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Sample records for short-period pulse helical

  1. Helicity Generation by Heat Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    1996-11-01

    In a large laboratory plasma (ne ~= 10^12 cm-3, k Te ~= 2 eV, B0 ~= 30 G, 1 m ⊥ B_0, 2.5 m allel B_0), the electrons are heated locally by a short intense current pulse (100 A, 0.2 μs) using a magnetic loop antenna or a biased electrode. The heat transport along the field establishes a flux tube with strong radial and weak axial temperature gradients. The time scale of temperature relaxation (Δ t ~= 50 μs) is much longer than that of the transient whistler wave pulse excited by the initial current pulse (Δ t < 2 μs). The temperature gradients drive linked field-aligned and diamagnetic currents which, due to their linkage, exhibit helicity and form a flux rope with J × B ~= 0.(R. L. Stenzel and J. M. Urrutia, Phys. Rev. Lett. 76), 1469 (1996). Alternatively, the helicity generation can be understood by the twisting of magnetic field lines which, in the parameter regime of electron MHD, are frozen into the electron fluid. The electron heating at one end of the flux tube causes a nonuniform diamagnetic rotation, hence the helicity. The heat transport by helical convection and conduction is investigated. The slowly time-varying magnetic field may excite Alfvénic perturbations.

  2. Pulsed Gamma-Ray Emission From Short-Period Pulsars: Predicted Gamma-Ray Pulsar PSR1951+32

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, K. S.; Ding, K. Y. Winnis

    1995-03-01

    We studied the gamma-ray emission mechanisms from pulsars with period, P, between 4.6 times 10(-2) B12(2/5) s and 0.17 B12(5/12) sin (1/6) theta alpha (-5/4) s in terms of outermagnetospheric gap model. We found that the spectra of all known gamma -ray pulsars can be fitted by two free parameters, namely, alpha r_L, the mean distance to the outergap, and sin theta , the mean pitch angle of the secondary e(+/-) pairs. Gamma-rays from those pulsars with P < 0.17 B12(5/12) sin (1/6) alpha (-5/4) s are mainly emitted by secondary e(+/-) pairs, which are created beyond the outergap, via synchrotron radiation and the gamma-ray emission efficiency is ~ 10(-2) . For pulsars with period approaching ~ 0.17 B12(5/12) sin (1/6) alpha (-5/4) s, their gamma-ray emission efficiency is approaching unity. We used our model to fit the observed spectra of gamma -ray pulsars (Vela, PSR1706-44, PSR1055-52, PSR1509-58, Geminga). All the best fit curves satisfy the constraints of alpha and sin theta . The pulse separation and relative intensity of pulses are function of alpha . In our model, the first three strongest theoretical gamma -ray sources have been detected. PSR1951+32 is predicted to be the fourth strongest gamma -ray pulsar (Cheng and Ding, 1994, ApJ, 432, 724) which is confirmed by the recent GRO result.

  3. Helicity and transport in electron MHD heat pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R.L.; Urrutia, J.M.

    1996-02-01

    Electrons are heated locally and temporally in a uniform magnetoplasma by applying a short current pulse to a loop antenna. The resultant heat pulse, satisfying electron MHD conditions ({omega}{sub {ital ce}}{sup {minus}1}{lt}{Delta}{ital t}{lt}{omega}{sub {ital ci}}{sup {minus}1}), generates helicity due to twisting of field lines by diamagnetic drifts. Heat convection and diffusion cool the pulse, which reduces its propagation to zero. The stationary temperature profile decays by cross-field transport conserving volume-integrated heat. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  4. Note: compact helical pulse forming line for the generation of longer duration rectangular pulse.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Surender Kumar; Deb, P; Sharma, Archana; Shukla, R; Prabaharan, T; Adhikary, B; Shyam, A

    2012-06-01

    The helical pulsed forming line (PFL) can generate longer duration rectangular pulse in a smaller length. A compact PFL using helical water line is designed and experimentally investigated. The impedance of the helical PFL is 22 [ohm sign]. The compactness is achieved in terms of reduction in length of the PFL by a factor of 5.5 using helical water PFL as compared to coaxial water PFL of same length. The helical PFL was pulsed charged to 200 kV using a high voltage pulse transformer in 4.5 μs and discharged into the matched 22 Ω resistive load through a self-breakdown pressurized spark gap switch. The rectangular voltage pulse of 100 kV, 260 ns (FWHM) is measured across the load. The effect of reduction in water temperature on the pulse width is also studied experimentally. The increase in pulse width up to 7% more is observed by reducing the temperature of the deionized water to 5 °C. It will further reduce the length of the PFL and make the system small for compact pulsed power drivers. PMID:22755669

  5. Long-pulse plasma discharge on the Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumazawa, R.; Mutoh, T.; Saito, K.; Seki, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Ohkubo, K.; Takeiri, Y.; Oka, Y.; Tsumori, K.; Osakabe, M.; Ikeda, K.; Nagaoka, K.; Kaneko, O.; Miyazawa, J.; Morita, S.; Narihara, K.; Shoji, M.; Masuzaki, S.; Kobayashi, M.; Ogawa, H.; Goto, M.; Morisaki, T.; Peterson, B. J.; Sato, K.; Tokuzawa, T.; Ashikawa, N.; Nishimura, K.; Funaba, H.; Chikaraishi, H.; Watari, T.; Watanabe, T.; Sakamoto, M.; Ichimura, M.; Takase, Y.; Notake, T.; Takeuchi, N.; Torii, Y.; Shimpo, F.; Nomura, G.; Takahashi, C.; Yokota, M.; Kato, A.; Zhao, Y.; Kwak, J. G.; Yoon, J. S.; Yamada, H.; Kawahata, K.; Ohyabu, N.; Ida, K.; Nagayama, Y.; Noda, N.; Komori, A.; Sudo, S.; Motojima, O.; LHD experiment Group

    2006-03-01

    A long-pulse plasma discharge of more than 30 min duration was achieved on the Large Helical Device (LHD). A plasma of ne = 0.8 × 1019 m-3 and Ti0 = 2.0 keV was sustained with PICH = 0.52 MW, PECH = 0.1 MW and averaged PNBI = 0.067 MW. The total injected heating energy was 1.3 GJ. One of the keys to the success of the experiment was a dispersion of the local plasma heat load to divertors, accomplished by sweeping the magnetic axis inward and outward. Causes limiting the long pulse plasma discharge are discussed. An ion impurity penetration limited further long-pulse discharge in the 8th experimental campaign (2004).

  6. Detecting short period variations in lava flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, M. R.; Pinkerton, H.

    2009-04-01

    indicated the active flow areas and nighttime sequences covering the two main proximal lava channels detected significant variations in illumination. These variations represented short periods of enhanced incandescence which travelled down-channel at velocities of approximately 10-20 m/min. Over the 7 nights of measurement, the generation of these incandescent pulses was not consistent, with one night producing an average of one pulse per hour, decreasing to approximately one per night within a few nights. The pulses are interpreted to reflect short term changes in effusion rate, and their characteristics and possible causes will be discussed.

  7. Full-wave simulations on ultrashort-pulse reflectometry for helical plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hojo, H.; Fukuchi, A.; Itakura, A.; Mase, A.

    2004-10-01

    The full-wave simulations on ultrashort-pulse reflectometry for helical plasmas are studied based on the FDTD method in two dimensions. The propagation of an ultrashort-pulse electromagnetic wave is computed in helical plasmas modeled for the Large Helical Device magnetic field configuration. The density-profile reconstruction is performed by the Abel inversion method with the time delay data for the reflected waves from plasma, and it is shown that the reconstructed density profile coincides well with the original profile.

  8. Increasing the magnetic helicity content of a plasma by pulsing a magnetized source.

    PubMed

    Woodruff, S; Stallard, B W; McLean, H S; Hooper, E B; Bulmer, R; Cohen, B I; Hill, D N; Holcomb, C T; Moller, J; Wood, R D

    2004-11-12

    By operating a magnetized coaxial gun in a pulsed mode it is possible to produce large voltage pulses of duration approximately 500 mus while reaching a few kV, giving a discrete input of helicity into a spheromak. In the sustained spheromak physics experiment (SSPX), it is observed that pulsing serves to nearly double the stored magnetic energy and double the temperature. We discuss these results by comparison with 3D MHD simulations of the same phenomenon. PMID:15600933

  9. Pulsed currents carried by whistlers. VII. Helicity and transport in heat pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R.L.; Urrutia, J.M.

    1996-07-01

    In a uniform magnetoplasma ({ital n}{approx_equal}10{sup 11} cm{sup {minus}3}, {ital kT}{sub {ital e}}{ge}0.5 eV, {ital B}{sub 0}{ge}15 G, 1 m {times} 2.5 m), electrons are heated locally and temporally by applying a short current pulse to a loop antenna or disk electrode. Electron magnetohydrodynamics characterize the experimental conditions. After the end of the applied current pulse and whistler wave transients, a current system driven by temperature gradients remains embedded in the plasma. The current system exhibits helicity. The associated electron drifts convect heat out of the flux tube. From diamagnetic field measurements, the decay of the electron temperature is obtained with high sensitivity ({Delta}{ital kT}{sub {ital e}}{approx_equal}0.001 eV). The heat transport is inferred from the space{endash}time dependence of the electron temperature. The temperature enhancement is confined to a channel whose length depends on heat input since the transport coefficients are temperature-dependent. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. The origin of short-period comets

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, M.E.; Stagg, C.R. Calgary Univ. )

    1990-07-01

    If the observed number of short-period comets can be accounted for by a spherically symmetric model of the Oort cloud, in conjunction with an inner core of merely moderate central concentration, then the observed correlation between the ecliptic plane and the inclinations of Jupiter-family short-period comets may be seen as partly due to the calculated decrease in capture probability with inclination, and partly to the effects of cometary decay and observational selection. The implied constraint on the inner core becomes even more severe, if a hypothetical comet disk in the Uranus-Neptune zone either makes a significant contribution to the observed short-period comets or if these comets' mean lifetime is greater than 3000 years. 32 refs.

  11. Measurement of edge density profiles of Large Helical Device plasmas using an ultrashort-pulse reflectometer.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Y; Mase, A; Kogi, Y; Bruskin, L G; Tokuzawa, T; Kawahata, K

    2008-05-01

    We report here on the application of an ultrashort-pulse reflectometer (USPR) to Large Helical Device in National Institute for Fusion Science. An impulse with picosecond pulse width is used as a source in an USPR. Since the bandwidth of a source is inversely related to the pulse width, we can utilize the frequency range of microwave to millimeter-wave by using wide band transmission lines. The density profiles can be reconstructed by collecting time-of-flight signal of each frequency component of an impulse reflected from each cutoff layer. Remote control system using super science information network has been introduced to the present USPR system. PMID:18513099

  12. Rotational swashplate pulse continuously variable transmission based on helical gear axial meshing transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jiandong; Fu, Wenyu; Lei, Hong; Tian, E.; Liu, Ziping

    2012-11-01

    The current research on pulse continuously variable transmission(CVT) is mainly focused on reducing the pulse degree and making pulse degrees a constant value. Current research mainly confined to find out new design parameters by using the method of optimization, and reduce the pulse degree of pulse CVT and its range of variation. But the fact is that the reduction of the pulse degree is not significant. This article presents a new structure of mechanical pulse CVT—the rotational swashplate pulse CVT with driven by helical gear axial meshing. This transmission is simple and compact in structure and low in pulsatile rate (it adopts 6 guide rods), and the pulsatile degree is irrelevant to the transmission ratio. Theoretically, pulsatile rate could be reduced to zero if appropriate curved surface of the swashplate is used. Compared with the connecting rod pulse CVT, the present structure uses helical gear mechanism as transmission part and it avoids unbalanced inertial force in the former model. This paper analyzes the principle of driving of this transmission, presents its mechanical structure, and discusses its motion characteristics. Experimental prototype of this type of CVT has been manufactured. Tests for the transmission efficiency(when the rotational speed of the output shaft is the maximum) and the angular velocity of the output shaft have been carried out, and data have been analyzed. The experimental results show that the speed of the output shaft for the experimental prototype is slightly lower than the theoretical value, and the transmission efficiency of the experimental prototype is about 70%. The pulse degree of the CVT discussed in this paper is less than the existing pulse CVT of other types, and it is irrelevant to the transmission ratio of the CVT. The research provides the new idea to the CVT study.

  13. Flux amplification and sustainment of ST plasmas by multi-pulsed coaxial helicity injection on HIST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashi, T.; Ishihara, M.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2010-11-01

    The Helicity Injected Spherical Torus (HIST) device has been developed towards high-current start up and sustainment by Multi-pulsed Coaxial Helicity Injection (M-CHI) method. Multiple pulses operation of the coaxial plasma gun can build the magnetic field of STs and spheromak plasmas in a stepwise manner. So far, successive gun pulses on SSPX at LLNL were demonstrated to maintain the magnetic field of spheromak in a quasi-steady state against resistive decay [1]. The resistive 3D-MHD numerical simulation [2] for STs reproduced the current amplification by the M-CHI method and confirmed that stochastic magnetic field was reduced during the decay phase. By double pulsed operation on HIST, the plasma current was effectively amplified against the resistive decay. The life time increases up to 10 ms which is longer than that in the single CHI case (4 ms). The edge poloidal fields last between 0.5 ms and 6 ms like a repetitive manner. During the second driven phase, the toroidal ion flow is driven in the same direction as the plasma current as well as in the initial driven phase. At the meeting, we will discuss a current amplification mechanism based on the merging process with the plasmoid injected secondly from the gun. [1] B. Hudson et al., Phys. Plasmas Vol.15, 056112 (2008). [2] Y. Kagei et al., J. Plasma Fusion Res. Vol.79, 217 (2003).

  14. Preferred Hosts for Short-Period Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-12-01

    In an effort to learn more about how planets form around their host stars, a team of scientists has analyzed the population of Kepler-discovered exoplanet candidates, looking for trends in where theyre found.Planetary OccurrenceSince its launch in 2009, Kepler has found thousands of candidate exoplanets around a variety of star types. Especially intriguing is the large population of super-Earths and mini-Neptunes planets with masses between that of Earth and Neptune that have short orbital periods. How did they come to exist so close to their host star? Did they form in situ, or migrate inwards, or some combination of both processes?To constrain these formation mechanisms, a team of scientists led by Gijs Mulders (University of Arizona and NASAs NExSS coalition) analyzed the population of Kepler planet candidates that have orbital periods between 2 and 50 days.Mulders and collaborators used statistical reconstructions to find the average number of planets, within this orbital range, around each star in the Kepler field. They then determined how this planet occurrence rate changed for different spectral types and therefore the masses of the host stars: do low-mass M-dwarf stars host more or fewer planets than higher-mass, main-sequence F, G, or K stars?Challenging ModelsAuthors estimates for the occurrence rate for short-period planets of different radii around M-dwarfs (purple) and around F, G, and K-type stars (blue). [Mulders et al. 2015]The team found that M dwarfs, compared to F, G, or K stars, host about half as many large planets with orbital periods of P 50 days. But, surprisingly, they host significantly more small planets, racking up an average of 3.5 times the number of planets in the size range of 12.8 Earth-radii.Could it be that M dwarfs have a lower total mass of planets, but that mass is distributed into more, smaller planets? Apparently not: the authors show that the mass of heavy elements trapped in short-orbital-period planets is higher for M

  15. Mechanisms of amplification of ultrashort electromagnetic pulses in gyrotron traveling wave tube with helically corrugated waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzburg, N. S.; Zotova, I. V.; Sergeev, A. S.; Zaslavsky, V. Yu.; Zheleznov, I. V.; Samsonov, S. V.; Mishakin, S. V.

    2015-11-01

    A time-domain self consistent theory of a gyrotron traveling wave tube with a helically corrugated operating waveguide has been developed. Based on this model, the process of short pulse amplification was studied in regimes of grazing and intersection of the dispersion curves of the electromagnetic wave and the electron beam. In the first case, the possibility of amplification without pulse form distortion was demonstrated for the pulse spectrum width of the order of the gain bandwidth. In the second case, when the electrons' axial velocity was smaller than the wave's group velocity, it was shown that the slippage of the incident signal with respect to the electron beam provides feeding of the signal by "fresh" electrons without initial modulation. As a result, the amplitude of the output pulse can exceed the amplitude of its saturated value for the case of the grazing regime, and, for optimal parameters, the peak output power can be even larger than the kinetic power of the electron beam.

  16. Mechanisms of amplification of ultrashort electromagnetic pulses in gyrotron traveling wave tube with helically corrugated waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Ginzburg, N. S. Zaslavsky, V. Yu.; Zotova, I. V.; Sergeev, A. S.; Zheleznov, I. V.; Samsonov, S. V.; Mishakin, S. V.

    2015-11-15

    A time-domain self consistent theory of a gyrotron traveling wave tube with a helically corrugated operating waveguide has been developed. Based on this model, the process of short pulse amplification was studied in regimes of grazing and intersection of the dispersion curves of the electromagnetic wave and the electron beam. In the first case, the possibility of amplification without pulse form distortion was demonstrated for the pulse spectrum width of the order of the gain bandwidth. In the second case, when the electrons' axial velocity was smaller than the wave's group velocity, it was shown that the slippage of the incident signal with respect to the electron beam provides feeding of the signal by “fresh” electrons without initial modulation. As a result, the amplitude of the output pulse can exceed the amplitude of its saturated value for the case of the grazing regime, and, for optimal parameters, the peak output power can be even larger than the kinetic power of the electron beam.

  17. A quantitative model for heat pulse propagation across large helical device plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, H.; Dendy, R. O.; Chapman, S. C.; Inagaki, S.

    2015-06-01

    It is known that rapid edge cooling of magnetically confined plasmas can trigger heat pulses that propagate rapidly inward. These can result in large excursion, either positive or negative, in the electron temperature at the core. A set of particularly detailed measurements was obtained in Large Helical Device (LHD) plasmas [S. Inagaki et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 52, 075002 (2010)], which are considered here. By applying a travelling wave transformation, we extend the model of Dendy et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 55, 115009 (2013), which successfully describes the local time-evolution of heat pulses in these plasmas, to include also spatial dependence. The new extended model comprises two coupled nonlinear first order differential equations for the (x, t) evolution of the deviation from steady state of two independent variables: the excess electron temperature gradient and the excess heat flux, both of which are measured in the LHD experiments. The mathematical structure of the model equations implies a formula for the pulse velocity, defined in terms of plasma quantities, which aligns with empirical expectations and is within a factor of two of the measured values. We thus model spatio-temporal pulse evolution, from first principles, in a way which yields as output the spatiotemporal evolution of the electron temperature, which is also measured in detail in the experiments. We compare the model results against LHD datasets using appropriate initial and boundary conditions. Sensitivity of this nonlinear model with respect to plasma parameters, initial conditions, and boundary conditions is also investigated. We conclude that this model is able to match experimental data for the spatio-temporal evolution of the temperature profiles of these pulses, and their propagation velocities, across a broad radial range from r /a ≃0.5 to the plasma core. The model further implies that the heat pulse may be related mathematically to soliton solutions of the

  18. Nonlinear MHD simulation of current drive by multi-pulsed coaxial helicity injection in spherical torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanki, Takashi; Nagata, Masayoshi; Kagei, Yasuhiro

    2011-10-01

    The dynamics of structures of magnetic field, current density, and plasma flow generated during multi-pulsed coaxial helicity injection in spherical torus is investigated by 3-D nonlinear MHD simulations. During the driven phase, the flux and current amplifications occur due to the merging and magnetic reconnection between the preexisting plasma in the confinement region and the ejected plasma from the gun region involving the n = 1 helical kink distortion of the central open flux column (COFC). Interestingly, the diamagnetic poloidal flow which tends toward the gun region is then observed due to the steep pressure gradients of the COFC generated by ohmic heating through an injection current winding around the inboard field lines, resulting in the formation of the strong poloidal flow shear at the interface between the COFC and the core region. This result is consistent with the flow shear observed in the HIST. During the decay phase, the configuration approaches the axisymmetric MHD equilibrium state without flow because of the dissipation of magnetic fluctuation energy to increase the closed flux surfaces, suggesting the generation of ordered magnetic field structure. The parallel current density λ concentrated in the COFC then diffuses to the core region so as to reduce the gradient in λ, relaxing in the direction of the Taylor state.

  19. Reconstruction of edge density profiles on Large Helical Device using ultrashort-pulse reflectometrya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokota, Yuya; Mase, Atsushi; Kogi, Yuichiro; Tokuzawa, Tokihiko; Kawahata, Kazuo; Nagayama, Yoshio; Hojo, Hitoshi

    2008-10-01

    Reflectometry has been expected to be one of the key diagnostics to measure density profiles. We have applied an ultrashort-pulse reflectometry (USPR) system to Large Helical Device in the National Institute for Fusion Science. Wide frequency band system is required to obtain wide density profile since an incident wave is reflected at the density layer corresponding to its cutoff frequency. The reflectometry utilizes an impulse with less than 30ps pulse width as a source. Since the bandwidth of an impulse has an inverse relation to the pulse width, we can cover the frequency range of micro- to millimeter waves (18-40GHz) with a single source. The density profiles can be reconstructed by collecting time-of-flight (TOF) signals for each frequency component of an impulse reflected from the corresponding cutoff layer. We utilize the signal record analysis (SRA) method to reconstruct the density profiles from the TOF signal. The effectiveness of the SRA method for the profile reconstruction is confirmed by a simulation study of the USPR using a finite-difference time domain method.

  20. Reconstruction of edge density profiles on Large Helical Device using ultrashort-pulse reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Yuya; Mase, Atsushi; Kogi, Yuichiro; Tokuzawa, Tokihiko; Kawahata, Kazuo; Nagayama, Yoshio; Hojo, Hitoshi

    2008-10-01

    Reflectometry has been expected to be one of the key diagnostics to measure density profiles. We have applied an ultrashort-pulse reflectometry (USPR) system to Large Helical Device in the National Institute for Fusion Science. Wide frequency band system is required to obtain wide density profile since an incident wave is reflected at the density layer corresponding to its cutoff frequency. The reflectometry utilizes an impulse with less than 30 ps pulse width as a source. Since the bandwidth of an impulse has an inverse relation to the pulse width, we can cover the frequency range of micro- to millimeter waves (18-40 GHz) with a single source. The density profiles can be reconstructed by collecting time-of-flight (TOF) signals for each frequency component of an impulse reflected from the corresponding cutoff layer. We utilize the signal record analysis (SRA) method to reconstruct the density profiles from the TOF signal. The effectiveness of the SRA method for the profile reconstruction is confirmed by a simulation study of the USPR using a finite-difference time domain method. PMID:19044596

  1. Studies of dust transport in long pulse plasma discharges in the large helical device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, M.; Kasahara, H.; Tokitani, M.; Seki, T.; Saito, K.; Kamio, S.; Seki, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Pigarov, A.; Smirnov, R.; Kawamura, G.; Tanaka, H.; Masuzaki, S.; Uesugi, Y.; Mutoh, T.; The LHD Experiment Group

    2015-05-01

    Three-dimensional trajectories of incandescent dust particles in plasmas were observed with stereoscopic fast framing cameras in a large helical device. It proved that the dust is located in the peripheral plasma and most of the dust moves along the magnetic field lines with acceleration in the direction that corresponds to the plasma flow. ICRF heated long pulse plasma discharges were terminated with the release of large amounts of dust from a closed divertor region. After the experimental campaign, the traces of exfoliation of carbon rich mixed-material deposition layers were found in the divertor region. Transport of carbon dust is investigated using a modified dust transport simulation code, which can explain the observed dust trajectories. It also shows that controlling the radius of the dust particles to less than 1 mm is necessary to prevent the plasma termination by penetration of dust for the long pulse discharges. Dust transport simulation including heavy metal dust particles demonstrates that high heating power operation is effective for shielding the main plasma from dust penetration by an enhanced plasma flow effect and a high heat load onto the dust particles in the peripheral plasma. It shows a more powerful penetration characteristic of tungsten dust particles compared to that of carbon and iron dust particles.

  2. Propagation of the Ultra-Short Laser Pulses Through the Helical 1D Photonic Crystal Structure with Twist Defect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, Dmitrii V.; Iegorov, Roman

    2016-02-01

    The presence of the photonic band-gap is a featured property of the cholesteric liquid crystals (CLC). It can be practically realized for almost any reasonable wavelengths with very high degree of tunability. We have investigated theoretically the influence of the twist defect of the CLC helical structure onto the bandwidth-limited ultra-short laser pulse propagating inside the photonic band-gap. The changes of both pulse duration and peak power with defect angle were observed together with pulse acceleration and retardation for a case of normal incidence of the light.

  3. Effects of multi-pulsed coaxial helicity injection on dynamics of spherical torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanki, T.; Nagata, M.; Kagei, Y.

    2012-10-01

    The mechanism to rebuild the magnetic fields and to amplify the currents in the high-q spherical torus (ST) by the multi-pulsed coaxial helicity injection is investigated using the resistive nonlinear 3D-MHD simulations. During the driven phase, the dynamics is almost axisymmetric because the magnetic fluctuation level of n=0 mode compared with other higher modes is much larger. The toroidal current It is effectively amplified due to the merging of plasmoid ejected from the gun region with the pre-existing ST in the confinement region. The poloidal flux is not significantly amplified because the current sheet generated by the merging process does not rapidly decay. The negative toroidal flow vt is then induced in the direction of It around the central open flux column (OFC) region by inductive toroidal electric field Et (=-vzBr) because of the plasmoid ejection. The strong poloidal flow vz (=ErBt) is also driven from the gun to confinement region due to the Lorentz force. As the result of vz, the flow vortices associated with the dynamo effect are caused around the upper confinement region. During the decay phase, the closed field lines are regenerated due to the dissipation of magnetic fluctuations. The helical distortion of the OFC becomes small, and then ordered magnetic field structures without flows are built. Just after turning off the external electric field, the poloidal flow from the confinement to gun region is caused by the pressure gradients. The parallel current density λ concentrated in the OFC diffuses to the core region, but does not relax in the direction of the Taylor state due to the pressure gradients.

  4. Photoacoustic spectroscopy of short-period gyrotropic superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Mityurich, G.S.; Starodubtsev, E.G.

    1994-12-31

    The Rosencwaig-Gersho photoacoustic transformation is extended to the case of the short-period superlattices formed by gytropic nonmagnetic cubic crystals. The potentialities of photoacoustic spectroscopy when applied to superlattices and the control of their parameters are considered. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Use of Helical Fields to Allow a Long Pulse Reversed Field Pinch

    SciTech Connect

    A. Boozer and N. Pomphrey

    2008-11-20

    The maintenance of the magnetic configuration of a Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) is an unsolved problem. Even a toroidal loop voltage does not suffice to maintain the magnetic configuration in axisymmetry but could if the plasma had helical shaping. The theoretical tools for plasma optimization using helical shaping have advanced, so an RFP could be relatively easily designed for optimal performance with a spatially constant toroidal loop voltage. A demonstration that interesting solutions exist is given.

  6. Short-Period Comets: Primordial Bodies or Collisional Fragments?

    PubMed

    Farinella; Davis

    1996-08-16

    Modeling results show that collisions among Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt Objects (EKOs), a vast swarm of small bodies orbiting beyond Neptune, have been a major process affecting this population and its progeny, the short-period comets. Most EKOs larger than about 100 kilometers in diameter survive over the age of the solar system, but at smaller sizes collisional breakup is frequent, producing a cascade of fragments having a power law size-frequency distribution. Collisions are also a plausible mechanism for injecting EKOs 1 to 10 kilometers in diameter into dynamical resonances, where they can be transported into the inner solar system to become short-period comets. The fragmental nature of these comets may explain their physical properties, such as shape, color, and strength. PMID:8688073

  7. Formation of Short-Period Binary Pulsars in Globular Clusters.

    PubMed

    Rasio; Pfahl; Rappaport

    2000-03-20

    We present a new dynamical scenario for the formation of short-period binary millisecond pulsars in globular clusters. Our work is motivated by the recent observations of 20 radio pulsars in 47 Tuc. In a dense cluster such as 47 Tuc, most neutron stars acquire binary companions through exchange interactions with primordial binaries. The resulting systems have semimajor axes in the range approximately 0.1-1 AU and neutron star companion masses approximately 1-3 M middle dot in circle. For many of these systems, we find that when the companion evolves off the main sequence and fills its Roche lobe, the subsequent mass transfer is dynamically unstable. This leads to a common envelope phase and the formation of short-period neutron star-white dwarf binaries. For a significant fraction of these binaries, the decay of the orbit due to gravitational radiation will be followed by a period of stable mass transfer driven by a combination of gravitational radiation and tidal heating of the companion. The properties of the resulting short-period binaries match well those of observed binary pulsars in 47 Tuc. PMID:10702129

  8. Ultra-short period binaries from the Catalina Surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, A. J.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Graham, M. J.; Mahabal, A. A.; Donalek, C.; Williams, R.; García-Álvarez, D.; Catelan, M.; Torrealba, G.; Prieto, J. L.; Abraham, S.; Larson, S.; Christensen, E.

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the properties of 367 ultra-short period binary candidates selected from 31,000 sources recently identified from Catalina Surveys data. Based on light curve morphology, along with WISE, Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and GALEX multi-color photometry, we identify two distinct groups of binaries with periods below the 0.22 day contact binary minimum. In contrast to most recent work, we spectroscopically confirm the existence of M dwarf+M dwarf contact binary systems. By measuring the radial velocity variations for five of the shortest-period systems, we find examples of rare cool white dwarf (WD)+M dwarf binaries. Only a few such systems are currently known. Unlike warmer WD systems, their UV flux and optical colors and spectra are dominated by the M-dwarf companion. We contrast our discoveries with previous photometrically selected ultra-short period contact binary candidates and highlight the ongoing need for confirmation using spectra and associated radial velocity measurements. Overall, our analysis increases the number of ultra-short period contact binary candidates by more than an order of magnitude.

  9. Planetary perturbations and the origins of short-period comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, T.; Tremaine, S.; Duncan, M.

    1990-06-01

    To investigate the dynamical plausibility of possible sources for the short-period comets, a representative sample of comet orbits in the field of the sun and the giant planets was integrated, with the aim to determine whether the distribution of orbits from a proposed source that reach observable perihelia (q less than 2.5 AU) matches the observed distribution of short-period orbits. It is found that the majority of the short-period comets, those with orbital period P less than 20 yr (the 'Jupiter family'), cannot arise from isotropic orbits with perihelia near Jupiter's orbit, because the resulting observable comet orbits have the wrong distribution in period, inclination, and argument of perihelion. The simulations also show that Jupiter-family comets cannot arise from isotropic orbits with perihelia in the Uranus-Neptune region. On the other hand, a source of low-inclination Neptune-crossing orbits yields a distribution of observable Jupiter-family comets that is consistent with the data in all respects. These results imply that the Jupiter-family comets arise from a disk source in the outer solar system rather than from the Oort comet cloud.

  10. Planetary perturbations and the origins of short-period comets

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, T.; Tremaine, S.; Duncan, M. Queen's Univ., Kingston )

    1990-06-01

    To investigate the dynamical plausibility of possible sources for the short-period comets, a representative sample of comet orbits in the field of the sun and the giant planets was integrated, with the aim to determine whether the distribution of orbits from a proposed source that reach observable perihelia (q less than 2.5 AU) matches the observed distribution of short-period orbits. It is found that the majority of the short-period comets, those with orbital period P less than 20 yr (the Jupiter family), cannot arise from isotropic orbits with perihelia near Jupiter's orbit, because the resulting observable comet orbits have the wrong distribution in period, inclination, and argument of perihelion. The simulations also show that Jupiter-family comets cannot arise from isotropic orbits with perihelia in the Uranus-Neptune region. On the other hand, a source of low-inclination Neptune-crossing orbits yields a distribution of observable Jupiter-family comets that is consistent with the data in all respects. These results imply that the Jupiter-family comets arise from a disk source in the outer solar system rather than from the Oort comet cloud. 30 refs.

  11. Testing the Double Corner Source Spectral Model for Long- and Short-Period Ground Motion Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, H.; Koketsu, K.

    2010-12-01

    The omega-squared source model with a single corner frequency is widely used in the earthquake source analyses and ground motion simulations. Recent studies show that the Brune stress drop of subduction-zone earthquakes is almost half of that for crustal earthquakes for a given magnitude. On the other hand, the empirical attenuation relations and spectral analyses of seismic source and ground motions support the fact that subduction-zone earthquakes provide 1-2 times of the short-period source spectral level for crustal earthquakes. To link long- and short-period source characteristics is a crucial issue to perform broadband ground motion simulations. This discrepancy may lead the source modeling with double corner frequencies [e.g., Atkinson, 1993]. We modeled the lower corner frequency corresponding to the size of asperities generating for long-period (> 2-5 s) ground motions by the deterministic approach and the higher corner frequency corresponding to the size of strong motion generation area for short-period ground motions by the semi-empirical approach. We propose that the double corner source spectral model is expressed as a frequency-dependent source model consists of either the asperities in a long-period range or the strong motion generation area in a short-period range and the surrounding background area inside the total rupture area. The characterized source model has been the potential to reproduce fairly well the rupture directivity pulses seen in the observed ground motions. We explore the applicability of the double corner source spectral model to broadband ground motion simulations for the 1978 Mw 7.6 Miyagi-oki and 2003 Mw 8.3 Tokachi-oki earthquakes along the Japan Trench. For both cases, the double corner source spectral model, where the size and stress drop for strong motion generation areas are respectively half and double of those for asperities, worked well to reproduce ground motion time histories and seismic intensity distribution.

  12. The possibility for a short-period hybrid staggered undulator.

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, S.; Experimental Facilities Division

    2005-01-01

    A short-period hybrid-type staggered undulator is proposed. A proper combination of vanadium Permendur (VP) pole and NdFeB magnet provide approximately 40% larger peak field strength than a conventional staggered undulator. The peak field of a 15-mm-period hybrid staggered undulator exceeds 0.8 T at a gap of 6 mm. Also, by using dysprosium as a pole and PrFeB as a magnet at liquid nitrogen temperature (77K), even higher peak field ({approx} 0.94 T) can be achieved at the same gap.

  13. Theory of short periodic orbits for partially open quantum maps.

    PubMed

    Carlo, Gabriel G; Benito, R M; Borondo, F

    2016-07-01

    We extend the semiclassical theory of short periodic orbits [M. Novaes et al., Phys. Rev. E 80, 035202(R) (2009)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.80.035202] to partially open quantum maps, which correspond to classical maps where the trajectories are partially bounced back due to a finite reflectivity R. These maps are representative of a class that has many experimental applications. The open scar functions are conveniently redefined, providing a suitable tool for the investigation of this kind of system. Our theory is applied to the paradigmatic partially open tribaker map. We find that the set of periodic orbits that belongs to the classical repeller of the open map (R=0) is able to support the set of long-lived resonances of the partially open quantum map in a perturbative regime. By including the most relevant trajectories outside of this set, the validity of the approximation is extended to a broad range of R values. Finally, we identify the details of the transition from qualitatively open to qualitatively closed behavior, providing an explanation in terms of short periodic orbits. PMID:27575138

  14. Theory of short periodic orbits for partially open quantum maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlo, Gabriel G.; Benito, R. M.; Borondo, F.

    2016-07-01

    We extend the semiclassical theory of short periodic orbits [M. Novaes et al., Phys. Rev. E 80, 035202(R) (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevE.80.035202] to partially open quantum maps, which correspond to classical maps where the trajectories are partially bounced back due to a finite reflectivity R . These maps are representative of a class that has many experimental applications. The open scar functions are conveniently redefined, providing a suitable tool for the investigation of this kind of system. Our theory is applied to the paradigmatic partially open tribaker map. We find that the set of periodic orbits that belongs to the classical repeller of the open map (R =0 ) is able to support the set of long-lived resonances of the partially open quantum map in a perturbative regime. By including the most relevant trajectories outside of this set, the validity of the approximation is extended to a broad range of R values. Finally, we identify the details of the transition from qualitatively open to qualitatively closed behavior, providing an explanation in terms of short periodic orbits.

  15. Generation of 3 GW microwave pulses in X-band from a combination of a relativistic backward-wave oscillator and a helical-waveguide compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Bratman, V. L.; Denisov, G. G.; Kolganov, N. G.; Mishakin, S. V.; Samsonov, S. V.; Cross, A. W.; He, W.; Zhang, L.; McStravick, M.; Whyte, C. G.; Young, A. R.; Ronald, K.; Robertson, C. W.; Phelps, A. D. R.

    2010-11-15

    The phenomenon of passive compression of frequency-modulated (FM) pulses in a dispersive media (DM) was used to increase the peak microwave power up to the multigigawatt level. A helically corrugated waveguide was used as the DM, while a relativistic X-band backward-wave oscillator (RBWO) with a descending-during-the-pulse accelerating voltage served as a source of FM pulses. Compression of pulses down to a halfwidth of 2.2 ns accompanied by a 4.5-fold power increase up to a value of about 3.2 GW has been demonstrated.

  16. Characteristics of long-pulse negative-ion source in the neutral beam injector of Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeiri, Y.; Ikeda, K.; Oka, Y.; Tsumori, K.; Osakabe, M.; Nagaoka, K.; Kaneko, O.; Asano, E.; Kondo, T.; Sato, M.; Shibuya, M.; Komada, S.

    2006-03-01

    The injection duration has been extended beyond 100 s with a high-power hydrogen negative-ion source in a negative-ion-based neutral beam injector of the Large Helical Device superconducting fusion machine. The ion source is a cesium-seeded source with a thermally insulated plasma grid (PG), and optimized for a short-pulse operation of 2-3 s. The negative-ion production efficiency is strongly dependent on the PG temperature, and in the long-pulse operation it exceeds an appropriate temperature range of 200-300 °C, at which the optimum cesium coverage is formed on the PG surface. By making the PG temperature rise slower with a reduced arc power, the injection duration was extended to 110 s with an injection power of 110 kW. To extend the injection duration further with a higher injection power, stainless-steel cooling tubes have been mechanically attached to the PG for suppression of the PG temperature rise in the long-pulse operation. As a result, a long-pulse injection with an injection power of 200 kW was extended to 128 s until it was manually stopped due to the plasma collapse. However, the beam duration could be limited to around 3 min because the PG temperature rise was not saturated due to a low thermal conductivity with the thickness of the stainless-steel tube determined so that the short-pulse operation is also possible. On the other hand, the longitudinal beam distribution in a grid area of 25×125cm2 is observed to be more uniform than that with the uncooled PG. The temperature distribution of the individual grid parts becomes more uniform with the cooled PG, which should contribute to the improvement of the beam uniformity.

  17. Bayesian Approach to Short Period Slowness Tomography in Central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maceira, M.; Taylor, S. R.; Ammon, C. J.

    2003-12-01

    We are investigating the utility of short-period, high-resolution surface-wave slowness maps for lowering detection thresholds and allowing for discrimination of explosions and earthquakes at lower magnitudes (3.0-4.8). We focus on the region of central Asia between 69 and 108 degrees east longitude and 29 and 54 degrees north latitude. We retrieved broadband waveform data from more than 1,100 events that occurred between January 1997 and May 2002. Waveforms were obtained from four different networks comprising 13 individual stations. Using multiple-filter and phase-matched filter techniques, we measured the dispersion characteristics of the signals between 6 and 30 seconds. These Rayleigh-wave group velocity dispersion curves were used to compute high-resolution, half a degree cell size, slowness tomographic maps for each period. We adopted a Bayesian tomography method to solve the equation that relates travel-time data with the slowness structure. We used a declustering technique to minimize the effect of event clusters on the results. Our model is similar, to some extent, to the a priori model, but contains more structure and the cell size is smaller (0.5 compared to 1 degree cell size for the a priori model). The tomographic patterns correlate well with known geologic and tectonic features in the area. Accumulations of relatively young sediments across Eurasia are greater than on any other continent due to the continuing rapid uplift across much of central Asia. The short periods are primarily sensitive to upper crustal structures. The tomographic images display low velocities associated with the known sedimentary basins - Tarim, Junggar and Quaidam basins - in the area of central Asia under study. High velocities are associated with mountainous tectonic features such as the Tien Shan. We validated our maps using Rayleigh group-velocity dispersion curves for 640 events that occurred on the region of interest between January 1993 and December 1996. We analyzed

  18. VLT Spectroscopy of Four Short Period Cataclysmic Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, Julie N.; Howell, S. B.; Mason, E.

    2006-12-01

    VLT UVES spectroscopy of four short period, non-magnetic cataclysmic variable stars is presented. The stars observed were GW Lib, BW Scl, VY Aqr, and Z Cha. The 0.1A resolution spectra were uses to measure line strengths and velocity information. Using these measured values, physical parameters, such as the stellar masses, the binary inclination, and the nature of the accretion disk were determined. Mass constraints in the stars BW Scl and GW Lib strongly suggest that the mass donors are likely to be degenerate stars with masses less than 0.06 M-sun. Skinner's research was supported by the NOAO/KPNO Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program which is funded by the National Science Foundation through Scientific Program Order No. 3 (AST-0243875) of the Cooperative Agreement No. AST-0132798 between the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) and the NSF.

  19. Cosmogonic regularities in the complex of short-period comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorshkova, O. A.; Kuzmichev, V. V.

    2006-05-01

    A statistical analysis of short-period comet complex (N = 250 objects, period P < 200 years) is carried out. Orbits distributions according to the major semiaxis value, eccentricity, perihelion and aphelion distances, heliocentric nodes distance, perihelion argument, inclination, mean motion n are given. A classification of comets according to mean motion n values is suggested. It is shown that Jupiter-family (N = 136 comets) is localized by depression with n = 598.2'' (commensurability with Jupiter is 1/2) and n = 358.9'' (commensurability with Jupiter is 5/6). Average statistical characteristics of the cometary orbits with n < 120.5'' (commensurability with Saturn is 1/1) are close to the corresponding parameters of near-parabolic comets (P > 200 years).

  20. The atmospheric circulation of ultra-short period exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataria, Tiffany; Showman, Adam P.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Stevenson, Kevin B.; Lewis, Nikole K.

    2015-01-01

    Even though ultra-short period exoplanets comprise only a small fraction of the total exoplanet population, they present a useful probe into the role of fast rotation rates and small orbital distances on atmospheric dynamics. In this regime, advective timescales are longer than radiative timescales such that the temperature contrasts from dayside to nightside are large (>500 K at photospheric pressures); this strong day-night forcing, coupled with the planet's fast rotation rate (and hence small Rossby deformation radius) yields multiple, narrow (~40 degrees) jets in the atmosphere. Here we will present two cases illustrative of the dynamical regime for ultra-short period exoplanets, and how we can use general circulation models to constrain observations of their atmospheres. First, we will present models of WASP-43b, a Jupiter-mass planet in a 19.5-hour orbit around a K7 star. Because WASP-43b has an equilibrium temperature similar to that of HD 209458b, we can explore the role of rotation rate on the dynamics at a fixed stellar flux. We then compare our models to spectrophotometric observations obtained with HST/WFC3 and show how our 5× solar model provides the best match to the data. Next, we explore the dynamical regime of 55 Cnc e, a 7 Earth-mass, 2 Earth-radius planet in a 0.7 day orbit around a K star. Because smaller planets have a large diversity in possible compositions, we compare hydrogen-, water- and carbon dioxide-dominated models and show how differences in opacity structure lead to differences in temperature structure and circulation. We also demonstrate how future observations can distinguish between these possible compositions of 55 Cnc e, particularly in emission.

  1. Short-period terrestrial planets and radial velocity stellar jitter.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumusque, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Stellar jitter is the main limitation to ultra-precise radial velocity (RV) measurements. It currently precludes our ability to detect a planet like the Earth. Short-period terrestrial planets present first the advantage of inducing a stronger RV signal. In addition, the signal produced by these planets have a period completely different than stellar activity. This allows us, when the observational strategy is adequate, to decorrelate the planetary signal from the jitter induced by the star using filtering techniques. I will show the examples of Kepler-78b and Corot-7b, where the amplitude of the planetary signal can be detected, despite the stellar activity jitter that is 5 and 3 times larger, respectively. The cases of Alpha Cen Bb will also be reviewed, with a new reduction of the published data that increases the significance of the planetary signal.This project is funded by ETAEARTH, a transnational collaboration between European countries and the US (the Swiss Space Office, the Harvard Origin of Life Initiative, the Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, the University of Geneva, the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, the Italian National Astrophysical Institute, the University of St. Andrews, Queens University Belfast, and the University of Edinburgh) setup to optimize the synergy between space-and ground-based data whose scientific potential for the characterization of extrasolar planets can only be fully exploited when analyzed together.

  2. Desensitization to media violence over a short period of time.

    PubMed

    Fanti, Kostas A; Vanman, Eric; Henrich, Christopher C; Avraamides, Marios N

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the desensitization to violence over a short period of time. Participants watched nine violent movie scenes and nine comedy scenes, and reported whether they enjoyed the violent or comedy scenes and whether they felt sympathetic toward the victim of violence. Using latent growth modeling, analyses were carried out to investigate how participants responded to the different scenes across time. The findings of this study suggested that repeated exposure to media violence reduces the psychological impact of media violence in the short term, therefore desensitizing viewers to media violence. As a result, viewers tended to feel less sympathetic toward the victims of violence and actually enjoy more the violence portrayed in the media. Additionally, desensitization to media violence was better represented by a curvilinear pattern, whereas desensitization to comedy scenes was better represented by a linear pattern. Finally, trait aggression was not related to the pattern of change over time, although significant effects were found for initial reports of enjoyment and sympathy. PMID:19172659

  3. Estimating short-period dynamics using an extended Kalman filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Jeffrey E.; Andrisani, Dominick

    1990-01-01

    An extended Kalman filter (EKF) is used to estimate the parameters of a low-order model from aircraft transient response data. The low-order model is a state space model derived from the short-period approximation of the longitudinal aircraft dynamics. The model corresponds to the pitch rate to stick force transfer function currently used in flying qualities analysis. Because of the model chosen, handling qualities information is also obtained. The parameters are estimated from flight data as well as from a six-degree-of-freedom, nonlinear simulation of the aircraft. These two estimates are then compared and the discrepancies noted. The low-order model is able to satisfactorily match both flight data and simulation data from a high-order computer simulation. The parameters obtained from the EKF analysis of flight data are compared to those obtained using frequency response analysis of the flight data. Time delays and damping ratios are compared and are in agreement. This technique demonstrates the potential to determine, in near real time, the extent of differences between computer models and the actual aircraft. Precise knowledge of these differences can help to determine the flying qualities of a test aircraft and lead to more efficient envelope expansion.

  4. Short-period Jupiter family comets after Stardust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchell, M. J.; Kearsley, A. T.

    2009-08-01

    The NASA Stardust mission has provided for laboratory study an extensive data set of cometary dust of known provenance (from comet 81P/Wild 2) yielding detailed insights into the composition of the comet. Combined with the results of data from other missions to short-period Jupiter family comets (JFC), this has greatly deepened the understanding of such objects. If depressions on the surface of comet 81P/Wild 2 are all taken as evidence of impact cratering, their number suggests a long occupancy in the outer region of the Solar System. The dust from comet 81P/Wild 2 has been shown to be heavily deficient in pre-Solar grains and rich in materials formed at high temperatures in the inner Solar System. Although it is too early to know if this is typical of JFC, it does argue for rapid and thorough mixing of materials in the disk on timescales related to comet formation, and may also suggest outward migration of small icy bodies after their formation. Thus, instead of providing mainly new knowledge of the pre-Solar materials expected to be rich in comets, Stardust and comet 81P/Wild 2 have instead focussed attention on large-scale transport processes during the critical period when cometary parent bodies were forming in the early Solar System.

  5. Quasi-single helicity state by a small positive pulse of toroidal magnetic field in TPE-RX reversed field pinch experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Y.; Koguchi, H.; Yambe, K.; Sakakita, H.; Kiyama, S.

    2006-12-15

    By applying a small positive pulse ({delta}B{sub ta}) in toroidal magnetic field, the quasi-single helicity (QSH) state can be obtained with a controllable and reproducible manner in a reversed-field pinch (RFP) experiment on the large RFP machine, TPE-RX [Y. Yagi et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 45, 421 (1999)]. The QSH state in RFP is one of the states where the improved confinement can be observed, and is important for development toward the pure single helicity (SH) state. In the SH state, the dynamo-action for sustaining the RFP configuration will be driven by a single helical mode and its harmonics, and the anomalous plasma loss can be avoided which is caused by the multi-helicity dynamo action in ordinary RFPs. In the operating condition presented here, the reversal of toroidal magnetic field (B{sub ta}) is maintained at a shallow value ({approx}-1 mT) for a certain period ({approx}20 ms) after the setting up of the RFP configuration and then the positive {delta}B{sub ta} ((less-or-similar sign)5 mT magnitude and {approx}2 ms width) is applied to the B{sub ta}, which is usually negative during the sustaining phase of RFP. Just after applying the pulse, the m/n=1/6 mode (m and n being the poloidal and toroidal Fourier mode numbers, respectively) grows dominantly and the configuration goes into QSH state. This QSH state can be sustained for a long period (up to {approx}45 ms) almost until the end of discharge by applying a delayed reversal of B{sub ta} with appropriate timing and magnitude. The setting up of the QSH states shows a reproducibility of almost 100% with the same timing corresponding to the applied positive pulse. This observation can confirm the interpretation in the former report [Y. Hirano et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 112501 (2005)], in which it is claimed that the QSH state is obtained when a small positive pulse in toroidal magnetic field spontaneously appears.

  6. Helicity-selective phase-matching and quasi-phase matching of circularly polarized high-order harmonics: towards chiral attosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kfir, Ofer; Grychtol, Patrik; Turgut, Emrah; Knut, Ronny; Zusin, Dmitriy; Fleischer, Avner; Bordo, Eliyahu; Fan, Tingting; Popmintchev, Dimitar; Popmintchev, Tenio; Kapteyn, Henry; Murnane, Margaret; Cohen, Oren

    2016-06-01

    Phase matching of circularly polarized high-order harmonics driven by counter-rotating bi-chromatic lasers was recently predicted theoretically and demonstrated experimentally. In that work, phase matching was analyzed by assuming that the total energy, spin angular momentum and linear momentum of the photons participating in the process are conserved. Here we propose a new perspective on phase matching of circularly polarized high harmonics. We derive an extended phase matching condition by requiring a new propagation matching condition between the classical vectorial bi-chromatic laser pump and harmonics fields. This allows us to include the influence of the laser pulse envelopes on phase matching. We find that the helicity dependent phase matching facilitates generation of high harmonics beams with a high degree of chirality. Indeed, we present an experimentally measured chiral spectrum that can support a train of attosecond pulses with a high degree of circular polarization. Moreover, while the degree of circularity of the most intense pulse approaches unity, all other pulses exhibit reduced circularity. This feature suggests the possibility of using a train of attosecond pulses as an isolated attosecond probe for chiral-sensitive experiments.

  7. A triple origin for the lack of tight coplanar circumbinary planets around short-period binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamers, Adrian; Perets, Hagai B.; Portegies Zwart, Simon

    2015-12-01

    Detection of transiting circumbinary planets is more tractable around short-period binaries. However, sofar, no such binaries have been found with orbits shorter than 7 days. Short-period main sequence binaries have been suggested to form in triple systems, through a combination of secular Kozai-Lidov cycles and tidal friction (KLCTF). Here, we show that coplanar circumbinary transiting planets are unlikely to exist around short-period binaries, due to triple evolution. We use secular analysis, N-body simulations and analytic considerations as well as population synthesis models to characterize their overall properties. We find that the existence of a circumbinary planet in a triple is likely to produce one of the following outcomes. (1) Sufficiently massive planets in tight and/or coplanar orbits around the inner binary can partially or completely quench the KL evolution, `shielding' the inner binary from the secular effects of the tertiary, and not allowing the KLCTF process to take place. In this case, the inner binary will not shrink to become a short-period binary. (2) KL evolution is not quenched and it drives the planetary orbit into high eccentricities, giving rise to an unstable configuration, in which the planet is most likely ejected from the system. (3) KL evolution is not quenched, but the planet survives the KLCTF evolution and the formation of the short-period binary; the planet orbit is likely to be much wider than the currently observed inner binary orbit, and is likely to be inclined in respect to the binary orbit, as well as eccentric. These outcomes lead to two main conclusions: (1) it is unlikely to find a (massive) planet on a tight and coplanar orbit around a short-period main-sequence binary, and (2) the frequency, masses and orbits of non-coplanar circumbinary planets in short-period binaries are constrained by their secular evolution.

  8. The distribution of the perihelion distances of short-period comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, J. A.

    1984-06-01

    The influence of physical (sublimation) and dynamical (perturbations by Jupiter) effects on the distribution of the perihelion distances of short-period comets (P less than 20 yr) is analyzed. It is found that the combination of both effects may account for the observed steep decrease of the number of short-period comets with small perihelion distances and explain why no short-period comet has so far been recorded for perihelion distances less than 0.34 AU. On dynamical grounds, the probability for a short-period comet to acquire an orbit of a very small perihelion distance is low. Unlikely high encounter velocities with Jupiter are required for a short-period comet to get very close to the sun. Furthermore, those comets that do reach the sun's neighborhood are subject to a rapid physical decay. These findings might help to explain such properties of the interplanetary dust as the radial dependence of its spatial density and the observation that more beta meteoroids seem to come from heliocentric distances greater than 0.5 AU than from smaller.

  9. Synthesis of Current-Voltage Characteristics of 670 GHz Gyrotron Magnetron Injection Gun and Calculation of the Helical Electron Beam Parameters at the Leading Edge of a High-Voltage Pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuilov, V. N.; Glyavin, M. Yu.

    2013-02-01

    A method of synthesis of current-voltage characteristics (CVC) and calculation of the parameters of a helical electron beam (HEB) at the leading edge of the accelerating voltage pulse for gyrotron electron guns is proposed. These data can be used for a study of the gyrotron startup scenario with the mode competition taken into account. As an example, the results of calculations for a pulsed gyrotron with a frequency of 670 GHz are presented.

  10. Chaotic motion in a comet disk beyond Neptune - The delivery of short-period comets

    SciTech Connect

    Torbett, M.V. )

    1989-10-01

    Recent Monte Carlo simulations have demonstrated that a source with a spherical distribution of orbital angular momenta such as the Oort Cloud cannot give rise to the highly flattened distribution of short-period comets. It was also demonstrated that the problem of delivery could be resolved if short-period comets originate in a low inclination disk of comets beyond the orbit of Neptune. Numerical integrations of cometary motion in this disk show that perturbations by the four major planets can result in chaotic motions which, on long timescales, can deliver comets to low inclination Neptune-crossing orbits. Multistage gravitational scattering by the major planets can then, according to theory, supply short-period comets with orbital elements matching observations. 34 refs.

  11. A survey for very short-period planets in the Kepler data

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Brian; Stark, Christopher C.; Chambers, John; Adams, Elisabeth R.; Deming, Drake

    2013-12-20

    We conducted a search for very short-period transiting objects in the publicly available Kepler data set. Our preliminary survey has revealed four planetary candidates, all with orbital periods less than 12 hr. We have analyzed the data for these candidates using photometric models that include transit light curves, ellipsoidal variations, and secondary eclipses to constrain the candidates' radii, masses, and effective temperatures. Even with masses of only a few Earth masses, the candidates' short periods mean that they may induce stellar radial velocity signals (a few m s{sup –1}) detectable by currently operating facilities. The origins of such short-period planets are unclear, but we discuss the possibility that they may be the remnants of disrupted hot Jupiters. Whatever their origins, if confirmed as planets, these candidates would be among the shortest-period planets ever discovered. Such planets would be particularly amenable to discovery by the planned TESS mission.

  12. A triple origin for the lack of tight coplanar circumbinary planets around short-period binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamers, Adrian S.; Perets, Hagai B.; Portegies Zwart, Simon F.

    2016-01-01

    Transiting circumbinary planets are more easily detected around short-period than long-period binaries, but none have yet been observed by Kepler orbiting binaries with periods shorter than seven days. In triple systems, secular Kozai-Lidov cycles and tidal friction (KLCTF) have been shown to reduce the inner orbital period from ˜104 to a few days. Indeed, the majority of short-period binaries are observed to possess a third stellar companion. Using secular evolution analysis and population synthesis, we show that KLCTF makes it unlikely for circumbinary transiting planets to exist around short-period binaries. We find the following outcomes. (1) Sufficiently massive planets in tight and/or coplanar orbits around the inner binary can quench the KL evolution because they induce precession in the inner binary. The KLCTF process does not take place, preventing the formation of a short-period binary. (2) Secular evolution is not quenched and it drives the planetary orbit into a high eccentricity, giving rise to an unstable configuration, in which the planet is most likely ejected from the system. (3) Secular evolution is not quenched but the planet survives the KLCTF evolution. Its orbit is likely to be much wider than the currently observed inner binary orbit, and is likely to be eccentric and inclined with respect to the inner binary. These outcomes lead to two main conclusions: (1) it is unlikely to find a massive planet on a tight and coplanar orbit around a short-period binary, and (2) the properties of circumbinary planets in short-period binaries are constrained by secular evolution.

  13. Tidal decay and stable Roche-lobe overflow of short-period gaseous exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Brian; Jensen, Emily; Peacock, Sarah; Arras, Phil; Penev, Kaloyan

    2016-06-01

    Many gaseous exoplanets in short-period orbits are on the verge or are in the process of Roche-lobe overflow (RLO). Moreover, orbital stability analysis shows tides can drive many hot Jupiters to spiral inevitably toward their host stars. Thus, the coupled processes of orbital evolution and RLO likely shape the observed distribution of close-in exoplanets and may even be responsible for producing some of the short-period rocky planets. However, the exact outcome for an overflowing planet depends on its internal response to mass loss, and the accompanying orbital evolution can act to enhance or inhibit RLO. In this study, we apply the fully-featured and robust Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics suite to model RLO of short-period gaseous planets. We show that, although the detailed evolution may depend on several properties of the planetary system, it is largely determined by the core mass of the overflowing gas giant. In particular, we find that the orbital expansion that accompanies RLO often stops and reverses at a specific maximum period that depends on the core mass. We suggest that RLO may often strand the remnant of a gas giant near this orbital period, which provides an observational prediction that can corroborate the hypothesis that short-period gas giants undergo RLO. We conduct a preliminary comparison of this prediction to the observed population of small, short-period planets and find some planets in orbits that may be consistent with this picture. To the extent that we can establish some short-period planets are indeed the remnants of gas giants, that population can elucidate the properties of gas giant cores, the properties of which remain largely unconstrained.

  14. Distribution of pulmonary ventilation and perfusion during short periods of weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michels, D. B.; West, J. B.

    1978-01-01

    Airborne experiments were conducted on four trained normal male subjects (28-40 yr) to study pulmonary function during short periods (22-27 sec) of zero gravity obtained by flying a jet aircraft through appropriate parabolic trajectories. The cabin was always pressurized to a sea-level altitude. The discussion is limited to pulmonary ventilation and perfusion. The results clearly demonstrate that gravity is the major factor causing nonuniformity in the topographical distribution of pulmonary ventilation. More importantly, the results suggest that virtually all the topographical nonuniformity of ventilation, blood flow, and lung volume observed under 1-G conditions are eliminated during short periods of zero gravity.

  15. Autocorrelation Analysis of Hipparcos Photometry of Short-Period Be Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percy, John R.; Hosick, JoAnne; Kincaide, Heather; Pang, Ceci

    2002-05-01

    We have used Hipparcos epoch photometry and a form of autocorrelation analysis to investigate the amplitude and timescale of the short-period variability of 82 Be stars, including 46 Be stars that were analyzed by Hubert & Floquet using Fourier and CLEAN analysis and 36 other Be stars that were suspected of short-period variability. Our method has given useful information for about 84% of these stars; for the rest, the time distribution of the Hipparcos epoch photometry limits the capability of our technique.

  16. Rotation of a Pulsed Jet, or Plume, in a Rotating Flow: A Source of Helicity for an α-ω Astrophysical Dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckley, Howard F.; Colgate, Stirling A.; Romero, Van D.; Ferrel, Ragnar

    2003-12-01

    A fluid-flow experiment was performed in water to investigate how an expanding pulsed jet rotates when injected off-axis into a rotating annular flow. The pulsed jet simulates a large-scale rising plume in a stellar or accretion disk environment. In the experiment, the pulsed jet was injected parallel to, but radially displaced from, the axis of rotation. The jet was observed to counterrotate Δφ~π/2 to π rad relative to the rotating frame before dispersing into the background flow. The counterrotation of an expanding pulsed jet in a rotating frame is the key result of the experiment. The counterrotation of the jet occurs because of the increased moment of inertia due to its expansion and conserved angular momentum. Rapid turbulent entrainment of the pulsed jet with the background flow during radial divergence when striking the end wall limits the net rotation of the jet. Shear within the differentially rotating background flow enhances the net rotation of the jet. Naturally occurring buoyant plumes in rotating flows should exhibit this same coherent nature, i.e., the same direction of rotation, the same vertical motion, and the same finite angle of rotation for every plume. This should make pulsed jets, or plumes, when occurring in a conducting medium, nearly ideal for producing helicity for the α-ω dynamo. In the experiment, Couette flow was established in water between two coaxial cylinders with an outer radius R0=15 cm, an inner radius R1=7.5 cm, and height Z=10 cm. The Reynolds number of the experiment was Re~=105 in order to simulate the behavior of turbulent entrainment at high Reynolds number. The differential rotation of the background flow was varied from constant rotation, dΩ/dR=0, to Ω~1/R. The flow was made visible by pulsed hydrogen electrolysis from a tungsten wire and by dispersed guanidine in water. The flow was imaged using a digital video camcorder. These measurements are a precursor to the design and development of an α-ω dynamo

  17. Five eccentric eclipsing binaries with the relatively short periods of apsidal motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucakova, H.; Wolf, M.

    2013-11-01

    This text is focused on some information and results of the analysis of the selected eccentric eclipsing binaries with relatively short periods of apsidal motion - V785 Cas, V821 Cas, V796 Cyg, V398 Lac, and V871 Per. Further and more detailed information can be found in the paper in A&A (M. Wolf et al. 2013).

  18. GSC 3377-0296 is a New Short-Period Eclipsing RS CVn Variable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, C.; Bernhard, K.; Monninger, G.

    2007-05-01

    GSC 3377-0296 is a new eclipsing RS CVn variable, which has been discovered in the ROTSE1 database. A very short period of 0.4224672 days has been determined from the available ROTSE1 data and our BVR photometry in 2006 and 2007. Large changes in the light curve occur on timescales of a few weeks.

  19. ExploreNEOs. VIII. Dormant Short-period Comets in the Near-Earth Asteroid Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mommert, M.; Harris, A. W.; Mueller, M.; Hora, J. L.; Trilling, D. E.; Bottke, W. F.; Thomas, C. A.; Delbo, M.; Emery, J. P.; Fazio, G.; Smith, H. A.

    2015-10-01

    We perform a search for dormant comets, asteroidal objects of cometary origin, in the near-Earth asteroid (NEA) population based on dynamical and physical considerations. Our study is based on albedos derived within the ExploreNEOs program and is extended by adding data from NEOWISE and the Akari asteroid catalog. We use a statistical approach to identify asteroids on orbits that resemble those of short-period near-Earth comets (NECs) using the Tisserand parameter with respect to Jupiter, the aphelion distance, and the minimum orbital intersection distance with respect to Jupiter. From the sample of NEAs on comet-like orbits, we select those with a geometric albedo pV ≤ 0.064 as dormant comet candidates, and find that only ˜50% of NEAs on comet-like orbits also have comet-like albedos. We identify a total of 23 NEAs from our sample that are likely to be dormant short-period NECs and, based on a de-biasing procedure applied to the cryogenic NEOWISE survey, estimate both magnitude-limited and size-limited fractions of the NEA population that are dormant short-period comets. We find that 0.3%-3.3% of the NEA population with H ≤ 21, and ({9}-5+2)% of the population with diameters d ≥ 1 km, are dormant short-period NECs.

  20. Cooperative Learning Combined with Short Periods of Lecturing: A Good Alternative in Teaching Biochemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez-Santander, Ana

    2008-01-01

    The informal activities of cooperative learning and short periods of lecturing has been combined and used in the university teaching of biochemistry as part of the first year course of Optics and Optometry in the academic years 2004-2005 and 2005-2006. The lessons were previously elaborated by the teacher and included all that is necessary to…

  1. CRTS discovery of an outburst from a short period binary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, A. J.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Mahabal, A. A.; Graham, M. J.; Donalek, C.; Williams, R.; Catelan, M.; Christensen, E.; Larson, S. M.

    2016-06-01

    Here we report the discovery of an outburst from known short period binary system 2MASS_J16211735+4412541. On 2016-06-03.45 UT, 2MASS_J162117 wasdetected by CRTS as a transient event ( CSS160603:162117+441254) with V_CSS=13.3.

  2. Origins of Solar Systems Workshop: The Origin, Evolution, and Detectability of Short Period Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, S. Alan

    1993-01-01

    The origin of the short period comets (SPC) (periods less than 200 years), the dynamical formation of their present reservoir(s), the cause and rate of their transport to the inner planetary region where they can be detected, and the magnitude of selection effects in their discovery are important research questions directly coupled to the goals of understanding the origin and evolution of the Solar System. To address these questions in an intensive way, an interdisciplinary, five month long Workshop from Jan. to May 1993 at Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) in San Antonio was convened. The goal of this Workshop was to advance the state of understanding about the origins, dynamical evolution, and present location of short period comets and their reservoir(s).

  3. Transformation of short-periodic high-inclination orbits of circumsolar submillimeter dust

    SciTech Connect

    Bazei, A.A.; Kramer, E.N.

    1995-11-01

    Disintegration of short-periodic comets is one of the sources of cosmic dust in the Solar System. Initially dust particles move approximately in the orbits of parent comets, in particular, in high-inclination orbits. In a few million years, some of these particles (the smallest ones) go over to the short-periodic, high-inclination orbits due to the Poynting-Robertson effect. The numerical integration of the equations of motion at this stage of evolution gives rise to somewhat surprising results. For example, when integrating the equations of motion as far back as 6000 years from the time of meteor observation, the real meteor particle gains the perihelion distance smaller than the solar radius (!). Our calculations show that the time of falling onto the Sun is shorter for a article moving in a high-inclination orbit. This is due to the superposition of gravitational perturbation and radiation effects.

  4. The very short-period extreme mass ratio binary 75 Pegasi - Photometry and model

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, B.E.; Hube, D.P.; Brown, C. Alberta, University, Edmonton Glenlea Astronomical Observatory Manitoba, University, Winnipeg )

    1991-05-01

    The bright star 75 Peg is a close binary ellipsoidal variable with a short period (0.5021035-day) and an extreme mass ratio of 0.104 B, V, and R photometric data, along with previously published radial-velocity data, are analyzed; they suggest that the primary of the 75 Peg system may be, or is very close to, filling its critical Roche lobe. 11 refs.

  5. Search for Random Fluctuations in Periods of Short-period Cepheids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdnikov, L. N.; Stevens, I. R.

    2010-02-01

    Data from SMEI instrument (onboard the CORIOLIS spacecraft) for 16 brightest Cepheids were analyzed with the Eddington-Plakidis method and random fluctuations in periods for four of them, SU Cas (P=1.95d), δ Cep (P=5.37d), κ Pav (P=9.09d), and α UMi (P=3.97d) were detected. Such fluctuations for short period Cepheids were found for the first time.

  6. A Survey for Very Short-Period Planets in the Kepler Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Brian K.; Stark, C. C.; Adams, E. R.; Endl, M.; Arras, P.; Boss, A.; Deming, D.

    2013-10-01

    Most gas giant exoplanets with orbital periods less than or equal to a few days are unstable against tidal decay and may be tidally disrupted before their host stars leave the main sequence. These gas giants may contain rocky and icy solid cores, and tidal disruption of the gas giants could strand these cores near their progenitors’ Roche limits (in orbital periods of a few to several hours). Whatever their origins, such short-period objects will evade the Kepler mission's transit search because it is focused on periods > 0.5 days. Motivated by these considerations, we conducted a search for very short-period transiting objects in the publicly available Kepler dataset. Our preliminary survey has revealed about a dozen planetary candidates, with periods ranging from 3.3 to 10 hours. We have analyzed the data for these candidates using photometric models that include transit light curves, as well as ellipsoidal variations and secondary eclipses, to constrain the candidates’ radii, masses, and brightness temperatures. Even with masses of only a few Earth masses, the candidates’ short periods mean they may induce stellar radial velocity signals 10 m/s) detectable by currently operating facilities. In this presentation, we will describe our survey, constraints from Kepler photometry, and plans for follow-up observations. If confirmed, these planets would be among the shortest-period planets ever discovered, and if common, such planets would be particularly amenable to discovery by the planned TESS mission, which is specifically designed to find short-period rocky planets.

  7. NSVS4484038, A contact binary system at the short-period cutoff

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X. B.; Deng, L. C.; Wang, K.; Yan, Z. Z.; Tian, J. F.; Peng, Y. J.; Pan, Y.; Luo, Z. Q.; Sun, J. J.; Liu, Q. L.; Xin, H. Q.; Zhou, Q.

    2014-09-01

    We present a photometric study of the short-period eclipsing binary NSVS4484038. Time-series CCD photometry of the star in the B and V band was carried out. An orbital period of 0.218551 days was determined for the eclipsing binary and a revised linear ephemeris was given. The first photometric solution of the binary system was detected through light-curve synthesis using the Wilson-Devinney method. It reveals an overcontact configuration for the system with a filling-out factor of about 10%. The mass ratio was determined to be 2.74 with an inclination of 72.°1. The less massive secondary component is found to have a higher surface temperature than the primary by about 90 K, indicating that NSVS4484038 could be a contact system of W subtype. The star is then identified to be a new member of W UMa systems at the short-period cutoff. Comparisons with known contact binaries at the short-period cutoff, the properties, and the evolutionary status of the binary system are discussed.

  8. The long-term dynamical behavior of short-period comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levison, Harold F.; Duncan, Martin J.

    1993-01-01

    The orbits of the known short-period comets under the influence of the Sun and all the planets except Mercury and Pluto are numerically integrated. The calculation was undertaken in order to determine the dynamical lifetimes for these objects as well as explaining the current orbital element distribution. It is found that a comet can move between Jupiter-family and Halley-family comets several times in its dynamical lifetime. The median lifetime of the known short-period comets from the time they are first injected into a short-period comet orbit to ultimate ejection is approximately 50,000 years. The very flat inclination distribution of Jupiter-family comets is observed to become more distended as it ages. The only possible explanation for the observed flat distribution is that the comets become extinct before their inclination distribution can change significantly. It is shown that the anomalous concentration of the argument of perihelion of Jupiter-family comets near 0 and 180 deg is a direct result of their aphelion distance being close to 5.2AU and the comet being recently perturbed onto a Jupiter-family orbit. Also the concentration of their aphelion near Jupiter's orbit is a result of the conservation of the Tisserand invariant during the capture process.

  9. Electron acceleration based on a laser pulse propagating through a plasma in the simultaneous presence of a helical wiggler and an obliquely applied external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gashti, M. A.; Jafari, S.

    2016-06-01

    Electron acceleration based on a laser pulse propagating through plasma channel has been studied in the simultaneous presence of a helical magnetic wiggler and an obliquely applied external magnetic field. A numerical study of electron energy and electron trajectory has been made using the fourth-order Runge-kutta method. Numerical results indicate that electron energy increases with decreasing θ -angle of the obliquely external magnetic field. Besides, it increases with increasing the amplitude of the obliquely magnetic field. It is also found that the electron attains a higher energy at shorter distances for higher amplitude of the wiggler field Ωw . Therefore, employing a magnetic wiggler field is very beneficial for electron acceleration in short distances. Further new results reveal that in the absence of the wiggler field (Ωw=0) , the electron energy increases with increasing the laser intensity, whereas in the presence of the wiggler field (Ωwneq0) , the electron energy increases with decreasing the laser intensity. As a result, employing a wiggler magnetic field in the laser-based electron accelerators can be worthwhile in the design of table top accelerators and it can enhance the electron energy at lower laser intensities.

  10. Design of polarizers for a mega-watt long-pulse millimeter-wave transmission line on the large helical device

    SciTech Connect

    Ii, T. Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Kobayashi, S.; Okada, K.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Takahashi, H.; Ito, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Okada, K.; Mutoh, T.; Makino, R.; Kobayashi, K.; Goto, Y.

    2015-02-15

    The polarizer is one of the critical components in a high-power millimeter-wave transmission line. It requires full and highly efficient coverage of any polarization states, high-power tolerance, and low-loss feature. Polarizers with rounded shape at the edge of the periodic groove surface are designed and fabricated by the machining process for a mega-watt long-pulse millimeter-wave transmission line of the electron cyclotron resonance heating system in the large helical device. The groove shape of λ/8- and λ/4-type polarizers for an 82.7 GHz transmission line is optimally designed in an integral method developed in the vector theories of diffraction gratings so that the efficiency to realize any polarization state can be maximized. The dependence of the polarization states on the combination of the two polarizer rotation angles (Φ{sub λ/8}, Φ{sub λ/4}) is examined experimentally in a low-power test with the newly developed polarization monitor. The results show that the measured polarization characteristics are in good agreement with the calculated ones.

  11. Helical equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, S.

    1981-08-01

    A straight, helical plasma equilibrium equation is solved numerically for a plasma with a helical magnetic axis. As is expected, by a suitable choice of the plasma boundary, the vacuum configuration is made line ..integral.. dl/B stable. As the plasma pressure increases, the line ..integral.. dl/B criterion will improve (again as expected). There is apparently no limit on the plasma ..beta.. from the equilibrium consideration. Thus helical-axis stellarator ..beta.. will presumably be limited by MHD stability ..beta.., and not by equilibrium ..beta...

  12. Long-term tidal evolution of short-period planets with companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardling, Rosemary A.

    2007-12-01

    Of the 14 transiting extrasolar planetary systems for which radii have been measured, at least three appear to be considerably larger than theoretical estimates suggest. It has been proposed by Bodenheimer, Lin & Mardling that undetected companions acting to excite the orbital eccentricity are responsible for these oversized planets, as they find new equilibrium radii in response to being tidally heated. In the case of HD 209458, this hypothesis has been rejected by some authors because there is no sign of such a companion at the 5 ms-1 level, and because it is difficult to say conclusively that the eccentricity is non-zero. Transit timing analysis as well as a direct transit search has further constrained the existence of very short period companions, especially in resonant orbits. Whether or not a companion is responsible for the large radius of HD 209458b, almost certainly some short-period systems have companions which force their eccentricities to non-zero values. This paper is dedicated to quantifying this effect. The eccentricity of a short-period planet will only be excited as long as its (non-resonant) companion's eccentricity is non-zero. Here, we show that the latter decays on a time-scale which depends on the structure of the interior planet, a time-scale which is often shorter than the lifetime of the system. This includes Earth-mass planets in the habitable zones of some stars. We determine which configurations are capable of sustaining significant eccentricity for at least the age of the system, and show that these include systems with companion masses as low as a fraction of an Earth mass. The orbital parameters of such companions are consistent with recent calculations which show that the migration process can induce the formation of low-mass planets external to the orbits of hot Jupiters. Systems with inflated planets are therefore good targets in the search for terrestrial planets.

  13. Studies of short-period comets on the eve of Rosetta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozuelos, F. J.; Moreno, F.; Aceituno, F.; Casanova, V.; Sota, A.; López-Moreno, J. J.; Cometas-Obs Team

    2015-05-01

    We present an extended study of the dust environment of a sample of short-period comets and their dynamical history. With this aim, we characterized the dust tails when the comets are active, and we make a statistical study to determine their dynamical evolution. The targets selected were 22P/Kopff, 30P/Reinmuth 1, 78P/Gehrels 2, 81P/Wild 2, 103P/Hartley 2, 115P/Maury, 118P/Shoemaker-Levy 4, 123P/West-Hartley, 157P/Tritton, 185P/Petriew, P/2011 W2 (Rinner).

  14. Infrared photometry of the RS CVn short-period systems - XY UMa and WY Cnc

    SciTech Connect

    Arevalo, M.J.; Lazaro, C. )

    1990-03-01

    Infrared J and K light curves of two RS CVn short-period systems, XY UMa and WY Cnc, are presented. Both systems show similar variability in the infrared to that observed in the visual. From the colors an infrared excess is inferred for the primary component of both systems. A new determination of their geometrical elements is presented and the resulting parameters are compared to those previously obtained from visible photometry. The light curves show peculiarities that may indicate the presence of gas streams in the systems. 27 refs.

  15. Study on the Geomagnetic Short Period Variations of the Northwestern Yunnan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Y.; Li, Q.; Cai, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Northwestern Yunnan is located in the interaction area between the Eurasian plate and the India plate. This area has been the ideal place for the research of continental dynamics and the prediction for risk region of strong earthquake for its complex tectonic environment and frequent seismic activity. Therefore the study on the geomagnetic short period variations is of great significance in the exploration of deep electrical structure, analysis of the seismic origin and deep geodynamics in the Northwestern Yunnan of China . This paper is based on the geomagnetic data from the magnetometer array with 8 sites built in the northwestern Yunnan to explore the deep electrical structure by the method of geomagnetic depth sounding. Firstly, we selected a total of 183 geomagnetic short period events at the range of 6min to 120min period. And we found a north northwest dividing line, of which two sides has the opposite value in the vertical component variation amplitude, which indicates the obvious conductivity anomaly underground. Secondly, the contour maps of the ratio of vertical component and horizontal component variation amplitude ΔZ/ΔH in different periods reflects the changes of a high conductivity belt's direction and position. In addition, the induction arrows maps within the period of 2 - 256min also shows that on the two sides of the dividing line the induction vectors deviate from each other, and the amplitude and direction of vectors varies with periods regularly. In the light of this, we infer that a high conductivity belt probably exists, which stretches from the deep crust to uppermost mantle and changes with depth constantly with the reference of magnetotelluric sounding. In the end of this paper, the staggered grid finite difference method is used to model the simplified three-dimensional high conductivity anomaly, and the result shows magnetic field distributions are consistent with the observed geomagnetic short period variations characteristics in

  16. Contribution of the Earth's gravitational potential to variations in orbital motion of short-period comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chepurova, Valentina M.; Kulikova, Nelli V.; Petrovskaya, Elena N.

    2016-04-01

    We present simulation results on evolution development of orbital motion of short-period comets with the revolution period not exceeding 6–7 years, namely comets 21P/Giacobini–Zinner, 26P/Grigg–Skjellerup and 7P/Pons–Winnecke. The calculations cover the range from the date of the object's discovery to 2100. Variations in the objects' orbital elements under the action of gravity disturbances, taking Earth's gravitational potential into account when the small body approaches, are analyzed. Corrected dates of perihelion passages can be used for scheduling observations.

  17. Photoluminescence Studies of Lateral Composition Modulated Short-Period AlAs/InAs Superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrenkiel, S.P.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Jones, E.D.; Lee, S.R.; Mascarenhas, A.; Mirecki Millunchick, J.; Norman, A.G.; Reno, J.L.; Twesten, R.D.; Zhang, Y.

    1999-01-04

    We present low temperature photoluminescence data for a series of spontaneous lateral composition modulation in (AlAs){sub m}/(InAs){sub n} short period superlattices on InP with differing average lattice constants, i.e., varying global strain. The low temperature photoluminescence peak energies were found to be much lower than the corresponding energy expected for the equivalent In{sub x}Al{sub 1{minus}x}As alloy. The bandgap energy reductions are found to approach 500 meV and this reduction is found to correlated with the strength of the composition modulation wave amplitude.

  18. Helical logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkle, Ralph C.; Drexler, K. Eric

    1996-12-01

    Helical logic is a theoretical proposal for a future computing technology using the presence or absence of individual electrons (or holes) to encode 1s and 0s. The electrons are constrained to move along helical paths, driven by a rotating electric field in which the entire circuit is immersed. The electric field remains roughly orthogonal to the major axis of the helix and confines each charge carrier to a fraction of a turn of a single helical loop, moving it like water in an Archimedean screw. Each loop could in principle hold an independent carrier, permitting high information density. One computationally universal logic operation involves two helices, one of which splits into two `descendant' helices. At the point of divergence, differences in the electrostatic potential resulting from the presence or absence of a carrier in the adjacent helix controls the direction taken by a carrier in the splitting helix. The reverse of this sequence can be used to merge two initially distinct helical paths into a single outgoing helical path without forcing a dissipative transition. Because these operations are both logically and thermodynamically reversible, energy dissipation can be reduced to extremely low levels. This is the first proposal known to the authors that combines thermodynamic reversibility with the use of single charge carriers. It is important to note that this proposal permits a single electron to switch another single electron, and does not require that many electrons be used to switch one electron. The energy dissipated per logic operation can very likely be reduced to less than 0957-4484/7/4/004/img5 at a temperature of 1 K and a speed of 10 GHz, though further analysis is required to confirm this. Irreversible operations, when required, can be easily implemented and should have a dissipation approaching the fundamental limit of 0957-4484/7/4/004/img6.

  19. Rapid-cadence optical monitoring for short-period variability of ɛ Aurigae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billings, Gary

    2013-07-01

    ɛ Aurigae was observed with CCD cameras and 35 mm SLR camera lenses, at rapid cadence (>1/minute), for long runs (up to 11 hours), on multiple occasions during 2009 - 2011, to monitor for variability of the system at scales of minutes to hours. The lens and camera were changed during the period to improve results, finalizing on a 135 mm focal length Canon f/2 lens (at f/2.8), an ND8 neutral density filter, a Johnson V filter, and an SBIG ST-8XME camera (Kodak KAF-1603ME microlensed chip). Differential photometry was attempted, but because of the large separation between the variable and comparison star (η Aur), noise caused by transient extinction variations was not consistently eliminated. The lowest-noise time series for searching for short-period variability proved to be the extinction-corrected instrumental magnitude of ɛ Aur obtained on "photometric nights", with η Aur used to determine and monitor the extinction coefficient for the night. No flares or short-period variations of ɛ Aur were detected by visual inspection of the light curves from observing runs with noise levels as low as 0.008 magnitudes rms.

  20. Evidence for short-period acoustic waves in the solar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunnenberg, M.; Kneer, F.; Hirzberger, J.

    2002-11-01

    Short-period acoustic waves are thought to supply the energy for the radiative losses of the non-magnetic chromosphere of the Sun and, in general, of late-type stars. Here, we present evidence for the existence of waves in the solar atmosphere with periods in the range of 50 s short-period range is concentrated above intergranular spaces. We estimate an acoustic flux into the chromosphere of approximately 3*E6 erg cm-2 s-1, as needed for the chromospheric radiative losses.

  1. Tracking the stellar longitudes of starspots in short-period Kepler binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaji, Bhaskaran; Croll, Bryce; Levine, Alan M.; Rappaport, Saul

    2015-03-01

    We report on a new method for tracking the phases of the orbital modulations in very short-period, near-contact, and contact binary systems in order to follow starspots. We apply this technique to Kepler light curves for 414 binary systems that were identified as having anticorrelated O-C curves for the mid-times of the primary and secondary eclipses, or in the case of non-eclipsing systems, their light-curve minima. This phase tracking approach extracts more information about starspot and binary system behaviour than may be easily obtained from the O-C curves. We confirm the hypothesis of Tran et al. that we can successfully follow the rotational motions of spots on the surfaces of the stars in these binaries. In ˜34 per cent of the systems, the spot rotation is retrograde as viewed in the frame rotating with the orbital motion, while ˜13 per cent show significant prograde spot rotation. The remaining systems show either little spot rotation or erratic behaviour, or sometimes include intervals of both types of behaviour. We discuss the possibility that the relative motions of spots are related to differential rotation of the stars. It is clear from this study that the motions of the starspots in at least 50 per cent of these short-period binaries are not exactly synchronized with the orbits.

  2. PLANET HUNTERS: ASSESSING THE KEPLER INVENTORY OF SHORT-PERIOD PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Schwamb, Megan E.; Lintott, Chris J.; Lynn, Stuart; Smith, Arfon M.; Simpson, Robert J.; Fischer, Debra A.; Giguere, Matthew J.; Brewer, John M.; Parrish, Michael; Schawinski, Kevin

    2012-08-01

    We present the results from a search of data from the first 33.5 days of the Kepler science mission (Quarter 1) for exoplanet transits by the Planet Hunters citizen science project. Planet Hunters enlists members of the general public to visually identify transits in the publicly released Kepler light curves via the World Wide Web. Over 24,000 volunteers reviewed the Kepler Quarter 1 data set. We examine the abundance of {>=}2 R{sub Circled-Plus} planets on short-period (<15 days) orbits based on Planet Hunters detections. We present these results along with an analysis of the detection efficiency of human classifiers to identify planetary transits including a comparison to the Kepler inventory of planet candidates. Although performance drops rapidly for smaller radii, {>=}4 R{sub Circled-Plus} Planet Hunters {>=}85% efficient at identifying transit signals for planets with periods less than 15 days for the Kepler sample of target stars. Our high efficiency rate for simulated transits along with recovery of the majority of Kepler {>=}4 R{sub Circled-Plus} planets suggests that the Kepler inventory of {>=}4 R{sub Circled-Plus} short-period planets is nearly complete.

  3. Theoretical study of InN/GaN short period superlattices to mimic disordered alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro, M. Marques, M.

    2014-06-14

    We carried out ab initio calculations of the (InN){sub n}∕(GaN){sub m} short period superlattices using the LDA-1/2 method in order to obtain approximate quasiparticle electronic structures. We performed calculations for several short period superlattices respecting the concentrations of 33%, 50%, 66%, and 80% of InN, considering different straining possibilities due to lattice mismatches. For the majority of configurations, we find relevant changes on the valence and conduction profiles around bandgap with position plane-by-plane along the superlattices growth direction, with the presence of intrinsic electric fields in the materials, in the case, when strain is applied. Our results show that for small numbers n and m of layers, the band edge states extend over the entire superlattice. For larger n and/or m, the edge states tend to localise on particular subtype layers (InN or GaN). For the former cases, the bandgaps are very close to the random alloys with the same concentrations, providing potential good materials for optoelectronic devices based on nitrides.

  4. The SuPerPiG search for short period planets in the K2 dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Elisabeth R.; Jackson, Brian

    2015-11-01

    Planets with orbital periods of less than a day present real challenges to theories of planet formation and evolution, and yet numerous objects with periods as short as a few hours have been found. So close to their host stars that some are actively disintegrating, these planets' origins remain unclear, and even modified models for planet formation and evolution with significant inward migration have trouble accounting for their periods. They thus provide an important probe of the innermost region of the protoplanetary disk. We report on the ongoing efforts of the Short-Period Planets Group (SuPerPiG, http://www.astrojack.com/research/superpig/) to find additional short-period planets in the K2 Mission, using the light curve products produced by the Vanderburg and Johnson k2sff pipeline (Vanderburg & Johnson 2014, https://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/k2sff/). Preliminary results from Campaign 2, including accounting for a 6-hour pseudo transit signal introduced by the Kepler spacecraft thruster re-pointing, will be presented.

  5. Time functions of deep earthquakes from broadband and short-period stacks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houston, H.; Benz, H.M.; Vidale, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    To constrain dynamic source properties of deep earthquakes, we have systematically constructed broadband time functions of deep earthquakes by stacking and scaling teleseismic P waves from U.S. National Seismic Network, TERRAscope, and Berkeley Digital Seismic Network broadband stations. We examined 42 earthquakes with depths from 100 to 660 km that occurred between July 1, 1992 and July 31, 1995. To directly compare time functions, or to group them by size, depth, or region, it is essential to scale them to remove the effect of moment, which varies by more than 3 orders of magnitude for these events. For each event we also computed short-period stacks of P waves recorded by west coast regional arrays. The comparison of broadband with short-period stacks yields a considerable advantage, enabling more reliable measurement of event duration. A more accurate estimate of the duration better constrains the scaling procedure to remove the effect of moment, producing scaled time functions with both correct timing and amplitude. We find only subtle differences in the broadband time-function shape with moment, indicating successful scaling and minimal effects of attenuation at the periods considered here. The average shape of the envelopes of the short-period stacks is very similar to the average broadband time function. The main variations seen with depth are (1) a mild decrease in duration with increasing depth, (2) greater asymmetry in the time functions of intermediate events compared to deep ones, and (3) unexpected complexity and late moment release for events between 350 and 550 km, with seven of the eight events in that depth interval displaying markedly more complicated time functions with more moment release late in the rupture than most events above or below. The first two results are broadly consistent with our previous studies, while the third is reported here for the first time. The greater complexity between 350 and 550 km suggests greater heterogeneity in

  6. B and V light curves of the very short-period binary VZ Piscium

    SciTech Connect

    Samec, R.G. )

    1989-07-01

    The very short-period W Ursae Majoris system VZ Psc was observed on two consecutive nights with the facilities at Lowell Observatory. The observations covering the eclipse portions of the light curves yielded four epochs of minimum light and an improved ephemeris. A period study covering nearly 27,000 cycles revealed that the period has remained rather constant with no discernible long-term variation. The light curves, defined by 321 observations with the B filter and 317 with the V filter, display shallow eclipse depths and are highly asymmetric with maxima occurring at phases 0.29 and 0.72. The maximum following primary eclipse is somewhat fainter and redder than the maximum following secondary eclipse. 16 refs.

  7. Multiband Photometry of Southern Very Short Period Eclipsing Binaries. I. V676 Centauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, J. D.; Samec, R. G.; Woissol, S. L.

    1996-05-01

    In this paper, we extend our study of solar-type binaries near the the low period limit to include Southern hemisphere systems. Observations are being taken at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Chile. Here, we report B,V,R,I observations of V676 Centauri. Our three nights of data were taken in May of 1991 with a dry ice cooled Ga-As photometer attached to the 1.0-m reflector. Two new primary and two secondary epochs of minimum light were determined from the observations, and more than 100 minima were collected from the literature. Our period study spans some 35 years. The light curves show a rather large difference in eclipse depths for a W UMa binary. An O'Connell effect lends evidence of spot activity in this very short period ( 0.291 d) system. A preliminary photometric analysis of the light curves is presented.

  8. Pitch Controllability Based on Airplane Model without Short-Period Approximation—Flight Simulator Experiment—

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Osamu; Kobayashi, Osamu

    Pitch controllability of an airplane is very important for longitudinal flying qualities, therefore, much research has been conducted. However, it has not been clarified why pitch handling qualities degrades in the low speed, e.g. take-off and landing flight phases. On this topic, this paper investigates the effect of several parameters of the short-period mode and phugoid mode using a flight simulator. The results show the following conclusions: The difference between the initial phase angles in two modal components in the pitch attitude response to elevator step input plays the most important role in the pitch handling qualities among modal parameters; and the difference of the two modal natural frequencies has small effect on the pitch controllability even when flight speed decreases.

  9. AM CVn Stars: Structure and Evolution of Ultra-Short Period Interacting Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froning, Cynthia

    2005-01-01

    This is the final report of a FUSE program to study the physics of accretion and outflows in ultra-compact, helium dominated, disk-accreting binaries. With FUSE, we observed the AM CVn binary V803 Cen, which is one of only two AM CVn systems observed by FUSE to date. V803 Cen is a short-period interacting binary in which a hydrogen-deficient white dwarf transfers mass to another white dwarf via a hot, steady-state accretion disk. Unlike other cataclysmic variables (CVs), AM CVn stars have undergone double common envelope evolution (one for each white dwarf in the binary) and so probe an alternate route of evolution in binary stars. Our goals in this project were to investigate how the structure of the accretion disk and the link between the disk and wind outflows are affected by the absence of hydrogen in the system and by the compact size of the binary and the accretion disk.

  10. Band gaps and internal electric fields in semipolar short period InN/GaN superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Gorczyca, I.; Skrobas, K.; Suski, T.; Christensen, N. E.; Svane, A.

    2014-06-09

    The electronic structures and internal electric fields of semipolar short-period mInN/nGaN superlattices (SLs) have been calculated for several compositions (m, n). Two types of SL are considered, (112{sup ¯}2) and (202{sup ¯}1), corresponding to growth along the wurtzite s2 and s6 directions, respectively. The results are compared to similar calculations for polar SLs (grown in the c-direction) and nonpolar SLs (grown in the a- and m-directions). The calculated band gaps for the semipolar SLs lie between those calculated for the nonpolar and polar SLs: For s2-SLs they fall slightly below the band gaps of a-plane SLs, whereas for s6-SLs they are considerably smaller.

  11. Characteristics of short-period internal waves in the Kara Sea inferred from satellite SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, I. E.; Kudryavtsev, V. N.; Zubkova, E. V.; Zimin, A. V.; Chapron, B.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we present the results of short-period internal wave (SIW) observations in the Kara Sea on the basis of satellite ENVISAT ASAR data between July and October 2007. Altogether, 248 internal wave (IW) packets and solitons are identified in 89 SAR images. Detailed spatial statistics of IW signatures and their properties in the Kara Sea is presented. The primary regions of IW activity are the areas near the Kara Gates Strait, the southeastern part of the Novaya Zemlya Trough, and in the vicinity of Cape Zhelaniya. We identify the regions where large IW packets are observed with wavelengths up to 2-3 km and the front length exceeding 200 km. The mean interpacket distance for observed IWs is about 20 km, but it may reach 50-60 km. Consequent IW packets are observed to travel up to 500 km from the presumed generation points. The results of satellite observations are compared with results of previous studies.

  12. Cometary magnitude distribution and the ratio between the numbers of long- and short-period comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, D. W.

    1988-01-01

    Comets are presently divided into three groups on the basis of orbital period: of more than 200 years, of 15-200 years, and of less than 15 years. It is noted that the number of bright, short-period comets presently visible from the earth may be accounted for through the postulation of certain Jovian capture parameters, in conjunction with a flux of bright long-period comets tending to the vicinity of the earth that is equal to the observed, 0.83 + or - 0.11/year flux. Attention is given to the relationship between absolute magnitude, on the one hand, and on the other the size, shape, and surface structure of the nucleus.

  13. Structure and Evolution of Nearby Stars with Planets. I. Short-Period Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Eric B.; Rasio, Frederic A.; Sills, Alison

    1999-03-01

    Using the Yale stellar evolution code, we have calculated theoretical models for nearby stars with planetary-mass companions in short-period nearly circular orbits: 51 Pegasi, τ Bootis, υ Andromedae, ρ1 Cancri, and ρ Coronae Borealis. We present tables listing key stellar parameters such as mass, radius, age, and size of the convective envelope as a function of the observable parameters (luminosity, effective temperature, and metallicity), as well as the unknown helium fraction. For each star we construct best models based on recently published spectroscopic data and the present understanding of galactic chemical evolution. We discuss our results in the context of planet formation theory and, in particular, tidal dissipation effects and stellar metallicity enhancements.

  14. PHOTOMETRIC STUDY OF THE VERY SHORT PERIOD SHALLOW CONTACT BINARY DD COMAE BERENICES

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, L.; Qian, S.-B.; Diethelm, R. E-mail: mikulas@physics.muni.c

    2010-07-15

    The first photometric solutions of the very short period (VSP) close binary DD Comae Berenices (P = 0fd26920811) based on our new complete (IR){sub C} light curves are derived by the 2003 version Wilson-Van Hamme code. They show that the system belongs to shallow contact W-type W UMa systems with a degree of overcontact of 8.7%. The observed light curve distortions are explained by employing the spots model due to the late-type nature of both components. We have collected all available photometric data about the system with emphasis on the individual observational data, which we treated simultaneously using our own method based on the usage of computed model light curves as templates. We recalculated published times of light minimum and added new ones of our own to construct an O - C diagram that spans over 70 years. Using a least squares method orthogonal quadratic model function, we found that the orbital period of DD Com is continuously increasing with P-dot =0.00401(22) s yr{sup -1}. The period increase may be caused by the mass transfer from the less-massive component to the more-massive one. With the period increase, the binary is evolving from the present shallow contact phase to the broken stage predicted by the thermal relaxation oscillation (TRO) theory. Compared with other VSP systems, DD Com is a rare system that lies on the expanding phase of the TRO cycle. Until now, only four such systems including DD Com are found in this stage. Thus, this target is another good observational proof of the TRO theory in a very short period region.

  15. Experimental and simulation study of undesirable short-period deformation in piezoelectric deformable x-ray mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamori, Hiroki; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Imai, Shota; Kimura, Takashi; Sano, Yasuhisa; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Tamasaku, Kenji; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2012-05-01

    To construct adaptive x-ray focusing optics whose optical parameters can be varied while performing wavefront correction, ultraprecise piezoelectric deformable mirrors have been developed. We computationally and experimentally investigated undesirable short-period deformation caused by piezoelectric actuators adhered to the substrate during mirror deformation. Based on the results of finite element method analysis, shape measurements, and the observation of x-ray reflection images, a guideline is developed for designing deformable mirrors that do not have short-period deformation errors.

  16. Towards a Fundamental Understanding of Short Period Eclipsing Binary Systems Using Kepler Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prsa, Andrej

    Kepler's ultra-high precision photometry is revolutionizing stellar astrophysics. We are seeing intrinsic phenomena on an unprecedented scale, and interpreting them is both a challenge and an exciting privilege. Eclipsing binary stars are of particular significance for stellar astrophysics because precise modeling leads to fundamental parameters of the orbiting components: masses, radii, temperatures and luminosities to better than 1-2%. On top of that, eclipsing binaries are ideal physical laboratories for studying other physical phenomena, such as asteroseismic properties, chromospheric activity, proximity effects, mass transfer in close binaries, etc. Because of the eclipses, the basic geometry is well constrained, but a follow-up spectroscopy is required to get the dynamical masses and the absolute scale of the system. A conjunction of Kepler photometry and ground- based spectroscopy is a treasure trove for eclipsing binary star astrophysics. This proposal focuses on a carefully selected set of 100 short period eclipsing binary stars. The fundamental goal of the project is to study the intrinsic astrophysical effects typical of short period binaries in great detail, utilizing Kepler photometry and follow-up spectroscopy to devise a robust and consistent set of modeling results. The complementing spectroscopy is being secured from 3 approved and fully funded programs: the NOAO 4-m echelle spectroscopy at Kitt Peak (30 nights; PI Prsa), the 10- m Hobby-Eberly Telescope high-resolution spectroscopy (PI Mahadevan), and the 2.5-m Sloan Digital Sky Survey III spectroscopy (PI Mahadevan). The targets are prioritized by the projected scientific yield. Short period detached binaries host low-mass (K- and M- type) components for which the mass-radius relationship is sparsely populated and still poorly understood, as the radii appear up to 20% larger than predicted by the population models. We demonstrate the spectroscopic detection viability in the secondary

  17. Site response and attenuation analyses using strong motion and short-period data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fangyin

    Site amplification and seismic attenuation are analyzed in this study using strong ground motion records and short period records. Site amplification factors at instrumented free-field sites are inferred from recorded motions using: (1) Generalized Inversion of S-waves; (2) the H/V method (i.e., the ratio of the spectral amplitudes of the horizontal and vertical components of motion); (3) Coda-wave Inversion; (4) the Standard Spectral Ratio method; and (5) the Coda Normalization method. The site amplification factors inferred from the above methods are compared to each other. The amplification factors obtained from the Generalized Inversion are validated by the other four methods. The correlation of site amplification to site condition is also analyzed and the results demonstrate that site amplification appears to be stronger for the geologically younger (and thus softer) sediments, and the site classification in conformance with UBC provisions provides smaller scatter than the classification based on geological formation. The site amplification factors for the different site classes of the NEHRP classification (i.e., site class C, D and E), which is important for engineering application, are provided and compared with the values proposed by Borcherdt (1994) and adopted in the 1997 UBC and 2003 IBC design codes. The agreement between the site amplification obtained in this study and those proposed by Borcherdt (1994) and adopted by the design codes is good. The nonlinearity of site amplification, resulting from the intensity of ground motion, is clearly identified at selected station where this is feasible. The intrinsic and scattering attenuation are analyzed at stations SML and TYC using the Multiple Lapse Time Window (MLTW) method. The total attenuation is derived from the intrinsic and scattering attenuation. The coda attenuation is analyzed for 14 stations from coda decay curves using linear regression. The S-wave attenuation is analyzed using the coda

  18. Helical filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, Nicholas; Hosseinimakarem, Zahra; Lim, Khan; Durand, Magali; Baudelet, Matthieu; Johnson, Eric; Richardson, Martin

    2014-06-01

    The shaping of laser-induced filamenting plasma channels into helical structures by guiding the process with a non-diffracting beam is demonstrated. This was achieved using a Bessel beam superposition to control the phase of an ultrafast laser beam possessing intensities sufficient to induce Kerr effect driven non-linear self-focusing. Several experimental methods were used to characterize the resulting beams and confirm the observed structures are laser air filaments.

  19. Quasiperiodic VLF emissions with short-period modulation and their relationship to whistlers: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manninen, J.; Demekhov, A. G.; Titova, E. E.; Kozlovsky, A. E.; Pasmanik, D. L.

    2014-05-01

    We study properties of quasiperiodic (QP) VLF emissions recorded on 24 December 2011 during the VLF campaign in northern Finland. The main attention is paid to interrelationships between different characteristic periods in the QP spectra. In particular, we analyze regular variations in the QP repetition intervals (1-10 min) during the event from 15:30 to 22 UT, their changes during substorms, and short periodic (several second) modulation observed within separate QP elements. We explained the variations of periods of QP emissions in terms of the model of auto-oscillation regime of the cyclotron instability in the magnetosphere. During the considered event lasting about 7 h we observed a regular increase in the time intervals between the QP elements. We relate this increase with weakening of the magnetospheric source of energetic electrons. Significant variations in the QP period occurred during substorms. These variations can be due to a substorm-related increase in the energetic-electron flux and/or due to the precipitation of these electrons into the ionosphere which changes the reflection coefficient of VLF waves. We analyze the fine structure of QP element spectra and reveal the periods related to the time scales of guided propagation of whistler mode waves along the magnetic field line, which suggests that ducted propagation regime took place for the QP emissions. The periods were about 6-9 s for frequencies 1.2-4 kHz, respectively, which was similar to the period of almost simultaneously observed two-hop whistlers. In the low-frequency part of QP spectra periodic emissions with shorter periods of about 3 s were observed. Analysis of fine structure of QP elements shows that their formation is affected by both linear effects (i.e., group-velocity dispersion) and quasi-linear effects related to the modification of the energetic electron distribution function. It allows us to observe the transition from purely linear to quasi-linear regime of wave

  20. Pulse

    MedlinePlus

    Heart rate; Heart beat ... The pulse can be measured at areas where an artery passes close to the skin. These areas include the: ... side of the foot Wrist To measure the pulse at the wrist, place the index and middle ...

  1. The Eccentricity Distribution of Short-period Planet Candidates Detected by Kepler in Occultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabram, Megan; Demory, Brice-Olivier; Cisewski, Jessi; Ford, Eric B.; Rogers, Leslie

    2016-04-01

    We characterize the eccentricity distribution of a sample of ∼50 short-period planet candidates using transit and occultation measurements from NASA’s Kepler Mission. First, we evaluate the sensitivity of our hierarchical Bayesian modeling and test its robustness to model misspecification using simulated data. When analyzing actual data assuming a Rayleigh distribution for eccentricity, we find that the posterior mode for the dispersion parameter is σ =0.081{+/- }0.0030.014. We find that a two-component Gaussian mixture model for e cos ω and e sin ω provides a better model than either a Rayleigh or Beta distribution. Based on our favored model, we find that ∼90% of planet candidates in our sample come from a population with an eccentricity distribution characterized by a small dispersion (∼0.01), and ∼10% come from a population with a larger dispersion (∼0.22). Finally, we investigate how the eccentricity distribution correlates with selected planet and host star parameters. We find evidence that suggests systems around higher metallicity stars and planet candidates with smaller radii come from a more complex eccentricity distribution.

  2. Searching the short-period variable stars with the photometric algorithm implemented in LUIZA framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obara, Lukasz; Żarnecki, Aleksander Filip

    2015-09-01

    Pi of the Sky is a system of wide field-of-view robotic telescopes, which search for short timescale astrophysical phenomena, especially for prompt optical GRB emission. The system was designed for autonomous operation, monitoring a large fraction of the sky with 12m-13m range and time resolution of the order of 1 - 100 seconds. LUIZA is a dedicated framework developed for efficient off-line processing of the Pi of the Sky data, implemented in C++. The photometric algorithm based on ASAS photometry was implemented in LUIZA and compared with the algorithm based on the pixel cluster reconstruction and simple aperture photometry algorithm. Optimized photometry algorithms were then applied to the sample of test images, which were modified to include different patterns of variability of the stars (training sample). Different statistical estimators are considered for developing the general variable star identification algorithm. The algorithm will then be used to search for short-period variable stars in the real data.

  3. The physical nature of the short-period RS CVn system DV Psc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. B.; Zhang, R. X.

    2007-12-01

    We present multicolour CCD photometry of the short-period RS CVn-type binary DV Psc obtained in 2006 September and October. Our observations indicate that GSC0008-789, the comparison star used by Robb et al. in their discovery of DV Psc, is a variable with amplitude exceeding 0.08 mag. Based on the new data, the orbital period of the eclipsing system is revised to 0.30853609 d. From the new observations, a set of completely covered B, V and R light curves and a single V-band light curve are formed in two epochs. The radial-velocity curves obtained by Lu, Rucinski & Ogloza are reformed with the newly determined ephemeris and are analysed along with the light curves using the 2003 version of the Wilson-Devinney code. The results show that DV Psc is a detached, near-contact binary system with a mass ratio of 0.693 +/- 0.005 and a separation of 2.038Rsolar. The masses and radii for the components are determined as 0.70 +/- 0.02Msolar, 0.68 +/- 0.03Rsolar for the primary, and 0.49 +/- 0.01Msolar, 0.51 +/- 0.02Rsolar for the secondary.

  4. Light curve modeling of the short-period W UMa star GSC 02049-01164

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox-Machado, Lester; Echevarria, Juan; Gonzalez-Buitrago, Diego; Michel, Raul

    2015-08-01

    The preliminary results of an analysis of the time-series photometric data of the binary star GSC 02049-01164 (ROTSE1 J164341.65+251748.1) are presented.GSC 02049-01164 was observed for eight consecutive nights from 2013, May 31 to June 07 UT with the 0.84m telescope of the San Pedro Martir Observatory in Mexico. The data were acquired through a Johnson V filter. The propierties of the GSC 02040-01164 light curve are consistent with a short period contact binary of W UMa type. The light curve is characterized by a small difference between the two out-of-eclipse maxima by about 0.035 mag and a flat bottom at the secondary minimum due to a total eclipse. Moreover, the primary and secondary eclipses accur almost at 0.5 phase interval suggesting a circular orbit. The period of the binary is 0.3256 d. In an effort to gain a better understanding of the binary system and determine its physical properties we have analyzed the light curve with the software PHOEBE V.0 0.31a. We have found that GSC 02049-01164 binary system has a mass ratio of ~ 0.42, an inclination of ~ 85 degrees, a semi-major axis of ~ 2.23 Rsun. The degree of overcontact of the stellar components is about 13 %.

  5. Substrate effects on the strain relaxation in GaN/AlN short-period superlattices

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We present a comparative study of the strain relaxation of GaN/AlN short-period superlattices (SLs) grown on two different III-nitride substrates introducing different amounts of compensating strain into the films. We grow by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (0001)-oriented SLs on a GaN buffer deposited on GaN(thick)-on-sapphire template and on AlN(thin)-on-sapphire template. The ex-situ analysis of strain, crack formation, dislocation density, and microstructure of the SL layers has established that the mechanism of strain relaxation in these structures depends on the residual strain in substrate and is determined mainly by the lattice mismatch between layers. For growth on the AlN film, the compensating strain introduced by this film on the layer prevented cracking; however, the densities of surface pits and dislocations were increased as compared with growth on the GaN template. Three-dimensional growth of the GaN cap layer in samples with pseudomorphly grown SLs on the AlN template is observed. At the same time, two-dimensional step-flow growth of the cap layer was observed for structures with non-pseudomorphly grown SLs on the GaN template with a significant density of large cracks appearing on the surface. The growth mode of the GaN cap layer is predefined by relaxation degree of top SL layers. PMID:22672771

  6. X-ray diffraction study of short-period AlN/GaN superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Kyutt, R. N. Shcheglov, M. P.; Ratnikov, V. V.; Yagovkina, M. A.; Davydov, V. Yu.; Smirnov, A. N.; Rozhavskaya, M. M.; Zavarin, E. E.; Lundin, V. V.

    2013-12-15

    The structure of short-period hexagonal GaN/AlN superlattices (SLs) has been investigated by X-ray diffraction. The samples have been grown by metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy (MOVPE) in a horizontal reactor at a temperature of 1050°C on (0001)Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates using GaN and AlN buffer layers. The SL period changes from 2 to 6 nm, and the thickness of the structure varies in a range from 0.3 to 1 μm. The complex of X-ray diffraction techniques includes a measurement of θ-2θ rocking curves of symmetric Bragg reflection, the construction of intensity maps for asymmetric reflections, a measurement and analysis of peak broadenings in different diffraction geometries, a precise measurement of lattice parameters, and the determination of radii of curvature. The thickness and strain of separate SL layers are determined by measuring the θ-2θ rocking curves subsequent simulation. It is shown that most SL samples are completely relaxed as a whole. At the same time, relaxation is absent between sublayers, which is why strains in the AlN and GaN sublayers (on the order of 1.2 × 10{sup −2}) have different signs. An analysis of diffraction peak half-widths allows us to determine the densities of individual sets of dislocations and observe their change from buffer layers to SLs.

  7. A SHORT-PERIOD CENSOR OF SUB-JUPITER MASS EXOPLANETS WITH LOW DENSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Szabo, Gy. M.; Kiss, L. L.

    2011-02-01

    Despite the existence of many short-period hot Jupiters, there is not one hot Neptune with an orbital period less than 2.5 days. Here, we discuss a cluster analysis of the currently known 106 transiting exoplanets to investigate a possible explanation for this observation. We find two distinct clusters in the mass-density space, one with hot Jupiters with a wide range of orbital periods (0.8-114 days) and a narrow range of planet radii (1.2 {+-} 0.2 R{sub J} ) and another one with a mixture of super-Earths, hot Neptunes, and hot Jupiters, exhibiting a surprisingly narrow period distribution (3.7 {+-} 0.8 days). These two clusters follow strikingly different distributions in the period-radius parameter plane. The branch of sub-Jupiter mass exoplanets is censored by the orbital period at the large-radius end: no planets with mass between 0.02 and 0.8 M{sub J} or with radius between 0.25 and 1.0 R{sub J} are known with P{sub orb} < 2.5 days. This clustering is not predicted by current theories of planet formation and evolution, which we also review briefly.

  8. The first orbital parameters and period variation of the short-period eclipsing binary AQ Boo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuai; Zhang, Liyun; Pi, Qingfeng; Han, Xianming L.; Zhang, Xiliang; Lu, Hongpeng; Wang, Daimei; Li, TongAn

    2016-10-01

    We obtained the first VRI CCD light curves of the short-period contact eclipsing binary AQ Boo, which was observed on March 22 and April 19 in 2014 at Xinglong station of National Astronomical Observatories, and on January 20, 21 and February 28 in 2015 at Kunming station of Yunnan Observatories of Chinese Academy of Sciences, China. Using our six newly obtained minima and the minima that other authors obtained previously, we revised the ephemeris of AQ Boo. By fitting the O-C (observed minus calculated) values of the minima, the orbital period of AQ Boo shows a decreasing tendency P˙ = - 1.47(0.17) ×10-7 days/year. We interpret the phenomenon by mass transfer from the secondary (more massive) component to the primary (less massive) one. By using the updated Wilson & Devinney program, we also derived the photometric orbital parameters of AQ Boo for the first time. We conclude that AQ Boo is a near contact binary with a low contact factor of 14.43%, and will become an over-contact system as the mass transfer continues.

  9. Long-term orbital evolution of short-period comets found in Project Cosmo-DICE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Tsuko; Yoshikawa, Makoto

    1992-01-01

    Orbital evolutions of about 160 short-period (SP) comets are numerically integrated for 4400 years in the framework of a realistic dynamical model. By the round-trip error in closure test, a reliable time space of the integrated orbits is estimated for each comet. Majority of the SP comets with their Tisserand's constant(J) between 2.8 and 3.1 are found to evolve within the past 1000-2000 years from the orbits whose perihelia are near the Jovian orbit to the orbits with perihelia of 1-2 AU. This evolution is much more rapid than that expected from Monte Carlo simulations based on symmetric distribution of planetary perturbations, thus suggesting that asymmetry of perturbation distribution play an important role in cometary evolution. Several comets are shown to evolve from the near-Saturn orbits and then to be handed over under the control of Jupiter. We also find that a few comets were captured from long-period orbits (a = 75-125 AU) via only a few close encounters with Jupiter. It is confirmed that the captured SP comets of low-inclination with 2.7 less than J less than 3.1 show more or less strong chaotic behavior. On the other hand, comets with longer orbital period and/or of high inclination reveal slow or quasi-periodic orbital evolution.

  10. Coherent phonon transport in short-period two-dimensional superlattices of graphene and boron nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Carlos; Saiz, Fernan; Romero, David A.; Amon, Cristina H.

    2016-03-01

    Promoting coherent transport of phonons at material interfaces is a promising strategy for controlling thermal transport in nanostructures and an alternative to traditional methods based on structural defects. Coherent transport is particularly relevant in short-period heterostructures with smooth interfaces and long-wavelength heat-carrying phonons, such as two-dimensional superlattices of graphene and boron nitride. In this work, we predict phonon properties and thermal conductivities in these superlattices using a normal mode decomposition approach. We study the variation of the frequency dependence of these properties with the periodicity and interface configuration (zigzag and armchair) for superlattices with period lengths within the coherent regime. Our results showed that the thermal conductivity decreases significantly from the first period length (0.44 nm) to the second period length (0.87 nm), 13% across the interfaces and 16% along the interfaces. For greater periods, the conductivity across the interfaces continues decreasing at a smaller rate of 11 W/mK per period length increase (0.43 nm), driven by changes in the phonon group velocities (coherent effects). In contrast, the conductivity along the interfaces slightly recovers at a rate of 2 W/mK per period, driven by changes in the phonon relaxation times (diffusive effects). By changing the interface configuration from armchair to zigzag, the conductivities for all period lengths increase by approximately 7% across the interfaces and 19% along the interfaces.

  11. Parameters of two low-mass contact eclipsing binaries near the short-period limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohr, M. E.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Norton, A. J.; Kolb, U. C.

    2014-03-01

    The two objects 1SWASP J150822.80-054236.9 and 1SWASP J160156.04+202821.6 were initially detected from their SuperWASP archived light curves as candidate eclipsing binaries with periods close to the short-period cut-off of the orbital period distribution of main-sequence binaries, at ~0.2 d. Using spectroscopic data from the Isaac Newton Telescope in La Palma, Canary Islands, we here confirm them as double-lined spectroscopic and eclipsing binaries, in contact configuration. Following modelling of their visual light curves and radial velocity curves, we determine their component and system parameters to precisions between ~2 and 11%. The first system contains components of 1.07 and 0.55 M⊙, with radii of 0.90 and 0.68 R⊙, respectively; its primary exhibits pulsations with a period of 1/6 of the orbital period of the system. The latter contains components of 0.86 and 0.57 M⊙, with radii of 0.75 and 0.63 R⊙, respectively.

  12. Substrate effects on the strain relaxation in GaN/AlN short-period superlattices.

    PubMed

    Kladko, Vasyl; Kuchuk, Andrian; Lytvyn, Petro; Yefanov, Olexandr; Safriuk, Nadiya; Belyaev, Alexander; Mazur, Yuriy I; Decuir, Eric A; Ware, Morgan E; Salamo, Gregory J

    2012-01-01

    We present a comparative study of the strain relaxation of GaN/AlN short-period superlattices (SLs) grown on two different III-nitride substrates introducing different amounts of compensating strain into the films. We grow by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (0001)-oriented SLs on a GaN buffer deposited on GaN(thick)-on-sapphire template and on AlN(thin)-on-sapphire template. The ex-situ analysis of strain, crack formation, dislocation density, and microstructure of the SL layers has established that the mechanism of strain relaxation in these structures depends on the residual strain in substrate and is determined mainly by the lattice mismatch between layers. For growth on the AlN film, the compensating strain introduced by this film on the layer prevented cracking; however, the densities of surface pits and dislocations were increased as compared with growth on the GaN template. Three-dimensional growth of the GaN cap layer in samples with pseudomorphly grown SLs on the AlN template is observed. At the same time, two-dimensional step-flow growth of the cap layer was observed for structures with non-pseudomorphly grown SLs on the GaN template with a significant density of large cracks appearing on the surface. The growth mode of the GaN cap layer is predefined by relaxation degree of top SL layers. PMID:22672771

  13. Emission line tomography of the short period cataclysmic variables CC Scl and V2051 Oph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longa-Peña, P.; Steeghs, D.; Marsh, T.

    2015-02-01

    We present time series spectroscopy of two short period cataclysmic variables, CC Scl and V2051 Oph, to test the efficiency of Doppler-tomography-based methods in constraining orbital parameters of evolved cataclysmic variables. We find that the Ca II triplet lines offer superior diagnostics, revealing emission components from the mass donors and sharp images of the accretion discs. Furthermore, we use Monte Carlo methods to estimate the uncertainties from ensembles of Doppler maps. We compare our new methods against traditional radial velocity methods and show that they offer a valid route towards system parameter determination. Our analysis of CC Scl suggests a low mass ratio of q = 0.08 ± 0.03 with a primary velocity of K1 = 37 ± 14 km s-1. This mass ratio is in between the pre- and post-period minimum status, however our K1 solution favours a post-period minimum system. Our derived parameters for V2051 Oph (q = 0.18 ± 0.05, K1 = 97 ± 10 km s-1) are in agreement with the eclipse solution (q = 0.19 ± 0.03), offering a direct validation of our methods.

  14. A generalized behavioral model for rotating short period comets with spectral orbital elements and axial orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanale, F. P.; Salvail, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    A generalized model for short period comets is developed which integrates in a fairly rigorous manner the isolation history of regions on rotating comets with specified axial orientation and the complex feedback processes involving heat, gas and dust transport, dust mantle development and coma opacity. Attention is focused on development, reconfiguration and partial or complete launching of dust mantles and the reciprocal effects of these three processes on ice surface temperature and gas and dust production. The dust mantle controls the H2O flux not only by its effect on the temperature at the ice interface but (dominantly) by its dynamic stability which strongly influences vapor diffusivity. The model includes the effects of latitude, rotation and spin axis orientation are included and applied to an initially homogeneous sphere of H2O ice and silicate using the orbital parameters of comet Encke. Numerous variations of the model, using combinations of grain size distribution, dust-to-ice ratio, latitude and spin axis orientation, are presented and discussed. Resulted for a similar nonrotating, constant Sun orientation models are also included.

  15. Reciprocal-Space Analysis of Compositional Modulation in Short-Period Superlattices Using Position-Sensitive X-Ray Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrenkiel, S.P.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Lee, S.R.; Millunchick, J.M.; Norman, A.G.; Reno, J.L.; Twesten, R.D.

    1998-11-10

    Epitaxial growth of AlAs-InAs short-period superlattices on (001) InP can lead to heterostructures exhibiting strong, quasi-periodic, lateral modulation of the alloy composition; transverse satellites arise in reciprocal space as a signature of the compositional modulation. Using an x-ray diffractometer equipped with a position-sensitive x-ray detector, we demonstrate reciprocal-space mapping of these satellites as an efficient, nondestructive means for detecting and characterizing the occurrence of compositional modulation. Systematic variations in the compositional modulation due to the structural design and the growth conditions of the short-period superlattice are characterized by routine mapping of the lateral satellites. Spontaneous compositional modulation occurs along the growth front during molecular-beam epitaxy of (AlAs) (InAs)n short-period superlattices. The modulation is quasi-periodic and forms a lateral superlattice superimposed on the intended SPS structure. Corresponding transverse satellites arise about each reciprocal lattice point, and x-ray diffraction can be routinely used to map their local reciprocal-space structure. The integrated intensity, spacing, orientation, and shape of these satellites provide a reliable means for nondestructively detecting and characterizing the compositional modulation in short-period superlattices. The analytical efficiency afforded by the use of a PSD has enabled detailed study of systematic vacations in compositional modulation as a function of the average composition, the period, and the growth rate of the short- period superlattice

  16. Conceptual Design for Superconducting Planar Helical Undulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Shigemi

    2004-05-01

    A preliminary consideration was made on a short-period superconducting planar helical undulator (SCHU) for circularly polarized radiation. The SCHU consists of coils and iron poles/yokes. There is no magnetic structure in the horizontal plane of the electron orbit. The SCHU would provide the large horizontal aperture needed to allow injection into the storage ring. The expected field strength is at least 30% larger than that by an APPLE-type permanent-magnet device with the same gap and the same period.

  17. A study of coronal X-ray emission from short-period Algol binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, K. P.; Drake, S. A.; White, N. E.

    1995-01-01

    A study of X-ray emission from five short-period Algol-type binaries based on observations with Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) and ROSAT is presented. We have observed RZ Cas with both satellites, and beta Per, U Cep, delta Lib, and TW Dra with ROSAT. Significant intensity variations are seen in the X-ray emission from RZ Cas, U Cep, TW Dra, and delta Lib. These variations seem unrelated to the eclipsing behavior of these systems and are probably due to either rotational modulation of compact active regions on the surfaces of the chromospherically active secondary components or to flaring activity in the systems. The spectra of all but one of the systems require the presence of at least two discrete plasma components with different temperatures (0.6 - 0.7 keV, and approximately 2 keV) and the abundances of the medium-Z elements 20% - 50% of the solar photospheric values. The high resolving power and signal-to-noise ratio of the ASCA spectra allow us to individually constrain the coronal abundances of O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, and Fe in RZ Cas. We demonstrate that, if we use the elemental abundances and temperatures obtained from the analysis of their ASCA spectra as (fixed) inputs, to fit the ROSAT PSPC spectra well requires the presence of a third component (kT approximately 0.2 - 0.3 keV) in RZ Cas and beta Per. A continuous emission measure model of the power-law type (EM(T) variesas (T/T(sub max)(sup alpha)) generally gives a poor fit to the ASCA and ROSAT data on most sources. Circumstellar or circumbinary absorbing matter seems to be present in some of these systems, as indicated by the variable total column density needed to fit their X-ray spectra.

  18. Magnetic activity and orbital period variation of the short-period eclipsing binary DV Psc

    SciTech Connect

    Pi, Qing-feng; Zhang, Li-Yun; Zhang, Xi-liang

    2014-03-01

    We present six new BVR{sub c}I{sub c} CCD light curves of a short-period RS CVn binary DV Psc obtained in 2010-2012. The light curve distortions change on both short and long timescales, which is explained by two starspots on the primary component. Moreover, five new flare events were detected and the flare ratio of DV Psc is about 0.082 flares per hour. There is a possible relation between the phases (longitude) of the flares and starspots for all of the available data of late-type binaries, which implies a correlation of the stellar activity of the spots and flares. The cyclic oscillation, with a period of 4.9 ± 0.4 yr, may result from the magnetic activity cycle, identified by the variability of Max. I-Max. II. Until now, there were no spectroscopic studies of chromospheric activity indicators of the H{sub β} and H{sub γ} lines for DV Psc. Our observations of these indicators show that DV Psc is active, with excess emissions. The updated O – C diagram with an observing time span of about 15 yr shows an upward parabola, which indicates a secular increase in the orbital period of DV Psc. The orbital period secularly increases at a rate of dP/dt = 2.0×10{sup –7} days yr{sup –1}, which might be explained by the angular momentum exchanges or mass transfer from the secondary to primary component.

  19. Distribution of pulmonary ventilation and perfusion during short periods of weightlessness.

    PubMed

    Michels, D B; West, J B

    1978-12-01

    Information on the distributions of pulmonary ventilation and perfusion was obtained from four subjects on board a Learjet during 112 weightless periods lasting up to 27 s each. Zero gravity (G) was obtained during all or part of each test by varying the aircraft flight profile. Single-breath N2 washouts were performed with the test inspiration containing an initial bolus of argon at residual volume (RV). When the test inspiration was at 0 G, and the washout at 0 G or greater, the terminal rises and the cardiogenic oscillations in both N2 and argon were small and often absent. If instead the test inspiration was at 1 G with the washout at 0 G, the terminal rises were again small or absent but the cardiogenic oscillations remained. The terminal rise and the cardiogenic oscillations for N2, but not argon, were also nearly eliminated by performing just the preliminary exhalation to RV at 0 G with the test inspiration and washout following at 1 G. Aleveolar plateaus for N2 sloped upward at 0 G apparently due to nontopographical inequalities of ventilation. In further tests during air breathing, recordings were made of expired partial pressure of oxygen PO2) and carbon dioxide (POO2) following a brief hyperventilation and a 15-s breath hold. These recordings revealed marked cardiogenic oscillations in PO2 and PCO2 at 1 G that were enhanced at 2 G but almost eliminated at 0 G. The results suggest that virtually all the topographical inequality of ventilation, blood flow, and lung volume seen under 1-G conditions are abolished during short periods of 0 G. PMID:730604

  20. The OmegaWhite survey for short-period variable stars - I. Overview and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macfarlane, S. A.; Toma, R.; Ramsay, G.; Groot, P. J.; Woudt, P. A.; Drew, J. E.; Barentsen, G.; Eislöffel, J.

    2015-11-01

    We present the goals, strategy and first results of the OmegaWhite survey: a wide-field high-cadence g-band synoptic survey which aims to unveil the Galactic population of short-period variable stars (with periods <80 min), including ultracompact binary star systems and stellar pulsators. The ultimate goal of OmegaWhite is to cover 400 deg2 along the Galactic plane reaching a depth of g = 21.5 mag (10σ), using OmegaCam on the VLT Survey Telescope (VST). The fields are selected to overlap with surveys such as the Galactic Bulge Survey and the VST Photometric Hα Survey of the Southern Galactic Plane for multiband colour information. Each field is observed using 38 exposures of 39 s each, with a median cadence of ˜2.7 min for a total duration of two hours. Within an initial 26 deg2, we have extracted the light curves of 1.6 million stars, and have identified 613 variable candidates which satisfy our selection criteria. Furthermore, we present the light curves and statistical properties of 20 sources which have the highest likelihood of being variable stars. One of these candidates exhibits the colours and light-curve properties typically associated with ultracompact AM CVn binaries, although its spectrum exhibits weak Balmer absorption lines and is thus not likely to be such a binary system. We also present follow-up spectroscopy of five other variable candidates, which identifies them as likely low-amplitude δ Sct pulsating stars.

  1. Magnetic structure of short-period CdTe/MnTe superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krenn, H.; Rupprecht, R.; Holl, S.; Faschinger, W.; Pascher, H.; Bauer, G.

    1998-12-01

    The magnetic properties of short-period superlattices consisting of zincblende MnTe (type-III antiferromagnet with Néel temperature of 67 K in bulk-like films) and CdTe are investigated by coherent Raman scattering (CRS) experiments as well as SQUID-magnetometry as a function of temperature (1.6-150 K) and magnetic field (0-7 T). In CRS the magnetization is probed by observing the paramagnetic (PMR) and antiferromagnetic resonances (AFMR) of localized d-electrons of Mn-ions and the spin-splitting of delocalized band carriers, respectively. Resonant CRS is particularly sensitive to Mn-ions located in regions with high expectation propabilities of electrons, i.e. near the interfaces between the CdTe quantum wells and MnTe barriers. Simultaneous observation of PMR and AFMR demonstrates that besides the antiferromagnetically coupled, also uncoupled Mn-spins exist in the interface regions. Their number is determined quantitatively by magnetization experiments. The observed free carrier spin-splitting energy is directly related to the local magnetization of magnetic ions within regions of high expectation probabilities of electrons. The data are analyzed within the framework of a mean-field analysis (MFA) which incorporates the electron-Mn-ion exchange as well as the Mn-Mn interion exchange interaction. The latter is represented by the individual nearest and next nearest neighbor exchange interactions, the coordination number of spins and their respective orientation. The phase transition temperature is substantially decreased due to the reduced dimensionality (less nearest neighbors) and due to strain which modifies the exchange integrals and bond angles.

  2. On the composition of earth's short-period seismic noise field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koper, K.D.; Seats, K.; Benz, H.

    2010-01-01

    In the classic microseismic band of 5-20 sec, seismic noise consists mainly of fundamental mode Rayleigh and Love waves; however, at shorter periods seismic noise also contains a significant amount of body-wave energy and higher mode surface waves. In this study we perform a global survey of Earth's short-period seismic noise field with the goal of quantifying the relative contributions of these propagation modes. We examined a year's worth of vertical component data from 18 seismic arrays of the International Monitoring System that were sited in a variety of geologic environments. The apertures of the arrays varied from 2 to 28 km, constraining the periods we analyzed to 0.25-2.5 sec. Using frequency-wavenumber analysis we identified the apparent velocity for each sample of noise and classified its mode of propagation. The dominant component was found to be Lg, occurring in about 50% of the noise windows. Because Lg does not propagate across ocean-continent boundaries, this energy is most likely created in shallow water areas near coastlines. The next most common component was P-wave energy, which accounted for about 28% of the noise windows. These were split between regional P waves (Pn=Pg at 6%), mantle bottoming P waves (14%), and core-sensitive waves (PKP at 8%). This energy is mostly generated in deep water away from coastlines, with a region of the North Pacific centered at 165?? W and 40?? N being especially prolific. The remainder of the energy arriving in the noise consisted of Rg waves (28%), a large fraction of which may have a cultural origin. Hence, in contrast to the classic micro-seismic band of 5-20 sec, at shorter periods fundamental mode Rayleigh waves are the least significant component.

  3. Short-period cataclysmic variables at Observatorio Astronomico Nacional IA UNAM.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharikov, S.

    2014-03-01

    We present results of time-resolved spectroscopy and photometry of faint (∼17-19 mag) Cataclysmic Variable stars with periods around the minimum orbital period (∼80 min). In this work we concentrated to our results of study of CVs systems which have evolved beyond the period minimum (so-called bounce-back systems). Using various instruments attached to 2.1m, 1.5m and 0.84m telescopes of OAN SPM of IA UNAM we explored conditions and structure of accretion disks in those short-period Cataclysmic Variables. We showed that the accretion disk in a system with an extremely low mass ratio (≤0.05) grows in the size reaching 2:1 resonance radius and is relatively cool. The disk in such systems also becomes largely optically thin in the continuum, contributing to the total flux less than the stellar components of the system. In contrast, the viscosity and the temperature in spiral arms formed at the outer edge of the disk are higher and their contribution in continuum plays an increasingly important role. We model such disks and generate light curves which successfully simulate the observed double-humped light curves in the quiescence. Thanks to support of our programs by the Time Allocation Commission of OAN SPM, the perfect astroclimate in the observatory, and the phase-locked method of spectroscopic observations, the significant progress in the study of bounce-back systems using a small size telescope was reached.

  4. The ACS LCID Project - VIII. The short-period Cepheids of Leo A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Edouard J.; Monelli, Matteo; Gallart, Carme; Fiorentino, Giuliana; Cassisi, Santi; Aparicio, Antonio; Cole, Andrew A.; Drozdovsky, Igor; Hidalgo, Sebastian L.; Skillman, Evan D.; Stetson, Peter B.; Tolstoy, Eline

    2013-07-01

    We present the results of a new search for variable stars in the Local Group dwarf galaxy Leo A, based on deep photometry from the Advanced Camera for Surveys onboard the Hubble Space Telescope. We detected 166 bona fide variables in our field, of which about 60 per cent are new discoveries and 33 candidate variables. Of the confirmed variables, we found 156 Cepheids, but only 10 RR Lyrae stars despite nearly 100 per cent completeness at the magnitude of the horizontal branch. The RR Lyrae stars include seven fundamental and three first-overtone pulsators, with mean periods of 0.636 and 0.366 d, respectively. From their position on the period-luminosity (PL) diagram and light-curve morphology, we classify 91, 58 and 4 Cepheids as fundamental, first-overtone and second-overtone mode Classical Cepheids (CC), respectively, and two as Population II Cepheids. However, due to the low metallicity of Leo A, about 90 per cent of the detected Cepheids have periods shorter than 1.5 d. Comparison with theoretical models indicate that some of the fainter stars classified as CC could be Anomalous Cepheids. We estimate the distance to Leo A using the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) and various methods based on the photometric and pulsational properties of the Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars. The distances obtained with the TRGB and RR Lyrae stars agree well with each other while that from the Cepheid PL relations is somewhat larger, which may indicate a mild metallicity effect on the luminosity of the short-period Cepheids. Due to its very low metallicity, Leo A thus serves as a valuable calibrator of the metallicity dependences of the variable star luminosities.

  5. THE VERY SHORT PERIOD M DWARF BINARY SDSS J001641-000925

    SciTech Connect

    Davenport, James R. A.; Becker, Andrew C.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Gunning, Heather C.; Munshi, Ferah A.; Albright, Meagan; West, Andrew A.; Bochanski, John J.; Holtzman, Jon; Hilton, Eric J.

    2013-02-10

    We present follow-up observations and analysis of the recently discovered short period low-mass eclipsing binary, SDSS J001641-000925. With an orbital period of 0.19856 days, this system has one of the shortest known periods for an M dwarf binary system. Medium-resolution spectroscopy and multi-band photometry for the system are presented. Markov Chain Monte Carlo modeling of the light curves and radial velocities yields estimated masses for the stars of M {sub 1} = 0.54 {+-} 0.07 M {sub Sun} and M {sub 2} = 0.34 {+-} 0.04 M {sub Sun }, and radii of R {sub 1} = 0.68 {+-} 0.03 R {sub Sun} and R {sub 2} = 0.58 {+-} 0.03 R {sub Sun }, respectively. This solution places both components above the critical Roche overfill limit, providing strong evidence that SDSS J001641-000925 is the first verified M-dwarf contact binary system. Within the follow-up spectroscopy we find signatures of non-solid body rotation velocities, which we interpret as evidence for mass transfer or loss within the system. In addition, our photometry samples the system over nine years, and we find strong evidence for period decay at the rate of P-dot {approx} 8 s yr{sup -1}. Both of these signatures raise the intriguing possibility that the system is in over-contact, and actively losing angular momentum, likely through mass loss. This places SDSS J001641-000925 as not just the first M-dwarf over-contact binary, but one of the few systems of any spectral type known to be actively undergoing coalescence. Further study of SDSS J001641-000925 is ongoing to verify the nature of the system, which may prove to be a unique astrophysical laboratory.

  6. Image measurements of short-period gravity waves at equatorial latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M. J.; Pendleton, W. R.; Clark, S.; Takahashi, H.; Gobbi, D.; Goldberg, R. A.

    1997-11-01

    A high-performance, all-sky imaging system has been used to obtain novel data on the morphology and dynamics of short-period (<1 hour) gravity waves at equatorial latitudes. Gravity waves imaged in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere were recorded in three nightglow emissions, the near-infrared OH emission, and the visible wavelength OI (557.7 nm) and Na (589.2 nm) emissions spanning the altitude range ˜80-100 km. The measurements were made from Alcantara, Brazil (2.3°S, 44.5°W), during the period August-October 1994 as part of the NASA/Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais "Guara campaign". Over 50 wave events were imaged from which a statistical study of the characteristics of equatorial gravity waves has been performed. The data were found to divide naturally into two groups. The first group corresponded to extensive, freely propagating (or ducted) gravity waves with observed periods ranging from 3.7 to 36.6 min, while the second group consisted of waves of a much smaller scale and transient nature. The later group exhibited a bimodal distribution for the observed periods at 5.18±0.26 min and 4.32±0.15 min, close to the local Brunt-Vaisala period and the acoustic cutoff period, respectively. In comparison, the larger-scale waves exhibited a clear tendency for their horizontal wavelengths to increase almost linearly with observed period. This trend was particularly well defined around the equinox and can be represented by a power-law relationship of the form λh=(3.1±0.5)τob1.06±0.10, where λh is measured in kilometers and τob in minutes. This result is in very good agreement with previous radar and passive optical measurements but differs significantly from the relationship λh ∝ τ1.5ob inferred from recent lidar studies. The larger-scale waves were also found to exhibit strong anisotropy in their propagation headings with the dominant direction of motion toward the-NE-ENE suggesting a preponderance for wave generation over the South

  7. The Very Short Period M Dwarf Binary SDSS J001641-000925

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, James R. A.; Becker, Andrew C.; West, Andrew A.; Bochanski, John J.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Holtzman, Jon; Gunning, Heather C.; Hilton, Eric J.; Munshi, Ferah A.; Albright, Meagan

    2013-02-01

    We present follow-up observations and analysis of the recently discovered short period low-mass eclipsing binary, SDSS J001641-000925. With an orbital period of 0.19856 days, this system has one of the shortest known periods for an M dwarf binary system. Medium-resolution spectroscopy and multi-band photometry for the system are presented. Markov Chain Monte Carlo modeling of the light curves and radial velocities yields estimated masses for the stars of M 1 = 0.54 ± 0.07 M ⊙ and M 2 = 0.34 ± 0.04 M ⊙, and radii of R 1 = 0.68 ± 0.03 R ⊙ and R 2 = 0.58 ± 0.03 R ⊙, respectively. This solution places both components above the critical Roche overfill limit, providing strong evidence that SDSS J001641-000925 is the first verified M-dwarf contact binary system. Within the follow-up spectroscopy we find signatures of non-solid body rotation velocities, which we interpret as evidence for mass transfer or loss within the system. In addition, our photometry samples the system over nine years, and we find strong evidence for period decay at the rate of \\dot{P}\\sim 8 s yr-1. Both of these signatures raise the intriguing possibility that the system is in over-contact, and actively losing angular momentum, likely through mass loss. This places SDSS J001641-000925 as not just the first M-dwarf over-contact binary, but one of the few systems of any spectral type known to be actively undergoing coalescence. Further study of SDSS J001641-000925 is ongoing to verify the nature of the system, which may prove to be a unique astrophysical laboratory. Based on observations obtained with the Apache Point Observatory 3.5 m telescope, which is owned and operated by the Astrophysical Research Consortium. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. Support for the design and construction of the Magellan Echellette Spectrograph was received from the Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, the

  8. A SEMI-EMPIRICAL MASS-LOSS RATE IN SHORT-PERIOD CATACLYSMIC VARIABLES

    SciTech Connect

    Sirotkin, Fedir V.; Kim, Woong-Tae E-mail: wkim@astro.snu.ac.k

    2010-10-01

    The mass-loss rate of donor stars in cataclysmic variables (CVs) is of paramount importance in the evolution of short-period CVs. Observed donors are oversized in comparison with those of isolated single stars of the same mass, which is thought to be a consequence of the mass loss. Using the empirical mass-radius relation of CVs and the homologous approximation for changes in effective temperature T{sub 2}, orbital period P, and luminosity of the donor with the stellar radius, we find the semi-empirical mass-loss rate M-dot{sub 2} of CVs as a function of P. The derived M-dot{sub 2} is at {approx}10{sup -9.5}-10{sup -10} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} and weakly depends on P when P>90 minutes, while it declines very rapidly toward the minimum period when P < 90 minutes, emulating the P-T{sub 2} relation. Due to strong deviation from thermal equilibrium caused by the mass loss, the semi-empirical M-dot{sub 2} is significantly different from and has a less-pronounced turnaround behavior with P than suggested by previous numerical models. The semi-empirical P- M-dot{sub 2} relation is consistent with the angular momentum loss due to gravitational wave emission and strongly suggests that CV secondaries with 0.075 M{sub sun} < M{sub 2} < 0.2 M{sub sun} are less than 2 Gyr old. When applied to selected eclipsing CVs, our semi-empirical mass-loss rates are in good agreement with the accretion rates derived from the effective temperatures T{sub 1} of white dwarfs, suggesting that M-dot{sub 2} can be used to reliably infer T{sub 2} from T{sub 1}. Based on the semi-empirical M-dot{sub 2}, SDSS 1501 and 1433 systems that were previously identified as post-bounce CVs have yet to reach the minimal period.

  9. Photometric Analysis of the Very Short Period Solar Type Binary, FY Bootis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samec, Ronald G.; Oliver, B.; Jaso, A.; Faulkner, D. R.; Hamme, W. V.

    2010-05-01

    We present a BVRcIc photometric analyses of the very short period eclipsing binary, FY Bootis. Our observations were taken with the 0.81-m Lowell Reflector on March 10-14 2009. A period study and a light curve solution is presented. The light curves were premodeled with Binary 3.0, then solved with the 2004 version Wilson code with intermediate integrations performed with PHOEBE. Our modeled light curves included 107 B, 109 V, 95 R and 98 I individual CCD observations taken with the 2K X 2K NASACAM. A hotter star modeling temperature of 4750 K was chosen after considering 2MASS J-H and H-K values and the Rucinski (1994) period color relation. These gave spectral types in the K0-K5V range. Six mean times of minimum light were determined, including HJDMin I= 2454901.9711 (±0.0022)d, 2454902.9350 (±0.0024)d, 2454904.8587 (±0.0002)d, 2454905.8304 (±0.0002)d and HJDMin II=2454904.9774 (±0.0007)d, 2454905.9491 (±0.0002)d. Some 30 minima from the literature were included with ours to reveal a sinusoidal ephemeris: HJD Min I =2454904.8646 (±0.0018)d + 0. 24116(±0.00158)*E +(0.0016±0.00004)sin [(0.00051±0.00006)*E-(0.4±0.6)]. The period of oscillation is 8±1 years with an amplitude of 0.2 AU in light travel time, assuming the orbital inclination of a third component is identical to the main binary orbit. The third body has 0.05 solar masses. Our Wilson Code analysis of FY Boo revealed it to be a W-type contact binary (the less massive component is the hotter) and a mass ratio of 2.5. The system parameters included a fill-out of 0.11, a component temperature difference of 200 K and an inclination of 82o. One large 68o magnetic region was modeled on the hotter companion with an average temperature of 0.96 times that of the photosphere. We wish to thank the American Astronomical Society for supporting this research through its small research grant program.

  10. Seismic Site Effects from the Seafloor Motion Recorded by the Short-period Ocean Bottom Seismometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J. Y.; Cheng, W. B.; Chin, S. J.; Hsu, S. K.; Dong, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    For decades, it has been mentioned that submarine slope failures are spatially linked to the presence of gas hydrates/gas-charged sediments. When triggered by earthquakes, oversteepen and instable sediments may prompt breakouts of the slopes containing gas hydrates and cause submarine landslides and tsunamis. Widely distributed BSRs have been observed in the area offshore of southwestern Taiwan where the active accretionary complex meets with the passive China continental margin. In the region, large or small scale landslides were also reported based on seismic interpretations. In order to clarify the link between earthquake, landslide and the presence of gas hydrate, we evaluate the response of seafloor sediments in regard to passive dynamic loads. Horizontal-to-vertical (H/V) spectral ratios are used to characterize the local sediment response. Ambient noise as well as distant earthquakes are used as generators of the passive dynamic loads. Based on this study, we aim to characterize the site in terms of its physical properties and the local site effect produced by shallow marine sediments. The results show that the maximum H/V ratios appeared in the range of 5-10 Hz, where the horizontal amplitudes increased by an order of magnitude relative to the vertical amplitude. The stations located in the northwestern part of study area were characterized by another relatively small peak at proximately 2 Hz, which may indicates the presence of a discontinuity of sediments. For most stations, the H/V ratios estimated based on the earthquake (i.e. strong input signal) and noise (background, micro-seismic noise) records were characterized by different pattern. No distinct peak is observed for the H/V pattern calculated during earthquakes. This phenomenon may suggest that no clear sedimentary boundary exist when a stronger motion applies. Estimating H/V spectral ratios of data recorded by the seven short period OBSs (Ocean Bottom Seismometer) deployed in the southwest Taiwan

  11. Characterizing Composition Modulations in InAs/AIAs Short-Period Superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrenkiel, S.P.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Jones, E.D.; Lee, S.R.; Mascarenhas, A.; Millunchick, J. Mirecki; Norman, A.G.; Reno, J.L.; Twesten, R.D.

    1999-04-26

    The formation of quantum wires has much interest due to their novel electronic properties which may lead to enhanced optoelectronic device performance and greater photovoltaic efficiencies. One method of forming these structures is through spontaneous lateral modulation found during the epitaxial growth of III/V alloys. In this paper, we report and summarize our investigations on the formation of lateral moduation in the MBE grown InAlAs/InP(001) system. This system was grown as a short-period superlattice where n-monolayers of InAs are deposited followed by m-Monolayers of AlAs (with n and m~2) and this sequence is repeated to grown a low strain InAlAs ternary alloy on InP(001) that exhibits lateral modulation. Films were grown under a variety of condition (growth temperature, effective alloy composition, superlattice period, and growth rate). These films have been extensively analyzed using X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and microcharacterization, in addition to photon-based spectroscopes. Here we present results of several microstructural characterizations using a wide range of TEM-based techniques, and compare them to results from the other methods to obtain a unified understanding of composition modulation. Two strong points consistently emerge: 1) The lateral modulation wavelength is insensitive to growth temperature and effective alloy composition, but the strength of the lateral modulation is greatest near an effective alloy composition of In(0.46)Al(0.54)As, which corresponds to a slightly tensile global strain with respect to InP. 2) The composition variation for the strongly modulated films is as much as 0.38 InAs mole fraction. In addition, for these strongly modulated films, the modulation wave is asymmetric showing strongly peaked, narrower InAs-rich regions separated by flat AlAs-rich regions. We discuss these results and their possible implications in addition to detailing the techniques used

  12. SOHO/SWAN OBSERVATIONS OF SHORT-PERIOD SPACECRAFT TARGET COMETS

    SciTech Connect

    Combi, M. R.; Lee, Y.; Patel, T. S.; Maekinen, J. T. T.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Quemerais, E.

    2011-04-15

    SWAN, the Solar Wind ANisotropies all-sky hydrogen Ly{alpha} camera on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory spacecraft that makes all-sky images of interplanetary neutral hydrogen, has an ongoing campaign to make special observations of comets, both short- and long-period ones, in addition to the serendipitous observations of comets as part of the all-sky monitoring program. We report here on a study of several short-period comets that were detected by SWAN: 21P/Giacobini-Zinner (1998 and 2005 apparitions), 19P/Borrelly (2001 apparition), 81P/Wild 2 (1997 apparition), and 103P/Hartley 2 (1997 apparition). SWAN observes comets over long continuous stretches of their visible apparitions and therefore provides excellent temporal coverage of the water production. For some of the observations we are also able to analyze an entire sequence of images over many days to several weeks/months using our time-resolved model and extract daily average water production rates over continuous periods of several days to months. The short-term (outburst) and long-term behavior can be correlated with other observations. The overall long-term variation is examined in light of seasonal effects seen in the pre- to post-perihelion differences. For 21P/Giacobini-Zinner and 81P/Wild 2 the activity variations over each apparition were more continuously monitored but nonetheless consistent with previous observations. For 19P/Borrelly we found a very steep variation of water production rates, again consistent with some previous observations, and a variation over six months around perihelion that was reasonably consistent with the spin-axis model of Schleicher et al. and the illumination of the main active areas. During the 1997-1998 apparition of 103P/Hartley 2, the target comet of the EPOXI mission (the Deep Impact extended mission), we found a variation with heliocentric distance ({approx}r{sup -3.6}) that was almost as steep as 19P/Borrelly and, given the small measured radius near

  13. Studying Short-Period Comets and Long-Period Comets Detected by WISE/NEOWISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Emily A.; Fernández, Yanga R.; Bauer, James M.; Stevenson, Rachel; Mainzer, Amy K.; Grav, Tommy; Masiero, Joseph; Walker, Russell G.; Lisse, Carey M.

    2014-11-01

    The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mission surveyed the sky in four infrared wavelength bands (3.4, 4.6, 12 and 22-micron) between January 2010 and February 2011 [1, 2]. During the mission, WISE serendipitously observed 160 comets, including 21 newly discovered objects. About 89 of the comets observed by WISE displayed a significant dust tail in the 12 and 22-micron (thermal emission) bands, showing a wide range of activity levels and dust morphology. Since the observed objects are a mix of both long-period comets (LPCs) and short-period comets (SPCs), differences in their activity can be used to better understand the thermal evolution that each of these populations has undergone. For the comets that displayed a significant dust tail, we have estimated the sizes and ages of the particles using dynamical models based on the Finson-Probstein method [3, 4]. For a selection of 40 comets, we have then compared these models to the data using a novel tail-fitting method that allows the best-fit model to be chosen analytically rather than subjectively. For comets that were observed multiple times by WISE, the dust tail particle properties were estimated separately, and then compared. We find that the dust tails of both LPCs and SPCs are primarily comprised of ~mm to cm sized particles, which were the result of emission that occurred several months to several years prior to the observations. The LPCs nearly all have strong dust emission close to the comet's perihelion distance, and the SPCs mostly have strong dust emission close to perihelion, but some have strong dust emission well before perihelion. Acknowledgments: This publication makes use of data products from (1) WISE, which is a joint project of UCLA and JPL/Caltech, funded by NASA; and (2) NEOWISE, which is a project of JPL/Caltech, funded by the Planetary Science Division of NASA. EK was supported by a NASA Earth and Space Sciences Fellowship. RS gratefully acknowledges support from the NASA

  14. The transfer of comets from parabolic orbits to short-period orbits: Numerical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, J. A.; Gallardo, T.

    1994-01-01

    The transfer process of long-period (LP) comets from parabolic orbits to short-period (SP) orbits is studied numerically for small perihelion distances (q less than 2 AU) and for perihelia in the Jupiter's zone (4 less than q less than 5.2 AU). Two different numerical approaches are used. For q less than 2 AU, it is shown that the inclination distribution of a population of LP comets with initial random orientations of their orbital planes (i.e. a sinusoidal distribution of i) evolves toward a flatter distribution by the combination of two dynamical effects. When the number of passages is limited by physical causes, less comets in retrograde orbits are found to reach evolved states owing to their slower evolution. This can explain the depletion of retrograde comets among the observed old LP comets (200 less than P less than 1000 yr) and intermediate-period (IP) comets (20 less than P less than 200 yr) with q less than 2 AU, which suggests average physical lifetimes of about 300-500 revolutions for comets moving through the LP path. For q less than 2 AU the probability of capture of a LP comet into an IP orbit is found to be about 0.01 when an upper limit of 400 revolutions is considered. This gives a steady-state population of intermediate-period comets of the Halley type with q less than 2 AU of approximately equal 300 members. Long-period comets evolving in the Jupiter's zone (4 less than q less than 5.2 AU) from an initial population of randomly oriented, parabolic comets reach the intermediate-period stage with an inclination distribution already biased toward direct orbits without considering physical losses. This is due to the stronger dependence of the typical energy change on the inclination, which results in a much lower transfer probability for retrograde orbits. Randomly-oriented LP comets captured in SP orbits, either from the small-q zone or from the Jupiter's zone, show dynamical properties that do not match the observed ones. There are also serious

  15. Pulse

    MedlinePlus

    ... resting for at least 10 minutes. Take the exercise heart rate while you are exercising. ... pulse rate can help determine if the patient's heart is pumping. ... rate gives information about your fitness level and health.

  16. Developing a Short-Period, Fundamental-Mode Rayleigh-Wave Attenuation Model for Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Levshin, A. L.; Barmin, M. P.; Ritzwoller, M. H.

    2008-12-01

    We are developing a 2D, short-period (12 - 22 s), fundamental-mode Rayleigh-wave attenuation model for Asia. This model can be used to invert for a 3D attenuation model of the Earth's crust and upper mantle as well as to implement more accurate path corrections in regional surface-wave magnitude calculations. The prerequisite for developing a reliable Rayleigh-wave attenuation model is the availability of accurate fundamental-mode Rayleigh-wave amplitude measurements. Fundamental-mode Rayleigh-wave amplitudes could be contaminated by a variety of sources such as multipathing, focusing and defocusing, body wave, higher-mode surface wave, and other noise sources. These contaminations must be reduced to the largest extent possible. To achieve this, we designed a procedure by taking advantage of certain Rayleigh-wave characteristics, such as dispersion and elliptical particle motion, for accurate amplitude measurements. We first analyze the dispersion of the surface-wave data using a spectrogram. Based on the characteristics of the data dispersion, we design a phase-matched filter by using either a manually picked dispersion curve, or a group-velocity-model predicted dispersion curve, or the dispersion of the data, and apply the filter to the seismogram. Intelligent filtering of the seismogram and windowing of the resulting cross-correlation based on the spectrogram analysis and the comparison between the phase-match filtered data spectrum, the raw-data spectrum and the theoretical source spectrum effectively reduces amplitude contaminations and results in reliable amplitude measurements in many cases. We implemented these measuring techniques in a graphic-user-interface tool called Surface Wave Amplitude Measurement Tool (SWAMTOOL). Using the tool, we collected and processed waveform data for 200 earthquakes occurring throughout 2003-2006 inside and around Eurasia. The records from 135 broadband stations were used. After obtaining the Rayleigh-wave amplitude

  17. The Advanced Helical Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Reisman, D B; Javedani, J B; Ellsworth, G F; Kuklo, R M; Goerz, D A; White, A D; Tallerico, L J; Gidding, D A; Murphy, M J; Chase, J B

    2009-10-26

    A high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) generator called the Advanced Helical Generator (AHG) has been designed, built, and successfully tested. The AHG incorporates design principles of voltage and current management to obtain a high current and energy gain. Its design was facilitated by the use of modern modeling tools as well as high precision manufacture. The result was a first-shot success. The AHG delivered 16 Mega-Amperes of current and 11 Mega-Joules of energy to a quasi-static 80 nH inductive load. A current gain of 154 times was obtained with a peak exponential rise time of 20 {micro}s. We will describe in detail the design and testing of the AHG.

  18. A high-average power tapered FEL amplifier at submillimeter frequencies using sheet electron beams and short-period wigglers

    SciTech Connect

    Bidwell, S.W.; Radack, D.J.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Booske, J.H.; Carmel, Y.; Destler, W.W.; Granatstein, V.L.; Levush, B.; Latham, P.E.; Zhang, Z.X.

    1990-01-01

    A high-average-power FEL amplifier operating at submillimeter frequencies is under development at the University of Maryland. Program goals are to produce a CW, {approximately}1 MW, FEL amplifier source at frequencies between 280 GHz and 560 GHz. To this end, a high-gain, high-efficiency, tapered FEL amplifier using a sheet electron beam and a short-period (superconducting) wiggler has been chosen. Development of this amplifier is progressing in three stages: (1) beam propagation through a long length ({approximately}1 m) of short period ({lambda}{sub {omega}} = 1 cm) wiggler, (2) demonstration of a proof-of-principle amplifier experiment at 98 GHz, and (3) designs of a superconducting tapered FEL amplifier meeting the ultimate design goal specifications. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  19. Concentric waves and short-period oscillations observed in the ionosphere after the 2013 Moore EF5 tornado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishioka, Michi; Tsugawa, Takuya; Kubota, Minoru; Ishii, Mamoru

    2013-11-01

    We detected clear concentric waves and short-period oscillations in the ionosphere after an Enhanced Fujita scale (EF)5 tornado hit Moore, Oklahoma, U.S., on 20 May 2013 using dense wide-coverage ionospheric total electron content (TEC) observations in North America. These concentric waves were nondispersive, with a horizontal wavelength of ~120 km and a period of ~13 min. They were observed for more than 7 h throughout North America. TEC oscillations with a period of ~4 min were also observed to the south of Moore for more than 8 h. A comparison between the TEC observations and infrared cloud image from the GOES satellite indicates that the concentric waves and short-period oscillations are caused by supercell-induced atmospheric gravity waves and acoustic resonances, respectively. This observational result provides the first clear evidence of a severe meteorological event causing atmospheric waves propagating upward in the upper atmosphere and reaching the ionosphere.

  20. Short period wave generation in Moss Landing Harbor caused by offshore landslides induced by the Loma Prieta earthquake

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner-Taggart, J.M.; Barminski, R.F. Jr. )

    1991-07-01

    Short period waves were observed in the Moss Landing Harbor approximately 2 minutes after the October 17, 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. Offshore submarine landslides in the region of wave generation was noted by scuba divers and recorded by side scanning sonographs, fathometer records and ROV video footage taken in the area after the quake. These waves are believed to have been generated by offshore submarine landslides along the canyon walls of the Monterey Canyon directly offshore of the Moss Landing Marine Laboratories.

  1. Characteristics of short period secondary microseisms (SPSM) in Taiwan: The influence of shallow ocean strait on SPSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying-Nien; Gung, Yuancheng; You, Shuei-Huei; Hung, Shu-Huei; Chiao, Ling-Yun; Huang, Tzu-Ying; Chen, Yen-Ling; Liang, Wen-Tzong; Jan, Sen

    2011-02-01

    Taking advantage of a unique opportunity provided by a dense array of coastal short-period seismic stations and the diverse bathymetry around Taiwan, we examine how the long-range coherent ambient noises are influenced by surrounding ocean settings using the cross-correlation functions (CCFs) between pairs of stations. The effective energy of the CCFs derived from three components of short-period seismometer data falls within the frequency range of the short period secondary microseism (SPSM). The spatial variations mapped from the amplitude asymmetry of CCFs and source migration images evidently demonstrate that the SPSM strengths are closely linked to the drastic changes in offshore ocean characteristics and result in much stronger SPSM in the shallow and narrow Taiwan Strait than in deep open seas of eastern Taiwan. The temporal variations of the CCF strengths exhibit very good correlations with the wind speeds and wave heights, explicitly indicating the observed SPSM is dominated by local sources generated from wind-driven ocean waves around offshore Taiwan.

  2. Demonstration of inverse free-electron laser seeding in a sub-80 K, short period cryogenic undulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    OʼShea, F. H.; Knyazik, Andrey; Marinelli, A.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Dunning, M.; Hast, C.; Hemsing, E.; Jobe, K.; Nelson, J.; Weathersby, S.; Xiang, D.; Holy, F.; Grüner, F.; Bahrdt, J.

    2014-12-01

    Short period, high field undulators have been shown to permit operation of x-ray free-electron lasers with short gain-lengths, and at unprecedented short wavelengths. In addition, the reduced beam energy required to reach resonance with a given radiation wavelength in short period undulators could prove useful in advanced inverse free-electron laser (IFEL) seeding schemes for future light sources, such as high-gain harmonic generation and echo-enabled harmonic generation, or in IFEL acceleration. We report here the in situ beam testing of a 9 mm period length cryogenic undulator having undulator parameter near unity in the context appropriate for advanced seeding and acceleration schemes, a linear accelerator. Because of the short period length of the undulator, a 47 MeV high-brightness electron beam could be used to produce near infrared photons via the undulator radiation mechanism. The undulator radiation was observed through a filter and the spectral response of the undulator is compared to simulation. Finally, an 800 nm seed laser was introduced in order to generate an energy modulation via the IFEL mechanism. Resonance between the electron beam and the laser seed was achieved without detailed knowledge of the temperature dependent undulator magnetic field through the observation of the undulator radiation. The energy modulation (and concomitant energy spread increase) of the electron beam was observed both directly in an electron beam spectrometer and indirectly via coherent transition radiation after conversion to a density modulation in a longitudinally dispersive chicane.

  3. Helical localized wave solutions of the scalar wave equation.

    PubMed

    Overfelt, P L

    2001-08-01

    A right-handed helical nonorthogonal coordinate system is used to determine helical localized wave solutions of the homogeneous scalar wave equation. Introducing the characteristic variables in the helical system, i.e., u = zeta - ct and v = zeta + ct, where zeta is the coordinate along the helical axis, we can use the bidirectional traveling plane wave representation and obtain sets of elementary bidirectional helical solutions to the wave equation. Not only are these sets bidirectional, i.e., based on a product of plane waves, but they may also be broken up into right-handed and left-handed solutions. The elementary helical solutions may in turn be used to create general superpositions, both Fourier and bidirectional, from which new solutions to the wave equation may be synthesized. These new solutions, based on the helical bidirectional superposition, are members of the class of localized waves. Examples of these new solutions are a helical fundamental Gaussian focus wave mode, a helical Bessel-Gauss pulse, and a helical acoustic directed energy pulse train. Some of these solutions have the interesting feature that their shape and localization properties depend not only on the wave number governing propagation along the longitudinal axis but also on the normalized helical pitch. PMID:11488494

  4. The OmegaWhite Survey for short period variable stars II: An overview of results from the first four years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toma, R.; Ramsay, G.; Macfarlane, S.; Groot, P. J.; Woudt, P. A.; Dhillon, V.; Jeffery, C. S.; Marsh, T.; Nelemans, G.; Steeghs, D.

    2016-08-01

    OmegaWhite is a wide-field, high cadence, synoptic survey targeting fields in the southern Galactic plane, with the aim of discovering short period variable stars. Our strategy is to take a series of 39 s exposures in the g band of a 1 square degree of sky lasting 2 h using the OmegaCAM wide field imager on the VLT Survey Telescope (VST). We give an overview of the initial 4 years of data which covers 134 square degrees and includes 12.3 million light curves. As the fields overlap with the VLT Survey Telescope Hα Photometric Survey of the Galactic plane and Bulge (VPHAS+), we currently have ugriHα photometry for ˜1/3 of our fields. We find that a significant fraction of the light curves have been affected by the diffraction spikes of bright stars sweeping across stars within a few dozen of pixels over the two hour observing time interval due to the alt-az nature of the VST. We select candidate variable stars using a variety of variability statistics, followed by a manual verification stage. We present samples of several classes of short period variables, including: an ultra compact binary, a DQ white dwarf, a compact object with evidence of a 100 min rotation period, three CVs, one eclipsing binary with an 85 min period, a symbiotic binary which shows evidence of a 31 min photometric period, and a large sample of candidate δ Sct type stars including one with a 9.3 min period. Our overall goal is to cover 400 square degrees, and this study indicates we will find many more interesting short period variable stars as a result.

  5. Led InGaN/GaN Structures with Short-Period Superlattice Grown on Flat and Patterned Sapphire Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanov, I. S.; Prudaev, I. A.; Brudnyi, V. N.; Kop'ev, V. V.; Novikov, Vad. A.; Marmalyuk, A. A.; Kureshov, V. A.; Sabitov, D. R.; Mazalov, A. V.

    2015-03-01

    The results of studies of blue LED InGaN/GaN heterostructures with a short-period InGaN/GaN superlattice in front of an active region of the structure grown on flat and patterned Al2O3 substrates are presented. In these structures, an increase of the internal quantum efficiency is observed. The high-resolution X-ray diffraction spectra and the integrated PL intensity are measured for two temperatures - 10 and 300 K - at different levels of optical YAG-laser pumping.

  6. Multidisciplinary experiment on studying short-period variability of the sedimentary process in the northeastern part of the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyuvitkin, A. A.; Ostrovskii, A. G.; Novigatskii, A. N.; Lisitzin, A. P.

    2016-07-01

    The principal aim of this work is to reveal the regularities of short-period synoptic variability of vertical flows and the composition of settling sedimentary material, to obtain information on the quantitative characteristics of the processes that influence sound-scattering layers in the water layer above the continental slope behind the shelf edge in the northeastern part of the Black Sea. The results were obtained due to improvement of the equipment and the procedures for performing sea experiments on studying physicogeological, biological, and hydrophysical processes in the upper illuminated layer of phytoplankton development.

  7. Photometric investigation of a very short-period binary - Is BX Pegasi undergoing continuous angular momentum losses

    SciTech Connect

    Samec, R.G. )

    1990-09-01

    Photoelectric observations of BX Peg, made in June and October 1988, are presented. Synthetic light-curve solutions indicate that the system consists of two late G type stars (G7 to G9) in a state of shallow contact (f = 12 percent), with the more massive component being the cooler one. The thermal contact is rather poor, with a temperature difference of 246 K; the mass ratio is about 0.37. Current theories of the structure of short-period low mass binaries are discussed. 43 refs.

  8. Three-dimensional full waveform inversion of short-period teleseismic wavefields based upon the SEM-DSM hybrid method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiller, Vadim; Chevrot, Sébastien; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Wang, Yi

    2015-08-01

    We present a method for high-resolution imaging of lithospheric structures based on full waveform inversion of teleseismic waveforms. We model the propagation of seismic waves using our recently developed direct solution method/spectral-element method hybrid technique, which allows us to simulate the propagation of short-period teleseismic waves through a regional 3-D model. We implement an iterative quasi-Newton method based upon the L-BFGS algorithm, where the gradient of the misfit function is computed using the adjoint-state method. Compared to gradient or conjugate-gradient methods, the L-BFGS algorithm has a much faster convergence rate. We illustrate the potential of this method on a synthetic test case that consists of a crustal model with a crustal discontinuity at 25 km depth and a sharp Moho jump. This model contains short- and long-wavelength heterogeneities along the lateral and vertical directions. The iterative inversion starts from a smooth 1-D model derived from the IASP91 reference Earth model. We invert both radial and vertical component waveforms, starting from long-period signals filtered at 10 s and gradually decreasing the cut-off period down to 1.25 s. This multiscale algorithm quickly converges towards a model that is very close to the true model, in contrast to inversions involving short-period waveforms only, which always get trapped into a local minimum of the cost function.

  9. Spontaneous lateral composition modulation in InAlAs and InGaAs short-period superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Follstaedt, D.M.; Twesten, R.D.; Millunchick, J.M.; Lee, S.R.; Jones, E.D.; Ahrenkiel, S.P.; Zhang, Y.; Mascarenhas, A.

    1997-07-11

    The microstructure of spontaneous lateral composition modulation along the [110] direction has been studied in (InAs){sub n}/(AlAs){sub m} short-period superlattices grown by molecular beam epitaxy on (001) InP. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy show that global strain ({var_epsilon}) in the superlattice reduces the degree of composition modulation, which disappears for the absolute value of {var_epsilon} > 0.7%. For tensile strains of {var_epsilon} {approx} +0.4%, they find that In-rich columns become regularly spaced and correlated with cusps in the growth surface. A similar correlation is seen in (InAs){sub n}/(GaAs){sub m} short-period superlattices between the enriched columns and the peaks and valleys of {l_brace}114{r_brace}{sub A} facets on the surface. The enriched columns in the (InAs){sub n}/(GaAs){sub m} layer (and the facets) extend for much longer distances ({approximately}0.2--0.4 {micro}m) in the [1{bar 1}0] direction than do the columns in the (InAs){sub n}/(AlAs){sub m} layer ({approximately} 56 nm).

  10. Short period ScP phase amplitude calculations for core-mantle boundary with intermediate scale topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zhichao; Ni, Sidao; Wu, Wenbo; Sun, Daoyuan

    2016-04-01

    The core-mantle boundary (CMB) topography plays a key role in constraining geodynamic modeling and core-mantle coupling. It's effective to resolve the intermediate lateral scale topography (hundreds of km) with short period core reflected seismic phases (ScP) due to their small Fresnel-zones at short epicentral distances (<3336 km (30°)). We developed a method based on the ray theory and representation theorem to calculate short period ScP synthetics for intermediate lateral scale CMB topography. The CMB topography we introduced here is axisymmetric and specified with two parameters: H (height) and L (diameter, or lateral length scale). Our numerical computation shows that a bump (H > 0) and dip (H < 0) model would cause defocusing/weakening and focusing/amplifying effects on ScP amplitude. Moreover, the effect of frequency and combination of L and H are quantified with the amplification coefficients. Then we applied this method to estimate a possible CMB topography beneath northeastern Japan, and a CMB model with L = 140 km, H = 1.2 km overall matches the observed pattern of 2D PcP/ScP amplitude ratios. However, it is difficult to totally rule out other factors that may also affect PcP/ScP pattern because of limitation of ray-based algorithms we used here. A hybrid method combining ray theory and numerical method is promising for studying complicated 3D structure and CMB topography in the future.

  11. Short-period X-ray oscillations in super-soft novae and persistent super-soft sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ness, J.-U.; Beardmore, A. P.; Osborne, J. P.; Kuulkers, E.; Henze, M.; Piro, A. L.; Drake, J. J.; Dobrotka, A.; Schwarz, G.; Starrfield, S.; Kretschmar, P.; Hirsch, M.; Wilms, J.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Transient short-period (<100 s) oscillations have been found in the X-ray light curves of three novae during their super-soft source (SSS) phase and in one persistent SSS. Aims: We pursue an observational approach to determine possible driving mechanisms and relations to fundamental system parameters such as the white dwarf mass. Methods: We performed a systematic search for short-period oscillations in all available XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray light curves of persistent SSS and novae during their SSS phase. To study time evolution, we divided each light curve into short time-segments and computed power spectra. We then constructed a dynamic power spectrum from which we identified transient periodic signals even when only present for a short time. We base our confidence levels on simulations of false-alarm probability for the chosen oversampling rate of 16, corrected for multiple testing based on the number of time segments. From all time segments of each system, we computed fractions of time when periodic signals were detected. Results: In addition to the previously known systems with short-period oscillations, RS Oph (35 s), KT Eri (35 s), V339 Del (54 s), and Cal 83 (67 s), we found one additional system, LMC 2009a (33 s), and also confirm the 35 s period from Chandra data of KT Eri. The oscillation amplitudes are of about <15% of the respective count rates and vary without any clear dependence on the X-ray count rate. The fractions of the time when the respective periods were detected at 2σ significance (duty cycle) are 11.3%, 38.8%, 16.9%, 49.2%, and 18.7% for LMC 2009a, RS Oph, KT Eri, V339 Del, and Cal 83, respectively. The respective highest duty cycles found in a single observation are 38.1%, 74.5%, 61.4%, 67.8%, and 61.8%. Conclusions: Since fast rotation periods of the white dwarfs as origin of these transient oscillations are speculative, we concentrate on pulsation mechanisms. We present initial considerations predicting the oscillation

  12. Flow of Planets, Not Weak Tidal Evolution, Produces the Short-Period Planet Distribution with More Planets than Expected

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Stuart F.

    2013-01-01

    The most unexpected planet finding is arguably the number of those with shorter periods than theorists had expected, because most such close planets had been expected to migrate into the star in shorter timescales than the ages of the stars. Subsequent effort has been made to show how tidal dissipation in stars due to planets could be weaker than expected, but we show how the occurrence distribution of differently-sized planets is more consistent with the explanation that these planets have more recently arrived as a flow of inwardly migrating planets, with giant planets more likely to be found while gradually going through a short period stage. This continual ``flow'' of new planets arriving from further out is presumably supplied by the flow likely responsible for the short period pileup of giant planets (Socrates+ 2011). We have previously shown that the shortest period region of the exoplanet occurrence distribution has a fall-off shaped by inward tidal migration due to stellar tides, that is, tides on the star caused by the planets (Taylor 2011, 2012). The power index of the fall-off of giant and intermediate radius planet candidates found from Kepler data (Howard+ 2011) is close to the index of 13/3 which is expected for planets in circular orbits undergoing tidal migration. However, there is a discrepancy of the strength of the tidal migration determined using fits to the giant and medium planets distributions. This discrepancy is best resolved by the explanation that more giant than medium radii planets migrate through these short period orbits. We also present a correlation between higher eccentricity of planetary orbits with higher Fe/H of host stars, which could be explained by high eccentricity planets being associated with recent episodes of other planets into stars. By the time these planets migrate to become hot Jupiters, the pollution may be mixed into the star. The clearing of other planets by migrating hot giant planets may result in hot Jupiters

  13. Formation and Evolution of Circumbinary Planets, and the Apparent Lack of CPBs Around Short-Period Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghighipour, Nader

    2015-12-01

    The success of the Kepler space telescope in detecting planets in circumbinary orbits strongly suggests that planet formation around binary stars is robust and planets of a variety of sizes and orbital configurations may exist in such complex environments. Accurate modeling of Kepler data has also indicated that some of these planets orbit their central binaries in close proximity to the boundary of orbital stability. This finding, combined with the unsuccessful attempts in forming circumbinary planets (CBPs) close to the orbital stability limit has lent strong support to the idea that almost all currently known CBPs have formed at large distances and undergone substantial radial migration. A survey of the currently known CBPs further indicates that these planets are mainly Neptune-mass and there seems to be a lack of planets of Jupiter-mass or larger in P-type orbits. Furthermore, an examination of the observational data obtained by the Kepler telescope seems to suggest an absence of CBPs around short-period binaries. Finally, recent detections of episodic transits in the two newly discovered circumbinary systems, Kepler 413b and Kepler 453b, as well as the discovery of Kepler non-transiting CBPs, (please see the abstract by Fabrycky et al) have indicated that in general, the orbits of planets and their host binaries are not co-planar. We present a new model for the formation and evolution of CBPs in which the migration of CBPs has been studied for low and high eccentricity binaries, and for different values of binary period. Results of our extensive hydrodynamical simulations show that planet-disk interaction in low-eccentricity binaries can account for the migration of CBPs and the proximity of their final orbits to the boundary of stability. In eccentric binaries, the situation is, however, more complex and in order to explain the final orbital architecture of the system, other factors such as planet-planet interaction have to be taken into account. We show

  14. On the use of volumetric strain meters to infer additional characteristics of short-period seismic radiation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borcherdt, R.D.; Johnston, M.J.S.; Glassmoyer, G.

    1989-01-01

    Volumetric strain meters (Sacks-Evertson design) are installed at 15 sites along the San Andreas fault system, to monitor long-term strain changes for earthquake prediction. Deployment of portable broadband, high-resolution digital recorders (GEOS) at several of the sites extends the detection band for volumetric strain to periods shorter than 5 ?? 10-2 sec and permits the simultaneous observation of seismic radiation fields using conventional short-period pendulum seismometers. Recordings of local and regional earthquakes indicate that dilatometers respond to P energy but not direct shear energy and that straingrams can be used to resolve superimposed reflect P and S waves for inference of wave characteristics not permitted by either sensor alone. Simultaneous measurements of incident P- and S-wave amplitudes are used to introduce a technique for single-station estimates of wave field inhomogeneity, free-surface reflection coefficients and local material P velocity. -from Authors

  15. Short-period circumnutations found in sunflower hypocotyls in satellite orbit. A reappraisal of data from Spacelab-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardal, Tom Kr; Johnsson, Anders; Chapman, David K.; Sager, J. C. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    We have further analysed data from an experiment performed in satellite orbit, in Spacelab-1. In micro-gravity the hypocotyls of Helianthus annuus, cv. "Teddy Bear", showed short period circumnutations (periods around 30 minutes) as well as the already reported long period nutations (with an average period of about 115 minutes). We applied various types of signal analysis (Fourier and wavelet analysis) to the data series. The long period circumnutations have a larger amplitude than the short term circumnutations. Both short and long period circumnutations exist in one and the same hypocotyl. (This is in contrast to our ground control experiments, where were found only the long-period nutations.) The period of the nutations changed throughout the experiment. These results are extending the conclusions drawn after the Spacelab experiment (Brown et al. 1990). In particular they emphasize the existence of both short- and long-period circumnutations in micro-gravity.

  16. Atomic intermixing and interface roughness in short-period InAs/GaSb superlattices for infrared photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ashuach, Y.; Lakin, E.; Kaufmann, Y.; Saguy, C.; Zolotoyabko, E.

    2014-09-28

    A set of advanced characterization methods, including high-resolution X-ray diffraction (measurements and simulations), cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy, and high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy is applied to quantify the interface roughness and atomic intermixing (in both cation and anion sub-lattices) in short period (6–7 nm) InAs/GaSb superlattices intended for mid-wavelength (M) and long-wavelength (L) infrared detectors. The undesired atomic intermixing and interface roughness in the L-samples were found to be considerably lower than in the M-samples. In all specimens, anion intermixing is much higher than that in the cation sub-lattice. Possible origins of these findings are discussed.

  17. Spontaneous lateral modulation in short-period superlattices investigated by grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Caha, O.; Mikulik, P.; Novak, J.; Holy, V.; Moss, S.C.; Norman, A.; Mascarenhas, A.; Reno, J.L.; Krause, B.

    2005-07-15

    The process of spontaneous lateral composition modulation in short-period InAs/AlAs superlattices has been investigated by grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction. We have developed a theoretical description of x-ray scattering from laterally modulated structures that makes it possible to determine the lateral composition modulation directly without assuming any structure model. From experimental intensity distributions in reciprocal space we have determined the amplitudes of the modulation and its degree of periodicity and their dependence on the number of superlattice periods. From the data it follows that the modulation process cannot be explained by bunching of monolayer steps and most likely, it is caused by stress-driven morphological instabilities of the growing surface.

  18. Optical properties of spontaneous lateral composition modulations in AlAs/InAs short-period superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    FRANCOEUR,S.; ALSINA,F.; ZHANG,YONG; NORMAN,A.G.; MASCARENHAS,A.; JONES,ERIC D.; RENO,JOHN L.; LEE,STEPHEN R.; FOLLSTAEDT,DAVID M.

    2000-05-11

    The effect of lateral composition modulation, spontaneously generated during the epitaxial growth of a AlAs/InAs short-period superlattice, on the electronic band structure is investigated using photo-transmission and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Compared with uniform layers of similar average composition, the presence of the composition modulation considerably reduces the band gap energy and produces strongly polarized emission and absorption spectra. The authors demonstrate that the dominant polarization can selectively be aligned along the [{bar 1}10] or [010] crystallographic directions. In compressively strained samples, the use of (001) InP substrates slightly miscut toward [111]A or [101] resulted in modulation directions along [110] or [100], respectively, and dominant polarizations along a direction orthogonal to the respective composition modulation. Band gap reduction as high as 350 meV and 310 meV are obtained for samples with composition modulation along [110] and [100], respectively. Polarization ratios up to 26 are observed in transmission spectra.

  19. THIRD COMPONENT SEARCH AND ABUNDANCES OF THE VERY DUSTY SHORT-PERIOD BINARY BD +20 Degree-Sign 307

    SciTech Connect

    Fekel, Francis C.; Cordero, Maria J.; Galicher, Raphael; Zuckerman, B.; Melis, Carl; Weinberger, Alycia J. E-mail: majocord@indiana.edu E-mail: ben@astro.ucla.edu E-mail: weinberger@dtm.ciw.edu

    2012-04-10

    We have obtained near-infrared adaptive optics imaging and collected additional radial velocity observations to search for a third component in the extremely dusty short-period binary system BD +20 Degree-Sign 307. Our image shows no evidence for a third component at separations greater than 19 AU. Our four seasons of radial velocities have a constant center-of-mass velocity and are consistent with the systemic velocities determined at two earlier epochs. Thus, the radial velocities also provide no support for a third component. Unfortunately, the separation domains covered by our imaging and radial velocity results do not overlap. Thus, we examined the parameters for possible orbits of a third component that could have been missed by our current observations. With our velocities we determined improved circular orbital elements for the 3.4 day double-lined binary. We also performed a spectroscopic abundance analysis of the short-period binary components and conclude that the stars are a mid- and a late-F dwarf. We find that the iron abundances of both components, [Fe/H] = 0.15, are somewhat greater than the solar value and comparable to that of stars in the Hyades. Despite the similarity of the binary components, the lithium abundances of the two stars are very unequal. The primary has log {epsilon} (Li) = 2.72, while in the secondary log {epsilon} (Li) {<=}1.46, which corresponds to a difference of at least a factor of 18. The very disparate lithium abundances in very similar stars make it impossible to ascribe a single age to them. While the system is likely at least 1 Gyr old, it may well be as old as the Sun.

  20. WASP-44b, WASP-45b and WASP-46b: three short-period, transiting extrasolar planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, D. R.; Collier Cameron, A.; Gillon, M.; Hellier, C.; Jehin, E.; Lendl, M.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Queloz, D.; Smalley, B.; Smith, A. M. S.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; West, R. G.; Pepe, F.; Pollacco, D.; Ségransan, D.; Todd, I.; Udry, S.

    2012-05-01

    We report the discovery of three extrasolar planets that transit their moderately bright (mV= 12-13) host stars. WASP-44b is a 0.89-MJup planet in a 2.42-day orbit around a G8V star. WASP-45b is a 1.03-MJup planet which passes in front of the limb of its K2V host star every 3.13 days. Weak Ca II H&K emission seen in the spectra of WASP-45 suggests that the star is chromospherically active. WASP-46b is a 2.10-MJup planet in a 1.43-day orbit around a G6V star. Rotational modulation of the light curves of WASP-46 and weak Ca II H&K emission in its spectra show the star to be photospherically and chromospherically active. We imposed circular orbits in our analyses as the radial-velocity data are consistent with (near-)circular orbits, as could be expected from both empirical and tidal-theory perspectives for such short-period, ˜Jupiter-mass planets. We discuss the impact of fitting for eccentric orbits for such planets when not supported by the data. The derived planetary and stellar radii depend on the fitted eccentricity and these parameters inform intense theoretical efforts concerning tidal circularization and heating, bulk planetary composition and the observed systematic errors in planetary and stellar radii. As such, we recommend exercising caution in fitting the orbits of short-period, ˜Jupiter-mass planets with an eccentric model when there is no evidence of non-circularity.

  1. Ultra-short-period Planets in K2 SuPerPiG Results for Campaigns 0–5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Elisabeth R.; Jackson, Brian; Endl, Michael

    2016-08-01

    We analyzed data from Campaigns 0–5 of the K2 mission and report 19 ultra-short-period candidate planets with orbital periods of less than one day (nine of which have not been previously reported). Planet candidates range in size from 0.7 to 16 Earth radii and in orbital period from 4.2 to 23.5 hr. One candidate (EPIC 203533312, Kp = 12.5) is among the shortest-period planet candidates discovered to date (P=4.2 hr), and, if confirmed as a planet, must have a density of at least ρ =8.9 {{g}} {{cm}}-3 to not be tidally disrupted. Five candidates have nominal radius values in the sub-Jovian desert ({R}P=3{--}11 {R}\\oplus and P≤slant 1.5 days) where theoretical models do not favor their long-term stability; the only confirmed planet in this range is thought to be disintegrating (EPIC 201637175). In addition to the planet candidates, we report on four objects that may not be planetary, including one with intermittent transits (EPIC 211152484) and three initially promising candidates that are likely false positives based on characteristics of their light curves and on radial velocity follow-up. A list of 91 suspected eclipsing binaries identified at various stages in our vetting process is also provided. Based on an assessment of our survey's completeness, we estimate an occurrence rate for ultra-short-period planets among K2 target stars that is about half that estimated from the Kepler sample, raising questions as to whether K2 systems are intrinsically different from Kepler systems, possibly as a result of their different galactic location.

  2. Helicity in superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedia, Hridesh; Kleckner, Dustin; Proment, Davide; Irvine, William T. M.

    Ideal fluid flow conserves a special quantity known as helicity, in addition to energy, momentum and angular momentum. Helicity can be understood as a measure of the knottedness of vortex lines of the flow, providing an important geometric tool to study diverse physical systems such as turbulent fluids and plasmas. Since superfluids flow without resistance just like ideal (Euler) fluids, a natural question arises: Is there an extra conserved quantity akin to helicity in superfluids? We address the question of a ''superfluid helicity'' theoretically and examine its consequences in numerical simulations.

  3. Early Oligocene geomagnetic field behavior from ODP Site 1128: Complex records of short-period polarity events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina-Garza, R. S.; Fuller, M. D.

    2001-12-01

    At Site 1128, in the Great Australian Bight, Leg 182 of the Ocean Drilling Program recovered a thick (~350 m) section of Upper Eocene and Lower Oligocene marine calcareous clays. Shipboard measurements established a magnetostratigraphy that can unambiguously be correlated to chrons C13n to C10n of the global polarity time scale (GPTS), and a less complete record of chrons C17n to C15r (due to poor core recovery). Correlation to the GPTS is further supported by available biostratigraphic data. For the Lower Oligocene sequence, average sedimentation rate is estimated at ~4 cm/kyr. The sediments recovered thus allow to test for the completeness and reliability of the geomagnetic field polarity during the Early Oligocene. The original shipboard long-core measurements suggested the presence of additional short polarity events or geomagnetic field excursions during chrons C13n, C12r, C11r, and C11n. In order to examine the reliability of the record and the nature of possible short-polarity events, we obtained discrete samples from the entire sequence at ~1 m intervals, with a closer sample spacing in critical intervals (~10 cm). The natural remanence of these sediments is normally simple. After removing a small soft overprint, the magnetization decays towards the origin with distributed coercivities and distributed unblocking temperatures. Demagnetization behavior and other rock magnetic data indicate that the remanence resides primarily in a cubic phase such as magnetite or maghemite, with a small contribution from hematite. Discrete samples from chron C12r did not reproduce the long-core record for two of the supposed events, single samples suggest the presence of short events or cryptochrons near the base of both C13n and C12r, and multiple samples suggest the existence of short-period normal polarity events during C11r and near the top of C12r. The records of these events are, however, complex. Demagnetization results indicate that the magnetization consists of an

  4. Distortions in protein helices.

    PubMed

    Geetha, V

    1996-08-01

    alpha-helices are the most common secondary structures in observed proteins. However, they are not always found in ideal helical conformation and they often exhibit structural distortions. Quantification of these irregularities become essential in understanding the packing of helices and therefore, their role in the functional characteristics of the protein. The backbone torsions phi, psi are of limited utility in this endeavor, because distorted helices often maintain the backbone geometry. The local compensatory effects are responsible for the preservation of the entire hydrogen bond network of the helical stretch. Earlier descriptions of helical linearity and curvature rest mostly on approximation, thus motivating the search for a better method for understanding and quantifying helical irregularities. We developed a method which involves the rotation and superposition of identical repeating units of the protein by the quaternion method. The set of parameters derived from the rotation-superposition algorithm helps in identifying the bends and kinks which are not necessarily induced by unusual amino acids like proline. The quantification of irregularities of observed helices might lead to a better understanding of their packing interactions. PMID:8842770

  5. A Helical Stairway Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Tom

    2008-01-01

    We answer a geometric question that was raised by the carpenter in charge of erecting helical stairs in a 10-story hospital. The explanation involves the equations of lines, planes, and helices in three-dimensional space. A brief version of the question is this: If A and B are points on a cylinder and the line segment AB is projected radially onto…

  6. Emerging double helical nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Meng-Qiang; Zhang, Qiang; Tian, Gui-Li; Wei, Fei

    2014-07-01

    As one of the most important and land-mark structures found in nature, a double helix consists of two congruent single helices with the same axis or a translation along the axis. This double helical structure renders the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) the crucial biomolecule in evolution and metabolism. DNA-like double helical nanostructures are probably the most fantastic yet ubiquitous geometry at the nanoscale level, which are expected to exhibit exceptional and even rather different properties due to the unique organization of the two single helices and their synergistic effect. The organization of nanomaterials into double helical structures is an emerging hot topic for nanomaterials science due to their promising exceptional unique properties and applications. This review focuses on the state-of-the-art research progress for the fabrication of double-helical nanostructures based on `bottom-up' and `top-down' strategies. The relevant nanoscale, mesoscale, and macroscopic scale fabrication methods, as well as the properties of the double helical nanostructures are included. Critical perspectives are devoted to the synthesis principles and potential applications in this emerging research area. A multidisciplinary approach from the scope of nanoscience, physics, chemistry, materials, engineering, and other application areas is still required to the well-controlled and large-scale synthesis, mechanism, property, and application exploration of double helical nanostructures.

  7. Heat Loss by Helicity Injection II

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, T K

    2006-04-25

    Arguments are reviewed showing that helicity transport always flattens the temperature profile, yielding unit current amplification in SSPX and flat temperature profiles in RFP's whenever the dynamo is active. The argument is based on transport theory yielding a hyper-resistivity {Lambda} {approx} (c{sup 2}/{omega}{sub pc}{sup 2}){chi}{sub c} with electron thermal diffusivity {chi}{sub c}, valid for any process producing a random-walk in electron constants of motion in the unperturbed field. The theory could be tested by deriving {Lambda} from helicity transport in SSPX, by analogy with recent analysis yielding {chi}{sub c} from heat transport. If the predicted ratio {Lambda}/{chi}{sub c} is confirmed, efforts to increase current amplification in SSPX must be based on scenario scenarios consistent with slow helicity transport compared to heat s transport (pulsed reactor, multipulse, neutral beam injection).

  8. Demonstration of steady inductive helicity injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieck, P. E.; Jarboe, T. R.; Izzo, V. A.; Hamp, W. T.; Nelson, B. A.; O'Neill, R. G.; Redd, A. J.; Smith, R. J.

    2006-02-01

    Initial results demonstrating the concept of constant inductive helicity injection are presented. Constant helicity injection is achieved using two oscillating inductive helicity injectors, with the goal of producing a bow tie spheromak. Each injector is a 180° segment of a reverse field pinch and they are driven 90° out of phase. Approximately 5 MW of power is injected during the 6 ms pulse, and the input power has been maintained at a fairly constant value by directly fuelling the injectors with neutral gas. Motivation for the experiment is given, including beta-limit calculations for the bow tie spheromak. Fuelling the injectors with neutral gas during the discharge is shown to produce injector parameters that are more constant in time. A series of discharges with increasing power input shows a promising increase in toroidal current. Unique construction techniques of the experiment are also described.

  9. In-plane and growth direction electron cyclotron effective mass in short period InAs/GaSb semiconductor superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Suchalkin, S.; Belenky, G.; Svensson, S. P.; Laikhtman, B.; Smirnov, D.; Tung, L. C.; Bandara, S.

    2011-08-15

    In plane and growth direction electron effective mass in short period InAs/GaSb semiconductor superlattices (SL) was measured using cyclotron resonance at different orientations of magnetic field with respect to SL growth direction. It was demonstrated that the electron spectrum near the bottom of the SL subband has 3D character, with the in-plane effective masses ranging from 0.023 m{sub 0} to 0.028 m{sub 0} and growth direction effective masses of 0.03-0.034 m{sub 0} depending on the SL period and growth conditions. The measured effective masses are close to those calculated in the weak coupling limit of the Kronig-Penney model. In this limit the SL electron effective mass is a weighted average of the electron effective masses of corresponding bulk materials. Correlation between the magnitude of cyclotron mobility, amplitude of negative magnetoresistance, and steepness of the long wavelength side of the photoluminescence spectrum indicate that the crystalline structure disorder is a major factor contributing to the momentum relaxation time of the electrons.

  10. A Case of Cellular Fibrous Histiocytoma on the Right Elbow with Repeated Relapse within a Short Period.

    PubMed

    Tsunoda, Kanako; Oikawa, Hiroki; Maeda, Fumihiko; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Akasaka, Toshihide

    2015-01-01

    Cellular fibrous histiocytoma, a variant of fibrous histiocytoma, is a designation used for lesions showing increased cellularity with a fascicular growth pattern and frequent extension into the subcutis. Here we describe a case of cellular fibrous histiocytoma showing repeated recurrence in a 36-year-old woman who initially presented with a 2-cm cutaneous tumor on her right elbow. Histopathologically, the first resected specimen demonstrated irregularly arranged collagen fibers mixed with scattered proliferating plump to spindle-shaped fibrohistiocytes. However, examination of the resected specimens obtained after recurrence showed that the cellularity had increased, the spindle-shaped cells showing monomorphic proliferation with a fascicular and storiform growth pattern extending into the subcutis, as well as an increase of Ki-67 positivity. Since the lesion showed repeated relapse within a short period, we performed wide-field resection of the tumor with a 3-cm margin. Currently, 48 months after surgery, there has been no local recurrence or metastasis, but continuous strict follow-up will be necessary. PMID:25759652

  11. A Case of Cellular Fibrous Histiocytoma on the Right Elbow with Repeated Relapse within a Short Period

    PubMed Central

    Tsunoda, Kanako; Oikawa, Hiroki; Maeda, Fumihiko; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Akasaka, Toshihide

    2015-01-01

    Cellular fibrous histiocytoma, a variant of fibrous histiocytoma, is a designation used for lesions showing increased cellularity with a fascicular growth pattern and frequent extension into the subcutis. Here we describe a case of cellular fibrous histiocytoma showing repeated recurrence in a 36-year-old woman who initially presented with a 2-cm cutaneous tumor on her right elbow. Histopathologically, the first resected specimen demonstrated irregularly arranged collagen fibers mixed with scattered proliferating plump to spindle-shaped fibrohistiocytes. However, examination of the resected specimens obtained after recurrence showed that the cellularity had increased, the spindle-shaped cells showing monomorphic proliferation with a fascicular and storiform growth pattern extending into the subcutis, as well as an increase of Ki-67 positivity. Since the lesion showed repeated relapse within a short period, we performed wide-field resection of the tumor with a 3-cm margin. Currently, 48 months after surgery, there has been no local recurrence or metastasis, but continuous strict follow-up will be necessary. PMID:25759652

  12. PG 0308 + 096 and PG 1026 + 002 - Two new short period binary stars resulting from common-envelope evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saffer, Rex A.; Wade, Richard A.; Liebert, James; Green, Richard F.; Sion, Edward M.; Bechtold, J.; Foss, Diana; Kidder, K.

    1993-01-01

    Ultraviolet spectroscopy, optical spectroscopy, and spectrophotometry have been used to study the excess UV stars PG 0308 + 096 and PG 1026 + 002. Both objects are short-period binary systems, each containing a DA white dwarf star and a dM star. Orbital periods of approximately 0.284 day for PG 0308 + 096, and aproximately 0.597 day for PG 1026, have been found by spectroscopic analysis of the H-alpha emission line. Ly-alpha and Balmer line profile fitting were used to estimate the mass of white dwarf stars; mass estimates for the dM stars are based on their spectral types. The orbital inclinations are derived from these masses, the periods, and amplitudes of the H-alpha radial velocity curves. The equivalent width of the H-alpha emission line, in each binary system, varies with the orbital phase in such a manner as to imply that it arises, in large part at least, from the hemisphere of the M star that faces the white dwarf star.

  13. Constraining the formation of black holes in short-period black hole low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repetto, Serena; Nelemans, Gijs

    2015-11-01

    The formation of stellar-mass black holes (BHs) is still very uncertain. Two main uncertainties are the amount of mass ejected in the supernova (SN) event (if any) and the magnitude of the natal kick (NK) the BH receives at birth (if any). Repetto et al., studying the position of Galactic X-ray binaries containing BHs, found evidence for BHs receiving high NKs at birth. In this paper, we extend that study, taking into account the previous binary evolution of the sources as well. The seven short-period BH X-ray binaries that we use are compact binaries consisting of a low-mass star orbiting a BH in a period less than 1 d. We trace their binary evolution backwards in time, from the current observed state of mass transfer, to the moment the BH was formed, and we add the extra information on the kinematics of the binaries. We find that several systems could be explained by no NK, just mass ejection, while for two systems (and possibly more) a high kick is required. So unless the latter have an alternative formation, such as within a globular cluster, we conclude that at least some BHs get high kicks. This challenges the standard picture that BH kicks would be scaled down from neutron star kicks. Furthermore, we find that five systems could have formed with a non-zero NK but zero mass ejected (i.e. no SN) at formation, as predicted by neutrino-driven NKs.

  14. SHORT-PERIOD g-MODE PULSATIONS IN LOW-MASS WHITE DWARFS TRIGGERED BY H-SHELL BURNING

    SciTech Connect

    Córsico, A. H.; Althaus, L. G.

    2014-09-20

    The detection of pulsations in white dwarfs with low mass offers the possibility of probing their internal structures through asteroseismology and placing constraints on the binary evolutionary processes involved in their formation. In this Letter, we assess the impact of stable H burning on the pulsational stability properties of low-mass He-core white dwarf models resulting from binary star evolutionary calculations. We found that besides a dense spectrum of unstable radial modes and nonradial g and p modes driven by the κ mechanism due to the partial ionization of H in the stellar envelope, some unstable g modes with short pulsation periods are also powered by H burning via the ε mechanism of mode driving. This is the first time that ε destabilized modes are found in models representative of cool white dwarf stars. The short periods recently detected in the pulsating low-mass white dwarf SDSS J111215.82+111745.0 could constitute the first evidence of the existence of stable H burning in these stars, in particular in the so-called extremely low-mass white dwarfs.

  15. Evidence of negative electrorefraction in type-II GaAs/GaAlAs short-period superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchukin, V. A.; Ledentsov, N. N.; Karachinsky, L. Ya; Blokhin, S. A.; Novikov, I. I.; Egorov, A. Yu; Maximov, M. V.; Gordeev, N. Yu; Kulagina, M. M.; Ustinov, V. M.

    2015-11-01

    A type-II GaAs/GaAlAs short-period superlattice (SPSL) used as an electro-optic medium for the spectral range 820-850 nm is studied in a vertical microcavity geometry. SPSL is sandwiched between two GaAlAs distributed Bragg reflectors. Optical power reflectance (OR) spectra are measured as a function of applied reverse bias at different tilt angles and temperatures. All spectra reveal a blue shift of the reflectivity dip upon applied voltage which evidences a negative electrorefraction of the electro-optic medium. The shift enhances up to ˜0.6 nm once the exciton resonance is brought close to the wavelength of the reflectivity dip. As opposed to those modulators based on quantum-confined Stark effect, no increased absorption is observed at an applied bias, because the integrated intensity of the reflectivity dip in the OR spectra is virtually constant. This indicates a low absorption loss with applied bias and consequently a high potential for the increased dynamic range of the related modulator.

  16. On the Nature of the Bright Short-Period X-Ray Source in the Circinus Galaxy Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Wu, Kinwah; Tennant, Allyn F.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Ghosh, Kajal K.

    2004-01-01

    The spectrum and light curve of the bright X-ray source CG X-1 in the field of the Circinus galaxy are reexamined. Previous analyses have concluded that the source is an accreting black hole of mass > or approx. 50 solar masses although it has been noted that the light curve resembles that of an AM Herculis system. Here we show that the short period and an assumed main-sequence companion constrain the mass of the companion to less than 1 solar mass. Furthermore, a possible eclipse seen during one of the Chandra observations and a subsequent XMM-Newton observation constrain the mass of the compact object to less than 60 solar masses. If such a system lies in the Circinus galaxy, then the accreting object must either radiate anisotropically or strongly violate the Eddington limit. Even if the emission is beamed, then the companion star that intercepts this flux during eclipse will be driven out of thermal equilibrium and evaporate within approx. 10(exp 3) yr. We find that the observations cannot rule out an AM Herculis system in the Milky Way and that such a system can account for the variations seen in the light curve.

  17. On the Nature of the Bright Short-Period X-ray Source in the Circinus Galaxy Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Wu, Kinwah; Swartz, Douglas A.; Ghosh, Kajal K.

    2003-01-01

    The spectrum and light curve of the bright X-ray source CG X-1 in the field of the Circinus galaxy are re-examined. Previous analyses have concluded that the source is an accreting black hole of mass approx. greater than 50 solar masses although it was noted that the light curve resembles that of an AM Her system. Here we show that the short period and an assumed main sequence companion constrain the mass of the companion to less than 1 solar mass. Further a possible eclipse seen during one of the Chandra observations and a subsequent XMM-Newton observation constrains the mass of the compact object to less than 60 solar masses. If such a system lies in the Circinus galaxy, then the accreting object must either radiate anisotropically or strongly violate the Eddington limit. Even if the emission is beamed, then the companion star which intercepts this flux during eclipse will be driven out of thermal equilibrium and evaporate within approx. 10(exp 3) yr. We find that the observations cannot rule out an AM Her system in the Milky Way and that such a system can account for the variations seen in the light curve.

  18. Predicted detection rates of regional-scale meteorite impacts on Mars with the InSight short-period seismometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teanby, N. A.

    2015-08-01

    In 2016 NASA will launch the InSight discovery-class mission, which aims to study the detailed internal structure of Mars for the first time. Short- and long-period seismometers form a major component of InSight's payload and have the potential to detect seismic waves generated by meteorite impacts. Large globally detectable impact events producing craters with diameters of ∼ 100 m have been investigated previously and are likely to be rare (Teanby, N.A., Wookey, J. [2011]. Phys. Earth Planet. Int. 186, 70-80), but smaller impacts producing craters in the 0.5-20 m range are more numerous and potentially occur sufficiently often to be detectable on regional scales (≲1000 km). At these distances, seismic waves will have significant high frequency content and will be suited to detection with InSight's short-period seismometer SEIS-SP. In this paper I estimate the current martian crater production function from observations of new craters (Malin, M.C. et al. [2006]. Science 314, 1573-1577; Daubar, I.J. et al. [2013]. Icarus 225, 506-516), model results (Williams, J.P., Pathare, A.V., Aharonson, O. [2014]. Icarus 235, 23-36), and standard isochrons (Hartmann, W.K. [2005]. Icarus 174, 294-320). These impact rates are combined with an empirical relation between impact energy, source-receiver distance, and peak seismogram amplitude, derived from a compilation of seismic recordings of terrestrial and lunar impacts, chemical explosions, and nuclear tests. The resulting peak seismogram amplitude scaling law contains significant uncertainty, but can be used to predict impact detection rates. I estimate that for a short-period instrument, with a noise spectral density of 10-8 ms-2 Hz-1/2 in the 1-16 Hz frequency band, approximately 0.1-30 regional impacts per year should be detectable with a nominal value of 1-3 impacts per year. Therefore, small regional impacts are likely to be a viable source of seismic energy for probing Mars' crustal and upper mantle structure. This is

  19. First multi-colour photometric study of the short period K-type contact binary NSVS 2701634

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martignoni, M.; Acerbi, F.; Barani, C.

    2016-07-01

    We present the first CCD sets of complete light curves for the W Ursae Majoris W-type system NSVS 2701634. The observations were performed in the B, V and Ic bands using the 0.25 m telescope of the "Stazione Astronomica Betelgeuse" Italy, during 8 nights in April 2015. From our observations we were able to confirm and revise the short-period (0.24 days) variation found by Shaw and collaborators in their online list Using our 12 times of minimum light, the orbital period variations of NSVS 2701634 are studied for the first time. The general trend of the (O-C) curve reveals that its period is varying by a downward parabola that means that period is decreasing, this fact could be explained by a mass transfer between the components of the system. The light curves were modelled using the Wilson-Devinney code and the elements obtained from this analysis are used to compute the physical parameters of the system in order to study its evolutionary status. A reasonable fit of the synthetic light curves of the data indicated that NSVS 2701634 is an late-type (K3 -K4+K6) contact binary system of W-Subtype of the W Ursae Majoris systems, with a mass ratio of q = 2.60, a degree of contact factor f = 15.3% and inclination i = 72°. The light curves show asymmetries at the maxima that are fitted adding an hot spot on the surface of the more massive star, known as inverse O'Connell effect. From an estimation of the absolute dimensions of the system and from the logM-logL diagram, it is seen that both components of NSVS 2701634 follow the general pattern of the W subtype W Ursae Majoris systems.

  20. A short period of high-intensity interval training improves skeletal muscle mitochondrial function and pulmonary oxygen uptake kinetics.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Peter M; Jacobs, Robert A; Bonne, Thomas; Flück, Daniela; Bangsbo, Jens; Lundby, Carsten

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether improvements in pulmonary oxygen uptake (V̇o2) kinetics following a short period of high-intensity training (HIT) would be associated with improved skeletal muscle mitochondrial function. Ten untrained male volunteers (age 26 ± 2 yr; mean ± SD) performed six HIT sessions (8-12 × 60 s at incremental test peak power; 271 ± 52 W) over a 2-wk period. Before and after the HIT period, V̇o2 kinetics was modeled during moderate-intensity cycling (110 ± 19 W). Mitochondrial function was assessed with high-resolution respirometry (HRR), and maximal activities of oxidative enzymes citrate synthase (CS) and cytochrome c oxidase (COX) were accordingly determined. In response to HIT, V̇o2 kinetics became faster (τ: 20.4 ± 4.4 vs. 28.9 ± 6.1 s; P < 0.01) and fatty acid oxidation (ETFP) and leak respiration (LN) both became elevated (P < 0.05). Activity of CS and COX did not increase in response to training. Both before and after the HIT period, fast V̇o2 kinetics (low τ values) was associated with large values for ETFP, electron transport system capacity (ETS), and electron flow specific to complex II (CIIP) (P < 0.05). Collectively, these findings support that selected measures of mitochondrial function obtained with HRR are important for fast V̇o2 kinetics and better markers than maximal oxidative enzyme activity in describing the speed of the V̇o2 response during moderate-intensity exercise. PMID:26846547

  1. Dearth of short-period Neptunian exoplanets: A desert in period-mass and period-radius planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazeh, T.; Holczer, T.; Faigler, S.

    2016-05-01

    A few studies have reported a significant dearth of exoplanets with Neptune mass and radius with orbital periods below 2-4 d. This cannot be explained by observational biases because many Neptunian planets with longer orbital periods have been detected. The existence of this desert is similar to the appearance of the so-called brown-dwarf desert that suggests different formation mechanisms of planets and stellar companions with short orbital periods. Similarly, the Neptunian desert might indicate different mechanisms of formation and evolution for hot Jupiters and short-period super-Earths. We here follow a previous study and examine the location and shape of the desert in both the period-mass and period-radius planes, using the currently available large samples of planets. The desert in the period-mass plane has a relatively sharp upper edge, with a planetary mass that is inversely proportional to the planetary orbital period, while the lower, somewhat blurred, boundary is located along masses that are apparently linearly proportional to the period. The desert in the period-radius plane of the transiting planets is less clear. It seems as if the radius along the upper boundary is inversely proportional to the period to the power of one-third, while the lower boundary shows a radius that is proportional to the period to the power of two-thirds. The combination of the two upper bounds of the desert, in the period-mass and period-radius planes, yields a planetary mass-radius relation of Rp/RJup ≃ (1.2 ± 0.3)(Mp/MJup)0.27 ± 0.11 for 0.1 ≲ Mp/MJup ≲ 1. The derived shape of the desert, which might extend up to periods of 5-10 d, could shed some light on the formation and evolution of close-in planets.

  2. Large-scale gravity wave influences on the propagation of short-period gravity waves to higher altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossert, K.; Fritts, D. C.; Pautet, P. D.; Taylor, M. J.; Williams, B. P.; Criddle, N.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the impacts of large-scale gravity waves (periods of multiple hours) on propagation environments for smaller-scale gravity waves (periods less than an hour). Large-scale gravity waves account for wind and temperature perturbations that can modulate the large-scale flow and either enhance or suppress the propagation of short-period waves to higher altitudes, thus also modulating their vertical transport of momentum. Specific cases are discussed using data from the DEEPWAVE mission, which took place from Christchurch, New Zealand in June and July 2014. The measurements used in this investigation utilize sodium and Rayleigh lidars that were aboard the NSF Gulfstream V research aircraft, as well as temperatures from Advanced Mesospheric Temperature Mappers (AMTMs) aboard the aircraft and stationed at the Lauder research station in New Zealand. The AMTM allows for temperatures to be derived from hydroxyl layer emissions. The Rayleigh lidar allows for temperatures to be measured vertically from ~25-50km. The sodium lidar allows for sodium density perturbations to be measured from ~80-100km. The combination of these instruments allows for more complete assessments of large-scale wave activity (hundreds of km) as well as smaller scale wave events (<100 km). The temperature measurements from both the lidars and AMTMs allow for the phase of the gravity waves at given locations and times to be determined. An example of an event is given in the attached keogram figure for June 21-22, 2014 from the Lauder AMTM. This night shows a gravity wave that appears to be propagating from ~10:00-12:30 UT in a distinct phase of a larger scale wave with a period in the range of 4-6 hours. Using case studies such as this, we aim to further understand the influences of such dynamics in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere.

  3. Doing more with short period data: Determining magnitudes from clipped and over-run seismic data at Mount St. Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellik, John J., II

    How can we calculate earthquake magnitudes when the signal is clipped and over-run? When a volcano is very active, the seismic record may saturate (i.e., the full amplitude of the signal is not recorded) or be over-run (i.e., the end of one event is covered by the start of a new event). The duration, and sometimes the amplitude, of an earthquake signal are necessary for determining event magnitudes; thus, it may be impossible to calculate earthquake magnitudes when a volcano is very active. This problem is most likely to occur at volcanoes with limited networks of short period seismometers. This study outlines two methods for calculating earthquake magnitudes when events are clipped and over-run. The first method entails modeling the shape of earthquake codas as a power law function and extrapolating duration from the decay of the function. The second method draws relations between clipped duration (i.e., the length of time a signal is clipped) and the full duration. These methods allow for magnitudes to be determined within 0.2 to 0.4 units of magnitude. This error is within the range of analyst hand-picks and is within the acceptable limits of uncertainty when quickly quantifying volcanic energy release during volcanic crises. Most importantly, these estimates can be made when data are clipped or over-run. These methods were developed with data from the initial stages of the 2004-2008 eruption at Mount St. Helens. Mount St. Helens is a well-studied volcano with many instruments placed at varying distances from the vent. This fact makes the 2004-2008 eruption a good place to calibrate and refine methodologies that can be applied to volcanoes with limited networks.

  4. Production of well-matured compost from night-soil sludge by an extremely short period of thermophilic composting.

    PubMed

    Nakasaki, Kiyohiko; Ohtaki, Akihito; Takemoto, Minoru; Fujiwara, Shunrokuro

    2011-03-01

    The effect of various operational conditions on the decomposition of organic material during the composting of night-soil treatment sludge was quantitatively examined. The optimum composting conditions were found to be a temperature of ca. 60°C and an initial pH value of 8. Rapid decomposition of organic matter ceased by the sixth day of composting under these optimum conditions, and the final value of the cumulative emission of carbon (E(C)), which represents the degree of organic matter decomposition, was less than 40%, indicating that the sludge contained only a small amount of easily degradable organic material. A plant growth assay using Komatsuna (Brassica campestris L. var. rapiferafroug) in a 1/5000a standard cultivation pot was then conducted for the compost at various degrees of organic matter decomposition: the raw composting material, the final compost obtained on day 6, and the 2 intermediate compost products (i.e., E(C)=10% and 20%). It was found that the larger the E(C), the greater the yield of Komatsuna growth. It was also found that 6 days of composting is sufficient to promote Komatsuna growth at the standard loading level, which is equivalent to a 1.5 g N/pot, since the promotion effect was as high as that obtained using chemical fertilizer. It can therefore be concluded that well-matured compost could be obtained in a short period of time (i.e., as early as 6 days), when night-soil sludge is composted under optimum conditions. PMID:21134735

  5. Quasi-periodic VLF emissions with short-period modulation and their relationship to whistlers: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titova, Elena; Demekhov, Andrei; Kozlovsky, Alexander; Manninen, Jyrki; Pasmanik, Dmitry

    We study properties of quasiperiodic (QP) VLF emissions recorded on December 24, 2011 during the VLF campaign in Northern Finland. The main attention is paid to interrelationships between different characteristic periods in the QP spectra. In particular, we analyze regular variations in the QP repetition intervals (1 - 10 min) during the event from 15:30 to 22 UT, their changes during substorms, and short periodic (several-second) modulation observed within separate QP elements. We explained the variations of periods of QP emissions in terms of the model of auto-oscillation regime of the cyclotron instability in the magnetosphere. During the considered event lasting about 7 hours we observed a regular increase in the time intervals between the QP elements. We relate this increase with weakening of the magnetospheric source of energetic electrons. Significant variations in the QP period occurred during substorms. These variations can be due to a substorm-related increase in the energetic-electron flux and/or due to the precipitation of these electrons into the ionosphere which changes the reflection coefficient of VLF waves. We analyze the fine structure of QP element spectra and reveal the periods related to the time scales of guided propagation of whistler-mode waves along the magnetic field line, which suggests that ducted propagation regime took place for the QP emissions. The periods were about 6--9 s for frequencies 3.5--1.2 kHz respectively, which was similar to the period of almost simultaneously observed two-hop whistlers In the low-frequency part of QP spectra periodic emissions with меньшими periods of about 3 s were observed. Analysis of fine structure of QP elements shows that their formation is affected by both linear effects (i.e., group-velocity dispersion) and nonlinear effects related

  6. The origin and evolution of short-period Miras in the solar neighborhood: Constraints on the life cycle of old stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.

    1994-01-01

    The spatial distribution of the short-period (P less than 300 days) oxygen-rich Miras in the solar neighborhood can be fitted with an exponential scale height above the Galactic plane of about 600 pc. Using the Gliese catalog of local main-sequence stars, we estimate that the density of suitable G-type progenitor dwarfs within 20 pc of the Sun for these short-period Miras is 6 x 10(exp -4)/cu pc. The portion of the H-R diagram near the main-sequence turnoff of these velocity-selected Gliese stars is intermediate between that of the old open cluster NGC 188 and that of the metal-rich globular cluster, 47 Tuc. We infer that the main-sequence progenitors of the short-period Miras have masses near 1.0 solar mass, and we estimate that these Miras have ages approximately 9 x 10(exp 9). We also identify a few old disk red giants in the neighborhood of the Sun. On the basis of very limited information, we estimate that the total amount of mass lost from these stars during their first ascent up the red giant branch is less than or equal to 0.1 solar mass. We derive a duration of the short-period Mira phase of close to 5 x 10(exp 5) yr. This estimate for the duration of the short period Mira phase is longer than our estimate of 2 x 10(exp 5) yr for the duration of the Mira phase for stars with periods longer than 300 days. From their infrared colors, we estimate a typical mass-loss rate from the short-period Miras of approximately 1 x 10(exp -7) solar mass/yr.

  7. Microseismicity and b-values of the Wabash Valley Intraplate Seismic Zone from short-period phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conder, J. A.; Milliron, K.; Zhu, L.

    2014-12-01

    Two phased arrays of 9 short-period stations each are currently recording in the Wabash Valley Seismic Zone (WVSZ) as part of the EarthScope Wabash FlexArray project. The phased arrays aim to address the level of microseismicity produced by the intraplate seismic zone. Although seismic hazard maps of the U.S. Midwest are dominated by the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ), the WVSZ has released 40% more seismic energy than the NMSZ over the last half century with four events larger than M5 and only one in the NMSZ reaching that threshold. A comparison of event frequency statistics suggests two markedly different systems. The NMSZ exhibits b-values near unity, but the WVSZ exhibits much smaller b-values in the 0.6-0.7 range. Deviations less than unity may be controlled through crack geometry and/or greater shear stresses possibly indicating a time-dependent, or migrating, behavior in mid-continent. Alternatively, it may be the case that the low b-values are simply a reflection of less complete catalog than the NMSZ. A previous short-term microseismicity study of the WVSZ shows a dearth of non-anthropogenic sources in the Wabash. The phased array near the central portion of the WVSZ largely confirms the previously noted lack of substantial natural seismicity along the central portion of the fault system and the associated low b-values. However, the phased array near the southern termination of the fault system shows significantly more activity. Importantly, the largest events from the Wabash, including the 2008 M5.4 Mt. Carmel and the 1968 M5.5 Harrisburg events occurred near the northern and southern ends of the fault system. The phased arrays seem to indicate different portions of the fault system yielding different levels of activity. As the catalogs become more complete, there is a preliminary suggestion that the anomalously low b-values for the Wabash do not denote a system under significantly larger stresses, but rather a conflation of regions along-strike of the

  8. Shear wave velocity and attenuation structure for the shallow crust of the southern Korean peninsula from short period Rayleigh waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Heeok; Jang, Yong-seok; Lee, Jung Mo; Moon, Wooil M.; Baag, Chang-Eob; Kim, Ki Young; Jo, Bong Gon

    2007-01-01

    We analyzed the short period Rayleigh waves from the first crustal-scale seismic refraction experiment in the Korean peninsula, KCRUST2002, to determine the shear wave velocity and attenuation structure of the uppermost 1 km of the crust in different tectonic zones of the Korean peninsula and to examine if this can be related to the surface geology of the study area. The experiment was conducted with two large explosive sources along a 300-km long profile in 2002. The seismic traces, recorded on 170 vertical-component, 2-Hz portable seismometers, show distinct Rayleigh waves in the period range between 0.2 s and 1.2 s, which are easily recognizable up to 30-60 km from the sources. The seismic profiles, which traverse three tectonic regions (Gyeonggi massif, Okcheon fold belt and Yeongnam massif), were divided into five subsections based on tectonic boundaries as well as lithology. Group and phase velocities for the five subsections obtained by a continuous wavelet transform method and a slant stack method, respectively, were inverted for the shear wave models. We obtained shear wave velocity models up to a depth of 1.0 km. Overall, the shear wave velocity of the Okcheon fold belt is lower than that of the Gyeonggi and Yeongnam massifs by ˜ 0.4 km/s in the shallowmost 0.2 km and by 0.2 km/s at depths below 0.2 km. Attenuation coefficients, determined from the decay of the fundamental mode Rayleigh waves, were used to obtain the shear wave attenuation structures for three subsections (one for each of the three different tectonic regions). We obtained an average value of Qβ- 1 in the upper 0.5 km for each subsection. Qβ- 1 for the Okcheon fold belt (˜ 0.026) is approximately three times larger than Qβ- 1 for the massif areas (˜ 0.008). The low shear wave velocity in the Okcheon fold belt is consistent with the high attenuation in this region.

  9. A Correlation method for detection short-period perturbations in the ionosphere, from a large network of GPS receivers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Garrison, J. L.; Haase, J.; Calais, E.

    2006-12-01

    A technique has been developed for detecting small, short period, traveling perturbations in the ionosphere and estimating their propagation speed and direction from ground-based GPS data. These perturbations can result from atmosphere-ionosphere coupling following an earthquake, tsunami, or large human induced disturbances, such as rocket launches or nuclear weapons tests. These disturbances are often, however, observed at times in which no such source can be identified. The correlation method increases the signal to noise ratio of small amplitude signals, allowing the detection of weaker disturbances. Time series of the Integral Electron Content (IEC), generated from many ground-based dual-frequency GPS receivers, are passed through a filter with a pass band of (typically) 3-10 minutes. Cross-correlations between every pair of IEC time-series, from the same GPS satellite, viewed at multiple ground stations, are used to test for the presence of a disturbance, and measure the propagation delay between the two sub-ionosphere points (SIP's) corresponding to each pair of receivers. A two-dimensional plane wave model is fit to the set of delay measurements from all of the time series having correlation powers above a threshold. A change of variables is shown to convert this model to a linear one, allowing the use of linear least squares estimation methods. The inversion of the linear model is found to be very fast, numerically, allowing it to be used to process large data sets efficiently. It could, thus, be applied autonomously to process large GPS datasets efficiently, for statistical studies of the occurrence of these disturbances. A technique is developed to remove the effects of the time-varying satellite motion and to reconstruct the waveform of the disturbance that would have been observed at a fixed station in the ionosphere. Several post-processing tests are derived to test the velocity estimate accuracy and validity. Two weeks of data, one in the summer (5

  10. Transport of marked pebbles in short periods of time on a coarse clastic beach (Marina di Pisa, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoni, D.; Ciavola, P.; Grottoli, E.; Sarti, G.

    2012-04-01

    in short periods of time.

  11. Short periodical oscillations of pole coordinates determined by the Main Astronomical Observatory of the UAS from the Lageos laser ranging data in the MERIT campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosek, W.; Kolaczek, B.; Nurutdinov, K. Kh.; Taradii, V. K.; Tsesis, M. L.

    Pole coordinate variations in the MERIT campaign were computed from Lageos laser ranging data by the Kiev Geodynamics Program on the basis of pure numerical integration techniques, and they were compared with the pole coordinate variations computed by the Center for Space Researches (CSR), U.S.A. Short periodical variations of the pole coordinate variations have been analyzed.

  12. Dynamics of the Bingham Canyon mine landslides from long-period and short-period seismic signal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibert, C.; Ekstrom, G.; Stark, C. P.

    2013-12-01

    On April 10, 2013, one of the largest landslides observed in North America occurred at the Bingham Canyon copper mine near Salt Lake City, Utah. Seismic waves recorded by the Global Seismographic Network suggest that two major slope failures occurred: at 03:31UT and at 05:06UT with long-period surface-wave magnitudes of Msw~5.1 and Msw~4.9 respectively. The combined debris of these landslides has been estimated at 150 million tonnes. We used long-period surface wave data to invert for the Landslide Force History (LFH) of each of the two events, allowing us to infer the trajectories of landslide motion and their average dynamic properties [1]. These inferred runout paths are broadly consistent with those deduced from analysis of the landslide scar using air photographs, satellite imagery and differential topographic maps. However, the total mass obtained from the LFH analysis is less consistent: using the observed runout distances for calibration [1], our inversions suggest a total landslide mass 50% less than that reported by the mining company. A further complexity, possibly related, is revealed by analysis of the short-period seismic waves, which indicates that the 05:06UT detection is in fact the composite signal of two distinct landslide seismic sources. Usually, high-frequency (HF, >1Hz) seismic signals generated by landslides are hard to observe because of their strong scattering and attenuation with distance. However, a very dense network of broadband seismic stations exists in the vicinity of the Bingham Canyon mine. Thus, we were able to compare the LFH, long-period and HF seismic signals for both events. Joint analysis of the inverted trajectory and the HF seismic signal recorded at the closest stations shows that, for the first 03:31UT event, a backward movement of the mass center started just after a final burst in the very high-frequency (VHF, >20Hz) signal. After this final burst, a tremor-like signal is observed in the VHF. This tremor-like signal

  13. Helical plasma thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beklemishev, A. D.

    2015-10-01

    A new scheme of plasma thruster is proposed. It is based on axial acceleration of rotating magnetized plasmas in magnetic field with helical corrugation. The idea is that the propellant ionization zone can be placed into the local magnetic well, so that initially the ions are trapped. The E × B rotation is provided by an applied radial electric field that makes the setup similar to a magnetron discharge. Then, from the rotating plasma viewpoint, the magnetic wells of the helically corrugated field look like axially moving mirror traps. Specific shaping of the corrugation can allow continuous acceleration of trapped plasma ions along the magnetic field by diamagnetic forces. The accelerated propellant is expelled through the expanding field of magnetic nozzle. By features of the acceleration principle, the helical plasma thruster may operate at high energy densities but requires a rather high axial magnetic field, which places it in the same class as the VASIMR® rocket engine.

  14. Helical screw viscometer

    DOEpatents

    Aubert, J.H.; Chapman, R.N.; Kraynik, A.M.

    1983-06-30

    A helical screw viscometer for the measurement of the viscosity of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids comprising an elongated cylindrical container closed by end caps defining a circular cylindrical cavity within the container, a cylindrical rotor member having a helical screw or ribbon flight carried by the outer periphery thereof rotatably carried within the cavity whereby the fluid to be measured is confined in the cavity filling the space between the rotor and the container wall. The rotor member is supported by axle members journaled in the end caps, one axle extending through one end cap and connectable to a drive source. A pair of longitudinally spaced ports are provided through the wall of the container in communication with the cavity and a differential pressure meter is connected between the ports for measuring the pressure drop caused by the rotation of the helical screw rotor acting on the confined fluid for computing viscosity.

  15. Helical plasma thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Beklemishev, A. D.

    2015-10-15

    A new scheme of plasma thruster is proposed. It is based on axial acceleration of rotating magnetized plasmas in magnetic field with helical corrugation. The idea is that the propellant ionization zone can be placed into the local magnetic well, so that initially the ions are trapped. The E × B rotation is provided by an applied radial electric field that makes the setup similar to a magnetron discharge. Then, from the rotating plasma viewpoint, the magnetic wells of the helically corrugated field look like axially moving mirror traps. Specific shaping of the corrugation can allow continuous acceleration of trapped plasma ions along the magnetic field by diamagnetic forces. The accelerated propellant is expelled through the expanding field of magnetic nozzle. By features of the acceleration principle, the helical plasma thruster may operate at high energy densities but requires a rather high axial magnetic field, which places it in the same class as the VASIMR{sup ®} rocket engine.

  16. Structural evidence for enhanced polarization in a commensurate short-period BaTiO3/SrTiO3 superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, W.; Jiang, J. C.; Pan, X. Q.; Haeni, J. H.; Li, Y. L.; Chen, L. Q.; Schlom, D. G.; Neaton, J. B.; Rabe, K. M.; Jia, Q. X.

    2006-08-01

    A short-period (BaTiO3)6/(SrTiO3)5 superlattice was characterized by x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The superlattice is epitaxially oriented with the c axes of BaTiO3 and SrTiO3 normal to the (001) surface of the SrTiO3 substrate. Despite the large in-plane lattice mismatch between BaTiO3 and SrTiO3 (˜2.2%), the superlattice interfaces were found to be nearly commensurate. The crystallographic c /a ratio of the superlattice was measured and the results agree quantitatively with first-principles calculations and phase-field modeling. The agreement supports the validity of the enhanced spontaneous polarization predicted for short-period BaTiO3/SrTiO3 superlattices.

  17. Band gap tuning and optical absorption in type-II InAs/GaSb mid infrared short period superlattices: 14 bands K Dot-Operator p study

    SciTech Connect

    AbuEl-Rub, Khaled M.

    2012-09-06

    The MBE growth of short-period InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice structures, varied around 20.5 A InAs/24 A GaSb were [J. Applied physics, 96, 2580 (2004)] carried out by Haugan et al. These SLs were designed to produce devices with an optimum mid-infrared photoresponse and a sharpest photoresponse cutoff. We have used a realistic and reliable 14-band k.p formalism description of the superlattice electronic band structure to calculate the absorption coefficient in such short-period InAs/GaSb type-II superlattices. The parameters for this formalism are known from fitting to independent experiments for the bulk materials. The band-gap energies are obtained without any fitting parameters, and are in good agreement with experimental data.

  18. Detection of lateral composition modulation in a (InAs){sub n}/(GaAs){sub n} short period superlattice on InP by magnetoexciton spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, E.D.; Mirecki-Millunchick, J.; Follstaedt, D.; Hafich, M.; Lee, S.; Reno, J.; Twesten, R.; Zhang, Y.; Mascarenhas, A.

    1997-03-01

    An experimental signature for detecting spontaneous lateral composition modulation in a (InAs){sub n}/(GaAs){sub n} short period superlattice on a InP substrate based on magnetoexciton spectroscopy is presented. The authors find by aligning the magnetic field in three crystallographic directions, one parallel to and the other two perpendicular to the composition modulation direction, that the magnetoexciton shifts are anisotropic and are a good indicator for the presence of composition modulation.

  19. Initial Results from Coaxial Helicity Injection Experiments in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, R.; Jarboe, T.R.; Mueller, D.; Schaffer, M.J.; Maqueda, R.; Nelson, B.A.; Sabbagh, S.; Bell, M.; Ewig, R.; Fredrickson, E.; Gates, D.; Hosea, J.; Ji, H.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.M.; Kugel, H.; Maingi, R.; Menard, J.; Ono, M.; Orvis, D.; Paolette, F.; Paul, S.; Peng, M.; Skinner, C.H.; Wilgen, W.; Zweben, S.; and the NSTX Research Team

    2001-05-10

    Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) has been investigated on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). Initial experiments produced 130 kA of toroidal current without the use of the central solenoid. The corresponding injector current was 20 kA. Discharges with pulse lengths up to 130 ms have been produced.

  20. Short-period volcanic gas precursors to phreatic eruptions: Insights from Poás Volcano, Costa Rica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    de Moor, Maarten; Aiuppa, Alessandro; Pacheco, Javier; Avard, Geoffroy; Kern, Christoph; Liuzzo, Marco; Martinez, Maria; Giudice, Gaetano; Fischer, Tobias P.

    2016-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions involving interaction with water are amongst the most violent and unpredictable geologic phenomena on Earth. Phreatic eruptions are exceptionally difficult to forecast by traditional geophysical techniques. Here we report on short-term precursory variations in gas emissions related to phreatic blasts at Poás volcano, Costa Rica, as measured with an in situ multiple gas analyzer that was deployed at the edge of the erupting lake. Gas emitted from this hyper-acid crater lake approaches magmatic values of SO2/CO2 1–6 days prior to eruption. The SO2 flux derived from magmatic degassing through the lake is measureable by differential optical absorption spectrometry (sporadic campaign measurements), which allows us to constrain lake gas output and input for the major gas species during eruptive and non-eruptive periods. We can further calculate power supply to the hydrothermal system using volatile mass balance and thermodynamics, which indicates that the magmatic heat flux into the shallow hydrothermal system increases from ∼27 MW during quiescence to ∼59 MW during periods of phreatic events. These transient pulses of gas and heat from the deeper magmatic system generate both phreatic eruptions and the observed short-term changes in gas composition, because at high gas flux scrubbing of sulfur by the hydrothermal system is both kinetically and thermodynamically inhibited whereas CO2gas is always essentially inert in hyperacid conditions. Thus, the SO2/CO2 of lake emissions approaches magmatic values as gas and power supply to the sub-limnic hydrothermal system increase, vaporizing fluids and priming the hydrothermal system for eruption. Our results suggest that high-frequency real-time gas monitoring could provide useful short-term eruptive precursors at volcanoes prone to phreatic explosions.

  1. Helically linked mirror arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Ranjan, P.

    1986-08-01

    A scheme is described for helical linking of mirror sections, which endeavors to combine the better features of toroidal and mirror devices by eliminating the longitudinal loss of mirror machines, having moderately high average ..beta.. and steady state operation. This scheme is aimed at a device, with closed magnetic surfaces having rotational transform for equilibrium, one or more axisymmetric straight sections for reduced radial loss, a simple geometrical axis for the links and an overall positive magnetic well depth for stability. We start by describing several other attempts at linking of mirror sections, made both in the past and the present. Then a description of our helically linked mirror scheme is given. This example has three identical straight sections connected by three sections having helical geometric axes. A theoretical analysis of the magnetic field and single-particle orbits in them leads to the conclusion that most of the passing particles would be confined in the device and they would have orbits independent of pitch angle under certain conditions. Numerical results are presented, which agree well with the theoretical results as far as passing particle orbits are concerned.

  2. MOVPE growth of short-period superlattices of AlP-GaP and its application for light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morii, A.; Okagawa, H.; Hara, K.; Yoshino, J.; Kukimoto, K.

    1992-11-01

    Short-period superlattices of AlP-GaP with different periods have been grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy using triethylaluminum, triethylgallium and phosphine as the sources, and they have been characterized by X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence measurements. As a result, it has been found that the samples of the present study are better in heterointerface abruptness than those of the previous study, where trimethylaluminum and trimethylgallium were used as Al and Ga sources. Light-emitting diodes consisting of the AlP-GaP superlattices have been fabricated as an application of this superlattice system.

  3. Hydrodynamic interactions between rotating helices.

    PubMed

    Kim, MunJu; Powers, Thomas R

    2004-06-01

    Escherichia coli bacteria use rotating helical flagella to swim. At this scale, viscous effects dominate inertia, and there are significant hydrodynamic interactions between nearby helices. These interactions cause the flagella to bundle during the "runs" of bacterial chemotaxis. Here we use slender-body theory to solve for the flow fields generated by rigid helices rotated by stationary motors. We determine how the hydrodynamic forces and torques depend on phase and phase difference, show that rigid helices driven at constant torque do not synchronize, and solve for the flows. We also use symmetry arguments based on kinematic reversibility to show that for two rigid helices rotating with zero phase difference, there is no time-averaged attractive or repulsive force between the helices. PMID:15244620

  4. Conservation of helicity in superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedia, Hridesh; Kleckner, Dustin; Proment, Davide; Irvine, William T. M.

    2015-03-01

    Helicity arises as a special conserved quantity in ideal fluids, in addition to energy, momentum and angular momentum. As a measure of the knottedness of vortex lines, Helicity provides an important tool for studying a wide variety of physical systems such as plasmas and turbulent fluids. Superfluids flow without resistance just like ideal (Euler) fluids, making it natural to ask whether their knottedness is similarly preserved. We address the conservation of helicity in superfluids theoretically and examine its consequences in numerical simulations.

  5. Conditioner for a helically transported electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Changbiao.

    1992-05-01

    The kinetic theory is developed to investigate a conditioner for a helically transported electron beam. Linear expressions for axial velocity spread are derived. Numerical simulation is used to check the theoretical results and examine nonlinear aspects of the conditioning process. The results show that in the linear regime the action of the beam conditioner on a pulsed beam mainly depends on the phase at which the beam enters the conditioner and depends only slightly on the operating wavelength. In the nonlinear regime, however, the action of the conditioner strongly depends on the operating wavelength and only slightly upon the entrance phase. For a properly chosen operating wavelength, a little less than the electron's relativistic cyclotron wavelength, the conditioner can decrease the axial velocity spread of a pulsed beam down to less than one-third of its initial value.

  6. Conditioner for a helically transported electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Changbiao

    1992-05-01

    The kinetic theory is developed to investigate a conditioner for a helically transported electron beam. Linear expressions for axial velocity spread are derived. Numerical simulation is used to check the theoretical results and examine nonlinear aspects of the conditioning process. The results show that in the linear regime the action of the beam conditioner on a pulsed beam mainly depends on the phase at which the beam enters the conditioner and depends only slightly on the operating wavelength. In the nonlinear regime, however, the action of the conditioner strongly depends on the operating wavelength and only slightly upon the entrance phase. For a properly chosen operating wavelength, a little less than the electron`s relativistic cyclotron wavelength, the conditioner can decrease the axial velocity spread of a pulsed beam down to less than one-third of its initial value.

  7. Conditioner for a helically transported electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.

    1992-05-01

    The kinetic theory is developed to investigate a conditioner for a helically imported electron beam. Linear expressions for axial velocity spread are derived. Numerical simulation is used to check the theoretical results and examine nonlinear aspects of the conditioning process. The results show that in the linear regime the action of the beam conditioner on a pulsed beam mainly depends on the phase at which the beam enters the conditioner and depends only slightly on the operating wavelength. In the nonlinear regime, however, the action of the conditioner strongly depends on the operating wavelength and only slightly upon the entrance phase. For a properly chosen operating wavelength, a little less than the electron's relativistic cyclotron wavelength, the conditioner can decrease the axial velocity spread of a pulsed beam down to less than one-third of its initial value.

  8. Conditioner for a helically transported electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.

    1992-05-01

    The kinetic theory is developed to investigate a conditioner for a helically imported electron beam. Linear expressions for axial velocity spread are derived. Numerical simulation is used to check the theoretical results and examine nonlinear aspects of the conditioning process. The results show that in the linear regime the action of the beam conditioner on a pulsed beam mainly depends on the phase at which the beam enters the conditioner and depends only slightly on the operating wavelength. In the nonlinear regime, however, the action of the conditioner strongly depends on the operating wavelength and only slightly upon the entrance phase. For a properly chosen operating wavelength, a little less than the electron`s relativistic cyclotron wavelength, the conditioner can decrease the axial velocity spread of a pulsed beam down to less than one-third of its initial value.

  9. The Effect of an Exercise Program in Conjunction With Short-Period Patellar Taping on Pain, Electromyogram Activity, and Muscle Strength in Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Defne; Callaghan, Michael James; Ozkan, Huseyin; Ozdag, Fatih; Atay, Ozgur Ahmet; Yuksel, Inci; Doral, Mahmut Nedim

    2010-01-01

    Background: McConnell recommended that patellar tape be kept on all day, until patients learn how to activate their vastus medialis obliquus (VMO) during an exercise program. This application may pose problems because prolonged taping may be inadvisable for some patients or even contraindicated owing to skin discomfort, irritation, or allergic reaction. Hypothesis: Wearing patellofemoral tape for a shorter duration during an exercise program would be just as beneficial as a prolonged taping application. Study Design: Prospective cohort. Methods: Twelve patients and 16 healthy people participated. Patients underwent short-period patellar taping plus an exercise program for 3 months. Numeric pain rating, muscle strength of the knee extensors, and electromyogram activity of the vastus lateralis and VMO were evaluated. Results: There were significant differences in electromyogram activity (P = .04) and knee extensor muscle strength (P = .03) between involved and uninvolved sides before treatment. After treatment, pain scores decreased, and there were no significant differences between involved and uninvolved sides in electromyogram activity (P = .68) and knee extensor strength (P = .62). Before treatment, mean VMO activation started significantly later than that of vastus lateralis, as compared with the matched healthy control group (P = .01). After treatment, these differences were nonsignificant (P = .08). Conclusion: Short-period patellar taping plus an exercise program improves VMO and vastus lateralis activation. Clinical Relevance: A shorter period of taping for the exercise program may be as beneficial as a prolonged taping application. PMID:23015969

  10. [Bilateral urolithiasis with zonisamide developed for a short period of time in a 10-year-old girl with intractable epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Sato, Shunsuke; Nishinaka, Kazuyuki; Takahashi, Satoshi; Hirobe, Megumi; Tsukamoto, Taiji

    2013-09-01

    Zonisamide is an antiepileptic drug mainly used in patients with refractory epilepsy. One of the urological adverse effects caused by zonisamide is urinary lithiasis. We reported bilateral urinary lithiasis with zonisamide developed for a short period of time. A 10 year-old girl had been treated with zonisamide for intractable epilepsy for nine years. She progressively developed microscopic hematuria as well as crystalluria while being hospitalized for ventriculoperitoneal shunt infection. A computed tomography (CT) showed bilaterally hydronephrotic kidneys obstructed by multiple ureteral calculi. What was impressive was the fact that any single urinary calculus was not identified in a CT image taken just three weeks prior to this event. Then the diagnosis was made of zonisamide-induced bilateral urinary calculi and zonisamide treatment was discontinued. However, since the deterioration of renal function and left-sided hydronephrosis progressed, we performed the construction of right-sided percutaneous nephrostomy (PNS) and the transurethral placement of a left ureteral stent. Subsequently her condition was stabilized and all of these stones were discharged. The analysis of these stones showed mainly calcium phosphatic calculus. We eventually removed both the right PNS and the left ureteral stent. Since then, there has not been any recurrence thus far. We need to recognize the risk of progressively developing renal calculi during zonisamide treatment for a relatively short period of time in the face of dehydration. PMID:24187857

  11. 1SWASP J075102.16+342405.3: A deep overcontact binary system with a period under the short period cut-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Linqiao; Qian, Sheng-Bang; Zhang, Jia; Liu, Nianping

    2015-12-01

    New photometry of two different seasons for the extremely short period eclipsing binary 1SWASP J075102.16+342405.3 were performed. The two sets of derived light curves show a large difference in their shape, i.e., the 2013 light curves show big asymmetry, whereas the 2014 light curve is almost symmetric. All light curves were analysed using the 2013 version of the Wilson-Devinney (W-D) code. The obtained solutions show that 1SWASP J075102.16+342405.3 is of the A subtype W UMa contact system with an extremely high fill-out of f ≈ 96% and a high mass ratio of 0.70-0.78. Furthermore, a third light contributing to the total flux of the system was found. All these properties make the system a very special short-period source. The analysis of the 2013 light curves proved that the changes in the light curve shape are caused by magnetic activities. By means of all available times of minimum light, the variation of the orbital period was studied. It was found that the O - C diagram implies an increasing orbital period over a time span of eight years, which may be caused by the mass transfer from the less massive component to the more massive one; however, we are more inclined to say that it is only a part of a long period cyclic variation which can be explained by the light-travel time effect (LTTE) via the third body.

  12. Growth of InAs/GaSb short-period superlattices for high-resolution mid-wavelength infrared focal plane array detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, M.; Schmitz, J.; Rehm, R.; Kopta, S.; Fuchs, F.; Fleißner, J.; Cabanski, W.; Ziegler, J.

    2005-05-01

    InAs/GaSb short-period superlattices (SLs) with a broken gap type-II band alignment are investigated for the fabrication of photovoltaic pin-photodetectors on GaSb substrates. The structures were grown by molecular beam epitaxy using valved cracker cells for arsenic and antimony. Effective bandgap and strain in the SL were adjusted by varying the thickness of the InAs and GaSb layers in the SL and the controlled formation of InSb-like or GaAs-like bonds at the interfaces. MBE growth conditions were investigated and optimized in order to achieve good morphological, electrical and optical properties. IR-photodiodes with a cut-off wavelength of 5.4 μm reveal quantum efficiencies around 30% and detectivity values exceeding 10 13 Jones at 77 K. A focal plane array camera with 256×256 detector elements and 40 μm pitch based on InAs/GaSb short-period SLs was fabricated for the first time. The camera system reveals an excellent thermal resolution with a noise equivalent temperature difference below 12 mK for an integration time of 5 ms using f/2 optics. The detector performance, comparable with state of the art mercury-cadmium-telluride IR detectors, makes this material system very interesting for the fabrication of advanced thermal imaging systems.

  13. Helical tomotherapy quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Balog, John; Soisson, Emilie

    2008-01-01

    Helical tomotherapy uses a dynamic delivery in which the gantry, treatment couch, and multileaf collimator leaves are all in motion during treatment. This results in highly conformal radiotherapy, but the complexity of the delivery is partially hidden from the end-user because of the extensive integration and automation of the tomotherapy control systems. This presents a challenge to the medical physicist who is expected to be both a system user and an expert, capable of verifying relevant aspects of treatment delivery. A related issue is that a clinical tomotherapy planning system arrives at a customer's site already commissioned by the manufacturer, not by the clinical physicist. The clinical physicist and the manufacturer's representative verify the commissioning at the customer site before acceptance. Theoretically, treatment could begin immediately after acceptance. However, the clinical physicist is responsible for the safe and proper use of the machine. In addition, the therapists and radiation oncologists need to understand the important machine characteristics before treatment can proceed. Typically, treatment begins about 2 weeks after acceptance. This report presents an overview of the tomotherapy system. Helical tomotherapy has unique dosimetry characteristics, and some of those features are emphasized. The integrated treatment planning, delivery, and patient-plan quality assurance process is described. A quality assurance protocol is proposed, with an emphasis on what a clinical medical physicist could and should check. Additionally, aspects of a tomotherapy quality assurance program that could be checked automatically and remotely because of its inherent imaging system and integrated database are discussed. PMID:18406907

  14. Helical Tomotherapy Quality Assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Balog, John Soisson, Emilie

    2008-05-01

    Helical tomotherapy uses a dynamic delivery in which the gantry, treatment couch, and multileaf collimator leaves are all in motion during treatment. This results in highly conformal radiotherapy, but the complexity of the delivery is partially hidden from the end-user because of the extensive integration and automation of the tomotherapy control systems. This presents a challenge to the medical physicist who is expected to be both a system user and an expert, capable of verifying relevant aspects of treatment delivery. A related issue is that a clinical tomotherapy planning system arrives at a customer's site already commissioned by the manufacturer, not by the clinical physicist. The clinical physicist and the manufacturer's representative verify the commissioning at the customer site before acceptance. Theoretically, treatment could begin immediately after acceptance. However, the clinical physicist is responsible for the safe and proper use of the machine. In addition, the therapists and radiation oncologists need to understand the important machine characteristics before treatment can proceed. Typically, treatment begins about 2 weeks after acceptance. This report presents an overview of the tomotherapy system. Helical tomotherapy has unique dosimetry characteristics, and some of those features are emphasized. The integrated treatment planning, delivery, and patient-plan quality assurance process is described. A quality assurance protocol is proposed, with an emphasis on what a clinical medical physicist could and should check. Additionally, aspects of a tomotherapy quality assurance program that could be checked automatically and remotely because of its inherent imaging system and integrated database are discussed.

  15. Suppression and control of leakage field in electromagnetic helical microwiggler

    SciTech Connect

    Ohigashi, N.; Tsunawaki, Y.; Imasaki, K.

    1995-12-31

    Shortening the period of electromagnetic wiggler introduces both the radical increase of the leakage field and the decrease of the field in the gap region. The leakage field is severer problem in planar electromagnetic wiggler than in helical wiggler. Hence, in order to develop a short period electromagnetic wiggler, we have adopted {open_quotes}three poles per period{close_quotes} type electromagnetic helical microwiggler. In this work, we inserted the permanent magnet (PM) blocks with specific magnetized directions in the space between magnetic poles, for suppressing the leakage field flowing out from a pole face to the neighboring pole face. These PM-blocks must have higher intrinsic coersive force than saturation field of pole material. The gap field due to each pole is adjustable by controlling the leakage fields, that is, controlling the position of each iron screw set in each retainer fixing the PM-blocks. At present time, a test wiggler with period 7.8mm, periodical number 10 and gap length 4.6mm has been manufactured. Because the ratio of PM-block aperture to gap length is important parameter to suppress the leakage field, the parameter has been surveyed experimentally for PM-blocks with several dimensions of aperture. The field strength of 3-5kG (K=0.2-0.4) would be expected in the wiggler.

  16. Magnetic design constraints of helical solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, M. L.; Krave, S. T.; Tompkins, J. C.; Yonehara, K.; Flanagan, G.; Kahn, S. A.; Melconian, K.

    2015-01-30

    Helical solenoids have been proposed as an option for a Helical Cooling Channel for muons in a proposed Muon Collider. Helical solenoids can provide the required three main field components: solenoidal, helical dipole, and a helical gradient. In general terms, the last two are a function of many geometric parameters: coil aperture, coil radial and longitudinal dimensions, helix period and orbit radius. In this paper, we present design studies of a Helical Solenoid, addressing the geometric tunability limits and auxiliary correction system.

  17. Helicity patterns on the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pevtsov, A.

    Solar magnetic fields exhibit hemispheric preference for negative (pos- itive) helicity in northern (southern) hemisphere. The hemispheric he- licity rule, however, is not very strong, - the patterns of opposite sign helicity were observed on different spatial scales in each hemisphere. For instance, many individual sunspots exhibit patches of opposite he- licity inside the single polarity field. There are also helicity patterns on scales larger than the size of typical active region. Such patterns were observed in distribution of active regions with abnormal (for a give hemisphere) helicity, in large-scale photospheric magnetic fields and coronal flux systems. We will review the observations of large-scale pat- terns of helicity in solar atmosphere and their possible relationship with (sub-)photospheric processes. The emphasis will be on large-scale pho- tospheric magnetic field and solar corona.

  18. Short-period superlattices of AlN/Al{sub 0.08}Ga{sub 0.92}N grown on AlN substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Nikishin, S.A.; Borisov, B.A.; Chandolu, A.; Kuryatkov, V.V.; Temkin, H.; Holtz, M.; Mokhov, E.N.; Makarov, Yu.; Helava, H.

    2004-11-08

    High-quality short-period superlattices of AlN/Al{sub 0.08}Ga{sub 0.92}N have been grown by gas-source molecular-beam epitaxy with ammonia on Al face of AlN (0001) substrates. A significant reduction was achieved in the dislocation density, down to 3x10{sup 8} cm{sup -2}. Complete removal of residual Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface oxide is needed in order to obtain low dislocation density in homoepitaxy on AlN. We show that the presence of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} islands with the surface coverage as low as 0.2% results in increased dislocation density.

  19. pH-sensing properties of cascaded long- and short-period fiber grating with poly acrylic acid/poly allylamine hydrochloride thin-film overlays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ying

    2014-11-01

    Based on coupled-mode theory and transfer matrix method, the mode coupling mechanism and the reflection spectral properties of coated cascaded long- and short-period gratings (CLBG) are discussed. The effects of the thin-film parameters (film refractive index and film thickness) on the reflection spectra of the coated CLBG are simulated. By using electrostatic self-assembly method, poly acrylic acid (PAA) and poly allylamine hydrochloride (PAH) multilayer molecular pH-sensitive thin-films are assembled on the surface of the partial corroded CLBG. When the CLBG coated with PAA/PAH films are used to sense pH values, the resonant wavelengths of the CLBG have almost no shift, whereas the resonance peak reflectivities change with pH values. In addition, the sensitivities of the resonance peak reflectivities responding to pH values are improved by an order of magnitude.

  20. X-ray standing-wave study of (AlAs){sub m}(GaAs){sub n} short-period superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Lessmann, A.; Brennan, S.; Munkholm, A.; Materlik, G.

    1999-04-01

    X-ray standing-waves (XSW) are used for an investigation of the structure of (AlAs){sub m}(GaAs){sub n} short-period superlattices (SL{close_quote}s). The XSW induced modulation of x-ray fluorescence from the Al, As, and Ga atoms and the total photoelectron yield are monitored around the 0th order SL satellite (AlAs)(GaAs)(004,0) and the GaAs(004) substrate Bragg reflection. From the specific shape of these modulations and the sample reflectivity, an atomic model about the interfaces is derived. This is accomplished by comparing the experimental data with dynamical calculations of x-ray wavefield distribution and reflectivity, which are based on the Takagi-Taupin equation. The fluorescence measurements at the 0th order SL satellite reveal a high crystalline order in the AlAs layers of the short-period SL, whereas in the GaAs layers, a fraction of the Ga and As atoms is not on the ideal lattice positions. From the analysis, a model of the atomic distribution along the [001] direction can be determined. This reveals that at each internal interface in the GaAs layers, two Ga atom planes are shifted by up to 0.035 nm and one As atom plane by 0.023 nm. At each interface, the shifts are directed towards the substrate. In addition, the XSW field at the GaAs(004) substrate reflection results in a moir{acute e} or beating effect in the SL structure, which can be used to determine the information depth {Lambda}{sub e} of total electron-yield measurements in a more detailed approach. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  1. Processes the Govern Helicity Injection in the SSPX Spheromak

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, S; Stallard, B W; Holcomb, C T; Cothran, C

    2002-10-08

    The physical processes that govern the gun-voltage and give rise to field generation by helicity injection are surveyed in the Sustained Spheromak Physics experiment (SSPX) using internal magnetic field probes and particular attention to the gun-voltage. SSPX is a gun-driven spheromak, similar in many respects to CTX, although differing substantially by virtue of a programmable vacuum field configuration. Device parameters are: diameter = 1m, I{sub tor}-400kA, T{sub e}{approx}120eV, t{sub pulse}{approx}3ms. SSPX is now in its third year of operation and has demonstrated reasonable confinement (core {chi}{sub e}{approx}30m{sup 2}/s), and evidence for a beta limit (<{beta}{sub e}>{sub vol}{approx}4%), suggesting that the route to high temperature is to increase the spheromak field-strength (or current amplification, A{sub I} = I{sub torr}/I{sub inj}). Some progress has been made to increase A{sub I} in SSPX (A{sub I} = 2.2), although the highest A{sub I} observed in a spheromak of 3 has yet to be beaten. We briefly review helicity injection as the paradigm for spheromak field generation. SSPX results show that the processes that give efficient injection of helicity are inductive, and that these processes rapidly terminate when the current path ceases to change. The inductive processes are subsequently replaced by ones that resistively dissipate the injected helicity. This result means that efficient helicity injection can be achieved by harnessing the inductive processes, possibly by pulsing the gun. A pulsed build-up scenario is presented which gives A{sub I} > 3 and emphasizes the need to maintain reasonable confinement while the field of the spheromak is being built.

  2. Twist Helicity in Classical Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheeler, Martin W.; Kedia, Hridesh; Kleckner, Dustin; Irvine, William T. M.

    2015-11-01

    Recent experimental work has demonstrated that a partial measure of fluid Helicity (the sum of linking and writhing of vortex tubes) is conserved even as those vortices undergo topology changing reconnections. Measuring the total Helicity, however, requires additional information about how the vortex lines are locally twisted inside the vortex core. To bridge this gap, we have developed a novel technique for experimentally measuring twist Helicity. Using this method, we are able to measure the production and eventual decay of twist for a variety of vortex evolutions. Remarkably, we observe twist dynamics capable of conserving total Helicity even in the presence of rapidly changing writhe. This work was supported by the NSF MRSEC shared facilities at the University of Chicago (DMR-0820054) and an NSF CAREER award (DMR-1351506). W.T.M.I. further acknowledges support from the A.P. Sloan Foundation and the Packard Foundation.

  3. Helicity multiplexed broadband metasurface holograms

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Dandan; Yue, Fuyong; Li, Guixin; Zheng, Guoxing; Chan, Kinlong; Chen, Shumei; Chen, Ming; Li, King Fai; Wong, Polis Wing Han; Cheah, Kok Wai; Yue Bun Pun, Edwin; Zhang, Shuang; Chen, Xianzhong

    2015-01-01

    Metasurfaces are engineered interfaces that contain a thin layer of plasmonic or dielectric nanostructures capable of manipulating light in a desirable manner. Advances in metasurfaces have led to various practical applications ranging from lensing to holography. Metasurface holograms that can be switched by the polarization state of incident light have been demonstrated for achieving polarization multiplexed functionalities. However, practical application of these devices has been limited by their capability for achieving high efficiency and high image quality. Here we experimentally demonstrate a helicity multiplexed metasurface hologram with high efficiency and good image fidelity over a broad range of frequencies. The metasurface hologram features the combination of two sets of hologram patterns operating with opposite incident helicities. Two symmetrically distributed off-axis images are interchangeable by controlling the helicity of the input light. The demonstrated helicity multiplexed metasurface hologram with its high performance opens avenues for future applications with functionality switchable optical devices. PMID:26354497

  4. Helicity multiplexed broadband metasurface holograms.

    PubMed

    Wen, Dandan; Yue, Fuyong; Li, Guixin; Zheng, Guoxing; Chan, Kinlong; Chen, Shumei; Chen, Ming; Li, King Fai; Wong, Polis Wing Han; Cheah, Kok Wai; Pun, Edwin Yue Bun; Zhang, Shuang; Chen, Xianzhong

    2015-01-01

    Metasurfaces are engineered interfaces that contain a thin layer of plasmonic or dielectric nanostructures capable of manipulating light in a desirable manner. Advances in metasurfaces have led to various practical applications ranging from lensing to holography. Metasurface holograms that can be switched by the polarization state of incident light have been demonstrated for achieving polarization multiplexed functionalities. However, practical application of these devices has been limited by their capability for achieving high efficiency and high image quality. Here we experimentally demonstrate a helicity multiplexed metasurface hologram with high efficiency and good image fidelity over a broad range of frequencies. The metasurface hologram features the combination of two sets of hologram patterns operating with opposite incident helicities. Two symmetrically distributed off-axis images are interchangeable by controlling the helicity of the input light. The demonstrated helicity multiplexed metasurface hologram with its high performance opens avenues for future applications with functionality switchable optical devices. PMID:26354497

  5. Reconstruction of 2D seismic wavefield from Long-Period Seismogram and Short-Period Seismogram Envelope by Seismic Gradiometry applied to the Hi-net Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Takuto; Nishida, Kiwamu; Takagi, Ryota; Obara, Kazushige

    2016-04-01

    The high-sensitive seismograph network (Hi-net) operated by National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED) has about 800 stations with average separation of 20 km all over the Japanese archipelago. Although it is equipped with short-period seismometers, we also can observe long-period seismic wave up to 100 s in periods for significantly large earthquakes. In this case, we may treat long-period seismic waves as a 2D wavefield with station separations shorter than wavelength rather than individual traces at stations. In this study, we attempt to reconstruct 2D wavefield and obtain its propagation properties from seismic gradiometry (SG) method. The SG estimates the wave amplitude and its spatial derivative coefficients from discrete station record by the Taylor series approximation with an inverse problem. By using spatial derivatives in horizontal directions, we can obtain properties of propagating wave packet such as the arrival direction, slowness, geometrical spreading and radiation pattern. In addition, by using spatial derivatives together with free-surface boundary condition, we may decompose the vector elastic 2D wavefield estimated by the SG into divergence and rotation components. First, we applied the seismic gradiometry to a synthetic long-period (20-50 s) seismogram dataset computed by numerical simulation in realistic 3D medium at the Hi-net station layout as a feasibility test. We confirmed that the wave amplitude and its spatial derivatives are very well reproduced with average correlation coefficients higher than 0.99 in this period range. Applications to a real large earthquakes show that the amplitude and phase of the wavefield are well reconstructed with additional information of arrival direction and its slowness. The reconstructed wavefield contained a clear contrast in slowness between body and surface waves, regional non-great-circle-path wave propagation which may be attributed to scattering. Slowness

  6. Helical Fiber Amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Koplow, Jeffrey P.; Kliner, Dahy; Goldberg, Lew

    2002-12-17

    A multi-mode gain fiber is provided which affords substantial improvements in the maximum pulse energy, peak power handling capabilities, average output power, and/or pumping efficiency of fiber amplifier and laser sources while maintaining good beam quality (comparable to that of a conventional single-mode fiber source). These benefits are realized by coiling the multimode gain fiber to induce significant bend loss for all but the lowest-order mode(s).

  7. Employing helicity amplitudes for resummation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moult, Ian; Stewart, Iain W.; Tackmann, Frank J.; Waalewijn, Wouter J.

    2016-05-01

    Many state-of-the-art QCD calculations for multileg processes use helicity amplitudes as their fundamental ingredients. We construct a simple and easy-to-use helicity operator basis in soft-collinear effective theory (SCET), for which the hard Wilson coefficients from matching QCD onto SCET are directly given in terms of color-ordered helicity amplitudes. Using this basis allows one to seamlessly combine fixed-order helicity amplitudes at any order they are known with a resummation of higher-order logarithmic corrections. In particular, the virtual loop amplitudes can be employed in factorization theorems to make predictions for exclusive jet cross sections without the use of numerical subtraction schemes to handle real-virtual infrared cancellations. We also discuss matching onto SCET in renormalization schemes with helicities in 4- and d -dimensions. To demonstrate that our helicity operator basis is easy to use, we provide an explicit construction of the operator basis, as well as results for the hard matching coefficients, for p p →H +0 , 1, 2 jets, p p →W /Z /γ +0 , 1, 2 jets, and p p →2 , 3 jets. These operator bases are completely crossing symmetric, so the results can easily be applied to processes with e+e- and e-p collisions.

  8. Attenuation of short-period P, PcP, ScP, and pP waves in the earth's mantle

    SciTech Connect

    Bock, G.; Clements, J.R.

    1982-05-10

    The parameter t* (ratio of body wave travel time to the average quality factor Q) was estimated under various assumptions of the nature of the earthquake sources for short-period P, PcP, and ScP phases originating from earthquakes in the Fiji-Tonga region and recorded at the Warramunga Seismic Array at Tennant Creek (Northern Territory, Australia). Spectral ratios were calculated for the amplitudes of PcP to P and of pP to P. The data reveal a laterally varying Q structure in the Fiji-Tonga region. The high-Q lithosphere descending beneath the Tonga Island arc is overlain above 350 km depth by a wedgelike zone of high attenuation with an average Q/sub ..cap alpha../ between 120 and 200 at short periods. The upper mantle farther to the west of the Tonga island arc is less attenuating, with Q/sub ..cap alpha../, between 370 and 560. Q/sub ..cap alpha../ is about 500 in the upper mantle on the oceanic side of the subduction zone. The t* estimates of this study are much smaller than estimates from the free oscillation model SL8. This can be partly explained by regional variations of Q in the upper mantle. If no lateral Q variations occur in the lower mantle, a frequency-dependent Q can make the PcP and ScP observations consistent with model SL8. Adopting the absorption band model to describe the frequency dependence of Q, the parameter tau/sub 2/, the cut-off period of the high-frequency end of the absorption band, was determined. For different source models with finite corner frequencies, the average tau/sub 2/ for the mantle is between 0.01 and 0.10 s (corresponding to frequencies between 16 and 1.6 Hz) as derived from the PcP data, and between 0.06 and 0.12 s (2.7 and 1.3 Hz), as derived from the ScP data.

  9. Performance characteristics of a new helical-channel microchannel plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, David C.; Timothy, J. Gethyn; Graves, Peter W.; Loretz, Thomas J.; Roy, Raymond L.

    1988-01-01

    An advanced version of the 'helical-channel' microchannel plate (MCP) is presented. This MCP is composed of four channels per fiber with each channel having a diameter of 50 microns. The dynamic range, pulse-height distribution, and gain characteristics of this MCP are discussed. It is found that increasing the twist density of the channels makes it possible to increase the detection efficiency and further improve the suppression of ion-feedback providing a tighter saturated pulse-height distribution and improved high-voltage characteristics.

  10. Band gaps and built-in electric fields in InAlN/GaN short period superlattices: Comparison with (InAlGa)N quaternary alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorczyca, I.; Suski, T.; Christensen, N. E.; Svane, A.

    2016-04-01

    The general trends in the behavior of the band gaps in short period superlattices (SLs) composed from InAlN and GaN layers and grown along the wurtzite c axis have been analyzed for different alloy compositions and several thicknesses of quantum wells and barriers. The composition dependence of the gaps is compared to that of the quaternary alloys I nyA l1 -x -yG axN with the same effective contents of In, Al, and Ga as the SLs. The differences in the gaps are explained mainly by the built-in electric fields in the SLs caused by spontaneous and piezoelectric polarizations. Other factors, such as internal strain caused by lattice mismatch between wells and barriers and wave function hybridization, are taken into account. A simplified approach to determine the built-in electric fields directly from the dielectric properties of the constituent materials has been applied and verified by comparison to ab initio calculations for selected SLs. The calculated band gaps are compared with existing experimental data.

  11. Lithium in a short-period tidally locked binary of M67: Implications for stellar evolution, Galactic Lithium evolution, and cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deliyannis, Constantine P.; King, Jeremy R.; Boesgaard, Ann M.; Ryan, Sean G.

    1994-01-01

    In open clusters, late-F stars exhibit a Li maximum (the Li 'peak' region) at lower abundance with age, which could be due either to stellar depletion or Galactic Li enrichment (or some other cause). We have observed a short-period tidally locked binary (SPTLB) on the Li peak region in the old cluster M67 to distinguish between alternatives. SPTLBs which synchronized in the early pre-main sequence would avoid the rotational mixing which, according to Yale models, may be responsible for depleting Li with age in open cluster dwarfs. We find that both components of the M67 SPTLB have a Li abundance lying about a factor of 2 or more above any other M67 single star and about a factor of 3 or more above the mean Li peak region abundance in M67. Our results suggest that the initial Li abundance in M67 is at least as high as approximately 3.0 = 12 + log (N(sub Li)/N(sub H)). Our high M67 SPTLB Li abundance and those in other clusters support the combination of Zahn's tidal circularization and the Yale rotational mixing theories and may indicate that the halo Li plateau (analogous to the cluster Li peak region) abundance has been depleted from a higher primordial value. Implications are discussed.

  12. GaAsSb/GaAsN short-period superlattices as a capping layer for improved InAs quantum dot-based optoelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Utrilla, A. D.; Ulloa, J. M. Guzman, A.; Hierro, A.

    2014-07-28

    The application of a GaAsSb/GaAsN short-period superlattice capping layer (CL) on InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) is shown to be an option for providing improved luminescence properties to this system. Separating both GaAsSb and GaAsN ternaries during the growth in 2 monolayer-thick phases solves the GaAsSbN immiscibility-related problems. Strong fluctuations in the CL composition and strain field as well as in the QD size distribution are significantly reduced, and a more regular CL interface is also obtained. Room-temperature (RT) photoluminescence (PL) is obtained for overall N contents as high as 3%, yielding PL peak wavelengths beyond 1.4 μm in samples with a type-II band alignment. High external quantum efficiency electroluminescence and photocurrent from the QD ground state are also demonstrated at RT in a single QD-layer p-i-n device. Thus, it becomes possible to combine and transfer the complementary benefits of Sb- and N-containing GaAs alloys to InAs QD-based optoelectronics.

  13. Discovery of the strongly eccentric, short-period binary nature of the B-type system HD 313926 by the MOST satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rucinski, Slavek M.; Kuschnig, Rainer; Matthews, Jaymie M.; Dimitrov, Wojtek; Pribulla, Theodor; Guenther, David B.; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Sasselov, Dimitar; Walker, Gordon A. H.; Weiss, Werner W.

    2007-09-01

    The MOST photometric space mission discovered an eclipsing binary among its guide stars in 2006 June which combines a relatively large eccentricity e = 0.20 with an orbital period of only 2.27 d. HD 313926 appears to consist of two early-type stars of spectral type B3-B7. It has the largest eccentricity among known early-type binaries with periods less than 3.5 d. Despite the large components indicated by its spectral type and light curve model, and its short period, the orbit of HD 313926 has not yet circularized so it is probably very young, even compared with other young B stars. Based on data from MOST, a Canadian Space Agency mission jointly operated by Dynacon Inc., the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies and the University of British Columbia, with the assistance of the University of Vienna, and on data from the David Dunlap Observatory, University of Toronto. E-mail: rucinski@astro.utoronto.ca

  14. Influence of internal electric fields on band gaps in short period GaN/GaAlN and InGaN/GaN polar superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Gorczyca, I. Skrobas, K.; Suski, T.; Christensen, N. E.; Svane, A.

    2015-08-21

    The electronic structures of short period mGaN/nGa{sub y}Al{sub 1−y}N and mIn{sub y}Ga{sub 1-y}N/nGaN superlattices grown along the wurtzite c axis have been calculated for different alloy compositions y and various small numbers m of well- and n of barrier-monolayers. The general trends in gap behavior can, to a large extent, be related to the strength of the internal electric field, E, in the GaN and InGaN quantum wells. In the GaN/GaAlN superlattices, E reaches 4 MV/cm, while in the InGaN/GaN superlattices, values as high as E ≈ 6.5 MV/cm are found. The strong electric fields are caused by spontaneous and piezoelectric polarizations, the latter contribution dominating in InGaN/GaN superlattices. The influence of different arrangements of In atoms (indium clustering) on the band gap values in InGaN/GaN superlattices is examined.

  15. Molecular beam epitaxy of ZnSSe/CdSe short-period superlattices for III–V/II–VI multijunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sorokin, S. V. Gronin, S. V.; Sedova, I. V.; Klimko, G. V.; Evropeitsev, E. A.; Baidakova, M. V.; Sitnikova, A. A.; Toropov, A. A.; Ivanov, S. V.

    2015-08-15

    Results on the molecular-beam epitaxy growth of short-period alternately-strained ZnS{sub x}Se{sub 1−x}/CdSe superlattices which are pseudomorphic to GaAs (001) substrates and possess effective band-gap values within the range of E{sub g} ≈ 2.5–2.7 eV are presented. Oscillations of the specular-spot intensity in reflection high-energy electron diffraction are used for in situ control of the superlattice parameters. A method to determine the SL parameters (compositions and thicknesses of the constituent layers) based on combined analysis of the grown structures by low-temperature photoluminescence and X-ray diffractometry is developed. It is found that the parameters of the grown ZnS{sub x}Se{sub 1−x}/CdSe superlattices are close to their design values and the density of extended defects in the structures is low even though the structure thickness (∼300 nm) considerably exceeds the critical thickness for bulk II–VI layers with the same lattice-constant mismatch.

  16. Heterogeneities of the field of short-period shear wave attenuation in the lithosphere of Central Asia and their relationship with seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopnichev, Yu. F.; Sokolova, I. N.

    2011-03-01

    The characteristics of the short-period shear wave attenuation field in the lithosphere of the Turanian Plate, West Tien Shan, Pamir, and Hindu Kush have been studied. The method based on analysis of the logarithm of the ratio between maximal amplitudes of Sn and Pn waves ( Sn/ Pn parameter) has been applied. More than 400 records of earthquakes, obtained at distances of ˜400-1000 km from the AAK digital station, have been processed. It has been found that relatively weak attenuation is observed in the regions of the West Tien Shan and Pamir. The largest area of strong attenuation is located in the region of the Afghan-Tadjik Depression adjacent to Hindu Kush. A wide band of low Sn/ Pn parameter values, stretched northeastwards, has been distinguished. Along with the analogous band of strong attenuation, distinguished before in the regions of Central Tien Shan and Dzungaria, it is the continuation of the largest Chaman Fault, which stretches 850 km along the boundary of the Indian Plate. Source zones of strong earthquakes with M ≥ 7.0 that occurred in the first half of 20th century correspond to relatively weak attenuation. Areas of high attenuation, where strong seismic events have not occurred for the last 110 years, are outlined. Analogously to other seismoactive regions, it is supposed that these areas are related to preparation of strong earthquakes.

  17. Interface study and performance of large layer pair ultra-short period W/B{sub 4}C X-ray multilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Pradhan, P. C. Nayak, M.; Mondal, P.; Lodha, G. S.

    2015-06-24

    The nature of interfaces in ultra short period W/B{sub 4}C multilayers (MLs) is studied using hard x-ray reflectivity and cross sectional transmission electron microscope. W/B{sub 4}C MLs are fabricated using magnetron sputtering system with systematic varying thickness of both W and B{sub 4}C layers from ∼5 to 30 Å keeping number of layer pairs fixed at 10. It is observed that in low period W/B{sub 4}C ML, as the layer thickness decreases, the interdiffusion plays a significant role because of the discontinuous nature of film. This gives variation of density and roughness of the layer as well as generates thickness errors in the ML structure due to volume changes which is originated by interdifusion process. Finally, W/B{sub 4}C MLs with large number of layer pairs (300) are fabricated with periodicity d= 20 Å which gives ∼54 % of reflectivity at energy 8.047 keV.

  18. Sex and age differences in meat composition of Yeso sika deer (Cervus nippon yesoensis) reared for a short period after capture in the wild.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, Maki; Souma, Kousaku; Sugo, Kazuki; Araki, Shin-Ichi; Ishizaka, Fumiaki; Ueda, Masami; Kasai, Takamasa; Masuko, Takayoshi

    2015-02-01

    Yeso sika deer captured in winter around Lake Akan in Hokkaido were reared for 8-10 months at Tokyo University of Agriculture in Abashiri. Six 1-year-old females and males and six 2-year-old or older (adult) females and males were slaughtered and their carcasses were processed. The chemical composition, mineral contents and fatty acid composition of the loin were measured. No marked influence of gender or age was noted in the chemical composition of loin. In the mineral contents, significant differences were noted. The potassium and sulfur contents were lower and the sodium content was higher in adult deer meat (P < 0.05, respectively) and the potassium content was higher in male deer meat (P < 0.05). Arsenic, cadmium or lead were not detected. In the unsaturated fatty acid, a significant interaction was detected (P < 0.05), and it was high in 1-year-old female deer meat and low in 1-year-old male deer meat. Significant gender or age differences were noted only in the mineral contents in the loin of deer reared for a short period after capture. PMID:25186458

  19. Hubble Space Telescope/STIS Spectroscopy of the White Dwarfs in the Short-Period Dwarf Novae LL Andromedae and EF Pegasi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Steve B.; Gänsicke, Boris T.; Szkody, Paula; Sion, Edward M.

    2002-08-01

    We present new Hubble Space Telescope Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph observations of the short-period dwarf novae LL And and EF Peg during deep quiescence. We fit stellar models to the UV spectra and use optical and IR observations to determine the physical parameters of the white dwarfs in the systems, the distances to the binaries, and the properties of the secondary stars. Both white dwarfs are relatively cool, having Teff near 15,000 K, and consistent with a mass of 0.6Msolar. The white dwarf in LL And appears to be of solar abundance or slightly lower, while that in EF Peg is near 0.1-0.3 times solar. LL And is found to be 760 pc away, while EF Peg is closer, at 380 pc. EF Peg appears to have an ~M5 V secondary star, consistent with that expected for its orbital period, while the secondary object in LL And remains a mystery. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the AURA under NASA contract NAS 5-26555 and with the Apache Point Observatory (APO) 3.5 m telescope, which is operated by the Astrophysical Research Consortium (ARC).

  20. Influences of Si-doped graded short-period superlattice on green InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwanjae; Lee, Cheul-Ro; Lee, Jin Hong; Chung, Tae-Hoon; Ryu, Mee-Yi; Jeong, Kwang-Un; Leem, Jae-Young; Kim, Jin Soo

    2016-04-01

    We report significant improvement in optical and electrical properties of green InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) by using Si-doped graded short-period InGaN/GaN superlattice (SiGSL) formed by so called indium-conversion technique. For comparison, a conventional LED without the superlattice (C-LED) and a LED with undoped graded superlattice (unGSL-LED) were prepared, respectively. The photoluminescence (PL) intensity of the SiGSL-LED was increased more than 3 times at room temperature (RT) as compared to C-LED. The PL intensity ratios of RT to 10K for the C-LED, unGSL-LED, and SiGSL-LED were measured to be 25, 40.9, and 47.5%, respectively. The difference in carrier lifetimes between 10K and RT for the SiGSL-LED is relatively small compared to that of the C-LED, which is consistent with the variation in PL intensity. The output power of a transistor-outline type SiGSL-LED was increased more than 2 times higher than that of the C-LED. PMID:27137059

  1. Time-resolved Spectroscopy of RS Canum Venaticorum Short-Period Systems. II. RT Andromedae, WY Cancri, and XY Ursae Majoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arévalo, M. J.; Lázaro, C.

    1999-08-01

    We present the second part of the results of our spectroscopic study of orbital phase resolution of short-period active binaries. In this paper we present the observations of the binaries RT And, WY Cnc, and XY UMa, for which we obtained simultaneous low-resolution spectra in the Hα, Hβ, and Ca II infrared triplet (IRT; 8498 and 8542 Å) lines, and higher resolution spectra in Hα for WY Cnc and XY UMa. Hα and Hβ emission excess was found in all the observed orbital phases of WY Cnc and XY UMa, while RT And showed Hα emission only during some orbital phases. We measure a clear Ca II (IRT) excess in all the spectra of the three binaries. The ratio of the flux excesses derived for these binaries, E_Hα/E_Hβ~= 1-3 and E_8542/E_8498~= 1-3, give low values typical of solar plage structures. In the higher resolution Hα spectra, we found emissions that can be associated with both stellar components of XY UMa and WY Cnc, indicating that the faint secondary stars in both binaries are active late-type dwarfs. Some Hα emission components, which could originate in extended structures between the stars, were detected in both systems.

  2. The Pulse Line Ion Accelerator Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, Richard J.

    2006-02-15

    The Pulse Line Ion Accelerator concept was motivated by the desire for an inexpensive way to accelerate intense short pulse heavy ion beams to regimes of interest for studies of High Energy Density Physics and Warm Dense Matter. A pulse power driver applied at one end of a helical pulse line creates a traveling wave pulse that accelerates and axially confines the heavy ion beam pulse. Acceleration scenarios with constant parameter helical lines are described which result in output energies of a single stage much larger than the several hundred kilovolt peak voltages on the line, with a goal of 3-5 MeV/meter acceleration gradients. The concept might be described crudely as an ''air core'' induction linac where the PFN is integrated into the beam line so the accelerating voltage pulse can move along with the ions to get voltage multiplication.

  3. All-Optical Helicity Dependent Spin Switching in a Many-Spin System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latta, Tanner; Zhang, G. P.

    All-optical helicity dependent magnetic switching (AOS) is achieved through using an ultrafast laser pulse to manipulate and switch the spin of an electron from one direction to another. This process happens in a short amount of femtoseconds after the laser pulse is introduced. All-optical helicity dependent magnetic switching (AOS) does not fall to the assistance of any external magnetic field. Linearly polarized light, as well as right and left circularly polarized light are used to manipulate the spin of the electrons. Ferrimagnetic, rather than ferromagnetic, materials are more suitable to create conditions in which AOS are viable due to the orientation of the spins within this material. In the following study we show and conclude that AOS is possible with the use of left and right circularly polarized laser pulses. All-optical helicity dependent magnetic switching has many applications in magnetic recording technology or magnetic memory devices. DE-FG02-06ER46304.

  4. Selective control for helical microswimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsamba, Panayiota; Lauga, Eric

    2015-11-01

    One of the greatest aspirations for artificial microswimmers is their application in non-invasive medicine. For any practical use, adequate mechanisms enabling control of multiple artificial swimmers is of paramount importance. Here we propose a multi-helical, freely-jointed motor as a novel selective control mechanism. We show that the nonlinear step-out behavior of a magnetized helix driven by a rotating magnetic field can be exploited, when used in conjunction with other helices, to obtain a velocity profile that is non-negligible only within a chosen interval of operating frequencies. Specifically, the force balance between the competing opposite-handed helices is tuned to give no net motion at low frequencies while in the middle frequency range, the swimming velocity increases monotonically with the driving frequency if two opposite helices are used, thereby allowing speed adjustment by varying the driving frequency. We illustrate this idea in detail on a two-helix system, and demonstrate how to generalize to N helices, both numerically and theoretically. We finish by explaining how to solve the inverse problem and design an artificial swimmer with an arbitrarily-complex velocity vs. frequency relationship.

  5. Flexible helical-axis stellarator

    DOEpatents

    Harris, Jeffrey H.; Hender, Timothy C.; Carreras, Benjamin A.; Cantrell, Jack L.; Morris, Robert N.

    1988-01-01

    An 1=1 helical winding which spirals about a conventional planar, circular central conductor of a helical-axis stellarator adds a significant degree of flexibility by making it possible to control the rotational transform profile and shear of the magnetic fields confining the plasma in a helical-axis stellarator. The toroidal central conductor links a plurality of toroidal field coils which are separately disposed to follow a helical path around the central conductor in phase with the helical path of the 1=1 winding. This coil configuration produces bean-shaped magnetic flux surfaces which rotate around the central circular conductor in the same manner as the toroidal field generating coils. The additional 1=1 winding provides flexible control of the magnetic field generated by the central conductor to prevent the formation of low-order resonances in the rotational transform profile which can produce break-up of the equilibrium magnetic surfaces. Further, this additional winding can deepen the magnetic well which together with the flexible control provides increased stability.

  6. Helicity Injected Torus Program Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redd, A. J.; Jarboe, T. R.; Aboulhosn, R. Z.; Akcay, C.; Hamp, W. T.; Marklin, G.; Nelson, B. A.; O'Neill, R. G.; Raman, R.; Sieck, P. E.; Smith, R. J.; Sutphin, G. L.; Wrobel, J. S.; Mueller, D.; Roquemore, L.

    2006-10-01

    The Helicity Injected Torus with Steady Inductive Helicity Injection (HIT--SI) spheromak experiment [Sieck, Nucl. Fusion v.46, p.254 (2006)] addresses critical issues for spheromaks, including current drive, high-beta operation, confinement quality and efficient steady-state operation. HIT--SI has a ``bow-tie'' shaped axisymmetric confinement region (major radius R=0.33 m, axial extent of 0.57 m) and two half-torus helicity injectors, one mounted on each end of the flux conserver. HIT--SI has produced spheromaks with up to 30 kA of toroidal current, using less than 4 MW of applied power, demonstrating that Steady Inductive Helicity Injection can generate and sustain discharges with modest power requirements. Fast camera images of HIT--SI discharges indicate a toroidally rotating n=1 structure, driven by the helicity injectors. The direction of the toroidal current is determined by the direction of rotation of the driven n=1. Measured surface and internal magnetic fields in HIT--SI discharges are consistent with that of the true 3D Taylor state, including the injectors. Recent HIT--SI physics studies, diagnostic improvements and machine upgrades will also be summarized.

  7. Generalized helicity and Beltrami fields

    SciTech Connect

    Buniy, Roman V.; Kephart, Thomas W.

    2014-05-15

    We propose covariant and non-abelian generalizations of the magnetic helicity and Beltrami equation. The gauge invariance, variational principle, conserved current, energy–momentum tensor and choice of boundary conditions elucidate the subject. In particular, we prove that any extremal of the Yang–Mills action functional 1/4 ∫{sub Ω}trF{sub μν}F{sup μν}d{sup 4}x subject to the local constraint ε{sup μναβ}trF{sub μν}F{sub αβ}=0 satisfies the covariant non-abelian Beltrami equation. -- Highlights: •We introduce the covariant non-abelian helicity and Beltrami equation. •The Yang–Mills action and instanton term constraint lead to the Beltrami equation. •Solutions of the Beltrami equation conserve helicity.

  8. Rational design of helical architectures

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Dwaipayan; Fejer, Szilard N.; Wales, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Nature has mastered the art of creating complex structures through self-assembly of simpler building blocks. Adapting such a bottom-up view provides a potential route to the fabrication of novel materials. However, this approach suffers from the lack of a sufficiently detailed understanding of the noncovalent forces that hold the self-assembled structures together. Here we demonstrate that nature can indeed guide us, as we explore routes to helicity with achiral building blocks driven by the interplay between two competing length scales for the interactions, as in DNA. By characterizing global minima for clusters, we illustrate several realizations of helical architecture, the simplest one involving ellipsoids of revolution as building blocks. In particular, we show that axially symmetric soft discoids can self-assemble into helical columnar arrangements. Understanding the molecular origin of such spatial organisation has important implications for the rational design of materials with useful optoelectronic applications.

  9. Zodiacal Exoplanets in Time (ZEIT). III. A Short-period Planet Orbiting a Pre-main-sequence Star in the Upper Scorpius OB Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Andrew W.; Newton, Elisabeth R.; Rizzuto, Aaron C.; Irwin, Jonathan; Feiden, Gregory A.; Gaidos, Eric; Mace, Gregory N.; Kraus, Adam L.; James, David J.; Ansdell, Megan; Charbonneau, David; Covey, Kevin R.; Ireland, Michael J.; Jaffe, Daniel T.; Johnson, Marshall C.; Kidder, Benjamin; Vanderburg, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    We confirm and characterize a close-in ({P}{{orb}} = 5.425 days), super-Neptune sized ({5.04}-0.37+0.34 {R}\\oplus ) planet transiting K2-33 (2MASS J16101473-1919095), a late-type (M3) pre-main-sequence (11 Myr old) star in the Upper Scorpius subgroup of the Scorpius–Centaurus OB association. The host star has the kinematics of a member of the Upper Scorpius OB association, and its spectrum contains lithium absorption, an unambiguous sign of youth (\\lt 20 Myr) in late-type dwarfs. We combine photometry from K2 and the ground-based MEarth project to refine the planet’s properties and constrain the host star’s density. We determine K2-33’s bolometric flux and effective temperature from moderate-resolution spectra. By utilizing isochrones that include the effects of magnetic fields, we derive a precise radius (6%–7%) and mass (16%) for the host star, and a stellar age consistent with the established value for Upper Scorpius. Follow-up high-resolution imaging and Doppler spectroscopy confirm that the transiting object is not a stellar companion or a background eclipsing binary blended with the target. The shape of the transit, the constancy of the transit depth and periodicity over 1.5 yr, and the independence with wavelength rule out stellar variability or a dust cloud or debris disk partially occulting the star as the source of the signal; we conclude that it must instead be planetary in origin. The existence of K2-33b suggests that close-in planets can form in situ or migrate within ∼10 Myr, e.g., via interactions with a disk, and that long-timescale dynamical migration such as by Lidov–Kozai or planet–planet scattering is not responsible for all short-period planets.

  10. BD Andromedae: A new short-period RS CVn eclipsing binary star with a distant tertiary body in a highly eccentric orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chun-Hwey; Song, Mi-Hwa; Yoon, Jo-Na; Jeong, Min-Ji; Han, Wonyong

    2014-06-20

    A photometric study of BD And was made through the analysis of two sets of new BVR light curves. The light curves with migrating photometric waves outside eclipse show that BD And is a short-period RS CVn-type binary star. The analysis of all available timings reveals that the orbital period has varied in a strictly cyclical way with a period of 9.2 yr. The periodic variation most likely arises from the light-time effect due to a tertiary moving in a highly elliptical orbit (e {sub 3} = 0.76). The Applegate mechanism could not operate properly in the eclipsing pair. The light curves were modeled with two large spots on the hotter star and a large third light amounting to about 14% of the total systemic light. BD And is a triple system: a detached binary system consisting of two nearly equal solar-type stars with an active primary star and a G6-G7 tertiary dwarf. The absolute dimensions of the eclipsing pair and tertiary components were determined. The three components with a mean age of about 5.8 Gyr are located at midpositions in main-sequence bands. The radius of the secondary is about 17% larger than that deduced from stellar models. The orbital and radiometric characteristics of the tertiary are intensively investigated. One important feature is that the mutual inclination between two orbits is larger than 60°, implying that Kozai cycles had occurred very efficiently in the past. The possible past and future evolutions of the BD And system, driven by KCTF and MBTF, are also discussed.

  11. Discrimination of nuclear explosions and earthquakes from teleseismic distances with a local network of short period seismic stations using artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiira, Timo

    1996-10-01

    Seismic discrimination capability of artificial neural networks (ANNs) was studied using earthquakes and nuclear explosions from teleseismic distances. The events were selected from two areas, which were analyzed separately. First, 23 nuclear explosions from Semipalatinsk and Lop Nor test sites were compared with 46 earthquakes from adjacent areas. Second, 39 explosions from Nevada test site were compared with 27 earthquakes from close-by areas. The basic discriminants were complexity, spectral ratio and third moment of frequency. The spectral discriminants were computed in five different ways to obtain all the information embedded in the signals, some of which were relatively weak. The discriminants were computed using data from six short period stations in Central and southern Finland. The spectral contents of the signals of both classes varied considerably between the stations. The 66 discriminants were formed into 65 optimum subsets of different sizes by using stepwise linear regression. A type of ANN called multilayer perceptron (MLP) was applied to each of the subsets. As a comparison the classification was repeated using linear discrimination analysis (LDA). Since the number of events was small the testing was made with the leave-one-out method. The ANN gave significantly better results than LDA. As a final tool for discrimination a combination of the ten neural nets with the best performance were used. All events from Central Asia were clearly discriminated and over 90% of the events from Nevada region were confidently discriminated. The better performance of ANNs was attributed to its ability to form complex decision regions between the groups and to its highly non-linear nature.

  12. Zodiacal Exoplanets in Time (ZEIT). III. A Short-period Planet Orbiting a Pre-main-sequence Star in the Upper Scorpius OB Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Andrew W.; Newton, Elisabeth R.; Rizzuto, Aaron C.; Irwin, Jonathan; Feiden, Gregory A.; Gaidos, Eric; Mace, Gregory N.; Kraus, Adam L.; James, David J.; Ansdell, Megan; Charbonneau, David; Covey, Kevin R.; Ireland, Michael J.; Jaffe, Daniel T.; Johnson, Marshall C.; Kidder, Benjamin; Vanderburg, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    We confirm and characterize a close-in ({P}{{orb}} = 5.425 days), super-Neptune sized ({5.04}-0.37+0.34 {R}\\oplus ) planet transiting K2-33 (2MASS J16101473-1919095), a late-type (M3) pre-main-sequence (11 Myr old) star in the Upper Scorpius subgroup of the Scorpius–Centaurus OB association. The host star has the kinematics of a member of the Upper Scorpius OB association, and its spectrum contains lithium absorption, an unambiguous sign of youth (\\lt 20 Myr) in late-type dwarfs. We combine photometry from K2 and the ground-based MEarth project to refine the planet’s properties and constrain the host star’s density. We determine K2-33’s bolometric flux and effective temperature from moderate-resolution spectra. By utilizing isochrones that include the effects of magnetic fields, we derive a precise radius (6%–7%) and mass (16%) for the host star, and a stellar age consistent with the established value for Upper Scorpius. Follow-up high-resolution imaging and Doppler spectroscopy confirm that the transiting object is not a stellar companion or a background eclipsing binary blended with the target. The shape of the transit, the constancy of the transit depth and periodicity over 1.5 yr, and the independence with wavelength rule out stellar variability or a dust cloud or debris disk partially occulting the star as the source of the signal; we conclude that it must instead be planetary in origin. The existence of K2-33b suggests that close-in planets can form in situ or migrate within ˜10 Myr, e.g., via interactions with a disk, and that long-timescale dynamical migration such as by Lidov–Kozai or planet–planet scattering is not responsible for all short-period planets.

  13. Effects of short-period exercise training and orlistat therapy on body composition and maximal power production capacity in obese patients.

    PubMed

    Colak, R; Ozcelik, O

    2004-01-01

    We examined the effects of weight loss induced by diet-orlistat (DO) and diet-orlistat combined with exercise (DOE) on maximal work rate production (Wmax) capacity in obese patients. Total of 24 obese patients were involved in this study. Twelve of them were subjected to DO therapy only and the remaining 12 patients participated in a regular aerobic exercise-training program in addition to DO therapy (DOE). Each patient performed two incremental ramp exercise tests up to exhaustion using an electromagnetically-braked cycle ergometer: one at the onset and one at the end of the 4th week. DOE therapy caused a significant decrease in total body weight: 101.5+/-17.4 kg (basal) vs 96.3+/-17.3 kg (4 wk) associated with a significant decrease in body fat mass: 45.0+/-10.5 kg (basal) vs 40.9+/-9.8 kg (4 wk). DO therapy also resulted in a significant decrease of total body weight 94.9+/-14.9 kg (basal) vs 91.6+/-13.5 kg (4 wk) associated with small but significant decreases in body fat mass: 37.7+/-5.6 kg (basal) to 36.0+/-6.2 kg (4 wk). Weight reduction achieved during DO therapy was not associated with increased Wmax capacity: 106+/-32 W (basal) vs 106+/-33 W (4 wk), while DOE therapy resulted in a markedly increased Wmax capacity: 109+/-39 W (basal) vs 138+/-30 W (4 wk). DO therapy combined with aerobic exercise training resulted in a significant reduction of fat mass tissue and markedly improved the aerobic fitness and Wmax capacities of obese patients. Considering this improvement within such a short period, physicians should consider applying an aerobic exercise-training program to sedentary obese patients for improving their physical fitness and thereby reduce the negative outcomes of obesity. PMID:14984314

  14. Helical axis stellarator equilibrium model

    SciTech Connect

    Koniges, A.E.; Johnson, J.L.

    1985-02-01

    An asymptotic model is developed to study MHD equilibria in toroidal systems with a helical magnetic axis. Using a characteristic coordinate system based on the vacuum field lines, the equilibrium problem is reduced to a two-dimensional generalized partial differential equation of the Grad-Shafranov type. A stellarator-expansion free-boundary equilibrium code is modified to solve the helical-axis equations. The expansion model is used to predict the equilibrium properties of Asperators NP-3 and NP-4. Numerically determined flux surfaces, magnetic well, transform, and shear are presented. The equilibria show a toroidal Shafranov shift.

  15. Brownian motion of helical flagella.

    PubMed

    Hoshikawa, H; Saito, N

    1979-07-01

    We develops a theory of the Brownian motion of a rigid helical object such as bacterial flagella. The statistical properties of the random forces acting on the helical object are discussed and the coefficients of the correlations of the random forces are determined. The averages , and are also calculated where z and theta are the position along and angle around the helix axis respectively. Although the theory is limited to short time interval, direct comparison with experiment is possible by using the recently developed cinematography technique. PMID:16997210

  16. OPE for all helicity amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basso, Benjamin; Caetano, João; Córdova, Lucía; Sever, Amit; Vieira, Pedro

    2015-08-01

    We extend the Operator Product Expansion (OPE) for scattering amplitudes in planar SYM to account for all possible helicities of the external states. This is done by constructing a simple map between helicity configurations and so-called charged pentagon transitions. These OPE building blocks are generalizations of the bosonic pentagons entering MHV amplitudes and they can be bootstrapped at finite coupling from the integrable dynamics of the color flux tube. A byproduct of our map is a simple realization of parity in the super Wilson loop picture.

  17. Development of a Blumlein based on helical line storage elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, V. P.; Narayan, B. S.; Nanu, K.; Ron, P. H.

    2001-03-01

    A Blumlein based on helical line storage elements was conceived and developed for generation of a rectangular pulse of 150 kV, 5 μs duration and which can drive a load of about 1 kΩ impedance. The helical line consisting of an aluminum tube of 750 mm length and 100 mm diam, wound with mylar film insulation to withstand 200 kV and then wound with copper wire was built and tested in our laboratory. It has a capacitance of 1.2 nF and has a characteristic impedance of 2 kΩ. The pulse generator built here, uses ten such coils in Blumlein configuration with five elements in parallel in each section giving total capacitance of about 10 nF. It has the advantages of compactness, simplicity, low cost, reliability, and high performance towards good flat top, low rise time, and small jitter. It can be designed to match load impedances in the range of a few ohms to several kilo ohms. This pulse power system was built and successfully tested for accelerating electrons in the gun chamber of an electron beam controlled CO2 laser operating in the single shot mode. This article describes the design, fabrication, and performance of the pulse power system.

  18. The transport of relative canonical helicity

    SciTech Connect

    You, S.

    2012-09-15

    The evolution of relative canonical helicity is examined in the two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic formalism. Canonical helicity is defined here as the helicity of the plasma species' canonical momentum. The species' canonical helicity are coupled together and can be converted from one into the other while the total gauge-invariant relative canonical helicity remains globally invariant. The conversion is driven by enthalpy differences at a surface common to ion and electron canonical flux tubes. The model provides an explanation for why the threshold for bifurcation in counter-helicity merging depends on the size parameter. The size parameter determines whether magnetic helicity annihilation channels enthalpy into the magnetic flux tube or into the vorticity flow tube components of the canonical flux tube. The transport of relative canonical helicity constrains the interaction between plasma flows and magnetic fields, and provides a more general framework for driving flows and currents from enthalpy or inductive boundary conditions.

  19. Conservation of magnetic helicity during plasma relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, H.; Prager, S.C.; Sarff, J.S.

    1994-07-01

    Decay of the total magnetic helicity during the sawtooth relaxation in the MST Reversed-Field Pinch is much larger than the MHD prediction. However, the helicity decay (3--4%) is smaller than the magnetic energy decay (7--9%), modestly supportive of the helicity conservation hypothesis in Taylor`s relaxation theory. Enhanced fluctuation-induced helicity transport during the relaxation is observed.

  20. Note: Helical nanobelt force sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, G.; Hashimoto, H.

    2012-12-15

    We present the fabrication and characterization of helical nanobelt force sensors. These self-sensing force sensors are based on the giant piezoresistivity of helical nanobelts. The three-dimensional helical nanobelts are self-formed from 27 nm-thick n-type InGaAs/GaAs bilayers using rolled-up techniques, and assembled onto electrodes on a micropipette using nanorobotic manipulations. The helical nanobelt force sensors can be calibrated using a calibrated atomic force microscope cantilever system under scanning electron microscope. Thanks to their giant piezoresistance coefficient (515 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} Pa{sup -1}), low stiffness (0.03125 N/m), large-displacement capability ({approx}10 {mu}m), and good fatigue resistance, they are well suited to function as stand-alone, compact ({approx}20 {mu}m without the plug-in support), light ({approx}5 g including the plug-in support), versatile and large range ({approx}{mu}N) and high resolution ({approx}nN) force sensors.

  1. Note: Helical nanobelt force sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, G.; Hashimoto, H.

    2012-12-01

    We present the fabrication and characterization of helical nanobelt force sensors. These self-sensing force sensors are based on the giant piezoresistivity of helical nanobelts. The three-dimensional helical nanobelts are self-formed from 27 nm-thick n-type InGaAs/GaAs bilayers using rolled-up techniques, and assembled onto electrodes on a micropipette using nanorobotic manipulations. The helical nanobelt force sensors can be calibrated using a calibrated atomic force microscope cantilever system under scanning electron microscope. Thanks to their giant piezoresistance coefficient (515 × 10-10 Pa-1), low stiffness (0.03125 N/m), large-displacement capability (˜10 μm), and good fatigue resistance, they are well suited to function as stand-alone, compact (˜20 μm without the plug-in support), light (˜5 g including the plug-in support), versatile and large range (˜μN) and high resolution (˜nN) force sensors.

  2. Note: helical nanobelt force sensors.

    PubMed

    Hwang, G; Hashimoto, H

    2012-12-01

    We present the fabrication and characterization of helical nanobelt force sensors. These self-sensing force sensors are based on the giant piezoresistivity of helical nanobelts. The three-dimensional helical nanobelts are self-formed from 27 nm-thick n-type InGaAs/GaAs bilayers using rolled-up techniques, and assembled onto electrodes on a micropipette using nanorobotic manipulations. The helical nanobelt force sensors can be calibrated using a calibrated atomic force microscope cantilever system under scanning electron microscope. Thanks to their giant piezoresistance coefficient (515 × 10(-10) Pa(-1)), low stiffness (0.03125 N/m), large-displacement capability (~10 μm), and good fatigue resistance, they are well suited to function as stand-alone, compact (~20 μm without the plug-in support), light (~5 g including the plug-in support), versatile and large range (~μN) and high resolution (~nN) force sensors. PMID:23278031

  3. KELT-1b: A STRONGLY IRRADIATED, HIGHLY INFLATED, SHORT PERIOD, 27 JUPITER-MASS COMPANION TRANSITING A MID-F STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Siverd, Robert J.; Pepper, Joshua; Stassun, Keivan G.; Beatty, Thomas G.; Scott Gaudi, B.; Eastman, Jason D.; Street, Rachel; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Collins, Karen; Bieryla, Allyson; Latham, David W.; Berlind, Perry; Calkins, Michael L.; Esquerdo, Gilbert A.; Furesz, Gabor; Geary, John C.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Jensen, Eric L. N.; Crepp, Justin R.; DePoy, D. L.; and others

    2012-12-20

    We present the discovery of KELT-1b, the first transiting low-mass companion from the wide-field Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope-North (KELT-North) transit survey. A joint analysis of the spectroscopic, radial velocity, and photometric data indicates that the V = 10.7 primary is a mildly evolved mid-F star with T{sub eff} = 6516 {+-} 49 K, log g 4.228{sup +0.014}{sub -0.021}, and [Fe/H] = 0.052 {+-} 0.079, with an inferred mass M{sub *} = 1.335 {+-} 0.063 M{sub Sun} and radius R{sub *} 1.471{sup +0.045}{sub -0.035} R{sub Sun }. The companion is a low-mass brown dwarf or a super-massive planet with mass M{sub P} = 27.38 {+-} 0.93 M{sub Jup} and radius R{sub P} = 1.116{sup +0.038}{sub -0.029} R{sub Jup}. The companion is on a very short ({approx}29 hr) period circular orbit, with an ephemeris T{sub c} (BJD{sub TDB}) = 2455909.29280 {+-} 0.00023 and P = 1.217501 {+-} 0.000018 days. KELT-1b receives a large amount of stellar insolation, resulting in an estimated equilibrium temperature assuming zero albedo and perfect redistribution of T{sub eq} = 2423{sup +34}{sub -27} K. Comparison with standard evolutionary models suggests that the radius of KELT-1b is likely to be significantly inflated. Adaptive optics imaging reveals a candidate stellar companion to KELT-1 with a separation of 588 {+-} 1 mas, which is consistent with an M dwarf if it is at the same distance as the primary. Rossiter-McLaughlin measurements during transit imply a projected spin-orbit alignment angle {lambda} = 2 {+-} 16 deg, consistent with a zero obliquity for KELT-1. Finally, the vsin I{sub *} = 56 {+-} 2 km s{sup -1} of the primary is consistent at {approx}2{sigma} with tidal synchronization. Given the extreme parameters of the KELT-1 system, we expect it to provide an important testbed for theories of the emplacement and evolution of short-period companions, as well as theories of tidal dissipation and irradiated brown dwarf atmospheres.

  4. On the nature of short-period oscillations of the main Black Sea pycnocline, submesoscale eddies, and response of the marine environment to the catastrophic shower of 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatsepin, A. G.; Ostrovskii, A. G.; Kremenetskiy, V. V.; Piotukh, V. B.; Kuklev, S. B.; Moskalenko, L. V.; Podymov, O. I.; Baranov, V. I.; Korzh, A. O.; Stanichny, S. V.

    2013-11-01

    Field studies performed at the Shirshov Institute of Oceanology, Russian Academy of Sciences (SIO RAS), Black Sea hydrophysical polygon in 2012 are illustrated. The variations in the vertical distribution of the hydrophysical characteristics (water temperature, salinity, and density, as well as current velocity) in the upper 200-m layer of the Black Sea above the continental slope in the cold season, obtained using an Aqualog autonomous profiler on a moored buoy station, have been analyzed. It has been established that the position of the permanent pycno-halocline and the hydrosulphuric zone upper boundary intensively oscillate with a characteristic period of 5-10 days. These oscillations cause short-period variations in the thickness of the oxigenated layer by 20-40 m, which reaches one-third of the total thickness of the layer. Measurements performed with autonomous stations (bottom ADCP, thermochain) at the experimental subsatellite polygon in the Gelendzhik coastal zone, as well as meteorological, ship, and satellite data obtained during the catastrophic rains and flooding on July 6-7, 2012, and afterward, have been simultaneously analyzed. It has been established that a catastrophic flow of turbid fresh water into the sea caused the formation of a belt of freshened (by 1.0-2.7 psu) less dense water with a high suspension concentration on the shelf and the upper continental slope. This water formed a quasi-geostrophic northwestward along-shore current, the velocity of which reached 40-50 cm/s. Therefore, the freshened and turbid water mostly escaped from the Gelendzhik region northwestward for two days after the flood, and the remaining water became free of suspension owing to its settlement during approximately the same period. The fields of the current velocity and suspension concentration in a submesoscale cyclonic eddy, identified on the satellite image, were measured at the hydrophysical polygon. It has been established that a high (when compared to the

  5. Seismic Discrimination of the May 11, 1998 Indian Nuclear Test with Short-period Regional Data from Station NIL (Nilore, Pakistan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, A. J.; Walter, W. R.

    - Regional seismic discriminants for the May 11, 1998 Indian underground nuclear test(s) and earthquakes recorded at station NIL (Nilore, Pakistan) provide new data to test strategies that can be used to monitor the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Three categories of regional discriminants (ratios of P- and/or S-wave energy) were measured on short-period (0.5-6Hz) seismograms: P/S amplitude ratios (phase ratios) measured in the same frequency band, P- and S-wave spectral ratios (i.e., low frequency to high frequency for the same phase) and P/S cross-spectral ratios (i.e., low frequency S-wave to high frequency P-wave). The P/S amplitude ratios show good separation of the Indian nuclear test and regional earthquakes for Pn/Lg and Pn/Sn, however Pg/Lg does not discriminate as well. Pn/Lg and Pn/Sn discriminate well at frequencies as low as 0.5-2Hz, especially after accounting for path effects. This observation differs from previous studies that report poor separation of earthquakes and explosions at lower frequencies. The P/S amplitude ratios do not show any magnitude dependence, suggesting that forming the ratios in a fixed frequency band cancels the effects of source size-corner frequency scaling. Spatial variability of the observed discriminants arises from variations in crustal waveguide and/or attenuation structure (path propagation effects). Grouping amplitude ratios for earthquakes with paths similar to the Indian test greatly improves discrimination. Removing distance trends does not generally improve discrimination. Accounting for path effects with Bayesian kriging significantly improves discrimination. Spectral ratios (e.g., Pn [0.5-1Hz]/Pn [4-6Hz]) and cross-spectral ratios (e.g., Lg [1-2Hz]/Pn [4-6Hz]) show distance and magnitude dependence. We developed a technique for simultaneously removing the effects of distance and source size-corner frequency scaling on amplitude and spectral ratios. The technique uses a gridsearch to find several

  6. KELT-1b: A Strongly Irradiated, Highly Inflated, Short Period, 27 Jupiter-mass Companion Transiting a Mid-F Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siverd, Robert J.; Beatty, Thomas G.; Pepper, Joshua; Eastman, Jason D.; Collins, Karen; Bieryla, Allyson; Latham, David W.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Jensen, Eric L. N.; Crepp, Justin R.; Street, Rachel; Stassun, Keivan G.; Gaudi, B. Scott; Berlind, Perry; Calkins, Michael L.; DePoy, D. L.; Esquerdo, Gilbert A.; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Fűrész, Gábor; Geary, John C.; Gould, Andrew; Hebb, Leslie; Kielkopf, John F.; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Pogge, Richard; Stanek, K. Z.; Stefanik, Robert P.; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew H.; Trueblood, Mark; Trueblood, Patricia; Stutz, Amelia M.; van Saders, Jennifer L.

    2012-12-01

    We present the discovery of KELT-1b, the first transiting low-mass companion from the wide-field Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope-North (KELT-North) transit survey. A joint analysis of the spectroscopic, radial velocity, and photometric data indicates that the V = 10.7 primary is a mildly evolved mid-F star with T eff = 6516 ± 49 K, log g = 4.228+0.014 -0.021, and [Fe/H] = 0.052 ± 0.079, with an inferred mass M * = 1.335 ± 0.063 M ⊙ and radius R * = 1.471+0.045 -0.035 R ⊙. The companion is a low-mass brown dwarf or a super-massive planet with mass MP = 27.38 ± 0.93 M Jup and radius RP = 1.116+0.038 -0.029 R Jup. The companion is on a very short (~29 hr) period circular orbit, with an ephemeris Tc (BJDTDB) = 2455909.29280 ± 0.00023 and P = 1.217501 ± 0.000018 days. KELT-1b receives a large amount of stellar insolation, resulting in an estimated equilibrium temperature assuming zero albedo and perfect redistribution of T eq = 2423+34 -27 K. Comparison with standard evolutionary models suggests that the radius of KELT-1b is likely to be significantly inflated. Adaptive optics imaging reveals a candidate stellar companion to KELT-1 with a separation of 588 ± 1 mas, which is consistent with an M dwarf if it is at the same distance as the primary. Rossiter-McLaughlin measurements during transit imply a projected spin-orbit alignment angle λ = 2 ± 16 deg, consistent with a zero obliquity for KELT-1. Finally, the vsin I * = 56 ± 2 km s-1 of the primary is consistent at ~2σ with tidal synchronization. Given the extreme parameters of the KELT-1 system, we expect it to provide an important testbed for theories of the emplacement and evolution of short-period companions, as well as theories of tidal dissipation and irradiated brown dwarf atmospheres.

  7. Growth and characterization of CdTe single quantum wells confined by Cd 1- xZn xTe alloy and short period CdTe/ZnTe superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnea, N.; Lentz, G.; Mariette, H.; Feuillet, G.; Dal'bo, F.; Tuffigo, H.

    1989-02-01

    A comparative study of structural and optical properties of CdTe single quantum wells has been performed. Very efficient CdTe-Cd 1-xZn xTe (x Zn ≤ 0.2) wells have been grown and short period superlattices appear as a promising substitute of the alloy.

  8. Resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations of helicity-injected startup plasmas in National Spherical Torus eXperiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, E. B.; Sovinec, C. R.; Raman, R.; Ebrahimi, F.; Menard, J. E.

    2013-09-15

    The generation of helicity-injected startup plasmas in National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX), including flux surface closure, is studied using resistive-magnetohydrodynamic simulations with plasma flows, currents, ohmic heating and anisotropic thermal conduction. An injection-voltage pulse shape is used that separates the injection and closure phases allowing elucidation of the physics. The formation of an X-point near the helicity-injection gap is triggered as the injector voltage drops to zero. Near the forming X-point, magnetic pressure due to toroidal field entrained in the E × B plasma flow from the helicity-injection gap drops, allowing resistive magnetic reconnection even though the total injected current is almost constant. Where appropriate, the simulations are compared with Transient Coaxial Helicity Injection experiments in the NSTX spherical tokamak, which have demonstrated the formation of a promising candidate for non-inductive startup plasmas [Raman et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 075005 (2003)].

  9. Detailed noise measurements on the SR-7A propeller: Tone behavior with helical tip Mach number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, James H.; Hall, David G.

    1991-01-01

    Detailed noise measurements were taken on the SR-7A propeller to investigate the behavior of the noise with helical tip Mach number and then to level off as Mach number was increased further. This behavior was further investigated by obtaining detailed pressure-time histories of data. The pressure-time histories indicate that a portion of the primary pressure pulse is progressively cancelled by a secondary pulse which results in the noise leveling off as the helical tip Mach number is increased. This second pulse appears to originate on the same blade as the primary pulse and is in some way connected to the blade itself. This leaves open the possibility of redesigning the blade to improve the cancellation; thereby, the propeller noise is reduced.

  10. Predictive supracolloidal helices from patchy particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ruohai; Mao, Jian; Xie, Xu-Ming; Yan, Li-Tang

    2014-11-01

    A priori prediction of supracolloidal architectures from nanoparticle and colloidal assembly is a challenging goal in materials chemistry and physics. Despite intense research in this area, much less has been known about the predictive science of supracolloidal helices from designed building blocks. Therefore, developing conceptually new rules to construct supracolloidal architectures with predictive helicity is becoming an important and urgent task of great scientific interest. Here, inspired by biological helices, we show that the rational design of patchy arrangement and interaction can drive patchy particles to self-assemble into biomolecular mimetic supracolloidal helices. We further derive a facile design rule for encoding the target supracolloidal helices, thus opening the doors to the predictive science of these supracolloidal architectures. It is also found that kinetics and reaction pathway during the formation of supracolloidal helices offer a unique way to study supramolecular polymerization, and that well-controlled supracolloidal helices can exhibit tailorable circular dichroism effects at visible wavelengths.

  11. Predictive supracolloidal helices from patchy particles

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ruohai; Mao, Jian; Xie, Xu-Ming; Yan, Li-Tang

    2014-01-01

    A priori prediction of supracolloidal architectures from nanoparticle and colloidal assembly is a challenging goal in materials chemistry and physics. Despite intense research in this area, much less has been known about the predictive science of supracolloidal helices from designed building blocks. Therefore, developing conceptually new rules to construct supracolloidal architectures with predictive helicity is becoming an important and urgent task of great scientific interest. Here, inspired by biological helices, we show that the rational design of patchy arrangement and interaction can drive patchy particles to self-assemble into biomolecular mimetic supracolloidal helices. We further derive a facile design rule for encoding the target supracolloidal helices, thus opening the doors to the predictive science of these supracolloidal architectures. It is also found that kinetics and reaction pathway during the formation of supracolloidal helices offer a unique way to study supramolecular polymerization, and that well-controlled supracolloidal helices can exhibit tailorable circular dichroism effects at visible wavelengths. PMID:25387544

  12. Hot subdwarf binaries from the MUCHFUSS project. Analysis of 12 new systems and a study of the short-period binary population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupfer, T.; Geier, S.; Heber, U.; Østensen, R. H.; Barlow, B. N.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Heuser, C.; Schaffenroth, V.; Gänsicke, B. T.

    2015-04-01

    The project Massive Unseen Companions to Hot Faint Underluminous Stars from SDSS (MUCHFUSS) aims at finding hot subdwarf stars with massive compact companions like massive white dwarfs (M > 1.0 M⊙), neutron stars, or stellar-mass black holes. The existence of such systems is predicted by binary evolution theory, and recent discoveries indicate that they exist in our Galaxy. We present orbital and atmospheric parameters and put constraints on the nature of the companions of 12 close hot subdwarf B star (sdB) binaries found in the course of the MUCHFUSS project. The systems show periods between 0.14 and 7.4 days. In nine cases the nature of the companions cannot be constrained unambiguously whereas three systems most likely have white dwarf companions. We find that the companion to SDSS J083006.17+475150.3 is likely to be a rare example of a low-mass helium-core white dwarf. SDSS J095101.28+034757.0 shows an excess in the infrared that probably originates from a third companion in a wide orbit, which makes this system the second candidate hierarchical triple system containing an sdB star. SDSS J113241.58-063652.8 is the first helium deficient sdO star with a confirmed close companion. This study brings to 142 the number of sdB binaries with orbital periods of less than 30 days and with measured mass functions. We present an analysis of the minimum companion mass distribution and show that it is bimodal. One peak around 0.1 M⊙ corresponds to the low-mass main sequence (dM) and substellar companions. The other peak around 0.4 M⊙ corresponds to the white dwarf companions. The derived masses for the white dwarf companions are significantly lower than the average mass for single carbon-oxygen white dwarfs. In a Teff - log g diagram of sdB+dM companions, we find signs that the sdB components are more massive than the rest of the sample. The full sample was compared to the known population of extremely low-mass white dwarf binaries as well as short-period white dwarfs

  13. High-Precision Locations and the Stress Field from Instrumental Seismicity, Moment Tensors, and Short-Period Mechanisms through the Mina Deflection, Central Walker Lane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhl, C. J.; Smith, K. D.

    2012-12-01

    include the 1934 M 6.5 Excelsior Mountains event south of Mina, NV, and the 1932 M 7.1 Cedar Mountains earthquake east of the Pilot Mountains. Another persistent feature in the seismicity is an ~40 km long arcuate distribution of activity extending from approximately Queen Valley, north of the White Mountains, to Mono Lake that appears to reflect a southwestern boundary to northeast-striking structures in the MD. Here we develop high-precision relocations of instrumental seismicity in the MD from 1984 through 2012, including relocations of the 2004 sequence, and account for the historical seismic record. MT solutions from published reports and computed from recent M 3.5+ earthquakes as well as available and developed short-period focal mechanisms are compiled to evaluate the stress field to assess mechanisms of slip accommodation. Based on the complex distribution of fault orientations, the stress field varies locally northward from the SWL throughout the MD; however, in many cases, fault plane alignments can be isolated from high-precision locations, providing better constraints on stress and slip orientations.

  14. An experimental superconducting helical undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Taylor, C.

    1995-12-31

    Improvements in the technology of superconducting magnets for high energy physics and recent advancements in SC materials with the artificial pinning centers (APC){sup 2}, have made a bifilar helical SC device an attractive candidate for a single-pass free electron laser (FEL){sup 3}. Initial studies have suggested that a 6.5 mm inner diameter helical device, with a 27 mm period, can generate a central field of 2-2.5 Tesla. Additional studies have also suggested that with a stored energy of 300 J/m, such a device can be made self-protecting in the event of a quench. However, since the most critical area associated with high current density SC magnets is connected with quenching and training, a short experimental device will have to be built and tested. In this paper we discuss technical issues relevant to the construction of such a device, including a conceptual design, fields, and forces.

  15. Helical screw expander evaluation project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, R.

    1982-01-01

    A one MW helical rotary screw expander power system for electric power generation from geothermal brine was evaluated. The technology explored in the testing is simple, potentially very efficient, and ideally suited to wellhead installations in moderate to high enthalpy, liquid dominated field. A functional one MW geothermal electric power plant that featured a helical screw expander was produced and then tested with a demonstrated average performance of approximately 45% machine efficiency over a wide range of test conditions in noncondensing, operation on two-phase geothermal fluids. The Project also produced a computer equipped data system, an instrumentation and control van, and a 1000 kW variable load bank, all integrated into a test array designed for operation at a variety of remote test sites. Data are presented for the Utah testing and for the noncondensing phases of the testing in Mexico. Test time logged was 437 hours during the Utah tests and 1101 hours during the Mexico tests.

  16. Lamb Wave Helical Ultrasonic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, K. R.; Hinders, M. K.

    2004-02-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves have been used for a wide variety of ultrasonic inspection techniques. We describe here a new variation called helical ultrasound tomography (HUT). This new technique, among other things, has direct application to advanced pipe inspection. HUT uses guided ultrasonic waves along with an adaptation of the tomographic reconstruction algorithms developed by seismologists for what they call "cross borehole" tomography. In HUT, the Lamb-like guided waves travel in various helical crisscross paths between two parallel circumferential transducer arrays instead of the planar crisscross seismic paths between two boreholes. Although the measurement itself is fairly complicated, the output of the tomographic reconstruction is a readily interpretable map of a quantity of interest such as pipe wall thickness. We demonstrate the feasibility of the HUT technique via laboratory scans on steel pipe segments into which controlled thinnings have been introduced.

  17. Helical screw expander evaluation project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, R.

    1982-03-01

    A one MW helical rotary screw expander power system for electric power generation from geothermal brine was evaluated. The technology explored in the testing is simple, potentially very efficient, and ideally suited to wellhead installations in moderate to high enthalpy, liquid dominated field. A functional one MW geothermal electric power plant that featured a helical screw expander was produced and then tested with a demonstrated average performance of approximately 45% machine efficiency over a wide range of test conditions in noncondensing, operation on two-phase geothermal fluids. The Project also produced a computer equipped data system, an instrumentation and control van, and a 1000 kW variable load bank, all integrated into a test array designed for operation at a variety of remote test sites. Data are presented for the Utah testing and for the noncondensing phases of the testing in Mexico. Test time logged was 437 hours during the Utah tests and 1101 hours during the Mexico tests.

  18. Emulsification-Induced Homohelicity in Racemic Helical Polymer for Preparing Optically Active Helical Polymer Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Biao; Deng, Jinrui; Deng, Jianping

    2016-04-01

    Optically active nano- and microparticles have constituted a significant category of advanced functional materials. However, constructing optically active particles derived from synthetic helical polymers still remains as a big challenge. In the present study, it is attempted to induce a racemic helical polymer (containing right- and left-handed helices in equal amount) to prefer one predominant helicity in aqueous media by using emulsifier in the presence of chiral additive (emulsification process). Excitingly, the emulsification process promotes the racemic helical polymer to unify the helicity and directly provides optically active nanoparticles constructed by chirally helical polymer. A possible mechanism is proposed to explain the emulsification-induced homohelicity effect. The present study establishes a novel strategy for preparing chirally helical polymer-derived optically active nanoparticles based on racemic helical polymers. PMID:26829250

  19. Topology of modified helical gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, F. L.; Zhang, J.; Handschuh, R. F.; Coy, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    The topology of several types of modified surfaces of helical gears is proposed. The modified surfaces allow absorption of a linear or almost linear function of transmission errors. These errors are caused by gear misalignment and an improvement of the contact of gear tooth surfaces. Principles and corresponding programs for computer aided simulation of meshing and contact of gears have been developed. The results of this investigation are illustrated with numerical examples.

  20. Helical Antimicrobial Sulfono- {gamma} -AApeptides

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yaqiong; Wu, Haifan; Teng, Peng; Bai, Ge; Lin, Xiaoyang; Zuo, Xiaobing; Cao, Chuanhai; Cai, Jianfeng

    2015-06-11

    Host-defense peptides (HDPs) such as magainin 2 have emerged as potential therapeutic agents combating antibiotic resistance. Inspired by their structures and mechanism of action, herein we report the fi rst example of antimicrobial helical sulfono- γ - AApeptide foldamers. The lead molecule displays broad-spectrum and potent antimicrobial activity against multi-drug-resistant Gram- positive and Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. Time-kill studies and fl uorescence microscopy suggest that sulfono- γ -AApeptides eradicate bacteria by taking a mode of action analogous to that of HDPs. Clear structure - function relationships exist in the studied sequences. Longer sequences, presumably adopting more-de fi ned helical structures, are more potent than shorter ones. Interestingly, the sequence with less helical propensity in solution could be more selective than the stronger helix-forming sequences. Moreover, this class of antimicrobial agents are resistant to proteolytic degradation. These results may lead to the development of a new class of antimicrobial foldamers combating emerging antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

  1. Dispersion of helically corrugated waveguides: analytical, numerical, and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Burt, G; Samsonov, S V; Ronald, K; Denisov, G G; Young, A R; Bratman, V L; Phelps, A D R; Cross, A W; Konoplev, I V; He, W; Thomson, J; Whyte, C G

    2004-10-01

    Helically corrugated waveguides have recently been studied for use in various applications such as interaction regions in gyrotron traveling-wave tubes and gyrotron backward-wave oscillators and as a dispersive medium for passive microwave pulse compression. The paper presents a summary of various methods that can be used for analysis of the wave dispersion of such waveguides. The results obtained from an analytical approach, simulations with the three-dimensional numerical code MAGIC, and cold microwave measurements are analyzed and compared. PMID:15600525

  2. The morphology transformation from helical nanofiber to helical nanotube in a diarylethene self-assembly system.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yulong; Yan, Shihai; Zhou, Xinhong; Xu, Wei; Xu, Hongxia; Liu, Zhihong; Zhang, Lixue; Zhang, Chuanjian; Cui, Guanglei; Yao, Lishan

    2014-08-01

    A helical nanostructure can be obtained by self-assembly of a diarylethene derivative that bears two malononitrile substitutes in a tetrahydrofuran/water medium. It is revealed that the helical nanostructure changed from helical nanofiber to helical nanotube when the diarylethene monomer changed from the open-ring isomer to the closed-ring isomer upon irradiation with 365 nm ultraviolet light, meanwhile, the helix angle of the nanostructure changed from 50° ± 5° to 75° ± 5°. There is a great possibility that the helical nanofibers and helical nanotubes are assembled from dimers as base units based on theoretical calculation and experimental results. PMID:24940732

  3. Helicity in dynamical processes in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurgansky, Michael; Maksimenkov, Leonid; Khapaev, Alexey; Chkhetiani, Otto

    2016-04-01

    In modern geophysical fluid dynamics and dynamic meteorology, a notable interest is observed to the notion of helicity ("kinetic helicity" to be distinguished from "magnetic helicity" widely used in magnetohydrodynamics, astrophysics and Solar physics), which is defined by the scalar product of 3D vectors of velocity and vorticity. In this contribution, we bring together different, both known in the literature and novel formulations of the helicity balance equation, by also taking into account the effects of air compressibility and Earth rotation. Equations and relationships are presented that are valid under different approximations customarily made in the dynamic meteorology, e.g. Boussinesq approximation, quasi-static approximation, quasi-geostrophic approximation. An emphasis is placed on the helicity budget analysis in large-scale atmospheric motions. An explicit expression is presented for the rate of helicity injection from the free atmosphere into a non-linear Ekman boundary layer. This injection is shown to be exactly balanced by the helicity viscous destruction within the boundary layer. It is conjectured that this helicity injection may characterize the intensity of atmospheric circulation in extratropical latitudes of both terrestrial hemispheres. Examples are provided based on re-analyses data. Vertical distribution of helicity and superhelicity in different Ekman boundary layers is also discussed.

  4. Building blocks for subleading helicity operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolodrubetz, Daniel W.; Moult, Ian; Stewart, Iain W.

    2016-05-01

    On-shell helicity methods provide powerful tools for determining scattering amplitudes, which have a one-to-one correspondence with leading power helicity operators in the Soft-Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) away from singular regions of phase space. We show that helicity based operators are also useful for enumerating power suppressed SCET operators, which encode subleading amplitude information about singular limits. In particular, we present a complete set of scalar helicity building blocks that are valid for constructing operators at any order in the SCET power expansion. We also describe an interesting angular momentum selection rule that restricts how these building blocks can be assembled.

  5. Magnetic helicity in emerging solar active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Bobra, M.; Hayashi, K.; Sun, X.; Schuck, P. W.

    2014-04-10

    Using vector magnetic field data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager instrument aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we study magnetic helicity injection into the corona in emerging active regions (ARs) and examine the hemispheric helicity rule. In every region studied, photospheric shearing motion contributes most of the helicity accumulated in the corona. In a sample of 28 emerging ARs, 17 follow the hemisphere rule (61% ± 18% at a 95% confidence interval). Magnetic helicity and twist in 25 ARs (89% ± 11%) have the same sign. The maximum magnetic twist, which depends on the size of an AR, is inferred in a sample of 23 emerging ARs with a bipolar magnetic field configuration.

  6. Helical axis stellarator with noninterlocking planar coils

    DOEpatents

    Reiman, Allan; Boozer, Allen H.

    1987-01-01

    A helical axis stellarator using only noninterlocking planar, non-circular coils, generates magnetic fields having a magnetic well and large rotational transform with resultant large equilibrium beta.

  7. Helical tomotherapy superficial dose measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, Chester R.; Seibert, Rebecca M.; Robison, Benjamin; Mitchell, Martha

    2007-08-15

    Helical tomotherapy is a treatment technique that is delivered from a 6 MV fan beam that traces a helical path while the couch moves linearly into the bore. In order to increase the treatment delivery dose rate, helical tomotherapy systems do not have a flattening filter. As such, the dose distributions near the surface of the patient may be considerably different from other forms of intensity-modulated delivery. The purpose of this study was to measure the dose distributions near the surface for helical tomotherapy plans with a varying separation between the target volume and the surface of an anthropomorphic phantom. A hypothetical planning target volume (PTV) was defined on an anthropomorphic head phantom to simulate a 2.0 Gy per fraction IMRT parotid-sparing head and neck treatment of the upper neck nodes. A total of six target volumes were created with 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 mm of separation between the surface of the phantom and the outer edge of the PTV. Superficial doses were measured for each of the treatment deliveries using film placed in the head phantom and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) placed on the phantom's surface underneath an immobilization mask. In the 0 mm test case where the PTV extends to the phantom surface, the mean TLD dose was 1.73{+-}0.10 Gy (or 86.6{+-}5.1% of the prescribed dose). The measured superficial dose decreases to 1.23{+-}0.10 Gy (61.5{+-}5.1% of the prescribed dose) for a PTV-surface separation of 5 mm. The doses measured by the TLDs indicated that the tomotherapy treatment planning system overestimates superficial doses by 8.9{+-}3.2%. The radiographic film dose for the 0 mm test case was 1.73{+-}0.07 Gy, as compared to the calculated dose of 1.78{+-}0.05 Gy. Given the results of the TLD and film measurements, the superficial calculated doses are overestimated between 3% and 13%. Without the use of bolus, tumor volumes that extend to the surface may be underdosed. As such, it is recommended that bolus be added for these

  8. NMR Assignments for a Helical 40 kDa Membrane Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Oxenoid, Kirill; Kim, Hak J.; Jacob, Jaison; Soennichsen, Frank D.; Sanders, Charles R.

    2004-04-28

    Backbone nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) assignments were achieved for diacylglycerol kinase (DAGK) in detergent micelles. DAGK is a homotrimeric integral membrane protein comprised of 121 residue subunits, each having three transmembrane segments. Assignments were made using TROSY-based pulse sequences. DAGK was found to be an almost exclusively helical protein. This work points to the feasibility of both solving the structure of DAGK using solution NMR methods and using NMR as a primary tool in structural studies of other helical integral membrane proteins of similar size and complexity.

  9. Human Skin as Arrays of Helical Antennas in the Millimeter and Submillimeter Wave Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Yuri; Puzenko, Alexander; Ben Ishai, Paul; Caduff, Andreas; Agranat, Aharon J.

    2008-03-01

    Recent studies of the minute morphology of the skin by optical coherence tomography showed that the sweat ducts in human skin are helically shaped tubes, filled with a conductive aqueous solution. A computer simulation study of these structures in millimeter and submillimeter wave bands show that the human skin functions as an array of low-Q helical antennas. Experimental evidence is presented that the spectral response in the sub-Terahertz region is governed by the level of activity of the perspiration system. It is also correlated to physiological stress as manifested by the pulse rate and the systolic blood pressure.

  10. Human skin as arrays of helical antennas in the millimeter and submillimeter wave range.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Yuri; Puzenko, Alexander; Ben Ishai, Paul; Caduff, Andreas; Agranat, Aharon J

    2008-03-28

    Recent studies of the minute morphology of the skin by optical coherence tomography showed that the sweat ducts in human skin are helically shaped tubes, filled with a conductive aqueous solution. A computer simulation study of these structures in millimeter and submillimeter wave bands show that the human skin functions as an array of low-Q helical antennas. Experimental evidence is presented that the spectral response in the sub-Terahertz region is governed by the level of activity of the perspiration system. It is also correlated to physiological stress as manifested by the pulse rate and the systolic blood pressure. PMID:18517913

  11. Spheromak Power and Helicity Balance

    SciTech Connect

    Thomassen, K.I.

    2000-05-18

    This note addresses the division of gun power and helicity between the open line volume and the closed flux surface volume in a steady state flux core spheromak. Our assumptions are that fine scale turbulence maintains each region close to a Taylor state, {mu}{sub o}J = {lambda}B. The gun region that feeds these two volumes surrounded by a flux conserver is shown topologically below. (The actual geometry is toroidal). Flux and current from the magnetized gun flow on open lines around the entire closed surface containing the spheromak. The gun current flows down the potential gradient, the potential difference between the two ends of each line being the gun voltage. Here, the gun voltage excludes the sheath drops at each end. When these volumes have different values of {lambda} (ratio of {mu}{sub o}B{sup -2}j {center_dot} B in each region) in the open line volume V{sub 1} and the closed spheromak volume V{sub 2} the efficiency of transferring the gun power to the spheromak to sustain the ohmic loss is the {lambda}-ratio of these regions, in the limit V{sub 1} << V{sub 2}. This result follows immediately from helicity balance in that limit. Here we give an accounting of all the gun power, and do not assume a small edge (open line) region.

  12. Helical coil thermal hydraulic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caramello, M.; Bertani, C.; De Salve, M.; Panella, B.

    2014-11-01

    A model has been developed in Matlab environment for the thermal hydraulic analysis of helical coil and shell steam generators. The model considers the internal flow inside one helix and its associated control volume of water on the external side, both characterized by their inlet thermodynamic conditions and the characteristic geometry data. The model evaluates the behaviour of the thermal-hydraulic parameters of the two fluids, such as temperature, pressure, heat transfer coefficients, flow quality, void fraction and heat flux. The evaluation of the heat transfer coefficients as well as the pressure drops has been performed by means of the most validated literature correlations. The model has been applied to one of the steam generators of the IRIS modular reactor and a comparison has been performed with the RELAP5/Mod.3.3 code applied to an inclined straight pipe that has the same length and the same elevation change between inlet and outlet of the real helix. The predictions of the developed model and RELAP5/Mod.3.3 code are in fairly good agreement before the dryout region, while the dryout front inside the helical pipes is predicted at a lower distance from inlet by the model.

  13. The AGS synchrotron with four helical magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoupas N.; Huang, H.; Roser, T.; MacKay, W.W.; Trbojevic, D.

    2012-05-20

    The idea of using two partial helical magnets was applied successfully to the AGS synchrotron to preserve the proton beam polarization. In this paper we explore in details the idea of using four helical magnets placed symmetrically in the AGS ring. The placement of four helical magnets in the AGS ring provides many advantages over the present setup of the AGS which uses two partial helical magnets. First, the symmetric placement of the four helical magnets allows for a better control of the AGS optics with reduced values of the beta functions especially near beam injection, second, the vertical spin direction during beam injection and extraction is closer to vertical, and third, it provides for a larger 'spin tune gap', which allows the vertical and horizontal tunes to be placed, and prevent the horizontal and vertical intrinsic spin resonances of the AGS to occur during the acceleration cycle. Although the same spin gap can be obtained with a single or two partial helices, the required high field strength of a single helix makes its use impractical, and that of the double helix rather difficult. In this paper we will provide results on the spin tune and on the optics of the AGS with four partial helical magnets, and compare these results with the present setup of the AGS that uses two partial helical magnets.

  14. Magnetic Helicity and the Solar Dynamo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Richard C.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to open a new window into the solar dynamo, convection, and magnetic reconnection through measurement of the helicity density of magnetic fields in the photosphere and tracing of large-scale patterns of magnetic helicity in the corona.

  15. Hydrodynamic characteristics of the helical flow pump.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Kohei; Hosoda, Kyohei; Nishida, Masahiro; Isoyama, Takashi; Saito, Itsuro; Ariyoshi, Koki; Inoue, Yusuke; Ono, Toshiya; Nakagawa, Hidemoto; Sato, Masami; Hara, Sintaro; Lee, Xinyang; Wu, Sheng-Yuan; Imachi, Kou; Abe, Yusuke

    2015-09-01

    The helical flow pump (HFP) was invented to be an ideal pump for developing the TAH and the helical flow TAH (HFTAH) using two HFPs has been developed. However, since the HFP is quite a new pump, hydrodynamic characteristics inside the pump are not clarified. To analyze hydrodynamic characteristics of the HFP, flow visualization study using the particle image velocimetry and computational fluid dynamics analysis were performed. The experimental and computational models were developed to simulate the left HFP of the HFTAH and distributions of flow velocity vectors, shear stress and pressure inside the pump were examined. In distribution of flow velocity vectors, the vortexes in the vane were observed, which indicated that the HFP has a novel and quite unique working principle in which centrifugal force rotates the fluid in the helical volutes and the fluid is transferred from the inlet to the outlet helical volutes according to the helical structure. In distribution of shear stress, the highest shear stress that was considered to be occurred by the shunt flow across the impeller was found around the entrance of the inlet helical volute. However, it was not so high to cause hemolysis. This shunt flow is thought to be improved by redesigning the inlet and outlet helical volutes. In distribution of pressure, negative pressure was found near the entrance of the inlet helical volute. However, it was not high. Negative pressure is thought to be reduced with an improvement in the design of the impeller or the vane shape. PMID:25784463

  16. Simplified Fabrication of Helical Copper Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petro, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    A simplified technique has been devised for fabricating helical antennas for use in experiments on radio-frequency generation and acceleration of plasmas. These antennas are typically made of copper (for electrical conductivity) and must have a specific helical shape and precise diameter.

  17. Chiral self-assembly of helical particles.

    PubMed

    Kolli, Hima Bindu; Cinacchi, Giorgio; Ferrarini, Alberta; Giacometti, Achille

    2016-04-12

    The shape of the building blocks plays a crucial role in directing self-assembly towards desired architectures. Out of the many different shapes, the helix has a unique position. Helical structures are ubiquitous in nature and a helical shape is exhibited by the most important biopolymers like polynucleotides, polypeptides and polysaccharides as well as by cellular organelles like flagella. Helical particles can self-assemble into chiral superstructures, which may have a variety of applications, e.g. as photonic (meta)materials. However, a clear and definite understanding of these structures has not been entirely achieved yet. We have recently undertaken an extensive investigation on the phase behaviour of hard helical particles, using numerical simulations and classical density functional theory. Here we present a detailed study of the phase diagram of hard helices as a function of their morphology. This includes a variety of liquid-crystal phases, with different degrees of orientational and positional ordering. We show how, by tuning the helix parameters, it is possible to control the organization of the system. Starting from slender helices, whose phase behaviour is similar to that of rodlike particles, an increase in curliness leads to the onset of azimuthal correlations between the particles and the formation of phases specific to helices. These phases feature a new kind of screw order, of which there is experimental evidence in colloidal suspensions of helical flagella. PMID:26767786

  18. Structure and interactions of biological helices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornyshev, Alexei A.; Lee, Dominic J.; Leikin, Sergey; Wynveen, Aaron

    2007-07-01

    Helices are essential building blocks of living organisms, be they molecular fragments of proteins ( α -helices), macromolecules (DNA and collagen), or multimolecular assemblies (microtubules and viruses). Their interactions are involved in packing of meters of genetic material within cells and phage heads, recognition of homologous genes in recombination and DNA repair, stability of tissues, and many other processes. Helical molecules form a variety of mesophases in vivo and in vitro. Recent structural studies, direct measurements of intermolecular forces, single-molecule manipulations, and other experiments have accumulated a wealth of information and revealed many puzzling physical phenomena. It is becoming increasingly clear that in many cases the physics of biological helices cannot be described by theories that treat them as simple, unstructured polyelectrolytes. The present article focuses on the most important and interesting aspects of the physics of structured macromolecules, highlighting various manifestations of the helical motif in their structure, elasticity, interactions with counterions, aggregation, and poly- and mesomorphic transitions.

  19. Helices of fractionalized Maxwell fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamil, Muhammad; Abro, Kashif Ali; Khan, Najeeb Alam

    2015-12-01

    In this paper the helical flows of fractionalized Maxwell fluid model, through a circular cylinder, is studied. The motion is produced by the cylinder that at the initial moment begins to rotate around its axis with an angular velocity Omegatp, and to slide along the same axis with linear velocity Utp. The solutions that have been obtained using Laplace and finite Hankel transforms and presented in series form in terms of the newly defined special function M(z), satisfy all imposed initial and boundary conditions. Moreover, the corresponding solutions for ordinary Maxwell and Newtonian fluid obtained as special cases of the present general solution. Finally, the influence of various pertinent parameters on fluid motion as well as the comparison among different fluids models is analyzed by graphical illustrations.

  20. Thermal deformation of helical gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Fei, Ye-tai; Liu, Shan-lin

    2010-08-01

    The analytical equation for the thermal field of a helical gear under normal working condition in a stable thermal field is established using mathematical physics, and the thermal deformation of the gear can be computed using this equation. The variations of gear geometric parameters, such as radial dimension, tooth depth, spiral angle, pressure angle, flank clearance and etc., are investigated with respect to the temperature change. According to the analytical and computational results obtained using the equation, the thermal deformation of the gear is strongly dependent on the choice of parameters, which is also confirmed using simulation software (COMSOL Multiphysic software). This is significant for the improvement of the rotation precision and working efficiency of screw gears.

  1. The quantum Hall effect helicity

    SciTech Connect

    Shrivastava, Keshav N.

    2015-04-16

    The quantum Hall effect in semiconductor heterostructures is explained by two signs in the angular momentum j=l±s and g=(2j+1)/(2l+1) along with the Landau factor (n+1/2). These modifications in the existing theories explain all of the fractional charges. The helicity which is the sign of the product of the linear momentum with the spin p.s plays an important role for the understanding of the data at high magnetic fields. In particular it is found that particles with positive sign in the spin move in one direction and those with negative sign move in another direction which explains the up and down stream motion of the particles.

  2. Adding helicity to inflationary magnetogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Caprini, Chiara; Sorbo, Lorenzo E-mail: sorbo@physics.umass.edu

    2014-10-01

    The most studied mechanism of inflationary magnetogenesis relies on the time-dependence of the coefficient of the gauge kinetic term F{sub μν} F{sup μν}. Unfortunately, only extremely finely tuned versions of the model can consistently generate the cosmological magnetic fields required by observations. We propose a generalization of this model, where also the pseudoscalar invariant F{sub μν}  F-tilde {sup μν} is multiplied by a time dependent function. The new parity violating term allows more freedom in tuning the amplitude of the field at the end of inflation. Moreover, it leads to a helical magnetic field that is amplified at large scales by magnetohydrodynamical processes during the radiation dominated epoch. As a consequence, our model can satisfy the observational lower bounds on fields in the intergalactic medium, while providing a seed for the galactic dynamo, if inflation occurs at an energy scale ranging from 10{sup 5} to 10{sup 10} GeV. Such energy scale is well below that suggested by the recent BICEP2 result, if the latter is due to primordial tensor modes. However, the gauge field is a source of tensors during inflation and generates a spectrum of gravitational waves that can give a sizable tensor to scalar ratio r=O(0.2) even if inflation occurs at low energies. This system therefore evades the Lyth bound. For smaller values of r, lower values of the inflationary energy scale are required. The model predicts fully helical cosmological magnetic fields and a chiral spectrum of primordial gravitational waves.

  3. Spontaneous sense inversion in helical mesophases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wensink, H. H.

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the pitch sensitivity of chiral nematic phases of helicoidal patchy cylinders as a generic model for chiral (bio-)polymers and helix-shaped colloidal rods. The behaviour of the macroscopic helical pitch is studied from microscopic principles by invoking a simple density functional theory generalised to accommodate weakly twisted director fields. Upon changing the degree of alignment along the local helicoidal director we find that chiral nematic phases exhibit a sudden sense inversion whereby the helical symmetry changes from left- to right-handed and vice versa. Since the local alignment is governed by thermodynamic variables such as density, temperature or the amplitude of an external directional field, such pitch sense inversions can be expected in systems of helical mesogens of both thermotropic and lyotropic origin. We show that the spontaneous change of helical symmetry is a direct consequence of an antagonistic effective torque between helical particles with a certain prescribed internal helicity. The results may help opening up new routes towards precise control of the helical handedness of chiral assemblies by a judicious choice of external control parameters.

  4. Magnetic Helicity in a Cyclic Convective Dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miesch, Mark S.; Zhang, Mei; Augustson, Kyle C.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic helicity is a fundamental agent for magnetic self-organization in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) dynamos. As a conserved quantity in ideal MHD, it establishes a strict topological coupling between large and small-scale magnetic fields. The generation of magnetic fields on scales larger than the velocity field is linked to an upscale transfer of magnetic helicity, either locally in spectral space as in the inverse cascade of magnetic helicity in MHD turbulence or non-locally, as in the turbulent alpha-effect of mean-field dynamo theory. Thus, understanding the generation, transport, and dissipation of magnetic helicity is an essential prerequisite to understanding manifestations of magnetic self-organization in the solar dynamo, including sunspots, the prominent dipole and quadrupole moments, and the 22-year magnetic activity cycle. We investigate the role of magnetic helicity in a convective dynamo model that exhibits regular magnetic cycles. The cycle is marked by coherent bands of toroidal field that persist within the convection zone and that are antisymmetric about the equator. When these toriodal bands interact across the equator, it initiates a global restructuring of the magnetic topology that contributes to the reversal of the dipole moment. Thus, the polar field reversals are preceeded by a brief reversal of the subsurface magnetic helicity. There is some evidence that the Sun may exhibit a similar magnetic helicity reversal prior to its polar field reversals.

  5. Magnetic Helicity in Solar Dynamo Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miesch, Mark; Augustson, Kyle C.; Zhang, Mei

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic helicity is a fundamental agent for magnetic self-organization in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) dynamos. As a conserved quantity in ideal MHD, it establishes a strict topological coupling between large and small-scale magnetic fields. The generation of magnetic fields on scales larger than the velocity field is linked to an upscale transfer of magnetic helicity, either locally in spectral space as in the inverse cascade of magnetic helicity in MHD turbulence or non-locally, as in the turbulent alpha-effect of mean-field dynamo theory. Thus, understanding the generation, transport, and dissipation of magnetic helicity is an essential prerequisite to understanding manifestations of magnetic self-organization in the solar dynamo, including sunspots, the prominent dipole and quadrupole moments, and the 22-year magnetic activity cycle. Yet, despite its significance, magnetic helicity is often neglected in observational and theoretical studies of solar magnetism. This can be attributed to two factors; First, the calculation of the magnetic helicity is not unique; in general it depends on an electromagnetic guage through the magnetic vector potential. Second, unless it is explicitly calculated as part of the computational algorithm in numerical models, it is not always straightforward to obtain the magnetic vector potential. Here we consider gauge-invariant measures of the magnetic helicity and magnetic helicity flux and we describe how they can be computed from measurable quantities such as the magnetic field, the bulk plasma velocity, and the electrical current density. These measures can be applied to local Cartesian geometries as well as global spherical shells. Here we apply them to two global dynamo simulations, each exhibiting regular magnetic cycles. These include a convective MHD dynamo model and a 3-D Babcock-Leighton dynamo model. Both exhibit patterns of magnetic helicity evolution that reflect the global restructuring of the magnetic field over the

  6. Enhanced helical swimming in Boger fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godinez, Francisco; Mendez-Rojano, Rodrigo; Zenit, Roberto; Lauga, Eric

    2014-11-01

    We conduct experiments with force-free magnetically-driven helical swimmers in Newtonian and viscoelastic (Boger) fluids. In order assess the effect of viscoelasticity on the swimming performance, we conduct experiments for swimmers with different helical tail geometries. We use helices with the same wave length and total length but vary the angle of the helix. As previously reported by the computational study of Spagniole and collaborators, we found that the swimming performance can either increase, decrease or remain unchanged, depending on the geometry of the tail. With the right geometry, the enhancement can be up to a factor of two.

  7. Helicity oscillations of Dirac and Majorana neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrynina, Alexandra; Kartavtsev, Alexander; Raffelt, Georg

    2016-06-01

    The helicity of a Dirac neutrino with mass m evolves under the influence of a B field because it has a magnetic dipole moment proportional to m . Moreover, it was recently shown that a polarized or anisotropic medium engenders the same effect for both Dirac and Majorana neutrinos. Because a B field polarizes a background medium, it instigates helicity oscillations even for Majorana neutrinos unless the medium is symmetric between matter and antimatter. Motivated by these observations, we review the impact of a B field and of an anisotropic or polarized medium on helicity oscillations for Dirac and Majorana neutrinos from the common perspective of in-medium dispersion.

  8. Steering Chiral Swimmers along Noisy Helical Paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Benjamin M.; Jülicher, Frank

    2009-08-01

    Chemotaxis along helical paths towards a target releasing a chemoattractant is found in sperm cells and many microorganisms. We discuss the stochastic differential geometry of the noisy helical swimming path of a chiral swimmer. A chiral swimmer equipped with a simple feedback system can navigate in a concentration gradient of chemoattractant. We derive an effective equation for the alignment of helical paths with a concentration gradient which is related to the alignment of a dipole in an external field and discuss the chemotaxis index.

  9. Thermally activated helicity reversals of skyrmions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, X. Z.; Shibata, K.; Koshibae, W.; Tokunaga, Y.; Kaneko, Y.; Nagai, T.; Kimoto, K.; Taguchi, Y.; Nagaosa, N.; Tokura, Y.

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic bubbles with winding number S =1 are topologically equivalent to skyrmions. Here we report the discovery of helicity (in-plane magnetization-swirling direction) reversal of skyrmions, while keeping their hexagonal lattice form, at above room temperature in a thin hexaferrite magnet. We have observed that the frequency of helicity reversals dramatically increases with temperature in a thermally activated manner, revealing that the generation energy of a kink-soliton pair for switching helicity on a skyrmion rapidly decreases towards the magnetic transition temperature.

  10. Helical flux ropes in solar prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martens, P. C. H.; Van Ballegooijen, A. A.

    1990-01-01

    The present numerical method for the computation of force-free, cancelling magnetic structures shows that flux cancellation at the neutral line in a sheared magnetic arcade generates helical field lines that can support a prominence's plasma. With increasing flux cancellation, the axis of the helical fields moves to greater heights; this is suggestive of a prominence eruption. Two alternative scenarios are proposed for the formation of polar crown prominences which yield the correct axial magnetic field sign. Both models are noted to retain the formation of helical flux tubes through flux cancellation as their key feature.

  11. Force-free electromagnetic pulses in a laboratory plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    A short, intense current pulse is drawn from an electrode immersed in a magnetized afterglow plasma. The induced magnetic field B(r,t) assumes the shape of a helical double vortex which propagates along B(0) through the uniform plasma as a whistler mode. The observations support a prediction of force-free (J x B + neE = 0) electromagnetic fields and solitary waves. Energy and helicity are approximately conserved.

  12. Dense Helical Electron Bunch Generation in Near-Critical Density Plasmas with Ultrarelativistic Laser Intensities

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ronghao; Liu, Bin; Lu, Haiyang; Zhou, Meilin; Lin, Chen; Sheng, Zhengming; Chen, Chia-erh; He, Xiantu; Yan, Xueqing

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism for emergence of helical electron bunch(HEB) from an ultrarelativistic circularly polarized laser pulse propagating in near-critical density(NCD) plasma is investigated. Self-consistent three-dimensional(3D) Particle-in-Cell(PIC) simulations are performed to model all aspects of the laser plasma interaction including laser pulse evolution, electron and ion motions. At a laser intensity of 1022 W/cm2, the accelerated electrons have a broadband spectrum ranging from 300 MeV to 1.3 GeV, with the charge of 22 nano-Coulombs(nC) within a solid-angle of 0.14 Sr. Based on the simulation results, a phase-space dynamics model is developed to explain the helical density structure and the broadband energy spectrum. PMID:26503634

  13. Dense Helical Electron Bunch Generation in Near-Critical Density Plasmas with Ultrarelativistic Laser Intensities.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ronghao; Liu, Bin; Lu, Haiyang; Zhou, Meilin; Lin, Chen; Sheng, Zhengming; Chen, Chia-erh; He, Xiantu; Yan, Xueqing

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism for emergence of helical electron bunch(HEB) from an ultrarelativistic circularly polarized laser pulse propagating in near-critical density(NCD) plasma is investigated. Self-consistent three-dimensional(3D) Particle-in-Cell(PIC) simulations are performed to model all aspects of the laser plasma interaction including laser pulse evolution, electron and ion motions. At a laser intensity of 10(22) W/cm(2), the accelerated electrons have a broadband spectrum ranging from 300 MeV to 1.3 GeV, with the charge of 22 nano-Coulombs(nC) within a solid-angle of 0.14 Sr. Based on the simulation results, a phase-space dynamics model is developed to explain the helical density structure and the broadband energy spectrum. PMID:26503634

  14. On helical vortex motions of moist air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurgansky, M. V.

    2013-09-01

    Two results that are fundamentally different from what takes place in a dry atmosphere have been obtained for adiabatic motions of unsaturated moist air: (1) the steady helical motion of moist air with collinear velocity and vorticity vectors everywhere is dynamically impossible; (2) the spontaneous amplification (generation) of helicity in a moist air due to baroclinicity is dynamically and thermodynamically feasible. In the absence of helicity flux through the boundary of the domain occupied by air flows, the difference between the values of integral helicity H at time instant t delaying at a small time interval from the initial instant t 0 (at which the instantaneous state of air motion is isomorphic either to a steady Beltrami flow or to an irrotational flow) and the initial value of H increases proportionally to ( t - t 0)4. The nonzero value of the proportionality factor is ensured by the difference in values of the Poisson ratio for dry air and water vapor, respectively.

  15. Passive micromixers with dual helical channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Keyin; Yang, Qing; Chen, Feng; Zhao, Yulong; Meng, Xiangwei; Shan, Chao; Li, Yanyang

    2015-02-01

    In this study, a three-dimensional (3D) micromixer with cross-linked double helical microchannels is studied to achieve rapid mixing of fluids at low Reynolds numbers (Re). The 3D micromixer takes full advantages of the chaotic advection model with helical microchannels; meanwhile, the proposed crossing structure of double helical microchannels enables two flow patterns of repelling flow and straight flow in the fluids to promote the agitation effect. The complex 3D micromixer is realized by an improved femtosecond laser wet etching (FLWE) technology embedded in fused silica. The mixing results show that cross-linked double helical microchannels can achieve excellent mixing within 3 cycles (300 μm) over a wide range of low Re (1.5×10-3~600), which compare well with the conventional passive micromixers. This highly-effective micromixer is hoped to contribute to the integration of microfluidic systems.

  16. Emergence of helicity in rotating stratified turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Raffaele; Mininni, Pablo D.; Rosenberg, Duane; Pouquet, Annick

    2013-03-01

    We perform numerical simulations of decaying rotating stratified turbulence and show, in the Boussinesq framework, that helicity (velocity-vorticity correlation), as observed in supercell storms and hurricanes, is spontaneously created due to an interplay between buoyancy and rotation common to large-scale atmospheric and oceanic flows. Helicity emerges from the joint action of eddies and of inertia-gravity waves (with inertia and gravity with respective associated frequencies f and N), and it occurs when the waves are sufficiently strong. For N/f<3 the amount of helicity produced is correctly predicted by a quasilinear balance equation. Outside this regime, and up to the highest Reynolds number obtained in this study, namely Re≈10000, helicity production is found to be persistent for N/f as large as ≈17, and for ReFr2 and ReRo2, respectively, as large as ≈100 and ≈24000.

  17. Evolution of helicities in dynamo problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetnyak, M. Yu.

    2015-07-01

    The properties of wavelet spectra of kinetic and magnetic energies, as well as of helicities, are considered by the example of a three-dimensional dynamo model in a rapidly rotating a plane layer and heated from below. It is shown that the transition from the kinematic mode to the full dynamo mode is accompanied by a decrease in the magnetic energy of the system. The hydrodynamic helicity changes its sign by height and has the same sign for all scales. The current and magnetic helicities also have the dipole form of symmetry in the physical space; however, their sign at small and large scales is different—the so-called effect of separation in scales. The cross-helicity has no separation in scales, but it can change the sign with time so that its averaged value is small.

  18. Helical vortices: viscous dynamics and instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Maurice; Selcuk, Can; Delbende, Ivan; Ijlra-Upmc Team; Limsi-Cnrs Team

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the dynamical properties of helical vortices is of great importance for numerous applications such as wind turbines, helicopter rotors, ship propellers. Locally these flows often display a helical symmetry: fields are invariant through combined axial translation of distance Δz and rotation of angle θ = Δz / L around the same z-axis, where 2 πL denotes the helix pitch. A DNS code with built-in helical symmetry has been developed in order to compute viscous quasi-steady basic states with one or multiple vortices. These states will be characterized (core structure, ellipticity, ...) as a function of the pitch, without or with an axial flow component. The instability modes growing in the above base flows and their growth rates are investigated by a linearized version of the DNS code coupled to an Arnoldi procedure. This analysis is complemented by a helical thin-cored vortex filaments model. ANR HELIX.

  19. CURRENT HELICITY OF ACTIVE REGIONS AS A TRACER OF LARGE-SCALE SOLAR MAGNETIC HELICITY

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.; Gao, Y.; Xu, H.; Moss, D.; Kleeorin, N.; Rogachevskii, I.; Kuzanyan, K.; Sokoloff, D.

    2012-05-20

    We demonstrate that the current helicity observed in solar active regions traces the magnetic helicity of the large-scale dynamo generated field. We use an advanced two-dimensional mean-field dynamo model with dynamo saturation based on the evolution of the magnetic helicity and algebraic quenching. For comparison, we also studied a more basic two-dimensional mean-field dynamo model with simple algebraic alpha-quenching only. Using these numerical models we obtained butterfly diagrams both for the small-scale current helicity and also for the large-scale magnetic helicity, and compared them with the butterfly diagram for the current helicity in active regions obtained from observations. This comparison shows that the current helicity of active regions, as estimated by -A {center_dot} B evaluated at the depth from which the active region arises, resembles the observational data much better than the small-scale current helicity calculated directly from the helicity evolution equation. Here B and A are, respectively, the dynamo generated mean magnetic field and its vector potential. A theoretical interpretation of these results is given.

  20. Planetary dynamos driven by helical waves - II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, P. A.; Ranjan, A.

    2015-09-01

    In most numerical simulations of the Earth's core the dynamo resides outside the tangent cylinder and may be crudely classified as being of the α2 type. In this region the flow comprises a sea of thin columnar vortices aligned with the rotation axis, taking the form of alternating cyclones and anticyclones. The dynamo is thought to be driven by these columnar vortices within which the flow is observed to be highly helical, helicity being a crucial ingredient of planetary dynamos. As noted in Davidson, one of the mysteries of this dynamo cartoon is the origin of the helicity, which is observed to be positive in the south and negative in the north. While Ekman pumping at the mantle can induce helicity in some of the overly viscous numerical simulations, it is extremely unlikely to be a significant source within planets. In this paper we return to the suggestion of Davidson that the helicity observed in the less viscous simulations owes its existence to helical wave packets, launched in and around the equatorial plane where the buoyancy flux is observed to be strong. Here we show that such wave packets act as a potent source of planetary helicity, constituting a simple, robust mechanism that yields the correct sign for h north and south of the equator. Since such a mechanism does not rely on the presence of a mantle, it can operate within both the Earth and the gas giants. Moreover, our numerical simulations show that helical wave packets dispersing from the equator produce a random sea of thin, columnar cyclone/anticyclone pairs, very like those observed in the more strongly forced dynamo simulations. We examine the local dynamics of helical wave packets dispersing from the equatorial regions, as well as the overall nature of an α2-dynamo driven by such wave packets. Our local analysis predicts the mean emf induced by helical waves, an analysis that rests on a number of simple approximations which are consistent with our numerical experiments, while our global

  1. Spheromak Power and Helicity Balance

    SciTech Connect

    Thomassen, K.I.

    2000-05-18

    This note addresses the division of gun power and helicity between the open line volume and the closed flux surface volume in a steady state flux core spheromak. Our assumptions are that fine scale turbulence maintains each region close to an axisymmetric Taylor state, {mu}{sub o}j = {lambda}B. The gun region that feeds these two volumes surrounded by a flux conserver is shown topologically below. (The actual geometry is toroidal). Flux and current from the magnetized gun flow on open lines around the entire closed surface containing the spheromak. The gun current flows down the potential gradient, the potential difference between the two ends of each line being the gun voltage. Here, the gun voltage excludes the sheath drops at each end. These volumes have different values of {lambda} in each region (open line volume V{sub 1} and closed spheromak volume V{sub 2}) and we want to calculate the efficiency of transferring the gun power to the spheromak to sustain the ohmic loss in steady state.

  2. Helical rotary screw expander power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, R. A.; Sprankle, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    An energy converter for the development of wet steam geothermal fields is described. A project to evaluate and characterize a helical rotary screw expander for geothermal applications is discussed. The helical screw expander is a positive displacement machine which can accept untreated corrosive mineralized water of any quality from a geothermal well. The subjects of corrosion, mineral deposition, the expansion process, and experience with prototype devices are reported.

  3. Studies of Solar Helicity Using Vector Magnetograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, Mona J.; Pevstov, Alexei A.

    1999-01-01

    observations of photospheric magnetic fields made with vector magnetographs have been used recently to study solar helicity. In this paper we indicate what can and cannot be derived from vector magnetograms, and point out some potential problems in these data that could affect the calculations of 'helicity'. Among these problems are magnetic saturation, Faraday rotation, low spectral resolution, and the method of resolving the ambiguity in the azimuth.

  4. Bioinspired helical microswimmers based on vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Feng, Xiaomiao; Pei, Allen; Kane, Christopher R; Tam, Ryan; Hennessy, Camille; Wang, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Plant-based bioinspired magnetically propelled helical microswimmers are described. The helical microstructures are derived from spiral water-conducting vessels of different plants, harnessing the intrinsic biological structures of nature. Geometric variables of the spiral vessels, such as the helix diameter and pitch, can be controlled by mechanical stretching for the precise fabrication and consistent performance of helical microswimmers. Xylem vessels of a wide variety of different plants have been evaluated for the consistency and reproducibility of their helical parameters. Sequential deposition of thin Ti and Ni layers directly on the spiral vessels, followed by dicing, leads to an extremely simple and cost-efficient mass-production of functional helical microswimmers. The resulting plant-based magnetic microswimmers display efficient propulsion, with a speed of over 250 μm/s, as well as powerful locomotion in biological media such as human serum. The influence of actuation frequencies on the swimming velocity is investigated. Such use of plant vessels results in significant savings in the processing costs and provides an extremely simple, cost-effective fabrication route for the large-scale production of helical magnetic swimmers. PMID:24283342

  5. The AGS with four helical magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoupas, N.; Huang, H.; MacKay, W.W.; Roser, T.; Trbojevic, D.

    2010-02-25

    The idea of using multiple partial helical magnets was applied successfully to the AGS synchrotron, to preserve the proton beam polarization. In this paper we explore in details the idea of using four helical magnets placed symmetrically in the AGS ring. This modification provides many advantages over the present setup of the AGS that uses two partial helical magnets. First, it provides a larger 'spin tune gap' for the placement of the vertical betatron tune of the AGS during acceleration, second, the vertical spin direction during the beam injection and extraction is closer to vertical, third, the symmetric placement of the snakes allows for a better control of the AGS optics, and for reduced values of the beta and eta functions, especially near injection, fourth, the optical properties of the helical magnets also favor the placement of the horizontal betatron tune in the 'spin tune gap', thus eliminating the horizontal spin resonances. In this paper we provide results on the spin tune and on the optics of the AGS with four partial helical magnets, and we compare these results with the present setup of the AGS that uses two partial helical magnets.

  6. On the helicity of open magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Prior, C.; Yeates, A. R.

    2014-06-01

    We reconsider the topological interpretation of magnetic helicity for magnetic fields in open domains, and relate this to the relative helicity. Specifically, our domains stretch between two parallel planes, and each of these ends may be magnetically open. It is demonstrated that, while the magnetic helicity is gauge-dependent, its value in any gauge may be physically interpreted as the average winding number among all pairs of field lines with respect to some orthonormal frame field. In fact, the choice of gauge is equivalent to the choice of reference field in the relative helicity, meaning that the magnetic helicity is no less physically meaningful. We prove that a particular gauge always measures the winding with respect to a fixed frame, and propose that this is normally the best choice. For periodic fields, this choice is equivalent to measuring relative helicity with respect to a potential reference field. However, for aperiodic fields, we show that the potential field can be twisted. We prove by construction that there always exists a possible untwisted reference field.

  7. Alternative Methods for Field Corrections in Helical Solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, M. L.; Krave, S. T.; Tompkins, J. C.; Yonehara, K.; Flanagan, G.; Kahn, S. A.; Melconian, K.

    2015-05-01

    Helical cooling channels have been proposed for highly efficient 6D muon cooling. Helical solenoids produce solenoidal, helical dipole, and helical gradient field components. Previous studies explored the geometric tunability limits on these main field components. In this paper we present two alternative correction schemes, tilting the solenoids and the addition of helical lines, to reduce the required strength of the anti-solenoid and add an additional tuning knob.

  8. A unified convention for biological assemblies with helical symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Chung-Jung; Nussinov, Ruth

    2011-08-01

    A new representation of helical structure by four parameters, [n{sub 1}, n{sub 2}, twist, rise], is able to generate an entire helical construct from asymmetric units, including cases of helical assembly with a seam. Assemblies with helical symmetry can be conveniently formulated in many distinct ways. Here, a new convention is presented which unifies the two most commonly used helical systems for generating helical assemblies from asymmetric units determined by X-ray fibre diffraction and EM imaging. A helical assembly is viewed as being composed of identical repetitive units in a one- or two-dimensional lattice, named 1-D and 2-D helical systems, respectively. The unification suggests that a new helical description with only four parameters [n{sub 1}, n{sub 2}, twist, rise], which is called the augmented 1-D helical system, can generate the complete set of helical arrangements, including coverage of helical discontinuities (seams). A unified four-parameter characterization implies similar parameters for similar assemblies, can eliminate errors in reproducing structures of helical assemblies and facilitates the generation of polymorphic ensembles from helical atomic models or EM density maps. Further, guidelines are provided for such a unique description that reflects the structural signature of an assembly, as well as rules for manipulating the helical symmetry presentation.

  9. Effective desynchronization with a resetting pulse train followed by a single pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tass, P. A.

    2001-07-01

    A combined pulse train, single-pulse stimulation technique is presented here which makes it possible to effectively desynchronize a cluster of globally coupled phase oscillators in the presence of noise. Such a composite stimulus consists of a resetting short periodic high-frequent pulse train followed by a desynchronizing single pulse. The pulse train entrains and, thus, restarts the collective oscillation independently of its initial dynamic state. With a fixed delay after the pulse train, a single pulse is delivered which desynchronizes the cluster by hitting it in a vulnerable state. After the desynchronization the cluster wants to become synchronized again since the incoherent state is unstable. Nevertheless, repeated administration of the same composite stimulus blocks the resynchronization. Compared to double-pulse phase resetting and with regard to neurological applications, this method is particularly mild and can be applied to effectively maintain incoherency in a population of oscillatory neurons that tend to synchronize their firing. The composite stimulation approach sheds new light on the mechanism of standard deep brain stimulation and suggests an improved, milder and demand-controlled deep brain stimulation technique for patients with Parkinson's disease or essential tremor.

  10. Short-Period Seismometer Development at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R.

    1995-01-01

    Determining the structure of the interior of Mars has been a high priority for every Mars exploration strategy developed in the past 20 years, and is one of the primary goals of the InterMarsnet mission. Seismology is by far the most effective and detailed tool for investigating the radial and lateral distribution of density and elastic properties within a planet. Whereas long-period signals contain information from surface waves and normal modes from relatively large events, as well as the tidal response of the planet, the ability to record the high-frequency portion of the seismic spectrum (0.05 > f > 50 Hz) is essential for using the body waves of small to moderate events for probing the interior and analyzing the source characteristics of martian quakes.

  11. 3382 Cassidy: A Short Period Asteroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risley, Ethan

    2013-04-01

    The asteroid 3382 Cassidy was observed from the Etscorn Campus Observatory (ECO, 2012) at New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology in Socorro, NM, on nine nights over a span of 43 days in 2012 September-November. A bimodal synodic period of 4.254 ± 0.002 h and an amplitude of 0.15 ± 0.02 mag were obtained.

  12. The influence of helical background fields on current helicity and electromotive force of magnetoconvection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüdiger, G.; Küker, M.

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by the empirical finding that the known hemispheric rules for the current helicity at the solar surface are not strict, we demonstrate the excitation of small-scale current helicity by the influence of large-scale helical magnetic background fields on nonrotating magnetoconvection. This is shown within a quasilinear analytic theory of driven turbulence and by nonlinear simulations of magnetoconvection that the resulting small-scale current helicity has the same sign as the large-scale current helicity, while the ratio of both pseudoscalars is of the order of the magnetic Reynolds number of the convection. The same models do not provide finite values of the small-scale kinetic helicity. On the other hand, a turbulence-induced electromotive force is produced including the diamagnetic pumping term, as well as the eddy diffusivity but, however, no α effect. It has thus been argued that the relations for the simultaneous existence of small-scale current helicity and α effect do not hold for the model of nonrotating magnetoconvection under consideration. Calculations for various values of the magnetic Prandtl number demonstrate that, for the considered diffusivities, the current helicity increases for growing magnetic Reynolds number, which is not true for the velocity of the diamagnetic pumping, which is in agreement with the results of the quasilinear analytical approximation.

  13. Evaluation of helicity generation in the tropical storm Gonu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahani, Majid M.; Khansalari, Sakineh; Azadi, Majid

    2016-06-01

    Helicity is a valuable dynamical concept for the study of rotating flows. Consequently helicity flux, indicative of the source or sink of helicity, owns comparable importance. In this study, while reviewing the existing methods, a mathematical relation between helicity and helicity-flux is introduced, discussed and examined. The computed values of helicity and helicity fluxes in an actual case, using the classical and this proposed method are compared. The down-stream helicity flux including sources and sinks of helicity is considered for the tropical storm Gonu that occurred over the coasts of Oman and Iran on June 2-7, 2007. Results show that the buoyancy, through the upper troposphere down to a height within boundary layer, is the main source in producing helicity, and surface friction from earth surface up to a height within boundary layer, is the main dissipating element of helicity. The dominance of buoyancy forcing over the dissipative friction forcing results in generation of vortex or enhancement of it after bouncing the land. Furthermore, the increase (decrease) of helicity results in an increase (decrease) in the height of the level in which maximum helicity flux occurs. It is suggested that the maximum helicity flux occurs at the top of the turbulent boundary layer, so that the height of boundary layer could be obtained.

  14. Antialiasing backprojection for helical MDCT.

    PubMed

    Mori, I

    2008-03-01

    Helical CTs are well known to suffer from aliasing artifacts because of their finite longitudinal sampling pitch. The artifact pattern is typically strong streaks from bone edges in clinical images. Especially in the case of multidetector row CT, the artifact resulting from longitudinal aliasing is often called a windmill artifact because the visible streaks form a windmill pattern when the object is of a particular shape. The scan must be performed using a very thin slice thickness, i.e., fine sampling in the longitudinal direction, with a longer scan time to mitigate this aliasing artifact. Some elaborate longitudinal interpolation methods to remediate longitudinal aliasing have been proposed, but they have not been successful in practice despite their theoretical importance. A periodic swing of the focal spot in the longitudinal direction, a so-called z-flying focal spot, was introduced recently to achieve finer sampling. Although it is a useful technique, some important deficiencies exist: It is sufficiently effective only near the isocenter and is difficult to apply to a scan using a thick slice thickness, even though longitudinal aliasing is more serious at the thicker scan. In this paper, the author addresses the nature of interlaced (or unequally spaced) sampling and derives a new principle of data treatment that can suppress the aliased spectra selectively. According to this principle, the common practice of image reconstruction, which backprojects data along the original sampling ray path, is never the best choice. The author proposes a new scheme of backprojection, which involves the longitudinal shift of projection data. A proper choice of longitudinal shift for backprojection provides effective and selective suppression of aliased spectra, with retention of the original frequency spectrum depending on the level of focus swing. With this shifted backprojection, the swing of focus can be made much smaller than for a conventional z-flying focal spot. The

  15. Pulse Oximetry

    MedlinePlus

    ... www.thoracic.org amount of gases (oxygen and carbon dioxide) that are in your blood. To get an ... Also, a pulse oximeter does not measure your carbon dioxide level. How accurate is the pulse oximeter? The ...

  16. Working member of a helical downhole motor for drilling wells

    SciTech Connect

    Kochnev, A.M.; Vshivkov, A.N.; Goldobin, V.B.

    1993-06-22

    A working member of a helical downhole motor is described for drilling wells comprising: separate tubular sections having helical teeth arranged in succession and interconnected by connecting elements, each connecting element having the form of a ring, rigidly secured at the tubular sections and having helical teeth of a pitch and a direction equal to a pitch and a direction, respectively, of the helical teeth of the tubular sections, whereas a profile of the helical teeth of the ring is equidistant to a profile of the helical teeth of the sections.

  17. S-duality and helicity amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colwell, Kitran; Terning, John

    2016-03-01

    We examine interacting Abelian theories at low energies and show that holomorphically normalized photon helicity amplitudes transform into dual amplitudes under SL(2, {Z} ) as modular forms with weights that depend on the number of positive and negative helicity photons and on the number of internal photon lines. Moreover, canonically normalized helicity amplitudes transform by a phase, so that even though the amplitudes are not duality invariant, their squares are duality invariant. We explicitly verify the duality transformation at one loop by comparing the amplitudes in the case of an electron and the dyon that is its SL(2, {Z} ) image, and extend the invariance of squared amplitudes order by order in perturbation theory. We demonstrate that S-duality is a property of all low-energy effective Abelian theories with electric and/or magnetic charges and see how the duality generically breaks down at high energies.

  18. Single-superfield helical-phase inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketov, Sergei V.; Terada, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    Large-field inflation in supergravity requires the approximate global symmetry needed to protect flatness of the scalar potential. In helical-phase inflation, the U(1) symmetry of the Kähler potential is assumed, the phase part of the complex scalar of a chiral superfield plays the role of inflaton, and the radial part is strongly stabilized. The original model of helical phase inflation, proposed by Li, Li and Nanopoulos (LLN), employs an extra (stabilizer) superfield. We propose a more economical new class of the helical phase inflationary models without a stabilizer superfield. As the specific examples, the quadratic, the natural, and the Starobinsky-type inflationary models are studied in our approach.

  19. Helical motion of chiral liquid crystal droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takaki; Sano, Masaki

    Artificial swimmers have been intensively studied to understand the mechanism of the locomotion and collective behaviors of cells and microorganisms. Among them, most of the artificial swimmers are designed to move along the straight path. However, in biological systems, chiral dynamics such as circular and helical motion are quite common because of the chirality of their bodies, which are made of chiral biomolecules. To understand the role of the chirality in the physics of microswimmers, we designed chiral artificial swimmers and the theoretical model for the chiral motion. We found that chiral liquid crystal droplets, when dispersed in surfactant solutions, swim in the helical path induced by the Marangoni effect. We will discuss the mechanism of the helical motion with our phenomenological model. This work is supported by Grant-in-Aid for JSPS Fellows (Grant No. 26.9814), and MEXT KAKENHI Grant No. 25103004.

  20. Structural Transition from Helices to Hemihelices

    PubMed Central

    Su, Tianxiang; Bertoldi, Katia; Clarke, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Helices are amongst the most common structures in nature and in some cases, such as tethered plant tendrils, a more complex but related shape, the hemihelix forms. In its simplest form it consists of two helices of opposite chirality joined by a perversion. A recent, simple experiment using elastomer strips reveals that hemihelices with multiple reversals of chirality can also occur, a richness not anticipated by existing analyses. Here, we show through analysis and experiments that the transition from a helical to a hemihelical shape, as well as the number of perversions, depends on the height to width ratio of the strip's cross-section. Our findings provides the basis for the deterministic manufacture of a variety of complex three-dimensional shapes from flat strips. PMID:24759785

  1. Helicity and singular structures in fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Moffatt, H. Keith

    2014-01-01

    Helicity is, like energy, a quadratic invariant of the Euler equations of ideal fluid flow, although, unlike energy, it is not sign definite. In physical terms, it represents the degree of linkage of the vortex lines of a flow, conserved when conditions are such that these vortex lines are frozen in the fluid. Some basic properties of helicity are reviewed, with particular reference to (i) its crucial role in the dynamo excitation of magnetic fields in cosmic systems; (ii) its bearing on the existence of Euler flows of arbitrarily complex streamline topology; (iii) the constraining role of the analogous magnetic helicity in the determination of stable knotted minimum-energy magnetostatic structures; and (iv) its role in depleting nonlinearity in the Navier-Stokes equations, with implications for the coherent structures and energy cascade of turbulence. In a final section, some singular phenomena in low Reynolds number flows are briefly described. PMID:24520175

  2. Primordial magnetic helicity from stochastic electric currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzetta, Esteban; Kandus, Alejandra

    2014-04-01

    We study the possibility that primordial magnetic fields generated in the transition between inflation and reheating posses magnetic helicity, HM. The fields are induced by stochastic currents of scalar charged particles created during the mentioned transition. We estimate the rms value of the induced magnetic helicity by computing different four-point scalar quantum electrodynamics Feynman diagrams. For any considered volume, the magnetic flux across its boundaries is in principle not null, which means that the magnetic helicity in those regions is gauge dependent. We use the prescription given by Berger and Field and interpret our result as the difference between two magnetic configurations that coincide in the exterior volume. In this case, the magnetic helicity gives only the number of magnetic links inside the considered volume. We calculate a concrete value of HM for large scales and analyze the distribution of magnetic defects as a function of the scale. Those defects correspond to regular as well as random fields in the considered volume. We find that the fractal dimension of the distribution of topological defects is D=1/2. We also study if the regular fields induced on large scales are helical, finding that they are and that the associated number of magnetic defects is independent of the scale. In this case, the fractal dimension is D=0. We finally estimate the intensity of fields induced at the horizon scale of reheating and evolve them until the decoupling of matter and radiation under the hypothesis of the inverse cascade of magnetic helicity. The resulting intensity is high enough and the coherence length long enough to have an impact on the subsequent process of structure formation.

  3. Au nanorod helical superstructures with designed chirality.

    PubMed

    Lan, Xiang; Lu, Xuxing; Shen, Chenqi; Ke, Yonggang; Ni, Weihai; Wang, Qiangbin

    2015-01-14

    A great challenge for nanotechnology is to controllably organize anisotropic nanomaterials into well-defined three-dimensional superstructures with customized properties. Here we successfully constructed anisotropic Au nanorod (AuNR) helical superstructures (helices) with tailored chirality in a programmable manner. By designing the 'X' pattern of the arrangement of DNA capturing strands (15nt) on both sides of a two-dimensional DNA origami template, AuNRs functionalized with the complementary DNA sequences were positioned on the origami and were assembled into AuNR helices with the origami intercalated between neighboring AuNRs. Left-handed (LH) and right-handed (RH) AuNR helices were conveniently accomplished by solely tuning the mirrored-symmetric 'X' patterns of capturing strands on the origami. The inter-rod distance was precisely defined as 14 nm and inter-rod angle as 45°, thus a full helix contains 9 AuNRs with its length up to about 220 nm. By changing the AuNR/origami molar ratio in the assembly system, the average number of AuNR in the helices was tuned from 2 to 4 and 9. Intense chiroptical activities arose from the longest AuNR helices with a maximum anisotropy factor of ∼0.02, which is highly comparable to the reported macroscopic AuNR assemblies. We expect that our strategy of origami templated assembly of anisotropic chiral superstructures would inspire the bottom-up fabrication of optically active nanostructures and shed light on a variety of applications, such as chiral fluids, chiral signal amplification, and fluorescence combined chiral spectroscopy. PMID:25516475

  4. Two-impurity helical Majorana problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, Erik; Zazunov, Alex; Sodano, Pasquale; Egger, Reinhold

    2015-02-01

    We predict experimentally accessible signatures for helical Majorana fermions in a topological superconductor by coupling to two quantum dots in the local moment regime (corresponding to spin-1 /2 impurities). Taking into account Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interactions mediated by bulk and edge modes, where the latter cause a long-range antiferromagnetic Ising coupling, we formulate and solve the low-energy theory for this two-impurity helical Majorana problem. In particular, we show that the long-time spin dynamics after a magnetic field quench displays weakly damped oscillations with universal quality factor.

  5. PULSE GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Roeschke, C.W.

    1957-09-24

    An improvement in pulse generators is described by which there are produced pulses of a duration from about 1 to 10 microseconds with a truly flat top and extremely rapid rise and fall. The pulses are produced by triggering from a separate input or by modifying the current to operate as a free-running pulse generator. In its broad aspect, the disclosed pulse generator comprises a first tube with an anode capacitor and grid circuit which controls the firing; a second tube series connected in the cathode circuit of the first tube such that discharge of the first tube places a voltage across it as the leading edge of the desired pulse; and an integrator circuit from the plate across the grid of the second tube to control the discharge time of the second tube, determining the pulse length.

  6. QCD Evolution of Helicity and Transversity TMDs

    SciTech Connect

    Prokudin, Alexei

    2014-01-01

    We examine the QCD evolution of the helicity and transversity parton distribution functions when including also their dependence on transverse momentum. Using an appropriate definition of these polarized transverse momentum distributions (TMDs), we describe their dependence on the factorization scale and rapidity cutoff, which is essential for phenomenological applications.

  7. Theory of helical electron beams in gyrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kuftin, A.N.; Lygin, V.K.; Manuilov, V.N.; Raisky, B.V.; Solujanova, E.A.; Tsimring, S.E.

    1993-04-01

    Helical electron beams (HEB) with disturbed axial symmetry of currents density and HEB with locking electrons in magnetic trap are described. The theory of magnetron injection gun (MIG) in space-charge limited current is developed. Systems on permanent magnets forming HEB are considered. 30 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Dynamics of helical states in MST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munaretto, Stefano; Auriemma, F.; Brower, D.; Chapman, B. E.; den Hartog, D. J.; Ding, W. X.; Duff, J.; Franz, P.; Goetz, J. A.; Holly, D.; Lin, L.; McCollam, K. J.; McGarry, M.; Morton, L.; Nornberg, M. D.; Parke, E.; Sarff, J. S.

    2014-10-01

    The thermal and the magnetic dynamics of quasi-single-helicity (QSH) plasmas evolve independently during the formation and sustainment of the core helical structure. At higher plasma current (and Lundquist number) MST plasmas transition from an axisymmetric multi-helicity state to a QSH state characterized by a strong core helical mode and reduced secondary mode amplitudes. Plasmas in the QSH state tend to wall-lock, often in an orientation that is unfavorable for optimized measurements of the 3D structure using MST's advanced diagnostics. Recently a technique to control the locking position through an applied resonant magnetic perturbation has been developed. Using this technique it is possible to adjust the 3D phase more optimally for specific diagnostics, to study the dynamics of the QSH structure and thermal features. The multi-chord FIR interferometer shows the presence of a density structure for the duration of the QSH state. Measurements of the time evolution of the electron temperature profile using the Thomson Scattering diagnostic reveal that the transition to QSH allows the presence of a 3D thermal structure, but this structure is intermittent. Understanding the mechanism(s) driving these dynamics is the goal of this work. Work supported by the US DOE and NSF.

  9. Deformation of flexible micro helices under flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daieff, Marine; Lindner, Anke; Du Roure, Olivia; Morozov, Alexander; Pham, Jonathan; Crosby, Alfred

    The interaction of small helices with fluids is important because of its relevance to both fundamental science and technological applications, such as swimming microrobots or microflow sensors. Helically shaped flagella are also exploited by swimming microorganisms to move through their surrounding fluids. Here we study experimentally the deformation of flexible helical ribbons under flow in a microfluidic channel. The size of the helix is typically microscale for the diameter and nanoscale for the thickness. We focus on two different aspects: the overall shape of the helix and the viscous frictional properties. The frictional coefficients determined by our experiments are consistent with calculated values in the context of resistive force theory. Deformation of helices by viscous flow is well-described by non-linear finite extensibility. Due to the non-uniform distribution of the pitch under distributed loading, we identify both linear and nonlinear behavior along the contour length of a single helix. Utilizing our system, we explore the impact of non-Newtonian fluid properties on the mechanics of helix-fluid interactions.

  10. Vibration of thin, tensioned, helically wrapped plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Ernesto; Müftü, Sinan

    2011-02-01

    Free vibration analysis of a thin tensioned plate, wrapped around a cylindrical guide in a helical manner is presented. The system is a model of a thin, flexible web wrapped around a turn-bar. The equation of motion of the wrapped plate is derived by using the energy method and with the Kirchhoff-Love assumptions. The weak form of the equation of motion was obtained by the finite element method and the eigenvalue problem was solved numerically. The effects of parameters such as plate tension, guide radius, longitudinal and helical wrap angles, plate width, and the lengths of the non-wrapped segments were investigated. Eigenmodes with same mode numbers were observed in symmetric and anti-symmetric fashion about the center of the plate, for symmetrically wrapped plates. It was shown that the plate/shell boundary of the wrapped plate effectively acts like a support. For non-helically wrapped plates the free edges cause a frequency clustering of the lateral modes about the dominant longitudinal mode. The frequency clustering diminishes when helical wrap is introduced.

  11. Bunch Coalescing in a Helical Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, D.V.; Yonehara, K.; Ankenbrandt, C.M.; Yoshikawa, C.Y.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

    2012-05-01

    A high-luminosity Muon Collider requires bunch recombination for optimal luminosity. In this paper, we take advantage of the large slip factor attainable in a helical transport channel (HTC) to coalesce bunches of muons into a single one over a shorter distance than can be achieved over a straight channel.

  12. Filament Channel Formation by Helicity Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knizhnik, K. J.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C.

    2013-12-01

    A major unexplained feature of the solar atmosphere is the accumulation of magnetic shear, in the form of filament channels, at photospheric polarity inversion lines (PILs). In addition to free energy, this shear also represents magnetic helicity, which is conserved under reconnection. Consequently, the observations raise the question: Why is helicity observed to be concentrated along PILs? Preliminary results of 3D MHD simulations using the Adaptively Refined MHD Solver (ARMS) are presented that support the magnetic-helicity condensation model of filament-channel formation (Antiochos 2013). In this work, we address the problem of filament-channel formation by considering supergranular twisting of a quasi-potential flux system, bounded by a PIL and containing a coronal hole (CH). The magnetic helicity injected by small-scale photospheric motions is shown to inverse-cascade up to the largest allowable scales that define the closed flux system: the PIL and the CH boundary. This, in effect, produces field lines that are both sheared and smooth and, in agreement with Antiochos (2013), are sheared in opposite senses at the PIL and the CH. We present a detailed analysis of our simulation results and discuss their implications for observations.

  13. Muon Beam Helical Cooling Channel Design

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland; Ankenbrandt, Charles; Flanagan, G; Kazakevich, G M; Marhauser, Frank; Neubauer, Michael; Roberts, T; Yoshikawa, C; Derbenev, Yaroslav; Morozov, Vasiliy; Kashikhin, V S; Lopes, Mattlock; Tollestrup, A; Yonehara, Katsuya; Zloblin, A

    2013-06-01

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) achieves effective ionization cooling of the six-dimensional (6d) phase space of a muon beam by means of a series of 21st century inventions. In the HCC, hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities enable high RF gradients in strong external magnetic fields. The theory of the HCC, which requires a magnetic field with solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole components, demonstrates that dispersion in the gaseous hydrogen energy absorber provides effective emittance exchange to enable longitudinal ionization cooling. The 10-year development of a practical implementation of a muon-beam cooling device has involved a series of technical innovations and experiments that imply that an HCC of less than 300 m length can cool the 6d emittance of a muon beam by six orders of magnitude. We describe the design and construction plans for a prototype HCC module based on oxygen-doped hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities that are loaded with dielectric, fed by magnetrons, and operate in a superconducting helical solenoid magnet.

  14. Phase diagram of two interacting helical states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Raul A.; Gutman, D. B.; Carr, Sam T.

    2016-06-01

    We consider two coupled time-reversal-invariant helical edge modes of the same helicity, such as would occur on two stacked quantum spin Hall insulators. In the presence of interaction, the low-energy physics is described by two collective modes, one corresponding to the total current flowing around the edge and the other one describing relative fluctuations between the two edges. We find that quite generically, the relative mode becomes gapped at low temperatures, but only when tunneling between the two helical modes is nonzero. There are two distinct possibilities for the gapped state depending on the relative size of different interactions. If the intraedge interaction is stronger than the interedge interaction, the state is characterized as a spin-nematic phase. However, in the opposite limit, when the interaction between the helical edge modes is strong compared to the interaction within each mode, a spin-density wave forms, with emergent topological properties. First, the gap protects the conducting phase against localization by weak nonmagnetic impurities; second, the protected phase hosts localized zero modes on the ends of the edge that may be created by sufficiently strong nonmagnetic impurities.

  15. Helically corrugated circular waveguides as antenna feeders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jecko, F.; Papiernik, A.

    1983-07-01

    Rotation of the plane of polarization of the TE(11)-mode is predicted and observed in a helically corrugated circular waveguide. Rotation is suppressed by a longitudinal deformation produced on the corrugation. This modified structure can be used as an antenna feeder with low losses.

  16. Exabyte helical scan devices at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Constanta-Fanourakis, P.; Kaczar, K.; Oleynik, G.; Petravick, D.; Votava, M.; White, V.; Hockney, G.; Bracker, S.; de Miranda, J.M.

    1989-05-01

    Exabyte 8mm helical scan storage devices are in use at Fermilab in a number of applications. These devices have the functionality of magnetic tape, but use media which is much more economical and much more dense than conventional 9 track tape. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Magnetic stripes and skyrmions with helicity reversals.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiuzhen; Mostovoy, Maxim; Tokunaga, Yusuke; Zhang, Weizhu; Kimoto, Koji; Matsui, Yoshio; Kaneko, Yoshio; Nagaosa, Naoto; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2012-06-01

    It was recently realized that topological spin textures do not merely have mathematical beauty but can also give rise to unique functionalities of magnetic materials. An example is the skyrmion--a nano-sized bundle of noncoplanar spins--that by virtue of its nontrivial topology acts as a flux of magnetic field on spin-polarized electrons. Lorentz transmission electron microscopy recently emerged as a powerful tool for direct visualization of skyrmions in noncentrosymmetric helimagnets. Topologically, skyrmions are equivalent to magnetic bubbles (cylindrical domains) in ferromagnetic thin films, which were extensively explored in the 1970s for data storage applications. In this study we use Lorentz microscopy to image magnetic domain patterns in the prototypical magnetic oxide-M-type hexaferrite with a hint of scandium. Surprisingly, we find that the magnetic bubbles and stripes in the hexaferrite have a much more complex structure than the skyrmions and spirals in helimagnets, which we associate with the new degree of freedom--helicity (or vector spin chirality) describing the direction of spin rotation across the domain walls. We observe numerous random reversals of helicity in the stripe domain state. Random helicity of cylindrical domain walls coexists with the positional order of magnetic bubbles in a triangular lattice. Most unexpectedly, we observe regular helicity reversals inside skyrmions with an unusual multiple-ring structure. PMID:22615354

  18. Helical axis stellarator with noninterlocking planar coils

    DOEpatents

    Reiman, A.; Boozer, A.H.

    1984-03-06

    The present invention generates stellarator fields having favorable properties (magnetic well and large rotational transform) by a simple coil system consisting only of unlinked planar non-circular coils. At large rotational transform toroidal effects on magnetic well and rotational transform are small and can be ignored. We do so herein, specializing in straight helical systems.

  19. Chiral transport of neutrinos in supernovae: Neutrino-induced fluid helicity and helical plasma instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Naoki

    2016-03-01

    Chirality of neutrinos modifies the conventional kinetic theory and hydrodynamics, leading to unusual chiral transport related to quantum anomalies in field theory. We argue that these corrections have new phenomenological consequences for hot and dense neutrino gases, especially in core-collapse supernovae. We find that the neutrino density can be converted to the fluid helicity through the chiral vortical effect. This fluid helicity effectively acts as a chiral chemical potential for electrons via the momentum exchange with neutrinos and induces a "helical plasma instability" that generates a strong helical magnetic field. This provides a new mechanism for converting the gravitational energy released by the core collapse to the electromagnetic energy and potentially explains the origin of magnetars. The other possible applications of the neutrino chiral transport theory are also discussed.

  20. The Effects of Spatial Smoothing on Solar Magnetic Helicity and the Hemispheric Helicity Sign Rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch Ocker, Stella; Petrie, Gordon

    2016-05-01

    The hemispheric sign rule for solar magnetic helicity, which states that negative/positive helicity occurs preferentially in the northern/southern hemisphere, provides clues to the causes of twisted, flaring magnetic fields. However, previous studies on the hemisphere rule may have been significantly affected by seeing from atmospheric turbulent motions. Using Hinode/SOT-SP data spanning from 2006 to 2012, we studied the effects of two important data processing steps that imitate the effects of atmospheric seeing: noise reduction by ignoring pixel values that are weaker than the estimated noise threshold, and Gaussian spatial smoothing. We applied these processing techniques to the helicity distribution maps for active regions NOAA 11158 and NOAA 11243, along with the average helicities of 36 active regions, in order to imitate and understand the effects of seeing from atmospheric turbulence. We found that rather than changing trends in the helicity distributions, Gaussian smoothing and noise reduction enhanced existing trends by pushing outliers towards the mean or removing them altogether. We also found that, when separated for weak and strong magnetic fields, the average helicities of the 36 active regions conformed to the hemisphere rule for weak field helicities and breached the rule for strong field helicities. In general, we found that data processing did not affect whether the hemisphere rule held for data taken from space-based instruments, and thus that seeing from atmospheric turbulence did not significantly affect previous studies' ground-based results on the hemisphere rule. This work was carried out through the National Solar Observatory Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program, which is funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). The National Solar Observatory is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA) under cooperative agreement with the NSF.

  1. Hydrodynamics of helical-shaped bacterial motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Hirofumi; Netz, Roland R.

    2009-08-01

    To reveal the underlying hydrodynamic mechanism for the directed propulsion of the bacterium Spiroplasma, we formulate a coarse-grained elastic polymer model with domains of alternating helicities along the contour. Using hydrodynamic simulations and analytic arguments, we show that the propagation of helical domain walls leads to the directed propulsion of the cell body opposite to the domain-wall traveling direction. Several key features of Spiroplasma motility are reproduced by our model. We in particular show that the helical pitch angle observed for Spiroplasma meliferum, ψ=35° , is optimized for maximal swimming speed and energy-conversion efficiency. Our analytic theory based on the slender-body hydrodynamic approximation agrees very well with our numerical data demonstrating how the chirality switch propagating along the helical cell body is converted to a translational thrust for the cell body itself. We in detail consider thermal effects on the propulsion efficiency in the form of orientational fluctuations and conformational fluctuations of the helix shape. The body length dependence of the cell motility is studied numerically and compared to our approximate analytic theory. For fixed pitch angle ψ=35° , the swimming speed is maximized at a ratio of cell-body length to domain length of about 2-3, which are typical values for real cells. We also propose simple analytic arguments for an enhancement of the swimming velocity with increasing solution viscosity by taking into account the effects of transient confinement of a helical cell body in a polymeric meshwork. Comparison with a generalized theory for the swimming speed of flagellated bacteria in polymeric meshworks shows that the presence of a finite-sized bacterial head gives rise to a maximal swimming speed at a finite solution viscosity, whereas in the absence of a head the swimming speed monotonically increases with increasing viscosity.

  2. Growth kinetics and structural perfection of (InN)1/(GaN)1-20 short-period superlattices on +c-GaN template in dynamic atomic layer epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusakabe, Kazuhide; Hashimoto, Naoki; Itoi, Takaomi; Wang, Ke; Imai, Daichi; Yoshikawa, Akihiko

    2016-04-01

    The growth kinetics and structural perfection of (InN)1/(GaN)1-20 short-period superlattices (SPSs) were investigated with their application to ordered alloys in mind. The SPSs were grown on +c-GaN template at 650 °C by dynamic atomic layer epitaxy in conventional plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. It was found that coherent structured InN/GaN SPSs could be fabricated when the thickness of the GaN barrier was 4 ML or above. Below 3 ML, the formation of SPSs was quite difficult owing to the increased strain in the SPS structure caused by the use of GaN as a template. The effective or average In composition of the (InN)1/(GaN)4 SPSs was around 10%, and the corresponding InN coverage in the ˜1 ML-thick InN wells was 50%. It was found that the effective InN coverage in ˜1 ML-thick InN wells could be varied with the growth conditions. In fact, the effective In composition could be increased up to 13.5%, i.e., the corresponding effective InN coverage was about 68%, by improving the capping/freezing speed by increasing the growth rate of the GaN barrier layer.

  3. Combination of helical ferritic-steel inserts and flux-tube-expansion divertor for the heat control in tokamak DEMO reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takizuka, T.; Tokunaga, S.; Hoshino, K.; Shimizu, K.; Asakura, N.

    2015-08-01

    Edge localized modes (ELMs) in the H-mode operation of tokamak reactors may be suppressed/mitigated by the resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP), but RMP coils are considered incompatible with DEMO reactors under the strong neutron flux. We propose an innovative concept of the RMP without installing coils but inserting ferritic steels of the helical configuration. Helically perturbed field is naturally formed in the axisymmetric toroidal field through the helical ferritic steel inserts (FSIs). When ELMs are avoided, large stationary heat load on divertor plates can be reduced by adopting a flux-tube-expansion (FTE) divertor like an X divertor. Separatrix shape and divertor-plate inclination are similar to those of a simple long-leg divertor configuration. Combination of the helical FSIs and the FTE divertor is a suitable method for the heat control to avoid transient ELM heat pulse and to reduce stationary divertor heat load in a tokamak DEMO reactor.

  4. Pulse stretcher

    DOEpatents

    Horton, J.A.

    1994-05-03

    Apparatus for increasing the length of a laser pulse to reduce its peak power without substantial loss in the average power of the pulse is disclosed. The apparatus uses a White cell having a plurality of optical delay paths of successively increasing number of passes between the field mirror and the objective mirrors. A pulse from a laser travels through a multi-leg reflective path between a beam splitter and a totally reflective mirror to the laser output. The laser pulse is also simultaneously injected through the beam splitter to the input mirrors of the optical delay paths. The pulses from the output mirrors of the optical delay paths go simultaneously to the laser output and to the input mirrors of the longer optical delay paths. The beam splitter is 50% reflective and 50% transmissive to provide equal attenuation of all of the pulses at the laser output. 6 figures.

  5. Pulsed power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, David H.

    Pulsed power systems are critical elements for such prospective weapons technologies as high-power microwaves, electrothermal and electromagnetic projectile launchers, neutral particle beams, space-based FELs, ground-based lasers, and charged particle beams. Pulsed power will also be essential for the development of nonweapon military systems such as lidars and ultrawideband radars, and could serve as the bases for nuclear weapon effect simulators. The pulsed power generation requirements for each of these systems is considered.

  6. Pulse Voltammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojek, Zbigniew

    The idea of imposing potential pulses and measuring the currents at the end of each pulse was proposed by Barker in a little-known journal as early as in 1958 [1]. However, the first reliable trouble-free and affordable polarographs offering voltammetric pulse techniques appeared on the market only in the 1970s. This delay was due to some limitations on the electronic side. In the 1990s, again substantial progress in electrochemical pulse instrumentation took place. This was related to the introduction of microprocessors, computers, and advanced software.

  7. Biot-Savart helicity versus physical helicity: A topological description of ideal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahihi, Taliya; Eshraghi, Homayoon

    2014-08-01

    For an isentropic (thus compressible) flow, fluid trajectories are considered as orbits of a family of one parameter, smooth, orientation-preserving, and nonsingular diffeomorphisms on a compact and smooth-boundary domain in the Euclidian 3-space which necessarily preserve a finite measure, later interpreted as the fluid mass. Under such diffeomorphisms the Biot-Savart helicity of the pushforward of a divergence-free and tangent to the boundary vector field is proved to be conserved and since these circumstances present an isentropic flow, the conservation of the "Biot-Savart helicity" is established for such flows. On the other hand, the well known helicity conservation in ideal flows which here we call it "physical helicity" is found to be an independent constant with respect to the Biot-Savart helicity. The difference between these two helicities reflects some topological features of the domain as well as the velocity and vorticity fields which is discussed and is shown for simply connected domains the two helicities coincide. The energy variation of the vorticity field is shown to be formally the same as for the incompressible flow obtained before. For fluid domains consisting of several disjoint solid tori, at each time, the harmonic knot subspace of smooth vector fields on the fluid domain is found to have two independent base sets with a special type of orthogonality between these two bases by which a topological description of the vortex and velocity fields depending on the helicity difference is achieved since this difference is shown to depend only on the harmonic knot parts of velocity, vorticity, and its Biot-Savart vector field. For an ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) flow three independent constant helicities are reviewed while the helicity of magnetic potential is generalized for non-simply connected domains by inserting a special harmonic knot field in the dynamics of the magnetic potential. It is proved that the harmonic knot part of the vorticity

  8. Applications of Elliptically Polarized, Few-Cycle Attosecond Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starace, Anthony F.

    2016-05-01

    Use of elliptically-polarized light opens the possibility of investigating effects that are not accessible with linearly-polarized pulses. This talk presents two new physical effects that are predicted for ionization of the helium atom by few-cycle, elliptically polarized attosecond pulses. For double ionization of He by an intense elliptically polarized attosecond pulse, we predict a nonlinear dichroic effect (i.e., the difference of the two-electron angular distributions in the polarization plane for opposite helicities of the ionizing pulse) that is sensitive to the carrier-envelope phase, ellipticity, peak intensity I, and temporal duration of the pulse. For single ionization of He by two oppositely circularly polarized, time-delayed attosecond pulses we predict that the photoelectron momentum distributions in the polarization plane have helical vortex structures that are exquisitely sensitive to the time-delay between the pulses, their relative phase, and their handedness. Both of these effects manifest the ability to control the angular distributions of the ionized electrons by means of the attosecond pulse parameters. Our predictions are obtained numerically by solving the six-dimensional two-electron time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the case of elliptically polarized attosecond pulses. They are interpreted analytically by means of perturbation theory analyses of the two ionization processes. This work is supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences (BES), Award No. DE-FG03-96ER14646.

  9. Stabilization of Helical Macromolecular Phases by Confined Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Matthew J.; Bachmann, Michael

    2015-07-01

    By means of extensive replica-exchange simulations of generic coarse-grained models for helical polymers, we systematically investigate the structural transitions into all possible helical phases for flexible and semiflexible elastic polymers with self-interaction under the influence of torsion barriers. The competing interactions lead to a variety of conformational phases including disordered helical arrangements, single helices, and ordered, tertiary helix bundles. Most remarkably, we find that a bending restraint entails a clear separation and stabilization of the helical phases. This aids in understanding why semiflexible polymers such as double-stranded DNA tend to form pronounced helical structures and proteins often exhibit an abundance of helical structures, such as helix bundles, within their tertiary structure.

  10. THE MAGNETIC ENERGY-HELICITY DIAGRAM OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Tziotziou, Kostas; Georgoulis, Manolis K.; Raouafi, Nour-Eddine

    2012-11-01

    Using a recently proposed nonlinear force-free method designed for single-vector magnetograms of solar active regions, we calculate the instantaneous free magnetic energy and relative magnetic helicity budgets in 162 vector magnetograms corresponding to 42 different active regions. We find a statistically robust, monotonic correlation between the free magnetic energy and the relative magnetic helicity in the studied regions. This correlation implies that magnetic helicity, in addition to free magnetic energy, may be an essential ingredient for major solar eruptions. Eruptive active regions appear well segregated from non-eruptive ones in both free energy and relative helicity with major (at least M-class) flares occurring in active regions with free energy and relative helicity exceeding 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 31} erg and 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 42} Mx{sup 2}, respectively. The helicity threshold agrees well with estimates of the helicity contents of typical coronal mass ejections.

  11. PULSE AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Johnstone, C.W.

    1958-06-17

    The improvement of pulse amplifiers used with scintillation detectors is described. The pulse amplifier circuit has the advantage of reducing the harmful effects of overloading cause by large signal inputs. In general the pulse amplifier circuit comprises two amplifier tubes with the input pulses applied to one amplifier grid and coupled to the second amplifier tube through a common cathode load. The output of the second amplifier is coupled from the plate circuit to a cathode follower tube grid and a diode tube in connected from grid to cathode of the cathode follower tube. Degenerative feedback is provided in the second amplifier by coupling a signal from the cathode follower cathode to the second amplifier grid. The circuit proqides moderate gain stability, and overload protection for subsequent pulse circuits.

  12. Ultraviolet GaN photodetectors on Si via oxide buffer heterostructures with integrated short period oxide-based distributed Bragg reflectors and leakage suppressing metal-oxide-semiconductor contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Szyszka, A. E-mail: adam.szyszka@pwr.wroc.pl; Haeberlen, M.; Storck, P.; Thapa, S. B.; Schroeder, T.

    2014-08-28

    Based on a novel double step oxide buffer heterostructure approach for GaN integration on Si, we present an optimized Metal-Semiconductor-Metal (MSM)-based Ultraviolet (UV) GaN photodetector system with integrated short-period (oxide/Si) Distributed Bragg Reflector (DBR) and leakage suppressing Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (MOS) electrode contacts. In terms of structural properties, it is demonstrated by in-situ reflection high energy electron diffraction and transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray studies that the DBR heterostructure layers grow with high thickness homogeneity and sharp interface structures sufficient for UV applications; only minor Si diffusion into the Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} films is detected under the applied thermal growth budget. As revealed by comparative high resolution x-ray diffraction studies on GaN/oxide buffer/Si systems with and without DBR systems, the final GaN layer structure quality is not significantly influenced by the growth of the integrated DBR heterostructure. In terms of optoelectronic properties, it is demonstrated that—with respect to the basic GaN/oxide/Si system without DBR—the insertion of (a) the DBR heterostructures and (b) dark current suppressing MOS contacts enhances the photoresponsivity below the GaN band-gap related UV cut-off energy by almost up to two orders of magnitude. Given the in-situ oxide passivation capability of grown GaN surfaces and the one order of magnitude lower number of superlattice layers in case of higher refractive index contrast (oxide/Si) systems with respect to classical III-N DBR superlattices, virtual GaN substrates on Si via functional oxide buffer systems are thus a promising robust approach for future GaN-based UV detector technologies.

  13. Photometric detection of non-transiting short-period low-mass companions through the beaming, ellipsoidal and reflection effects in Kepler and CoRoT light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faigler, S.; Mazeh, T.

    2011-08-01

    We present a simple algorithm, BEER, to search for a combination of the BEaming, Ellipsoidal and the Reflection/heating periodic modulations, induced by short-period non-transiting low-mass companions. The beaming effect is due to the increase (decrease) in the brightness of any light source approaching (receding from) the observer. To first order, the beaming and the reflection/heating effects modulate the stellar brightness at the orbital period, with phases separated by a quarter of a period, whereas the ellipsoidal effect is modulated with the orbital first harmonic. The phase and harmonic differences between the three modulations allow the algorithm to search for a combination of the three effects and identify stellar candidates for low-mass companions. The paper presents the algorithm, including an assignment of a likelihood factor to any possible detection, based on the expected ratio of the beaming and ellipsoidal effects, given an order-of-magnitude estimate of the three effects. As predicted by Loeb & Gaudi and by Zucker, Mazeh & Alexander, the Kepler and the CoRoT light curves are precise enough to allow detection of massive planets and brown-dwarf/low-mass-stellar companions with orbital period up to 10-30 days. To demonstrate the feasibility of the algorithm, we present two examples of candidates found in the first 33 days of the Q1 Kepler light curves. Although we used a relatively short time-span, the light curves were precise enough to enable the detection of periodic effects with amplitudes as small as one part in 104 of the stellar flux.

  14. Guided wave helical ultrasonic tomography of pipes.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Kevin R; Hinders, Mark K

    2003-08-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves have been used for a wide variety of ultrasonic inspection techniques. We describe here a new variation called helical ultrasound tomography (HUT) that uses guided ultrasonic waves along with tomographic reconstruction algorithms that have been developed by seismologists for what they call "cross borehole" tomography. In HUT, the Lamb-like guided waves travel the various helical criss-cross paths between two parallel circumferential transducer arrays instead of the planar criss-cross seismic paths between two boreholes. Although the measurement itself is fairly complicated, the output of the tomographic reconstruction is a readily interpretable map of a quantity of interest such as pipe wall thickness. In this paper we demonstrate HUT via laboratory scans on steel pipe segments into which controlled thinnings have been introduced. PMID:12942959

  15. Algebraic Apect of Helicities in Hadron Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Murat; Ji, Chueng

    2015-04-01

    We examined the relation of polarization vectors and spinors of (1 , 0) ⊕(0 , 1) representation of Lorentz group in Clifford algebra Cl1 , 3 , their relation with standard algebra, and properties of these spinors. Cl1 , 3 consists of different grades:e.g. the first and the second grades represent (1 / 2 , 1 / 2) and (1 , 0) ⊕(0 , 1) representation of spin groups respectively with 4 and 6 components. However, these Clifford numbers are not the helicity eigenstates and thus we transform them into combinations of helicity eigenstates by expressing them as spherical harmonics. We relate the spin-one polarization vectors and (1 , 0) ⊕(0 , 1) spinors under one simple transformation with the spin operators. We also link our work with Winnberg's work of a superfield of a spinors of Clifford algebra by giving a physical meaning to Grassmann variables and discuss how Grassman algebra is linked with Clifford algebra.

  16. Guided wave helical ultrasonic tomography of pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Kevin R.; Hinders, Mark K.

    2003-08-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves have been used for a wide variety of ultrasonic inspection techniques. We describe here a new variation called helical ultrasound tomography (HUT) that uses guided ultrasonic waves along with tomographic reconstruction algorithms that have been developed by seismologists for what they call ``cross borehole'' tomography. In HUT, the Lamb-like guided waves travel the various helical criss-cross paths between two parallel circumferential transducer arrays instead of the planar criss-cross seismic paths between two boreholes. Although the measurement itself is fairly complicated, the output of the tomographic reconstruction is a readily interpretable map of a quantity of interest such as pipe wall thickness. In this paper we demonstrate HUT via laboratory scans on steel pipe segments into which controlled thinnings have been introduced.

  17. Vacuum systems for the ILC helical undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Malyshev, O. B.; Scott, D. J.; Bailey, I. R.; Barber, D. P.; Baynham, E.; Bradshaw, T.; Brummitt, A.; Carr, S.; Clarke, J. A.; Cooke, P.; Dainton, J. B.; Ivanyushenkov, Y.; Malysheva, L. I.; Moortgat-Pick, G. A.; Rochford, J.; Department of Physics, University of Liverpool Oxford St. Liverpool L69 7ZE; Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD

    2007-07-15

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) positron source uses a helical undulator to generate polarized photons of {approx}10 MeV at the first harmonic. Unlike many undulators used in synchrotron radiation sources, the ILC helical undulator vacuum chamber will be bombarded by photons, generated by the undulator, with energies mostly below that of the first harmonic. Achieving the vacuum specification of {approx}100 nTorr in a narrow chamber of 4-6 mm inner diameter, with a long length of 100-200 m, makes the design of the vacuum system challenging. This article describes the vacuum specifications and calculations of the flux and energy of photons irradiating the undulator vacuum chamber and considers possible vacuum system design solutions for two cases: cryogenic and room temperature.

  18. Viscosity of Sheared Helical filament Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartucci, Matthew; Urbach, Jeff; Blair, Dan; Schwenger, Walter

    The viscosity of suspensions can be dramatically affected by high aspect ratio particles. Understanding these systems provides insight into key biological functions and can be manipulated for many technological applications. In this talk, the viscosity as a function of shear rate of suspensions of helical filaments is compared to that of suspensions of straight rod-like filaments. Our goal is to determine the impact of filament geometry on low volume fraction colloidal suspensions in order to identify strategies for altering viscosity with minimal volume fraction. In this research, the detached flagella of the bacteria Salmonella Typhimurium are used as a model system of helical filaments and compared to mutated straight flagella of the Salmonella. We compare rheological measurements of the suspension viscosity in response to shear flow and use a combination of the rheology and fluorescence microscopy to identify the microstructural changes responsible for the observed rheological response.

  19. Windmill artifact in multislice helical CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, Michael D.; Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Hein, Ilmar A.; Chiang, BeShan; Kazama, Masahiro; Mori, Issei

    2003-05-01

    Multi-slice helical CT-systems suffer from windmill artifacts: black/white patterns that spin off of features with high longitudinal gradients. The number of black/white pairs matches the number of slices (detector rows) in the multi-slive detector. The period of spin is the same as the helical pitch. We investigate the cause of the pattern by following the traces of selected voxels through the multi-slive detector array as a function of view position. This forms an "extracted sinogram" which represents the data used to reconstruct the specific voxel. Now we can determine the cause of the artifact by correlating the windmill streak in the image with the extracted data. The investigation shows that inadequate sampling along the longitudinal direction causes the artifact.

  20. Solar flares controlled by helicity conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliner, Erast B.; Osherovich, Vladimir A.

    1995-01-01

    The energy release in a class of solar flares is studied on the assumption that during burst events in highly conducting plasma the magnetic helicity of plasma is approximately conserved. The available energy release under a solar flare controlled by the helicity conservation is shown to be defined by the magnetic structure of the associated prominence. The approach throws light on some solar flare enigmas: the role of the associated prominence. The approach throws light on some solar flare enigmas: the role of the associated prominences; the discontinuation of the reconnection of magnetic lines long before the complete reconnection of participated fields occurs; the existence of quiet prominences which, in spite of their usual optical appearance, do not initiate any flare events; the small energy release under a solar flare in comparison with the stockpile of magnetic energy in surrounding fields. The predicted scale of the energy release is in a fair agreement with observations.

  1. On the energy density of helical proteins.

    PubMed

    Barros, Manuel; Ferrández, Angel

    2014-12-01

    We solve the problem of determining the energy actions whose moduli space of extremals contains the class of Lancret helices with a prescribed slope. We first see that the energy density should be linear both in the total bending and in the total twisting, such that the ratio between the weights of them is the prescribed slope. This will give an affirmative answer to the conjecture stated in Barros and Ferrández (J Math Phys 50:103529, 2009). Then, we normalize to get the best choice for the helical energy. It allows us to show that the energy, for instance of a protein chain, does not depend on the slope and is invariant under homotopic changes of the cross section which determines the cylinder where the helix is lying. In particular, the energy of a helix is not arbitrary, but it is given as natural multiples of some basic quantity of energy. PMID:24390481

  2. A Helical Magnet Design for RHIC^*.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willen, E.; Gupta, R.; Kelly, E.; Muratore, J.

    1997-05-01

    Helical dipole magnets are required in a project for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) to control and preserve the beam polarization in order to allow the collision of polarized proton beams. The project requires superconducting magnets with a 100 mm coil aperture and a 4 Tesla field in which the field rotates 360 degrees over a distance of 2.4 meters. A design restraint is that the magnets operate at relatively low current (less than 500 amperes) in order to minimize the heat load from the current leads. A magnet has been developed that uses a small diameter superconducting cable wound into helical grooves machined into a thick-walled aluminum cylinder. The design and test results of this prototype magnet will be described. ^*Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  3. Broadband optical isolator based on helical metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hu; Yang, ZhenYu; Zhao, Ming; Wu, Lin; Zhang, Peng

    2015-05-01

    Based on helical metamaterials, a new broadband optical isolator with a triple-helix structure is proposed in this paper. The right-handed circularly polarized light can transmit through the isolator with its polarization unchanged. The reverse propagating light, which is caused by the reflection of the latter optical devices, is converted into left-handed circularly polarized light that is suppressed by the proposed isolator because of absorption. Our design has some unprecedented advantages such as broad frequency ranges and a compact structure; moreover, neither polarizers nor adscititious magnetic fields are required. Properties of the isolator are investigated using the finite-difference time-domain method, and this phenomenon is studied by the mechanism of helical antenna theory. PMID:26366900

  4. Helical relativistic electron beam Vlasov equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, H. M.

    1980-08-01

    Three existing helical relativistic electron beam models are discussed and compared. Both Yoshikawa's and Lawson's models are shown to be derivable from appropriate Vlasov equilibria. A new helical Vlasov equilibrium with energy spread is presented and studied. Unlike Auer's axial current model in which the allowance of an energy spread limits the total current in the relativistic beam case, the present model, with the addition of an azimuthal current, permits solutions with arbitrarily large current. On the other hand, like the model studied by Kan and Lai, the present model leads to nonhollowed-out beam solutions in which, the larger the beam current, the more force-free is the magnetic field configuration.

  5. Helicity of a toroidal vortex with swirl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannikova, E. Yu.; Kontorovich, V. M.; Poslavsky, S. A.

    2016-04-01

    Based on the solutions of the Bragg-Hawthorne equation, we discuss the helicity of a thin toroidal vortex in the presence of swirl, orbital motion along the torus directrix. The relation between the helicity and circulations along the small and large linked circumferences (the torus directrix and generatrix) is shown to depend on the azimuthal velocity distribution in the core of the swirling ring vortex. In the case of nonuniform swirl, this relation differs from the well-known Moffat relation, viz., twice the product of such circulations multiplied by the number of linkages. The results can find applications in investigating the vortices in planetary atmospheres and the motions in the vicinity of active galactic nuclei.

  6. Coherent electron transport in a helical nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Guo-Hua; Wang, Yong-Long; Du, Long; Jiang, Hua; Kang, Guang-Zhen; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2016-09-01

    The quantum dynamics of carriers bound to helical tube surfaces is investigated in a thin-layer quantization scheme. By numerically solving the open-boundary Schrödinger equation in curvilinear coordinates, geometric effect on the coherent transmission spectra is analysed in the case of single propagating mode as well as multimode. It is shown that, the coiling endows the helical nanotube with different transport properties from a bent cylindrical surface. Fano resonance appears as a purely geometric effect in the conductance, the corresponding energy of quasibound state is obviously influenced by the torsion and length of the nanotube. We also find new plateaus in the conductance. The transport of double-degenerate mode in this geometry is reminiscent of the Zeeman coupling between the magnetic field and spin angular momentum in quasi-one-dimensional structure.

  7. Helical Muon Beam Cooling Channel Engineering Design

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, V.S.; Lopes, M.L.; Romanov, G.V.; Tartaglia, M.A.; Yonehara, K.; Yu, M.; Zlobin, A.V.; Flanagan, G.; Johnson, R.P.; Kazakevich, G.M.; Marhauser, F.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

    2012-05-01

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), a novel technique for six-dimensional (6D) ionization cooling of muon beams, has shown considerable promise based on analytic and simulation studies. However, the implementation of this revolutionary method of muon cooling requires new techniques for the integration of hydrogen-pressurized, high-power RF cavities into the low-temperature superconducting magnets of the HCC. We present the progress toward a conceptual design for the integration of 805 MHz RF cavities into a 10 T Nb{sub 3}Sn based HCC test section. We include discussions on the pressure and thermal barriers needed within the cryostat to maintain operation of the magnet at 4.2 K while operating the RF and energy absorber at a higher temperature. Additionally, we include progress on the Nb{sub 3}Sn helical solenoid design.

  8. Helical Tomotherapy for Parotid Gland Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Tae Kyu; Rosen, Isaac I.; Gibbons, John P.; Fields, Robert S.; Hogstrom, Kenneth R.

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate helical tomotherapy (HT) intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) as a postoperative treatment for parotid gland tumors. Methods and Materials: Helical tomotherapy plans were developed for 4 patients previously treated with segmental multileaf collimator (SMLC) IMRT. A primary planning target volume (PTV64) and two secondary PTVs (PTV60, PTV54) were defined. The clinical goals from the SMLC plans were applied as closely as possible to the HT planning. The SMLC plans included bolus, whereas HT plans did not. Results: In general, the HT plans showed better target coverage and target dose homogeneity. The minimum doses to the desired coverage volume were greater, on average, in the HT plans for all the targets. Minimum PTV doses were larger, on average, in the HT plans by 4.6 Gy (p = 0.03), 4.8 Gy (p = 0.06), and 4.9 Gy (p = 0.06) for PTV64, PTV60, and PTV54, respectively. Maximum PTV doses were smaller, on average, by 2.9 Gy (p = 0.23), 3.2 Gy (p = 0.02), and 3.6 Gy (p = 0.03) for PTV64, PTV60, and PTV54, respectively. Average dose homogeneity index was statistically smaller in the HT plans, and conformity index was larger for PTV64 in 3 patients. Tumor control probabilities were higher for 3 of the 4 patients. Sparing of normal structures was comparable for the two techniques. There were no significant differences between the normal tissue complication probabilities for the HT and SMLC plans. Conclusions: Helical tomotherapy treatment plans were comparable to or slightly better than SMLC plans. Helical tomotherapy is an effective alternative to SMLC IMRT for treatment of parotid tumors.

  9. Sawtooth oscillations about helical current channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theobald, M. L.; Montgomery, David; Doolen, G. D.; Dahlburg, J. P.

    1989-01-01

    An existing pseudospectral code for solving the three-dimensional equations of reduced magnetohydrodynamics is extended by adding a temperature equation. Resistivities and thermal conductivities are given their (isotropic) Braginskii temperature dependences, and are advanced self-consistently. Realistic-looking sawtooth oscillations are observed at modest Lundquist and Reynolds numbers. However, the oscillations are excited upon, and relax back to, a helical (rather than an axisymmetric) current channel.

  10. Bacteria that glide with helical tracks

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Beiyan; McBride, Mark J.; Chen, Jing; Zusman, David R.; Oster, George

    2014-01-01

    Many bacteria glide smoothly on surfaces, but with no discernable propulsive organelles on their surface. Recent experiments with Myxococcus xanthus and Flavobacterium johnsoniae show that both distantly related bacterial species glide utilizing proteins that move in helical tracks, albeit with significantly different motility mechanisms. Both species utilize proton motive force for movement. However, the motors that power gliding in M. xanthus have been identified, while the F. johnsoniae motors remain to be discovered. PMID:24556443

  11. Field of a helical Siberian Snake

    SciTech Connect

    Luccio, A.

    1995-02-01

    To preserve the spin polarization of a beam of high energy protons in a circular accelerator, magnets with periodic magnetic field, called Siberian Snakes are being used. Recently, it was proposed to build Siberian Snakes with superconducting helical dipoles. In a helical, or twisted dipole, the magnetic field is perpendicular to the axis of the helix and rotates around it as one proceeds along the magnet. In an engineering study of a 4 Tesla helical snake, the coil geometry is derived, by twisting, from the geometry of a cosine superconducting dipole. While waiting for magnetic measurement data on such a prototype, an analytical expression for the field of the helice is important, to calculate the particle trajectories and the spin precession in the helix. This model will also allow to determine the optical characteristics of the snake, as an insertion in the lattice of the accelerator. In particular, one can calculate the integrated multipoles through the magnet and the equivalent transfer matrix. An expression for the field in the helix body, i.e., excluding the fringe field was given in a classical paper. An alternate expression can be found by elaborating on the treatment of the field of a transverse wiggler obtained under the rather general conditions that the variables are separable. This expression exactly satisfies Maxwell`s div and curl equations for a stationary field, {del} {center_dot} B = 0, {del} x B = 0. This approach is useful in that it will allow one to use much of the work already done on the problem of inserting wigglers and undulators in the lattice of a circular accelerator.

  12. Noncontrast helical CT for ureteral stones.

    PubMed

    Boridy, I C; Nikolaidis, P; Kawashima, A; Sandler, C M; Goldman, S M

    1998-01-01

    Noncontrast helical computed tomography (CT) has recently been found to be superior to excretory urography (IVU) in the evaluation of patients with suspected ureterolithiasis. Noncontrast helical CT does not require the use of intravenous contrast material with its associated cost and risk of adverse reactions and can be completed within 5 min, in most cases. Noncontrast CT often detects extraurinary pathology responsible for the patient's symptoms. CT is also more sensitive than IVU in detecting the calculus, regardless of its size, location, and chemical composition. However, confidently differentiating ureteral calculi from phleboliths along the course of the ureter may, at times, be difficult. The "tissue-rim" sign, a rim of soft tissue attenuation around the suspicious calcification, is helpful in making this distinction. Noncontrast CT does not provide physiological information about renal function and the degree of obstruction. A pilot study has suggested a proportional relationship between the extent of perinephric edema and the degree of obstruction. The cost of the examination and the radiation dose delivered to the patient may be higher with CT. Despite these limitations, noncontrast helical CT has quickly become the imaging study of choice in evaluating patients with acute flank pain. PMID:9542010

  13. The infrared dichroism of transmembrane helical polypeptides.

    PubMed Central

    Axelsen, P H; Kaufman, B K; McElhaney, R N; Lewis, R N

    1995-01-01

    Polarized attenuated total internal reflectance techniques were applied to study the infrared dichroism of the amide I transition moment in two membrane-bound peptides that are known to form oriented transmembrane helices: gramicidin A in a supported phospholipid monolayer and Ac-Lys2-Leu24-Lys2-amide (L24) in oriented multibilayers. These studies were performed to test the ability of these techniques to determine the orientation of these peptides, to verify the value of optical parameters used to calculate electric field strengths, to examine the common assumptions regarding the amide I transition moment orientation, and to ascertain the effect of surface imperfections on molecular disorder. The two peptides exhibit marked differences in the shape and frequency of their amide I absorption bands. Yet both peptides are highly ordered and oriented with their helical axes perpendicular to the membrane surface. In the alpha-helix formed by L24, there is evidence for a mode with type E1 symmetry contributing to amide I, and the amide I transition moment must be more closely aligned with the peptide C=O (< 34 degrees) than earlier studies have suggested. These results indicate that long-standing assumptions about the orientation of amide I in a peptide require some revision, but that in general, infrared spectroscopy yields reliable information about the orientation of membrane-bound helical peptides. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8599683

  14. Total scalp irradiation using helical tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Orton, Nigel . E-mail: nporton@facstaff.wisc.edu; Jaradat, Hazim; Welsh, James; Tome, Wolfgang

    2005-09-30

    Homogeneous irradiation of the scalp poses technical and dosimetric challenges due to the extensive, superficial, curved treatment volume. Conventional treatments on a linear accelerator use multiple matched electron fields or a combination of electron and photon fields. Problems with these techniques include dose heterogeneity in the target due to varying source-to-skin distance (SSD) and angle of beam incidence, significant dose to the brain, and the potential for overdose or underdose at match lines between the fields. Linac-based intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans have similar problems. This work presents treatment plans for total scalp irradiation on a helical tomotherapy machine. Helical tomotherapy is well-suited for scalp irradiation because it has the ability to deliver beamlets that are tangential to the scalp at all points. Helical tomotherapy also avoids problems associated with field matching and use of more than one modality. Tomotherapy treatment plans were generated and are compared to plans for treatment of the same patient on a linac. The resulting tomotherapy plans show more homogeneous target dose and improved critical structure dose when compared to state-of-the-art linac techniques. Target equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for the best tomotherapy plan was slightly higher than for the linac plan, while the volume of brain tissue receiving over 30 Gy was reduced by two thirds. Furthermore, the tomotherapy plan can be more reliably delivered than linac treatments, because the patient is aligned prior to each treatment based on megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT)

  15. Bifurcated helical core equilibrium states in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, W. A.; Chapman, I. T.; Schmitz, O.; Turnbull, A. D.; Tobias, B. J.; Lazarus, E. A.; Turco, F.; Lanctot, M. J.; Evans, T. E.; Graves, J. P.; Brunetti, D.; Pfefferlé, D.; Reimerdes, H.; Sauter, O.; Halpern, F. D.; Tran, T. M.; Coda, S.; Duval, B. P.; Labit, B.; Pochelon, A.; Turnyanskiy, M. R.; Lao, L.; Luce, T. C.; Buttery, R.; Ferron, J. R.; Hollmann, E. M.; Petty, C. C.; van Zeeland, M.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Hanson, J. M.; Lütjens, H.

    2013-07-01

    Tokamaks with weak to moderate reversed central shear in which the minimum inverse rotational transform (safety factor) qmin is in the neighbourhood of unity can trigger bifurcated magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium states, one of which is similar to a saturated ideal internal kink mode. Peaked prescribed pressure profiles reproduce the ‘snake’ structures observed in many tokamaks which has led to a novel explanation of the snake as a bifurcated equilibrium state. Snake equilibrium structures are computed in simulations of the tokamak à configuration variable (TCV), DIII-D and mega amp spherical torus (MAST) tokamaks. The internal helical deformations only weakly modulate the plasma-vacuum interface which is more sensitive to ripple and resonant magnetic perturbations. On the other hand, the external perturbations do not alter the helical core deformation in a significant manner. The confinement of fast particles in MAST simulations deteriorate with the amplitude of the helical core distortion. These three-dimensional bifurcated solutions constitute a paradigm shift that motivates the applications of tools developed for stellarator research in tokamak physics investigations.

  16. Mechanical resonances of helically coiled carbon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Saini, D; Behlow, H; Podila, R; Dickel, D; Pillai, B; Skove, M J; Serkiz, S M; Rao, A M

    2014-01-01

    Despite their wide spread applications, the mechanical behavior of helically coiled structures has evaded an accurate understanding at any length scale (nano to macro) mainly due to their geometrical complexity. The advent of helically coiled micro/nanoscale structures in nano-robotics, nano-inductors, and impact protection coatings has necessitated the development of new methodologies for determining their shear and tensile properties. Accordingly, we developed a synergistic protocol which (i) integrates analytical, numerical (i.e., finite element using COMSOL) and experimental (harmonic detection of resonance; HDR) methods to obtain an empirically validated closed form expression for the shear modulus and resonance frequency of a singly clamped helically coiled carbon nanowire (HCNW), and (ii) circumvents the need for solving 12th order differential equations. From the experimental standpoint, a visual detection of resonances (using in situ scanning electron microscopy) combined with HDR revealed intriguing non-planar resonance modes at much lower driving forces relative to those needed for linear carbon nanotube cantilevers. Interestingly, despite the presence of mechanical and geometrical nonlinearities in the HCNW resonance behavior the ratio of the first two transverse modes f₂/f₁ was found to be similar to the ratio predicted by the Euler-Bernoulli theorem for linear cantilevers. PMID:24986377

  17. Manipulation of wavefront using helical metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenyu; Wang, Zhaokun; Tao, Huan; Zhao, Ming

    2016-08-01

    Helical metamaterials, a kind of 3-dimensional structure, has relatively strong coupling effect among the helical nano-wires. Therefore, it is expected to be a good candidate for generating phase shift and controlling wavefront with high efficiency. In this paper, using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, we studied the phase shift properties in the helical metamaterials. It is found that the phase shift occurs for both transmitted and reflected light waves. And the maximum of reflection coefficients can reach over 60%. In addition, the phase shift (φ) is dispersionless in the range of 600 nm to 860 nm, that is, it is only dominated by the initial angle (θ) of the helix. The relationship between them is φ = ± 2θ. Using Jones calculus we give a further explanation for these properties. Finally, by arranging the helixes in an array with a constant phase gradient, the phenomenon of anomalous refraction was also observed in a broad wavelength range. PMID:27505790

  18. Buckling transition in long α-helices

    SciTech Connect

    Palenčár, Peter; Bleha, Tomáš

    2014-11-07

    The treatment of bending and buckling of stiff biopolymer filaments by the popular worm-like chain model does not provide adequate understanding of these processes at the microscopic level. Thus, we have used the atomistic molecular-dynamic simulations and the Amber03 force field to examine the compression buckling of α-helix (AH) filaments at room temperature. It was found that the buckling instability occurs in AHs at the critical force f{sub c} in the range of tens of pN depending on the AH length. The decrease of the force f{sub c} with the contour length follows the prediction of the classic thin rod theory. At the force f{sub c} the helical filament undergoes the swift and irreversible transition from the smoothly bent structure to the buckled one. A sharp kink in the AH contour arises at the transition, accompanied by the disruption of the hydrogen bonds in its vicinity. The kink defect brings in an effective softening of the AH molecule at buckling. Nonbonded interactions between helical branches drive the rearrangement of a kinked AH into the ultimate buckled structure of a compact helical hairpin described earlier in the literature.

  19. Helical antimicrobial polypeptides with radial amphiphilicity

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Menghua; Lee, Michelle W.; Mansbach, Rachael A.; Song, Ziyuan; Bao, Yan; Peek, Richard M.; Yao, Catherine; Chen, Lin-Feng; Ferguson, Andrew L.; Wong, Gerard C. L.; Cheng, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    α-Helical antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) generally have facially amphiphilic structures that may lead to undesired peptide interactions with blood proteins and self-aggregation due to exposed hydrophobic surfaces. Here we report the design of a class of cationic, helical homo-polypeptide antimicrobials with a hydrophobic internal helical core and a charged exterior shell, possessing unprecedented radial amphiphilicity. The radially amphiphilic structure enables the polypeptide to bind effectively to the negatively charged bacterial surface and exhibit high antimicrobial activity against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Moreover, the shielding of the hydrophobic core by the charged exterior shell decreases nonspecific interactions with eukaryotic cells, as evidenced by low hemolytic activity, and protects the polypeptide backbone from proteolytic degradation. The radially amphiphilic polypeptides can also be used as effective adjuvants, allowing improved permeation of commercial antibiotics in bacteria and enhanced antimicrobial activity by one to two orders of magnitude. Designing AMPs bearing this unprecedented, unique radially amphiphilic structure represents an alternative direction of AMP development; radially amphiphilic polypeptides may become a general platform for developing AMPs to treat drug-resistant bacteria. PMID:26460016

  20. Nuclear design of Helical Cruciform Fuel rods

    SciTech Connect

    Shirvan, K.; Kazimi, M. S.

    2012-07-01

    In order to increase the power density of current and new light water reactor designs, the Helical Cruciform Fuel (HCF) rods are proposed. The HCF rods are equivalent to a cylindrical rod, with the fuel in a cruciform shaped, twisted axially. The HCF rods increase the surface area to volume ratio and inter-subchannel mixing behavior due to their cruciform and helical shapes, respectively. In a previous study, the HCF rods have shown the potential to up-rate existing PWRs by 50% and BWRs by 25%. However, HCF rods do display different neutronics modeling and performance. The cruciform cross section of HCF rods creates radially asymmetric heat generation and temperature distribution. The nominal HCF rod's beginning of life reactivity is reduced, compared to a cylindrical rod with the same fuel volume, by 500 pcm, due to increase in absorption in cladding. The rotation of these rods accounts for reactivity changes, which depends on the H/HM ratio of the pin cell. The HCF geometry shows large sensitivities to U{sup 235} or gadolinium enrichments compared to a cylindrical geometry. In addition, the gadolinium-containing HCF rods show a stronger effect on neighboring HCF rods than in case of cylindrical rods, depending on the orientation of the HCF rods. The helical geometry of the rods introduces axial shadowing of about 600 pcm, not seen in typical cylindrical rods. (authors)

  1. Mechanical Resonances of Helically Coiled Carbon Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, D.; Behlow, H.; Podila, R.; Dickel, D.; Pillai, B.; Skove, M. J.; Serkiz, S. M.; Rao, A. M.

    2014-07-01

    Despite their wide spread applications, the mechanical behavior of helically coiled structures has evaded an accurate understanding at any length scale (nano to macro) mainly due to their geometrical complexity. The advent of helically coiled micro/nanoscale structures in nano-robotics, nano-inductors, and impact protection coatings has necessitated the development of new methodologies for determining their shear and tensile properties. Accordingly, we developed a synergistic protocol which (i) integrates analytical, numerical (i.e., finite element using COMSOL®) and experimental (harmonic detection of resonance; HDR) methods to obtain an empirically validated closed form expression for the shear modulus and resonance frequency of a singly clamped helically coiled carbon nanowire (HCNW), and (ii) circumvents the need for solving 12th order differential equations. From the experimental standpoint, a visual detection of resonances (using in situ scanning electron microscopy) combined with HDR revealed intriguing non-planar resonance modes at much lower driving forces relative to those needed for linear carbon nanotube cantilevers. Interestingly, despite the presence of mechanical and geometrical nonlinearities in the HCNW resonance behavior the ratio of the first two transverse modes f2/f1 was found to be similar to the ratio predicted by the Euler-Bernoulli theorem for linear cantilevers.

  2. Progress in development of the neutron profile monitor for the large helical device.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, K; Isobe, M; Takada, E; Uchida, Y; Ochiai, K; Tomita, H; Uritani, A; Kobuchi, T; Takeiri, Y

    2014-11-01

    The neutron profile monitor stably operated at a high-count-rate for deuterium operations in the Large Helical Device has been developed to enhance the research on the fast-ion confinement. It is composed of a multichannel collimator, scintillation-detectors, and a field programmable gate array circuit. The entire neutron detector system was tested using an accelerator-based neutron generator. This system stably acquires the pulse data without any data loss at high-count-rate conditions up to 8 × 10(5) counts per second. PMID:25430289

  3. Progress in development of the neutron profile monitor for the large helical device

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, K. Kobuchi, T.; Isobe, M.; Takeiri, Y.; Takada, E.; Uchida, Y.; Ochiai, K.; Tomita, H.; Uritani, A.

    2014-11-15

    The neutron profile monitor stably operated at a high-count-rate for deuterium operations in the Large Helical Device has been developed to enhance the research on the fast-ion confinement. It is composed of a multichannel collimator, scintillation-detectors, and a field programmable gate array circuit. The entire neutron detector system was tested using an accelerator-based neutron generator. This system stably acquires the pulse data without any data loss at high-count-rate conditions up to 8 × 10{sup 5} counts per second.

  4. Evolution of field line helicity during magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, A. J. B. Hornig, G.; Wilmot-Smith, A. L.; Yeates, A. R.

    2015-03-15

    We investigate the evolution of field line helicity for magnetic fields that connect two boundaries without null points, with emphasis on localized finite-B magnetic reconnection. Total (relative) magnetic helicity is already recognized as an important topological constraint on magnetohydrodynamic processes. Field line helicity offers further advantages because it preserves all topological information and can distinguish between different magnetic fields with the same total helicity. Magnetic reconnection changes field connectivity and field line helicity reflects these changes; the goal of this paper is to characterize that evolution. We start by deriving the evolution equation for field line helicity and examining its terms, also obtaining a simplified form for cases where dynamics are localized within the domain. The main result, which we support using kinematic examples, is that during localized reconnection in a complex magnetic field, the evolution of field line helicity is dominated by a work-like term that is evaluated at the field line endpoints, namely, the scalar product of the generalized field line velocity and the vector potential. Furthermore, the flux integral of this term over certain areas is very small compared to the integral of the unsigned quantity, which indicates that changes of field line helicity happen in a well-organized pairwise manner. It follows that reconnection is very efficient at redistributing helicity in complex magnetic fields despite having little effect on the total helicity.

  5. Cryo-EM Structure Determination Using Segmented Helical Image Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Fromm, S A; Sachse, C

    2016-01-01

    Treating helices as single-particle-like segments followed by helical image reconstruction has become the method of choice for high-resolution structure determination of well-ordered helical viruses as well as flexible filaments. In this review, we will illustrate how the combination of latest hardware developments with optimized image processing routines have led to a series of near-atomic resolution structures of helical assemblies. Originally, the treatment of helices as a sequence of segments followed by Fourier-Bessel reconstruction revealed the potential to determine near-atomic resolution structures from helical specimens. In the meantime, real-space image processing of helices in a stack of single particles was developed and enabled the structure determination of specimens that resisted classical Fourier helical reconstruction and also facilitated high-resolution structure determination. Despite the progress in real-space analysis, the combination of Fourier and real-space processing is still commonly used to better estimate the symmetry parameters as the imposition of the correct helical symmetry is essential for high-resolution structure determination. Recent hardware advancement by the introduction of direct electron detectors has significantly enhanced the image quality and together with improved image processing procedures has made segmented helical reconstruction a very productive cryo-EM structure determination method. PMID:27572732

  6. Faraday signature of magnetic helicity from reduced depolarization

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenburg, Axel; Stepanov, Rodion

    2014-05-10

    Using one-dimensional models, we show that a helical magnetic field with an appropriate sign of helicity can compensate the Faraday depolarization resulting from the superposition of Faraday-rotated polarization planes from a spatially extended source. For radio emission from a helical magnetic field, the polarization as a function of the square of the wavelength becomes asymmetric with respect to zero. Mathematically speaking, the resulting emission occurs then either at observable or at unobservable (imaginary) wavelengths. We demonstrate that rotation measure (RM) synthesis allows for the reconstruction of the underlying Faraday dispersion function in the former case, but not in the latter. The presence of positive magnetic helicity can thus be detected by observing positive RM in highly polarized regions in the sky and negative RM in weakly polarized regions. Conversely, negative magnetic helicity can be detected by observing negative RM in highly polarized regions and positive RM in weakly polarized regions. The simultaneous presence of two magnetic constituents with opposite signs of helicity is shown to possess signatures that can be quantified through polarization peaks at specific wavelengths and the gradient of the phase of the Faraday dispersion function. Similar polarization peaks can tentatively also be identified for the bi-helical magnetic fields that are generated self-consistently by a dynamo from helically forced turbulence, even though the magnetic energy spectrum is then continuous. Finally, we discuss the possibility of detecting magnetic fields with helical and non-helical properties in external galaxies using the Square Kilometre Array.

  7. New Exact Relations for Helicities in Hall Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Supratik; Galtier, Sebastien

    2016-04-01

    Hall magnetohydrodynamics is a mono-fluid plasma model appropriate for probing Final{some of the} physical processes (other than pure kinetic effects) at length scales smaller than the scales of standard MHD. In sub-ionic space plasma turbulence (e.g. the solar wind) this fluid model has been proved to be useful. Three-dimensional incompressible Hall magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) possesses three inviscid invariants which are the total energy, the magnetic helicity and the generalized helicity. In this presentation, we would like to discuss new exact relations for helicities (magnetic helicities and generalized helicities) which are derived for homogeneous stationary (not necessarily isotropic) Hall MHD turbulence (and also for its inertialess electron MHD limit) in the asymptotic limit of large Reynolds numbers. The universal laws are written only in terms of mixed second-order structure functions, i.e. the scalar product of two different increments and are written simply as ηM = di < δ ( {b} × {j}) \\cdot δ {b} >, with ηM the average magnetic helicity flux rate, {b} the magnetic field, {j} the current and ± ηG = < δ ( {v} × {Ω} ) \\cdot δ {Ω} > , with ηM the average generalized helicity flux rate, {v} the fluid velocity and {Ω} = {b} + dI {ω} being the generalized helicity where ω is simply the fluid vorticity ( = nabla × {v}). It provides, therefore, a direct measurement of the dissipation rates for the corresponding helicities even in case of an anisotropic plasma turbulence. This study shows that the generalized helicity cascade is strongly linked to the left polarized fluctuations while the magnetic helicity cascade is linked to the right polarized fluctuations. The newly derived relations also show that like energy, a non-zero helicity flux can only be associated to a departure of Beltrami flow state. {Reference} S. Banerjee & S. Galtier, {Chiral Exact Relations for Helicities in Hall Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence} (submitted).

  8. SMART Observation of Magnetic Helicity in Solar Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagino, M.; Kitai, R.; Shibata, K.

    2006-08-01

    We examined the magnetic helicity of solar filaments from their structure in the chromosphere and corona. The H-alpha telescope of the Solar Magnetic Activity Research Telescope (SMART) observed 239 intermediate filaments from 2005 July 1 to 2006 May 15. The intermediate filament usually locates between two active regions. Using these images, we identified the filament spine and its barbs, and determined the chromospheric filament helicity from the mean angle between each barbs and a spine. We found that 71% (78 of 110) of intermediate filaments in the northern hemisphere are negative helicity and 67% (87 of 129) of filaments in the southern hemisphere are positive, which agreed with the well-known hemispheric tendency of the magnetic helicity. Additionally, we studied the coronal helicity of intermediate filaments. The coronal filament helicity is defined as the crossing angle of threads formed a filament. The helicity pattern of coronal filaments obtained with EIT/SOHO 171A also shows the helicity hemispheric tendency. Namely, 65% (71 of 110) of coronal filaments in the northern hemisphere exhibit negative helicity and the 65% (84 of 129) of filaments in the southern hemisphere show negative helicity. These data were observed in the same day with the SMART H-alpha data. Moreover, we found 12 filament eruptions in our data. The 7 of 12 filaments show the clear opposite sign of the hemispheric tendency of the magnetic helicity. The helicity seems to be change during temporal evolution. This results suggest that filament instability may be driven by the opposite sign helicity injection from the foot point of the barb.

  9. Guest-Induced Arylamide Polymer Helicity: Twist-Sense Bias and Solvent-Dependent Helicity Inversion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Liang; Wang, Ze-Kun; Zhang, Yun-Chang; Guo, Rong; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Dan-Wei; Li, Zhan-Ting

    2016-06-01

    A benzene/naphthalene alternately incorporated amide polymer was synthesized and characterized. (1) H NMR spectroscopy, fluorescence, and circular dichroism (CD) experiments indicated that, in chloroform, the polymer could be induced by the chiral l-aspartic acid dianion or one of its derivatives to form a helical tubular conformation with twist-sense bias. CD titration studies showed that the l-aspartic acid dianion (8 equiv.) could lead to a maximum Cotton effect. It was also revealed that the twist-sense bias obeyed the majority rule, and 70 % enantiomeric excess could realize the maximum helicity bias. Adding acetonitrile to the solution of chloroform caused inversion of the guest-induced helicity bias of the polymer. PMID:27027979

  10. Helical muon beam cooling channel engineering design

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland

    2015-08-07

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) achieves effective ionization cooling of the six-dimensional (6d) phase space of a muon beam by means of a series of 21st century inventions. In the HCC, hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities enable high RF gradients in strong external magnetic fields. The theory of the HCC, which requires a magnetic field with solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole components, demonstrates that dispersion in the gaseous hydrogen energy absorber provides effective emittance exchange to enable longitudinal ionization cooling. The 10-year development of a practical implementation of a muon-beam cooling device has involved a series of technical innovations and experiments that imply that an HCC of less than 300 m length can cool the 6d emittance of a muon beam by six orders of magnitude. We describe the design and construction plans for a prototype HCC module based on oxygen-doped hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities that are loaded with dielectric, fed by magnetrons, and operate in a superconducting helical solenoid magnet. The first phase of this project saw the development of a conceptual design for the integration of 805 MHz RF cavities into a 10 T Nb3Sn based HS test section. Two very novel ideas are required to realize the design. The first idea is the use of dielectric inserts in the RF cavities to make them smaller for a given frequency so that the cavities and associated plumbing easily fit inside the magnet cryostat. Calculations indicate that heat loads will be tolerable, while RF breakdown of the dielectric inserts will be suppressed by the pressurized hydrogen gas. The second new idea is the use of a multi-layer Nb3Sn helical solenoid. The technology demonstrations for the two aforementioned key components of a 10T, 805 MHz HCC were begun in this project. The work load in the Fermilab Technical Division made it difficult to test a multi-layer Nb3Sn solenoid as originally planned. Instead, a complementary project was approved by the DOE

  11. Compact pulsed electron beam system for microwave generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S. K.; Deb, P.; Shukla, R.; Banerjee, P.; Prabaharan, T.; Adhikary, B.; Verma, R.; Sharma, A.; Shyam, A.

    2012-11-01

    A compact 180 kV electron beam system is designed for high power microwave generation. The electron beam system is consists of a secondary energy storage device, which can deliver energy to the load at faster rate than usual primary energy storage system such as tesla transformers or marx generator. The short duration, high voltage pulse with fast rise time and good flattop is applied to vacuum diode for high power microwave generation. The compact electron beam system is made up of single turn primary tesla transformer which charges a helical pulse forming line and transfers its energy to vacuum diode through a high voltage pressurized spark gap switch. We have used helical pulse forming line which has higher inductance as compared to coaxial pulse forming line, which in turns increases, the pulse width and reduce the length of the pulse forming line. Water dielectric medium is used because of its high dielectric constant, high dielectric strength and efficient energy storage capability. The time dependent breakdown property and high relative permittivity of water makes it an ideal choice for this system. The high voltage flat-top pulse of 90 kV, 260 ns is measured across the matched load. In this article we have reported the design details, simulation and initial experimental results of 180 kV pulsed electron beam system for high power microwave generation.

  12. Equilibrium helical order in radially confined superfluid 3He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiman, Joshua; Sauls, J. A.

    An exciting prediction of confined superfluid 3He is the presence of spontaneously broken translational symmetry, resulting in a superfluid phase that has a different translational symmetry than that of the confining geometry. Such phases have been described theoretically in films, cylinders, and ribbons. We predict an inhomogeneous superfluid phase with helical order that is energetically stable within cylindrical channels of radius comparable to the Cooper pair coherence length. By incorporating extensions to standard Ginzburg-Landau (GL) strong-coupling theory that accurately reproduce the bulk phase diagram at high pressures and allow tuneable boundary conditions, we find this new phase to be stable at both high and low pressures and favored by boundary conditions with strong pairbreaking. We present superfluid phase diagrams as functions of pressure, temperature, and channel radius showing the regions of stability for this ``spiral'' phase relative to those phases previously predicted for the channel. Transverse NMR frequency shifts are a possible experimental signature of this phase, and we present calculations of these shifts as functions of rf pulse tipping angle, field orientation, and temperature. Supported by NSF Grant DMR-1508730.

  13. Pulse Voltammetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osteryoung, Janet

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the nature of pulse voltammetry, indicating that its widespread use arises from good sensitivity and detection limits and from ease of application and low cost. Provides analytical and mechanistic applications of the procedure. (JN)

  14. Resistive Interchange Modes Destabilized by Helically Trapped Energetic Ions in a Helical Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, X. D.; Toi, K.; Osakabe, M.; Ohdachi, S.; Ido, T.; Tanaka, K.; Yokoyama, M.; Yoshinuma, M.; Ogawa, K.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Isobe, M.; Nagaoka, K.; Ozaki, T.; Sakakibara, S.; Seki, R.; Shimizu, A.; Suzuki, Y.; Tsuchiya, H.

    2015-04-01

    A new bursting m =1 /n =1 instability (m ,n : poloidal and toroidal mode numbers) with rapid frequency chirping down has been observed for the first time in a helical plasma with intense perpendicular neutral beam injection. This is destabilized in the plasma peripheral region by resonant interaction between helically trapped energetic ions and the resistive interchange mode. A large radial electric field is induced near the edge due to enhanced radial transport of the trapped energetic ions by the mode, and leads to clear change in toroidal plasma flow, suppression of microturbulence, and triggering an improvement of bulk plasma confinement.

  15. Pulse stretcher

    DOEpatents

    Horton, James A.

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus (20) for increasing the length of a laser pulse to reduce its peak power without substantial loss in the average power of the pulse. The apparatus (20) uses a White cell (10) having a plurality of optical delay paths (18a-18d) of successively increasing number of passes between the field mirror (13) and the objective mirrors (11 and 12). A pulse (26) from a laser (27) travels through a multi-leg reflective path (28) between a beam splitter (21) and a totally reflective mirror (24) to the laser output (37). The laser pulse (26) is also simultaneously injected through the beam splitter (21) to the input mirrors (14a-14d) of the optical delay paths (18a-18d). The pulses from the output mirrors (16a-16d) of the optical delay paths (18a-18d) go simultaneously to the laser output (37) and to the input mirrors ( 14b-14d) of the longer optical delay paths. The beam splitter (21) is 50% reflective and 50% transmissive to provide equal attenuation of all of the pulses at the laser output (37).

  16. VERY LOW MASS STELLAR AND SUBSTELLAR COMPANIONS TO SOLAR-LIKE STARS FROM MARVELS. II. A SHORT-PERIOD COMPANION ORBITING AN F STAR WITH EVIDENCE OF A STELLAR TERTIARY AND SIGNIFICANT MUTUAL INCLINATION

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, Scott W.; Ge Jian; De Lee, Nathan; Jiang Peng; Lee, Brian; Nelson, Ben; Barnes, Rory; Beatty, Thomas G.; Gaudi, B. Scott; Shappee, Benjamin J.; Crepp, Justin R.; Esposito, Massimiliano; Femenia, Bruno; Gonzalez Hernandez, Jonay I.; Ferreira, Leticia; Porto de Mello, Gustavo F.; Gary, Bruce; Hebb, Leslie; Stassun, Keivan; Ghezzi, Luan; and others

    2012-09-15

    We report the discovery via radial velocity (RV) measurements of a short-period (P = 2.430420 {+-} 0.000006 days) companion to the F-type main-sequence star TYC 2930-00872-1. A long-term trend in the RV data also suggests the presence of a tertiary stellar companion with P > 2000 days. High-resolution spectroscopy of the host star yields T{sub eff} = 6427 {+-} 33 K, log g = 4.52 {+-} 0.14, and [Fe/H] = -0.04 {+-} 0.05. These parameters, combined with the broadband spectral energy distribution (SED) and a parallax, allow us to infer a mass and radius of the host star of M{sub 1} = 1.21 {+-} 0.08 M{sub Sun} and R{sub 1} = 1.09{sup +0.15}{sub -0.13} R{sub Sun }. The minimum mass of the inner companion is below the hydrogen-burning limit; however, the true mass is likely to be substantially higher. We are able to exclude transits of the inner companion with high confidence. Further, the host star spectrum exhibits a clear signature of Ca H and K core emission, indicating stellar activity, but a lack of photometric variability and small vsin I suggest that the primary's spin axis is oriented in a pole-on configuration. The rotational period of the primary estimated through an activity-rotation relation matches the orbital period of the inner companion to within 1.5 {sigma}, suggesting that the primary and inner companion are tidally locked. If the inner companion's orbital angular momentum vector is aligned with the stellar spin axis as expected through tidal evolution, then it has a stellar mass of {approx}0.3-0.4 M{sub Sun }. Direct imaging limits the existence of stellar companions to projected separations <30 AU. No set of spectral lines and no significant flux contribution to the SED from either companion are detected, which places individual upper mass limits of M{sub {l_brace}2,3{r_brace}} {approx}< 1.0 M{sub Sun }, provided they are not stellar remnants. If the tertiary is not a stellar remnant, then it likely has a mass of {approx}0.5-0.6 M{sub Sun }, and its

  17. Helical growth in plant organs: mechanisms and significance.

    PubMed

    Smyth, David R

    2016-09-15

    Many plants show some form of helical growth, such as the circular searching movements of growing stems and other organs (circumnutation), tendril coiling, leaf and bud reversal (resupination), petal arrangement (contortion) and leaf blade twisting. Recent genetic findings have revealed that such helical growth may be associated with helical arrays of cortical microtubules and of overlying cellulose microfibrils. An alternative mechanism of coiling that is based on differential contraction within a bilayer has also recently been identified and underlies at least some of these growth patterns. Here, I provide an overview of the genes and cellular processes that underlie helical patterning. I also discuss the diversity of helical growth patterns in plants, highlighting their potential adaptive significance and comparing them with helical growth patterns in animals. PMID:27624832

  18. A Half Century of Magnetic Helicity in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieber, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    Using NASA's "OMNI" dataset, this work presents observations of the net magnetic helicity and the normalized helicity spectrum at 1 AU over the period 1965 - 2014. Past studies (1,2) reported that the helicity at large scales has a definite dominant sign organized with respect to the heliospheric current sheet, with negative helicities occurring north of the current sheet, and positive helicities south. The present study confirms this pattern and extends it by more than two solar cycles and past the most recent solar maximum. Particle scattering by turbulence with finite magnetic helicity is one of only two known particle transport mechanisms that are sensitive to particle charge sign and magnetic field polarity. Implications to cosmic ray transport will be discussed. References: (1) Bieber, Evenson, and Matthaeus, Geophys. Res. Lett. , Vol 14, p 864, 1987. (2) Smith and Bieber, Proc. 23rd Internat. Cosmic Ray Conf. (Calgary), Vol 3, p 493, 1993.

  19. Non-Kolmogorov cascade of helicity-driven turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessar, Mouloud; Plunian, Franck; Stepanov, Rodion; Balarac, Guillaume

    2015-09-01

    We solve the Navier-Stokes equations with two simultaneous forcings. One forcing is applied at a given large scale and it injects energy. The other forcing is applied at all scales belonging to the inertial range and it injects helicity. In this way we can vary the degree of turbulence helicity from nonhelical to maximally helical. We find that increasing the rate of helicity injection does not change the energy flux. On the other hand, the level of total energy is strongly increased and the energy spectrum gets steeper. The energy spectrum spans from a Kolmogorov scaling law k-5 /3 for a nonhelical turbulence, to a non-Kolmogorov scaling law k-7 /3 for a maximally helical turbulence. In the latter case we find that the characteristic time of the turbulence is not the turnover time but a time based on the helicity injection rate. We also analyze the results in terms of helical modes decomposition. For a maximally helical turbulence one type of helical mode is found to be much more energetic than the other one, by several orders of magnitude. The energy cascade of the most energetic type of helical mode results from the sum of two fluxes. One flux is negative and can be understood in terms of a decimated model. This negative flux, however, is not sufficient to lead an inverse energy cascade. Indeed, the other flux involving the least energetic type of helical mode is positive and the largest. The least energetic type of helical mode is then essential and cannot be neglected.

  20. Decay of magnetic helicity producing polarized Alfven waves

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Z.; Mahajan, S.M.

    1994-02-01

    When a super-Alfvenic electron beam propagates along an ambient magnetic field, the left-hand circularly polarized Alfven wave is Cherenkov-emitted (two stream instability). This instability results in a spontaneous conversion of the background plasma helicity to the wave helicity. The background helicity induces a frequency (energy) shift in the eigenmodes, which changes the critical velocity for Cherenkov emission, and it becomes possible for a sub-Alfvenic electron beam to excite a nonsingular Alfven mode.

  1. Helicity conservation under quantum reconnection of vortex rings.

    PubMed

    Zuccher, Simone; Ricca, Renzo L

    2015-12-01

    Here we show that under quantum reconnection, simulated by using the three-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation, self-helicity of a system of two interacting vortex rings remains conserved. By resolving the fine structure of the vortex cores, we demonstrate that the total length of the vortex system reaches a maximum at the reconnection time, while both writhe helicity and twist helicity remain separately unchanged throughout the process. Self-helicity is computed by two independent methods, and topological information is based on the extraction and analysis of geometric quantities such as writhe, total torsion, and intrinsic twist of the reconnecting vortex rings. PMID:26764622

  2. Spontaneous formation of organic helical architectures through dynamic covalent chemistry.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenfang; Dong, Zeyuan; Zhu, Junyan; Luo, Quan; Liu, Junqiu

    2014-12-01

    The spontaneous formation of organic helical structures, accompanied with an amplification of chirality, by dynamic covalent bonds between achiral and chiral building blocks is reported. PMID:25325888

  3. Large-scale flow generation by inhomogeneous helicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoi, N.; Brandenburg, A.

    2016-03-01

    The effect of kinetic helicity (velocity-vorticity correlation) on turbulent momentum transport is investigated. The turbulent kinetic helicity (pseudoscalar) enters the Reynolds stress (mirror-symmetric tensor) expression in the form of a helicity gradient as the coupling coefficient for the mean vorticity and/or the angular velocity (axial vector), which suggests the possibility of mean-flow generation in the presence of inhomogeneous helicity. This inhomogeneous helicity effect, which was previously confirmed at the level of a turbulence- or closure-model simulation, is examined with the aid of direct numerical simulations of rotating turbulence with nonuniform helicity sustained by an external forcing. The numerical simulations show that the spatial distribution of the Reynolds stress is in agreement with the helicity-related term coupled with the angular velocity, and that a large-scale flow is generated in the direction of angular velocity. Such a large-scale flow is not induced in the case of homogeneous turbulent helicity. This result confirms the validity of the inhomogeneous helicity effect in large-scale flow generation and suggests that a vortex dynamo is possible even in incompressible turbulence where there is no baroclinicity effect.

  4. Applying of helicity in an analysis of a severe sandstorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jian-hong; Wang, Jin-song; Feng, Jian-ying; Chang, Yue; Liu, Xiao-li

    2005-08-01

    The helicity of a severe sandstorm happened in Northwest China was analyzed by using global reanalysis grid data of NCEP/NCAR for 4 times a day. As an important physical parameter in analyzing and predicting severe convective weather, the helicity also has good indication in the forecasting of sandstorm. The distribution of helicity over the sandstorm area was negative at higher levels and positive at lower levels. There was definite relationship between the evolvement of helicity's negative value at higher levels and the occurrence of sandstorm.

  5. Helical Magnetic Fields from Sphaleron Decay and Baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Copi, Craig J.; Ferrer, Francesc; Vachaspati, Tanmay; Achucarro, Ana

    2008-10-24

    Many models of baryogenesis rely on anomalous particle physics processes to give baryon number violation. By numerically evolving the electroweak equations on a lattice, we show that baryogenesis in these models creates helical cosmic magnetic fields, though the helicity created is smaller than earlier analytical estimates. After a transitory period, electroweak dynamics is found to conserve the Chern-Simons number and the total electromagnetic helicity. We argue that baryogenesis could lead to magnetic fields of nano-Gauss strength today on astrophysical length scales. In addition to being astrophysically relevant, such helical magnetic fields can provide an independent probe of baryogenesis and CP violation in particle physics.

  6. Potential vorticity and helicity in a moist atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurgansky, Michael

    2013-04-01

    The helicity balance equation and Ertel's theorem on potential vorticity are applied for an analysis of helical flows of moist unsaturated air and for clarifying the conditions of spontaneous amplification (generation) of helicity due to the atmospheric baroclinicity. Critical comparison is made with the case of dry atmosphere. Spontaneous amplification of helicity owing to the latent heating is also addressed and possible generalization of the proposed methodology onto the case of precipitating atmosphere is highlighted, aiming inter alia at the problem of origination of tornadoes and waterspouts.

  7. Helical structure of Bordetella pertussis fimbriae.

    PubMed Central

    Steven, A C; Bisher, M E; Trus, B L; Thomas, D; Zhang, J M; Cowell, J L

    1986-01-01

    The helical structures of Bordetella pertussis fimbriae of serotypes 2 and 6 were determined by optical diffraction analysis of electron micrographs of negatively stained paracrystalline bundles of purified fimbriae. The fimbrial structure is based on an axial repeat of 13 nm that contains five repeating units in two complete turns of a single-start helix. This structure was confirmed by direct measurements of mass per unit length for individual fimbriae performed by dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy of unstained specimens. These data further established that the helically repeating unit is a monomer of fimbrial protein (Mr congruent to 22,000 for type 2 and Mr congruent to 21,500 for type 6). Radial density profiles calculated from the scanning transmission electron micrographs showed that the fimbria has peak density at its center, i.e., no axial channel, consistent with the results of conventional negative-staining electron microscopy. The radial profile gives an outermost diameter of approximately 7.5 nm, although the peripheral density is, on average, diffuse, allowing sufficient intercalation between adjacent fimbriae to give a center-to-center spacing of approximately 5.5 nm in the paracrystals. Despite serological and biochemical differences between type 2 and type 6 fimbriae, the packing arrangements of their fimbrial subunits are identical. From this observation, we infer that the respective subunits may have in common conserved regions whose packing dictates the helical geometry of the fimbria. It is plausible that a similar mechanism may underlie the phenomenon of phase variations in other systems of bacterial fimbriae. Images PMID:2875062

  8. Helical currents in metallic Rashba strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamad, Ignacio J.; Gazza, Claudio J.; Riera, José A.

    2016-05-01

    We study the texture of helical currents in metallic planar strips in the presence of Rashba spin-orbit coupling (RSOC) on the lattice at zero temperature. In the noninteracting case and in the absence of external electromagnetic sources, we determine, by exact numerical diagonalization of the single-particle Hamiltonian, the distribution across the strip section of these Rashba helical currents (RHC) as well as their sign oscillation, as a function of the RSOC strength, strip width, electron filling, and strip boundary conditions. Then, we study the effects of charge currents introduced into the system by an Aharonov-Bohm flux for the case of rings or by a voltage bias in the case of open strips. The former setup is studied by variational Monte Carlo, and the latter by the time-dependent density-matrix renormalization-group technique. Particularly for strips formed by two, three, and four coupled chains, we show how these RHC vary in the presence of such induced charge current, and how their differences between spin-up and spin-down electron currents on each chain help to explain the distribution across the strip of charge currents, both of the spin-conserving and the spin-flipping types. We also predict the appearance of polarized charge currents on each chain. Finally, we show that these Rashba helical currents and their derived features remain in the presence of an on-site Hubbard repulsion as long as the system remains metallic, at quarter filling, and even at half filling where a Mott-Hubbard metal-insulator transition occurs for large Hubbard repulsion.

  9. Helical anisotropy and Matteucci effect in Co-Si-B amorphous wires with negative magnetostriction (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, J.; Takajo, M.; Humphrey, F. B.

    1994-05-01

    The Co-Si-B amorphous wires having the negative magnetostriction comprises shell and core domains and exhibits the re-entrant flux reversal as the Fe-Si-B wire with positive magnetostriction. One of the characteristic features of Co based wires is that a sharp pulse voltage generation between two wire ends (Matteucci effect) is accompanied with re-entrant flux reversal, which is useful for sensor application because of no need for sense windings. In this work, we studied the origin of the large Matteucci effect of Co-Si-B wires by domain observation with a Kerr microscope and by Sixtus-Tonks experiments by driving the reverse domain propagation with the circular fields generated by the current through wires. We also tried to measure the hysteresis loop in the circular direction by integrating the Matteucci voltage. It was found that the domain patterns of the Co-Si-B wire surface is not the previously reported bamboo configuration but the helical configuration. Most of the anisotropy of the amorphous materials is magnetostrictive in origin. The helical anisotropy of Co based wire seems consistent, if we assume the same residual stress distribution as in the steel rod quenched into the water. Because of the helical anisotropy, the Co wire has the big circular component of magnetization in the core domain as well as in the shell domain, and both domain can interact near the interface region. It was found that reverse domain propagation along the wire axis can be caused by application of the circular field and that the shell domain moves discontinuously during the re-entrant flux reversal in the core domain. These circular magnetization components in both core and shell domains due to helical anisotropy and their interaction seems responsible for the large Matteucci effect in the Co-Si-B wires.

  10. α-Peptide-Oligourea Chimeras: Stabilization of Short α-Helices by Non-Peptide Helical Foldamers.

    PubMed

    Fremaux, Juliette; Mauran, Laura; Pulka-Ziach, Karolina; Kauffmann, Brice; Odaert, Benoit; Guichard, Gilles

    2015-08-17

    Short α-peptides with less than 10 residues generally display a low propensity to nucleate stable helical conformations. While various strategies to stabilize peptide helices have been previously reported, the ability of non-peptide helical foldamers to stabilize α-helices when fused to short α-peptide segments has not been investigated. Towards this end, structural investigations into a series of chimeric oligomers obtained by joining aliphatic oligoureas to the C- or N-termini of α-peptides are described. All chimeras were found to be fully helical, with as few as 2 (or 3) urea units sufficient to propagate an α-helical conformation in the fused peptide segment. The remarkable compatibility of α-peptides with oligoureas described here, along with the simplicity of the approach, highlights the potential of interfacing natural and non-peptide backbones as a means to further control the behavior of α-peptides. PMID:26136402

  11. Triangular Helical Column for Centrifugal Countercurrent Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yoichiro; Yu, Henry

    2009-01-01

    Effective column space and stationary phase retention have been improved by changing the configuration of the helical column originally used for toroidal coil countercurrent chromatography. The use of an equilateral triangular core for the helix column doubles effective column space and retains the stationary phase over 40% of the total column capacity without increasing the column pressure. The present results suggest that the stationary phase retention and the peak resolution will be further improved using new column designs fabricated by a new technology called "laser sintering for rapid prototyping." PMID:20046940

  12. Spin transport in helical biological systems

    SciTech Connect

    Díaz, Elena; Gutierrez, Rafael

    2014-08-20

    Motivated by the recent experimental demonstration of spin selective effects in monolayers of double-stranded DNA oligomers, our work presents a minimal model to describe electron transmission through helical fields. Our model highlight that the lack of inversion symmetry due to the chirality of the potential is a key factor which will lead to a high spin-polarization (SP). We also study the stability of the SP against fluctuations of the electronic structure induced by static disorder affecting the on-site energies. In the energy regions where the spin-filtering occurs, our results remain stable against moderate disorders although the SP is slightly reduced.

  13. Spinor helicity structures in higher spin theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananth, Sudarshan

    2012-11-01

    It is shown that the coefficient of the cubic interaction vertex, in higher spin Lagrangians, has a very simple form when written in terms of spinor helicity products. The result for a higher-spin field, of spin λ, is equal to the corresponding Yang-Mills coefficient raised to the power λ. Among other things, this suggests perturbative ties, similar to the KLT relations, between higher spin theories and pure Yang-Mills. This result is obtained in four-dimensional flat spacetime.

  14. Landau theory for helical nematic phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kats, E. I.; Lebedev, V. V.

    2014-09-01

    We propose Landau phenomenology for the phase transition from the conventional nematic into the conical helical orientationally non-uniform structure recently identified in liquid crystals formed by "banana"-shaped molecules. The mean field predictions are mostly in agreement with experimental data. Based on the analogy with de Gennes model, we argue that fluctuations of the order parameter turn the transition to the first order phase transition rather than continuous one predicted by the mean-field theory. This conclusion is in agreement with experimental observations. We discuss the new Goldstone mode to be observed in the low-temperature phase.

  15. Helicon wave excitation with helical antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Light, M.; Chen, F.F.

    1995-04-01

    Components of the wave magnetic field in a helicon discharge have been measured with a single-turn, coaxial magnetic probe. Left- and right-handed helical antennas, as well as plane-polarized antennas, were used; and the results were compared with the field patterns computed for a nonuniform plasma. The results show that the right-hand circularly polarized mode is preferentially excited with all antennas, even those designed to excite the left-hand mode. For right-hand excitation, the radial amplitude profiles are in excellent agreement with computations. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  16. Helical Disruptions in Small Loops of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoli, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The thermodynamical stability of DNA minicircles is investigated by means of path integral techniques. Hydrogen bonds between base pairs on complementary strands can be broken by thermal fluctuations and temporary fluctuational openings along the double helix are essential to biological functions such as transcription and replication of the genetic information. Helix unwinding and bubble formation patterns are computed in circular sequences with variable radius in order to analyze the interplay between molecule size and appearance of helical disruptions. The latter are found in minicircles with < 100 base pairs and appear as a strategy to soften the stress due to the bending and torsion of the helix.

  17. Electronic transport in single-helical protein molecules: Effects of multiple charge conduction pathways and helical symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Sourav; Karmakar, S. N.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a tight-binding model to investigate electronic transport properties of single helical protein molecules incorporating both the helical symmetry and the possibility of multiple charge transfer pathways. Our study reveals that due to existence of both the multiple charge transfer pathways and helical symmetry, the transport properties are quite rigid under influence of environmental fluctuations which indicates that these biomolecules can serve as better alternatives in nanoelectronic devices than its other biological counterparts e.g., single-stranded DNA.

  18. CURRENT AND KINETIC HELICITY OF LONG-LIVED ACTIVITY COMPLEXES

    SciTech Connect

    Komm, Rudolf; Gosain, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    We study long-lived activity complexes and their current helicity at the solar surface and their kinetic helicity below the surface. The current helicity has been determined from synoptic vector magnetograms from the NSO/SOLIS facility, and the kinetic helicity of subsurface flows has been determined with ring-diagram analysis applied to full-disk Dopplergrams from NSO/GONG and SDO/HMI. Current and kinetic helicity of activity complexes follow the hemispheric helicity rule with mainly positive values (78%; 78%, respectively, with a 95% confidence level of 31%) in the southern hemisphere and negative ones (80%; 93%, respectively, with a 95% confidence level of 22% and 14%, respectively) in the northern hemisphere. The locations with the dominant sign of kinetic helicity derived from Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) and SDO/HMI data are more organized than those of the secondary sign even if they are not part of an activity complex, while locations with the secondary sign are more fragmented. This is the case for both hemispheres even for the northern one where it is not as obvious visually due to the large amount of magnetic activity present as compared to the southern hemisphere. The current helicity shows a similar behavior. The dominant sign of current helicity is the same as that of kinetic helicity for the majority of the activity complexes (83% with a 95% confidence level of 15%). During the 24 Carrington rotations analyzed here, there is at least one longitude in each hemisphere where activity complexes occur repeatedly throughout the epoch. These ''active'' longitudes are identifiable as locations of strong current and kinetic helicity of the same sign.

  19. 3(10)-helices in proteins are parahelices.

    PubMed

    Enkhbayar, Purevjav; Hikichi, Kunio; Osaki, Mitsuru; Kretsinger, Robert H; Matsushima, Norio

    2006-08-15

    The 3(10)-helix is characterized by having at least two consecutive hydrogen bonds between the main-chain carbonyl oxygen of residue i and the main-chain amide hydrogen of residue i + 3. The helical parameters--pitch, residues per turn, radius, and root mean square deviation (rmsd) from the best-fit helix--were determined by using the HELFIT program. All 3(10)-helices were classified as regular or irregular based on rmsd/(N - 1)1/2 where N is the helix length. For both there are systematic, position-specific shifts in the backbone dihedral angles. The average phi, psi shift systematically from approximately -58 degrees, approximately -32 degrees to approximately -90 degrees, approximately -4 degrees for helices 5, 6, and 7 residues long. The same general pattern is seen for helices, N = 8 and 9; however, in N = 9, the trend is repeated with residues 6, 7, and 8 approximately repeating the phi, psi of residues 2, 3, and 4. The residues per turn and radius of regular 3(10)-helices decrease with increasing length of helix, while the helix pitch and rise per residue increase. That is, regular 3(10)-helices become thinner and longer as N increases from 5 to 8. The fraction of regular 3(10)-helices decreases linearly with helix length. All longer helices, N > or = 9 are irregular. Energy minimizations show that regular helices become less stable with increasing helix length. These findings indicate that the definition of 3(10)-helices in terms of average, uniform dihedral angles is not appropriate and that it is inherently unstable for a polypeptide to form an extended, regular 3(10)-helix. The 3(10)-helices observed in proteins are better referred to parahelices. PMID:16783793

  20. Transport of helical gyrotactic swimmers in channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alqarni, M. S.; Bearon, R. N.

    2016-07-01

    We develop a mechanistic model that describes the transport of gyrotactic cells with propulsive force and propulsive torque that are not parallel. In sufficiently weak shear this yields helical swimming trajectories, whereas in stronger shear cells can attain a stable equilibrium orientation. We obtain the stable equilibrium solution for cell orientation as a function of the shear strength and determine the feasibility region for equilibrium solutions. We compute numerically the trajectories of cells in two dimensional vertical channel flow where the shear is non-uniform. Depending on the parameter values, we show that helical swimmers may display classical gyrotactic focussing towards the centre of the channel or can display a new phenomenon of focussing away from the centre of the channel. This result can be explained by consideration of the equilibrium solution for cell orientation. In this study we consider only dilute suspensions where there is no feedback from cell swimming on the hydrodynamics, and both cell-wall and cell-cell interactions are neglected.

  1. Helicity of the Solar Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Sanjiv Kumar

    2009-11-01

    Magnetic helicity is a physical quantity that measures the degree of linkages and twistedness in the field lines. It is given by a volume integral over the scalar product of magnetic field B and its vector potential A. Direct computation of magnetic helicity in the solar atmosphere is not possible due to two reasons. First, we do not have the observations at different heights in the solar atmosphere to compute the volume integral. Second, the vector potential A is non-unique owing to gauge variance. Many researchers incorrectly inferred twist, a component of magnetic helicity, from the force-free parameter α. We clarified the physical meaning of α and its relation with the magnetic helicity. Also, a direct method is proposed for the computation of global α values of sunspots. An analytical bipole was generated to study the effect of polarimetric noise on the estimation of various magnetic parameters. We find that the effect of polarimetric noise, present in the recent vector magnetograms e.g., from Hinode (Solar Optical Telescope/Spectro- Polarimeter (SOT/SP)), on the magnetic parameters like α and magnetic energy, is negligible. We examined the fine structures of local current and α in the sunspots. Local α patches of opposite signs are present in the umbra of each sunspot. The amplitude of the spatial variation of local α in the umbra is typically of the order of the global α of the sunspot. We find that the local α and current are distributed as alternately positive and negative filaments in the penumbra. The amplitude of azimuthal variation of the local α in the penumbra is approximately an order of magnitude larger than that in the umbra. The contributions of the local positive and negative currents and α in the penumbra cancel each other giving almost no contribution for their global values for whole sunspot. We have introduced the concept of signed shear angle (SSA) for sunspots and establish its importance for non force

  2. Quantification of a Helical Origami Fold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Eric; Han, Xiaomin; Chen, Zi

    2015-03-01

    Origami, the Japanese art of paper folding, is traditionally viewed as an amusing pastime and medium of artistic expression. However, in recent years, origami has served as a source of inspiration for innovations in science and engineering. Here, we present the geometric and mechanical properties of a twisting origami fold. The origami structure created by the fold exhibits several interesting properties, including rigid foldibility, local bistability and finely tunable helical coiling, with control over pitch, radius and handedness of the helix. In addition, the pattern generated by the fold closely mimics the twist buckling patterns shown by thin materials, for example, a mobius strip. We use six parameters of the twisting origami pattern to generate a fully tunable graphical model of the fold. Finally, we present a mathematical model of the local bistability of the twisting origami fold. Our study elucidates the mechanisms behind the helical coiling and local bistability of the twisting origami fold, with potential applications in robotics and deployable structures. Acknowledgment to Branco Weiss Fellowship for funding.

  3. Determining How Magnetic Helicity Injection Really Works

    SciTech Connect

    Paul M. Bellan

    2001-10-09

    OAK-B135 The goal of the Caltech program is to determine how helicity injection works by investigating the actual dynamics and topological evolution associated with magnetic relaxation. A new coaxial helicity injection source has been constructed and brought into operation. The key feature of this source is that it has maximum geometric simplicity. Besides being important for fusion research, this work also has astrophysical implications. Photos obtained using high-speed cameras show a clear sequence of events in the formation process. In particular, they show initial merging/reconnection processes, jet-like expansion, kinking, and separation of the plasma from the source. Various diagnostics have been developed, including laser induced fluorescence and soft x-ray detection using high speed diodes. Gas valves have been improved and a patent disclosure relating to puffed gas valves has been filed. Presentations on this work have been given in the form of invited talks at several university physics departments that were previously unfamiliar with laboratory plasma experiments.

  4. Flow around a helically twisted elliptic cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Woojin; Lee, Jungil; Choi, Haecheon

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, we conduct unsteady three-dimensional simulations of flows around a helically twisted elliptic (HTE) cylinder at the Reynolds numbers of 100 and 3900, based on the free-stream velocity and square root of the product of the lengths of its major and minor axes. A parametric study is conducted for Re = 100 by varying the aspect ratio (AR) of the elliptic cross section and the helical spanwise wavelength (λ). Depending on the values of AR and λ, the flow in the wake contains the characteristic wavelengths of λ, 2λ, 6λ, or even longer than 60λ, showing a wide diversity of flows in the wake due to the shape change. The drag on the optimal (i.e., having lowest drag) HTE cylinder (AR = 1.3 and λ = 3.5d) is lower by 18% than that of the circular cylinder, and its lift fluctuations are zero owing to complete suppression of vortex shedding in the wake. This optimal HTE configuration reduces the drag by 23% for Re = 3900 where the wake is turbulent, showing that the HTE cylinder reduces the mean drag and lift fluctuations for both laminar and turbulent flows.

  5. Structural models for non-helical DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Yagil, G; Sussman, J L

    1986-01-01

    Structural modelling techniques are employed to explore the energetic requirements for the transformation of classical B DNA into unwound yet double-stranded DNA structures. Structural idealization using CORELS computer program of Sussman et al. followed by energy minimization using the EREF program of Levitt, leads to two regular non-helical models. In both models, the bases are conventionally paired and stacked, yet there is no net rotation between successive base pairs. One model, N1, has a 1-bp repeating unit; the second, N2, has a 2-bp repeating unit. The dihedral angles of the backbone all have values found either in the B or the Z form of DNA, except for the P-O5'-C5'-C4' angle, which is in the unprecedented g+ or g- domains. The energy difference found between the two N form models and B form DNA are 6.6 and 3.4 kcal/mol/nucleotide for N1 and N2 respectively. These relatively low energy differences encourage the idea that non-helical forms of DNA may contribute to the alternate DNA structures found in S1 nuclease sensitive and other regulatory regions of active genes. PMID:3017709

  6. Cosmic acceleration and the helicity-0 graviton

    SciTech Connect

    Rham, Claudia de; Heisenberg, Lavinia; Gabadadze, Gregory; Pirtskhalava, David

    2011-05-15

    We explore cosmology in the decoupling limit of a nonlinear covariant extension of Fierz-Pauli massive gravity obtained recently in arXiv:1007.0443. In this limit the theory is a scalar-tensor model of a unique form defined by symmetries. We find that it admits a self-accelerated solution, with the Hubble parameter set by the graviton mass. The negative pressure causing the acceleration is due to a condensate of the helicity-0 component of the massive graviton, and the background evolution, in the approximation used, is indistinguishable from the {Lambda}CDM model. Fluctuations about the self-accelerated background are stable for a certain range of parameters involved. Most surprisingly, the fluctuation of the helicity-0 field above its background decouples from an arbitrary source in the linearized theory. We also show how massive gravity can remarkably screen an arbitrarily large cosmological constant in the decoupling limit, while evading issues with ghosts. The obtained static solution is stable against small perturbations, suggesting that the degravitation of the vacuum energy is possible in the full theory. Interestingly, however, this mechanism postpones the Vainshtein effect to shorter distance scales. Hence, fifth force measurements severely constrain the value of the cosmological constant that can be neutralized, making this scheme phenomenologically not viable for solving the old cosmological constant problem. We briefly speculate on a possible way out of this issue.

  7. An Investigation of Pulse Transit Time as a Non-Invasive Blood Pressure Measurement Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, B. M.; O'Flynn, B.; Mathewson, A.

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this paper is to examine the Pulse Transit Method (PTT) as a non-invasive means to track Blood Pressure over a short period of time. PTT was measured as the time it takes for an ECG R-wave to propagate to the finger, where it is detected by a photoplethysmograph sensor. The PTT method is ideal for continuous 24-hour Blood Pressure Measurement (BPM) since it is both cuff-less and non-invasive and therefore comfortable and unobtrusive for the patient. Other techniques, such as the oscillometric method, have shown to be accurate and reliable but require a cuff for operation, making them unsuitable for long term monitoring. Although a relatively new technique, the PTT method has shown to be able to accurately track blood pressure changes over short periods of time, after which re-calibration is necessary. The purpose of this study is to determine the accuracy of the method.

  8. Manifestation of helicity in one-dimensional iodobismuthate.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Souvik; Andrews, Alex P; Venugopal, Ajay

    2016-06-01

    We report here, the first example of an inorganic-organic hybrid material incorporating a helical iodobismuthate [BiI4]∞ templated by 2,6-diisopropylanilinium cations. The realisation of the helical iodobismuthate opens up the possibility of a wide range of physical properties among hybrid materials. PMID:27163408

  9. Numerical Simulations of Helicity Condensation in the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, L.; DeVore, C. R.; Antiochos, S. K.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2015-01-01

    The helicity condensation model has been proposed by Antiochos (2013) to explain the observed smoothness of coronal loops and the observed buildup of magnetic shear at filament channels. The basic hypothesis of the model is that magnetic reconnection in the corona causes the magnetic stress injected by photospheric motions to collect only at those special locations where prominences form. In this work we present the first detailed quantitative MHD simulations of the reconnection evolution proposed by the helicity condensation model. We use the well-known ansatz of modeling the closed corona as an initially uniform field between two horizontal photospheric plates. The system is driven by applying photospheric rotational flows that inject magnetic helicity into the system. The flows are confined to a finite region on the photosphere so as to mimic the finite flux system of, for example, a bipolar active region. The calculations demonstrate that, contrary to common belief, coronal loops having opposite helicity do not reconnect, whereas loops having the same sense of helicity do reconnect. Furthermore, we find that for a given amount of helicity injected into the corona, the evolution of the magnetic shear is insensitive to whether the pattern of driving photospheric motions is fixed or quasi-random. In all cases, the shear propagates via reconnection to the boundary of the flow region while the total magnetic helicity is conserved, as predicted by the model. We discuss the implications of our results for solar observations and for future, more realistic simulations of the helicity condensation process.

  10. Patterned helical metallic ribbon for continuous edge winding applications

    DOEpatents

    Liebermann, Howard H.; Frischmann, Peter G.; Rosenberry, Jr., George M.

    1983-04-19

    Metallic ribbon having cutout patterns therein is provided in continuous helical form. The cutout patterns may be situated to intersect either or both of the ribbon edges or may be situated entirely within the ribbon. The helical ribbon with the cutout patterns may additionally have a nesting, or self-stacking, feature.

  11. The magnetic helicity spectrum from solar vector magnetograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, Axel; Zhang, Hongqi; Sokoloff, Dmitry

    2016-05-01

    The gauge-invariant (or relative) magnetic helicity is often measured to characterize the degree of magnetic complexity of active regions. However, magnetic helicity is expected to have different signs on different length scales that can be identified with the large- and small-scale fields used in dynamo theory. To address this, it is important to determine magnetic helicity spectra as functions of wavenumber. These spectra are defined such that the integral over all wavenumbers gives the usual magnetic helicity density in a particular patch of interest. Using vector magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory for active region NOAA 11515, which was on the southern hemisphere, we show that the magnetic helicity spectrum has positive sign on scales below 30 Mm, but negative sign on larger scales. This active region was rather complex and its magnetic helicity was within 26% of its theoretical maximum value. This is much more than that of NOAA 11158, which was also rather complex, but only within 5% of its theoretical maximum value. Since the contribution of larger length scales turned out to be important in the case of NOAA 11515, its total magnetic helicity is dominated by the negative values from large length scales, which explains the unusual sign for the southern hemisphere. Measuring magnetic helicity spectra with DKIST may become an important tool to learn about the workings of the underlying dynamo.

  12. Helical channel design and technology for cooling of muon beams

    SciTech Connect

    Yonehara, K; Derbenev, Y.S.; Johnson, R.P.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

    2010-08-01

    Novel magnetic helical channel designs for capture and cooling of bright muon beams are being developed using numerical simulations based on new inventions such as helical solenoid (HS) magnets and hydrogen-pressurized RF (HPRF) cavities. We are close to the factor of a million six-dimensional phase space (6D) reduction needed for muon colliders. Recent experimental and simulation results are presented.

  13. Helical dipole magnets for polarized protons in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Syphers, M.; Courant, E.; Fischer, W.

    1997-07-01

    Superconducting helical dipole magnets will be used in the Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) to maintain polarization of proton beams and to perform localized spin rotations at the two major experimental detector regions. Requirements for the helical dipole system are discussed, and magnet prototype work is reported.

  14. Helical Channel Design and Technology for Cooling of Muon Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonehara, K.; Derbenev, Y. S.; Johnson, R. P.

    2010-11-01

    Novel magnetic helical channel designs for capture and cooling of bright muon beams are being developed using numerical simulations based on new inventions such as helical solenoid (HS) magnets and hydrogen-pressurized RF (HPRF) cavities. We are close to the factor of a million six-dimensional phase space (6D) reduction needed for muon colliders. Recent experimental and simulation results are presented.

  15. Experimental investigation of solar powered diaphragm and helical pumps

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For several years, many types of solar powered water pumping systems were evaluated, and in this paper, diaphragm and helical solar photovoltaic (PV) powered water pumping systems are discussed. Data were collected on diaphragm and helical pumps which were powered by different solar PV arrays at mul...

  16. Helical Channel Design and Technology for Cooling of Muon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Yonehara, K.; Derbenev, Y. S.; Johnson, R. P.

    2010-11-04

    Novel magnetic helical channel designs for capture and cooling of bright muon beams are being developed using numerical simulations based on new inventions such as helical solenoid (HS) magnets and hydrogen-pressurized RF (HPRF) cavities. We are close to the factor of a million six-dimensional phase space (6D) reduction needed for muon colliders. Recent experimental and simulation results are presented.

  17. An optimal hydrogen-bond surrogate for α-helices.

    PubMed

    Joy, Stephen T; Arora, Paramjit S

    2016-04-14

    Substitution of a main chain i → i + 4 hydrogen bond with a covalent bond can nucleate and stabilize the α-helical conformation in peptides. Herein we describe the potential of different alkene isosteres to mimic intramolecular hydrogen bonds and stabilize α-helices in diverse peptide sequences. PMID:27046675

  18. Mechanical properties of carbon nanotube ropes with hierarchical helical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zi-Long; Zhao, Hong-Ping; Wang, Jian-Shan; Zhang, Zhong; Feng, Xi-Qiao

    2014-11-01

    Hierarchical helical structures widely exist in both artificial and biological materials. Such nanomaterials as carbon nanotube ropes with hierarchical helical structures hold a promise for potential applications, for instance, in aerospace and medical engineering. In the present paper, a bottom-up theoretical model is established to investigate the mechanical properties of this kind of novel nanomaterials. The geometry of a rope with a hierarchy of chirality is first formulated. On the basis of the analysis of the internal forces and deformations of a single helical ply, a theoretical model is provided to predict the mechanical responses of multi-level helical materials. The effect of hierarchical helical structures is revealed by comparing the properties between a carbon nanotube rope with two-level helical structure and its counterpart bundle consisting of straight carbon nanotubes. The dependence of the mechanical properties of materials on the initial helical angles, fiber numbers, and handednesses at different structural levels are examined. Carbon nanotube ropes are found with higher deformation ability and elastic property which can be easily tuned via their microstructural parameters. This work helps understand the behavior of chiral materials and also provides inspirations for optimal design of advanced nanomaterials with hierarchical helical structures.

  19. Theoretical model for calculation of helicity in solar active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, P.

    We (Choudhuri, Chatterjee and Nandy, 2005) calculate helicities of solar active regions based on the idea of Choudhuri (2003) that poloidal flux lines get wrapped around a toroidal flux tube rising through the convection zone, thereby giving rise to the helicity. Rough estimates based on this idea compare favourably with the observed magnitude of helicity. We use our solar dynamo model based on the Babcock--Leighton α-effect to study how helicity varies with latitude and time. At the time of solar maximum, our theoretical model gives negative helicity in the northern hemisphere and positive helicity in the south, in accordance with observed hemispheric trends. However, we find that, during a short interval at the beginning of a cycle, helicities tend to be opposite of the preferred hemispheric trends. Next we (Chatterjee, Choudhuri and Petrovay 2006) use the above idea along with the sunspot decay model of Petrovay and Moreno-Insertis, (1997) to estimate the distribution of helicity inside a flux tube as it keeps collecting more azimuthal flux during its rise through the convection zone and as turbulent diffusion keeps acting on it. By varying parameters over reasonable ranges in our simple 1-d model, we find that the azimuthal flux penetrates the flux tube to some extent instead of being confined to a narrow sheath outside.

  20. Hierarchically controlled helical graphite films prepared from iodine-doped helical polyacetylene films using morphology-retaining carbonization.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Satoshi; Kyotani, Mutsumasa; Akagi, Kazuo

    2011-11-01

    One-handed helical graphite films with a hierarchically controlled morphology were prepared from iodine-doped helical polyacetylene (H-PA) films using the recently developed morphology-retaining carbonization method. Results from scanning electron microscopy indicate that the hierarchical helical morphology of the H-PA film remains unchanged even after carbonization at 800 °C. The weight loss of the film due to carbonization was very small; only 10-29% of the weight of the film before doping was lost. Furthermore, the graphite film prepared by subsequent heating at 2600 °C retained the same morphology as that of the original H-PA film and that of the helical carbon film prepared at 800 °C. The screwed direction, twisted degree, and vertical or horizontal alignment of the helical graphite film were well controlled by changing the helical sense, helical pitch, and orientation state of the chiral nematic liquid crystal (N*-LC) used as an asymmetric LC reaction field. X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering measurements showed that graphitic crystallization proceeds in the carbon film during heat treatment at 2600 °C. Transmission electron microscopy measurements indicate that ultrasonication of the helical graphite film in ethanol for several hours gives rise to a single helical graphite fibril. The profound potentiality of the present graphite films is exemplified in their electrical properties. The horizontally aligned helical graphite film exhibits an enhancement in electrical conductivity and an evolution of electrical anisotropy in which conductivity parallel to the helical axis of the fibril bundle is higher than that perpendicular to the axis. PMID:21970653

  1. PULSE COUNTER

    DOEpatents

    Trumbo, D.E.

    1959-02-10

    A transistorized pulse-counting circuit adapted for use with nuclear radiation detecting detecting devices to provide a small, light weight portable counter is reported. The small size and low power requirements of the transistor are of particular value in this instance. The circuit provides an adjustable count scale with a single transistor which is triggered by the accumulated charge on a storage capacitor.

  2. Setup for fast-pulsed measurements of large critical currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ovidio, Claudio Alberto; Esparza, Daniel Antonio; Malachevsky, Maria Teresa

    2000-07-01

    We describe a set of equipments for pulsed measurements of transport critical currents in superconducting materials having a critical current of tens or hundreds of amperes. It is based on the appliance of an electrical current for a very short period of time, rapid enough to preserve the integrity of the current leads and to minimize the Joule effect. Power is applied to the wire-sample setup and the voltage drop is measured within seconds, with a resolution of the order of 10 nV. In this way the I- V characteristics can be obtained with a 1% error, if the 1 μV/ cm criterion is employed. The hardware is composed of three parts: the current pulse generator, a fast low-noise voltage amplifier and a PC with a DAC-ADC card. The data acquisition is achieved via an Assembler program.

  3. On the viscosity influence on a helical vortex flament evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agafontseva, M. V.; Kuibin, P. A.

    2015-01-01

    Helical vortices whose parameters have a strong influence on the efficiency of the apparatus is often occur in technical devices using swirling flow (cyclones, separators, etc.). To date the internal structure of such vortices is poorly understood. In [1] a model of helical vortex with uniform vorticity distribution in the core is proposed. Vortices arising in real flow always have a smooth vorticity distribution due to the viscosity action. The problem on steady moving helical vortices with the vortex core of small size in an inviscid fluid was solved in [2]. The non-orthogonal `helical' coordinate system was introduced that allowed author to reduce the problem to two dimensional one. However, the velocity of the vortex motion was written only in the form of a quadratures computation of which is difficult. This paper presents first attempt for research on the diffusion and dynamics of a viscous helical vortex.

  4. Hierarchical Helical Order in the Twisted Growth of Plant Organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Hirofumi

    2012-09-01

    The molecular and cellular basis of left-right asymmetry in plant morphogenesis is a fundamental issue in biology. A rapidly elongating root or hypocotyl of twisting mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana exhibits a helical growth with a handedness opposite to that of the underlying cortical microtubule arrays in epidermal cells. However, how such a hierarchical helical order emerges is currently unknown. We propose a model for investigating macroscopic chiral asymmetry in Arabidopsis mutants. Our elastic model suggests that the helical pattern observed is a direct consequence of the simultaneous presence of anisotropic growth and tilting of cortical microtubule arrays. We predict that the root helical pitch angle is a function of the microtubule helical angle and elastic moduli of the tissues. The proposed model is versatile and is potentially important for other biological systems ranging from protein fibrous structures to tree trunks.

  5. Determining how magnetic helicity injection really works. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bellan, P.M.

    1998-10-21

    Magnetic helicity injection is the essential process underlying both spheromak formation and helicity injection toroidal current drive in tokamaks (e.g., HIT and NSTX). The dynamical details of the helicity injection process are poorly understood because existing models avoid a dynamic description. In particular, Taylor relaxation, the main model motivating helicity injection efforts, is an argument that predicts the state to which a turbulent magnetic configuration relaxes after all dynamics are over. The goal of the Caltech experiment is to investigate the actual dynamics and topological evolution associated with relaxation and so determine how helicity injection really works. Although the global relaxation model (i.e., Taylor model) typically invokes axisymmetry, simple physical arguments (Cowling`s theorem) show that the detailed dynamics must involve topologically complex, non-axisymmetric processes. Progress for this project is given here.

  6. Hierarchically arranged helical fibre actuators driven by solvents and vapours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peining; Xu, Yifan; He, Sisi; Sun, Xuemei; Pan, Shaowu; Deng, Jue; Chen, Daoyong; Peng, Huisheng

    2015-12-01

    Mechanical responsiveness in many plants is produced by helical organizations of cellulose microfibrils. However, simple mimicry of these naturally occurring helical structures does not produce artificial materials with the desired tunable actuations. Here, we show that actuating fibres that respond to solvent and vapour stimuli can be created through the hierarchical and helical assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes. Primary fibres consisting of helical assemblies of multiwalled carbon nanotubes are twisted together to form the helical actuating fibres. The nanoscale gaps between the nanotubes and micrometre-scale gaps among the primary fibres contribute to the rapid response and large actuation stroke of the actuating fibres. The compact coils allow the actuating fibre to rotate reversibly. We show that these fibres, which are lightweight, flexible and strong, are suitable for a variety of applications such as energy-harvesting generators, deformable sensing springs and smart textiles.

  7. Accumulation of heavy particles around a helical vortex filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    IJzermans, Rutger H. A.; Hagmeijer, Rob; van Langen, Pieter J.

    2007-10-01

    The motion of small heavy particles near a helical vortex filament in incompressible flow is investigated. Both the configurations of a helical vortex filament in free space and a helical vortex filament in a concentric pipe are considered, and the corresponding helically symmetric velocity fields are expressed in terms of a stream function. Particle motion is assumed to be driven by Stokes drag, and the flow fields are assumed to be independent from the motion of particles. Numerical results show that heavy particles may be attracted to helical trajectories. The stability of these attraction trajectories is demonstrated by linear stability analysis. In addition, the correlation between the attraction trajectories and the streamline topologies is investigated.

  8. Hierarchically arranged helical fibre actuators driven by solvents and vapours.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peining; Xu, Yifan; He, Sisi; Sun, Xuemei; Pan, Shaowu; Deng, Jue; Chen, Daoyong; Peng, Huisheng

    2015-12-01

    Mechanical responsiveness in many plants is produced by helical organizations of cellulose microfibrils. However, simple mimicry of these naturally occurring helical structures does not produce artificial materials with the desired tunable actuations. Here, we show that actuating fibres that respond to solvent and vapour stimuli can be created through the hierarchical and helical assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes. Primary fibres consisting of helical assemblies of multiwalled carbon nanotubes are twisted together to form the helical actuating fibres. The nanoscale gaps between the nanotubes and micrometre-scale gaps among the primary fibres contribute to the rapid response and large actuation stroke of the actuating fibres. The compact coils allow the actuating fibre to rotate reversibly. We show that these fibres, which are lightweight, flexible and strong, are suitable for a variety of applications such as energy-harvesting generators, deformable sensing springs and smart textiles. PMID:26367106

  9. The Writhe of Helical Structures in the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toeroek, T.; Berger, M. A.; Kliem, B.

    2010-01-01

    Context. Helicity is a fundamental property of magnetic fields, conserved in ideal MHD. In flux rope topology, it consists of twist and writhe helicity. Despite the common occurrence of helical structures in the solar atmosphere, little is known about how their shape relates to the writhe, which fraction of helicity is contained in writhe, and how much helicity is exchanged between twist and writhe when they erupt. Aims. Here we perform a quantitative investigation of these questions relevant for coronal flux ropes. Methods. The decomposition of the writhe of a curve into local and nonlocal components greatly facilitates its computation. We use it to study the relation between writhe and projected S shape of helical curves and to measure writhe and twist in numerical simulations of flux rope instabilities. The results are discussed with regard to filament eruptions and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Results. (1) We demonstrate that the relation between writhe and projected S shape is not unique in principle, but that the ambiguity does not affect low-lying structures, thus supporting the established empirical rule which associates stable forward (reverse) S shaped structures low in the corona with positive (negative) helicity. (2) Kink-unstable erupting flux ropes are found to transform a far smaller fraction of their twist helicity into writhe helicity than often assumed. (3) Confined flux rope eruptions tend to show stronger writhe at low heights than ejective eruptions (CMEs). This argues against suggestions that the writhing facilitates the rise of the rope through the overlying field. (4) Erupting filaments which are S shaped already before the eruption and keep the sign of their axis writhe (which is expected if field of one chirality dominates the source volume of the eruption), must reverse their S shape in the course of the rise. Implications for the occurrence of the helical kink instability in such events are discussed.

  10. Chaotic coordinates for the Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, S. R.; Suzuki, Y.

    2014-10-01

    The theory of quadratic-flux-minimizing (QFM) surfaces is reviewed, and numerical techniques that allow high-order QFM surfaces to be efficiently constructed for experimentally relevant, non-integrable magnetic fields are described. As a practical example, the chaotic edge of the magnetic field in the Large Helical Device (LHD) is examined. A precise technique for finding the boundary surface is implemented, the hierarchy of partial barriers associated with the near-critical cantori is constructed, and a coordinate system, which we call chaotic coordinates, that is based on a selection of QFM surfaces is constructed that simplifies the description of the magnetic field, so that flux surfaces become "straight" and islands become "square."

  11. Winding light beams along elliptical helical trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Yuanhui; Chen, Yujie; Zhang, Yanfeng; Chen, Hui; Yu, Siyuan

    2016-07-01

    Conventional caustic methods in real or Fourier space produced accelerating optical beams only with convex trajectories. We developed a superposition caustic method capable of winding light beams along nonconvex trajectories. We ascertain this method by constructing a one-dimensional (1D) accelerating beam moving along a sinusoidal trajectory, and subsequently extending to two-dimensional (2D) accelerating beams along arbitrarily elliptical helical trajectories. We experimentally implemented the method with a compact and robust integrated optics approach by fabricating micro-optical structures on quartz glass plates to perform the spatial phase and amplitude modulation to the incident light, generating beam trajectories highly consistent with prediction. The theoretical and implementation methods can in principle be extended to the construction of accelerating beams with a wide variety of nonconvex trajectories, thereby opening up a route of manipulating light beams for fundamental research and practical applications.

  12. Cool and hot flux ropes, their helicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nindos, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    We will review recent indirect and direct evidence for the existence of magnetic flux ropes in the solar atmosphere. Magnetic flux ropes may appear as S-shaped or reverse S-shaped (sigmoidal) structures in regions that are likely to erupt, and may also show in nonlinear force-free field extrapolations that use data from photospheric vector magnetograms as boundary condition. The availability of high sensitivity data recorded with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution in hot EUV wavelengths by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) has revealed the existence of coherent structures identified as hot flux ropes. In this presentation, we will review the properties of both cool and hot flux ropes with an emphasis on the frequency of their occurrence in large flares and on their magnetic helicity content.

  13. Equilibrium Reconstruction on the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel A. Lazerson, D. Gates, D. Monticello, H. Neilson, N. Pomphrey, A. Reiman S. Sakakibara, and Y. Suzuki

    2012-07-27

    Equilibrium reconstruction is commonly applied to axisymmetric toroidal devices. Recent advances in computational power and equilibrium codes have allowed for reconstructions of three-dimensional fields in stellarators and heliotrons. We present the first reconstructions of finite beta discharges in the Large Helical Device (LHD). The plasma boundary and magnetic axis are constrained by the pressure profile from Thomson scattering. This results in a calculation of plasma beta without a-priori assumptions of the equipartition of energy between species. Saddle loop arrays place additional constraints on the equilibrium. These reconstruction utilize STELLOPT, which calls VMEC. The VMEC equilibrium code assumes good nested flux surfaces. Reconstructed magnetic fields are fed into the PIES code which relaxes this constraint allowing for the examination of the effect of islands and stochastic regions on the magnetic measurements.

  14. Helicity evolution at small-x

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kovchegov, Yuri V.; Pitonyak, Daniel; Sievert, Matthew D.

    2016-01-13

    We construct small-x evolution equations which can be used to calculate quark and anti-quark helicity TMDs and PDFs, along with the g1 structure function. These evolution equations resum powers of αs ln2(1/x) in the polarization-dependent evolution along with the powers of αs ln(1/x) in the unpolarized evolution which includes saturation efects. The equations are written in an operator form in terms of polarization-dependent Wilson line-like operators. While the equations do not close in general, they become closed and self-contained systems of non-linear equations in the large-Nc and large-Nc & Nf limits. As a cross-check, in the ladder approximation, our equationsmore » map onto the same ladder limit of the infrared evolution equations for g1 structure function derived previously by Bartels, Ermolaev and Ryskin.« less

  15. DYNAMO EFFICIENCY WITH SHEAR IN HELICAL TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Leprovost, Nicolas; Kim, Eun-jin

    2009-05-10

    To elucidate the influence of shear flow on the generation of magnetic fields through the modification of turbulence property, we consider the case where a large-scale magnetic field is parallel to a large-scale shear flow without direct interaction between the two in the kinematic limit where the magnetic field does not backreact on the velocity. By nonperturbatively incorporating the effect of shear in a helically forced turbulence, we show that turbulence intensity and turbulent transport coefficients (turbulent viscosity, {alpha} and {beta} effect) are enhanced by a weak shear, while strongly suppressed for strong shear. In particular, {beta} is shown to be much more strongly suppressed than {alpha} effect. We discuss its important implications for dynamo efficiency, i.e., on the scaling of the dynamo number with differential rotation.

  16. Novel Design of Superconducting Helical Dipole Magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinke, R.; Senti, M.; Stelzer, G.

    1997-05-01

    Superconducting helical dipole magnets with a nominal field of 4 Tesla are needed for the spin physics program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The magnets are required to operate at a relatively low current of 400 A since many of these magnets have to be independently controlled. The Advanced Magnet Lab, Inc., in Palm Bay, FL has designed and built two prototype magnets using advanced computer controlled coil winding technology. The AML design is extremely cost effective since it avoids magnet specific tooling despite the required complex coil pattern and any precision machined inserts or spacers. It is the first time an accelerator magnet of this technology has reached a field above 4 Tesla. Results from the prototype testing at BNL are presented.

  17. Nucleic acid recognition by tandem helical repeats.

    PubMed

    Rubinson, Emily H; Eichman, Brandt F

    2012-02-01

    Protein domains constructed from tandem α-helical repeats have until recently been primarily associated with protein scaffolds or RNA recognition. Recent crystal structures of human mitochondrial termination factor MTERF1 and Bacillus cereus alkylpurine DNA glycosylase AlkD bound to DNA revealed two new superhelical tandem repeat architectures capable of wrapping around the double helix in unique ways. Unlike DNA sequence recognition motifs that rely mainly on major groove read-out, MTERF and ALK motifs locate target sequences and aberrant nucleotides within DNA by resculpting the double-helix through extensive backbone contacts. Comparisons between MTERF and ALK repeats, together with recent advances in ssRNA recognition by Pumilio/FBF (PUF) domains, provide new insights into the fundamental principles of protein-nucleic acid recognition. PMID:22154606

  18. Microinstability Studies for the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    G. Rewoldt; L.-P. Ku; W.M. Tang; H. Sugama; N. Nakajima; K.Y. Watanabe; S. Murakami; H. Yamada; W.A. Cooper

    2002-01-28

    Fully kinetic assessments of the stability properties of toroidal drift modes have been obtained for cases for the Large Helical Device (LHD). This calculation employs the comprehensive linear microinstability code FULL, as recently extended for nonaxisymmetric systems. The code retains the important effects in the linearized gyrokinetic equation, using the lowest-order ''ballooning representation'' for high toroidal mode number instabilities in the electrostatic limit. These effects include trapped particles, FLR, transit and bounce and magnetic drift frequency resonances, etc., for any number of plasma species. Results for toroidal drift waves destabilized by trapped electrons and ion temperature gradients are presented, using numerically-calculated three-dimensional MHD equilibria. These are reconstructed from experimental measurements. Quasilinear fluxes of particles and energy for each species are also calculated. Pairs of LHD discharges with different magnetic axis positions and with and without pellet injection are compared.

  19. Helical Membrane Protein Conformations and their Environment

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Timothy A.; Murray, Dylan T.; Watts, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Evidence that membrane proteins respond conformationally and functionally to their environment is gaining pace. Structural models, by necessity, have been characterized in preparations where the protein has been removed from its native environment. Different structural methods have used various membrane mimetics that have recently included lipid bilayers as a more native-like environment. Structural tools applied to lipid bilayer-embedded integral proteins are informing us about important generic characteristics of how membrane proteins respond to the lipid environment as compared with their response to other non-lipid environments. Here, we review the current status of the field, with specific reference to observations of some well-studied α-helical membrane proteins, as a starting point to aid the development of possible generic principals for model refinement. PMID:23996195

  20. Chaotic coordinates for the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, S. R.; Suzuki, Y.

    2014-10-15

    The theory of quadratic-flux-minimizing (QFM) surfaces is reviewed, and numerical techniques that allow high-order QFM surfaces to be efficiently constructed for experimentally relevant, non-integrable magnetic fields are described. As a practical example, the chaotic edge of the magnetic field in the Large Helical Device (LHD) is examined. A precise technique for finding the boundary surface is implemented, the hierarchy of partial barriers associated with the near-critical cantori is constructed, and a coordinate system, which we call chaotic coordinates, that is based on a selection of QFM surfaces is constructed that simplifies the description of the magnetic field, so that flux surfaces become “straight” and islands become “square.”.

  1. Evolutionary Optimization of a Quadrifilar Helical Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohn, Jason D.; Kraus, William F.; Linden, Derek S.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Automated antenna synthesis via evolutionary design has recently garnered much attention in the research literature. Evolutionary algorithms show promise because, among search algorithms, they are able to effectively search large, unknown design spaces. NASA's Mars Odyssey spacecraft is due to reach final Martian orbit insertion in January, 2002. Onboard the spacecraft is a quadrifilar helical antenna that provides telecommunications in the UHF band with landed assets, such as robotic rovers. Each helix is driven by the same signal which is phase-delayed in 90 deg increments. A small ground plane is provided at the base. It is designed to operate in the frequency band of 400-438 MHz. Based on encouraging previous results in automated antenna design using evolutionary search, we wanted to see whether such techniques could improve upon Mars Odyssey antenna design. Specifically, a co-evolutionary genetic algorithm is applied to optimize the gain and size of the quadrifilar helical antenna. The optimization was performed in-situ in the presence of a neighboring spacecraft structure. On the spacecraft, a large aluminum fuel tank is adjacent to the antenna. Since this fuel tank can dramatically affect the antenna's performance, we leave it to the evolutionary process to see if it can exploit the fuel tank's properties advantageously. Optimizing in the presence of surrounding structures would be quite difficult for human antenna designers, and thus the actual antenna was designed for free space (with a small ground plane). In fact, when flying on the spacecraft, surrounding structures that are moveable (e.g., solar panels) may be moved during the mission in order to improve the antenna's performance.

  2. Pulsed hydrojet

    DOEpatents

    Bohachevsky, I.O.; Torrey, M.D.

    1986-06-10

    An underwater pulsed hydrojet propulsion system is provided for accelerating and propelling a projectile or other vessel. A reactant, such as lithium, is fluidized and injected into a water volume. The resulting reaction produces an energy density in a time effective to form a steam pocket. Thrust flaps or baffles direct the pressure from the steam pocket toward an exit nozzle for accelerating a water volume to create thrust. A control system regulates the dispersion of reactant to control thrust characteristics.

  3. Schemes for generation of isolated attosecond pulses of pure circular polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-García, C.; Durfee, C. G.; Hickstein, D. D.; Popmintchev, T.; Meier, A.; Murnane, M. M.; Kapteyn, H. C.; Sola, I. J.; Jaron-Becker, A.; Becker, A.

    2016-04-01

    We propose and analyze two schemes capable of generating isolated attosecond pulses of pure circular polarization, based on results of numerical simulations. Both schemes utilize the generation of circularly polarized high-order-harmonics by crossing two circularly polarized counter-rotating pulses in a noncollinear geometry. Our results show that in this setup isolation of a single attosecond pulse can be achieved either by restricting the driver pulse duration to a few cycles or by temporally delaying the two crossed driver pulses. We further propose to compensate the temporal walk-off between the pulses across the focal spot and increasing the conversion efficiency by using angular spatial chirp to provide perfectly matched pulse fronts. The isolation of pure circularly polarized attosecond pulses, along with the opportunity to select their central energy and helicity in the noncollinear technique, opens new perspectives from which to study ultrafast dynamics in chiral systems and magnetic materials.

  4. Hindered Energy Cascade in Highly Helical Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, Rodion; Golbraikh, Ephim; Frick, Peter; Shestakov, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    The conventional approach to the turbulent energy cascade, based on Richardson-Kolmogorov phenomenology, ignores the topology of emerging vortices, which is related to the helicity of the turbulent flow. It is generally believed that helicity can play a significant role in turbulent systems, e.g., supporting the generation of large-scale magnetic fields, but its impact on the energy cascade to small scales has never been observed. We suggest, for the first time, a generalized phenomenology for isotropic turbulence with an arbitrary spectral distribution of the helicity. We discuss various scenarios of direct turbulent cascades with new helicity effect, which can be interpreted as a hindering of the spectral energy transfer. Therefore, the energy is accumulated and redistributed so that the efficiency of nonlinear interactions will be sufficient to provide a constant energy flux. We confirm our phenomenology by high Reynolds number numerical simulations based on a shell model of helical turbulence. The energy in our model is injected at a certain large scale only, whereas the source of helicity is distributed over all scales. In particular, we found that the helical bottleneck effect can appear in the inertial interval of the energy spectrum.

  5. Phage Selection of Chemically Stabilized α-Helical Peptide Ligands.

    PubMed

    Diderich, Philippe; Bertoldo, Davide; Dessen, Pierre; Khan, Maola M; Pizzitola, Irene; Held, Werner; Huelsken, Joerg; Heinis, Christian

    2016-05-20

    Short α-helical peptides stabilized by linkages between constituent amino acids offer an attractive format for ligand development. In recent years, a range of excellent ligands based on stabilized α-helices were generated by rational design using α-helical peptides of natural proteins as templates. Herein, we developed a method to engineer chemically stabilized α-helical ligands in a combinatorial fashion. In brief, peptides containing cysteines in position i and i + 4 are genetically encoded by phage display, the cysteines are modified with chemical bridges to impose α-helical conformations, and binders are isolated by affinity selection. We applied the strategy to affinity mature an α-helical peptide binding β-catenin. We succeeded in developing ligands with Kd's as low as 5.2 nM, having >200-fold improved affinity. The strategy is generally applicable for affinity maturation of any α-helical peptide. Compared to hydrocarbon stapled peptides, the herein evolved thioether-bridged peptide ligands can be synthesized more easily, as no unnatural amino acids are required and the cyclization reaction is more efficient and yields no stereoisomers. A further advantage of the thioether-bridged peptide ligands is that they can be expressed recombinantly as fusion proteins. PMID:26929989

  6. Deducing the symmetry of helical assemblies: Applications to membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Coudray, Nicolas; Lasala, Ralph; Zhang, Zhening; Clark, Kathy M; Dumont, Mark E; Stokes, David L

    2016-08-01

    Helical reconstruction represents a convenient and powerful approach for structure determination of macromolecules that assemble into helical arrays. In the case of membrane proteins, formation of tubular crystals with helical symmetry represents an attractive alternative, especially when their small size precludes the use of single-particle analysis. An essential first step for helical reconstruction is to characterize the helical symmetry. This process is often daunting, due to the complexity of helical diffraction and to the low signal-to-noise ratio in images of individual assemblies. Furthermore, the large diameters of the tubular crystals produced by membrane proteins exacerbates the innate ambiguities that, if not resolved, will produce incorrect structures. In this report, we describe a set of tools that can be used to eliminate ambiguities and to validate the choice of symmetry. The first approach increases the signal-to-noise ratio along layer lines by incoherently summing data from multiple helical assemblies, thus producing several candidate indexing schemes. The second approach compares the layer lines from images with those from synthetic models built with the various candidate schemes. The third approach uses unit cell dimensions measured from collapsed tubes to distinguish between these candidate schemes. These approaches are illustrated with tubular crystals from a boron transporter from yeast, Bor1p, and a β-barrel channel from the outer membrane of E. coli, OmpF. PMID:27255388

  7. Hindered Energy Cascade in Highly Helical Isotropic Turbulence.

    PubMed

    Stepanov, Rodion; Golbraikh, Ephim; Frick, Peter; Shestakov, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    The conventional approach to the turbulent energy cascade, based on Richardson-Kolmogorov phenomenology, ignores the topology of emerging vortices, which is related to the helicity of the turbulent flow. It is generally believed that helicity can play a significant role in turbulent systems, e.g., supporting the generation of large-scale magnetic fields, but its impact on the energy cascade to small scales has never been observed. We suggest, for the first time, a generalized phenomenology for isotropic turbulence with an arbitrary spectral distribution of the helicity. We discuss various scenarios of direct turbulent cascades with new helicity effect, which can be interpreted as a hindering of the spectral energy transfer. Therefore, the energy is accumulated and redistributed so that the efficiency of nonlinear interactions will be sufficient to provide a constant energy flux. We confirm our phenomenology by high Reynolds number numerical simulations based on a shell model of helical turbulence. The energy in our model is injected at a certain large scale only, whereas the source of helicity is distributed over all scales. In particular, we found that the helical bottleneck effect can appear in the inertial interval of the energy spectrum. PMID:26684120

  8. HELICITY CONSERVATION IN NONLINEAR MEAN-FIELD SOLAR DYNAMO

    SciTech Connect

    Pipin, V. V.; Sokoloff, D. D.; Zhang, H.; Kuzanyan, K. M.

    2013-05-01

    It is believed that magnetic helicity conservation is an important constraint on large-scale astrophysical dynamos. In this paper, we study a mean-field solar dynamo model that employs two different formulations of the magnetic helicity conservation. In the first approach, the evolution of the averaged small-scale magnetic helicity is largely determined by the local induction effects due to the large-scale magnetic field, turbulent motions, and the turbulent diffusive loss of helicity. In this case, the dynamo model shows that the typical strength of the large-scale magnetic field generated by the dynamo is much smaller than the equipartition value for the magnetic Reynolds number 10{sup 6}. This is the so-called catastrophic quenching (CQ) phenomenon. In the literature, this is considered to be typical for various kinds of solar dynamo models, including the distributed-type and the Babcock-Leighton-type dynamos. The problem can be resolved by the second formulation, which is derived from the integral conservation of the total magnetic helicity. In this case, the dynamo model shows that magnetic helicity propagates with the dynamo wave from the bottom of the convection zone to the surface. This prevents CQ because of the local balance between the large-scale and small-scale magnetic helicities. Thus, the solar dynamo can operate in a wide range of magnetic Reynolds numbers up to 10{sup 6}.

  9. Pulsed currents carried by whistlers. IV. Electric fields and radiation excited by an electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R.L.; Urrutia, J.M.; Rousculp, C.L.

    1995-04-01

    Electromagnetic properties of current pulses carried by whistler wave packets are obtained from a basic laboratory experiment. While the magnetic field and current density are described in the preceding companion paper (Part III), the present analysis starts with the electric field. The inductive and space charge electric field contributions are separately calculated in Fourier space from the measured magnetic field and Ohm`s law along B{sub 0}. Inverse Fourier transformation yields the total electric field in space and time, separated into rotational and divergent contributions. The space-charge density in whistler wave packets is obtained. The cross-field tensor conductivity is determined. The frozen-in condition is nearly satisfied, {bold E}+{bold v}{sub {ital e}}{times}{bold B}{congruent}0. The dissipation is obtained from Poynting`s theorem. The waves are collisionally damped; Landau damping is negligible. A radiation resistance for the electrode is determined. Analogous to Poynting`s theorem, the transport of helicity is analyzed. Current helicity is generated by a flow of helicity between pulses traveling in opposite directions which carry opposite signs of helicity. Helicity is dissipated by collisions. These observations complete a detailed description of whistler/current pulses which can occur in various laboratory and space plasmas. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  10. Multipinhole SPECT helical scan parameters and imaging volume

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Rutao Deng, Xiao; Wei, Qingyang; Dai, Tiantian; Ma, Tianyu; Lecomte, Roger

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The authors developed SPECT imaging capability on an animal PET scanner using a multiple-pinhole collimator and step-and-shoot helical data acquisition protocols. The objective of this work was to determine the preferred helical scan parameters, i.e., the angular and axial step sizes, and the imaging volume, that provide optimal imaging performance. Methods: The authors studied nine helical scan protocols formed by permuting three rotational and three axial step sizes. These step sizes were chosen around the reference values analytically calculated from the estimated spatial resolution of the SPECT system and the Nyquist sampling theorem. The nine helical protocols were evaluated by two figures-of-merit: the sampling completeness percentage (SCP) and the root-mean-square (RMS) resolution. SCP was an analytically calculated numerical index based on projection sampling. RMS resolution was derived from the reconstructed images of a sphere-grid phantom. Results: The RMS resolution results show that (1) the start and end pinhole planes of the helical scheme determine the axial extent of the effective field of view (EFOV), and (2) the diameter of the transverse EFOV is adequately calculated from the geometry of the pinhole opening, since the peripheral region beyond EFOV would introduce projection multiplexing and consequent effects. The RMS resolution results of the nine helical scan schemes show optimal resolution is achieved when the axial step size is the half, and the angular step size is about twice the corresponding values derived from the Nyquist theorem. The SCP results agree in general with that of RMS resolution but are less critical in assessing the effects of helical parameters and EFOV. Conclusions: The authors quantitatively validated the effective FOV of multiple pinhole helical scan protocols and proposed a simple method to calculate optimal helical scan parameters.

  11. Helicity dynamics in stratified turbulence in the absence of forcing.

    PubMed

    Rorai, C; Rosenberg, D; Pouquet, A; Mininni, P D

    2013-06-01

    A numerical study of decaying stably stratified flows is performed. Relatively high stratification (Froude number ≈10(-2)-10(-1)) and moderate Reynolds (Re) numbers (Re≈ 3-6×10(3)) are considered and a particular emphasis is placed on the role of helicity (velocity-vorticity correlations), which is not an invariant of the nondissipative equations. The problem is tackled by integrating the Boussinesq equations in a periodic cubical domain using different initial conditions: a nonhelical Taylor-Green (TG) flow, a fully helical Beltrami [Arnold-Beltrami-Childress (ABC)] flow, and random flows with a tunable helicity. We show that for stratified ABC flows helicity undergoes a substantially slower decay than for unstratified ABC flows. This fact is likely associated to the combined effect of stratification and large-scale coherent structures. Indeed, when the latter are missing, as in random flows, helicity is rapidly destroyed by the onset of gravitational waves. A type of large-scale dissipative "cyclostrophic" balance can be invoked to explain this behavior. No production of helicity is observed, contrary to the case of rotating and stratified flows. When helicity survives in the system, it strongly affects the temporal energy decay and the energy distribution among Fourier modes. We discover in fact that the decay rate of energy for stratified helical flows is much slower than for stratified nonhelical flows and can be considered with a phenomenological model in a way similar to what is done for unstratified rotating flows. We also show that helicity, when strong, has a measurable effect on the Fourier spectra, in particular at scales larger than the buoyancy scale, for which it displays a rather flat scaling associated with vertical shear, as observed in the planetary boundary layer. PMID:23848772

  12. High temporal resolution for multislice helical computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, K; Anno, H

    2000-05-01

    Multislice helical computed tomography (CT) substantially reduces scanning time. However, the temporal resolution of individual images is still insufficient for imaging rapidly moving organs such as the heart and adjacent pulmonary vessels. It may, in some cases, be worse than with current single-slice helical CT. The purpose of this study is to describe a novel image reconstruction algorithm to improve temporal resolution in multislice helical CT, and to evaluate its performance against existing algorithms. The proposed image reconstruction algorithm uses helical interpolation followed by data weighting based on the acquisition time. The temporal resolution, the longitudinal (z-axis) spatial resolution, the image noise, and the in-plane image artifacts created by a moving phantom were compared with those from the basic multislice helical reconstruction (helical filter interpolation, HFI) algorithm and the basic single-slice helical reconstruction algorithm (180 degrees linear interpolation, 180LI) using computer simulations. Computer simulation results were verified with CT examinations of the heart and lung vasculature using a 0.5 second multislice scanner. The temporal resolution of HFI algorithm varies from 0.28 and 0.86 s, depending on helical pitch. The proposed method improves the resolution to a constant value of 0.29 s, independent of pitch, allowing moving objects to be imaged with reduced blurring or motion artifacts. The spatial (z) resolution was slightly worse than with the HFI algorithm; the image noise was worse than with the HFI algorithm but was comparable to axial (step-and-shoot) CT. The proposed method provided sharp images of the moving objects, portraying the anatomy accurately. The proposed algorithm for multislice helical CT allowed us to obtain CT images with high temporal resolution. It may improve the image quality of clinical cardiac, lung, and vascular CT imaging. PMID:10841388

  13. Neoclassical Transport in the Helical Reversed-Field Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobbin, M.; Spizzo, G.; Marrelli, L.; White, R. B.

    2010-11-01

    Test particle evaluation of the diffusion coefficient in a fusion plasma in the reversed-field pinch (RFP) configuration shows distinct similarities with stellarators when the plasma spontaneously evolves towards a helical shape. The almost total absence of superbanana particles at the levels of helical deformation seen in experiment (Bh/B=10%) causes transport to be proportional to collision frequency (at low collisions). This fact excludes the possibility that the minimum conceivable transport could be inversely proportional to collision frequency, which is typical of unoptimized stellarators. This result strengthens the perspectives of the helical RFP as a fusion configuration.

  14. Tailoring chiro-optical effects by helical nanowire arrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Marco; Tasco, Vittorianna; Todisco, Francesco; Benedetti, Alessio; Tarantini, Iolena; Cuscunà, Massimo; Dominici, Lorenzo; de Giorgi, Milena; Passaseo, Adriana

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we experimentally investigate the chiro-optical properties of 3D metallic helical systems at optical frequencies. Both single and triple-nanowire geometries have been studied. In particular, we found that in single-helical nanostructures, the enhancement of chiro-optical effects achievable by geometrical design is limited, especially with respect to the operation wavelength and the circular polarization conversion purity. Conversely, in the triple-helical nanowire configuration, the dominant interaction is the coupling among the intertwined coaxial helices which is driven by a symmetric spatial arrangement. Consequently, a general improvement in the g-factor, extinction ratio and signal-to-noise-ratio is achieved in a broad spectral range. Moreover, while in single-helical nanowires a mixed linear and circular birefringence results in an optical activity strongly dependent on the sample orientation and wavelength, in the triple-helical nanowire configuration, the obtained purely circular birefringence leads to a large optical activity up to 8°, independent of the sample angle, and extending in a broad band of 500 nm in the visible range. These results demonstrate a strong correlation between the configurational internal interactions and the chiral feature designation, which can be effectively exploited for nanoscale chiral device engineering.In this work, we experimentally investigate the chiro-optical properties of 3D metallic helical systems at optical frequencies. Both single and triple-nanowire geometries have been studied. In particular, we found that in single-helical nanostructures, the enhancement of chiro-optical effects achievable by geometrical design is limited, especially with respect to the operation wavelength and the circular polarization conversion purity. Conversely, in the triple-helical nanowire configuration, the dominant interaction is the coupling among the intertwined coaxial helices which is driven by a symmetric spatial

  15. Absolute magnetic helicity and the cylindrical magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, B. C.

    2011-05-01

    The different magnetic helicities conserved under conditions of perfect electrical conductivity are expressions of the fundamental property that every evolving fluid surface conserves its net magnetic flux. This basic hydromagnetic point unifies the well known Eulerian helicities with the Lagrangian helicity defined by the conserved fluxes frozen into a prescribed set of disjoint toroidal tubes of fluid flowing as a permanent partition of the entire fluid [B. C. Low, Astrophys. J. 649, 1064 (2006)]. This unifying theory is constructed from first principles, beginning with an analysis of the Eulerian and Lagrangian descriptions of fluids, separating the ideas of fluid and magnetic-flux tubes and removing the complication of the magnetic vector potential's free gauge from the concept of helicity. The analysis prepares for the construction of a conserved Eulerian helicity, without that gauge complication, to describe a 3D anchored flux in an upright cylindrical domain, this helicity called absolute to distinguish it from the well known relative helicity. In a version of the Chandrasekhar-Kendall representation, the evolving field at any instant is a unique superposition of a writhed, untwisted axial flux with a circulating flux of field lines all closed and unlinked within the cylindrical domain. The absolute helicity is then a flux-weighted sum of the writhe of that axial flux and its mutual linkage with the circulating flux. The absolute helicity is also conserved if the frozen-in field and its domain are continuously deformed by changing the separation between the rigid cylinder-ends with no change of cylinder radius. This hitherto intractable cylindrical construction closes a crucial conceptual gap for the fundamentals to be complete at last. The concluding discussion shows the impact of this development on our understanding of helicity, covering (i) the helicities of wholly contained and anchored fields; (ii) the Eulerian and Lagrangian descriptions of field

  16. Josephson junction through a disordered topological insulator with helical magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyuzin, Alexander; Alidoust, Mohammad; Loss, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    We study supercurrent and proximity vortices in a Josephson junction made of disordered surface states of a three-dimensional topological insulator with a proximity induced in-plane helical magnetization. In a regime where the rotation period of helical magnetization is larger than the junction width, we find supercurrent 0 -π crossovers as a function of junction thickness, magnetization strength, and parameters inherent to the helical modulation and surface states. The supercurrent reversals are associated with proximity induced vortices, nucleated along the junction width, where the number of vortices and their locations can be manipulated by means of the superconducting phase difference and the parameters mentioned above.

  17. Helical Spin Order from Topological Dirac and Weyl Semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiao-Qi; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; Wang, Zhong

    2015-08-01

    We study dynamical mass generation and the resultant helical spin orders in topological Dirac and Weyl semimetals, including the edge states of quantum spin Hall insulators, the surface states of weak topological insulators, and the bulk materials of Weyl semimetals. In particular, the helical spin textures of Weyl semimetals manifest the spin-momentum locking of Weyl fermions in a visible manner. The spin-wave fluctuations of the helical order carry electric charge density; therefore, the spin textures can be electrically controlled in a simple and predictable manner.

  18. Drift mode calculations for the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    G. Rewoldt; L.-P. Ku; W.M. Tang; H. Sugama; N. Nakajima; K.Y. Watanabe; S. Murakami; H. Yamada; W.A. Cooper

    2000-06-08

    A fully kinetic assessment of the stability properties of toroidal drift modes has been obtained for a case for the Large Helical Device (LHD) [A.Iiyoshi, et al., Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, 1998, Nucl.Fusion 39, 1245 (1999)]. This calculation retains the important effects in the linearized gyrokinetic equation, using the lowest-order ''ballooning representation'' for high toroidal mode number instabilities in the electrostatic limit. Results for toroidal drift waves destabilized by trapped particle dynamics and ion temperature gradients are presented, using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics equilibria reconstructed from experimental measurements. The effects of helically-trapped particles and helical curvature are investigated.

  19. Experimental Evidence of Helical Flow in Porous Media.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yu; Chiogna, Gabriele; Cirpka, Olaf A; Grathwohl, Peter; Rolle, Massimo

    2015-11-01

    Helical flow leads to deformation of solute plumes and enhances transverse mixing in porous media. We present experiments in which macroscopic helical flow is created by arranging different materials to obtain an anisotropic macroscopic permeability tensor with spatially variable orientation. The resulting helical flow entails twisting streamlines which cause a significant increase in lateral mass exchange and thus a large enhancement of plume dilution (up to 235%) compared to transport in homogenous media. The setup may be used to effectively mix solutes in parallel streams similarly to static mixers, but in porous media. PMID:26588388

  20. Control of the polarization of attosecond pulses using a two-color field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Camilo; Hoffmann, David J.; Torres, Ricardo; Chipperfield, Luke E.; Marangos, Jonathan P.

    2009-11-01

    Control over the polarization of an attosecond pulse train (APT) is demonstrated theoretically using orthogonally polarized two-color fields. The carrier envelope phase of the two pulses is used as a control parameter to generate both an APT with linear polarization in two nearly perpendicular planes or a train of elliptically polarized pulses of alternating helicity. By using few-cycle driving laser fields an isolated attosecond pulse with elliptical polarization is shown to be generated after selecting the cut-off region of the harmonic spectrum. The control mechanism is explained in terms of classical trajectories.