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Sample records for short-pulse excited dielectric

  1. Enhanced performance of an EUV light source (λ = 84 nm) using short-pulse excitation of a windowless dielectric barrier discharge in neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carman, R. J.; Kane, D. M.; Ward, B. K.

    2010-01-01

    The electrical and optical characteristics of a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) based neon excimer lamp generating output in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral range (λ = 84 nm) have been investigated experimentally. We report a detailed comparison of lamp performance for both pulsed and sinusoidal voltage excitation waveforms, using otherwise identical operating conditions. The results show that pulsed voltage excitation yields a ~50% increase in the overall electrical to EUV conversion efficiency compared with sinusoidal waveforms, when operating in the pressure range 500-900 mbar. Pulsed operation allows greater control of parameters associated with the temporal evolution of the EUV pulse shapes (risetime, instantaneous peak power). The Ne DBD based source is also found to be highly monochromatic with respect to its spectral output from the second continuum band at λ ~ 84 nm (5 nm FWHM). This continuum band dominates the spectral emission over the wavelength range 30-550 nm. Lamp performance; as measured by the overall EUV output energy, electrical to EUV conversion efficiency and spectral purity at λ ~ 84 nm; improves with increasing gas pressure up to p = 900 mbar.

  2. Theory of suppressing avalanche process of carrier in short pulse laser irradiated dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Hongxiang; Zu, Xiaotao; Zheng, WG; Yuan, XD; Xiang, Xia; Sun, Kai; Gao, Fei

    2014-05-28

    A theory for controlling avalanche process of carrier during short pulse laser irradiation is proposed. We show that avalanche process of conduction band electrons (CBEs) is determined by the occupation number of phonons in dielectrics. The theory provides a way to suppress avalanche process and a direct judgment for the contribution of avalanche process and photon ionization process to the generation of CBEs. The obtained temperature dependent rate equation shows that the laser induced damage threshold of dielectrics, e.g., fused silica, increase nonlinearly with the decreases of temperature. Present theory predicts a new approach to improve the laser induced damage threshold of dielectrics.

  3. Time of flight emission spectroscopy of laser produced nickel plasma: Short-pulse and ultrafast excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Smijesh, N.; Chandrasekharan, K.; Joshi, Jagdish C.; Philip, Reji

    2014-07-07

    We report the experimental investigation and comparison of the temporal features of short-pulse (7 ns) and ultrafast (100 fs) laser produced plasmas generated from a solid nickel target, expanding into a nitrogen background. When the ambient pressure is varied in a large range of 10⁻⁶Torr to 10²Torr, the plume intensity is found to increase rapidly as the pressure crosses 1 Torr. Time of flight (TOF) spectroscopy of emission from neutral nickel (Ni I) at 361.9 nm (3d⁹(²D) 4p → 3d⁹(²D) 4s transition) reveals two peaks (fast and slow species) in short-pulse excitation and a single peak in ultrafast excitation. The fast and slow peaks represent recombined neutrals and un-ionized neutrals, respectively. TOF emission from singly ionized nickel (Ni II) studied using the 428.5 nm (3p⁶3d⁸(³P) 4s→ 3p⁶3d⁹ 4s) transition shows only a single peak for either excitation. Velocities of the neutral and ionic species are determined from TOF measurements carried out at different positions (i.e., at distances of 2 mm and 4 mm, respectively, from the target surface) on the plume axis. Measured velocities indicate acceleration of neutrals and ions, which is caused by the Coulomb pull of the electrons enveloping the plume front in the case of ultrafast excitation. Both Coulomb pull and laser-plasma interaction contribute to the acceleration in the case of short-pulse excitation. These investigations provide new information on the pressure dependent temporal behavior of nickel plasmas produced by short-pulse and ultrafast laser pulses, which have potential uses in applications such as pulsed laser deposition and laser-induced nanoparticle generation.

  4. Time-dependent directionality of cooperative emission after short pulse excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedberg, Richard; Manassah, Jamal T.

    2008-09-01

    Cooperative emission from a sphere of N two-level atoms excited by a short pulse is shown to have a time-dependent angular distribution, with the possibility of reversal in the dominant direction of emission. This is a result of the different values of the frequency shifts and decay rates associated with the various collective eigenmodes of the atomic system obtained in a scalar photon model.

  5. Aperture excited dielectric antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosswell, W. F.; Chatterjee, J. S.; Mason, V. B.; Tai, C. T.

    1974-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive experimental and theoretical study of the effect of placing dielectric objects over the aperture of waveguide antennas are presented. Experimental measurements of the radiation patterns, gain, impedance, near-field amplitude, and pattern and impedance coupling between pairs of antennas are given for various Plexiglas shapes, including the sphere and the cube, excited by rectangular, circular, and square waveguide feed apertures. The waveguide excitation of a dielectric sphere is modeled using the Huygens' source, and expressions for the resulting electric fields, directivity, and efficiency are derived. Calculations using this model show good overall agreement with experimental patterns and directivity measurements. The waveguide under an infinite dielectric slab is used as an impedance model. Calculations using this model agree qualitatively with the measured impedance data. It is concluded that dielectric loaded antennas such as the waveguide excited sphere, cube, or sphere-cylinder can produce directivities in excess of that obtained by a uniformly illuminated aperture of the same cross section, particularly for dielectric objects with dimensions of 2 wavelengths or less. It is also shown that for certain configurations coupling between two antennas of this type is less than that for the same antennas without dielectric loading.

  6. Optical damage performance measurements of multilayer dielectric gratings for high energy short pulse lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessi, D.; Carr, C. W.; Negres, R. A.; Hackel, R. P.; Stanion, K. A.; Cross, D. A.; Guss, G.; Nissen, J. D.; Luthi, R.; Fair, J. E.; Britten, J. A.; Haefner, C.

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the laser damage resistance of multilayer dielectric (MLD) diffraction gratings used in the pulse compressors for high energy, high peak power laser systems such as the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) Petawatt laser on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Our study includes measurements of damage threshold and damage density (ρ(Φ)) with picosecond laser pulses at 1053 nm under relevant operational conditions. Initial results indicate that sparse defects present on the optic surface from the manufacturing processes are responsible for damage initiation at laser fluences below the damage threshold indicated by the standard R-on-1 test methods, as is the case for laser damage with nanosecond pulse durations. As such, this study supports the development of damage density measurements for more accurate predictions on the damage performance of large area optics.

  7. Longitudinally excited CO2 laser with tail-free short pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Kazuyuki; Dobashi, Kazuma; Akitsu, Tetsuya; Jitsuno, Takahisa

    2014-11-01

    We developed a longitudinally excited CO2 laser with a tail-free short laser pulse. In a discharge tube, two structures were researched. One is a shingle scheme that is constituted of a 45 cm-long discharge tube. Another is a tandem that is constituted of two 30 cm-long discharge tubes connected with an intermediate electrode were used. In gas media, CO2- rich mixture (CO2: N2= 20: 1) was used to reduce a laser pulse tail. The laser system did not require expensive and scarce helium. A fast discharge (<1 μs) in a low gas pressure (<1.8 kPa) produced a tail-free laser pulse with the pulse width of about 100 ns. The single scheme produced an output energy of 4.7 mJ by a charging voltage of -36.3 kV, and the tandem scheme produced an output energy of 9.3 mJ by a charging voltage of -25.2 kV. The tandem scheme produced higher spike pulse by lower voltage than the single scheme. Therefore, the tandem scheme will be effective in longitudinally excited CO2 lasers with simple and compact designs.

  8. Short pulse neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Elizondo-Decanini, Juan M.

    2016-08-02

    Short pulse neutron generators are described herein. In a general embodiment, the short pulse neutron generator includes a Blumlein structure. The Blumlein structure includes a first conductive plate, a second conductive plate, a third conductive plate, at least one of an inductor or a resistor, a switch, and a dielectric material. The first conductive plate is positioned relative to the second conductive plate such that a gap separates these plates. A vacuum chamber is positioned in the gap, and an ion source is positioned to emit ions in the vacuum chamber. The third conductive plate is electrically grounded, and the switch is operable to electrically connect and disconnect the second conductive plate and the third conductive plate. The at least one of the resistor or the inductor is coupled to the first conductive plate and the second conductive plate.

  9. SHORT PULSE STRETCHER

    DOEpatents

    Branum, D.R.; Cummins, W.F.

    1962-12-01

    >A short pulse stretching circuit capable of stretching a short puise to enable it to be displayed on a relatively slow sweeping oscilloscope is described. Moreover, the duration of the pulse is increased by charging a capacitor through a diode and thereafter discharging the capacitor at such time as is desired. In the circuit the trigger pulse alone passes through a delay line, whereas the main signal passes through the diode only, and results in over-all circuit losses which are proportional to the low losses of the diode only. (AEC)

  10. Infrared Luminescence at 1010 nm and 1500 nm in LiNbO3:Er3+ Excitted by Short Pulse Radiation at 980 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokanyan, E. P.; Demirkhanyan, G. G.; Steveler, E.; Rinnert, H.; Aillerie, M.

    Luminescence of LiNbO3:Er3+ crystal at a wavelength of 1010 nm and 1500 nm under pulsed excitation of different power at a wavelength of 980 nm are experimentally and theoretically studied. It is revealed, that the main part of the absorbed energy gives rise to the luminescence at 1500 nm. Considered concentrations of Er3+ impurity ions allow to exclude cooperative processes in the impurity subsystem. The experimental results are interpreted in the framework of a three electronic levels system, assuming that the population of the higher lasing level 4I13/2 in the crystal under study is caused by relaxation processes from the excited level. It is shown that for obtaining of a laser radiation at about 1500 nm one can effectively use a pulse-pumping at 980 nm with a power density in a range of 50 ÷ 60 MW/cm2.

  11. Multiline short-pulse solid-state seeded carbon dioxide laser for extreme ultraviolet employing multipass radio frequency excited slab amplifier.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Krzysztof M; Ohta, Takeshi; Suganuma, Takashi; Fujimoto, Junichi; Mizoguchi, Hakaru

    2013-03-15

    In this Letter we describe in more detail a solid-state seeded, nanosecond pulse, multiline CO(2) oscillator designed and built for the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) laser-produced-plasma (LPP) source. Our oscillator featured quantum cascade laser seeders, a diffraction-type seed beam combiner, and a radio-frequency-discharge-excited, diffusion-cooled, slab-waveguide CO(2) gain cell in a compact multipass regenerative amplifier configuration. The oscillator generated pulses of exceptional stability in terms of envelope, energy, and spectrum. Excellent stability of output was achieved without any additional techniques. The output spectrum consisted of two laser lines of a 00(0)1-10(0)0 band of a CO(2) molecule, P20 and P22, with a target of four lines P18-P24. The pulse duration was electronically adjustable between 11 and 35 ns at a repetition frequency from a few hertz to hundreds of kilohertz. Electronic adjustment of the pulse duration was achieved by relative timing offsets of individual seeders, opening an avenue to a range of on-line adjustments of pulse shape and spectral content timing. The jitter-tolerant operation allows for easy synchronization with an external event, such as a droplet target in an EUV LPP source. A resistance to parasitic seeding of more than 40 dB was recorded. The oscillator produced up to 20 W of average output power at a repetition rate of 100 kHz in a near-diffraction-limited beam of M(2)<1.3 and a pointing stability below 50 μrad. PMID:23503247

  12. Extremely short pulses via resonantly induced transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radeonychev, Y. V.; Polovinkin, V. A.; Kocharovskaya, O.

    2011-07-01

    We study a novel method to produce extremely short pulses of radiation in a resonant medium via induced transparency by means of adiabatic periodic modulation of atomic transition frequencies by far-off-resonant laser field, which causes linear Stark splitting of atomic energy levels resulting in partial transparency of an optically deep medium and drastic spectral modification of an incident resonant radiation. We find the regimes where the output spectrum corresponds to extremely short pulses and discuss several possible experimental realizations of generation of attosecond pulses in Li2+ ions and femtosecond pulses in atomic hydrogen with commercially available facilities.

  13. GSFC short pulse radar, JONSWAP-75

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, D. M.; Walton, W. T.; Eckerman, J.; Kutz, R. L.; Dombrowski, M.; Kalshoven, J. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    In September 1975, the Goddard Space Flight Center operated a short pulse radar during ocean wave measuring experiments off the coast of West Germany in the North Sea. The experiment was part of JONSWAP-75. The radar system and operations during the experiment are described along with examples of data.

  14. Short-pulse photolytic iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tate, Ralph F.; Harris, Melvin; Anderson, Brian T.; Hager, Gordon D.

    2000-08-01

    A compact, short pulse photolytic iodine laser (PIL) system designed for use as a source in Raman conversion experiments is described. The single-shot, flashlamp-pumped laser outputs 10 Joules in a 3 microsecond(s) FWHM pulse at a wavelength of 1.315 micrometer and uses n-C3F7I as the renewable laser fuel. Laser design and performance characteristics are presented.

  15. Electromagnetic Pulses at Short-Pulse Laser Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Jr., C G; Throop, A; Eder, D; Kimbrough, J

    2007-08-28

    Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) is a known issue for short-pulse laser facilities, and will also be an issue for experiments using the advanced radiographic capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The ARC diagnostic uses four NIF beams that are compressed to picosecond durations for backlighting ignition capsules and other applications. Consequently, we are working to understand the EMP due to high-energy (MeV) electrons escaping from targets heated by short-pulse lasers. Our approach is to measure EMP in the Titan short-pulse laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and to employ that data to establish analysis and simulation capabilities. We have installed a wide variety of probes inside and outside the Titan laser chamber. We have high-frequency B-dots and D-dots, a photodiode, and fast current-viewing and integrating current transformers. The probe outputs are digitized by 10 and 20 Gsample/s oscilloscopes. The cables and oscilloscopes are well shielded to reduce noise. Our initial measurement campaign has yielded data useful mainly from hundreds of MHz to several GHz. We currently are supplementing our high-frequency probes with lower-frequency ones to obtain better low-frequency data. In order to establish analysis and simulation capabilities we are modeling the Titan facility using various commercial and LLNL numerical electromagnetic codes. We have simulated EMP generation by having a specified number of electrons leave the target and strike the chamber wall and other components in the chamber. This short impulse of electrons has a corresponding broad spectrum, exciting high-frequency structure in the resulting EMP. In this paper, we present results of our initial measurement campaign and comparisons between the measurements and simulations.

  16. Electromagnetic Pulses at Short-Pulse Laser Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C G; Throop, A; Eder, D; Kimbrough, J

    2008-02-04

    Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) is a known issue for short-pulse laser facilities, and will also be an issue for experiments using the advanced radiographic capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The ARC diagnostic uses four NIF beams that are compressed to picosecond durations for backlighting ignition capsules and other applications. Consequently, we are working to understand the EMP due to high-energy (MeV) electrons escaping from targets heated by short-pulse lasers. Our approach is to measure EMP in the Titan short-pulse laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and to employ that data to establish analysis and simulation capabilities. We have installed a wide variety of probes inside and outside the Titan laser chamber. We have high-frequency B-dot and D-dot probes, a photodiode, and fast current-viewing and integrating current transformers. The probe outputs are digitized by 10 and 20 Gsample/s oscilloscopes. The cables and oscilloscopes are well shielded to reduce noise. Our initial measurement campaign has yielded data useful mainly from several hundreds of MHz to several GHz. We currently are supplementing our high-frequency probes with lower-frequency ones to obtain better low-frequency data. In order to establish analysis and simulation capabilities we are modeling the Titan facility using various commercial and LLNL numerical electromagnetics codes. We have simulated EMP generation by having a specified number of electrons leave the target and strike the chamber wall and other components in the chamber. This short impulse of electrons has a correspondingly broad spectrum, exciting high-frequency structure in the resulting EMP. In this paper, we present results of our initial measurement campaign and comparisons between the measurements and simulations.

  17. A Bright Neutron Source Driven by a Short Pulse Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Markus

    2012-10-01

    Neutrons are a unique tool to alter and diagnose material properties, and to exciting nuclear reactions, for many applications. Accelerator based spallation sources provide high neutron fluxes for research, but there is a growing need for more compact sources with higher peak brightness, whether fast or moderated neutrons. Intense lasers promise such as source, readily linkable to other experimental facilities, or deployable outside a laboratory setting. We present experimental results on the first short-pulse laser-driven neutron source powerful enough for radiography. A novel laser-driven ion acceleration mechanism (Breakout Afterburner), operating in the relativistic transparency regime, is used. Based on the mechanism's advantages, a laser-driven deuteron beam is used to achieve a new record in laser-neutron production, in numbers, energy and directionality. This neutron beam is a highly directional pulse < 1 ns at ˜ 1 cm from the target, with a flux > 40/2̂, and thus suitable for imaging applications with high temporal resolution. The beam contained, for the first time, neutrons with energies of up to 150 MeV. Thus using short pulse lasers, it is now possible to use the resulting hard x-rays and neutrons of different energies to radiograph an unknown object and to determine its material composition. Our data matches the simulated data for our test samples.

  18. An Ultra-Short Pulsed Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomerantz, Ishay; McCary, Eddie; Meadows, Alexander R.; Arefiev, Alexey; Bernstein, Aaron C.; Chester, Clay; Cortez, Jose; Donovan, Michael E.; Dyer, Gilliss; Gaul, Erhard W.; Hamilton, David; Kuk, Donghoon; Lestrade, Arantxa; Wang, Chunhua; Ditmire, Todd; Hegelich, Manuel B.

    2014-10-01

    We report on a novel compact laser-driven neutron source with unprecedented short pulse duration (<50 ps) and high flux (>1018 neutrons/cm2/s), an order of magnitude higher than any existing source. In our experiments, high-energy electron jets are generated from thin (<1 μm) plastic targets irradiated by a petawatt laser. These intense electron beams are employed to generate neutrons from a metal converter. Our method opens venues for enhancing neutron radiography contrast, conducting time-resolved neutron-damage studies at their characteristic evolution time-scales and for creating astrophysical conditions of heavy element synthesis in the laboratory.

  19. Thomson scattering in short pulse laser experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, E. G.; Rose, S. J.

    2012-08-15

    Thomson scattering is well used as a diagnostic in many areas of high energy density physics. In this paper, we quantitatively demonstrate the practicality of using Thomson scattering as a diagnostic of short-pulse laser-plasma experiments in the regime, where the plasmas probed are at solid density and have temperatures of many hundreds of eV using a backlighter produced with an optical laser. This method allows a diagnosis both spatially and temporally of the density and temperature distributions in high energy density laser-plasma interactions which is independent from, and would act as a useful complement to, the existing spectroscopic methods.

  20. Excitation of electrostatic plasma waves using a dielectric covered metallic electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Kar, S.; Mukherjee, S.

    2011-11-15

    Plasma response to high positive and negative voltage pulses is studied using pulsed capacitive excitation in a uniform and unmagnetized plasma. The positive or negative voltage pulse is applied to a metallic electrode, covered by a dielectric (Kapton) film, immersed in a low pressure argon plasma. The pulse magnitude is much greater than the electron temperature (U{sub 0} >> kT{sub e}/e). Experiments are carried out for different plasma parameters, to find how the plasma perturbations propagate for various applied pulse widths in comparison to ion plasma period ( f{sub i}{sup -1}). Plasma perturbations are studied by varying the thickness of the dielectric. For positive pulse bias, depending on the dielectric thickness, excitation of solitary electron holes, or solitary ion holes are observed. For negative pulse bias, varying the dielectric thicknesses, only ion rarefaction waves are excited.

  1. Transient Current of Nematic Liquid Crystals with Negative Dielectric Anisotropy Induced by Step-Voltage Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Yosuke; Naito, Hiroyoshi; Inoue, Masaru; Ichinose, Hideo; Klasen-Memmer, Melanie; Tarumi, Kazuaki

    2004-12-01

    A simple theory for measuring the rotational viscosity has been proposed from the analysis of transient current, induced by step-voltage excitation, in nematic liquid crystal cells (NLCs) with positive dielectric anisotropy [M. Imai et al.: Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 33 (1994) L119]. The applicability of the theory to NLCs with negative dielectric anisotropy has been examined. It is found that the transient current shape of NLCs with negative dielectric anisotropy is different from that of NLCs with positive dielectric anisotropy, and hence, the theory cannot directly be applied to the analysis of the transient current of NLCs with negative dielectric anisotropy. Computer simulation shows that the transient current of NLCs with negative dielectric anisotropy is successfully reproduced by taking into account the flow effects with an appropriate boundary condition and that the flow effects play a key role in eliciting a faster electrooptic response in vertically aligned NLC displays.

  2. Precision short-pulse damage test station utilizing optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Jovanovic, I; Brown, C; Wattellier, B; Nielsen, N; Molander, W; Stuart, B; Pennington, D; Barty, C J

    2004-03-22

    The next generation of high-energy petawatt (HEPW)-class lasers will utilize multilayer dielectric diffraction gratings for pulse compression, due to their high efficiency and high damage threshold for picosecond pulses. The peak power of HEPW lasers will be determined by the aperture and damage threshold of the final dielectric grating in the pulse compressor and final focusing optics. We have developed a short-pulse damage test station for accurate determination of the damage threshold of the optics used on future HEPW lasers. Our damage test station is based on a highly stable, high-beam-quality optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier (OPCPA) operating at 1053 nm at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. We present the design of our OPCPA system pumped by a commercial Q-switched pump laser and the results of the full system characterization. Initial short-pulse damage experiments in the far field using our system have been performed.

  3. Short-pulse electromagnetics for sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felsen, Leopold B.; Vecchi, G.; Carin, Lawrence; Bertoni, H. L.

    1991-08-01

    Recent developments make it possible to radiate and coherently detect electromagnetic pulses consisting of a few half-cycles of a sine wave having a period on the order of 10 ps. The antennas involved are compact, typically consisting of conducting films on thin dielectric substrates having lateral dimensions of about 2 cm. Short, broadband pulse technology can be used for position sensing, object identification, and for monitoring the state of an object. Such target interrogation may have application to robotics. This possibility is explored here, and an example of the dependence of the scattered pulse on the internal state of an object is presented. The short electromagnetic pulses (SEP) permit position sensing of objects with spatial resolution on the order of 1 mm. They also permit identification of objects and the monitoring of their state. This follows because, depending on its size, shape, and the materials from which it is constructed, an object will exhibit a series of resonant frequencies at which it strongly reflects electromagnetic waves of harmonic time dependence. When illuminated by SEP, having frequency content spread over a wide bandwidth, these resonances will be excited. The resonances appear in the late-time tail of the scattered pulse. This late-time response is almost independent of the orientation of the object, and can therefore be used for identification. For targets that involve conducting bodies with aperture coupling to internal cavities the externally observed resonances can be especially useful in monitoring changes in the internal structure. The illustrative example demonstrating this aspect involves a slit- coupled closed shell with an internal load. If the shell and load are good conductors it is shown that the resulting high-Q resonances are highly sensitive to changes in the locatio of the load.

  4. Excitation of Bloch-like surface waves in quasi-crystals and aperiodic dielectric multilayers.

    PubMed

    Koju, Vijay; Robertson, William M

    2016-07-01

    The existence of Bloch surface waves in periodic dielectric multilayer structures with a surface defect is well known. Not yet recognized is that quasi-crystals and aperiodic dielectric multilayers can also support Bloch-like surface waves. In this work, we numerically show the excitation of Bloch-like surface waves in Fibonacci quasi-crystals and Thue-Morse aperiodic dielectric multilayers using the prism coupling method. We report improved surface electric field intensity and penetration depth of Bloch-like surface waves in the air side in such structures compared to their periodic counterparts. PMID:27367064

  5. Dielectric Function and Electronic Excitations of Functionalized DNA Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hosuk; Lee, Hosun; Lee, Jung Eun; Rha Lee, U.; Choi, Dong Hoon

    2010-06-01

    We measure the dielectric functions of organic-soluble, functionalized DNAs bearing functional moieties in the near-infrared, visible, and ultra-violet spectra by using spectroscopic ellipsometry. Natural double-stranded DNA is dissolved in water and reacted with carbazole-based trimethyl ammonium bromide, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, and chalcone-terminated trimethyl ammonium bromide. The functional DNA products are all precipitated and filtered for washing and drying. We successfully prepare functionalized DNAs that are insoluble in water but soluble in organic solvents. The thin films are fabricated by using the spin coating technique after preparing solutions in either homogeneous or mixed organic solvents. We measure the ultraviolet-visible absorbance spectra of the films. The absorbance spectra show that the optical energy gaps of the functionalized DNAs change little even though the DNAs are connected to the complex molecules by electrostatic interaction. From the measured ellipsometric angles, we estimate the dielectric functions by using parametric optical constant model and layer model analysis. Depending on the nature of the attached complex molecules, the dielectric functions change, new optical structures develop below and above band gaps arising from the side molecules, and the optical energy gaps of the DNAs are altered slightly by weak coupling to the tethered complex molecules.

  6. Short-pulse laser interactions with disordered materials and liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Phinney, L.M.; Goldman, C.H.; Longtin, J.P.; Tien, C.L.

    1995-12-31

    High-power, short-pulse lasers in the picosecond and subpicosecond range are utilized in an increasing number of technologies, including materials processing and diagnostics, micro-electronics and devices, and medicine. In these applications, the short-pulse radiation interacts with a wide range of media encompassing disordered materials and liquids. Examples of disordered materials include porous media, polymers, organic tissues, and amorphous forms of silicon, silicon nitride, and silicon dioxide. In order to accurately model, efficiently control, and optimize short-pulse, laser-material interactions, a thorough understanding of the energy transport mechanisms is necessary. Thus, fractals and percolation theory are used to analyze the anomalous diffusion regime in random media. In liquids, the thermal aspects of saturable and multiphoton absorption are examined. Finally, a novel application of short-pulse laser radiation to reduce surface adhesion forces in microstructures through short-pulse laser-induced water desorption is presented.

  7. Plasma mirrors for short pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Yanovksy, V.P.; Perry, M.D.; Brown, C.G.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.

    1997-06-11

    We show experimentally and theoretically that plasmas created by a sufficiently (1014 1015 2 short (<500 fs) intense W/cm ) laser pulse on the surface of dielectric material act as nearly perfect mirrors: reflecting p to 90% of the incident radiation with a wavefront quality equal to that of the initial solid surface.

  8. Studying the mechanism of micromachining by short pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadag, Shiva

    The semiconductor materials like Si and the transparent dielectric materials like glass and quartz are extensively used in optoelectronics, microelectronics, and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) industries. The combination of these materials often go hand in hand for applications in MEMS such as in chips for pressure sensors, charge coupled devices (CCD), and photovoltaic (PV) cells for solar energy generation. The transparent negative terminal of the solar cell is made of glass on one surface of the PV cell. The positive terminal (cathode) on the other surface of the solar cell is made of silicon with a glass negative terminal (anode). The digital watches and cell phones, LEDs, micro-lens, optical components, and laser optics are other examples for the application of silicon and or glass. The Si and quartz are materials extensively used in CCD and LED for digital cameras and CD players respectively. Hence, three materials: (1) a semiconductor silicon and transparent dielectrics,- (2) glass, and (3) quartz are chosen for laser micromachining as they have wide spread applications in microelectronics industry. The Q-switched, nanosecond pulsed lasers are most extensively used for micro-machining. The nanosecond type of short pulsed laser is less expensive for the end users than the second type, pico or femto, ultra-short pulsed lasers. The majority of the research work done on these materials (Si, SiO 2, and glass) is based on the ultra-short pulsed lasers. This is because of the cut quality, pin point precision of the drilled holes, formation of the nanometer size microstructures and fine features, and minimally invasive heat affected zone. However, there are many applications such as large surface area dicing, cutting, surface cleaning of Si wafers by ablation, and drilling of relatively large-sized holes where some associated heat affected zone due to melting can be tolerated. In such applications the nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of materials is very

  9. Studying the mechanism of micromachining by short pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadag, Shiva

    The semiconductor materials like Si and the transparent dielectric materials like glass and quartz are extensively used in optoelectronics, microelectronics, and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) industries. The combination of these materials often go hand in hand for applications in MEMS such as in chips for pressure sensors, charge coupled devices (CCD), and photovoltaic (PV) cells for solar energy generation. The transparent negative terminal of the solar cell is made of glass on one surface of the PV cell. The positive terminal (cathode) on the other surface of the solar cell is made of silicon with a glass negative terminal (anode). The digital watches and cell phones, LEDs, micro-lens, optical components, and laser optics are other examples for the application of silicon and or glass. The Si and quartz are materials extensively used in CCD and LED for digital cameras and CD players respectively. Hence, three materials: (1) a semiconductor silicon and transparent dielectrics,- (2) glass, and (3) quartz are chosen for laser micromachining as they have wide spread applications in microelectronics industry. The Q-switched, nanosecond pulsed lasers are most extensively used for micro-machining. The nanosecond type of short pulsed laser is less expensive for the end users than the second type, pico or femto, ultra-short pulsed lasers. The majority of the research work done on these materials (Si, SiO 2, and glass) is based on the ultra-short pulsed lasers. This is because of the cut quality, pin point precision of the drilled holes, formation of the nanometer size microstructures and fine features, and minimally invasive heat affected zone. However, there are many applications such as large surface area dicing, cutting, surface cleaning of Si wafers by ablation, and drilling of relatively large-sized holes where some associated heat affected zone due to melting can be tolerated. In such applications the nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of materials is very

  10. Directional excitation of surface plasmons by dielectric resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Chengjun; Withayachumnankul, Withawat; Shadrivov, Ilya V.; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Fumeaux, Christophe

    2015-02-01

    An important aim of current research on plasmonics is to develop compact components to manipulate surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) and specifically to develop efficient SPP couplers. The commonly used metallic resonators are inefficient to couple free-space waves to SPPs and metallic gratings require oblique incidence for achieving unidirectional propagation. In this article, we propose to use nanoscale nonuniform arrays of dielectric resonator antennas (DRAs) to realize unidirectional launching of SPPs. DRAs are made of low-loss high-permittivity nanostructures operating on a metal surface. The applications of metallodielectric nanostructures can produce resonances mainly in the low-loss dielectric parts and hence the power dissipated through oscillating current in metal can be reduced. Similar to metallic resonators, DRAs operating near resonance can provide phase control when coupling incident waves into SPPs, adding degrees of freedom in controlling propagation direction. The theoretical analysis in this article, with numerical validation, shows efficient SPPs launching by nonuniform array of cylindrical DRAs into a predesigned direction. Furthermore, with proper patterning, optimal launching can be achieved by avoiding power leakage via deflection into free space. The SPP launching condition and the influence of propagation loss are also mathematically analyzed from the viewpoint of antenna array theory. The SPPs launchers based on DRAs have a potential for applications in highly efficient integrated optics and optical waveguides.

  11. Status Of The Dielectric Wall Accelerator For Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, George J.; Chen Yujiuan; Watson, James A.; Blackfield, Don T.; Nelson, Scott D.; Poole, Brian R.; Stanley, Joel R.; Sullivan, James S.

    2011-06-01

    The Dielectric Wall Accelerator (DWA) offers the potential to produce a high gradient linear accelerator for proton therapy and other applications. The current status of the DWA for proton therapy will be reviewed. Recent progress in SiC photoconductive switch development will be presented. There are serious beam transport challenges in the DWA arising from short pulse excitation of the wall. Solutions to these transport difficulties will be discussed.

  12. Nonlinear theory of wakefield excitation in a rectangular multizone dielectric resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galaydych, K. V.; Sotnikov, G. V.

    2011-01-01

    A nonlinear self-consistent theory has been constructed and used to investigate numerically the wakefield excitation in multilayered dielectric resonators by relativistic electron bunches. Analytical expressions for solenoidal and potential components of an excited electromagnetic field have been derived. The excitation of a five-zone dielectric resonator by relativistic electron bunches was numerically investigated and comparison was made between the longitudinal distribution of an axial electric field and the results obtained previously for a corresponding problem in the waveguide formulation. The necessity of optimizing geometrical parameters of the resonator to reduce mode amplitudes nonresonant with a bunch, and to obtain a symmetric distribution of the longitudinal electric field component in the drive and accelerating channels, has been demonstrated.

  13. Mixing Layer Excitation by Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, Richard; Little, Jesse

    2012-11-01

    The response of a mixing layer with velocity ratio 0.28 to perturbations near the high-speed side (U2=11 m/s, ReL = 0.26 × 106) of its origin from dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators is studied experimentally. Both alternating current (ac) and nanosecond (ns) pulse driven plasma are investigated in an effort to clarify the mechanisms associated with each technique as well as the more general physics associated with flow control via momentum-based versus thermal actuation. Ac-DBD plasma actuators, which function through electrohydrodynamic effects, are found to generate an increase in mixing layer momentum thickness that is strongly dependent on forcing frequency. Results are qualitatively similar to previous archival literature on the topic employing oscillating flaps. Ns-DBD plasma, which is believed to function through thermal effects, has no measureable influence on the mixing layer profile at similar forcing conditions. In the context of previous archival literature, these results suggest different physical mechanisms govern active control via ac- and ns-DBD plasma actuation and more generally, momentum versus thermal perturbations. Further investigation of these phenomena will be provided through variation of the boundary/mixing layer properties and forcing parameters in the context of spatially and temporally resolved experimental data. Supported by: AFOSR and Raytheon Missile Systems.

  14. The source of THz radiation based on dielectric waveguide excited by sequence of electron bunches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altmark, A. M.; Kanareykin, A. D.

    2016-07-01

    We present a new method for excitation of THz Cherenkov radiation in a dielectric waveguide by relativistic electron bunches. A sequence of bunches generates monochromatic radiation. The frequency of radiation is defined by the distance between the bunches. The studies were carried by using the newly updated BBU-3000 code which permits taking into account a number of additional options: an external quadrupole focusing system, group velocity of the wakefield, and the dielectric material loss factor. In this paper, we present our algorithm for optimizing the number and sequential positions of bunches for generation of narrow band high power THz radiation.

  15. Long pulse production from short pulses

    DOEpatents

    Toeppen, J.S.

    1994-08-02

    A method of producing a long output pulse from a short pump pulse is disclosed, using an elongated amplified fiber having a doped core that provides an amplifying medium for light of one color when driven into an excited state by light of a shorter wavelength and a surrounding cladding. A seed beam of the longer wavelength is injected into the core at one end of the fiber and a pump pulse of the shorter wavelength is injected into the cladding at the other end of the fiber. The counter-propagating seed beam and pump pulse will produce an amplified output pulse having a time duration equal to twice the transit time of the pump pulse through the fiber plus the length of the pump pulse. 3 figs.

  16. Long pulse production from short pulses

    DOEpatents

    Toeppen, John S.

    1994-01-01

    A method of producing a long output pulse (SA) from a short pump pulse (P), using an elongated amplified fiber (11) having a doped core (12) that provides an amplifying medium for light of one color when driven into an excited state by light of a shorter wavelength and a surrounding cladding 13. A seed beam (S) of the longer wavelength is injected into the core (12) at one end of the fiber (11) and a pump pulse (P) of the shorter wavelength is injected into the cladding (13) at the other end of the fiber (11). The counter-propagating seed beam (S) and pump pulse (P) will produce an amplified output pulse (SA) having a time duration equal to twice the transit time of the pump pulse (P) through the fiber (11) plus the length of the pump pulse (P).

  17. Wakefield Excitation by a Sequence of Electron Bunches in a Rectangular Waveguide Lined with Dielectric Slabs

    SciTech Connect

    Kiselev, V. A.; Linnik, A. F.; Onishchenko, I. N.; Onishchenko, N. I.; Sotnikov, G. V.; Uskov, V. V.; Marshall, T. C.

    2006-11-27

    A rectangular dielectric-lined metallic structure was studied that has an advantage over a cylindrical structure from the possibility of exciting by a sequence of bunches many equally-spaced modes, thereby building up a larger mode-locked wakefield. A rectangular vacuum copper waveguide was lined with two dielectric slabs, the size of which was calculated to provide resonant excitation of the fundamental LSM mode by a sequence of bunches with repetition frequency f0=2805 MHz, produced by linear resonant electron accelerator (4.5 MeV, number of bunches 6.103, diameter 1cm, duration 60 ps each, distance between bunches 300 ps, number of electrons in each bunch 109). The waveguide has cross section 85 mm x 180 mm, and Teflon ({epsilon} 2.1) plates were placed along the smaller sides of the waveguide, their thickness from the calculation being 22 mm. In experiments, the length of the resonator was 535mm. We found that the total wakefield is three times larger than the fundamental mode; thus a greater number of excited modes was excited compared with the cylindrical case, for which this ratio was only 1.5. We found considerably more energy loss of electron bunches for the resonator case compared with the waveguide case.

  18. Medical applications of ultra-short pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B M; Marion, J E

    1999-06-08

    The medical applications for ultra short pulse lasers (USPLs) and their associated commercial potential are reviewed. Short pulse lasers offer the surgeon the possibility of precision cutting or disruption of tissue with virtually no thermal or mechanical damage to the surrounding areas. Therefore the USPL offers potential improvement to numerous existing medical procedures. Secondly, when USPLs are combined with advanced tissue diagnostics, there are possibilities for tissue-selective precision ablation that may allow for new surgeries that cannot at present be performed. Here we briefly review the advantages of short pulse lasers, examine the potential markets both from an investment community perspective, and from the view. of the technology provider. Finally nominal performance and cost requirements for the lasers, delivery systems and diagnostics and the present state of development will be addressed.

  19. High frequency excitation waveform for efficient operation of a xenon excimer dielectric barrier discharge lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beleznai, Sz; Mihajlik, G.; Maros, I.; Balázs, L.; Richter, P.

    2010-01-01

    The application of a high frequency (~2.5 MHz) burst (amplitude-modulated sinusoidal) excitation voltage waveform is investigated for driving a fluorescent dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) light source. The excitation waveform presents a novel method for generating spatially stable homogeneous Xe DBD possessing a high conversion efficiency from electrical energy to VUV Xe_{2}^{\\ast} excimer radiation (~172 nm), even at a significantly higher electrical energy deposition than realized by pulsed excitation. Simulation and experimental results predict discharge efficiencies around 60%. Lamp efficacy above 74 lm W-1 has been achieved. VUV emission and loss mechanisms are investigated extensively and the performance of burst and pulsed waveforms is compared both theoretically and experimentally.

  20. Cylindrical short-pulse Child-Langmuir law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Wee Shing

    2005-10-01

    Laser-driven short pulses have been prevalently used in photo-injectors to produce extremely high current densities. If the pulse length of the short-pulse current is less than the transit time across the gap, the space-charge-limiting (SCL) current density of the electron beam exceeds that of the classical long-pulse limit as given by the Child-Langmuir (CL) Law. The 1D short-pulse CL law for a planar electrode has been derived with verification from PIC simulation [1]. The extension to the 2D and 3D models of the short-pulse CL law has also been presented recently [2]. In the long pulse limit, the 2D and 3D CL laws for both planar and cylindrical diodes have also been developed [3]. In this paper, we will present the 1D and 2D short-pulse CL law in the coaxial cylinder configuration for both convergent and divergent flows. The analytical results will be compared with 2D PIC simulation results. [1] 'Ag'ust Valfells et. al. , ``Effects of pulse-length and emitter area in virtual cathode formation in electron guns'', Phys. Plasmas 9, 2377 (2002). [2] W. S. Koh and L. K. Ang, "Two-dimensional Short-Pulse Chid-Langmuir Law", The 32nd International Conference on Plasma Science (ICOPS), N05CH37707, 3P38, pp. 298 (2005).[3] W. S. Koh, et. al., Three-dimensional Child-Langmuir law for hot electron emission, Phys. Plasmas 12, 053107 (2005). Email: elkang@ntu.edu.sg

  1. Transient Scattering from Bodies of Revolution with Applications in Short-Pulse Reflector Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Allen Tan-Sen

    This dissertation studies the transient scattering from bodies of revolution (BOR). The work presents two distinct integral formulations for analyzing a wide variety of BOR configurations, numerous scattering examples to better understand the transient scattering phenomena, and two reflector antennas geometries suitable for ultra-wideband radar applications. The March-on-Time (MOT) method and an Inverse Discrete Fourier Transform (IDFT) method are both examined and fully developed to determine their capabilities in analyzing a wide variety of BOR configurations. The IDFT approach is ultimately selected over the MOT for our particular applications. This method transforms the transient scattering problem into the frequency domain where a Moment Method formulation with entire-domain basis functions then determines the equivalent surface currents induced on the scatterer. Once the electromagnetic field radiated by these currents are computed in the frequency domain, they are returned back to the time domain using Fast-Fourier Transform (FFT) techniques. The IDFT analysis technique is used to examine the transient scattering behavior of representative scatterers. Many scatterer geometries are considered, among them perfect conductors, dielectric bodies, dielectric-coated conductors, and multi-body scatterers. The edge diffraction behavior of perfectly conducting scatterers, as well as the scattering characteristics of dielectric spheres made of different dielectric constants and lossy materials, are also studied. Other examples considered are metal scatterers coated with a layer of lossy dispersive material. The last part of this work pertains to the design of reflector antennas for short-pulse radiation. Its main objective is to present representative single- and dual -reflector antennas capable of radiating a collimated user -specified short pulse in the far-zone region. The double -Gaussian time pulse serves as the desired radiated waveform in this section of the

  2. Fiber Laser Front Ends for High Energy, Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J; Messerly, M; Phan, H; Siders, C; Beach, R; Barty, C

    2007-06-21

    We are developing a fiber laser system for short pulse (1-10ps), high energy ({approx}1kJ) glass laser systems. Fiber lasers are ideal for these systems as they are highly reliable and enable long term stable operation.

  3. Oscillatory penetration of near-fields in plasmonic excitation at metal-dielectric interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. C.; Kang, J. H.; Park, Q.-H.; Krishna, S.; Brueck, S. R. J.

    2016-04-01

    The electric field immediately below an illuminated metal-film that is perforated with a hole array on a dielectric consists of direct transmission and scattering of the incident light through the holes and evanescent near-field from plasmonic excitations. Depending on the size and shape of the hole apertures, it exhibits an oscillatory decay in the propagation direction. This unusual field penetration is explained by the interference between these contributions, and is experimentally confirmed through an aperture which is engineered with four arms stretched out from a simple circle to manipulate a specific plasmonic excitation available in the metal film. A numerical simulation quantitatively supports the experiment. This fundamental characteristic will impact plasmonics with the near-fields designed by aperture engineering for practical applications.

  4. 3D Analysis of Wake Field Excitation in a Dielectric Loaded Rectangular Resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Sotnikov, Gennadij V.; Onishchenko, Ivan N.; Marshall, Thomas C.

    2006-11-27

    The results of a three-dimensional analysis of wake field excitation in a slab-symmetric dielectric-loaded resonator by rigid electron bunches are presented. The complete set of solutions, including the solenoidal and potential parts of the electromagnetic field, consists of LSM and LSE modes. Each of the LSM and LSE modes contains odd and even waves. A numerical analysis of wake field excitation by symmetric electron bunches is carried out. The three-dimensional spatial structure of the longitudinal electric field is investigated. The influence of the drift vacuum channel on the wake field amplitude and on the coherent summation of wakefields for a regular sequence of bunches is studied.

  5. Oscillatory penetration of near-fields in plasmonic excitation at metal-dielectric interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S. C.; Kang, J. H.; Park, Q-H.; Krishna, S.; Brueck, S. R. J.

    2016-01-01

    The electric field immediately below an illuminated metal-film that is perforated with a hole array on a dielectric consists of direct transmission and scattering of the incident light through the holes and evanescent near-field from plasmonic excitations. Depending on the size and shape of the hole apertures, it exhibits an oscillatory decay in the propagation direction. This unusual field penetration is explained by the interference between these contributions, and is experimentally confirmed through an aperture which is engineered with four arms stretched out from a simple circle to manipulate a specific plasmonic excitation available in the metal film. A numerical simulation quantitatively supports the experiment. This fundamental characteristic will impact plasmonics with the near-fields designed by aperture engineering for practical applications. PMID:27090841

  6. Electron current extraction from radio frequency excited micro-dielectric barrier discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jun-Chieh; Kushner, Mark J.; Leoni, Napoleon; Birecki, Henryk; Gila, Omer

    2013-01-21

    Micro dielectric barrier discharges (mDBDs) consist of micro-plasma devices (10-100 {mu}m diameter) in which the electrodes are fully or partially covered by dielectrics, and often operate at atmospheric pressure driven with radio frequency (rf) waveforms. In certain applications, it may be desirable to extract electron current out of the mDBD plasma, which necessitates a third electrode. As a result, the physical structure of the m-DBD and the electron emitting properties of its materials are important to its operation. In this paper, results from a two-dimensional computer simulation of current extraction from mDBDs sustained in atmospheric pressure N{sub 2} will be discussed. The mDBDs are sandwich structures with an opening of tens-of-microns excited with rf voltage waveforms of up to 25 MHz. Following avalanche by electron impact ionization in the mDBD cavity, the plasma can be expelled from the cavity towards the extraction electrode during the part of the rf cycle when the extraction electrode appears anodic. The electron current extraction can be enhanced by biasing this electrode. The charge collection can be controlled by choice of rf frequency, rf driving voltage, and permittivity of the dielectric barrier.

  7. Dimensionality of electronic excitations in organic semiconductors: A dielectric function approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campoy-Quiles, Mariano; Nelson, Jenny; Bradley, Donal D. C.; Etchegoin, Pablo G.

    2007-12-01

    We present a detailed investigation on the effective dimensionality (associated with the degree of delocalization) of electronic excitations in thin organic films using the dielectric function as obtained from ellipsometry. To this end, we study first the best analytical representation of the optical dielectric function of these materials and compare different approaches found in the literature: (i) the harmonic oscillator approximation, (ii) the standard critical-point model (SCP), (iii) the model dielectric function (MDF), and (iv) the Forouhi-Bloomer model. We use these models to analyze variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry raw data for a thin poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene) (PFO) film deposited on quartz (taken as an archetypal sample). The superiority of the SCP model for PFO films and a wide range of other spin-coated conjugated polymers (and guest-molecules in polymers) is demonstrated. Moreover, we show how the SCP model can be used to gain physical information on the microscopic structure. As an example, we show that the delocalization of excitons decreases for nonconjugated polymers, such as polymethylmethacrylate and polyimide, while the conjugation length and exciton delocalization are, respectively, enhanced in cases where a planar conformation (e.g., β phase of PFO) or a high degree of crystallinity [e.g., poly(3-hexylthiophene)] is achieved. As an additional example, we employ the SCP excitonic model to investigate the temperature dependence of the dielectric function of crystalline and glassy PFO films. We propose that the SCP excitonic model should be adopted as the standard choice to model the optical properties of polymer thin films from ellipsometry data.

  8. Microwave short-pulse bed-level detector. Annual report, January 1-December 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Balanis, C.A.; Delauder, D.M.

    1981-01-01

    A short-pulse microwave system for measuring the bed-level within a fluidized-bed combustor, has been designed, built, and laboratory tested on static beds. The system is a short-pulse radar which operates in the frequency region of 6.75 to 10.95 GHz as a time-domain measurement system. Laboratory measurements of static bed-levels, for smooth and corrugated surfaces of metal plates and limestone sand, agree to an average of 2.0% of the actual heights. Additionally, the system was tested with a dielectric thermal protector, which did not compromise the accuracy of the measurements. Analytical models have been formulated to provide insight into the operation of the system on a wide range of simulated targets without the necessity of performing expensive and difficult laboratory experiments. Two formulations have been used to describe electromagnetic scattering by a rough surface as a function of frequency: the space harmonic model and the physical optics model. A reconstruction technique has been devised which uses the scattering models and the spectrum of the transmitted pulse to synthesize the reflected pulse. The data generated by the models compare well to previously published data and to experimental results.

  9. Approximate analytical solution for waveguide excitation of a plane dielectric layer by a Gaussian beam at frustrated total internal reflection.

    PubMed

    Serdyuk, Vladimir; Rudnitsky, Anton

    2015-05-01

    We present an approximate 2D asymptotic analytic theory of light field excitation in a plane thin dielectric layer under conditions of frustrated total internal reflection, when an inclined Gaussian beam, falling from a triangular prism, excites a decaying field in air spacing between a prism and a plane dielectric. Ignoring the radiation scattering on the sharp edges of a prism, we have obtained the formulas that allow us to compute spatial structures of an electromagnetic field in every point of space and to estimate the integral efficiency of waveguide mode excitation in a plane dielectric layer and the total energy of a reflected beam. It is shown that the width of an initial Gaussian beam has an effect on waveguide mode intensity. PMID:26366908

  10. Short Pulse Experimental Capability at the Nike Laser Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, J. L.; Chan, Y.; Gardner, J.; Giuliani, J.; Karasik, M.; Kehne, D.; Mostovych, A.; Obenschain, S.; Velikovich, A.; Schmitt, A.; Serlin, V.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Metzler, N.; Smyth, Z.; Terrell, S.

    2004-11-01

    Recent simulations demonstrated high gain for direct drive pellets compressed by a laser pulse incorporating a short pulse prior to the main pulse. Theoretical work has also shown that a short prepulse can create a tailored density profile that reduces the initial instability growth due to laser imprinting. A new short pulse (0.35-0.75 ns FWHM)is being added to the Nike KrF laser system to facilitate hydrodynamic experiments with short prepulses. This capability has been incorporated into the initial stages of the laser system and the propagation of these pulses through the angularly multiplexed amplifiers is being studied. Measurements of pulse shape and energy will be compared to simulations using the KrF physics code Orestes for the next to last amplifier of the laser system, the 20 cm x 20 cm e-beam pumped laser cell. The effects of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) upon individual output pulses will be also discussed.

  11. Application of Yb:YAG short pulse laser system

    DOEpatents

    Erbert, Gaylen V.; Biswal, Subrat; Bartolick, Joseph M.; Stuart, Brent C.; Crane, John K.; Telford, Steve; Perry, Michael D.

    2004-07-06

    A diode pumped, high power (at least 20W), short pulse (up to 2 ps), chirped pulse amplified laser using Yb:YAG as the gain material is employed for material processing. Yb:YAG is used as the gain medium for both a regenerative amplifier and a high power 4-pass amplifier. A single common reflective grating optical device is used to both stretch pulses for amplification purposes and to recompress amplified pulses before being directed to a workpiece.

  12. PHASE NOISE COMPARISON OF SHORT PULSE LASER SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Shukui Zhang; Stephen Benson; John Hansknecht; David Hardy; George Neil; Michelle D. Shinn

    2006-08-27

    This paper describes phase noise measurements of several different laser systems that have completely different gain media and configurations including a multi-kW free-electron laser. We will focus on state-of-the-art short pulse lasers, especially drive lasers for photocathode injectors. Phase noise comparison of the FEL drive laser, electron beam and FEL laser output also will be presented.

  13. Phase Noise Comparision of Short Pulse Laser Systems

    SciTech Connect

    S. Zhang; S. V. Benson; J. Hansknecht; D. Hardy; G. Neil; Michelle D. Shinn

    2006-12-01

    This paper describes the phase noise measurement on several different mode-locked laser systems that have completely different gain media and configurations including a multi-kW free-electron laser. We will focus on the state of the art short pulse lasers, especially the drive lasers for photocathode injectors. A comparison between the phase noise of the drive laser pulses, electron bunches and FEL pulses will also be presented.

  14. Transient thermal and nonthermal electron and phonon relaxation after short-pulsed laser heating of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Giri, Ashutosh; Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2015-12-07

    Several dynamic thermal and nonthermal scattering processes affect ultrafast heat transfer in metals after short-pulsed laser heating. Even with decades of measurements of electron-phonon relaxation, the role of thermal vs. nonthermal electron and phonon scattering on overall electron energy transfer to the phonons remains unclear. In this work, we derive an analytical expression for the electron-phonon coupling factor in a metal that includes contributions from equilibrium and nonequilibrium distributions of electrons. While the contribution from the nonthermal electrons to electron-phonon coupling is non-negligible, the increase in the electron relaxation rates with increasing laser fluence measured by thermoreflectance techniques cannot be accounted for by only considering electron-phonon relaxations. We conclude that electron-electron scattering along with electron-phonon scattering have to be considered simultaneously to correctly predict the transient nature of electron relaxation during and after short-pulsed heating of metals at elevated electron temperatures. Furthermore, for high electron temperature perturbations achieved at high absorbed laser fluences, we show good agreement between our model, which accounts for d-band excitations, and previous experimental data. Our model can be extended to other free electron metals with the knowledge of the density of states of electrons in the metals and considering electronic excitations from non-Fermi surface states.

  15. Modeling and simulation of ultra-short pulse amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pflaum, Christoph; Hartmann, Rainer; Rahimi, Zhabiz

    2016-03-01

    Ultra-short pulses with high average power are required for a variety of technical and medical applications. Single, multi-pass, and regenerative amplifiers are used, in order to increase the power of ultra-short lasers. Typical laser crystals for such amplifiers include Ti:Sapphire or Yb:YAG laser crystals. Difficulties in the amplification of ultra-short pulses include gain narrowing effects and dispersion effects in the laser crystal. In particular, these complications arise, when a pulse stretcher is needed before amplification of the laser beam. We present a technique to model and simulate the amplification of ultra-short pulses. This technique allows to model both gain narrowing effects and decrease of beam quality caused by amplification of the laser beam. This requires a detailed 3-dimensional simulation of population inversion. Gain narrowing effects are taken into account by analyzing the gain of the spectrum of the laser beam. It is important to distinguish amplifiers with one or only two passes and a regenerative amplifier. These two different kind of amplifiers are modeled by different approaches. A regenerative amplifier is modeled by a set of time dependent rate equations. However, a single pass amplifier is modeled by a set of spatial dependent rate equations. In both cases, a system of rate equations arises from spectral discretization of the laser beam. Detailed simulation results are presented.

  16. Dynamic analysis of a tunable viscoelastic dielectric elastomer oscillator under external excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jianyou; Jiang, Liying; Khayat, Roger E.

    2016-02-01

    As a category of soft electroactive materials, dielectric elastomers (DEs) show great potential for the development of tunable oscillators and resonators for actuating and sensing purposes. However, the dynamic performance of these DE-based vibration devices could be very susceptible to external environment (external loads and excitations) and material viscoelasticity of the DEs. Based on the finite-deformation viscoelasticity theory, this work first investigates the frequency tuning process of a viscoelastic DE membrane oscillator. A comparison of the frequency tuning process and the tunable frequency range between a viscoelastic and a purely elastic DE oscillator is presented. Moreover, particular considerations have been given to the nonlinear response of the oscillator to external harmonic excitation. It is found that the displacement transmissibility of the oscillator can also be actively tuned by changing the static voltage applied to the DE membrane. Under harmonic excitation, various vibration patterns of the oscillator could be actively achieved with the application of both static and alternating electric voltage. Simulation results in this work demonstrate that the material viscoelasticity has a significant effect on the electromechanical coupling and the dynamic performance of the DE-based vibration devices.

  17. High-repetition-rate short-pulse gas discharge.

    PubMed

    Tulip, J; Seguin, H; Mace, P N

    1979-09-01

    A high-average-power short-pulse gas discharge is described. This consists of a volume-preionized transverse discharge of the type used in gas lasers driven by a Blumlein energy storage circuit. The Blumlein circuit is fabricated from coaxial cable, is pulse-charged from a high-repetition-rate Marx-bank generator, and is switched by a high-repetition-rate segmented rail gap. The operation of this discharge under conditions typical of rare-gas halide lasers is described. A maximum of 900 pps was obtained, giving a power flow into the discharge of 30 kW. PMID:18699678

  18. Ultra-short pulse propagation in complex optical systems.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Ulrike; Zeitner, Uwe; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2005-05-16

    In application of ultra-short laser pulses the pulse parameters have to be controlled accurately. Hence the manipulation of the propagation behavior of ultra-short pulses requires for specially designed optics. We have developed a tool for the simulation of ultra-short laser pulse propagation through complex real optical systems based on a combination of ray-tracing and wave optical propagation methods. For the practical implementation of the approach two commercially available software packages have been linked together, which are ZEMAX and Virtual Optics Lab. The focussing properties of different lenses will be analyzed and the results are demonstrated. PMID:19495292

  19. Ultra short pulse generation and reshaping using highly nonlinear fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, S.; Namiki, S.; Inoue, T.; Oguri, A.; Akutsu, T.; Shinozaki, J.; Ozeki, Y.; Takasaka, S.; Igarashi, K.; Sakano, M.; Yagi, T.

    2005-11-01

    We experimentally investigate the generation of a low-noise ultra short pulse train from 40GHz to160GHz by using Comb-like profiled fiber (CPF) for adiabatic soliton conversion and compression. Highly nonlinear fibers allow us to reduce total length of CPF as well as to utilize Kerr effect in the fiber effectively. We demonstrate generations of 160GHz soliton train of 750fs, the compression to 500fs of 40GHz externally-modulated pulse with wideband tunability over 30nm. Then we apply the CPF pulse compression technique to achieve the programmable repetition tunability from 5 to 500 MHz in low pedestral 300fs pulse train generation.

  20. Short-Pulse Laser-Matter Computational Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Town, R; Tabak, M

    2004-11-02

    For three days at the end of August 2004, 55 plasma scientists met at the Four Points by Sheraton in Pleasanton to discuss some of the critical issues associated with the computational aspects of the interaction of short-pulse high-intensity lasers with matter. The workshop was organized around the following six key areas: (1) Laser propagation/interaction through various density plasmas: micro scale; (2) Anomalous electron transport effects: From micro to meso scale; (3) Electron transport through plasmas: From meso to macro scale; (4) Ion beam generation, transport, and focusing; (5) ''Atomic-scale'' electron and proton stopping powers; and (6) K{alpha} diagnostics.

  1. Development of short pulse soft x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Da Silva, L.B.; MacGowan, B.J.; Koch, J.A.; Mrowka, S.; Matthews, D.L.; Eder, D.; London, R.

    1993-02-01

    X-ray lasers with pulse duration shorter than 20 ps allow the possibility of imaging laser produced plasmas with {mu}m resolution. In addition, the high peak brightness of these new sources will allow us to study nonlinear optics in the xuv region. In this paper we will describe our efforts to produce collisionally pumped short pulse x-ray lasers. Initial results, which have produced {approximately} 45 ps (FWHM) x-ray lasers, using a double pulse irradiation technique are presented along with a discussion of the prospects for reducing the pulse width.

  2. Industrial beam delivery system for ultra-short pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funck, Max C.; Wedel, Björn; Kayander, Ilya; Niemeyer, Jörg

    2015-03-01

    Beam delivery systems are an integral part of industrial laser equipment. Separating laser source and application fiber optic beam delivery is employed wherever great flexibility is required. And today, fiber optic beam delivery of several kW average power is available for continuous wave operation using multimode step index fibers with core diameters of several 100 μm. However, during short-pulse or even ultra-short pulse laser operation step index fibers fail due to high power density levels and nonlinear effects such as self-focusing and induced scattering. Hollow core photonic crystal fibers (HC-PCF) are an alternative to traditional fibers featuring light propagation mostly inside a hollow core, enabling high power handling and drastically reduced nonlinear effects. These fibers have become available during the past decade and are used in research but also for fiber laser systems and exhibit a growing popularity. We report on using HC-PCF fibers and their integration into an industrial beam delivery package comparable to today's fiber optic standards and will discuss power handling, beam quality and efficiency as well as future prospects of this technology. In a preliminary industrial beam delivery setup 300 fs pulses at 100 W average power could be delivered.

  3. Short pulse generation by laser slicing at NSLSII

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, L.; Blednykh, A.; Guo, W.; Krinsky, S.; Li, Y.; Shaftan, T.; Tchoubar, O.; Wang, G.; Willeke, F.; Yang, L.

    2011-03-28

    We discuss an upgrade R&D project for NSLSII to generate sub-pico-second short x-ray pulses using laser slicing. We discuss its basic parameters and present a specific example for a viable design and its performance. Since the installation of the laser slicing system into the storage ring will break the symmetry of the lattice, we demonstrate it is possible to recover the dynamical aperture to the original design goal of the ring. There is a rapid growth of ultrafast user community interested in science using sub-pico-second x-ray pulses. In BNL's Short Pulse Workshop, the discussion from users shows clearly the need for a sub-pico-second pulse source using laser slicing method. In the proposal submitted following this workshop, NSLS team proposed both hard x-ray and soft x-ray beamlines using laser slicing pulses. Hence there is clearly a need to consider the R&D efforts of laser slicing short pulse generation at NSLSII to meet these goals.

  4. Making relativistic positrons using ultraintense short pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Hui; Wilks, S. C.; Bonlie, J. D.; Chen, S. N.; Cone, K. V.; Elberson, L. N.; Price, D. F.; Schneider, M. B.; Shepherd, R.; Stafford, D. C.; Tommasini, R.; Van Maren, R.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Gregori, G.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Myatt, J.

    2009-12-15

    This paper describes a new positron source using ultraintense short pulse lasers. Although it has been theoretically studied since the 1970s, the use of lasers as a valuable new positron source was not demonstrated experimentally until recent years, when the petawatt-class short pulse lasers were developed. In 2008 and 2009, in a series of experiments performed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a large number of positrons were observed after shooting a millimeter thick solid gold target. Up to 2x10{sup 10} positrons/s ejected at the back of approximately millimeter thick gold targets were detected. The targets were illuminated with short (approx1 ps) ultraintense (approx1x10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}) laser pulses. These positrons are produced predominantly by the Bethe-Heitler process and have an effective temperature of 2-4 MeV, with the distribution peaking at 4-7 MeV. The angular distribution of the positrons is anisotropic. For a wide range of applications, this new laser-based positron source with its unique characteristics may complement the existing sources based on radioactive isotopes and accelerators.

  5. Making Relativistic Positrons Using Ultra-Intense Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Wilks, S; Bonlie, J; Chen, C; Chen, S; Cone, K; Elberson, L; Gregori, G; Liang, E; Price, D; Van Maren, R; Meyerhofer, D D; Mithen, J; Murphy, C V; Myatt, J; Schneider, M; Shepherd, R; Stafford, D; Tommasini, R; Beiersdorfer, P

    2009-08-24

    This paper describes a new positron source produced using ultra-intense short pulse lasers. Although it has been studied in theory since as early as the 1970s, the use of lasers as a valuable new positron source was not demonstrated experimentally until recent years, when the petawatt-class short pulse lasers were developed. In 2008 and 2009, in a series of experiments performed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a large number of positrons were observed after shooting a millimeter thick solid gold target. Up to 2 x 10{sup 10} positrons per steradian ejected out the back of {approx}mm thick gold targets were detected. The targets were illuminated with short ({approx}1 ps) ultra-intense ({approx}1 x 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}) laser pulses. These positrons are produced predominantly by the Bethe-Heitler process, and have an effective temperature of 2-4 MeV, with the distribution peaking at 4-7 MeV. The angular distribution of the positrons is anisotropic. For a wide range of applications, this new laser based positron source with its unique characteristics may complements the existing sources using radioactive isotopes and accelerators.

  6. Transient Self-Amplified Cerenkov Radiation with a Short Pulse Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, B R; Blackfield, D T; Camacho, J F

    2009-01-22

    An analytic and numerical examination of the slow wave Cerenkov free electron maser is presented. We consider the steady state amplifier configuration as well as operation in the selfamplified spontaneous emission (SASE) regime. The linear theory is extended to include electron beams that have a parabolic radial density inhomogeneity. Closed form solutions for the dispersion relation and modal structure of the electromagnetic field are determined in this inhomogeneous case. To determine the steady state response, a macro-particle approach is used to develop a set of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations for the amplitude and phase of the electromagnetic wave, which are solved in conjunction with the particle dynamical equations to determine the response when the system is driven as an amplifier with a time harmonic source. We then consider the case in which a fast rise time electron beam is injected into a dielectric loaded waveguide. In this case, radiation is generated by SASE, with the instability seeded by the leading edge of the electron beam. A pulse of radiation is produced, slipping behind the leading edge of the beam due to the disparity between the group velocity of the radiation and the beam velocity. Short pulses of microwave radiation are generated in the SASE regime and are investigated using particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The nonlinear dynamics are significantly more complicated in the transient SASE regime when compared with the steady state amplifier model due to the slippage of the radiation with respect to the beam. As strong self-bunching of the electron beam develops due to SASE, short pulses of superradiant emission develop with peak powers significantly larger than the predicted saturated power based on the steady state amplifier model. As these superradiant pulses grow, their pulse length decreases and forms a series of soliton-like pulses. Comparisons between the linear theory, macro-particle model, and PIC simulations are

  7. Certain considerations in aperture synthesis of ultrawideband/short-pulse radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyman, Ehud; Melamed, Timor

    1994-04-01

    We consider certain characteristics of the radiation from collimated, ultrawideband short-pulse aperture distributions. It is shown that an efficient radiation must account for the multifrequency nature of the field. Two alternative schemes for wideband aperture synthesis of an impulse-like radiation pattern are examined. The first, entitled the 'iso-width aperture,' utilizes only temporal shaping of the excitation pulse. In the other, the 'iso-diffracting aperture,' we suggest source shaping in space-time so that all the frequency components in the field have the same collimation distance. The 'iso-diffracting' scheme yields higher directivity and more efficient pulsed radiation. Explicit examples for the pulsed source distribution and for the pulsed radiation patterns are presented, parametrized, and contrasted.

  8. Transient excitation of two coupled wires over an interface between two dielectric half spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio Bretones, Amelia; Tijhuis, Anton G.

    1997-01-01

    The transient excitation of two identical, straight, thin wire antennas above a plane interface between two homogeneous dielectric half spaces is analyzed. The two wires are located parallel to each other and to the interface, and one of them is excited by a voltage source. By applying symmetry considerations, the problem is decomposed into two single-wire problems, for which a method of solution is available from previous work by the authors [Rubio Bretones and Tijhuis, 1995]. The problem is solved in two steps. First, the configuration of two wires in a homogeneous medium is studied. The electric field integral equation for the total current on the wires is derived directly in the time domain and subsequently solved by using the continuous-time discretized-space approach. This results in a linear system of equations of a fixed dimension which is solved by marching on in frequency. Subsequently, we consider the complete configuration. As in our previous work, the field reflected by the interface is treated as a secondary incident field in the integral equation for the currents on the two wires. This leads to an integral equation of a form similar to the one describing the currents on the two wires in free space. In this equation the response of a pulsed dipole source in the two-media configuration occurs as a Green's function. The spatial Fourier inversion involved is carried out with the aid of a fixed composite Gaussian quadature rule. This again leads to a system of equations of a fixed dimension, which can be solved by marching on in frequency. Finally, some representative numerical results are presented and discussed.

  9. Modelling hot electron generation in short pulse target heating experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sircombe, N. J.; Hughes, S. J.

    2013-11-01

    Target heating experiments planned for the Orion laser facility, and electron beam driven fast ignition schemes, rely on the interaction of a short pulse high intensity laser with dense material to generate a flux of energetic electrons. It is essential that the characteristics of this electron source are well known in order to inform transport models in radiation hydrodynamics codes and allow effective evaluation of experimental results and forward modelling of future campaigns. We present results obtained with the particle in cell (PIC) code EPOCH for realistic target and laser parameters, including first and second harmonic light. The hot electron distributions are characterised and their implications for onward transport and target heating are considered with the aid of the Monte-Carlo transport code THOR.

  10. Stimulated brillouin backscatter of a short-pulse laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkel, D.E.; Williams, E.A.; Berger, R.L.

    1994-11-03

    Stimulated Brillouin backscattering (SBBS) from a short-pulse laser, where the pulse length is short compared to the plasma length, is found to be qualitatively different than in the long pulse regime, where the pulse length is long compared to the plasma length. We find that after an initial transient of order the laser pulse length transit time, the instability reaches a steady state in the variables x{prime} = x {minus} V{sub g}t, t{prime} = t, where V{sub g} is the pulse group velocity. In contrast, SBBS in a long pulse can be absolutely unstable and grows indefinitely, or until nonlinearities intervene. We find that the motion of the laser pulse induces Doppler related effects that substantially modify the backscattered spectrum at higher intensities, where the instability is strongly coupled (i.e. , has a growth rate large compared to the ion acoustic frequency).

  11. Ultra-short Pulse Laser Structuring of Molding Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Daniel; Richter, Lars

    The machining of highly filled abrasive polymer plastics in injection molding processes determines high resistant tools in the industrial production. One of the most important points is a long durability of the molding tools to reduce the costs of production. Thus, the adhesion force and abrasion will be reduced with the help of defined surface properties. To achieve appropriate surface conditions, an ultra-short pulse laser is used for a micro structuring. Additional a laser polishing of the micro-structured surfaces to optimize the frictional properties is presented. This paper shows the research results of investigations on the laser modification of steel surfaces, to generate high-quality and wear-resistant surfaces for injection molding tools.

  12. Short-pulse laser removal of organic coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, Craig T.

    2000-08-01

    A major problem in the regular maintenance of aerospace systems is the removal of paint and other protective coatings from surfaces without polluting the atmosphere or endangering workers. Recent research has demonstrated that many organic coatings can be removed from surfaces efficiently using short laser pulses without the use of any chemical agents. The lasers employed in this study were repetitively-pulsed neodymium YAG devices operating at 1064 nm (15 - 30 ns, 10 - 20 Hz). The efficiency of removal can be cast in terms of an effective heat of ablation, Q* (kJ of laser energy incident per g of paint removed), although, for short pulses, the mechanism of removal is believed to be dominated more by thermo- mechanical or shock effects than by photo-ablation. Q* data were collected as a function of pulse fluence for several paint types. For many paint types, there was a fairly sharp threshold fluence per pulse near 1 J/cm2, above which Q* values dropped to levels which were a factor of four lower than those observed for long- pulse or continuous laser ablation of paint. In this regime, the coating is removed in fairly large particles or, in the case of one paint, the entire thickness of the coating was removed over the exposed area in one pulse. Hardware for implementing short-pulse laser paint stripping in the field is under development and will be highlighted in the presentation. Practical paint stripping rates achieved using the prototype hardware are presented for several paint types.

  13. Voyager 0.2-lbf thruster valve assembly short pulse test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    The short pulse width testing completed on the Voyager 0.2-lbf thruster value assemblies (T/VA's) and the disassembly and inspection of T/VA S/N 020 is reported. The purpose for performing the short pulse width testing on Voyager 0.2-lbf thruster valve assemblies (T/VA's) was to determine: (1) impulse bit versus electrical pulse width; (2) impulse bit variations versus electrical pulse width; and (3) whether the short pulses decrease thruster life.

  14. Effect of a Dielectric Overlay on a Linearly Tapered Slot Antenna Excited by a Coplanar Waveguide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Lee, Richard Q.; Perl, Thomas D.; Silvestro, John

    1993-01-01

    The effect of a dielectric overlay on a linearly tapered slot antenna (LTSA) is studied. The LTSA under study has very wide bandwidth and excellent radiation patterns. A dielectric overlay improves the patterns and directivity of the antenna by increasing the electrical length and effective aperture of the antenna. A dielectric overlay can also be used to reduce the physical length of the antenna without compromising the pattern quality.

  15. Ultra-Short Pulsed Laser Engineered Metal-Glass Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stalmashonak, Andrei; Seifert, Gerhard; Abdolvand, Amin

    Glasses and other dielectrics containing metallic nanoparticles are very promising materials for applications in optoelectronics due to their unique linear and non-linear optical properties. These properties are dominated by the strong surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the metal nanoparticles. The SPR occurs when the electron and light waves couple with each other at a metal-dielectric interface. These are regarded as the collective oscillation of the nanoparticle (NP) electrons.

  16. Overview of LANL short-pulse ion acceleration activities

    SciTech Connect

    Flippo, Kirk A.; Schmitt, Mark J.; Offermann, Dustin; Cobble, James A.; Gautier, Donald; Kline, John; Workman, Jonathan; Archuleta, Fred; Gonzales, Raymond; Hurry, Thomas; Johnson, Randall; Letzring, Samuel; Montgomery, David; Reid, Sha-Marie; Shimada, Tsutomu; Gaillard, Sandrine A.; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Bussman, Michael; Kluge, Thomas; Cowan, Thomas E.; Rassuchine, Jenny M.; Lowenstern, Mario E.; Mucino, J. Eduardo; Gall, Brady; Korgan, Grant; Malekos, Steven; Adams, Jesse; Bartal, Teresa; Chawla, Surgreev; Higginson, Drew; Beg, Farhat; Nilson, Phil; Mac Phee, Andrew; Le Pape, Sebastien; Hey, Daniel; Mac Kinnon, Andy; Geissel, Mattias; Schollmeier, Marius; Stephens, Rich

    2009-12-02

    An overview of Los Alamos National Laboratory's activities related to short-pulse ion acceleration is presented. LANL is involved is several projects related to Inertial Confinement Fusion (Fast Ignition) and Laser-Ion Acceleration. LANL has an active high energy X-ray backlighter program for radiographing ICF implosions and other High Energy Density Laboratory Physics experiments. Using the Trident 200TW laser we are currently developing high energy photon (>10 keV) phase contrast imaging techniques to be applied on Omega and the NIF. In addition we are engaged in multiple programs in laser ion acceleration to boost the ion energies and efficiencies for various potential applications including Fast Ignition, active material interrogation, and medical applications. Two basic avenues to increase ion performance are currently under study: one involves ultra-thin targets and the other involves changing the target geometry. We have recently had success in boosting proton energies above 65 MeV into the medical application range. Highlights covered in the presentation include: The Trident Laser System; X-ray Phase Contrast Imaging for ICF and HEDLP; Improving TNSA Ion Acceleration; Scaling Laws; Flat Targets; Thin Targets; Cone Targets; Ion Focusing;Trident; Omega EP; Scaling Comparisons; and, Conclusions.

  17. Photoconductive Semiconductor Switch Technology for Short Pulse Electromagnetics and Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Denison, Gary J.; Helgeson, Wesley D.; Hjalmarson, Harold P.; Loubriel, Guillermo M.; Mar, Alan; O'Malley, Martin W.; Zutavern, Fred J.

    1999-08-05

    High gain photoconductive semiconductor switches (PCSS) are being used to produce high power electromagnetic pulses foc (1) compact, repetitive accelerators, (2) ultra-wide band impulse sources, (3) precision gas switch triggers, (4) optically-activated firesets, and (5) high power optical pulse generation and control. High power, sub-nanosecond optical pulses are used for active optical sensors such as compact optical radars and range-gated hallistic imaging systems. Following a brief introduction to high gain PCSS and its general applications, this paper will focus on PCSS for optical pulse generation and control. PCSS technology can be employed in three distinct approaches to optical pulse generation and control: (1) short pulse carrier injection to induce gain-switching in semiconductor lasers, (2) electro-optical Q-switching, and (3) optically activated Q-switching. The most significant PCSS issues for these applications are switch rise time, jitter, and longevity. This paper will describe both the requirements of these applications and the most recent results from PCSS technology. Experiments to understand and expand the limitations of high gain PCSS will also be described.

  18. Airborne profiling of ice thickness using a short pulse radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vickers, R. S.; Heighway, J. E.; Gedney, R.

    1973-01-01

    The acquisition and interpretation of ice thickness data from a mobile platform has for some time been a goal of the remote sensing community. Such data, once obtainable, is of value in monitoring the changes in ice thickness over large areas, and in mapping the potential hazards to traffic in shipping lanes. Measurements made from a helicopter-borne ice thickness profiler of ice in Lake Superior, Lake St. Clair and the St. Clair river as part of NASA's program to develop an ice information system are described. The profiler described is a high resolution, non-imaging, short pulse radar, operating at a carrier frequency of 2.7 GHz. The system can resolve reflective surfaces separated by as little as 10 cm. and permits measurement of the distance between resolvable surfaces with an accuracy of about 1 cm. Data samples are given for measurements both in a static (helicopter hovering), and a traverse mode. Ground truth measurements taken by an ice auger team traveling with the helicopter are compared with the remotely sensed data and the accuracy of the profiler is discussed based on these measurements.

  19. High Average Power, High Energy Short Pulse Fiber Laser System

    SciTech Connect

    Messerly, M J

    2007-11-13

    Recently continuous wave fiber laser systems with output powers in excess of 500W with good beam quality have been demonstrated [1]. High energy, ultrafast, chirped pulsed fiber laser systems have achieved record output energies of 1mJ [2]. However, these high-energy systems have not been scaled beyond a few watts of average output power. Fiber laser systems are attractive for many applications because they offer the promise of high efficiency, compact, robust systems that are turn key. Applications such as cutting, drilling and materials processing, front end systems for high energy pulsed lasers (such as petawatts) and laser based sources of high spatial coherence, high flux x-rays all require high energy short pulses and two of the three of these applications also require high average power. The challenge in creating a high energy chirped pulse fiber laser system is to find a way to scale the output energy while avoiding nonlinear effects and maintaining good beam quality in the amplifier fiber. To this end, our 3-year LDRD program sought to demonstrate a high energy, high average power fiber laser system. This work included exploring designs of large mode area optical fiber amplifiers for high energy systems as well as understanding the issues associated chirped pulse amplification in optical fiber amplifier systems.

  20. Proton acceleration from short pulse lasers interacting with ultrathin foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, George; McGuffey, Christopher; Thomas, Alec; Krushelnick, Karl; Beg, Farhat

    2015-11-01

    Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations using 50 nm Si3N4 and DLC foils are compared to published experimental data of proton acceleration from ultra-thin foils (<1 μm) irradiated by short pulse lasers (30-50 fs), and some underlying physics issues pertinent to proton acceleration have been addressed. 2D particle-in-cell simulations show that the maximum proton energy scales as I2/3, stronger than Target Normal Sheath Acceleration for thick foils (>1 μm), which is typically between I1/3 and I1/2. Published experimental data were found to depend primarily on the laser energy and scale as E2/3. The different scaling laws for thick (>1 μm) and ultra-thin (<1 μm) foils are explained qualitatively as transitioning from Target Normal Sheath Acceleration to more advanced acceleration schemes such as Radiation-Induced Transparency and Radiation Pressure Acceleration regimes. This work was performed with the support of the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under grant FA9550-14-1-0282.

  1. Computational Design of Short Pulse Laser Driven Iron Opacity Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Madison E.; London, Richard A.; Goluoglu, Sedat; Whitley, Heather D.

    2015-11-01

    Opacity is a critical parameter in the transport of radiation in systems such as inertial confinement fusion capsules and stars. The resolution of current disagreements between solar models and helioseismological observations would benefit from experimental validation of theoretical opacity models. Short pulse lasers can be used to heat targets to higher temperatures and densities than long pulse lasers and pulsed power machines, thus potentially enabling access to emission spectra at conditions relevant to solar models. In order to ensure that the relevant plasma conditions are accessible and that an emission measurement is practical, we use computational design of experiments to optimize the target characteristics and laser conditions. Radiation-hydrodynamic modeling, using HYDRA, is used to investigate the effects of modifying laser irradiance, target dimensions, and dopant dilution on the plasma conditions and emission of an iron opacity target. Several optimized designs reaching temperatures and densities relevant to the radiative zone of the sun will be discussed. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC.

  2. Adaptive optics for ultra short pulsed lasers in UHV environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deneuville, Francois; Ropert, Laurent; Sauvageot, Paul; Theis, Sébastien

    2015-02-01

    ISP SYSTEM has developed an electro-mechanical deformable mirror compatible with Ultra High Vacuum environment, suitable for ultra short pulsed lasers. The design of the MD-AME deformable mirror is based on force application on numerous locations. μ-AME actuators are driven by stepper motors, and their patented special design allows controlling the force with a very high accuracy. Materials and assembly method have been adapted to UHV constraints and the performances were evaluated on a first application for a beam with a diameter of 250mm. A Strehl ratio above 0.9 was reached for this application. Optical aberrations up to Zernike order 5 can be corrected with a very low residual error as for standard MD-AME mirror. Amplitude can reach up to several hundreds of μm for low order corrections. Hysteresis is lower than 0.1% and linearity better than 99%. Contrary to piezo-electric actuators, the μ-AME actuators avoid print-through effects and they permit to keep the mirror shape stable even unpowered, providing a high resistance to electro-magnetic pulses. The deformable mirror design allows changing easily an actuator or even the membrane if needed, in order to improve the facility availability. They are designed for circular, square or elliptical aperture from 30mm up to 500mm or more, with incidence angle from 0° to 45°. They can be equipped with passive or active cooling for high power lasers with high repetition rate.

  3. A high current, short pulse electron source for wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Ching-Hung.

    1992-01-01

    Design studies for the generation of a high current, short pulse electron source for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator are presented. An L-band laser photocathode rf gun cavity is designed using the computer code URMEL to maximize the electric field on the cathode surface for fixed frequency and rf input power. A new technique using a curved incoming laser wavefront to minimize the space charge effect near the photocathode is studied. A preaccelerator with large iris to minimize wakefield effects is used to boost the drive beam to a useful energy of around 20 MeV for wakefield acceleration experiments. Focusing in the photocathode gun and the preaccelerator is accomplished with solenoids. Beam dynamics simulations throughout the preaccelerator are performed using particle simulation codes TBCI-SF and PARMELA. An example providing a useful set of operation parameters for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator is given. The effects of the sagitta of the curved beam and laser amplitude and timing jitter effects are discussed. Measurement results of low rf power level bench tests and a high power test for the gun cavity are presented and discussed.

  4. A high current, short pulse electron source for wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Ching-Hung

    1992-12-31

    Design studies for the generation of a high current, short pulse electron source for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator are presented. An L-band laser photocathode rf gun cavity is designed using the computer code URMEL to maximize the electric field on the cathode surface for fixed frequency and rf input power. A new technique using a curved incoming laser wavefront to minimize the space charge effect near the photocathode is studied. A preaccelerator with large iris to minimize wakefield effects is used to boost the drive beam to a useful energy of around 20 MeV for wakefield acceleration experiments. Focusing in the photocathode gun and the preaccelerator is accomplished with solenoids. Beam dynamics simulations throughout the preaccelerator are performed using particle simulation codes TBCI-SF and PARMELA. An example providing a useful set of operation parameters for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator is given. The effects of the sagitta of the curved beam and laser amplitude and timing jitter effects are discussed. Measurement results of low rf power level bench tests and a high power test for the gun cavity are presented and discussed.

  5. New constraints for low-momentum electronic excitations in condensed matter: fundamental consequences from classical and quantum dielectric theory.

    PubMed

    Chantler, C T; Bourke, J D

    2015-11-18

    We present new constraints for the transportation behaviour of low-momentum electronic excitations in condensed matter systems, and demonstrate that these have both a fundamental physical interpretation and a significant impact on the description of low-energy inelastic electron scattering. The dispersion behaviour and characteristic lifetime properties of plasmon and single-electron excitations are investigated using popular classical, semi-classical and quantum dielectric models. We find that, irrespective of constrained agreement to the well known high-momentum and high-energy Bethe ridge limit, standard descriptions of low-momentum electron excitations are inconsistent and unphysical. These observations have direct impact on calculations of transport properties such as inelastic mean free paths, stopping powers and escape depths of charged particles in condensed matter systems. PMID:26490726

  6. New constraints for low-momentum electronic excitations in condensed matter: fundamental consequences from classical and quantum dielectric theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantler, C. T.; Bourke, J. D.

    2015-11-01

    We present new constraints for the transportation behaviour of low-momentum electronic excitations in condensed matter systems, and demonstrate that these have both a fundamental physical interpretation and a significant impact on the description of low-energy inelastic electron scattering. The dispersion behaviour and characteristic lifetime properties of plasmon and single-electron excitations are investigated using popular classical, semi-classical and quantum dielectric models. We find that, irrespective of constrained agreement to the well known high-momentum and high-energy Bethe ridge limit, standard descriptions of low-momentum electron excitations are inconsistent and unphysical. These observations have direct impact on calculations of transport properties such as inelastic mean free paths, stopping powers and escape depths of charged particles in condensed matter systems.

  7. Plasmas and Short-Pulse, High-Intensity Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Thomas

    1999-11-01

    Many of the applications of short-pulse, high-intensity laser systems, including coherent UV and X-ray generation, compact particle accelerators, and non-perturbative nonlinear optics as well as the study of laser-matter interaction physics, require large intensity-interaction length products. In recent years, plasma structures resulting from the hydrodynamic evolution of laser-produced plasma filaments have proven to be attractive media for guiding pulses with peak powers approaching the terawatt level over lengths many times the vacuum Rayleigh range. The hydrodynamics of plasma waveguides have been characterized using time- and space-resolved interferometry measurements of electron density profiles. The laser-driven ionization and heating phase of the plasma filament creation is followed by hot electron driven plasma expansion. Density profiles suitable for optical guiding develop within the first few hundred picoseconds after plasma creation, during which rapid cooling occurs. At longer times the plasma expansion closely follows that of a cylindrical blast wave, with further cooling due to expansion work. The observed guided intensity profiles of end-coupled and tunnel-coupled pulses compare favorably with calculations of the quasi-bound waveguide modes based on the measured electron density profiles. Time- and space-resolved electron density measurements of a laser-driven concentric implosion were also performed. The implosion is the result of the interaction of a second laser pulse with an existing plasma waveguide. The two-pulse absorption and ionization significantly exceed that due to a single pulse of the same total energy. The author would like to acknowledge the significant contributions of Prof. Howard M. Milchberg to the work being presented.

  8. SLIM, Short-pulse Technology for High Gradient Induction Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Arntz, Floyd; Kardo-Sysoev, A.; Krasnykh, A.; /SLAC

    2008-12-16

    A novel short-pulse concept (SLIM) suited to a new generation of a high gradient induction particle accelerators is described herein. It applies advanced solid state semiconductor technology and modern microfabrication techniques to a coreless induction method of charged particle acceleration first proven on a macro scale in the 1960's. Because this approach avoids use of magnetic materials there is the prospect of such an accelerator working efficiently with accelerating pulses in the nanosecond range and, potentially, at megahertz pulse rates. The principal accelerator section is envisioned as a stack of coreless induction cells, the only active element within each being a single, extremely fast (subnanosecond) solid state opening switch: a Drift Step Recovery Diode (DSRD). Each coreless induction cell incorporates an electromagnetic pulse compressor in which inductive energy developed within a transmission-line feed structure over a period of tens of nanoseconds is diverted to the acceleration of the passing charge packet for a few nanoseconds by the abrupt opening of the DSRD switch. The duration of this accelerating output pulse--typically two-to-four nanoseconds--is precisely determined by a microfabricated pulse forming line connected to the cell. Because the accelerating pulse is only nanoseconds in duration, longitudinal accelerating gradients approaching 100 MeV per meter are believed to be achievable without inciting breakdown. Further benefits of this approach are that, (1) only a low voltage power supply is required to produce the high accelerating gradient, and, (2) since the DSRD switch is normally closed, voltage stress is limited to a few nanoseconds per period, hence the susceptibility to hostile environment conditions such as ionizing radiation, mismatch (e.g. in medical applications the peak beam current may be low), strong electromagnetic noise levels, etc is expected to be minimal. Finally, we observe the SLIM concept is not limited to linac

  9. Broadband Dielectric Spectroscopy on Lysozyme in the Sub-Gigahertz to Terahertz Frequency Regions: Effects of Hydration and Thermal Excitation.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Naoki; Ohta, Kaoru; Tamura, Atsuo; Tominaga, Keisuke

    2016-06-01

    We have performed dielectric spectral measurements of lysozyme in a solid state to understand the effects of hydration and thermal excitation on the low-frequency dynamics of protein. Dielectric measurements were performed under changing hydration conditions at room temperature in the frequency region of 0.5 GHz to 1.8 THz. We also studied the temperature dependence (83 to 293 K) of the complex dielectric spectra in the THz frequency region (0.3 THz to 1.8 THz). Spectral analyses were performed using model functions for the complex dielectric constant. To reproduce the spectra, we found that two relaxational modes and two underdamped modes are necessary together with an ionic conductivity term in the model function. At room temperature, the two relaxational modes have relaxation times of ∼20 ps and ∼100 ps. The faster component has a major spectral intensity and is suggested to be due to coupled water-protein motion. The two underdamped modes are necessary to reproduce the temperature dependence of the spectra in the THz region satisfactorily. The protein dynamical transition is a well-known behavior in the neutron-scattering experiment for proteins, where the atomic mean-square displacement shows a sudden change in the temperature dependence at approximately 200 K, when the samples are hydrated. A similar behavior has also been observed in the temperature dependence of the absorption spectra of protein in the THz frequency region. From our broadband dielectric spectroscopic measurements, we conclude that the increase in the spectral intensities in the THz region at approximately 200 K is due to a spectral blue-shift of the fast relaxational mode. PMID:27158918

  10. Optical ablation by high-power short-pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, B.C.; Feit, M.D.; Herman, S.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Shore, B.W.; Perry, M.D.

    1996-02-01

    Laser-induced damage threshold measurements were performed on homogeneous and multilayer dielectrics and gold-coated optics at 1053 and 526 nm for pulse durations {tau} ranging from 140 fs to 1 ns. Gold coatings were found, both experimentally and theoretically, to be limited to 0.6 J/cm{sup 2} in the subpicosecond range for 1053-nm pulses. In dielectrics, we find qualitative differences in the morphology of damage and a departure from the diffusion-dominated {tau}{sup 1/2} scaling that indicate that damage results from plasma formation and ablation for {tau}{le}10 ps and from conventional heating and melting for {tau}{approx_gt}50 ps. A theoretical model based on electron production by multiphoton ionization, joule heating, and collisional (avalanche) ionization is in quantitative agreement with both the pulse-width and the wavelength scaling of experimental results. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  11. A rigorous theoretical model of guided waves excitation in a plane dielectric layer under electromagnetic diffraction by a conducting strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serdyuk, Vladimir M.; Titovitsky, Joseph A.

    2014-06-01

    An exact solution of two-dimensional problem of plane electromagnetic wave scattering by a perfectly conducting strip in the presence of a parallel plane dielectric layer is presented. The given solution is constructed using the mode-matching technique in the form of diffraction integrals over propagation parameter, i.e. in the form of superposition of a large number of homogeneous and inhomogeneous plane waves with continuous spectrum of spatial frequencies. These integrals have poles, which are caused by the presence of a transparent dielectric layer and correspond to its waveguide modes. Because of this, diffraction integrals need the procedure of regularization with explicit extraction of pole terms and smoothing of integrands, whereupon the residual diffraction integrals are computed using simple numerical methods. They describe usual scattered field of a bounded obstacle, which is determined by regularized diffraction integrals and decreases in all directions from an obstacle. Besides, the total diffraction field contains a discrete finite sum of waveguide fields of guided modes of a plane dielectric layer, which correspond to the extracted pole terms of initial diffraction integrals. These fields correspond to pairs of guided waves, which move apart from the region of their excitation near a strip, propagating parallel to the boundaries of a layer and conserving finite amplitude at infinity.

  12. The Short-Pulse X-ray Facility at the Advanced Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Linda; Evans, Paul

    2013-05-01

    The Short-Pulse X-ray (SPX) Facility will extend time-resolved x-ray scattering and spectroscopy to the picosecond time scale while retaining the powerful characteristics of synchrotron radiation, i.e., user-controlled continuous tunability of energy, polarization, and bandwidth combined with exquisite x-ray energy and pulse-length stability over a wide energy range. Experiments at the SPX facility will produce 1-ps stroboscopic snapshots of molecular rotations, molecular excited-state transient structures, stress/strain wave propagation, magnetic domain wall dynamics, phase transitions, and the coupling between electronic, vibrational, and magnetic degrees of freedom in condensed matter systems. Time-resolved studies of transient dynamics will be possible with simultaneous picosecond time resolution and picometer structural precision for a variety of atomic, molecular, supramolecular, nanoscale, and bulk material systems. Pump-probe experiments using high-average-power, sub-picosecond, high-repetition-rate laser systems will make efficient use of the MHz x-ray rates of the SPX. Five end stations for x-ray scattering, diffraction, spectroscopy, imaging, and microscopy can be developed as part of the Advanced Photon Source Upgrade project. The Advanced Photon Source is an Office of Science User Facility operated for the U.S. Dept of Energy Office of Science by Argonne National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  13. Continuous-time discretized-space approach to modeling short-pulse propagation and scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tijhuis, A. G.

    With the examples given in the paper, the author has described the building blocks for a new way of using integral equations to model the propagation and scattering of transient electromagnetic waves. Of each example, generalizations to more complicated scattering problems have already been realized. Mentioned in particular is the application of the marching-on in frequency method to the two dimensional transient scattering by conducting and dielectric obstacles. Applications to layered media include the excitation of a horizontally stratified dielectric slab by a point source and the excitation of a cylindrically symmetric borehole by a line or ring source. The next challenge is to combine these ideas so that realistic configurations can be handled.

  14. Space Debris-de-Orbiting by Vaporization Impulse using Short Pulse Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Early, J; Bibeau, C; Claude, P

    2003-09-16

    Space debris constitutes a significant hazard to low earth orbit satellites and particularly to manned spacecraft. A quite small velocity decrease from vaporization impulses is enough to lower the perigee of the debris sufficiently for atmospheric drag to de-orbit the debris. A short pulse (picosecond) laser version of the Orion concept can accomplish this task in several years of operation. The ''Mercury'' short pulse Yb:S-FAP laser being developed at LLNL for laser fusion is appropriate for this task.

  15. Short pulse fiber lasers mode-locked by carbon nanotubes and graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Shinji; Martinez, Amos; Xu, Bo

    2014-12-01

    One and two dimensional forms of carbon, carbon nanotubes and graphene, have interesting and useful, not only electronic but also photonic, properties. For fiber lasers, they are very attractive passive mode lockers for ultra-short pulse generation, since they have saturable absorption with inherently fast recovery time (<1 ps). In this paper, we review the photonic properties of graphene and CNT and our recent works on fabrication of fiber devices and applications to ultra-short pulse mode-locked fiber lasers.

  16. Formation of a strong electric field resulting in the excitation of microplasma discharges at the edge of a dielectric film on a metal in a plasma flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V. A.; Sakharov, A. S.; Konyzhev, M. E.

    2016-06-01

    Results are presented from experimental and analytical studies of the processes resulting in the excitation of microplasma discharges (MPDs) on a metal surface partially covered with a thin dielectric film under the action of an external plasma flow in vacuum. It is shown experimentally that MPDs are excited at the interface between the open metal surface and the region covered by the dielectric film. The probability of MPD excitation is investigated as a function of the thickness of the dielectric film deposited on the metal. It is found that, for a film thickness of 1 μm, the probability of MPD excitation is close to unity. As the film thickness decreases below ~10 nm or increases above ~10 μm, the probability of MPD excitation is reduced by more than two orders of magnitude. A two-dimensional kinetic numerical code is developed that allows one to model the processes of Debye sheath formation and generation of a strong electric field near the edge of a finite-thickness dielectric film on a metal surface in a plasma flow for different configurations of the film edge. It is shown that the maximum value of the tangential component of the electric field is reached at the film edge and amounts to E max ≈ |φ0|/2 d (where φ0 < 0 is the electric potential applied to the metal and d is the film thickness), which for typical conditions of experiments on the excitation of MPDs on metal surfaces (φ0 ≈-400 V, d ≈ 1 μm) yields E max ≈ 2 MV/cm. The results of kinetic simulations confirm the qualitative idea about the mechanism of the formation of a strong electric field resulting in the excitation of MPDs at the edge of a dielectric film on a metal surface in a plasma flow and agree with experimental data.

  17. Effects of Solvent Dielectric Constant and Viscosity on Two Rotational Relaxation Paths of Excited 9-(Dicyanovinyl) Julolidine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Songqiu; Han, Keli

    2016-07-14

    The understanding of the interplay between microenvironment and molecular rotors is helpful for designing and developing of molecular sensors of local physical properties. We present a study on the two rotational relaxation paths of excited 9-(dicyanovinyl) julolidine in several solvents. One rotational path (C-C single-bond rotation, τb) quickly leads to the formation of a twisted state. The other path (C═C double-bond rotation, τc) shows that the populations go back to the ground state directly via a conical intersection between the S1 and ground state. The increase in the solvent dielectric constant shows little effect on the τb lifetime for its small energy barrier (<0.01 eV), but τc lifetime is increased in larger dielectric constant solvents due to the larger energy gap at conical intersection. Both τb and τc are increased greatly with the increased solvent viscosity. τb is more sensitive to viscosity than τc may be due to its larger rotational moiety. PMID:26886050

  18. Wake Fields Excited in a Micron-Scale Dielectric Rectangular Structure by a Train of Femtosecond Bunches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, T. C.; Fang, J.-M.; Hirshfield, J. L.; Wang, Changbiao; Tarakanov, V. P.; Park, S. Y.

    2002-12-01

    We study the longitudinal wake field components which are induced in a rectangular, dielectric-lined structure having micron-scale dimensions by the passage of one or more charge bunches having femtosecond duration. The bunches would be obtained from a 500 MeV LACARA "chopper" which uses a TW optical wave from a CO2 laser [1]; the bunches are chopped from a macrobunch having duration ˜1 psec obtained from a high brightness 500 MeV rf linac. The high intensity laser wave accomplishes the chopping of the macrobunch into slices which are roughly 10% of the 10.6 μm radiation wavelength. These microbunches can be shaped into a rectangular cross section, approximately 10 μm × 150 μm in dimension, and will excite wake fields when injected into a rectangular dielectric wake field accelerating structure. We compute sample 3D wake fields, using the PIC code KARAT, as well as by means of an analytic method. The passage of just one pC bunch will set up a longitudinal wake field ˜ 40 MeV/m, and a train of ten properly-timed such bunches can produce a cumulative wake field ˜ 600 MeV/m. The choice of dimensions causes the wave solutions to approximate a single-mode excited by an infinitely-tall bunch in a 2D structure; a highly uniform longitudinal wake field in the cross-sectional plane of the structure results, suitable for accelerating a correctly positioned "test bunch". KARAT includes the effect of interference between the Cerenkov radiation of the bunch with the transition radiation emitted as the bunch enters the structure. The wake field structure is several cm in length, and is both rigid and capable of microfabrication accuracy; it could accordingly be a reproducible module in a staged array. The stability of the bunches and the analytic formulation are dealt with in a companion paper [2].

  19. Space and surface charge excitation of a slanted dielectric interface between two electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Seidel, D.B.; Levinson, C.L.

    1982-09-01

    The two-dimensional, electrostatic problem of a planar dielectric interface between two perfectly conducting plates has been solved numerically. The solution allows for an arbitrary interface angle relative to the plates as well as arbitrary distributions of both charge within the volume and surface charge along the interface. The problem is treated by first converting the governing differential equations to a pair of coupled integral equations using Green's function techniques, then solving these integral equations numerically using moment methods. This report details this solution and shows some sample results. This work was motivated by the need to understand the physics of dielectric breakdown by flashover in high voltage insulator applications. Of particular interest is the physics associated with Magnetic Flashover Inhibition (MFI), a possible method of significantly increasing insulator breakdown strength above that possible using currently proven technologies. A solution of this type has several apparent advantages over existing techniques for treating this type of problem and is currently being adapted for use in an existing two-dimensional Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code.

  20. The effects of nanoparticles and organic additives with controlled dispersion on dielectric properties of polymers: Charge trapping and impact excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yanhui; Wu, Ke; Bell, Michael; Oakes, Andrew; Ratcliff, Tyree; Lanzillo, Nicholas A.; Breneman, Curt; Benicewicz, Brian C.; Schadler, Linda S.

    2016-08-01

    This work presents a comprehensive investigation into the effects of nanoparticles and organic additives on the dielectric properties of insulating polymers using reinforced silicone rubber as a model system. TiO2 and ZrO2 nanoparticles (d = 5 nm) were well dispersed into the polymer via a bimodal surface modification approach. Organic molecules with the potential of voltage stabilization were further grafted to the nanoparticle to ensure their dispersion. These extrinsic species were found to provide deep traps for charge carriers and exhibited effective charge trapping properties at a rather small concentration (˜1017 cm-3). The charge trapping is found to have the most significant effect on breakdown strength when the electrical stressing time is long enough that most charges are trapped in the deep states. To establish a quantitative correlation between the trap depth and the molecular properties, the electron affinity and ionization energy of each species were calculated by an ab initio method and were compared with the experimentally measured values. The correlation however remains elusive and is possibly complicated by the field effect and the electronic interactions between different species that are not considered in this computation. At high field, a super-linear increase of current density was observed for TiO2 filled composites and is likely caused by impact excitation due to the low excitation energy of TiO2 compared to ZrO2. It is reasoned that the hot charge carriers with energies greater than the excitation energy of TiO2 may excite an electron-hole pair upon collision with the NP, which later will be dissociated and contribute to free charge carriers. This mechanism can enhance the energy dissipation and may account for the retarded electrical degradation and breakdown of TiO2 composites.

  1. Field and photo-emission in a short-pulse, high-charge Cesium telluride RF photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisniewski, Eric E.

    A new high-charge RF gun is now operating at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The 1.5 cell 1.3 GHz gun uses a Cesium telluride photocathode driven with a 248 nm laser to provide short-pulse, high charge electron beams for the new 75 MeV drive beamline. The high-gradient RF gun (peak field on the cathode > 80MV/m) is a key piece of the facility upgrade. The large Cs2Te photocathode (diameter > 30 mm) was fabricated in-house. The photo-injector will be used to generate high-charge, short pulse, single bunches (Q > 100 nC) and bunch-trains (Q > 1000 nC) for wakefield experiments, typically involving dielectric-loaded accelerating structures. Details of the photocathode fabrication process and the results of associated diagnostic measurements are presented, including QE measurements and work function measurements performed with a Kelvin probe. Fieldemitted dark current from the Cs2Te cathode was measured during RF conditioning and characterized. Fowler-Nordheim plots of the data are presented and compared to similar measurements made using a copper cathode in the initial phase of conditioning. The results for cesium telluride exhibited non-linear regions within the Fowler-Nordheim plots similar to previous experimental results for other p-type semiconductors. Results of quantum efficiency (QE) studies are presented with the cathode operating in both single and bunch-train modes. QE uniformity and lifetime studies are presented. During commissioning, the cesium telluride photocathode produced bunch-charge of 100 nC, breaking the previous record. No evidence of bunch-train position-dependence of QE was found when generating four-bunch trains with total charge up to 200 nC.

  2. A rapidly-tuned, short-pulse-length, high-repetition-rate CO{sub 2} laser for IR dial

    SciTech Connect

    Zaugg, T.; Thompson, D.; Leland, W.T.; Busch, G.

    1997-08-01

    Analysis of noise sources in Differential Absorption LIDAR (DIAL) in the infrared region of the spectrum indicates that the signal-to-noise ratio for direct detection can be improved if multiple-wavelength, short-pulse-length beams are transmitted and received at high repetition rates. Atmospheric effects can be minimized, albedo can be rapidly scanned, and uncorrelated speckle can be acquired at the maximum possible rate. A compact, rugged, RF-excited waveguide laser can produce 15 nanosecond pulses at a 100 kHz rate with sufficient energy per pulse to reach the speckle limit of the signal-to-noise ratio. A high-repetition-rate laser has been procured and will be used to verify these signal and noise scaling relationships at high repetition rates. Current line-tuning devices are mechanical and are capable of switching lines at a rate up to a few hundred Hertz. Acousto-optic modulators, deflectors or tunable filters can be substituted for these mechanical devices in the resonator of a CO{sub 2} laser and used to rapidly line-tune the laser across the 9 and 10 micron bands at a rate as high as 100 kHz. Several configurations for line tuning using acousto-optic and electro-optic devices with and without gratings are presented. The merits of and constraints on each design are also discussed. A pair of large aperture, acousto-optic deflectors has been purchased and the various line-tuning designs will be evaluated in a conventional, glass tube, CO{sub 2} laser, with a view to incorporation into the high-repetition-rate, waveguide laser. A computer model of the dynamics of an RF-excited, short-pulse-length, high-repetition-rate waveguide laser has been developed. The model will be used to test the consequences of various line-tuning designs.

  3. Electromagnetic fields and currents excited by dipoles normal to the conducting surface of dielectric loaded bodies of revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozzaim, Cengiz

    1999-12-01

    A modulated laser beam incident upon a conducting surface can cause electrons to be emitted in such a way that the resulting electromagnetic radiation is closely approximated by that from a distribution of electric dipoles normal to the surface. A major goal of this research has been to develop an understanding of the coupling of electromagnetic energy from the modulated laser light to objects and to the medium surrounding the object. Specific attention is focused upon coupling of the laser-induced electromagnetic field to structures which exhibit some of the characteristics of symmetric antennas. A method is presented for computing the signal caused by a modulated laser beam at a load impedance terminating a coaxial waveguide whose center conductor protrudes into a thin-wall cylindrical tube. The tube is open at one end and, on the other, it has a planar bottom through which the coax center conductor protrudes. Two case are treated: one in which the cavity is empty (free space) and a second in which it is partially filled with a dielectric insert. The excitation is the signal radiated by electrons emitted from the conducting surface by an impinging laser beam, modulated in such a way that the electrons at the surface oscillate harmonically in time. The computations are based on a procedure involving the formulation and numerical solution of integral equations plus utilization of the reciprocity theorem. A model was fabricated and experimental data were obtained to corroborate the results obtained from theory and numerical analysis. A similar analysis was conducted to determine the axial electric field at the focal point of the common parabolic reflector antenna illuminated by the laser-induced dipoles, but no experiments were performed in this case. It has been found that for the dipole excitation, penetration and coupling results are markedly different from those expected for more traditional excitations.

  4. An Overview of High Energy Short Pulse Technology for Advanced Radiography of Laser Fusion Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, C J; Key, M; Britten, J; Beach, R; Beer, G; Brown, C; Bryan, S; Caird, J; Carlson, T; Crane, J; Dawson, J; Erlandson, A C; Fittinghoff, D; Hermann, M; Hoaglan, C; Iyer, A; Jones, L; Jovanovic, I; Komashko, A; Landen, O; Liao, Z; Molander, W; Mitchell, A; Moses, E; Nielsen, N; Nguyen, H; Nissen, J; Payne, S; Pennington, D; Risinger, L; Rushford, M; Skulina, K; Spaeth, M; Stuart, B; Tietbohl, G; Wattellier, B

    2004-06-18

    The technical challenges and motivations for high-energy, short-pulse generation with NIF-class, Nd:glass laser systems are reviewed. High energy short pulse generation (multi-kilojoule, picosecond pulses) will be possible via the adaptation of chirped pulse amplification laser techniques on the NIF. Development of meter-scale, high efficiency, high-damage-threshold final optics is a key technical challenge. In addition, deployment of HEPW pulses on NIF is constrained by existing laser infrastructure and requires new, compact compressor designs and short-pulse, fiber-based, seed-laser systems. The key motivations for high energy petawatt pulses on NIF is briefly outlined and includes high-energy, x-ray radiography, proton beam radiography, proton isochoric heating and tests of the fast ignitor concept for inertial confinement fusion.

  5. Defocusing complex short-pulse equation and its multi-dark-soliton solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Bao-Feng; Ling, Liming; Zhu, Zuonong

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a complex short-pulse equation of both focusing and defocusing types, which governs the propagation of ultrashort pulses in nonlinear optical fibers. It can be viewed as an analog of the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation in the ultrashort-pulse regime. Furthermore, we construct the multi-dark-soliton solution for the defocusing complex short-pulse equation through the Darboux transformation and reciprocal (hodograph) transformation. One- and two-dark-soliton solutions are given explicitly, whose properties and dynamics are analyzed and illustrated.

  6. Measurement of lake ice thickness with a short-pulse radar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D. W.; Mueller, R. A.; Schertler, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of lake ice thickness were made during March 1975 at the Straits of Mackinac by using a short-pulse radar system aboard an all-terrain vehicle. These measurements were compared with ice thicknesses determined with an auger. Over 25 sites were explored which had ice thicknesses in the range 29 to 60 cm. The maximum difference between radar and auger measurements was less than 9.8 percent. The magnitude of the error was less than + or - 3.5 cm. The NASA operating short-pulse radar system used in monitoring lake ice thickness from an aircraft is also described.

  7. Excitation of THz hybrid modes in an elliptical dielectric rod waveguide with a cold collisionless unmagnetized plasma column by an annular electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, Z.; Heidari-Semiromi, E.; Safari, S.

    2016-06-01

    The dispersion relation of electromagnetic waves propagating in an elliptical plasma waveguide with a cold collisionless unmagnetized plasma column and a dielectric rod is studied analytically. The frequency spectrum of the hybrid waves and the growth rate for excitation of the waves by a thin annular relativistic elliptical electron beam (TAREEB) is obtained. The effects of relative permittivity constant of dielectric rod, geometrical dimensions, plasma frequency, accelerating voltage, and current density of TAREEB on the growth rate and frequency spectra of the waveguide will be investigated.

  8. Numerical studies of startup scenarios in a 1.5 MW, 110 GHz gyrotron operating in short pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinitsyn, Oleksandr; Nusinovich, Gregory; Antonsen, Thomas, Jr.; Tax, David; Temkin, Richard; Ireap, University Of Maryland Collaboration; Psfc, Massachusetts Institute Of Technology Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    Megawatt class gyrotrons operate in very high-order modes which form a very dense spectrum. In order to excite the operating mode in the presence of many competitors and drive it to the nominal operating point, careful control of the gyrotron's startup is necessary. Our studies are focused on the startup scenarios of the 110 GHz MIT gyrotron designed for operation at 1.5 MW power level in short pulses. Nominal parameters of the electron beam are: 96 kV, 42 A and orbital-to-axial velocity ratio α = 1.4. Previous numerical studies of the startup of this gyrotron had shown that at low voltages (at about 62 kV), first, the high-frequency TE23,6 mode was excited and then, at higher voltages (at about 74 kV), it was replaced by the desired TE22,6 mode. However, during a series of recent experiments at MIT it was shown that instead of the TE23,6 mode a low-frequency TE21,6 mode was excited during the voltage rise and persisted up to a voltage of 70 kV. In this work the authors make an attempt to simulate and explain this result with the help of self-consistent time-dependent code MAGY.

  9. Short Pulse High Brightness X-ray Production with the PLEIADES Thomson Scattering Source

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S G; Barty, C P J; Betts, S M; Brown, W J; Crane, J K; Cross, R R; Fittinghoff, D N; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Kuba, J; LaSage, G P; Rosenzweig, J B; Slaughter, D R; Springer, P T; Tremaine, A M

    2003-07-01

    We describe PLEIADES, a compact, tunable, high-brightness, ultra-short pulse, Thomson x-ray source. The peak brightness of the source is expected to exceed 10{sup 20} photons/s/0.1% bandwidth/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}. Initial results are reported and compared to theoretical calculations.

  10. Surface excitations in electron spectroscopy. Part I: dielectric formalism and Monte Carlo algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Salvat-Pujol, F; Werner, W S M

    2013-01-01

    The theory describing energy losses of charged non-relativistic projectiles crossing a planar interface is derived on the basis of the Maxwell equations, outlining the physical assumptions of the model in great detail. The employed approach is very general in that various common models for surface excitations (such as the specular reflection model) can be obtained by an appropriate choice of parameter values. The dynamics of charged projectiles near surfaces is examined by calculations of the induced surface charge and the depth- and direction-dependent differential inelastic inverse mean free path (DIIMFP) and stopping power. The effect of several simplifications frequently encountered in the literature is investigated: differences of up to 100% are found in heights, widths, and positions of peaks in the DIIMFP. The presented model is implemented in a Monte Carlo algorithm for the simulation of the electron transport relevant for surface electron spectroscopy. Simulated reflection electron energy loss spectra are in good agreement with experiment on an absolute scale. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23794766

  11. Effects of previous ionization and excitation on the ionization wave propagation along the dielectric tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yang; Liu, Dongping; Wang, Wenchun; Bi, Zhenhua; Wang, Xueyang; Niu, Jinhai; Ji, Longfei; Song, Ying; Qi, Zhihua

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, by using a high precision synchronization system, the ignition time, velocity, and propagation properties of the ionization waves (IWs) have been investigated in detail from the 1st high voltage (HV) pulse to the sequential ones over a large range of the pulse-off time. In order to clarify the effects of previous ionization and excitation on the IW propagation, the density of the residual charges are controlled by varying the pulse-off time from 199 μs to 15 μs. The results show that the formation and propagation of IWs can be strongly affected by previous discharge. For a longer pulse-off time (100 μs-190 μs), the propagation velocity of plasma bullets are decreased from the 1st to the 10th HV pulse, then increased after the 10th pulse, and finally become stable after about 500 pulses. When the pulse-off time is reduced to 15 μs, the propagation velocity of plasma bullets will rapidly increase and become stable after the 1st HV pulse. The ignition voltage is significantly reduced after the 1st HV pulse with the decrease in pulse-off time. Consequently, the generation and propagation of IWs in the tube are strongly affected by the accumulation of long-lived metastable helium (He) species and residual charges from previous discharges, which is important for understanding the plasma bullet behavior.

  12. Surface excitations in electron spectroscopy. Part I: dielectric formalism and Monte Carlo algorithm.

    PubMed

    Salvat-Pujol, F; Werner, W S M

    2013-05-01

    The theory describing energy losses of charged non-relativistic projectiles crossing a planar interface is derived on the basis of the Maxwell equations, outlining the physical assumptions of the model in great detail. The employed approach is very general in that various common models for surface excitations (such as the specular reflection model) can be obtained by an appropriate choice of parameter values. The dynamics of charged projectiles near surfaces is examined by calculations of the induced surface charge and the depth- and direction-dependent differential inelastic inverse mean free path (DIIMFP) and stopping power. The effect of several simplifications frequently encountered in the literature is investigated: differences of up to 100% are found in heights, widths, and positions of peaks in the DIIMFP. The presented model is implemented in a Monte Carlo algorithm for the simulation of the electron transport relevant for surface electron spectroscopy. Simulated reflection electron energy loss spectra are in good agreement with experiment on an absolute scale. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23794766

  13. Transient, polarity-dependent dielectric response in a twisted nematic liquid crystal under very low frequency excitation.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, K S

    2015-09-01

    The electric Freedericksz transition is a second-order quadratic effect, which, in a planarly aligned nematic liquid crystal layer, manifests above a threshold field as a homogeneous symmetric distortion with maximum director-tilt in the midplane. We find that, upon excitation by a low frequency (<0.2Hz) square-wave field, the instability becomes spatially and temporally varying. This is demonstrated using calamitic liquid crystals, initially in the 90°-twisted planar configuration. The distortion occurs close to the negative electrode following each polarity switch and, for low-voltage amplitudes, decays completely in time. We use the elastically favorable geometry of Brochard-Leger walls to establish the location of maximum distortion. Thus, at successive polarity changes, the direction of extension of both annular and open walls switches between the alignment directions at the two substrates. For high voltages, this direction is largely along the midplane director, while remaining marginally oscillatory. These results are broadly understood by taking into account the time-varying and inhomogeneous field conditions that prevail soon after the polarity reverses. Polarity dependence of the instability is traced to the formation of intrinsic double layers that lead to an asymmetry in field distribution in the presence of an external bias. Momentary field elevation near the negative electrode following a voltage sign reversal leads to locally enhanced dielectric and gradient flexoelectric torques, which accounts for the surface-like phenomenon observed at low voltages. These spatiotemporal effects, also found earlier for other instabilities, are generic in nature. PMID:26465487

  14. Ultra-short pulse laser deep drilling of C/SiC composites in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunhui; Zhang, Litong; Liu, Yongsheng; Cheng, Guanghua; Zhang, Qing; Hua, Ke

    2013-06-01

    Ultra-short pulse laser machining is an important finishing technology for high hardness materials. In this study, it demonstrated that the ultra-short pulse laser can be used to drill the film cooling holes and square holes in aero-engine turbine blades made of C/SiC composites. Both the edges and bottoms of the drilling holes are covered with small particles. The following factors have a great effect on drilling holes according to this work: (1) circular holes can be processed only at a relative small helical lines spacing. (2) With the increase of laser scanning speed, the depth of holes reduces while the diameter rarely changes. (3) Through the holes of high aspect ratio can be obtained via high processing power.

  15. Pulse-forming-line based on-chip short pulse generator.

    PubMed

    Zou, Huan; Wang, Haiyang

    2015-04-01

    A traditional pulse generation circuit based on the pulse-forming-line (PFL) is implemented in a commercial 0.13 μm digital CMOS technology. A meandered on-chip coplanar waveguide is used as the PFL, and CMOS transistor is used as switch in the Cadence Spectre simulation. The circuit sample is fabricated and tested. Pulses of ∼170 ps durations and 120-200 mV amplitudes are obtained when the power supply is tuned from 1.2 V to 2 V. The results show that the traditional PFL based circuit can be implemented in standard CMOS technology for on-chip short pulse generation. Furthermore, the PFL circuits significantly extend the short pulse generation capabilities of CMOS technology. PMID:25933879

  16. Pulse-forming-line based on-chip short pulse generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Huan; Wang, Haiyang

    2015-04-01

    A traditional pulse generation circuit based on the pulse-forming-line (PFL) is implemented in a commercial 0.13 μm digital CMOS technology. A meandered on-chip coplanar waveguide is used as the PFL, and CMOS transistor is used as switch in the Cadence Spectre simulation. The circuit sample is fabricated and tested. Pulses of ˜170 ps durations and 120-200 mV amplitudes are obtained when the power supply is tuned from 1.2 V to 2 V. The results show that the traditional PFL based circuit can be implemented in standard CMOS technology for on-chip short pulse generation. Furthermore, the PFL circuits significantly extend the short pulse generation capabilities of CMOS technology.

  17. SHORT-PULSE ELECTROMAGNETIC TRANSPONDER FOR HOLE-TO-HOLE USE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, David L.; Watts, Raymond D.; Bramsoe, Erik

    1983-01-01

    Hole-to-hole observations were made through nearly 20 m of granite using an electromagnetic transponder (an active reflector) in one borehole and a single-hole short-pulse radar in another. The transponder is inexpensive, operationally simple, and effective in extending the capability of a short-pulse borehole radar system to allow hole-to-hole operation without requiring timing cables. A detector in the transponder senses the arrival of each pulse from the radar. Each pulse detection triggers a kilovolt-amplitude pulse for retransmission. The transponder 'echo' may be stronger than that of a passive reflector by a factor of as much as 120 db. The result is an increase in range capability by a factor which depends on attenuation in the medium and hole-to-hole wavepath geometry.

  18. Chromium carbide thin films deposited by ultra-short pulse laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teghil, R.; Santagata, A.; De Bonis, A.; Galasso, A.; Villani, P.

    2009-06-01

    Pulsed laser deposition performed by a laser with a pulse duration of 250 fs has been used to deposit films from a Cr 3C 2 target. Due to the different processes involved in the laser ablation when it is performed by an ultra-short pulse source instead of a conventional short pulse one, it has been possible to obtain in vacuum films containing only one type of carbide, Cr 3C 2, as shown by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. On the other hand, Cr 3C 2 is not the only component of the films, since a large amount of amorphous carbon is also present. The films, deposited at room temperature, are amorphous and seem to be formed by the coalescence of a large number of particles with nanometric size. The film composition can be explained in terms of thermal evaporation from particles ejected from the target.

  19. Feasibility study on a short-pulsed IR wavelength for effective calculus fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyun Wook

    2015-05-01

    Laser-induced lithotripsy has been used for a minimally-invasive surgery to treat kidney-stone disease associated with urinary obstruction. A short-pulsed Tm:YAG laser (λ = 2.01 µm) was developed to improve fragmentation efficiency and was evaluated with a Ho:YAG laser (λ = 2.12 μm) as to its ablation feature and mass removal rate. Application of a train of sub-microsecond pulses with a lower energy at a frequency of 500 Hz created multiple events of cavitation that accompanied strong acoustic transients. During Tm:YAG irradiation, both high light absorption and secondary photomechanical impacts readily fragmented the calculus into small pieces (< 3 mm) and removed them 130 times faster than photothermal Ho:YAG lithotripsy. The proposed short-pulsed Tm:YAG approach may be an effective lithotripter for treating calculus disease.

  20. Broadening of ultra-short pulses propagating through weak-to-strong oceanic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Lu, Lu; Zhang, Pengfei; Fan, Chengyu; Ji, Xiaoling

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the new approach of correlation function of the complex phase perturbed by oceanic turbulence is shown. Based on this new approach, the general formula of the two-frequency mutual coherence function (MCF) of ultra-short pulses in oceanic turbulence is derived. Using a temporal moments approach and combining with this new formula for the MCF, the analytical expression for the pulse width is deduced. Besides, the quantity of Rytov variance σR2 in oceanic turbulence is obtained, which is widely used as a measure of the strength of turbulence. In particular, the on-axis relative pulse broadening and turbulent effective coefficient of ultra-short pulses (i.e., femtosecond-picosecond regime) propagating through oceanic turbulence are investigated.

  1. Simulation studies of vapor bubble generation by short-pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Amendt, P.; London, R.A.; Strauss, M.

    1997-10-26

    Formation of vapor bubbles is characteristic of many applications of short-pulse lasers in medicine. An understanding of the dynamics of vapor bubble generation is useful for developing and optimizing laser-based medical therapies. To this end, experiments in vapor bubble generation with laser light deposited in an aqueous dye solution near a fiber-optic tip have been performed. Numerical hydrodynamic simulations have been developed to understand and extrapolate results from these experiments. Comparison of two-dimensional simulations with the experiment shows excellent agreement in tracking the bubble evolution. Another regime of vapor bubble generation is short-pulse laser interactions with melanosomes. Strong shock generation and vapor bubble generation are common physical features of this interaction. A novel effect of discrete absorption by melanin granules within a melanosome is studied as a possible role in previously reported high Mach number shocks.

  2. Electron acceleration in relativistic plasma waves generated by a single frequency short-pulse laser

    SciTech Connect

    Coverdale, C.A.; Darrow, C.B.; Decker, C.D.; Mori, W.B.; Tzeng, K.C., Clayton, C.E.; Marsh, K.A.; Joshi, C.

    1995-04-27

    Experimental evidence for the acceleration of electrons in a relativistic plasma wave generated by Raman forward scattering (SRS-F) of a single-frequency short pulse laser are presented. A 1.053 {mu}m, 600 fsec, 5 TW laser was focused into a gas jet with a peak intensity of 8{times}10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}. At a plasma density of 2{times}10{sup 19} cm{sup {minus}3}, 2 MeV electrons were detected and their appearance was correlated with the anti-Stokes laser sideband generated by SRS-F. The results are in good agreement with 2-D PIC simulations. The use of short pulse lasers for making ultra-high gradient accelerators is explored.

  3. Nonlinear wave interactions between short pulses of different spatio-temporal extents

    PubMed Central

    Sivan, Y.; Rozenberg, S.; Halstuch, A.; Ishaaya, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    We study the nonlinear wave interactions between short pulses of different spatio-temporal extents. Unlike the well-understood mixing of quasi-monochromatic waves, this configuration is highly non-intuitive due to the complex coupling between the spatial and temporal degrees of freedom of the interacting pulses. We illustrate the process intuitively with transitions between different branches of the dispersion curves and interpret it in terms of spectral exchange between the interacting pulses. We verify our interpretation with an example whereby a spectrally-narrow pulse “inherits” the wide spectrum of a pump pulse centered at a different wavelength, using exact numerical simulations, as well as a simplified coupled mode analysis and an asymptotic analytical solution. The latter also provides a simple and intuitive quantitative interpretation. The complex wave mixing process studied here may enable flexible spatio-temporal shaping of short pulses and is the starting point of the study of more complicated systems. PMID:27381552

  4. Short-pulse laser-produced plasma from C60 molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Wuelker, Cornelius; Theobald, Wolfgang; Ouw, Donald; Schaefer, Fritz P.; Chichkov, Boris N.

    1995-05-01

    The first experimental observations of a plasma produced in a vapor of C60 molecules with a high-intensity subpicosecond KrF laser (6x10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}) are reported. It differs from a plasma created in an ordinary carbon preplasma by reaching much higher ionization stages under the same experimental conditions. This remarkable property of C60 molecules (and other clusters) opens new prospects for short-pulse driven X-ray lasers.

  5. Superconducting Cavity Design for Short-Pulse X-Rays at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    G.J. Waldschmidt, R. Nassiri, G. Cheng, R.A. Rimmer, H. Wang

    2011-03-01

    Superconducting cavities have been analyzed for the short-pulse x-ray (SPX) project at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Due to the strong damping requirements in the APS storage ring, single-cell superconducting cavities have been designed. The geometry has been optimized for lower-order and higher-order mode damping, reduced peak surface magnetic fields, and compact size. The integration of the cavity assembly, with dampers and waveguide input coupler, into a cryomodule will be discussed.

  6. Assessment and Mitigation of Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) Impacts at Short-pulse Laser Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Jr., C G; Bond, E; Clancy, T; Dangi, S; Eder, D C; Ferguson, W; Kimbrough, J; Throop, A

    2010-02-04

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) will be impacted by electromagnetic pulse (EMP) during normal long-pulse operation, but the largest impacts are expected during short-pulse operation utilizing the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC). Without mitigation these impacts could range from data corruption to hardware damage. We describe our EMP measurement systems on Titan and NIF and present some preliminary results and thoughts on mitigation.

  7. Assessment and Mitigation of Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) Impacts at Short-pulse Laser Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Jr., C G; Bond, E; Clancy, T; Dangi, S; Eder, D C; Ferguson, W; Kimbrough, J; Throop, A

    2009-10-02

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) will be impacted by electromagnetic pulse (EMP) during normal long-pulse operation, but the largest impacts are expected during short-pulse operation utilizing the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC). Without mitigation these impacts could range from data corruption to hardware damage. We describe our EMP measurement systems on Titan and NIF and present some preliminary results and thoughts on mitigation.

  8. All-solid-state repetitive semiconductor opening switch-based short pulse generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Zhenjie; Hao, Qingsong; Hu, Long; Su, Jiancang; Liu, Guozhi

    2009-09-01

    The operating characteristics of a semiconductor opening switch (SOS) are determined by its pumping circuit parameters. SOS is still able to cut off the current when pumping current duration falls to the order of tens of nanoseconds and a short pulse forms simultaneously in the output load. An all-solid-state repetitive SOS-based short pulse generator (SPG100) with a three-level magnetic pulse compression unit was successfully constructed. The generator adopts magnetic pulse compression unit with metallic glass and ferrite cores, which compresses a 600 V, 10 μs primary pulse into short pulse with forward pumping current of 825 A, 60 ns and reverse pumping current of 1.3 kA, 30 ns. The current is sent to SOS in which the reverse pumping current is interrupted. The generator is capable of providing a pulse with the voltage of 120 kV and duration of 5-6 ns while output load being 125 Ω. The highest repetition rate is up to 1 kHz.

  9. Measuring the energy of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) in a short pulse laser amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliev, Marin; Adams, Daniel; Greco, Michael; Meier, Amanda; Squier, Jeff; Durfee, Charles

    2010-10-01

    In high-gain pulsed laser amplifiers, amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) tends to limit the gain in single stage fiber amplifiers. Even if ASE is not strong enough to deplete the gain of the amplifier, it still contributes strongly to a low-intensity background output in the amplified signal. The intensity contrast between the amplified short pulse and this background ASE pedestal can be measured with third-order autocorrelation, but this method cannot be used to completely specify the ASE's energy, which is distributed over many nanoseconds. We have developed a novel method that allows us to determine the energy and the spectrum of the ASE. We use a cross polarized wave (XPW) generating crystal such as BaF2 to ``clean up'' the ASE from the short pulse(SP). The input pulse (SP and ASE) and the cross-polarized signal are passed through a birefringent crystal such as sapphire. The relative group velocity difference along each crystal axis results in a delay between both channels. After passing through a polarizer, an interferogram is obtained in a spectrometer. This interferogram results from interference of the XPW pulse with the short-pulse content of the amplifier output, with a background of the ASE spectrum. Fourier analysis yields both the ASE energy and its spectrum.

  10. Short-pulse, compressed ion beams at the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, P. A.; Barnard, J. J.; Davidson, R. C.; Friedman, A.; Gilson, E. P.; Grote, D.; Ji, Q.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Persaud, A.; Waldron, W. L.; Schenkel, T.

    2016-05-01

    We have commenced experiments with intense short pulses of ion beams on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, with 1-mm beam spot size within 2.5 ns full-width at half maximum. The ion kinetic energy is 1.2 MeV. To enable the short pulse duration and mm-scale focal spot radius, the beam is neutralized in a 1.5-meter-long drift compression section following the last accelerator cell. A short-focal-length solenoid focuses the beam in the presence of the volumetric plasma that is near the target. In the accelerator, the line-charge density increases due to the velocity ramp imparted on the beam bunch. The scientific topics to be explored are warm dense matter, the dynamics of radiation damage in materials, and intense beam and beam-plasma physics including select topics of relevance to the development of heavy-ion drivers for inertial fusion energy. Below the transition to melting, the short beam pulses offer an opportunity to study the multi-scale dynamics of radiation-induced damage in materials with pump-probe experiments, and to stabilize novel metastable phases of materials when short-pulse heating is followed by rapid quenching. First experiments used a lithium ion source; a new plasma-based helium ion source shows much greater charge delivered to the target.

  11. Ultra-short pulsed laser tissue ablation using focused laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaunich, Megan K.; Raje, Shreya; Mitra, Kunal; Grace, Michael S.; Fahey, Molly; Spooner, Greg

    2008-02-01

    Short pulse lasers are used for a variety of therapeutic applications in medicine. Recently ultra-short pulse lasers have gained prominence due to the reduction in collateral thermal damage to surrounding healthy tissue during tissue ablation. In this paper, ultra-short pulsed laser ablation of mouse skin tissue is analyzed by assessing the extent of damage produced due to focused laser beam irradiation. The laser used for this study is a fiber-based desktop laser (Raydiance, Inc.) having a wavelength of 1552 nm and a pulse width of 1.3 ps. The laser beam is focused on the sample surface to a spot size on the order of 10 microns, thus producing high peak intensity necessary for precise clean ablation. A parametric study is performed on in vitro mouse tissue specimens and live anaesthetized mice with mammary tumors through variation of laser parameters such as time-averaged laser power, repetition rate, laser scanning rate and irradiation time. Radial temperature distribution is measured using thermal camera to analyze the heat affected zone. Temperature measurements are performed to assess the peak temperature rise attained during ablation. A detailed histological study is performed using frozen section technique to observe the nature and extent of laser-induced damages.

  12. All-solid-state repetitive semiconductor opening switch-based short pulse generator.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhenjie; Hao, Qingsong; Hu, Long; Su, Jiancang; Liu, Guozhi

    2009-09-01

    The operating characteristics of a semiconductor opening switch (SOS) are determined by its pumping circuit parameters. SOS is still able to cut off the current when pumping current duration falls to the order of tens of nanoseconds and a short pulse forms simultaneously in the output load. An all-solid-state repetitive SOS-based short pulse generator (SPG100) with a three-level magnetic pulse compression unit was successfully constructed. The generator adopts magnetic pulse compression unit with metallic glass and ferrite cores, which compresses a 600 V, 10 mus primary pulse into short pulse with forward pumping current of 825 A, 60 ns and reverse pumping current of 1.3 kA, 30 ns. The current is sent to SOS in which the reverse pumping current is interrupted. The generator is capable of providing a pulse with the voltage of 120 kV and duration of 5-6 ns while output load being 125 Omega. The highest repetition rate is up to 1 kHz. PMID:19791935

  13. Harmonics generation of a terahertz wakefield free-electron laser from a dielectric loaded waveguide excited by a direct current electron beam.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiwei; Lu, Yalin; He, Zhigang; Jia, Qika; Wang, Lin

    2016-06-01

    We propose to generate high-power terahertz (THz) radiation from a cylindrical dielectric loaded waveguide (DLW) excited by a direct-current electron beam with the harmonics generation method. The DLW supports a discrete set of modes that can be excited by an electron beam passing through the structure. The interaction of these modes with the co-propagating electron beam results in micro-bunching and the coherent enhancement of the wakefield radiation, which is dominated by the fundamental mode. By properly choosing the parameters of DLW and beam energy, the high order modes can be the harmonics of the fundamental one; thus, high frequency radiation corresponding to the high order modes will benefit from the dominating bunching process at the fundamental eigenfrequency and can also be coherently excited. With the proposed method, high power THz radiation can be obtained with an easily achievable electron beam and a large DLW structure. PMID:27244388

  14. FY05 LDRD Final ReportTime-Resolved Dynamic Studies using Short Pulse X-Ray Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, A; Dunn, J; van Buuren, T; Budil, K; Sadigh, B; Gilmer, G; Falcone, R; Lee, R; Ng, A

    2006-02-10

    Established techniques must be extended down to the ps and sub-ps time domain to directly probe product states of materials under extreme conditions. We used short pulse ({le} 1 ps) x-ray radiation to track changes in the physical properties in tandem with measurements of the atomic and electronic structure of materials undergoing fast laser excitation and shock-related phenomena. The sources included those already available at LLNL, including the picosecond X-ray laser as well as the ALS Femtosecond Phenomena beamline and the SSRL based sub-picosecond photon source (SPPS). These allow the temporal resolution to be improved by 2 orders of magnitude over the current state-of-the-art, which is {approx} 100 ps. Thus, we observed the manifestations of dynamical processes with unprecedented time resolution. Time-resolved x-ray photoemission spectroscopy and x-ray scattering were used to study phase changes in materials with sub-picosecond time resolution. These experiments coupled to multiscale modeling allow us to explore the physics of materials in high laser fields and extreme non-equilibrium states of matter. The ability to characterize the physical and electronic structure of materials under extreme conditions together with state-of-the-art models and computational facilities will catapult LLNL's core competencies into the scientific world arena as well as support its missions of national security and stockpile stewardship.

  15. SiO2-glass drilling by short-pulse CO2 laser with controllable pulse-tail energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Kazuyuki; Yamamoto, Takuya; Watanabe, Miyu; Akitsu, Tetsuya; Jitsuno, Takahisa

    2016-03-01

    We developed a longitudinally excited CO2 laser that produces a short laser pulse with the almost same spike-pulse energy of about 0.8 mJ and the controllable pulse-tail energy of 6.33-23.08 mJ. The laser was very simple and consisted of a 45-cm-long alumina ceramic pipe with an inner diameter of 9 mm, a pulse power supply, a step-up transformer, a storage capacitance and a spark-gap switch. The dependence of SiO2 glass drilling on the fluence and the number was investigated by four types of short-pulse CO2 lasers. In this work, the effective short laser pulse with the spike pulse energy of 0.8 mJ for SiO2 glass drilling was the laser pulse with the pulse tail energy of 19.88 mJ, and produces the drilling depth per the fluence of 124 μm/J/cm2.

  16. A new high intensity and short-pulse molecular beam valve.

    PubMed

    Yan, B; Claus, P F H; van Oorschot, B G M; Gerritsen, L; Eppink, A T J B; van de Meerakker, S Y T; Parker, D H

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we report on the design and performance of a new home-built pulsed gas valve, which we refer to as the Nijmegen Pulsed Valve (NPV). The main output characteristics include a short pulse width (as short as 20 μs) combined with operating rates up to 30 Hz. The operation principle of the NPV is based on the Lorentz force created by a pulsed current passing through an aluminum strip located within a magnetic field, which opens the nozzle periodically. The amplitude of displacement of the opening mechanism is sufficient to allow the use of nozzles with up to 1.0 mm diameter. To investigate the performance of the valve, several characterizations were performed with different experimental methods. First, a fast ionization gauge was used to measure the beam intensity of the free jet emanating from the NPV. We compare free jets from the NPV with those from several other pulsed valves in current use in our laboratory. Results showed that a high intensity and short pulse-length beam could be generated by the new valve. Second, the NPV was tested in combination with a skimmer, where resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization combined with velocity map imaging was used to show that the NPV was able to produce a pulsed molecular beam with short pulse duration (~20 μs using 0.1% NO/He at 6 bars) and low rotational temperature (~1 K using 0.5% NO/Ar at 6 bars). Third, a novel two-point pump-probe method was employed which we label double delay scan. This method allows a full kinematic characterization of the molecular beam, including accurate speed ratios at different temporal positions. It was found that the speed ratio was maximum (S = 50 using 0.1% NO/He at 3 bars) at the peak position of the molecular beam and decreased when it was on the leading or falling edge. PMID:23464190

  17. Parallel PIC Simulations of Short-Pulse High Intensity Laser Plasma Interactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasinski, B. F.; Still, C. H.; Langdon, A. B.

    2001-10-01

    We extend our previous simulations of high intensity short pulse laser plasma interactions footnote B. F. Lasinski, A. B. Langdon, S. P. Hatchett, M. H. Key, and M. Tabak, Phys. Plasmas 6, 2041 (1999); S. C. Wilks and W. L. Kruer, IEEE Journal of Quantum Electronics 11, 1954 (1997). to 3D and to much larger systems in 2D using our new, modern, 3D, electromagnetic, fully relativistic, massively parallel PIC code. We study the generation of hot electrons and energetic ions and the associated complex phenomena. Laser light filamentation and the formation of high static magnetic fields are described.

  18. Large-amplitude plasma wave generation with a high-intensity short-pulse beat wave.

    PubMed

    Walton, B; Najmudin, Z; Wei, M S; Marle, C; Kingham, R J; Krushelnick, K; Dangor, A E; Clarke, R J; Poulter, M J; Hernandez-Gomez, C; Hawkes, S; Neely, D; Collier, J L; Danson, C N; Fritzler, S; Malka, V

    2002-12-15

    A short-pulse laser beat wave scheme for advanced particle accelerator applications is examined. A short, intense (3-ps, >10(18)-W cm(-2)) two-frequency laser pulse is produced by use of a modified chirped-pulse amplification scheme and is shown to produce relativistic plasma waves during interactions with low-density plasmas. The generation of plasma waves was observed by measurement of forward Raman scattering. Resonance was found to occur at an electron density many times that expected, owing to ponderomotive displacement of plasma within the focal region. PMID:18033483

  19. Application of short pulsed laser systems for micro-scale processing.

    SciTech Connect

    Jared, Bradley Howell

    2010-03-01

    The relatively recent development of short (nsec) and ultra-short (fsec) pulsed laser systems has introduced process capabilities which are particularly suited for micro-manufacturing applications. Micrometer feature resolutions and minimal heat affected zones are commonly cited benefits, although unique material interactions also prove attractive for many applications. A background of short and ultra-short pulsed laser system capabilities and material interactions will be presented for micro-scale processing. Processing strengths and limitations will be discussed and demonstrated within the framework of applications related to micro-machining, material surface modifications, and fundamental material science research.

  20. Ultrafast dynamics of the dielectric functions of ZnO and BaTiO{sub 3} thin films after intense femtosecond laser excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, S.; Seifert, G.; Chouthe, S.; Graener, H.; Böntgen, T.; Sturm, C.; Schmidt-Grund, R.; Grundmann, M.

    2014-02-07

    The ultrafast carrier dynamics of epitaxial ZnO and BaTiO{sub 3} thin films after intense excitation at 3.10 eV and 4.66 eV photon energy has been studied by femtosecond absorption spectroscopy. Modelling the transient transmission changes on the basis of spectroscopic ellipsometry data and pertinent equilibrium model dielectric functions extended by additional terms for the effects at high carrier density (P-band luminescence and stimulated emission from electron-hole-plasma), a self-consistent parameterized description was obtained for both materials. Excited carrier lifetimes in the range of ≈2 to ≈60 ps and long-lived thermal effects after several hundred ps have been identified in both materials. These findings form a reliable basis to quantitatively describe future femtosecond studies on ZnO/BaTiO{sub 3} heterolayer systems.

  1. Excitation and tuning of Fano-like cavity plasmon resonances in dielectric-metal core-shell resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Ping; Wan, Mingjie; Wu, Wenyang; Chen, Zhuo; Wang, Zhenlin

    2016-05-01

    Fano resonances have been realized in plasmonic systems and have found intriguing applications, in which, however, precisely controlled symmetry breaking or particular arrangement of multiple constituents is usually involved. Although simple core-shell type architectures composed of a spherical dielectric core and a concentric metallic shell layer have been proposed as good candidates that support inherent Fano resonances, these theoretical predictions have rarely seen any detailed experimental investigation. Here, we report on the experimental investigation of the magnetic and electric-based multipolar plasmonic Fano resonances in the dielectric-metal core-shell resonators that are formed by wrapping a nearly perfect metal shell layer around a dielectric sphere. We demonstrate that these Fano resonances originate from the interference between the Mie cavity and sphere plasmon resonances. Moreover, we present that the variation on either the dielectric core size or core refractive index allows for easily tuning the observed Fano resonances over a wide spectral range. Our findings are supported by excellent agreement with analytical calculations, and offer unprecedented opportunities for realizing ultrasensitive bio-sensors, lasing and nonlinear optical devices.Fano resonances have been realized in plasmonic systems and have found intriguing applications, in which, however, precisely controlled symmetry breaking or particular arrangement of multiple constituents is usually involved. Although simple core-shell type architectures composed of a spherical dielectric core and a concentric metallic shell layer have been proposed as good candidates that support inherent Fano resonances, these theoretical predictions have rarely seen any detailed experimental investigation. Here, we report on the experimental investigation of the magnetic and electric-based multipolar plasmonic Fano resonances in the dielectric-metal core-shell resonators that are formed by wrapping a

  2. Advanced concepts for high-power, short-pulse CO2 laser development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Daniel F.; Hasson, Victor; von Bergmann, Hubertus; Chen, Yu-hsin; Schmitt-Sody, A.; Penano, Joseph R.

    2016-06-01

    Ultra-short pulse lasers are dominated by solid-state technology, which typically operates in the near-infrared. Efforts to extend this technology to longer wavelengths are meeting with some success, but the trend remains that longer wavelengths correlate with greatly reduced power. The carbon dioxide (CO2) laser is capable of delivering high energy, 10 micron wavelength pulses, but the gain structure makes operating in the ultra-short pulse regime difficult. The Naval Research Laboratory and Air Force Research Laboratory are developing a novel CO2 laser designed to deliver ~1 Joule, ~1 picosecond pulses, from a compact gain volume (~2x2x80 cm). The design is based on injection seeding an unstable resonator, in order to achieve high energy extraction efficiency, and to take advantage of power broadening. The unstable resonator is seeded by a solid state front end, pumped by a custom built titanium sapphire laser matched to the CO2 laser bandwidth. In order to access a broader range of mid infrared wavelengths using CO2 lasers, one must consider nonlinear frequency multiplication, which is non-trivial due to the bandwidth of the 10 micron radiation.

  3. Strip Velocity Measurements for Gated X-Ray Imagers Using Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, P. W.; Cardenas, M.; Griffin, M.; Mead, A.; Silbernagel, C. T.; Bell, P.; Haque, S. H.

    2013-09-01

    Strip velocity measurements of gated X-ray imagers are presented using an ultra-short pulse laser. Obtaining time-resolved X-ray images of inertial confinement fusion shots presents a difficult challenge. One diagnostic developed to address this challenge is the gated X-ray imagers. The gated X-ray detectors (GXDs) developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory use a microchannel plate (MCP) coated with a gold strip line, which serves as a photocathode. GXDs are used with an array of pinholes, which image onto various parts of the GXD image plane. As the pulse sweeps over the strip lines, it creates a time history of the event with consecutive images. In order to accurately interpret the timing of the images obtained using the GXDs, it is necessary to measure the propagation of the pulse over the strip line. The strip velocity was measured using a short pulse laser with a pulse duration of approximately 1-2 ps. The 200nm light from the laser is used to illuminate the GXD MCP. The laser pulse is split and a retroreflective mirror is used to delay one of the legs. By adjusting the distance to the mirror, one leg is temporally delayed compared to the reference leg. The retroreflective setup is calibrated using a streak camera with a 1 ns full sweep. Resolution of 0.5 mm is accomplished to achieve a temporal resolution of ~5 ps on the GXD strip line.

  4. GINGER simulations of short-pulse effects in the LEUTL FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.; Fawley, W.M.

    2001-07-01

    While the long-pulse, coasting beam model is often used in analysis and simulation of self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free-electron lasers (FELs), many current SASE demonstration experiments employ relatively short electron bunches whose pulse length is on the order of the radiation slippage length. In particular, the low-energy undulator test line (LEUTL) FEL at the Advanced Photon Source has recently lased and nominally saturated in both visible and near-ultraviolet wavelength regions with a sub-ps pulse length that is somewhat shorter than the total slippage length in the 22-m undulator system. In this paper we explore several characteristics of the short pulse regime for SASE FELs with the multidimensional, time-dependent simulation code GINGER, concentrating on making a direct comparison with the experimental results from LEUTL. Items of interest include the radiation gain length, pulse energy, saturation position, and spectral bandwidth. We address the importance of short-pulse effects when scaling the LEUTL results to proposed x-ray FELs and also briefly discuss the possible importance of coherent spontaneous emission at startup.

  5. Inequivalence of Phase and Time Delay in High Harmonic Generation with Short Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Dian; Pi, Liangwen; Starace, Anthony

    2016-05-01

    When mixing two (or more) laser pulses, the phase difference and the time delay are two crucial parameters. For long pulses, the relative phase and the time delay are equivalent: for example, cos(ω1 t) + cos(ω2 t + ϕ) = cos(ω1 t) + cos [ω2(t + ϕ /ω2) ] , i.e. in the extreme case of infinitely long pulses, the phase ϕ can be viewed as a time delay ϕ /ω2 between the two pulses. However, for ultra short pulses, this equivalence breaks down: the carrier-envelope phase can't be viewed as equivalent to a time delay between two pulse envelopes. Our quantum simulations show that the inequivalence of the phase and the time delay in short pulses can result in significantly different high-order harmonic generation spectra, with up to an order of magnitude difference in intensity and up to about 10 harmonic orders of difference in cutoff energy. Further analysis shows the underlying physics of such difference. Exposing this inequivalence directly for the first time, our work provides new insights into pulse shaping and related issues for both experimentalists and theorists. This work was supported in part by NSF Grant No. PHYS-1505492.

  6. Characteristics of High Energy Ka and Bremsstrahlung Sources Generated by Short Pulse Petawatt Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H; Izumi, N; Key, M H; Koch, J A; Landen, O L; Patel, P K; Phillips, T W; Zhang, B B

    2004-04-13

    We have measured the characteristics of high energy K{alpha} sources created with the Vulcan Petawatt laser at RAL and the JanUSP laser at LLNL. High energy x-ray backlighters will be essential for radiographing High-Energy-Density Experimental Science (HEDES) targets for NIF projects especially to probe implosions and high areal density planar samples. Hard K{alpha} x-ray photons are created through relativistic electron plasma interactions in the target material after irradiation by short pulse high intensity lasers. For our Vulcan experiment, we employed a CsI scintillator/CCD camera for imaging and a CCD camera for single photon counting. We measured the Ag K{alpha} source (22 keV) size using a pinhole array and the K{alpha} flux using a single photon counting method. We also radiographed a high Z target using the high energy broadband x-rays generated from these short pulse lasers. This paper will present results from these experiments.

  7. Backscatter RCS for TE and TM excitations of dielectric-filled cavity-backed apertures in two-dimensional bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goggans, Paul M.; Shumpert, Thomas H.

    1991-01-01

    Transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) scattering from dielectric-filled, cavity-backed apertures in two-dimensional bodies are treated using the method of moments technique to solve a set of combined-field integral equations for the equivalent induced electric and magnetic currents on the exterior of the scattering body and on the associated aperture. Results are presented for the backscatter radar cross section (RCS) versus the electrical size of the scatterer for two different dielectric-filled cavity-backed geometries. The first geometry is a circular cylinder of infinite length which has an infinite length slot aperture along one side. The cavity inside the cylinder is dielectric filled and is also of circular cross section. The two cylinders (external and internal) are of different radii and their respective longitudinal axes are parallel but not collocated. The second is a square cylinder of infinite length which has an infinite length slot aperture along one side. The cavity inside the square cylinder is dielectric-filled and is also of square cross section.

  8. Excitation and tuning of Fano-like cavity plasmon resonances in dielectric-metal core-shell resonators.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ping; Wan, Mingjie; Wu, Wenyang; Chen, Zhuo; Wang, Zhenlin

    2016-05-21

    Fano resonances have been realized in plasmonic systems and have found intriguing applications, in which, however, precisely controlled symmetry breaking or particular arrangement of multiple constituents is usually involved. Although simple core-shell type architectures composed of a spherical dielectric core and a concentric metallic shell layer have been proposed as good candidates that support inherent Fano resonances, these theoretical predictions have rarely seen any detailed experimental investigation. Here, we report on the experimental investigation of the magnetic and electric-based multipolar plasmonic Fano resonances in the dielectric-metal core-shell resonators that are formed by wrapping a nearly perfect metal shell layer around a dielectric sphere. We demonstrate that these Fano resonances originate from the interference between the Mie cavity and sphere plasmon resonances. Moreover, we present that the variation on either the dielectric core size or core refractive index allows for easily tuning the observed Fano resonances over a wide spectral range. Our findings are supported by excellent agreement with analytical calculations, and offer unprecedented opportunities for realizing ultrasensitive bio-sensors, lasing and nonlinear optical devices. PMID:27139034

  9. Comparison of short-pulsed and long-pulsed 532 nm lasers in the removal of freckles.

    PubMed

    Vejjabhinanta, Voraphol; Elsaie, Mohamed L; Patel, Shalu S; Patel, Asha; Caperton, Caroline; Nouri, Keyvan

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of the 532 nm long-pulsed laser (10 ms) with that of the 532 nm short-pulsed laser (10 ns) for freckle removal. Currently, the gold standard for treatment is the short-pulsed laser. Recently, several long-pulsed lasers have been introduced for both hair removal and the treatment of freckles. To our investigative team's knowledge, no controlled experiments have been performed to compare the safety and efficacy of long-pulsed versus short-pulsed lasers for the treatment of freckles. This was a 4-week trial, and all patients had three freckles that were randomly allocated to be treated with short-pulse laser, long-pulse laser, or to receive no treatment (control). All patients had three freckles that were randomly selected to be treated with short-pulse 532 nm Medlite IV laser (10 n, 1 J/cm(2)), or long-pulse 532 nm Aura laser (10 ms, 1 J/cm(2)) or to remain as a control (no treatment). The laser treatment was only performed once, followed by a 1-day and a 1-month follow-up visit. Freckle size was determined by a novel surface area measurement technique that was created by our research staff. The study included 17 sets of freckles (three in each set). All of the lesions which received the short-pulsed laser treatment had immediate whitening of the lesions, which turned into dry scabs the next day. None of the freckles treated in the long-pulsed group or control group developed immediate whitening or scabs. No blisters or ulcers developed. The average pain score in the short-pulsed laser group was 2-3 out of 10, while it was 0 out of 10 in the long-pulsed laser group. All scabs that developed in the short-pulsed laser group fell off between days 6 and 12 (average 8 days). The outcome of this study verified the appropriate treatment of freckles. The study confirmed that when the same energy settings, short-pulsed laser is the more effective laser treatment regimen (when compared with the long-pulsed laser

  10. Short-Pulse Laser Sintering of Multilayer Hard Metal Coatings: Structure and Wear Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharanzhevskiy, Evgeny; Ipatov, Alexey; Nikolaeva, Irina; Zakirova, Raushaniya

    2015-06-01

    This paper reports on the phase composition and properties of multilayer hard metal coatings deposited on steel by a process variant of Selective laser melting (SLM). The process is based on layer-wise short-pulse laser sintering of high-dispersive WC-Co powder on a steel substrate. High temperature in the molten zone and chemical interaction with the substrate explain high level of adhesion strength between the coating and the substrate. The technique allows obtaining both high quality hard-metal multilayer gradient coatings with thickness up to 200 μm, density near to the theoretical density (TD), hardness up to 21 GPa and complex 3D objects by layer-wise powder based process such as SLM.

  11. Monochromatic short pulse laser produced ion beam using a compact passive magnetic device

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S. N.; Gauthier, M.; Higginson, D. P.; Dorard, S.; Marquès, J.-R.; Fuchs, J.; Mangia, F.; Atzeni, S.; Riquier, R.; CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon

    2014-04-15

    High-intensity laser accelerated protons and ions are emerging sources with complementary characteristics to those of conventional sources, namely high charge, high current, and short bunch duration, and therefore can be useful for dedicated applications. However, these beams exhibit a broadband energy spectrum when, for some experiments, monoenergetic beams are required. We present here an adaptation of conventional chicane devices in a compact form (10 cm × 20 cm) which enables selection of a specific energy interval from the broadband spectrum. This is achieved by employing magnetic fields to bend the trajectory of the laser produced proton beam through two slits in order to select the minimum and maximum beam energy. The device enables a production of a high current, short duration source with a reproducible output spectrum from short pulse laser produced charged particle beams.

  12. Fluctuations of energy density of short-pulse optical radiation in the turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Banakh, V A; Smalikho, I N

    2014-09-22

    Fluctuations of energy density of short-pulse optical radiation in the turbulent atmosphere have been studied based on numerical solution of the parabolic wave equation for the complex spectral amplitude of the wave field by the split-step method. It has been shown that under conditions of strong optical turbulence, the relative variance of energy density fluctuations of pulsed radiation of femtosecond duration becomes much less than the relative variance of intensity fluctuations of continuous-wave radiation. The spatial structure of fluctuations of the energy density with a decrease of the pulse duration becomes more large-scale and homogeneous. For shorter pulses the maximal value of the probability density distribution of energy density fluctuations tends to the mean value of the energy density. PMID:25321700

  13. Ion Beams in Short-Pulse, High Intensity Laser Matter Interactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasinski, B. F.; Langdon, A. B.; Still, C. H.; Tabak, M.; Town, R. P. J.; Kruer, W. L.; Wilks, S. C.; Welch, D. R.

    2002-11-01

    Experiments on the interaction of short pulse high intensity lasers with thin foils have produced intense ion beams with surprisingly good emittance. We report on explicit PIC and hybrid particle-fluid simulations motivated by these experiments. In addition, we study the focusing of these beams and their possible collective effects. The LSP code footnote D. R. Welch, et al, Nucl. Inst. Meth. Phys. Res. A 242, 134 (2001). uses a direct implicit particle-in-cell algorithm in 2 or 3 dimensions to solve for the beam particles and the background particles are treated as a fluid. Implications for the fast ignitor concept footnote M. Tabak, et al, Phys. Plasmas 1, 1626 (1994). in which energetic fast particles transport energy to the high-density compressed fuel will be discussed.

  14. Ignition and Growth Modeling of Short Pulse Duration Shock Initiation Experiments on HNS IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarver, Craig; Chidester, Steven

    2013-06-01

    Short pulse duration shock initiation experiments on 1.60 g/cm3 density (92% TMD) HNS IV have been reported by Schwarz, Bowden et al., Dudley et al., Goveas et al., Greenaway et al., and others. This flyer threshold velocity for detonation/failure data plus measured unreacted HNS Hugoniot data and detonation cylinder test product expansion data were used as the experimental basis for the development of an Ignition and Growth reactive flow model for the shock initiation of HNS IV. The resulting Ignition and Growth HNS IV model parameters yielded good overall agreement with all of this experimental data. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.: Explosive, HNS IV, shock to detonation transition, Ignition and Growth: 82.33.Vx, 82.40.Fp.

  15. Epithermal Neutron Source for Neutron Resonance Spectroscopy (NRS) using High Intensity, Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Higginson, D P; McNaney, J M; Swift, D C; Bartal, T; Hey, D S; Pape, S L; Mackinnon, A; Mariscal, D; Nakamura, H; Nakanii, N; Beg, F N

    2010-04-22

    A neutron source for neutron resonance spectroscopy (NRS) has been developed using high intensity, short pulse lasers. This measurement technique will allow for robust measurements of interior ion temperature of laser-shocked materials and provide insight into equation of state (EOS) measurements. The neutron generation technique uses protons accelerated by lasers off of Cu foils to create neutrons in LiF, through (p,n) reactions with {sup 7}Li and {sup 19}F. The distribution of the incident proton beam has been diagnosed using radiochromic film (RCF). This distribution is used as the input for a (p,n) neturon prediction code which is compared to experimentally measured neutron yields. From this calculation, a total fluence of 1.8 x 10{sup 9} neutrons is infered, which is shown to be a reasonable amount for NRS temperature measurement.

  16. Characterization of a novel, short pulse laser-driven neutron sourcea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, D.; Falk, K.; Guler, N.; Deppert, O.; Devlin, M.; Favalli, A.; Fernandez, J. C.; Gautier, D. C.; Geissel, M.; Haight, R.; Hamilton, C. E.; Hegelich, B. M.; Johnson, R. P.; Merrill, F.; Schaumann, G.; Schoenberg, K.; Schollmeier, M.; Shimada, T.; Taddeucci, T.; Tybo, J. L.; Wender, S. A.; Wilde, C. H.; Wurden, G. A.; Roth, M.

    2013-05-01

    We present a full characterization of a short pulse laser-driven neutron source. Neutrons are produced by nuclear reactions of laser-driven ions deposited in a secondary target. The emission of neutrons is a superposition of an isotropic component into 4π and a forward directed, jet-like contribution, with energies ranging up to 80 MeV. A maximum flux of 4.4 × 109 neutrons/sr has been observed and used for fast neutron radiography. On-shot characterization of the ion driver and neutron beam has been done with a variety of different diagnostics, including particle detectors, nuclear reaction, and time-of-flight methods. The results are of great value for future optimization of this novel technique and implementation in advanced applications.

  17. Characterization of a novel, short pulse laser-driven neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, D.; Falk, K.; Guler, N.; Devlin, M.; Favalli, A.; Fernandez, J. C.; Gautier, D. C.; Haight, R.; Hamilton, C. E.; Hegelich, B. M.; Johnson, R. P.; Merrill, F.; Schoenberg, K.; Shimada, T.; Taddeucci, T.; Tybo, J. L.; Wender, S. A.; Wilde, C. H.; Wurden, G. A.; Deppert, O.; and others

    2013-05-15

    We present a full characterization of a short pulse laser-driven neutron source. Neutrons are produced by nuclear reactions of laser-driven ions deposited in a secondary target. The emission of neutrons is a superposition of an isotropic component into 4π and a forward directed, jet-like contribution, with energies ranging up to 80 MeV. A maximum flux of 4.4 × 10{sup 9} neutrons/sr has been observed and used for fast neutron radiography. On-shot characterization of the ion driver and neutron beam has been done with a variety of different diagnostics, including particle detectors, nuclear reaction, and time-of-flight methods. The results are of great value for future optimization of this novel technique and implementation in advanced applications.

  18. Status of the Short-Pulse X-ray Project at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Nassiri, A; Berenc, T G; Borland, M; Brajuskovic, B; Bromberek, D J; Carwardine, J; Decker, G; Emery, L; Fuerst, J D; Grelick, A E; Horan, D; Kaluzny, J; Lenkszus, F; Lill, R M; Liu, J; Ma, H; Sajaev, V; Smith, T L; Stillwell, B K; Waldschmidt, G J; Wu, G; Yang, B X; Yang, Y; Zholents, A; Byrd, J M; Doolittle, L R; Huang, G; Cheng, G; Ciovati, G; Dhakal, P; Eremeev, G V; Feingold, J J; Geng, R L; Henry, J; Kneisel, P; Macha, K; Mammosser, J D; Matalevich, J; Palczewski, A D; Rimmer, R A; Wang, H; Wilson, K M; Wiseman, M; Li, Z; Xiao, L

    2012-07-01

    The Advanced Photon Source Upgrade (APS-U) Project at Argonne will include generation of short-pulse x-rays based on Zholents deflecting cavity scheme. We have chosen superconducting (SC) cavities in order to have a continuous train of crabbed bunches and flexibility of operating modes. In collaboration with Jefferson Laboratory, we are prototyping and testing a number of single-cell deflecting cavities and associated auxiliary systems with promising initial results. In collaboration with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, we are working to develop state-of-the-art timing, synchronization, and differential rf phase stability systems that are required for SPX. Collaboration with Advanced Computations Department at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center is looking into simulations of complex, multi-cavity geometries with lower- and higher-order modes waveguide dampers using ACE3P. This contribution provides the current R&D status of the SPX project.

  19. High power, short pulses ultraviolet laser for the development of a new x-ray laser

    SciTech Connect

    Meixler, L.; Nam, C.H.; Robinson, J.; Tighe, W.; Krushelnick, K.; Suckewer, S.; Goldhar, J.; Seely, J.; Feldman, U.

    1989-04-01

    A high power, short pulse ultraviolet laser system (Powerful Picosecond-Laser) has been developed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) as part of experiments designed to generate shorter wavelength x-ray lasers. With the addition of pulse compression and a final KrF amplifier the laser output is expected to have reached 1/3-1/2 TW (10/sup 12/ watts) levels. The laser system, particularly the final amplifier, is described along with some initial soft x-ray spectra from laser-target experiments. The front end of the PP-Laser provides an output of 20--30 GW (10/sup 9/ watts) and can be focussed to intensities of /approximately/10/sup 16/ W/cm/sup 2/. Experiments using this output to examine the effects of a prepulse on laser-target interaction are described. 19 refs., 14 figs.

  20. Osteoblast behavior on various ultra short pulsed laser deposited surface coatings.

    PubMed

    Qu, Chengjuan; Myllymaa, Sami; Prittinen, Juha; Koistinen, Arto P; Lappalainen, Reijo; Lammi, Mikko J

    2013-04-01

    Ultra short pulsed laser deposition technique was utilized to create amorphous diamond, alumina and carbon nitride, and two different titania coatings on silicon wafers, thus producing five different surface deposited films with variable physico-chemical properties. The surface characterizations, including the roughness, the contact angle and the zeta potential measurements were performed before we tested the growth properties of human osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells on these surfaces (three separate experiments). The average roughness and hydrophobicity were the highest on titania-deposited surfaces, while carbon nitride was the most hydrophilic one. Osteoblasts on all surfaces showed a flattened, spread-out morphology, although on amorphous diamond the cell shape appeared more elongated than on the other surfaces. On rough titania, the area covered by the osteoblasts was smaller than on the other ones. Cell proliferation assay did not show any statistically significant differences. PMID:23827623

  1. Two-color short-pulse laser altimeter measurements of ocean surface backscatter.

    PubMed

    Abshire, J B; McGarry, J F

    1987-04-01

    The timing and correlation properties of pulsed laser backscatter from the ocean surface have been measured with a two-color short-pulse laser altimeter. The Nd: YAG laser transmitted 70-and 35-ps wide pulses simultaneously at 532 and 355 nm at nadir, and the time-resolved returns were recorded by a receiver with 800-ps response time. The time-resolved backscatter measured at both 330- and 1291-m altitudes showed little pulse broadening due to the submeter laser spot size. The differential delay of the 355- and 532-nm backscattered waveforms were measured with a rms error of ~75 ps. The change in aircraft altitudes also permitted the change in atmospheric pressure to be estimated by using the two-color technique. PMID:20454319

  2. Focal spot measurement in ultra-intense ultra-short pulse laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lanqin; Peng, Hansheng; Zhou, Kainan; Wang, Xiaodong; Wang, Xiao; Zeng, Xiaoming; Zhu, Qihua; Huang, Xiaojun; Wei, Xiaofeng; Ren, Huan

    2005-06-01

    A peak power of 286-TW Ti:sapphire laser facility referred to as SILEX-I was successfully built at China Academy of Engineering Physics, for a pulse duration of 30 fs in a three-stage Ti:sapphire amplifier chain based on chirped-pulse amplification. The beam have a wavefront distortion of 0.63μm PV and 0.09μm RMS, and the focal spot with an f/2.2 OAP is 5.7μm, to our knowledge, this is the best far field obtained for high-power ultra-short pulse laser systems with no deformable mirror wavefront correction. The peak focused intensity of ~1021W /cm2 were expected.

  3. The thermoelastic basis of short pulsed laser ablation of biological tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Itzkan, I; Albagli, D; Dark, M L; Perelman, L T; von Rosenberg, C; Feld, M S

    1995-01-01

    Strong evidence that short-pulse laser ablation of biological tissues is a photomechanical process is presented. A full three-dimensional, time-dependent solution to the thermoelastic wave equation is compared to the results of experiments using an interferometric surface monitor to measure thermoelastic expansion. Agreement is excellent for calibrations performed on glass and on acrylic at low laser fluences. For cortical bone, the measurements agree well with the theoretical predictions once optical scattering is included. The theory predicts the presence of the tensile stresses necessary to rupture the tissue during photomechanical ablation. The technique is also used to monitor the ablation event both before and after material is ejected. PMID:7892208

  4. Two-dimensional electromagnetic Child-Langmuir law of a short-pulse electron flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S. H.; Tai, L. C.; Liu, Y. L.; Ang, L. K.; Koh, W. S.

    2011-02-15

    Two-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations were performed to study the effect of the displacement current and the self-magnetic field on the space charge limited current density or the Child-Langmuir law of a short-pulse electron flow with a propagation distance of {zeta} and an emitting width of W from the classical regime to the relativistic regime. Numerical scaling of the two-dimensional electromagnetic Child-Langmuir law was constructed and it scales with ({zeta}/W) and ({zeta}/W){sup 2} at the classical and relativistic regimes, respectively. Our findings reveal that the displacement current can considerably enhance the space charge limited current density as compared to the well-known two-dimensional electrostatic Child-Langmuir law even at the classical regime.

  5. Polarimetric, Ka-band, combined, short-pulse scatterometer, and radiometer system for platform application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakelyan, Artashes K.; Alaverdyan, Eduard R.; Arakelyan, Arsen A.; Darbinyan, Sargis A.; Hambaryan, Astghik K.; Hambaryan, Vardan K.; Karyan, Vanik V.; Ogannesyan, Gagik G.; Poghosyan, Nubar G.; Smolin, Aleksander I.

    2005-05-01

    In this paper Ka-band (37GHz), dual polarization, combined short-pulse scatterometer-radiometer is described, for short distance remote sensing of bare soil and land snow cover and for simultaneous and coincident measurements of observed media microwave reflective and emissive characteristics, under laboratory-control conditions. Developed system is set on a mobile bogie moving on the height of 6.5m along a stationary platform of 26m of length. It allows carry out polarimetric (vv, vh, hh, hv), simultaneous and coincident microwave active-passive measurements of observed surface (soil, soil vegetation, snow and water surface) parameters at angles of incidence from the while of 0-60o.

  6. All-reflective, highly accurate polarization rotator for high-power short-pulse laser systems.

    PubMed

    Keppler, S; Hornung, M; Bödefeld, R; Kahle, M; Hein, J; Kaluza, M C

    2012-08-27

    We present the setup of a polarization rotating device and its adaption for high-power short-pulse laser systems. Compared to conventional halfwave plates, the all-reflective principle using three zero-phase shift mirrors provides a higher accuracy and a higher damage threshold. Since plan-parallel plates, e.g. these halfwave plates, generate postpulses, which could lead to the generation of prepulses during the subsequent laser chain, the presented device avoids parasitic pulses and is therefore the preferable alternative for high-contrast applications. Moreover the device is easily scalable for large beam diameters and its spectral reflectivity can be adjusted by an appropriate mirror coating to be well suited for ultra-short laser pulses. PMID:23037123

  7. Chirp-free ultra-short pulses in complex nonlinear optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiance; Liang, Jianchu; Cao, Jianzhong; Song, Jinxiang; Cai, Zebin

    2016-04-01

    Chirp-free ultra-short pulses propagating in optical fiber with complex parameters are investigated for the first time. The existence condition for such chirp-free ultrashort pulses is that the imaginary parts of the nonlinear terms, i.e., the nonlinear absorption coefficient (a2i), nonlinear dispersion coefficient (a4i) and imaginary Raman coefficient (a2i) fulfill a linear relationship a2i = a4i ω = -2/3 a5i ω . Bight solitons can stably propagate in such complex nonlinear optical fiber. It is found that the single Jacobi elliptic function solutions have two free parameters while hybrid Jacobi elliptic function solutions have only one free parameter.

  8. Heating Mechanisms in Short-Pulse Laser-Driven Cone Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R.J.

    2006-01-27

    The fast ignitor is a modern approach to laser fusion that uses a short-pulse laser to initiate thermonuclear burn. In its simplest form the laser launches relativistic electrons that carry its energy to a precompressed fusion target. Cones have been used to give the light access to the dense target core through the low-density ablative cloud surrounding it. Here the ANTHEM implicit hybrid simulation model shows that the peak ion temperatures measured in recent cone target experiments arose chiefly from return current joule heating, mildly supplemented by relativistic electron drag. Magnetic fields augment this heating only slightly, but capture hot electrons near the cone surface and force the hot electron stream into filaments.

  9. Heating mechanisms in short-pulse laser-driven cone targets.

    PubMed

    Mason, R J

    2006-01-27

    The fast ignitor is a modern approach to laser fusion that uses a short-pulse laser to initiate thermonuclear burn. In its simplest form the laser launches relativistic electrons that carry its energy to a precompressed fusion target. Cones have been used to give the light access to the dense target core through the low-density ablative cloud surrounding it. Here the ANTHEM implicit hybrid simulation model shows that the peak ion temperatures measured in recent cone target experiments arose chiefly from return current joule heating, mildly supplemented by relativistic electron drag. Magnetic fields augment this heating only slightly, but capture hot electrons near the cone surface and force the hot electron stream into filaments. PMID:16486715

  10. Monochromatic short pulse laser produced ion beam using a compact passive magnetic device.

    PubMed

    Chen, S N; Gauthier, M; Higginson, D P; Dorard, S; Mangia, F; Riquier, R; Atzeni, S; Marquès, J-R; Fuchs, J

    2014-04-01

    High-intensity laser accelerated protons and ions are emerging sources with complementary characteristics to those of conventional sources, namely high charge, high current, and short bunch duration, and therefore can be useful for dedicated applications. However, these beams exhibit a broadband energy spectrum when, for some experiments, monoenergetic beams are required. We present here an adaptation of conventional chicane devices in a compact form (10 cm × 20 cm) which enables selection of a specific energy interval from the broadband spectrum. This is achieved by employing magnetic fields to bend the trajectory of the laser produced proton beam through two slits in order to select the minimum and maximum beam energy. The device enables a production of a high current, short duration source with a reproducible output spectrum from short pulse laser produced charged particle beams. PMID:24784604

  11. Experimental approach to interaction physics challenges of the shock ignition scheme using short pulse lasers.

    PubMed

    Goyon, C; Depierreux, S; Yahia, V; Loisel, G; Baccou, C; Courvoisier, C; Borisenko, N G; Orekhov, A; Rosmej, O; Labaune, C

    2013-12-01

    An experimental program was designed to study the most important issues of laser-plasma interaction physics in the context of the shock ignition scheme. In the new experiments presented in this Letter, a combination of kilojoule and short laser pulses was used to study the laser-plasma coupling at high laser intensities for a large range of electron densities and plasma profiles. We find that the backscatter is dominated by stimulated Brillouin scattering with stimulated Raman scattering staying at a limited level. This is in agreement with past experiments using long pulses but laser intensities limited to 2×10(15)  W/cm2, or short pulses with intensities up to 5×10(16)  W/cm2 as well as with 2D particle-in-cell simulations. PMID:24476284

  12. The evolution of ultra-intense, short-pulse lasers in underdense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, C.D.; Mori, W.B.; Tzeng, K.C.

    1995-11-03

    The propagation of short-pulse lasers through underdense plasmas at ultra-high intensities (I {>=}10{sup 19}W/cm) is examined. The pulse evolution is found to be significantly different than it is for moderate intensities. Rather than beam breakup from self-modulation, Raman forward scattering and laser hose instabilities the behavior is dominated by leading edge erosion. A differential equation which describes local pump depletion is derived and used to analyze the formation and evolution of the erosion. This pulse erosion is demonstrated with one dimensional particle in cell (PIC) simulations. In addition, two dimensional simulations are presented which show pulse erosion along with other effects such as channeling and diffraction.

  13. An imaging proton spectrometer for short-pulse laser plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Hazi, A; van Maren, R; Chen, S; Fuchs, J; Gauthier, M; Pape, S L; Rygg, J R; Shepherd, R

    2010-05-11

    Ultra intense short pulse laser pulses incident on solid targets can generate energetic protons. In additions to their potentially important applications such as in cancer treatments and proton fast ignition, these protons are essential to understand the complex physics of intense laser plasma interaction. To better characterize these laser-produced protons, we designed and constructed a novel, spatially imaging proton spectrometer that will not only measure proton energy distribution with high resolution, but also provide its angular characteristics. The information obtained from this spectrometer compliments those from commonly used diagnostics including radiochromic film packs, CR39 nuclear track detectors, and non-imaging magnetic spectrometers. The basic characterizations and sample data from this instrument are presented.

  14. High Energy, Short Pulse Fiber Injection Lasers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J W; Messerly, M J; Phan, H H; Crane, J K; Beach, R J; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2008-09-10

    A short pulse fiber injection laser for the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has been developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This system produces 100 {micro}J pulses with 5 nm of bandwidth centered at 1053 nm. The pulses are stretched to 2.5 ns and have been recompressed to sub-ps pulse widths. A key feature of the system is that the pre-pulse power contrast ratio exceeds 80 dB. The system can also precisely adjust the final recompressed pulse width and timing and has been designed for reliable, hands free operation. The key challenges in constructing this system were control of the signal to noise ratio, dispersion management and managing the impact of self phase modulation on the chirped pulse.

  15. A short pulse, free running, Nd : YAG laser for the cleaning of stone cultural heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzinghi, Piero; Margheri, Fabrizio

    2003-09-01

    This paper presents a Nd : YAG laser operating in free running (FR) regime, with a pulse duration (20 μs) shorter than conventional systems (>200 μs), mainly developed for applications in laser cleaning of stones, especially for the restoration of cultural heritage. The system was also optimized to achieve high energy and low divergence, for easy coupling with optical fibers. The unusual pulse temporal regime induces a spiky behavior of the laser output which could also help in the application. Details on the technologies for the flashlamps power supplies, including the discharge circuits needed to achieve the short pulses, are given. Application trials on artworks and artificial samples are also discussed. Results show that the intermediate pulse duration avoids the mechanical damage induced by the photomechanical effect of Q-switch lasers and the thermal damage, as superficial melting, usually induced by long pulse FR lasers.

  16. Short Pulse Laser Absorption and Energy Partition at Relativistic Laser Intensities

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, R; Chen, H; Ping, Y; Dyer, G; Wilks, S; Chung, H; Kemp, A; Hanson, S; Widmann, K; Fournier, K; Faenov, A; Pikuz, T; Niles, A; Beiersdorfer, P

    2007-02-27

    We have performed experiments at the COMET and Calisto short pulse laser facilities to make the first comprehensive measurements of the laser absorption and energy partition in solid targets heated with an ultrashort laser pulse focused to relativistic laser intensities (>10 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}). The measurements show an exceedingly high absorption for P polarized laser-target interactions above 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. Additionally, the hot electron population is observed to markedly increase at the same intensity range. An investigation of the relaxation process was initiated u using time sing time-resolved K{sub {alpha}} spectroscopy. Measurements of the time time-resolved K{sub {alpha}} radiation suggest a 10-20 ps relativistic electron relaxation time. However modeling difficulties of these data are apparent and a more detailed investigation on this subject matter is warranted.

  17. Detection limits of organic compounds achievable with intense, short-pulse lasers.

    PubMed

    Miles, Jordan; De Camillis, Simone; Alexander, Grace; Hamilton, Kathryn; Kelly, Thomas J; Costello, John T; Zepf, Matthew; Williams, Ian D; Greenwood, Jason B

    2015-06-21

    Many organic molecules have strong absorption bands which can be accessed by ultraviolet short pulse lasers to produce efficient ionization. This resonant multiphoton ionization scheme has already been exploited as an ionization source in time-of-flight mass spectrometers used for environmental trace analysis. In the present work we quantify the ultimate potential of this technique by measuring absolute ion yields produced from the interaction of 267 nm femtosecond laser pulses with the organic molecules indole and toluene, and gases Xe, N2 and O2. Using multiphoton ionization cross sections extracted from these results, we show that the laser pulse parameters required for real-time detection of aromatic molecules at concentrations of one part per trillion in air and a limit of detection of a few attomoles are achievable with presently available commercial laser systems. The potential applications for the analysis of human breath, blood and tissue samples are discussed. PMID:25929227

  18. Hot-electron surface retention in intense short-pulse laser-matter interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R.J.; Dodd, E.S.; Albright, B.J.

    2005-07-01

    Implicit hybrid plasma simulations predict that a significant fraction of the energy deposited into hot electrons can be retained near the surface of targets with steep density gradients illuminated by intense short-pulse lasers. This retention derives from the lateral transport of heated electrons randomly emitted in the presence of spontaneous magnetic fields arising near the laser spot, from geometric effects associated with a small hot-electron source, and from E fields arising in reaction to the ponderomotive force. Below the laser spot hot electrons are axially focused into a target by the B fields, and can filament in moderate Z targets by resistive Weibel-like instability, if the effective background electron temperature remains sufficiently low. Carefully engineered use of such retention in conjunction with ponderomotive density profile steepening could result in a reduced hot-electron range that aids fast ignition. Alternatively, such retention may disturb a deeper deposition needed for efficient radiography and backside fast ion generation.

  19. Plasma channel charging by an intense short pulse laser and ion Coulomb explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, V.K.; Taguchi, T.; Liu, C.S.

    2005-04-15

    The combined effects of relativistic self-focusing and the expulsion of electrons by the ponderomotive force of a radially focused laser create an ion channel, depleted of electrons, of radius r{sub 0}{approx}c/{omega}{sub p}, where {omega}{sub p} is the electron plasma frequency. This charging process takes place on plasma period, {omega}{sub p}{sup -1}, time scale. The Coulomb explosion of the channel accelerates ions to several hundreds of keV energy in about an ion plasma period, constituting an important ion acceleration mechanism by short pulse intense laser. In the case of a deuterium-tritium plasma, the accelerated ions can produce fusion energy with an efficiency of {approx}0.5%.

  20. Control of Brillouin short-pulse seed amplification by chirping the pump pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmann, G.; Spatschek, K. H.

    2015-04-15

    Seed amplification via Brillouin backscattering of a long pump pulse is considered. Similar to Raman amplification, several obstructive effects may occur during short-pulse Brillouin amplification. One is the spontaneous Raman backscattering of the pump before interacting with the seed. Preforming the plasma and/or chirping the pump will reduce unwanted pump backscattering. Optimized regions for low-loss pump propagation were proposed already in conjunction with Raman seed amplification. Hence, the influence of the chirp of the pump during Brillouin interaction with the seed becomes important and will be considered here. Both, the linear as well as the nonlinear evolution phases of the seed caused by Brillouin amplification under the action of a chirped pump are investigated. The amplification rate as well as the seed profiles are presented as function of the chirping rate. Also the dependence of superradiant scaling rates on the chirp parameter is discussed.

  1. Optical coherence tomography in material deformation by using short pulse laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Eun Seo; Kwak, Wooseop; Shin, Yongjin; Kim, Youngseop; Jung, Woonggyu; Ahn, Yeh-Chan; Chen, Zhongping; Jeong, Eun Joo; Kim, Chang-Seok

    2008-02-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of OCT imaging for the investigation of samples, which are processed by the short pulse laser. The use of short pulse lasers in various material processing have provided the advantages such as a high peak power and a small heat affected zone over conventional methods based on mechanical treatment. However, due to the improper application of the lasers, the unwanted surface or structural deformation of materials and the thermal damages around an irradiation spot can be caused. Thus, the real-time monitoring/evaluation of laser processing performance in-situ is needed to prevent the excessive deformation of the material and to determine optimal processing conditions. As a standard method to investigation of the material processing by using the lasers, the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) or the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation of a physically cleaved surface is used although sample damages are given during the cleaving and polishing process. In this paper, we utilized the OCT advantages such as high resolution and non-invasive investigation to evaluate the laser processing performance. OCT images for the deformation monitoring of the ABS plastic present correlation with images obtained from conventional investigation methods. OCT images of the maxillary bone clearly show the difference in the pit formation of the biological sample at different irradiation conditions. We prove the potential of OCT for the evaluation of laser-processed various samples. Integrating OCT system into a laser processing system, we can visualize the effect of laser-based treatments in clinical and industrial fields.

  2. An overview of LLNL high-energy short-pulse technology for advanced radiography of laser fusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barty, C. P. J.; Key, M.; Britten, J.; Beach, R.; Beer, G.; Brown, C.; Bryan, S.; Caird, J.; Carlson, T.; Crane, J.; Dawson, J.; Erlandson, A. C.; Fittinghoff, D.; Hermann, M.; Hoaglan, C.; Iyer, A.; Jones, L., II; Jovanovic, I.; Komashko, A.; Landen, O.; Liao, Z.; Molander, W.; Mitchell, S.; Moses, E.; Nielsen, N.; Nguyen, H.-H.; Nissen, J.; Payne, S.; Pennington, D.; Risinger, L.; Rushford, M.; Skulina, K.; Spaeth, M.; Stuart, B.; Tietbohl, G.; Wattellier, B.

    2004-12-01

    The technical challenges and motivations for high-energy, short-pulse generation with NIF and possibly other large-scale Nd : glass lasers are reviewed. High-energy short-pulse generation (multi-kilojoule, picosecond pulses) will be possible via the adaptation of chirped pulse amplification laser techniques on NIF. Development of metre-scale, high-efficiency, high-damage-threshold final optics is a key technical challenge. In addition, deployment of high energy petawatt (HEPW) pulses on NIF is constrained by existing laser infrastructure and requires new, compact compressor designs and short-pulse, fibre-based, seed-laser systems. The key motivations for HEPW pulses on NIF is briefly outlined and includes high-energy, x-ray radiography, proton beam radiography, proton isochoric heating and tests of the fast ignitor concept for inertial confinement fusion.

  3. Mitigation of Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) Effects from Short-Pulse Lasers and Fusion Neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Eder, D C; Throop, A; Brown, Jr., C G; Kimbrough, J; Stowell, M L; White, D A; Song, P; Back, N; MacPhee, A; Chen, H; DeHope, W; Ping, Y; Maddox, B; Lister, J; Pratt, G; Ma, T; Tsui, Y; Perkins, M; O'Brien, D; Patel, P

    2009-03-06

    Our research focused on obtaining a fundamental understanding of the source and properties of EMP at the Titan PW(petawatt)-class laser facility. The project was motivated by data loss and damage to components due to EMP, which can limit diagnostic techniques that can be used reliably at short-pulse PW-class laser facilities. Our measurements of the electromagnetic fields, using a variety of probes, provide information on the strength, time duration, and frequency dependence of the EMP. We measure electric field strengths in the 100's of kV/m range, durations up to 100 ns, and very broad frequency response extending out to 5 GHz and possibly beyond. This information is being used to design shielding to mitigate the effects of EMP on components at various laser facilities. We showed the need for well-shielded cables and oscilloscopes to obtain high quality data. Significant work was invested in data analysis techniques to process this data. This work is now being transferred to data analysis procedures for the EMP diagnostics being fielded on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In addition to electromagnetic field measurements, we measured the spatial and energy distribution of electrons escaping from targets. This information is used as input into the 3D electromagnetic code, EMSolve, which calculates time dependent electromagnetic fields. The simulation results compare reasonably well with data for both the strength and broad frequency bandwidth of the EMP. This modeling work required significant improvements in EMSolve to model the fields in the Titan chamber generated by electrons escaping the target. During dedicated Titan shots, we studied the effects of varying laser energy, target size, and pulse duration on EMP properties. We also studied the effect of surrounding the target with a thick conducting sphere and cube as a potential mitigation approach. System generated EMP (SGEMP) in coaxial cables does not appear to be a significant at Titan. Our results

  4. Experimental Results on the First Short Pulse Laser Driven Neutron Source Powerful Enough For Applications In Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guler, Nevzat

    2012-10-01

    Short pulse laser driven neutron source can be a compact and relatively cheap way to produce neutrons with energies in excess of 10 MeV. It is based on short pulse laser driven ions interacting with a converter material to produce neutrons via separation or breakup mechanisms. Previous research on the short pulse laser driven ion acceleration has mainly concentrated on surface acceleration mechanisms, which typically yield isotropic emission of neutrons from the converter. Recent experiments performed with a high contrast laser at TRIDENT facility at LANL demonstrated laser driven ion acceleration mechanism based on the concept of relativistic transparency. This produced an intense beam of high energy (up to 80 MeV) deuterons directed into a Be converter to produce a forward peaked neutron flux with a record yield, on the order of 4.4x10^9 n/sr. The produced neutron beam had a pulse duration less than a nanosecond and an energy range between 2-80 MeV, peaking around 12 MeV. The neutrons in the energy range of 2.5 to 15 MeV were selected by the gated neutron imager to radiograph tungsten blocks of different thicknesses. We will present the results from the two acceleration mechanisms and the first short pulse laser generated neutron radiograph.

  5. Characterization of radiochromic film scanning techniques used in short-pulse-laser ion acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Joseph S.; Flippo, Kirk A.; Gaillard, Sandrine A.

    2008-10-15

    Radiochromic film (RCF) is increasingly being used as a detector for proton beams from short-pulse laser-matter interaction experiments using the RCF imaging spectroscope technique. The community has traditionally used inexpensive flatbed scanners to digitize and analyze the data, as opposed to more expensive and time-consuming microdensitometers (MicroDs). Often, the RCF densities in some regions exceed an optical density (OD) of 3. Flatbed scanners are generally limited to a maximum OD of {approx}3. Because of the high exposure density, flatbed scanners may yield data that are not reliable due to light scatter and light diffusion from areas of low density to areas of high density. This happens even when the OD is slightly above 1. We will demonstrate the limitations of using flatbed scanners for this type of radiographic media and characterize them compared to measurements made using a MicroD. A technique for cross characterizing both systems using a diffuse densitometer with a NIST wedge will also be presented.

  6. Acceleration of neutral atoms in strong short-pulse laser fields.

    PubMed

    Eichmann, U; Nubbemeyer, T; Rottke, H; Sandner, W

    2009-10-29

    A charged particle exposed to an oscillating electric field experiences a force proportional to the cycle-averaged intensity gradient. This so-called ponderomotive force plays a major part in a variety of physical situations such as Paul traps for charged particles, electron diffraction in strong (standing) laser fields (the Kapitza-Dirac effect) and laser-based particle acceleration. Comparably weak forces on neutral atoms in inhomogeneous light fields may arise from the dynamical polarization of an atom; these are physically similar to the cycle-averaged forces. Here we observe previously unconsidered extremely strong kinematic forces on neutral atoms in short-pulse laser fields. We identify the ponderomotive force on electrons as the driving mechanism, leading to ultrastrong acceleration of neutral atoms with a magnitude as high as approximately 10(14) times the Earth's gravitational acceleration, g. To our knowledge, this is by far the highest observed acceleration on neutral atoms in external fields and may lead to new applications in both fundamental and applied physics. PMID:19865167

  7. A 1- to 5-MW, RCS-based, short-pulse spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y. Chae, Y.C.; Crosbie, E.

    1997-06-01

    Two accelerator configurations, the linac/compressor ring scheme and the linac/RCS scheme, are commonly used to provide the proton beam power for a short-pulse spallation neutron source. In one configuration, a full-power linac provides the beam power and a compressor ring shortens the pulse length from 1-ms down to 1 {micro}s. In the other, rapid cycling synchrotrons (RCSs) provide the beam power and also shorten the pulse length. A feasibility study of a staged approach to a 5-MW proton source utilizing RCS technology, allowing intermediate operation at 1 MW, was performed at ANL and is presented in this paper. This study is complementary to a study in progress at ORNL based on a linac and an accumulator ring. The 1-MW facility consists of a 400-MeV injector linac that delivers 0.5-mA time-averaged current, a synchrotron that accelerates the beam to 2 GeV at a 30-Hz rate, and two neutron-generating target stations. In the second phase, the 2-GeV beam is accelerated to 10 GeV by a larger RCS, increasing the facility beam power to 5 MW.

  8. Highly-charged heavy-ion production with short pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, G.; Bitmire, T.; Perry, M.; Anderson, O.; Kuehl, T.

    1998-01-27

    This MathCAD document describes a possible approach using a PW -class short pulse laser to form a useful number (10{sup 12}) of high and uniform charge state ions with low ion temperature (<< 100 eV) and low momentum spread ({delta}p{sub z}/p, < 10{sup -4} ) for injection into heavy-ion fusion accelerators. As a specific example, we consider here Xenon{sup +26}, which has an ionization energy E{sub i} {approximately} 860 eV for the 26th electron, and a significantly higher ionization potential of 1500 eV for the 27th electron because of the M-shell jump. The approach considered here may be used for other ion species as well. The challenge is not simply to produce high charge states with a laser (the ITEP group [Sharkov] have used long pulse CO{sub 2} lasers to create many charge states of chromium up to helium-like Cr{sup +25} by collisional ionization at high Te), nor just to create such high charge states more selectively by field (tunneling) ionization at higher intensities and shorter pulses. Rather, the challenge is to create a selected uniform high charge state, in useful numbers, while keeping the ion temperature and momentum spread small, and avoiding subsequent loss of ion charge state due to recombination and charge-exchange with background gas atoms during extraction into a useful low emittance beam.

  9. Large-scale atomistic simulations of surface nanostructuring by short pulse laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chengping; Shugaev, Maxim; Zhigilei, Leonid

    2015-03-01

    The availability of petascale supercomputing resources has expanded the range of research questions that can be addressed in the simulations and, in particular, enabled large-scale atomistic simulations of short pulse laser nanostructuring of metal surfaces. A series of simulations performed for systems consisting of 108 - 109 atoms is used in this study to investigate the mechanisms responsible for the generation of complex multiscale surface morphology and microstructure. At low laser fluence, just below the spallation threshold, a concurrent occurrence of fast laser melting, dynamic relaxation of laser-induced stresses, and rapid cooling and resolidification of the transiently melted surface region is found to produce a sub-surface porous region covered by a nanocrystalline layer. At higher laser fluences, in the spallation and phase explosion regimes, the material disintegration and ejection driven by the relaxation of laser-induced stresses and/or explosive release of vapor leads to the formation of complex surface morphology that can only be studied in billion-atom simulations. The first result from a billion atom simulation of surface nanostructuring performed on Titan will be discussed in the presentation. Financial support is provided by NSF (DMR-0907247 and CMMI-1301298) and AFOSR (FA9550-10-1-0541). Computational support is provided by the OLCF (MAT048) and NSF XSEDE (TG-DMR110090).

  10. Fiber Laser Front Ends for High-Energy Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J W; Liao, Z M; Mitchell, S; Messerly, M; Beach, R; Jovanovic, I; Brown, C; Payne, S A; Barty, C J

    2005-01-18

    We are developing an all fiber laser system optimized for providing input pulses for short pulse (1-10ps), high energy ({approx}1kJ) glass laser systems. Fiber lasers are ideal solutions for these systems as they are highly reliable and once constructed they can be operated with ease. Furthermore, they offer an additional benefit of significantly reduced footprint. In most labs containing equivalent bulk laser systems, the system occupies two 4'x8' tables and would consist of 10's if not a 100 of optics which would need to be individually aligned and maintained. The design requirements for this application are very different those commonly seen in fiber lasers. High energy lasers often have low repetition rates (as low as one pulse every few hours) and thus high average power and efficiency are of little practical value. What is of high value is pulse energy, high signal to noise ratio (expressed as pre-pulse contrast), good beam quality, consistent output parameters and timing. Our system focuses on maximizing these parameters sometimes at the expense of efficient operation or average power. Our prototype system consists of a mode-locked fiber laser, a compressed pulse fiber amplifier, a ''pulse cleaner'', a chirped fiber Bragg grating, pulse selectors, a transport fiber system and a large flattened mode fiber amplifier. In our talk we will review the system in detail and present theoretical and experimental studies of critical components. We will also present experimental results from the integrated system.

  11. Facial resurfacing using a high-energy, short-pulse carbon dioxide laser.

    PubMed

    Goodman, G J

    1996-08-01

    Facial skin resurfacing is now possible using short-pulse, high-energy carbon dioxide (CO2) lasers. The laser utilized in this particular paper is the Ultra-pulse CO2 laser. The Ultra-pulse laser represents the first CO2 laser able to vaporize tissue in a single pulse with the use of a large spot size. This laser utilizes the principles of selective photothermolysis. The high-power pulses are completed in less than the thermal relaxation time of skin, estimated to be less than 1 millisecond. This translates into rapid vaporization of tissue with little heat conduction to surrounding tissues. It also should allow a reproducibility of results between practitioners with set parameters not possible with previous CO2 lasers. Clinically, this laser is useful for the removal of skin lesions, and the resurfacing of areas of sun damage, wrinkles and scars. The immediate haemostasis and excellent visibility allows for precise vaporization of abnormal tissue. Rapid and pain-free wound healing is usual. The complication rate would appear to compare very favourably with dermabrasion and chemical peeling techniques. PMID:8771864

  12. Exploring polygon scanner head capabilities for ultra-short pulse laser texturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mincuzzi, G.; Fleureau, M.; Faucon, M.; Kling, R.

    2016-03-01

    The combination of both, fast beam scanning systems and high repetition rate, high average power lasers, represents an interesting technological solution for surface texturing by Ultra-Short Pulses Laser to gain a foothold into industrial environment for commercial purposes. Nevertheless unwanted thermal effects are expected when the average power exceeds some tens of W. An interesting strategy for a reliable heat management would consists of texturing surfaces with a low fluence values (slightly higher than the ablation threshold) and utilising a polygon scanning head which is able to deflect the laser beam with unprecedented speed. Here we show that over stainless steel, it is possible to obtain different surface textures (in particular ripples, micro grooves and spikes) by utilising a 2 MHz femtosecond laser jointly with a fast and accurate polygonal scanner head at relatively low fluence (0.11 J·cm-2). The evolution of the Laser induced surface structures morphology is shown when varying the scan speed between 25 m·s-1 and 90 m·s-1. Two different wavelengths have been utilised for the process λ= 1030 nm and λ = 515 nm and the difference of the results obtained have been highlighted. Moreover, a full structures morphology characterization by SEM has been carried out for all the textured surfaces. Finally, by increasing the number of successive surface scans is possible to tailor the surface reflectivity. As a result an average reflectivity value of < 5% over the visible range has been extracted from a blackened stainless steel surface.

  13. A short-pulse mode for the SPHINX LTD Z-pinch driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Almeida, Thierry; Lassalle, Francis; Zucchini, Frederic; Loyen, Arnaud; Morell, Alain; Chuvatin, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    The SPHINX machine is a 6MA, 1 μs, LTD Z-pinch driver at CEA Gramat (France) and primarily used for studying radiation effects. Different power amplification concepts were examined in order to reduce the current rise time without modifying the generator discharge scheme, including the Dynamic Load Current Multiplier (DLCM) proposed by Chuvatin. A DLCM device, capable of shaping the current pulse without reducing the rise time, was developed at CEA. This device proved valuable for isentropic compression experiments in cylindrical geometry. Recently, we achieved a short pulse operation mode by inserting a vacuum closing switch between the DLCM and the load. The current rise time was reduced to ~300 ns. We explored the use of a reduced-height wire array for the Dynamic Flux Extruder in order to improve the wire array compression rate and increase the efficiency of the current transfer to the load. These developments are presented. Potential benefits of these developments for future Z pinch experiments are discussed.

  14. Compensation of nonlinear phase shifts with third-order dispersion in short-pulse fiber amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shian; Kuznetsova, Lyuba; Chong, Andy; Wise, Frank

    2005-06-27

    We show that nonlinear phase shifts and third-order dispersion can compensate each other in short-pulse fiber amplifiers. This compen-sation can be exploited in any implementation of chirped-pulse amplification, with stretching and compression accomplished with diffraction gratings, single-mode fiber, microstructure fiber, fiber Bragg gratings, etc. In particular, we consider chirped-pulse fiber amplifiers at wavelengths for which the fiber dispersion is normal. The nonlinear phase shift accumulated in the amplifier can be compensated by the third-order dispersion of the combination of a fiber stretcher and grating compressor. A numerical model is used to predict the compensation, and experimental results that exhibit the main features of the calculations are presented. In the presence of third-order dispersion, an optimal nonlinear phase shift reduces the pulse duration, and enhances the peak power and pulse contrast compared to the pulse produced in linear propagation. Contrary to common belief, fiber stretchers can perform as well or better than grating stretchers in fiber amplifiers, while offering the major practical advantages of a waveguide medium. PMID:19498473

  15. Lattice Boltzmann method for short-pulsed laser transport in a multi-layered medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Yi, Hong-Liang; Tan, He-Ping

    2015-04-01

    We construct a lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for transient radiative transfer in one-dimensional multi-layered medium with distinct refractive index in each layer. The left boundary is irradiated normally by a short-pulsed laser. The Fresnel interfaces conditions, which incorporate reflection and refraction, are used at the boundaries and the interfaces. Based on the Fresnel's law and Snell's law, the interfacial intensity formulas are introduced. The collimated and diffuse intensities are treated individually. At a transient time step, the collimated component is first solved by LBM and then embedded into the transient radiative transfer equation as a source term. To keep the consistency of the directions in all the layers, angular interpolation of the intensities at the interfaces is adopted. The transient radiative transfer in a two-layer medium is first investigated, and the time-resolved results are validated by comparing with those by the Monte Carlo method (MCM). Of particular interest, the angular intensities along the slab at different times are presented to illustrate a variety of interesting phenomena, and the discontinuous nature of the intensity at the interfaces is discussed. The effects of various parameters on the time-resolved signals are examined.

  16. Proton acceleration from high-contrast short pulse lasers interacting with sub-micron thin foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, G. M.; McGuffey, C.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.; Beg, F. N.

    2016-02-01

    A theoretical study complemented with published experimental data of proton acceleration from sub-micron (thickness < 1 μm) foils irradiated by ultra-high contrast ( >1010 ) short pulse lasers is presented. The underlying physics issues pertinent to proton acceleration are addressed using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. For laser energy ɛ≤4 J (intensity I ≤5 ×1020 W/cm 2 ), simulation predictions agree with experimental data, both exhibiting scaling superior to Target Normal Sheath Acceleration's model. Anomalous behavior was observed for ɛ>4 J ( I >5 ×1020 W/cm 2 ), for which the measured maximum proton energies were much lower than predicted by scaling and these simulations. This unexpected behavior could not be explained within the frame of the model, and we conjecture that pre-pulses preceding the main pulse by picoseconds may be responsible. If technological issues can be resolved, energetic proton beams could be generated for a wide range of applications such as nuclear physics, radiography, and medical science.

  17. Large-scale massively parallel atomistic simulations of short pulse laser interaction with metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chengping; Zhigilei, Leonid; Computational Materials Group Team

    2014-03-01

    Taking advantage of petascale supercomputing architectures, large-scale massively parallel atomistic simulations (108-109 atoms) are performed to study the microscopic mechanisms of short pulse laser interaction with metals. The results of the simulations reveal a complex picture of highly non-equilibrium processes responsible for material modification and/or ejection. At low laser fluences below the ablation threshold, fast melting and resolidification occur under conditions of extreme heating and cooling rates resulting in surface microstructure modification. At higher laser fluences in the spallation regime, the material is ejected by the relaxation of laser-induced stresses and proceeds through the nucleation, growth and percolation of multiple voids in the sub-surface region of the irradiated target. At a fluence of ~ 2.5 times the spallation threshold, the top part of the target reaches the conditions for an explosive decomposition into vapor and small droplets, marking the transition to the phase explosion regime of laser ablation. The dynamics of plume formation and the characteristics of the ablation plume are obtained from the simulations and compared with the results of time-resolved plume imaging experiments. Financial support for this work was provided by NSF (DMR-0907247 and CMMI-1301298) and AFOSR (FA9550-10-1-0541). Computational support was provided by the OLCF (MAT048) and XSEDE (TG-DMR110090).

  18. Investigation of energy partitioning from Leopard short-pulse laser interactions in mass limited targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, B.; Sawada, H.; Yabuuchi, T.; McLean, H.; Patel, P.; Beg, F.

    2013-10-01

    The energy distribution in the interaction of a high-intensity, short-pulse laser with a mass limited target was investigated by simultaneously collecting x-ray and particle data. The Leopard laser system at the Nevada Terawatt Facility delivered 15 J of energy in a 350 fs pulse duration. With a beam spot size limited to within 8 μm, the target interaction achieved a peak intensity of 1019 W/cm2 at 20° incidence. The size of the Cu foil targets was varied from 2-20 μm in thickness and from 50 by 50 μm to 2000 by 2000 μm in surface area. A Bragg crystal x-ray spectrometer and a spherical crystal imager were used to measure 7.5-9.5 keV x-rays and 8.05 keV monochromatic x-ray images respectively. The escaping electrons and protons in the rear were monitored with a magnet-based electron spectrometer and radiochromic film. Preliminary results show both a decrease of the K β/K α ratio and a stronger He α emission for smaller sized targets, less than 250 by 250 μm. The detailed analyses of the K α images and particle data will be presented.

  19. Theoretical analysis of saturation and limit cycles in short pulse FEL oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Piovella, N.; Chaix, P.; Jaroszynski, D.

    1995-12-31

    We derive a model for the non linear evolution of a short pulse oscillator from low signal up to saturation in the small gain regime. This system is controlled by only two independent parameters: cavity detuning and losses. Using a closure relation, this model reduces to a closed set of 5 non linear partial differential equations for the EM field and moments of the electron distribution. An analysis of the linearised system allows to define and calculate the eigenmodes characterising the small signal regime. An arbitrary solution of the complete nonlinear system can then be expanded in terms of these eigenmodes. This allows interpreting various observed nonlinear behaviours, including steady state saturation, limit cycles, and transition to chaos. The single mode approximation reduces to a Landau-Ginzburg equation. It allows to obtain gain, nonlinear frequency shift, and efficiency as functions of cavity detuning and cavity losses. A generalisation to two modes allows to obtain a simple description of the limit cycle behaviour, as a competition between these two modes. An analysis of the transitions to more complex dynamics is also given. Finally, the analytical results are compared to the experimental data from the FELIX experiment.

  20. Creation of Pure Frozen Gas Targets for Ion Acceleration using Short Pulse Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCary, Edward; Stehr, Florian; Jiao, Xuejing; Quevedo, Hernan; Franke, Philip; Agustsson, Ronald; Oshea, Finn; Berry, Robert; Chao, Dennis; Woods, Kayley; Gautier, Donald; Letzring, Sam; Hegelich, Bjorn

    2015-11-01

    A system for shooting interchangeable frozen gas targets was developed at the University of Texas and will be tested at Los Alamos National Lab. A target holder which can hold up to five substrates used for target growing was cryogenically cooled to temperatures below 14 K. The target substrates consist of holes with diameters ranging from 15 μm-500 μm and TEM grids with micron scale spacing, across which films of ice are frozen by releasing small amounts of pure gas molecules directly into the vacuum target chamber. Frozen gas targets comprised of simple molecules like methane and single element gasses like hydrogen and deuterium will provide novel target configuations that will be compared with laser plasma interaction simulations. The targets will be shot with the ultra-intense short-pulse Trident laser. Accelerated ion spectra will be characterized using a Thomson Parabola with magnetic field strength of 0.92T and electric field strength of 30kV. Hydrogen targets will be additionally characterized using stacks of copper which become activated upon exposure to energetic protons resulting in a beta decay signal which be imaged on electron sensitive imaging plates to provide an energy spectrum and spacial profile of the proton beam. Details of target creation and pre-shot characterization will be presented.

  1. STATUS OF THE DIELECTRIC WALL ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G J; Chen, Y; Sampayan, S; Akana, G; Anaya, R; Blackfield, D; Carroll, J; Cook, E; Falabella, S; Guethlein, G; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Hickman, B; Holmes, C; Horner, A; Nelson, S; Paul, A; Pearson, D; Poole, B; Richardson, R; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J; Weir, J

    2009-04-22

    The dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) system being developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) uses fast switched high voltage transmission lines to generate pulsed electric fields on the inside of a high gradient insulating (HGI) acceleration tube. High electric field gradients are achieved by the use of alternating insulators and conductors and short pulse times. The system is capable of accelerating any charge to mass ratio particle. Applications of high gradient proton and electron versions of this accelerator will be discussed. The status of the developmental new technologies that make the compact system possible will be reviewed. These include, high gradient vacuum insulators, solid dielectric materials, photoconductive switches and compact proton sources.

  2. Conceptual moderator studies for the Spallation Neutron Source short-pulse second target station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallmeier, F. X.; Lu, W.; Riemer, B. W.; Zhao, J. K.; Herwig, K. W.; Robertson, J. L.

    2016-06-01

    Candidate moderator configurations for a short-pulse second target station (STS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) have been identified using a global optimizer framework built around the MCNPX particle transport code. Neutron brightness metrics were selected as the figure-of-merit. We assumed that STS would use one out of six proton pulses produced by an SNS accelerator upgraded to operate at 1.3 GeV proton energy, 2.8 MW power and 60 Hz repetition rate. The simulations indicate that the peak brightness can be increased by a factor of 5 and 2.5 on a per proton pulse basis compared to the SNS first target station for both coupled and decoupled para-hydrogen moderators, respectively. Additional increases by factors of 3 and 2 were demonstrated for coupled and decoupled moderators, respectively, by reducing the area of neutron emission from 100 × 100 mm2 to 20 × 20 mm2. This increase in brightness has the potential to translate to an increase of beam intensity at the instruments' sample positions even though the total neutron emission of the smaller moderator is less than that of the larger. This is especially true for instruments with small samples (beam dimensions). The increased fluxes in the STS moderators come at accelerated poison and de-coupler burnout and higher radiation-induced material damage rates per unit power, which overall translate into lower moderator lifetimes. A first effort was undertaken to group decoupled moderators into a cluster collectively positioning them at the peak neutron production zone in the target and having a three-port neutron emission scheme that complements that of a cylindrical coupled moderator.

  3. Generation of high-energy (>15 MeV) neutrons using short pulse high intensity lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, G. M.; Davis, J.; Petrova, Tz. B.; Higginson, D. P.; McNaney, J. M.; McGuffey, C.; Qiao, B.; Beg, F. N.

    2012-09-15

    A roadmap is suggested and demonstrated experimentally for the production of high-energy (>15 MeV) neutrons using short pulse lasers. Investigation with a 3D Monte Carlo model has been employed to quantify the production of energetic neutrons. Numerical simulations have been performed for three nuclear reactions, d(d,n){sup 3}He, {sup 7}Li(d,n){sup 8}Be, and {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be, driven by monoenergetic ion beams. Quantitative estimates for the driver ion beam energy and number have been made and the neutron spectra and yield in the ion propagation direction have been evaluated for various incident ion energies. In order to generate neutron fluence above a detection limit of 10{sup 6} neutrons/sr, either {approx}10{sup 10} protons with energy 20-30 MeV or comparable amount of deuterons with energy 5-10 MeV are required. Experimental verification of the concept with deuterons driven by the Titan laser (peak intensity 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, pulse duration of 9 ps, wavelength 1.05 {mu}m, and energy of 360 J) is provided with the generation of neutrons with energy of up to 18 MeV from {sup 7}Li(d,n){sup 8}Be reactions. Future research will focus on optimized schemes for ion acceleration for production of high-energy neutrons, which will involve efficient target design, laser parameter optimization, and converter material.

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPACT PHOTO-INJECTOR WITH RFFOCUSING LENS FOR SHORT PULSE ELECTRON SOURCE APPLICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Grabenhofer, Alexander; Eaton, Douglas W.

    2013-09-01

    For development of compact ultrafast electron source system, we are currently designing a short-pulse RF-gun with RF focusing structure by means of a series of comprehensive modeling analysis processes. EM design of a 2.5 cell resonant cavity with input coupler, acceleration dynamics of photo-emitted electron bunch, EM design of RF-lens with input coupler, and phasespace analysis of focused electron bunch are systematically examined with multi-physics simulators. All the features of the 2.856 GHz cavity geometry were precisely engineered for acceleration energies ranging from 100 keV to 500 keV (safety limited) to be powered by our 5 MW S-band klystron. The klystron (Thales TH2163) and modulator system (ScandiNova K1 turnkey system) were successfully installed and tested. Performance tests of the klystron system show peak output power > 5 MW, as per operation specifications. At the quasi-relativistic energies, the electron source is capable of generating 100fC – 1 pC electron bunch with pulse duration close to 30 fs – 1 ps and transverse size of a few hundred microns. PIC simulations have shown that the electron bunch undergoes fast RF acceleration, rapidly reaching the desired energies, which can be controlled by tuning RF injection phase and input driving power. It has been shown that it is possible to also focus/compress the bunch longitudinally using a RF-lens, which would allow us to control the temporal resolution of the system as well. While our primary analysis has been performed on a 2.5 cell design, we are also looking into half-cell (single cavity) design that is expected to provide the same range of beam energy with a simple configuration.

  5. K-(alpha) Radiography at 20-100 keV Using Short-Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H S; Chambers, D; Clarke, R; Eagleton, R; Giraldez, E; Goldsack, T; Heathcote, R; Izumi, N; Key, M; King, J; Koch, J; Landen, O L; Mackinnon, A; Nikroo, A; Patel, P; Pasley, J; Remington, B; Robey, H; Snavely, R; Steinman, D; Stephenson, R; Stoeckl, C; Storm, M; Tabak, M; Theobald, W; Town, R J

    2005-08-29

    X-ray radiography is an important tool for diagnosing and imaging planar and convergent hydrodynamics phenomena for laser experiments. Until now, hydrodynamics experiments at Omega and NIF utilize E{sub x-ray} < 9 keV backlighter x-rays emitted by thermal plasmas. However, future experiments will need to diagnose larger and denser targets and will require x-ray probes of energies from 20-100 keV and possibly up to 1 MeV. Hard K-{alpha} x-ray photons can be created through high-energy electron interactions in the target material after irradiation by petawatt-class high-intensity-short-pulse lasers with > 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}. We have performed several experiments on the JanUSP, and the Vulcan 100TW, and Vulcan Petawatt lasers to understand K-{alpha} sources and to test radiography concepts. 1-D radiography using an edge-on foil and 2-D radiography using buried wires and cone-fiber targets were tested. We find that 1-D thin edge-on foils can have imaging resolution better than 10 {micro}m. Micro volume targets produce bright sources with measured conversion efficiency from laser energy to x-ray photons of {approx} 1 x 10{sup -5}. This level of conversion may not be enough for 2-D point projection radiography. A comparison of our experimental measurements of small volume sources with the LSP/PIC simulation show similar K-{alpha} creation profiles but discrepancy in absolute yields.

  6. Short-pulse laser amplification and saturation using stimulated Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, E. S.; Ren, J.; Kwan, T. J. T.; Schmitt, M. J.; Lundquist, P. B.; Sarkisyan, S.; Nelson-Melby, E.

    2010-11-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental work has focused on using backward-stimulated Raman scattering (BSRS) in plasmas as a means of laser pulse amplification and compression [1,2,3]. We present initial computational and experimental work on SRS amplification in a capillary-discharge generated Xe plasma. The experimental set-up uses a 200 ps pump pulse with an 800 nm wavelength seeded by a 100 fs pulse from a broadband source and counter-propagates the pulses through a plasma of length 1 cm and diameter 0.1 cm. Results from initial experiments characterizing the plasma and on short-pulse amplification will be presented. Additionally, we present results from calculations using pF3d [4], and discuss the role of SRS saturation and determine the possible significance of electron trapping with a model implemented in pF3d [5]. [1] G. Shvets, N. J. Fisch, A. Pukhov, and J. Meyer-ter-Vehn, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81 4879 (1998). [2] V. M. Malkin, G. Shvets, and N. J. Fisch, Phys. Rev. Lett. 82 4448 (1999). [3] R. K. Kirkwood, E. Dewald, and C. Niemann, et al., Phys. Plasmas 14 113109 (2007). [4] R. L. Berger, B. F. Lasinski, T. B. Kaiser, et al., Phys. Fluids B 5 2243 (1993). [5] H. X. Vu, D. F. DuBois, and B. Bezzerides, Phys. Plasmas 14 012702 (2007). Supported by US DOE and LANS, LLC under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. LA-UR-10-04787

  7. Conceptual moderator studies for the Spallation Neutron Source short-pulse second target station.

    PubMed

    Gallmeier, F X; Lu, W; Riemer, B W; Zhao, J K; Herwig, K W; Robertson, J L

    2016-06-01

    Candidate moderator configurations for a short-pulse second target station (STS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) have been identified using a global optimizer framework built around the MCNPX particle transport code. Neutron brightness metrics were selected as the figure-of-merit. We assumed that STS would use one out of six proton pulses produced by an SNS accelerator upgraded to operate at 1.3 GeV proton energy, 2.8 MW power and 60 Hz repetition rate. The simulations indicate that the peak brightness can be increased by a factor of 5 and 2.5 on a per proton pulse basis compared to the SNS first target station for both coupled and decoupled para-hydrogen moderators, respectively. Additional increases by factors of 3 and 2 were demonstrated for coupled and decoupled moderators, respectively, by reducing the area of neutron emission from 100 × 100 mm(2) to 20 × 20 mm(2). This increase in brightness has the potential to translate to an increase of beam intensity at the instruments' sample positions even though the total neutron emission of the smaller moderator is less than that of the larger. This is especially true for instruments with small samples (beam dimensions). The increased fluxes in the STS moderators come at accelerated poison and de-coupler burnout and higher radiation-induced material damage rates per unit power, which overall translate into lower moderator lifetimes. A first effort was undertaken to group decoupled moderators into a cluster collectively positioning them at the peak neutron production zone in the target and having a three-port neutron emission scheme that complements that of a cylindrical coupled moderator. PMID:27370444

  8. Cutting and drilling of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) by 70W short pulse nanosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeschke, Peter; Stolberg, Klaus; Bastick, Stefan; Ziolkowski, Ewa; Roehner, Markus; Suttmann, Oliver; Overmeyer, Ludger

    2014-02-01

    Continuous carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) are recognized as having a significant lightweight construction potential for a wide variety of industrial applications. However, a today`s barrier for a comprehensive dissemination of CFRP structures is the lack of economic, quick and reliable manufacture processes, e.g. the cutting and drilling steps. In this paper, the capability of using pulsed disk lasers in CFRP machining is discussed. In CFRP processing with NIR lasers, carbon fibers show excellent optical absorption and heat dissipation, contrary to the plastics matrix. Therefore heat dissipation away from the laser focus into the material is driven by heat conduction of the fibres. The matrix is heated indirectly by heat transfer from the fibres. To cut CFRP, it is required to reach the melting temperature for thermoplastic matrix materials or the disintegration temperature for thermoset systems as well as the sublimation temperature of the reinforcing fibers simultaneously. One solution for this problem is to use short pulse nanosecond lasers. We have investigated CFRP cutting and drilling with such a laser (max. 7 mJ @ 10 kHz, 30 ns). This laser offers the opportunity of wide range parameter tuning for systematic process optimization. By applying drilling and cutting operations based on galvanometer scanning techniques in multi-cycle mode, excellent surface and edge characteristics in terms of delamination-free and intact fiber-matrix interface were achieved. The results indicate that nanosecond disk laser machining could consequently be a suitable tool for the automotive and aircraft industry for cutting and drilling steps.

  9. Atmospheric air diffuse array-needles dielectric barrier discharge excited by positive, negative, and bipolar nanosecond pulses in large electrode gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Yang, De-zheng; Wang, Wen-chun; Liu, Zhi-jie; Wang, Sen; Jiang, Peng-chao; Zhang, Shuai

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, positive, negative, and bipolar nanosecond pulses are employed to generate stable and diffuse discharge plasma using array needles-plate electrode configuration at atmospheric pressure. A comparison study of discharge images, electrical characteristics, optical emission spectra, and plasma vibrational temperature and rotational temperatures in three pulsed polarity discharges is carried on under different discharge conditions. It is found that bipolar pulse is beneficial to the excitation of diffuse dielectric barrier discharge, which can generate a room temperature plasma with more homogeneous and higher discharge intensity compared with unipolar discharges. Under the condition of 6 mm electrode gap distance, 26 kV pulse peak voltage, and 150 Hz pulse repetition rate, the emission intensity of N2 (C3Πu → B3Πg) of the bipolar pulsed discharge is 4 times higher than the unipolar discharge (both positive and negative), while the plasma gas temperature is kept at 300 K, which is about 10-20 K lower than the unipolar discharge plasma.

  10. Three Dimensional Numerical Analysis on Discharge Properties of Microwave Excited Ring-Dielectric-Line Surface Wave Processing Plasma Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Takashi; Kim, Jaeho; Toba, Takayuki; Katsurai, Makoto

    A three dimensional simulation code with the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method combined with the fluid model for electron has been developed for the microwave excited surface wave plasma in the RDL-SWP device. This code permits the numerical analysis of the spatial distributions of electric field, power absorption, electron density and electron temperature. At low gas pressure of about 10 mTorr, the numerical results were compared with the experimental measurements that show the validity of this 3-D simulation code. A simplified analysis assuming that an electron density is spatially uniform has been studied and its applicability is evaluated by the 3-D simulation. The surface wave eigenmodes are determined by the electron density, and it is found that the structure of the device strongly influences to the spatial distribution of the electric fields of surface waves in a low density area (ne<3.0×1011cm-3). A method to irradiate a microwave to the whole surface area of the plasma is proposed which is found to be effective to obtain a high uniformity distribution of electron density.

  11. Modeling target bulk heating resulting from ultra-intense short pulse laser irradiation of solid density targets

    SciTech Connect

    Antici, P.; INRS-EMT, Varennes, Québec; Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via E. Fermi, 40-00044 Frascati; LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau ; Gremillet, L.; Grismayer, T.; Audebert, P.; Mančic, A.; Fuchs, J.; Borghesi, M.; Cecchetti, C. A.

    2013-12-15

    Isochoric heating of solid-density matter up to a few tens of eV is of interest for investigating astrophysical or inertial fusion scenarios. Such ultra-fast heating can be achieved via the energy deposition of short-pulse laser generated electrons. Here, we report on experimental measurements of this process by means of time- and space-resolved optical interferometry. Our results are found in reasonable agreement with a simple numerical model of fast electron-induced heating.

  12. Pulse shaping effects on weld porosity in laser beam spot welds : contrast of long- & short- pulse welds.

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, Chad M.; Perricone, Matthew J.; Faraone, Kevin M.; Norris, Jerome T.

    2007-10-01

    Weld porosity is being investigated for long-pulse spot welds produced by high power continuous output lasers. Short-pulse spot welds (made with a pulsed laser system) are also being studied but to a much small extent. Given that weld area of a spot weld is commensurate with weld strength, the loss of weld area due to an undefined or unexpected pore results in undefined or unexpected loss in strength. For this reason, a better understanding of spot weld porosity is sought. Long-pulse spot welds are defined and limited by the slow shutter speed of most high output power continuous lasers. Continuous lasers typically ramp up to a simmer power before reaching the high power needed to produce the desired weld. A post-pulse ramp down time is usually present as well. The result is a pulse length tenths of a second long as oppose to the typical millisecond regime of the short-pulse pulsed laser. This study will employ a Lumonics JK802 Nd:YAG laser with Super Modulation pulse shaping capability and a Lasag SLS C16 40 W pulsed Nd:YAG laser. Pulse shaping will include square wave modulation of various peak powers for long-pulse welds and square (or top hat) and constant ramp down pulses for short-pulse welds. Characterization of weld porosity will be performed for both pulse welding methods.

  13. Development of high damage threshold optics for petawatt-class short-pulse lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, Brent C.; Perry, Michael D.; Boyd, Robert D.; Britten, Jerald A.; Shore, Bruce W.; Feit, Michael D.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.

    1995-04-01

    We report laser-induced damage threshold measurements on pure and multilayer dielectrics and gold-coated optics at 1053 and 526 nm for pulse durations, (tau) , ranging from 140 fs to 1 ns. Damage thresholds of gold coatings are limited to 500 mJ/cm2 in the subpicosecond range from 1053-nm pulses. In dielectrics, qualitative differences in the morphology of damage and a departure from the diffusion-dominated (tau) 1/2 scaling indicate that damage results from plasma formation and ablation for (tau) 50 ps. A theoretical model based on electron production via multiphoton ionization, Joule heating, and collisional (avalanche) ionization is in quantitative agreement with both the pulsewidth and wavelength scaling of experimental results.

  14. Development of high damage threshold optics for petawatt-class short-pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, B.C.; Perry, M.D.; Boyd, R.D.

    1995-02-22

    The authors report laser-induced damage threshold measurements on pure and multilayer dielectrics and gold-coated optics at 1053 and 526 nm for pulse durations, {tau}, ranging from 140 fs to 1 ns. Damage thresholds of gold coatings are limited to 500 mJ/cm{sup 2} in the subpicosecond range for 1053-nm pulses. In dielectrics, qualitative differences in the morphology of damage and a departure from the diffusion-dominated {tau}1/2 scaling indicate that damage results from plasma formation and ablation for {tau}{le}10 ps and from conventional melting and boiling for {tau}>50 ps. A theoretical model based on electron production via multiphoton ionization, Joule heating, and collisional (avalanche) ionization is in quantitative agreement with both the pulsewidth and wavelength scaling of experimental results.

  15. Short pulse laser stretcher-compressor using a single common reflective grating

    DOEpatents

    Erbert, Gaylen V.; Biswal, Subrat; Bartolick, Joseph M.; Stuart, Brent C.; Telford, Steve

    2004-05-25

    The present invention provides an easily aligned, all-reflective, aberration-free pulse stretcher-compressor in a compact geometry. The stretcher-compressor device is a reflective multi-layer dielectric that can be utilized for high power chirped-pulse amplification material processing applications. A reflective grating element of the device is constructed: 1) to receive a beam for stretching of laser pulses in a beam stretcher beam path and 2) to also receive stretched amplified pulses to be compressed in a compressor beam path through the same (i.e., common) reflective multilayer dielectric diffraction grating. The stretched and compressed pulses are interleaved about the grating element to provide the desired number of passes in each respective beam path in order to achieve the desired results.

  16. Compact Short-Pulsed Electron Linac Based Neutron Sources for Precise Nuclear Material Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesaka, M.; Tagi, K.; Matsuyama, D.; Fujiwara, T.; Dobashi, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Harada, H.

    2015-10-01

    An X-band (11.424GHz) electron linac as a neutron source for nuclear data study for the melted fuel debris analysis and nuclear security in Fukushima is under development. Originally we developed the linac for Compton scattering X-ray source. Quantitative material analysis and forensics for nuclear security will start several years later after the safe settlement of the accident is established. For the purpose, we should now accumulate more precise nuclear data of U, Pu, etc., especially in epithermal (0.1-10 eV) neutrons. Therefore, we have decided to modify and install the linac in the core space of the experimental nuclear reactor "Yayoi" which is now under the decommission procedure. Due to the compactness of the X-band linac, an electron gun, accelerating tube and other components can be installed in a small space in the core. First we plan to perform the time-of-flight (TOF) transmission measurement for study of total cross sections of the nuclei for 0.1-10 eV energy neutrons. Therefore, if we adopt a TOF line of less than 10m, the o-pulse length of generated neutrons should be shorter than 100 ns. Electronenergy, o-pulse length, power, and neutron yield are ~30 MeV, 100 ns - 1 micros, ~0.4 kW, and ~1011 n/s (~103 n/cm2/s at samples), respectively. Optimization of the design of a neutron target (Ta, W, 238U), TOF line and neutron detector (Ce:LiCAF) of high sensitivity and fast response is underway. We are upgrading the electron gun and a buncher to realize higher current and beam power with a reasonable beam size in order to avoid damage of the neutron target. Although the neutron flux is limited in case of the X-band electron linac based source, we take advantage of its short pulse aspect and availability for nuclear data measurement with a short TOF system. First, we form a tentative configuration in the current experimental room for Compton scattering in 2014. Then, after the decommissioning has been finished, we move it to the "Yayoi" room and perform

  17. Return current and proton emission from wire targets interacting with an intense short pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beg, Farhat

    2004-05-01

    One of the important characteristics of short pulse high intensity laser-solid interactions is the generation of energetic charged particles, which result from the very efficient conversion of laser energy into hot electrons. Since the electrons in the electric field of the laser have relativistic quiver motions, the temperature of the hot electron distribution of the plasma produced at such extreme intensities can become very high. A large number of hot electrons (1013-1014) having an average energy of the order of 1-2 MeV can be generated as intensities exceed 1019 Wcm-2. Since the resulting beam current exceeds the Alfvén limit, a neutralizing return current of cold plasma electrons moving in the opposite direction is produced. Another source of return current is that due to the escape of very energetic electrons from the target, which then creates a large electrostatic potential due to charge separation. These return currents can cause significant ohmic heating. In addition escaping electrons establish the large electrostatic fields, accelerating a large number of protons from the target with energies of 10's of MeV. The experiments reported here were performed at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory with the VULCAN laser facility at intensity greater than 5 x1019 Wcm-2 on wire targets. In some shots an additional wire or foil was placed nearby. The laser was blocked by the main wire target so that no laser light reached the additional wire or foil. Three main observations were made: (i) a Z-pinch was driven in the wire due to the return current, (ii) optical transition radiation (OTR) at 2w was generated and (iii) energetic proton emission was observed. The wire targets were observed to be ohmically heated and were m=0 unstable. The OTR emission is likely due to electron bunches accelerated by the ponderomotive force of the laser. The proton emission was in a form of thin disk perpendicular to the wire and centered on the wire at the laser focus. Proton

  18. Dielectric controlled excited state relaxation pathways of a representative push-pull stilbene: A mechanistic study using femtosecond fluorescence up-conversion technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiq, Shahnawaz; Sen, Pratik

    2013-02-01

    Femtosecond fluorescence up-conversion technique was employed to reinvestigate the intriguing dependence of fluorescence quantum yield of trans-4-dimethylamino-4'-nitrostilbene (DNS) on dielectric properties of the media. In polar solvents, such as methanol and acetonitrile, the two time components of the fluorescence transients were assigned to intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) dynamics and to the depletion of the ICT state to the ground state via internal conversion along the torsional coordinate of nitro moiety. The viscosity independence of the first time component indicates the absence of any torsional coordinate in the charge transfer process. In slightly polar solvent (carbon tetrachloride) the fluorescence transients show a triple exponential behavior. The first time component was assigned to the formation of the ICT state on a 2 ps time scale. Second time component was assigned to the relaxation of the ICT state via two torsion controlled channels. First channel involves the torsional motion about the central double bond leading to the trans-cis isomerization via a conical intersection or avoided crossing. The other channel contributing to the depopulation of ICT state involves the torsional coordinates of dimethylanilino and/or nitrophenyl moieties and leads to the formation of a conformationally relaxed state, which subsequently relaxes back to the ground state radiatively, and is responsible for the high fluorescence quantum yield of DNS in slightly polar solvents such as carbon tetrachloride, toluene, etc. The excited singlet state which is having a dominant π-π* character may also decay via intersystem crossing to the n-π* triplet manifold and thus accounts for the observed triplet yield of the molecule in slightly polar solvents.

  19. Comparison of Single Event Transients Generated by Short Pulsed X-Rays, Lasers and Heavy Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Cardoza, David; LaLumondiere, Stephen D.; Tockstein, Michael A.; Brewe, Dale L.; Wells, Nathan P.; Koga, Rokutaro; Gaab, K. M.; Lotshaw, William T.; Moss, Steven C.

    2014-12-01

    We report an experimental study of the transients generated by pulsed x-rays, heavy ions, and different laser wavelengths in a Si p-i-n photodiode. We compare the charge collected by all of the excitation methods to determine the equivalent LET for pulsed x-rays relative to heavy ions. Our comparisons show that pulsed x-rays from synchrotron sources can generate a large range of equivalent LET and generate transients similar to those excited by laser pulses and heavy ion strikes. We also look at how the pulse width of the transients changes for the different excitation methods. We show that the charge collected with pulsed x-rays is greater than expected as the x-ray photon energy increases. Combined with their capability of focusing to small spot sizes and of penetrating metallization, pulsed x-rays are a promising new tool for high resolution screening of SEE susceptibility

  20. Measuring 8–250 ps short pulses using a high-speed streak camera on kilojoule, petawatt-class laser systems

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, J.; Jaanimagi, P. A.; Boni, R.; Bromage, J.; Hill, E.

    2013-07-15

    Short-pulse measurements using a streak camera are sensitive to space-charge broadening, which depends on the pulse duration and shape, and on the uniformity of photocathode illumination. An anamorphic-diffuser-based beam-homogenizing system and a space-charge-broadening calibration method were developed to accurately measure short pulses using an optical streak camera. This approach provides a more-uniform streak image and enables one to characterize space-charge-induced pulse-broadening effects.

  1. Atomistic simulation study of short pulse laser interactions with a metal target under conditions of spatial confinement by a transparent overlayer

    SciTech Connect

    Karim, Eaman T.; Shugaev, Maxim; Wu, Chengping; Zhigilei, Leonid V.; Lin, Zhibin; Hainsey, Robert F.

    2014-05-14

    The distinct characteristics of short pulse laser interactions with a metal target under conditions of spatial confinement by a solid transparent overlayer are investigated in a series of atomistic simulations. The simulations are performed with a computational model combining classical molecular dynamics (MD) technique with a continuum description of the laser excitation, electron-phonon equilibration, and electronic heat transfer based on two-temperature model (TTM). Two methods for incorporation of the description of a transparent overlayer into the TTM-MD model are designed and parameterized for Ag-silica system. The material response to the laser energy deposition is studied for a range of laser fluences that, in the absence of the transparent overlayer, covers the regimes of melting and resolidification, photomechanical spallation, and phase explosion of the overheated surface region. In contrast to the irradiation in vacuum, the spatial confinement by the overlayer facilitates generation of sustained high-temperature and high-pressure conditions near the metal-overlayer interface, suppresses the generation of unloading tensile wave, decreases the maximum depth of melting, and prevents the spallation and explosive disintegration of the surface region of the metal target. At high laser fluences, when the laser excitation brings the surface region of the metal target to supercritical conditions, the confinement prevents the expansion and phase decomposition characteristic for the vacuum conditions leading to a gradual cooling of the hot compressed supercritical fluid down to the liquid phase and eventual solidification. The target modification in this case is limited to the generation of crystal defects and the detachment of the metal target from the overlayer.

  2. Heat generation caused by ablation of dental restorative materials with an ultra short pulse laser (USPL) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Andreas; Wehry, Richard; Brede, Olivier; Frentzen, Matthias; Schelle, Florian

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess heat generation in dental restoration materials following laser ablation using an Ultra Short Pulse Laser (USPL) system. Specimens of phosphate cement (PC), ceramic (CE) and composite (C) were used. Ablation was performed with an Nd:YVO4 laser at 1064 nm and a pulse length of 8 ps. Heat generation during laser ablation depended on the thickness of the restoration material. A time delay for temperature increase was observed in the PC and C group. Employing the USPL system for removal of restorative materials, heat generation has to be considered.

  3. Multi-charged heavy ion acceleration from the ultra-intense short pulse laser system interacting with the metal target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiuchi, M.; Sakaki, H.; Maeda, S.; Sagisaka, A.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Pikuz, T.; Faenov, A.; Ogura, K.; Kanasaki, M.; Matsukawa, K.; Kusumoto, T.; Tao, A.; Fukami, T.; Esirkepov, T.; Koga, J.; Kiriyama, H.; Okada, H.; Shimomura, T.; Tanoue, M.; Nakai, Y.; Fukuda, Y.; Sakai, S.; Tamura, J.; Nishio, K.; Sako, H.; Kando, M.; Yamauchi, T.; Watanabe, Y.; Bulanov, S. V.; Kondo, K.

    2014-02-01

    Experimental demonstration of multi-charged heavy ion acceleration from the interaction between the ultra-intense short pulse laser system and the metal target is presented. Al ions are accelerated up to 12 MeV/u (324 MeV total energy). To our knowledge, this is far the highest energy ever reported for the case of acceleration of the heavy ions produced by the <10 J laser energy of 200 TW class Ti:sapphire laser system. Adding to that, thanks to the extraordinary high intensity laser field of ˜1021 W cm-2, the accelerated ions are almost fully stripped, having high charge to mass ratio (Q/M).

  4. A short-pulse K(a)-band instrumentation radar for foliage attenuation measurements.

    PubMed

    Puranen, Mikko; Eskelinen, Pekka

    2008-10-01

    A portable K(a)-band instrumentation radar for foliage attenuation measurements has been designed. It uses direct dielectric resonator oscillator multiplier pulse modulation giving a half power pulse width of 17 ns. The dual conversion scalar receiver utilizes either a digital storage oscilloscope in envelope detection format or a special gated comparator arrangement providing 1 m resolution and associated led seven segment display for data analysis. The calibrated dynamic range is better than 37 dB with an equivalent noise floor of 0.005 dBsm at 25 m test range distance. First experiments indicate an effective beamwidth close to 1 degree. The total weight is below 5 kg and the unit can be mounted on a conventional photographic tripod. Power is supplied from a 12 V/6 A h sealed lead acid battery giving an operating time in excess of 10 h. PMID:19044750

  5. All-optical short pulse translation through cross-phase modulation in a VO₂ thin film.

    PubMed

    Fardad, Shima; Das, Susobhan; Salandrino, Alessandro; Breckenfeld, Eric; Kim, Heungsoo; Wu, Judy; Hui, Rongqing

    2016-01-15

    VO2 is a promising material for reconfigurable photonic devices due to the ultrafast changes in electronic and optical properties associated with its dielectric-to-metal phase transition. Based on a fiber-optic, pump-probe setup at 1550 nm wavelength window, and by varying the pump-pulse duration, we show that the material phase transition is primarily caused by the pump-pulse energy. For the first time, we demonstrate that the instantaneous optical phase modulation of probe during pump leading edge can be utilized to create short optical pulses at probe wavelength, through optical frequency discrimination. This circumvents the impact of long recovery time well known for the phase transition of VO2. PMID:26766683

  6. Wavelength and Intensity Dependence of Short Pulse Laser Xenon Double Ionization between 500 and 2300 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Gingras, G.; Tripathi, A.; Witzel, B.

    2009-10-23

    The wavelength and intensity dependence of xenon ionization with 50 fs laser pulses has been studied using time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We compare the ion yield distribution of singly and doubly charged xenon with the Perelomov-Popov-Terent'ev (PPT) theory, Perelomov, Popov, and Terent'ev, Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz. 50, 1393 (1966) [Sov. Phys. JETP 23, 924 (1966)], in the regime between 500 and 2300 nm. The intensity dependence for each wavelength is measured in a range between 1x10{sup 13} and 1x10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. The Xe{sup +}-ion signal is in good agreement with the PPT theory at all used wavelengths. In addition we demonstrate that ionic 5s5p{sup 6} {sup 2}S state is excited by an electron impact excitation process and contributes to the nonsequential double ionization process.

  7. Optical and electrical properties of SnO2 thin films after ultra-short pulsed laser annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scorticati, D.; Illiberi, A.; Römer, G. R. B. E.; Bor, T.; Ogieglo, W.; Klein Gunnewiek, M.; Lenkferink, A.; Otto, C.; Skolski, J. Z. P.; Grob, F.; de Lange, D. F.; Huis in't Veld, A. J.

    2013-09-01

    Ultra-short pulsed laser sources, with pulse durations in the ps and fs regime, are commonly exploited for cold ablation. However, operating ultra-short pulsed laser sources at fluence levels well below the ablation threshold allows for fast and selective thermal processing. The latter is especially advantageous for the processing of thin films. A precise control of the heat affected zone, as small as tens of nanometers, depending on the material and laser conditions, can be achieved. It enables the treatment of the upper section of thin films with negligible effects on the bulk of the film and no thermal damage of sensitive substrates below. By applying picosecond laser pulses, the optical and electrical properties of 900 nm thick SnO2 films, grown by an industrial CVD process on borofloat®-glass, were modified. The treated films showed a higher transmittance of light in the visible and near infra-red range, as well as a slightly increased electrical sheet resistance. Changes in optical properties are attributed to thermal annealing, as well as to the occurrence of Laser- Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSSs) superimposed on the surface of the SnO2 film. The small increase of electrical resistance is attributed to the generation of laser induced defects introduced during the fast heating-quenching cycle of the film. These results can be used to further improve the performance of SnO2-based electrodes for solar cells and/or electronic devices.

  8. Short-pulse Er:YAG laser increases bond strength of composite resin to sound and eroded dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cersosimo, Maria Cecília Pereira; Matos, Adriana Bona; Couto, Roberta Souza D.'Almeida; Marques, Márcia Martins; de Freitas, Patricia Moreira

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluated the influence of the irradiation with a short-pulse Er:YAG laser on the adhesion of composite resin to sound and eroded dentin (SD and ED). Forty-six samples of occlusal dentine, obtained from human molars, had half of their surface protected, while the other half was submitted to erosive cycles. Afterward, 23 samples were irradiated with Er:YAG laser, resulting in four experimental groups: SD, sound irradiated dentine (SID-Er:YAG, 50 μs, 2 Hz, 80 mJ, and 12.6 J/cm2), ED, and eroded irradiated dentin (EID-erosion + Er:YAG laser). A self-etching adhesive system was used, and then cylinders of composite resin were prepared. A microshear bond strength test was performed after 24 h storage (n=20). The morphology of SD and ED, with or without Er:YAG laser irradiation, was evaluated under scanning electron microscopy (n=3). Bond strength values (MPa) were subjected to analysis of variance followed by Tukey's test. Statistically significant differences were found among the experimental groups: SD (9.76±3.39 B), SID (12.77±5.09 A), ED (5.12±1.72 D), and EID (7.62±3.39 C). Even though erosion reduces the adhesion to dentin, the surface irradiation with a short-pulse Er:YAG laser increases adhesion to both ED and SD.

  9. Temporal and spatial temperature distribution in the glabrous skin of rats induced by short-pulse CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Pen-Li; Hsu, Shu-Shen; Tsai, Meng-Li; Jaw, Fu-Shan; Wang, An-Bang; Yen, Chen-Tung

    2012-11-01

    Pain is a natural alarm that aids the body in avoiding potential danger and can also present as an important indicator in clinics. Infrared laser-evoked potentials can be used as an objective index to evaluate nociception. In animal studies, a short-pulse laser is crucial because it completes the stimulation before escape behavior. The objective of the present study was to obtain the temporal and spatial temperature distributions in the skin caused by the irradiation of a short-pulse laser. A fast speed infrared camera was used to measure the surface temperature caused by a CO2 laser of different durations (25 and 35 ms) and power. The measured results were subsequently implemented with a three-layer finite element model to predict the subsurface temperature. We found that stratum corneum was crucial in the modeling of fast temperature response, and escape behaviors correlated with predictions of temperature at subsurface. Results indicated that the onset latency and duration of activated nociceptors must be carefully considered when interpreting physiological responses evoked by infrared irradiation.

  10. Impact of Pre-Plasma on Fast Electron Generation and Transport from Short Pulse High Intensity Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peebles, J.; McGuffey, C.; Krauland, C.; Jarrott, L. C.; Sorokovikova, A.; Qiao, B.; Krasheninnikov, S.; Beg, F. N.; Wei, M. S.; Park, J.; Link, A.; Chen, H.; McLean, H. S.; Wagner, C.; Minello, V.; McCary, E.; Meadows, A.; Spinks, M.; Gaul, E.; Dyer, G.; Hegelich, B. M.; Martinez, M.; Donovan, M.; Ditmire, T.

    2014-10-01

    We present the results and analysis from recent short pulse laser matter experiments using the Texas Petawatt Laser to study the impact of pre-plasma on fast electron generation and transport. The experimental setup consisted of 3 separate beam elements: a main, high intensity, short pulse beam for the interaction, a secondary pulse of equal intensity interacting with a separate thin foil target to generate protons for side-on proton imaging and a third, low intensity, wider beam to generate a varied scale length pre-plasma. The main target consisted of a multilayer planar Al foil with a buried Cu fluor layer. The electron beam was characterized with multiple diagnostics, including several bremsstrahlung spectrometers, magnetic electron spectrometers and Cu-K α imaging. The protons from the secondary target were used to image the fields on the front of the target in the region of laser plasma interaction. Features seen in the interaction region by these protons will be presented along with characteristics of the generated electron beam. This work performed under the auspices of the US DOE under Contracts DE-FOA-0000583 (FES, NNSA).

  11. Molecular hydrogen density measurements of short-pulse, high-density fuelling from a molecular cluster injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundberg, D. P.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.

    2012-01-01

    A molecular cluster injector (MCI) has been developed to provide short-pulse, high-density fuelling for the lithium tokamak experiment (LTX). Using an electron-beam fluorescence method, the molecular density profiles produced by the injector are measured with sub-cm spatial resolution. The system, which is cryogenically cooled to promote the formation of molecular clusters, demonstrates a significant increase in molecular density relative to room-temperature supersonic gas injectors. The transient characteristics of short pulses (3-5 ms) are measured with 250 µs temporal resolution, and the jet shock structure is found to evolve significantly on that time scale. Supplemental measurements with a pressure transducer validate the electron-beam measurements. The measured density profiles are consistent with supersonic flows suitable for producing substantial populations of molecular clusters. The measured densities and flow rates are appropriate for high-density fuelling of LTX plasmas. The MCI will be used to investigate the physics of molecular cluster fuelling of LTX plasmas.

  12. Determination of mean surface position and sea state from the radar return of a short-pulse satellite altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrick, D. E.

    1972-01-01

    Using the specular point theory of scatter from a very rough surface, the average backscatter cross section per unit area per radar cell width is derived for a cell located at a given height above the mean sea surface. This result is then applied to predict the average radar cross section observed by a short-pulse altimeter as a function of time for two modes of operation: pulse-limited and beam-limited configurations. For a pulse-limited satellite altimeter, a family of curves is calculated showing the distortion of the leading edge of the receiver output signal as a function of sea state (i.e., wind speed). A signal processing scheme is discussed that permits an accurate determination of the mean surface position--even in high seas--and, as a by-product, the estimation of the significant seawave height (or wind speed above the surface). Comparison of these analytical results with experimental data for both pulse-limited and beam-limited operation lends credence to the model. Such a model should aid in the design of short-pulse altimeters for accurate determination of the geoid over the oceans, as well as for the use of such altimeters for orbital sea-state monitoring.

  13. High-power radio frequency pulse generation and extration based on wakefield excited by an intense charged particle beam in dielectric-loaded waveguides.

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, F.; High Energy Physics; Illinois Inst. of Tech

    2009-07-24

    Power extraction using a dielectric-loaded (DL) waveguide is a way to generate high-power radio frequency (RF) waves for future particle accelerators, especially for two-beam-acceleration. In a two-beam-acceleration scheme, a low-energy, high-current particle beam is passed through a deceleration section of waveguide (decelerator), where the power from the beam is partially transferred to trailing electromagnetic waves (wakefields); then with a properly designed RF output coupler, the power generated in the decelerator is extracted to an output waveguide, where finally the power can be transmitted and used to accelerate another usually high-energy low-current beam. The decelerator, together with the RF output coupler, is called a power extractor. At Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA), we designed a 7.8GHz power extractor with a circular DL waveguide and tested it with single electron bunches and bunch trains. The output RF frequency (7.8GHz) is the sixth harmonic of the operational frequency (1.3GHz) of the electron gun and the linac at AWA. In single bunch excitation, a 1.7ns RF pulse with 30MW of power was generated by a single 66nC electron bunch passing through the decelerator. In subsequent experiments, by employing different splitting-recombining optics for the photoinjector laser, electron bunch trains were generated and thus longer RF pulses could be successfully generated and extracted. In 16-bunch experiments, 10ns and 22ns RF pulses have been generated and extracted; and in 4-bunch experiments, the maximum power generated was 44MW with 40MW extracted. A 26GHz DL power extractor has also been designed to test this technique in the millimeter-wave range. A power level of 148MW is expected to be generated by a bunch train with a bunch spacing of 769ps and bunch charges of 20nC each. The arrangement for the experiment is illustrated in a diagram. Higher-order-mode (HOM) power extraction has also been explored in a dual-frequency design. By using a bunch

  14. Time growth rate and field profiles of hybrid modes excited by a relativistic elliptical electron beam in an elliptical metallic waveguide with dielectric rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jazi, B.; Rahmani, Z.; Heidari-Semiromi, E.; Abdoli-Arani, A.

    2012-10-01

    The dispersion relation of guided electromagnetic waves propagating in an elliptical metallic waveguide with a dielectric rod driven by relativistic elliptical electron beam (REEB) is investigated. The electric field profiles and the growth rates of the waves are numerically calculated by using Mathieu functions. The effects of relative permittivity constant of dielectric rod, accelerating voltage, and current density of REEB on the growth rate are presented.

  15. Time growth rate and field profiles of hybrid modes excited by a relativistic elliptical electron beam in an elliptical metallic waveguide with dielectric rod

    SciTech Connect

    Jazi, B.; Rahmani, Z.; Abdoli-Arani, A.; Heidari-Semiromi, E.

    2012-10-15

    The dispersion relation of guided electromagnetic waves propagating in an elliptical metallic waveguide with a dielectric rod driven by relativistic elliptical electron beam (REEB) is investigated. The electric field profiles and the growth rates of the waves are numerically calculated by using Mathieu functions. The effects of relative permittivity constant of dielectric rod, accelerating voltage, and current density of REEB on the growth rate are presented.

  16. Laser induced damage in multilayer dielectric gratings due to ultrashort laser pulses. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, B.W.; Stuart, B.C.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Perry, M.D.

    1995-07-11

    Chirped pulse amplification is increasingly used to produce intense ultrashort laser pulses. When high-efficiency gratings are the dispersive element, as in the LLNL Petawatt laser, their susceptibility to laser induced damage constitutes a limitation on the peak intensities that can be reached. To obtain robust gratings, it is necessary to understand the causes of short-pulse damage, and to recognize the range of design options for high efficiency gratings. Metal gratings owe their high efficiency to their high conductivity. To avoid the inevitable light absorption that accompanies conductivity, we have developed designs for high efficiency rejection gratings that use only transparent dielectric materials. These combine the reflectivity of a multi-layer dielectric stack with a diffraction grating. We report here our present understanding of short-pulse laser induced damage, as it applies to dielectric gratings.

  17. Laser induced damage in multilayer dielectric gratings due to ultrashort laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, B.W.; Stuart, B.C.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Perry, M.D.

    1995-05-26

    Chirped pulse amplification is increasingly used to produce intense ultrashort laser pulses. When high-efficiency gratings are the dispersive element, as in the LLNL Petawatt laser, their susceptibility to laser induced damage constitutes a limitation on the peak intensities that can be reached. To obtain robust gratings, it is necessary to understand the causes of short-pulse damage, and to recognize the range of design options for high efficiency gratings. Metal gratings owe their high efficiency to their high conductivity. To avoid the inevitable light absorption that accompanies conductivity, we have developed designs for high efficiency reflection gratings that use only transparent dielectric materials. These combine the reflectivity of a multilayer dielectric stack with a diffraction grating. We report here our present understanding of short-pulse laser induced damage, as it applies to dielectric gratings.

  18. A design study for photon diagnostics for the APS storage ring short-pulse x-ray source.

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, B. X.; Lumpkin, A. H.; Landahl, E. C.; Dufresne, E. M.

    2008-01-01

    A short x-ray pulse source based on the crab cavity scheme proposed by Zholents is being developed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Photon diagnostics that visualize the electron bunches with transverse momentum chirp and verify the performance of the short x-ray pulse are required. We present a design study for the imaging diagnostics inside and outside of the crab cavity zone, utilizing both x-ray and visible synchrotron radiation. The diagnostics outside of the crab cavity zone will be used to map out stable operation parameters of the storage ring with crab cavities and to perform single-bunch, single- pass imaging of the chirped bunch, which facilitates optimizing the performance of the short-pulse source without disturbing other users around the ring.

  19. Remote sensing of atmospheric pressure and sea state from satellites using short-pulse multicolor laser altimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, C. S.; Tsai, B. M.; Abshire, J. B.

    1983-01-01

    Short pulse multicolor laser ranging systems are currently being developed for satellite ranging applications. These systems use Q-switched pulsed lasers and streak tube cameras to provide timing accuracies approaching a few picoseconds. Satellite laser ranging systems was used to evaluate many important geophysical phenomena such as fault motion, polar motion and solid earth tides, by measuring the orbital perturbations of retroreflector equipped satellites. Some existing operational systems provide range resolution approaching a few millimeters. There is currently considerable interest in adapting these highly accurate systems for use as airborne and satellite based altimeters. Potential applications include the measurement of sea state, ground topography and atmospheric pressure. This paper reviews recent progress in the development of multicolor laser altimeters for use in monitoring sea state and atmospheric pressure.

  20. 20-100 keV K(alpha) X-Ray Source Generation by Short Pulse High Intensity Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H-S; Koch, J A; Landen, O L; Phillips, T W; Goldsack, T

    2003-08-22

    We are studying the feasibility of utilizing K{alpha} x-ray sources in the range of 20 to 100 keV as a backlighters for imaging various stages of implosions and high areal density planar samples driven by the NIF laser facility. The hard x-ray K{alpha} sources are created by relativistic electron plasma interactions in the target material after a radiation by short pulse high intensity lasers. In order to understand K{alpha} source characteristics such as production efficiency and brightness as a function of laser parameters, we have performed experiments using the 10 J, 100 fs JanUSP laser. We utilized single-photon counting spectroscopy and x-ray imaging diagnostics to characterize the K{alpha} source. We find that the K{alpha} conversion efficiency from the laser energy is {approx} 3 x 10{sup -4}.

  1. Remote profiling of lake ice using an S-band short pulse radar aboard an all-terrain vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D. W.; Mueller, R. A.; Schertler, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    An airborne short-pulse radar system to measure ice thickness was designed. The system supported an effort to develop an all-weather Great Lakes Ice Information System to aid in extending the winter navigation season. Experimental studies into the accuracy and limitations of the system are described. A low power version was operated from an all-terrain vehicle on the Straits of Mackinac during March 1975. The vehicle allowed rapid surveying of large areas and eliminated the ambiguity in location between the radar system and the ground truth ice auger team. It was also possible to the effects of snow cover, surface melt water, pressure ridging, and ice type upon the accuracy of the system. Over 25 sites were explored which had ice thicknesses from 29 to 60 cm. The maximum radar overestimate was 9.8 percent, while the maximum underestimate was 6.6 percent. The average error of the 25 measurements was 0.1 percent.

  2. Remote profiling of lake ice thickness using a short pulse radar system aboard a C-47 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D. W.; Heighway, J. E.; Shook, D. F.; Jirberg, R. J.; Vickers, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    Design and operation of short pulse radar systems for use in ice thickness measurement are described. Two ice profiling systems were tested, an S system which used either random noise or continous wave modulation at 2.8 GHz and a less powerful C band system which operated at 6.0 GHz and did not have random noise modulation. Flight altitudes of 4,000 feet were used, but the S band system was usable at 7,000 feet allowing flights in poor weather conditions. A minimum ice thickness of four inches is required for measurement, while the thickest ice measured was 36 inches. System accuracy is plus or minus one inch.

  3. Investigating short-pulse shock initiation in HMX-based explosives with reactive meso-scale simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, H. K.; Tarver, C. M.; Reaugh, J. E.; May, C. M.

    2014-05-01

    We performed reactive meso-scale simulations of short-pulse experiments to study the influence of flyer velocity and pore structure on shock initiation of LX-10 (95wt% HMX, 5wt% Viton A). Our calculations show that the reaction evolution fit a power law relationship in time and increases with increasing porosity, decreasing pore size, and increasing flyer velocity. While heterogeneous shock initiation modes, dependent on hot spot mechanisms, are predicted at lower flyer velocities, mixed heterogeneous-homogeneous shock initiation modes, less dependent on hot spots, are predicted at higher velocities. These studies are important because they enable the development of predictive shock initiation models that incorporate complex microstructure and can be used to optimize performance-safety characteristics of explosives.

  4. Multi-charged heavy ion acceleration from the ultra-intense short pulse laser system interacting with the metal target.

    PubMed

    Nishiuchi, M; Sakaki, H; Maeda, S; Sagisaka, A; Pirozhkov, A S; Pikuz, T; Faenov, A; Ogura, K; Kanasaki, M; Matsukawa, K; Kusumoto, T; Tao, A; Fukami, T; Esirkepov, T; Koga, J; Kiriyama, H; Okada, H; Shimomura, T; Tanoue, M; Nakai, Y; Fukuda, Y; Sakai, S; Tamura, J; Nishio, K; Sako, H; Kando, M; Yamauchi, T; Watanabe, Y; Bulanov, S V; Kondo, K

    2014-02-01

    Experimental demonstration of multi-charged heavy ion acceleration from the interaction between the ultra-intense short pulse laser system and the metal target is presented. Al ions are accelerated up to 12 MeV/u (324 MeV total energy). To our knowledge, this is far the highest energy ever reported for the case of acceleration of the heavy ions produced by the <10 J laser energy of 200 TW class Ti:sapphire laser system. Adding to that, thanks to the extraordinary high intensity laser field of ∼10(21) W cm(-2), the accelerated ions are almost fully stripped, having high charge to mass ratio (Q/M). PMID:24593609

  5. On the study of pulse evolution in ultra-short pulse mode-locked fiber lasers by numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Thomas; Ortaç, Bülend; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2007-06-25

    In this contribution we highlight several aspects concerning the numerical simulation of ultra-short pulse mode-locked fiber lasers by a non-distributed model. We show that for fixed system parameters multiple attractors are accessible by different initial conditions especially in the transient region between different mode-locking regimes. The reduction of multiple attractors stabilizing from different quantum noise fields to a single solution by gain ramping is demonstrated. Based on this analysis and model, different regimes of mode-locking obtained by varying the intra-cavity dispersion and saturation energy of the gain fiber are revised and it is shown that a regime producing linearly chirped parabolic pulses known from self-similar evolution is embedded in the wave-breaking free mode-locking regime. PMID:19547154

  6. High-power Waveguide Dampers for the Short-Pulse X-Ray Project at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Waldschmidt, G J; Liu, J; Middendorf, M E; Nassiri, A; Smith, T L; Wu, G; Henry, J; Mammosser, J D; Rimmer, R A; Wiseman, M

    2012-07-01

    High-power waveguide dampers have been designed and prototyped for the Short-Pulse X-ray (SPX) cavities at the Advanced Photon Source. The cavities will operate at 2.815 GHz and utilize the TM110 dipole mode. As a result, higher-order (HOM) and lower-order mode (LOM) in-vacuum dampers have been designed to satisfy the demanding broadband damping requirements in the APS storage ring. The SPX single-cell cavity consists of two WR284 waveguides for damping the HOMs and one WR284 waveguide for primarily damping the LOM where up to 2kW will be dissipated in the damping material. The damper designs and high-power experimental results will be discussed in this paper.

  7. Fast fabrication of super-hydrophobic surfaces on polypropylene by replication of short-pulse laser structured molds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekesi, J.; Kaakkunen, J. J. J.; Michaeli, W.; Klaiber, F.; Schoengart, M.; Ihlemann, J.; Simon, P.

    2010-06-01

    A new two-step method, facilitating the rapid generation of super-hydrophobic surface structures via parallel laser processing followed by a replica generation by injection molding is reported. A self-made fused silica-based diffractive optical element (DOE) is applied to distribute the laser energy into a 25×25 dot matrix. This DOE is used as a transmission mask for surface ablation of metal molds, applying short-pulse UV laser pulses. In a subsequent process step, replicas of the processed stamp are produced by variothermal injection molding, enabling the mass production of the surface pattern on plastics parts. The resulting topography facilitates a super-hydrophobic behavior of the fabricated components.

  8. Multi-soliton, multi-breather and higher order rogue wave solutions to the complex short pulse equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Liming; Feng, Bao-Feng; Zhu, Zuonong

    2016-07-01

    In the present paper, we are concerned with the general analytic solutions to the complex short pulse (CSP) equation including soliton, breather and rogue wave solutions. With the aid of a generalized Darboux transformation, we construct the N-bright soliton solution in a compact determinant form, the N-breather solution including the Akhmediev breather and a general higher order rogue wave solution. The first and second order rogue wave solutions are given explicitly and analyzed. The asymptotic analysis is performed rigorously for both the N-soliton and the N-breather solutions. All three forms of the analytical solutions admit either smoothed-, cusped- or looped-type ones for the CSP equation depending on the parameters. It is noted that, due to the reciprocal (hodograph) transformation, the rogue wave solution to the CSP equation can be a smoothed, cusponed or a looped one, which is different from the rogue wave solution found so far.

  9. The new methods of treatment for age-related macular degeneration using the ultra-short pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Yumiko; Awazu, Kunio; Suzuki, Sachiko; Ohshima, Tetsuro; Sawa, Miki; Sakaguchi, Hirokazu; Tano, Yasuo; Ohji, Masahito

    2007-02-01

    The non-invasive methods of treatments have been studying for the improvement of quality of life (QOL) of patients undergoing treatment. A photodynamic therapy (PDT) is one of the non-invasive treatments. PDT is the methods of treatment using combination of a laser and a photosensitizer. PDT has few risks for patients. Furthermore, PDT enables function preservation of a disease part. PDT has been used for early cancer till now, but in late years it is applied for age-related macular degeneration (AMD). AMD is one of the causes of vision loss in older people. However, PDT for AMD does not produce the best improvement in visual acuity. The skin photosensivity by an absorption characteristic of a photosensitizer is avoided. We examined new PDT using combination of an ultra-short pulsed laser and indocyanine green (ICG).

  10. Simulation of the short pulse effects in the start-up from noise in high-gain FELS

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, S.J.; Kim, K.J.

    1995-12-31

    The spatio-temporal evolution of high-gain free electron lasers from noise is investigated by 1-D simulation calculation. To understand the discrepancy between the experimental result and theoretical prediction of the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), the strong slippage effect in the short pulse electron beam and the coherent bunched beam effect are considered. When the length over which the electron density varies significantly is comparable or smaller than the FEL wavelength, the initial noise level would be increased due to the enhanced coherence between electrons. With a proper computer modeling of the start-up from noise including the energy spread, the overall performance and characteristics of SASE are studied. This work will be helpful to increase the credibility of the simulation calculation to predict the SASE performance in all wave-length regions.

  11. High performance compact magnetic spectrometers for energetic ion and electron measurement in ultra intense short pulse laser solid interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Link, A; van Maren, R; Patel, P; Shepherd, R; Wilks, S C; Beiersdorfer, P

    2008-05-08

    Ultra intense short pulse lasers incident on solid targets can generate relativistic electrons that then accelerate energetic protons and ions. These fast electrons and ions can effectively heat the solid target, beyond the region of direct laser interaction, and are vital to realizing the fast ignition concept. To study these energetic ions and electrons produced from the laser-target interactions, we have developed a range of spectrometers that can cover a large energy range (from less than 0.1 MeV to above 100 MeV). They are physically compact and feature high performance and low cost. We will present the basic design of these spectrometers and their test results from recent laser experiments.

  12. Method for determining the position, angle and other injection parameters of a short pulsed beam in the Brookhaven AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C.; Ahrens, L.

    1985-01-01

    As part of the effort to improve the monitoring of the injection process at the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), we have developed a beam diagnostics package which processes the signals from the plates of a pick-up electrode (PUE) located near the injection region of the AGS and provides measurements of the position and angle (with respect to the equilibrium orbit) of the injected beam at the stripping foil where the incident H/sup -/ beam is converted into protons. In addition the package provides measurements of the tune and chromaticity of the AGS at injection, and a measurement of the momentum spread of the injected beam. Since these parameters are obtained for a short-pulsed beam at injection we shall refer to the diagnostics package as PIP which stands for Pulsed Injection Parameters.

  13. Self-consistent particle-in-cell modelling of short pulse absorption and transport for high energy density physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsay, M. G.; Arber, T. D.; Sircombe, N. J.

    2016-03-01

    In order for detailed, solid density particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations to run within a reasonable time frame, novel approaches to modelling high density material must be employed. For the purposes of modelling high intensity, short pulse laser-plasma interactions, however, these approaches must be consistent with retaining a full PIC model in the low-density laser interaction region. By replacing the standard Maxwell field solver with an electric field update based on a simplified Ohm's law in regions of high electron density, it is possible to access densities at and above solid without being subject to the standard grid and time step constraints. Such a model has recently been implemented in the PIC code EPOCH. We present the initial results of a detailed two-dimensional simulation performed to compare the adapted version of the code with recent experimental results from the Orion laser facility.

  14. An analysis of short pulse and dual frequency radar techniques for measuring ocean wave spectra from satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, F. C.

    1980-01-01

    Scanning beam microwave radars were used to measure ocean wave directional spectra from satellites. In principle, surface wave spectral resolution in wave number can be obtained using either short pulse (SP) or dual frequency (DF) techniques; in either case, directional resolution obtains naturally as a consequence of a Bragg-like wave front matching. A four frequency moment characterization of backscatter from the near vertical using physical optics in the high frequency limit was applied to an analysis of the SP and DF measurement techniques. The intrinsic electromagnetic modulation spectrum was to the first order in wave steepness proportional to the large wave directional slope spectrum. Harmonic distortion was small and was a minimum near 10 deg incidence. NonGaussian wave statistics can have an effect comparable to that in the second order of scattering from a normally distributed sea surface. The SP technique is superior to the DF technique in terms of measurement signal to noise ratio and contrast ratio.

  15. Short-pulse cross-phase modulation in an electromagnetically-induced-transparency medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feizpour, Amir; Dmochowski, Greg; Steinberg, Aephraim M.

    2016-01-01

    Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) has been proposed as a way to greatly enhance cross-phase modulation, with the possibility of leading to few-photon-level optical nonlinearities [Schmidt and Imamoglu, Opt. Lett. 21, 1936 (1996), 10.1364/OL.21.001936]. This enhancement grows as the transparency window width, ΔEIT, is narrowed. Decreasing ΔEIT, however, has been shown to increase the response time of the nonlinear medium. This suggests that, for a given pulse duration, the nonlinearity would diminish once the window width became narrower than this pulse bandwidth. We show that this is not the case: the peak phase shift saturates but does not decrease. We show that in the regimes of most practical interest—narrow EIT windows perturbed by short signal pulses—the enhancement offered by EIT is not only in the magnitude of the nonlinear phase shift but also in its increased duration. That is, for the case of signal pulses much shorter (temporally) than the inverse EIT bandwidth, the narrow window serves to prolong the effect of the passing signal pulse, leading to an integrated phase shift that grows linearly with 1 /ΔEIT ; this continued growth of the integrated phase shift improves the detectability of the phase shift, in principle, without bound. For many purposes, it is this detectability which is of more interest than the absolute magnitude of the peak phase shift. We present analytical expressions based on a linear time-invariant model that accounts for the temporal behavior of the cross-phase modulation for several parameter ranges of interest. We conclude that in order to optimize the detectability of the EIT-based cross-phase shift, one should use the narrowest possible EIT window and a signal pulse that is as broadband as the excited-state linewidth and detuned by half a linewidth.

  16. Pulse compression below 40fs at 1μm: The first step towards a short-pulse, high-energy beam line at LULI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaowei; Zou, Jiping; Martin, Luc; Simon, Francois; Lopez-Martens, Rodrigo; Audebert, Patrick

    2010-08-01

    We present the upgrading project ELFIE (Equipement Laser de Forte Intensité et Energie) based on the "100TW" mixed Nd:glass CPA laser system at 1μm at LULI, which includes an energy enhancement and the development of a short-pulse, high-energy, good temporal contrast beam line (50fs/5J). We report the first experimental step towards the short-pulse, high-energy beam line: spectral broadening above 60nm from 7nm and temporal pulse compression below 40fs from 300fs at 1μm through a Krypton-filled hollow fiber compressor.

  17. A microwave dielectric resonant oscillatory circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigov, A. S.; Shvartsburg, A. B.

    2016-07-01

    Bias currents in a thin dielectric nonconducting torus are investigated, and the resonant mode of excitation of these currents is established. The similarity of the frequency spectrum of such a dielectric element to the spectra of a classical Thomson oscillatory circuit and a metamaterial with negative permittivity is demonstrated. The resonant frequency of electromagnetic oscillations of the ring dielectric circuit and magnetic and electric fields of such a circuit under resonant excitation are determined.

  18. Dielectric barrier discharges applied for optical spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, S.; Schütz, A.; Klute, F. D.; Kratzer, J.; Franzke, J.

    2016-09-01

    The present review reflects the importance of dielectric barrier discharges for optical spectrometric detection in analytical chemistry. In contrast to usual discharges with a direct current the electrodes are separated by at least one dielectric barrier. There are two main features of the dielectric barrier discharges: they can serve as dissociation and excitation devices as well as ionization sources, respectively. This article portrays various application fields of dielectric barrier discharges in analytical chemistry used for elemental and molecular detection with optical spectrometry.

  19. Mechanism and influencing factors on critical pulse width of oil-immersed polymer insulators under short pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liang; Su, Jian Cang; Li, Rui; Zeng, Bo; Cheng, Jie; Zheng, Lei; Yu, Bin Xiong; Wu, Xiao Long; Zhang, Xi Bo; Pan, Ya Feng

    2015-04-01

    The critical pulse width (τc) is a pulse width at which the surface flashover threshold (Ef) is equal to the bulk breakdown threshold (EBD) for liquid-polymer composite insulation systems, which is discovered by Zhao et al. [Annual Report Conference on Electrical Insulation and Dielectric Phenomena (IEEE Dielectrics and Electrical Insulation Society, Shenzhen, China, 2013), Vol. 2, pp. 854-857]. In this paper, the mechanism of τc is interpreted in perspective of the threshold and the time delay (td) of surface flashover and bulk breakdown, respectively. It is found that two changes appear as the pulse width decreases which are responsible for the existence of τc: (1) EBD is lower than Ef; (2) td of bulk breakdown is shorter than td of surface flashover. In addition, factors which have influences on τc are investigated, such as the dielectric type, the insulation length, the dielectric thickness, the dielectrics configuration, the pulse number, and the liquid purity. These influences of factors are generalized as three types if τc is expected to increase: (1) factors causing EBD to decrease, such as increasing the pulse number or employing a dielectric of lower EBD; (2) factors causing Ef to increase, such as complicating the insulator's configuration or increasing the liquid purity; (3) factors causing EBD and Ef to increase together, but Ef increases faster than EBD, such as decreasing the dielectric thickness or the insulation length. With the data in references, all the three cases are verified experimentally. In the end, a general method based on τc for solid insulation design is presented and the significance of τc on solid insulation design and on solid demolition are discussed.

  20. Direct laser acceleration of electron by an ultra intense and short-pulsed laser in under-dense plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y. Y.; Gu, Y. J.; Zhu, Z.; Li, X. F.; Ban, H. Y.; Kong, Q.; Kawata, S.

    2011-05-15

    Direct laser acceleration (DLA) of electron by an ultra intense and short-pulsed laser interacting with under-dense plasma is investigated based on 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. A high-density electron beam is generated by the laser longitudinal ponderomotive force. Although the total number of DLA electrons is significantly smaller than the number of electrons trapped in the bubble, the total charge of high-energy DLA electrons (E>800MeV) reaches 67 pC/{mu}m. It is found that the electron beam occurs in a two-stage acceleration, i.e., accelerated in vacuum by the laser directly soon after a DLA process in plasma. The beam is accelerated violently with effective acceleration gradient in 100 GeV/cm. The energy spectrum of electrons presents a Maxwellian distribution with the highest energy of about 3.1 GeV. The dependence of maximum electron energy and electric quantity with laser intensity, laser width, pulse duration, and initial plasma density are also studied.

  1. Spectroscopy of Neutrons Generated Through Nuclear Reactions with Light Ions in Short-Pulse Laser-Interaction Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeckl, C.; Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Sangster, T. C.; Schroder, W. U.

    2015-11-01

    Neutron and charged-particle production has been studied in OMEGA EP laser-driven light-ion reactions including D-D fusion, D-9Be fusion, and 9Be(D,n)10B processes at deuteron energies from 1 to a few MeV. The energetic deuterons are produced in a primary target, which is irradiated with one short-pulse (10-ps) beam with energies of up to 1.25 kJ focused at the target front surface. Charged particles from the backside of the target create neutrons and ions through nuclear reactions in a secondary target placed closely behind the primary interaction target. Angle-dependent yields and spectra of the neutrons generated in the secondary target are measured using scintillator-photomultiplier-based neutron time-of-flight detectors and nuclear activation samples. A Thomson parabola is used to measure the spectra of the primary and secondary charged particles. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944 and DE-FC02-04ER54789.

  2. Investigation of Stimulated Raman Scattering Using Short-Pulse Diffraction Limited Laser Beam near the Instability Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, J. L.; Montgomery, D. S.; Yin, L.; Flippo, K. A.; Albright, B. J.; Johnson, R. P.; Shimada, T.; Rose, H. A.; Rousseaux, C.; Tassin, V.; Baton, S. D.; Amiranoff, F.; Hardin, R. A.

    2008-11-01

    Short pulse laser plasma interaction experiments using diffraction limited beams provide an excellent platform to investigate the fundamental physics of Stimulated Raman (SRS) and Stimulated Brillouin (SBS) Scattering. Detailed understanding of these laser plasma instabilities impacts the current inertial confinement fusion ignition designs and could potentially impact fast ignition when higher energy lasers are used with longer pulse durations ( > 1 kJ and > 1 ps). Using short laser pulses, experiments can be modeled over the entire interaction time of the laser using PIC codes to validate our understanding. Experiments have been conducted at the Trident laser and the LULI to investigate SRS near the threshold of the instability using 527 and 1064 nm laser light respectively with 1.5 -- 3 ps pulses. In the case of both experiments, the interaction beam was focused into a pre-ionized He gasjet plasma. Measurements of the reflectivity as a function of intensity and k?D were completed at the Trident laser. At LULI, a 300 fs Thomson scattering probe is used to directly measure the density fluctuations of the driven electron plasma and ion acoustic waves. Details of the experimental results will be presented.

  3. Production of neutrons up to 18 MeV in high-intensity, short-pulse laser matter interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Higginson, D. P.; McNaney, J. M.; Swift, D. C.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Patel, P. K.; Petrov, G. M.; Davis, J.; Frenje, J. A.; Jarrott, L. C.; Tynan, G.; Beg, F. N.; Kodama, R.; Nakamura, H.; Lancaster, K. L.

    2011-10-15

    The generation of high-energy neutrons using laser-accelerated ions is demonstrated experimentally using the Titan laser with 360 J of laser energy in a 9 ps pulse. In this technique, a short-pulse, high-energy laser accelerates deuterons from a CD{sub 2} foil. These are incident on a LiF foil and subsequently create high energy neutrons through the {sup 7}Li(d,xn) nuclear reaction (Q = 15 MeV). Radiochromic film and a Thomson parabola ion-spectrometer were used to diagnose the laser accelerated deuterons and protons. Conversion efficiency into protons was 0.5%, an order of magnitude greater than into deuterons. Maximum neutron energy was shown to be angularly dependent with up to 18 MeV neutrons observed in the forward direction using neutron time-of-flight spectrometry. Absolutely calibrated CR-39 detected spectrally integrated neutron fluence of up to 8 x 10{sup 8} n sr{sup -1} in the forward direction.

  4. Transition from interpulse to afterglow plasmas driven by repetitive short-pulse microwaves in a multicusp magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Shail; Sahu, Debaprasad; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep

    2012-08-15

    In the power-off phase, plasmas generated by repetitive short-pulse microwaves in a multicusp magnetic field show a transitive nature from interpulse to afterglow as a function of pulse duration t{sub w} = 20-200 {mu}s. The ionized medium can be driven from a highly non equilibrium to an equilibrium state inside the pulses, thereby dictating the behavior of the plasma in the power-off phase. Compared to afterglows, interpulse plasmas observed for t{sub w} < 50 {mu}s are characterized by a quasi-steady-state in electron density that persists for {approx} 20-40 {mu}s even after the end of the pulse and has a relatively slower decay rate ({approx} 4.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} s{sup -1}) of the electron temperature, as corroborated by optical measurements. The associated electron energy probability function indicates depletion in low energy electrons which appear at higher energies just after the end of the pulse. The transition occurs at t{sub w} {approx} 50 {mu}s as confirmed by time evolution of integrated electron numbers densities obtained from the distribution function.

  5. Scanning electron microscopy and thermal characteristics of dentin ablated by a short-pulse XeCl excimer laser.

    PubMed

    Neev, J; Stabholtz, A; Liaw, L H; Torabinejad, M; Fujishige, J T; Ho, P D; Berns, M W

    1993-01-01

    The interaction of a short pulse XeCl excimer laser radiation with human dentin was investigated. The dependence of surface temperatures and temperature gradients into the treated teeth on laser parameters such as fluence (0.5J/cm2-7J/cm2), pulse repetition rate (1Hz-35Hz), and spot size (0.004cm2-0.12cm2) was studied. Additionally, the effect of fluence and pulse repetition rate on dentin microstructure was studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It is demonstrated that this "cold ablation" excimer laser can result in significant thermal modification in the dentin surfaces. Changes include the formation of melted dentin grains, which uniformly cover the surface and the exposed dentin tubules. Maximum temperatures of the ablated surfaces, however, remained relatively low at most laser parameters used. Also, the immediate neighborhood of the root canal was essentially undisturbed at most laser parameters. These observations suggest that with the appropriate choice of parameters XeCl lasers can be effective in producing surface structures that may prove useful in enhancing bond strength or other applications in dentistry, without exposing tooth pulp to significant temperature elevation. PMID:8515674

  6. Numerical simulation of high-power virtual-cathode reflex triode driven by repetitive short pulse electron gun

    SciTech Connect

    Yovchev, I.G.; Spassovsky, I.P.; Nikolov, N.A.; Dimitrov, D.P.; Messina, G.; Raimondi, P.; Barroso, J.J.; Correa, R.A.

    1996-06-01

    A virtual-cathode reflex triode is investigated by numerical simulations. A trapezoidal in shape voltage pulse with an amplitude of 300 kV is applied to the solid cathode of the device to drive the cathode negative. The electron beam-to-microwave power conversion efficiency {epsilon}, calculated for the pulse flat top with a duration {tau}{sub ft} = 1.2 ns is approximately the same (about 1.5--2%) as well as for a long flat top ({tau}{sub ft} = 4 ns). The simulations show a 10--15% increase of {epsilon} at {tau}{sub ft} shortening to 0.6 ns. However, this occurs when the anode mesh transparency is high (80--90%). Considerable enhancement of the efficiency (about four times) for {tau}{sub ft} = 0.6 ns has been calculated if the cathode side surface is brought near to the anode tube (from {approx}0.5% at cathode radius R{sub c} = 1.6 cm to {approx}2% at R{sub c} = 3.8 cm). The obtained results would find an application for the design of virtual-cathode reflex triode devices driven by a short pulse and high repetition rate electron gun.

  7. Measurements of plasma-wave generation using a short-pulse high-intensity laser beat wave

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, B.; Najmudin, Z.; Wei, M.S.; Marle, C.; Kingham, R.J.; Krushelnick, K.; Dangor, A.E.; Clarke, R.J.; Poulter, M. J.; Hernandez-Gomez, C.; Hawkes, S.; Neely, D.; Collier, J.L.; Danson, C.N.; Fritzler, S.; Malka, V.

    2006-01-15

    Experiments to examine the generation of relativistic plasma waves via a high-intensity short-pulse beat-wave scheme are described in detail. The pulse stretcher of the Vulcan chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) laser system was modified to produce two frequency, 3 ps pulses focusable to intensities up to 10{sup 18} W cm{sup -2}. Short high-intensity pulses were used to avoid limitations to the plasma-wave amplitude due to the modulational instability. Two experiments were undertaken, at 3 and 10 TW, with the generation of plasma waves diagnosed by measuring the sidebands produced in the spectrum of the forward scattered beam. A resonance in the sideband signal was observed for an initial plasma density higher than expected for the given beat frequency. This resonance shift can be attributed to transverse ponderomotive expulsion of plasma electrons from the laser focal region. A monotonically increasing background was also observed, which was due to nonresonant cross-phase modulation.

  8. Coaxial short pulsed laser

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, M.A.; Davies, T.J.

    1975-08-01

    This invention relates to a laser system of rugged design suitable for use in a field environment. The laser itself is of coaxial design with a solid potting material filling the space between components. A reservoir is employed to provide a gas lasing medium between an electrode pair, each of which is connected to one of the coaxial conductors. (auth)

  9. Precise ablation of dental hard tissues with ultra-short pulsed lasers. Preliminary exploratory investigation on adequate laser parameters.

    PubMed

    Bello-Silva, Marina Stella; Wehner, Martin; Eduardo, Carlos de Paula; Lampert, Friedrich; Poprawe, Reinhart; Hermans, Martin; Esteves-Oliveira, Marcella

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the possibility of introducing ultra-short pulsed lasers (USPL) in restorative dentistry by maintaining the well-known benefits of lasers for caries removal, but also overcoming disadvantages, such as thermal damage of irradiated substrate. USPL ablation of dental hard tissues was investigated in two phases. Phase 1--different wavelengths (355, 532, 1,045, and 1,064 nm), pulse durations (picoseconds and femtoseconds) and irradiation parameters (scanning speed, output power, and pulse repetition rate) were assessed for enamel and dentin. Ablation rate was determined, and the temperature increase measured in real time. Phase 2--the most favorable laser parameters were evaluated to correlate temperature increase to ablation rate and ablation efficiency. The influence of cooling methods (air, air-water spray) on ablation process was further analyzed. All parameters tested provided precise and selective tissue ablation. For all lasers, faster scanning speeds resulted in better interaction and reduced temperature increase. The most adequate results were observed for the 1064-nm ps-laser and the 1045-nm fs-laser. Forced cooling caused moderate changes in temperature increase, but reduced ablation, being considered unnecessary during irradiation with USPL. For dentin, the correlation between temperature increase and ablation efficiency was satisfactory for both pulse durations, while for enamel, the best correlation was observed for fs-laser, independently of the power used. USPL may be suitable for cavity preparation in dentin and enamel, since effective ablation and low temperature increase were observed. If adequate laser parameters are selected, this technique seems to be promising for promoting the laser-assisted, minimally invasive approach. PMID:22565342

  10. Study of energy partitioning in mass limited targets using the 50 TW Leopard short-pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Brandon; Sawada, Hiroshi; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Yabuuchi, Toshinori; Chen, Hui; Park, J.-B.; McClean, Harry; Patel, Prav; Beg, Farhat

    2014-10-01

    Mass limited Cu targets were used to study the energy distribution in the interaction of an ultra-intense, short-pulse laser by measuring characteristic x-rays and energetic particles. At the Nevada Terawatt Facility, Leopard delivered 15 J to an 8 μm spot size in a 350 fs pulse, achieving a peak intensity of 1019 W/cm2 at 20° incidence. The 2 μm thick Cu foil targets varied in size from 1 mm2 to 75 μm by 60 μm. A spherical crystal imager and a Bragg crystal x-ray spectrometer were used to measure 8.05 keV monochromatic x-ray images and 7.5-9.5 keV x-rays respectively. A magnet-based electron spectrometer in the rear monitored escaping electrons. Results show a decrease in the absolute yield of both escaped electrons and Cu K-shell x-rays as targets sizes are reduced, while He α emission remains nearly constant. In the smallest target, a bulk temperature of about 150 eV was inferred from the ratio of K β to K α. The interaction of the Leopard laser with the targets was simulated with 2-D implicit Particle-in-cell code PICLS. Comparisons of the simulation and experiment will be presented. This work was supported by the DOE Office of Fusion Energy Science under Fusion Science Center, and the National Nuclear Security Administration under cooperative agreements DE-FC52-06NA27616 and DE-NA0002075. T.Y. was supported by Japan/U.S. Cooperation.

  11. Analysis of the short-pulsed CO2 laser ablation process for optimizing the processing performance for cutting bony tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrwald, Markus; Burgner, Jessica; Platzek, Christoph; Feldmann, Claus; Raczkowsky, Jörg; Wörn, Heinz

    2010-02-01

    Recently we established an experimental setup for robot-assisted laser bone ablation using short-pulsed CO2 laser. Due to the comparable low processing speed of laser bone ablation the application in surgical interventions is not yet feasible. In order to optimize this ablation process, we conducted a series of experiments to derive parameters for a discrete process model. After applying single and multiple laser pulses with varying intensity onto bone, the resulting craters were measured using a confocal microscope in 3D. The resulting ablation volumes were evaluated by applying Gaussian function fitting. We then derived a logarithmic function for the depth prediction of laser ablation on bone. In order to increase the ablation performance we conducted experiments using alternate fluids replacing the water spray: pure glycerin, glycerin/water mixture, acids and bases. Because of the higher boiling point of glycerin compared to water we had expected deeper craters through the resulting higher temperatures. Experimental results showed that glycerin or a glycerin/water mix do not have any effect on the depth of the ablation craters. Additionally applying the acid or base on to the ablation site does only show minor benefits compared to water. Furthermore we preheated the chemicals with a low energy pulse prior to the ablation pulse, which also showed no effect. However, applying a longer soaking time of the chemicals induced nearly a doubling of the ablation depth in some cases. Furthermore with this longer soaking time, carbonization at the crater margins does not occur as is observed when using conventionally water spray.

  12. Mechanism and influencing factors on critical pulse width of oil-immersed polymer insulators under short pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Liang Li, Rui; Zheng, Lei; Su, Jian Cang; Cheng, Jie; Yu, Bin Xiong; Wu, Xiao Long; Zhang, Xi Bo; Pan, Ya Feng; Zeng, Bo

    2015-04-15

    The critical pulse width (τ{sub c}) is a pulse width at which the surface flashover threshold (E{sub f}) is equal to the bulk breakdown threshold (E{sub BD}) for liquid-polymer composite insulation systems, which is discovered by Zhao et al. [Annual Report Conference on Electrical Insulation and Dielectric Phenomena (IEEE Dielectrics and Electrical Insulation Society, Shenzhen, China, 2013), Vol. 2, pp. 854–857]. In this paper, the mechanism of τ{sub c} is interpreted in perspective of the threshold and the time delay (t{sub d}) of surface flashover and bulk breakdown, respectively. It is found that two changes appear as the pulse width decreases which are responsible for the existence of τ{sub c}: (1) E{sub BD} is lower than E{sub f}; (2) t{sub d} of bulk breakdown is shorter than t{sub d} of surface flashover. In addition, factors which have influences on τ{sub c} are investigated, such as the dielectric type, the insulation length, the dielectric thickness, the dielectrics configuration, the pulse number, and the liquid purity. These influences of factors are generalized as three types if τ{sub c} is expected to increase: (1) factors causing E{sub BD} to decrease, such as increasing the pulse number or employing a dielectric of lower E{sub BD}; (2) factors causing E{sub f} to increase, such as complicating the insulator's configuration or increasing the liquid purity; (3) factors causing E{sub BD} and E{sub f} to increase together, but E{sub f} increases faster than E{sub BD}, such as decreasing the dielectric thickness or the insulation length. With the data in references, all the three cases are verified experimentally. In the end, a general method based on τ{sub c} for solid insulation design is presented and the significance of τ{sub c} on solid insulation design and on solid demolition are discussed.

  13. Broadband local dielectric spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labardi, M.; Lucchesi, M.; Prevosto, D.; Capaccioli, S.

    2016-05-01

    A route to extend the measurement bandwidth of local dielectric spectroscopy up to the MHz range has been devised. The method is based on a slow amplitude modulation at a frequency Ω of the excitation field oscillating at a frequency ω and the coherent detection of the modulated average electric force or force gradient at Ω. The cantilever mechanical response does not affect the measurement if Ω is well below its resonant frequency; therefore, limitations on the excitation field frequency are strongly reduced. Demonstration on a thin poly(vinyl acetate) film is provided, showing its structural relaxation spectrum on the local scale up to 45 °C higher than glass temperature, and nanoscale resolution dielectric relaxation imaging near conductive nanowires embedded in the polymer matrix was obtained up to 5 MHz frequency, with no physical reason to hinder further bandwidth extension.

  14. Investigation of Vacuum Insulator Surface Dielectric Strength with Nanosecond Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Nunnally, W C; Krogh, M; Williams, C; Trimble, D; Sampayan, S; Caporaso, G

    2003-06-03

    The maximum vacuum insulator surface dielectric strength determines the acceleration electric field gradient possible in a short pulse accelerator. Previous work has indicated that higher electric field strengths along the insulator-vacuum interface might be obtained as the pulse duration is decreased. In this work, a 250 kV, single ns wide impulse source was applied to small diameter, segmented insulators samples in a vacuum to evaluate the multi-layer surface dielectric strength of the sample construction. Resonances in the low inductance test geometry were used to obtain unipolar, pulsed electric fields in excess of 100 MV/m on the insulator surface. The sample construction, experimental arrangement and experimental results are presented for the initial data in this work. Modeling of the multi-layer structure is discussed and methods of improving insulator surface dielectric strength in a vacuum are proposed.

  15. Direct electron-impact mechanism of excitation of mercury monobromide in a double-pulse dielectric-barrier-discharge HgBr lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datsyuk, V. V.; Izmailov, I. A.; Naumov, V. V.; Kochelap, V. A.

    2016-08-01

    In a nonequlibrium plasma of a gas-discharge HgBr lamp, the terminal electronic state of the HgBr(B–X) radiative transition with a peak wavelength of 502 nm remains populated for a relatively long time and is repeatedly excited to the B state in collisions with plasma electrons. This transfer of the HgBr molecules from the ground state X to the excited state B is the main mechanism of formation of the light-emitting molecules especially when the lamp is excited by double current pulses. According to our simulations, due to the electron-induced transitions between HgBr(X) and HgBr(B), the output characteristics of the DBD lamp operating in a double-pulse regime are better than those of the lamp operating in a single-pulse regime. In the considered case, the peak power is calculated to increase by a factor of about 2 and the lamp efficiency increases by about 50%.

  16. Transmission line based short pulse generation circuits in a 0.13 μm complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Huan; Geng, Yongtao; Wang, Pingshan

    2011-02-01

    A few traditional pulse forming circuits are implemented and compared in a commercial 0.13 μm digital CMOS technology. Standard on-chip transmission lines are used as pulse forming lines (PFLs), while CMOS transistors are used as switches. The shortest output pulses of these circuits are analyzed and compared through Cadence Spectre simulations. All the CMOS circuits are fabricated in the commercial technology. Pulses of ˜170 ps durations and 120-400 mV amplitudes are obtained when the power supply is tuned from 1.2 to 2 V. The results show that these traditional PFL based circuits can be implemented in standard CMOS technology for high power short pulse generations. Furthermore, the PFL circuits significantly extend the short pulse generation capabilities of CMOS technologies.

  17. Enhancing caries resistance with a short-pulsed CO2 9.3-μm laser: a laboratory study (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rechmann, Peter; Rechmann, Beate M.; Groves, William H.; Le, Charles; Rapozo-Hilo, Marcia L.; Featherstone, John D. B.

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this laboratory study was to test whether irradiation with a new 9.3µm microsecond short-pulsed CO2-laser enhances enamel caries resistance with and without additional fluoride applications. 101 human enamel samples were divided into 7 groups. Each group was treated with different laser parameters (Carbon-dioxide laser, wavelength 9.3µm, 43Hz pulse-repetition rate, pulse duration between 3μs to 7μs (1.5mJ/pulse to 2.9mJ/pulse). Using a pH-cycling model and cross-sectional microhardness testing determined the mean relative mineral loss delta Z (∆Z) for each group. The pH-cycling was performed with or without additional fluoride. The CO2 9.3μm short-pulsed laser energy rendered enamel caries resistant with and without additional fluoride use.

  18. Generation of a Periodic Series of High-Power Ultra-Short Pulses in a Gyro-TWT with a Bleachable Cyclotron Absorber in the Feedback Circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilkov, M. N.; Ginzburg, N. S.; Denisov, G. G.; Zotova, I. V.; Sergeev, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of forming a periodic series of ultra-short pulses, which has a peak power exceeding significantly the radiation power in stationary regimes, in a gyroresonance traveling-wave tube (gyro-TWT) with a bleachable cyclotron absorber in the feedback circuit. The mechanism of pulsed generation is similar to the method of passive mode locking, which is used widely in laser physics.

  19. Directional spectra of ocean waves from microwave backscatter: A physical optics solution with application to the short-pulse and two-frequency measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, F. C.

    1979-01-01

    Two simple microwave radar techniques that are potentially capable of providing routine satellite measurements of the directional spectrum of ocean waves were developed. One technique, the short pulse technique, makes use of very short pulses to resolve ocean surface wave contrast features in the range direction; the other technique, the two frequency correlation technique makes use of coherency in the transmitted waveform to detect the large ocean wave contrast modulation as a beat or mixing frequency in the power backscattered at two closely separated microwave frequencies. A frequency domain analysis of the short pulse and two frequency systems shows that the two measurement systems are essentially duals; they each operate on the generalized (three frequency) fourth-order statistical moment of the surface transfer function in different, but symmetrical ways, and they both measure the same directional contrast modulation spectrum. A three dimensional physical optics solution for the fourth-order moment was obtained for backscatter in the near vertical, specular regime, assuming Gaussian surface statistics.

  20. Mid-infrared Laser System Development for Dielectric Laser Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanovic, Igor; Xu, Guibao; Wandel, Scott

    Laser-driven particle accelerators based on dielectric laser acceleration are under development and exhibit unique and challenging pump requirements. Operation in the mid-infrared (5 μm) range with short pulses (<1 ps FWHM), high pulse energy (>500 μJ) and good beam quality is required. We present our progress on the design and development of a novel two- stage source of mid-infrared pulses for this application, which is based on optical parametric amplification. Beta barium borate and zinc germanium phosphide crystals are used, and are pumped by a Ti:sapphire ultrashort laser and seeded by self-phase modulation and parametric generation-based sources.

  1. Dielectric barrier discharges in analytical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Meyer, C; Müller, S; Gurevich, E L; Franzke, J

    2011-06-21

    The present review reflects the importance of dielectric barrier discharges in analytical chemistry. Special about this discharge is-and in contrast to usual discharges with direct current-that the plasma is separated from one or two electrodes by a dielectric barrier. This gives rise to two main features of the dielectric barrier discharges; it can serve as dissociation and excitation device and as ionization mechanism, respectively. The article portrays the various application fields for dielectric barrier discharges in analytical chemistry, for example the use for elemental detection with optical spectrometry or as ionization source for mass spectrometry. Besides the introduction of different kinds of dielectric barrier discharges used for analytical chemistry from the literature, a clear and concise classification of dielectric barrier discharges into capacitively coupled discharges is provided followed by an overview about the characteristics of a dielectric barrier discharge concerning discharge properties and the ignition mechanism. PMID:21562672

  2. Coaxial-type water load for measuring high voltage, high current and short pulse of a compact Marx system for a high power microwave source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jaeeun; Kim, Jung-ho; Park, Sang-duck; Yoon, Moohyun; Park, Soo Yong; Choi, Do Won; Shin, Jin Woo; So, Joon Ho

    2009-11-01

    A coaxial-type water load was used to measure the voltage output from a Marx generator for a high power microwave source. This output had a rise time of 20 ns, a pulse duration of a few hundred ns, and an amplitude up to 500 kV. The design of the coaxial water load showed that it is an ideal resistive divider and can also accurately measure a short pulse. Experiments were performed to test the performance of the Marx generator with the calibrated coaxial water load.

  3. High-peak-power, short-pulse-width, LD end-pumped, passively Q-switched Nd:YAG 946 nm laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Renpeng; Yu, Xin; Ma, Yufei; Li, Xudong; Chen, Deying; Yu, Junhua

    2012-10-01

    High-peak-power, short-pulse-width diode pumped 946 nm Nd:YAG laser in passively Q-switching operation with Cr4+:YAG is reported. The highest average output power reaches 3.4 W using the Cr4+:YAG with initial transmissivity T0=95%. When the T0=90% Cr4+:YAG is employed, the maximum peak power of 31.4 kW with a pulse width of 8.3 ns at 946 nm is generated.

  4. Precision damage tests of multilayer dielectric gratings for high-energy petawatt lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Jovanovic, I; Brown, C G; Stuart, B C; Molander, W; Nielsen, N; Wattellier, B; Britten, J; Pennington, D M; Barty, C J

    2004-11-08

    The next generation of high-energy petawatt (HEPW)-class lasers will utilize multilayer dielectric diffraction gratings for pulse compression due to their high efficiency and high damage threshold for picosecond pulses. We have developed a short-pulse damage test station for accurate determination of the damage threshold of the optics used on future HEPW lasers. The design and performance of the damage test laser source, based on a highly stable, high-beam-quality optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier, is presented. Our short-pulse damage measurement methodology and results are discussed. The damage initiation is attributed to multiphoton-induced avalanche ionization, strongly dependent on the electric field enhancement in the grating groove structure and surface defects. Measurement results of the dependence of damage threshold on the pulse width, angular dependence of damage threshold of diffraction gratings, and an investigation of short-pulse conditioning effects are presented. We report record >4 J/cm{sup 2} right section surface damage thresholds obtained on multilayer dielectric diffraction gratings at 76.5 incidence angles for 10-ps pulses.

  5. Electromagnetic response of buried cylindrical structures for line current excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajewski, Lara; Ponti, Cristina

    2013-04-01

    arbitrary arrangements of cylinders in the soil. As future work, the presented analysis, carried out in the spectral domain, will be extended to a time-domain solution following an approach analogous to the one developed in [6] for pulsed plane-wave excitation. [1] M. Di Vico, F. Frezza, L. Pajewski, and G. Schettini, "Scattering by a Finite Set of Perfectly Conducting Cylinders Buried in a Dielectric Half-Space: a Spectral-Domain Solution," IEEE Transactions Antennas and Propagation, vol. 53(2), 719-727, 2005. [2] M. Di Vico, F. Frezza, L. Pajewski, and G. Schettini, "Scattering by Buried Dielectric Cylindrical Structures," Radio Science, vol. 40(6), RS6S18, 2005. [3] F. Frezza, L. Pajewski, C. Ponti, and G. Schettini, "Scattering by Perfectly-Conducting Cylinders Buried in a Dielectric Slab through the Cylindrical Wave Approach," IEEE Transactions Antennas and Propagation, vol. 57(4), 1208-1217, 2009. [4] F. Frezza, L. Pajewski, C. Ponti, and G. Schettini, "Accurate Wire-Grid Modeling of Buried Conducting Cylindrical Scatterers," Nondestructive Testing and Evaluation (Special Issue on "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar"), vol. 27(3), pp. 199-207, 2012. [5] F. Frezza, L. Pajewski, C. Ponti, G. Schettini, and N. Tedeschi, "Electromagnetic Scattering by a Metallic Cylinder Buried in a Lossy Medium with the Cylindrical Wave Approach," IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters, vol. 10(1), pp. 179-183, 2013. [6] F. Frezza, P. Martinelli, L. Pajewski, and G. Schettini, "Short-Pulse Electromagnetic Scattering from Buried Perfectly-Conducting Cylinders," IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters, vol. 4(4), pp. 611-615, 2007.

  6. An electrohydrodynamics model for non-equilibrium electron and phonon transport in metal films after ultra-short pulse laser heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jun; Li, Nianbei; Yang, Ronggui

    2015-06-01

    The electrons and phonons in metal films after ultra-short pulse laser heating are in highly non-equilibrium states not only between the electrons and the phonons but also within the electrons. An electrohydrodynamics model consisting of the balance equations of electron density, energy density of electrons, and energy density of phonons is derived from the coupled non-equilibrium electron and phonon Boltzmann transport equations to study the nonlinear thermal transport by considering the electron density fluctuation and the transient electric current in metal films, after ultra-short pulse laser heating. The temperature evolution is calculated by the coupled electron and phonon Boltzmann transport equations, the electrohydrodynamics model derived in this work, and the two-temperature model. Different laser pulse durations, film thicknesses, and laser fluences are considered. We find that the two-temperature model overestimates the electron temperature at the front surface of the film and underestimates the damage threshold when the nonlinear thermal transport of electrons is important. The electrohydrodynamics model proposed in this work could be a more accurate prediction tool to study the non-equilibrium electron and phonon transport process than the two-temperature model and it is much easier to be solved than the Boltzmann transport equations.

  7. Dynamics of shock waves and cavitation bubbles in bilinear elastic-plastic media, and the implications to short-pulsed laser surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brujan, E.-A.

    2005-01-01

    The dynamics of shock waves and cavitation bubbles generated by short laser pulses in water and elastic-plastic media were investigated theoretically in order to get a better understanding of their role in short-pulsed laser surgery. Numerical simulations were performed using a spherical model of bubble dynamics which include the elastic-plastic behaviour of the medium surrounding the bubble, compressibility, viscosity, density and surface tension. Breakdown in water produces a monopolar acoustic signal characterized by a compressive wave. Breakdown in an elastic-plastic medium produces a bipolar acoustic signal, with a leading positive compression wave and a trailing negative tensile wave. The calculations revealed that consideration of the tissue elasticity is essential to describe the bipolar shape of the shock wave emitted during optical breakdown. The elastic-plastic response of the medium surrounding the bubble leads to a significant decrease of the maximum size of the cavitation bubble and pressure amplitude of the shock wave emitted during bubble collapse, and shortening of the oscillation period of the bubble. The results are discussed with respect to collateral damage in short-pulsed laser surgery.

  8. Combined passive detection and ultrafast active imaging of cavitation events induced by short pulses of high-intensity ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Gateau, Jérôme; Aubry, Jean-François; Pernot, Mathieu; Fink, Mathias; Tanter, Mickaël

    2011-03-01

    The activation of natural gas nuclei to induce larger bubbles is possible using short ultrasonic excitations of high amplitude, and is required for ultrasound cavitation therapies. However, little is known about the distribution of nuclei in tissues. Therefore, the acoustic pressure level necessary to generate bubbles in a targeted zone and their exact location are currently difficult to predict. To monitor the initiation of cavitation activity, a novel all-ultrasound technique sensitive to single nucleation events is presented here. It is based on combined passive detection and ultrafast active imaging over a large volume using the same multi-element probe. Bubble nucleation was induced using a focused transducer (660 kHz, f-number = 1) driven by a high-power electric burst (up to 300 W) of one to two cycles. Detection was performed with a linear array (4 to 7 MHz) aligned with the single-element focal point. In vitro experiments in gelatin gel and muscular tissue are presented. The synchronized passive detection enabled radio-frequency data to be recorded, comprising high-frequency coherent wave fronts as signatures of the acoustic emissions linked to the activation of the nuclei. Active change detection images were obtained by subtracting echoes collected in the unnucleated medium. These indicated the appearance of stable cavitating regions. Because of the ultrafast frame rate, active detection occurred as quickly as 330 μs after the high-amplitude excitation and the dynamics of the induced regions were studied individually. PMID:21429844

  9. Combined passive detection and ultrafast active imaging of cavitation events induced by short pulses of high-intensity ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Gateau, Jérôme; Aubry, Jean-François; Pernot, Mathieu; Fink, Mathias; Tanter, Mickaël

    2011-01-01

    The activation of natural gas nuclei to induce larger bubbles is possible using short ultrasonic excitations of high amplitude, and is required for ultrasound cavitation therapies. However, little is known about the distribution of nuclei in tissues. Therefore, the acoustic pressure level necessary to generate bubbles in a targeted zone and their exact location are currently difficult to predict. In order to monitor the initiation of cavitation activity, a novel all-ultrasound technique sensitive to single nucleation events is presented here. It is based on combined passive detection and ultrafast active imaging over a large volume and with the same multi-element probe. Bubble nucleation was induced with a focused transducer (660kHz, f#=1) driven by a high power (up to 300 W) electric burst of one to two cycles. Detection was performed with a linear array (4–7MHz) aligned with the single-element focal point. In vitro experiments in gelatin gel and muscular tissue are presented. The synchronized passive detection enabled radio-frequency data to be recorded, comprising high-frequency coherent wave fronts as signatures of the acoustic emissions linked to the activation of the nuclei. Active change detection images were obtained by subtracting echoes collected in the unucleated medium. These indicated the appearance of stable cavitating regions. Thanks to the ultrafast frame rate, active detection occurred as soon as 330 μs after the high amplitude excitation and the dynamics of the induced regions were studied individually. PMID:21429844

  10. A short pulse (7 micros FWHM) and high repetition rate (dc-5 kHz) cantilever piezovalve for pulsed atomic and molecular beams.

    PubMed

    Irimia, Daniel; Dobrikov, Dimitar; Kortekaas, Rob; Voet, Han; van den Ende, Daan A; Groen, Wilhelm A; Janssen, Maurice H M

    2009-11-01

    In this paper we report on the design and operation of a novel piezovalve for the production of short pulsed atomic or molecular beams. The high speed valve operates on the principle of a cantilever piezo. The only moving part, besides the cantilever piezo itself, is a very small O-ring that forms the vacuum seal. The valve can operate continuous (dc) and in pulsed mode with the same drive electronics. Pulsed operation has been tested at repetition frequencies up to 5 kHz. The static deflection of the cantilever, as mounted in the valve body, was measured as a function of driving field strength with a confocal microscope. The deflection and high speed dynamical response of the cantilever can be easily changed and optimized for a particular nozzle diameter or repetition rate by a simple adjustment of the free cantilever length. Pulsed molecular beams with a full width at half maximum pulse width as low as 7 micros have been measured at a position 10 cm downstream of the nozzle exit. This represents a gas pulse with a length of only 10 mm making it well matched to for instance experiments using laser beams. Such a short pulse with 6 bar backing pressure behind a 150 microm nozzle releases about 10(16) particles/pulse and the beam brightness was estimated to be 4x10(22) particles/(s str). The short pulses of the cantilever piezovalve result in a much reduced gas load in the vacuum system. We demonstrate operation of the pulsed valve with skimmer in a single vacuum chamber pumped by a 520 l/s turbomolecular pump maintaining a pressure of 5x10(-6) Torr, which is an excellent vacuum to have the strong and cold skimmed molecular beam interact with laser beams only 10 cm downstream of the nozzle to do velocity map slice imaging with a microchannel-plate imaging detector in a single chamber. The piezovalve produces cold and narrow (Delta v/v=2%-3%) velocity distributions of molecules seeded in helium or neon at modest backing pressures of only 6 bar. The low gas load of the

  11. A short pulse (7 {mu}s FWHM) and high repetition rate (dc-5kHz) cantilever piezovalve for pulsed atomic and molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Irimia, Daniel; Dobrikov, Dimitar; Kortekaas, Rob; Voet, Han; Janssen, Maurice H. M.; Ende, Daan A. van den; Groen, Wilhelm A.

    2009-11-15

    In this paper we report on the design and operation of a novel piezovalve for the production of short pulsed atomic or molecular beams. The high speed valve operates on the principle of a cantilever piezo. The only moving part, besides the cantilever piezo itself, is a very small O-ring that forms the vacuum seal. The valve can operate continuous (dc) and in pulsed mode with the same drive electronics. Pulsed operation has been tested at repetition frequencies up to 5 kHz. The static deflection of the cantilever, as mounted in the valve body, was measured as a function of driving field strength with a confocal microscope. The deflection and high speed dynamical response of the cantilever can be easily changed and optimized for a particular nozzle diameter or repetition rate by a simple adjustment of the free cantilever length. Pulsed molecular beams with a full width at half maximum pulse width as low as 7 {mu}s have been measured at a position 10 cm downstream of the nozzle exit. This represents a gas pulse with a length of only 10 mm making it well matched to for instance experiments using laser beams. Such a short pulse with 6 bar backing pressure behind a 150 {mu}m nozzle releases about 10{sup 16} particles/pulse and the beam brightness was estimated to be 4x10{sup 22} particles/(s str). The short pulses of the cantilever piezovalve result in a much reduced gas load in the vacuum system. We demonstrate operation of the pulsed valve with skimmer in a single vacuum chamber pumped by a 520 l/s turbomolecular pump maintaining a pressure of 5x10{sup -6} Torr, which is an excellent vacuum to have the strong and cold skimmed molecular beam interact with laser beams only 10 cm downstream of the nozzle to do velocity map slice imaging with a microchannel-plate imaging detector in a single chamber. The piezovalve produces cold and narrow ({Delta}v/v=2%-3%) velocity distributions of molecules seeded in helium or neon at modest backing pressures of only 6 bar. The low gas

  12. A short pulse (7 μs FWHM) and high repetition rate (dc-5kHz) cantilever piezovalve for pulsed atomic and molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irimia, Daniel; Dobrikov, Dimitar; Kortekaas, Rob; Voet, Han; van den Ende, Daan A.; Groen, Wilhelm A.; Janssen, Maurice H. M.

    2009-11-01

    In this paper we report on the design and operation of a novel piezovalve for the production of short pulsed atomic or molecular beams. The high speed valve operates on the principle of a cantilever piezo. The only moving part, besides the cantilever piezo itself, is a very small O-ring that forms the vacuum seal. The valve can operate continuous (dc) and in pulsed mode with the same drive electronics. Pulsed operation has been tested at repetition frequencies up to 5 kHz. The static deflection of the cantilever, as mounted in the valve body, was measured as a function of driving field strength with a confocal microscope. The deflection and high speed dynamical response of the cantilever can be easily changed and optimized for a particular nozzle diameter or repetition rate by a simple adjustment of the free cantilever length. Pulsed molecular beams with a full width at half maximum pulse width as low as 7 μs have been measured at a position 10 cm downstream of the nozzle exit. This represents a gas pulse with a length of only 10 mm making it well matched to for instance experiments using laser beams. Such a short pulse with 6 bar backing pressure behind a 150 μm nozzle releases about 1016 particles/pulse and the beam brightness was estimated to be 4×1022 particles/(s str). The short pulses of the cantilever piezovalve result in a much reduced gas load in the vacuum system. We demonstrate operation of the pulsed valve with skimmer in a single vacuum chamber pumped by a 520 l/s turbomolecular pump maintaining a pressure of 5×10-6 Torr, which is an excellent vacuum to have the strong and cold skimmed molecular beam interact with laser beams only 10 cm downstream of the nozzle to do velocity map slice imaging with a microchannel-plate imaging detector in a single chamber. The piezovalve produces cold and narrow (Δv /v=2%-3%) velocity distributions of molecules seeded in helium or neon at modest backing pressures of only 6 bar. The low gas load of the cantilever

  13. All-dielectric metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahani, Saman; Jacob, Zubin

    2016-01-01

    The ideal material for nanophotonic applications will have a large refractive index at optical frequencies, respond to both the electric and magnetic fields of light, support large optical chirality and anisotropy, confine and guide light at the nanoscale, and be able to modify the phase and amplitude of incoming radiation in a fraction of a wavelength. Artificial electromagnetic media, or metamaterials, based on metallic or polar dielectric nanostructures can provide many of these properties by coupling light to free electrons (plasmons) or phonons (phonon polaritons), respectively, but at the inevitable cost of significant energy dissipation and reduced device efficiency. Recently, however, there has been a shift in the approach to nanophotonics. Low-loss electromagnetic responses covering all four quadrants of possible permittivities and permeabilities have been achieved using completely transparent and high-refractive-index dielectric building blocks. Moreover, an emerging class of all-dielectric metamaterials consisting of anisotropic crystals has been shown to support large refractive index contrast between orthogonal polarizations of light. These advances have revived the exciting prospect of integrating exotic electromagnetic effects in practical photonic devices, to achieve, for example, ultrathin and efficient optical elements, and realize the long-standing goal of subdiffraction confinement and guiding of light without metals. In this Review, we present a broad outline of the whole range of electromagnetic effects observed using all-dielectric metamaterials: high-refractive-index nanoresonators, metasurfaces, zero-index metamaterials and anisotropic metamaterials. Finally, we discuss current challenges and future goals for the field at the intersection with quantum, thermal and silicon photonics, as well as biomimetic metasurfaces.

  14. All-dielectric metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Jahani, Saman; Jacob, Zubin

    2016-01-01

    The ideal material for nanophotonic applications will have a large refractive index at optical frequencies, respond to both the electric and magnetic fields of light, support large optical chirality and anisotropy, confine and guide light at the nanoscale, and be able to modify the phase and amplitude of incoming radiation in a fraction of a wavelength. Artificial electromagnetic media, or metamaterials, based on metallic or polar dielectric nanostructures can provide many of these properties by coupling light to free electrons (plasmons) or phonons (phonon polaritons), respectively, but at the inevitable cost of significant energy dissipation and reduced device efficiency. Recently, however, there has been a shift in the approach to nanophotonics. Low-loss electromagnetic responses covering all four quadrants of possible permittivities and permeabilities have been achieved using completely transparent and high-refractive-index dielectric building blocks. Moreover, an emerging class of all-dielectric metamaterials consisting of anisotropic crystals has been shown to support large refractive index contrast between orthogonal polarizations of light. These advances have revived the exciting prospect of integrating exotic electromagnetic effects in practical photonic devices, to achieve, for example, ultrathin and efficient optical elements, and realize the long-standing goal of subdiffraction confinement and guiding of light without metals. In this Review, we present a broad outline of the whole range of electromagnetic effects observed using all-dielectric metamaterials: high-refractive-index nanoresonators, metasurfaces, zero-index metamaterials and anisotropic metamaterials. Finally, we discuss current challenges and future goals for the field at the intersection with quantum, thermal and silicon photonics, as well as biomimetic metasurfaces. PMID:26740041

  15. Effect of pulse slippage on density transition-based resonant third-harmonic generation of short-pulse laser in plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Vishal; Kant, Niti

    2016-08-01

    The resonant third-harmonic generation of a self-focusing laser in plasma with a density transition was investigated. Because of self-focusing of the fundamental laser pulse, a transverse intensity gradient was created, which generated a plasma wave at the fundamental wave frequency. Phase matching was satisfied by using a Wiggler magnetic field, which provided additional angular momentum to the third-harmonic photon to make the process resonant. An enhancement was observed in the resonant third-harmonic generation of an intense short-pulse laser in plasma embedded with a magnetic Wiggler with a density transition. A plasma density ramp played an important role in the self-focusing, enhancing the third-harmonic generation in plasma. We also examined the effect of the Wiggler magnetic field on the pulse slippage of the third-harmonic pulse in plasma. The pulse slippage was due to the group-velocity mismatch between the fundamental and third-harmonic pulses.

  16. Study of silver K{alpha} and bremsstrahlung radiation from short-pulse laser-matter interactions with applications for x-ray radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Westover, B.; Beg, F. N.; MacPhee, A.; Chen, C.; Hey, D.; Maddox, B.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B.; Ma, T.

    2010-08-15

    Measurements of K{alpha} radiation yield and x-ray bremsstrahlung emission from thin-foil silver targets are presented. The targets were irradiated by a short pulse laser with intensities from 5x10{sup 16} to 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} at 40 ps. Single hit charge-coupled device detectors, differential filter-stack detectors, and a crystal spectrometer were used to investigate the angular distribution of the K{alpha} and bremsstrahlung x-rays. This study is the first to use a broadband detector to estimate the absolute numbers of K{alpha} photons and to determine K{alpha} to bremsstrahlung ratios. The relevance of this work in the context of x-ray diffraction and x-ray radiography is discussed.

  17. Diode-pumped short pulse passively Q-switched 912 nm Nd:GdVO4/Cr:YAG laser at high repetition rate operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, F.; Yu, X.; Wang, C.; Yan, R. P.; Li, X. D.; Gao, J.; Zhang, Z. H.; Yu, J. H.

    2010-06-01

    A diode-end-pumped passively Q-switched 912 nm Nd:GdVO4/Cr:YAG laser is demonstrated for the first time. In a concave-piano cavity, pulsed 912 nm laser performance is investigated using two kinds of Cr:YAG crystal with different unsaturated transmission ( T U) of 95% and 90% at 912 nm as the saturable absorbers. When the T U = 90% Cr:YAG is used, as much as 2.6 W average output power for short pulsed 912 nm laser is achieved at an absorbed pump power of 34.0 W, corresponding to an optical efficiency of 7.6% and a slope efficiency of 20.3%. Moreover, 10.5 ns duration pulses and up to 2.3 kW peak power is obtained at the repetition rate around 81.6 kHz.

  18. Stable High-Brightness Electron Beam System with a Photocathode RF Gun for Short Pulse X-Ray Generation by Thomson Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Fumio; Yang, Jinfeng; Yorozu, Masafumi; Okada, Yasuhiro; Yanagida, Tatsuya; Endo, Akira

    2002-03-01

    A high-brightness electron accelerator system with a photocathode RF gun and an all-solid stable laser for the photocathode was installed, and a commissioning test was performed to generate short-pulse X-ray beams by the Thomson scattering method. Electron energy was boosted by a linear accelerator (linac) up to 14 MeV. Energy dispersion of the electron beams was measured to be 0.7% (rms). The normalized emittance of the electron beam was 4 πmm-mrad with a 0.4 nC bunch charge. The electron beam size at the interaction point, where the electron beams and high peak power laser light interacted, was measured to be 100 μm (rms). Good stability in the spatial and temporal domains was also obtained.

  19. Short pulse-width gain-switched Ho:YAG ceramic laser at ∼2.09  μm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianing; Liu, QiYao; Shen, Deyuan; Zhang, Jian; Tang, Dingyuan; Chen, Hao

    2016-03-10

    This paper presents a short pulse-width gain-switched Ho:YAG ceramic laser at 2089 nm resonantly pumped by a homemade Q-switched Tm:fiber laser at ∼1908  nm. We generated stable pulses of 44-103 ns duration and 0.13-2 kW peak power at 20 kHz of pulse repetition frequency when the incident pump pulse energy increased from ∼0.1 to 0.3 mJ. We also obtained an average output power of 1.76 W under an incident pump power of 6 W, corresponding to a slope efficiency of 41.8%. Finally, this paper discusses the prospects to further improve the results with even a shorter pulse-width and higher peak power. PMID:26974778

  20. The nonlinear interplay between Raman scattering, self-focusing, and hosing of intense short-pulse lasers propagating in an underdense plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzeng, Kuo-Cheng

    1998-11-01

    Understanding the propagation of short-pulse high intensity lasers through Rayleigh lengths of underdense plasma is essential for the successful development of laser-plasma accelerator schemes and the fast ignitor fusion concept. When short-pulse lasers propagate through underdense plasmas they are susceptible to a wide range of instabilities, including Raman scattering, spot size self-modulation, relativistic self-focusing, and hosing. Furthermore, the highly nonlinear interplay between these instabilities leads to the generation of relativistic plasma waves which can wave break, generating kA's of relativistic electrons with energies up to ≈100 MeV. To unravel this complex interplay of instabilities, we use a fully relativistic parallelized particle-in-cell code. The simulations show that for parameters relevant to several ongoing laser-plasma accelerator experiments that significant laser absorption occurs within Rayleigh length distances, that Raman scattering and plasma heating can suppress self-focusing and ponderomotive blowout, and that the final nonlinear state of the pulses is dominated by a long wavelength hosing instability. The simulations also provide details of the characteristics of the accelerated electrons including, the self-trapping mechanism, their maximum energy, energy spread and emittance. The simulations show that the maximum energy can exceed simple dephasing estimates in agreement with recent experimental observations. This work was done in collaboration with R.G.Hemker, B.J.Duda, W.B.Mori and T.Katsouleas Work supported by DOE grants DE-FG-03-92-ER40727 and DE-FG-03-98-DP00211, LLNL contract W-7405-ENG-48, and NSF grant DMS-9722121. *Currently at Capital Management Sciences, Los Angeles

  1. Spatially and Temporally Resolved Atomic Oxygen Measurements in Short Pulse Discharges by Two Photon Laser Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lempert, Walter; Uddi, Mruthunjaya; Mintusov, Eugene; Jiang, Naibo; Adamovich, Igor

    2007-10-01

    Two Photon Laser Induced Fluorescence (TALIF) is used to measure time-dependent absolute oxygen atom concentrations in O2/He, O2/N2, and CH4/air plasmas produced with a 20 nanosecond duration, 20 kV pulsed discharge at 10 Hz repetition rate. Xenon calibrated spectra show that a single discharge pulse creates initial oxygen dissociation fraction of ˜0.0005 for air like mixtures at 40-60 torr total pressure. Peak O atom concentration is a factor of approximately two lower in fuel lean (φ=0.5) methane/air mixtures. In helium buffer, the initially formed atomic oxygen decays monotonically, with decay time consistent with formation of ozone. In all nitrogen containing mixtures, atomic oxygen concentrations are found to initially increase, for time scales on the order of 10-100 microseconds, due presumably to additional O2 dissociation caused by collisions with electronically excited nitrogen. Further evidence of the role of metastable N2 is demonstrated from time-dependent N2 2^nd Positive and NO Gamma band emission spectroscopy. Comparisons with modeling predictions show qualitative, but not quantitative, agreement with the experimental data.

  2. Hard-tissue drilling by short-pulse CO2 laser with controllable pulse-tail energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Kazuyuki; Sasaki, Tatsufumi; Yamamoto, Takuya; Akitsu, Tetsuya; Jitsuno, Takahisa

    2016-02-01

    We developed a longitudinally excited CO2 laser that produces a short laser pulse with the almost same spike-pulse energy of about 0.8 mJ and the controllable pulse-tail energy of 0-21.26 mJ. The laser was very simple and consisted of a 45-cm-long alumina ceramic pipe with an inner diameter of 9 mm, a pulse power supply, a step-up transformer, a storage capacitance and a spark-gap switch. In single-shot irradiation using these laser pulses, the dependence of the drilling depth of dry ivory samples on the fluence was investigated. The drilling depth increased with the fluence in the same laser pulse waveform. In this work, the effective short laser pulse for the hard tissue drilling was the laser pulse with the spike pulse energy of 0.87 mJ and the pulse tail energy of 6.33 mJ that produced the drilling depth of 28.1 μm at the fluence of 3.48 J/cm2 and the drilling depth per the fluence of 7.27 μm/J/cm2.

  3. Dielectric ridge waveguide gas laser apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    DeMaria, A.J.; Bridges, W.

    1989-03-14

    A dielectric ridged waveguide flowing gas laser apparatus is described, comprising in combination; a dielectric substrate having a predetermined number of the grooves formed theron, the grooves extending along the longitudinal axis of the dielectric substrate, an electrically conductive member in parallel alignment with the grooved side of the dielectric substrate such that an air gasp is formed therebetween the air gap containing an active laser gas medium, electrically conductive strips disposed on the outside of the dielectric substrate forming electrodes, the conductive strips being aligned with the grooves and having the same length and width as the grooves, and an excitation source connected between the conductive member and the conductive strips, to provide lasing in the ridged waveguide.

  4. Superbackscattering from single dielectric particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberal, Iñigo; Ederra, Iñigo; Gonzalo, Ramón; Ziolkowski, Richard W.

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate that superbackscattering responses can be excited in subwavelength dielectric particles with simple geometries. The superbackscattering response arises from the simultaneous, coherent excitation of electric dipole and magnetic quadrupole resonances. Its signature is a superdirective scattering pattern simultaneously pointing towards both the forward and backward directions. The practical implementation of this effect with Tellurium particles operating in the thermal infrared is also addressed. The examples presented reveal that spherical resonators outperform array-based superbackscatterers in terms of the backscattering peak, compact size, robustness against losses and isotropic response.

  5. Parametric generation of energetic short mid-infrared pulses for dielectric laser acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandel, S.; Xu, G.; Yin, Y.; Jovanovic, I.

    2014-12-01

    Laser-driven high-gradient electron acceleration in dielectric photonic structures is an enabling technology for compact and robust sources of tunable monochromatic x-rays. Such advanced x-ray sources are sought in medical imaging, security, industrial, and scientific applications. The use of long-wavelength pulses can mitigate the problem of laser-induced breakdown in dielectric structures at high optical intensities, relax the structure fabrication requirements, and allow greater pulse energy to be injected into the structure. We report on the design and construction of a simple and robust, short-pulse parametric source operating at a center wavelength 5 μm, to be used as a pump for a dielectric photonic structure for laser-driven acceleration. The source is based on a two-stage parametric downconversion design, consisting of a β-BaB2O4-based 2.05 μm optical parametric amplifier (OPA) and a ZnGeP2-based 5 μm OPA. The 2.05 μm OPA is presently pumped by a standard Ti:sapphire chirped-pulse amplified laser, which will be replaced with direct laser pumping at wavelengths \\gt 2 μ m in the future. The design and performance of the constructed short-pulse mid-infrared source are described. The demonstrated architecture is also of interest for use in other applications, such as high harmonic generation and attosecond pulse production.

  6. The Dielectric Wall Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, George J.; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Sampayan, Stephen E.

    2009-01-01

    The Dielectric Wall Accelerator (DWA), a class of induction accelerators, employs a novel insulating beam tube to impress a longitudinal electric field on a bunch of charged particles. The surface flashover characteristics of this tube may permit the attainment of accelerating gradients on the order of 100 MV/m for accelerating pulses on the order of a nanosecond in duration. A virtual traveling wave of excitation along the tube is produced at any desired speed by controlling the timing of pulse generating modules that supply a tangential electric field to the tube wall. Because of the ability to control the speed of this virtual wave, the accelerator is capable of handling any charge to mass ratio particle; hence it can be used for electrons, protons and any ion. The accelerator architectures, key technologies and development challenges will be described.

  7. Thin-ribbon tapered coupler for dielectric waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, C.; Otoshi, T. Y.; Shimabukuro, F. I.

    1994-01-01

    A recent discovery shows that a high-dielectric constant, low-loss, solid material can be made into a ribbon-like waveguide structure to yield an attenuation constant of less than 0.02 dB/m for single-mode guidance of millimeter/submillimeter waves. One of the crucial components that must be invented in order to guarantee the low-loss utilization of this dielectric-waveguide guiding system is the excitation coupler. The traditional tapered-to-a-point coupler for a dielectric rod waveguide fails when the dielectric constant of the dielectric waveguide is large. This article presents a new way to design a low-loss coupler for a high- or low-dielectric constant dielectric waveguide for millimeter or submillimeter waves.

  8. Investigation of damage threshold of ion beam deposited oxide thin film optics for high-peak-power short-pulse lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald Dummer, Ann M.; Brizuela, Fernando; Duskis, Charissa; Luther, Brad; Larotonda, Miguel; Rocca, Jorge J.; George, Jason; Kohli, Sandeep; McCurdy, Pat; Menoni, Carmen S.

    2004-09-01

    In this work we report on the damage threshold of ion beam deposited oxide films designed for high peak power short pulse laser systems. Single layers of ZrO2, SiO2, Al2O3, TiO2, and Ta2O5 and multilayers of Al2O 3/TiO2, SiO2/Ta2O5, and SiO2/ZrO2 were grown on polished borosilicate glass substrates using ion beam sputter deposition. Deposition conditions were optimized to yield fully oxidized films as determined from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Damage threshold testing was performed using an amplified Ti:Sapphire laser producing a train of 120 picosecond pulses at a wavelength of 800 nm. The laser output was focused with a lens to generate fluences ranging from 0.1 to 24 J/cm2. The highest damage threshold of 15.4 J/cm2 was measured for a single layer film of SiO2. The damage threshold of high reflectance and anti-reflection multilayer coatings fabricated for 800 nm applications was evaluated using the same procedure as for the single layer films. Highest damage thresholds of 2.5 and 3.5 J/cm2 were measured for a 6-pair ZrO2/SiO2 high reflectance coating and a 5 layer anti-reflection coating of the same materials.

  9. Effect of pulse to pulse interactions on ultra-short pulse laser drilling of steel with repetition rates up to 10 MHz.

    PubMed

    Finger, Johannes; Reininghaus, Martin

    2014-07-28

    We report on the effect of pulse to pulse interactions during percussion drilling of steel using high power ps-laser radiation with repetition rates of up to 10 MHz and high average powers up to 80 W. The ablation rate per pulse is measured as a function of the pulse repetition rate for four fluences ranging from 500 mJ/cm2 up to 1500 mJ/cm2. For every investigated fluence an abrupt increase of the ablation rate per pulse is observed at a distinctive repetition rate. The onset repetition rate for this effect is strongly dependent on the applied pulse fluence. The origin of the increase of the ablation rate is attributed to the emergence of a melt based ablation processes, as Laser Scanning Microscopy (LSM) images show the occurrence of melt ejected material surrounding the drilling holes. A semi empirical model based on classical heat conduction including heat accumulation as well as pulse-particle interactions is applied to enable quantitative conclusions on the origin of the observed data. In agreement with previous studies, the acquired data confirm the relevance of these two effects for the fundamental description of materials processing with ultra-short pulsed laser radiation at high repetition rates and high average power. PMID:25089496

  10. The Influence of High-Power Ion Beams and High-Intensity Short-Pulse Implantation of Ions on the Properties of Ceramic Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabyshev, A. V.; Konusov, F. V.; Pavlov, S. K.; Remnev, G. E.

    2016-02-01

    The paper is focused on the study of the structural, electrical and optical characteristics of the ceramic silicon carbide before and after irradiation in the regimes of the high-power ion beams (HPIB) and high-intensity short-pulse implantation (HISPI) of carbon ions. The dominant mechanism of transport of charge carriers, their type and the energy spectrum of localized states (LS) of defects determining the properties of SiC were established. Electrical and optical characteristics of ceramic before and after irradiation are determined by the biographical and radiation defects whose band gap (BG) energy levels have a continuous energetic distribution. A dominant p-type activation component of conduction with participation of shallow acceptor levels 0.05-0.16 eV is complemented by hopping mechanism of conduction involving the defects LS with a density of 1.2T017-2.4T018 eV-Am-3 distributed near the Fermi level.The effect of radiation defects with deep levels in the BG on properties change dominates after HISPI. A new material with the changed electronic structure and properties is formed in the near surface layer of SiC after the impact of the HPIB.

  11. Short pulse photoemission from a dispenser cathode under the 2nd, 3rd and 4th harmonics of a picosecond Nd: YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblond, B.

    1992-06-01

    We present new results concerning the photoemissive properties of a standard thermionic dispenser cathode, B type, a porous tungsten matrix impregnated with barium calcium aluminate, 5 BaO-3 CaO, 2 Al 2O 3, working in ultra-short pulses at a temperature far below the measurable thermoemission threshold thanks to a picosecond frequency doubled-tripled or quadrupled Nd: YAG laser delivering 35 ps pulses and a continuous electrical accelerating field applied to the cathode plane surface. Our experiments have shown that the maximum emitted charge in each current pulse corresponds to the maximum available superficial charge of the cathode and that the emitted charge is proportional to the illuminated surface area. The quantum yield values measured at low laser energy are about: η = 2.5 × 10 -5, η = 1 × 10 -4 and η = 3.5 × 10 -4 at the three photon energies h̵ω 3 = 2.34 eV, h̵ω 3 = 3.51 EV andh̵ω 4 = 4.68 eV respectively. Poisoning effectsdue to some residual gas molecules like O 2-H 2O existing in the vacuum cell modify the composition of the surface Ba-O monolayer and are at the origin of a decrease of the photoemitted current about 3.6% per hour. Heating slightly and permanently the cathode permits to limit these effects.

  12. Free-electron laser at the TESLA Test Facility at DESY: toward a tunable short-pulsed soft x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerth, Christopher

    2001-12-01

    A high peak current, low emittance, short pulse electron beam can produce intense, laser-like radiation in a single pass through a long periodic magnetic structure. The construction of such free-electron lasers (FELs) based on self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) has become feasible by recent advances in accelerator technologies. Since SASE FELs do not require any optical components they are promising sources for the generation of intense, sub- picosecond laser pulses which are continuously tunable over a wide wavelength range in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and X-ray region. In the first phase of the VUV-FEL (phase I) at the TESLA Test Facility at DESY, SASE was achieved for the first time in the VUV at wavelengths between 80 and 180 nm. The concept of the VUV FEL at DESY and first experimental results are presented. The second phase of the TESLA Test Facility (phase II), which includes an increase of the electron beam energy to 1 GeV, aims at the construction of a SASE FEL operating in the soft X-ray region. An overview of the current status and the activities toward a soft X-ray FEL user facility is given.

  13. High-resolution measurements of the spatial and temporal evolution of megagauss magnetic fields created in intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Gourab Singh, Prashant Kumar; Adak, Amitava; Lad, Amit D.; Kumar, G. Ravindra

    2014-01-15

    A pump-probe polarimetric technique is demonstrated, which provides a complete, temporally and spatially resolved mapping of the megagauss magnetic fields generated in intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions. A normally incident time-delayed probe pulse reflected from its critical surface undergoes a change in its ellipticity according to the magneto-optic Cotton-Mouton effect due to the azimuthal nature of the ambient self-generated megagauss magnetic fields. The temporal resolution of the magnetic field mapping is typically of the order of the pulsewidth, limited by the laser intensity contrast, whereas a spatial resolution of a few μm is achieved by this optical technique. High-harmonics of the probe can be employed to penetrate deeper into the plasma to even near-solid densities. The spatial and temporal evolution of the megagauss magnetic fields at the target front as well as at the target rear are presented. The μm-scale resolution of the magnetic field mapping provides valuable information on the filamentary instabilities at the target front, whereas probing the target rear mirrors the highly complex fast electron transport in intense laser-plasma interactions.

  14. K{sub α} and bremsstrahlung x-ray radiation backlighter sources from short pulse laser driven silver targets as a function of laser pre-pulse energy

    SciTech Connect

    Jarrott, L. C.; Mariscal, D.; McGuffey, C.; Beg, F. N.; Kemp, A. J.; Divol, L.; Chen, C.; Hey, D.; Maddox, B.; Hawreliak, J.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B.; MacPhee, A.; Westover, B.; Suggit, M.; Wei, M. S.

    2014-03-15

    Measurements of silver K-shell and bremsstrahlung emission from thin-foil laser targets as a function of laser prepulse energy are presented. The silver targets were chosen as a potential 22 keV backlighter source for the National Ignition Facility Experiments. The targets were irradiated by the Titan laser with an intensity of 8 × 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2} with 40 ps pulse length. A secondary nanosecond timescale laser pulse with controlled, variable energy was used to emulate the laser prepulse. Results show a decrease in both K{sub α} and bremsstrahlung yield with increasing artificial prepulse. Radiation hydrodynamic modeling of the prepulse interaction determined that the preplasma and intact target fraction were different in the three prepulse energies investigated. Interaction of the short pulse laser with the resulting preplasma and target was then modeled using a particle-in-cell code PSC which explained the experimental results. The relevance of this work to future Advanced Radiographic Capability laser x-ray backlighter sources is discussed.

  15. Comparison of silver nanoparticles confined in nanoporous silica prepared by chemical synthesis and by ultra-short pulsed laser ablation in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szegedi, Á.; Popova, M.; Valyon, J.; Guarnaccio, A.; De Stefanis, A.; De Bonis, A.; Orlando, S.; Sansone, M.; Teghil, R.; Santagata, A.

    2014-10-01

    Hexagonally ordered mesoporous silica materials, MCM-41 and SBA-15, have been synthesized and loaded with Ag nanoparticles, utilizing both chemical synthesis and ultra-short pulsed laser ablation in liquid. In laser ablation, a silver target, immersed in aqueous suspension of ordered mesoporous silica SBA-15, was irradiated by ultra-short laser pulses to generate silver nanoparticles. For comparison, samples of similar silver contents were prepared either by incorporating silver into the SBA-15 during a hydrothermal synthesis or by introducing silver in MCM-41 by template ion-exchange. Samples were characterized by XRD, N2 physisorption, TEM and UV-vis spectroscopy. All preparations contained significant amount of 5-50 nm size silver agglomerates on the outer surface of the silica particles. The laser ablation process did not cause significant destruction of the SBA-15 structure and metallic silver (Ag0) nanoparticles were mainly generated. It is demonstrated that by laser ablation in aqueous silica suspension smaller and more uniform metallic silver particles can be produced and loaded on the surface of the silica support than by synthesis procedures. Catalytic properties of the samples have been tested in the total oxidation of toluene. Because of its favorable Ag dispersity, the Ag/SBA-15 catalyst, generated by the laser ablation method, had better catalytic stability and, relative to its Ag load, higher activity than the conventional Ag/SBA-15 preparations.

  16. Ultra-short pulse generator

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1993-12-28

    An inexpensive pulse generating circuit is disclosed that generates ultra-short, 200 picosecond, and high voltage 100 kW, pulses suitable for wideband radar and other wideband applications. The circuit implements a nonlinear transmission line with series inductors and variable capacitors coupled to ground made from reverse biased diodes to sharpen and increase the amplitude of a high-voltage power MOSFET driver input pulse until it causes non-destructive transit time breakdown in a final avalanche shock wave diode, which increases and sharpens the pulse even more. 5 figures.

  17. Ultra-short pulse generator

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1993-01-01

    An inexpensive pulse generating circuit is disclosed that generates ultra-short, 200 picosecond, and high voltage 100 kW, pulses suitable for wideband radar and other wideband applications. The circuit implements a nonlinear transmission line with series inductors and variable capacitors coupled to ground made from reverse biased diodes to sharpen and increase the amplitude of a high-voltage power MOSFET driver input pulse until it causes non-destructive transit time breakdown in a final avalanche shockwave diode, which increases and sharpens the pulse even more.

  18. Ultra-High Gradient Dielectric Wakefield Accelerator Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M. C.; Badakov, H.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Travis, G.; Hogan, M.; Ischebeck, R.; Kirby, N.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.; Muggli, P.; Scott, A.; Yoder, R.

    2006-11-27

    Ultra-high gradient dielectric wakefield accelerators are a potential option for a linear collider afterburner since they are immune to the ion collapse and electron/positron asymmetry problems implicit in a plasma based afterburner. The first phase of an experiment to study the performance of dielectric Cerenkov wakefield accelerating structures at extremely high gradients in the GV/m range has been completed. The experiment took advantage of the unique SLAC FFTB electron beam and its ultra-short pulse lengths and high currents (e.g., {sigma}z = 20 {mu}m at Q = 3 nC). The FFTB electron beam was successfully focused down and sent through short lengths of fused silica capillary tubing (ID = 200 {mu}m / OD = 325 {mu}m). The pulse length of the electron beam was varied to produce a range of electric fields between 2 and 20 GV/m at the inner surface of the dielectric tubes. We observed a sharp increase in optical emissions from the capillaries in the middle part of this surface field range which we believe indicates the transition between sustainable field levels and breakdown. If this initial interpretation is correct, the surfaced fields that were sustained equate to on axis accelerating field of several GV/m. In future experiments being developed for the SLAC SABER and BNL ATF we plan to use the coherent Cerenkov radiation emitted from the capillary tube as a field strength diagnostic and demonstrate GV/m range particle energy gain.

  19. Ultra-High Gradient Dielectric Wakefield Accelerator Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, M. C.; Badakov, H.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Travis, G.; Hogan, M.; Ischebeck, R.; Kirby, N.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.; Muggli, P.; Scott, A.; Yoder, R.

    2006-11-01

    Ultra-high gradient dielectric wakefield accelerators are a potential option for a linear collider afterburner since they are immune to the ion collapse and electron/positron asymmetry problems implicit in a plasma based afterburner. The first phase of an experiment to study the performance of dielectric Cerenkov wakefield accelerating structures at extremely high gradients in the GV/m range has been completed. The experiment took advantage of the unique SLAC FFTB electron beam and its ultra-short pulse lengths and high currents (e.g., σz = 20 μm at Q = 3 nC). The FFTB electron beam was successfully focused down and sent through short lengths of fused silica capillary tubing (ID = 200 μm / OD = 325 μm). The pulse length of the electron beam was varied to produce a range of electric fields between 2 and 20 GV/m at the inner surface of the dielectric tubes. We observed a sharp increase in optical emissions from the capillaries in the middle part of this surface field range which we believe indicates the transition between sustainable field levels and breakdown. If this initial interpretation is correct, the surfaced fields that were sustained equate to on axis accelerating field of several GV/m. In future experiments being developed for the SLAC SABER and BNL ATF we plan to use the coherent Cerenkov radiation emitted from the capillary tube as a field strength diagnostic and demonstrate GV/m range particle energy gain.

  20. Ultra-High Gradient Dielectric Wakefield Accelerator Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M.C.; Badakov, H.; Rosenzweig, J.B.; Travish, G.; Hogan, M.; Ischebeck, R.; Kirby, N.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.; Muggli, P.; Scott, A.; Yoder, R.; /LLNL, Livermore /UCLA /SLAC /Southern California U. /UC, Santa Barbara /Manhattan Coll., Riverdale

    2007-03-27

    Ultra-high gradient dielectric wakefield accelerators are a potential option for a linear collider afterburner since they are immune to the ion collapse and electron/positron asymmetry problems implicit in a plasma based afterburner. The first phase of an experiment to study the performance of dielectric Cerenkov wakefield accelerating structures at extremely high gradients in the GV/m range has been completed. The experiment took advantage of the unique SLAC FFTB electron beam and its ultra-short pulse lengths and high currents (e.g., {sigma}{sub z} = 20 {micro}m at Q = 3 nC). The FFTB electron beam was successfully focused down and sent through short lengths of fused silica capillary tubing (ID = 200 {micro}m/OD = 325 {micro}m). The pulse length of the electron beam was varied to produce a range of electric fields between 2 and 20 GV/m at the inner surface of the dielectric tubes. We observed a sharp increase in optical emissions from the capillaries in the middle part of this surface field range which we believe indicates the transition between sustainable field levels and breakdown. If this initial interpretation is correct, the surfaced fields that were sustained equate to on axis accelerating field of several GV/m. In future experiments being developed for the SLAC SABER and BNL ATF we plan to use the coherent Cerenkov radiation emitted from the capillary tube as a field strength diagnostic and demonstrate GV/m range particle energy gain.

  1. Ultra-High Gradient Dielectric Wakefield Accelerator Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M C; Badakov, H; Rosenzweig, J B; Travish, G; Hogan, M; Ischebeck, R; Kirby, N; Siemann, R; Walz, D; Muggli, P; Scott, A; Yoder, R

    2006-08-04

    Ultra-high gradient dielectric wakefield accelerators are a potential option for a linear collider afterburner since they are immune to the ion collapse and electron/positron asymmetry problems implicit in a plasma based afterburner. The first phase of an experiment to study the performance of dielectric Cerenkov wakefield accelerating structures at extremely high gradients in the GV/m range has been completed. The experiment took advantage of the unique SLAC FFTB electron beam and its ultra-short pulse lengths and high currents (e.g., {sigma}{sub z} = 20 {micro}m at Q = 3 nC). The FFTB electron beam was successfully focused down and sent through short lengths of fused silica capillary tubing (ID = 200 {micro}m/OD = 325 {micro}m). The pulse length of the electron beam was varied to produce a range of electric fields between 2 and 20 GV/m at the inner surface of the dielectric tubes. We observed a sharp increase in optical emissions from the capillaries in the middle part of this surface field range which we believe indicates the transition between sustainable field levels and breakdown. If this initial interpretation is correct, the surfaced fields that were sustained equate to on axis accelerating field of several GV/m. In future experiments being developed for the SLAC SABER and BNL ATF we plan to use the coherent Cerenkov radiation emitted from the capillary tube as a field strength diagnostic and demonstrate GV/m range particle energy gain.

  2. Investigations of the concept of a multibunch dielectric wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onishchenko, I. N.; Kiselev, V. A.; Linnik, A. F.; Pristupa, V. I.; Sotnikov, G. V.

    2016-09-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations of the physical principles of multibunch dielectric wakefield accelerator concept based on the wakefield excitation in the dielectric structure by a sequence of relativistic electron bunches are presented. The purpose of the concept is to enhance the wakefield intensity by means of the multibunch coherent excitation and wakefield accumulation in a resonator. The acceleration of bunches is achieved at detuning of bunch repetition frequency relative to the frequency of the excited wakefield. In such a way the sequence of bunches is divided into exciting and accelerated parts due to displacing bunches into accelerating phases of wakefield excited by a previous part of bunches of the same sequence. Besides the change of the permittivity and loss tangent of dielectrics under the irradiation by 100 MeV electron beam is studied.

  3. Stripline dipole with dielectric covering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Hansen, V.

    The use of stripline antennas has greatly increased during the last ten years. In connection with an employment of the antennas, it is often necessary to provide an additional dielectric covering layer to protect the antenna against atmospheric conditions. Water or ice layers can also be described as dielectric layers. The present investigation is concerned with the effect of such additional layers on the radiation characteristics of stripline dipoles. A description is presented of a procedure for the calculation of all important antenna characteristics, taking into account current distribution, input impedance, radiation characteristics, the excitation of surface waves, and aspects of coupling. With the aid of a number of examples it is shown that even a thin covering layer can have a pronounced effect. Such layers can, therefore, also be employed to modify the antenna radiation characteristics to improve their suitability for a given application.

  4. Modeling ultrashort-pulse laser ablation of dielectric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, B. H.; Balling, P.

    2009-04-15

    An approach to modeling ablation thresholds and depths in dielectric materials is proposed. The model is based on the multiple-rate-equation description suggested by Rethfeld [Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 187401 (2004)]. This model has been extended to include a description of the propagation of the light into the dielectric sample. The generic model is based on only a few experimental quantities that characterize the native material. A Drude model describing the evolution of the dielectric constant owing to an excitation of the electrons in the material is applied. The model is compared to experimental ablation data for different dielectric materials from the literature.

  5. SERS-active dielectric metamaterials based on periodic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Lagarkov, Andrey; Budashov, Igor; Chistyaev, Vladimir; Ezhov, Alexander; Fedyanin, Andrey; Ivanov, Andrey; Kurochkin, Ilya; Kosolobov, Sergey; Latyshev, Alexander; Nasimov, Dmitriy; Ryzhikov, Ilya; Shcherbakov, Maxim; Vaskin, Aleksandr; Sarychev, Andrey K

    2016-04-01

    New dielectric SERS metamaterial is investigated. The material consists of periodic dielectric bars deposited on the metal substrate. Computer simulations as well as real experiment reveal extraordinary optical reflectance in the proposed metamaterial due to the excitation of the multiple dielectric resonances. We demonstrate the enhancement of the Raman signal from the complex of 5,5'-dithio-bis-[2-nitrobenzoic acid] molecules and gold nanoparticle (DTNB-Au-NP), which is immobilized on the surface of the barshaped dielectric metamaterial. PMID:27137006

  6. The effects of short pulse laser surface cleaning on porosity formation and reduction in laser welding of aluminium alloy for automotive component manufacture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlShaer, A. W.; Li, L.; Mistry, A.

    2014-12-01

    Laser welding of aluminium alloys typically results in porosity in the fusion zones, leading to poor mechanical and corrosion performances. Mechanical and chemical cleaning of surfaces has been used previously to remove contaminants for weld joint preparations. However, these methods are slow, ineffective (e.g. due to hydrogen trapping) or lead to environmental hazards. This paper reports the effects of short pulsed laser surface cleaning on porosity formation and reduction in laser welding of AC-170PX (AA6014) aluminium sheets (coated with Ti/Zr and lubricated using a dry lubricant AlO70) with two types of joints: fillet edge and flange couch, using an AA4043 filler wire for automotive component assembly. The effect of laser cleaning on porosity reduction during laser welding using a filler wire has not been reported before. In this work, porosity and weld fusion zone geometry were examined prior to and after laser cleaning. The nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser cleaning was found to reduce porosity significantly in the weld fusion zones. For the fillet edge welds, porosity was reduced to less than 0.5% compared with 10-80% without laser cleaning. For flange couch welds, porosity was reduced to 0.23-0.8% with laser cleaning from 0.7% to 4.3% without laser cleaning. This has been found to be due to the elimination of contaminations and oxide layers that contribute to the porosity formation. The laser cleaning is based on thermal ablation. This research focuses on porosity reduction in laser welding of aluminium alloy. Weld quality was investigated for two joints, fillet edge and flange couch joints. The effect of laser cleaning on porosity reduction after welding was investigated. It was found that laser cleaning reduced porosity less than 1% in both joints. Weld dimensions and strength were evaluated and discussed for both types of joints.

  7. Experimental characterization and atomistic modeling of interfacial void formation and detachment in short pulse laser processing of metal surfaces covered by solid transparent overlayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, Eaman T.; Shugaev, Maxim V.; Wu, Chengping; Lin, Zhibin; Matsumoto, Hisashi; Conneran, Maria; Kleinert, Jan; Hainsey, Robert F.; Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    2016-04-01

    The short pulse laser interaction with metal surfaces covered by solid transparent overlayers is investigated in experiments and atomistic simulations, with a particular aim of revealing the mechanisms responsible for structural modification of the metal-overlayer interfacial regions. Experimental characterization of Al-silica targets modified by single-pulse laser irradiation with the pulse duration of 10 ps reveals the transitions from the generation of extended interfacial voids with internal nanoscale surface roughness to the partial detachment of the overlayer from the metal substrate, and to the cracking/chipping or complete removal of the overlayer as the laser fluence increases. The mechanisms responsible for the appearance, growth, and percolation of the interfacial voids leading to the detachment of the overlayer from the metal substrate are investigated in a large-scale atomistic simulation. The results of the simulation demonstrate that the processes of nucleation and growth of the interfacial voids are driven by the dynamic relaxation of laser-induced stresses proceeding simultaneously with rapid phase transformations and temperature variation in the interfacial region. The growth and coalescence of the interfacial voids results in the formation of liquid bridges connecting the overlayer and the metal substrate, whereas solidification of the transient liquid structures produced by the breakup of the liquid bridges may be responsible for the formation of the nanoscale roughness of the interfacial voids observed in experiments. Computational analysis of the effect of preexisting interfacial voids reveals a complex dynamic picture of the initial expansion and subsequent compaction of the surface region of the metal substrate and suggests a possible scenario for the formation of voids below the metal-overlayer interface.

  8. Generation of energetic (>15 MeV) neutron beams from proton- and deuteron-driven nuclear reactions using short pulse lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, G. M.; Higginson, D. P.; Davis, J.; Petrova, Tz B.; McGuffey, C.; Qiao, B.; Beg, F. N.

    2013-10-01

    A roadmap is proposed for the production of high-energy (>15 MeV) neutrons using short pulse lasers. Different approaches are suggested for the two limiting cases of small (E1 ≪ Q) and large (E1 ≫ Q) projectile energies E1 depending on the Q-value of the nuclear reaction. The neutron fluence from many converter materials is evaluated for two projectiles: protons and deuterons. We found profound differences between proton- and deuteron-driven reactions with regard to both converter material and generated neutron fluence. The optimum converter material for deuteron-driven reactions is low-Z elements such as Li and Be, while for proton-driven reactions the converter material is not critical. For a projectile energy of 50 MeV the deuteron-driven reactions are two orders of magnitude more efficient compared to the proton-driven reactions. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations have been performed for laser pulses with peak intensity 3 × 1020 W cm-2, pulse duration 40 fs, spot size 5 µm and energy 3 J interacting with ultrathin (0.1 µm) CD foil. The calculated deuteron beam is highly directional along the laser propagation direction with maximum energy of 45 MeV. The interaction of the deuteron beam with a lithium converter and the production of neutrons is modeled using a Monte Carlo code. The computed neutron spectra show that a forward directed neutron beam is generated with an opening angle of ˜1 sr, maximum energy of 60 MeV and a fluence in the forward direction 1.8 × 108 n sr-1, ˜20% of which are with energy above 15 MeV.

  9. Broadband excitation in solid-state NMR of paramagnetic samples using Delays Alternating with Nutation for Tailored Excitation ('Para-DANTE')

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnevale, Diego; Vitzthum, Veronika; Lafon, Olivier; Trébosc, Julien; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2012-11-01

    This Letter shows that interleaved sequences of short pulses in the manner of 'Delays Alternating with Nutation for Tailored Excitation' (DANTE) with N = 1, 2, 3 … equidistant pulses per rotor period extending over K rotor periods can be used to excite, invert or refocus a large number of spinning sidebands of spin-1/2 nuclei in paramagnetic samples where hyperfine couplings lead to very broad spectra that extend over more than 1 MHz. The breadth of the response is maintained for rf-field amplitudes as low as 30 kHz since it results from cumulative effects of individual pulses with very short durations.

  10. High average power, high energy 1.55 μm ultra-short pulse laser beam delivery using large mode area hollow core photonic band-gap fiber.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiang; Mielke, Michael; Booth, Timothy

    2011-01-17

    We demonstrate high average power, high energy 1.55 μm ultra-short pulse (<1 ps) laser delivery using helium-filled and argon-filled large mode area hollow core photonic band-gap fibers and compare relevant performance parameters. The ultra-short pulse laser beam-with pulse energy higher than 7 μJ and pulse train average power larger than 0.7 W-is output from a 2 m long hollow core fiber with diffraction limited beam quality. We introduce a pulse tuning mechanism of argon-filled hollow core photonic band-gap fiber. We assess the damage threshold of the hollow core photonic band-gap fiber and propose methods to further increase pulse energy and average power handling. PMID:21263632

  11. Cryogenic exciter

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, James William; Garces, Luis Jose

    2012-03-13

    The disclosed technology is a cryogenic static exciter. The cryogenic static exciter is connected to a synchronous electric machine that has a field winding. The synchronous electric machine is cooled via a refrigerator or cryogen like liquid nitrogen. The static exciter is in communication with the field winding and is operating at ambient temperature. The static exciter receives cooling from a refrigerator or cryogen source, which may also service the synchronous machine, to selected areas of the static exciter and the cooling selectively reduces the operating temperature of the selected areas of the static exciter.

  12. Excitation of Accelerating Plasma Waves by Counter-propagating Laser Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gennady Shvets; Nathaniel J. Fisch; and Alexander Pukhov

    2001-08-30

    Generation of accelerating plasma waves using two counter-propagating laser beams is considered. Colliding-beam accelerator requires two laser pulses: the long pump and the short timing beam. We emphasize the similarities and differences between the conventional laser wakefield accelerator and the colliding-beam accelerator (CBA). The highly nonlinear nature of the wake excitation is explained using both nonlinear optics and plasma physics concepts. Two regimes of CBA are considered: (i) the short-pulse regime, where the timing beam is shorter than the plasma period, and (ii) the parametric excitation regime, where the timing beam is longer than the plasma period. Possible future experiments are also outlined.

  13. Coupling of phonon-polariton modes at dielectric-dielectric interfaces by the ATR technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocoletzi, G. H.; Olvera Hernández, J.; Martínez Montes, G.

    1989-08-01

    We report the calculated ATR dispersion relation of the interface phonon-polariton modes in the prism-dielectric-dielectric configuration. Comparison of electromagnetic dispersion relations (EMDR) with the ATR dispersion relations are presented for three different interfaces: I) GaAs/GaP, II) CdF2/CaF2 and III) CaF2/GaP in two propagation windows, using the Otto and Kretschmann geometries for p-polarized light. We have studied the three cases using angle and frequency scans for each window and geometry. The results indicate that it is possible to excite and detect phonon-polariton modes at the dielectric-dielectric interface.

  14. Production of silver-silica core-shell nanocomposites using ultra-short pulsed laser ablation in nanoporous aqueous silica colloidal solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santagata, A.; Guarnaccio, A.; Pietrangeli, D.; Szegedi, Á.; Valyon, J.; De Stefanis, A.; De Bonis, A.; Teghil, R.; Sansone, M.; Mollica, D.; Parisi, G. P.

    2015-05-01

    Ultra-short pulsed laser ablation of materials in liquid has been demonstrated to be a versatile technique for nanoparticles production. In a previous paper, it has been described, for the first time, how by laser ablation in a liquid system, silver nanoparticles can be loaded onto SBA-15 and MCM-41 supports which show promising catalytic properties for the oxidation of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs). The aim of the present research is to demonstrate the formation of stable silver-silica core-shell nanoparticles by direct laser ablation (Ti:Sa; 800 nm pulse duration: 120 fs repetition rate: 1 kHz, pulse energy: 3.6 mJ, fluence: 9 J cm  -  2) of a Ag target submerged in a static colloidal solution of MCM-41 or SBA-15 silica nanoporous materials. In previous studies, it was discovered that a side and negligible product of the laser ablation process of silver performed in water-silica systems, could be related to the formation of silver-silica core-shell nanoparticles. In order to emphasize this side process some modifications to the laser ablation experimental set-up were performed. Among these, the most important one, in order to favor the production of the core-shell systems, was to keep the liquid silica suspension firm. The laser generated nanomaterials were then analyzed using TEM morphologic characterization. By UV-vis absorption spectra the observed features have been related to components of the colloidal solution as well as to the number of the incident laser pulses. In this manner characterizations on both the process and the resulting suspension have been performed. Significant amount of small sized silver-silica core-shell nanoparticles have been detected in the studied systems. The size distribution, polydispersivity, UV-vis plasmonic bands and stability of the produced silver-silica core-shell nanocomposites have been related to the extent of damage induced in the nanoporous silica structure during the ablation procedure adopted

  15. DIELECTRIC WAKE FIELD RESONATOR ACCELERATOR MODULE

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2013-11-06

    Results are presented from experiments, and numerical analysis of wake fields set up by electron bunches passing through a cylindrical or rectangular dielectric-lined structure. These bunches excite many TM-modes, with Ez components of the wake fields sharply localized on the axis of the structure periodically behind the bunches. The experiment with the cylindrical structure, carried out at ATF Brookhaven National Laboratory, used up to three 50 MeV bunches spaced by one wake field period (21 cm) to study the superposition of wake fields by measuring the energy loss of each bunch after it passed through the 53-cm long dielectric element. The millimeter-wave spectrum of radiation excited by the passage of bunches is also studied. Numerical analysis was aimed not only to simulate the behavior of our device, but in general to predict dielectric wake field accelerator performance. It is shown that one needs to match the radius of the cylindrical dielectric channel with the bunch longitudinal rms-length to achieve optimal performance.

  16. Resonant dielectric metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Loui, Hung; Carroll, James; Clem, Paul G; Sinclair, Michael B

    2014-12-02

    A resonant dielectric metamaterial comprises a first and a second set of dielectric scattering particles (e.g., spheres) having different permittivities arranged in a cubic array. The array can be an ordered or randomized array of particles. The resonant dielectric metamaterials are low-loss 3D isotropic materials with negative permittivity and permeability. Such isotropic double negative materials offer polarization and direction independent electromagnetic wave propagation.

  17. Dihedron dielectric loaded surface plasmon athermal polarization converter.

    PubMed

    Hassan, K; Leroy, F; Colas-des-Francs, G; Weeber, J-C

    2014-02-01

    We investigate numerically a novel plasmonic polarization converter relying on the excitation of a so-called dihedron dielectric loaded plasmon polariton. The dihedron dielectric loaded waveguide consists of a dielectric ridge implemented at the inner corner of a metal-coated dielectric step. For a dielectric ridge with a square cross section, the plasmon polariton modes supported by each side of the metallized step hybridize to create supermodes with crossed polarizations. We show that the two supermodes can be operated in a dual-mode interferometer configuration to perform an efficient (24 dB) TE-TM/TM-TE polarization conversion over typical distances below 30 μm at telecommunications wavelengths. In addition, on the basis of the thermo-optical properties of our device, we find that the dihedron plasmonic polarization converter is temperature insensitive. PMID:24487902

  18. Dielectrically loaded horns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tun, S. M.; Bustamante, R.; Williams, N.

    Dielectrically loaded horns have been proposed as alternatives to conical corrugated horns in high-performance primary feeds in virtue both of their lower cost and theoretical indications of superior operational bandwidth performance, while retaining circularly symmetric radiation, low sidelobes, and low cross-polarization. A prototype dielectric core-loaded horn, and a dual-band transmit/receive horn antenna incorporating a dielectric rod inside a small corrugated horn, have been developed and tested; the dielectric used for the rod is Rexolite. The high performance obtainable by this inexpensive technology has been experimentally demonstrated.

  19. Dynamic electromechanical instability of a dielectric elastomer balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feifei; Zhu, Jian; Wang, Michael Yu

    2015-11-01

    Electromechanical instability, a significant phenomenon in dielectric elastomers, has been well studied in the literature. However, most previous work was based on the assumption that dielectric elastomers undergo quasi-static deformation. This letter investigates the dynamic electromechanical instability of a dielectric elastomer balloon which renders four types of oscillation subject to a parametric combination of DC and AC voltages. The simulated oscillations show that dynamic electromechanical instability occurs within quite a large range of excitation frequency, in the form of snap-through or snap-back, when the DC and AC voltages reach critical values. The balloon is at its most susceptible to dynamic electromechanical instability when the superharmonic, harmonic or subharmonic resonance is excited. Taking all excitation parameters into account, this letter analyzes the global critical condition which triggers the dynamic electromechanical instability of the balloon.

  20. Magnetically coupled electromagnetically induced transparency analogy of dielectric metamaterial

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fuli He, Xuan; Zhao, Qian; Lan, Chuwen; Zhou, Ji; Zhang, Weihong Qiu, Kepeng

    2014-03-31

    In this manuscript, we experimentally demonstrate magnetically coupled electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) analogy effect inside dielectric metamaterial. In contrast to previous studies employed different metallic topological microstructures to introduce dissipation loss change, barium strontium titanate, and calcium titanate (CaTiO{sub 3}) are chosen as the bright and dark EIT resonators, respectively, due to their different intrinsic dielectric loss. Under incident magnetic field excitation, dielectric metamaterial exhibits an EIT-type transparency window around 8.9 GHz, which is accompanied by abrupt change of transmission phase. Numerical calculations show good agreement with experiment spectra and reveal remarkably increased group index, indicating potential application in slow light.

  1. Femtosecond-laser ablation dynamics of dielectrics: basics and applications for thin films.

    PubMed

    Balling, P; Schou, J

    2013-03-01

    Laser ablation of dielectrics by ultrashort laser pulses is reviewed. The basic interaction between ultrashort light pulses and the dielectric material is described, and different approaches to the modeling of the femtosecond ablation dynamics are reviewed. Material excitation by ultrashort laser pulses is induced by a combination of strong-field excitation (multi-photon and tunnel excitation), collisional excitation (potentially leading to an avalanche process), and absorption in the plasma consisting of the electrons excited to the conduction band. It is discussed how these excitation processes can be described by various rate-equation models in combination with different descriptions of the excited electrons. The optical properties of the highly excited dielectric undergo a rapid change during the laser pulse, which must be included in a detailed modeling of the excitations. The material ejected from the dielectric following the femtosecond-laser excitation can potentially be used for thin-film deposition. The deposition rate is typically much smaller than that for nanosecond lasers, but film production by femtosecond lasers does possess several attractive features. First, the strong-field excitation makes it possible to produce films of materials that are transparent to the laser light. Second, the highly localized excitation reduces the emission of larger material particulates. Third, lasers with ultrashort pulses are shown to be particularly useful tools for the production of nanocluster films. The important question of the film stoichiometry relative to that of the target will be thoroughly discussed in relation to the films reported in the literature. PMID:23439493

  2. Numerical modeling of multi-GeV laser wakefield electron acceleration inside a dielectric capillary tube

    SciTech Connect

    Paradkar, B. S.; Cros, B.; Maynard, G.; Mora, P.

    2013-08-15

    Numerical modeling of laser wakefield electron acceleration inside a gas filled dielectric capillary tube is presented. Guiding of a short pulse laser inside a dielectric capillary tube over a long distance (∼1 m) and acceleration of an externally injected electron bunch to ultra-relativistic energies (∼5-10 GeV) are demonstrated in the quasi-linear regime of laser wakefield acceleration. Two dimensional axisymmetric simulations were performed with the code WAKE-EP (Extended Performances), which allows computationally efficient simulations of such long scale plasma. The code is an upgrade of the quasi-static particle code, WAKE [P. Mora and T. M. Antonsen, Jr., Phys. Plasmas 4, 217 (1997)], to simulate the acceleration of an externally injected electron bunch (including beam loading effect) and propagation of the laser beam inside a dielectric capillary. The influence of the transverse electric field of the plasma wake on the radial loss of the accelerated electrons to the dielectric wall is investigated. The stable acceleration of electrons to multi-GeV energy with a non-resonant laser pulse with a large spot-size is demonstrated.

  3. Time-resolved vacuum-ultraviolet emission (λ  =  60-120 nm) from a high pressure DBD-excited helium plasma: formation mechanisms of the fast component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carman, R. J.; Ganesan, R.; Kane, D. M.

    2016-03-01

    We report time and wavelength resolved studies of the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) emission from a windowless dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in helium. Short-pulse voltage excitation is utilised to clearly resolve the fast and slow temporal components of the Hopfield continuum between λ  =  60-120 nm. Experimental results and theoretical modelling of the spectral distributions indicate that the two components of the VUV emission must originate from the same radiating molecular state—\\text{He}2\\ast≤ft({{\\text{A}}1}Σ\\text{u}+\\right) , and that two distinct pumping mechanisms populate this state. The time evolution of the fast component is found to correlate with that from the (0,0) molecular transition \\text{He}2\\ast≤ft({{\\text{E}}1}{{\\Pi}\\text{g}}-~{{\\text{A}}1}Σ\\text{u}+\\right) (λ  =  513.4 nm). Thus the \\text{He}2\\ast≤ft({{\\text{A}}1}{}Σ\\text{u}+\\right) state is initially rapidly pumped via radiative cascade from higher \\text{He}2\\ast(n=3) molecular states. In addition, the observed band emissions from the molecular \\text{He}2\\ast≤ft({{\\text{E}}1}{{\\Pi}\\text{g}}\\right) v=0 and \\text{He}2\\ast≤ft({{\\text{F}}1}Σ\\text{u}+\\right) v=0 states and the line emissions from the atomic He*(n  =  3) states all exhibit similar temporal behaviour during the discharge excitation period. Our results are consistent with the recent report of Frost et al (J. Phys. B 34 1569 2001) concerning the existence of a so-called ‘neglected channel’ to fast \\text{He}2\\ast production from He*(n  =  3) atomic state precursors.

  4. Perfect coupling of light to a periodic dielectric/metal/dielectric structure

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhengling E-mail: shiqiangli2013@u.northwestern.edu; Li, Shiqiang E-mail: shiqiangli2013@u.northwestern.edu; Chang, R. P. H.; Ketterson, John B.

    2014-07-21

    Using the finite difference time domain method, it is demonstrated that perfect coupling can be achieved between normally incident light and a periodic dielectric/metal/dielectric structure. The structure serves as a diffraction grating that excites modes related to the long range surface plasmon and short range surface plasmon modes that propagate on continuous metallic films. By optimizing the structural dimensions, perfect coupling is achieved between the incident light and these modes. A high Q of 697 and an accompanying ultrasharp linewidth of 0.8 nm are predicted for a 10 nm silver film for optimal conditions.

  5. Effect of Parasitic Dielectric Resonators on CPW/Aperture-Coupled Dielectric Resonator Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, R. N.; Lee, R. Q.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of parasitic dielectric resonators on the HE (sub 11 sigma) and HE (High Efficiency) (sub 13 sigma) modes of a cylindrical dielectric resonator antenna (DRA) have been studied. The DRA was excited electromagnetically with a grounded coplanar waveguide through an aperture in the common ground plane. Strong couplings were observed for the HE (sub 11 sigma) mode with the parasitic element superimposed on the driven DRA, and for the HE (sub 13 sigma) mode with parasitic elements placed on both sides of the driven DRA. Results indicate significant enhancement in bandwidth for both modes, and good radiation patterns for the HE (sub 11 sigma) mode.

  6. Dielectric Barrier Discharge Methane Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chong; Fridman, Alexander; Rabinovich, Alexander; Dobrynin, Danil

    2015-09-01

    With the large amount of nature gas discovery every year, there is an increasing interest on modification of methane. The fact that methane is gaseous makes it less economic and efficient than liquid fuel. Here we propose a new way of converting methane from gas phase to liquid phase. Dielectric barrier discharge is used to treat methane and nitrogen mixture bubbles inside of liquid fuel. Nitrogen is here to help activate methane into an excited state, then it is possible for the excited molecules to react with other liquid hydrocarbon. Gaseous methane is converted in to liquid phase when excited methane replace a hydrogen and add onto the carbon chain. In this study some preliminary experiments is done to verify this hypothesis. There is equivalent weight increases with methane and nitrogen mixture discharging in diesel when compare to only nitrogen discharging in diesel. The same experiment have also been done with gas mixture discharged in 1-methylnaphthalene. And FTIR analysis of the after treatment hydrocarbon liquid all indicates that there is an increasing in C-H bond concentration and a decreasing in phenyl ring structure.

  7. Gaseous dielectrics V

    SciTech Connect

    Christophorou, L.G.; Bouldin, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    This symposium represents a transdisciplinary and comprehensive approach to the study of gaseous dielectrics. The goal of the symposium was to demonstrate the effective coupling between basic and applied research and modern technology achieved in this area, and to guide future research and development and industrial use of gaseous dielectrics. Separate abstracts were prepared for 85 papers in these proceedings. (DWL)

  8. Terahertz Artificial Dielectric Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendis, Rajind; Nagai, Masaya; Wang, Yiqiu; Karl, Nicholas; Mittleman, Daniel M.

    2016-03-01

    We have designed, fabricated, and experimentally characterized a lens for the THz regime based on artificial dielectrics. These are man-made media that mimic properties of naturally occurring dielectric media, or even manifest properties that cannot generally occur in nature. For example, the well-known dielectric property, the refractive index, which usually has a value greater than unity, can have a value less than unity in an artificial dielectric. For our lens, the artificial-dielectric medium is made up of a parallel stack of 100 μm thick metal plates that form an array of parallel-plate waveguides. The convergent lens has a plano-concave geometry, in contrast to conventional dielectric lenses. Our results demonstrate that this lens is capable of focusing a 2 cm diameter beam to a spot size of 4 mm, at the design frequency of 0.17 THz. The results further demonstrate that the overall power transmission of the lens can be better than certain conventional dielectric lenses commonly used in the THz regime. Intriguingly, we also observe that under certain conditions, the lens boundary demarcated by the discontinuous plate edges actually resembles a smooth continuous surface. These results highlight the importance of this artificial-dielectric technology for the development of future THz-wave devices.

  9. Composite dielectric waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, E.; Atsuki, K.; Kuzuya, R.

    1980-09-01

    The modal analysis of a composite circular dielectric waveguide (CCDW) is presented. Computed values of the propagation constant of a CCDW are compared with those of the homogeneous circular dielectric waveguides (HCDW). Microwave experiments concerning the propagation constant of a CCDW of Teflon and Rexolite are described.

  10. Terahertz Artificial Dielectric Lens

    PubMed Central

    Mendis, Rajind; Nagai, Masaya; Wang, Yiqiu; Karl, Nicholas; Mittleman, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    We have designed, fabricated, and experimentally characterized a lens for the THz regime based on artificial dielectrics. These are man-made media that mimic properties of naturally occurring dielectric media, or even manifest properties that cannot generally occur in nature. For example, the well-known dielectric property, the refractive index, which usually has a value greater than unity, can have a value less than unity in an artificial dielectric. For our lens, the artificial-dielectric medium is made up of a parallel stack of 100 μm thick metal plates that form an array of parallel-plate waveguides. The convergent lens has a plano-concave geometry, in contrast to conventional dielectric lenses. Our results demonstrate that this lens is capable of focusing a 2 cm diameter beam to a spot size of 4 mm, at the design frequency of 0.17 THz. The results further demonstrate that the overall power transmission of the lens can be better than certain conventional dielectric lenses commonly used in the THz regime. Intriguingly, we also observe that under certain conditions, the lens boundary demarcated by the discontinuous plate edges actually resembles a smooth continuous surface. These results highlight the importance of this artificial-dielectric technology for the development of future THz-wave devices. PMID:26973294

  11. Terahertz Artificial Dielectric Lens.

    PubMed

    Mendis, Rajind; Nagai, Masaya; Wang, Yiqiu; Karl, Nicholas; Mittleman, Daniel M

    2016-01-01

    We have designed, fabricated, and experimentally characterized a lens for the THz regime based on artificial dielectrics. These are man-made media that mimic properties of naturally occurring dielectric media, or even manifest properties that cannot generally occur in nature. For example, the well-known dielectric property, the refractive index, which usually has a value greater than unity, can have a value less than unity in an artificial dielectric. For our lens, the artificial-dielectric medium is made up of a parallel stack of 100 μm thick metal plates that form an array of parallel-plate waveguides. The convergent lens has a plano-concave geometry, in contrast to conventional dielectric lenses. Our results demonstrate that this lens is capable of focusing a 2 cm diameter beam to a spot size of 4 mm, at the design frequency of 0.17 THz. The results further demonstrate that the overall power transmission of the lens can be better than certain conventional dielectric lenses commonly used in the THz regime. Intriguingly, we also observe that under certain conditions, the lens boundary demarcated by the discontinuous plate edges actually resembles a smooth continuous surface. These results highlight the importance of this artificial-dielectric technology for the development of future THz-wave devices. PMID:26973294

  12. Dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuator for flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opaits, Dmitry Florievich

    Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) and magnetohydrodynamic phenomena are being widely studied for aerodynamic applications. The major effects of these phenomena are heating of the gas, body force generation, and enthalpy addition or extraction, [1, 2, 3]. In particular, asymmetric dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators are known to be effective EHD device in aerodynamic control, [4, 5]. Experiments have demonstrated their effectiveness in separation control, acoustic noise reduction, and other aeronautic applications. In contrast to conventional DBD actuators driven by sinusoidal voltages, we proposed and used a voltage profile consisting of nanosecond pulses superimposed on dc bias voltage. This produces what is essentially a non-self-sustained discharge: the plasma is generated by repetitive short pulses, and the pushing of the gas occurs primarily due to the bias voltage. The advantage of this non-self-sustained discharge is that the parameters of ionizing pulses and the driving bias voltage can be varied independently, which adds flexibility to control and optimization of the actuators performance. Experimental studies were conducted of a flow induced in a quiescent room air by a single DBD actuator. A new approach for non-intrusive diagnostics of plasma actuator induced flows in quiescent gas was proposed, consisting of three elements coupled together: the Schlieren technique, burst mode of plasma actuator operation, and 2-D numerical fluid modeling. During the experiments, it was found that DBD performance is severely limited by surface charge accumulation on the dielectric. Several ways to mitigate the surface charge were found: using a reversing DC bias potential, three-electrode configuration, slightly conductive dielectrics, and semi conductive coatings. Force balance measurements proved the effectiveness of the suggested configurations and advantages of the new voltage profile (pulses+bias) over the traditional sinusoidal one at relatively low

  13. Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Actuator for Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opaits, Dmitry, F.

    2012-01-01

    This report is Part II of the final report of NASA Cooperative Agreement contract no. NNX07AC02A. It includes a Ph.D. dissertation. The period of performance was January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2010. Part I of the final report is the overview published as NASA/CR-2012- 217654. Asymmetric dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators driven by nanosecond pulses superimposed on dc bias voltage are studied experimentally. This produces non-self-sustained discharge: the plasma is generated by repetitive short pulses, and the pushing of the gas occurs primarily due to the bias voltage. The parameters of ionizing pulses and the driving bias voltage can be varied independently, which adds flexibility to control and optimization of the actuators performance. The approach consisted of three elements coupled together: the Schlieren technique, burst mode of plasma actuator operation, and 2-D numerical fluid modeling. During the experiments, it was found that DBD performance is severely limited by surface charge accumulation on the dielectric. Several ways to mitigate the surface charge were found: using a reversing DC bias potential, three-electrode configuration, slightly conductive dielectrics, and semi conductive coatings. Force balance measurements proved the effectiveness of the suggested configurations and advantages of the new voltage profile (pulses+bias) over the traditional sinusoidal one at relatively low voltages. In view of practical applications certain questions have been also addressed, such as electrodynamic effects which accompany scaling of the actuators to real size models, and environmental effects of ozone production by the plasma actuators.

  14. Dielectric bow-tie nanocavity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qijing; Shu, Fang-Jie; Zou, Chang-Ling

    2013-12-15

    We propose a novel dielectric bow-tie (DBT) nanocavity consisting of two opposing tip-to-tip triangle semiconductor nanowires, whose end faces are coated by silver nanofilms. Based on the advantages of the dielectric slot and tip structures, and the high reflectivity of the silver mirror, light can be confined in this nanocavity with low loss. We demonstrate that at 4.5 K (300 K) around the resonance wavelength of 1550 nm, the mode excited in this nanocavity has a deep subwavelength mode volume of 2.8×10(-4) μm³ and a high quality factor of 4.9×10(4) (401.3), corresponding to an ultrahigh Purcell factor of 1.6×10(7) (1.36×10(5)). This DBT nanocavity may find applications for integrated nanophotonic circuits, such as high-efficiency single photon sources, thresholdless nanolasers, and strong coupling in cavity quantum electrodynamics experiments. PMID:24322245

  15. Fundamentals of femtosecond laser ablation of dielectric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Byskov-Nielsen, J.; Le, D. Q. S.; Christensen, M. N.; Balling, P.; Christensen, B. H.

    2010-10-08

    The modeling of laser-excited dielectric materials requires a detailed description of the electronic excitation. Dielectric materials do not absorb visible light by traditional linear absorption, so the dynamical generation of conduction-band electrons strongly couples to the absorption. The generation of free electrons is initiated by strong-field excitation and followed by multiplication through impact ionization by energetic electrons heated by the laser. The present paper describes an approach to solving the coupled problem of electron excitation and one-dimensional light propagation. The electronic excitation is described in the so-called multiple-rate-equation model, and the light is absorbed by a combination of strong-field excitation and linear absorption by the excited electrons, which are assumed to behave as a free-electron gas described by a Drude model. The model is generic and based on a few key parameters: the wavelength and the pulse duration of the light, and the band gap of the dielectric medium. This allows parametric investigations of ablation phenomena.

  16. Ultrafast and short pulse optical nonlinearities of meso-tetrakis-(2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-N,N,N-trimethyl-4-aniliniumyl) porphyrin and its metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siji Narendran, N. K.; Soman, Rahul; Sankar, Pranitha; Arunkumar, Chellaiah; Chandrasekharan, K.

    2015-11-01

    Among the various classes of Nonlinear Optical chromophores, porphyrins appear to have exclusive characteristics that make them superior to other compounds as optical materials. Here we report the experimental analysis on the nonlinear optical properties of a new series of porphyrins, meso-tetrakis(2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-N,N,N-trimethyl-4-aniliniumyl) porphyrin and its central metal substitutions using Z-scan technique under nanosecond (532 nm, 7 ns) and femtosecond (800 nm, 100 fs) excitations. The compounds were found to exhibit two photon absorption assisted excited state absorption in the nanosecond regime and effective three photon absorption in the femtosecond regime. The third-order nonlinear optical susceptibilities (χ(3)) were of the order 10-11 esu and are compared through degenerate four wave mixing (DFWM). The compounds showed good optical limiting behavior in both femtosecond and nanosecond regimes which find applications in laser safety. The structure property relationship has been established with the support of Electrostatic Surface Potential (ESP) mapping.

  17. Fluorescence enhancement in visible light: dielectric or noble metal?

    PubMed

    Sun, S; Wu, L; Bai, P; Png, C E

    2016-07-28

    A high permittivity dielectric gives the impression of outperforming plasmonic noble metal in visible light fluorescence enhancement primarily because of its small loss. Nonetheless, the performances of these two platforms in various situations remain obscure due to the different optical confinement mechanisms as well as the complexity in the fluorescence enhancement process. This study presents a comprehensive comparison between these two platforms based on nanoparticles (NPs) to evaluate their capability and applicability in fluorescence enhancement by taking into account the fluorescence excitation rate, the quantum yield, the fluorophore wavelengths and Stokes shifts as well as the far field intensity. In a low permittivity sensing medium (e.g. air), the dielectric NP can achieve comparable or higher fluorescence enhancement than the metal NP due to its decent NP-enhanced excitation rate and larger quantum yield. In a relatively high permittivity sensing medium (e.g. water), however, there is a significant decrement of the excitation rate of the dielectric NP as the permittivity contrast decreases, leading to a smaller fluorescence enhancement compared to the metallic counterpart. Combining the fluorescence enhancement and the far field intensity studies, we further conclude that for both dielectric and plasmonic NPs, the optimal situation occurs when the fluorescence excitation wavelength, the fluorescence emission wavelength and the electric-dipole-mode of the dielectric NP (or the plasmonic resonance of the metal NP) are the same and all fall in the low conductivity region of the NP material. We also find that the electric-dipole-mode of the dielectric NP performs better than the magnetic-dipole-mode for fluorescence enhancement applications because only the electric-dipole-mode can be strongly excited by the routinely used fluorescent dyes and quantum dots, which behave as electric dipoles by nature. PMID:27374052

  18. Picosecond laser damage performance assessment of multilayer dielectric gratings in vacuum.

    PubMed

    Alessi, David A; Carr, C Wren; Hackel, Richard P; Negres, Raluca A; Stanion, Kenneth; Fair, James E; Cross, David A; Nissen, James; Luthi, Ronald; Guss, Gabe; Britten, Jerald A; Gourdin, William H; Haefner, Constantin

    2015-06-15

    Precise assessment of the high fluence performance of pulse compressor gratings is necessary to determine the safe operational limits of short-pulse high energy lasers. We have measured the picosecond laser damage behavior of multilayer dielectric (MLD) diffraction gratings used in the compression of chirped pulses on the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) kilojoule petawatt laser system at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). We present optical damage density measurements of MLD gratings using the raster scan method in order to estimate operational performance. We also report results of R-on-1 tests performed with varying pulse duration (1-30 ps) in air, and clean vacuum. Measurements were also performed in vacuum with controlled exposure to organic contamination to simulate the grating use environment. Results show sparse defects with lower damage resistance which were not detected by small-area damage test methods. PMID:26193533

  19. Room temperature optical anisotropy of a LaMnO3 thin-film induced by ultra-short pulse laser

    SciTech Connect

    Munkhbaatar, Purevdorj; Marton, Zsolt; Tsermaa, Bataarchuluun; Choi, Woo Seok; Seo, Sung Seok A.; Kim, Jin Seung; Nakagawa, Naoyuki; Hwang, H. Y.; Lee, Ho Nyung; Myung-Whun, Kim

    2015-03-04

    Ultra-short laser pulse induced optical anisotropy of LaMnO3 thin films grown on SrTiO3 substrates were observed by irradiation with a femto-second laser pulse with the fluence of less than 0.1 mJ/cm2 at room temperature. The transmittance and reflectance showed different intensities for different polarization states of the probe pulse after pump pulse irradiation. The theoretical optical transmittance and re ectance that assumed an orbital ordering of the 3d eg electrons in Mn3+ ions resulted in an anisotropic time dependent changes similar to those obtained from the experimental results, suggesting that the photo-induced optical anisotropy of LaMnO3 is a result of photo-induced symmetry breaking of the orbital ordering for an optically excited state.

  20. Room temperature optical anisotropy of a LaMnO3 thin-film induced by ultra-short pulse laser

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Munkhbaatar, Purevdorj; Marton, Zsolt; Tsermaa, Bataarchuluun; Choi, Woo Seok; Seo, Sung Seok A.; Kim, Jin Seung; Nakagawa, Naoyuki; Hwang, H. Y.; Lee, Ho Nyung; Myung-Whun, Kim

    2015-03-04

    Ultra-short laser pulse induced optical anisotropy of LaMnO3 thin films grown on SrTiO3 substrates were observed by irradiation with a femto-second laser pulse with the fluence of less than 0.1 mJ/cm2 at room temperature. The transmittance and reflectance showed different intensities for different polarization states of the probe pulse after pump pulse irradiation. The theoretical optical transmittance and re ectance that assumed an orbital ordering of the 3d eg electrons in Mn3+ ions resulted in an anisotropic time dependent changes similar to those obtained from the experimental results, suggesting that the photo-induced optical anisotropy of LaMnO3 is a result ofmore » photo-induced symmetry breaking of the orbital ordering for an optically excited state.« less

  1. Dielectric elastomer switches for smart artificial muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Benjamin M.; Calius, Emilio P.; Inamura, Tokushu; Xie, Sheng Q.; Anderson, Iain A.

    2010-08-01

    Some of the most exciting possibilities for dielectric elastomer artificial muscles consist of biologically inspired networks of smart actuators working towards common goals. However, the creation of these networks will only be realised once intelligence and feedback can be fully distributed throughout an artificial muscle device. Here we show that dielectric elastomer artificial muscles can be built with intrinsic sensor, control, and driver circuitry, bringing them closer in capability to their natural analogues. This was achieved by exploiting the piezoresistive behaviour of the actuator's highly compliant electrodes using what we have called the dielectric elastomer switch. We developed suitable switching material using carbon loaded silicone grease and experimentally demonstrated the primitives required for self-sensing actuators and digital computation, namely compliant electromechanical NAND gates and oscillator circuits. We anticipate that dielectric elastomer switches will reduce the need for bulky and rigid external circuitry as well as provide the simple distributed intelligence required for soft, biologically inspired networks of actuators. Examples include many-degree-of-freedom robotic hearts, intestines, and manipulators; wearable assistive devices; smart sensor skins and fabrics; and ultimately new types of artificial muscle embedded, electromechanical computers.

  2. Cast dielectric composite linear accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Sanders, David M.; Sampayan, Stephen; Slenes, Kirk; Stoller, H. M.

    2009-11-10

    A linear accelerator having cast dielectric composite layers integrally formed with conductor electrodes in a solventless fabrication process, with the cast dielectric composite preferably having a nanoparticle filler in an organic polymer such as a thermosetting resin. By incorporating this cast dielectric composite the dielectric constant of critical insulating layers of the transmission lines of the accelerator are increased while simultaneously maintaining high dielectric strengths for the accelerator.

  3. Metal-dielectric interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    There is a wide variety of situations wherein metals are in solid state contact with dielectric materials. The paper reviews some of the factors that influence solid state interactions for metals in contact with dielectric surfaces. Since surfaces play an important part in these reactions, the use of analytical tools in characterizing surfaces is discussed. Adhesion, friction, and wear are utilized as indicators of the nature of interfacial bonding between metals and dielectrics can be effectively determined with adhesion and friction force measurements. Films present on the surface, such as oxygen or water vapor, markedly alter adhesive bond strength which in turn affects friction force and interfacial fracture when attempts are made to separate the contact regions. Analytical surface tools such as the field ion microscope, Auger emission spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are very effective in providing insight into the effect of contact on the surfaces of metals and dielectrics.

  4. Dielectric spectroscopy in agrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skierucha, W.; Wilczek, A.; Szypłowska, A.

    2012-04-01

    The paper presents scientific foundation and some examples of agrophysical applications of dielectric spectroscopy techniques. The aim of agrophysics is to apply physical methods and techniques for studies of materials and processes which occur in agriculture. Dielectric spectroscopy, which describes the dielectric properties of a sample as a function of frequency, may be successfully used for examinations of properties of various materials. Possible test materials may include agrophysical objects such as soil, fruit, vegetables, intermediate and final products of the food industry, grain, oils, etc. Dielectric spectroscopy techniques enable non-destructive and non-invasive measurements of the agricultural materials, therefore providing tools for rapid evaluation of their water content and quality. There is a limited number of research in the field of dielectric spectroscopy of agricultural objects, which is caused by the relatively high cost of the respective measurement equipment. With the fast development of modern technology, especially in high frequency applications, dielectric spectroscopy has great potential of expansion in agrophysics, both in cognitive and utilitarian aspects.

  5. Emittance of short-pulsed high-current ion beams formed from the plasma of the electron cyclotron resonance discharge sustained by high-power millimeter-wave gyrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Razin, S. Zorin, V.; Izotov, I.; Sidorov, A.; Skalyga, V.

    2014-02-15

    We present experimental results on measuring the emittance of short-pulsed (≤100 μs) high-current (80–100 mA) ion beams of heavy gases (Nitrogen, Argon) formed from a dense plasma of an ECR source of multiply charged ions (MCI) with quasi-gas-dynamic mode of plasma confinement in a magnetic trap of simple mirror configuration. The discharge was created by a high-power (90 kW) pulsed radiation of a 37.5-GHz gyrotron. The normalized emittance of generated ion beams of 100 mA current was (1.2–1.3) π mm mrad (70% of ions in the beams). Comparing these results with those obtained using a cusp magnetic trap, it was concluded that the structure of the trap magnetic field lines does not exert a decisive influence on the emittance of ion beams in the gas-dynamic ECR source of MCI.

  6. Emittance of short-pulsed high-current ion beams formed from the plasma of the electron cyclotron resonance discharge sustained by high-power millimeter-wave gyrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Razin, S; Zorin, V; Izotov, I; Sidorov, A; Skalyga, V

    2014-02-01

    We present experimental results on measuring the emittance of short-pulsed (≤100 μs) high-current (80-100 mA) ion beams of heavy gases (Nitrogen, Argon) formed from a dense plasma of an ECR source of multiply charged ions (MCI) with quasi-gas-dynamic mode of plasma confinement in a magnetic trap of simple mirror configuration. The discharge was created by a high-power (90 kW) pulsed radiation of a 37.5-GHz gyrotron. The normalized emittance of generated ion beams of 100 mA current was (1.2-1.3) π mm mrad (70% of ions in the beams). Comparing these results with those obtained using a cusp magnetic trap, it was concluded that the structure of the trap magnetic field lines does not exert a decisive influence on the emittance of ion beams in the gas-dynamic ECR source of MCI. PMID:24593354

  7. Emittance of short-pulsed high-current ion beams formed from the plasma of the electron cyclotron resonance discharge sustained by high-power millimeter-wave gyrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razin, S.; Zorin, V.; Izotov, I.; Sidorov, A.; Skalyga, V.

    2014-02-01

    We present experimental results on measuring the emittance of short-pulsed (≤100 μs) high-current (80-100 mA) ion beams of heavy gases (Nitrogen, Argon) formed from a dense plasma of an ECR source of multiply charged ions (MCI) with quasi-gas-dynamic mode of plasma confinement in a magnetic trap of simple mirror configuration. The discharge was created by a high-power (90 kW) pulsed radiation of a 37.5-GHz gyrotron. The normalized emittance of generated ion beams of 100 mA current was (1.2-1.3) π mm mrad (70% of ions in the beams). Comparing these results with those obtained using a cusp magnetic trap, it was concluded that the structure of the trap magnetic field lines does not exert a decisive influence on the emittance of ion beams in the gas-dynamic ECR source of MCI.

  8. Optimizing a Cleaning Process for Multilayer-Dielectric- (MLD) Diffraction Grating

    SciTech Connect

    Ashe, B.; Giacofei, C.; Myhre, G.; Schmid, A.W.

    2008-01-30

    A critical component for the OMEGA EP short-pulse petawatt laser system is the grating compressor chamber. This large vacuum chamber contains critical optics where laser-pulse compression is performed at the output of the system on two 40 cm-sq-aperture, IR (1054-nm) laser beams. Critical to this compression, within the grating compressor chamber, are four sets of tiled multilayer-dielectric-diffraction gratings that provide the capability for producing 2.6-kJ output IR energy per beam at 10 ps. Degradation of the grating laser-damage threshold due to adsorption of contaminants from the manufacturing process must be prevented to maintain system performance. In this paper we discuss an optimized cleaning process to achieve the OMEGA EP requirements. The fabrication of multilayer-dielectric gratings involves processes that utilize a wide variety of both organic materials (photoresist processes) and inorganic materials (metals and metal oxides) that can affect the final cleaning process. A number of these materials have significant optical absorbance; therefore, incomplete cleaning of these residues may result in the multilayer-dielectric gratings experiencing laser damage.

  9. Enhancing caries resistance in occlusal fissures with a short-pulsed CO2 9.6-μm laser: an in vitro pH-cycling study, preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charland, Daniel; Fulton, Crystal; Rechmann, Beate; Hewko, Mark; Featherstone, John; Choo-Smith, Lin-P'ing; Rechmann, Peter

    2011-03-01

    Treatment of occlusal surfaces with a short-pulsed CO2 9.6 μm wavelength laser has previously been proposed as a method for caries prevention. A sample of 20 extracted human molars were measured before and after demineralizationremineralization pH-cycling with ICDAS II visual inspection, DIAGNOdent, quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF), SoproLife in daylight and blue light-induced fluorescence mode, optical coherence tomography (OCT) and polarized Raman spectroscopy (PRS). Per tooth, one fissure was subjected to laser treatment using a short-pulsed CO2 laser at 9.6 μm wavelength with a fluence of 3.5 J/cm2, 20 Hz pulse repetition rate, 20 μs pulse duration, angulated handpiece, and focus diameter of 600 μm, while the other fissure was left untreated as control. The teeth were subjected to a demineralization-remineralization pH-cycling for 9 days. Cross-sectional micro-hardness testing was done as a gold standard to compare results with findings from the other detection methods used. Due to the small sample size reported, the trend observed was that laser treated fissures demonstrated a smaller relative mineral loss ▵Z than the controls. QLF findings followed a similar trend. Using a rotary catheter probe, OCT measurements were acquired from the various fissures to generate circularly mapped OCT depth images. PRS measurements of parallel- and cross-polarized spectra were acquired with a Raman microscope system. Preliminary OCT images showed differences in the initial air-tooth interface, with PRS results indicating a change in the surface property along with biochemical alterations after pH-cycling. Following pH-cycling, an increase in the OCT subsurface light backscattering intensity in the control fissures was observed compared to the laser test fissures. Porphyrin based fluorescence methods like DIAGNOdent and SoproLife, respectively demonstrated only additional light scattering due to the demineralization process.

  10. Room temperature optical anisotropy of a LaMnO{sub 3} thin-film induced by ultra-short pulse laser

    SciTech Connect

    Munkhbaatar, Purevdorj; Kim, Jin Seung; Myung-Whun, Kim; Marton, Zsolt; Lee, Ho Nyung; Tsermaa, Baatarchuluun; Choi, Woo Seok; Seo, Sung S. Ambrose; Nakagawa, Naoyuki; Hwang, Harold Y.

    2015-03-02

    We observed ultra-short laser pulse-induced transient optical anisotropy in a LaMnO{sub 3} thin film. The anisotropy was induced by laser pulse irradiation with a fluence of less than 0.1 mJ/cm{sup 2} at room temperature. The transmittance and reflectance showed strong dependence on the polarization states of the pulses. For parallel and perpendicular polarization states, there exists a difference of approximately 0.2% for transmittance and 0.05% for reflectance at 0.3 ps after the irradiation with a pump pulse, respectively. The theoretical values for optical transmittance and reflectance with an assumption of an orbital ordering of 3d e{sub g} electrons in Mn{sup 3+} ions showed good agreement with the experimental results, demonstrating that the transient optical anisotropy in LaMnO{sub 3} thin film is due to the photo-induced symmetry-breaking of orbital ordering in excited states.

  11. Mechanisms Responsible for Microwave Properties in High Performance Dielectric Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shengke

    Microwave properties of low-loss commercial dielectric materials are optimized by adding transition-metal dopants or alloying agents (i.e. Ni, Co, Mn) to tune the temperature coefficient of resonant frequency (tau f) to zero. This occurs as a result of the temperature dependence of dielectric constant offsetting the thermal expansion. At cryogenic temperatures, the microwave loss in these dielectric materials is dominated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) loss, which results from the spin-excitations of d-shell electron spins in exchange-coupled clusters. We show that the origin of the observed magnetically-induced shifts in the dielectric resonator frequency originates from the same mechanism, as described by the Kramers-Kronig relations. The temperature coefficient of resonator frequency, tauf, is related to three material parameters according to the equation, tau f = - (½ tauepsilon + ½ taumu + alphaL), where tauepsilon, taumu , and alphaL are the temperature coefficient of dielectric constant, magnetic permeability, and lattice constant, respectively. Each of these parameters for dielectric materials of interest are measured experimentally. These results, in combination with density functional simulations, developed a much improved understanding of the fundamental mechanisms responsible for tau f. The same experimental methods have been used to characterize in-situ the physical nature and concentration of performance-degrading point defects in the dielectrics of superconducting planar microwave resonators.

  12. Band Excitation Kelvin probe force microscopy utilizing photothermal excitation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Wisinger, Nina Balke; Rodriguez, Brian; Kalinin, Sergei; Li, Qian

    2015-01-01

    A multifrequency open loop Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) approach utilizing photothermal as opposed to electrical excitation is developed. Photothermal band excitation (PthBE)-KPFM is implemented here in a grid mode on a model test sample comprising a metal-insulator junction with local charge-patterned regions. Unlike the previously described open loop BE-KPFM, which relies on capacitive actuation of the cantilever, photothermal actuation is shown to be highly sensitive to the electrostatic force gradient even at biases close to the contact potential difference (CPD). PthBE-KPFM is further shown to provide a more localized measurement of true CPD in comparison to the gold standardmore » ambient KPFM approach, amplitude modulated KPFM. Finally, PthBE-KPFM data contain information relating to local dielectric properties and electronic dissipation between tip and sample unattainable using conventional single frequency KPFM approaches.« less

  13. Band excitation Kelvin probe force microscopy utilizing photothermal excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Balke, Nina; Rodriguez, Brian J.; Kalinin, Sergei; Li, Qian

    2015-03-01

    A multifrequency open loop Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) approach utilizing photothermal as opposed to electrical excitation is developed. Photothermal band excitation (PthBE)-KPFM is implemented here in a grid mode on a model test sample comprising a metal-insulator junction with local charge-patterned regions. Unlike the previously described open loop BE-KPFM, which relies on capacitive actuation of the cantilever, photothermal actuation is shown to be highly sensitive to the electrostatic force gradient even at biases close to the contact potential difference (CPD). PthBE-KPFM is further shown to provide a more localized measurement of true CPD in comparison to the gold standard ambient KPFM approach, amplitude modulated KPFM. Finally, PthBE-KPFM data contain information relating to local dielectric properties and electronic dissipation between tip and sample unattainable using conventional single frequency KPFM approaches.

  14. Band excitation Kelvin probe force microscopy utilizing photothermal excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Liam E-mail: liq1@ORNL.gov; Rodriguez, Brian J.; Jesse, Stephen; Balke, Nina; Kalinin, Sergei; Li, Qian E-mail: liq1@ORNL.gov

    2015-03-09

    A multifrequency open loop Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) approach utilizing photothermal as opposed to electrical excitation is developed. Photothermal band excitation (PthBE)-KPFM is implemented here in a grid mode on a model test sample comprising a metal-insulator junction with local charge-patterned regions. Unlike the previously described open loop BE-KPFM, which relies on capacitive actuation of the cantilever, photothermal actuation is shown to be highly sensitive to the electrostatic force gradient even at biases close to the contact potential difference (CPD). PthBE-KPFM is further shown to provide a more localized measurement of true CPD in comparison to the gold standard ambient KPFM approach, amplitude modulated KPFM. Finally, PthBE-KPFM data contain information relating to local dielectric properties and electronic dissipation between tip and sample unattainable using conventional single frequency KPFM approaches.

  15. Excited Delirium

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Asia; Ahern, Terence L.; Henderson, Sean O.

    2011-01-01

    Excited (or agitated) delirium is characterized by agitation, aggression, acute distress and sudden death, often in the pre-hospital care setting. It is typically associated with the use of drugs that alter dopamine processing, hyperthermia, and, most notably, sometimes with death of the affected person in the custody of law enforcement. Subjects typically die from cardiopulmonary arrest, although the cause is debated. Unfortunately an adequate treatment plan has yet to be established, in part due to the fact that most patients die before hospital arrival. While there is still much to be discovered about the pathophysiology and treatment, it is hoped that this extensive review will provide both police and medical personnel with the information necessary to recognize and respond appropriately to excited delirium. PMID:21691475

  16. Excited baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, N.C.

    1986-01-01

    The status of the theory of the low-energy approach to hadron structure is reviewed briefly by surveying a few relevant models. A few examples of tests needed to sort out the predictions of different models pertaining to the quark-gluon structure of hadrons are discussed, and given the resulting physics objectives, a few experimental options for excited baryon research at CFBAF are suggested. (LEW)

  17. PREFACE: Dielectrics 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, Alun; Lewin, Paul

    2011-08-01

    In 2011, the biennial meeting of the Dielectrics Group of the IOP, Dielectrics 2011, was held for the first time in a number of years at the University of Kent at Canterbury. This conference represents the most recent in a long standing series that can trace its roots back to a two-day meeting that was held in the spring of 1968 at Gregynog Hall of the University of Wales. In the intervening 43 years, this series of meetings has addressed many topics, including dielectric relaxation, high field phenomena, biomaterials and even molecular electronics, and has been held at many different venues within the UK. However, in the early 1990s, a regular venue was established at the University of Kent at Canterbury and, it this respect, this year's conference can be considered as "Dielectrics coming home". The format for the 2011 meeting followed that established at Dielectrics 2009, in breaking away from the concept of a strongly themed event that held sway during the mid 2000s. Rather, we again adopted a general, inclusive approach that was based upon four broad technical areas: Theme 1: Insulation/HV Materials Theme 2: Dielectric Spectroscopy Theme 3: Modelling Dielectric Response Theme 4: Functional Materials The result was a highly successful conference that attracted more than 60 delegates from eight countries, giving the event a truly international flavour, and which included both regular and new attendees; it was particularly pleasing to see the number of early career researchers at the meeting. Consequently, the organizing committee would like to thank our colleagues at the IOP, the invited speakers, our sponsors and all the delegates for making the event such a success. Finally, we look forward to convening again in 2013, when we will be returning to The University of Reading. Prof Alun Vaughan and Prof Paul Lewin, Editors

  18. Fluorescence lifetime excitation cytometry by kinetic dithering.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenyan; Vacca, Giacomo; Castillo, Maryann; Houston, Kevin D; Houston, Jessica P

    2014-07-01

    Flow cytometers are powerful high-throughput devices that capture spectroscopic information from individual particles or cells. These instruments provide a means of multi-parametric analyses for various cellular biomarkers or labeled organelles and cellular proteins. However, the spectral overlap of fluorophores limits the number of fluorophores that can be used simultaneously during experimentation. Time-resolved parameters enable the quantification of fluorescence decay kinetics, thus circumventing common issues associated with intensity-based measurements. This contribution introduces fluorescence lifetime excitation cytometry by kinetic dithering (FLECKD) as a method to capture multiple fluorescence lifetimes using a hybrid time-domain approach. The FLECKD approach excites fluorophores by delivering short pulses of light to cells or particles by rapid dithering and facilitates measurement of complex fluorescence decay kinetics by flow cytometry. Our simulations demonstrated a resolvable fluorescence lifetime value as low as 1.8 ns (±0.3 ns) with less than 20% absolute error. Using the FLECKD instrument, we measured the shortest average fluorescence lifetime value of 2.4 ns and found the system measurement error to be ±0.3 ns (SEM), from hundreds of monodisperse and chemically stable fluorescent microspheres. Additionally, we demonstrate the ability to detect two distinct excited state lifetimes from fluorophores in single cells using FLECKD. This approach presents a new ability to resolve multiple fluorescence lifetimes while retaining the fluidic throughput of a cytometry system. The ability to discriminate more than one average fluorescence lifetime expands the current capabilities of high-throughput and intensity-based cytometry assays as the need to tag one single cell with multiple fluorophores is now widespread. PMID:24668857

  19. Fluorescence lifetime excitation cytometry by kinetic dithering

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenyan; Vacca, Giacomo; Castillo, Maryann; Houston, Kevin D; Houston, Jessica P

    2014-01-01

    Flow cytometers are powerful high-throughput devices that capture spectroscopic information from individual particles or cells. These instruments provide a means of multi-parametric analyses for various cellular biomarkers or labeled organelles and cellular proteins. However, the spectral overlap of fluorophores limits the number of fluorophores that can be used simultaneously during experimentation. Time-resolved parameters enable the quantification of fluorescence decay kinetics, thus circumventing common issues associated with intensity-based measurements. This contribution introduces fluorescence lifetime excitation cytometry by kinetic dithering (FLECKD) as a method to capture multiple fluorescence lifetimes using a hybrid time-domain approach. The FLECKD approach excites fluorophores by delivering short pulses of light to cells or particles by rapid dithering and facilitates measurement of complex fluorescence decay kinetics by flow cytometry. Our simulations demonstrated a resolvable fluorescence lifetime value as low as 1.8 ns (±0.3 ns) with less than 20% absolute error. Using the FLECKD instrument, we measured the shortest average fluorescence lifetime value of 2.4 ns and found the system measurement error to be ±0.3 ns (SEM), from hundreds of monodisperse and chemically stable fluorescent microspheres. Additionally, we demonstrate the ability to detect two distinct excited state lifetimes from fluorophores in single cells using FLECKD. This approach presents a new ability to resolve multiple fluorescence lifetimes while retaining the fluidic throughput of a cytometry system. The ability to discriminate more than one average fluorescence lifetime expands the current capabilities of high-throughput and intensity-based cytometry assays as the need to tag one single cell with multiple fluorophores is now widespread. PMID:24668857

  20. Experimental demonstration of superdirective dielectric antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnok, Alexander E.; Filonov, Dmitry S.; Belov, Pavel A.; Simovski, Constantin R.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2014-03-31

    We propose and demonstrate experimentally a simple approach for achieving superdirectivity of emitted radiation for electrically small antennas based on a spherical dielectric resonator with a notch excited by a dipole source. Superdirectivity is achieved without using complex antenna arrays and for a wide range of frequencies. We also demonstrate the steering effect for a subwavelength displacement of the source. Finally, unlike previously known superdirective antennas, our design has significantly smaller losses, at the operation frequency radiation efficiency attains 80%, and matching holds in the 3%-wide frequency band without any special matching technique.

  1. Controlling birefringence in dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danner, Aaron J.; Tyc, Tomáš; Leonhardt, Ulf

    2011-06-01

    Birefringence, from the very essence of the word itself, refers to the splitting of light rays into two parts. In natural birefringent materials, this splitting is a beautiful phenomenon, resulting in the perception of a double image. In optical metamaterials, birefringence is often an unwanted side effect of forcing a device designed through transformation optics to operate in dielectrics. One polarization is usually implemented in dielectrics, and the other is sacrificed. Here we show, with techniques beyond transformation optics, that this need not be the case, that both polarizations can be controlled to perform useful tasks in dielectrics, and that rays, at all incident angles, can even follow different trajectories through a device and emerge together as if the birefringence did not exist at all. A number of examples are shown, including a combination Maxwell fisheye/Luneburg lens that performs a useful task and is achievable with current fabrication materials.

  2. Dielectric assist accelerating structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, D.; Yoshida, M.; Hayashizaki, N.

    2016-01-01

    A higher-order TM02 n mode accelerating structure is proposed based on a novel concept of dielectric loaded rf cavities. This accelerating structure consists of ultralow-loss dielectric cylinders and disks with irises which are periodically arranged in a metallic enclosure. Unlike conventional dielectric loaded accelerating structures, most of the rf power is stored in the vacuum space near the beam axis, leading to a significant reduction of the wall loss, much lower than that of conventional normal-conducting linac structures. This allows us to realize an extremely high quality factor and a very high shunt impedance at room temperature. A simulation of a 5 cell prototype design with an existing alumina ceramic indicates an unloaded quality factor of the accelerating mode over 120 000 and a shunt impedance exceeding 650 M Ω /m at room temperature.

  3. Dielectric Constant of Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendelson, Kenneth S.; Ackmann, James J.

    1997-03-01

    We have used a finite element method to calculate the dielectric constant of a cubic array of spheres. Extensive calculations support preliminary conclusions reported previously (K. Mendelson and J. Ackmann, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 41), 657 (1996).. At frequencies below 100 kHz the real part of the dielectric constant (ɛ') shows oscillations as a function of the volume fraction of suspension. These oscillations disappear at low conductivities of the suspending fluid. Measurements of the dielectric constant (J. Ackmann, et al., Ann. Biomed. Eng. 24), 58 (1996). (H. Fricke and H. Curtis, J. Phys. Chem. 41), 729 (1937). are not sufficiently sensitive to show oscillations but appear to be consistent with the theoretical results.

  4. PREFACE: Dielectrics 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjiloucas, Sillas; Blackburn, John

    2013-11-01

    This volume records the 42nd Dielectrics Group Proceedings of the Dielectrics Conference that took place at the University of Reading UK from 10-12 April 2013. The meeting is part of the biennial Dielectrics series of the Dielectrics Group, and formerly Dielectrics Society, and is organised by the Institute of Physics. The conference proceedings showcase some of the diversity and activity of the Dielectrics community worldwide, and bring together contributions from academics and industrial researchers with a diverse background and experiences from the Physics, Chemistry and Engineering communities. It is interesting to note some continuing themes such as Insulation/HV Materials, Dielectric Spectroscopy, Dielectric Measurement Techniques and Ferroelectric materials have a growing importance across a range of technologically important areas from the Energy sector to Materials research, Semiconductor and Electronics industries, and Metrology. We would like to thank all of our colleagues and friends in the Dielectrics community who have supported this event by contributing manuscripts and participating in the event. The conference has provided excellent networking opportunities for all delegates. Our thanks go also to our theme chairs: Dr Stephen Dodd (University of Leicester) on Insulation/HV Materials, Professor Darryl Almond (University of Bath) on Dielectric Spectroscopy, Dr John Blackburn (NPL) on Dielectric Measurement Techniques and Professor Anthony R West (University of Sheffield) on Ferroelectric Materials. We would also like to thank the other members of the Technical Programme Committee for their support, and refereeing the submitted manuscripts. Our community would also like to wish a full recovery to our plenary speaker Prof John Fothergill (City University London) who was unexpectedly unable to give his talk as well as thank Professor Alun Vaughan for stepping in and giving an excellent plenary lecture in his place at such very short notice. We are also

  5. Sexual excitement.

    PubMed

    Stoller, R J

    1976-08-01

    Sexual excitement depends on a scenario the person to be aroused has been writing since childhood. The story is an adventure, an autobiography disguised as fiction, in which the hero/heroine hides crucial intrapsychic conflicts, mysteries, screen memories of actual traumatic events and the resolution of these elements into a happy ending, best celebrated by orgasm. The function of the fantasy is to take these painful experiences and convert them to pleasure-triumph. In order to sharpen excitement-the vibration between the fear of original traumas repeating and the hope of a pleasurable conclusion this time-one introduces into the story elements of risk (approximations of the trauma) meant to prevent boredom and safety factors (sub-limnal signals to the storyteller that the risk are not truly dangerous). Sexual fantasy can be studied by means of a person's daydreams (including those chosen in magazines, books, plays, television, movies, and outright pornography), masturbatory behavior, object choice, foreplay, techniques of intercourse, or postcoital behavior. PMID:949223

  6. Multilayer dielectric diffraction gratings

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Michael D.; Britten, Jerald A.; Nguyen, Hoang T.; Boyd, Robert; Shore, Bruce W.

    1999-01-01

    The design and fabrication of dielectric grating structures with high diffraction efficiency used in reflection or transmission is described. By forming a multilayer structure of alternating index dielectric materials and placing a grating structure on top of the multilayer, a diffraction grating of adjustable efficiency, and variable optical bandwidth can be obtained. Diffraction efficiency into the first order in reflection varying between 1 and 98 percent has been achieved by controlling the design of the multilayer and the depth, shape, and material comprising the grooves of the grating structure. Methods for fabricating these gratings without the use of ion etching techniques are described.

  7. Multilayer dielectric diffraction gratings

    DOEpatents

    Perry, M.D.; Britten, J.A.; Nguyen, H.T.; Boyd, R.; Shore, B.W.

    1999-05-25

    The design and fabrication of dielectric grating structures with high diffraction efficiency used in reflection or transmission is described. By forming a multilayer structure of alternating index dielectric materials and placing a grating structure on top of the multilayer, a diffraction grating of adjustable efficiency, and variable optical bandwidth can be obtained. Diffraction efficiency into the first order in reflection varying between 1 and 98 percent has been achieved by controlling the design of the multilayer and the depth, shape, and material comprising the grooves of the grating structure. Methods for fabricating these gratings without the use of ion etching techniques are described. 7 figs.

  8. Thermally switchable dielectrics

    DOEpatents

    Dirk, Shawn M.; Johnson, Ross S.

    2013-04-30

    Precursor polymers to conjugated polymers, such as poly(phenylene vinylene), poly(poly(thiophene vinylene), poly(aniline vinylene), and poly(pyrrole vinylene), can be used as thermally switchable capacitor dielectrics that fail at a specific temperature due to the non-conjugated precursor polymer irreversibly switching from an insulator to the conjugated polymer, which serves as a bleed resistor. The precursor polymer is a good dielectric until it reaches a specific temperature determined by the stability of the leaving groups. Conjugation of the polymer backbone at high temperature effectively disables the capacitor, providing a `built-in` safety mechanism for electronic devices.

  9. Dielectric behaviour of polycarbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Shabasy, M.; Riad, A. S.

    1996-05-01

    The dielectric constant and the dielectric loss of polycarbonate are investigated in the frequency range 30-10 5 Hz and at temperature from 297 to 365 K. The frequency dependence of the impedance spectra plotted in the complex plane shows semicircles. The system could be represented by an equivalent circuit of a bulk resistance in series with a parallel surface resistance-capacitance combination. The Cole-Cole diagrams have been used to determine the molecular relaxation time τ. The temperature dependence of τ is expressed by a thermally activated process. Analysis of the AC conductivity reveals semiconducting features based predominantly on a hopping mechanism.

  10. Controlling guided modes in plasmonic metal/dielectric multilayer waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickremasinghe, N.; Thompson, J.; Wang, X.; Schmitzer, H.; Wagner, H. P.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the mode properties of planar dielectric aluminum-quinoline (Alq3) multilayer waveguides comprising one single or three equally spaced embedded nanometer-thin (˜10 nm thick) Alq3-Mg0.9:Ag0.1 composite metal-island layers. The plasmonic waveguides were fabricated by organic molecular beam deposition. Transverse magnetic (TM) and transverse electric (TE) modes were selectively excited using the m-line method. The symmetric plasmonic TM0 mode was launched in all waveguides and—in addition—two higher order plasmonic TM1 and TM2 modes were generated in waveguides comprising three metal layers. Other TM modes have hybrid dielectric-plasmonic characters, showing an increased effective refractive index when one electric field antinode is close to a metallic layer. TM modes which have all their antinode(s) in the dielectric layers propagate essentially like dielectric modes. TE modes with antinode(s) at the position of the metal layer(s) are strongly damped while the losses are low for TE modes comprising a node at the position of the composite metal film(s). The possibility to control the effective refractive index and the losses for individual hybrid plasmonic-dielectric TM and dielectric TE modes opens new design opportunities for mode selective waveguides and TM-TE mode couplers.

  11. Controlling guided modes in plasmonic metal/dielectric multilayer waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Wickremasinghe, N.; Wang, X.; Wagner, H. P.; Thompson, J.; Schmitzer, H.

    2015-06-07

    We investigate the mode properties of planar dielectric aluminum-quinoline (Alq{sub 3}) multilayer waveguides comprising one single or three equally spaced embedded nanometer-thin (∼10 nm thick) Alq{sub 3}-Mg{sub 0.9}:Ag{sub 0.1} composite metal-island layers. The plasmonic waveguides were fabricated by organic molecular beam deposition. Transverse magnetic (TM) and transverse electric (TE) modes were selectively excited using the m-line method. The symmetric plasmonic TM{sub 0} mode was launched in all waveguides and—in addition—two higher order plasmonic TM{sub 1} and TM{sub 2} modes were generated in waveguides comprising three metal layers. Other TM modes have hybrid dielectric-plasmonic characters, showing an increased effective refractive index when one electric field antinode is close to a metallic layer. TM modes which have all their antinode(s) in the dielectric layers propagate essentially like dielectric modes. TE modes with antinode(s) at the position of the metal layer(s) are strongly damped while the losses are low for TE modes comprising a node at the position of the composite metal film(s). The possibility to control the effective refractive index and the losses for individual hybrid plasmonic-dielectric TM and dielectric TE modes opens new design opportunities for mode selective waveguides and TM-TE mode couplers.

  12. Molds for cable dielectrics

    DOEpatents

    Roose, L.D.

    1996-12-10

    Molds for use in making end moldings for high-voltage cables are described wherein the dielectric insulator of a cable is heated and molded to conform to a desired shape. As a consequence, high quality substantially bubble-free cable connectors suitable for mating to premanufactured fittings are made. 5 figs.

  13. Molds for cable dielectrics

    DOEpatents

    Roose, Lars D.

    1996-01-01

    Molds for use in making end moldings for high-voltage cables are described wherein the dielectric insulator of a cable is heated and molded to conform to a desired shape. As a consequence, high quality substantially bubble-free cable connectors suitable for mating to premanufactured fittings are made.

  14. Interfaces: nanometric dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, T. J.

    2005-01-01

    The incorporation of nanometric size particles in a matrix to form dielectric composites shows promise of materials (nanodielectrics) with new and improved properties. It is argued that the properties of the interfaces between the particles and the matrix, which will themselves be of nanometric dimensions, will have an increasingly dominant role in determining dielectric performance as the particle size decreases. The forces that determine the electrical and dielectric properties of interfaces are considered, with emphasis on the way in which they might influence composite behaviour. A number of examples are given in which interfaces at the nanometric level exercise both passive and active control over dielectric, optical and conductive properties. Electromechanical properties are also considered, and it is shown that interfaces have important electrostrictive and piezoelectric characteristics. It is demonstrated that the process of poling, namely subjecting macroscopic composite materials to electrical stress and raised temperatures to create piezoelectric materials, can be explained in terms of optimizing the collective response of the nanometric interfaces involved. If the electrical and electromechanical features are coupled to the long-established electrochemical properties, interfaces represent highly versatile active elements with considerable potential in nanotechnology.

  15. Dielectric elastomer memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Benjamin M.; McKay, Thomas G.; Xie, Sheng Q.; Calius, Emilio P.; Anderson, Iain A.

    2011-04-01

    Life shows us that the distribution of intelligence throughout flexible muscular networks is a highly successful solution to a wide range of challenges, for example: human hearts, octopi, or even starfish. Recreating this success in engineered systems requires soft actuator technologies with embedded sensing and intelligence. Dielectric Elastomer Actuator(s) (DEA) are promising due to their large stresses and strains, as well as quiet flexible multimodal operation. Recently dielectric elastomer devices were presented with built in sensor, driver, and logic capability enabled by a new concept called the Dielectric Elastomer Switch(es) (DES). DES use electrode piezoresistivity to control the charge on DEA and enable the distribution of intelligence throughout a DEA device. In this paper we advance the capabilities of DES further to form volatile memory elements. A set reset flip-flop with inverted reset line was developed based on DES and DEA. With a 3200V supply the flip-flop behaved appropriately and demonstrated the creation of dielectric elastomer memory capable of changing state in response to 1 second long set and reset pulses. This memory opens up applications such as oscillator, de-bounce, timing, and sequential logic circuits; all of which could be distributed throughout biomimetic actuator arrays. Future work will include miniaturisation to improve response speed, implementation into more complex circuits, and investigation of longer lasting and more sensitive switching materials.

  16. Excitation of Accelerating Plasma Waves by Counter-Propagating Laser Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Shvets, Gennady; Fisch, Nathaniel J; Pukhov, Alexander

    2002-04-05

    The conventional approach to exciting high phase velocity waves in plasmas is to employ a laser pulse moving in the direction of the desired particle acceleration. Photon downshifting then causes momentum transfer to the plasma and wave excitation. Novel approaches to plasma wake excitation, colliding-beam accelerator (CBA), which involve photon exchange between the long and short counter-propagating laser beams, are described. Depending on the frequency detuning Dw between beams and duration tL of the short pulse, there are two approaches to CBA. The first approach assumes tL ª 2/wp. Photons exchanged between the beams deposit their recoil momentum in the plasma driving the plasma wake. Frequency detuning between the beams determines the direction of the photon exchange, thereby controlling the phase of the plasma wake. This phase control can be used for reversing the slippage of the accelerated particles with respect to the wake. A variation on the same theme, super-beatwave accelerator, is also described. In the second approach, a short pulse with tL >> 2/wp1 detuned by Dw ~ 2wp from the counter-propagating beam is employed. While parametric excitation of plasma waves by the electromagnetic beatwave at 2wp of two co-propagating lasers was first predicted by Rosenbluth and Liu [M.N. Rosenbluth, C.S. Liu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 29 (1972) 701], it is demonstrated that the two excitation beams can be counter-propagating. The advantages of using this geometry (higher instability growth rate, insensitivity to plasma inhomogeneity) are explained, and supporting numerical simulations presented.

  17. The electromagnetic radiation from simple sources in the presence of a homogeneous dielectric sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, V. B.

    1973-01-01

    In this research, the effect of a homogeneous dielectric sphere on the electromagnetic radiation from simple sources is treated as a boundary value problem, and the solution is obtained by the technique of dyadic Green's functions. Exact representations of the electric fields in the various regions due to a source located inside, outside, or on the surface of a dielectric sphere are formulated. Particular attention is given to the effect of sphere size, source location, dielectric constant, and dielectric loss on the radiation patterns and directivity of small spheres (less than 5 wavelengths in diameter) using the Huygens' source excitation. The computed results are found to closely agree with those measured for waveguide-excited plexiglas spheres. Radiation patterns for an extended Huygens' source and for curved electric dipoles located on the sphere's surface are also presented. The resonance phenomenon associated with the dielectric sphere is studied in terms of the modal representation of the radiated fields. It is found that when the sphere is excited at certain frequencies, much of the energy is radiated into the sidelobes. The addition of a moderate amount of dielectric loss, however, quickly attenuates this resonance effect. A computer program which may be used to calculate the directivity and radiation pattern of a Huygens' source located inside or on the surface of a lossy dielectric sphere is listed.

  18. Enhancement of the stability of a synchronously excited cw dye laser by insertion of a nonlinear absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Gafurov, K.G.; Krindach, D.P.; Nekhaenko, V.A.; Yakovlev, A.G.

    1985-06-01

    An experimental investigation was made of combined mode locking of a cw laser utilizing a mixture of rhodamine 6G (amplifier) and malachite green (absorber). The action of a saturable absorber shortened the output pulses to 700 fsec, widened the range of existence of the short pulses, and appreciably increased the lasing stability compared with synchronous excitation of pure rhodamine 6G. These characteristics of the radiation of a laser with combined mode locking were associated with the saturation dynamics of the gain and the absorption.

  19. Electromagnetic diffraction by two perfectly conducting wedges with dented edges loaded with a dielectric cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsherbeni, A. Z.; Auda, H. A.

    1989-06-01

    A rigorous field analysis of the problem of two identical perfectly conducting parallel wedges with dented edges loaded with a dielectric cylinder, and excited by an electric or magnetic line current in the upper sector, is given in this paper. The dielectric medium is assumed to be linear, homogeneous, isotropic and free from losses, whereas the mediums of the upper and lower sectors are free space. A field equivalence theorem is used to derive, for each excitation, a system of coupled integral equations for the equivalent magnetic currents on the dielectric interfaces, which is later solved using Galerkin's method. The fields and powers transmitted into the lower sector, hence the transmission coefficients, for both polarizations are subsequently determined in terms of the equivalent magnetic currents on the lower dielectric interface. The analysis is then specialized to the problem of a slit loaded with a dielectric cylinder, as well as to the case of plane wave excitation. Sample numerical results for the dielectric-loaded double dented wedge and slit problems in the case of plane wave excitation are also given.

  20. Model of dissipative dielectric elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang Foo, Choon; Cai, Shengqiang; Jin Adrian Koh, Soo; Bauer, Siegfried; Suo, Zhigang

    2012-02-01

    The dynamic performance of dielectric elastomer transducers and their capability of electromechanical energy conversion are affected by dissipative processes, such as viscoelasticity, dielectric relaxation, and current leakage. This paper describes a method to construct a model of dissipative dielectric elastomers on the basis of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. We characterize the state of the dielectric elastomer with kinematic variables through which external loads do work, and internal variables that measure the progress of the dissipative processes. The method is illustrated with examples motivated by existing experiments of polyacrylate very-high-bond dielectric elastomers. This model predicts the dynamic response of the dielectric elastomer and the leakage current behavior. We show that current leakage can be significant under large deformation and for long durations. Furthermore, current leakage can result in significant hysteresis for dielectric elastomers under cyclic voltage.

  1. Microsecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge plasma stimulation of tissue macrophages for treatment of peripheral vascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, V. Lin, A.; Brettschneider, J.; Fridman, G.; Fridman, A.; Kako, F.; Gabunia, K.; Kelemen, S.; Autieri, M.

    2015-12-15

    Angiogenesis is the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing vessels and normally occurs during the process of inflammatory reactions, wound healing, tissue repair, and restoration of blood flow after injury or insult. Stimulation of angiogenesis is a promising and an important step in the treatment of peripheral artery disease. Reactive oxygen species have been shown to be involved in stimulation of this process. For this reason, we have developed and validated a non-equilibrium atmospheric temperature and pressure short-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge plasma system, which can non-destructively generate reactive oxygen species and other active species at the surface of the tissue being treated. We show that this plasma treatment stimulates the production of vascular endothelial growth factor, matrix metalloproteinase-9, and CXCL 1 that in turn induces angiogenesis in mouse aortic rings in vitro. This effect may be mediated by the direct effect of plasma generated reactive oxygen species on tissue.

  2. Microsecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge plasma stimulation of tissue macrophages for treatment of peripheral vascular disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, V.; Lin, A.; Kako, F.; Gabunia, K.; Kelemen, S.; Brettschneider, J.; Fridman, G.; Fridman, A.; Autieri, M.

    2015-12-01

    Angiogenesis is the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing vessels and normally occurs during the process of inflammatory reactions, wound healing, tissue repair, and restoration of blood flow after injury or insult. Stimulation of angiogenesis is a promising and an important step in the treatment of peripheral artery disease. Reactive oxygen species have been shown to be involved in stimulation of this process. For this reason, we have developed and validated a non-equilibrium atmospheric temperature and pressure short-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge plasma system, which can non-destructively generate reactive oxygen species and other active species at the surface of the tissue being treated. We show that this plasma treatment stimulates the production of vascular endothelial growth factor, matrix metalloproteinase-9, and CXCL 1 that in turn induces angiogenesis in mouse aortic rings in vitro. This effect may be mediated by the direct effect of plasma generated reactive oxygen species on tissue.

  3. Prospects for the diagnosis of electron-ion temperature equilibration rates of warm dense matter by ultra-short pulse hard X-ray diffraction with an X-ray free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angulo Gareta, J. J.; Riley, D.

    2006-10-01

    Ultra-short pulse kiloelectronvolt X-ray diffraction with an X-ray free electron laser and its potential for the diagnosis of electron-ion equilibration rates of warm dense matter are evaluated. A simple experimental configuration is suggested for the generation and subsequent probing of warm dense aluminium with the TESLA X-ray free electron laser. Differential scattering cross-sections are computed in an approximate manner with Thomas-Fermi form factors and tabular ion-ion static structure factors of one-component plasmas, inclusive of electron screening and degeneracy. This requires simulation of the sample, for which we use a hydrodynamic code featuring the Sesame equation of state, Thomas-Fermi ionisation and cold solid opacities (for the calculation of energy deposition). The effect of electron-ion equilibration rate on the evolution of the diffraction pattern on a picosecond time-scale is investigated. Finally, the signal level expected from experiment is estimated, indicating that measurements with good angular-resolution are possible.

  4. Antenna with Dielectric Having Geometric Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudley, Kenneth L. (Inventor); Elliott, Holly A. (Inventor); Cravey, Robin L. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor); Ghose, Sayata (Inventor); Watson, Kent A. (Inventor); Smith, Jr., Joseph G. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An antenna includes a ground plane, a dielectric disposed on the ground plane, and an electrically-conductive radiator disposed on the dielectric. The dielectric includes at least one layer of a first dielectric material and a second dielectric material that collectively define a dielectric geometric pattern, which may comprise a fractal geometry. The radiator defines a radiator geometric pattern, and the dielectric geometric pattern is geometrically identical, or substantially geometrically identical, to the radiator geometric pattern.

  5. A Compact Linac for Proton Therapy Based on a Dielectric Wall Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G J; Mackie, T R; Sampayan, S; Chen, Y -; Blackfield, D; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Nelson, S; Paul, A; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J; Reckwerdt, P J; Schmidt, R; Pearson, D; Flynn, R W; Matthews, D; Purdy, J

    2007-10-29

    A novel compact CT-guided intensity modulated proton radiotherapy (IMPT) system is described. The system is being designed to deliver fast IMPT so that larger target volumes and motion management can be accomplished. The system will be ideal for large and complex target volumes in young patients. The basis of the design is the dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) system being developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The DWA uses fast switched high voltage transmission lines to generate pulsed electric fields on the inside of a high gradient insulating (HGI) acceleration tube. High electric field gradients are achieved by the use of alternating insulators and conductors and short pulse times. The system will produce individual pulses that can be varied in intensity, energy and spot width. The IMPT planning system will optimize delivery characteristics. The system will be capable of being sited in a conventional linac vault and provide intensity modulated rotational therapy. Feasibility tests of an optimization system for selecting the position, energy, intensity and spot size for a collection of spots comprising the treatment are underway. A prototype is being designed and concept designs of the envelope and environmental needs of the unit are beginning. The status of the developmental new technologies that make the compact system possible will be reviewed. These include, high gradient vacuum insulators, solid dielectric materials, SiC photoconductive switches and compact proton sources.

  6. Compact Dielectric Wall Accelerator Development For Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy And Homeland Security Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y -; Caporaso, G J; Guethlein, G; Sampayan, S; Akana, G; Anaya, R; Blackfield, D; Cook, E; Falabella, S; Gower, E; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Hickman, B; Holmes, C; Horner, A; Nelson, S; Paul, A; Pearson, D; Poole, B; Richardson, R; Sanders, D; Stanley, J; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J; Weir, J

    2009-06-17

    Compact dielectric wall (DWA) accelerator technology is being developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The DWA accelerator uses fast switched high voltage transmission lines to generate pulsed electric fields on the inside of a high gradient insulating (HGI) acceleration tube. Its high electric field gradients are achieved by the use of alternating insulators and conductors and short pulse times. The DWA concept can be applied to accelerate charge particle beams with any charge to mass ratio and energy. Based on the DWA system, a novel compact proton therapy accelerator is being developed. This proton therapy system will produce individual pulses that can be varied in intensity, energy and spot width. The system will be capable of being sited in a conventional linac vault and provide intensity modulated rotational therapy. The status of the developmental new technologies that make the compact system possible will be reviewed. These include, high gradient vacuum insulators, solid dielectric materials, SiC photoconductive switches and compact proton sources. Applications of the DWA accelerator to problems in homeland security will also be discussed.

  7. Inverse dielectric response function for copper oxide superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A. C.; Kulshrestha, Ina

    1992-09-01

    We use a layered-electron-gas model to calculate the inverse electronic dielectric response functions for the normal state of copper oxide superconductors with one and two copper oxide layers per unit cell. Our calculation demonstrates that the low-energy electronic collective-excitation spectrum consists of both acoustic and optic plasmons. The acoustic plasmon modes are found to be well behaved only for certain restricted values of the wave vector and damping parameter. Our computed optical inverse dielectric response function exhibits one peak in the low-energy region and varies as βω2 for 0<=ω<=ωp. Here β is a material-dependent parameter and ωp is the position of the peak that corresponds to the intraband optic plasmon mode. Our calculated optical dielectric response functions show excellent agreement with the experimental results of Bozovic for 0<=ω<=ωp.

  8. Miniaturized Argon Plasma: Neutral Gas Characteristics in Dielectric Barrier Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashraf, Farahat

    2015-10-01

    Plasma-neutral gas dynamics is computationally investigated in a miniaturized microthruster that encloses Ar and contains dielectric material sandwiched between two metal plates using a two-dimensional plasma mode. Spatial and temporal plasma properties are investigated by solving the Poisson equation with the conservation equations of charged and excited neutral plasma species using the COMSOL Multiphysics 4.2b. The microthruster property is found to depend on the secondary electron emission coefficient. The electrohydrodynamic force (EHD) is calculated and found to be significant in the sheath area near the dielectric layer and is found to affect gas flow dynamics including the Ar excimer formation and density. The effects of pressure and secondary emission coefficient are discussed. The plasma characteristics are affected by small changes in the secondary electron emission coefficient, which could result from the dielectric erosion and aging, and is found to affect the electrohydrodynamic force produced when the microthruster is used to produce thrust for a small spacecraft.

  9. Non-destructive evaluation method employing dielectric electrostatic ultrasonic transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, Jr., John H. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An acoustic nonlinearity parameter (.beta.) measurement method and system for Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) of materials and structural members novelly employs a loosely mounted dielectric electrostatic ultrasonic transducer (DEUT) to receive and convert ultrasonic energy into an electrical signal which can be analyzed to determine the .beta. of the test material. The dielectric material is ferroelectric with a high dielectric constant .di-elect cons.. A computer-controlled measurement system coupled to the DEUT contains an excitation signal generator section and a measurement and analysis section. As a result, the DEUT measures the absolute particle displacement amplitudes in test material, leading to derivation of the nonlinearity parameter (.beta.) without the costly, low field reliability methods of the prior art.

  10. Temperature switchable polymer dielectrics.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Ross Stefan

    2010-08-01

    Materials with switchable states are desirable in many areas of science and technology. The ability to thermally transform a dielectric material to a conductive state should allow for the creation of electronics with built-in safety features. Specifically, the non-desirable build-up and discharge of electricity in the event of a fire or over-heating would be averted by utilizing thermo-switchable dielectrics in the capacitors of electrical devices (preventing the capacitors from charging at elevated temperatures). We have designed a series of polymers that effectively switch from a non-conductive to a conductive state. The thermal transition is governed by the stability of the leaving group after it leaves as a free entity. Here, we present the synthesis and characterization of a series of precursor polymers that eliminate to form poly(p-phenylene vinylene) (PPV's).

  11. Dielectric coated wire antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, J. H.; Newman, E. H.

    1976-01-01

    An electrically thin dielectric insulating shell on an antenna composed of electrically thin circular cylindrical wires is examined. A moment method solution is obtained, and the insulating shell is modeled by equivalent volume polarization currents. These polarization currents are related in a simple manner to the surface charge density on the wire antenna. In this way the insulating shell causes no new unknowns to be introduced, and the size of the impedance matrix is the same as for the uninsulated wires. The insulation is accounted for entirely through a modification of the symmetric impedance matrix. This modification influences the current distribution, impedance, efficiency, field patterns, and scattering properties. The theory is compared with measurement for dielectric coated antennas in air.

  12. Dielectric spectroscopy of polyaniline

    SciTech Connect

    Calleja, R.D.; Matveeva, E.M.

    1993-12-31

    Polyaniline films (PANI) are being considered as attractive new galvanic sources, electrochromic displays, chemical sensors, etc. So far much work has been done to study their optical, electrochemical and electrical properties. However, there are still doubts about the basic electric conductivity mechanisms of PANI. The aim of this paper is to study the influence of water molecules and acid anions on the properties of PANI films by dielectric spectroscopy.

  13. Short pulse photoemission from a dispenser cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeret, H.; Boussoukaya, M.; Chehab, R.; Leblond, B.; Le Duff, J.

    1991-03-01

    Pulsed photoemission in the picosecond regime has been obtained from a standard thermionic dispenser cathode (WBaCa) at temperatures below the measurable thermoemission threshold. A picosecond Nd : YAG mode locked laser has been used at both green and UV light. Micropulse charges up to 0.5 nC have been measured on a wideband coaxial pickup located behind the anode. They correspond to an electron saturation limit from an approximately 20 mm 2 illuminated cathode area with a surface field of 3 MV/m. The effective cathode efficiency at small laser energies, defined as the number of electrons impinging on the coaxial pickup divided by the number of photons impinging on the cathode, is about 2 × 10 -5.

  14. Ultra short pulse reconstruction software: GROG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galletti, M.; Galimberti, M.; Giulietti, D.; Curcio, A.

    2016-07-01

    A new algorithmic method based on the 1D Conjugate Gradient Minimization Method, is presented. The purpose is, analyzing experimental FROG/GRENOUILLE traces, to accurately retrieve intensity and phase both in temporal and spectral domain so as to completely characterize an Ultra Short High Power laser pulse. This algorithm shows important features in the reconstruction of many different pulse classes. The employment of this algorithm also permits the inclusion of material response function present in the FROG/GRENOUILLE set-up.

  15. Short pulse C-band Doppler scatterometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakelyan, Artashes K.; Hambaryan, Astghik K.; Smolin, Aleksander I.; Karyan, Vanik V.; Hovhannesyan, Gagik G.; Alaverdyan, Eduard R.; Arakelyan, Arsen A.; Hambaryan, Vardan K.

    2005-05-01

    In this paper C-band (~5.75GHz), dual polarization, Doppler scatterometer is developed, for short distance remote sensing of water surface microwave reflective and spectrum characteristics simultaneous and coincident measurements, under laboratory-control conditions. Developed system will be set on a mobile bogie moving on the height of 6.5m along a stationary platform of 32m of length. It will allow carry out polarimetric (vv, vh, hh, hv), simultaneous and coincident microwave active measurements of pool water surface parameters at angles of incidence from the while of 0-40o.

  16. Fiber Optic Solutions for Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R; Dawson, J; Liao, Z; Jovanovic, I; Wattellier, B; Payne, S; Barty, C P

    2003-01-29

    For applications requiring high beam quality radiation from efficient, compact and rugged sources, diffraction limited fiber lasers are ideal, and to date have been demonstrated at average CW power levels exceeding 100 W with near diffraction limited: output. For conventional single-core step-index single-mode fibers, this power level represents the sealing limit because of nonlinear and laser damage considerations. Higher average powers would exceed nonlinear process thresholds such as the Raman and stimulated Brillouin scattering limit, or else damage the fiber due to the high intensity level in the fiber's core. The obvious way to increase the average power capability of fibers is to increase the area of their core. Simply expanding the core dimensions of the fiber allows a straightforward power sealing due to enhanced nonlinear and power handling characteristics that scale directly with the core area. Femtosecond, chirped-pulse, fiber lasers with pulse energies greater than 1mJ have been demonstrated in the literature [2] using this technique. This output energy was still limited by the onset of stimulated Raman scattering. We have pursued an alternative and complimentary approach which is to reduce the intensity of light propagating in the core by distributing it more evenly across the core area via careful design of the refractive index profile [3]. We have also sought to address the primary issue that results from scaling the core. The enhanced power handling capability comes at the expense of beam quality, as increasing the core diameter in standard step index fibers permits multiple transverse modes to lase simultaneously. Although this problem of multimode operation can be mitigated to some extent by appropriately designing the fiber's waveguide structure, limitations such as bend radius loss, sensitivity to thermally induced perturbations of the waveguide structure, and refractive index control, all become more stringent as the core diameter grows, limiting the extent to which the core diameter can be grown and still ensure single mode operation from the fiber. The large flattened mode fiber addresses some of these limitations and enables a new approach to single transverse mode operation of large mode area (LMA) fibers, providing a route to high average powers exceeding 1 kW from a single aperture in a Strehi-ratio-optimizing fiat-topped output beam.

  17. Short pulse free electron laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Schlitt, Leland G.; Szoke, Abraham

    1985-01-01

    Method and apparatus for amplification of a laser pulse in a free electron laser amplifier where the laser pulse duration may be a small fraction of the electron beam pulse duration used for amplification. An electron beam pulse is passed through a first wiggler magnet and a short laser pulse to be amplified is passed through the same wiggler so that only the energy of the last fraction, f, (f<1) of the electron beam pulse is consumed in amplifying the laser pulse. After suitable delay of the electron beam, the process is repeated in a second wiggler magnet, a third, . . . , where substantially the same fraction f of the remainder of the electron beam pulse is consumed in amplification of the given short laser pulse in each wiggler magnet region until the useful electron beam energy is substantially completely consumed by amplification of the laser pulse.

  18. Low-k Dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Yoshihiro

    As CMOS transistors were scaled, interconnects to link them are also shrunk to reduce the line pitches [1-10]. As shown in Fig. 22.1, the interconnect pitches have been shrunk from 180 nm, 140 nm, and 100 nm for 65 [4], 45 [32], and 32 nm nodes [10] LSIs, respectively. To eliminate the interconnect parasitic capacitance, low-k dielectric films which have lower permittivity than the conventional silica (SiO2) dielectrics have been introduced. Figure 22.2 shows the technology trend of the k-value and the deposition process, in which the low-k films are deposited by spin-on-dielectric (SOD) method or plasma-enhanced CVD. In the case of SOD, precursor solution is poured on a rotated wafer, and the precursor film is heated to vaporize the solvent followed by reaction and densification to make a low-k film. In the case of PECVD [36, 42], on the other hand, precursor solution is vaporized with inert carrier gas such as He, and the precursor gas is introduced into PECVD chamber with RF power. The vaporized precursor gas is exited from plasma, depositing a low-k film on a wafer heated in high vacuum. The SOD method is advantageous to decrease the k-value, while PECVD method is superior in the adhesion strength due to the possibility of in-suite plasma surface treatment in vacuum just before the low-k deposition.

  19. Tunable Dielectric Properties of Ferrite-Dielectric Based Metamaterial

    PubMed Central

    Bi, K.; Huang, K.; Zeng, L. Y.; Zhou, M. H.; Wang, Q. M.; Wang, Y. G.; Lei, M.

    2015-01-01

    A ferrite-dielectric metamaterial composed of dielectric and ferrite cuboids has been investigated by experiments and simulations. By interacting with the electromagnetic wave, the Mie resonance can take place in the dielectric cuboids and the ferromagnetic precession will appear in the ferrite cuboids. The magnetic field distributions show the electric Mie resonance of the dielectric cuboids can be influenced by the ferromagnetic precession of ferrite cuboids when a certain magnetic field is applied. The effective permittivity of the metamaterial can be tuned by modifying the applied magnetic field. A good agreement between experimental and simulated results is demonstrated, which confirms that these metamaterials can be used for tunable microwave devices. PMID:25993433

  20. Tunable dielectric properties of ferrite-dielectric based metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Bi, K; Huang, K; Zeng, L Y; Zhou, M H; Wang, Q M; Wang, Y G; Lei, M

    2015-01-01

    A ferrite-dielectric metamaterial composed of dielectric and ferrite cuboids has been investigated by experiments and simulations. By interacting with the electromagnetic wave, the Mie resonance can take place in the dielectric cuboids and the ferromagnetic precession will appear in the ferrite cuboids. The magnetic field distributions show the electric Mie resonance of the dielectric cuboids can be influenced by the ferromagnetic precession of ferrite cuboids when a certain magnetic field is applied. The effective permittivity of the metamaterial can be tuned by modifying the applied magnetic field. A good agreement between experimental and simulated results is demonstrated, which confirms that these metamaterials can be used for tunable microwave devices. PMID:25993433

  1. New silicone dielectric elastomers with a high dielectric constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen; Liu, Liwu; Fan, Jiumin; Yu, Kai; Liu, Yanju; Shi, Liang; Leng, Jinsong

    2008-03-01

    Dielectric elastomers (Des) are a type of EAPs with unique electrical properties and mechanical properties: high actuation strains and stresses, fast response times, high efficiency, stability, reliability and durability. The excellent figures of merit possessed by dielectric elastomers make them the most performing materials which can be applied in many domains: biomimetics, aerospace, mechanics, medicals, etc. In this paper, we present a kind of electroactive polymer composites based on silicone Dielectric elastomers with a high dielectric constant. Novel high DEs could be realized by means of a composite approach. By filling an ordinary elastomer (e.g. silicone) with a component of functional ceramic filler having a greater dielectric permittivity, it is possible to obtain a resulting composite showing the fruitful combination of the matrix's advantageous elasticity and the filler's high permittivity. Here we add the ferroelectric relaxor ceramics (mainly BaTiO3) which has high dielectric constant (>3000) to the conventional silicone Dielectric elastomers, to get the dielectric elastomer which can exhibit high elastic energy densities induced by an electric field of about 15 MV/m. Tests of the physical and chemical properties of the dielectric elastomers are conducted, which verify our supposes and offer the experimental data supporting further researches.

  2. Two-photon excitation in scattering media by spatiotemporally shaped beams and their application in optogenetic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Bègue, Aurélien; Papagiakoumou, Eirini; Leshem, Ben; Conti, Rossella; Enke, Leona; Oron, Dan; Emiliani, Valentina

    2013-01-01

    The use of wavefront shaping to generate extended optical excitation patterns which are confined to a predetermined volume has become commonplace on various microscopy applications. For multiphoton excitation, three-dimensional confinement can be achieved by combining the technique of temporal focusing of ultra-short pulses with different approaches for lateral light shaping, including computer generated holography or generalized phase contrast. Here we present a theoretical and experimental study on the effect of scattering on the propagation of holographic beams with and without temporal focusing. Results from fixed and acute cortical slices show that temporally focused spatial patterns are extremely robust against the effects of scattering and this permits their three-dimensionally confined excitation for depths more than 500 µm. Finally we prove the efficiency of using temporally focused holographic beams in two-photon stimulation of neurons expressing the red-shifted optogenetic channel C1V1. PMID:24409387

  3. Experimental realisation of all-dielectric bianisotropic metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odit, Mikhail; Kapitanova, Polina; Belov, Pavel; Alaee, Rasoul; Rockstuhl, Carsten; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2016-05-01

    All-dielectric reciprocal metasurface based on bianisotropic scatterers operating at microwave frequencies is demonstrated experimentally. Experimental studies of a single bianisotropic particle supporting both electric and magnetic Mie-type resonances are performed, and reveal that the particle with a broken symmetry exhibits different back-scattering for the opposite excitation directions. A metasurface composed of the all-dielectric bianisotropic particles is fabricated and experimentally investigated in the frequency range of 4-9 GHz. The measured data demonstrate that the metasurface is characterized by different reflection phases when being excited from the opposite directions. At the frequency 6.8 GHz, the metasurface provides a 2π phase change in the reflection spectrum with the amplitude close to 1.

  4. Metal–Dielectric Waveguides for High Efficiency Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Liangfu; Zhang, Douguo; Wang, Ruxue; Wang, Pei; Ming, Hai; Badugu, Ramachandram; Du, Luping; Yuan, Xiaocong; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that Metal–Dielectric Waveguide structures (MDWs) with high efficiency of fluorescence coupling can be suitable as substrates for fluorescence imaging. This hybrid MDWs consists of a continuous metal film and a dielectric top layer. The optical modes sustaining inside this structure can be excited with a high numerical aperture (N.A) objective, and then focused into a virtual optical probe with high intensity, leading to efficient excitation of fluorophores deposited on top of the MDWs. The emitted fluorophores couple with the optical modes thus enabling the directional emission, which is verified by the back focal plane (BFP) imaging. These unique properties of MDWs have been adopted in a scanning laser confocal optical microscopy, and show the merit of high efficiency fluorescence imaging. MDWs can be easily fabricated by vapor deposition and/or spin coating, the silica surface of the MDWs is suitable for biomolecule tethering, and will offer new opportunities for cell biology and biophysics research. PMID:26525494

  5. Ultrafast excited-state proton transfer from dicyano-naphthol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmeli, I.; Huppert, D.; Tolbert, L. M.; Haubrich, J. E.

    1996-09-01

    The rate of proton transfer from electronically excited 5,8-dicyano-2-naphthol (DCN2) to the solvent is studied by time-resolved fluorescence. Unlike most naphthol derivatives, excited DCN2 is a strong acid ( pK ∗ 2≈ -4.5 ) and therefore is capable of transferring protons to alcohols and other moderate proton acceptor solvents. The rate constant of proton transfer, κd, at low temperatures (< 250 K) is slightly larger than the inverse dielectric relaxation time, 1/τ D and has the same activation energy of the dielectric relaxation. On the other hand, at temperatures above 250 K the temperature dependence of the proton transfer rate decreases monotonically with increasing temperature, while the dielectric relaxation activation energy maintains the low temperature value.

  6. Numerical study for electromagnetic wave emission from intrinsic Josephson junction stacks with a dielectric cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, T.; Matsumoto, H.; Ota, Y.; Machida, M.

    2013-08-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) wave emission from the intrinsic Josephson junction stacks (IJJ’s) covered with a thin dielectric medium is numerically investigated, using the multi-scale simulation method developed in our previous paper. It is shown that the power of emitted EM waves is considerably increased in the IJJ’s with a dielectric cover. The emission from the n = 2 resonance mode is greatly enhanced. The enhancement is caused by the excitation of a solitonic mode.

  7. Electron dynamics and plasma jet formation in a helium atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge jet

    SciTech Connect

    Algwari, Q. Th.; O'Connell, D.

    2011-09-19

    The excitation dynamics within the main plasma production region and the plasma jets of a kHz atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) jet operated in helium was investigated. Within the dielectric tube, the plasma ignites as a streamer-type discharge. Plasma jets are emitted from both the powered and grounded electrode end; their dynamics are compared and contrasted. Ignition of these jets are quite different; the jet emitted from the powered electrode is ignited with a slight time delay to plasma ignition inside the dielectric tube, while breakdown of the jet at the grounded electrode end is from charging of the dielectric and is therefore dependent on plasma production and transport within the dielectric tube. Present streamer theories can explain these dynamics.

  8. Polarization insensitive metamaterial absorber based on E-shaped all-dielectric structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liyang; Wang, Jun; Ma, Hua; Wang, Jiafu; Du, Hongliang; Qu, Shaobo

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we designed a metamaterial absorber performed in microwave frequency band. This absorber is composed of E-shaped dielectrics which are arranged along different directions. The E-shaped all-dielectric structure is made of microwave ceramics with high permittivity and low loss. Within about 1 GHz frequency band, more than 86% absorption efficiency was observed for this metamaterial absorber. This absorber is polarization insensitive and is stable for incident angles. It is figured out that the polarization insensitive absorption is caused by the nearly located varied resonant modes which are excited by the E-shaped all-dielectric resonators with the same size but in the different direction. The E-shaped dielectric absorber contains intensive resonant points. Our research work paves a way for designing all-dielectric absorber.

  9. Voltage-induced pinnacle response in the dynamics of dielectric elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Zhang, Junshi; Chen, Hualing; Li, Dichen

    2016-05-01

    A dielectric elastomer is capable of large deformation under alternating electromechanical excitation. In this paper, several dynamic properties of a dielectric elastomer are investigated, in particular the effect of strain stiffening. A theoretical model is established that shows that the bias voltage affects the amplitude and the response waveform during vibration, a curve with the shape of a pinnacle. We also describe the underlying physical mechanism by considering the molecular chain length and cross-linking density of the material. A phase portrait is presented that reveals the transitional behavior of the dielectric elastomer as it switches between soft and stiffened vibration states.

  10. Experimental demonstration of isotropic negative permeability in a three-dimensional dielectric composite.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qian; Kang, Lei; Du, B; Zhao, H; Xie, Q; Huang, X; Li, B; Zhou, J; Li, L

    2008-07-11

    Isotropic negative permeability resulting from Mie resonance is demonstrated in a three-dimensional (3D) dielectric composite consisting of an array of dielectric cubes. A strong subwavelength magnetic resonance, corresponding to the first Mie resonance, was excited in dielectric cubes by electromagnetic wave. Negative permeability is verified in the magnetic resonance area via microwave measurement and the dispersion properties. The resonance relies on the size and permittivity of the cubes. It is promising for construction of novel isotropic 3D left-handed materials with a simple structure. PMID:18764227

  11. Applications of dielectric barrier discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Falkenstein, Z.

    1998-12-31

    Dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) in oxygen and air are well established for the production of large quantities of ozone and are more recently being applied to a wider range of plasmachemical processes. Here, the application of DBDs for ozone synthesis, the non-thermal oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air, the generation of incoherent (V)UV radiation and surface processing (etching, ashing) is presented. The main plasmaphysical features of sinusoidally-driven DBDs (transient, filamented, non-thermal plasmas at atmospheric pressure) are described, and a simple plasmachemical reaction pathway for ozone synthesis are give. Experimental results on the degradation of VOCs (2-propanol, trichloroethylene, carbon tetrachloride), as well as byproduct formation is presented for stand-alone DBD treatment, as well as for simultaneous (V)UV illumination of the discharge. Illumination of the discharge with (V)UV can change the plasmachemistry by enhanced formation of certain species of radicals--and thereby change byproduct formation--but also can change the discharge physics, known as the Joshi effect. As an example for generation of excited dimers and exiplexes for the production of incoherent UV light, experimental results on a XeBr* excimer UV light source are presented. Effects of the total and partial pressure of a Xe/Br{sub 2} system, the gap spacing and the applied driving frequency on the UV radiant efficiency are shown. For the application of DBDs for surface processing, experimental results of photoresist ashing on Si wafers using DBDs in oxygen are shown function of gas pressure, gap spacing and applied frequency.

  12. Square dielectric THz waveguides.

    PubMed

    Aflakian, N; Yang, N; LaFave, T; Henderson, R M; O, K K; MacFarlane, D L

    2016-06-27

    A holey cladding dielectric waveguide with square cross section is designed, simulated, fabricated and characterized. The TOPAS waveguide is designed to be single mode across the broad frequency range of 180 GHz to 360 GHz as shown by finite-difference time domain simulation and to robustly support simultaneous TE and TM mode propagation. The square fiber geometry is realized by pulling through a heat distribution made square by appropriate furnace design. The transmitted mode profile is imaged using a vector network analyzer with a pinhole at the receiver module. Good agreement between the measured mode distribution and the calculated mode distribution is demonstrated. PMID:27410645

  13. Low Dielectric Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venumbaka, Sreenivasulu R.; Cassidy, Patrick E.

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes results obtained from research funded through Research Cooperative Agreement No. NCC-1-01033-"Low Dielectric Polymers" (from 5/10/01 through 5/09/02). Results are reported in three of the proposed research areas (Tasks 1-3 in the original proposal): (1) Repeat and confirm the preparation and properties of the new alkyl-substituted PEK, 6HC17-PEK, (2) Prepare and evaluate polymers derived from a highly fluorinated monomer, and (3) Prepare and evaluate new silicon and/or fluorine-containing polymers expected to retain useful properties at low temperature.

  14. THz Dielectric Properties of High Explosives Calculated by Density Functional Theory for the Design of Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabaev, A.; Lambrakos, S. G.; Bernstein, N.; Jacobs, V.; Finkenstadt, D.

    2011-12-01

    The current need for better detection of explosive devices has imposed a new necessity for determining the dielectric response properties of energetic materials with respect to electromagnetic wave excitation. Among the range of different frequencies for electromagnetic excitation, the THz frequency range is of particular interest because of its nondestructive nature and ability to penetrate materials that are characteristic of clothing. Typically, the dielectric response properties for electromagnetic wave excitation at THz frequencies, as well as at other frequencies, are determined by means of experimental measurements. The present study, however, emphasizes that density functional theory (DFT), and associated software technology, is sufficiently mature for the determination of dielectric response functions, and actually provides complementary information to that obtained from experiment. In particular, these dielectric response functions provide quantitative initial estimates of spectral response features that can be adjusted with respect to additional information such as laboratory measurements and other types of theory-based calculations, as well as providing for the molecular level interpretation of response structure. This point is demonstrated in the present study by calculations of ground-state resonance structure associated with the high explosives RDX, TNT1, and TNT2 using DFT, which is for the construction of parameterized dielectric response functions for excitation by electromagnetic waves at frequencies within the THz range. The DFT software NRLMOL was used for the calculations of ground-state resonance structure presented here.

  15. Boron nitride as two dimensional dielectric: Reliability and dielectric breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yanfeng; Pan, Chengbin; Zhang, Meiyun; Long, Shibing; Lian, Xiaojuan; Miao, Feng; Hui, Fei; Shi, Yuanyuan; Larcher, Luca; Wu, Ernest; Lanza, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Boron Nitride (BN) is a two dimensional insulator with excellent chemical, thermal, mechanical, and optical properties, which make it especially attractive for logic device applications. Nevertheless, its insulating properties and reliability as a dielectric material have never been analyzed in-depth. Here, we present the first thorough characterization of BN as dielectric film using nanoscale and device level experiments complementing with theoretical study. Our results reveal that BN is extremely stable against voltage stress, and it does not show the reliability problems related to conventional dielectrics like HfO2, such as charge trapping and detrapping, stress induced leakage current, and untimely dielectric breakdown. Moreover, we observe a unique layer-by-layer dielectric breakdown, both at the nanoscale and device level. These findings may be of interest for many materials scientists and could open a new pathway towards two dimensional logic device applications.

  16. SLAB symmetric dielectric micron scale structures for high gradient electron acceleration.

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, J. B.; Schoessow, P. V.

    1999-06-12

    A class of planar microstructure is proposed which provide high accelerating gradients when excited by an infrared laser pulse. These structures consist of parallel dielectric slabs separated by a vacuum gap; the dielectric or the outer surface coating are spatially modulated at the laser wavelength along the beam direction so as to support a standing wave accelerating field. We have developed numerical and analytic models of the accelerating mode fields in the structure. We show an optimized coupling scheme such that this mode is excited resonantly with a large quality factor. The status of planned experiments on fabricating and measuring these planar structures will be described.

  17. Voltage sensor and dielectric material

    DOEpatents

    Yakymyshyn, Christopher Paul; Yakymyshyn, Pamela Jane; Brubaker, Michael Allen

    2006-10-17

    A voltage sensor is described that consists of an arrangement of impedance elements. The sensor is optimized to provide an output ratio that is substantially immune to changes in voltage, temperature variations or aging. Also disclosed is a material with a large and stable dielectric constant. The dielectric constant can be tailored to vary with position or direction in the material.

  18. Microwave Propagation in Dielectric Fluids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lonc, W. P.

    1980-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate experiment designed to verify quantitatively the effect of a dielectric fluid's dielectric constant on the observed wavelength of microwave radiation propagating through the fluid. The fluid used is castor oil, and results agree with the expected behavior within 5 percent. (Author/CS)

  19. Ferroelectric-dielectric tunable composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Vladimir O.; Tagantsev, Alexander K.; Setter, Nava; Iddles, David; Price, Tim

    2006-04-01

    The dielectric response of ferroelectric-dielectric composites is theoretically addressed. Dielectric permittivity, tunability (relative change of the permittivity driven by dc electric field), and loss tangent are evaluated for various composite models. The analytical results for small dielectric concentration and relative tunability are obtained in terms of the traditional electrostatic consideration. The results for large tunability are obtained numerically. A method is proposed for the evaluation of the tunability and loss at large concentrations of the dielectric. The basic idea of the method is to reformulate the effective medium approach in terms of electrical energies stored and dissipated in the composite. The important practical conclusion of the paper is that, for random ferroelectric-dielectric composite, the addition of small amounts of a linear dielectric into the tunable ferroelectric results in an increase of the tunability of the mixture. The loss tangent of such composites is shown to be virtually unaffected by the addition of moderate amounts of the low-loss dielectric. The experimental data for (Ba,Sr)TiO3 based composites are analyzed in terms of the theory developed and shown to be in a reasonable agreement with the theoretical results.

  20. Degradation Of Reflectors And Dielectrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, Frank L.; Cuddihy, Edward F.; Maag, Carl R., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Report describes important degrading effects of atmosphere and outer-space environments on reflective surfaces and dielectrics. For reflective surfaces, terrestrial effects include soiling on glass surfaces and changing with time. Space effects include ultraviolet enhancement of contamination and possible surface erosion due to solar radiation, impact of debris, and interactions with atomic oxygen. Dielectrics similarly affected in both environments.

  1. Low dielectric polyimide fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorogy, William E., Jr. (Inventor); St.clair, Anne K. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A high temperature resistant polyimide fiber that has a dielectric constant of less than 3 is presented. The fiber was prepared by first reacting 2,2-bis (4-(4aminophenoxy)phenyl) hexafluoropropane with 2,2-bis (3,4-dicarboxyphenyl) hexafluoropropane dianhydride in an aprotic solvent to form a polyamic acid resin solution. The polyamic acid resin solution is then extruded into a coagulation medium to form polyamic acid fibers. The fibers are thermally cured to their polyimide form. Alternatively, 2,2-bis(4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl) hexafluoropropane is reacted with 2,2-bis(3,4-dicarboxyphenyl) hexafluoropropane dianhydride to form a polyamic acid, and the polyamic acid is chemically converted to its polyimide form. The polyimide is then dissolved in a solvent to form a polyimide resin solution, and the polyimide resin is extruded into a coagulation medium to form a polyimide wet gel filament. In order to obtain polyimide fibers of increased tensile properties, the polyimide wet gel filaments are stretched at elevated temperatures. The tensile properties of the fibers were measured and found to be in the range of standard textile fibers. Polyimide fibers obtained by either method will have a dielectric constant similar to that of the corresponding polymer, viz., less than 3 at 10 GHz.

  2. Plasmonics without negative dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Giovampaola, Cristian; Engheta, Nader

    2016-05-01

    Plasmonic phenomena are exhibited in light-matter interaction involving materials whose real parts of permittivity functions attain negative values at operating wavelengths. However, such materials usually suffer from dissipative losses, thus limiting the performance of plasmon-based optical devices. Here, we utilize an alternative methodology that mimics a variety of plasmonic phenomena by exploiting the well-known structural dispersion of electromagnetic modes in bounded guided-wave structures filled with only materials with positive permittivity. A key issue in the design of such structures is prevention of mode coupling, which can be achieved by implementing thin metallic wires at proper interfaces. This method, which is more suitable for lower frequencies, allows designers to employ conventional dielectrics and highly conductive metals for which the loss is low at these frequencies, while achieving plasmonic features. We demonstrate, numerically and analytically, that this platform can provide surface plasmon polaritons, local plasmonic resonance, plasmonic cloaking, and epsilon-near-zero-based tunneling using conventional positive-dielectric materials.

  3. Dielectric laser accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    England, R. Joel; Noble, Robert J.; Bane, Karl; Dowell, David H.; Ng, Cho-Kuen; Spencer, James E.; Tantawi, Sami; Wu, Ziran; Byer, Robert L.; Peralta, Edgar; Soong, Ken; Chang, Chia-Ming; Montazeri, Behnam; Wolf, Stephen J.; Cowan, Benjamin; Dawson, Jay; Gai, Wei; Hommelhoff, Peter; Huang, Yen-Chieh; Jing, Chunguang; McGuinness, Christopher; Palmer, Robert B.; Naranjo, Brian; Rosenzweig, James; Travish, Gil; Mizrahi, Amit; Schachter, Levi; Sears, Christopher; Werner, Gregory R.; Yoder, Rodney B.

    2014-10-01

    The use of infrared lasers to power optical-scale lithographically fabricated particle accelerators is a developing area of research that has garnered increasing interest in recent years. The physics and technology of this approach is reviewed, which is referred to as dielectric laser acceleration (DLA). In the DLA scheme operating at typical laser pulse lengths of 0.1 to 1 ps, the laser damage fluences for robust dielectric materials correspond to peak surface electric fields in the GV /m regime. The corresponding accelerating field enhancement represents a potential reduction in active length of the accelerator between 1 and 2 orders of magnitude. Power sources for DLA-based accelerators (lasers) are less costly than microwave sources (klystrons) for equivalent average power levels due to wider availability and private sector investment. Because of the high laser-to-particle coupling efficiency, required pulse energies are consistent with tabletop microJoule class lasers. Combined with the very high (MHz) repetition rates these lasers can provide, the DLA approach appears promising for a variety of applications, including future high-energy physics colliders, compact light sources, and portable medical scanners and radiative therapy machines.

  4. Dielectric Actuation of Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xiaofan

    Dielectric polymers are widely used in a plurality of applications, such as electrical insulation, dielectric capacitors, and electromechanical actuators. Dielectric polymers with large strain deformations under an electric field are named dielectric elastomers (DE), because of their relative low modulus, high elongation at break, and outstanding resilience. Dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA) are superior to traditional transducers as a muscle-like technology: large strains, high energy densities, high coupling efficiency, quiet operation, and light weight. One focus of this dissertation is on the design of DE materials with high performance and easy processing. UV radiation curing of reactive species is studied as a generic synthesis methodology to provide a platform for material scientists to customize their own DE materials. Oligomers/monomers, crosslinkers, and other additives are mixed and cured at appropriate ratios to control the stress-strain response, suppress electromechanical instability of the resulting polymers, and provide stable actuation strains larger than 100% and energy densities higher than 1 J/g. The processing is largely simplified in the new material system by removal of the prestretching step. Multilayer stack actuators with 11% linear strain are demonstrated in a procedure fully compatible with industrial production. A multifunctional DE derivative material, bistable electroactive polymer (BSEP), is invented enabling repeatable rigid-to-rigid deformation without bulky external structures. Bistable actuation allows the polymer actuator to have two distinct states that can support external load without device failure. Plasticizers are used to lower the glass transition temperature to 45 °C. Interpenetrating polymer network structure is established inside the BSEP to suppress electromechanical instability, providing a breakdown field of 194 MV/m and a stable bistable strain as large as 228% with a 97% strain fixity. The application of BSEP

  5. Combined dielectric and plasmon resonance for giant enhancement of Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukushkin, V. I.; Grishina, Ya. V.; Egorov, S. V.; Solov'ev, V. V.; Kukushkin, I. V.

    2016-04-01

    Combined dielectric/metal resonators for colossal enhancement of inelastic light scattering are developed and their properties are investigated. It is shown that a record enhancement factor of 2 × 108 can be obtained using these structures. The dielectric resonators are fabricated on Si/SiO2 substrates where periodic arrays of square 10- to 200-nm-high dielectric pillars are produced via electron-beam lithography and plasma etching. The lateral size a of the pillars varies between 50 and 1500 nm, and their period in the array is 2 a. To make a combined dielectric/metal resonator, a nanostructured layer of silver is deposited onto the fabricated periodic dielectric structure by thermal evaporation. It is established that, for a fixed height of the dielectric pillars, the Raman scattering enhancement factor experiences pronounced oscillations as a function of the period (and size) of the pillars. It is shown that these oscillations are determined by the modes of the dielectric resonator and governed by the relation between the excitation laser wavelength and the planar size of the dielectric pillars.

  6. Nanoscale Mapping of Dielectric Properties of Nanomaterials from Kilohertz to Megahertz Using Ultrasmall Cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Cadena, Maria J; Sung, Seung Hyun; Boudouris, Bryan W; Reifenberger, Ronald; Raman, Arvind

    2016-04-26

    Electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) is often used for nanoscale dielectric spectroscopy, the measurement of local dielectric properties of materials as a function of frequency. However, the frequency range of atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based dielectric spectroscopy has been limited to a few kilohertz by the resonance frequency and noise of soft microcantilevers used for this purpose. Here, we boost the frequency range of local dielectric spectroscopy by 3 orders of magnitude from a few kilohertz to a few megahertz by developing a technique that exploits the high resonance frequency and low thermal noise of ultrasmall cantilevers (USCs). We map the frequency response of the real and imaginary components of the capacitance gradient (∂C(ω)/∂z) by using second-harmonic EFM and a theoretical model, which relates cantilever dynamics to the complex dielectric constant. We demonstrate the method by mapping the nanoscale dielectric spectrum of polymer-based materials for organic electronic devices. Beyond offering a powerful extension to AFM-based dielectric spectroscopy, the approach also allows the identification of electrostatic excitation frequencies which affords high dielectric contrast on nanomaterials. PMID:26972782

  7. Nonradiating anapole modes in dielectric nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miroshnichenko, Andrey E.; Evlyukhin, Andrey B.; Yu, Ye Feng; Bakker, Reuben M.; Chipouline, Arkadi; Kuznetsov, Arseniy I.; Luk'yanchuk, Boris; Chichkov, Boris N.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2015-08-01

    Nonradiating current configurations attract attention of physicists for many years as possible models of stable atoms. One intriguing example of such a nonradiating source is known as `anapole'. An anapole mode can be viewed as a composition of electric and toroidal dipole moments, resulting in destructive interference of the radiation fields due to similarity of their far-field scattering patterns. Here we demonstrate experimentally that dielectric nanoparticles can exhibit a radiationless anapole mode in visible. We achieve the spectral overlap of the toroidal and electric dipole modes through a geometry tuning, and observe a highly pronounced dip in the far-field scattering accompanied by the specific near-field distribution associated with the anapole mode. The anapole physics provides a unique playground for the study of electromagnetic properties of nontrivial excitations of complex fields, reciprocity violation and Aharonov-Bohm like phenomena at optical frequencies.

  8. Generalized Brewster effect in dielectric metasurfaces

    PubMed Central

    Paniagua-Domínguez, Ramón; Yu, Ye Feng; Miroshnichenko, Andrey E.; Krivitsky, Leonid A.; Fu, Yuan Hsing; Valuckas, Vytautas; Gonzaga, Leonard; Toh, Yeow Teck; Kay, Anthony Yew Seng; Luk'yanchuk, Boris; Kuznetsov, Arseniy I.

    2016-01-01

    Polarization is a key property defining the state of light. It was discovered by Brewster, while studying light reflected from materials at different angles. This led to the first polarizers, based on Brewster's effect. Now, one of the trends in photonics is the study of miniaturized devices exhibiting similar, or improved, functionalities compared with bulk optical elements. In this work, it is theoretically predicted that a properly designed all-dielectric metasurface exhibits a generalized Brewster's effect potentially for any angle, wavelength and polarization of choice. The effect is experimentally demonstrated for an array of silicon nanodisks at visible wavelengths. The underlying physics is related to the suppressed scattering at certain angles due to the interference between the electric and magnetic dipole resonances excited in the nanoparticles. These findings open doors for Brewster phenomenon to new applications in photonics, which are not bonded to a specific polarization or angle of incidence. PMID:26783075

  9. Nonradiating anapole modes in dielectric nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Miroshnichenko, Andrey E.; Evlyukhin, Andrey B.; Yu, Ye Feng; Bakker, Reuben M.; Chipouline, Arkadi; Kuznetsov, Arseniy I.; Luk'yanchuk, Boris; Chichkov, Boris N.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2015-01-01

    Nonradiating current configurations attract attention of physicists for many years as possible models of stable atoms. One intriguing example of such a nonradiating source is known as ‘anapole'. An anapole mode can be viewed as a composition of electric and toroidal dipole moments, resulting in destructive interference of the radiation fields due to similarity of their far-field scattering patterns. Here we demonstrate experimentally that dielectric nanoparticles can exhibit a radiationless anapole mode in visible. We achieve the spectral overlap of the toroidal and electric dipole modes through a geometry tuning, and observe a highly pronounced dip in the far-field scattering accompanied by the specific near-field distribution associated with the anapole mode. The anapole physics provides a unique playground for the study of electromagnetic properties of nontrivial excitations of complex fields, reciprocity violation and Aharonov–Bohm like phenomena at optical frequencies. PMID:26311109

  10. Generalized Brewster effect in dielectric metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Paniagua-Domínguez, Ramón; Yu, Ye Feng; Miroshnichenko, Andrey E; Krivitsky, Leonid A; Fu, Yuan Hsing; Valuckas, Vytautas; Gonzaga, Leonard; Toh, Yeow Teck; Kay, Anthony Yew Seng; Luk'yanchuk, Boris; Kuznetsov, Arseniy I

    2016-01-01

    Polarization is a key property defining the state of light. It was discovered by Brewster, while studying light reflected from materials at different angles. This led to the first polarizers, based on Brewster's effect. Now, one of the trends in photonics is the study of miniaturized devices exhibiting similar, or improved, functionalities compared with bulk optical elements. In this work, it is theoretically predicted that a properly designed all-dielectric metasurface exhibits a generalized Brewster's effect potentially for any angle, wavelength and polarization of choice. The effect is experimentally demonstrated for an array of silicon nanodisks at visible wavelengths. The underlying physics is related to the suppressed scattering at certain angles due to the interference between the electric and magnetic dipole resonances excited in the nanoparticles. These findings open doors for Brewster phenomenon to new applications in photonics, which are not bonded to a specific polarization or angle of incidence. PMID:26783075

  11. Nonradiating anapole modes in dielectric nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Miroshnichenko, Andrey E; Evlyukhin, Andrey B; Yu, Ye Feng; Bakker, Reuben M; Chipouline, Arkadi; Kuznetsov, Arseniy I; Luk'yanchuk, Boris; Chichkov, Boris N; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2015-01-01

    Nonradiating current configurations attract attention of physicists for many years as possible models of stable atoms. One intriguing example of such a nonradiating source is known as 'anapole'. An anapole mode can be viewed as a composition of electric and toroidal dipole moments, resulting in destructive interference of the radiation fields due to similarity of their far-field scattering patterns. Here we demonstrate experimentally that dielectric nanoparticles can exhibit a radiationless anapole mode in visible. We achieve the spectral overlap of the toroidal and electric dipole modes through a geometry tuning, and observe a highly pronounced dip in the far-field scattering accompanied by the specific near-field distribution associated with the anapole mode. The anapole physics provides a unique playground for the study of electromagnetic properties of nontrivial excitations of complex fields, reciprocity violation and Aharonov-Bohm like phenomena at optical frequencies. PMID:26311109

  12. Dielectric sensors based on electromagnetic energy tunneling.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Omar; Kashanianfard, Mani; Ramahi, Omar

    2015-01-01

    We show that metallic wires embedded in narrow waveguide bends and channels demonstrate resonance behavior at specific frequencies. The electromagnetic energy at these resonances tunnels through the narrow waveguide channels with almost no propagation losses. Under the tunneling behavior, high-intensity electromagnetic fields are produced in the vicinity of the metallic wires. These intense field resonances can be exploited to build highly sensitive dielectric sensors. The sensor operation is explained with the help of full-wave simulations. A practical setup consisting of a 3D waveguide bend is presented to experimentally observe the tunneling phenomenon. The tunneling frequency is predicted by determining the input impedance minima through a variational formula based on the Green function of a probe-excited parallel plate waveguide. PMID:25835188

  13. Dielectric Sensors Based on Electromagnetic Energy Tunneling

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Omar; Kashanianfard, Mani; Ramahi, Omar

    2015-01-01

    We show that metallic wires embedded in narrow waveguide bends and channels demonstrate resonance behavior at specific frequencies. The electromagnetic energy at these resonances tunnels through the narrow waveguide channels with almost no propagation losses. Under the tunneling behavior, high-intensity electromagnetic fields are produced in the vicinity of the metallic wires. These intense field resonances can be exploited to build highly sensitive dielectric sensors. The sensor operation is explained with the help of full-wave simulations. A practical setup consisting of a 3D waveguide bend is presented to experimentally observe the tunneling phenomenon. The tunneling frequency is predicted by determining the input impedance minima through a variational formula based on the Green function of a probe-excited parallel plate waveguide. PMID:25835188

  14. Dielectric relaxation of CdO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Ramna; Dutta, Alo; Das, Sayantani; Kumar, Akhilesh; Sinha, T. P.

    2016-02-01

    Nanoparticles of cadmium oxide have been synthesized by soft chemical route using thioglycerol as the capping agent. The crystallite size is determined by X-ray diffraction technique and the particle size is obtained by transmission electron microscope. The band gap of the material is obtained using Tauc relation to UV-visible absorption spectrum. The photoluminescence emission spectra of the sample are measured at various excitation wavelengths. The molecular components in the material have been analyzed by FT-IR spectroscopy. The dielectric dispersion of the material is investigated in the temperature range from 313 to 393 K and in the frequency range from 100 Hz to 1 MHz by impedance spectroscopy. The Cole-Cole model is used to describe the dielectric relaxation of the system. The scaling behavior of imaginary part of impedance shows that the relaxation describes the same mechanism at various temperatures. The frequency-dependent electrical data are also analyzed in the framework of conductivity and electrical modulus formalisms. The frequency-dependent conductivity spectra are found to obey the power law.

  15. Designing dielectric resonators on substrates: combining magnetic and electric resonances.

    PubMed

    van de Groep, J; Polman, A

    2013-11-01

    High-performance integrated optics, solar cells, and sensors require nanoscale optical components at the surface of the device, in order to manipulate, redirect and concentrate light. High-index dielectric resonators provide the possibility to do this efficiently with low absorption losses. The resonances supported by dielectric resonators are both magnetic and electric in nature. Combined scattering from these two can be used for directional scattering. Most applications require strong coupling between the particles and the substrate in order to enhance the absorption in the substrate. However, the coupling with the substrate strongly influences the resonant behavior of the particles. Here, we systematically study the influence of particle geometry and dielectric environment on the resonant behavior of dielectric resonators in the visible to near-IR spectral range. We show the key role of retardation in the excitation of the magnetic dipole (MD) mode, as well as the limit where no MD mode is supported. Furthermore, we study the influence of particle diameter, shape and substrate index on the spectral position, width and overlap of the electric dipole (ED) and MD modes. Also, we show that the ED and MD mode can selectively be enhanced or suppressed using multi-layer substrates. And, by comparing dipole excitation and plane wave excitation, we study the influence of driving field on the scattering properties. Finally, we show that the directional radiation profiles of the ED and MD modes in resonators on a substrate are similar to those of point-dipoles close to a substrate. Altogether, this work is a guideline how to tune magnetic and electric resonances for specific applications. PMID:24216852

  16. Design and simulation of a hybrid dielectric waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryal, Krishna Prasad

    Waveguides, in general are used as a means to route photons. Traditional dielectric waveguides, composed of a high index core surrounded by a low index cladding, produce maximum field intensities far from dielectric interfaces. This thesis presents the design of a plasmonic enhanced waveguide, which relocates the maximum optical field intensity from the center of the waveguide to an interfacial region defined by a dielectric and a negative index material. This is accomplished through the use of a metal film, positioned on top of a traditional ridge waveguide in those places where one wishes to excite a plasmon mode as opposed to the more traditional dielectric mode. Plasmon modes have their highest field intensity at the interface located between the metal and the dielectric. In this thesis, the waveguide dimensions of a hybrid dielectric waveguide are determined with the intent of producing single mode operation for a ridge waveguide with and without metal on top. A commercial Eigen mode solver (MODE Lumerical) is used to obtain all field profiles, waveguide effective index and waveguide loss. Multiple simulations were used to design a waveguide, which supports a single plasmonic mode when the metal film is in place and a single dielectric mode when the metal film is absent. Such a waveguide is expected to find use in the field of integrated quantum optics where quantum dots, defined by near surface confining potentials, require high interfacial fields for maximum dot/field interactions. Further, based on the final waveguide design height of ( 5microm ) and width of ( 7.9microm ), an effective index of ( 3.687 ) results when operated in the plasmon mode and (3.619) when operated in dielectric mode. This change in refractive index suggests such hybrid dielectric/plasmon waveguides can be used for the design of Bragg reflectors leading to plasmonic cavities, which, when coupled to the proposed near surface located quantum dots, can be used for the production and

  17. Dielectric permittivity of suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Sushko, M. Ya.

    2007-08-15

    A strict macroscopic analysis of the limiting long-wavelength permittivity of a model suspension is presented in which the suspension is considered as a finely dispersed system consisting of isotropic dielectric balls with piecewise-continuous radial permittivity profile. The analysis is performed within the framework of the notion of compact groups of inhomogeneities and the procedure of field averaging over volumes significantly exceeding the scale of these groups. The indicated value is described by the Lorentz-Lorenz formula. The effective polarizability of balls in the suspension is reconstructed from their parameters and the parameters of the medium by means of integration. The result is valid for any concentration of the balls at which the suspension remains macroscopically homogeneous and isotropic with respect to the field and for an arbitrary difference between the ball and medium permittivities.

  18. Multilayer optical dielectric coating

    DOEpatents

    Emmett, John L.

    1990-01-01

    A highly damage resistant, multilayer, optical reflective coating includes alternating layers of doped and undoped dielectric material. The doping levels are low enough that there are no distinct interfaces between the doped and undoped layers so that the coating has properties nearly identical to the undoped material. The coating is fabricated at high temperature with plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques to eliminate defects, reduce energy-absorption sites, and maintain proper chemical stoichiometry. A number of differently-doped layer pairs, each layer having a thickness equal to one-quarter of a predetermined wavelength in the material are combined to form a narrowband reflective coating for a predetermined wavelength. Broadband reflectors are made by using a number of narrowband reflectors, each covering a portion of the broadband.

  19. Dielectric Property Measurements to Support Interpretation of Cassini Radar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson, Corey; Barmatz, M.

    2012-10-01

    Radar observations are useful for constraining surface and near-surface compositions and illuminating geologic processes on Solar System bodies. The interpretation of Cassini radiometric and radar data at 13.78 GHz (2.2 cm) of Titan and other Saturnian icy satellites is aided by laboratory measurements of the dielectric properties of relevant materials. However, existing dielectric measurements of candidate surface materials at microwave frequencies and low temperatures is sparse. We have set up a microwave cavity and cryogenic system to measure the complex dielectric properties of liquid hydrocarbons relevant to Titan, specifically methane, ethane and their mixtures to support the interpretation of spacecraft instrument and telescope radar observations. To perform these measurements, we excite and detect the TM020 mode in a custom-built cavity with small metal loop antennas powered by a Vector Network Analyzer. The hydrocarbon samples are condensed into a cylindrical quartz tube that is axially oriented in the cavity. Frequency sweeps through a resonance are performed with an empty cavity, an empty quartz tube inserted into the cavity, and with a sample-filled quartz tube in the cavity. These sweeps are fit by a Lorentzian line shape, from which we obtain the resonant frequency, f, and quality factor, Q, for each experimental arrangement. We then derive dielectric constants and loss tangents for our samples near 13.78 GHz using a new technique ideally suited for measuring liquid samples. We will present temperature-dependent, dielectric property measurements for liquid methane and ethane. The full interpretation of the radar and radiometry observations of Saturn’s icy satellites depends critically on understanding the dielectric properties of potential surface materials. By investigating relevant liquids and solids we will improve constrains on lake depths, volumes and compositions, which are important to understand Titan’s carbon/organic cycle and inevitably

  20. Higher order mode of a microstripline fed cylindrical dielectric resonator antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A. V. Praveen

    2016-03-01

    A microstrip transmission line can be used to excite the broadside radiating mode of a cylindrical dielectric resonator antenna (CDRA). The same is found to excite considerably well a higher order mode (HOM) as well. However unlike the broadside mode, the higher order mode gives distorted radiation pattern which makes this mode less useful for practical applications. The cause of distortion in the HOM radiation and the dependence of HOM coupling on the microstrip feed line are explored using HFSS simulations.

  1. Metal-Multilayer-Dielectric Structure for Enhancement of s- and p-Polarized Evanescent Waves.

    PubMed

    Ilchenko, Svitlana G; Lymarenko, Ruslan A; Taranenko, Victor B

    2016-12-01

    We propose a structure based on combination of multilayer stack of dielectric films and thin metal layer for excitation and enhancement of both s- and p-polarized evanescent waves. It is shown that two different mechanisms of evanescent wave excitation may occur at the same angle of light beam incidence on the structure. Application for evanescent wave polarization holographic recording with the help of this structure is discussed. PMID:26831680

  2. Pulsed Excitation Dynamics of an Optomechanical Crystal Resonator near Its Quantum Ground State of Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meenehan, Seán M.; Cohen, Justin D.; MacCabe, Gregory S.; Marsili, Francesco; Shaw, Matthew D.; Painter, Oskar

    2015-10-01

    Using pulsed optical excitation and read-out along with single-phonon-counting techniques, we measure the transient backaction, heating, and damping dynamics of a nanoscale silicon optomechanical crystal cavity mounted in a dilution refrigerator at a base temperature of Tf≈11 mK . In addition to observing a slow (approximately 740-ns) turn-on time for the optical-absorption-induced hot-phonon bath, we measure for the 5.6-GHz "breathing" acoustic mode of the cavity an initial phonon occupancy as low as ⟨n ⟩=0.021 ±0.007 (mode temperature Tmin≈70 mK ) and an intrinsic mechanical decay rate of γ0=328 ±14 Hz (Qm≈1.7 ×107). These measurements demonstrate the feasibility of using short pulsed measurements for a variety of quantum optomechanical applications despite the presence of steady-state optical heating.

  3. Dielectric properties of marsh vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochetkova, Tatiana D.; Suslyaev, Valentin I.; Shcheglova, Anna S.

    2015-10-01

    The present work is devoted to the measurement of the dielectric properties of mosses and lichens in the frequency range from 500 MHz to 18 GHz. Subjects of this research were three species of march vegetation - moss (Dicranum polysetum Michx), groundcedar (Diphasiastrum complanatum (L.) Holub) and lichen (Cladonia stellaris). Samples of vegetation were collected in Tomsk region, Western Siberia, Russia. Complex dielectric permittivity was measured in coaxial section by Agilent Technologies vector network analyzer E8363B. Green samples was measured for some moisture contents from 100% to 3-5 % during a natural drying. The measurements were performed at room temperature, which remained within 21 ÷ 23 ° C. The frequency dependence of the dielectric constant for the three species of marsh vegetation differ markedly. Different parts of the complex permittivity dependency on moisture were fitted by line for all frequency points. Two break point were observed corresponding to the transition of water in the vegetation in various phase states. The complex permittivity spectra of water in the vegetation allow determining the most likely corresponding dielectric model of water in the vegetation by the method of hypothesis testing. It is the Debye's model. Parameters of Debye's model were obtained by numerical methods for all of three states of water. This enables to calculate the dielectric constant of water at any frequency range from 500 MHz to 18 GHz and to find the parameters of the dielectric model of the vegetation.

  4. Demonstration of the enhanced Purcell factor in all-dielectric structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnok, Alexander; Glybovski, Stanislav; Petrov, Mihail; Makarov, Sergey; Savelev, Roman; Belov, Pavel; Simovski, Constantin; Kivshar, Yuri

    2016-05-01

    The Purcell effect is usually described as a modification of the spontaneous decay rate in the presence of a resonator. In plasmonics, this effect is commonly associated with a large local-field enhancement in "hot spots" due to the excitation of surface plasmons. However, high-index dielectric nanostructures, which become the basis of all-dielectric nanophotonics, cannot provide high values of the local-field enhancement due to larger radiation losses. Here, we demonstrate how to achieve a strong Purcell effect in all-dielectric nanostructures, and show theoretically that the Purcell factor can be increased by two orders of magnitude in a finite chain of silicon nanoparticles. Using the eigenmode analysis for an infinite chain, we demonstrate that the high Purcell factor regime is associated with a Van Hove singularity. We perform a proof-of-concept experiment for microwave frequencies and observe the 65-fold enhancement of the Purcell factor in a chain of 10 dielectric particles.

  5. Two-level system dynamics in amorphous dielectrics probed with a dc electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Moe; Gladchenko, Sergiy; Stoutimore, M. J. A.; Wellstood, F. C.; Osborn, K. D.

    2012-02-01

    We report loss in a thin-film dc electric-field tunable LC resonator built with superconducting aluminum and silicon nitride dielectric. To measure the loss we continually apply microwave power on resonance and monitor the transmitted power. At milli-Kelvin temperatures, loss is limited by two-level systems in the dielectric which are saturated with high microwave excitation power. Measurements show that a sudden change of applied dc field causes the dielectric loss to increase to the intrinsic low power loss tangent of the dielectric. We study the subsequent relaxation of the loss tangent caused by two-level system saturation and interactions. We discuss how this arises from the dynamics of a distribution of two-level system defects and compare it with new theoretical work on interacting two-level systems.

  6. A THz Coaxial Two-Channel Dielectric Wakefield Structure for High Gradient Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, T. C.; Sotnikov, G. V.; Hirshfield, J. L.

    2010-11-04

    A coaxial two-channel dielectric wakefield structure is examined for use as a high gradient accelerator. A THz design, having radius {approx}1 mm, is shown to provide GeV/m--level acceleration gradient, high transformer ratio, and stable accelerated bunch motion when excited by a stable-moving 5-GeV 6-nC annular drive bunch.

  7. A THz Coaxial Two-Channel Dielectric Wakefield Structure for High Gradient Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, T. C.; Sotnikov, G. V.; Hirshfield, J. L.

    2010-11-01

    A coaxial two-channel dielectric wakefield structure is examined for use as a high gradient accelerator. A THz design, having radius ˜1 mm, is shown to provide GeV/m—level acceleration gradient, high transformer ratio, and stable accelerated bunch motion when excited by a stable-moving 5-GeV 6-nC annular drive bunch.

  8. Laser-based excitation and diagnostics of planar fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, T. E.; Van Wijk, K.; Snieder, R.; Willis, M. E.

    2011-12-01

    Faults are of interest not only to earth science, but also at different scales in the non-destructive testing (NDT) community. Remote sensing of faults is of interest to both communities, with the idea of inverting for the fracture properties in a non-invasive way. Alternatively, the wave field directly excited at the fracture is of interest to both communities because the waves thus radiated are equivalent to those emitted by acoustic emissions or micro-earthquakes. Much can be learned from recording of elastic waves excited at the the fracture. Based on technology developed for NDT, we use laser ultrasonics in the laboratory to excite and detect elastic waves, in order to determine the properties of fractures or faults in laboratory rock and synthetic samples. We show examples of wave propagation in a clear Poly(methyl methacrylate) cylinder. By focusing a high power infrared (IR) laser inside the cylinder we create a visible single disk-shaped fracture near the center of the sample. The laser generates a short pulse (~20 ns) of infrared light that is absorbed by the sample material at the focal point and is converted into heat. The sudden thermal expansion generates stress and forms a fracture parallel to the cylindrical axis. We excite elastic waves at the surface of the sample using the same high-power pulsed laser, but at a much lower energy setting, and with an unfocused beam. We measure the direct and scattered wave field from the fracture with a laser interferometer, and also excite the fracture directly with a fraction of the source laser energy impinging directly on the fracture. A comparison of the direct excitation and the elastic scattered wavefields, including studies of the tip diffractions from the fracture, shows strong agreement. The measured tip diffractions carry information about the stress concentration near the crack tips, which is crucial for understanding rupture processes. This novel laboratory technique allows us to measure the source

  9. Metal-dielectric interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Metal direlectric surface interactions and dielectric films on metal substrates were investigated. Since interfacial interaction depends so heavily on the nature of the surfaces, analytical surface tools such as Auger emission spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and field ion microscopy were used to assist in surface and interfacial characterization. The results indicate that with metals contacting certain glasses in the clean state interfacial, bonding produces fractures in the glasses while when a film such as water is present, fractures occur in the metal near the interface. Friction forces were used to measure the interfacial bond strengths. Studies with metals contacting polymers using field ion microscopy revealed that strong bonding forces could develop being between a metal and polymer surface with polymer transferring to the metal surface in various ways depending upon the forces applied to the surface in contact. With the deposition of refractory carbides, silicides and borides onto metal and alloy substrates the presence of oxides at the interface or active gases in the deposition plasma were shown to alter interfacial properties and chemistry. Auger ion depth profile analysis indicated the chemical composition at the interface and this could be related to the mechanical, friction, and wear behavior of the coating.

  10. Dielectric optical invisibility cloaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, J.; Tamma, V. A.; Park, W.; Summers, C. J.

    2010-08-01

    Recently, metamaterial cloaks for the microwave frequency range have been designed using transformative optics design techniques and experimentally demonstrated. The design of these structures requires extreme values of permittivity and permeability within the device, which has been accomplished by the use of resonating metal elements. However, these elements severely limit the operating frequency range of the cloak due to their non-ideal dispersion properties at optical frequencies. In this paper we present designs to implement a simpler demonstration of cloaking, the carpet cloak, in which a curved reflective surface is compressed into a flat reflective surface, effectively shielding objects behind the curve from view with respect to the incoming radiation source. This approach eliminates the need for metallic resonant elements. These structures can now be fabricated using only high index dielectric materials by the use of electron beam lithography and standard cleanroom technologies. The design method, simulation analysis, device fabrication, and near field optical microscopy (NSOM) characterization results are presented for devices designed to operate in the 1400-1600nm wavelength range. Improvements to device performance by the deposition/infiltration of linear, and potentially non-linear optical materials, were investigated.

  11. Dielectric and permeability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, K. D.

    1982-01-01

    Using the unabridged Maxwell equations (including vectors D, E and H) new effects in collisionless plasmas are uncovered. In a steady state, it is found that spatially varying energy density of the electric field (E perpendicular) orthogonal to B produces electric current leading, under certain conditions, to the relationship P perpendicular+B(2)/8 pi-epsilon E perpendicular(2)/8 pi = constant, where epsilon is the dielectric constant of the plasma for fields orthogonal to B. In steady state quasi-two-dimensional flows in plasmas, a general relationship between the components of electric field parallel and perpendicular to B is found. These effects are significant in goephysical and astrophysical plasmas. The general conditions for a steady state in collisionless plasma are deduced. With time variations in a plasma, slow compared to ion-gyroperiod, there is a general current, (j*), which includes the well-known polarisation current, given by J*=d/dt (ExM)+(PxB)xB B(-2) where M and P are the magnetization and polarization vectors respectively.

  12. COAXIAL TWO-CHANNEL DIELECTRIC WAKE FIELD ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2013-04-30

    Theory, computations, and experimental apparatus are presented that describe and are intended to confirm novel properties of a coaxial two-channel dielectric wake field accelerator. In this configuration, an annular drive beam in the outer coaxial channel excites multimode wakefields which, in the inner channel, can accelerate a test beam to an energy much higher than the energy of the drive beam. This high transformer ratio is the result of judicious choice of the dielectric structure parameters, and of the phase separation between drive bunches and test bunches. A structure with cm-scale wakefields has been build for tests at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Laboratory, and a structure with mm-scale wakefields has been built for tests at the SLAC FACET facility. Both tests await scheduling by the respective facilities.

  13. A Wideband Circularly Polarized Pixelated Dielectric Resonator Antenna.

    PubMed

    Trinh-Van, Son; Yang, Youngoo; Lee, Kang-Yoon; Hwang, Keum Cheol

    2016-01-01

    The design of a wideband circularly polarized pixelated dielectric resonator antenna using a real-coded genetic algorithm (GA) is presented for far-field wireless power transfer applications. The antenna consists of a dielectric resonator (DR) which is discretized into 8 × 8 grid DR bars. The real-coded GA is utilized to estimate the optimal heights of the 64 DR bars to realize circular polarization. The proposed antenna is excited by a narrow rectangular slot etched on the ground plane. A prototype of the proposed antenna is fabricated and tested. The measured -10 dB reflection and 3 dB axial ratio bandwidths are 32.32% (2.62-3.63 GHz) and 14.63% (2.85-3.30 GHz), respectively. A measured peak gain of 6.13 dBic is achieved at 3.2 GHz. PMID:27563897

  14. Dielectric microwave resonators in TE011 cavities for electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mett, Richard R.; Sidabras, Jason W.; Golovina, Iryna S.; Hyde, James S.

    2008-09-01

    The coupled system of the microwave cylindrical TE011 cavity and the TE01δ dielectric modes has been analyzed in order to determine the maximum achievable resonator efficiency parameter of a dielectric inserted into a cavity, and whether this value can exceed that of a dedicated TE01δ mode dielectric resonator. The frequency, Q value, and resonator efficiency parameter Λ for each mode of the coupled system were calculated as the size of the dielectric was varied. Other output parameters include the relative field magnitudes and phases. Two modes are found: one with fields in the dielectric parallel to the fields in the cavity center and the other with antiparallel fields. Results closely match those from a computer program that solves Maxwell's equations by finite element methods. Depending on the relative natural resonance frequencies of the cavity and dielectric, one mode has a higher Q value and correspondingly lower Λ than the other. The mode with the higher Q value is preferentially excited by a coupling iris or loop in or near the cavity wall. However, depending on the frequency separation between modes, either can be excited in this way. A relatively narrow optimum is found for the size of the insert that produces maximum signal for both modes simultaneously. It occurs when the self-resonance frequencies of the two resonators are nearly equal. The maximum signal is almost the same as that of the dedicated TE01δ mode dielectric resonator alone, Λ ≅40 G/W1/2 at X-band for a KTaO3 crystal. The cavity is analogous to the second stage of a two-stage coupler. In general, there is no electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal benefit by use of a second stage. However, there is a benefit of convenience. A properly designed sample-mounted resonator inserted into a cavity can give EPR signals as large as what one would expect from the dielectric resonator alone.

  15. Dielectric microwave resonators in TE(011) cavities for electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mett, Richard R; Sidabras, Jason W; Golovina, Iryna S; Hyde, James S

    2008-09-01

    The coupled system of the microwave cylindrical TE(011) cavity and the TE(01delta) dielectric modes has been analyzed in order to determine the maximum achievable resonator efficiency parameter of a dielectric inserted into a cavity, and whether this value can exceed that of a dedicated TE(01delta) mode dielectric resonator. The frequency, Q value, and resonator efficiency parameter Lambda for each mode of the coupled system were calculated as the size of the dielectric was varied. Other output parameters include the relative field magnitudes and phases. Two modes are found: one with fields in the dielectric parallel to the fields in the cavity center and the other with antiparallel fields. Results closely match those from a computer program that solves Maxwell's equations by finite element methods. Depending on the relative natural resonance frequencies of the cavity and dielectric, one mode has a higher Q value and correspondingly lower Lambda than the other. The mode with the higher Q value is preferentially excited by a coupling iris or loop in or near the cavity wall. However, depending on the frequency separation between modes, either can be excited in this way. A relatively narrow optimum is found for the size of the insert that produces maximum signal for both modes simultaneously. It occurs when the self-resonance frequencies of the two resonators are nearly equal. The maximum signal is almost the same as that of the dedicated TE(01delta) mode dielectric resonator alone, Lambda congruent with40 G/W(1/2) at X-band for a KTaO(3) crystal. The cavity is analogous to the second stage of a two-stage coupler. In general, there is no electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal benefit by use of a second stage. However, there is a benefit of convenience. A properly designed sample-mounted resonator inserted into a cavity can give EPR signals as large as what one would expect from the dielectric resonator alone. PMID:19044441

  16. Modeling of laser-induced breakdown in dielectrics with subpicosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostolova, T.; Hahn, Y.

    2000-07-01

    Theoretical study of ultrafast laser induced damage by short pulses (τ<1 ps) is carried out on large-band-gap dielectric in an effort to understand the complex physical processes involved. The numerical method of solving a general time-dependent Fokker-Planck type equation for free electron production is discussed in detail. The calculation shows that the collisional avalanche ionization competes with the multiphoton ionization even for pulse length shorter than 25 fs. Sensitivity tests of all the rates in the equation are performed and the most critical ones are identified. From these tests we obtain valuable information in developing new materials that have the desired damage fluence for specific applications. To describe the relaxation of electron plasma, a three body recombination rate is included. Thus, the temporal behavior of the electron density due to a single pulse is treated, as well as the case of exposure to two laser pulses with a time delay between them. The model is only partially successful in reproducing the recent experimental data. Effect of the presence of a linear decay term and optical defects on the damage threshold is considered in the context of the rate equation input.

  17. High-efficiency, dielectric multilayer gratings optimized for manufacturability and laser damage threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Britten, J.A.; Perry, M.D.; Shore, B.W.; Boyd, R.D.; Loomis, G.E.; Chow, R.

    1995-11-29

    Ultrashort pulse, high-intensity lasers offer new opportunities for the study of light-matter interaction and for inertial confinement fusion. A 100 Terawatt laser operating 400 fs and 1.053 {mu}m is operational at LLNL, and a 1000 Terawatt (Petawatt) laser will come online in early 1996. These lasers use large-aperture (40 cm and 94 cm diameter, respectively) diffraction gratings to compress the amplified laser pulse. At present, hologrphically produced, gold overcoated photoresist gratings are used: these gratings represent the fuse in the laser chain. Higher laser damage thresholds and higher diffraction efficiencies are theoretically possible with multilayer dielectric gratings (MDG`s). A number of design parameters regarding both the multilayer stack and the etched grating structure can be optimized to maximize the laser damage threshold and also improve the processing latitude for the interference lithography and reactive ion etching steps used during manufacture of these gratings. This paper presents model predictions for the behavior of hafnia/silica MDG`s both during processing and in operation, and presents experimental data on the diffraction efficiency and short- pulse laser damage threshold for optimized witness gratings.

  18. Acoustically excited heated jets. 1: Internal excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, J.; Ahuja, K. K.; Brown, W. H.; Salikuddin, M.; Morris, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of relatively strong upstream acoustic excitation on the mixing of heated jets with the surrounding air are investigated. To determine the extent of the available information on experiments and theories dealing with acoustically excited heated jets, an extensive literature survey was carried out. The experimental program consisted of flow visualization and flowfield velocity and temperature measurements for a broad range of jet operating and flow excitation conditions. A 50.8-mm-diam nozzle was used for this purpose. Parallel to the experimental study, an existing theoretical model of excited jets was refined to include the region downstream of the jet potential core. Excellent agreement was found between theory and experiment in moderately heated jets. However, the theory has not yet been confirmed for highly heated jets. It was found that the sensitivity of heated jets to upstream acoustic excitation varies strongly with the jet operating conditions and that the threshold excitation level increases with increasing jet temperature. Furthermore, the preferential Strouhal number is found not to change significantly with a change of the jet operating conditions. Finally, the effects of the nozzle exit boundary layer thickness appear to be similar for both heated and unheated jets at low Mach numbers.

  19. Multiple-photon excitation imaging with an all-solid-state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wokosin, David L.; Centonze, Victoria F.; White, John G.; Hird, Steven N.; Sepsenwol, S.; Malcolm, Graeme P. A.; Maker, Gareth T.; Ferguson, Allister I.

    1996-05-01

    Two-photon excitation imaging is a recently described optical sectioning technique where fluorophore excitation is confined to--and therefore defines--the optical section being observed. This characteristic offers a significant advantage over laser-scanning confocal microscopy; the volume of fluorophore excited in the minimum necessary for imaging, thereby minimizing the destructive effects of fluorophore excitation in living tissues. In addition, a confocal pinhole is not required for optical scattering--thus further reducing the excitation needed for efficient photon collection. We have set up a two-photon excitation imaging system which uses an all-solid-state, short-pulse, long-wavelength laser as an excitation source. The source is a diode-pumped, mode-locked Nd:YLF laser operating in the infrared (1047 nm). This laser is small, has modest power requirements, and has proven reliable and stable in operation. The short laser pulses from the laser are affected by the system optical path; this has been investigated with second harmonic generation derived from a nonlinear crystal. The system has been specifically designed for the study of live biological specimens. Two cell types especially sensitive to high-energy illumination, the developing Caenorhabditis elegans embryo and the crawling sperm of the nematode, Ascaris, were used to demonstrate the dramatic increase in viability when fluorescence is generated by two-photon excitation. The system has the capability of switching between two-photon and confocal imaging modes to facilitate direct comparison of theory of these two optical sectioning techniques on the same specimen. A heavily stained zebra fish embryo was used to demonstrate the increase in sectioning depth when fluorescence is generated by infrared two- photon excitation. Two-photon excitation with the 1047 nm laser produces bright images with a variety of red emitting fluorophores, and some green emitting fluorophores, commonly used in biological

  20. Terahertz electromagnetic wave generation and amplification by an electron beam in the elliptical plasma waveguides with dielectric rod

    SciTech Connect

    Rahmani, Z. Jazi, B.; Heidari-Semiromi, E.

    2014-09-15

    The propagation of electromagnetic waves in an elliptical plasma waveguide including strongly magnetized plasma column and a dielectric rod is investigated. The dispersion relation of guided hybrid electromagnetic waves is obtained. Excitation of the waves by a thin annular relativistic elliptical electron beam will be studied. The time growth rate of electromagnetic waves is obtained. The effects of relative permittivity constant of dielectric rod, radius of dielectric rod, accelerating voltage, and current density of the annular elliptical beam on the growth rate and the frequency spectra are numerically presented.

  1. Agricultural applications of dielectric spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Stuart O

    2004-01-01

    A brief account of interest in dielectric properties of agricultural materials is presented, and some examples of dielectric spectroscopy applied to agricultural problems are discussed. Included are wide frequency range (250 Hz to 12 GHz) permittivity, or dielectric properties, measurements on adult rice weevils and hard red winter wheat, for the purpose of assessing selective dielectric heating of the insects, and broadband (200 MHz to 20 GHz) permittivity measurements on tissues of fresh fruits and vegetables. Similar measurements are shown for tree-ripened peaches, which were obtained to assess possibilities for a permittivity-based maturity index. Broadband (10 MHz to 1.8 GHz) permittivity measurements are shown for several fruits and vegetables as a function of temperature from 5 to 95 degrees C. Measurements over the same frequency range and similar temperature ranges are presented for two other food products, whey protein gel and apple juice. A few comments are offered on likely future dielectric spectroscopy applications in agriculture. PMID:15719907

  2. Dielectric Covered Planar Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Llombart Juan, Nuria (Inventor); Lee, Choonsup (Inventor); Chattopadhyay, Goutam (Inventor); Gill, John J. (Inventor); Skalare, Anders J. (Inventor); Siegel, Peter H. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An antenna element suitable for integrated arrays at terahertz frequencies is disclosed. The antenna element comprises an extended spherical (e.g. hemispherical) semiconductor lens, e.g. silicon, antenna fed by a leaky wave waveguide feed. The extended spherical lens comprises a substantially spherical lens adjacent a substantially planar lens extension. A couple of TE/TM leaky wave modes are excited in a resonant cavity formed between a ground plane and the substantially planar lens extension by a waveguide block coupled to the ground plane. Due to these modes, the primary feed radiates inside the lens with a directive pattern that illuminates a small sector of the lens. The antenna structure is compatible with known semiconductor fabrication technology and enables production of large format imaging arrays.

  3. Excited State Electronic Properties of Sodium Iodide and Cesium Iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Luke W.; Gao, Fei

    2013-05-01

    We compute from first principles the dielectric function, loss function, lifetime and scattering rate of quasiparticles due to electronic losses, and secondary particle spectrum due to plasmon decay in two scintillating alkali halides, sodium iodide and cesium iodide. Particular emphasis is placed on quasiparticles within several multiples of the band gap from the band edges. A theory for the decay spectra of plasmons and other electronic excitations in crystals is presented. Applications to Monte Carlo radiation transport codes are discussed.

  4. Optical excitation of surface plasma waves without grating structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Hai-Yao; Liu, Feng; Wakabayashi, Katsunori

    2016-05-01

    Surface plasma waves (SPWs) are usually discussed in the context of a metal in contact with a dielectric. However, they can also exist between two metals. In this work we study these bimetallic waves. We find that their dispersion curve always cuts the light line, which allows direct optical coupling without surface grating structures. We propose practical schemes to excite them and the excitation efficiency is estimated. We also show that these waves can be much less lossy than conventional SPWs and their losses can be systematically controlled, a highly desirable attribute in applications. Conducting metal oxides seem fit for experimental studies.

  5. Scattering from thin dielectric straps surrounding a perfectly conducting structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Al-Hekail, Zeyad; Gupta, Inder J.

    1989-01-01

    A method to calculate the electromagnetic scattered fields from a dielectric strap wrapped around convex, conducting structure is presented. A moment method technique is used to find the current excited within the strap by the incident plane wave. Then, Uniform Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (UTD) is used to compute the fields scattered by the strap. Reasonable agreement was obtained between the computed and the measured results. The results found in this study are useful in evaluating straps as a target support structure for scattering measurements.

  6. Radiative heat transfer from a black body to dielectric nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalopin, Yann; Dammak, Hichem; Laroche, Marine; Hayoun, Marc; Greffet, Jean-Jacques

    2011-12-01

    Heating of dielectric nanoparticles by black-body radiation is investigated by using molecular-dynamics simulation. The thermal interaction with the radiation is modeled by coupling the ions with a random electric field and including a radiation reaction force. This approach shows that the heat is absorbed by the polariton mode. Its subsequent redistribution among other vibration modes strongly depends on the particle size and on temperature. We observe energy trapping in a finite subset of vibrational modes and study the relaxation pathway of (MgO)4 by performing a selective excitation with a deterministic force.

  7. Anomalous relaxation and dielectric response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goychuk, Igor

    2007-10-01

    It is shown that all the known experimental (quasi)stationary dielectric response functions of glassy media can be derived from a standard generalized Langevin description of overdamped torsional dipole oscillators in trapping potentials with random orientations under some minimal assumptions. The non-Markovian theory obeys the fluctuation-dissipation theorem and the Onsager regression theorem. Moreover, it displays no aging on the time scale of the dielectric response, all in assumption of local thermal (quasi)equilibrium. Aging might come from jumping among metastable traps. It occurs on a quite different time scale which is not related to the principal dielectric response. We put the old phenomenological theory of Cole and Cole, Davidson and Cole, and others on a firm basis within a stochastic, thermodynamically consistent approach.

  8. Dielectric theorem within the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov framework

    SciTech Connect

    Capelli, Luigi; Colo, Gianluca; Li, Jun

    2009-05-15

    Excitation spectra usually reveal important features of the many-body systems. The vibrational excitations can be studied through the well-known linear response theory. This theory is realized, in the nuclear case, by means of the random-phase approximation (RPA); the generalization in the case in which one deals with open shells, and the pairing force is active, is the quasiparticle RPA (QRPA). It is useful to have at one's disposal theorems that provide information on, e.g., the sum rules and mean excitation energies associated with given external operators acting on the system. This article focuses on such theorems in the case of self-consistent QRPA based on Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB). In particular, the so-called dielectric theorem that provides the value of the inverse-energy-weighted sum rule based on the simple knowledge of the ground state is demonstrated. This theorem is applied to the case of constrained calculations of the average excitation energy of the monopole resonance combined with the Thouless theorem. The pairing correlations are shown to have the effect of increasing the polarizability m{sub -1}. The detailed analysis of the profile of the strength functions by mean of QRPA reveals that the decrease of the average monopole excitation energies in some isotopes is associated with neutron states that emerge at an energy that is lower than the main giant resonance peak.

  9. USDA/ARS and dielectric properties research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An overview of the research is presented, including RF dielectric heating for seed treatment, insect control, product conditioning, and moisture and quality sensing applications, equipment used, dielectric properties measurement techniques, broad- frequency- range data obtained, and research results...

  10. Capacitive Cells for Dielectric Constant Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguilar, Horacio Munguía; Maldonado, Rigoberto Franco

    2015-01-01

    A simple capacitive cell for dielectric constant measurement in liquids is presented. As an illustrative application, the cell is used for measuring the degradation of overheated edible oil through the evaluation of their dielectric constant.

  11. CVD Diamond Dielectric Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Gat, R.

    2009-01-22

    The electrical and mechanical properties of diamond make it an ideal candidate material for use in dielectric accelerating structures: high RF breakdown field, extremely low dielectric losses and the highest available thermoconductive coefficient. Using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) cylindrical diamond structures have been manufactured with dimensions corresponding to fundamental TM{sub 01} mode frequencies in the GHz to THz range. Surface treatments are being developed to reduce the secondary electron emission (SEE) coefficient below unity to reduce the possibility of multipactor. The diamond CVD cylindrical waveguide technology developed here can be applied to a variety of other high frequency, large-signal applications.

  12. Dielectric response of the human tooth dentine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leskovec, J.; Filipič, C.; Levstik, A.

    2005-07-01

    Dielectric properties of tooth dentine can be well described by the model which was developed for the dielectric response to hydrating porous cement paste. It is shown that the normalized dielectric constant and the normalized specific conductivity are proportional to the model parameters ɛ and σv, indicating the deposition of AgCl in the dentine tubules during the duration of the precipitation. The fractal dimension of the tooth dentine was determined by dielectric spectroscopy.

  13. Applications for Dielectric Properties of Agricultural Products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of dielectric properties of agricultural products for sensing moisture in grain and seed and their application in radio-frequency and microwave dielectric heating are discussed briefly. Values for the dielectric properties of a number of products, including grain, fruit, and poultry products...

  14. Dielectric properties of agricultural products and applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of dielectric properties of agricultural products for sensing moisture in grain and seed and their application in radio-frequency and microwave dielectric heating is discussed briefly. Values for the dielectric properties of a number of products, including grain and seed, fruits and vegetab...

  15. Photo-induced change of dielectric response in BaCoSiO4 stuffed tridymite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Hiroki; Moriwake, Hiroki; Kuwabara, Akihide; Okamura, Takuma; Yamamoto, Takafumi; Okazaki, Ryuji; Itoh, Mitsuru; Terasaki, Ichiro

    2014-04-01

    The photodielectric effect is demonstrated in Mott-insulator BaCoSiO4 with a stuffed-tridymite-type structure under irradiation of visible light at 365 nm. The real part of dielectric permittivity is enhanced by ˜300% with little increase of tan δ in a low-frequency region. Results of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, first-principles calculations and dielectric measurements suggest that the photodielectric effect stems from a response of photo-excited electrons in an unoccupied upper-Hubbard band for 3d-orbitals of cobalt, which have significantly small mobility due to the unique configuration of Co ions in the stuffed-tridymite-type structure.

  16. Coded Excitation Plane Wave Imaging for Shear Wave Motion Detection

    PubMed Central

    Song, Pengfei; Urban, Matthew W.; Manduca, Armando; Greenleaf, James F.; Chen, Shigao

    2015-01-01

    Plane wave imaging has greatly advanced the field of shear wave elastography thanks to its ultrafast imaging frame rate and the large field-of-view (FOV). However, plane wave imaging also has decreased penetration due to lack of transmit focusing, which makes it challenging to use plane waves for shear wave detection in deep tissues and in obese patients. This study investigated the feasibility of implementing coded excitation in plane wave imaging for shear wave detection, with the hypothesis that coded ultrasound signals can provide superior detection penetration and shear wave signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) compared to conventional ultrasound signals. Both phase encoding (Barker code) and frequency encoding (chirp code) methods were studied. A first phantom experiment showed an approximate penetration gain of 2-4 cm for the coded pulses. Two subsequent phantom studies showed that all coded pulses outperformed the conventional short imaging pulse by providing superior sensitivity to small motion and robustness to weak ultrasound signals. Finally, an in vivo liver case study on an obese subject (Body Mass Index = 40) demonstrated the feasibility of using the proposed method for in vivo applications, and showed that all coded pulses could provide higher SNR shear wave signals than the conventional short pulse. These findings indicate that by using coded excitation shear wave detection, one can benefit from the ultrafast imaging frame rate and large FOV provided by plane wave imaging while preserving good penetration and shear wave signal quality, which is essential for obtaining robust shear elasticity measurements of tissue. PMID:26168181

  17. Visible fiber lasers excited by GaN laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Yasushi; Nakanishi, Jun; Yamada, Tsuyoshi; Ishii, Osamu; Yamazaki, Masaaki

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes and discusses visible fiber lasers that are excited by GaN laser diodes. One of the attractive points of visible light is that the human eye is sensitive to it between 400 and 700 nm, and therefore we can see applications in display technology. Of course, many other applications exist. First, we briefly review previously developed visible lasers in the gas, liquid, and solid-state phases and describe the history of primary solid-state visible laser research by focusing on rare-earth doped fluoride media, including glasses and crystals, to clarify the differences and the merits of primary solid-state visible lasers. We also demonstrate over 1 W operation of a Pr:WPFG fiber laser due to high-power GaN laser diodes and low-loss optical fibers (0.1 dB/m) made by waterproof fluoride glasses. This new optical fiber glass is based on an AlF3 system fluoride glass, and its waterproof property is much better than the well known fluoride glass of ZBLAN. The configuration of primary visible fiber lasers promises highly efficient, cost-effective, and simple laser systems and will realize visible lasers with photon beam quality and quantity, such as high-power CW or tunable laser systems, compact ultraviolet lasers, and low-cost ultra-short pulse laser systems. We believe that primary visible fiber lasers, especially those excited by GaN laser diodes, will be effective tools for creating the next generation of research and light sources.

  18. Improved RF performance of travelling wave MR with a high permittivity dielectric lining of the bore.

    PubMed

    Andreychenko, A; Bluemink, J J; Raaijmakers, A J E; Lagendijk, J J W; Luijten, P R; van den Berg, C A T

    2013-09-01

    Application of travelling wave MR to human body imaging is restricted by the limited peak power of the available RF amplifiers. Nevertheless, travelling wave MR advantages like a large field of view excitation and distant location of transmit elements would be desirable for whole body MRI. In this work, improvement of the B1+ efficiency of travelling wave MR is demonstrated. High permittivity dielectric lining placed next to the scanner bore wall effectively reduces attenuation of the travelling wave in the longitudinal direction and at the same time directs the radial power flow toward the load. First, this is shown with an analytical model of a metallic cylindrical waveguide with the dielectric lining next to the wall and loaded with a cylindrical phantom. Simulations and experiments also reveal an increase of B1+ efficiency in the center of the bore for travelling wave MR with a dielectric lining. Phantom experiments show up to a 2-fold gain in B1+ with the dielectric lining. This corresponds to a 4-fold increase in power efficiency of travelling wave MR. In vivo experiments demonstrate an 8-fold signal-to-noise ratio gain with the dielectric lining. Overall, it is shown that dielectric lining is a constructive method to improve efficacy of travelling wave MR. PMID:23044511

  19. Scattering from Thin Dielectric Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, D. M.; Schneider, A.; Lang, R. H.; Carter, H. G.

    1984-01-01

    A solution was obtained for scattering from thin dielectric disks by approximating the currents induced inside the disk with the currents which would exist inside a dielectric slab of the same thickness, orientation and dielectric properties. This approximation reduces to an electrostatic approximation when the disk thickness, T, is small compared to the wavelength of the incident radiation and the approximation yields a conventional physical optics solution when the dimension, A, characteristic of the geometrical cross section of the disk (e.g., the diameter of a circular disk) is large compared to wavelength. When the ratio A/T is sufficiently large the disk will always be in one or the other of these regimes (T lambda or kA1. Consequently, when A/T is large this solution provides a conventional approximation for the scattered fields which can be applied at all frequencies. As a check on this conclusion, a comparison was made between the theoretical and measured radar cross section of thin dielectric disks. Agreement was found for thin disks with both large and small values of kA.

  20. Counteracting Gravitation In Dielectric Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israelsson, Ulf E.; Jackson, Henry W.; Strayer, Donald M.

    1993-01-01

    Force of gravity in variety of dielectric liquids counteracted by imposing suitably contoured electric fields. Technique makes possible to perform, on Earth, variety of experiments previously performed only in outer space and at great cost. Also used similarly in outer space to generate sort of artificial gravitation.