber-vinyl ester composites

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, M.J.; Weitzsacker, C.W.; Xie, M.; Corbin, S.; Drzal, L.T.

    1997-12-31

    The decline in price of carbon fibers gives an economic incentive to reconsider the use of these reinforcements in markets previously deemed too expensive, such as the automotive industry. Additionally, it would be advantageous if carbon fibers could be immediately used with polymers and manufacturing methods currently used for the production of fiberglass composites, and thus minimize development and startup costs. Of particular interest is the use of carbon fibers in vinyl esters manufactured by resin transfer molding, a leading manufacturing technology for the production of large and complex shaped composite parts. However, carbon fiber-vinyl ester composites have inferior mechanical properties as a result of poor bonding between fiber and matrix. The objective of this program was to evaluate the physical and chemical mechanisms currently thought responsible for adhesion in order to improve the performance of carbon fiber-vinyl ester composites. The effect of carbon fiber surface treatment on fiber chemistry and topography was evaluated to uncover the fundamental mechanisms governing carbon fiber to vinyl ester adhesion.

  4. Unified micromechanics of damping for unidirectional fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Chamis, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    An integrated micromechanics methodology for the prediction of damping capacity in fiber-reinforced polymer matrix unidirectional composites has been developed. Explicit micromechanics equations based on hysteretic damping are presented relating the on-axis damping capacities to the fiber and matrix properties and volume fraction. The damping capacities of unidirectional composites subjected to off-axis loading are synthesized from thermal effect on the damping performance of unidirectional composites due to temperature and moisture variations is also modeled. The damping contributions from interfacial friction between broken fibers and matrix are incorporated. Finally, the temperature rise in continuously vibrating composite plies is estimated. Application examples illustrate the significance of various parameters on the damping performance of unidirectional and off-axis fiber reinforced composites.

  5. Electrospun Nanofiber Coating of Fiber Materials: A Composite Toughening Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohlman, Lee W.; Roberts, Gary D.

    2012-01-01

    Textile-based composites could significantly benefit from local toughening using nanofiber coatings. Nanofibers, thermoplastic or otherwise, can be applied to the surface of the fiber tow bundle, achieving toughening of the fiber tow contact surfaces, resulting in tougher and more damage-resistant/tolerant composite structures. The same technique could also be applied to other technologies such as tape laying, fiber placement, or filament winding operations. Other modifications to the composite properties such as thermal and electrical conductivity could be made through selection of appropriate nanofiber material. Control of the needle electric potential, precursor solution, ambient temperature, ambient humidity, airflow, etc., are used to vary the diameter and nanofiber coating morphology as needed. This method produces a product with a toughening agent applied to the fiber tow or other continuous composite precursor material where it is needed (at interfaces and boundaries) without interfering with other composite processing characteristics.

  6. Simulations of Fiber Distribution Effects in Fiber-Reinforced Cement Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Bolander, John E.; Lim, Yun Mook

    2008-02-15

    This paper describes a lattice model for coupled moisture transport/stress analyses of fiber-reinforced cement composites (FRCC). Each fiber, and its interface with the matrix material, is explicitly represented within the three-dimensional material volume. This enables the direct study of fiber orientation and distribution effects on composite performance. Realistic, nonuniform fiber distributions can be specified as model input. Basic applications of the model are presented, with emphasis toward simulating the durability mechanics of FRCC exposed to drying environments. The modeling of functionally graded FRCC is an obvious potential extension of this work.

  7. A comparison of fiber effects on polymer matrix composite oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1991-01-01

    A number of thermo-oxidative stability studies addressing the effects of fiber reinforcement on composite thermal stability and influence of geometry on the results of aging studies were performed at NASA-Lewis. The information presented herein, a compilation of some results from these studies, shows the influence of the reinforcement fibers on the oxidative degradation of various PMR-15 composites. Reinforcement of graphite and ceramics were studied and three composite oxidation mechanisms were observed. One was a dominant attack of the reinforcement fiber, the second was the aggressive oxidation of the matrix material, and the third was interfacial degradation.

  8. Micromechanical analysis of fiber-reinforced composites with interfacial phenomena. I - Modeling and analysis of discontinuous fiber-reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Kenji; Iwamoto, Masaharu; Araki, Shigetoshi; Yano, Tadayoshi

    1992-04-01

    A mechanical analysis is presented of fiber-reinforced composite material exhibiting matrix cracking and/or interface sliding between a fiber and a matrix, i.e., the problem of a bridging fiber, by the method of micromechanics. In the case where there are many kinds of inhomogeneities, the interaction between the inhomogeneities, which are neglected in Eshelby's (1961) generally used method, must be taken into consideration. The present method is the extension of the method of Taya and Chou (1981) to the analysis of fiber-reinforced composites with interfacial sliding.

  9. Micromechanical modeling of short glass-fiber reinforced thermoplastics-Isotropic damage of pseudograins

    SciTech Connect

    Kammoun, S.; Brassart, L.; Doghri, I.; Delannay, L.; Robert, G.

    2011-05-04

    A micromechanical damage modeling approach is presented to predict the overall elasto-plastic behavior and damage evolution in short fiber reinforced composite materials. The practical use of the approach is for injection molded thermoplastic parts reinforced with short glass fibers. The modeling is proceeded as follows. The representative volume element is decomposed into a set of pseudograins, the damage of which affects progressively the overall stiffness and strength up to total failure. Each pseudograin is a two-phase composite with aligned inclusions having same aspect ratio. A two-step mean-field homogenization procedure is adopted. In the first step, the pseudograins are homogenized individually according to the Mori-Tanaka scheme. The second step consists in a self-consistent homogenization of homogenized pseudograins. An isotropic damage model is applied at the pseudograin level. The model is implemented as a UMAT in the finite element code ABAQUS. Model is shown to reproduce the strength and the anisotropy (Lankford coefficient) during uniaxial tensile tests on samples cut under different directions relative to the injection flow direction.

  10. A Model for Fiber Length Attrition in Injection-Molded Long-Fiber Composites

    SciTech Connect

    TuckerIII, Charles L.; Phelps, Jay H; El-Rahman, Ahmed Abd; Kunc, Vlastimil

    2013-01-01

    Long-fiber thermoplastic (LFT) composites consist of an engineering thermoplastic matrix with glass or carbon reinforcing fibers that are initially 10 to 13 mm long. When an LFT is injection molded, flow during mold filling orients the fibers and degrades the fiber length. Fiber orientation models for injection molding are well developed, and special orientation models for LFTs have been developed. Here we present a detailed quantitative model for fiber length attrition in a flowing fiber suspension. The model tracks a discrete fiber length distribution (FLD) at each spatial node. Key equations are a conservation equation for total fiber length, and a breakage rate equation. The breakage rate is based on buckling of fibers due to hydrodynamic forces, when the fibers are in unfavorable orientations. The FLD model is combined with a mold filling simulation to predict spatial and temporal variations in fiber length distribution in a mold cavity during filling. The predictions compare well to experiments on a glassfiber/ PP LFT molding. Fiber length distributions predicted by the model are easily incorporated into micromechanics models to predict the stress-strain behavior of molded LFT materials. Author to whom correspondence should be addressed; electronic mail: ctucker@illinois.edu 1

  11. Fracture behavior of glass fiber reinforced polymer composite

    SciTech Connect

    Avci, A.; Arikan, H.; Akdemir, A

    2004-03-01

    Chopped strand glass fiber reinforced particle-filled polymer composite beams with varying notch-to-depth ratios and different volume fractions of glass fibers were investigated in Mode I fracture using three-point bending tests. Effects of polyester resin content and glass fiber content on fracture behavior was also studied. Polyester resin contents were used 13.00%%, 14.75%, 16.50%, 18.00% and 19.50%, and glass fiber contents were 1% and 1.5% of the total weight of the polymer composite system. Flexural strength of the polymer composite increases with increase in polyester and fiber content. The critical stress intensity factor was determined by using several methods such as initial notch depth method, compliance method and J-integral method. The values of K{sub IC} obtained from these methods were compared.

  12. Fiber optic ultrasound transducers with carbon/PDMS composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosse, Charles A.; Colchester, Richard J.; Bhachu, Davinder S.; Zhang, Edward Z.; Papakonstantinou, Ioannis; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2014-03-01

    Novel ultrasound transducers were created with a composite of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) that was dip coated onto the end faces of optical fibers. The CNTs were functionalized with oleylamine to allow for their dissolution in xylene, a solvent of PDMS. Ultrasound pulses were generated by illuminating the composite coating with pulsed laser light. At distances of 2 to 16 mm from the end faces, ultrasound pressures ranged from 0.81 to 0.07 MPa and from 0.27 to 0.03 MPa with 105 and 200 μm core fibers, respectively. Using an optical fiber hydrophone positioned adjacent to the coated 200 µm core optical fiber, ultrasound reflectance measurements were obtained from the outer surface of a sheep heart ventricle. The results of this study suggest that ultrasound transducers that comprise optical fibers with CNT-PDMS composite coatings may be suitable for miniature medical imaging probes.

  13. Interfacial studies in fiber-reinforced thermoplastic-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    The major theme of this dissertation is structure/property relationships in fiber-reinforced thermoplastic-matrix composites. Effort has been focused on the interface: interfacial crystallization and fiber/matrix adhesion. Included are investigations on interfacial nucleation and morphology, measurement of fiber/matrix adhesion, effects of interfacial adsorption and crystallization on fiber/matrix adhesion, and composites reinforced with thermotropic liquid crystal copolyester fibers. Crystallization of a copolyester and polybutylene terephthalate with glass, carbon, or aramid fibers has been studied with regard to interfacial morphology. Techniques employed included hot-stage optical microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. Nucleation by the fibers was found to be a general phenomenon. Morphology could be varied by changing the cooling rate. In order to better monitor fiber /matrix adhesion, a buckled plate test has been developed. The test measures transverse toughness as the parameter characterizing interfacial adhesion in unidirectional, continuous-fiber composites. The test is simple to perform yet has advantages over other interfacial evaluation techniques. The buckled plate test was found to be a sensitive measure of fiber/matrix adhesion. The buckled plate test has been used along with the transverse tensile test to examine how interfacial adsorption and crystallization affect fiber/matrix adhesion in polycarbonate/carbon fiber composites. Adsorption was found to be of primary importance in developing adhesion, while crystallization is a secondary effect. The toughness data have been fit successfully for annealing time and temperature dependence. The dependence of adsorption and transverse toughness on matrix molecular weight was found to be large, with higher molecular weights adsorbing more effectively.

  14. Composite embedded fiber optic data links in Standard Electronic Modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, S. L.; Jones, K. J.; Morgan, R. E.; Hixson, Jay

    1990-12-01

    The goal of this project is to fabricate a chassis/circuit card demonstration entirely 'wired' with embedded and interconnected optical fibers. Graphite/epoxy Standard Electronic Module E (SEM-E) configured panels have been successfully fabricated. Fiber-embedded SEM-E configured panels have been subjected to simultaneous signal transmission and vibration testing. Packaging constraints will require tapping composite-embedded optical fibers at right angles to the direction of optical transmission.

  15. Oxygen Reactivity of a Carbon Fiber Composite

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Theron Devol; Pawelko, Robert James; Anderl, Robert Andrew; Smolik, Galen Richard

    2002-09-01

    Carbon Fiber Composites (CFCs) are often suggested as armor material for the first wall of a fusion plasma chamber due to carbon's low atomic number, high thermal conductivity, and high melting point. However, carbon is chemically reactive in air and will react with ingress air during a Loss of Vacuum Accident and release tritium fuel that has been retained in the carbon. Tritium mobilization and carbon monoxide generation via CFC oxidation are both safety concerns. This paper discusses chemical reactivity experiments that were performed using the state-of-the-art 3-dimensional NB31 CFC produced by SNECMA and a laminar reaction gas of Ar–21 vol% O2. Oxidation reaction rates were measured for CFC temperatures of 525, 600, 700, 800, 900, and 1000 °C and a 100 standard cubic centimeters per minute (sccm) Ar–O2 flow rate. Experiments were also performed at CFC temperatures of 700 and 1000 °C and a 1000 sccm Ar–O2 flow rate. Mass spectral analyses of the exhaust reaction gas suggested that carbon monoxide was the primary reaction at the CFC surface and carbon dioxide was readily produced in the exiting reaction gas. The measured reaction rates compare well with the literature and were used to produce a CFC oxidation curve that is recommended for use in fusion safety analyses.

  16. Integration of long-gage fiber optic sensor into a fiber-reinforced composite sensing tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glisic, Branko; Inaudi, Daniele

    2003-07-01

    Thermoplastic and thermoset fiber-reinforced composite materials are well established in aerospace engineering, but also more and more used in the oil and gas industry as well as in civil engineering. In these applications they are mainly used to reinfoce, repair or straighten existing structures, but recently full-composite structures have also been built. Independently from the domain of the use, there is a need for these composite structures to be monitored. Since the composite materials are usually applied in the form of thin tapes or sheets, sensors have to be embedded within the structure, depending on structural layer that has to be monitored. Embedding the sensors may have as a consequence a significant decrease of the mechanical properties of the composite material due to the dimensions of the sensor. The solution presented in this paper is integration of a fiber optic sensor directly into the main composite component, i.e. into the composite tape. In this paper we present the development of a thermoplastic fiber-reinforced composite tape with integrated long-gage fiber-optic sensors. The fiber-optic sensors are selected due to small transversal dimension and good compatibility with the plastic materials. The tape with integrated optical fiber can be used for tape winding of a structural element, embedded between different layers, but also as a separate sensor - a sensing tape. The optical and mechanical properties of the tapes with sensor are tested. The sensing tape is then installed onto the rail along with standard long-gage fiber optic sensor, additional tests are performed and performance of both sensor compared. The integration of optical fiber into the composite tape, the results of the tests as well as the performances of the tape with integrated optical fiber are presented in this paper.

  17. Carbide coated fibers in graphite-aluminum composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imprescia, R. J.; Levinson, L. S.; Reiswig, R. D.; Wallace, T. C.; Williams, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    Thin, uniform coats of titanium carbide, deposited on graphite fibers by chemical vapor deposition with thicknesses up to approximately 0.1 microns were shown to improve fiber strength significantly. For greater thicknesses, strength was degraded. The coats promote wetting of the fibers and infiltration of the fiber yarns with aluminum alloys, and act as protective barriers to inhibit reaction between the fibers and the alloys. Chemical vapor deposition was used to produce silicon carbide coats on graphite fibers. In general, the coats were nonuniform and were characterized by numerous surface irregularities. Despite these irregularities, infiltration of these fibers with aluminum alloys was good. Small graphite-aluminum composite samples were produced by vacuum hot-pressing of aluminum-infiltrated graphite yarn at temperatures above the metal liquidus.

  18. NDE Elastic Properties of Fiber-Reinforced Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites are increasingly replacing metallic alloys as structural materials for primary components of fracture-critical structures. This trend is a result of the growing understanding of material behavior and recognition of the desirable properties of composites. A research program was conducted on NDE methods for determining the elastic properties of composites.

  19. Polyimide fiber-glass composite resists high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilwee, W. J.; Rosser, R. W.; Parker, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    Composites synthesized from bismaleimide have superior strength and oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures when compared with similar composites prepared with epoxy or silicon polymers of similar cost. Polyimide synthesis technique and processing method yield essentially void-free fiber-glass reinforced composites.

  20. Short pulse fiber lasers mode-locked by carbon nanotubes and graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Shinji; Martinez, Amos; Xu, Bo

    2014-12-01

    One and two dimensional forms of carbon, carbon nanotubes and graphene, have interesting and useful, not only electronic but also photonic, properties. For fiber lasers, they are very attractive passive mode lockers for ultra-short pulse generation, since they have saturable absorption with inherently fast recovery time (<1 ps). In this paper, we review the photonic properties of graphene and CNT and our recent works on fabrication of fiber devices and applications to ultra-short pulse mode-locked fiber lasers.

  1. and Carbon Fiber Reinforced 2024 Aluminum Alloy Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaczmar, Jacek W.; Naplocha, Krzysztof; Morgiel, Jerzy

    2014-08-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of 2024 aluminum alloy composite materials strengthened with Al2O3 Saffil fibers or together with addition of carbon fibers were investigated. The fibers were stabilized in the preform with silica binder strengthened by further heat treatment. The preforms with 80-90% porosity were infiltrated by direct squeeze casting method. The microstructure of the as-cast specimens consisted mainly of α-dendrites with intermetallic compounds precipitated at their boundaries. The homogenization treatment of the composite materials substituted silica binder with a mixture of the Θ phase and silicon precipitates distributed in the remnants of SiO2 amorphous phase. Outside of this area at the binder/matrix interface, fine MgO precipitates were also present. At surface of C fibers, a small amount of fine Al3C4 carbides were formed. During pressure infiltration of preforms containing carbon fibers under oxygen carrying atmosphere, C fibers can burn releasing gasses and causing cracks initiated by thermal stress. The examination of tensile and bending strength showed that reinforcing of aluminum matrix with 10-20% fibers improved investigated properties in the entire temperature range. The largest increase in relation to unreinforced alloy was observed for composite materials examined at the temperature of 300 °C. Substituting Al2O3 Saffil fibers with carbon fibers leads to better wear resistance at dry condition with no relevant effect on strength properties.

  2. Creep rupture testing of carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Kathryn Anne

    Carbon fiber is becoming more prevalent in everyday life. As such, it is necessary to have a thorough understanding of, not solely general mechanical properties, but of long-term material behavior. Creep rupture testing of carbon fiber is very difficult due to high strength and low strain to rupture properties. Past efforts have included testing upon strands, single tows and overwrapped pressure vessels. In this study, 1 inch wide, [0°/90°]s laminated composite specimens were constructed from fabric supplied by T.D. Williamson Inc. Specimen fabrication methods and gripping techniques were investigated and a method was developed to collect long term creep rupture behavior data. An Instron 1321 servo-hydraulic material testing machine was used to execute static strength and short term creep rupture tests. A hanging dead-weight apparatus was designed to perform long-term creep rupture testing. The testing apparatus, specimens, and specimen grips functioned well. Collected data exhibited a power law distribution and therefore, a linear trend upon a log strength-log time plot. Statistical analysis indicated the material exhibited slow degradation behavior, similar to previous studies, and could maintain a 50 year carrying capacity at 62% of static strength, approximately 45.7 ksi.

  3. Development of Ceramic Fibers for Reinforcement in Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, L. E.; Lent, W. E.; Teague, W. T.

    1961-01-01

    Refinements of the vertical arc fiberizing apparatus resulted in its ability to fiberize very different refractory glasses having wide ranges of properties. Although the apparatus, was originally designed as a laboratory research tool for the evaluation of many compositions daily, up to one quarter pound of fibers of a single composition could be produced in an 8-hour day. Fibers up to six and a half feet long were produced with the apparatus. Studies were conducted of two methods of fiberizing refractory glasses requiring rapid freezing from the melt. The first method consisted of fiberizing droplets of molten glass passing through an annular nozzle. The second method consisted of reconstructing the annular nozzle in. the shape of a horseshoe to achieve a shorter delay in blasting a molten droplet from the tip of a rod. Both methods were judged feasible for producing fibers of glasses requiring rapid freezing. The first method would be more amenable to volume fiber production. Studies of induction heating for fiber formation did not lead to its designation as a very efficient heating method. Problems. remain to be solved, in the design of a suitable susceptor for a higher heating rate, in protecting the susceptor from oxidation with an inert gas, in contamination of the melt from a refractory crucible, and in the protective radiation shielding of the induction concentrator coil. It is not considered practical to continue studies of this heating method. In the course of this program 151 refractory glass compositions were evaluated for fiber, forming characteristics. Of the various types of materials studied, the following showed promise in producing acceptable refractory fibers: sIlica- spinel (magnesium aluminate), silica- spinel-zirconia, silica-zirconia, silica-zinc spinel, aluminum phosphate glasses, and fluoride glasses. Compositions which did not produce acceptable fibers were high zirconia materials, barium spinels, and calcium aluminates. Improvements in

  4. Optimum Interfacial Layers For Fiber/Metal Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, Bradley A.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    1993-01-01

    Report presents theoretical stress-analysis study of some of factors affecting choice of thin layer of material placed at interface between each fiber and matrix of ceramic-fiber/metal-matrix composite. Effects of thickness, modulus of elasticity, and coefficient of thermal expansion considered.

  5. Energy Absorption in Chopped Carbon Fiber Compression Molded Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Starbuck, J.M.

    2001-07-20

    In passenger vehicles the ability to absorb energy due to impact and be survivable for the occupant is called the ''crashworthiness'' of the structure. To identify and quantify the energy absorbing mechanisms in candidate automotive composite materials, test methodologies were developed for conducting progressive crush tests on composite plate specimens. The test method development and experimental set-up focused on isolating the damage modes associated with the frond formation that occurs in dynamic testing of composite tubes. Quasi-static progressive crush tests were performed on composite plates manufactured from chopped carbon fiber with an epoxy resin system using compression molding techniques. The carbon fiber was Toray T700 and the epoxy resin was YLA RS-35. The effect of various material and test parameters on energy absorption was evaluated by varying the following parameters during testing: fiber volume fraction, fiber length, fiber tow size, specimen width, profile radius, and profile constraint condition. It was demonstrated during testing that the use of a roller constraint directed the crushing process and the load deflection curves were similar to progressive crushing of tubes. Of all the parameters evaluated, the fiber length appeared to be the most critical material parameter, with shorter fibers having a higher specific energy absorption than longer fibers. The combination of material parameters that yielded the highest energy absorbing material was identified.

  6. Biodegradable/Compostable Composites From Ligno-Cellulosic Fibers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The increased importance of renewable resources for raw materials and recyclabi1ity/biodegradability of the product at the end of the useful life are demanding a shift from petroleum-based synthetics to agro-based natural fibers in automotive interiors. Natural fiber composites can contribute greatl...

  7. Continuous, linearly intermixed fiber tows and composite molded article thereform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMahon, Paul E. (Inventor); Chung, Tai-Shung (Inventor); Ying, Lincoln (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The instant invention involves a process used in preparing fibrous tows which may be formed into polymeric plastic composites. The process involves the steps of (a) forming a carbon fiber tow; (b) forming a thermoplastic polymeric fiber tow; (c) intermixing the two tows; and (d) withdrawing the intermixed tow for further use.

  8. All-aramid composites by partial fiber dissolution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian Min; Mousavi, Zeinab; Soykeabkaew, Nattakan; Smith, Paul; Nishino, Takashi; Peijs, Ton

    2010-03-01

    The area of self-reinforced polymer composites is one of the fastest growing areas in engineering polymers, but until now these materials have been mainly developed on the basis of thermoplastic fibers of moderate performance. In this work, we report on a new type of self-reinforced composites based on high-performance aramid fibers to produce an "all-aramid" composite by applying a surface-dissolution method to fuse poly(p-phenylene terephthalamide) (PPTA) fibers together. After immersion in concentrated (95%) sulphuric acid (H(2)SO(4)) for a selected period of time, partially dissolved fiber surfaces were converted into a PPTA interphase or matrix phase. Following extraction of H(2)SO(4) and drying, a consolidated all-aramid composite was formed. The structure, mechanical- and thermal properties of these single-polymer composites were investigated. Optimum processing conditions resulted in unidirectional composites of high reinforcement content (approximately 75 vol %) and good interfacial bonding. The all-aramid composites featured a Young's modulus of approximately 65 GPa at room temperature, and a tensile strength of 1.4 GPa, which are comparable with or exceed the corresponding values of conventional aramid/epoxy composites. However, since fiber, matrix and interphase in all-aramid composites are based on the same high-temperature resistant PPTA polymer, a high modulus of approximately 50 GPa was maintained up to 250 degrees C, demonstrating the potential of these materials for high-temperature applications. PMID:20356299

  9. Short pulse dynamics in a linear cavity fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razukov, Vadim A.; Melnikov, Leonid A.

    2016-04-01

    New suitable numerical scheme is proposed for simulation of dynamics of oppositely running pulses in a fiber laser with linear cavity. The proposed model allows to include various temporal and spatial effects which affect the laser dynamics. The pulse evolution in the fiber cavity with perfect reflectors at the fiber ends with accounting of fiber group velocity dispersion and self-phase modulation is demonstrated.

  10. Laser Processing of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite for Optical Fiber Guidelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, M. S. F.; Sakamoto, J. M. S.; Simoes, J. G. A.; Riva, R.

    The replacement of copper wires by optical fibers for control and monitoring of aircraft systems are gaining more and more acceptance due to weight reductions and their intrinsic reliability. The present investigation proposes a new method for producing fiber optical guidelines in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites using laser texturing and machining. Laser texturing was used to improve the adhesion bonding between the CFRP parts and laser machining is used to create a channel where the optical fiber will be placed and protected. The results show that using only 20 W of a Nd:YAG pulsed laser it is possible to enhance the joint resistance of CFRP composites and also protecting the optical fiber embedded in between two CFRP pieces. Using the proposed technology, the maximum load of a lap joint increased by 85% and the optical fiber remained integral even under severe bending conditions.

  11. Liquid composite molding-processing and characterization of fiber-reinforced composites modified with carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeiler, R.; Khalid, U.; Kuttner, C.; Kothmann, M.; Dijkstra, D. J.; Fery, A.; Altstädt, V.

    2014-05-01

    The increasing demand in fiber-reinforced plastics (FRPs) necessitates economic processing of high quality, like the vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) process. FRPs exhibit excellent in-plane properties but weaknesses in off-plane direction. The addition of nanofillers into the resinous matrix phase embodies a promising approach due to benefits of the nano-scaled size of the filler, especially its high surface and interface areas. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are preferable candidates for resin modification in regard of their excellent mechanical properties and high aspect ratios. However, especially the high aspect ratios give rise to withholding or filtering by fibrous fabrics during the impregnation process, i.e. length dependent withholding of tubes (short tubes pass through the fabric, while long tubes are restrained) and a decrease in the local CNT content in the laminate along the flow path can occur. In this study, hybrid composites containing endless glass fiber reinforcement and surface functionalized CNTs dispersed in the matrix phase were produced by VARTM. New methodologies for the quantification of the filtering of CNTs were developed and applied to test laminates. As a first step, a method to analyze the CNT length distribution before and after injection was established for thermosetting composites to characterize length dependent withholding of nanotubes. The used glass fiber fabric showed no perceptible length dependent retaining of CNTs. Afterward, the resulting test laminates were examined by Raman spectroscopy and compared to reference samples of known CNT content. This Raman based technique was developed further to assess the quality of the impregnation process and to quantitatively follow the local CNT content along the injection flow in cured composites. A local decline in CNT content of approx. 20% was observed. These methodologies allow for the quality control of the filler content and size-distribution in CNT based hybrid

  12. Creep behavior of tungsten fiber reinforced niobium metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobstein, Toni L.

    1992-01-01

    Tungsten fiber reinforced niobium metal matrix composites were evaluated for use in space nuclear power conversion systems. The composite panels were fabricated using the arc-spray monotape technique at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The creep behavior of W/Nb composite material was determined at 1400 and 1500 K in vacuum over a wide range of applied loads. The time to reach 1 percent strain, the time to rupture, and the minimum creep rate were measured. The W/Nb composites exceeded the properties of monolithic niobium alloys significantly even when compared creep strength also was evaluated. Kirkendall void formation was observed at the fiber/matrix interface; the void distribution differed depending the fiber orientation relative to the stress axis. A relationship was found between the fiber orientation and the creep strength.

  13. Eddy-Current Probes For Inspecting Graphite-Fiber Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Wang, Morgan

    1992-01-01

    Eddy-current probes with E-shaped and U-shaped magnetic cores developed to detect flaws in graphite-fiber/epoxy and other composites. Magnetic fields more concentrated, yielding better coupling with specimens.

  14. SURFACE MORPHOLOGY OF CARBON FIBER POLYMER COMPOSITES AFTER LASER STRUCTURING

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S; Chen, Jian; Jones, Jonaaron F.; Alexandra, Hackett; Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle; Daniel, Claus; Warren, Charles David; Rehkopf, Jackie D.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of Carbon Fiber Polymer Composite (CFPC) as a lightweight material in automotive and aerospace industries requires the control of surface morphology. In this study, the composites surface was prepared by ablating the resin in the top fiber layer of the composite using an Nd:YAG laser. The CFPC specimens with T700S carbon fiber and Prepreg - T83 resin (epoxy) were supplied by Plasan Carbon Composites, Inc. as 4 ply thick, 0/90o plaques. The effect of laser fluence, scanning speed, and wavelength was investigated to remove resin without an excessive damage of the fibers. In addition, resin ablation due to the power variation created by a laser interference technique is presented. Optical property measurements, optical micrographs, 3D imaging, and high-resolution optical profiler images were used to study the effect of the laser processing on the surface morphology.

  15. Metal matrix coated fiber composites and the methods of manufacturing such composites

    DOEpatents

    Weeks, J.K. Jr.; Gensse, C.

    1993-09-14

    A fiber coating which allows ceramic or metal fibers to be wetted by molten metals is disclosed. The coating inhibits degradation of the physical properties caused by chemical reaction between the fiber and the coating itself or between the fiber and the metal matrix. The fiber coating preferably includes at least a wetting layer, and in some applications, a wetting layer and a barrier layer between the fiber and the wetting layer. The wetting layer promotes fiber wetting by the metal matrix. The barrier layer inhibits fiber degradation. The fiber coating permits the fibers to be infiltrated with the metal matrix resulting in composites having unique properties not obtainable in pure materials. 8 figures.

  16. Carbon fiber composite characterization in adverse thermal environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Vasquez, Sylvia; Brown, Alexander L.; Hubbard, Joshua A.; Ramirez, Ciro J.; Dodd, Amanda B.

    2011-05-01

    The behavior of carbon fiber aircraft composites was studied in adverse thermal environments. The effects of resin composition and fiber orientation were measured in two test configurations: 102 by 127 millimeter (mm) test coupons were irradiated at approximately 22.5 kW/m{sup 2} to measure thermal response, and 102 by 254 mm test coupons were irradiated at approximately 30.7 kW/m{sup 2} to characterize piloted flame spread in the vertically upward direction. Carbon-fiber composite materials with epoxy and bismaleimide resins, and uni-directional and woven fiber orientations, were tested. Bismaleimide samples produced less smoke, and were more resistant to flame spread, as expected for high temperature thermoset resins with characteristically lower heat release rates. All materials lost approximately 20-25% of their mass regardless of resin type, fiber orientation, or test configuration. Woven fiber composites displayed localized smoke jetting whereas uni-directional composites developed cracks parallel to the fibers from which smoke and flames emanated. Swelling and delamination were observed with volumetric expansion on the order of 100% to 200%. The purpose of this work was to provide validation data for SNL's foundational thermal and combustion modeling capabilities.

  17. Interlaminar shear properties of graphite fiber, high-performance resin composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Needles, H. L.; Kourtides, D. A.; Fish, R. H.; Varma, D. S.

    1983-01-01

    Short beam testing was used to determine the shear properties of laminates consisting of T-300 and Celion 3000 and 6000 graphite fibers, in epoxy, hot melt and solvent bismaleimide, polyimide and polystyrylpyridine (PSP). Epoxy, composites showed the highest interlaminar shear strength, with values for all other resins being substantially lower. The dependence of interlaminar shear properties on the fiber-resin interfacial bond and on resin wetting characteristics and mechanical properties is investigated, and it is determined that the lower shear strength of the tested composites, by comparison with epoxy resin matrix composites, is due to their correspondingly lower interfacial bond strengths. An investigation of the effect of the wettability of carbon fiber tow on shear strength shows wetting variations among resins that are too small to account for the large shear strength property differences observed.

  18. Recent advancement in optical fiber sensing for aerospace composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakuchi, Shu; Takeda, Nobuo

    2013-12-01

    Optical fiber sensors have attracted considerable attention in health monitoring of aerospace composite structures. This paper briefly reviews our recent advancement mainly in Brillouin-based distributed sensing. Damage detection, life cycle monitoring and shape reconstruction systems applicable to large-scale composite structures are presented, and new technical concepts, "smart crack arrester" and "hierarchical sensing system", are described as well, highlighting the great potential of optical fiber sensors for the structural health monitoring (SHM) field.

  19. Carbon-fiber composite molecular sieves for gas separation

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.

    1996-08-01

    This report describes continuing work on the activation and characterization of formed carbon fiber composites. The composites are produced at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and activated at the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) using steam, CO{sub 2}, or O{sub 2} at different conditions of temperature and time, and with different furnace configurations. The general aims of the project are to produce uniformly activated samples with controlled pore structures for specialist applications such as gas separation and water treatment. In previous work the authors reported that composites produced from isotropic pitch fibers weighing up to 25g can be uniformly activated through the appropriate choice of reaction conditions and furnace configurations. They have now succeeded in uniformly activating composites of dimensions up to 12 x 7 x 6 cm, or up to about 166 gram - a scale-up factor of about six. Part of the work has involved the installation of a new furnace that can accommodate larger composites. Efforts were made to achieve uniform activation in both steam and CO{sub 2}. The authors have also succeeded in producing materials with very uniform and narrow pore size distributions by using a novel method involving low temperature oxygen chemisorption in combination with heat treatment in N{sub 2} at high temperatures. Work has also started on the activation of PAN based carbon fibers and fiber composites with the aim of producing composites with wide pore structures for use as catalyst supports. So far activation of the PAN fiber composites supplied by ORNL has been difficult which is attributed to the low reactivity of the PAN fibers. As a result, studies are now being made of the activation of the PAN fibers to investigate the optimum carbonization and activation conditions for PAN based fibers.

  20. Parametric Study Of A Ceramic-Fiber/Metal-Matrix Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L. N.; Hopkins, D. A.; Chamis, C. C.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes computer-model parametric study of effects of degradation of constituent materials upon mechanical properties of ceramic-fiber/metal-matrix composite material. Contributes to understanding of weakening effects of large changes in temperature and mechanical stresses in fabrication and use. Concerned mainly with influences of in situ fiber and matrix properties upon behavior of composite. Particular attention given to influence of in situ matrix strength and influence of interphase degradation.

  1. Ceramic fiber reinforced glass-ceramic matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A slurry of BSAS glass powders is cast into tapes which are cut to predetermined sizes. Mats of continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with these matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite which is heated to burn out organic constituents. The remaining interim material is then hot-pressed to form a BSAS glass-ceramic fiber-reinforced composite.

  2. Modeling the thermal conductivity of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Beecher, S.C.; Dinwiddie, R.B.

    1993-06-01

    A review of models for the prediction of the thermal conductivity of uni-directional fiber-reinforced composites will be presented. The ability of these models to give an accurate prediction of the composite thermal conductivity depends on the amount of information known about the constituent phase properties under the assumption that these properties do not change as a result of processing. Also presented are models that take into account the effects of fiber coatings.

  3. Carbon-fiber composite molecular sieves for gas separation

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G.; Fei, Y.Q.

    1995-08-01

    The progress of research in the development of novel, rigid, monolithic adsorbent carbon fiber composites is described. Carbon fiber composites are produced at ORNL and activated at the CAER using steam or CO{sub 2} under different conditions, with the aims of producing a uniform degree of activation through the material, and of closely controlling pore structure and adsorptive properties The principal focus of the work to date has been to produce materials with narrow porosity for use in gas separations.

  4. Variability of Fiber Elastic Moduli in Composite Random Fiber Networks Makes the Network Softer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Ehsan; Picu, Catalin

    2015-03-01

    Athermal fiber networks are assemblies of beams or trusses. They have been used to model mechanics of fibrous materials such as biopolymer gels and synthetic nonwovens. Elasticity of these networks has been studied in terms of various microstructural parameters such as the stiffness of their constituent fibers. In this work we investigate the elasticity of composite fiber networks made from fibers with moduli sampled from a distribution function. We use finite elements simulations to study networks made by 3D Voronoi and Delaunay tessellations. The resulting data collapse to power laws showing that variability in fiber stiffness makes fiber networks softer. We also support the findings by analytical arguments. Finally, we apply these results to a network with curved fibers to explain the dependence of the network's modulus on the variation of its structural parameters.

  5. A comparison of tensile properties of polyester composites reinforced with pineapple leaf fiber and pineapple peduncle fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juraidi, J. M.; Shuhairul, N.; Syed Azuan, S. A.; Intan Saffinaz Anuar, Noor

    2013-12-01

    Pineapple fiber which is rich in cellulose, relatively inexpensive, and abundantly available has the potential for polymer reinforcement. This research presents a study of the tensile properties of pineapple leaf fiber and pineapple peduncle fiber reinforced polyester composites. Composites were fabricated using leaf fiber and peduncle fiber with varying fiber length and fiber loading. Both fibers were mixed with polyester composites the various fiber volume fractions of 4, 8 and 12% and with three different fiber lengths of 10, 20 and 30 mm. The composites panels were fabricated using hand lay-out technique. The tensile test was carried out in accordance to ASTM D638. The result showed that pineapple peduncle fiber with 4% fiber volume fraction and fiber length of 30 mm give highest tensile properties. From the overall results, pineapple peduncle fiber shown the higher tensile properties compared to pineapple leaf fiber. It is found that by increasing the fiber volume fraction the tensile properties has significantly decreased but by increasing the fiber length, the tensile properties will be increased proportionally. Minitab software is used to perform the two-way ANOVA analysis to measure the significant. From the analysis done, there is a significant effect of fiber volume fraction and fiber length on the tensile properties.

  6. Thermoelastic stresses in composite ceramic fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Filimonov, I.A.; Grigor`ev, Yu. M.

    1995-08-01

    A calculation of stress and deformation fields in ceramic fibers formed by the method of chemical vapor deposition onto a heated substrate is performed within the framework of linear elasticity theory. Optimum parameters for fibers with a homogeneous structure, a layered structure, and a gradient one are sought.

  7. Fiber reinforced composites in prosthodontics – A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Nayar, Sanjna; Ganesh, R.; Santhosh, S.

    2015-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC), prostheses offer the potential advantages of optimized esthetics, low wear of the opposing dentition and the ability to bond the prosthesis to the abutment teeth, thereby compensating for less-than-optimal abutment tooth retention and resistance form. These prostheses are composed of two types of composite materials: Fiber-composites to build the substructure and hybrid or micro fill particulate composites to create the external veneer surface. This article reviews the various types of FRCs and its mechanical properties. PMID:26015717

  8. Fiber: composition, structures, and functional properties.

    PubMed

    Sims, Ian M; Monro, John A

    2013-01-01

    Kiwifruit dietary fiber consists of cell-wall polysaccharides that are typical of the cell walls of many dicotyledonous fruits, being composed of pectic polysaccharides, hemicelluloses, and cellulose. The kiwifruit pectic polysaccharides consist of homo- and rhamnogalacturonans with various neutral, (arabino)-galactan side chains, while the hemicelluloses are mostly xyloglucan and xylan. The proportions of pectic polysaccharide, hemicellulose, and cellulose in both green 'Hayward' and 'Zespri® Gold' are similar and are little affected by in vitro exposure to gastric and small intestinal digestion. The hydration properties of the kiwifruit-swelling and water retention capacity-are also unaffected by foregut digestion, indicating that the functional properties of kiwifruit fiber survive in the foregut. However, in the hindgut, kiwifruit fiber is fermented, but whole kiwifruit consumed in association with slowly fermented fiber leads to distal displacement of fermentation, indicating that hindgut benefits of kiwifruit may result from its interaction with other dietary sources of fiber. PMID:23394983

  9. Dynamic characterization of short duration stress pulses generated by a magnetic flyer plate in carbon-fiber/epoxy laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Bruck, H.A.; Epstein, J.S.; Perry, K.E. Jr.; Abdallah, M.G.

    1995-11-01

    There is a great deal of interest in characterizing the dynamic mechanical behavior of laminated carbon-fiber/epoxy composites for military and aerospace applications. Current research efforts have been directed at measuring the strength lost because of accumulated damage. Very little work has been done to determine how this damage is accumulated during dynamic mechanical loading. Of particular interest is the effect of short duration (< 1 {micro}s) stress pulses on mechanical behavior such as delamination. In this paper, a magnetic flyer plate apparatus is presented for generating a short duration stress pulse in a unidirectional carbon-fiber/epoxy laminated composite. The stress pulse is characterized using a dynamic moire interferometer.

  10. Ultra-high modulus organic fiber hybrid composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Champion, A. R.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental organic fiber, designated Fiber D, was characterized, and its performance as a reinforcement for composites was investigated. The fiber has a modulus of 172 GPa, tensile strength of 3.14 GPa, and density of 1.46 gm/cu cm. Unidirectional Fiber D/epoxy laminates containing 60 percent fiber by volume were evaluated in flexure, shear, and compression, at room temperature and 121 C in both the as fabricated condition and after humidity aging for 14 days at 95 percent RH and 82 C. A modulus of 94.1 GPa, flexure strength of 700 MPa, shear strength of 54 MPa, and compressive strength of 232 MPa were observed at room temperature. The as-fabricated composites at elevated temperature and humidity aged material at room temperature had properties 1 to 20 percent below these values. Combined humidity aging plus evaluated temperature testing resulted in even lower mechanical properties. Hybrid composite laminates of Fiber D with Fiber FP alumina or Thornel 300 graphite fiber were also evaluated and significant increases in modulus, flexure, and compressive strengths were observed.

  11. Mechanical Properties of Continuous Fiber Reinforced Zirconium Diboride Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuffle, Kevin; Creegan, Peter; Nowell, Steven; Bull, Jeffrey D.; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Continuous fiber reinforced zirconium diboride matrix composites, SCS-9a-(RBSiCZrB2)matrix, are being developed for leading edge, rocket nozzle and turbine engine applications. Recently, the composite materials have been characterized for tensile properties to 1250 C, the highest temperature tested. The tensile properties are fiber dominated as the matrix is microcracked on fabrication, but favorable failure characteristic are observed. Compression and shear mechanical testing results will be reported if completed. The effects of fiber volume fraction and matrix density on mechanical properties will be discussed. The target applications of the materials will be discussed. Specific testing being performed towards qualification for these applications will be included.

  12. The prospects for composites based on boron fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naslain, R.

    1978-01-01

    The fabrication of boron filaments and the production of composite materials consisting of boron filaments and organic or metallic matrices are discussed. Problem involving the use of tungsten substrates in the filament fabrication process, the protection of boron fibers with diffusion barrier cladings, and the application of alloy additives in the matrix to lessen the effects of diffusion are considered. Data on the kinetics of the boron fiber/matrix interaction at high temperatures, and the influence of the fiber/matrix interaction on the mechanical properties of the composite are presented.

  13. Composite-embedded optical fibers for communication links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, R. E.; Mitkus, V. V.; Jones, K. J.; Hixson, R. L.

    1989-12-01

    A design concept is examined in which fiber optics embedded in a composite material for avionics packaging will serve as communication links (rather than as stress sensors as in so called 'smart skins/structures'). Attention is given to the material processing technologies, optical fibers, connectors, and composite materials suitable for this purpose. It is emphasized that embedded optical fibers will make it possible to increase signal throughput and the security from EMI/EMP, and will become part of the avionic structure without affecting its shape and volume (or significantly increase its weight).

  14. Bounds on the Strength Distribution of Unidirectional Fiber Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Mahesh, S.; Beyerlein, I.J.; Phoenix, S.L.

    1999-06-13

    Failure mechanisms under tensile loading of unidirectional fiber composites comprising of Weibull fibers embedded in a matrix are studied using Monte-Carlo simulations. Two fundamental mechanisms of failure are recognized--stress concentration driven failure and strength driven failure. It is shown that the cumulative distribution function for composite strength predicted by the stressconcentration-driven failure and strength-driven failure form apparent upper and lower bounds respectively and also that failure mechanism switches from one to the other as fiber strength variability changes.

  15. Bounds on the strength distribution of unidirectional fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Mahesh, S.; Phoenix, S.L.; Beyerlein, I.J.

    1999-06-01

    Failure mechanisms under tensile loading of unidirectional fiber composites comprising of Weibull fibers embedded in a matrix are studied using Monte-Carlo simulations. Two fundamental mechanisms of failure are recognized--stress concentration driven failure and strength driven failure. It is shown that the cumulative distribution function for composite strength predicted by the stress concentration -driven failure and strength-driven failure form apparent upper and lower bounds respectively and also that failure mechanism switches from one to the other as fiber strength variability changes.

  16. Diaphragm forming of carbon-fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Smiley, A.J.

    1988-01-01

    The experimental work consisted of fabricating composite components and identifying the effects of the forming parameters on the resulting thickness profiles and fiber orientation. The transverse fiber flow produced thickness variations and fiber-orientation fields peculiar to the tool-surface geometry, diaphragm deformation behavior, and laminate configuration. The transverse flow in the surface-ply layers was dominated by the stretching diaphragms. In the interior ply layers the flow appeared to be driven by the pressure gradients produced at the contact points. The analytical work consisted of the development of a diaphragm-forming process model which employed engineering mechanics and fiber kinematics to predict post-formed thickness variations and fiber orientation fields of axisymmetric composite components. The flow analysis determined the thickness variation and flow velocities in the transverse fiber direction. The flow velocities were employed to determine the relative fiber realignment. The realignment of the fibers was then utilized in a geometric mapping procedure to determine the fiber-orientation field. Overall, the predictions on interior-ply and surface-ply layer orientations matched reasonably well with the experimental observations.

  17. Patterned fiber composites: Process, characterization, and damping performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, William F.

    1999-11-01

    This dissertation reports the invention, characterization, and performance of a new fiber-reinforced material system termed "Patterned Fiber Composites". The invention of a process and a machine concept that is capable of producing resin pre-impregnated composite materials (pre-preg) with a controlled pattern in the lay of the reinforcing fiber is reported. Two laminates with opposing wavy fiber patterns are combined with a viscoelastic layer in a sandwiched construction. When this combination is placed under load the fibers tend to straighten and cause differential shearing in the sandwiched viscoelastic layer. This shearing action causes stretching of the long chain polymers in the viscoelastic which in turn generates heat, dissipates energy, and causes damping in the structure. Carbon fiber based material has been produced with the process, characterized, and used in tubular structures to demonstrate the capabilities of this new material system. Changes to the rule-of-mixtures have been proposed which will account for the unique properties of wavy patterned fiber composites while retaining their applicability in the more general sense to analyze conventional composites. An investigation into the capabilities of existing finite element analysis programs has shown areas where changes are required to fix deficiencies in the programs. Methodologies are proposed that should allow more efficient solution methods. A practical boring bar has been designed and built with this new material that exhibited damping improvements of 1200% over conventional steel carbide bars while retaining high stiffness.

  18. The HFIR 14J irradiation SiC/SiC composite and SiC fiber collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, G.E.; Jones, R.H.; Kohyama, Akira; Katoh, Yutai; Hasegawa, Akira; Snead, L.; Scholz, R.

    1998-09-01

    A short introduction with references establishes the current status of research and development of SiC{sub f}/SiC composites for fusion energy systems with respect to several key issues. The SiC fiber and composite specimen types selected for the JUPITER 14J irradiation experiment are presented together with the rationale for their selection.

  19. Durability-Based Design Properties of Reference Crossply Carbon-Fiber Composite

    SciTech Connect

    Corum, J.M.

    2001-04-16

    This report provides recommended durability-based design properties and criteria for a crossply carbon-fiber composite for possible automotive structural applications. Although the composite utilized aerospace-grade carbon-fiber reinforcement, it was made by a rapid-molding process suitable for high-volume automotive use. The material is the first in a planned progression of candidate composites to be characterized as part of an Oak Ridge National Laboratory project entitled Durability of Carbon-Fiber Composites. The overall goal of the project, which is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies and is closely coordinated with the Advanced Composites Consortium, is to develop durability-driven design data and criteria to assure the long-term integrity of carbon-fiber-based composite systems for automotive structural applications. The composite addressed in this report is a ({+-}45{degree})3S crossply consisting of continuous Thornel T300 fibers in a Baydur 420 IMR urethane matrix. This composite is highly anisotropic with two dominant fiber orientations--0/90{degree} and {+-}45{degree}. Properties and models were developed for both orientations. This document is in two parts. Part 1 provides design data and correlations, while Part 2 provides the underlying experimental data and models. The durability issues addressed include the effects of short-time, cyclic, and sustained loadings; temperature; fluid environments; and low-energy impacts (e.g., tool drops and kickups of roadway debris) on deformation, strength, and stiffness. Guidance for design analysis, time-independent and time-dependent allowable stresses, rules for cyclic loadings, and damage-tolerance design guidance are provided.

  20. Designing for fiber composite structural durability in hygrothermomechanical environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    A methodology is described which can be used to design/analyze fiber composite structures subjected to complex hygrothermomechanical environments. This methodology includes composite mechanics and advanced structural analysis methods (finite element). Select examples are described to illustrate the application of the available methodology. The examples include: (1) composite progressive fracture; (2) composite design for high cycle fatigue combined with hot-wet conditions; and (3) general laminate design.

  1. New composite fiber-optic overhead ground wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, S.; Kitayama, Y.; Ona, A.; Shimada, S.; Kikuta, T.

    1986-11-01

    A composite fiber-optic overhead ground wire (OPGW) has already been used commercially. Most of the electric power companies have the plans to establish new telecommunication networks by means of OPGW, and it is greatly needed to develop OPGW which has a maximum number of fibers for specific ground wire size with low transmission loss, easy handling and higher reliability. We have developed New OPGW, which satisfies these demands. It has the following features: (1) 18 fibers within 75 sq mm ground wire. (2) The fiber is a pure silica core and a fluorine-doped cladding single mode fiber with the average transmission loss of 0.4 dB/km at 1.3 micron. (3) Six fibers are stranded into a compact bunch and three bunches are housed in the spiral grooves of an aluminum spacer.

  2. Inspection and evaluation of dry fibers in thick composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayal, Vinay; Chakrapani, Sunil Kishore; Barnard, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the investigation of dry fibers in thick composites. Dry fibers can be defined as lack of epoxy in localized regions. These local regions act as potential defects in thick composites under compressive loads and act as an initiation point for defects such as matrix cracking and delamination. Detection and characterization of dryness in glass/epoxy composites, with thickness greater than one inch, is presented in this paper. One inch samples with dry fibers were fabricated and tested. Detection is carried out with the help of air coupled ultrasonics in both through transmission and singled sided inspection. To characterize the amount of epoxy, time of flight data was correlated with density and fiber volume fraction. Based on the observations a technique was developed for characterization of dryness.

  3. FIBER-TEX 1991: The Fifth Conference on Advanced Engineering Fibers and Textile Structures for Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, J.D.

    1992-10-01

    This document is a compilation of papers presented at a joint NASA/North Carolina State University/DoD/Clemson University/Drexel University conference on Fibers, Textile Technology, and Composites Structures held at the College of Textiles Building on Centennial Campus of North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina on October 15-17, 1991. Conference papers presented information on advanced engineering fibers, textile processes and structures, structural fabric production, mechanics and characteristics of woven composites, pultruded composites, and the latest requirements for the use of textiles in the production of composite materials and structures. Separate abstracts have been prepared for papers in this report.

  4. FIBER-TEX 1992: The Sixth Conference on Advanced Engineering Fibers and Textile Structures for Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, John D. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The FIBER-TEX 1992 proceedings contain the papers presented at the conference held on 27-29 Oct. 1992 at Drexel University. The conference was held to create a forum to encourage an interrelationship of the various disciplines involved in the fabrication of materials, the types of equipment, and the processes used in the production of advanced composite structures. Topics discussed were advanced engineering fibers, textile processes and structures, structural fabric production, mechanics and characteristics of woven composites, and the latest requirements for the use of textiles in the production of composite materials and structures as related to global activities focused on textile structural composites.

  5. FIBER-TEX 1991: The Fifth Conference on Advanced Engineering Fibers and Textile Structures for Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, John D. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    This document is a compilation of papers presented at a joint NASA/North Carolina State University/DoD/Clemson University/Drexel University conference on Fibers, Textile Technology, and Composites Structures held at the College of Textiles Building on Centennial Campus of North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina on October 15-17, 1991. Conference papers presented information on advanced engineering fibers, textile processes and structures, structural fabric production, mechanics and characteristics of woven composites, pultruded composites, and the latest requirements for the use of textiles in the production of composite materials and structures.

  6. Fatigue damage criteria - Matrix, fibers and interfaces of continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1988-01-01

    Continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites (MMC) are projected for use in high temperature, stiffness critical parts that will be subjected to cyclic loadings. Depending on the relative fatigue behavior of the fiber and matrix, and the interface properties, the failure modes of MMC can be grouped into four catagories: (1) matrix dominated, (2) fiber dominated, (3) self-similar damage growth, and (4) fiber/matrix interfacial failures. These four types of damage are discussed and illustrated by examples. The emphasis is on the fatigue of unnotched laminates.

  7. Smart pultruded composite reinforcements incorporating fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalamkarov, Alexander L.; Fitzgerald, Stephen B.; MacDonald, Douglas O.; Georgiades, Anastasis V.

    1998-03-01

    The issues of processing, evaluation, experimental testing, and modeling of smart fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite materials are discussed. The specific application in view is the use of smart composite reinforcements for a monitoring of innovative bridges and structures. The pultrusion technology for the fabrication of fiber reinforced polymer composites with embedded fiber optic senors (Fabry Perot and Bragg Grating) is developed. The optical sensor/composite material interaction is studied. The tensile and shear properties of the pultruded carbon/vinylester and glass/vinylester rods with and without optical fibers are determined. The microstructural analysis of the smart pultruded FRP is carried out. The interfaces between the resin matrix and the acrylate and polyimide coated optical fibers are examined and interpreted in terms of the coatings's ability to resist high temperature and its compatibility with resin matrix. The strain monitoring during the pultrusion of composite parts using the embedded fiber optic sensors was performed. The strain readings from the sensors and the extensometer were compared in mechanical tensile tests.

  8. Fabrication of Fiber-Reinforced Celsian Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Setlock, John A.

    2000-01-01

    A method has been developed for the fabrication of small diameter, multifilament tow fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites. Its application has been successfully demonstrated for the Hi-Nicalon/celsian system. Strong and tough celsian matrix composites, reinforced with BN/SiC-coated Hi-Nicalon fibers, have been fabricated by infiltrating the fiber tows with the matrix slurry, winding the tows on a drum, cutting and stacking of the prepreg tapes in the desired orientation, and hot pressing. The monoclinic celsian phase in the matrix was produced in situ, during hot pressing, from the 0.75BaO-0.25SrO-Al2O3-2SiO2 mixed precursor synthesized by solid state reaction from metal oxides. Hot pressing resulted in almost fully dense fiber-reinforced composites. The unidirectional composites having approx. 42 vol% of fibers exhibited graceful failure with extensive fiber pullout in three-point bend tests at room temperature. Values of yield stress and strain were 435 +/- 35 MPa and 0.27 +/- 0.01 percent, respectively, and ultimate strengths of 900 +/- 60 MPa were observed. The Young's modulus of the composites was measured to be 165 +/- 5 GPa.

  9. Fungal degradation of fiber-reinforced composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gu, J. D.; Lu, C.; Mitchell, R.; Thorp, K.; Crasto, A.

    1997-01-01

    As described in a previous report, a fungal consortium isolated from degraded polymeric materials was capable of growth on presterilized coupons of five composites, resulting in deep penetration into the interior of all materials within five weeks. Data describing the utilization of composite constituents as nutrients for the microflora are described in this article. Increased microbial growth was observed when composite extract was incubated with the fungal inoculum at ambient temperatures. Scanning electron microscopic observation of carbon fibers incubated with a naturally developed population of microorganisms showed the formation of bacterial biofilms on the fiber surfaces, suggesting possible utilization of the fiber chemical sizing as carbon and energy sources. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used to monitor the phenomena occurring at the fiber-matrix interfaces. Significant differences were observed between inoculated and sterile panels of the composite materials. A progressive decline in impedance was detected in the inoculated panels. Several reaction steps may be involved in the degradation process. Initial ingress of water into the resin matrix appeared to be followed by degradation of fiber surfaces, and separation of fibers from the resin matrix. This investigation suggested that composite materials are susceptible to microbial attack by providing nutrients for growth.

  10. SIZE EFFECTS IN THE TENSILE STRENGTH OF UNIDIRECTIONAL FIBER COMPOSITES

    SciTech Connect

    M. SIVASAMBU; ET AL

    1999-08-01

    Monte Carlo simulation and theoretical modeling are used to study the statistical failure modes in unidirectional composites consisting of elastic fibers in an elastic matrix. Both linear and hexagonal fiber arrays are considered, forming 2D and 3D composites, respectively. Failure is idealized using the chain-of-bundles model in terms of {delta}-bundles of length {delta}, which is the length-scale of fiber load transfer. Within each {delta}-bundle, fiber load redistribution is determined by local load-sharing models that approximate the in-plane fiber load redistribution from planar break clusters as predicted from 2D and 3D shear-lag models. As a result these models are 1D and 2D, respectively. Fiber elements have random strengths following either the Weibull or the power-law distribution with shape and scale parameters {rho} and {sigma}{sub {delta}}, respectively. Simulations of {delta}-bundle failure, reveal two regimes. When fiber strength variability is low (roughly {rho} > 2) the dominant failure mode is by growing clusters of fiber breaks up to instability. When this variability is high (roughly 0 < {rho} < 1) cluster formation is suppressed by a dispersed fiber failure mode. For these two cases, closed-form approximations to the strength distribution of a {delta}-bundle are developed under the local load-sharing model and an equal load-sharing model of Daniels, respectively. The results compare favorably with simulations on {delta}-bundles with up to 1500 fibers. The location of the transition in terms of {rho} is affected by the upper tail properties of the fiber strength distributions as well as the number of fibers.

  11. Long-Fiber Thermoplastic Injection Molded Composites: from Process Modeling to Property Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Holbery, Jim D.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Smith, Mark T.

    2005-09-01

    Recently, long-fiber filled thermoplastics have become a great interest to the automotive industry since these materials offer much better property performance (e.g. elastic moduli, strength, durability…) than their short-fiber analogues, and they can be processed through injection molding with some specific tool design. However, in order that long-fiber thermoplastic injection molded composites can be used efficiently for automotive applications, there is a tremendous need to develop process and constitutive models as well as computational tools to predict the microstructure of the as-formed composite, and its resulting properties and macroscopic responses from processing to the final product. The microstructure and properties of such a composite are governed by i) flow-induced fiber orientation, ii) fiber breakage during injection molding, and iii) processing conditions (e,g. pressure, mold and melt temperatures, mold geometries, injection speed, etc.). This paper highlights our efforts to address these challenging issues. The work is an integrated part of a research program supported by the US Department of Energy, which includes • The development of process models for long-fiber filled thermoplastics, • The construction of an interface between process modeling and property prediction as well as the development of new constitutive models to perform linear and nonlinear structural analyses, • Experimental characterization of model parameters and verification of the model predictions.

  12. The dynamic response of carbon fiber-filled polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dattelbaum, D. M.; Gustavsen, R. L.; Sheffield, S. A.; Stahl, D. B.; Scharff, R. J.; Rigg, P. A.; Furmanski, J.; Orler, E. B.; Patterson, B.; Coe, J. D.

    2012-08-01

    The dynamic (shock) responses of two carbon fiber-filled polymer composites have been quantified using gas gun-driven plate impact experimentation. The first composite is a filament-wound, highly unidirectional carbon fiber-filled epoxy with a high degree of porosity. The second composite is a chopped carbon fiber- and graphite-filled phenolic resin with little-to-no porosity. Hugoniot data are presented for the carbon fiber-epoxy (CE) composite to 18.6 GPa in the through-thickness direction, in which the shock propagates normal to the fibers. The data are best represented by a linear Rankine-Hugoniot fit: Us = 2.87 + 1.17 ×up(ρ0 = 1.536g/cm3). The shock wave structures were found to be highly heterogeneous, both due to the anisotropic nature of the fiber-epoxy microstructure, and the high degree of void volume. Plate impact experiments were also performed on a carbon fiber-filled phenolic (CP) composite to much higher shock input pressures, exceeding the reactants-to-products transition common to polymers. The CP was found to be stiffer than the filament-wound CE in the unreacted Hugoniot regime, and transformed to products near the shock-driven reaction threshold on the principal Hugoniot previously shown for the phenolic binder itself. [19] On-going research is focused on interrogating the direction-dependent dyanamic response and dynamic failure strength (spall) for the CE composite in the TT and 0∘ (fiber) directions.

  13. Adherence of Streptococcus mutans to Fiber-Reinforced Filling Composite and Conventional Restorative Materials

    PubMed Central

    Lassila, Lippo V.J; Garoushi, Sufyan; Tanner, Johanna; Vallittu, Pekka K; Söderling, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. The aim was to investigate the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) to a short glass fibers reinforced semi-IPN polymer matrix composite resin. The effect of surface roughness on adhesion was also studied. For comparison, different commercial restorative materials were also evaluated. Materials and Methods. Experimental composite FC resin was prepared by mixing 22.5 wt% of short E-glass fibers, 22.5 wt% of IPN-resin and 55 wt% of silane treated silica fillers using high speed mixing machine. Three direct composite resins (Z250, Grandio and Nulite), resin-modified glass ionomers (Fuji II LC), amalgam (ANA 2000), fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) (everStick and Ribbond), and pre-fabricated ceramic filling insert (Cerana class 1) were tested in this study. Enamel and dentin were used as controls. The specimens (n=3/group) with or without saliva were incubated in a suspension of S. mutans allowing initial adhesion to occur. For the enumeration of cells on the disc surfaces as colony forming units (CFU) the vials with the microbe samples were thoroughly Vortex-treated and after serial dilutions grown anaerobically for 2 days at +37°C on Mitis salivarius agars (Difco) containing bacitracin. Bacterial adhesion was also evaluated by using scanning electron microscopy. Surface roughness (Ra) of the materials was also determined using a surface profilometer. All results were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results. Composite FC resin and other commercial restorative materials showed similar adhesion of S. mutans, while adhesion to dentin and enamel was significantly higher (p<0.05). Surface roughness had no effect on bacterial adhesion. Saliva coating significantly decreased the adhesion for all materials (p<0.05). Composite FC resin had a significantly higher Ra value than control groups (p<0.05). Conclusions. Short fiber-reinforced composite with semi-IPN polymer matrix revealed similar S. mutans adhesion than

  14. Adherence of Streptococcus mutans to Fiber-Reinforced Filling Composite and Conventional Restorative Materials.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Lippo V J; Garoushi, Sufyan; Tanner, Johanna; Vallittu, Pekka K; Söderling, Eva

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES.: The aim was to investigate the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) to a short glass fibers reinforced semi-IPN polymer matrix composite resin. The effect of surface roughness on adhesion was also studied. For comparison, different commercial restorative materials were also evaluated. MATERIALS AND METHODS.: Experimental composite FC resin was prepared by mixing 22.5 wt% of short E-glass fibers, 22.5 wt% of IPN-resin and 55 wt% of silane treated silica fillers using high speed mixing machine. Three direct composite resins (Z250, Grandio and Nulite), resin-modified glass ionomers (Fuji II LC), amalgam (ANA 2000), fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) (everStick and Ribbond), and pre-fabricated ceramic filling insert (Cerana class 1) were tested in this study. Enamel and dentin were used as controls. The specimens (n=3/group) with or without saliva were incubated in a suspension of S. mutans allowing initial adhesion to occur. For the enumeration of cells on the disc surfaces as colony forming units (CFU) the vials with the microbe samples were thoroughly Vortex-treated and after serial dilutions grown anaerobically for 2 days at +37 degrees C on Mitis salivarius agars (Difco) containing bacitracin. Bacterial adhesion was also evaluated by using scanning electron microscopy. Surface roughness (Ra) of the materials was also determined using a surface profilometer. All results were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). RESULTS.: Composite FC resin and other commercial restorative materials showed similar adhesion of S. mutans, while adhesion to dentin and enamel was significantly higher (p<0.05). Surface roughness had no effect on bacterial adhesion. Saliva coating significantly decreased the adhesion for all materials (p<0.05). Composite FC resin had a significantly higher Ra value than control groups (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS.: Short fiber-reinforced composite with semi-IPN polymer matrix revealed similar S. mutans adhesion

  15. Effects of fiber bridging and fiber fracture on fatigue cracking in a titanium-matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, D.J.; Hillberry, B.M.

    1997-12-31

    Continuous-fiber titanium-matrix composites (TMCs) are being considered for a number of aerospace structures where high specific strength and stiffness are required at elevated temperatures. Potential applications include advanced gas turbine components and hypersonic aircraft structures. To design lightweight, damage-tolerant TMC structures, an understanding of fatigue crack propagation in TMCs is necessary. Here, constant amplitude fatigue tests were performed on [0]{sub 4} and [0/90]{sub s}SCS-6/TIMETAL 21S titanium-matrix composite specimens to study fiber bridging of matrix fatigue cracks. Crack length was monitored throughout the tests, and displacements near the crack surface were measured periodically by placing an Elber gage (1.5-mm gage length point extensometer) across the crack at a number of positions. Specimens were removed prior to failure and mechanically polished to the first layer of fibers and the extent of fiber bridging observed. While some cracks were fully bridged, other cracks contained broken fibers among the intact, bridging fibers. A model has been developed to study the mechanics of a cracked unidirectional composite with any combination of intact and broken fibers in the wake of the matrix crack. Displacements near the crack surface predicted by the model agree with the Elber gage measurements for cracks that were fully bridged. Predictions were also performed for bridged cracks with discrete fiber breaks in the crack wake based on the geometry observed after polishing with good correlation between the predictions and the experimental measurements.

  16. Effects of fiber, matrix, and interphase on carbon fiber composite compression strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nairn, John A.; Harper, Sheila I.; Bascom, Willard D.

    1994-01-01

    The major goal of this project was to obtain basic information on compression failure properties of carbon fiber composites. To do this, we investigated fiber effects, matrix effects, and fiber/matrix interface effects. Using each of nine fiber types, we prepared embedded single-fiber specimens, single-ply specimens, and full laminates. From the single-fiber specimens, in addition to the standard fragmentation test analysis, we were able to use the low crack density data to provide information about the distribution of fiber flaws. The single-ply specimens provided evidence of a correlation between the size of kink band zones and the quality of the interface. Results of the laminate compression experiments mostly agreed with the results from single-ply experiments, although the ultimate compression strengths of laminates were higher. Generally, these experiments showed a strong effect of interfacial properties. Matrix effects were examined using laminates subjected to precracking under mixed-mode loading conditions. A large effect of precracking conditions on the mode 1 toughness of the laminates was found. In order to control the properties of the fiber/matrix interface, we prepared composites of carbon fiber and polycarbonate and subjected these to annealing. The changes in interfacial properties directly correlated with changes in compression strength.

  17. Lifetimes of fiber composites under sustained tensile loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiao, T. T.; Sherry, R. J.; Chiao, C. C.

    1977-01-01

    A description is presented of the test techniques which have been used to apply sustained uniaxial tensile loading to fiber/epoxy composites. The fiber types used include S-glass, aramid, graphite, and beryllium wire. The applied load vs lifetime data for four composite materials are presented in graphs. Attention is given to a statistical analysis of data, a performance comparison of various composites, the age effect on the strength of composites, the applicability of the lifetime data to complex composites, and aspects of accelerated test method development. It is found that the lifetime of a composite under a sustained load varies widely. Depending on the composite system, the minimum life typically differs from the maximum life by a factor of 100 to 1000. It is in this connection recommended that a use of average life data should be avoided in serious design calculations.

  18. Fabrication of sisal fibers/epoxy composites with liquid crystals polymer grafted on sisal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Q. Y.; Lu, S. R.; Song, L. F.; Li, Y. Q.

    2016-07-01

    In this word, microcrystalline cellulose fibers (MCFs), extracted from sisal fibers, were treated with function end-group hyperbranched liquid crystals (HLP). This work brought some insights into the successful surface modification in epoxy composite with HLP. The HLP-MCFs/epoxy composites are studied systematically. The HLP - MCFs/epoxy composites were studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), polarizing microscope (POM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and mechanical properties analysis. The results reveal that the reinforcement of EP composites was carried out by adding HLP-MCFs. In particular, with 1.0 wt% filler loading, the flexural strength, tensile strength, impact strength and flexural modulus of the HLP-MCFs/EP composites were increased by 60%, 69%, 130%, and 192%, respectively. It anticipates that our current work exploits more efficient methods to overcome the few nature fiber/polymer (NPC) adhesion in the interface region and provides implications for the engineering applications of the development of NPC.

  19. Creep rupture of an oxide/oxide composite fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, Vincent Harold

    Due to their low-cost and thermal stability, alumina-based tow-fibers are currently being considered for use in elevated temperature composites. Unfortunately, the fine grain size of the filaments results in extremely poor creep resistance when subjected to high temperature loading. The recent development of a tow-based composite fiber offers a possible solution for improving the creep performance of these materials. To explore the viability of this approach, the creep response of an oxide/oxide composite fiber has been determined through a series of uniaxial creep tests. Despite the high porosity content of the alumina matrix, significant improvements in both steady-state creep rate and creep lifetimes were observed for the composite fibers relative to the as-received tows. The creep strength was found to be strongly sensitive to sintering temperature but only mildly dependent on matrix volume fraction within the range studied. A transition from tough to brittle fracture was also observed in the composite fiber with increasing sintering temperature. An analytical model was developed for predicting the creep response of the as-received Nextel 610 tow. The strain-time history of the tow is generated using the power-law creep rate equation for a Nextel 610 single filament. The failure strain of the tow is predicted using a damage mechanics approach based on a Monkman-Grant type parameter. Predicted values of creep lifetime and failure strain are within 20% of those measured experimentally. The model is then extended to address the creep response of the composite fiber by incorporating the influence of composite fiber architecture, interfacial roughness, and clamping stresses on the reloading of failed filaments.

  20. Fiber-Reinforced Reactive Nano-Epoxy Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhong, Wei-Hong

    2011-01-01

    An ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene/ matrix interface based on the fabrication of a reactive nano-epoxy matrix with lower surface energy has been improved. Enhanced mechanical properties versus pure epoxy on a three-point bend test include: strength (25 percent), modulus (20 percent), and toughness (30 percent). Increased thermal properties include higher Tg (glass transition temperature) and stable CTE (coefficient of thermal expansion). Improved processability for manufacturing composites includes faster wetting rates on macro-fiber surfaces, lower viscosity, better resin infusion rates, and improved rheological properties. Improved interfacial adhesion properties with Spectra fibers by pullout tests include initial debonding force of 35 percent, a maximum pullout force of 25 percent, and energy to debond at 65 percent. Improved mechanical properties of Spectra fiber composites (tensile) aging resistance properties include hygrothermal effects. With this innovation, high-performance composites have been created, including carbon fibers/nano-epoxy, glass fibers/nano-epoxy, aramid fibers/ nano-epoxy, and ultra-high-molecularweight polyethylene fiber (UHMWPE).

  1. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composite (CFCC) Program: Gaseous Nitridation

    SciTech Connect

    R. Suplinskas G. DiBona; W. Grant

    2001-10-29

    Textron has developed a mature process for the fabrication of continuous fiber ceramic composite (CFCC) tubes for application in the aluminum processing and casting industry. The major milestones in this project are System Composition; Matrix Formulation; Preform Fabrication; Nitridation; Material Characterization; Component Evaluation

  2. An Assessment of Self-Healing Fiber Reinforced Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Joseph G., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Several reviews and books have been written concerning self-healing polymers over the last few years. These have focused primarily on the types of self-healing materials being studied, with minor emphasis given to composite properties. The purpose of this review is to assess the self-healing ability of these materials when utilized in fiber reinforced composites

  3. SiC Fiber-Reinforced Celsian Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    2003-01-01

    Celsian is a promising matrix material for fiber-reinforced composites for high temperature structural applications. Processing and fabrication of small diameter multifilament silicon carbide tow reinforced celsian matrix composites are described. Mechanical and microstructural properties of these composites at ambient and elevated temperatures are presented. Effects of high-temperature exposures in air on the mechanical behavior of these composites are also given. The composites show mechanical integrity up to 1100 C but degrade at higher temperatures in oxidizing atmospheres. A model has been proposed for the degradation of these composites in oxidizing atmospheres at high temperatures.

  4. Friction and wear behavior of graphite fiber reinforced polymide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.; Sliney, H. E.

    1977-01-01

    The friction and wear rate characteristics of 50/50 (weight percent) graphite fiber polyimide composites were studied by sliding metallic hemispherically tipped riders against disks made from the composites. Two different polyimides and two different graphite fibers were evaluated. Also studied were such variables as the effect of moisture in an air atmosphere; the effect of temperature; and the effect of different sliding speeds. In general, wear to the the metallic riders was negligible, and composite wear increased at a constant rate as a function of number of sliding cycles.

  5. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, Kunigal; Argade, Shyam

    2003-01-01

    This report presents a critical review of the processing techniques for fabricating continuous fiber-reinforced CMCs for possible applications at elevated temperatures. Some of the issues affecting durability of the composite materials such as fiber coatings and cracking of the matrix because of shrinkage in PIP-process are also examined. An assessment of the potential inexpensive processes is also provided. Finally three potential routes of manufacturing C/SiC composites using a technology that NC A&T developed for carbon/carbon composites are outlined. Challenges that will be encountered are also listed.

  6. Age hardening of 6061/alumina-silica fiber composite

    SciTech Connect

    Khangaonkar, P.R.; Shamsul, J.B.; Azmi, R.

    1994-12-31

    Continuous alumina-silica fiber (Altex of Sumitomo) which yields high performance composites with some aluminium alloys was tried for squeeze cast 6061 based composites with volume fractions of 0.5 and 0.32, and the matrix microhardness and resistivity changes during age hardening were studied. The matrix in the composites hardened much more than the unreinforced alloy. Microhardness increases of up to 70 VPN above the solution treated condition at various aging temperatures were observed. The resistivity variation indicated an appreciable state of internal stress which continued to persist even when hardness fell by overaging. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis indicated that the regions close to the fibers had a higher silicon content than the matrix, and amorphous silica in the fiber may have a role in the formation of an enriched layer which may help the bonding and strength in the composite.

  7. Puncture-Healing Thermoplastic Resin Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Keith L. (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Grimsley, Brian W. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Czabaj, Michael W. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A composite comprising a combination of a self-healing polymer matrix and a carbon fiber reinforcement is described. In one embodiment, the matrix is a polybutadiene graft copolymer matrix, such as polybutadiene graft copolymer comprising poly(butadiene)-graft-poly(methyl acrylate-co-acrylonitrile). A method of fabricating the composite is also described, comprising the steps of manufacturing a pre-impregnated unidirectional carbon fiber preform by wetting a plurality of carbon fibers with a solution, the solution comprising a self-healing polymer and a solvent, and curing the preform. A method of repairing a structure made from the composite of the invention is described. A novel prepreg material used to manufacture the composite of the invention is described.

  8. Long discontinuous fiber composite structure: Forming and structural mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pipes, R. B.; Santare, M. H.; Otoole, B. J.; Beaussart, A. J.; Deheer, D. C.; Okine, R. K.

    1991-01-01

    Cost effective composite structure has motivated the investigation of several new approaches to develop composite structure from innovative material forms. Among the promising new approaches is the conversion of planar sheet to components of complex curvature through sheet forming or stretch forming. In both cases, the potential for material stretch in the fiber direction appears to offer a clear advantage in formability over continuous fiber systems. In the present study, the authors have established a framework which allows the simulation of the anisotropic mechanisms of deformation of long discontinuous fiber laminates wherein the matrix phase is a viscous fluid. The initial study focuses upon the establishment of micromechanics models for prediction of the effective anisotropic viscosities of the oriented fiber assembly in a viscous matrix. Next, the developed constitutive relation is employed through an analogy with incompressible elasticity to exercise the finite element technique for determination of local fiber orientation and laminate thickness after forming. Results are presented for the stretch bending of a curved beam from an arbitrary composite laminate and the bulging of a clamped sheet. Structural analyses are conducted to determine the effect of microstructure on the performance of curved beams manufactured from long discontinuous fiber composites. For the purposes of this study, several curved beams with ideal and non-ideal microstructures are compared for response under pure bending. Material parameters are determined from a separate microstructural analysis.

  9. Durability of Cement Composites Reinforced with Sisal Fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jianqiang

    This dissertation focuses mainly on investigating the aging mechanisms and degradation kinetics of sisal fiber, as well as the approaches to mitigate its degradation in the matrix of cement composites. In contrast to previous works reported in the literature, a novel approach is proposed in this study to directly determine the fiber's degradation rate by separately studying the composition changes, mechanical and physical properties of the embedded sisal fibers. Cement hydration is presented to be a crucial factor in understanding fiber degradation behavior. The degradation mechanisms of natural fiber consist of mineralization of cell walls, alkali hydrolysis of lignin and hemicellulose, as well as the cellulose decomposition which includes stripping of cellulose microfibrils and alkaline hydrolysis of amorphous regions in cellulose chains. Two mineralization mechanisms, CH-mineralization and self-mineralization, are proposed. The degradation kinetics of sisal fiber in the cement matrix are also analyzed and a model to predict the degradation rate of cellulose for natural fiber embedded in cement is outlined. The results indicate that the time needed to completely degrade the cellulose in the matrix with cement replacement by 30wt.% metakaolin is 13 times longer than that in pure cement. A novel and scientific method is presented to determine accelerated aging conditions, and to evaluating sisal fiber's degradation rate and durability of natural fiber-reinforced cement composites. Among the static aggressive environments, the most effective approach for accelerating the degradation of natural fiber in cement composites is to soak the samples or change the humidity at 70 °C and higher temperature. However, the dynamic wetting and drying cycling treatment has a more accelerating effect on the alkali hydrolysis of fiber's amorphous components evidenced by the highest crystallinity indices, minimum content of holocellulose, and lowest tensile strength. Based on the

  10. Mechanical behavior and fatigue performance of SMA short fiber reinforced MMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Matar, Basem Jawad

    The mechanical behavior and performance of Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) short fiber NiTi reinforced Al was experimentally investigated for monotonic and fatigue test Al 6061 NiTi-SiC T6 was superior to unreinforced materials as well as to the reinforced Al T4. Taya three-dimensional model was performed on the monotonic tensile test at room temperature. It showed good agreement with experimental results. In order to utilize the compressive criterion for SMA, the NiTi reinforced Al composite was cooled at -10°C and prestrained at 1.2%. Beyond this limit composite suffered from damage. The net enhancement of SMA effect was around 10 MPa on composite yield stress. Results showed that the elastic constant for the composite did not change with loading and unloading suggesting that the inelastic behavior is plasticity. Further investigation on the inelastic behavior model as damage and/or plasticity by evaluating Poisson's ratio during loading was carried out by Adaptive Image Correlation Technique for Full-Field Strain Measurement. Poisson's ratio increased from around 0.33 to 0.5 demonstrating that it is plasticity that is responsible for the inelastic behavior. Scanning electron microscopy was also used and confirmed model results. The overall damage-behavior was quantified in terms of the post fatigue failure strength for low-cycle fatigue tests. Power law model was best to fit experimental findings.

  11. Polymer/carbon nanotube nano composite fibers--a review.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaodong; Kumar, Satish

    2014-05-14

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are regarded as ideal filler materials for polymeric fiber reinforcement due to their exceptional mechanical properties and 1D cylindrical geometry (nanometer-size diameter and very high aspect ratio). The reported processing conditions and property improvements of CNT reinforced polymeric fiber are summarized in this review. Because of CNT polymer interaction, polymer chains in CNTs' vicinity (interphase) have been observed to have more compact packing, higher orientation, and better mechanical properties than bulk polymer. Evidences of the existence of interphase polymers in composite fibers, characterizations of their structures, and fiber properties are summarized and discussed. Implications of interphase phenomena on a broader field of fiber and polymer processing to make much stronger materials are now in the early stages of exploration. Beside improvements in tensile properties, the presence of CNTs in polymeric fibers strongly affects other properties, such as thermal stability, thermal transition temperature, fiber thermal shrinkage, chemical resistance, electrical conductivity, and thermal conductivity. This paper will be helpful to better understand the current status of polymer/CNT fibers, especially high-performance fibers, and to find the most suitable processing techniques and conditions. PMID:24520802

  12. Strength distribution of reinforcing fibers in a Nicalon fiber/chemically vapor infiltrated silicon carbide matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckel, Andrew J.; Bradt, Richard C.

    1989-01-01

    The strength distribution of fibers within a two-dimensional laminate ceramic/ceramic composite consisting of an eight harness satin weave of Nicalon continuous fiber within a chemically vapor infiltrated SiC matrix was determined from analysis of the fracture mirrors of the fibers. Comparison of the fiber strengths and the Weibull moduli with those for Nicalon fibers prior to incorporation into composites suggests that possible fiber damage may occur either during the weaving or during another stage of the composite manufacture. Observations also indicate that it is the higher-strength fibers which experience the greatest extent of fiber pullout and thus make a larger contribution to the overall composite toughness than do the weaker fibers.

  13. Modelling of dimensional stability of fiber reinforced composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, H. T.; Hosangadi, A.

    1982-01-01

    Various methods of predicting the expansion and diffusion properties of composite laminates are reviewed. The prediction equations for continuous fiber composites can be applied to SMC composites as the effective fiber aspect ratio in the latter is large enough. The effect of hygrothermal expansion on the dimensional stability of composite laminates was demonstrated through the warping of unsymmetric graphite/epoxy laminates. The warping is very sensitive to the size of the panel, and to the moisture content which is in turn sensitive to the relative humidity in the environment. Thus, any long term creep test must be carried out in a humidity-controlled environment. Environmental effects in SMC composites and bulk polyester were studied under seven different environments. The SMC composites chosen are SMC-R25, SMC-R40, and SMC-R65.

  14. Compressive elastic modulus of natural fiber based binary composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widayani, Susanah, Y.; Utami, L. S.; Khotimah, S. N.; Viridi, S.

    2012-06-01

    The composites made of bamboo apus fiber - epoxy resin and charcoal - tapioca starch with several compositions have been synthesized. Bamboo fiber powder as the rest of cutting process was refined and filtered by mesh 40 before used. Epoxy resin 1021A and hardener 1021B has been used as resin. The synthesis of epoxy resin-based composites was carried out via simple mixing method by adding adequate 70% ethanol solution before drying. The 100 mesh-filtered dry charcoal was mixed with tapioca mixture before it was pressed and dried to produce briquette composites. To study the compressive elastic modulus of the composites, pressure tests using Mark 10 Pressure Test Machine have been carried out. It was found that all the composites show maximum compressive elastic modulus at certain component compositions. The maximum elastic modulus for bamboo fiber-epoxy resin, charcoal - epoxy resin and charcoal-tapioca starch were observed at 52.9%, 56.3%, and 25.0% of mass fraction of bamboo fiber, charcoal and tapioca starch, respectively.

  15. The effect of processing on strength of Nicalon fibers in Nicalon fiber-SiC matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, D.; Singh, J.P.

    1991-12-01

    Degradation of strength of Nicalon (silicon carbide) fibers during processing of Nicalon fiber-SiC matrix composites was studied. Strength distribution of as-fabricated Nicalon fibers was obtained via bundle tests. Whereas, strengths of fractured fibers in Nicalon fiber-reinforced SiC matrix composite specimens were estimated by measuring fracture mirror radii. Comparison of fracture probability plots indicate significant differences in the behavior of the as-fabricated fibers and those in the composite. Possible causes leading to these differences are discussed.

  16. Micromechanical modeling of fiber fragmentation in a single fiber metal matrix composite specimen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Jean E.

    Micromechanical models have been developed in this study to predict the longitudinal mechanical behavior of unidirectional continuous fiber composite materials under a uniaxial applied effective strain of sufficient magnitude to cause irreversible damage in the form of brittle fiber fracture, interface damage resulting in a compliant interphase region, and matrix plasticity. A single fiber composite (SFC) specimen that consists of a single silicon carbide fiber embedded in an aluminum matrix with a thin interphase layer was used to investigate these effects. The objective of this research was to create a micromechanical model to predict the longitudinal constitutive behavior of the composite as damage occurs and to determine if the interfacial shear stress can be estimated from the fiber fragment length at a given effective strain. The aluminum matrix was modeled as either linear elastic, elastic-perfectly plastic, linear strain hardening, or power-law strain hardening. Before fiber fracture, the interphase layer forms a perfect bond between the fiber and matrix. During fiber fracture, the interphase is damaged and the interfacial bond becomes imperfect. The imperfect interface may be compliant or compliant and weak, and was modeled as a spring layer with vanishing thickness. The fiber fragments are assumed to be uniformly distributed such that the fragment lengths are equal at each load level. The Weibull distribution was used to relate the fiber fragment length to the tensile strength of the fiber. An increase in the applied effective strain causes successive fiber fractures, in that the fragments become increasingly shorter. The SFCs studied had either no fiber fractures, one fracture, or successive fractures; one of the four matrix material types; and either perfect, compliant, or compliant and weak interfaces. The finite element method was used to provide numerical solutions for the state of stress and fiber length at a given applied effective strain which

  17. Resistivity of pristine and intercalated graphite fiber epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Hambourger, Paul D.; Slabe, Melissa E.

    1989-01-01

    Laminar composites were fabricated from pristine and bromine intercalated Amoco P-55, P-75, and P-100 graphite fibers and Hysol-Grafil EAG101-1 film epoxy. The thickness and r.f. eddy current resistivity of several samples were measured at grid points and averaged point by point to obtain final values. Although the values obtained this way have high precision (less than 3 percent deviation), the resistivity values appear to be 20 to 90 percent higher than resistivities measured on high aspect ratio samples using multi-point techniques, and by those predicted by theory. The temperature dependence of the resistivity indicates that the fibers are neither damaged nor deintercalated by the composite fabrication process. The resistivity of the composites is a function of sample thickness (i.e., resin content). Composite resistivity is dominated by fiber resistivity, so lowering the resistivity of the fibers, either through increased graphitization or intercalation, results in a lower composite resistivity. A modification of the simple rule of mixtures model appears to predict the conductivity of high aspect ratio samples measured along a fiber direction, but a directional dependence appears which is not predicted by the theory. The resistivity of these materials is clearly more complex than that of homogeneous materials.

  18. Time-dependent failure in fiber-reinforced composites by fiber degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Iyengar, N.; Curtin, W.A.

    1997-04-01

    The failure of fiber-reinforced ceramic and metal matrix composites under a fixed load for extended times occurs because of strength degradation in the constituent fibers. Specifically, the ceramic fibers possess a Weibull strength distribution caused by crack-like flaws, which can grow according to a power-law growth mechanism. Failure of individual fibers causes interfacial slippage and stress redistribution to unfailed fibers, which in turn accelerates the degradation rate of the remaining fibers, and culminates in abrupt failure of the composite after sufficient damage has accumulated. This sequence of events is modeled both analytically and numerically within the Global Load Sharing (GLS) approximation previously utilized for quasi-static loading. Analytically, a general constitutive model for the relationship between the stress on the damaged fiber bundle, the strain in the unbroken fibers, and the extent of damage, is combined with a time-dependent damage evolution equation derived from the slow-crack-growth kinetics to yield an integral equation for the strain vs time at fixed applied load. A simple, accurate but approximate relationship between applied load, time to failure, fiber Weibull modulus, and slow crack growth exponent is presented. The numerical simulations of the same degradation process verify the general accuracy of the failure time obtained from the analytic results. The remaining tensile strength after some time at load but prior to failure is also studied, and the simulation results generally exhibited a more sudden-death failure than the analytical predictions. A specific application to the failure of a Nicalon fiber composite is presented.

  19. Potential release of fibers from burning carbon composites. [aircraft fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, V. L.

    1980-01-01

    A comprehensive experimental carbon fiber source program was conducted to determine the potential for the release of conductive carbon fibers from burning composites. Laboratory testing determined the relative importance of several parameters influencing the amounts of single fibers released, while large-scale aviation jet fuel pool fires provided realistic confirmation of the laboratory data. The dimensions and size distributions of fire-released carbon fibers were determined, not only for those of concern in an electrical sense, but also for those of potential interest from a health and environmental standpoint. Fire plume and chemistry studies were performed with large pool fires to provide an experimental input into an analytical modelling of simulated aircraft crash fires. A study of a high voltage spark system resulted in a promising device for the detection, counting, and sizing of electrically conductive fibers, for both active and passive modes of operation.

  20. Graphite-Fiber-Reinforced Glass-Matrix Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Dicus, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    G/GI structural composite material made of graphite fibers embedded in borosilicate glass exhibit excellent strength, fracture toughness, and dimensional stability at elevated temperatures. It is made by passing graphite-fiber yarn through slurry containing suspension of fine glass particles in carrier liquid and winding on drum to produce prepegged uniaxial tape. After drying, tapes are cut into appropriate lengths and laid up in graphite die in desired stacking scheme. Stack is consolidated by hot pressing in furnace.

  1. Carbon fiber reinforced composites: their structural and thermal properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jingquan; Yang, Dehua

    2010-07-01

    More and more astronomical telescopes use carbon fiber reinforced composites (CFRP). CFRP has high stiffness, high strength, and low thermal expansion. However, they are not isotropic in performance. Their properties are direction dependent. This paper discusses, in detail, the structural and thermal properties of carbon fiber structure members, such as tubes, plates, and honeycomb sandwich structures. Comparisons are provided both from the structural point of view and from the thermal point of view.

  2. Longitudinal interfacial shearing of a unidirectional fiber composite

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, M.; Kurth, R.E.

    1995-12-31

    In this work, longitudinal interfacial shearing of a unidirectional fiber composite which sustains slippage at the interface between fiber and matrix is analyzed. Based on the experimental work on the fiber pull-out, the interface between the fiber and the matrix can be divided as three regions, depending on the longitudinal shear stress. These three regions are the bonded region, frictional slip regions, and the free-friction slid region. The problem is formulated as a nonlinear system of singular integral equations and solved numerically. It has been shown that when the longitudinal shear stress is less than a critical value, the fiber and the matrix can be assumed to be bonded perfectly. When the longitudinal shear stress is greater than this critical value, the slippage at the interface between the fiber and the interface takes place. From the recent fiber pull-out test, the phenomena of fiber frictional slip followed by free slide has been observed and analyzed. Thus, there are three stages for the deformation of interfacial shearing of a unidirectional fiber composite under longitudinal shearing. The first stage occurs when the applied longitudinal shear stress is less than the critical value corresponding to the onset of slippage. In the second stage, the interface is divided into two regions, namely, the bonded region and the frictional slip region in which the shear stress is either assumed to be constant or governed by a friction law. The third stage occurs when the longitudinal shear stress is greater than the critical value corresponding to free sliding or when the friction limit is exceeded. In the third stage, the interface between the fiber and the matrix can be divided into three regions, depending on the longitudinal shear stress. These three regions are the bonded region, the frictional slip regions, and the free-friction slide region in which the shear stress is neglected.

  3. Modeling of Euclidean braided fiber architectures to optimize composite properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong-Carroll, E.; Pastore, C.; Ko, F. K.

    1992-01-01

    Three-dimensional braided fiber reinforcements are a very effective toughening mechanism for composite materials. The integral yarn path inherent to this fiber architecture allows for effective multidirectional dispersion of strain energy and negates delamination problems. In this paper a geometric model of Euclidean braid fiber architectures is presented. This information is used to determine the degree of geometric isotropy in the braids. This information, when combined with candidate material properties, can be used to quickly generate an estimate of the available load-carrying capacity of Euclidean braids at any arbitrary angle.

  4. Modelling of the glass fiber length and the glass fiber length distribution in the compounding of short glass fiber-reinforced thermoplastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloke, P.; Herken, T.; Schöppner, V.; Rudloff, J.; Kretschmer, K.; Heidemeyer, P.; Bastian, M.; Walther, Dridger, A.

    2014-05-01

    The use of short glass fiber-reinforced thermoplastics for the production of highly stressed parts in the plastics processing industry has experienced an enormous boom in the last few years. The reasons for this are primarily the improvements to the stiffness and strength properties brought about by fiber reinforcement. These positive characteristics of glass fiber-reinforced polymers are governed predominantly by the mean glass fiber length and the glass fiber length distribution. It is not enough to describe the properties of a plastics component solely as a function of the mean glass fiber length [1]. For this reason, a mathematical-physical model has been developed for describing the glass fiber length distribution in compounding. With this model, it is possible on the one hand to optimize processes for the production of short glass fiber-reinforced thermoplastics, and, on the other, to obtain information on the final distribution, on the basis of which much more detailed statements can be made about the subsequent properties of the molded part. Based on experimental tests, it was shown that this model is able to accurately describe the change in glass fiber length distribution in compounding.

  5. Method of Manufacturing Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon Composite Valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Northam, G. Burton (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A method for forming a carbon composite valve for internal combustion engines is discussed. The process includes the steps of braiding carbon fiber into a rope thereby forming a cylindrically shaped valve stem portion and continuing to braid said fiber while introducing into the braiding carbon fiber rope a carbon matrix plug having an outer surface in a net shape of a valve head thereby forming a valve head portion. The said carbon matrix plug acting as a mandrel over which said carbon fiber rope is braided, said carbon fiber rope and carbon matrix plug forming a valve head portion suitable for mating with a valve seat; cutting said braided carbon valve stem portion at one end to form a valve tip and cutting said braided carbon fiber after said valve head portion to form a valve face and thus provide a composite valve preform; and densifying said preform by embedding the braided carbon in a matrix of carbon to convert said valve stem portion to a valve stem and said valve head portion to a valve head thereby providing said composite valve.

  6. Continuous fiber ceramic composites for energy related applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-07

    The US Department of Energy has established the Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCC) program to develop technology for the manufacture of CFCC`s for use in industrial applications where a reduction in energy usage or emissions could be realized. As part of this program, the Dow Chemical Company explored the manufacture of a fiber reinforced/self reinforced silicon nitride for use in industrial chemical processing. In Dow`s program, CFCC manufacturing technology was developed around traditional, cost effective, tape casting routes. Formulations were developed and coupled with unique processing procedures which enabled the manufacture of tubular green laminates of the dimension needed for the application. An evaluation of the effect of various fibers and fiber coatings on the properties of a fiber reinforced composites was also conducted. Results indicated that fiber coatings could provide composites exhibiting non-catastrophic failure and substantially improved toughness. However, an evaluation of these materials in industrial process environments showed that the material system chosen by Dow did not provide the required performance improvements to make replacement of current metallic components with CFCC components economically viable.

  7. In Vitro Study of Transverse Strength of Fiber Reinforced Composites

    PubMed Central

    Mosharraf, R.; Hashemi, Z.; Torkan, S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Reinforcement with fiber is an effective method for considerable improvement in flexural properties of indirect composite resin restorations. The aim of this in-vitro study was to compare the transverse strength of composite resin bars reinforced with pre-impregnated and non-impregnated fibers. Materials and Methods Thirty six bar type composite resin specimens (3×2×25 mm) were constructed in three groups. The first group was the control group (C) without any fiber reinforcement. The specimens in the second group (P) were reinforced with pre-impregnated fibers and the third group (N) with non-impregnated fibers. These specimens were tested by the three-point bending method to measure primary transverse strength. Data were statistically analyzed with one way ANOVA and Tukey’s tests. Results There was a significant difference among the mean primary transverse strength in the three groups (P<0.001). The post-hoc (Tukey) test showed that there was a significant difference between the pre-impregnated and control groups in their primary transverse strength (P<0.001). Regarding deflection, there was also a significant difference among the three groups (P=0.001). There were significant differences among the mean deflection of the control group and two other groups (PC&N<.001 and PC&P=.004), but there was no significant difference between the non-and pre-impregnated groups (PN&P=.813). Conclusion Within the limitations of this study, it was concluded that reinforcement with fiber considerably increased the transverse strength of composite resin specimens, but impregnation of the fiber used implemented no significant difference in the transverse strength of composite resin samples. PMID:22457836

  8. BASIC PROPERTIES OF REFERENCE CROSSPLY CARBON-FIBER COMPOSITE

    SciTech Connect

    Corum, J.M.

    2001-01-11

    This report provides basic in-air property data and correlations-tensile, compressive, shear, tensile fatigue, and tensile creep-for a reference carbon-fiber composite being characterized as a part of the Durability of Carbon-Fiber Composites Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The overall goal of the project, which is sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Advanced Automotive Materials and is closely coordinated with the Advanced Composites Consortium, is to develop durability-based design guidance for polymeric composites for automotive structural applications. The composite addressed here is a {+-}45{degree} crossply consisting of continuous Thornel T300 fibers in a Baydur 420 IMR urethane matrix. Basic tensile, compressive, and shear properties are tabulated for the temperature range from {minus}40 to 120 C. Fatigue response at room-temperature and 120 C are presented, and creep and creep rupture at room temperature only are reported. In all cases, two fiber orientations--0/90{degree} and {+-}45{degree}--relative to the specimen axes are addressed. The properties and correlations presented are interim in nature. They are intended as a baseline for planning a full durability test program on this reference composite.

  9. Research on interdigitated electrodes piezoelectric fiber composites by FEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yonggang; Shen, Xing; Zhao, Dongbiao; Qiu, Jinhao

    2007-07-01

    Interdigitated electrodes(IDEs) piezoelectric fiber composites is one kind of new smart materials which can be used as actuators in many applications because of its unique properties such as high induced stain and easy integration on curved surface of the base structure. In this paper, basic theories about composite were introduced briefly firstly. Then Electrostatic Field of this special electrode was analyzed. Finally, Finite Element Method is employed to numerically research the influence of thickness and material constants of polymer around electrodes, volume ratio of fibers and dimension of electrodes on the composite's induced strain and stress. The results show that the actuating strain and stress of interdigitated electrodes piezoelectric fiber composites can be improved much by employing polymer having high dielectric constant or decreasing the thickness of the polymer around IDEs. In addition, much higher induced strain and stress can be got by decreasing period of IDEs or increasing width of IDEs and volume ratio of fibers among the composite. At last, the maximum strain (280μɛ) was got from the numeric model of optimized samples, which is very large considering composite is not pure PZT ceramics.

  10. Failure mechanics of fiber composite notched charpy specimens. [stress analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1976-01-01

    A finite element stress analysis was performed to determine the stress variation in the vicinity of the notch and far field of fiber composites Charpy specimens (ASTM Standard). NASTRAN was used for the finite element analysis assuming linear behavior and equivalent static load. The unidirectional composites investigated ranged from Thornel 75 Epoxy to S-Glass/Epoxy with the fiber direction parallel to the long dimension of the specimen. The results indicate a biaxial stress state exists in (1) the notch vicinity which is dominated by transverse tensile and interlaminar shear and (2) near the load application point which is dominated by transverse compression and interlaminar shear. The results also lead to the postulation of hypotheses for the predominant failure modes, the fracture initiation, and the fracture process. Finally, the results indicate that the notched Charpy test specimen is not suitable for assessing the impact resistance of nonmetallic fiber composites directly.

  11. Lamb Wave Assessment of Fiber Volume Fraction in Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seale, Michael D.; Smith, Barry T.; Prosser, W. H.; Zalameda, Joseph N.

    1998-01-01

    Among the various techniques available, ultrasonic Lamb waves offer a convenient method of examining composite materials. Since the Lamb wave velocity depends on the elastic properties of a material, an effective tool exists to evaluate composites by measuring the velocity of these waves. Lamb waves can propagate over long distances and are sensitive to the desired in-plane elastic properties of the material. This paper discusses a study in which Lamb waves were used to examine fiber volume fraction variations of approximately 0.40-0.70 in composites. The Lamb wave measurements were compared to fiber volume fractions obtained from acid digestion tests. Additionally, a model to predict the fiber volume fraction from Lamb wave velocity values was evaluated.

  12. Stress analysis of carbon fiber embedded composite material of rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, O.; Taya, M.

    1995-12-31

    Thermo-mechanical properties of a composite of rubber embedded by carbon fill has been studied from the viewpoint of developing an electric device. The objective of the present study is to show stress analysis of carbon fiber embedded composite material of rubber by using a mixed-type finite element method. Based on the condition o plane strain, the geometry of composite material is taken as the two types of orientation of carbon fiber, which are distributed regularly according the specified volume fraction along the horizontal and vertical directions in the base material of rubber. The loading condition is assumed to be the two types of axial and shearing deformations. Through the calculated results of equivalent and mean stress distributions and the load-deflection curve, effects of the geometry size, the carbon fiber orientation and the loading condition are clarified. The results for the typical axial deformation is compared with the experimental results.

  13. Engineered Polymer Composites Through Electrospun Nanofiber Coating of Fiber Tows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohlman, Lee W.

    2013-01-01

    Toughening and other property enhancements of composite materials are typically implemented by-modifying the bulk properties of the constituents, either the fiber or matrix materials. This often leads to difficulties in processing and higher material costs. Many composites consist of tows or yarns (thousands of individual fibers) that are either filament wound or processed into a fabric by weaving or braiding. The matrix material can be added to the tow or fabric before final processing, resulting in a prepreg material, or infused into the fiber material during final processing by a variety of methods. By using a direct electrospun deposition method to apply thermoplastic nanofiber to the surface of the tows, the tow-tow interface in the resulting composite can be modified while using otherwise conventional materials and handling processes. Other materials of interest could also be incorporated into the electrospun precursor.

  14. Toughened Matrix SiC Fiber Reinforced Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Stanley R.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Morscher, Gregory N.; Kiser, James D.

    2005-01-01

    First matrix cracking stress is a critical parameter for application of Sic fiber reinforced composites in highly stressed, environmentally demanding applications such as turbine blades. High matrix fracture toughness is a key property that contributes to high composite fracture stress. Silicon nitride offers reduced matrix elastic modulus, lower coefficient of thermal expansion, and potentially high fracture toughness compared to Sic matrices. All of these factors can be used to advantage to increase matrix fracture stress. As a first model system we are pursuing toughened silicon nitride matrix composites reinforced with SCS-9 fibers. Fabrication is by tape casting the matrix plies and tape lay-up with fiber plies followed by hot pressing at 1800 C. Progress toward this end will be reported.

  15. Effects of interphase on fiber fracture in a single fiber composite specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.E.; Qu, J.

    1995-12-31

    A single fiber composite (SFC) specimen containing a silicon carbide fiber in an aluminum matrix is used to investigate the effect of an interphase layer between the fiber and the matrix. The interphase layer consists of a reaction zone between the fiber and the matrix that occurs during fabrication. The interphase layer, when damaged during fiber fracture, introduces imperfect interfacial bonding between the fiber and the matrix. The effect of imperfect interfacial bonding is qualified in this study by evaluating the tensile stiffness degradation and the nonlinear effective stress-strain relationship caused by successive fiber fracture for an SFC subjected to axial tension. The finite element method (FEM) is used to obtain numerical solutions for the stress and strain fields in the SFC specimens for various fiber fragmentation lengths under a prescribed axial displacement loading. The fiber fractures are assumed to be uniformly distributed such that the fragment lengths are equal at each given load level. The Weibull strength distribution is used to relate the fiber fragment length to the tensile strength of the brittle fiber. The FEM stress and strain results are used to calculate the effective modulus of the SFC, which characterizes the degradation in tensile stiffness caused by successive fiber fracture. The effective stress is determined for a given fracture density using the effective applied strain and the corresponding effective modulus. The final result is the relationship between the effective stress and effective strain. Qualitative comparisons of the stiffness degradation and the effective stress-strain relationship are made between models with perfect and imperfect interfacial bonding to evaluate the effect of a interphase layer.

  16. Properties of fiber composites for advanced flywheel energy storage devices

    SciTech Connect

    DeTeresa, S J; Groves, S E

    2001-01-12

    The performance of commercial high-performance fibers is examined for application to flywheel power supplies. It is shown that actual delivered performance depends on multiple factors such as inherent fiber strength, strength translation and stress-rupture lifetime. Experimental results for recent stress-rupture studies of carbon fibers will be presented and compared with other candidate reinforcement materials. Based on an evaluation of all of the performance factors, it is concluded that carbon fibers are preferred for highest performance and E-glass fibers for lowest cost. The inferior performance of the low-cost E-glass fibers can be improved to some extent by retarding the stress-corrosion of the material due to moisture and practical approaches to mitigating this corrosion are discussed. Many flywheel designs are limited not by fiber failure, but by matrix-dominated failure modes. Unfortunately, very few experimental results for stress-rupture under transverse tensile loading are available. As a consequence, significant efforts are made in flywheel design to avoid generating any transverse tensile stresses. Recent results for stress-rupture of a carbon fiber/epoxy composite under transverse tensile load reveal that these materials are surprisingly durable under the transverse loading condition and that some radial tensile stress could be tolerated in flywheel applications.

  17. Electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness of polypropylene/conducting fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Pyoung-Chan; Kim, Bo-Ram; Jeoung, Sun Kyoung; Kim, Yeung Keun

    2016-03-01

    Electromagnetic released from the automotive electronic parts is harmful to human body. Electromagnetic interference (EMT) shielding refers to the reflection and/or adsorption of electromagnetic radiation by a material, which thereby acts as a shield against the penetration of the radiation through the shield. Polypropylene (PP)/conductive micro fiber composites containing various fiber contents and fiber length were injection-molded. The effect of fiber content and length on electrical properties of the composites was studied by electrical resistivity and EMT shielding measurements. The through-plane electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity were obtained by measuring dielectric properties. The EMT shielding effectiveness (SE) was investigated by using S-parameter in the range of 100 ~ 1500 MHz. Reflection, absorption and multiple-reflection are the EMT attenuation mechanisms. From the measurement of S-Parameters, the absorption coefficient, reflection coefficient, and the shielding efficiency of the materials were calculated. The EMT SE of PP/conducing fiber composites is 40 dB over a wide frequency range up to 1.5 GHz, which is higher than that of PP/talc composite used automotive parts, viz. 0 dB.

  18. Characterization of aerosols and fibers emitted from composite materials combustion.

    PubMed

    Chivas-Joly, C; Gaie-Levrel, F; Motzkus, C; Ducourtieux, S; Delvallée, A; De Lagos, F; Nevé, S Le; Gutierrez, J; Lopez-Cuesta, J-M

    2016-01-15

    This work investigates the aerosols emitted during combustion of aircraft and naval structural composite materials (epoxy resin/carbon fibers and vinyl ester/glass fibers and carbon nanotubes). Combustion tests were performed at lab-scale using a modified cone calorimeter. The aerosols emitted have been characterized using various metrological devices devoted to the analysis of aerosols. The influence of the nature of polymer matrices, the incorporation of fibers and carbon nanotubes as well as glass reinforcements on the number concentration and the size distribution of airborne particles produced, was studied in the 5 nm-10 μm range. Incorporation of carbon fibers into epoxy resin significantly reduced the total particle number concentration. In addition, the interlaced orientation of carbon fibers limited the particles production compared to the composites with unidirectional one. The carbon nanotubes loading in vinyl ester resin composites influenced the total particles production during the flaming combustion with changes during kinetics emission. Predominant populations of airborne particles generated during combustion of all tested composites were characterized by a PN50 following by PN(100-500). PMID:26348148

  19. Fracture modes in off-axis fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, J. H.; Chamis, C. C.

    1978-01-01

    Criteria were developed for identifying, characterizing, and quantifying fracture modes in high-modulus graphite-fiber/resin unidirectional composites subjected to off-axis tensile loading. Procedures are described which use sensitivity analyses and off-axis data to determine the uniaxial strength of fiber composites. It was found that off-axis composites fail by three fracture modes which produce unique fracture surface characteristics. The stress that dominates each fracture mode and the load angle range of its dominance can be identified. Linear composite mechanics is adequate to describe quantitatively the mechanical behavior of off-axis composites. The uniaxial strengths predicted from off-axis data are comparable to these measured in uniaxial tests.

  20. Fracture modes in off-axis fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, J. H.; Chamis, C. C.

    1979-01-01

    Criteria have been developed for identifying, characterizing, and quantifying fracture modes in high-modulus graphite-fiber/resin unidirectional composites subjected to off-axis tensile loading. Procedures are described which use sensitivity analyses and off-axis data to determine the uniaxial strength of fiber composites. It was found that off-axis composites fail by three fracture modes which produce unique fracture surface characteristics. The stress that dominates each fracture mode and the load angle range of its dominance can be identified. Linear composite mechanics is adequate to describe quantitatively the mechanical behavior of off-axis composites. The uniaxial strengths predicted from off-axis data are comparable to those measured in uniaxial tests.

  1. Effect of fiber length on static and fatigue strengths of short fiber reinforced thermoplastics with polypropylene matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, T.; Fujii, T.; Tanaka, T.

    1996-10-01

    Changes in the damage mechanism as a function of fiber length were examined in a quasi-isotropically reinforced random chopped glass/polypropylene composite during uniaxial tensile testing (at various temperatures) and fatigue testing (at room temperature). Three types of specimens, which have the different fiber length in a pellet, were used. As a result, the effect of fiber length on mechanical properties was revealed. Moreover, the outline of the percolation theory was given, which estimates the strength and other important mechanical properties on the basis of the probabilistic microcrack initiation and bonding of microcracks.

  2. Quantification of short and long asbestos fibers to assess asbestos exposure: a review of fiber size toxicity.

    PubMed

    Boulanger, Guillaume; Andujar, Pascal; Pairon, Jean-Claude; Billon-Galland, Marie-Annick; Dion, Chantal; Dumortier, Pascal; Brochard, Patrick; Sobaszek, Annie; Bartsch, Pierre; Paris, Christophe; Jaurand, Marie-Claude

    2014-01-01

    The fibrogenicity and carcinogenicity of asbestos fibers are dependent on several fiber parameters including fiber dimensions. Based on the WHO (World Health Organization) definition, the current regulations focalise on long asbestos fibers (LAF) (Length: L ≥ 5 μm, Diameter: D < 3 μm and L/D ratio > 3). However air samples contain short asbestos fibers (SAF) (L < 5 μm). In a recent study we found that several air samples collected in buildings with asbestos containing materials (ACM) were composed only of SAF, sometimes in a concentration of ≥10 fibers.L-1. This exhaustive review focuses on available information from peer-review publications on the size-dependent pathogenetic effects of asbestos fibers reported in experimental in vivo and in vitro studies. In the literature, the findings that SAF are less pathogenic than LAF are based on experiments where a cut-off of 5 μm was generally made to differentiate short from long asbestos fibers. Nevertheless, the value of 5 μm as the limit for length is not based on scientific evidence, but is a limit for comparative analyses. From this review, it is clear that the pathogenicity of SAF cannot be completely ruled out, especially in high exposure situations. Therefore, the presence of SAF in air samples appears as an indicator of the degradation of ACM and inclusion of their systematic search should be considered in the regulation. Measurement of these fibers in air samples will then make it possible to identify pollution and anticipate health risk. PMID:25043725

  3. Quantification of short and long asbestos fibers to assess asbestos exposure: a review of fiber size toxicity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The fibrogenicity and carcinogenicity of asbestos fibers are dependent on several fiber parameters including fiber dimensions. Based on the WHO (World Health Organization) definition, the current regulations focalise on long asbestos fibers (LAF) (Length: L ≥ 5 μm, Diameter: D < 3 μm and L/D ratio > 3). However air samples contain short asbestos fibers (SAF) (L < 5 μm). In a recent study we found that several air samples collected in buildings with asbestos containing materials (ACM) were composed only of SAF, sometimes in a concentration of ≥10 fibers.L−1. This exhaustive review focuses on available information from peer-review publications on the size-dependent pathogenetic effects of asbestos fibers reported in experimental in vivo and in vitro studies. In the literature, the findings that SAF are less pathogenic than LAF are based on experiments where a cut-off of 5 μm was generally made to differentiate short from long asbestos fibers. Nevertheless, the value of 5 μm as the limit for length is not based on scientific evidence, but is a limit for comparative analyses. From this review, it is clear that the pathogenicity of SAF cannot be completely ruled out, especially in high exposure situations. Therefore, the presence of SAF in air samples appears as an indicator of the degradation of ACM and inclusion of their systematic search should be considered in the regulation. Measurement of these fibers in air samples will then make it possible to identify pollution and anticipate health risk. PMID:25043725

  4. Effect of Architecture on the Resistivity of Carbon Fiber Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Opaluch, Amanda

    2005-01-01

    The electrical resistivity of carbon fiber laminar composites can be tailored by weave direction, fiber composition, resin composition, applied pressure, and fiber fraction. Although the weave direction was only found to be important in the case of high aspect ratio composites, the other factors were found to influence the resistivity generally. Most intriguing, the resistivity of composites with lamina of different fiber compositions follows a parallel resistor model. This opens the door for higher performance, lower cost composites to be fabricated from these mixed fiber composites.

  5. Effects of Fiber/Matrix Interface and its Composition on Mechanical Properties of Hi Nicalon/Celsian Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    1998-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMC) are prospective candidate materials for high temperature structural applications in aerospace, energy conservation, power generation, nuclear, petrochemical, and other industries. At NASA Lewis, we are investigating celsian matrix composites reinforced with various types of silicon carbide fibers. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of fiber/matrix interface and its composition on the mechanical properties of silicon carbide (Hi-Nicalon) fiber-reinforced celsian matrix composites.

  6. Ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation of impact-damaged graphite fiber composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. H., Jr.; Lampert, N. R.

    1980-01-01

    Unidirectional Hercules AS/3501-6 graphite fiber epoxy composites were subjected to repeated controlled low-velocity drop weight impacts in the laminate direction. The degradation was ultrasonically monitored using through-thickness attenuation and a modified stress wave factor (SWF). There appears to be strong correlations between the number of drop-weight impacts, the residual tensile strength, the through-thickness attenuation, and the SWF. The results are very encouraging with respect to the NDE potential of both of these ultrasonic parameters to provide strength characterizations in virgin as well as impact-damaged fiber composite structures.

  7. Silkworm cocoons inspire models for random fiber and particulate composites

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Fujia; Porter, David; Vollrath, Fritz

    2010-10-15

    The bioengineering design principles evolved in silkworm cocoons make them ideal natural prototypes and models for structural composites. Cocoons depend for their stiffness and strength on the connectivity of bonding between their constituent materials of silk fibers and sericin binder. Strain-activated mechanisms for loss of bonding connectivity in cocoons can be translated directly into a surprisingly simple yet universal set of physically realistic as well as predictive quantitative structure-property relations for a wide range of technologically important fiber and particulate composite materials.

  8. Silkworm cocoons inspire models for random fiber and particulate composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fujia; Porter, David; Vollrath, Fritz

    2010-10-01

    The bioengineering design principles evolved in silkworm cocoons make them ideal natural prototypes and models for structural composites. Cocoons depend for their stiffness and strength on the connectivity of bonding between their constituent materials of silk fibers and sericin binder. Strain-activated mechanisms for loss of bonding connectivity in cocoons can be translated directly into a surprisingly simple yet universal set of physically realistic as well as predictive quantitative structure-property relations for a wide range of technologically important fiber and particulate composite materials.

  9. Engineered Polymer Composites Through Electrospun Nanofiber Coating of Fiber Tows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohlman, Lee W.; Bakis, Charles; Williams, Tiffany S.; Johnston, James C.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Roberts, Gary D.

    2014-01-01

    Composite materials offer significant weight savings in many aerospace applications. The toughness of the interface of fibers crossing at different angles often determines failure of composite components. A method for toughening the interface in fabric and filament wound components using directly electrospun thermoplastic nanofiber on carbon fiber tow is presented. The method was first demonstrated with limited trials, and then was scaled up to a continuous lab scale process. Filament wound tubes were fabricated and tested using unmodified baseline towpreg material and nanofiber coated towpreg.

  10. A study of fiber materials for use in temperature resistant fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachowsky, M. J.; Anderson, R. N.

    1982-01-01

    This study has been directed at characterizing the micro-properties of candidate ceramics and glasses for use in making fibers used in fiber reinforced material composites. Particular emphasis has been given into developing techniques to guide the optimization of fiber properties. The Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and X-ray Diffractometer (XRD) have been used to help collate the method of synthesis, crystal structure and surface morphology with physical performance parameters. As a result, progress has been made in characterizing such materials. This increased understanding makes the previous research worthy of further study.

  11. Rapid oxidation/stabilization technique for carbon foams, carbon fibers and C/C composites

    DOEpatents

    Tan, Seng; Tan, Cher-Dip

    2004-05-11

    An enhanced method for the post processing, i.e. oxidation or stabilization, of carbon materials including, but not limited to, carbon foams, carbon fibers, dense carbon-carbon composites, carbon/ceramic and carbon/metal composites, which method requires relatively very short and more effective such processing steps. The introduction of an "oxygen spill over catalyst" into the carbon precursor by blending with the carbon starting material or exposure of the carbon precursor to such a material supplies required oxygen at the atomic level and permits oxidation/stabilization of carbon materials in a fraction of the time and with a fraction of the energy normally required to accomplish such carbon processing steps. Carbon based foams, solids, composites and fiber products made utilizing this method are also described.

  12. Preface to the Special Issue on short pulse fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delavaux, Jean-Marc P.; Grelu, Philippe; Pu, Wang; Ilday, Fatih Ömer

    2014-12-01

    In the last two decades the fiber laser has evolved from a laboratory curiosity to a viable tool in an increasing number of applications in such diverse areas as material processing, atmospheric monitoring, high energy physics, medicine, telecommunications, and defense. The reasons for the growing acceptance of fiber lasers lie in the combination of their many attractive features. Indeed, fiber lasers are together power efficient, compact, light weight, versatile and reliable. Initially, the development of fiber laser technology was led to challenge the dominance of well entrenched solid state lasers used in the lucrative manufacturing industry. Traditionally, the emission wavelength band of interest was mostly limited to the near infrared (NIR) region (i.e. from 1 to 1.6 μm). More recently, extensive fiber laser R&D advances have extended the laser applications to a broader spectrum, from the ultra violet (UV) to the mid-infrared (Mid-IR) wavelength region, and investigated the specific advantages associated with different pulse widths, from ns to fs, and different operating regimes.

  13. Pressure variation assisted fiber extraction and development of high performance natural fiber composites and nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markevicius, Gediminas

    It is believed, that due to the large surface areas provided by the nano scale materials, various composite properties could be enhanced when such particles are incorporated into a polymer matrix. There is also a trend of utilizing natural resources or reusing and recycling materials that are already available for the fabrication of the new composite materials. Cellulose is the most abundant natural polymer on the planet, and therefore it is not surprising to be of interest for composite fabrication. Basic structures of cellulose, comprised of long polysaccharide chains, are the building blocks of cellulose nano fibers. Nano fibers are further bound into micro fibrils and macro fibers. Theoretically pure cellulose nano fibers have tremendous strengths, and therefore are some of the most sought after nano particles. The fiber extraction however is a complex task. The ultrasound, which creates pressure variation in the medium, was employed to extract nano-size cellulose particles from microcrystalline cellulose (MCC). The length and the intensity of the cavitations were evaluated. Electron microscopy studies revealed that cellulose nanoparticles were successfully obtained from the MCC after ultrasound treatment of just 30 minutes. Structure of the fractionated cellulose was also analyzed with the help of X-ray diffraction, and its thermal properties were evaluated with the help of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Ultrasound treatment performed on the wheat straw, kenaf, and miscanthus particles altered fiber structure as a result of the cavitation. The micro fibers were generated from these materials after they were subjected to NaOH treatment followed by the ultrasound processing. The potential of larger than nano-sized natural fibers to be used for composite fabrication was also explored. The agricultural byproducts, such as wheat or rice straw, as well as other fast growing crops as miscanthus or kenaf, are comprised of three basic polymers. Just like in

  14. Impetus of composite mechanics on test methods for fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1978-01-01

    The impetus of composite mechanics on composite test methods and/or on interpreting test results is described by using examples from composite micromechanics, composite macromechanics and laminate theory. The specific examples included contributions such as criteria for selecting resin matrices for improved composite strength, the 10 deg off-axis tensile test, criteria for configuring hybrids and superhybrids for improved impact resistance and the reduced bending rigidities concept for buckling and vibration analyses.

  15. Strong, damage tolerant oxide-fiber/oxide matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Yahua

    Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) is an easy and cost effective method to fabricate fiber-reinforced green composites. Non-conductive Nextel(TM) 720 fibers were successfully coated with a transient, conductive polypyrrole submicron surface layer for use directly as an electrode in EPD processing. However, electric-field shielding limits particle infiltration into the conductive fiber bundles and they mostly deposit on the outer surface of the fiber bundle. When the bundle is large, central cavities exist after deposition. The EPD cell was modified for electrophoretic infiltration deposition (EPID). Non conductive fibers were laid on an electrode and charged particles in an ethanol suspension are driven there through by an electric field, infiltrate and deposit on the electrode to then build up into the fiber preform and fill the voids therein. Dense, uniform, green fiber composites were successfully fabricated via constant current EPID. The EPID process is modeled as capillary electrophoretic infiltration. The process consists of two steps: particle electrophoresis outside the capillaries and electrophoretic infiltration inside the capillaries. Due to the zero net flow of the ethanol across the capillary cross-section, there is no electro-osmotic flow contribution to the deposition rate. Hamaker's law was extended to the EPID process, i.e., the deposition yield is proportional to the electric field inside the capillaries. The total deposition yield is controlled by the slow step of the process, i.e., the rate of electrophoresis in the open suspension outside the capillaries. AlPO4 was proposed as a weak layer between oxide fibers and oxide matrix in fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMC's). AlPO 4 nano particles were synthesized by chemical co-precipitation of Al 3+ and HPO42- with urea at 95°C. The solution pH basic region and amorphous AlPO4 precipitated of narrow size distribution with a mean particle size 50nm. Nextel 720 fibers were pretreated with

  16. Joining of aluminum and long fiber thermoplastic (LFT) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Rahul R.

    Metal/polymer joints are used in variety of areas: aerospace, automotive, prosthetic devices, electronic packaging, etc. The present study involves a tailcone, which is currently made of aluminum and a new design will involve a joint between aluminum and long fiber thermoplastic (LFT) composite. The new tailcones were processed by insert molding, also called as extrusion-compression molding. Finite element (FE) models were used to obtain a temperature profile during cooling of tailcone from processing and to estimate thermal stresses generated. Experimental verification of the temperature profile was obtained by IR thermography. It was observed that the LFT part of the tailcone cooled faster than aluminum. During the cooling of the tailcone, the aluminum insert acted as a heat sink because of the large difference between the thermal conductivities of aluminum and the LFT composite. Thermal stresses computed were 2.5 MPa and 12 MPa in the case of beaded and threaded insert tailcones, respectively. Static pullout tests were done to obtain an insight into the failure mechanisms of the joint between aluminum and LFT composite. Both the tailcone configurations, with beaded and threaded inserts, showed about the same average peak load, 96 kN. Radiographic and metallographic studies showed that the damage at the interface between aluminum and LFT composite occurred in the form of microcracks, followed by complete separation normal to the stress axis. The tailcones housed in projectiles were test fired and it was found that the HBTs disintegrated immediately after they came out of the barrel. A new design was proposed to overcome the drawbacks of the HBTs, called filled-back tailcone (FBT). Static pullout tests on FBTs showed no failure of the tailcones, which was in accord with the test firing where tailcone did not fail. The study of aluminum/LFT composite interfaces was extended into the realm of laminated composites. Laminated composites were made in the form of

  17. Influence of fiber content on mechanical performance of SiC-fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride composites

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, D.; Singh, J.P.; Bhatt, R.T.

    1995-01-01

    The effect of fiber content on the resulting mechanical properties (first matrix cracking stress, ultimate strength, and work-of-fracture) of silicon carbide (SiC)-fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) matrix composites was investigated. Flexure tests were used to evaluate mechanical properties of composites containing various fiber contents. The first matrix cracking stress, ultimate strength, and work-of-fracture of the composites increased with increasing fiber content, reaching a peak value at a fiber content of {approximately} 16 vol.%. Further increases in fiber content degraded the mechanical properties of the composites. The variations in mechanical properties with fiber contents were correlated to the residual stresses in the matrix phase, processing related flaws, and failure modes observed in these composites.

  18. Piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate ceramic fiber/polymer composites

    SciTech Connect

    Waller, D.J.; Safari, P. )

    1992-06-01

    This papers on piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramic fiber/polymer composite were fabricated by a novel technique referred to as relic processing. Basically, this involved impregnating a woven carbon-fiber template material with PZT precursor by soaking the template in a PZT stock solution. Careful heat treatment pyrolized the carbon, resulting in a PZT ceramic relic that retained the fibrous template form. After sintering, the densified relic was backfilled with polymer to form a composite. Optimized relic processing consisted of soaking activated carbon-fiber fabric twice in an intermediate concentration (405-mg PZT/(1-g solution)) alkoxide PZT solution and sintering at 1285{degrees}C for 2 h. A series of piezoelectric composites encompassing a wide range of dielectric and piezoelectric properties was prepared by varying the PZT-fiber orientation and polymer-matrix material. In PZT/Eccogel polymer composites with PZT fibers orientated parallel to the electrodes, K = 75, d{sub 33} = 145 pC/N, d{sub h} = 45 {plus minus} 5 pC/N, and d{sub h}g{sub h} = 3150 {times} 10{sup {minus}15} m{sup 2}/N were measured. Furthermore, in composites with a number of PZT fibers arranged perpendicular to the electroded surfaces, K = 190, d{sub 33} = 250 pC/N, d{sub h} = 65 {plus minus} 2 pC/N, and d{sub h}g{sub h} = 2600 {times} 10{sup {minus}15} m{sub 2}/N.

  19. Carbide coated fibers in graphite-aluminum composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imprescia, R. J.; Levinson, L. S.; Reiswig, R. D.; Wallace, T. C.; Williams, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    The NASA-supported program at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) to develop carbon fiber-aluminum matrix composites is described. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was used to uniformly deposit thin, smooth, continuous coats of TiC on the fibers of graphite tows. Wet chemical coating of fibers, followed by high-temperature treatment, was also used, but showed little promise as an alternative coating method. Strength measurements on CVD coated fiber tows showed that thin carbide coats can add to fiber strength. The ability of aluminum alloys to wet TiC was successfully demonstrated using TiC-coated graphite surfaces. Pressure-infiltration of TiC- and ZrC-coated fiber tows with aluminum alloys was only partially successful. Experiments were performed to evaluate the effectiveness of carbide coats on carbon as barriers to prevent reaction between alluminum alloys and carbon. Initial results indicate that composites of aluminum and carbide-coated graphite are stable for long periods of time at temperatures near the alloy solidus.

  20. Factors Affecting Fiber Design and Selection for Advanced Ceramic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCarlo, James A.

    1998-01-01

    Structural Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMC) have the potential for application in the hot sections of a variety of advanced propulsion and power systems. It is therefore necessary to have a general understanding of the key properties of CMC and Reinforcing Fibers. This need is complicated by the wide variety of application conditions and structural requirements for which CMC's will be used, and the proprietary concerns of the design engineers. CMC's, to be successful, must display properties which are competitive with the currently used high temperature structural materials: (i.e., Iron and Nickel based superalloys, tough monolithic ceramics, and carbon/carbon composites.) Structural CMC offers several areas of competition: (1) performance, (i.e., strength and strength retention, creep resistance, and thermal conductivity), (2) reliability (i.e., environmental durability, and damage tolerance) and (3) processing (i.e., capability for varying sizes and shapes, and cost effective fabrication). The presentation further discusses, and illustrates with fiber and CMC data the key fiber properties and processes which strongly affect each CMC area of competition. The presentation further discusses the current knowledge of the important factors which control the key fiber properties. A design guidelines for the optimum fiber characteristics is developed, and the currently available fibers are compared against those guidelines.

  1. Fiber composite analysis and design. Volume 2: Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, B.W.

    1998-09-01

    Recent years have witnessed a significant increase in the understanding and utilization of fibrous composite materials. There has also been a much larger increase in the amount of published literature in this field. This book builds upon existing literature to present a review of the available capability for composite structural design and analysis. The aim is to provide guidance for one who seeks to become familiar with the tools required for designing with fibrous composites. Thus, the book identifies the key concepts associated with the use of these unique materials. This second volume addresses the design and analysis of structural configurations for the practical and efficient utilization of fiber composite materials.

  2. Thermoplastics Reinforced with Self-Welded Short Carbon Fibers: Nanoparticle-Promoted Structural Evolution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongge; Liu, Yaohua; Lin, Yu; Wu, Guozhang

    2016-07-27

    The large volume of currently available fiber-reinforced polymer composites critically limits the intrinsic versatility of fibers such as high mechanical strength, heat resistance, and excellent thermal/electrical conductivity. We proposed a facile and widely applicable strategy to promote self-organization of randomly dispersed short carbon fibers (CFs) into a three-dimensionally continuous scaffold. The morphological evolution and structural reinforcement of the self-welded CF-polyamide 6 (PA6) scaffold in polystyrene (PS) matrix were investigated, with carbon black (CB) or titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) selectively localized in the PA6 domains. Surprisingly, all of the PA6 droplets once dispersed in the PS matrix can migrate and evenly encapsulate onto the CF surface when 5.8 wt % CB is incorporated, whereas in the TiO2-filled system, the PA6 droplets preferentially segregate at the junction point of CFs to fasten the self-welded CF structure. In addition, a remarkable increase in the interfacial adhesive work between PA6 and CF was observed only when TiO2 is added, and a loading of even less than 0.8 wt % can effectively abruptly strengthen the self-welded CF scaffold. We clarified that the structural evolution is promoted by the nature of self-agglomeration of NPs. CB is highly capable of self-networking in the PA6 domain, resulting in high encapsulation of PA6, although the capillary force for preferential segregation of PA6 at the junction point of CFs is reduced. By contrast, the TiO2 particles tend to form compact aggregates. Such an agglomeration pattern, together with enhanced interfacial affinity, must contribute to a strong capillary force for the preferential segregation of PA6. PMID:27391703

  3. Thermal shock behavior of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, R.N.; Wang, H.

    1995-10-01

    The influence of fiber type and method of composite fabrication on the thermal shock behavior of 2-D fiber-reinforced ceramic composites is studied. Thermal shock tests are performed using a water quench technique, and thermal shock damage is characterized by both destructive and nondestructive techniques. It is shown that the composites possessed superior resistance to thermal shock damage than the monolithic ceramics. Catastrophic failure due to severe thermal stresses is prevented in composites and a significant portion of their original strength is retained at a quench temperature difference up to 1,000 C. These results along with an analysis of the thermal shock damage mechanism based on the destructive and nondestructive tests is described.

  4. Three-dimensional printing fiber reinforced hydrogel composites.

    PubMed

    Bakarich, Shannon E; Gorkin, Robert; in het Panhuis, Marc; Spinks, Geoffrey M

    2014-09-24

    An additive manufacturing process that combines digital modeling and 3D printing was used to prepare fiber reinforced hydrogels in a single-step process. The composite materials were fabricated by selectively pattering a combination of alginate/acrylamide gel precursor solution and an epoxy based UV-curable adhesive (Emax 904 Gel-SC) with an extrusion printer. UV irradiation was used to cure the two inks into a single composite material. Spatial control of fiber distribution within the digital models allowed for the fabrication of a series of materials with a spectrum of swelling behavior and mechanical properties with physical characteristics ranging from soft and wet to hard and dry. A comparison with the "rule of mixtures" was used to show that the swollen composite materials adhere to standard composite theory. A prototype meniscus cartilage was prepared to illustrate the potential application in bioengineering. PMID:25197745

  5. Natural-fiber-reinforced polymer composites in automotive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbery, James; Houston, Dan

    2006-11-01

    In the past decade, natural-fiber composites with thermoplastic and thermoset matrices have been embraced by European car manufacturers and suppliers for door panels, seat backs, headliners, package trays, dashboards, and interior parts. Natural fibers such as kenaf, hemp, flax, jute, and sisal offer such benefits as reductions in weight, cost, and CO2, less reliance on foreign oil sources, and recyclability. However, several major technical considerations must be addressed before the engineering, scientific, and commercial communities gain the confidence to enable wide-scale acceptance, particularly in exterior parts where a Class A surface finish is required. Challenges include the homogenization of the fiber's properties and a full understanding of the degree of polymerization and crystallization, adhesion between the fiber and matrix, moisture repellence, and flame-retardant properties, to name but a few.

  6. Carbide coated fibers in graphite-aluminum composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imprescia, R. J.; Levinson, L. S.; Reiswig, R. D.; Wallace, T. C.; Williams, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    The study of protective-coupling layers of refractory metal carbides on the graphite fibers prior to their incorporation into composites is presented. Such layers should be directly wettable by liquid aluminum and should act as diffusion barriers to prevent the formation of aluminum carbide. Chemical vapor deposition was used to uniformly deposit thin, smooth, continuous coats of ZrC on the carbon fibers of tows derived from both rayon and polyacrylonitrile. A wet chemical coating of the fibers, followed by high-temperature treatment, was used, and showed promise as an alternative coating method. Experiments were performed to demonstrate the ability of aluminum alloys to wet carbide surfaces. Titanium carbide, zirconium carbide and carbide-coated graphite surfaces were successfully wetted. Results indicate that initial attempts to wet surfaces of ZrC-coated carbon fibers appear successful.

  7. The effect of bromination of carbon fibers on the coefficient of thermal expansion of graphite fiber-epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, D. A.; Maciag, C.

    1987-01-01

    To examine the effect of bromination of carbon fibers on the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of carbon fiber epoxy composites, several pristine and brominated carbon fiber-epoxy composite samples were subjected to thermomechanical analysis. The CTE's of these samples were measured in the uniaxial and transverse directions. The CTE was dominated by the fibers in the uniaxial direction, while it was dominated by the matrix in the transverse directions. Bromination had no effect on the CTE of any of the composites. In addition, the CTE of fiber tow was measured in the absence of a polymer matrix, using an extension probe. The results from this technique were inconclusive.

  8. A small-scale test for fiber release from carbon composites. [pyrolysis and impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilwee, W. J., Jr.; Fish, R. H.

    1980-01-01

    A test method was developed to determine relative fiber loss from pyrolyzed composites with different resins and fiber construction. Eleven composites consisting of woven and unwoven carbon fiber reinforcement and different resins were subjected to the burn and impact test device. The composites made with undirectional tape had higher fiber loss than those with woven fabric. Also, the fiber loss was inversely proportional to the char yield of the resin.

  9. Impetus of composite mechanics on test methods for fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1978-01-01

    Significant contributions of the three major areas of composite mechanics to the development of test methods are illustrated with selected examples. The areas of composite mechanics include composite micromechanics, composite macromechanics, and laminate theory. The examples can be considered to be representative of the contribution of composite mechanics to the development of composite test methods. The specific examples describe contributions such as criteria for selecting resin matrices for improved composite strength, the 10 deg off-axis tensile test, procedures for configuring hybrids, and the concept of 'reduced bending rigidities'. The pertinent composite mechanics equations associated with each contribution are given and supplemented by tabular and/or graphical data which illustrate the significance of the contribution.

  10. Graphite fiber textile preform/copper matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilatovs, G. J.; Lee, Bruce; Bass, Lowell

    1995-01-01

    Graphite fiber reinforced/copper matrix composites have sufficiently high thermal conduction to make them candidate materials for critical heat transmitting and rejection components. The term textile composites arises because the preform is braided from fiber tows, conferring three-dimensional reinforcement and near net shape. The principal issues investigated in the past two years have centered on developing methods to characterize the preform and fabricated composite and on braidability. It is necessary to have an analytic structural description for both processing and final property modeling. The structure of the true 3-D braids used is complex and has required considerable effort to model. A structural mapping has been developed as a foundation for analytic models for thermal conduction and mechanical properties. The conductivity has contributions both from the copper and the reinforcement. The latter is accomplished by graphitization of the fibers, the higher the amount of graphitization the greater the conduction. This is accompanied by an increase in the fiber modulus, which is desirable from a stiffness point of view but decreases the braidability; the highest conductivity fibers are simply too brittle to be braided. Considerable effort has been expended on determining the optimal braidability--conductivity region. While a number of preforms have been fabricated, one other complication intervenes; graphite and copper are immiscible, resulting in a poor mechanical bond and difficulties in infiltration by molten copper. The approach taken is to utilize a proprietary fiber coating process developed by TRA, of Salt Lake City, Utah, which forms an itermediary bond. A number of preforms have been fabricated from a variety of fiber types and two sets of these have been infiltrated with OFHC copper, one with the TRA coating and one without. Mechanical tests have been performed using a small-scale specimen method and show the coated specimens to have superior

  11. Compressive strength of fiber-reinforced composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. G., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Results of an experimental and analytical investigation of the compressive strength of unidirectional boron-epoxy composite material are presented. Observation of fiber coordinates in a boron-epoxy composite indicates that the fibers contain initial curvature. Combined axial compression and torsion tests were conducted on boron-epoxy tubes and it was shown that the shear modulus is a function of axial compressive stress. An analytical model which includes initial curvature in the fibers and permits an estimate of the effect of curvature on compressive strength is proposed. Two modes of failure which may result from the application of axial compressive stress are analyzed - delamination and shear instability. Based on tests and analysis, failure of boron-epoxy under axial compressive load is due to shear instability.

  12. Durability/life of fiber composites in hygrothermomechanical environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    Statistical analysis and multiple regression were used to determine and quantify the significant hygrothermomechanical variables which infuence the tensile durability/life (cycle loading, fatigue) of boron-fiber/epoxy-matrix (B/E) and high-modulus-fiber/epoxy-matrix (HMS/E) composites. The use of the multiple regression analysis reduced the variables from fifteen, assumed initially, to six or less with a probability of greater than 0.999. The reduced variables were used to derive predictive models for compression an intralaminar shear durability/life of B/E and HMS/E composites assuming isoparametric fatigue behavior. The predictive models were subsequently generalized to predict the durability/life of graphite-fiber-r generalized model is of simple form, predicts conservative values compared with measured data and should be adequate for use in preliminary designs.

  13. Flexural analysis of palm fiber reinforced hybrid polymer matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatachalam, G.; Gautham Shankar, A.; Raghav, Dasarath; Santhosh Kiran, R.; Mahesh, Bhargav; Kumar, Krishna

    2015-07-01

    Uncertainty in availability of fossil fuels in the future and global warming increased the need for more environment friendly materials. In this work, an attempt is made to fabricate a hybrid polymer matrix composite. The blend is a mixture of General Purpose Resin and Cashew Nut Shell Liquid, a natural resin extracted from cashew plant. Palm fiber, which has high strength, is used as reinforcement material. The fiber is treated with alkali (NaOH) solution to increase its strength and adhesiveness. Parametric study of flexure strength is carried out by varying alkali concentration, duration of alkali treatment and fiber volume. Taguchi L9 Orthogonal array is followed in the design of experiments procedure for simplification. With the help of ANOVA technique, regression equations are obtained which gives the level of influence of each parameter on the flexure strength of the composite.

  14. Durability/life of fiber composites in hygrothermomechanical environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    Statistical analysis and multiple regression were used to determine and quantify the significant hygrothermomechanical variables which influence the tensile durability/life (cycle loading, fatigue) of boron-fiber/epoxy-matrix (B/E) and high-modulus-fiber/epoxy-matrix (HMS/E) composites. The use of the multiple regression analysis reduced the variables from fifteen, assumed initially, to six or less with a probability of greater than 0.999. The reduced variables were used to derive predictive models for compression and intralaminar shear durability/life of B/E and HMS/E composites assuming isoparametric fatigue behavior. The predictive models were subsequently generalized to predict the durability/life of graphite/fiber-r generalized model is of simple form, predicts conservative values compared with measured data and should be adequate for use in preliminary designs. Previously announced in STAR as N82-14287

  15. Process Optimization of Bismaleimide (BMI) Resin Infused Carbon Fiber Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehrlich, Joshua W.; Tate, LaNetra C.; Cox, Sarah B.; Taylor, Brian J.; Wright, M. Clara; Faughnan, Patrick D.; Batterson, Lawrence M.; Caraccio, Anne J.; Sampson, Jeffery W.

    2013-01-01

    Engineers today are presented with the opportunity to design and build the next generation of space vehicles out of the lightest, strongest, and most durable materials available. Composites offer excellent structural characteristics and outstanding reliability in many forms that will be utilized in future aerospace applications including the Commercial Crew and Cargo Program and the Orion space capsule. NASA's Composites for Exploration (CoEx) project researches the various methods of manufacturing composite materials of different fiber characteristics while using proven infusion methods of different resin compositions. Development and testing on these different material combinations will provide engineers the opportunity to produce optimal material compounds for multidisciplinary applications. Through the CoEx project, engineers pursue the opportunity to research and develop repair patch procedures for damaged spacecraft. Working in conjunction with Raptor Resins Inc., NASA engineers are utilizing high flow liquid infusion molding practices to manufacture high-temperature composite parts comprised of intermediate modulus 7 (IM7) carbon fiber material. IM7 is a continuous, high-tensile strength composite with outstanding structural qualities such as high shear strength, tensile strength and modulus as well as excellent corrosion, creep, and fatigue resistance. IM7 carbon fiber, combined with existing thermoset and thermoplastic resin systems, can provide improvements in material strength reinforcement and deformation-resistant properties for high-temperature applications. Void analysis of the different layups of the IM7 material discovered the largest total void composition within the [ +45 , 90 , 90 , -45 ] composite panel. Tensile and compressional testing proved the highest mechanical strength was found in the [0 4] layup. This paper further investigates the infusion procedure of a low-cost/high-performance BMI resin into an IM7 carbon fiber material and the

  16. Progressive Fracture of Fiber Composite Builtup Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, Pascal K.; Chamis, Christos C.; Minnetyan, Levon

    1996-01-01

    The damage progression and fracture of builtup composite structures was evaluated by using computational simulation to examine the behavior and response of a stiffened composite (0 +/- 45/90)(sub s6) laminate panel subjected to a bending load. The damage initiation, growth, accumulation, progression, and propagation to structural collapse were simulated. An integrated computer code (CODSTRAN) was augmented for the simulation of the progressive damage and fracture of builtup composite structures under mechanical loading. Results showed that damage initiation and progression have a significant effect on the structural response. Also investigated was the influence of different types of bending load on the damage initiation, propagation, and final fracture of the builtup composite panel.

  17. Numerical prediction of flow induced fibers orientation in injection molded polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oumer, A. N.; Hamidi, N. M.; Mat Sahat, I.

    2015-12-01

    Since the filling stage of injection molding process has important effect on the determination of the orientation state of the fibers, accurate analysis of the flow field for the mold filling stage becomes a necessity. The aim of the paper is to characterize the flow induced orientation state of short fibers in injection molding cavities. A dog-bone shaped model is considered for the simulation and experiment. The numerical model for determination of the fibers orientation during mold-filling stage of injection molding process was solved using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software called MoldFlow. Both the simulation and experimental results showed that two different regions (or three layers of orientation structures) across the thickness of the specimen could be found: a shell region which is near to the mold cavity wall, and a core region at the middle of the cross section. The simulation results support the experimental observations that for thin plates the probability of fiber alignment to the flow direction near the mold cavity walls is high but low at the core region. It is apparent that the results of this study could assist in decisions regarding short fiber reinforced polymer composites.

  18. Effect of Reinforcement Shape and Fiber Treatment on the Mechanical Properties of Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch-Polyethylene Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Arif, M. F.; Yusoff, P. S. M. M.; Eng, K. K.

    2010-03-11

    High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) composites were fabricated using oil palm empty fruit bunch (EFB) as the reinforcing material. The effect of reinforcement shape on the tensile and flexural properties, that is 5 mm average length of short fiber and 325-400 {mu}m size distribution of particulate filler have been studied. Overall, EFB short fiber-HDPE composites yield higher mechanical properties compared to EFB particulate-HDPE composites. For both types of composites, considerable improvement showed in tensile and flexural modulus. However, the tensile strength decreased with increase in EFB content. Attempts to improve these properties using alkali and two types of silane, namely gamma-Methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MTS) and vinyltriethoxysilane (VTS) were described. It is found that both types of silane enhanced the mechanical properties of composites. MTS showed better tensile strength compared to VTS. However, only marginal improvement obtained from alkali treatments.

  19. Effect of Reinforcement Shape and Fiber Treatment on the Mechanical Properties of Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch-Polyethylene Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif, M. F.; Yusoff, P. S. M. M.; Eng, K. K.

    2010-03-01

    High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) composites were fabricated using oil palm empty fruit bunch (EFB) as the reinforcing material. The effect of reinforcement shape on the tensile and flexural properties, that is 5 mm average length of short fiber and 325-400 μm size distribution of particulate filler have been studied. Overall, EFB short fiber-HDPE composites yield higher mechanical properties compared to EFB particulate-HDPE composites. For both types of composites, considerable improvement showed in tensile and flexural modulus. However, the tensile strength decreased with increase in EFB content. Attempts to improve these properties using alkali and two types of silane, namely γ-Methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MTS) and vinyltriethoxysilane (VTS) were described. It is found that both types of silane enhanced the mechanical properties of composites. MTS showed better tensile strength compared to VTS. However, only marginal improvement obtained from alkali treatments.

  20. Biopersistences of man-made vitreous fibers and crocidolite fibers in rat lungs following short-term exposures.

    PubMed Central

    Musselman, R P; Miiller, W C; Eastes, W; Hadley, J G; Kamstrup, O; Thevenaz, P; Hesterberg, T W

    1994-01-01

    Biopersistence of commercial man-made vitreous fibers (MMVF) and crocidolite were studied in Fischer 344 rats. MMVF used were size-selected to be rat-respirable, and rats were exposed nose-only 6 h/day for 5 days to gravimetric concentrations (30 mg/m3) of two fiber glass compositions--a rockwool, and a slagwool--or to 10 mg/m3 of long-fibered crocidolite, or to filtered air. Animals were sacrificed at 1 hr, 1, 5, 31, 90, 180, 270, 365, and 545 days after exposure stopped. Fibers were recovered from digested lung tissue to determine changes in concentrations (fibers/mg dry lung) and fiber retentions (expressed as percent of day 1 retention [PR]) for selected dimension categories. One-day average concentrations of lung-retained MMVF and crocidolite fibers, of diameter > or = 0.5 micron or > 20 microns in length, were nearly equal, permitting direct comparisons between MMVF and crocidolite. At 270 days average PR for MMVF > or = 0.5 micron in diameter were from 3 to 6 +/- 2% and 27 +/- 9% for crocidolite. For fibers > 20 microns, PR were 1 to 4 +/- 4% for MMVF and 37 +/- 20% for crocidolite. At 545 days, MMVF > 20 microns in length were at background level while concentration of crocidolite fibers > 20 microns in length remained at 2000 +/- 400 f/mg DL (dry lung), or 38 +/- 9% of day-1 retention. These results suggest strongly that MMVF dissolved or fractured in vivo whereas crocidolite fibers did not change. PMID:7882918

  1. Properties of foam and composite materials made o starch and cellulose fiber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Composite materials were made of starch and cellulose fibers. Pre-gelatinized starch was effective in dispersing pulp fiber in a starch matrix to form a viscous starch/fiber dough. The starch/fiber dough was a useful feedstock for various composite foam and plastic materials. Viscous blends of star...

  2. Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... short period of time can cause intestinal gas ( flatulence ), bloating , and abdominal cramps . This problem often goes ... 213. National Research Council. Dietary Reference Intakes for Energy, Carbohydrate, Fiber, Fat, Fatty Acids, Cholesterol, Protein, and ...

  3. Method of forming composite fiber blends and molding same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMahon, Paul E. (Inventor); Chung, Tai-Shung (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The instant invention involves a process used in preparing fibrous tows which may be formed into polymeric plastic composites. The process involves the steps of (a) forming a tow of strong filamentary materials; (b) forming a thermoplastic polymeric fiber; (c) intermixing the two tows; and (d) withdrawing the intermixed tow for further use.

  4. Crushing characteristics of continuous fiber-reinforced composite tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.; Jones, Robert M.

    1992-01-01

    Composite tubes can be reinforced with continuous fibers. When such tubes are subjected to crushing loads, the response is complex and depends on interaction between the different mechanisms that control the crushing process. The modes of crushing and their controlling mechanisms are described. Also, the resulting crushing process and its efficiency are addressed.

  5. Testing and Characterizing of Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowden, Richard M.; Moore, Karren L.; Tortorelli, Pete F.; Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    1996-01-01

    Understanding interfacial microstructural evolution during environmental testing and use is critical to the development of stable continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC's) for their use in 'corrosive' environments. The use of advanced characterization techniques is required to track subtle microstructural changes. These techniques must be coordinated with other CFCC tasks to completely evaluate their interfacial behavior.

  6. Fillers for improved graphite fiber retention by polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    House, E. E.; Sheppard, C. H.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a program designed to determine the extent to which elemental boron and boron containing fillers added to the matrix resin of graphite/epoxy composites prevent the release of graphite fibers when the composites are exposed to fire and impact conditions are described. The fillers evaluated were boron, boron carbide and aluminum boride. The conditions evaluated were laboratory simulations of those that could exist in the event of an aircraft crash and burn situation. The baseline (i.e., unfilled) laminates evaluated were prepared from commercially available graphite/epoxy. The baseline and filled laminates' mechanical properties, before and after isothermal and humidity aging, also were compared. It was found that a small amount of graphite fiber was released from the baseline graphite/epoxy laminates during the burn and impact conditions used in this program. However, the extent to which the fibers were released is not considered a severe enough problem to preclude the use of graphite reinforced composites in civil aircraft structure. It also was found that the addition of boron and boron containing fillers to the resin matrix eliminated this fiber release. Mechanical properties of laminates containing the boron and boron containing fillers were lower than those of the baseline laminates. These property degradations for two systems: boron (5 micron) at 2.5 percent filler loading, and boron (5 micron) at 5.0 percent filler loading do not appear severe enough to preclude their use in structural composite applications.

  7. INDUCTION HEATING OF CARBON-FIBER COMPOSITES: THERMAL GENERATION MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A theory of local and global mechanisms of heat generation and distribution in carbon-fiber-based composites subjected to an alternating magnetic field has been proposed. A model that predicts the strength and distribution of thermal generation through the thickness of carbon-fib...

  8. Lifetimes of fiber composites under sustained tensile loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiao, T. T.; Sherry, R. J.; Chiao, C. C.

    1977-01-01

    Results are presented for a study intended to summarize lifetime data on several fiber/epoxy composite materials subjected to sustained uniaxial tensile loading, to report preliminary results of an accelerated test method for predicting the life of simple composites, and to describe related work in progress on pressure vessels and other filament-wound structures. The lifetime performance of the tested composites was compared by plotting the percent of ultimate strength (applied fiber stress normalized with respect to fiber failure stress in a composite) versus lifetime. In terms of performance in long-term tensile applications, the tested composites are ranked in the following order: graphite/epoxy, Be wire/epoxy, Aramid/epoxy, and S-glass/epoxy. The accelerated test using temperature and stress to simulate the passage of time proves to be encouraging, at least in the case of the Aramid/epoxy composite. The potential of a statistical analysis based on Weibull distribution analyses or a power law relationship is demonstrated.

  9. A constitutive law for continuous fiber reinforced brittle matrix composites with fiber fragmentation and stress recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumeister, Jonas M.

    1993-08-01

    THE TENSILE BEHAVIOR of a brittle matrix composite is studied for post matrix crack saturation conditions. Scatter of fiber strength following the Weibull distribution as well as the influence of the major microstructural variables is considered. The stress in a fiber is assumed to recover linearly around a failure due to a fiber-matrix interface behavior mainly ruled by friction. The constitutive behavior for such a composite is analysed. Results are given for a simplified and a refined approximate description and compared with an analysis resulting from the exact analytical theory of fiber fragmentation. It is shown that the stress-strain relation for the refined model excellently follows the exact solution and gives the location of the maximum to within 1% in both stress and strain; for most materials the agreement is even better. Also it is shown that all relations can be normalized to depend on only two variables; a stress reference and the Weibull exponent. For systems with low scatter in fiber strength the simplified model is sufficient to determine the stress maximum but not the postcritical behavior. In addition, the simplified model gives explicit analytical expressions for the maximum stress and corresponding strain. None of the models contain any volume dependence or statistical scatter, but the maximum stress given by the stress-strain relation constitutes an upper bound for the ultimate tensile strength of the composite.

  10. In vitro fermentation of bacterial cellulose composites as model dietary fibers.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, Deirdre; Gidley, Michael J; Williams, Barbara A

    2011-04-27

    Plant cell walls within the human diet are compositionally heterogeneous, so defining the basis of nutritive properties is difficult. Using a pig fecal inoculum, in vitro fermentations of soluble forms of arabinoxylan, mixed-linkage glucan, and xyloglucan were compared with the same polymers incorporated into bacterial cellulose composites. Fermentation rates were highest and similar for the soluble polysaccharides. Cellulose composites incorporating those polysaccharides fermented more slowly and at similar rates to wheat bran. Bacterial cellulose and cotton fermented most slowly. Cellulose composite fermentation resulted in a different short-chain fatty acid profile, compared with soluble polysaccharides, with more butyrate and less propionate. The results suggest that physical form is more relevant than the chemistry of plant cell wall polysaccharides in determining both rate and end-products of fermentation using fecal bacteria. This work also establishes bacterial cellulose composites as a useful model system for the fermentation of complex cell wall dietary fiber. PMID:21417282

  11. Performance of integrated active fiber composites in fiber reinforced epoxy laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnykowycz, M.; Kornmann, X.; Huber, C.; Barbezat, M.; Brunner, A. J.

    2006-02-01

    Active fiber composite (AFC) composed of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) fibers with interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) has been integrated into orthotropic glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) laminates to characterize the performance of AFC as a smart material component in laminated materials. Monotonic cyclic tensile loading was performed on integrated specimens at different strain levels. The AFC output was monitored to determine the effect of applied strain level on the AFC performance. It was found that the AFC sensitivity degraded beyond strains of 0.20% and approached a minimum at 0.50% strain. The degradation in the AFC performance appears to be attributed to the dominating effect of PZT fiber fragmentation during testing, as opposed to depolarization. Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring was used to detect damage in laminates during testing and was correlated with crack evidence from microscopy observations during testing to characterize damage evolution in response to strain levels.

  12. Tunable Fiber Bragg Grating Ring Lasers using Macro Fiber Composite Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geddis, Demetris L.; Allison, Sidney G.; Shams, Qamar A.

    2006-01-01

    The research reported herein includes the fabrication of a tunable optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) fiber ring laser (FRL)1 from commercially available components as a high-speed alternative tunable laser source for NASA Langley s optical frequency domain reflectometer (OFDR) interrogator, which reads low reflectivity FBG sensors. A Macro-Fiber Composite (MFC) actuator invented at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) was selected to tune the laser. MFC actuators use a piezoelectric sheet cut into uniaxially aligned rectangular piezo-fibers surrounded by a polymer matrix and incorporate interdigitated electrodes to deliver electric fields along the length of the piezo-fibers. This configuration enables MFC actuators to produce displacements larger than the original uncut piezoelectric sheet. The FBG filter was sandwiched between two MFC actuators, and when strained, produced approximately 3.62 nm of wavelength shift in the FRL when biasing the MFC actuators from 500 V to 2000 V. This tunability range is comparable to that of other tunable lasers and is adequate for interrogating FBG sensors using OFDR technology. Three different FRL configurations were studied. Configuration A examined the importance of erbium-doped fiber length and output coupling. Configuration B demonstrated the importance of the FBG filter. Configuration C added an output coupler to increase the output power and to isolate the filter. Only configuration C was tuned because it offered the best optical power output of the three configurations. Use of Plastic Optical Fiber (POF) FBG s holds promise for enhanced tunability in future research.

  13. EFFECTS OF TEMPERATURE AND ENVIRONMENT ON MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF TWO CHOPPED-FIBER AUTOMOTIVE STRUCTURAL COMPOSITES

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggles-Wrenn, M.B.

    2003-10-06

    The Durability of Lightweight Composite Structures Project was established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) by the U.S. Department of Energy to provide the experimentally-based, durability-driven design guidelines necessary to assure long-term structural integrity of automotive composite components. The initial focus of the ORNL Durability Project was on composite materials consisting of polyurethane reinforced with E-glass. Current focus of the project is on composite materials reinforced with carbon fibers. The primary purpose of this report is to provide the individual specimen test date. Basic mechanical property testing and results for two chopped-fiber composite materials, one reinforced with glass- and the other with carbon fiber are provided. Both materials use the same polyurethane matrix. Preforms for both materials were produced using the P4 process. Behavioral trends, effects of temperature and environment, and corresponding design knockdown factors are established for both materials. Effects of prior short-time loads and of prior thermal cycling are discussed.

  14. Circular Functions Based Comprehensive Analysis of Plastic Creep Deformations in the Fiber Reinforced Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monfared, Vahid

    2016-06-01

    Analytically based model is presented for behavioral analysis of the plastic deformations in the reinforced materials using the circular (trigonometric) functions. The analytical method is proposed to predict creep behavior of the fibrous composites based on basic and constitutive equations under a tensile axial stress. New insight of the work is to predict some important behaviors of the creeping matrix. In the present model, the prediction of the behaviors is simpler than the available methods. Principal creep strain rate behaviors are very noteworthy for designing the fibrous composites in the creeping composites. Analysis of the mentioned parameter behavior in the reinforced materials is necessary to analyze failure, fracture, and fatigue studies in the creep of the short fiber composites. Shuttles, spaceships, turbine blades and discs, and nozzle guide vanes are commonly subjected to the creep effects. Also, predicting the creep behavior is significant to design the optoelectronic and photonic advanced composites with optical fibers. As a result, the uniform behavior with constant gradient is seen in the principal creep strain rate behavior, and also creep rupture may happen at the fiber end. Finally, good agreements are found through comparing the obtained analytical and FEM results.

  15. Basalt fiber reinforced polymer composites: Processing and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiang

    A high efficiency rig was designed and built for in-plane permeability measurement of fabric materials. A new data derivation procedure to acquire the flow fluid pattern in the experiment was developed. The measurement results of the in-plane permeability for basalt twill 31 fabric material showed that a high correlation exists between the two principal permeability values for this fabric at 35% fiber volume fraction. This may be the most important scientific contribution made in this thesis. The results from radial measurements corresponded quite well with those from Unidirectional (UD) measurements, which is a well-established technique. No significant differences in mechanical properties were found between basalt fabric reinforced polymer composites and glass composites reinforced by a fabric of similar weave pattern. Aging results indicate that the interfacial region in basalt composites may be more vulnerable to environmental damage than that in glass composites. However, the basalt/epoxy interface may have been more durable than the glass/epoxy interface in tension-tension fatigue because the basalt composites have significantly longer fatigue life. In this thesis, chapter I reviews the literature on fiber reinforced polymer composites, with concentration on permeability measurement, mechanical properties and durability. Chapter II discusses the design of the new rig for in-plane permeability measurement, the new derivation procedure for monitoring of the fluid flow pattern, and the permeability measurement results. Chapter III compares the mechanical properties and durability between basalt fiber and glass fiber reinforced polymer composites. Lastly, chapter IV gives some suggestions and recommendations for future work.

  16. Recycling high-performance carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites using sub-critical and supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Chase C.

    of the polymer matrix. To date, very few studies have been reported in this area and the studies thus far have only focused on small scale feasibility and have only shown the recovery of random fibers. The goal of this research is to advance the knowledge in the field of sub-critical and supercritical fluid recycling by providing fundamental information that will be necessary to move this process forward to an industrial scale. This dissertation work consists of several phases of studies. In the first phase of this research, the feasibility of recycling woven CFRP was established on a scale approximately 30 times larger than previously reported. The industrial relevance was also conveyed, as the process was shown to remove up 99% of a highly cross-linked resin from an aerospace grade composite system with 100% retention of the single filament tensile strength and modulus whilst also retaining the highly valuable woven fiber structure. The second phase of research demonstrated the power of this technology to recycle multi-layer composites and provide the ability to reuse the highly valuable materials. Up to 99% resin elimination was achieved for a woven 12-layer aerospace grade composite. The recycled woven fabric layers, with excellent retention of the fiber architecture, were directly reused to fabricate reclaimed fiber composites (RFC). Manufacturing issues associated with the use of the recycled fiber were investigated. Several fabrication technologies were used to fabricate the composite, and the composites show moderate short beam shear strength and may be suitable for certain industrial applications. Moreover, fresh composites were also recycled, recovered, and reused to investigate the retention of flexural properties of the fibers after recycling. Up to 95% of the flexural strength and 98% of the flexural modulus was retained in the reclaimed fiber composites. The recycled resin residual can be incorporated into fresh resin and cured, demonstrating a near

  17. Structural tailoring of select fiber composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Rubinstein, Robert I.

    1990-01-01

    A multidisciplinary design process for aerospace propulsion composite structures was formalized and embedded into computer codes. These computer codes are streamlined to obtain tailored designs for select composite structures. The codes available are briefly described with sample cases to illustrate their applications. The sample cases include aircraft engine blades, propfans (turboprops), flat, and cylindrical panels. Typical results illustrate that the use of these codes enable the designer to obtain designs which meet all the design requirements with maximum benefits in efficiency, noise, weight or thermal distortions.

  18. An analytical solution for the elastoplastic response of a continuous fiber composite under uniaxial loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jong-Won; Allen, David H.

    1990-01-01

    A continuous fiber composite is modelled by a two-element composite cylinder in order to predict the elastoplastic response of the composite under a monotonically increasing tensile loading parallel to fibers. The fibers and matrix are assumed to be elastic-perfectly plastic materials obeying Hill's and Tresca's yield criteria, respectively. Here, the composite behavior when the fibers yield prior to the matrix is investigated.

  19. Properties of PMR Polyimide composites made with improved high strength graphite fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    High strength, intermediate modulus graphite fibers were obtained from various commercial suppliers, and were used to fabricate PMR-15 and PMR-2 polyimide composites. The effects of the improved high strength graphite fibers on composite properties after exposure in air at 600 F were investigated. Two of the improved fibers were found to have an adverse effect on the long term performance of PMR composites. The influence of various factors such as fiber physical properties, surface morphology and chemical composition were also examined.

  20. Method of making a continuous ceramic fiber composite hot gas filter

    DOEpatents

    Hill, Charles A.; Wagner, Richard A.; Komoroski, Ronald G.; Gunter, Greg A.; Barringer, Eric A.; Goettler, Richard W.

    1999-01-01

    A ceramic fiber composite structure particularly suitable for use as a hot gas cleanup ceramic fiber composite filter and method of making same from ceramic composite material has a structure which provides for increased strength and toughness in high temperature environments. The ceramic fiber composite structure or filter is made by a process in which a continuous ceramic fiber is intimately surrounded by discontinuous chopped ceramic fibers during manufacture to produce a ceramic fiber composite preform which is then bonded using various ceramic binders. The ceramic fiber composite preform is then fired to create a bond phase at the fiber contact points. Parameters such as fiber tension, spacing, and the relative proportions of the continuous ceramic fiber and chopped ceramic fibers can be varied as the continuous ceramic fiber and chopped ceramic fiber are simultaneously formed on the porous vacuum mandrel to obtain a desired distribution of the continuous ceramic fiber and the chopped ceramic fiber in the ceramic fiber composite structure or filter.

  1. Geniohyoid muscle properties and myosin heavy chain composition are altered after short-term intermittent hypoxic exposure.

    PubMed

    Pae, Eung-Kwon; Wu, Jennifer; Nguyen, Daniel; Monti, Ryan; Harper, Ronald M

    2005-03-01

    Patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) often exhibit fatigued or inefficient upper airway dilator and constrictor muscles; an upper airway dilator, the geniohyoid (GH) muscle, is a particular example. Intermittent hypoxia (IH) is a frequent concomitant of OSA, and it may trigger muscle fiber composition changes that are characteristic of a fatigable nature. We examined effects of short-term IH on diaphragmatic and GH muscle fiber composition and fatigue properties by exposing 24 rats to alternating 10.3% O(2)-balance N(2) and room air every 480 s (240 s duty cycle) for a total duration of 5, 10, 15, 20, or 30 h. Sternohyoid fiber composition was also examined. Control animals were exposed to room air on the same schedule. Single-fiber analyses showed that GH muscle fiber types changed completely from myosin heavy chain (MHC) type 2A to MHC type 2B after 10 h of exposure, and the conversion was maintained for at least 30 h. Sternohyoid muscle fibers showed a delayed transition from MHC type 2A/2B to MHC type 2B. In contrast, major fiber types of the diaphragm were not significantly altered. The GH muscles showed similar tension-frequency relationships in all groups, but an increased fatigability developed, proportional to the duration of IH treatment. We conclude that short-term IH exposure alters GH muscle composition and physical properties toward more fatigable, fast-twitch types and that it may account for the fatigable upper airway fiber types found in sleep-disturbed breathing. PMID:15557011

  2. Multifunctional Hybrid Carbon Nanotube/Carbon Fiber Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Jin Ho; Cano, Roberto J.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Luong, Hoa; Grimsley, Brian W.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2016-01-01

    For aircraft primary structures, carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites possess many advantages over conventional aluminum alloys due to their light weight, higher strengthand stiffness-to-weight ratio, and low life-cycle maintenance costs. However, the relatively low electrical and thermal conductivities of CFRP composites fail to provide structural safety in certain operational conditions such as lightning strikes. Despite several attempts to solve these issues with the addition of carbon nanotubes (CNT) into polymer matrices, and/or by interleaving CNT sheets between conventional carbon fiber (CF) composite layers, there are still interfacial problems that exist between CNTs (or CF) and the resin. In this study, hybrid CNT/CF polymer composites were fabricated by interleaving layers of CNT sheets with Hexcel® IM7/8852 prepreg. Resin concentrations from 1 wt% to 50 wt% were used to infuse the CNT sheets prior to composite fabrication. The interlaminar properties of the resulting hybrid composites were characterized by mode I and II fracture toughness testing (double cantilever beam and end-notched flexure test). Fractographical analysis was performed to study the effect of resin concentration. In addition, multi-directional physical properties like thermal conductivity of the orthotropic hybrid polymer composite were evaluated. Interleaving CNT sheets significantly improved the in-plane (axial and perpendicular direction of CF alignment) thermal conductivity of the hybrid composite laminates by 50 - 400%.

  3. Highly Aligned Carbon Fiber in Polymer Composite Structures via Additive Manufacturing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tekinalp, Halil L; Kunc, Vlastimil; Velez-Garcia, Gregorio M; Duty, Chad E; Love, Lonnie J; Naskar, Amit K; Blue, Craig A; Ozcan, Soydan

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing, diverging from traditional manufacturing techniques, such as casting and machining materials, can handle complex shapes with great design flexibility without the typical waste. Although this technique has been mainly used for rapid prototyping, interest is growing in using this method to directly manufacture actual parts of complex shape. To use 3D-printing additive manufacturing in wide spread applications, the technique and the feedstock materials require improvements to meet the mechanical requirements of load-bearing components. Thus, we investigated the short fiber (0.2 mm to 0.4 mm) reinforced acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene composites as a feedstock for 3D-printing in terms of their processibility, microstructuremore » and mechanical performance; and also provided comparison with traditional compression molded composites. The tensile strength and modulus of 3D-printed samples increased ~115% and ~700%, respectively. 3D-printer yielded samples with very high fiber orientation in printing direction (up to 91.5 %), whereas, compression molding process yielded samples with significantly less fiber orientation. Microstructure-mechanical property relationships revealed that although the relatively high porosity is observed in the 3D-printed composites as compared to those produced by the conventional compression molding technique, they both exhibited comparable tensile strength and modulus. This phenomena is explained based on the changes in fiber orientation, dispersion and void formation.« less

  4. Thermal properties of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)/vegetable fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitorino, Maria B. C.; Reul, Lízzia T. A.; Carvalho, Laura H.; Canedo, Eduardo L.

    2015-05-01

    The present work studies the thermal properties of composites of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) - a fully biodegradable semi-crystalline thermo-plastic obtained from renewable resources through low-impact biotechno-logical process, biocompatible and non-toxic - and vegetable fiber from the fruit (coconut) of babassu palm tree. PHB is a highly crystalline resin and this characteristic leads to suboptimal properties in some cases. Consequently, thermal properties, in particular those associated with the crystallization of the matrix, are important to judge the suitability of the compounds for specific applications. PHB/babassu composites with 0-50% load were prepared in an internal mixer. Two different types of babassu fibers with two different particle size ranges were compounded with PHB and test specimens molded by compression. Melting and crystallization behavior were studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) at heating/cooling rates between 2 and 30°C/min. Several parameters, including melting point, crystallization temperature, crystallinity, and rate of crystallization, were estimated as functions of load and heating/cooling rates. Results indicate that fibers do not affect the melting process, but facilitate crystallization from the melt. Crystallization temperatures are 30 to 40°C higher for the compounds compared with the neat resin. However, the amount of fiber added has little effect on crystallinity and the degree of crystallinity is hardly affected by the load. Fiber type and initial particle size do not have a significant effect on thermal properties.

  5. Anomaly detection of microstructural defects in continuous fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bricker, Stephen; Simmons, J. P.; Przybyla, Craig; Hardie, Russell

    2015-03-01

    Ceramic matrix composites (CMC) with continuous fiber reinforcements have the potential to enable the next generation of high speed hypersonic vehicles and/or significant improvements in gas turbine engine performance due to their exhibited toughness when subjected to high mechanical loads at extreme temperatures (2200F+). Reinforced fiber composites (RFC) provide increased fracture toughness, crack growth resistance, and strength, though little is known about how stochastic variation and imperfections in the material effect material properties. In this work, tools are developed for quantifying anomalies within the microstructure at several scales. The detection and characterization of anomalous microstructure is a critical step in linking production techniques to properties, as well as in accurate material simulation and property prediction for the integrated computation materials engineering (ICME) of RFC based components. It is desired to find statistical outliers for any number of material characteristics such as fibers, fiber coatings, and pores. Here, fiber orientation, or `velocity', and `velocity' gradient are developed and examined for anomalous behavior. Categorizing anomalous behavior in the CMC is approached by multivariate Gaussian mixture modeling. A Gaussian mixture is employed to estimate the probability density function (PDF) of the features in question, and anomalies are classified by their likelihood of belonging to the statistical normal behavior for that feature.

  6. Thermostructural tailoring of fiber composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acquaviva, Thomas H.

    1992-01-01

    A significant area of interest in design of complex structures involves the study of multidisciplined problems. The coordination of several different intricate areas of study to obtain a particular design of a structure is a new and pressing area of research. In the past, each discipline would perform its task consecutively using the appropriate inputs from the other disciplines. This process usually required several time-consuming iterations to obtain a satisfactory design. The alternative pursued here is combining various participating disciplines and specified design requirements into a formal structural computer code. The main focus of this research is to develop a multidiscipline structural tailoring method for select composite structures and to demonstrate its application to specific areas. The development of an integrated computer program involves the coupling of three independent computer programs using an excutive module. This module will be the foundation for integrating a structural optimizer, a composites analyzer and a thermal analyzer. With the completion of the executive module, the first step was taken toward the evolution of multidiscipline software in the field of composite mechanics. Through the use of an array of cases involving a variety of objective functions/constraints and thermal-mechanical load conditions, it became evident that simple composite structures can be designed to a combined loads environment.

  7. Metal-bonded, carbon fiber-reinforced composites

    DOEpatents

    Sastri, S.A.; Pemsler, J.P.; Cooke, R.A.; Litchfield, J.K.; Smith, M.B.

    1996-03-05

    Metal bonded carbon fiber-reinforced composites are disclosed in which the metal and the composite are strongly bound by (1) providing a matrix-depleted zone in the composite of sufficient depth to provide a binding site for the metal to be bonded and then (2) infiltrating the metal into the matrix-free zone to fill a substantial portion of the zone and also provide a surface layer of metal, thereby forming a strong bond between the composite and the metal. The invention also includes the metal-bound composite itself, as well as the provision of a coating over the metal for high-temperature performance or for joining to other such composites or to other substrates. 2 figs.

  8. Metal-bonded, carbon fiber-reinforced composites

    DOEpatents

    Sastri, Suri A.; Pemsler, J. Paul; Cooke, Richard A.; Litchfield, John K.; Smith, Mark B.

    1996-01-01

    Metal bonded carbon fiber-reinforced composites are disclosed in which the metal and the composite are strongly bound by (1) providing a matrix-depleted zone in the composite of sufficient depth to provide a binding site for the metal to be bonded and then (2) infiltrating the metal into the matrix-free zone to fill a substantial portion of the zone and also provide a surface layer of metal, thereby forming a strong bond between the composite and the metal. The invention also includes the metal-bound composite itself, as well as the provision of a coating over the metal for high-temperature performance or for joining to other such composites or to other substrates.

  9. Chemical Vapor Deposited SiC (SCS-0) Fiber-Reinforced Strontium Aluminosilicate Glass-Ceramic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    1997-01-01

    Unidirectional SrO Al2O3 2SiO2 glass-ceramic matrix composites reinforced with uncoated Chemical Vapor Deposited (CVD) SiC (SCS-0) fibers have been fabricated by hot-pressing under appropriate conditions using the glass-ceramic approach. Almost fully dense composites having a fiber volume fraction of 0.24 have been obtained. Monoclinic celsian, SrAl2Si2O8, was the only crystalline phase observed in the matrix by x-ray diffraction. No chemical reaction was observed between the fiber and the matrix after high temperature processing. In three-point flexure, the composite exhibited a first matrix cracking stress of approx. 231 +/- 20 MPa and an ultimate strength of 265 +/- 17 MPa. Examination of fracture surfaces revealed limited short length fiber pull-out. From fiber push-out, the fiber/matrix interfacial debonding and frictional strengths were evaluated to be approx. 17.5 +/- 2.7 MPa and 11.3 +/- 1.6 MPa, respectively. Some fibers were strongly bonded to the matrix and could not be pushed out. The micromechanical models were not useful in predicting values of the first matrix cracking stress as well as the ultimate strength of the composites.

  10. Activation and micropore structure of carbon-fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G.

    1997-12-01

    Rigid, high surface area activated carbon fiber composites have been produced with high permeabilities for environmental applications in gas and water purification. The project involves a collaboration between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), University of Kentucky. The main focus of recent work has been to find a satisfactory means to uniformly activate large samples of carbon fiber composites to produce controlled pore structures. Processes have been developed using activation in steam and CO{sub 2}, and a less conventional method involving oxygen chemisorption and subsequent heat treatment. Another objective has been to explore applications for the activated composites in environmental applications related to fossil energy production.

  11. Friction and wear behavior of graphite fiber reinforced polyimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.; Sliney, H. E.

    1977-01-01

    The friction and wear rate characteristics of 50/50 (weight per cent) graphite fiber-polyimide composites were studied by sliding metallic hemispherically tipped riders against disks made from the composites. Two different polyimides and two different graphite fibers were evaluated. Also studied were such variables as the effect of adding 10 per cent weight additions of powdered (CF-1.1)n, CdI2, or CdO, the effect of moisture in an air atmosphere, the effect of temperature, and the effect of different sliding speeds. In general, wear to the metallic riders was negligible and composite wear increased at a constant rate as a function of number of sliding cycles.

  12. Radiation Transport Properties of Polyethylene-Fiber Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Raj K.; Barghouty, A. F.; Dahche, H. M.

    2003-01-01

    Composite materials that can both serve as effective shielding materials against cosmic-ray and energetic solar particles in deep space as well as structural materials for habitat and spacecraft remain a critical and mission enabling piece in mission planning and exploration. Polyethylene is known to have excellent shielding properties due to its low density coupled with high hydrogen content. Polyethylene fiber reinforced composites promise to combine this shielding effectiveness with the required mechanical properties of structural materials. Samples of Polyethylene-fiber reinforced epoxy matrix composite 1-5 cm thick were prepared at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and tested against 500 MeV/nucleon Fe beam at the HIMAC facility of NIRS in Chiba, Japan. This paper presents measured and calculated results for the radiation transport properties of these samples.

  13. Auger analysis of a fiber/matrix interface in a ceramic matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honecy, Frank S.; Pepper, Stephen V.

    1988-01-01

    Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) depth profiling was used to characterize the fiber/matrix interface of an SiC fiber, reaction bonded Si3N4 matrix composite. Depth profiles of the as received double coated fiber revealed concentration oscillations which disappeared after annealing the fiber in the environment used to fabricate the composite. After the composite was fractured, the Auger depth profiles showed that failure occurred in neither the Beta-SiC fiber body nor in the Si3N4 matrix but, concurrently, at the fiber coating/matrix interface and within the fiber coating itself.

  14. Boron/aluminum graphite/resin advanced fiber composite hybrids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Lark, R. F.; Sullivan, T. L.

    1975-01-01

    Fabrication feasibility and potential of an adhesively bonded metal and resin matrix fiber-composite hybrid are determined as an advanced material for aerospace and other structural applications. The results show that using this hybrid concept makes possible a composite design which, when compared with nonhybrid composites, has greater transverse strength, transverse stiffness, and impact resistance with only a small penalty on density and longitudinal properties. The results also show that laminate theory is suitable for predicting the structural response of such hybrids. The sequence of fracture modes indicates that these types of hybrids can be readily designed to meet fail-safe requirements.

  15. Graphite fiber textile preform/copper matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filatovs, G. J.

    1993-01-01

    This project has the objective of exploring the use of graphite fiber textile preform/copper matrix composites in spacecraft heat transmitting and radiating components. The preforms are to be fabricated by braiding of tows and when infiltrated with copper will result in a 3-D reinforced, near net shape composite with improved specific properties such as lower density and higher stiffness. It is anticipated that the use of textile technology will result in a more robust preform and consequently better final composite; it is hard to anticipate what performance tradeoffs will result, and these will be explored through testing and characterization.

  16. Method of Fabricating Chopped-Fiber Composite Piston

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Northam, G. Burton (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A three-dimensional piston molding is fabricated from a mixture of chopped, carbon tow filaments of variable length, which are prepregged with carbonaceous organic resins and/or pitches and molded by conventional molding processes into a near net shape, to form a carbon-fiber reinforced organic-matrix composite part. Continuous reinforcement in the form of carbon-carbon composite tapes or pieces of fabric can be also laid in the mold before or during the charging of the mold with the chopped-fiber mixture, to enhance the strength in the crown and wrist-pin areas. The molded chopped-fiber reinforced organic-matrix composite parts are then pyrolized in an inert atmosphere, to convert the organic matrix materials to carbon. These pyrolized parts are then densified by reimpregnation with resins or pitches, which are subsequently carbonized. Densification is also accomplished by direct infiltration with carbon by vapor deposition processes. Once the desired density has been achieved, the piston molds are machined to final piston dimensions, and piston ring grooves are added. To prevent oxidation and/or to seal the piston surface or near surface, the chopped-fiber piston is coated with ceramic and/or metallic sealants: and/or coated with a catalyst.

  17. Rapid Fabrication of Carbide Matrix/Carbon Fiber Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian E.; Bernander, Robert E.

    2007-01-01

    Composites of zirconium carbide matrix material reinforced with carbon fibers can be fabricated relatively rapidly in a process that includes a melt infiltration step. Heretofore, these and other ceramic matrix composites have been made in a chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process that takes months. The finished products of the CVI process are highly porous and cannot withstand temperatures above 3,000 F (approx.1,600 C). In contrast, the melt-infiltration-based process takes only a few days, and the composite products are more nearly fully dense and have withstood temperatures as high as 4,350 F (approx.2,400 C) in a highly oxidizing thrust chamber environment. Moreover, because the melt- infiltration-based process takes much less time, the finished products are expected to cost much less. Fabrication begins with the preparation of a carbon fiber preform that, typically, is of the size and shape of a part to be fabricated. By use of low-temperature ultraviolet-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, the carbon fibers in the preform are coated with one or more interfacial material(s), which could include oxides. The interfacial material helps to protect the fibers against chemical attack during the remainder of the fabrication process and against oxidation during subsequent use; it also enables slippage between the fibers and the matrix material, thereby helping to deflect cracks and distribute loads. Once the fibers have been coated with the interfacial material, the fiber preform is further infiltrated with a controlled amount of additional carbon, which serves as a reactant for the formation of the carbide matrix material. The next step is melt infiltration. The preform is exposed to molten zirconium, which wicks into the preform, drawn by capillary action. The molten metal fills most of the interstices of the preform and reacts with the added carbon to form the zirconium carbide matrix material. The zirconium does not react with the underlying fibers because they

  18. Dynamic tensile response of a carbon-fiber-reinforced LCP composite and its temperature sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Victor P. W.; Yuan, J.; Lim, C. T.

    2001-06-01

    The tensile mechanical behavior of a short carbon fiber filled liquid crystalline polymer (LCP) composite, Vectra A230, was examined under static extension and dynamic loading at three temperatures. Dynamic tension was applied using a pendulum-type tensile spilt Hopkinson bar device. Specimens fabricated according to both the mould flow and transverse directions were tested. The stress-strain curves at various strain rates and temperatures were determined and found to be sensitive to strain rate as well as temperature for both types of specimens. With reference to the properties of pure LCP, mechanical anisotropy and fiber reinforcement effects were characterized and are discussed. Failed specimens were observed suing an optical microscope. Deformation and failure mechanisms in the microstructure of the LCP composite were studied to understand the effects of strain rate and temperature on material strength and failure strain.

  19. Fabrication Routes for Continuous Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic Composites (CFCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCarlo, James A.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    1998-01-01

    The primary approaches used for fabrication of continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composite (CFCC) components have been reviewed. The CFCC fabrication issues related to fiber, interface, and matrix have been analyzed. The capabilities. advantages and limitations of the five matrix-infiltration routes have been compared and discussed. Today. the best fabrication route for the CFCC end-user is not clear and compromises need to be made depending on the details of the CFCC application. However, with time, this problem should be reduced as research continues to develop advanced CFCC constituents and fabrication routes.

  20. Fabrication Routes for Continuous Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic Composites (CFCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCarlo, James A.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    1998-01-01

    The primary approaches used for fabrication of continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composite (CFCC) components have been reviewed. The CFCC fabrication issues related to fiber, interface, and matrix have been analyzed. The capabilities, advantages and limitations of the five matrix-infiltration routes have been compared and discussed. Today, the best fabrication route for the CFCC end-user is not clear and compromises need to be made depending on the details of the CFCC application. However, with time, this problem should be reduced as research continues to develop advanced CFCC constituents and fabrication routes.

  1. Nonlinear laminate analysis for metal matrix fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    A nonlinear laminate analysis is described for predicting the mechanical behavior (stress-strain relationships) of angle-ply laminates in which the matrix is strained nonlinearly by both the residual stress and the mechanical load and in which additional nonlinearities are induced due to progressive fiber fractures and ply relative rotations. The nonlinear laminate analysis is based on linear composite mechanics and a piece-wise linear laminate analysis to handle the nonlinear responses. Results obtained by using this nonlinear analysis on boron-fiber/aluminum-matrix angle-ply laminates agree well with experimental data. The results shown illustrate the in situ ply stress-strain behavior and synergistic strength enhancement.

  2. Nonlinear laminate analysis for metal matrix fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    A nonlinear laminate analysis is described for predicting the mechanical behavior (stress-strain relationships) of angleplied laminates in which the matrix is strained nonlinearly by both the residual stress and the mechanical load and in which additional nonlinearities are induced due to progressive fiber fractures and ply relative rotations. The nonlinear laminate analysis (NLA) is based on linear composite mechanics and a piece wise linear laminate analysis to handle the nonlinear responses. Results obtained by using this nonlinear analysis on boron fiber/aluminum matrix angleplied laminates agree well with experimental data. The results shown illustrate the in situ ply stress-strain behavior and synergistic strength enhancement.

  3. Electromagnetic Shielding of Oriented Carbon Fiber Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micheli, D.; Laurenzi, S.; Mariani Primiani, V.; Moglie, F.; Gradoni, G.; Marchetti, M.

    2012-05-01

    The paper analyses the electromagnetic shielding measurements of carbon fiber composite structure. In particular the shielding effectiveness is measured applying the nested reverberation chamber method in the frequency range of 3.5 GHz - 8.5 GHz. This method ensure a realistic electromagnetic excitation of the sample under test characterized by a random polarization and incoming direction. The paper also describes the material manufacturing procedure and gives important details about the sample mounting technique. Three material samples are considered which differ in carbon fiber orientation and stratification. Obtained results highlight the capability of such materials to behave as high-performance shields in the microwave region.

  4. Use of Carbon Fiber Composite Molecular Sieves for Air Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Frederick S; Contescu, Cristian I; Gallego, Nidia C; Burchell, Timothy D

    2005-09-01

    A novel adsorbent material, 'carbon fiber composite molecular sieve' (CFCMS), has been developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Its features include high surface area, large pore volume, and a rigid, permeable carbon structure that exhibits significant electrical conductivity. The unique combination of high adsorptive capacity, permeability, good mechanical properties, and electrical conductivity represents an enabling technology for the development of novel gas separation and purification systems. In this context, it is proposed that a fast-cycle air separation process that exploits a kinetic separation of oxygen and nitrogen should be possible using a CFCMS material coupled with electrical swing adsorption (ESA). The adsorption of O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2} on activated carbon fibers was investigated using static and dynamic techniques. Molecular sieving effects in the activated carbon fiber were highlighted by the adsorption of CO{sub 2}, a more sensitive probe molecule for the presence of microporosity in adsorbents. The kinetic studies revealed that O2 was more rapidly adsorbed on the carbon fiber than N{sub 2}, and with higher uptake under equilibrium conditions, providing the fiber contained a high proportion of very narrow micropores. The work indicated that CFCMS is capable of separating O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} from air on the basis of the different diffusion rates of the two molecules in the micropore network of the activated carbon fibers comprising the composite material. In response to recent enquires from several potential users of CFCMS materials, attention has been given to the development of a viable continuous process for the commercial production of CFCMS material. As part of this effort, work was implemented on characterizing the performance of lignin-based activated carbon fiber, a potentially lower cost fiber than the pitch-based fibers used for CFCMS production to date. Similarly, to address engineering issues, measurements were

  5. Compensation of nonlinear phase shifts with third-order dispersion in short-pulse fiber amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shian; Kuznetsova, Lyuba; Chong, Andy; Wise, Frank

    2005-06-27

    We show that nonlinear phase shifts and third-order dispersion can compensate each other in short-pulse fiber amplifiers. This compen-sation can be exploited in any implementation of chirped-pulse amplification, with stretching and compression accomplished with diffraction gratings, single-mode fiber, microstructure fiber, fiber Bragg gratings, etc. In particular, we consider chirped-pulse fiber amplifiers at wavelengths for which the fiber dispersion is normal. The nonlinear phase shift accumulated in the amplifier can be compensated by the third-order dispersion of the combination of a fiber stretcher and grating compressor. A numerical model is used to predict the compensation, and experimental results that exhibit the main features of the calculations are presented. In the presence of third-order dispersion, an optimal nonlinear phase shift reduces the pulse duration, and enhances the peak power and pulse contrast compared to the pulse produced in linear propagation. Contrary to common belief, fiber stretchers can perform as well or better than grating stretchers in fiber amplifiers, while offering the major practical advantages of a waveguide medium. PMID:19498473

  6. A New Fiber Preform with Nanocarbon Binder for Manufacturing Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composite by Liquid Molding Process.

    PubMed

    Seong, Dong Gi; Ha, Jong Rok; Lee, Jea Uk; Lee, Wonoh; Kim, Byung Sun

    2015-11-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced composite has been a good candidate of lightweight structural component in the automotive industry. As fast production speed is essential to apply the composite materials for the mass production area such as automotive components, the high speed liquid composite molding processes have been developed. Fast resin injection through the fiber preform by high pressure is required to improve the production speed, but it often results in undesirable deformations of the fiber preform which causes defectives in size and properties of the final composite products. In order to prevent the undesirable deformation and improve the stability of preform shape, polymer type binder materials are used. More stable fiber preform can be obtained by increasing the amount of binder material, but it disturbs the resin impregnation through the fiber preform. In this study, carbon nanomaterials such as graphene oxide were embedded on the surface of carbon fiber by electrophoretic deposition method in order to improve the shape stability of fiber preform and interfacial bonding between polymer and the reinforcing fiber. Effects of the modified reinforcing fiber were investigated in two respects. One is to increase the binding energy between fiber tows, and the other is to increase the interfacial bonding between polymer matrix and fiber surface. The effects were analyzed by measuring the binding force of fiber preform and interlaminar shear strength of the composite. This study also investigated the high speed liquid molding process of the composite materials composed of polymer matrix and the carbon fiber preforms embedded by carbon nanomaterials. Process parameter such as permeability of fiber preform was measured to investigate the effect of nanoscale surface modification on the macroscale processing condition for composite manufacturing. PMID:26726642

  7. Reflectance Imaging by Graded-Index Short Multimode Fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Manabu; Kanno, Takahiro; Ishihara, Syoutarou; Suto, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Toshihiro; Nishidate, Izumi

    2013-05-01

    The imaging condition and magnifications were measured using a graded-index multimode fiber for optical communication with a diameter of 140 µm and a length of 5 mm. The field of view was about 80 µm and the test pattern of 4.38 µm period was recognized. Reducing the background noise with the polarizer reflectance images of the weed surface were measured to show the cell shapes. There are problems such as background, distortion, and nonuniformity of image quality; however, the feasibility for minimally invasive endoscope has been shown.

  8. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Short Fiber Mutants Ligon-lintless 1 And 2 Reveals Common Mechanisms Pertinent to Fiber Elongation in Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the molecular processes affecting cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) fiber development is important for developing tools aimed at improving fiber quality. Short fiber cotton mutants Ligon-lintless 1 (Li1) and Ligon-lintless 2 (Li2) are naturally occurring, monogenic mutations residing on diff...

  9. Degradation of the composite fiber/matrix interface in marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farooq, Muhammad Umar

    Durability of the composite materials in marine environments has been investigated experimentally and with analytical and numerical methods. The main focus of this study is on the integrity of the fiber/matrix interface under seawater exposure. A single-fiber compression test specimen called the Outwater-Murphy (OM) test has been analyzed using mechanics of materials principles and linear elastic fracture mechanics. Sizing of the OM specimen was conducted so that debonding of the fiber from the interface should be achieved prior to yielding of the matrix and global instability failure. Stress analysis of the OM specimen has been conducted from theory of elasticity and finite element analysis. A superelement technique was developed for detailed analysis of the stress state at the fiber/matrix interface. The interface stress state at the debond site in the OM specimen, i.e. at the hole edge, was identified as biaxial tension at the fiber/matrix interface. Characterization of cure and post-cure of 8084 and 510A vinlyester resins has been performed using cure shrinkage tests based on dynamic mechanical analysis and coated beam experiments. In addition, moisture absorption, swelling and the influence of moisture on the mechanical properties of the resins were determined. Testing of OM specimens consisting of a single carbon or glass fiber embedded in vinylester resin at dry conditions and after seawater exposure revealed that the debond toughness was substantially reduced after exposure of the OM specimen to seawater. C(F) did not debond. Macroscopic carbon/vinylester woven composites where the fibers were sized with F sizing were tested in shear at dry conditions and after four weeks of seawater exposure. The shear strength was very little affected after the short immersion time.

  10. Fiber composite fan blade impact improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graff, J.; Stoltze, L.; Varholak, E. M.

    1976-01-01

    The improved foreign object damage resistance of a metal matrix advanced composite fan blade was demonstrated. The fabrication, whirl impact test and subsequent evaluation of nine advanced composite fan blades of the "QCSEE" type design were performed. The blades were designed to operate at a tip speed of 282 m/sec. The blade design was the spar/shell type, consisting of a titanium spar and boron/aluminum composite airfoils. The blade retention was designed to rock on impact with large birds, thereby reducing the blade bending stresses. The program demonstrated the ability of the blades to sustain impacts with up to 681 g slices of birds at 0.38 rad with little damage (only 1.4 percent max weight loss) and 788 g slices of birds at 0.56 rad with only 3.2 percent max weight loss. Unbonding did not exceed 1.1 percent of the post-test blade area during any of the tests. All blades in the post-test condition were judged capable of operation in accordance with the FAA guidelines for medium and large bird impacts.

  11. Energy Dependent Processing of Fiber Reinforced Plastics with Ultra Short Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, N.; Lasagni, A.; Klotzbach, U.

    In this paper the processing of a fiber reinforced plastic consisting of glass fibers embedded in polypropylene with ultra short laser systems is shown. Focus of the study is on the dependence of working wavelength (1064 nm, 532 nm and 355 nm) and pulse duration (500 fs to 10 ps) on the laser ablation characteristic of the treated material. Depending on the energy density and the material properties, two different process regions could be identified.

  12. CODIFICATION OF FIBER REINFORCED COMPOSITE PIPING

    SciTech Connect

    Rawls, G.

    2012-10-10

    The goal of the overall project is to successfully adapt spoolable FRP currently used in the oil industry for use in hydrogen pipelines. The use of FRP materials for hydrogen service will rely on the demonstrated compatibility of these materials for pipeline service environments and operating conditions. The ability of the polymer piping to withstand degradation while in service, and development of the tools and data required for life management are imperative for successful implementation of these materials for hydrogen pipeline. The information and data provided in this report provides the technical basis for the codification for fiber reinforced piping (FRP) for hydrogen service. The DOE has invested in the evaluation of FRP for the delivery for gaseous hydrogen to support the development of a hydrogen infrastructure. The codification plan calls for detailed investigation of the following areas: System design and applicable codes and standards; Service degradation of FRP; Flaw tolerance and flaw detection; Integrity management plan; Leak detection and operational controls evaluation; Repair evaluation. The FRP codification process started with commercially available products that had extensive use in the oil and gas industry. These products have been evaluated to assure that sufficient structural integrity is available for a gaseous hydrogen environment.

  13. CO2-laser-assisted processing of glass fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, Christian; Emonts, Michael; Schares, Richard Ludwig; Stimpfl, Joffrey

    2013-02-01

    To fully exploit the potential of fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites (FRTC) and to achieve a broad industrial application, automated manufacturing systems are crucial. Investigations at Fraunhofer IPT have proven that the use of laser system technology in processing FRTC allows to achieve high throughput, quality, flexibility, reproducibility and out-of-autoclave processing simultaneously. As 90% of the FRP in Europe1 are glass fiber-reinforced a high impact can be achieved by introducing laser-assisted processing with all its benefits to glass fiber-reinforced thermoplastics (GFRTC). Fraunhofer IPT has developed the diode laser-assisted tape placement (laying and winding) to process carbon fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites (CFRTC) for years. However, this technology cannot be transferred unchanged to process milky transparent GFRTC prepregs (preimpregnated fibers). Due to the short wavelength (approx. 980 nm) and therefore high transmission less than 20% of the diode laser energy is absorbed as heat into non-colored GFRTC prepregs. Hence, the use of a different wave length, e.g. CO2-laser (10.6 μm) with more than 90% laser absorption, is required to allow the full potential of laser-assisted processing of GFRTC. Also the absorption of CO2-laser radiation at the surface compared to volume absorption of diode laser radiation is beneficial for the interlaminar joining of GFRTC. Fraunhofer IPT is currently developing and investigating the CO2-laser-assisted tape placement including new system, beam guiding, process and monitoring technology to enable a resource and energy efficient mass production of GFRP composites, e.g. pipes, tanks, masts. The successful processing of non-colored glass fiber-reinforced Polypropylene (PP) and Polyphenylene Sulfide (PPS) has already been proven.

  14. Natural Curaua Fiber-Reinforced Composites in Multilayered Ballistic Armor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, Sergio Neves; Louro, Luis Henrique Leme; Trindade, Willian; Elias, Carlos Nelson; Ferreira, Carlos Luiz; de Sousa Lima, Eduardo; Weber, Ricardo Pondé; Miguez Suarez, João Carlos; da Silva Figueiredo, André Ben-Hur; Pinheiro, Wagner Anacleto; da Silva, Luis Carlos; Lima, Édio Pereira

    2015-10-01

    The performance of a novel multilayered armor in which the commonly used plies of aramid fabric layer were replaced by an equal thickness layer of distinct curaua fiber-reinforced composites with epoxy or polyester matrices was assessed. The investigated armor, in addition to its polymeric layer (aramid fabric or curaua composite), was also composed of a front Al2O3 ceramic tile and backed by an aluminum alloy sheet. Ballistic impact tests were performed with actual 7.62 caliber ammunitions. Indentation in a clay witness, simulating human body behind the back layer, attested the efficacy of the curaua-reinforced composite as an armor component. The conventional aramid fabric display a similar indentation as the curaua/polyester composite but was less efficient (deeper indentation) than the curaua/epoxy composite. This advantage is shown to be significant, especially in favor of the lighter and cheaper epoxy composite reinforced with 30 vol pct of curaua fiber, as possible substitute for aramid fabric in multilayered ballistic armor for individual protection. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the mechanism associated with the curaua composite ballistic performance.

  15. Evaluation of a new fiber-reinforced resin composite.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, S; Saimi, Y; Ono, T

    2006-01-01

    Efficacy of the usage of an experimental fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) on mechanical properties of an indirect composite was investigated by means of three-point bending and Charpy impact tests. Bond strength between the FRC and the indirect composite was also evaluated by tensile testing. The FRC consisted of a matrix resin with 25% silanized milled glass fiber (11-microm diameter, 150-microm length) and 5% colloidal silica. The values of strain of proportional limit, total strain, and fracture energy of the FRC during the bending test (1.2%, 10.4%, and 41.6 x 10(-3) J) were significantly higher than those of the indirect composite (0.1%, 2.5%, and 11.9 x 10(-3) J). The impact strengths of the 1-mm specimens with FRC ranged from 15.2 to 15.9 kJ/m(2), and were significantly higher than that of the control (3.1 kJ/m(2)). The 2-mm specimens showed significant difference from the control when the FRC thickness was equal or greater than 0.5 mm. The bond strength after the thermocycling was 15.2 MPa, and all of the specimens exhibited cohesive fracture inside the indirect composite. Based upon the results, it was concluded that the FRC tested in this study improved toughness and impact resistance of the indirect composite. The interfacial bonding between the FRC and the indirect composite was strong enough to prevent delamination. PMID:16161120

  16. Effects of Fiber-reinforced Composite Bases on Microleakage of Composite Restorations in Proximal Locations

    PubMed Central

    A, Tezvergil-Mutluay; P.K, Vallittu

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the microleakage of direct restorative composite resin upon the addition of an intermediate glass fiber-reinforced composite (GFRC) layer of various fiber orientations between tooth and particulate filler composite resin (PFRC). Materials and Methods: Cavities were prepared both on the mesial and distal surfaces of sixty extracted human molars with one margin placed below and the other above the cementoenamel junction (CEJ). Teeth were assigned to five different groups. Four of the groups received a layer of semi-interpenetrating polymer network (semi-IPN) resin system impregnated E-glass GFRC at the bottom of the cavity: Group 1; unidirectional continuous GFRC (EVS) in buccolingual direction (EVS-BL), Group 2; EVS in mesiodistal direction (EVS-MD), Group 3; bidirectional woven GFRC (EVN), Group 4; multidirectional short GFRC (EXP-MLT), Group 5; PRFC only (control). After acid etching and priming of the cavities and insertion of GFRC layer with the adhesive resin (Scotchbond Multipurpose 3M-ESPE), the cavities were filled incrementally with PRFC (Filtek Z250, 3M-ESPE) and each layer was light cured for 20 s. After finishing and polishing, the restored teeth were water-stored for 24 h at 37 °C and then thermocycled for 6000 cycles between 5-55 °C, before immersion in 0.5 % basic fuchsin dye for 24 h. After sectioning by 3-5 sagittal cuts, each sequential section was imaged and digitally analyzed to determine the stain depth. Results: All GFRC groups in dentin revealed significantly lower microleakage compared to control (p<0.05). The orientation of FRC intermediate layer did not reveal significant differences in microleakage (p>0.05). The microleakeage in enamel was not different between the groups (p>0.05). Conclusion: Use of intermediate GFRC layer between tooth and PFRC could provide alternative method to minimize microleakage. Clinical Relevance: Use of GFRC intermediate layer underneath the particulate filler

  17. Short-term inhalation and in vitro tests as predictors of fiber pathogenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, R T; Miller, B G; Davis, J M; Brown, D M; Donaldson, K

    1997-01-01

    A wide range of fiber types was tested in two in vitro assays: toxicity to A549 epithelial cells, as detachment from substrate, and the production of the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) by rat alveolar macrophages. Three of the fibers were also studied in vivo, using short-term inhalation followed by a) bronchoalveolar lavage to assess the inflammatory response and b) measurement of cell proliferation in terminal bronchioles and alveolar ducts, using incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). The amount of TNF produced by macrophages in vitro depended on the fiber type, with the man-made vitreous fibers, and refractory ceramic fibers being least stimulatory and silicon carbide (SiC) whiskers providing the greatest stimulation. In the epithelial detachment assay there were dose-dependent differences in the toxicity of the various fibers, with long amosite being the most toxic. However, there was no clear relationship to known chronic pathogenicity. Fibers studied by short-term inhalation produced some inflammation, but there was no clear discrimination between the responses to code 100/475 glass fibers and the more pathogenic amosite and SiC. However, measurements of BrdU uptake into lung cells showed that amosite and SiC produced a greater reaction than code 100/475, which itself caused no more proliferation than that seen in untreated lungs. These results mirror the pathogenicity ranking of the fibers in long-term experiments. In conclusion, the only test to show potential as a predictive measure of pathogenicity was that of cell proliferation in lungs after brief inhalation exposure (BrdU assay). We believe that this assay should be validated with a wider range of fibers, doses, and time points. PMID:9400730

  18. Planarized fiber-FHD optical composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, C.; Carpenter, L. G.; Gates, J. C.; Gawith, C. B. E.; Smith, P. G. R.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate the fabrication of a mechanically robust planarised fibre-FHD optical composite. Fabrication is achieved through deposition and consolidation of optical grade silica soot on to both an optical fibre and planar substrate. The consolidated silica acts in joining the fibre and planar substrate both mechanically and optically. The concept lends itself to applications where long interaction lengths (order of tens of centimetres) and optical interaction via a planar waveguide are required, such as pump schemes, precision layup of fibre optics and hybrid fibre-planar devices. This paper considers the developments in fabrication process that enable component development.

  19. Reliability analysis of continuous fiber composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, David J.; Wetherhold, Robert C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes two methods, the maximum distortion energy (MDE) and the principle of independent action (PIA), developed for the analysis of the reliability of a single continuous composite lamina. It is shown that, for the typical laminated plate structure, the individual lamina reliabilities can be combined in order to produce the upper and the lower bounds of reliability for the laminate, similar in nature to the bounds on properties produced from variational elastic methods. These limits were derived for both the interactive and the model failure considerations. Analytical expressions were also derived for the sensitivity of the reliability limits with respect to changes in the Weibull parameters and in loading conditions.

  20. Short vegetal-fiber reinforced HDPE-A study of electron-beam radiation treatment effects on mechanical and morphological properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Maiara S.; Sartori, Mariana N.; Oliveira, Rene R.; Guven, Olgun; Moura, Esperidiana A. B.

    2014-08-01

    The effects of electron-beam radiation treatment on fiber-matrix adhesion and mechanical properties of short piassava fibers reinforced high density polyethylene (HDPE) matrix were studied. Glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) was added at 2.5% and 5.0% (on piassava fiber wt) as a cross-linking agent and the effects upon the properties of the resulting composites treated by electron-beam radiation were also examined. HDPE reinforced with short piassava fiber composites was prepared by melt-mixing processing, using a twin screw extruder machine. The materials were irradiated with 100 and 200 kGy using a 1.5 MeV electron beam accelerator, at room temperature in presence of air. Material samples were submitted to mechanical and thermo-mechanical tests and SEM analyses. Correlation between properties was discussed. The comparison of mechanical and thermo-mechanical properties of the composites showed that electron-beam radiation treatment produced a significant improvement in mechanical properties, when compared with the non-irradiated composite sample and neat HDPE. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies of the composite failure surfaces indicated that there was an improved adhesion between fiber and matrix. Examination of the failure surfaces indicated dependence of the interfacial adhesion upon the radiation dose and GMA content. Better interfacial adhesion between fiber and HDPE matrix was observed for composites with 5.0% GMA addition and treated with electron-beam radiation dose of 200 kGy. It can be concluded that GMA addition followed by electron-beam irradiation treatment, at the doses studied in this work, effectively improved the HDPE properties and led to the obtaining of composite materials with superior properties suitable for several industrial applications.

  1. SMART composite high pressure vessels with integrated optical fiber sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazejewski, Wojciech; Czulak, Andrzej; Gasior, Pawel; Kaleta, Jerzy; Mech, Rafal

    2010-04-01

    In this paper application of integrated Optical Fiber Sensors for strain state monitoring of composite high pressure vessels is presented. The composite tanks find broad application in areas such as: automotive industry, aeronautics, rescue services, etc. In automotive application they are mainly used for gaseous fuels storage (like CNG or compressed Hydrogen). In comparison with standard steel vessels, composite ones have many advantages (i.e. high mechanical strength, significant weight reduction, etc). In the present work a novel technique of vessel manufacturing, according to this construction, was applied. It is called braiding technique, and can be used as an alternative to the winding method. During braiding process, between GFRC layers, two types of optical fiber sensors were installed: point sensors in the form of FBGs as well as interferometric sensors with long measuring arms (SOFO®). Integrated optical fiber sensors create the nervous system of the pressure vessel and are used for its structural health monitoring. OFS register deformation areas and detect construction damages in their early stage (ensure a high safety level for users). Applied sensor system also ensured a possibility of strain state monitoring even during the vessel manufacturing process. However the main application of OFS based monitoring system is to detect defects in the composite structure. An idea of such a SMART vessel with integrated sensor system as well as an algorithm of defect detection was presented.

  2. Oxidation Behavior of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Silicon Carbide Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentin, Victor M.

    1995-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced Silicon Carbide (C-SiC) composites offer high strength at high temperatures and good oxidation resistance. However, these composites present some matrix microcracks which allow the path of oxygen to the fiber. The aim of this research was to study the effectiveness of a new Silicon Carbide (SiC) coating developed by DUPONT-LANXIDE to enhance the oxidation resistance of C-SiC composites. A thermogravimetric analysis was used to determine the oxidation rate of the samples at different temperatures and pressures. The Dupont coat proved to be a good protection for the SiC matrix at temperatures lower than 1240 C at low and high pressures. On the other hand, at temperatures above 1340 C the Dupont coat did not seem to give good protection to the composite fiber and matrix. Even though some results of the tests have been discussed, because of time restraints, only a small portion of the desired tests could be completed. Therefore, no major conclusions or results about the effectiveness of the coat are available at this time.

  3. Graphite Fiber Textile Preform/Copper Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filatovs, G. J.; Lee, Bruce; Bass, Lowell

    1996-01-01

    Graphite fiber reinforced/copper matrix composites are candidate materials for critical heat transmitting and rejection components because of their high thermal conduction. The use of textile (braid) preforms allows near-net shapes which confers additional advantages, both for enhanced thermal conduction and increased robustness of the preform against infiltration and handling damage. Issues addressed in the past year center on the determination of the braid structure following infiltration, and the braidability vs. the conductivity of the fibers. Highly conductive fibers eventuate from increased graphitization, which increases the elastic modulus, but lowers the braidability; a balance between these factors must be achieved. Good quality braided preform bars have been fabricated and infiltrated, and their thermal expansion characterized; their analytic modeling is underway. The braided preform of an integral finned tube has been fabricated and is being prepared for infiltration.

  4. Thermal Fatigue Limitations of Continuous Fiber Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, Gary R.; Arya, Vinod K.

    1997-01-01

    The potential structural benefits of unidirectional, continuous-fiber, metal matrix composites (MMC's) are legendary. When compared to their monolithic matrices, MMC's possess superior properties such as higher stiffness and tensile strength, and lower coefficient of thermal expansion in the direction of the reinforcing fibers. As an added bonus, the MMC density will be lower if the fibers are less dense than the matrix matErial they replace. The potential has been demonstrated unequivocally both analytically and experimentally, especially at ambient temperatures. Successes prompted heavily-funded National efforts within the United States (USAF and NASA) and elsewhere to extend the promise of MMC's into the temperature regime wherein creep, stress relaxation, oxidation, and thermal fatigue damage mechanisms lurk. This is the very regime for which alternative high-temperature materials are becoming mandatory, since further enhancement of state- of-the-art monolithic alloys is rapidly approaching a point of diminishing returns.

  5. Corrosion and tribological properties of basalt fiber reinforced composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Jin Cheol; Kim, Yun-Hae; Lee, Myeong-Hoon; Moon, Kyung-Man; Park, Se-Ho

    2015-03-01

    This experiment has examined the corrosion and tribological properties of basalt fiber reinforced composite materials. There were slight changes of weight after the occurring of corrosion based on time and H2SO4 concentration, but in general, the weight increased. It is assumed that this happens due to the basalt fiber precipitate. Prior to the corrosion, friction-wear behavior showed irregular patterns compared to metallic materials, and when it was compared with the behavior after the corrosion, the coefficient of friction was 2 to 3 times greater. The coefficient of friction of all test specimen ranged from 0.1 to 0.2. Such a result has proven that the basalt fiber, similar to the resin rubber, shows regular patterns regardless of time and H2SO4 concentration because of the space made between resins and reinforced materials.

  6. Ballistic impact fatigue behavior of spectra fiber-reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.W.; Lee, B.L.

    1994-12-31

    The study examined the penetration failure mechanisms of Spectra fiber-reinforced composites under ballistic impact and assessed the roles played by resin matrix properties in controlling the process of impact damage propagation. In order to observe gradual propagation of damage, a concept of impact fatigue was introduced by subjecting the composite plates to a multiple number of repeated ballistic impact. When the striking velocity of,a projectile was below the ballistic limit, repeated impact resulted in a progressive growth of local delamination until full penetration of the projectile occurs. Preliminary results indicated that the vinyl ester resin matrix composites have a higher ballistic limit and longer impact fatigue life at a given striking velocity than the polyurethane matrix composites. Based on the test results of dynamic mechanical properties, more localized delamination of polyurethane matrix composites was attributed to a greater degree of stress wave attenuation and lower bending stiffness of material system.

  7. Lamination residual stresses in fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, I. M.; Liber, T.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the magnitude of lamination residual stresses in angle-ply composites and to evaluate their effects on composite structural integrity. The materials investigated were boron/epoxy, boron/polyimide, graphite/low modulus epoxy, graphite/high modulus epoxy, graphite/polyimide and s-glass/epoxy. These materials were fully characterized. Static properties of laminates were also determined. Experimental techniques using embedded strain gages were developed and used to measure residual strains during curing. The extent of relaxation of lamination residual stresses was investigated. It was concluded that the degree of such relaxation is low. The behavior of angle-ply laminates subjected to thermal cycling, tensile load cycling, and combined thermal cycling with tensile load was investigated. In most cases these cycling programs did not have any measurable influence on residual strength and stiffness of the laminates. In the tensile load cycling tests, the graphite/polyimide shows the highest endurance with 10 million cycle runouts at loads up to 90 percent of the static strength.

  8. Mechanical Behavior of Homogeneous and Composite Random Fiber Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahsavari, Ali

    systems with large multiscale heterogeneity, which controls their mechanical behavior. This pronounced heterogeneity leads to a pronounced size and boundary condition effects on their mechanical behavior. To emphasize the source of the size effect, the network heterogeneity is characterized by analyzing the geometry of the network (density distribution), the strain field and the strain energy distribution. It is shown that the heterogeneity of the mechanical fields depends not only on the network topology, but also on the ratio between the bending and axial stiffness of fibers. In this study, the size effect is quantified and the minimum model size needed to eliminate the size effect for a given set of system parameters, is determined. The results are also used for the selection of the size of representative volume elements useful for multiscale models of fiber networks such as the sequential approach. The elastic response of composite random fiber networks in which two types of fibers are used, is studied. This analysis is performed by adding stiff fibers to a relatively softer base while considering two cases: cross-linked and non-cross-linked added fibers. The linear elastic modulus of the network is determined in terms of the system parameters, including the density of added fibers. The results are compared to the case of adding stiff fibers to a homogeneous continuum base. It is shown that there is a threshold of added fiber density, above which the axial stiffens of the base filaments controls the mechanics. In this regime, the elastic response of the composites that have network bases mimics the behavior of those with continuum bases. The results presented in this thesis are relevant for many biological and engineering fibrous materials, including connective tissue, the cellular cytoskeleton, special clothing, consumer products, filters, and dampers. It is shown that the overall behavior of the material is very sensitive to several system parameters (power law

  9. A process to recover carbon fibers from polymer-matrix composites in end-of-life vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jody, Bassam J.; Pomykala, Joseph A.; Daniels, Edward J.; Greminger, Jessica L.

    2004-08-01

    Because of their high strength-to-weight ratios, carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer-matrix composite (PMC) materials are being evaluated for use in the automotive industry. The major barriers to their widespread use are their relatively high cost and the uncertainty about whether they can be recycled. A process to recover carbon fibers from obsolete PMC materials has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The process was tested using PMC samples made with different thermoset or thermoplastic substrates. For most mixtures of PMCs, the process can be energy self-sufficient using the polymer substrate as an energy source. An evaluation of the recovered samples found that the fibers appear to have retained good properties and characteristics and are suitable for short fiber applications. This paper describes the process and the characteristics and properties of the recovered fibers.

  10. Fabrication of borassus fruit lignocellulose fiber/PP composites and comparison with jute, sisal and coir fibers.

    PubMed

    Sudhakara, P; Jagadeesh, Dani; Wang, YiQi; Prasad, C Venkata; Devi, A P Kamala; Balakrishnan, G; Kim, B S; Song, J I

    2013-10-15

    Novel composites based on borassus fruit fine fiber (BFF) and polypropylene (PP) were fabricated with variable fiber composition (5, 10, 15 and 20 wt%) by injection molding. Maleated PP (MAPP) was also used as compatibilizer at 5 wt% for effective fiber-matrix adhesion. FTIR analysis confirms the evidence of a chemical bonding between the fiber and polymeric matrix through esterification in presence of MAPP. The tensile and flexural properties were found to increase with 15 and 10 wt% fiber loadings respectively, and decreased thereafter. Coir, jute and sisal fiber composites were also fabricated with 15 wt% fiber loading under the same conditions as used for BFF/PP composites. It was found that the mechanical properties of BFF (15 wt%)/PP composites were equivalent to jute/PP, sisal/PP and superior to coir/PP composites. Jute/PP and sisal/PP composites showed higher water absorption than BFF/PP and coir/PP composites. These results have demonstrated that the BFF/PP composites can also be an alternative material for composites applications. PMID:23987440

  11. Cell attachment to hydrogel-electrospun fiber mat composite materials.

    PubMed

    Han, Ning; Johnson, Jed K; Bradley, Patrick A; Parikh, Kunal S; Lannutti, John J; Winter, Jessica O

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogels, electrospun fiber mats (EFMs), and their composites have been extensively studied for tissue engineering because of their physical and chemical similarity to native biological systems. However, while chemically similar, hydrogels and electrospun fiber mats display very different topographical features. Here, we examine the influence of surface topography and composition of hydrogels, EFMs, and hydrogel-EFM composites on cell behavior. Materials studied were composed of synthetic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(ε-caprolactone) (PEGPCL) hydrogels and electrospun poly(caprolactone) (PCL) and core/shell PCL/PEGPCL constituent materials. The number of adherent cells and cell circularity were most strongly influenced by the fibrous nature of materials (e.g., topography), whereas cell spreading was more strongly influenced by material composition (e.g., chemistry). These results suggest that cell attachment and proliferation to hydrogel-EFM composites can be tuned by varying these properties to provide important insights for the future design of such composite materials. PMID:24955629

  12. Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Muscle Fiber Composition Under Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenthal, Nadia A.

    1999-01-01

    upstream targets for the effects of weightlessness. In the past year we have determined that the expression of E Proteins is restricted to specific fiber types by post-transcriptional mechanisms. By far, the most prevalent mechanism of cellular control for achieving post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression is selective proteolysis -through the ubiquitin -proteasome pathway. Steady-state levels of HEB message are similar in all fast and slow skeletal muscle fiber types, yet the protein is restricted to Type IIX fibers. HEB appears to be a nodal point for regulating fiber-specific transcription, as expression of the transcription factor is regulated at the post-transcriptional level. It is not clear at present whether the regulation is at the level of protein synthesis or degradation. We are now poised to evaluate the biological role of ubiquitination in fiber specific-gene expression by controlling the post-transcriptional expression of E Proteins. The use of metabolic labelling and pharmacological inhibitors of the ubiquitin pathway will be used to identify the mode of regulation of the Type IIX expression pattern. The potential role of specific kinases in effecting the restriction of HEB expression will be examined by using both inhibitors and activators. The results of these studies will provide the necessary information to evaluate the biological role of E proteins in controlling fiber type transitions, and in potentially attenuating the atrophic effects of microgravity conditions. We have also recently shown that ectopic expression of the HEB protein transactivates the Type IIX-specific skeletal a-actin reporter. The 218 bp skeletal a-actin promoter drives transgene expression solely in mature Type IIX fibers. A mouse also carrying the transgene MLCI/HEB (which ectopically expresses the E Protein HEB in Type IIB fibers) forces expression of the skeletal a-actin reporter gene in Type IIB fibers. We can now dissect the composition of this fiber-specific cis

  13. Discontinuous Fiber-reinforced Composites above Critical Length

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, R.C.

    2014-01-01

    Micromechanical physics of critical fiber length, describing a minimum filament distance for resin impregnation and stress transfer, has not yet been applied in dental science. As a test of the hypothesis that 9-micron-diameter, 3-mm-long quartz fibers would increase mechanical strength over particulate-filled composites, photocure-resin-pre-impregnated discontinuous reinforcement was incorporated at 35 wt% into 3M Corporation Z100, Kerr Corporation HerculiteXRV, and an experimental photocure paste with increased radiopaque particulate. Fully articulated four-point bend testing per ASTM C 1161-94 for advanced ceramics and Izod impact testing according to a modified unnotched ASTM D 256-00 specification were then performed. All photocure-fiber-reinforced composites demonstrated significant improvements over particulate-filled compounds (p < 0.001) for flexural strength, modulus, work of fracture, strain at maximum load, and Izod toughness, with one exception for the moduli of Z100 and the experimental reinforced paste. The results indicate that inclusion of pre-impregnated fibers above the critical aspect ratio yields major advancements regarding the mechanical properties tested. PMID:15790745

  14. Characterization of carbon fiber composite materials for RF applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Elliot J.; Lenzing, Erik H.; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2014-05-01

    Carbon Fiber Composite (CFC) materials have been used for decades in the aerospace, automotive, and naval industries. They have often been used because of their mechanical advantages. These advantageous characteristics have typically included low weight and high strength. It is also a benefit that CFC materials can be made into nearly any shape or size. With the abundant use of CFC materials, it seems desirable to better under- stand the electromagnetic applications of these materials. CFC materials consist of a non-conductive resin or epoxy in addition to conductive carbon fibers. The carbon fibers can be oriented and layered in many different configurations. The specific orientation and layering of the carbon fibers has a direct impact on its electrical characteristics. One specific characteristic of interest is the conductivity of CFC materials. The work in this paper deals with probing the conductivity characteristics of CFC materials for applications in antenna and radar design. Multiple layouts of carbon fiber are investigated. The DC conductivity was measured by applying a conductive epoxy to sample edges and using a milliohm meter. Shielding effectiveness was then predicted based on fundamental electromagnetics for conducting media. Finally, prototype dipole antennas made from CFC materials were investigated.

  15. Intestinal fuels: glutamine, short-chain fatty acids, and dietary fiber.

    PubMed

    Evans, M A; Shronts, E P

    1992-10-01

    In recent years, considerable research has focused on the physiologic effects and clinical uses of three dietary constituents thought to be trophic to the intestinal tract in human beings: glutamine, short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), and dietary fiber. Glutamine is an important nitrogen-carrying amino acid that may be "conditionally essential" in certain disease states to support the gut barrier and immune function and overall protein use. Colonic irrigations with SCFA preparations have demonstrated enhanced healing of bowel tissue in animals and human beings. Dietary fiber supports bacterial SCFA production, normal stool output, and the gut barrier and immune function. However, optimal fiber doses for various medical conditions are not known, and the risk for gastrointestinal (GI) obstruction, diarrhea, gas, and bloating necessitates careful selection of patients and daily monitoring of fiber tolerance. A review of the current literature indicates that widespread use of glutamine and SCFA additives parenterally and enterally awaits further evidence of safety and efficacy in human beings, establishment of appropriate doses, and advances in formulation technology. Administration of dietary fiber to enhance bowel motility should be considered in long-term tube-fed patients with intact GI function and sufficient fluid tolerance to permit hydration of fiber. Industrywide agreement on fiber analysis methods and labeling standards (eg, fiber fermentability vs solubility) would facilitate selection of enteral products. To streamline studies and optimize research efforts in future clinical trials, standard criteria for evaluating GI function, diarrheagenic factors, and intestinal outcome variables should be established. PMID:1328345

  16. Fiber Laser Front Ends for High-Energy Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J W; Liao, Z M; Mitchell, S; Messerly, M; Beach, R; Jovanovic, I; Brown, C; Payne, S A; Barty, C J

    2005-01-18

    We are developing an all fiber laser system optimized for providing input pulses for short pulse (1-10ps), high energy ({approx}1kJ) glass laser systems. Fiber lasers are ideal solutions for these systems as they are highly reliable and once constructed they can be operated with ease. Furthermore, they offer an additional benefit of significantly reduced footprint. In most labs containing equivalent bulk laser systems, the system occupies two 4'x8' tables and would consist of 10's if not a 100 of optics which would need to be individually aligned and maintained. The design requirements for this application are very different those commonly seen in fiber lasers. High energy lasers often have low repetition rates (as low as one pulse every few hours) and thus high average power and efficiency are of little practical value. What is of high value is pulse energy, high signal to noise ratio (expressed as pre-pulse contrast), good beam quality, consistent output parameters and timing. Our system focuses on maximizing these parameters sometimes at the expense of efficient operation or average power. Our prototype system consists of a mode-locked fiber laser, a compressed pulse fiber amplifier, a ''pulse cleaner'', a chirped fiber Bragg grating, pulse selectors, a transport fiber system and a large flattened mode fiber amplifier. In our talk we will review the system in detail and present theoretical and experimental studies of critical components. We will also present experimental results from the integrated system.

  17. Microstructured Optical Fiber Sensors Embedded in a Laminate Composite for Smart Material Applications

    PubMed Central

    Sonnenfeld, Camille; Sulejmani, Sanne; Geernaert, Thomas; Eve, Sophie; Lammens, Nicolas; Luyckx, Geert; Voet, Eli; Degrieck, Joris; Urbanczyk, Waclaw; Mergo, Pawel; Becker, Martin; Bartelt, Hartmut; Berghmans, Francis; Thienpont, Hugo

    2011-01-01

    Fiber Bragg gratings written in highly birefringent microstructured optical fiber with a dedicated design are embedded in a composite fiber-reinforced polymer. The Bragg peak wavelength shifts are measured under controlled axial and transversal strain and during thermal cycling of the composite sample. We obtain a sensitivity to transversal strain that exceeds values reported earlier in literature by one order of magnitude. Our results evidence the relevance of using microstructured optical fibers for structural integrity monitoring of composite material structures. PMID:22163755

  18. A Magnetostrictive Composite-Fiber Bragg Grating Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Quintero, Sully M. M.; Braga, Arthur M. B.; Weber, Hans I.; Bruno, Antonio C.; Araújo, Jefferson F. D. F.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a light and compact optical fiber Bragg Grating sensor for DC and AC magnetic field measurements. The fiber is coated by a thick layer of a magnetostrictive composite consisting of particles of Terfenol-D dispersed in a polymeric matrix. Among the different compositions for the coating that were tested, the best magnetostrictive response was obtained using an epoxy resin as binder and a 30% volume fraction of Terfenol-D particles with sizes ranging from 212 to 300 μm. The effect of a compressive preload in the sensor was also investigated. The achieved resolution was 0.4 mT without a preload or 0.3 mT with a compressive pre-stress of 8.6 MPa. The sensor was tested at magnetic fields of up to 750 mT under static conditions. Dynamic measurements were conducted with a magnetic unbalanced four-pole rotor. PMID:22163644

  19. Preliminary evaluation of fiber composite reinforcement of truck frame rails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faddoul, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The use of graphite fiber/resin matrix composite to effectively reinforce a standard steel truck frame rail is studied. A preliminary design was made and it was determined that the reinforcement weight could be reduced by a factor of 10 when compared to a steel reinforcement. A section of a 1/3 scale reinforced rail was fabricated to demonstrate low cost manufacturing techniques. The scale rail section was then tested and increased stiffness was confirmed. No evidence of composite fatigue was found after 500,000 cycles to a fiber stress of 34,000 psi. The test specimen failed in bending in a static test at a load 50 percent greater than that predicted for a non-reinforced rail.

  20. Skeletal muscle fiber type composition and performance during repeated bouts of maximal, concentric contractions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colliander, E. B.; Dudley, G. A.; Tesch, P. A.

    1988-01-01

    Force output and fatigue and recovery patterns were studied during intermittent short-term exercise. 27 men performed three bouts of 30 maximal unilateral knee extensions on 2 different occasions. Blood flow was maintained or occluded during recovery periods (60 s). Blood flow was restricted by inflating a pneumatic cuff placed around the proximal thigh. Muscle biopsies from vastus lateralis were analyzed for identification of fast twitch (FT) and slow twitch (ST) fibers and relative FT area. Peak torque decreased during each bout of exercise and more when blood flow was restricted during recovery. Initial peak torque (IPT) and average peak torque (APT) decreased over the three exercise bouts. This response was 3 fold greater without than with blood flow during recovery. IPT and APT decreased more in individuals with mainly FT fibers than in those with mainly ST fibers. It is suggested that performance during repeated bouts of maximal concentric contractions differs between individuals with different fiber type composition. Specifically, in high intensity, intermittent exercise with emphasis on anaerobic energy release a high FT composition may not necessarily be advantageous for performance.