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Sample records for short stature hypotonia

  1. Microdeletion at 4q21.3 is associated with intellectual disability, dysmorphic facies, hypotonia, and short stature.

    PubMed

    Dukes-Rimsky, Lynn; Guzauskas, Gregory F; Holden, Kenton R; Griggs, Rachel; Ladd, Sydney; Montoya, Maria del Carmen; DuPont, Barbara R; Srivastava, Anand K

    2011-09-01

    Chromosomal imbalances are a major cause of intellectual disability (ID) and multiple congenital anomalies. We have clinically and molecularly characterized two patients with chromosome translocations and ID. Using whole genome array CGH analysis, we identified a microdeletion involving 4q21.3, unrelated to the translocations in both patients. We confirmed the 4q21.3 microdeletions using fluorescence in situ hybridization and quantitative genomic PCR. The corresponding deletion boundaries in the patients were further mapped and compared to previously reported 4q21 deletions and the associated clinical features. We determined a common region of deletion overlap that appears unique to ID, short stature, hypotonia, and dysmorphic facial features. PMID:21834054

  2. Short stature

    MedlinePLUS

    ... TREATMENT Your child's short stature may affect her self-esteem. Check in with your child about relationships with ... cm). The child is having extreme trouble with self-esteem and fitting in due to being short (although ...

  3. Genetic Evaluation of Short Stature

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, Ron G.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Genetics plays a major role in determining an individual's height. Although there are many monogenic disorders that lead to perturbations in growth and result in short stature, there is still no consensus as to the role that genetic diagnostics should play in the evaluation of a child with short stature. Evidence Acquisition: A search of PubMed was performed, focusing on the genetic diagnosis of short stature as well as on specific diagnostic subgroups included in this article. Consensus guidelines were reviewed. Evidence Synthesis: There are a multitude of rare genetic causes of severe short stature. There is no high-quality evidence to define the optimal approach to the genetic evaluation of short stature. We review genetic etiologies of a number of diagnostic subgroups and propose an algorithm for genetic testing based on these subgroups. Conclusion: Advances in genomic technologies are revolutionizing the diagnostic approach to short stature. Endocrinologists must become facile with the use of genetic testing in order to identify the various monogenic disorders that present with short stature. PMID:24915122

  4. Syndromic Disorders with Short Stature

    PubMed Central

    ??klar, Zeynep; Berbero?lu, Merih

    2014-01-01

    Short stature is one of the major components of many dysmorphic syndromes. Growth failure may be due to a wide variety of mechanisms, either related to the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor axis or to underlying unknown pathologies. In this review, the relatively more frequently seen syndromes with short stature (Noonan syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, Silver-Russell syndrome and Aarskog-Scott syndrome) were discussed. These disorders are associated with a number of endocrinopathies, as well as with developmental, systemic and behavioral issues. At present, GH therapy is used in most syndromic disorders, although long-term studies evaluating this treatment are insufficient and some controversies exist with regard to GH dose, optimal age to begin therapy and adverse effects. Before starting GH treatment, patients with syndromic disorders should be evaluated extensively. PMID:24637303

  5. Syndromic disorders with short stature.

    PubMed

    ??klar, Zeynep; Berbero?lu, Merih

    2014-01-01

    Short stature is one of the major components of many dysmorphic syndromes. Growth failure may be due to a wide variety of mechanisms, either related to the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor axis or to underlying unknown pathologies. In this review, the relatively more frequently seen syndromes with short stature (Noonan syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, Silver-Russell syndrome and Aarskog-Scott syndrome) were discussed. These disorders are associated with a number of endocrinopathies, as well as with developmental, systemic and behavioral issues. At present, GH therapy is used in most syndromic disorders, although long-term studies evaluating this treatment are insufficient and some controversies exist with regard to GH dose, optimal age to begin therapy and adverse effects. Before starting GH treatment, patients with syndromic disorders should be evaluated extensively. PMID:24637303

  6. Short Stature in Childhood and Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Bannard, James R.; Schnell, Frank N.

    1991-01-01

    The literature on the psychosocial impact of short stature in childhood and adolescence is reviewed, with particular reference to IQ and educational attainment, personality and psychopathology, and the concept of infantilization. Adult outcome studies are also reviewed with comments on inherent methodological problems. Suggestions are offered for the psychosocial management of short stature. PMID:21229094

  7. Short Stature—Physiology and Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Rimoin, David L.; Borochowitz, Zvi; Horton, William A.

    1986-01-01

    Stature, the quantitative measure of height, varies widely within each ethnic group with a fairly normal distribution. Of the numerous patients whom physicians encounter because of short stature, relatively few are pathologically small in the context of family and ethnic background. Physicians must be able to differentiate pathologic short stature from the lower end of the normal curve before embarking on a complex diagnostic evaluation. There are literally hundreds of different causes of short stature, and the clinical evaluation requires a wide variety of clinical, radiographic, pathologic and biochemical tools. Although specific treatment to promote growth is available only in persons with the endocrinopathies and the acquired nutritional, emotional and chronic disease states, diagnosis of the specific form of short stature can have great importance in being able to prevent complications and to offer accurate prognostic information and genetic counseling. ImagesFigure 2.Figure 3. PMID:2873688

  8. Evaluation of the Child with Short Stature.

    PubMed

    Mehlman, Charles T; Ain, Michael C

    2015-10-01

    Orthopedic surgeons frequently encounter short statured patients. A systematic approach is needed for proper evaluation of these children. The differential diagnosis includes both proportionate and disproportionate short stature types. A proper history and physical examination and judicious use of plain film radiography will establish the diagnosis in most cases. In addition to the orthopedic surgeon, most of these patients will also be evaluated by other specialists, including endocrinologists and geneticists. This article provides an overview of the evaluation of the child with short stature and offers several illustrative examples. PMID:26410640

  9. Evaluation of Short and Tall Stature in Children.

    PubMed

    Barstow, Craig; Rerucha, Caitlyn

    2015-07-01

    Short stature is defined as a height more than two standard deviations below the mean for age (less than the 3rd percentile). Tall stature is defined as a height more than two standard deviations above the mean for age (greater than the 97th percentile). The initial evaluation of short and tall stature should include a history and physical examination, accurate serial measurements, and determination of growth velocity, midparental height, and bone age. Common normal variants of short stature are familial short stature, constitutional delay of growth and puberty, and idiopathic short stature. Pathologic causes of short stature include chronic diseases; growth hormone deficiency; and genetic disorders, such as Turner syndrome. Tall stature has the same prevalence as short stature, but it is a much less common reason for referral to subspecialty care. Common causes of tall stature include familial tall stature, obesity, Klinefelter syndrome, Marfan syndrome, and precocious puberty. Although most children with short or tall stature have variants of normal growth, children who are more than three standard deviations from the mean for age are more likely to have underlying pathology. Evaluation for pathologic etiologies is guided by history and physical examination findings. PMID:26132126

  10. Challenges in the Management of Short Stature.

    PubMed

    Argente, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Human growth, from fetal life to adolescence, is dynamic and a good marker of health. Growth is a complex process influenced by genetic, hormonal, nutritional and environmental factors, both pre- and postnatally. To date, no international agreement regarding normal height has been established. Auxological parameters are fundamental to investigate potential short stature (SS), either with a known diagnosis, e.g. disproportionate or proportionate, prenatal and/or postnatal onset, or an unknown diagnosis, i.e. idiopathic SS. The incidence/prevalence of SS is difficult to establish. The measurement of choice in children aged <2 years is length, while in those >2 years of age it is height. A number of monogenic diseases that lead to proportionate SS due to either isolated growth hormone deficiency, multiple pituitary hormone deficiency, growth hormone insensitivity, primary acid-labile subunit deficiency, primary IGF-1 deficiency, IGF-1 resistance, primary IGF-2 deficiency or primary protease deficiency have been discovered in the last 30 years. In addition, the Nosology and Classification of Genetic Skeletal Disorders revised in 2015 includes 436 conditions, with a number of genes of 364. A practical algorithm for the evaluation of SS as well as therapeutic options are discussed. PMID:26649429

  11. Copy number variants in patients with short stature

    PubMed Central

    van Duyvenvoorde, Hermine A; Lui, Julian C; Kant, Sarina G; Oostdijk, Wilma; Gijsbers, Antoinet CJ; Hoffer, Mariëtte JV; Karperien, Marcel; Walenkamp, Marie JE; Noordam, Cees; Voorhoeve, Paul G; Mericq, Verónica; Pereira, Alberto M; Claahsen-van de Grinten, Hedi L; van Gool, Sandy A; Breuning, Martijn H; Losekoot, Monique; Baron, Jeffrey; Ruivenkamp, Claudia AL; Wit, Jan M

    2014-01-01

    Height is a highly heritable and classic polygenic trait. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed that at least 180 genetic variants influence adult height. However, these variants explain only about 10% of the phenotypic variation in height. Genetic analysis of short individuals can lead to the discovery of novel rare gene defects with a large effect on growth. In an effort to identify novel genes associated with short stature, genome-wide analysis for copy number variants (CNVs), using single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays, in 162 patients (149 families) with short stature was performed. Segregation analysis was performed if possible, and genes in CNVs were compared with information from GWAS, gene expression in rodents' growth plates and published information. CNVs were detected in 40 families. In six families, a known cause of short stature was found (SHOX deletion or duplication, IGF1R deletion), in two combined with a de novo potentially pathogenic CNV. Thirty-three families had one or more potentially pathogenic CNVs (n=40). In 24 of these families, segregation analysis could be performed, identifying three de novo CNVs and nine CNVs segregating with short stature. Four were located near loci associated with height in GWAS (ADAMTS17, TULP4, PRKG2/BMP3 and PAPPA). Besides six CNVs known to be causative for short stature, 40 CNVs with possible pathogenicity were identified. Segregation studies and bioinformatics analysis suggested various potential candidate genes. PMID:24065112

  12. Copy number variants in patients with short stature.

    PubMed

    van Duyvenvoorde, Hermine A; Lui, Julian C; Kant, Sarina G; Oostdijk, Wilma; Gijsbers, Antoinet C J; Hoffer, Mariëtte J V; Karperien, Marcel; Walenkamp, Marie J E; Noordam, Cees; Voorhoeve, Paul G; Mericq, Verónica; Pereira, Alberto M; Claahsen-van de Grinten, Hedi L; van Gool, Sandy A; Breuning, Martijn H; Losekoot, Monique; Baron, Jeffrey; Ruivenkamp, Claudia A L; Wit, Jan M

    2014-05-01

    Height is a highly heritable and classic polygenic trait. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed that at least 180 genetic variants influence adult height. However, these variants explain only about 10% of the phenotypic variation in height. Genetic analysis of short individuals can lead to the discovery of novel rare gene defects with a large effect on growth. In an effort to identify novel genes associated with short stature, genome-wide analysis for copy number variants (CNVs), using single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays, in 162 patients (149 families) with short stature was performed. Segregation analysis was performed if possible, and genes in CNVs were compared with information from GWAS, gene expression in rodents' growth plates and published information. CNVs were detected in 40 families. In six families, a known cause of short stature was found (SHOX deletion or duplication, IGF1R deletion), in two combined with a de novo potentially pathogenic CNV. Thirty-three families had one or more potentially pathogenic CNVs (n=40). In 24 of these families, segregation analysis could be performed, identifying three de novo CNVs and nine CNVs segregating with short stature. Four were located near loci associated with height in GWAS (ADAMTS17, TULP4, PRKG2/BMP3 and PAPPA). Besides six CNVs known to be causative for short stature, 40 CNVs with possible pathogenicity were identified. Segregation studies and bioinformatics analysis suggested various potential candidate genes. PMID:24065112

  13. Growth hormone, enhancement and the pharmaceuticalisation of short stature.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Michael

    2015-04-01

    This paper takes the biological drug human Growth Hormone (hGH) as a case study to investigate processes of pharmaceuticalisation and medicalisation in configuring childhood short stature as a site for pharmaceutical intervention. Human growth hormone is considered to have legitimate applications in treating childhood growth hormone deficiency and short stature associated with other recognised conditions. It is also regarded by bioethicists and others as a form of human biomedical enhancement when applied to children with idiopathic or 'normal' short stature. The purpose of this study is not to evaluate whether treatment of idiopathic short stature is enhancement or not, but to evaluate how some applications of hGH in treating short stature have come to be accepted and stabilised as legitimate 'therapies' while others remain contested as 'enhancements'. A comparative, historical approach is employed, drawing on approaches from medical sociology and Science and Technology Studies (STS) to set out a socio-technical history of hGH in the US and UK. Through this history the relative influence and interplay of drivers of pharmaceuticalisation, including industry marketing and networks of drug distribution, and processes of medicalisation will be employed to address this question and simultaneously query the value of enhancement as a sociological concept. PMID:25455477

  14. Chromosome abnormalities in Indonesian patients with short stature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Short stature is associated with several disorders including wide variations of chromosomal disorders and single gene disorders. The objective of this report is to present the cytogenetic findings in Indonesian patients with short stature. Methods G-banding and interphase/metaphase FISH were performed on short stature patients with and without other clinical features who were referred by clinicians all over Indonesia to our laboratory during the year 2003–2009. Results The results of chromosomal analysis of ninety seven patients (mean age: 10.7 years old) were collected. The group of patients with other clinical features showed sex chromosome abnormalities in 45% (18/40) and autosomal abnormalities in 10% (4/40), whereas those with short stature only, 42.1% (24/57) had sex chromosome abnormalities and 1.75% (1/57) had autosomal abnormalities. The autosomal chromosomal abnormalities involved mostly subtelomeric regions. Results discrepancies between karyotype and FISH were found in 10 patients, including detection of low-level monosomy X mosaicism in 6 patients with normal karyotype, and detection of mosaic aneuploidy chromosome 18 in 1 patient with 45,XX,rob(13;14)(q10;q10). Statistical analysis showed no significant association between the groups and the type of chromosomal abnormalities. Conclusion Chromosome abnormalities account for about 50% of the short stature patients. Wide variations of both sex and autosomal chromosomes abnormalities were detected in the study. Since three out of five patients had autosomal structural abnormalities involving the subtelomeric regions, thus in the future, subtelomeric FISH or even a more sensitive method such as genomic/SNP microarray is needed to confirm deletions of subtelomeric regions of chromosome 9, 11 and 18. Low-level mosaicism in normal karyotype patients indicates interphase FISH need to be routinely carried out in short stature patients as an adjunct to karyotyping. PMID:22863325

  15. Idiopathic Short Stature: Conundrums of Definition and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbloom, Arlan L.

    2009-01-01

    Children with idiopathic short stature (ISS) are statistically defined by height SDS < ?2 for their bone age and should be distinguished from children with familial short stature for whom height SDS corresponds to mean parental SDS and from the most common explanation for short stature referred to pediatric endocrinologists, constitutional delay in growth and maturation (CDGM), in which there is normal height for bone age and predicted normal adult stature. Low IGF-I levels reported in ISS may be the result of subtle undernutrition or reference to standards appropriate for chronologic age but not osseous maturation in CDGM inappropriately labeled as ISS. While growth hormone (GH) treatment of ISS may add 4-5 cm to adult height, meta-analysis indicates that there is no documented evidence that such treatment improves health related quality of life or psychological adaptation. Thus, the estimated cost of US$52 000/inch gained is difficult to justify. Absence of data regarding efficacy of the use of IGF-I for treatment of ISS has been noted in a recent consensus statement from the North American and European pediatric endocrinology societies. This report further emphasizes the importance of discouraging the expectation that taller stature from GH treatment will improve quality of life. PMID:19956707

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Short stature, hyperextensibility, hernia, ocular depression, Rieger anomaly, and teething ...

    MedlinePLUS

    ... disorder catalog Conditions > Short stature, hyperextensibility, hernia, ocular depression, Rieger anomaly, and teething delay (often shortened to ... is SHORT syndrome? Short stature, hyperextensibility, hernia, ocular depression, Rieger anomaly, and teething delay, commonly known by ...

  17. MECHANISMS IN ENDOCRINOLOGY: Novel genetic causes of short stature.

    PubMed

    Wit, Jan M; Oostdijk, Wilma; Losekoot, Monique; van Duyvenvoorde, Hermine A; Ruivenkamp, Claudia A L; Kant, Sarina G

    2016-04-01

    The fast technological development, particularly single nucleotide polymorphism array, array-comparative genomic hybridization, and whole exome sequencing, has led to the discovery of many novel genetic causes of growth failure. In this review we discuss a selection of these, according to a diagnostic classification centred on the epiphyseal growth plate. We successively discuss disorders in hormone signalling, paracrine factors, matrix molecules, intracellular pathways, and fundamental cellular processes, followed by chromosomal aberrations including copy number variants (CNVs) and imprinting disorders associated with short stature. Many novel causes of GH deficiency (GHD) as part of combined pituitary hormone deficiency have been uncovered. The most frequent genetic causes of isolated GHD are GH1 and GHRHR defects, but several novel causes have recently been found, such as GHSR, RNPC3, and IFT172 mutations. Besides well-defined causes of GH insensitivity (GHR, STAT5B, IGFALS, IGF1 defects), disorders of NFκB signalling, STAT3 and IGF2 have recently been discovered. Heterozygous IGF1R defects are a relatively frequent cause of prenatal and postnatal growth retardation. TRHA mutations cause a syndromic form of short stature with elevated T3/T4 ratio. Disorders of signalling of various paracrine factors (FGFs, BMPs, WNTs, PTHrP/IHH, and CNP/NPR2) or genetic defects affecting cartilage extracellular matrix usually cause disproportionate short stature. Heterozygous NPR2 or SHOX defects may be found in ∼3% of short children, and also rasopathies (e.g., Noonan syndrome) can be found in children without clear syndromic appearance. Numerous other syndromes associated with short stature are caused by genetic defects in fundamental cellular processes, chromosomal abnormalities, CNVs, and imprinting disorders. PMID:26578640

  18. [Growth hormone treatment in short stature of unknown origin].

    PubMed

    Wit, J M

    1992-10-01

    Most children with idiopathic short stature can be classified under the diagnoses familial short stature and constitutional delay of growth and adolescence. Administration of growth hormone leads to faster growth, but also faster bone maturation. Daily injections are more efficacious than three injections per week. There is a dose-response relationship. In a Dutch prospective study, the acceleration of growth was only slightly more than bone age advance, so that the average predicted adult height increased only by 3 cm over a period of 4-5 year. In an untreated control group final height was 1 cm lower than predicted. There were great inter-individual differences in terms of growth and bone maturation, which could not be predicted on the basis of clinical and biochemical variables. PMID:1448806

  19. High incidence of SHOX anomalies in individuals with short stature

    PubMed Central

    Huber, C; Rosilio, M; Munnich, A; Cormier?Daire, V

    2006-01-01

    Objective To study the SHOX gene and the PAR1 region in individuals with short stature. Methods The study involved 56 cases of dyschondrosteosis and 84 cases of idiopathic short stature (ISS). The study was designed to determine the following: the prevalence of SHOX anomalies in ISS; the frequency of Madelung deformity in individuals with SHOX anomalies; and the value of a family history of short stature in deciding whether to test for the SHOX gene. Results 54 SHOX anomalies were observed, including 42 (68%) in the dyschondrosteosis group and 12 (15%) in the ISS group. The high frequency of SHOX anomalies in the ISS group can be explained by the large proportion of boys in this group, reflecting the difficulty in diagnosing dyschondrosteosis in young boys. Clinical evidence of Madelung deformity in six parents of ISS individuals emphasised the importance of family evaluation. Among the 54 SHOX anomalies, 33 PAR1 deletions were identified encompassing the SHOX gene (62%), one partial intragenic deletion (2%), nine deletions located downstream of the SHOX gene (16%), and 11 point mutations (20%). Conclusions These data emphasise the value of using microsatellite markers located within and downstream of the SHOX gene. PMID:16597678

  20. Etiologies and characteristics of children with chief complaint of short stature

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kyung Chul; Jin, Song Lee; Kwon, Ah Reum; Chae, Hyun Wook; Ahn, Jung Min; Kim, Duk Hee

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Short stature is a very common reason for visits to pediatric endocrine clinics. It could be the first sign of an underlying disease. The purpose of this study is to investigate the etiologies and general characteristics of subjects who visited an outpatient clinic due to short stature. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 3,371 patients who visited Severance Children's Hospital with the chief complaint of short stature from 2010 to 2012. Medical history, auxological data, and laboratory tests including bone age were collected and analyzed. Chromosome studies or combined pituitary function tests were performed if needed. Results Approximately 89.4% of the subjects with the chief complaint of short stature who visited the outpatient clinic were of normal height, and only 10.6% of subjects were identified as having short stature. Of the subject of short stature, 44.7% were classified as having normal variant short stature; that is, familial short stature (23.0%), constitutional delay in growth (17.7%), and mixed form (3.9%). Pathological short stature was found in 193 subjects (54.2%). Among pathological short stature, most common etiology was growth hormone deficiency (GHD) (38.9%). Conclusion A majority of children had a normal height. Among children with short stature, pathological short stature and normal variants occupied a similar percentage. GHD was the most common cause of pathological short stature and found in about 20% of the children with short stature. In pathological short stature, the height, height velocity, and IGF-1 level were lower than in normal variants. PMID:25883925

  1. Pharmacological interventions for short stature: pros and cons.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Ron G

    2013-01-01

    Although growth hormone (GH) therapy is virtually always effective in accelerating growth and restoring height potential to children with GH deficiency (GHD), the expansion of its use to a wide variety of other clinical disorders associated with short stature has resulted in considerable ethical and cost-benefit issues. Logic would demand that therapy should either be restricted to true 'replacement', thereby limiting its use to cases of unequivocal GHD, or treatment should be considered as a legitimate 'enhancement', and be available to all children with significant short stature. Consideration of the latter option requires a careful look at issues surrounding efficacy (both in terms of stature and any perceived disability resulting therefrom), cost and potential adverse effects. Similar concerns involve treatment with insulin-like growth factor-I and any related growth-augmenting therapy. To date, safety issues have been addressed through pharmaceutical-sponsored postmarketing surveillance studies. While of definite use, such investigations also have significant limitations, especially in addressing long-term concerns. The possibility of lifespan cohort studies, with surveillance of all GH recipients throughout life and comparison with data from appropriate controls, should be considered. PMID:23502156

  2. Aromatase Inhibitors in the Treatment of Short Stature.

    PubMed

    Hero, Matti

    2016-01-01

    Reports published in the 1990s of men with estrogen deficiency caused by defective aromatase or estrogen resistance due to a defective estrogen receptor ? confirmed the crucial role of estrogen in bone maturation, closure of the epiphyses and cessation of statural growth. Based on these findings, it became reasonable to postulate that selective inhibition of estrogen synthesis with aromatase inhibitors could increase adult height by delaying bone maturation and prolonging the period of growth in males. To date, aromatase inhibitors have been employed in rare pediatric conditions associated with sex steroid excess, and in randomized controlled trials involving boys with short stature and/or constitutional delay of puberty. Findings from these randomized trials suggest that potent aromatase inhibitors increase predicted height, but final adult height data are scarce. Moreover, several safety issues remain inadequately studied. In this paper, published findings on the use of aromatase inhibitors in growth indications are reviewed with emphasis on treatment efficacy and safety. PMID:26684331

  3. Differences in Dietary Intakes between Normal and Short Stature Korean Children Visiting a Growth Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Mi; Park, Mi Jung; Ahn, Hong Seok

    2012-01-01

    This study compared birth stature, parents' stature, and food and nutrient intakes between normal and short stature Korean children visiting a growth clinic. A total of 143 growth clinic visitors agreed to participate in the study. Out of the 143 subjects, 37 children with height below the fifth percentile (short stature group) and 58 children with height above the twenty-fifth percentile (normal group) were included in the study analysis. Data were collected through a survey of parents or guardians of children and anthropometric measurements. The ratio of short stature in either parent was significantly higher in short stature group. The mean intakes of protein, fat, calcium, and iron were lower in short stature children compared to normal children. Among five major food groups, the intake frequency of vegetables and fruits was significantly lower in short stature group and that of meat·fish·egg·legume group was also significantly lower in short stature group. In further analysis categorized into 11 detail food groups, the intake frequency of fruit group and legume group was significantly lower in short stature group. Nutritional counseling should be provided to emphasize adequate intake of various food groups including vegetables, fruits, and legumes to short stature children visiting a growth clinic. PMID:23430972

  4. Short stature and pubertal delay in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Wood, Claire L; Straub, Volker; Guglieri, Michela; Bushby, Kate; Cheetham, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) are shorter than their healthy peers. The introduction of corticosteroid (CS) has beneficial effects on muscle function but slows growth further and is associated with pubertal delay. In contrast to CS usage in most children and adolescents, weaning glucocorticoid is not a key objective of management in DMD. As the outlook for these young people improves, one of the main challenges is to reduce or offset the detrimental effects of CS on growth and development. This is a review of the aetiology and prevalence of short stature and delayed puberty in DMD, a summary of the treatments available and suggestions for areas of further research. PMID:26141541

  5. 45,X/47,XXX Mosaicism and Short Stature.

    PubMed

    Everest, Erica; Tsilianidis, Laurie A; Haider, Anzar; Rogers, Douglas G; Raissouni, Nouhad; Schweiger, Bahareh

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of a ten-year-old girl with short stature and 45,X/47,XXX genotype. She also suffered from vesicoureteric reflux and kidney dysfunction prior to having surgery on her ureters. Otherwise, she does not have any of the characteristics of Turner nor Triple X syndrome. It has been shown that this mosaic condition as well as other varieties creates a milder phenotype than typical Turner syndrome, which is what we mostly see in our patient. However, this patient is a special case, because she is exceptionally short. Overall, one cannot predict the resultant phenotype in these mosaic conditions. This creates difficulty in counseling parents whose children or fetuses have these karyotypes. PMID:26137340

  6. 45,X/47,XXX Mosaicism and Short Stature

    PubMed Central

    Everest, Erica; Tsilianidis, Laurie A.; Haider, Anzar; Rogers, Douglas G.; Raissouni, Nouhad; Schweiger, Bahareh

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of a ten-year-old girl with short stature and 45,X/47,XXX genotype. She also suffered from vesicoureteric reflux and kidney dysfunction prior to having surgery on her ureters. Otherwise, she does not have any of the characteristics of Turner nor Triple X syndrome. It has been shown that this mosaic condition as well as other varieties creates a milder phenotype than typical Turner syndrome, which is what we mostly see in our patient. However, this patient is a special case, because she is exceptionally short. Overall, one cannot predict the resultant phenotype in these mosaic conditions. This creates difficulty in counseling parents whose children or fetuses have these karyotypes. PMID:26137340

  7. Unresolving short stature in a possible case of mucopolysccharidosis.

    PubMed

    Ayuk, Ac; Obu, Ho; Ughasoro, Md; Ibeziako, Ns

    2014-03-01

    We present a metabolic disorder with main complaints of unresolving short stature following prolonged treatment for rickets. ES is a 4-year-old male who first presented to our hospital on self-referral but had been seen previously at another tertiary health facility. The complaints were a swelling on the back and poor growth since 1 year of age with associated skeletal deformities: Chest wall, wrists, knees and ankle joints, which were progressive. Examination revealed a severely stunted child with a large head and caput quadratum, craniofacial disproportion, coarse facial features, saddle-shaped nose, thick lips and bilateral corneal clouding/opacities. He had very poor language development for his age. His diagnoses based on clinical and radiological assessment was in keeping with Hurlers type of mucopolysaccharidoses. We highlight this case to emphasize the need for early consideration of other possible rare differential diagnoses in metabolic conditions in children. PMID:25031905

  8. Karyotype/phenotype correlation in females with short stature.

    PubMed

    Temtamy, S A; Ghali, I; Salam, M A; Hussein, F H; Ezz, E H; Salah, N

    1992-03-01

    We studied 60 females who presented with short stature. The main aim was to determine the effect of karyotype variation on phenotype. A somatic feature score was calculated for each case depending on the presence of 17 clinical somatic changes known to occur in Turner syndrome. Karyotype studies showed the following results: 45,X (n = 22): 46,XX (n = 11); 45,X/46,XX (n = 10); 46,XX/46,Xi(Xq) (n = 4); 46,XX/46,XXq- (n = 3); 46,XX/46,XXp- (n = 2); 46,Xi(Xq) (n = 2); 45,X/46,Xi(Xq) (n = 2); 46,XXp- (n = 1); 46,XX/47,XXX (n = 1); 46,XXq- (n = 1); 45,X/46,X(ry) (n = 1). Karyotype/phenotype correlation showed the gradation of severity of clinical phenotype to be related to the number of X chromosomes. The highest somatic scores and the most severe clinical manifestations were noted in cases of pure 45,X Turner and the mildest in 46,XX/46,XX(str) mosaics or pure 46,XX, including hypergonadotrophic hypogonadism. Our findings revealed a dosage effect of the X chromosome on phenotype, thus confirming that partial X chromosome inactivation modifies somatic and pubertal development. Our results also support both the additive and interactive hypotheses of karyotype/phenotype correlation. PMID:1563089

  9. Concentration of Selected Metals in Whole Blood, Plasma, and Urine in Short Stature and Healthy Children.

    PubMed

    Klatka, Maria; Błażewicz, Anna; Partyka, Małgorzata; Kołłątaj, Witold; Zienkiewicz, Ewa; Kocjan, Ryszard

    2015-08-01

    The short stature in children is defined as height below the third percentile from the mean for age and gender. This problem affects about 3% of young people. More than 20,000 children in Poland have problems with short stature. There is not much information available in the literature on the study of metals in blood, plasma, and urine in children with short stature. The study was conducted on a group of 56 short stature Polish children and 35 healthy children. The content of metals was determined using high-performance ion chromatography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry methods. The study revealed significant differences between the content of selected metals in body fluids between a short stature group and healthy children. There were significant differences in the Fe, Cu, and Ni concentrations between the groups with respect to the hormonal therapy. There were no significant differences between the groups with respect to the area where the children lived. The results showed no statistically significant differences between metal concentration and age, body weight, and height. The study demonstrated statistically significant differences between the content of metals in body fluids in short stature children compared with the healthy children. It seems that the difference in the concentration of certain elements may also be the result of growth hormone therapy and the interaction between various metals. Both the alterations in the content of metals and their mutual interactions may play an important role in the pathogenesis of short stature children. PMID:25855373

  10. Short Stature, Accelerated Bone Maturation, and Early Growth Cessation Due to Heterozygous Aggrecan Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Ola; Guo, Michael H.; Dunbar, Nancy; Popovic, Jadranka; Flynn, Daniel; Jacobsen, Christina; Lui, Julian C.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Baron, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Context: Many children with idiopathic short stature have a delayed bone age. Idiopathic short stature with advanced bone age is far less common. Objective: The aim was to identify underlying genetic causes of short stature with advanced bone age. Setting and Design: We used whole-exome sequencing to study three families with autosomal-dominant short stature, advanced bone age, and premature growth cessation. Results: Affected individuals presented with short stature [adult heights ?2.3 to ?4.2 standard deviation scores (SDS)] with histories of early growth cessation or childhood short stature (height SDS ?1.9 to ?3.5 SDS), advancement of bone age, and normal endocrine evaluations. Whole-exome sequencing identified novel heterozygous variants in ACAN, which encodes aggrecan, a proteoglycan in the extracellular matrix of growth plate and other cartilaginous tissues. The variants were present in all affected, but in no unaffected, family members. In Family 1, a novel frameshift mutation in exon 3 (c.272delA) was identified, which is predicted to cause early truncation of the aggrecan protein. In Family 2, a base-pair substitution was found in a highly conserved location within a splice donor site (c.2026+1G>A), which is also likely to alter the amino acid sequence of a large portion of the protein. In Family 3, a missense variant (c.7064T>C) in exon 14 affects a highly conserved residue (L2355P) and is strongly predicted to perturb protein function. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates that heterozygous mutations in ACAN can cause a mild skeletal dysplasia, which presents clinically as short stature with advanced bone age. The accelerating effect on skeletal maturation has not previously been noted in the few prior reports of human ACAN mutations. Our findings thus expand the spectrum of ACAN defects and provide a new molecular genetic etiology for the unusual child who presents with short stature and accelerated skeletal maturation. PMID:24762113

  11. Low Growth Hormone Levels in Short-Stature Children with Pituitary Hyperplasia Secondary to Primary Hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Minghua; Hu, Yanyan; Li, Guimei; Hu, Wenwen

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The follow-up of GH levels in short-stature children with pituitary hyperplasia secondary to primary hypothyroidism (PPH) is reported in a few cases. We aimed to observe changes in GH secretion in short-stature children with PPH. Methods. A total of 11 short-stature children with PPH accompanied by low GH levels were included. They received levothyroxine therapy after diagnosis. Their thyroid hormones, IGF-1, PRL, and pituitary height were measured at baseline and 3 months after therapy. GH stimulation tests were performed at baseline and after regression of thyroid hormones and pituitary. Results. At baseline, they had decreased GH peak and FT3 and FT4 levels and elevated TSH levels. Decreased IGF-1 levels were found in seven children. Elevated PRL levels and positive thyroid antibodies were found in 10 children. The mean pituitary height was 14.3 ± 3.8?mm. After 3 months, FT3, FT4, and IGF-1 levels were significantly increased (all p < 0.01), and values of TSH, PRL, and pituitary height were significantly decreased (all p < 0.001). After 6 months, pituitary hyperplasia completely regressed. GH levels returned to normal in nine children and were still low in two children. Conclusion. GH secretion can be resolved in most short-stature children with PPH. PMID:26421010

  12. Spine Shape in Sagittal and Frontal Planes in Short- and Tall-Statured Children Aged 13 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichota, Malgorzata

    2008-01-01

    Study aim: To assess spine curvatures, postural categories and scolioses in short and tall children aged 13 years. Material and methods: Short-statured (below Percentile 10) and tall-statured (above Percentile 90) boys (n = 13 and 18, respectively) and girls (n = 10 and 11, respectively) aged 13 years were studied. The following angles of spine…

  13. Spine Shape in Sagittal and Frontal Planes in Short- and Tall-Statured Children Aged 13 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichota, Malgorzata

    2008-01-01

    Study aim: To assess spine curvatures, postural categories and scolioses in short and tall children aged 13 years. Material and methods: Short-statured (below Percentile 10) and tall-statured (above Percentile 90) boys (n = 13 and 18, respectively) and girls (n = 10 and 11, respectively) aged 13 years were studied. The following angles of spine…

  14. The etiology of short stature affects the clinical outcome of lower limb lengthening using external fixation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose Distraction osteogenesis (DO) has been used to gain height in short statured individuals. However, there have been no studies comparing the clinical outcome of limb lengthening based on the etiology of the short stature. We assessed whether different underlying diagnoses are associated with varied clinical outcomes in these patients. Methods We performed a systematic review of the literature pertaining to lower limb lengthening using external fixation for short stature. Clinical outcomes including amount of lengthening, healing index (HI), and complications based on the underlying diagnosis for the short stature were documented. Results 18 clinical studies were included, with 547 patients who underwent 1,581 lower limb segment lengthening procedures. Mean follow-up was 4.3 years. The average age at lengthening was less for individuals with achondroplasia/hypochondroplasia (A/H) (14.5 years) than for those with Turner’s syndrome (TS) (18.2 years) or with constitutional short stature (CSS) (21.7 years). Mean height gained was greater in patients with A/H (9.5 cm) than in those with TS (7.7 cm) or CSS (6.1 cm) group. The HI was better in A/H (30.8 days/cm) and CSS (32 days/cm) than in TS (45.1 days/cm). The reported complication rate per segment was lower for A/H (0.68) and TS (0.71) than for CSS (1.06). Interpretation Patients with A/H tolerated larger amounts of lengthening with fewer complications than those with other diagnoses. PMID:24650027

  15. Short stature--the role of intelligence in psychosocial adjustment.

    PubMed Central

    Gilmour, J; Skuse, D

    1996-01-01

    Short children are often described as having psychosocial problems. These reports may be inaccurate as former studies have relied largely on parental report. Psychosocial functioning of short children was assessed with the aim of using them and their peers as informants. Twenty two short (mean (SD) height -2.53 (0.28) SD score) prepubertal children aged between 6 and 11 years were recruited from growth clinics. Comparison children were recruited from each case child's class at school. Cognitive and psychosocial functioning was assessed. Peer relationships were measured using sociometry. There were no significant group differences in terms of peer acceptance, self perception, and social competence. Although cases described themselves as receiving less social support from teachers, no differences were evident in other areas of social support. Little evidence was found to suggest clinic referred prepubertal short children are psychosocially maladjusted. Further analysis revealed cognitive ability was a better predictor than height for most aspects of behavioural and emotional adjustment. PMID:8813866

  16. MCM9 Mutations Are Associated with Ovarian Failure, Short Stature, and Chromosomal Instability

    PubMed Central

    Wood-Trageser, Michelle A.; Gurbuz, Fatih; Yatsenko, Svetlana A.; Jeffries, Elizabeth P.; Kotan, L. Damla; Surti, Urvashi; Ketterer, Deborah M.; Matic, Jelena; Chipkin, Jacqueline; Jiang, Huaiyang; Trakselis, Michael A.; Topaloglu, A. Kemal; Rajkovic, Aleksandar

    2014-01-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is genetically heterogeneous and manifests as hypergonadotropic hypogonadism either as part of a syndrome or in isolation. We studied two unrelated consanguineous families with daughters exhibiting primary amenorrhea, short stature, and a 46,XX karyotype. A combination of SNP arrays, comparative genomic hybridization arrays, and whole-exome sequencing analyses identified homozygous pathogenic variants in MCM9, a gene implicated in homologous recombination and repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. In one family, the MCM9 c.1732+2T>C variant alters a splice donor site, resulting in abnormal alternative splicing and truncated forms of MCM9 that are unable to be recruited to sites of DNA damage. In the second family, MCM9 c.394C>T (p.Arg132∗) results in a predicted loss of functional MCM9. Repair of chromosome breaks was impaired in lymphocytes from affected, but not unaffected, females in both families, consistent with MCM9 function in homologous recombination. Autosomal-recessive variants in MCM9 cause a genomic-instability syndrome associated with hypergonadotropic hypogonadism and short stature. Preferential sensitivity of germline meiosis to MCM9 functional deficiency and compromised DNA repair in the somatic component most likely account for the ovarian failure and short stature. PMID:25480036

  17. Can antigliadin antibody detect symptomless coeliac disease in children with short stature?

    PubMed

    Cacciari, E; Salardi, S; Volta, U; Biasco, G; Lazzari, R; Corazza, G R; Feliciani, M; Cicognani, A; Partesotti, S; Azzaroni, D

    Duodenal biopsy and tests for antigliadin antibodies were done in 108 children with short stature unassociated with gastrointestinal symptoms. Other investigations for causes of growth failure were also carried out. In 88 patients, the cause of short stature could not be determined (group I). In 9 patients (8.3%) biopsy showed total villous atrophy, indicating probable coeliac disease (group II), while 7 patients had mild partial villous atrophy (group III). 4 patients (3.7%) had complete growth hormone deficiency. Antigliadin antibodies detected by immunofluorescence (IFL-AGA) were positive in 8 of the 9 group II patients. Symptomless coeliac disease is therefore a commoner cause of short stature than is hypopituitarism; by use of the IFL-AGA test it is possible to select patients for biopsy, thereby identifying most of the coeliac patients. If duodenal biopsies had been limited to IFL-AGA positive patients, 18 biopsies would have been carried out and coeliac disease would have been diagnosed in 8 of the 9 patients. PMID:2861409

  18. Efficacy of Short-Term Growth Hormone Treatment in Prepubertal Children with Idiopathic Short Stature

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ho-Seong; Yang, Sei Won; Yoo, Han-Wook; Suh, Byung Kyu; Ko, Cheol Woo; Chung, Woo Yeong; Lee, Kee Hyoung; Hwang, Jin Soon; Ji, Hyi-Jeong; Ahn, Hyunji

    2014-01-01

    Purpose It has been reported that daily recombinant human growth hormone (GH) treatment showed beneficial effects on growth in prepubertal children with idiopathic short stature (ISS). The present study aimed to validate the GH (Eutropin®) effect on growth promotion and safety after short-term GH treatment. Materials and Methods This study was an open-label, multicenter, interventional study conducted at nine university hospitals in Korea between 2008 and 2009. Thirty six prepubertal children with ISS were enrolled in this study to receive 6-month GH treatment. Yearly growth rate, height standard deviation score (SDS), and adverse events were investigated during treatment. Results After 26 weeks of GH treatment, the height velocity significantly increased by 6.36±3.36 cm/year (p<0.001). The lower end of one-sided 95% confidence interval was 5.22 cm/year, far greater than the predefined effect size. The gain in height SDS at week 26 was 0.57±0.27 (p<0.0001). Bone age significantly increased after GH treatment, however, bone maturation rate (bone age for chronological age) showed limited advancement. This 26-week GH treatment was effective in increasing serum levels of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I and IGF binding protein (IGFBP)-3 from baseline (p<0.0001). Eutropin was well tolerated and there were no withdrawals due to adverse events. No clinically significant changes in laboratory values were observed. Conclusion This 6-month daily GH treatment in children with ISS demonstrated increased height velocity, improved height SDS, and increased IGF-I and IGFBP-3 levels with a favorable safety profile. PMID:24339287

  19. New recessive truncating mutation in LTBP3 in a family with oligodontia, short stature, and mitral valve prolapse.

    PubMed

    Dugan, Sarah L; Temme, Renee T; Olson, Rebecca A; Mikhailov, Anna; Law, Rosalind; Mahmood, Huda; Noor, Abdul; Vincent, John B

    2015-06-01

    Latent TGFB-binding protein 3 (LTBP3) is known to increase bio-availability of TGFB. A homozygous mutation in this gene has previously been associated with oligodontia and short stature in a single family. We report on two sisters with homozygous truncating mutations in LTBP3. In addition to oligodontia and short stature, both sisters have mitral valve prolapse, suggesting a link between truncating LTBP3 mutations and mitral valve disease mediated through the TGFB pathway. PMID:25899461

  20. Growth failure starts from early infancy in children with short stature at age 6

    PubMed Central

    Noda, Masahiro; Sato, Naoko; Tanaka, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We compared the growth of 183 children with short stature (? 2SD) and 73 children of normal height at age six who were visiting the Tanaka Growth Clinic. We classified these short children as suffering from either idiopathic short stature (ISS, n = 119), GH deficiency (GHD, n = 33) or small-for-gestational-age short stature (SGASS, n = 31) on the basis of subsequent test results and other factors. We also conducted a retrospective study of changes in their height, wt and nutritional intake over time. The mean changes in height SD score from birth to 6 yr were –0.24 SD in normal height children with a normal birth length and +2.27 SD in normal height children with a low birth length. In short children, these changes were –1.93 SD for children with ISS, –2.41 SD for those with GHD and +0.58 for those with SGASS. The mean changes from birth to 6 mo were –0.84 SD, ?1.03 SD and +0.38 SD in children with ISS, GHD and SGASS, respectively. The mean change in height SD score from birth to age 1 yr was –1.07 SD, –1.44 SD and +0.35 SD, respectively. The decrease in height SD score from birth to 6 mo accounted for 43.5% of the decrease in height SD score from birth to 6 yr in children with ISS and it accounted for 42.6% of the decrease in children with GHD. Only 19% of short children bottle-fed well, and 53% fed poorly, as opposed to 56% and 16% of normal height children who fed well and poorly, respectively. Post weaning, only 22% of short children ate well, and 56% fed poorly, as opposed to 53% and 17% of normal height children who fed well and poorly, respectively. These findings demonstrated that growth failure started from early infancy in ISS and GHD children. It was suggested that poor nutritional intake in infancy and early childhood was a partial cause of short stature at age 6. PMID:25678754

  1. Height-reducing variants and selection for short stature in Sardinia.

    PubMed

    Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Sidore, Carlo; Chiang, Charleston W K; Sanna, Serena; Mulas, Antonella; Steri, Maristella; Busonero, Fabio; Marcus, Joseph H; Marongiu, Michele; Maschio, Andrea; Del Vecchyo, Diego Ortega; Floris, Matteo; Meloni, Antonella; Delitala, Alessandro; Concas, Maria Pina; Murgia, Federico; Biino, Ginevra; Vaccargiu, Simona; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Lohmueller, Kirk E; Timpson, Nicholas J; Soranzo, Nicole; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Dedoussis, George; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Uzzau, Sergio; Jones, Chris; Lyons, Robert; Angius, Andrea; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Novembre, John; Schlessinger, David; Cucca, Francesco

    2015-11-01

    We report sequencing-based whole-genome association analyses to evaluate the impact of rare and founder variants on stature in 6,307 individuals on the island of Sardinia. We identify two variants with large effects. One variant, which introduces a stop codon in the GHR gene, is relatively frequent in Sardinia (0.87% versus <0.01% elsewhere) and in the homozygous state causes Laron syndrome involving short stature. We find that this variant reduces height in heterozygotes by an average of 4.2 cm (-0.64 s.d.). The other variant, in the imprinted KCNQ1 gene (minor allele frequency (MAF) = 7.7% in Sardinia versus <1% elsewhere) reduces height by an average of 1.83 cm (-0.31 s.d.) when maternally inherited. Additionally, polygenic scores indicate that known height-decreasing alleles are at systematically higher frequencies in Sardinians than would be expected by genetic drift. The findings are consistent with selection for shorter stature in Sardinia and a suggestive human example of the proposed 'island effect' reducing the size of large mammals. PMID:26366551

  2. Mutations in XRCC4 cause primary microcephaly, short stature and increased genomic instability.

    PubMed

    Rosin, Nadine; Elcioglu, Nursel H; Beleggia, Filippo; Isgüven, Pinar; Altmüller, Janine; Thiele, Holger; Steindl, Katharina; Joset, Pascal; Rauch, Anita; Nürnberg, Peter; Wollnik, Bernd; Yigit, Gökhan

    2015-07-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are highly toxic lesions, which, if not properly repaired, can give rise to genomic instability. Non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), a well-orchestrated, multistep process involving numerous proteins essential for cell viability, represents one major pathway to repair DSBs in mammalian cells, and mutations in different NHEJ components have been described in microcephalic syndromes associated, e.g. with short stature, facial dysmorphism and immune dysfunction. By using whole-exome sequencing, we now identified in three affected brothers of a consanguineous Turkish family a homozygous mutation, c.482G>A, in the XRCC4 gene encoding a crucial component of the NHEJ pathway. Moreover, we found one additional patient of Swiss origin carrying the compound heterozygous mutations c.25delG (p.His9Thrfs*8) and c.823C>T (p.Arg275*) in XRCC4. The clinical phenotype presented in these patients was characterized by severe microcephaly, facial dysmorphism and short stature, but they did not show a recognizable immunological phenotype. We showed that the XRCC4 c.482G>A mutation, which affects the last nucleotide of exon 4, induces defective splicing of XRCC4 pre-mRNA mainly resulting in premature protein truncation and most likely loss of XRCC4 function. Moreover, we observed on cellular level that XRCC4 deficiency leads to hypersensitivity to DSB-inducing agents and defective DSB repair, which results in increased cell death after exposure to genotoxic agents. Taken together, our data provide evidence that autosomal recessive mutations in XRCC4 induce increased genomic instability and cause a NHEJ-related syndrome defined by facial dysmorphism, primary microcephaly and short stature. PMID:25839420

  3. [Moderated form of Morquio syndrome: an unknown cause of short stature (three case reports)].

    PubMed

    Oulahiane, A; Elhaddad, N; Ouleghzal, H; Gaouzi, A

    2011-09-01

    Morquio disease is a rare genetic disorder characterized by the accumulation of keratan sulfate in tissues. We distinguish two forms according to the deficient enzyme: type A, with a poor prognosis, and type B. Its management is essentially symptomatic. Enzyme replacement therapy and gene therapy are still being evaluated. We report observations of three patients with Morquio disease type A in its moderate form. This article reports the latest facts in both Morquio disease diagnosis and treatment, emphasizing the minor forms usually presented by short stature that should bring out this disorder. PMID:21820286

  4. Spinal anesthesia using Taylor's approach helps avoid general anesthesia in short stature asthmatic patient.

    PubMed

    Patil, Amarjeet Dnyandeo; Bapat, Manasi; Patil, Sunita A; Gogna, Roshan Lal

    2015-01-01

    The case history of a 35-year-old female patient with short stature is presented. She was posted for rectopexy in view of rectal prolapse. She was a known case of bronchial asthma. She had crowding of intervertebral spaces, which made administration of spinal anesthesia via the normal route very difficult. Taylor's approach for administration of the same was tried and proved successful, thus saving the patient from receiving general anesthesia in the presence of bronchial asthma, for a perineal surgery. The possible cause for the difficulty in administration of spinal anesthesia and the Taylor's approach are discussed, and reports of similar cases reviewed. PMID:26543472

  5. RBBP8 syndrome with microcephaly, intellectual disability, short stature and brachydactyly.

    PubMed

    Mumtaz, Sara; Y?ld?z, Esra; Jabeen, Saliha; Khan, Amjad; Tolun, Asl?han; Malik, Sajid

    2015-12-01

    Primary microcephaly is clinically variable and genetically heterogeneous. Four phenotypically distinct types of autosomal recessive microcephaly syndromes are due to different RBBP8 mutations. We report on a consanguineous Pakistani family with homozygous RBBP8 mutation c.1808_1809delTA (p.Ile603Lysfs*7) manifesting microcephaly and a distinct combination of skeletal, limb and ectodermal defects, mild intellectual disability, minor facial anomalies, anonychia, disproportionate short stature and brachydactyly, and additionally talipes in one patient. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26333564

  6. The Meier-Gorlin syndrome, or ear-patella-short stature syndrome, in sibs.

    PubMed

    Loeys, B L; Lemmerling, M M; Van Mol, C E; Leroy, J G

    1999-05-01

    The Meier-Gorlin syndrome, first described by Meier and Rothschild [1959: Helv Paediatr Acta 14:213-216] and further delineated by Gorlin et al. [1975: A Selected Miscellany, p 39-50], is characterized by short stature, slender body build, craniofacial anomalies, microtia, delayed skeletal development, hypogonadism, and absence of the patellae. It has also been called the ear-patella-short stature syndrome [Boles et al., 1994: Clin Dysmorphol 3:207-214]. We report on two brothers with Meier-Gorlin syndrome, the younger of whom was more severely affected. Both patients had severe deafness and congenital labyrinthine anomalies, which have not previously been described as features of this syndrome. The neuromotor and mental development of these patients was adversely affected by late diagnosis, deafness, and their sociocultural environment, but their cognitive ability fell within the range observed in other Meier-Gorlin patients. Neuroradiographic imaging and functional inner ear investigations are recommended in the diagnostic workup of this rather specific, probably autosomal recessive mental retardation syndrome with multiple congenital anomalies. PMID:10213048

  7. Potential Misclassification of Blood Pressure Status in Children and Adolescents With Short or Tall Stature.

    PubMed

    Parker, Emily D; Sinaiko, Alan R; O'Connor, Patrick J; Ekstrom, Heidi; Appana, Deepika; Amundson, Jerry; Kharbanda, Elyse Olshen

    2016-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) is measured in percentiles that are adjusted for sex, age, and height percentile in children and adolescents. Standard tables for the conversion of BP percentiles do not present exact BP percentile cutoffs for extremes in stature, either short (<5th percentile) or tall (>95th percentile). An algorithm can be used to calculate exact BP percentiles across a range of height z scores. We compared values from standard BP tables with exact calculations of BP percentiles to see which were better at identifying hypertension in more than 5,000 children with either short or tall stature. Study subjects were 3-17-year-old patients within HealthPartners Medical Group, an integrated health care delivery system in Minnesota, at any time between 2007 and 2012. Approximately half of the subjects who met the criteria for hypertension using exact calculation would be misclassified as normal using available thresholds in the published BP tables instead of the recommended algorithm, which was not included in the tables. PMID:26646294

  8. Congenital disorder of fucosylation type 2c (LADII) presenting with short stature and developmental delay with minimal adhesion defect

    PubMed Central

    Dauber, Andrew; Ercan, Altan; Lee, Jack; James, Philip; Jacobs, Pieter P.; Ashline, David J.; Wang, Sophie R.; Miller, Timothy; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Nigrovic, Peter A.; Sackstein, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Leukocyte adhesion deficiency type II is a hereditary disorder of neutrophil migration caused by mutations in the guanosine diphosphate-fucose transporter gene (SLC35C1). In these patients, inability to generate key fucosylated molecules including sialyl Lewis X leads to leukocytosis and recurrent infections, in addition to short stature and developmental delay. We report two brothers with short stature and developmental delay who are compound heterozygotes for novel mutations in SLC35C1 resulting in partial in vivo defects in fucosylation. Specifically, plasma glycoproteins including immunoglobulin G demonstrated marked changes in glycoform distribution. While neutrophil rolling on endothelial selectins was partially impeded, residual adhesion proved sufficient to avoid leukocytosis or recurrent infection. These findings demonstrate a surprising degree of immune redundancy in the face of substantial alterations in adhesion molecule expression, and show that short stature and developmental delay may be the sole presenting signs in this disorder. PMID:24403049

  9. Growth hormone significantly increases the adult height of children with idiopathic short stature: comparison of subgroups and benefit

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Children with Idiopathic Short Stature do not attain a normal adult height. The improvement of adult height with treatment with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH), at doses of 0.16 to 0.28 mg/kg/week is modest, usually less that 4 cm, and they remain short as adults. The benefit obtained seems dose dependent and benefits of 7.0 to 8.0 cm have been reported with higher doses of 0.32 to 0.4 mg/kg/week, but the number of studies is limited. The topic has remained controversial. Objective The objective was to conduct a retrospective analysis of our experience with 123 children with ISS treated with 0.32 ± 0.03 mg/kg/week of rhGH, with the aim of comparing the different subgroups of non-familial short stature, familial short stature, normal puberty, and delayed puberty and to assess the benefit by comparison with 305 untreated historical controls, from nine different randomized and nonrandomized controlled studies. Results Eighty eight of our children (68 males and 20 females) attained an adult height or near adult height of -0.71 SDS (0.74 SD) (95% CI, -0.87 to -0.55) with a benefit over untreated controls of 9.5 cm (7.4 to 11.6 cm) for males and 8.6 cm (6.7 to 10.5 cm) for females. In the analysis of the subgroups, the adult height and adult height gain of children with non-familial short stature were significantly higher than of familial short stature. No difference was found in the cohorts with normal or delayed puberty in any of the subgroups, except between the non-familial short stature and familial short stature puberty cohorts. This has implications for the interpretation of the benefit of treatment in studies where the number of children with familial short stature in the controls or treated subjects is not known. The treatment was safe. There were no significant adverse events. The IGF-1 values were essentially within the levels expected for the stages of puberty. Conclusion Our experience was quite positive with normalization of the heights and growth of the children during childhood and the attainment of normal adult heights, the main two aims of treatment. PMID:25075207

  10. Exploring the spectrum of 3-M syndrome, a primordial short stature disorder of disrupted ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Peter E; Hanson, Dan; Magee, Lucia; Murray, Philip G; Saunders, Emma; Abu-Amero, Sayeda N; Moore, Gudrun E; Black, Graeme C M

    2012-09-01

    3-M syndrome is an autosomal recessive primordial growth disorder characterized by small birth size and post-natal growth restriction associated with a spectrum of minor anomalies (including a triangular-shaped face, flat cheeks, full lips, short chest and prominent fleshy heels). Unlike many other primordial short stature syndromes, intelligence is normal and there is no other major system involvement, indicating that 3-M is predominantly a growth-related condition. From an endocrine perspective, serum GH levels are usually normal and IGF-I normal or low, while growth response to rhGH therapy is variable but typically poor. All these features suggest a degree of resistance in the GH-IGF axis. To date, mutations in three genes CUL7, OBSL1 and CCDC8 have been shown to cause 3-M. CUL7 acts an ubiquitin ligase and is known to interact with p53, cyclin D-1 and the growth factor signalling molecule IRS-1, the link with the latter may contribute to the GH-IGF resistance. OBSL1 is a putative cytoskeletal adaptor that interacts with and stabilizes CUL7. CCDC8 is the newest member of the pathway and interacts with OBSL1 and, like CUL7, associates with p53, acting as a co-factor in p53-medicated apoptosis. 3-M patients without a mutation have also been identified, indicating the involvement of additional genes in the pathway. Potentially damaging sequence variants in CUL7 and OBSL1 have been identified in idiopathic short stature (ISS), including those born small with failure of catch-up growth, signifying that the 3-M pathway could play a wider role in disordered growth. PMID:22624670

  11. Differences in physical characteristics, perinatal histories, and social backgrounds between children with growth hormone deficiency and constitutional short stature.

    PubMed Central

    Vimpani, G V; Vimpani, A F; Pocock, S J; Farquhar, J W

    1981-01-01

    Four hundred and forty-nine children with heights below -2.5 SD were identified by screening for height a total population of 48221 in three Scottish cities. Children participating in the study could be classified into 5 groups: severe growth hormone deficiency (n = 13), partial growth hormone deficiency (n = 25), low birthweight short stature (n = 34), constitutional short stature (n = 178), and short stature associated with some underlying disease (n = 106). Children with growth hormone deficiency tended to be shorter, were more likely to be obese, were growing more slowly, more often were the products of an abnormal pregnancy, and were less socially disadvantaged than constitutionally short children. Their parents were also more likely to have sought medical advice about the short stature. These findings have important implications for improved case-finding of children suffering from growth-hormone deficiency, who in this study accounted for about 10% of all short but otherwise normal children who came from non-disadvantaged communities. PMID:7199274

  12. The variability of responses to growth hormone therapy in children with short stature

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Martin O.; Bang, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is widely prescribed for children with short stature across a range of growth disorders. We describe the variability of responses seen in conditions approved for GH therapy. Although responses in different growth disorders are satisfactory, evidence is increasing for an unacceptably high rate of poor or unsatisfactory response (i.e., not leading to significant catch-up growth) in terms of change in height standard deviation score and height velocity. Consequently, there is a need to define a poor response and to prevent or correct it by optimizing treatment regimens. This review discusses the optimal investigation of the child who is a candidate for GH therapy so that a diagnosis-based guide to therapy and dosage can be made. The relevant parameters in the evaluation of growth response are described together with the definitions of a poor response. PMID:23565373

  13. Growing up with idiopathic short stature: psychosocial development and hormone treatment; a critical review

    PubMed Central

    Balen, H Visser?van; Sinnema, G; Geenen, R

    2006-01-01

    To facilitate decisions on interventions in medically referred children with idiopathic short stature, the research on psychosocial functioning of these children, possible risk and protective factors influencing adaptation, and effects of hormone treatment were reviewed. Parents ranked the behaviour of their children on average between normal and below normal. The magnitude of these deviations varied from small to large. Little is known about the children's self?perceived psychosocial functioning. Some risk factors were found: being teased, being juvenilised, being a boy, having a younger but taller sibling, low intelligence, and low socioeconomic status. There have been few studies on the impact of protective factors including temperament, coping strategies, and social support. On average, hormone treatment did not improve psychosocial functioning. The research shows the advantages and disadvantages of hormone treatment that must be considered when choosing a suitable intervention. It is suggested that psychosocial adjustment can be improved by focusing on factors other than height alone. PMID:16632673

  14. Growth Hormone Responses to Provocative Tests in Children with Short Stature

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Noorisaem; Oh, Ka Young; Yang, Eun Mi

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) is defined as a serum peak GH concentration <10 ng/mL with provocation as tested by a combination of at least two separate tests. The aim of this study was to compare two standard tests, insulin and levodopa (L-dopa), with a primary focus on specificity and accuracy. Clinical data were collected retrospectively from a review of 120 children who visited the pediatric endocrine clinic at Chonnam National University Hospital for the evaluation of short stature between January 2006 and April 2014. Subjects underwent GH provocation tests with insulin and L-dopa. Blood samples were obtained at 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min after administration, and GH levels were measured. In the insulin test, serial glucose levels were also checked, closely monitoring hypoglycemia. A total of 83 children (69.2%) were diagnosed with GHD and 37 children (30.8%) were diagnosed with idiopathic short stature (ISS). Peak GH levels were achieved an average of 45 min after the administration of insulin and L-dopa for both groups. The specificity and accuracy were 78.4% and 93.6% for the insulin test and 29.7% and 79.2% for L-dopa test, respectively. In the ISS group, the cumulative frequency of a GH cutoff value of >10 ng/mL at 120 min was 75.6% after insulin stimulation compared with 35.1% after L-dopa stimulation. Considering these results, we recommend performing the insulin test first to exclude ISS and then the L-dopa test for the diagnosis of GHD. This way, ISS patients are diagnosed after a single test, thus reducing hospital days and the burden of undergoing two serial tests. PMID:25914878

  15. The role of GHR and IGF1 genes in the genetic determination of African pygmies' short stature

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Noémie SA; Verdu, Paul; Georges, Myriam; Duquesnoy, Philippe; Froment, Alain; Amselem, Serge; Le Bouc, Yves; Heyer, Evelyne

    2013-01-01

    African pygmies are at the lower extreme of human variation in adult stature and many evolutionary hypotheses have been proposed to explain this phenotype. We showed in a recent study that the difference in average stature of about 10?cm observed between contemporary pygmies and neighboring non-pygmies has a genetic component. Nevertheless, the genetic basis of African pygmies' short stature remains unknown. Using a candidate-gene approach, we show that intronic polymorphisms in GH receptor (GHR) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) genes present outlying values of the genetic distance between Baka pygmies and their non-pygmy Nzimé neighbors. We further show that GHR and IGF1 genes have experienced divergent natural selection pressures between pygmies and non-pygmies throughout evolution. In addition, these SNPs are associated with stature in a sample composed of 60 pygmies and 30 non-pygmies and this association remains significant when correcting for population structure for the GHR locus. We conclude that the GHR and IGF1 genes may have a role in African pygmies' short stature. The use of phenotypically contrasted populations is a promising strategy to identify new variants associated with complex traits in humans. PMID:23047741

  16. Severe scoliosis, torticollis and short stature in a woman with Wildervanck Syndrome (WS).

    PubMed

    Laban, N B; Tasic, V B; Danilovski, D; Polenakovic, M; Gucev, Z S

    2015-01-01

    (Full text is available at http://www.manu.edu.mk/prilozi). Wildervanck syndrome (WS) combines features of Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS), sixth nerve palsy, and deafness. This is a case of a 23 year old woman, diagnosed with KFS (a triad of short neck, low posterior hairline and restricted neck movements) at the age of 20 days. The manifestations of the WS in this patient are severe: she has torticollis, and an extremely severe scoliosis. In addition, she is short (-3 SD; parental target height + 0.8SD) and has mixed sensorineural and conductive deafness. She also has ptosis, strabismus and a high myopia. Radiologically, there are multiple coalitions of cervical vertebrae. Intelligence is unaffected (IQ 95), but deafness, strabismus and high myopia forced her early out of school. Karyotype is 46, XX. In brief, this is a patient with severe WS and additional anomalies. Short and/or reduced parental target height is a part of WS. Key words: Wildervanck syndrome, short stature, Duane retraction syndrome, Klippel Feil anomaly, deafness, torticollis, severe scoliosis. PMID:26076792

  17. Effects of growth hormone therapy on circadian osteocalcin rhythms in idiopathic short stature.

    PubMed

    Markowitz, M E; DiMartino-Nardi, J; Gasparini, F; Fishman, K; Rosen, J F; Saenger, P

    1989-08-01

    The effects of GH administration on the circadian osteocalcin (Oc) rhythm were determined in four prepubertal children with idiopathic short stature (height, less than 5th percentile; growth velocity, less than 50th percentile for age). Each child underwent 24-h sequential blood sampling on three occasions: immediately before the initiation of GH treatment, 6 months later, and at the end of 12 months of treatment. The growth rate increased more than 50% over baseline in three of the four children during at least one of the 6-month periods. Insulin-like growth factor-I levels increased during treatment in all of the children. Twenty-four-hour Oc levels increased on 7 of the 8 treatment days evaluated. When mean 24-h Oc patterns for each of the 3 study days were derived by averaging across individual subjects at each time point and then compared, we noted an upward shift in the entire pattern during treatment (t = 13.2 at P less than 0.001 and t = 5.9 at P less than 0.001 for 6 and 12 month comparisons vs. the pretreatment day, respectively). This was more easily appreciated after the data were smoothed using the method of running means. There was, in addition, a progressive improvement in the shape of the Oc pattern compared to a normative model derived from a study of healthy adult men. The correlation between the model and the pre-GH day was 0.46, that between the model and the 6 months of GH day was 0.77, and that between the model and the 12 months of GH day was 0.96. Cross-correlation analyses showed that the peak correlation between the 2 treatment days and the model occurred at zero lag. In contrast, the peak correlation between the pre-GH day and the model or the pre-GH day and either of the 2 treatment days occurred when the pre-GH series was lagged by 2-3 h. Thus, an additional finding is the synchronization of the Oc series that occurred during treatment. We conclude that GH treatment increases Oc concentrations in children with idiopathic short stature by affecting its circadian rhythm. This rise in Oc values may not necessarily reflect an increase in growth velocity. PMID:2787800

  18. The first Korean case of lysinuric protein intolerance: presented with short stature and increased somnolence.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jung Min; Shin, Choong Ho; Yang, Sei Won; Seong, Moon Woo; Park, Sung Sup; Song, Junghan

    2012-08-01

    Lysinuric protein intolerance (LPI) is a rare inherited metabolic disease, caused by defective transport of dibasic amino acids. Failure to thrive, hepatosplenomegaly, hematological abnormalities, and hyperammonemic crisis are major clinical features. However, there has been no reported Korean patient with LPI as of yet. We recently encountered a 3.7-yr-old Korean girl with LPI and the diagnosis was confirmed by amino acid analyses and the SLC7A7 gene analysis. Her initial chief complaint was short stature below the 3rd percentile and increased somnolence for several months. Hepatosplenomegaly was noted, as were anemia, leukopenia, elevated levels of ferritin and lactate dehydrogenase, and hyperammonemia. Lysine, arginine, and ornithine levels were low in plasma and high in urine. The patient was a homozygote with a splicing site mutation of IVS4+1G > A in the SLC7A7. With the implementation of a low protein diet, sodium benzoate, citrulline and L-carnitine supplementation, anemia, hyperferritinemia, and hyperammonemia were improved, and normal growth velocity was observed. PMID:22876067

  19. Treatment of short stature and growth hormone deficiency in children with somatotropin (rDNA origin)

    PubMed Central

    Hardin, Dana S

    2008-01-01

    Somatotropin (growth hormone, GH) of recombinant DNA origin has provided a readily available and safe drug that has greatly improved management of children and adolescents with GH deficiency (GHD) and other disorders of growth. In the US and Europe, regulatory agencies have given approval for the use of GH in children and adults who meet specific criteria. However, clinical and ethical controversies remain regarding the diagnosis of GHD, dosing of GH, duration of therapy and expected outcomes. Areas which also require consensus include management of pubertal patients, transitioning pediatric patients to adulthood, management of children with idiopathic short stature and the role of recombinant IGF-1 in treatment. Additionally, studies have demonstrated anabolic benefits of GH in children who have inflammatory-based underlying disease and efficacy of GH in overcoming growth delays in people treated chronically with corticosteroids. These areas are open for possible new uses of this drug. This review summarizes current indications for GH use in children and discusses areas of clinical debate and potential anabolic uses in chronic illness. PMID:19707446

  20. Common VDR polymorphisms and idiopathic short stature in children from northern Greece

    PubMed Central

    Emmanouilidou, E; Galli-Tsinopoulou, A; Kyrgios, I; Gbandi, E; Goulas, A

    2015-01-01

    Background: A Vitamin D Receptor gene (VDR) polymorphism, rs10735810 (Fok1), has been associated in the past with idiopathic short stature (ISS) in a linkage study. We have investigated the association of the same, as well as a different polymorphism in the same gene [rs731236 (Taq1)] with ISS, in an independent study in Greek children. Methods: The VDR rs10735810 (Fok1) and rs731236 (Taq1) polymorphisms were genotyped in a group of ISS children (n= 47) and an age and sex-matched group of normal height children (n= 60) from northern Greece. Genotyping was accomplished through established PCR-RFLP methods. Results: An association trend of rs10735810 with ISS was observed, with the TT (ff) genotype being apparently underrepresented among ISS children compared to controls (p= 0.076; OR= 0.165, 95% CI= 0.025-1.094). Conclusions: The above results, together with recent evidence related to the functionality of the rs10735810 polymorphism, cannot exclude an involvement of VDR in the pathogenesis of ISS. Hippokratia 2015, 19 (1): 25-29. PMID:26435642

  1. Lactose Intolerance: Lack of Evidence for Short Stature or Vitamin D Deficiency in Prepubertal Children

    PubMed Central

    Setty-Shah, Nithya; Maranda, Louise; Candela, Ninfa; Fong, Jay; Dahod, Idris; Rogol, Alan D.; Nwosu, Benjamin Udoka

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background The health consequences of lactose intolerance (LI) are unclear. Aims To investigate the effects of LI on stature and vitamin D status. Hypotheses LI subjects will have similar heights and vitamin D status as controls. Subjects and Methods Prepubertal children of ages 3-12 years with LI (n=38, age 8.61 ± 3.08y, male/female 19/19) were compared to healthy, age- and gender-matched controls (n=49, age 7.95±2.64, male/female 28/21). Inclusion criteria: prepubertal status (boys: testicular volume <3cc; girls: Tanner 1 breasts), diagnosis of LI by hydrogen breath test, and no history of calcium or vitamin D supplementation. Vitamin D deficiency was defined as 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] <50 nmol/L. Gender-adjusted midparental target height (MPTH) z-score was calculated using NCHS data for 18 year-old adults. Data were expressed as mean ± SD. Results There was no significant difference in 25(OH)D between the LI and non-LI subjects (60.1±21.1, vs. 65.4 ± 26.1 nmol/L, p = 0.29). Upon stratification into normal weight (BMI <85th percentile) vs. overweight/obese (BMI ≥85th percentile), the normal weight controls had significantly higher 25(OH)D level than both the normal weight LI children (78.3 ± 32.6 vs. 62.9 ± 23.2, p = 0.025), and the overweight/obese LI children (78.3±32.6 vs. 55.3±16.5, p = 0.004). Secondly, there was no overall difference in height z-score between the LI children and controls. The normal weight LI patients had similar height as normal controls (-0.46 ± 0.89 vs. -0.71 ± 1.67, p = 0.53), while the overweight/obese LI group was taller than the normal weight controls (0.36 ± 1.41 vs. -0.71 ± 1.67, p = 0.049), and of similar height as the overweight/obese controls (0.36 ± 1.41 vs. 0.87 ± 1.45, p = 0.28). MPTH z-score was similar between the groups. Conclusion Short stature and vitamin D deficiency are not features of LI in prepubertal children. PMID:24205288

  2. Molecular Study of a Hoxa2 Gain-of-Function in Chondrogenesis: A Model of Idiopathic Proportionate Short Stature

    PubMed Central

    Deprez, Pierre M. L.; Nichane, Miloud G.; Lengelé, Benoît G.; Rezsöhazy, René; Nyssen-Behets, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    In a previous study using transgenic mice ectopically expressing Hoxa2 during chondrogenesis, we associated the animal phenotype to human idiopathic proportionate short stature. Our analysis showed that this overall size reduction was correlated with a negative influence of Hoxa2 at the first step of endochondral ossification. However, the molecular pathways leading to such phenotype are still unknown. Using protein immunodetection and histological techniques comparing transgenic mice to controls, we show here that the persistent expression of Hoxa2 in chondrogenic territories provokes a general down-regulation of the main factors controlling the differentiation cascade, such as Bapx1, Bmp7, Bmpr1a, Ihh, Msx1, Pax9, Sox6, Sox9 and Wnt5a. These data confirm the impairment of chondrogenic differentiation by Hoxa2 overexpression. They also show a selective effect of Hoxa2 on endochondral ossification processes since Gdf5 and Gdf10, and Bmp4 or PthrP were up-regulated and unmodified, respectively. Since Hoxa2 deregulation in mice induces a proportionate short stature phenotype mimicking human idiopathic conditions, our results give an insight into understanding proportionate short stature pathogenesis by highlighting molecular factors whose combined deregulation may be involved in such a disease. PMID:24129174

  3. Growth monitoring for short stature: update of a systematic review and economic model.

    PubMed Central

    Craig, D; Fayter, D; Stirk, L; Crott, R

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The aim of the project was to compare different screening rules and/or referral cut-offs for the identification of children with disorders of short stature. We undertook an update of a previous systematic review and economic model that addressed the same question. DATA SOURCES Sources searched included MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index, Social Science Citation Index, Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Science/Social Science & Humanities, Cochrane Library 2009 Issue 4, Office of Health Economics Health Economic Evaluations Database, and the NHS Economic Evaluation Database. REVIEW METHODS The review was conducted as an update to our previous assessment in 2007. Searching covered January 2005 to November 2009 with no language or publication restrictions. Two reviewers examined full papers for relevance. Data extraction was conducted by one reviewer and independently checked by a second. In addition, searches were conducted to identify quality of life or utility papers to inform the economic evaluation. We developed a probabilistic decision analytic model to estimate the costs and quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gains from the perspective of the UK NHS and personal social services. The model was a cohort model, assuming a homogeneous population of 5-year-olds at baseline. RESULTS One study was included in the systematic review. The study was not UK based, but had been identified in the brief as relevant to the UK setting. The study's authors examined the performance of a number of rules to determine sensitivity and specificity of referral for short stature in four patient groups and three reference groups in the Netherlands. They derived an algorithm for referral based on the optimal rules. No new studies were located that provided appropriate quality of life or utilities data for the economic model. The model was based on the previous assessment which was updated to better reflect current UK clinical practice. We compared two alternative monitoring strategies, one of which was based on the study identified in our systematic review (Grote strategy); the other was based on UK consensus (UK strategy). We identified that the UK strategy was the least effective and least costly, with a mean gain of 0.001 QALYs at a mean cost of £21. The Grote strategy was both more expensive and more effective, with a mean cost of £68 and a mean QALY gain of 0.042. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was £1144 per QALY gained. CONCLUSIONS This assessment contributes further knowledge, but does not provide definitive answers on how to deliver growth monitoring. In particular, we were unable to ascertain current practice in the UK for growth screening. Further, we were unable to evaluate through the use of identified studies and modelling an optimal referral cut-off and age at which to screen. We identified a number of research questions that would further inform referral strategies, which in summary would involve further primary and secondary data collection. FUNDING The National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment programme. PMID:21356163

  4. Massive pericardial effusion and short stature caused by autoimmune hypothyroidism in a 9-year-old girl

    PubMed Central

    Gyon, Yun Hee

    2015-01-01

    A 9-year-, 11-month-old girl was brought to the Emergency Department for sudden dyspnea caused by massive pericardial effusion. In addition to relative bradycardia despite impending cardiac tamponade, short stature, overweight, and hypercholesterolemia were clues for suspected hypothyroidism. During thyroxine supplementation, catch-up growth was incomplete by rapid skeletal maturation. The use of short-term growth hormone showed increased growth velocity. In conclusion, primary hypothyroidism should be included in the etiologic evaluation of pericardial effusion, especially when it is associated with relative bradycardia. Additional growth promoting therapy should be considered for incomplete catch-up growth in prolonged hypothyroidism during thyroxine supplementation. PMID:26191514

  5. Hypotonia: Questions and Comments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Stanley D.,Comp.

    1979-01-01

    The article excerpts letters of eight parents whose children have cerebral hypotonia, an early symptom of brain damage characterized by a defective muscular condition. The problems which accompany hypotonia (such as feeding problems, retardation, respiratory distress, and seizures) are touched on. (SBH)

  6. [Generalized neonatal hypotonia].

    PubMed

    Alfonso, I; Papazian, O; Valencia, P

    Generalized neonatal hypotonia implies a pathologically decreased postural tone involving at least the extremities, trunk and neck occurring during the first month of life. The gestational age of the neonate, the behavioral state of the neonate at the time of the examination, and the possibility of pseudoparalysis (due to generalized pain) should be considered when evaluating a neonate for the possibility of generalized hypotonia. The evaluation of neonates with hypotonia should be guided by the characteristic of the muscular dynamic reflexes, primitive reflexes, the relation between the degree of hypotonia and weakness and findings during several maneuvers (traction, ventral and horizontal suspension, plantar response and response to forward displacement from a lying position). Possible sites of pathology in neonates with hypotonia include: (1) brain, (2) brain stem, (3) cervical spine, (4) cerebellum, (5) lower motor neurons in the brain stem and spine; (6) nerve, (7) myoneural junction, and (8) muscles. PMID:12938055

  7. The short die young: the interrelationship between stature and longevity-evidence from skeletal remains.

    PubMed

    Kemkes-Grottenthaler, Ariane

    2005-10-01

    It has long been observed that tall people display longer life spans. The current data were employed to verify this association within the bioarchaeological context. To this end, stature and its association with age-at-death were analyzed in a pooled sample of 2,923 skeletons. Height was estimated from proxy indicators based on the maximum length of the humerus, radius, femur, and tibia. Stature estimation followed the procedure outlined by Pearson ([1899] Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. [A] 192:169-244), incorporating minor modifications by Rösing ([ 1988] Handbuch der vergleichenden Biologie des Menschen; Stuttgart: Gustave Fischer, p 586-600). Individual age estimates were classified into three mutually exclusive age groups: 20-39 years (591 males, 667 females), 40-59 years (876 males, 499 females), and 60+ years (171 males, 119 females). The results document that both sexes display a statistically significant inverse relationship between adult height and age-at-death (males, P < 0.01; females, P < 0.05). Taking an epidemiological approach, the risk model implies that the estimated odds of survival beyond age 40 improve by approximately 16% for 1 SD in bone length. However, not all bones may be equally adept at displaying the association. The radius failed to support the positive association between stature and longevity, which may be indicative of a relatively greater contribution of environmental factor to radius length. Overall, the relationship between body height and longevity is not causal but coincidental: mitigated by diverse environmental factors such as nutrition, socioeconomic stressors, and disease load. PMID:15861421

  8. Duplications upstream and downstream of SHOX identified as novel causes of Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis or idiopathic short stature.

    PubMed

    Bunyan, David J; Baffico, Maria; Capone, Lucia; Vannelli, Silvia; Iughetti, Lorenzo; Schmitt, Sébastien; Taylor, Emma-Jane; Herridge, Adam A; Shears, Deborah; Forabosco, Antonino; Coviello, Domenico A

    2016-04-01

    Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis is a pseudoautosomal dominantly-inherited skeletal dysplasia ascribed to haploinsufficiency of the SHOX gene caused by deletions, point mutations, or partial duplications of the gene, or to heterozygous deletions upstream or downstream of the intact SHOX gene involving conserved non-coding cis-regulatory DNA elements that show enhancer activity. Recently, two SHOX conserved non-coding element duplications, one upstream and one downstream, were reported in patients referred with idiopathic short stature. To further evaluate the role of these duplications in SHOX-related disorders, we describe seven patients (five with Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis and two with short stature) all of whom have duplications of part of the upstream or downstream conserved non-coding element regions, identified by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. In addition, we show data from 32 patients with an apparently identical downstream duplication that includes a proposed putative regulatory element (identified by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification or array comparative genome hybridization), which results in a variable phenotype from normal to mild Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis. These additional data provide further evidence that duplications of upstream and downstream long range cis-regulatory DNA elements can result in a SHOX-related phenotype. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26698168

  9. How many entities exist for the spectrum of disorders associated with brachydactyly, syndactyly, short stature, microcephaly, and intellectual disability?

    PubMed

    Ravel, Aimé; Chouery, Eliane; Stora, Samantha; Jalkh, Nadine; Villard, Laurent; Temtamy, Samia; Mégarbané, André

    2011-04-01

    We describe a French young man with digital anomalies consisting of brachydactyly, F1-5 bilateral camptodactyly, interdigital webbing, F5 bilateral radial clinodactyly, and partial syndactyly of some fingers and toes. He had psychomotor retardation, short stature, umbilical hernia, a secundum atrial septal defect, seizures, hearing impairment, and dysmorphic features consisting of microcephaly, a prominent metopic ridge, upslanting palpebral fissures, synophrys, enophthalmia, large ears, a bulbous nose, a high palate, a smooth and short philtrum, a low hanging columella, a thin upper vermillion, an everted lower lip, prognathism, pectum excavatum, and supernumerary nipples. Osteotendinous reflexes were brisk. Mild nystagmus, myopia, and astigmatia were also noted. Total body X-rays showed short terminal phalanges of the hands, short middle phalanges of the index and little fingers, clinodactyly of the little fingers, short and fused proximal 4th and 5th metacarpals of the right hand, a short 5th metacarpal of the left hand, a fused left lunate-triquetrum, fused capitate-hamates, a prominent mandibula, and partial sacral agenesis. A thin posterior corpus callosum was apparent by MRI. Differential diagnoses for mainly the Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome, the Tsukahara syndrome, the Filippi syndrome, the Feingold syndrome, and the Tonoki syndrome are discussed, and the possibility that we might be reporting a novel entity is raised. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21416592

  10. [Schimke's immuno-osseous dysplasia as an explanation for the rare combination of disproportionately short stature and the nephrotic syndrome].

    PubMed

    de Jong, M; van Wijk, J A E; van der Hulst, J P C M; Ludwig, M; Bökenkamp, A

    2005-09-24

    A 10-year-old Turkish boy with consanguineous parents was presented with a disproportionately short stature and a nephrotic syndrome. The mild form of Schimke's immuno-osseous dysplasia was diagnosed as the common cause. This rare, autosomal recessive osteochondrodysplasia is characterised by spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, facial dysmorphism, T-cell immunodeficiency and progressive renal failure due to focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. In Schimke's immuno-osseous dysplasia, a severe early-onset form and a milder later-onset form can be distinguished on the basis of the clinical course. The patient was treated by fluid and salt restriction, enalapril and later also losartan, which led to a decrease in the proteinuria and an increase in serum albumin concentration. Two years later, the renal function was still normal. PMID:16223078

  11. A syndrome of microcephaly, short stature, polysyndactyly, and dental anomalies caused by a homozygous KATNB1 mutation.

    PubMed

    Yigit, Gökhan; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Bögershausen, Nina; Beleggia, Filippo; Möller-Hartmann, Claudia; Altmüller, Janine; Thiele, Holger; Nürnberg, Peter; Wollnik, Bernd

    2016-03-01

    Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous acceptor splice-site mutation in intron 6 of the KATNB1 gene in a patient from a consanguineous Turkish family who presented with congenital microcephaly, lissencephaly, short stature, polysyndactyly, and dental abnormalities. cDNA analysis revealed complete loss of the natural acceptor splice-site resulting either in the usage of an alternative, exonic acceptor splice-site inducing a frame-shift and premature protein truncation or, to a minor extent, in complete skipping of exon 7. Both effects most likely lead to complete loss of KATNB1 function. Homozygous and compound heterozygous mutations in KATNB1 have very recently been described as a cause of microcephaly with brain malformations and seizures. We extend the KATNB1 associated phenotype by describing a syndrome characterized by primordial dwarfism, lissencephaly, polysyndactyly, and dental anomalies, which is caused by a homozygous truncating KATNB1 mutation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26640080

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Short stature, hyperextensibility, hernia, ocular depression, Rieger anomaly, and teething ...

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Clinical summary Genetic Testing Registry - Repository of genetic test information (1 link) PubMed - Recent literature OMIM - Genetic disorder catalog What other names do people use for SHORT syndrome? growth retardation-Rieger anomaly lipodystrophy, ...

  13. A Missense Mutation in PPP1R15B Causes a Syndrome Including Diabetes, Short Stature, and Microcephaly.

    PubMed

    Abdulkarim, Baroj; Nicolino, Marc; Igoillo-Esteve, Mariana; Daures, Mathilde; Romero, Sophie; Philippi, Anne; Senée, Valérie; Lopes, Miguel; Cunha, Daniel A; Harding, Heather P; Derbois, Céline; Bendelac, Nathalie; Hattersley, Andrew T; Eizirik, Décio L; Ron, David; Cnop, Miriam; Julier, Cécile

    2015-11-01

    Dysregulated endoplasmic reticulum stress and phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2? (eIF2?) are associated with pancreatic ?-cell failure and diabetes. Here, we report the first homozygous mutation in the PPP1R15B gene (also known as constitutive repressor of eIF2? phosphorylation [CReP]) encoding the regulatory subunit of an eIF2?-specific phosphatase in two siblings affected by a novel syndrome of diabetes of youth with short stature, intellectual disability, and microcephaly. The R658C mutation in PPP1R15B affects a conserved amino acid within the domain important for protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) binding. The R658C mutation decreases PP1 binding and eIF2? dephosphorylation and results in ?-cell apoptosis. Our findings support the concept that dysregulated eIF2? phosphorylation, whether decreased by mutation of the kinase (EIF2AK3) in Wolcott-Rallison syndrome or increased by mutation of the phosphatase (PPP1R15B), is deleterious to ?-cells and other secretory tissues, resulting in diabetes associated with multisystem abnormalities. PMID:26159176

  14. Zip1, Zip2, and Zip8 mRNA expressions were associated with growth hormone level during the growth hormone provocation test in children with short stature.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ping; Wang, Shifu; Jiang, Yali; Tao, Yanting; Tian, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Kai; Wan, Haiyan; Zhang, Lehai; Zhang, Lianying

    2013-10-01

    Short stature of children is affected by multiple factors. One of them is growth hormone (GH) deficiency. Growth hormone therapy can increase the final height of children with growth hormone deficiency. Zinc is found to induce dimerization and to enhance the bioactivity of human GH. Two gene families have been identified involved in zinc homeostasis. Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that Zip1, Zip2, Zip6, and ZnT1 mRNA were associated with zinc level in established human breast cancer in nude mice model; Zip8 was significantly lower in zinc-deficient Wistar rats in kidney. In this study, five zinc transporters: Zip1, Zip2, Zip6, Zip8, and ZnT1 were chosen. We aimed to investigate the mRNA expression of zinc transporters and to explore the relationship between zinc transporters and growth hormone in short stature children. Growth hormone provocation test is used to confirm the diagnosis of growth hormone deficiency. Six short children for the test were enrolled. At the same time, 15 sex- and age-matched normal children were enrolled as control. The expression levels of zinc transporters in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Zip1 and Zip2 mRNA expression positively correlated with growth hormone level (r = 0.5133, P = 0.0371; r = 0.6719, P = 0.0032); Zip8 mRNA expression negatively correlated with growth hormone level (r = -0.5264, P = 0.0285) during the test in short stature children. The average expression level of Zip2 was significantly higher and Zip6, Zip8 mRNA levels were significantly lower in short stature children than in health controls at 0 min (P < 0.05, P < 0.05). PMID:23921484

  15. Mental retardation/shortness of stature/multiple minor anomalies syndrome associated with insertion of 3q material into 18p

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Attia, H.M.; Sedaghatian, M.R.

    1995-03-13

    This is a case report of a 16-year-old Arab girl with mental subnormality, shortness of stature and multiple minor phenotypic anomalies. She is obese with normal secondary sexual characteristics, and has a speech deficit. Cytogenetic studies showed a 46,XX,dir ins (18;3)(p11.1;q13.2{yields}q25). The chromosome arrangement appeared balanced. Her condition is not a recognizable specific syndrome; thus, it remained unclear as to whether her condition is attributable to disruption of 3q or 18p or both. Further cytogenetic analysis by molecular biologists is required to solve this problem. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Cleft Lip/Palate, Short Stature, and Developmental Delay in a Boy with a 5.6-Mb Interstitial Deletion Involving 10p15.3p14

    PubMed Central

    Gamba, Bruno F.; Rosenberg, Carla; Costa, Silvia; Richieri-Costa, Antonio; Ribeiro-Bicudo, Lucilene A.

    2015-01-01

    The chromosome interval 10p15.3p14 harbors about a dozen genes. This region has been implicated in a few well-known human phenotypes, namely HDR syndrome (hypoparathyroidism, sensorineural deafness, and renal dysplasia) and DGS2 (DiGeorge syndrome 2), but a number of variable phenotypes have also been reported. Cleft lip/palate seems to be a very unusual finding within the clinical spectrum of patients with this deletion. Here, we report a male child born with short stature, cleft lip/palate, and feeding problems who was found to have a 5.6-Mb deletion at 10p15.3p14. PMID:25852446

  17. A novel TRPS1 gene mutation causing trichorhinophalangeal syndrome with growth hormone responsive short stature: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The role of growth hormone (GH) and its therapeutic supplementation in the trichorhinophalangeal syndrome type I (TRPS I) is not well delineated. TRPS I is a rare congenital syndrome, characterized by craniofacial and skeletal malformations including short stature, sparse, thin scalp hair and lateral eyebrows, pear-shaped nose, cone shaped epiphyses and hip dysplasia. It is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner and caused by haploinsufficiency of the TRPS1 gene. We report a family (Mother and 3 of her 4 children) with a novel mutation in the TRPS1 gene. The diagnosis was suspected only after meeting all family members and comparing affected and unaffected siblings since the features of this syndrome might be subtle. The eldest sibling, who had neither GH deficiency nor insensitivity, improved his growth velocity and height SDS after 2 years of treatment with exogenous GH. No change in growth velocity was observed in the untreated siblings during this same period. This report emphasizes the importance of examining all family members when suspecting a genetic syndrome. It also demonstrates the therapeutic effect of GH treatment in TRPS I despite normal GH-IGF1 axis. A review of the literature is included to address whether TRPS I is associated with: a) GH deficiency, b) GH resistance, or c) GH-responsive short stature. More studies are needed before recommending GH treatment for TRPS I but a trial should be considered on an individual basis. PMID:25177352

  18. Early anthropometric indices predict short stature and overweight status in a cohort of Peruvians in early adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, Robie; Miranda, J Jaime; Gilman, Robert H; Cabrera, Lilia; Sterling, Charles R; Bern, Caryn; Checkley, William

    2014-01-01

    While childhood malnutrition is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, less well understood is how early childhood growth influences height and body composition later in life. We revisited 152 Peruvian children who participated in a birth cohort study between 1995 and 1998, and obtained anthropometric and bioimpedance measurements 11 to 14 years later. We used multivariable regression models to study the effects of childhood anthropometric indices on height and body composition in early adolescence. Each standard deviation decrease in length-for-age at birth was associated with a decrease in adolescent height-for-age of 0.7 SD in both boys and girls (all p<0.001) and 9.7 greater odds of stunting (95% CI 3.3 to 28.6). Each SD decrease in length-for-age in the first 30 months of life was associated with a decrease in adolescent height-for-age of 0.4 in boys and 0.6 standard deviation in girls (all p<0.001) and with 5.8 greater odds of stunting (95% CI 2.6 to 13.5). The effect of weight gain during early childhood on weight in early adolescence was more complex to understand. Weight-for-length at birth and rate of change in weight-for-length in early childhood were positively associated with age- and sex-adjusted body mass index and a greater risk of being overweight in early adolescence. Linear growth retardation in early childhood is a strong determinant of adolescent stature, indicating that, in developing countries, growth failure in height during early childhood persists through early adolescence. Interventions addressing linear growth retardation in childhood are likely to improve adolescent stature and related-health outcomes in adulthood. PMID:22552904

  19. Compound heterozygous variants in the LARP7 gene as a cause of Alazami syndrome in a Caucasian female with significant failure to thrive, short stature, and developmental disability.

    PubMed

    Ling, Tina T; Sorrentino, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Alazami syndrome is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by primordial dwarfism, distinct dysmorphic features, and severe intellectual disability. Since it was first identified in a large consanguineous Arabic family in 2012, additional cases have not been published in the literature. We present a 2-year-old Northern European/Caucasian female with short stature, failure to thrive, and developmental delay. Whole exome sequencing (WES) identified two novel pathogenic variants in LARP7 (c.213_214dup and c.651_655del), indicating a diagnosis of Alazami syndrome. The case report describes a novel genotypic and phenotypic presentation of Alazami syndrome, contributing to the current knowledge of the condition as well as the expansion of differential diagnoses for growth restriction and intellectual disability. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26374271

  20. Familial short stature due to a 5q22.1-q23.2 duplication refines the 5q duplication spectrum.

    PubMed

    Zahnleiter, Diana; Trautmann, Udo; Ekici, Arif B; Goehring, Ina; Reis, André; Dörr, Helmuth-Günther; Rauch, Anita; Thiel, Christian T

    2011-01-01

    We identified a maternally inherited 14.2Mb duplication 5q22.1-q23.2 in two female siblings and their mother by molecular karyotyping. Both siblings were small for gestational age and presented with pronounced postnatal growth retardation, mild motor delay, congenital heart disease in one of the siblings, and distinct facial dysmorphism. As this duplication is one of the smallest reported 5q duplications, short stature and facial dysmorphism can be attributed to duplications of 5q22, whereas severe mental retardation is not part of the phenotypic spectrum of the 5q22.1-q23.2 region. Congenital heart defects, as observed in other 5q duplications, have a variable penetrance. We compared the facial features of patients with 5q duplications and found some consistent features such as high arched eyebrows, bulbous nasal tip and small lips with thin vermilion border. PMID:21777705

  1. A cryptic familial rearrangement of 11p15.5, involving both imprinting centers, in a family with a history of short stature.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lindsay A; Rupps, Rosemarie; Peñaherrera, Maria S; Robinson, Wendy P; Patel, Millan S; Eydoux, Patrice; Boerkoel, Cornelius F

    2014-06-01

    Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS) is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by intrauterine and postnatal growth retardation, dysmorphic facial features and body asymmetry. Both hypomethylation of the telomeric imprinting control region 1 (ICR1) at 11p15.5 and maternal duplication of 11p15.5 have been implicated in the etiology of this disorder. Here we report the origin and segregation of the first reported between-arm intrachromosomal insertion of 11p15.5 that encompasses both ICR1 and ICR2 in a multigenerational family with a history of short stature. One (or any odd number) crossover within the centromeric segment during meiosis would produce recombinant chromosomes; one with a duplication of the inserted segment and the other a deletion. In this 4-generation family, there were six instances of transmission of the recombinant chromosome with duplication of the11p15.5 segment, which leads to a SRS phenotype when maternally inherited and a Beckwith-Wiedemann phenotype when paternally transmitted. The size of the duplicated region is ~1.9 Mb as determined by microarray analysis. This study provides further evidence that maternally inherited duplications of 11p15.5 result in a SRS phenotype that includes short stature and other variable features. The methylation status of the extra copy of the duplicated region of 11p15.5 ultimately predicts the resulting phenotype. Thus, the different phenotype based on parental mode of transmission is of importance in the genetic counseling of these patients. PMID:24668696

  2. Congenital hypotonia: clinical and developmental assessment.

    PubMed

    Harris, Susan R

    2008-12-01

    Identifying the underlying cause of congenital hypotonia remains difficult, despite advances in diagnostic laboratory and imaging techniques. Clinical evaluation strategies and standardized developmental tests can assist in differentiating hypotonia resulting from primary involvement of the upper motoneuron (central hypotonia) versus that involving the lower motoneuron and motor unit (peripheral hypotonia). This is especially important in infants with idiopathic hypotonia. This review outlines and describes the components of the clinical assessment: detailed infant and family history, clinical techniques and characteristics for differentiating hypotonia of central versus peripheral origin, and clinical evaluation (muscle tone, primitive reflexes, deep tendon reflexes, etc). Recent research that has contributed to the differential diagnosis of congenital hypotonia is reviewed and directions for future research are provided. Ideally, the assessment of infants with congenital hypotonia is best accomplished by an interdisciplinary team of developmental specialists including pediatricians, medical geneticists, child neurologists, and physical or occupational therapists. PMID:19046184

  3. The basis for optimising growth with growth hormone usage in children with idiopathic short stature: analysis of data from KIGS (Pfizer International Growth Study Database).

    PubMed

    Ranke, Michael B; Lindberg, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Many children with idiopathic short stature (ISS) remain short as adults. Height can be improved permanently by growth hormone (GH) treatment, as in children with Turner syndrome or born small for gestational age. Although GH treatment for ISS is an approved indication in the United States, there is ongoing controversy in Europe about approving GH treatment for this indication as well as determining the optimal mode of treatment. In addition to data from randomized controlled trials, data from pharmacoepidemiological surveys such as the Pfizer International Growth Study Database (KIGS) have provided substantial information about the short-term and long-term effects of GH on growth and adult height in children with ISS. Based on published articles and a recent survey from KIGS on 454 patients who have reached adult height, we attempted to categorize those children with ISS who have the greatest chances of achieving a normal adult height, or at least gain the most height following GH treatment. This analysis provides a rational basis for discussion about the most efficacious and cost-effective uses of GH treatment in children with ISS. PMID:21912166

  4. Partial isodisomy for maternal chromosome 7 and short stature in an individual with a mutation at the COL1A2 locus

    SciTech Connect

    Spotila, L.D.; Sereda, L.; Prockop, D.J. )

    1992-12-01

    Uniparental disomy for chromosome 7 has been described previously in two individuals with cystic fibrosis. Here, the authors describe a third case that was discovered because the proband was homozygous for a mutation in the COL1A2 gene for type I procollagen, although his mother was heterozygous and his father did not have the mutation. Phenotypically, the proband was similar to the two previously reported cases with uniparental disomy for chromosome 7, in that he was short in stature and growth retarded. Paternity was assessed with five polymorphic markers. Chromosome 7 inheritance in the proband was analyzed using 12 polymorphic markers distributed along the entire chromosome. Similar analysis of the proband's two brothers established the phase of the alleles at the various loci, assuming minimal recombination. The proband inherited only maternal alleles at five loci and was homozygous at all loci examined, except one. He was heterozygous for an RFLP at the IGBP-1 locus at 7p13-p12. The results suggest that the isodisomy was not complete because of a recombination event involving the proximal short arms of two maternal chromosomes. In addition, the phenotype of proportional dwarfism in the proband suggests imprinting of one or more growth-related genes on chromosome 7. 42 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Hypotonia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 798-2291 Prepared by: Office of Communications and Public Liaison National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke National Institutes of Health Bethesda, MD 20892 NINDS health-related material is ...

  6. SAMS, a Syndrome of Short Stature, Auditory-Canal Atresia, Mandibular Hypoplasia, and Skeletal Abnormalities Is a Unique Neurocristopathy Caused by Mutations in Goosecoid

    PubMed Central

    Parry, David A.; Logan, Clare V.; Stegmann, Alexander P.A.; Abdelhamed, Zakia A.; Calder, Alistair; Khan, Shabana; Bonthron, David T.; Clowes, Virginia; Sheridan, Eamonn; Ghali, Neeti; Chudley, Albert E.; Dobbie, Angus; Stumpel, Constance T.R.M.; Johnson, Colin A.

    2013-01-01

    Short stature, auditory canal atresia, mandibular hypoplasia, and skeletal abnormalities (SAMS) has been reported previously to be a rare, autosomal-recessive developmental disorder with other, unique rhizomelic skeletal anomalies. These include bilateral humeral hypoplasia, humeroscapular synostosis, pelvic abnormalities, and proximal defects of the femora. To identify the genetic basis of SAMS, we used molecular karyotyping and whole-exome sequencing (WES) to study small, unrelated families. Filtering of variants from the WES data included segregation analysis followed by comparison of in-house exomes. We identified a homozygous 306 kb microdeletion and homozygous predicted null mutations of GSC, encoding Goosecoid homeobox protein, a paired-like homeodomain transcription factor. This confirms that SAMS is a human malformation syndrome resulting from GSC mutations. Previously, Goosecoid has been shown to be a determinant at the Xenopus gastrula organizer region and a segment-polarity determinant in Drosophila. In the present report, we present data on Goosecoid protein localization in staged mouse embryos. These data and the SAMS clinical phenotype both suggest that Goosecoid is a downstream effector of the regulatory networks that define neural-crest cell-fate specification and subsequent mesoderm cell lineages in mammals, particularly during shoulder and hip formation. Our findings confirm that Goosecoid has an essential role in human craniofacial and joint development and suggest that Goosecoid is an essential regulator of mesodermal patterning in mammals and that it has specific functions in neural crest cell derivatives. PMID:24290375

  7. High Incidence of Noonan Syndrome Features Including Short Stature and Pulmonic Stenosis in Patients carrying NF1 Missense Mutations Affecting p.Arg1809: Genotype-Phenotype Correlation.

    PubMed

    Rojnueangnit, Kitiwan; Xie, Jing; Gomes, Alicia; Sharp, Angela; Callens, Tom; Chen, Yunjia; Liu, Ying; Cochran, Meagan; Abbott, Mary-Alice; Atkin, Joan; Babovic-Vuksanovic, Dusica; Barnett, Christopher P; Crenshaw, Melissa; Bartholomew, Dennis W; Basel, Lina; Bellus, Gary; Ben-Shachar, Shay; Bialer, Martin G; Bick, David; Blumberg, Bruce; Cortes, Fanny; David, Karen L; Destree, Anne; Duat-Rodriguez, Anna; Earl, Dawn; Escobar, Luis; Eswara, Marthanda; Ezquieta, Begona; Frayling, Ian M; Frydman, Moshe; Gardner, Kathy; Gripp, Karen W; Hernández-Chico, Concepcion; Heyrman, Kurt; Ibrahim, Jennifer; Janssens, Sandra; Keena, Beth A; Llano-Rivas, Isabel; Leppig, Kathy; McDonald, Marie; Misra, Vinod K; Mulbury, Jennifer; Narayanan, Vinodh; Orenstein, Naama; Galvin-Parton, Patricia; Pedro, Helio; Pivnick, Eniko K; Powell, Cynthia M; Randolph, Linda; Raskin, Salmo; Rosell, Jordi; Rubin, Karol; Seashore, Margretta; Schaaf, Christian P; Scheuerle, Angela; Schultz, Meredith; Schorry, Elizabeth; Schnur, Rhonda; Siqveland, Elizabeth; Tkachuk, Amanda; Tonsgard, James; Upadhyaya, Meena; Verma, Ishwar C; Wallace, Stephanie; Williams, Charles; Zackai, Elaine; Zonana, Jonathan; Lazaro, Conxi; Claes, Kathleen; Korf, Bruce; Martin, Yolanda; Legius, Eric; Messiaen, Ludwine

    2015-11-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is one of the most frequent genetic disorders, affecting 1:3,000 worldwide. Identification of genotype-phenotype correlations is challenging because of the wide range clinical variability, the progressive nature of the disorder, and extreme diversity of the mutational spectrum. We report 136 individuals with a distinct phenotype carrying one of five different NF1 missense mutations affecting p.Arg1809. Patients presented with multiple café-au-lait macules (CALM) with or without freckling and Lisch nodules, but no externally visible plexiform neurofibromas or clear cutaneous neurofibromas were found. About 25% of the individuals had Noonan-like features. Pulmonic stenosis and short stature were significantly more prevalent compared with classic cohorts (P < 0.0001). Developmental delays and/or learning disabilities were reported in over 50% of patients. Melanocytes cultured from a CALM in a segmental NF1-patient showed two different somatic NF1 mutations, p.Arg1809Cys and a multi-exon deletion, providing genetic evidence that p.Arg1809Cys is a loss-of-function mutation in the melanocytes and causes a pigmentary phenotype. Constitutional missense mutations at p.Arg1809 affect 1.23% of unrelated NF1 probands in the UAB cohort, therefore this specific NF1 genotype-phenotype correlation will affect counseling and management of a significant number of patients. PMID:26178382

  8. Rare pseudoautosomal copy-number variations involving SHOX and/or its flanking regions in individuals with and without short stature.

    PubMed

    Fukami, Maki; Naiki, Yasuhiro; Muroya, Koji; Hamajima, Takashi; Soneda, Shun; Horikawa, Reiko; Jinno, Tomoko; Katsumi, Momori; Nakamura, Akie; Asakura, Yumi; Adachi, Masanori; Ogata, Tsutomu; Kanzaki, Susumu

    2015-09-01

    Pseudoautosomal region 1 (PAR1) contains SHOX, in addition to seven highly conserved non-coding DNA elements (CNEs) with cis-regulatory activity. Microdeletions involving SHOX exons 1-6a and/or the CNEs result in idiopathic short stature (ISS) and Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis (LWD). Here, we report six rare copy-number variations (CNVs) in PAR1 identified through copy-number analyzes of 245 ISS/LWD patients and 15 unaffected individuals. The six CNVs consisted of three microduplications encompassing SHOX and some of the CNEs, two microduplications in the SHOX 3'-region affecting one or four of the downstream CNEs, and a microdeletion involving SHOX exon 6b and its neighboring CNE. The amplified DNA fragments of two SHOX-containing duplications were detected at chromosomal regions adjacent to the original positions. The breakpoints of a SHOX-containing duplication resided within Alu repeats. A microduplication encompassing four downstream CNEs was identified in an unaffected father-daughter pair, whereas the other five CNVs were detected in ISS patients. These results suggest that microduplications involving SHOX cause ISS by disrupting the cis-regulatory machinery of this gene and that at least some of microduplications in PAR1 arise from Alu-mediated non-allelic homologous recombination. The pathogenicity of other rare PAR1-linked CNVs, such as CNE-containing microduplications and exon 6b-flanking microdeletions, merits further investigation. PMID:26040210

  9. Relationship between vitamin D receptor (VDR) polymorphisms and the efficacy of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) treatment in children with idiopathic short stature.

    PubMed

    Wang, W; Luo, X P; Cai, L X; Cui, Z R; Luo, X Y; Luo, R K

    2015-01-01

    Polymorphisms in the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene are associated with idiopathic short stature (ISS) in several countries. This study aimed to identify a possible correlation between polymorphisms in the VDR promoter in Chinese children with ISS and the efficacy of the recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) treatment. Pre-pubertal children with ISS and healthy age- and gender-matched children (N = 95 each) were enrolled in this study. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the VDR promoter (rs11568820 at the Cdx-2-binding site upstream of exon 1e and rs4516035 at -1012 upstream of exon 1a) were typed. The growth velocity, standard deviation score (SDS) of height for chronological age, height SDS for bone age, predicted adult height, and serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and IGF-binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) levels of the ISS patients were determined before and 6 months after rhGH treatment. No significant differences were observed in the genotype frequencies between the ISS cases and controls. After rhGH treatment, the growth velocity of the A/G genotype at the Cdx-2-binding site SNP locus was significantly higher than that of the G/G genotype; the IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 levels were also higher in the treated group than the untreated group. However, these changes were independent of the VDR-promoter genotype. Polymorphisms in the VDR promoter may not result in the pathogenesis of ISS in Chinese children. The A/G genotype showed a significantly higher growth velocity than the G/G genotype, and may represent a short-term marker of growth potential. PMID:26400282

  10. Evaluation of growth hormone release and human growth hormone treatment in children with cranial irradiation-associated short stature

    SciTech Connect

    Romshe, C.A.; Zipf, W.B.; Miser, A.; Miser, J.; Sotos, J.F.; Newton, W.A.

    1984-02-01

    We studied nine children who had received cranial irradiation for various malignancies and subsequently experienced decreased growth velocity. Their response to standard growth hormone stimulation and release tests were compared with that in seven children with classic GH deficiency and in 24 short normal control subjects. With arginine and L-dopa stimulation, six of nine patients who received radiation had a normal GH response (greater than 7 ng/ml), whereas by design none of the GH deficient and all of the normal children had a positive response. Only two of nine patients had a normal response to insulin hypoglycemia, with no significant differences in the mean maximal response of the radiation and the GH-deficient groups. Pulsatile secretion was not significantly different in the radiation and GH-deficient groups, but was different in the radiation and normal groups. All subjects in the GH-deficient and radiation groups were given human growth hormone for 1 year. Growth velocity increased in all, with no significant difference in the response of the two groups when comparing the z scores for growth velocity of each subject's bone age. We recommend a 6-month trial of hGH in children who have had cranial radiation and are in prolonged remission with a decreased growth velocity, as there is no completely reliable combination of GH stimulation or release tests to determine their response.

  11. Effectiveness of the Combined Recombinant Human Growth Hormone and Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Analog Therapy in Pubertal Patients with Short Stature due to SHOX Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Scalco, Renata C.; Melo, Suzana S. J.; Pugliese-Pires, Patricia N.; Funari, Mariana F. A.; Nishi, Mirian Y.; Arnhold, Ivo J. P.; Mendonca, Berenice B.; Jorge, Alexander A. L.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Isolated heterozygous SHOX defects are the most frequent monogenic cause of short stature, and combined therapy with recombinant human GH (rhGH) and GnRH analog (GnRHa) in pubertal patients has been suggested, but there are no data on final height. Objective: The aim of the study was to analyze adult height after rhGH and GnRHa therapy in patients with SHOX haploinsufficiency. Patients: Ten peripubertal patients with isolated SHOX defects participated in the study. Intervention: Five patients were followed without treatment, and five were treated with rhGH (50 ?g/kg/d) and depot leuprolide acetate (3.75 mg/month). Main Outcome Measures: Adult height sd score (SDS) was measured. Results: All patients followed without treatment had marked downward growth shift during puberty (height SDS, ?1.2 ± 0.7 at 11.4 ± 1.4 yr; adult height SDS, ?2.5 ± 0.5). Conversely, four of five patients treated with rhGH for 2 to 4.9 yr associated to GnRHa for 1.4 to 5.8 yr improved their height SDS from ?2.3 ± 1.3 at 11.8 ± 2.1 yr to a final height SDS of ?1.7 ± 1.6. The difference between the mean height SDS at the first evaluation and final height SDS was statistically significant in nontreated vs. treated patients (mean height SDS change, ?1.2 ± 0.4 vs. 0.6 ± 0.4, respectively; P <0.001). Conclusion: A gain in adult height of patients with isolated SHOX defects treated with combined rhGH and GnRHa therapy was demonstrated for the first time, supporting this treatment for children with SHOX defects who have just started puberty to avoid the loss of growth potential observed in these patients during puberty. PMID:19926713

  12. A Novel Variant in CDKN1C Is Associated With Intrauterine Growth Restriction, Short Stature, and Early-Adulthood-Onset Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kerns, Sarah L.; Andrew, Shayne; Geng, Juan; Guevara, Carolina; Guevara-Aguirre, Marco; Guo, Michael; Oddoux, Carole; Shen, Yiping; Zurita, Andres; Rosenfeld, Ron G.; Ostrer, Harry; Hwa, Vivian

    2014-01-01

    Context: CDKN1C, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor and negative regulator of cellular proliferation, is paternally imprinted and has been shown to regulate ?-cell proliferation. CDKN1C mutations are associated with growth disorders, including Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and IMAGe syndrome. Objective: To investigate the genetic basis for a familial disorder characterized by intrauterine growth restriction, short stature, and early-adulthood-onset diabetes. Design, Setting, and Participants: Genomic DNA samples (15 affected and 26 unaffected from a six-generation pedigree) were analyzed by genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism arrays, whole exome and Sanger sequencing, and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. Main Outcome Measure(s): Subjects were assessed for height, weight, adrenal gland size, ACTH, diabetes status, and testis volume. Linkage and sequence analyses were performed, and the identified genetic variant was functionally evaluated in reconstitution studies. Results: The pedigree followed a paternally imprinted pattern of inheritance, and genetic linkage analysis identified a single significant 2.6-megabase locus on chromosome 11p15, within the imprinting center region 2. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification did not detect copy number variants or methylation abnormalities. Whole exome sequencing revealed a single novel variant in the proliferating cell nuclear antigen-binding region of CDKN1C (c.842G>T, p.R281I) that co-segregated with affected status and, unlike variants found in IMAGe, did not entirely abrogate proliferating cell nuclear antigen binding. Clinical assessments revealed that affected individuals had low testicular volume but normal adrenal function. Conclusions: We report a novel CDKN1C mutation associated with features of IMAGe syndrome, but without adrenal insufficiency or metaphyseal dysplasia, and characterized by early-adulthood-onset diabetes. Our data expand the range of phenotypes observed with CDKN1C defects and suggest that CDKN1C mutations may represent a novel monogenic form of diabetes. PMID:25057881

  13. Homozygous mutation in the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2alpha phosphatase gene, PPP1R15B, is associated with severe microcephaly, short stature and intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    Kernohan, Kristin D.; Tétreault, Martine; Liwak-Muir, Urszula; Geraghty, Michael T.; Qin, Wen; Venkateswaran, Sunita; Davila, Jorge; Holcik, Martin; Majewski, Jacek; Richer, Julie; Boycott, Kym M.

    2015-01-01

    Protein translation is an essential cellular process initiated by the association of a methionyl–tRNA with the translation initiation factor eIF2. The Met-tRNA/eIF2 complex then associates with the small ribosomal subunit, other translation factors and mRNA, which together comprise the translational initiation complex. This process is regulated by the phosphorylation status of the α subunit of eIF2 (eIF2α); phosphorylated eIF2α attenuates protein translation. Here, we report a consanguineous family with severe microcephaly, short stature, hypoplastic brainstem and cord, delayed myelination and intellectual disability in two siblings. Whole-exome sequencing identified a homozygous missense mutation, c.1972G>A; p.Arg658Cys, in protein phosphatase 1, regulatory subunit 15b (PPP1R15B), a protein which functions with the PPP1C phosphatase to maintain dephosphorylated eIF2α in unstressed cells. The p.R658C PPP1R15B mutation is located within the PPP1C binding site. We show that patient cells have greatly diminished levels of PPP1R15B–PPP1C interaction, which results in increased eIF2α phosphorylation and resistance to cellular stress. Finally, we find that patient cells have elevated levels of PPP1R15B mRNA and protein, suggesting activation of a compensatory program aimed at restoring cellular homeostasis which is ineffective due to PPP1R15B alteration. PPP1R15B now joins the expanding list of translation-associated proteins which when mutated cause rare genetic diseases. PMID:26307080

  14. Homozygous mutation in the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2alpha phosphatase gene, PPP1R15B, is associated with severe microcephaly, short stature and intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Kernohan, Kristin D; Tétreault, Martine; Liwak-Muir, Urszula; Geraghty, Michael T; Qin, Wen; Venkateswaran, Sunita; Davila, Jorge; Holcik, Martin; Majewski, Jacek; Richer, Julie; Boycott, Kym M

    2015-11-15

    Protein translation is an essential cellular process initiated by the association of a methionyl-tRNA with the translation initiation factor eIF2. The Met-tRNA/eIF2 complex then associates with the small ribosomal subunit, other translation factors and mRNA, which together comprise the translational initiation complex. This process is regulated by the phosphorylation status of the ? subunit of eIF2 (eIF2?); phosphorylated eIF2? attenuates protein translation. Here, we report a consanguineous family with severe microcephaly, short stature, hypoplastic brainstem and cord, delayed myelination and intellectual disability in two siblings. Whole-exome sequencing identified a homozygous missense mutation, c.1972G>A; p.Arg658Cys, in protein phosphatase 1, regulatory subunit 15b (PPP1R15B), a protein which functions with the PPP1C phosphatase to maintain dephosphorylated eIF2? in unstressed cells. The p.R658C PPP1R15B mutation is located within the PPP1C binding site. We show that patient cells have greatly diminished levels of PPP1R15B-PPP1C interaction, which results in increased eIF2? phosphorylation and resistance to cellular stress. Finally, we find that patient cells have elevated levels of PPP1R15B mRNA and protein, suggesting activation of a compensatory program aimed at restoring cellular homeostasis which is ineffective due to PPP1R15B alteration. PPP1R15B now joins the expanding list of translation-associated proteins which when mutated cause rare genetic diseases. PMID:26307080

  15. Overexpression of Indian hedgehog partially rescues short stature homeobox 2-overexpression-associated congenital dysplasia of the temporomandibular joint in mice

    PubMed Central

    LI, XIHAI; LIANG, WENNA; YE, HONGZHI; WENG, XIAPING; LIU, FAYUAN; LIN, PINGDONG; LIU, XIANXIANG

    2015-01-01

    The role of short stature homeobox 2 (shox2) in the development and homeostasis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has been well documented. Shox2 is known to be expressed in the progenitor cells and perichondrium of the developing condyle. A previous study by our group reported that overexpression of shox2 leads to congenital dysplasia of the TMJ via downregulation of the Indian hedgehog (Ihh) signaling pathway, which is essential for embryonic disc primordium formation and mandibular condylar growth. To determine whether overexpression of Ihh may rescue the overexpression of shox2 leading to congenital dysplasia of the TMJ, a mouse model in which Ihh and shox2 were overexpressed (Wnt1-Cre; pMes-stop shox2; pMes-stop Ihh mice) was utilized to assess the consequences of this overexpression on TMJ development during post-natal life. The results showed that the developmental process and expression levels of runt-related transcription factor 2 and sex determining region Y-box 9 in the TMJ of the Wnt1-Cre; pMes-stop shox2; pMes-stop Ihh mice were similar to those in wild-type mice. Overexpression of Ihh rescued shox2 overexpression-associated reduction of extracellular matrix components. However, overexpression of Ihh did not inhibit the shox2 overexpression-associated increase of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) MMP9, MMP13 and apoptosis in the TMJ. These combinatory cellular and molecular defects appeared to account for the observed congenital dysplasia of TMJ, suggesting that overexpression of Ihh partially rescued shox2 overexpression-associated congenital dysplasia of the TMJ in mice. PMID:26096903

  16. Personality functioning: the influence of stature

    PubMed Central

    Ulph, F; Betts, P; Mulligan, J; Stratford, R

    2004-01-01

    Background: The Wessex Growth Study has monitored the psychological development of a large cohort of short normal and average height control participants since school entry. Aims: To examine the effect of stature on their personality functioning now that they are aged 18–20 years. Methods: This report contains data from 48 short normal and 66 control participants. Mean height SD score at recruitment was: short normals -2.62 SD, controls -0.22 SD. Final height SD score was: short normals -1.86, controls 0.07. The Adolescent to Adult Personality Functioning Assessment (ADAPFA) measures functioning in six domains: education and employment, love relationships, friendships, coping, social contacts, and negotiations. Results: No significant effect of recruitment height or final height was found on total ADAPFA score or on any of the domain scores. Socioeconomic status significantly affected total score, employment and education, and coping domain scores. Gender had a significant effect on total score, love relationships, coping, and social contacts domain scores. Salient aspects of daily living for this sample were identified from the interviews (prevalence%): consuming alcohol (94%), further education (63%), love relationships (55%), current drug use (29%), experience of violence (28%), parenthood (11%), and unemployment (9%). Stature was not significantly related to behaviour in any of these areas. Conclusions: Despite previously reported links between short stature and poorer psychosocial adaptation, no evidence was found that stature per se significantly affected the functioning of the participants in these areas as young adults. PMID:14709494

  17. Homoarginine (hArg) and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) in short stature children without and with growth hormone deficiency: hArg and ADMA are involved differently in growth in the childhood.

    PubMed

    Langen, Jennifer; Kayacelebi, Arslan Arinc; Beckmann, Bibiana; Weigt-Usinger, Katharina; Carmann, Christina; Hörster, Irina; Lilienthal, Eggert; Richter-Unruh, Annette; Tsikas, Dimitrios; Lücke, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Adult subjects with growth hormone (GH) deficiency (GHD) are known to have reduced life expectancy due to increased cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events. In adults, these events are associated with elevated circulating concentrations of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) which is an endogenous inhibitor of L-arginine (Arg)-derived nitric oxide (NO). Low circulating concentrations of homoarginine (hArg) emerged as a cardiovascular risk factor. In adults, hArg seems to antagonize ADMA. In the present work, we tested the hypothesis that children with short stature without or with GHD have altered Arg/NO pathway as compared to children with normal growth. We studied 66 short stature children (38 boys, 28 girls) aged 3.5-17.3 years, who underwent the routine L-Arginine Test to diagnose presence of GHD. GHD was confirmed in 47 children (GHD group; 30 boys, 17 girls) and was absent in the remaining 19 children (non-GHD group; 8 boys, 11 girls). In addition, we investigated 24 healthy age- and gender-matched children (10 boys, 14 girls) with normal growth. In EDTA plasma samples of all children, we determined by mass spectrometry-based methods the concentrations of Arg, hArg and ADMA, and calculated the Arg/ADMA and hArg/ADMA molar ratios. With respect to these biochemical parameters, we did not find statistically significant differences between the GHD and non-GHD groups. Comparing short with normal stature children, we found small differences regarding plasma hArg concentrations [mean ± SD; median (25th-75th percentile)]: 2.06 ± 0.52 µM; 2.12 (1.74-2.36) µM vs. 1.7 ± 0.5 µM; 1.6 (1.4-1.8) µM, P < 0.001. Compared to normal stature children, short stature children had considerably higher plasma concentrations of ADMA [0.77 ± 0.15 µM; 0.77 (0.66-0.85) µM vs. 0.57 ± 0.09 µM; 0.58 (0.50-0.63) µM, P < 0.001], but not of Arg [83.3 ± 19.2 µM; 82.2 (71.9-90.3) µM vs. 86.5 ± 17.8 µM; 84.8 (77.2-94.8) µM, P = 0.336], or the hArg/ADMA ratio [2.74 ± 0.76; 2.7 (2.2-3.1) vs. 3.1 ± 1.2; 2.85 (2.42-3.66), P = 0.161. hArg in the GHD group (r = 0.41, P = 0.004) and the hArg/ADMA ratio in both groups (r = 0.44, P = 0.002 in GHD; r = 0.55, P = 0.01 in non-GHD)], but not ADMA were positively correlated with insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). hArg and hArg/ADMA differed between girls and boys in the GHD and non-GHD groups but in the normal growth group. The hArg/ADMA ratio increased with age in all groups. Our study suggests that hArg and ADMA are involved in growth in the childhood, presumably in an antagonistic manner, with ADMA slowing and hArg accelerating growth. PMID:26123987

  18. Mental retardation, congenital heart defect, cleft palate, short stature, and facial anomalies: A new X-linked multiple congenital anomalies/mental retardation syndrome: Clinical description and molecular studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hamel, B.C.J.; Mariman, E.C.M.; Beersum, S.E.C. van; Ropers, H.H.; Schoonbrood-Lenssen, A.M.J.

    1994-07-15

    We report on two brothers and their two maternal uncles with severe mental retardation, congenital heart defect, cleft or highly arched palate, short stature and craniofacial anomalies consisting of microcephaly, abnormal ears, bulbous nose, broad nasal bridge, malar hypoplasia, and micro-gnathia. Three of the four patients died at an early age. The mother of the two brothers had an atrial septal defect. She is assumed to be manifesting carrier of a mutant gene, which is expressed in her two sons and two brothers. By multipoint linkage analysis it is found that the most likely location of the responsible gene is the pericentromeric region Xp21.3-q21.3 with DMD and DXS3 as flanking markers. Maximum information is obtained with marker DXS453 (Z = 1.20 at {theta} = 0.0). 24 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Congenital hypotonia: is there an algorithm?

    PubMed

    Paro-Panjan, Darja; Neubauer, David

    2004-06-01

    This study was performed with the aim of determining the diagnostic profile of newborns with hypotonia and of analyzing the usefulness of different procedures in the diagnostic process. One hundred thirty-eight hypotonic newborns were identified through the search of hospital records in a 10-year period: 121 (88%) had central hypotonia and 13 (9%) had peripheral hypotonia, whereas 4 (3%) remained unclassified. Analysis of the contribution of clinical data and results of investigations led to the construction of an algorithm, by which all cases in the group were diagnosed. Step 1, which included clinical data and results of examinations, solved 50% of all diagnosed cases. Neuroimaging techniques made up step 2 and contributed to the diagnosis in 13%. Step 3 was accomplished by a search through Oxford Medical Databases, which yielded the final diagnosis in 9%, whereas karyotyping and fluorescent in situ hybridization for Prader-Willi syndrome comprised step 4 and contributed to the diagnosis in 6.5%. Biochemical tests formed step 5 and contributed to the diagnosis in 6%. Step 6, which included specific investigations of muscle and nerve, was diagnostic in 6%. The remaining cases (6.5%) were diagnosed only after several follow-up examinations. These results could assist the neonatologist when deciding the diagnostic approach to floppy newborns. PMID:15446393

  20. Bilateral radial agenesis with absent thumbs, complex heart defect, short stature, and facial dysmorphism in a patient with pure distal microduplication of 5q35.2-5q35.3

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A partial duplication of the distal long arm of chromosome 5 (5q35--?>?qter) is known to be associated with a distinct phenotype referred to as Hunter-McAlpine syndrome. Clinical spectrum of this disorder mainly consists of mental retardation, microcephaly, short stature, skeletal anomalies, and craniofacial dysmorphism featuring flat facies, micrognathia, large, low-set dysplastic ears, hypertelorism, almond-shaped, down-slanted palpebral fissures, epicanthal folds, small nose, long philtrum, small mouth, and thin upper lip. Less frequent remarkable findings include craniosynostosis, heart defect, hypoplastic phalanges, preaxial polydactyly, hypospadias, cryptorchidism, and inguinal hernia. In most patients with a partial duplication of 5q the aberration occurred due to an inherited unbalanced translocation, therefore the phenotype was not reflective of pure trisomy 5q. Case presentation We report on a 9.5-year-old boy with some feature of Hunter-McAlpine syndrome including short stature, complex heart defect (dextrocardia, dextroversion, PFO), bilateral cryptorchidism, hypothyroidism, and craniofacial dysmorphism. Additionally, bilateral radial agenesis with complete absence of Ist digital rays, ulnar hypoplasia with bowing, choroidal and retinal coloboma, abnormal biliary vesicle were identified, which have never been noted in 5q trisomy patients. Karyotype analysis, sequencing and MLPA for TBX5 and SALL4 genes were unremarkable. Array comparative genomic hybridization detected a duplication on 5q35.2-5q35.3, resulting from a de novo chromosomal rearrangement. Our proband carried the smallest of all previously reported pure distal 5q trisomies encompassing terminal 5.4-5.6 Mb and presented with the most severe limb malformation attributed to the increased number of distal 5q copies. Conclusions We postulate that a terminal distal trisomy of 5q35.2-5q35.3, which maps 1.1 Mb telomeric to the MSX2 gene is causative for both radial agenesis and complex heart defect in our proband. A potential candidate gene causative for limb malformation in our proband could be FGFR4, which maps relatively in the closest position to the chromosomal breakage site (about 1.3 Mb) from all known 5q duplications. Since the limb malformation as well as the underlying genetic defect are distinct from other 5q trisomy patient we propose that a position effect resulting in altered long-range regulation of the FGFR4 (alternatively MSX2) may be responsible for the limb malformation in our proband. PMID:23342975

  1. Deletions of Yq11 associated with short stature and the Turner syndrome. Tentative mapping of a region associated with specific Turner stigmata to proximal interval 5.

    SciTech Connect

    McElreavey, K.; Barbaux, S.; Vilain, E.

    1994-09-01

    Turner syndrome is a complex human phenotype, commonly associated with a 45,X karyotype. Mapping the Turner phenotype is difficult since hidden mosaicisms, partial monosomy and complex rearrangements are present in many affected individuals. In addition, attempts to map the genes involved to the X chromosome have failed to yield a consistent localisation. An alternative approach to map and identify Turner genes is to study XY individuals, with sex chromosome abnormalities, who present with or without characteristic Turner stigmata. We report the analysis of 4 individuals with terminal deletions of Yq. The individuals were azoospermic males without phenotypic abnormalities (2 cases) and azoospermic males presenting with a specific subset of Turner stigmata (2 cases). Breakpoints in each of the cytogenetically detectable Yq deletions were mapped by Southern analysis and Y chromosome-specific sequence tagged sites (STS). Correlation between the patients phenotypes and the extent of their deletion indicate a critical region associated with specific Turner stigmata (cubitus valgus, shield chest, short fourth metacarpals) and growth retardation at Yq at proximal interval 5. These data provide evidence that the somatic features of the Turner syndrome are most likely caused by haploinsufficiency of genes at several loci.

  2. Association between Adult Stature and Energy Expenditure in Low-Income Women from Northeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque, Fabiana Cristina Alves; Bueno, Nassib Bezerra; Clemente, Ana Paula Grotti; Ferriolli, Eduardo; Florêncio, Telma Maria Menezes Toledo; Hoffman, Daniel; Sawaya, Ana Lydia

    2015-01-01

    Background Perinatal undernutrition may lead to important metabolic adaptations in adult life, short stature being the most visible. The present study aimed to evaluate the association between stature and total energy expenditure of low-income women. Method Women aged 19–45 years from low-income communities in Maceió-AL were recruited. A sample of 67 volunteers was selected and divided into either short stature (≤152.4 cm; n = 34) or non-short stature (≥158.7 cm; n = 33) group. Data on socioeconomic status, anthropometric variables, and hormonal profiles was collected. Total energy expenditure and body composition were assessed by the doubly labeled water technique with multiple points over 14 days. In addition, physical activity levels were measured with triaxial accelerometers and dietary intake data were collected using three 24-hour food records. Results The mean subject age was 30.94 years. Women of short stature had lower body weight and lean body mass compared to non-short women, but there were no differences in thyroid hormone concentrations or daily energy intake between the two groups. Short-stature women showed lower total energy expenditure (P = 0.01) and a significantly higher physical activity level (P = 0.01) compared to non-short women. However, the difference in total energy expenditure was no longer significant after statistical adjustment for age, lean body mass, and triiodothyronine concentrations. Conclusion Women with short stature present the same energy intake, but lower total energy expenditure than non-short women, even with a higher physical activity level, which suggests that they are more prone to weight gain. PMID:26147672

  3. Prediction of stature using hand dimensions.

    PubMed

    Agnihotri, Arun Kumar; Agnihotri, Smriti; Jeebun, Nilima; Googoolye, Krishna

    2008-11-01

    In this study, an attempt was made to find out possible correlations between hand dimensions and stature using linear and curvilinear regression models for both genders. The study was conducted amongst 250 medical students (125 male and 125 female) aged 18-30 years. Each student has been studied for measurements of stature, hand length and hand breadth. To explain stature, all the explanatory variables like age, sex, hand length (right and left) and hand breadth (right and left) were included for model generation using SPSS. A general linear regression model was found to be best explanatory in both males and females, however, amongst the curvilinear models; the exponential model emerged as the 'best' in explaining stature of the individual. Left hand length alone explained very significantly (P<0.001). PMID:18926497

  4. Loss of the N-myc oncogene in a patient with a small interstitial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 2

    SciTech Connect

    Saal, H.M.; Johnson, R.C.; Carr, A.G.; Samango-Sprouse, C.

    1996-12-30

    To our knowledge, only four previous cases of distal chromosome 2p deletions exist in the literature. We present a patient with minor facial anomalies who had a distal interstitial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 2, del(2)(p24.2p25.1). This patient had many features seen in other patients with distal 2p deletion including short stature, {open_quotes}rectangular{close_quotes} facies, microcephaly, hypotonia, and mental retardation. This patient also has sensorineural hearing loss which has been described in one other patient with a similar deletion. The N-myc oncogene has been mapped to 2p24. By fluorescence in situ hybridization using a cDNA probe for the N-myc oncogene, this patient was found to have a deletion of the N-myc oncogene. This confirms the previous map location for N-myc. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Turner syndrome presented with tall stature due to overdosage of the SHOX gene.

    PubMed

    Seo, Go Hun; Kang, Eungu; Cho, Ja Hyang; Lee, Beom Hee; Choi, Jin-Ho; Kim, Gu-Hwan; Seo, Eul-Ju; Yoo, Han-Wook

    2015-06-01

    Turner syndrome is one of the most common chromosomal disorders. It is caused by numerical or structural abnormalities of the X chromosome and results in short stature and gonadal dysgenesis. The short stature arises from haploinsufficiency of the SHOX gene, whereas overdosage contributes to tall stature. This report describes the first Korean case of Turner syndrome with tall stature caused by SHOX overdosage. The patient presented with primary amenorrhea and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism at the age of 17 years. Estrogen replacement therapy was initiated at that time. She displayed tall stature from childhood, with normal growth velocity, and reached a final height of 190 cm (standard deviation score, 4.3) at the age of 30 years. Her karyotype was 46,X, psu idic(X)(q21.2), representing partial monosomy of Xq and partial trisomy of Xp. Analysis by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification detected a duplication at Xp22.3-Xp22.2, encompassing the PPP2R3 gene near the 5'-end of the SHOX gene through the FANCD gene at Xp22.2. PMID:26191517

  6. Stature and footsize in four Thai communities of Assam, India.

    PubMed

    Singh, T S; Phookan, M N

    1993-12-01

    An attempt has been made to examine correlationships between stature and footlength, stature and footbreadth, and footlength and breadth among four Thai (male) populations of Assam (India), viz. the Khamyangs, the Turungs, the Aitons and the Khamitis. Significant positive correlations have been found in all the cases. Mean values of the indices have revealed a more or less constant ratio of stature and footsize at all heights suggesting the possibility of estimating stature from footlength or breadth and vice versa. Estimation of stature from footlength is, however, preferable to estimation from footbreadth. The Turungs stand for the tallest in stature and biggest foot measurements. They fall into 'medium' stature of the Martin's scale while the others fall into 'below medium'. Statistically significant difference has been observed the Turungs and the Khamyangs in respect of footbreadth, between the Turungs and the Aitons in footlength and, between the Khamyangs and the Khamtis in respect of stature footbreadth index. PMID:8285602

  7. Genetics Home Reference: 22q11.2 duplication

    MedlinePLUS

    ... leading to short stature, and weak muscle tone (hypotonia). Many people with the duplication have no apparent ... cell ; chromosome ; developmental delay ; disabilities ; disability ; DNA ; duplication ; hypotonia ; inherit ; inheritance ; inherited ; Mb ; muscle tone ; population ; prevalence ; ...

  8. Novel treatment of short stature with aromatase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dunkel, Leo; Wickman, Sanna

    2003-09-01

    Estrogens have an essential role in the regulation of bone maturation and importantly in the closure of growth plates in both sexes. This prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled study was undertaken to evaluate whether suppression of estrogen synthesis in pubertal boys delays bone maturation and ultimately results in increased adult height. A total of 23 boys with constitutional delay of puberty (CDP) received a conventional, low-dose testosterone treatment for inducing progression of puberty. Eleven of these 23 boys were randomized to receive a specific and potent P450-aromatase inhibitor, letrozole, for suppression of estrogen action, and 12 boys were randomized to receive placebo. Estradiol concentrations in the letrozole-treated boys remained at the pretreatment level during the administration of letrozole, whereas the concentrations increased during the treatment with testosterone alone and during spontaneous progression of puberty. Testosterone concentrations increased in all groups, but during the letrozole treatment, the increase was more than fivefold higher than in the group treated with testosterone alone. The inhibition of estrogen synthesis delayed bone maturation. The slower bone maturation in the boys treated with testosterone and letrozole, despite higher androgen concentrations, than in the boys treated with testosterone indicate that estrogens are more important than androgens in regulation of bone maturation in pubertal boys. During the 18 months follow-up, an increase of 5.1 cm in predicted adult height was observed in the boys who received testosterone and letrozole, but no change was seen in the boys who received testosterone alone or in the untreated boys. This finding indicates that an increase in adult height can be attained in growing adolescent boys by inhibiting of estrogen action. PMID:14623531

  9. Revision of the Fully technique for estimating statures.

    PubMed

    Raxter, Michelle H; Auerbach, Benjamin M; Ruff, Christopher B

    2006-07-01

    The "anatomical" method of Fully (1956 Ann. Legale Med. 35:266-273) for reconstructing stature, involving the addition of skeletal elements from the calcaneus to the skull, has been increasingly used in anthropological and forensic contexts, but has undergone little systematic testing on samples other than the original sample used to develop the technique. The original description by Fully of the method also does not provide completely explicit directions for taking all of the necessary measurements. This study tested the accuracy and applicability of his method, and clarified measurement procedures. The study sample consisted of 119 adult black and white males and females of known cadaveric statures from the Terry Collection. Cadaveric statures were adjusted to living statures, following the recommendations of Trotter and Gleser (1952 Am. J. Phys. Anthropol. 10:469-514). We obtained the best results using maximum vertebral body heights (anterior to the pedicles) and measurement of the articulated talus and calcaneus height in anatomical position. Statures derived using the original Fully technique are strongly correlated with living statures in our sample (r = 0.96), but underestimate living stature by an average of about 2.4 cm. Anatomical considerations also suggest that the correction factors applied by Fully to convert summed skeletal height to living stature are too small. New formulae are derived to calculate living stature from skeletal height. There is no effect of sex or ancestry on stature prediction. Resulting stature estimates are accurate to within 4.5 cm in 95% of the individuals in our sample, with no directional bias. PMID:16425177

  10. Global distribution of the most prevalent deletions causing hypotonia-cystinuria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Martens, Kevin; Heulens, Inge; Meulemans, Sandra; Zaffanello, Marco; Tilstra, David; Hes, Frederik J; Rooman, Raoul; François, Inge; de Zegher, Francis; Jaeken, Jaak; Matthijs, Gert; Creemers, John W M

    2007-10-01

    Hypotonia-cystinuria syndrome (HCS) is a recessive disorder caused by microdeletions of SLC3A1 and PREPL on chromosome 2p21. Patients present with generalized hypotonia at birth, failure to thrive, growth retardation and cystinuria type I. While the initially described HCS families live in small regions in Belgium and France, we have now identified HCS alleles in patients and carriers from the Netherlands, Italy, Canada and United States of America. Surprisingly, among the nine deletions detected in those patients, only one novel deletion was found. Furthermore, one previously described deletion was found six times, another twice. Finally, we have investigated the frequency of both deletions using a random Belgian cohort. Given the global occurrence, HCS should be considered in the differential diagnosis of neonatal hypotonia. PMID:17579669

  11. Metatarsals in the estimation of stature in South Africans.

    PubMed

    Bidmos, Mubarak Ariyo

    2008-11-01

    To date, only one study has investigated the potential of metatarsals in the estimation of stature for forensic purposes. The morphology of these bones from clinical and paleontological perspectives is well researched in different parts of the world including South Africa. The present study aimed at assessing the usefulness of metatarsals of South Africans in the estimation of stature. For this study, 226 complete skeletons obtained from the Raymond A. Dart Collection were used in the formulation of univariate and multivariate regression equations from six linear measurements of metatarsals. The standard error of estimate for these equations was lower than that obtained for fragments of long bones and other skeletal elements studied so far for stature estimation in South Africans with the exception of intact long bones. Therefore, regression equations presented in this study can provide a reliable estimate of stature in cases where intact long bones are not available for forensic analysis. PMID:18926502

  12. Estimation of stature from handprint dimensions in Egyptian population.

    PubMed

    Paulis, Melad G

    2015-08-01

    Handprint in the scene of the crime is one of the most valuable clues in identification of the assailant. There are numerous studies on estimation of stature from direct measures of hand dimensions, but using a handprint instead, there is little research on it. So this study tried to focus on handprint as a tool used in estimation of stature. One hundred right male hands and 91 right female hands were scanned, processed via Photoshop program and handprint measurements were taken using a software program. Our results showed that stature could be estimated from handprint measurements by simple and multiple regression equations with standard error of estimate was the lowest in handprint length ±4.54 cm in male and ±5.38 cm in female. It was concluded that handprint from the scene of the crime could be used for the prediction of the stature of the assailant. PMID:26165660

  13. Stature-for-Age and Weight-for-Age Percentiles: Girls 2 to 20 Years

    MedlinePLUS

    2 to 20 years: Girls NAME Stature-for-age and Weight-for-age percentiles RECORD # 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Mother’s Stature Date Age Father’s Stature Weight Stature BMI* AGE (YEARS) in cm 160 62 155 60 150 58 145 56 140 S 54 ...

  14. Family size, the physical environment, and socioeconomic effects across the stature distribution.

    PubMed

    Carson, Scott Alan

    2012-04-01

    A neglected area in historical stature studies is the relationship between stature and family size. Using robust statistics and a large 19th century data set, this study documents a positive relationship between stature and family size across the stature distribution. The relationship between material inequality and health is the subject of considerable debate, and there was a positive relationship between stature and wealth and an inverse relationship between stature and material inequality. After controlling for family size and wealth variables, the paper reports a positive relationship between the physical environment and stature. PMID:22541664

  15. Objective Evaluation of Muscle Strength in Infants with Hypotonia and Muscle Weakness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reus, Linda; van Vlimmeren, Leo A.; Staal, J. Bart; Janssen, Anjo J. W. M.; Otten, Barto J.; Pelzer, Ben J.; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W. G.

    2013-01-01

    The clinical evaluation of an infant with motor delay, muscle weakness, and/or hypotonia would improve considerably if muscle strength could be measured objectively and normal reference values were available. The authors developed a method to measure muscle strength in infants and tested 81 typically developing infants, 6-36 months of age, and 17…

  16. Objective Evaluation of Muscle Strength in Infants with Hypotonia and Muscle Weakness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reus, Linda; van Vlimmeren, Leo A.; Staal, J. Bart; Janssen, Anjo J. W. M.; Otten, Barto J.; Pelzer, Ben J.; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W. G.

    2013-01-01

    The clinical evaluation of an infant with motor delay, muscle weakness, and/or hypotonia would improve considerably if muscle strength could be measured objectively and normal reference values were available. The authors developed a method to measure muscle strength in infants and tested 81 typically developing infants, 6-36 months of age, and 17…

  17. A New Syndrome with Hypotonia, Obesity, Mental Deficiency, and Facial, Oral, Ocular, and Limb Anomalies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, M. Michael, Jr.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Presented were three case reports of patients, 8 to 18 years of age, who shared common features, such as obesity beginning in midchildhood, hypotonia, mental deficiency characteristic craniofacial appearance (antimongoloid slant, open mouth, or prominent central incisors), oral and ocular anomalies, and tapering extremities with narrow hands and…

  18. Stature estimation from complete long bones in the Middle Pleistocene humans from the Sima de los Huesos, Sierra de Atapuerca (Spain).

    PubMed

    Carretero, José-Miguel; Rodríguez, Laura; García-González, Rebeca; Arsuaga, Juan-Luis; Gómez-Olivencia, Asier; Lorenzo, Carlos; Bonmatí, Alejandro; Gracia, Ana; Martínez, Ignacio; Quam, Rolf

    2012-02-01

    Systematic excavations at the site of the Sima de los Huesos (SH) in the Sierra de Atapuerca (Burgos, Spain) have allowed us to reconstruct 27 complete long bones of the human species Homo heidelbergensis. The SH sample is used here, together with a sample of 39 complete Homo neanderthalensis long bones and 17 complete early Homo sapiens (Skhul/Qafzeh) long bones, to compare the stature of these three different human species. Stature is estimated for each bone using race- and sex-independent regression formulae, yielding an average stature for each bone within each taxon. The mean length of each long bone from SH is significantly greater (p < 0.05) than the corresponding mean values in the Neandertal sample. The stature has been calculated for male and female specimens separately, averaging both means to calculate a general mean. This general mean stature for the entire sample of long bones is 163.6 cm for the SH hominins, 160.6 cm for Neandertals and 177.4 cm for early modern humans. Despite some overlap in the ranges of variation, all mean values in the SH sample (whether considering isolated bones, the upper or lower limb, males or females or more complete individuals) are larger than those of Neandertals. Given the strong relationship between long bone length and stature, we conclude that SH hominins represent a slightly taller population or species than the Neandertals. However, compared with living European Mediterranean populations, neither the Sima de los Huesos hominins nor the Neandertals should be considered 'short' people. In fact, the average stature within the genus Homo seems to have changed little over the course of the last two million years, since the appearance of Homo ergaster in East Africa. It is only with the emergence of H. sapiens, whose earliest representatives were 'very tall', that a significant increase in stature can be documented. PMID:22196156

  19. Quality of life in short adults.

    PubMed

    Busschbach, J J; Rikken, B; Grobbee, D E; De Charro, F T; Wit, J M

    1998-01-01

    The use of (costly) growth hormone (GH) treatment in short children is often justified by the assumption that short stature considerably reduces quality of life in adults. We tested this assumption in 5 groups of short adults: 25 patients with isolated GH deficiency; 17 male patients with childhood onset renal failure; 25 women with Turner syndrome and 26 patients who were presented as a child to a paediatrician for idiopathic short stature. A group of 44 short individuals with presumably idiopathic short stature, who had not been presented to a paediatrician for short stature, was sampled from the general population ('normal shorts'). We measured quality of life in terms of socio-economic variables, the Nottingham Health Profile and time trade-off. The mean height of most groups was close to the 3rd percentile. The chance of having a partner was low for all groups, except for the normal shorts. Problems with job application were only reported in Turner syndrome. The scores on the Nottingham Health Profile were all within the normal range, but GH-deficient adults had a higher score on the domain energy than normal shorts. Women with Turner syndrome, individuals with renal failure, and those with idiopathic short stature had a wish to be taller, with an estimated reduction in quality of life of 2-4% (time trade-off). As the normal shorts did not show any sign of a reduced quality of life, we falsify the assumption of a direct relation between short stature and quality of life. The complaints of patients with idiopathic short stature around the 3rd percentile seem to be the result of unsuccessful coping strategies. PMID:9438783

  20. Developing Korean-specific equations of stature estimation.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yangseung; Jantz, Lee Meadows

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to develop Korean-specific equations for stature estimation and compare their performance to existing techniques. Due to a lack of appropriate reference samples in Korea, equations were generated using a hybrid method on 113 Korean unknown skeletons. In this approach, estimates using the anatomical method [1] were regarded as actual stature. Results revealed that new equations produced more accurate and precise estimates than previous techniques. In addition, due to consistent body proportions of Korean populations through time and space, new equations are applicable to Korean skeletons regardless of their temporal and geographic origins. For obtaining statures at death, particularly in a forensic context, an age correction factor, 0.0426cm/year, should be applied. PMID:26833426

  1. Sacralization of a sixth lumbar vertebra and its effect upon the estimation of living stature.

    PubMed

    Lundy, J K

    1988-07-01

    Stature is estimated in a case presenting a sacralized sixth lumbar vertebra using both Fully's anatomical method and Trotter and Gleser's stature estimation formulas. In this case, where antemortem stature is known, the accuracy of the anatomical method is enhanced by including the height of the actual S1 segment in the calculation, while the accuracy of the Trotter and Gleser estimate is enhanced by adding the height of the extra vertebra to the stature estimate. PMID:3171499

  2. Femoral lengths and stature in Plio-Pleistocene hominids.

    PubMed

    McHenry, H M

    1991-06-01

    This study reports the femoral lengths of 31 Plio-Pleistocene hominids dated between 3.1 and 0.7 million years ago, and uses those lengths to estimate stature by way of the femur-stature ratio reported by Feldesman et al. (Am. J. Phys. Anthropol. 78:219-220, 1989). By this method the average female Australopithecus afarensis is 105 cm and the average male is 151 cm. The respective values are 115 and 138 cm for A. africanus. As defined by Howell (In VJ Maglio and HBS Cooke (eds): The Evolution of African Mammals. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1978) and Johanson et al. (Kirtlandia 28:1-14, 1978), Homo habilis is a sexually dimorphic species, with females standing 118 cm and males 157 cm. Such apparently strong dimorphism may be due to the possibility that there are actually two species of nonrobust hominids between 2 and 1.7 m.y.a. The estimate for the female Australopithecus boisei is 124 cm and for the male, 137 cm, but these estimates are especially difficult to be certain of because there are no femora that can be positively identified as male A. boisei. Australopithecus robustus is estimated to be 110 cm (female) and 132 cm (male). African Homo erectus stood 160 cm (female) and 180 cm (male). From these estimates several generalizations are apparent. First, there is apparently strong sexual dimorphism in stature in A. afarensis and H. habilis, but less in the other species. Second, the "robust" australopithecines were relatively small statured. Third, it is apparently not true that humans have been getting progressively taller throughout their evolutionary history. Some individuals were as tall as modern humans 3 m.y.a., by 2 m.y.a. one individual stood about 173 cm, and by 1.7 m.y.a. a stature of 180+ cm was not uncommon. PMID:1882979

  3. Wealth, inequality, and insolation effects across the 19th century white US stature distribution.

    PubMed

    Carson, Scott Alan

    2010-12-01

    Sources associated with 19th century stature variation have been widely considered. Using US state prison records and robust statistics, this paper illustrates that 19th century US white statures were positively associated with a broad combination of wealth, equality, and environmental characteristics. Individuals from geographic areas characterized by low wealth and high inequality had shorter statures. After controlling for various factors, direct sunlight--the primary source of vitamin D--was also positively associated with stature. After controlling for wealth, inequality, and insolation, farmers were taller than workers in other occupations. These wealth, insolation, and socioeconomic relationships are significant across the stature distribution. PMID:21055748

  4. Multiplication factor versus regression analysis in stature estimation from hand and foot dimensions.

    PubMed

    Krishan, Kewal; Kanchan, Tanuj; Sharma, Abhilasha

    2012-05-01

    Estimation of stature is an important parameter in identification of human remains in forensic examinations. The present study is aimed to compare the reliability and accuracy of stature estimation and to demonstrate the variability in estimated stature and actual stature using multiplication factor and regression analysis methods. The study is based on a sample of 246 subjects (123 males and 123 females) from North India aged between 17 and 20 years. Four anthropometric measurements; hand length, hand breadth, foot length and foot breadth taken on the left side in each subject were included in the study. Stature was measured using standard anthropometric techniques. Multiplication factors were calculated and linear regression models were derived for estimation of stature from hand and foot dimensions. Derived multiplication factors and regression formula were applied to the hand and foot measurements in the study sample. The estimated stature from the multiplication factors and regression analysis was compared with the actual stature to find the error in estimated stature. The results indicate that the range of error in estimation of stature from regression analysis method is less than that of multiplication factor method thus, confirming that the regression analysis method is better than multiplication factor analysis in stature estimation. PMID:22520373

  5. XYY syndrome: a 13-year-old boy with tall stature

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Won Ha; Jung, Mo Kyung; Kim, Ki Eun; Chae, Hyun Wook; Kim, Duk Hee; Kwon, Ah Reum

    2015-01-01

    When evaluating the underlying causes of tall stature, it is important to differentiate pathologic tall stature from familial tall stature. Various pathologic conditions leading to adult tall stature include excess growth hormone secretion, Marfan syndrome, androgen or estrogen deficiency, testicular feminization, and sex chromosome anomaly, such as Klinefelter syndrome and XYY syndrome. Men with 47,XYY syndrome can exhibit multiple phenotypes. A 13-year-old boy visited the hospital for evaluation of tall stature. The boy had no other physical abnormalities except tall stature. All biochemical and imaging studies were within the normal ranges. He was diagnosed with XYY syndrome in this chromosome study. When evaluating men with tall stature, XYY syndrome should be ruled out. PMID:26512355

  6. XYY syndrome: a 13-year-old boy with tall stature.

    PubMed

    Jo, Won Ha; Jung, Mo Kyung; Kim, Ki Eun; Chae, Hyun Wook; Kim, Duk Hee; Kwon, Ah Reum; Kim, Ho-Seong

    2015-09-01

    When evaluating the underlying causes of tall stature, it is important to differentiate pathologic tall stature from familial tall stature. Various pathologic conditions leading to adult tall stature include excess growth hormone secretion, Marfan syndrome, androgen or estrogen deficiency, testicular feminization, and sex chromosome anomaly, such as Klinefelter syndrome and XYY syndrome. Men with 47,XYY syndrome can exhibit multiple phenotypes. A 13-year-old boy visited the hospital for evaluation of tall stature. The boy had no other physical abnormalities except tall stature. All biochemical and imaging studies were within the normal ranges. He was diagnosed with XYY syndrome in this chromosome study. When evaluating men with tall stature, XYY syndrome should be ruled out. PMID:26512355

  7. ETHNICITY AND INCOME IMPACT ON BMI AND STATURE OF SCHOOL CHILDREN LIVING IN URBAN SOUTHERN MEXICO.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Nina; Barrera-Pérez, The Late Mario; Palma-Solis, Marco; Zavala-Castro, Jorge; Dickinson, Federico; Azcorra, Hugo; Prelip, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Obesity affects quality of life and increases the risk of morbidity and mortality. Mexico, a middle-income country, has a high prevalence of overweight and obesity among urban children. Merida is the most populated and growing city in southern Mexico with a mixed Mayan and non-Maya population. Local urbanization and access to industrialized foods have impacted the eating habits and physical activity of children, increasing the risk of overweight and obesity. This study aimed to contribute to the existing literature on the global prevalence of overweight and obesity and examined the association of parental income, ethnicity and nutritional status with body mass index (BMI) and height in primary school children in Merida. The heights and weights of 3243 children aged 6-12 from sixteen randomly selected schools in the city were collected between April and December 2012. Multinomial logistic regression models were used to examine differences in the prevalence of BMI and height categories (based on WHO reference values) by ethnicity and income levels. Of the total students, 1648 (50.9%) were overweight or obese. Stunting was found in 227 children (7%), while 755 (23.3%) were defined as having short stature. Combined stunting and overweight/obesity was found in 301 students (9.3%) and twelve (0.4%) were classified as stunted and of low weight. Having two Mayan surnames was inversely associated with having adequate height (OR=0.69, p<0.05) and the presence of two Maya surnames in children increased the odds of short stature and stunting. Children from lower income families had twice the odds of being stunted and obese. Overweight, obesity and short stature were frequent among the studied children. A significant proportion of Meridan children could face an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease and its associated negative economic and social outcomes unless healthier habits are adopted. Action is needed to reduce the prevalence of obesity among southern Mexican families of all ethnic groups, particularly those of lower income. PMID:26041567

  8. Biallelic Mutations in UNC80 Cause Persistent Hypotonia, Encephalopathy, Growth Retardation, and Severe Intellectual Disability.

    PubMed

    Stray-Pedersen, Asbjørg; Cobben, Jan-Maarten; Prescott, Trine E; Lee, Sora; Cang, Chunlei; Aranda, Kimberly; Ahmed, Sohnee; Alders, Marielle; Gerstner, Thorsten; Aslaksen, Kathinka; Tétreault, Martine; Qin, Wen; Hartley, Taila; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Muzny, Donna M; Tarailo-Graovac, Maja; van Karnebeek, Clara D M; Lupski, James R; Ren, Dejian; Yoon, Grace

    2016-01-01

    Ion channel proteins are required for both the establishment of resting membrane potentials and the generation of action potentials. Hundreds of mutations in genes encoding voltage-gated ion channels responsible for action potential generation have been found to cause severe neurological diseases. In contrast, the roles of voltage-independent "leak" channels, important for the establishment and maintenance of resting membrane potentials upon which action potentials are generated, are not well established in human disease. UNC80 is a large component of the NALCN sodium-leak channel complex that regulates the basal excitability of the nervous system. Loss-of-function mutations of NALCN cause infantile hypotonia with psychomotor retardation and characteristic facies (IHPRF). We report four individuals from three unrelated families who have homozygous missense or compound heterozygous truncating mutations in UNC80 and persistent hypotonia, encephalopathy, growth failure, and severe intellectual disability. Compared to control cells, HEK293T cells transfected with an expression plasmid containing the c.5098C>T (p.Pro1700Ser) UNC80 mutation found in one individual showed markedly decreased NALCN channel currents. Our findings demonstrate the fundamental significance of UNC80 and basal ionic conductance to human health. PMID:26708751

  9. [Transplacental or breast milk intoxication to clonidine: a case of neonatal hypotonia and drowsiness].

    PubMed

    Sevrez, C; Lavocat, M-P; Mounier, G; Elefant, E; Magnin, S; Teyssier, G; Patural, H

    2014-02-01

    We report a case of clonidine poisoning in a breastfed newborn. At 2 days of life, this boy presented a consciousness deficit with drowsiness, hypotonia, and suspected generalized seizures. There were no cardiorespiratory problems outside of progressive central apneas beginning the 5th day. Further initial investigations were normal (extensive biological exams, cranial ultrasonography and transfontanellar Doppler, electroencephalography, and brain MRI study), excluding the main causes of neonatal hypotonia (encephalitis, infection, metabolic disorder). However, new medical questioning revealed maternal daily intake of 0.15 mg clonidine for hypertension during and after pregnancy. Since it was impossible to quantify clonidine quantification in newborn serum and breast milk, a weaning test was performed the 9th day. Twenty-four hours after cessation of breastfeeding, complete regression of symptoms was obtained. Poisoning by clonidine after fetal and neonatal exposure through breast milk is rare but severe enough to simulate a neurological disease. Diagnosis is based on the search for drug use and the cessation of breastfeeding if doubt persists. Recovery of normal examination results is then rapid and complete. PMID:24411570

  10. Estimation of stature using hand and foot dimensions in Slovak adults.

    PubMed

    Uhrová, Petra; Beňuš, Radoslav; Masnicová, Soňa; Obertová, Zuzana; Kramárová, Daniela; Kyselicová, Klaudia; Dörnhöferová, Michaela; Bodoriková, Silvia; Neščáková, Eva

    2015-03-01

    Hand and foot dimensions used for stature estimation help to formulate a biological profile in the process of personal identification. Morphological variability of hands and feet shows the importance of generating population-specific equations to estimate stature. The stature, hand length, hand breadth, foot length and foot breadth of 250 young Slovak males and females, aged 18-24 years, were measured according to standard anthropometric procedures. The data were statistically analyzed using independent t-test for sex and bilateral differences. Pearson correlation coefficient was used for assessing relationship between stature and hand/foot parameters, and subsequently linear regression analysis was used to estimate stature. The results revealed significant sex differences in hand and foot dimensions as well as in stature (p<0.05). There was a positive and statistically significant correlation between stature and all measurements in both sexes (p<0.01). The highest correlation coefficient was found for foot length in males (r=0.71) as well as in females (r=0.63). Regression equations were computed separately for each sex. The accuracy of stature prediction ranged from ±4.6 to ±6.1cm. The results of this study indicate that hand and foot dimension can be used to estimate stature for Slovak for the purpose of forensic field. The regression equations can be of use for stature estimation particularly in cases of dismembered bodies. PMID:25459368

  11. Estimation of stature from the upper limb measurements of Sudanese adults.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Altayeb Abdalla

    2013-05-10

    The estimation of stature using different parts of the body is crucial for formulating a biological profile during the process of personal identification, especially when mutilated and amputated limbs or body parts are found. Hand anthropometry has been reported in the literature including limited range of populations to be promising for stature prediction, but few studies have attempted to link upper limb anthropometry to stature. No previous research on this topic has been reported for modern Sudanese adults. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the relationship between the upper limb dimensions and stature in Sudanese adults and to develop regression formulae to estimate stature from these dimensions. The stature, upper arm length, ulnar length, wrist breadth, hand length, and hand breadth of 200 right-handed subjects, comprising 100 males and 100 females (aged 25-30 years), were measured. Initially, the data were analyzed using basic univariate analysis and independent t-tests; then sex-specific simple and multiple linear regression models were used to estimate stature. The results indicated significant sexual dimorphism for all measurements. There was a positive correlation between upper limb measurements and stature (p<0.01), which was highest for ulnar length. The accuracy of stature prediction ranged from ±3.54 to 5.85 cm. The use of multiple regression equations gave better results than simple regression equations. This study provides new forensic standards for stature estimation from the upper limb measurements of Sudanese adults. PMID:23528834

  12. Biological Conditions and Economic Development: Nineteenth-Century Stature on the U.S. Great Plains.

    PubMed

    Carson, Scott Alan

    2015-06-01

    Average stature is now a well-accepted measure of material and economic well-being in development studies when traditional measures are sparse or unreliable, but little work has been done on the biological conditions for individuals on the nineteenth-century U.S. Great Plains. Records of 14,427 inmates from the Nebraska state prison are used to examine the relationship between stature and economic conditions. Statures of both black and white prisoners in Nebraska increased through time, indicating that biological conditions improved as Nebraska's output market and agricultural sectors developed. The effect of rural environments on stature is illustrated by the fact that farm laborers were taller than common laborers. Urbanization and industrialization had significant impacts on stature, and proximity to trade routes and waterways was inversely related to stature. PMID:26040245

  13. Is There a Correlation Between Footstep Length, Lower Extremities, and Stature?

    PubMed

    Kanchan, Tanuj; Sinha, Shreya; Krishan, Kewal

    2015-09-01

    A probable correlation between stature and footstep length is expected, and consequently, the stature may be estimated from footstep length. The present research was conducted to study the correlation of footstep length with length of the lower extremities and stature. The study participants (n=142) were asked to walk on a paper sheet with inked feet and footstep length was measured. Mean stature and lower limb length were significantly larger in males. Sex differences were not observed in the average footstep length. Average footstep length and lower limb length did not show a significant correlation among the participants. A statistically significant correlation was observed between average footstep length and stature only among females. Our observations suggest that the length of the lower limb may not be a major factor in determining the footstep length of a person and that the forensic utility of stature estimation from footstep length may be limited. PMID:26218919

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Alpha thalassemia X-linked intellectual disability syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... disability syndrome include an unusually small head size (microcephaly), short stature, and skeletal abnormalities. Many affected individuals ... gene expression ; genitalia ; hemoglobin ; hypospadias ; hypotonia ; inheritance ; inherited ; microcephaly ; motor ; muscle tone ; newborn screening ; oxygen ; prevalence ; protein ; ...

  15. Concurrence of inv(7)(q11.2q32) and del(8)(p23.1) in a girl with congenital microcephaly, hypotonia, developmental delay, strabismus, hypernatremia, hypermagnesemia and deafness.

    PubMed

    Mahjoubi, F; Nasiri, F; Razazian, F

    2012-01-01

    The clinical manifestations and cytogenetic details of a de novo partial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 8, del(8)(p23.1), and inversion of long arm chromosome 7, inv(7)(q11.2q32), are described. The case was a 22 month old girl referred to our cytogenetic laboratory due to many abnormal features such as congenital microcephaly, hypotonia, developmental delay, strabismus, highly arched palate, hypernatremia, hypermagnesemia and deafness. Chromosome analysis revealed 46,XX, inv(7)(q11.2q32),del(8)(p23.1) de novo karyotype. The concurrence of these two abnormalities has not been reported previously. PMID:23072189

  16. Estimation of stature from dimensions of hands and feet in a North Indian population.

    PubMed

    Krishan, Kewal; Sharma, Abhilasha

    2007-08-01

    In medico-legal autopsies, establishing personal identity of the victims is often required. Estimation of stature from extremities and their parts plays an important role in identifying the dead in forensic examinations. The study examines the relationship between stature and dimensions of hands and feet among Rajputs of Himachal Pradesh -- a North Indian endogamous group. The purpose for understanding these examinations was the paucity in the literature of studies that allow the reconstruction of stature from various dimensions of hands and feet amongst Rajputs. Hand length, hand breadth, foot length and foot breadth of 246 subjects comprising 123 males and 123 females ranging in age from 17 to 20 years were taken independently on left and right side of each individual. Statistical analyses indicated that the bilateral variation was insignificant for all the measurements except hand breadth in both the sexes (P<0.01). Sex differences were found to be highly significant for all the measurements (P<0.01). Linear and multiple regression equations for stature estimation were calculated using the above mentioned variables. The correlation coefficients between stature and all the measurements of hands and feet were found to be positive and statistically significant. The highest correlation coefficient between stature and foot length and lowest SEE (standard error of estimate) indicate that the foot length provides highest reliability and accuracy in estimating stature of an unknown individual. The regression equations were checked for their accuracy by comparing the estimated stature and actual stature. PMID:17239650

  17. Adjustment to the light environment in small-statured forbs as a strategy for complementary resource use in mixtures of grassland species

    PubMed Central

    Roscher, Christiane; Kutsch, Werner L.; Kolle, Olaf; Ziegler, Waldemar; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims The biological mechanisms of niche complementarity allowing for a stable coexistence of a large number of species in a plant community are still poorly understood. This study investigated how small-statured forbs use environmental niches in light and CO2 to explain their persistence in diverse temperate grasslands. Methods Light and CO2 profiles and the corresponding leaf characteristics of seven small-statured forbs were measured in monocultures and a multi-species mixture within a biodiversity experiment (Jena Experiment) to assess their adjustment to growth conditions in the canopy. Key Results Environmental conditions near the ground varied throughout the season with a substantial CO2 enrichment (>70 µmol mol?1 at 2 cm, >20 µmol mol?1 at 10 cm above soil surface) and a decrease in light transmittance (to <5 % deep in the canopy) with large standing biomass (>500 g d. wt m?2) in the multi-species assemblage. Leaf morphology, biochemistry and physiology of small-statured forbs adjusted to low light in the mixture compared with the monocultures. However, the net carbon assimilation balance during the period of low light only compensated the costs of maintenance respiration, while CO2 enrichment near the ground did not allow for additional carbon gain. Close correlations of leaf mass per area with changes in light availability suggested that small-statured forbs are capable of adjusting to exploit seasonal niches with better light supply for growth and to maintain the carbon metabolism for survival if light transmittance is substantially reduced in multi-species assemblages. Conclusions This study shows that adjustment to a highly dynamic light environment is most important for spatial and seasonal niche separation of small-statured forb species in regularly mown, species-rich grasslands. The utilization of short-period CO2 enrichment developing in dense vegetation close to the ground hardly improves their carbon balance and contributes little to species segregation along environmental niche axes. PMID:21385779

  18. Estimation of Stature from Arm Span in Medical Students of Maharashtra, India

    PubMed Central

    Supare, MS; Bagul, AS; Pandit, SV; Jadhav, JS

    2015-01-01

    Background: Stature can be estimated from body parameters in dead and mutilated bodies using regression equation or multiplication factor. However, regression equations and multiplication factors are specific for the region only and can’t be used in all population. Aim: To formulate regression equation and multiplication factor for the estimation of stature from arm span (AS) for a region in Maharashtra, India. Subjects and Methods: It was a cross-sectional study, did over a period of 2 years, from October 2011 to September 2013. Four hundred students of three Government medical colleges of Maharashtra, aged 18–24 years were enrolled in the study. Stature and AS were measured and subjected to statistical analysis. Unpaired t-test and simple linear regression were used. Results: Stature and AS of 400 medical students (219 males and 181 females) were measured. Subjects were divided into six groups depending upon age. Simple regression equation and multiplication factor for male and female and for each age group were derived for estimation of stature. We found correlation coefficient (R) of 0.89 in male and 0.90 in female using simple regression, which shows strong correlation between stature and AS. Conclusion: Mean stature and AS of male were more than female with statistical significance. Stature can be accurately estimated from AS using simple regression equation or multiplication factor. PMID:26097765

  19. The determination of correlation between stature and upper limb and hand measurements in Iranian adults.

    PubMed

    Mahakizadeh, S; -Ghoroghi, F Moghani; Moshkdanian, Gh; Mokhtari, T; Hassanzadeh, G

    2016-03-01

    Estimation of stature is an important issue, which is significantly considered in forensic anthropology. It will be difficult to predict the identification of an individual when only some parts of dead body are discovered following disasters or criminal events. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between stature and upper limb and hand length in Iranian adults to generate regression formulae for stature estimation. Three anthropometric measurements; Stature, Upper Limb Length (ULL) and Hand Length (HL) were taken on subjects, comprising 142 male students (18-25 years) using standard measuring instruments. The data were analysed using SPSS 16. Then linear regression models were used to estimate stature. The results indicated a positive correlation between stature and upper limb and hand measurements. The correlation coefficient with upper limb length was r= 0.89 & p =0.0001 and with hand length was r= 0.78 & p =0.0001. In conclusion, we found a strong correlation between stature and upper limb and hand length. The regression analysis also showed that the Upper Limb Length give better prediction of stature compared to Hand length measurements. PMID:26795396

  20. Stature-for-Age and Weight-for-Age Percentiles: Boys, 2 to 20 Years

    MedlinePLUS

    2 to 20 years: Boys NAME Stature-for-age and Weight-for-age percentiles RECORD # Mother’s Stature Date Age in cm 160 62 S 155 60 T 150 ... 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 BMI* AGE (YEARS) cm 95 190 90 185 75 180 ...

  1. Do group-specific equations provide the best estimates of stature?

    PubMed

    Albanese, John; Osley, Stephanie E; Tuck, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    An estimate of stature can be used by a forensic anthropologist with the preliminary identification of an unknown individual when human skeletal remains are recovered. Fordisc is a computer application that can be used to estimate stature; like many other methods it requires the user to assign an unknown individual to a specific group defined by sex, race/ancestry, and century of birth before an equation is applied. The assumption is that a group-specific equation controls for group differences and should provide the best results most often. In this paper we assess the utility and benefits of using group-specific equations to estimate stature using Fordisc. Using the maximum length of the humerus and the maximum length of the femur from individuals with documented stature, we address the question: Do sex-, race/ancestry- and century-specific stature equations provide the best results when estimating stature? The data for our sample of 19th Century White males (n=28) were entered into Fordisc and stature was estimated using 22 different equation options for a total of 616 trials: 19th and 20th Century Black males, 19th and 20th Century Black females, 19th and 20th Century White females, 19th and 20th Century White males, 19th and 20th Century any, and 20th Century Hispanic males. The equations were assessed for utility in any one case (how many times the estimated range bracketed the documented stature) and in aggregate using 1-way ANOVA and other approaches. This group-specific equation that should have provided the best results was outperformed by several other equations for both the femur and humerus. These results suggest that group-specific equations do not provide better results for estimating stature while at the same time are more difficult to apply because an unknown must be allocated to a given group before stature can be estimated. PMID:26945108

  2. Small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptide N quantitative methylation analysis in infants with central hypotonia.

    PubMed

    Nájera, Nayelli; González, Lourdes; Pérez Durand, Javier; Ruíz, Elizabeth; Garibay, Nayely; Pastrana, Yadira; Barragan, Eduardo; Durán-R, Rosa Eréndira; Queipo, Gloria

    2011-01-01

    Central hypotonic is one of the most difficult issues in neurology, ruling out neurogenetic syndromic causes is critical, Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) it is the most frequent genetic syndrome, it is caused by the loss of expression of the paternal allele in a group of imprinted genes within 15q11-q13, and is characterized by severe prenatal and postnatal hypotonia. SNURF-SNRPN gene methylation detects 99% of the cases but fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis is necessary to confirm chromosome microdeletions. The advantage of SNRP-quantitative strategy of methylated alleles is that it makes it possible to make the diagnosis and identify deletions and mosaicism in one reaction. In infants clinical diagnosis is difficult. It has been proposed that around 40% of hypotonic patients have PWS but an accurate percentage has not been established. Twenty-four central hypotonic infants were studied by this molecular strategy, showing 41.5% with the disease. This molecular approach also permitted calculation of gene dosage and detection of those cases with microdeletion. PMID:21932609

  3. Higher Education and the Public Trust: Improving Stature in Colleges and Universities. ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report No. 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alfred, Richard L.; Weissman, Julie

    Institutional stature, its development and determination, and strategies for its enhancement in colleges and universities are discussed. Focus is on the fundamental dimensions of stature, how it is affected by the external environment, and what colleges can do to improve it. Chapters are as follow: "Definition and Dimensions of Stature" (higher…

  4. Epiphysial dysplasia: a constant finding in the XXXXY syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, R; Pajewski, M; Rosenblatt, M

    1978-01-01

    Two patients with the XXXXY syndrome are presented. Both boys are mentally retarded with short stature, muscular hypotonia, and hypogonadism. A constant feature of this syndrome is a varying degree of epiphysial dysplasia probably secondary to hypotonia and growth deceleration. Images PMID:568664

  5. Mutations in PURA Cause Profound Neonatal Hypotonia, Seizures, and Encephalopathy in 5q31.3 Microdeletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lalani, Seema R.; Zhang, Jing; Schaaf, Christian P.; Brown, Chester W.; Magoulas, Pilar; Tsai, Anne Chun-Hui; El-Gharbawy, Areeg; Wierenga, Klaas J.; Bartholomew, Dennis; Fong, Chin-To; Barbaro-Dieber, Tina; Kukolich, Mary K.; Burrage, Lindsay C.; Austin, Elise; Keller, Kory; Pastore, Matthew; Fernandez, Fabio; Lotze, Timothy; Wilfong, Angus; Purcarin, Gabriela; Zhu, Wenmiao; Craigen, William J.; McGuire, Marianne; Jain, Mahim; Cooney, Erin; Azamian, Mahshid; Bainbridge, Matthew N.; Muzny, Donna M.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Person, Richard E.; Niu, Zhiyv; Eng, Christine M.; Lupski, James R.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Yang, Yaping; Wang, Meng C.; Xia, Fan

    2014-01-01

    5q31.3 microdeletion syndrome is characterized by neonatal hypotonia, encephalopathy with or without epilepsy, and severe developmental delay, and the minimal critical deletion interval harbors three genes. We describe 11 individuals with clinical features of 5q31.3 microdeletion syndrome and de novo mutations in PURA, encoding transcriptional activator protein Pur-?, within the critical region. These data implicate causative PURA mutations responsible for the severe neurological phenotypes observed in this syndrome. PMID:25439098

  6. Mutations in PURA cause profound neonatal hypotonia, seizures, and encephalopathy in 5q31.3 microdeletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lalani, Seema R; Zhang, Jing; Schaaf, Christian P; Brown, Chester W; Magoulas, Pilar; Tsai, Anne Chun-Hui; El-Gharbawy, Areeg; Wierenga, Klaas J; Bartholomew, Dennis; Fong, Chin-To; Barbaro-Dieber, Tina; Kukolich, Mary K; Burrage, Lindsay C; Austin, Elise; Keller, Kory; Pastore, Matthew; Fernandez, Fabio; Lotze, Timothy; Wilfong, Angus; Purcarin, Gabriela; Zhu, Wenmiao; Craigen, William J; McGuire, Marianne; Jain, Mahim; Cooney, Erin; Azamian, Mahshid; Bainbridge, Matthew N; Muzny, Donna M; Boerwinkle, Eric; Person, Richard E; Niu, Zhiyv; Eng, Christine M; Lupski, James R; Gibbs, Richard A; Beaudet, Arthur L; Yang, Yaping; Wang, Meng C; Xia, Fan

    2014-11-01

    5q31.3 microdeletion syndrome is characterized by neonatal hypotonia, encephalopathy with or without epilepsy, and severe developmental delay, and the minimal critical deletion interval harbors three genes. We describe 11 individuals with clinical features of 5q31.3 microdeletion syndrome and de novo mutations in PURA, encoding transcriptional activator protein Pur-?, within the critical region. These data implicate causative PURA mutations responsible for the severe neurological phenotypes observed in this syndrome. PMID:25439098

  7. Deletion of PREPL, a gene encoding a putative serine oligopeptidase, in patients with hypotonia-cystinuria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jaeken, Jaak; Martens, Kevin; Francois, Inge; Eyskens, Francois; Lecointre, Claudine; Derua, Rita; Meulemans, Sandra; Slootstra, Jerry W; Waelkens, Etienne; de Zegher, Francis; Creemers, John W M; Matthijs, Gert

    2006-01-01

    In 11 patients with a recessive congenital disorder, which we refer to as "the hypotonia-cystinuria syndrome," microdeletion of part of the SLC3A1 and PREPL genes on chromosome 2p21 was found. Patients present with generalized hypotonia at birth, nephrolithiasis, growth hormone deficiency, minor facial dysmorphism, and failure to thrive, followed by hyperphagia and rapid weight gain in late childhood. Since loss-of-function mutations in SLC3A1 are known to cause isolated cystinuria type I, and since the expression of the flanking genes, C2orf34 and PPM1B, was normal, the extended phenotype can be attributed to the deletion of PREPL. PREPL is localized in the cytosol and shows homology with prolyl endopeptidase and oligopeptidase B. Substitution of the predicted catalytic residues (Ser470, Asp556, and His601) by alanines resulted in loss of reactivity with a serine hydrolase-specific probe. In sharp contrast to prolyl oligopeptidase and oligopeptidase B, which require both aminoterminal and carboxyterminal sequences for activity, PREPL activity appears to depend only on the carboxyterminal domain. Taken together, these results suggest that PREPL is a novel oligopeptidase, with unique structural and functional characteristics, involved in hypotonia-cystinuria syndrome. PMID:16385448

  8. Deletion of PREPL, a Gene Encoding a Putative Serine Oligopeptidase, in Patients with Hypotonia-Cystinuria Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jaeken, Jaak; Martens, Kevin; François, Inge; Eyskens, François; Lecointre, Claudine; Derua, Rita; Meulemans, Sandra; Slootstra, Jerry W.; Waelkens, Etienne; Zegher, Francis de; Creemers, John W. M.; Matthijs, Gert

    2006-01-01

    In 11 patients with a recessive congenital disorder, which we refer to as “the hypotonia-cystinuria syndrome,” microdeletion of part of the SLC3A1 and PREPL genes on chromosome 2p21 was found. Patients present with generalized hypotonia at birth, nephrolithiasis, growth hormone deficiency, minor facial dysmorphism, and failure to thrive, followed by hyperphagia and rapid weight gain in late childhood. Since loss-of-function mutations in SLC3A1 are known to cause isolated cystinuria type I, and since the expression of the flanking genes, C2orf34 and PPM1B, was normal, the extended phenotype can be attributed to the deletion of PREPL. PREPL is localized in the cytosol and shows homology with prolyl endopeptidase and oligopeptidase B. Substitution of the predicted catalytic residues (Ser470, Asp556, and His601) by alanines resulted in loss of reactivity with a serine hydrolase-specific probe. In sharp contrast to prolyl oligopeptidase and oligopeptidase B, which require both aminoterminal and carboxyterminal sequences for activity, PREPL activity appears to depend only on the carboxyterminal domain. Taken together, these results suggest that PREPL is a novel oligopeptidase, with unique structural and functional characteristics, involved in hypotonia-cystinuria syndrome. PMID:16385448

  9. Encephalopathy and Hypotonia due to Baclofen Toxicity in a Patient with End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ijaz, Mohsin; Tariq, Hassan; Kashif, Muhammad; Marquez, Jose Gomez

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 57 Final Diagnosis: Baclofen toxicity Symptoms: Encephalopathy • hypotonia Medication: Baclofen Clinical Procedure: Hemodialysis Specialty: Critical Care Objective: Unusual or unexpected effect of treatment Background: Baclofen is a centrally acting gamma-aminobutyric acid agonist used for the symptomatic relief of skeletal muscle spasm and spasticity in traumatic spinal cord lesions, multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, and stroke. It is also used in the treatment of chronic hiccups and cocaine abuse. Baclofen-induced central nervous system depression is rare at the usual therapeutic doses. However, patients with impaired renal function are at a higher risk of developing baclofen toxicity, even at a lower dose. Case Report: A 57-year-old woman with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis was admitted to our emergency department with progressive confusion and a generalized decrease in muscular tone. There was no obvious metabolic or infectious etiology that could have explained her condition. A comprehensive laboratory and imaging workup was negative. A review of her medication showed that she had recently been prescribed baclofen for muscular spasm. She was diagnosed with baclofen toxicity and was treated with emergent hemodialysis, which improved her mental status and her decreased muscle tone. Repeated sessions of hemodialysis administered on her second and third days of admission ultimately produced sustained clinical improvement and a complete return to her baseline mental status. She was subsequently discharged home with instructions to stay off baclofen. Conclusions: Baclofen toxicity is an under-diagnosed condition, especially in patients with renal dysfunction. Physicians should consider baclofen toxicity in patients with suboptimal kidney function on baclofen who present with altered mental status. Emergent hemodialysis and intensive care unit monitoring is recommended. PMID:25895118

  10. Covariation between human pelvis shape, stature, and head size alleviates the obstetric dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Barbara; Mitteroecker, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Compared with other primates, childbirth is remarkably difficult in humans because the head of a human neonate is large relative to the birth-relevant dimensions of the maternal pelvis. It seems puzzling that females have not evolved wider pelvises despite the high maternal mortality and morbidity risk connected to childbirth. Despite this seeming lack of change in average pelvic morphology, we show that humans have evolved a complex link between pelvis shape, stature, and head circumference that was not recognized before. The identified covariance patterns contribute to ameliorate the “obstetric dilemma.” Females with a large head, who are likely to give birth to neonates with a large head, possess birth canals that are shaped to better accommodate large-headed neonates. Short females with an increased risk of cephalopelvic mismatch possess a rounder inlet, which is beneficial for obstetrics. We suggest that these covariances have evolved by the strong correlational selection resulting from childbirth. Although males are not subject to obstetric selection, they also show part of these association patterns, indicating a genetic–developmental origin of integration. PMID:25902498

  11. Voices of athletes reveal only modest acoustic correlates of stature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owren, Michael J.; Anderson, John D.

    2005-04-01

    Recent studies of acoustic cues to body-size in nonhuman primate and human vocalizations have produced results varying from very strong relationships between formant frequencies and length/weight in rhesus monkeys to weak correlations between formants and stature in humans. The current work attempted to address these discrepancies by compiling a database of naturally occurring speech with a large number of vocalizers of maximally varying size. To that end, fundamental frequency (F0) and formant frequencies were measured in both running speech and filled pauses (i.e., ``ah'' and ``um'') produced by male athletes during televised same-day interviews. Multiple-regression analysis of data from 100 male athletes showed that these acoustic measures accounted for at most 17% of variance in height over a 37-cm range. Analyses of filled speech pauses produced by a subset of 48 athletes could account for up to 36%. These outcomes fall within the range of previously reported outcomes, indicating that while speech acoustics are correlated with body-size in human adult males, the cues provided are quite modest.

  12. Relationship between childhood blood lead levels and stature.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, J; Angle, C; Pitcher, H

    1986-03-01

    The second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1976 to 1980, incorporated medical history, physical examination, anthropometric measurements, dietary information (24-hour recall and food frequency), laboratory tests, and radiographs. In linear regressions of adjusted data from 2,695 children aged 7 years and younger, 91% of the variance in height, 72% of the variance in weight, and 58% of the variance in chest circumference were explained by six variables: age, race, sex, blood lead level, total calories or protein, and hematocrit or transferrin saturation level. Variables that did not significantly improve the models predicting growth included family income, degree of urbanization, serum albumin, copper, iron, and zinc levels, dietary carbohydrate, fat, calcium, potassium, phosphorus, vitamin A, vitamin C, niacin, riboflavin, and thiamine. The highly significant correlation of blood lead level with growth does not contradict the established association of childhood deprivation with increased lead exposure and with nutritional deficiences known to enhance lead absorption. Blood lead level may also represent a composite marker for unidentified genetic, ethnic, environmental, and sociocultural variables, other than race, sex, and nutrition, that affect growth. However, the correlation of stature, particularly height, with blood lead levels in the range of 5 to 35 micrograms/dL is so statistically significant that it merits investigation in other surveys and consideration of the multiple biologic mechanisms by which low-level lead exposure could impair the growth of children. PMID:3951909

  13. Stature in 19th and early 20th century Copenhagen. A comparative study based on skeletal remains.

    PubMed

    Jørkov, Marie Louise S

    2015-12-01

    Individual stature depends on multifactorial causes and is often used as a proxy for investigating the biological standard of living. While the majority of European studies on 19th and 20th century populations are based on conscript heights, stature derived from skeletal remains are scarce. For the first time in Denmark this study makes a comparison between skeletal stature and contemporary Danish conscript heights and investigates stature of males and females temporally and between socially distinct individuals and populations in 19th and early 20th century Copenhagen. A total of 357 individuals (181 males, 176 females) excavated at the Assistens cemetery in Copenhagen is analyzed. Two stature regression formulae (Trotter, 1970; Boldsen, 1990) are applied using femur measurements and evaluated compared to conscript heights. The results indicate that mean male stature using Boldsen follows a similar trend as the Danish conscript heights and that Trotter overestimate stature by ca. 6cm over Boldsen. At an inter population level statistically significant differences in male stature are observed between first and second half of the 19th century towards a slight stature decrease and larger variation while there are no significant changes observed in female stature. There are insignificant differences in stature between middle and high class individuals, but male stature differs statistically between cemeteries (p=0.000) representing middle/high class, paupers and navy employees, respectively. Female stature had no significant wealth gradient (p=0.516). This study provides new evidence of stature among males and females during the 19th century and suggests that males may have been more sensitive to changes in environmental living and nutrition than females. PMID:26256129

  14. Stature estimation from skull measurements using multidetector computed tomographic images: A Japanese forensic sample.

    PubMed

    Torimitsu, Suguru; Makino, Yohsuke; Saitoh, Hisako; Sakuma, Ayaka; Ishii, Namiko; Yajima, Daisuke; Inokuchi, Go; Motomura, Ayumi; Chiba, Fumiko; Yamaguchi, Rutsuko; Hashimoto, Mari; Hoshioka, Yumi; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between stature and cranial measurements in a contemporary Japanese population, using three-dimensional (3D) computed tomographic (CT) images. A total of 228 cadavers (123 males, 105 females) underwent postmortem CT scanning and subsequent forensic autopsy between May 2011 and April 2015. Five cranial measurements were taken from 3D CT reconstructed images that extracted only cranial data. The correlations between stature and each of the cranial measurements were assessed with Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients. Simple and multiple regression analyses showed significant correlations between stature and cranial measurements. In conclusion, cranial measurements obtained from 3D CT images may be useful for forensic estimation of the stature of Japanese individuals, particularly in cases where better predictors, such as long bones, are not available. PMID:26832382

  15. Tall stature as presenting symptom in a girl with triple X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Liebezeit, B U; Rohrer, T R; Singer, H; Doerr, H G

    2003-02-01

    An 11 year-old girl presented with 47,XXX karyotype. Our report emphasizes the fact that triple X syndrome has also to be considered in girls presenting with tall stature that is not explained by parental heights. PMID:12713263

  16. Stature estimation from hand dimensions in a Han population of Southern China.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jianpin; Chen, Rui; Lai, Xiaoping

    2012-11-01

    To analyze the relationship between stature and hand dimensions for forensic applications, the stature and hand dimensions of 400 healthy adults aged between 20 and 25 years were measured in a Han population of Southern China. The mean values of the stature are 170.49 and 159.72 cm in the men and the women, respectively. The statistically significant differences between the right- and the left-hand dimensions were not observed in the men, whereas the bilateral differences are statistically significant in female hand dimensions. The correlation coefficients were found to be statistically significant for the hand dimensions in both the sexes. The hand length showed higher correlation coefficients than the hand breadth in both sexes. Linear and multiple regressions were developed in this study; multiple regressions showed higher correlation coefficients than linear regressions. Two regression models could be used to estimate the stature from the hand dimensions in this population. PMID:22536752

  17. Stature estimation from sternum length using computed tomography-volume rendering technique images of western Chinese.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kui; Luo, Ying-zhen; Fan, Fei; Zheng, Jie-qian; Yang, Min; Li, Tao; Pang, Tao; Zhang, Jian; Deng, Zhen-hua

    2015-10-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to generate linear regression models for stature estimation on the basis of sternum length derived from computed tomography-volume rendering technique (CT-VRT) images for Western Chinese. The study sample comprised 288 individuals of Western Chinese, including 124 females and 164 males, with documented ages between 19 and 78 years, and was randomly divided into two subgroups. The linear regression analysis for the calibration sample data yielded the following formulae: male stature (cm) = 137.28 + 1.99*combined length of manubrium and mesosternum and female stature (cm) = 111.59 + 3.51* combined length of manubrium and mesosternum. Pearson's correlation coefficients for the regression models were r = 0.459 and r = 0.541 for the male and female formulae, respectively. The standard errors of the estimate (SEE) were 4.76 cm for the male equation and 6.73 cm for the female equation. The 95% confidence intervals of the predicted values encompassed the correct stature of all specimen in the validation sample. The regression equations derived from the sternum length in the present study can be used for stature estimation and the length of the sternum is a reliable predictor of stature in Chinese when better predictors of stature like the long bones are not available, and the CT-VRT method may be a practical method for stature estimation. PMID:26344458

  18. Down Syndrome Related Muscle Hypotonia: Association with COL6A3 Functional SNP rs2270669

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Arpita; Bhowmik, Krishnendu; Chatterjee, Arpita; Chakrabarty, Pit Baran; Sinha, Swagata; Mukhopadhyay, Kanchan

    2013-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS), the principal cause for intellectual disability, is also associated with hormonal, immunological, and gastrointestinal abnormalities. Muscle hypotonia (MH) and congenital heart diseases (CHD) are also frequently observed. Collagen molecules are essential components for maintaining muscle integrity and are formed by the assembly of three chains, alpha 1–3. The type VI collagen is crucial for cardiac as well as skeletal muscles. The COL ?1 (VI) and ?2 (VI) chains are encoded by genes located at the 21st chromosome and are expected to have higher dosage in individuals with DS. The ? 3 (VI) chain is encoded by the COL6A3 located at the chromosome 2. We hypothesized that apart from COL6A1 and COL6A2, COL6A3 may also have some role in the MH of subjects with DS. To find out the relevance of COL6A3 in DS associated MH and CHD, we genotyped two SNPs in COL6A3, rs2270669 and rs2270668, in individuals with DS. Subjects with DS were recruited based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders-IV and having trisomy of the 21st chromosome. Parents of individuals with DS and ethnically matched controls were enrolled for comparison. Informed written consent was obtained for participation. Peripheral blood was used for isolation of genomic DNA. Target genetic loci were studied by DNA sequence analysis. Data obtained was subjected to population – as well as family-based statistical analysis. rs2270668 was found to be non-polymorphic in the studied population. rs2270669 showed significant association of the “C” allele and “CC” genotype with DS probands having MH (P?=?0.02). Computational analysis showed that rs2270669 may induce structural and functional alterations in the COL ?3 (VI). Interaction of COL?3 (VI) with different proteins, crucial for muscle integrity, was also noticed by computational methods. This pioneering study on COL6A3 with DS related MH thus indicates that rs2270669 “C” could be considered as a risk factor for DS related MH. PMID:23626599

  19. Stature estimation from body segment lengths in young adults--application to people with physical disabilities.

    PubMed

    Canda, Alicia

    2009-03-01

    Knowledge of stature is necessary for evaluating nutritional status and for correcting certain functional parameters. Measuring stature is difficult or impossible in bedridden or wheelchair-bound persons and may also be diminished by disorders of the spinal column or extremities. The purpose of this work is to develop estimation equations for young adult athletes for their subsequent application to disabled persons. The main sample comprised 445 male and 401 female sportspersons. Cross validation was also performed on 100 males and 101 females. All were Caucasian, the males being over 21 and the females over 18, and all practiced some kind of sport. The following variables were included: stature, sitting height, arm span, and lengths of upper arm, forearm, hand, thigh, lower leg, and foot. Simple and multiple regression analyses were performed using stature as a dependent variable and the others as predictive variables. The best equation for males (R(2)=0.978; RMSE=1.41 cm; PE=1.54 cm) was stature: 1.346+1.023 * lower leg+0.957 * sitting height+0.530 * thigh+0.493 * upper arm+0.228 * forearm. For females (R(2)=0.959; RMSE=1.57 cm; PE=1.25 cm) it was stature: 1.772+0.159 * arm span+0.957 * sitting height+0.424 * thigh+0.966 * lower leg. Alternative equations were developed for when a particular variable cannot be included for reasons of mobility, technical difficulty, or segment loss. PMID:19346667

  20. Copy Number Variants in Short Children Born Small for Gestational Age

    PubMed Central

    Wit, Jan M.; van Duyvenvoorde, Hermine A.; van Klinken, Jan B.; Caliebe, Janina; Bosch, Cathy A.J.; Lui, Julian C.; Gijsbers, Antoinet C.J.; Bakker, Egbert; Breuning, Martijn H.; Oostdijk, Wilma; Losekoot, Monique; Baron, Jeffrey; Binder, Gerhard; Ranke, Michael B.; Ruivenkamp, Claudia A.L.

    2014-01-01

    Background/aims In addition to Genome-Wide Association studies (GWAS) height-associated genes may be uncovered by studying individuals with extreme short or tall stature. Methods Genome-wide analysis for copy number variants (CNVs), using Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) arrays, was performed in 49 index cases born small for gestational age (SGA) with persistent short stature. Segregation analysis was performed, and genes in CNVs were compared with information from GWAS, gene expression in rodents’ growth plates, and published information. Results CNVs were detected in 13 cases. In 5 children a known cause of short stature was found: UPD7, UPD14, a duplication of the SHOX enhancer region, an IGF1R deletion, and a 22q11.21 deletion. In the remaining 8 cases potential pathogenic CNVs were detected, either de novo (n=1), segregating (n=2), or not segregating with short stature (n=5). Bioinformatic analysis of the de novo and segregating CNVs suggested that HOXD4, AGPS, PDE11A, OSBPL6, PRKRA and PLEKHA3, and possibly DGKB and TNFRSF11B are potential candidate genes. A SERPINA7 or NRK defect may be associated with an X-linked form of short stature. Conclusion SNP arrays detected 5 known causes of short stature with prenatal onset and suggested several potential candidate genes. PMID:25300501

  1. Effect of fusion status of sternum in stature estimation - A study from South India.

    PubMed

    Chandrakanth, H V; Kanchan, Tanuj; Krishan, Kewal

    2015-11-01

    Forensic anthropologists examine and identify skeletal, dismembered and commingled remains in a legal context to establish the biological profile of the deceased. Stature estimation is one of the important parameters in establishing the biological profile. The present study is planned to derive regression models for stature estimation from sternal measurements. Various factors are likely to affect stature estimation in forensic investigations. Since, none of the previous researchers have studied the effect of fusion status on stature estimation from sternum and its segments, the present study attempts to find if the fusion status of the sternum affect its reliability and accuracy in stature estimation. The sample of the present study consisted of 117 sterna that were obtained from autopsied bodies. Five measurements i.e. Length of manubrium (M), length of mesosternum (B), combined length of manusbrium and mesosternum and the (M + B), width at first sternabrae (S1) and width of 3rd sternabrae (S3) were taken on the autopsied sterna. The sterna were classified as fused (both manubriosternal and xiphisternal joints were fused), partly fused (only one of the manubriosternal or xiphisternal joints was fused) and not fused (both manubriosternal and xiphisternal joints were not fused). Regression models were derived using statistical methods. All the sternal measurements show a positive however, a weak correlation with stature. Thus, it can be concluded that the accuracy and reliability of stature estimation from sternum and its segments is quite low in practical situations. Among the sterna classified based on the fusion status, the length measurements of completely fused sterna show significant correlation with the stature. None of the other sternal measurements on the non-fused or partly fused sterna show statistically significant correlation with stature. The present study concludes that the fusion status of the sternum is likely to affect the reliability and accuracy in estimation of stature. The findings of this study however, should be considered 'preliminary' until they are corroborated by similar studies based on larger samples from different populations. PMID:26414874

  2. Cardiomyopathy and short stature associated with mitochondrial and/or lipid storage myopathy of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Sengers, R C; Stadhouders, A M; Jaspar, H H; Trijbels, J M; Daniels, O

    1976-05-01

    The patient described in this report was an 11-year-old girl with a negligible heart murmur. The length was below 10th percentile. There appeared to be a cardiomyopathy with, at that moment, no signs of obstruction. There were no evident clinical symptoms of myopathy of skeletal muscle. However, electromyography was myopathic. Biochemical studies revealed no abnormalities. In muscle biopsy sections, the Sudan staining reactions revealed the presence of large amounts of sudanophilic droplets, predominantly in type I fibers. Electronmicroscopy demonstrated lipid excess and accumulations of enlarged, mostly rounded mitochondria in a subsarcolemmal location, with closely packed cristae. In many mitochondria a dense osmiophilic material was present in the spaces between the cristal membranes. The patient's parents were first cousins. One of her brothers who died at the age of 4 1/2 years presumably suffered from the same disease. The pattern of inheritance is most probably autosomal recessive. PMID:134294

  3. Truncation of POC1A associated with short stature and extreme insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian-Hua; Segni, Maria; Payne, Felicity; Huang-Doran, Isabel; Sleigh, Alison; Adams, Claire; Savage, David B.; O’Rahilly, Stephen; Semple, Robert K.; Barroso, Inês

    2016-01-01

    We describe a female proband with primordial dwarfism, skeletal dysplasia, facial dysmorphism, extreme dyslipidaemic insulin resistance and fatty liver associated with a novel homozygous frameshift mutation in POC1A, predicted to affect two of the three protein products of the gene. POC1A encodes a protein associated with centrioles throughout the cell cycle and implicated in both mitotic spindle and primary ciliary function. Two homozygous mutations affecting all isoforms of POC1A have recently been implicated in a similar syndrome of primordial dwarfism, although no detailed metabolic phenotypes were described. Primary cells from the proband we describe exhibited increased centrosome amplification and multipolar spindle formation during mitosis, but showed normal DNA content, arguing against mitotic skipping, cleavage failure or cell fusion. Despite evidence of increased DNA damage in cells with supernumerary centrosomes, no aneuploidy was detected. Extensive centrosome clustering both at mitotic spindles and in primary cilia mitigated the consequences of centrosome amplification, and primary ciliary formation was normal. Although further metabolic studies of patients with POC1A mutations are warranted, we suggest that POC1A may be added to ALMS1 and PCNT as examples of centrosomal or pericentriolar proteins whose dysfunction leads to extreme dyslipidaemic insulin resistance. Further investigation of links between these molecular defects and adipose tissue dysfunction is likely to yield insights into mechanisms of adipose tissue maintenance and regeneration that are critical to metabolic health. PMID:26336158

  4. Trisomy 18 mosaicism in a 15-year-old boy with normal intelligence and short stature

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-08

    We report a 15-year-old boy with mosaicism for trisomy 18 and normal intelligence. Approximately 50% of his leukocytes are trisomic. This patient represents the sixth report of an individual with trisomy 18 mosaicism and normal intelligence. Those individuals with trisomy 18 mosaicism and normal intelligence need to be advised of increased risks for offspring with chromosome abnormalities and offered the option of prenatal diagnosis for cytogenetic anomalies. 6 refs.

  5. The relationship between cadaver, living and forensic stature: A review of current knowledge and a test using a sample of adult Portuguese males.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Hugo F V; Marinho, Luísa; Albanese, John

    2016-01-01

    The use of cadaver length and forensic stature as a proxy for living standing height has not been scrutinized in detail. In this paper we present a brief review of the current knowledge on the relationship between cadaver, living and forensic stature; assess the magnitude and nature of the differences between these three measures of stature; and investigate the potential impact of these differences in forensic contexts. The study uses a sample of 84 males who were autopsied in 2008 at the National Institute of Legal Medicine and Forensic Sciences (Porto, Portugal), where stature data were collected from three different sources: cadaver stature was obtained from the corpse prior to autopsy, living stature was obtained from military conscription records and forensic stature was obtained from national citizenship identification card records. Descriptive statistics, ANOVA and linear regression are used to analyze the data. The results show that cadaver stature is the highest measure, followed by forensic and by living stature, and the difference between cadaver and living stature is greater than expected (4.3cm). Results also show considerable individual variation in the differences between the three measures of stature and that differences decrease with stature, although only slightly. This study has shown that the difference between cadaver and living stature is greater than previously thought and suggests that previously reported correction factors are a minimum rather than a mean correction. Forensic stature is likely to be incorrectly estimated and can jeopardize identification if methods estimate living rather than forensic stature. PMID:26654866

  6. Estimation of stature and sex from sternal lengths: an autopsy study.

    PubMed

    Yonguc, Goksin Nilufer; Kurtulus, Ayse; Bayazit, Onur; Adiguzel, Esat; Unal, Ilker; Demir, Sumeyra; Acar, Kemalettin

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to derive regression equations for estimating stature and further to estimate sex from four measured sternal lengths. This study included intact sterna from 65 males and 30 females, aged between 25 and 40 years, obtained during medico-legal autopsies. Stature and four sternal lengths, length of the manubrium (LM), length of the body (LB), length of the manubrium and body (LMB) and total sternal length, of each cadaver were measured. Stature and all measured sternal lengths were greater in males compared to females (p < 0.001). All sternal lengths were positively correlated with stature in sexes. LMB had the highest correlation coefficient in both males and females (correlation coefficient: 0.721 and 0.740, respectively). In both sexes, linear regression analysis for stature estimation revealed equations with the highest R (2) values when derived from LMB (R (2) = 0.521 for males and R (2) = 0.547 for females). On the other hand, only the multiple linear regression equation derived from the combination of the LB and LMB had the higher R (2) value (R (2) = 0.640) for stature estimation in females. Receiver-operating curve analysis for all measurements was statistically significant (p < 0.05 for all). These findings suggested that measured sternal lengths can be used for estimation of sex. However, LB and LMB measurements were found to be the most reliable sternal lengths for estimating sex with an accuracy rate of 90 %. Our results revealed that the sternum is a useful tool for estimating stature and sex when other skeletal bones are not available. PMID:24748542

  7. Directional dominance on stature and cognition in diverse human populations

    PubMed Central

    Mattsson, Hannele; Eklund, Niina; Gandin, Ilaria; Nutile, Teresa; Jackson, Anne U.; Schurmann, Claudia; Smith, Albert V.; Zhang, Weihua; Okada, Yukinori; Stančáková, Alena; Faul, Jessica D.; Zhao, Wei; Bartz, Traci M.; Concas, Maria Pina; Franceschini, Nora; Enroth, Stefan; Vitart, Veronique; Trompet, Stella; Guo, Xiuqing; Chasman, Daniel I.; O’Connel, Jeffery R.; Corre, Tanguy; Nongmaithem, Suraj S.; Chen, Yuning; Mangino, Massimo; Ruggiero, Daniela; Traglia, Michela; Farmaki, Aliki-Eleni; Kacprowski, Tim; Bjonnes, Andrew; van der Spek, Ashley; Wu, Ying; Giri, Anil K.; Yanek, Lisa R.; Wang, Lihua; Hofer, Edith; Rietveld, Cornelius A.; McLeod, Olga; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Pattaro, Cristian; Verweij, Niek; Baumbach, Clemens; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Warren, Helen R.; Vuckovic, Dragana; Mei, Hao; Bouchard, Claude; Perry, John R.B.; Cappellani, Stefania; Mirza, Saira S.; Benton, Miles C.; Broeckel, Ulrich; Medland, Sarah E.; Lind, Penelope A.; Malerba, Giovanni; Drong, Alexander; Yengo, Loic; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Zhi, Degui; van der Most, Peter J.; Shriner, Daniel; Mägi, Reedik; Hemani, Gibran; Karaderi, Tugce; Wang, Zhaoming; Liu, Tian; Demuth, Ilja; Zhao, Jing Hua; Meng, Weihua; Lataniotis, Lazaros; van der Laan, Sander W.; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Wood, Andrew R.; Bonnefond, Amelie; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.; Hall, Leanne M.; Salvi, Erika; Yazar, Seyhan; Carstensen, Lisbeth; de Haan, Hugoline G.; Abney, Mark; Afzal, Uzma; Allison, Matthew A.; Amin, Najaf; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Bakker, Stephan J.L.; Barr, R. Graham; Baumeister, Sebastian E.; Benjamin, Daniel J.; Bergmann, Sven; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Campbell, Archie; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chan, Yingleong; Chanock, Stephen J.; Chen, Constance; Chen, Y.-D. Ida; Collins, Francis S.; Connell, John; Correa, Adolfo; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Smith, George Davey; Davies, Gail; Dörr, Marcus; Ehret, Georg; Ellis, Stephen B.; Feenstra, Bjarke; Feitosa, Mary F.; Ford, Ian; Fox, Caroline S.; Frayling, Timothy M.; Friedrich, Nele; Geller, Frank; Scotland, Generation; Gillham-Nasenya, Irina; Gottesman, Omri; Graff, Misa; Grodstein, Francine; Gu, Charles; Haley, Chris; Hammond, Christopher J.; Harris, Sarah E.; Harris, Tamara B.; Hastie, Nicholas D.; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Heikkilä, Kauko; Hocking, Lynne J.; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Huang, Jinyan; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Hysi, Pirro G.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Ingelsson, Erik; Joensuu, Anni; Johansson, Åsa; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jukema, J. Wouter; Kähönen, Mika; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kerr, Shona M.; Khan, Nazir M.; Koellinger, Philipp; Koistinen, Heikki A.; Kooner, Manraj K.; Kubo, Michiaki; Kuusisto, Johanna; Lahti, Jari; Launer, Lenore J.; Lea, Rodney A.; Lehne, Benjamin; Lehtimäki, Terho; Liewald, David C.M.; Lind, Lars; Loh, Marie; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; London, Stephanie J.; Loomis, Stephanie J.; Loukola, Anu; Lu, Yingchang; Lumley, Thomas; Lundqvist, Annamari; Männistö, Satu; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Masciullo, Corrado; Matchan, Angela; Mathias, Rasika A.; Matsuda, Koichi; Meigs, James B.; Meisinger, Christa; Meitinger, Thomas; Menni, Cristina; Mentch, Frank D.; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Montasser, May E.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Morrison, Alanna; Myers, Richard H.; Nadukuru, Rajiv; Navarro, Pau; Nelis, Mari; Nieminen, Markku S.; Nolte, Ilja M.; O’Connor, George T.; Ogunniyi, Adesola; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Palmas, Walter R.; Pankow, James S.; Patarcic, Inga; Pavani, Francesca; Peyser, Patricia A.; Pietilainen, Kirsi; Poulter, Neil; Prokopenko, Inga; Ralhan, Sarju; Redmond, Paul; Rich, Stephen S.; Rissanen, Harri; Robino, Antonietta; Rose, Lynda M.; Rose, Richard; Sala, Cinzia; Salako, Babatunde; Salomaa, Veikko; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Saxena, Richa; Schmidt, Helena; Scott, Laura J.; Scott, William R.; Sennblad, Bengt; Seshadri, Sudha; Sever, Peter; Shrestha, Smeeta; Smith, Blair H.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Soranzo, Nicole; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Southam, Lorraine; Stanton, Alice V.; Stathopoulou, Maria G.; Strauch, Konstantin; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Suderman, Matthew J.; Tandon, Nikhil; Tang, Sian-Tsun; Taylor, Kent D.; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Töglhofer, Anna Maria; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Tšernikova, Natalia; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Vaidya, Dhananjay; van Hylckama Vlieg, Astrid; van Setten, Jessica; Vasankari, Tuula; Vedantam, Sailaja; Vlachopoulou, Efthymia; Vozzi, Diego; Vuoksimaa, Eero; Waldenberger, Melanie; Ware, Erin B.; Wentworth-Shields, William; Whitfield, John B.; Wild, Sarah; Willemsen, Gonneke; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S.; Yao, Jie; Zaza, Gianluigi; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Project, The BioBank Japan; Salem, Rany M.; Melbye, Mads; Bisgaard, Hans; Samani, Nilesh J.; Cusi, Daniele; Mackey, David A.; Cooper, Richard S.; Froguel, Philippe; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Grant, Struan F.A.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Ferrucci, Luigi; Scott, Robert A.; Morris, Andrew D.; Palmer, Colin N.A.; Dedoussis, George; Deloukas, Panos; Bertram, Lars; Lindenberger, Ulman; Berndt, Sonja I.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tönjes, Anke; Munroe, Patricia B.; Sørensen, Thorkild I.A.; Rotimi, Charles N.; Arnett, Donna K.; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Balkau, Beverley; Gambaro, Giovanni; Morris, Andrew P.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Wright, Margie J.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Hunt, Steven C.; Starr, John M.; Deary, Ian J.; Griffiths, Lyn R.; Tiemeier, Henning; Pirastu, Nicola; Kaprio, Jaakko; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Pérusse, Louis; Wilson, James G.; Girotto, Giorgia; Caulfield, Mark J.; Raitakari, Olli; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Gieger, Christian; van der Harst, Pim; Hicks, Andrew A.; Kraft, Peter; Sinisalo, Juha; Knekt, Paul; Johannesson, Magnus; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Hamsten, Anders; Schmidt, Reinhold; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Vartiainen, Erkki; Becker, Diane M.; Bharadwaj, Dwaipayan; Mohlke, Karen L.; Boehnke, Michael; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Sanghera, Dharambir K.; Teumer, Alexander; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Metspalu, Andres; Gasparini, Paolo; Ulivi, Sheila; Ober, Carole; Toniolo, Daniela; Rudan, Igor; Porteous, David J.; Ciullo, Marina; Spector, Tim D.; Hayward, Caroline; Dupuis, Josée; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Wright, Alan F.; Chandak, Giriraj R.; Vollenweider, Peter; Shuldiner, Alan; Ridker, Paul M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Sattar, Naveed; Gyllensten, Ulf; North, Kari E.; Pirastu, Mario; Psaty, Bruce M.; Weir, David R.; Laakso, Markku; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Takahashi, Atsushi; Chambers, John C.; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Strachan, David P.; Campbell, Harry; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Perola, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Homozygosity has long been associated with rare, often devastating, Mendelian disorders1 and Darwin was one of the first to recognise that inbreeding reduces evolutionary fitness2. However, the effect of the more distant parental relatedness common in modern human populations is less well understood. Genomic data now allow us to investigate the effects of homozygosity on traits of public health importance by observing contiguous homozygous segments (runs of homozygosity, ROH), which are inferred to be homozygous along their complete length. Given the low levels of genome-wide homozygosity prevalent in most human populations, information is required on very large numbers of people to provide sufficient power3,4. Here we use ROH to study 16 health-related quantitative traits in 354,224 individuals from 102 cohorts and find statistically significant associations between summed runs of homozygosity (SROH) and four complex traits: height, forced expiratory lung volume in 1 second (FEV1), general cognitive ability (g) and educational attainment (nominal p<1 × 10−300, 2.1 × 10−6, 2.5 × 10−10, 1.8 × 10−10). In each case increased homozygosity was associated with decreased trait value, equivalent to the offspring of first cousins being 1.2 cm shorter and having 10 months less education. Similar effect sizes were found across four continental groups and populations with different degrees of genome-wide homozygosity, providing convincing evidence for the first time that homozygosity, rather than confounding, directly contributes to phenotypic variance. Contrary to earlier reports in substantially smaller samples5,6, no evidence was seen of an influence of genome-wide homozygosity on blood pressure and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, or ten other cardio-metabolic traits. Since directional dominance is predicted for traits under directional evolutionary selection7, this study provides evidence that increased stature and cognitive function have been positively selected in human evolution, whereas many important risk factors for late-onset complex diseases may not have been. PMID:26131930

  8. Genotype-phenotype correlation of congenital anomalies in multiple congenital anomalies hypotonia seizures syndrome (MCAHS1)/PIGN-related epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Leah; Lemmon, Monica; Beck, Natalie; Johnson, Maria; Mu, Weiyi; Murdock, David; Bodurtha, Joann; Hoover-Fong, Julie; Cohn, Ronald; Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Barañano, Kristin; Hamosh, Ada

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in PIGN, resulting in multiple congenital anomalies-hypotonia-seizures syndrome, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor deficiency, have been published in four families to date. We report four patients from three unrelated families with epilepsy and hypotonia in whom whole exome sequencing yielded compound heterozygous variants in PIGN. As with previous reports Patients 1 and 2 (full siblings) have severe global developmental delay, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and minor dysmorphic features, including high palate, bitemporal narrowing, depressed nasal bridge, and micrognathia; Patient 3 had early global developmental delay with later progressive spastic quadriparesis, intellectual disability, and intractable generalized epilepsy; Patient 4 had bilateral narrowing as well but differed by the presence of hypertelorism, markedly narrow palpebral fissures, and long philtrum, had small distal phalanges of fingers 2, 3, and 4, absent distal phalanx of finger 5 and similar toe anomalies, underdeveloped nails, unusual brain anomalies, and a more severe early clinical course. These patients expand the known clinical spectrum of the disease. The severity of the presentations in conjunction with the patients' mutations suggest a genotype-phenotype correlation in which congenital anomalies are only seen in patients with biallelic loss-of-function. In addition, PIGN mutations appear to be panethnic and may be an underappreciated cause of epilepsy. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26394714

  9. Mutations in NALCN cause an autosomal-recessive syndrome with severe hypotonia, speech impairment, and cognitive delay.

    PubMed

    Al-Sayed, Moeenaldeen D; Al-Zaidan, Hamad; Albakheet, Albandary; Hakami, Hana; Kenana, Rosan; Al-Yafee, Yusra; Al-Dosary, Mazhor; Qari, Alya; Al-Sheddi, Tarfa; Al-Muheiza, Muhammed; Al-Qubbaj, Wafa; Lakmache, Yamina; Al-Hindi, Hindi; Ghaziuddin, Muhammad; Colak, Dilek; Kaya, Namik

    2013-10-01

    Sodium leak channel, nonselective (NALCN) is a voltage-independent and cation-nonselective channel that is mainly responsible for the leaky sodium transport across neuronal membranes and controls neuronal excitability. Although NALCN variants have been conflictingly reported to be in linkage disequilibrium with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, to our knowledge, no mutations have been reported to date for any inherited disorders. Using linkage, SNP-based homozygosity mapping, targeted sequencing, and confirmatory exome sequencing, we identified two mutations, one missense and one nonsense, in NALCN in two unrelated families. The mutations cause an autosomal-recessive syndrome characterized by subtle facial dysmorphism, variable degrees of hypotonia, speech impairment, chronic constipation, and intellectual disability. Furthermore, one of the families pursued preimplantation genetic diagnosis on the basis of the results from this study, and the mother recently delivered healthy twins, a boy and a girl, with no symptoms of hypotonia, which was present in all the affected children at birth. Hence, the two families we describe here represent instances of loss of function in human NALCN. PMID:24075186

  10. Mutations in NALCN Cause an Autosomal-Recessive Syndrome with Severe Hypotonia, Speech Impairment, and Cognitive Delay

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sayed, Moeenaldeen D.; Al-Zaidan, Hamad; Albakheet, AlBandary; Hakami, Hana; Kenana, Rosan; Al-Yafee, Yusra; Al-Dosary, Mazhor; Qari, Alya; Al-Sheddi, Tarfa; Al-Muheiza, Muhammed; Al-Qubbaj, Wafa; Lakmache, Yamina; Al-Hindi, Hindi; Ghaziuddin, Muhammad; Colak, Dilek; Kaya, Namik

    2013-01-01

    Sodium leak channel, nonselective (NALCN) is a voltage-independent and cation-nonselective channel that is mainly responsible for the leaky sodium transport across neuronal membranes and controls neuronal excitability. Although NALCN variants have been conflictingly reported to be in linkage disequilibrium with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, to our knowledge, no mutations have been reported to date for any inherited disorders. Using linkage, SNP-based homozygosity mapping, targeted sequencing, and confirmatory exome sequencing, we identified two mutations, one missense and one nonsense, in NALCN in two unrelated families. The mutations cause an autosomal-recessive syndrome characterized by subtle facial dysmorphism, variable degrees of hypotonia, speech impairment, chronic constipation, and intellectual disability. Furthermore, one of the families pursued preimplantation genetic diagnosis on the basis of the results from this study, and the mother recently delivered healthy twins, a boy and a girl, with no symptoms of hypotonia, which was present in all the affected children at birth. Hence, the two families we describe here represent instances of loss of function in human NALCN. PMID:24075186

  11. Estimation of stature from radiologic anthropometry of the lumbar vertebral dimensions in Chinese.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kui; Chang, Yun-feng; Fan, Fei; Deng, Zhen-hua

    2015-11-01

    The recent study was to assess the relationship between the radiologic anthropometry of the lumbar vertebral dimensions and stature in Chinese and to develop regression formulae to estimate stature from these dimensions. A total of 412 normal, healthy volunteers, comprising 206 males and 206 females, were recruited. The linear regression analysis were performed to assess the correlation between the stature and lengths of various segments of the lumbar vertebral column. Among the regression equations created for single variable, the predictive value was greatest for the reconstruction of stature from the lumbar segment in both sexes and subgroup analysis. When individual vertebral body was used, the heights of posterior vertebral body of L3 gave the most accurate results for male group, the heights of central vertebral body of L1 provided the most accurate results for female group and female group with age above 45 years, the heights of central vertebral body of L3 gave the most accurate results for the groups with age from 20-45 years for both sexes and the male group with age above 45 years. The heights of anterior vertebral body of L5 gave the less accurate results except for the heights of anterior vertebral body of L4 provided the less accurate result for the male group with age above 45 years. As expected, multiple regression equations were more successful than equations derived from a single variable. The research observations suggest lumbar vertebral dimensions to be useful in stature estimation among Chinese population. PMID:26593994

  12. Estimation of stature from maxillo-facial anthropometry in a central Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Wankhede, Kanchankumar P; Kamdi, Namdeo Y; Parchand, Madhukar P; Anjankar, Vaibhav P; Bardale, Rajesh V

    2012-01-01

    Background: For establishing identity, stature is an important parameter in medico-legal and forensic examination. Aims: To estimate stature from facial parameters. Setting and Design: Prospective study conducted from December 2007 to September 2008 in the Department of Anatomy, Government Medical College, Nagpur. Materials and Methods: A total of 470 healthy medical students were taken, comprising 260 males and 210 females in the age group of 18 to 24 years. Statistical Analysis: The data were analyzed using regression analysis and correlation coefficient. Results: The average height of males and females was 170.97 (± 6.80) cm and 156.89 (± 5.89) cm respectively. It was observed that in males the total facial height had greater correlation with stature (r = 0.19) and had standard error of ±6.68 cm. In females, nasal height had greater correlation with stature (r = 0.19) and had standard error of ±5.78 cm Conclusion: It can be stated that percutaneous facial dimensions are not good predictors of accurate stature estimation and can be used when other parameters are not available PMID:23087580

  13. Stature estimation in Japanese cadavers based on scapular measurements using multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Torimitsu, Suguru; Makino, Yohsuke; Saitoh, Hisako; Sakuma, Ayaka; Ishii, Namiko; Hayakawa, Mutsumi; Inokuchi, Go; Motomura, Ayumi; Chiba, Fumiko; Hoshioka, Yumi; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the correlation between stature and scapular measurements in a Japanese population, using three-dimensional (3D) computed tomographic (CT) images, and derived regression equations for predicting stature. A total of 194 cadavers (100 males 94 females) underwent postmortem CT (PMCT) and subsequent forensic autopsy in our department between May 2011 and April 2014. Left and right longitudinal scapular lengths (LLSL and RLSL, respectively) and left and right transverse scapular lengths (LTSL and RTSL, respectively) were measured on 3D CT reconstructed images that extracted only scapular data. The correlation between stature and each of the scapular measurements were analyzed using Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients. The four variables correlated significantly with stature, regardless of sex. The LLSL measurement had the lowest standard error of estimation value among all subjects (4.22 cm) and among all females (4.37 cm), whereas the RLSL measurement had the lowest standard error of estimation value among all males (3.75 cm). The results of this study indicate that scapular measurements may be useful for the forensic estimation of the stature of Japanese individuals, particularly in cases where better predictors, such as long bone lengths, are unavailable. PMID:25064735

  14. Body stature growth trajectories during childhood and the development of myopia

    PubMed Central

    Northstone, Kate; Guggenheim, Jeremy A.; Howe, Laura D.; Tilling, Kate; Paternoster, Lavinia; Kemp, John P.; McMahon, George; Williams, Cathy

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Stature at a particular age can be considered the cumulative result of growth during a number of preceding growth trajectory periods. We investigated whether height and weight growth trajectories from birth to age 10 years were related to refractive error at ages 11 and 15 years, and eye size at age 15 years. Design Prospective analysis in a birth cohort. Participants Children participating in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) United Kingdom birth cohort (minimum N=2,676). Methods Growth trajectories between birth and 10 years were modeled from a series of height and weight measurements (N=6,815). Refractive error was assessed by non-cycloplegic autorefraction at ages 11 and 15 years (minimum N=4,737). Axial length and radius of corneal curvature were measured with an IOLmaster at age 15 years (minimum N=2,676). Growth trajectories, and an allelic score for 180 genetic variants associated with adult height, were tested for association with refractive error and eye size. Main outcome measures Non-cycloplegic autorefraction at ages 11 and 15 years, and axial length and corneal curvature at age 15 years. Results Height growth trajectory during the linear phase between 2.5-10 years was negatively associated with refractive error at 11 and 15 years (P<0.001), but explained <0.5% of inter-subject variation. Height and weight growth trajectories, especially shortly after birth, were positively associated with axial length and corneal curvature (P<0.001), predicting 1-5% of trait variation. Height growth after 2.5 years was not associated with corneal curvature, whilst the association with axial length continued up to 10 years. The height allelic score was associated with corneal curvature (P=0.03) but not with refractive error or axial length. Conclusions Up to the age of 10 years, shared growth mechanisms contribute to scaling of eye and body size but minimally to the development of myopia. PMID:23415774

  15. Long term sequelae of sex steroid treatment in the management of constitutionally tall stature.

    PubMed Central

    de Waal, W J; Torn, M; de Muinck Keizer-Schrama, S M; Aarsen, R S; Drop, S L

    1995-01-01

    AIM--To evaluate possible long term side effects of high doses of sex steroids in the management of constitutionally tall stature, with special attention to hypothalamic-gonadal function. METHODS--Sixty four tall adult men and 180 tall adult women, who received supraphysiological doses of sex hormones during puberty, were interviewed in a standardised way at a mean follow up period of 10 years after cessation of treatment. Sixty one untreated tall adult men and 94 untreated tall adult women served as controls. RESULTS--The majority of the subjects were satisfied with their decision regarding hormone treatment. Seventy seven per cent of the women and 78% of the men reported one or more side effects during treatment. Most side effects were mild. In women, only 3% stopped treatment because of an adverse event; in men, the reported side effects never stopped treatment. The frequency of reported side effects in women was higher during treatment with high doses of oestrogens than during oral contraceptive use, indicating a dose dependent relationship. Amenorrhoea of longer than six months after cessation of therapy was found in 5%. Menstrual cycle characteristics of previously treated women were comparable with controls. Malignancy was not reported. Information about a total of 127 pregnancies was obtained and revealed no distinct differences in details and outcome between previously treated women and men, and controls. CONCLUSIONS--At a mean follow up of 10 years there is no evidence that pharmacological doses of sex hormones have a long term effect on reproductive function. However, this period is still too short to draw definite conclusions. PMID:7492194

  16. Mutation in NDUFA13/GRIM19 leads to early onset hypotonia, dyskinesia and sensorial deficiencies, and mitochondrial complex I instability.

    PubMed

    Angebault, Claire; Charif, Majida; Guegen, Naig; Piro-Megy, Camille; Mousson de Camaret, Benedicte; Procaccio, Vincent; Guichet, Pierre-Olivier; Hebrard, Maxime; Manes, Gael; Leboucq, Nicolas; Rivier, François; Hamel, Christian P; Lenaers, Guy; Roubertie, Agathe

    2015-07-15

    Mitochondrial complex I (CI) deficiencies are causing debilitating neurological diseases, among which, the Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy and Leigh Syndrome are the most frequent. Here, we describe the first germinal pathogenic mutation in the NDUFA13/GRIM19 gene encoding a CI subunit, in two sisters with early onset hypotonia, dyskinesia and sensorial deficiencies, including a severe optic neuropathy. Biochemical analysis revealed a drastic decrease in CI enzymatic activity in patient muscle biopsies, and reduction of CI-driven respiration in fibroblasts, while the activities of complex II, III and IV were hardly affected. Western blots disclosed that the abundances of NDUFA13 protein, CI holoenzyme and super complexes were drastically reduced in mitochondrial fractions, a situation that was reproduced by silencing NDUFA13 in control cells. Thus, we established here a correlation between the first mutation yet identified in the NDUFA13 gene, which induces CI instability and a severe but slowly evolving clinical presentation affecting the central nervous system. PMID:25901006

  17. A syndrome of hypotonia, psychomotor retardation, seizures, delayed and dysharmonic skeletal maturation, and congenital fibre type disproportion.

    PubMed Central

    Qazi, Q H; Markouizos, D; Rao, C; Sheikh, T; Beller, E; Kula, R

    1994-01-01

    Three unrelated Puerto Rican boys, ranging in age from 3 to 4 years, had marked, central, non-progressive hypotonia, chronic constipation, severe psychomotor retardation, seizures or abnormal electroencephalograph or both, abnormal dermatoglyphics, delayed bone age, dysharmonic skeletal maturation, and preponderance and larger size of type 2 muscle fibres. Additional findings included narrow, high arched palate, prominent nasal root, long philtrum, distended abdomen, and drooling from open mouth. Two of the three patients also had undescended testes, hypertelorism, and tapered fingers. Birth weight, postnatal physical growth, and head size were average. Family and gestational histories and laboratory evaluations were normal. The combination of features observed in the three boys appears to be distinct and to represent a new syndrome. Images PMID:8064821

  18. The Effects of Muscle Hypotonia and Weakness on Balance: A Study on Prader-Willi and Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galli, Manuela; Cimolin, Veronica; Vismara, Luca; Grugni, Graziano; Camerota, Filippo; Celletti, Claudia; Albertini, Giorgio; Rigoldi, Chiara; Capodaglio, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) are two different genetical disorders both characterized, among other features, by muscular hypotonia. Postural control seems to be impaired in both conditions. The aim of the present study was to quantitatively compare postural control in adult PWS and EDS using stabilometric platform…

  19. The Effects of Muscle Hypotonia and Weakness on Balance: A Study on Prader-Willi and Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galli, Manuela; Cimolin, Veronica; Vismara, Luca; Grugni, Graziano; Camerota, Filippo; Celletti, Claudia; Albertini, Giorgio; Rigoldi, Chiara; Capodaglio, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) are two different genetical disorders both characterized, among other features, by muscular hypotonia. Postural control seems to be impaired in both conditions. The aim of the present study was to quantitatively compare postural control in adult PWS and EDS using stabilometric platform…

  20. Craniometric analysis for estimation of stature in Nepalese population--A study on an autopsy sample.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Rijen; Shrestha, Pramod Kumar; Wasti, Harihar; Kadel, Tulsi; Kanchan, Tanuj; Krishan, Kewal

    2015-03-01

    Establishing the identity of the deceased becomes essential when highly decomposed bodies, mutilated body parts or skeletal remains are recovered from mass fatality sites. In these situations, estimation of stature along with other parameters such as age, sex and race/ethnicity becomes important to establish the biological profile of the deceased. Following the Maoist insurgency in Nepal, there have been numerous discoveries of unidentified human remains in mass graves or otherwise. No systemic studies and anthropological data on the Nepalese population however, is available posing problems in anthropologic evaluation of the remains. The sample of the present study consisted of 200 autopsied cases (148 males and 52 female adult cadavers). During the autopsy, the scalp was reflected after giving a coronal incision extending from one mastoid to the other exposing the cranium in each case. Maximum cranial length (MCL), maximum cranial breadth (MCB), bi-zygomatic breadth (BZB), minimum frontal breadth (MFB) and length of parietal chord (PC) were then measured. Stature was measured as the length of the body from head to heel in centimeters with the heel, buttocks, back of the shoulders and the head in contact with the autopsy table. Linear and stepwise multiple regression models were derived for estimation of stature from cranial measurements. Univariate, bivariate and multivariate regression models show statistically significant correlation between stature and the cranial measurements. The present study opines that the stature estimation from cranial dimensions using multivariate linear regression models is more accurate than those of the univariate and bivariate regression models. This study presents a rare data from Nepalese population that show typical Asian features and thus, is significant from anthropologic and genetic point of view. The study observations further contribute a baseline data bank for forensic pathologists and specialists. PMID:25595547

  1. A male-specific quantitative trait locus on 1p21 controlling human stature

    PubMed Central

    Sammalisto, S; Hiekkalinna, T; Suviolahti, E; Sood, K; Metzidis, A; Pajukanta, P; Lilja, H; Soro-Paavonen, A; Taskinen, M; Tuomi, T; Almgren, P; Orho-Melander, M; Groop, L; Peltonen, L; Perola, M

    2005-01-01

    Background: Many genome-wide scans aimed at complex traits have been statistically underpowered due to small sample size. Combining data from several genome-wide screens with comparable quantitative phenotype data should improve statistical power for the localisation of genomic regions contributing to these traits. Objective: To perform a genome-wide screen for loci affecting adult stature by combined analysis of four previously performed genome-wide scans. Methods: We developed a web based computer tool, Cartographer, for combining genetic marker maps which positions genetic markers accurately using the July 2003 release of the human genome sequence and the deCODE genetic map. Using Cartographer, we combined the primary genotype data from four genome-wide scans and performed variance components (VC) linkage analyses for human stature on the pooled dataset of 1417 individuals from 277 families and performed VC analyses for males and females separately. Results: We found significant linkage to stature on 1p21 (multipoint LOD score 4.25) and suggestive linkages on 9p24 and 18q21 (multipoint LOD scores 2.57 and 2.39, respectively) in males-only analyses. We also found suggestive linkage to 4q35 and 22q13 (multipoint LOD scores 2.18 and 2.85, respectively) when we analysed both females and males and to 13q12 (multipoint LOD score 2.66) in females-only analyses. Conclusions: We strengthened the evidence for linkage to previously reported quantitative trait loci (QTL) for stature and also found significant evidence of a novel male-specific QTL on 1p21. Further investigation of several interesting candidate genes in this region will help towards characterisation of this first sex-specific locus affecting human stature. PMID:15827092

  2. Low Incidence of Pathology Detection and High Cost of Screening in the Evaluation of Asymptomatic Short Children

    PubMed Central

    Sisley, Stephanie; Trujillo, Marcela Vargas; Khoury, Jane; Backeljauw, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the incidence of pathology during routine screening of healthy short children, testing adherence to a consensus statement on the diagnosis and treatment of children with idiopathic short stature, and the cost per identified diagnosis resulting from comprehensive screening. Study design Retrospective chart review of 1373 consecutive short stature referrals evaluated at the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center Pediatric Endocrinology Clinic between 2008 and 2011. We identified 235 patients with a height of <3rd percentile, negative history and review of systems, and normal physical examination. Outcome measures were incidence of pathology detection, diagnostic group characteristics, clinicians' adherence to testing guidelines, and screening costs. ANOVA and χ2 were used to analyze the data. Results Nearly 99% of patients were diagnosed as possible variants of normal growth: 23% with familial short stature, 41% with constitutional delay of growth and maturation, and 36% with idiopathic short stature. The incidence of newly diagnosed pathology was 1.3%: 1 patient with biopsy-proved celiac disease, 1 with unconfirmed celiac disease, and 1 with potential insulin-like growth factor I receptor defect. On average, each patient had 64.3% of the recommended tests for age and sex; 2.1% of patients had all of the recommended testing. The total screening tests costs were $315 321, yielding $105 107 per new diagnosis entertained. Conclusions Healthy short children do not warrant nondirected, comprehensive screening. Future guidelines for evaluating short stature should include patient-specific testing. PMID:23706358

  3. De Novo Missense Variants in PPP2R5D Are Associated with Intellectual Disability, Macrocephaly, Hypotonia, and Autism

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Linshan; Henderson, Lindsay B.; Cho, Megan T.; Petrey, Donald S.; Fong, Chin-To; Haude, Katrina M.; Shur, Natasha; Lundberg, Julie; Hauser, Natalie; Carmichael, Jason; Innis, Jeffrey; Schuette, Jane; Wu, Yvonne W.; Asaikar, Shailesh; Pearson, Margaret; Folk, Leandra; Retterer, Kyle; Monaghan, Kristin G.; Chung, Wendy K.

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a heterotrimeric protein serine/threonine phosphatase and is involved in a broad range of cellular processes. PPP2R5D is a regulatory B subunit of PP2A and plays an important role in regulating key neuronal and developmental regulation processes such as PI3K/AKT and GSK3β-mediated cell growth, chromatin remodeling and gene transcriptional regulation. Using WES, we identified four de novo variants in PPP2R5D in a total of seven unrelated individuals with ID and other shared clinical characteristics, including autism spectrum disorder, macrocephaly, hypotonia, seizures and dysmorphic features. Among the four variant, two have been previously reported, and two are novel. All four amino acids are highly conserved among the PP2A subunit family, and all change a negatively charged acidic glutamic acid (E) to a positively charged basic lysine (K), and are predicted to disrupt the PP2A subunits binding and impair the dephosphorylation capacity. Our data provides further support for PPP2R5D as a genetic cause of ID. PMID:26576547

  4. De novo missense variants in PPP2R5D are associated with intellectual disability, macrocephaly, hypotonia, and autism.

    PubMed

    Shang, Linshan; Henderson, Lindsay B; Cho, Megan T; Petrey, Donald S; Fong, Chin-To; Haude, Katrina M; Shur, Natasha; Lundberg, Julie; Hauser, Natalie; Carmichael, Jason; Innis, Jeffrey; Schuette, Jane; Wu, Yvonne W; Asaikar, Shailesh; Pearson, Margaret; Folk, Leandra; Retterer, Kyle; Monaghan, Kristin G; Chung, Wendy K

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a heterotrimeric protein serine/threonine phosphatase and is involved in a broad range of cellular processes. PPP2R5D is a regulatory B subunit of PP2A and plays an important role in regulating key neuronal and developmental regulation processes such as PI3K/AKT and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3?)-mediated cell growth, chromatin remodeling, and gene transcriptional regulation. Using whole-exome sequencing (WES), we identified four de novo variants in PPP2R5D in a total of seven unrelated individuals with intellectual disability (ID) and other shared clinical characteristics, including autism spectrum disorder, macrocephaly, hypotonia, seizures, and dysmorphic features. Among the four variants, two have been previously reported and two are novel. All four amino acids are highly conserved among the PP2A subunit family, and all change a negatively charged acidic glutamic acid (E) to a positively charged basic lysine (K) and are predicted to disrupt the PP2A subunit binding and impair the dephosphorylation capacity. Our data provides further support for PPP2R5D as a genetic cause of ID. PMID:26576547

  5. De novo interstitial deletion of 15q22q23 with global developmental delay and hypotonia: the first Korean case

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ha-Su; Han, Jin-Yeong

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial deletions involving the chromosome band 15q22q24 are very rare and only nine cases have been previously reported. Here, we report on a 12-day-old patient with a de novo 15q22q23 interstitial deletion. He was born by elective cesarean section with a birth weight of 3,120 g at 41.3-week gestation. He presented with hypotonia, sensory and neural hearing loss, dysmorphism with frontal bossing, flat nasal bridge, microretrognathia with normal palate and uvula, thin upper lip in an inverted V-shape, a midline sacral dimple, severe calcanovalgus at admission, and severe global developmental delay at 18 months of age. Fluorescence in situ hybridization findings confirmed that the deleted regions contained at least 15q22. The chromosome analysis revealed a karyotype of 46,XY,del(15) (q22q23). Parental chromosome analysis was performed and results were normal. After reviewing the limited literature on interstitial 15q deletions, we believe that the presented case is the first description of mapping of an interstitial deletion involving the chromosome 15q22q23 segment in Korea. This report adds to the knowledge of the clinical phenotype associated with the 15q22q23 deletion. PMID:26388897

  6. Monoallelic and Biallelic Variants in EMC1 Identified in Individuals with Global Developmental Delay, Hypotonia, Scoliosis, and Cerebellar Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Harel, Tamar; Yesil, Gozde; Bayram, Yavuz; Coban-Akdemir, Zeynep; Charng, Wu-Lin; Karaca, Ender; Al Asmari, Ali; Eldomery, Mohammad K; Hunter, Jill V; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Pehlivan, Davut; El-Hattab, Ayman W; Saleh, Mohammed A; LeDuc, Charles A; Muzny, Donna; Boerwinkle, Eric; Gibbs, Richard A; Chung, Wendy K; Yang, Yaping; Belmont, John W; Lupski, James R

    2016-03-01

    The paradigm of a single gene associated with one specific phenotype and mode of inheritance has been repeatedly challenged. Genotype-phenotype correlations can often be traced to different mutation types, localization of the variants in distinct protein domains, or the trigger of or escape from nonsense-mediated decay. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified homozygous variants in EMC1 that segregated with a phenotype of developmental delay, hypotonia, scoliosis, and cerebellar atrophy in three families. In addition, a de novo heterozygous EMC1 variant was seen in an individual with a similar clinical and MRI imaging phenotype. EMC1 encodes a member of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-membrane protein complex (EMC), an evolutionarily conserved complex that has been proposed to have multiple roles in ER-associated degradation, ER-mitochondria tethering, and proper assembly of multi-pass transmembrane proteins. Perturbations of protein folding and organelle crosstalk have been implicated in neurodegenerative processes including cerebellar atrophy. We propose EMC1 as a gene in which either biallelic or monoallelic variants might lead to a syndrome including intellectual disability and preferential degeneration of the cerebellum. PMID:26942288

  7. Physical Stature Decline and the Health Status of the Elderly Population in England

    PubMed Central

    Fernihough, Alan; McGovern, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Few research papers in economics have examined the extent, causes or consequences of physical stature decline in aging populations. Using repeated observations on objectively measured data from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA), we document that reduction in height is an important phenomenon among older individuals. On average, physical stature decline amongst older individuals occurs at an annual rate of between 0.08% and 0.10% for males, and 0.12% and 0.14% for females—which approximately translates into a 2cm to 4cm reduction in height over the life course. Since height is commonly used as a measure of long-run health, our results demonstrate that failing to take age-related height loss into account substantially overstates the health disadvantage of older birth cohorts relative to their younger counterparts. We also show that there is an absence of consistent predictors of physical stature decline at the individual level. However, we demonstrate how deteriorating health and reductions in height occur simultaneously. We document that declines in muscle mass and bone density are likely to be the mechanism through which these effects are operating. This has potential implications for the existing literature because if this decline is determined by deteriorating health in adulthood, the coefficient on a measured height when used as an input in a typical empirical health production function will be affected by reverse causality. While our analysis details the inherent difficulties associated with measuring height in older populations, we do not find that significant bias arises in typical empirical health production functions from the use of height which has not been adjusted for physical stature decline. Therefore, our results validate the use of height among the population over 50. PMID:24508050

  8. Effects of garments on photoanthropometry of body parts: application to stature estimation.

    PubMed

    Scoleri, Tony; Lucas, Teghan; Henneberg, Maciej

    2014-04-01

    Person identification from images is an important task in many security applications and forensic investigations. The essence of the problem comes down to measuring key observable anatomical features which can help describing similarities or differences between two or more individuals. In this paper, we examine how different types of garments affect the placement of body markers that enable precise anatomical human description. We focus in particular on landmark positioning errors on the upper limb. Closed-form formulae are provided to compute the maximum likelihood estimate of upper limb length from an image. Subject stature is then predicted from the limb length through a regression model and used as identification criterion. Following initial laboratory experiments, the technique is demonstrated to be invariant to posture and applicable to uninformed subjects in unconstrained environments. Seven technical errors of measurement and statistical tests are quantified empirically from statures obtained by three assessors. Results show that thicker garments produce higher inaccuracies in landmark localisation but errors decrease as placement is repeated, as expected. Overall, comparison to truth reveals that on average statures are predicted with accuracy in excess of 96% for the worst assessor. PMID:24582408

  9. Estimation of stature from hand dimensions of north and south Indians.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Prateek; Nagesh, K R; Yoganarasimha, K

    2008-07-01

    The present study was undertaken to predict the stature of a person using hand length and breadth. The study includes 500 right-hand dominant medical students aged between 20 and 30 years, from northern and southern parts of India, studying in Kasturba medical college, Manipal, India. Hand length was measured 'between the distal wrist crease and the tip of middle finger (HL-1)' and 'between the mid-point of inter-styloid line to the tip of middle finger (HL-2)'. Hand breadth was measured between radial side of the second metacarpophalyngeal joint and ulnar side of the fifth metacarpophalyngeal joint (HB). No significant difference was present in hand dimensions between north and south Indians. When compared between both hands, right-hand dimensions were larger than the left hand, with statistically significant difference in HL-2 and HB. Linear regression equations using hand length is more helpful in estimating stature than the hand breadth. The correlation coefficients ranged from 0.673 to 0.665 and 0.740 to 0.732 in north Indian males and females, respectively. Whereas in south Indians, it ranged from 0.752 to 0.732 and 0.701 to 0.691 in males and females, respectively. Multiple regression equations give better results than linear regression equations. HL-2 gives more accurate results in stature estimation than the HL-1. PMID:18291701

  10. Estimation of stature from diversified hand anthropometric dimensions from Korean population.

    PubMed

    Jee, Soo-Chan; Yun, Myung Hwan

    2015-10-01

    The anthropometric method has served as a useful tool in reducing the amount of time and effort in confirmation of identity. This study is based on a sample of 321 people (167 males and 154 females) from South Korea. Twenty-nine variables including lengths, breadths, thickness, and circumference of their hands and wrists were measured. The body dimension data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. To find the relationship between the various parts of the hand and height, Pearson correlation coefficients for the parts were compared. Further, the single regression and determination coefficient of a regression estimation equation (R(2)) and standard error of estimate (S.E.E) were calculated to compare prediction reliability. Hand length was found to be the variable with the highest correlation to stature in both males (r = 0.628) and females (r = 0.534). For male subjects, hand length (R(2) = 0.398) and palm length (R(2) = 0.358) proved to be the greatest determining factors for the regression equation. For both males and females, an R-square value of 0.643 was obtained with an estimation error of ±5.719 cm by using the derived multiple regressions. In this study single and multiple regression equations were derived for accurate estimation of stature and hand length was found to be the most relevant predictor of stature. PMID:26344451

  11. Stature and gender determination and their correlation using odontometry and skull anthropometry

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Amit; Kumar, Kiran; Shetty, Devi Charan; Wadhwan, Vijay; Jain, Anshi; Khanna, Kaveri Surya

    2014-01-01

    Background: When the body has been mutilated, it is common to have the extremities or head amputated from the trunk. In concern with forensic odontology, an estimate must have been made based on the correlation of osteometry along with odontometry in determining sex, race and stature. Objective: The objective of this study is to investigate and correlate height and gender from odontometry and anthropometric data of the skull. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology and Microbiology, I.T.S Center for Dental studies and Research, Muradnagar, Ghaziabad (UP) with the representative study subjects of 60 patients as 30 males and 30 females in the age group of 15-25 years. The selected parameters were measured and then correlated to investigate stature and gender from odontometry and anthropometric data of the skull. Results: On linear regression analysis, the selected parameters were found to be statistically significant predictor of height. It was also established by Karl Pearson's coefficient correlation that the left mandibular canine index for female was statistically significant to show sexual dimorphism. Conclusion: In the emerging field of forensic odontology, skull anthropometry, odontometry exhibits stature determination and strong sexual dimorphism. PMID:25125917

  12. A PIGN mutation responsible for multiple congenital anomalies-hypotonia-seizures syndrome 1 (MCAHS1) in an Israeli-Arab family.

    PubMed

    Khayat, Morad; Tilghman, Joseph Mark; Chervinsky, Ilana; Zalman, Lucia; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Shalev, Stavit A

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the PIGN gene involved in the glycosylphoshatidylinositol (GPI) anchor biosynthesis pathway cause Multiple Congenital Anomalies-Hypotonia-Seizures syndrome 1 (MCAHS1). The syndrome manifests developmental delay, hypotonia, and epilepsy, combined with multiple congenital anomalies. We report on the identification of a homozygous novel c.755A>T (p.D252V) deleterious mutation in a patient with Israeli-Arab origin with MCAHS1. The mutated PIGN caused a significant decrease of the overall GPI-anchored proteins and CD24 expression. Our results, strongly support previously published data, that partial depletion of GPI-anchored proteins is sufficient to cause severe phenotypic expression. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26364997

  13. Estimation of stature from the foot and its segments in a sub-adult female population of North India

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Establishing personal identity is one of the main concerns in forensic investigations. Estimation of stature forms a basic domain of the investigation process in unknown and co-mingled human remains in forensic anthropology case work. The objective of the present study was to set up standards for estimation of stature from the foot and its segments in a sub-adult female population. Methods The sample for the study constituted 149 young females from the Northern part of India. The participants were aged between 13 and 18 years. Besides stature, seven anthropometric measurements that included length of the foot from each toe (T1, T2, T3, T4, and T5 respectively), foot breadth at ball (BBAL) and foot breadth at heel (BHEL) were measured on both feet in each participant using standard methods and techniques. Results The results indicated that statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) between left and right feet occur in both the foot breadth measurements (BBAL and BHEL). Foot length measurements (T1 to T5 lengths) did not show any statistically significant bilateral asymmetry. The correlation between stature and all the foot measurements was found to be positive and statistically significant (p-value < 0.001). Linear regression models and multiple regression models were derived for estimation of stature from the measurements of the foot. The present study indicates that anthropometric measurements of foot and its segments are valuable in the estimation of stature. Foot length measurements estimate stature with greater accuracy when compared to foot breadth measurements. Conclusions The present study concluded that foot measurements have a strong relationship with stature in the sub-adult female population of North India. Hence, the stature of an individual can be successfully estimated from the foot and its segments using different regression models derived in the study. The regression models derived in the study may be applied successfully for the estimation of stature in sub-adult females, whenever foot remains are brought for forensic examination. Stepwise multiple regression models tend to estimate stature more accurately than linear regression models in female sub-adults. PMID:22104433

  14. Estimation of stature by cephalometric facial dimensions in skeletonized bodies: study from a sample modern Colombians skeletal remains.

    PubMed

    González-Colmenares, Gretel; Medina, César Sanabria; Báez, Liliana Carolina

    2016-01-01

    Estimation of stature is an important factor in the identification of the deceased from unknown fragmentary and dismembered remains. The skull sometimes is the only remain available for identification. The aim of the present study was to estimate the stature of an individual from cephalo-facial dimensions. The study was carried out on 54 males and 16 females from the bone collection of the contemporary Colombian population that belongs to the National Institute of Legal Medicine. Ten cephalo-facial measurements were also made on each subject. The stature of each individual in centimeters was taken from the registration and/or from the autopsy document. The results indicate that the measurements N-M (p<0.001) and G-Op, Ba-N, Ma-SN (p<0.05) are correlated with stature for males. The correlation between these measures with stature for females was not significant. However, the formulae obtained from univariate linear regression analysis using cephalo-facial measurements showed a greater degree of reliability for estimation of stature in males and females. PMID:26631845

  15. Neonatal seizures and severe hypotonia in a male infant suffering from a defect in peroxisomal beta-oxidation.

    PubMed

    Van Maldergem, L; Espeel, M; Wanders, R J; Roels, F; Gerard, P; Scalais, E; Mannaerts, G P; Casteels, M; Gillerot, Y

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a baby male born to healthy non-consanguineous parents presenting at birth with hypotonia and seizures. Additional salient clinical features included the development of glaucoma, the absence of significant facial dysmorphism and the absence of liver enlargement or renal cysts. The patient died at the age of 3 months. At autopsy, liver fibrosis and kidney glomerulosclerosis were noted. Neuropathological findings included pachygyria of the olivary nuclei and cerebellar neuronal heterotopias. There was no evidence for a demyelinating process. Biochemically, the patient was found to have elevated plasma levels of very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA) and abnormal bile acid intermediates, whereas other indicators of peroxisomal function (plasmalogen biosynthesis and plasma pipecolic acid) were normal. Catalase staining of a liver biopsy specimen revealed peroxisomes to be present in normal numbers, although some were abnormally large. Trilamellar inclusions typical of a peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation defect were present in macrophages. Indeed, beta-oxidation of the very-long-chain fatty acid hexacosanoic acid (C26:0) was found to be strongly deficient. Fatty acyl-CoA oxidase activity in the patient's liver was normal, however. Furthermore immunocytochemical studies using antibodies against acyl-CoA oxidase, bifunctional protein and peroxisomal thiolase, revealed the normal localization of all three enzyme proteins within the peroxisomes. We suggest that our patient has a selective peroxisomal beta-oxidation defect, a recently identified heterogeneous group of early-onset peroxisomal disorders distinct from the Zellweger syndrome and other generalized peroxisomal disorders. PMID:1483048

  16. Experience of severe desaturation during anesthetic induction period in an obese adult patient with Prader-Willi syndrome -A case report-.

    PubMed

    Choi, Joon Woo; Kim, Eun-Ju; Min, Byung Woo; Ban, Jong Seouk; Lee, Sang Gon; Lee, Ji-Hyang

    2012-02-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome is characterized by infantile hypotonia, childhood-onset obesity, short stature, mental retardation, hyperphagia, hypogonadism. After infantile hypotonia phase, patient is prone to morbid obesity due to hyperphagia. Complications associated with morbid obesity are recognized as the main risk factors for death the lifespan of patients with Prader-Willi syndrome. We experienced desaturation and bronchospasm during arteriovenous fistula surgery in an obese adult with Prader-Willi syndrome. PMID:22379576

  17. Decreasing Birth Weight Is Associated with Adverse Metabolic Profile and Lower Stature in Childhood and Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Derraik, José G. B.; Rowe, Deborah L.; Cutfield, Wayne S.; Hofman, Paul L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We aimed to evaluate the association of birth weight SDS with insulin resistance, blood pressure, and auxology in children and adolescents born 23–42 weeks of gestation. Methods We studied 143 singleton children and adolescents aged 9.3 ± 3.3 years (range 2.0–17.9 years). Clinical assessments included insulin resistance measured by HOMA2-IR, auxology, and blood pressure from sphygmomanometer measurements. Continuous associations were examined, and stratified analyses carried out. For the latter, participants were divided into those of below-average birth weight (BABW, <0 SDS) and above-average birth weight (AABW, ?0 SDS). Results Irrespective of gestational age, lower birth weight SDS was associated with progressively greater HOMA2-IR (p<0.0001) and higher fasting insulin concentrations (p<0.0001). Decreasing birth weight SDS was associated with higher systolic (p = 0.011) and diastolic (p = 0.006) blood pressure. Lower birth weight SDS was also associated with decreasing stature (p<0.010). The BABW group was ~40% more insulin resistant than AABW participants (p = 0.004), with the former also displaying fasting insulin concentrations 37% higher (p = 0.004). BABW participants were 0.54 SDS shorter than those of higher birth weight (p = 0.002). On average, BABW participants had not met their genetic potential, tending to be shorter than their parents (p = 0.065). As a result, when corrected for parents' heights, BABW participants were 0.62 SDS shorter than those born of higher birth weight (p = 0.001). Sub-group analyses on participants born appropriate-for-gestational-age (n = 128) showed that associations of birth weight SDS with both insulin resistance and stature remained (although attenuated). Conclusion Decreasing birth weight SDS (even within the normal range) is associated with adverse metabolic profile and lower stature in children and adolescents. PMID:25760717

  18. Inequality in Japan (1892-1941): physical stature, income, and health.

    PubMed

    Bassino, Jean-Pascal

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates the relationship between physical stature, per capita income, health, and regional inequality in Japan at the prefecture-level for the period 1892-1941. The analysis shows that inequality in income and access to health services explains differences in average height of the population across the 47 Japanese prefectures during this period and that variation in income contributed to changes in height during the 1930s. Annual regional time series of height indicate that Japan experienced a regional convergence in biological welfare before 1914, and that a divergence occurred during the interwar period; personal inequality followed a similar pattern. PMID:16371256

  19. Stature estimation based on measurements of the sternal medullary cavity using multidetector computed tomography images of Japanese cadavers.

    PubMed

    Torimitsu, Suguru; Makino, Yohsuke; Saitoh, Hisako; Sakuma, Ayaka; Ishii, Namiko; Hayakawa, Mutsumi; Yajima, Daisuke; Inokuchi, Go; Motomura, Ayumi; Chiba, Fumiko; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2014-09-01

    Stature estimation using a skeleton is important for the medicolegal investigation of unidentified human remains. The aims of this study were to identify a correlation between stature and measurements of the sternal medullary cavity using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and derive regression equations for stature estimation in the Japanese population. Measurements were conducted on 215 Japanese subjects (107 males, 108 females) who underwent postmortem computed tomography with subsequent forensic autopsy between May 2012 and January 2014. For assessment, MDCT cross-sections through the mid-point of the first costal facets were chosen. The length of a rising diagonal stroke from the bottom left to the top right of the sternal medullary cavity (RS) and the length of a falling diagonal stroke from top left to bottom right of the sternal medullary cavity (FS) were measured. Statistical analyses indicated that both RS and FS were positively correlated with stature regardless of sex. The correlations were stronger for males than for females. The correlation coefficients for RS were higher than those for FS, and standard errors of estimation calculated by regression analysis using RS were lower than those using FS regardless of sex. Measurement of the sternal medullary cavity using MDCT images may be a potentially useful tool for stature estimation, particularly in cases where better predictors such as long bones are not available. PMID:25082372

  20. An alternative approach for estimating stature from long bones that is not population- or group-specific.

    PubMed

    Albanese, John; Tuck, Andrew; Gomes, José; Cardoso, Hugo F V

    2016-02-01

    An accurate and precise estimate of stature can be very useful in the analysis of human remains in forensic cases. A problem with many stature estimation methods is that an unknown individual must first be assigned to a specific group before a method can be applied. Group membership has been defined by sex, age, year of birth, race, ancestry, continental origin, nationality or a combination of these criteria. Univariate and multivariate sex-specific and generic equations are presented here that do not require an unknown individual to be assigned to a group before stature is estimated. The equations were developed using linear regression with a sample (n=244) from the Terry Collection and tested using independent samples from the Forensic Anthropology Databank (n=136) and the Lisbon Collection (n=85). Tests with these independent samples show that (1) the femur provides the best univariate results; (2) the best multivariate equation includes the humerus, femur and tibia lengths; (3) a generic equation that does not require an unknown to first be assigned to a given category provides the best results most often; (4) a population-specific equation does not provide better results for estimating stature; (5) sex-specific equations can provide slightly better results in some cases; however, estimating the wrong sex can have a negative impact on precision and accuracy. With these equations, stature can be estimated independently of age at death, sex or group membership. PMID:26750990

  1. Differences in stature, BMI, and dietary practices between US born and newly immigrated Hmong children.

    PubMed

    Franzen, Lisa; Smith, Chery

    2009-08-01

    This study investigated how acculturation influences diet, cultural practices related to cooking and food preparation knowledge, and stature and body mass index (BMI) of Hmong children. Focus groups (n=12) were conducted during the spring of 2008 in St. Paul/Minneapolis, Minnesota with those born in the US and 9-13 years old (n=22), those born in the US and 14-18 years old (n=25), and those born in Thailand or Laos, who had lived in the US< or =5 years, and 14-18 years old (n=21). Respondents also completed a survey instrument to assess acculturation level which was evaluated by questions about social connections, language use, and dietary habits. Compared to those born in the US, those born in Thailand or Laos were significantly shorter and leaner. Those born in the US also showed elevated acculturation levels in language use, social connections, and gender-oriented tasks compared to those born in Thailand or Laos. Themes from focus group discussions were mealtime patterns, determinants of food health, future health concerns, and changing cultural traditions. Acculturation, years lived in the US, and birth place may play an important role in stature and BMI, food and physical activity habits, cooking and food preparation knowledge, and perceptions of health. PMID:19556047

  2. Small-stature emergent macrophytes and crepuscular sprinkler disturbance reduce mosquito abundance in wetland mesocosms.

    PubMed

    Popko, David A; Walton, William E

    2013-12-01

    The impact of emergent macrophyte species and crepuscular sprinkler disturbance on mosquito abundance over a 2-year period was measured in wetland mesocosms. Mosquito oviposition and abundance of immature mosquitoes and aquatic invertebrates were monitored in monotypic plots of small-stature (height of mature stands <1.5 m) alkali bulrush (Schoenoplectus maritimus) and large-stature (height of mature stands > 2 m) California bulrush (Schoenoplectus californicus) without or with daily sprinkler showers to deter mosquito egg laying. Relative to wetlands without operational sprinklers, oviposition by culicine mosquitoes was reduced by > 99% and immature mosquito abundance was reduced by > 90% by crepuscular sprinkler applications. Mosquito abundance or distribution in wetlands did not differ between the two bulrush species subjected to the sprinkler treatment. Alkali bulrush wetlands without daily sprinkler treatments contained more egg rafts but significantly fewer mosquito larvae than did California bulrush wetlands. Predaceous damselfly naiads were 3-5 times more abundant in alkali bulrush than in California bulrush. Stem density, rate of spread, and autumnal mortality of alkali bulrush were higher than for California bulrush. Replacement of large emergent macrophytes by smaller species may enhance the efficacy of integrated mosquito management programs to reduce mosquito-transmitted disease cycles associated with multipurpose constructed wetlands used worldwide for water reclamation and habitat restoration. PMID:24581369

  3. Familial C/G Translocation in Three Relatives Associated with Severe Mental Retardation, Short Stature, Unusual Dermatoglyphics and Other Malformations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yanagisawa, S.; Hiraoka, K.

    1971-01-01

    Three case studies of patients (relatives) suffering from a chromosomal aberration (translocation between one of the C group chromosomes and one of the G group chromosomes) resulting in severe mental retardation and skin malformations are reported. It was suggested that the anomaly is hereditary in nature (CD)

  4. Microcephaly, short stature, and developmental delay associated with a chemotactic defect and transient hypogammaglobulinaemia in two brothers.

    PubMed Central

    Say, B; Barber, N; Miller, G C; Grogg, S E

    1986-01-01

    Two brothers presented with unusual facial features, microcephaly, developmental delay, and severe postnatal growth retardation. They both developed eczema in infancy and have had recurrent infections. Additional physical findings in both boys included hypogonadism, flexion contractures, hypoplastic patellae, and scoliosis. Their facial similarity was striking with sloping foreheads, beaked noses, large, protruding ears, and micrognathia. Low levels of serum gammaglobulins and defective chemotaxis were present in both boys in infancy. The hypogammaglobulinaemia was transient and improved, reaching normal levels by 3 1/2 years and 15 months, respectively. Defective chemotaxis and recurrent infections have persisted to the present. Both parents were normal. The mode of inheritance was not clear, as both X linked and autosomal recessive patterns were possible. Although patients with congenital malformations who also had immunodeficiency have previously been reported, immune system abnormalities, especially those of a transient nature, may frequently go unrecognised. Images PMID:3746838

  5. Estimating aboveground biomass of low-stature Arctic shrubs with terrestrial LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greaves, H.; Vierling, L. A.; Eitel, J.; Boelman, N.; Griffin, K. L.; Magney, T. S.

    2014-12-01

    Arctic tundra ecosystems appear to be responding to rapid climatic warming via changes in vegetation composition and increased woody biomass, which may induce significant shifts in ecosystem structure and function. Although understanding these shifts is important for predicting ecosystem trajectories, establishing methods for quantifying and scaling woody plant biomass in low-stature biomes is challenging. We used LiDAR data from a terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) to estimate harvested biomass and leaf area of two dominant low-stature (<1.5 m) Arctic shrub species (Salix pulchra Cham. and Betula nana L.) in small (0.64 m2) plots. We explored two biomass estimation approaches (volumetric surface differencing and voxel counting) applied to point clouds obtained from either close-range (2 m) or variable-range (<50 m) TLS scans. Relationships between harvested biomass and laser scan metrics were strong for all combinations of approaches. Voxel counting provided a marginally better result than surface differencing for close-range scans (R2 = 0.94 vs 0.92; RMSE = 102 g vs 117 g), while surface differencing proved stronger than voxel counting for variable-range scans (R2 = 0.90 vs 0.79; RMSE = 128 g vs 184 g). Strong relationships between total harvested biomass and total leaf dry mass (R2 = 0.93; RMSE = 13.4 g), and between leaf dry mass and leaf wet area (R2 = 0.99; RMSE = 9.01 cm2) justify estimation of shrub leaf area from TLS-derived shrub biomass. Our results show that rapidly acquired, repeatable terrestrial laser scans taken from multiple distance ranges can be processed using simple algorithms to yield aboveground biomass and leaf area estimates for low-stature shrubs at fine spatial scales (sub-meter to 50 + meters). These data have the fidelity required to monitor small but ecologically meaningful changes in tundra structure, and could be employed as ground reference data for broader scale remote sensing data collection to provide shrub biomass and leaf-area estimates at fine resolution over large spatial extents.

  6. Do century-specific equations provide better estimates of stature? A test of the 19-20th century boundary for the stature estimation feature in Fordisc 3.0.

    PubMed

    Albanese, John; Osley, Stephanie E; Tuck, Andrew

    2012-06-10

    A sample (n=28) from the Terry Collection was selected to include only White males who were born and had their entire growth and development period before 1900 to assess the effects year of birth have on accuracy and precision when estimating stature. Using the computer application Fordisc 3.0, stature was estimated using the humerus, radius, femur, and tibia equations developed from White males born in the 19th Century and the 20th Century. The 19th Century White male equations did not consistently provide the most precise and accurate estimates of stature. The 20th Century equations provide results that were as good as or slightly better than the 19th Century equations for the humerus, radius and femur. The 20th Century equations provided notably better results for the tibia. There is a great deal of evidence that there are clear positive secular changes in most of North America in the last 100-125 years, but the division commonly advocated in a forensic context at the year 1900 has no positive effect on accuracy or precision when estimating stature. PMID:22206715

  7. On the relationship between stature and anthropometric measurements of lumbar vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Klein, Anke; Nagel, Katrin; Gührs, Julian; Poodendaen, Chanasorn; Püschel, Klaus; Morlock, Michael M; Huber, Gerd

    2015-12-01

    Stature estimation is important for identifying human remains. Analysis of body parts has become an important forensic tool during global operations in the context of cases in which human remains have been dismembered, mutilated or decomposed. However, unless almost the full skeleton or at least a long bone of the lower limb is available, accuracy is still limited to approximate body height. Especially with respect to single vertebral measurements, only a rough prediction is possible. Due to their complex geometry, vertebral measurements are possible at various locations. Nine locations have been considered in this study. Regression equations for stature estimation using lumbar vertebral geometry from computed tomography scans have been evaluated to identify the measurement which gives the most reliable body height estimation. The study group comprised a representative sample of a German metropolitan male population (42 autopsied individuals). Comparing the influence of various vertebral geometry measurements with body height resulted in a coefficient of correlation (R) of 0.19-0.53 and a 95% confidence interval (CI) of ± 11.6 up to ± 13.1cm. The largest correlation with a single vertebral measurement was achieved with the central height of the vertebral body of L2 as predictor; the standard error (SE) of the estimate was 5.9 cm. Using models from CT scans appeared superior to current invasive procedures that use direct measurements of the vertebral body, in terms of reproducibility and time efficiency. For fragmented non-skeletonized human bodies, height prediction based on an all-virtual model of the vertebrae is possible. However, the regression coefficient may be similar to classic caliper measurements that prove easier if skeletonized bones are available. PMID:26654071

  8. Adult stature and age at menarche in Zapotec-speaking communities in the Valley of Oaxaca, Mexico, in a secular perspective.

    PubMed

    Malina, R M; Selby, H A; Buschang, P H; Aronson, W L; Wilkinson, R G

    1983-04-01

    Adult stature and the age at menarche among individuals from Zapotec-speaking communities in the Valley of Oaxaca in southern Mexico are considered in a secular perspective. Four sets of observations are utilized: 1) adult stature in males and females from five rural communities; 2) age at menarche in adult women and school girls from a single rural community; 3) earlier studies of adult stature in the Valley of Oaxaca; and 4) estimated stature from long bones excavated in various archaeological sites in the Valley of Oaxaca. There were no significant differences among the five communities for stature; hence, the data were pooled for analysis and comparison. Results of linear regression of stature and stature adjusted for the estimated effects of aging after 30 years of age on year of birth indicate negligible secular changes in either sex. Comparisons with statures from earlier surveys, the earliest dates to 1899, also indicate negligible changes. When adult women are grouped according to age, there are no differences in mean ages at menarche between the older and younger women. Mean age at menarche for the total adult sample is 14.53 +/- 0.08 years, which compares favorably with the probit estimate for school girls, 14.70 +/- 0.32 years. These results thus suggest virtually no secular change in adult size and maturity of the Zapotec-speaking population in the Valley of Oaxaca over the past 80 years. Differences in stature between contemporary populations and estimated statures from long bones from several archaeological sites in Oaxaca are small, and thus suggests little secular change over the past one to two-thousand years. PMID:6846514

  9. In Italy, North-South Differences in IQ Predict Differences in Income, Education, Infant Mortality, Stature, and Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynn, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Regional differences in IQ are presented for 12 regions of Italy showing that IQs are highest in the north and lowest in the south. Regional IQs obtained in 2006 are highly correlated with average incomes at r = 0.937, and with stature, infant mortality, literacy and education. The lower IQ in southern Italy may be attributable to genetic…

  10. In Italy, North-South Differences in IQ Predict Differences in Income, Education, Infant Mortality, Stature, and Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynn, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Regional differences in IQ are presented for 12 regions of Italy showing that IQs are highest in the north and lowest in the south. Regional IQs obtained in 2006 are highly correlated with average incomes at r = 0.937, and with stature, infant mortality, literacy and education. The lower IQ in southern Italy may be attributable to genetic…

  11. Genetics of coronary artery disease: Short people at risk?

    PubMed

    Trenkwalder, Teresa; Kessler, Thorsten; Schunkert, Heribert; Erdmann, Jeanette

    2015-11-01

    Traditional cardiovascular risk factors have been in the spotlight for coronary artery disease (CAD) management over the past decades. A non-modifiable risk marker is short adult stature. However, a causal role in the etiology of CAD was always questioned, since multiple confounders may also explain the inverse association between height and CAD risk. The assumption that genetic variants affecting height do so without interference of exogenous factors allows for the testing of the association between short stature, that is, genetic markers affecting height, and CAD even without measuring height. Interestingly, these studies suggest a rather multifaceted relationship between the two complex phenotypes. Indeed, investigating 180 height-associated genetic variants in 65,066 patients with CAD and 128,383 healthy controls suggests a causal relationship of short stature and CAD risk. Multiple signaling pathways affecting growth, as well as pleiotropic effects of genetic variants affecting height and lipids, seem to underlie the association between height and CAD risk. PMID:26414801

  12. Quality of Life and Psychological Well-Being in GH-Treated, Adult PWS Patients: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertella, L.; Mori, I.; Grugni, G.; Pignatti, R.; Ceriani, F.; Molinari, E.; Ceccarelli, A.; Sartorio, A.; Vettor, R.; Semenza, C.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a congenital alteration of chromosome pair 15. It is characterized by short stature, muscular hypotonia, hyperphagia, obesity, behavioural and emotional disturbances, hypogonadism and partial Growth Hormone (GH) deficiency. The aim of this study was to assess the long-term effect of GH treatment on the…

  13. Cognitive, Emotional, Physical and Social Effects of Growth Hormone Treatment in Adults with Prader-Willi Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoybye, C; Thoren, M.; Bohm, B.

    2005-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a multisystem genetic disorder characterized by short stature, muscular hypotonia, hyperphagia, obesity, maladaptive behaviour, hypogonadism and partial growth hormone (GH) deficiency (GHD). Severe GHD of other aetiologies has been shown to affect mood and quality of life negatively, and there are reports of…

  14. Sensory Motor and Functional Skills of Dizygotic Twins: One with Smith-Magenis Syndrome and a Twin Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Michaele R.; Hildenbrand, Hanna; Smith, Ann C. M.

    2009-01-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS), the result of an interstitial deletion within chromosome 17p11.2, is a disorder that may include minor dysmorphic features, brachydactyly, short stature, hypotonia, speech delays, cognitive deficits, signs of peripheral neuropathy, scoliosis, and neurobehavioral problems including sleep disturbances and maladaptive…

  15. Quality of Life and Psychological Well-Being in GH-Treated, Adult PWS Patients: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertella, L.; Mori, I.; Grugni, G.; Pignatti, R.; Ceriani, F.; Molinari, E.; Ceccarelli, A.; Sartorio, A.; Vettor, R.; Semenza, C.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a congenital alteration of chromosome pair 15. It is characterized by short stature, muscular hypotonia, hyperphagia, obesity, behavioural and emotional disturbances, hypogonadism and partial Growth Hormone (GH) deficiency. The aim of this study was to assess the long-term effect of GH treatment on the…

  16. Cognitive, Emotional, Physical and Social Effects of Growth Hormone Treatment in Adults with Prader-Willi Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoybye, C; Thoren, M.; Bohm, B.

    2005-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a multisystem genetic disorder characterized by short stature, muscular hypotonia, hyperphagia, obesity, maladaptive behaviour, hypogonadism and partial growth hormone (GH) deficiency (GHD). Severe GHD of other aetiologies has been shown to affect mood and quality of life negatively, and there are reports of…

  17. Visual-Motor Integration in Children with Prader-Willi Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo, S. T.; Collin, P. J. L.; Hokken-Koelega, A. C. S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is characterised by hypotonia, hypogonadism, short stature, obesity, behavioural problems, intellectual disability, and delay in language, social and motor development. There is very limited knowledge about visual-motor integration in children with PWS. Method: Seventy-three children with PWS aged 7-17 years…

  18. Visual-Motor Integration in Children with Prader-Willi Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo, S. T.; Collin, P. J. L.; Hokken-Koelega, A. C. S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is characterised by hypotonia, hypogonadism, short stature, obesity, behavioural problems, intellectual disability, and delay in language, social and motor development. There is very limited knowledge about visual-motor integration in children with PWS. Method: Seventy-three children with PWS aged 7-17 years…

  19. Sensory Motor and Functional Skills of Dizygotic Twins: One with Smith-Magenis Syndrome and a Twin Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Michaele R.; Hildenbrand, Hanna; Smith, Ann C. M.

    2009-01-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS), the result of an interstitial deletion within chromosome 17p11.2, is a disorder that may include minor dysmorphic features, brachydactyly, short stature, hypotonia, speech delays, cognitive deficits, signs of peripheral neuropathy, scoliosis, and neurobehavioral problems including sleep disturbances and maladaptive…

  20. 476?Severe Autoimmunity with Polyarticular Joint Disease Requiring Anti-TNF Therapy and T+B-NK+ Immunodeficiency in a Family with Small Stature and Intermediate Radiation Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Torgerson, Troy; Ochs, Hans; Lu, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Background We have identified a family in which 3 of 4 children are affected with significant autoimmunity and immunodeficiency that does not fit any of the known disorders. We have embarked to characterize their defect and describe a completely new disorder. Methods Whole Exome Sequencing, T and B Cell Immunophenotyping, Radiation Sensitivity, Bacteriophage. Results The oldest affected child is female with severe polyarticular arthritis (treated with etanercept), eczema, diarrhea, short stature and numerous infections including pneumonia. She is s/p bone marrow transplant using a matched sibling donor, is fully engrafted and doing well. The second affected child was also female and had numerous episodes of pneumonia, bronchiolitis, otitis media and conjunctivitis. She died at 11 months from presumed fulminant CMV hepatitis. The third affected child is male with hypothyroidism, chronic diarrhea, alopecia totalis, eczema, multiple food allergies, reactive airway disease and short stature. All had normal CD4+ and CD8+ T cell and NK cell numbers but marked B cell lymphopenia. T cell immunophenotyping demonstrated a modest decrease in effector memory T cells. Mitogens were normal. B cell immunophenotyping demonstrated a dramatic block in B cell development at the transition from immature to mature B cells suggesting a defect in immunoglobulin gene rearrangement. All affected patients were hypogammaglobulinemic. Immunization with bacteriophage ?X174 to more thoroughly evaluate humoral immune responses demonstrated a poor immunoglobulin response with only modest amplification and markedly decreased immunoglobulin class switching. Radiation sensitivity testing using skin fibroblasts was performed and demonstrated an intermediate radiation sensitivity. Sequencing of the RAG1, RAG2, and Artemis genes was normal. Evaluation via western blotting of other components of the DNA repair machinery that lead to defective immunoglobulin gene rearrangement and radiation sensitivity was normal. Conclusions The overall clinical and laboratory picture of severe autoimmunity with a T+B-NK+ phenotype is unusual and does not fit any known immune defect. The CMV susceptibility suggests that even though T cell numbers and proliferation are normal, there may be a subtle defect in T cell function. We are currently in the process of whole exome sequencing and optimistic we will find a novel defect in DNA repair.

  1. X-linked mental retardation with neonatal hypotonia in a French family (MRX15): Gene assignment to Xp11.22-Xp21.1

    SciTech Connect

    Raynaud, M.; Dessay, B.; Ayrault, A.D.

    1996-07-12

    Linkage analysis was performed in a family with non-specific X-linked mental retardation (MRX 15). Hypotonia in infancy was the most remarkable physical manifestation. The severity of mental deficiency was variable among the patients, but all of them had poor or absent speech. Significant lod scores at a recombination fraction of zero were detected with the marker loci DXS1126, DXS255, and DXS573 (Zmax = 2.01) and recombination was observed with the two flanking loci DXS164 (Xp21.1) and DXS988 (Xp11.22), identifying a 17 cM interval. This result suggests a new gene localization in the proximal Xp region. In numerous families with non-specific X-linked mental retardation (MRX), the corresponding gene has been localized to the paracentromeric region in which a low recombination rate impairs the precision of mapping. 58 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Proximal 10q duplication in a child with severe central hypotonia characterized by array-comparative genomic hybridization: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    MANOLAKOS, EMMANOUIL; VETRO, ANNALISA; GARAS, ANTONIOS; THOMAIDIS, LORETTA; KEFALAS, KONSTANTINOS; KITSOS, GEORGE; ZIEGLER, MONIKA; LIEHR, THOMAS; ZUFFARDI, ORSETTA; PAPOULIDIS, IOANNIS

    2014-01-01

    Proximal 10q duplication is a well-defined but rare genetic syndrome. Duplication of proximal segments of the long arm of chromosome 10 results in a pattern of malformations, which are distinct from those of the more common distal 10q trisomy syndrome. The present study describes the case of a boy with phenotypic abnormalities (severe central hypotonia, mild ataxia, moderate developmental delay and mild dysmorphic features), due to duplication of chromosome region, 10q11.21?q11.22, which was characterized by the array-comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) technique. The phenotypic findings were compared with those in eight additional similar published cases. Major similarities have emerged, suggesting a likely minimal critical region. However, only detailed characterization of additional cases may provide firm conclusions. PMID:24669257

  3. De novo mutations in NALCN cause a syndrome characterized by congenital contractures of the limbs and face, hypotonia, and developmental delay.

    PubMed

    Chong, Jessica X; McMillin, Margaret J; Shively, Kathryn M; Beck, Anita E; Marvin, Colby T; Armenteros, Jose R; Buckingham, Kati J; Nkinsi, Naomi T; Boyle, Evan A; Berry, Margaret N; Bocian, Maureen; Foulds, Nicola; Uzielli, Maria Luisa Giovannucci; Haldeman-Englert, Chad; Hennekam, Raoul C M; Kaplan, Paige; Kline, Antonie D; Mercer, Catherine L; Nowaczyk, Malgorzata J M; Klein Wassink-Ruiter, Jolien S; McPherson, Elizabeth W; Moreno, Regina A; Scheuerle, Angela E; Shashi, Vandana; Stevens, Cathy A; Carey, John C; Monteil, Arnaud; Lory, Philippe; Tabor, Holly K; Smith, Joshua D; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A; Bamshad, Michael J

    2015-03-01

    Freeman-Sheldon syndrome, or distal arthrogryposis type 2A (DA2A), is an autosomal-dominant condition caused by mutations in MYH3 and characterized by multiple congenital contractures of the face and limbs and normal cognitive development. We identified a subset of five individuals who had been putatively diagnosed with "DA2A with severe neurological abnormalities" and for whom congenital contractures of the limbs and face, hypotonia, and global developmental delay had resulted in early death in three cases; this is a unique condition that we now refer to as CLIFAHDD syndrome. Exome sequencing identified missense mutations in the sodium leak channel, non-selective (NALCN) in four families affected by CLIFAHDD syndrome. We used molecular-inversion probes to screen for NALCN in a cohort of 202 distal arthrogryposis (DA)-affected individuals as well as concurrent exome sequencing of six other DA-affected individuals, thus revealing NALCN mutations in ten additional families with "atypical" forms of DA. All 14 mutations were missense variants predicted to alter amino acid residues in or near the S5 and S6 pore-forming segments of NALCN, highlighting the functional importance of these segments. In vitro functional studies demonstrated that NALCN alterations nearly abolished the expression of wild-type NALCN, suggesting that alterations that cause CLIFAHDD syndrome have a dominant-negative effect. In contrast, homozygosity for mutations in other regions of NALCN has been reported in three families affected by an autosomal-recessive condition characterized mainly by hypotonia and severe intellectual disability. Accordingly, mutations in NALCN can cause either a recessive or dominant condition characterized by varied though overlapping phenotypic features, perhaps based on the type of mutation and affected protein domain(s). PMID:25683120

  4. CDC174, a novel component of the exon junction complex whose mutation underlies a syndrome of hypotonia and psychomotor developmental delay.

    PubMed

    Volodarsky, Michael; Lichtig, Hava; Leibson, Tom; Sadaka, Yair; Kadir, Rotem; Perez, Yonatan; Liani-Leibson, Keren; Gradstein, Libe; Shaco-Levy, Ruthy; Shorer, Zamir; Frank, Dale; Birk, Ohad S

    2015-11-15

    Siblings of non-consanguineous Jewish-Ethiopian ancestry presented with congenital axial hypotonia, weakness of the abducens nerve, psychomotor developmental delay with brain ventriculomegaly, variable thinning of corpus callosum and cardiac septal defects. Homozygosity mapping identified a single disease-associated locus of 3.5 Mb on chromosome 3. Studies of a Bedouin consanguineous kindred affected with a similar recessive phenotype identified a single disease-associated 18 Mb homozygosity locus encompassing the entire 3.5 Mb locus. Whole exome sequencing demonstrated only two homozygous mutations within a shared identical haplotype of 0.6 Mb, common to both Bedouin and Ethiopian affected individuals, suggesting an ancient common founder. Only one of the mutations segregated as expected in both kindreds and was not found in Bedouin and Jewish-Ethiopian controls: c.1404A>G, p.[*468Trpext*6] in CCDC174. We showed that CCDC174 is ubiquitous, restricted to the cell nucleus and co-localized with EIF4A3. In fact, yeast-two-hybrid assay demonstrated interaction of CCDC174 with EIF4A3, a component of exon junction complex. Knockdown of the CCDC174 ortholog in Xenopus laevis embryos resulted in poor neural fold closure at the neurula stage with later embryonic lethality. Knockdown embryos exhibited a sharp reduction in expression of n-tubulin, a marker for differentiating primary neurons, and of hindbrain markers krox20 and hoxb3. The Xenopus phenotype could be rescued by the human normal, yet not the mutant CCDC174 transcripts. Moreover, overexpression of mutant but not normal CCDC174 in neuroblastoma cells caused rapid apoptosis. In line with the hypotonia phenotype, the CCDC174 mutation caused depletion of RYR1 and marked myopathic changes in skeletal muscle of affected individuals. PMID:26358778

  5. De Novo Mutations in NALCN Cause a Syndrome Characterized by Congenital Contractures of the Limbs and Face, Hypotonia, and Developmental Delay

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Jessica X.; McMillin, Margaret J.; Shively, Kathryn M.; Beck, Anita E.; Marvin, Colby T.; Armenteros, Jose R.; Buckingham, Kati J.; Nkinsi, Naomi T.; Boyle, Evan A.; Berry, Margaret N.; Bocian, Maureen; Foulds, Nicola; Uzielli, Maria Luisa Giovannucci; Haldeman-Englert, Chad; Hennekam, Raoul C.M.; Kaplan, Paige; Kline, Antonie D.; Mercer, Catherine L.; Nowaczyk, Malgorzata J.M.; Klein Wassink-Ruiter, Jolien S.; McPherson, Elizabeth W.; Moreno, Regina A.; Scheuerle, Angela E.; Shashi, Vandana; Stevens, Cathy A.; Carey, John C.; Monteil, Arnaud; Lory, Philippe; Tabor, Holly K.; Smith, Joshua D.; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Anderson, Peter; Blue, Elizabeth Marchani; Annable, Marcus; Browning, Brian L.; Buckingham, Kati J.; Chen, Christina; Chin, Jennifer; Chong, Jessica X.; Cooper, Gregory M.; Davis, Colleen P.; Frazar, Christopher; Harrell, Tanya M.; He, Zongxiao; Jain, Preti; Jarvik, Gail P.; Jimenez, Guillaume; Johanson, Eric; Jun, Goo; Kircher, Martin; Kolar, Tom; Krauter, Stephanie A.; Krumm, Niklas; Leal, Suzanne M.; Luksic, Daniel; Marvin, Colby T.; McMillin, Margaret J.; McGee, Sean; O’Reilly, Patrick; Paeper, Bryan; Patterson, Karynne; Perez, Marcos; Phillips, Sam W.; Pijoan, Jessica; Poel, Christa; Reinier, Frederic; Robertson, Peggy D.; Santos-Cortez, Regie; Shaffer, Tristan; Shephard, Cindy; Shively, Kathryn M.; Siegel, Deborah L.; Smith, Joshua D.; Staples, Jeffrey C.; Tabor, Holly K.; Tackett, Monica; Underwood, Jason G.; Wegener, Marc; Wang, Gao; Wheeler, Marsha M.; Yi, Qian; Bamshad, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Freeman-Sheldon syndrome, or distal arthrogryposis type 2A (DA2A), is an autosomal-dominant condition caused by mutations in MYH3 and characterized by multiple congenital contractures of the face and limbs and normal cognitive development. We identified a subset of five individuals who had been putatively diagnosed with “DA2A with severe neurological abnormalities” and for whom congenital contractures of the limbs and face, hypotonia, and global developmental delay had resulted in early death in three cases; this is a unique condition that we now refer to as CLIFAHDD syndrome. Exome sequencing identified missense mutations in the sodium leak channel, non-selective (NALCN) in four families affected by CLIFAHDD syndrome. We used molecular-inversion probes to screen for NALCN in a cohort of 202 distal arthrogryposis (DA)-affected individuals as well as concurrent exome sequencing of six other DA-affected individuals, thus revealing NALCN mutations in ten additional families with “atypical” forms of DA. All 14 mutations were missense variants predicted to alter amino acid residues in or near the S5 and S6 pore-forming segments of NALCN, highlighting the functional importance of these segments. In vitro functional studies demonstrated that NALCN alterations nearly abolished the expression of wild-type NALCN, suggesting that alterations that cause CLIFAHDD syndrome have a dominant-negative effect. In contrast, homozygosity for mutations in other regions of NALCN has been reported in three families affected by an autosomal-recessive condition characterized mainly by hypotonia and severe intellectual disability. Accordingly, mutations in NALCN can cause either a recessive or dominant condition characterized by varied though overlapping phenotypic features, perhaps based on the type of mutation and affected protein domain(s). PMID:25683120

  6. Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone Agonist Treatment to Increase Final Stature in Children With Precocious Puberty

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pin; Li, Yan; Yang, Chung-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In the setting of central precocious puberty (CPP), the motivation for hormonal intervention is to help the child to reach a taller adult stature than she would achieve otherwise. While gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs (GnRHa) constitute an established treatment for improving adult stature in girls presenting with CPP up to age 6 (true precocious puberty), it is not yet clear whether or not the same is true in the setting of CPP presented in girls beyond age 6 (advance puberty). GnRHa may slow growth velocity, offsetting the anticipated improvement in final height that should have resulted from the increased time before growth plate fusion. Consequently, it's been suggested that growth hormone (GH) should be combined with GnRHa to improve the results. Few controlled prospective studies have been performed with GnRHa in children and many conclusions rely in part on collective expert opinion. Therefore, the literature was searched and relevant studies were selected using the search terms “gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist,” “precocious puberty/early puberty,” and “GnRH analogue.” After selected articles were screened for relevance, the process yielded 8 studies, the results of which were then pooled in a meta-analysis aimed at evaluating the effects of GnRHa therapy both with and without added GH in the setting of early puberty. A significant difference was elucidated in final height and predicted adult height comparing GnRHa and combined GnRHa/GH groups. However, no significant difference was elucidated in final height standard deviation scores (SDS) and initial height SDS when comparing GnRHa and control groups. At the same time, the final analysis revealed no significant difference in final height SDS and initial height SDS when GnRHa and combined GnRHa/GH groups were compared. The results suggest GnRHa therapy may have a positive effect on final adult height in girls with early puberty, while adding GH to the treatment may suggest more advantage. Interpretation of the results requires extreme caution, given the complexity of the outcome analysis. Final height gain may prove to be a more appropriate measure of treatment efficacy in any case. PMID:25501098

  7. Early-life environment and adult stature in Brazil: an analysis for cohorts born between 1950 and 1980.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Victor Hugo; Quintana-Domeque, Climent

    2014-12-01

    We study the relationship between environmental conditions at birth (GDP per capita and infant mortality rate) and adult stature using cohort-state level data in Brazil for the period 1950-1980. We find that GDP per capita, whose annual percentage growth rate was 4.8% during this period, not infant mortality rate, is a robust correlate of population stature in Brazil. Our results are robust to a battery of robustness checks. Using a useful bracketing property of the (state) fixed effects and lagged dependent variables (heights) estimators, we find that an increase in GDP per capita of the magnitude corresponding to that period is associated with 43-68% of the increase in adult height occurring in the same time span. Income, not disease, appears to be the main correlate of Brazilian population heights in the second half of the 20th Century. PMID:25108192

  8. Transgenic Wuzhishan minipigs designed to express a dominant-negative porcine growth hormone receptor display small stature and a perturbed insulin/IGF-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Feida; Li, Yong; Liu, Huan; Zhang, Xingju; Liu, Chuxin; Tian, Kai; Bolund, Lars; Dou, Hongwei; Yang, Wenxian; Yang, Huanming; Staunstrup, Nicklas Heine; Du, Yutao

    2015-12-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is an anabolic mitogen with widespread influence on cellular growth and differentiation as well as on glucose and lipid metabolism. GH binding to the growth hormone receptor (GHR) on hepatocytes prompts expression of insulin growth factor I (IGF-1) involved in nutritionally induced compensatory hyperplasia of pancreatic β-cell islets and insulin release. A prolonged hyperactivity of the IGF-1/insulin axis in the face of insulinotropic nutrition, on the other hand, can lead to collapse of the pancreatic islets and glucose intolerance. Individuals with Laron syndrome carry mutations in the GHR gene resulting in severe congenital IGF-1 deficiency and elevated GH serum levels leading to short stature as well as perturbed lipid and glucose metabolism. However, these individuals enjoy a reduced prevalence of acne, cancer and possibly diabetes. Minipigs have become important biomedical models for human conditions due to similarities in organ anatomy, physiology, and metabolism relative to humans. The purpose of this study was to generate transgenic Wuzhishan minipigs by handmade cloning with impaired systemic GHR activity and assess their growth profile and glucose metabolism. Transgenic minipigs featuring overexpression of a dominant-negative porcine GHR (GHR(dm)) presented postnatal growth retardation and proportionate dwarfism. Molecular changes included elevated GH serum levels and mild hyperglycemia. We believe that this model may prove valuable in the study of GH functions in relation to cancer, diabetes and longevity. PMID:26510874

  9. Growth in stature in fragile X families: A mixed longitudinal study

    SciTech Connect

    Loesch, D.Z.; Huggins, R.M.; Hoang, N.H.

    1995-09-11

    The effect of fragile X on growth in stature was estimated in individuals aged 5-20 years from 50 fragile X families. The multivariate normal model for pedigree analysis was applied to the mixed longitudinal data, which varied with regard to intervals between the measurements and their number in individual subjects, totalling 349 measurement data points from fragile X families, and 292 data points from unrelated normal subjects. The results of genetic and regression analysis showed that, in fragile X boys and girls, total pubertal height gain is impaired, whereas the rate of growth during the preadolescent period is increased, compared with the growth rate of nonfragile X subjects. Moreover, the growth parameters in fragile X males were found to be correlated with the size of CGG trinucleotide expansion. The hypothesis of premature activation of the hypothalamo-pituitary gonadal axis is postulated as the cause of growth impairment in fragile X boys and girls, which should be verified by data on the timing of pubertal stages, hormone levels, and bone maturation. 33 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Does natural selection favour taller stature among the tallest people on earth?

    PubMed

    Stulp, Gert; Barrett, Louise; Tropf, Felix C; Mills, Melinda

    2015-05-01

    The Dutch are the tallest people on earth. Over the last 200 years, they have grown 20 cm in height: a rapid rate of increase that points to environmental causes. This secular trend in height is echoed across all Western populations, but came to an end, or at least levelled off, much earlier than in The Netherlands. One possibility, then, is that natural selection acted congruently with these environmentally induced changes to further promote tall stature among the people of the lowlands. Using data from the LifeLines study, which follows a large sample of the population of the north of The Netherlands (n = 94 516), we examined how height was related to measures of reproductive success (as a proxy for fitness). Across three decades (1935-1967), height was consistently related to reproductive output (number of children born and number of surviving children), favouring taller men and average height women. This was despite a later age at first birth for taller individuals. Furthermore, even in this low-mortality population, taller women experienced higher child survival, which contributed positively to their increased reproductive success. Thus, natural selection in addition to good environmental conditions may help explain why the Dutch are so tall. PMID:25854890

  11. Facial Indices of North and South Indian Adults: Reliability in Stature Estimation and Sexual Dimorphism

    PubMed Central

    LC, Prasanna; S, Bhosale; AS, D’Souza; H, Mamatha; RH, Thomas; KS, Sachin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Anthropological studies have document differences in craniofacial features as well as in body characteristics among different populations. The variations in the facial morphology arise through a differential growth and they help us in distinguishing one person from another. These are controlled by a number of factors which include genetic heritage, climate and environment in which we live. Very few researchers from India have worked on these facial features with respect to population and environment. The present work was undertaken to determine whether facial variations were subjected to sexual dimorphism. In addition, comparison of facial indices was made, in order to determine possible variations between south and north Indian populations. Methods: The sample consisted of 200 individuals, 100 each from north and south Indian regions. Various facial parameters were determined on the basis of international anatomical description and facial indices were calculated. Results: North Indian males and females had highest facial height and upper facial height. Facial width of south Indians was more as compared to that of north Indians in both sexes. Regression equation was calculated to compare the probable height with actual height. Conclusion: All the facial parameters and facial indices were found to be statistically highly significant and they showed inter-regional and gender variations. These indices will be beneficial in facial reconstruction surgeries, maxillofacial surgeries, and in forensic medicine, for estimating the stature and sex of an individual. PMID:24086833

  12. Comparing the Relationship Between Stature and Later Life Health in Six Low and Middle Income Countries

    PubMed Central

    McGovern, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between stature and later life health in 6 emerging economies, each of which are expected to experience significant increases in the mean age of their populations over the coming decades. Using data from the WHO Study on Global Ageing and Adult Health (SAGE) and pilot data from the Longitudinal Ageing Study in India (LASI), I show that various measures of health are associated with height, a commonly used proxy for childhood environment. In the pooled sample, an additional 10cm increase in height is associated with between a 2 and 3 percentage point increase in the probability of being in very good or good self-reported health, a 3 percentage point increase in the probability of reporting no difficulties with activities of daily living or instrumental activities of daily living, and between a fifth and a quarter of a standard deviation increase in grip strength and lung function. Adopting a methodology previously used in the research on inequality, I also summarise the height-grip strength gradient for each country using the concentration index, and provide a decomposition analysis. PMID:25590021

  13. Composite Selection Signals for Complex Traits Exemplified Through Bovine Stature Using Multibreed Cohorts of European and African Bos taurus

    PubMed Central

    Randhawa, Imtiaz A. S.; Khatkar, Mehar S.; Thomson, Peter C.; Raadsma, Herman W.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the evolution and molecular architecture of complex traits is important in domestic animals. Due to phenotypic selection, genomic regions develop unique patterns of genetic diversity called signatures of selection, which are challenging to detect, especially for complex polygenic traits. In this study, we applied the composite selection signals (CSS) method to investigate evidence of positive selection in a complex polygenic trait by examining stature in phenotypically diverse cattle comprising 47 European and 8 African Bos taurus breeds, utilizing a panel of 38,033 SNPs genotyped on 1106 animals. CSS were computed for phenotypic contrasts between multibreed cohorts of cattle by classifying the breeds according to their documented wither height to detect the candidate regions under selection. Using the CSS method, clusters of signatures of selection were detected at 26 regions (9 in European and 17 in African cohorts) on 13 bovine autosomes. Using comparative mapping information on human height, 30 candidate genes mapped at 12 selection regions (on 8 autosomes) could be linked to bovine stature diversity. Of these 12 candidate gene regions, three contained known genes (i.e., NCAPG-LCORL, FBP2-PTCH1, and PLAG1-CHCHD7) related to bovine stature, and nine were not previously described in cattle (five in European and four in African cohorts). Overall, this study demonstrates the utility of CSS coupled with strategies of combining multibreed datasets in the identification and discovery of genomic regions underlying complex traits. Characterization of multiple signatures of selection and their underlying candidate genes will elucidate the polygenic nature of stature across cattle breeds. PMID:25931611

  14. Mutation accumulation in real branches: fitness assays for genomic deleterious mutation rate and effect in large-statured plants.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Stewart T; Scofield, Douglas G

    2009-08-01

    The genomic deleterious mutation rate and mean effect are central to the biology and evolution of all species. Large-statured plants, such as trees, are predicted to have high mutation rates due to mitotic mutation and the absence of a sheltered germ line, but their size and generation time has hindered genetic study. We develop and test approaches for estimating deleterious mutation rates and effects from viability comparisons within the canopy of large-statured plants. Our methods, inspired by E. J. Klekowski, are a modification of the classic Bateman-Mukai mutation-accumulation experiment. Within a canopy, cell lineages accumulate mitotic mutations independently. Gametes or zygotes produced at more distal points by these cell lineages contain more mitotic mutations than those at basal locations, and within-flower selfs contain more homozygous mutations than between-flower selfs. The resulting viability differences allow demonstration of lethal mutation with experiments similar in size to assays of genetic load and allow estimates of the rate and effect of new mutations with moderate precision and bias similar to that of classic mutation-accumulation experiments in small-statured organisms. These methods open up new possibilities with the potential to provide valuable new insights into the evolutionary genetics of plants. PMID:19548838

  15. Two families with quadrupedalism, mental retardation, no speech, and infantile hypotonia (Uner Tan Syndrome Type-II); a novel theory for the evolutionary emergence of human bipedalism

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Uner

    2014-01-01

    Two consanguineous families with Uner Tan Syndrome (UTS) were analyzed in relation to self-organizing processes in complex systems, and the evolutionary emergence of human bipedalism. The cases had the key symptoms of previously reported cases of UTS, such as quadrupedalism, mental retardation, and dysarthric or no speech, but the new cases also exhibited infantile hypotonia and are designated UTS Type-II. There were 10 siblings in Branch I and 12 siblings in Branch II. Of these, there were seven cases exhibiting habitual quadrupedal locomotion (QL): four deceased and three living. The infantile hypotonia in the surviving cases gradually disappeared over a period of years, so that they could sit by about 10 years, crawl on hands and knees by about 12 years. They began walking on all fours around 14 years, habitually using QL. Neurological examinations showed normal tonus in their arms and legs, no Babinski sign, brisk tendon reflexes especially in the legs, and mild tremor. The patients could not walk in a straight line, but (except in one case) could stand up and maintain upright posture with truncal ataxia. Cerebello-vermial hypoplasia and mild gyral simplification were noted in their MRIs. The results of the genetic analysis were inconclusive: no genetic code could be identified as the triggering factor for the syndrome in these families. Instead, the extremely low socio-economic status of the patients was thought to play a role in the emergence of UTS, possibly by epigenetically changing the brain structure and function, with a consequent selection of ancestral neural networks for QL during locomotor development. It was suggested that UTS may be regarded as one of the unpredictable outcomes of self-organization within a complex system. It was also noted that the prominent feature of this syndrome, the diagonal-sequence habitual QL, generated an interference between ipsilateral hands and feet, as in non-human primates. It was suggested that this may have been the triggering factor for the attractor state “bipedal locomotion” (BL), which had visual and manual benefits for our ape-like ancestors, and therefore enhancing their chances for survival, with consequent developments in the psychomotor domain of humans. This was put forward as a novel theory of the evolution of BL in human beings. PMID:24795558

  16. Stature, body mass, and brain size: a two-million-year odyssey.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Andrew

    2013-12-01

    Physical size has been critical in the evolutionary success of the genus Homo over the past 2.4 million-years. An acceleration in the expansion of savannah grasslands in Africa from 1.6Ma to 1.2Ma witnessed concomitant increases in physical stature (150-170cm), weight (50-70kg), and brain size (750-900cm(3)). With the onset of 100,000year Middle Pleistocene glacial cycles ("ice ages") some 780,000years ago, large-bodied Homo groups had reached modern size and had successfully dispersed from equatorial Africa, Central, and Southeast Asia to high-latitude localities in Atlantic Europe and North East Asia. While there is support for incursions of multiple Homo lineages to West Asia and Continental Europe at this time, data does not favour a persistence of Homo erectus beyond ?400,000years ago in Africa, west and Central Asia, and Europe. Novel Middle Pleistocene Homo forms (780,000-400,000years) may not have been substantially taller (150-170cm) than earlier Homo (1.6Ma-800,000years), yet brain size exceeded 1000cm(3) and body mass approached 80kg in some males. Later Pleistocene Homo (400,000-138,000years) were 'massive' in their height (160-190cm) and mass (70-90kg) and consistently exceed recent humans. Relative brain size exceeds earlier Homo, yet is substantially lower than in final glacial H. sapiens and Homo neanderthalensis. A final leap in absolute and relative brain size in Homo (300,000-138,000years) occurred independent of any observed increase in body mass and implies a different selective mediator to that operating on brain size increases observed in earlier Homo. PMID:23562520

  17. A stature-specific concept for uncemented, primary total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Omlor, Georg W; Ullrich, Hannah; Krahmer, Knut; Jung, Alexander; Aldinger, Günther

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Variations in hip anatomy limit the femoral canal fit of standard uncemented hip stems. In addition, there are still issues with leg length discrepancy and offset reconstruction, potentially resulting in impingement, dislocation, and wear. Modular stems with different shapes for femoral canal fit and multiple neck options may improve the outcome and reduce complications. Patients and methods 173 patients (190 hips) received an uncemented THA with 1 of 2 different stem shapes for canal fit and a modular neck for stature-specific hip reconstruction. Median follow-up time was 9 (7–13) years. During the follow-up period, 20 patients died (22 hips) and 12 patients (13 hips) were lost to follow-up. 155 hips were available for evaluation, including clinical and radiological outcome. Results 1 stem was revised for a periprosthetic fracture following trauma; 10 cups and 2 modular necks were revised (1 for breakage and 1 during cup revision). At 10 years, stem survival was 100%, modular neck survival was 99% (CI: 95–100), and cup survival was 94% (CI: 87–97). No leg length discrepancies were measured in 96% of cases. Offset with anatomic lateralization was achieved in 98%. Median Harris hip score was 94 (47–100) and median Merle d'Aubigné score was 16 (10–18). Relevant radiolucent lines and osteolysis were not found. Interpretation The uncemented modular neck, dual-stem system used in this series allows accurate reconstruction of the joint by adapting the implant to the needs of the patient. This may improve the outcome of primary THA, which is supported by the results of this medium-term follow-up evaluation. PMID:20146639

  18. Fine root respiration in the mangrove Rhizophora mangle over variation in forest stature and nutrient availability.

    PubMed

    Lovelock, Catherine E; Ruess, Roger W; Feller, Ilka C

    2006-12-01

    Root respiration uses a significant proportion of photosynthetically fixed carbon (C) and is a globally important source of C liberated from soils. Mangroves, which are an important and productive forest resource in many tropical and subtropical countries, sustain a high ratio of root to shoot biomass which may indicate that root respiration is a particularly important component in mangrove forest carbon budgets. Mangroves are often exposed to nutrient pollution from coastal waters. Here we assessed the magnitude of fine root respiration in mangrove forests in Belize and investigated how root respiration is influenced by nutrient additions. Respiration rates of excised fine roots of the mangrove, Rhizophora mangle L., were low (4.01 +/- 0.16 nmol CO(2) g(-1) s(-1)) compared to those measured in temperate tree species at similar temperatures. In an experiment where trees where fertilized with nitrogen (N) or phosphorus (P) in low productivity dwarf forests (1-2 m height) and more productive, taller (4- 7 m height) seaward fringing forests, respiration of fine roots did not vary consistently with fertilization treatments or with forest stature. Fine roots of taller fringe trees had higher concentrations of both N and P compared to dwarf trees. Fertilization with P enhanced fine root P concentrations in both dwarf and fringe trees, but reduced root N concentrations compared to controls. Fertilization with N had no effect on root N or P concentrations. Unlike photosynthetic C gain and growth, which is strongly limited by P availability in dwarf forests at this site, fine root respiration (expressed on a mass basis) was variable, but showed no significant enhancements with nutrient additions. Variation in fine root production and standing biomass are, therefore, likely to be more important factors determining C efflux from mangrove sediments than variations in fine root respiration per unit mass. PMID:17169899

  19. Directional dominance on stature and cognition in diverse human populations.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Peter K; Esko, Tonu; Mattsson, Hannele; Eklund, Niina; Gandin, Ilaria; Nutile, Teresa; Jackson, Anne U; Schurmann, Claudia; Smith, Albert V; Zhang, Weihua; Okada, Yukinori; Stančáková, Alena; Faul, Jessica D; Zhao, Wei; Bartz, Traci M; Concas, Maria Pina; Franceschini, Nora; Enroth, Stefan; Vitart, Veronique; Trompet, Stella; Guo, Xiuqing; Chasman, Daniel I; O'Connel, Jeffrey R; Corre, Tanguy; Nongmaithem, Suraj S; Chen, Yuning; Mangino, Massimo; Ruggiero, Daniela; Traglia, Michela; Farmaki, Aliki-Eleni; Kacprowski, Tim; Bjonnes, Andrew; van der Spek, Ashley; Wu, Ying; Giri, Anil K; Yanek, Lisa R; Wang, Lihua; Hofer, Edith; Rietveld, Cornelius A; McLeod, Olga; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Pattaro, Cristian; Verweij, Niek; Baumbach, Clemens; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Warren, Helen R; Vuckovic, Dragana; Mei, Hao; Bouchard, Claude; Perry, John R B; Cappellani, Stefania; Mirza, Saira S; Benton, Miles C; Broeckel, Ulrich; Medland, Sarah E; Lind, Penelope A; Malerba, Giovanni; Drong, Alexander; Yengo, Loic; Bielak, Lawrence F; Zhi, Degui; van der Most, Peter J; Shriner, Daniel; Mägi, Reedik; Hemani, Gibran; Karaderi, Tugce; Wang, Zhaoming; Liu, Tian; Demuth, Ilja; Zhao, Jing Hua; Meng, Weihua; Lataniotis, Lazaros; van der Laan, Sander W; Bradfield, Jonathan P; Wood, Andrew R; Bonnefond, Amelie; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Hall, Leanne M; Salvi, Erika; Yazar, Seyhan; Carstensen, Lisbeth; de Haan, Hugoline G; Abney, Mark; Afzal, Uzma; Allison, Matthew A; Amin, Najaf; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Bakker, Stephan J L; Barr, R Graham; Baumeister, Sebastian E; Benjamin, Daniel J; Bergmann, Sven; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bottinger, Erwin P; Campbell, Archie; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chan, Yingleong; Chanock, Stephen J; Chen, Constance; Chen, Y-D Ida; Collins, Francis S; Connell, John; Correa, Adolfo; Cupples, L Adrienne; Smith, George Davey; Davies, Gail; Dörr, Marcus; Ehret, Georg; Ellis, Stephen B; Feenstra, Bjarke; Feitosa, Mary F; Ford, Ian; Fox, Caroline S; Frayling, Timothy M; Friedrich, Nele; Geller, Frank; Scotland, Generation; Gillham-Nasenya, Irina; Gottesman, Omri; Graff, Misa; Grodstein, Francine; Gu, Charles; Haley, Chris; Hammond, Christopher J; Harris, Sarah E; Harris, Tamara B; Hastie, Nicholas D; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; Heikkilä, Kauko; Hocking, Lynne J; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Huang, Jinyan; Huffman, Jennifer E; Hysi, Pirro G; Ikram, M Arfan; Ingelsson, Erik; Joensuu, Anni; Johansson, Åsa; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jukema, J Wouter; Kähönen, Mika; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kerr, Shona M; Khan, Nazir M; Koellinger, Philipp; Koistinen, Heikki A; Kooner, Manraj K; Kubo, Michiaki; Kuusisto, Johanna; Lahti, Jari; Launer, Lenore J; Lea, Rodney A; Lehne, Benjamin; Lehtimäki, Terho; Liewald, David C M; Lind, Lars; Loh, Marie; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; London, Stephanie J; Loomis, Stephanie J; Loukola, Anu; Lu, Yingchang; Lumley, Thomas; Lundqvist, Annamari; Männistö, Satu; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Masciullo, Corrado; Matchan, Angela; Mathias, Rasika A; Matsuda, Koichi; Meigs, James B; Meisinger, Christa; Meitinger, Thomas; Menni, Cristina; Mentch, Frank D; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Montasser, May E; Montgomery, Grant W; Morrison, Alanna; Myers, Richard H; Nadukuru, Rajiv; Navarro, Pau; Nelis, Mari; Nieminen, Markku S; Nolte, Ilja M; O'Connor, George T; Ogunniyi, Adesola; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Palmas, Walter R; Pankow, James S; Patarcic, Inga; Pavani, Francesca; Peyser, Patricia A; Pietilainen, Kirsi; Poulter, Neil; Prokopenko, Inga; Ralhan, Sarju; Redmond, Paul; Rich, Stephen S; Rissanen, Harri; Robino, Antonietta; Rose, Lynda M; Rose, Richard; Sala, Cinzia; Salako, Babatunde; Salomaa, Veikko; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Saxena, Richa; Schmidt, Helena; Scott, Laura J; Scott, William R; Sennblad, Bengt; Seshadri, Sudha; Sever, Peter; Shrestha, Smeeta; Smith, Blair H; Smith, Jennifer A; Soranzo, Nicole; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Southam, Lorraine; Stanton, Alice V; Stathopoulou, Maria G; Strauch, Konstantin; Strawbridge, Rona J; Suderman, Matthew J; Tandon, Nikhil; Tang, Sian-Tsun; Taylor, Kent D; Tayo, Bamidele O; Töglhofer, Anna Maria; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Tšernikova, Natalia; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Vaidya, Dhananjay; van Hylckama Vlieg, Astrid; van Setten, Jessica; Vasankari, Tuula; Vedantam, Sailaja; Vlachopoulou, Efthymia; Vozzi, Diego; Vuoksimaa, Eero; Waldenberger, Melanie; Ware, Erin B; Wentworth-Shields, William; Whitfield, John B; Wild, Sarah; Willemsen, Gonneke; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S; Yao, Jie; Zaza, Gianluigi; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Salem, Rany M; Melbye, Mads; Bisgaard, Hans; Samani, Nilesh J; Cusi, Daniele; Mackey, David A; Cooper, Richard S; Froguel, Philippe; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Grant, Struan F A; Hakonarson, Hakon; Ferrucci, Luigi; Scott, Robert A; Morris, Andrew D; Palmer, Colin N A; Dedoussis, George; Deloukas, Panos; Bertram, Lars; Lindenberger, Ulman; Berndt, Sonja I; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tönjes, Anke; Munroe, Patricia B; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Rotimi, Charles N; Arnett, Donna K; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Kardia, Sharon L R; Balkau, Beverley; Gambaro, Giovanni; Morris, Andrew P; Eriksson, Johan G; Wright, Margie J; Martin, Nicholas G; Hunt, Steven C; Starr, John M; Deary, Ian J; Griffiths, Lyn R; Tiemeier, Henning; Pirastu, Nicola; Kaprio, Jaakko; Wareham, Nicholas J; Pérusse, Louis; Wilson, James G; Girotto, Giorgia; Caulfield, Mark J; Raitakari, Olli; Boomsma, Dorret I; Gieger, Christian; van der Harst, Pim; Hicks, Andrew A; Kraft, Peter; Sinisalo, Juha; Knekt, Paul; Johannesson, Magnus; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Hamsten, Anders; Schmidt, Reinhold; Borecki, Ingrid B; Vartiainen, Erkki; Becker, Diane M; Bharadwaj, Dwaipayan; Mohlke, Karen L; Boehnke, Michael; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Sanghera, Dharambir K; Teumer, Alexander; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Metspalu, Andres; Gasparini, Paolo; Ulivi, Sheila; Ober, Carole; Toniolo, Daniela; Rudan, Igor; Porteous, David J; Ciullo, Marina; Spector, Tim D; Hayward, Caroline; Dupuis, Josée; Loos, Ruth J F; Wright, Alan F; Chandak, Giriraj R; Vollenweider, Peter; Shuldiner, Alan R; Ridker, Paul M; Rotter, Jerome I; Sattar, Naveed; Gyllensten, Ulf; North, Kari E; Pirastu, Mario; Psaty, Bruce M; Weir, David R; Laakso, Markku; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Takahashi, Atsushi; Chambers, John C; Kooner, Jaspal S; Strachan, David P; Campbell, Harry; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Perola, Markus; Polašek, Ozren; Wilson, James F

    2015-07-23

    Homozygosity has long been associated with rare, often devastating, Mendelian disorders, and Darwin was one of the first to recognize that inbreeding reduces evolutionary fitness. However, the effect of the more distant parental relatedness that is common in modern human populations is less well understood. Genomic data now allow us to investigate the effects of homozygosity on traits of public health importance by observing contiguous homozygous segments (runs of homozygosity), which are inferred to be homozygous along their complete length. Given the low levels of genome-wide homozygosity prevalent in most human populations, information is required on very large numbers of people to provide sufficient power. Here we use runs of homozygosity to study 16 health-related quantitative traits in 354,224 individuals from 102 cohorts, and find statistically significant associations between summed runs of homozygosity and four complex traits: height, forced expiratory lung volume in one second, general cognitive ability and educational attainment (P < 1 × 10(-300), 2.1 × 10(-6), 2.5 × 10(-10) and 1.8 × 10(-10), respectively). In each case, increased homozygosity was associated with decreased trait value, equivalent to the offspring of first cousins being 1.2 cm shorter and having 10 months' less education. Similar effect sizes were found across four continental groups and populations with different degrees of genome-wide homozygosity, providing evidence that homozygosity, rather than confounding, directly contributes to phenotypic variance. Contrary to earlier reports in substantially smaller samples, no evidence was seen of an influence of genome-wide homozygosity on blood pressure and low density lipoprotein cholesterol, or ten other cardio-metabolic traits. Since directional dominance is predicted for traits under directional evolutionary selection, this study provides evidence that increased stature and cognitive function have been positively selected in human evolution, whereas many important risk factors for late-onset complex diseases may not have been. PMID:26131930

  20. Pachygyria, seizures, hypotonia, and growth retardation in a patient with an atypical 1.33Mb inherited microduplication at 22q11.23.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jiazhen; Zhao, Lijuan; Chen, Chen; Peng, Ying; Xia, Yan; Tang, Guizhi; Bai, Ting; Zhang, Yanghui; Ma, Ruiyu; Guo, Ruolan; Mei, Libin; Liang, Desheng; Cao, Qinying; Wu, Lingqian

    2015-09-10

    22q11.2 microduplication syndrome was recently described as a new disorder with variable clinical features that ranged from normal to mental retardation and with congenital defects. According to published reports, majority of patients with 22q11.2 duplications inherit these from unaffected parents rather than by de novo mutations, which is different from most microduplication/microdeletion syndromes. In this study, we report a patient that carried a paternally inherited atypical 1.33Mb duplication at 22q11.23. The proband (or proposita) presented with hypotonia, feeding difficulties, intractable epilepsy, hearing disability, and pachygyria. A pachygyria phenotype had not been previously reported to be associated with a 22q11 microduplication syndrome. Cytogenetic and molecular genetic analyses based on standard G-banding, SNP array, and fluorescence in situ hybridization were performed for the proband and her parents. An atypical 1.33Mb duplication at 22q11.23 was detected in both the proband and her father. Thus, our findings verify the pathogenicity and diverse phenotypes of 22q11.2 microduplication and expand its phenotypic spectrum. PMID:26099517

  1. [A clinical investigation of pediatric patients with sleep-disordered breathing who suffered perioperative respiratory complications of adenotonsillectomy].

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Makoto; Hosokawa, Kiyohito; Inohara, Hidenori

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical background and identify the risk factors for perioperative respiratory complication in pediatric patients with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) who underwent adenotonsillectomy (AT). Of the 186 pediatric subjects (male: 131, female: 55) undergoing AT as the first surgical treatment for SDB, 14 patients (male: 9, female: 5) fulfilled the following criteria: 1) disturbed ventilation, 2) cyanosis with an oxygen saturation of less than 90% on pulse oximetry during the perioperative period and 3) the subsequent need for medical intervention, including immediate intubation, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) or airway insertion. Among these 14 patients, nine were less than 3 years of age. In addition, 5 and 3 patients had hypotonia due to cerebral paralysis and metabolic disturbances, respectively. Seven had a short stature with an SD of worse than - 1.5. A statistical analysis showed that cases with either an age of less than 3 years, hypotonia or a short stature had a high risk for suffering from respiratory complications, and suggested that low body weight and a high value for preoperative apnea-hypopnea index were additional risk factors. However, a chart review exhibited that, of the 14 cases with respiratory complications, the 8 cases whose age was under 3 years had either of hypotonia or a short stature. In thirteen of the 14 cases, respiratory complications were associated with the process of general anesthesia, and ten patients exhibited pharyngeal collapse. After surgery, 7 and 3 patients required intensive care in the ICU and the pediatric recovery unit, respectively. Based on these results, it is suggested that pediatric SDB cases under 3 years of age and either with hypotonia or a short stature have a high risk for respiratory complications associated with AT, and therefore AT for such patients should only be performed in medical facilities with an ICU or an equivalent department. PMID:24783453

  2. Body height preferences and actual dimorphism in stature between partners in two non-Western societies (Hadza and Tsimane').

    PubMed

    Sorokowski, Piotr; Sorokowska, Agnieszka; Butovskaya, Marina; Stulp, Gert; Huanca, Tomas; Fink, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Body height influences human mate preferences and choice. A typical finding in Western societies is that women prefer men who are taller than themselves and, equivalently, men prefer women who are shorter than themselves. However, recent reports in non-Western societies (e.g., the Himba in Namibia) challenge the view on the universality of such preferences. Here we report on male and female height preferences in two non-Western populations--the Hadza (Tanzania) and the Tsimane' (Bolivia)--and the relationships between body height preferences and the height of actual partners. In the Hadza, most individuals preferred a sexual dimorphism in stature (SDS) with the man being much taller than the woman. Preferences for SDS and actual partner SDS were positively and significantly correlated in both men and women, suggesting that people who preferred larger height differences also had larger height differences with their partners. In the Tsimane', the majority of men preferred an SDS with the man being taller than the woman, but women did not show such a preference. Unlike in the Hadza, SDS preference was not significantly correlated to actual partner SDS. We conclude that patterns of height preferences and choices in the Hadza and Tsimane' are different than those observed in Western societies, and discuss possible causes for the observed differences between non-Western and Western societies. PMID:26079105

  3. Stature estimation based on radial and ulnar lengths using three-dimensional images from multidetector computed tomography in a Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Torimitsu, Suguru; Makino, Yohsuke; Saitoh, Hisako; Sakuma, Ayaka; Ishii, Namiko; Hayakawa, Mutsumi; Yajima, Daisuke; Inokuchi, Go; Motomura, Ayumi; Chiba, Fumiko; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2014-07-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate correlations between cadaver stature (CS) and radial and ulnar lengths based on three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) images, and to develop modern regression equations for estimating CS in a Japanese population. Measurements were performed on 245 Japanese subjects (123 males and 122 females) who underwent postmortem CT between May 2011 and December 2013. A 3D reconstructed image was used for assessment. The linear distances of the left radial (LR) and right radial (RR) lengths were measured as a straight-line distance from the most anteroproximal point of the head to the most distal end of the styloid process. The linear distances of the left ulnar (LU) and right ulnar (RU) lengths were measured as a straight-line distance from the most posteroproximal point of the olecranon to the most distal end of the styloid process. The correlation between CS and each parameter (LR, LU, RR, and RU) was assessed using Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients and regression analysis was performed for stature estimation. There were significant correlations between CS and each parameter regardless of sex, indicating that the radial and ulnar lengths measured on 3D CT images can be predictive of stature estimation. Simple regression equations for stature estimation calculated from LR provided the lowest standard error of estimation (SEE) (all subjects, SEE=4.18 cm; males, SEE=4.09 cm; females, SEE=4.21 cm). In addition, multiple regression equations were more accurate and reliable than the single linear regression equations. PMID:24650584

  4. Identification and genetic characterization of a gibberellin 2-oxidase gene that controls tree stature and reproductive growth in plum

    PubMed Central

    El-Sharkawy, I.; El Kayal, W.; Prasath, D.; Fernández, H.; Bouzayen, M.; Svircev, A. M.; Jayasankar, S.

    2012-01-01

    Several dwarf plum genotypes (Prunus salicina L.), due to deficiency of unknown gibberellin (GA) signalling, were identified. A cDNA encoding GA 2-oxidase (PslGA2ox), the major gibberellin catabolic enzyme in plants, was cloned and used to screen the GA-deficient hybrids. This resulted in the identification of a dwarf plum hybrid, designated as DGO24, that exhibits a markedly elevated PslGA2ox signal. Grafting ‘Early Golden’ (EG), a commercial plum cultivar, on DGO24 (EG/D) enhanced PslGA2ox accumulation in the scion part and generated trees of compact stature. Assessment of active GAs in such trees revealed that DGO24 and EG/D accumulated relatively much lower quantities of main bioactive GAs (GA1 and GA4) than control trees (EG/M). Moreover, the physiological function of PslGA2ox was studied by determining the molecular and developmental consequences due to ectopic expression in Arabidopsis. Among several lines, two groups of homozygous transgenics that exhibited contrasting phenotypes were identified. Group-1 displayed a dwarf growth pattern typical of mutants with a GA deficiency including smaller leaves, shorter stems, and delay in the development of reproductive events. In contrast, Group-2 exhibited a ‘GA overdose’ phenotype as all the plants showed elongated growth, a typical response to GA application, even under limited GA conditions, potentially due to co-suppression of closely related Arabidopsis homologous. The studies reveal the possibility of utilizing PslGA2ox as a marker for developing size-controlling rootstocks in Prunus. PMID:22080981

  5. Stature and jumping height are required in female volleyball, but motor coordination is a key factor for future elite success.

    PubMed

    Pion, Johan A; Fransen, Job; Deprez, Dieter N; Segers, Veerle I; Vaeyens, Roel; Philippaerts, Renaat M; Lenoir, Matthieu

    2015-06-01

    It was hypothesized that differences in anthropometry, physical performance, and motor coordination would be found between Belgian elite and sub-elite level female volleyball players using a retrospective analysis of test results gathered over a 5-year period. The test sample in this study consisted of 21 young female volleyball players (15.3 ± 1.5 years) who were selected to train at the Flemish Top Sports Academy for Volleyball in 2008. All players (elite, n = 13; sub-elite, n = 8) were included in the same talent development program, and the elite-level athletes were of a high to very high performance levels according to European competition level in 2013. Five multivariate analyses of variance were used. There was no significant effect of playing level on measures of anthropometry (F = 0.455, p = 0.718, (Equation is included in full-text article.)= 0.07), flexibility (F = 1.861, p = 0.188, (Equation is included in full-text article.)= 0.19), strength (F = 1.218, p = 0.355, (Equation is included in full-text article.)= 0.32); and speed and agility (F = 1.176, p = 0.350, (Equation is included in full-text article.)= 0.18). Multivariate analyses of variance revealed significant multivariate effects between playing levels for motor coordination (F = 3.470, p = 0.036, (Equation is included in full-text article.)= 0.59). A Mann-Whitney U test and a sequential discriminant analysis confirmed these results. Previous research revealed that stature and jump height are prerequisites for talent identification in female volleyball. In addition, the results show that motor coordination is an important factor in determining inclusion into the elite level in female volleyball. PMID:25436627

  6. Intersection of economics, history, and human biology: secular trends in stature in nineteenth-century Sioux Indians.

    PubMed

    Prince, J M

    1995-06-01

    An unusual confluence of historical factors may be responsible for nineteenth-century Sioux being able to sustain high statures despite enduring adverse conditions during the early reservation experience. An exceptionally long span of Dakota Sioux history was examined for secular trends using a cross-sectional design. Two primary sources were used: One anthropometric data set was collected in the late nineteenth century under the direction of Franz Boas, and another set was collected by James R. Walker in the early twentieth century. Collectively, the data represent the birth years between 1820 and 1880 for adult individuals 20 years old or older. Adult heights (n = 1197) were adjusted for aging effects and regressed on age, with each data set and each sex analyzed separately. Tests for differences between the adult means of age cohorts by decade of birth (1820-1880) were also carried out. Only one sample of adults showed any convincing secular trend (p < 0.05): surprisingly, a positive linear trend for Walker's sample of adult males. This sample was also the one sample of adults that showed significant differences between age cohorts. The failure to find any negative secular trend in this population of Amerindians is remarkable, given the drastic socioeconomic changes that occurred with the coming of the reservation period (ca. 1868). Comparisons with contemporary white Americans show that the Sioux remained consistently taller than whites well into the reservation period and that Sioux children (Prince 1989) continued to grow at highly favorable rates during this time of severe conditions. A possible explanation for these findings involves the relatively favorable level of subsistence support received by most of the Sioux from the US government, as stipulated by various treaties. Conservative estimates suggest that the Sioux may have been able to sustain net levels of per capita annual meat consumption that exceeded the US average for several years before 1893. PMID:7607635

  7. Predictors of maximal short-term power outputs in basketball players 14-16 years.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Humberto M; Coelho E Silva, Manuel J; Figueiredo, António J; Gonçalves, Carlos E; Philippaerts, Renaat M; Castagna, Carlo; Malina, Robert M

    2011-05-01

    Relationships between growth, maturation and maximal short-term power outputs were investigated in 94 youth basketball players aged 14-16 years. Data included chronological age (CA), skeletal age (SA), years of training; body dimensions, estimated thigh volume, a running based short-term exercise assessed by the line drill test (LDT), the Bangsbo sprint test (BST) and short-term muscle power outputs with the Wingate anaerobic test (WAnT). Multiple linear regression analyses were used to estimate the effects of CA, skeletal maturity (SA/CA), years of training experience, body size and lower-limb volume on short-term performance in the LDT, BST and WAnT, respectively. Explained variances differed between cycle-ergometry outputs (52-54%) and running test performances (23-46%). The independent effects of predictors were small in the fatigue scores of the WAnT (4%) and the BST (11%). Skeletal maturity, body mass and leg length were primary predictors for all maximal short-term power output measures. Leg length was more relevant as a predictor than stature in the WAnT outputs, while stature and body mass appeared in the model with the running tests as dependent variable. Maximal short-term running abilities were also sensitive to years of training. In summary, skeletal maturation, body size and thigh muscle mass explained moderate to large proportions of the variance on maximal short-term performances of adolescent basketball players. The results highlight the importance of considering maturity status in evaluating the maximal short-term power outputs of adolescent athletes. PMID:20981436

  8. Shortness of Breath

    MedlinePLUS

    MENU Return to Web version Shortness of Breath Overview What is shortness of breath? When you are short of breath, you may feel ... lungs and scarring of the lung tissue. Diagnosis & Tests What tests will my doctor perform? Your doctor ...

  9. Evidence for Linkage of Stature to Chromosome 3p26 in a Large U.K. Family Data Set Ascertained for Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wiltshire, Steven; Frayling, Timothy M.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Hitman, Graham A.; Walker, Mark; Levy, Jonathan C.; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Groves, Christopher J.; Menzel, Stephan; Cardon, Lon R.; McCarthy, Mark I.

    2002-01-01

    We have analyzed data from 573 pedigrees from the United Kingdom for evidence for linkage to loci influencing adult stature. Our data set comprised 1,214 diabetic and 163 nondiabetic siblings for whom height data were available. We used variance-components analysis implemented in GENEHUNTER 2 and a modification of the Haseman-Elston regression method, HE-COM. We found evidence for a locus on 3p26 (LOD score 3.17) influencing height in this adult sample, with less-significant evidence for loci on chromosomes 7, 10, 15, 17, 19, and 20. Our findings extend similar recent studies in Scandinavian and Quebecois populations, adding further evidence that height is indeed under the control of multiple genes. PMID:11753821

  10. Growth retardation, general hypotonia, and loss of acquired neuromotor skills in the infants of mothers with cobalamin deficiency and the possible role of succinyl-CoA and glycine in the pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bicakci, Zafer

    2015-03-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin, Cbl) deficiency can cause metabolic, hematological, and neurological abnormalities. Adequate levels of succinyl-coenzyme A (CoA) cannot be synthesized from methylmalonyl-CoA because of the decreased activity of the methylmalonyl-CoA mutase enzyme that uses Cbl as the cofactor. Succinyl-CoA synthesis deficiency leads to decreased heme synthesis and gluconeogenesis. The reason of growth retardation can be gluconeogenesis deficiency together with heme synthesis deficiency whereas the reason of the neurological abnormalities can be glycine increase in the tissue due to decreased heme synthesis. We present 7 infants diagnosed with severe nutritional Cbl deficiency and discuss the role of succinyl-CoA and glycine in the possible pathogenesis in this article. Patients brought to our clinic with a complaint of growth retardation and diagnosed with nutritional Cbl deficiency were included in the study. There were 5 females and 2 males. The mean age was 11?±?2.30 (range 6-13) months. All patients had general muscular hypotonia and 4 had growth retardation. Neuromotor growth retardation was found in 4 of the children who had previously shown normal neuromotor development for age. The mean Cbl level was 83.8?±?27.6 (45.6-114)?pg/mL. The mean Cbl level of the mothers was 155?±?56.6 (88-258)?pg/mL. Six of the patients had anemia and 1 had thrombocytopenia. Mean corpuscular volume value was 91.5?±?12.2?fL. Following treatment, the muscle tonus of the patients improved, the anemia and growth retardation decreased, and the lost neuromotor abilities were recovered. Severe nutritional Cbl deficiency is an important nutritional disease where complications can be prevented with early treatment. When evaluating the pathogenesis, it should be noted that nutritional Cbl deficiency is a succinyl-CoA synthesis deficiency. PMID:25738478

  11. A genome-wide association study using international breeding-evaluation data identifies major loci affecting production traits and stature in the Brown Swiss cattle breed

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The genome-wide association study (GWAS) is a useful approach to identify genes affecting economically important traits in dairy cattle. Here, we report the results from a GWAS based on high-density SNP genotype data and estimated breeding values for nine production, fertility, body conformation, udder health and workability traits in the Brown Swiss cattle population that is part of the international genomic evaluation program. Result GWASs were performed using 50?k SNP chip data and deregressed estimated breeding values (DEBVs) for nine traits from between 2061 and 5043 bulls that were part of the international genomic evaluation program coordinated by Interbull Center. The nine traits were milk yield (MY), fat yield (FY), protein yield (PY), lactating cow’s ability to recycle after calving (CRC), angularity (ANG), body depth (BDE), stature (STA), milk somatic cell score (SCS) and milk speed (MSP). Analyses were performed using a linear mixed model correcting for population confounding. A total of 74 SNPs were detected to be genome-wide significantly associated with one or several of the nine analyzed traits. The strongest signal was identified on chromosome 25 for milk production traits, stature and body depth. Other signals were on chromosome 11 for angularity, chromosome 24 for somatic cell score, and chromosome 6 for milking speed. Some signals overlapped with earlier reported QTL for similar traits in other cattle populations and were located close to interesting candidate genes worthy of further investigations. Conclusions Our study shows that international genetic evaluation data is a useful resource for identifying genetic factors influencing complex traits in livestock. Several genome wide significant association signals could be identified in the Brown Swiss population, including a major signal on BTA25. Our findings report several associations and plausible candidate genes that deserve further exploration in other populations and molecular dissection to explore the potential economic impact and the genetic mechanisms underlying these production traits in cattle. PMID:23031427

  12. Contiguous gene syndromes due to deletions in the distal short arm of the human X chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Ballabio, A.; Andria, G. ); Bardoni, B.; Fraccaro, M.; Maraschio, P.; Zuffardi, O.; Guioli, S.; Camerino, G. ); Carrozzo, R. ); Bick, D.; Campbell, L. ); Hamel, B. ); Ferguson-Smith, M.A. ); Gimelli, G. )

    1989-12-01

    Mendelian inherited disorders to deletions of adjacent genes on a chromosome have been described as contiguous gene syndromes. Short stature, chondrodysplasia punctata, mental retardation, steroid sulfatase deficiency, and Kallmann syndrome have been found as isolated entities or associated in various combination in 27 patients with interstitial and terminal deletions involving the distal short are of the X chromosome. The use of cDNA and genomic probes from the Xp22-pter region allowed us to identify 12 different deletion intervals and to confirm, and further refine, the chromosomal assignment of X-linked recessive chondrodysplasia punctata and Kallmann syndrome genes. A putative pseudoautosomal gene affecting height and an X-linked nonspecific mental retardation gene have been tentatively assigned to specific intervals. The deletion panel described is a useful tool for mapping new sequences and orienting chromosome walks in the region.

  13. Growth Retardation, General Hypotonia, and Loss of Acquired Neuromotor Skills in the Infants of Mothers With Cobalamin Deficiency and the Possible Role of Succinyl-CoA and Glycine in the Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bicakci, Zafer

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Vitamin B12 (cobalamin, Cbl) deficiency can cause metabolic, hematological, and neurological abnormalities. Adequate levels of succinyl-coenzyme A (CoA) cannot be synthesized from methylmalonyl-CoA because of the decreased activity of the methylmalonyl-CoA mutase enzyme that uses Cbl as the cofactor. Succinyl-CoA synthesis deficiency leads to decreased heme synthesis and gluconeogenesis. The reason of growth retardation can be gluconeogenesis deficiency together with heme synthesis deficiency whereas the reason of the neurological abnormalities can be glycine increase in the tissue due to decreased heme synthesis. We present 7 infants diagnosed with severe nutritional Cbl deficiency and discuss the role of succinyl-CoA and glycine in the possible pathogenesis in this article. Patients brought to our clinic with a complaint of growth retardation and diagnosed with nutritional Cbl deficiency were included in the study. There were 5 females and 2 males. The mean age was 11 ± 2.30 (range 6–13) months. All patients had general muscular hypotonia and 4 had growth retardation. Neuromotor growth retardation was found in 4 of the children who had previously shown normal neuromotor development for age. The mean Cbl level was 83.8 ± 27.6 (45.6–114) pg/mL. The mean Cbl level of the mothers was 155 ± 56.6 (88–258) pg/mL. Six of the patients had anemia and 1 had thrombocytopenia. Mean corpuscular volume value was 91.5 ± 12.2 fL. Following treatment, the muscle tonus of the patients improved, the anemia and growth retardation decreased, and the lost neuromotor abilities were recovered. Severe nutritional Cbl deficiency is an important nutritional disease where complications can be prevented with early treatment. When evaluating the pathogenesis, it should be noted that nutritional Cbl deficiency is a succinyl-CoA synthesis deficiency. PMID:25738478

  14. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Scans for Human Adult Stature Identifies Novel Loci and Associations with Measures of Skeletal Frame Size

    PubMed Central

    Malkina, Ida; Richards, J. Brent; Hammond, Naomi; Stolk, Lisette; Nica, Alexandra; Inouye, Michael; Hofman, Albert; Stephens, Jonathan; Wheeler, Eleanor; Arp, Pascal; Gwilliam, Rhian; Jhamai, P. Mila; Potter, Simon; Chaney, Amy; Ghori, Mohammed J. R.; Ravindrarajah, Radhi; Ermakov, Sergey; Estrada, Karol; Pols, Huibert A. P.; Williams, Frances M.; McArdle, Wendy L.; van Meurs, Joyce B.; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Ahmadi, Kourosh R.; Hart, Deborah J.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Barroso, Inês; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Strachan, David P.; Livshits, Gregory; Spector, Timothy D.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Deloukas, Panos

    2009-01-01

    Recent genome-wide (GW) scans have identified several independent loci affecting human stature, but their contribution through the different skeletal components of height is still poorly understood. We carried out a genome-wide scan in 12,611 participants, followed by replication in an additional 7,187 individuals, and identified 17 genomic regions with GW-significant association with height. Of these, two are entirely novel (rs11809207 in CATSPER4, combined P-value?=?6.1×10?8 and rs910316 in TMED10, P-value?=?1.4×10?7) and two had previously been described with weak statistical support (rs10472828 in NPR3, P-value?=?3×10?7 and rs849141 in JAZF1, P-value?=?3.2×10?11). One locus (rs1182188 at GNA12) identifies the first height eQTL. We also assessed the contribution of height loci to the upper- (trunk) and lower-body (hip axis and femur) skeletal components of height. We find evidence for several loci associated with trunk length (including rs6570507 in GPR126, P-value?=?4×10?5 and rs6817306 in LCORL, P-value?=?4×10?4), hip axis length (including rs6830062 at LCORL, P-value?=?4.8×10?4 and rs4911494 at UQCC, P-value?=?1.9×10?4), and femur length (including rs710841 at PRKG2, P-value?=?2.4×10?5 and rs10946808 at HIST1H1D, P-value?=?6.4×10?6). Finally, we used conditional analyses to explore a possible differential contribution of the height loci to these different skeletal size measurements. In addition to validating four novel loci controlling adult stature, our study represents the first effort to assess the contribution of genetic loci to three skeletal components of height. Further statistical tests in larger numbers of individuals will be required to verify if the height loci affect height preferentially through these subcomponents of height. PMID:19343178

  15. A Review of Stature, Body Mass and Maximal Oxygen Uptake Profiles of U17, U20 and First Division Players in Brazilian Soccer

    PubMed Central

    Da Silva, Cristiano Diniz; Bloomfield, Jonathan; Marins, João Carlos Bouzas

    2008-01-01

    Investigations in the physiological demands of soccer have identified that a significant percentage of energy production in match performance is provided through the aerobic pathways. It is therefore important to assess maximal oxygen uptake (VO2Max) of players in order to evaluate their aerobic fitness status and optimize their physical conditioning. However, it is also important to consider the variation of (VO2Max) profiles for soccer players, with differences having been identified in terms of playing position as well as playing style. This paper reviews the academic literature between 1996 and 2006 and reports on the methodologies employed and the values obtained for stature, body mass and (VO2Max) profiles of soccer players of different positions in professional Brazilian clubs at U-17, U-20 and First Division levels. Indirect measurements accounted for the majority of tests conducted at U-17 (70%) and U-20 (84.6%) levels whereas at First Division level almost half of the (VO2Max) evaluations were performed by direct measurements (47.8%). The mean (VO2Max) profiles obtained for outfield players in U-17 was 56.95 ± 3.60 ml·kg-1·min-1, 58.13 ± 3.21 ml·kg-1·min-1 for U-20 players and 56.58 ± 5.03 ml·kg-1·min-1 for First Division players. In Brazil, the U-20 players appear to have highest VO2Max values, however the profiles reported for all outfield positions in U-17 and First Division levels are often lower than those reported for the same category of players from other countries. This may be a reflection of the style of play used in Brazilian soccer. This is further emphasized by the fact that the playing position with the highest VO2Max values was the external defenders whereas most findings from studies performed in European soccer indicate that midfielders require the highest VO2Max values. Key pointsPhysical and physiological differences exist between Brazilian soccer and European soccer.Players in Brazil appear to be shorter in stature, similar in body mass and have a lower overall aerobic capacity to their European equivalentsIn Brazil, there seems to be a physical development phase for players at U-20 level which prepares them for the demands at First Division level. PMID:24149897

  16. Growth hormone for short children--whom should we be treating and why?

    PubMed

    Kelnar, C J

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this paper was to determine systematically the impact of growth hormone (GH)therapy on adult height of children with (so-called) 'idiopathic short stature' (ISS) using the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Medline, and the bibliographic references from retrieved articles of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and non-RCTs from 1985 to April 2010. Inclusion criteria were initial short stature (defined as height >2 standard deviation[SD] below the mean), peak growth hormone responses>10 micrograms per litre (?g/L), prepuberty, no previous growth hormone therapy, and no comorbid conditions that would impair growth. Data extracted were adult height and overall gain in height from baseline measurement in childhood.Three RCTs (115 children) met the inclusion criteria.The adult height of the GH treated children exceeded that of the controls by 0.65 SD score (~4 cm). The mean height gain in treated children was 1.2 SD score compared with 0.34 SD score in untreated children. A difference of ~1.2 cm in adult height was observed between two GH dose regimens. In the seven non-RCTs, adult height of the GH-treated group exceeded that of controls by 0.45 SD score (~3 cm).The authors conclude that 1) GH therapy in children with ISS seems effective in partially reducing the deficit in height as adults, although less so than in other conditions for which GH is licensed; treated individuals remain relatively short compared with normal height peers. 2)Individual responses to therapy are highly variable; further studies are needed to identify responders. 3) High quality evidence from long-term RCTs of GH therapy that continue until adult height is necessary to determine the ideal dosage and long-term safety. PMID:22441061

  17. Associations of prenatal exposure to Ramadan with small stature and thinness in adulthood: results from a large Indonesian population-based study.

    PubMed

    van Ewijk, Reyn J G; Painter, Rebecca C; Roseboom, Tessa J

    2013-04-15

    A growing body of evidence suggests that maternal diet during pregnancy can lead to permanent alterations to the physiology of the fetus. It is unknown whether intermittent maternal fasting during Ramadan has long-term associations with the offspring's body composition. By using data from the third wave of the Indonesian Family Life Survey (2000), we compared the body mass indices (weight (kg)/height (m)(2)) of Muslims who had been in utero during Ramadan with those of Muslims who had not been in utero during Ramadan. Adult Muslims who had been in utero during Ramadan were slightly thinner than Muslims who had not been in utero during Ramadan (adjusted adult body mass index: -0.32, 95% confidence interval: -0.57, -0.06). Those who were conceived during Ramadan also had smaller stature, being on average 0.80 cm shorter than those who were not exposed to Ramadan prenatally. Among non-Muslims, no such associations were found. This study suggests that exposure to Ramadan during pregnancy may have lasting consequences for adult body size of the offspring. PMID:23486307

  18. Interstitial duplication of chromosome region 1q25.1q25.3: report of a patient with mild cognitive deficits, tall stature and facial dysmorphisms.

    PubMed

    Kehrer, Martin; Liehr, Thomas; Benkert, Tanja; Singer, Sylke; Grasshoff, Ute; Schaeferhoff, Karin; Bonin, Michael; Weichselbaum, Annette; Tzschach, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    Isolated interstitial duplications of chromosome band 1q25 are apparently very rare; no patients with detailed molecular and clinical characterization of duplications restricted to this region have been published to date. We report on a 9-year-old girl with mild cognitive deficits, tall stature, macrocephaly and discrete dysmorphic features in whom a de novo interstitial 7.5 Mb duplication of 1q25.1q25.3 was detected by SNP array analysis (arr[hg19] 1q25.1q25.3(173,925,505-181,381,242)x3 dn). The duplicated region was inversely inserted into chromosome band 1q42.2: 46,XX,der(1)(pter→q42.2::q25.3→q25.1::q42.2→qter). Overexpression of one or several of the 87 genes in the duplicated interval was presumably the major causative factor for the clinical manifestations. Reports of additional patients with overlapping duplications will be needed to establish detailed karyotype-phenotype correlations and to gain a better understanding of the underlying pathomechanisms. PMID:25691419

  19. Non-synonymous FGD3 Variant as Positional Candidate for Disproportional Tall Stature Accounting for a Carcass Weight QTL (CW-3) and Skeletal Dysplasia in Japanese Black Cattle.

    PubMed

    Takasuga, Akiko; Sato, Kunio; Nakamura, Ryouichi; Saito, Yosuke; Sasaki, Shinji; Tsuji, Takehito; Suzuki, Akio; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Matsuhashi, Tamako; Setoguchi, Koji; Okabe, Hiroshi; Ootsubo, Toshitake; Tabuchi, Ichiro; Fujita, Tatsuo; Watanabe, Naoto; Hirano, Takashi; Nishimura, Shota; Watanabe, Toshio; Hayakawa, Makio; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu; Kojima, Takatoshi

    2015-08-01

    Recessive skeletal dysplasia, characterized by joint- and/or hip bone-enlargement, was mapped within the critical region for a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) influencing carcass weight; previously named CW-3 in Japanese Black cattle. The risk allele was on the same chromosome as the Q allele that increases carcass weight. Phenotypic characterization revealed that the risk allele causes disproportional tall stature and bone size that increases carcass weight in heterozygous individuals but causes disproportionately narrow chest width in homozygotes. A non-synonymous variant of FGD3 was identified as a positional candidate quantitative trait nucleotide (QTN) and the corresponding mutant protein showed reduced activity as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Cdc42. FGD3 is expressed in the growth plate cartilage of femurs from bovine and mouse. Thus, loss of FDG3 activity may lead to subsequent loss of Cdc42 function. This would be consistent with the columnar disorganization of proliferating chondrocytes in chondrocyte-specific inactivated Cdc42 mutant mice. This is the first report showing association of FGD3 with skeletal dysplasia. PMID:26306008

  20. Non-synonymous FGD3 Variant as Positional Candidate for Disproportional Tall Stature Accounting for a Carcass Weight QTL (CW-3) and Skeletal Dysplasia in Japanese Black Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Takasuga, Akiko; Sato, Kunio; Nakamura, Ryouichi; Saito, Yosuke; Sasaki, Shinji; Tsuji, Takehito; Suzuki, Akio; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Matsuhashi, Tamako; Setoguchi, Koji; Okabe, Hiroshi; Ootsubo, Toshitake; Tabuchi, Ichiro; Fujita, Tatsuo; Watanabe, Naoto; Hirano, Takashi; Nishimura, Shota; Watanabe, Toshio; Hayakawa, Makio; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu; Kojima, Takatoshi

    2015-01-01

    Recessive skeletal dysplasia, characterized by joint- and/or hip bone-enlargement, was mapped within the critical region for a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) influencing carcass weight; previously named CW-3 in Japanese Black cattle. The risk allele was on the same chromosome as the Q allele that increases carcass weight. Phenotypic characterization revealed that the risk allele causes disproportional tall stature and bone size that increases carcass weight in heterozygous individuals but causes disproportionately narrow chest width in homozygotes. A non-synonymous variant of FGD3 was identified as a positional candidate quantitative trait nucleotide (QTN) and the corresponding mutant protein showed reduced activity as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Cdc42. FGD3 is expressed in the growth plate cartilage of femurs from bovine and mouse. Thus, loss of FDG3 activity may lead to subsequent loss of Cdc42 function. This would be consistent with the columnar disorganization of proliferating chondrocytes in chondrocyte-specific inactivated Cdc42 mutant mice. This is the first report showing association of FGD3 with skeletal dysplasia. PMID:26306008

  1. Paediatric short case examination.

    PubMed

    Isaacs, David

    2014-11-01

    The short case is a highly artificial scenario, in which the examination candidate is given little or no history and instructed to examine one system or one aspect of a patient and draw conclusions. Despite their artificiality, short cases test clinical skills which senior paediatricians value and consider essential qualities of a competent physician. This article presents some general suggestions on an approach to doing short case examinations. PMID:25376346

  2. Are short normal children at a disadvantage? The Wessex growth study.

    PubMed Central

    Downie, A. B.; Mulligan, J.; Stratford, R. J.; Betts, P. R.; Voss, L. D.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine whether short stature through childhood represents a disadvantage at around 12 years. DESIGN: Longitudinal non-intervention study of the physical and psychological development of children recruited from the community in 1986-7 after entry into primary school at age 5-6 years; this is the second psychometric assessment made in 1994-5 after entry into secondary school at age 11-13 years. SETTING: Southampton and Winchester health districts. SUBJECTS: 106 short normal children (< 3rd centile for height when recruited) and 119 controls of average stature (10th-90th centile). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Psychometric measures of cognitive development, self concept development, behaviour, and locus of control. RESULTS: The short children did not differ significantly from the control children on measures of self esteem (19.4 v 20.2), self perception (104.2 v 102.4), parents' perception (46.9 v 47.0), or behaviour (6.8 v 5.3). The short children achieved significantly lower scores on measures of intelligence quotient (IQ) (102.6 v 108.6; P < 0.005), reading attainment (44.3 v 47.9; P < 0.002), and basic number skills (40.2 v 43.5; P < 0.003) and displayed less internalisation of control (16.6 v 14.3; P < 0.001) and less satisfaction with their height (P < 0.0001). More short than control children, however, came from working class homes (P < 0.05). Social class was a better predictor than height of all measures except that of body satisfaction. Attainment scores were predicted by class and IQ together rather than by height. Height accounted for some of the variance in IQ and locus of control scores. CONCLUSIONS: These results provide only limited support for the hypothesis that short children are disadvantaged, at least up until 11-13 years old. Social class seems to have more influence than height on children's psychological development. PMID:9006466

  3. Short Bowel Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... short bowel syndrome cannot absorb enough water, vitamins, minerals, protein, fat, calories, and other nutrients from food. ... of the small intestine, where iron and other minerals are absorbed jejunum—the middle section of the ...

  4. The Short Nose.

    PubMed

    Cone, Jeffrey D; Hobar, P Craig

    2016-01-01

    The causes of the short nose deformity vary greatly, from congenital malformations to acquired deformities. Despite this degree of variation, key commonalities exist, namely, a shortened nasal length, overrotation of the nasal tip, and increased nostril show. This article is designed to help the reader identify precise causes of the short nose, outline associated anatomy, and discuss reliable surgical techniques to correct this deformity. PMID:26616704

  5. [False penile shortness].

    PubMed

    Fontana, D; Rolle, L; Ceruti, C; Datta, G; Ragni, F; Tamagnone, A

    1998-12-01

    The rising interest on male genital aesthetics increased the number of patients complaining of short penis. therefore, the andrologist must be able to perform a correct diagnostic assessment and to make the correct therapeutical choice as well, even if there's no standard yet. The aim of this paper is to discuss some diagnostic troubles about penile shortness and, in particular, to explain the basic surgical strategies suitable for the treatment of "hidden penis". PMID:9882906

  6. Polymorphisms in the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) gene are associated with variation in vertebral bone mass, vertebral bone size, and stature in whites.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Serge L; Deutsch, Samuel; Choudhury, Urmila; Chevalley, Thierry; Bonjour, Jean-Philippe; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; Rizzoli, Rene; Antonarakis, Stylianos E

    2004-05-01

    Stature, bone size, and bone mass are interrelated traits with high heritability, but the major genes that govern these phenotypes remain unknown. Independent genomewide quantitative-trait locus studies have suggested a locus for bone-mineral density and stature at chromosome 11q12-13, a region harboring the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) gene. Mutations in the LRP5 gene were recently implicated in osteoporosis-pseudoglioma and "high-bone-mass" syndromes. To test whether polymorphisms in the LRP5 gene contribute to bone-mass determination in the general population, we studied a cross-sectional cohort of 889 healthy whites of both sexes. Significant associations were found for a missense substitution in exon 9 (c.2047G-->A) with lumbar spine (LS)-bone-mineral content (BMC) (P=.0032), with bone area (P=.0014), and with stature (P=.0062). The associations were observed mainly in adult men, in whom LRP5 polymorphisms accounted for

  7. Measurement of short bunches

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, D.X.

    1996-10-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing interest in short electron bunches for different applications such as short wavelength FELs, linear colliders, and advanced accelerators such as laser or plasma wakefield accelerators. One would like to meet various requirements such as high peak current, low momentum spread, high luminosity, small ratio of bunch length to plasma wavelength, and accurate timing. Meanwhile, recent development and advances in RF photoinjectors and various bunching schemes make it possible to generate very short electron bunches. Measuring the longitudinal profile and monitoring bunch length are critical to understand the bunching process and longitudinal beam dynamics, and to commission and operate such short bunch machines. In this paper, several commonly used measurement techniques for subpicosecond bunches and their relative advantages and disadvantages are discussed. As examples, bunch length related measurements at Jefferson lab are presented. At Jefferson Lab, bunch lengths s short as 84 fs have been systematically measured using a zero-phasing technique. A highly sensitive Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) detector has been developed to noninvasively monitor bunch length for low charge bunches. Phase transfer function measurements provide a means of correcting RF phase drifts and reproducing RF phases to within a couple of tenths of a degree. The measurement results are in excellent agreement with simulations. A comprehensive bunch length control scheme is presented.

  8. Multikinase activity of fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) inhibitors SU5402, PD173074, AZD1480, AZD4547 and BGJ398 compromises the use of small chemicals targeting FGFR catalytic activity for therapy of short-stature syndromes.

    PubMed

    Gudernova, Iva; Vesela, Iva; Balek, Lukas; Buchtova, Marcela; Dosedelova, Hana; Kunova, Michaela; Pivnicka, Jakub; Jelinkova, Iva; Roubalova, Lucie; Kozubik, Alois; Krejci, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Activating mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) cause the most common genetic form of human dwarfism, achondroplasia (ACH). Small chemical inhibitors of FGFR tyrosine kinase activity are considered to be viable option for treating ACH, but little experimental evidence supports this claim. We evaluated five FGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) (SU5402, PD173074, AZD1480, AZD4547 and BGJ398) for their activity against FGFR signaling in chondrocytes. All five TKIs strongly inhibited FGFR activation in cultured chondrocytes and limb rudiment cultures, completely relieving FGFR-mediated inhibition of chondrocyte proliferation and maturation. In contrast, TKI treatment of newborn mice did not improve skeletal growth and had lethal toxic effects on the liver, lungs and kidneys. In cell-free kinase assays as well as in vitro and in vivo cell assays, none of the tested TKIs demonstrated selectivity for FGFR3 over three other FGFR tyrosine kinases. In addition, the TKIs exhibited significant off-target activity when screened against a panel of 14 unrelated tyrosine kinases. This was most extensive in SU5402 and AZD1480, which inhibited DDR2, IGF1R, FLT3, TRKA, FLT4, ABL and JAK3 with efficiencies similar to or greater than those for FGFR. Low target specificity and toxicity of FGFR TKIs thus compromise their use for treatment of ACH. Conceptually, different avenues of therapeutic FGFR3 targeting should be investigated. PMID:26494904

  9. Partial monosomy 3p (3p26.2 --> pter) and partial trisomy 5q (5q34 --> qter) in a girl with coarctation of the aorta, congenital heart defects, short stature, microcephaly and developmental delay.

    PubMed

    Chen, C P; Lin, S P; Chen, M R; Su, Y N; Chern, S R; Liu, Y P; Su, J W; Lee, M S; Wang, W

    2012-01-01

    A 1-year-and-3-month-old girl presented with psychomotor retardation, developmental delay, clinodactyly of the thumb, coarctation of the aorta, patent ductus arteriosus, peripheral pulmonary stenosis, atrial septal defect, microcephaly, brachycephaly, a small oval face, almond-shaped eyes, a down-turned mouth, a widened nasal bridge, hypertelorism, epicanthic folds, long philtrum, low-set large ears and but no craniosynostosis. Oligonucleotide-based array comparative genomic hybridization revealed a -4.79-Mb deletion of 3p26.2 --> pter encompassing CHL1 and CNTN4, and a -19.56-Mb duplication of 5q34 --> qter encompassing MSX2, NKX2-5 and NSD1. The karyotype of the girl was 46,XX,der(3)t(3;5)(p26.2;q34) pat. The present case adds distal 5q duplication to the list of chromosome aberrations associated with coarctation of the aorta. PMID:23072190

  10. 8.6Mb interstitial deletion of chromosome 4q13.3q21.23 in a boy with cognitive impairment, short stature, hearing loss, skeletal abnormalities and facial dysmorphism.

    PubMed

    Lipska, B S; Brzeskwiniewicz, M; Wierzba, J; Morzuchi, L; Piotrowski, A; Limon, J

    2011-01-01

    We describe a 16-year-old boy with an 8.6Mb interstitial deletion of chromosome 4q 13.3q21.23 identified by oligo array-CGH. The patient presents psychomotor developmental delay, absent speech, marked progressive growth restriction, hearing loss, skeletal defects and minor facial anomalies. The patient required surgical treatment for cleft lip and palate, bilateral cryptorchidism and a neurofibroma. The analysis of the presented patient against previously published cases allowed us to expand further on the phenotype and to reevaluate previously proposed critical overlapping region at 4q21. As an addition to PRKG2 and RASGEFIB genes, we propose to include BMP3 gene as the principal determinant of the observed common phenotype. BMP3 haploinsufficiency appears to be causative of hearing loss and peculiar skeletal abnormalities including hemivertebrae and brachydactyly. PMID:22303795

  11. Congenital Short QT Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Crotti, Lia; Taravelli, Erika; Girardengo, Giulia; Schwartz, Peter J

    2010-01-01

    The Short QT Syndrome is a recently described new genetic disorder, characterized by abnormally short QT interval, paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and life threatening ventricular arrhythmias. This autosomal dominant syndrome can afflict infants, children, or young adults; often a remarkable family background of cardiac sudden death is elucidated. At electrophysiological study, short atrial and ventricular refractory periods are found, with atrial fibrillation and polymorphic ventricular tachycardia easily induced by programmed electrical stimulation. Gain of function mutations in three genes encoding K+ channels have been identified, explaining the abbreviated repolarization seen in this condition: KCNH2 for Ikr (SQT1), KCNQ1 for Iks (SQT2) and KCNJ2 for Ik1 (SQT3). The currently suggested therapeutic strategy is an ICD implantation, although many concerns exist for asymptomatic patients, especially in pediatric age. Pharmacological treatment is still under evaluation; quinidine has shown to prolong QT and reduce the inducibility of ventricular arrhythmias, but awaits additional confirmatory clinical data. PMID:20126594

  12. Short wavelength FELS

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    The generation of coherent ultraviolet and shorter wavelength light is presently limited to synchrotron sources. The recent progress in the development of brighter electron beams enables the use of much lower energy electron rf linacs to reach short-wavelengths than previously considered possible. This paper will summarize the present results obtained with synchrotron sources, review proposed short- wavelength FEL designs and then present a new design which is capable of over an order of magnitude higher power to the extreme ultraviolet. 17 refs., 10 figs.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Coffin-Lowry syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... condition include short stature, an unusually small head (microcephaly), progressive abnormal curvature of the spine (kyphoscoliosis), and ... cell ; chromosome ; disability ; gene ; incidence ; inheritance ; inherited ; kyphoscoliosis ; microcephaly ; protein ; sex chromosomes ; short stature ; stature ; syndrome ; X- ...

  14. Troubling Practices: Short Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Gary; Simic, Lena; Haley, David; Svendsen, Zoe; Neal, Lucy; Samba, Emelda Ngufor

    2012-01-01

    In this "RiDE" themed edition on environmentalism, some short pieces are chosen where practitioners describe their own specific environmental practices. Zoe Svendsen and Lucy Neal point to the positives in two commissioned works ("The Trashcatchers' Carnival" and "3rd Ring Out"), underlining the importance of participant agency for effective…

  15. MASTER: short optical transient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, E.; Lipunov, V.; Buckley, D.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Kornilov, V.; Kuznetsov, A.; Balanutsa, P.; Tiurina, N.; Chazov, V.; Gorbunov, I.; Potter, S.; Kotze, M.; Rebolo, R.; Serra-Ricart, M.; Lodieu, N.; Israelian, G.; Budnev, N.; Gress, O.; Ivanov, K.; Tlatov, A.; Senik, V.; Dormidontov, D.; Krushinsky, V.; Zalozhnykh, I.; Sergienko, Yu.; Yurkov, V.; Gabovich, A.

    2015-08-01

    MASTER OT J200554.05-364811.0 discovery - very short ( MASTER-SAAO auto-detection system ( Lipunov et al., Advances in Astronomy, MASTER Global Robotic Net, 2010 ) discovered OT source at (RA, Dec) = 20h 05m 54.05s -36d 48m 11.0s on 2015-08-15.85505 UT.

  16. SHORT COURSE IN MENDE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SPEARS, RICHARD A.

    THIS SHORT COURSE IN MENDE (A TONE LANGUAGE OF LIBERIA AND SIERRA LEONE) IS AN ABRIDGEMENT OF THE BASIC COURSE IN MENDE AND CONSISTS OF THE MOST "IMMEDIATELY USEFUL" PARTS OF THE BASIC COURSE. THESE PARTS INCLUDE A VOCABULARY, USEFUL PHRASES, AND "NARRATIVE DRILLS" TO BE USED WITH THE ACCOMPANYING 18 SLIDES, IN ADDITION TO CHAPTERS ON PHONOLOGY…

  17. [The short nose].

    PubMed

    Levet, Y

    2014-12-01

    Short noses are not only depending on the length of the dorsum, but also if there is a saddle deformity, or a too lower situation of the fronto-nasal angle, or an open naso-labial angle or a rim retraction. All the cases are treated, often with the help of cartilage grafts and with a closed approach. PMID:25156433

  18. Troubling Practices: Short Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Gary; Simic, Lena; Haley, David; Svendsen, Zoe; Neal, Lucy; Samba, Emelda Ngufor

    2012-01-01

    In this "RiDE" themed edition on environmentalism, some short pieces are chosen where practitioners describe their own specific environmental practices. Zoe Svendsen and Lucy Neal point to the positives in two commissioned works ("The Trashcatchers' Carnival" and "3rd Ring Out"), underlining the importance of participant agency for effective…

  19. Short wavelength laser

    DOEpatents

    Hagelstein, P.L.

    1984-06-25

    A short wavelength laser is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses. A multiplicity of panels, mounted on substrates, are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path. When the panels are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses, single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses are produced.

  20. Novel DDR2 mutation identified by whole exome sequencing in a Moroccan patient with spondylo-meta-epiphyseal dysplasia, short limb-abnormal calcification type.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Maria; Kayserili, Hülya; Elalaoui, Siham Chafai; Nishimura, Gen; Iida, Aritoshi; Lyahyai, Jaber; Miyake, Noriko; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Sefiani, Abdelaziz; Ikegawa, Shiro

    2016-02-01

    Spondylo-meta-epiphyseal dysplasia (SMED), short limb-abnormal calcification type (SMED, SL-AC), is a very rare autosomal recessive disorder with various skeletal changes characterized by premature calcification leading to severe disproportionate short stature. Twenty-two patients have been reported until now, but only five mutations (four missense and one splice-site) in the conserved sequence encoding the tyrosine kinase domain of the DDR2 gene has been identified. We report here a novel DDR2 missense mutation, c.370C?>?T (p.Arg124Trp) in a Moroccan girl with SMED, SL-AC, identified by whole exome sequencing. Our study has expanded the mutational spectrum of this rare disease and it has shown that exome sequencing is a powerful and cost-effective tool for the diagnosis of clinically heterogeneous disorders such as SMED. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26463668

  1. Short wavelength laser

    DOEpatents

    Hagelstein, Peter L. (Livermore, CA)

    1986-01-01

    A short wavelength laser (28) is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses (30, 31). A multiplicity of panels (32), mounted on substrates (34), are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path (42). When the panels (32) are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses (30, 31), single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses (44, 46) are produced.

  2. Future short-field aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galloway, T. L.

    1972-01-01

    The application of short takeoff and landing aircraft for improving short-haul air transportation is examined. The contracts with industry to study quiet turbofan short-field aircraft in the short-haul air transportation system are identified. Studies of appropriate propulsion systems are conducted in parallel with the aircraft studies. The objectives of the studies are to: (1) determine economic and social viability of short-haul air transportation, (2) identify critical technology and technology-related problems, (3) define representative aircraft configurations and characteristics to include development and operational costs, and (4) to establish desirable technology advances for improving short-haul transportation systems.

  3. Scottish Short Stone Rows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggles, Clive L. N.

    Short stone rows received a good deal of attention during the 1980s and 1990s, at a time when archaeoastronomy in prehistoric Britain and Ireland was moving beyond reassessments of Alexander Thom's "megalithic observatories" by identifying coherent groups of similar monuments with clear orientation trends. Many such rows are found in western Scotland, with the main concentration in Argyll and the island of Mull. Systematic analyses of their orientations produced credible evidence of an awareness of the 18.6-year lunar node cycle, within a "primary-secondary" pattern whereby isolated rows were oriented close to moonrise or moonset at the southern major standstill limit, while others oriented in this way were accompanied by a second row oriented in a declination range that could be interpreted either as lunar or solar. A detailed investigation of the landscape situation of the sites in northern Mull, accompanied by excavations at two of the sites, suggested that they were deliberately placed in locations where critical moonsets would be seen against prominent distant landscape features, but where the distant horizon in most or all other directions was hidden from view. A lack of independent archaeological evidence may help to explain why archaeoastronomical investigations at short stone rows have never progressed beyond "data-driven" studies of orientations and landscape situation. Nonetheless, the work that was done at these sites raised important general methodological issues, and pioneered techniques, that remain relevant across archaeoastronomy today.

  4. Short-period comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, Paul R.; Campins, Humberto

    1991-01-01

    The spacecraft flybys of Comet Halley in 1986 confirmed Whipple's icy conglomerate hypothesis for cometary nuclei and showed that comets are far richer in volatiles than any other class of solar system bodies. Water is the most abundant volatile, comprising roughly 80 percent of the gas flowing out from the nucleus. Carbon monoxide is next with a content of 15 percent relative to water, though with approximately half of that coming from an extended source in the cometary coma, i.e., hydrocarbon dust grains. The detection of large numbers of hydrocarbon CHON grains was one of the more significant discoveries of the Halley flybys, as was the ground-based observation that CN occurs in jets, again indicating an extended source. Evidence was also found for more complex hydrocarbons. Estimates of the total dust-to-gas ratio for Halley range as high as 2:1, indicating that a substantial fraction of the volatile material may be tied up in solid hydrocarbons rather than ices. The role of clathrates in trapping more volatile ices is not yet understood. If Halley can be taken to be representative of all short-period comets, then the short-period comets may provide a significant source of volatiles in near-earth space. This resource is more difficult to reach dynamically than the near-earth asteriods, but the high volatile content may justify the additional effort necessary. In addition, there is considerable evidence that at least some fraction of the near-earth asteriods are extinct cometary nuclei which have evolved into asteroid orbits, and which may contain significant volatiles buried beneath an insulating lag-deposit crust of nonvolatiles. Knowledge of comets will be greatly enhanced in the near future by the Comet Rendezvous Flyby mission now under development by NASA, and by the proposed Rosetta mission.

  5. Does priming with sex steroids improve the diagnosis of normal growth hormone secretion in short children?

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Ashraf; Adel, Ashraf; Sabt, Aml; Elbukhari, Elkhansa; Ahmed, Hannah; De Sanctis, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: There is still controversy for priming with sex steroid before growth hormone (GH) testing. Objective: We studied GH response to stimulation in 92 children >9 years with idiopathic short stature (height standard deviation score [HtSDS]-2). They were divided randomly into two groups. Children in Group 1 (n = 50) were primed with premarin in girls and testosterone in boys and those in Group 2 were not primed (n = 42). All children were tested using standard clonidine test and their serum insulin-like growth factor-I concentration (IGF-I). Additionally the growth and GH-IGF-I data of the two groups of children were compared with those for 32 short children (HtSDS 9 years. The peak GH response to clonidine provocation test did not differ before (n = 42) versus after 9 years (n = 32) of age. Conclusions: In this randomized study priming with sex steroids before GH testing did not significantly increase the yield of diagnosing short patients with normal GH secretion. In addition, GH response to provocation did not vary significantly between young (<9 years) and old (>9 years) short children. PMID:25538882

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Noonan syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... palate ; pectus excavatum ; phenotype ; philtrum ; protein ; puberty ; pulmonary ; scoliosis ; short stature ; stature ; stenosis ; surgery ; syndrome ; testicles ; tissue You may find definitions for ...

  7. Short-wave Diathermy

    PubMed Central

    1935-01-01

    It is submitted that the thermal action of short-wave therapy does not account for the therapeutic results obtained. The theory is put forward that many of the results obtained can be better explained by the disruptive and dispersive action of the impact of the electromagnetic vibrations. An analogy, indicating such disruptive effects at high frequency, is drawn from the molecular vibrations—transmitted through transformer oil, and excited by the application of high frequency currents to the layers of quartz in the piezo-electric oscillator of quartz. It is submitted that these disruptive and dispersive effects will be greatest where the conductivity of the tissues is low, such as in bones and fat, and it is shown that it is in these regions that the therapeutic action of these currents is most obvious. It is also pointed out that, if effects, comparable to those obtained in the subcutaneous area, are obtained in the deeper tissues and organs, the application of deep-wave therapy would be attended by serious risk. PMID:19990107

  8. Are Short GRBs Really Hard?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, T.; Barbier, L.; Barthelmy, S.; Cummings, J.; Fenimore, E.; Gehrels, N.; Hullinger, D.; Krimm, H.; Markwardt, C.; Palmer, D.; Parsons, A.; Sato, G.; Tueller, J.; Aptekar, R.; Cline, T.; Golenetskii, S.; Mazets, E.; Pal'Shin, V.; Ricker, G.; Lamb, D.; Atteia, J.-L.; Swift-Bat; Konus-Wind; Hete-2 Team

    2006-05-01

    Thanks to the rapid position notice and response by HETE-2 and Swift, the X-ray afterglow emissions have been found for four recent short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs GRB 050509b, GRB 050709, GRB 050724, and GRB 050813). The positions of three out of four short GRBs are coincident with galaxies with no current or recent star formation. This discovery tightens the case for a different origin for short and long GRBs. On the other hand, from the prompt emission point of view, a short GRB shows a harder spectrum comparing to that of the long duration GRBs according to the BATSE observations. We investigate the prompt emission properties of four short GRBs observed by Swift/BAT. We found that the hardness of all four BAT short GRBs is in between the BATSE range for short and long GRBs. We will discuss the spectral properties of short GRBs including the short GRB sample of Konus-Wind and HETE-2 to understand the hard nature of the BATSE short GRBs.

  9. Pediatric Short Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Ariel U.; Neaga, Andreea; West, Brady; Safran, Jared; Brown, Pamela; Btaiche, Imad; Kuzma-O'Reilly, Barbara; Teitelbaum, Daniel H.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine predictors of survival and of weaning off parenteral nutrition (PN) in pediatric short bowel syndrome (SBS) patients. Summary Background Data: Pediatric SBS carries extensive morbidity and high mortality, but factors believed to predict survival or weaning from PN have been based on limited studies. This study reviews outcomes of a large number of SBS infants and identifies predictors of success. Methods: Multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis was conducted on 80 pediatric SBS patients. Primary outcome was survival; secondary outcome was ability to wean off PN. Nonsignificant covariates were eliminated. P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Over a mean of 5.1 years of follow-up, survival was 58 of 80 (72.5%) and 51 weaned off PN (63.8%). Cholestasis (conjugated bilirubin ?2.5 mg/dL) was the strongest predictor of mortality (relative risk [RR] 22.7, P = 0.005). Although absolute small bowel length was only slightly predictive, percentage of normal bowel length (for a given infant's gestational age) was strongly predictive of mortality (if <10% of normal length, RR of death was 5.7, P = 0.003) and of weaning PN (if ?10% of normal, RR of weaning PN was 11.8, P = 0.001). Presence of the ileocecal valve (ICV) also strongly predicted weaning PN (RR 3.9, P < 0.0005); however, ICV was not predictive of survival. Conclusions: Cholestasis and age-adjusted small bowel length are the major predictors of mortality in pediatric SBS. Age-adjusted small bowel length and ICV are the major predictors of weaning from PN. These data permit better prediction of outcomes of pediatric SBS, which may help to direct future management of these challenging patients. PMID:16135926

  10. Short-term and long-term sequelae in intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR).

    PubMed

    Longo, Stefania; Bollani, Lina; Decembrino, Lidia; Di Comite, Amelia; Angelini, Mauro; Stronati, M

    2013-02-01

    Intrauterine Growth Retardation (IUGR) is defined as a rate of growth of a fetus that is less than normal for the growth potential of the fetus (for that particular gestational age). Small for Gestational Age (SGA) is defined infant born following IUGR, with a weight at birth below the 10th percentile.Suboptimal fetal growth occurring in IUGR fetuses is an important cause of perinatal mortality and morbidity. The acute neonatal consequences of IUGR include metabolic and hematological disturbances, and disrupted thermoregulation; in addition, respiratory distress (RDS), necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) may contribute to perinatal morbidity. Metabolic disturbances are related to glucose and fatty acid metabolism. It is well-known that individuals who display poor growth in utero are at significantly increased risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance (the so-called metabolic syndrome, MS). MS ultimately leads to the premature development of cardiovascular diseases. In addition, short stature in children and adults, premature adrenarche, and the polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) are endocrinological sequelae of IUGR. (8) Early onset growth delay and prematurity significantly increase the risk for neurological sequelae and motor and cognitive delay.Future prospective studies need to investigate risk factors for infants who are SGA. If reliable prediction can be achieved, there is potential to reduce future perinatal morbidity and mortality, and long term consequences among SGA babies. PMID:23030765

  11. Clinical aspects of short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    van Maldegem, Bianca T; Wanders, Ronald J A; Wijburg, Frits A

    2010-10-01

    Short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (SCADD) is an autosomal recessive inborn error of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. SCADD is biochemically characterized by increased C4-carnitine in plasma and ethylmalonic acid in urine. The diagnosis of SCADD is confirmed by DNA analysis showing SCAD gene mutations and/or variants. SCAD gene variants are present in homozygous form in approximately 6% of the general population and considered to confer susceptibility to development of clinical disease. Clinically, SCADD generally appears to present early in life and to be most frequently associated with developmental delay, hypotonia, epilepsy, behavioral disorders, and hypoglycemia. However, these symptoms often ameliorate and even disappear spontaneously during follow-up and were found to be unrelated to the SCAD genotype. In addition, in some cases, symptoms initially attributed to SCADD could later be explained by other causes. Finally, SCADD relatives of SCADD patients as well as almost all SCADD individuals diagnosed by neonatal screening remained asymptomatic during follow-up. This potential lack of clinical consequences of SCADD has several implications. First, the diagnosis of SCADD should never preclude extension of the diagnostic workup for other potential causes of the observed symptoms. Second, patients and parents should be clearly informed about the potential lack of relevance of the disorder to avoid unfounded anxiety. Furthermore, to date, SCADD is not an optimal candidate for inclusion in newborn screening programs. More studies are needed to fully establish the relevance of SCADD and solve the question as to whether SCADD is involved in a multifactorial disease or represents a nondisease. PMID:20429031

  12. Clinical aspects of short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Wijburg, Frits A.

    2010-01-01

    Short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (SCADD) is an autosomal recessive inborn error of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. SCADD is biochemically characterized by increased C4-carnitine in plasma and ethylmalonic acid in urine. The diagnosis of SCADD is confirmed by DNA analysis showing SCAD gene mutations and/or variants. SCAD gene variants are present in homozygous form in approximately 6% of the general population and considered to confer susceptibility to development of clinical disease. Clinically, SCADD generally appears to present early in life and to be most frequently associated with developmental delay, hypotonia, epilepsy, behavioral disorders, and hypoglycemia. However, these symptoms often ameliorate and even disappear spontaneously during follow-up and were found to be unrelated to the SCAD genotype. In addition, in some cases, symptoms initially attributed to SCADD could later be explained by other causes. Finally, SCADD relatives of SCADD patients as well as almost all SCADD individuals diagnosed by neonatal screening remained asymptomatic during follow-up. This potential lack of clinical consequences of SCADD has several implications. First, the diagnosis of SCADD should never preclude extension of the diagnostic workup for other potential causes of the observed symptoms. Second, patients and parents should be clearly informed about the potential lack of relevance of the disorder to avoid unfounded anxiety. Furthermore, to date, SCADD is not an optimal candidate for inclusion in newborn screening programs. More studies are needed to fully establish the relevance of SCADD and solve the question as to whether SCADD is involved in a multifactorial disease or represents a nondisease. PMID:20429031

  13. Short Stories in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Carole L., Ed.; Kratzke, Peter, Ed.

    Examining how teachers help students respond to short fiction, this book presents 25 essays that look closely at "teachable" short stories by a diverse group of classic and contemporary writers. The approaches shared by the contributors move from readers' first personal connections to a story, through a growing facility with the structure of…

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Costello syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... calf muscles to the heel), weak muscle tone (hypotonia), a structural abnormality of the brain called a ... cell division ; disability ; gene ; growth hormone ; hormone ; hypertrophic ; hypotonia ; malformation ; muscle tone ; mutation ; prevalence ; protein ; rhabdomyosarcoma ; short ...

  15. Intentionally Short Range Communications (ISRC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, J.; Poirier, P.; Obrien, M. E.; Gibeson, L.

    1993-05-01

    This document details the feasibility studies conducted for the Intentionally Short Range Communications (ISRC) project. The short-range limitation arises from the need for low probability of intercept (LPI), low probability of detection (LPD) communication links. The detection of an undecipherable transmission would still provide an enemy with information regarding transmitter location. The technologies being studied are ultraviolet (UV) lamps, UV lasers, infrared (IR) lasers, millimeter waves (MMW), and direct sequence spread spectrum.

  16. Molecular and cytogenetic characterization of a recurrent unbalanced translocation (4;21) (p16.3;q22.1): Relevance to the Wolf-Hirschhorn and Down syndrome critical regions

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastio, G.; Perone, L.; Guzzetta, V.

    1996-05-17

    We report on an aneuploidy syndrome due to the unbalanced segregation of a familial translocation (4;21)(p16.3;q22.1) causing a partial 4p monosomy and a partial 21q trisomy. The three affected children presented with severe failure to thrive, short stature, microcephaly, profound hypotonia, and mental retardation. The face, very similar in the three children, is characterized by frontal bossing, upslanting of the palpebral fissures, short nose, and deep set ears, giving the overall appearance of the Down syndrome. The molecular study has defined the aneuploid segment on both 4p and 21q. Most of the Down syndrome critical region was found to be trisomic, while only part of the candidate Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome critical region was deleted, suggesting that this region is not critical for the major malformations characteristic for WHS. 15 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Magnet Coil Shorted Turn Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Dinkel, J.A.; Biggs, J.E.

    1994-03-01

    The Magnet Coil Shorted Turn Detector has been developed to facilitate the location of shorted turns in magnet coils. Finding these shorted turns is necessary to determine failure modes that are a necessary step in developing future production techniques. Up to this point, coils with shorted turns had the insulation burned off without the fault having been located. This disassembly process destroyed any chance of being able to find the fault. In order to maintain a flux balance in a coupled system such as a magnet coil, the current in a shorted turn must be opposed to the incident current. If the direction of the current in each conductor can be measured relative to the incident current, then the exact location of the short can be determined. In this device, an AC voltage is applied to the magnet under test. A small hand held B-dot pickup coil monitors the magnetic field produced by current in the individual magnet conductors. The relative phase of this pickup coil voltage is compared to a reference signal derived from the input current to detect a current reversal as the B-dot pickup coil is swept over the conductors of the coil under test. This technique however, is limited to only those conductors that are accessible to the hand held probe.

  18. Short implants: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Karthikeyan, I.; Desai, Shrikar R.; Singh, Rika

    2012-01-01

    Background: Short implants are manufactured for use in atrophic regions of the jaws. Although many studies report on short implants as ?10 mm length with considerable success, the literature regarding survival rate of ?7 mm is sparse. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to systematically evaluate the publications concerning short dental implants defined as an implant with a length of ?7 mm placed in the maxilla or in the mandible. Materials and Methods: A Medline and manual search was conducted to identify studies concerning short dental implants of length ?7 mm published between 1991 and 2011. The articles included in this study report data on implant length ?7 mm, such as demographic variables, implant type, location in jaws, observation time, prostheses and complications. Results: The 28 included studies represent one randomized controlled trial, 12 prospective studies and 10 retrospective studies. The survival rate of short implant was found to be increased from 80% to 90% gradually, with recent articles showing 100%. Conclusion: When severe atrophy of jaws was encountered, short and wide implants can be placed successfully. PMID:23162320

  19. Short baseline phase delay interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, C. D.

    1987-01-01

    The high precision of the phase delay data type allows angular navigation accuracy on relatively short baselines to compete with the angular accuracy achieved with long baseline group delay measurements. Differential phase delay observations of close quasar pairs on both a 5.9-km baseline (DSS 12-DSS 13) and a 253-km baseline (DSS 13-Owens Valley Radio Observatory) have been performed to study the potential navigational precision and accuracy of the short baseline interferometry. As a first step toward demonstration of a connected element system at Goldstone, the DSS 12-DSS 13 baseline was operated coherently, distributing a common frequency reference via a recently installed fiber optic cable. The observed phase delay residuals of about 10 psec or less on both baselines appear to be dominated by short term troposphere fluctuations, and correspond to navigational accuracies of well below 50 nrad for the 253-km baseline. Additional experiments will be required to probe the full range of systematic errors.

  20. Long Swarms and Short Swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, S. R.

    2011-12-01

    Many earthquake swarms at volcanoes last several months, then have a sharp uptick in rate in the hours before eruption. Examples include 2006 Augustine, 8.5 months then 10 hours; 1992 Spurr, 10 months then 4 hours; 1994 Rabaul, ~1 year then 27 hours; 2008 Kasatochi, 6 weeks then 2 days; and 2011 Puyuehue Cordon Caulle, 5 weeks then 2 days. For the well studied Augustine case, broadband data showed that very long period (VLP) energy accompanied 221 of 722 located earthquakes in the 10 hours before the first explosive eruption on 11 January 2006. This was revealed by low-pass filtering and the period of the VLP signal was 50 sec. The Augustine broadband stations were campaign instruments at distances of 2-3 km from the vent. No similar VLP energy has been found in events during the 8.5 month long swarm. Okmok volcano had a short swarm only lasting 5 hours prior to its 12 July 2008 eruption. Low-pass filtering of data from broadband station OKSO, 10 km from the vent, showed that 23 of 42 located events had VLP energy with a period of 30-40 sec. Events from Kasatochi volcano were scanned on station ATKA. Here the broadband station is much farther away at 88 km but the earthquakes in the short swarm 7 August 2008 were much larger with many M>3 events. The station suffered data gaps so only a few hours of data were scanned but numerous events were observed with VLP energy starting just after the P phase. Low-pass filtering showed VLP energy with a period of 10-12 sec. No VLP energy has been found in events of the preceding 6 week long swarm. These observations at three different volcanoes suggest that the short swarms represent a different process than the long swarms. The long swarms likely reflect pressure increases in the surrounding country rock caused by increasing magma pressure. The short swarms in contrast, appear to represent discrete pulses of magma injection at shallow depths. For all three volcanoes the earthquakes looked like typical volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes on short-period stations. This demonstrates that broadband stations are needed at close distances to be able to make the needed observations. The short swarms are very short - a few hours to 2 days - and have important implications for hazards assessments. It is not known how commonly the long swarm-short swarm pairs occur and the false alarm rate is also not known.

  1. Shorts in self-checking circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaidis, M.

    1987-04-01

    Consequences of shorts in self-checking NMOS and CMOS circuits are analyzed. Circuits checked by the parity code or by unordered codes are considered. Coverage of the different short types by techniques for other faults is examined. It is shown that the techniques cover feedback shorts having different consequences than the faults for which these techniques are originally proposed. Transfer of the results to other technologies is easy since the technology independent classification of short gives four possible cases: non feedback shorts always giving logical erroneous levels (the error on the two shorted lines is always single); non feedback shorts which may give indeterminate erroneous levels (the error on the two shorted lines may be double non unidirectional); even feedback shorts (the possible double error on the two shorted lines is implicitly unidirectional); and odd feedback shorts (the possible double error on the two shorted lines is implicitly non unidirectional).

  2. Towards short wavelengths FELs workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Winick, H.

    1993-12-01

    This workshop was caged because of the growing perception in the FEL source community that recent advances have made it possible to extend FEL operation to wavelengths about two orders of magnitude shorter than the 240 nm that has been achieved to date. In addition short wavelength FELs offer the possibilities of extremely high peak power (several gigawatts) and very short pulses (of the order of 100 fs). Several groups in the USA are developing plans for such short wavelength FEL facilities. However, reviewers of these plans have pointed out that it would be highly desirable to first carry out proof-of-principle experiments at longer wavelengths to increase confidence that the shorter wavelength devices will indeed perform as calculated. The need for such experiments has now been broadly accepted by the FEL community. Such experiments were the main focus of this workshop as described in the following objectives distributed to attendees: (1) Define measurements needed to gain confidence that short wavelength FELs will perform as calculated. (2) List possible hardware that could be used to carry out these measurements in the near term. (3) Define a prioritized FEL physics experimental program and suggested timetable. (4) Form collaborative teams to carry out this program.

  3. Pick of the (Short) Flicks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Frank, Ed.

    1967-01-01

    Five experts suggest a list of 50 short motion pictures which are inexpensive and fit easily within a normal class period. These films, not narrowly related to specific disciplines, range from visual poems inducing creative responses, to films analyzing the problems of maturing in an irrelevant society. Twenty of the film entries have annotations…

  4. Novel applications of short and ultra-short pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straßl, M.; Kopecek, H.; Weinrotter, M.; Bäcker, A.; Al-Janabi, A. H.; Wieger, V.; Wintner, E.

    2005-07-01

    This paper offers recent successful examples for the application of nanosecond (ns) as well as picosecond (ps) and femtosecond (fs) laser pulses to media of gaseous, liquid or solid nature via non-linear interactions as a review, the laser ignition and dental ultra-short pulse interaction being parts of the authors' own work. Plasma-initiated ignition of combustible gas mixtures represents a potential alternative way for long-lasting operation of gas engines with rather clean exhaust. Ultra-short pulses are useful for materials processing including dental hard tissue. Using miniaturized scanners of different types yields perfect cavity sizes without collateral damage at ablation rates coming close to mechanical drills in dentistry.

  5. Effect of zinc supplementation on growth Hormone Insulin growth factor axis in short Egyptian children with zinc deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The relationship between zinc (Zn) and growth hormone-insulin growth factor (GH-IGF) system and how Zn therapy stimulates growth in children has not been clearly defined in humans. Thus, we aimed to assess GH-IGF axis in short children with Zn deficiency and to investigate the effect of Zn supplementation on these parameters. Methods Fifty pre-pubertal Egyptian children with short stature and Zn deficiency were compared to 50 age-, sex-, and pubertal stage- matched controls. All subjects were subjected to history, auxological assessment and measurement of serum Zn, IGF-1, insulin growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3); and basal and stimulated GH before and 3?months after Zn supplementation (50?mg/day). Results After 3?months of Zn supplementation in Zn-deficient patients, there were significant increases in height standard deviation score (SDS, P?=?0.033), serum Zn (P?short children with Zn deficiency, and increased after Zn supplementation for 3?months but their levels were still lower than the normal reference ranges in most children; therefore, Zn supplementation may be necessary for longer periods. PMID:22625223

  6. Optimal short-sighted rules.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois-Gironde, Sacha

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to assess the relevance of methodological transfers from behavioral ecology to experimental economics with respect to the elicitation of intertemporal preferences. More precisely our discussion will stem from the analysis of Stephens and Anderson's (2001) seminal article. In their study with blue jays they document that foraging behavior typically implements short-sighted choice rules which are beneficial in the long run. Such long-term profitability of short-sighted behavior cannot be evidenced when using a self-control paradigm (one which contrasts in a binary way sooner smaller and later larger payoffs) but becomes apparent when ecological patch-paradigms (replicating economic situations in which the main trade-off consists in staying on a food patch or leaving for another patch) are implemented. We transfer this methodology in view of contrasting foraging strategies and self-control in human intertemporal choices. PMID:22973188

  7. Optimal Short-Sighted Rules

    PubMed Central

    Bourgeois-Gironde, Sacha

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to assess the relevance of methodological transfers from behavioral ecology to experimental economics with respect to the elicitation of intertemporal preferences. More precisely our discussion will stem from the analysis of Stephens and Anderson’s (2001) seminal article. In their study with blue jays they document that foraging behavior typically implements short-sighted choice rules which are beneficial in the long run. Such long-term profitability of short-sighted behavior cannot be evidenced when using a self-control paradigm (one which contrasts in a binary way sooner smaller and later larger payoffs) but becomes apparent when ecological patch-paradigms (replicating economic situations in which the main trade-off consists in staying on a food patch or leaving for another patch) are implemented. We transfer this methodology in view of contrasting foraging strategies and self-control in human intertemporal choices. PMID:22973188

  8. Short-range communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean C. (Inventor); Howard, David E. (Inventor); Smith, Dennis A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A short-range communication system includes an antenna, a transmitter, and a receiver. The antenna is an electrical conductor formed as a planar coil with rings thereof being uniformly spaced. The transmitter is spaced apart from the plane of the coil by a gap. An amplitude-modulated and asynchronous signal indicative of a data stream of known peak amplitude is transmitted into the gap. The receiver detects the coil's resonance and decodes same to recover the data stream.

  9. Tetrahymena mutants with short telomeres.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, S; Sheng, H; Niu, L; Henderson, E

    1998-01-01

    Telomere length is dynamic in many organisms. Genetic screens that identify mutants with altered telomere lengths are essential if we are to understand how telomere length is regulated in vivo. In Tetrahymena thermophila, telomeres become long at 30 degrees, and growth rate slows. A slow-growing culture with long telomeres is often overgrown by a variant cell type with short telomeres and a rapid-doubling rate. Here we show that this variant cell type with short telomeres is in fact a mutant with a genetic defect in telomere length regulation. One of these telomere growth inhibited forever (tgi) mutants was heterozygous for a telomerase RNA mutation, and this mutant telomerase RNA caused telomere shortening when overexpressed in wild-type cells. Several other tgi mutants were also likely to be heterozygous at their mutant loci, since they reverted to wild type when selective pressure for short telomeres was removed. These results illustrate that telomere length can regulate growth rate in Tetrahymena and that this phenomenon can be exploited to identify genes involved in telomere length regulation. PMID:9755196

  10. Orogeny can be very short

    PubMed Central

    Dewey, John F.

    2005-01-01

    In contrast to continent/continent collision, arc–continent collision generates very short-lived orogeny because the buoyancy-driven impedance of the subduction of continental lithosphere, accompanied by arc/suprasubduction-zone ophiolite obduction, is relieved by subduction polarity reversal (flip). This tectonic principle is illustrated by the early Ordovician Grampian Orogeny in the British and Irish Caledonides, in which a wealth of detailed sedimentologic, heavy mineral, and geochronologic data pin the Orogeny to a very short Arenig/Llanvirn event. The Orogeny, from the initial subduction of continental margin sediments to the end of postflip shortening, lasted ≈18 million years (my). The collisional shortening, prograde-metamorphic phase of the Orogeny lasted 8 my, extensional collapse and exhumation of midcrustal rocks lasted 1.5 my, and postflip shortening lasted 4.5 my. Strain rates were a typical plate-boundary-zone 10-15. Metamorphism, to the second sillimanite isograd, with extensive partial melting, occurred within a few my after initial collision, indicating that conductive models for metamorphic heat transfer in Barrovian terrains are incorrect and must be replaced by advective models in which large volumes of mafic/ultramafic magma are emplaced, syn-tectonically, below and into evolving nappe stacks. Arc/continent collision generates fast and very short orogeny, regional metamorphism, and exhumation. PMID:16126898

  11. Orogeny can be very short.

    PubMed

    Dewey, John F

    2005-10-25

    In contrast to continent/continent collision, arc-continent collision generates very short-lived orogeny because the buoyancy-driven impedance of the subduction of continental lithosphere, accompanied by arc/suprasubduction-zone ophiolite obduction, is relieved by subduction polarity reversal (flip). This tectonic principle is illustrated by the early Ordovician Grampian Orogeny in the British and Irish Caledonides, in which a wealth of detailed sedimentologic, heavy mineral, and geochronologic data pin the Orogeny to a very short Arenig/Llanvirn event. The Orogeny, from the initial subduction of continental margin sediments to the end of postflip shortening, lasted approximately 18 million years (my). The collisional shortening, prograde-metamorphic phase of the Orogeny lasted 8 my, extensional collapse and exhumation of midcrustal rocks lasted 1.5 my, and postflip shortening lasted 4.5 my. Strain rates were a typical plate-boundary-zone 10(-15). Metamorphism, to the second sillimanite isograd, with extensive partial melting, occurred within a few my after initial collision, indicating that conductive models for metamorphic heat transfer in Barrovian terrains are incorrect and must be replaced by advective models in which large volumes of mafic/ultramafic magma are emplaced, syn-tectonically, below and into evolving nappe stacks. Arc/continent collision generates fast and very short orogeny, regional metamorphism, and exhumation. PMID:16126898

  12. Anticipatory guidance for parents of Prader-Willi children.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Mary Ellen

    2003-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a complex genetic disorder. It is characterized by hypotonia, short stature, hypogonadism, mental retardation, behavioral problems, and hyperphagia, which result in excessive obesity (Lindgren et al., 2000). The abnormal body composition resembles children seen with growth hormone deficiency (Carrel & Allen, 2001) . The dysmorphic features characteristic of PWS include a narrow forehead, a broad nasal bridge, slightly up slanting almond-shaped palpebral fissures, a down turned mouth with a thin upper lip, and narrow hands and feet (Martin et al., 1998). Management of children with PWS requires an ongoing multidisciplinary approach. The delivery of care includes assistance from geneticists, nutritionists, internists, endocrinologists, physical therapists, and psychologists to meet the medical, developmental, behavioral, and social needs. The focus of the nurse practitioner should include assisting the family in the management of these complex patients throughout their childhood. PMID:14743837

  13. Prader–Willi syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cassidy, Suzanne B; Driscoll, Daniel J

    2009-01-01

    Prader–Willi syndrome (PWS) is a highly variable genetic disorder affecting multiple body systems whose most consistent major manifestations include hypotonia with poor suck and poor weight gain in infancy; mild mental retardation, hypogonadism, growth hormone insufficiency causing short stature for the family, early childhood-onset hyperphagia and obesity, characteristic appearance, and behavioral and sometimes psychiatric disturbance. Many more minor characteristics can be helpful in diagnosis and important in management. PWS is an example of a genetic condition involving genomic imprinting. It can occur by three main mechanisms, which lead to absence of expression of paternally inherited genes in the 15q11.2–q13 region: paternal microdeletion, maternal uniparental disomy, and imprinting defect. PMID:18781185

  14. Submicroscopic deletions at 16p13.3 in Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome: frequency and clinical manifestations in a North American population.

    PubMed Central

    Wallerstein, R; Anderson, C E; Hay, B; Gupta, P; Gibas, L; Ansari, K; Cowchock, F S; Weinblatt, V; Reid, C; Levitas, A; Jackson, L

    1997-01-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS) is a well delineated multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterised by mental retardation, broad thumbs and toes, short stature, and specific facial features. The recent localisation of the disorder to 16p13.3 and subsequent identification of a submicroscopic deletion of this region in RTS patients led us to screen a large cohort of affected subjects using the RT1 probe. Among 64 patients with clinical evidence of RTS, seven (11%) had a deletion. Another patient had a translocation of the region without evidence of a deletion. The features of coloboma, growth retardation, naevus flammeus, and hypotonia have a positive predictive value for the presence of an RT1 deletion. Because of the relatively low frequency of deletions in RTS, the RT1 probe is useful in diagnostic confirmation, but has limited use as a screening tool. PMID:9132490

  15. Prader-Willi syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Cassidy, S B

    1997-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome is a complex disorder affecting multiple systems with many manifestations relating to hypothalamic insufficiency. Major findings include infantile hypotonia, developmental delay and mental retardation, behaviour disorder, characteristic facial appearance, obesity, hypogonadism, and short stature. Obesity and the behavioural problems are the major causes of morbidity and mortality. Prader-Willi syndrome is caused by abnormalities of the imprinted region of proximal 15q and results from absence of the normally active paternal genes in this region. Such absence results from paternal interstitial deletion, maternal uniparental disomy, or a mutation or other abnormality in the imprinting process. Diagnostic identification of all causes has become available in recent years, permitting early detection and institution of appropriate management. This testing has permitted recent identification of some phenotypic differences among affected subjects of different race and between those with deletions and uniparental disomy as a cause. Images PMID:9391886

  16. Differential Gene Expression Reveals Mitochondrial Dysfunction in an Imprinting Center Deletion Mouse Model of Prader-Willi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Weiwei; Coskun, Pinar E.; Nalbandian, Angèle; Knoblach, Susan; Resnick, James L.; Hoffman, Eric; Wallace, Douglas C.; Kimonis, Virginia E.

    2013-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a genetic disorder caused by deficiency of imprinted gene expression from the paternal chromosome 15q11-15q13 and clinically characterized by neonatal hypotonia, short stature, cognitive impairment, hypogonadism, hyperphagia, morbid obesity and diabetes. Previous clinical studies suggest that a defect in energy metabolism may be involved in the pathogenesis of PWS. We focused our attention on the genes associated with energy metabolism and found that there were 95 and 66 mitochondrial genes differentially expressed in PWS muscle and brain, respectively. Assessment of enzyme activities of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes in the brain, heart, liver and muscle were assessed. We found the enzyme activities of the cardiac mitochondrial complexes II+III were upregulated in the imprinting center deletion (PWS-IC) mice compared to the wild type littermates. These studies suggest that differential gene expression, especially of the mitochondrial genes may contribute to the pathophysiology of PWS. PMID:24127921

  17. Sensory motor and functional skills of dizygotic twins: one with Smith-Magenis syndrome and a twin control.

    PubMed

    Smith, Michaele R; Hildenbrand, Hanna; Smith, Ann C M

    2009-01-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS), the result of an interstitial deletion within chromosome 17p11.2, is a disorder that may include minor dysmorphic features, brachydactyly, short stature, hypotonia, speech delays, cognitive deficits, signs of peripheral neuropathy, scoliosis, and neurobehavioral problems including sleep disturbances and maladaptive repetitive and self-injurious behaviors. Physical and occupational therapists provide services for children who have the syndrome, whose genetic disorder is frequently not identified or diagnosed before 1 year of age. A comprehensive physical and occupational therapy evaluation was completed in nonidentical twins with one having SMS, using the Sensory Profile; Brief Assessment of Motor Function (BAMF); Peabody Developmental Motor Scales, Second Edition (PDMS-2); and Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI). This provides a framework for conducting assessments to enhance early detection and interdisciplinary management with this specialized population. PMID:19842854

  18. Prader-Willi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, Suzanne B; Driscoll, Daniel J

    2009-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a highly variable genetic disorder affecting multiple body systems whose most consistent major manifestations include hypotonia with poor suck and poor weight gain in infancy; mild mental retardation, hypogonadism, growth hormone insufficiency causing short stature for the family, early childhood-onset hyperphagia and obesity, characteristic appearance, and behavioral and sometimes psychiatric disturbance. Many more minor characteristics can be helpful in diagnosis and important in management. PWS is an example of a genetic condition involving genomic imprinting. It can occur by three main mechanisms, which lead to absence of expression of paternally inherited genes in the 15q11.2-q13 region: paternal microdeletion, maternal uniparental disomy, and imprinting defect. PMID:18781185

  19. Short-term responses of wetland vegetation after liming of an Adirondack watershed

    SciTech Connect

    Mackun, I.R.; Leopold, D.J.; Raynal, D.J. )

    1994-08-01

    Watershed liming has been suggested as a long-term mitigation strategy for lake acidity, particularly in areas subject to high levels of acidic deposition. However, virtually no information has been available on the impacts of liming on wetland vegetation. In 1989, 1100 Mg of limestone (83.5% CaCO[sub 3]) were aerially applied to 48% (100 ha) of the Woods Lake watershed in the west-central Adirondack region of New York as part of the first comprehensive watershed liming study in North America. We inventoried wetland vegetation in 1.0-m[sup 2] plots before liming and during the subsequent 2 yr. Within this period liming influenced the cover, frequency, or importance values of only 6 of 64 wetland taxa. The cover of Sphagnum spp. and of the cespitose sedge Carex interior decreased in control relative to limed plots, and cover of the rhizomatous sedge Cladium mariscoides increased nearly threefold in limed areas. These two sedges, which are relatively tall, are characteristic of more calcareous habitats. Cover of the grass Muhlenbergia uniflora, cover and importance were adversely affected or inhibited by lime. It is unclear whether liming directly inhibited the growth of these three small-statured species, or whether the adverse effects of lime were mediated through shifts in competitive interactions with other species. The limited responses that we observed to liming, along with changes that occurred in control plots over the study period, may indicate that in the short term watershed liming was no more of a perturbation than the environmental factors responsible for natural annual variation in wetland communities.

  20. Genetic mapping of X-linked mental retardation genes with short tandem repeat polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, N.J.; Pritchard, J.K.

    1994-09-01

    A number of loci for non-specific and syndromal forms of mental retardation (XLMR) have been mapped to certain regions of the X chromosome. As a prerequisite for molecular identification of several forms of XLMR, we have conducted linkage studies in five families. In family 1, the affected members have severe MR, microcephaly, foot anomalies and digital arches. The most likely location of the gene is between DXS983 and DXYS1. A maximum lod score of 3.0 was obtained with DXS986. In family 2, affected males with moderate MR, spasticity of the lower limbs, and clasped thumbs (probably have MASA syndrome). The gene maps between DXS297 and F8C with a maximum lod score with DXS52. In three families, genes were localized by recombinants but lod scores >2 were not achieved. Family 3 has affected males with moderate MR, microcephaly, short stature, widening of the nasal tip and brachydactyly. The obligate carrier females are normal. The gene was localized to Xp11.3-q21 between SYN1 and DXS1105. In family 4, the affected males have non-specific MR whereas the obligate carrier females are normal. The most likely location of the gene is Xp11.4-p22.1 between MAO-B amd DXS987. Family 5 has affected males with profound MR, seizures, and limb contractures and two of five carrier females with moderate MR and limb contractures. The gene maps between DXS1003 and DXS992 (Xp11.4-p22).

  1. Ultra-short pulse generator

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1993-12-28

    An inexpensive pulse generating circuit is disclosed that generates ultra-short, 200 picosecond, and high voltage 100 kW, pulses suitable for wideband radar and other wideband applications. The circuit implements a nonlinear transmission line with series inductors and variable capacitors coupled to ground made from reverse biased diodes to sharpen and increase the amplitude of a high-voltage power MOSFET driver input pulse until it causes non-destructive transit time breakdown in a final avalanche shock wave diode, which increases and sharpens the pulse even more. 5 figures.

  2. Recycler short kicker beam impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Crisp, Jim; Fellenz, Brian; /Fermilab

    2009-07-01

    Measured longitudinal and calculated transverse beam impedance is presented for the short kicker magnets being installed in the Fermilab Recycler. Fermi drawing number ME-457159. The longitudinal impedance was measured with a stretched wire and the Panofsky equation was used to estimate the transverse impedance. The impedance of 3319 meters (the Recycler circumference) of stainless vacuum pipe is provided for comparison. Although measurements where done to 3GHz, impedance was negligible above 30MHz. The beam power lost to the kicker impedance is shown for a range of bunch lengths. The measurements are for one kicker assuming a rotation frequency of 90KHz. Seven of these kickers are being installed.

  3. Ultra-short pulse generator

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1993-01-01

    An inexpensive pulse generating circuit is disclosed that generates ultra-short, 200 picosecond, and high voltage 100 kW, pulses suitable for wideband radar and other wideband applications. The circuit implements a nonlinear transmission line with series inductors and variable capacitors coupled to ground made from reverse biased diodes to sharpen and increase the amplitude of a high-voltage power MOSFET driver input pulse until it causes non-destructive transit time breakdown in a final avalanche shockwave diode, which increases and sharpens the pulse even more.

  4. Short rotation Wood Crops Program

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, L.L.; Ehrenshaft, A.R.

    1990-08-01

    This report synthesizes the technical progress of research projects in the Short Rotation Woody Crops Program for the year ending September 30, 1989. The primary goal of this research program, sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Biofuels and Municipal Waste Technology Division, is the development of a viable technology for producing renewable feedstocks for conversion to biofuels. One of the more significant accomplishments was the documentation that short-rotation woody crops total delivered costs could be $40/Mg or less under optimistic but attainable conditions. By taking advantage of federal subsidies such as those offered under the Conservation Reserve Program, wood energy feedstock costs could be lower. Genetic improvement studies are broadening species performance within geographic regions and under less-than-optimum site conditions. Advances in physiological research are identifying key characteristics of species productivity and response to nutrient applications. Recent developments utilizing biotechnology have achieved success in cell and tissue culture, somaclonal variation, and gene-insertion studies. Productivity gains have been realized with advanced cultural studies of spacing, coppice, and mixed-species trials. 8 figs., 20 tabs.

  5. TOXIC MODELING SYSTEM SHORT-TERM (TOXST)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Toxic Modeling System Short-Term (TOXST) addresses the problem of estimating expected exceedances of specified short-term health effects thresholds in the vicinity of continuous and intermittent toxic releases. Certain industrial facilities emit airborne toxic chemicals known...

  6. Effects of Growth Hormone in Chronically Ill Children

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2006-02-01

    - Hurler Syndrome (MPS-1) With Short Stature and Muscle Wasting; - Cerebral Palsy With Muscle Wasting; - Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis With Muscle Wasting and Short Stature; - Crohn’s Disease; - HIV Infection.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: Ring chromosome 20 syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... slow growth and short stature, a small head (microcephaly), and subtle differences in facial features. Major birth ... division ; chromosome ; disability ; embryonic ; epilepsy ; epileptic ; gene ; inherited ; microcephaly ; mosaicism ; prevalence ; reproductive cells ; seizure ; short stature ; sperm ; ...

  8. Shapeable short circuit resistant capacitor

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Ralph S.; Myers, John D.; Baney, William J.

    2015-10-06

    A ceramic short circuit resistant capacitor that is bendable and/or shapeable to provide a multiple layer capacitor that is extremely compact and amenable to desirable geometries. The capacitor that exhibits a benign failure mode in which a multitude of discrete failure events result in a gradual loss of capacitance. Each event is a localized event in which localized heating causes an adjacent portion of one or both of the electrodes to vaporize, physically cleaning away electrode material from the failure site. A first metal electrode, a second metal electrode, and a ceramic dielectric layer between the electrodes are thin enough to be formed in a serpentine-arrangement with gaps between the first electrode and the second electrode that allow venting of vaporized electrode material in the event of a benign failure.

  9. Short-Lived Climate Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierrehumbert, R. T.

    2014-05-01

    Although carbon dioxide emissions are by far the most important mediator of anthropogenic climate disruption, a number of shorter-lived substances with atmospheric lifetimes of under a few decades also contribute significantly to the radiative forcing that drives climate change. In recent years, the argument that early and aggressive mitigation of the emission of these substances or their precursors forms an essential part of any climate protection strategy has gained a considerable following. There is often an implication that such control can in some way make up for the current inaction on carbon dioxide emissions. The prime targets for mitigation, known collectively as short-lived climate pollution (SLCP), are methane, hydrofluo-rocarbons, black carbon, and ozone. A re-examination of the issues shows that the benefits of early SLCP mitigation have been greatly exaggerated, largely because of inadequacies in the methodologies used to compare the climate effects of short-lived substances with those of CO2, which causes nearly irreversible climate change persisting millennia after emissions cease. Eventual mitigation of SLCP can make a useful contribution to climate protection, but there is little to be gained by implementing SLCP mitigation before stringent carbon dioxide controls are in place and have caused annual emissions to approach zero. Any earlier implementation of SLCP mitigation that substitutes to any significant extent for carbon dioxide mitigation will lead to a climate irreversibly warmer than will a strategy with delayed SLCP mitigation. SLCP mitigation does not buy time for implementation of stringent controls on CO2 emissions.

  10. Arctic warming: Short-term solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmale, Julia

    2016-03-01

    Arctic temperatures are increasing because of long- and short-lived climate forcers, with reduction of the short-lived species potentially offering some quick mitigation. Now a regional assessment reveals the emission locations of these short-lived species and indicates international co-operation is needed to develop an effective mitigation plan.

  11. 46 CFR 15.725 - Sailing short.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Sailing short. 15.725 Section 15.725 Shipping COAST... Limitations and Qualifying Factors § 15.725 Sailing short. Whenever a vessel is deprived of the service of a... vessel is sufficiently manned for the voyage. A report of sailing short must be filed in writing with...

  12. 46 CFR 15.725 - Sailing short.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Sailing short. 15.725 Section 15.725 Shipping COAST... Limitations and Qualifying Factors § 15.725 Sailing short. Whenever a vessel is deprived of the service of a... vessel is sufficiently manned for the voyage. A report of sailing short must be filed in writing with...

  13. 46 CFR 15.725 - Sailing short.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Sailing short. 15.725 Section 15.725 Shipping COAST... Limitations and Qualifying Factors § 15.725 Sailing short. Whenever a vessel is deprived of the service of a... vessel is sufficiently manned for the voyage. A report of sailing short must be filed in writing with...

  14. 46 CFR 15.725 - Sailing short.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Sailing short. 15.725 Section 15.725 Shipping COAST... Limitations and Qualifying Factors § 15.725 Sailing short. Whenever a vessel is deprived of the service of a... vessel is sufficiently manned for the voyage. A report of sailing short must be filed with the...

  15. Approaches to Teaching the Short Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Dorothy, Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Approached from a variety of perspectives, the first nine articles in this special journal issue focus on teaching the short story. Specific topics discussed in the articles are (1) the AIM game as a prereading strategy for teaching the short story, (2) short story readers and writers as partners in the act of artistic communication, (3) oral…

  16. Approaches to Teaching the Short Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Dorothy, Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Approached from a variety of perspectives, the first nine articles in this special journal issue focus on teaching the short story. Specific topics discussed in the articles are (1) the AIM game as a prereading strategy for teaching the short story, (2) short story readers and writers as partners in the act of artistic communication, (3) oral…

  17. Drop short control of electrode gap

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, Robert W. (Albuquerque, NM); Maroone, James P. (Albuquerque, NM); Tipping, Donald W. (Albuquerque, NM); Zanner, Frank J. (Sandia Park, NM)

    1986-01-01

    During vacuum consumable arc remelting the electrode gap between a consumable electrode and a pool of molten metal is difficult to control. The present invention monitors drop shorts by detecting a decrease in the voltage between the consumable electrode and molten pool. The drop shorts and their associated voltage reductions occur as repetitive pulses which are closely correlated to the electrode gap. Thus, the method and apparatus of the present invention controls electrode gap based upon drop shorts detected from the monitored anode-cathode voltage. The number of drop shorts are accumulated, and each time the number of drop shorts reach a predetermined number, the average period between drop shorts is calculated from this predetermined number and the time in which this number is accumulated. This average drop short period is used in a drop short period electrode gap model which determines the actual electrode gap from the drop short. The actual electrode gap is then compared with a desired electrode gap which is selected to produce optimum operating conditions and the velocity of the consumable error is varied based upon the gap error. The consumable electrode is driven according to any prior art system at this velocity. In the preferred embodiment, a microprocessor system is utilized to perform the necessary calculations and further to monitor the duration of each drop short. If any drop short exceeds a preset duration period, the consumable electrode is rapidly retracted a predetermined distance to prevent bonding of the consumable electrode to the molten remelt.

  18. Dopamine-Responsive Growth-Hormone Deficiency and Central Hypothyroidism in Sepiapterin Reductase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Zielonka, Matthias; Makhseed, Nawal; Blau, Nenad; Bettendorf, Markus; Hoffmann, Georg Friedrich; Opladen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Sepiapterin reductase (SR) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessively inherited error of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) biosynthesis, resulting in disturbed dopaminergic and serotonergic neurotransmission. The clinical phenotype is characterized by dopa-responsive movement disorders including muscular hypotonia, dystonia, and parkinsonism. Due to the rarity of the disease, the phenotype of SR deficiency is far from being completely understood. Here, we report a 7-year-old boy, who was referred for diagnostic evaluation of combined psychomotor retardation, spastic tetraplegia, extrapyramidal symptoms, and short stature. Due to discrepancy between motor status and mental condition, analyses of biogenic amines and pterins in CSF were performed, leading to the diagnosis of SR deficiency. The diagnosis was confirmed by a novel homozygous mutation c.530G>C; p.(Arg177Pro) in exon 2 of the SPR gene. Because of persistent short stature, systematic endocrinological investigations were initiated. Insufficient growth-hormone release in a severe hypoglycemic episode after overnight fasting confirmed growth-hormone deficiency as a cause of short stature. In addition, central hypothyroidism was present. A general hypothalamic affection could be excluded. Since dopamine is known to regulate growth-hormone excretion, IGF-1, IGF-BP3, and peripheral thyroid hormone levels were monitored under L-dopa/carbidopa supplementation. Both growth-hormone-dependent factors and thyroid function normalized under treatment. This is the first report describing growth-hormone deficiency and central hypothyroidism in SR deficiency. It extends the phenotypic spectrum of the disease and identifies dopamine depletion as cause for the endocrinological disturbances. PMID:26006722

  19. Onboard Short Term Plan Viewer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Tim; LeBlanc, Troy; Ulman, Brian; McDonald, Aaron; Gramm, Paul; Chang, Li-Min; Keerthi, Suman; Kivlovitz, Dov; Hadlock, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Onboard Short Term Plan Viewer (OSTPV) is a computer program for electronic display of mission plans and timelines, both aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and in ISS ground control stations located in several countries. OSTPV was specifically designed both (1) for use within the limited ISS computing environment and (2) to be compatible with computers used in ground control stations. OSTPV supplants a prior system in which, aboard the ISS, timelines were printed on paper and incorporated into files that also contained other paper documents. Hence, the introduction of OSTPV has both reduced the consumption of resources and saved time in updating plans and timelines. OSTPV accepts, as input, the mission timeline output of a legacy, print-oriented, UNIX-based program called "Consolidated Planning System" and converts the timeline information for display in an interactive, dynamic, Windows Web-based graphical user interface that is used by both the ISS crew and ground control teams in real time. OSTPV enables the ISS crew to electronically indicate execution of timeline steps, launch electronic procedures, and efficiently report to ground control teams on the statuses of ISS activities, all by use of laptop computers aboard the ISS.

  20. Short paths in expander graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinberg, J.; Rubinfeld, R.

    1996-12-31

    Graph expansion has proved to be a powerful general tool for analyzing the behavior of routing algorithms and the interconnection networks on which they run. We develop new routing algorithms and structural results for bounded-degree expander graphs. Our results are unified by the fact that they are all based upon, and extend, a body of work asserting that expanders are rich in short, disjoint paths. In particular, our work has consequences for the disjoint paths problem, multicommodify flow, and graph minor containment. We show: (i) A greedy algorithm for approximating the maximum disjoint paths problem achieves a polylogarithmic approximation ratio in bounded-degree expanders. Although our algorithm is both deterministic and on-line, its performance guarantee is an improvement over previous bounds in expanders. (ii) For a multicommodily flow problem with arbitrary demands on a bounded-degree expander, there is a (1 + {epsilon})-optimal solution using only flow paths of polylogarithmic length. It follows that the multicommodity flow algorithm of Awerbuch and Leighton runs in nearly linear time per commodity in expanders. Our analysis is based on establishing the following: given edge weights on an expander G, one can increase some of the weights very slightly so the resulting shortest-path metric is smooth - the min-weight path between any pair of nodes uses a polylogarithmic number of edges. (iii) Every bounded-degree expander on n nodes contains every graph with O(n/log{sup O(1)} n) nodes and edges as a minor.

  1. Recurrent deletions and duplications of chromosome 2q11.2 and 2q13 are associated with variable outcomes.

    PubMed

    Riley, Kacie N; Catalano, Lisa M; Bernat, John A; Adams, Stacie D; Martin, Donna M; Lalani, Seema R; Patel, Ankita; Burnside, Rachel D; Innis, Jeffrey W; Rudd, M Katharine

    2015-11-01

    Copy number variation (CNV) in the long arm of chromosome 2 has been implicated in developmental delay (DD), intellectual disability (ID), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), congenital anomalies, and psychiatric disorders. Here we describe 14 new subjects with recurrent deletions and duplications of chromosome 2q11.2, 2q13, and 2q11.2-2q13. Though diverse phenotypes are associated with these CNVs, some common features have emerged. Subjects with 2q11.2 deletions often exhibit DD, speech delay, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), whereas those with 2q11.2 duplications have DD, gastroesophageal reflux, and short stature. Congenital heart defects (CHDs), hypotonia, dysmorphic features, and abnormal head size are common in those with 2q13 deletions. In the 2q13 duplication cohort, we report dysmorphic features, DD, and abnormal head size. Two individuals with large duplications spanning 2q11.2-2q13 have dysmorphic features, hypotonia, and DD. This compilation of clinical features associated with 2q CNVs provides information that will be useful for healthcare providers and for families of affected children. However, the reduced penetrance and variable expressivity associated with these recurrent CNVs makes genetic counseling and prediction of outcomes challenging. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26227573

  2. Short GRB Prompt and Afterglow Correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2007-01-01

    The Swift data set on short GRBs has now grown large enough to study correlations of key parameters. The goal is to compare long and short bursts to better understand similarities and differences in the burst origins. In this study we consider the both prompt and afterglow fluxes. It is found that the optical, X-ray and gamma-ray emissions are linearly correlated - stronger bursts tend to have brighter afterglows, and bursts with brighter X-ray afterglow tend to have brighter optical afterglow. Both the prompt and afterglow fluxes are, on average, lower for short bursts than for long. Although there are short GRBs with undetected optical emission, there is no evidence for "dark" short bursts with anomalously low opt/X ratios. The weakest short bursts have a low X-ray/gamma-ray ratio.

  3. Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 130 Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database (Web, free access)   Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database is intended to benefit research and application of short tandem repeat DNA markers for human identity testing. Facts and sequence information on each STR system, population data, commonly used multiplex STR systems, PCR primers and conditions, and a review of various technologies for analysis of STR alleles have been included.

  4. Short Interval Leaf Movements of Cotton 12

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Charles S.

    1975-01-01

    Gossypium hirsutum L. cv. Lankart plants exhibited three different types of independent short interval leaf movements which were superimposed on the circadian movements. The different types were termed SIRV (short interval rhythmical vertical), SIHM (short interval horizontal movements), and SHAKE (short stroked SIRV). The 36-minute period SIRV movements occurred at higher moisture levels. The 176-minute period SIHM occurred at lower moisture levels and ceased as the stress increased. The SHAKE movements were initiated with further stresses. The SLEEP (circadian, diurnal) movements ceased with further stress. The last to cease just prior to permanent wilting were the SHAKE movements. PMID:16659123

  5. Genotype-phenotype analysis of 18q12.1-q12.2 copy number variation in autism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peter; Carrion, Prescilla; Qiao, Ying; Tyson, Christine; Hrynchak, Monica; Calli, Kristina; Lopez-Rangel, Elena; Andrieux, Joris; Delobel, Bruno; Duban-Bedu, Bénédicte; Thuresson, Ann-Charlotte; Annerén, Göran; Liu, Xudong; Rajcan-Separovic, Evica; Suzanne Lewis, M E

    2013-08-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) are complex neurodevelopmental conditions characterized by delays in social interactions and communication as well as displays of restrictive/repetitive interests. DNA copy number variants have been identified as a genomic susceptibility factor in ASDs and imply significant genetic heterogeneity. We report a 7-year-old female with ADOS-G and ADI-R confirmed autistic disorder harbouring a de novo 4 Mb duplication (18q12.1). Our subject displays severely deficient expressive language, stereotypic and repetitive behaviours, mild intellectual disability (ID), focal epilepsy, short stature and absence of significant dysmorphic features. Search of the PubMed literature and DECIPHER database identified 4 additional cases involving 18q12.1 associated with autism and/or ID that overlap our case: one duplication, two deletions and one balanced translocation. Notably, autism and ID are seen with genomic gain or loss at 18q12.1, plus epilepsy and short stature in duplication cases, and hypotonia and tall stature in deletion cases. No consistent dysmorphic features were noted amongst the reviewed cases. We review prospective ASD/ID candidate genes integral to 18q12.1, including those coding for the desmocollin/desmoglein cluster, ring finger proteins 125 and 138, trafficking protein particle complex 8 and dystrobrevin-alpha. The collective clinical and molecular features common to microduplication 18q12.1 suggest that dosage-sensitive, position or contiguous gene effects may be associated in the etiopathogenesis of this autism-ID-epilepsy syndrome. PMID:23727450

  6. Measuring the short fiber content of cotton.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twenty-nine bales of cotton with short fiber content ranging from about five to twenty-five percent were selected for the purpose of comparing the effectiveness and relationships between current test methods for fiber length. These various instruments/methods used to measure short fiber included: H...

  7. 31 CFR 505.01 - Short title.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Short title. 505.01 Section 505.01 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN... CERTAIN MERCHANDISE BETWEEN FOREIGN COUNTRIES § 505.01 Short title. The regulations in this part may...

  8. 33 CFR 401.1 - Short title.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Short title. 401.1 Section 401.1 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations § 401.1 Short title. These regulations may be cited as...

  9. 18 CFR 415.1 - Short title.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Short title. 415.1 Section 415.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL BASIN REGULATIONS-FLOOD PLAIN REGULATIONS Generally § 415.1 Short title. This part shall be...

  10. 18 CFR 415.1 - Short title.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Short title. 415.1 Section 415.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL BASIN REGULATIONS-FLOOD PLAIN REGULATIONS Generally § 415.1 Short title. This part shall be...

  11. Short Form of the Developmental Behaviour Checklist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taffe, John R.; Gray, Kylie M.; Einfeld, Stewart L.; Dekker, Marielle C.; Koot, Hans M.; Emerson, Eric; Koskentausta, Terhi; Tonge, Bruce J.

    2007-01-01

    A 24-item short form of the 96-item Developmental Behaviour Checklist was developed to provide a brief measure of Total Behaviour Problem Score for research purposes. The short form Developmental Behaviour Checklist (DBC-P24) was chosen for low bias and high precision from among 100 randomly selected item sets. The DBC-P24 was developed from…

  12. Natural language insensitive short textual string compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantinescu, Cornel; Trelewicz, Jennifer Q.; Arps, Ronald B.

    2004-01-01

    There are applications (such as Internet search engines) where short textual strings, for example abstracts or pieces of Web pages, need to be compressed independently of each other. The usual adaptive compression algorithms perform poorly on these short strings due to the lack of necessary data to learn. In this manuscript, we introduce a compression algorithm targeting short text strings; e.g., containing a few hundred symbols. We also target natural language insensitivity, to facilitate its robust compression and fast implementation. The algorithm is based on the following findings. Applying the move-to-front transform (MTFT) after the Burrows-Wheeler transform (BWT) brings the short textual strings to a "normalized form" where the distribution of the resulting "ranks" has a shape similar over the set of natural language strings. This facilitates the use of a static coding method with few variations, which we call shortBWT, where no on-line learning is needed, to encode the ranks. Finally, for short strings, shortBWT runs very fast because the strings fit into the cache of most current computers. The introduction for this paper will review the mathematical bases of BWT and MTF, it will also review our recently published metric for rapidly pre-characterizing the compressibility of such short textual strings when using these transforms.

  13. The Short Story as HyperStory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Charles E.

    A software application called HyperStory is a reading program for short fiction which has proved to be effective in the classroom. In 3 years of use, over 300 students have tried it out. Part of the reason for its suitability for helping students develop short story reading skills lies in the relationship between the computer technology known as…

  14. Teaching Literature to Adolescents: Short Stories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunning, Stephen

    Intended for teachers-to-be at the undergraduate level as well as for teachers with experience, this book presents the premise that the short story--with its appropriate length and natural interest for students--is a unique teaching vehicle. Five parts comprise the volume: Part 1 discusses four teaching principles illustrated by actual short…

  15. Short-Distance Structure of Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas Higinbotham, Eliazer Piasetzky, Stephen Wood

    2011-06-01

    One of Jefferson Lab's original missions was to further our understanding of the short-distance structure of nuclei. In particular, to understand what happens when two or more nucleons within a nucleus have strongly overlapping wave-functions; a phenomena commonly referred to as short-range correlations. Herein, we review the results of the (e,e'), (e,e'p) and (e,e'pN) reactions that have been used at Jefferson Lab to probe this short-distance structure as well as provide an outlook for future experiments.

  16. Precursors of Short Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troja, E.; Rosswog, S.; Gehrels, N.

    2010-01-01

    We carried out a systematic search of precursors on the sample of short GRBs observed by Swift. We found that approx. 8-10% of short GRBs display such early episode of emission. One burst (GRB 090510) shows two precursor events, the former approx.13 s and the latter approx. 0.5 s before the GRB. We did not find any substantial difference between the precursor and the main GRB emission, and between short GRBs with and without precursors. We discuss possible mechanisms to reproduce the observed precursor emission within the scenario of compact object mergers. The implications of our results on quantum gravity constraints are also discussed.

  17. High current short pulse ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-08-01

    High current short pulse ion beams can be generated by using a multicusp source. This is accomplished by switching the arc or the RF induction discharge on and off. An alternative approach is to maintain a continuous plasma discharge and extraction voltage but control the plasma flow into the extraction aperture by a combination of magnetic and electric fields. Short beam pulses can be obtained by using a fast electronic switch and a dc bias power supply. It is also demonstrated that very short beam pulses ({approximately} 10 {micro}s) with high repetition rate can be formed by a laser-driven LaB{sub 6} or barium photo-cathode.

  18. Analyzing Short-Term Disability Benefits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houff, James N.; Wiatrowski, William J.

    1989-01-01

    The Bureau of Labour Statistics has combined data on sick leave and sickness and accident insurance. Results show that short-term disability benefits vary by length of service and between the private and public sectors. (Author)

  19. A Short Introduction to this Volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baracca, Angelo; Renn, Jürgen; Wendt, Helge

    This volume opens with a personal perspective on the history of Cuba by Angelo Baracca. It is followed by a short critical bibliography by Duccio Basosi that gives an overview of historical studies on different periods of Cuban history.

  20. Short read fragment assembly of bacterial genomes

    PubMed Central

    Chaisson, Mark J.; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    2008-01-01

    In the last year, high-throughput sequencing technologies have progressed from proof-of-concept to production quality. While these methods produce high-quality reads, they have yet to produce reads comparable in length to Sanger-based sequencing. Current fragment assembly algorithms have been implemented and optimized for mate-paired Sanger-based reads, and thus do not perform well on short reads produced by short read technologies. We present a new Eulerian assembler that generates nearly optimal short read assemblies of bacterial genomes and describe an approach to assemble reads in the case of the popular hybrid protocol when short and long Sanger-based reads are combined. PMID:18083777

  1. Intentionally Short-Range Communications (ISRC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, J.; Poirier, P.; Obrien, M.

    1994-02-01

    The U.S. Marine Corps (USMC) desired to develop short-range communications links whose ranges are intentionally limited to very short distances. These links support tactical missions such as LAN Backbone, Wideband Data Link, and Company Radio. The short-range limitation arises from the need for low probability of detection and intercept (LPD/LPI). Since the detection of an undecipherable transmission would still provide an enemy with information regarding transmitter location and allow him to take countermeasures, the Marine Corps Systems Command (MARCORSYSCOM) is sponsoring the development of technologies that can be LPD by their very nature. The Intentionally Short-Range Communications (ISRC) project at the Naval Command, Control and Ocean Surveillance Center (NCCOSC) RDT&E Division (NRaD) is pursuing feasibility studies for these USMC missions based on such technologies as ultraviolet (LTV) lamps, UV lasers, infrared (IR) lasers, millimeter waves and direct sequence spread spectrum (DSSS) at radio frequencies.

  2. Short winters threaten temperate fish populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, Troy M.; Marschall, Elizabeth A.; Dabrowski, Konrad; Ludsin, Stuart A.

    2015-07-01

    Although climate warming is expected to benefit temperate ectotherms by lengthening the summer growing season, declines in reproductive success following short, warm winters may counter such positive effects. Here we present long-term (1973-2010) field patterns for Lake Erie yellow perch, Perca flavescens, which show that failed annual recruitment events followed short, warm winters. Subsequent laboratory experimentation and field investigations revealed how reduced reproductive success following short, warm winters underlie these observed field patterns. Following short winters, females spawn at warmer temperatures and produce smaller eggs that both hatch at lower rates and produce smaller larvae than females exposed to long winters. Our research suggests that continued climate warming can lead to unanticipated, negative effects on temperate fish populations.

  3. Microbial production of short chain diols.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yudong; Liu, Wei; Zou, Huibin; Cheng, Tao; Tian, Ning; Xian, Mo

    2014-01-01

    Short chain diols (propanediols, butanediols, pentanediols) have been widely used in bulk and fine chemical industries as fuels, solvents, polymer monomers and pharmaceutical precursors. The chemical production of short chain diols from fossil resources has been developed and optimized for decades. Consideration of the exhausting fossil resources and the increasing environment issues, the bio-based process to produce short chain diols is attracting interests. Currently, a variety of biotechnologies have been developed for the microbial production of the short chain diols from renewable feed-stocks. In order to efficiently produce bio-diols, the techniques like metabolically engineering the production strains, optimization of the fermentation processes, and integration of a reasonable downstream recovery processes have been thoroughly investigated. In this review, we summarized the recent development in the whole process of bio-diols production including substrate, microorganism, metabolic pathway, fermentation process and downstream process. PMID:25491899

  4. A Short Foucault Pendulum for Corridor Display.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Byron E.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the construction and operation of a short Foucault pendulum, which indicates earth's rotation with less than 2 percent error. The pendulum is suitable for display either in a classroom or hallway. (SK)

  5. Short winters threaten temperate fish populations

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, Troy M.; Marschall, Elizabeth A.; Dabrowski, Konrad; Ludsin, Stuart A.

    2015-01-01

    Although climate warming is expected to benefit temperate ectotherms by lengthening the summer growing season, declines in reproductive success following short, warm winters may counter such positive effects. Here we present long-term (1973–2010) field patterns for Lake Erie yellow perch, Perca flavescens, which show that failed annual recruitment events followed short, warm winters. Subsequent laboratory experimentation and field investigations revealed how reduced reproductive success following short, warm winters underlie these observed field patterns. Following short winters, females spawn at warmer temperatures and produce smaller eggs that both hatch at lower rates and produce smaller larvae than females exposed to long winters. Our research suggests that continued climate warming can lead to unanticipated, negative effects on temperate fish populations. PMID:26173734

  6. Are shorted pipeline casings a problem

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, W.F. )

    1994-11-01

    The pipeline industry has many road and railroad crossings with casings which have been in service for more than 50 years without exhibiting any major problems, regardless of whether the casing is shorted to or isolated from the carrier pipe. The use of smart pigging and continual visual inspection when retrieving a cased pipeline segment have shown that whether shorted or isolated, casings have no significant bearing on the presence or absence of corrosion on the carrier pipe.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: Neurofibromatosis type 1

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a condition characterized by changes in skin coloring (pigmentation) and the growth of tumors along nerves in ... mutation ; oligodendrocytes ; optic nerve ; pattern of inheritance ; peripheral ; pigmentation ; protein ; Schwann cells ; scoliosis ; short stature ; stature ; tissue ; ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: Mucopolysaccharidosis type I

    MedlinePLUS

    ... affected individuals eventually lose basic functional skills (developmentally regress). Children with this form of the disorder usually ... inguinal ; inherited ; joint ; macrocephaly ; macroglossia ; obstruction ; progression ; recessive ; regress ; respiratory ; short stature ; stature ; stenosis ; syndrome You may ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: Mucopolysaccharidosis type II

    MedlinePLUS

    ... form begin to lose basic functional skills (developmentally regress) between the ages of 6 and 8. The ... inherited ; joint ; macrocephaly ; macroglossia ; mutation ; obstruction ; progression ; recessive ; regress ; respiratory ; retina ; sex chromosomes ; short stature ; stature ; stenosis ; ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 11-beta-hydroxylase deficiency

    MedlinePLUS

    ... develop excessive body hair growth (hirsutism) and irregular menstruation. Males with the non-classic form of this ... gene ; genitalia ; hirsutism ; hormone ; hyperplasia ; hypertension ; inflammation ; inherited ; menstruation ; newborn screening ; recessive ; screening ; short stature ; stature ; stress ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: Pitt-Hopkins syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... activities, the TCF4 protein is known as a transcription factor. The TCF4 protein plays a role in ... psychomotor ; short stature ; spectrum ; stature ; strabismus ; syndrome ; testes ; transcription ; transcription factor You may find definitions for these ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Saethre-Chotzen syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... role in early development. This protein is a transcription factor, which means that it attaches (binds) to ... protein ; ptosis ; rearrangement ; short stature ; stature ; syndactyly ; syndrome ; transcription ; transcription factor ; unilateral ; vertebra You may find definitions ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Mowat-Wilson syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and tissues before birth. This protein is a transcription factor, which means that it attaches (binds) to ... protein ; short stature ; sign ; sign language ; stature ; syndrome ; transcription ; transcription factor You may find definitions for these ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Werner syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... shortened protein is not transported to the cell's nucleus, where it normally interacts with DNA. Evidence also ... DNA damage ; fertility ; gene ; inherited ; loss of hair ; nucleus ; osteoporosis ; protein ; puberty ; recessive ; short stature ; stature ; syndrome ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in the same direction (strabismus), involuntary eye movements (nystagmus), and impaired speech (dysarthria). Affected individuals may have ... dysarthria ; endoplasmic reticulum ; gene ; hereditary ; hypogonadism ; inherited ; involuntary ; nystagmus ; protein ; puberty ; recessive ; scoliosis ; short stature ; stature ; strabismus ; ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Chanarin-Dorfman syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... storage disease with impaired long-chain fatty acid oxidation For more information about naming genetic conditions, see ... ichthyosiform ; ichthyosis ; incidence ; inherited ; intestine ; involuntary ; lipid ; nystagmus ; oxidation ; protein ; recessive ; short stature ; stature ; syndrome ; triglycerides You ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Mucolipidosis III alpha/beta

    MedlinePLUS

    ... process of attaching a molecule called mannose-6-phosphate (M6P) to specific digestive enzymes. Just as luggage ... valve ; inherited ; joint ; lysosome ; mannose ; mineral ; molecule ; osteoporosis ; phosphate ; prevalence ; recessive ; respiratory ; short stature ; spectrum ; stature ; subunit ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Pseudoachondroplasia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... have a spine that curves to the side (scoliosis) or an abnormally curved lower back (lordosis). People ... dysplasia ; gene ; inherited ; joint ; lordosis ; mutation ; prevalence ; protein ; scoliosis ; short stature ; stature ; syndrome ; tissue You may find ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Ring chromosome 14 syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

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  20. Genetics Home Reference: Cartilage-hair hypoplasia

    MedlinePLUS

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  1. Genetics Home Reference: Prader-Willi syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

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  2. Genetics Home Reference: Mevalonate kinase deficiency

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Steroid hormones are needed for normal development and reproduction, and bile acids are used to digest fats. ... inherited ; injury ; joint ; kidney ; kinase ; lymph ; protein ; recessive ; reproduction ; sclera ; short stature ; stature ; stress ; surgery ; syndrome ; uveitis ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Shwachman-Diamond syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... SBDS protein may play a role in processing RNA (a molecule that is a chemical cousin of ... oxygen ; pancreas ; pancreatic ; platelets ; pneumonia ; protein ; recessive ; ribosomes ; RNA ; short stature ; stature ; steatorrhea ; syndrome ; thrombocytopenia ; tissue ; white ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Floating-Harbor syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... unusually high-pitched voice; and, in males, undescended testes (cryptorchidism). How common is Floating-Harbor syndrome? Floating- ... motor ; mutation ; philtrum ; protein ; short stature ; stature ; syndrome ; testes You may find definitions for these and many ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: Congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 11-beta-hydroxylase deficiency

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and Families Resources for Health Professionals What glossary definitions help with understanding congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to ... screening ; short stature ; stature ; stress You may find definitions for these and many other terms in the ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Stickler syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Characteristics & Diagnostic Criteria Stickler Involved People: Stickler Syndrome Recognition, Diagnosis, Treatment You might also find information on ... joint ; lower jaw ; micrognathia ; mutation ; myopia ; nearsightedness ; palate ; pattern of inheritance ; recessive ; scoliosis ; short stature ; stature ; syndrome ...

  7. Metaphyseal Engaging Short and Ultra-Short Anatomic Cementless Stems in Young and Active Patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Hoo; Park, Jang-Won; Kim, Jun-Shik

    2016-01-01

    We report 400 patients (mean age, 53years) who received a short stem (17.8years of follow-up) and 201 patients (mean age 53years) who received an ultra-short stem (12.3years of follow-up). At the final follow-up, the mean Harris hip score, WOMAC score and the mean UCLA activity scores were not different between two groups. No patient had thigh pain in either group. Two hips (0.3%) in the short stem group were revised because of early postoperative infection and one hip (0.2%) in the ultra-short stem group was revised for fracture of the proximal femur. Metaphyseal engaging short and ultra-short anatomic cementless stem without diaphyseal fixation provided long-term durable fixation in young and active patients. PMID:26300282

  8. Means for limiting and ameliorating electrode shorting

    SciTech Connect

    Konynenburg, R.A. van; Farmer, J.C.

    1999-11-09

    A fuse and filter arrangement is described for limiting and ameliorating electrode shorting in capacitive deionization water purification systems utilizing carbon aerogel, for example. This arrangement limits and ameliorates the effects of conducting particles or debonded carbon aerogel in shorting the electrodes of a system such as a capacitive deionization water purification system. This is important because of the small interelectrode spacing and the finite possibility of debonding or fragmentation of carbon aerogel in a large system. The fuse and filter arrangement electrically protect the entire system from shutting down if a single pair of electrodes is shorted and mechanically prevents a conducting particle from migrating through the electrode stack, shorting a series of electrode pairs in sequence. It also limits the amount of energy released in a shorting event. The arrangement consists of a set of circuit breakers or fuses with one fuse or breaker in the power line connected to one electrode of each electrode pair and a set of screens of filters in the water flow channels between each set of electrode pairs.

  9. Means for limiting and ameliorating electrode shorting

    DOEpatents

    Van Konynenburg, Richard A. (Livermore, CA); Farmer, Joseph C. (Tracy, CA)

    1999-01-01

    A fuse and filter arrangement for limiting and ameliorating electrode shorting in capacitive deionization water purification systems utilizing carbon aerogel, for example. This arrangement limits and ameliorates the effects of conducting particles or debonded carbon aerogel in shorting the electrodes of a system such as a capacitive deionization water purification system. This is important because of the small interelectrode spacing and the finite possibility of debonding or fragmentation of carbon aerogel in a large system. The fuse and filter arrangement electrically protect the entire system from shutting down if a single pair of electrodes is shorted and mechanically prevents a conducting particle from migrating through the electrode stack, shorting a series of electrode pairs in sequence. It also limits the amount of energy released in a shorting event. The arrangement consists of a set of circuit breakers or fuses with one fuse or breaker in the power line connected to one electrode of each electrode pair and a set of screens of filters in the water flow channels between each set of electrode pairs.

  10. GRB 071227:. another Disguised Short Burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caito, L.; Bernardini, M. G.; Bianco, C. L.; Izzo, L.; Patricelli, B.; Ruffini, R.

    Observations of Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs) put forward in the recent years have revealed, with increasing evidence, that the historical classification between long and short bursts has to be revised. Within the Fireshell scenario, both short and long bursts are canonical bursts, consisting of two different phases. First, a Proper-GRB (P-GRB), that is the emission of photons at the transparency of the fireshell. Then, the Extended Afterglow, multiwavelength emission due to the interacion of the baryonic remnants of the fireshell with the CircumBurst Medium (CBM). We discriminate between long and short bursts by the amount of energy stored in the first phase with respect to the second one. Within the Fireshell scenario, we have introduced a third intermediate class: the disguised GRBs. They appear like short bursts, because their morphology is characterized by a first, short, hard episode and a following deflated tail, but this last part — coincident with the peak of the afterglow — is energetically predominant. The origin of this peculiar kind of sources is inferred to a very low average density of the environment (of the order of 10-3). After GRB 970228 and GRB 060614, we find in GRB 071227 a third example of disguised burst.

  11. The quiet short-haul research aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochrane, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    The design concepts, performance capabilities, and projected applications of the Quiet Short-Haul Research Aircraft (QSRA) are discussed. The propulsive lift system of the QSRA provides the lift required for short field operations at low community noise levels. This system consists of four high bipass ratio, geared turbofan engines mounted so that the engine exhaust flows across the upper surface of the wing (upper surface blowing). Large specially shaped flaps behind each engine control the direction of the flow for each phase of flight. A 95 passenger short haul transport based on this technology could operate out of a 2500 foot runway with a combined takeoff and landing 90 EPNdB footprint area of 2.7 sq mi.

  12. Correlation dynamics after short-pulse photoassociation

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Christiane P.; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2010-06-15

    Two atoms in an ultracold gas are correlated at short interatomic distances due to threshold effects in which the potential energy of their interaction dominates the kinetic energy. The correlations manifest themselves in a distinct nodal structure of the density matrix at short interatomic distances. Pump-probe spectroscopy has recently been suggested [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 260401 (2009)] to probe these pair correlations: A suitably chosen, short photoassociation laser pulse depletes the ground-state pair density within the photoassociation window, creating a nonstationary wave packet in the electronic ground state. The dynamics of this nonstationary wave packet is monitored by time-delayed probe and ionization pulses. Here we discuss how the choice of the pulse parameters affects the experimental feasibility of this pump-probe spectroscopy of two-body correlations.

  13. Short Gamma-Ray Bursts Are Different

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, J. P.; Scargle, J. D.; Bonnell, J. T.

    We analyze BATSE time-tagged event (TTE) data for short gamma-ray bursts (T 90 duration < 2.6 s), studying spectral lag vs. peak flux and duration, as well as the number of distinct pulse structures per burst. Performing the cross-correlation between two energy bands, we measure an average lag ˜ 20-40 x shorter than for long bursts, and a lag distribution close to symmetric about zero - unlike long bursts. Using a "Bayesian Block" method to identify significantly distinct pulse peaks, we find an order of magnitude fewer pulses than found in studies of long bursts. The disparity in lag magnitude is discontinuous across the ˜ 2-s valley between long and short bursts. Thus, short bursts do not appear to be representable as a continuation of long bursts' temporalc haracteristics.

  14. RF synchronized short pulse laser ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Iwashita, Yoshihisa; Tongu, Hiromu; Inoue, Shunsuke; Hashida, Masaki; Sakabe, Shuji; Okamura, Masahiro; Yamazaki, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    A laser ion source that produces shortly bunched ion beam is proposed. In this ion source, ions are extracted immediately after the generation of laser plasma by an ultra-short pulse laser before its diffusion. The ions can be injected into radio frequency (RF) accelerating bucket of a subsequent accelerator. As a proof-of-principle experiment of the ion source, a RF resonator is prepared and H2 gas was ionized by a short pulse laser in the RF electric field in the resonator. As a result, bunched ions with 1.2 mA peak current and 5 ns pulse length were observed at the exit of RF resonator by a probe.

  15. The origin of short-period comets

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, M.E.; Stagg, C.R. Calgary Univ. )

    1990-07-01

    If the observed number of short-period comets can be accounted for by a spherically symmetric model of the Oort cloud, in conjunction with an inner core of merely moderate central concentration, then the observed correlation between the ecliptic plane and the inclinations of Jupiter-family short-period comets may be seen as partly due to the calculated decrease in capture probability with inclination, and partly to the effects of cometary decay and observational selection. The implied constraint on the inner core becomes even more severe, if a hypothetical comet disk in the Uranus-Neptune zone either makes a significant contribution to the observed short-period comets or if these comets' mean lifetime is greater than 3000 years. 32 refs.

  16. Short Gamma-Ray Bursts Are Different

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, J. P.; Scargle, J. D.; Bonnell, J. T.

    2000-10-01

    We analyze the BATSE time-tagged event (TTE) data for short gamma-ray bursts (durations less than 2 s). We study spectral lag vs. peak flux and hardness ratio, finding an average lag timescale approximately 20 times shorter than that for long bursts. We also use an optimal ``Bayesian block" approach, based on a 1-D Voronoi tesselation method, to identify significantly distinct pulse peaks. Comparison with previous results for long bursts indicates that short bursts clearly have shorter fundamental timescales, and thus are not explicable as an extension of the pulse paradigm for long bursts by mere reduction in the number of pulses.

  17. Life prediction of short fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zago, Alessandro

    A procedure is described for estimating the fatigue lives (i.e. the number of cycles to failure) of parts made of short fiber reinforced thermoplastic matrix composites. First, S-N curves were generated at stress ratios of R = 0 and R = -1 for short glass fiber reinforced Copolyamide coupons with 0° (30% or 50% fiber content by weight), 45° (50% fiber content) and 90° (30% or 50% fiber content) fiber orientations. Second, these S-N curves were compared to data reported in the literature for a wide range of short glass and short carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastics materials. On the basis of these comparison, all available data were "collapsed" on two S-N curves, one for R = 0 and one for R = -l. The fatigue lives of short fiber reinforced thermoplastics were modeled by a Generalized Miner's Rule. Tests were conducted measuring the fatigue lives of 150 by 10 by 2 mm short glass fiber reinforced Copolyamide coupons under different types of cyclic loads. The fatigue lives measured in these tests were compared to those provided by the Generalized Miner's Rule, and good agreements were found between the test and model results. The fatigue lives of two different parts (made of short glass fiber reinforced Copolyamide) were then investigated. The first one was a 150 by 10 by 4 mm coupon with a 2 mm hole at the center. The second one was an automotive gear shift link. The fiber orientations and the stresses inside these parts were calculated, respectively, by the commercial softwares C-Mold and by ABAQUS. The fatigue lives under different cyclic loads were measured; they were also calculated by the Generalized Miner's Rule together with the results of C-Mold and ABAQUS and the S-N data generated in this study. Comparisons between the measured and estimated (by the model) fatigue lives are in reasonable agreement, indicating that the procedure employed is a useful tool for estimating the fatigue lives of parts made of short fiber reinforced thermoplastics.

  18. Heating Augmentation for Short Hypersonic Protuberances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazaheri, Alireza R.; Wood, William A.

    2008-01-01

    Computational aeroheating analyses of the Space Shuttle Orbiter plug repair models are validated against data collected in the Calspan University of Buffalo Research Center (CUBRC) 48 inch shock tunnel. The comparison shows that the average difference between computed heat transfer results and the data is about 9:5%. Using CFD and Wind Tunnel (WT) data, an empirical correlation for estimating heating augmentation on short hyper- sonic protuberances (k/delta < 0.33) is proposed. This proposed correlation is compared with several computed flight simulation cases and good agreement is achieved. Accordingly, this correlation is proposed for further investigation on other short hypersonic protuberances for estimating heating augmentation.

  19. Heating Augmentation for Short Hypersonic Protuberances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazaheri, Ali R.; Wood, William A.

    2008-01-01

    Computational aeroheating analyses of the Space Shuttle Orbiter plug repair models are validated against data collected in the Calspan University of Buffalo Research Center (CUBRC) 48 inch shock tunnel. The comparison shows that the average difference between computed heat transfer results and the data is about 9.5%. Using CFD and Wind Tunnel (WT) data, an empirical correlation for estimating heating augmentation on short hypersonic protuberances (k/delta less than 0.3) is proposed. This proposed correlation is compared with several computed flight simulation cases and good agreement is achieved. Accordingly, this correlation is proposed for further investigation on other short hypersonic protuberances for estimating heating augmentation.

  20. Theoretical models of synaptic short term plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Hennig, Matthias H.

    2013-01-01

    Short term plasticity is a highly abundant form of rapid, activity-dependent modulation of synaptic efficacy. A shared set of mechanisms can cause both depression and enhancement of the postsynaptic response at different synapses, with important consequences for information processing. Mathematical models have been extensively used to study the mechanisms and roles of short term plasticity. This review provides an overview of existing models and their biological basis, and of their main properties. Special attention will be given to slow processes such as calcium channel inactivation and the effect of activation of presynaptic autoreceptors. PMID:23626536

  1. Short-Range Structure of Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Higinbotham, Douglas W.

    2008-10-13

    The nucleons in a nucleus can form short-range correlated pairs. A recent Jefferson Lab electron scattering experiment, where a proton was knocked-out of the nucleus with high momentum transfer and high missing momentum, has shown that in {sup 12}C the neutron-proton pairs are nearly twenty times as prevalent as proton-proton pairs and, by inference, neutron-neutron pairs. This difference between the types of pairs has been shown to be due to the short-range tensor part of the nucleon-nucleon interaction.

  2. Catalysts for synthesizing various short chain hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Colmenares, Carlos

    1991-01-01

    Method and apparatus (10), including novel photocatalysts, are disclosed for the synthesis of various short chain hydrocarbons. Light-transparent SiO.sub.2 aerogels doped with photochemically active uranyl ions (18) are fluidized in a fluidized-bed reactor (12) having a transparent window (16), by hydrogen and CO, C.sub.2 H.sub.4 or C.sub.2 H.sub.6 gas mixtures (20), and exposed to radiation (34) from a light source (32) external to the reactor (12), to produce the short chain hydrocarbons (36).

  3. libgapmis: extending short-read alignments

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A wide variety of short-read alignment programmes have been published recently to tackle the problem of mapping millions of short reads to a reference genome, focusing on different aspects of the procedure such as time and memory efficiency, sensitivity, and accuracy. These tools allow for a small number of mismatches in the alignment; however, their ability to allow for gaps varies greatly, with many performing poorly or not allowing them at all. The seed-and-extend strategy is applied in most short-read alignment programmes. After aligning a substring of the reference sequence against the high-quality prefix of a short read--the seed--an important problem is to find the best possible alignment between a substring of the reference sequence succeeding and the remaining suffix of low quality of the read--extend. The fact that the reads are rather short and that the gap occurrence frequency observed in various studies is rather low suggest that aligning (parts of) those reads with a single gap is in fact desirable. Results In this article, we present libgapmis, a library for extending pairwise short-read alignments. Apart from the standard CPU version, it includes ultrafast SSE- and GPU-based implementations. libgapmis is based on an algorithm computing a modified version of the traditional dynamic-programming matrix for sequence alignment. Extensive experimental results demonstrate that the functions of the CPU version provided in this library accelerate the computations by a factor of 20 compared to other programmes. The analogous SSE- and GPU-based implementations accelerate the computations by a factor of 6 and 11, respectively, compared to the CPU version. The library also provides the user the flexibility to split the read into fragments, based on the observed gap occurrence frequency and the length of the read, thereby allowing for a variable, but bounded, number of gaps in the alignment. Conclusions We present libgapmis, a library for extending pairwise short-read alignments. We show that libgapmis is better-suited and more efficient than existing algorithms for this task. The importance of our contribution is underlined by the fact that the provided functions may be seamlessly integrated into any short-read alignment pipeline. The open-source code of libgapmis is available at http://www.exelixis-lab.org/gapmis. PMID:24564250

  4. The Long and the Short of It: The Use of Short Films in the German Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sundquist, John

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on the benefits of using short film in the German classroom at the secondary or post-secondary level. The article addresses a number of characteristics of short films that lend themselves well to the classroom, including their abbreviated length, artistic innovation, and compact storytelling. In addition to discussing specific…

  5. Short-Term Study Abroad, 2001: IIE's Complete Guide to Summer and Short-Term Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Sullivan, Marie, Ed.

    This guide, formerly called "Vacation Study Abroad," lists short-term educational programs of varying lengths from 1 week to several months. Offerings are for the winter and spring breaks, the summer, and other short-term intervals. Some 60% of these programs are sponsored by U.S. accredited colleges and universities. The guide also offers…

  6. Spanish: Familiarization and Short-Term Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arbelaez, Vicente; And Others

    The State Department's Foreign Service Institute short-term, intensive course in Spanish language and culture for government employees going to work in Spanish-speaking countries contains an introductory section and 38 lessons and 10 related audio cassettes intended as the basis for a ten-week program with an instructor. The lessons cover these…

  7. GSFC short pulse radar, JONSWAP-75

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, D. M.; Walton, W. T.; Eckerman, J.; Kutz, R. L.; Dombrowski, M.; Kalshoven, J. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    In September 1975, the Goddard Space Flight Center operated a short pulse radar during ocean wave measuring experiments off the coast of West Germany in the North Sea. The experiment was part of JONSWAP-75. The radar system and operations during the experiment are described along with examples of data.

  8. Reading Abilities and Strategies: A Short Introduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Feng

    2010-01-01

    This paper gives a short analysis of reading abilities and reading strategies. Much research has been done to investigate the nature of reading, though it's had to exactly define reading abilities and strategies. Different kinds of readings are discussed in this paper and distinctions are made between first language reading and second or foreign…

  9. 35-Flicks: Review of 35 Short Films.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Univ., Tempe. EPDA Inst. in Media and the Teaching of English.

    Comments about these short films, written by participants of the EPDA Institute in Media and the Teaching of English, include an abstract of the film's main points, a plot synopsis, appropriate age level of the audience, strengths and weakenesses of the film, possible unit themes or topics to be developed around the film, a list of books and…

  10. Teaching Trickster Figures in Short Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenna, John J.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the figure of the trickster, a character who lives by his or her own wits. Proposes getting students to the point of sympathetic understanding of the trickster is often not easy. Outlines three examples of the trickster in short fiction. (PM)

  11. Short-Term Play Therapy for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaduson, Heidi Gerard, Ed.; Schaefer, Charles E., Ed.

    Play therapy offers a powerful means of helping children resolve a wide range of psychological difficulties, and many play approaches are ideally suited to short-term work. This book brings together leading play therapists to share their expertise on facilitating children's healing in a shorter time frame. The book provides knowledge and skills…

  12. A Short History of Three Chemical Shifts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagaoka, Shin-ichi

    2007-01-01

    A short history of chemical shifts in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) and Mossbauer spectroscopy, which are useful for chemical studies, is described. The term chemical shift is shown to have originated in the mistaken assumption that nuclei of a given element would all undergo resonance at the…

  13. Truancy: Short and Long-Term Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Ken

    This book offers guidance on dealing with the problem of truancy and non-attendance. It provides examples of the latest ways that schools, teachers, education welfare officers, and local education authorities in the United Kingdom have worked to overcome their attendance problems, identifying 120 short-term solutions and several long-term…

  14. Short summary of multispectral imaging systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, P. N.

    1983-01-01

    This paper summarizes a survey of over 40 multispectral imaging systems that have been used during the past decade for earth resources studies from aircraft or spacecraft, or are presently in the proposal or design and development stage. In addition, some short wave infrared systems are described including a recent NASA suggestion for a research remote sensing system for the 1990's.

  15. Textbook Error: Short Circuiting on Electrochemical Cell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonicamp, Judith M.; Clark, Roy W.

    2007-01-01

    Short circuiting an electrochemical cell is an unreported but persistent error in the electrochemistry textbooks. It is suggested that diagrams depicting a cell delivering usable current to a load be postponed, the theory of open-circuit galvanic cells is explained, the voltages from the tables of standard reduction potentials is calculated and…

  16. A Short History of Three Chemical Shifts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagaoka, Shin-ichi

    2007-01-01

    A short history of chemical shifts in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) and Mossbauer spectroscopy, which are useful for chemical studies, is described. The term chemical shift is shown to have originated in the mistaken assumption that nuclei of a given element would all undergo resonance at the…

  17. Collis-Nissen gastroplasty for short oesophagus.

    PubMed

    Mattioli, Sandro; Lugaresi, Marialuisa; Ruffato, Alberto; Daddi, Niccolò; Di Simone, Massimo Pierluigi; Perrone, Ottorino; Brusori, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    The Collis-Nissen procedure is performed for the surgical treatment of 'true short oesophagus'. When this condition is strongly suspected radiologically, the patient is placed in the 45° left lateral position on the operating table with the left chest and arm lifted to perform a thoracostomy in the V-VI space, posterior to the axillary line. The hiatus is opened and the distal oesophagus is widely mobilized. With intraoperative endoscopy, the position of the oesophago-gastric junction in relationship to the hiatus is determined and the measurement of the length of the intra-abdominal oesophagus is performed to decide either to carry out a standard anti-reflux procedure or to lengthen the oesophagus. If the oesophagus is irreversibly short ('true short oesophagus'), the short gastric vessels are divided and the gastric fundus is mobilized. An endostapler is introduced into the left chest. The left thoracoscopic approach is suitable to control effectively the otherwise blind passage of the endostapler into the mediastinum and upper abdomen (if a second optic is not used). The tip of the stapler is clearly visible while 'walking' on the left diaphragm. The Collis gastroplasty is performed over a 46 Maloney bougie. A floppy Nissen fundoplication and the hiatoplasty complete the procedure. PMID:26585969

  18. On double reduction of short pulse equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Joseph Boon Zik; Fakhar, Kamran; Ahmad, Shamsuddin; Kara, Abdul Hamid

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, the association between the Lie symmetry and conservation law termed as `double reduction' has been employed to study the Short Pulse Equation (SPE), which describes the pulse propagation in optical fibers. Few reductions have been performed and appropriate conclusions are drawn.

  19. Teaching Hemingway's "The Short Happy Life."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stacy, Gerald

    2000-01-01

    Considers many ways to teach Hemingway's "The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber." Explores the ironic implications of Macomber's experience and compares it with the experience of Sammy in another initiation story, John Updike's "A&P." Describes how he leads the discussion about this story, and ends the discussion by reviewing what the students…

  20. 46 CFR 15.725 - Sailing short.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sailing short. 15.725 Section 15.725 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN MANNING REQUIREMENTS... personnel to man the vessel, the master or person in charge may proceed on the voyage, having determined...

  1. Metropolitan French: Familiarization & Short-Term Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iszkowski, Marie-Charlotte

    The U.S. Department of State's Foreign Service Institute French Familiarization and Short-Term (FAST) course for personnel working and living in France consists of 10 weeks of French language instruction combined with practical and cultural information. An introductory section outlines FAST course objectives and sample teaching techniques in…

  2. Improving Reproductive Performance: Long and Short Term

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improvements in reproductive performance for beef herds can be classified as short term (current year) or long term (lifetime production) and can be applied to and measured in individual animals or the entire herd. In other species, results show that rearing young animals under caloric restriction ...

  3. Aircraft concepts for advanced short haul systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galloway, T. L.

    1975-01-01

    The results of recent NASA-sponsored high-density and medium-density short-haul (less than 500 miles) air transportation systems studies are summarized. Trends in vehicle characteristics, in particular of RTOL and STOL concepts, are noted, and their economic suitability and impact on the community are examined.

  4. Nonperturbative short-range dynamics in TMDs

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Christian

    2013-05-01

    This presentation covers: deep inelastic processes and transverse momentum distributions; chiral symmetry breaking, including the physical picture, the dynamical model, and parton distributions; partonic structures, including transverse momentum distributions, coordinate space correlator, and short range correlations; and measurements of semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering, correlations, and multi-parton processes in pp interactions.

  5. Personality Characteristics of Long and Short Sleepers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Mervyn K.; Mooney, Dean K.

    1975-01-01

    The present study used a variety of personality tests to compare long- and short-sleeping college students and a stepwise multiple regression analysis in order to arrive at a pattern analysis and to include a test for the effect of possible repressor variables. (Author)

  6. Electricity and short wavelength radiation generator

    DOEpatents

    George, E.V.

    1985-08-26

    Methods and associated apparati for use of collisions of high energy atoms and ions of He, Ne, or Ar with themselves or with high energy neutrons to produce short wavelength radiation (lambda approx. = 840-1300 A) that may be utilized to produce cathode-anode currents or photovoltaic currents.

  7. Textbook Error: Short Circuiting on Electrochemical Cell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonicamp, Judith M.; Clark, Roy W.

    2007-01-01

    Short circuiting an electrochemical cell is an unreported but persistent error in the electrochemistry textbooks. It is suggested that diagrams depicting a cell delivering usable current to a load be postponed, the theory of open-circuit galvanic cells is explained, the voltages from the tables of standard reduction potentials is calculated and…

  8. Spanish: Familiarization and Short-Term Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arbelaez, Vicente; And Others

    The State Department's Foreign Service Institute short-term, intensive course in Spanish language and culture for government employees going to work in Spanish-speaking countries contains an introductory section and 38 lessons and 10 related audio cassettes intended as the basis for a ten-week program with an instructor. The lessons cover these…

  9. Blacks in Pop Music: A Short Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickelman, Melinda

    1991-01-01

    A short history of black pop music includes artists who have changed pop music or culture and highlights from the 1920s into the 1980s, from Fats Waller to Michael Jackson. In black pop music, there is a direct line of influence from the sharecropper to the current Top 40. (SLD)

  10. A hybrid short read mapping accelerator

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The rapid growth of short read datasets poses a new challenge to the short read mapping problem in terms of sensitivity and execution speed. Existing methods often use a restrictive error model for computing the alignments to improve speed, whereas more flexible error models are generally too slow for large-scale applications. A number of short read mapping software tools have been proposed. However, designs based on hardware are relatively rare. Field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) have been successfully used in a number of specific application areas, such as the DSP and communications domains due to their outstanding parallel data processing capabilities, making them a competitive platform to solve problems that are “inherently parallel”. Results We present a hybrid system for short read mapping utilizing both FPGA-based hardware and CPU-based software. The computation intensive alignment and the seed generation operations are mapped onto an FPGA. We present a computationally efficient, parallel block-wise alignment structure (Align Core) to approximate the conventional dynamic programming algorithm. The performance is compared to the multi-threaded CPU-based GASSST and BWA software implementations. For single-end alignment, our hybrid system achieves faster processing speed than GASSST (with a similar sensitivity) and BWA (with a higher sensitivity); for pair-end alignment, our design achieves a slightly worse sensitivity than that of BWA but has a higher processing speed. Conclusions This paper shows that our hybrid system can effectively accelerate the mapping of short reads to a reference genome based on the seed-and-extend approach. The performance comparison to the GASSST and BWA software implementations under different conditions shows that our hybrid design achieves a high degree of sensitivity and requires less overall execution time with only modest FPGA resource utilization. Our hybrid system design also shows that the performance bottleneck for the short read mapping problem can be changed from the alignment stage to the seed generation stage, which provides an additional requirement for the future development of short read aligners. PMID:23441908

  11. Heterogeneity in Short Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, Jay P.; Gehrels Neil; Scargle, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the Swift/BAT sample of short gamma-ray bursts, using an objective Bayesian Block procedure to extract temporal descriptors of the bursts' initial pulse complexes (IPCs). The sample comprises 12 and 41 bursts with and without extended emission (EE) components, respectively. IPCs of non-EE bursts are dominated by single pulse structures, while EE bursts tend to have two or more pulse structures. The medians of characteristic timescales - durations, pulse structure widths, and peak intervals - for EE bursts are factors of approx 2-3 longer than for non-EE bursts. A trend previously reported by Hakkila and colleagues unifying long and short bursts - the anti-correlation of pulse intensity and width - continues in the two short burst groups, with non-EE bursts extending to more intense, narrower pulses. In addition we find that preceding and succeeding pulse intensities are anti-correlated with pulse interval. We also examine the short burst X-ray afterglows as observed by the Swift/XRT. The median flux of the initial XRT detections for EE bursts (approx 6 X 10(exp -10) erg / sq cm/ s) is approx > 20 x brighter than for non-EE bursts, and the median X-ray afterglow duration for EE bursts (approx 60,000 s) is approx 30 x longer than for non-EE bursts. The tendency for EE bursts toward longer prompt-emission timescales and higher initial X-ray afterglow fluxes implies larger energy injections powering the afterglows. The longer-lasting X-ray afterglows of EE bursts may suggest that a significant fraction explode into more dense environments than non-EE bursts, or that the sometimes-dominant EE component efficiently p()wers the afterglow. Combined, these results favor different progenitors for EE and non-EE short bursts.

  12. HETEROGENEITY IN SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, Jay P.; Gehrels, Neil

    2011-07-01

    We analyze the Swift/BAT sample of short gamma-ray bursts, using an objective Bayesian Block procedure to extract temporal descriptors of the bursts' initial pulse complexes (IPCs). The sample is comprised of 12 and 41 bursts with and without extended emission (EE) components, respectively. IPCs of non-EE bursts are dominated by single pulse structures, while EE bursts tend to have two or more pulse structures. The medians of characteristic timescales-durations, pulse structure widths, and peak intervals-for EE bursts are factors of {approx}2-3 longer than for non-EE bursts. A trend previously reported by Hakkila and colleagues unifying long and short bursts-the anti-correlation of pulse intensity and width-continues in the two short burst groups, with non-EE bursts extending to more intense, narrower pulses. In addition, we find that preceding and succeeding pulse intensities are anti-correlated with pulse interval. We also examine the short burst X-ray afterglows as observed by the Swift/X-Ray Telescope (XRT). The median flux of the initial XRT detections for EE bursts ({approx}6x10{sup -10} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}) is {approx}>20x brighter than for non-EE bursts, and the median X-ray afterglow duration for EE bursts ({approx}60,000 s) is {approx}30x longer than for non-EE bursts. The tendency for EE bursts toward longer prompt-emission timescales and higher initial X-ray afterglow fluxes implies larger energy injections powering the afterglows. The longer-lasting X-ray afterglows of EE bursts may suggest that a significant fraction explode into denser environments than non-EE bursts, or that the sometimes-dominant EE component efficiently powers the afterglow. Combined, these results favor different progenitors for EE and non-EE short bursts.

  13. 19 CFR 357.102 - Short supply allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Short supply allowances. 357.102 Section 357.102 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE SHORT SUPPLY PROCEDURES § 357.102 Short supply allowances. (a) The Secretary will authorize a short supply allowance if: (1)...

  14. 19 CFR 357.102 - Short supply allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Short supply allowances. 357.102 Section 357.102 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE SHORT SUPPLY PROCEDURES § 357.102 Short supply allowances. (a) The Secretary will authorize a short supply allowance if: (1)...

  15. 19 CFR 357.102 - Short supply allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Short supply allowances. 357.102 Section 357.102 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE SHORT SUPPLY PROCEDURES § 357.102 Short supply allowances. (a) The Secretary will authorize a short supply allowance if: (1)...

  16. Transverse Effect due to Short-range Resistive Wall Wakefield

    SciTech Connect

    Juhao Wu; Alex Chao; Jean Delayen

    2007-06-18

    For accelerator designs with ultra short electron beams, beam dynamics study has to invoke the short-range wakefields. In this paper, we first obtain the short-range dipole mode resistive wall wakefield. Analytical approach is then developed to study the single bunch transverse beam dynamics due to this short-range resistive wall wake. The results are applied to the LCLS undulator.

  17. 19 CFR 207.27 - Short life cycle products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Short life cycle products. 207.27 Section 207.27... SUBSIDIZED EXPORTS TO THE UNITED STATES Final Determinations, Short Life Cycle Products § 207.27 Short life... short life cycle merchandise which has been the subject of two or more affirmative...

  18. 19 CFR 207.27 - Short life cycle products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Short life cycle products. 207.27 Section 207.27... SUBSIDIZED EXPORTS TO THE UNITED STATES Final Determinations, Short Life Cycle Products § 207.27 Short life... short life cycle merchandise which has been the subject of two or more affirmative...

  19. 19 CFR 207.27 - Short life cycle products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Short life cycle products. 207.27 Section 207.27... SUBSIDIZED EXPORTS TO THE UNITED STATES Final Determinations, Short Life Cycle Products § 207.27 Short life... short life cycle merchandise which has been the subject of two or more affirmative...

  20. 19 CFR 207.27 - Short life cycle products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Short life cycle products. 207.27 Section 207.27... SUBSIDIZED EXPORTS TO THE UNITED STATES Final Determinations, Short Life Cycle Products § 207.27 Short life... short life cycle merchandise which has been the subject of two or more affirmative...

  1. 19 CFR 207.27 - Short life cycle products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Short life cycle products. 207.27 Section 207.27... SUBSIDIZED EXPORTS TO THE UNITED STATES Final Determinations, Short Life Cycle Products § 207.27 Short life... short life cycle merchandise which has been the subject of two or more affirmative...

  2. Short-time diffusivity of dicolloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panczyk, Mark M.; Wagner, Norman J.; Furst, Eric M.

    2014-06-01

    The short-time diffusivity of dicolloid particles as a function of particle volume fraction ? from 0.01???0.6 is measured using diffusing wave spectroscopy. The diffusivities of symmetric and asymmetric dicolloids are compared with similarly sized spheres. The short-time diffusivity is independent of salt concentration and decreases with increasing volume fraction for both spheres and asymmetric dicolloids. Symmetric dicolloids have a higher diffusivity than spheres at similar volume fractions. This difference is accounted for by rescaling the dicolloid volume fraction based on the ratio of the random close-packing volume fractions of spheres and dicolloids. Finally, a useful method is provided for calculating the diffusivity of symmetric dicolloid particles of arbitrary aspect ratio based on the calculated hydrodynamic resistance of Zabarankin [Proc. R. Soc. A 463, 2329 (2007), 10.1098/rspa.2007.1872].

  3. Short-time diffusivity of dicolloids.

    PubMed

    Panczyk, Mark M; Wagner, Norman J; Furst, Eric M

    2014-06-01

    The short-time diffusivity of dicolloid particles as a function of particle volume fraction ? from 0.01 ? ? ? 0.6 is measured using diffusing wave spectroscopy. The diffusivities of symmetric and asymmetric dicolloids are compared with similarly sized spheres. The short-time diffusivity is independent of salt concentration and decreases with increasing volume fraction for both spheres and asymmetric dicolloids. Symmetric dicolloids have a higher diffusivity than spheres at similar volume fractions. This difference is accounted for by rescaling the dicolloid volume fraction based on the ratio of the random close-packing volume fractions of spheres and dicolloids. Finally, a useful method is provided for calculating the diffusivity of symmetric dicolloid particles of arbitrary aspect ratio based on the calculated hydrodynamic resistance of Zabarankin [Proc. R. Soc. A 463, 2329 (2007)]. PMID:25019780

  4. Ultimately short ballistic vertical graphene Josephson junctions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gil-Ho; Kim, Sol; Jhi, Seung-Hoon; Lee, Hu-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Much efforts have been made for the realization of hybrid Josephson junctions incorporating various materials for the fundamental studies of exotic physical phenomena as well as the applications to superconducting quantum devices. Nonetheless, the efforts have been hindered by the diffusive nature of the conducting channels and interfaces. To overcome the obstacles, we vertically sandwiched a cleaved graphene monoatomic layer as the normal-conducting spacer between superconducting electrodes. The atomically thin single-crystalline graphene layer serves as an ultimately short conducting channel, with highly transparent interfaces with superconductors. In particular, we show the strong Josephson coupling reaching the theoretical limit, the convex-shaped temperature dependence of the Josephson critical current and the exceptionally skewed phase dependence of the Josephson current; all demonstrate the bona fide short and ballistic Josephson nature. This vertical stacking scheme for extremely thin transparent spacers would open a new pathway for exploring the exotic coherence phenomena occurring on an atomic scale. PMID:25635386

  5. Ultimately short ballistic vertical graphene Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gil-Ho; Kim, Sol; Jhi, Seung-Hoon; Lee, Hu-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Much efforts have been made for the realization of hybrid Josephson junctions incorporating various materials for the fundamental studies of exotic physical phenomena as well as the applications to superconducting quantum devices. Nonetheless, the efforts have been hindered by the diffusive nature of the conducting channels and interfaces. To overcome the obstacles, we vertically sandwiched a cleaved graphene monoatomic layer as the normal-conducting spacer between superconducting electrodes. The atomically thin single-crystalline graphene layer serves as an ultimately short conducting channel, with highly transparent interfaces with superconductors. In particular, we show the strong Josephson coupling reaching the theoretical limit, the convex-shaped temperature dependence of the Josephson critical current and the exceptionally skewed phase dependence of the Josephson current; all demonstrate the bona fide short and ballistic Josephson nature. This vertical stacking scheme for extremely thin transparent spacers would open a new pathway for exploring the exotic coherence phenomena occurring on an atomic scale.

  6. Short time cycles of purely quantum refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmann, Tova; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2012-05-01

    Four stroke Otto refrigerator cycles with no classical analog are studied. Extremely short cycle times with respect to the internal timescale of the working medium characterize these refrigerators. Therefore, these cycles are termed sudden. The sudden cycles are characterized by the stable limit cycle, which is the invariant of the global cycle propagator. During their operation the states of the working medium possess significant coherence which is not erased in the equilibration segments due to the very short time allocated. This characteristic is reflected in a difference between the energy entropy and the Von Neumann entropy of the working medium. A classification scheme for sudden refrigerators is developed allowing simple approximations for the cooling power and coefficient of performance.

  7. Ultimately short ballistic vertical graphene Josephson junctions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gil-Ho; Kim, Sol; Jhi, Seung-Hoon; Lee, Hu-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Much efforts have been made for the realization of hybrid Josephson junctions incorporating various materials for the fundamental studies of exotic physical phenomena as well as the applications to superconducting quantum devices. Nonetheless, the efforts have been hindered by the diffusive nature of the conducting channels and interfaces. To overcome the obstacles, we vertically sandwiched a cleaved graphene monoatomic layer as the normal-conducting spacer between superconducting electrodes. The atomically thin single-crystalline graphene layer serves as an ultimately short conducting channel, with highly transparent interfaces with superconductors. In particular, we show the strong Josephson coupling reaching the theoretical limit, the convex-shaped temperature dependence of the Josephson critical current and the exceptionally skewed phase dependence of the Josephson current; all demonstrate the bona fide short and ballistic Josephson nature. This vertical stacking scheme for extremely thin transparent spacers would open a new pathway for exploring the exotic coherence phenomena occurring on an atomic scale. PMID:25635386

  8. Short-time dynamics of percolation observables

    SciTech Connect

    Wanzeller, Wanderson G.; Mendes, Tereza; Krein, Gastao

    2006-11-15

    We consider the critical short-time evolution of magnetic and droplet-percolation order parameters for the Ising model in two and three dimensions, through Monte Carlo simulations with the (local) heat-bath method. We find qualitatively different dynamic behaviors for the two types of order parameters. More precisely, we find that the percolation order parameter does not have a power-law behavior as encountered for the magnetization, but develops a scale (related to the relaxation time to equilibrium) in the Monte Carlo time. We argue that this difference is due to the difficulty in forming large clusters at the early stages of the evolution. Our results show that, although the descriptions in terms of magnetic and percolation order parameters may be equivalent in the equilibrium regime, greater care must be taken to interpret percolation observables at short times. In particular, this concerns the attempts to describe the dynamics of the deconfinement phase transition in QCD using cluster observables.

  9. Short Read Alignment Using SOAP2.

    PubMed

    Hurgobin, Bhavna

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have rapidly evolved in the last 5 years, leading to the generation of millions of short reads in a single run. Consequently, various sequence alignment algorithms have been developed to compare these reads to an appropriate reference in order to perform important downstream analysis. SOAP2 from the SOAP series is one of the most commonly used alignment programs to handle NGS data, and it efficiently does so using low computer memory usage and fast alignment speed. This chapter describes the protocol used to align short reads to a reference genome using SOAP2, and highlights the significance of using the in-built command-line options to tune the behavior of the algorithm according to the inputs and the desired results. PMID:26519410

  10. Skylab short-lived event alert program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Citron, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    During the three manned Skylab missions, the Center for Short-Lived Phenomena (CSLP) reported a total of 39 significant events to the Johnson Space Center (JSC) as part of the Skylab Short-Lived Event Alert Program. The telegraphed daily status reports included the names and locations of the events, the track number and revolution number during which the event could be observed, the time (GMT) to within plus or minus 2 sec when Skylab was closest to the event area, and the light condition (daylight or darkness) at that time and place. The messages sent to JSC during the Skylab 4 mission also included information pertaining to ground-truth studies and observations being conducted on the events. Photographic priorities were assigned for each event.

  11. Short pulse free electron laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Schlitt, Leland G. (Livermore, CA); Szoke, Abraham (Fremont, CA)

    1985-01-01

    Method and apparatus for amplification of a laser pulse in a free electron laser amplifier where the laser pulse duration may be a small fraction of the electron beam pulse duration used for amplification. An electron beam pulse is passed through a first wiggler magnet and a short laser pulse to be amplified is passed through the same wiggler so that only the energy of the last fraction, f, (f<1) of the electron beam pulse is consumed in amplifying the laser pulse. After suitable delay of the electron beam, the process is repeated in a second wiggler magnet, a third, . . . , where substantially the same fraction f of the remainder of the electron beam pulse is consumed in amplification of the given short laser pulse in each wiggler magnet region until the useful electron beam energy is substantially completely consumed by amplification of the laser pulse.

  12. Short wavelength striations on expanding plasma clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Winske, D.; Gary, S.P.

    1989-01-01

    The growth and evolution of short wavelength (

  13. Deformable mirror for short wavelength applications

    DOEpatents

    Chapman, Henry N. (2417 Kilkare Rd., Sunol, CA 94586); Sweeney, Donald W. (5020 Canyon Crest Dr., San Ramon, CA 94583)

    1999-01-01

    A deformable mirror compatible with short wavelength (extreme ultraviolet) radiation that can be precisely controlled to nanometer and subnanometer accuracy is described. Actuators are coupled between a reaction plate and a face plate which has a reflective coating. A control system adjusts the voltage supplied to the actuators; by coordinating the voltages supplied to the actuators, the reflective surface of the mirror can be deformed to correct for dimensional errors in the mirror or to produce a desired contour.

  14. Short cracks in piping and piping welds

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkowski, G.M.; Brust, F.; Francini, R.; Ghadiali, N.; Kilinski, T.; Krishnaswamy, P.; Landow, M.; Marschall, C.W.; Rahman, S.; Scott, P. )

    1992-09-01

    This is the third semiannual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Short Cracks in Piping and Piping Welds research program. This 4-year program began in March 1990. The overall objective of this program is to verify and improve fracture analyses for circumferentially cracked large-diameter nuclear piping with crack sizes typically used in leak-before-break analyses or inservice flaw evaluations.

  15. Source of coherent short wavelength radiation

    DOEpatents

    Villa, Francesco (Alameda, CA)

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus for producing coherent radiation ranging from X-rays to the far ultraviolet (i.e., 1 Kev to 10 eV) utilizing the Compton scattering effect. A photon beam from a laser is scattered on a high energy electron bunch from a pulse power linac. The short wavelength radiation produced by such scattering has sufficient intensity and spatial coherence for use in high resolution applications such as microscopy.

  16. Alchemy with short-lived radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Rubio, F.F.; Finn, R.D.; Gilson, A.J.

    1981-04-01

    A variety of short-lived radionuclides are produced and subsequently incorporated into radiopharmaceutical compounds in the radionuclide production program currently being conducted at the Cyclotron Facility of Mount Sinai Medical Center. The recovery of high specific activity oxygen-15 labelled water prepared by means of an inexpensive system operating in conjunction with an on-line radiogas target routinely utilized for oxygen-15 labelled carbon dioxide studies is currently receiving particular attention.

  17. Modeling and control parameters for GMAW, short-circuiting transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, G.E.; DeLapp, D.R.; Barnett, R.J.; Strauss, A.M.

    1996-12-31

    Digital signal processing was used to analyze the electrical arc signals of the gas metal arc welding process with short-circuiting transfer. Among the features extracted were arc voltage and current (both average and peak values), short-circuiting frequency, arc period, shorting period, and the ratio of the arcing to shorting period. Additionally , a Joule heating model was derived which accurately predicted the melt-back distance during each short. The short-circuiting frequency, the ratio of the arc period to short periods, and the melt-back distance were found to be good indicators for monitoring and control of stable arc conditions.

  18. Ultra-short silicon MMI duplexer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Huaxiang; Huang, Yawen; Wang, Xingjun; Zhou, Zhiping

    2012-11-01

    The fiber-to-the-home (FTTH) systems are growing fast these days, where two different wavelengths are used for upstream and downstream traffic, typically 1310nm and 1490nm. The duplexers are the key elements to separate these wavelengths into different path in central offices (CO) and optical network unit (ONU) in passive optical network (PON). Multimode interference (MMI) has some benefits to be a duplexer including large fabrication tolerance, low-temperature dependence, and low-polarization dependence, but its size is too large to integrate in conventional case. Based on the silicon photonics platform, ultra-short silicon MMI duplexer was demonstrated to separate the 1310nm and 1490nm lights. By studying the theory of self-image phenomena in MMI, the first order images are adopted in order to keep the device short. A cascaded MMI structure was investigated to implement the wavelength splitting, where both the light of 1310nm and 1490nm was input from the same port, and the 1490nm light was coupling cross the first MMI and output at the cross-port in the device while the 1310nm light was coupling through the first and second MMI and output at the bar-port in the device. The experiment was carried on with the SOI wafer of 340nm top silicon. The cascaded MMI was investigated to fold the length of the duplexer as short as 117μm with the extinct ratio over 10dB.

  19. Short gamma-ray bursts: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Avanzo, P.

    2015-09-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are rapid, bright flashes of radiation peaking in the gamma-ray band occurring at an average rate of one event per day at cosmological distances. They are characterized by a collimated relativistic outflow pushing through the interstellar medium shining in gamma-rays powered by a central engine. This prompt phase is followed by a fading afterglow emission at longer wavelength, powered in part by the expanding outflow, and in part by continuous energy injection by the central engine. The observed evidences of supernovae associated to long GRBs (those with a duration of the gamma-ray emission > 2 s) brought to a general consensus on indicating the core collapse of massive stars as the progenitor of these events. Following the most accredited model, short GRBs (the events with a duration of the gamma-ray emission ? 2 s) originate from the coalescence of compact binary systems (two neutron stars or neutron star-black hole systems). This paper presents a review of the observational properties of short GRBs and shows how the study of these properties can be used as a tool to unveil their elusive progenitors and provide information on the nature of the central engine powering the observed emission. The increasing evidence for compact object binary progenitors makes short GRBs one of the most promising sources of gravitational waves for the forthcoming Advanced LIGO/Virgo experiments.

  20. Management of patients with a short bowel

    PubMed Central

    Nightingale, Jeremy M D

    2001-01-01

    There are two common types of adult patient with a short bowel, those with jejunum in continuity with a functioning colon and those with a jejunostomy. Both groups have potential problems of undernutrition, but this is a greater problem in those without a colon, as they do not derive energy from anaerobic bacterial fermentation of carbohydrate to short chain fatty acids in the colon. Patients with a jejunostomy have major problems of dehydration, sodium and magnesium depletion all due to a large volume of stomal output. Both types of patient have lost at least 60 cm of terminal ileum and so will become deficient of vitamin B12. Both groups have a high prevalence of gallstones (45%) resulting from periods of biliary stasis. Patients with a retained colon have a 25% chance of developing calcium oxalate renal stones and they may have problems with D (-) lactic acidosis. The survival of patients with a short bowel, even if they need long-term parenteral nutrition, is good. PMID:11819867

  1. Study of quiet turbofan STOL aircraft for short haul transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higgins, T. P.; Stout, E. G.; Sweet, H. S.

    1973-01-01

    A study of quiet turbofan short takeoff aircraft for short haul air transportation was conducted. The objectives of the study were to: (1) define representative aircraft configurations, characteristics, and costs associated with their development, (2) identify critical technology and technology related problems to be resolved in successful introduction of representative short haul aircraft, (3) determine relationships between quiet short takeoff aircraft and the economic and social viability of short haul, and (4) identify high payoff technology areas.

  2. Microbial production of short-chain alkanes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yong Jun; Lee, Sang Yup

    2013-10-24

    Increasing concerns about limited fossil fuels and global environmental problems have focused attention on the need to develop sustainable biofuels from renewable resources. Although microbial production of diesel has been reported, production of another much in demand transport fuel, petrol (gasoline), has not yet been demonstrated. Here we report the development of platform Escherichia coli strains that are capable of producing short-chain alkanes (SCAs; petrol), free fatty acids (FFAs), fatty esters and fatty alcohols through the fatty acyl (acyl carrier protein (ACP)) to fatty acid to fatty acyl-CoA pathway. First, the ?-oxidation pathway was blocked by deleting the fadE gene to prevent the degradation of fatty acyl-CoAs generated in vivo. To increase the formation of short-chain fatty acids suitable for subsequent conversion to SCAs in vivo, the activity of 3-oxoacyl-ACP synthase (FabH), which is inhibited by unsaturated fatty acyl-ACPs, was enhanced to promote the initiation of fatty acid biosynthesis by deleting the fadR gene; deletion of the fadR gene prevents upregulation of the fabA and fabB genes responsible for unsaturated fatty acids biosynthesis. A modified thioesterase was used to convert short-chain fatty acyl-ACPs to the corresponding FFAs, which were then converted to SCAs by the sequential reactions of E. coli fatty acyl-CoA synthetase, Clostridium acetobutylicum fatty acyl-CoA reductase and Arabidopsis thaliana fatty aldehyde decarbonylase. The final engineered strain produced up to 580.8?mg?l(-1) of SCAs consisting of nonane (327.8?mg?l(-1)), dodecane (136.5?mg?l(-1)), tridecane (64.8?mg?l(-1)), 2-methyl-dodecane (42.8?mg?l(-1)) and tetradecane (8.9?mg?l(-1)), together with small amounts of other hydrocarbons. Furthermore, this platform strain could produce short-chain FFAs using a fadD-deleted strain, and short-chain fatty esters by introducing the Acinetobacter sp. ADP1 wax ester synthase (atfA) and the E. coli mutant alcohol dehydrogenase (adhE(mut)). PMID:24077097

  3. Stretching short DNA tethers using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reihani, Nader; Bosanac, Lana; Hansen, Thomas M.; Oddershede, Lene B.

    2006-08-01

    With the evolution of single molecule techniques as force-scope optical tweezers, it has become possible to perform very accurate measurements of the elastic properties of biopolymers as e.g. DNA. Nucleic acid elasticity is important in the interaction of these molecules with proteins and protein complexes in the living cell. Most experimental and theoretical effort has been aimed at uncovering and understanding of the behavior of polymers with contour lengths significantly longer than their persistence length. The well-established Worm-Like-Chain model has been modified such that a satisfactory description of such long biopolymers is available. However, in many single molecule experiments, such as the unfolding of RNA stem-loops1 and RNA pseudoknots,2 one is dealing with biopolymers whose contour lengths are comparable to persistence lengths. A full understanding of such curves requires an understanding of the physics of short biopolymers. For such cases, theories are just beginning to emerge and there is hardly any experimental data available. We target this problem by optical tweezers quantitative force-extension measurements on short biopolymers. The biopolymers used are primarily double stranded DNA whose total length ( 300 nm) is comparable to their persistence length ( 50 nm). As a control of our equipment and methods, we also stretch longer dsDNA (1100 nm), the force-extension curves of which resemble those in literature. 3 For the short DNA the force-extension curves qualitatively resemble those predicted by WLC theories, but a reasonable fit can only be made if the persistence length is allowed to be a fitting parameter. If made a fitting parameter, the 'apparent persistence length' is found as 8.7+/-4 nm, a number which is significantly lower than the real physical value.

  4. Short-term energy outlook: Quarterly projections

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) quarterly estimates of short-term energy supply, demand, and prices are revised in January, April, July, and October for publication in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). This issue of the Outlook is a substitute for the third-quarter 1990 issue of the Outlook and incorporates the latest effects on world oil markets from the events in the Persian Gulf. The principal users of the Outlook are managers and energy analysts in private industry and government. The projections in this volume extend through the fourth quarter of 1991. The scenarios are produced using the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS). The STIFS model is driven principally by the following sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, a particular set of world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are produced by DRI/McGraw-Hill, but are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy produce prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook. (The EIA model is available on computer tape from the National Technical Information Service.) The estimates and historical data are based on EIA data published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in those publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. All percentage changes are calculated from the values in the tables rather than from any rounded numbers cited in the text. 4 refs., 1 fig., 10 tabs.

  5. Dissipation regimes for short wind waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulliez, Guillemette

    2013-02-01

    The dissipation processes affecting short wind waves of centimeter and decimeter scales are investigated experimentally in laboratory. The processes include damping due to molecular viscosity, generation of capillary waves, microbreaking, and breaking. The observations were made in a large wind wave tank for a wide range of fetches and winds, using a laser sheet and a high-resolution video camera. The work aims at constructing a comprehensive picture of dissipative processes in the short wind wave field, to find for which scales particular dissipative mechanism may become important. Four distinct regimes have been identified. For capillary-gravity wave fields, i.e., for dominant waves with scales below 4 cm, viscous damping is found to be the main dissipation mechanism. The gravity-capillary wave fields with dominant wavelength less than 10 cm usually exhibit a train of capillary ripples at the crest wavefront, but no wave breaking. For such waves, the main dissipation process is molecular viscosity occurring through nonlinear energy cascade toward high-frequency motions. Microscale breaking takes place for waves longer than 10 cm and manifests itself in a very localized surface disruption on the forward face of the crest. Such events generate turbulent motions in water and thus enhance wave dissipation. Plunging breaking, characterized by formation of a crest bulge, a microjet hitting the water surface and a splash-up, occurs for short gravity waves of wavelength exceeding 20 cm. Macroscale spilling breaking is also observed for longer waves at high winds. In both cases, the direct momentum transfer from breaking waves to the water flow contributes significantly to wave damping.

  6. Failure Prevention by Short Time Corrosion Tests

    SciTech Connect

    MICKALONIS, JOHN

    2005-05-01

    Short time corrosion testing of perforated sheets and wire meshes fabricated from Type 304L stainless steel, Alloy 600 and C276 showed that 304L stainless steel perforated sheet should perform well as the material of construction for dissolver baskets. The baskets will be exposed to hot nitric acid solutions and are limited life components. The corrosion rates of the other alloys and of wire meshes were too high for useful extended service. Test results also indicated that corrosion of the dissolver should drop quickly during the dissolutions due to the inhibiting effects of the corrosion products produced by the dissolution processes.

  7. Electrical characteristics of a short RFQ resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Jain, A.; Wang, H. . Dept. of Physics); Lombardi, A. . Lab. Nazionale di Legnaro)

    1990-01-01

    Electrical characteristics of a short RFQ resonator of the four rod'' type have been studied by carrying out measurements on models and numerical simulations using the MAFIA codes. An empirical formula is obtained for the capacitance of vane-like electrodes in a four-rod RFQ resonator. It is shown that the electrode supports could account for a significant part of the total capacitance. This additional capacitance may change the circuit symmetry and give rise to a dipole component. This effect can be compensated by appropriate modifications of the support structure. The beam offset due to a dipole component is estimated. 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Modulation compression for short wavelength harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.

    2010-01-11

    Laser modulator is used to seed free electron lasers. In this paper, we propose a scheme to compress the initial laser modulation in the longitudinal phase space by using two opposite sign bunch compressors and two opposite sign energy chirpers. This scheme could potentially reduce the initial modulation wavelength by a factor of C and increase the energy modulation amplitude by a factor of C, where C is the compression factor of the first bunch compressor. Such a compressed energy modulation can be directly used to generate short wavelength current modulation with a large bunching factor.

  9. The Fermilab short-baseline neutrino program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camilleri, Leslie

    2015-10-01

    The Fermilab short-baseline program is a multi-facetted one. Primarily it searches for evidence of sterile neutrinos as hinted at by the MiniBooNE and LSND results. It will also measure a whole suite of ν-Argon cross sections which will be very useful in future liquid argon long-baseline projects. The program is based on MicroBooNE, already installed in the beam line, the recently approved LAr1-ND and the future addition of the refurbished ICARUS.

  10. Short wavelength ion temperature gradient turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, J.; Ganesh, R.; Brunner, S.; Lapillonne, X.; Villard, L.; Jenko, F.

    2012-10-15

    The ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode in the high wavenumber regime (k{sub y}{rho}{sub s}>1), referred to as short wavelength ion temperature gradient mode (SWITG) is studied using the nonlinear gyrokinetic electromagnetic code GENE. It is shown that, although the SWITG mode may be linearly more unstable than the standard long wavelength (k{sub y}{rho}{sub s}<1) ITG mode, nonlinearly its contribution to the total thermal ion heat transport is found to be low. We interpret this as resulting from an increased zonal flow shearing effect on the SWITG mode suppression.

  11. Analysis of short-rotation willow

    SciTech Connect

    Raunonaa, T.; Samela, J.; Kantele, O.; Reponen, A.

    1986-01-01

    The applicability of the proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) method to determination of the elemental composition of short-rotation willow is studied. The analysis samples were taken as a time series from different willow stands. The concentrations of 15 elements between aluminum and lead were determined, and the implications of certain correlations between two distinct groups of elements are considered. The elemental composition of gases from willow combustion was also tentatively measured by PIXE. Nutrient dynamics and growth of willow seedlings were in addition studied by this technique and a simple simulation model was developed to depict the nutrient dynamics in willow leaves.

  12. Short rise time intense electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Olson, C.L.

    1984-03-16

    A generator for producing an intense relativisitc electron beam having a subnanosecond current rise time includes a conventional generator of intense relativistic electrons feeding into a short electrically conductive drift tube including a cavity containing a working gas at a low enough pressure to prevent the input beam from significantly ionizing the working gas. Ionizing means such as a laser simultaneously ionize the entire volume of working gas in the cavity to generate an output beam having a rise time less than one nanosecond.

  13. Short rise time intense electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Craig L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1987-01-01

    A generator for producing an intense relativistic electron beam having a subnanosecond current rise time includes a conventional generator of intense relativistic electrons feeding into a short electrically conductive drift tube including a cavity containing a working gas at a low enough pressure to prevent the input beam from significantly ionizing the working gas. Ionizing means such as a laser simultaneously ionize the entire volume of working gas in the cavity to generate an output beam having a rise time less than one nanosecond.

  14. An Ultra-Short Pulsed Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomerantz, Ishay; McCary, Eddie; Meadows, Alexander R.; Arefiev, Alexey; Bernstein, Aaron C.; Chester, Clay; Cortez, Jose; Donovan, Michael E.; Dyer, Gilliss; Gaul, Erhard W.; Hamilton, David; Kuk, Donghoon; Lestrade, Arantxa; Wang, Chunhua; Ditmire, Todd; Hegelich, Manuel B.

    2014-10-01

    We report on a novel compact laser-driven neutron source with unprecedented short pulse duration (<50 ps) and high flux (>1018 neutrons/cm2/s), an order of magnitude higher than any existing source. In our experiments, high-energy electron jets are generated from thin (<1 ?m) plastic targets irradiated by a petawatt laser. These intense electron beams are employed to generate neutrons from a metal converter. Our method opens venues for enhancing neutron radiography contrast, conducting time-resolved neutron-damage studies at their characteristic evolution time-scales and for creating astrophysical conditions of heavy element synthesis in the laboratory.

  15. Short-cavity squeezing in barium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hope, D. M.; Bachor, H-A.; Manson, P. J.; Mcclelland, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    Broadband phase sensitive noise and squeezing were experimentally observed in a system of barium atoms interacting with a single mode of a short optical cavity. Squeezing of 13 +/- 3 percent was observed. A maximum possible squeezing of 45 +/- 8 percent could be inferred for out experimental conditions, after correction for measured loss factors. Noise reductions below the quantum limit were found over a range of detection frequencies 60-170 MHz and were best for high cavity transmission and large optical depths. The amount of squeezing observed is consistent with theoretical predictions from a full quantum statistical model of the system.

  16. Longitudinal Diagnostics for Short Electron Beam Bunches

    SciTech Connect

    Loos, H.; ,

    2010-06-11

    Single-pass free electron lasers require high peak currents from ultra-short electron bunches to reach saturation and an accurate measurement of bunch length and longitudinal bunch profile is necessary to control the bunch compression process from low to high beam energy. The various state-of-the-art diagnostics methods from ps to fs time scales using coherent radiation detection, RF deflection, and other techniques are presented. The use of linear accelerators as drivers for free electron lasers (FEL) and the advent of single-pass (SASE) FELs has driven the development of a wide range of diagnostic techniques for measuring the length and longitudinal distribution of short and ultra-short electron bunches. For SASE FELs the radiation power and the length of the undulator needed to achieve saturation depend strongly on the charge density of the electron beam. In the case of X-ray FELs, this requires the accelerator to produce ultra-high brightness beams with micron size transverse normalized emittances and peak currents of several kA through several stages of magnetic bunch compression. Different longitudinal diagnostics are employed to measure the peak current and bunch profile along these stages. The measurement techniques can be distinguished into different classes. Coherent methods detect the light emitted from the beam by some coherent radiation process (spectroscopic measurement), or directly measure the Coulomb field traveling with the beam (electro-optic). Phase space manipulation techniques map the time coordinate onto a transverse dimension and then use conventional transverse beam diagnostics (transverse deflector, rf zero-phasing). Further methods measure the profile or duration of an incoherent light pulse emitted by the bunch at wavelengths much shorted than the bunch length (streak camera, fluctuation technique) or modulate the electron beam at an optical wavelength and then generate a narrow bandwidth radiation pulse with the longitudinal profile of the beam mapped onto (optical replicator). The operational needs for bunch length measurements to have fast acquisitions, to be used in feedback systems, to distinguish pulse to pulse changes and to be nondestructive or parasitically have resulted into developing many of the diagnostics into single-shot techniques and in the following the main discussion will emphasize them.

  17. Short Bowel Syndrome in the Nicu

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Sachin C.; Pappas, Cleo; Iyengar, Hari

    2013-01-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is the most common cause of intestinal failure in infants. In neonates and young infants, necrotizing enterocolitis, gastroschisis, intestinal atresia and intestinal malrotation/volvulus are the leading causes of SBS. Following an acute post-surgical phase, the residual gastrointestinal tract adapts with reorganization of the crypt-villus histoarchitecture and functional changes in nutrient absorption and motility. A cohesive, multidisciplinary approach can allow most neonates with SBS to transition to full enteral feeds and achieve normal growth and development. In this article, we review the clinical features, management, complications, and prognostic factors in SBS. PMID:23415263

  18. A Variable Diameter Short Haul Civil Tiltrotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, James M.; Jones, Christopher T.; Nixon, Mark W.

    1999-01-01

    The Short-Haul-Civil-tiltrotor (SHCT) component of the NASA Aviation System Capacity Program is an effort to develop the technologies needed for a potential 40-passenger civil tiltrotor. The variable diameter tiltrotor (VDTR) is a Sikorsky concept aimed at improving tiltrotor hover and cruise performance currently limited by disk loading that is much higher in hover than conventional helicopter, and much lower in cruise than turbo-prop systems. This paper describes the technical merits of using a VDTR on a SHCT aircraft. The focus will be the rotor design.

  19. Short wavelength ion temperature gradient turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, J.; Brunner, S.; Ganesh, R.; Lapillonne, X.; Villard, L.; Jenko, F.

    2012-10-01

    The ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode in the high wavenumber regime (ky?s>1), referred to as short wavelength ion temperature gradient mode (SWITG) is studied using the nonlinear gyrokinetic electromagnetic code GENE. It is shown that, although the SWITG mode may be linearly more unstable than the standard long wavelength (ky?s<1) ITG mode, nonlinearly its contribution to the total thermal ion heat transport is found to be low. We interpret this as resulting from an increased zonal flow shearing effect on the SWITG mode suppression.

  20. Thomson scattering in short pulse laser experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, E. G.; Rose, S. J.

    2012-08-15

    Thomson scattering is well used as a diagnostic in many areas of high energy density physics. In this paper, we quantitatively demonstrate the practicality of using Thomson scattering as a diagnostic of short-pulse laser-plasma experiments in the regime, where the plasmas probed are at solid density and have temperatures of many hundreds of eV using a backlighter produced with an optical laser. This method allows a diagnosis both spatially and temporally of the density and temperature distributions in high energy density laser-plasma interactions which is independent from, and would act as a useful complement to, the existing spectroscopic methods.

  1. The short-range resistive wall wakefields

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.L.F.; Sands, M.

    1995-12-01

    In an accelerator when the bunch length becomes comparable to a characteristic distance s{sub 0}, one which depends on the radius and the conductivity of the beam tube and in typical structures is on the order of tens of microns, the usual formulas for the resistive wall wakefield do not apply. In this report the authors derive the short-range resistive wall wakefields of an ultra-relativistic point particle in a metallic, cylindrical tube, both for a model in which the wall conductivity is taken to be independent of frequency and for one in which a frequency dependence is included. On this scale the wakefield is found to be dominated by a damped, high frequency resonator component. For the case of constant conductivity the resonant frequency is given by {omega} = {radical}(3 c/s{sub 0}) and the Q-factor equals {radical}(3/2). They provide a physical model to explain these results. For the case of a frequency dependent conductivity the resonator parameters depend also on the relaxation time of the metal {tau}. For c{tau}/s{sub 0} {approx_gt} 0.5 the frequency {omega} {approx} {radical}(2{omega}{sub p}c/b), with {omega}{sub p} the plasma frequency of the free electrons in the metal and b the tube radius, and the 1/e damping time becomes 4{tau}. Finally, they calculate the wakefield and loss factor of a short Gaussian bunch.

  2. Short Term Exogenic Climate Change Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krahenbuhl, Daniel

    Several short term exogenic forcings affecting Earth's climate are but recently identified. Lunar nutation periodicity has implications for numerical meteorological prediction. Abrupt shifts in solar wind bulk velocity, particle density, and polarity exhibit correlation with terrestrial hemispheric vorticity changes, cyclonic strengthening and the intensification of baroclinic disturbances. Galactic Cosmic ray induced tropospheric ionization modifies cloud microphysics, and modulates the global electric circuit. This dissertation is constructed around three research questions: (1): What are the biweekly declination effects of lunar gravitation upon the troposphere? (2): How do United States severe weather reports correlate with heliospheric current sheet crossings? and (3): How does cloud cover spatially and temporally vary with galactic cosmic rays? Study 1 findings show spatial consistency concerning lunar declination extremes upon Rossby longwaves. Due to the influence of Rossby longwaves on synoptic scale circulation, our results could theoretically extend numerical meteorological forecasting. Study 2 results indicate a preference for violent tornadoes to occur prior to a HCS crossing. Violent tornadoes (EF3+) are 10% more probable to occur near, and 4% less probable immediately after a HCS crossing. The distribution of hail and damaging wind reports do not mirror this pattern. Polarity is critical for the effect. Study 3 results confirm anticorrelation between solar flux and low-level marine-layer cloud cover, but indicate substantial regional variability between cloud cover altitude and GCRs. Ultimately, this dissertation serves to extend short term meteorological forecasting, enhance climatological modeling and through analysis of severe violent weather and heliospheric events, protect property and save lives.

  3. Acoustics of a short strombolian eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sesterhenn, Jörn; Pena Fernandez, Juan Jose

    2014-05-01

    Many Strombolian eruptions are characterized by relatively short but intense blasts. The acoustic properties of such eruptions are totally different from the volcanic jets with longer duration because of different physical phenomena generating the sound. The dominant feature responsible for the emanated sound is a front vortex ring which interacts with the emerging shock wave pattern. The strength of both depends strongly on the initial overpressure. The interaction between the high vorticity region of the vortex ring, the emerging shockwaves and the shear layer, make the eddies from the shear layer detach from the supersonic region into the subsonic one, emanating high amplitude pressure perturbations predominantly in a specific direction. The amplitude is observed to reach up to 160 dB during a short period of time. Direct Numerical Simulations of a supersonic impulsively starting jet are performed, analyzing the main structures present in the flow field that lead to the phenomena described. Unterstanding the relationship between sound wave patterns and vortex strenght will help to find out the overpressure that generated the specific eruption. The results will also be applicable to eruptions which develop into a steady blowing jet.

  4. Short cracks in piping and piping welds

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkowski, G.M.; Brust, F.; Francini, R.; Ghadiali, N.; Kilinski, T.; Krishnaswamy, P.; Landow, M.; Marschall, C.W.; Rahman, S.; Scott, P. )

    1992-04-01

    This is the second semiannual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Short Cracks in Piping and Piping Welds research program. The program began in March 1990 and will extend for 4 years. The intent of this program is to verify and improve fracture analyses for circumferentially cracked large-diameter nuclear piping with crack sizes typically used in leak-before-break analyses or in-service flaw evaluations. Only quasi-static loading rates are evaluated since the NRC's International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG) program is evaluating the effects of seismic loading rates on cracked piping systems. Progress for through-wall-cracked pipe involved (1) conducting a 28-inch diameter stainless steel SAW and 4-inch diameter French TP316 experiments, (2) conducting a matrix of FEM analyses to determine GE/EPRI functions for short TWC pipe, (3) comparison of uncracked pipe maximum moments to various analyses and FEM solutions, (4) development of a J-estimation scheme that includes the strength of both the weld and base metals. Progress for surface-cracked pipe involved (1) conducting two experiments on 6-inch diameter pipe with d/t = 0.5 and {Theta}/{pi} = 0.25 cracks, (2) comparisons of the pipe experiments to Net-Section-Collapse predictions, and (3) modification of the SC.TNP and SC.TKP J-estimation schemes to include external surface cracks.

  5. Evaluation of short read metagenomic assembly

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Metagenomic assembly is a challenging problem due to the presence of genetic material from multiple organisms. The problem becomes even more difficult when short reads produced by next generation sequencing technologies are used. Although whole genome assemblers are not designed to assemble metagenomic samples, they are being used for metagenomics due to the lack of assemblers capable of dealing with metagenomic samples. We present an evaluation of assembly of simulated short-read metagenomic samples using a state-of-art de Bruijn graph based assembler. Results We assembled simulated metagenomic reads from datasets of various complexities using a state-of-art de Bruijn graph based parallel assembler. We have also studied the effect of k-mer size used in de Bruijn graph on metagenomic assembly and developed a clustering solution to pool the contigs obtained from different assembly runs, which allowed us to obtain longer contigs. We have also assessed the degree of chimericity of the assembled contigs using an entropy/impurity metric and compared the metagenomic assemblies to assemblies of isolated individual source genomes. Conclusions Our results show that accuracy of the assembled contigs was better than expected for the metagenomic samples with a few dominant organisms and was especially poor in samples containing many closely related strains. Clustering contigs from different k-mer parameter of the de Bruijn graph allowed us to obtain longer contigs, however the clustering resulted in accumulation of erroneous contigs thus increasing the error rate in clustered contigs. PMID:21989307

  6. Short-term energy outlook, July 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares The Short-Term Energy Outlook (energy supply, demand, and price projections) monthly for distribution on the internet at: www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/steo/pub/contents.html. In addition, printed versions of the report are available to subscribers in January, April, July and October. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from July 1998 through December 1999. Values for second quarter of 1998 data, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the July 1998 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. 28 figs., 19 tabs.

  7. Short hyperdynamic profiles influence primate temperature regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. A.; Williams, B. A.

    1982-01-01

    Primates have been shown to be sensitive to hyperdynamic fields. That is, when exposed to + 2Gz, body temperature falls. The purpose of this study was to examine the relative sensitivity of these animals to short centrifugation profiles which mimic the gravitational envelope seen on the Space Shuttle during launch (8 minutes, 2.9 Gz max) and re-entry (19 min, 1.7 Gz max). Four loosely restrained squirrel monkeys, isolated from additional external stimuli, were exposed to these profiles. During launch simulation, the temperatures never fell markedly below control levels. However, subsequent to return to 1G, the recovery phase showed decreases in body temperature in all four animals averaging 0.4 C over the next 10 to 15 minutes. The two animals exposed to the reentry profile showed decreases in body temperature within five minutes of the onset of centrifugation. Maximum fall in body temperature was reached by the end of the centrifugation phase and averaged 0.7 C. Thus, the temperature regulation system of this primate is sensitive to short hyperdynamic field exposures.

  8. Hurst exponents for short time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Jingchao; Yang, Huijie

    2011-12-01

    A concept called balanced estimator of diffusion entropy is proposed to detect quantitatively scalings in short time series. The effectiveness is verified by detecting successfully scaling properties for a large number of artificial fractional Brownian motions. Calculations show that this method can give reliable scalings for short time series with length ˜102. It is also used to detect scalings in the Shanghai Stock Index, five stock catalogs, and a total of 134 stocks collected from the Shanghai Stock Exchange Market. The scaling exponent for each catalog is significantly larger compared with that for the stocks included in the catalog. Selecting a window with size 650, the evolution of scaling for the Shanghai Stock Index is obtained by the window's sliding along the series. Global patterns in the evolutionary process are captured from the smoothed evolutionary curve. By comparing the patterns with the important event list in the history of the considered stock market, the evolution of scaling is matched with the stock index series. We can find that the important events fit very well with global transitions of the scaling behaviors.

  9. SHORT-WAVELENGTH MAGNETIC BUOYANCY INSTABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Mizerski, K. A.; Davies, C. R.; Hughes, D. W. E-mail: tina@maths.leeds.ac.uk

    2013-04-01

    Magnetic buoyancy instability plays an important role in the evolution of astrophysical magnetic fields. Here we revisit the problem introduced by Gilman of the short-wavelength linear stability of a plane layer of compressible isothermal fluid permeated by a horizontal magnetic field of strength decreasing with height. Dissipation of momentum and magnetic field is neglected. By the use of a Rayleigh-Schroedinger perturbation analysis, we explain in detail the limit in which the transverse horizontal wavenumber of the perturbation, denoted by k, is large (i.e., short horizontal wavelength) and show that the fastest growing perturbations become localized in the vertical direction as k is increased. The growth rates are determined by a function of the vertical coordinate z since, in the large k limit, the eigenmodes are strongly localized in the vertical direction. We consider in detail the case of two-dimensional perturbations varying in the directions perpendicular to the magnetic field, which, for sufficiently strong field gradients, are the most unstable. The results of our analysis are backed up by comparison with a series of initial value problems. Finally, we extend the analysis to three-dimensional perturbations.

  10. Short-term energy outlook, January 1999

    SciTech Connect

    1999-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares the Short-Term Energy Outlook (energy supply, demand, and price projections) monthly. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from January 1999 through December 2000. Data values for the fourth quarter 1998, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the January 1999 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are produced by DRI/McGraw-Hill but are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy product prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook. By varying the assumptions, alternative cases are produced by using the STIFS model. 28 figs., 19 tabs.

  11. Hamiltonian Framework for Short Optical Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiranashvili, Shalva

    Physics of short optical pulses is an important and active research area in nonlinear optics. In this Chapter we theoretically consider the most extreme representatives of short pulses that contain only several oscillations of electromagnetic field. Description of such pulses is traditionally based on envelope equations and slowly varying envelope approximation, despite the fact that the envelope is not "slow" and, moreover, there is no clear definition of such a "fast" envelope. This happens due to another paradoxical feature: the standard (envelope) generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation yields very good correspondence to numerical solutions of full Maxwell equations even for few-cycle pulses, the thing that should not be.In what follows we address ultrashort optical pulses using Hamiltonian framework for nonlinear waves. As it appears, the standard optical envelope equation is just a reformulation of general Hamiltonian equations. In a sense, no approximations are required, this is why the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation is so effective. Moreover, the Hamiltonian framework contributes greatly to our understanding of "fast" envelopes, ultrashort solitons, stability and radiation of optical pulses. Even the inclusion of dissipative terms is possible making the Hamiltonian approach an universal theoretical tool also in extreme nonlinear optics.

  12. Use of Both the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment Questionnaire and the Short Form-36 among Tibial Fracture Patients was Redundant

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Objective To compare the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment Dysfunction Index and the Short Form-36 Physical Component Summary scores among patients undergoing operative management of tibial fractures. Study Design and Setting Between July 2000 and September 2005, we enrolled 1319 skeletally mature patients with open or closed fractures of the tibial shaft that were managed with intramedullary nailing. Patients were asked to complete the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment and Short Form-36 at discharge and 3, 6, and 12 months post surgical fixation. Results Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment Dysfunction Index and Short Form-36 Physical Component Summary scores were highly correlated at 3, 6, and 12 months post surgical fixation. The difference in mean standardized change scores for the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment Dysfunction Index and the Short Form-36 Physical Component Summary, from 3 to 12 months post-surgical fixation, was not statistically significant. Both the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment Dysfunction Index and Short Form-36 Physical Component Summary scores were able to discriminate between healed and non-healed tibial fractures at 3, 6, and 12 months post surgery. Conclusion In patients with tibial shaft fractures, the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment Dysfunction Index offered no important advantages over the Short Form-36 Physical Component Summary score. These results, along with the usefulness of the Short Form-36 for comparing populations, recommends the Short Form-36 for assessing physical function in studies of patients with tibial fractures. PMID:19364637

  13. Ultraintense ion beams driven by a short-wavelength short-pulse laser

    SciTech Connect

    Badziak, J.; Jablonski, S.

    2010-07-15

    The results of particle-in-cell simulations are reported which demonstrate that a short-wavelength (lambda<=0.5 mum) short-pulse laser driver can produce much more intense ion beams than the commonly used long-wavelength (lambdaapprox1 mum) ones. In particular, such a driver allows for efficient generation of ultrashort (<=100 fs), multi-MeV proton bunches of extremely high intensities (>10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2}) and current densities (>10{sup 14} A/cm{sup 2}) even at moderate values of dimensionless laser amplitude a{sub 0}<=10.

  14. Short Bursts of Intense Exercise Might Benefit Type 2 Diabetics

    MedlinePLUS

    ... news/fullstory_155644.html Short Bursts of Intense Exercise Might Benefit Type 2 Diabetics Research suggests brief ... 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Short sessions of high-intensity exercise may provide more health benefits for people with ...

  15. An analysis of short haul airline operating costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanafani, A.; Taghavi, S.

    1975-01-01

    The demand and supply characteristics of short haul air transportation systems are investigated in terms of airline operating costs. Direct, indirect, and ground handling costs are included. Supply models of short haul air transportation systems are constructed.

  16. Short course review and the future

    SciTech Connect

    Corden, Pierce S.

    2014-05-09

    The presentations at the short course that were the basis of the present Proceedings covered many critical issues related to the objective of eliminating nuclear weapons as a means of ensuring global security and stability. This paper is based on the concluding talk, which briefly reviewed the course, offered a net assessment of where the project of elimination - a policy objective for nearly all the world's states - stands, and discussed some of the factors that need to be dealt with in achieving a nuclear weapon free world. These include understanding what 'proliferation' means and how it has changed over time, how the spread of nuclear weapons has proceeded over time, both 'vertical' in numbers and 'horizontal' to additional countries, what way the 'vector' of reversing proliferation is pointing, and the roles of nuclear energy and international governance.

  17. Using Short Videos to Teach Research Ethics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loui, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    Created with support from the National Science Foundation, EthicsCORE (www.natonalethicscenter.org) is an online resource center for ethics in science and engineering. Among the resources, EthicsCORE hosts short video vignettes produced at the University of Nebraska - Lincoln that dramatize problems in the responsible conduct of research, such as peer review of journal submissions, and mentoring relationships between faculty and graduate students. I will use one of the video vignettes in an interactive pedagogical demonstration. After showing the video, I will ask participants to engage in a think-pair-share activity on the professional obligations of researchers. During the sharing phase, participants will supply the reasons for these obligations.

  18. The Doctor Will See You Shortly

    PubMed Central

    Braddock, Clarence H; Snyder, Lois

    2005-01-01

    Many physicians and health care leaders express concern about the amount of time available for clinical practice. While debates rage on about how much time is truly available, the perception that time is inadequate is now pervasive. This perception has ethical significance, because it may cause clinicians to forego activities and behaviors that promote important aspects of the patient-physician relationship, to shortcut shared decision making, and to fall short of obligations to act as patient advocates. Furthermore, perceived time constraints can hinder the just distribution of physician time. Although creating more time in the clinical encounter would certainly address these ethical concerns, specific strategies—many of which do not take significantly more time—can effectively change the perception that time is inadequate. These approaches are critical for clinicians and health systems to maintain their ethical commitments and simultaneously deal with the realities of time. PMID:16307634

  19. Short course review and the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corden, Pierce S.

    2014-05-01

    The presentations at the short course that were the basis of the present Proceedings covered many critical issues related to the objective of eliminating nuclear weapons as a means of ensuring global security and stability. This paper is based on the concluding talk, which briefly reviewed the course, offered a net assessment of where the project of elimination - a policy objective for nearly all the world's states - stands, and discussed some of the factors that need to be dealt with in achieving a nuclear weapon free world. These include understanding what "proliferation" means and how it has changed over time, how the spread of nuclear weapons has proceeded over time, both "vertical" in numbers and "horizontal" to additional countries, what way the "vector" of reversing proliferation is pointing, and the roles of nuclear energy and international governance.

  20. Economics of solar energy: Short term costing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klee, H.

    The solar economics based on life cycle costs are refuted as both imaginary and irrelevant. It is argued that predicting rates of inflation and fuel escalation, expected life, maintenance costs, and legislation over the next ten to twenty years is pure guesswork. Furthermore, given the high mobility level of the U.S. population, the average consumer is skeptical of long run arguments which will pay returns only to the next owners. In the short term cost analysis, the house is sold prior to the end of the expected life of the system. The cash flow of the seller and buyer are considered. All the relevant factors, including the federal tax credit and the added value of the house because of the solar system are included.