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Sample records for short vertical sus304-tube

  1. Ultimately short ballistic vertical graphene Josephson junctions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gil-Ho; Kim, Sol; Jhi, Seung-Hoon; Lee, Hu-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Much efforts have been made for the realization of hybrid Josephson junctions incorporating various materials for the fundamental studies of exotic physical phenomena as well as the applications to superconducting quantum devices. Nonetheless, the efforts have been hindered by the diffusive nature of the conducting channels and interfaces. To overcome the obstacles, we vertically sandwiched a cleaved graphene monoatomic layer as the normal-conducting spacer between superconducting electrodes. The atomically thin single-crystalline graphene layer serves as an ultimately short conducting channel, with highly transparent interfaces with superconductors. In particular, we show the strong Josephson coupling reaching the theoretical limit, the convex-shaped temperature dependence of the Josephson critical current and the exceptionally skewed phase dependence of the Josephson current; all demonstrate the bona fide short and ballistic Josephson nature. This vertical stacking scheme for extremely thin transparent spacers would open a new pathway for exploring the exotic coherence phenomena occurring on an atomic scale. PMID:25635386

  2. Observation of short ballistic Josephson effect in vertical graphene junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gil-Ho; Lee, Hu-Jong

    2014-03-01

    The current-phase relation (CPR) of vertical graphene Josephson junctions (vGJJs) was measured using phase-sensitive dc-SQUID interferometry. A vGJJ, realized by vertically sandwiching a monolayer graphene between two Al electrodes, had an atomically short channel with transparent contacts for the highly coherent junction nature. The measured CPR was almost perfectly skewed, which rigorously confirmed the short ballisticity of the vGJJs. The short ballistic character of a Josephson junction has been predicted since 1970's but has never been realized in scalable hybrid systems. The CPR also provided energy spectrum of Andreev levels formed inside the junction, which offered a promising prospect for scalable quantum information devices such as Andreev-level qubits. This vertical-junction scheme is also readily applicable to the other cleavable materials such as three-dimensional topological insulators or transition metal dichalcogenides, opening a new pathway for uncovering exotic coherence phenomena arising in an atomic scale.

  3. Influence of Heating Rate on Subcooled Flow Boiling Critical Heat Flux in a Short Vertical Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, Koichi; Shiotsu, Masahiro; Noda, Nobuaki

    The subcooled flow boiling critical heat flux (CHF) for the flow velocities (u=4.0 to 13.3m/s), the inlet subcoolings (ΔTsub, in=130 to 161K), the inlet pressure (Pin=812 to 1315kPa), the dissolved oxygen concentration (O2=5.88 and 7.34ppm) and the increasing heat input (Q0exp(t/τ), τ=38.1ms to 8.3s) are systematically measured by the experimental water loop installed the pressurizer. The SUS304 tube of test tube inner diameter (d=6mm), heated length (L=60mm), L/d=10 and wall thickness (δ=0.5mm) with the rough finished inner surface (Surface roughness, Ra=3.18µm) is used in this work. The CHF data for high heating rate were compared with the quasi steady state ones previously obtained and the values calculated by the steady state CHF correlations against outlet and inlet subcoolings. Transient CHF correlation against inlet subcooling has been given based on the experimental data for wide exponentially increasing heat input (Q0exp(t/τ), τ=38.1ms to 8.3s). The influence of heating rate on CHF was investigated into details and the dominant mechanism of subcooled flow boiling critical heat flux for high heating rate was discussed.

  4. Advanced Short Takeoff and Vertical Landing (ASTOVL) Concepts Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    In this cooperative program between NASA, Lockheed Corporation, and the Advanced Research and Projects Agency (ARPA), an advanced short takeoff and vertical landing (ASTOVL) model was tested in the 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The 10-percent scaled model was tested over a range of headwind velocities from 25 to 120 kn. This inlet/forebody test was a key part of an important Department of Defense program investigation enabling technologies for future high-performance ASTOVL aircraft. The Lockheed concept is focused on a shaft-coupled lift fan system centered around Pratt & Whitney's F119 power plant. As envisioned, a conventional takeoff and landing version (CTOL) would replace the U.S. Air Force's F-16's. The ASTOVL version would eventually replace Marine and, possibly, British Harrier aircraft. The ASTOVL and CTOL versions are scheduled to begin their manufacturing development phases in 2000. The purpose of this test was to acquire data pertinent to the inlet-forebody model. The test was very successful. Both steady-state and dynamic data were obtained. This small-scale testing, which is directed at reducing risks, may greatly reduce the risks on a full-scale aircraft.

  5. Critical Heat Fluxes of Subcooled Water Flow Boiling against Inlet Subcooling in Short Vertical Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, Koichi; Komori, Hirokazu; Shiotsu, Masahiro; Noda, Nobuaki

    The critical heat fluxes (CHFs) of subcooled water flow boiling for the test tube inner diameters (d=3 and 6mm) and the heated lengths (L=67, 120 and 150mm) are systematically measured for the flow velocities (u=4.0 to 13.3m/s), the inlet subcoolings (ΔTsub, in=48 to 148K), the outlet subcoolings (ΔTsub, out=10.5 to 95.1K), the inlet pressure (Pin=753 to 995kPa) and the outlet pressure (Pout=720 to 887kPa). The SUS304 tubes of L=67, 120 and 150mm for d=3mm and L=150mm for d=6mm are used. The values of L/d are 22, 40 and 50 for d=3mm, and 25 for d=6mm, respectively. The CHFs, qcr, sub, for a fixed ΔTsub, out become gradually lower with an increase in the L/d in the whole experimental range. The CHF correlation against outlet subcooling, which has been previously derived for L/d lower than 16, was modified to new one containing the L/d effect based on these experimental data. Furthermore, the relation between qcr, sub and L/d for a fixed ΔTsub, in was checked. The values of qcr, sub for a fixed ΔTsub, in became exponentially lower with the increase in L/d. CHF correlation against inlet subcooling has been given based on the experimental data for L/d ranging from 4.08 to 50. The correlations against outlet and inlet subcoolings can describe not only the CHFs obtained in this work for the inner diameter of 3 and 6mm at the outlet pressure of around 800kPa but also the authors' published CHFs data (1611 points) for the wide ranges of Pin=159kPa to 1MPa, d=3 to 12mm, L=33 to 150mm and u=4.0 to 13.3m/s within 15% difference for 30K≤ΔTsub, out≤140K and 40K≤ΔTsub, in≤151K.

  6. Preliminary design of a supersonic Short-Takeoff and Vertical-Landing (STOVL) fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    A preliminary study of a supersonic short takeoff and vertical landing (STOVL) fighter is presented. Three configurations (a lift plus lift/cruise concept, a hybrid fan vectored thrust concept, and a mixed flow vectored thrust concept) were initially investigated with one configuration selected for further design analysis. The selected configuration, the lift plus lift/cruise concept, was successfully integrated to accommodate the powered lift short takeoff and vertical landing requirements as well as the demanding supersonic cruise and point performance requirements. A supersonic fighter aircraft with a short takeoff and vertical landing capability using the lift plus lift/cruise engine concept seems a viable option for the next generation fighter.

  7. Influence of short incompatible practice on the Simon effect: transfer along the vertical dimension and across vertical and horizontal dimensions.

    PubMed

    Conde, Erick F Q; Fraga-Filho, Roberto Sena; Lameira, Allan Pablo; Mograbi, Daniel C; Riggio, Lucia; Gawryszewski, Luiz G

    2015-11-01

    In spatial compatibility and Simon tasks, the response is faster when stimulus and response locations are on the same side than when they are on opposite sides. It has been shown that a spatial incompatible practice leads to a subsequent modulation of the Simon effect along the horizontal dimension. It has also been reported that this modulation occurs both along and across vertical and horizontal dimensions, but only after intensive incompatible training (600 trials). In this work, we show that this modulatory effect can be obtained with a smaller number of incompatible trials, changing the spatial arrangement of the vertical response keys to obtain a stronger dimensional overlap between the spatial codes of stimuli and response keys. The results of Experiment 1 showed that 80 incompatible vertical trials abolished the Simon effect in the same dimension. Experiment 2 showed that a modulation of the vertical Simon effect could be obtained after 80 horizontal incompatible trials. Experiment 3 explored whether the transfer effect can also occur in a horizontal Simon task after a brief vertical spatial incompatibility task, and results were similar to the previous experiments. In conclusion, we suggest that the spatial arrangement between response key and stimulus locations may be critical to establish the short-term memory links that enable the transfer of learning between brief incompatible practices and the Simon effects, both along the vertical dimension and across vertical and horizontal dimensions. PMID:26265123

  8. [Stabilometric features of vertical stability in healthy individuals by short-time bite change].

    PubMed

    Pogabalo, I V; Kubriak, O V; Grokhovskiĭ, S S; Kopetskiĭ, I S

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate vertical stability changes according to stabilometric findings under artificial short-time disturbed occlusion. Twelve individuals were included in the study and vertical stability was assessed in stability platform before and under short-time bite change. The registered changes might be connected with an approximate reaction and random reasons. There is a possibility of bias by mechanical transfer of the stabilometric study results on the diagnosis of dental status. PMID:25588344

  9. Design of a Low Cost Short Takeoff-vertical Landing Export Fighter/attack Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcher, Anne; Bodeker, Dan, III; Miu, Steve; Petro, Laura; Senf, Cary Taylor; Woeltjen, Donald

    1990-01-01

    The design of a supersonic short takeoff and vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft is presented that is suitable for export. An advanced four poster, low bypass turbofan engine is to be used for propulsion. Preliminary aerodynamic analysis is presented covering a determination of CD versus CL, CD versus Mach number, as well as best cruise Mach number and altitude. Component locations are presented and center of gravity determined. Cost minimization is achieved through the use of developed subsystems and standard fabrication techniques using nonexotic materials. Conclusions regarding the viability of the STOVL design are presented.

  10. US/UK Advanced Short Takeoff and Vertical Landing program (ASTOVL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, J.; Inglis, Malcolm

    1989-01-01

    Both the U.S. and the UK have substantial technology bases from past and current R and D programs, a common background of service experience and, potentially, much common interest in the future use of advanced STOVL combat aircraft. Equally interested in the operational advantages of the short takeoff and vertical landing capability of combat aircraft, combined with supersonic and high agility performance, the U.S. and the UK have agreed to collaborate on ASTOVL research underwritten by a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) (1986) between the two governments. The paper describes the aims and provisions of the MOU, gives the results of studies, illustrates the technology development underway, and outlines the future ASTOVL technology program. Particular attention is given to concept studies on advanced vectored thrust, the ejector augmentor, the hybrid tandem fan, and the remote augmented lift system.

  11. Short-term ionospheric precursors of earthquakes using vertical and oblique ionosondes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaunstein, N.; Hayakawa, M.

    The possibility to use short-term ionospheric parameters as a new precursor of earthquakes (EQs) is examined both theoretically and experimentally by using ground-based vertical and oblique ionosondes and broadcasting stations operating in the frequency ranges of 5-40 MHz and 150-180 kHz, respectively. A rigorous self-matching three-dimensional (3D) electrodynamic model of interaction of the acoustic branch of acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) generated by the lithosphere-atmosphere interactions during the seismic event preparation, with the cold dense ionospheric plasma, accompanied by the ambient magnetic and perturbed electric fields (both in vertical and horizontal directions), was constructed in conjunction with the actual height variations of the plasma particles mobility and conductivity tensors in the ionosphere. We present a generation mechanism of ionospheric inhomogeneities with different scales and with various degree of perturbations, Δ N/ N0 = 10 -3-10 -4 ( N0 is the concentration of electrons (or ions) of the background ionospheric plasma and Δ N, its perturbation). A 3D model of probing UHF and HF wave scattering from the disturbed ionospheric area above the seismic epicenter is proposed both for oblique and vertical propagation through the disturbed area, based on the well-known 2D models. The corresponding observations are arranged by using the oblique and vertical ionosondes, and the broadcasting stations with traces passing through the seismic ionospheric area above the epicenter. The anomalous effects of ionospheric plasma, quasi-regular structure stratification and generation of additional sporadic layers in whole thickness of the ionosphere are observed 20-24 hours before the seismic event using sounding the disturbed ionosphere by radio signals operated in LF-frequency band from 150 to 180 kHz and in HF-frequency band from 5 to 30-40 MHz. We observe an additional effect of irregular “flashes” and sharp fading of broadcasting signals at 150-180 kHz, passing through the disturbed ionosphere above the epicenter several hours before the seismic event. The plasma density disturbances with respect to the background ionospheric plasma, the “worked” volume and area of disturbed ionosphere above the epicenter, as well as the magnitude of seismic event and the area of seismic zone, can be estimated using both models and the results of experimental measurements.

  12. Preliminary design of a supersonic Short Takeoff and Vertical Landing (STOVL) fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Brian; Borchers, Paul; Gomer, Charlie; Henderson, Dean; Jacobs, Tavis; Lawson, Todd; Peterson, Eric; Ross, Tweed, III; Bellmard, Larry

    1990-01-01

    The preliminary design study of a supersonic Short Takeoff and Vertical Landing (STOVL) fighter is presented. A brief historical survey of powered lift vehicles was presented, followed by a technology assessment of the latest supersonic STOVL engine cycles under consideration by industry and government in the U.S. and UK. A survey of operational fighter/attack aircraft and the modern battlefield scenario were completed to develop, respectively, the performance requirements and mission profiles for the study. Three configurations were initially investigated with the following engine cycles: a hybrid fan vectored thrust cycle, a lift+lift/cruise cycle, and a mixed flow vectored thrust cycle. The lift+lift/cruise aircraft configuration was selected for detailed design work which consisted of: (1) a material selection and structural layout, including engine removal considerations, (2) an aircraft systems layout, (3) a weapons integration model showing the internal weapons bay mechanism, (4) inlet and nozzle integration, (5) an aircraft suckdown prediction, (6) an aircraft stability and control analysis, including a takeoff, hover, and transition control analysis, (7) a performance and mission capability study, and (8) a life cycle cost analysis. A supersonic fighter aircraft with STOVL capability with the lift+lift/cruise engine cycle seems a viable option for the next generation fighter.

  13. Short wavelength vertical fluctuations of the melting regime in the suboceanic melting region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunelli, D.; Seyler, M.; Paganelli, E.; Barbieri, E.

    2011-12-01

    Modelling of mantle residua cpx REE patterns allow recognizing short wavelenght vertical variability of the porosity regime of a melting region differing from that deriving after melt focusing processes ultimately leading to dunitic channelling of the mantle section. A trace element detailed study of residual clinopyroxenes from the ultraslow eastern SWIR section shows compositional trends crosscutting the expected partial melting trends at the typical kilometre lenghtscale. In the REE compositional space these trends appear as pattern rotations around a mid-point. Open-system melting modelling reveals the intensity of the rotation and the position of the pivot element depending mainly on the ratio between input/output melt flux and on the enrichment of the percolating melt with respect to the depleted screen. We derived two important indications on the process: first some regions experience near-batch melting, i.e. melt accumulation with very low output melt flux, in regions soon after the grt/sp transition. This observations suggest permeability barriers to occur in the main melting region possibly due to porosity consumption by melt/rock reaction enhanced by grt breakdown energy competition. Consequently melt stagnation processes similar to those described for the plagioclase facies may act in the spinel field portion of the melting region. Second: we attest the presence of enriched melts delivered to the spinel field region. These melts may derive from very low degrees of melting in the garnet field of a DMM source or by consumption of an enriched heterogeneity with a lower melting point than the surrounding mantle.

  14. Improved sub-threshold slope in short-channel vertical MOSFETs using FILOX oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakim, M. M. A.; Tan, L.; Buiu, O.; Redman-White, W.; Hall, S.; Ashburn, P.

    2009-07-01

    This paper investigates the origins of sub-threshold slope degradation in vertical MOSFETs (v-MOSFETs) due to dry etching of the polysilicon surround gate. Control v-MOSFETs exhibit a degradation of sub-threshold slope as the channel length is reduced from 250 to 100 nm, with 100 nm transistors having a value of 125 mV/dec and a DIBL of 210 mV/V. The effect of the polysilicon gate etch is investigated using a frame-gate architecture in which the polysilicon gate overlaps the side of the pillar, thereby protecting the channel from etch damage. This device shows no degradation of short channel effects when the channel length is scaled and exhibits a near-ideal sub-threshold slope of 76 mV/dec and a DIBL of 33 mV/V at a channel length of 100 nm. Gated diode measurements unambiguously demonstrate that this improved sub-threshold slope is due to the elimination of etch damage at the top and bottom of the pillar created during polysilicon gate etch. An alternative method of eliminating dry etch damage is then investigated by optimizing the Fillet Local Oxidation (FILOX). These devices give a sub-threshold slope of 81 mV/dec and a DIBL of 25 mV/V at a channel length of 100 nm. The improved immunity to dry etch damage is due to the creation of a thick protective oxide at the top and bottom of the pillar during the FILOX process.

  15. Static internal performance of ventral and rear nozzle concepts for short-takeoff and vertical-landing aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Re, Richard J.; Carson, George T., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The internal performance of two exhaust system concepts applicable to single-engine short-take-off and vertical-landing tactical fighter configurations was investigated. These concepts involved blocking (or partially blocking) tailpipe flow to the rear (cruise) nozzle and diverting it through an opening to a ventral nozzle exit for vertical thrust. A set of variable angle vanes at the ventral nozzle exit were used to vary ventral nozzle thrust angle between 45 and 110 deg relative to the positive axial force direction. In the vertical flight mode the rear nozzle (or tailpipe flow to it) was completely blocked. In the transition flight mode flow in the tailpipe was split between the rear and ventral nozzles and the flow was vectored at both exits for aircraft control purposes through this flight regime. In the cruise flight mode the ventral nozzle was sealed and all flow exited through the rear nozzle.

  16. Short term variation in the vertical distribution of copepods off the coast of northern Peru

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S L; Boyd, C M; Lane, P V.Z.

    1980-04-01

    Vertical profiles of chlorophyll a, oxygen, density and copepods were collected during November 1977 near 9/sup 0/S off Peru. The majority of three groups of copepod, the Oncaeidae, the Oithonidae and small calanoids, remained above the depth (approx. 30m) where concentrations of oxygen became less than 0.5 ml.l/sup -1/ both day and night. Centers of population of all three groups were in or below the pycnocline at all times. In daytime all three groups accumulated at depth, while at night all three groups showed some dispersion throughout the upper 30 m with statistically significant separation in the layers of Oncaeidae and small calanoids. Small calanoids were always higher in the water column than the Oncaeidae at night. The rather small, daily vertical excursions by the Oncaeidae and small calanoids exposed them to mean onshore, poleward flow by day and mean offshore, equatorward flow at night.

  17. Time-resolved observation of fast domain-walls driven by vertical spin currents in short tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampaio, Joao; Lequeux, Steven; Metaxas, Peter J.; Chanthbouala, Andre; Matsumoto, Rie; Yakushiji, Kay; Kubota, Hitoshi; Fukushima, Akio; Yuasa, Shinji; Nishimura, Kazumasa; Nagamine, Yoshinori; Maehara, Hiroki; Tsunekawa, Koji; Cros, Vincent; Grollier, Julie

    2013-12-01

    We present time-resolved measurements of the displacement of magnetic domain-walls (DWs) driven by vertical spin-polarized currents in track-shaped magnetic tunnel junctions. In these structures, we observe very high DW velocities (600 m/s) at current densities below 107 A/cm2. We show that the efficient spin-transfer torque combined with a short propagation distance allows avoiding the Walker breakdown process and achieving deterministic, reversible, and fast (≈1 ns) DW-mediated switching of magnetic tunnel junction elements, which is of great interest for the implementation of fast DW-based spintronic devices.

  18. Time-resolved observation of fast domain-walls driven by vertical spin currents in short tracks

    SciTech Connect

    Sampaio, Joao; Lequeux, Steven; Chanthbouala, Andre; Cros, Vincent; Grollier, Julie; Matsumoto, Rie; Yakushiji, Kay; Kubota, Hitoshi; Fukushima, Akio; Yuasa, Shinji; Nishimura, Kazumasa; Nagamine, Yoshinori; Maehara, Hiroki; Tsunekawa, Koji

    2013-12-09

    We present time-resolved measurements of the displacement of magnetic domain-walls (DWs) driven by vertical spin-polarized currents in track-shaped magnetic tunnel junctions. In these structures, we observe very high DW velocities (600 m/s) at current densities below 10{sup 7} A/cm{sup 2}. We show that the efficient spin-transfer torque combined with a short propagation distance allows avoiding the Walker breakdown process and achieving deterministic, reversible, and fast (≈1 ns) DW-mediated switching of magnetic tunnel junction elements, which is of great interest for the implementation of fast DW-based spintronic devices.

  19. High-Power Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser under a Short Pulsed Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otake, Nobuyuki; Abe, Katsunori; Yamada, Hitoshi; Wado, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Yukihiro

    2009-05-01

    We report on the lasing characteristics of a single vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) with InGaAs/GaAs multiple-quantum-wells under high-power pulsed operations. External quantum efficiency was improved by decreasing carrier overflow in the active region, and it was found that increasing the number of quantum wells suppressed carrier overflow. The highest peak pulsed power of over 12.5 W at an injection current of 20 A was achieved by a single VCSEL with five InGaAs quantum wells (QWs) in the active region.

  20. The octopus vertical lobe modulates short-term learning rate and uses LTP to acquire long-term memory.

    PubMed

    Shomrat, Tal; Zarrella, Ilaria; Fiorito, Graziano; Hochner, Binyamin

    2008-03-11

    Analyzing the processes and neuronal circuitry involved in complex behaviors in phylogenetically remote species can help us understand the evolution and function of these systems. Cephalopods, with their vertebrate-like behaviors but much simpler brains, are ideal for such an analysis. The vertical lobe (VL) of Octopus vulgaris is a pivotal brain station in its learning and memory system. To examine the organization of the learning and memory circuitry and to test whether the LTP that we discovered in the VL is involved in behavioral learning, we tetanized the VL to induce a global synaptic enhancement of the VL pathway. The effects of tetanization on learning and memory of a passive avoidance task were compared to those of transecting the same pathway. Tetanization accelerated and transection slowed short-term learning to avoid attacking a negatively reinforced object. However, both treatments impaired long-term recall the next day. Our results suggest that the learning and memory system in the octopus, as in mammals [9], is separated into short- and long-term memory sites. In the octopus, the two memory sites are not independent; the VL, which mediates long-term memory acquisition through LTP, also modulates the circuitry controlling behavior and short-term learning. PMID:18328706

  1. Short Takeoff and Vertical Landing Capability Upgraded in NASA Glenn's 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stark, David E.

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center supports short takeoff and vertical landing (STOVL) tests in its 9- by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel (9 x 15 LSWT). As part of a facility capability upgrade, a dynamic actuation system (DAS) was fabricated to enhance the STOVL testing capabilities. The DAS serves as the mechanical interface between the 9 x 15 LSWT test section structure and the STOVL model to be tested. It provides vertical and horizontal translation of the model in the test section and maintains the model attitude (pitch, yaw, and roll) during translation. It also integrates a piping system to supply the model with exhaust and hot air to simulate the inlet suction and nozzle exhausts, respectively. Hot gas ingestion studies have been performed with the facility ground plane installed. The DAS provides vertical (ascent and descent) translation speeds of up to 48 in./s and horizontal translation speeds of up to 12 in./s. Model pitch variations of +/- 7, roll variations of +/- 5, and yaw variations of 0 to 180 deg can be accommodated and are maintained within 0.25 deg throughout the translation profile. The hot air supply, generated by the facility heaters and regulated by control valves, provides three separate temperature zones to the model for STOVL and hot gas ingestion testing. Channels along the supertube provide instrumentation paths from the model to the facility data system for data collection purposes. The DAS is supported by the 9 x 15 LSWT test section ceiling structure. A carriage that rides on two linear rails provides for horizontal translation of the system along the test section longitudinal axis. A vertical translation assembly, consisting of a cage and supertube, is secured to the carriage. The supertube traverses vertically through the cage on a set of linear rails. Both translation axes are hydraulically actuated and provide position and velocity profile control. The lower flange on the supertube serves as the model interface to the DAS. The supertube also serves as the exhaust path to the model and supports the hot air piping on its external surfaces. The DAS is currently being assembled at the 9 15 LSWT facility. Following assembly and installation, a series of checkouts will be performed to confirm the operation of the system.

  2. Short vertical tube furnace for the fabrication of doped glass microsphere lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Jonathan M.; Wu, Yuqiang; Khalfi, Krimo; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2010-07-01

    We report on the design of an electric tube furnace that can be used for the fabrication of doped glass microsphere lasers. The tube furnace has a short hot zone of length 133 mm and is based on a quartz tube design. Doped laser glass particles, specifically Er:Yb phosphate glass (IOG-2), of ˜1 μm diameter are blown into the furnace using a 60 ml syringe and microspheres ranging in size from 10 to 400 μm are collected at the output of the tube furnace in a Petri dish. The furnace operates at a wall temperature of ˜900 °C and is capable of making microspheres from glasses with glass transition temperatures of at least 375 °C. High quality (Q ˜105) whispering gallery modes have been excited within the microspheres by optically pumping at 978 nm via a tapered optical fiber.

  3. Short vertical tube furnace for the fabrication of doped glass microsphere lasers.

    PubMed

    Ward, Jonathan M; Wu, Yuqiang; Khalfi, Krimo; Nic Chormaic, Síle

    2010-07-01

    We report on the design of an electric tube furnace that can be used for the fabrication of doped glass microsphere lasers. The tube furnace has a short hot zone of length 133 mm and is based on a quartz tube design. Doped laser glass particles, specifically Er:Yb phosphate glass (IOG-2), of approximately 1 microm diameter are blown into the furnace using a 60 ml syringe and microspheres ranging in size from 10 to 400 microm are collected at the output of the tube furnace in a Petri dish. The furnace operates at a wall temperature of approximately 900 degrees C and is capable of making microspheres from glasses with glass transition temperatures of at least 375 degrees C. High quality (Q approximately 10(5)) whispering gallery modes have been excited within the microspheres by optically pumping at 978 nm via a tapered optical fiber. PMID:20687704

  4. Effects of a short proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching bout on quadriceps neuromuscular function, flexibility, and vertical jump performance.

    PubMed

    Place, Nicolas; Blum, Yannick; Armand, Stéphane; Maffiuletti, Nicola A; Behm, David G

    2013-02-01

    The inclusion of relatively long bouts of stretching (repeated static stretches of ∼30 seconds) in the warm-up is usually associated with a drop in muscle performance. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of a novel self-administered proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) paradigm with short periods of stretching and contraction on quadriceps neuromuscular function, vertical jump performance, and articular range of motion (ROM). Twelve healthy men (age: 27.7 ± 7.3 years, height: 178.4 ± 10.4 cm, weight: 73.8 ± 16.9 kg) volunteered to participate in a PNF session and a control session separated by 2-7 days. The PNF stretching lasted 2 minutes and consisted of 4 sets of 5-second isometric hamstring contraction immediately followed by 5 seconds of passive static stretch of the quadriceps immediately followed by 5 seconds isometric quadriceps contraction for each leg. For the control session, the participants were asked to walk at a comfortable speed for 2 minutes. Active ROM of knee flexion, vertical jump performance, and quadriceps neuromuscular function were tested before, immediately after, and 15 minutes after the intervention. The PNF stretching procedure did not affect ROM, squat jump, and countermovement jump performances. Accordingly, we did not observe any change in maximal voluntary contraction force, voluntary activation level, M-wave and twitch contractile properties that could be attributed to PNF stretching. The present self-administered PNF stretching of the quadriceps with short (5-second) stretches is not recommended before sports where flexibility is mandatory for performance. PMID:22505131

  5. A Study for Application of Vertical Infiltration in Runoff Analysis Model to Long- and Short- Term Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimi, K.; Wang, C. W.; Yamada, T.

    2014-12-01

    In general, the runoff phenomenon at the time of a flood is consisted of a series of runoff components. For example, Horton (1933) proposed that when the rainfall amount is over then the limit capacity of soil permeation, the other water would be output as the surface runoff. Kikkawa et. al (1979) considered that sub-system of the discharge decreasing progressively for the tank model. And Kure et. al (2005) recommended the smallest scale tank for unique slope including of the characteristics of soil, topography to calculate the rainfall- runoff volume. However, the physical meaning of these researches was not very clearly. Therefore, the authors would focus on it and develop the multi-layers flow as the main model to evaluate the flood runoff in a short term and long term period. First the historically rainfall-runoff model considering multi-layer flow in a slope is proposed. The purpose of this study is to propose the runoff model in consideration of multi-layer flow and to indicate possible application of long-and short-term runoff analysis. It shows outline of proposed rainfall-runoff model considering multi-layer flow in a slope. Additionally, it argues over the difference of reproducibility from existing model. And finally, this model is applied to long-and short-term runoff analysis at a small dam basin (254km2) in Japan. In conclusion, the model considering multi-layer flow was able to be proposed by incorporating no difficulty involved vertical infiltration mechanism to the existing model. As a result of runoff analysis at the dam basin, the availability of the proposed model is shown.

  6. The effect of short-term resistance training on hip and knee kinematics during vertical drop jumps.

    PubMed

    McCurdy, Kevin; Walker, John; Saxe, Joseph; Woods, Jonathan

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a weight-bearing free weight resistance training program alone on knee flexion, hip flexion, and knee valgus during unilateral and bilateral drop jump tasks. Twenty-nine young adult females with previous athletic experience were randomly divided into a control (n = 16) and a resistance training (n = 13) groups. The resistance training group completed 8 weeks of lower extremity, weight-bearing exercises using free weights, whereas the control group did not train. A pre- and posttest was conducted to measure knee valgus, knee flexion, and hip flexion during unilateral (30 cm) and bilateral (60 cm) vertical drop jumps for maximum height. Joint angles were determined using 3-dimensional electromagnetic tracking sensors (MotionMonitor; Innovative Sports Training, Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Initial training intensity for the bilateral squat was 50% of the subject's 1 repetition maximum (RM), which increased 5% each week to 85% during the final week. Sets and repetitions ranged from 2 to 4 and from 4 to 12, respectively. The training loads for all other exercises (lunge, step-up, unilateral squat, and Romanian deadlift) increased from 15RM to 6RM from the initial to the final week. A repeated measures analysis of variance was used to determine differences in the hip and knee joint angles. No significant differences for knee valgus and hip flexion measures were found between the groups after training; however, knee flexion angle significantly increased in the training group from the pretest (77.2 ± 4.1°) to posttest (83.2 ± 3.7°) during the bilateral drop jump. No significant changes occurred during the unilateral drop jump. Bilateral measures for knee flexion, hip flexion, and knee valgus were significantly (p < 0.05) greater than the unilateral measures during the drop jump task, which indicate an increased risk for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury during unilateral drop jumps. The data support that the strength and conditioning specialist can implement resistance training alone during a short-term training period to reduce the risk of ACL injury by increasing knee flexion during a bilateral drop jump task. Increased knee flexion angles after resistance training may indicate a reduced risk for knee injury from improved neuromuscular control, resulting in a softer landing. PMID:22344064

  7. Short-term effects on lower-body functional power development: weightlifting vs. vertical jump training programs.

    PubMed

    Tricoli, Valmor; Lamas, Leonardo; Carnevale, Roberto; Ugrinowitsch, Carlos

    2005-05-01

    Among sport conditioning coaches, there is considerable discussion regarding the efficiency of training methods that improve lower-body power. Heavy resistance training combined with vertical jump (VJ) training is a well-established training method; however, there is a lack of information about its combination with Olympic weightlifting (WL) exercises. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the short-term effects of heavy resistance training combined with either the VJ or WL program. Thirty-two young men were assigned to 3 groups: WL = 12, VJ = 12, and control = 8. These 32 men participated in an 8-week training study. The WL training program consisted of 3 x 6RM high pull, 4 x 4RM power clean, and 4 x 4RM clean and jerk. The VJ training program consisted of 6 x 4 double-leg hurdle hops, 4 x 4 alternated single-leg hurdle hops, 4 x 4 single-leg hurdle hops, and 4 x 4 40-cm drop jumps. Additionally, both groups performed 4 x 6RM half-squat exercises. Training volume was increased after 4 weeks. Pretesting and posttesting consisted of squat jump (SJ) and countermovement jump (CMJ) tests, 10- and 30-m sprint speeds, an agility test, a half-squat 1RM, and a clean-and-jerk 1RM (only for WL). The WL program significantly increased the 10-m sprint speed (p < 0.05). Both groups, WL and VJ, increased CMJ (p < 0.05), but groups using the WL program increased more than those using the VJ program. On the other hand, the group using the VJ program increased its 1RM half-squat strength more than the WL group (47.8 and 43.7%, respectively). Only the WL group improved in the SJ (9.5%). There were no significant changes in the control group. In conclusion, Olympic WL exercises seemed to produce broader performance improvements than VJ exercises in physically active subjects. PMID:15903387

  8. Differences in End Range of Motion Vertical Jump Kinetic and Kinematic Strategies Between Trained Weightlifters and Elite Short Track Speed Skaters.

    PubMed

    Haug, William B; Spratford, Wayne; Williams, Kym J; Chapman, Dale W; Drinkwater, Eric J

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to identify differences in end range of motion (ROM) kinetic and kinematic strategies between highly resistance and vertical jump-trained athletes and controls. Weightlifters (WL: n = 4), short track speed skaters (STSS: n = 5), and nonresistance-trained controls (C: n = 6) performed 6 standing vertical squat jumps (SJ) and countermovement jumps (CMJ) without external resistance. Jump testing was performed using 3-dimensional marker trajectories captured with a 15-camera motion analysis system synchronized with 2 in-ground force plates. During SJ, there were large effects for the difference in time before toe off of peak vertical velocity between WL to STSS and C (ES: -1.43; ES: -1.73, respectively) and for the decrease between peak and toe off vertical velocity (ES: -1.28; ES: -1.71, respectively). During CMJ, there were large effects for the difference in time before toe off of peak vertical velocity between WL to STSS and C (ES: -1.28; ES: -1.53, respectively) and for decrease between peak and toe off vertical velocity (ES: -1.03; ES: -1.59, respectively). Accompanying these differences for both jump types were large effects for time of joint deceleration before toe off for all lower body joints between WL compared with C with large effects between WL and STSS at the hip and between STSS and C at the ankle. These findings suggest that the end ROM kinetic and kinematic strategy used during jumping is group-specific in power-trained athletes, with WL exhibiting superior strategies as compared with resistance- and jump-trained STSS. PMID:25774628

  9. The Effects of Short-Term Ski Trainings on Dynamic Balance Performance and Vertical Jump in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camliguney, Asiye Filiz

    2013-01-01

    Skiing is a sport where balance and strength are critical and which can be practiced actively especially from early years to old age. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of a 5-day training of skiing skills on dynamic balance performance and development of vertical jump strength in adolescents. Sixteen adolescent volunteers who do…

  10. The Effects of Short-Term Ski Trainings on Dynamic Balance Performance and Vertical Jump in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camliguney, Asiye Filiz

    2013-01-01

    Skiing is a sport where balance and strength are critical and which can be practiced actively especially from early years to old age. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of a 5-day training of skiing skills on dynamic balance performance and development of vertical jump strength in adolescents. Sixteen adolescent volunteers who do

  11. Vertical transmission of Mycoplasma wenyonii in cattle, supported by analysis of the ribonuclease P RNA gene - Short communication.

    PubMed

    Sasaoka, Fumina; Suzuki, Jin; Hirata, Toh-Ichi; Ichijo, Toshihiro; Furuhama, Kazuhisa; Harasawa, Ryô; Satoh, Hiroshi

    2015-09-01

    The vertical transmission of Mycoplasma (M.) wenyonii was investigated in beef cattle raised on a farm in Japan by analysing the ribonuclease P RNA (rnpB) gene sequence using PCR. Peripheral blood samples from 17 dams infected with M. wenyonii and from their neonatal calves were collected and colostrum samples were taken from cows immediately after parturition, and subsequently the blood samples of calves were monitored continuously for three months. At birth on day 0, although no rnpB gene was detected in the colostrum of any of the dams, four (23.5%) of the 17 calves born were positive. At three months after delivery, the number of positive calves decreased to three. Although horizontal transmission by blood-feeding arthropod vectors has been basically accepted as the most common route of haemoplasma infection, these findings suggest that vertical transmission is, at least in part, another most likely route of M. wenyonii infection in cattle. PMID:26551417

  12. Blue 6-ps short-pulse generation in gain-switched InGaN vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers via impulsive optical pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shaoqiang; Okano, Makoto; Zhang, Baoping; Yoshita, Masahiro; Akiyama, Hidefumi; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko

    2012-11-01

    We report the demonstration of the picosecond-pulse lasing in blue region from an optically pumped gain-switched InGaN vertical-cavity-surface-emitting laser (VCSEL). Through 150-fs optical pulse excitations at room temperature, multimode pulse lasing with a main mode at 436.5 nm from the InGaN VCSEL was observed. The output pulse widths were measured to be as short as 9.8 ps for the total lasing spectra and 6.0 ps for the main mode. Since the obtained short pulses were still not limited by its photon lifetime of 0.7 ps or band-width of 0.8 nm, possible ways to generate even shorter pulses have been examined.

  13. Vertical structure and physical processes of the Madden-Julian Oscillation: Biases and uncertainties at short range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xavier, Prince K.; Petch, Jon C.; Klingaman, Nicholas P.; Woolnough, Steve J.; Jiang, Xianan; Waliser, Duane E.; Caian, Mihaela; Cole, Jason; Hagos, Samson M.; Hannay, Cecile; Kim, Daehyun; Miyakawa, Tomoki; Pritchard, Michael S.; Roehrig, Romain; Shindo, Eiki; Vitart, Frederic; Wang, Hailan

    2015-05-01

    An analysis of diabatic heating and moistening processes from 12 to 36 h lead time forecasts from 12 Global Circulation Models are presented as part of the "Vertical structure and physical processes of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO)" project. A lead time of 12-36 h is chosen to constrain the large-scale dynamics and thermodynamics to be close to observations while avoiding being too close to the initial spin-up of the models as they adjust to being driven from the Years of Tropical Convection (YOTC) analysis. A comparison of the vertical velocity and rainfall with the observations and YOTC analysis suggests that the phases of convection associated with the MJO are constrained in most models at this lead time although the rainfall in the suppressed phase is typically overestimated. Although the large-scale dynamics is reasonably constrained, moistening and heating profiles have large intermodel spread. In particular, there are large spreads in convective heating and moistening at midlevels during the transition to active convection. Radiative heating and cloud parameters have the largest relative spread across models at upper levels during the active phase. A detailed analysis of time step behavior shows that some models show strong intermittency in rainfall and differences in the precipitation and dynamics relationship between models. The wealth of model outputs archived during this project is a very valuable resource for model developers beyond the study of the MJO. In addition, the findings of this study can inform the design of process model experiments, and inform the priorities for field experiments and future observing systems.

  14. Conceptual design of 1.5m aperture vertical collimator assembly with short tube and long focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fei; Ming, Ming; Wang, Fu-guo; Zhang, Li-min; Chen, Bao-gang; Shao, Liang

    2013-09-01

    In order to evaluate and test the image quality of large aperture telescope, the most directly method is adopting the collimator and test the telescope system with full aperture. Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics (CIOMP) commenced developing the large aperture collimator for interferometric and image quality testing of meter scale optical systems under cryogenic, vacuum conditions. The aperture of the collimator which has been on the conceptual design phase is 1.5m diameter, and the optical configuration is Cassegrain, the focus is 50m. The material of reaction bonded Silicon Carbide (RB-SiC) produced by CIOMP will be used as the primary mirror substrate. And the figure accuracy of the primary mirror will be polished better than 15nm (RMS). The collimator will be working in a vacuum chamber and face down vertically to the unit under test. The application requirements, specification requirements, and some key technology are demonstrated and analysed with finite element analysis (FEA) in the paper. The feasibility, error budget, and hazards evaluation of the collimator are fulfilled by the FEA results. It demonstrated that the conceptual design meet the requirements of the 1.5m aperture vertical collimator, and could achieve the high accuracy requirements of the wavefront for the beam of light in the vacuum chamber, which the wavefront error should less than 32nm(RMS). Mechanical alignment errors induced by thermal and structural perturbations are monitored with an auto-focusing system to enable focus compensation. The ambient temperature of the collimator in chamber are controlled allowing testing while the chamber shrouds and test unit are brought to cryogenic temperatures. With the high accuracy of the wavefront, the collimator could test the image resolution, modulation transfer functions (MTFs), point spread functions (PSFs), encircled energy, wavefront error, best focus, etc. for optical systems. And the conceptual design could be consulted to other large aperture collimators.

  15. Vertical structure and physical processes of the Madden-Julian Oscillation: Biases and uncertainties at short range

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xavier, Prince K.; Petch, Jon C.; Klingaman, Nicholas P.; Woolnough, Steve J.; Jiang, Xianan; Waliser, Duane E.; Caian, Mihaela; Cole, Jason; Hagos, Samson M.; Hannay, Cecile; et al

    2015-05-26

    We present an analysis of diabatic heating and moistening processes from 12 to 36 h lead time forecasts from 12 Global Circulation Models as part of the “Vertical structure and physical processes of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO)” project. A lead time of 12–36 h is chosen to constrain the large-scale dynamics and thermodynamics to be close to observations while avoiding being too close to the initial spin-up of the models as they adjust to being driven from the Years of Tropical Convection (YOTC) analysis. A comparison of the vertical velocity and rainfall with the observations and YOTC analysis suggests thatmore » the phases of convection associated with the MJO are constrained in most models at this lead time although the rainfall in the suppressed phase is typically overestimated. Although the large-scale dynamics is reasonably constrained, moistening and heating profiles have large intermodel spread. In particular, there are large spreads in convective heating and moistening at midlevels during the transition to active convection. Radiative heating and cloud parameters have the largest relative spread across models at upper levels during the active phase. A detailed analysis of time step behavior shows that some models show strong intermittency in rainfall and differences in the precipitation and dynamics relationship between models. In conclusion, the wealth of model outputs archived during this project is a very valuable resource for model developers beyond the study of the MJO. Additionally, the findings of this study can inform the design of process model experiments, and inform the priorities for field experiments and future observing systems.« less

  16. Vertical structure and physical processes of the Madden-Julian Oscillation: Biases and uncertainties at short range

    SciTech Connect

    Xavier, Prince K.; Petch, Jon C.; Klingaman, Nicholas P.; Woolnough, Steve J.; Jiang, Xianan; Waliser, Duane E.; Caian, Mihaela; Cole, Jason; Hagos, Samson M.; Hannay, Cecile; Kim, Daehyun; Miyakawa, Tomoki; Pritchard, Michael S.; Roehrig, Romain; Shindo, Eiki; Vitart, Frederic; Wang, Hailan

    2015-05-26

    We present an analysis of diabatic heating and moistening processes from 12 to 36 h lead time forecasts from 12 Global Circulation Models as part of the “Vertical structure and physical processes of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO)” project. A lead time of 12–36 h is chosen to constrain the large-scale dynamics and thermodynamics to be close to observations while avoiding being too close to the initial spin-up of the models as they adjust to being driven from the Years of Tropical Convection (YOTC) analysis. A comparison of the vertical velocity and rainfall with the observations and YOTC analysis suggests that the phases of convection associated with the MJO are constrained in most models at this lead time although the rainfall in the suppressed phase is typically overestimated. Although the large-scale dynamics is reasonably constrained, moistening and heating profiles have large intermodel spread. In particular, there are large spreads in convective heating and moistening at midlevels during the transition to active convection. Radiative heating and cloud parameters have the largest relative spread across models at upper levels during the active phase. A detailed analysis of time step behavior shows that some models show strong intermittency in rainfall and differences in the precipitation and dynamics relationship between models. In conclusion, the wealth of model outputs archived during this project is a very valuable resource for model developers beyond the study of the MJO. Additionally, the findings of this study can inform the design of process model experiments, and inform the priorities for field experiments and future observing systems.

  17. Semiempirical Procedure for Estimating Lift and Drag Characteristics of Propeller-Wing-Flap Configurations for Vertical-and Short-Take-Off-and-Landing Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Richard E.

    1959-01-01

    The analysis presented uses the momentum theory as a starting point in developing semiempirical expressions for calculating the effect of propeller thrust and slipstream on the lift and drag characteristics of wing-flap configurations that would be suitable for vertical-take-off-and-landing (VTOL) and short-take-off-and-landing (STOL) airplanes. The method uses power-off forward-speed information and measured slipstream deflection data at zero forward speed to provide a basis for estimating the lift and drag at combined forward speed and power-on conditions. A correlation of slipstream deflection data is also included. The procedure is applicable only in the unstalled flight regime; nevertheless, it should be useful in preliminary design estimates of the performance that may be expected of VTOL and STOL airplanes.

  18. Short-Pulse Operation of a High-Power-Density Proton-Implanted Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naito, Hideyuki; Miyamoto, Masahiro; Aoki, Yuta; Higuchi, Akira; Torii, Kousuke; Nagakura, Takehito; Morita, Takenori; Maeda, Junya; Miyajima, Hirofumi; Yoshida, Harumasa

    2012-08-01

    We report on a GaAs-based high-power-density vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser diode (VCSEL) array with ion-implanted isolated current apertures. A peak output power of 40.6 W has been achieved from the VCSEL array with seven emitters under 100-ns-pulse operation. This is the first demonstration of a ten-watt-class output power for a VCSEL array with ion-implanted isolated current aperture configuration. The corresponding power-density is estimated to be 73.8 kW/cm2, which is three times greater than the record power-density of the short-pulse-operated oxide-confined VCSEL.

  19. Short-term changes in population structure and vertical distribution of mesopelagic copepods during the spring phytoplankton bloom in the Oyashio region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Yoshiyuki; Ishii, Ken-ichiro; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Imai, Ichiro

    To evaluate the responses to the spring phytoplankton bloom, short-term changes in population structure and vertical distribution of mesopelagic copepods (Gaetanus simplex, Gaidius variabilis, Pleuromamma scutullata, Paraeuchaeta elongata, P. birostrata, Heterorhabdus tanneri and Heterostylites major) were studied in the Oyashio region. Samples were collected with a 60 μm mesh VMPS from 9 strata between 0 and 1000 m both day and night on five occasions during March-April 2007. All the species except Heterorhabdidae species performed reproduction during the spring phytoplankton bloom, while no recruitment to copepodid stages was detected because the newly born individuals were eggs or nauplii. The shallower-living species, G. simplex, P. scutullata and P. elongata had nocturnal ascent diel vertical migration (DVM). While suspension feeding copepods cease DVM after 11 April (P. scutullata) or 23 April (G. simplex), carnivorous P. elongata continued DVM over the study period. Since the gut contents of G. simplex showed a nocturnal increment even in the period of no DVM (23 and 29 April), they might be feeding at depth without DVM. Thus, the cessation of DVM in mesopelagic suspension feeding copepods would be induced by the increase of sinking particles (e.g. food for suspension feeders) during the spring phytoplankton bloom.

  20. Short-Term Fidelity, Habitat Use and Vertical Movement Behavior of the Black Rockfish Sebastes schlegelii as Determined by Acoustic Telemetry

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yingqiu; Xu, Qiang; Alós, Josep; Liu, Hui; Xu, Qinzeng; Yang, Hongsheng

    2015-01-01

    The recent miniaturization of acoustic tracking devices has allowed fishery managers and scientists to collect spatial and temporal data for sustainable fishery management. The spatial and temporal dimensions of fish behavior (movement and/or vertical migrations) are particularly relevant for rockfishes (Sebastes spp.) because most rockfish species are long-lived and have high site fidelity, increasing their vulnerability to overexploitation. In this study, we describe the short-term (with a tracking period of up to 46 d) spatial behavior, as determined by acoustic tracking, of the black rockfish Sebastes schlegelii, a species subject to overexploitation in the Yellow Sea of China. The average residence index (the ratio of detected days to the total period from release to the last detection) in the study area was 0.92 ± 0.13, and most of the tagged fish were detected by only one region of the acoustic receiver array, suggesting relatively high site fidelity to the study area. Acoustic tracking also suggested that this species is more frequently detected during the day than at night in our study area. However, the diel detection periodicity (24 h) was only evident for certain periods of the tracking time, as revealed by a continuous wavelet transform. The habitat selection index of tagged S. schlegelii suggested that S. schlegelii preferred natural reefs, mixed sand/artificial reef bottoms and mixed bottoms of boulder, cobble, gravel and artificial reefs. The preference of this species for the artificial reefs that were recently deployed in the study area suggests that artificial seascapes may be effective management tools to attract individuals. The vertical movement of tagged S. schlegelii was mostly characterized by bottom dwelling behavior, and there was high individual variability in the vertical migration pattern. Our results have important implications for S. schlegelii catchability, the implementation of marine protected areas, and the identification of key species habitats, and our study provides novel information for future studies on the sustainability of this important marine resource in eastern China. PMID:26322604

  1. Dynamics of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers in the short external cavity regime: Pulse packages and polarization mode competition

    SciTech Connect

    Tabaka, Andrzej; Thienpont, Hugo; Veretennicoff, Irina; Panajotov, Krassimir; Peil, Michael; Elsaesser, Wolfgang; Sciamanna, Marc; Fischer, Ingo

    2006-01-15

    We study the influence of delayed optical feedback from a short external cavity (EC) on the emission dynamics of vertical-cavity surface-emitting semiconductor lasers (VCSELs). We find the emergence of pulse packages (PP) exhibiting characteristics which originate from the interplay of time-delay induced dynamics and polarization mode (PM) competition. We provide detailed analysis of the polarization dynamics applying complementary cross-correlation and spectral analysis techniques. The analysis reveals an interplay of the dynamics linked to the hierarchy of time scales present in the laser system: the fast time scale of the EC delay, the slower time scale of the PP, and the slow time scale of the polarization mode competition. For an analysis of the dynamics we provide a toolbox of methods adapted to the different relevant time scales and temporal variations of the dynamics. This complementary view unveils distinct changes in the relative oscillation phase of the two PM for increasing the injection current on both the fast and the slow time scales. Our results emphasize the significance of the polarization mode competition for PP dynamics in VCSELs, contrasting the observed behavior to what was reported for edge emitters.

  2. Morphologic and Geochronological constraints on the long (> Ma) and short (10-100 Kyr) term vertical rates on south Tibetan normal faults.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kali, E.; van der Woerd, J.; Arnaud, N.; Leloup, P. H.; Mahéo, G.; Liu-Zeng, J.; Chevalier, M. L.; Lacassin, R.; Tapponnier, P.; Thuizat, R.

    2009-04-01

    Quantification of slip and exhumation rates along the long recognized north-south trending active normal faults of the Tibetan plateau are key data in order to constrain mechanical models of the geodynamic evolution of the India-Asia convergence zone. In this study, we combine morphologic, structural, petrological analysis and low to medium thermo-chronology of Quaternary and basement rocks in order to compare short-term and long-term fault rates along two of the main Tibetan rifts systems: Yadong-Gulu and Xainza-Dinggye. At the southern end of the Xainza-Dingyye rift system the Ama Drime range (Everest region) is a horst flanked on each side by N-S trending ductile normal shear zones and active normal faults. Petrological studies combined with U/Pb and Ar/Ar geochronology reveal that the horst formation induced an exhumation on the order of 2 to 4 kbar (7 to 15 km), starting at ~12 Ma. This corresponds to exhumation rates of 0.6 to 1.3 mm/year. Low temperature geochronology (apatite (U-Th)/He dating) indicate Pliocene apparent exhumation rates of about 1 mm/yr since ~5 Ma for the whole massif (this study, Jessup et al., 2008). Short term fault rates can be obtained using cosmogenic nuclide exposure ages of offset geomorphic features such as terraces or moraines. Such features are abundant along the western flank of the Ama Drime range, where the Kharta active fault separates the range from the Kharta basin where the Arun river has abandoned fluvial terraces. The river crosses the fault three times carving deep gorges into the footwall before finally crossing the Himalayas. In the southern part of the Kharta basin, river terraces ~100 m above the present riverbed are offset between 10 and 15 m by one branch of the normal fault. 10Be cosmogenic nuclide exposure ages of these terraces range between 9 and 11 kyr, consistent with aggradation after the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM ~20 ka), followed by rapid incision of the Arun. Together, offsets and ages imply a vertical throw-rate of about 0.9 to 1.7 mm/yr. A few kilometres south of Kharta, the normal fault offsets abandoned lateral moraines by about 30 m. The age of these moraines is yet unknown but 10Be ages of similar lateral moraines on the eastern flank of the Ama Drime range between 20 to 40 ka, in agreement with emplacement during the MIS stages 2-4 and a post-LGM glacier retreat. Taking these ages for the moraines near Kharta would yield a late Pleistocene slip-rate of 0.7 to 1.5 mm/yr on the western branch of the Kharta fault. 70 kilometres farther north-east, moraines across the Nabja west-dipping normal fault are offset by 15-20 m. All these data indicate similar short- and long-term vertical rates on the order of 0.6 to 1.7 mm/yr on the N-S active faults in the Ama Drime area. Similar rates of deformation are found along two other rift systems. In the Kung Co half grabben, thermochronological data indicate apparent exhumation rates between 0.35 and 0.93 mm/yr since ~4 Ma (Maheo et al., 2007). North of the Yarlung Zangbo, in the Nianqentanglha range exposure ages of lateral moraines have also shown to have ages ranging from 20 to 40 ka. Since these moraines are offset by 20 to 40 m this would correspond to 0.5 to 1.5 mm/yr of vertical offset but more precise estimates are underway. Data from three different active south Tibetan grabens suggest vertical throw rates on the order of 0.5-1.7 mm/yr initiating in the Pliocene with the long-term, Pliocene apparent exhumation rate being similar than the Late Pleistocene-Holocene rates determined from offset moraines and river terraces. These results suggest that south Tibetan E-W extension rates did not significantly change since ~4Ma. This has major implications for the structural evolution of the Tibetan plateau, particularly for models of E-W extension. More data on the timing of E-W extension throughout Tibet should help constrain further the age of extensional onset and whether it varies regionally. References : Jessup et al., Geology, 36, 2008. Maheo et al., Earth Planet Sci. Lett., 256, 2007.

  3. Short-term effects of irrigation with treated domestic wastewater on microbiological activity of a Vertic xerofluvent soil under Mediterranean conditions.

    PubMed

    Kayikcioglu, Huseyin Husnu

    2012-07-15

    Approximately 70% of the world water use, including all the water diverted from rivers and pumped from underground, is used for agricultural irrigation, so the reuse of treated domestic wastewater (TWW) for purposes such as agricultural and landscape irrigation reduces the amount of water that needs to be extracted from natural water sources as well as reducing discharge of wastewater to the environment. Thus, TWW is a valuable water source for recycling and reusing in arid and semi-arid regions which are frequently confronting water shortages. In this regard, this study was planned to reveal the short-term effects of advanced-TWW irrigation on microbial parameters of Vertic xerofluvent soil. For this purpose, certain parameters were measured in the study, including soil total organic carbon (C(org)), N-mineralization (N(min)), microbial biomass carbon (C(mic)), soil microbial quotient (C(mic)/C(org)) and the activities of the enzymes dehydrogenase (DHG), urease (UA), alkaline phosphatase (ALKPA), β-glucosidase (GLU) and aryl sulphatase (ArSA) in soils irrigated with TWW and fresh water (FW). All of the microbial parameters were negatively affected by TWW irrigation. Microbial parameters decreased by 10.1%-54.1% in comparison with the FW plots. This decrease especially in enzymatic activities of soil irrigated with TWW, presumably due to some heavy metals inhibited their activity associated with the soil types and the concentrations of heavy metals in wastewater. In contrast, C(mic)/C(org) was found higher in the plots irrigated with TWW at the end of the experiment. The addition of organic matter to soil by irrigation with TWW is cause for the increase in this ratio. The dose of irrigation should be modified to reduce the quantity and to increase the frequency of application to avoid the loss of aggregation and salt accumulation. TWW irrigation is a strategy with many benefits to agricultural land management; however, long-term studies should be implemented to investigate the microbiological characteristics of soil and to assess the feasibility of wastewater reuse for irrigation. PMID:22446138

  4. Short-term breast-feeding may reduce the risk of vertical transmission of HTLV-I. The Tsushima ATL Study Group.

    PubMed

    Takezaki, T; Tajima, K; Ito, M; Ito, S; Kinoshita, K; Tachibana, K; Matsushita, Y

    1997-04-01

    To establish a desirable preventive measure against mother-to-child transmission of HTLV-I through breast milk, we conducted a prospective study to investigate the seroconversion rate among children born to HTLV-I carrier mothers on two highly HTLV-I-endemic islands where 8% of pregnant women carry HTLV-I. Between 1985 to 1991, 428 pregnant women were found to be positive against anti-HTLV-I antibody and were advised not to breast-feed their newborn babies. Among them, 212 women (50%) accepted this advice and the other mothers proceeded to breast-feed. Results were obtained from 277 children born to HTLV-I carrier mothers and were followed up until more than 30 months of age. When the seroconversion rate was analyzed by feeding manner, short-term breast-feeders (< or = 6 months) showed a statistically significant lower seroconversion rate than long-term breast-feeders (2/51; 3.9% vs. 13/64; 20.3%, p < 0.05). On the other hand, four out of 162 bottle-fed children (2.5%) became positive. It is hypothesized that maternal HTLV-I antibody may protect babies from HTLV-I infection through breast milk during the first 6 months. PMID:9209298

  5. THE VERTICAL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albert, Stephen L.; Spencer, Jeffrey B.

    1994-01-01

    'THE VERTICAL' computer keyboard is designed to address critical factors which contribute to Repetitive Motion Injuries (RMI) (including Carpal Tunnel Syndrome) in association with computer keyboard usage. This keyboard splits the standard QWERTY design into two halves and positions each half 90 degrees from the desk. In order to access a computer correctly. 'THE VERTICAL' requires users to position their bodies in optimal alignment with the keyboard. The orthopaedically neutral forearm position (with hands palms-in and thumbs-up) reduces nerve compression in the forearm. The vertically arranged keypad halves ameliorate onset occurrence of keyboard-associated RMI. By utilizing visually-reference mirrored mylar surfaces adjustable to the user's eye, the user is able to readily reference any key indicia (reversed) just as they would on a conventional keyboard. Transverse adjustability substantially reduces cumulative musculoskeletal discomfort in the shoulders. 'THE VERTICAL' eliminates the need for an exterior mouse by offering a convenient finger-accessible curser control while the hands remain in the vertically neutral position. The potential commercial application for 'THE VERTICAL' is enormous since the product can effect every person who uses a computer anywhere in the world. Employers and their insurance carriers are spending hundreds of millions of dollars per year as a result of RMI. This keyboard will reduce the risk.

  6. Vertical sleeve gastrectomy

    MedlinePlus

    Gastrectomy - sleeve; Gastrectomy - greater curvature; Gastrectomy - parietal; Gastric reduction; Vertical gastroplasty ... been able to lose weight through diet and exercise. Vertical sleeve gastrectomy is not a quick fix ...

  7. Inter-plate and intraplate seismotectonic complex deduced from long-term and short-term records of vertical movements of the Sanriku coast on the Northeast Japan forearc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimura, D.; Miyauchi, T.; Kaneda, H.

    2012-12-01

    The 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake (Mw 9.0) was accompanied by wide crustal subsidence (max. 1.2 m) along the Saniku coast on the Northeast Japan forearc, about 150 km distant from the axis of Japan Trench. This fact led us to qualitatively and quantitatively reexamine the component of coseismic, post-seismic and inter-seismic crustal movements in cumulative long-term uplift of the coast on the forearc. We demonstrate a geodynamic diagram of vertical movements of the coast and refer to another possible intraplate earthquake off the coast, based on geomorphological method and subsurface core analysis. Mid-late Pleistocene marine terraces indicating the average uplift rate of 0.2-0.4 mm/yr are well developed along the northern part of the Sanriku coast. Holocene intermittently emergent shoreline topography is partially recognized at two levels, 4 m and 2 m in altitude. The 14C dates and lithofacies of geologic cores indicate the tendency of successive subsidence and the seeming subsidence rate of 3 mm/yr in Holocene. Recent tidal data show the faster subsidence rate of 5-9 mm/yr in the last 50 years. Furthermore, no historical large earthquakes with distinct coastal uplifts are documented in the last 1200 years. Such complex vertical movement of the Sanriku coast suggests that another unusual coseismic uplift different from the 2011's M9 earthquake occurred during continuous inter-seismic crustal subsidence, which was accompanied by vertical uplift of 5 m along the northern Sanriku coast. The seismic source fault is estimated be under a 150 km long flexural scarp, 20 km off the coast. The expected magnitude and recurrence interval of offshore earthquakes are more than M8 and 1500 years, respectively. This episodic co-seismic uplift by intraplate great earthquakes quantitatively excelled the inter-seismic subsidence by the drag of coupling of plates and the coseismic subsidence at gigantic plate boundary earthquakes, and the total plus balance in vertical movements has possibly produced the sequence of Pleistocene marine terraces corresponding to interglacial high sea-level stands.

  8. Congenital Vertical Talus: Etiology and Management.

    PubMed

    Miller, Mark; Dobbs, Matthew B

    2015-10-01

    Congenital vertical talus is a rare foot deformity. If left untreated, it causes significant disability, including pain and functional limitations. Although the etiology of vertical talus is likely heterogeneous, recent evidence strongly supports a genetic cause linking it to genes expressed during early limb development. Traditional management for vertical talus involves extensive surgeries that are associated with significant short- and long-term complications. A minimally invasive approach that relies on serial manipulation and casting to achieve most of the correction has been shown to produce excellent short-term results with regard to clinical and radiographic correction in both isolated and nonisolated cases of vertical talus. Although long-term studies are needed, achieving correction without extensive surgery may lead to more flexible and functional feet, much as Ponseti method has done for clubfeet. PMID:26337950

  9. Vertical bounce of two vertically aligned balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2007-11-01

    When a tennis ball rests on top of a basketball and both drop to the floor together, the tennis ball is projected vertically at high speed. A mass-spring model of the impact, as well as air track data, suggest that the tennis ball should be projected at relatively low speed. Measurements of the forces on each ball and the bounce of vertically aligned superballs are used to resolve the discrepancy.

  10. Vertical axis wind turbines

    DOEpatents

    Krivcov, Vladimir; Krivospitski, Vladimir; Maksimov, Vasili; Halstead, Richard; Grahov, Jurij

    2011-03-08

    A vertical axis wind turbine is described. The wind turbine can include a top ring, a middle ring and a lower ring, wherein a plurality of vertical airfoils are disposed between the rings. For example, three vertical airfoils can be attached between the upper ring and the middle ring. In addition, three more vertical airfoils can be attached between the lower ring and the middle ring. When wind contacts the vertically arranged airfoils the rings begin to spin. By connecting the rings to a center pole which spins an alternator, electricity can be generated from wind.

  11. Vertical axis wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Y.; Seki, K.; Shimizu, Y.

    1981-01-27

    Wind turbines are largely divided into vertical axis wind turbines and propeller (Horizontal axis) wind turbines. The present invention discloses a vertical axis high speed wind turbine provided with a starting and braking control system. This vertical axis wind turbine is formed by having blades of a proper airfoil fitted to respective supporting arms provided radially from a vertical rotary axis by keeping the blade span-wise direction in parallel with the axis and being provided with a low speed control windmill in which the radial position of each operating piece varies with a centrifugal force produced by the rotation of the vertical rotary axis.

  12. 850-nm Zn-diffusion vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with with oxide-relief structure for high-speed and energy-efficient optical interconnects from very-short to medium (2km) reaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jin-Wei; Wei, Chia-Chien; Chen, Jason (Jyehong); Yang, Ying-Jay

    2015-03-01

    High-speed and "green" ~850 nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) have lately attracted lots of attention due to their suitability for applications in optical interconnects (OIs). To further enhance the speed and its maximum allowable linking distance of VCSELs are two major trends to meet the requirement of OI in next generation data centers. Recently, by use of the advanced 850 nm VCSEL technique, data rate as high as 64 Gbit/sec over 57m and 20 Gbit/sec over 2km MMF transmission have been demonstrated, respectively. Here, we will review our recent work about 850 nm Zn-diffusion VCSELs with oxide-relief apertures to further enhance the above-mentioned performances. By using Zn-diffusion, we can not only reduce the device resistance but also manipulate the number of optical modes to benefit transmission. Combing such device, which has excellent single-mode (SMSR >30 dB) and high-power (~7mW) performance, with advanced modulation format (OFDM), record-high bit-rate-distance-product through MMF (2.3 km×28 Gbit/sec) has been demonstrated. Furthermore, by selective etching away the oxide aperture inside Zn-diffusion VCSEL, significant enhancement of device speed, D-factor, and reliability can be observed. With such unique VCSEL structure, >40 Gbit/sec energy-efficient transmission over 100m MMF under extremely low-driving current density (<10kA/cm2) has been successfully demonstrated.

  13. Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2002-04-01

    Blade fatigue life is an important element in determining the economic viability of the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT). VAWT-SAL Vertical Axis Wind Turbine- Stochastic Aerodynamic Loads Ver 3.2 numerically simulates the stochastic (random0 aerodynamic loads of the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) created by the atomspheric turbulence. The program takes into account the rotor geometry, operating conditions, and assumed turbulence properties.

  14. Vertical axis wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Y.; Seki, K.; Shimizu, Y.

    1981-01-27

    Wind turbines are largely divided into vertical axis wind turbines and propeller (Horizontal axis) wind turbines. The present invention discloses a vertical axis high speed wind turbine provided with rotational speed control systems. This vertical axis wind turbine is formed by having blades of a proper airfoil fitted to respective supporting arms provided radially from a vertical rotating shaft by keeping the blade span-wise direction in parallel with the shaft and being provided with aerodynamic control elements operating manually or automatically to control the rotational speed of the turbine.

  15. Vertical axis windmill

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.S.

    1980-04-08

    A vertical axis windmill is described which involves a rotatable central vertical shaft having horizontal arms pivotally supporting three sails that are free to function in the wind like the main sail on a sail boat, and means for disabling the sails to allow the windmill to be stopped in a blowing wind.

  16. 14. Pier under south line of trusses supporting vertical strut ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Pier under south line of trusses supporting vertical strut shown in MN-61-11. View to northeast. - Selby Avenue Bridge, Spanning Short Line Railways track at Selby Avenue between Hamline & Snelling Avenues, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  17. 17. Detail showing roller nest for vertical strut sitting atop ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Detail showing roller nest for vertical strut sitting atop granite pier cap. View to southwest. - Selby Avenue Bridge, Spanning Short Line Railways track at Selby Avenue between Hamline & Snelling Avenues, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  18. 15. Detail showing lower chord pinconnected to vertical member, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Detail showing lower chord pin-connected to vertical member, showing floor beam riveted to extension of vertical member below pin-connection, and showing brackets supporting cantilevered sidewalk. View to southwest. - Selby Avenue Bridge, Spanning Short Line Railways track at Selby Avenue between Hamline & Snelling Avenues, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  19. Micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, A.P.; Sommargren, G.E.; McConaghy, C.F.; Krulevitch, P.A.

    1999-10-19

    A micromachined vertical actuator utilizing a levitational force, such as in electrostatic comb drives, provides vertical actuation that is relatively linear in actuation for control, and can be readily combined with parallel plate capacitive position sensing for position control. The micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator provides accurate movement in the sub-micron to micron ranges which is desirable in the phase modulation instrument, such as optical phase shifting. For example, compact, inexpensive, and position controllable micromirrors utilizing an electrostatic vertical actuator can replace the large, expensive, and difficult-to-maintain piezoelectric actuators. A thirty pound piezoelectric actuator with corner cube reflectors, as utilized in a phase shifting diffraction interferometer can be replaced with a micromirror and a lens. For any very precise and small amplitudes of motion, micromachined electrostatic actuation may be used because it is the most compact in size, with low power consumption and has more straightforward sensing and control options.

  20. Micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Sommargren, Gary E.; McConaghy, Charles F.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    1999-10-19

    A micromachined vertical actuator utilizing a levitational force, such as in electrostatic comb drives, provides vertical actuation that is relatively linear in actuation for control, and can be readily combined with parallel plate capacitive position sensing for position control. The micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator provides accurate movement in the sub-micron to micron ranges which is desirable in the phase modulation instrument, such as optical phase shifting. For example, compact, inexpensive, and position controllable micromirrors utilizing an electrostatic vertical actuator can replace the large, expensive, and difficult-to-maintain piezoelectric actuators. A thirty pound piezoelectric actuator with corner cube reflectors, as utilized in a phase shifting diffraction interferometer can be replaced with a micromirror and a lens. For any very precise and small amplitudes of motion` micromachined electrostatic actuation may be used because it is the most compact in size, with low power consumption and has more straightforward sensing and control options.

  1. Short philtrum

    MedlinePlus

    Chromosome 18q deletion syndrome Cohen syndrome DiGeorge syndrome Oral-facial-digital syndrome (OFD) ... are present? Tests to diagnose a short philtrum: Chromosome studies Enzyme tests Metabolic studies on both mother ...

  2. Vertical flowline connector

    SciTech Connect

    Saliger, K. C.

    1985-10-01

    Several embodiments are disclosed of a vertical type of flowline connector for providing a fluid connection between a horizontal flowline and an additional subsea facility. The upper and lower portions of the connector can be properly positioned relative to each other by simply lowering an upper female portion of the connector onto a lower male portion thereof. The lower portion of the connector at the subsea facility is provided with at least two vertically positioned, upwardly facing male mandrel connectors. The upper portion of the connector assembly includes at least two vertically positioned, downwardly facing corresponding female connectors designed to be lowered onto the corresponding male mandrel connectors. At least one of the female connectors is mounted on the connector assembly by a free floating mounting. The free floating mounting allows for slight misalignments of the female connectors relative to the corresponding male connectors as the upper connector assembly is lowered onto, and passively positioned relative to, the lower connector assembly.

  3. Vertical leaf pressure filter LVAzh 225

    SciTech Connect

    Fomichev, V.I.; Abramov, V.P.; Gutin, Y.V.

    1984-01-01

    A new vertical lead pressure filter LVAzh 225 has been developed with an arrangement for hydraulic coke removal. Industrial trials of the filter, however, showed the service life of the rubber seals of the butterfly valves to be short, so that butterfly valves were replaced by shut-off valves with a pneumatic drive. The prototype of the LVAzh 225 leaf filter has been recommended for series production.

  4. Improved vertical scanning interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harasaki, Akiko

    2000-11-01

    Vertical scanning interferometers are routinely used for the measurement of optical fiber connectors. There are increasing needs for measurements of such items as machined surfaces, contact lenses, paint texture, cell structure, and integrated circuit devices, to name a few. These structures have too much depth, or are too rough, to measure with standard interferometry methods. Phase- measurement interferometry methods are limited to surfaces that do not have any discontinuities larger than one quarter of the operating wavelength. On the other hand, vertical scanning interferometers can be very effective, even though they have low height resolution compared to that of phase-measurement interferometers. Improving the height resolution of vertical scanning interferometers from the point of hardware improvement and signal processing has been one of the major research interests in the surface metrology area. This work provides a new algorithm, which called here ``PSI on the Fly'' technique, as a solution for improving height resolution of vertical scanning interferometers. This dissertation begins with a review of white-light interference microscopes. The height and lateral resolutions are derived based on scalar diffraction theory. Next, various well-established. algorithms for finding a topographic map of the small object surface are discussed. The work proceeds with a discussion of the phase change upon reflection and its influence on the coherence envelope. Then phase measurement interferometry methods are reviewed. The emphasis is in errors in phase measurement resulting from using a white light source instead of a monochromatic light source as in the usual case. The following chapter describes and examines an often- observed artifact of vertical-scanning interferometry when applied to step heights. The artifact is called ``bat wings'' because of its appearance. The physical cause of the ``bat wings'' artifact is discussed through a diffraction model. The next chapter proposes an improved vertical-scanning interferometry algorithm. The method, called here ``PSI on the Fly'' technique, has been developed by combining regular vertical-scanning interferometry and a monochromatic phase-shifting interferometry technique. The PSI on the Fly technique improves the surface height resolution of vertical scanning interferometry to that of a phase-shifting interferometry measurement. In addition to the resolution improvement, the algorithm also successfully removes the ``bat wings'' artifact.

  5. Overview of STOVL aircraft propulsion research offtakes and vertical lift systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biesiadny, Thomas J.; Mcardle, Jack G.; Esker, Barbara S.

    1993-01-01

    The overall Short Takeoff and Vertical Landing (STOVL) Aircraft Propulsion Research program includes key technologies involving offtake systems, vertical lift systems, hot gas ingestion, STOVL augmentors, and integrated flight propulsion controls. A part of the NASA Lewis work involving STOVL aircraft propulsion systems is presented with the emphasis on component-level experiments and analysis related to offtakes and vertical lift systems.

  6. Vertical Propagation of Lakewide Internal Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Stephen; Harrison, John; Deemer, Bridget

    2013-04-01

    Internal seiches dominate flows in the interior of many lakes. Seiche dissipation generates turbulence, which is responsible for mixing heat, sediments, chemicals, organisms, and pollutants. We present observations of a new type of seiche-like internal wave propagating vertically in a small lake (main basin 3000m by 400m by 18m). Velocity and temperature profiles indicate that the observed waves, like seiches, had horizontal wavelengths exceeding the metalimnion length. However, the vertical propagation of the observed waves contrasts with the vertically-standing behavior of non-dissipative seiches. The observed propagation was predicted by a simple model for dissipation in the bottom boundary layer. The model and data indicate that the waves had small vertical group velocity, leading to a slow supply of energy to the lakebed, which could easily be dissipated rather than being reflected. Similar slow vertical propagation and boundary layer absorption is predicted in other short, deep lakes with strong near-bed stratification. The absence of upward-propagating energy precludes seiche resonance, limits focusing of waves toward attractors, and suggests that hypolimnion dissipation was limited by the supply of downward-propagating energy.

  7. Aiding Vertical Guidance Understanding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feary, Michael; McCrobie, Daniel; Alkin, Martin; Sherry, Lance; Polson, Peter; Palmer, Everett; McQuinn, Noreen

    1998-01-01

    A two-part study was conducted to evaluate modern flight deck automation and interfaces. In the first part, a survey was performed to validate the existence of automation surprises with current pilots. Results indicated that pilots were often surprised by the behavior of the automation. There were several surprises that were reported more frequently than others. An experimental study was then performed to evaluate (1) the reduction of automation surprises through training specifically for the vertical guidance logic, and (2) a new display that describes the flight guidance in terms of aircraft behaviors instead of control modes. The study was performed in a simulator that was used to run a complete flight with actual airline pilots. Three groups were used to evaluate the guidance display and training. In the training, condition, participants went through a training program for vertical guidance before flying the simulation. In the display condition, participants ran through the same training program and then flew the experimental scenario with the new Guidance-Flight Mode Annunciator (G-FMA). Results showed improved pilot performance when given training specifically for the vertical guidance logic and greater improvements when given the training and the new G-FMA. Using actual behavior of the avionics to design pilot training and FMA is feasible, and when the automated vertical guidance mode of the Flight Management System is engaged, the display of the guidance mode and targets yields improved pilot performance.

  8. Vertical shaft windmill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grana, D. C.; Inge, S. V., Jr. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A vertical shaft has several equally spaced blades mounted. Each blade consists of an inboard section and an outboard section skew hinged to the inboard section. The inboard sections automatically adjust their positions with respect to the fixed inboard sections with changes in velocity of the wind. This windmill design automatically governs the maximum rotational speed of shaft.

  9. Vertical organic transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüssem, Björn; Günther, Alrun; Fischer, Axel; Kasemann, Daniel; Leo, Karl

    2015-11-01

    Organic switching devices such as field effect transistors (OFETs) are a key element of future flexible electronic devices. So far, however, a commercial breakthrough has not been achieved because these devices usually lack in switching speed (e.g. for logic applications) and current density (e.g. for display pixel driving). The limited performance is caused by a combination of comparatively low charge carrier mobilities and the large channel length caused by the need for low-cost structuring. Vertical Organic Transistors are a novel technology that has the potential to overcome these limitations of OFETs. Vertical Organic Transistors allow to scale the channel length of organic transistors into the 100 nm regime without cost intensive structuring techniques. Several different approaches have been proposed in literature, which show high output currents, low operation voltages, and comparatively high speed even without sub-μm structuring technologies. In this review, these different approaches are compared and recent progress is highlighted.

  10. Hilly Surroundings (vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 360-degree view of the terrain surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit was taken on the rover's 189th sol on Mars (July 15, 2004). It was assembled from images taken by the rover's navigation camera at a position referred to as Site 72, which is at the base of the 'West Spur' portion of the 'Columbia Hills.'' The view is presented in a vertical projection with geometrical seam correction.

  11. Vertical bloch line memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, Romney R. (Inventor); Stadler, Henry L. (Inventor); Wu, Jiin-chuan (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A new read gate design for the vertical Bloch line (VBL) memory is disclosed which offers larger operating margin than the existing read gate designs. In the existing read gate designs, a current is applied to all the stripes. The stripes that contain a VBL pair are chopped, while the stripes that do not contain a VBL pair are not chopped. The information is then detected by inspecting the presence or absence of the bubble. The margin of the chopping current amplitude is very small, and sometimes non-existent. A new method of reading Vertical Bloch Line memory is also disclosed. Instead of using the wall chirality to separate the two binary states, the spatial deflection of the stripe head is used. Also disclosed herein is a compact memory which uses vertical Bloch line (VBL) memory technology for providing data storage. A three-dimensional arrangement in the form of stacks of VBL memory layers is used to achieve high volumetric storage density. High data transfer rate is achieved by operating all the layers in parallel. Using Hall effect sensing, and optical sensing via the Faraday effect to access the data from within the three-dimensional packages, an even higher data transfer rate can be achieved due to parallel operation within each layer.

  12. The vertical motion simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosein, Todd

    1988-01-01

    Today's flight simulators, such as NASA's multimillion dollar Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS), recreate an authentic aircraft environment, and reproduce the sensations of flight by mechanically generating true physical events. In addition to their application as a training tool for pilots, simulators have become essential in the design, construction, and testing of new aircraft. Simulators allow engineers to study an aircraft's flight performance and characteristics without the cost or risk of an actual test flight. Because of their practicality, simulators will become more and more important in the development and design of new, safer aircraft.

  13. 'Endurance' Untouched (vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This navigation camera mosaic, created from images taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on sols 115 and 116 (May 21 and 22, 2004) provides a dramatic view of 'Endurance Crater.' The rover engineering team carefully plotted the safest path into the football field-sized crater, eventually easing the rover down the slopes around sol 130 (June 12, 2004). To the upper left of the crater sits the rover's protective heatshield, which sheltered Opportunity as it passed through the martian atmosphere. The 360-degree view is presented in a vertical projection, with geometric and radiometric seam correction.

  14. Vertical organic transistors.

    PubMed

    Lüssem, Björn; Günther, Alrun; Fischer, Axel; Kasemann, Daniel; Leo, Karl

    2015-11-11

    Organic switching devices such as field effect transistors (OFETs) are a key element of future flexible electronic devices. So far, however, a commercial breakthrough has not been achieved because these devices usually lack in switching speed (e.g. for logic applications) and current density (e.g. for display pixel driving). The limited performance is caused by a combination of comparatively low charge carrier mobilities and the large channel length caused by the need for low-cost structuring. Vertical Organic Transistors are a novel technology that has the potential to overcome these limitations of OFETs. Vertical Organic Transistors allow to scale the channel length of organic transistors into the 100 nm regime without cost intensive structuring techniques. Several different approaches have been proposed in literature, which show high output currents, low operation voltages, and comparatively high speed even without sub-μm structuring technologies. In this review, these different approaches are compared and recent progress is highlighted. PMID:26466388

  15. Numerical modeling of vertical cavity semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, W.W.; Hadley, G.R.

    1996-08-01

    A vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) is a diode laser whose optical cavity is formed by growing or depositing DBR mirror stacks that sandwich an active gain region. The resulting short cavity supports lasing into a single longitudinal mode normal to the wafer, making these devices ideal for a multitude of applications, ranging from high-speed communication to high-power sources (from 2D arrays). This report describes the development of a numerical VCSEL model, whose goal is to both further their understanding of these complex devices and provide a tool for accurate design and data analysis.

  16. Radiation tolerance of vertical junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schelnine, A.; Wohlgemuth, J.

    1980-01-01

    Extensive radiation testing of vertical junction (VJ) solar cells demonstrated a radiation tolerance better than both planar silicon cells and at least one type of (AlGa)As-GaAs cell. Due to tradeoffs between short circuit current and open circuit voltage, the end of life (10 to the 16th power 1 MeV electrons/sq cm) maximum power point is nearly independent of bulk resistivity between 2 and 10 ohm cm, increases slightly with increasing wafer thickness between 3 and 11 mils, and increases slightly with increasing groove depth between 1 and 3 mils.

  17. Vertical ramisection for prognathism.

    PubMed

    Broadbent, T R; Woolf, R M

    1977-11-01

    Forty-four patients with Class III malocclusion, who were operated on for prognathism, have been reviewed. In spite of the associated problems of pain, nausea, fear, relapse, additional orthodontia, lip numbness, lip weakness, and 8 weeks with their teeth wired together, only one patient of the 44 said he (or she) would decline this surgery if it were to be considered anew. The surgeon must make a strong effort to keep the vertical cut in the bony ramus posterior to the lingula, to avoid postoperative lip numbness. He should also keep traction on the soft tissues minimal, to avoid postoperative weakness of the lower lip. A significant relapse was uncommon in this series, and the facial symmetry was greatly enhanced. Most of these 44 patients (66 percent) said the improvement in their self-image and personal appearance was far more important to them than the improvement in their bite. PMID:918178

  18. Multicolored Vertical Silicon Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Kwanyong; Wober, Munib; Steinvurzel, P.; Schonbrun, E.; Dan, Yaping; Ellenbogen, T.; Crozier, K. B.

    2011-04-13

    We demonstrate that vertical silicon nanowires take on a surprising variety of colors covering the entire visible spectrum, in marked contrast to the gray color of bulk silicon. This effect is readily observable by bright-field microscopy, or even to the naked eye. The reflection spectra of the nanowires each show a dip whose position depends on the nanowire radii. We compare the experimental data to the results of finite difference time domain simulations to elucidate the physical mechanisms behind the phenomena we observe. The nanowires are fabricated as arrays, but the vivid colors arise not from scattering or diffractive effects of the array, but from the guided mode properties of the individual nanowires. Each nanowire can thus define its own color, allowing for complex spatial patterning. We anticipate that the color filter effect we demonstrate could be employed in nanoscale image sensor devices.

  19. Measurement of ultralow vertical emittance using a calibrated vertical undulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wootton, K. P.; Boland, M. J.; Rassool, R. P.

    2014-11-01

    Very few experimental techniques are useful for the direct observation of ultralow vertical emittance in electron storage rings. In this work, quantitative measurements of ultralow (pm rad) electron beam vertical emittance using a vertical undulator are presented. An undulator radiation model was developed using the measured magnetic field of the APPLE-II type undulator. Using calibrated experimental apparatus, a geometric vertical emittance of ɛy=0.9 ±0.3 pm rad has been observed. These measurements could also inform modeling of the angular distribution of undulator radiation at high harmonics, for proposed diffraction-limited storage ring light sources.

  20. 12. Detail showing ornamental intermediate portal bracing and vertical member ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Detail showing ornamental intermediate portal bracing and vertical member (right) near mid-span along north line of trusses. View to northwest. - Selby Avenue Bridge, Spanning Short Line Railways track at Selby Avenue between Hamline & Snelling Avenues, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  1. 11. Detail of showing ornamental intermediate portal bracing and vertical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Detail of showing ornamental intermediate portal bracing and vertical strut (left) standing atop pier along south line of trusses. View to southwest - Selby Avenue Bridge, Spanning Short Line Railways track at Selby Avenue between Hamline & Snelling Avenues, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  2. ON-LINE TOOLS FOR PROPER VERTICAL POSITIONING OF VERTICAL SAMPLING INTERVALS DURING SITE ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation presents on-line tools for proper vertical positioning of vertical sampling intervals during site assessment. Proper vertical sample interval selection is critical for generate data on the vertical distribution of contamination. Without vertical delineation, th...

  3. 4. VIEW OF VERTICAL BORING MACHINE. (Bullard) Vertical turning lathe ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW OF VERTICAL BORING MACHINE. (Bullard) Vertical turning lathe (VTL). Machining the fixture for GE Turboshroud. G.S. O'Brien, operator. - Juniata Shops, Machine Shop No. 1, East of Fourth Avenue at Third Street, Altoona, Blair County, PA

  4. Vertical 2D Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotsch, Bettina V.

    2015-07-01

    Graphene's legacy has become an integral part of today's condensed matter science and has equipped a whole generation of scientists with an armory of concepts and techniques that open up new perspectives for the postgraphene area. In particular, the judicious combination of 2D building blocks into vertical heterostructures has recently been identified as a promising route to rationally engineer complex multilayer systems and artificial solids with intriguing properties. The present review highlights recent developments in the rapidly emerging field of 2D nanoarchitectonics from a materials chemistry perspective, with a focus on the types of heterostructures available, their assembly strategies, and their emerging properties. This overview is intended to bridge the gap between two major—yet largely disjunct—developments in 2D heterostructures, which are firmly rooted in solid-state chemistry or physics. Although the underlying types of heterostructures differ with respect to their dimensions, layer alignment, and interfacial quality, there is common ground, and future synergies between the various assembly strategies are to be expected.

  5. Vertically reciprocating auger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etheridge, Mark; Morgan, Scott; Fain, Robert; Pearson, Jonathan; Weldi, Kevin; Woodrough, Stephen B., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The mathematical model and test results developed for the Vertically Reciprocating Auger (VRA) are summarized. The VRA is a device capable of transporting cuttings that result from below surface drilling. It was developed chiefly for the lunar surface, where conventional fluid flushing while drilling would not be practical. The VRA uses only reciprocating motion and transports material through reflections with the surface above. Particles are reflected forward and land ahead of radially placed fences, which prevent the particles from rolling back down the auger. Three input wave forms are considered to drive the auger. A modified sawtooth wave form was chosen for testing, over a modified square wave or sine wave, due to its simplicity and effectiveness. The three-dimensional mathematical model predicted a sand throughput rate of 0.2667 pounds/stroke, while the actual test setup transported 0.075 pounds/stroke. Based on this result, a correction factor of 0.281 is suggested for a modified sawtooth input.

  6. Diagnosis of vertical motion from VAS retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuelberg, Henry E.; Funk, Theodore W.

    1987-01-01

    Satellite-derived temperature profiles are used to determine if reliable estimates of synoptic-scale vertical motion can be obtained from the adiabatic, vorticity, and omega equation techniques. The period of study contains a short-wave trough over the Midwest and a convective outbreak over the middle Mississippi River Valley. Satellite soundings are available at 1-3 h intervals at five times. The emphasis is on assessing the strengths and weaknesses of the three vertical motion procedures, and determining the effects of short-interval observations on the calculations. Results show that the quasi-geostrophic omega equation provided patterns and magnitudes most consistent with observed weather events and 12 h radiosonde-derived motions. The vorticity method produced less satisfactory results, while adiabatic motions were unacceptable. The time derivative term dominated adiabatic motions and was a major influence in the vorticity method. Unrealistic temperature tendencies resulted from the retrieval algorithm; i.e., a diurnal temperature bias extended upwards to 500 mb, and there was a compensating effect at higher levels.

  7. The Gains from Vertical Scaling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Derek C.; Domingue, Ben

    2013-01-01

    It is often assumed that a vertical scale is necessary when value-added models depend upon the gain scores of students across two or more points in time. This article examines the conditions under which the scale transformations associated with the vertical scaling process would be expected to have a significant impact on normative interpretations…

  8. Visualize Vertical Connectedness (Middle Ground).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Allen, Lanny

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the possibility of vertical connectedness in K-12 education through references to journal articles and the author's own reflections. Suggests that middle school teachers may be leaders in a movement toward eliminating redundancy and gaps between grade levels. (TB)

  9. Vertical axis wind turbine airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Krivcov, Vladimir; Krivospitski, Vladimir; Maksimov, Vasili; Halstead, Richard; Grahov, Jurij Vasiljevich

    2012-12-18

    A vertical axis wind turbine airfoil is described. The wind turbine airfoil can include a leading edge, a trailing edge, an upper curved surface, a lower curved surface, and a centerline running between the upper surface and the lower surface and from the leading edge to the trailing edge. The airfoil can be configured so that the distance between the centerline and the upper surface is the same as the distance between the centerline and the lower surface at all points along the length of the airfoil. A plurality of such airfoils can be included in a vertical axis wind turbine. These airfoils can be vertically disposed and can rotate about a vertical axis.

  10. Vertical transmission in chikungunya infection.

    PubMed

    Senanayake, M P; Senanayake, S M; Vidanage, K K; Gunasena, S; Lamabadusuriya, S P

    2009-06-01

    We report the pregnancy outcome and clinical and laboratory findings in infants born to women with chikungunya infection during pregnancy. There was evidence of vertical transmission and poor pregnancy outcome in some cases. PMID:19670548

  11. The TEXT upgrade vertical interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallock, G. A.; Gartman, M. L.; Li, W.; Chiang, K.; Shin, S.; Castles, R. L.; Chatterjee, R.; Rahman, A. S.

    1992-10-01

    A far-infrared interferometer has been installed on TEXT upgrade to obtain electron density profiles. The primary system views the plasma vertically through a set of large (60-cm radial×7.62-cm toroidal) diagnostic ports. A 1-cm channel spacing (59 channels total) and fast electronic time response is used, to provide high resolution for radial profiles and perturbation experiments. Initial operation of the vertical system was obtained late in 1991, with six operating channels.

  12. Vertical Ripples in the Jovian Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showalter, Mark R.; Hedman, M. M.; Burns, J. A.

    2010-10-01

    Galileo spacecraft images from 1996 revealed a pattern of vertical "ripples" or corrugations in the main Jovian ring. The pattern appeared clearly in a set of three images, but was never reported again. Later ring images from Galileo in 2000-2001 and from New Horizons in 2007 were similar to the 1996 data set in terms of viewing geometry, resolution and sensitivity, but they did not show any ripples with comparable wavelength and amplitude. We revisit these data sets in light of the Cassini ISS result that corrugations in Saturn's rings are a spiral pattern that winds tighter due to differential nodal regression. A more detailed re-analysis of the 1996 images reveals that the Jovian pattern is a superposition of two sinusoidal corrugations. The stronger pattern has a wavelength of 1700 km and a vertical amplitude of 3 km. The weaker one has a wavelength of 600 km and an amplitude of 0.6 km. We now find these same corrugations in Galileo images from 2000, at shorter wavelengths of 700 km and 500 km. The reduced wavelengths are consistent with the differential nodal regression rate expected for Jupiter's gravity field; the wavenumber of corrugations in the Jovian ring is predicted to increase linearly by 1/(4000 km) per year. The wavelengths should be 200-300 km during the New Horizons flyby, too short to be detected in that data set. With two patterns now detected in Jupiter's ring and one in Saturn's, vertical corrugations appear to be more common features of planetary rings than had been previously suspected. We investigate the nature of the events that might initiate these features.

  13. The vertical structure and thickness of Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, J. N.; Burns, J. A.; Durisen, R. H.; Hamill, P. M.

    1979-01-01

    An explanation for the vertical structure and thickness of Saturn's rings compatible with observational data is presented. The model of the rings as being many particles thick is shown to be possible, with random particle motions preventing the complete flattening of the system and a gaussian distribution of particle density with vertical displacement. The model prediction of a maximum ring thickness of tens of meters, however, is in conflict with observations of ring thickness of at least 0.8 km at ring-plane passage. It is shown that perturbations to ring particle orbits caused by the sun and Saturn's large satellites may produce long- and short-period coherent vertical ring displacements and a nonlinear displacement of the ring plane from the equatorial plane with radial distance, leading to an apparent edge-on thickness of a few hundred meters.

  14. LEP vertical tunnel movement -- Lessons for future colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Pitthan, R.

    1999-12-07

    The data from 10 years of vertical surveys verify for all of LEP the previous observation, localized to region P1, that LEP floor movements are predominantly deterministic. This rules out the ATL model as being correct for this tunnel. If generalized, for yearly movements a random ATL model underestimates the possible maximum long-term motions. In contrast, extrapolation of the LEP vertical data to the short-term (hours and days) time-scale shows that the random approach predicts larger short-term movements than the deterministic model. This means that simulations using the ATL hypothesis are overly pessimistic with regard to the frequency of operational re-alignments required. Depending on the constants chosen in the models these differences can be large, of the order of a magnitude and more.

  15. RHIC VERTICAL AC DIPOLE COMMISSIONING.

    SciTech Connect

    BAI,M.; DELONG,J.; HOFF,L.; PAI,C.; PEGGS,S.; PIACENTINO,J.; OERTER,B.; ODDO,P.; ROSER,T.; SATOGATA,T.; TRBOJEVIC,D.; ZALTSMAN,A.

    2002-06-02

    The RHIC vertical ac dipole was installed in the summer of 2001. The magnet is located in the interaction region between sector 3 and sector 4 common to both beams. The resonant frequency of the ac dipole was first configured to be around half of the beam revolution frequency to act as a spin flipper. At the end of the RHIC 2002 run, the ac dipole frequency was reconfigured for linear optics studies. A 0.35 mm driven betatron oscillation was excited with the vertical ac dipole and the vertical betatron functions and phase advances at each beam position monitor (BPM) around the RHIC yellow ring were measured using the excited coherence. We also recorded horizontal turn-by-turn beam positions at each BPM location to investigate coupling effects. Analysis algorithms and measurement results are presented.

  16. Measurements of vertical bar Vcb vertical bar and vertical bar Vub vertical bar at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Rotondo, M.

    2005-10-12

    We report results from the BABAR Collaboration on the semileptonic B decays, highlighting the measurements of the magnitude of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements Vub and Vcb. We describe the techniques used to obtain the matrix element |Vcb| using the measurement of the inclusive B {yields} Xclv process and a large sample of exclusive B {yields} D*lv decays. The vertical bar Vub vertical bar matrix elements has been measured studying different kinematic variables of the B {yields} Xulv process, and also with the exclusive reconstruction of B {yields} {pi}({rho})lv decays.

  17. Vertical motion simulator familiarization guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danek, George L.

    1993-01-01

    The Vertical Motion Simulator Familiarization Guide provides a synoptic description of the Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) and descriptions of the various simulation components and systems. The intended audience is the community of scientists and engineers who employ the VMS for research and development. The concept of a research simulator system is introduced and the building block nature of the VMS is emphasized. Individual sections describe all the hardware elements in terms of general properties and capabilities. Also included are an example of a typical VMS simulation which graphically illustrates the composition of the system and shows the signal flow among the elements and a glossary of specialized terms, abbreviations, and acronyms.

  18. On the vertically averaged balance equation of atmospheric trace constituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramm, G.; Dlugi, R.; Mölders, N.

    The vertically averaged balance equation of atmospheric trace constituents that customarily serves as a basis for one- and two-layer (box) models of the atmospheric boundary layer and the whole troposphere is derived and discussed. It is shown that this kind of balance equation is accompanied by several prominent short-comings so that the capability of such models to predict real situations of photochemical smog formation and depletion is strongly limited. Three of these short-comings are theoretically elucidated, namely (1) the vertically averaged source and sink terms owing to chemical reactions, (2) the parameterisation of the dry deposition and exhalation fluxes at the earth's surface that serve as lower boundary conditions, and (3) the parameterisation of the upper boundary conditions. Even though the consumption of computing time is much smaller than those of sophisticated Eulerian air pollution models like ADOM, DRAIS, EURAD, RADM, and TADAP, we have to conclude from our theoretical results that one- and two-layer (box) models should not be considered as a true alternative to such air pollution models. We also suggest that the influence of these short-comings on the predicted results has to be estimated and evaluated in a reliable manner before vertically averaged balance equations of atmospheric trace constituents are introduced into general circulation models to investigate the influence of air pollution on climate change on the basis of long-term simulations.

  19. Nonperturbative vertices in supersymmetric quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, M. L.; Burden, C. J.

    1999-11-01

    We derive the complete set of supersymmetric Ward identities involving only two- and three-point proper vertices in supersymmetric QED. We also present the most general form of the proper vertices consistent with both the supersymmetric and U(1) gauge Ward identities. These vertices are the supersymmetric equivalent of the nonsupersymmetric Ball-Chiu vertices.

  20. Feasibility of Measuring Mean Vertical Motion for Estimating Advection. Chapter 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vickers, Dean; Mahrt, L.

    2005-01-01

    Numerous recent studies calculate horizontal and vertical advection terms for budget studies of net ecosystem exchange of carbon. One potential uncertainty in such studies is the estimate of mean vertical motion. This work addresses the reliability of vertical advection estimates by contrasting the vertical motion obtained from the standard practise of measuring the vertical velocity and applying a tilt correction, to the vertical motion calculated from measurements of the horizontal divergence of the flow using a network of towers. Results are compared for three different tilt correction methods. Estimates of mean vertical motion are sensitive to the choice of tilt correction method. The short-term mean (10 to 60 minutes) vertical motion based on the horizontal divergence is more realistic compared to the estimates derived from the standard practise. The divergence shows long-term mean (days to months) sinking motion at the site, apparently due to the surface roughness change. Because all the tilt correction methods rely on the assumption that the long-term mean vertical motion is zero for a given wind direction, they fail to reproduce the vertical motion based on the divergence.

  1. Vertical Sextants give Good Sights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Mark

    Many texts stress the need for marine sextants to be held precisely vertical at the instant that the altitude of a heavenly body is measured. Several authors lay particular emphasis on the technique of the instrument in a small arc about the horizontal axis to obtain a good sight. Nobody, to the author's knowledge, however, has attempted to quantify the errors involved, so as to compare them with other errors inherent in determining celestial position lines. This paper sets out to address these issues and to pose the question: what level of accuracy of vertical alignment can reasonably be expected during marine sextant work at sea ?When a heavenly body is brought to tangency with the visible horizon it is particularly important to ensure that the sextant is held in a truly vertical position. To this end the instrument is rocked gently about the horizontal so that the image of the body describes a small arc in the observer's field of vision. As Bruce Bauer points out, tangency with the horizon must be achieved during the process of rocking and not a second or so after rocking has been discontinued. The altitude is recorded for the instant that the body kisses the visible horizon at the lowest point of the rocking arc, as in Fig. 2. The only other visual clue as to whether the sextant is vertical is provided by the right angle made by the vertical edge of the horizon glass mirror with the horizon. There may also be some input from the observer's sense of balance and his hand orientation.

  2. Inertial Rise in Short Capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shardt, Orest; Waghmare, Prashant; Mitra, Sushanta; Derksen, Jos

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the primarily inertial rise of liquid in vertical glass capillaries that are shorter than the equilibrium rise height (Jurin height). We focus on the behavior of the liquid upon reaching the top of the capillary and use high-speed imaging to observe the motion of the liquid-air interface with high spatial and temporal resolution. We examine the dependence of the interface behavior on the meniscus speed and capillary height and describe a new phenomenon. Upon reaching the upper edge of a sufficiently short capillary, the meniscus inverts, rises upward, and bulges out radially. The bulging liquid then wets the external surface of the capillary and slides down. The meniscus inside the capillary retracts, falling below the upper edge, and then oscillates vertically with decaying amplitude, inverting several times before reaching a steady shape. A theoretical analysis is used to interpret the conditions required for this phenomenon to occur. A key assumption in the analysis is that the transient flow is inertial and therefore the capillary driving force is balanced by the weight and inertia of the rising liquid column while viscous forces are comparatively small. The analysis points to the possibility of obtaining previously-unseen behavior under reduced gravity.

  3. Shortness-of-Breath

    MedlinePlus

    ... can lead to shortness of breath include anxiety, panic attacks, anemia and even constipation. The experience of shortness ... are used to treat patients with anxiety or panic attacks. Other commonly used drugs include bronchodilators to widen ...

  4. Kinematic Fitting of Detached Vertices

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Mattione

    2007-05-01

    The eg3 experiment at the Jefferson Lab CLAS detector aims to determine the existence of the $\\Xi_{5}$ pentaquarks and investigate the excited $\\Xi$ states. Specifically, the exotic $\\Xi_{5}^{--}$ pentaquark will be sought by first reconstructing the $\\Xi^{-}$ particle through its weak decays, $\\Xi^{-}\\to\\pi^{-}\\Lambda$ and $\\Lambda\\to\\pi^{-}$. A kinematic fitting routine was developed to reconstruct the detached vertices of these decays, where confidence level cuts on the fits are used to remove background events. Prior to fitting these decays, the exclusive reaction $\\gamma D\\rightarrow pp\\pi^{-}$ was studied in order to correct the track measurements and covariance matrices of the charged particles. The $\\Lambda\\rightarrow p\\pi^{-}$ and $\\Xi^{-}\\to\\pi^{-}\\Lambda$ decays were then investigated to demonstrate that the kinematic fitting routine reconstructs the decaying particles and their detached vertices correctly.

  5. Vertically Integrated Circuits at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Deptuch, Grzegorz; Demarteau, Marcel; Hoff, James; Lipton, Ronald; Shenai, Alpana; Trimpl, Marcel; Yarema, Raymond; Zimmerman, Tom; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    The exploration of vertically integrated circuits, also commonly known as 3D-IC technology, for applications in radiation detection started at Fermilab in 2006. This paper examines the opportunities that vertical integration offers by looking at various 3D designs that have been completed by Fermilab. The emphasis is on opportunities that are presented by through silicon vias (TSV), wafer and circuit thinning, and finally fusion bonding techniques to replace conventional bump bonding. Early work by Fermilab has led to an international consortium for the development of 3D-IC circuits for High Energy Physics. For the first time, Fermilab has organized a 3D MPW run, to which more than 25 different designs have been submitted by the consortium.

  6. Vertically Integrated Circuits at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Deptuch, Grzegorz; Demarteau, Marcel; Hoff, James; Lipton, Ronald; Shenai, Alpana; Trimpl, Marcel; Yarema, Raymond; Zimmerman, Tom; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    The exploration of the vertically integrated circuits, also commonly known as 3D-IC technology, for applications in radiation detection started at Fermilab in 2006. This paper examines the opportunities that vertical integration offers by looking at various 3D designs that have been completed by Fermilab. The emphasis is on opportunities that are presented by through silicon vias (TSV), wafer and circuit thinning and finally fusion bonding techniques to replace conventional bump bonding. Early work by Fermilab has led to an international consortium for the development of 3D-IC circuits for High Energy Physics. The consortium has submitted over 25 different designs for the Fermilab organized MPW run organized for the first time.

  7. 5-Foot Vertical Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Schematic drawing of 5-Foot Vertical Wind Tunnel. Carl Wenzinger and Thomas Harris describe the tunnel in NACA TR No. 387: 'The tunnel has an open jet, an open test chamber, and a closed return passage. ... The air passes through the test section in a downward direction then enters the exit cone and passes through the first set of guide vanes to a propeller. From here it passes, by way of the return passage, through the successive sets of guide vanes at the corners, then through the honeycomb, and finally through the entrance cone.' In an earlier report, NACA TR 387, Carl Wenzinger and Thomas Harris supply this description of the tunnel: 'The vertical open-throat wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics ... was built mainly for studying the spinning characteristics of airplane models, but may be used as well for the usual types of wind-tunnel tests. A special spinning balance is being developed to measure the desired forces and moments with the model simulating the actual spin of an airplane. Satisfactory air flow has been attained with a velocity that is uniform over the jet to within 0.5%. The turbulence present in the tunnel has been compared with that of several other tunnels by means of the results of sphere drag tests and was found to average well with the values of those tunnels. Included also in the report are comparisons of results of stable autorotation and of rolling-moment tests obtained both in the vertical tunnel and in the old horizontal 5-foot atmospheric tunnel.' The design of a vertical tunnel having a 5-foot diameter jet was accordingly started by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics in 1928. Actual construction of the new tunnel was completed in 1930, and the calibration tests were then made.'

  8. NASA-Ames vertical gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, P. H.

    1984-01-01

    A national facility, the NASA-Ames vertical gun range (AVGR) has an excellent reputation for revealing fundamental aspects of impact cratering that provide important constraints for planetary processes. The current logistics in accessing the AVGR, some of the past and ongoing experimental programs and their relevance, and the future role of this facility in planetary studies are reviewed. Publications resulting from experiments with the gun (1979 to 1984) are listed as well as the researchers and subjects studied.

  9. Vertical tail buffeting of fighter aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, B. H. K.

    2000-04-01

    Vertical tail buffeting at high angles of attack is a phenomenon associated with the impact of vortical flows generated by the aircraft on the fins. This poses a serious problem for both single- and twin-tail fighter aircraft from the point of view of combat maneuverability and structural integrity. The research activities to understand the flow physics with an aim to alleviate buffet loads were quite intense during the period from the late 1970s to the early 1990s. Most of the investigations were carried out on the F/A-18 mainly because of two international programs involving countries that operate the F/A-18 in their air force. This review begins with a description of the water tunnel experiments showing some flow visualization results of the leading-edge extension (LEX) burst vortical flows. Wind tunnel studies on a 1/9 scale F/A-18 model in Australia, a 1/6.65 scale model in the United Kingdom, a 6% scale model in Canada, 12%, 16% and full-scale models in the United States are summarized. Scale effects can be deduced from the various sub- and full-scale models tested. Flight test results conducted on the High Alpha Research Vehicle in the United States and on an instrumented CF-18 test aircraft in Canada are presented. The accuracy of analytical methods utilizing wind tunnel data to predict buffet loads at flight conditions is discussed. The use of CFD to compute vertical fin buffeting is challenging and requires a large amount of computing power. A brief exposure to the methodology is given and results from the only available computational case study carried out by NASA Ames are compared with wind tunnel and flight test data. A short introduction to statistical non-stationary effects is given. Hysteresis effect of the LEX vortex burst on the buffet loads is discussed, and a statistical non-stationary buffet prediction method is outlined. This review provides a useful reference to the results collected from the High Alpha Technology Program, The Technical Cooperation Program and the International Follow-On Structural Test Project which together form an extremely valuable data base for vertical tail buffeting studies.

  10. 5-Foot Vertical Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Construction of 5-Foot Vertical Wind Tunnel. The 5-Foot Vertical Wind Tunnel was built to study spinning characteristics of aircraft. It was an open throat tunnel capable of a maximum speed of 80 mph. NACA engineer Charles H. Zimmerman designed the tunnel starting in 1928. Construction was completed in December 1929. It was one of two tunnels which replaced the original Atmospheric Wind Tunnel (The other was the 7x10-Foot Wind Tunnel.). In NACA TR 387 (p. 499), Carl Wenzinger and Thomas Harris report that 'the tunnel passages are constructed of 1/8-inch sheet iron, stiffened with angle iron and bolted together at the corners. The over-all dimensions are: Height 31 feet 2 inches; length, 20 feet 3 inches; width, 10 feet 3 inches.' The tunnel was partially constructed in the Langley hanger as indicated by the aircraft in the background. Published in NACA TR 387, 'The Vertical Wind Tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics,' by Carl J. Wenzinger and Thomas A. Harris, 1931.

  11. The Subjective Visual Vertical and the Subjective Haptic Vertical Access Different Gravity Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Lindsey E.; Makooie, Bobbak; Harris, Laurence R.

    2015-01-01

    The subjective visual vertical (SVV) and the subjective haptic vertical (SHV) both claim to probe the underlying perception of gravity. However, when the body is roll tilted these two measures evoke different patterns of errors with SVV generally becoming biased towards the body (A-effect, named for its discoverer, Hermann Rudolph Aubert) and SHV remaining accurate or becoming biased away from the body (E-effect, short for Entgegengesetzt-effect, meaning “opposite”, i.e., opposite to the A-effect). We compared the two methods in a series of five experiments and provide evidence that the two measures access two different but related estimates of gravitational vertical. Experiment 1 compared SVV and SHV across three levels of whole-body tilt and found that SVV showed an A-effect at larger tilts while SHV was accurate. Experiment 2 found that tilting either the head or the trunk independently produced an A-effect in SVV while SHV remained accurate when the head was tilted on an upright body but showed an A-effect when the body was tilted below an upright head. Experiment 3 repeated these head/body configurations in the presence of vestibular noise induced by using disruptive galvanic vestibular stimulation (dGVS). dGVS abolished both SVV and SHV A-effects while evoking a massive E-effect in the SHV head tilt condition. Experiments 4 and 5 show that SVV and SHV do not combine in an optimally statistical fashion, but when vibration is applied to the dorsal neck muscles, integration becomes optimal. Overall our results suggest that SVV and SHV access distinct underlying gravity percepts based primarily on head and body position information respectively, consistent with a model proposed by Clemens and colleagues. PMID:26716835

  12. On the vertical-shear instability in astrophysical discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, A. J.; Latter, H. N.

    2015-06-01

    We explore the linear stability of astrophysical discs exhibiting vertical shear, which arises when there is a radial variation in the temperature or entropy. Such discs are subject to a `vertical-shear instability', which recent non-linear simulations have shown to drive hydrodynamic activity in the MRI-stable regions of protoplanetary discs. We first revisit locally isothermal discs using the quasi-global reduced model derived by Nelson et al. This analysis is then extended to global axisymmetric perturbations in a cylindrical domain. We also derive and study a reduced model describing discs with power-law radial entropy profiles (`locally polytropic discs'), which are somewhat more realistic in that they possess physical (as opposed to numerical) surfaces. The fastest growing modes have very short wavelengths and are localized at the disc surfaces (if present), where the vertical shear is maximal. An additional class of modestly growing vertically global body modes is excited, corresponding to destabilized classical inertial waves (`r modes'). We discuss the properties of both types of modes, and stress that those that grow fastest occur on the shortest available length-scales (determined either by the numerical grid or the physical viscous length). This ill-posedness makes simulations of the instability difficult to interpret. We end with some brief speculation on the non-linear saturation and resulting angular momentum transport.

  13. Continental seismic events observed by the MPL vertical DIFAR array

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D.B.; D`Spain, G.

    1993-11-01

    The vertical DIFAR array, an underwater acoustic sensor system, deployed by the Marine Physical Laboratory (MPL) was in place over the continental shelf off of Southern California and recorded the HUNTERS TROPHY nuclear test and nearly a score of after-shocks of the Landers/Big Bear earthquakes. Data from this array raise the possibility that detection thresholds for continental events may be significantly lower for arrays over the continental shelf than for arrays in the deep ocean basins. Offshore stations could be used to fill gaps in land-based seismic networks for monitoring the NPT and a CTBT, especially for monitoring non-cooperating nations with large coastlines. This preliminary report provides an analysis of the HUNTERS TROPHY observation as well as one of the Landers aftershocks. The analysis suggests detection thresholds for vertical hydrophone arrays below mb 3.0 at ranges between 3 and 4 degrees, and below mb 4.4 out to 6 degrees. This report also describes two signal processing techniques that enhance the detection potential of short vertical arrays. These methods are deterministic null steering to suppress horizontally propagating ambient ocean noise, and matched field processing for vertically-incident acoustic fields. The latter technique is ideally suited for acoustic fields derived from incident seismic waves, and may be viewed as a {open_quotes}synthetic aperture{close_quotes} approach to increase the effective aperture of the array.

  14. Diatom vertical migration within land-fast Arctic sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumack, C. F.; Juhl, A. R.; Krembs, C.

    2014-11-01

    Light levels inside first-year, landfast sea ice were experimentally altered by manipulating overlying snow depths. Irradiance available for ice algae growing near the ice-bottom, and under the ice, was highly dependent on snow depths ranging from 0 to > 30 cm. Importantly, algal vertical distributions also changed under different irradiances. Under thick snow (low light), the majority of algae were found several cm above the ice-seawater interface, while progressively more were found nearer the interface at locations with thinner overlying snow (higher light). Short-term field experiments suggested that ice algae were able to reposition themselves within the ice column within 3 days after manipulating snow depths. Laboratory gliding rate measurements of a cultured ice diatom suggested that it is capable of daily cm-scale movement. Vertical migration may help ice diatoms balance opposing light and nutrient resource gradients, similar to strategies used by some benthic and pelagic algae. Moreover, when ice algae congregate near the ice-seawater interface, they may be especially susceptible to loss from the ice environment. Vertical repositioning in response to changing light dynamics may be a mechanism to optimize between vertically-opposing environmental factors and help explain the connection between melting snow cover and export of biomass from sea ice.

  15. Novel vertical silicon photodiodes based on salicided polysilicon trenched contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, Yelena; Shauly, Eitan; Paz, Yaron

    2015-12-01

    The classical concept of silicon photodiodes comprises of a planar design characterized by heavily doped emitters. Such geometry has low collection efficiency of the photons absorbed close to the surface. An alternative, promising, approach is to use a vertical design. Nevertheless, realization of such design is technologically challenged, hence hardly explored. Herein, a novel type of silicon photodiodes, based on salicided polysilicon trenched contacts, is presented. These contacts can be prepared up to 10 μm in depth, without showing any leakage current associated with the increase in the contact area. Consequently, the trenched photodiodes revealed better performance than no-trench photodiodes. A simple two dimensional model was developed, allowing to estimate the conditions under which a vertical design has the potential to have better performance than that of a planar design. At large, the deeper the trench is, the better is the vertical design relative to the planar (up to 10 μm for silicon). The vertical design is more advantageous for materials characterized by short diffusion lengths of the carriers. Salicided polysilicon trenched contacts open new opportunities for the design of solar cells and image sensors. For example, these contacts may passivate high contact area buried contacts, by virtue of the conformity of polysilicon interlayer, thus lowering the via resistance induced recombination enhancement effect.

  16. SHORT-WAVELENGTH MAGNETIC BUOYANCY INSTABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Mizerski, K. A.; Davies, C. R.; Hughes, D. W. E-mail: tina@maths.leeds.ac.uk

    2013-04-01

    Magnetic buoyancy instability plays an important role in the evolution of astrophysical magnetic fields. Here we revisit the problem introduced by Gilman of the short-wavelength linear stability of a plane layer of compressible isothermal fluid permeated by a horizontal magnetic field of strength decreasing with height. Dissipation of momentum and magnetic field is neglected. By the use of a Rayleigh-Schroedinger perturbation analysis, we explain in detail the limit in which the transverse horizontal wavenumber of the perturbation, denoted by k, is large (i.e., short horizontal wavelength) and show that the fastest growing perturbations become localized in the vertical direction as k is increased. The growth rates are determined by a function of the vertical coordinate z since, in the large k limit, the eigenmodes are strongly localized in the vertical direction. We consider in detail the case of two-dimensional perturbations varying in the directions perpendicular to the magnetic field, which, for sufficiently strong field gradients, are the most unstable. The results of our analysis are backed up by comparison with a series of initial value problems. Finally, we extend the analysis to three-dimensional perturbations.

  17. 33 CFR 84.19 - Vertical sectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vertical sectors. 84.19 Section 84.19 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INLAND NAVIGATION RULES ANNEX I: POSITIONING AND TECHNICAL DETAILS OF LIGHTS AND SHAPES § 84.19 Vertical sectors. (a) The vertical sectors of electric lights as...

  18. Vertical Feature Mask Feature Classification Flag Extraction

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-03-28

      Vertical Feature Mask Feature Classification Flag Extraction This routine demonstrates ... stored in a CALIPSO Lidar Level 2 Vertical Feature Mask feature classification flag value. It is written in Interactive Data ... Products Catalog . Download  Vertical Feature Mask Feature Classification Flag Extraction routine  (5 KB) Interactive ...

  19. Vertical Lift - Not Just For Terrestrial Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A

    2000-01-01

    Autonomous vertical lift vehicles hold considerable potential for supporting planetary science and exploration missions. This paper discusses several technical aspects of vertical lift planetary aerial vehicles in general, and specifically addresses technical challenges and work to date examining notional vertical lift vehicles for Mars, Titan, and Venus exploration.

  20. Vertically aligned nanostructure scanning probe microscope tips

    DOEpatents

    Guillorn, Michael A.; Ilic, Bojan; Melechko, Anatoli V.; Merkulov, Vladimir I.; Lowndes, Douglas H.; Simpson, Michael L.

    2006-12-19

    Methods and apparatus are described for cantilever structures that include a vertically aligned nanostructure, especially vertically aligned carbon nanofiber scanning probe microscope tips. An apparatus includes a cantilever structure including a substrate including a cantilever body, that optionally includes a doped layer, and a vertically aligned nanostructure coupled to the cantilever body.

  1. ?Vertical Sextants give Good Sights?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richey, Michael

    Mark Dixon suggests (Forum, Vol. 50, 137) that nobody thus far has attempted to quantify the errors from tilt that arise while observing with the marine sextant. The issue in fact, with the related problem of what exactly is the axis about which the sextant is rotated whilst being (to define the vertical), was the subject of a lively controversy in the first two volumes of this Journal some fifty years ago. Since the consensus of opinion seems to have been that the maximum error does not necessarily occur at 45 degrees, whereas Dixon's table suggests that it does, some reiteration of the arguments may be in order.

  2. Vertical jumping and signaled avoidance

    PubMed Central

    Cándido, Antonio; Maldonado, Antonio; Vila, Jaime

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports an experiment intended to demonstrate that the vertical jumping response can be learned using a signaled-avoidance technique. A photoelectric cell system was used to record the response. Twenty female rats, divided equally into two groups, were exposed to intertrial intervals of either 15 or 40 s. Subjects had to achieve three successive criteria of acquisition: 3, 5, and 10 consecutive avoidance responses. Results showed that both groups learned the avoidance response, requiring increasingly larger numbers of trials as the acquisition criteria increased. No significant effect of intertrial interval was observed. PMID:16812559

  3. Vertical-Bloch-Line Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, Romney R.; Wu, Jiin-Chuan; Stadler, Henry L.

    1993-01-01

    Vertical-Bloch-line memory is developmental very-large-scale integrated-circuit block-access magnetic memory. Stores data in form of localized pairs of twists (VBL pairs) in magnetic field at edge of ferromagnetic domain in each stripe. Presence or absence of VBL pair at bit position denotes one or zero, respectively. Offers advantages of resistance to ionizing radiation, potential areal storage density approximately less than 1 Gb/cm squared, data rates approximately less than 1 Gb/s, and average access times of order of milliseconds. Furthermore, mass, volume, and demand for power less than other magnetic and electronic memories.

  4. Neighbourly polytopes with few vertices

    SciTech Connect

    Devyatov, Rostislav A

    2011-10-31

    A family of neighbourly polytopes in R{sup 2d} with N=2d+4 vertices is constructed. All polytopes in the family have a planar Gale diagram of a special type, namely, with exactly d+3 black points in convex position. These Gale diagrams are parametrized by 3-trees (trees with a certain additional structure). For all polytopes in the family, the number of faces of dimension m containing a given vertex A depends only on d and m. Bibliography: 7 titles.

  5. [Class II--vertical dimension].

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, J P; Grobéty, D; Joho, J P

    1978-08-01

    The vertical dimension and its implication in the etiology of the class II are described. This dimension is analysed at the level of the cranial base, the maxillary and mandibular bones and alveolar processes. Then, the facial architecture as a whole is considered and particularly the key position of the upper molar. The dorsal and low position of these teeth in the hyperdivergent cases is fundamentally different from the one they occupy in the hypodivergent cases. The therapeutic approach is completely different in both cases and is illustrated by means of three deep overbite and three open bite cases. PMID:279095

  6. Paediatric short case examination.

    PubMed

    Isaacs, David

    2014-11-01

    The short case is a highly artificial scenario, in which the examination candidate is given little or no history and instructed to examine one system or one aspect of a patient and draw conclusions. Despite their artificiality, short cases test clinical skills which senior paediatricians value and consider essential qualities of a competent physician. This article presents some general suggestions on an approach to doing short case examinations. PMID:25376346

  7. Laser tracking for vertical control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Peter; Torrence, Mark; Pavlis, Erricos; Kolenkiewicz, Ron; Smith, David

    1993-01-01

    The Global Laser Tracking Network has provided LAGEOS ranging data of high accuracy since the first MERIT campaign in late 1983 and we can now resolve centimeter-level three dimensional positions of participating observatories at monthly intervals. In this analysis, the station height estimates have been considered separately from the horizontal components, and can be determined by the strongest stations with a formal standard error of 2 mm using eight years of continuous observations. The rate of change in the vertical can be resolved to a few mm/year, which is at the expected level of several geophysical effects. In comparing the behavior of the stations to that predicted by recent models of post-glacial rebound, we find no correlation in this very small effect. Particular attention must be applied to data and survey quality control when measuring the vertical component, and the survey observations are critical components of the geodynamic results. Seasonal patterns are observed in the heights of most stations, and the possibility of secular motion at the level of several millimeters per year cannot be excluded. Any such motion must be considered in the interpretation of horizontal inter-site measurements, and can help to identify mechanisms which can cause variations which occur linearly with time, seasonally, or abruptly.

  8. Local and Remote Influences on Vertical Wind Shear over the Northern Tropical Atlantic Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saravanan, R.; Zhu, X.

    2009-12-01

    Vertical wind shear is one of the most important parameters controlling the frequency and intensity of Atlantic hurricanes. It has been argued that in global warming scenarios, the mechanical effect of changing vertical wind shear may even trump the thermodynamic effect of increasing Atlantic sea surface temperatures, when it comes to projected trends in Atlantic hurricane activity. Despite its importance, little is known about the connection between vertical shear in the north Atlantic region and the global atmospheric circulation, apart from the well-known positive correlation with El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). In this study, we analyze the statistical relationship between vertical shear and features of the large-scale circulation such as the distribution of sea surface temperature and vertical motion. We examine whether this relationship is different on interannual timescales associated with ENSO as compared to the decadal timescales associated with the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO). We also investigate how well the global general circulation models manage to simulate the observed vertical shear in this region, and its relationship to the large-scale circulation. Our analyses reveal an interesting sensitivity to air-sea coupling in model simulations of vertical shear. Another interesting property of vertical shear, as defined in the context of hurricane studies, is that it is positive definite, rather like precipitation. This means that it has a very nongaussian probability distribution on short timescales. We analyze how this nongaussianity changes when averaged over longer timescales.

  9. Natural short sleeper

    MedlinePlus

    ... 9 hours of sleep each night. Short sleepers sleep less than 75% of what is normal for their age. Natural short sleepers are different from people who chronically do not get enough sleep because of work or family demands, or those ...

  10. 5-foot Vertical Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1932-01-01

    The researcher is sitting above the exit cone of the 5-foot Vertical Wind Tunnel and is examining the new 6-component spinning balance. This balance was developed between 1930 and 1933. It was an important advance in the technology of rotating or rolling balances. As M.J. Bamber and C.H. Zimmerman wrote in NACA TR 456: 'Data upon the aerodynamic characteristics of a spinning airplane may be obtained in several ways; namely, flight tests with full-scale airplanes, flight tests with balanced models, strip-method analysis of wind-tunnel force and moment tests, and wind-tunnel tests of rotating models.' Further, they note: 'Rolling-balance data have been of limited value because it has not been possible to measure all six force and moment components or to reproduce a true spinning condition. The spinning balance used in this investigation is a 6-component rotating balance from which it is possible to obtain wind-tunnel data for any of a wide range of possible spinning conditions.' Bamber and Zimmerman described the balance as follows: 'The spinning balance consists of a balance head that supports the model and contains the force-measuring units, a horizontal turntable supported by streamline struts in the center of the jet and, outside the tunnel, a direct-current driving motor, a liquid tachometer, an air compressor, a mercury manometer, a pair of indicating lamps, and the necessary controls. The balance head is mounted on the turntable and it may be set to give any radius of spin between 0 and 8 inches.' In an earlier report, NACA TR 387, Carl Wenzinger and Thomas Harris supply this description of the tunnel: 'The vertical open-throat wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics ... was built mainly for studying the spinning characteristics of airplane models, but may be used as well for the usual types of wind-tunnel tests. A special spinning balance is being developed to measure the desired forces and moments with the model simulating the actual spin of an airplane. Satisfactory air flow has been attained with a velocity that is uniform over the jet to within 0.5 per cent. The turbulence present in the tunnel has been compared with that of several other tunnels by means of the results of sphere drag tests and was found to average well with the values of those tunnels. Included also in the report are comparisons of results of stable autorotation and of rolling-moment tests obtained both in the vertical tunnel and in the old horizontal 5-foot atmospheric tunnel.' The design of a vertical tunnel having a 5-foot diameter jet was accordingly started by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics in 1928. Actual construction of the new tunnel was completed in 1930, and the calibration tests were then made.'

  11. 5-Foot Vertical Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    General view of 5-Foot Vertical Wind Tunnel. The man is on a platform next to the test chamber. In the foreground is the return passage. Carl Wenzinger and Thomas Harris describe the tunnel in NACA TR No. 387: ' The tunnel has an open jet, an open test chamber, and a closed return passage. ... The air passes through the test section in a downward direction then enters the exit cone and passes through the first set of guide vanes to a propeller. From here it passes, by way of the return passage, through the successive sets of guide vanes at the corners, then through the honeycomb, and finally through the entrance cone.' The tunnel was 31 feet tall; 20 feet long and 10 feet wide.

  12. Plasma vertical stabilisation in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribov, Y.; Kavin, A.; Lukash, V.; Khayrutdinov, R.; Huijsmans, G. T. A.; Loarte, A.; Snipes, J. A.; Zabeo, L.

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes the progress in analysis of the ITER plasma vertical stabilisation (VS) system since its design review in 2007-2008. Two indices characterising plasma VS were studied. These are (1) the maximum value of plasma vertical displacement due to free drift that can be stopped by the VS system and (2) the maximum root mean square value of low frequency noise in the dZ/dt measurement signal used in the VS feedback loop. The first VS index was calculated using the PET code for 15 MA plasmas with the nominal position and shape. The second VS index was studied with the DINA code in the most demanding simulations for plasma magnetic control of 15 MA scenarios with the fastest plasma current ramp-up and early X-point formation, the fastest plasma current ramp-down in a divertor configuration, and an H to L mode transition at the current flattop. The studies performed demonstrate that the VS in-vessel coils, adopted recently in the baseline design, significantly increase the range of plasma controllability in comparison with the stabilising systems VS1 and VS2, providing operating margins sufficient to achieve ITER's goals specified in the project requirements. Additionally two sets of the DINA code simulations were performed with the goal of assessment of the capability of the PF system with the VS in-vessel coils: (i) to control the position of runaway electrons generated during disruptions in 15 MA scenarios and (ii) to trigger ELMs in H-mode plasmas of 7.5 MA/2.65 T scenarios planned for the early phase of ITER operation. It was also shown that ferromagnetic structures of the vacuum vessel (ferromagnetic inserts) and test blanket modules insignificantly affect the plasma VS.

  13. Imaging in short stature

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Vikas; Bano, Shahina

    2012-01-01

    Short stature can be a sign of disease, disability, and social stigma causing psychological stress. It is important to have an early diagnosis and treatment. Short stature may result from skeletal dysplasias, endocrine disorders, may be familial, or may be the result of malnutrition and chronic illnesses. A team effort of the healthcare professionals like pediatricians, endocrinologists, radiologists, and pathologists is required to diagnose, treat and monitor various pathological conditions associated with growth abnormality. In this review, we have discussed the role of imaging in diagnosing and characterizing various pathological conditions associated with short stature. PMID:23087851

  14. Vertical root fracture in nonendodontically treated teeth.

    PubMed

    Yang, S F; Rivera, E M; Walton, R E

    1995-06-01

    Vertical root fractures have been reported to occur primarily in endodontically treated teeth due to condensation forces and/or with post placement. This study describes 11 Chinese patients with 12 molars that developed vertical root fractures without endodontic or post procedures. These showed characteristics of a true vertical root fracture as confirmed after extraction. Fractured teeth showed a consistent pattern. The majority were severely attrited mandibular molars in males. All had clinically intact crowns with no or minimal restorations. PMID:7673845

  15. Strapdown system redundancy management flight demonstration. [vertical takeoff and landing aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The suitability of strapdown inertial systems in providing highly reliable short-term navigation for vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) aircraft operating in an intra-urban setting under all-weather conditions was assessed. A preliminary design configuration of a skewed sensor inertial reference system employing a redundancy management concept to achieve fail-operational, fail-operational performance, was developed.

  16. Vertical motion requirements for landing simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the significance of vertical acceleration cues in the simulation of the visual approach and landing maneuver. Landing performance measures were obtained for four subject pilots operating a visual landing simulation device which provides up to plus or minus 40 feet of vertical motion. Test results indicate that vertical motion cues are utilized in the landing task, and that they are particularly important in the simulation of aircraft with marginal longitudinal handling qualities. To assure vertical motion cues of the desired fidelity in the landing tasks, it appears that a simulator must have excursion capabilities of at least plus or minus 20 feet.

  17. Advancements of vertically aligned liquid crystal displays.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pankaj; Jaggi, Chinky; Sharma, Vandna; Raina, Kuldeep Kumar

    2016-02-01

    This review describes the recent advancements in the field of the vertical aligned (VA) liquid crystal displays. The process and formation of different vertical alignment modes such as conventional VA, patterned VA, multi-domain VA, and polymer stabilised VA etc are widely discussed. Vertical alignment of liquid crystal due to nano particle dispersion in LC host, bifunctional PR-SAM formed by silane coupling reaction to oxide surfaces, azo dye etc., are also highlighted and discussed. Overall, the article highlights the advances in the research of vertical aligned liquid crystal in terms of their scientific and technological aspects. PMID:26800482

  18. Exploring Vertical Transmission of Bifidobacteria from Mother to Child

    PubMed Central

    Milani, Christian; Mancabelli, Leonardo; Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Duranti, Sabrina; Turroni, Francesca; Ferrario, Chiara; Mangifesta, Marta; Viappiani, Alice; Ferretti, Pamela; Gorfer, Valentina; Tett, Adrian; Segata, Nicola; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2015-01-01

    Passage through the birth canal and consequent exposure to the mother's microbiota is considered to represent the initiating event for microbial colonization of the gastrointestinal tract of the newborn. However, a precise evaluation of such suspected vertical microbiota transmission has yet to be performed. Here, we evaluated the microbiomes of four sample sets, each consisting of a mother's fecal and milk samples and the corresponding infant's fecal sample, by means of amplicon-based profiling supported by shotgun metagenomics data for two key samples. Notably, targeted genome reconstruction from microbiome data revealed vertical transmission of a Bifidobacterium breve strain and a Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum strain from mother to infant, a notion confirmed by strain isolation and genome sequencing. Furthermore, PCR analyses targeting unique genes from these two strains highlighted their persistence in the infant gut at 6 months. Thus, this study demonstrates the existence of specific bifidobacterial strains that are common to mother and child and thus indicative of vertical transmission and that are maintained in the infant for at least relatively short time spans. PMID:26231653

  19. Short Bowel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... our online catalog. ​ Additional Links Crohn's Disease Diarrhea Peptic Ulcer Disease Upper GI Series What I need to ... complications of short bowel syndrome may include malnutrition peptic ulcers—sores on the lining of the stomach or ...

  20. Bring Back Short Division.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Chich

    1985-01-01

    Some benefits of helping learners think in prime numbers are detailed. Reasons for the decay of this ability are described, with short division presented as one activity which should be reintroduced in schools. (MNS)

  1. [False penile shortness].

    PubMed

    Fontana, D; Rolle, L; Ceruti, C; Datta, G; Ragni, F; Tamagnone, A

    1998-12-01

    The rising interest on male genital aesthetics increased the number of patients complaining of short penis. therefore, the andrologist must be able to perform a correct diagnostic assessment and to make the correct therapeutical choice as well, even if there's no standard yet. The aim of this paper is to discuss some diagnostic troubles about penile shortness and, in particular, to explain the basic surgical strategies suitable for the treatment of "hidden penis". PMID:9882906

  2. Vertical combustor for particulate refuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, P. M.; Carlson, L.

    1981-03-01

    A one-dimensional model is constructed of a vertical combustor for refuse particle combustion in order to analyze it for waste energy recovery. The three components of the model, fuel particles, inert solid particles and the gaseous mixture are described by momentum, energy, and mass conservation equations, resulting in three different flow velocities and temperatures for the medium. The gaseous component is further divided into six chemical species that evolve in combustion at temperatures below about 1367 K. A detailed description is given of the fuel particle combustion through heating, devolatilization, and combustion of the volatile gas in the boundary layer, return of the flame sheet to the fuel surface, and char combustion. The solutions show the combustor to be viable for U.S. refuse which consists of combustibles that can be volatilized up to 85 to 95% below 1366 K. Char combustion, however, is found to be too slow to be attempted in the combustor, where the fuel residence time is of the order of 2 s.

  3. Vertical gating of sketched nanodevices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, Yun-Yi; Park, Dong-Wook; Huang, Mengchen; Annadi, Anil; Lee, Hyungwoo; Ma, Zhenqiang; Eom, Chang-Beom; Irvin, Patrick; Levy, Jeremy

    Conductive-atomic force microscope (c-AFM) lithography at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface has enabled the creation of various classes of nanostructures, such as nanoscale transistors, single-electron transistors and has proven to be a promising testbed for mesoscopic physics. To date, these devices have used lithographically-defined side gates, which are limited by leakage currents. To reduce leakage and improve the electric field effect, we have investigated nanostructures with in-situ grown gold top gate. We will discuss designs of logic devices such as inverters, NAND, and NOR gates. In the quantum regime, we compare the performance of in-situ vertical top gates and that of written coplanar side gates with Quantum Dot devices. We gratefully acknowledge financial support from the following agencies and grants: AFOSR (FA9550-­10-­1­-0524(JL), FA9550-­12-­1-­0342(CBE)), NSF (DMR­1124131 (JL, CBE) and DMR­1234096 (CBE)), ONR (N00014-15-1-2847 (JL)).

  4. Opportunity at 'Cook Islands' (Vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,825th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (March 12, 2009). North is at the top.

    This view is presented as a vertical projection with geometric seam correction.

    The rover had driven half a meter (1.5 feet) earlier on Sol 1825 to fine-tune its location for placing its robotic arm onto an exposed patch of outcrop including a target area informally called 'Cook Islands.' On the preceding sol, Opportunity turned around to drive frontwards and then drove 4.5 meters (15 feet) toward this outcrop. The tracks from the SOl 1824 drive are visible near the center of this view at about the 11 o'clock position. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches). Opportunity had previously been driving backward as a strategy to redistribute lubrication in a wheel drawing more electrical current than usual.

    The outcrop exposure that includes 'Cook Islands' is visible just below the center of the image.

    The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and lighter-toned bedrock.

  5. Rupture of vertical soap films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rio, Emmanuelle

    2014-11-01

    Soap films are ephemeral and fragile objects. They tend to thin under gravity, which gives rise to the fascinating variations of colors at their interfaces but leads systematically to rupture. Even a child can create, manipulate and admire soap films and bubbles. Nevertheless, the reason why it suddenly bursts remains a mystery although the soap chosen to stabilize the film as well as the humidity of the air seem very important. One difficulty to study the rupture of vertical soap films is to control the initial solution. To avoid this problem we choose to study the rupture during the generation of the film at a controlled velocity. We have built an experiment, in which we measure the maximum length of the film together with its lifetime. The generation of the film is due to the presence of a gradient of surface concentration of surfactants at the liquid/air interface. This leads to a Marangoni force directed toward the top of the film. The film is expected to burst only when its weight is not balanced anymore by this force. We will show that this leads to the surprising result that the thicker films have shorter lifetimes than the thinner ones. It is thus the ability of the interface to sustain a surface concentration gradient of surfactants which controls its stability.

  6. Vertical two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, Richard D.

    1999-03-16

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700.degree. and 800.degree. C.) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800.degree. to 950.degree. C. to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product.

  7. Vertical two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, R.D.

    1999-03-16

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace is disclosed. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700 and 800 C) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800 to 950 C to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product. 2 figs.

  8. The Ames Vertical Gun Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karcz, J. S.; Bowling, D.; Cornelison, C.; Parrish, A.; Perez, A.; Raiche, G.; Wiens, J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    The Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR) is a national facility for conducting laboratory- scale investigations of high-speed impact processes. It provides a set of light-gas, powder, and compressed gas guns capable of accelerating projectiles to speeds up to 7 km s(exp -1). The AVGR has a unique capability to vary the angle between the projectile-launch and gravity vectors between 0 and 90 deg. The target resides in a large chamber (diameter approximately 2.5 m) that can be held at vacuum or filled with an experiment-specific atmosphere. The chamber provides a number of viewing ports and feed-throughs for data, power, and fluids. Impacts are observed via high-speed digital cameras along with investigation-specific instrumentation, such as spectrometers. Use of the range is available via grant proposals through any Planetary Science Research Program element of the NASA Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences (ROSES) calls. Exploratory experiments (one to two days) are additionally possible in order to develop a new proposal.

  9. Vertical Integration, Monopoly, and the First Amendment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Timothy J.

    This paper addresses the relationship between the First Amendment, monopoly of transmission media, and vertical integration of transmission and content provision. A survey of some of the incentives a profit-maximizing transmission monopolist may have with respect to content is followed by a discussion of how vertical integration affects those…

  10. Vertical Hegelianism and Beyond: Digital Cinema Editing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyatt, Roger B.

    Cinema as an art and communication form is entering its second century of development. Sergei Eisenstein conceived of editing in horizontal and vertical terms. He saw vertical editing patterns primarily as the synchronization of simultaneous image and sound elements, particularly music, no create cinematic meaning by means of the relationship…

  11. A Vertically Resolved Planetary Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, H. M.

    1984-01-01

    Increase of the vertical resolution of the GLAS Fourth Order General Circulation Model (GCM) near the Earth's surface and installation of a new package of parameterization schemes for subgrid-scale physical processes were sought so that the GLAS Model GCM will predict the resolved vertical structure of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) for all grid points.

  12. Influence of Compression and Stiffness Apparel on Vertical Jump Performance.

    PubMed

    Wannop, John W; Worobets, Jay T; Madden, Ryan; Stefanyshyn, Darren J

    2016-04-01

    Wannop, JW, Worobets, JT, Madden, R, and Stefanyshyn, DJ. Influence of compression and stiffness apparel on vertical jump performance. J Strength Cond Res 30(4): 1093-1101, 2016-Compression apparel alters both compression of the soft tissues and the hip joint stiffness of athletes. It is not known whether it is the compression elements, the stiffness elements, or some combination that increases performance. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine how systematically increasing upper leg compression and hip joint stiffness independently from one another affects vertical jumping performance. Ten male athletes performed countermovement vertical jumps in 8 concept apparel conditions and 1 control condition (loose fitting shorts). The 8 apparel conditions, 4 that specifically altered the amount of compression exerted on the thigh and 4 that altered the hip joint stiffness by means of elastic thermoplastic polyurethane bands, were tested on 2 separate testing sessions (one testing the compression apparel and the other testing the stiffness apparel). Maximum jump height was measured, while kinematic data of the hip, knee, and ankle joint were recorded with a high-speed camera (480 Hz). Both compression and stiffness apparel can have a positive influence on vertical jumping performance. The increase in jump height for the optimal compression was due to increased hip joint range of motion and a trend of increasing the jump time. Optimal stiffness also increased jump height and had the trend of decreasing the hip joint range of motion and hip joint angular velocity. The exact mechanisms by which apparel interventions alter performance is not clear, but it may be due to alterations to the force-length and force-velocity relationships of muscle. PMID:27003453

  13. Inclusion of Vertical Dynamics in Vertically-integrated Models for CO2 Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, B.; Bandilla, K.; Celia, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Mathematical models of different complexity are needed to answer a range of questions for geological sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). One category of simplified models is based on vertical integration, which reduces the three-dimensional problem to two dimensions. Usually, these models assume that brine and CO2 are in vertical equilibrium. This type of model is useful and accurate for simulation times that are large relative to the time for buoyant segregation. But, vertical-equilibrium models are inappropriate in some situations, for instance, in the early stage of injection, when brine and CO2 have not fully segregated. Therefore, for these situations, the vertical equilibrium assumption needs to be relaxed and vertical dynamics needs to be included in the governing equations. To avoid significant increases of computational effort due to the inclusion of vertical dynamics, a multi-scale algorithm can be constructed where the vertically integrated equations are still used to model the (dominant) horizontal flow processes with the vertical reconstruction included as a dynamic problem. Such an approach allows each vertical column of grid cells to be solved independently, as a one-dimensional problem, during the dynamic reconstruction step. Because the top and bottom boundaries usually correspond to impermeable caprock, the total flow for these one-dimensional problems is zero and counter-current flow driven only by buoyancy and capillarity is involved. Solutions for this kind of problem are relatively simple and require little computational effort. With careful coupling between the vertical calculations and the horizontally integrated equations, an efficient algorithm can be developed to simulate a fairly wide range of problems including those with significant vertical dynamics. When vertical dynamics become insignificant, then usual vertical equilibrium reconstruction is used in the vertically integrated models. This new algorithm provides an intermediate choice in model complexity between full three-dimensional models and vertical-equilibrium two-dimensional models.

  14. Congenital Short QT Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Crotti, Lia; Taravelli, Erika; Girardengo, Giulia; Schwartz, Peter J

    2010-01-01

    The Short QT Syndrome is a recently described new genetic disorder, characterized by abnormally short QT interval, paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and life threatening ventricular arrhythmias. This autosomal dominant syndrome can afflict infants, children, or young adults; often a remarkable family background of cardiac sudden death is elucidated. At electrophysiological study, short atrial and ventricular refractory periods are found, with atrial fibrillation and polymorphic ventricular tachycardia easily induced by programmed electrical stimulation. Gain of function mutations in three genes encoding K+ channels have been identified, explaining the abbreviated repolarization seen in this condition: KCNH2 for Ikr (SQT1), KCNQ1 for Iks (SQT2) and KCNJ2 for Ik1 (SQT3). The currently suggested therapeutic strategy is an ICD implantation, although many concerns exist for asymptomatic patients, especially in pediatric age. Pharmacological treatment is still under evaluation; quinidine has shown to prolong QT and reduce the inducibility of ventricular arrhythmias, but awaits additional confirmatory clinical data. PMID:20126594

  15. SHORT PULSE STRETCHER

    DOEpatents

    Branum, D.R.; Cummins, W.F.

    1962-12-01

    >A short pulse stretching circuit capable of stretching a short puise to enable it to be displayed on a relatively slow sweeping oscilloscope is described. Moreover, the duration of the pulse is increased by charging a capacitor through a diode and thereafter discharging the capacitor at such time as is desired. In the circuit the trigger pulse alone passes through a delay line, whereas the main signal passes through the diode only, and results in over-all circuit losses which are proportional to the low losses of the diode only. (AEC)

  16. Vertical grid of retrieved atmospheric profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceccherini, Simone; Carli, Bruno; Raspollini, Piera

    2016-05-01

    The choice of the vertical grid of atmospheric profiles retrieved from remote sensing observations is discussed considering the two cases of profiles used to represent the results of individual measurements and of profiles used for subsequent data fusion applications. An ozone measurement of the MIPAS instrument is used to assess, for different vertical grids, the quality of the retrieved profiles in terms of profile values, retrieval errors, vertical resolutions and number of degrees of freedom. In the case of individual retrievals no evident advantage is obtained with the use of a grid finer than the one with a reduced number of grid points, which are optimized according to the information content of the observations. Nevertheless, this instrument dependent vertical grid, which seems to extract all the available information, provides very poor results when used for data fusion applications. A loss of about a quarter of the degrees of freedom is observed when the data fusion is made using the instrument dependent vertical grid relative to the data fusion made using a vertical grid optimized for the data fusion product. This result is explained by the analysis of the eigenvalues of the Fisher information matrix and leads to the conclusion that different vertical grids must be adopted when data fusion is the expected application.

  17. Sonic Anemometer Vertical Wind Speed Measurement Errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochendorfer, J.; Horst, T. W.; Frank, J. M.; Massman, W. J.; Meyers, T. P.

    2014-12-01

    In eddy covariance studies, errors in the measured vertical wind speed cause errors of a similar magnitude in the vertical fluxes of energy and mass. Several recent studies on the accuracy of sonic anemometer measurements indicate that non-orthogonal sonic anemometers used in eddy covariance studies underestimate the vertical wind speed. It has been suggested that this underestimation is caused by flow distortion from the interference of the structure of the anemometer itself on the flow. When oriented ideally with respect to the horizontal wind direction, orthogonal sonic anemometers that measure the vertical wind speed with a single vertically-oriented acoustic path may measure the vertical wind speed more accurately in typical surface-layer conditions. For non-orthogonal sonic anemometers, Horst et al. (2014) proposed that transducer shadowing may be a dominant factor in sonic flow distortion. As the ratio of sonic transducer diameter to path length and the zenith angle of the three transducer paths decrease, the effects of transducer shadowing on measurements of vertical velocity will decrease. An overview of this research and some of the methods available to correct historical data will be presented.

  18. Multiport well design for sampling of ground water at closely spaced vertical intervals

    SciTech Connect

    Delin, G.N.; Landon, M.K.

    1996-11-01

    Detailed vertical sampling is useful in aquifers where vertical mixing is limited and steep vertical gradients in chemical concentrations are expected. Samples can be collected at closely spaced vertical intervals from nested wells with short screened intervals. However, this approach may not be appropriate in all situations. An easy-to-construct and easy-to-install multiport sampling well to collect ground-water samples from closely spaced vertical intervals was developed and tested. The multiport sampling well was designed to sample ground water from surficial sand-and-gravel aquifers. The device consists of multiple stainless-steel tubes within a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) protective casing. The tubes protrude through the wall of the PVC casing at the desired sampling depths. A peristaltic pump is used to collect ground-water samples form the sampling ports. The difference in hydraulic head between any two sampling ports can be measured with a vacuum pump and a modified manometer. The usefulness and versatility of this multiport well design was demonstrated at an agricultural research site near Princeton, Minnesota where sampling ports were installed to a maximum depth of about 12 m below land surface. Trace experiments were conducted using potassium bromide to document the degree to which short-circuiting occurred between sampling ports. Samples were successfully collected for analysis of major cations and anions, nutrients, selected herbicides, isotopes, dissolved gases, and chlorofluorocarbon concentrations.

  19. Multiport well design for sampling of ground water at closely spaced vertical intervals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Delin, G.N.; Landon, M.K.

    1996-01-01

    Detailed vertical sampling is useful in aquifers where vertical mixing is limited and steep vertical gradients in chemical concentrations are expected. Samples can be collected at closely spaced vertical intervals from nested wells with short screened intervals. However, this approach may not be appropriate in all situations. An easy-to-construct and easy-to-install multiport sampling well to collect ground-water samples from closely spaced vertical intervals was developed and tested. The multiport sampling well was designed to sample ground water from surficial sand-and-gravel aquifers. The device consists of multiple stainless-steel tubes within a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) protective casing. The tubes protrude through the wall of the PVC casing at the desired sampling depths. A peristaltic pump is used to collect ground-water samples from the sampling ports. The difference in hydraulic head between any two sampling ports can be measured with a vacuum pump and a modified manometer. The usefulness and versatility of this multiport well design was demonstrated at an agricultural research site near Princeton, Minnesota where sampling ports were installed to a maximum depth of about 12 m below land surface. Tracer experiments were conducted using potassium bromide to document the degree to which short-circuiting occurred between sampling ports. Samples were successfully collected for analysis of major cations and anions, nutrients, selected herbicides, isotopes, dissolved gases, and chlorofluorcarbon concentrations.

  20. Vertical junction silicon microdisk modulators and switches.

    PubMed

    Watts, Michael R; Zortman, William A; Trotter, Douglas C; Young, Ralph W; Lentine, Anthony L

    2011-10-24

    Vertical junction resonant microdisk modulators and switches have been demonstrated with exceptionally low power consumption, low-voltage operation, high-speed, and compact size. This paper reviews the progress of vertical junction microdisk modulators, provides detailed design data, and compares vertical junction performance to lateral junction performance. The use of a vertical junction maximizes the overlap of the depletion region with the optical mode thereby minimizing both the drive voltage and power consumption of a depletion-mode modulator. Further, the vertical junction enables contact to be made from the interior of the resonator and therein a hard outer wall to be formed that minimizes radiation in small diameter resonators, further reducing the capacitance and drive power of the modulator. Initial simple vertical junction modulators using depletion-mode operation demonstrated the first sub-100 fJ/bit silicon modulators. With more intricate doping schemes and through the use of AC-coupled drive signals, 3.5 μm diameter vertical junction microdisk modulators have recently achieved a communications efficiency of 3 fJ/bit, making these modulators the smallest and lowest power modulators demonstrated to date, in any material system. Additionally, the demonstration was performed at 12.5 Gb/s, required a peak-to-peak signal level of only 1 V, and achieved bit-error-rates below 10(-12) without requiring signal pre-emphasis. As an additional benefit to the use of interior contacts, higher-order active filters can be constructed from multiple vertical-junction modulators without interference of the electrodes. Doing so, we demonstrated second-order active high-speed bandpass switches with ~2.5 ns switching speeds, and power penalties of only 0.4 dB. Through the use of vertical junctions in resonant modulators, we have achieved the lowest power consumption, lowest voltage, and smallest silicon modulators demonstrated to date. PMID:22109050

  1. Methods of testing parameterizations: Vertical ocean mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tziperman, Eli

    1992-01-01

    The ocean's velocity field is characterized by an exceptional variety of scales. While the small-scale oceanic turbulence responsible for the vertical mixing in the ocean is of scales a few centimeters and smaller, the oceanic general circulation is characterized by horizontal scales of thousands of kilometers. In oceanic general circulation models that are typically run today, the vertical structure of the ocean is represented by a few tens of discrete grid points. Such models cannot explicitly model the small-scale mixing processes, and must, therefore, find ways to parameterize them in terms of the larger-scale fields. Finding a parameterization that is both reliable and plausible to use in ocean models is not a simple task. Vertical mixing in the ocean is the combined result of many complex processes, and, in fact, mixing is one of the less known and less understood aspects of the oceanic circulation. In present models of the oceanic circulation, the many complex processes responsible for vertical mixing are often parameterized in an oversimplified manner. Yet, finding an adequate parameterization of vertical ocean mixing is crucial to the successful application of ocean models to climate studies. The results of general circulation models for quantities that are of particular interest to climate studies, such as the meridional heat flux carried by the ocean, are quite sensitive to the strength of the vertical mixing. We try to examine the difficulties in choosing an appropriate vertical mixing parameterization, and the methods that are available for validating different parameterizations by comparing model results to oceanographic data. First, some of the physical processes responsible for vertically mixing the ocean are briefly mentioned, and some possible approaches to the parameterization of these processes in oceanographic general circulation models are described in the following section. We then discuss the role of the vertical mixing in the physics of the large-scale ocean circulation, and examine methods of validating mixing parameterizations using large-scale ocean models.

  2. The research on relationship between wavelet transform on vertical deformation and moderate earthquakes in hexi region, Gansu Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong-Zhi; Wang, Shuang-Xu

    1998-03-01

    In this paper, the possibility of wavelet transform applied to compute the vertical deformation is discussed. Both two dimension plane equation of wavelet transform and B-wavelet based on basic spline function are deduced. According to the equation and B-wavelet, multi-periods vertical deformation data which were measured from 1971 to 1995 in Hexi-Qilian Mountain region, Gansu Province are calculated. The results are: (1) The multi-resolution analysis of wavelet transform can filter the different spatial wavelength in vertical deformation information on different scales effectively and let us to see the heterogeneous in distribution of vertical deformation clearly, therefore, it is an important tool in investigating the relationship between the vertical deformation and the seismicity; (2) The main variation of both the first and second results in wavelet transform mainly takes place along the main faults which explains that the short wave variation of vertical deformation is caused by the faults activities; (3) The wavelet transform of vertical deformation in Hexi-Qilian Mountain area shows that the vertical deformation in southeast parts of Hexi region was larger than that in other parts and there were several moderate earthquakes such as Menyuan M s=6.4 earthquake in 1986, Jingtai M s=6.2 earthquake in 1990, Yongdeng M s=5.8 earthquake in 1995. The vertical deformation in the northwest part of the region was not so large as that in southeast part where ware no strong earthquakes.

  3. Troubling Practices: Short Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Gary; Simic, Lena; Haley, David; Svendsen, Zoe; Neal, Lucy; Samba, Emelda Ngufor

    2012-01-01

    In this "RiDE" themed edition on environmentalism, some short pieces are chosen where practitioners describe their own specific environmental practices. Zoe Svendsen and Lucy Neal point to the positives in two commissioned works ("The Trashcatchers' Carnival" and "3rd Ring Out"), underlining the importance of participant agency for effective…

  4. Short wavelength laser

    DOEpatents

    Hagelstein, P.L.

    1984-06-25

    A short wavelength laser is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses. A multiplicity of panels, mounted on substrates, are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path. When the panels are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses, single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses are produced.

  5. Troubling Practices: Short Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Gary; Simic, Lena; Haley, David; Svendsen, Zoe; Neal, Lucy; Samba, Emelda Ngufor

    2012-01-01

    In this "RiDE" themed edition on environmentalism, some short pieces are chosen where practitioners describe their own specific environmental practices. Zoe Svendsen and Lucy Neal point to the positives in two commissioned works ("The Trashcatchers' Carnival" and "3rd Ring Out"), underlining the importance of participant agency for effective

  6. [The short nose].

    PubMed

    Levet, Y

    2014-12-01

    Short noses are not only depending on the length of the dorsum, but also if there is a saddle deformity, or a too lower situation of the fronto-nasal angle, or an open naso-labial angle or a rim retraction. All the cases are treated, often with the help of cartilage grafts and with a closed approach. PMID:25156433

  7. Displaced vertices in extended supersymmetric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesselbach, S.; Franke, F.; Fraas, H.

    2000-10-01

    In extended supersymmetric models with additional singlet Higgs fields displaced vertices could be observed if the decay width of the next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle becomes very small due to a singlino dominated LSP. We study the supersymmetric parameter space where displaced vertices of the second lightest neutralino exist in the NMSSM and an E6 inspired model. For a mass difference between LSP and NLSP of more than 10 GeV the singlet vacuum expectation value has to be at least of the order of /100 TeV in order to obtain a lightest neutralino with a singlino component large enough for displaced vertices.

  8. Tobacco smoking and vertical periodontal bone loss.

    PubMed

    Baljoon, Mostafa

    2005-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with increased prevalence and severity of destructive periodontal disease in terms of periodontal pocketing, periodontal bone loss, and tooth loss. The smoking destructive effect on periodontal bone may be of even "horizontal" and vertical "angular" pattern. The vertical bone loss or the "vertical defect" is a sign of progressive periodontal breakdown that involves the periodontal bone. Water pipe smoking has a sharp rise by the popularity in the recent years by men and women in Middle East countries. The general objective of this thesis was to investigate the relationship between tobacco smoking and vertical periodontal bone loss cross-sectionally and longitudinally. This thesis is based on two study populations, Swedish musicians and a Saudi Arabian population. All participants had a full set of intra-oral radiographs including 16 periapical and 4 bitewing projections that were assessed with regard to presence or absence of vertical defects. In Study I, the number of defects per person increased with age. Vertical defects were more common in the posterior as compared to the anterior region of the dentition and the distribution of defects within the maxilla as well as the mandible typically revealed a right-left hand side symmetry. Cigarette smoking was significantly associated with the prevalence and severity of vertical bone defects (Studies II and III). The relative risk associated with cigarette smoking was 2 to 3-fold increased. The impact of water pipe smoking was of the same magnitude as that of cigarette smoking and the relative risk associated with water pipe smoking was 6-fold increased compared to non-smoking. In addition, the risk of vertical defects increased with increased exposure in cigarette smokers as well as water pipe smokers (Study III). In Study IV, the proportion of vertical defects increased over a 10-year period and the increase over time was significantly associated with smoking. Moreover, the 10-year vertical bone loss was significantly greater in heavy exposure smokers than in light exposure smokers suggesting an exposure-response effect of smoking. Compared to non-smokers the 10-year relative risk was 2.4-fold increased in light exposure smokers and 5.8-fold increased in heavy exposure smokers. In conclusion, the present observations indicate that there is a significant relationship between tobacco smoking and vertical periodontal bone loss. Tobacco smoking should be considered a risk factor for periodontal vertical bone loss. PMID:15973969

  9. Surface tension profiles in vertical soap films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adami, N.; Caps, H.

    2015-01-01

    Surface tension profiles in vertical soap films are experimentally investigated. Measurements are performed by introducing deformable elastic objets in the films. The shape adopted by those objects once set in the film is related to the surface tension value at a given vertical position by numerically solving the adapted elasticity equations. We show that the observed dependency of the surface tension versus the vertical position is predicted by simple modeling that takes into account the mechanical equilibrium of the films coupled to previous thickness measurements.

  10. Effects of vertical rotation on Arabidopsis development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, A. H.; Chapman, D. K.; Dahl, A. O.

    1975-01-01

    Various gross morphological end points of Arabidopsis development are examined in an attempt to separate the effects of growth on the horizontal clinostat into a component caused by rotation alone and another component caused by the altered position with respect to the direction of the g-vector. In a series of tests which involved comparisons between vertical stationary plants, vertical rotated plants, and plants rotated on clinostats, certain characters were consistently influenced by vertical rotation alone. The characters for which this effect was statistically significant were petiole length and leaf blade width.

  11. Short stem shoulder replacement

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Simon N.; Coghlan, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    Context: It is agreed that it is important to anatomically reproduce the proximal humeral anatomy when performing a prosthetic shoulder replacement. This can be difficult with a long stemmed prosthesis, in particular if there is little relationship of the metaphysis to the humeral shaft. The ‘short stem’ prosthesis can deal with this problem. Aims: A prospective study assessed the results of total shoulder arthroplasty using a short stem humeral prosthesis, a ceramic humeral head, and a pegged cemented polyethylene glenoid. Materials and methods: Patients with primary shoulder osteoarthritis were recruited into this prospective trial and pre-operatively had the ASES, Constant, SPADI, and DASH scores recorded. The patients were clinically reviewed at the two weeks, eight weeks, one year, and two year mark with completion of a data form. Radiological evaluation was at the eight week, one year and two year follow-up. At the one and two year follow-up the satisfaction rating, the range of passive and active motion, Constant, ASES, SPADI, DASH and pain results were recorded and analysed with SPPS 20. Results: During the study period 97 short stem, ceramic head total shoulder replacements were carried out. At the time of follow-up 12 were two years from operation and 38 one year from operation. Active elevation was overall mean 160 degrees. Constant scores were 76 at 1 year, and 86 at 2 years, ASES 88 and 93, and satisfaction 96% and 98% respectively at one and 2 year follow up. There were no problems during insertion of the humeral prosthesis, or any radiolucent lines or movement of the prosthesis on later radiographs. Conclusion: The short stem prosthesis had no complications, and on follow up radiographs good bone fixation. These fairly short term clinical results were overall good. PMID:25258497

  12. Facial soft tissue thickness among various vertical facial patterns in adult Pakistani subjects.

    PubMed

    Jeelani, Waqar; Fida, Mubassar; Shaikh, Attiya

    2015-12-01

    Facial reconstruction techniques are used to obtain an approximation of an individual's appearance thus helping identification of unidentified decedents from their dried skeletal remains. Many of these techniques rely on the sets of average facial soft tissue thickness (FST) values at different anatomical landmarks provided by the previous studies. FST is influenced by the age, sex, ethnicity and the body mass index of the individual. Recent literature has shown that the anthropological variations of the skull may also affect FST at certain points. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of such variations in vertical skull morphology on FST as around one third of different population groups have either a long or short facial pattern as compared to the average facial pattern. Moreover, this study also provides a FST database for the adult Pakistani subjects that may have potential implications in the facial reconstruction of the local subjects. A retrospective analysis of 276 lateral cephalograms of adult subjects having normal sagittal facial pattern was performed. Subjects were categorized into three vertical facial patterns (long face=95, average face=102, short face=79) according to the vertical dimensions of the skull and the FST was measured at 11 midline points. To compare the FST between males and females Mann-Whitney U test was used. Kruskal-Wallis test was applied to compare FST among three vertical facial patterns. The results of our study revealed significant differences in FST at nine landmarks between males and females. These sex-based differences were more pronounced in the long and short facial patterns as compared to the average facial pattern. FST at stomion, pogonion, gnathion and menton was significantly greater in the short facial pattern as compared to the long facial pattern in both the sexes. The results of the present study highlight the importance of anthropological analysis of the skull and taking the vertical skeletal dimension into consideration while performing facial reconstruction. PMID:26476716

  13. Influence of Test Tube Material on Subcooled Flow Boiling Critical Heat Flux in Short Vertical Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, Koichi; Shiotsu, Masahiro; Noda, Nobuaki

    The steady state subcooled flow boiling critical heat flux (CHF) for the flow velocities (u=4.0 to 13.3 m/s), the inlet subcoolings (ΔTsub,in=48.6 to 154.7 K), the inlet pressure (Pin=735.2 to 969.0 kPa) and the increasing heat input (Q0 exp(t/τ), τ=10, 20 and 33.3 s) are systematically measured with the experimental water loop. The 304 Stainless Steel (SUS304) test tube of inner diameter (d=6 mm), heated length (L=66 mm) and L/d=11 with the inner surface of rough finished (Surface roughness, Ra=3.18 μm), the Cupro Nickel (Cu-Ni 30%) test tube of d=6 mm, L=60 mm and L/d=10 with Ra=0.18 μm and the Platinum (Pt) test tubes of d=3 and 6 mm, L=66.5 and 69.6 mm, and L/d=22.2 and 11.6 respectively with Ra=0.45 μm are used in this work. The CHF data for the SUS304, Cu-Ni 30% and Pt test tubes were compared with SUS304 ones for the wide ranges of d and L/d previously obtained and the values calculated by the authors' published steady state CHF correlations against outlet and inlet subcoolings. The influence of the test tube material on CHF is investigated into details and the dominant mechanism of subcooled flow boiling critical heat flux is discussed.

  14. Vertically stabilized elongated cross-section tokamak

    DOEpatents

    Sheffield, George V.

    1977-01-01

    This invention provides a vertically stabilized, non-circular (minor) cross-section, toroidal plasma column characterized by an external separatrix. To this end, a specific poloidal coil means is added outside a toroidal plasma column containing an endless plasma current in a tokamak to produce a rectangular cross-section plasma column along the equilibrium axis of the plasma column. By elongating the spacing between the poloidal coil means the plasma cross-section is vertically elongated, while maintaining vertical stability, efficiently to increase the poloidal flux in linear proportion to the plasma cross-section height to achieve a much greater plasma volume than could be achieved with the heretofore known round cross-section plasma columns. Also, vertical stability is enhanced over an elliptical cross-section plasma column, and poloidal magnetic divertors are achieved.

  15. Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Foundation parameter study

    SciTech Connect

    Lodde, P.F.

    1980-07-01

    The dynamic failure criterion governing the dimensions of prototype Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Foundations is treated as a variable parameter. The resulting change in foundation dimensions and costs is examined.

  16. Vertical stratification in arthropod spatial distribution research

    PubMed Central

    Marler, Thomas E

    2013-01-01

    Spatial heterogeneity within individual host trees is often overlooked in surveys of phytophagous arthropod abundance and distribution. The armored scale Aulacaspis yasumatsui is controlled by the predator Rhyzobius lophanthae to a greater degree on leaves at 75-cm height than on leaves at ground level within its host tree Cycas micronesica. The direct influence of elevation on the predator indirectly generates vertical heterogeneity of the scale insect. Arthropod sampling schemes that fail to include all strata within the vertical profile of the host tree species may generate misleading outcomes. Results indicate that sub-meter increments can reveal significant differences in vertical distribution of phytophagous insects, and that inclusion of observations on other organisms that interact with the target arthropod may illuminate determinants of vertical heterogeneity. PMID:24567772

  17. Vertical sounding balloons for long duration flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaterre, P.

    1994-02-01

    Vertical soundings in the lower stratosphere are possible on command with an Infrared Montgolfiere, between 16 km and 28 km. Results of simulations are presented. The first test flight of a 7800 m3 Montgolfiere with a relief valve, has been conducted in Arctic area (Spitzbergen, July 1992). The flight of an Infrared Montgolfiere, with full vertical sounding capabilities, is planned for the end of 1993, from Ecuador (South AMERICA).

  18. Vertical sounding balloons for long duration flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaterre, P.

    1994-02-01

    Vertical soundings in the lower stratosphere are possible on command with an Infrared Montgolfiere, between 16 km and 28 km. Results of simulations are presented. The first test flight of a 7800 cu m Montgolfiere with a relief valve, has been conducted in Arctic area (Spitzbergen, July 1992). The flight of an Infrared Montgolfiere, with full vertical sounding capabilities, is planned for the end of 1993, from Ecuador (South AMERICA).

  19. Artificial gravity: head movements during short-radius centrifugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Laurence R.; Hecht, Heiko; Lyne, Lisette E.; Sienko, Kathleen H.; Cheung, Carol C.; Kavelaars, Jessica

    2001-08-01

    Short-radius centrifugation is a potential countermeasure to long-term weightlessness. Unfortunately, head movements in a rotating environment induce serious discomfort, non-compensatory vestibulo-ocular reflexes, and subjective illusions of body tilt. In two experiments we investigated the effects of pitch and yaw head movements in participants placed supine on a rotating bed with their head at the center of rotation, feel at the rim. The vast majority of participants experienced motion sickness, inappropriate vertical nystagmus and illusory tilt and roll as predicted by a semicircular canal model. However, a small but significant number of the 28 participants experienced tilt in the predicted plane but in the opposite direction. Heart rate was elevated following one-second duration head turns. Significant adaptation occurred following a series of head turns in the light. Vertical nystagmus, motion sickness and illusory tilt all decreased with adaptation. Consequences for artificial gravity produced by short-radius centrifuges as a countermeasure are discussed.

  20. Horizontal wires replace the vertical files.

    PubMed

    Colburn, J L

    1997-01-01

    Traditionally, clippings of newspaper articles, pictures from magazines, pamphlets, charts, graphs, posters, proceedings, or copies thereof, and other miscellaneous information sources have been stored in vertical files in libraries. The practice of creating and maintaining vertical files is extremely time consuming. In a medical library, in particular, old information about diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis can quickly become incorrect, misleading, and possibly harmful. Adequately tending to the vertical files can require a librarian to create a balancing act between properly maintaining vertical files and meeting the needs of the users in other areas of the library. The maintenance of vertical files is, by nature, highly consumptive of paper and space consuming. A reasonable alternative to the traditional vertical files is the World-Wide Web. Search engines exist for locating specific information, and bookmarks and/or links which point users to particularly useful sites can be set in search software. Some methods for searching are discussed, and a variety of World-Wide Web information sources are offered. PMID:10173596

  1. Short wavelength laser

    DOEpatents

    Hagelstein, Peter L.

    1986-01-01

    A short wavelength laser (28) is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses (30, 31). A multiplicity of panels (32), mounted on substrates (34), are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path (42). When the panels (32) are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses (30, 31), single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses (44, 46) are produced.

  2. High-power vertical-cavity surface-emitting arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seurin, Jean-Francois; Ghosh, Chuni L.; Khalfin, Viktor; Miglo, Aleksandr; Xu, Guoyang; Wynn, James D.; Pradhan, Prachi; D'Asaro, L. Arthur

    2008-02-01

    We present record output power levels (a few hundred Watts) in continuous-wave (CW) and quasi-CW (QCW) from 2D vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) arrays, corresponding to power densities exceeding 1kW/cm2 in CW and 3.5kW/cm2 in QCW. These VCSEL arrays emit around 975nm with narrow spectral width (<1nm) and excellent wavelength stability (<0.07nm/K). Peak power conversion efficiency of properly designed arrays exceeds 50%. Additional features of these arrays include emission in a circular, low-diverging beam, and reliable high-temperature operation. These arrays can also be operated reliably in short pulses (<200nsec) at many times their roll-over CW current, making them useful for high-energy applications. VCSEL arrays with 2.2kW peak output power operating under 100nsec pulse-width have been demonstrated.

  3. Single transverse mode selectively oxidized vertical cavity lasers

    SciTech Connect

    CHOQUETTE,KENT D.

    2000-04-18

    Vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) sources have been adopted into Gigabit Ethernet applications in a remarkably short time period. VCSELs are particularly suitable for multimode optical fiber local area networks (LANs), due to their reduced threshold current, circular output beam, and inexpensive and high volume manufacture. Moreover, selectively oxidized VCSELs are nearly ideal LAN sources since the oxide aperture within the laser cavity produces strong electrical and optical confinement which enables high electrical to optical conversion efficiency and minimal modal discrimination allowing emission into multiple transverse optical modes. In addition to the large demand for multimode lasers, VCSELs which emit into a single optical mode are also increasingly sought for emerging applications, which include data communication with single mode optical fiber, bar code scanning, laser printing, optical read/write heads, and modulation spectroscopy. To achieve single mode selectively oxidized VCSELs is a challenging task, since the inherent index confinement within these high performance lasers is very large.

  4. Vertical Ge/Si Core/Shell Nanowire Junctionless Transistor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Cai, Fuxi; Otuonye, Ugo; Lu, Wei D

    2016-01-13

    Vertical junctionless transistors with a gate-all-around (GAA) structure based on Ge/Si core/shell nanowires epitaxially grown and integrated on a ⟨111⟩ Si substrate were fabricated and analyzed. Because of efficient gate coupling in the nanowire-GAA transistor structure and the high density one-dimensional hole gas formed in the Ge nanowire core, excellent P-type transistor behaviors with Ion of 750 μA/μm were obtained at a moderate gate length of 544 nm with minimal short-channel effects. The experimental data can be quantitatively modeled by a GAA junctionless transistor model with few fitting parameters, suggesting the nanowire transistors can be fabricated reliably without introducing additional factors that can degrade device performance. Devices with different gate lengths were readily obtained by tuning the thickness of an etching mask film. Analysis of the histogram of different devices yielded a single dominate peak in device parameter distribution, indicating excellent uniformity and high confidence of single nanowire operation. Using two vertical nanowire junctionless transistors, a PMOS-logic inverter with near rail-to-rail output voltage was demonstrated, and device matching in the logic can be conveniently obtained by controlling the number of nanowires employed in different devices rather than modifying device geometry. These studies show that junctionless transistors based on vertical Ge/Si core/shell nanowires can be fabricated in a controlled fashion with excellent performance and may be used in future hybrid, high-performance circuits where bottom-up grown nanowire devices with different functionalities can be directly integrated with an existing Si platform. PMID:26674542

  5. Psychosocial Functioning, Personality, and Body Image Following Vertical Banded Gastroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Fortuin, Frederiek A. M.; Pelle, Aline J. M.; van Heck, Guus L.

    2007-01-01

    Background In addition to increased risks of morbidity and mortality, extreme obesity is substantially associated with psychosocial problems. Therefore, the ultimate goal of bariatric surgery should not only be reducing weight and counteracting comorbid conditions but also improving psychosocial functioning. In addition to being an important goal of bariatric surgery, enhanced psychosocial functioning may motivate patients to adhere to adequate health behavior to maintain the surgically established weight loss. Methods We evaluated early postoperative psychosocial functioning in several domains over time. Preoperatively as well as 6, 12, and 24 months after vertical banded gastroplasty, 104 patients were psychologically assessed using a semi-structured interview and psychological questionnaires focusing on psychosocial functioning, personality, and body image. Results Over time, we found significant changes in weight: 2 years excess weight loss was 58.6%. In addition, most aspects of psychosocial functioning showed significant improvements over time. However, initial improvements in depressive symptoms, sleeping problems, and neuroticism did not last. With respect to personality features, only short-term changes in self-esteem were found. The most robust improvements were seen in the case of body image. Finally, within the patient group, there was a wide variability in changes. Conclusion Vertical banded gastroplasty not only leads to considerable weight loss but also to significant improvements in psychosocial functioning. However, some improvements waned over time, and successful postoperative functioning did not apply to all patients. PMID:18080723

  6. Piezoelectric potential in vertically aligned nanowires for high output nanogenerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Giuseppe; Mantini, Giulia; Di Carlo, Aldo; D'Amico, Arnaldo; Falconi, Christian; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2011-11-01

    In this work we analyze the coupled piezoelectric and semiconductive behavior of vertically aligned ZnO nanowires under uniform compression. The screening effect on the piezoelectric field caused by the free carriers in vertically compressed zinc oxide nanowires (NWs) has been computed by means of both analytical considerations and finite element calculations. We predict that, for typical geometries and donor concentrations, the length of the NW does not significantly influence the maximum output piezopotential because the potential mainly drops across the tip, so that relatively short NWs can be sufficient for high-efficiency nanogenerators, which is an important result for wet-chemistry fabrication of low-cost, CMOS- or MEMS-compatible nanogenerators. Furthermore, simulations reveal that the dielectric surrounding the NW influences the output piezopotential, especially for low donor concentrations. Other parameters such as the applied force, the sectional area and the donor concentration have been varied in order to understand their effects on the output voltage of the nanogenerator.

  7. Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing Detail, Horizontal Cross ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing Detail, Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing-End Detail - Cumberland Covered Bridge, Spanning Mississinewa River, Matthews, Grant County, IN

  8. Enceladus' Influence on the Vertical Structure of Saturn's E Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Joseph A.; Agarwal, M.; Hedman, M. M.; Tiscareno, M. S.

    2013-10-01

    Within ~+/- 20,000 km of Enceladus' orbit, Saturn's tenuous E ring has a double-banded appearance, with the number of particles depleted by a few percent within +/- 1000 km of the planet’s equatorial plane (Hedman et al. 2012). We wish to understand this vertical structure, to learn if it might indicate launch speeds or a sweeping effect of Enceladus. We have combined order-of-magnitude analytical estimates and numerical simulations that include Enceladus and Saturn's gravity up to J6 in short-term (1-2 days) and longer-term 200-yr) integrations. Because most particles emanating from the surface geysers will fall back on the moon, the E ring must be dominated by particles that barely escaped. Hence we follow the orbits of many hundreds of particles launched near Enceladus' southern pole with speeds between ~ 0.8 to 2 times the nominal escape speed (i.e., that from an isolated sphere). We illustrate some contorted trajectories within the three-body problem for such launch conditions. Typically, gravitational deceleration after launch followed by a few gravitational kicks from the moon induce many particles to attain orbital inclinations corresponding to a maximum height of ~4rE (rE = radius of Enceladus = 250 km), or about one Hill radius for Enceladus. The vertical epicyclic motions of such inclined orbits account the observed two-banded structure. Simultaneous gravitational interactions will scatter particles to produce a two-banded, radially extended (+/-10,000km) Gaussian core on either side of Enceladus, as observed. In our simple model, particles are lost by collisions into Enceladus in ~ 100 yrs; mutual impacts are ignored. Since gravity alone can generate in short order the most prominent features in the observed structures, non-gravitational forces (cf. Kempf et al. 2010) mostly affect other aspects of the E ring structure and evolution.

  9. High-temperature long-wavelength vertical-cavity lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margalit, Near Moses

    Vertical cavity lasers(VCLs) have recently been the subject of much research effort around the world. These lasers hold the promise of inexpensive, low threshold, high speed sources for optical communication. Short wavelength lasers have many applications, including free space optical interconnects and short distance datacom, but have limited potential for longer distances due to the absorption and dispersion spectrum of standard optical fiber. The longer wavelength sources near 1.3 or 1.5 /mu m are ideally suited for medium and long distance applications. Interoperability as well as compatibility with existing fiber optic infrastructure also call for longer wavelength sources. However, large volume commercialization of such devices, for applications such as FTTH(fiber to the home), requires a wide temperature range of operation ([-]40o C to 85o C). Historically, the realization of such high performance long-wavelength vertical cavity- lasers has been difficult. Nonetheless, advances in fabrication techniques, such as wafer fusion, have allowed for ever increasing device performance. In this thesis, we present recent results that include devices with multigigahetz frequency responses, hundred of microwatts of cw output powers, as well as 65o C continuous-wave operating temperatures. In addition, these devices have now been demonstrated as sources in link transmission experiment at 2.5 Gb/s over 200 km of optical fiber, far surpassing the record distance-bandwidth products of any other VCL experiment. We analyze here the design and fabrication of these record performance devices. Further advancements may soon lead to commercial level performance.

  10. Short course review and the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corden, Pierce S.

    2014-05-01

    The presentations at the short course that were the basis of the present Proceedings covered many critical issues related to the objective of eliminating nuclear weapons as a means of ensuring global security and stability. This paper is based on the concluding talk, which briefly reviewed the course, offered a net assessment of where the project of elimination - a policy objective for nearly all the world's states - stands, and discussed some of the factors that need to be dealt with in achieving a nuclear weapon free world. These include understanding what "proliferation" means and how it has changed over time, how the spread of nuclear weapons has proceeded over time, both "vertical" in numbers and "horizontal" to additional countries, what way the "vector" of reversing proliferation is pointing, and the roles of nuclear energy and international governance.

  11. Short course review and the future

    SciTech Connect

    Corden, Pierce S.

    2014-05-09

    The presentations at the short course that were the basis of the present Proceedings covered many critical issues related to the objective of eliminating nuclear weapons as a means of ensuring global security and stability. This paper is based on the concluding talk, which briefly reviewed the course, offered a net assessment of where the project of elimination - a policy objective for nearly all the world's states - stands, and discussed some of the factors that need to be dealt with in achieving a nuclear weapon free world. These include understanding what 'proliferation' means and how it has changed over time, how the spread of nuclear weapons has proceeded over time, both 'vertical' in numbers and 'horizontal' to additional countries, what way the 'vector' of reversing proliferation is pointing, and the roles of nuclear energy and international governance.

  12. Biomechanical Comparison of Shorts With Different Pads

    PubMed Central

    Marcolin, Giuseppe; Petrone, Nicola; Reggiani, Carlo; Panizzolo, Fausto A.; Paoli, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract An intensive use of the bicycle may increase the risk of erectile dysfunction and the compression of the perineal area has been showed to be a major mechanism leading to sexual alterations compromising the quality of life. Manufacturers claim that pads contribute to increase cyclists perineal protection ensuring a high level of comfort. To investigate the influence of various cycling pads with regard to perineal protection and level of comfort. Nine club road cyclists rode 20 min on a drum simulator, located at the Nutrition and Exercise Physiology Laboratory, at a constant speed and gear ratio wearing the shorts with 3 cycling pads of different design and thickness: basic (BAS), intermediate (INT), and endurance (END). Kinematics and pressure data were recorded at min 5, 15, and 20 of the test using a motion capture system and a pressure sensor mat. The variables of interest were: 3-dimensional pelvis excursions, peak pressure, mean pressure, and vertical force. The comfort level was assessed with a ranking order based on the subjects’ perception after the 20-min trials and measuring the vertical ground reaction force under the anterior wheel as well as the length of the center of pressure (COP) trajectory on the saddle. Results showed that the vertical force and the average value of mean pressure on the saddle significantly decreased during the 20-min period of testing for BAS and END. Mean peak pressure on the corresponding perineal cyclist area significantly increased only for BAS during the 20-min period. Interestingly objective comfort indexes measured did not match cyclists subjective comfort evaluation. The lower capacity of BAS to reduce the peak pressure on the corresponding perineal area after 20 min of testing, together with its positive comfort evaluation, suggest that a balance between protection and perceived comfort should be taken into account in the choice of the pad. Hence, the quantitative approach of objective comfort indexes introduced in this study could be helpful for manufacturers in the development of their protective pads. PMID:26200626

  13. Lesions of the vertical lobe impair visual discrimination learning by observation in Octopus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Fiorito, G; Chichery, R

    1995-06-01

    We investigated whether lesions of the vertical lobe of the supraesophageal nervous mass of Octopus vulgaris impair discrimination learning acquired by observation of conspecific behavior. When tested alone, observer octopuses with about 50% of the vertical lobe removed showed a deficit in their learning by observation performance. The level of learning improved 24 h after the observational phase, when observer Octopus vulgaris showed a visual discriminatory performance significantly in agreement with the observed one. Control animals that had no brain tissue removed, did not show any impairment in the discriminative performance they had acquired vicariously. Removal of the vertical lobe of the octopus 'brain' has been reported to induce learning and memory deficits of visual discrimination in direct learning by conditioning experiments. Our findings support the conclusion that the removal of such brain center impairs short-term recall, but does not impair acquisition nor retention of 'observational' long-term memory. PMID:7675317

  14. Thermal Impacts of Vertical Greenery Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safikhani, Tabassom; Abdullah, Aminatuzuhariah Megat; Ossen, Dilshan Remaz; Baharvand, Mohammad

    2014-12-01

    - Using vertical greenery systems to reduce heat transmission is becoming more common in modern architecture. Vertical greenery systems are divided into two main categories; green facades and living walls. This study aims to examine the thermal performance of vertical greenery systems in hot and humid climates. An experimental procedure was used to measure indoor temperature and humidity. These parameters were also measured for the gap between the vertical greenery systems and wall surfaces. Three boxes were used as small-scale rooms. Two boxes were provided with either a living wall or a green facade and one box did not have any greenery (benchmark). Blue Trumpet Vine was used in the vertical greenery systems. The data were recorded over the course of three sunny days in April 2013. An analyses of the results showed that the living wall and green facade reduced indoor temperature up to 4.0 °C and 3.0 °C, respectively. The living wall and green facade also reduced cavity temperatures by 8.0 °C and 6.5 °C, respectively.

  15. Some vertical lineaments of lip position.

    PubMed

    Peck, S; Peck, L; Kataja, M

    1992-06-01

    This study was performed to elucidate quantitatively upper lip-tooth-jaw relativity in the vertical dimension. Values for five linear dentolabial measurements were generated from male (n = 42) and female (n = 46) reference samples. In addition, three vertical skeletofacial dimensions and two vertical dental dimensions were recorded. A significant sexual dimorphism was found in the vertical lip-tooth-jaw relationship: the upper lip of the female subjects was positioned on average 1.5 mm more superiorly at maximum smile than the upper lip of the male subjects (p less than 0.01). High smile lines appeared to be a female lineament, and low smile lines appeared to be a male lineament. There was a significant sex difference in upper lip length: the male subjects exhibited a longer upper lip than the female subjects (p less than 0.001). The mean difference was 2.2 mm. A similarly significant male-female difference was seen in the skeletal maxillary height measurement: the male sample showed a 2.2 mm mean vertical maxillary increase over the female sample (p less than 0.001). Furthermore, a significant difference was found between the clinical crown height of the maxillary central incisors in the male and female subjects of comparable ages: the male group had longer central incisor crowns (p less than 0.01). PMID:1598892

  16. Climatology of tropospheric vertical velocity spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ecklund, W. L.; Gage, K. S.; Balsley, B. B.; Carter, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    Vertical velocity power spectra obtained from Poker Flat, Alaska; Platteville, Colorado; Rhone Delta, France; and Ponape, East Caroline Islands using 50-MHz clear-air radars with vertical beams are given. The spectra were obtained by analyzing the quietest periods from the one-minute-resolution time series for each site. The lengths of available vertical records ranged from as long as 6 months at Poker Flat to about 1 month at Platteville. The quiet-time vertical velocity spectra are shown. Spectral period ranging from 2 minutes to 4 hours is shown on the abscissa and power spectral density is given on the ordinate. The Brunt-Vaisala (B-V) periods (determined from nearby sounding balloons) are indicated. All spectra (except the one from Platteville) exhibit a peak at periods slightly longer than the B-V period, are flat at longer periods, and fall rapidly at periods less than the B-V period. This behavior is expected for a spectrum of internal waves and is very similar to what is observed in the ocean (Eriksen, 1978). The spectral amplitudes vary by only a factor of 2 or 3 about the mean, and show that under quiet conditions vertical velocity spectra from the troposphere are very similar at widely different locations.

  17. Future short-field aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galloway, T. L.

    1972-01-01

    The application of short takeoff and landing aircraft for improving short-haul air transportation is examined. The contracts with industry to study quiet turbofan short-field aircraft in the short-haul air transportation system are identified. Studies of appropriate propulsion systems are conducted in parallel with the aircraft studies. The objectives of the studies are to: (1) determine economic and social viability of short-haul air transportation, (2) identify critical technology and technology-related problems, (3) define representative aircraft configurations and characteristics to include development and operational costs, and (4) to establish desirable technology advances for improving short-haul transportation systems.

  18. Scottish Short Stone Rows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggles, Clive L. N.

    Short stone rows received a good deal of attention during the 1980s and 1990s, at a time when archaeoastronomy in prehistoric Britain and Ireland was moving beyond reassessments of Alexander Thom's "megalithic observatories" by identifying coherent groups of similar monuments with clear orientation trends. Many such rows are found in western Scotland, with the main concentration in Argyll and the island of Mull. Systematic analyses of their orientations produced credible evidence of an awareness of the 18.6-year lunar node cycle, within a "primary-secondary" pattern whereby isolated rows were oriented close to moonrise or moonset at the southern major standstill limit, while others oriented in this way were accompanied by a second row oriented in a declination range that could be interpreted either as lunar or solar. A detailed investigation of the landscape situation of the sites in northern Mull, accompanied by excavations at two of the sites, suggested that they were deliberately placed in locations where critical moonsets would be seen against prominent distant landscape features, but where the distant horizon in most or all other directions was hidden from view. A lack of independent archaeological evidence may help to explain why archaeoastronomical investigations at short stone rows have never progressed beyond "data-driven" studies of orientations and landscape situation. Nonetheless, the work that was done at these sites raised important general methodological issues, and pioneered techniques, that remain relevant across archaeoastronomy today.

  19. Reconstructing the vertical profile of humidity on the basis of the vertical profile of temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bazlova, T. I.

    1974-01-01

    The vertical profile of humidity in the atmosphere is developed on the basis of the vertical profile of temperature using an empirical formula linking changes in humidity with changes in temperature and altitude. The atmosphere is divided into three layers by altitude, since the condition for the formation of humidity varies with altitude.

  20. Vertical vibration analysis for elevator compensating sheave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Seiji; Okawa, Takeya; Nakazawa, Daisuke; Fukui, Daiki

    2013-07-01

    Most elevators applied to tall buildings include compensating ropes to satisfy the balanced rope tension between the car and the counter weight. The compensating ropes receive tension by the compensating sheave, which is installed at the bottom space of the elevator shaft. The compensating sheave is only suspended by the compensating ropes, therefore, the sheave can move vertically while the car is traveling. This paper shows the elevator dynamic model to evaluate the vertical motion of the compensating sheave. Especially, behavior in emergency cases, such as brake activation and buffer strike, was investigated to evaluate the maximum upward motion of the sheave. The simulation results were validated by experiments and the most influenced factor for the sheave vertical motion was clarified.

  1. Liquid storage tanks under vertical excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Philippacopoulos, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    Until recently, the hydrodynamic effects on liquid storage tanks induced by an earthquake excitation were basically treated for the horizontal component of the earthquake. Recent studies, however, showed that the hydrodynamic effects due to the vertical component of an earthquake may be significant. In these studies the tank is assumed to be fixed at the bottom. This paper is concerned with the hydrodynamic behavior of liquid storage tanks induced by vertical earthquake input excitation. First, the fluid-tank system is treated as a fixed-base system and a simple formula is obtained for the coupled fluid-structure natural frequency. Second, additional interaction effects due to the foundation flexibility on the fluid-tank system are investigated. It is concluded that the foundation flexibility may have a significant effect on the hydrodynamic behavior of the liquid storage tanks under a vertical ground shaking.

  2. Abdominal incisions--vertical or transverse?

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, H.; Coleridge-Smith, P. D.; Joyce, A. D.

    1984-01-01

    Two-hundred and nine patients were entered into a prospective, randomized trial in order to determine whether a vertical or transverse abdominal incision is the more satisfactory in producing sound wounds. Ninety-six patients were randomized between paramedian and transverse incisions, and followed up for at least 1 year. No significant difference in the incidence of wound failure could be shown between 46 paramedian and 50 transverse incisions. Those patients who were considered to require a vertical incision were randomized between median and paramedian incisions. No significant difference in wound failure rates between 39 median and 40 paramedian incisions could be demonstrated. No advantage or disadvantage of a transverse over a vertical abdominal incision or of a paramedian over a median incision could be shown in this study. PMID:6462980

  3. Purification process for vertically aligned carbon nanofibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Cattien V.; Delziet, Lance; Matthews, Kristopher; Chen, Bin; Meyyappan, M.

    2003-01-01

    Individual, free-standing, vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes or nanofibers are ideal for sensor and electrode applications. Our plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition techniques for producing free-standing and vertically aligned carbon nanofibers use catalyst particles at the tip of the fiber. Here we present a simple purification process for the removal of iron catalyst particles at the tip of vertically aligned carbon nanofibers derived by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The first step involves thermal oxidation in air, at temperatures of 200-400 degrees C, resulting in the physical swelling of the iron particles from the formation of iron oxide. Subsequently, the complete removal of the iron oxide particles is achieved with diluted acid (12% HCl). The purification process appears to be very efficient at removing all of the iron catalyst particles. Electron microscopy images and Raman spectroscopy data indicate that the purification process does not damage the graphitic structure of the nanotubes.

  4. Vertical Velocity Measurements in Warm Stratiform Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luke, E. P.; Kollias, P.

    2013-12-01

    Measurements of vertical air motion in warm boundary layer clouds are key for quantitatively describing cloud-scale turbulence and for improving our understanding of cloud and drizzle microphysical processes. Recently, a new technique that produces seamless measurements of vertical air velocity in the cloud and sub-cloud layers for both drizzling and non-drizzling stratocumulus clouds has been developed. The technique combines radar Doppler spectra-based retrievals of vertical air motion in cloud and light drizzle conditions with a novel neural network analysis during heavily drizzling periods. Observations from Doppler lidars are used to characterize sub-cloud velocities and to evaluate the performance of the technique near the cloud base. The technique is applied to several cases of stratiform clouds observed by the ARM Mobile Facility during the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) campaign in Cape Cod. The observations clearly illustrate coupling of the sub-cloud and cloud layer turbulent structures.

  5. Modeling the CAPTEX vertical tracer concentration profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Draxler, R.R.; Stunder, B.J.B.

    1988-05-01

    Perfluorocarbon tracer concentration profiles measured by aircraft 600--900 km downwind of the release locations during CAPTEX are discussed and compared with some model results. In general, the concentrations decreased with height in the upper half of the boundary layer where the aircraft measurements were made. The results of a model sensitivity study suggested that the shape of the profile was primarily due to winds increasing with height and relative position of the sampling with respect to the upwind and downwind edge of the plume. Further modeling studies showed that relatively simple vertical mixing parameterizations could account for the complex vertical plume structure when the model had sufficient vertical resolution. In general, the model performed better with slower winds and corresponding longer transport times.

  6. Planetary-scale variability of the fair-weather vertical electric field in the stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzworth, R. H.; Onsager, T.; Kintner, P.; Powell, S.

    1984-01-01

    The paper reports the discovery of short-term variability in the planetary-scale-size vertical electric field measured in the stratosphere. Measurements were made on superpressure balloons at 26-km altitude separated by up to 3000 km. Data are presented which show that the large-scale current system is variable, with twice the amplitude of the average diurnal variations, on time scales of tens of minutes to hours.

  7. Top-down vertical itemset mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrabi, Mohammad Karim; Ghods, Vahid

    2015-03-01

    Vertical itemset mining is an important frequent pattern mining problem with broad applications. It is challenging since one may need to examine a combinatorial explosive number of possible patterns of items of a dataset in a traditional horizontal algorithm. Since high dimensional datasets typically contain a large number of columns and a small number of rows, vertical itemset mining algorithms, which extract the frequent itemsets of dataset by producing all combination of rows ids, are a good alternative for horizontal algorithms in mining frequent itemsets from high dimensional dataset. Since a rowset can be simply produced from its subsets by adding a new row id to a sub rowset, many bottom up vertical itemset mining algorithms are designed and represented in the literature. However, bottom up vertical mining algorithms suffer from a main drawback. Bottom-up algorithms start the process of generating and testing of rowsets from the small rowsets and go on to the larger rowsets, whereas the small rowsets cannot produce a frequent itemsets because they contain less than minimum support threshold number of rows. In this paper, we described a new efficient vertical top down algorithm called VTD (Vertical Top Down) to conduct mining of frequent itemsets in high dimensional datasets. Our top down approach employed the minimum support threshold to prune the rowsets which any itemset could not be extracted from them. Several experiments on real bioinformatics datasets showed that VTD is orders of magnitude better than previous closed pattern mining algorithms. Our performance study showed that this algorithm outperformed substantially the best former algorithms.

  8. European Vertical Reference System Influence in Latvia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celms, A.; Reķe, I.; Ratkevičs, A.

    2015-11-01

    Till 1 December, 2014, in Latvia the heights were determined in Baltic Normal Height System 1977. The national height system is determined by the Cabinet of Ministers and internal laws. Now for the change of the national height system to reconcile it with the European Vertical Reference System, amendments to the laws and regulations have been developed, but so far only the amendment to the Geospatial Information Law is in force, the amendment to the regulation of the Cabinet of Ministers is still not approved. This amendment declares the Latvia Height System based on the European Vertical Reference System in Latvia as the national height system. For height transformation, there is a transformation formula for each European country. After calculations it is seen that height difference between Baltic Normal Height System 1977 and European Vertical Reference System depends on point location in the territory (coordinates). This unequal height difference between both height systems will cause unequal height values on border connection points between Baltic countries. The aim of the research is to evaluate the European Vertical Reference System in Latvia. To reach the aim the following tasks are set: 1) to evaluate the components of transformation formulas; 2) using the transformation formulas to calculate height differences between Baltic Normal Height System 1977 and the European Vertical Reference System realization EVRF2007 for the territory of Latvia and also between Baltic Normal Height System 1977 and the Latvia Normal Height System; 3) to get height differences in the European Vertical Reference System on the borderlines of Latvia - Estonia and Latvia - Lithuania.

  9. Turbulence in vertical axis wind turbine canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinzel, Matthias; Araya, Daniel B.; Dabiri, John O.

    2015-11-01

    Experimental results from three different full scale arrays of vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWTs) under natural wind conditions are presented. The wind velocities throughout the turbine arrays are measured using a portable meteorological tower with seven, vertically staggered, three-component ultrasonic anemometers. The power output of each turbine is recorded simultaneously. The comparison between the horizontal and vertical energy transport for the different turbine array sizes shows the importance of vertical transport for large array configurations. Quadrant-hole analysis is employed to gain a better understanding of the vertical energy transport at the top of the VAWT arrays. The results show a striking similarity between the flows in the VAWT arrays and the adjustment region of canopies. Namely, an increase in ejections and sweeps and decrease in inward and outward interactions occur inside the turbine array. Ejections are the strongest contributor, which is in agreement with the literature on evolving and sparse canopy flows. The influence of the turbine array size on the power output of the downstream turbines is examined by comparing a streamwise row of four single turbines with square arrays of nine turbine pairs. The results suggest that a new boundary layer forms on top of the larger turbine arrays as the flow adjusts to the new roughness length. This increases the turbulent energy transport over the whole planform area of the turbine array. By contrast, for the four single turbines, the vertical energy transport due to turbulent fluctuations is only increased in the near wake of the turbines. These findings add to the knowledge of energy transport in turbine arrays and therefore the optimization of the turbine spacing in wind farms.

  10. Vortex Formation in Vertically Stratified Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Glen R.

    2013-10-01

    A central problem of planet formation is how to form large planetesimals in a turbulent protoplanetary disk. Recent work suggests that MRI turbulence would excite such large velocities that the planetesimals would collisionally fragment rather than grow. The structure of chondritic meteorites indicates a gentle nebular environment where chondrules are sorted by size and cemented together rapidly. Although it is well established that anticyclones can concentrate particles that are weakly coupled to the gas in protoplanetary disks, the conditions required for the formation and long-time stability of anticyclones in a vertically stratified disk are still highly uncertain. Fully three dimensional fluid dynamic simulations of protoplanetary disks are computationally expensive when one requires a computational domain that is large compared to the vertical scale height of the disk. An alternative simulation approach is to use potential temperature as the vertical coordinate so that the equations of motion resemble the shallow water equations (Dowling et al. 1998). We have therefore modified a multilayer shallow water simulation code to model the formation of vortices in a vertically stratified protoplanetary disk with a radial entropy gradient. Vertical stratification of the disk is modeled by using multiple layers, where each layer has a different constant value of the entropy. By forcing a slope in the interfaces between the layers, we impose a radial entropy gradient in the disk. Radiative heating and cooling causes vertical mass exchange between adjacent constant entropy layers according to a Newton cooling formula. We find that the formation of anticyclones is robust, and that these vortices actively excite density waves, which in turn, transport angular momentum through the disk. Our simulations therefore yield new insights on how the dusty dead zones of protoplanetary disks can transport angular momentum through the disk by purely hydrodynamic processes. Support from NASA’s Origins of Solar Systems program is gratefully acknowledged.

  11. Vertical stability, high elongation, and the consequences of loss of vertical control on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Kellman, A.G.; Ferron, J.R.; Jensen, T.H.; Lao, L.L.; Luxon, J.L.; Skinner, D.G.; Strait, E.J.; Reis, E.; Taylor, T.S.; Turnbull, A.D. ); Lazarus, E.A. ); Lister, J.B. )

    1990-09-01

    Recent modifications to the vertical control system for DIII-D has enabled operation of discharges with vertical elongation {kappa}, up to 2.5. When vertical stability is lost, a disruption follows and a large vertical force on the vacuum vessel is observed. The loss of plasma energy begins when the edge safety factor q is 2 but the current decay does not begin until q {approximately}1.3. Current flow on the open field lines in the plasma scrapeoff layer has been measured and the magnitude and distribution of these currents can explain the observed force on the vessel. Equilibrium calculations and simulation of this vertical displacement episode are presented. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  12. CIRSS vertical data integration, San Bernardino study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodson, W.; Christenson, J.; Michel, R. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    The creation and use of a vertically integrated data base, including LANDSAT data, for local planning purposes in a portion of San Bernardino County, California are described. The project illustrates that a vertically integrated approach can benefit local users, can be used to identify and rectify discrepancies in various data sources, and that the LANDSAT component can be effectively used to identify change, perform initial capability/suitability modeling, update existing data, and refine existing data in a geographic information system. Local analyses were developed which produced data of value to planners in the San Bernardino County Planning Department and the San Bernardino National Forest staff.

  13. Photochemistry and vertical mixing. [in Uranus atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atreya, S. K.; Sandel, B. R.; Romani, P. N.

    1991-01-01

    Earth-based observations relevant to the question of photochemistry and vertical mixing are discussed. Phytolysis of methane, the only known photochemically active volatile in the Uranian atmosphere, produces heavier hydrocarbons, the most abundant of which are ethane, acetylene, and the polyacetylenes. Unlike Jupiter and Saturn, these hydrocarbon products condense at the low temperatures prevalent in the middle atmosphere. Contrary to the pre-Voyager notion that the atmosphere of Uranus is remarkable clear, it is found that the aerosols are widely and extensively distributed. Despite its photodestruction, methane remains stable in the Uranian atmosphere. The vertical mixing on Uranus is found to be the least efficient of any of the planetary atmospheres.

  14. Concepts for generating optimum vertical flight profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    Algorithms for generating optimum vertical profiles are derived and examined. These algorithms form the basis for the design of onboard flight management concepts. The variations in the optimum vertical profiles (resulting from these concepts) due to variations in wind, takeoff weight, and range-to-destination are presented. Further considerations for mechanizing two different onboard methods of computing near-optimum flight profiles are then outlined. Finally, the results are summarized, and recommendations are made for further work. Technical details of optimum trajectory design, steering requirements for following these trajectories, and off-line computer programs for testing the concepts are included.

  15. Geysering inhibitor for vertical cryogenic transfer piping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, F. S.

    1973-01-01

    Geysering (i.e., the expulsion of boiling liquid and its vapor from a vertical tube) has been a problem for the missile industry in long vertical cryogenic propellant feed lines connecting the launch vehicle propellant tank with the rocket engines. A proposed novel method of inhibiting geysering and the associated pressure gradients provides a self-starting self-regulating action that is not dependent on other active systems or components. The inhibiting action is attained by incorporating a concentric tube within the main transfer tube to prevent constriction of natural convective flow.

  16. Mode-locked vertical-cavity semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wenbin

    In-plane semiconductor lasers can be mode locked to generate ultra short pulses, but the output power is small because of the gain saturation limitation. Vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSEL), on the other hand, have a large gain saturation energy because of the large active area. High power ultra short optical pulses can thus be generated by mode locking a VCSEL. Optically pumped external cavity VCSELs have been synchronously mode locked to generate subpicosecond pulses with a peak power two orders of magnitude higher than that from an in-plane laser. However, pulses generated from the mode locked VCSEL are broadened because of the pulse chirping. The cause of this pulse chirping is analyzed. Carrier transport effect is identified as another cause of the pulse broadening. A periodic gain structure has been used to limit the carrier transport so that pulses with an intensity autocorrelation width of 300 fs have been directly generated from the mode-locked VCSEL. To make the mode-locked VCSEL compact, devices for electrical pumping have been designed and fabricated. Active mode locking of such devices has yielded pulses with a pulsewidth of 80 ps and a pulse energy of 4.6 pJ at a repetition rate of 1 GHz. This is the first electrically pumped mode locked VCSEL.

  17. Vertical Drop Testing and Simulation of Anthropomorphic Test Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polanco, Michael A.; Littell, Justin D.

    2011-01-01

    A series of 14 vertical impact tests were conducted using Hybrid III 50th Percentile and Hybrid II 50th Percentile Anthropomorphic Test Devices (ATDs) at NASA Langley Research Center. The purpose of conducting these tests was threefold: to compare and contrast the impact responses of Hybrid II and Hybrid III ATDs under two different loading conditions, to compare the impact responses of the Hybrid III configured with a nominal curved lumbar spine to that of a Hybrid III configured with a straight lumbar spine, and to generate data for comparison with predicted responses from two commercially available ATD finite element models. The two loading conditions examined were a high magnitude, short duration acceleration pulse, and a low magnitude, long duration acceleration pulse, each created by using different paper honeycomb blocks as pulse shape generators in the drop tower. The test results show that the Hybrid III results differ from the Hybrid II results more for the high magnitude, short duration pulse case. The comparison of the lumbar loads for each ATD configuration show drastic differences in the loads seen in the spine. The analytical results show major differences between the responses of the two finite element models. A detailed discussion of possible sources of the discrepancies between the two analytical models is also provided.

  18. Theoretical Investigation of the Vertically Averaged Balance Equations for Chemically Reactive Trace Constituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramm, G.; Dlugi, R.

    2001-12-01

    The vertically averaged balance equation of chemically reactive atmospheric trace constituents as customarily served as a basis for so-called box models is derived and discussed. It is shown that this kind of balance equation has several prominent short-comings so that the capability of box models to predict real situations of photochemical smog formation and depletion is strongly limited. Two of these prominent short-comings are theoretically elucidated in more detail, namely (1) the vertically averaged source and sink terms owing to chemical reactions, and (2) the parameterization of the dry deposition and exhalation fluxes at the earth's surface. Based on our theoretical results, we suggest that such box models should be refused. Even though the consumption of computing time is much smaller than those of sophisticated Eulerian air pollution models like ADOM, DRAIS, EURAD or RADM, box models should not be considered as a true alternative to such air pollution models. It is also shown that before introducing vertically averaged balance equation of atmospheric trace constituents into general circulation models (GCMs) to investigate the interrelation between air pollution and climate change on the basis of long-term simulations the influence of these short-comings has to be estimated in a reliable manner.

  19. 33 CFR 118.85 - Lights on vertical lift bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lights on vertical lift bridges... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.85 Lights on vertical lift bridges. (a) Lift span lights. The vertical lift span of every vertical lift bridge shall be lighted so that the center of...

  20. 33 CFR 118.85 - Lights on vertical lift bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lights on vertical lift bridges... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.85 Lights on vertical lift bridges. (a) Lift span lights. The vertical lift span of every vertical lift bridge shall be lighted so that the center of...

  1. 33 CFR 118.85 - Lights on vertical lift bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lights on vertical lift bridges... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.85 Lights on vertical lift bridges. (a) Lift span lights. The vertical lift span of every vertical lift bridge shall be lighted so that the center of...

  2. 33 CFR 118.85 - Lights on vertical lift bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lights on vertical lift bridges... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.85 Lights on vertical lift bridges. (a) Lift span lights. The vertical lift span of every vertical lift bridge shall be lighted so that the center of...

  3. 33 CFR 118.85 - Lights on vertical lift bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lights on vertical lift bridges... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.85 Lights on vertical lift bridges. (a) Lift span lights. The vertical lift span of every vertical lift bridge shall be lighted so that the center of...

  4. Short-period comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, Paul R.; Campins, Humberto

    1991-01-01

    The spacecraft flybys of Comet Halley in 1986 confirmed Whipple's icy conglomerate hypothesis for cometary nuclei and showed that comets are far richer in volatiles than any other class of solar system bodies. Water is the most abundant volatile, comprising roughly 80 percent of the gas flowing out from the nucleus. Carbon monoxide is next with a content of 15 percent relative to water, though with approximately half of that coming from an extended source in the cometary coma, i.e., hydrocarbon dust grains. The detection of large numbers of hydrocarbon CHON grains was one of the more significant discoveries of the Halley flybys, as was the ground-based observation that CN occurs in jets, again indicating an extended source. Evidence was also found for more complex hydrocarbons. Estimates of the total dust-to-gas ratio for Halley range as high as 2:1, indicating that a substantial fraction of the volatile material may be tied up in solid hydrocarbons rather than ices. The role of clathrates in trapping more volatile ices is not yet understood. If Halley can be taken to be representative of all short-period comets, then the short-period comets may provide a significant source of volatiles in near-earth space. This resource is more difficult to reach dynamically than the near-earth asteriods, but the high volatile content may justify the additional effort necessary. In addition, there is considerable evidence that at least some fraction of the near-earth asteriods are extinct cometary nuclei which have evolved into asteroid orbits, and which may contain significant volatiles buried beneath an insulating lag-deposit crust of nonvolatiles. Knowledge of comets will be greatly enhanced in the near future by the Comet Rendezvous Flyby mission now under development by NASA, and by the proposed Rosetta mission.

  5. Vertical deformation along the Indio Hills, San Andreas Fault, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharer, K. M.; Blisniuk, K.; Sharp, W. D.; Williams, P. L.; Johnson, K.

    2014-12-01

    Halfway between the Salton Sea and San Gorgonio Pass, the southernmost San Andreas Fault (SAF) bifurcates into the Mission Creek and Banning strands. These strands bound the Indio Hills (IH), and mark the first of a series of left-stepping branches that define the transpressional, southern Big Bend of the SAF. Between the fault strands, the Quaternary Ocotillo Formation is deformed with fold axis orientations consistent with dextral shear; structurally the IH are synclinal in the east, transitioning to a complex antiform with increased uplift suggested by exhumation of Tertiary units in the west. We report new long- and short-term erosion rates across the IH and uplift rates on the Banning strand, and we evaluate these measurements in terms of slip rates across the fault system and structural deformation within the IH. Two methods of catchment-averaged erosion rates provide minimum rates yield similar results, (0.08 to 0.34 mm/yr) across 6 catchments. The long-term rates are calculated from eroded volumes estimated from a 10-m DEM surface enveloping the Indio Hills and assume that all folding and uplift initiated ca. 500ka (the 750 ka Bishop ash is uplifted and warped within the IH). The short-term rates, determined from 10Be dating of alluvial sediments, increase gradually to the northwest. Similarity of the rates suggests steady state uplift over the history of the fold; ongoing structural analysis and dating needed to constrain the maximum rates will test this possibility. The new uplift rate for the Banning strand at the east end of the IH is determined from a 60 pts/m^2 DEM produced by structure from motion photogrammetry and U-series ages and cosmogenic dates that provide an age range of 20-76ka for a fan vertically offset by ~2.5 m. The resulting uplift rate on the fault (0.03-0.125 mm/yr) overlaps with the short-term catchment-averaged erosion rate for this location (0.08 mm/yr). Consequently, we interpret that vertical strain is partitioned onto both the Banning fault and in uplift and folding of the IH. The uplift rates increase westward along the IH, possibly indicating increased activity on the Banning strand to the west. This pattern will be considered in the context of paleoseismic and horizontal slip rate studies in the region, and implications for rupture directivity on this hazardous fault system.

  6. Step-off, vertical electromagnetic responses of a deep resistivity layer buried in marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hangilro; Jang, Hannuree; Lee, Ki Ha; Kim, Hee Joon

    2013-04-01

    A frequency-domain, marine controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) method has been applied successfully in deep water areas for detecting hydrocarbon (HC) reservoirs. However, a typical technique with horizontal transmitters and receivers requires large source-receiver separations with respect to the target depth. A time-domain EM system with vertical transmitters and receivers can be an alternative because vertical electric fields are sensitive to deep resistive layers. In this paper, a time-domain modelling code, with multiple source and receiver dipoles that are finite in length, has been written to investigate transient EM problems. With the use of this code, we calculate step-off responses for one-dimensional HC reservoir models. Although the vertical electric field has much smaller amplitude of signal than the horizontal field, vertical currents resulting from a vertical transmitter are sensitive to resistive layers. The modelling shows a significant difference between step-off responses of HC- and water-filled reservoirs, and the contrast can be recognized at late times at relatively short offsets. A maximum contrast occurs at more than 4 s, being delayed with the depth of the HC layer.

  7. Data/model integration for vertical mixing in the stable Arctic boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, S.; ReVelle, D.O.; Kao, C.Y.J.; Bigg, E.K.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a short Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Data on atmospheric trace constituents and the vertical structure of stratus clouds from a 1996 expedition to the central Arctic reveal mechanisms of vertical mixing that have not been observed in mid-latitudes. Time series of the altitude and thickness of summer arctic stratus have been observed using an elastic backscatter lidar aboard an icebreaker. With the ship moored to the pack ice during 14 data collection stations and the lidar staring vertically, the time series represent advected cloud fields. The lidar data reveal a significant amount of vertical undulation in the clouds, strongly suggestive of traveling waves in the buoyantly damped atmosphere that predominates in the high Arctic. Concurrent observations of trace gases associated with the natural sulfur cycle (dimethyl sulfide, SO{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and aerosols show evidence of vertical mixing events that coincide with a characteristic signature in the cloud field that may be called dropout or lift out. A segment of a cloud deck appears to be relocated from the otherwise quasicontinuous layer to another altitude a few hundred meters lower or higher. Atmospheric models have been applied to identify the mechanism that cause the dropout phenomenon and connect it dynamically to the surface layer mixing.

  8. Vertical Profiles of Aerosol Volume from High Spectral Resolution Infrared Transmission Measurements: Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldering, Annmarie; Kahn, Brian H.; Mills, Franklin P.; Irion, Fredrick W.; Steele, Helen M.; Gunson, Michael R.

    2004-01-01

    The high-resolution infrared absorption spectra of the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) experiment are utilized to derive vertical profiles of sulfate aerosol volume density and extinction coefficient. Following the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo in June 1991, the ATMOS spectra obtained on three Space Shuttle missions (1992, 1993, and 1994) provide a unique opportunity to study the global stratospheric sulfate aerosol layer shortly after a major volcanic eruption and periodically during the decay phase. Synthetic sulfate aerosol spectra are fit to the observed spectra, and a global fitting inversion routine is used to derive vertical profiles of sulfate aerosol volume density. Vertical profiles of sulfate aerosol volume density for the three missions over portions of the globe are presented, with the peak in aerosol volume density occurring from as low as 10 km (polar latitudes) to as high as 20 km (subtropical latitudes). Derived aerosol volume density is as high as 2-3.5 (mu)m(exp 3) per cubic centimeter +/-10% in 1992, decreasing to 0.2-0.5 (mu)m(exp 3) per cubic centimeter +/-20% in 1994, in agreement with other experiments. Vertical extinction profiles derived from ATMOS are compared with profiles from Improved Stratospheric And Mesospheric Sounder (ISAMS) and Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) that coincide in space and time and show good general agreement. The uncertainty of the ATMOS vertical profiles is similar to CLAES and consistently smaller than ISAMS at similar altitudes.

  9. IMPROVED PREDICTION OF THE VERTICAL PROFILE OF ATMOSPHERIC BLACK CARBON: DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF WRF-CMAQ

    EPA Science Inventory

    Advanced model descriptions of cloud processing of atmospheric pollutants will improve predicted vertical profiles of optically active particulate carbon (e.g., black carbon (Be) and other short lived climate forcers (SLCFs) such as "brown" carbon). More accurate prediction of...

  10. Surgical correction of primary cutis vertices gyrata.

    PubMed

    Al-Malaq, Ali; Hashem, Fuad K; Helmi, Ayman; Al-Qattan, Mohammed M

    2002-12-01

    Primary cutis vertices gyrata is a rare condition of the scalp characterized by the formation of furrows and folds resembling the convolutions of the brain. A review of the English literature did not reveal any surgically treated cases. The authors report three cases treated by simple excision of the deepest furrows with a satisfactory result. PMID:12461454

  11. Vertically Equated Tests: Fact or Phantom?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slinde, Jeffrey A.; Linn, Robert L.

    1977-01-01

    Conventional linear and equipercentile procedures are reviewed with an emphasis on their utility for equating achievement tests pitched at different levels of difficulty. It is argued that the equipercentile procedure is superior to the linear procedure, but that neither is very satisfactory for the vertical equating problem. (Author/JKS)

  12. [From vertical to horizontal. Writing in adolescence].

    PubMed

    Catheline-Antipoff, N

    1995-04-01

    Writing at adolescence has a non negligible part in identity's construction. Vertical writing as tags, graphs and graffiti refer to a narcissism deficiency and express a pulsional necessity, whereas, horizontal writing as private diaries, letters and novels express object's search and are made in dreaming attitude. PMID:7618823

  13. A Simple Vertical Slab Gel Electrophoresis Apparatus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, J. B.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive, easily constructed, and safe vertical slab gel kit used routinely for sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis research and student experiments. Five kits are run from a single transformer. Because toxic solutions are used, students are given plastic gloves and closely supervised during laboratory

  14. Leak-tight vertical membrane microvalves.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Jonas; Hillmering, Mikael; Haraldsson, Tommy; van der Wijngaart, Wouter

    2016-04-12

    Pneumatic microvalves are fundamental control components in a large range of microfluidic applications. Their key performance parameters are small size, i.e. occupying a minimum of microfluidic real estate, low flow resistance in the open state, and leak-tight closing at limited control pressures. In this work we present the successful design, realization and evaluation of the first leak-tight, vertical membrane, pneumatic microvalves. The realization of the vertical membrane microvalves is enabled by a novel dual-sided molding method for microstructuring monolithic 3D microfluidic networks in PDMS in a single step, eliminating the need for layer-to-layer alignment during bonding. We demonstrate minimum lateral device features down to 20-30 μm in size, and vertical via density of ∼30 000 per cm(2), which provides significant gains in chip real estate compared to previously reported PDMS manufacturing methods. In contrast to horizontal membrane microvalves, there are no manufacturing restrictions on the cross-sectional geometry of the flow channel of the vertical membrane microvalves. This allows tuning the design towards lower closing pressure or lower open state flow resistance compared to those of horizontal membrane microvalves. PMID:26983557

  15. Vertical distribution of natural radionuclides in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco Rodríguez, P.; Tomé, F. Vera; Lozano, J. C.

    2012-04-01

    Low-level alpha spectrometry techniques using semiconductor detectors (PIPS) and liquid scintillation counters (LKB Quantulus 1220™) were used in order to determine the activity concentration of 238U, 232Th, 234U, 230Th, 226Ra, and 210Pb in soil samples. The soils were collected from an old disused uranium mine located in southwest Spain. The soils were selected with different levels of influence from the installation, in such a way that they had different levels of radioactive contamination. The vertical profiles in the soils (down to 40 cm depth) were studied in order to evaluate the vertical distribution of the natural radionuclides. The possible contamination of subsurface waters depends strongly on vertical migration, and the transfer to plants (herbs, shrubs, and trees) also will depend on the distribution of the radionuclides in the root zone. The study of the activity ratios between radionuclides belonging to the same series allowed us to assess the differing behaviour of the radionuclides involved. The vertical profiles for these radionuclides were different at each sampling point, showing the local impact of the installation. However, the profiles per point were similar for the long-lived radionuclides of the 238TJ series (238U, 234U, 230Th, and 226Ra). Also, a major disequilibrium was observed between 210Pb and 226Ra in the surface layer, due to 222Rn emanation and subsequent surface deposition of 210Pb.

  16. Electrostatic comb drive for vertical actuation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, A. P., LLNL

    1997-07-10

    The electrostatic comb finger drive has become an integral design for microsensor and microactuator applications. This paper reports on utilizing the levitation effect of comb fingers to design vertical-to-the-substrate actuation for interferometric applications. For typical polysilicon comb drives with 2 {micro}m gaps between the stationary and moving fingers, as well as between the microstructures and the substrate, the equilibrium position is nominally 1-2 {micro}m above the stationary comb fingers. This distance is ideal for many phase shifting interferometric applications. Theoretical calculations of the vertical actuation characteristics are compared with the experimental results, and a general design guideline is derived from these results. The suspension flexure stiffnesses, gravity forces, squeeze film damping, and comb finger thicknesses are parameters investigated which affect the displacement curve of the vertical microactuator. By designing a parallel plate capacitor between the suspended mass and the substrate, in situ position sensing can be used to control the vertical movement, providing a total feedback-controlled system. Fundamentals of various capacitive position sensing techniques are discussed. Experimental verification is carried out by a Zygo distance measurement interferometer.

  17. Higher Education Vertical Infrastructure Maintenance Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weidner, Theodore J.

    To assist higher education facility officers in documenting their financial needs for renewing and renovating existing physical facilities, this study examined the accuracy against observed conditions of the tools used to identify vertical infrastructure maintenance needs in a large public university. Data developed for U.S. Army facilities is…

  18. Model of 5-Foot Vertical Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Model of 5-Foot Vertical Wind Tunnel. Carl Wenzinger and Thomas Harris wrote in NACA TR 387: 'The vertical open-throat wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics ... was built mainly for studying the spinning characteristics of airplane models, but may be used as well for the usual types of wind-tunnel tests. A special spinning balance is being developed to measure the desired forces and moments with the model simulating the actual spin of an airplane. Satisfactory air flow has been attained with a velocity that is uniform over the jet to within 0.5 per cent. The turbulence present in the tunnel has been compared with that of several other tunnels by means of the results of sphere drag tests and was found to average well with the values of those tunnels. Included also in the report are comparisons of results of stable autorotation and of rolling-moment tests obtained both in the vertical tunnel and in the old horizontal 5-foot atmospheric tunnel.' The design of a vertical tunnel having a 5-foot diameter jet was accordingly started by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics in 1928. Actual construction of the new tunnel was completed in 1930, and the calibration tests were then made.'

  19. A Vertical Approach to Math Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gojak, Linda

    2012-01-01

    In the current era of mathematics standards, whether they are Common Core State Standards or other state standards, effective vertical mathematics teams offer an opportunity for teachers to grow professionally through shared experiences, for leadership to grow among the faculty, and for the school to change its perspective on the teaching and…

  20. Vertical Decalage and the EFL Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paine, Michael

    1984-01-01

    Discusses problems encountered in reading of English by foreign students who are unaccustomed to English script. Considering two levels of reading, students having difficulties at one level will regress by reason of vertical decalage to a lower level of learning strategy. This is manifested by a more intent focus on individual letters if the pupil…

  1. Vertically aligned biaxially textured molybdenum thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Rahul; Riley, Michael; Lee, Sabrina; Lu, Toh-Ming

    2011-09-15

    Vertically aligned, biaxially textured molybdenum nanorods were deposited using dc magnetron sputtering with glancing flux incidence (alpha = 85 degrees with respect to the substrate normal) and a two-step substrate-rotation mode. These nanorods were identified with a body-centered cubic crystal structure. The formation of a vertically aligned biaxial texture with a [110] out-of-plane orientation was combined with a [-110] in-plane orientation. The kinetics of the growth process was found to be highly sensitive to an optimum rest time of 35 seconds for the two-step substrate rotation mode. At all other rest times, the nanorods possessed two separate biaxial textures each tilted toward one flux direction. While the in-plane texture for the vertical nanorods maintains maximum flux capture area, inclined Mo nanorods deposited at alpha = 85 degrees without substrate rotation display a [-1-1-4] in-plane texture that does not comply with the maximum flux capture area argument. Finally, an in situ capping film was deposited with normal flux incidence over the biaxially textured vertical nanorods resulting in a thin film over the porous nanorods. This capping film possessed the same biaxial texture as the nanorods and could serve as an effective substrate for the epitaxial growth of other functional materials.

  2. Viewing Vertical Objects with an Overhead Projector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wild, R. L.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the use of an overhead projector for the deflection of a vertical image to a screen. Describes three demonstrations: magnetizing of a steel ball bearing and paper clip; convection currents of a hot liquid within a cold liquid; and oscillation of concentrated salt solution into fresh water. (YP)

  3. Vertical pump with free floating check valve

    DOEpatents

    Lindsay, Malcolm

    1980-01-01

    A vertical pump with a bottom discharge having a free floating check valve isposed in the outlet plenum thereof. The free floating check valve comprises a spherical member with a hemispherical cage-like member attached thereto which is capable of allowing forward or reverse flow under appropriate conditions while preventing reverse flow under inappropriate conditions.

  4. Modeling vertical coral connectivity and mesophotic refugia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holstein, Daniel M.; Paris, Claire B.; Vaz, Ana C.; Smith, Tyler B.

    2016-03-01

    Whether mesophotic reefs will behave as refugia for corals threatened by global climate change and coastal development depends on vertical exchange of larvae between diverse habitats. Here we use a biophysical model of larval dispersal to estimate vertical connectivity of a broadcasting ( Orbicella faveolata) and a brooding ( Porites astreoides) species of coral in the US Virgin Islands. Modeling predicts subsidy to shallow areas by mesophotic larvae of both species based on local hydrology, adult reproductive characteristics, larval traits, and a wide range of scenarios developed to test depth-sensitive factors, such as fertilization rates and post-settlement survivorship. In extreme model scenarios of reduced fertilization and post-settlement survivorship of mesophotic larvae, 1-10 % local mesophotic subsidy to shallow recruitment is predicted for both species, which are demographically significant. Although direct vertical connectivity is higher for the broadcaster, the brooder demonstrates higher local multigenerational vertical connectivity, which suggests that local P. astreoides populations are more resilient than those of O. faveolata, and corroborates field studies. As shallow habitat degrades, mesophotic-shallow subsidy is predicted to increase for both species. This study is the first of its kind to simulate larval dispersal and settlement between habitats of different depths, and these findings have local, regional, and global implications for predicting and managing coral reef persistence in a changing climate.

  5. Vertical root fractures and their management

    PubMed Central

    Khasnis, Sandhya Anand; Kidiyoor, Krishnamurthy Haridas; Patil, Anand Basavaraj; Kenganal, Smita Basavaraj

    2014-01-01

    Vertical root fractures associated with endodontically treated teeth and less commonly in vital teeth represent one of the most difficult clinical problems to diagnose and treat. In as much as there are no specific symptoms, diagnosis can be difficult. Clinical detection of this condition by endodontists is becoming more frequent, where as it is rather underestimated by the general practitioners. Since, vertical root fractures almost exclusively involve endodontically treated teeth; it often becomes difficult to differentiate a tooth with this condition from an endodontically failed one or one with concomitant periodontal involvement. Also, a tooth diagnosed for vertical root fracture is usually extracted, though attempts to reunite fractured root have been done in various studies with varying success rates. Early detection of a fractured root and extraction of the tooth maintain the integrity of alveolar bone for placement of an implant. Cone beam computed tomography has been shown to be very accurate in this regard. This article focuses on the diagnostic and treatment strategies, and discusses about predisposing factors which can be useful in the prevention of vertical root fractures. PMID:24778502

  6. Vertical Alveolar Ridge Augmentation by Distraction Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, N. Nanda; Ravindran, C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Compromised alveolar ridge in vertical and horizontal dimension is a common finding in patients visiting practitioners for dental prosthesis. Various treatment modalities are available for correction of deficient ridges among which alveolar distraction osteogenesis is one. Aim To study the efficacy of alveolar distraction osteogenesis in augmentation of alveolar ridges deficient in vertical dimension. Materials and Methods Ten patients aged 16 to 46 years with deficient alveolar ridge underwent ridge augmentation in 11 alveolar segments using the distraction osteogenesis method. For each patient a custom made distraction device was fabricated. The device was indigenously manufactured with SS-316 (ISO 3506). Results The vertical bone gain reached more than 10mm without the use of bone transplantation. Certain complications like incorrect vector of distraction, paresthesia, pain and loss of transport segment were encountered during the course of the study. Conclusion Alveolar vertical distraction osteogenesis is a reliable and predictable technique for both hard and soft tissue genesis. Implant placement is feasible with primary stability in neogenerated bone at the level of the distracted areas. PMID:26816991

  7. Hinged-Blade, Vertical-Shaft Windmill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shultz, B., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Vertical-shaft windmill concept calls for hinged, flapping blades to increase energy-conversion efficiency by reducing wind-energy loss. Hinged Blade Halves unfold to catch wind when moving with it, then fold away from wind when moving against it.

  8. Vertical motions in the equatorial middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisman, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    A single station vertical velocity equation which considers ageostrophic and diabatic effects derived from the first law of thermodynamics and a generalized thermal wind relation is presented. An analysis and verification procedure which accounts for measurement and calculation errors as well as time and space continuity arguments and theoretical predictions are described. Vertical velocities are calculated at every kilometer between 25 and 60 km and for approximately every three hours for the above diurnal period at Kourou (French Guiana), Fort Sherman (Panama Canal Zone), Ascension Island, Antigua (British West Indies) and Natal (Brazil). The results, plotted as time series cross sections, suggest vertical motions ranging in magnitude from 1 or 2 cm/sec at 30 km to as much as 15 cm/sec at 60 km. Many of the general features of the results agree well with atmospheric tidal predictions but many particular features suggest that both smaller time scale gravity waves (periods less than 6 hours) and synoptic type waves (periods greater than 1 day) may be interacting significantly with the tidal fields. The results suggest that vertical motions can be calculated for the equatorial middle atmosphere and must be considered a significant part of the motion for time scales from 8 to 24 hours.

  9. Vertical integration strategies: more promising than diversification.

    PubMed

    Fox, W L

    1989-01-01

    Investment in businesses outside of traditional hospital services can help providers withstand the ill effects of today's business climate. However, the typical diversification approach must be discarded. This article describes a different approach that has been used successfully in other industries--vertical integration. PMID:2670833

  10. A Simple Vertical Slab Gel Electrophoresis Apparatus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, J. B.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive, easily constructed, and safe vertical slab gel kit used routinely for sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis research and student experiments. Five kits are run from a single transformer. Because toxic solutions are used, students are given plastic gloves and closely supervised during laboratory…

  11. Vertical Transmission of Babesia microti, United States

    PubMed Central

    Purtill, Kerry; Wong, Susan J.; Munoz, Jose; Teal, Allen; Madison-Antenucci, Susan; Horowitz, Harold W.; Aguero-Rosenfeld, Maria E.; Moore, Julie M.; Abramowsky, Carlos; Wormser, Gary P.

    2012-01-01

    Babesiosis is usually acquired from a tick bite or through a blood transfusion. We report a case of babesiosis in an infant for whom vertical transmission was suggested by evidence of Babesia spp. antibodies in the heel-stick blood sample and confirmed by detection of Babesia spp. DNA in placenta tissue. PMID:22840424

  12. Modifications in vertical scar breast reduction.

    PubMed

    Beer, G M; Morgenthaler, W; Spicher, I; Meyer, V E

    2001-06-01

    The use of vertical-scar breast reduction techniques is only slowly increasing, even though they have been advocated by Lassus and Lejour and are requested by patients. Possible reasons why surgeons are reluctant to use these techniques are that they are said to be more difficult to learn, they require considerable experience and intuition, and their applicability is confined to small breasts. Several surgeons have developed modifications, combining vertical-scar breast reduction techniques with details of the familiar inverted-T-scar technique. We present a procedure involving two further modifications of the vertical-scar breast reduction technique: first, a standardised, geometrical preoperative drawing from our superior-pedicle T technique, with the aim of establishing a reproducible method of reduction requiring no particular intuitive touch, and, second, the addition of a periareolar skin resection, to give the breast the desired round shape. Between September 1998 and December 1999 we used this technique in a prospective series of 52 patients. The median resection weight was 450 g. The maximal postoperative follow-up was 15 months. There were no acute postoperative complications necessitating reoperation. The late complication rate was within the expected range for such procedures (seven patients, 13.5%) and included vertical-scar widening, areolar distortion, residual wrinkles due to incomplete shrinkage of the undermined skin in the inferior pole and asymmetry of the breast. This procedure enables us to offer patients with moderate to marked hypertrophy a reproducible versatile vertical breast reduction technique. The technique is easy to teach and easy to learn, especially for those who are familiar with the superior pedicle inverted-T-scar technique. PMID:11355991

  13. Short-wave Diathermy

    PubMed Central

    1935-01-01

    It is submitted that the thermal action of short-wave therapy does not account for the therapeutic results obtained. The theory is put forward that many of the results obtained can be better explained by the disruptive and dispersive action of the impact of the electromagnetic vibrations. An analogy, indicating such disruptive effects at high frequency, is drawn from the molecular vibrationstransmitted through transformer oil, and excited by the application of high frequency currents to the layers of quartz in the piezo-electric oscillator of quartz. It is submitted that these disruptive and dispersive effects will be greatest where the conductivity of the tissues is low, such as in bones and fat, and it is shown that it is in these regions that the therapeutic action of these currents is most obvious. It is also pointed out that, if effects, comparable to those obtained in the subcutaneous area, are obtained in the deeper tissues and organs, the application of deep-wave therapy would be attended by serious risk. PMID:19990107

  14. [Short-lived disorders].

    PubMed

    Artigas-Pallares, Josep

    2012-02-29

    Over the years, most of the mental disorders that are dealt with in everyday clinical practice have changed not only their names but also their conceptualisation. Furthermore, as some disorders disappear or are forgotten, others come into being. Seen from a historical perspective and unlike many of the diseases included within classical medicine, it can be stated that one of the basic characteristics of mental disorders is their short-lived presence in the scientific literature. In this study we analyse the causes underlying the transitory nature of mental disorders. The disappearance of a disorder or the modification of how it is conceptualised may be linked to several different motives. Sometimes they may be due to an evolution of the construct, as a result of new findings. On other occasions the disorder falls into disuse owing to the weakness of the theoretical construct or the clinical research upholding it. Lastly, because the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders and the International Classification of Diseases require updates that incorporate new contributions and correct faults in the current model, they give rise to new denominations and definitions in mental disorders. This article analyses these three situations and offers an illustrative example in each case. PMID:22374762

  15. Are Short GRBs Really Hard?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, T.; Barbier, L.; Barthelmy, S.; Cummings, J.; Fenimore, E.; Gehrels, N.; Hullinger, D.; Krimm, H.; Markwardt, C.; Palmer, D.; Parsons, A.; Sato, G.; Tueller, J.; Aptekar, R.; Cline, T.; Golenetskii, S.; Mazets, E.; Pal'Shin, V.; Ricker, G.; Lamb, D.; Atteia, J.-L.; Swift-Bat; Konus-Wind; Hete-2 Team

    2006-05-01

    Thanks to the rapid position notice and response by HETE-2 and Swift, the X-ray afterglow emissions have been found for four recent short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs GRB 050509b, GRB 050709, GRB 050724, and GRB 050813). The positions of three out of four short GRBs are coincident with galaxies with no current or recent star formation. This discovery tightens the case for a different origin for short and long GRBs. On the other hand, from the prompt emission point of view, a short GRB shows a harder spectrum comparing to that of the long duration GRBs according to the BATSE observations. We investigate the prompt emission properties of four short GRBs observed by Swift/BAT. We found that the hardness of all four BAT short GRBs is in between the BATSE range for short and long GRBs. We will discuss the spectral properties of short GRBs including the short GRB sample of Konus-Wind and HETE-2 to understand the hard nature of the BATSE short GRBs.

  16. Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) Vertical Cylinder Habitat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, Alan; Kennedy, Kriss J.; Gill, Tracy R.; Tri, Terry O.; Toups, Larry; Howard, Robert I.; Spexarth, Gary R.; Cavanaugh, Stephen; Langford, William M.; Dorsey, John T.

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Constellation Architecture Team defined an outpost scenario optimized for intensive mobility that uses small, highly mobile pressurized rovers supported by portable habitat modules that can be carried between locations of interest on the lunar surface. A compact vertical cylinder characterizes the habitat concept, where the large diameter maximizes usable flat floor area optimized for a gravity environment and allows for efficient internal layout. The module was sized to fit into payload fairings for the Constellation Ares V launch vehicle, and optimized for surface transport carried by the All-Terrain Hex-Limbed Extra-Terrestrial Explorer (ATHLETE) mobility system. Launch and other loads are carried through the barrel to a top and bottom truss that interfaces with a structural support unit (SSU). The SSU contains self-leveling feet and docking interfaces for Tri-ATHLETE grasping and heavy lift. A pressurized module needed to be created that was appropriate for the lunar environment, could be easily relocated to new locations, and could be docked together in multiples for expanding pressurized volume in a lunar outpost. It was determined that horizontally oriented pressure vessels did not optimize floor area, which takes advantage of the gravity vector for full use. Hybrid hard-inflatable habitats added an unproven degree of complexity that may eventually be worked out. Other versions of vertically oriented pressure vessels were either too big, bulky, or did not optimize floor area. The purpose of the HDU vertical habitat module is to provide pressurized units that can be docked together in a modular way for lunar outpost pressurized volume expansion, and allow for other vehicles, rovers, and modules to be attached to the outpost to allow for IVA (intra-vehicular activity) transfer between them. The module is a vertically oriented cylinder with a large radius to allow for maximal floor area and use of volume. The modular, 5- m-diameter HDU vertical habitat module consists of a 2-m-high barrel with 0.6-mhigh end domes forming the 56-cubicmeter pressure vessel, and a 19-squaremeter floor area. The module has up to four docking ports located orthogonally from each other around the perimeter, and up to one docking port each on the top or bottom end domes. In addition, the module has mounting trusses top and bottom for equipment, and to allow docking with the ATHLETE mobility system. Novel or unique features of the HDU vertical habitat module include the nodelike function with multiple pressure hatches for docking with other versions of itself and other modules and vehicles; the capacity to be carried by an ATHLETE mobility system; and the ability to attach inflatable 'attic' domes to the top for additional pressurized volume.

  17. Vertical distribution of Macrocystis pyrifera nutrient exposure in southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konotchick, T.; Parnell, P. E.; Dayton, P. K.; Leichter, J. J.

    2012-06-01

    We examined water column temperature time series profiles for several years at two locations in a single kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera) forest to characterize the alongshore variability of the nutrient climate that giant kelp is exposed to and compare it to the response of giant kelp. The differences in nutrient climate are due to differential alongshore vertical variations in temperature, a well-established proxy of nitrate, due to the topographically induced internal wave dynamics within the kelp forest. We observed the greatest temperature variability during summer and most of this variability occurred near the surface. The 14.5 °C isotherm, indicating the presence of nitrate, ranged the entire vertical extent of the water column, and was shallowest during the winter and in the southern portion of the kelp forest. Predicted water column integrated nitrate varies from 0 μmol NO3-/m2 to 431 μmol NO3-/m2 yielding a time series daily average of 0.12 gN/m2day (North La Jolla) and 0.18 gN/m2day (South La Jolla). Redfield conversion of these values puts the time series daily average for carbon production (upper limit) between 0.8 and 1.2 gC/m2day for the north and south parts of the bed respectively, and shows considerable variation at several time scales. Giant kelp in the southern portion of the forest exhibited greater stipe densities (a proxy for kelp production) than individuals in the northern portion, corresponding with the alongshore nutrient climate variability. The depth of the nutricline varied by up to 10 m over time scales as short as hours. Variability was greatest at diurnal and semi-diurnal frequencies, with shallower water column depths showing greatest variability. These depth-specific variations in temperature and nutrient exposure may have biologically important consequences for M. pyrifera especially during low nutrient seasons.

  18. Vertical-plane sound localization with distorted spectral cues.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, Ewan A; Sabin, Andrew T

    2013-12-01

    For human listeners, the primary cues for localization in the vertical plane are provided by the direction-dependent filtering of the pinnae, head, and upper body. Vertical-plane localization generally is accurate for broadband sounds, but when such sounds are presented at near-threshold levels or at high levels with short durations (<20 ms), the apparent location is biased toward the horizontal plane (i.e., elevation gain <1). We tested the hypothesis that these effects result in part from distorted peripheral representations of sound spectra. Human listeners indicated the apparent position of 100-ms, 50-60 dB SPL, wideband noise-burst targets by orienting their heads. The targets were synthesized in virtual auditory space and presented over headphones. Faithfully synthesized targets were interleaved with targets for which the directional transfer function spectral notches were filled in, peaks were leveled off, or the spectral contrast of the entire profile was reduced or expanded. As notches were filled in progressively or peaks leveled progressively, elevation gain decreased in a graded manner similar to that observed as sensation level is reduced below 30 dB or, for brief sounds, increased above 45 dB. As spectral contrast was reduced, gain dropped only at the most extreme reduction (25% of normal). Spectral contrast expansion had little effect. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that loss of representation of spectral features contributes to reduced elevation gain at low and high sound levels. The results also suggest that perceived location depends on a correlation-like spectral matching process that is sensitive to the relative, rather than absolute, across-frequency shape of the spectral profile. PMID:24076423

  19. Convective vertical velocity and cloud internal vertical structure: An A-Train perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhengzhao Johnny; Jeyaratnam, Jeyavinoth; Iwasaki, Suginori; Takahashi, Hanii; Anderson, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a novel use of A-Train observations to estimate vertical velocities for actively growing convective plumes and to relate them to cloud internal vertical structure. Convective vertical velocity is derived from time-delayed (1-2 min) IR measurements from MODIS and IIR. Convective vertical velocities are found to be clustered around 2-4 m/s but the distributions are positively skewed with long tails extending to larger values. Land convection during the 13:30 overpasses has higher vertical velocities than those during the 1:30 overpasses; oceanic convection shows the opposite, albeit smaller, contrast. Our results also show that convection with larger vertical velocity tends to transport larger precipitation-size particle and/or greater amount of water substance to higher altitude and produces heavier rainfall. Finally, we discuss the implications of this study for the designs of future space-borne missions that focus on fast-evolving processes such as those related to clouds and precipitation.

  20. Lunar vertical-shaft mining system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Introne, Steven D. (Editor); Krause, Roy; Williams, Erik; Baskette, Keith; Martich, Frederick; Weaver, Brad; Meve, Jeff; Alexander, Kyle; Dailey, Ron; White, Matt

    1994-01-01

    This report proposes a method that will allow lunar vertical-shaft mining. Lunar mining allows the exploitation of mineral resources imbedded within the surface. The proposed lunar vertical-shaft mining system is comprised of five subsystems: structure, materials handling, drilling, mining, and planning. The structure provides support for the exploration and mining equipment in the lunar environment. The materials handling subsystem moves mined material outside the structure and mining and drilling equipment inside the structure. The drilling process bores into the surface for the purpose of collecting soil samples, inserting transducer probes, or locating ore deposits. Once the ore deposits are discovered and pinpointed, mining operations bring the ore to the surface. The final subsystem is planning, which involves the construction of the mining structure.

  1. Coupled Resonator Vertical Cavity Laser Diode

    SciTech Connect

    CHOQUETTE, KENT D.; CHOW, WENG W.; FISCHER, ARTHUR J.; GEIB, KENT M.; HOU, HONG Q.

    1999-09-16

    We report the operation of an electrically injected monolithic coupled resonator vertical cavity laser which consists of an active cavity containing In{sub x}Ga{sub 1{minus}x}As quantum wells optically coupled to a passive GaAs cavity. This device demonstrates novel modulation characteristics arising from dynamic changes in the coupling between the active and passive cavities. A composite mode theory is used to model the output modulation of the coupled resonator vertical cavity laser. It is shown that the laser intensity can be modulated by either forward or reverse biasing the passive cavity. Under forward biasing, the modulation is due to carrier induced changes in the refractive index, while for reverse bias operation the modulation is caused by field dependent cavity enhanced absorption.

  2. Laser drilling of vertical vias in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.D.; Gassman, R.A.; Keicher, D.M.

    1993-08-01

    Any advance beyond the density of standard 2D Multichip Modules (MCM) will require a vertical interconnect technology that can produce reliable area array interconnection with small feature sizes. Laser drilled vertical vias have been controllably produced in standard silicon (Si) wafers down to 0.035mm (0.0014 inches) in diameter. Several laser systems and their system parameters have been explored to determine the optimum parametric set for repeatable vias in Si. The vias produced have exhibited clean smooth interior surfaces with an aspect ratio of up to 20:1 with little or no taper. All laser systems used, their system parameters, design modifications, theory of operation, and drilling results are discussed.

  3. Vertically Integrated Multiple Nanowire Field Effect Transistor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Hyun; Kang, Min-Ho; Ahn, Dae-Chul; Park, Jun-Young; Bang, Tewook; Jeon, Seung-Bae; Hur, Jae; Lee, Dongil; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2015-12-01

    A vertically integrated multiple channel-based field-effect transistor (FET) with the highest number of nanowires reported ever is demonstrated on a bulk silicon substrate without use of wet etching. The driving current is increased by 5-fold due to the inherent vertically stacked five-level nanowires, thus showing good feasibility of three-dimensional integration-based high performance transistor. The developed fabrication process, which is simple and reproducible, is used to create multiple stiction-free and uniformly sized nanowires with the aid of the one-route all-dry etching process (ORADEP). Furthermore, the proposed FET is revamped to create nonvolatile memory with the adoption of a charge trapping layer for enhanced practicality. Thus, this research suggests an ultimate design for the end-of-the-roadmap devices to overcome the limits of scaling. PMID:26544156

  4. Instability of Rotating Vertical Viscous Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribe, Neil; Badr, Sarah; Morris, Stephen

    2015-11-01

    We have studied experimentally and theoretically the instability of a jet of viscous fluid (corn syrup) ejected downward from a nozzle that rotates about a vertical axis with an angular velocity Ω. For small values of Ω, the jet behaves in a way similar to that of normal (Ω = 0) liquid rope coiling. Above a critical value of Ω, however, a bifurcation occurs to a whirling spiral state in which the jet is strongly deflected from the vertical almost immediately after its exit from the nozzle. Experiments conducted for Ω increasing and decreasing show that the transition between the undeflected and spiral states is hysteretic. We will report results of a linear stability analysis of the undeflected state as a function of the dimensionless parameters that characterize the system, and will compare the results with our experimental measurements.

  5. Experimental Studies in Helicopter Vertical Climb Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKillip, Robert M., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Data and analysis from an experimental program to measure vertical climb performance on an eight-foot model rotor are presented. The rotor testing was performed using a unique moving-model facility capable of accurately simulating the flow conditions during axial flight, and was conducted from July 9, 1992 to July 16, 1992 at the Dynamic Model Track, or 'Long Track,' just prior to its demolition in August of 1992. Data collected during this brief test program included force and moment time histories from a sting-mounted strain gauge balance, support carriage velocity, and rotor rpm pulses. In addition, limited video footage (of marginal use) was recorded from smoke flow studies for both simulated vertical climb and descent trajectories. Analytical comparisons with these data include a series of progressively more detailed calculations ranging from simple momentum theory, a prescribed wake method, and a free-wake prediction.

  6. Ozone vertical profile changes over South Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oltmans, S. J.; Hofmann, D. J.; Komhyr, W. D.; Lathrop, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    Important changes in the ozone vertical profile over South Pole, Antarctica have occurred both during the recent period of measurements, 1986-1991, and since an earlier set of soundings was carried out from 1967-1971. From the onset of the 'ozone hole' over Antarctica in the early 1980s, there has been a tendency for years with lower spring ozone amounts to alternate with years with somewhat higher (although still depleted) ozone amounts. Beginning in 1989 there have been three consecutive years of strong depletion although the timing of the breakdown of the vortex has varied from year to year. Comparison of the vertical profiles between the two periods of study reveals the dramatic decreases in the ozone amounts in the stratosphere between 15-21 km during the spring. In addition, it appears that summer values are also now much lower in this altitude region.

  7. The distinctive vertical heterophoria of dyslexics.

    PubMed

    Quercia, Patrick; Quercia, Madeleine; Feiss, Léonard J; Allaert, François

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we looked for the presence of vertical heterophoria (VH) in 42 dyslexic children (22 males and 20 females) aged 118.5±12.9 months who were compared with a control group of 22 nondyslexic children (eleven males and eleven females) aged 112±9.8 months. Dyslexics presented a low-level (always <1 prism diopter) VH combined with torsion. This oculomotor feature clearly separates the dyslexic group from the normal readers group. It is independent of the type of dyslexia. The essential feature of this VH is a lability that appears during specific stimulation of sensory receptors involved in postural regulation. This lability is demonstrated using a vertical Maddox test conducted under very specific conditions in which postural sensors are successively stimulated in a predetermined order. A quantitative variation in this VH may be seen during the Bielchowsky Head Tilt Test, which reveals hypertonia of the lower or upper oblique muscles. Vertical orthophoria can be achieved by placing low-power prisms asymmetrically within the direction of action of the superior or inferior oblique muscles. The selection of power and axis is not only guided by elements of the eye examination but also from observation of postural muscle tone. All these elements suggest that the VH could be of postural origin and somehow related to the vertical action of the oblique muscles. VH and torsion are not harmful per se. There is no statistical relationship between their level and the various parameters used to assess the reading skills of dyslexic children. VH and torsion could be a clinical marker of global proprioceptive dysfunction responsible for high-level multisensory disturbances secondary to poor spatial localization of visual and auditory information. This dysfunction might also explain the motor disorders concomitant to dyslexia. PMID:26445526

  8. Engineering high-performance vertical cavity lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Lear, K.L.; Hou, H.Q.; Hietala, V.M.; Choquette, K.D.; Schneider, R.P. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    The cw and high-speed performance of vertical cavity surface emitting laser diodes (VCSELs) are affected by both electrical and optical issues arising from the geometry and fabrication of these devices. Structures with low resistance semiconductor mirrors and Al-oxide confinement layers address these issues and have produced record performance including 50% power conversion efficiency and modulation bandwidths up to 20 GHz at small bias currents.

  9. Radially Magnetized Protoplanetary Disk: Vertical Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Matthew; Thompson, Christopher

    2015-11-01

    This paper studies the response of a thin accretion disk to an external radial magnetic field. Our focus is on protoplanetary disks (PPDs), which are exposed during their later evolution to an intense, magnetized wind from the central star. A radial magnetic field is mixed into a thin surface layer, wound up by the disk shear, and pushed downward by a combination of turbulent mixing and ambipolar and ohmic drift. The toroidal field reaches much greater strengths than the seed vertical field that is usually invoked in PPD models, even becoming superthermal. Linear stability analysis indicates that the disk experiences the magnetorotational instability (MRI) at a higher magnetization than a vertically magnetized disk when both the effects of ambipolar and Hall drift are taken into account. Steady vertical profiles of density and magnetic field are obtained at several radii between 0.06 and 1 AU in response to a wind magnetic field Br ˜ (10-4-10-2)(r/ AU)-2 G. Careful attention is given to the radial and vertical ionization structure resulting from irradiation by stellar X-rays. The disk is more strongly magnetized closer to the star, where it can support a higher rate of mass transfer. As a result, the inner ˜1 AU of a PPD is found to evolve toward lower surface density. Mass transfer rates around 10-8 M⊙ yr-1 are obtained under conservative assumptions about the MRI-generated stress. The evolution of the disk and the implications for planet migration are investigated in the accompanying paper.

  10. Electrically floating, near vertical incidence, skywave antenna

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Allen A.; Kaser, Timothy G.; Tremblay, Paul A.; Mays, Belva L.

    2014-07-08

    An Electrically Floating, Near Vertical Incidence, Skywave (NVIS) Antenna comprising an antenna element, a floating ground element, and a grounding element. At least part of said floating ground element is positioned between said antenna element and said grounding element. The antenna is separated from the floating ground element and the grounding element by one or more electrical insulators. The floating ground element is separated from said antenna and said grounding element by one or more electrical insulators.

  11. Inverse scattering problem for quantum graph vertices

    SciTech Connect

    Cheon, Taksu; Turek, Ondrej; Exner, Pavel

    2011-06-15

    We demonstrate how the inverse scattering problem of a quantum star graph can be solved by means of diagonalization of the Hermitian unitary matrix when the vertex coupling is of the scale-invariant (or Fueloep-Tsutsui) form. This enables the construction of quantum graphs with desired properties in a tailor-made fashion. The procedure is illustrated on the example of quantum vertices with equal transmission probabilities.

  12. Flow boiling in vertical down-flow

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, T.; Fighetti, C.; Reddy, G.; Yang, B.; Jafri, T. ); McAssey, E. ); Qureshi, Z. )

    1989-01-01

    An experimental program has been conducted to investigate the onset of Ledinegg instability in vertical down-flow. For three size uniformly heated test sections with L/D ratios from 100 to 150, the pressure drop under subcooled boiling conditions has been obtained for a wide range of operating parameters. The results are presented in non-dimensional forms which correlate the important variables and provide techniques for predicting the onset of flow instability. 3 refs.

  13. Flow boiling in vertical down-flow

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, T.; Fighetti, C.; Reddy, G.; Yang, B.; Jafri, T.; McAssey, E.; Qureshi, Z.

    1989-12-31

    An experimental program has been conducted to investigate the onset of Ledinegg instability in vertical down-flow. For three size uniformly heated test sections with L/D ratios from 100 to 150, the pressure drop under subcooled boiling conditions has been obtained for a wide range of operating parameters. The results are presented in non-dimensional forms which correlate the important variables and provide techniques for predicting the onset of flow instability. 3 refs.

  14. Vertical flight path steering system for aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambregts, Antonius A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    Disclosed is a vertical flight path angle steering system for aircraft, utilizing a digital flight control computer which processes pilot control inputs and aircraft response parameters into suitable elevator commands and control information for display to the pilot on a cathode ray tube. The system yields desirable airplane control handling qualities and responses as well as improvements in pilot workload and safety during airplane operation in the terminal area and under windshear conditions.

  15. Ozone vertical distribution in Mars polar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komitov, B.

    On the basis of an ultraviolet spectrum obtained over the north polar region of Mars by Mariner-9, the vertical profile of the ozone density is calculated. A density maximum is found at about 25 km height over the surface of the planet. Its value is about 1×1010molecules cm-3. The obtained result is compared to the results obtained by other authors.

  16. Vertical Carbon Nanotube Device in Nanoporous Templates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maschmann, Matthew Ralph (Inventor); Fisher, Timothy Scott (Inventor); Sands, Timothy (Inventor); Bashir, Rashid (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A modified porous anodic alumina template (PAA) containing a thin CNT catalyst layer directly embedded into the pore walls. CNT synthesis using the template selectively catalyzes SWNTs and DWNTs from the embedded catalyst layer to the top PAA surface, creating a vertical CNT channel within the pores. Subsequent processing allows for easy contact metallization and adaptable functionalization of the CNTs and template for a myriad of applications.

  17. The distinctive vertical heterophoria of dyslexics

    PubMed Central

    Quercia, Patrick; Quercia, Madeleine; Feiss, Léonard J; Allaert, François

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we looked for the presence of vertical heterophoria (VH) in 42 dyslexic children (22 males and 20 females) aged 118.5±12.9 months who were compared with a control group of 22 nondyslexic children (eleven males and eleven females) aged 112±9.8 months. Dyslexics presented a low-level (always <1 prism diopter) VH combined with torsion. This oculomotor feature clearly separates the dyslexic group from the normal readers group. It is independent of the type of dyslexia. The essential feature of this VH is a lability that appears during specific stimulation of sensory receptors involved in postural regulation. This lability is demonstrated using a vertical Maddox test conducted under very specific conditions in which postural sensors are successively stimulated in a predetermined order. A quantitative variation in this VH may be seen during the Bielchowsky Head Tilt Test, which reveals hypertonia of the lower or upper oblique muscles. Vertical orthophoria can be achieved by placing low-power prisms asymmetrically within the direction of action of the superior or inferior oblique muscles. The selection of power and axis is not only guided by elements of the eye examination but also from observation of postural muscle tone. All these elements suggest that the VH could be of postural origin and somehow related to the vertical action of the oblique muscles. VH and torsion are not harmful per se. There is no statistical relationship between their level and the various parameters used to assess the reading skills of dyslexic children. VH and torsion could be a clinical marker of global proprioceptive dysfunction responsible for high-level multisensory disturbances secondary to poor spatial localization of visual and auditory information. This dysfunction might also explain the motor disorders concomitant to dyslexia. PMID:26445526

  18. Present day vertical deformation in New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hreinsdóttir, Sigrún; Wallace, Laura; Litchfield, Nicola; D'Anastasio, Elisabetta; Denys, Paul; Pearson, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    New Zealand is tectonically very active. It lies along the oblique convergent plate boundary between the Pacific and Australian plate. In the North Island active tectonics is dominated by westward subduction of the Pacific Plate beneath the eastern North Island at the Hikurangi Trench, strike-slip faulting in the upper plate, and back-arc rifting in the central North Island. A series of very large strike-slip faults run through the South Island (Marlborough Fault System and the Alpine Fault) connecting with the Puysegur subduction zone in the south. The present day uplift rates are evaluated by analyzing data from continuous GPS stations in New Zealand. The up to 20 years of continuous GPS gives us a snapshot into the deformation rate. The average velocity is corrected for significant coseismic offsets, but the data can also be influenced by postseismic deformation, slow slip events along the Hikurangi subduction zone, volcanic deformation, as well as none tectonic local affects such as water extraction. We evaluate the interseismic vertical rate. We exclude data significantly affected by postseismic deformation from recent earthquakes and provide vertical rates both with and without correcting for slow slip events. Outside the Taupo rift zone the vertical rates are range from -6 to +6 mm/yr with uplift observed across the Alpine fault, few mm/yr uplift around the Raukumara Peninsula, northeast North Island, and subsidence along the southeast North Island, reflecting variation in plate locking. We compare the present day vertical deformation to the long-term motion along the coast determined primarily from 125,000 years old marine geological markers. The largest proportion of the New Zealand coastline (45%) is undergoing long-term tectonic uplift. Small stretches of the coastline (15%) are undergoing long-term subsidence. Areas farthest from the plate boundary (northern North Island and southeastern South Island) are assessed to be tectonically stable, in agreement with the continuous GPS data.

  19. Vertical Scales of Turbulence at the Mount Wilson Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treuhaft, Robert N.; Lowe, Stephen T.; Bester, Manfred; Danchi, William C.; Townes, Charles H.

    1995-01-01

    The vertical scales of turbulence at the Mount Wilson Observatory are inferred from data from the University of California at Berkeley Infrared Spatial Interferometer (ISI), by modeling path length fluctuations observed in the interferometric paths to celestial objects and those in instrumental ground-based paths. The correlations between the stellar and ground-based path length fluctuations and the temporal statistics of those fluctuations are modeled on various timescales to constrain the vertical scales. A Kolmogorov-Taylor turbulence model with a finite outer scale was used to simulate ISI data. The simulation also included the white instrumental noise of the interferometer, aperture-filtering effects, and the data analysis algorithms. The simulations suggest that the path delay fluctuations observed in the 1992-1993 ISI data are largely consistent with being generated by refractivity fluctuations at two characteristic vertical scales: one extending to a height of 45 m above the ground, with a wind speed of about 1 m/ s, and another at a much higher altitude, with a wind speed of about 10 m/ s. The height of the lower layer is of the order of the dimensions of trees and other structures near the interferometer, which suggests that these objects, including elements of the interferometer, may play a role in generating the lower layer of turbulence. The modeling indicates that the high- attitude component contributes primarily to short-period (less than 10 s) fluctuations, while the lower component dominates the long-period (up to a few minutes) fluctuations. The lower component turbulent height, along with outer scales of the order of 10 m, suggest that the baseline dependence of long-term interferometric, atmospheric fluctuations should weaken for baselines greater than a few tens of meters. Simulations further show that there is the potential for improving the seeing or astrometric accuracy by about 30%-50% on average, if the path length fluctuations in the lower component are directly calibrated. Statistical and systematic effects induce an error of about 15 m in the estimate of the lower component turbulent altitude.

  20. Vertical and horizontal seismometric observations of tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambotte, S.; Rivera, L.; Hinderer, J.

    2006-01-01

    Tidal signals have been largely studied with gravimeters, strainmeters and tiltmeters, but can also be retrieved from digital records of the output of long-period seismometers, such as STS-1, particularly if they are properly isolated. Horizontal components are often noisier than the vertical ones, due to sensitivity to tilt at long periods. Hence, horizontal components are often disturbed by local effects such as topography, geology and cavity effects, which imply a strain-tilt coupling. We use series of data (duration larger than 1 month) from several permanent broadband seismological stations to examine these disturbances. We search a minimal set of observable signals (tilts, horizontal and vertical displacements, strains, gravity) necessary to reconstruct the seismological record. Such analysis gives a set of coefficients (per component for each studied station), which are stable over years and then can be used systematically to correct data from these disturbances without needing heavy numerical computation. A special attention is devoted to ocean loading for stations close to oceans (e.g. Matsushiro station in Japon (MAJO)), and to pressure correction when barometric data are available. Interesting observations are made for vertical seismometric components; in particular, we found a pressure admittance between pressure and data 10 times larger than for gravimeters for periods larger than 1 day, while this admittance reaches the usual value of -3.5 nm/s 2/mbar for periods below 3 h. This observation may be due to instrumental noise, but the exact mechanism is not yet understood.

  1. A Vertically Integrated Junctionless Nanowire Transistor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Hyun; Hur, Jae; Kang, Min-Ho; Bang, Tewook; Ahn, Dae-Chul; Lee, Dongil; Kim, Kwang-Hee; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2016-03-01

    A vertically integrated junctionless field-effect transistor (VJ-FET), which is composed of vertically stacked multiple silicon nanowires (SiNWs) with a gate-all-around (GAA) structure, is demonstrated on a bulk silicon wafer for the first time. The proposed VJ-FET mitigates the issues of variability and fabrication complexity that are encountered in the vertically integrated multi-NW FET (VM-FET) based on an identical structure in which the VM-FET, as recently reported, harnesses a source and drain (S/D) junction for its operation and is thus based on the inversion mode. Variability is alleviated by bulk conduction in a junctionless FET (JL-FET), where current flows through the core of the SiNW, whereas it is not mitigated by surface conduction in an inversion mode FET (IM-FET), where current flows via the surface of the SiNW. The fabrication complexity is reduced by the inherent JL structure of the JL-FET because S/D formation is not required. In contrast, it is very difficult to dope the S/D when it is positioned at each floor of a tall SiNW with greater uniformity and with less damage to the crystalline structure of the SiNW in a VM-FET. Moreover, when the proposed VJ-FET is used as nonvolatile flash memory, the endurance and retention characteristics are improved due to the above-mentioned bulk conduction. PMID:26885948

  2. Processes regulating short-lived species in the tropical tropopause layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gettelman, A.; Lauritzen, P. H.; Park, M.; Kay, J. E.

    2009-07-01

    A one-dimensional model of vertical transport in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) is developed. The model uses vertical advection, a convective source, and a chemical sink to simulate the profiles of very short lived substances in the TTL. The model simulates evanescent profiles of short-lived hydrocarbon species observed by satellite and is also used to simulate short-lived bromine species. Tracers with chemical lifetimes of 25 days or longer have significant concentrations in the stratosphere, and vertical advection is critical. Convection is important up to its peak altitude, nearly 19 km. Convection dominates the distribution of species with lifetimes less than 25 days. The annual cycle of species with lifetimes longer than 25 days is governed primarily by the variations of vertical velocity, not convection. This is particularly true for carbon monoxide, where a seasonal cycle in the lower stratosphere of the right phase is produced without variations in tropospheric emissions. An analysis of critical short-lived bromine species (CH2Br2 and CHBr3) indicates that substantial amounts of these tracers may get advected into the lower stratosphere as source gases at 18 km, and are estimated to contribute 2.8 pptv (1.1-4.1) to stratospheric bromine.

  3. Solving vertical and horizontal well hydraulics problems analytically in Cartesian coordinates with vertical and horizontal anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batu, Vedat

    2012-01-01

    SummaryA new generalized three-dimensional analytical solution is developed for a partially-penetrating vertical rectangular parallelepiped well screen in a confined aquifer by solving the three-dimensional transient ground water flow differential equation in x- y- z Cartesian coordinates system for drawdown by taking into account the three principal hydraulic conductivities ( Kx, Ky, and Kz) along the x- y- z coordinate directions. The fully penetrating screen case becomes equivalent to the single vertical fracture case of Gringarten and Ramey (1973). It is shown that the new solution and Gringarten and Ramey solution (1973) match very well. Similarly, it is shown that this new solution for a horizontally tiny fully penetrating parallelepiped rectangular parallelepiped screen case match very well with Theis (1935) solution. Moreover, it is also shown that the horizontally tiny partially-penetrating parallelepiped rectangular well screen case of this new solution match very well with Hantush (1964) solution. This new analytical solution can also cover a partially-penetrating horizontal well by representing its screen interval with vertically tiny rectangular parallelepiped. Also the solution takes into account both the vertical anisotropy ( azx = Kz/ Kx) as well as the horizontal anisotropy ( ayx = Ky/ Kx) and has potential application areas to analyze pumping test drawdown data from partially-penetrating vertical and horizontal wells by representing them as tiny rectangular parallelepiped as well as line sources. The solution has also potential application areas for a partially-penetrating parallelepiped rectangular vertical fracture. With this new solution, the horizontal anisotropy ( ayx = Ky/ Kx) in addition to the vertical anisotropy ( azx = Kz/ Kx) can also be determined using observed drawdown data. Most importantly, with this solution, to the knowledge of the author, it has been shown the first time in the literature that some well-known well hydraulics problems can also be solved in Cartesian coordinates with some additional advantages other than the conventional cylindrical coordinates method.

  4. Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing Detail, Horizontal Cross ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing Detail, Horizontal Cross Bracing Joint, Vertical Cross Bracing End Detail - Ceylon Covered Bridge, Limberlost Park, spanning Wabash River at County Road 900 South, Geneva, Adams County, IN

  5. ostglacial rebound from VLBI Geodesy: On Establishing Vertical Reference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argus, Donald .

    1996-01-01

    I propose that a useful reference frame for vertical motions is that found by minimizing differences between vertical motions observed with VLBI [Ma and Ryan, 1995] and predictions from postglacial rebound predictions [Peltier, 1995].

  6. 22. Top Lateral Bracing & Top Chord, Vertical Tension Member ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Top Lateral Bracing & Top Chord, Vertical Tension Member 6, end Vertical Compression Members 5 & 4; South Swing Span; looking N. - Pacific Shortline Bridge, U.S. Route 20,spanning Missouri River, Sioux City, Woodbury County, IA

  7. 19. VERTICAL VIEW, FROM DECK, SHOWING CONNECTION OF CENTER TRUSS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. VERTICAL VIEW, FROM DECK, SHOWING CONNECTION OF CENTER TRUSS TENSION BARS, DIAGONAL TENSION RODS, AND LATTICE-JOINED VERTICAL CHANNELS - Lenox Bridge, Spanning Obion River, Rural Road S8025, Lenox, Dyer County, TN

  8. 24. PIN CONNECTION AT VERTICAL AND BOTTOM CHORD ON CAMELBACK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. PIN CONNECTION AT VERTICAL AND BOTTOM CHORD ON CAMELBACK THROUGH TRUSS. VERTICAL AND BOTTOM CHORD MADE OF HAND-FORGED EYE BARS - New River Bridge, Spanning New River at State Route 623, Pembroke, Giles County, VA

  9. A Vertical Grid Module for Baroclinic Models of the Atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, John B

    2008-04-01

    The vertical grid of an atmospheric model assigns dynamic and thermo- dynamic variables to grid locations. The vertical coordinate is typically not height but one of a class of meteorological variables that vary with atmo- spheric conditions. The grid system is chosen to further numerical approx- imations of the boundary conditions so that the system is terrain following at the surface. Lagrangian vertical coordinates are useful in reducing the numerical errors from advection processes. That the choices will effect the numercial properties and accuracy is explored in this report. A MATLAB class for Lorentz vertical grids is described and applied to the vertical struc- ture equation and baroclinic atmospheric circulation. A generalized meteo- rolgoical coordinate system is developed which can support σ, isentropic θ vertical coordinate, or Lagrangian vertical coordinates. The vertical atmo- spheric column is a MATLAB class that includes the kinematic and ther- modynamic variables along with methods for computing geopoentials and terms relevant to a 3D baroclinc atmospheric model.

  10. Going Up? The Pros and Cons of Vertical Expansion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myler, Patricia A.; Boggs, Richard C.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the advantages and disadvantages of the vertical expansion of school buildings. Considers such factors as fire protection, compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, and cost. Discusses alternatives to vertical expansion. (PKP)

  11. 9. View of connection to top chord, diagonals, verticals, lateral ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. View of connection to top chord, diagonals, verticals, lateral bracing, struts and spandrels. Looking at south side, east end of west span. This is typical of all diagonaland vertical connections. - Boomershine Bridge, Spanning Twin Creek, Farmersville, Montgomery County, OH

  12. Short Stories in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Carole L., Ed.; Kratzke, Peter, Ed.

    Examining how teachers help students respond to short fiction, this book presents 25 essays that look closely at "teachable" short stories by a diverse group of classic and contemporary writers. The approaches shared by the contributors move from readers' first personal connections to a story, through a growing facility with the structure of…

  13. Does whole-body cryotherapy improve vertical jump recovery following a high-intensity exercise bout?

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Amilton; Bottaro, Martim; Ferreira-Junior, Joao B; Vieira, Carlos; Cleto, Vitor A; Cadore, Eduardo L; Simões, Herbert G; Carmo, Jake Do; Brown, Lee E

    2015-01-01

    Whole-body cryotherapy (WBC) has been used as a recovery strategy following different sports activities. Thus, the aim of the study reported here was to examine the effect of WBC on vertical jump recovery following a high-intensity exercise (HIE) bout. Twelve trained men (mean ± standard deviation age = 23.9±5.9 years) were randomly exposed to two different conditions separated by 7 days: 1) WBC (3 minutes of WBC at −110°C immediately after the HIE) and 2) control (CON; no WBC after the HIE). The HIE consisted of six sets of ten repetitions of knee extensions at 60° · s−1 concentric and 180° · s−1 eccentric on an isokinetic dynamometer. The vertical jump test was used to evaluate the influence of HIE on lower extremity muscular performance. The vertical jump was performed on a force platform before HIE (T1) and 30 minutes after (T2) the WBC and CON conditions. As a result of HIE, jump height, muscle power, and maximal velocity (Vmax) had significant decreases between T1 and T2, however no significance was found between the WBC and CON conditions. The results indicate that one session of WBC had no effect on vertical jump following an HIE compared with a CON condition. WBC may not improve muscle-function (dependent on stretch-shortening cycle) recovery in very short periods (ie, 30 minutes) following HIE. PMID:25750548

  14. Optimal GPS/accelerometer integration algorithm for monitoring the vertical structural dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiaolin; Wang, Jian; Han, Houzeng

    2014-11-01

    The vertical structural dynamics is a crucial factor for structural health monitoring (SHM) of civil structures such as high-rise buildings, suspension bridges and towers. This paper presents an optimal GPS/accelerometer integration algorithm for an automated multi-sensor monitoring system. The closed loop feedback algorithm for integrating the vertical GPS and accelerometer measurements is proposed based on a 5 state extended KALMAN filter (EKF) and then the narrow moving window Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis is applied to extract structural dynamics. A civil structural vibration is simulated and the analysed result shows the proposed algorithm can effectively integrate the online vertical measurements produced by GPS and accelerometer. Furthermore, the accelerometer bias and scale factor can also be estimated which is impossible with traditional integration algorithms. Further analysis shows the vibration frequencies detected in GPS or accelerometer are all included in the integrated vertical defection time series and the accelerometer can effectively compensate the short-term GPS outages with high quality. Finally, the data set collected with a time synchronised and integrated GPS/accelerometer monitoring system installed on the Nottingham Wilford Bridge when excited by 15 people jumping together at its mid-span are utilised to verify the effectiveness of this proposed algorithm. Its implementations are satisfactory and the detected vibration frequencies are 1.720 Hz, 1.870 Hz, 2.104 Hz, 2.905 Hz and also 10.050 Hz, which is not found in GPS or accelerometer only measurements.

  15. Does whole-body cryotherapy improve vertical jump recovery following a high-intensity exercise bout?

    PubMed

    Vieira, Amilton; Bottaro, Martim; Ferreira-Junior, Joao B; Vieira, Carlos; Cleto, Vitor A; Cadore, Eduardo L; Simões, Herbert G; Carmo, Jake Do; Brown, Lee E

    2015-01-01

    Whole-body cryotherapy (WBC) has been used as a recovery strategy following different sports activities. Thus, the aim of the study reported here was to examine the effect of WBC on vertical jump recovery following a high-intensity exercise (HIE) bout. Twelve trained men (mean ± standard deviation age = 23.9±5.9 years) were randomly exposed to two different conditions separated by 7 days: 1) WBC (3 minutes of WBC at -110°C immediately after the HIE) and 2) control (CON; no WBC after the HIE). The HIE consisted of six sets of ten repetitions of knee extensions at 60° · s(-1) concentric and 180° · s(-1) eccentric on an isokinetic dynamometer. The vertical jump test was used to evaluate the influence of HIE on lower extremity muscular performance. The vertical jump was performed on a force platform before HIE (T1) and 30 minutes after (T2) the WBC and CON conditions. As a result of HIE, jump height, muscle power, and maximal velocity (Vmax) had significant decreases between T1 and T2, however no significance was found between the WBC and CON conditions. The results indicate that one session of WBC had no effect on vertical jump following an HIE compared with a CON condition. WBC may not improve muscle-function (dependent on stretch-shortening cycle) recovery in very short periods (ie, 30 minutes) following HIE. PMID:25750548

  16. Vertical heterostructure of two-dimensional MoS₂ and WSe₂ with vertically aligned layers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jung Ho; Lee, Hye Ryoung; Hong, Seung Sae; Kong, Desheng; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Wang, Haotian; Xiong, Feng; Wang, Shuang; Cui, Yi

    2015-02-11

    Two-dimensional (2D) layered materials consist of covalently bonded 2D atomic layers stacked by van der Waals interactions. Such anisotropic bonding nature gives rise to the orientation-dependent functionalities of the 2D layered materials. Different from most studies of 2D materials with their atomic layers parallel to substrate, we have recently developed layer vertically aligned 2D material nanofilms. Built on these developments, here, we demonstrate the synthesis of vertical heterostructure of n-type MoS2 and p-type WSe2 with vertically aligned atomic layers. Thin film of MoS2/WSe2 vertical structure was successfully synthesized without significant alloy formation. The heterostructure synthesis is scalable to a large area over 1 cm(2). We demonstrated the pn junction diode behavior of the heterostructure device. This novel device geometry opens up exciting opportunities for a variety of electronic and optoelectronic devices, complementary to the recent interesting vertical heterostructures with horizontal atomic layers. PMID:25590995

  17. Adsorption to fish sperm of vertically transmitted fish viruses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulcahy, D.; Pascho, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    More than 99 percent of a vertically transmitted fish rhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus, was removed from suspension in less than 1 minute by adsorption to the surface membrane of sperm from two genera of salmonid fishes. The vertically transmitted, infectious pancreatic necrosis virus adsorbed to a lesser degree, but no adsorption occurred with a second fish rhabdovirus that is not vertically transmitted. Such adsorption may be involved in vertical transmission of these viruses.

  18. Carbon Monoxide Retrievals From Short Wave Infrared Observations Of Sciamachy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Franz; Gimeno-Garcia, Sebastian; Lihtenberg, Gunter; Hess, Michael

    2013-12-01

    For the estimation of vertical column densities from short-wave near infrared nadir observations from SCIA- MACHY (and similar instruments like GOSAT) the “Beer InfraRed Retrieval Algorithm” BIRRA has been developed that performs a nonlinear or separable least squares fit of concentration profile scaling factors along with some auxiliary parameters. Our recent work focuses on improvements with respect to wavelength calibration, a more flexible multiwindow fitting scheme, and a better modeling of SCIAMACHY's channel 8 spectral response function. Here we present results from carbon monoxide retrevials from SCIAMACHY's channel 8 indicating the significant impact of fitting the wavelength shift.

  19. 49 CFR 179.14 - Coupler vertical restraint system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... material failure, vertical loads of at least 200,000 pounds (90,718.5 kg) applied in upward and downward... mating coupler (or simulated coupler) having only frictional vertical force resistance at the mating... section. A test is successful when a vertical disengagement or material failure does not occur during...

  20. Are all types of vertical information created equal?

    PubMed

    Weisberg, Steven M; Newcombe, Nora S

    2013-10-01

    The vertical component of space occurs in two distinct fashions in natural environments. One kind of verticality is orthogonal-to-horizontal (as in climbing trees, operating in volumetric spaces such as water or air, or taking elevators in multilevel buildings). Another kind of verticality, which might be functionally distinct, comes from navigating on sloped terrain (as in traversing hills or ramps). PMID:24103624

  1. Diel Vertical Migration Thresholds of Karenia brevis (Dinophyceae).

    EPA Science Inventory

    Light and nutrient availability change throughout dinoflagellate diel vertical migration (DVM) and/or with subpopulation location in the water column along the west Florida shelf. Typically, the vertical depth of the shelf is greater than the distance a subpopulation can vertical...

  2. The Temporal Structure of Vertical Arm Movements

    PubMed Central

    Gaveau, Jérémie; Papaxanthis, Charalambos

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigates how the CNS deals with the omnipresent force of gravity during arm motor planning. Previous studies have reported direction-dependent kinematic differences in the vertical plane; notably, acceleration duration was greater during a downward than an upward arm movement. Although the analysis of acceleration and deceleration phases has permitted to explore the integration of gravity force, further investigation is necessary to conclude whether feedforward or feedback control processes are at the origin of this incorporation. We considered that a more detailed analysis of the temporal features of vertical arm movements could provide additional information about gravity force integration into the motor planning. Eight subjects performed single joint vertical arm movements (45° rotation around the shoulder joint) in two opposite directions (upwards and downwards) and at three different speeds (slow, natural and fast). We calculated different parameters of hand acceleration profiles: movement duration (MD), duration to peak acceleration (D PA), duration from peak acceleration to peak velocity (D PA-PV), duration from peak velocity to peak deceleration (D PV-PD), duration from peak deceleration to the movement end (D PD-End), acceleration duration (AD), deceleration duration (DD), peak acceleration (PA), peak velocity (PV), and peak deceleration (PD). While movement durations and amplitudes were similar for upward and downward movements, the temporal structure of acceleration profiles differed between the two directions. More specifically, subjects performed upward movements faster than downward movements; these direction-dependent asymmetries appeared early in the movement (i.e., before PA) and lasted until the moment of PD. Additionally, PA and PV were greater for upward than downward movements. Movement speed also changed the temporal structure of acceleration profiles. The effect of speed and direction on the form of acceleration profiles is consistent with the premise that the CNS optimises motor commands with respect to both gravitational and inertial constraints. PMID:21765935

  3. Vertical deformation at western part of Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Febriyani, Caroline; Prijatna, Kosasih; Meilano, Irwan

    2015-04-01

    This research tries to make advancement in GPS signal processing to estimate the interseismic vertical deformation field at western part of Sumatra Island. The data derived by Continuous Global Positioning System (CGPS) from Badan Informasi Geospasial (BIG) between 2010 and 2012. GPS Analyze at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (GAMIT) software and Global Kalman Filter (GLOBK) software are used to process the GPS signal to estimate the vertical velocities of the CGPS station. In order to minimize noise due to atmospheric delay, Vienna Mapping Function 1 (VMF1) is used as atmospheric parameter model and include daily IONEX file provided by the Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE) as well. It improves GAMIT daily position accuracy up to 0.8 mm. In a second step of processing, the GLOBK is used in order to estimate site positions and velocities in the ITRF08 reference frame. The result shows that the uncertainties of estimated displacement velocity at all CGPS stations are smaller than 1.5 mm/yr. The subsided deformation patterns are seen at the northern and southern part of west Sumatra. The vertical deformation at northern part of west Sumatra indicates postseismic phase associated with the 2010 and 2012 Northern Sumatra earthquakes and also the long-term postseismic associated with the 2004 and 2005 Northern Sumatra earthquakes. The uplifted deformation patterns are seen from Bukit Tinggi to Seblat which indicate a long-term interseismic phase after the 2007 Bengkulu earthquake and 2010 Mentawai earthquake. GANO station shows a subsidence at rate 12.25 mm/yr, indicating the overriding Indo-Australia Plate which is dragged down by the subducting Southeast Asian Plate.

  4. Centropages behaviour: Swimming and vertical migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcaraz, Miguel; Saiz, Enric; Calbet, Albert

    2007-02-01

    The evolutionary success of any species living in a variable environment depends on its capacity to enhance the probability of finding food and mates, and escaping predators. In the case of copepods of the genus Centropages, as in all planktonic copepods, their swimming behaviour is closely tied to these vital aspects, and shows a high degree of plasticity and adaptive capacity. Swimming mechanisms of Centropages change radically during development, mainly in the transition between naupliar stages to the 1st copepodite; nauplii do not produce feeding currents, whereas copepodites do. Adults and late developmental stages of C. typicus, C. hamatus and C. velificatus spend most of the time in slow swimming and resting breaks, with occasional and brief fast swimming (escape reactions) and grooming events. Slow swimming is closely related to the creation of feeding currents, and results from the beating of the cephalic appendages in a “fling and clap” manner. The proportion of time allocated to the different swimming activities depends on sensory cues like type and concentration of food, presence of potential mates, light intensity, hydrodynamic flow, etc. The responses of Centropages to changes in flow velocity fluctuations (small-scale turbulence) are similar to the escape responses (fast swimming) triggered by the presence of potential predators. Centropages generally have standard nocturnal vertical migration patterns involving considerable vertical displacements. This behaviour is closely related to the narrow spectral sensitivity and the low intensity threshold of the genus, and has important consequences for the active vertical transport of matter and energy. The variety of responses of Centropages to environmental changes, and in general all the aspects related to its swimming behaviour seem to be controlled by the trade-off between energetic gains (food intake), losses (swimming energy expenditure), and predation risk. Behavioural plasticity and adaptation appear to be the most relevant characteristics for the success of the genus in a wide range of marine environments.

  5. Vertical deformation at western part of Sumatra

    SciTech Connect

    Febriyani, Caroline Prijatna, Kosasih Meilano, Irwan

    2015-04-24

    This research tries to make advancement in GPS signal processing to estimate the interseismic vertical deformation field at western part of Sumatra Island. The data derived by Continuous Global Positioning System (CGPS) from Badan Informasi Geospasial (BIG) between 2010 and 2012. GPS Analyze at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (GAMIT) software and Global Kalman Filter (GLOBK) software are used to process the GPS signal to estimate the vertical velocities of the CGPS station. In order to minimize noise due to atmospheric delay, Vienna Mapping Function 1 (VMF1) is used as atmospheric parameter model and include daily IONEX file provided by the Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE) as well. It improves GAMIT daily position accuracy up to 0.8 mm. In a second step of processing, the GLOBK is used in order to estimate site positions and velocities in the ITRF08 reference frame. The result shows that the uncertainties of estimated displacement velocity at all CGPS stations are smaller than 1.5 mm/yr. The subsided deformation patterns are seen at the northern and southern part of west Sumatra. The vertical deformation at northern part of west Sumatra indicates postseismic phase associated with the 2010 and 2012 Northern Sumatra earthquakes and also the long-term postseismic associated with the 2004 and 2005 Northern Sumatra earthquakes. The uplifted deformation patterns are seen from Bukit Tinggi to Seblat which indicate a long-term interseismic phase after the 2007 Bengkulu earthquake and 2010 Mentawai earthquake. GANO station shows a subsidence at rate 12.25 mm/yr, indicating the overriding Indo-Australia Plate which is dragged down by the subducting Southeast Asian Plate.

  6. Effect of vertical magnetic field on convection and segregation in vertical Bridgman crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Do Hyun; Adornato, Peter M.; Brown, Robert A.

    1988-01-01

    A previous finite-element analysis of vertical Bridgman growth for dilute and nondilute alloys is extended to include the effect of a vertically-aligned magnetic field in the limit of zero magnetic Reynolds number. Calculations are presented for growth of a dilute gallium-germanium alloy in a vertically stabilized Bridgman-Stockbarger system and in a furnace with a uniform temperature gradient imposed along the ampoule. Steady cellular convection driven by radial temperature gradients causes good axial and radial mixing in both systems without a magnetic field. A weak magnetic field decreases the intensity of convection and the effectiveness of solute mixing. The radial nonuniformity is greatest for an intermediate field strength. Stronger fields suppress flow recirculation completely, and lead to uniform solute segregation across the crystal and to diffusion-controlled axial segregation.

  7. Spin-controlled vertical cavity surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hövel, Stephan; Gerhardt, Nils C.; Brenner, Carsten; Hofmann, Martin R.; Lo, Fang-Yuh; Reuter, Dirk; Wieck, Andreas D.; Schuster, Ellen; Keune, Werner

    2006-04-01

    The output polarization of an optically pumped InGaAs/GaAs vertical cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) is analyzed at room temperature as a function of the circular input polarization degree. The emission of the VCSEL is unambiguously controlled by the exciting polarization and only 30% of spin-polarized electrons are needed in the active region to generate an output polarization degree of up to 100% at short-pulsed pumping. This testifies that a VCSEL can be used as an effective amplifier for spin information even at room temperature. Measurements with a continuous wave excitation were executed to demonstrate the possibility of spin-amplification by electrical spin-injection in a VCSEL. All measurements were confirmed by a phenomenological spin flip model. Our paper is completed with the introduction of Fe/Tb-Multilayers used for spin injection. These contacts enable spin injection without external magnetic fields, i.e. in remanence. Finally, we suggest a combination of these multilayers with a VCSEL-structure to create the first spin-optoelectronic device working both at room temperature and without external fields.

  8. Lubricating system for vertical shaft engine

    SciTech Connect

    Miyaki, M.; Tachibana, Y.; Oguri, K.; Isaka, Y.

    1988-08-30

    This patent describes a lubrication system for an internal combustion engine having an output shaft rotatable about a generally vertically extending axis, a lubricant reservoir defined at least in part by a lower wall of the engine surrounding the output shaft and through which the output shaft passes for driving a driven element. The lower wall is formed with an upwardly extending baffle for dividing the lubricant reservoir into separate sections and for reducing sloshing of lubricant within the lubricant reservoir, and oil passage means extending through the baffle for permitting lubricant to flow therethrough.

  9. Long wavelength vertical cavity surface emitting laser

    DOEpatents

    Choquette, Kent D.; Klem, John F.

    2005-08-16

    Selectively oxidized vertical cavity lasers emitting near 1300 nm using InGaAsN quantum wells are reported for the first time which operate continuous wave below, at and above room temperature. The lasers employ two n-type Al.sub.0.94 Ga.sub.0.06 As/GaAs distributed Bragg reflectors each with a selectively oxidized current aperture adjacent to the active region, and the top output mirror contains a tunnel junction to inject holes into the active region. Continuous wave single mode lasing is observed up to 55.degree. C.

  10. Lidar measurements of ozone vertical profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megie, G. J.; Ancellet, G.; Pelon, J.

    1985-11-01

    Attention is given to the differential absorption lidar technique used in measuring the vertical ozone distribution of the troposphere and stratosphere. The basis of these measurements are UV wavelength range laser sources which encompass Nd:YAG pumped dye lasers and Exciplex lasers. High temporal and spatial resolution, together with measurement continuity, allow the observation of ozone variations at various time and space scales that are important in such areas of current interest as troposphere-stratosphere exchanges, long range transport, the global ozone budget, and correlations between ozone number densities and other atmospheric parameters.

  11. Vertical Cable Seismic Survey for Hydrothermal Deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakawa, E.; Murakami, F.; Sekino, Y.; Okamoto, T.; Ishikawa, K.; Tsukahara, H.; Shimura, T.

    2012-04-01

    The vertical cable seismic is one of the reflection seismic methods. It uses hydrophone arrays vertically moored from the seafloor to record acoustic waves generated by surface, deep-towed or ocean bottom sources. Analyzing the reflections from the sub-seabed, we could look into the subsurface structure. This type of survey is generally called VCS (Vertical Cable Seismic). Because VCS is an efficient high-resolution 3D seismic survey method for a spatially-bounded area, we proposed the method for the hydrothermal deposit survey tool development program that the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) started in 2009. We are now developing a VCS system, including not only data acquisition hardware but data processing and analysis technique. Our first experiment of VCS surveys has been carried out in Lake Biwa, JAPAN in November 2009 for a feasibility study. Prestack depth migration is applied to the 3D VCS data to obtain a high quality 3D depth volume. Based on the results from the feasibility study, we have developed two autonomous recording VCS systems. After we carried out a trial experiment in the actual ocean at a water depth of about 400m and we carried out the second VCS survey at Iheya Knoll with a deep-towed source. In this survey, we could establish the procedures for the deployment/recovery of the system and could examine the locations and the fluctuations of the vertical cables at a water depth of around 1000m. The acquired VCS data clearly shows the reflections from the sub-seafloor. Through the experiment, we could confirm that our VCS system works well even in the severe circumstances around the locations of seafloor hydrothermal deposits. We have, however, also confirmed that the uncertainty in the locations of the source and of the hydrophones could lower the quality of subsurface image. It is, therefore, strongly necessary to develop a total survey system that assures a accurate positioning and a deployment techniques. We have carried out two field surveys in FY2011. One is a 3D survey with a boomer for a high-resolution surface source and the other one for an actual field survey in the Izena Cauldron an active hydrothermal area in the Okinawa Trough. Through these surveys, the VCS will become a practical exploration tool for the exploration of seafloor hydrothermal deposits.

  12. Propulsion systems for vertical flight aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, A.

    1990-01-01

    The present evaluation of VTOL airframe/powerplant integration configurations combining high forward flight speed with safe and efficient vertical flight identifies six configurations that can be matched with one of three powerplant types: turboshafts, convertible-driveshaft lift fans, and gas-drive lift fans. The airframes configurations are (1) tilt-rotor, (2) folded tilt-rotor, (3) tilt-wing, (4) rotor wing/disk wing, (5) lift fan, and (6) variable-diameter rotor. Attention is given to the lift-fan VTOL configuration. The evaluation of these configurations has been conducted by both a joint NASA/DARPA program and the NASA High Speed Rotorcraft program. 7 refs.

  13. Axon-First Neuritogenesis on Vertical Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyungtae; Park, Yi-Seul; Park, Matthew; Jang, Min Jee; Kim, Seong-Min; Lee, Juno; Choi, Ji Yu; Jung, Da Hee; Chang, Young-Tae; Yoon, Myung-Han; Lee, Jin Seok; Nam, Yoonkey; Choi, Insung S

    2016-01-13

    In this work, we report that high-density, vertically grown silicon nanowires (vg-SiNWs) direct a new in vitro developmental pathway of primary hippocampal neurons. Neurons on vg-SiNWs formed a single, extremely elongated major neurite earlier than minor neurites, which led to accelerated polarization. Additionally, the development of lamellipodia, which generally occurs on 2D culture coverslips, was absent on vg-SiNWs. The results indicate that surface topography is an important factor that influences neuronal development and also provide implications for the role of topography in neuronal development in vivo. PMID:26645112

  14. Vertical Isolation for Photodiodes in CMOS Imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata

    2008-01-01

    In a proposed improvement in complementary metal oxide/semi conduct - or (CMOS) image detectors, two additional implants in each pixel would effect vertical isolation between the metal oxide/semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) and the photodiode of the pixel. This improvement is expected to enable separate optimization of the designs of the photodiode and the MOSFETs so as to optimize their performances independently of each other. The purpose to be served by enabling this separate optimization is to eliminate or vastly reduce diffusion cross-talk, thereby increasing sensitivity, effective spatial resolution, and color fidelity while reducing noise.

  15. Genetic Evaluation of Short Stature

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, Ron G.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Genetics plays a major role in determining an individual's height. Although there are many monogenic disorders that lead to perturbations in growth and result in short stature, there is still no consensus as to the role that genetic diagnostics should play in the evaluation of a child with short stature. Evidence Acquisition: A search of PubMed was performed, focusing on the genetic diagnosis of short stature as well as on specific diagnostic subgroups included in this article. Consensus guidelines were reviewed. Evidence Synthesis: There are a multitude of rare genetic causes of severe short stature. There is no high-quality evidence to define the optimal approach to the genetic evaluation of short stature. We review genetic etiologies of a number of diagnostic subgroups and propose an algorithm for genetic testing based on these subgroups. Conclusion: Advances in genomic technologies are revolutionizing the diagnostic approach to short stature. Endocrinologists must become facile with the use of genetic testing in order to identify the various monogenic disorders that present with short stature. PMID:24915122

  16. Dynamic Range of Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers in Multimode Links

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.L.T.; Dalal, R.V.; Ram, R.J.; Choquette, K.D.

    1999-07-07

    The authors report spurious free dynamic range measurements of 850nm vertical cavity surface emitting lasers in short multimode links for radio frequency communication. For a 27m fiber link, the dynamic range at optimal bias was greater than 95dB-Hz{sup 2/3} for modulation frequencies between 1 and 5.5 GHz, which exceeds the requirements for antenna remoting in microcellular networks. In a free space link, they have measured the highest dynamic range in an 850nm vertical cavity surface emitting laser of 113dB-Hz{sup 2/3} at 900MHz. We have also investigated the effects of modal noise and differential mode delay on the dynamic range for longer lengths of fiber.

  17. Diagnosis of vertical motions from VAS retrievals during a convective outbreak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, T. W.; Fuelberg, H. E.

    1985-01-01

    GOES-VAS satellite retrievals are used to investigate an intense convective outbreak over the Mississippi River Valley on 21-22 July 1982. The primary goals are to assess the strengths and weaknesses of three methods for computing vertical motion using satellite retrievals and to determine the effects of short interval observations on the calculations. Then, the vertical motions are incorporated with thermodynamic parameters to assess the usefulness of VAS data in delineating factors leading to storm formation. Results indicate that the quasi-geotrophic omega equation provided patterns and magnitudes most consistent with observed weather events and the 12 h radiosonde-derived motions. The vorticity method generally produced reasonable patterns, especially over the convective outbreak, although magnitudes were large due to its time derivative.

  18. Highly uniform and vertically aligned SnO2 nanochannel arrays for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae-Yup; Kang, Jin Soo; Shin, Junyoung; Kim, Jin; Han, Seung-Joo; Park, Jongwoo; Min, Yo-Sep; Ko, Min Jae; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2015-04-01

    Nanostructured electrodes with vertical alignment have been considered ideal structures for electron transport and interfacial contact with redox electrolytes in photovoltaic devices. Here, we report large-scale vertically aligned SnO2 nanochannel arrays with uniform structures, without lateral cracks fabricated by a modified anodic oxidation process. In the modified process, ultrasonication is utilized to avoid formation of partial compact layers and lateral cracks in the SnO2 nanochannel arrays. Building on this breakthrough, we first demonstrate the photovoltaic application of these vertically aligned SnO2 nanochannel arrays. These vertically aligned arrays were directly and successfully applied in quasi-solid state dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) as photoanodes, yielding reasonable conversion efficiency under back-side illumination. In addition, a significantly short process time (330 s) for achieving the optimal thickness (7.0 μm) and direct utilization of the anodized electrodes enable a simple, rapid and low-cost fabrication process. Furthermore, a TiO2 shell layer was coated on the SnO2 nanochannel arrays by the atomic layer deposition (ALD) process for enhancement of dye-loading and prolonging the electron lifetime in the DSSC. Owing to the presence of the ALD TiO2 layer, the short-circuit photocurrent density (Jsc) and conversion efficiency were increased by 20% and 19%, respectively, compared to those of the DSSC without the ALD TiO2 layer. This study provides valuable insight into the development of efficient SnO2-based photoanodes for photovoltaic application by a simple and rapid fabrication process.Nanostructured electrodes with vertical alignment have been considered ideal structures for electron transport and interfacial contact with redox electrolytes in photovoltaic devices. Here, we report large-scale vertically aligned SnO2 nanochannel arrays with uniform structures, without lateral cracks fabricated by a modified anodic oxidation process. In the modified process, ultrasonication is utilized to avoid formation of partial compact layers and lateral cracks in the SnO2 nanochannel arrays. Building on this breakthrough, we first demonstrate the photovoltaic application of these vertically aligned SnO2 nanochannel arrays. These vertically aligned arrays were directly and successfully applied in quasi-solid state dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) as photoanodes, yielding reasonable conversion efficiency under back-side illumination. In addition, a significantly short process time (330 s) for achieving the optimal thickness (7.0 μm) and direct utilization of the anodized electrodes enable a simple, rapid and low-cost fabrication process. Furthermore, a TiO2 shell layer was coated on the SnO2 nanochannel arrays by the atomic layer deposition (ALD) process for enhancement of dye-loading and prolonging the electron lifetime in the DSSC. Owing to the presence of the ALD TiO2 layer, the short-circuit photocurrent density (Jsc) and conversion efficiency were increased by 20% and 19%, respectively, compared to those of the DSSC without the ALD TiO2 layer. This study provides valuable insight into the development of efficient SnO2-based photoanodes for photovoltaic application by a simple and rapid fabrication process. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00202h

  19. Vertically Stacked Graphene/Transition-Metal-Dichalcogenides/Graphene Heterojunction Devices for High Performance Photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Jinseong; Jeong, Heejeong; Lee, Jaeho; Lee, Kiyoung; Lee, Eun-Kyu; Lee, Sangyeob; Cho, Yeonchoo; Byun, Kyung-Eun; Lee, Chang-Won; Park, Seongjun; Hwang, Sungwoo

    Photodetectors based on vertically stacked graphene heterojunctions have advantages of short transit length for photo-generated carriers and large sensing area, thus implying fast response time and high responsivity. Previously, vertically stacked Graphene (Gr)/Transition-Metal-Dichalcogenide (TMDC)/Gr junctions were introduced for optoelectronic devices, showing high current on and off ratio as well as photoresponsivity. But for high performance photodetectors, both thorough and comparative study in terms of the figures of merit such as photoresponse time and photoresponsivity depending on different TMDC materials is crucial. Here, we report fast response time (28 us) and high responsivity (20 A/W) from Gr/WSe2 and MoS2/Gr, respectively. At the same time, those devices operate as p- and n-type barrier-variable transistors, respectively, being a potential building block for optoelectronic system on a chip.

  20. Vertical distribution of the chloromonad flagellate Heterosigma carterae in columns: Implications for bloom development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hershberger, P.K.; Rensel, J.E.; Matter, A.L.; Taub, F.B.

    1998-01-01

    Blooms of the marine flagellate Heterosigma carterae have been associated with catastrophic fish kills at mariculture facilities around the world. The precise cause(s) of the sudden appearance and disappearance of Heterosigma surface blooms has not been completely described or understood. Environmental data from prior studies of blooms indicate the presence of vertical stratification of the water column that is often induced by freshwater runoff. We report the relatively rapid concentration of Heterosigma cells at the surface of tubes shortly after the addition of distilled water to the surface. This phenomenon of cell concentration in surface waters may partially explain the sudden appearance of Heterosigma cells near the surface and subsequent disappearance when vertical stratification is lost due to turbulence or mixing. The results may lead to bloom mitigation techniques for net pen aquaculture.

  1. Characterization of vertical strain silicon MOSFET incorporating dielectric pocket (SDP-VMOSFET)

    SciTech Connect

    Napiah, Z. A. F. M. E-mail: nazirah6969@gmail.com E-mail: idzdihar@utem.edu.my E-mail: yashidar@yahoo.com Makhtar, N. E-mail: nazirah6969@gmail.com E-mail: idzdihar@utem.edu.my E-mail: yashidar@yahoo.com Othman, M. A. E-mail: nazirah6969@gmail.com E-mail: idzdihar@utem.edu.my E-mail: yashidar@yahoo.com Idris, M. I. E-mail: nazirah6969@gmail.com E-mail: idzdihar@utem.edu.my E-mail: yashidar@yahoo.com Arith, F. E-mail: nazirah6969@gmail.com E-mail: idzdihar@utem.edu.my E-mail: yashidar@yahoo.com Yasin, N. Y. M. E-mail: nazirah6969@gmail.com E-mail: idzdihar@utem.edu.my E-mail: yashidar@yahoo.com Taib, S. N. E-mail: nazirah6969@gmail.com E-mail: idzdihar@utem.edu.my E-mail: yashidar@yahoo.com

    2014-02-24

    The vertical Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect-Transistor (MOSFET) leads to a double channel width that can increase the packaging density. The strained silicon MOSFET was introduced to modify the carrier transport properties of silicon in order to enhance transport of both electrons and holes within strained layer. Dielectric pocket was act to control encroachment of the drain doping into the channel and reduce short channel effects (SCE). SDP-VMOSFET which was a combination of those advantages was proposed to overcome the SCE in term of leakage current, threshold voltage roll-off also Drain Induce Barrier Lowering (DIBL). As a result, SDP-VMOSFET produces a better threshold voltage and DIBL compared to related structures. Meanwhile, it gives slightly increased for leakage current compared to Vertical MOSFET Incorporating Dielectric Pocket. The characteristics of the SDP-VMOSFET are analyzed in order to optimize the performance of the device and leading to the next generation of IC technology.

  2. Mechanistic modeling of the vertical soil organic matter profile in terrestrial ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braakhekke, Maarten; Beer, Christian; Hoosbeek, Marcel; Reichstein, Markus; Kruijt, Bart; Wutzler, Thomas; Kattge, Jens; Schrumpf, Marion; Kabat, Pavel

    2010-05-01

    Modelling and measuring studies of soil organic carbon have traditionally focused on the 30 cm of the soil. In the recent past however, interest in the vertical distribution of soil carbon has increased due to 1) estimates suggesting that the deep soil globally stores a large amount of carbon, and 2) increasing evidence that soil carbon stabilization is be controlled by different processes at different depths that are likely to respond varyingly to future global changes, possibly leading to release of previously stabilized carbon. Therefore the ‘bucket' approach employed in traditional soil carbon models is not sufficient to adequately predict future soil carbon dynamics on long time scales. Furthermore, aggregation of soil temperature and moisture response of the whole profile may lead to biased results on short time scales as well. Hence, a more vertically explicit representation is needed, but development and parameterization of such models is hindered by lack of understanding of the processes involved in SOM profile development. Our study aims to answer the following questions: 1) what are the key driving processes that determine the vertical profile of soil organic matter and their comparative strength? and 2) can we improve soil carbon cycle models by accounting for the vertical SOM profile? In this scope we have developed SOMPROF, a new soil carbon model that dynamically simulates the vertical profile of the SOM fraction in the mineral soil, as well as the storage of organic matter in organic surface horizons L, F and H. The model includes two mechanisms of vertical organic matter transport: 1) diffusion, representing bioturbation (mixing of the soil matrix by soil biota), and 2) advection, representing downward movement with infiltrating water. Furthermore organic matter may be input directly at depth by root turnover. The model includes 5 organic carbon pools that differ with respect to their transport behavior and decomposability. The model has been parameterized for two Europe forests with strongly contrasting soil conditions: Loobos, a young Pinus Sylvestris forest on an acid sandy soil in the Netherlands, and Hainich, an old Fagus Silvatica forest on a basic clay soil in Germany. SOMPROF is well able to reproduce the vertical SOM profiles of both sites, as well as effective turnover rates at different depths in Hainich. However, due to the large number of parameters (10-12) and limited availability of measurements, parameter optimization is somewhat problematic. We therefore implemented a Monte Carlo Markov Chain algorithm to explore the parameters space. Furthermore, we investigated the information content of the available data. This approach allows us to define the type and amount of data needed to constrain the different processes involved in the development of vertical SOM profile.

  3. Free-flight model investigation of a vertical-attitude VTOL fighter with twin vertical tails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grafton, S. B.; Anglin, E. L.

    1975-01-01

    Free-flight tests were conducted in the Langley full-scale tunnel to determine the stability and control characteristics of a vertical-attitude VTOL fighter having twin vertical tails and a pivoted fuselage forebody (nose-cockpit) arrangement. The flight tests included hovering flights and transition flights from hover to conventional forward flight. Static force tests were also made to aid in the analysis of the flight tests. The model exhibited satisfactory stability and control characteristics, and the transition from hovering flight to conventional forward flight was relatively smooth and straightforward.

  4. Highly uniform and vertically aligned SnO2 nanochannel arrays for photovoltaic applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Yup; Kang, Jin Soo; Shin, Junyoung; Kim, Jin; Han, Seung-Joo; Park, Jongwoo; Min, Yo-Sep; Ko, Min Jae; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2015-05-14

    Nanostructured electrodes with vertical alignment have been considered ideal structures for electron transport and interfacial contact with redox electrolytes in photovoltaic devices. Here, we report large-scale vertically aligned SnO2 nanochannel arrays with uniform structures, without lateral cracks fabricated by a modified anodic oxidation process. In the modified process, ultrasonication is utilized to avoid formation of partial compact layers and lateral cracks in the SnO2 nanochannel arrays. Building on this breakthrough, we first demonstrate the photovoltaic application of these vertically aligned SnO2 nanochannel arrays. These vertically aligned arrays were directly and successfully applied in quasi-solid state dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) as photoanodes, yielding reasonable conversion efficiency under back-side illumination. In addition, a significantly short process time (330 s) for achieving the optimal thickness (7.0 μm) and direct utilization of the anodized electrodes enable a simple, rapid and low-cost fabrication process. Furthermore, a TiO2 shell layer was coated on the SnO2 nanochannel arrays by the atomic layer deposition (ALD) process for enhancement of dye-loading and prolonging the electron lifetime in the DSSC. Owing to the presence of the ALD TiO2 layer, the short-circuit photocurrent density (Jsc) and conversion efficiency were increased by 20% and 19%, respectively, compared to those of the DSSC without the ALD TiO2 layer. This study provides valuable insight into the development of efficient SnO2-based photoanodes for photovoltaic application by a simple and rapid fabrication process. PMID:25779772

  5. Vertical Profiling of Air Pollution at RAPCD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newchurch, Michael J.; Fuller, Kirk A.; Bowdle, David A.; Johnson, Steven; Knupp, Kevin; Gillani, Noor; Biazar, Arastoo; Mcnider, Richard T.; Burris, John

    2004-01-01

    The interaction between local and regional pollution levels occurs at the interface of the Planetary Boundary Layer and the Free Troposphere. Measuring the vertical distribution of ozone, aerosols, and winds with high temporal and vertical resolution is essential to diagnose the nature of this interchange and ultimately for accurately forecasting ozone and aerosol pollution levels. The Regional Atmospheric Profiling Center for Discovery, RAPCD, was built and instrumented to address this critical issue. The ozone W DIAL lidar, Nd:YAG aerosol lidar, and 2.1 micron Doppler wind lidar, along with balloon- borne ECC ozonesondes form the core of the W C D instrumentation for addressing this problem. Instrumentation in the associated Mobile Integrated Profiling (MIPS) laboratory includes 91 5Mhz profiler, sodar, and ceilometer. The collocated Applied particle Optics and Radiometry (ApOR) laboratory hosts an FTIR along with MOUDI and optical particle counters. With MODELS-3 analysis by colleagues in the National Space Science and Technology Center on the UAH campus and the co- located National Weather Service Forecasting Office in Huntsville, AL we are developing a unique facility for advancing the state of the science of pollution forecasting.

  6. Vertical alignment of the Gulf Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratsimandresy, A. W.; Pelegrí, J. L.

    2005-08-01

    A historical set of expendable bathythermograph (XBT) and Pegasus sections across the Gulf Stream in natural coordinates is examined to investigate the isopycnic structure of the current off Cape Hatteras. In isopycnic-natural coordinates, the axis of the Stream remains vertically aligned, in contrast to its well-known offshore tilting when plotted as a function of depth. These results are confirmed using the geostrophic velocities obtained from a synthetic temperature field for the Gulf Stream. We prove that a baroclinic current aligned with density cannot be aligned with depth, and vice versa, and we show that the density alignment of the Gulf Stream results from the distortion of the density field and has negligible dependence on the choice of reference level. The invariable character of intense geophysical jets is supported through analogous representations for the upper level atmospheric jet stream in isentropic coordinates. These show that the atmospheric jet, when plotted on to a section normal to the direction of its maximum velocity core, is vertically aligned with potential temperature.

  7. Photoresponse in Graphene Boron Nitride Vertical Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Trond; Ma, Qiong; Lui, Chun-Hung; Nair, Nityan; Gabor, Nathaniel; Young, Andrea; Fang, Wenjing; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Kong, Jing; Gedik, Nuh; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo

    2015-03-01

    Combining two-dimensional materials into vertical heterostructures reveals diverse, intriguing phenomena and provides a novel way of engineering materials with desired electronic properties. Placing graphene on hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) has given particularly interesting results, including enhanced mobility, opening of a band gap, and highly controllable photo-induced doping. We explore the photoresponse of vertical graphene-hBN-graphene heterostructures in a high electronic temperature regime where thermionic emission dominates. Near the charge neutral point, we observe a pronounced conductance peak, which we attribute to a cooling bottleneck that appears at low carrier density, thus suggesting hot carrier enhanced thermionic emission. To further investigate the mechanism by which current is generated, we conduct two-pulse correlation measurements and study the temporal dynamics of the system. We observe a positive correlation, implying that the hot carriers thermalize before crossing the hBN barrier. Finally, we propose an advanced, modified two-temperature model, which allows for numerical simulations that are consistent with our measurements.

  8. Control system for a vertical axis windmill

    DOEpatents

    Brulle, Robert V.

    1983-10-18

    A vertical axis windmill having a rotating structure is provided with a series of articulated vertical blades whose positions are controlled to maintain a constant RPM for the rotating structure, when wind speed is sufficient. A microprocessor controller is used to process information on wind speed, wind direction and RPM of the rotating structure to develop an electrical signal for establishing blade position. The preferred embodiment of the invention, when connected to a utility grid, is designed to generate 40 kilowatts of power when exposed to a 20 mile per hour wind. The control system for the windmill includes electrical blade actuators that modulate the blades of the rotating structure. Blade modulation controls the blade angle of attack, which in turn controls the RPM of the rotor. In the preferred embodiment, the microprocessor controller provides the operation logic and control functions. A wind speed sensor provides inputs to start or stop the windmill, and a wind direction sensor is used to keep the blade flip region at 90.degree. and 270.degree. to the wind. The control system is designed to maintain constant rotor RPM when wind speed is between 10 and 40 miles per hour.

  9. Filtering using variable order vertical derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, G. R. J.; Cowan, D. R.

    2004-06-01

    Vertical derivatives of aeromagnetic and gravity datasets are routinely used as an aid to the interpretation process because they enhance detail and sharpen geophysical anomalies. Since they are a form of high-pass filter they also have the undesirable property of enhancing noise. Traditionally, the second order vertical derivative of a dataset would be calculated, and if this proved too noisy then the first-order derivative map would be used. Recently, much interest has been shown in the use of derivatives of fractional order to achieve a derivative map that contains the correct balance between the enhancement of signal and noise. If the data set being processed has a frequency content which does not vary spatially by a great amount this process can be effective. However, if this is not the situation then the result is a map where some portions are too noisy for convenient interpretation, whereas other portions are too smooth and show little detail. The use of derivatives whose order varies across the dataset in a manner based on the local standard deviation of the data proved effective in resolving this problem. The method is demonstrated on aeromagnetic data from Botswana and on elevation data from South Africa.

  10. Seismic Behaviour of Vertical Mass Isolated Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Nekooei, M.; Ziyaeifar, M.

    2008-07-08

    In this paper, the seismic behaviour of vertical mass isolated structures against the earthquake is studied. These structures are assumed to be consisted of two subsystems. Mass subsystem possesses low lateral stiffness but carries the major part of mass of the system. Stiffness subsystem, however, controls the deformation of the mass subsystem and attributes with much higher stiffness. The isolator layer is, therefore, located in between the mass and the stiffness subsystems and assumed to be a viscous damper layer. The analytical model used for this investigation is a dual mass-spring model which is an extended form of the three element Maxwell model. In this study, the ability of mass isolation techniques in reducing earthquake effects on buildings with two approaches, parametric and numerical approaches, is shown. In the parametric approach, by definition an isolation factor for structure and determination the dynamic characteristics of system, the relative optimum value of the isolator damping coefficient is obtained. The results provide an insight on role of relative stiffness and mass ratio of the two subsystems. Finally, in the numerical approach, the spectral responses of these structures due to the earthquake are investigated. The results show a noticeable decrease in earthquake input force to vertical mass isolated structures in comparison with non-isolated structures.

  11. Determinants of Arbovirus Vertical Transmission in Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Lequime, Sebastian; Paul, Richard E.; Lambrechts, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Vertical transmission (VT) and horizontal transmission (HT) of pathogens refer to parental and non-parental chains of host-to-host transmission. Combining HT with VT enlarges considerably the range of ecological conditions in which a pathogen can persist, but the factors governing the relative frequency of each transmission mode are poorly understood for pathogens with mixed-mode transmission. Elucidating these factors is particularly important for understanding the epidemiology of arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) of public health significance. Arboviruses are primarily maintained by HT between arthropod vectors and vertebrate hosts in nature, but are occasionally transmitted vertically in the vector population from an infected female to her offspring, which is a proposed maintenance mechanism during adverse conditions for HT. Here, we review over a century of published primary literature on natural and experimental VT, which we previously assembled into large databases, to identify biological factors associated with the efficiency of arbovirus VT in mosquito vectors. Using a robust statistical framework, we highlight a suite of environmental, taxonomic, and physiological predictors of arbovirus VT. These novel insights contribute to refine our understanding of strategies employed by arboviruses to persist in the environment and cause substantial public health concern. They also provide hypotheses on the biological processes underlying the relative VT frequency for pathogens with mixed-mode transmission that can be tested empirically. PMID:27171170

  12. Vertical Slot Convection: A linear study

    SciTech Connect

    McAllister, A.; Steinolfson, R.; Tajima, T.

    1992-11-01

    The linear stability properties of fluid convection in a vertical slot were studied. We use a Fourier-Chebychev decomposition was used to set up the linear eigenvalue problems for the Vertical Slot Convection and Benard problems. The eigenvalues, neutral stability curves, and critical point values of the Grashof number, G, and the wavenumber were determined. Plots of the real and imaginary parts of the eigenvalues as functions of G and {alpha} are given for a wide range of the Prandtl number, Pr, and special note is made of the complex mode that becomes linearly unstable above Pr {approximately} 12.5. A discussion comparing different special cases facilitates the physical understanding of the VSC equations, especially the interaction of the shear-flow and buoyancy induced physics. Making use of the real and imaginary eigenvalues and the phase properties of the eigenmodes, the eigenmodes were characterized. One finds that the mode structure becomes progressively simpler with increasing Pr, with the greatest complexity in the mid ranges where the terms in the heat equation are of roughly the same size.

  13. Vertical Slot Convection: A linear study

    SciTech Connect

    McAllister, A. ); Steinolfson, R. ); Tajima, T. . Inst. for Fusion Studies)

    1992-11-01

    The linear stability properties of fluid convection in a vertical slot were studied. We use a Fourier-Chebychev decomposition was used to set up the linear eigenvalue problems for the Vertical Slot Convection and Benard problems. The eigenvalues, neutral stability curves, and critical point values of the Grashof number, G, and the wavenumber were determined. Plots of the real and imaginary parts of the eigenvalues as functions of G and [alpha] are given for a wide range of the Prandtl number, Pr, and special note is made of the complex mode that becomes linearly unstable above Pr [approximately] 12.5. A discussion comparing different special cases facilitates the physical understanding of the VSC equations, especially the interaction of the shear-flow and buoyancy induced physics. Making use of the real and imaginary eigenvalues and the phase properties of the eigenmodes, the eigenmodes were characterized. One finds that the mode structure becomes progressively simpler with increasing Pr, with the greatest complexity in the mid ranges where the terms in the heat equation are of roughly the same size.

  14. Spaceborne Radar Measurements of Rainfall Vertical Velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Im, Eastwood; Tanelli, Simone; Giuli, Dino; Durden, Stephen L.; Facheris, Luca

    2000-01-01

    This paper studies the performance of a spaceborne precipitation radar in measuring vertical Doppler velocity of rainfall. As far as a downward pointing precipitation radar is concerned, one of the major problems affecting Doppler measurement at the nadir direction arises from the Non-Uniform Beam-Filling effect (NUBF). That is, when significant variation in rain rate is present within the radar IFOV (Instrument Field of View) in the along track direction. the Doppler shift caused by the radial component of the horizontal speed of the satellite is weighted differently among the portions of IFOV. The effects of this non-uniform weighting may dominate any other contribution. Under this condition, shape, average value and width of the Doppler spectrum may not be directly correlated with the vertical velocity of the precipitating particles. However, by using an inversion technique which over-samples the radar measurements in the along track direction, we show that the shift due to NUBF can be evaluated, and that the NUBF induced errors on average fall speed can be reduced.

  15. Control system for a vertical axis windmill

    SciTech Connect

    Brulle, R.V.

    1983-10-18

    A vertical axis windmill having a rotating structure is provided with a series of articulated vertical blades whose positions are controlled to maintain a constant RPM for the rotating structure, when wind speed is sufficient. A microprocessor controller is used to process information on wind speed, wind direction and RPM of the rotating structure to develop an electrical signal for establishing blade position. The preferred embodiment of the invention, when connected to a utility grid, is designed to generate 40 kilowatts of power when exposed to a 20 mile per hour wind. The control system for the windmill includes electrical blade actuators that modulate the blades of the rotating structure. Blade modulation controls the blade angle of attack, which in turn controls the RPM of the rotor. In the preferred embodiment, the microprocessor controller provides the operation logic and control functions. A wind speed sensor provides inputs to start or stop the windmill, and a wind direction sensor is used to keep the blade flip region at 90/sup 0/ and 270/sup 0/ to the wind. The control system is designed to maintain constant rotor RPM when wind speed is between 10 and 40 miles per hour.

  16. Experimental gas-solid vertical transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Kuo Ming

    1987-05-01

    Gas-solid transport in dilute and dense phase conveying is studied. A new experimental system for vertical pneumatic conveying incorporates a screw feeder for dilute transport and an L-valve for dense flow. For measuring solid volume fractions a novel method using an x-ray densitometer was developed. The pressure in the system was measured using a strip chart recorder (SCR) and a manometer. The solids flux was estimated by collecting the particles from the system for a known time. The porosity and pressure drop data in the fully developed region were translated into drag coefficients and friction factors. The drag coefficients are in reasonable agreement with literature values. The friction factors with the wall were sometimes negative, reflecting downward flow, as observed in two-dimensional studies. Four available hydrodynamic models for vertical pneumatic conveying were used to predict the porosity and the pressure for the experimental conditions. Experimental data for porosity and pressure agree well with theoretical predictions. However, the predictions from the relative velocity model were in the best agreement for pressure drop values.

  17. High vertical resolution crosswell seismic imaging

    DOEpatents

    Lazaratos, Spyridon K.

    1999-12-07

    A method for producing high vertical resolution seismic images from crosswell data is disclosed. In accordance with one aspect of the disclosure, a set of vertically spaced, generally horizontally extending continuous layers and associated nodes are defined within a region between two boreholes. The specific number of nodes is selected such that the value of a particular characteristic of the subterranean region at each of the nodes is one which can be determined from the seismic data. Once values are established at the nodes, values of the particular characteristic are assigned to positions between the node points of each layer based on the values at node within that layer and without regard to the values at node points within any other layer. A seismic map is produced using the node values and the assigned values therebetween. In accordance with another aspect of the disclosure, an approximate model of the region is established using direct arrival traveltime data. Thereafter, the approximate model is adjusted using reflected arrival data. In accordance with still another aspect of the disclosure, correction is provided for well deviation. An associated technique which provides improvements in ray tracing is also disclosed.

  18. A sensor fusion method for tracking vertical velocity and height based on inertial and barometric altimeter measurements.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, Angelo Maria; Genovese, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    A sensor fusion method was developed for vertical channel stabilization by fusing inertial measurements from an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and pressure altitude measurements from a barometric altimeter integrated in the same device (baro-IMU). An Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) estimated the quaternion from the sensor frame to the navigation frame; the sensed specific force was rotated into the navigation frame and compensated for gravity, yielding the vertical linear acceleration; finally, a complementary filter driven by the vertical linear acceleration and the measured pressure altitude produced estimates of height and vertical velocity. A method was also developed to condition the measured pressure altitude using a whitening filter, which helped to remove the short-term correlation due to environment-dependent pressure changes from raw pressure altitude. The sensor fusion method was implemented to work on-line using data from a wireless baro-IMU and tested for the capability of tracking low-frequency small-amplitude vertical human-like motions that can be critical for stand-alone inertial sensor measurements. Validation tests were performed in different experimental conditions, namely no motion, free-fall motion, forced circular motion and squatting. Accurate on-line tracking of height and vertical velocity was achieved, giving confidence to the use of the sensor fusion method for tracking typical vertical human motions: velocity Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) was in the range 0.04-0.24 m/s; height RMSE was in the range 5-68 cm, with statistically significant performance gains when the whitening filter was used by the sensor fusion method to track relatively high-frequency vertical motions. PMID:25061835

  19. A Sensor Fusion Method for Tracking Vertical Velocity and Height Based on Inertial and Barometric Altimeter Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Sabatini, Angelo Maria; Genovese, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    A sensor fusion method was developed for vertical channel stabilization by fusing inertial measurements from an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and pressure altitude measurements from a barometric altimeter integrated in the same device (baro-IMU). An Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) estimated the quaternion from the sensor frame to the navigation frame; the sensed specific force was rotated into the navigation frame and compensated for gravity, yielding the vertical linear acceleration; finally, a complementary filter driven by the vertical linear acceleration and the measured pressure altitude produced estimates of height and vertical velocity. A method was also developed to condition the measured pressure altitude using a whitening filter, which helped to remove the short-term correlation due to environment-dependent pressure changes from raw pressure altitude. The sensor fusion method was implemented to work on-line using data from a wireless baro-IMU and tested for the capability of tracking low-frequency small-amplitude vertical human-like motions that can be critical for stand-alone inertial sensor measurements. Validation tests were performed in different experimental conditions, namely no motion, free-fall motion, forced circular motion and squatting. Accurate on-line tracking of height and vertical velocity was achieved, giving confidence to the use of the sensor fusion method for tracking typical vertical human motions: velocity Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) was in the range 0.04–0.24 m/s; height RMSE was in the range 5–68 cm, with statistically significant performance gains when the whitening filter was used by the sensor fusion method to track relatively high-frequency vertical motions. PMID:25061835

  20. Intestinal Failure (Short Bowel Syndrome)

    MedlinePlus

    Intestinal Failure (Short Bowel Syndrome) What is intestinal failure? Intestinal failure occurs when a significant portion of the small intestine is not present or does not function normally. This can occur if a large part of the small ...

  1. Palliative care - shortness of breath

    MedlinePlus

    ... to control shortness of breath: Call your doctor, palliative care team, or hospice nurse for advice Call 911 ... Bicanovsky L. Comfort care: symptom control in the dying. In: Walsh ... . 1st ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2008:chap 181.

  2. Dechirper wakefields for short bunches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bane, Karl; Stupakov, Gennady

    2016-06-01

    In previous work (Bane and Stupakov, 2015 [1]) general expressions, valid for arbitrary bunch lengths, were derived for the wakefields of corrugated structures with flat geometry, such as is used in the RadiaBeam/LCLS dechirper. However, the bunch at the end of linac-based X-ray FELs-like the LCLS-is extremely short, and for short bunches the wakes can be considerably simplified. In this work, we first derive analytical approximations to the short-range wakes. These are generalized wakes, in the sense that their validity is not limited to a small neighborhood of the symmetry axis, but rather extends to arbitrary transverse offsets of driving and test particles. The validity of these short-bunch wakes holds not only for the corrugated structure, but rather for any flat structure whose beam-cavity interaction can be described by a surface impedance. We use these wakes to obtain, for a short bunch passing through a dechirper: estimates of the energy loss as function of gap, the transverse kick as a function of beam offset, the slice energy spread increase, and the emittance growth. In the Appendix, a more accurate derivation-than that is found in Bane and Stupakov (2015) [1]-of the arbitrary bunch length wakes is performed; we find full agreement with the earlier results, provided the bunches are short compared to the dechirper gap, which is normally the regime of interest.

  3. Rolling Motion of a Ball Spinning About a Near-Vertical Axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2012-01-01

    A ball that is projected forward without spin on a horizontal surface will slide for a short distance before it starts rolling. Sliding friction acts to decrease the translation speed v and it acts to increase the rotation speed ω. When v = Rω, where R is the ball radius, the ball will start rolling and the friction force drops almost to zero since the contact point at the bottom of the ball comes to rest on the surface. The coefficient of rolling friction is much smaller than that for sliding friction. A different situation arises if the ball is projected forward while it is spinning about a vertical or near vertical axis. The latter situation arises in many ball sports. It arises if a player attempts to curve a ball down a bowling alley, or when a billiards player imparts sidespin or "English" to a ball,2 and it can arise in golf if a player strikes a ball with a putter at a point well away from the middle of the putter head. The situation also arises in the game of curling,3 although in that case the object that is projected is a cylindrical rock rather than a spherical ball, and it arises in tennis when a ball lands on the court spinning about a near vertical axis, as it does in both a slice serve and a kick serve. In a slice serve, the axis is almost vertical. In a kick serve, the axis is tilted about 30 degrees away from the vertical in order to increase the amount of topspin.4

  4. Predicting Vertical Jump Height from Bar Velocity

    PubMed Central

    García-Ramos, Amador; Štirn, Igor; Padial, Paulino; Argüelles-Cienfuegos, Javier; De la Fuente, Blanca; Strojnik, Vojko; Feriche, Belén

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the use of maximum (Vmax) and final propulsive phase (FPV) bar velocity to predict jump height in the weighted jump squat. FPV was defined as the velocity reached just before bar acceleration was lower than gravity (-9.81 m·s-2). Vertical jump height was calculated from the take-off velocity (Vtake-off) provided by a force platform. Thirty swimmers belonging to the National Slovenian swimming team performed a jump squat incremental loading test, lifting 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of body weight in a Smith machine. Jump performance was simultaneously monitored using an AMTI portable force platform and a linear velocity transducer attached to the barbell. Simple linear regression was used to estimate jump height from the Vmax and FPV recorded by the linear velocity transducer. Vmax (y = 16.577x - 16.384) was able to explain 93% of jump height variance with a standard error of the estimate of 1.47 cm. FPV (y = 12.828x - 6.504) was able to explain 91% of jump height variance with a standard error of the estimate of 1.66 cm. Despite that both variables resulted to be good predictors, heteroscedasticity in the differences between FPV and Vtake-off was observed (r2 = 0.307), while the differences between Vmax and Vtake-off were homogenously distributed (r2 = 0.071). These results suggest that Vmax is a valid tool for estimating vertical jump height in a loaded jump squat test performed in a Smith machine. Key points Vertical jump height in the loaded jump squat can be estimated with acceptable precision from the maximum bar velocity recorded by a linear velocity transducer. The relationship between the point at which bar acceleration is less than -9.81 m·s-2 and the real take-off is affected by the velocity of movement. Mean propulsive velocity recorded by a linear velocity transducer does not appear to be optimal to monitor ballistic exercise performance. PMID:25983572

  5. Vertical and Interfacial Transport in Wetlands (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Variano, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this work is to understand the fluxes connecting the water column, substrate, and atmosphere in wetland environments. To do this, analytical, numerical, and laboratory models have been used to quantify the hydrodynamic contributions to vertical fluxes. A key question is whether the hydrodynamic transport can be modeled as a diffusivity, and, if so, what the vertical structure of this diffusivity is. This question will be addressed in a number of flow types and for a number of fluxes. The fluxes of interest are heat, sediment, dissolved gases (such as methane and oxygen) and other dissolved solutes (such as nutrients and pollutants). The flows of interest include: unidirectional current, reversing flow (under waves, seiches, and tides), wind-sheared surface flows, and thermal convection. Rain and bioturbation can be important, but are not considered in the modeling work discussed herein. Specifically, we will present results on gas transport at wind-sheared free surface, sediment transport in unidirectional flow, and heat transfer in an oscillating flow cause by a seiche. All three of these will be used to consider the question of appropriate analytical models for vertical transport. The analytic models considered here are all 1D models that assume homogeneity in the horizontal plane. The numerical models use finite element methods and resolve the flow around individual vegetation stems in an idealized geometry. Laboratory models discussed herein also use an idealized geometry. Vegetation is represented by an array of cylinders, whose geometry is modeled after Scirpus spp. wetlands in Northern California. The laboratory model is constructed in a way that allows optical access to the flow, even in dense vegetation and far from boundaries. This is accomplished by using fluoropolymer plastics to construct vegetation models. The optical access allows us to employ particle image velocimetry (PIV) and planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) to measure the velocity and scalar fields, respectively. To study sediment transport, an additional step is needed. Idealized sediment grains are manufactured, again using fluoropolymers. This allows the sediment and fluid phase to be resolved simultaneously, and the velocities of each to be determined independently of the other. The use of fluoropolymers means that the laboratory imaging techniques do not suffer from blockage during laser light delivery or during image capture by digital cameras. Cameras are paired and run in stereoscopic mode to allow three-dimensional velocities to be determined. This is important given the 3D nature of flow through vegetation. Current results from ongoing laboratory, field, and modeling efforts will be discussed, as well as the upcoming steps.

  6. Predicting vertical jump height from bar velocity.

    PubMed

    García-Ramos, Amador; Štirn, Igor; Padial, Paulino; Argüelles-Cienfuegos, Javier; De la Fuente, Blanca; Strojnik, Vojko; Feriche, Belén

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the use of maximum (Vmax) and final propulsive phase (FPV) bar velocity to predict jump height in the weighted jump squat. FPV was defined as the velocity reached just before bar acceleration was lower than gravity (-9.81 m·s(-2)). Vertical jump height was calculated from the take-off velocity (Vtake-off) provided by a force platform. Thirty swimmers belonging to the National Slovenian swimming team performed a jump squat incremental loading test, lifting 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of body weight in a Smith machine. Jump performance was simultaneously monitored using an AMTI portable force platform and a linear velocity transducer attached to the barbell. Simple linear regression was used to estimate jump height from the Vmax and FPV recorded by the linear velocity transducer. Vmax (y = 16.577x - 16.384) was able to explain 93% of jump height variance with a standard error of the estimate of 1.47 cm. FPV (y = 12.828x - 6.504) was able to explain 91% of jump height variance with a standard error of the estimate of 1.66 cm. Despite that both variables resulted to be good predictors, heteroscedasticity in the differences between FPV and Vtake-off was observed (r(2) = 0.307), while the differences between Vmax and Vtake-off were homogenously distributed (r(2) = 0.071). These results suggest that Vmax is a valid tool for estimating vertical jump height in a loaded jump squat test performed in a Smith machine. Key pointsVertical jump height in the loaded jump squat can be estimated with acceptable precision from the maximum bar velocity recorded by a linear velocity transducer.The relationship between the point at which bar acceleration is less than -9.81 m·s(-2) and the real take-off is affected by the velocity of movement.Mean propulsive velocity recorded by a linear velocity transducer does not appear to be optimal to monitor ballistic exercise performance. PMID:25983572

  7. Design of a vertically coupled liquid-crystal long-range plasmonic optical switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zografopoulos, Dimitrios C.; Beccherelli, Romeo

    2013-03-01

    An optical switch based on liquid-crystal (LC) tunable long-range metal stripe waveguides is proposed and theoretically investigated. A nematic liquid crystal layer placed between a vertical configuration consisting of two gold stripes is shown to allow for the extensive electro-optic tuning of the coupler's waveguiding characteristics. Rigorous liquid-crystal switching studies are coupled with the investigation of the optical properties of the proposed plasmonic structure, taking into account different excitation conditions and the impact of LC-scattering losses. A directional coupler optical switch is demonstrated, which combines low power consumption, low cross-talk, short coupling lengths, along with sufficiently reduced insertion losses.

  8. MLS vertical guidance and navigation for a STOL airplane landing on an elevated STOLport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, D. N., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    In contrast to CTOL landing operations, STOL airplanes landing on short STOLport runways typically begin the flare maneuver before reaching the runway surface. Vertical guidance procedures were developed to allow an autoland flight control system for a STOL airplane to use Microwave Landing System (MLS) signals as altitude and sink rate references for flare initiation, with a transition to radar altimeter after the airplane is over the runway. The implementation has minimum impact on the control system and landing performance. Data are presented which show validation of the concepts in a simulator.

  9. Effect of vertical active vibration isolation on tracking performance and on ride qualities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimasi, F. P.; Allen, R. E.; Calcaterra, P. C.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation to determine the effect on pilot performance and comfort of an active vibration isolation system for a commercial transport pilot seat is reported. The test setup consisted of: a hydraulic shaker which produced random vertical vibration inputs; the active vibration isolation system; the pilot seat; the pilot control wheel and column; the side-arm controller; and a two-axis compensatory tracking task. The effects of various degrees of pilot isolation on short-term (two-minute) tracking performance and comfort were determined.

  10. Artificial gravity: head movements during short-radius centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, L. R.; Hecht, H.; Lyne, L. E.; Sienko, K. H.; Cheung, C. C.; Kavelaars, J.

    2001-01-01

    Short-radius centrifugation is a potential countermeasure to long-term weightlessness. Unfortunately, head movements in a rotating environment induce serious discomfort, non-compensatory vestibulo-ocular reflexes, and subjective illusions of body tilt. In two experiments we investigated the effects of pitch and yaw head movements in participants placed supine on a rotating bed with their head at the center of rotation, feet at the rim. The vast majority of participants experienced motion sickness, inappropriate vertical nystagmus and illusory tilt and roll as predicted by a semicircular canal model. However, a small but significant number of the 28 participants experienced tilt in the predicted plane but in the opposite direction. Heart rate was elevated following one-second duration head turns. Significant adaptation occurred following a series of head turns in the light. Vertical nystagmus, motion sickness and illusory tilt all decreased with adaptation. Consequences for artificial gravity produced by short-radius centrifuges as a countermeasure are discussed. Grant numbers: NCC 9-58. c 2001. Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Trends in the Vertical Distribution of Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randel, William J.; Stolarski, Richard S.; Cunnold, Derek M.; Logan, Jennifer A.; Newchurch, M. J.

    1998-01-01

    Recent reanalyses of satellite, ground-based and balloon measurements allow updated estimates of trends in the vertical profile of ozone during 1980-96. The results show overall consistency between several independent measurement systems, particularly for northern hemisphere mid-latitudes where most ground-based measurements are made. Combined trend estimates over these latitudes show statistically significant negative trends at all altitudes between 10 and 45 km, with two local maxima: -7.4 +/- 2.0%/decade at 40 km and -7.6 +/- 4.6%/decade at 15 km altitude. There is a strong seasonal variation in trends over northern mid-latitudes in the altitude range of 10- 18 km. The profile trends are in quantitative agreement with independently measured trends in column ozone.

  12. Flow Regimes in Vertical Pneumatic Conveying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, S. B.; Yu, A. B.; Zou, Z. S.

    2009-06-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of the flow regimes in a vertical pipeline by a combined approach of discrete element model for solid phase and computational fluid dynamics model for gas phase. Two typical cases, i.e. the transports of glass beads when Solid Loading Ratio (SLR) = 0.5˜3.4 and polyethylene pellets when SLR = 7.3-33.0 are considered. The results show that in both cases, the phase diagrams featured with the flow transition between the dense-phase flow and dilute-phase flow can be produced. In the transport of glass beads, only the dispersed flow regime is observed. However, both the slug flow regime and the dispersed flow regime are observed in the transport of polyethylene pellets. These results satisfactorily agree with the experiments.

  13. Track of Right-Wheel Drag (Vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 360-degree panorama combines several frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the rover's 313th martian day (Nov. 19, 2004). The site, labeled Spirit site 93, is in the 'Columbia Hills' inside Gusev Crater. The rover tracks point westward. Spirit had driven eastward, in reverse and dragging its right front wheel, for about 30 meters (100 feet) on the day the picture was taken. Driving backwards while dragging that wheel is a precautionary strategy to extend the usefulness of the wheel for when it is most needed, because it has developed more friction than the other wheels. The right-hand track in this look backwards shows how the dragging disturbed the soil. This view is presented in a vertical projection with geometric seam correction.

  14. Opportunity's Surroundings on Sol 1818 (Vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,818th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (March 5, 2009). South is at the center; north at both ends.

    This view is presented as a vertical projection with geometric seam correction. North is at the top.

    The rover had driven 80.3 meters (263 feet) southward earlier on that sol. Tracks from the drive recede northward in this view.

    The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and lighter-toned bedrock.

  15. Opportunity's Surroundings on Sol 1798 (Vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 180-degree view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,798th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (Feb. 13, 2009). North is on top.

    This view is presented as a vertical projection with geometric seam correction.

    The rover had driven 111 meters (364 feet) southward on the preceding sol. Tracks from that drive recede northward in this view. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

    The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and lighter-toned bedrock.

  16. Opportunity's Surroundings After Sol 1820 Drive (Vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,820th to 1,822nd Martian days, or sols, of Opportunity's surface mission (March 7 to 9, 2009).

    This view is presented as a vertical projection with geometric seam correction. North is at the top.

    The rover had driven 20.6 meters toward the northwest on Sol 1820 before beginning to take the frames in this view. Tracks from that drive recede southwestward. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

    The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and small exposures of lighter-toned bedrock.

  17. Vertical axis wind turbine control strategy

    SciTech Connect

    McNerney, G.M.

    1981-08-01

    Early expensive in automatic operation of the Sandia 17-m vertical axis research wind turbine (VAWT) has demonstrated the need for a systematic study of control algorithms. To this end, a computer model has been developed that uses actual wind time series and turbine performance data to calculate the power produced by the Sandia 17-m VAWT operating in automatic control. The model has been used to investigate the influence of starting algorithms on annual energy production. The results indicate that, depending on turbine and local wind characteristics, a bad choice of a control algorithm can significantly reduce overall energy production. The model can be used to select control algorithms and threshold parameters that maximize long-term energy production. An attempt has been made to generalize these results from local site and turbine characteristics to obtain general guidelines for control algorithm design.

  18. Stability of vertical and horizontal axis Levitrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelis, M. M.; Taylor, D. B.

    2015-11-01

    The stability of the new horizontal axis Levitron3 is compared with that of the vertical axis device. The rotation frequency ranges are similar because they are determined by the same precessional micro-trap, for which some theory is given. But the macro-trap of the horizontal axis system gives it far greater mechanical stability. Field-line studies allow this to be more easily visualized. The greater stability allows for educational experiments which could only be contemplated with the old Levitron: driven precession and nutation and motion along the field lines. These experiments illustrate some very fundamental space dynamics and several other topics. The enhanced stability may also lead to electro-mechanical applications.

  19. Multichannel Wiener deconvolution of vertical seismic profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Haldorsen, J.B.U. ); Miller, D.E. ); Walsh, J.J. )

    1994-10-01

    The authors describe a technique for performing optimal, least-squares deconvolution of vertical seismic profile (VSP) data. The method is a two-step process that involves (1) estimating the source signature and (2) applying a least-squares optimum deconvolution operator that minimizes the noise not coherent with the source signature estimate. The optimum inverse problem, formulated in the frequency domain, gives as a solution an operator that can be interpreted as a simple inverse to the estimated aligned signature multiplied by semblance across the array. An application to a zero-offset VSP acquired with a dynamite source shows the effectiveness of the operator in attaining the two conflicting goals of adaptively spiking the effective source signature and minimizing the noise. Signature design for seismic surveys could benefit from observing that the optimum deconvolution operator gives a flat signal spectrum if and only if the seismic source has the same amplitude spectrum as the noise.

  20. Development of Vertical Cable Seismic System (2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakawa, E.; Murakami, F.; Tsukahara, H.; Ishikawa, K.

    2012-12-01

    The vertical cable seismic is one of the reflection seismic methods. It uses hydrophone arrays vertically moored from the seafloor to record acoustic waves generated by surface, deep-towed or ocean bottom sources. Analyzing the reflections from the sub-seabed, we could look into the subsurface structure. This type of survey is generally called VCS (Vertical Cable Seismic). Because VCS is an efficient high-resolution 3D seismic survey method for a spatially-bounded area, we proposed the method for the hydrothermal deposit survey tool development program that the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) started in 2009. We are now developing a VCS system, including not only data acquisition hardware but data processing and analysis technique. Our first experiment of VCS surveys has been carried out in Lake Biwa, JAPAN in November 2009 for a feasibility study. Prestack depth migration is applied to the 3D VCS data to obtain a high quality 3D depth volume. Based on the results from the feasibility study, we have developed two autonomous recording VCS systems. After we carried out a trial experiment in the actual ocean at a water depth of about 400m and we carried out the second VCS survey at Iheya Knoll with a deep-towed source. In this survey, we could establish the procedures for the deployment/recovery of the system and could examine the locations and the fluctuations of the vertical cables at a water depth of around 1000m. The acquired VCS data clearly shows the reflections from the sub-seafloor. Through the experiment, we could confirm that our VCS system works well even in the severe circumstances around the locations of seafloor hydrothermal deposits. We have carried out two field surveys in 2011. One is a 3D survey with a boomer for a high-resolution surface source and the other one for an actual field survey in the Izena Cauldron an active hydrothermal area in the Okinawa Trough. Through these surveys, we have confirmed that the uncertainty in the locations of the source and of the hydrophones in water could lower the quality of subsurface image. It is, therefore, strongly necessary to develop a total survey system that assures an accurate positioning and a deployment techniques. In case of shooting on sea surface, GPS navigation system are available, but in case of deep-towed source or ocean bottom source, the accuracy of shot position with SSBL/USBL is not sufficient for the very high-resolution imaging as requested for the SMS survey. We will incorporate the accurate LBL navigation systems with VCs. The LBL navigation system has been developed by IIS of the University of Tokyo. The error is estimated less than 10cm at the water depth of 3000m. Another approach is that the shot points can be calculated using the first break of the VCS after the VCS locations are estimated by slant-ranging from the sea surface. Our VCS system has been designed as a survey tool for hydrothermal deposit, but it will be also applicable for deep water site surveys or geohazard assessment such as active faults.

  1. Heat Convection in a Vertical Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisserand, Jean-Christophe; Creyssels, Mathieu; Gibert, Mathieu; Castaing, Bernard; Chillà, Francesca

    2008-11-01

    The Rayleigh-Benard flow, heat convection between two horizontal plates at different temperatures, has been the most studied system of thermal convection. Recent controversies stressed the interest of a better knowledge of the bulk flow. However, in this situation, the heat transfer is mainly controlled by the neighborhood of the plates. Therefore, we had to build a vertical long channel in which the flow forgets the plates. In this configuration, the flow is, either globally ascending in the left part, and descending in the right one, or the opposite. The paper focuses in a first part on the study of these flow-reversals thanks to correlation functions and particle image velocimetry. In a second part, the paper gives an interpretation of results in terms of velocity of plumes.

  2. Oceanography. Vertical mixing in the ocean.

    PubMed

    Webb, D J; Suginohara, N

    2001-01-01

    The thermohaline circulation of the ocean results primarily from downwelling at sites in the Nordic and Labrador Seas and upwelling throughout the rest of the ocean. The latter is often described as being due to breaking internal waves. Here we reconcile the difference between theoretical and observed estimates of vertical mixing in the deep ocean by presenting a revised view of the thermohaline circulation, which allows for additional upwelling in the Southern Ocean and the separation of the North Atlantic Deep Water cell from the Antarctic Bottom Water cell. The changes also mean that much less wind and tidal energy needs to be dissipated in the deep ocean than was originally thought. PMID:11343103

  3. Ultrahigh efficiencies in vertical epitaxial heterostructure architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fafard, S.; York, M. C. A.; Proulx, F.; Valdivia, C. E.; Wilkins, M. M.; Arès, R.; Aimez, V.; Hinzer, K.; Masson, D. P.

    2016-02-01

    Optical to electrical power converting semiconductor devices were achieved with breakthrough performance by designing a Vertical Epitaxial Heterostructure Architecture. The devices are featuring modeled and measured conversion efficiencies greater than 65%. The ultrahigh conversion efficiencies were obtained by monolithically integrating several thin GaAs photovoltaic junctions tailored with submicron absorption thicknesses and grown in a single crystal by epitaxy. The heterostructures that were engineered with a number N of such ultrathin junctions yielded an optimal external quantum efficiencies approaching 100%/N. The heterostructures are capable of output voltages that are multiple times larger than the corresponding photovoltage of the input light. The individual nanoscale junctions are each generating up to ˜1.2 V of output voltage when illuminated in the infrared. We compare the optoelectronic properties of phototransducers prepared with designs having 5 to 12 junctions and that are exhibiting voltage outputs between >5 V and >14 V.

  4. Neck after vertical hemilaryngectomy: computed tomographic study

    SciTech Connect

    DiSantis, D.J.; Balfe, D.M.; Hayden, R.; Sessions, D.; Sagel, S.S.

    1984-06-01

    Computed tomographic scans in 22 postoperative vertical hemilaryngectomy patients were analyzed retrospectively to determine the normal postoperative appearance and to evaluate the role of CT in assessing recurrent neoplasm. Twelve patients without clinical evidence of recurrence illustrated the normal postoperative changes. In the six patients with recurrent neoplasm, the CT manifestations included increased width of the remaining true vocal cord, convexity of the surgically formed pseudocord at glottic level, subglottic tumor, and extralaryngeal neck masses. Recurrence was mimicked in four patients by bulky soft tissue at the endolaryngeal operative site at both CT and laryngoscopy. CT supplemented the physical examination and indirect laryngoscopy, providing information regarding the presence and extent of tumor that was useful in planning the mode or scope of subsequent therapy.

  5. Dynamic soil pressures on rigid vertical walls

    SciTech Connect

    Veletsos, A.S.; Younan, A.H. )

    1992-12-01

    A critical evaluation is made of the dynamic pressures and the associated forces induced by ground shaking on a rigid, straight, vertical wall retaining a semi-infinite, uniform viscoelastic layer of constant thickness. The effects of both harmonic and earthquake-induced excitations are examined. Simple approximate expressions for the responses of the system are developed, and comprehensive numerical data are presented which elucidate the effects and relative importance of the various parameters involved. These solutions are then compared with those obtained by use of a simple model proposed previously by Scott, and the accuracy of this model is assessed. Finally, two versions of an alternative model are proposed which better approximate the action of the system. In the first, the properties of the model are defined by frequency-dependent parameters, whereas in the second, which is particularly helpful in analyses of transient response, they are represented by frequency-independent, constant parameters.

  6. Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine Mesh Generator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-01-24

    VAWTGen is a mesh generator for creating a finite element beam mesh of arbitrary vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWT). The software accepts input files specifying tower and blade structural and aerodynamic descriptions and constructs a VAWT using a minimal set of inputs. VAWTs with an arbitrary number of blades can be constructed with or without a central tower. Strut connections between the tower and blades can be specified in an arbitrary manner. The software also facilitatesmore » specifying arbitrary joints between structural components and concentrated structural tenns (mass and stiffness). The output files which describe the VAWT configuration are intended to be used with the Offshore Wind ENergy Simulation (OWENS) Toolkit software for structural dynamics analysis of VAWTs. Furthermore, VAWTGen is useful for visualizing output from the OWENS analysis software.« less

  7. Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine Mesh Generator

    SciTech Connect

    2014-01-24

    VAWTGen is a mesh generator for creating a finite element beam mesh of arbitrary vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWT). The software accepts input files specifying tower and blade structural and aerodynamic descriptions and constructs a VAWT using a minimal set of inputs. VAWTs with an arbitrary number of blades can be constructed with or without a central tower. Strut connections between the tower and blades can be specified in an arbitrary manner. The software also facilitates specifying arbitrary joints between structural components and concentrated structural tenns (mass and stiffness). The output files which describe the VAWT configuration are intended to be used with the Offshore Wind ENergy Simulation (OWENS) Toolkit software for structural dynamics analysis of VAWTs. Furthermore, VAWTGen is useful for visualizing output from the OWENS analysis software.

  8. Integrated Vertical Bloch Line (VBL) memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, R. R.; Wu, J. C.; Stadler, H. L.

    1991-01-01

    Vertical Bloch Line (VBL) Memory is a recently conceived, integrated, solid state, block access, VLSI memory which offers the potential of 1 Gbit/sq cm areal storage density, data rates of hundreds of megabits/sec, and submillisecond average access time simultaneously at relatively low mass, volume, and power values when compared to alternative technologies. VBLs are micromagnetic structures within magnetic domain walls which can be manipulated using magnetic fields from integrated conductors. The presence or absence of BVL pairs are used to store binary information. At present, efforts are being directed at developing a single chip memory using 25 Mbit/sq cm technology in magnetic garnet material which integrates, at a single operating point, the writing, storage, reading, and amplification functions needed in a memory. The current design architecture, functional elements, and supercomputer simulation results are described which are used to assist the design process.

  9. Multispectral imaging with vertical silicon nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyunsung; Crozier, Kenneth B.

    2013-01-01

    Multispectral imaging is a powerful tool that extends the capabilities of the human eye. However, multispectral imaging systems generally are expensive and bulky, and multiple exposures are needed. Here, we report the demonstration of a compact multispectral imaging system that uses vertical silicon nanowires to realize a filter array. Multiple filter functions covering visible to near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths are simultaneously defined in a single lithography step using a single material (silicon). Nanowires are then etched and embedded into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), thereby realizing a device with eight filter functions. By attaching it to a monochrome silicon image sensor, we successfully realize an all-silicon multispectral imaging system. We demonstrate visible and NIR imaging. We show that the latter is highly sensitive to vegetation and furthermore enables imaging through objects opaque to the eye. PMID:23955156

  10. Opportunity's Surroundings on Sol 1687 (Vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on the 1,687th Martian day, or sol, of its surface mission (Oct. 22, 2008).

    Opportunity had driven 133 meters (436 feet) that sol, crossing sand ripples up to about 10 centimeters (4 inches) tall. The tracks visible in the foreground are in the east-northeast direction.

    Opportunity's position on Sol 1687 was about 300 meters southwest of Victoria Crater. The rover was beginning a long trek toward a much larger crater, Endeavour, about 12 kilometers (7 miles) to the southeast.

    This view is presented as a vertical projection with geometric seam correction.

  11. Fracture characterization from vertical seismic profiling data

    SciTech Connect

    Cicerone, R.D.; Toksoez, M.N.

    1995-03-10

    In vertical seismic profiling (VSP) data, large-amplitude borehole Stoneley waves are observed at depths where fractures intersect the borehole. The authors present a model which predicts the amplitudes of these Stoneley waves as a function of certain parameters of the fractures, namely, the fracture aperture (width), the orientation, and the degree of stiffness and roughness of the fracture. The proposed mechanism for the generation of these borehole Stoneley waves is coupling of a guided mode, induced in the fracture by an incident plane wave (typically a P wave), to the borehole. The model expresses the borehole Stoneley wave amplitude, normalized by the amplitude of the direct P wave, as a function of frequency, in terms of the fracture parameters. The model is used as the basis for an inversion scheme, employing a nonlinear least squares algorithm to estimate the fracture parameters. The inversion is then applied to VSP data where borehole Stoneley waves are observed at depths where fractures are known to intersect the borehole. The results of the inversion indicate that the aperture and vertical component of the orientation (i.e., dip) of the fracture can be accurately estimated but the horizontal component of the orientation (i.e., strike) is not well resolved. These conclusions are based on comparisons with independent estimates of these parameters from flow tests and borehole televiewer measurements. In addition, stiffness and roughness of the fractures are important effects which must be considered in order to obtain realistic estimates for the other parameters, especially the fracture aperture. 27 refs., 14 figs., 21 tabs.

  12. Vertical structure of recent Arctic warming.

    PubMed

    Graversen, Rune G; Mauritsen, Thorsten; Tjernström, Michael; Källén, Erland; Svensson, Gunilla

    2008-01-01

    Near-surface warming in the Arctic has been almost twice as large as the global average over recent decades-a phenomenon that is known as the 'Arctic amplification'. The underlying causes of this temperature amplification remain uncertain. The reduction in snow and ice cover that has occurred over recent decades may have played a role. Climate model experiments indicate that when global temperature rises, Arctic snow and ice cover retreats, causing excessive polar warming. Reduction of the snow and ice cover causes albedo changes, and increased refreezing of sea ice during the cold season and decreases in sea-ice thickness both increase heat flux from the ocean to the atmosphere. Changes in oceanic and atmospheric circulation, as well as cloud cover, have also been proposed to cause Arctic temperature amplification. Here we examine the vertical structure of temperature change in the Arctic during the late twentieth century using reanalysis data. We find evidence for temperature amplification well above the surface. Snow and ice feedbacks cannot be the main cause of the warming aloft during the greater part of the year, because these feedbacks are expected to primarily affect temperatures in the lowermost part of the atmosphere, resulting in a pattern of warming that we only observe in spring. A significant proportion of the observed temperature amplification must therefore be explained by mechanisms that induce warming above the lowermost part of the atmosphere. We regress the Arctic temperature field on the atmospheric energy transport into the Arctic and find that, in the summer half-year, a significant proportion of the vertical structure of warming can be explained by changes in this variable. We conclude that changes in atmospheric heat transport may be an important cause of the recent Arctic temperature amplification. PMID:18172495

  13. Effects of vertical interarch space and abutment height on stress distributions: a 3D finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Naveau, Adrien; Renault, Patrick; Pierrisnard, Laurent

    2009-06-01

    This three dimensional Finite Element Analysis study investigated stress distribution and intensity in implants restored with cemented or screwed crown. Two parameters varied: interarch space and abutment height. Highest stresses occurred at the cervical area in all models. Stresses increased mainly with vertical interarch space highness, and secondarily with abutments shortness. From a mechanical point of view, bone and prosthetics components supporting cemented crowns were not as solicited as with screwed crowns. PMID:19645311

  14. Infants' sensitivity to vertical disparity for depth perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuruhara, Aki; Kaneko, Hirohiko; Kanazawa, So; Otsuka, Yumiko; Shirai, Nobu; Yamaguchi, Masami K.

    2013-05-01

    Both horizontal and vertical binocular disparities produce depth perception in adults. In developmental studies, infants aged around 4 to 6 months were shown to perceive depth from horizontal disparity. However, infants' sensitivity to vertical disparity has not been shown clearly. To examine the sensitivity in infants, this study measured preferential looking behavior of infants aged 20 to 27 weeks. Results showed a significant preference for the stimulus with vertical disparity, providing the first evidence of infants' sensitivity to vertical disparity. The infants in the same age group did not show preference for stimulus with horizontal disparity when the stimulus were comparable to the stimulus with vertical disparity, while their sensitivity to horizontal disparity was confirmed with the stimuli used in a previous study. Our results would suggest that properties in processing horizontal and vertical disparities are different in infancy, and that the sensitivity to horizontal disparity are still premature in 27 weeks after birth.

  15. Decoration of vertical graphene with aerosol nanoparticles for gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Shumao; Guo, Xiaoru; Ren, Ren; Zhou, Guihua; Chen, Junhong

    2015-08-01

    A facile method was demonstrated to decorate aerosol Ag nanoparticles onto vertical graphene surfaces using a mini-arc plasma reactor. The vertical graphene was directly grown on a sensor electrode using a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) method. The aerosol Ag nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple vapor condensation process using a mini-arc plasma source. Then, the nanoparticles were assembled on the surface of vertical graphene through the assistance of an electric field. Based on our observation, nonagglomerated Ag nanoparticles formed in the gas phase and were assembled onto vertical graphene sheets. Nanohybrids of Ag nanoparticle-decorated vertical graphene were characterized for ammonia gas detection at room temperature. The vertical graphene served as the conductance channel, and the conductance change upon exposure to ammonia was used as the sensing signal. The sensing results show that Ag nanoparticles significantly improve the sensitivity, response time, and recovery time of the sensor.

  16. Short baseline phase delay interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, C. D.

    1987-01-01

    The high precision of the phase delay data type allows angular navigation accuracy on relatively short baselines to compete with the angular accuracy achieved with long baseline group delay measurements. Differential phase delay observations of close quasar pairs on both a 5.9-km baseline (DSS 12-DSS 13) and a 253-km baseline (DSS 13-Owens Valley Radio Observatory) have been performed to study the potential navigational precision and accuracy of the short baseline interferometry. As a first step toward demonstration of a connected element system at Goldstone, the DSS 12-DSS 13 baseline was operated coherently, distributing a common frequency reference via a recently installed fiber optic cable. The observed phase delay residuals of about 10 psec or less on both baselines appear to be dominated by short term troposphere fluctuations, and correspond to navigational accuracies of well below 50 nrad for the 253-km baseline. Additional experiments will be required to probe the full range of systematic errors.

  17. Processes regulating short-lived species in the tropical tropopause layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gettelman, A.; Kay, J. E.; Lauritzen, P.; Park, M.

    2009-12-01

    A one-dimensional model of vertical transport in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) is presented to better understand the processes controlling short lived species in the TTL. The model simulates evanescent profiles of short-lived hydrocarbon species observed by satellite and is also used to simulate short-lived bromine species. Results indicate that tracers with chemical lifetimes of 25 days or longer have significant concentrations in the stratosphere, and vertical advection is critical. Convection is important up to its peak altitude, nearly 19 km. Convection dominates the distribution of species with lifetimes less than 25 days. The annual cycle of species with lifetimes longer than 25 days is governed primarily by the variations of vertical velocity, not convection. This is particularly true for carbon monoxide, where a seasonal cycle in the lower stratosphere of the right phase is produced without variations in tropospheric emissions. An analysis of critical short-lived bromine species (CH2Br2 and CHBr3) indicates that substantial amounts of these tracers may get advected into the lower stratosphere as source gases at 18 km, and contribute significantly to stratospheric bromine.

  18. Robotic platform for traveling on vertical piping network

    DOEpatents

    Nance, Thomas A; Vrettos, Nick J; Krementz, Daniel; Marzolf, Athneal D

    2015-02-03

    This invention relates generally to robotic systems and is specifically designed for a robotic system that can navigate vertical pipes within a waste tank or similar environment. The robotic system allows a process for sampling, cleaning, inspecting and removing waste around vertical pipes by supplying a robotic platform that uses the vertical pipes to support and navigate the platform above waste material contained in the tank.

  19. Beware Postpartum Shortness of Breath

    PubMed Central

    Akpinar, Guleser; Ipekci, Afsin; Gulen, Bedia; Ikizceli, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is one of the potentially life-threatening complications of pregnancy. We report a case of a 36-year-old female patient who presented with shortness of breath, swelling of feet after giving birth to triplets, and her tests revealed that left ventricle is dilated with its diameter on the borderline and she had EF 35% with advanced systolic dysfunction. Anterior wall and septum were severely hypokinetic. In the presence of these findings, the patient was evaluated as PPCM. PPCM must be considered in the differential diagnosis of a patient presenting with shortness of breath and swelling of feet, which are also common in pregnancy. PMID:26649031

  20. [Short-term occupational disability].

    PubMed

    Bebensee, H; Conrad, P; Hein, R

    1994-01-01

    The present political discussion about absenteeism in industry and introduction of days of absence in case of sickness emphasises the amount of short-term sickness cases. More or less openly the misuse of continued salary payment via "unauthorized" working inability is discussed: this is often connected with the increased absenteeism on Mondays and Fridays. From the point of view of the Legal Health Insurances this thesis of misuse is investigated in an analysis of cases of short-term work disability. PMID:8148587

  1. Ice-templated Self-assembly of VOPO4–Graphene Nanocomposites for Vertically Porous 3D Supercapacitor Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwang Hoon; Lee, Young-Woo; Lee, Seung Woo; Ha, Jeong Sook; Lee, Sang-Soo; Son, Jeong Gon

    2015-01-01

    A simple ice-templated self-assembly process is used to prepare a three-dimensional (3D) and vertically porous nanocomposite of layered vanadium phosphates (VOPO4) and graphene nanosheets with high surface area and high electrical conductivity. The resulting 3D VOPO4–graphene nanocomposite has a much higher capacitance of 527.9 F g−1 at a current density of 0.5 A g−1, compared with ~247 F g−1 of simple 3D VOPO4, with solid cycling stability. The enhanced pseudocapacitive behavior mainly originates from vertically porous structures from directionally grown ice crystals and simultaneously inducing radial segregation and forming inter-stacked structures of VOPO4–graphene nanosheets. This VOPO4–graphene nanocomposite electrode exhibits high surface area, vertically porous structure to the separator, structural stability from interstacked structure and high electrical conductivity, which would provide the short diffusion paths of electrolyte ions and fast transportation of charges within the conductive frameworks. In addition, an asymmetric supercapacitor (ASC) is fabricated by using vertically porous VOPO4–graphene as the positive electrode and vertically porous 3D graphene as the negative electrode; it exhibits a wide cell voltage of 1.6 V and a largely enhanced energy density of 108 Wh kg−1. PMID:26333591

  2. Reconstruction of the vertical electron density profile based on vertical TEC using the simulated annealing algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chunhua; Yang, Guobin; Zhu, Peng; Nishioka, Michi; Yokoyama, Tatsuhiro; Zhou, Chen; Song, Huan; Lan, Ting; Zhao, Zhengyu; Zhang, Yuannong

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a new method to reconstruct the vertical electron density profile based on vertical Total Electron Content (TEC) using the simulated annealing algorithm. The present technique used the Quasi-parabolic segments (QPS) to model the bottomside ionosphere. The initial parameters of the ionosphere model were determined from both International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) (Bilitza et al., 2014) and vertical TEC (vTEC). Then, the simulated annealing algorithm was used to search the best-fit parameters of the ionosphere model by comparing with the GPS-TEC. The performance and robust of this technique were verified by ionosonde data. The critical frequency (foF2) and peak height (hmF2) of the F2 layer obtained from ionograms recorded at different locations and on different days were compared with those calculated by the proposed method. The analysis of results shows that the present method is inspiring for obtaining foF2 from vTEC. However, the accuracy of hmF2 needs to be improved in the future work.

  3. Development of Vertical Cable Seismic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakawa, E.; Murakami, F.; Sekino, Y.; Okamoto, T.; Ishikawa, K.; Tsukahara, H.; Shimura, T.

    2011-12-01

    In 2009, Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology(MEXT) started the survey system development for Hydrothermal deposit. We proposed the Vertical Cable Seismic (VCS), the reflection seismic survey with vertical cable above seabottom. VCS has the following advantages for hydrothermal deposit survey. (1) VCS is an efficient high-resolution 3D seismic survey in limited area. (2) It achieves high-resolution image because the sensors are closely located to the target. (3) It avoids the coupling problems between sensor and seabottom that cause serious damage of seismic data quality. (4) Because of autonomous recording system on sea floor, various types of marine source are applicable with VCS such as sea-surface source (GI gun etc.) , deep-towed or ocean bottom source. Our first experiment of 2D/3D VCS surveys has been carried out in Lake Biwa, JAPAN, in November 2009. The 2D VCS data processing follows the walk-away VSP, including wave field separation and depth migration. Seismic Interferometry technique is also applied. The results give much clearer image than the conventional surface seismic. Prestack depth migration is applied to 3D data to obtain good quality 3D depth volume. Seismic Interferometry technique is applied to obtain the high resolution image in the very shallow zone. Based on the feasibility study, we have developed the autonomous recording VCS system and carried out the trial experiment in actual ocean at the water depth of about 400m to establish the procedures of deployment/recovery and to examine the VC position or fluctuation at seabottom. The result shows that the VC position is estimated with sufficient accuracy and very little fluctuation is observed. Institute of Industrial Science, the University of Tokyo took the research cruise NT11-02 on JAMSTEC R/V Natsushima in February, 2011. In the cruise NT11-02, JGI carried out the second VCS survey using the autonomous VCS recording system with the deep towed source provided by Institute of Industrial Science, the University of Tokyo. It generates high frequency acoustic waves around 1kHz. The acquired VCS data clearly shows the reflections and currently being processed for imaging the subsurface structure.

  4. Development of Vertical Cable Seismic System (3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakawa, E.; Murakami, F.; Tsukahara, H.; Mizohata, S.; Ishikawa, K.

    2013-12-01

    The VCS (Vertical Cable Seismic) is one of the reflection seismic methods. It uses hydrophone arrays vertically moored from the seafloor to record acoustic waves generated by surface, deep-towed or ocean bottom sources. Analyzing the reflections from the sub-seabed, we could look into the subsurface structure. Because VCS is an efficient high-resolution 3D seismic survey method for a spatially-bounded area, we proposed the method for the hydrothermal deposit survey tool development program that the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) started in 2009. We are now developing a VCS system, including not only data acquisition hardware but data processing and analysis technique. We carried out several VCS surveys combining with surface towed source, deep towed source and ocean bottom source. The water depths of the survey are from 100m up to 2100m. The target of the survey includes not only hydrothermal deposit but oil and gas exploration. Through these experiments, our VCS data acquisition system has been completed. But the data processing techniques are still on the way. One of the most critical issues is the positioning in the water. The uncertainty in the positions of the source and of the hydrophones in water degraded the quality of subsurface image. GPS navigation system are available on sea surface, but in case of deep-towed source or ocean bottom source, the accuracy of shot position with SSBL/USBL is not sufficient for the very high-resolution imaging. We have developed another approach to determine the positions in water using the travel time data from the source to VCS hydrophones. In the data acquisition stage, we estimate the position of VCS location with slant ranging method from the sea surface. The deep-towed source or ocean bottom source is estimated by SSBL/USBL. The water velocity profile is measured by XCTD. After the data acquisition, we pick the first break times of the VCS recorded data. The estimated positions of shot points and receiver points in the field include the errors. We use these data as initial guesses, we invert iteratively shot and receiver positions to match the travel time data. After several iterations we could finally estimate the most probable positions. Integration of the constraint of VCS hydrophone positions, such as the spacing is 10m, can accelerate the convergence of the iterative inversion and improve results. The accuracy of the estimated positions from the travel time date is enough for the VCS data processing.

  5. Vertical Cable Seismic Survey for SMS exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakawa, Eiichi; Murakami, Fumitoshi; Tsukahara, Hotoshi; Mizohata, Shigeharu

    2014-05-01

    The Vertical Cable Seismic (VCS) survey is one of the reflection seismic methods. It uses hydrophone arrays vertically moored from the seafloor to record acoustic waves generated by sea-surface, deep-towed or ocean bottom sources. Analyzing the reflections from the sub-seabed, we could look into the subsurface structure. Because the VCS is an efficient high-resolution 3D seismic survey method for a spatially-bounded area, we proposed it for the SMS survey tool development program that the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) started in 2009. We have been developing the VCS survey system, including not only data acquisition hardware but data processing and analysis technique. We carried out several VCS surveys combining with surface towed source, deep towed source and ocean bottom source. The water depths of these surveys are from 100m up to 2100 m. Through these experiments, our VCS data acquisition system has been also completed. But the data processing techniques are still on the way. One of the most critical issues is the positioning in the water. The uncertainty in the positions of the source and of the hydrophones in water degraded the quality of subsurface image. GPS navigation system is available on sea surface, but in case of deep-towed source or ocean bottom source, the accuracy of shot position with SSBL/USBL is not sufficient for the very high-resolution imaging. We have developed a new approach to determine the positions in water using the travel time data from the source to VCS hydrophones. In 2013, we have carried out the second VCS survey using the surface-towed high-voltage sparker and ocean bottom source in the Izena Cauldron, which is one of the most promising SMS areas around Japan. The positions of ocean bottom source estimated by this method are consistent with the VCS field records. The VCS data with the sparker have been processed with 3D PSTM. It gives the very high resolution 3D volume deeper than two hundred meters. Our VCS system has been demonstrated as a promising survey tool for the SMS exploration.

  6. MEMS-tunable vertical-cavity SOAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Garrett D.

    Vertical-cavity semiconductor optical amplifiers (VCSOAs) are attractive as a low-cost alternative to existing amplifier technologies for use in fiber-optic communication systems such as metro and access networks. In contrast with in-plane SOAs, the surface-normal operation of vertical-cavity SOAs gives rise to a number of advantages including a high coupling efficiency to optical fiber, polarization insensitive gain, the potential to fabricate high fill-factor two-dimensional arrays, and the ability to test devices on wafer. Due to their narrow gain bandwidth, VCSOAs function as amplifying filters. In these devices the inherent spectral filtering of the high-finesse Fabry-Perot cavity leads to the elimination of out-of-band noise and results in channel-selective amplification. For multi-wavelength communications systems, it is of great interest to develop widely tunable VCSOAs that can be dynamically adjusted to match the signal wavelength. A promising approach to achieve wide wavelength tuning in VCSOAs is micromechanical, or MEMS-based tuning. Here, mechanical alteration of the effective cavity length gives rise to tuning ranges greater than those that can be achieved via refractive index modulation. This dissertation outlines the development of three generations of MEMS-tunable VCSOAs (MT-VCSOAs), with the initial generation of devices being noteworthy as the first demonstration of a micromechanically-tunable VCSOA. In contrast with temperature tuning, the AlGaAs-based electrostatic actuator used in these devices allows for rapid, low power, and wide wavelength tuning. In the final generation, the MT-VCSOA utilizes a bottom-emitting configuration in which the MEMS-tuning element serves as the high-reflectivity back mirror. By suppressing the variation in reflectance with tuning, this configuration exhibits a two-fold increase in the effective tuning range as compared with the initial generation of devices---with a minimum of 5 dB fiber-to-fiber gain (12 dB on-chip gain) over a wavelength span of 21 nm, from 1557.4 nm to 1536.4 nm, while requiring a maximum tuning bias of 10.5 V (a five-fold reduction when compared with the first generation of MT-VCSOAs). Furthermore, these devices exhibit properties comparable to state-of-the-art fixed-wavelength VCSOAs, with a maximum fiber-coupled saturation output power of -1.4 dBm and an average gain bandwidth and noise figure of 65.2 GHz and 7.5 dB respectively.

  7. Seasonal and regional change in vertical distribution and diel vertical migration of four euphausiid species (Euphausia pacifica, Thysanoessa inspinata, T. longipes, and Tessarabrachion oculatum) in the northwestern Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sogawa, Sayaka; Sugisaki, Hiroya; Saito, Hiroaki; Okazaki, Yuji; Ono, Tsuneo; Shimode, Shinji; Kikuchi, Tomohiko

    2016-03-01

    We studied seasonal and regional change in vertical distribution and DVM patterns of four euphausiid species (Euphausia pacifica, Thysanoessa inspinata, Thysanoessa longipes, and Tessarabrachion oculatum) from two years of surveys using MOCNESS above 1500 m depth across a transect in 3 regions of the northwestern (NW) Pacific, off east of Japan; Oyashio, Kuroshio, and Oyashio-Kuroshio Mixed Water Regions (MWR). The four euphausiid species exhibited a regional change in vertical distribution, i.e., slightly deeper in the MWR and much deeper in the Kuroshio region than in the Oyashio region. They found in higher and wider temperature ranges in the MWR than in the Oyashio region, which demonstrated that the four species were able to adapt to different temperatures in different regions. In the MWR and Oyashio regions, E. pacifica is a surface migrant (differences between day and night mean median depths, D-N, were ca. 300 m) and T. oculatum is a moderate subsurface migrant that performs short DVM in the upper mesopelagic zone (D-N ca. 100 m). The other two morphologically similar Thysanoessa species (T. inspinata and T. longipes) segregated vertically between E. pacifica and T. oculatum at night in the Oyashio region, suggesting vertical habitat partitioning with the former two species but not with themselves. However, a seasonal pattern was observed in the vertical distribution and DVM of T. longipes in the Oyashio region. It behaves as a surface migrant in May, whereas most of individuals were found in the mesopelagic layer in September. In contrast, T. inspinata did not exhibit a clear DVM throughout the year (i.e., a moderate subsurface migrant). This seasonal difference might be a strategy to minimize competition between related species. Among the four species, only E. pacifica was found in higher temperatures at night than during the daytime, and the highest temperatures at the median depth varied among species (from 7.5 °C to 13.7 °C) although the lowest temperature did not vary greatly (from 1.0 °C to 1.8 °C), which indicates high temperatures act as a limiting factor as opposed to low temperatures. Furthermore, the integrated chlorophyll a values exhibited significant negative correlation with median depths of only E. pacifica at night. These results indicate a strategy which makes E. pacifica the dominant species in the area, that is, it has a trade-off of long migrations and a warmer environment that accelerates metabolism, in return for obtaining a food-rich environment.

  8. Increasing vertical mixing to reduce Southern Ocean deep convection in NEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuz, C.; Ridley, J. K.; Calvert, D.; Stevens, D. P.; Heywood, K. J.

    2015-03-01

    Most CMIP5 models unrealistically form Antarctic Bottom Water by open ocean deep convection in the Weddell and Ross Seas. To identify the triggering mechanisms leading to Southern Ocean deep convection in models, we perform sensitivity experiments on the ocean model NEMO forced by prescribed atmospheric fluxes. We vary the vertical velocity scale of the Langmuir turbulence, the fraction of turbulent kinetic energy transferred below the mixed layer, and the background diffusivity and run short simulations from 1980. All experiments exhibit deep convection in the Riiser-Larsen Sea in 1987; the origin is a positive sea ice anomaly in 1985, causing a shallow anomaly in mixed layer depth, hence anomalously warm surface waters and subsequent polynya opening. Modifying the vertical mixing impacts both the climatological state and the associated surface anomalies. The experiments with enhanced mixing exhibit colder surface waters and reduced deep convection. The experiments with decreased mixing are warmer, open larger polynyas and have deep convection across the Weddell Sea until the simulations end. Extended experiments reveal an increase in the Drake Passage transport of 4 Sv each year deep convection occurs, leading to an unrealistically large transport at the end of the simulation. North Atlantic deep convection is not significantly affected by the changes in mixing parameters. As new climate model overflow parameterisations are developed to form Antarctic Bottom Water more realistically, we argue that models would benefit from stopping Southern Ocean deep convection, for example by increasing their vertical mixing.

  9. Effect of Vertical Wind Shear on Concentration Fluctuation Statistics in a Point Source Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilderman, Trevor; Wilson, David J.

    2008-10-01

    Measurements of concentration fluctuation intensity, intermittency factor, and integral time scale were made in a water channel for a plume dispersing in a well-developed, rough surface, neutrally stable, boundary layer, and in grid-generated turbulence with no mean velocity shear. The water-channel simulations apply to full-scale atmospheric plumes with very short averaging times, on the order of 1 4 min, because plume meandering was suppressed by the water-channel side walls. High spatial and temporal resolution vertical and crosswind profiles of fluctuations in the plume were obtained using a linescan camera laser-induced dye tracer fluorescence technique. A semi-empirical algebraic mean velocity shear history model was developed to predict these concentration statistics. This shear history concentration fluctuation model requires only a minimal set of parameters to be known: atmospheric stability, surface roughness, vertical velocity profile, and vertical and crosswind plume spreads. The universal shear history parameter used was the mean velocity shear normalized by surface friction velocity, plume travel time, and local mean wind speed. The reference height at which this non-dimensional shear history was calculated was important, because both the source and the receptor positions influence the history of particles passing through the receptor position.

  10. Impact of episodic vertical fluxes on sea surface pCO2.

    PubMed

    Mahadevan, A; Tagliabue, A; Bopp, L; Lenton, A; Mémery, L; Lévy, M

    2011-05-28

    Episodic events like hurricanes, storms and frontal- and eddy-driven upwelling can alter the partial pressure of CO(2) (pCO(2)) at the sea surface by entraining subsurface waters into the surface mixed layer (ML) of the ocean. Since pCO(2) is a function of total dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), temperature (T), salinity and alkalinity, it responds to the combined impacts of physical, chemical and biological changes. Here, we present an analytical framework for assessing the relative magnitude and sign in the short-term perturbation of surface pCO(2) arising from vertical mixing events. Using global, monthly, climatological datasets, we assess the individual, as well as integrated, contribution of various properties to surface pCO(2) in response to episodic mixing. The response depends on the relative vertical gradients of properties beneath the ML. Many areas of the ocean exhibit very little sensitivity to mixing owing to the compensatory effects of DIC and T on pCO(2), whereas others, such as the eastern upwelling margins, have the potential to generate large positive/negative anomalies in surface pCO(2). The response varies seasonally and spatially and becomes more intense in subtropical and subpolar regions during summer. Regions showing a greater pCO(2) response to vertical mixing are likely to exhibit higher spatial variability in surface pCO(2) on time scales of days. PMID:21502173

  11. Short-term energy outlook

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-07

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) presents future scenarios of quarterly short-term energy supply, demand, and prices for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes previous estimate errors, compares recent scenarios with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics of the short-term energy markets. (See Short-Term Energy Outlook: Annual Supplement, DOE/EIA-0202.) The principal users of the Outlook are managers and energy analysts in private industry and government. The scenario period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the fourth quarter of 1990 through the fourth quarter of 1991. Some data for the third quarter of 1990 are preliminary EIA estimates of actual data (for example, some petroleum estimates are based on statistics from the Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are derived from internal model simulations using the latest exogenous information available (for example, some electricity demand estimates are based on recent weather data). 11 figs., 13 tabs.

  12. Pick of the (Short) Flicks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Frank, Ed.

    1967-01-01

    Five experts suggest a list of 50 short motion pictures which are inexpensive and fit easily within a normal class period. These films, not narrowly related to specific disciplines, range from visual poems inducing creative responses, to films analyzing the problems of maturing in an irrelevant society. Twenty of the film entries have annotations…

  13. Towards short wavelengths FELs workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Winick, H.

    1993-12-01

    This workshop was caged because of the growing perception in the FEL source community that recent advances have made it possible to extend FEL operation to wavelengths about two orders of magnitude shorter than the 240 nm that has been achieved to date. In addition short wavelength FELs offer the possibilities of extremely high peak power (several gigawatts) and very short pulses (of the order of 100 fs). Several groups in the USA are developing plans for such short wavelength FEL facilities. However, reviewers of these plans have pointed out that it would be highly desirable to first carry out proof-of-principle experiments at longer wavelengths to increase confidence that the shorter wavelength devices will indeed perform as calculated. The need for such experiments has now been broadly accepted by the FEL community. Such experiments were the main focus of this workshop as described in the following objectives distributed to attendees: (1) Define measurements needed to gain confidence that short wavelength FELs will perform as calculated. (2) List possible hardware that could be used to carry out these measurements in the near term. (3) Define a prioritized FEL physics experimental program and suggested timetable. (4) Form collaborative teams to carry out this program.

  14. Vortex formation in protoplanetary discs induced by the vertical shear instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Samuel; Nelson, Richard P.; Umurhan, Orkan M.

    2016-03-01

    We present the results of 2D and 3D hydrodynamic simulations of idealized protoplanetary discs that examine the formation and evolution of vortices by the vertical shear instability (VSI). In agreement with recent work, we find that discs with radially decreasing temperature profiles and short thermal relaxation time-scales, are subject to the axisymmetric VSI. In three dimensions, the resulting velocity perturbations give rise to quasi-axisymmetric potential vorticity perturbations that break up into discrete vortices, in a manner that is reminiscent of the Rossby wave instability. Discs with very short thermal evolution time-scales (i.e. τ ≤ 0.1 local orbit periods) develop strong vorticity perturbations that roll up into vortices that have small aspect ratios (χ ≤ 2) and short lifetimes (˜ a few orbits). Longer thermal time-scales give rise to vortices with larger aspect ratios (6 ≤ χ ≤ 10), and lifetimes that depend on the entropy gradient. A steeply decreasing entropy profile leads to vortex lifetimes that exceed the simulation run times of hundreds of orbital periods. Vortex lifetimes in discs with positive or weakly decreasing entropy profiles are much shorter, being 10s of orbits at most, suggesting that the subcritical baroclinic instability plays an important role in sustaining vortices against destruction through the elliptical instability. Applied to the outer regions of protoplanetary discs, where the VSI is most likely to occur, our results suggest that vortices formed by the VSI are likely to be short-lived structures.

  15. A theoretical analysis of vertical flow equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Yortsos, Y.C.

    1992-01-01

    The assumption of Vertical Flow Equilibrium (VFE) and of parallel flow conditions, in general, is often applied to the modeling of flow and displacement in natural porous media. However, the methodology for the development of the various models is rather intuitive, and no rigorous method is currently available. In this paper, we develop an asymptotic theory using as parameter the variable R{sub L} = (L/H){radical}(k{sub V})/(k{sub H}). It is rigorously shown that present models represent the leading order term of an asymptotic expansion with respect to 1/R{sub L}{sup 2}. Although this was numerically suspected, it is the first time that is is theoretically proved. Based on the general formulation, a series of models are subsequently obtained. In the absence of strong gravity effects, they generalize previous works by Zapata and Lake (1981), Yokoyama and Lake (1981) and Lake and Hirasaki (1981), on immiscible and miscible displacements. In the limit of gravity-segregated flow, we prove conditions for the fluids to be segregated and derive the Dupuit and Dietz (1953) approximations. Finally, we also discuss effects of capillarity and transverse dispersion.

  16. Functionalization of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Van Hooijdonk, Eloise; Bittencourt, Carla; Snyders, Rony; Colomer, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    This review focuses and summarizes recent studies on the functionalization of carbon nanotubes oriented perpendicularly to their substrate, so-called vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VA-CNTs). The intrinsic properties of individual nanotubes make the VA-CNTs ideal candidates for integration in a wide range of devices, and many potential applications have been envisaged. These applications can benefit from the unidirectional alignment of the nanotubes, the large surface area, the high carbon purity, the outstanding electrical conductivity, and the uniformly long length. However, practical uses of VA-CNTs are limited by their surface characteristics, which must be often modified in order to meet the specificity of each particular application. The proposed approaches are based on the chemical modifications of the surface by functionalization (grafting of functional chemical groups, decoration with metal particles or wrapping of polymers) to bring new properties or to improve the interactions between the VA-CNTs and their environment while maintaining the alignment of CNTs. PMID:23504581

  17. Visible vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lott, James A.

    This dissertation explores the design, fabrication, and characterization of visible (620 to 690 nm) vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSEL's), consisting of a strained quantum well optical cavity active region, surrounded by distributed Bragg reflectors (DBR's). The lattice-matched device structures are grown on GaAs substrates by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE). The key design and fabrication issues are reviewed and contrasted with conventional near infrared (IR) VCSEL's. Design trade-offs and quantum well gain characteristics are examined by studying optically pumped structures. Device fabrication techniques are developed, and the first electrically injected visible AlGaInP VCSEL's are demonstrated. Prototype devices operate with pulsed current excitation at room temperature with a maximum output power of 3.38 mW at a lasing emission wavelength of 650 nm with threshold current densities of about 4.2 kA/sq. cm and threshold voltages of about 2.7 V. Due to cavity losses and unoptimized gain layer design, lasing is only achieved with significant gain contributions from the second (n=2) quantized quantum well state. With several design improvements, pulsed room temperature (23 deg C) lasing is achieved over the very broad range 629.6 to 691.4 nm, where the lasing emission above 650 nm is due primarily to gain contributions from the first (n=1) quantized quantum well state.

  18. Absolute Position Encoders With Vertical Image Binning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.

    2005-01-01

    Improved optoelectronic patternrecognition encoders that measure rotary and linear 1-dimensional positions at conversion rates (numbers of readings per unit time) exceeding 20 kHz have been invented. Heretofore, optoelectronic pattern-recognition absoluteposition encoders have been limited to conversion rates <15 Hz -- too low for emerging industrial applications in which conversion rates ranging from 1 kHz to as much as 100 kHz are required. The high conversion rates of the improved encoders are made possible, in part, by use of vertically compressible or binnable (as described below) scale patterns in combination with modified readout sequences of the image sensors [charge-coupled devices (CCDs)] used to read the scale patterns. The modified readout sequences and the processing of the images thus read out are amenable to implementation by use of modern, high-speed, ultra-compact microprocessors and digital signal processors or field-programmable gate arrays. This combination of improvements makes it possible to greatly increase conversion rates through substantial reductions in all three components of conversion time: exposure time, image-readout time, and image-processing time.

  19. Maximum height and minimum time vertical jumping.

    PubMed

    Domire, Zachary J; Challis, John H

    2015-08-20

    The performance criterion in maximum vertical jumping has typically been assumed to simply raise the center of mass as high as possible. In many sporting activities minimizing movement time during the jump is likely also critical to successful performance. The purpose of this study was to examine maximum height jumps performed while minimizing jump time. A direct dynamics model was used to examine squat jump performance, with dual performance criteria: maximize jump height and minimize jump time. The muscle model had activation dynamics, force-length, force-velocity properties, and a series of elastic component representing the tendon. The simulations were run in two modes. In Mode 1 the model was placed in a fixed initial position. In Mode 2 the simulation model selected the initial squat configuration as well as the sequence of muscle activations. The inclusion of time as a factor in Mode 1 simulations resulted in a small decrease in jump height and moderate time savings. The improvement in time was mostly accomplished by taking off from a less extended position. In Mode 2 simulations, more substantial time savings could be achieved by beginning the jump in a more upright posture. However, when time was weighted more heavily in these simulations, there was a more substantial reduction in jump height. Future work is needed to examine the implications for countermovement jumping and to examine the possibility of minimizing movement time as part of the control scheme even when the task is to jump maximally. PMID:25964210

  20. Drop motion induced by vertical vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, Paolo; Quagliati, Damiano; Varagnolo, Silvia; Pierno, Matteo; Mistura, Giampaolo; Magaletti, Francesco; Massimo Casciola, Carlo

    2015-11-01

    We have studied the motion of liquid drops on an inclined plate subject to vertical vibrations. The liquids comprised distilled water and different aqueous solutions of glycerol, ethanol and isopropanol spanning the range 1-39 mm2 s-1 in kinematic viscosities and 40-72 mN m-1 in surface tension. At sufficiently low oscillating amplitudes, the drops are always pinned to the surface. Vibrating the plate above a certain amplitude yields sliding of the drop. Further increasing the oscillating amplitude drives the drop upward against gravity. In the case of the most hydrophilic aqueous solutions, this motion is not observed and the drop only slides downward. Images taken with a fast camera show that the drop profile evolves in a different way during sliding and climbing. In particular, the climbing drop experiences a much bigger variation in its profile during an oscillating period. Complementary numerical simulations of 2D drops based on a diffuse interface approach confirm the experimental findings. The overall qualitative behavior is reproduced suggesting that the contact line pinning due to contact angle hysteresis is not necessary to explain the drop climbing.

  1. Vertical landscraping, a big regionalism for Dubai.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Dubai's ecologic and economic complications are exacerbated by six years of accelerated expansion, a fixed top-down approach to urbanism and the construction of iconic single-phase mega-projects. With recent construction delays, project cancellations and growing landscape issues, Dubai's tower typologies have been unresponsive to changing environmental, socio-cultural and economic patterns (BBC, 2009; Gillet, 2009; Lewis, 2009). In this essay, a theory of "Big Regionalism" guides an argument for an economically and ecologically linked tower typology called the Condenser. This phased "box-to-tower" typology is part of a greater Landscape Urbanist strategy called Vertical Landscraping. Within this strategy, the Condenser's role is to densify the city, facilitating the creation of ecologic voids that order the urban region. Delineating "Big Regional" principles, the Condenser provides a time-based, global-local urban growth approach that weaves Bigness into a series of urban-regional, economic and ecological relationships, builds upon the environmental performance of the city's regional architecture and planning, promotes a continuity of Dubai's urban history, and responds to its landscape issues while condensing development. These speculations permit consideration of the overlooked opportunities embedded within Dubai's mega-projects and their long-term impact on the urban morphology. PMID:21132951

  2. Microfluidic dielectrophoretic sorter using gel vertical electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jason; Nelson, Edward L.; Li, G. P.; Bachman, Mark

    2014-01-01

    We report the development and results of a two-step method for sorting cells and small particles in a microfluidic device. This approach uses a single microfluidic channel that has (1) a microfabricated sieve which efficiently focuses particles into a thin stream, followed by (2) a dielectrophoresis (DEP) section consisting of electrodes along the channel walls for efficient continuous sorting based on dielectric properties of the particles. For our demonstration, the device was constructed of polydimethylsiloxane, bonded to a glass surface, and conductive agarose gel electrodes. Gold traces were used to make electrical connections to the conductive gel. The device had several novel features that aided performance of the sorting. These included a sieving structure that performed continuous displacement of particles into a single stream within the microfluidic channel (improving the performance of downstream DEP, and avoiding the need for additional focusing flow inlets), and DEP electrodes that were the full height of the microfluidic walls (“vertical electrodes”), allowing for improved formation and control of electric field gradients in the microfluidic device. The device was used to sort polymer particles and HeLa cells, demonstrating that this unique combination provides improved capability for continuous DEP sorting of particles in a microfluidic device. PMID:24926390

  3. Mudflow rheology in a vertically rotating flume

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holmes, Jr., Robert R.; Westphal, Jerome A.; Jobson, Harvey E.

    1990-01-01

    Joint research by the U.S. Geological Survey and the University of Missouri-Rolla currently (1990) is being conducted on a 3.05 meters in diameter vertically rotating flume used to simulate mudflows under steady-state conditions. Observed mudflow simulations indicate flow patterns in the flume are similar to those occurring in natural mudflows. Variables such as mean and surface velocity, depth, and average boundary shear stress can be measured in this flume more easily than in the field or in a traditional tilting flume. Sensitive variables such as sediment concentration, grain-size distribution, and Atterberg limits also can be precisely and easily controlled. A known Newtonian fluid, SAE 30 motor oil, was tested in the flume and the computed value for viscosity was within 12.5 percent of the stated viscosity. This provided support that the data from the flume can be used to determine the rheological properties of fluids such as mud. Measurements on mud slurries indicate that flows with sediment concentrations ranging from 81 to 87 percent sediment by weight can be approximated as Bingham plastic for strain rates greater than 1 per second. In this approximation, the yield stress and Bingham viscosity were extremely sensitive to sediment concentration. Generally, the magnitude of the yield stress was large relative to the change in shear stress with increasing mudflow velocity.

  4. Numerical Simulations of Hot Vertical Displacement Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunkers, K. J.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2015-11-01

    Loss of vertical positioning control in tokamaks leads to instability where hot confined plasma rests against the chamber wall. Resistive-MHD modeling with the NIMROD code is applied to model these events. After divertor-coil current is perturbed, resistive diffusion through the non-ideal wall sets the timescale as the simulated tokamak evolves from a diverted equilibrium to a limited configuration. Results show that plasma outflow along opening magnetic surfaces, just outside the confinement zone, approaches the local ion-acoustic speed. The projection of the plasma flow velocity into the surface-normal direction (n . V) near the surface exceeds the local E × B drift speed; near surfaces n × E is approximately the same as n ×Ewall in the nearly steady conditions. The safety factor of flux surfaces that remain intact is approximately constant over the evolution time, which is much shorter than the plasma resistive diffusion time. Assessment of external-kink stability and initial findings from 3D nonlinear computations are presented. This effort is supported by the U.S. Dept. of Energy, award numbers DE-FG02-06ER54850 and DE-FC02-08ER54975.

  5. Plug cementing: Horizontal to vertical conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Calvert, D.G.; Heathman, J.F.; Griffith, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents an in-depth study of cement plug placement that was conducted with large-scale models for the improvement of plug cementing practices and plug integrity. Common hole and workstring geometries were examined with various rheology and density ratios between the drilling fluid and cement. The critical conditions dictating the difference between success and failure for various wellbore angles and conditions were explored, and the mechanisms controlling slurry movement before and after placement are now better understood. An understanding of these mechanisms allows the engineer to better tailor a design to specific hole conditions. Controversial concepts regarding plug-setting practices have been examined and resolved. The cumulative effects of density, rheology, and hole angle are major factors affecting plug success. While the Boycott effect and an extrusion effect were observed to be predominant in inclined wellbores, a spiraling or {open_quotes}roping{close_quotes} effect controls slurry movement in vertical wellbores. Ultimate success of a cement plug can be obtained if allowances are made for these effects in the job design, provided all other previously published recommended placement practices are followed. Results of this work can be applied to many sidetracking and plug-to-abandon operations. Additionally, the understanding of the fluid movement (creep) mechanisms holds potential for use in primary and remedial cementing work, and in controlling the placement of noncementitious fluids in the wellbore.

  6. Vertical Distribution of Water at Phoenix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamppari, L. K.; Lemmon, M. T.

    2011-01-01

    Phoenix results, combined with coordinated observations from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter of the Phoenix lander site, indicate that the water vapor is nonuniform (i.e., not well mixed) up to a calculated cloud condensation level. It is important to understand the mixing profile of water vapor because (a) the assumption of a well-mixed atmosphere up to a cloud condensation level is common in retrievals of column water abundances which are in turn used to understand the seasonal and interannual behavior of water, (b) there is a long history of observations and modeling that conclude both that water vapor is and is not well-mixed, and some studies indicate that the water vapor vertical mixing profile may, in fact, change with season and location, (c) the water vapor in the lowest part of the atmosphere is the reservoir that can exchange with the regolith and higher amounts may have an impact on the surface chemistry, and (d) greater water vapor abundances close to the surface may enhance surface exchange thereby reducing regional transport, which in turn has implications to the net transport of water vapor over seasonal and annual timescales.

  7. Morpheus Vertical Test Bed Flight Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Jeremy; Devolites, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Morpheus Project has developed and tested a prototype planetary lander capable of vertical takeoff and landing, that is designed to serve as a testbed for advanced spacecraft technologies. The lander vehicle, propelled by a LOX/Methane engine and sized to carry a 500kg payload to the lunar surface, provides a platform for bringing technologies from the laboratory into an integrated flight system at relatively low cost. Morpheus onboard software is autonomous from ignition all the way through landing, and is designed to be capable of executing a variety of flight trajectories, with onboard fault checks and automatic contingency responses. The Morpheus 1.5A vehicle performed 26 integrated vehicle test flights including hot-fire tests, tethered tests, and two attempted freeflights between April 2011 and August 2012. The final flight of Morpheus 1.5A resulted in a loss of the vehicle. In September 2012, development began on the Morpheus 1.5B vehicle, which subsequently followed a similar test campaign culminating in free-flights at a simulated planetary landscape built at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility. This paper describes the integrated test campaign, including successes and setbacks, and how the system design for handling faults and failures evolved over the course of the project.

  8. ATLAS LTCS Vertically Challenged System Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Deepak; Garrison, Matt; Ku, Jentung

    2014-01-01

    Re-planning of LTCS TVAC testing and supporting RTA (Receiver Telescope Assembly) Test Plan and Procedure document preparation. The Laser Thermal Control System (LTCS) is designed to maintain the lasers onboard Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS) at their operational temperatures. In order to verify the functionality of the LTCS, a thermal balance test of the thermal hardware was performed. During the first cold start of the LTCS, the Loop Heat Pipe (LHP) was unable to control the laser mass simulators temperature. The control heaters were fully on and the loop temperature remained well below the desired setpoint. Thermal analysis of the loop did not show these results. This unpredicted behavior of the LTCS was brought up to a panel of LHP experts. Based on the testing and a review of all the data, there were multiple diagnostic performed in order to narrow down the cause. The prevailing theory is that gravity is causing oscillating flow within the loop, which artificially increased the control power needs. This resulted in a replan of the LTCS test flow and the addition of a GSE heater to allow vertical operation.

  9. Engineering design of vertical test stand cryostat

    SciTech Connect

    Suhane, S.K.; Sharma, N.K.; Raghavendra, S.; Joshi, S.C.; Das, S.; Kush, P.K.; Sahni, V.C.; Gupta, P.D.; Sylvester, C.; Rabehl, R.; Ozelis, J.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Under Indian Institutions and Fermilab collaboration, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory are jointly developing 2K Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostats for testing SCRF cavities at 2K. The VTS cryostat has been designed for a large testing aperture of 86.36 cm for testing of 325 MHz Spoke resonators, 650 MHz and 1.3 GHz multi-cell SCRF cavities for Fermilab's Project-X. Units will be installed at Fermilab and RRCAT and used to test cavities for Project-X. A VTS cryostat comprises of liquid helium (LHe) vessel with internal magnetic shield, top insert plate equipped with cavity support stand and radiation shield, liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) shield and vacuum vessel with external magnetic shield. The engineering design and analysis of VTS cryostat has been carried out using ASME B&PV Code and Finite Element Analysis. Design of internal and external magnetic shields was performed to limit the magnetic field inside LHe vessel at the cavity surface <1 {micro}T. Thermal analysis for LN{sub 2} shield has been performed to check the effectiveness of LN{sub 2} cooling and for compliance with ASME piping code allowable stresses.

  10. Vertical extensions of galactic spiral arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soukup, J. E.; Yuan, C.

    1981-01-01

    The vertical structure of the large scale galactic shock along spiral arms is studied in order to understand the extended features or the wings of spiral arms observed by Kepner (1970) and recently checked by Soukup (1979). Numerical calculations of two-dimensional gas flow were performed for two models of the gas. The results show that the shock front, standing perfectly perpendicular to the galactic plane, extends impressively above the scale height of the interstellar gas. In the extreme case of isothermal gas, the shock solution exists at any distance from the plane. In a realistic model in which the kinetic temperature of the gas is stratified, increasing with height, the shock can extend up to 700 pc. For both models, although the velocity component perpendicular to the galactic plane is small, the solutions corresponding to layered one-dimensional flow contain no shocks at such heights. In order to study the geometry of the shock front and the flow pattern near it, a simplified model is adopted, in which the Coriolis force is neglected. However, estimates show that including it will enhance the shock strength. The compression at the shock front makes the gas observable at high latitudes.

  11. Premixed flame propagation in vertical tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakov, Kirill A.

    2016-04-01

    Analytical treatment of the premixed flame propagation in vertical tubes with smooth walls is given. Using the on-shell flame description, equations for a quasi-steady flame with a small but finite front thickness are obtained and solved numerically. It is found that near the limits of inflammability, solutions describing upward flame propagation come in pairs having close propagation speeds and that the effect of gravity is to reverse the burnt gas velocity profile generated by the flame. On the basis of these results, a theory of partial flame propagation driven by a strong gravitational field is developed. A complete explanation is given of the intricate observed behavior of limit flames, including dependence of the inflammability range on the size of the combustion domain, the large distances of partial flame propagation, and the progression of flame extinction. The role of the finite front-thickness effects is discussed in detail. Also, various mechanisms governing flame acceleration in smooth tubes are identified. Acceleration of methane-air flames in open tubes is shown to be a combined effect of the hydrostatic pressure difference produced by the ambient cold air and the difference of dynamic gas pressure at the tube ends. On the other hand, a strong spontaneous acceleration of the fast methane-oxygen flames at the initial stage of their evolution in open-closed tubes is conditioned by metastability of the quasi-steady propagation regimes. An extensive comparison of the obtained results with the experimental data is made.

  12. Functionalization of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Snyders, Rony; Colomer, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    Summary This review focuses and summarizes recent studies on the functionalization of carbon nanotubes oriented perpendicularly to their substrate, so-called vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VA-CNTs). The intrinsic properties of individual nanotubes make the VA-CNTs ideal candidates for integration in a wide range of devices, and many potential applications have been envisaged. These applications can benefit from the unidirectional alignment of the nanotubes, the large surface area, the high carbon purity, the outstanding electrical conductivity, and the uniformly long length. However, practical uses of VA-CNTs are limited by their surface characteristics, which must be often modified in order to meet the specificity of each particular application. The proposed approaches are based on the chemical modifications of the surface by functionalization (grafting of functional chemical groups, decoration with metal particles or wrapping of polymers) to bring new properties or to improve the interactions between the VA-CNTs and their environment while maintaining the alignment of CNTs. PMID:23504581

  13. Temporal variability of vertical export flux at the DYFAMED time-series station (Northwestern Mediterranean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimbürger, Lars-Eric; Lavigne, Héloïse; Migon, Christophe; D'Ortenzio, Fabrizio; Estournel, Claude; Coppola, Laurent; Miquel, Juan-Carlos

    2013-12-01

    The temporal evolution of the vertical export flux at the DYFAMED time-series station (Ligurian Sea) over the last 20 years reveals a strong interannual variability. Winter convection allows particulate (and dissolved) matter to be vertically exported (“flush-down” effect). The efficiency of this process determines also the concentration of nutrients brought to surface waters and, therefore, the intensity of the subsequent phytoplankton bloom. The sequence “convection-bloom” is the main driving force of vertical export flux in this region. The present work attempts to better identify the parameters that control vertical export flux dynamics by observing a 20 year time-series in relation with the temporal variability of mixed layer depth and surface primary production. The consequences of a more stratified water column in the future on biological productivity and vertical export flux are pointed out. In winter, the cooling of surface water, combined with evaporation, increases its density and determines the vertical convection. This allows for a rapid downward transfer of dissolved and particulate matter, yielding high vertical export flux. This “flush-down effect” results from a combination of convection and gravitational flux, since the diving of dense surface waters breaks the stratification of the water column and carries all material (particulate + dissolved) accumulated in the surface layer to depth. The rapid downward transfer of dissolved and particulate matter by this “flush-down effect” yields high vertical export fluxes. The magnitude of these fluxes may vary according to the amount of atmospheric material accumulated in surface waters during the preceding stratified period. In the present data set, highest vertical export fluxes were observed in 1999, 2003 and 2004. In those years, the MLD was greater (Fig. 2), suggesting a causal relationship between the efficiency of vertical mixing and the subsequent vertical export flux. In spring, nutrients brought to surface waters by the vertical mixing trigger phytoplankton blooms, which generate new material for the vertical transfer of dissolved and particulate matter. Maximum Chl-a occurs shortly after the MLD maximum. Gačić et al. (2002) observed a marked seasonal variability of POC fluxes in the Adriatic Sea. Spring maxima are associated with phytoplankton blooms. In spite of interannual variations in the intensity of the phytoplankton blooms, their seasonal distribution and biomass abundance are reproducible (Marty et al., 2002), with maximum values of carbon assimilation in March and April (Marty and Chiavérini, 2002; Fig. 2). Indeed, high vertical export fluxes were observed within the present dataset in spring, as a result of biological productivity (e.g. 2000). In summer and fall, the heating of the sea surface results in a stratified water column with a shallow ML which is rapidly exhausted of nutrients. During such oligotrophic conditions (June to November), the concentrations of biogenic matter in the photic layer are minimal. Therefore, owing to insignificant transfer of POC, atmospherically-transported individual particles presumably do not sink (or sink with negligible sinking velocity), according to Stokesian settling calculations (Stokes, 1901). In the absence of packaging into large biogenic material (adsorption onto phytoplanktonic debris or incorporation into fecal pellets), atmospheric particles thus accumulate in the surface ML. In addition, dissolved atmospheric matter (e.g., from atmospheric wet deposition) is not removed from surface waters via its assimilation by phytoplankton, and it accumulates in the surface ML (e.g. dissolved organic matter (DOM); (Copin-Montégut and Avril, 1993)). Consequently, the lowest vertical export fluxes are observed during this period of the year. For example, years 2003 and 2004 exhibited minimal vertical export fluxes during summer and fall (Fig. 2). However, summer 2002 was unusual, with relatively a high vertical export flux. This resulted from the combination of particularly strong summer stratification and the erosion of the thermocline by wind gales in late summer, with the subsequent release of the organic particulates accumulated above the pycnocline (Martín and Miquel, 2010).

  14. Novel applications of short and ultra-short pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stral, M.; Kopecek, H.; Weinrotter, M.; Bcker, A.; Al-Janabi, A. H.; Wieger, V.; Wintner, E.

    2005-07-01

    This paper offers recent successful examples for the application of nanosecond (ns) as well as picosecond (ps) and femtosecond (fs) laser pulses to media of gaseous, liquid or solid nature via non-linear interactions as a review, the laser ignition and dental ultra-short pulse interaction being parts of the authors' own work. Plasma-initiated ignition of combustible gas mixtures represents a potential alternative way for long-lasting operation of gas engines with rather clean exhaust. Ultra-short pulses are useful for materials processing including dental hard tissue. Using miniaturized scanners of different types yields perfect cavity sizes without collateral damage at ablation rates coming close to mechanical drills in dentistry.

  15. Effects of Vertical Scaling Methods on Linear Growth Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lei, Pui-Wa; Zhao, Yu

    2012-01-01

    Vertical scaling is necessary to facilitate comparison of scores from test forms of different difficulty levels. It is widely used to enable the tracking of student growth in academic performance over time. Most previous studies on vertical scaling methods assume relatively long tests and large samples. Little is known about their performance when…

  16. Experimental Vertical Stability Studies for ITER Performance and Design Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, D A; Casper, T A; Eidietis, N; Ferrera, M; Gates, D A; Hutchinson, I H; Jackson, G L; Kolemen, E; Leuer, J A; Lister, J; LoDestro, L L; Meyer, W H; Pearlstein, L D; Sartori, F; Walker, M L; Welander, A S; Wolfe, S M

    2008-10-13

    Operating experimental devices have provided key inputs to the design process for ITER axisymmetric control. In particular, experiments have quantified controllability and robustness requirements in the presence of realistic noise and disturbance environments, which are difficult or impossible to characterize with modeling and simulation alone. This kind of information is particularly critical for ITER vertical control, which poses some of the highest demands on poloidal field system performance, since the consequences of loss of vertical control can be very severe. The present work describes results of multi-machine studies performed under a joint ITPA experiment on fundamental vertical control performance and controllability limits. We present experimental results from Alcator C-Mod, DIII-D, NSTX, TCV, and JET, along with analysis of these data to provide vertical control performance guidance to ITER. Useful metrics to quantify this control performance include the stability margin and maximum controllable vertical displacement. Theoretical analysis of the maximum controllable vertical displacement suggests effective approaches to improving performance in terms of this metric, with implications for ITER design modifications. Typical levels of noise in the vertical position measurement which can challenge the vertical control loop are assessed and analyzed.

  17. Experimental vertical stability studies for ITER performance and design guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, D. A.; Casper, T. A.; Eidietis, N.; Ferrara, M.; Gates, D. A.; Hutchinson, I. H.; Jackson, G. L.; Kolemen, E.; Leuer, J. A.; Lister, J.; Lo Destro, L. L.; Meyer, W. H.; Pearlstein, L. D.; Portone, A.; Sartori, F.; Walker, M. L.; Welander, A. S.; Wolfe, S. M.

    2009-11-01

    Operating experimental devices have provided key inputs to the design process for ITER axisymmetric control. In particular, experiments have quantified controllability and robustness requirements in the presence of realistic noise and disturbance environments, which are difficult or impossible to characterize with modelling and simulation alone. This kind of information is particularly critical for ITER vertical control, which poses the highest demands on poloidal field system performance, since the consequences of loss of vertical control can be severe. This work describes results of multi-machine studies performed under a joint ITPA experiment (MDC-13) on fundamental vertical control performance and controllability limits. We present experimental results from Alcator C-Mod, DIII-D, NSTX, TCV and JET, along with analysis of these data to provide vertical control performance guidance to ITER. Useful metrics to quantify this control performance include the stability margin and maximum controllable vertical displacement. Theoretical analysis of the maximum controllable vertical displacement suggests effective approaches to improving performance in terms of this metric, with implications for ITER design modifications. Typical levels of noise in the vertical position measurement and several common disturbances which can challenge the vertical control loop are assessed and analysed.

  18. Vertical distribution of phosphorus in agricultural drainage ditch soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pedological processes such as gleization and organic matter accumulation may affect the vertical distribution of P within agricultural drainage ditch soils. The objective of this study was to assess the vertical distribution of P as a function of horizonation in ditch soils at the University of Mary...

  19. Perception of Verticality by Boys and Girls in Grade 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Johnson, Wallace S.

    1980-01-01

    Understanding of the principle of verticality was tested by having 246 sixth-grade students draw a pendulum on pictures of an abstract shape similar to a steeple. Girls performed more poorly than boys. Verticality was apparently much better understood by subjects than horizontality, also tested to provide a comparison. (Author)

  20. Understanding Functions without Using the Vertical Line Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Eileen

    2005-01-01

    Study was conducted on how the students were made to think meaningfully and widely within and across the representations in solving and identifying functions in precalculus, without the usage of the vertical line test. It was concluded that the "no vertical line testing" method proved to be easily accessible by all students and also made them…

  1. SeedChaser: Vertical soil tillage distribution model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of the vertical distribution of surface residues, chemicals, or seeds following tillage operations is of paramount importance to a wide variety of soil research areas. This paper describes a 1-D empirical vertical soil tillage distribution model with 1-cm grid spacing (SeedChaser) that pre...

  2. Subjective Visual Vertical and Postural Performance in Healthy Children

    PubMed Central

    Gaertner, Chrystal; Bucci, Maria Pia; Obeid, Rima; Wiener-Vacher, Sylvette

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Verticality is essential in our life, especially for postural stability. Subjective vertical as well as postural stability depends on different sensorial information: visual, vestibular and somesthesic. They help to build the spatial referentials and create a central representation of verticality. Children are more visuo-dependant than adults; however, we did not find any study focusing on how children develop their sense of verticality. Methods We studied two groups of subjects: 10 children (from 6 to 8 years) and 12 young adults. We recorded postural stability with a Techno Concept plateform and perception of subjective visual vertical in the following conditions: while adjusting the vertical in the dark or with visual perturbation, while fixating the vertical bar, and with eyes closed. Results Children are more instable than adults in terms of postural parameters, and also while performing a double task, especially when no visual references are present. They also present a higher variability and lower accuracy than adults in reporting their perception of true vertical reference. Discussion Children might have limited attentional resources, and focus their attention on the more demanding task, corresponding to the U-shaped non-linear model. PMID:24236146

  3. Competency-Based Route to Vertical Curriculum Articulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burger, Laura; And Others

    What competency-based instruction is and how it can help improve vertical articulation between the curriculum of secondary and postsecondary vocational-technical education programs in Minnesota is the focus of this booklet. Explanation consists of responses to the following questions: (1) What is vertical curriculum articulation? (2) What is…

  4. Vertical Heterophoria and Susceptibility to Visually-induced Motion Sickness

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Danielle N.; Bedell, Harold E.

    2013-01-01

    Motion sickness is reported to be a common symptom in patients with vertical heterophoria. The goal of this study was to assess the relationship between vertical phoria and susceptibility to motion sickness in a non-clinical sample of 43 subjects. Vertical phoria was measured with a Maddox rod after 30 s of occlusion. To evaluate susceptibility to motion sickness, subjects read text while sitting inside a rotating optokinetic drum for 10 min. Subjects rated their level of motion sickness at 1 min intervals during drum rotation and the magnitude of 13 motion-sickness symptoms after drum rotation ended. The magnitude of vertical phoria ranged from 0 to 2.13 prism diopters (pd) with a mean of 0.46 pd and correlated significantly with both the maximum rating of motion sickness during drum rotation and the summed symptom score following rotation. A vertical phoria of 0.75 pd discriminated best between subjects with low vs. high summed motion-sickness-symptom scores (p < 0.0001). Introducing a prism to artificially increase the phoria of 12 subjects with vertical phorias < 0.75 pd increased motion-sickness symptoms in only 1 subject. Prisms that reduced the phoria of subjects with vertical phorias > 0.75 pd reduced motion-sickness symptoms in 2 of the 4 subjects tested. The results confirm an association between vertical phoria and motion sickness, but suggest the relationship may not be causal. PMID:22390327

  5. SIMPLE PDF MODELS FOR CONVECTIVELY DRIVEN VERTICAL DIFFUSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mode of vertical velocity in convective boundary layers is usually negative and the probability distribution function(PDF) of w, pw is rarely symmetrlc. Consequently, vertical diffusion from elevated sources is usually asymmetric and exhibits a descending mode of concentratio...

  6. Rasch Simultaneous Vertical Equating for Measuring Reading Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Ong Kim

    2003-01-01

    Compared the observation of children's growth in reading using grade equivalents with that using the Rasch simultaneous vertical equating procedure. Results from equating 25 reading tests show that grade equivalents differ more between two different test forms than do ability measures obtained from the Rasch simultaneous vertical equating. (SLD)

  7. Half-State Readout In Vertical-Bloch-Line Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, Romney R.; Wu, Jiin-Chuan; Stadler, Henry L.

    1994-01-01

    Potentially narrow margins of chirality-based chopping of magnetic stripes avoided. Half-state readout is experimental method of readout in Vertical-Bloch-Line (VBL) memory. Based on differential deflections of magnetic stripe domains in which data bits stored. To give meaning to explanation of half-state readout, see "Vertical-Bloch-Line Memory" (NPO-18467).

  8. 19. VIEW SOUTHWEST OF INTERMEDIATE VERTICAL PENNSYLVANIA PETIT TRUSS WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. VIEW SOUTHWEST OF INTERMEDIATE VERTICAL PENNSYLVANIA PETIT TRUSS WITH CASTLE ROCK IN BACKGROUND. JUNCTION OF INTERMEDIATE VERTICAL AND TOP CHORD WITH STABILIZING LATERAL STRUT ABOVE AND SWAY STRUT BELOW. ORIGINAL PAIRED DIAGONAL EYE BARS LATER REINFORCED WITH TIE ROD - New River Bridge, Spanning New River at State Route 623, Pembroke, Giles County, VA

  9. The Subjective Visual Vertical: Validation of a Simple Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tesio, Luigi; Longo, Stefano; Rota, Viviana

    2011-01-01

    The study sought to provide norms for a simple test of visual perception of verticality (subjective visual vertical). The study was designed as a cohort study with a balanced design. The setting was the Rehabilitation Department of a University Hospital. Twenty-two healthy adults, of 23-58 years, 11 men (three left handed) and 11 women (three left…

  10. Synthetic Convection Log — Characterization of vertical transport processes in fluid-filled boreholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthold, Susann

    2010-09-01

    Two main types of vertical convective flows play an important role in transport along the fluid column: forced convective and free convective flows. Forced vertical convection in fluid-filled boreholes (short-circuit flow) can be detected by means of borehole measurements, e.g. different types of flowmeters, temperature logs, and fluid-logging. For detecting free vertical convection (natural convection), so far, no special logging device or interpretation algorithm was available. This paper presents a new synthetic borehole log, the so-called Synthetic Convection Log (SYNCO-Log). It enables in-situ detection and identification of free convective, including double-diffusive, flows using state-of-the-art geophysical borehole measurements. Vertical convection in fluid-filled boreholes is known to lead to transport of heat and mass. Thus, understanding free convective flow is crucial for geothermics, borehole geophysics, hydrological investigations, and meaningful fluid sampling. The SYNCO-Log is divided into two closely linked parts: (1) the cause-oriented approach compares the situation along the fluid column with critical thresholds for the onset of free convection and (2) the effect-oriented approach separates the anomalies and patterns in fluid quality that are induced by free convection. Inputs for the interpretation algorithm are simultaneously acquired temperature and mudresistivity (or fluid conductivity) logs, hydraulic pressure, and borehole diameter. Output of the algorithm is a computer generated, descriptive illustration of the results including a classified plot for delineating the type of flow. The reliability of the SYNCO-Log is high, as causes and effects, i.e. driving forces and resulting heat and mass transport, are simultaneously identified. Its applicability and the relevance of the results are shown on the example of borehole measurements from the KTB-MH deep crustal borehole, located in the Bavarian region of Germany.

  11. Ontogenetic vertical migration of grenadiers revealed by otolith microstructures and stable isotopic composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hsien-Yung; Shiao, Jen-Chieh; Chen, Yue-Gau; Iizuka, Yoshiyuki

    2012-03-01

    Otolith δ18O and δ13C of six species grenadiers were analyzed to reconstruct the historical residing depths and metabolic activity. During the larval to juvenile stage, Spicomacrurus kuronumai, Hymenocephalus lethonemus, and Bathygadus nipponicus gradually migrated from the mixed layer to the thermocline downward over a vertical distance >140 m after which they moved within a narrow vertical range for the remaining life. The downward migration distance was less than 65 m during the larval stage of Hymenocephalus sp. and Coryphaenoides acrolepis, which showed a second descent period from the thermocline to deeper water as juveniles. Coryphaenoides marginatus stayed at the lower thermocline during the larval stage and the juveniles migrated downward in a relative short distance around 100 m and settled in deeper water (>600 m), followed by irregular movements over a vertical range of about 200 m during juvenile and adult stages. The otolith δ13C profile suggested that fishes (S. kuronumai, H. lethonemus, and B. nipponicus) with a longer migration distance had a higher metabolic rate in their early life-history stages than in the later stages. However, the metabolic rate did not vary for those fishes (H. sp., C. acrolepis and C. marginatus) living within a narrow vertical range during their larval to adult stages. The otolith microchemistry suggested that ontogenetic downward migration was an important strategy for grenadiers linking the life stages between pelagic larvae and benthic settlement. Furthermore, the migration timing and distance for the pelagic larvae varied between species and habitats. S. kuronumai, H. lethonemus, H. sp. and C. acrolepis might metamorphose and settle at the same time, B. nipponicus metamorphosed during migration and C. marginatus migrated as juveniles.

  12. A dynamic optimization model of the diel vertical distribution of a pelagic planktivorous fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosland, Rune; Giske, Jarl

    A stochastic dynamic optimization model for the diel depth distribution of juveniles and adults of the mesopelagic planktivore Maurolicus muelleri (Gmelin) is developed and used for a winter situation. Observations from Masfjorden, western Norway, reveal differences in vertical distribution, growth and mortality between juveniles and adults in January. Juveniles stay within the upper 100m with high feeding rates, while adults stay within the 100-150m zone with very low feeding rates during the diel cycle. The difference in depth profitability is assumed to be caused by age-dependent processes, and are calculated from a mechanistic model for visual feeding. The environment is described as a set of habitats represented by discrete depth intervals along the vertical axis, differing with respect to light intensity, food abundance, predation risk and temperature. The short time interval (24h) allows fitness to be linearly related to growth (feeding), assuming that growth increases the future reproductive output of the fish. Optimal depth position is calculated from balancing feeding opportunity against mortality risk, where the fitness reward gained by feeding is weighted against the danger of being killed by a predator. A basic run is established, and the model is validated by comparing predictions and observations. The sensitivity for different parameter values is also tested. The modelled vertical distributions and feeding patterns of juvenile and adult fish correspond well with the observations, and the assumption of age differences in mortality-feeding trade-offs seems adequate to explain the different depth profitability of the two age groups. The results indicate a preference for crepuscular feeding activity of the juveniles, and the vertical distribution of zooplankton seems to be the most important environmental factor regulating the adult depth position during the winter months in Masfjorden.

  13. Vertical δ13C and δ15N changes during pedogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunn, Melanie; Spielvogel, Sandra; Wells, Andrew; Condron, Leo; Oelmann, Yvonne

    2015-04-01

    The natural abundance of soil organic matter (SOM) stable C and N isotope ratios are subjected to vertical changes throughout the soil profile. This vertical distribution is a widely reported phenomenon across varieties of ecosystems and constitutes important insights of soil carbon cycling. In most ecosystems, SOM becomes enriched in heavy isotopes by several per mill in the first few centimeters of the topsoil. The enrichment of 13C in SOM with soil depth is attributed to biological and physical-chemical processes in soil e.g., plant physiological impacts, microbial decomposition, sorption and transport processes. Such vertical trends in 13C and 15N abundance have rarely been related to SOM composition during pedogenesis. The aims of our study were to investigate short and long-term δ13C and δ15N depth changes and their interrelations under progressing pedogenesis and ecosystem development. We sampled soils across the well studied fordune progradation Haast-chronosequence, a dune ridge system under super-humid climate at the West Coast of New Zealand's South Island (43° 53' S, 169° 3' E). Soils from 11 sites with five replicates each covered a time span of around 2870 yr of soil development (from Arenosol to Podzol). Vertical changes of δ13C and δ15N values of SOM were investigated in the organic layers and in 1-cm depth intervals of the upper 10 cm of the mineral soil. With increasing soil depth SOM became enriched in δ13C by 1.9 ± SE 0.1 o and in δ15N by 6.0 ± 0.4 ‰˙Litter δ13C values slightly decreased with increasing soil age (r = -0.61; p = 0.00) likely due to less efficient assimilation linked to nutrient limitations. Fractionation processes during mycorrhizal transfer appeared to affect δ15N values in the litter. We found a strong decrease of δ15N in the early succession stages ≤ 300 yr B.P. (r = -0.95; p = 0.00). Positive relations of vertical 13C and 15N enrichment with soil age might be related to decomposition and appeared to be affected by a change of hydrology, nutrient limitations, secondary minerals and root impacts. The investigation of vertical changes of soil organic matter (SOM) stable isotope ratios provides the opportunity to detect combined processes that enhance our understanding of terrestrial ecosystem functioning and pedogenetic processes leading to stabilization/destabilization in soil and therefore addressing the soil's sink/source function.

  14. Vertical Wellbore Flow Monitoring for Assessing Spatial and Temporal Flow Relationships with a Dynamic River Boundary

    SciTech Connect

    Newcomer, Darrell R.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Vermeul, Vincent R.

    2010-10-01

    A useful tool for identifying the temporal and spatial ambient wellbore flow relationships near a dynamic river boundary is to continuously monitor ambient vertical wellbore flow with an electromagnetic borehole flowmeter (EBF). This is important because the presence of the wellbore can result in significant mixing or exchange of groundwater vertically across the aquifer. Mixing or exchanging groundwater within the well-screen section can have significant impacts on the distribution of contaminants within the aquifer and adverse effects on the representativeness of groundwater samples collected from the monitoring well. EBF monitoring data collected from long, fully screened wells at Hanford’s 300-Area Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site, located ~260 to 290 m from the Columbia River, demonstrate that ambient vertical wellbore flow exhibits both a positive (direct) and inverse temporal relationship with periodic river-stage fluctuations over short distances. The ambient flow monitoring wells fully penetrate a highly transmissive unconfined aquifer that consists of unconsolidated coarse sediments of the Hanford formation. The spatial distribution of ambient vertical wellbore flows across the IFRC’s ~2,200 m2 well-field size indicates two general regions of inverse ambient wellbore flow behavior. The western region of the IFRC site is characterized by ambient vertical wellbore flows that are positively related to river-stage fluctuations. In contrast, the eastern region of the site exhibits ambient wellbore flows that are inversely related to river-stage fluctuations. The cause of this opposite relationship between ambient wellbore flows and river-stage changes is not completely understood; however, the positive relationships appear to be associated with high-energy Hanford formation flood deposits. These flood deposits have a well-defined northwest-southeast trend and are believed to coincide with a local paleochannel. This local paleochannel bisects the site and connects to larger, more regionally developed flood paleochannels that laterally connect to the north and south across the 300 Area and the Hanford Site. The inverse relationships are attributed to an erosional, subsurface high in the Hanford/Ringold formation contact between the IFRC site and the Columbia River. Under these complex hydrogeologic and hydrodynamic conditions, the behavior of ambient vertical wellbore flow in monitoring wells near a dynamic river boundary can have important implications for collecting groundwater-quality samples, for contributing to contaminant distribution and transport within an aquifer system, and for implementing effective remediation strategies.

  15. Graphene vertical hot-electron terahertz detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ryzhii, V.; Satou, A.; Otsuji, T.; Ryzhii, M.; Mitin, V.; Shur, M. S.

    2014-09-21

    We propose and analyze the concept of the vertical hot-electron terahertz (THz) graphene-layer detectors (GLDs) based on the double-GL and multiple-GL structures with the barrier layers made of materials with a moderate conduction band off-set (such as tungsten disulfide and related materials). The operation of these detectors is enabled by the thermionic emissions from the GLs enhanced by the electrons heated by incoming THz radiation. Hence, these detectors are the hot-electron bolometric detectors. The electron heating is primarily associated with the intraband absorption (the Drude absorption). In the frame of the developed model, we calculate the responsivity and detectivity as functions of the photon energy, GL doping, and the applied voltage for the GLDs with different number of GLs. The detectors based on the cascade multiple-GL structures can exhibit a substantial photoelectric gain resulting in the elevated responsivity and detectivity. The advantages of the THz detectors under consideration are associated with their high sensitivity to the normal incident radiation and efficient operation at room temperature at the low end of the THz frequency range. Such GLDs with a metal grating, supporting the excitation of plasma oscillations in the GL-structures by the incident THz radiation, can exhibit a strong resonant response at the frequencies of several THz (in the range, where the operation of the conventional detectors based on A{sub 3}B{sub 5} materials, in particular, THz quantum-well detectors, is hindered due to a strong optical phonon radiation absorption in such materials). We also evaluate the characteristics of GLDs in the mid- and far-infrared ranges where the electron heating is due to the interband absorption in GLs.

  16. Hydrodynamics of a vertical hydraulic fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimhan, T.N.

    1987-03-24

    We have developed a numerical algorithm, HUBBERT, to simulate the hydrodynamics of a propagating vertical, rectangular fracture in an elastic porous medium. Based on the IFD method, this algorithm assumes fracture geometry to be prescribed. The breakdown and the creation of the incipient fracture is carried out according to the Hubbert-Willis theory. The propagation of the fracture is based on the criterion provided by Griffith, based on energy considerations. The deformation properties of the open fracture are based on simple elasticity solutions. The fracture is assumed to have an elliptical shape to a distance equal to the fracture height, beyond which the shape is assumed to be parallel plate. A consequence of Griffith's criterion is that the fracture must propagate in discrete steps. The parametric studies carried out suggest that for a clear understanding of the hydrodynamics of the hydraulic fracture many hitherto unrecognized parameters must be better understood. Among these parameters one might mention, efficiency, aperture of the newly formed fracture, stiffness of the newly formed fracture, relation between fracture aperture and permeability, and well bore compliance. The results of the studies indicate that the patterns of pressure transients and the magnitudes of fracture length appear to conform to field observations. In particular, the discrete nature of fracture propagation as well as the relevant time scales of interest inferred from the present work seem to be corroborated by seismic monitoring in the field. The results suggest that the estimation of least principal stress can be reliably made either with shut in data or with reinjection data provided that injection rates are very small.

  17. Vertical diffusivities of active and passive tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Cheng, Y.; Howard, A. M.

    The climate models that include a carbon-cycle need the vertical diffusivity of a passive tracer. Since an expression for the latter is not available, it has been common practice to identify it with that of salt. The identification is questionable since T, S are active, not passive tracers. We present the first derivation of the diffusivity of a passive tracer in terms of Ri (Richardson number) and R ρ (density ratio, ratio of salinity over temperature z-gradients). The following results have emerged: The passive tracer diffusivity is an algebraic function of Ri, R ρ. In doubly stable regimes (DS, ∂ T/∂z > 0, ∂S/∂ z < 0), the passive scalar diffusivity is nearly the same as that of salt/heat for any values of R ρ < 0 and Ri > 0. In DC regimes (diffusive convection, ∂ T/∂ z < 0, ∂ S/∂ z < 0, R ρ > 1), the passive scalar diffusivity is larger than that of salt. At Ri = O(1), it can be more than twice as large. In SF regimes (salt fingers, ∂ T/∂ z > 0, ∂ S/∂ z > 0, R ρ < 1), the passive scalar diffusivity is smaller than that of salt. At Ri = O(1), it can be less than half of it. The passive tracer diffusivity predicted at the location of NATRE (North Atlantic Tracer Release Experiment) is discussed. Perhaps the most relevant conclusion is that the common identification of the tracer diffusivity with that of salt is valid only in DS regimes. In the Southern Ocean, where there is the largest CO 2 absorption, the dominant regime is diffusive convection discussed in (c) above.

  18. Spirit Near 'Stapledon' on Sol 1802 (Vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its navigation camera for the images assembled into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,802nd Martian day, or sol, (January 26, 2009) of Spirit's mission on the surface of Mars. North is at the top.

    This view is presented as a vertical projection with geometric seam correction.

    Spirit had driven down off the low plateau called 'Home Plate' on Sol 1782 (January 6, 2009) after spending 12 months on a north-facing slope on the northern edge of Home Plate. The position on the slope (at about the 9-o'clock position in this view) tilted Spirit's solar panels toward the sun, enabling the rover to generate enough electricity to survive its third Martian winter. Tracks at about the 11-o'clock position of this panorama can be seen leading back to that 'Winter Haven 3' site from the Sol 1802 position about 10 meters (33 feet) away. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about one meter (40 inches).

    Where the receding tracks bend to the left, a circular pattern resulted from Spirit turning in place at a soil target informally named 'Stapledon' after William Olaf Stapledon, a British philosopher and science-fiction author who lived from 1886 to 1950. Scientists on the rover team suspected that the soil in that area might have a high concentration of silica, resembling a high-silica soil patch discovered east of Home Plate in 2007. Bright material visible in the track furthest to the right was examined with Spirit's alpha partical X-ray spectrometer and found, indeed, to be rich in silica.

    The team laid plans to drive Spirit from this Sol 1802 location back up onto Home Plate, then southward for the rover's summer field season.

  19. 'Victoria Crater' from 'Duck Bay' (Vertical Projection)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Mars rover Opportunity edged 3.7 meters (12 feet) closer to the top of the 'Duck Bay' alcove along the rim of 'Victoria Crater' during the rover's 952nd Martian day, or sol (overnight Sept. 27 to Sept. 28), and gained this vista of the crater. The rover's navigation camera took the seven exposures combined into this mosaic view of the crater's interior. This crater has been the mission's long-term destination for the past 21 Earth months.

    The far side of the crater is about 800 meters (one-half mile) away. The rim of the crater is composed of alternating promontories, rocky points towering approximately 70 meters (230 feet) above the crater floor, and recessed alcoves, such as Duck Bay. The bottom of the crater is covered by sand that has been shaped into ripples by the Martian wind. The rocky cliffs in the foreground have been informally named 'Cape Verde,' on the left, and 'Cabo Frio,' on the right.

    Victoria Crater is about five times wider than 'Endurance Crater,' which Opportunity spent six months examining in 2004, and about 40 times wider than 'Eagle Crater,' where Opportunity first landed. The great lure of Victoria is an expectation that the thick stack of geological layers exposed in the crater walls could reveal the record of past environmental conditions over a much greater span of time than Opportunity has read from rocks examined earlier in the mission.

    This view is presented as a vertical projection with geometric seam correction.

  20. Vertical Diffusivities of Active and Passive Tracers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Cheng, Y.; Howard, A. M.

    2010-01-01

    The climate models that include a carbon-cycle need the vertical diffusivity of a passive tracer. Since an expression for the latter is not available, it has been common practice to identify it with that of salt. The identification is questionable since T, S are active, not passive tracers. We present the first derivation of the diffusivity of a passive tracer in terms of Ri (Richardson number) and Rq (density ratio, ratio of salinity over temperature z-gradients). The following results have emerged: (a) The passive tracer diffusivity is an algebraic function of Ri, Rq. (b) In doubly stable regimes (DS, partial derivative of T with respect to z > 0, partial derivative of S with respect to z < 0), the passive scalar diffusivity is nearly the same as that of salt/heat for any values of Rq < 0 and Ri > 0. (c) In DC regimes (diffusive convection, partial derivative of T with respect to z < 0, partial derivative of S with respect to z < 0, Rq > 1), the passive scalar diffusivity is larger than that of salt. At Ri = O(1), it can be more than twice as large. (d) In SF regimes (salt fingers, partial derivative of T with respect to z > 0, partial derivative of S with respect to z > 0, Rq < 1), the passive scalar diffusivity is smaller than that of salt. At Ri = O(1), it can be less than half of it. (e) The passive tracer diffusivity predicted at the location of NATRE (North Atlantic Tracer Release Experiment) is discussed. (f) Perhaps the most relevant conclusion is that the common identification of the tracer diffusivity with that of salt is valid only in DS regimes. In the Southern Ocean, where there is the largest CO2 absorption, the dominant regime is diffusive convection discussed in (c) above.

  1. Doppler Lidar Vertical Velocity Statistics Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect

    Newsom, R. K.; Sivaraman, C.; Shippert, T. R.; Riihimaki, L. D.

    2015-07-01

    Accurate height-resolved measurements of higher-order statistical moments of vertical velocity fluctuations are crucial for improved understanding of turbulent mixing and diffusion, convective initiation, and cloud life cycles. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility operates coherent Doppler lidar systems at several sites around the globe. These instruments provide measurements of clear-air vertical velocity profiles in the lower troposphere with a nominal temporal resolution of 1 sec and height resolution of 30 m. The purpose of the Doppler lidar vertical velocity statistics (DLWSTATS) value-added product (VAP) is to produce height- and time-resolved estimates of vertical velocity variance, skewness, and kurtosis from these raw measurements. The VAP also produces estimates of cloud properties, including cloud-base height (CBH), cloud frequency, cloud-base vertical velocity, and cloud-base updraft fraction.

  2. The oceanic vertical pump induced by mesoscale and submesoscale turbulence.

    PubMed

    Klein, Patrice; Lapeyre, Guillaume

    2009-01-01

    The motivation to study the vertical exchanges of tracers associated with mesoscale eddies is that the mean concentration of most oceanic tracers changes rapidly with depth. Because mesoscale processes may transport these tracers vertically, biogeochemists hypothesized that these vertical exchanges may strongly affect global tracer budgets. This hypothesis has motivated a large number of biogeochemical studies that we review here by focusing on the significant advances that have been achieved and the remaining issues and uncertainties. The main question that emerges concerns the importance of the submesoscales (10 km in the horizontal) in these vertical exchanges. Independently, in the past decade, fluid dynamicists examined the three-dimensional properties of submesoscales generated by a mesoscale (100 km in the horizontal) turbulent eddy field. We review their results and discuss how the vertical exchanges associated with these submesoscales may answer the issues raised by biogeochemical studies and inspire future directions. PMID:21141041

  3. Theoretic base of Edge Local Mode triggering by vertical displacements

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z. T.; He, Z. X.; Wang, Z. H.; Wu, N.; Tang, C. J.

    2015-05-15

    Vertical instability is studied with R-dependent displacement. For Solovev's configuration, the stability boundary of the vertical instability is calculated. The pressure gradient is a destabilizing factor which is contrary to Rebhan's result. Equilibrium parallel current density, j{sub //}, at plasma boundary is a drive of the vertical instability similar to Peeling-ballooning modes; however, the vertical instability cannot be stabilized by the magnetic shear which tends towards infinity near the separatrix. The induced current observed in the Edge Local Mode (ELM) triggering experiment by vertical modulation is derived. The theory provides some theoretic explanation for the mitigation of type-I ELMS on ASDEX Upgrade. The principle could be also used for ITER.

  4. Impact of Vertical Wind Shear on Tropical Cyclone Rainfall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecil, Dan; Marchok, Tim

    2014-01-01

    While tropical cyclone rainfall has a large axisymmetric component, previous observational and theoretical studies have shown that environmental vertical wind shear leads to an asymmetric component of the vertical motion and precipitation fields. Composites consistently depict a precipitation enhancement downshear and also cyclonically downwind from the downshear direction. For consistence with much of the literature and with Northern Hemisphere observations, this is subsequently referred to as "Downshear-Left". Stronger shear magnitudes are associated with greater amplitude precipitation asymmetries. Recent work has reinforced the prior findings, and explored details of the response of the precipitation and kinematic fields to environmental vertical wind shear. Much of this research has focused on tropical cyclones away from land, to limit the influence of other processes that might distort the signal related to vertical wind shear. Recent evidence does suggest vertical wind shear can also play a major role in precipitation asymmetries during and after landfall.

  5. Steerable vertical to horizontal energy transducer for mobile robots

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.; Fischer, Gary J.; Feddema, John T.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a steerable vertical to horizontal energy transducer for mobile robots that less complex and requires less power than two degree of freedom tilt mechanisms. The present invention comprises an end effector that, when mounted with a hopping actuator, translates along axis (typically vertical) actuation into combined vertical and horizontal motion. The end effector, or foot, mounts with an end of the actuator that moves toward the support surface (typically a floor or the earth). The foot is shaped so that the first contact with the support surface is off the axis of the actuator. Off-axis contact with the support surface generates an on-axis force (typically resulting in vertical motion) and a moment orthogonal to the axis. The moment initiates a horizontal tumbling motion, and tilts the actuator so that its axis is oriented with a horizontal component and continued actuation generates both vertical and horizontal force.

  6. A vertical handoff decision algorithm based on ARMA prediction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ru; Shen, Jiao; Chen, Jun; Liu, Qiuhuan

    2012-01-01

    With the development of computer technology and the increasing demand for mobile communications, the next generation wireless networks will be composed of various wireless networks (e.g., WiMAX and WiFi). Vertical handoff is a key technology of next generation wireless networks. During the vertical handoff procedure, handoff decision is a crucial issue for an efficient mobility. Based on auto regression moving average (ARMA) prediction model, we propose a vertical handoff decision algorithm, which aims to improve the performance of vertical handoff and avoid unnecessary handoff. Based on the current received signal strength (RSS) and the previous RSS, the proposed approach adopt ARMA model to predict the next RSS. And then according to the predicted RSS to determine whether trigger the link layer triggering event and complete vertical handoff. The simulation results indicate that the proposed algorithm outperforms the RSS-based scheme with a threshold in the performance of handoff and the number of handoff.

  7. A vertical handoff decision algorithm based on ARMA prediction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ru; Shen, Jiao; Chen, Jun; Liu, Qiuhuan

    2011-12-01

    With the development of computer technology and the increasing demand for mobile communications, the next generation wireless networks will be composed of various wireless networks (e.g., WiMAX and WiFi). Vertical handoff is a key technology of next generation wireless networks. During the vertical handoff procedure, handoff decision is a crucial issue for an efficient mobility. Based on auto regression moving average (ARMA) prediction model, we propose a vertical handoff decision algorithm, which aims to improve the performance of vertical handoff and avoid unnecessary handoff. Based on the current received signal strength (RSS) and the previous RSS, the proposed approach adopt ARMA model to predict the next RSS. And then according to the predicted RSS to determine whether trigger the link layer triggering event and complete vertical handoff. The simulation results indicate that the proposed algorithm outperforms the RSS-based scheme with a threshold in the performance of handoff and the number of handoff.

  8. A Vertical Differential Configuration in GPR prospecting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persico, Raffaele; Pochanin, Gennadiy; Varianytsia-Roshchupkina, Liudmyla; Catapano, Ilaria; Gennarelli, Gianluca; Soldovieri, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    The rejection of the direct coupling between the antennas is an issue of interest in several GPR applications, especially when it is important to distinguish the targets of interest from the clutter and the signal reflected from the air soil interface. Therefore, in this framework several hardware and software strategies have been proposed. Among the software strategies, probably the most common one is the background removal [1], whereas as an hardware strategy the differential configuration has been introduced in [2-3] and then further on studied in [4] with respect to the spatial filtering properties of the relevant mathematical operator. In particular, the studies proposed in [1] and [4] have shown that, in general, all the strategies for the rejection of the direct coupling have necessarily some drawback, essentially because it is not possible to erase all and only the undesired contributions leaving "untouched" the contributions of the targets of interest to the gathered signal. With specific regard to the differential configuration, in [2-3], the differential configuration consisted in a couple of receiving antennas symmetrically placed around the transmitting one, being the three antennas placed along the same horizontal segment. Therefore, we might define that configuration as a "horizontal differential configuration". Here, we propose a novel differential GPR configuration, where the two receiving antennas are still symmetrically located with respect to the transmitting one, but are placed piled on each other at different heights from the air-soil interface, whereas the transmitting antenna is at the medium height between the two receiving one (however, it is not at the same abscissa but at a fixed horizontal offset from the receiving antennas). Such a differential configuration has been previously presented in [5-6] and allows a good isolation between the antennas, while preserving the possibility to collect backscattered signals from both electrically small objects and interfaces. This configuration can be labeled as a vertical differential configuration. At the conference, the reconstruction capabilities of this differential GPR configuration system will be discussed by means of an analysis of the problem based on a properly designed microwave tomographic inversion approach. The proposed approach exploits the Born approximation and faces the imaging as the solution of a linear inverse scattering problem. In this way, the problem of the local minima is avoided [7] and it is possible to impose some regularization to the problem in an easy way problem [8-9]. At the conference, a theoretical analysis of the mathematical propserties of the scattering operator under the vertical differential configuration will be presented showing that, with respect to the horizontal differential configuration, the vertical one allows to reject the direct coupling between the antennas but not the coupling of the antennas occurring through the air-soil interface. On the other hand, the filtering properties of the operator at hand con be considered, let say, less severe in some cases. At the conference, both some numerical and experimental results will be shown. References [1] R. Persico, F. Soldovieri, "Effects of the background removal in linear inverse scattering", IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens, vol. 46, pp. 1104-1114, April 2008. [2] L. Gurel, U. Oguz, "Three-Dimensional FDTD modeling of a ground penetrating radar", IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens, vol. 38, pp. 1513-1521, July 2000. [3] L. Gurel, U. Oguz, "Optimization of the transmitter-receiver separation in the ground penetrating radar", IEEE Trans. Antennas and Propag., vol. 51, no 3, pp. 362-370, March 2003. [4] R. Persico, F. Soldovieri, "A microwave tomography approach for a differential configuration in GPR prospecting", IEEE Trans. Antennas and Propag., vol. 54, pp. 3541 - 3548, 2006. [5] Y.A. Kopylov, S.A. Masalov, G.P. Pochanin, "The way of isolation between transmitting and receiving modules of antenna", Patent 81652 Ukraine: IPC (2006) H01Q 9/00 H01Q 19/10 / publ. 25.01.08, Bull. N. 2 [6] G.P. Pochanin, "Some Advances in UWB GPR," in "Unexploded Ordnance Detection and Mitigation, - NATO Science for Peace and Security Series -B: Physics and Biophysics - Ed. by Jim Byrnes, Springer: Dordrecht, (The Nederland), 2009. pp.223-233. [7] R. Persico, F. Soldovieri, R. Pierri, "Convergence Properties of a Quadratic Approach to the Inverse Scattering Problem", Journal of Optical Society of America Part A, vol. 19, n. 12, pp. 2424-2428, December 2002. [8] R. Pierri, G. Leone, F. Soldovieri, R. Persico, "Electromagnetic inversion for subsurface applications under the distorted Born approximation" Nuovo Cimento, vol. 24C, N. 2, pp 245-261, March-April 2001. [9] R. Persico, Introduction to ground penetrating Radar: Inverse Scattering and data Processing, in print on Wiley and Sons, 2014, ISBN 9781118305003.

  9. [Bone dysplasia with short limb].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Satsuma, Shinichi

    2008-12-01

    We described the condition of the disease, clinical appearance, X-rays appearance, orthopaedic problems about Achondroplasia, Pseudoachondroplasia, Metaphyseal Chondrodysplasia (Schmid type) , Mesomelic dysplasia (Dyschondrosteosis) as a representative bone dysplasia who present a short stature with short limbs. Clinical features are almost evident at birth in the patient with Achondroplasia. However, in other cases, there is no specific finding on clinically and radiologically at birth. Clinical and radiological findings develop slowly from period for childhood. It is considered that the diagnosis is not difficult since each of them have characteristic clinical features and X-rays views, only if examining them carefully. Correct and rapid diagnosis would be important for having a good relationship with patients. PMID:19043194

  10. Optimal Short-Sighted Rules

    PubMed Central

    Bourgeois-Gironde, Sacha

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to assess the relevance of methodological transfers from behavioral ecology to experimental economics with respect to the elicitation of intertemporal preferences. More precisely our discussion will stem from the analysis of Stephens and Anderson’s (2001) seminal article. In their study with blue jays they document that foraging behavior typically implements short-sighted choice rules which are beneficial in the long run. Such long-term profitability of short-sighted behavior cannot be evidenced when using a self-control paradigm (one which contrasts in a binary way sooner smaller and later larger payoffs) but becomes apparent when ecological patch-paradigms (replicating economic situations in which the main trade-off consists in staying on a food patch or leaving for another patch) are implemented. We transfer this methodology in view of contrasting foraging strategies and self-control in human intertemporal choices. PMID:22973188

  11. Optimal short-sighted rules.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois-Gironde, Sacha

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to assess the relevance of methodological transfers from behavioral ecology to experimental economics with respect to the elicitation of intertemporal preferences. More precisely our discussion will stem from the analysis of Stephens and Anderson's (2001) seminal article. In their study with blue jays they document that foraging behavior typically implements short-sighted choice rules which are beneficial in the long run. Such long-term profitability of short-sighted behavior cannot be evidenced when using a self-control paradigm (one which contrasts in a binary way sooner smaller and later larger payoffs) but becomes apparent when ecological patch-paradigms (replicating economic situations in which the main trade-off consists in staying on a food patch or leaving for another patch) are implemented. We transfer this methodology in view of contrasting foraging strategies and self-control in human intertemporal choices. PMID:22973188

  12. Syndromic Disorders with Short Stature

    PubMed Central

    Şıklar, Zeynep; Berberoğlu, Merih

    2014-01-01

    Short stature is one of the major components of many dysmorphic syndromes. Growth failure may be due to a wide variety of mechanisms, either related to the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor axis or to underlying unknown pathologies. In this review, the relatively more frequently seen syndromes with short stature (Noonan syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, Silver-Russell syndrome and Aarskog-Scott syndrome) were discussed. These disorders are associated with a number of endocrinopathies, as well as with developmental, systemic and behavioral issues. At present, GH therapy is used in most syndromic disorders, although long-term studies evaluating this treatment are insufficient and some controversies exist with regard to GH dose, optimal age to begin therapy and adverse effects. Before starting GH treatment, patients with syndromic disorders should be evaluated extensively. PMID:24637303

  13. Syndromic disorders with short stature.

    PubMed

    Şıklar, Zeynep; Berberoğlu, Merih

    2014-01-01

    Short stature is one of the major components of many dysmorphic syndromes. Growth failure may be due to a wide variety of mechanisms, either related to the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor axis or to underlying unknown pathologies. In this review, the relatively more frequently seen syndromes with short stature (Noonan syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, Silver-Russell syndrome and Aarskog-Scott syndrome) were discussed. These disorders are associated with a number of endocrinopathies, as well as with developmental, systemic and behavioral issues. At present, GH therapy is used in most syndromic disorders, although long-term studies evaluating this treatment are insufficient and some controversies exist with regard to GH dose, optimal age to begin therapy and adverse effects. Before starting GH treatment, patients with syndromic disorders should be evaluated extensively. PMID:24637303

  14. Review of short wavelength lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hagelstein, P.L.

    1985-03-18

    There has recently been a substantial amount of research devoted to the development of short wavelength amplifiers and lasers. A number of experimental results have been published wherein the observation of significant gain has been claimed on transitions in the EUV and soft x-ray regimes. The present review is intended to discuss the main approaches to the creation of population inversions and laser media in the short wavelength regime, and hopefully aid workers in the field by helping to provide access to a growing literature. The approaches to pumping EUV and soft x-ray lasers are discussed according to inversion mechanism. The approaches may be divided into roughly seven categories, including collisional excitation pumping, recombination pumping, direct photoionization and photoexcitation pumping, metastable state storage plus optical pumping, charge exchange pumping, and finally, the extension of free electron laser techniques into the EUV and soft x-ray regimes. 250 references.

  15. Short-range communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean C. (Inventor); Howard, David E. (Inventor); Smith, Dennis A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A short-range communication system includes an antenna, a transmitter, and a receiver. The antenna is an electrical conductor formed as a planar coil with rings thereof being uniformly spaced. The transmitter is spaced apart from the plane of the coil by a gap. An amplitude-modulated and asynchronous signal indicative of a data stream of known peak amplitude is transmitted into the gap. The receiver detects the coil's resonance and decodes same to recover the data stream.

  16. The long and the short.

    PubMed

    Vines, R

    1977-04-01

    The diagnostic problems posed by unusually great height at various ages are discussed, together with the principles governing treatment to curtail height by exhibition of oestrogens or androgens. Short stature is then discussed in terms of an initial approach to assessment and diagnosis, followed by a systematic one. The main agents used in treatment are briefly mentioned, together with some details concerning the use of human growth hormone (hGH). PMID:875791

  17. Orogeny can be very short

    PubMed Central

    Dewey, John F.

    2005-01-01

    In contrast to continent/continent collision, arc–continent collision generates very short-lived orogeny because the buoyancy-driven impedance of the subduction of continental lithosphere, accompanied by arc/suprasubduction-zone ophiolite obduction, is relieved by subduction polarity reversal (flip). This tectonic principle is illustrated by the early Ordovician Grampian Orogeny in the British and Irish Caledonides, in which a wealth of detailed sedimentologic, heavy mineral, and geochronologic data pin the Orogeny to a very short Arenig/Llanvirn event. The Orogeny, from the initial subduction of continental margin sediments to the end of postflip shortening, lasted ≈18 million years (my). The collisional shortening, prograde-metamorphic phase of the Orogeny lasted 8 my, extensional collapse and exhumation of midcrustal rocks lasted 1.5 my, and postflip shortening lasted 4.5 my. Strain rates were a typical plate-boundary-zone 10-15. Metamorphism, to the second sillimanite isograd, with extensive partial melting, occurred within a few my after initial collision, indicating that conductive models for metamorphic heat transfer in Barrovian terrains are incorrect and must be replaced by advective models in which large volumes of mafic/ultramafic magma are emplaced, syn-tectonically, below and into evolving nappe stacks. Arc/continent collision generates fast and very short orogeny, regional metamorphism, and exhumation. PMID:16126898

  18. Longitudinal Differences of Ionospheric Vertical Density Distribution and Equatorial Electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yizengaw, E.; Zesta, E.; Moldwin, M. B.; Damtie, B.; Mebrahtu, A.; Valledares, C.E.; Pfaff, R. F.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate estimation of global vertical distribution of ionospheric and plasmaspheric density as a function of local time, season, and magnetic activity is required to improve the operation of space-based navigation and communication systems. The vertical density distribution, especially at low and equatorial latitudes, is governed by the equatorial electrodynamics that produces a vertical driving force. The vertical structure of the equatorial density distribution can be observed by using tomographic reconstruction techniques on ground-based global positioning system (GPS) total electron content (TEC). Similarly, the vertical drift, which is one of the driving mechanisms that govern equatorial electrodynamics and strongly affect the structure and dynamics of the ionosphere in the low/midlatitude region, can be estimated using ground magnetometer observations. We present tomographically reconstructed density distribution and the corresponding vertical drifts at two different longitudes: the East African and west South American sectors. Chains of GPS stations in the east African and west South American longitudinal sectors, covering the equatorial anomaly region of meridian approx. 37 deg and 290 deg E, respectively, are used to reconstruct the vertical density distribution. Similarly, magnetometer sites of African Meridian B-field Education and Research (AMBER) and INTERMAGNET for the east African sector and South American Meridional B-field Array (SAMBA) and Low Latitude Ionospheric Sensor Network (LISN) are used to estimate the vertical drift velocity at two distinct longitudes. The comparison between the reconstructed and Jicamarca Incoherent Scatter Radar (ISR) measured density profiles shows excellent agreement, demonstrating the usefulness of tomographic reconstruction technique in providing the vertical density distribution at different longitudes. Similarly, the comparison between magnetometer estimated vertical drift and other independent drift observation, such as from VEFI onboard Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite and JULIA radar, is equally promising. The observations at different longitudes suggest that the vertical drift velocities and the vertical density distribution have significant longitudinal differences; especially the equatorial anomaly peaks expand to higher latitudes more in American sector than the African sector, indicating that the vertical drift in the American sector is stronger than the African sector.

  19. Longitudinal differences of ionospheric vertical density distribution and equatorial electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yizengaw, E.; Zesta, E.; Moldwin, M. B.; Damtie, B.; Mebrahtu, A.; Valladares, C. E.; Pfaff, R. F.

    2012-07-01

    Accurate estimation of global vertical distribution of ionospheric and plasmaspheric density as a function of local time, season, and magnetic activity is required to improve the operation of space-based navigation and communication systems. The vertical density distribution, especially at low and equatorial latitudes, is governed by the equatorial electrodynamics that produces a vertical driving force. The vertical structure of the equatorial density distribution can be observed by using tomographic reconstruction techniques on ground-based global positioning system (GPS) total electron content (TEC). Similarly, the vertical drift, which is one of the driving mechanisms that govern equatorial electrodynamics and strongly affect the structure and dynamics of the ionosphere in the low/midlatitude region, can be estimated using ground magnetometer observations. We present tomographically reconstructed density distribution and the corresponding vertical drifts at two different longitudes: the East African and west South American sectors. Chains of GPS stations in the east African and west South American longitudinal sectors, covering the equatorial anomaly region of meridian ˜37°E and 290°E, respectively, are used to reconstruct the vertical density distribution. Similarly, magnetometer sites of African Meridian B-field Education and Research (AMBER) and INTERMAGNET for the east African sector and South American Meridional B-field Array (SAMBA) and Low Latitude Ionospheric Sensor Network (LISN) are used to estimate the vertical drift velocity at two distinct longitudes. The comparison between the reconstructed and Jicamarca Incoherent Scatter Radar (ISR) measured density profiles shows excellent agreement, demonstrating the usefulness of tomographic reconstruction technique in providing the vertical density distribution at different longitudes. Similarly, the comparison between magnetometer estimated vertical drift and other independent drift observation, such as from VEFI onboard Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite and JULIA radar, is equally promising. The observations at different longitudes suggest that the vertical drift velocities and the vertical density distribution have significant longitudinal differences; especially the equatorial anomaly peaks expand to higher latitudes more in American sector than the African sector, indicating that the vertical drift in the American sector is stronger than the African sector.

  20. High efficiency binary blazed grating coupler for perfectly-vertical and near-vertical coupling in chip level optical interconnections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Li; Liu, Lu; Zhou, Zhiping; Wang, Xingjun

    2015-11-01

    The high-efficiency binary blazed grating couplers with perfectly vertical and nearly vertical coupling are proposed. The efficiencies of them are much higher than those of other types of grating couplers without bottom mirrors under vertical and oblique incidence respectively. For perfectly vertical coupler with transverse-electric polarized incident light, the coupling efficiency, which is defined as the ratio between the power coupled to the fundamental mode of the chip waveguide and that carried by the fundamental mode of the input optical fiber, is 75%, while the nearly vertical coupler with the incident angle of 10.2° has a coupling efficiency of 84%. Rigorous coupled-wave diffraction analysis and a complete optimization method have been used to make the optimal design valid and unique.

  1. Vertical behavior and diet of albacore tuna (Thunnus alalunga) vary with latitude in the South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Ashley J.; Allain, Valerie; Nicol, Simon J.; Evans, Karen J.; Hoyle, Simon D.; Dupoux, Cyndie; Vourey, Elodie; Dubosc, Jeff

    2015-03-01

    Albacore tuna (Thunnus alalunga) are an important upper tropic-level oceanic predator with a circum-global distribution. Little is known of the movements and diet of albacore tuna in the South Pacific Ocean and how variability in both might influence the vulnerability of albacore tuna to fisheries across their range. We coupled data derived from satellite-tagged albacore tuna with stomach samples collected from individuals at the same locations to characterize the vertical behavior, thermal and dietary habits of albacore tuna at tropical (New Caledonia and Tonga) and temperate (New Zealand) latitudes. A total of 18 pop-up satellite archival tags deployed on albacore tuna remained attached for 0-50 days. Position estimates, calculated from 11 tags, described short-term movements of predominantly less than 500 km, although one fish moved more than 1000 km over a period of 50 days. Vertical behavior and diet differed substantially between tropical and temperate latitudes. At tropical latitudes, albacore tuna showed a distinct diel pattern in vertical habitat use, occupying shallower, warmer waters above the mixed layer depth (MLD) at night, and deeper, cooler waters below the MLD during the day. In contrast, there was little evidence of a diel pattern of vertical behavior in albacore tuna at temperate latitudes, with fish limited to shallow waters above the MLD almost all of the time. Spatial patterns of species composition in stomach contents were consistent with vertical movement patterns, with significantly more deepwater prey species consumed in tropical waters than in temperate waters. Albacore in tropical waters also consumed significantly greater diversities of prey than in temperate waters, predominately preying on fish species, whereas those in temperate waters predominately preyed on crustacea. Our results indicate that the vertical distribution of albacore is constrained either by thermal preferences with diet reflecting these preferences, by the vertical distribution of prey species, which may be affected by the thermal structure of the ocean, or most likely by a mixture of both. Spatial differences in the vertical distribution of albacore tuna suggest that vulnerability of albacore to oceanic fisheries varies with latitude. Changes in the thermal structure of oceanic waters in temperate areas associated with climate change might influence the vertical distributions and, therefore, vulnerability of albacore to oceanic fisheries into the future.

  2. Vertical velocity estimates in the North Pacific using Argo floats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeland, Howard J.

    2013-01-01

    Vertical velocity in the oceans is critical for maintenance of the structure of the main thermoclines and the transport of nutrients from deepwater towards the surface and thus is an important variable for understanding the dynamics of the ocean and the transport of scalar variables. In the mid 1970s the author was engaged in discussions with Tom Rossby about how SOFAR floats might be used to observe the vertical component of velocity. This paper in some sense follows on from those discussions almost 40 years later. In this paper the Argo array is used to compute the horizontal volume divergence in a control volume in the North Pacific. Divergence is found and this must be related to a volume flux through the base of the control volume. The implied vertical velocity is large and various tests are proposed to determine whether or not the estimate is plausible. The first test shows that a vertical velocity this large is necessary to close the salt budget. The second test shows that the vertical velocity balances about half of the observed heat divergence, the remainder is then accounted for by heat flux at the sea surface. Finally the time variable vertical velocity is computed and used to compute the evolution of the salt content in the control volume. Thus though the estimated vertical velocity is surprisingly large, it passes plausibility tests.

  3. Vertical stiffness and muscle strain in professional Australian football.

    PubMed

    Serpell, Benjamin G; Scarvell, Jennie M; Ball, Nick B; Smith, Paul N

    2014-12-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to establish if vertical stiffness was greater in professional Australian rules footballers who sustained a lower limb skeletal muscle strain compared to those who did not, and to establish if a relationship between age, or training history, and vertical stiffness existed. Thirty-one participants underwent weekly rebound jump testing on a force platform over two seasons. Vertical stiffness was calculated for injured players and the uninjured cohort 1 and 3 weeks prior to sustaining an injury and at the end of preseason. Eighteen athletes were in the "uninjured" cohort and 13 in the "injured" cohort. No significant difference in vertical stiffness was observed between groups (P = 0.18 for absolute stiffness; P = 0.08 for stiffness relative to body mass), within groups (P = 0.83 and P = 0.88, respectively) or for a time*cohort interaction (P = 0.77 and P = 0.80, respectively). No relationship between age and vertical stiffness existed (r = -0.06 for absolute and relative stiffness), or training history and vertical stiffness (r = -0.01 and 0.00 for absolute and relative stiffness, respectively) existed. These results and others lend to suggest that vertical stiffness is not related to lower limb muscle strain injury. PMID:25058314

  4. Subjective Visual Vertical and Postural Capability in Children Born Prematurely

    PubMed Central

    Bucci, Maria Pia; Wiener-Vacher, Sylvette; Trousson, Clémence; Baud, Olivier; Biran, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We compared postural stability and subjective visual vertical performance in a group of very preterm-born children aged 3-4 years and in a group of age-matched full-term children. Materials and Methods A platform (from TechnoConcept) was used to measure postural control in children. Perception of subjective visual vertical was also recorded with posture while the child had to adjust the vertical in the dark or with visual perturbation. Two other conditions (control conditions) were also recorded while the child was on the platform: for a fixation of the vertical bar, and in eyes closed condition. Results Postural performance was poor in preterm-born children compared to that of age-matched full-term children: the surface area, the length in medio-lateral direction and the mean speed of the center of pressure (CoP) were significantly larger in the preterm-born children group (p < 0.04, p < 0.01, and p < 0.04, respectively). Dual task in both groups of children significantly affected postural control. The subjective visual vertical (SVV) values were more variable and less precise in preterm-born children. Discussion-Conclusions We suggest that poor postural control as well as perception of verticality observed in preterm-born children could be due to immaturity of the cortical processes involved in the motor control and in the treatment of perception and orientation of verticality. PMID:25790327

  5. Silicon-integrated short-wavelength hybrid-cavity VCSEL.

    PubMed

    Haglund, Emanuel P; Kumari, Sulakshna; Westbergh, Petter; Gustavsson, Johan S; Roelkens, Gunther; Baets, Roel; Larsson, Anders

    2015-12-28

    We demonstrate a short-wavelength hybrid-cavity vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) heterogeneously integrated on silicon. A GaAs-based "half-VCSEL" has been attached to a dielectric distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) on a silicon wafer using ultra-thin divinylsiloxane-bis-benzocyclobutene (DVS-BCB) adhesive bonding, thereby creating a cavity with the standing-wave optical field extending over the silicon- and GaAs-based parts of the cavity. A 9 µm oxide aperture diameter VCSEL with a threshold current of 1.2 mA produces 1.6 mW optical output power at 6.0 mA bias current with a wavelength of ~845 nm. PMID:26832027

  6. Global distribution of vertical wavenumber spectra in the lower stratosphere observed using high-vertical-resolution temperature profiles from COSMIC GPS radio occultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noersomadi; Tsuda, T.

    2016-02-01

    We retrieved temperature (T) profiles with a high vertical resolution using the full spectrum inversion (FSI) method from the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC) GPS radio occultation (GPS-RO) data from January 2007 to December 2009. We studied the characteristics of temperature perturbations in the stratosphere at 20-27 km altitude. This height range does not include a sharp jump in the background Brunt-Väisälä frequency squared (N2) near the tropopause, and it was reasonably stable regardless of season and latitude. We analyzed the vertical wavenumber spectra of gravity waves (GWs) with vertical wavelengths ranging from 0.5 to 3.5 km, and we integrated the (total) potential energy EpT. Another integration of the spectra from 0.5 to 1.75 km was defined as EpS for short vertical wavelength GWs, which was not studied with the conventional geometrical optics (GO) retrievals. We also estimated the logarithmic spectral slope (p) for the saturated portion of spectra with a linear regression fitting from 0.5 to 1.75 km.Latitude and time variations in the spectral parameters were investigated in two longitudinal regions: (a) 90-150° E, where the topography was more complicated, and (b) 170-230° E, which is dominated by oceans. We compared EpT, EpS, and p, with the mean zonal winds (U) and outgoing longwave radiation (OLR). We also show a ratio of EpS to EpT and discuss the generation source of EpS. EpT and p clearly showed an annual cycle, with their maximum values in winter at 30-50° N in region (a), and 50-70° N in region (b), which was related to the topography. At 30-50° N in region (b), EpT and p exhibited some irregular variations in addition to an annual cycle. In the Southern Hemisphere, we also found an annual oscillation in EpT and p, but it showed a time lag of about 2 months relative to U. Characteristics of EpTand p in the tropical region seem to be related to convective activity. The ratio of EpT to the theoretical model value, assuming saturated GWs, became larger in the equatorial region and over mountainous regions.

  7. Internal wave propagation sensitivity to model vertical coordinate and resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Boyer, Arnaud; Lathuilire, Cyril; Pichon, Annick; Gouillon, Flavien

    2015-04-01

    Oceanic General Circulation Models (OGCM) can almost be solely defined by their vertical coordinate. The necessary discretization of the physical space to apply numerical methods can lead to a misrepresentation of some physical processes. This is particularly the case at small spatial scales where mixing is involved as OGCMs do not have a sufficient spatial resolution to represent these processes. This work focuses on the role of the model vertical resolution on the Internal waves (IW) propagation and on the modal representation of IWs using idealized numerical experiments. We show how the model vertical resolution and the choice of isopycnic or eulerian (i.e., geopotential or terrain following models) coordinate impact the IW propagation in an idealized context. The IW are generated over a continental slope and forced by an S2 barotropic tide in a two dimensions domain. Three different initial stratifications are used to allow for IW propagation: a two-layer ocean, a depth constant Brunt-Visl frequency (N) and a mixed layer above a depth constant N. Step stratifications can be challenging for OGCMs and any model vertical coordinate inducing abrupt changes in the water masses properties. These changes would imply a modification of the IW characteristics with respect to time in eulerian coordinate ocean model. Despite a spurious diapycnal mixing associated with the fixed vertical coordinates, we show that model solutions converge for high model vertical resolution (~80 levels) and for all the stratifications. Coarser model vertical resolutions (~40 levels) show that there is a wave phase lag and/or amplitude modulation between the isopycnic and eulerian vertical coordinates. For these vertical resolutions, an isopycnic experiment using a time-evolving stratification from an eulerian coordinate simulation is ran as an initial conditions. Because there is no diapycnal mixing in a fully-isopycnic coordinate system, the changes in the IW wave field due to the spurious mixing is diagnosed. The actual model vertical resolutions are likely to induce biases in the internal wave field and their propagation thus inducing unrealistic vertical mixing rates in global/regional simulation. With this study, we aim to define a vertical model resolution threshold for OGCMs below which, these biases could vanish or be negligible.

  8. Sidewall containment of liquid metal with vertical alternating magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Lari, Robert J.; Praeg, Walter F.; Turner, Larry R.; Battles, James E.; Hull, John R.; Rote, Donald M.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus for containing molten metal using a magnet producing vertical alternating magnetic field positioned adjacent the area in which the molten metal is to be confined. This invention can be adapted particularly to the casting of metal between counter-rotating rollers with the vertical alternating magnetic field used to confine the molten metal at the edges of the rollers. Alternately, the vertical alternating magnetic field can be used as a flow regulator in casting molten metal from an opening in a channel.

  9. Offshore application of a novel technology for drilling vertical boreholes

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, P.E.; Aitken, A.

    1994-12-31

    A new concept for automatically drilling vertical boreholes was recently implemented by Elf Enterprise Caledonia--the Vertical Drilling System. The VDS was used to drill the 16 inch hole section of a North Sea exploration well. This was the first time this technology had been used offshore, drilling from a semi-submersible drilling unit. The VDS was shown to have an application in penetrating a drilling target that required a near vertical wellbore. Technical functioning of the tool and field experience is reported along with performance comparisons to offset wells.

  10. Sidewall containment of liquid metal with vertical alternating magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Lari, R.J.; Praeg, W.F.; Turner, L.R.; Battles, J.E.; Hull, J.R.; Rote, D.M.

    1988-06-17

    An apparatus for containing molten metal using a magnet producing vertical alternating magnetic field positioned adjacent to the area in which the molten metal is to be confined. This invention can be adapted particularly to the casting of metal between counter-rotating rollers with the vertical alternating magnetic field used to confine the molten metal at the edges of the rollers. Alternately, the vertical alternating magnetic field can be used as a flow regulator in casting molten metal from an opening in a channel. 8 figs.

  11. Sidewall containment of liquid metal with vertical alternating magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Lari, R.J.; Praeg, W.F.; Turner, L.R.; Battles, J.E.; Hull, J.R.; Rote, D.M.

    1990-12-04

    An apparatus is disclosed for containing molten metal using a magnet producing vertical alternating magnetic field positioned adjacent the area in which the molten metal is to be confined. This invention can be adapted particularly to the casting of metal between counter-rotating rollers with the vertical alternating magnetic field used to confine the molten metal at the edges of the rollers. Alternately, the vertical alternating magnetic field can be used as a flow regulator in casting molten metal from an opening in a channel. 9 figs.

  12. Short intense submillimeter pulse generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detemple, T. A.

    1980-07-01

    The use of a mode-locked CO2 laser for an optically pumped near millimeter wave source has been refined and extended to the generation of pulses from C(13)H3F at 1.22mm. More refined theoretical estimates illustrate the transient nature of the conversion process in both space and time and set approximate limits on the ultimate pulse duration to be about one-half that of the pump. The implications are that one is not limited by the intrinsic linewidth in producting short pulse and that significant conversion may occur in modest distances, of order meters, suggesting quasi-compact sources for further experiments.

  13. Ultra-short pulse generator

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1993-12-28

    An inexpensive pulse generating circuit is disclosed that generates ultra-short, 200 picosecond, and high voltage 100 kW, pulses suitable for wideband radar and other wideband applications. The circuit implements a nonlinear transmission line with series inductors and variable capacitors coupled to ground made from reverse biased diodes to sharpen and increase the amplitude of a high-voltage power MOSFET driver input pulse until it causes non-destructive transit time breakdown in a final avalanche shock wave diode, which increases and sharpens the pulse even more. 5 figures.

  14. Recycler short kicker beam impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Crisp, Jim; Fellenz, Brian; /Fermilab

    2009-07-01

    Measured longitudinal and calculated transverse beam impedance is presented for the short kicker magnets being installed in the Fermilab Recycler. Fermi drawing number ME-457159. The longitudinal impedance was measured with a stretched wire and the Panofsky equation was used to estimate the transverse impedance. The impedance of 3319 meters (the Recycler circumference) of stainless vacuum pipe is provided for comparison. Although measurements where done to 3GHz, impedance was negligible above 30MHz. The beam power lost to the kicker impedance is shown for a range of bunch lengths. The measurements are for one kicker assuming a rotation frequency of 90KHz. Seven of these kickers are being installed.

  15. Ultra-short pulse generator

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1993-01-01

    An inexpensive pulse generating circuit is disclosed that generates ultra-short, 200 picosecond, and high voltage 100 kW, pulses suitable for wideband radar and other wideband applications. The circuit implements a nonlinear transmission line with series inductors and variable capacitors coupled to ground made from reverse biased diodes to sharpen and increase the amplitude of a high-voltage power MOSFET driver input pulse until it causes non-destructive transit time breakdown in a final avalanche shockwave diode, which increases and sharpens the pulse even more.

  16. Assessment of EGM2008 in Europe using accurate astrogeodetic vertical deflections and omission error estimates from SRTM/DTM2006.0 residual terrain model data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirt, C.; Marti, U.; Bürki, B.; Featherstone, W. E.

    2010-10-01

    We assess the new EGM2008 Earth gravitational model using a set of 1056 astrogeodetic vertical deflections over parts of continental Europe. Our astrogeodetic vertical deflection data set originates from zenith camera observations performed during 1983-2008. This set, which is completely independent from EGM2008, covers, e.g., Switzerland, Germany, Portugal and Greece, and samples a variety of topography - level terrain, medium elevated and rugged Alpine areas. We describe how EGM2008 is used to compute vertical deflections according to Helmert's (surface) definition. Particular attention is paid to estimating the EGM2008 signal omission error from residual terrain model (RTM) data. The RTM data is obtained from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) elevation model and the DTM2006.0 high degree spherical harmonic reference surface. The comparisons between the astrogeodetic and EGM2008 vertical deflections show an agreement of about 3 arc seconds (root mean square, RMS). Adding omission error estimates from RTM to EGM2008 significantly reduces the discrepancies from the complete European set of astrogeodetic deflections to 1 arc second (RMS). Depending on the region, the RMS errors vary between 0.4 and 1.5 arc seconds. These values not only reflect EGM2008 commission errors, but also short-scale mass-density anomalies not modelled from the RTM data. Given (1) formally stated EGM2008 commission error estimates of about 0.6-0.8 arc seconds for vertical deflections, and (2) that short-scale mass-density anomalies may affect vertical deflections by about 1 arc second, the agreement between EGM2008 and our astrogeodetic deflection data set is very good. Further focus is placed on the investigation of the high-degree spectral bands of EGM2008. As a general conclusion, EGM2008 - enhanced by RTM data - is capable of predicting Helmert vertical deflections at the 1 arc second accuracy level over Europe.

  17. Ionospheric vertical drifts over an Indian low latitude station and its comparison with IRI-2007 vertical drift model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saranya, P. L.; Prasad, D. S. V. V. D.; Rama Rao, P. V. S.

    2014-09-01

    The vertical plasma drift velocity (Vz=dh‧F/dt) of the Ionospheric F-Region is calculated using the Ionosonde data over an Indian low latitude station, Waltair (17.7°N, 83.3°E, dip 20°N). The vertical drift velocities thus computed are compared with those of the IRI-2007 vertical drift model during the post sunset hours of the high sunspot period of 2001-2002. The vertical drift values are entirely downward between 2000 and 0700 h LT for the IRI-2007 vertical drift model compared to those derived using Ionosonde. The root mean square errors (RMSE) in the vertical drifts during the post sun-set hours computed between the IRI vertical drift model and Ionosonde measured values are found to be 13.54, 21.68 and 22.39 m/s for summer, equinox and winter seasons respectively. The average vertical drifts derived using Ionosonde showing pre-reversal enhancements during evening hours (1700-1900 h LT) over Waltair are found to be 8, 16 and 12 m/s, whereas the IRI-2007 model derived values show 15, 35 and 36 m/s during summer, equinox and winter seasons respectively. The correlation analysis of peak drift velocities derived using Ionosonde and those from IRI model with Rz and F10.7 shows more or less similar variation while they are differed in their variation with Ap index. A good correlation is observed between the vertical plasma drift obtained using Ionosonde and Equatorial Electrojet Strength (EEJ) except during winter, while the correlation coefficients computed using IRI model are little higher than those obtained using Ionosonde with maximum values during summer season. The percentage of deviation for IRI-model correlation coefficient and that of Ionosonde-inferred drift for equinoctial and summer months is around 50% and 25% respectively where as it is more than 100% for winter.

  18. Short rotation Wood Crops Program

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, L.L.; Ehrenshaft, A.R.

    1990-08-01

    This report synthesizes the technical progress of research projects in the Short Rotation Woody Crops Program for the year ending September 30, 1989. The primary goal of this research program, sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Biofuels and Municipal Waste Technology Division, is the development of a viable technology for producing renewable feedstocks for conversion to biofuels. One of the more significant accomplishments was the documentation that short-rotation woody crops total delivered costs could be $40/Mg or less under optimistic but attainable conditions. By taking advantage of federal subsidies such as those offered under the Conservation Reserve Program, wood energy feedstock costs could be lower. Genetic improvement studies are broadening species performance within geographic regions and under less-than-optimum site conditions. Advances in physiological research are identifying key characteristics of species productivity and response to nutrient applications. Recent developments utilizing biotechnology have achieved success in cell and tissue culture, somaclonal variation, and gene-insertion studies. Productivity gains have been realized with advanced cultural studies of spacing, coppice, and mixed-species trials. 8 figs., 20 tabs.

  19. Normalized vertical ice mass flux profiles from vertically pointing 8-mm-wavelength Doppler radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Brad W.; Kropfli, Robert A.

    1993-01-01

    During the FIRE 2 (First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project Regional Experiment) project, NOAA's Wave Propagation Laboratory (WPL) operated its 8-mm wavelength Doppler radar extensively in the vertically pointing mode. This allowed for the calculation of a number of important cirrus cloud parameters, including cloud boundary statistics, cloud particle characteristic sizes and concentrations, and ice mass content (imc). The flux of imc, or, alternatively, ice mass flux (imf), is also an important parameter of a cirrus cloud system. Ice mass flux is important in the vertical redistribution of water substance and thus, in part, determines the cloud evolution. It is important for the development of cloud parameterizations to be able to define the essential physical characteristics of large populations of clouds in the simplest possible way. One method would be to normalize profiles of observed cloud properties, such as those mentioned above, in ways similar to those used in the convective boundary layer. The height then scales from 0.0 at cloud base to 1.0 at cloud top, and the measured cloud parameter scales by its maximum value so that all normalized profiles have 1.0 as their maximum value. The goal is that there will be a 'universal' shape to profiles of the normalized data. This idea was applied to estimates of imf calculated from data obtained by the WPL cloud radar during FIRE II. Other quantities such as median particle diameter, concentration, and ice mass content can also be estimated with this radar, and we expect to also examine normalized profiles of these quantities in time for the 1993 FIRE II meeting.

  20. 24. UPPER STATION, LOWER FLOOR, MOTOR ROOM, OFF VERTICAL DEFLECTOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. UPPER STATION, LOWER FLOOR, MOTOR ROOM, OFF VERTICAL DEFLECTOR SHEAVE, MOTOR, BRAKE, PINION SHAFT, DRIVE WHEEL. - Monongahela Incline Plane, Connecting North side of Grandview Avenue at Wyoming Street with West Carson Street near Smithfield Street, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  1. 29. EXTERIOR, VERTICAL VIEW OF UMBRA, SOUTH TOWER, AND CONSERVATORY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. EXTERIOR, VERTICAL VIEW OF UMBRA, SOUTH TOWER, AND CONSERVATORY FROM THE SOUTHEAST - Mark Twain House, 351 Farmington Avenue (corrected from original address of 531 Farmington Avenue), Hartford, Hartford County, CT

  2. 10. EYEBAR PIN CONNECTION JOINING VERTICAL SUSPENSION STRINGER WITH LATERAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. EYEBAR PIN CONNECTION JOINING VERTICAL SUSPENSION STRINGER WITH LATERAL BRACING MEMBERS - Spruce Street Bridge, East Spruce Street, 500 Block, spanning Power Canal, Sault Ste. Marie, Chippewa County, MI

  3. High-speed vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Lear, K.L.; Ochiai, M.; Hietala, V.M.

    1997-03-01

    High speed modulation and pulsing are reported for oxide-confined vertical cavity surface emitting laser diodes (VCSELs) with inverted doping and proton implantation to reduce the extrinsic limitations.

  4. 32. VERTICAL / STRUT / UPPER CHORD DETAIL AT PINCONNECTED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. VERTICAL / STRUT / UPPER CHORD DETAIL AT PIN-CONNECTED EXPANSION JOINT BETWEEN CANTILEVER ARM AND SUSPENDED SPAN. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - MacArthur Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River on Highway 34 between IA & IL, Burlington, Des Moines County, IA

  5. VERTICAL REDISTRIBUTION OF A POLLUTANT TRACER DUE TO CUMULUS CONVECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mathematical formalisms that incorporate the physical processes responsible for the vertical redistribution of a conservative pollutant tracer due to a convective cloud field are presented. Two modeling approaches are presented differing in the manner in which the cloud fields ar...

  6. View down into vertical flame channel of Test Stand 'A' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View down into vertical flame channel of Test Stand 'A' from superstructure. Wooden platform open side faces west. - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand A, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  7. 10. View of end portals, top chords, diagonals, verticals and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. View of end portals, top chords, diagonals, verticals and strut connections. Looking from east span to east end of west span. - Boomershine Bridge, Spanning Twin Creek, Farmersville, Montgomery County, OH

  8. Modelling Of Random Vertical Irregularities Of Railway Tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podwrna, M.

    2015-08-01

    The study presents state-of-the-art in analytical and numerical modelling of random vertical irregularities of continuously welded ballasted railway tracks. The common model of railway track irregularity vertical profiles is applied, in the form of a stationary and ergodic Gaussian process in space. Random samples of track irregularity vertical profiles are generated with the Monte-Carlo method. Based on the numerical method developed in the study, the minimum and recommended sampling number required in the random analysis of railway bridges and number of frequency increments (harmonic components) in track irregularity vertical profiles simulation are determined. The lower and upper limits of wavelengths are determined based on the literature studies. The approach yields track irregularity random samples close to reality. The track irregularity model developed in the study can be used in the dynamic analysis of railway bridge / track structure / highspeed train systems.

  9. Detail, east truss of south span, showing railing, vertical UL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail, east truss of south span, showing railing, vertical U-L, diagonal eyebar U-L with turnbuckle - Castle Garden Bridge, Township Route 343 over Bennetts Branch of Sinnemahoning Creek, Driftwood, Cameron County, PA

  10. VIEW OF PROCESS DEVELOPMENT PILE (PDP) TANK TOP, WITH VERTICAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF PROCESS DEVELOPMENT PILE (PDP) TANK TOP, WITH VERTICAL ELEMENTS IN BACKGROUND, LEVEL 0’, LOOKING NORTHWEST - Physics Assembly Laboratory, Area A/M, Savannah River Site, Aiken, Aiken County, SC

  11. INTERIOR OF WEST SPAN LOOKING WEST (SHADOW OF VERTICAL LAPS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF WEST SPAN LOOKING WEST (SHADOW OF VERTICAL LAPS PLACED ON ZONE III; ASPHALT ZONE IX) - Honey Run Bridge, Spanning Butte Creek, bypassed section of Honey Run Road (originally Carr Hill Road), Paradise, Butte County, CA

  12. 't Hooft vertices, partial quenching, and rooted staggered QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Claude; Golterman, Maarten; Shamir, Yigal; Sharpe, Stephen R.

    2008-06-01

    We discuss the properties of 't Hooft vertices in partially quenched and rooted versions of QCD in the continuum. These theories have a physical subspace, equivalent to ordinary QCD, that is contained within a larger space that includes many unphysical correlation functions. We find that the 't Hooft vertices in the physical subspace have the expected form, despite the presence of unphysical 't Hooft vertices appearing in correlation functions that have an excess of valence quarks (or ghost quarks). We also show that, due to the singular behavior of unphysical correlation functions as the massless limit is approached, order parameters for nonanomalous symmetries can be nonvanishing in finite volume if these symmetries act outside of the physical subspace. Using these results, we demonstrate that arguments recently given by Creutz - claiming to disprove the validity of rooted staggered QCD - are incorrect. In particular, the unphysical 't Hooft vertices do not present an obstacle to the recovery of taste symmetry in the continuum limit.

  13. 1. GENERAL VIEW. OVERHANG, PAINTED RED, HAS VERTICAL SIDING AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW. OVERHANG, PAINTED RED, HAS VERTICAL SIDING AND FADED PAINTINGS OF FARM ANIMALS: COW, DONKEYS AND HORSE. - De Turck House, Barn, State Route 662 vicinity, Oley Township, Oley, Berks County, PA

  14. VERTICAL MIXING OF LAKE SEDIMENTS BY TUBIFICID OLIGOCHAETES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vertical mixing of lake sediments by tubificid oligochaetes was studied in laboratory experiments by using a radioactive (cesium 137 labeled sediment) marker horizon. Results from these experiments were used to develop and test a mathematical model describing tubificid sediment m...

  15. GROUND WATER SAMPLING FOR VERTICAL PROFILING OF CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate delineation of plume boundaries and vertical contaminant distribution are necessary in order to adequately characterize waste sites and determine remedial strategies to be employed. However, it is important to consider the sampling objectives, sampling methods, and sampl...

  16. 31. View from southeast of vertical gas washer with No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. View from southeast of vertical gas washer with No. 2 Furnace and dust catcher in background. - Sloss-Sheffield Steel & Iron, First Avenue North Viaduct at Thirty-second Street, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  17. 6. Detail, vertical guides adjacent to east portal of Tunnel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Detail, vertical guides adjacent to east portal of Tunnel 28, view to southwest, 135mm lens with electronic flash fill. - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Tunnel No. 28, Milepost 134.75, Applegate, Placer County, CA

  18. Seaglider observations of vertical velocity in the Labrador Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frajka-Williams, Eleanor; Rhines, Peter B.; Eriksen, Charles C.; Harcourt, Ramsey R.

    2013-04-01

    Five Seagliders spent a combined total of over 24 months in the Labrador Sea between 2003-2005. The hydrographic observations made by Seagliders can then be used to estimate vertical water velocities, in stratified regimes (observing internal waves), and mixed regimes (including wintertime mixed layers during deep convection exceeding 1000m deep). Across the seasons and from shelf seas to deep water, the vertical velocity regimes will be described, with particular focus on the velocity measurements during deep convection (Jan-Feb). New results from the high-resolution hydrographic measurements show striking horizontal density variability over tens of kilometers, containing sufficient buoyancy to restratify the region to the degree of stratification observed by Argo floats in April. Concurrently, the vertical velocity measurements show narrow, fast, downwelling plumes between broader and somewhat slower upwelling regions. These new measurements offer a compelling snapshot of deep convection, in both hydrography and vertical velocity, at unprecendented resolution.

  19. Shaping the distribution of vertical velocities of antihydrogen in GBAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufour, G.; Debu, P.; Lambrecht, A.; Nesvizhevsky, V. V.; Reynaud, S.; Voronin, A. Yu.

    2014-01-01

    GBAR is a project aiming at measuring the free-fall acceleration of gravity for antimatter, namely antihydrogen atoms (). The precision of this timing experiment depends crucially on the dispersion of initial vertical velocities of the atoms as well as on the reliable control of their distribution. We propose to use a new method for shaping the distribution of the vertical velocities of , which improves these factors simultaneously. The method is based on quantum reflection of elastically and specularly bouncing with small initial vertical velocity on a bottom mirror disk, and absorption of atoms with large initial vertical velocities on a top rough disk. We estimate statistical and systematic uncertainties, and we show that the accuracy for measuring the free fall acceleration of could be pushed below under realistic experimental conditions.

  20. 20. Typical lower chord tension member, vertical lattice and diagonal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Typical lower chord tension member, vertical lattice and diagonal tension bar pinning. View is of north side of 3rd span looking east. - Cleves Bridge, Spanning Great Miami River on U.S. Highway 50, Cleves, Hamilton County, OH