Science.gov

Sample records for short revisit time

  1. The Late-time Afterglow of the Extremely Energetic Short Burst GRB 090510 Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guelbenzu, A. Nicuesa; Klose, S.; Kruehler, T.; Greiner, J.; Rossi, A.; Kann, D. A.; Olivares, F.; Rau, A.; Afonso, P. M. J.; Elliott, J.; Filgas, R.; Yoldas, A. Kuepcue; McBreen, S.; Nardini, M.; Schady, P.; Schmidl, S.; Sudilovsky, V.; Updike, A. C.; Yoldas, A.

    2012-01-01

    Context. The Swift discovery of the short burst GRB 090510 has raised considerable attention mainly because of two reasons: first, it had a bright optical afterglow, and second it is among the most energetic events detected so far within the entire GRB population (long plus short). The afterglow of GRB 090510 was observed with Swift/UVOT and Swift/XRT and evidence of a jet break around 1.5 ks after the burst has been reported in the literature, implying that after this break the optical and X-ray light curve should fade with the same decay slope. Aims. As noted by several authors, the post-break decay slope seen in the UVOT data is much shallower than the steep decay in the X-ray band, pointing to a (theoretically hard to understand) excess of optical flux at late times. We assess here the validity of this peculiar behavior. Methods. We reduced and analyzed new afterglow light-curve data obtained with the multichannel imager GROND. These additional g'r'i'z' data were then combined with the UVOT and XRT data to study the behavior of the afterglow at late times more stringently. Results. Based on the densely sampled data set obtained with GROND, we find that the optical afterglow of GRB 090510 did indeed enter a steep decay phase starting around 22 ks after the burst. During this time the GROND optical light curve is achromatic, and its slope is identical to the slope of the X-ray data. In combination with the UVOT data this implies that a second break must have occurred in the optical light curve around 22 ks post burst, which, however, has no obvious counterpart in the X-ray band, contradicting the interpretation that this could be another jet break. Conclusions. The GROND data provide the missing piece of evidence that the optical afterglow of GRB 090510 did follow a post-jet break evolution at late times. The break seen in the optical light curve around 22 ks in combination with its missing counterpart in the X-ray band could be due to the passage of the

  2. Time functions revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathi, Albert

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we revisit our joint work with Antonio Siconolfi on time functions. We will give a brief introduction to the subject. We will then show how to construct a Lipschitz time function in a simplified setting. We will end with a new result showing that the Aubry set is not an artifact of our proof of existence of time functions for stably causal manifolds.

  3. The Laplace transform on time scales revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, John M.; Gravagne, Ian A.; Jackson, Billy J.; Marks, Robert J., II; Ramos, Alice A.

    2007-08-01

    In this work, we reexamine the time scale Laplace transform as defined by Bohner and Peterson [M. Bohner, A. Peterson, Dynamic Equations on Time Scales: An Introduction with Applications, Birkhauser, Boston, 2001; M. Bohner, A. Peterson, Laplace transform and Z-transform: Unification and extension, Methods Appl. Anal. 9 (1) (2002) 155-162]. In particular, we give conditions on the class of functions which have a transform, develop an inversion formula for the transform, and further, we provide a convolution for the transform. The notion of convolution leads to considering its algebraic structure--in particular the existence of an identity element--motivating the development of the Dirac delta functional on time scales. Applications and examples of these concepts are given.

  4. Nonlinear time-series analysis revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Elizabeth; Kantz, Holger

    2015-09-01

    In 1980 and 1981, two pioneering papers laid the foundation for what became known as nonlinear time-series analysis: the analysis of observed data—typically univariate—via dynamical systems theory. Based on the concept of state-space reconstruction, this set of methods allows us to compute characteristic quantities such as Lyapunov exponents and fractal dimensions, to predict the future course of the time series, and even to reconstruct the equations of motion in some cases. In practice, however, there are a number of issues that restrict the power of this approach: whether the signal accurately and thoroughly samples the dynamics, for instance, and whether it contains noise. Moreover, the numerical algorithms that we use to instantiate these ideas are not perfect; they involve approximations, scale parameters, and finite-precision arithmetic, among other things. Even so, nonlinear time-series analysis has been used to great advantage on thousands of real and synthetic data sets from a wide variety of systems ranging from roulette wheels to lasers to the human heart. Even in cases where the data do not meet the mathematical or algorithmic requirements to assure full topological conjugacy, the results of nonlinear time-series analysis can be helpful in understanding, characterizing, and predicting dynamical systems.

  5. Nonlinear time-series analysis revisited.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Elizabeth; Kantz, Holger

    2015-09-01

    In 1980 and 1981, two pioneering papers laid the foundation for what became known as nonlinear time-series analysis: the analysis of observed data-typically univariate-via dynamical systems theory. Based on the concept of state-space reconstruction, this set of methods allows us to compute characteristic quantities such as Lyapunov exponents and fractal dimensions, to predict the future course of the time series, and even to reconstruct the equations of motion in some cases. In practice, however, there are a number of issues that restrict the power of this approach: whether the signal accurately and thoroughly samples the dynamics, for instance, and whether it contains noise. Moreover, the numerical algorithms that we use to instantiate these ideas are not perfect; they involve approximations, scale parameters, and finite-precision arithmetic, among other things. Even so, nonlinear time-series analysis has been used to great advantage on thousands of real and synthetic data sets from a wide variety of systems ranging from roulette wheels to lasers to the human heart. Even in cases where the data do not meet the mathematical or algorithmic requirements to assure full topological conjugacy, the results of nonlinear time-series analysis can be helpful in understanding, characterizing, and predicting dynamical systems. PMID:26428563

  6. Principal Preparation--Revisited--Time Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutmore, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    There has been both a historic and continuing interest in the preparation process for school administrators (principals and vice principals). Much of the literature has been critical of how school administrators are prepared (Achilles, 1991; Hale and Moorman, 2003; Levine, 2005; Hallinger and Lu, 2013). Although the length of time from graduation…

  7. Time Variability of Titan's Ionosphere Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Jen-Kai; Ip, Wing-Huen; Perryman, Rebecca; Waite, Hunter

    2015-04-01

    Since the Saturn Orbital Insertion in 2004, the Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) experiment aboard the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft has acquired an extensive data set. The decadal coverage of the measurements during numerous close encounters with Titan allows the study of spatial and temporal variations of Titan's nitrogen-rich atmosphere above 1000-km altitude. Titan's ionosphere is quite different to that of Earth's ionosphere. Due to Titan's thick (hundreds of kilometers) and dense atmosphere, the measurable ion density of Titan's nightside ionosphere extends well beyond the terminator. The diurnal variation of the ion density profiles and compositional changes are the result of photoionization and magnetospheric electron ionization (important at the night side). The different time evolutions of the light and heavy species from day to night could be indicative of the effects of flow dynamics and ion-molecule chemistry. From the observations, we can determine the ion content in Titan's night-side and the asymmetry between the dawn and dusk ion density profiles. We have also found in the long term data base the signature of the equatorial expansion of Titan's atmosphere during solar maximum. In addition the global distributions of the major compound N2 and minor species like CH4 and H2 all exhibit significant changes over a solar cycle as the closest approach points of Cassini moved from the northern hemisphere to the southern hemisphere. In this work, we will first compare the diurnal variations between different ion species and simulate the ion densities to study the possible contributing factors. Then we will compare the results of our analysis to those reported by other groups to construct a comprehensive model of Titan's neutral atmosphere and ionosphere under different solar conditions.

  8. Time to Revisit the Heterogeneous Telescope Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessman, F. V.

    The "Heterogeneous Telescope Network" (HTN) was founded in 2005 as a loose collaboration of people somehow associated with robotic telescopes and/or projects interested in the transient universe. Other than being a very interesting forum for the exchange of ideas, the only lasting contribution of the HTN was a proposed protocol for the operation of a loose e-market for the exchange of telescope time (Allan et al. 2006; White & Allan 2007). Since the last formal meeting in 2007, the HTN has gone into a "Dornröschenschlaf" (a better word than "hibernation") : the players and interest are there, but the public visibility and activity is not. Although the participants knew and know that global networking is the way of the future for many types of science, various things have kept the HTN from taking the idea and actually implementing it: work on simply getting one's own system to work (e.g. myself), career paths of major players (e.g. Allan), dealing with the complexity of ones' own network (TALONS, RoboNet, LCO), and - most importantly - no common science driver big enough to push the participants to try it in earnest. Things have changed, however: robotic telescopes have become easier to create and operate, private networks have matured, large-scale consortia have become more common, event reporting using VOEvent has become the global standard and has a well-defined infrastructure, and large-scale sources of new objects and events are operating or will soon be operating (OGLE, CSS, Pan-STARRs, GAIA). I will review the scientific and sociological prospects for re-invigorating the HTN idea and invite discussion.

  9. The Coral Data Time Series Need To Be Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juillet-Leclerc, A.

    2004-12-01

    Coral skeleton is formed under organism control and its geochemical properties are strongly influenced by biological effects embedding environmental signal. Geochemists have been puzzled by the diversity of geochemical responses showed by colonies grown in a same area. By revisiting the Weber and Woodhead data series (1972), gathering data from enough colonies developed in similar conditions to provide a statistical isotopic value representative of one site, we demonstrate that for Porites and Acropora, the expected isotopic thermometer is revealed when the "vital effect" is removed. On the other hand, by using Acropora cultured in controlled condition, with changing temperature on a range comprised between 23 and 29°C, the comparison of oxygen and carbon isotopic values revealed the role played by kinetic fractionation. This apparent paradox of two co-existing fractionations is explained by the isotopic analyzes of wild and cultured corals operated at micrometer size scale taking into account of microstructures of the skeleton. Two different crystals appear to be the growth units of the skeleton, each crystal corresponding to a specific deposition mechanism. Thus, the measurement performed with a conventional method is a "bulk" measurement, which depends upon two isotopic fractionations. Some investigations underlined the discrepancy of the meaning of the inter-annual and seasonal isotopic records, which could be illustrated by different isotopic calibrations assessed from seasonal or annual data. It has been also explained by micrometer analyses of Porites aragonite. A smoothing at around 400microns of isotopic measurements as well as Sr/Ca indicates that at seasonal time scale the growth unit is the month. This is in agreement with extensive studies conducted by biologists describing the mechanism governing the formation of Porites skeleton: every month is deposited a framework which is progressively filled in. By combining biologists and geochemists knowledge

  10. Transient nanobubbles in short-time electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svetovoy, Vitaly B.; Sanders, Remco G. P.; Elwenspoek, Miko C.

    2013-05-01

    Water electrolysis in a microsystem is observed and analyzed on a short-time scale of ∼10 μs. The very unusual properties of the process are stressed. An extremely high current density is observed because the process is not limited by the diffusion of electroactive species. The high current is accompanied by a high relative supersaturation, S > 1000, that results in homogeneous nucleation of bubbles. On the short-time scale only nanobubbles can be formed. These nanobubbles densely cover the electrodes and aggregate at a later time to microbubbles. The effect is significantly intensified with a small increase of temperature. Application of alternating polarity voltage pulses produces bubbles containing a mixture of hydrogen and oxygen. Spontaneous reaction between gases is observed for stoichiometric bubbles with sizes smaller than ∼150 nm. Such bubbles disintegrate violently affecting the surfaces of the electrodes.

  11. Transient nanobubbles in short-time electrolysis.

    PubMed

    Svetovoy, Vitaly B; Sanders, Remco G P; Elwenspoek, Miko C

    2013-05-01

    Water electrolysis in a microsystem is observed and analyzed on a short-time scale of ∼10 μs. The very unusual properties of the process are stressed. An extremely high current density is observed because the process is not limited by the diffusion of electroactive species. The high current is accompanied by a high relative supersaturation, S > 1000, that results in homogeneous nucleation of bubbles. On the short-time scale only nanobubbles can be formed. These nanobubbles densely cover the electrodes and aggregate at a later time to microbubbles. The effect is significantly intensified with a small increase of temperature. Application of alternating polarity voltage pulses produces bubbles containing a mixture of hydrogen and oxygen. Spontaneous reaction between gases is observed for stoichiometric bubbles with sizes smaller than ∼150 nm. Such bubbles disintegrate violently affecting the surfaces of the electrodes. PMID:23598648

  12. Short-time diffusivity of dicolloids.

    PubMed

    Panczyk, Mark M; Wagner, Norman J; Furst, Eric M

    2014-06-01

    The short-time diffusivity of dicolloid particles as a function of particle volume fraction ϕ from 0.01 ≤ ϕ ≤ 0.6 is measured using diffusing wave spectroscopy. The diffusivities of symmetric and asymmetric dicolloids are compared with similarly sized spheres. The short-time diffusivity is independent of salt concentration and decreases with increasing volume fraction for both spheres and asymmetric dicolloids. Symmetric dicolloids have a higher diffusivity than spheres at similar volume fractions. This difference is accounted for by rescaling the dicolloid volume fraction based on the ratio of the random close-packing volume fractions of spheres and dicolloids. Finally, a useful method is provided for calculating the diffusivity of symmetric dicolloid particles of arbitrary aspect ratio based on the calculated hydrodynamic resistance of Zabarankin [Proc. R. Soc. A 463, 2329 (2007)]. PMID:25019780

  13. Short time cycles of purely quantum refrigerators.

    PubMed

    Feldmann, Tova; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2012-05-01

    Four stroke Otto refrigerator cycles with no classical analog are studied. Extremely short cycle times with respect to the internal timescale of the working medium characterize these refrigerators. Therefore, these cycles are termed sudden. The sudden cycles are characterized by the stable limit cycle, which is the invariant of the global cycle propagator. During their operation the states of the working medium possess significant coherence which is not erased in the equilibration segments due to the very short time allocated. This characteristic is reflected in a difference between the energy entropy and the Von Neumann entropy of the working medium. A classification scheme for sudden refrigerators is developed allowing simple approximations for the cooling power and coefficient of performance. PMID:23004710

  14. Particle creation in a time-dependent electric field revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, Gaurang

    2009-02-15

    We adopt the general formalism for analyzing evolution of gaussian states of quantized fields in time-dependent backgrounds in the Schrodinger picture (presented in detail in Mahajan and Padmanabhan [G. Mahajan, T. Padmanabhan, Gen. Rel. Grav. 40 (2008) 661]) to study the example of a spatially uniform electric field background (in a time-dependent gauge) which is kept turned on for a finite duration of time. In particular, we study the time-dependent particle content, defined in terms of the concept of instantaneous eigenstates, and describe how it captures the time evolution of the quantized field modes. The actual particle creation process occurs over a relatively short interval in time, and the particle content saturates rather quickly. We also compare the power spectrum of the field modes, computed in the asymptotic limit, with the corresponding situation in a cosmological de Sitter background. Particle creation under the influence of a spiked electric field localized in time, as a particular limiting case of the above general model, is also considered.

  15. Particle creation in a time-dependent electric field revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Gaurang

    2009-02-01

    We adopt the general formalism for analyzing evolution of gaussian states of quantized fields in time-dependent backgrounds in the Schrodinger picture (presented in detail in Mahajan and Padmanabhan [G. Mahajan, T. Padmanabhan, Gen. Rel. Grav. 40 (2008) 661]) to study the example of a spatially uniform electric field background (in a time-dependent gauge) which is kept turned on for a finite duration of time. In particular, we study the time-dependent particle content, defined in terms of the concept of instantaneous eigenstates, and describe how it captures the time evolution of the quantized field modes. The actual particle creation process occurs over a relatively short interval in time, and the particle content saturates rather quickly. We also compare the power spectrum of the field modes, computed in the asymptotic limit, with the corresponding situation in a cosmological de Sitter background. Particle creation under the influence of a spiked electric field localized in time, as a particular limiting case of the above general model, is also considered.

  16. Clustering Short Time-Series Microarray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Loh Wei; Hasan, Yahya Abu

    2008-01-01

    Most microarray analyses are carried out on static gene expressions. However, the dynamical study of microarrays has lately gained more attention. Most researches on time-series microarray emphasize on the bioscience and medical aspects but few from the numerical aspect. This study attempts to analyze short time-series microarray mathematically using STEM clustering tool which formally preprocess data followed by clustering. We next introduce the Circular Mould Distance (CMD) algorithm with combinations of both preprocessing and clustering analysis. Both methods are subsequently compared in terms of efficiencies.

  17. Short rise time intense electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Olson, C.L.

    1984-03-16

    A generator for producing an intense relativisitc electron beam having a subnanosecond current rise time includes a conventional generator of intense relativistic electrons feeding into a short electrically conductive drift tube including a cavity containing a working gas at a low enough pressure to prevent the input beam from significantly ionizing the working gas. Ionizing means such as a laser simultaneously ionize the entire volume of working gas in the cavity to generate an output beam having a rise time less than one nanosecond.

  18. Short rise time intense electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Craig L.

    1987-01-01

    A generator for producing an intense relativistic electron beam having a subnanosecond current rise time includes a conventional generator of intense relativistic electrons feeding into a short electrically conductive drift tube including a cavity containing a working gas at a low enough pressure to prevent the input beam from significantly ionizing the working gas. Ionizing means such as a laser simultaneously ionize the entire volume of working gas in the cavity to generate an output beam having a rise time less than one nanosecond.

  19. Short-time dynamics of polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Arashiro, Everaldo; Drugowich de Felício, J R; Hansmann, Ulrich H E

    2007-01-28

    The authors study the short-time dynamics of helix-forming polypeptide chains using an all-atom representation of the molecules and an implicit solvation model to approximate the interaction with the surrounding solvent. The results confirm earlier observations that the helix-coil transition in proteins can be described by a set of critical exponents. The high statistics of the simulations allows the authors to determine the exponent values with increased precision and support universality of the helix-coil transition in homopolymers and (helical) proteins. PMID:17286517

  20. Failure Prevention by Short Time Corrosion Tests

    SciTech Connect

    MICKALONIS, JOHN

    2005-05-01

    Short time corrosion testing of perforated sheets and wire meshes fabricated from Type 304L stainless steel, Alloy 600 and C276 showed that 304L stainless steel perforated sheet should perform well as the material of construction for dissolver baskets. The baskets will be exposed to hot nitric acid solutions and are limited life components. The corrosion rates of the other alloys and of wire meshes were too high for useful extended service. Test results also indicated that corrosion of the dissolver should drop quickly during the dissolutions due to the inhibiting effects of the corrosion products produced by the dissolution processes.

  1. Biogas from Macroalgae: is it time to revisit the idea?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The economic and environmental viability of dedicated terrestrial energy crops is in doubt. The production of large scale biomass (macroalgae) for biofuels in the marine environment was first tested in the late 1960’s. The culture attempts failed due to the engineering challenges of farming offshore. However the energy conversion via anaerobic digestion was successful as the biochemical composition of macroalgae makes it an ideal feedstock. The technology for the mass production of macroalgae has developed principally in China and Asia over the last 50 years to such a degree that it is now the single largest product of aquaculture. There has also been significant technology transfer and macroalgal cultivation is now well tried and tested in Europe and America. The inherent advantage of production of biofuel feedstock in the marine environment is that it does not compete with food production for land or fresh water. Here we revisit the idea of the large scale cultivation of macroalgae at sea for subsequent anaerobic digestion to produce biogas as a source of renewable energy, using a European case study as an example. PMID:23186536

  2. Sco X-1 revisited with Kepler, MAXI and HERMES: outflows, time-lags and echoes unveiled

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaringi, S.; Maccarone, T. J.; Hynes, R. I.; Körding, E.; Ponti, G.; Knigge, C.; Britt, C. T.; van Winckel, H.

    2015-08-01

    Sco X-1 has been the subject of many multiwavelength studies in the past, being the brightest persistent extrasolar X-ray source ever observed. Here, we revisit Sco X-1 with simultaneous short cadence Kepler optical photometry and Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image X-ray photometry over a 78 d period, as well as optical spectroscopy obtained with High Efficiency and Resolution Mercator Echelle Spectrograph (HERMES). We find Sco X-1 to be highly variable in all our data sets. The optical fluxes are clearly bimodal, implying the system can be found in two distinct optical states. These states are generally associated with the known flaring/normal branch X-ray states, although the flux distributions associated with these states overlap. Furthermore, we find that the optical power spectrum of Sco X-1 differs substantially between optical luminosity states. Additionally we find rms-flux relations in both optical states, but only find a linear relation during periods of low optical luminosity. The full optical/X-ray discrete correlation function displays a broad ≈12.5 h optical lag. However, during the normal branch phase, the X-ray and optical fluxes are anticorrelated, whilst being correlated during the flaring branch. We also performed a Cepstrum analysis on the full Kepler light curve to determine the presence of any echoes within the optical light curve alone. We find significant echo signals, consistent with the optical lags found using the discrete cross-correlation. We speculate that whilst some of the driving X-ray emission is reflected by the disc, some is absorbed and re-processed on the thermal time-scale, giving rise to both the observed optical lags and optical echoes.

  3. REVISITING COINCIDENCE RATE BETWEEN GRAVITATIONAL WAVE DETECTION AND SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURST FOR THE ADVANCED AND THIRD GENERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Regimbau, T.; Siellez, K.; Meacher, D.; Gendre, B.; Boër, M.

    2015-01-20

    We use realistic Monte Carlo simulations including both gravitational-wave (GW) and short gamma-ray burst (sGRB) selection effects to revisit the coincident rate of binary systems composed of two neutron stars or a neutron star and a black hole. We show that the fraction of GW triggers that can be observed in coincidence with sGRBs is proportional to the beaming factor at z = 0, but increases with the distance until it reaches 100% at the GW detector horizon distance. When this is taken into account the rate is improved by a factor of three compared to the simple beaming factor correction. We provide an estimate of the performance future GRB detectors should achieve in order to fully exploit the potentiality of the planned third-generation GW antenna Einstein Telescope, and we propose a simple method to constrain the beaming angle of sGRBs.

  4. Why are very short times so long and very long times so short in elastic waves?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parravicini, Guido; Rigamonti, Serena

    2011-01-01

    In a first study of thermoelastic waves, such as in the textbook of Landau and Lifshitz, one might at first glance understand that when the given period is very short, waves are isentropic because heat conduction does not set in, while if the given period is very long, waves are isothermal because there is enough time for thermalization to be thoroughly accomplished. When one pursues the study of these waves further, by the mathematical inspection of the complete thermoelastic wave equation one finds that if the period is very short, much shorter than a characteristic time of the material, the wave is isothermal, while if it is very long, much longer than the characteristic time, the wave is isentropic. One also learns that this fact is supported by experiments: at low frequencies the elastic waves are isentropic, while they are isothermal when the frequencies are so high that can be attained in few cases. The authors show that there is no contradiction between first-glance understanding and the mathematical treatment of the elastic wave equation: for thermal effects very long periods are so short and very short periods are so long.

  5. Primate molar crown formation times and life history evolution revisited.

    PubMed

    Macho, G A

    2001-12-01

    Comparative studies have convincingly demonstrated that the pattern and timing of tooth emergence are highly correlated with life-history variables and brain size. Conversely, a firm relationship between molar formation time and life-history variables has not yet been established. It seems counterintuitive that one aspect of dental development should be correlated with life-history variables, whereas the other should not. In order to shed light on this apparent discrepancy this study analyzed all data on primate molar crown formations available in the published literature in relation to life-history variables, brain size, and female body mass. Crown formation times were found to be particularly highly correlated with both female body mass and brain size. Species that depart from the overall brain/body allometry by being relatively large-bodied, e.g., Gorilla gorilla and later Theropithecus oswaldi, also have shorter molar crown formation times than expected. The reverse is not found for species that depart from the overall brain/body allometry due to their larger brains, i.e., Homo sapiens. This finding is interpreted within an evolutionary and ecological framework. Specifically, by focusing on ecological commonalities, a scenario is proposed which may allow predictions to be made about the evolutionary history of other extinct primates also. If confirmed in future studies, crown formation time may again become a powerful tool in evolutionary enquiry. PMID:11748692

  6. On Lambda and Time Operators: the Inverse Intertwining Problem Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Cubillo, F.; Suchanecki, Z.; Villullas, S.

    2011-07-01

    An exact theory of irreversibility was proposed by Misra, Prigogine and Courbage, based on non-unitary similarity transformations Λ that intertwine reversible dynamics and irreversible ones. This would advocate the idea that irreversible behavior would originate at the microscopic level. Reversible evolution with an internal time operator have the intertwining property. Recently the inverse intertwining problem has been answered in the negative, that is, not every unitary evolution allowing such Λ-transformation has an internal time. This work contributes new results in this direction.

  7. Revisiting the Effect of Nicotine on Interval Timing

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Carter W.; Watterson, Elizabeth; Garcia, Raul; Mazur, Gabriel J.; Brackney, Ryan J.; Sanabria, Federico

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews the evidence for nicotine-induced acceleration of the internal clock when timing in the seconds-to-minutes timescale, and proposes an alternative explanation to this evidence: that nicotine reduces the threshold for responses that result in more reinforcement. These two hypotheses were tested in male Wistar rats using a novel timing task. In this task, rats were trained to seek food at one location after 8 s since trial onset and at a different location after 16 s. Some rats received the same reward at both times (group SAME); some received a larger reward at 16 s (group DIFF). Steady baseline performance was followed by 3 days of subcutaneous nicotine administration (0.3 mg/kg), baseline recovery, and an antagonist challenge (mecamylamine, 1.0 mg/kg). Nicotine induced a larger, immediate reduction in latencies to switch (LTS) in group DIFF than in group SAME. This effect was sustained throughout nicotine administration. Mecamylamine administration and discontinuation of nicotine rapidly recovered baseline performance. These results support a response-threshold account of nicotinic disruption of timing performance, possibly mediated by nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. A detailed analysis of the distribution of LTSs suggests that anomalous effects of nicotine on LTS dispersion may be due to loss of temporal control of behavior. PMID:25637907

  8. The multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree approach revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Manthe, Uwe

    2015-06-28

    The multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) approach facilitates accurate high-dimensional quantum dynamics simulations. In the approach, the wavefunction is expanded in a direct product of self-adapting time-dependent single-particle functions (SPFs). The equations of motion for the expansion coefficients and the SPFs are obtained via the Dirac-Frenkel variational principle. While this derivation yields well-defined differential equations for the motion of occupied SPFs, singularities in the working equations resulting from unoccupied SPFs have to be removed by a regularization procedure. Here, an alternative derivation of the MCTDH equations of motion is presented. It employs an analysis of the time-dependence of the single-particle density matrices up to second order. While the analysis of the first order terms yields the known equations of motion for the occupied SPFs, the analysis of the second order terms provides new equations which allow one to identify optimal choices for the unoccupied SPFs. The effect of the optimal choice of the unoccupied SPFs on the structure of the MCTDH equations of motion and their regularization is discussed. Generalized equations applicable in the multi-layer MCTDH framework are presented. Finally, the effects resulting from the initial choice of the unoccupied SPFs are illustrated by a simple numerical example.

  9. The multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree approach revisited.

    PubMed

    Manthe, Uwe

    2015-06-28

    The multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) approach facilitates accurate high-dimensional quantum dynamics simulations. In the approach, the wavefunction is expanded in a direct product of self-adapting time-dependent single-particle functions (SPFs). The equations of motion for the expansion coefficients and the SPFs are obtained via the Dirac-Frenkel variational principle. While this derivation yields well-defined differential equations for the motion of occupied SPFs, singularities in the working equations resulting from unoccupied SPFs have to be removed by a regularization procedure. Here, an alternative derivation of the MCTDH equations of motion is presented. It employs an analysis of the time-dependence of the single-particle density matrices up to second order. While the analysis of the first order terms yields the known equations of motion for the occupied SPFs, the analysis of the second order terms provides new equations which allow one to identify optimal choices for the unoccupied SPFs. The effect of the optimal choice of the unoccupied SPFs on the structure of the MCTDH equations of motion and their regularization is discussed. Generalized equations applicable in the multi-layer MCTDH framework are presented. Finally, the effects resulting from the initial choice of the unoccupied SPFs are illustrated by a simple numerical example. PMID:26133412

  10. Revisiting the Central Dogma One Molecule at a Time

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, Carlos; Cheng, Wei; Meija, Yara

    2011-01-01

    The faithful relay and timely expression of genetic information depend on specialized molecular machines, many of which function as nucleic acid translocases. The emergence over the last decade of single-molecule fluorescence detection and manipulation techniques with nm and Å resolution, and their application to the study of nucleic acid translocases are painting an increasingly sharp picture of the inner workings of these machines, the dynamics and coordination of their moving parts, their thermodynamic efficiency, and the nature of their transient intermediates. Here we present an overview of the main results arrived at by the application of single-molecule methods to the study of the main machines of the central dogma. PMID:21335233

  11. Nuclear Winter Revisited: can it Make a Difference This Time?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, S.

    2006-12-01

    news. Therefore, the re- examination in this AGU session of the entire subject of environmental and social after-effects of any nuclear weapons use is, unfortunately, once again timely. Hopefully it will convince anyone not already convinced based on conventional damages from nuclear weapons use of the urgent need to abate proliferation and monitor and control access to and potential capabilities of those who might contemplate using such weapons for some Strangelove-like strategic or ideological objective. The extent to which a scientific re-examination of the broader horrendous implications of any scale of use of nuclear weapons will deter those contemplating their use is questionable. However, it seems likely such research would increase the resolve of the large number of countries and institutions already pressing to prevent nuclear weapons use.

  12. Bronchodilator reversibility in patients with COPD revisited: short-term reproducibility

    PubMed Central

    Pascoe, Steven; Wu, Wei; Zhu, Chang-Qing; Singh, Dave

    2016-01-01

    Categorization of patients with COPD as reversible or nonreversible to a bronchodilator may change over time. This post hoc analysis aimed to determine if an individual’s reversibility, when treated as a continuous variable, could predict his/her future response to two short-acting bronchodilators: albuterol and ipratropium. The analysis was completed using data from a 4-week, randomized, open-label, two-period crossover study (NCT01691482; GSK study DB2114956). Patients received albuterol (doses: UK =4×100 μg/puff; US =4×90 μg/puff) followed 1 hour later by ipratropium (4×20 μg/puff) or vice versa during treatment Period 1. The order of treatments was reversed during Period 2. Predefined efficacy end points included pre- and post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second. The correlation coefficient between bronchodilator response on Days 1 and 10 was investigated, as well as the correlation between treatment response on Day 1 and the mean treatment response on Days 5–10, for each individual patient. Bronchodilator response to albuterol on Day 1 was strongly correlated with that on Day 10 (r=0.64; n=53). The correlation coefficient of bronchodilator treatment response on Day 1 and Days 5–10 was 0.78 (P<0.001; n=53) and 0.76 (P<0.001; n=54) for albuterol and ipratropium, respectively. A single measurement of the initial bronchodilator response to albuterol or ipratropium was, therefore, highly correlated with the subsequent mean bronchodilator response over 5–10 days, demonstrating its potential usefulness for future treatment decisions. PMID:27621609

  13. Bronchodilator reversibility in patients with COPD revisited: short-term reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, Steven; Wu, Wei; Zhu, Chang-Qing; Singh, Dave

    2016-01-01

    Categorization of patients with COPD as reversible or nonreversible to a bronchodilator may change over time. This post hoc analysis aimed to determine if an individual's reversibility, when treated as a continuous variable, could predict his/her future response to two short-acting bronchodilators: albuterol and ipratropium. The analysis was completed using data from a 4-week, randomized, open-label, two-period crossover study (NCT01691482; GSK study DB2114956). Patients received albuterol (doses: UK =4×100 μg/puff; US =4×90 μg/puff) followed 1 hour later by ipratropium (4×20 μg/puff) or vice versa during treatment Period 1. The order of treatments was reversed during Period 2. Predefined efficacy end points included pre- and post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second. The correlation coefficient between bronchodilator response on Days 1 and 10 was investigated, as well as the correlation between treatment response on Day 1 and the mean treatment response on Days 5-10, for each individual patient. Bronchodilator response to albuterol on Day 1 was strongly correlated with that on Day 10 (r=0.64; n=53). The correlation coefficient of bronchodilator treatment response on Day 1 and Days 5-10 was 0.78 (P<0.001; n=53) and 0.76 (P<0.001; n=54) for albuterol and ipratropium, respectively. A single measurement of the initial bronchodilator response to albuterol or ipratropium was, therefore, highly correlated with the subsequent mean bronchodilator response over 5-10 days, demonstrating its potential usefulness for future treatment decisions. PMID:27621609

  14. Short-time oxidation of zirconium.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, L. P.; Archbold, T. F.

    1972-01-01

    Study of zirconium oxidation kinetics for maximum exposure times of 3 min and in the temperature range 440 to 850 C. 'Discontinuous' oxidation runs were employed whereby a specimen was inserted into the gas stream for a predetermined time, removed and weighed, and reinserted into the oxidation atmosphere. It is considered that the increase in the observed activation energy for the early stage parabolic oxidation is a manifestation of a change from an n-type oxide to a predominantly p-type oxide, in agreement with the authors' earlier conclusion (1971) based on pressure effects.

  15. Controlled short residence time coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Raymond P.; Schmalzer, David K.; Wright, Charles H.

    1982-05-04

    Normally solid dissolved coal product and a distillate liquid product are produced by continuously passing a feed slurry comprising raw feed coal and a recycle solvent oil and/or slurry together with hydrogen to a preheating-reaction zone (26, alone, or 26 together with 42), the hydrogen pressure in the preheating-reaction zone being at least 1500 psig (105 kg/cm.sup.2), reacting the slurry in the preheating-reaction zone (26, or 26 with 42) at a temperature in the range of between about 455.degree. and about 500.degree. C. to dissolve the coal to form normally liquid coal and normally solid dissolved coal. A total slurry residence time is maintained in the reaction zone ranging from a finite value from about 0 to about 0.2 hour, and reaction effluent is continuously and directly contacted with a quenching fluid (40, 68) to substantially immediately reduce the temperature of the reaction effluent to below 425.degree. C. to substantially inhibit polymerization so that the yield of insoluble organic matter comprises less than 9 weight percent of said feed coal on a moisture-free basis. The reaction is performed under conditions of temperature, hydrogen pressure and residence time such that the quantity of distillate liquid boiling within the range C.sub.5 -455.degree. C. is an amount at least equal to that obtainable by performing the process under the same conditions except for a longer total slurry residence time, e.g., 0.3 hour. Solvent boiling range liquid is separated from the reaction effluent and recycled as process solvent.

  16. The Demise of Short-Term Memory Revisited: Empirical and Computational Investigations of Recency Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davelaar,Eddy J.; Goshen-Gottstein, Yonatan; Ashkenazi, Amir; Haarmann, Henk J.; Usher, Marius

    2005-01-01

    In the single-store model of memory, the enhanced recall for the last items in a free-recall task (i.e., the recency effect) is understood to reflect a general property of memory rather than a separate short-term store. This interpretation is supported by the finding of a long-term recency effect under conditions that eliminate the contribution…

  17. Short Vowels versus Word Familiarity in the Reading Comprehension of Arab Readers: A Revisited Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seraye, Abdullah M.

    2016-01-01

    Arab readers, both beginning and advanced, are encouraged to read and accustomed to unvowelized and undiacriticized texts. Previous literature claimed that the presence of short vowels in the text would facilitate the reading comprehension of both beginning and advanced Arab readers. However, with a claimed strict controlling procedure, different…

  18. Potential barrier classification by short-time measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Granot, Er'el; Marchewka, Avi

    2006-03-15

    We investigate the short-time dynamics of a delta-function potential barrier on an initially confined wave packet. There are mainly two conclusions: (A) At short times the probability density of the first particles that passed through the barrier is unaffected by it. (B) When the barrier is absorptive (i.e., its potential is imaginary) it affects the transmitted wave function at shorter times than a real potential barrier. Therefore, it is possible to distinguish between an imaginary and a real potential barrier by measuring its effect at short times only on the transmitting wave function.

  19. Recent studies of short-range order in alloys: The Cowley theory revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhard, L.; Moss, S.C.

    1993-02-08

    We present comparisons of various statistical theories for effective pair interactions (EPI) in alloys. We then evaluate these EPI`s using the Cowley theory, the Krivoglaz-Clapp-Moss (KCM) approximation, the {gamma}-expansion method (GEM) of Tokar, Masanskii and coworkers, and the exact inverse Monte Carlo (IMC) method, introduced by Gerold and Kern. Via a series of model calculations on a hypothetical bcc alloy with a single nearest-neighbor interaction we show that the Cowley theory is successful in evaluating the EPI`s in more dilute alloys but tends to overestimate the magnitude of the nearest neighbor energy at higher concentrations, whereas the KCM expression becomes increasingly inaccurate at lower concentrations. In general, however, the approximate mean field theories are most accurate at higher concentrations and higher temperatures. Recent studies of short-range order in single crystals are discussed in which these EPI`s have been evaluated using the IMC, KCM, GEM and Cowley theories. Examples include the bcc alloy Fe{sub 0.53}Cr{sub 0.47} and the fcc alloys Cu{sub 3} Au, CU{sub 0.69}Zn{sub 0.31} and Ni{sub 0.89}BgCr{sub 0.11}. In all cases the approximate expressions do quite well, especially the GEM.

  20. Koolau Revisited: Vertical, Short-Scale Heterogeneities in the Hawaiian Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizimis, M.; Salters, V. J.; Huang, S.

    2008-12-01

    observation is consistent with vertical heterogeneity within the Hawaiian plume. If vertical streaks are present within the upwelling plume (i.e. 'spaghetti' model), then the tight binary arrays defined by each volcano require that the compositions of the "streaks" are relatively constant but only present during the life cycle of each shield volcano (~500 ky). The "streaks" must have a finite length (i.e. short 'spaghetti', perhaps 'penne') in order to account for the volcano-to-volcano variability. While the concentrically zoned plume or the asymmetrically bilateral plume models are consistent with some large-scale lateral features of the Hawaiian plume (e.g. Loa - Kea trends) our data suggests that there is also considerable vertical heterogeneity within the Hawaiian plume.

  1. Short-time Chebyshev wave packet method for molecular photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhaopeng; Zheng, Yujun

    2016-08-01

    In this letter we present the extended usage of short-time Chebyshev wave packet method in the laser induced molecular photoionization dynamics. In our extension, the polynomial expansion of the exponential in the time evolution operator, the Hamiltonian operator can act on the wave packet directly which neatly avoids the matrix diagonalization. This propagation scheme is of obvious advantages when the dynamical system has large Hamiltonian matrix. Computational simulations are performed for the calculation of photoelectronic distributions from intense short pulse ionization of K2 and NaI which represent the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) model and Non-BO one, respectively.

  2. Orphan drugs for rare diseases: is it time to revisit their special market access status?

    PubMed

    Simoens, Steven; Cassiman, David; Dooms, Marc; Picavet, Eline

    2012-07-30

    Orphan drugs are intended for diseases with a very low prevalence, and many countries have implemented legislation to support market access of orphan drugs. We argue that it is time to revisit the special market access status of orphan drugs. Indeed, evidence suggests that there is no societal preference for treating rare diseases. Although society appears to assign a greater value to severity of disease, this criterion is equally relevant to many common diseases. Furthermore, the criterion of equity in access to treatment, which underpins orphan drug legislation, puts more value on health improvement in rare diseases than in common diseases and implies that population health is not maximized. Finally, incentives for the development, pricing and reimbursement of orphan drugs have created market failures, including monopolistic prices and the artificial creation of rare diseases. We argue that, instead of awarding special market access status to orphan drugs, there is scope to optimize research and development (R&D) of orphan drugs and to control prices of orphan drugs by means of, for example, patent auctions, advance purchase commitments, pay-as-you-go schemes and dose-modification studies. Governments should consider carefully the right incentive strategy for R&D of orphan drugs in rare diseases. PMID:22747423

  3. The Oklo bound on the time variation of the fine-structure constant revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damour, Thibault; Dyson, Freeman

    1996-02-01

    It has been pointed out by Shlyakhter that data from the natural fission reactors which operated about two billion years ago at Oklo (Gabon) had the potential of providing an extremely tight bound on the variability of the fine-structure constant α. We revisit the derivation of such a bound by (i) reanalyzing a large selection of published rare-earth data from Oklo, (ii) critically taking into account the very large uncertainty of the temperature at which the reactors operated, and (iii) connecting in a new way (using isotope shift measurements) the Oklo-derived constraint on a possible shift of thermal neutron-capture resonances with a bound on the time variation of α. Our final (95% C.L.) results are: -0.9 × 10 -7 < ( αOklo - αnow)/ α < 1.2 × 10 -7 and -6.7 × 10 -17yr-1 < αdotaveraged/α < 5.0 × 10 -17yr-1.

  4. Speech processing based on short-time Fourier analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Portnoff, M.R.

    1981-06-02

    Short-time Fourier analysis (STFA) is a mathematical technique that represents nonstationary signals, such as speech, music, and seismic signals in terms of time-varying spectra. This representation provides a formalism for such intuitive notions as time-varying frequency components and pitch contours. Consequently, STFA is useful for speech analysis and speech processing. This paper shows that STFA provides a convenient technique for estimating and modifying certain perceptual parameters of speech. As an example of an application of STFA of speech, the problem of time-compression or expansion of speech, while preserving pitch and time-varying frequency content is presented.

  5. A Short Term Real Time Study in Syntactic Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duarte, Maria Eugenia Lamoglia

    Recent research has shown that Brazilian Portuguese is undergoing a change regarding the null subject parameter, evolving from a null subject to a non-null subject language. This paper presents the results of a short term, real time study of speakers of Brazilian Portuguese with low and mid levels of formal education. The study was based on…

  6. (abstract) Short Time Period Variations in Jupiter's Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolton, S. J.; Klein, M. J.; Gulkis, S.; Foster, R.; Heiles, C.; Pater, I. de

    1994-01-01

    The long term time variability of Jupiter's synchrotron radiation on yearly time scales has been established for some time. For many years, theorists have speculated about the effects variations in the solar wind, solar flux, Io, the Io torus, and Jupiter's magnetic field have on the ultra-relativistic electron population responsible for the emission. Early observational results suggested the additional possibility of a short term time variability, on timescales of days to weeks. In 1989 a program designed to investigate the existence of short term time variability using the 85 foot Hat Creek radio telescope operating at 1400 MHz was initiated. The availability of a dedicated telescope provided the opportunity, for the first time, to obtain numerous observations over the full Jupiter rotation period. These and future observations will enable two important studies, characterization and confirmation of possible short term variations, and the investigation of the stability of Jupiter's synchrotron emission beaming curve. Analysis of Hat Creek observations and early results from the Maryland Point Naval research Laboratory will be presented.

  7. Performance of multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis on short time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Juan Luis; Contreras, Jesús Guillermo

    2013-02-01

    The performance of the multifractal detrended analysis on short time series is evaluated for synthetic samples of several mono- and multifractal models. The reconstruction of the generalized Hurst exponents is used to determine the range of applicability of the method and the precision of its results as a function of the decreasing length of the series. As an application the series of the daily exchange rate between the U.S. dollar and the euro is studied.

  8. NEA Mitigation Studies for Short Warning Time Scenarios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbee, Brent; Syal, Megan Bruck; Gisler, Galen

    2016-01-01

    This talk describes current collaborative research efforts between NASA GSFC and the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) national labs (Lawrence Livermore, Los Alamos, and Sandia) to design systems and frameworks for robust responses to short warning time near-Earth asteroid (NEA) scenarios, in which we would have less than 10 years to respond to an NEA on its way to impact the Earth.

  9. Short-time spectroscopic measurement of the temperature of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mach, H.

    1984-02-01

    The short-time temperature rise dependent deformation caused by shocks on solids were measured with radiation pyrometric and spectroscopic methods. The methods can only be applied on solids emitting a measurable radiation and are based on spectral radiation and the temperature of the solid. The Planck-Kirchhoff radiation laws and the measuring method are presented. The measuring equipment consists of an image reproducing optical device and a photodetector with spectral or interference filters for wavelength selection.

  10. Short time transient periodicities from Cyg X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auriemma, G.; Cardini, D.; Costa, E.; Giovannelli, F.; Ranieri, M.

    1976-01-01

    The temporal behavior of three new events of modulated optical emission from Cyg X1, detected in July 1975, is presented. Short time periodicities in the optical band are investigated. Single photon pulses from the photomultiplier are recorded on magnetic tape together with a very accurate 1 kHz reference frequency. During playback of the tape, the reference signal gives a 1 ms timing to a scaler interfaced with a small processor and the number of photon per millisecond is recorded on a digital tape.

  11. Evaluation of Scaling Invariance Embedded in Short Time Series

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xue; Hou, Lei; Stephen, Mutua; Yang, Huijie; Zhu, Chenping

    2014-01-01

    Scaling invariance of time series has been making great contributions in diverse research fields. But how to evaluate scaling exponent from a real-world series is still an open problem. Finite length of time series may induce unacceptable fluctuation and bias to statistical quantities and consequent invalidation of currently used standard methods. In this paper a new concept called correlation-dependent balanced estimation of diffusion entropy is developed to evaluate scale-invariance in very short time series with length . Calculations with specified Hurst exponent values of show that by using the standard central moving average de-trending procedure this method can evaluate the scaling exponents for short time series with ignorable bias () and sharp confidential interval (standard deviation ). Considering the stride series from ten volunteers along an approximate oval path of a specified length, we observe that though the averages and deviations of scaling exponents are close, their evolutionary behaviors display rich patterns. It has potential use in analyzing physiological signals, detecting early warning signals, and so on. As an emphasis, the our core contribution is that by means of the proposed method one can estimate precisely shannon entropy from limited records. PMID:25549356

  12. Short Acceleration Times from Superdiffusive Shock Acceleration in the Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perri, S.; Zimbardo, G.

    2015-12-01

    The analysis of time profiles of particles accelerated at interplanetary shocks allows particle transport properties to be inferred. The frequently observed power-law decay upstream, indeed, implies a superdiffusive particle transport when the level of magnetic field variance does not change as the time interval from the shock front increases. In this context, a superdiffusive shock acceleration (SSA) theory has been developed, allowing us to make predictions of the acceleration times. In this work we estimate for a number of interplanetary shocks, including the solar wind termination shock, the acceleration times for energetic protons in the framework of SSA and we compare the results with the acceleration times predicted by standard diffusive shock acceleration. The acceleration times due to SSA are found to be much shorter than in the classical model, and also shorter than the interplanetary shock lifetimes. This decrease of the acceleration times is due to the scale-free nature of the particle displacements in the framework of superdiffusion. Indeed, very long displacements are possible, increasing the probability for particles far from the front of the shock to return, and short displacements have a high probability of occurrence, increasing the chances for particles close to the front to cross the shock many times.

  13. Urban air pollution by odor sources: Short time prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettarin, Nicola; Campolo, Marina; Soldati, Alfredo

    2015-12-01

    A numerical approach is proposed to predict the short time dispersion of odors in the urban environment. The model is based on (i) a three dimensional computational domain describing the urban topography at fine spatial scale (1 m) and on (ii) highly time resolved (1 min frequency) meteorological data used as inflow conditions. The time dependent, three dimensional wind velocity field is reconstructed in the Eulerian framework using a fast response finite volume solver of Navier-Stokes equations. Odor dispersion is calculated using a Lagrangian approach. An application of the model to the historic city of Verona (Italy) is presented. Results confirm that this type of odor dispersion simulations can be used (i) to assess the impact of odor emissions in urban areas and (ii) to evaluate the potential mitigation produced by odor abatement systems.

  14. Desensitization to media violence over a short period of time.

    PubMed

    Fanti, Kostas A; Vanman, Eric; Henrich, Christopher C; Avraamides, Marios N

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the desensitization to violence over a short period of time. Participants watched nine violent movie scenes and nine comedy scenes, and reported whether they enjoyed the violent or comedy scenes and whether they felt sympathetic toward the victim of violence. Using latent growth modeling, analyses were carried out to investigate how participants responded to the different scenes across time. The findings of this study suggested that repeated exposure to media violence reduces the psychological impact of media violence in the short term, therefore desensitizing viewers to media violence. As a result, viewers tended to feel less sympathetic toward the victims of violence and actually enjoy more the violence portrayed in the media. Additionally, desensitization to media violence was better represented by a curvilinear pattern, whereas desensitization to comedy scenes was better represented by a linear pattern. Finally, trait aggression was not related to the pattern of change over time, although significant effects were found for initial reports of enjoyment and sympathy. PMID:19172659

  15. Experimental Study of Short-Time Brownian Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Jianyong; Simha, Akarsh; Riegler, David; Raizen, Mark

    2015-03-01

    We report our progress on the study of short-time Brownian motion of optically-trapped microspheres. In earlier work, we observed the instantaneous velocity of microspheres in gas and in liquid, verifying a prediction by Albert Einstein from 1907. We now report a more accurate test of the energy equipartition theorem for a particle in liquid. We also observe boundary effects on Brownian motion in liquid by setting a wall near the trapped particle, which changes the dynamics of the motion. We find that the velocity autocorrelation of the particle decreases faster as the particle gets closer to the wall.

  16. Short-time-interaction quantum measurement through an incoherent mediator

    SciTech Connect

    Casanova, J.; Romero, G.; Lizuain, I.; Muga, J. G.; Retamal, J. C.; Roos, C. F.; Solano, E.

    2010-06-15

    We propose a method of indirect measurements where a probe is able to read, in short interaction times, the quantum state of a remote system through an incoherent third party, hereafter called a mediator. The probe and system can interact briefly with the mediator in an incoherent state but not directly among themselves and, nevertheless, the transfer of quantum information can be achieved with robustness. We exemplify our measurement scheme with a paradigmatic example of this tripartite problem--a qubit-oscillator-qubit setup--and discuss different physical scenarios, pointing out the associated advantages and limitations.

  17. Superdiffusive shock acceleration and short acceleration times at interplanetary shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perri, Silvia; Zimbardo, Gaetano

    2016-04-01

    The analysis of time profiles of particles accelerated at interplanetary shock waves has shown evidence for superdiffusive transport in the upstream region. Superdiffusive transport is characterized by a mean square displacement that grows faster than linearly in time and by non Gaussian statistics for the distribution of the particle jump lengths. In the superdiffusive framework it has been shown that particle time profiles upstream of a planar shock decay as power laws, at variance with exponential particle time profiles predicted in the case of diffusive transport. A large number of interplanetary shocks, including coronal mass ejection driven shocks, exhibit energetic particle time profiles that decay as power laws far upstream. In order to take this evidence into account, we have extended the standard theory of diffusive shock acceleration to the case of particle superdiffusive transport (superdiffusive shock acceleration). This has allowed us to derive both hard energy spectral indices and short acceleration times. This new theory has been tested for a number of interplanetary shock waves, observed by the Ulysses and the ACE spacecraft, and for the termination shock. The superdiffusive shock acceleration leads to a strong reduction of the acceleration times (even of about one order of magnitude) with respect to the diffusive shock acceleration. Thus, this new framework provides a substantial advancement in the understanding of the processes of particle acceleration and particle transport, which are among the main objectives of the new Solar Probe and Solar Orbiter space missions.

  18. Short and long time drop dynamics on lubricated substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, A.; Kim, P.; Amberg, G.; Stone, H. A.

    2013-11-01

    Liquid infiltrated solids have been proposed as functional solvent-phobic surfaces for handling single and multiphase flows. Implementation of such surfaces alters the interfacial transport phenomenon as compared to a dry substrate. To better understand the interface characteristics in such systems we study experimentally the dynamics of a pendant water drop in air that contacts a substrate coated by thin oil films. At short times the water drop is deformed by the oil that spreads onto the water-air interface, and the dynamics are characterized by inertial and viscous regimes. At late times, the the oil film under the drop relaxes either to a stable thin film or ruptures. In the thin film rupture regime, we measure the waiting time for the rupture as a function of the drop equilibrium contact angle on a dry substrate and the initial film height. The waiting time is rationalized by lubrication theory, which indicates that long-range intermolecular forces destabilize the oil-water interface and is the primary mechanism for the film drainage.

  19. Short-term Time Step Convergence in a Climate Model

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wan, Hui; Rasch, Philip J.; Taylor, Mark; Jablonowski, Christiane

    2015-02-11

    A testing procedure is designed to assess the convergence property of a global climate model with respect to time step size, based on evaluation of the root-mean-square temperature difference at the end of very short (1 h) simulations with time step sizes ranging from 1 s to 1800 s. A set of validation tests conducted without sub-grid scale parameterizations confirmed that the method was able to correctly assess the convergence rate of the dynamical core under various configurations. The testing procedure was then applied to the full model, and revealed a slow convergence of order 0.4 in contrast to themore » expected first-order convergence. Sensitivity experiments showed without ambiguity that the time stepping errors in the model were dominated by those from the stratiform cloud parameterizations, in particular the cloud microphysics. This provides a clear guidance for future work on the design of more accurate numerical methods for time stepping and process coupling in the model.« less

  20. Short-term Time Step Convergence in a Climate Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Hui; Rasch, Philip J.; Taylor, Mark; Jablonowski, Christiane

    2015-02-11

    A testing procedure is designed to assess the convergence property of a global climate model with respect to time step size, based on evaluation of the root-mean-square temperature difference at the end of very short (1 h) simulations with time step sizes ranging from 1 s to 1800 s. A set of validation tests conducted without sub-grid scale parameterizations confirmed that the method was able to correctly assess the convergence rate of the dynamical core under various configurations. The testing procedure was then applied to the full model, and revealed a slow convergence of order 0.4 in contrast to the expected first-order convergence. Sensitivity experiments showed without ambiguity that the time stepping errors in the model were dominated by those from the stratiform cloud parameterizations, in particular the cloud microphysics. This provides a clear guidance for future work on the design of more accurate numerical methods for time stepping and process coupling in the model.

  1. How a short stay unit can reduce children's waiting times.

    PubMed

    Gray, Constance; Christensen, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Admitting children to emergency departments (EDs) often places them in an environment better suited to the treatment of adult patients. These children are often triaged and treated as adults, resulting in children being given the wrong triage categories and having their treatment delayed. EDs have problems giving drugs to children, staff are unfamiliar with children's emergency care, and children find EDs frightening. A paediatric emergency short stay unit (PESSU) was opened at Caboolture Hospital, Queensland, Australia, in January 2014. Admission to the PESSU has significantly reduced waiting times for children arriving at the ED and enabled specialist nursing and medical care to be provided quickly. This has been supported by the development of the paediatric flow nurse role ( Gray et al 2016 ). PMID:27266752

  2. Predator-prey interactions, resource depression and patch revisitation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erwin, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    Generalist predators may be confronted by different types of prey in different patches: sedentary and conspicuous, cryptic (with or without refugia), conspicuous and nonsocial, or conspicuous and social. I argue that, where encounter rates with prey are of most importance, patch revisitation should be a profitable tactic where prey have short 'recovery' times (conspicuous, nonsocial prey), or where anti-predator response (e.g. shoaling) may increase conspicuousness. Predictions are made for how temporal changes in prey encounter rates should affect revisit schedules and feeding rates for the 4 different prey types.

  3. A short- time beltrami kernel for smoothing images and manifolds.

    PubMed

    Spira, Alon; Kimmel, Ron; Sochen, Nir

    2007-06-01

    We introduce a short-time kernel for the Beltrami image enhancing flow. The flow is implemented by "convolving" the image with a space dependent kernel in a similar fashion to the solution of the heat equation by a convolution with a Gaussian kernel. The kernel is appropriate for smoothing regular (flat) 2-D images, for smoothing images painted on manifolds, and for simultaneously smoothing images and the manifolds they are painted on. The kernel combines the geometry of the image and that of the manifold into one metric tensor, thus enabling a natural unified approach for the manipulation of both. Additionally, the derivation of the kernel gives a better geometrical understanding of the Beltrami flow and shows that the bilateral filter is a Euclidean approximation of it. On a practical level, the use of the kernel allows arbitrarily large time steps as opposed to the existing explicit numerical schemes for the Beltrami flow. In addition, the kernel works with equal ease on regular 2-D images and on images painted on parametric or triangulated manifolds. We demonstrate the denoising properties of the kernel by applying it to various types of images and manifolds. PMID:17547140

  4. Variations in solar Lyman alpha irradiance on short time scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pap, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    Variations in solar UV irradiance at Lyman alpha are studied on short time scales (from days to months) after removing the long-term changes over the solar cycle. The SME/Lyman alpha irradiance is estimated from various solar indices using linear regression analysis. In order to study the nonlinear effects, Lyman alpha irradiance is modeled with a 5th-degree polynomial as well. It is shown that the full-disk equivalent width of the He line at 1083 nm, which is used as a proxy for the plages and active network, can best reproduce the changes observed in Lyman alpha. Approximately 72 percent of the solar-activity-related changes in Lyman alpha irradiance arise from plages and the network. The network contribution is estimated by the correlation analysis to be about 19 percent. It is shown that significant variability remains in Lyman alpha irradiance, with periods around 300, 27, and 13.5d, which is not explained by the solar activity indices. It is shown that the nonlinear effects cannot account for a significant part of the unexplained variation in Lyman alpha irradiance. Therefore, additional events (e.g., large-scale motions and/or a systematic difference in the area and intensity of the plages and network observed in the lines of Ca-K, He 1083, and Lyman alpha) may explain the discrepancies found between the observed and estimated irradiance values.

  5. WHO, RECIST, and immune-related response criteria: is it time to revisit pembrolizumab results?

    PubMed Central

    Ades, Felipe; Yamaguchi, Nise

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, with the rise of immunotherapeutic agents for cancer treatment, we have observed a paradigm shift in oncology drug development. One common problem accompanying such paradigm shifts is how to build research strategies to fit the mechanism of action of the newer compounds. Developing immunotherapy in oncology requires us to address the unique characteristics of immunotherapeutic agents and to provide adequate tools for their evaluation, including the adjustment of clinical trial endpoints. Immunotherapy creates patterns of response different from those of chemotherapy, and thus they are not captured by the traditional World Health Organisation (WHO) tumour response criteria or the RECIST. Revisiting the results of pembrolizumab in patients with melanoma can help to evaluate the efficacy of the immune-related response criteria (irRC) as the gold standard for evaluating the clinical response of immunologic agents in oncology. PMID:26715941

  6. Drop tower Beijing and short-time microgravity experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, S. H.; Yin, M. G.; Guan, X. D.; Lin, H.; Xie, J. C.; Hu, Wen-Rui

    Being an important, large ground-based experiment facility for microgravity science, the drop tower of National Microgravity Lab, CAS was founded in 2003 and, since then, has been un-dertaking the experiments to meet the requirements in microgravity research. The 116 meters high drop tower is located in Zhong Guan Cun district, the scientific town of Beijing. Main components of the facility consist of the drop capsule, release mechanism and deceleration and recovery devices, and were developed with particular technical characteristics. Inner space of the drop tower was not vacuumed during the experiment, and a dual capsule system was adopted. The dual capsule comprises an inner and an outer capsule, and there is a space between in the evacuated atmosphere of 30 Pa. During the free fall, the outer capsule falls in normal atmospheric condition, and the inner capsule falls in vacuum. In addition, a single capsule configuration is also available for experiments w of lower gravity level. The residual acceleration is 10-5go or 10-3g0 related to dual capsule or single capsule arrangement respec-tively. An electric magnetic release system was used to release the capsule from position of 83 meters in height. The designed structure of the release mechanism guaranteed the release disturbance to be small enough. An elastic controllable decelerated system, consisted of the reversible mechanic/electric energy transducer, steel cables and rings, string bag, elastic rub-ber stringassembly, energy dissipation resistance, controlling computer system, was used in the drop tower facility. This system is effective to reduce the impact acceleration to a level of 15g0. The experiment data can be recorded by an on-board data acquisition and control system, and transmitted wirelessly to the control room. Many experiments related to the fluid physics, combustion, material science and other field have been successfully conducted by using the short-time microgravity facility of drop tower in

  7. Revisiting doxycycline in pregnancy and early childhood – time to rebuild its reputation?

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Ruby; Ling, Clare; Day, Nicholas P. J.; McGready, Rose; Paris, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Doxycycline is highly effective, inexpensive with a broad therapeutic spectrum and exceptional bioavailability. However these benefits have been overshadowed by its classification alongside the tetracyclines – class D drugs, contraindicated in pregnancy and in children under 8 years of age. Doxycycline-treatable diseases are emerging as leading causes of undifferentiated febrile illness in Southeast Asia. For example scrub typhus and murine typhus have an unusually severe impact on pregnancy outcomes, and current mortality rates for scrub typhus reach 12-13% in India and Thailand. The emerging evidence for these important doxycycline-treatable diseases prompted us to revisit doxycycline usage in pregnancy and childhood. Areas Covered: A systematic review of the available literature on doxycycline use in pregnant women and children revealed a safety profile of doxycycline that differed significantly from that of tetracycline; no correlation between the use of doxycycline and teratogenic effects during pregnancy or dental staining in children was found. Expert Opinion: The change of the US FDA pregnancy classification scheme to an evidence-based approach will enable adequate evaluation of doxycycline in common tropical illnesses and in vulnerable populations in clinical treatment trials, dosage-optimization pharmacokinetic studies and for the empirical treatment of undifferentiated febrile illnesses, especially in pregnant women and children. PMID:26680308

  8. SHORT COMMUNICATION: Time measurement device with four femtosecond stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panek, Petr; Prochazka, Ivan; Kodet, Jan

    2010-10-01

    We present the experimental results of extremely precise timing in the sense of time-of-arrival measurements in a local time scale. The timing device designed and constructed in our laboratory is based on a new concept using a surface acoustic wave filter as a time interpolator. Construction of the device is briefly described. The experiments described were focused on evaluating the timing precision and stability. Low-jitter test pulses with a repetition frequency of 763 Hz were generated synchronously to the local time base and their times of arrival were measured. The resulting precision of a single measurement was typically 900 fs RMS, and a timing stability TDEV of 4 fs was achieved for time intervals in the range from 300 s to 2 h. To our knowledge this is the best value reported to date for the stability of a timing device. The experimental results are discussed and possible improvements are proposed.

  9. Effect of heating strategies on whey protein denaturation--Revisited by liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Akkerman, M; Rauh, V M; Christensen, M; Johansen, L B; Hammershøj, M; Larsen, L B

    2016-01-01

    Previous standards in the area of effect of heat treatment processes on milk protein denaturation were based primarily on laboratory-scale analysis and determination of denaturation degrees by, for example, electrophoresis. In this study, whey protein denaturation was revisited by pilot-scale heating strategies and liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer (LC/MC Q-TOF) analysis. Skim milk was heat treated by the use of 3 heating strategies, namely plate heat exchanger (PHE), tubular heat exchanger (THE), and direct steam injection (DSI), under various heating temperatures (T) and holding times. The effect of heating strategy on the degree of denaturation of β-lactoglobulin and α-lactalbumin was determined using LC/MC Q-TOF of pH 4.5-soluble whey proteins. Furthermore, effect of heating strategy on the rennet-induced coagulation properties was studied by oscillatory rheometry. In addition, rennet-induced coagulation of heat-treated micellar casein concentrate subjected to PHE was studied. For skim milk, the whey protein denaturation increased significantly as T and holding time increased, regardless of heating method. High denaturation degrees were obtained for T >100°C using PHE and THE, whereas DSI resulted in significantly lower denaturation degrees, compared with PHE and THE. Rennet coagulation properties were impaired by increased T and holding time regardless of heating method, although DSI resulted in less impairment compared with PHE and THE. No significant difference was found between THE and PHE for effect on rennet coagulation time, whereas the curd firming rate was significantly larger for THE compared with PHE. Micellar casein concentrate possessed improved rennet coagulation properties compared with skim milk receiving equal heat treatment. PMID:26506552

  10. Short Hours, Short Shrift. Causes and Consequences of Part-Time Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilly, Chris

    The recent growth in part-time employment has been propelled by a marked increase in the number of involuntary part-time workers. Most of the growth can be traced to sectoral shifts in the economy toward industries dominated by low-wage, part-time jobs. Many employers hire part-timers to cut costs and gain flexibility, but the creation of more…

  11. Revisiting spin-lattice relaxation time measurements for dilute spins in high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Riqiang; Li, Jun; Cui, Jingyu; Peng, Xinhua

    2016-07-01

    Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times (T1S) for dilute spins such as (13)C have led to investigations of the motional dynamics of individual functional groups in solid materials. In this work, we revisit the Solomon equations and analyze how the heteronuclear cross relaxation between the dilute S (e.g. (13)C) and abundant I (e.g. (1)H) spins affects the measured T1S values in solid-state NMR in the absence of (1)H saturation during the recovery time. It is found theoretically that at the beginning of the S spin magnetization recovery, the existence of non-equilibrium I magnetization introduces the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect onto the recovery of the S spin magnetization and confirmed experimentally that such a heteronuclear cross relaxation effect results in the recovery overshoot phenomena for the dilute spins when T1S is on the same order of T1H, leading to inaccurate measurements of the T1S values. Even when T1S is ten times larger than T1H, the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect on the measured T1S values is still noticeable. Furthermore, this cross relaxation effect on recovery trajectory of the S spins can be manipulated and even suppressed by preparing the initial I and S magnetization, so as to obtain the accurate T1S values. A sample of natural abundance l-isoleucine powder has been used to demonstrate the T1S measurements and their corresponding measured T1C values under various experimental conditions. PMID:27187211

  12. Revisiting spin-lattice relaxation time measurements for dilute spins in high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Riqiang; Li, Jun; Cui, Jingyu; Peng, Xinhua

    2016-07-01

    Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times (T1S) for dilute spins such as 13C have led to investigations of the motional dynamics of individual functional groups in solid materials. In this work, we revisit the Solomon equations and analyze how the heteronuclear cross relaxation between the dilute S (e.g. 13C) and abundant I (e.g. 1H) spins affects the measured T1S values in solid-state NMR in the absence of 1H saturation during the recovery time. It is found theoretically that at the beginning of the S spin magnetization recovery, the existence of non-equilibrium I magnetization introduces the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect onto the recovery of the S spin magnetization and confirmed experimentally that such a heteronuclear cross relaxation effect results in the recovery overshoot phenomena for the dilute spins when T1S is on the same order of T1H, leading to inaccurate measurements of the T1S values. Even when T1S is ten times larger than T1H, the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect on the measured T1S values is still noticeable. Furthermore, this cross relaxation effect on recovery trajectory of the S spins can be manipulated and even suppressed by preparing the initial I and S magnetization, so as to obtain the accurate T1S values. A sample of natural abundance L-isoleucine powder has been used to demonstrate the T1S measurements and their corresponding measured T1C values under various experimental conditions.

  13. Short-chain fatty acids: ready for prime time?

    PubMed

    Roy, Claude C; Kien, C Lawrence; Bouthillier, Lise; Levy, Emile

    2006-08-01

    The concept of colonic health has become a major target for the development of functional foods such as probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics. These bioactive agents have a profound effect on the composition of the microflora, as well as on the physiology of the colon, and display distinct health benefits. Dietary carbohydrates escaping digestion/absorption in the small bowel and prebiotics undergo fermentation in the colon and give rise to short-chain fatty acids (SCFA). As the main anions of the colon and the major source of energy for colonocytes, SCFA are rapidly absorbed by nonionic diffusion mostly but also by active transport mediated by a sodium-coupled transporter, thereby fostering the absorption of sodium and water. SCFA in general and butyrate in particular enhance the growth of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria and play a central role on the physiology and metabolism of the colon. The effect of prebiotics on cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, mucin production, immune function, mineral absorption, lipid metabolism, and gastrointestinal (GI) peptides has been well documented experimentally. These effects seem to be largely mediated by SCFA, but evidence from human studies remains inconsistent. The food industry is making a leap of faith in their efforts to commercialize prebiotics and exploit potential health benefits. The future lies with the design of studies to further explore basic mechanisms, and gene expression in particular, but emphasis should be placed on human intervention trials. PMID:16870803

  14. Short-time dynamics of correlated quantum Coulomb systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonitz, Michael

    2007-03-01

    Strong correlations in dense Coulomb systems are attracting increasing interest in many fields ranging from dense astrophysical plasmas, dusty plasmas and semiconductors to metal clusters and ultracold trapped ions [1]. Examples are bound states in dense plasmas (atoms, molecules, clusters) and semiconductors (excitons, trions, biexcitons) and many-particle correlations such as Coulomb and Yukawa liquids and crystals. Of particular current interest is the response of these systems to short excitations generated e.g. by femtosecond laser pulses and giving rise to ultrafast relaxation processes and build up of binary correlations. The proper theoretical tool are non-Markovian quantum kinetic equations [1,2] which can be derived from Nonequilibrium Green's Functions (NEGF) and are now successfully solved numerically for dense plasmas and semiconductors [3], correlated electrons [4] and other many-body systems with moderate correlations [5]. This method is well suited to compute the nonlinear response to strong fields selfconsistently including many-body effects [6]. Finally, we discuss recent extensions of the NEGF-computations to the dynamics of strongly correlated Coulomb systems, such as single atoms and molecules [7] and electron and exciton Wigner crystals in quantum dots [8,9]. [1] H. Haug and A.-P. Jauho, Quantum Kinetics in Transport and Optics of Semiconductors, Springer 1996; M. Bonitz Quantum Kinetic Theory, Teubner, Stuttgart/Leipzig 1998; [2] Progress in Nonequilibrium Green's Functions III, M. Bonitz and A. Filinov (Eds.), J. Phys. Conf. Ser. vol. 35 (2006); [3] M. Bonitz et al. Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter 8, 6057 (1996); R. Binder, H.S. K"ohler, and M. Bonitz, Phys. Rev. B 55, 5110 (1997); [4] N.H. Kwong, and M. Bonitz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 1768 (2000); [5] Introduction to Computational Methods for Many-Body Systems, M. Bonitz and D. Semkat (eds.), Rinton Press, Princeton (2006); [6] H. Haberland, M. Bonitz, and D. Kremp, Phys. Rev. E 64

  15. Healthy Work Revisited: Do Changes in Time Strain Predict Well-Being?

    PubMed Central

    Moen, Phyllis; Kelly, Erin L.; Lam, Jack

    2013-01-01

    Building on Karasek and Theorell (R. Karasek & T. Theorell, 1990, Healthy work: Stress, productivity, and the reconstruction of working life, New York, NY: Basic Books), we theorized and tested the relationship between time strain (work-time demands and control) and seven self-reported health outcomes. We drew on survey data from 550 employees fielded before and 6 months after the implementation of an organizational intervention, the Results Only Work Environment (ROWE) in a white-collar organization. Cross-sectional (Wave 1) models showed psychological time demands and time control measures were related to health outcomes in expected directions. The ROWE intervention did not predict changes in psychological time demands by Wave 2, but did predict increased time control (a sense of time adequacy and schedule control). Statistical models revealed increases in psychological time demands and time adequacy predicted changes in positive (energy, mastery, psychological well-being, self-assessed health) and negative (emotional exhaustion, somatic symptoms, psychological distress) outcomes in expected directions, net of job and home demands and covariates. This study demonstrates the value of including time strain in investigations of the health effects of job conditions. Results encourage longitudinal models of change in psychological time demands as well as time control, along with the development and testing of interventions aimed at reducing time strain in different populations of workers. PMID:23506547

  16. Spectral Evolution of Short GRBS on sub-millisecond time scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernenko, A.

    2013-07-01

    There has been growing consensus that short and long GRBs are associated with two different populations of astrophysical sources: mergers and SN explosions, respectively. While temporal properties of short and long GRBs could be considered with similar depth and accuracy, patterns of spectral variability of the 2 classes of GRBs are much harder to compare. This is due to the fact, that short GRBs exhibit variability on time scales shorter than 1 ms and count rate, measured at such short time scales, is not sufficient for reliable spectroscopy even for the brightest events. In this situation, any new possibility to look at spectral evolution of short GRBs on sub-millisecond time scales in terms of spectral parameters, may provide more solid background for theoretical analysis. In this paper we present analysis of spectral evolution of short GRBs in terms of Band spectral function parameters, using the earlier developed Global Fit approach (GFA).

  17. An Optimal Mitigation Strategy Against the Asteroid Impact Threat with Short Warning Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wie, Bong; Barbee, Brent; Pitz, Alan; Kaplinger, Brian; Hawkins, Matt; Winkler, Tim; Premaratne, Pavithra; Vardaxis, George; Lyzhoft, Joshua; Zimmerman, Ben

    2015-01-01

    To develop an innovative yet practically implementable mitigation technique for the most probable impact threat of an asteroid or comet with short warning time (i.e., when we don't have sufficient warning times for a deflection mission).

  18. Short residence time coal liquefaction process including catalytic hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Raymond P.; Schmalzer, David K.; Wright, Charles H.

    1982-05-18

    Normally solid dissolved coal product and a distillate liquid product are produced by continuously passing a feed slurry comprising raw feed coal and a recycle solvent oil and/or slurry together with hydrogen to a preheating-reaction zone (26, alone, or 26 together with 42), the hydrogen pressure in the preheating-reaction zone being at least 1500 psig (105 kg/cm.sup.2), reacting the slurry in the preheating-reaction zone (26, or 26 with 42) at a temperature in the range of between about 455.degree. and about 500.degree. C. to dissolve the coal to form normally liquid coal and normally solid dissolved coal. A total slurry residence time is maintained in the reaction zone ranging from a finite value from about 0 to about 0.2 hour, and reaction effluent is continuously and directly contacted with a quenching fluid (40, 68) to substantially immediately reduce the temperature of the reaction effluent to below 425.degree. C. to substantially inhibit polymerization so that the yield of insoluble organic matter comprises less than 9 weight percent of said feed coal on a moisture-free basis. The reaction is performed under conditions of temperature, hydrogen pressure and residence time such that the quantity of distillate liquid boiling within the range C.sub.5 -454.degree. C. is an amount at least equal to that obtainable by performing the process under the same condition except for a longer total slurry residence time, e.g., 0.3 hour. Solvent boiling range liquid is separated from the reaction effluent (83) and recycled as process solvent (16). The amount of solvent boiling range liquid is sufficient to provide at least 80 weight percent of that required to maintain the process in overall solvent balance.

  19. Short residence time coal liquefaction process including catalytic hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, R.P.; Schmalzer, D.K.; Wright, C.H.

    1982-05-18

    Normally solid dissolved coal product and a distillate liquid product are produced by continuously passing a feed slurry comprising raw feed coal and a recycle solvent oil and/or slurry together with hydrogen to a preheating-reaction zone, the hydrogen pressure in the preheating-reaction zone being at least 1,500 psig (105 kg/cm[sup 2]), reacting the slurry in the preheating-reaction zone at a temperature in the range of between about 455 and about 500 C to dissolve the coal to form normally liquid coal and normally solid dissolved coal. A total slurry residence time is maintained in the reaction zone ranging from a finite value from about 0 to about 0.2 hour, and reaction effluent is continuously and directly contacted with a quenching fluid to substantially immediately reduce the temperature of the reaction effluent to below 425 C to substantially inhibit polymerization so that the yield of insoluble organic matter comprises less than 9 weight percent of said feed coal on a moisture-free basis. The reaction is performed under conditions of temperature, hydrogen pressure and residence time such that the quantity of distillate liquid boiling within the range C[sub 5]-454 C is an amount at least equal to that obtainable by performing the process under the same condition except for a longer total slurry residence time, e.g., 0.3 hour. Solvent boiling range liquid is separated from the reaction effluent and recycled as process solvent. The amount of solvent boiling range liquid is sufficient to provide at least 80 weight percent of that required to maintain the process in overall solvent balance. 6 figs.

  20. Revisiting the Development of Time Sharing Using a Dual Motor Task Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getchell, Nancy; Pabreja, Priya

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss and examine how to develop time sharing using a dual motor task and its effects. They state that when one is required to perform two tasks at the same time (time sharing), an individual may experience difficulty in expressing one or both of the tasks. This phenomenon, known as interference, has been studied…

  1. Short recovery time, multianode, microchannel plate photomultiplier for plasma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giudicotti, L.; Bassan, M.; Sardella, A.; Perdon, E.

    1989-12-01

    Laser scattering-based plasma diagnostics are presently undertaken by means of a multianode microchannel plate (MCP) photomultiplier (PM) whose recovery time is two orders of magnitude shorter than that typical of conventional MCP devices. This PM is suitable for detection of fast light-pulse bursts whose repetition rate is sufficiently low for heat dissipation between successive bursts. Attention is given to the device's thermal behavior, measuring the temperature increase of the Z-plate due to a single, high-voltage square pulse as a function of pulse energy. The Z-plate recovers from the maximum linear pulse in about 50 microsec.

  2. Revisiting the Time Trade-Off Hypothesis: Work, Organized Activities, and Academics During College.

    PubMed

    Greene, Kaylin M; Maggs, Jennifer L

    2015-08-01

    How adolescents spend their time has long-term implications for their educational, health, and labor market outcomes, yet surprisingly little research has explored the time use of students across days and semesters. The current study used longitudinal daily diary data from a sample of college students attending a large public university in the Northeastern US (n = 726, M age = 18.4) that was followed for 14 days within each of seven semesters (for up to 98 diary days per student). The study had two primary aims. The first aim was to explore demographic correlates of employment time, organized activity time, and academic time. The second aim was to provide a rigorous test of the time trade-off hypothesis, which suggests that students will spend less time on academics when they spend more time on employment and extracurricular activities. The results demonstrated that time use varied by gender, parental education, and race/ethnicity. Furthermore, the results from multi-level models provided some support for the time trade-off hypothesis, although associations varied by the activity type and whether the day was a weekend. More time spent on employment was linked to less time spent on academics across days and semesters whereas organized activities were associated with less time on academics at the daily level only. The negative associations between employment and academics were most pronounced on weekdays. These results suggest that students may balance certain activities across days, whereas other activities may be in competition over longer time frames (i.e., semesters). PMID:25381597

  3. [Molecular genetics and determination of time since death - short communication].

    PubMed

    Šaňková, Markéta; Račanská, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    Estimation of time since death, i.e. the post-mortem interval (PMI), is one of the most problematic issues in forensic practice. Accurate determination of the PMI still remains very complicated task even for an experienced forensic pathologist.Physical changes including algor, livor and rigor mortis can be observed already during the first hours after death of an individual. Unfortunately, the estimation of PMI on the basis of these changes is often burdened with a certain degree of inaccuracy, which is caused by the temperature of surrounding environment, constitution of the body, cause of the death, location of the body, drug abuse etc.Accurate PMI estimation requires assessment of such parameters, which change constantly from the moment of death, but independently on ambient factors. According to current research in the field of molecular biology, it appears that a post-mortem degradation of nucleic acids (both DNA and RNA) will correspond to this definition. PMID:27526264

  4. A Material and Practical Account of Education in Digital Times: Neil Postman's Views on Literacy and the Screen Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vlieghe, Joris

    2016-01-01

    In this article I deal with the impact of digitization on education by revisiting the ideas Neil Postman developed in regard with the omnipresence of screens in the American society of the 1980s and their impact on what it means to grow up and to become an educated person. Arguing, on the one hand, that traditionally education is profoundly…

  5. High voltage electrical amplifier having a short rise time

    DOEpatents

    Christie, David J.; Dallum, Gregory E.

    1991-01-01

    A circuit, comprising an amplifier and a transformer is disclosed that produces a high power pulse having a fast response time, and that responds to a digital control signal applied through a digital-to-analog converter. The present invention is suitable for driving a component such as an electro-optic modulator with a voltage in the kilovolt range. The circuit is stable at high frequencies and during pulse transients, and its impedance matching circuit matches the load impedance with the output impedance. The preferred embodiment comprises an input stage compatible with high-speed semiconductor components for amplifying the voltage of the input control signal, a buffer for isolating the input stage from the output stage; and a plurality of current amplifiers connected to the buffer. Each current amplifier is connected to a field effect transistor (FET), which switches a high voltage power supply to a transformer which then provides an output terminal for driving a load. The transformer comprises a plurality of transmission lines connected to the FETs and the load. The transformer changes the impedance and voltage of the output. The preferred embodiment also comprises a low voltage power supply for biasing the FETs at or near an operational voltage.

  6. The short-time spectrum analysis of real-time sampling speech with DSP TMS320VC5416 chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Qinru; Ren, Wen-hua

    2013-07-01

    For automatic speech recognition (ASR), the research centers mainly on algorithm of improving robust, researchers put less emphasis on realization and application of better speech algorithm. Real-time proceeding of speech recognition directly influence on its application, so real-time proceeding of speech recognition is as important as study of algorithm. Speech transform domain method is a necessary technique of speech recognition, so real-time analysis of transform domain method is necessary. In transform domain methods, the short-time spectrum analysis is simple and easy to realize, especially the short-time FFT algorithm is applied to the short-time spectrum analysis. FFT algorithm reduces multiplications greatly. For the purpose, this paper presents short-time spectrum analysis of real-time sampling speech based on FFT algorithm. We use DSP TMS320VC5416 chip and speech codec ASIC TLV320AIC23 as hardware, the real-time speech signal is acquired by ASIC TLV320AIC23. When working frequency of TMS320VC5416 is set 160 MHz and sampling frequency is 44.1 kHz, the short-time FFT is radix-2 DIF-FFT algorithm and the length of short-time window is 128, the simulation waves and data show that the short-time FFT algorithm analysis based on TMS320VC5416 chip can meet real-time of system. For estimation of proceeding error, we make a calculation of radix- 2 DIT-IFFT. Comparing the result of DIT-IFFT and sampling speech data, error is less than 10-3.

  7. The time-dependent quantum harmonic oscillator revisited: Applications to quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez Vergel, Daniel Villasenor, Eduardo J.S.

    2009-06-15

    In this article, we formulate the study of the unitary time evolution of systems consisting of an infinite number of uncoupled time-dependent harmonic oscillators in mathematically rigorous terms. We base this analysis on the theory of a single one-dimensional time-dependent oscillator, for which we first summarize some basic results concerning the unitary implementability of the dynamics. This is done by employing techniques different from those used so far to derive the Feynman propagator. In particular, we calculate the transition amplitudes for the usual harmonic oscillator eigenstates and define suitable semiclassical states for some physically relevant models. We then explore the possible extension of this study to infinite dimensional dynamical systems. Specifically, we construct Schroedinger functional representations in terms of appropriate probability spaces, analyze the unitarity of the time evolution, and probe the existence of semiclassical states for a wide range of physical systems, particularly, the well-known Minkowskian free scalar fields and Gowdy cosmological models.

  8. Highly optimized fourth-order short-time approximation for pathintegrals

    SciTech Connect

    Predescu, Cristian

    2006-10-01

    We derive a fourth-order short-time approximation for use in imaginary-time path-integral simulations. The short-time approximation converges for all continuous and bounded from below potentials, attains quartic order of convergence for sufficiently smooth potentials, and utilizes statistically independent random variables for its construction. These properties recommend the approximation as a natural replacement of the trapezoidal Trotter-Suzuki approximation for physical systems with continuous distributions.

  9. Highly optimized fourth-order short-time approximation for path integrals.

    PubMed

    Predescu, Cristian

    2006-01-19

    We derive a fourth-order short-time approximation for use in imaginary-time path-integral simulations. The short-time approximation converges for all continuous and bounded-from-below potentials, attains quartic order of convergence for sufficiently smooth potentials, and utilizes statistically independent random variables for its construction. These properties recommend the approximation as a natural replacement of the trapezoidal Trotter-Suzuki approximation for physical systems with continuous distributions. PMID:16471584

  10. Nutrient timing revisited: is there a post-exercise anabolic window?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Nutrient timing is a popular nutritional strategy that involves the consumption of combinations of nutrients--primarily protein and carbohydrate--in and around an exercise session. Some have claimed that this approach can produce dramatic improvements in body composition. It has even been postulated that the timing of nutritional consumption may be more important than the absolute daily intake of nutrients. The post-exercise period is widely considered the most critical part of nutrient timing. Theoretically, consuming the proper ratio of nutrients during this time not only initiates the rebuilding of damaged muscle tissue and restoration of energy reserves, but it does so in a supercompensated fashion that enhances both body composition and exercise performance. Several researchers have made reference to an anabolic “window of opportunity” whereby a limited time exists after training to optimize training-related muscular adaptations. However, the importance - and even the existence - of a post-exercise ‘window’ can vary according to a number of factors. Not only is nutrient timing research open to question in terms of applicability, but recent evidence has directly challenged the classical view of the relevance of post-exercise nutritional intake with respect to anabolism. Therefore, the purpose of this paper will be twofold: 1) to review the existing literature on the effects of nutrient timing with respect to post-exercise muscular adaptations, and; 2) to draw relevant conclusions that allow practical, evidence-based nutritional recommendations to be made for maximizing the anabolic response to exercise. PMID:23360586

  11. Revisiting the time domain induced polarization technique, from linearization to inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, S.; Oldenburg, D.

    2015-12-01

    The induced polarization (IP) technique has been successful in mineral exploration, particularly for finding disseminated sulphide or porphyry deposits, but also in helping solve geotechnical and environmental problems. Electrical induced polarization (EIP) surveys use grounded electrodes and take measurements of the electric field while the current is both "on" and "off". Currently, 2D and 3D inversions of EIP data are generally carried out by first finding a background conductivity from the asymptotic "on-time" measurements. The DC resistivity problem is then linearized about that conductivity to obtain a linear relationship between the off-time data and the "pseudo-chargeability". The distribution of pseudo-chargeability in the earth is then interpreted within the context of the initial geoscience problem pursued. Despite its success, the current EIP implementation does have challenges. A fundamental assumption, that there is no electromagnetic induction (EM) effect, breaks down when the background is conductive. This is especially problematic in regions having conductive overburden. EM induction complicates, and sometimes overwhelms, the IP signal. To ameliorate this effect, we estimate the inductive signal, subtract it from the "off-time" data and invert the resultant IP data using the linearized formulation. We carefully examine the conditions under which this works. We also investigate the potential alterations to the linearized sensitivity function that are needed to allow a linearized inversion to be carried out. Inversions of EIP data recover a "chargeability" but this is not a uniquely defined quantity. There are multiple definitions of this property because there are a diverse number of ways in which an IP datum is defined. In time domain IP surveys, the data might be mV/V or a time-integrated voltage with units of ms. In reality however, data from an EIP survey have many time channels and each one can be inverted separately to produce a chargeability

  12. Insights into How Longicorn Beetle Larvae Determine the Timing of Metamorphosis: Starvation-Induced Mechanism Revisited.

    PubMed

    Nagamine, Keisuke; Ishikawa, Yukio; Hoshizaki, Sugihiko

    2016-01-01

    Larvae of holometabolous insects must determine the timing of their metamorphosis. How they determine this timing has only been studied in detail for a few insect species. In a few species of Coleoptera, starvation is known to be a cue for metamorphosis, leading to the formation of smaller adults (starvation-induced pupation, SiP). We investigated the occurrence of SiP in the beetle Psacothea hilaris. When P. hilaris larvae were starved late in the feeding phase of the last (5th) instar, they exhibited typical SiP characterized by constancy of the time from food deprivation to pupation (TTP) irrespective of the body weight upon food deprivation or the length of prior feeding. In contrast, when larvae were starved early in the feeding phase, TTP decreased by roughly 1 day as the feeding became 1 day longer. The change in the response to starvation was estimated to occur on day 5.9 in the last instar. A series of refeeding experiments suggested that whereas SiP occurred readily in the larvae starved in the late feeding phase, activation of SiP was suspended until day 5.9 in the larvae starved early in the feeding phase. When P. hilaris larvae were fed continuously, they eventually ceased feeding spontaneously and pupated. The time length between spontaneous cessation of feeding and pupation was approximately equal to the TTP in SiP. This suggests that the same mechanism was activated by food deprivation in the late feeding phase and by spontaneous cessation of ad libitum feeding. PMID:27386861

  13. Insights into How Longicorn Beetle Larvae Determine the Timing of Metamorphosis: Starvation-Induced Mechanism Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Nagamine, Keisuke; Ishikawa, Yukio; Hoshizaki, Sugihiko

    2016-01-01

    Larvae of holometabolous insects must determine the timing of their metamorphosis. How they determine this timing has only been studied in detail for a few insect species. In a few species of Coleoptera, starvation is known to be a cue for metamorphosis, leading to the formation of smaller adults (starvation-induced pupation, SiP). We investigated the occurrence of SiP in the beetle Psacothea hilaris. When P. hilaris larvae were starved late in the feeding phase of the last (5th) instar, they exhibited typical SiP characterized by constancy of the time from food deprivation to pupation (TTP) irrespective of the body weight upon food deprivation or the length of prior feeding. In contrast, when larvae were starved early in the feeding phase, TTP decreased by roughly 1 day as the feeding became 1 day longer. The change in the response to starvation was estimated to occur on day 5.9 in the last instar. A series of refeeding experiments suggested that whereas SiP occurred readily in the larvae starved in the late feeding phase, activation of SiP was suspended until day 5.9 in the larvae starved early in the feeding phase. When P. hilaris larvae were fed continuously, they eventually ceased feeding spontaneously and pupated. The time length between spontaneous cessation of feeding and pupation was approximately equal to the TTP in SiP. This suggests that the same mechanism was activated by food deprivation in the late feeding phase and by spontaneous cessation of ad libitum feeding. PMID:27386861

  14. Blankenbach 3 revisited: intricate time-dependent patterns in a simple model of mantle convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Z.; van Keken, P. E.

    2010-12-01

    We evaluate time-dependent nature of mantle convection using a simple 2D Cartesian model with internal heating based on the benchmark case 3 in Blankenbach et al. (Geophysical Journal International, 1989). We are particularly interested in the bifurcation patterns of the Vrms-Nu phase plot for Rayleigh numbers (Ra) around the benchmark value (Ra = 2.16×105), but more information is disclosed when we go to higher Ra (up to 8×105). We also investigate the role of the boundary conditions, for which we change to periodic boundary conditions for a second bifurcation study. We find an intricate pattern in the behavior of the heat flow (as measured by the Nusselt number Nu(t)) and the kinetic energy (as measured by Vrms(t)) which include period doubling, break down of periodic into episodic flow and reorganization into periodic flow at higher Ra. Two patterns of bifurcation are found. One is the period doubling pattern, described in Blankenbach et al. 1989 and referred to as P2-P4 bifurcation. The period doubling results from the differentiation of existing limit points of the time series of Nu or Vrms. The other pattern is period-preserving, which is found at higher Ra number in this study. In the period-preserving bifurcation, the new limit points (peak and valley) of the Nu and Vrms time series showed up as a twist in the monotonic intervals between a peak and valley. In this case the period doesn’t change. Both of the two patterns are observed in the models with the two types of boundary conditions (reflective and periodic). At a given Ra, different solutions can be obtained with different initial conditions. The initial condition is usually a solution with its Ra in the neighborhood, and with this neighborhood searching method, we were able to span the bifurcation plot (Ra-limit points of Nu(t) or Vrms(t)) to the range of Ra = 1×105~8×105 with both two boundary conditions. In this process, hysteresis is observed as expected in dynamic system, and the overlap of

  15. Revisiting chronodisruption: when the physiological nexus between internal and external times splits in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erren, Thomas C.; Reiter, Russel J.

    2013-04-01

    In this Concepts & Synthesis paper, we expand the definition of chronodisruption in humans by proposing that it can be operationalized as the split nexus of internal and external times. With this premise, we suggest how chronotype may be used as a temporal marker (chronomarker) of exposure to chronodisruption in studies of cancer, and beyond, offer cancer risk predictions for observational research on the basis of a chronotype-related hypothesis and corollary, and point to first empirical data in humans. In an a priori way, we examine possible outcomes and perspectives for preventive measures following from our rationale and the suggested chronobiology-driven studies and close with overall advances of chronodisruption research.

  16. Revisiting the Stark Broadening by fluctuating electric fields using the Continuous Time Random Walk Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capes, H.; Christova, M.; Boland, D.; Catoire, F.; Godbert-Mouret, L.; Koubiti, M.; Mekkaoui, A.; Rosato, J.; Marandet, Y.; Stamm, R.

    2010-10-01

    Stark broadening of atomic lines in plasmas is calculated by modelling the plasma stochastic electric field using the CTRW approach [1,2]. This allows retaining non Markovian terms in the Schrödinger equation averaged over the electric field fluctuations. As an application we consider a special case of a non separable CTRW process, the so called Kangaroo process [3]. An analytic expression for the line profile is presented for arbitrary waiting time distribution functions. A preliminary application to the hydrogen Lyman α line is discussed.

  17. Lakatos Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Court, Deborah

    1999-01-01

    Revisits and reviews Imre Lakatos' ideas on "Falsification and the Methodology of Scientific Research Programmes." Suggests that Lakatos' framework offers an insightful way of looking at the relationship between theory and research that is relevant not only for evaluating research programs in theoretical physics, but in the social sciences as…

  18. Circinus X-1 revisited: Fast-timing properties in relation to spectral state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oosterbroek, T.; Van Der Klis, M.; Kuulkers, E.; Van Paradijs, J.; Lewin, W. H. G.

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the X-ray spectral and fast-timing variations of Cir X-1 by performing a homogenous analysis of all EXOSAT ME data on this source using X-ray hardness-intensity diagrams (HIDs), color-color diagrams (CDs), and power spectra. Cir X-1 exhibits a wide range of power spectral shapes and a large variety in X-ray spectral shapes. At different epochs the power spectra variously resemble those of an atoll source, a Z source, a black-hole candidate, or are unlike any of these. At some epochs one-dimensional connected-branch patterns are seen in HID and CD, and at other times more complex structures are found. We interpret the complex behavior of Cir X-1 in terms of a model where accretion rate, orbital phase and epoch are the main determinants of the source behavior, and where the unique properties of the source are due to two special circumstances: (1) the source is the only known atoll source (accreting neutron star with a very low magnetic field) that can reach the Eddington critical accretion rate, and (2) it has a unique, highly eccentric and probably precessing orbit. Property (1) makes Cir X-1 a very important source for our understanding of the similarities in the observable properties of neutron stars and black holes as it allows to separate out black hole signatures from properties that are merely due to the presence of accretion compact with a low magnetic field.

  19. Viewing time effects revisited: prolonged response latencies for sexually attractive targets under restricted task conditions.

    PubMed

    Imhoff, Roland; Schmidt, Alexander F; Nordsiek, Uta; Luzar, Charlotte; Young, Andrew W; Banse, Rainer

    2010-12-01

    Sexually attractive stimuli are watched longer than unattractive stimuli. The processes underlying this robust and reliable viewing time effect are presently not well understood. In the present research comprising four experiments (total N = 250), four classes of potential explanations are proposed and the derived implications were experimentally tested. Contrary to explanations based on either deliberate delay or attentional adhesion to sexually attractive stimuli, prolonged response latencies were also found under restricted task conditions. Sexually preferred targets elicited longer response latencies in a self-paced evaluation task when stimulus pictures were presented for 750 ms (Experiment 1) or for 500 ms and followed by a pattern mask (Experiment 2). Prolonged latencies for sexually preferred targets were also observed when sexual attractiveness was rated in a speeded binary decision task with a response window of 1000 ms (Experiment 3). Eventually, it was shown that the response latency effect in the speeded binary choice task was still preserved when only the heads of target individuals were presented instead of the bodies (Experiment 4). Mate identification and schematic processes are discussed as the remaining plausible mechanisms for prolonged response latencies for sexually attractive targets under restricted conditions. PMID:20198414

  20. Revisiting Decidability and Optimum Reachability for Multi-Priced Timed Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fränzle, Martin; Swaminathan, Mani

    We investigate the optimum reachability problem for Multi-Priced Timed Automata (MPTA) that admit both positive and negative costs on edges and locations, thus bridging the gap between the results of Bouyer et al. (2007) and of Larsen and Rasmussen (2008). Our contributions are the following: (1) We show that even the location reachability problem is undecidable for MPTA equipped with both positive and negative costs, provided the costs are subject to a bounded budget, in the sense that paths of the underlying Multi-Priced Transition System (MPTS) that operationally exceed the budget are considered as not being viable. This undecidability result follows from an encoding of Stop-Watch Automata using such MPTA, and applies to MPTA with as few as two cost variables, and even when no costs are incurred upon taking edges. (2) We then restrict the MPTA such that each viable quasi-cyclic path of the underlying MPTS incurs a minimum absolute cost. Under such a condition, the location reachability problem is shown to be decidable and the optimum cost is shown to be computable for MPTA with positive and negative costs and a bounded budget. These results follow from a reduction of the optimum reachability problem to the solution of a linear constraint system representing the path conditions over a finite number of viable paths of bounded length.

  1. A New Method to Evaluate the Short-Time Withstand Current for Air Circuit Breaker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Honggang; Chen, Degui; Li, Xingwen; Tong, Weixiong

    Short-time withstand current is one of the crucial nominal parameters in air circuit breaker. A numerical method to evaluate the short-time withstand current is proposed. Cylindrical current carrying bridge is introduced to describe the contact spot between movable and fixed contacts. Taking into account the action of ferromagnetic splitter plates, the variation of the conductor properties with temperature and the variation of contact spot radius with the electro-dynamic repulsion force, a transient finite element calculation model is developed by coupling the electromagnetic field and thermal field. The loaded short circuit current is considered as the short-time withstand current once the highest temperature is near to the melting point of the contact material. It demonstrates that the method is useful to evaluate the performance of the air circuit breaker.

  2. The behaviour of tungsten during mantle melting revisited with implications for planetary differentiation time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babechuk, Michael G.; Kamber, Balz S.; Greig, Alan; Canil, Dante; Kodolányi, János

    2010-02-01

    closure of CAIs is calculated with a more prolonged time between core formation and mantle fractionation of ca. 2 Myr. This timeline is consistent with most recent published chronologies of the EPB differentiation based on the 53Mn- 53Cr and 26Al- 26Mg systems.

  3. Real-time mobile customer short message system design and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Qirui; Sun, Fang

    To expand the current mobile phone short message service, and to make the contact between schools, teachers, parents and feedback of the modern school office system more timely and conveniently, designed and developed the Short Message System based on the Linux platform. The state-of-the-art principles and designed proposals in the Short Message System based on the Linux platform are introduced. Finally we propose an optimized secure access authentication method. At present, many schools,vbusinesses and research institutions ratify the promotion and application the messaging system gradually, which has shown benign market prospects.

  4. Short-time evolution of Lagrangian velocity gradient correlations in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, L.; Bos, W. J. T.; Jin, G. D.

    2015-12-01

    We show by direct numerical simulation (DNS) that the Lagrangian cross correlation of velocity gradients in homogeneous isotropic turbulence increases at short times, whereas its auto-correlation decreases. Kinematic considerations allow to show that two invariants of the turbulent velocity field determine the short-time velocity gradient correlations. In order to get a more intuitive understanding of the dynamics for longer times, heuristic models are proposed involving the combined action of local shear and rotation. These models quantitatively reproduce the effects and disentangle the different physical mechanisms leading to the observations in the DNS.

  5. A search for short time scale TeV variability in Mkn501

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Michael; McKernan, Barry; Yaqoob, Tahir; Fegan, David

    1999-06-01

    We analyse Whipple TeV gamma-ray data from active states of Mkn501 for short time scale variability using the new Excess Pair Fraction (EPF) method. No evidence is found for significant variability on time scales less than 10 minutes.

  6. Viruses as groundwater tracers: using ecohydrology to characterize short travel times in aquifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Viruses are attractive tracers of short (<3 yr) travel times in aquifers because they have unique genetic signatures, are detectable in trace quantities, and are mobile and stable in groundwater. Virus “snaphots” result from infection and disappearance over time as a community develops resistance. T...

  7. Short time Fourier analysis of the electromyogram - Fast movements and constant contraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannaford, Blake; Lehman, Steven

    1986-01-01

    Short-time Fourier analysis was applied to surface electromyograms (EMG) recorded during rapid movements, and during isometric contractions at constant forces. A portion of the data to be transformed by multiplying the signal by a Hamming window was selected, and then the discrete Fourier transform was computed. Shifting the window along the data record, a new spectrum was computed each 10 ms. The transformed data were displayed in spectograms or 'voiceprints'. This short-time technique made it possible to see time-dependencies in the EMG that are normally averaged in the Fourier analysis of these signals. Spectra of EMGs during isometric contractions at constant force vary in the short (10-20 ms) term. Short-time spectra from EMGs recorded during rapid movements were much less variable. The windowing technique picked out the typical 'three-burst pattern' in EMG's from both wrist and head movements. Spectra during the bursts were more consistent than those during isometric contractions. Furthermore, there was a consistent shift in spectral statistics in the course of the three bursts. Both the center frequency and the variance of the spectral energy distribution grew from the first burst to the second burst in the same muscle. The analogy between EMGs and speech signals is extended to argue for future applicability of short-time spectral analysis of EMG.

  8. Direct Visualization of Short Transverse Relaxation Time Component (ViSTa)

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Se-Hong; Bilello, Michel; Schindler, Matthew; Markowitz, Clyde E.; Detre, John A.; Lee, Jongho

    2013-01-01

    White matter of the brain has been demonstrated to have multiple relaxation components. Among them, the short transverse relaxation time component (T2 < 40 ms; T2* < 25 ms at 3T) has been suggested to originate from myelin water whereas long transverse relaxation time components have been associated with axonal and/or interstitial water. In myelin water imaging, T2 or T2* signal decay is measured to estimate myelin water fraction based on T2 or T2* differences among the water components. This method has been demonstrated to be sensitive to demyelination in the brain but suffers from low SNR and image artifacts originating from ill-conditioned multi-exponential fitting. In this study, a novel approach that selectively acquires short transverse relaxation time signal is proposed. The method utilizes a double inversion RF pair to suppress a range of long T1 signal. This suppression leaves short T2* signal, which has been suggested to have short T1, as the primary source of the image. The experimental results confirms that after suppression of long T1 signals, the image is dominated by short T2* in the range of myelin water, allowing us to directly visualize the short transverse relaxation time component in the brain. Compared to conventional myelin water imaging, this new method of direct visualization of short relaxation time component (ViSTa) provides high quality images. When applied to multiple sclerosis patients, chronic lesions show significantly reduced signal intensity in ViSTa images suggesting sensitivity to demyelination. PMID:23796545

  9. 25 CFR 26.30 - Does the Job Training Program provide part-time training or short-term training?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Does the Job Training Program provide part-time training or short-term training? 26.30 Section 26.30 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Program provide part-time training or short-term training? Yes, part-time and short-term training...

  10. Short Contact Time Direct Coal Liquefaction Using a Novel Batch Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    He Huang; Michael T. Klein; William H. Calkins

    1997-01-30

    The primary objective of this research is to optimize the design and operation of the bench scale batch reactor (SCTBR) for studying direct coal liquefaction at short contact times (.01 to 10 minutes or longer). Additional objectives are to study the kinetics of direct coal liquefaction particularly at short reaction times and to investigate the role of organic oxygen components of coal and their reaction pathways during coal liquefaction. Many of those objectives have already been achieved. This quarterly report discusses further kinetic studies of the liquefaction in tetralin of a Montana Lignite, Wyodak-Anderson subbituminous coal, Illinois #6 hv bituminous coal, Pittsburgh #8 hv bituminous coals, and Pocohontas lV bituminous coal at short contact times. All of these coals showed a distinct extraction stage. Further work has also been done to attempt to clarify the role of the liquefaction solvent in the direct liquefaction process.

  11. Crossover between short- and long-time behavior of stress fluctuations and viscoelasticity of liquids.

    PubMed

    Hess, Siegfried; Kröger, Martin; Evans, Denis

    2003-04-01

    An effective viscosity coefficient is introduced based on definite time averages of equilibrium stress fluctuations rather than stress correlations. Analysis of this quantity via molecular dynamics of a simple model liquid reveals a crossover between the expected short-time elastic and the long-time viscous behavior with increasing averaging time. The procedure allows us to extract the zero-rate shear viscosity when the averaging time becomes one order of magnitude larger than the relevant relaxation time. A relationship between this effective viscosity and the dynamic viscosities is established. PMID:12786406

  12. Hierarchical structure of the energy landscape of proteins revisited by time series analysis. II. Investigation of explicit solvent effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alakent, Burak; Camurdan, Mehmet C.; Doruker, Pemra

    2005-10-01

    Time series analysis tools are employed on the principal modes obtained from the Cα trajectories from two independent molecular-dynamics simulations of α-amylase inhibitor (tendamistat). Fluctuations inside an energy minimum (intraminimum motions), transitions between minima (interminimum motions), and relaxations in different hierarchical energy levels are investigated and compared with those encountered in vacuum by using different sampling window sizes and intervals. The low-frequency low-indexed mode relationship, established in vacuum, is also encountered in water, which shows the reliability of the important dynamics information offered by principal components analysis in water. It has been shown that examining a short data collection period (100ps) may result in a high population of overdamped modes, while some of the low-frequency oscillations (<10cm-1) can be captured in water by using a longer data collection period (1200ps). Simultaneous analysis of short and long sampling window sizes gives the following picture of the effect of water on protein dynamics. Water makes the protein lose its memory: future conformations are less dependent on previous conformations due to the lowering of energy barriers in hierarchical levels of the energy landscape. In short-time dynamics (<10ps), damping factors extracted from time series model parameters are lowered. For tendamistat, the friction coefficient in the Langevin equation is found to be around 40-60cm-1 for the low-indexed modes, compatible with literature. The fact that water has increased the friction and that on the other hand has lubrication effect at first sight contradicts. However, this comes about because water enhances the transitions between minima and forces the protein to reduce its already inherent inability to maintain oscillations observed in vacuum. Some of the frequencies lower than 10cm-1 are found to be overdamped, while those higher than 20cm-1 are slightly increased. As for the long-time

  13. Dispersion curves from short-time molecular dynamics simulation. 1. Diatomic chain results

    SciTech Connect

    Noid, D.W.; Broocks, B.T.; Gray, S.K.; Marple, S.L.

    1988-06-16

    The multiple signal classification method (MUSIC) for frequency estimation is used to compute the frequency dispersion curves of a diatomic chain from the time-dependent structure factor. In this paper, the authors demonstrate that MUSIC can accurately determine the frequencies from very short time trajectories. MUSIC is also used to show how the frequencies can vary in time, i.e., along a trajectory. The method is ideally suited for analyzing molecular dynamics simulations of large systems.

  14. Short-Time Glassy-like Dynamics Observed in Viscous Protein Solutions with Competing Potential Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Norman; Godfrin, Doug; Liu, Yun

    Structures in concentrated protein solutions caused by the combination of short-range attraction (SA) and long-range repulsion (LR) have been extensively studied due to their importance in understanding therapeutic protein formulations and the phase behavior in general. Despite extensive studies of kinetically arrested states in colloidal systems with short-range attraction, less is understood for the effect of an additional longer-range repulsion on model colloidal systems with a SA interaction. Highly purified lysozyme is used a model experimental system due to its stable globular structure and SALR interactions at low ionic strength that can be quantitatively modeled. The fluid microstructure and protein short time self diffusion are measured across a broad range of conditions by small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and neutron spin echo (NSE), respectively. Newtonian liquid behavior is observed at all concentrations, even with an increase of zero shear viscosity by almost four orders of magnitude with increasing concentration. However, dynamic measurements demonstrate a sub-diffusive regime at relatively short time scales for concentrated samples at low temperature. The formation of a heterogeneous density distribution is shown to produce localized regions of high density that reduce protein motion, giving it a glassy-like behavior at the short time scale. This heterogeneity occurs at the length scale associated with the intermediate range order driven by the competing potential features, distinguishable from heterogeneous colloidal gels.

  15. Short relaxation times but long transient times in both simple and complex reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Henry, Adrien; Martin, Olivier C

    2016-07-01

    When relaxation towards an equilibrium or steady state is exponential at large times, one usually considers that the associated relaxation time τ, i.e. the inverse of the decay rate, is the longest characteristic time in the system. However, that need not be true, other times such as the lifetime of an infinitesimal perturbation can be much longer. In the present work, we demonstrate that this paradoxical property can arise even in quite simple systems such as a linear chain of reactions obeying mass action (MA) kinetics. By mathematical analysis of simple reaction networks, we pin-point the reason why the standard relaxation time does not provide relevant information on the potentially long transient times of typical infinitesimal perturbations. Overall, we consider four characteristic times and study their behaviour in both simple linear chains and in more complex reaction networks taken from the publicly available database 'Biomodels'. In all these systems, whether involving MA rates, Michaelis-Menten reversible kinetics, or phenomenological laws for reaction rates, we find that the characteristic times corresponding to lifetimes of tracers and of concentration perturbations can be significantly longer than τ. PMID:27411726

  16. Short relaxation times but long transient times in both simple and complex reaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Adrien; Martin, Olivier C.

    2016-01-01

    When relaxation towards an equilibrium or steady state is exponential at large times, one usually considers that the associated relaxation time τ, i.e. the inverse of the decay rate, is the longest characteristic time in the system. However, that need not be true, other times such as the lifetime of an infinitesimal perturbation can be much longer. In the present work, we demonstrate that this paradoxical property can arise even in quite simple systems such as a linear chain of reactions obeying mass action (MA) kinetics. By mathematical analysis of simple reaction networks, we pin-point the reason why the standard relaxation time does not provide relevant information on the potentially long transient times of typical infinitesimal perturbations. Overall, we consider four characteristic times and study their behaviour in both simple linear chains and in more complex reaction networks taken from the publicly available database ‘Biomodels’. In all these systems, whether involving MA rates, Michaelis–Menten reversible kinetics, or phenomenological laws for reaction rates, we find that the characteristic times corresponding to lifetimes of tracers and of concentration perturbations can be significantly longer than τ. PMID:27411726

  17. TIME - MAKING THE BEST OF IT! A Fieldwork Study Outlining Time in Endoscopy Facilities for Short-Term Stay

    PubMed Central

    Bundgaard, Karin; Sørensen, Erik E.; Delmar, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This paper focus on nursing and time in endoscopy facilities for short-term stay aiming to explore aspects of time in this setting and how expectations from the healthcare organisation, patients and nurses are expressed and met when managing nursing time. Background: Former research primarily focuses on the subject of time in the understanding of duration where having more time is closely associated with the ability to deliver better quality nursing care. The main concern is the nurses’ increased number of tasks and the decreased length of time at their disposal. However, few studies describe nursing when time is sparse, and the possibility of providing individualised nursing within a very short span of time. Design: Inspired by practical ethnographic principles, a fieldwork study was performed in high technology endoscopy clinics during 2008-2010. Methods: Data triangulation included participant observation, participant reports and patients and nurses semi-structured interviews. Results/Findings: The issue of time was an interwoven part of life in the productive endoscopy units. The understanding of time related to the main category: ‘Time - making the best of it’, and the sub categories “Responsibility of time”, “Information and preparation”, and “Time wasters”. Conclusion: The study underlines the possibility of combining the health care systems, patients and the nurses’ perspectives on and expectations of how to spend nursing time in endoscopy settings. In successful patient pathways nursing maximize patient outcome, support the goals of the healthcare organisations, is reliable, assure, tangible, empathic and responsive, and is individually tailored to the patient’s needs. The study contributes by underlining the importance of discussing not how to get more time in clinical practice but instead how to spend the time in the best way possible. PMID:27347251

  18. A Unified Framework for Estimating Minimum Detectable Effects for Comparative Short Interrupted Time Series Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Cristofer; Unlu, Fatih

    2014-01-01

    The Comparative Short Interrupted Time Series (C-SITS) design is a frequently employed quasi-experimental method, in which the pre- and post-intervention changes observed in the outcome levels of a treatment group is compared with those of a comparison group where the difference between the former and the latter is attributed to the treatment. The…

  19. APPARATUS FOR SHORT TIME MEASUREMENTS IN A FIXED-BED, GAS/SOLID REACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    An apparatus for exposure of a solid to reactive process gas is described which makes possible short time (≥ 0.3 to 15 s) exposures in a fixed-bed reactor. Operating conditions for differential reaction with respect to the gas concentration and rapid quench for arresting hi...

  20. Lay-Offs and Short-Time Working in Selected OECD Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grais, Bernard; And Others

    This report, which includes the conclusions of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Working Party on Employment and Unemployment Statistics, analyzes arrangements for compensating workers in the OECD countries who are temporarily laid-off or subject to short-time work. In introductory sections to part 1, the concepts of…

  1. Managing the Editing Function on Large Publication Tasks with Short Flow Times.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa, Terry M. Dalla

    Large publication tasks with short flow times require that several editors be assigned to work together as part of a larger publication team that includes management, engineer-writers, publishing logistics personnel, word processor operators, illustrators, and printers. Team-edited publications have special problems, and the technical editing and…

  2. New methods for regulating flowering time in short-day strawberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Higher percentages of transplants of short-day cultivars 'Chandler', 'Carmine', 'Strawberry Festival', and 'Sweet Charlie' from runner tips plugged in early July rather than the standard time (early August) bloomed in the fall. Nearly 100% of the transplants produced in early July flowered in the f...

  3. Short-time dynamics of monomers and dimers in quasi-two-dimensional colloidal mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarmiento-Gómez, Erick; Villanueva-Valencia, José Ramón; Herrera-Velarde, Salvador; Ruiz-Santoyo, José Arturo; Santana-Solano, Jesús; Arauz-Lara, José Luis; Castañeda-Priego, Ramón

    2016-07-01

    We report on the short-time dynamics in colloidal mixtures made up of monomers and dimers highly confined between two glass plates. At low concentrations, the experimental measurements of colloidal motion agree well with the solution of the Navier-Stokes equation at low Reynolds numbers; the latter takes into account the increase in the drag force on a colloidal particle due to wall-particle hydrodynamic forces. More importantly, we find that the ratio of the short-time diffusion coefficient of the monomer and that of the center of mass of the dimmer is almost independent of both the dimer molar fraction, xd, and the total packing fraction, ϕ , up to ϕ ≈0.5 . At higher concentrations, this ratio displays a small but systematic increase. A similar physical scenario is observed for the ratio between the parallel and the perpendicular components of the short-time diffusion coefficients of the dimer. This dynamical behavior is corroborated by means of molecular dynamics computer simulations that include explicitly the particle-particle hydrodynamic forces induced by the solvent. Our results suggest that the effects of colloid-colloid hydrodynamic interactions on the short-time diffusion coefficients are almost identical and factorable in both species.

  4. Short-time dynamics of monomers and dimers in quasi-two-dimensional colloidal mixtures.

    PubMed

    Sarmiento-Gómez, Erick; Villanueva-Valencia, José Ramón; Herrera-Velarde, Salvador; Ruiz-Santoyo, José Arturo; Santana-Solano, Jesús; Arauz-Lara, José Luis; Castañeda-Priego, Ramón

    2016-07-01

    We report on the short-time dynamics in colloidal mixtures made up of monomers and dimers highly confined between two glass plates. At low concentrations, the experimental measurements of colloidal motion agree well with the solution of the Navier-Stokes equation at low Reynolds numbers; the latter takes into account the increase in the drag force on a colloidal particle due to wall-particle hydrodynamic forces. More importantly, we find that the ratio of the short-time diffusion coefficient of the monomer and that of the center of mass of the dimmer is almost independent of both the dimer molar fraction, x_{d}, and the total packing fraction, ϕ, up to ϕ≈0.5. At higher concentrations, this ratio displays a small but systematic increase. A similar physical scenario is observed for the ratio between the parallel and the perpendicular components of the short-time diffusion coefficients of the dimer. This dynamical behavior is corroborated by means of molecular dynamics computer simulations that include explicitly the particle-particle hydrodynamic forces induced by the solvent. Our results suggest that the effects of colloid-colloid hydrodynamic interactions on the short-time diffusion coefficients are almost identical and factorable in both species. PMID:27575180

  5. Dissociation of Short-Term Forgetting from the Passage of Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, K. Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    In many theories, forgetting is closely linked to the passage of time. In the present experiments, recall in a short-term memory task was less accurate when the retention interval included a difficult arithmetic addition task, compared with an easy task. In a novel condition, the interfering task was switched from hard to easy partway through the…

  6. MULTI-INSTRUMENT X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF THERMONUCLEAR BURSTS WITH SHORT RECURRENCE TIMES

    SciTech Connect

    Keek, L.; Heger, A.; Galloway, D. K.; In't Zand, J. J. M.

    2010-07-20

    Type I X-ray bursts from low-mass X-ray binaries result from a thermonuclear runaway in the material accreted onto the neutron star. Although typical recurrence times are a few hours, consistent with theoretical ignition model predictions, there are also observations of bursts occurring as promptly as 10 minutes or less after the previous event. We present a comprehensive assessment of this phenomenon using a catalog of 3387 bursts observed with the BeppoSAX/WFCs and RXTE/PCA X-ray instruments. This catalog contains 136 bursts with recurrence times of less than 1 hr, that come in multiples of up to four events, from 15 sources. Short recurrence times are not observed from the so-called ultra-compact binaries, indicating that hydrogen-burning processes play a crucial role. As far as the neutron star spin frequency is known, these sources all spin fast at over 500 Hz; the rotationally induced mixing may explain burst recurrence times of the order of 10 minutes. Short recurrence time bursts generally occur at all mass accretion rates where normal bursts are observed, but for individual sources the short recurrence times may be restricted to a smaller interval of accretion rate. The fraction of such bursts is roughly 30%. We also report the shortest known recurrence time of 3.8 minutes.

  7. Reframing in dentistry: revisited.

    PubMed

    Nuvvula, Sivakumar; Kamatham, Rekalakshmi; Challa, Ramasubbareddy; Asokan, Sharath

    2013-01-01

    The successful practice of dentistry involves a good combination of technical skills and soft skills. Soft skills or communication skills are not taught extensively in dental schools and it can be challenging to learn and at times in treating dental patients. Guiding the child's behavior in the dental operatory is one of the preliminary steps to be taken by the pediatric dentist and one who can successfully modify the behavior can definitely pave the way for a life time comprehensive oral care. This article is an attempt to revisit a simple behavior guidance technique, reframing and explain the possible psychological perspectives behind it for better use in the clinical practice. PMID:24021326

  8. SLIM--An Early Work Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Alex; /SLAC

    2008-07-25

    An early, but at the time illuminating, piece of work on how to deal with a general, linearly coupled accelerator lattice is revisited. This work is based on the SLIM formalism developed in 1979-1981.

  9. Removals of pharmaceutical compounds from hospital wastewater in membrane bioreactor operated under short hydraulic retention time.

    PubMed

    Prasertkulsak, S; Chiemchaisri, C; Chiemchaisri, W; Itonaga, T; Yamamoto, K

    2016-05-01

    Pilot-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR) was operated at a short hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 3 h for the treatment of hospital wastewater. The removals of eleven pharmaceutical compounds in MBR operated at different mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) level were investigated during which nitrification degree was differed. The results experiments revealed the importance of immediate adsorption onto the colloidal particles in supernatant of MBR sludge and subsequently removed by membrane filtration for the recalcitrant pharmaceutical compounds. Nevertheless, the removals through biodegradation during short HRT were also found significant for some compounds. DGGE profile revealed the development of pharmaceutical degrading microorganisms in MBR. PMID:26852096

  10. Short-Time Glassy Dynamics in Viscous Protein Solutions with Competing Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfrin, P. Douglas; Hudson, Steven D.; Hong, Kunlun; Porcar, Lionel; Falus, Peter; Wagner, Norman J.; Liu, Yun

    2015-11-01

    The glass transition of colloidal dispersions interacting with both a short-ranged attraction and long-ranged repulsion is studied using highly purified lysozyme solutions. Newtonian liquid behavior is observed at all conditions while measurements of the dynamics in the short-time limit show features typical of glassy colloidal systems at high protein concentrations. This interesting behavior is due to the competition of the attraction and repulsion that produces a heterogeneous microstructure only at intermediate range length scales. The results demonstrate that theories for the macroscopic properties of systems with competing interactions need to include intermediate range order.

  11. A short-time fading study of Al2O3:C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimento, L. F.; Vanhavere, F.; Silva, E. H.; Deene, Y. De

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies the short-time fading from Al2O3:C by measuring optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) signals (Total OSL: TOSL, and Peak OSL: POSL) from droplets and Luxel™ pellets. The influence of various bleaching regimes (blue, green and white) and light power is compared. The fading effect is the decay of the OSL signal in the dark at room temperature. Al2O3:C detectors were submitted to various bleaching regimes, irradiated with a reference dose and read out after different time spans. Investigations were carried out using 2 mm size droplet detectors, made of thin Al2O3:C powder mixed with a photocured polymer. Tests were compared to Luxel™-type detectors (Landauer Inc.). Short-time post-irradiation fading is present in OSL results (TOSL and POSL) droplets for time spans up to 200 s. The effect of short-time fading can be lowered/removed when treating the detectors with high-power and/or long time bleaching regimes; this result was observed in both TOSL and POSL from droplets and Luxel™.

  12. Internal dynamics of proteins. Short time and long time motions of aromatic sidechains in PTI.

    PubMed Central

    Karplus, M; Gelin, B R; McCammon, J A

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical approaches to the internal dynamics of proteins are outlined and illustrated by application to the aromatic sidechain motions of tyrosines in the bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor. High frequency torsional oscillations are obtained from a molecular dynamics simulation, while the longer time ring rotations are analyzed by use of adiabatic energy minimization and special transition-state trajectory techniques. PMID:7248464

  13. Detection systems for short-time stroboscopic neutron imaging and measurements on a rotating engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillinger, B.; Abele, H.; Brunner, J.; Frei, G.; Gähler, R.; Gildemeister, A.; Hillenbach, A.; Lehmann, E.; Vontobel, P.

    2005-04-01

    Today's neutron sources do not deliver sufficient flux to examine singular short-time events in the millisecond range by neutron radiography. However, periodic processes can be examined if a triggered accumulating detector collects information of identical time-windows and positions over several cycles of the process. The same problem applies if the source signal itself carries information, like the energy-time dependence in the pulse of a spallation source. Several possible detection methods were considered; measurements were performed at the intense neutron beam H9 of ILL Grenoble, where an electrically driven BMW engine was examined at 1000 rpm with time resolution of 200 μs.

  14. Corrections for the combined effects of decay and dead time in live-timed counting of short-lived radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, R

    2016-03-01

    Studies and calibrations of short-lived radionuclides, for example (15)O, are of particular interest in nuclear medicine. Yet counting experiments on such species are vulnerable to an error due to the combined effect of decay and dead time. Separate decay corrections and dead-time corrections do not account for this issue. Usually counting data are decay-corrected to the start time of the count period, or else instead of correcting the count rate, the mid-time of the measurement is used as the reference time. Correction factors are derived for both those methods, considering both extending and non-extending dead time. Series approximations are derived here and the accuracy of those approximations are discussed. PMID:26682893

  15. Effect of short-time external short circuiting on the capacity fading mechanism during long-term cycling of LiCoO2/mesocarbon microbeads battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lingling; Cheng, Xinqun; Ma, Yulin; Guan, Ting; Sun, Shun; Cui, Yingzhi; Du, Chunyu; Zuo, Pengjian; Gao, Yunzhi; Yin, Geping

    2016-06-01

    Commercial LiCoO2/mesocarbon microbeads (MCMB) batteries (CP475148AR) are short circuited by different contact resistances (0.6 mΩ and 5.0 mΩ) for short times. The short circuited battery is cycled for 1000 times, and the effect of the short-time external short circuiting on the capacity fading mechanism during long-term cycling of LiCoO2/MCMB battery is studied by analyzing the morphology, structure, and electrochemical performance. The results of SEM indicates that the morphology of LiCoO2 material is almost unchanged, except that the particle surface becomes smooth, and the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) film on the surface of MCMB electrode becomes nonuniform due to the high temperature caused by short circuiting. The lithium ions are more difficult to de-intercalate from the anode and the lattice structure of LiCoO2 degrades according to the results of X-ray diffraction (XRD). The high discharge current caused by short circuiting can damage electrodes, leaving vacancies in structure. The damage of electrode structure can lead to a decrease of diffusion coefficient of lithium (D), so polarization increases and mainly caused by the LiCoO2 electrode. The capacity deterioration of short circuited battery during long-term cycling is mainly caused by the increase of polarization and capacity loss of electrodes.

  16. Short-duration low-gravity experiments - Time scales, challenges and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, F.

    1993-01-01

    Short-duration low-gravity experiments can be conducted either in drop tubes and drop towers, or on sounding rockets and aircraft on ballistic trajectories. While these facilities offer more frequent flight opportunities and higher cost effectiveness than orbiting spacecraft, their relatively short low-gravity times are often perceived as limiting their utility to only a narrow range of applications and research areas. In this review it is shown, based on scaling laws for diffusive transport of momentum, species and heat, radiative heat transfer and capillarity-driven motion, that with proper consideration of the characteristic length scales, a host of phenomena can be meaningfully investigated during a few seconds. This usefulness of short-duration low-gravity facilities is illustrated with numerous results of recent studies of solidification, combustion, transport in multiphase systems, statics and dynamics of liquid surfaces, magnetic Benard convection, fluid management, transport properties and the graviperception in cells.

  17. Short time-scale variability of chromospheric Ca II in late-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baliunas, S. L.; Vaughan, A. H.; Hartmann, L.; Liller, W.; Dupree, A. K.

    1981-01-01

    The short time-scale variability of singly ionized calcium chromospheric emission has been investigated in a few late-type stars. Emission-line variations with time scales of a few minutes to hours are seen in Alpha Tau (K5 III), Lambda And (G8 III-IV), and Epsilon Eri (K2 V). The existence of substantial chromospheric flux changes (10 to the 30th to 10 to the 32nd ergs) over short periods of time suggests that the calcium emission arises from a few small, coherent regions. Frequencies present in the data are discussed in the context of acoustic wave predictions and estimated acoustic cutoff frequencies for giants and dwarfs.

  18. The time of onset of abnormal calcification in spondylometaepiphyseal dysplasia, short limb-abnormal calcification type.

    PubMed

    Tüysüz, Beyhan; Gazioğlu, Nurperi; Ungür, Savaş; Aji, Dolly Yafet; Türkmen, Seval

    2009-01-01

    A 1-month-old boy with shortness of extremities on prenatal US was referred to our department with a provisional diagnosis of achondroplasia. His height was normal but he had short extremities and platyspondyly, premature carpal epiphyses on both hands, and short tubular bones with irregular metaphyses on radiographs. Re-evaluation of the patient at the age of 1 year revealed very short height and premature calcification of the costal cartilages and epiphyses. Spondylometaepiphyseal dysplasia (SMED), short limb-abnormal calcification type was diagnosed. This condition is a very rare autosomal recessively inherited disorder, and most of the patients die in early childhood due to neurological involvement. At the age of 2 years and 5 months, a CT scan showed narrowing of the cervical spinal canal. One month later he died suddenly because of spinal cord injury. In conclusion early diagnosis is very important because the recurrence risk is high and patients may die due to early neurological complications. The time of onset of abnormal calcifications, a diagnostic finding of the disease, is at the age of around 1 year in most patients. When abnormal calcifications are not yet present, but radiological changes associated with SMED are present, this rare disease must be considered. PMID:19002453

  19. While We Wait for Life, Life Passes: The Time Metaphors Questionnaire-Short Form.

    PubMed

    Sobol-Kwapinska, Malgorzata; Przepiorka, Aneta; Nosal, Czeslaw

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a short version of the Time Metaphors Questionnaire (TMQ; Sobol-Kwapinska & Nosal, 2009 ). The original TMQ consists of 95 items and was designed to measure time conceiving. Because completing the TMQ is very time-consuming, this research develops a short form of this questionnaire-Time Metaphors Questionnaire-Short Form (TMQ-SF). A sample of 990 Polish adults completed the TMQ. One-half of the sample was used to construct the TMQ-SF by selecting items based on the exploratory factor analysis. The other half of the sample was used to cross-validate the factorial structure of the TMQ-SF by means of confirmatory factor analysis. The TMQ-SF presented high internal consistency and a clear three-factor structure. The convergent and discriminant validity were assessed based on comparison with the Big Five factors of personality, satisfaction with life, positive and negative affect, time perspective, and mindfulness. PMID:27410054

  20. Fractal analysis of the short time series in a visibility graph method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruixue; Wang, Jiang; Yu, Haitao; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile; Chen, Yingyuan

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the performance of the visibility graph (VG) method on short fractal time series. In this paper, the time series of Fractional Brownian motions (fBm), characterized by different Hurst exponent H, are simulated and then mapped into a scale-free visibility graph, of which the degree distributions show the power-law form. The maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) is applied to estimate power-law indexes of degree distribution, and in this progress, the Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) statistic is used to test the performance of estimation of power-law index, aiming to avoid the influence of droop head and heavy tail in degree distribution. As a result, we find that the MLE gives an optimal estimation of power-law index when KS statistic reaches its first local minimum. Based on the results from KS statistic, the relationship between the power-law index and the Hurst exponent is reexamined and then amended to meet short time series. Thus, a method combining VG, MLE and KS statistics is proposed to estimate Hurst exponents from short time series. Lastly, this paper also offers an exemplification to verify the effectiveness of the combined method. In addition, the corresponding results show that the VG can provide a reliable estimation of Hurst exponents.

  1. Short Lag Times for Invasive Tropical Plants: Evidence from Experimental Plantings in Hawai'i

    PubMed Central

    Daehler, Curtis C.

    2009-01-01

    Background The lag time of an invasion is the delay between arrival of an introduced species and its successful spread in a new area. To date, most estimates of lag times for plants have been indirect or anecdotal, and these estimates suggest that plant invasions are often characterized by lag times of 50 years or more. No general estimates are available of lag times for tropical plant invasions. Historical plantings and documentation were used to directly estimate lag times for tropical plant invasions in Hawai'i. Methodology/Principal Findings Historical planting records for the Lyon Arboretum dating back to 1920 were examined to identify plants that have since become invasive pests in the Hawaiian Islands. Annual reports describing escape from plantings were then used to determine the lag times between initial plantings and earliest recorded spread of the successful invaders. Among 23 species that eventually became invasive pests, the average lag time between introduction and first evidence of spread was 14 years for woody plants and 5 years for herbaceous plants. Conclusions/Significance These direct estimates of lag times are as much as an order of magnitude shorter than previous, indirect estimates, which were mainly based on temperate plants. Tropical invaders may have much shorter lag times than temperate species. A lack of direct and deliberate observations may have also inflated many previous lag time estimates. Although there have been documented cases of long lag times due to delayed arrival of a mutualist or environmental changes over time, this study suggests that most successful invasions are likely to begin shortly after arrival of the plant in a suitable habitat, at least in tropical environments. Short lag times suggest that controlled field trials may be a practical element of risk assessment for plant introductions. PMID:19223966

  2. Short contact time direct coal liquefaction using a novel batch reactor. Quarterly report, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, M.T.; Calkins, W.H.; Huang, H.

    1996-05-01

    The objective of this research is to optimize the design and operation of the bench scale batch reactor (SCTBR) for coal liquefaction at short contact times (0.01 to 10 minutes or longer). Additional objectives are to study the kinetics of direct coal liquefaction particularly at short reaction times, and to investigate the role of the organic oxygen components of coal and their reaction pathways during liquefaction. Many of those objectives have already been achieved and others are still in progress. This quarterly report covers further progress toward those objectives. Much of the previous quarterly report was concerned mainly in the retrograde reactions occurring during the liquefaction process. This report is largely devoted to the kinetics and mechanisms of the liquefaction process itself and the influence of the liquefaction solvents.

  3. Error correction in short time steps during the application of quantum gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro, L. A.; Napolitano, R. d. J.

    2016-04-01

    We propose a modification of the standard quantum error-correction method to enable the correction of errors that occur due to the interaction with a noisy environment during quantum gates without modifying the codification used for memory qubits. Using a perturbation treatment of the noise that allows us to separate it from the ideal evolution of the quantum gate, we demonstrate that in certain cases it is necessary to divide the logical operation in short time steps intercalated by correction procedures. A prescription of how these gates can be constructed is provided, as well as a proof that, even for the cases when the division of the quantum gate in short time steps is not necessary, this method may be advantageous for reducing the total duration of the computation.

  4. Short-time dynamics of isotropic and anisotropic Bak-Sneppen model: extensive simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirnakli, Ugur; Lyra, Marcelo L.

    2004-12-01

    In this work, the short-time dynamics of the isotropic and anisotropic versions of the Bak-Sneppen (BS) model has been investigated using the standard damage spreading technique. Since the system sizes attained in our simulations are larger than the ones employed in previous studies, our results for the dynamic scaling exponents are expected to be more accurate than the results of the existing literature. The obtained scaling exponents of both versions of the BS model are found to be greater than the ones given in previous works. These findings are in agreement with the recent claim of Cafiero et al. (Eur. Phys. J. B7 (1999) 505). Moreover, it is found that the short-time dynamics of the anisotropic model is only slightly affected by finite-size effects and the reported estimate of α≃0.53 can be considered as a good estimate of the true exponent in the thermodynamic limit.

  5. Critical short-time dynamics in a system with interacting static and diffusive populations.

    PubMed

    Argolo, C; Quintino, Yan; Gleria, Iram; Lyra, M L

    2012-01-01

    We study the critical short-time dynamical behavior of a one-dimensional model where diffusive individuals can infect a static population upon contact. The model presents an absorbing phase transition from an active to an inactive state. Previous calculations of the critical exponents based on quasistationary quantities have indicated an unusual crossover from the directed percolation to the diffusive contact process universality classes. Here we show that the critical exponents governing the slow short-time dynamic evolution of several relevant quantities, including the order parameter, its relative fluctuations, and correlation function, reinforce the lack of universality in this model. Accurate estimates show that the critical exponents are distinct in the regimes of low and high recovery rates. PMID:22400516

  6. 26 CFR 1.6074-2 - Time for filing declarations by corporations in case of a short taxable year.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... case of a short taxable year. 1.6074-2 Section 1.6074-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Returns and Other Documents § 1.6074-2 Time for filing declarations by corporations in case of a short... short taxable year of 9 months or more beginning on or before December 31, 1963, where the...

  7. 26 CFR 1.6074-2 - Time for filing declarations by corporations in case of a short taxable year.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... case of a short taxable year. 1.6074-2 Section 1.6074-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Documents § 1.6074-2 Time for filing declarations by corporations in case of a short taxable year. (a) Taxable years beginning on or before December 31, 1963—(1) In general. In the case of a short taxable...

  8. Time-dependent directionality of cooperative emission after short pulse excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedberg, Richard; Manassah, Jamal T.

    2008-09-01

    Cooperative emission from a sphere of N two-level atoms excited by a short pulse is shown to have a time-dependent angular distribution, with the possibility of reversal in the dominant direction of emission. This is a result of the different values of the frequency shifts and decay rates associated with the various collective eigenmodes of the atomic system obtained in a scalar photon model.

  9. Recent operating experience with Flexicracking commercial developments in short contact time catalytic cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Ladwig, P.K.; Bienstock, M.G.; Citarella, V.A.; Draemel, D.C. )

    1994-01-01

    Short contact time (SCT) catalytic cracking applications have been receiving high attention in recent years, with a large number of revamps of existing FCCU's as well as construction of new facilities. This paper will recap some of these developments and discuss the benefits demonstrated by the application of state-of-the-art riser termination, stripping, and feed injection technologies. Commercial projects demonstrating fast-track project execution, and confirming the outstanding improvements in yields and yield selectivities possible, will also be discussed.

  10. Using the ENF Criterion for Determining the Time of Recording of Short Digital Audio Recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huijbregtse, Maarten; Geradts, Zeno

    The Electric Network Frequency (ENF) Criterion is a recently developed forensic technique for determining the time of recording of digital audio recordings, by matching the ENF pattern from a questioned recording with an ENF pattern database. In this paper we discuss its inherent limitations in the case of short - i.e., less than 10 minutes in duration - digital audio recordings. We also present a matching procedure based on the correlation coefficient, as a more robust alternative to squared error matching.

  11. Anonymous Signatures Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraswat, Vishal; Yun, Aaram

    We revisit the notion of the anonymous signature, first formalized by Yang, Wong, Deng and Wang [10], and then further developed by Fischlin [4] and Zhang and Imai [11]. We present a new formalism of anonymous signature, where instead of the message, a part of the signature is withheld to maintain anonymity. We introduce the notion unpretendability to guarantee infeasibility for someone other than the correct signer to pretend authorship of the message and signature. Our definition retains applicability for all previous applications of the anonymous signature, provides stronger security, and is conceptually simpler. We give a generic construction from any ordinary signature scheme, and also show that the short signature scheme by Boneh and Boyen [2] can be naturally regarded as such a secure anonymous signature scheme according to our formalism.

  12. The short-term prediction of universal time and length of day using atmospheric angular momentum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, A. P.; Steppe, J. A.; Dickey, J. O.; Eubanks, T. M.; Sung, L.-Y.

    1994-01-01

    The ability to predict short-term variations in the Earth's rotation has gained importance in recent years owing to more precise spacecraft tracking requirements. Universal time (UT1), that component of the Earth's orientation corresponding to the rotation angle, can be measured by number of high-precision space geodetic techniques. A Kalman filter developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) optimally combines these different data sets and generates a smoothed times series and a set of predictions for UT1, as well as for additional Earth orientation components. These UT1 predictions utilize an empirically derived random walk stochastic model for the length of the day (LOD) and require frequent and up-to-date measurements of either UT1 or LOD to keep errors from quickly accumulating. Recent studies have shown that LOD variations are correlated with changes in the Earth's axial atmospheric angular momentum (AAM) over timescales of several years down to as little as 8 days. AAM estimates and forecasts out to 10 days are routinely available from meteorological analysis centers; these data can supplement geodetic measurements to improve the short-term prediction of LOD and have therefore been incorporated as independent data types in the JPL Kalman filter. We find that AAM and, to a lesser extent, AAM forecast data are extremely helpful in generating accurate near-real-time estimates of UT1 and LOD and in improving short-term predictions of these quantities out to about 10 days.

  13. Short-Time Glassy Dynamics in Viscous Protein Solutions with Competing Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrin, P. Douglas; Hudson, Steven; Hong, Kunlun; Porcar, Lionel; Falus, Peter; Wagner, Norman; Liu, Yun

    2015-11-24

    Although there have been numerous investigations of the glass transition for colloidal dispersions with only a short-ranged attraction, less is understood for systems interacting with a long-ranged repulsion in addition to this attraction, which is ubiquitous in aqueous protein solutions at low ionic strength. Highly puri ed concentrated lysozyme solutions are used as a model system and investigated over a large range of protein concentrations at very low ionic strength. Newtonian liquid behavior is observed at all concentrations, even up to 480 mg/mL, where the zero shear viscosity increases by more than three orders of magnitude with increasing concentration. Remarkably, despite this macroscopic liquid-like behavior, the measurements of the dynamics in the short-time limit shows features typical of glassy colloidal systems. Investigation of the inter-protein structure indicates that the reduced short-time mobility of the protein is caused by localized regions of high density within a heterogeneous density distribution. This structural heterogeneity occurs on intermediate range length scale, driven by the competing potential features, and is distinct from commonly studied colloidal gel systems in which a heterogeneous density distribution tends to extend to the whole system. The presence of long-ranged repulsion also allows for more mobility over large length and long time scales resulting in the macroscopic relaxation of the structure. The experimental results provide evidence for the need to explicitly include intermediate range order in theories for the macroscopic properties of protein solutions interacting via competing potential features.

  14. 78 FR 48199 - Comment Request for Information Collection for Employers Survey of the Short-Time Compensation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-07

    ... Short-Time Compensation Program (STC); New Collection AGENCY: Employment and Training Administration... data can be provided in the desired format, reporting burden (time and financial resources) is... Short-Time Compensation Program. OMB Number: 1205-0NEW. Affected Public: Private Sector,...

  15. Quantifying complexity of financial short-term time series by composite multiscale entropy measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Hongli; Wang, Jun

    2015-05-01

    It is significant to study the complexity of financial time series since the financial market is a complex evolved dynamic system. Multiscale entropy is a prevailing method used to quantify the complexity of a time series. Due to its less reliability of entropy estimation for short-term time series at large time scales, a modification method, the composite multiscale entropy, is applied to the financial market. To qualify its effectiveness, its applications in the synthetic white noise and 1 / f noise with different data lengths are reproduced first in the present paper. Then it is introduced for the first time to make a reliability test with two Chinese stock indices. After conducting on short-time return series, the CMSE method shows the advantages in reducing deviations of entropy estimation and demonstrates more stable and reliable results when compared with the conventional MSE algorithm. Finally, the composite multiscale entropy of six important stock indices from the world financial markets is investigated, and some useful and interesting empirical results are obtained.

  16. Inequivalence of Phase and Time Delay in High Harmonic Generation with Short Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Dian; Pi, Liangwen; Starace, Anthony

    2016-05-01

    When mixing two (or more) laser pulses, the phase difference and the time delay are two crucial parameters. For long pulses, the relative phase and the time delay are equivalent: for example, cos(ω1 t) + cos(ω2 t + ϕ) = cos(ω1 t) + cos [ω2(t + ϕ /ω2) ] , i.e. in the extreme case of infinitely long pulses, the phase ϕ can be viewed as a time delay ϕ /ω2 between the two pulses. However, for ultra short pulses, this equivalence breaks down: the carrier-envelope phase can't be viewed as equivalent to a time delay between two pulse envelopes. Our quantum simulations show that the inequivalence of the phase and the time delay in short pulses can result in significantly different high-order harmonic generation spectra, with up to an order of magnitude difference in intensity and up to about 10 harmonic orders of difference in cutoff energy. Further analysis shows the underlying physics of such difference. Exposing this inequivalence directly for the first time, our work provides new insights into pulse shaping and related issues for both experimentalists and theorists. This work was supported in part by NSF Grant No. PHYS-1505492.

  17. Fingerprint enhancement revisited and the effects of blood enhancement chemicals on subsequent profiler Plus fluorescent short tandem repeat DNA analysis of fresh and aged bloody fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Frégeau, C J; Germain, O; Fourney, R M

    2000-03-01

    FGA, D8S1179, D21S11, D18S51, D5S818, D13S317, D7S820) or of the gender determination marker Amelogenin. The intensity of the fluorescent signals was very similar and the allele size measurements remained constant and identical to those of untreated bloody fingerprints. No additional background fluorescence was noted. Continuous exposure (for 54 days) to two of the seven enhancement chemicals selected (i.e., Crowle's Double Stain and Hungarian Red) slightly reduced the amplification efficiency of the longer STR loci in profiles of fresh and 7 to 14-day-old bloodprints. This suggests that long-term exposure to these chemicals possibly affects the integrity of the DNA molecules. This study indicates that significant evidence can be obtained from fresh or aged bloody fingerprints applied to a variety of absorbent and nonabsorbent surfaces which are exposed to different enhancement chemicals for short or long periods of time. It also reaffirms that PCR STR DNA typing procedures are robust and provide excellent results when used in concert with fluorescence-based detection assays after fingerprint identification has taken place. PMID:10782955

  18. Short-term foreshocks in Southern California and Italy revisited: Observed deviations from the Epidemic-Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seif, Stefanie; Mignan, Arnaud; Wiemer, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    Numerous studies have suggested that short-term foreshocks observed prior to large earthquakes are undistinguishable from the normal behaviour of seismicity, which is well described for example by the Epidemic-Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) model. Here we show that these studies fail to extract abnormal foreshock behaviour due to the much more frequent occurrence of aftershocks in comparison to potential foreshocks, which results in undervaluing the role of foreshocks. We first define mainshocks as earthquakes of magnitude M6+ and use a space-time-magnitude window method with a maximum distance of 10 km to the mainshock, a maximum time range of 3 days before the mainshock and a minimum magnitude M4+ to define foreshocks in Southern California and in Italy. We then compare the observed rate of foreshock-mainshock pairs to the rate expected by ETAS simulations. Similar to previous studies, these results indicate that the foreshock activity observed in real catalogues is compatible with the ETAS model. Definition of foreshocks with a window method is, however, simplistic, since any individual event may be considered a foreshock although it is impossible to distinguish a foreshock from background or aftershock activity at a one-to-one event basis. We extend our foreshock analysis based on the predictions of the Non-Critical Precursory Accelerating Seismicity Theory (NC PAST), which are: (1) foreshocks are due to overloading on the main fault and occur in clusters, the activity of which is significantly higher than background activity, (2) microseismicity (M<3) must be included for the emergence of a reliable signal and (3) foreshocks are not systematic before large earthquakes due to aleatoric uncertainty on the rupture process. Following these guidelines, we systematically investigate foreshock sequences before large earthquakes (M6+) in Southern California and Italy. Using different approaches, we finally show that significant anomalies are observed before some

  19. EQUIVALENCE BETWEEN SHORT-TIME BIPHASIC AND INCOMPRESSIBLE ELASTIC MATERIAL RESPONSES

    PubMed Central

    Ateshian, Gerard A.; Ellis, Benjamin J.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2009-01-01

    Porous-permeable tissues have often been modeled using porous media theories such as the biphasic theory. This study examines the equivalence of the short-time biphasic and incompressible elastic responses for arbitrary deformations and constitutive relations from first principles. This equivalence is illustrated in problems of unconfined compression of a disk, and of articular contact under finite deformation, using two different constitutive relations for the solid matrix of cartilage, one of which accounts for the large disparity observed between the tensile and compressive moduli in this tissue. Demonstrating this equivalence under general conditions provides a rationale for using available finite element codes for incompressible elastic materials as a practical substitute for biphasic analyses, so long as only the short-time biphasic response is sought. In practice, an incompressible elastic analysis is representative of a biphasic analysis over the short-term response δt≪Δ2/‖C4‖||K||, where Δ is a characteristic dimension, C4 is the elasticity tensor and K is the hydraulic permeability tensor of the solid matrix. Certain notes of caution are provided with regard to implementation issues, particularly when finite element formulations of incompressible elasticity employ an uncoupled strain energy function consisting of additive deviatoric and volumetric components. PMID:17536908

  20. Monitoring Short-term Cosmic-ray Spectral Variations Using Neutron Monitor Time-delay Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffolo, D.; Sáiz, A.; Mangeard, P.-S.; Kamyan, N.; Muangha, P.; Nutaro, T.; Sumran, S.; Chaiwattana, C.; Gasiprong, N.; Channok, C.; Wuttiya, C.; Rujiwarodom, M.; Tooprakai, P.; Asavapibhop, B.; Bieber, J. W.; Clem, J.; Evenson, P.; Munakata, K.

    2016-01-01

    Neutron monitors (NMs) are ground-based detectors of cosmic-ray showers that are widely used for high-precision monitoring of changes in the Galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) flux due to solar storms and solar wind variations. In the present work, we show that a single neutron monitor station can also monitor short-term changes in the GCR spectrum, avoiding the systematic uncertainties in comparing data from different stations, by means of NM time-delay histograms. Using data for 2007-2014 from the Princess Sirindhorn Neutron Monitor, a station at Doi Inthanon, Thailand, with the world’s highest vertical geomagnetic cutoff rigidity of 16.8 GV, we have developed an analysis of time-delay histograms that removes the chance coincidences that can dominate conventional measures of multiplicity. We infer the “leader fraction” L of neutron counts that do not follow a previous neutron count in the same counter from the same atmospheric secondary, which is inversely related to the actual multiplicity and increases for increasing GCR spectral index. After correction for atmospheric pressure and water vapor, we find that L indicates substantial short-term GCR spectral hardening during some but not all Forbush decreases in GCR flux due to solar storms. Such spectral data from Doi Inthanon provide information about cosmic-ray energies beyond the Earth’s maximum geomagnetic cutoff, extending the reach of the worldwide NM network and opening a new avenue in the study of short-term GCR decreases.

  1. The loss of short-term visual representations over time: decay or temporal distinctiveness?

    PubMed

    Mercer, Tom

    2014-12-01

    There has been much recent interest in the loss of visual short-term memories over the passage of time. According to decay theory, visual representations are gradually forgotten as time passes, reflecting a slow and steady distortion of the memory trace. However, this is controversial and decay effects can be explained in other ways. The present experiment aimed to reexamine the maintenance and loss of visual information over the short term. Decay and temporal distinctiveness models were tested using a delayed discrimination task, in which participants compared complex and novel objects over unfilled retention intervals of variable length. Experiment 1 found no significant change in the accuracy of visual memory from 2 to 6 s, but the gap separating trials reliably influenced task performance. Experiment 2 found evidence for information loss at a 10-s retention interval, but temporally separating trials restored the fidelity of visual memory, possibly because temporally isolated representations are distinct from older memory traces. In conclusion, visual representations lose accuracy at some point after 6 s, but only within temporally crowded contexts. These findings highlight the importance of temporal distinctiveness within visual short-term memory. PMID:25314045

  2. Short-term probabilistic earthquake risk assessment considering time-dependent b values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulia, Laura; Tormann, Thessa; Wiemer, Stefan; Herrmann, Marcus; Seif, Stefanie

    2016-02-01

    Laboratory experiments highlight a systematic b value decrease during the stress increase period before failure, and some large natural events are known to show a precursory decrease in the b value. However, short-term forecast models currently consider only the generic probability that an event can trigger subsequent seismicity in the near field. While the probability increase over a stationary Poissonian background is substantial, selected case studies have shown through cost-benefit analysis that the absolute main shock probability remains too low to warrant significant mitigation actions. We analyze the probabilities considering both changes in the seismicity rates and temporal changes in the b value. The precursory b value decrease in the 2009 L'Aquila case results in an additional fiftyfold probability increase for a M6.3 event. Translated into time-varying hazard and risk, these changes surpass the cost-benefit threshold for short-term evacuation.

  3. Nonlinear response of vessel walls due to short-time thermomechanical loading

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeiffer, P.A.; Kulak, R.F.

    1994-06-01

    Maintaining structural integrity of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) during a postulated core melt accident is an important safety consideration in the design of the vessel. This study addresses the failure predictions of the vessel due to thermal and pressure loadings fro the molten core debris depositing on the lower head of the vessel. Different loading combinations were considered based on the dead load, yield stress assumptions, material response and internal pressurization. The analyses considered only short term failure (quasi static) modes, long term failure modes were not considered. Short term failure modes include plastic instabilities of the structure and failure due to exceeding the failure strain. Long term failure odes would be caused by creep rupture that leads to plastic instability of the structure. Due to the sort time durations analyzed, creep was not considered in the analyses presented.

  4. Short- and long-time dynamics of isolated many-body quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavora, Marco; Torres-Herrera, Jonathan; Ferreira Dos Santos, Lea

    We show our results for the relaxation process of isolated interacting quantum spin chains in the integrable and chaotic regimes. The dynamics of the survival probability (the probability for finding the system still in its initial state at later times) and of few-body observables are analyzed. Different time scales are considered. While the short-time evolution is determined by the shape of the weighted energy distribution of the initial state, the long-time behavior depends on the bounds of the spectrum. Both numerical and analytical results are presented as well as comparisons with existing rigorous mathematical derivations. We consider initial states that can be prepared in experiments with cold atoms in optical lattices. Nsf Grant No. DMR-1147430.

  5. [Functional status of submariners after short-time submarine raid in the sea].

    PubMed

    Kalmanov, A S; Pisarev, A A; Khankevich, Yu R; Bloshchinskii, I A; Valskii, A V

    2015-10-01

    Short-time sea submarine raids (from a few days to a few weeks), performed during one working cycle, negatively influence on the functional state of the submariners organism. Upon returning to the point of basing the crew involved in the maintenance of the material and performs preparations for further access to the sea. Due to the high workload and lack of time personnel are not held in any correctional and rehabilitation activities, and therefore the time for the next release in the sea functional condition and functional reserves of the body does not have time to fully recover. The transfer of the submarine crew and referral to medical and psychological rehabilitation assumed only after the end of the operating cycle after the crew the task of further voyage. Based on the assessment of the functional systems of the submarine after a short voyage concluded on the need to develop a set of remedial measures for the recovery of submarine crews during inter-cruise period. PMID:26827506

  6. Short time spreading and wetting of offset printing liquids on model calcium carbonate coating structures.

    PubMed

    Koivula, Hanna; Toivakka, Martti; Gane, Patrick

    2012-03-01

    Spreading of oils and water on porous and pre-saturated model carbonate coating structures was studied with high speed video imaging. The short-time data were complemented with long time absorption and wicking experiments. The results indicate a strong dependence between surface structural features of the pigment tablets and water spreading at short times, both in non-saturated and water pre-saturated cases, while the oil spreading is mainly dependent on the liquid properties. Sodium polyacrylate dispersant on pigment surfaces is shown to contribute to water spreading and absorption. On pre-saturated structures the liquid-liquid interactions are dominant and the majority of results support spreading according to the molecular kinetic model. The evidence supports the hypothesis of S. Rousu, P. Gane, and D. Eklund, ["Influence of coating pigment chemistry and morphology on the chromatographic separation of offset ink constituents," in The Science of Papermaking Transactions of the 12th Fundamental Research Symposium, FRC The Pulp & Paper Fundamental Research Society, Oxford, UK, 2001, p. 1115] that at long times the oils absorb into the porous structure at a rate proportional to the ratio of viscosity and surface tension, provided there is no sorptive action with the binder. A combination of nanosized pores and large surface area is useful for providing sufficient absorption capability for carbonate based coatings. PMID:22196346

  7. Time functions of deep earthquakes from broadband and short-period stacks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houston, H.; Benz, H.M.; Vidale, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    To constrain dynamic source properties of deep earthquakes, we have systematically constructed broadband time functions of deep earthquakes by stacking and scaling teleseismic P waves from U.S. National Seismic Network, TERRAscope, and Berkeley Digital Seismic Network broadband stations. We examined 42 earthquakes with depths from 100 to 660 km that occurred between July 1, 1992 and July 31, 1995. To directly compare time functions, or to group them by size, depth, or region, it is essential to scale them to remove the effect of moment, which varies by more than 3 orders of magnitude for these events. For each event we also computed short-period stacks of P waves recorded by west coast regional arrays. The comparison of broadband with short-period stacks yields a considerable advantage, enabling more reliable measurement of event duration. A more accurate estimate of the duration better constrains the scaling procedure to remove the effect of moment, producing scaled time functions with both correct timing and amplitude. We find only subtle differences in the broadband time-function shape with moment, indicating successful scaling and minimal effects of attenuation at the periods considered here. The average shape of the envelopes of the short-period stacks is very similar to the average broadband time function. The main variations seen with depth are (1) a mild decrease in duration with increasing depth, (2) greater asymmetry in the time functions of intermediate events compared to deep ones, and (3) unexpected complexity and late moment release for events between 350 and 550 km, with seven of the eight events in that depth interval displaying markedly more complicated time functions with more moment release late in the rupture than most events above or below. The first two results are broadly consistent with our previous studies, while the third is reported here for the first time. The greater complexity between 350 and 550 km suggests greater heterogeneity in

  8. Modeling circadian and sleep-homeostatic effects on short-term interval timing

    PubMed Central

    Späti, Jakub; Aritake, Sayaka; Meyer, Andrea H.; Kitamura, Shingo; Hida, Akiko; Higuchi, Shigekazu; Moriguchi, Yoshiya; Mishima, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Short-term interval timing i.e., perception and action relating to durations in the seconds range, has been suggested to display time-of-day as well as wake dependent fluctuations due to circadian and sleep-homeostatic changes to the rate at which an underlying pacemaker emits pulses; pertinent human data being relatively sparse and lacking in consistency however, the phenomenon remains elusive and its mechanism poorly understood. To better characterize the putative circadian and sleep-homeostatic effects on interval timing and to assess the ability of a pacemaker-based mechanism to account for the data, we measured timing performance in eighteen young healthy male subjects across two epochs of sustained wakefulness of 38.67 h each, conducted prior to (under entrained conditions) and following (under free-running conditions) a 28 h sleep-wake schedule, using the methods of duration estimation and duration production on target intervals of 10 and 40 s. Our findings of opposing oscillatory time courses across both epochs of sustained wakefulness that combine with increasing and, respectively, decreasing, saturating exponential change for the tasks of estimation and production are consistent with the hypothesis that a pacemaker emitting pulses at a rate controlled by the circadian oscillator and increasing with time awake determines human short-term interval timing; the duration-specificity of this pattern is interpreted as reflecting challenges to maintaining stable attention to the task that progressively increase with stimulus magnitude and thereby moderate the effects of pacemaker-rate changes on overt behavior. PMID:25741253

  9. Short-Time Glassy Dynamics in Viscous Protein Solutions with Competing Interactions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Godfrin, P. Douglas; Hudson, Steven; Hong, Kunlun; Porcar, Lionel; Falus, Peter; Wagner, Norman; Liu, Yun

    2015-11-24

    Although there have been numerous investigations of the glass transition for colloidal dispersions with only a short-ranged attraction, less is understood for systems interacting with a long-ranged repulsion in addition to this attraction, which is ubiquitous in aqueous protein solutions at low ionic strength. Highly puri ed concentrated lysozyme solutions are used as a model system and investigated over a large range of protein concentrations at very low ionic strength. Newtonian liquid behavior is observed at all concentrations, even up to 480 mg/mL, where the zero shear viscosity increases by more than three orders of magnitude with increasing concentration. Remarkably,more » despite this macroscopic liquid-like behavior, the measurements of the dynamics in the short-time limit shows features typical of glassy colloidal systems. Investigation of the inter-protein structure indicates that the reduced short-time mobility of the protein is caused by localized regions of high density within a heterogeneous density distribution. This structural heterogeneity occurs on intermediate range length scale, driven by the competing potential features, and is distinct from commonly studied colloidal gel systems in which a heterogeneous density distribution tends to extend to the whole system. The presence of long-ranged repulsion also allows for more mobility over large length and long time scales resulting in the macroscopic relaxation of the structure. The experimental results provide evidence for the need to explicitly include intermediate range order in theories for the macroscopic properties of protein solutions interacting via competing potential features.« less

  10. Overview of tracer technology instrumentation for short-term and real-time building ventilation determinations

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, R.N.

    1988-03-01

    An intercomparison of three real-time tracer technologies demonstrated the potential of in-the-field feedback on the determination of air infiltration and air exchange rates between multiple zones in buildings influenced by occupancy behavior and ventilation system changes. Some tracer technologies can also employ less-expensive, short-term measurement methods for subsequent laboratory determination of flow rates in these steady-state modes. In the build-up mode, both short-term and real-time measurements with these technologies can provide ventilation efficiencies and local ages of air. For short-term measurements, all but one of the technologies can use whole-air sampling; only the perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) methodology is capable of adsorbent sampling. For real-time measurements, each technology uses field-deployable sampling and analyzing equipment. Tracer costs for implementing the PFT technology are more than 1000-fold less than for the SF/sub 6/ constant concentration tracer gas (CCTG) technique, more than 10,000-fold less than for the halocarbon (HC) electron capture detector-gas chromatograph (ECD-GC) technology, and more than 100,000- to 1,000,000-fold less than for the HC mass spectrographic (MS) approach. The number of tracers available in both the PFT (7), ECD-GC (6), and MS (4) technologies are potentially comparable, although cost and toxicity might limit the selection of HCs; the CCTG technique requires only 1 tracer but cannot readily measure multizone air exchange rates. 12 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Short-Time Beta Relaxation in Glass-Forming Liquids Is Cooperative in Nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Smarajit; Dasgupta, Chandan; Sastry, Srikanth

    2016-02-01

    Temporal relaxation of density fluctuations in supercooled liquids near the glass transition occurs in multiple steps. Using molecular dynamics simulations for three model glass-forming liquids, we show that the short-time β relaxation is cooperative in nature. Using finite-size scaling analysis, we extract a growing length scale associated with beta relaxation from the observed dependence of the beta relaxation time on the system size. We find, in qualitative agreement with the prediction of the inhomogeneous mode coupling theory, that the temperature dependence of this length scale is the same as that of the length scale that describes the spatial heterogeneity of local dynamics in the long-time α -relaxation regime.

  12. Ultra short-time dynamics of radiation damage in fcc metals

    SciTech Connect

    Hayoun, Marc; Coddens, Gerrit; Petite, Guillaume

    2009-11-01

    We have performed molecular-dynamics simulations of displacement cascades in copper in order to investigate the nonequilibrium ultra-short-time damage and to evaluate the possibility of observing it experimentally in situ (e.g., in a pump/probe laser experiment). The atomic trajectories have been analyzed by calculating their x-ray diffraction patterns as a function of time. The results show that an integrated x-ray intensity can indeed be used to evidence the irradiation effects. Even though the number of Frenkel defects is large, the main effect of the irradiation showing up in the x-ray intensities at ultrashort times is an important alteration of the lattice vibrations. On the basis of these results, a pump/probe setup is proposed.

  13. Hyperferritinemia is associated with short survival time in dogs with multicentric lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    CHIKAZAWA, Seishiro; HORI, Yasutomo; HOSHI, Fumio; KANAI, Kazutaka; ITO, Naoyuki

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the relationship between serum ferritin concentration before treatment and survival time in dogs with multicentric lymphoma. Eighteen dogs with multicentric lymphoma were enrolled in the study. When the dogs were classified into high and low ferritin groups on the basis of their serum ferritin concentration (3,000 ng/ml cut-off value), the median survival time of dogs with high concentrations (≥3,000 ng/ml, n=7) was 40 days, whereas it was 360 days among dogs with low concentrations (<3,000 ng/ml, n=11). This difference was statistically significant (P=0.001). This finding suggests that the initial high level of serum ferritin indicates short survival time in dogs with multicentric lymphoma. Large-scale research is necessary to confirm this finding. PMID:25715650

  14. Spectral phase encoding of ultra-short optical pulse in time domain for OCDMA application.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Wada, Naoya

    2007-06-11

    We propose a novel reconfigurable time domain spectral phase encoding (SPE) scheme for coherent optical code-division-multiple-access application. In the proposed scheme, the ultra-short optical pulse is stretched by dispersive device and the SPE is done in time domain using high speed phase modulator. The time domain SPE scheme is robust to wavelength drift of the light source and is very flexible and compatible with the fiber optical system. Proof-of-principle experiments of encoding with 16-chip, 20 GHz/chip binary-phase-shift-keying codes and 1.25 Gbps data transmission have been successfully demonstrated together with an arrayed-wave-guide decoder. PMID:19547055

  15. Thick-target bremsstrahlung interpretation of short time-scale solar hard X-ray features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. G.

    1983-01-01

    Steady-state analyses of bremsstrahlung hard X-ray production in solar flares are appropriate only if the lifetime of the high energy electrons in the X-ray source is much shorter than the duration of the observed X-ray burst. For a thick-target nonthermal model, this implies that a full time-dependent analysis is required when the duration of the burst is comparable to the collisional lifetime of the injected electrons, in turn set by the lengths and densities of the flaring region. In this paper we present the results of such a time-dependent analysis, and we point out that the intrinsic temporal signature of the thick-target production mechanism, caused by the finite travel time of the electrons through the target, may indeed rule out such a mechanism for extremely short duration hard X-ray events.

  16. Short Contact Time Direct Coal Liquefaction Using a Novel Batch Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    He Huang; Michael T. Klein; William H. Calkins

    1997-04-03

    The primary objective of this research is to optimize the design and operation of the bench scale batch reactor (SCTBR) for studying direct coal liquefaction at short contact times (.01 to 10 minutes or longer) . An additional objective is to study the kinetics of direct coal liquefaction particularly at short reaction times. Both of these objectives have been nearly achieved, however this work has shown the great importance of the liquefaction solvent characteristics and the solvent-catalyst interaction on the liquefaction process. This has prompted us to do a preliminary investigation of solvents and the solvent-catalyst systems in coal liquefaction. SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS 1) Conversion vs time data have been extended to 5 coals of ranks from lignite to low volatile bituminous coal. A broad range of reaction rates have been observed with a maximum in the high volatile bituminous range. 2) A series of direct coal liquefaction runs have been made using a range of nitrogen containing solvents that given high liquefaction conversions of coal. These runs are now being analyzed. 3) The coalification process has been shown by TGA to go through an intermediate stage which may account for the greater reactivity of bituminous coals in the direct coal liquefaction process. 4) It was shown that coal rank can be accurately determined by thermogravimetric analysis

  17. Automated control and monitoring of thermal processing using high temperature, short time pasteurization.

    PubMed

    Schlesser, J E; Armstrong, D J; Cinar, A; Ramanauskas, P; Negiz, A

    1997-10-01

    High temperature, short time pasteurization was used to evaluate a computer-based system for controlling the pasteurization process, acquiring data, and monitoring records. Software was used for the control of hot water temperature, flow rate through the centrifugal timing pump, and diversion of under-processed product. Three types of control strategies were conducted: single loop, cascade, and multivariable. The single loop control strategy showed the most rapid responses to temperature changes, but the temperature response curve was slowest to return to its set point. The cascade control strategy showed slower recoveries to temperature changes, but the temperature response curve was smoother. The multivariable control strategy responded slightly faster than the cascade control strategy, and the temperature response curve was slightly smoother than the cascade control strategy. The multivariable control strategy was able to control the flow diversion valve by the use of a lethality controller. The data acquisition system, used to monitor the data obtained from the high temperature, short-time pasteurization system, was within +/- 0.1 degree C of the temperature recorded by the safety thermal limit recorder. Reliability was determined by examining the changes in the position of the flow diversion valve to identify process deviations and by comparing the changes to the event marker on circular charts. The data acquisition system was an effective alternative for monitoring the completeness of data. PMID:9361200

  18. Stellar scintillation in the short exposure regime and atmospheric coherence time evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornilov, V.

    2011-06-01

    Aims: Accurately measuring the atmospheric coherence time is still a significant problem despite a variety of applicable methods. The Multi-Aperture Scintillation Sensor (MASS) designed for the vertical profiling of optical turbulence also provides a measurements of coherence time, but its results were found to be biased. Hence there is a need for a more robust method to determine τ0. Methods: The effect of smoothing the stellar scintillation by a finite exposure of the detector is considered. The short exposure regime is described and its limits are defined. The re-analysis of previous measurements with the MASS is performed to test the applicability of this approach in real data processing. It is shown that most of the actual measurements satisfy the criteria of short exposures. Results: The expressions for the mean wind speeds bar V_2 in the free atmosphere from the measurement of the scintillation indices are derived for this regime. These values provide an estimate of the atmospheric coherence time τ0 without the need of empirical calibration. The verification of the method based on real measurements of the resulting τ0 agree well with independent methods.

  19. A Statistical and Spectral Model for Representing Noisy Sounds with Short-Time Sinusoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, Pierre; Desainte-Catherine, Myriam

    2005-12-01

    We propose an original model for noise analysis, transformation, and synthesis: the CNSS model. Noisy sounds are represented with short-time sinusoids whose frequencies and phases are random variables. This spectral and statistical model represents information about the spectral density of frequencies. This perceptually relevant property is modeled by three mathematical parameters that define the distribution of the frequencies. This model also represents the spectral envelope. The mathematical parameters are defined and the analysis algorithms to extract these parameters from sounds are introduced. Then algorithms for generating sounds from the parameters of the model are presented. Applications of this model include tools for composers, psychoacoustic experiments, and pedagogy.

  20. Extraction of self-diffusivity in systems with nondiffusive short-time behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanbhag, Sachin

    2013-10-01

    We consider a toy model that captures the short-time nondiffusive behavior seen in many physical systems, to study the extraction of self-diffusivity from particle trajectories. We propose and evaluate a simple method to automatically detect the transition to diffusive behavior. We simulate the toy model to generate data sets of varying quality and test different methods of extracting the self-diffusion coefficient and characterizing its uncertainty. We find that weighted least-squares with statistical bootstrap is the most accurate and efficient means for analyzing the trajectory data. The analysis suggests an iterative recipe for designing simulations to conform to a specified level of accuracy.

  1. Time of flight emission spectroscopy of laser produced nickel plasma: Short-pulse and ultrafast excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Smijesh, N.; Chandrasekharan, K.; Joshi, Jagdish C.; Philip, Reji

    2014-07-07

    We report the experimental investigation and comparison of the temporal features of short-pulse (7 ns) and ultrafast (100 fs) laser produced plasmas generated from a solid nickel target, expanding into a nitrogen background. When the ambient pressure is varied in a large range of 10⁻⁶Torr to 10²Torr, the plume intensity is found to increase rapidly as the pressure crosses 1 Torr. Time of flight (TOF) spectroscopy of emission from neutral nickel (Ni I) at 361.9 nm (3d⁹(²D) 4p → 3d⁹(²D) 4s transition) reveals two peaks (fast and slow species) in short-pulse excitation and a single peak in ultrafast excitation. The fast and slow peaks represent recombined neutrals and un-ionized neutrals, respectively. TOF emission from singly ionized nickel (Ni II) studied using the 428.5 nm (3p⁶3d⁸(³P) 4s→ 3p⁶3d⁹ 4s) transition shows only a single peak for either excitation. Velocities of the neutral and ionic species are determined from TOF measurements carried out at different positions (i.e., at distances of 2 mm and 4 mm, respectively, from the target surface) on the plume axis. Measured velocities indicate acceleration of neutrals and ions, which is caused by the Coulomb pull of the electrons enveloping the plume front in the case of ultrafast excitation. Both Coulomb pull and laser-plasma interaction contribute to the acceleration in the case of short-pulse excitation. These investigations provide new information on the pressure dependent temporal behavior of nickel plasmas produced by short-pulse and ultrafast laser pulses, which have potential uses in applications such as pulsed laser deposition and laser-induced nanoparticle generation.

  2. Significance of time awake for predicting pilots' fatigue on short-haul flights: implications for flight duty time regulations.

    PubMed

    Vejvoda, Martin; Elmenhorst, Eva-Maria; Pennig, Sibylle; Plath, Gernot; Maass, Hartmut; Tritschler, Kristjof; Basner, Mathias; Aeschbach, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    European regulations restrict the duration of the maximum daily flight duty period for pilots as a function of the duty start time and the number of scheduled flights. However, late duty end times that may include long times awake are not specifically regulated. In this study, fatigue levels in pilots finishing their duty late at night (00:00-01:59 hour) were analysed and compared with pilots starting their duty early (05:00-06:59 hour). Fatigue levels of 40 commercial short-haul pilots were studied during a total of 188 flight duty periods, of which 87 started early and 22 finished late. Pilots used a small handheld computer to maintain a duty and sleep log, and to indicate fatigue levels immediately after each flight. Sleep logs were checked with actigraphy. Pilots on late-finishing flight duty periods were more fatigued at the end of their duty than pilots on early-starting flight duty periods, despite the fact that preceding sleep duration was longer by 1.1 h. Linear mixed-model regression identified time awake as a preeminent factor predicting fatigue. Workload had a minor effect. Pilots on late-finishing flight duty periods were awake longer by an average of 5.5 h (6.6 versus 1.1 h) before commencing their duty than pilots who started early in the morning. Late-finishing flights were associated with long times awake at a time when the circadian system stops promoting alertness, and an increased, previously underestimated fatigue risk. Based on these findings, flight duty limitations should consider not only duty start time, but also the time of the final landing. PMID:25040665

  3. Mining biological information from 3D short time-series gene expression data: the OPTricluster algorithm

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nowadays, it is possible to collect expression levels of a set of genes from a set of biological samples during a series of time points. Such data have three dimensions: gene-sample-time (GST). Thus they are called 3D microarray gene expression data. To take advantage of the 3D data collected, and to fully understand the biological knowledge hidden in the GST data, novel subspace clustering algorithms have to be developed to effectively address the biological problem in the corresponding space. Results We developed a subspace clustering algorithm called Order Preserving Triclustering (OPTricluster), for 3D short time-series data mining. OPTricluster is able to identify 3D clusters with coherent evolution from a given 3D dataset using a combinatorial approach on the sample dimension, and the order preserving (OP) concept on the time dimension. The fusion of the two methodologies allows one to study similarities and differences between samples in terms of their temporal expression profile. OPTricluster has been successfully applied to four case studies: immune response in mice infected by malaria (Plasmodium chabaudi), systemic acquired resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana, similarities and differences between inner and outer cotyledon in Brassica napus during seed development, and to Brassica napus whole seed development. These studies showed that OPTricluster is robust to noise and is able to detect the similarities and differences between biological samples. Conclusions Our analysis showed that OPTricluster generally outperforms other well known clustering algorithms such as the TRICLUSTER, gTRICLUSTER and K-means; it is robust to noise and can effectively mine the biological knowledge hidden in the 3D short time-series gene expression data. PMID:22475802

  4. Short-term earthquake risk assessment considering time-dependent b-values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulia, Laura; Tormann, Thessa; Wiemer, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    Observations from laboratory experiments measuring acoustic emissions during loading cycles in pressurized rock samples have repeatedly suggested that small events in the precursory phase of an impending large event change in their relative size distribution. In particular, they highlight a systematic b-value decrease during the stress increase period before the main event. A number of large natural events, but not all of them, have been shown to have a precursory decrease in the b-value at very different time scales, from months to a few days before the subsequent mainshock. At present short term-forecast models such as STEP and ETAS consider the generic probability that an event can trigger subsequent seismicity in the near field; the rate increasing during the foreshock sequences can offer a probability gain for a significant earthquake to happen. While the probability gain of a stationary Poissonian background is substantial, selected case studies have shown through cost-benefit analysis that the absolute probability remains too low to warrant actions. This was shown for example by van Stiphout et al. (2010, GRL), for the 2009 a Mw 6.3 earthquake that hit the city of L'Aquila (Central Italy) after three months of foreshock activity. We here analyze the probability gain of a novel generation of short term forecast models which considers both the change in the seismicity rates and the temporal changes in the b-value. Changes in earthquake probability are then translated also into time-dependent hazard and risk. Preliminary results suggest that the precursory b-value decrease in the L'Aquila case results in an additional probability increase of a M6.3 event of about a factor of 30-50, which then surpasses the cost-benefit threshold for short-term evacuation in selected cases.

  5. Evidence of Different Propofol Pharmacokinetics under Short and Prolonged Infusion Times in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Campos, Sónia; Monteiro, Joaquim; Valenzuela, Belén; Gonçalinho, Helena; de Pinho, Paula Guedes; Fresco, Paula; Félix, Luis; Antunes, Luís

    2016-06-01

    Propofol is an anaesthetic widely used in both human beings and animals. However, the characterization of propofol pharmacokinetics (PK) is not well understood when long-term infusions are used. The main objective of this study was to explore the PK behaviour of propofol in a rabbit model during short and prolonged propofol infusions and to develop an internally validated PK model, for propofol dose individualization in the rabbit for future use. Population 1 (P1) was constituted by seven New Zealand rabbits and was used to characterize the PK profile of propofol at short infusions. Animals were anaesthetized with a bolus of 20 mg/kg, followed by an infusion rate of 50 mg/kg/hr of propofol at 1%, which was then maintained for 30 min. A second rabbit population (P2, n = 7) was sedated according to reflexes responses and Index of Consciousness values, for 20 consecutive hours using propofol 2% aiming at characterizing propofol behaviour at long-term infusions. Clinical data and blood samples were collected at specific time-points in both populations. Propofol plasma concentrations were determined by gas chromatography/ion trap mass spectrometry. The NONMEM VII software was used to evaluate the relationships between dose and plasma concentrations. A linear two-compartment model with different central compartment volume and plasma clearance (separately modelled in the two populations) was the one that best described propofol concentrations. The time course of propofol plasma concentrations was well characterized by the PK model developed, which simultaneously accounts for propofol short- and long-term infusions and can be used to optimize future PK studies in rabbits. PMID:26551921

  6. Protein supplementation during a short-interval prostaglandin-based protocol for timed AI in sheep.

    PubMed

    Fierro, S; Gil, J; Viñoles, C; Soca, F; Banchero, G; Olivera-Muzante, J

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this experiment was to improve the reproductive performance of a short-interval prostaglandin (PG)-based protocol for timed artificial insemination in sheep, using a short-term nutritional treatment. During the breeding season (March-April), 132 multiparous and 61 nulliparous Corriedale ewes grazing natural pastures (600 kg DM/ha, 8.5% CP), were allocated to two groups: 1, Control group (n=100) two injections of D-Cloprostenol (75 μg per dose, 7d apart: Synchrovine(®) protocol); and 2, Supplemented group (n=93) ewes in which stage of the oestrous cycle was synchronised with Synchrovine(®) protocol plus focus feeding of a protein supplement (33.8% CP) between PG doses (Day -7 to -2). Cervical AI was performed at fixed time (Day 0), 46 ± 1.0 h after the second PG injection using 150 million sperm per ewe. Ovulation rate (Day 10), pregnancy rate, prolificacy and fecundity at Day 69 were evaluated by ultrasonography. Ovulation rate at Day 10 (1.20 ± 0.05 vs. 1.22 ± 0.05), pregnancy (46 ± 0.05 vs. 56 ± 0.05), prolificacy (1.09 ± 0.04 vs. 1.06 ± 0.05), and fecundity (0.49 ± 0.06 vs. 0.59 ± 0.06) at Day 69, were similar between groups (P>0.05; Control and Supplemented group respectively). It is concluded that focus feeding for 6d with protein supplementation during a short-interval PG-based protocol (Synchrovine(®)) did not improve the reproductive outcome associated with this protocol. PMID:25129637

  7. Short-time transport properties of bidisperse suspensions and porous media: A Stokesian dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mu; Brady, John F.

    2015-03-01

    We present a comprehensive computational study of the short-time transport properties of bidisperse hard-sphere colloidal suspensions and the corresponding porous media. Our study covers bidisperse particle size ratios up to 4 and total volume fractions up to and beyond the monodisperse hard-sphere close packing limit. The many-body hydrodynamic interactions are computed using conventional Stokesian Dynamics (SD) via a Monte-Carlo approach. We address suspension properties including the short-time translational and rotational self-diffusivities, the instantaneous sedimentation velocity, the wavenumber-dependent partial hydrodynamic functions, and the high-frequency shear and bulk viscosities and porous media properties including the permeability and the translational and rotational hindered diffusivities. We carefully compare the SD computations with existing theoretical and numerical results. For suspensions, we also explore the range of validity of various approximation schemes, notably the pairwise additive approximations with the Percus-Yevick structural input. We critically assess the strengths and weaknesses of the SD algorithm for various transport properties. For very dense systems, we discuss in detail the interplay between the hydrodynamic interactions and the structures due to the presence of a second species of a different size.

  8. Atmospheric Array Loss Statistics Derived from Short Time Scale Site Test Interferometer Phase Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morabito, David D.; D'Addario, Larry R.

    2014-08-01

    NASA is interested in using the technique of arraying smaller-diameter antennas to increase effective aperture to replace the aging 70-m-diameter antennas of the Deep Space Network (DSN). Downlink arraying using the 34-m-diameter and 70-m-diameter antennas is routinely performed. Future scenarios include extending the technique to uplink arraying where a downlink signal may not be available. Atmospheric turbulence causes decorrelation of the arrayed signal, and becomes more severe at higher frequencies such as at the uplink allocations near 34 GHz and 40 GHz. This article expands the study initiated in a previous article that focused on average array loss statistics extracted from Site Test Interferometer (STI) data. In that study, cumulative distributions of the annual and monthly expected phasing loss were derived from STI data collected at the Goldstone and Canberra DSN complexes. For a two-element array, the average array loss cannot exceed 3 dB. This article considers the instantaneous (short time scale) array loss that sometimes exceeds 3 dB for a two-element array. We also consider cases of three-element arrays, which behave somewhat differently. The short time scale statistics of array loss at 7.15 GHz and 34.5 GHz are compared against the average array loss statistics for the best-case and worst-case weather months for the Goldstone and Canberra DSN sites.

  9. Decomposing a signal into short-time narrow-banded modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeill, S. I.

    2016-07-01

    An algorithm for nonparametric decomposition of a signal into the sum of short-time narrow-banded modes (components) is introduced. Specifically, the signal data is augmented with its Hilbert transform to obtain the analytic signal. Then the set of constituent amplitude and frequency modulated (AM-FM) analytic sinusoids, each with slowly varying amplitude and frequency, is sought. The method for obtaining the short-time narrow-banded modes is derived by minimizing an objective function comprised of three criteria: smoothness of the instantaneous amplitude envelope, smoothness of the instantaneous frequency and complete reconstruction of the signal data. A minimum of the objective function is approached using a sequence of suboptimal updates of amplitude and phase. The updates are intuitive, efficient and simple to implement. For a given mode, the amplitude and phase are extracted from the band-pass filtered residual (signal after the other modes are removed), where the band-pass filter is applied about the previous modal instantaneous frequency estimate. The method is demonstrated by application to random output-only vibration data and order tracking data. It is demonstrated that vibration modal responses can be estimated from single channel data and order tracking can be performed without measured tachometer data.

  10. Multivariate time series modeling of short-term system scale irrigation demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, Kushan C.; Western, Andrew W.; George, Biju; Nawarathna, Bandara

    2015-12-01

    Travel time limits the ability of irrigation system operators to react to short-term irrigation demand fluctuations that result from variations in weather, including very hot periods and rainfall events, as well as the various other pressures and opportunities that farmers face. Short-term system-wide irrigation demand forecasts can assist in system operation. Here we developed a multivariate time series (ARMAX) model to forecast irrigation demands with respect to aggregated service points flows (IDCGi, ASP) and off take regulator flows (IDCGi, OTR) based across 5 command areas, which included area covered under four irrigation channels and the study area. These command area specific ARMAX models forecast 1-5 days ahead daily IDCGi, ASP and IDCGi, OTR using the real time flow data recorded at the service points and the uppermost regulators and observed meteorological data collected from automatic weather stations. The model efficiency and the predictive performance were quantified using the root mean squared error (RMSE), Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficient (NSE), anomaly correlation coefficient (ACC) and mean square skill score (MSSS). During the evaluation period, NSE for IDCGi, ASP and IDCGi, OTR across 5 command areas were ranged 0.98-0.78. These models were capable of generating skillful forecasts (MSSS ⩾ 0.5 and ACC ⩾ 0.6) of IDCGi, ASP and IDCGi, OTR for all 5 lead days and IDCGi, ASP and IDCGi, OTR forecasts were better than using the long term monthly mean irrigation demand. Overall these predictive performance from the ARMAX time series models were higher than almost all the previous studies we are aware. Further, IDCGi, ASP and IDCGi, OTR forecasts have improved the operators' ability to react for near future irrigation demand fluctuations as the developed ARMAX time series models were self-adaptive to reflect the short-term changes in the irrigation demand with respect to various pressures and opportunities that farmers' face, such as

  11. Verification of short lead time forecast models: applied to Kp and Dst forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wintoft, Peter; Wik, Magnus

    2016-04-01

    In the ongoing EU/H2020 project PROGRESS models that predicts Kp, Dst, and AE from L1 solar wind data will be used as inputs to radiation belt models. The possible lead times from L1 measurements are shorter (10s of minutes to hours) than the typical duration of the physical phenomena that should be forecast. Under these circumstances several metrics fail to single out trivial cases, such as persistence. In this work we explore metrics and approaches for short lead time forecasts. We apply these to current Kp and Dst forecast models. This project has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 637302.

  12. An Optimal Mitigation Strategy Against the Asteroid Impact Threat with Short Warning Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wie, Bong; Barbee, Brent W.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a NASA Innovative Advanced Concept (NIAC) Phase 2 study entitled "An Innovative Solution to NASA's Near-Earth Object (NEO) Impact Threat Mitigation Grand Challenge and Flight Validation Mission Architecture Development." This NIAC Phase 2 study was conducted at the Asteroid Deflection Research Center (ADRC) of Iowa State University in 2012-2014. The study objective was to develop an innovative yet practically implementable mitigation strategy for the most probable impact threat of an asteroid or comet with short warning time (less than 5 years). The mitigation strategy described in this paper is intended to optimally reduce the severity and catastrophic damage of the NEO impact event, especially when we don't have sufficient warning times for non-disruptive deflection of a hazardous NEO. This paper provides an executive summary of the NIAC Phase 2 study results.

  13. Measurement and deconvolution of detector response time for short HPM pulses: Part 1, Microwave diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, P.R.

    1987-06-01

    A technique is described for measuring and deconvolving response times of microwave diode detection systems in order to generate corrected input signals typical of an infinite detection rate. The method has been applied to cases of 2.86 GHz ultra-short HPM pulse detection where pulse rise time is comparable to that of the detector; whereas, the duration of a few nanoseconds is significantly longer. Results are specified in terms of the enhancement of equivalent deconvolved input voltages for given observed voltages. The convolution integral imposes the constraint of linear detector response to input power levels. This is physically equivalent to the conservation of integrated pulse energy in the deconvolution process. The applicable dynamic range of a microwave diode is therefore limited to a smaller signal region as determined by its calibration.

  14. Salt marsh mapping based on a short-time interval NDVI time-series from HJ-1 CCD imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SUN, C.

    2015-12-01

    Salt marshes are regard as one of the most dynamic and valuable ecosystems in coastal zone. It is crucial to obtain accurate information on the species composition and spatial distribution of salt marshes in time since they are experiencing tremendous replacement and disappearance. However, discriminating various types of salt marshes is a rather difficult task because of the strong spectral similarities. In previous studies, salt marsh mappings were mainly focused on high-spatial and hyperspectral resolution imageries combined with auxiliary information but this method can hardly extend to a large region. With high temporal and moderate spatial resolutions, Chinese HJ-1 CCD imagery would not only allow monitoring phenological changes of salt marsh vegetation in short-time intervals, but also cover large areas of salt marshes. Taking the middle coast of Jiangsu (east China) as an example, our study first constructed a monthly NDVI time-series to classify various types of salt marshes. Then, we tested the idea of compressed time-series continuously to broaden the applicability and portability of this particular approach. The results showed that (1) the overall accuracy of salt marsh mapping based on the monthly NDVI time-series reached 90.3%, which increased approximately 16.0% in contrast with a single-phase classification strategy; (2) a compressed time-series, including NDVI from six key months (April, June to September, and November) demonstrated very little decline (2.3%) in overall accuracy but led to obvious improvements in unstable regions; (3) Spartina alterniflora identification could be achieved with only a scene NDVI image from November, which could provide an effective way to regularly monitor its distribution. Besides, by comparing the calibrated performance between HJ-1 CCD and other sensors (i.e., Landsat TM/ETM+, OLI), we certified the reliability of HJ-1 CCD imagery, which is expected to pave the way for laws expansibility from this imagery.

  15. EXPLORING THE POTENTIAL OF SHORT-TIME FOURIER TRANSFORMS FOR ANALYZING SKIN CONDUCTANCE AND PUPILLOMETRY IN REAL-TIME APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Roger Lew; Brian P. Dyre; Steffen Werner; Jeffrey C. Joe; Brian Wotring; Tuan Tran

    2008-09-01

    The development of real-time predictors of mental workload is critical for the practical application of augmented cognition to human-machine systems. This paper explores a novel method based on a short-time Fourier transform (STFT) for analyzing galvanic skin conductance (SC) and pupillometry time-series data to extract estimates of mental workload with temporal bandwidth high-enough to be useful for augmented cognition applications. We tested the method in the context of a process control task based on the DURESS simulation developed by Vincente and Pawlak (1994; ported to Java by Cosentino,& Ross, 1999). SC, pupil dilation, blink rate, and visual scanning patterns were measured for four participants actively engaged in controlling the simulation. Fault events were introduced that required participants to diagnose errors and make control adjustments to keep the simulator operating within a target range. We were interested in whether the STFT of these measures would produce visible effects of the increase in mental workload and stress associated with these events. Graphical exploratory data analysis of the STFT showed visible increases in the power spectrum across a range of frequencies directly following fault events. We believe this approach shows potential as a relatively unobtrusive, low-cost, high bandwidth measure of mental workload that could be particularly useful for the application of augmented cognition to human-machine systems.

  16. Revisiting Lambert's problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzo, Dario

    2015-01-01

    The orbital boundary value problem, also known as Lambert problem, is revisited. Building upon Lancaster and Blanchard approach, new relations are revealed and a new variable representing all problem classes, under L-similarity, is used to express the time of flight equation. In the new variable, the time of flight curves have two oblique asymptotes and they mostly appear to be conveniently approximated by piecewise continuous lines. We use and invert such a simple approximation to provide an efficient initial guess to an Householder iterative method that is then able to converge, for the single revolution case, in only two iterations. The resulting algorithm is compared, for single and multiple revolutions, to Gooding's procedure revealing to be numerically as accurate, while having a significantly smaller computational complexity.

  17. Effects of Diffusion Time on Short-Range Hyperpolarized 3He Diffusivity Measurements in Emphysema

    SciTech Connect

    Gierada, David S.; Woods, Jason C.; Bierhals, Andrew J.; Bartel, Seth T.; Ritter, Jon H.; Choong, Cliff K.; Das, Nitin A.; Hong, Cheng; Pilgram, Thomas K.; Chang, Yulin V.; Jacob, Rick E.; Hogg, James C.; Battafarano, Richard J.; Cooper, Joel D.; Meyers, Bryan F.; Patterson, G Alexander; Yablonskiy, Dmitriy A.; Conradi, Mark S.

    2009-09-28

    Purpose: To characterize the effect of diffusion time on short-range hyperpolarized 3He MR diffusion measurements across a wide range of emphysema severity. Materials and Methods: 3He diffusion MR imaging was performed on 19 lungs or lobes resected from 18 subjects with varying degrees of emphysema using 3 diffusion times (1.6 msec, 5 msec, and 10 msec) at constant b value. Emphysema severity was quantified as the mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and as the percentage of pixels with ADC higher than multiple thresholds from 0.30-0.55 cm2/sec (ADC index). Quantitative histology (mean linear intercept) was obtained in 10 of the lung specimens from 10 of the subjects. Results: The mean ADCs with diffusion times of 1.6, 5.0, and 10.0 msec were 0.46, 0.40, and 0.37 cm2/sec, respectively (P <0.0001, ANOVA). There was no relationship between the ADC magnitude and the effect of diffusion time on ADC values. Mean linear intercept correlated with ADC (r=0.91-0.94, P<0.001) and ADC index (r=0.78-0.92, P<0.01) at all diffusion times.

  18. Structure and short-time dynamics in concentrated suspensions of charged colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westermeier, Fabian; Fischer, Birgit; Roseker, Wojciech; Grübel, Gerhard; Nägele, Gerhard; Heinen, Marco

    2012-09-01

    We report a comprehensive joint experimental-theoretical study of the equilibrium pair-structure and short-time diffusion in aqueous suspensions of highly charged poly-acrylate (PA) spheres in the colloidal fluid phase. Low-polydispersity PA sphere systems with two different hard-core radii, R0 = 542 and 1117 Å, are explored over a wide range of concentrations and salinities using static and dynamic light scattering (DLS), small angle x-ray scattering, and x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS). The measured static and dynamic scattering functions are analyzed using state-of-the-art theoretical methods. For all samples, the measured static structure factor, S(Q), is in good agreement with results by an analytical integral equation method for particles interacting by a repulsive screened Coulomb plus hard-core pair potential. In our DLS and XPCS measurements, we have determined the short-time diffusion function D(Q) = D0 H(Q)/S(Q), comprising the free diffusion coefficient D0 and the hydrodynamic function H(Q). The latter is calculated analytically using a self-part corrected version of the δγ-scheme by Beenakker and Mazur which accounts approximately for many-body hydrodynamic interactions (HIs). Except for low-salinity systems at the highest investigated volume fraction ϕ ≈ 0.32, the theoretical predictions for H(Q) are in excellent agreement with the experimental data. In particular, the increase in the collective diffusion coefficient Dc = D(Q → 0), and the decrease of the self-diffusion coefficient, Ds = D(Q → ∞), with increasing ϕ is well described. In accord with the theoretical prediction, the peak value, H(Qm), of H(Q) relates to the nearest neighbor cage size ˜2π/Qm, for which concentration scaling relations are discussed. The peak values H(Qm) are globally bound from below by the corresponding neutral hard-spheres peak values, and from above by the limiting peak values for low-salinity charge-stabilized systems. HIs usually slow short-time

  19. Enhancement of anaerobic methanogenesis at a short hydraulic retention time via bioelectrochemical enrichment of hydrogenotrophic methanogens.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Zhang, Yaobin; Liu, Yiwen; Zhao, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Zisheng; Liu, Sitong; Zhao, Huimin; Quan, Xie

    2016-10-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is an important energy strategy for converting organic waste to CH4. A major factor limiting the practical applicability of AD is the relatively long hydraulic retention time (HRT) which declines the treatment efficiency of digesters. A coupling process of anaerobic digestion and 'electromethanogenesis' was proposed to enhance anaerobic digestion at a short HRT in this study. Microorganisms analysis indicated that the electric-biological reactor enriched hydrogenotrophic methanogens in both cathodic biofilm and suspended sludge, helping achieve the high organic removal (71.0% vs 42.3% [control reactor]) and CH4 production (248.5mL/h vs 51.3mL/h), while the additional electric input was only accounted for 25.6% of the energy income from the increased CH4 production. This study demonstrated that a bioelectrochemical enhanced anaerobic reactor could improve the CH4 production and organic removal at a short HRT, providing an economically feasible scheme to treat wastewater. PMID:27394997

  20. Fluctuation of similarity to detect transitions between distinct dynamical regimes in short time series.

    PubMed

    Malik, Nishant; Marwan, Norbert; Zou, Yong; Mucha, Peter J; Kurths, Jürgen

    2014-06-01

    A method to identify distinct dynamical regimes and transitions between those regimes in a short univariate time series was recently introduced [N. Malik et al., Europhys. Lett. 97, 40009 (2012)], employing the computation of fluctuations in a measure of nonlinear similarity based on local recurrence properties. In this work, we describe the details of the analytical relationships between this newly introduced measure and the well-known concepts of attractor dimensions and Lyapunov exponents. We show that the new measure has linear dependence on the effective dimension of the attractor and it measures the variations in the sum of the Lyapunov spectrum. To illustrate the practical usefulness of the method, we identify various types of dynamical transitions in different nonlinear models. We present testbed examples for the new method's robustness against noise and missing values in the time series. We also use this method to analyze time series of social dynamics, specifically an analysis of the US crime record time series from 1975 to 1993. Using this method, we find that dynamical complexity in robberies was influenced by the unemployment rate until the late 1980s. We have also observed a dynamical transition in homicide and robbery rates in the late 1980s and early 1990s, leading to increase in the dynamical complexity of these rates. PMID:25019852

  1. Qualitative Features Extraction from Sensor Data using Short-time Fourier Transform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amini, Abolfazl M.; Figueroa, Fernando

    2004-01-01

    The information gathered from sensors is used to determine the health of a sensor. Once a normal mode of operation is established any deviation from the normal behavior indicates a change. This change may be due to a malfunction of the sensor(s) or the system (or process). The step-up and step-down features, as well as sensor disturbances are assumed to be exponential. An RC network is used to model the main process, which is defined by a step-up (charging), drift, and step-down (discharging). The sensor disturbances and spike are added while the system is in drift. The system runs for a period of at least three time-constants of the main process every time a process feature occurs (e.g. step change). The Short-Time Fourier Transform of the Signal is taken using the Hamming window. Three window widths are used. The DC value is removed from the windowed data prior to taking the FFT. The resulting three dimensional spectral plots provide good time frequency resolution. The results indicate distinct shapes corresponding to each process.

  2. Fluctuation of similarity to detect transitions between distinct dynamical regimes in short time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Nishant; Marwan, Norbert; Zou, Yong; Mucha, Peter J.; Kurths, Jürgen

    2014-06-01

    A method to identify distinct dynamical regimes and transitions between those regimes in a short univariate time series was recently introduced [N. Malik et al., Europhys. Lett. 97, 40009 (2012), 10.1209/0295-5075/97/40009], employing the computation of fluctuations in a measure of nonlinear similarity based on local recurrence properties. In this work, we describe the details of the analytical relationships between this newly introduced measure and the well-known concepts of attractor dimensions and Lyapunov exponents. We show that the new measure has linear dependence on the effective dimension of the attractor and it measures the variations in the sum of the Lyapunov spectrum. To illustrate the practical usefulness of the method, we identify various types of dynamical transitions in different nonlinear models. We present testbed examples for the new method's robustness against noise and missing values in the time series. We also use this method to analyze time series of social dynamics, specifically an analysis of the US crime record time series from 1975 to 1993. Using this method, we find that dynamical complexity in robberies was influenced by the unemployment rate until the late 1980s. We have also observed a dynamical transition in homicide and robbery rates in the late 1980s and early 1990s, leading to increase in the dynamical complexity of these rates.

  3. An analytic algorithm for global coverage of the revisiting orbit and its application to the CFOSAT satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ming; Huang, Li

    2014-08-01

    This paper addresses a new analytic algorithm for global coverage of the revisiting orbit and its application to the mission revisiting the Earth within long periods of time, such as Chinese-French Oceanic Satellite (abbr., CFOSAT). In the first, it is presented that the traditional design methodology of the revisiting orbit for some imaging satellites only on the single (ascending or descending) pass, and the repeating orbit is employed to perform the global coverage within short periods of time. However, the selection of the repeating orbit is essentially to yield the suboptimum from the rare measure of rational numbers of passes per day, which will lose lots of available revisiting orbits. Thus, an innovative design scheme is proposed to check both rational and irrational passes per day to acquire the relationship between the coverage percentage and the altitude. To improve the traditional imaging only on the single pass, the proposed algorithm is mapping every pass into its ascending and descending nodes on the specified latitude circle, and then is accumulating the projected width on the circle by the field of view of the satellite. The ergodic geometry of coverage percentage produced from the algorithm is affecting the final scheme, such as the optimal one owning the largest percentage, and the balance one possessing the less gradient in its vicinity, and is guiding to heuristic design for the station-keeping control strategies. The application of CFOSAT validates the feasibility of the algorithm.

  4. Short pulse multi-frequency phase-based time delay estimation.

    PubMed

    Assous, Said; Hopper, Clare; Lovell, Mike; Gunn, Dave; Jackson, Peter; Rees, John

    2010-01-01

    An approach for time delay estimation, based on phase difference detection, is presented. A multiple-frequency short continuous wave pulse is used to solve the well-known phase ambiguity problem when the maximum distance exceeds a full wavelength. Within an unambiguous range defined with the lowest frequency difference between components, the corresponding phase difference is unique and any distance within this range can be determined. Phase differences between higher frequency components are used to achieve a finer resolution. The concept will be presented and the effectiveness of the approach will be investigated through theoretical and practical examples. The method will be validated using underwater acoustic measurements, simulating noisy environments, demonstrating resolutions better than a 50th of a wavelength, even in the presence of high levels (-5 dB) of additive Gaussian noise. Furthermore, the algorithm is simple to use and can be easily implemented, being based on phase detection using the discrete Fourier transform. PMID:20058978

  5. Short-time particulate matter PM10 forecasts using predictive modeling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A.; Gocheva-Ilieva, S.

    2013-10-01

    Two types of predictive modeling techniques - seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA) and a new Generalized PathSeeker (GPS) Regularized Regression method have been used for modeling data related to ambient air quality. The models are built for the measured data for the primary air pollutant - particulate matter PM10 in the town of Shumen, Bulgaria. The time series analysis was carried out based on hourly data with respect to six meteorological variables during a period of one month. The constructed models have been used for short-term four-days-ahead forecasts. The obtained results demonstrate some advantages of the GPS method over seasonal ARIMA stochastic modeling and its applicability. This gives a new perspective for analyzing and preventing the possible pollution problems in urban areas.

  6. Super-resolution spectral estimation in short-time non-contact vital sign measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Li; Li, Yusheng; Hong, Hong; Xi, Feng; Cai, Weidong; Zhu, Xiaohua

    2015-04-01

    Non-contact techniques for measuring vital signs attract great interest due to the benefits shown in medical monitoring, military application, etc. However, the presence of respiration harmonics caused by nonlinear phase modulation will result in performance degradation. Suffering from smearing and leakage problems, conventional discrete Fourier transform (DFT) based methods cannot distinguish the heartbeat component from closely located respiration harmonics in frequency domain, especially in short-time processing. In this paper, the theory of sparse reconstruction is merged with an extended harmonic model of vital signals, aiming at achieving a super-resolution spectral estimation of vital signals by additionally exploiting the inherent sparse prior information. Both simulated and experimental results show that the proposed algorithm has superior performance to DFT-based methods and the recently applied multiple signal classification algorithm, and the required processing window length has been shortened to 5.12 s.

  7. Photoacoustic detection of blood in dental pulp by using short-time Fourier transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Azusa; Kakino, Satoko; Matsuura, Yuji

    2016-03-01

    A method based on photoacoustic analysis is proposed to diagnose dental pulp vitality. Photoacoustic analysis enables to get signal from deeper tissues than other optical analyses and therefore, signal detection from root canal of thick dental tissues such as molar teeth is expected. As a light source for excitation of photoacoustic waves, a microchip Q-switched YAG laser with a wavelength of 1064 nm was used and owing to large penetration depth of the near infrared laser, photoacoustic signals from dental root were successfully obtained. It was found that the photoacoustic signals from the teeth containing hemoglobin solution in the pulp cavity provide vibration in high frequency region. It was also shown that the intensities of the high frequency component have correlation with the hemoglobin concentration of solution. We applied short-time Fourier transform for evaluation of photoacoustic signals and this analysis clearly showed photoacoustic signals from dental root.

  8. Transient polar motions and the nature of the asthenosphere for short time scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boschi, E.; Sabadini, R.; Yuen, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    A uniformly valid mathematical formalism is developed to study the secular motions of the rotational axis of a layered viscoelastic earth due to seismic excitation. The changes required for implementing the formulation within the framework of the faulting problem. The rationale of adopting the chosen nrheological model, which contains a low-viscosity zone beneath the lithosphere and is based on linear Maxell constitutive relationship, is discussed. The impact of this low-viscosity channel on thhe two families of relaxation time, governing both isostatic readjustment and rotational processes, is considered. It is found that the polar motions depend sensitively on the viscosity structure of the asthenosphere and not at all on the underlying mantle. A gloal low-velocity zone with short-term asthenospheric viscosities less than about 5 x 10 to the 18th Pa-s and widths greater than 50 km is ruled out.

  9. Super-resolution spectral estimation in short-time non-contact vital sign measurement.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li; Li, Yusheng; Hong, Hong; Xi, Feng; Cai, Weidong; Zhu, Xiaohua

    2015-04-01

    Non-contact techniques for measuring vital signs attract great interest due to the benefits shown in medical monitoring, military application, etc. However, the presence of respiration harmonics caused by nonlinear phase modulation will result in performance degradation. Suffering from smearing and leakage problems, conventional discrete Fourier transform (DFT) based methods cannot distinguish the heartbeat component from closely located respiration harmonics in frequency domain, especially in short-time processing. In this paper, the theory of sparse reconstruction is merged with an extended harmonic model of vital signals, aiming at achieving a super-resolution spectral estimation of vital signals by additionally exploiting the inherent sparse prior information. Both simulated and experimental results show that the proposed algorithm has superior performance to DFT-based methods and the recently applied multiple signal classification algorithm, and the required processing window length has been shortened to 5.12 s. PMID:25933881

  10. Caffeine and Screen Time in Adolescence: Associations with Short Sleep and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Drescher, Amy A.; Goodwin, James L.; Silva, Graciela E.; Quan, Stuart F.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the associations between sleep duration and obesity incidence and risk factors among pre-adolescents and adolescents. Design: Cross-sectional study of a community based cohort Setting: The Tucson Children's Assessment of Sleep Apnea follow-up study (TuCASA) cohort. Participants: 319 Caucasian and Hispanics between 10-17 years. Main Outcome: Parent-reported sleep duration and BMI z-score. Outcome Measures: Surveys of electronic screen time, dietary and caffeine intake, exercise and sleep habits by parents, and anthropometric measures. Results: Parent-reported total sleep time (TST) was inversely associated with BMI z-score, but not significantly correlated with any of the examined nutritional variables or exercise components. Hispanic ethnicity was associated with significantly lower parent-reported TST and higher BMI z-score. Parent-reported TST was inversely related to electronic screen time and caffeine use, but these findings were differentially related to age. Caffeine consumption was associated with decreasing parent-reported TST primarily in older adolescents. Electronic screen time was associated with lower parent-reported TST in younger adolescents. Conclusions: Hispanic ethnicity and parental reports of TST were found to be the most closely associated with BMI z-score. Decreased TST and increased caffeine intake and screen time may result in higher obesity risk in the adolescent population. Citation: Drescher AA; Goodwin JL; Silva GE; Quan SF. Caffeine and screen time in adolescence: associations with short sleep and obesity. J Clin Sleep Med 2011;7(4):337-342. PMID:21897768

  11. SHORT DISSIPATION TIMES OF PROTO-PLANETARY DISKS: AN ARTIFACT OF SELECTION EFFECTS?

    SciTech Connect

    Pfalzner, Susanne; Steinhausen, Manuel; Menten, Karl

    2014-10-01

    The frequency of disks around young stars, a key parameter for understanding planet formation, is most readily determined in young stellar clusters where many relatively coeval stars are located in close proximity. Observational studies seem to show that the disk frequency decreases rapidly with cluster age with <10% of cluster stars retaining their disks for longer than 2-6 Myr. Given that at least half of all stars in the field seem to harbor one or more planets, this would imply extremely fast disk dispersal and rapid planet growth. Here we question the validity of this constraint by demonstrating that the short disk dissipation times inferred to date might have been heavily underestimated by selection effects. Critically, for ages >3 Myr only stars that originally populated the densest areas of very populous clusters, which are prone to disk erosion, are actually considered. This tiny sample may not be representative of the majority of stars. In fact, the higher disk fractions in co-moving groups indicate that it is likely that over 30% of all field stars retain their disks well beyond 10 Myr, leaving ample time for planet growth. Equally, our solar system, with a likely formation time >10 Myr, need no longer be an exception but in fact typical of planetary systems.

  12. Cisplatin Concentrations in Long and Short Duration Infusion: Implications for the Optimal Time of Radiation Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Binu Susan; Das, Saikat; Isaiah, Rajesh; John, Subashini; Prabha, Ratna; Fleming, Denise Helen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cisplatin has radiosensitizing properties and the best sensitization to radiotherapy occurs with a higher plasma concentration of cisplatin. To our knowledge the optimal time sequence between chemotherapy and administration of radiation therapy, to obtain maximum effect from concurrent chemoradiation is unclear. Aim The aim of this study was to measure the two cisplatin infusion regimens in order to determine the total and free cisplatin post infusion concentration changes over time. These changes may have clinical implications on the optimum time of administration of post infusion radiation therapy. Materials and Methods Two cohorts of patients were recruited and both, total and free plasma concentration of cisplatin following long and short durations of intravenous infusion was determined. Blood samples were collected at 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3 and 5 hours from the start of the infusion in the 1hour infusion group and at 2, 3, 3.5, 4, 6 and 24 hours from the start of the infusion, in the 3 hour infusion group. Total and free cisplatin concentrations were measured using a validated HPLC-UV method. Results The highest concentration of total and free cisplatin was achieved at the end of the infusion in both regimens. Total cisplatin concentration declined 30 minutes after the end of infusion in both the groups. After 1hour of discontinuing cisplatin, the free cisplatin concentration also declined significantly. Conclusion We conclude that radiation should be administered within 30 minutes of completion of the infusion irrespective of the duration of infusion.

  13. Spatial convergent cross mapping to detect causal relationships from short time series.

    PubMed

    Clark, Thomas; Ye, Hao; Isbell, Forest; Deyle, Ethan R; Cowles, Jane; Tilman, G David; Sugihara, George

    2015-05-01

    Recent developments in complex systems analysis have led to new techniques for detecting causal relationships using relatively short time series, on the order of 30 sequential observations. Although many ecological observation series are even shorter, perhaps fewer than ten sequential observations, these shorter time series are often highly replicated in space (i.e., plot replication). Here, we combine the existing techniques of convergent cross mapping (CCM) and dewdrop regression to build a novel test of causal relations that leverages spatial replication, which we call multispatial CCM. Using examples from simulated and real-world ecological data, we test the ability of multispatial CCM to detect causal relationships between processes. We find that multispatial CCM successfully detects causal relationships with as few as five sequential observations, even in the presence of process noise and observation error. Our results suggest that this technique may constitute a useful test for causality in systems where experiments are difficult to perform and long time series are not available. This new technique is available in the multispatialCCM package for the R programming language. PMID:26236832

  14. Laser-induced short time scale thermal chemistry of perfluoropolyether lubricant films

    SciTech Connect

    Heller, J.; Mate, C.J.; Poon, C.C.; Tam, A.C.

    1999-11-09

    The authors investigate the effect of heating a perfluoropolyether lubricant film in a localized area for relatively short time periods using laser irradiation versus conventional oven heating. These experiments help provide understanding on how flash temperatures generated at frictional contacts affect the thermal chemistry of lubricant films. In these experiments, a CO{sub 2} laser heats a 50 {micro}m wide area of a silicon wafer for time periods ranging from 0.1 to 60 s. The surface temperature within the heated area (up to 280 C in these experiments) is monitored with a second laser by measuring the change in reflectivity near the center of the heated area. A major difference observed for laser heating compared to oven heating is that the effective evaporation rate is orders of magnitude higher for laser heating. If the lubricant film is heated for sufficiently long enough time at high temperatures, the authors are able to observe thermal bonding of the lubricant via its alcohol end groups to the silicon oxide surface, followed by thermal decomposition of the lubricant molecules. After laser heating, the authors are able to observe the diffusion of lubricant back into the localized heated area using a combination of optical microscopy and imaging ellipsometry.

  15. Long and short time variations of the Na/K ratio in the exosphere of Mercury.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mura, Alessandro; Lammer, Helmut; Wurz, Peter; Orsini, Stefano; Milillo, Anna; Mangano, Valeria; Lichtenegger, Herbert; Scherf, Manuel; Khodachenko, Maxim; Pfleger, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Here we present the results of our model for the short-time and yearly variations of the Sodium and Potassium exosphere of Mercury. Such surface-bounded exosphere is produced by release processes occurring at the planetary surface, such as ion sputtering, thermal- or photon-stimulated desorption. The amount of surface Sodium or Potassium that is available for release, however, is limited. Those release processes deplete the surface in Na and K, which is continuously refilled by diffusion from the interior of regolith grains or by chemical sputtering. Ejected particles may either escape the gravity field, assisted by the radiation pressure acceleration, or be photoionized, or fall back onto the surface. Falling particles will stick to the surface. A Montecarlo model, simulating all these processes, is used to obtain the exosphere densities and the Na/K ratio, taking into account the planet's orbit and rotation speed. The influence of variations of the solar wind precipitation (i.e., CMEs) is also included. We compare this model with either ground- and space-based observations of the exosphere and tail to evaluate the effectiveness of each source process. We find that including a source process which effectiveness is proportional to the precipitation of solar wind protons, is necessary to explain most of the available observations in both qualitative and quantitative way. We find that, to reproduce dawn-dusk asymmetries, we need to include the rotation of Mercury's surface in the model. After finding the correct model parameter by calibrating the model with observation, we simulate the short-term and yearly variations of Na/K.

  16. BOOK REVIEW: Nonequilibrium Physics at Short Time Scales: Formation of Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peliti, L.

    2005-02-01

    It is a happy situation when similar concepts and theoretical techniques can be applied to widely different physical systems because of a deep similarity in the situations being studied. The book illustrates this well; it focuses on the description of correlations in quantum systems out of equilibrium at very short time scales, prompted by experiments with short laser pulses in semiconductors, and in complex reactions in heavy nuclei. In both cases the experiments are characterized by nonlinear dynamics and by strong correlations out of equilibrium. In some systems there are also important finite-size effects. The book comprises several independent contributions of moderate length, and I sometimes felt that a more intensive effort in cross-coordination of the different contributions could have been of help. It is divided almost equally between theory and experiment. In the theoretical part, there is a thorough discussion both of the kinematic aspects (description of correlations) and the dynamical ones (evaluation of correlations). The experimental part is naturally divided according to the nature of the system: the interaction of pulsed lasers with matter on the one hand, and the correlations in finite-size systems (nanoparticles and nuclei) on the other. There is also a discussion on the dynamics of superconductors, a subject currently of great interest. Although an effort has been made to keep each contribution self-contained, I must admit that reading level is uneven. However, there are a number of thorough and stimulating contributions that make this book a useful introduction to the topic at the level of graduate students or researchers acquainted with quantum statistical mechanics.

  17. SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS IN THE ''TIME-REVERSAL'' SCENARIO

    SciTech Connect

    Ciolfi, Riccardo; Siegel, Daniel M. E-mail: daniel.siegel@aei.mpg.de

    2015-01-10

    Short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) are among the most luminous explosions in the universe and their origin still remains uncertain. Observational evidence favors the association with binary neutron star or neutron star-black hole (NS-BH) binary mergers. Leading models relate SGRBs to a relativistic jet launched by the BH-torus system resulting from the merger. However, recent observations have revealed a large fraction of SGRB events accompanied by X-ray afterglows with durations ∼10{sup 2}-10{sup 5} s, suggesting continuous energy injection from a long-lived central engine, which is incompatible with the short (≲ 1 s) accretion timescale of a BH-torus system. The formation of a supramassive NS, resisting the collapse on much longer spin-down timescales, can explain these afterglow durations, but leaves serious doubts on whether a relativistic jet can be launched at the merger. Here we present a novel scenario accommodating both aspects, where the SGRB is produced after the collapse of a supramassive NS. Early differential rotation and subsequent spin-down emission generate an optically thick environment around the NS consisting of a photon-pair nebula and an outer shell of baryon-loaded ejecta. While the jet easily drills through this environment, spin-down radiation diffuses outward on much longer timescales and accumulates a delay that allows the SGRB to be observed before (part of) the long-lasting X-ray signal. By analyzing diffusion timescales for a wide range of physical parameters, we find delays that can generally reach ∼10{sup 5} s, compatible with observations. The success of this fundamental test makes this ''time-reversal'' scenario an attractive alternative to current SGRB models.

  18. Short Gamma-Ray Bursts in the "Time-reversal" Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciolfi, Riccardo; Siegel, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) are among the most luminous explosions in the universe and their origin still remains uncertain. Observational evidence favors the association with binary neutron star or neutron star-black hole (NS-BH) binary mergers. Leading models relate SGRBs to a relativistic jet launched by the BH-torus system resulting from the merger. However, recent observations have revealed a large fraction of SGRB events accompanied by X-ray afterglows with durations ~102-105 s, suggesting continuous energy injection from a long-lived central engine, which is incompatible with the short (lsim 1 s) accretion timescale of a BH-torus system. The formation of a supramassive NS, resisting the collapse on much longer spin-down timescales, can explain these afterglow durations, but leaves serious doubts on whether a relativistic jet can be launched at the merger. Here we present a novel scenario accommodating both aspects, where the SGRB is produced after the collapse of a supramassive NS. Early differential rotation and subsequent spin-down emission generate an optically thick environment around the NS consisting of a photon-pair nebula and an outer shell of baryon-loaded ejecta. While the jet easily drills through this environment, spin-down radiation diffuses outward on much longer timescales and accumulates a delay that allows the SGRB to be observed before (part of) the long-lasting X-ray signal. By analyzing diffusion timescales for a wide range of physical parameters, we find delays that can generally reach ~105 s, compatible with observations. The success of this fundamental test makes this "time-reversal" scenario an attractive alternative to current SGRB models.

  19. Short-time electrical effects during volcanic eruption: Experiments and field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büttner, Ralf; Zimanowski, Bernd; Röder, Helmut

    2000-02-01

    Laboratory experiments on the fragmentation and expansion of magmatic melt have been performed using remelted volcanic rock at magmatic temperatures as magma simulant. A specially designed dc amplifier in combination with high speed data recording was used to detect short-time electrostatic field effects related to the fragmentation and expansion history of the experimental system, as documented by simultaneous force and pressure recording, as well as by high-speed cinematography. It was found that (1) the voltage-time ratio of electrostatic field gradients (100 to 104 V/s) reflects different physical mechanisms of fragmentation and expansion and (2) the maximum voltage measured in 1 m distance (-0.1 to -180 V) can be correlated with the intensity of the respective processes. Based on these experimental results, a field method was developed and tested at Stromboli volcano in Italy. A 0.8 m rod antenna was used to detect the dc voltage against local ground (i.e., the electrostatic field gradient), at a distance of 60 to 260 m from the respective vent. Upwind position of the detection site was chosen to prevent interference caused by contact of charged ash particles with the antenna. A standard 8 Hz geophone was used to detect the accompanying seismicity. Three types of volcanic activity occurred during the surveillance operation; two of these could be clearly related to specific electrical and seismical signals. A typical delay time was found between the electrical and the seismical signal, corresponding to the seismic velocity within the crater deposits. Using a simple first-order electrostatic model, the field measurements were recalibrated to the laboratory scale. Comparison of field and laboratory data at first approximation revealed striking similarities, thus encouraging the further development of this technique for real-time surveillance operation at active volcanoes.

  20. R -matrix-incorporating-time method for H2+ in short and intense laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ó Broin, Cathal; Nikolopoulos, L. A. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this work we develop an approach for a molecular hydrogen ion (H2+ ) in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation while exposed to intense short-pulse radiation. Our starting point is the R -matrix-incorporating-time formulation for atomic hydrogen [L. A. A. Nikolopoulos et al., Phys. Rev. A 78, 063420 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevA.78.063420], which has proven to be successful at treating multielectron atomic systems efficiently and with a high accuracy [L. R. Moore et al., J. Mod. Opt. 58, 1132 (2011), 10.1080/09500340.2011.559315]. The present study on H2+ is performed with the similar objective of developing an ab initio method for solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for multielectron diatomic molecules exposed to an external time-dependent potential field. The theoretical formulation is developed in detail for the molecular hydrogen ion where all the multielectron and internuclei complications are absent. As in the atomic case, the configuration space of the electron's coordinates is separated artificially over two regions: the inner (I) and outer (II) regions. In region I the time-dependent wave function is expanded on the eigenstate basis corresponding to the molecule's Hamiltonian augmented by Bloch operators, while in region II a grid representation is used. We demonstrate the independence of our results from the introduced artificial boundary surface by calculating observables that are directly accessed experimentally and also by showing that gauge-dependent quantities are also invariant with the region I box size. We also compare our results with other theoretical works and emphasize cases where basis-set approaches are currently very computationally expensive or intractable in terms of computational resources.

  1. Two Machine Learning Approaches for Short-Term Wind Speed Time-Series Prediction.

    PubMed

    Ak, Ronay; Fink, Olga; Zio, Enrico

    2016-08-01

    The increasing liberalization of European electricity markets, the growing proportion of intermittent renewable energy being fed into the energy grids, and also new challenges in the patterns of energy consumption (such as electric mobility) require flexible and intelligent power grids capable of providing efficient, reliable, economical, and sustainable energy production and distribution. From the supplier side, particularly, the integration of renewable energy sources (e.g., wind and solar) into the grid imposes an engineering and economic challenge because of the limited ability to control and dispatch these energy sources due to their intermittent characteristics. Time-series prediction of wind speed for wind power production is a particularly important and challenging task, wherein prediction intervals (PIs) are preferable results of the prediction, rather than point estimates, because they provide information on the confidence in the prediction. In this paper, two different machine learning approaches to assess PIs of time-series predictions are considered and compared: 1) multilayer perceptron neural networks trained with a multiobjective genetic algorithm and 2) extreme learning machines combined with the nearest neighbors approach. The proposed approaches are applied for short-term wind speed prediction from a real data set of hourly wind speed measurements for the region of Regina in Saskatchewan, Canada. Both approaches demonstrate good prediction precision and provide complementary advantages with respect to different evaluation criteria. PMID:25910257

  2. Rapid growth, early maturation and short generation time in African annual fishes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Extreme environmental conditions can give rise to extreme adaptations. We document growth, sexual maturation and fecundity in two species of African annual fish inhabiting temporary savanna pools. Results Nothobranchius kadleci started to reproduce at the age of 17 days and size of 31 mm and Nothobranchius furzeri at 18 days and 32 mm. All four study populations demonstrated rapid growth rates of up to 2.72 mm/day (23.4% of their total length). Both species may produce diapausing embryos or embryos that are able to hatch in as few as 15 days, resulting in a minimum generation time as short as only one month. Incubation on the surface of damp peat moss results in high embryo survival (73%) and a high proportion of rapidly developing embryos (58%) that skip diapauses and hatch in less than 30 days. We further demonstrated that rapid growth and maturation do not compromise subsequent fecundity. Conclusions Our data suggest that both species have the most rapid sexual maturation and minimum generation time of any vertebrate species, and that rapid maturity does not involve paedogenesis. PMID:24007640

  3. Time estimation among low-functioning individuals with autism spectrum disorders: evidence of poor sensitivity to variability of short durations.

    PubMed

    Brodeur, Darlene A; Gordon Green, Cathryn; Flores, Heidi; Burack, Jacob A

    2014-04-01

    Time estimation of short durations (under 1 sec) was examined in low-functioning individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and typically developing (TD) children matched on mental age. Temporal bisection and generalization tasks were used to examine basic perceptual timing mechanisms. For both tasks, the participants with ASD demonstrated less sensitivity to variability in short durations than the TD children, adding to a growing body of literature suggesting deficits in timing exist for longer durations. The results highlight the need to examine multiple levels of processing of time-related information from basic perceptual mechanisms to higher level cognitive mechanisms. PMID:24574256

  4. Suborbital Asteroid Intercept and Fragmentation for Very Short Warning Time Scenarios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hupp, Ryan; Dewald, Spencer; Wie, Bong; Barbee, Brent W.

    2015-01-01

    Small near-Earth objects (NEOs) 50150 m in size are far more numerous (hundreds of thousands to millions yet to be discovered) than larger NEOs. Small NEOs, which are mostly asteroids rather than comets, are very faint in the night sky due to their small sizes, and are, therefore, difficult to discover far in advance of Earth impact. However, even small NEOs are capable of creating explosions with energies on the order of tens or hundreds of megatons (Mt).We are, therefore, motivated to prepare to respond effectively to short warning time, small NEO impact scenarios. In this paper we explore the lower bound on actionable warning time by investigating the performance of notional upgraded Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles (ICBMs) to carry Nuclear Explosive Device (NED) payloads to intercept and disrupt a fictitious incoming NEO at high altitudes (generally, at least 2500 km above Earth). We conduct this investigation by developing optimal NEO intercept trajectories for a range of cases and comparing their performances.Our results show that suborbital NEO intercepts using Minuteman III or SM-3 IIA launch vehicles could achieve NEO intercept a few minutes prior to when the NEOwould strike Earth. We also find that more powerful versions of the launch vehicles (e.g., total V 9.511 kms) could intercept incoming NEOs over a day prior to when the NEO would strike Earth, if launched at least several days prior to the time of NEO intercept. Finally, we discuss a number of limiting factors and practicalities that affect whether the notional systems we describe could become feasible.

  5. Suborbital Intercept and Fragmentation of an Asteroid with Very Short Warning Time Scenario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hupp, Ryan; DeWald, Spencer; Wie, Bong; Barbee, Brent W.

    2015-01-01

    Small near-Earth objects (NEOs) is approx. 50-150 m in size are far more numerous (hundreds of thousands to millions yet to be discovered) than larger NEOs. Small NEOs, which are mostly asteroids rather than comets, are very faint in the night sky due to their small sizes, and are, therefore, difficult to discover far in advance of Earth impact. Furthermore, even small NEOs are capable of creating explosions with energies on the order of tens or hundreds of megatons (Mt). We are, therefore, motivated to prepare to respond effectively to short warning time, small NEO impact scenarios. In this paper we explore the lower bound on actionable warning time by investigating the performance of notional upgraded Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles (ICBMs) to carry Nuclear Explosive Device (NED) payloads to intercept and disrupt a hypothetical incoming NEO at high altitudes (generally at least 2500 km above Earth). We conduct this investigation by developing optimal NEO intercept trajectories for a range of cases and comparing their performances. Our results show that suborbital NEO intercepts using Minuteman III or SM-3 IIA launch vehicles could achieve NEO intercept a few minutes prior to when the NEO would strike Earth. We also find that more powerful versions of the launch vehicles (e.g., total deltaV is approx. 9.5-11 km/s) could intercept incoming NEOs several hours prior to when the NEO would strike Earth, if launched at least several days prior to the time of intercept. Finally, we discuss a number of limiting factors and practicalities that affect whether the notional systems we describe could become feasible.

  6. A Real-Time MODIS Vegetation Composite for Land Surface Models and Short-Term Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Jonathan L.; LaFontaine, Frank J.; Kumar, Sujay V.; Jedlovec, Gary J.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center is producing real-time, 1- km resolution Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) gridded composites over a Continental U.S. domain. These composites are updated daily based on swath data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor aboard the polar orbiting NASA Aqua and Terra satellites, with a product time lag of about one day. A simple time-weighting algorithm is applied to the NDVI swath data that queries the previous 20 days of data to ensure a continuous grid of data populated at all pixels. The daily composites exhibited good continuity both spatially and temporally during June and July 2010. The composites also nicely depicted high greenness anomalies that resulted from significant rainfall over southwestern Texas, Mexico, and New Mexico during July due to early-season tropical cyclone activity. The SPoRT Center is in the process of computing greenness vegetation fraction (GVF) composites from the MODIS NDVI data at the same spatial and temporal resolution for use in the NASA Land Information System (LIS). The new daily GVF dataset would replace the monthly climatological GVF database (based on Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer [AVHRR] observations from 1992-93) currently available to the Noah land surface model (LSM) in both LIS and the public version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The much higher spatial resolution (1 km versus 0.15 degree) and daily updates based on real-time satellite observations have the capability to greatly improve the simulation of the surface energy budget in the Noah LSM within LIS and WRF. Once code is developed in LIS to incorporate the daily updated GVFs, the SPoRT Center will conduct simulation sensitivity experiments to quantify the impacts and improvements realized by the MODIS real-time GVF data. This presentation will describe the methodology used to develop the 1-km MODIS NDVI composites and

  7. Revisiting the question: Does high-latitude solar activity lead low-latitude solar activity in time phase?

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, D. F.; Qu, Z. N.; Guo, Q. L.

    2014-05-01

    Cross-correlation analysis and wavelet transform methods are used to investigate whether high-latitude solar activity leads low-latitude solar activity in time phase or not, using the data of the Carte Synoptique solar filaments archive from 1919 March to 1989 December. From the cross-correlation analysis, high-latitude solar filaments have a time lead of 12 Carrington solar rotations with respect to low-latitude ones. Both the cross-wavelet transform and wavelet coherence indicate that high-latitude solar filaments lead low-latitude ones in time phase. Furthermore, low-latitude solar activity is better correlated with high-latitude solar activity of the previous cycle than with that of the following cycle, which is statistically significant. Thus, the present study confirms that high-latitude solar activity in the polar regions is indeed better correlated with the low-latitude solar activity of the following cycle than with that of the previous cycle, namely, leading in time phase.

  8. Revisiting the time until fixation of a neutral mutant in a finite population - A coalescent theory approach.

    PubMed

    Greenbaum, Gili

    2015-09-01

    Evaluation of the time scale of the fixation of neutral mutations is crucial to the theoretical understanding of the role of neutral mutations in evolution. Diffusion approximations of the Wright-Fisher model are most often used to derive analytic formulations of genetic drift, as well as for the time scales of the fixation of neutral mutations. These approximations require a set of assumptions, most notably that genetic drift is a stochastic process in a continuous allele-frequency space, an assumption appropriate for large populations. Here equivalent approximations are derived using a coalescent theory approach which relies on a different set of assumptions than the diffusion approach, and adopts a discrete allele-frequency space. Solutions for the mean and variance of the time to fixation of a neutral mutation derived from the two approaches converge for large populations but slightly differ for small populations. A Markov chain analysis of the Wright-Fisher model for small populations is used to evaluate the solutions obtained, showing that both the mean and the variance are better approximated by the coalescent approach. The coalescence approximation represents a tighter upper-bound for the mean time to fixation than the diffusion approximation, while the diffusion approximation and coalescence approximation form an upper and lower bound, respectively, for the variance. The converging solutions and the small deviations of the two approaches strongly validate the use of diffusion approximations, but suggest that coalescent theory can provide more accurate approximations for small populations. PMID:26002994

  9. SHORT CONTACT TIME DIRECT COAL LIQUEFACTION USING A NOVEL BATCH REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Michael T. Klein; William H. Calkins

    1997-10-29

    The overall goal of this research is to develop an understanding of the Direct Coal Liquefaction process at the molecular level. Many approaches have been used to study this process including kinetic studies, study of the liquefaction products, study of the effect of reaction variables, such as temperature, solvent type and composition, the changing nature and composition of the coal during liquefaction, and the distribution in the liquefaction products of the hydrogen consumed. While all these studies have contributed to our growing knowledge of the liquefaction process, an adequate understanding of direct liquefaction still eludes us. This is due to many reasons including: the complexity and variable nature of coal itself and the many different chemical reactions which are occurring simultaneously during direct coal liquefaction. We believe that a study of the liquefaction process at the very early stages will avoid the complexities of secondary reactions associated with free radical high temperature processes that are clearly involved in direct coal liquefaction. This prompted us to devise a reactor system which avoids long heat up and cool-down times associated with previous kinetic studies, and allows kinetic measurements even at as short as the first few seconds of the liquefaction reaction.

  10. Short-Time Structural Stability of Compressible Vortex Sheets with Surface Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Ben

    2016-06-01

    Assume we start with an initial vortex-sheet configuration which consists of two inviscid fluids with density bounded below flowing smoothly past each other, where a strictly positive fixed coefficient of surface tension produces a surface tension force across the common interface, balanced by the pressure jump. We model the fluids by the compressible Euler equations in three space dimensions with a very general equation of state relating the pressure, entropy and density such that the sound speed is positive. We prove that, for a short time, there exists a unique solution of the equations with the same structure. The mathematical approach consists of introducing a carefully chosen artificial viscosity-type regularisation which allows one to linearise the system so as to obtain a collection of transport equations for the entropy, pressure and curl together with a parabolic-type equation for the velocity which becomes fairly standard after rotating the velocity according to the interface normal. We prove a high order energy estimate for the non-linear equations that is independent of the artificial viscosity parameter which allows us to send it to zero. This approach loosely follows that introduced by Shkoller et al. in the setting of a compressible liquid-vacuum interface.

  11. The influence of alcoholic intoxication on the short-time energy function of speech.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Christian; Schiel, Florian

    2014-05-01

    This study investigates rhythmic features based on the short-time energy function of speech signals with the aim of finding robust, speaker-independent features that indicate speaker intoxication. Data from the German Alcohol Language Corpus, which comprises read, spontaneous, and command&control speech uttered by 162 speakers of both genders and various age groups when sober and intoxicated, were analyzed. Energy contours are compared directly (Root Mean Squared Error, statistical correlation, or the Euclidean distance in the spectral space of the contour) and by parameterization of the contour using the Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) and the first and second moments of the lower DCT spectrum. Contours are also analyzed by Principal Components Analysis aiming at fundamental "eigen contour" changes that might encode intoxication. Energy contours differ significantly with intoxication in terms of distance measures, the second and fourth DCT coefficients, and the first and second moments of the lower DCT spectrum. Principal Components Analysis did not yield interpretable "eigen contours" that could be used in distinguishing intoxicated from sober contours. PMID:24815274

  12. Application of MOSFET detectors for dosimetry in small animal radiography using short exposure times.

    PubMed

    De Lin, Ming; Toncheva, Greta; Nguyen, Giao; Kim, Sangroh; Anderson-Evans, Colin; Johnson, G Allan; Yoshizumi, Terry T

    2008-08-01

    Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) X-ray imaging for small animals can be used for functional phenotyping given its ability to capture rapid physiological changes at high spatial and temporal resolution. The higher temporal and spatial requirements for small-animal imaging drive the need for short, high-flux X-ray pulses. However, high doses of ionizing radiation can affect the physiology. The purpose of this study was to verify and apply metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) technology to dosimetry for small-animal diagnostic imaging. A tungsten anode X-ray source was used to expose a tissue-equivalent mouse phantom. Dose measurements were made on the phantom surface and interior. The MOSFETs were verified with thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs). Bland-Altman analysis showed that the MOSFET results agreed with the TLD results (bias, 0.0625). Using typical small animal DSA scan parameters, the dose ranged from 0.7 to 2.2 cGy. Application of the MOSFETs in the small animal environment provided two main benefits: (1) the availability of results in near real-time instead of the hours needed for TLD processes and (2) the ability to support multiple exposures with different X-ray techniques (various of kVp, mA and ms) using the same MOSFET. This MOSFET technology has proven to be a fast, reliable small animal dosimetry method for DSA imaging and is a good system for dose monitoring for serial and gene expression studies. PMID:18666818

  13. Zipf's Law in Short-Time Timbral Codings of Speech, Music, and Environmental Sound Signals

    PubMed Central

    Haro, Martín; Serrà, Joan; Herrera, Perfecto; Corral, Álvaro

    2012-01-01

    Timbre is a key perceptual feature that allows discrimination between different sounds. Timbral sensations are highly dependent on the temporal evolution of the power spectrum of an audio signal. In order to quantitatively characterize such sensations, the shape of the power spectrum has to be encoded in a way that preserves certain physical and perceptual properties. Therefore, it is common practice to encode short-time power spectra using psychoacoustical frequency scales. In this paper, we study and characterize the statistical properties of such encodings, here called timbral code-words. In particular, we report on rank-frequency distributions of timbral code-words extracted from 740 hours of audio coming from disparate sources such as speech, music, and environmental sounds. Analogously to text corpora, we find a heavy-tailed Zipfian distribution with exponent close to one. Importantly, this distribution is found independently of different encoding decisions and regardless of the audio source. Further analysis on the intrinsic characteristics of most and least frequent code-words reveals that the most frequent code-words tend to have a more homogeneous structure. We also find that speech and music databases have specific, distinctive code-words while, in the case of the environmental sounds, this database-specific code-words are not present. Finally, we find that a Yule-Simon process with memory provides a reasonable quantitative approximation for our data, suggesting the existence of a common simple generative mechanism for all considered sound sources. PMID:22479497

  14. Applying Short-Time Fourier Transform on Groundwater Fluctuation for the Estimation of Regional Groundwater Pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. W.; Yu, C. H.; Wang, Y.; Chang, L. C.; Chen, Y. C.

    2015-12-01

    For sustainable management of groundwater resource, precise records of regional groundwater pumping is crucial. However, the fact that number of private pumping wells is too huge makes obtaining precise pumping records of each wells become difficult. Because the most significant response of pumping is drawdown and the influence radius of pumping might over several hundred meters, a network of observation wells can be used to sense the regional pumping. Groundwater fluctuations are the synthetic effect of different physical mechanisms include pumping, recharge, tidal effect and others and an analysis of short-time Fourier transform is applied to identified the temporal effects of each mechanisms. Because pumping is a kind of human activity and the most significant frequency of human activity is daily, the temporal amplitude with daily frequency (TADF) is the response of regional pumping in the neighborhood of the observation well and TADF can be a linear indicator of regional groundwater pumping. The proposed method was applied in the Pingtung Plain and the horizontal of analysis period is from 2008 to 2011. The TADF of each observation well can reflect the temporal variation of regional groundwater pumping around the observation well. For the well in coast area, the shape of TADF looks like a sinusoid line with a half year cycle and the peaks of large pumping respectively are during January and July. The peaks of large pumping are mainly caused by fish farms.

  15. Application of Grey Model GM(1, 1) to Ultra Short-Term Predictions of Universal Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yu; Guo, Min; Zhao, Danning; Cai, Hongbing; Hu, Dandan

    2016-03-01

    A mathematical model known as one-order one-variable grey differential equation model GM(1, 1) has been herein employed successfully for the ultra short-term (<10days) predictions of universal time (UT1-UTC). The results of predictions are analyzed and compared with those obtained by other methods. It is shown that the accuracy of the predictions is comparable with that obtained by other prediction methods. The proposed method is able to yield an exact prediction even though only a few observations are provided. Hence it is very valuable in the case of a small size dataset since traditional methods, e.g., least-squares (LS) extrapolation, require longer data span to make a good forecast. In addition, these results can be obtained without making any assumption about an original dataset, and thus is of high reliability. Another advantage is that the developed method is easy to use. All these reveal a great potential of the GM(1, 1) model for UT1-UTC predictions.

  16. Evaluation of high-temperature and short-time sterilization of injection ampules by microwave heating.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, K; Honda, W; Miyake, Y

    1998-01-01

    The high-temperature and short-time sterilization by microwave heating with a continuous microwave sterilizer (MWS) was evaluated. The evaluation were performed with respect to: [1] lethal effect against microorganisms corresponding to F-value, and [2] reliability of MWS sterilization process. Bacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 7953 spores were used as the biological indicator and the heat-resistance of spores was evaluated with conventional heating method (121-129 degrees C). In MWS sterilization (125-135 degrees C), the actual lethal effect against B. stearothermophilus spores was almost in agreement with the F-value and the survival curve against the F-value was quite consistent with that for the autoclave. These results suggest that the actual lethal effect could be estimated by the F-value with heat-resistance parameters of spores from lower than actual temperatures and that there was no nonthermal effect of the microwave on B. stearothermophilus spores. The reliability of sterilization with the MWS was confirmed using more than 25,000 test ampules containing biological indicators. All biological indicators were killed, thus the present study shows that the MWS was completely reliable for all ampules. PMID:9542408

  17. Generalization of Clausius-Mossotti approximation in application to short-time transport properties of suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makuch, Karol

    2015-10-01

    In 1983, Felderhof, Ford, and Cohen gave microscopic explanation of the famous Clausius-Mossotti formula for the dielectric constant of nonpolar dielectric. They based their considerations on the cluster expansion of the dielectric constant, which relates this macroscopic property with the microscopic characteristics of the system. In this article, we analyze the cluster expansion of Felderhof, Ford, and Cohen by performing its resummation (renormalization). Our analysis leads to the ring expansion for the macroscopic characteristic of the system, which is an expression alternative to the cluster expansion. Using similarity of structures of the cluster expansion and the ring expansion, we generalize (renormalize) the Clausius-Mossotti approximation. We apply our renormalized Clausius-Mossotti approximation to the case of the short-time transport properties of suspensions, calculating the effective viscosity and the hydrodynamic function with the translational self-diffusion and the collective diffusion coefficient. We perform calculations for monodisperse hard-sphere suspensions in equilibrium with volume fraction up to 45 % . To assess the renormalized Clausius-Mossotti approximation, it is compared with numerical simulations and the Beenakker-Mazur method. The results of our renormalized Clausius-Mossotti approximation lead to comparable or much less error (with respect to the numerical simulations) than the Beenakker-Mazur method for the volume fractions below ϕ ≈30 % (apart from a small range of wave vectors in hydrodynamic function). For volume fractions above ϕ ≈30 % , the Beenakker-Mazur method gives in most cases lower error than the renormalized Clausius-Mossotti approximation.

  18. Java-based framework for processing and displaying short-echo-time magnetic resonance spectroscopy signals.

    PubMed

    De Neuter, B; Luts, J; Vanhamme, L; Lemmerling, P; Van Huffel, S

    2007-02-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) can be used to determine in a non-invasive way the concentrations of certain chemical substances, also called metabolites. The spectra of MRS signals contain peaks that correspond to the metabolites of interest. Short-echo-time signals are characterized by heavily overlapping metabolite peaks and require sophisticated processing methods. To be useful in a clinical environment tools are needed that can process those signals in an accurate and fast way. Therefore, we developed novel processing methods and we designed a freely available and open-source framework (http://www.esat.kuleuven.ac.be/sista/members/biomed) in which the processing methods can be integrated. The framework has a set of abstract classes, called hot spots, and its goal is to provide a general structure and determine the control flow of the program. It provides building blocks or components in order to help developers with integrating their methods in the framework via a plug-in system. The framework is designed with the unified modeling language (UML) and implemented in Java. When a developer implements the framework he gets an application that acts like a simple and user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI) for processing MRS data. This article describes in detail the structure and implementation of the framework and the integration of our processing methods in it. PMID:17174003

  19. Thermal sterilization of heat-sensitive products using high-temperature short-time sterilization.

    PubMed

    Mann, A; Kiefer, M; Leuenberger, H

    2001-03-01

    High-temperature short-time (HTST) sterilization with a continuous-flow sterilizer, developed for this study, was evaluated. The evaluation was performed with respect to (a) the chemical degradation of two heat-sensitive drugs in HTST range (140-160 degrees C) and (b) the microbiological effect of HTST sterilization. Degradation kinetics of two heat-sensitive drugs showed that a high peak temperature sterilization process resulted in less chemical degradation for the same microbiological effect than a low peak temperature process. Both drugs investigated could be sterilized with acceptable degradation at HTST conditions. For the evaluation of the microbiological effect, Bacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 7953 spores were used as indicator bacteria. Indicator spore kinetics (D(T), z value, k, and E(a)), were determined in the HTST range. A comparison between the Bigelow model (z value concept) and the Arrhenius model, used to describe the temperature coefficient of the microbial inactivation, demonstrated that the Bigelow model is more accurate in prediction of D(T) values in the HTST range. The temperature coefficient decreased with increasing temperature. The influence of Ca(2+) ions and pH value on the heat resistance of the indicator spores, which is known under typical sterilization conditions, did not change under HTST conditions. PMID:11170021

  20. Application of MOSFET Detectors for Dosimetry in Small Animal Radiography Using Short Exposure Times

    PubMed Central

    De Lin, Ming; Toncheva, Greta; Nguyen, Giao; Kim, Sangroh; Anderson-Evans, Colin; Johnson, G. Allan; Yoshizumi, Terry T.

    2008-01-01

    Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) X-ray imaging for small animals can be used for functional phenotyping given its ability to capture rapid physiological changes at high spatial and temporal resolution. The higher temporal and spatial requirements for small-animal imaging drive the need for short, high-flux X-ray pulses. However, high doses of ionizing radiation can affect the physiology. The purpose of this study was to verify and apply metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) technology to dosimetry for small-animal diagnostic imaging. A tungsten anode X-ray source was used to expose a tissue-equivalent mouse phantom. Dose measurements were made on the phantom surface and interior. The MOSFETs were verified with thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs). Bland-Altman analysis showed that the MOSFET results agreed with the TLD results (bias, 0.0625). Using typical small animal DSA scan parameters, the dose ranged from 0.7 to 2.2 cGy. Application of the MOSFETs in the small animal environment provided two main benefits: (1) the availability of results in near real-time instead of the hours needed for TLD processes and (2) the ability to support multiple exposures with different X-ray techniques (various of kVp, mA and ms) using the same MOSFET. This MOSFET technology has proven to be a fast, reliable small animal dosimetry method for DSA imaging and is a good system for dose monitoring for serial and gene expression studies. PMID:18666818

  1. Short time interval for condensation of high-temperature silicates in the solar accretion disk.

    PubMed

    Luu, Tu-Han; Young, Edward D; Gounelle, Matthieu; Chaussidon, Marc

    2015-02-01

    Chondritic meteorites are made of primitive components that record the first steps of formation of solids in our Solar System. Chondrules are the major component of chondrites, yet little is known about their formation mechanisms and history within the solar protoplanetary disk (SPD). We use the reconstructed concentrations of short-lived (26)Al in chondrules to constrain the timing of formation of their precursors in the SPD. High-precision bulk magnesium isotopic measurements of 14 chondrules from the Allende chondrite define a (26)Al isochron with (26)Al/(27)Al = 1.2(±0.2) × 10(-5) for this subset of Allende chondrules. This can be considered to be the minimum bulk chondrule (26)Al isochron because all chondrules analyzed so far with high precision (∼50 chondrules from CV and ordinary chondrites) have an inferred minimum bulk initial ((26)Al/(27)Al) ≥ 1.2 × 10(-5). In addition, mineral (26)Al isochrons determined on the same chondrules show that their formation (i.e., fusion of their precursors by energetic events) took place from 0 Myr to ∼2 Myr after the formation of their precursors, thus showing in some cases a clear decoupling in time between the two events. The finding of a minimum bulk chondrule (26)Al isochron is used to constrain the astrophysical settings for chondrule formation. Either the temperature of the condensation zone dropped below the condensation temperature of chondrule precursors at ∼1.5 My after the start of the Solar System or the transport of precursors from the condensation zone to potential storage sites stopped after 1.5 My, possibly due to a drop in the disk accretion rate. PMID:25605942

  2. Variational data assimilation for the optimized ozone initial state and the short-time forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.-Y.; Kim, D.-H.; Lee, S.-H.; Lee, H. W.

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we apply the four-dimensional variational (4D-Var) data assimilation to optimize initial ozone state and to improve the predictability of air quality. The numerical modeling systems used for simulations of atmospheric condition and chemical formation are the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model. The study area covers the capital region of South Korea, where the surface measurement sites are relatively evenly distributed. The 4D-Var code previously developed for the CMAQ model is modified to consider background error in matrix form, and various numerical tests are conducted. The results are evaluated with an idealized covariance function for the appropriateness of the modified codes. The background error is then constructed using the NMC method with long-term modeling results, and the characteristics of the spatial correlation scale related to local circulation is analyzed. The background error is applied in the 4D-Var research, and a surface observational assimilation is conducted to optimize the initial concentration of ozone. The statistical results for the 12 h assimilation periods and the 120 observatory sites show a 49.4 % decrease in the root mean squred error (RMSE), and a 59.9 % increase in the index of agreement (IOA). The temporal variation of spatial distribution of the analysis increments indicates that the optimized initial state of ozone concentration is transported to inland areas by the clockwise-rotating local circulation during the assimilation windows. To investigate the predictability of ozone concentration after the assimilation window, a short-time forecasting is carried out. The ratios of the RMSE with assimilation vs. that without assimilation are 8 and 13 % for the +24 and +12 h, respectively. Such a significant improvement in the forecast accuracy is obtained solely by using the optimized initial state. The potential improvement in ozone prediction for both the

  3. Short time interval for condensation of high-temperature silicates in the solar accretion disk

    PubMed Central

    Luu, Tu-Han; Young, Edward D.; Gounelle, Matthieu; Chaussidon, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Chondritic meteorites are made of primitive components that record the first steps of formation of solids in our Solar System. Chondrules are the major component of chondrites, yet little is known about their formation mechanisms and history within the solar protoplanetary disk (SPD). We use the reconstructed concentrations of short-lived 26Al in chondrules to constrain the timing of formation of their precursors in the SPD. High-precision bulk magnesium isotopic measurements of 14 chondrules from the Allende chondrite define a 26Al isochron with 26Al/27Al = 1.2(±0.2) × 10−5 for this subset of Allende chondrules. This can be considered to be the minimum bulk chondrule 26Al isochron because all chondrules analyzed so far with high precision (∼50 chondrules from CV and ordinary chondrites) have an inferred minimum bulk initial (26Al/27Al) ≥ 1.2 × 10−5. In addition, mineral 26Al isochrons determined on the same chondrules show that their formation (i.e., fusion of their precursors by energetic events) took place from 0 Myr to ∼2 Myr after the formation of their precursors, thus showing in some cases a clear decoupling in time between the two events. The finding of a minimum bulk chondrule 26Al isochron is used to constrain the astrophysical settings for chondrule formation. Either the temperature of the condensation zone dropped below the condensation temperature of chondrule precursors at ∼1.5 My after the start of the Solar System or the transport of precursors from the condensation zone to potential storage sites stopped after 1.5 My, possibly due to a drop in the disk accretion rate. PMID:25605942

  4. Time-Based Loss in Visual Short-Term Memory Is from Trace Decay, Not Temporal Distinctiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricker, Timothy J.; Spiegel, Lauren R.; Cowan, Nelson

    2014-01-01

    There is no consensus as to why forgetting occurs in short-term memory tasks. In past work, we have shown that forgetting occurs with the passage of time, but there are 2 classes of theories that can explain this effect. In the present work, we investigate the reason for time-based forgetting by contrasting the predictions of temporal…

  5. Revisiting the “Golden Hour”: An Evaluation of Out-of-Hospital Time in Shock and Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Newgard, Craig D.; Meier, Eric N.; Bulger, Eileen M.; Buick, Jason; Sheehan, Kellie; Lin, Steve; Minei, Joseph P.; Barnes-Mackey, Roxy A.; Brasel, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective We evaluated shock and traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients previously enrolled in an out-of-hospital clinical trial to test the association between out-of-hospital time and outcome. Methods This was a secondary analysis of shock and TBI patients ≥ 15 years enrolled in a Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium out-of-hospital clinical trial by 81 EMS agencies transporting to 46 Level I and II trauma centers in 11 sites (May 2006 through May 2009). Inclusion criteria were: SBP ≤ 70 mmHg or SBP 71 - 90 mmHg with heart rate ≥ 108 beats per minute (shock cohort) and Glasgow Coma Scale score ≤ 8 (TBI cohort); patients meeting both criteria were placed in the shock cohort. Primary outcomes were 28-day mortality (shock cohort) and 6-month Glasgow Outcome Scale - Extended (GOSE) ≤ 4 (TBI cohort). Results There were 778 patients in the shock cohort (26% 28-day mortality) and 1,239 patients in the TBI cohort (53% 6-month GOSE ≤ 4). Out-of-hospital time > 60 minutes was not associated with worse outcomes after accounting for important confounders in the shock cohort (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.42, 95% CI 0.77-2.62) or TBI cohort (aOR 0.80, 95% CI 0.52-1.21). However, shock patients requiring early critical hospital resources and arriving > 60 minutes had higher 28-day mortality (aOR 2.37, 95% CI 1.05-5.37); this finding was not observed among a similar TBI subgroup. Conclusions Among out-of-hospital trauma patients meeting physiologic criteria for shock and TBI, there was no association between time and outcome. However, the subgroup of shock patients requiring early critical resources arriving after 60 minutes had higher mortality. PMID:25596960

  6. Pearlite revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbach, Ingo; Plapp, Mathis

    2012-11-01

    Zener's model of pearlite transformation in steels can be viewed as the prototype of many microstructure evolution models in materials science. It links principles of thermodynamics and kinetics to the scale of the microstructure. In addition it solves a very practical problem: How the hardness of steel is correlated to the conditions of processing. Although the model is well established since the 1950s, quantitative explanation of growth kinetics was missing until very recently. The present paper will shortly review the classical model of pearlite transformation. Zener's conjecture of maximum entropy production will be annotated by modern theoretical and experimental considerations of a band of stable (sometimes oscillating) states around the state of maximum entropy production. Finally, an explanation of the growth kinetics observed in experiments is proposed based on diffusion fluxes driven by stress gradients due to large transformation strain.

  7. Bimolecular photoinduced electron transfer beyond the diffusion limit: the Rehm-Weller experiment revisited with femtosecond time resolution.

    PubMed

    Rosspeintner, Arnulf; Angulo, Gonzalo; Vauthey, Eric

    2014-02-01

    To access the intrinsic, diffusion free, rate constant of bimolecular photoinduced electron transfer reactions, fluorescence quenching experiments have been performed with 14 donor/acceptor pairs, covering a driving-force range going from 0.6 to 2.4 eV, using steady-state and femtosecond time-resolved emission, and applying a diffusion-reaction model that accounts for the static and transient stages of the quenching for the analysis. The intrinsic electron transfer rate constants are up to 2 orders of magnitude larger than the diffusion rate constant in acetonitrile. Above ∼1.5 eV, a slight decrease of the rate constant is observed, pointing to a much weaker Marcus inverted region than those reported for other types of electron transfer reactions, such as charge recombination. Despite this, the driving force dependence can be rationalized in terms of Marcus theory. PMID:24400958

  8. Revisiting Mr. Tall and Mr. Short

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riehl, Suzanne M.; Steinthorsdottir, Olof Bjorg

    2014-01-01

    Ratio, rate, and proportion are central ideas in the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for middle-grades mathematics (CCSSI 2010). These ideas closely connect to themes in earlier grades (pattern building, multiplicative reasoning, rational number concepts) and are the foundation for understanding linear functions as well as many high school…

  9. Variational data assimilation for the optimized ozone initial state and the short-time forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Soon-Young; Kim, Dong-Hyeok; Lee, Soon-Hwan; Lee, Hwa Woon

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we apply the four-dimensional variational (4D-Var) data assimilation to optimize initial ozone state and to improve the predictability of air quality. The numerical modeling systems used for simulations of atmospheric condition and chemical formation are the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model. The study area covers the capital region of South Korea, where the surface measurement sites are relatively evenly distributed. The 4D-Var code previously developed for the CMAQ model is modified to consider background error in matrix form, and various numerical tests are conducted. The results are evaluated with an idealized covariance function for the appropriateness of the modified codes. The background error is then constructed using the NMC method with long-term modeling results, and the characteristics of the spatial correlation scale related to local circulation are analyzed. The background error is applied in the 4D-Var research, and a surface observational assimilation is conducted to optimize the initial concentration of ozone. The statistical results for the 12 h assimilation periods and the 120 observatory sites show a 49.4 % decrease in the root mean squared error (RMSE), and a 59.9 % increase in the index of agreement (IOA). The temporal variation of spatial distribution of the analysis increments indicates that the optimized initial state of ozone concentration is transported to inland areas by the clockwise-rotating local circulation during the assimilation windows. To investigate the predictability of ozone concentration after the assimilation window, a short-time forecasting is carried out. The ratios of the RMSE (root mean squared error) with assimilation versus that without assimilation are 8 and 13 % for the +24 and +12 h, respectively. Such a significant improvement in the forecast accuracy is obtained solely by using the optimized initial state. The potential improvement in

  10. A coordinated approach for real-time short term hydro scheduling

    SciTech Connect

    Tufegdzic, N.; Frowd, R.J.; Stadlin, W.O.

    1996-11-01

    The paper describes a coordinated approach to short-term hydro scheduling and dispatch that has been developed as a part of the Tasmanian Hydro Electric Commission`s (HEC) new Energy Management System (EMS), which is being delivered by Landis and Gyr Energy Management. Tasmania`s hydro generation system consists of 40 reservoirs in six river catchments. The daily water release for each plant is scheduled using the HEC`s mid-term operation policy. The Hydro Scheduling and Commitment (HSC) function schedules the hydro units on a half hourly basis so that the allocated water release maximizes the energy production. This maximization of energy production is achieved by maximizing the head and this ensures that operation is always as close as possible to maximum efficiency. Mixed Integer Linear Programming is used with a detailed model of the interconnected hydro system to determine the half-hourly operation schedule. The Hydro Economic Dispatch (HED) function is used to implement the schedules produced by HSC in the real-time operation. The HED also uses a detailed model of the hydro system with a Linear Programming algorithm to ensure that each unit operates as close as possible to its head-dependent theoretical maximum efficiency point while meeting the desired storage levels specified by the HSC solution. HSC and HED have been tested against a number of operational scenarios and when it is fully integrated within the new EMS it is expected to yield annual stored energy savings up to 0.5% through more efficient hydro-electric system operation. It is expected to also provide additional savings by fostering improvements to the mid-term operating plan.