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Sample records for show prolonged intracellular

  1. Prolonged Intracellular Na+ Dynamics Govern Electrical Activity in Accessory Olfactory Bulb Mitral Cells.

    PubMed

    Zylbertal, Asaph; Kahan, Anat; Ben-Shaul, Yoram; Yarom, Yosef; Wagner, Shlomo

    2015-12-01

    Persistent activity has been reported in many brain areas and is hypothesized to mediate working memory and emotional brain states and to rely upon network or biophysical feedback. Here, we demonstrate a novel mechanism by which persistent neuronal activity can be generated without feedback, relying instead on the slow removal of Na+ from neurons following bursts of activity. We show that mitral cells in the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB), which plays a major role in mammalian social behavior, may respond to a brief sensory stimulation with persistent firing. By combining electrical recordings, Ca2+ and Na+ imaging, and realistic computational modeling, we explored the mechanisms underlying the persistent activity in AOB mitral cells. We found that the exceptionally slow inward current that underlies this activity is governed by prolonged dynamics of intracellular Na+ ([Na+]i), which affects neuronal electrical activity via several pathways. Specifically, elevated dendritic [Na+]i reverses the Na+-Ca2+ exchanger activity, thus modifying the [Ca2+]i set-point. This process, which relies on ubiquitous membrane mechanisms, is likely to play a role in other neuronal types in various brain regions. PMID:26674618

  2. Prolonged Intracellular Na+ Dynamics Govern Electrical Activity in Accessory Olfactory Bulb Mitral Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zylbertal, Asaph; Kahan, Anat; Ben-Shaul, Yoram; Yarom, Yosef; Wagner, Shlomo

    2015-01-01

    Persistent activity has been reported in many brain areas and is hypothesized to mediate working memory and emotional brain states and to rely upon network or biophysical feedback. Here, we demonstrate a novel mechanism by which persistent neuronal activity can be generated without feedback, relying instead on the slow removal of Na+ from neurons following bursts of activity. We show that mitral cells in the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB), which plays a major role in mammalian social behavior, may respond to a brief sensory stimulation with persistent firing. By combining electrical recordings, Ca2+ and Na+ imaging, and realistic computational modeling, we explored the mechanisms underlying the persistent activity in AOB mitral cells. We found that the exceptionally slow inward current that underlies this activity is governed by prolonged dynamics of intracellular Na+ ([Na+]i), which affects neuronal electrical activity via several pathways. Specifically, elevated dendritic [Na+]i reverses the Na+-Ca2+ exchanger activity, thus modifying the [Ca2+]i set-point. This process, which relies on ubiquitous membrane mechanisms, is likely to play a role in other neuronal types in various brain regions. PMID:26674618

  3. Intracellular Potassium Activity in Guinea Pig Papillary Muscle during Prolonged Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Guarnieri, Thomas; Strauss, Harold C.

    1982-01-01

    During prolonged hypoxia, intracellular potassium concentration, [K]i has been reported to fall by 70% with a concomitant decrease in the calculated potassium equilibrium potential, EK. Nevertheless, resting membrane potential, Vm, declined only slightly. Because Vm depolarized very little in relation to the calculated EK, it was hypothesized that electrogenic Na-K pumping contributed up to 40 mV to Vm during prolonged hypoxia. To further test this hypothesis we studied what changes prolonged hypoxia makes in the thermodynamically active fraction of cellular potassium, intracellular potassium activity, αKi, and how change in αKi affects the relationship between Vm, EK and, by inference, the Na-K pump. Using double-barrel K-selective electrodes, Vm and αKi were measured in quiescent guinea pig right ventricular papillary muscles superfused for 8 h with hypoxic Tyrode's solution. Over the 8-h period both Vm and αKi decreased. However, the decline in Vm was paralleled by a decrease in the EK calculated from αKi. At no time was there hyperpolarization of Vm beyond EK. After 8 h the Na-K pump was inhibited by exposing the muscles to 0.1 mM ouabain. The onset of an increase in extracellular potassium activity, measured with a double-barrel electrode, was used to mark the amount of depolarization of Vm due solely to pump inhibition. After hypoxia, Vm depolarized 8.4±4.4 mV before extracellular potassium activity (αKe) increased. Thus, the decrease in αKi during hypoxia is much less than that reported for [K]i. The parallel decline in Vm and EK and the small depolarization of Vm with ouabain suggest that after prolonged hypoxia the Na-K pump continues to contribute to Vm, but the amount of this contribution is substantially less than previously reported. PMID:6276442

  4. Iridium Oxide Nanotube Electrodes for Highly Sensitive and Prolonged Intracellular Measurement of Action Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ziliang Carter; Xie, Chong; Osakada, Yasuko; Cui, Yi; Cui, Bianxiao

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular recording of action potentials is important to understand electrically-excitable cells. Recently, vertical nanoelectrodes have been developed to achieve highly sensitive, minimally invasive, and large scale intracellular recording. It has been demonstrated that the vertical geometry is crucial for the enhanced signal detection. Here we develop nanoelectrodes made up of nanotubes of iridium oxide. When cardiomyocytes are cultured upon those nanotubes, the cell membrane not only wraps around the vertical tubes but also protrudes deep into the hollow center. We show that this geometry enhances cell-electrode coupling and results in measuring much larger intracellular action potentials. The nanotube electrodes afford much longer intracellular access and are minimally invasive, making it possible to achieve stable recording up to an hour in a single session and more than 8 days of consecutive daily recording. This study suggests that the electrode performance can be significantly improved by optimizing the electrode geometry. PMID:24487777

  5. Effect of prolonged depolarizations on twitch tension and intracellular sodium activity in sheep cardiac Purkinje fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Brill, D M; Fozzard, H A; Makielski, J C; Wasserstrom, J A

    1987-01-01

    1. Twitch tension and intracellular Na+ activity (aiNa) were measured in voltage-clamped sheep cardiac Purkinje fibres. aiNa was measured using Na+-sensitive micro-electrodes filled with the liquid ion exchange resin. ETH 227. The stimulus for contraction was a constant 200 ms depolarizing pulse to 0 mV from a holding potential of -80 mV delivered at 0.25 Hz. Prolonged test pulses for 1.8 s (post-pulses) were applied at the end of the stimulus pulse. The effects of post-pulses on twitch tension and aiNa were examined. 2. Post-pulses in the range of -40 mV reduced twitch tension below control force produced without post-pulse. Progressively more positive post-pulses to levels above 0 mV profoundly increased twitch tension, with a greater than 400% rise in tension at +50 to +60 mV compared to control tension. aiNa declined at positive post-pulse potentials by more than 2 mM at +30 to +40 mV. 3. Tetrodotoxin (100 microM) did not affect the post-pulse voltage-tension or voltage-aiNa relation. Ca2+ channel modulation with nitrendipine (1 microM) similarly did not alter the post-pulse voltage-tension relation. 4. Removal of extracellular Na+ eliminated the nadir in tension at post-pulses to -40 mV and the augmentation of tension at post-pulses above 0 mV. 5. We interpret these findings as evidence of voltage-sensitive Na-Ca exchange promoting net Ca2+ influx and net Na+ efflux during positive post-pulses. The unusual shape of the post-pulse voltage-tension relation curve can be accounted for by a charged-carrier model of electrogenic Na-Ca exchange. The inverse relation between aiNa and twitch tension probably reflects the combined effects of reduced aiNa leak and changes in Na+ and Ca2+ flux via voltage-sensitive Na-Ca exchange. PMID:2443661

  6. Prolonged Oxaliplatin Exposure Alters Intracellular Calcium Signaling: A New Mechanism To Explain Oxaliplatin-Associated Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Christin; McGowan, Margit; Jordt, Sven; Ehrlich, Barbara E

    2012-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is a platinum based cytotoxic agent commonly used to treat colorectal cancers. Despite its effectiveness, oxaliplatin administration is associated with the development of cold-induced peripheral neuropathy. This potentially permanent side effect is provoked by cold exposure and can range from mild and self limited to severe and debilitating. Even with tumor shrinkage, these painful side effects can force dose-reduction or discontinuation of treatment. Neither the mechanism of action of oxaliplatin nor that of cold-induced neuropathy is understood. Paclitaxel, an entirely different chemotherapeutic agent used to treat a variety of malignancies, also is associated with the development of peripheral neuropathy. Unlike oxaliplatin, neurotoxicity arising from paclitaxel treatment is better understood and was found to have profound effects on intracellular calcium signaling (1,2). In this study we examined the effects of oxaliplatin on calcium signaling pathways and found that acute exposure of either a neuroblastoma cell line or primary neurons with therapeutic concentrations of oxaliplatin had no effect on intracellular calcium signaling. We also found that cellular temperature sensors (TRP channels) were also not activated by oxaliplatin. Interestingly, prolonged exposure of oxaliplatin sensitized cells to subsequent stimuli and enhanced the magnitude of intracellular calcium responses. Taken together, our results suggest that acute oxaliplatin exposure will not induce abnormal calcium signaling but oxaliplatin-primed cells do exhibit enhanced sensitivity. These findings provide new insight to the mechanism behind oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy. PMID:21859566

  7. Ecological changes in Miocene mammalian record show impact of prolonged climatic forcing.

    PubMed

    Badgley, Catherine; Barry, John C; Morgan, Michèle E; Nelson, Sherry V; Behrensmeyer, Anna K; Cerling, Thure E; Pilbeam, David

    2008-08-26

    Geohistorical records reveal the long-term impacts of climate change on ecosystem structure. A 5-myr record of mammalian faunas from floodplain ecosystems of South Asia shows substantial change in species richness and ecological structure in relation to vegetation change as documented by stable isotopes of C and O from paleosols. Between 8.5 and 6.0 Ma, C(4) savannah replaced C(3) forest and woodland. Isotopic historical trends for 27 mammalian herbivore species, in combination with ecomorphological data from teeth, show three patterns of response. Most forest frugivores and browsers maintained their dietary habits and disappeared. Other herbivores altered their dietary habits to include increasing amounts of C(4) plants and persisted for >1 myr during the vegetation transition. The few lineages that persisted through the vegetation transition show isotopic enrichment of delta(13)C values over time. These results are evidence for long-term climatic forcing of vegetation structure and mammalian ecological diversity at the subcontinental scale. PMID:18711123

  8. Ecological changes in Miocene mammalian record show impact of prolonged climatic forcing

    PubMed Central

    Badgley, Catherine; Barry, John C.; Morgan, Michèle E.; Nelson, Sherry V.; Behrensmeyer, Anna K.; Cerling, Thure E.; Pilbeam, David

    2008-01-01

    Geohistorical records reveal the long-term impacts of climate change on ecosystem structure. A 5-myr record of mammalian faunas from floodplain ecosystems of South Asia shows substantial change in species richness and ecological structure in relation to vegetation change as documented by stable isotopes of C and O from paleosols. Between 8.5 and 6.0 Ma, C4 savannah replaced C3 forest and woodland. Isotopic historical trends for 27 mammalian herbivore species, in combination with ecomorphological data from teeth, show three patterns of response. Most forest frugivores and browsers maintained their dietary habits and disappeared. Other herbivores altered their dietary habits to include increasing amounts of C4 plants and persisted for >1 myr during the vegetation transition. The few lineages that persisted through the vegetation transition show isotopic enrichment of δ13C values over time. These results are evidence for long-term climatic forcing of vegetation structure and mammalian ecological diversity at the subcontinental scale. PMID:18711123

  9. Prolonged Hypoxia Increases Survival Even in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Showing Cardiac Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Renate; Bauer, Ines; Ramalingam, Anil; Egg, Margit; Schwerte, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Tolerance towards hypoxia is highly pronounced in zebrafish. In this study even beneficial effects of hypoxia, specifically enhanced survival of zebrafish larvae, could be demonstrated. This effect was actually more pronounced in breakdance mutants, which phenotypically show cardiac arrhythmia. Breakdance mutants (bre) are characterized by chronically reduced cardiac output. Despite an about 50% heart rate reduction, they become adults, but survival rate significantly drops to 40%. Normoxic bre animals demonstrate increased hypoxia inducible factor 1 a (Hif-1α) expression, which indicates an activated hypoxic signaling pathway. Consequently, cardiovascular acclimation, like cardiac hypertrophy and increased erythrocyte concentration, occurs. Thus, it was hypothesized, that under hypoxic conditions survival might be even more reduced. When bre mutants were exposed to hypoxic conditions, they surprisingly showed higher survival rates than under normoxic conditions and even reached wildtype values. In hypoxic wildtype zebrafish, survival yet exceeded normoxic control values. To specify physiological acclimation, cardiovascular and metabolic parameters were measured before hypoxia started (3 dpf), when the first differences in survival rate occurred (7 dpf) and when survival rate plateaued (15 dpf). Hypoxic animals expectedly demonstrated Hif-1α accumulation and consequently enhanced convective oxygen carrying capacity. Moreover, bre animals showed a significantly enhanced heart rate under hypoxic conditions, which reached normoxic wildtype values. This improvement in convective oxygen transport ensured a sufficient oxygen and nutrient supply and was also reflected in the significantly higher mitochondrial activity. The highly optimized energy metabolism observed in hypoxic zebrafish larvae might be decisive for periods of higher energy demand due to organ development, growth and increased activity. However, hypoxia increased survival only during a short period of

  10. Randomized, Controlled, Thorough QT/QTc Study Shows Absence of QT Prolongation with Luseogliflozin in Healthy Japanese Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Kumagai, Yuji; Hasunuma, Tomoko; Sakai, Soichi; Ochiai, Hidekazu; Samukawa, Yoshishige

    2015-01-01

    Luseogliflozin is a selective sodium glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor. To evaluate the cardiac safety of luseogliflozin, a thorough QT/QTc study was conducted in healthy Japanese subjects. The effects of moxifloxacin on QT prolongation in Japanese subjects were also evaluated. In this double-blind, placebo- and open-label positive-controlled, 4-way crossover study, 28 male and 28 female subjects received a single dose of luseogliflozin 5 mg (therapeutic dose), luseogliflozin 20 mg (supratherapeutic dose), placebo, and moxifloxacin 400 mg. Serial triplicate digital 12-lead electrocardiograms (ECGs) were recorded before and after dosing, and results were analyzed using the Fridericia correction (QTcF) method. Serial blood sampling was performed for pharmacokinetic analyses of luseogliflozin and moxifloxacin to analyze the relationship between QTcF interval and plasma concentration. The upper limits of the two-sided 90% confidence intervals (CIs) for baseline and placebo-adjusted QTcF intervals (ΔΔQTcF) in the 5 mg and 20 mg luseogliflozin groups were less than 10 ms at all time points. No correlation between plasma luseogliflozin concentrations and ΔΔQTcF was observed. In the moxifloxacin group, the lower limits of the two-sided 90% CIs for ΔΔQTcF were greater than 5 ms at all time points. A positive relationship was observed between plasma moxifloxacin concentration and change in ΔΔQTcF. Luseogliflozin was well tolerated at both dose levels. The majority of adverse events were mild in severity, and no serious or life-threatening adverse events occurred. Neither therapeutic (5 mg) nor supratherapeutic (20 mg) doses of luseogliflozin affected QT prolongation in healthy Japanese subjects. PMID:26444986

  11. Neutrophils from patients with SAPHO syndrome show no signs of aberrant NADPH oxidase-dependent production of intracellular reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Wekell, Per; Björnsdottir, Halla; Björkman, Lena; Sundqvist, Martina; Christenson, Karin; Osla, Veronica; Berg, Stefan; Fasth, Anders; Welin, Amanda; Bylund, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Objective. We aimed to investigate if aberrant intracellular production of NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) in neutrophils is a disease mechanism in the autoinflammatory disease SAPHO syndrome, characterized by synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis, as has previously been suggested based on a family with SAPHO syndrome-like disease. Methods. Neutrophil function was explored in a cohort of four patients with SAPHO syndrome, two of whom were sampled during both inflammatory and non-inflammatory phase. Intracellular neutrophil ROS production was determined by luminol-amplified chemiluminescence in response to phorbol myristate acetate. Results. Cells from all patients produced normal amounts of ROS, both intra- and extracellularly, when compared with internal controls as well as with a large collection of healthy controls assayed in the laboratory over time (showing an extensive inter-personal variability in a normal population). Further, intracellular production of ROS increased during the inflammatory phase. Neutrophil activation markers were comparable between patients and controls. Conclusion. Dysfunctional generation of intracellular ROS in neutrophils is not a generalizable feature in SAPHO syndrome. Secondly, serum amyloid A appears to be a more sensitive inflammatory marker than CRP during improvement and relapses in SAPHO syndrome. PMID:27121779

  12. Why is intracellular ice lethal? A microscopical study showing evidence of programmed cell death in cryo-exposed embryonic axes of recalcitrant seeds of Acer saccharinum

    PubMed Central

    Wesley-Smith, James; Walters, Christina; Pammenter, N. W.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Conservation of the genetic diversity afforded by recalcitrant seeds is achieved by cryopreservation, in which excised embryonic axes (or, where possible, embryos) are treated and stored at temperatures lower than −180 °C using liquid nitrogen. It has previously been shown that intracellular ice forms in rapidly cooled embryonic axes of Acer saccharinum (silver maple) but this is not necessarily lethal when ice crystals are small. This study seeks to understand the nature and extent of damage from intracellular ice, and the course of recovery and regrowth in surviving tissues. Methods Embryonic axes of A. saccharinum, not subjected to dehydration or cryoprotection treatments (water content was 1·9 g H2O g−1 dry mass), were cooled to liquid nitrogen temperatures using two methods: plunging into nitrogen slush to achieve a cooling rate of 97 °C s−1 or programmed cooling at 3·3 °C s−1. Samples were thawed rapidly (177 °C s−1) and cell structure was examined microscopically immediately, and at intervals up to 72 h in vitro. Survival was assessed after 4 weeks in vitro. Axes were processed conventionally for optical microscopy and ultrastructural examination. Key Results Immediately following thaw after cryogenic exposure, cells from axes did not show signs of damage at an ultrastructural level. Signs that cells had been damaged were apparent after several hours of in vitro culture and appeared as autophagic decomposition. In surviving tissues, dead cells were sloughed off and pockets of living cells were the origin of regrowth. In roots, regrowth occurred from the ground meristem and procambium, not the distal meristem, which became lethally damaged. Regrowth of shoots occurred from isolated pockets of surviving cells of peripheral and pith meristems. The size of these pockets may determine the possibility for, the extent of and the vigour of regrowth. Conclusions Autophagic degradation and ultimately autolysis of cells following

  13. Why is intracellular ice lethal? A microscopical study showing evidence of programmed cell death in cryo-exposed embryonic axes of recalcitrant seeds of Acer saccharinum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Intracellular ice formed in rapidly cooled embryonic axes of Acer saccharinum and was not necessarily lethal when ice crystals were small. This study seeks to understand the nature and extent of damage from intracellular ice, and the course of recovery and regrowth in surviving tissues. Embryonic a...

  14. Polymeric micelles with α-glutamyl-terminated PEG shells show low non-specific protein adsorption and a prolonged in vivo circulation time.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoju; Yang, Cuiping; Wang, Chenhong; Guo, Leijia; Zhang, Tianhong; Zhang, Zhenqing; Yan, Husheng; Liu, Keliang

    2016-02-01

    Although PEG remains the gold standard for stealth functionalization in drug delivery field up to date, complete inhibition of protein corona formation on PEG-coated nanoparticles remains a challenge. To improve the stealth property of PEG, herein an α-glutamyl group was conjugated to the end of PEG and polymeric micelles with α-glutamyl-terminated PEG shells were prepared. After incubation with bovine serum albumin or in fetal calf serum, the size of the micelles changed slightly, while the size of the micelles of similar diblock copolymer but without α-glutamyl group increased markedly. These results indicated that the micelles with α-glutamyl-terminated PEG shells showed low non-specific protein adsorption. In vivo blood clearance kinetics assay showed that the micelles with α-glutamyl-terminated PEG shells exhibited a longer in vivo blood circulation time compared with similar micelles but without α-glutamyl groups. The better stealth property of the micelles with α-glutamyl-terminated PEG shells was presumably attributed to the zwitterionic property of the α-glutamyl groups. PMID:26652431

  15. Prolonged pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Hollis, Brian

    2002-04-01

    Prolonged pregnancy is defined as any pregnancy that lasts 294 days or more. It is now well recognized that prolonged pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of perinatal mortality and morbidity. It is these complications of pregnancy that have led obstetricians to adopt a policy of induction of labour before the onset of the post-term period. The induction of labour between 41 and 42 weeks is, however, a very crude strategy for reducing term and post-term stillbirth rates. Although the risk of fetal death is increased after 42 weeks, many more fetuses die in utero between 37 and 42 weeks than die in the post-term period. It appears that smaller term fetuses run a greater risk than their larger counterparts, and that current methods of antepartum assessment of the term fetus are still inadequate. It behoves us as obstetricians to improve our capabilities in identifying the compromised fetus at term. This review puts into perspective the most recent publications and highlights areas requiring further study. PMID:11914699

  16. Prolonged contraction duration in aged myocardium.

    PubMed

    Lakatta, E G; Gerstenblith, G; Angell, C S; Shock, N W; Weisfeldt, M L

    1975-01-01

    Isometric performance at 29degreesC was measured in left ventricular trabeculae carneae from young adult (6-mo) and aged (25-mo) rats (n equals 18 in each group). Active tension and maximal rate of tension development did not differ with age, but contraction duration was 255plus or minus6 ms in the young adult and 283plus or minus6 ms in the aged group (P less than0.001). Although catecholamine content per gram heart weight was less in the aged myocardium, additional experiments showed that neither 1 times 10-6 M propranolol nor pretreatment with 6-hydroxydopamine eliminated the age difference in contraction duration. To determine if this age difference resulted from a prolonged active state, electromechanical dissociation and the overshoot of contraction duration during recovery from hypoxia were measured. During paired stimulation greater mechanical refractoriness was found in aged muscles (P less than0.01), but intracellular action potential recordings showed no age difference in the electrical refractory period. On recovery from hypoxia, contraction duration overshoot was 117plus or minus 4percent of control in the young and 138plus or minus 4percent of control in the aged muscles (P less than0.01). The greater electromechanical dissociation and greater overshoot in contraction duration following hypoxia in aged myocardium suggests that prolonged contraction duration in aged myocardium results from a prolonged active state rather than changes in passive properties or myocardial catecholamine content. PMID:1109181

  17. Intracellular proteoglycans.

    PubMed Central

    Kolset, Svein Olav; Prydz, Kristian; Pejler, Gunnar

    2004-01-01

    Proteoglycans (PGs) are proteins with glycosaminoglycan chains, are ubiquitously expressed and have a wide range of functions. PGs in the extracellular matrix and on the cell surface have been the subject of extensive structural and functional studies. Less attention has so far been given to PGs located in intracellular compartments, although several reports suggest that these have biological functions in storage granules, the nucleus and other intracellular organelles. The purpose of this review is, therefore, to present some of these studies and to discuss possible functions linked to PGs located in different intracellular compartments. Reference will be made to publications relevant for the topics we present. It is beyond the scope of this review to cover all publications on PGs in intracellular locations. PMID:14759226

  18. Correlative Light-Electron Microscopy Shows RGD-Targeted ZnO Nanoparticles Dissolve in the Intracellular Environment of Triple Negative Breast Cancer Cells and Cause Apoptosis with Intratumor Heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Othman, Basmah A; Greenwood, Christina; Abuelela, Ayman F; Bharath, Anil A; Chen, Shu; Theodorou, Ioannis; Douglas, Trevor; Uchida, Maskai; Ryan, Mary; Merzaban, Jasmeen S; Porter, Alexandra E

    2016-06-01

    ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) are reported to show a high degree of cancer cell selectivity with potential use in cancer imaging and therapy. Questions remain about the mode by which the ZnO NPs cause cell death, whether they exert an intra- or extracellular effect, and the resistance among different cancer cell types to ZnO NP exposure. The present study quantifies the variability between the cellular toxicity, dynamics of cellular uptake, and dissolution of bare and RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp)-targeted ZnO NPs by MDA-MB-231 cells. Compared to bare ZnO NPs, RGD-targeting of the ZnO NPs to integrin αvβ3 receptors expressed on MDA-MB-231 cells appears to increase the toxicity of the ZnO NPs to breast cancer cells at lower doses. Confocal microscopy of live MDA-MB-231 cells confirms uptake of both classes of ZnO NPs with a commensurate rise in intracellular Zn(2+) concentration prior to cell death. The response of the cells within the population to intracellular Zn(2+) is highly heterogeneous. In addition, the results emphasize the utility of dynamic and quantitative imaging in understanding cell uptake and processing of targeted therapeutic ZnO NPs at the cellular level by heterogeneous cancer cell populations, which can be crucial for the development of optimized treatment strategies. PMID:27111660

  19. Intracellular microlasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humar, Matjaž; Hyun Yun, Seok

    2015-09-01

    Optical microresonators, which confine light within a small cavity, are widely exploited for various applications ranging from the realization of lasers and nonlinear devices to biochemical and optomechanical sensing. Here we use microresonators and suitable optical gain materials inside biological cells to demonstrate various optical functions in vitro including lasing. We explore two distinct types of microresonator—soft and hard—that support whispering-gallery modes. Soft droplets formed by injecting oil or using natural lipid droplets support intracellular laser action. The laser spectra from oil-droplet microlasers can chart cytoplasmic internal stress (˜500 pN μm-2) and its dynamic fluctuations at a sensitivity of 20 pN μm-2 (20 Pa). In a second form, whispering-gallery modes within phagocytized polystyrene beads of different sizes enable individual tagging of thousands of cells easily and, in principle, a much larger number by multiplexing with different dyes.

  20. Intracellular microlasers

    PubMed Central

    Humar, Matjaž; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Optical microresonators1 which confine light within a small cavity are widely exploited for various applications ranging from the realization of lasers2 and nonlinear devices3, 4, 5 to biochemical and optomechanical sensing6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11. Here we employ microresonators and suitable optical gain materials inside biological cells to demonstrate various optical functions in vitro including lasing. We explored two distinct types of microresonators: soft and hard, that support whispering-gallery modes (WGM). Soft droplets formed by injecting oil or using natural lipid droplets support intracellular laser action. The laser spectra from oil-droplet microlasers can chart cytoplasmic internal stress (~500 pN/μm2) and its dynamic fluctuations at a sensitivity of 20 pN/μm2 (20 Pa). In a second form, WGMs within phagocytized polystyrene beads of different sizes enable individual tagging of thousands of cells easily and, in principle, a much larger number by multiplexing with different dyes. PMID:26417383

  1. Managing intracellular transport

    PubMed Central

    Chua, John J.E.; Jahn, Reinhard; Klopfenstein, Dieter R.

    2013-01-01

    Formation and normal function of neuronal synapses are intimately dependent on the delivery to and removal of biological materials from synapses by the intracellular transport machinery. Indeed, defects in intracellular transport contribute to the development and aggravation of neurodegenerative disorders. Despite its importance, regulatory mechanisms underlying this machinery remain poorly defined. We recently uncovered a phosphorylation-regulated mechanism that controls FEZ1-mediated Kinesin-1-based delivery of Stx1 into neuronal axons. Using C. elegans as a model organism to investigate transport defects, we show that FEZ1 mutations resulted in abnormal Stx1 aggregation in neuronal cell bodies and axons. This phenomenon closely resembles transport defects observed in neurodegenerative disorders. Importantly, diminished transport due to mutations of FEZ1 and Kinesin-1 were concomitant with increased accumulation of autophagosomes. Here, we discuss the significance of our findings in a broader context in relation to regulation of Kinesin-mediated transport and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24058857

  2. Prolonged daily light exposure increases body fat mass through attenuation of brown adipose tissue activity

    PubMed Central

    Kooijman, Sander; van den Berg, Rosa; Ramkisoensing, Ashna; Boon, Mariëtte R.; Kuipers, Eline N.; Loef, Marieke; Zonneveld, Tom C. M.; Lucassen, Eliane A.; Sips, Hetty C. M.; Chatzispyrou, Iliana A.; Houtkooper, Riekelt H.; Meijer, Johanna H.; Coomans, Claudia P.; Biermasz, Nienke R.; Rensen, Patrick C. N.

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of circadian rhythmicity is associated with obesity and related disorders, including type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Specifically, prolonged artificial light exposure associates with obesity in humans, although the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here, we report that increasing the daily hours of light exposure increases body adiposity through attenuation of brown adipose tissue (BAT) activity, a major contributor of energy expenditure. Mice exposed to a prolonged day length of 16- and 24-h light, compared with regular 12-h light, showed increased adiposity without affecting food intake or locomotor activity. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that prolonged day length decreases sympathetic input into BAT and reduces β3-adrenergic intracellular signaling. Concomitantly, prolonging day length decreased the uptake of fatty acids from triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, as well as of glucose from plasma selectively by BAT. We conclude that impaired BAT activity is an important mediator in the association between disturbed circadian rhythm and adiposity, and anticipate that activation of BAT may overcome the adverse metabolic consequences of disturbed circadian rhythmicity. PMID:25964318

  3. Targeted Cancer Therapy: Correlative Light-Electron Microscopy Shows RGD-Targeted ZnO Nanoparticles Dissolve in the Intracellular Environment of Triple Negative Breast Cancer Cells and Cause Apoptosis with Intratumor Heterogeneity (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 11/2016).

    PubMed

    Othman, Basmah A; Greenwood, Christina; Abuelela, Ayman F; Bharath, Anil A; Chen, Shu; Theodorou, Ioannis; Douglas, Trevor; Uchida, Maskai; Ryan, Mary; Merzaban, Jasmeen S; Porter, Alexandra E

    2016-06-01

    On page 1310 J. S. Merzaban, A. E. Porter, and co-workers present fluorescently labeled RGD-targeted ZnO nanoparticles (NPs; green) for the targeted delivery of cytotoxic ZnO to integrin αvβ3 receptors expressed on triple negative breast cancer cells. Correlative light-electron microscopy shows that NPs dissolve into ionic Zn(2+) (blue) upon uptake and cause apoptosis (red) with intra-tumor heterogeneity, thereby providing a possible strategy for targeted breast cancer therapy. Cover design by Ivan Gromicho. PMID:27275627

  4. Methods to follow intracellular trafficking of cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Pärnaste, Ly; Arukuusk, Piret; Zagato, Elisa; Braeckmans, Kevin; Langel, Ülo

    2016-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are efficient vehicles to transport bioactive molecules into the cells. Despite numerous studies the exact mechanism by which CPPs facilitate delivery of cargo to its intracellular target is still debated. The current work presents methods that can be used for tracking CPP/pDNA complexes through endosomal transport and show the role of endosomal transport in the delivery of cargo. Separation of endosomal vesicles by differential centrifugation enables to pinpoint the localization of delivered cargo without labeling it and gives important quantitative information about pDNA trafficing in certain endosomal compartments. Single particle tracking (SPT) allows following individual CPP/cargo complex through endosomal path in live cells, using fluoresently labled cargo and green fluoresent protein expressing cells. These two different methods show similar results about tested NickFect/pDNA complexes intracellular trafficing. NF51 facilitates rapid internalization of complexes into the cells, prolongs their stay in early endosomes and promotes release to cytosol. NF1 is less capable to induce endosomal release and higher amount of complexes are routed to lysosomes for degradation. Our findings offer potential delivery vector for in vivo applications, NF51, where endosomal entrapment has been allayed. Furthermore, these methods are valuable tools to study other CPP-based delivery systems. PMID:26460120

  5. Calcium Imaging of AM Dyes Following Prolonged Incubation in Acute Neuronal Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Morley, John W.; Tapson, Jonathan; Breen, Paul P.; van Schaik, André

    2016-01-01

    Calcium-imaging is a sensitive method for monitoring calcium dynamics during neuronal activity. As intracellular calcium concentration is correlated to physiological and pathophysiological activity of neurons, calcium imaging with fluorescent indicators is one of the most commonly used techniques in neuroscience today. Current methodologies for loading calcium dyes into the tissue require prolonged incubation time (45–150 min), in addition to dissection and recovery time after the slicing procedure. This prolonged incubation curtails experimental time, as tissue is typically maintained for 6–8 hours after slicing. Using a recently introduced recovery chamber that extends the viability of acute brain slices to more than 24 hours, we tested the effectiveness of calcium AM staining following long incubation periods post cell loading and its impact on the functional properties of calcium signals in acute brain slices and wholemount retinae. We show that calcium dyes remain within cells and are fully functional >24 hours after loading. Moreover, the calcium dynamics recorded >24 hrs were similar to the calcium signals recorded in fresh tissue that was incubated for <4 hrs. These results indicate that long exposure of calcium AM dyes to the intracellular cytoplasm did not alter the intracellular calcium concentration, the functional range of the dye or viability of the neurons. This data extends our previous work showing that a custom recovery chamber can extend the viability of neuronal tissue, and reliable data for both electrophysiology and imaging can be obtained >24hrs after dissection. These methods will not only extend experimental time for those using acute neuronal tissue, but also may reduce the number of animals required to complete experimental goals. PMID:27183102

  6. Intracellular Parasite Invasion Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibley, L. D.

    2004-04-01

    Intracellular parasites use various strategies to invade cells and to subvert cellular signaling pathways and, thus, to gain a foothold against host defenses. Efficient cell entry, ability to exploit intracellular niches, and persistence make these parasites treacherous pathogens. Most intracellular parasites gain entry via host-mediated processes, but apicomplexans use a system of adhesion-based motility called ``gliding'' to actively penetrate host cells. Actin polymerization-dependent motility facilitates parasite migration across cellular barriers, enables dissemination within tissues, and powers invasion of host cells. Efficient invasion has brought widespread success to this group, which includes Toxoplasma, Plasmodium, and Cryptosporidium.

  7. Two complementary approaches for intracellular delivery of exogenous enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Rust, Aleksander; Hassan, Hazirah H. A.; Sedelnikova, Svetlana; Niranjan, Dhevahi; Hautbergue, Guillaume; Abbas, Shaymaa A.; Partridge, Lynda; Rice, David; Binz, Thomas; Davletov, Bazbek

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular delivery of biologically active proteins remains a formidable challenge in biomedical research. Here we show that biomedically relevant enzymes can be delivered into cells using a new DNA transfection reagent, lipofectamine 3000, allowing assessment of their intracellular functions. We also show that the J774.2 macrophage cell line exhibits unusual intracellular uptake of structurally and functionally distinct enzymes providing a convenient, reagent-free approach for evaluation of intracellular activities of enzymes. PMID:26207613

  8. Two complementary approaches for intracellular delivery of exogenous enzymes.

    PubMed

    Rust, Aleksander; Hassan, Hazirah H A; Sedelnikova, Svetlana; Niranjan, Dhevahi; Hautbergue, Guillaume; Abbas, Shaymaa A; Partridge, Lynda; Rice, David; Binz, Thomas; Davletov, Bazbek

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular delivery of biologically active proteins remains a formidable challenge in biomedical research. Here we show that biomedically relevant enzymes can be delivered into cells using a new DNA transfection reagent, lipofectamine 3000, allowing assessment of their intracellular functions. We also show that the J774.2 macrophage cell line exhibits unusual intracellular uptake of structurally and functionally distinct enzymes providing a convenient, reagent-free approach for evaluation of intracellular activities of enzymes. PMID:26207613

  9. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Prolong Cardiac Repolarization through Transcriptional Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Spence, Stan; Deurinck, Mark; Ju, Haisong; Traebert, Martin; McLean, LeeAnne; Marlowe, Jennifer; Emotte, Corinne; Tritto, Elaine; Tseng, Min; Shultz, Michael; Friedrichs, Gregory S

    2016-09-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are an emerging class of anticancer agents that modify gene expression by altering the acetylation status of lysine residues of histone proteins, thereby inducing transcription, cell cycle arrest, differentiation, and cell death or apoptosis of cancer cells. In the clinical setting, treatment with HDAC inhibitors has been associated with delayed cardiac repolarization and in rare instances a lethal ventricular tachyarrhythmia known as torsades de pointes. The mechanism(s) of HDAC inhibitor-induced effects on cardiac repolarization is unknown. We demonstrate that administration of structurally diverse HDAC inhibitors to dogs causes delayed but persistent increases in the heart rate corrected QT interval (QTc), an in vivo measure of cardiac repolarization, at timepoints far removed from the Tmax for parent drug and metabolites. Transcriptional profiling of ventricular myocardium from dogs treated with various HDAC inhibitors demonstrated effects on genes involved in protein trafficking, scaffolding and insertion of various ion channels into the cell membrane as well as genes for specific ion channel subunits involved in cardiac repolarization. Extensive in vitro ion channel profiling of various structural classes of HDAC inhibitors (and their major metabolites) by binding and acute patch clamp assays failed to show any consistent correlations with direct ion channel blockade. Drug-induced rescue of an intracellular trafficking-deficient mutant potassium ion channel, hERG (G601S), and decreased maturation (glycosylation) of wild-type hERG expressed by CHO cells in vitro correlated with prolongation of QTc intervals observed in vivo The results suggest that HDAC inhibitor-induced prolongation of cardiac repolarization may be mediated in part by transcriptional changes of genes required for ion channel trafficking and localization to the sarcolemma. These data have broad implications for the development of these drug classes and

  10. Prolonged Starvation—A Dangerous Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Runcie, J.; Thomson, T. J.

    1970-01-01

    Experience with 18 obese patients who have undergone prolonged (60 days) therapeutic starvation shows that in general this is a safe procedure, but there are significant associated hazards, particularly a breakdown in electrolyte homoeostasis. The need for close biochemical control of such patients is stressed. PMID:5454322

  11. Intracellular Penetration and Activity of Gemifloxacin in Human Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    García, Isabel; Pascual, Alvaro; Ballesta, Sofía; Joyanes, Providencia; Perea, Evelio J.

    2000-01-01

    The intracellular penetration and activity of gemifloxacin in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) were evaluated. Gemifloxacin reached intracellular concentrations eight times higher than extracellular concentrations. The uptake was rapid, reversible, and nonsaturable and was affected by environmental temperature, cell viability, and membrane stimuli. At therapeutic extracellular concentrations, gemifloxacin showed intracellular activity against Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:11036051

  12. Azelnidipine prevents cardiac dysfunction in streptozotocin-diabetic rats by reducing intracellular calcium accumulation, oxidative stress and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Numerous evidences suggest that diabetic heart is characterized by compromised ventricular contraction and prolonged relaxation attributable to multiple causative factors including calcium accumulation, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Therapeutic interventions to prevent calcium accumulation and oxidative stress could be therefore helpful in improving the cardiac function under diabetic condition. Methods This study was designed to examine the effect of long-acting calcium channel blocker (CCB), Azelnidipine (AZL) on contractile dysfunction, intracellular calcium (Ca2+) cycling proteins, stress-activated signaling molecules and apoptosis on cardiomyocytes in diabetes. Adult male Wistar rats were made diabetic by a single intraperitoneal (IP) injection of streptozotocin (STZ). Contractile functions were traced from live diabetic rats to isolated individual cardiomyocytes including peak shortening (PS), time-to-PS (TPS), time-to-relengthening (TR90), maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening (± dL/dt) and intracellular Ca2+ fluorescence. Results Diabetic heart showed significantly depressed PS, ± dL/dt, prolonged TPS, TR90 and intracellular Ca2+ clearing and showed an elevated resting intracellular Ca2+. AZL itself exhibited little effect on myocyte mechanics but it significantly alleviated STZ-induced myocyte contractile dysfunction. Diabetes increased the levels of superoxide, enhanced expression of the cardiac damage markers like troponin I, p67phox NADPH oxidase subunit, restored the levels of the mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD), calcium regulatory proteins RyR2 and SERCA2a, and suppressed the levels of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein. All of these STZ-induced alterations were reconciled by AZL treatment. Conclusion Collectively, the data suggest beneficial effect of AZL in diabetic cardiomyopathy via altering intracellular Ca2+ handling proteins and preventing apoptosis by its antioxidant property. PMID:22054019

  13. Chloride Channels of Intracellular Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, John C.; Kahl, Christina R.

    2010-01-01

    Proteins implicated as intracellular chloride channels include the intracellular ClC proteins, the bestrophins, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, the CLICs, and the recently described Golgi pH regulator. This paper examines current hypotheses regarding roles of intracellular chloride channels and reviews the evidence supporting a role in intracellular chloride transport for each of these proteins. PMID:20100480

  14. "The Show"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehring, John

    2004-01-01

    For the past 16 years, the blue-collar city of Huntington, West Virginia, has rolled out the red carpet to welcome young wrestlers and their families as old friends. They have come to town chasing the same dream for a spot in what many of them call "The Show". For three days, under the lights of an arena packed with 5,000 fans, the state's best…

  15. Glutamate-induced intracellular calcium oscillations in astrocytes with confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuan; Zhou, Wei; Liu, Xiuli; Zhu, Geng; Wu, Yuxiang; Luo, Qingming

    2006-02-01

    Changes in the intracellular Ca 2+ concentration ([Ca 2+]i) play a crucial role involved in the modulation of signal transduction, development, and plasticity in the CNS. Glial cells can respond to various stimuli with an increase in [Ca 2+]i. In this paper, we used confocal microscopy to study calcium transient induced by glutamate in cultured astrocytes. Firstly, 100 μM glutamate induced long-time intracellular calcium oscillations in astrocytes and only a single spike under calcium-free solution. When the concentration of glutamate decreased to 1 μM, only a single spike could be induced. It shows that intracellular calcium oscillations depend on agonist concentration and extracellular Ca 2+. Secondly, we investigated amplitude of responses under different stimulation. The amplitude of initial peak induced by 100 μM glutamate decreased in Ca 2+-free condition, whereas the duration of kinetics was prolonged. But both the amplitude and area of a single spike induced by 1 μM Glu decreased in Ca 2+-free condition. The results show that areaof peak is more accurate than amplitude to display transients of [Ca 2+]i. All results above suggest that astrocytes are not passive, they display diverse temporal and spatial increases in [Ca 2+]i in response to a variety of stimuli. These [Ca 2+]i increases provide a possible means for information coding.

  16. Prolonged hypothermia exposure diminishes neuroprotection for severe ischemic-hypoxic primary neurons.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiao-Ya; Zhu, Shu-Zhen; Xiang, Wei; Huang, Kai-Bin; Hu, Ya-Fang; Gu, Yong; Pan, Su-Yue

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to identify optimal mild hypothermic (MH) condition that would provide the best protection for neuronal cells undergoing severe ischemia and hypoxia. We also sought to determine if longer exposure to mild hypothermia would confer greater protection to severe ischemia and hypoxia in these cells. We designed a primary neuronal cell model for severe glucose and oxygen deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD/R) to simulate the hypoxic-ischemic condition of patients with severe stroke, trauma, or hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. We evaluated the viability of these neurons following 3 h of OGD/R and variable MH conditions including different temperatures and durations of OGD/R exposure. We further explored the effects of the optimal MH condition on several parts which are associated with mitochondrial apoptosis pathway: intracellular calcium, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and mitochondrial transmembrane potential (MTP). The results of this study showed that the apoptosis proportion (AP) and cell viability proportion (CVP) after OGD/R significantly varied depending on which MH condition cells were exposed to (p < 0.001). Further, our findings showed that prolonged MH reduced the neuroprotection to AP and CVP. We also determined that the optimal MH conditions (34 °C for 4.5 h) reduced intracellular calcium, ROS, and recovered MTP. These findings indicate that there is an optimal MH treatment strategy for severely hypoxia-ischemic neurons, prolonged duration might diminish the neuroprotection, and that MH treatment likely initiates neuroprotection by inhibiting the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. PMID:26802735

  17. Physiology Of Prolonged Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes physiological effects of prolonged bed rest. Rest for periods of 24 hours or longer deconditions body to some extent; healing proceeds simultaneously with deconditioning. Report provides details on shifts in fluid electrolytes and loss of lean body mass, which comprises everything in body besides fat - that is, water, muscle, and bone. Based on published research.

  18. Measures that Prolong Work Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nusberg, Charlotte

    1986-01-01

    Discusses measures that have been adopted by France, Great Britain, Sweden, the Netherlands, the United States, and Japan to prolong the work life of older workers. Measures include job transfer and exemption, dismissal protection, retirement policies, and reintegration of unemployed older workers. (JOW)

  19. Prolonged abulia following putaminal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Nagaratnam, N; Fanella, S; Gopinath, S; Goodwin, A

    2001-01-01

    Abulia, akinetic mutism, and other conditions causing reduced activity and slowness are a continuum of severity of behavior. Unilateral lesions usually cause transient symptoms. This article describes a patient with prolonged abulia lasting 12 weeks after aspontaneous left putaminal hemorrhage. He developed seizures that could be a contributing factor. The pathophysiologic mechanisms are discussed. PMID:17903806

  20. Glycan modification of antigen alters its intracellular routing in dendritic cells, promoting priming of T cells

    PubMed Central

    Streng-Ouwehand, Ingeborg; Ho, Nataschja I; Litjens, Manja; Kalay, Hakan; Boks, Martine Annemarie; Cornelissen, Lenneke AM; Kaur Singh, Satwinder; Saeland, Eirikur; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J; Ossendorp, Ferry A; Unger, Wendy WJ; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2016-01-01

    Antigen uptake by dendritic cells and intracellular routing of antigens to specific compartments is regulated by C-type lectin receptors that recognize glycan structures. We show that the modification of Ovalbumin (OVA) with the glycan-structure LewisX (LeX) re-directs OVA to the C-type lectin receptor MGL1. LeX-modification of OVA favored Th1 skewing of CD4+ T cells and enhanced cross-priming of CD8+ T cells. While cross-presentation of native OVA requires high antigen dose and TLR stimuli, LeX modification reduces the required amount 100-fold and obviates its dependence on TLR signaling. The OVA-LeX-induced enhancement of T cell cross-priming is MGL1-dependent as shown by reduced CD8+ effector T cell frequencies in MGL1-deficient mice. Moreover, MGL1-mediated cross-presentation of OVA-LeX neither required TAP-transporters nor Cathepsin-S and was still observed after prolonged intracellular storage of antigen in Rab11+LAMP1+ compartments. We conclude that controlled neo-glycosylation of antigens can crucially influence intracellular routing of antigens, the nature and strength of immune responses and should be considered for optimizing current vaccination strategies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11765.001 PMID:26999763

  1. Propofol-associated QTc prolongation

    PubMed Central

    Scalese, Michael J.; Herring, Holly R.; Rathbun, R. Chris; Skrepnek, Grant H.; Ripley, Toni L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Propofol is a preferred agent for sedation in patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) due, in part, to its established safety profile. Despite this, recent case reports have suggested a potential for prolongation of the corrected QT interval (QTc) in ICU patients receiving propofol, though limited empirical work has been conducted to evaluate this association. As such, the purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between propofol infusion and QTc prolongation in a historical cohort of ICU patients. Methods: A single-center, historical, observational, pre-post cohort analysis of medical records from admitted patients ⩾18 years old with cardiovascular disease was conducted, involving cases who received propofol infusion for ⩾3 hours with sequential electrocardiogram monitoring from 2006 to 2012. A multivariable, generalized linear model regression was employed to assess the primary outcome of on-propofol QTc interval (QTc2), controlling for various demographic and clinical factors. Results: A total of 96 patients met inclusion criteria, averaging 56.1 ± 14.1 years of age and 86.1 ± 25.0 kg, with 37.5% being female. A mean prolongation in QTc interval of 30.4 ± 55.5 ms (p < 0.001) was observed during the propofol infusion, with 43.8% of cases exhibiting an on-infusion QTc2 of ⩾ 500 ms. Regression analyses suggested that prolongation in on-propofol QTc was independently associated with baseline QTc interval and amiodarone use, while weight as inversely associated with QTc2 (p < 0.05). Conclusion: This historical cohort analysis of adult ICU patients receiving propofol suggests that on-infusion QTc prolongation was associated with increasing baseline QTc interval and with amiodarone use. Further research is needed to evaluate the clinical significance and cause-and-effect relationship between potential QTc changes and propofol use in the ICU. PMID:27298717

  2. Prolonged stimulus exposure reveals prolonged neurobehavioral response patterns.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Brett A; Woo, Cynthia C; Zeng, Yu; Xu, Zhe; Hingco, Edna E; Ong, Joan; Leon, Michael

    2010-05-15

    Although it has been shown repeatedly that minimum response times in sensory systems can be quite short, organisms more often continue to respond to sensory stimuli over considerably longer periods of time. The continuing response to sensory stimulation may be a more realistic assessment of natural sensory responses, so we determined for how long a stimulus would evoke a response in naïve, freely moving animals. Specifically, we determined for how long such rats responded to odorants during continuous passive exposures by monitoring their sniffing with whole-body plethysmography. We found that naïve rats continue to sniff odorants vigorously for up to 3 minutes, much longer than what has been reported for highly trained, highly motivated rats. Patterns of 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) uptake in the glomerular layer of the rat olfactory bulb also were seen after only 1-5 minutes of odorant exposure, overlapping with the period of increased respiration to odorants. Moreover, these 2-DG uptake patterns closely resembled the patterns that emerge from prolonged odorant exposures, suggesting that activity mapping over prolonged periods can identify areas of activity that are present when rats are still attending and responding to odorant stimuli. Given these findings, it seems important to consider the possibility that prolonged exposure to other sensory stimuli will reveal more realistic neural response patterns. PMID:20232477

  3. Nanovehicular Intracellular Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    PROKOP, ALES; DAVIDSON, JEFFREY M.

    2013-01-01

    This article provides an overview of principles and barriers relevant to intracellular drug and gene transport, accumulation and retention (collectively called as drug delivery) by means of nanovehicles (NV). The aim is to deliver a cargo to a particular intracellular site, if possible, to exert a local action. Some of the principles discussed in this article apply to noncolloidal drugs that are not permeable to the plasma membrane or to the blood–brain barrier. NV are defined as a wide range of nanosized particles leading to colloidal objects which are capable of entering cells and tissues and delivering a cargo intracelullarly. Different localization and targeting means are discussed. Limited discussion on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics is also presented. NVs are contrasted to micro-delivery and current nanotechnologies which are already in commercial use. Newer developments in NV technologies are outlined and future applications are stressed. We also briefly review the existing modeling tools and approaches to quantitatively describe the behavior of targeted NV within the vascular and tumor compartments, an area of particular importance. While we list “elementary” phenomena related to different level of complexity of delivery to cancer, we also stress importance of multi-scale modeling and bottom-up systems biology approach. PMID:18200527

  4. Nanovehicular intracellular delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Prokop, Ales; Davidson, Jeffrey M

    2008-09-01

    This article provides an overview of principles and barriers relevant to intracellular drug and gene transport, accumulation and retention (collectively called as drug delivery) by means of nanovehicles (NV). The aim is to deliver a cargo to a particular intracellular site, if possible, to exert a local action. Some of the principles discussed in this article apply to noncolloidal drugs that are not permeable to the plasma membrane or to the blood-brain barrier. NV are defined as a wide range of nanosized particles leading to colloidal objects which are capable of entering cells and tissues and delivering a cargo intracelullarly. Different localization and targeting means are discussed. Limited discussion on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics is also presented. NVs are contrasted to micro-delivery and current nanotechnologies which are already in commercial use. Newer developments in NV technologies are outlined and future applications are stressed. We also briefly review the existing modeling tools and approaches to quantitatively describe the behavior of targeted NV within the vascular and tumor compartments, an area of particular importance. While we list "elementary" phenomena related to different level of complexity of delivery to cancer, we also stress importance of multi-scale modeling and bottom-up systems biology approach. PMID:18200527

  5. Metabolism of normothermic woodchucks during prolonged fasting.

    PubMed

    Reidy, Shannon P; Weber, Jean-Michel

    2004-12-01

    The energy metabolism of hibernators has not been characterized for normothermic fasting, and our goal was to quantify oxidative fuel selection of non-hibernating woodchucks Marmota monax during prolonged food deprivation. Indirect calorimetry and nitrogen excretion measurements were used to assess changes in metabolic rate (VO2), fuel selection and composition of nitrogen wastes, as well as seasonal differences. For reference, matching experiments were also performed on rabbits. The results show that woodchucks have a higher metabolic rate in summer (271 micromol O2 kg(-1) min(-1)) than in spring (200 micromol O2 kg(-1) min(-1)) and that fasting-induced metabolic depression is only possible in summer (-25% in 14 days). The metabolic rate of rabbits is high at all times (383 micromol O2 kg(-1) min(-1)), but they show a more rapid depression in response to fasting (-32% in 7 days). Woodchucks have a naturally low reliance on proteins in the fed state (accounting for 8% VO2) in spring; 17% VO2 in summer; vs 28% VO2 in rabbits) and are able to decrease it even further during fasting (spring, 5% VO2); summer, 6% VO2; vs 20% VO2 in rabbits). This study shows that, apart from their notorious capacity for hibernation, woodchucks are particularly well adapted for normothermic fasting. Their ability to cope with prolonged food deprivation is based on a series of integrated responses eliciting deep metabolic depression and a rapid change in fuel selection to spare limited protein reserves. Information presently available on prolonged fasting suggests that such an ability for metabolic depression, possibly down to minimal levels still compatible with normothermic life, may be common among mammals. In contrast, the extreme protein sparing demonstrated in woodchucks is a unique metabolic feature of fasting champions. PMID:15579548

  6. GABAAergic stimulation modulates intracellular protein arginine methylation.

    PubMed

    Denman, Robert B; Xie, Wen; Merz, George; Sung, Ying-Ju

    2014-06-20

    Changes in cytoplasmic pH are known to regulate diverse cellular processes and influence neuronal activities. In neurons, the intracellular alkalization is shown to occur after stimulating several channels and receptors. For example, it has previously demonstrated in P19 neurons that a sustained intracellular alkalinization can be mediated by the Na(+)/H(+) antiporter. In addition, the benzodiazepine binding subtypes of the γ-amino butyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor mediate a transient intracellular alkalinization when they are stimulated. Because the activities of many enzymes are sensitive to pH shift, here we investigate the effects of intracellular pH modulation resulted from stimulating GABAA receptor on the protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMT) activities. We show that the major benzodiazepine subtype (2α1, 2β2, 1γ2) is constitutively expressed in both undifferentiated P19 cells and retinoic acid (RA) differentiated P19 neurons. Furthermore stimulation with diazepam and, diazepam plus muscimol produce an intracellular alkalinization that can be detected ex vivo with the fluorescence dye. The alkalinization results in significant perturbation in protein arginine methylation activity as measured in methylation assays with specific protein substrates. Altered protein arginine methylation is also observed when cells are treated with the GABAA agonist muscimol but not an antagonist, bicuculline. These data suggest that pH-dependent and pH-independent methylation pathways can be activated by GABAAergic stimulation, which we verified using hippocampal slice preparations from a mouse model of fragile X syndrome. PMID:24793772

  7. Chemical development of intracellular protein heterodimerizers.

    PubMed

    Erhart, Dominik; Zimmermann, Mirjam; Jacques, Olivier; Wittwer, Matthias B; Ernst, Beat; Constable, Edwin; Zvelebil, Marketa; Beaufils, Florent; Wymann, Matthias P

    2013-04-18

    Cell activation initiated by receptor ligands or oncogenes triggers complex and convoluted intracellular signaling. Techniques initiating signals at defined starting points and cellular locations are attractive to elucidate the output of selected pathways. Here, we present the development and validation of a protein heterodimerization system based on small molecules cross-linking fusion proteins derived from HaloTags and SNAP-tags. Chemical dimerizers of HaloTag and SNAP-tag (HaXS) show excellent selectivity and have been optimized for intracellular reactivity. HaXS force protein-protein interactions and can translocate proteins to various cellular compartments. Due to the covalent nature of the HaloTag-HaXS-SNAP-tag complex, intracellular dimerization can be easily monitored. First applications include protein targeting to cytoskeleton, to the plasma membrane, to lysosomes, the initiation of the PI3K/mTOR pathway, and multiplexed protein complex formation in combination with the rapamycin dimerization system. PMID:23601644

  8. Biodegradable silicon nanoneedles delivering nucleic acids intracellularly induce localized in vivo neovascularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiappini, C.; De Rosa, E.; Martinez, J. O.; Liu, X.; Steele, J.; Stevens, M. M.; Tasciotti, E.

    2015-05-01

    The controlled delivery of nucleic acids to selected tissues remains an inefficient process mired by low transfection efficacy, poor scalability because of varying efficiency with cell type and location, and questionable safety as a result of toxicity issues arising from the typical materials and procedures employed. High efficiency and minimal toxicity in vitro has been shown for intracellular delivery of nuclei acids by using nanoneedles, yet extending these characteristics to in vivo delivery has been difficult, as current interfacing strategies rely on complex equipment or active cell internalization through prolonged interfacing. Here, we show that a tunable array of biodegradable nanoneedles fabricated by metal-assisted chemical etching of silicon can access the cytosol to co-deliver DNA and siRNA with an efficiency greater than 90%, and that in vivo the nanoneedles transfect the VEGF-165 gene, inducing sustained neovascularization and a localized sixfold increase in blood perfusion in a target region of the muscle.

  9. Intracellular Sterol Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Mesmin, Bruno; Maxfield, Frederick R.

    2009-01-01

    We review the cellular mechanisms implicated in cholesterol trafficking and distribution. Recent studies have provided new information about the distribution of sterols within cells, including analysis of its transbilayer distribution. The cholesterol interaction with other lipids and its engagement in various trafficking processes will determine its proper level in a specific membrane; making the cholesterol distribution uneven among the various intracellular organelles. The cholesterol content is important since cholesterol plays an essential role in membranes by controlling their physicochemical properties as well as key cellular events such as signal transduction and protein trafficking. Cholesterol movement between cellular organelles is highly dynamic, and can be achieved by vesicular and non-vesicular processes. Various studies have analyzed the proteins that play a significant role in these processes, giving us new information about the relative importance of these two trafficking pathways in cholesterol transport. Although still poorly characterized in many trafficking routes, several potential sterol transport proteins have been described in detail; as a result, molecular mechanisms for sterol transport among membranes start to be appreciated. PMID:19286471

  10. Human muscle function following prolonged eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Sargeant, A J; Dolan, P

    1987-01-01

    4 subjects performed repeated eccentric contractions with leg extensors during prolonged downhill walking (-25% gradient) at 6.44 km.h-1 until collapse due to muscle weakness (range of exercise duration 29 to 40 min). During the exercise oxygen uptake rose progressively from approximately 45% of the previously determined VO2max at 10 min to approximately 65% at the end of the exercise. Following the exercise there was an immediate, significant, and sustained reduction in maximal voluntary isometric contraction, and short term (anaerobic) power output measured concentrically on an isokinetic ergometer. These reductions in muscle function persisted for 96 hours post exercise, and were reflected by significant reductions in the tension generated at low frequency (20 Hz) relative to higher frequency (50 Hz) percutaneous stimulation of the quadriceps. All four subjects showed an increase in plasma levels of creatine kinase post eccentric exercise. Performing concentric contractions by walking uphill for one hour at a significantly greater metabolic cost failed to induce comparable reductions in muscle function. These results provide evidence for the consequences of prolonged eccentric work upon dynamic function which complements earlier reports of structural, enzymatic, and static function changes. PMID:3678226

  11. Moving frames and prolongation algebras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estabrook, F. B.

    1982-01-01

    Differential ideals generated by sets of 2-forms which can be written with constant coefficients in a canonical basis of 1-forms are considered. By setting up a Cartan-Ehresmann connection, in a fiber bundle over a base space in which the 2-forms live, one finds an incomplete Lie algebra of vector fields in the fields in the fibers. Conversely, given this algebra (a prolongation algebra), one can derive the differential ideal. The two constructs are thus dual, and analysis of either derives properties of both. Such systems arise in the classical differential geometry of moving frames. Examples of this are discussed, together with examples arising more recently: the Korteweg-de Vries and Harrison-Ernst systems.

  12. INTRACELLULAR SIGNALING AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROTOXICITY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A book chapter in ?Molecular Toxicology: Transcriptional Targets? reviewed the role of intracellular signaling in the developmental neurotoxicity of environmental chemicals. This chapter covered a number of aspects including the development of the nervous system, role of intrace...

  13. Overexpression of hsp27 Rescued Neuronal Cell Death and Reduction in Life- and Health-Span in Drosophila melanogaster Against Prolonged Exposure to Dichlorvos.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ashutosh; Saini, Sanjay; Khatoon, Rehana; Sharma, Divya; Narayan, Gopeshwar; Kar Chowdhuri, Debapratim

    2016-07-01

    Long-term exposure to dichlorvos (O,O-dimethyl-2,2-dichlorovinyl phosphate (DDVP), an organophosphate pesticide) is reported to exert neurotoxicity, i.e., generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), oxidative damage, and neuronal cell death along with life- and health-span reduction in nontarget organisms including humans. However, studies on genetic modulation towards neuroprotection against prolonged DDVP exposure are elusive. Hsp27 (a small heat shock protein) is involved in various cellular processes and thus has attained emphasis as a therapeutic target. We aimed to examine the protective effect of hsp27 overexpression against prolonged DDVP exposure using an in vivo model Drosophila melanogaster. Flies were exposed to 15.0 ng/ml DDVP for a prolonged period to examine neuronal cell death, locomotor performance, and lifespan. After prolonged exposure, cell death, ROS level, glutathione depletion, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate level (NADPH), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) activities were examined in fly brain tissues at different days of age (days 10, 20, and 30). Flies with ubiquitous overexpression of hsp27 showed better resistance (improved lifespan and locomotor performance) in comparison to that targeted to motor neurons and nervous system. These flies also exhibited lesser intracellular ROS level and glutathione depletion by restoring G6PD activity, NADPH level, and TrxR activity in their brains thereby resisted neuronal cell death. Conversely, hsp27 knockdown flies exhibited reversal of the above endpoints. The study evidenced the neuroprotective efficacy of hsp27 overexpression against prolonged DDVP exposure and favored Hsp27 as a therapeutic target towards achieving better organismal (including human) health against long-term chemical exposure. PMID:26033218

  14. Pharmacometabolomic Approach to Predict QT Prolongation in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hae Won; Lim, Mi-sun; Seong, Sook Jin; Seo, Jeong Ju; Kim, Eun-Jung; Kang, Wonku; Yoon, Young-Ran

    2013-01-01

    Drug-induced torsades de pointes (TdP), a life-threatening arrhythmia associated with prolongation of the QT interval, has been a significant reason for withdrawal of several medicines from the market. Prolongation of the QT interval is considered as the best biomarker for predicting the torsadogenic risk of a new chemical entity. Because of the difficulty assessing the risk for TdP during drug development, we evaluated the metabolic phenotype for predicting QT prolongation induced by sparfloxacin, and elucidated the metabolic pathway related to the QT prolongation. We performed electrocardiography analysis and liquid chromatography–mass spectroscopy-based metabolic profiling of plasma samples obtained from 15 guinea pigs after administration of sparfloxacin at doses of 33.3, 100, and 300 mg/kg. Principal component analysis and partial least squares modelling were conducted to select the metabolites that substantially contributed to the prediction of QT prolongation. QTc increased significantly with increasing dose (r = 0.93). From the PLS analysis, the key metabolites that showed the highest variable importance in the projection values (>1.5) were selected, identified, and used to determine the metabolic network. In particular, cytidine-5′-diphosphate (CDP), deoxycorticosterone, L-aspartic acid and stearic acid were found to be final metabolomic phenotypes for the prediction of QT prolongation. Metabolomic phenotypes for predicting drug-induced QT prolongation of sparfloxacin were developed and can be applied to cardiac toxicity screening of other drugs. In addition, this integrative pharmacometabolomic approach would serve as a good tool for predicting pharmacodynamic or toxicological effects caused by changes in dose. PMID:23593245

  15. Physiology of prolonged bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.

    1988-01-01

    Bed rest has been a normal procedure used by physicians for centuries in the treatment of injury and disease. Exposure of patients to prolonged bed rest in the horizontal position induces adaptive deconditioning responses. While deconditioning responses are appropriate for patients or test subjects in the horizontal position, they usually result in adverse physiological responses (fainting, muscular weakness) when the patient assume the upright posture. These deconditioning responses result from reduction in hydrostatic pressure within the cardiovascular system, virtual elimination of longitudinal pressure on the long bones, some decrease in total body metabolism, changes in diet, and perhaps psychological impact from the different environment. Almost every system in the body is affected. An early stimulus is the cephalic shift of fluid from the legs which increases atrial pressure and induces compensatory responses for fluid and electrolyte redistribution. Without countermeasures, deterioration in strength and muscle function occurs within 1 wk while increased calcium loss may continue for months. Research should also focus on drug and carbohydrate metabolism.

  16. Imaging and controlling intracellular reactions: Lysosome transport as a function of diameter and the intracellular synthesis of conducting polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Christine

    2014-03-01

    Eukaryotic cells are the ultimate complex environment with intracellular chemical reactions regulated by the local cellular environment. For example, reactants are sequestered into specific organelles to control local concentration and pH, motor proteins transport reactants within the cell, and intracellular vesicles undergo fusion to bring reactants together. Current research in the Payne Lab in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Georgia Tech is aimed at understanding and utilizing this complex environment to control intracellular chemical reactions. This will be illustrated using two examples, intracellular transport as a function of organelle diameter and the intracellular synthesis of conducting polymers. Using single particle tracking fluorescence microscopy, we measured the intracellular transport of lysosomes, membrane-bound organelles, as a function of diameter as they underwent transport in living cells. Both ATP-dependent active transport and diffusion were examined. As expected, diffusion scales with the diameter of the lysosome. However, active transport is unaffected suggesting that motor proteins are insensitive to cytosolic drag. In a second example, we utilize intracellular complexity, specifically the distinct micro-environments of different organelles, to carry out chemical reactions. We show that catalase, found in the peroxisomes of cells, can be used to catalyze the polymerization of the conducting polymer PEDOT:PSS. More importantly, we have found that a range of iron-containing biomolecules are suitable catalysts with different iron-containing biomolecules leading to different polymer properties. These experiments illustrate the advantage of intracellular complexity for the synthesis of novel materials.

  17. [Excessive energy drink consumption caused marked QT prolongation. Case report].

    PubMed

    Tomcsányi, János; Jávor, Kinga

    2015-10-25

    The authors report a case of a 22-year-old man with atypical chest pain after consumption of six energy drinks (1.5 liter containing 470 mg coffein) with vodka. On admission ECG showed marked QT/QTc prolongation (QT/QTc, 520/580 msec). Next day the QT/QTc returned to fully normal (QT/QTc, 360/430 msec). It was assumed that the patient had a silent long QT syndrome and that high dose of highly caffeinated energy drink triggered the (paradoxical) prolonged QT/QTc. The authors conclude that excessive energy drink intake with alcohol or during physical exercise should be avoided. PMID:26477618

  18. TgERK7 is involved in the intracellular proliferation of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong-Yuan; Wang, Ze-Dong; Huang, Si-Yang; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Liu, Quan

    2016-09-01

    Toxoplasma gondii uses a unique mechanism to fulfill its asexual life cycles by which the parasite can infect all the warm-blooded animals including humans. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) or extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway widely existed in eukaryotic cells mediates the conversion of environmental stimuli to intracellular events such as proliferation and differentiation. Their counterparts have been identified in Apicomplexan parasites such as ERK7 in T. gondii. To confirm whether the unique mechanism of T. gondii is relevant to MAPK/ERK member, we created a mutant (ΔTgERK7) in GT1 tachyzoites using double homologous recombination method. Our results of virulence evaluation showed 100 % survival of all the ΔTgERK7-infected mice until 35 days post-challenge compared to no survival in wild-type GT1-infected group (10.6 ± 0.34 days). Furthermore, lower parasite loads were detected in the peritoneal fluid of ΔTgERK7-infected mice (P < 0.05). To ensure whether or not ERK7 gene knockout leads to the growth deficiency of T. gondii, the intracellular proliferation of ΔTgERK7 was also examined in vitro. Our data indicated that the proliferation of ΔTgERK7 parasites was significantly prolonged in comparison with wild-type GT1 tachyzoites (P < 0.05). Therefore, we concluded that TgERK7 is important for the intracellular proliferation of T. gondii, which further emphasized that MAPK/ERK derived from T. gondii participates in the regulation of the asexual life cycles to ensure the survival and reinfections of this parasite. PMID:27150970

  19. The CovS/CovR acid response regulator is required for intracellular survival of group B Streptococcus in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Cumley, Nicola J; Smith, Leanne M; Anthony, Mark; May, Robin C

    2012-05-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a leading cause of neonatal meningitis and septicemia. The ability of this organism to survive inside phagocytic cells is poorly understood but thought to be an important step for the establishment of disease in the host. Here, we demonstrate that GBS shows prolonged survival within J774 macrophages and that the capacity to survive is not significantly changed across a diverse range of strains representing different serotypes, multilocus sequence types (MLST), and sites of clinical isolation. Using staining for the lysosome-associated membrane protein (LAMP) and by pharmacological inhibition of phagosome acidification, we demonstrate that streptococci reside in a phagosome and that acidification of the phagosome is required for GBS to survive intracellularly. Moreover, we show that the GBS two-component system CovS/CovR, which is the major acid response regulator in this organism, is required for survival inside the phagosome. PMID:22331428

  20. The CovS/CovR Acid Response Regulator Is Required for Intracellular Survival of Group B Streptococcus in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Cumley, Nicola J.; Smith, Leanne M.; Anthony, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a leading cause of neonatal meningitis and septicemia. The ability of this organism to survive inside phagocytic cells is poorly understood but thought to be an important step for the establishment of disease in the host. Here, we demonstrate that GBS shows prolonged survival within J774 macrophages and that the capacity to survive is not significantly changed across a diverse range of strains representing different serotypes, multilocus sequence types (MLST), and sites of clinical isolation. Using staining for the lysosome-associated membrane protein (LAMP) and by pharmacological inhibition of phagosome acidification, we demonstrate that streptococci reside in a phagosome and that acidification of the phagosome is required for GBS to survive intracellularly. Moreover, we show that the GBS two-component system CovS/CovR, which is the major acid response regulator in this organism, is required for survival inside the phagosome. PMID:22331428

  1. Calcium Transients Closely Reflect Prolonged Action Potentials in iPSC Models of Inherited Cardiac Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, C. Ian; Baba, Shiro; Nakamura, Kenta; Hua, Ethan A.; Sears, Marie A.F.; Fu, Chi-cheng; Zhang, Jianhua; Balijepalli, Sadguna; Tomoda, Kiichiro; Hayashi, Yohei; Lizarraga, Paweena; Wojciak, Julianne; Scheinman, Melvin M.; Aalto-Setälä, Katriina; Makielski, Jonathan C.; January, Craig T.; Healy, Kevin E.; Kamp, Timothy J.; Yamanaka, Shinya; Conklin, Bruce R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Long-QT syndrome mutations can cause syncope and sudden death by prolonging the cardiac action potential (AP). Ion channels affected by mutations are various, and the influences of cellular calcium cycling on LQTS cardiac events are unknown. To better understand LQTS arrhythmias, we performed current-clamp and intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) measurements on cardiomyocytes differentiated from patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS-CM). In myocytes carrying an LQT2 mutation (HERG-A422T), APs and [Ca2+]i transients were prolonged in parallel. APs were abbreviated by nifedipine exposure and further lengthened upon releasing intracellularly stored Ca2+. Validating this model, control iPS-CM treated with HERG-blocking drugs recapitulated the LQT2 phenotype. In LQT3 iPS-CM, expressing NaV1.5-N406K, APs and [Ca2+]i transients were markedly prolonged. AP prolongation was sensitive to tetrodotoxin and to inhibiting Na+-Ca2+ exchange. These results suggest that LQTS mutations act partly on cytosolic Ca2+ cycling, potentially providing a basis for functionally targeted interventions regardless of the specific mutation site. PMID:25254341

  2. Competing for Consciousness: Prolonged Mask Exposure Reduces Object Substitution Masking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodhew, Stephanie C.; Visser, Troy A. W.; Lipp, Ottmar V.; Dux, Paul E.

    2011-01-01

    In object substitution masking (OSM) a sparse, temporally trailing 4-dot mask impairs target identification, even though it has different contours from, and does not spatially overlap with the target. Here, we demonstrate a previously unknown characteristic of OSM: Observers show reduced masking at prolonged (e.g., 640 ms) relative to intermediate…

  3. Recognition Memory Is Impaired in Children after Prolonged Febrile Seizures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinos, Marina M.; Yoong, Michael; Patil, Shekhar; Chin, Richard F. M.; Neville, Brian G.; Scott, Rod C.; de Haan, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Children with a history of a prolonged febrile seizure show signs of acute hippocampal injury on magnetic resonance imaging. In addition, animal studies have shown that adult rats who suffered febrile seizures during development reveal memory impairments. Together, these lines of evidence suggest that memory impairments related to hippocampal…

  4. Light adaptation of invertebrate photoreceptors: influence of intracellular pH buffering capacity.

    PubMed Central

    Bolsover, S R; Brown, J E

    1982-01-01

    1. The possible role of pH changes in mediating light adaptation in Limulus ventral photoreceptor cells was studied by intracellular injection of zwitterionic pH buffers. The intracellular concentration of buffer was estimated by inclusion of a radioactive marker in the injection solution. 2. The light-induced increase of intracellular Ca2+ concentration was monitored by intracellular aequorin. The light-induced increase of Ca2+ concentration was not markedly altered by injection of pH buffer to an intracellular concentration of about 200 mM. 3. The progressive decrease in responsiveness during intracellular ionophoretic injection of Ca2+ was not markedly altered by injection of pH buffer to an intracellular concentration of about 200 mM. 4. Photoreceptors of both Limulus and Balanus were impaled with two micropipettes and voltage clamped. Membrane current induced by a prolonged steady illumination declined from an early transient to a plateau. This delayed decline of current indicates a light-induced reduction of sensitivity (i.e. light adaptation). The wave forms were similar before and after injection of pH buffer to an intracellular concentration of about 200 mM. 5. We conclude that it is unlikely that a light-induced change of cytosolic pH mediates light adaptation in Limulus (and Balanus) photoreceptors. PMID:7175745

  5. A practical approach for intracellular protein delivery

    PubMed Central

    Biri, Stéphanie; Adib, Abdennaji; Erbacher, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    Protein delivery represents a powerful tool for experiments in live cells including studies of protein-protein interactions, protein interference with blocking antibodies, intracellular trafficking and protein or peptide biological functions. Most available reagents dedicated to the protein delivery allow efficient crossing of the plasma membrane. Nevertheless, the major disadvantage for these reagents is a weak release of the delivered protein into the cytoplasm. In this publication we demonstrate efficient protein delivery with a non-peptide based reagent, in human epithelial carcinoma HeLa cells and primary human skin fibroblasts. Using a fluorescent protein in combination with fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence-assisted cell sorting analysis, we show that the delivered protein is indeed released effectively in the cytoplasm, as expected for a dedicated carrier. Furthermore, we present a step-by-step method to optimize conditions for successful intracellular protein delivery. PMID:19002840

  6. Intracellular Pressure Dynamics in Blebbing Cells.

    PubMed

    Strychalski, Wanda; Guy, Robert D

    2016-03-01

    Blebs are pressure-driven protrusions that play an important role in cell migration, particularly in three-dimensional environments. A bleb is initiated when the cytoskeleton detaches from the cell membrane, resulting in the pressure-driven flow of cytosol toward the area of detachment and local expansion of the cell membrane. Recent experiments involving blebbing cells have led to conflicting hypotheses regarding the timescale of intracellular pressure propagation. The interpretation of one set of experiments supports a poroelastic model of the cytoplasm that leads to slow pressure equilibration when compared to the timescale of bleb expansion. A different study concludes that pressure equilibrates faster than the timescale of bleb expansion. To address this discrepancy, a dynamic computational model of the cell was developed that includes mechanics of and the interactions among the cytoplasm, the actin cortex, the cell membrane, and the cytoskeleton. The model results quantify the relationship among cytoplasmic rheology, pressure, and bleb expansion dynamics, and provide a more detailed picture of intracellular pressure dynamics. This study shows the elastic response of the cytoplasm relieves pressure and limits bleb size, and that both permeability and elasticity of the cytoplasm determine bleb expansion time. Our model with a poroelastic cytoplasm shows that pressure disturbances from bleb initiation propagate faster than the timescale of bleb expansion and that pressure equilibrates slower than the timescale of bleb expansion. The multiple timescales in intracellular pressure dynamics explain the apparent discrepancy in the interpretation of experimental results. PMID:26958893

  7. Intracellular auxin transport in pollen

    PubMed Central

    Dal Bosco, Cristina; Dovzhenko, Alexander; Palme, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Cellular auxin homeostasis is controlled at many levels that include auxin biosynthesis, auxin metabolism, and auxin transport. In addition to intercellular auxin transport, auxin homeostasis is modulated by auxin flow through the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). PIN5, a member of the auxin efflux facilitators PIN protein family, was the first protein to be characterized as an intracellular auxin transporter. We demonstrated that PIN8, the closest member of the PIN family to PIN5, represents another ER-residing auxin transporter. PIN8 is specifically expressed in the male gametophyte and is located in the ER. By combining genetic, physiological, cellular and biochemical data we demonstrated a role for PIN8 in intracellular auxin homeostasis. Although our investigation shed light on intracellular auxin transport in pollen, the physiological function of PIN8 still remains to be elucidated. Here we discuss our data taking in consideration other recent findings. PMID:22990451

  8. Intracellular Acidosis Enhances the Excitability of Working Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Thomas H.; Nielsen, Ole B.; Lamb, Graham D.; Stephenson, D. George

    2004-08-01

    Intracellular acidification of skeletal muscles is commonly thought to contribute to muscle fatigue. However, intracellular acidosis also acts to preserve muscle excitability when muscles become depolarized, which occurs with working muscles. Here, we show that this process may be mediated by decreased chloride permeability, which enables action potentials to still be propagated along the internal network of tubules in a muscle fiber (the T system) despite muscle depolarization. These results implicate chloride ion channels in muscle function and emphasize that intracellular acidosis of muscle has protective effects during muscle fatigue.

  9. Are steady magnetospheric convection events prolonged substorms?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walach, M.-T.; Milan, S. E.

    2015-03-01

    Magnetospheric modes, including substorms, sawtooth events, and steady magnetospheric convection events, have in the past been described as different responses of the magnetosphere to coupling with the solar wind. Using previously determined event lists for sawtooth events, steady magnetospheric convection events, and substorms, we produce a statistical study of these event types to examine their similarities and behavior in terms of solar wind parameters, auroral brightness, open magnetospheric flux, and geomagnetic indices. A superposed epoch analysis shows that individual sawteeth show the same signatures as substorms but occur during more extreme cases of solar wind driving as well as geomagnetic activity. We also explore the limitations of current methods of identifying steady magnetospheric convection events and explain why some of those events are flagged inappropriately. We show that 58% of the steady magnetospheric convection events considered, as identified by criteria defined in previous studies are part of a prolonged version of substorms due to continued dayside driving during expansion phase. The remaining 42% are episodes of enhanced magnetospheric convection, occurring after extended periods of dayside driving.

  10. The Nod1, Nod2, and Rip2 Axis Contributes to Host Immune Defense against Intracellular Acinetobacter baumannii Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bist, Pradeep; Dikshit, Neha; Koh, Tse Hsien; Mortellaro, Alessandra; Tan, Thuan Tong

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a major extensively drug-resistant lethal human nosocomial bacterium. However, the host innate immune mechanisms controlling A. baumannii are not well understood. Although viewed as an extracellular pathogen, A. baumannii can also invade and survive intracellularly. However, whether host innate immune pathways sensing intracellular bacteria contribute to immunity against A. baumannii is not known. Here, we provide evidence for the first time that intracellular antibacterial innate immune receptors Nod1 and Nod2, and their adaptor Rip2, play critical roles in the sensing and clearance of A. baumannii by human airway epithelial cells in vitro. A. baumannii infection upregulated Rip2 expression. Silencing of Nod1, Nod2, and Rip2 expression profoundly increased intracellular invasion and prolonged the multiplication and survival of A. baumannii in lung epithelial cells. Notably, the Nod1/2-Rip2 axis did not contribute to the control of A. baumannii infection of human macrophages, indicating that they play cell type-specific roles. The Nod1/2-Rip2 axis was needed for A. baumannii infection-induced activation of NF-κB but not mitogen-activated protein kinases. Moreover, the Nod1/2-Rip2 axis was critical to induce optimal cytokine and chemokine responses to A. baumannii infection. Mechanistic studies showed that the Nod1/2 pathway contributed to the innate control of A. baumannii infection through the production of β-defensin 2 by airway epithelial cells. This study revealed new insights into the immune control of A. baumannii and may contribute to the development of effective immune therapeutics and vaccines against A. baumannii. PMID:24366254

  11. Liver cancer cells: targeting and prolonged-release drug carriers consisting of mesoporous silica nanoparticles and alginate microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yu-Te; Liu, Chia-Hung; Yu, Jiashing; Wu, Kevin C-W

    2014-01-01

    A new microsphere consisting of inorganic mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) and organic alginate (denoted as MSN@Alg) was successfully synthesized by air-dynamic atomization and applied to the intracellular drug delivery systems (DDS) of liver cancer cells with sustained release and specific targeting properties. MSN@Alg microspheres have the advantages of MSN and alginate, where MSN provides a large surface area for high drug loading and alginate provides excellent biocompatibility and COOH functionality for specific targeting. Rhodamine 6G was used as a model drug, and the sustained release behavior of the rhodamine 6G-loaded MSN@Alg microspheres can be prolonged up to 20 days. For targeting therapy, the anticancer drug doxorubicin was loaded into MSN@Alg microspheres, and the (lysine)4-tyrosine-arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (K4YRGD) peptide was functionalized onto the surface of MSN@Alg for targeting liver cancer cells, hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2). The results of the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and confocal laser scanning microscopy indicate that the MSN@Alg microspheres were successfully uptaken by HepG2 without apparent cytotoxicity. In addition, the intracellular drug delivery efficiency was greatly enhanced (ie, 3.5-fold) for the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD)-labeled, doxorubicin-loaded MSN@Alg drug delivery system compared with the non-RGD case. The synthesized MSN@Alg microspheres show great potential as drug vehicles with high biocompatibility, sustained release, and targeting features for future intracellular DDS. PMID:24940057

  12. A bacteriophage endolysin that eliminates intracellular streptococci.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yang; Barros, Marilia; Vennemann, Tarek; Gallagher, D Travis; Yin, Yizhou; Linden, Sara B; Heselpoth, Ryan D; Spencer, Dennis J; Donovan, David M; Moult, John; Fischetti, Vincent A; Heinrich, Frank; Lösche, Mathias; Nelson, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    PlyC, a bacteriophage-encoded endolysin, lyses Streptococcus pyogenes (Spy) on contact. Here, we demonstrate that PlyC is a potent agent for controlling intracellular Spy that often underlies refractory infections. We show that the PlyC holoenzyme, mediated by its PlyCB subunit, crosses epithelial cell membranes and clears intracellular Spy in a dose-dependent manner. Quantitative studies using model membranes establish that PlyCB interacts strongly with phosphatidylserine (PS), whereas its interaction with other lipids is weak, suggesting specificity for PS as its cellular receptor. Neutron reflection further substantiates that PlyC penetrates bilayers above a PS threshold concentration. Crystallography and docking studies identify key residues that mediate PlyCB-PS interactions, which are validated by site-directed mutagenesis. This is the first report that a native endolysin can traverse epithelial membranes, thus substantiating the potential of PlyC as an antimicrobial for Spy in the extracellular and intracellular milieu and as a scaffold for engineering other functionalities. PMID:26978792

  13. A bacteriophage endolysin that eliminates intracellular streptococci

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yang; Barros, Marilia; Vennemann, Tarek; Gallagher, D Travis; Yin, Yizhou; Linden, Sara B; Heselpoth, Ryan D; Spencer, Dennis J; Donovan, David M; Moult, John; Fischetti, Vincent A; Heinrich, Frank; Lösche, Mathias; Nelson, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    PlyC, a bacteriophage-encoded endolysin, lyses Streptococcus pyogenes (Spy) on contact. Here, we demonstrate that PlyC is a potent agent for controlling intracellular Spy that often underlies refractory infections. We show that the PlyC holoenzyme, mediated by its PlyCB subunit, crosses epithelial cell membranes and clears intracellular Spy in a dose-dependent manner. Quantitative studies using model membranes establish that PlyCB interacts strongly with phosphatidylserine (PS), whereas its interaction with other lipids is weak, suggesting specificity for PS as its cellular receptor. Neutron reflection further substantiates that PlyC penetrates bilayers above a PS threshold concentration. Crystallography and docking studies identify key residues that mediate PlyCB–PS interactions, which are validated by site-directed mutagenesis. This is the first report that a native endolysin can traverse epithelial membranes, thus substantiating the potential of PlyC as an antimicrobial for Spy in the extracellular and intracellular milieu and as a scaffold for engineering other functionalities. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13152.001 PMID:26978792

  14. Prolonged Speech and Modification of Stuttering: Perceptual, Acoustic, and Electroglottographic Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Packman, Ann; And Others

    1994-01-01

    This study investigated changes in the speech patterns of young adult male subjects when stuttering was modified by deliberately prolonging speech. Three subjects showed clinically significant stuttering reductions when using prolonged speech to reduce their stuttering. Resulting speech was perceptually stutter free. Acoustic and…

  15. Prolonged partial epilepsy: a case report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, M.A.

    1980-11-01

    The case study of a patient with prolonged partial epilepsy is presented. There was a discrepancy between the extent of the abnormality seen on the radionuclide angiogram and that seen on the static brain scan.

  16. Stigma Prolongs Global HIV Epidemic Among Gays

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159757.html Stigma Prolongs Global HIV Epidemic Among Gays High-risk men still ... some countries will repeal anti-gay laws. "The global epidemic of HIV in gay men is ongoing ...

  17. Intracellular Delivery System for Antibody–Peptide Drug Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Berguig, Geoffrey Y; Convertine, Anthony J; Frayo, Shani; Kern, Hanna B; Procko, Erik; Roy, Debashish; Srinivasan, Selvi; Margineantu, Daciana H; Booth, Garrett; Palanca-Wessels, Maria Corinna; Baker, David; Hockenbery, David; Press, Oliver W; Stayton, Patrick S

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies armed with biologic drugs could greatly expand the therapeutic potential of antibody–drug conjugates for cancer therapy, broadening their application to disease targets currently limited by intracellular delivery barriers. Additional selectivity and new therapeutic approaches could be realized with intracellular protein drugs that more specifically target dysregulated pathways in hematologic cancers and other malignancies. A multifunctional polymeric delivery system for enhanced cytosolic delivery of protein drugs has been developed that incorporates endosomal-releasing activity, antibody targeting, and a biocompatible long-chain ethylene glycol component for optimized safety, pharmacokinetics, and tumor biodistribution. The pH-responsive polymeric micelle carrier, with an internalizing anti-CD22 monoclonal targeting antibody, effectively delivered a proapoptotic Bcl-2 interacting mediator (BIM) peptide drug that suppressed tumor growth for the duration of treatment and prolonged survival in a xenograft mouse model of human B-cell lymphoma. Antitumor drug activity was correlated with a mechanistic induction of the Bcl-2 pathway biomarker cleaved caspase-3 and a marked decrease in the Ki-67 proliferation biomarker. Broadening the intracellular target space by more effective delivery of protein/peptide drugs could expand the repertoire of antibody–drug conjugates to currently undruggable disease-specific targets and permit tailored drug strategies to stratified subpopulations and personalized medicines. PMID:25669432

  18. [A case of prolonged paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Akiko; Ide, Shuhei; Iwasaki, Yuji; Kaga, Makiko; Arima, Masataka

    2016-03-01

    We report the case of a 4-year-old girl who presented with paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity (PSH), after developing severe hypoxic-ischemic-encephalopathy because of cardiopulmonary arrest. She showed dramatic paroxysmal sympathetic activity with dystonia. She was treated with wide variety of medications against PSH, which were found to be effective in previous studies. Among them, morphine, bromocriptine, propranolol, and clonidine were effective in reducing the frequency of her attacks while gabapentin, baclofen, dantrolene, and benzodiazepine were ineffective. Though the paroxysms decreased markedly after the treatment, they could not be completely controlled beyond 500 days. Following the treatment, levels of plasma catecholamines and their urinary metabolites decreased to normal during inter- paroxysms. However, once a paroxysm had recurred, these levels were again very high. This case study is considered significant for two rea- sons. One is that PSH among children have been rarely reported, and the other is that this case of prolonged PSH delineated the transition of plasma catecholamines during the treatment. The excitatory: inhibitory ratio (EIR) model proposed by Baguley was considered while dis- cussing drug sensitivity in this case. Accumulation of similar case studies will help establish more effective treatment strategies and elucidate the pathophysiology of PSH. PMID:27149743

  19. Primary Pulmonary Synovial Sarcoma Showing a Prolonged Survival with Multimodality Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Hirokazu; Hanibuchi, Masaki; Takizawa, Hiromitsu; Sakiyama, Shoji; Sumitomo, Hiroyuki; Iwamoto, Seiji; Ikushima, Hitoshi; Nakajima, Kohei; Nagahiro, Shinji; Yamago, Taito; Toyoda, Yuko; Bando, Yoshimi; Nishioka, Yasuhiko

    2016-01-01

    A 54-year-old man was referred to our hospital due to a mass shadow noted on a chest X-ray. Thoracoscopic lobectomy yielded a diagnosis of primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma according to the histology and SYT-SSX1 gene analyses. Five months after the thoracic surgery, he developed brain metastasis; therefore, we performed resection of the brain metastatic focus followed by radiotherapy. As a local recurrence in the thoracic cavity concurrently emerged, systemic chemotherapy was also administered. These observations indicated that a multidisciplinary approach may be useful against primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma, although there is presently no established therapeutic strategy due to its rarity and highly aggressive nature. PMID:26875964

  20. ROS and intracellular ion channels.

    PubMed

    Kiselyov, Kirill; Muallem, Shmuel

    2016-08-01

    Oxidative stress is a well-known driver of numerous pathological processes involving protein and lipid peroxidation and DNA damage. The resulting increase of pro-apoptotic pressure drives tissue damage in a host of conditions, including ischemic stroke and reperfusion injury, diabetes, death in acute pancreatitis and neurodegenerative diseases. Somewhat less frequently discussed, but arguably as important, is the signaling function of oxidative stress stemming from the ability of oxidative stress to modulate ion channel activity. The evidence for the modulation of the intracellular ion channels and transporters by oxidative stress is constantly emerging and such evidence suggests new regulatory and pathological circuits that can be explored towards new treatments for diseases in which oxidative stress is an issue. In this review we summarize the current knowledge on the effects of oxidative stress on the intracellular ion channels and transporters and their role in cell function. PMID:26995054

  1. Direct Measurement of Intracellular Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Petrie, Ryan J.; Koo, Hyun

    2014-01-01

    A method to directly measure the intracellular pressure of adherent, migrating cells is described in the Basic Protocol. This approach is based on the servo-null method where a microelectrode is introduced into the cell to directly measure the physical pressure of the cytoplasm. We also describe the initial calibration of the microelectrode as well as the application of the method to cells migrating inside three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix (ECM). PMID:24894836

  2. Stochastic models of intracellular transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressloff, Paul C.; Newby, Jay M.

    2013-01-01

    The interior of a living cell is a crowded, heterogenuous, fluctuating environment. Hence, a major challenge in modeling intracellular transport is to analyze stochastic processes within complex environments. Broadly speaking, there are two basic mechanisms for intracellular transport: passive diffusion and motor-driven active transport. Diffusive transport can be formulated in terms of the motion of an overdamped Brownian particle. On the other hand, active transport requires chemical energy, usually in the form of adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis, and can be direction specific, allowing biomolecules to be transported long distances; this is particularly important in neurons due to their complex geometry. In this review a wide range of analytical methods and models of intracellular transport is presented. In the case of diffusive transport, narrow escape problems, diffusion to a small target, confined and single-file diffusion, homogenization theory, and fractional diffusion are considered. In the case of active transport, Brownian ratchets, random walk models, exclusion processes, random intermittent search processes, quasi-steady-state reduction methods, and mean-field approximations are considered. Applications include receptor trafficking, axonal transport, membrane diffusion, nuclear transport, protein-DNA interactions, virus trafficking, and the self-organization of subcellular structures.

  3. Use of in vitro methods to predict QT prolongation

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, T.G. . E-mail: tim.hammond@astrazeneca.com; Pollard, C.E.

    2005-09-01

    The inhibition of the hERG-encoded potassium channel can lead to prolongation of the cardiac action potential-manifested as a prolongation of the QT interval on the ECG. Although QT interval prolongation is not dangerous per se, in a small percentage of cases, it is associated with a potentially fatal arrhythmia: Torsades de Pointes (TdP). This channel type is pharmacologically promiscuous, so many compounds have caused QT interval prolongation in man and this has led to drugs being withdrawn from the market following evidence of TdP. From a drug discovery perspective, focusing as early as possible on screening out hERG activity is important. Retrospective analysis of hERG potency versus clinical incidence of TdP suggests provisional safety margins that could be used as target values by medicinal chemists. Large safety margins will not always be possible; however, and in such circumstances, if the risk-benefit ratio still favours developing the compound, a pre-clinical assessment of the likelihood that any QT interval prolongation will or will not lead to TdP in man may be important. An isolated rabbit heart model of arrhythmia shows promise in this respect, based on a comparison of clinical data with that obtained from this assay. Specific regulatory guidance on this topic is still in the draft form but the pre-clinical document (ICH S7B) contains a largely useful perspective on how an integrated risk assessment could be formed using in vitro and in vivo assays. The role of this document is evolving however, since the draft clinical guideline (E14) suggests that irrespective of the pre-clinical data, a thorough clinical ECG study will be required at some point during development.

  4. Invasion of the Central Nervous System by Intracellular Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Drevets, Douglas A.; Leenen, Pieter J. M.; Greenfield, Ronald A.

    2004-01-01

    Infection of the central nervous system (CNS) is a severe and frequently fatal event during the course of many diseases caused by microbes with predominantly intracellular life cycles. Examples of these include the facultative intracellular bacteria Listeria monocytogenes, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and Brucella and Salmonella spp. and obligate intracellular microbes of the Rickettsiaceae family and Tropheryma whipplei. Unfortunately, the mechanisms used by intracellular bacterial pathogens to enter the CNS are less well known than those used by bacterial pathogens with an extracellular life cycle. The goal of this review is to elaborate on the means by which intracellular bacterial pathogens establish infection within the CNS. This review encompasses the clinical and pathological findings that pertain to the CNS infection in humans and includes experimental data from animal models that illuminate how these microbes enter the CNS. Recent experimental data showing that L. monocytogenes can invade the CNS by more than one mechanism make it a useful model for discussing the various routes for neuroinvasion used by intracellular bacterial pathogens. PMID:15084504

  5. Change in macrostructure and porosity of graphite on prolonged irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Virgil'ev, Y.S.; Butyrin, G.M.; Kalyagina, I.P.; Nikishina, L.M.; Shurshakova, T.N.

    1986-02-01

    This work studies the variation in the microstructure of strongly irradiated reactor-grade graphite samples by mercury porosimetry, optical microscopy, and x-ray analysis. The chief characteristics of the samples are listed. Experimental study of the nature of porous and crystal structure of reactor graphite show that prolonged neutron irradiation at 360 and 1220 degrees K up to a luence of 10/sup 22/ neutrons/cm/sup 2/ causes marked irreversible changes in the graphite macrostructure.

  6. Mesangial cell hillocks. Nodular foci of exaggerated growth of cells and matrix in prolonged culture.

    PubMed Central

    Sterzel, R. B.; Lovett, D. H.; Foellmer, H. G.; Perfetto, M.; Biemesderfer, D.; Kashgarian, M.

    1986-01-01

    To examine the capability of glomerular mesangial cells (MCs) to produce extracellular matrix, the authors studied MCs in culture by light and electron microscopy as well as immunocytochemistry. MCs were obtained from isolated rat glomeruli and maintained up to 12 weeks in medium containing 20% fetal calf serum. MC outgrowth of primary culture and of up to three subcultures showed characteristic organization consisting of bands of elongated or stellate intertwined cells. After confluency at 10-16 days, MCs continued to grow in irregular multilayers. MCs produced extracellular matrix material within 2-4 days after plating, and large amounts of matrix accumulated with time. By 2-3 weeks, foci of exaggerated MC proliferation, matrix secretion, and necrotic cell debris formed nodular protrusions, which gradually produced large hillocks. Immunocytochemical studies of MC outgrowths were performed on culture plates or on sectioned material with the use of specific rabbit polyclonal antibodies to isolated matrix proteins and FITC-conjugated, affinity-purified second antibodies. Within 3 days of culture, MCs elaborated fibronectin and collagen Types I, III, IV, and V. With time, strands of matrix, notably in the central mass of hillocks, stained extensively for these constituents. Staining for laminin was less pronounced. Smooth muscle cell myosin was regularly found on distinct intracellular fibrils and in the extracellular material of hillocks. Electron microscopy revealed the hillocks to be composed of elongated cells on the surface and stellate cells intermingled with matrix and necrotic cell debris in the core. The results show that proliferating MCs can be maintained in homogeneous culture for a prolonged time period. MCs produce large amounts of the extracellular matrix proteins (Type IV and V collagen, fibronectin, laminin), which are found in normal glomeruli. Cultured MCs also produce interstitial collagen Types I and III. MC hillocks show the nodular accumulation

  7. Intracellular calcium levels can regulate Importin-dependent nuclear import

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Ly-Huynh, Jennifer D.; Jans, David A.

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • High intracellular calcium inhibits Impα/β1- or Impβ1-dependent nuclear protein import. • The effect of Ca{sup 2+} on nuclear import does not relate to changes in the nuclear pore. • High intracellular calcium can result in mislocalisation of Impβ1, Ran and RCC1. - Abstract: We previously showed that increased intracellular calcium can modulate Importin (Imp)β1-dependent nuclear import of SRY-related chromatin remodeling proteins. Here we extend this work to show for the first time that high intracellular calcium inhibits Impα/β1- or Impβ1-dependent nuclear protein import generally. The basis of this relates to the mislocalisation of the transport factors Impβ1 and Ran, which show significantly higher nuclear localization in contrast to various other factors, and RCC1, which shows altered subnuclear localisation. The results here establish for the first time that intracellular calcium modulates conventional nuclear import through direct effects on the nuclear transport machinery.

  8. Peptide modified gold nanoparticles for improved cellular uptake, nuclear transport, and intracellular retention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, C.; Uertz, J.; Yohan, D.; Chithrani, B. D.

    2014-09-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are being extensively used in cancer therapeutic applications due to their ability to act both as an anticancer drug carrier in chemotherapy and as a dose enhancer in radiotherapy. The therapeutic response can be further enhanced if nanoparticles (NPs) can be effectively targeted into the nucleus. Here, we present an uptake and removal of GNPs functionalized with three peptides. The first peptide (RGD peptide) enhanced the uptake, the second peptide (NLS peptide) facilitated the nuclear delivery, while the third one (pentapeptide) covered the rest of the surface and protected it from the binding of serum proteins onto the NP surface. The pentapeptide also stabilized the conjugated GNP complex. The peptide-capped GNPs showed a five-fold increase in NP uptake followed by effective nuclear localization. The fraction of NPs exocytosed was less for peptide-capped NPs as compared to citrate-capped ones. Enhanced uptake and prolonged intracellular retention of peptide-capped GNPs could allow NPs to perform their desired applications more efficiently in cells. These studies will provide guidelines for developing NPs for therapeutic applications, which will require ``controlling'' of the NP accumulation rate while maintaining low toxicity.Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are being extensively used in cancer therapeutic applications due to their ability to act both as an anticancer drug carrier in chemotherapy and as a dose enhancer in radiotherapy. The therapeutic response can be further enhanced if nanoparticles (NPs) can be effectively targeted into the nucleus. Here, we present an uptake and removal of GNPs functionalized with three peptides. The first peptide (RGD peptide) enhanced the uptake, the second peptide (NLS peptide) facilitated the nuclear delivery, while the third one (pentapeptide) covered the rest of the surface and protected it from the binding of serum proteins onto the NP surface. The pentapeptide also stabilized the conjugated GNP

  9. Management of children with prolonged diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Giannattasio, Antonietta; Guarino, Alfredo; Lo Vecchio, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged diarrhea is usually defined as acute-onset diarrhea lasting 7 days or more, but less than 14 days. Its trend has been declining in recent years because of improvement in the management of acute diarrhea, which represents the ideal strategy to prevent prolonged diarrhea. The pathogenesis of prolonged diarrhea is multifactorial and essentially based on persistent mucosal damage due to specific infections or sequential infections with different pathogens, host-related factors including micronutrient and/or vitamin deficiency, undernutrition and immunodeficiency, high mucosal permeability due to previous infectious processes and nutrient deficiency with consequential malabsorption, and microbiota disruption. Infections seem to play a major role in causing prolonged diarrhea in both developing and developed areas. However, single etiologic pathogens have not been identified, and the pattern of agents varies according to settings, host risk factors, and previous use of antibiotics and other drugs. The management of prolonged diarrhea is complex. Because of the wide etiologic spectrum, diagnostic algorithms should take into consideration the age of the patient, clinical and epidemiological factors, and the nutritional status and should always include a search for enteric pathogens. Often, expensive laboratory evaluations are of little benefit in guiding therapy, and an empirical approach may be effective in the majority of cases. The presence or absence of weight loss is crucial for driving the initial management of prolonged diarrhea. If there is no weight loss, generally there is no need for further evaluation. If weight loss is present, empiric anti-infectious therapy or elimination diet may be considered once specific etiologies have been excluded. PMID:26962439

  10. Management of children with prolonged diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Giannattasio, Antonietta; Guarino, Alfredo; Lo Vecchio, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged diarrhea is usually defined as acute-onset diarrhea lasting 7 days or more, but less than 14 days. Its trend has been declining in recent years because of improvement in the management of acute diarrhea, which represents the ideal strategy to prevent prolonged diarrhea. The pathogenesis of prolonged diarrhea is multifactorial and essentially based on persistent mucosal damage due to specific infections or sequential infections with different pathogens, host-related factors including micronutrient and/or vitamin deficiency, undernutrition and immunodeficiency, high mucosal permeability due to previous infectious processes and nutrient deficiency with consequential malabsorption, and microbiota disruption. Infections seem to play a major role in causing prolonged diarrhea in both developing and developed areas. However, single etiologic pathogens have not been identified, and the pattern of agents varies according to settings, host risk factors, and previous use of antibiotics and other drugs. The management of prolonged diarrhea is complex. Because of the wide etiologic spectrum, diagnostic algorithms should take into consideration the age of the patient, clinical and epidemiological factors, and the nutritional status and should always include a search for enteric pathogens. Often, expensive laboratory evaluations are of little benefit in guiding therapy, and an empirical approach may be effective in the majority of cases. The presence or absence of weight loss is crucial for driving the initial management of prolonged diarrhea. If there is no weight loss, generally there is no need for further evaluation. If weight loss is present, empiric anti-infectious therapy or elimination diet may be considered once specific etiologies have been excluded. PMID:26962439

  11. Intracellular replication of Staphylococcus aureus in mature phagolysosomes in macrophages precedes host cell death, and bacterial escape and dissemination.

    PubMed

    Flannagan, Ronald S; Heit, Bryan; Heinrichs, David E

    2016-04-01

    The success of Staphylococcus aureus as a pathogen is partly attributable to its ability to thwart host innate immune responses, which includes resisting the antimicrobial functions of phagocytes. Here, we have studied the interaction of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strain USA300 with murine RAW 264.7 and primary human macrophages using molecular imaging and single cell analysis to obtain an unprecedented understanding of the interaction between the macrophage and MRSA. Herein we demonstrate that macrophages fail to control intracellular infection by MRSA USA300 despite trafficking the bacteria into mature phagolysosomes. Using fluorescence-based proliferation assays we also show that intracellular staphylococci proliferate and that replication commences while the bacteria are residing in mature phagolysosomes hours after initial phagocytosis. Finally, live-cell fluorescence video microscopy allowed for unprecedented visual insight into the escape of MRSA from macrophages, demonstrating that the macrophages die through a pathway characterized by membrane blebbing and activation of caspase-3 followed by acquisition of the vital dye propidium iodide. Moreover, cell death precedes the emergence of MRSA from infected macrophages, and these events can be ablated by prolonged exposure of infected phagocytes to gentamicin. PMID:26408990

  12. Intracellular targeting with engineered proteins.

    PubMed

    Miersch, Shane; Sidhu, Sachdev S

    2016-01-01

    If the isolation, production, and clinical use of insulin marked the inception of the age of biologics as therapeutics, the convergence of molecular biology and combinatorial engineering techniques marked its coming of age. The first wave of recombinant protein-based drugs in the 1980s demonstrated emphatically that proteins could be engineered, formulated, and employed for clinical advantage. Yet despite the successes of protein-based drugs such as antibodies, enzymes, and cytokines, the druggable target space for biologics is currently restricted to targets outside the cell. Insofar as estimates place the number of proteins either secreted or with extracellular domains in the range of 8000 to 9000, this represents only one-third of the proteome and circumscribes the pathways that can be targeted for therapeutic intervention. Clearly, a major objective for this field to reach maturity is to access, interrogate, and modulate the majority of proteins found inside the cell. However, owing to the large size, complex architecture, and general cellular impermeability of existing protein-based drugs, this poses a daunting challenge. In recent years, though, advances on the two related fronts of protein engineering and drug delivery are beginning to bring this goal within reach. First, prompted by the restrictions that limit the applicability of antibodies, intense efforts have been applied to identifying and engineering smaller alternative protein scaffolds for the modulation of intracellular targets. In parallel, innovative solutions for delivering proteins to the intracellular space while maintaining their stability and functional activity have begun to yield successes. This review provides an overview of bioactive intrabodies and alternative protein scaffolds amenable to engineering for intracellular targeting and also outlines advances in protein engineering and formulation for delivery of functional proteins to the interior of the cell to achieve therapeutic action

  13. Intracellular ion channels and cancer.

    PubMed

    Leanza, Luigi; Biasutto, Lucia; Managò, Antonella; Gulbins, Erich; Zoratti, Mario; Szabò, Ildikò

    2013-01-01

    Several types of channels play a role in the maintenance of ion homeostasis in subcellular organelles including endoplasmatic reticulum, nucleus, lysosome, endosome, and mitochondria. Here we give a brief overview of the contribution of various mitochondrial and other organellar channels to cancer cell proliferation or death. Much attention is focused on channels involved in intracellular calcium signaling and on ion fluxes in the ATP-producing organelle mitochondria. Mitochondrial K(+) channels (Ca(2+)-dependent BKCa and IKCa, ATP-dependent KATP, Kv1.3, two-pore TWIK-related Acid-Sensitive K(+) channel-3 (TASK-3)), Ca(2+) uniporter MCU, Mg(2+)-permeable Mrs2, anion channels (voltage-dependent chloride channel VDAC, intracellular chloride channel CLIC) and the Permeability Transition Pore (MPTP) contribute importantly to the regulation of function in this organelle. Since mitochondria play a central role in apoptosis, modulation of their ion channels by pharmacological means may lead to death of cancer cells. The nuclear potassium channel Kv10.1 and the nuclear chloride channel CLIC4 as well as the endoplasmatic reticulum (ER)-located inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor, the ER-located Ca(2+) depletion sensor STIM1 (stromal interaction molecule 1), a component of the store-operated Ca(2+) channel and the ER-resident TRPM8 are also mentioned. Furthermore, pharmacological tools affecting organellar channels and modulating cancer cell survival are discussed. The channels described in this review are summarized on Figure 1. Overall, the view is emerging that intracellular ion channels may represent a promising target for cancer treatment. PMID:24027528

  14. Intracellular targeting with engineered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Miersch, Shane; Sidhu, Sachdev S.

    2016-01-01

    If the isolation, production, and clinical use of insulin marked the inception of the age of biologics as therapeutics, the convergence of molecular biology and combinatorial engineering techniques marked its coming of age. The first wave of recombinant protein-based drugs in the 1980s demonstrated emphatically that proteins could be engineered, formulated, and employed for clinical advantage. Yet despite the successes of protein-based drugs such as antibodies, enzymes, and cytokines, the druggable target space for biologics is currently restricted to targets outside the cell. Insofar as estimates place the number of proteins either secreted or with extracellular domains in the range of 8000 to 9000, this represents only one-third of the proteome and circumscribes the pathways that can be targeted for therapeutic intervention. Clearly, a major objective for this field to reach maturity is to access, interrogate, and modulate the majority of proteins found inside the cell. However, owing to the large size, complex architecture, and general cellular impermeability of existing protein-based drugs, this poses a daunting challenge. In recent years, though, advances on the two related fronts of protein engineering and drug delivery are beginning to bring this goal within reach. First, prompted by the restrictions that limit the applicability of antibodies, intense efforts have been applied to identifying and engineering smaller alternative protein scaffolds for the modulation of intracellular targets. In parallel, innovative solutions for delivering proteins to the intracellular space while maintaining their stability and functional activity have begun to yield successes. This review provides an overview of bioactive intrabodies and alternative protein scaffolds amenable to engineering for intracellular targeting and also outlines advances in protein engineering and formulation for delivery of functional proteins to the interior of the cell to achieve therapeutic action

  15. Pharmacology of intracellular signalling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Nahorski, Stefan R

    2006-01-01

    This article provides a brief and somewhat personalized review of the dramatic developments that have occurred over the last 45 years in our understanding of intracellular signalling pathways associated with G-protein-coupled receptor activation. Signalling via cyclic AMP, the phosphoinositides and Ca2+ is emphasized and these systems have already been revealed as new pharmacological targets. The therapeutic benefits of most of such targets are, however, yet to be realized, but it is certain that the discipline of pharmacology needs to widen its boundaries to meet these challenges in the future. PMID:16402119

  16. Prolonged and tunable residence time using reversible covalent kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, J. Michael; McFarland, Jesse M.; Paavilainen, Ville O.; Bisconte, Angelina; Tam, Danny; Phan, Vernon T.; Romanov, Sergei; Finkle, David; Shu, Jin; Patel, Vaishali; Ton, Tony; Li, Xiaoyan; Loughhead, David G.; Nunn, Philip A.; Karr, Dane E.; Gerritsen, Mary E.; Funk, Jens Oliver; Owens, Timothy D.; Verner, Erik; Brameld, Ken A.; Hill, Ronald J.; Goldstein, David M.; Taunton, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Drugs with prolonged, on-target residence time often show superior efficacy, yet general strategies for optimizing drug-target residence time are lacking. Here, we demonstrate progress toward this elusive goal by targeting a noncatalytic cysteine in Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) with reversible covalent inhibitors. Utilizing an inverted orientation of the cysteine-reactive cyanoacrylamide electrophile, we identified potent and selective BTK inhibitors that demonstrate biochemical residence times spanning from minutes to 7 days. An inverted cyanoacrylamide with prolonged residence time in vivo remained bound to BTK more than 18 hours after clearance from the circulation. The inverted cyanoacrylamide strategy was further utilized to discover fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) kinase inhibitors with residence times of several days, demonstrating generalizability of the approach. Targeting noncatalytic cysteines with inverted cyanoacrylamides may serve as a broadly applicable platform that facilitates “residence time by design”, the ability to modulate and improve the duration of target engagement in vivo. PMID:26006010

  17. A new PZT with prolonged exposure and Wuchang PZT catalogue.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Buxi; Li, Jingfeng; Hu, Yashe

    The most important improvement in the authors' PZT is that the stars with 11 mag. can be observed, because exposure time for dimmer stars is prolonged. The observational practice during last three years denotes that the method of prolonged exposure is very successful. The number of observed stars is increased about three times, and the precision is improved. As there are so many star images in the plate, a series of processes is suggested, which includes the process of predicting the positions of star images on plates, finding out the pairs of star images and their corresponding stars automatically, calculating the apparent positions of stars and giving the final observational results. The corrections of 289 stars (on 150 measured plates) are given. The results show that many errors of stellar positions in AGK 3R and AGK 3 are larger than 0″5.

  18. Prolongation of Actions of Ca2+ Early in Phototransduction by 9-Demethylretinal

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Hugh R.; Cornwall, M.C.; Crouch, R.K.

    2001-01-01

    During adaptation Ca2+ acts on a step early in phototransduction, which is normally available for only a brief period after excitation. To investigate the identity of this step, we studied the effect of the light-induced decline in intracellular Ca2+ concentration on the response to a bright flash in normal rods, and in rods bleached and regenerated with 11-cis 9-demethylretinal, which forms a photopigment with a prolonged photoactivated lifetime. Changes in cytoplasmic Ca2+ were opposed by rapid superfusion of the outer segment with a 0Na+/0Ca2+ solution designed to minimize Ca2+ fluxes across the surface membrane. After regeneration of a bleached rod with 9-demethlyretinal, the response in Ringer's to a 440-nm bright flash was prolonged in comparison with the unbleached control, and the response remained in saturation for 10–15s. If the dynamic fall in Ca2+i induced by the flash was delayed by stepping the outer segment to 0Na+/0Ca2+ solution just before the flash and returning it to Ringer's shortly before recovery, then the response saturation was prolonged further, increasing linearly by 0.41 ± 0.01 of the time spent in this solution. In contrast, even long exposures to 0Na+/0Ca2+ solution of rods containing native photopigment evoked only a modest response prolongation on the return to Ringer's. Furthermore, if the rod was preexposed to steady subsaturating light, thereby reducing the cytoplasmic calcium concentration, then the prolongation of the bright flash response evoked by 0Na+/0Ca2+ solution was reduced in a graded manner with increasing background intensity. These results indicate that altering the chromophore of rhodopsin prolongs the time course of the Ca2+-dependent step early in the transduction cascade so that it dominates response recovery, and suggest that it is associated with photopigment quenching by phosphorylation. PMID:11585850

  19. Modification of bursting in a Helix neuron by drugs influencing intracellular regulation of calcium level.

    PubMed

    Salánki, J; Budai, D; Véró, M

    1983-01-01

    The effect of ruthenium red, caffein and EGTA (ethyleneglycol tetraacetic acid) influencing intracellular Ca2+ level as well as that of pH-lowering was investigated on identified RPal neuron of Helix pomatia characterized by bimodal pacemaker (bursting) activity. Drugs were applied both extracellularly and intracellularly. Intracellular injection was performed from micropipettes by pressure. It was found that intracellular injection of ruthenium red, caffein, EGTA and pH-lowering caused immediate short hyperpolarization and suspension of bursting. The effect of caffein and lowering of pH was biphasic, hyperpolarization was followed by an increase of spiking. Following EGTA injection the amplitudes of interburst hyperpolarizing waves decreased, and prolongation of spikes occurred. Extracellular application of ruthenium red caused slight depolarization, while caffein produced mainly effects that were similar to those of the intracellular injection. Adding EGTA into the bath resulted in cessation of bursting, and later on also spike generation was blocked. All these effects could be eliminated by washing. It is concluded that Ca-influx during spiking cannot be considered as a single factor in maintaining bursting activity, nevertheless, intracellular binding and liberation of Ca depending on the cell metabolism should also be taken into consideration as a possible mechanism of burst regulation. PMID:6198869

  20. Intracellular azo decolorization is coupled with aerobic respiration by a Klebsiella oxytoca strain.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Zhang, Xiao-Yu; Xie, Tian; Hu, Jin-Mei; Wang, Shi; Li, Wen-Wei

    2015-03-01

    Reduction of azo dye methyl red coupled with aerobic respiration by growing cultures of Klebsiella oxytoca GS-4-08 was investigated. In liquid media containing dye and 0.6 % glucose in a mineral salts base, 100 mg l(-1) of the dye are completely removed in 3 h under shaking conditions. The dye cannot be aerobically decolorized by strain GS-4-08 without extra carbon sources, indicating a co-metabolism process. Higher initial dye concentration prolonged the lag phase of the cell growth, but final cell concentrations of each batches reached a same level with range from 6.3 to 7.6 mg l(-1) after the dye adaption period. This strain showed stronger dye tolerance and decolorization ability than many reported strains. Furthermore, a new intracellular oxygen-insensitive azoreductase was isolated from this strain, and the specific activity of enzyme was 0.846 and 0.633 U mg(-1) protein in the presence of NADH and NADPH, respectively. N,N dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine and anthranilic acid were stoichiometrically released from MR dye, indicating the breakage of azo bonds accounts for the intracellular decolorization. Combining the characteristics of azoreductase, the stoichiometry of EMP, and TCA cycle, the electron transfer chain theory of aerobic respiration, and the possible mechanism of aerobic respiration coupled with azo reduction by K. oxytoca GS-4-08 are proposed. This study is expected to provide a sound theoretical basis for the development of the K. oxytoca strain in aerobic process for azo dye containing wastewaters. PMID:25343980

  1. A novel glyceryl monoolein-bearing cubosomes for gambogenic acid: Preparation, cytotoxicity and intracellular uptake.

    PubMed

    Luo, Qing; Lin, Tongyuan; Zhang, Cai Yuan; Zhu, Tingting; Wang, Lei; Ji, Zhaojie; Jia, Buyun; Ge, Tao; Peng, Daiyin; Chen, Weidong

    2015-09-30

    Lyotropic cubic liquid crystalline nanoparticles, also known as 'cubosomes', have been tested as effective carriers for a variety of drugs due to their ability to enhance delivery efficiency and reduced drug side effects. Cubosomes are colloidal carriers composed of biodegradable Glyceryl monooleate and F127. Being composed of well tolerable and physiological materials, these carriers are well tolerated, compatible and non-toxic. In this study, therefore, we developed a novel, water-soluble, glyceryl monooleate and F127 based multiblock copolymer for Gambogenic acid (GNA) by emulsion-evaporation and low temperature-solidification technique. Physicochemical properties, in vitro cytotoxicity, cellular uptake and in vivo pharmacokinetic of GNA-loaded cubosomes (GNA-Cubs) were investigated. The results revealed that GNA-Cubs were spherical or ellipsoidal monocellular by dynamic light scattering, meanwhile, 150-250nm in mean size with narrow polydispersity indexas determined by transmission electron microscopy. Small angle X-ray scattering indicated that GNA-Cubs retain the Pn3m cubic symmetry. Compared with GNA solution, GNA-Cubs exhibited markedly prolonged inhibitory activity in SMMC-7721 cells, as well as time-dependent increases in intra-cellular uptake. Furthermore, in vivo pharmacokinetic study showed that the Cmax values and the AUC of GNA-Cubs were higher than GNA solution approximately 1.2-fold and 9.1-fold, respectively. In conclusion, the results showed that the cubic liquid crystalline nanoparticles could be a potentially nanocarrier in the delivery of GNA for cancer therapy. PMID:26209071

  2. S2k-Guideline "Prolonged Weaning".

    PubMed

    Schönhofer, B; Geiseler, J; Dellweg, D; Moerer, O; Barchfeld, T; Fuchs, H; Karg, O; Rosseau, S; Sitter, H; Weber-Carstens, S; Westhoff, M; Windisch, W

    2015-10-01

    All mechanically ventilated patients must be weaned from the ventilator at some stage. According to an International Consensus Conference the criteria for "prolonged weaning" are fulfilled if patients fail at least 3 weaning attempts (i. e. spontaneous breathing trial, SBT) or require more than 7 days of weaning after the first SBT. This occurs in about 15 - 20 % of patients.Because of the growing number of patients requiring prolonged weaning a German guideline on prolonged weaning has been developed. It is an initiative of the German Respiratory Society (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Pneumologie und Beatmungsmedizin e. V., DGP) in cooperation with other societies (see acknowledgement) engaged in the field chaired by the Association of Scientific and Medical Societies in Germany (Arbeitsgemeinschaft der Wissenschaftlichen Medizinischen Fachgesellschaften, AWMF).This guideline deals with the definition, epidemiology, weaning categories, underlying pathophysiology, therapeutic strategies, the weaning unit, transition to out-of-hospital ventilation and therapeutic recommendations for end of life care. This short version summarises recommendations on prolonged weaning from the German guideline. PMID:26444135

  3. Neurological complications of prolonged hunger strike.

    PubMed

    Başoğlu, M; Yetimalar, Y; Gürgör, N; Büyükçatalbaş, S; Kurt, T; Seçil, Y; Yeniocak, A

    2006-10-01

    We investigated neurological findings in 41 prisoners (mean age: 28.6) who participated in a hunger strike between 2000 and 2002. All cases were evaluated using neuropsychological, neuroradiological, and electrophysiological methods. The total duration of fasting ranged from 130 to 324 days (mean 199 days). All cases had 200-600 mg/day thiamine orally for 60-294 days (mean 156) during the hunger strike, and had neurological findings consistent with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. All 41 patients exhibited altered consciousness which lasted from 3 to 31 days. All patients also presented gaze-evoked horizontal nystagmus and truncal ataxia. Paralysis of lateral rectus muscles was found in 14. Amnesia was apparent in all cases. Abnormal nerve conduction study parameters were not found in the patient group, but the amplitude of compound muscle action potential of the median and fibular nerves and sensory nerve action potential amplitude of the sural nerve were lower than the control group, and distal motor latency of the posterior tibial nerve was significantly prolonged as compared with the control group. The latency of visual evoked potential was prolonged in 22 cases. Somatosensory evoked potential (P37) was prolonged but not statistically significant. Our most significant finding was that the effect of hunger was more prominent on the central nervous system than on the neuromuscular system, despite the fact that all patients were taking thiamine. In our opinion, partial recovery of neurological, and neurocognitive signs in prolonged hunger could be a result of permanent neurological injury. PMID:16987161

  4. Effects of Prolonged Deprivation on Learned Helplessness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mal, Suraj; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Investigated influence of prolonged deprivation on responses to uncontrollable outcome among 104 Indian students in the tenth grade. Finds high-deprived and female students displayed greater helplessness than did their low-deprived and male counterparts. Females and high-deprives students attributed uncontrollable outcome more to internal, stable,…

  5. Intracellular α-Amylase of Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Christine L.; Russell, Roy R. B.

    1998-01-01

    Sequencing upstream of the Streptococcus mutans gene for a CcpA gene homolog, regM, revealed an open reading frame, named amy, with homology to genes encoding α-amylases. The deduced amino acid sequence showed a strong similarity (60% amino acid identity) to the intracellular α-amylase of Streptococcus bovis and, in common with this enzyme, lacked a signal sequence. Amylase activity was found only in S. mutans cell extracts, with no activity detected in culture supernatants. Inactivation of amy by insertion of an antibiotic resistance marker confirmed that S. mutans has a single α-amylase activity. The amylase activity was induced by maltose but not by starch, and no acid was produced from starch. S. mutans can, however, transport limit dextrins and maltooligosaccharides generated by salivary amylase, but inactivation of amy did not affect growth on these substrates or acid production. The amylase digested the glycogen-like intracellular polysaccharide (IPS) purified from S. mutans, but the amy mutant was able to digest and produce acid from IPS; thus, amylase does not appear to be essential for IPS breakdown. However, when grown on excess maltose, the amy mutant produced nearly threefold the amount of IPS produced by the parent strain. The role of Amy has not been established, but Amy appears to be important in the accumulation of IPS in S. mutans grown on maltose. PMID:9721315

  6. Intracellular alpha-amylase of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Simpson, C L; Russell, R R

    1998-09-01

    Sequencing upstream of the Streptococcus mutans gene for a CcpA gene homolog, regM, revealed an open reading frame, named amy, with homology to genes encoding alpha-amylases. The deduced amino acid sequence showed a strong similarity (60% amino acid identity) to the intracellular alpha-amylase of Streptococcus bovis and, in common with this enzyme, lacked a signal sequence. Amylase activity was found only in S. mutans cell extracts, with no activity detected in culture supernatants. Inactivation of amy by insertion of an antibiotic resistance marker confirmed that S. mutans has a single alpha-amylase activity. The amylase activity was induced by maltose but not by starch, and no acid was produced from starch. S. mutans can, however, transport limit dextrins and maltooligosaccharides generated by salivary amylase, but inactivation of amy did not affect growth on these substrates or acid production. The amylase digested the glycogen-like intracellular polysaccharide (IPS) purified from S. mutans, but the amy mutant was able to digest and produce acid from IPS; thus, amylase does not appear to be essential for IPS breakdown. However, when grown on excess maltose, the amy mutant produced nearly threefold the amount of IPS produced by the parent strain. The role of Amy has not been established, but Amy appears to be important in the accumulation of IPS in S. mutans grown on maltose. PMID:9721315

  7. High-Throughput Intracellular Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Chiaraviglio, Lucius

    2015-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a Gram-negative opportunistic human pathogen that causes a severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease. Notably, in the human host, the organism is believed to replicate solely within an intracellular compartment, predominantly within pulmonary macrophages. Consequently, successful therapy is predicated on antimicrobials penetrating into this intracellular growth niche. However, standard antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods test solely for extracellular growth inhibition. Here, we make use of a high-throughput assay to characterize intracellular growth inhibition activity of known antimicrobials. For select antimicrobials, high-resolution dose-response analysis was then performed to characterize and compare activity levels in both macrophage infection and axenic growth assays. Results support the superiority of several classes of nonpolar antimicrobials in abrogating intracellular growth. Importantly, our assay results show excellent correlations with prior clinical observations of antimicrobial efficacy. Furthermore, we also show the applicability of high-throughput automation to two- and three-dimensional synergy testing. High-resolution isocontour isobolograms provide in vitro support for specific combination antimicrobial therapy. Taken together, findings suggest that high-throughput screening technology may be successfully applied to identify and characterize antimicrobials that target bacterial pathogens that make use of an intracellular growth niche. PMID:26392509

  8. High-Throughput Intracellular Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Chiaraviglio, Lucius; Kirby, James E

    2015-12-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a Gram-negative opportunistic human pathogen that causes a severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease. Notably, in the human host, the organism is believed to replicate solely within an intracellular compartment, predominantly within pulmonary macrophages. Consequently, successful therapy is predicated on antimicrobials penetrating into this intracellular growth niche. However, standard antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods test solely for extracellular growth inhibition. Here, we make use of a high-throughput assay to characterize intracellular growth inhibition activity of known antimicrobials. For select antimicrobials, high-resolution dose-response analysis was then performed to characterize and compare activity levels in both macrophage infection and axenic growth assays. Results support the superiority of several classes of nonpolar antimicrobials in abrogating intracellular growth. Importantly, our assay results show excellent correlations with prior clinical observations of antimicrobial efficacy. Furthermore, we also show the applicability of high-throughput automation to two- and three-dimensional synergy testing. High-resolution isocontour isobolograms provide in vitro support for specific combination antimicrobial therapy. Taken together, findings suggest that high-throughput screening technology may be successfully applied to identify and characterize antimicrobials that target bacterial pathogens that make use of an intracellular growth niche. PMID:26392509

  9. Motor-driven intracellular transport powers bacterial gliding motility.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mingzhai; Wartel, Morgane; Cascales, Eric; Shaevitz, Joshua W; Mignot, Tâm

    2011-05-01

    Protein-directed intracellular transport has not been observed in bacteria despite the existence of dynamic protein localization and a complex cytoskeleton. However, protein trafficking has clear potential uses for important cellular processes such as growth, development, chromosome segregation, and motility. Conflicting models have been proposed to explain Myxococcus xanthus motility on solid surfaces, some favoring secretion engines at the rear of cells and others evoking an unknown class of molecular motors distributed along the cell body. Through a combination of fluorescence imaging, force microscopy, and genetic manipulation, we show that membrane-bound cytoplasmic complexes consisting of motor and regulatory proteins are directionally transported down the axis of a cell at constant velocity. This intracellular motion is transmitted to the exterior of the cell and converted to traction forces on the substrate. Thus, this study demonstrates the existence of a conserved class of processive intracellular motors in bacteria and shows how these motors have been adapted to produce cell motility. PMID:21482768

  10. Neuronal Recordings with Solid-Conductor Intracellular Nanoelectrodes (SCINEs)

    PubMed Central

    Angle, Matthew R.; Schaefer, Andreas T.

    2012-01-01

    Direct electrical recording of the neuronal transmembrane potential has been crucial to our understanding of the biophysical mechanisms subserving neuronal computation. Existing intracellular recording techniques, however, limit the accuracy and duration of such measurements by changing intracellular biochemistry and/or by damaging the plasma membrane. Here we demonstrate that nanoengineered electrodes can be used to record neuronal transmembrane potentials in brain tissue without causing these physiological perturbations. Using focused ion beam milling, we have fabricated Solid-Conductor Intracellular NanoElectrodes (SCINEs), from conventional tungsten microelectrodes. SCINEs have tips that are <300 nm in diameter for several micrometers, but can be easily handled and can be inserted into brain tissue. Performing simultaneous whole-cell patch recordings, we show that SCINEs can record action potentials (APs) as well as slower, subthreshold neuronal potentials without altering cellular properties. These results show a key role for nanotechnology in the development of new electrical recording techniques in neuroscience. PMID:22905231

  11. Carotid Baroreflex Function During Prolonged Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raven, P. B.

    1999-01-01

    Astronauts are often required to work (exercise) at moderate to high intensities for extended periods while performing extra-vehicular activities (EVA). Although the physiologic responses associated with prolonged exercise have been documented, the mechanisms involved in blood pressure regulation under these conditions have not yet been fully elucidated. An understanding of this issue is pertinent to the ability of humans to perform work in microgravity and complies with the emphasis of NASA's Space Physiology and Countermeasures Program. Prolonged exercise at a constant workload is know to result in a progressive decrease in mean arterial pressure (MAP) concomitant with a decrease in stroke volume and a compensatory increase in heart rate. The continuous decrease in MAP during the exercise, which is related to the thermoregulatory redistribution of circulating blood volume to the cutaneous circulation, raises the question as to whether there is a loss of baroreflex regulation of arterial blood pressure. We propose that with prolongation of the exercise to 60 minutes, progressive increases on central command reflect a progressive upward resetting of the carotid baroreflex (CBR) such that the operating point of the CBR is shifted to a pressure below the threshold of the reflex rendering it ineffectual in correcting the downward drift in MAP. In order to test this hypothesis, experiments have been designed to uncouple the global hemodynamic response to prolonged exercise from the central command mediated response via: (1) continuous maintenance of cardiac filling volume by intravenous infusion of a dextran solution; and (2) whole body surface cooling to counteract thermoregulatory cutaneous vasodialation. As the type of work (exercise) performed by astronauts is inherently arm and upper body dependent, we will also examine the physiologic responses to prolonged leg cycling and arm ergometry exercise in the supine positions with and without level lower body negative

  12. [Circulating immune complexes in acute and prolonged hepatitis A infection].

    PubMed

    Dautović-Krkić, Sajma; Gribajcević, Mehmed

    2002-01-01

    Level and dynamics activity of circulating immune complexes (CiC) and persistence CiC in the sera in the acute and prolonged HAV-infection was examined. In the same time we explored the relation of level and dynamics CiC compared with level, dynamics and persistence length ALT and IgM anti-HAV in sera, longitude excretion HAV Ag in stool and intensity patohistological damage in liver. Research have been undertaken in the prospected study on two groups with 90 patients in total: 60 patients with prolonged form of the hepatitis A, and 30 patients with HAV-infection with normal development. CiC was prescribe with fotometer in sediment of poliethilenglicol, and IgM anti HAV with ELISA technique. Ag-HAV in stool was prescribe with methodImmuno/electro/osmophoresis. Results of examination showed that high level values of CiC had present in all patients with HAV-infection, bat yet middle values of CiC had significantly higher in prolonged forms (p < 0.01). In a case of patients with PTHA CiC persistence almost three times longer than in HAV infection with normal development. The highest value of CiC have been found from one to two weeks after e peak ALT in HAV and in PTHA 4-6 weeks later. Persistence of elevated values CiC responded to the middle length persistence of Igm anti HAV-in the sera. PMID:12378858

  13. Slow recovery in desert perennial vegetation following prolonged human disturbance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guo, Q.

    2004-01-01

    Questions: How long may it take for desert perennial vegetation to recover from prolonged human disturbance and how do different plant community variables (i.e. diversity, density and cover) change during the recovery process? Location: Sonoran Desert, Arizona, USA. Methods: Since protection from grazing from 1907 onwards, plant diversity, density and cover of perennial species were monitored intermittently on ten 10 m x 10 m permanent plots on Tumamoc Hill, Tucson, Arizona, USA. Results: The study shows an exceptionally slow recovery of perennial vegetation from prolonged heavy grazing and other human impacts. Since protection, overall species richness and habitat heterogeneity at the study site continued to increase until the 1960s when diversity, density and cover had been stabilized. During the same period, overall plant density and cover also increased. Species turnover increased gradually with time but no significant relation between any of the three community variables and precipitation or Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) was detected. Conclusions: It took more than 50 yr for the perennial vegetation to recover from prolonged human disturbance. The increases in plant species richness, density, and cover of the perennial vegetation were mostly due to the increase of herbaceous species, especially palatable species. The lack of a clear relationship between environment (e.g. precipitation) and community variables suggests that site history and plant life history must be taken into account in examining the nature of vegetation recovery processes after disturbance.

  14. Resveratrol Improves Survival and Prolongs Life Following Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Ayub, Ahmar; Poulose, Ninu; Raju, Raghavan

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol has been shown to potentiate mitochondrial function and extend longevity; however, there is no evidence to support whether resveratrol can improve survival or prolong life following hemorrhagic shock. We sought to determine whether (a) resveratrol can improve survival following hemorrhage and resuscitation and (b) prolong life in the absence of resuscitation. Using a hemorrhagic injury (HI) model in the rat, we describe for the first time that the naturally occurring small molecule, resveratrol, may be an effective adjunct to resuscitation fluid. In a series of three sets of experiments we show that resveratrol administration during resuscitation improves survival following HI (p < 0.05), resveratrol and its synthetic mimic SRT1720 can significantly prolong life in the absence of resuscitation fluid (<30 min versus up to 4 h; p < 0.05), and resveratrol as well as SRT1720 restores left ventricular function following HI. We also found significant changes in the expression level of mitochondria-related transcription factors Ppar-α and Tfam, as well as Pgc-1α in the left ventricular tissues of rats subjected to HI and treated with resveratrol. The results indicate that resveratrol is a strong candidate adjunct to resuscitation following severe hemorrhage. PMID:25879628

  15. Prolonging dying is the same as prolonging living--one more response to Long.

    PubMed

    Kuhse, H; Singer, P

    1991-12-01

    In earlier publications, we had argued that Paul Ramsey is inconsistent because he simultaneously asserts that (i) 'all our days and years are of equal worth' and (ii) 'that it is permissible to refrain from prolonging the lives of some dying patients'. Thomas Long has suggested that we have not shown that Paul Ramsey is inconsistent. Ramsey and we, he holds, start from incommensurable metaphysical views: for Ramsey, the dying process has religious significance--God is calling his servant home. While it is normally a good thing to keep a patient alive, it would, for Ramsey, show deafness to God's call to keep a dying patient alive. It is true we do not share Paul Ramsey's religious views. It is, however, not necessary to rely on any particular metaphysical views to refute Ramsey's position. For Ramsey's view to be internally consistent, Ramsey would have to be able to distinguish between dying and non-dying patients. We examine some of Ramsey's examples and show that his practical judgements do not allow us to draw this distinction. This means that, contra Long, we hold fast to our charge that Ramsey's view is inconsistent. PMID:1787522

  16. Prolonged reorganization of thiol-capped Au nanoparticles layered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Sarathi; Das, Kaushik; Konovalov, Oleg

    2013-09-01

    Prolonged reorganization behaviour of mono-, di-, tri- and multi-layer films of Au nanoparticles prepared by Langmuir-Blodgett method on hydrophobic Si(001) substrates have been studied by using X-ray scattering techniques. Out-of-plane study shows that although at the initial stage the reorganization occurs through the compaction of the films keeping the layered structure unchanged but finally all layered structures modify to monolayer structure. Due to this reorganization the Au density increases within the nanometer thick films. In-plane study shows that inside the reorganized films Au nanoparticles are distributed randomly and the particle size modifies as the metallic core of Au nanoparticles coalesces.

  17. Intracellular insulin processing is altered in monocytes from patients with type II diabetes mellitus

    SciTech Connect

    Trischitta, V.; Benzi, L.; Brunetti, A.; Cecchetti, P.; Marchetti, P.; Vigneri, R.; Navalesi, R.

    1987-05-01

    We studied total cell-associated A14-(/sup 125/I)insulin radioactivity (including surface-bound and internalized radioactivity), insulin internalization, and its intracellular degradation at 37 C in monocytes from nonobese type II untreated diabetic patients (n = 9) and normal subjects (n = 7). Total cell-associated radioactivity was decreased in diabetic patients (2.65 +/- 1.21% (+/- SD) vs. 4.47 +/- 1.04% of total radioactivity. Insulin internalization was also reduced in diabetic patients (34.0 +/- 6.8% vs. 59.0 +/- 11.3% of cell-associated radioactivity. Using high performance liquid chromatography six intracellular forms of radioactivity derived from A14-(/sup 125/I) insulin were identified; 10-20% of intracellular radioactivity had approximately 300,000 mol wt and was identified as radioactivity bound to the insulin receptor, and the remaining intracellular radioactivity included intact A14-(/sup 125/I)insulin, (/sup 125/I)iodide, or (/sup 125/I)tyrosine, and three intermediate compounds. A progressive reduction of intact insulin and a corresponding increase in iodine were found when the incubation time was prolonged. Intracellular insulin degradation was reduced in monocytes from diabetic patients; intracellular intact insulin was 65.6 +/- 18.1% vs. 37.4 +/- 18.0% of intracellular radioactivity after 2 min and 23.6 +/- 22.3% vs. 3.9 +/- 2.3% after 60 min in diabetic patients vs. normal subjects, respectively. In conclusion, 1) human monocytes internalize and degrade insulin in the intracellular compartment in a stepwise time-dependent manner; and 2) in monocytes from type II diabetic patients total cell-associated radioactivity, insulin internalization, and insulin degradation are significantly reduced. These defects may be related to the cellular insulin resistance present in these patients.

  18. Mechanisms of Obligatory Intracellular Infection with Anaplasma phagocytophilum

    PubMed Central

    Rikihisa, Yasuko

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Anaplasma phagocytophilum persists in nature by cycling between mammals and ticks. Human infection by the bite of an infected tick leads to a potentially fatal emerging disease called human granulocytic anaplasmosis. A. phagocytophilum is an obligatory intracellular bacterium that replicates inside mammalian granulocytes and the salivary gland and midgut cells of ticks. A. phagocytophilum evolved the remarkable ability to hijack the regulatory system of host cells. A. phagocytophilum alters vesicular traffic to create an intracellular membrane-bound compartment that allows replication in seclusion from lysosomes. The bacterium downregulates or actively inhibits a number of innate immune responses of mammalian host cells, and it upregulates cellular cholesterol uptake to acquire cholesterol for survival. It also upregulates several genes critical for the infection of ticks, and it prolongs tick survival at freezing temperatures. Several host factors that exacerbate infection have been identified, including interleukin-8 (IL-8) and cholesterol. Host factors that overcome infection include IL-12 and gamma interferon (IFN-γ). Two bacterial type IV secretion effectors and several bacterial proteins that associate with inclusion membranes have been identified. An understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying A. phagocytophilum infection will foster the development of creative ideas to prevent or treat this emerging tick-borne disease. PMID:21734244

  19. Intracellular Ca-carbonate biomineralization is widespread in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Benzerara, Karim; Skouri-Panet, Feriel; Li, Jinhua; Férard, Céline; Gugger, Muriel; Laurent, Thierry; Couradeau, Estelle; Ragon, Marie; Cosmidis, Julie; Menguy, Nicolas; Margaret-Oliver, Isabel; Tavera, Rosaluz; López-García, Purificación; Moreira, David

    2014-07-29

    Cyanobacteria have played a significant role in the formation of past and modern carbonate deposits at the surface of the Earth using a biomineralization process that has been almost systematically considered induced and extracellular. Recently, a deep-branching cyanobacterial species, Candidatus Gloeomargarita lithophora, was reported to form intracellular amorphous Ca-rich carbonates. However, the significance and diversity of the cyanobacteria in which intracellular biomineralization occurs remain unknown. Here, we searched for intracellular Ca-carbonate inclusions in 68 cyanobacterial strains distributed throughout the phylogenetic tree of cyanobacteria. We discovered that diverse unicellular cyanobacterial taxa form intracellular amorphous Ca-carbonates with at least two different distribution patterns, suggesting the existence of at least two distinct mechanisms of biomineralization: (i) one with Ca-carbonate inclusions scattered within the cell cytoplasm such as in Ca. G. lithophora, and (ii) another one observed in strains belonging to the Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1 lineage, in which Ca-carbonate inclusions lie at the cell poles. This pattern seems to be linked with the nucleation of the inclusions at the septum of the cells, showing an intricate and original connection between cell division and biomineralization. These findings indicate that intracellular Ca-carbonate biomineralization by cyanobacteria has been overlooked by past studies and open new perspectives on the mechanisms and the evolutionary history of intra- and extracellular Ca-carbonate biomineralization by cyanobacteria. PMID:25009182

  20. Intracellular Ca-carbonate biomineralization is widespread in cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Benzerara, Karim; Skouri-Panet, Feriel; Li, Jinhua; Férard, Céline; Gugger, Muriel; Laurent, Thierry; Couradeau, Estelle; Ragon, Marie; Cosmidis, Julie; Menguy, Nicolas; Margaret-Oliver, Isabel; Tavera, Rosaluz; López-García, Purificación; Moreira, David

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacteria have played a significant role in the formation of past and modern carbonate deposits at the surface of the Earth using a biomineralization process that has been almost systematically considered induced and extracellular. Recently, a deep-branching cyanobacterial species, Candidatus Gloeomargarita lithophora, was reported to form intracellular amorphous Ca-rich carbonates. However, the significance and diversity of the cyanobacteria in which intracellular biomineralization occurs remain unknown. Here, we searched for intracellular Ca-carbonate inclusions in 68 cyanobacterial strains distributed throughout the phylogenetic tree of cyanobacteria. We discovered that diverse unicellular cyanobacterial taxa form intracellular amorphous Ca-carbonates with at least two different distribution patterns, suggesting the existence of at least two distinct mechanisms of biomineralization: (i) one with Ca-carbonate inclusions scattered within the cell cytoplasm such as in Ca. G. lithophora, and (ii) another one observed in strains belonging to the Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1 lineage, in which Ca-carbonate inclusions lie at the cell poles. This pattern seems to be linked with the nucleation of the inclusions at the septum of the cells, showing an intricate and original connection between cell division and biomineralization. These findings indicate that intracellular Ca-carbonate biomineralization by cyanobacteria has been overlooked by past studies and open new perspectives on the mechanisms and the evolutionary history of intra- and extracellular Ca-carbonate biomineralization by cyanobacteria. PMID:25009182

  1. Intracellular Neural Recording with Pure Carbon Nanotube Probes

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Inho; Hamaguchi, Kosuke; Borzenets, Ivan V.; Finkelstein, Gleb; Mooney, Richard; Donald, Bruce R.

    2013-01-01

    The computational complexity of the brain depends in part on a neuron’s capacity to integrate electrochemical information from vast numbers of synaptic inputs. The measurements of synaptic activity that are crucial for mechanistic understanding of brain function are also challenging, because they require intracellular recording methods to detect and resolve millivolt- scale synaptic potentials. Although glass electrodes are widely used for intracellular recordings, novel electrodes with superior mechanical and electrical properties are desirable, because they could extend intracellular recording methods to challenging environments, including long term recordings in freely behaving animals. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can theoretically deliver this advance, but the difficulty of assembling CNTs has limited their application to a coating layer or assembly on a planar substrate, resulting in electrodes that are more suitable for in vivo extracellular recording or extracellular recording from isolated cells. Here we show that a novel, yet remarkably simple, millimeter-long electrode with a sub-micron tip, fabricated from self-entangled pure CNTs can be used to obtain intracellular and extracellular recordings from vertebrate neurons in vitro and in vivo. This fabrication technology provides a new method for assembling intracellular electrodes from CNTs, affording a promising opportunity to harness nanotechnology for neuroscience applications. PMID:23840357

  2. Intracellular trafficking of VP22 in bovine herpesvirus-1 infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lobanov, Vladislav A.; Babiuk, Lorne A.; Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, Sylvia van

    2010-01-20

    The intracellular trafficking of different VP22-enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) fusion proteins expressed by bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1) recombinants was examined by live-cell imaging. Our results demonstrate that (i) the fusion of EYFP to the C terminus of VP22 does not alter the trafficking of the protein in infected cells, (ii) VP22 expressed during BHV-1 infection translocates to the nucleus through three different pathways, namely early mitosis-dependent nuclear translocation, late massive nuclear translocation that follows a prolonged cytoplasmic stage of the protein in non-mitotic cells, and accumulation of a small subset of VP22 in discrete dot-like nuclear domains during its early cytoplasmic stage, (iii) the addition of the SV40 large-T-antigen nuclear localization signal (NLS) to VP22-EYFP abrogates its early cytoplasmic stage, and (iv) the VP22 {sup 131}PRPR{sup 134} NLS is not required for the late massive nuclear translocation of the protein, but this motif is essential for the targeting of VP22 to discrete dot-like nuclear domains during the early cytoplasmic stage. These results show that the amount of VP22 in the nucleus is precisely regulated at different stages of BHV-1 infection and suggest that the early pathways of VP22 nuclear accumulation may be more relevant to the infection process as the late massive nuclear influx starts when most of the viral progeny has already emerged from the cell.

  3. VEGF-functionalized dextran has longer intracellular bioactivity than VEGF in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Maia, João; Vazão, Helena; Pedroso, Dora C S; Jesus, Catarina S H; Brito, Rui M M; Grãos, Mário; Gil, Maria H; Ferreira, Lino

    2012-09-10

    Herein, we report that VEGF-functionalized dextran (dexOx-VEGF) is comparatively superior to free VEGF in prolonging the phosphorylation of VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR-2). Both dexOx-VEGF and free VEGF activate VEGFR-2, and the complexes are internalized into early endosomes (EEA1(+) vesicles) and then transported to lysosomes (Rab7(+) vesicles). However, after cell activation, dexOx-VEGF is preferentially colocalized in early endosomes where VEGF signaling is still active while free VEGF is preferentially transported to late endosomes or lysosomes. We further show that dexOx-VEGF after phosphorylation of VEGF receptor 2 induces an increase of intracellular Ca(2+) and activates VEGF downstream effectors such as Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) proteins. Under specific conditions, the activation level is different from the one observed for free VEGF, thus suggesting mechanistic differences, which is illustrated by cell migration and cord-like formation studies. DexOx-VEGF can be cross-linked with adipic acid dihydrazide to form a degradable gel, which in turn can be incorporated in a fibrin gel containing endothelial cells (ECs) to modulate their activity. We envision that these constructs might be beneficial to extend the pro-angiogenic activity of VEGF in ischemic tissues and to modulate the biological activity of vascular cells. PMID:22901277

  4. Measurements of intracellular Ca2+ in dissociated type I cells of the rabbit carotid body.

    PubMed Central

    Biscoe, T J; Duchen, M R; Eisner, D A; O'Neill, S C; Valdeolmillos, M

    1989-01-01

    1. The carotid body chemoreceptors are stimulated in situ by cyanide (CN-), which mimics the effect of hypoxia. We have shown that CN- increases a calcium-dependent potassium conductance (gK(Ca)) in single type I cells dissociated from the carotid body of the rabbit. We have now used the Ca2(+)-sensitive fluorophore, Fura-2, to measure intracellular Ca2+ directly in single type I cells. 2. CN- reversibly increased [Ca2+]i from approximately 90 nM to a mean of approximately 200 nM. Some of this Ca2+ originated from an intracellular store, which was depleted by exposure to Ca2(+)-free solutions. Prolonged application of CN- caused a sustained increase in [Ca2+]i, suggesting that CN- impairs the removal or sequestration of Ca2+. 3. pHi measured with the dye BCECF (2,7-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein) did not change consistently in response to CN-, although pHi changed predictably in response to both ammonium chloride and to acidification of the superfusate with CO2. 4. Potassium-induced depolarization (35 mM-K+) caused a large, cadmium-sensitive rise in [Ca2+]i. The K(+)-induced Ca2+ load was used to study the regulation of [Ca2+]i. 5. The clearance of a Ca2+ load was slowed either by removal of [Na+]o or by application of CN-. This shows that both a Na+-Ca2+ exchange and an energy-dependent process or processes contribute to the regulation of [Ca2+]i. 6. Carbachol (CCh, 10-100 microM), which also hyperpolarizes type I cells, caused a small transient rise in [Ca2+]i, indicating release from an exhaustible intracellular pool. The response to CN- was unaffected by prior or continued exposure to CCh, suggesting that the two stimuli operate by distinct mechanisms. 7. The increased gK(Ca) seen in type I cells in response to CN- thus reflects a change in cellular Ca2+ homeostasis. The rise in [Ca2+]i presumably underlies the documented increase in transmitter release from the carotid body in response to CN-. If chemotransduction is a consequence of the

  5. Severe bradycardia and prolonged hypotension in ciguatera.

    PubMed

    Chan, Thomas Yan Keung

    2013-06-01

    Ciguatera results when ciguatoxin-contaminated coral reef fish from tropical or subtropical waters are consumed. The clinical features that present in affected persons are mainly gastrointestinal, neurological, general, and much less commonly, cardiovascular. We report the case of a 50-year-old man who developed the characteristic combination of acute gastrointestinal and neurological symptoms after the consumption of an unidentified coral reef fish head. In addition to those symptoms, he developed dizziness, severe bradycardia (46 bpm) and prolonged hypotension, which required the administration of intravenous atropine and over three days of intravenous fluid replacement with dopamine infusion. Patients with ciguatera can develop severe bradycardia and prolonged hypotension. Physicians should recognise the possible cardiovascular complications of ciguatera and promptly initiate treatment with intravenous atropine, intravenous fluid replacement and inotropic therapy if such complications are observed. PMID:23665698

  6. Mobilization of intracellular calcium by intracellular flash photolysis of caged dihydrosphingosine in cultured neonatal rat sensory neurones.

    PubMed

    Ayar, A; Thatcher, N M; Zehavi, U; Trentham, D R; Scott, R H

    1998-01-01

    The ability of dihydrosphingosine to release Ca2+ from intracellular stores in neurones was investigated by combining the whole cell patch clamp technique with intracellular flash photolysis of caged, N-(2-nitrobenzyl)dihydrosphingosine. The caged dihydrosphingosine (100 microM) was applied to the intracellular environment via the CsCl-based patch pipette solution which also contained 0.3% dimethylformamide and 2 mM dithiothreitol. Cultured dorsal root ganglion neurones from neonatal rats were voltage clamped at -90 mV and inward whole cell Ca2+-activated currents were recorded in response to intracellular photorelease of dihydrosphingosine. Intracellular photorelease of dihydrosphingosine (about 5 microM) was achieved using a Xenon flash lamp. Inward Ca2+-activated currents were evoked in 50 out of 57 neurones, the mean delay to current activation following photolysis was 82+/-13 s. The responses were variable with neurones showing transient, oscillating or sustained inward currents. High voltage-activated Ca2+ currents evoked by 100 ms voltage step commands to 0 mV were not attenuated by photorelease of dihydrosphingosine. Controls showed that alone a flash from the Xenon lamp did not activate currents, and that the unphotolysed caged dihydrosphingosine, and intracellular photolysis of 2-(2-nitrobenzylamino) propanediol also did not evoke responses. The dihydrosphingosine current had a reversal potential of -11+/-3 mV (n = 11), and was carried by two distinct Cl- and cation currents which were reduced by 85% and about 20% following replacement of monovalent cations with N-methyl-D-glucamine or application of the Cl- channel blocker niflumic acid (10 microM) respectively. The responses to photoreleased dihydrosphingosine were inhibited by intracellular application of 20 mM EGTA, 10 microM ryanodine or extracellular application of 10 microM dantrolene, but persisted when Ca2+ free saline was applied to the extracellular environment. Intracellular application of

  7. Nanoconjugation prolongs endosomal signaling of the epidermal growth factor receptor and enhances apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, L.; Xu, F.; Reinhard, B. M.

    2016-07-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that intracellular signaling can be subject to strict spatial control. As the covalent attachment of a signaling ligand to a nanoparticle (NP) impacts ligand-receptor binding, uptake, and trafficking, nanoconjugation provides new opportunities for manipulating intracellular signaling in a controlled fashion. To establish the effect of nanoconjugation on epidermal growth factor (EGF) mediated signaling, we investigate here the intracellular fate of nanoconjugated EGF (NP-EGF) and its bound receptor (EGFR) by quantitative correlated darkfield/fluorescence microscopy and density-based endosomal fractionation. We demonstrate that nanoconjugation prolongs the dwell time of phosphorylated receptors in the early endosomes and that the retention of activated EGFR in the early endosomes is accompanied by an EGF mediated apoptosis at effective concentrations that do not induce apoptosis in the case of free EGF. Overall, these findings indicate nanoconjugation as a rational strategy for modifying signaling that acts by modulating the temporo-spatial distribution of the activated EGF-EGFR ligand-receptor complex.It is becoming increasingly clear that intracellular signaling can be subject to strict spatial control. As the covalent attachment of a signaling ligand to a nanoparticle (NP) impacts ligand-receptor binding, uptake, and trafficking, nanoconjugation provides new opportunities for manipulating intracellular signaling in a controlled fashion. To establish the effect of nanoconjugation on epidermal growth factor (EGF) mediated signaling, we investigate here the intracellular fate of nanoconjugated EGF (NP-EGF) and its bound receptor (EGFR) by quantitative correlated darkfield/fluorescence microscopy and density-based endosomal fractionation. We demonstrate that nanoconjugation prolongs the dwell time of phosphorylated receptors in the early endosomes and that the retention of activated EGFR in the early endosomes is accompanied by an EGF

  8. Evidence of Health Risks Associated with Prolonged Standing at Work and Intervention Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Thomas R.; Dick, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Prolonged standing at work has been shown to be associated with a number of potentially serious health outcomes, such as lower back and leg pain, cardiovascular problems, fatigue, discomfort, and pregnancy related health outcomes. Recent studies have been conducted examining the relationship between these health outcomes and the amount of time spent standing while on the job. The purpose of this article was to provide a review of the health risks and interventions for workers and employers that are involved in occupations requiring prolonged standing. A brief review of recommendations by governmental and professional organizations for hours of prolonged standing is also included. Findings Based on our review of the literature, there seems to be ample evidence showing that prolonged standing at work leads to adverse health outcomes. Review of the literature also supports the conclusion that certain interventions are effective in reducing the hazards associated with prolonged standing. Suggested interventions include the use of floor mats, sit-stand workstations/chairs, shoes, shoe inserts and hosiery or stockings. Studies could be improved by using more precise definitions of prolonged standing (e.g., duration, movement restrictions, and type of work), better measurement of the health outcomes and more rigorous study protocols. Conclusion and Clinical Relevance Use of interventions and following suggested guidelines on hours of standing from governmental and professional organizations should reduce the health risks from prolonged standing. PMID:25041875

  9. The Association between Job-Related Psychosocial Factors and Prolonged Fatigue among Industrial Employees in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Feng-Cheng; Li, Ren-Hau; Huang, Shu-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Prolonged fatigue is common among employees, but the relationship between prolonged fatigue and job-related psychosocial factors is seldom studied. This study aimed (1) to assess the individual relations of physical condition, psychological condition, and job-related psychosocial factors to prolonged fatigue among employees, and (2) to clarify the associations between job-related psychosocial factors and prolonged fatigue using hierarchical regression when demographic characteristics, physical condition, and psychological condition were controlled. Methods A cross-sectional study was employed. A questionnaire was used to obtain information pertaining to demographic characteristics, physical condition (perceived physical health and exercise routine), psychological condition (perceived mental health and psychological distress), job-related psychosocial factors (job demand, job control, and workplace social support), and prolonged fatigue. Results A total of 3,109 employees were recruited. Using multiple regression with controlled demographic characteristics, psychological condition explained 52.0% of the variance in prolonged fatigue. Physical condition and job-related psychosocial factors had an adjusted R2 of 0.370 and 0.251, respectively. Hierarchical multiple regression revealed that, among job-related psychosocial factors, job demand and job control showed significant associations with fatigue. Conclusion Our findings highlight the role of job demand and job control, in addition to the role of perceived physical health, perceived mental health, and psychological distress, in workers’ prolonged fatigue. However, more research is required to verify the causation among all the variables. PMID:26930064

  10. Brain glycogen decreases during prolonged exercise

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Takashi; Soya, Shingo; Okamoto, Masahiro; Ichitani, Yukio; Kawanaka, Kentaro; Soya, Hideaki

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Brain glycogen could be a critical energy source for brain activity when the glucose supply from the blood is inadequate (hypoglycaemia). Although untested, it is hypothesized that during prolonged exhaustive exercise that induces hypoglycaemia and muscular glycogen depletion, the resultant hypoglycaemia may cause a decrease in brain glycogen. Here, we tested this hypothesis and also investigated the possible involvement of brain monoamines with the reduced levels of brain glycogen. For this purpose, we exercised male Wistar rats on a treadmill for different durations (30–120 min) at moderate intensity (20 m min−1) and measured their brain glycogen levels using high-power microwave irradiation (10 kW). At the end of 30 and 60 min of running, the brain glycogen levels remained unchanged from resting levels, but liver and muscle glycogen decreased. After 120 min of running, the glycogen levels decreased significantly by ∼37–60% in five discrete brain loci (the cerebellum 60%, cortex 48%, hippocampus 43%, brainstem 37% and hypothalamus 34%) compared to those of the sedentary control. The brain glycogen levels in all five regions after running were positively correlated with the respective blood and brain glucose levels. Further, in the cortex, the levels of methoxyhydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), potential involved in degradation of the brain glycogen, increased during prolonged exercise and negatively correlated with the glycogen levels. These results support the hypothesis that brain glycogen could decrease with prolonged exhaustive exercise. Increased monoamines together with hypoglycaemia should be associated with the development of decreased brain glycogen, suggesting a new clue towards the understanding of central fatigue during prolonged exercise. PMID:21521757

  11. Prolonged grief: setting the research agenda

    PubMed Central

    Rosner, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Background Prolonged grief disorder is proposed for the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11), though it was rejected as a diagnosis for DSM-5. Objective This review outlines findings and defines important areas for future research viewed from a lifespan perspective. Results The development and psychometric evaluation of measures for the new diagnosis is paramount, specifically for children and adolescents. Treatments need to be adapted for specific subgroups and research findings have to be disseminated into various professional settings. PMID:25994020

  12. Novel Waddlia Intracellular Bacterium in Artibeus intermedius Fruit Bats, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Pierlé, Sebastián Aguilar; Morales, Cirani Obregón; Martínez, Leonardo Perea; Ceballos, Nidia Aréchiga; Rivero, Juan José Pérez; Díaz, Osvaldo López; Brayton, Kelly A.

    2015-01-01

    An intracellular bacterium was isolated from fruit bats (Artibeus intermedius) in Cocoyoc, Mexico. The bacterium caused severe lesions in the lungs and spleens of bats and intracytoplasmic vacuoles in cell cultures. Sequence analyses showed it is related to Waddlia spp. (order Chlamydiales). We propose to call this bacterium Waddlia cocoyoc. PMID:26583968

  13. Novel Waddlia Intracellular Bacterium in Artibeus intermedius Fruit Bats, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Pierlé, Sebastián Aguilar; Morales, Cirani Obregón; Martínez, Leonardo Perea; Ceballos, Nidia Aréchiga; Rivero, Juan José Pérez; Díaz, Osvaldo López; Brayton, Kelly A; Setién, Alvaro Aguilar

    2015-12-01

    An intracellular bacterium was isolated from fruit bats (Artibeus intermedius) in Cocoyoc, Mexico. The bacterium caused severe lesions in the lungs and spleens of bats and intracytoplasmic vacuoles in cell cultures. Sequence analyses showed it is related to Waddlia spp. (order Chlamydiales). We propose to call this bacterium Waddlia cocoyoc. PMID:26583968

  14. Proton-dependent zinc release from intracellular ligands.

    PubMed

    Kiedrowski, Lech

    2014-07-01

    In cultured cortical and hippocampal neurons when intracellular pH drops from 6.6 to 6.1, yet unclear intracellular stores release micromolar amounts of Zn(2+) into the cytosol. Mitochondria, acidic organelles, and/or intracellular ligands could release this Zn(2+) . Although exposure to the protonophore FCCP precludes reloading of the mitochondria and acidic organelles with Zn(2+) , FCCP failed to compromise the ability of the intracellular stores to repeatedly release Zn(2+) . Therefore, Zn(2+) -releasing stores were not mitochondria or acidic organelles but rather intracellular Zn(2+) ligands. To test which ligands might be involved, the rate of acid-induced Zn(2+) release from complexes with cysteine, glutathione, histidine, aspartate, glutamate, glycine, and carnosine was investigated; [Zn(2+) ] was monitored in vitro using the ratiometric Zn(2+) -sensitive fluorescent probe FuraZin-1. Carnosine failed to chelate Zn(2+) but did chelate Cu(2+) ; the remaining ligands chelated Zn(2+) and upon acidification were releasing it into the medium. However, when pH was decreasing from 6.6 to 6.1, only zinc-cysteine complexes rapidly accelerated the rate of Zn(2+) release. The zinc-cysteine complexes also released Zn(2+) when a histidine-modifying agent, diethylpyrocarbonate, was applied at pH 7.2. Since the cytosolic zinc-cysteine complexes can contain micromolar amounts of Zn(2+) , these complexes may represent the stores responsible for an acid-induced intracellular Zn(2+) release. This study aimed at identifying intracellular stores which release Zn(2+) when pHi drops from 6.6 to 6.1. It was found that these stores are not mitochondria or acidic organelles, but rather intracellular Zn(2+) ligands. When the pH was decreasing from 6.6 to 6.1, only zinc-cysteine complexes showed a rapid acceleration in the rate of Zn(2+) release. Therefore, the stores responsible for an acid-induced intracellular Zn(2+) release in neurons may be the cytosolic zinc-cysteine complexes

  15. Prolonging life: legal, ethical, and social dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Paulson, Steve; Comfort, Christopher P; Lee, Barbara Coombs; Shemie, Sam; Solomon, Mildred Z

    2014-11-01

    The ability of modern medicine to prolong life has raised a variety of difficult legal, ethical, and social issues on which reasonable minds can differ. Among these are the morality of euthanasia in cases of deep coma or irreversible injury, as well as the Dead Donor Rule with respect to organ harvesting and transplants. As science continues to refine and develop lifesaving technologies, questions remain as to how much medical effort and financial resources should be expended to prolong the lives of patients suspended between life and death. At what point should death be considered irreversible? What criteria should be used to determine when to withhold or withdraw life-prolonging treatments in cases of severe brain damage and terminal illness? To explore these complex dilemmas, Steve Paulson, executive producer and host of To the Best of Our Knowledge, moderated a discussion panel. Pediatrician Sam Shemie, hospice medical director Christopher P. Comfort, bioethicist Mildred Z. Solomon, and attorney Barbara Coombs Lee examined the underlying assumptions and considerations that ultimately shape individual and societal decisions surrounding these issues. The following is an edited transcript of the discussion that occurred November 12, 2013, 7:00-8:30 PM, at the New York Academy of Sciences in New York City. PMID:25079490

  16. Adaptive prolonged postreproductive life span in killer whales.

    PubMed

    Foster, Emma A; Franks, Daniel W; Mazzi, Sonia; Darden, Safi K; Balcomb, Ken C; Ford, John K B; Croft, Darren P

    2012-09-14

    Prolonged life after reproduction is difficult to explain evolutionarily unless it arises as a physiological side effect of increased longevity or it benefits related individuals (i.e., increases inclusive fitness). There is little evidence that postreproductive life spans are adaptive in nonhuman animals. By using multigenerational records for two killer whale (Orcinus orca) populations in which females can live for decades after their final parturition, we show that postreproductive mothers increase the survival of offspring, particularly their older male offspring. This finding may explain why female killer whales have evolved the longest postreproductive life span of all nonhuman animals. PMID:22984064

  17. A prolonged rhythmic midtemporal discharge in a child without seizures.

    PubMed

    Fawaz, Ahmad; Nasreddine, Wassim; Bustros, Stephanie; Kayed, Deeb Maxwell; Beydoun, Ahmad

    2015-04-01

    Rhythmic midtemporal discharge (RMTD) is one of the benign epileptiform variants, typically consisting of runs of 4-Hz to 7-Hz activity, lasting up to 10 seconds and maximal over the midtemporal area. We report a child who, during an admission for diagnostic closed-circuit television (CCTV) and electroencephalographic (EEG) monitoring, was found to have prolonged rhythmic monomorphic discharges, alternating over both midtemporal areas, with one of the discharges lasting up to 82 minutes. An analysis of the dominant frequency, during the longest discharge, showed that it was monomorphic throughout. On the basis of various features of these discharges, we concluded that they represented RMTD of unusual duration. PMID:24864322

  18. Fluorescence Ratio Imaging Of Dynamic Intracellular Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harootunian, Alec T.; Kao, J. P.; Tsien, Roger Y.

    1989-12-01

    Traditional biochemical assays of cellular messengers require grinding up thousands or millions of cells for each data point. Such destructive measurements use up large amounts of tissue, have poor time resolution, and cannot assess heterogeneity between individual cells or dynamic spatial localizations. Recent technical advances now enable important ionic signals to be continuously imaged inside individual living cells with micron spatial resolution and subsecond time resolution. This methodology relies on the molecular engineering of indicator dyes whose fluorescence is strong and highly sensitive to ions such as Ca2+, H+, or Na+. Binding of these ions shifts the fluorescence excitation spectrum of the corresponding indicator. The ratio of excitation amplitudes at two wavelengths measures the free ion concentration while canceling out intensity variations due to nonuniform cell thickness or dye content. By rapidly alternating between the two ion-sensitive excitation wavelengths, a fluorescence microscope equipped with a low-light television camera and digital image processor can produce dynamic images of intracellular messenger levels. In many populations of cells traditionally assumed to be homogeneous, we find that neighboring individual cells can differ enormously in their cytosolic Ca2+ response to agonist stimulation, some ignoring the stimulus, others raising cytosolic Ca2+ transiently, others showing oscillations. Oscillations have been speculated to be important as a basis for frequency-coding of oscillations. Oscillations have been speculated to be important as a basis for frequency-coding of graded inputs; we are investigating the mechanism of their generation using light flashes to generate pulses of intracellular messengers. Spatial gradients of cytosolic Ca t+ within single cells have been observed in embryos during fertilization and development, neurons exposed to electrical or drug stimulation and in cytotoxic T lymphocytes during killing of target

  19. Secretome of obligate intracellular Rickettsia

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Joseph J.; Kaur, Simran J.; Rahman, M. Sayeedur; Rennoll-Bankert, Kristen; Sears, Khandra T.; Beier-Sexton, Magda; Azad, Abdu F.

    2014-01-01

    The genus Rickettsia (Alphaproteobacteria, Rickettsiales, Rickettsiaceae) is comprised of obligate intracellular parasites, with virulent species of interest both as causes of emerging infectious diseases and for their potential deployment as bioterrorism agents. Currently, there are no effective commercially available vaccines, with treatment limited primarily to tetracycline antibiotics, although others (e.g. josamycin, ciprofloxacin, chloramphenicol, and azithromycin) are also effective. Much of the recent research geared toward understanding mechanisms underlying rickettsial pathogenicity has centered on characterization of secreted proteins that directly engage eukaryotic cells. Herein, we review all aspects of the Rickettsia secretome, including six secretion systems, 19 characterized secretory proteins, and potential moonlighting proteins identified on surfaces of multiple Rickettsia species. Employing bioinformatics and phylogenomics, we present novel structural and functional insight on each secretion system. Unexpectedly, our investigation revealed that the majority of characterized secretory proteins have not been assigned to their cognate secretion pathways. Furthermore, for most secretion pathways, the requisite signal sequences mediating translocation are poorly understood. As a blueprint for all known routes of protein translocation into host cells, this resource will assist research aimed at uniting characterized secreted proteins with their apposite secretion pathways. Furthermore, our work will help in the identification of novel secreted proteins involved in rickettsial ‘life on the inside’. PMID:25168200

  20. Dynamics of intracellular information decoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Tetsuya J.; Kamimura, Atsushi

    2011-10-01

    A variety of cellular functions are robust even to substantial intrinsic and extrinsic noise in intracellular reactions and the environment that could be strong enough to impair or limit them. In particular, of substantial importance is cellular decision-making in which a cell chooses a fate or behavior on the basis of information conveyed in noisy external signals. For robust decoding, the crucial step is filtering out the noise inevitably added during information transmission. As a minimal and optimal implementation of such an information decoding process, the autocatalytic phosphorylation and autocatalytic dephosphorylation (aPadP) cycle was recently proposed. Here, we analyze the dynamical properties of the aPadP cycle in detail. We describe the dynamical roles of the stationary and short-term responses in determining the efficiency of information decoding and clarify the optimality of the threshold value of the stationary response and its information-theoretical meaning. Furthermore, we investigate the robustness of the aPadP cycle against the receptor inactivation time and intrinsic noise. Finally, we discuss the relationship among information decoding with information-dependent actions, bet-hedging and network modularity.

  1. Intracellular signalling during neutrophil recruitment.

    PubMed

    Mócsai, Attila; Walzog, Barbara; Lowell, Clifford A

    2015-08-01

    Recruitment of leucocytes such as neutrophils to the extravascular space is a critical step of the inflammation process and plays a major role in the development of various diseases including several cardiovascular diseases. Neutrophils themselves play a very active role in that process by sensing their environment and responding to the extracellular cues by adhesion and de-adhesion, cellular shape changes, chemotactic migration, and other effector functions of cell activation. Those responses are co-ordinated by a number of cell surface receptors and their complex intracellular signal transduction pathways. Here, we review neutrophil signal transduction processes critical for recruitment to the site of inflammation. The two key requirements for neutrophil recruitment are the establishment of appropriate chemoattractant gradients and the intrinsic ability of the cells to migrate along those gradients. We will first discuss signalling steps required for sensing extracellular chemoattractants such as chemokines and lipid mediators and the processes (e.g. PI3-kinase pathways) leading to the translation of extracellular chemoattractant gradients to polarized cellular responses. We will then discuss signal transduction by leucocyte adhesion receptors (e.g. tyrosine kinase pathways) which are critical for adhesion to, and migration through the vessel wall. Finally, additional neutrophil signalling pathways with an indirect effect on the neutrophil recruitment process, e.g. through modulation of the inflammatory environment, will be discussed. Mechanistic understanding of these pathways provide better understanding of the inflammation process and may point to novel therapeutic strategies for controlling excessive inflammation during infection or tissue damage. PMID:25998986

  2. The role of autophagy in the intracellular survival of Campylobacter concisus

    PubMed Central

    Burgos-Portugal, Jose A.; Mitchell, Hazel M.; Castaño-Rodríguez, Natalia; Kaakoush, Nadeem O.

    2014-01-01

    Campylobacter concisus is an emerging pathogen that has been associated with gastrointestinal diseases. Given the importance of autophagy for the elimination of intracellular bacteria and the subversion of this process by pathogenic bacteria, we investigated the role of autophagy in C. concisus intracellular survival. Gentamicin protection assays were employed to assess intracellular levels of C. concisus within Caco-2 cells, following autophagy induction and inhibition. To assess the interaction between C. concisus and autophagosomes, confocal microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy were employed. Expression levels of 84 genes involved in the autophagy process were measured using qPCR. Autophagy inhibition resulted in two- to four-fold increases in intracellular levels of C. concisus within Caco-2 cells, while autophagy induction resulted in a significant reduction in intracellular levels or bacterial clearance. C. concisus strains with low intracellular survival levels showed a dramatic increase in these levels upon autophagy inhibition. Confocal microscopy showed co-localization of the bacterium with autophagosomes, while transmission electron microscopy identified intracellular bacteria persisting within autophagic vesicles. Further, qPCR showed that following infection, 13 genes involved in the autophagy process were significantly regulated, and a further five showed borderline results, with an overall indication towards a dampening effect exerted by the bacterium on this process. Our data collectively indicates that while autophagy is important for the clearance of C. concisus, some strains may manipulate this process to benefit their intracellular survival. PMID:24918042

  3. Television Quiz Show Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Jonnie Lynn

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the simulation of four television quiz shows for students in China studying English as a foreign language (EFL). It discusses the adaptation and implementation of television quiz shows and how the students reacted to them.

  4. Inhibition of AMPK accentuates prolonged caloric restriction-induced change in cardiac contractile function through disruption of compensatory autophagy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qijun; Zhao, Kun; Han, Xuefeng; Huff, Anna F; Cui, Qin; Babcock, Sara A; Yu, Shiqiang; Zhang, Yingmei

    2015-02-01

    Prolonged caloric restriction often results in alteration in heart geometry and function although the underlying mechanism remains poorly defined. Autophagy, a conserved pathway for bulk degradation of intracellular proteins and organelles, preserves energy and nutrient in the face of caloric insufficiency. This study was designed to examine the role of AMPK in prolonged caloric restriction-induced change in cardiac homeostasis and the underlying mechanism(s) involved with a focus on autophagy. Wild-type (WT) and AMPK kinase dead (KD) mice were caloric restricted (by 40%) for 30 weeks. Echocardiographic, cardiomyocyte contractile and intracellular Ca²⁺ properties, autophagy and autophagy regulatory proteins were evaluated. Caloric restriction compromised echocardiographic indices (decreased ventricular mass, left ventricular diameters, and cardiac output), cardiomyocyte contractile and intracellular Ca²⁺ properties associated with upregulated autophagy (Beclin-1, Atg5 and LC3BII-to-LC3BI ratio), increased autophagy adaptor protein p62, elevated phosphorylation of AMPK and TSC1/2, depressed phosphorylation of mTOR and ULK1. Although AMPK inhibition did not affect cardiac mechanical function, autophagy and autophagy signaling proteins, it significantly accentuated caloric restriction-induced changes in myocardial contractile function and intracellular Ca²⁺ handling. Interestingly, AMPK inhibition reversed caloric restriction-induced changes in autophagy and autophagy signaling. AMPK inhibition led to dampened levels of Beclin-1, Atg 5 and LC3B ratio along with suppressed phosphorylation of AMPK and TSC1/2 as well as elevated phosphorylation of mTOR and ULK1. Taken together, these data suggest an indispensible role for AMPK in the maintenance of cardiac homeostasis under prolonged caloric restriction-induced pathological changes possibly through autophagy regulation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Autophagy and protein quality control in

  5. Proton Fall or Bicarbonate Rise: GLYCOLYTIC RATE IN MOUSE ASTROCYTES IS PAVED BY INTRACELLULAR ALKALINIZATION.

    PubMed

    Theparambil, Shefeeq M; Weber, Tobias; Schmälzle, Jana; Ruminot, Ivàn; Deitmer, Joachim W

    2016-09-01

    Glycolysis is the primary step for major energy production in the cell. There is strong evidence suggesting that glucose consumption and rate of glycolysis are highly modulated by cytosolic pH/[H(+)], but those can also be stimulated by an increase in the intracellular [HCO3 (-)]. Because proton and bicarbonate shift concomitantly, it remained unclear whether enhanced glucose consumption and glycolytic rate were mediated by the changes in intracellular [H(+)] or [HCO3 (-)]. We have asked whether glucose metabolism is enhanced by either a fall in intracellular [H(+)] or a rise in intracellular [HCO3 (-)], or by both, in mammalian astrocytes. We have recorded intracellular glucose in mouse astrocytes using a FRET-based nanosensor, while imposing different intracellular [H(+)] and [CO2]/[HCO3 (-)]. Glucose consumption and glycolytic rate were augmented by a fall in intracellular [H(+)], irrespective of a concomitant rise or fall in intracellular [HCO3 (-)]. Transport of HCO3 (-) into and out of astrocytes by the electrogenic sodium bicarbonate cotransporter (NBCe1) played a crucial role in causing changes in intracellular pH and [HCO3 (-)], but was not obligatory for the pH-dependent changes in glucose metabolism. Our results clearly show that it is the cytosolic pH that modulates glucose metabolism in cortical astrocytes, and possibly also in other cell types. PMID:27422823

  6. [Prolonged or chronic fatigue of unknown origin].

    PubMed

    Favrat, Bernard; Guessous, Idris; Gonthier, Ariane; Cornuz, Jacques

    2015-04-22

    Although prolonged or chronic fatigue is a very common complaint in primary care medicine, a biomedical obvious cause is often not found. In such a case, for women between 18 and 50 years with a ferritin level of less than 50 µg/l in the absence of anaemia, an iron supplementation may be associated with an improvement in fatigue. Appropriate treatment is also important for depression, anxiety or insomnia. In other cases, the approach is essentially non-pharmacological in the form of lifestyle advice, empathy and cognitive behavioural therapy as well as progressive and adapted physical exercises. PMID:26072601

  7. Prolonged cataleptogenic effects of potentized homoeopathic drugs.

    PubMed

    Sukul, N C; Bala, S K; Bhattacharyya, B

    1986-01-01

    The four homoeopathic drugs, Gelsemium, Cannabis Indica, Graphites and Agaricus Muscarius, administered orally in 30th and 200th potencies on white rats, enhanced restraint-induced catalepsy in a similar manner to the two standard drugs pilocarpine and haloperidol (IP injection at 5 mg/kg). All the drugs tested differed from each other in the duration of cataleptogenic effect, which was more prolonged with Cannabis, Graphites and Agaricus than with Gelsemium and the two non-homoeopathic drugs used. The 200th potency of any homoeopathic drug tested acted longer than its 30th potency. PMID:3088660

  8. JC virus Reactivation During Prolonged Natalizumab Monotherapy for Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chalkias, Spyridon; Dang, Xin; Bord, Evelyn; Stein, Marion C.; Kinkel, R. Philip; Sloane, Jacob A.; Donnelly, Maureen; Ionete, Carolina; Houtchens, Maria K.; Buckle, Guy J.; Batson, Stephanie; Koralnik, Igor J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence of JC virus (JCV) reactivation and JCV-specific cellular immune response during prolonged natalizumab treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods We enrolled 43 JCV-seropositive MS patients, including 32 on natalizumab monotherapy>18 months, 6 on interferon β-1a monotherapy>36 months and 5 untreated controls. We performed QPCR in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), blood and urine for JCV DNA and we determined JCV-specific T cell responses using enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISpot) and intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) assays, ex vivo and after in vitro stimulation with JCV peptides. Results JCV DNA was detected in the CSF of 2/27 (7.4%) natalizumab-treated MS patients who had no symptoms or MRI lesions consistent with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. JCV DNA was detected in blood of 12/43 (27.9%) and in urine of 11/43 (25.6%) subjects without difference between natalizumab-treated patients and controls. JC viral load was higher in CD34+ cells and in monocytes compared to other subpopulations. ICS was more sensitive than ELISpot, and JCV-specific T cell responses, mediated by both CD4+ and CD8+ T-lymphocytes, were detected more frequently after in vitro stimulation. JCV-specific CD4+ T-cells were detected ex vivo more frequently in MS patients with JCV DNA in CD34+ (p=0.05) and B cells (p=0.03). Interpretation Asymptomatic JCV reactivation may occur in CSF of natalizumab-treated MS patients. JCV DNA load is higher in circulating CD34+ cells and monocytes compared to other mononuclear cells, and JCV in blood might trigger a JCV-specific CD4+ T-cell response. JCV-specific cellular immune response is highly prevalent in all JCV-seropositive MS patients, regardless of treatment. PMID:24687904

  9. Nanoconjugation prolongs endosomal signaling of the epidermal growth factor receptor and enhances apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wu, L; Xu, F; Reinhard, B M

    2016-07-14

    It is becoming increasingly clear that intracellular signaling can be subject to strict spatial control. As the covalent attachment of a signaling ligand to a nanoparticle (NP) impacts ligand-receptor binding, uptake, and trafficking, nanoconjugation provides new opportunities for manipulating intracellular signaling in a controlled fashion. To establish the effect of nanoconjugation on epidermal growth factor (EGF) mediated signaling, we investigate here the intracellular fate of nanoconjugated EGF (NP-EGF) and its bound receptor (EGFR) by quantitative correlated darkfield/fluorescence microscopy and density-based endosomal fractionation. We demonstrate that nanoconjugation prolongs the dwell time of phosphorylated receptors in the early endosomes and that the retention of activated EGFR in the early endosomes is accompanied by an EGF mediated apoptosis at effective concentrations that do not induce apoptosis in the case of free EGF. Overall, these findings indicate nanoconjugation as a rational strategy for modifying signaling that acts by modulating the temporo-spatial distribution of the activated EGF-EGFR ligand-receptor complex. PMID:27378391

  10. Review and Outcome of Prolonged Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Youness, Houssein; Al Halabi, Tarek; Hussein, Hussein; Awab, Ahmed; Jones, Kellie; Keddissi, Jean

    2016-01-01

    The maximal duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is unknown. We report a case of prolonged CPR. We have then reviewed all published cases with CPR duration equal to or more than 20 minutes. The objective was to determine the survival rate, the neurological outcome, and the characteristics of the survivors. Measurements and Main Results. The CPR data for 82 patients was reviewed. The median duration of CPR was 75 minutes. Patients mean age was 43 ± 21 years with no significant comorbidities. The main causes of the cardiac arrests were myocardial infarction (29%), hypothermia (21%), and pulmonary emboli (12%). 74% of the arrests were witnessed, with a mean latency to CPR of 2 ± 6 minutes and good quality chest compression provided in 96% of the cases. Adjunct therapy included extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (18%), thrombolysis (15.8%), and rewarming for hypothermia (19.5%). 83% were alive at 1 year, with full neurological recovery reported in 63 patients. Conclusion. Patients undergoing prolonged CPR can survive with good outcome. Young age, myocardial infarction, and potentially reversible causes of cardiac arrest such as hypothermia and pulmonary emboli predict a favorable result, especially when the arrest is witnessed and followed by prompt and good resuscitative efforts. PMID:26885387

  11. Prolonged Sleep under Stone Age Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Piosczyk, Hannah; Landmann, Nina; Holz, Johannes; Feige, Bernd; Riemann, Dieter; Nissen, Christoph; Voderholzer, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: We report on a unique experiment designed to investigate the impact of prehistoric living conditions on sleep-wake behavior. Methods: A group of five healthy adults were assessed during life in a Stone Age-like settlement over two months. Results: The most notable finding was that nocturnal time in bed and estimated sleep time, as measured by actigraphy, markedly increased during the experimental period compared to the periods prior to and following the experiment. These increases were primarily driven by a phase-advance shift of sleep onset. Subjective assessments of health and functioning did not reveal any relevant changes across the study. Conclusions: Our observations provide further evidence for the long-held belief that the absence of modern living conditions is associated with an earlier sleep phase and prolonged sleep duration. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 723. Citation: Piosczyk H, Landmann N, Holz J, Feige B, Riemann D, Nissen C, Voderholzer U. Prolonged sleep under Stone Age conditions. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(7):719-722. PMID:25024647

  12. Autophagy and checkpoints for intracellular pathogen defense

    PubMed Central

    Paulus, Geraldine L.C.; Xavier, Ramnik J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Autophagy plays a crucial role in intracellular defense against various pathogens. Xenophagy is a form of selective autophagy that targets intracellular pathogens for degradation. In addition, several related yet distinct intracellular defense responses depend on autophagy-related (ATG) genes. This review gives an overview of these processes, pathogen strategies to subvert them, and their crosstalk with various cell death programs. Recent findings The recruitment of ATG proteins plays a key role in multiple intracellular defense programs, specifically xenophagy, LC3-associated phagocytosis (LAP), and the IFNγ-mediated elimination of pathogens such as Toxoplasma gondii and murine norovirus. Recent progress has revealed methods employed by pathogens to resist these intracellular defense mechanisms and/or persist in spite of them. The intracellular pathogen load can tip the balance between cell survival and cell death. Further, it was recently observed that LAP is indispensable for the efficient clearance of dying cells. Summary Autophagy-dependent and ATG gene-dependent pathways are essential in intracellular defense against a broad range of pathogens. PMID:25394238

  13. The Wordpath Show.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderton, Alice

    The Intertribal Wordpath Society is a nonprofit educational corporation formed to promote the teaching, status, awareness, and use of Oklahoma Indian languages. The Society produces "Wordpath," a weekly 30-minute public access television show about Oklahoma Indian languages and the people who are teaching and preserving them. The show aims to…

  14. Prolonged grief disorder and depression in a German community sample.

    PubMed

    Schaal, Susanne; Richter, Anne; Elbert, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to examine rates and risk factors for prolonged grief and to investigate the association between prolonged grief and depression. The authors interviewed a heterogeneous bereaved sample of 61 Germans, 6 of whom had prolonged grief and depression, respectively. The 2 syndromes were strongly linked to one another. Risk factors for prolonged grief were being a woman and having high levels of religious beliefs and low levels of satisfaction with one's religious beliefs, emotional closeness to the deceased, and unanticipated loss. Symptoms of prolonged grief may endure years post-loss and often overlap with depression. PMID:24758218

  15. Stochastic resonance in an intracellular genetic perceptron.

    PubMed

    Bates, Russell; Blyuss, Oleg; Zaikin, Alexey

    2014-03-01

    Intracellular genetic networks are more intelligent than was first assumed due to their ability to learn. One of the manifestations of this intelligence is the ability to learn associations of two stimuli within gene-regulating circuitry: Hebbian-type learning within the cellular life. However, gene expression is an intrinsically noisy process; hence, we investigate the effect of intrinsic and extrinsic noise on this kind of intracellular intelligence. We report a stochastic resonance in an intracellular associative genetic perceptron, a noise-induced phenomenon, which manifests itself in noise-induced increase of response in efficiency after the learning event under the conditions of optimal stochasticity. PMID:24730883

  16. Visualization of Intracellular Tyrosinase Activity in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Setty, Subba Rao Gangi

    2016-01-01

    Melanocytes produce the melanin pigments in melanosomes and these organelles protect the skin against harmful ultraviolet rays. Tyrosinase is the key cuproenzyme which initiates the pigment synthesis using its substrate amino acid tyrosine or L-DOPA (L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine). Moreover, the activity of tyrosinase directly correlates to the cellular pigmentation. Defects in tyrosinase transport to melanosomes or mutations in the enzyme or reduced intracellular copper levels results in loss of tyrosinase activity in melanosomes, commonly observed in albinism. Here, we described a method to detect the intracellular activity of tyrosinase in mouse melanocytes. This protocol will visualize the active tyrosinase present in the intracellular vesicles or organelles including melanosomes. PMID:27231711

  17. QTc interval prolongation with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ghatalia, P; Je, Y; Kaymakcalan, M D; Sonpavde, G; Choueiri, T K

    2015-01-01

    Background: Multi-targeted vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are known to cause cardiac toxicity, but the relative risk (RR) of QTc interval prolongation and serious arrhythmias associated with them are not reported. Methods: We conducted a trial-level meta-analysis of randomised phase II and III trials comparing arms with and without a US Food and Drug Administration-approved VEGFR TKI (sunitinib, sorafenib, pazopanib, axitinib, vandetanib, cabozantinib, ponatinib and regorafenib). A total of 6548 patients from 18 trials were selected. Statistical analyses were conducted to calculate the summary incidence, RR and 95% CIs. Results: The RR for all-grade and high-grade QTc prolongation for the TKI vs no TKI arms was 8.66 (95% CI 4.92–15.2, P<0.001) and 2.69 (95% CI 1.33–5.44, P=0.006), respectively, with most of the events being asymptomatic QTc prolongation. Respectively, 4.4% and 0.83% of patients exposed to VEGFR TKI had all-grade and high-grade QTc prolongation. On subgroup analysis, only sunitinib and vandetanib were associated with a statistically significant risk of QTc prolongation, with higher doses of vandetanib associated with a greater risk. The rate of serious arrhythmias including torsades de pointes did not seem to be higher with high-grade QTc prolongation. The risk of QTc prolongation was independent of the duration of therapy. Conclusions: In the largest study to date, we show that VEGFR TKI can be associated with QTc prolongation. Although most cases were of low clinical significance, it is unclear whether the same applies to patients treated off clinical trials. PMID:25349964

  18. Microsporidia Are Natural Intracellular Parasites of the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Troemel, Emily R; Félix, Marie-Anne; Whiteman, Noah K; Barrière, Antoine; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2008-01-01

    For decades the soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been an important model system for biology, but little is known about its natural ecology. Recently, C. elegans has become the focus of studies of innate immunity and several pathogens have been shown to cause lethal intestinal infections in C. elegans. However none of these pathogens has been shown to invade nematode intestinal cells, and no pathogen has been isolated from wild-caught C. elegans. Here we describe an intracellular pathogen isolated from wild-caught C. elegans that we show is a new species of microsporidia. Microsporidia comprise a large class of eukaryotic intracellular parasites that are medically and agriculturally important, but poorly understood. We show that microsporidian infection of the C. elegans intestine proceeds through distinct stages and is transmitted horizontally. Disruption of a conserved cytoskeletal structure in the intestine called the terminal web correlates with the release of microsporidian spores from infected cells, and appears to be part of a novel mechanism by which intracellular pathogens exit from infected cells. Unlike in bacterial intestinal infections, the p38 MAPK and insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling pathways do not appear to play substantial roles in resistance to microsporidian infection in C. elegans. We found microsporidia in multiple wild-caught isolates of Caenorhabditis nematodes from diverse geographic locations. These results indicate that microsporidia are common parasites of C. elegans in the wild. In addition, the interaction between C. elegans and its natural microsporidian parasites provides a system in which to dissect intracellular intestinal infection in vivo and insight into the diversity of pathogenic mechanisms used by intracellular microbes. PMID:19071962

  19. Intracellular mGluR5 plays a critical role in neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Kathleen; Cornea, Virginia M.; Jong, Yuh-Jiin I.; Laferrière, André; Kumar, Naresh; Mickeviciute, Aiste; Fung, Jollee S. T.; Bandegi, Pouya; Ribeiro-da-Silva, Alfredo; O'Malley, Karen L.; Coderre, Terence J.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal mGluR5 is a key mediator of neuroplasticity underlying persistent pain. Although brain mGluR5 is localized on cell surface and intracellular membranes, neither the presence nor physiological role of spinal intracellular mGluR5 is established. Here we show that in spinal dorsal horn neurons >80% of mGluR5 is intracellular, of which ∼60% is located on nuclear membranes, where activation leads to sustained Ca2+ responses. Nerve injury inducing nociceptive hypersensitivity also increases the expression of nuclear mGluR5 and receptor-mediated phosphorylated-ERK1/2, Arc/Arg3.1 and c-fos. Spinal blockade of intracellular mGluR5 reduces neuropathic pain behaviours and signalling molecules, whereas blockade of cell-surface mGluR5 has little effect. Decreasing intracellular glutamate via blocking EAAT-3, mimics the effects of intracellular mGluR5 antagonism. These findings show a direct link between an intracellular GPCR and behavioural expression in vivo. Blockade of intracellular mGluR5 represents a new strategy for the development of effective therapies for persistent pain. PMID:26837579

  20. Imaging atrial arrhythmic intracellular calcium in intact heart

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wenjun; Santulli, Gaetano; Guo, Xiaoxiao; Gao, Melanie; Chen, Bi-Xing; Marks, Andrew R.

    2014-01-01

    Abnormalities in intracellular Ca2+ signaling have been proposed to play an essential role in the pathophysiology of atrial arrhythmias. However, a direct observation of intracellular Ca2+ in atrial myocytes during atrial arrhythmias is lacking. Here, we have developed an ex vivo model of simultaneous Ca2+ imaging and electrocardiographic recording in cardiac atria. Using this system we were able to record atrial arrhythmic intracellular Ca2+ activities. Our results indicate that atrial arrhythmias can be tightly linked to intracellular Ca2+ waves and Ca2+ alternans. Moreover, we applied this strategy to analyze Ca2+ signals in the hearts of WT and knock-in mice harboring a ‘leaky’ type 2 ryanodine receptor (RyR2-R2474S). We showed that sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ leak increases the susceptibility to Ca2+ alternans and Ca2+ waves increasing the incidence of atrial arrhythmias. Reduction of SR Ca2+ leak via RyR2 by acute treatment with S107 reduced both Ca2+ alternans and Ca2+ waves, and prevented atrial arrhythmias. PMID:24041536

  1. Optogenetic oligomerization of Rab GTPases regulates intracellular membrane trafficking.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Mai Khanh; Kim, Cha Yeon; Kim, Jin Man; Park, Byung Ouk; Lee, Sangkyu; Park, Hyerim; Heo, Won Do

    2016-06-01

    Intracellular membrane trafficking, which is involved in diverse cellular processes, is dynamic and difficult to study in a spatiotemporal manner. Here we report an optogenetic strategy, termed light-activated reversible inhibition by assembled trap of intracellular membranes (IM-LARIAT), that uses various Rab GTPases combined with blue-light-induced hetero-interaction between cryptochrome 2 and CIB1. In this system, illumination induces a rapid and reversible intracellular membrane aggregation that disrupts the dynamics and functions of the targeted membrane. We applied IM-LARIAT to specifically perturb several Rab-mediated trafficking processes, including receptor transport, protein sorting and secretion, and signaling initiated from endosomes. We finally used this tool to reveal different functions of local Rab5-mediated and Rab11-mediated membrane trafficking in growth cones and soma of young hippocampal neurons. Our results show that IM-LARIAT is a versatile tool that can be used to dissect spatiotemporal functions of intracellular membranes in diverse systems. PMID:27065232

  2. Intracellular pH measurements using perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Michael J; Janjic, Jelena M; Teng, Haibing; O'Hear, Meredith R; Brown, Cortlyn W; Stokum, Jesse A; Schmidt, Brigitte F; Ahrens, Eric T; Waggoner, Alan S

    2013-12-11

    We report the synthesis and formulation of unique perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanoemulsions enabling intracellular pH measurements in living cells via fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry. These nanoemulsions are formulated to readily enter cells upon coincubation and contain two cyanine-based fluorescent reporters covalently bound to the PFC molecules, specifically Cy3-PFC and CypHer5-PFC conjugates. The spectral and pH-sensing properties of the nanoemulsions were characterized in vitro and showed the unaltered spectral behavior of dyes after formulation. In rat 9L glioma cells loaded with nanoemulsion, the local pH of nanoemulsions was longitudinally quantified using optical microscopy and flow cytometry and displayed a steady decrease in pH to a level of 5.5 over 3 h, indicating rapid uptake of nanoemulsion to acidic compartments. Overall, these reagents enable real-time optical detection of intracellular pH in living cells in response to pharmacological manipulations. Moreover, recent approaches for in vivo cell tracking using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) employ intracellular PFC nanoemulsion probes to track cells using (19)F MRI. However, the intracellular fate of these imaging probes is poorly understood. The pH-sensing nanoemulsions allow the study of the fate of the PFC tracer inside the labeled cell, which is important for understanding the PFC cell loading dynamics, nanoemulsion stability and cell viability over time. PMID:24266634

  3. Intracellular pH measurements using perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, Michael J.; Janjic, Jelena M.; Teng, Haibing; O’Hear, Meredith R.; Brown, Cortlyn W.; Stokum, Jesse A.; Schmidt, Brigitte F.; Ahrens, Eric T.; Waggoner, Alan S.

    2014-01-01

    We report the synthesis and formulation of unique perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanoemulsions enabling intracellular pH measurements in living cells via fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry. These nanoemulsions are formulated to readily enter cells upon co-incubation and contain two cyanine-based fluorescent reporters covalently bound to the PFC molecules, specifically Cy3-PFC and CypHer5-PFC conjugates. The spectral and pH-sensing properties of the nanoemulsions where characterized in vitro and showed the unaltered spectral behavior of dyes after formulation. In rat 9L glioma cells loaded with nanoemulsion, the local pH of nanoemulsions was longitudinally quantified using optical microscopy and flow cytometry, and displayed a steady decrease in pH to a level of 5.5 over 3 hours, indicating rapid uptake of nanoemulsion to acidic compartments. Overall, these reagents enable real-time optical detection of intracellular pH in living cells in response to pharmacological manipulations. Moreover, recent approaches for in vivo cell tracking using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) employ intracellular PFC nanoemulsion probes to track cells using 19F MRI. However, the intracellular fate of these imaging probes is poorly understood. The pH sensing nanoemulsions allow the study of the fate of the PFC tracer inside the labeled cell, which is important for understanding the PFC cell loading dynamics and nanoemulsion stability and cell viability over time. PMID:24266634

  4. Drug-induced QT interval prolongation: mechanisms and clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Nachimuthu, Senthil; Assar, Manish D.

    2012-01-01

    The prolonged QT interval is both widely seen and associated with the potentially deadly rhythm, Torsades de Pointes (TdP). While it can occur spontaneously in the congenital form, there is a wide array of drugs that have been implicated in the prolongation of the QT interval. Some of these drugs have either been restricted or withdrawn from the market due to the increased incidence of fatal polymorphic ventricular tachycardia. The list of drugs that cause QT prolongation continues to grow, and an updated list of specific drugs that prolong the QT interval can be found at www.qtdrugs.org. This review focuses on the mechanism of drug-induced QT prolongation, risk factors for TdP, culprit drugs, prevention and monitoring of prolonged drug-induced QT prolongation and treatment strategies. PMID:25083239

  5. A Holographic Road Show.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkpatrick, Larry D.; Rugheimer, Mac

    1979-01-01

    Describes the viewing sessions and the holograms of a holographic road show. The traveling exhibits, believed to stimulate interest in physics, include a wide variety of holograms and demonstrate several physical principles. (GA)

  6. HIF-1α-mediated upregulation of SERCA2b: The endogenous mechanism for alleviating the ischemia-induced intracellular Ca(2+) store dysfunction in CA1 and CA3 hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Kopach, Olga; Maistrenko, Anastasiia; Lushnikova, Iryna; Belan, Pavel; Skibo, Galina; Voitenko, Nana

    2016-05-01

    Pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus possess differential susceptibility to the ischemia-induced damage with the highest vulnerability of CA1 and the lower sensitivity of CA3 neurons. This damage is triggered by Ca(2+)-dependent excitotoxicity and can result in a delayed cell death that might be potentially suspended through activation of endogenous neuroprotection with the hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIF). However, the molecular mechanisms of this neuroprotection remain poorly understood. Here we show that prolonged (30min) oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) in situ impairs intracellular Ca(2+) regulation in CA1 rather than in CA3 neurons with the differently altered expression of genes coding Ca(2+)-ATPases: the mRNA level of plasmalemmal Ca(2+)-ATPases (PMCA1 and PMCA2 subtypes) was downregulated in CA1 neurons, whereas the mRNA level of the endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPases (SERCA2b subtype) was increased in CA3 neurons at 4h of re-oxygenation after prolonged OGD. These demonstrate distinct susceptibility of CA1 and CA3 neurons to the ischemic impairments in intracellular Ca(2+) regulation and Ca(2+)-ATPase expression. Stabilization of HIF-1α by inhibiting HIF-1α hydroxylation prevented the ischemic decrease in both PMCA1 and PMCA2 mRNAs in CA1 neurons, upregulated the SERCA2b mRNA level and eliminated the OGD-induced Ca(2+) store dysfunction in these neurons. Cumulatively, these findings reveal the previously unknown HIF-1α-driven upregulation of Ca(2+)-ATPases as a mechanism opposing the ischemic impairments in intracellular Ca(2+) regulation in hippocampal neurons. The ability of HIF-1α to modulate expression of genes coding Ca(2+)-ATPases suggests SERCA2b as a novel target for HIF-1 and may provide potential implications for HIF-1α-stabilizing strategy in activating endogenous neuroprotection. PMID:26969192

  7. Intracellular activity of antibiotics against Staphylococcus aureus in a mouse peritonitis model.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, Anne; Hessler, Jonas H R; Skov, Robert L; Blom, Jens; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2009-05-01

    Antibiotic treatment of Staphylococcus aureus infections is often problematic due to the slow response to therapy and the high frequency of infection recurrence. The intracellular persistence of staphylococci has been recognized and could offer a good explanation for these treatment difficulties. Knowledge of the interplay between intracellular antibiotic activity and the overall outcome of infection is therefore important. Several intracellular in vitro models have been developed, but few experimental animal models have been published. The mouse peritonitis/sepsis model was used as the basic in vivo model exploring a quantitative ex vivo extra- and intracellular differentiation assay. The intracellular presence of S. aureus was documented by electron microscopy. Five antibiotics, dicloxacillin, cefuroxime, gentamicin, azithromycin, and rifampin (rifampicin), were tested in the new in vivo model; and the model was able to distinguish between their extra- and intracellular effects. The intracellular effects of the five antibiotics could be ranked as follows as the mean change in the log(10) number of CFU/ml (Delta log(10) CFU/ml) between treated and untreated mice after 4 h of treatment: dicloxacillin (3.70 Delta log(10) CFU/ml) > cefuroxime (3.56 Delta log(10) CFU/ml) > rifampin (1.86 Delta log(10) CFU/ml) > gentamicin (0.61 Delta log(10) CFU/ml) > azithromycin (0.21 Delta log(10) CFU/ml). We could also show that the important factors during testing of intracellular activity in vivo are the size, number, and frequency of doses; the time of exposure; and the timing between the start of infection and treatment. A poor correlation between the intracellular accumulation of the antibiotics and the actual intracellular effect was found. This stresses the importance of performing experimental studies, like those with the new in vivo model described here, to measure actual intracellular activity instead of making predictions based on cellular pharmacokinetic and MICs. PMID

  8. Polymer physics of intracellular phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brangwynne, Clifford P.; Tompa, Peter; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2015-11-01

    Intracellular organelles are either membrane-bound vesicles or membrane-less compartments that are made up of proteins and RNA. These organelles play key biological roles, by compartmentalizing the cell to enable spatiotemporal control of biological reactions. Recent studies suggest that membrane-less intracellular compartments are multicomponent viscous liquid droplets that form via phase separation. Proteins that have an intrinsic tendency for being conformationally heterogeneous seem to be the main drivers of liquid-liquid phase separation in the cell. These findings highlight the relevance of classical concepts from the physics of polymeric phase transitions for understanding the assembly of intracellular membrane-less compartments. However, applying these concepts is challenging, given the heteropolymeric nature of protein sequences, the complex intracellular environment, and non-equilibrium features intrinsic to cells. This provides new opportunities for adapting established theories and for the emergence of new physics.

  9. Nanoparticles for intracellular-targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulo, Cristiana S. O.; Pires das Neves, Ricardo; Ferreira, Lino S.

    2011-12-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are very promising for the intracellular delivery of anticancer and immunomodulatory drugs, stem cell differentiation biomolecules and cell activity modulators. Although initial studies in the area of intracellular drug delivery have been performed in the delivery of DNA, there is an increasing interest in the use of other molecules to modulate cell activity. Herein, we review the latest advances in the intracellular-targeted delivery of short interference RNA, proteins and small molecules using NPs. In most cases, the drugs act at different cellular organelles and therefore the drug-containing NPs should be directed to precise locations within the cell. This will lead to the desired magnitude and duration of the drug effects. The spatial control in the intracellular delivery might open new avenues to modulate cell activity while avoiding side-effects.

  10. Influence of a Prolonged Tennis Match Play on Serve Biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Martin, Caroline; Bideau, Benoit; Delamarche, Paul; Kulpa, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify kinematic, kinetic and performance changes that occur in the serve throughout a prolonged tennis match play. Serves of eight male advanced tennis players were recorded with a motion capture system before, at mid-match, and after a 3-hour tennis match. Before and after each match, electromyographic data of 8 upper limb muscles obtained during isometric maximal voluntary contraction were compared to determine the presence of muscular fatigue. Vertical ground reaction forces, rating of perceived exertion, ball speed, and ball impact height were measured. Kinematic and upper limb kinetic variables were computed. The results show decrease in mean power frequency values for several upper limb muscles that is an indicator of local muscular fatigue. Decreases in serve ball speed, ball impact height, maximal angular velocities and an increase in rating of perceived exertion were also observed between the beginning and the end of the match. With fatigue, the majority of the upper limb joint kinetics decreases at the end of the match. No change in timing of maximal angular velocities was observed between the beginning and the end of the match. A prolonged tennis match play may induce fatigue in upper limb muscles, which decrease performance and cause changes in serve maximal angular velocities and joint kinetics. The consistency in timing of maximal angular velocities suggests that advanced tennis players are able to maintain the temporal pattern of their serve technique, in spite of the muscular fatigue development. PMID:27532421

  11. Cranberry anthocyanin extract prolongs lifespan of fruit flies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lijun; Li, Yuk Man; Lei, Lin; Liu, Yuwei; Wang, Xiaobo; Ma, Ka Ying; Chen, Zhen-Yu

    2015-09-01

    Cranberry is an excellent source of dietary antioxidants. The present study investigated the effect of cranberry anthocyanin (CrA) extract on the lifespan of fruit flies with focus on its interaction with aging-related genes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), methuselah (MTH), insulin receptor (InR), target of rapamycin (TOR), hemipterus (Hep), and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK). Results showed that diet containing 20mg/mL CrA could significantly prolong the mean lifespan of fruit flies by 10% compared with the control diet. This was accompanied by up-regulation of SOD1 and down-regulation of MTH, InR, TOR and PEPCK. The stress resistance test demonstrated that CrA could reduce the mortality rate induced by H2O2 but not by paraquat. It was therefore concluded that the lifespan-prolonging activity of CrA was most likely mediated by modulating the genes of SOD1, MTH, InR, TOR and PEPCK. PMID:26159161

  12. The evolution of prolonged life after reproduction.

    PubMed

    Croft, Darren P; Brent, Lauren J N; Franks, Daniel W; Cant, Michael A

    2015-07-01

    Why females of some species cease ovulation before the end of their natural lifespan is a longstanding evolutionary puzzle. For many species in captivity, post-reproductive life is simply an epiphenomenon of lengthened lifespan. Yet in natural populations of humans as well as some cetaceans and insects, reproductive senescence occurs much faster than somatic aging and females exhibit prolonged post-reproductive lifespans (PRLSs). Determining the mechanisms and functions that underpin PRLSs has proved a significant challenge. Here we bring together both classic and modern hypotheses proposed to explain PRLSs and discuss their application to both human and nonhuman animals. By taking an integrative and broad taxonomic approach we highlight the need to consider multiple interacting explanations for the evolution of PRLSs. PMID:25982154

  13. Dengue haemorrhagic fever with unusual prolonged thrombocytopaenia.

    PubMed

    Kamil, S M; Mohamad, N H; Narazah, M Y; Khan, F A

    2006-04-01

    We describe a case of dengue haemorrhagic fever with prolonged thrombocytopaenia. A 22-year-old Malay man with no prior illness presented with a history of fever and generalised macular rash of four days duration. Initial work-up suggested the diagnosis of dengue haemorrhagic fever based on thrombocytopaenia and positive dengue serology. Patient recovered from acute illness by day ten, and was discharged from the hospital with improving platelet count. He was then noted to have declining platelet count on follow-up and required another hospital admission on day 19 of his illness because of declining platelet count. The patient remained hospitalised till day 44 of his illness and managed with repeated platelet transfusion and supportive care till he recovered spontaneously. PMID:16572249

  14. Bilateral Scapulohumeral Ankylosis after Prolonged Mechanical Ventilation.

    PubMed

    van Lotten, Manon L; Schreinemakers, J Rieneke; van Noort, Arthur; Rademakers, Maarten V

    2016-09-01

    This case demonstrates a rarely reported bilateral scapulohumeral bony ankylosis. A young woman developed extensive heterotopic ossifications (HOs) in both shoulder joints after being mechanically ventilated for several months at the intensive care unit in a comatose status. She presented with a severe movement restriction of both shoulder joints. Surgical resection of the bony bridges was performed in 2 separate sessions with a significant improvement of shoulder function afterwards. No postoperative complications, pain, or recurrence of HOs were noted at 1-year follow-up. Mechanical ventilation, immobilization, neuromuscular blockage, and prolonged sedation are known risk factors for the development of HOs in the shoulder joints. Relatively early surgical resection of the HOs can be performed safely in contrary to earlier belief. Afterwards, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and/or radiation therapy can be possible treatment modalities to prevent recurrence of HOs. PMID:27583120

  15. Bilateral Scapulohumeral Ankylosis after Prolonged Mechanical Ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Schreinemakers, J. Rieneke; van Noort, Arthur; Rademakers, Maarten V.

    2016-01-01

    This case demonstrates a rarely reported bilateral scapulohumeral bony ankylosis. A young woman developed extensive heterotopic ossifications (HOs) in both shoulder joints after being mechanically ventilated for several months at the intensive care unit in a comatose status. She presented with a severe movement restriction of both shoulder joints. Surgical resection of the bony bridges was performed in 2 separate sessions with a significant improvement of shoulder function afterwards. No postoperative complications, pain, or recurrence of HOs were noted at 1-year follow-up. Mechanical ventilation, immobilization, neuromuscular blockage, and prolonged sedation are known risk factors for the development of HOs in the shoulder joints. Relatively early surgical resection of the HOs can be performed safely in contrary to earlier belief. Afterwards, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and/or radiation therapy can be possible treatment modalities to prevent recurrence of HOs. PMID:27583120

  16. Liver and kidney metabolism during prolonged starvation

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Oliver E.; Felig, Philip; Morgan, Alfred P.; Wahren, John; Cahill, George F.

    1969-01-01

    This study quantifies the concentrations of circulating insulin, growth hormone, glucose, free fatty acids, glycerol, β-hydroxybutyrate, acetoacetate, and alpha amino nitrogen in 11 obese subjects during prolonged starvation. The sites and estimated rates of gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis after 5-6 wk of fasting were investigated in five of the subjects. Blood glucose and insulin concentrations fell acutely during the 1st 3 days of fasting, and alpha amino nitrogen after 17 days. The concentration of free fatty acids, β-hydroxybutyrate, and acetoacetate did not reach a plateau until after 17 days. Estimated glucose production at 5-6 wk of starvation is reduced to approximately 86 g/24 hr. Of this amount the liver contributes about one-half and the kidney the remainder. Approximately all of the lactate, pyruvate, glycerol, and amino acid carbons which are removed by liver and kidney are converted into glucose, as evidenced by substrate balances across these organs. Images PMID:5773093

  17. Prolonging Microgravity on Parabolic Airplane Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, David W.

    2003-01-01

    Three techniques have been proposed to prolong the intervals of time available for microgravity experiments aboard airplanes flown along parabolic trajectories. Typically, a pilot strives to keep an airplane on such a trajectory during a nominal time interval as long as 25 seconds, and an experimental apparatus is released to float freely in the airplane cabin to take advantage of the microgravitational environment of the trajectory for as long as possible. It is usually not possible to maintain effective microgravity during the entire nominal time interval because random aerodynamic forces and fluctuations in pilot control inputs cause the airplane to deviate slightly from a perfect parabolic trajectory, such that the freely floating apparatus bumps into the ceiling, floor, or a wall of the airplane before the completion of the parabola.

  18. Effects of Prolonged Centrifugation on Orthostasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Malcolm M..; Hargens, A. R.; Yates, B. J.; Bowley, Susan M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A feasibility study conducted on the Ames 20-G Human Centrifuge examined how well humans can maintain orthostatic tolerance during and after prolonged exposures to hypergravity. Three adult males lived for periods of 22 hours in the centrifuge while it was at rest (1.00 G), and while it rotated at 9.38 RPM to provide 1.25 G-total at the mean radius of 7.62 m. Two participants also experienced 22-hour habitation sessions at 11.46 RPM, which provided 1.50 G-total. Both before and after each habitation session, the participants were given gradual onset rate (GOR) acceleration profiles at 0.067 G/sec to determine their Gz tolerance. In addition, cardiovascular responses were compared while subjects were supine, siting, and standing at various times during the habitation (stand test), and cardiovascular responsiveness was determined using a lower body negative pressure tilt table (LBNPTT) at the beginning of the experiment and after each session. Post-Pre changes in G tolerance were -0.33 (mean) +/- 0.11 (std. error) Gz for habitation at 1.00 G, -0.02 +/- 0.12 Gz for habitation at 1.25 G, and +0.41 +/- 0.13 Gz for habitation at 1.50 G. Performance on the stand test generally improved with duration of habitation in hypergravity. Our results suggest that habitation in a confined chamber at 1.00 G reduces G tolerance and leads to lowered LBNPTT tolerance. Exposure to increased G in the centrifuge leads to enhanced performance on the stand test, and to increased GOR acceleration tolerance, but only when fluid balance is maintained; when motion sickness and negative fluid balance were observed, G tolerance was reduced. The data indicate that enhanced G tolerance can result from prolonged exposure to hypergravity, but that these changes are complex and depend on multiple underlying physiological processes.

  19. Showing What They Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cech, Scott J.

    2008-01-01

    Having students show their skills in three dimensions, known as performance-based assessment, dates back at least to Socrates. Individual schools such as Barrington High School--located just outside of Providence--have been requiring students to actively demonstrate their knowledge for years. The Rhode Island's high school graduating class became…

  20. Show What You Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eccleston, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Big things come in small packages. This saying came to the mind of the author after he created a simple math review activity for his fourth grade students. Though simple, it has proven to be extremely advantageous in reinforcing math concepts. He uses this activity, which he calls "Show What You Know," often. This activity provides the perfect…

  1. The Ozone Show.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathieu, Aaron

    2000-01-01

    Uses a talk show activity for a final assessment tool for students to debate about the ozone hole. Students are assessed on five areas: (1) cooperative learning; (2) the written component; (3) content; (4) self-evaluation; and (5) peer evaluation. (SAH)

  2. Stage a Water Show

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frasier, Debra

    2008-01-01

    In the author's book titled "The Incredible Water Show," the characters from "Miss Alaineus: A Vocabulary Disaster" used an ocean of information to stage an inventive performance about the water cycle. In this article, the author relates how she turned the story into hands-on science teaching for real-life fifth-grade students. The author also…

  3. Honored Teacher Shows Commitment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratte, Kathy

    1987-01-01

    Part of the acceptance speech of the 1985 National Council for the Social Studies Teacher of the Year, this article describes the censorship experience of this honored social studies teacher. The incident involved the showing of a videotape version of the feature film entitled "The Seduction of Joe Tynan." (JDH)

  4. Talk Show Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Mitzi Ruth

    1992-01-01

    Proposes having students perform skits in which they play the roles of the science concepts they are trying to understand. Provides the dialog for a skit in which hot and cold gas molecules are interviewed on a talk show to study how these properties affect wind, rain, and other weather phenomena. (MDH)

  5. Intracellular recording of action potentials by nanopillar electroporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Chong; Lin, Ziliang; Hanson, Lindsey; Cui, Yi; Cui, Bianxiao

    2012-03-01

    Action potentials have a central role in the nervous system and in many cellular processes, notably those involving ion channels. The accurate measurement of action potentials requires efficient coupling between the cell membrane and the measuring electrodes. Intracellular recording methods such as patch clamping involve measuring the voltage or current across the cell membrane by accessing the cell interior with an electrode, allowing both the amplitude and shape of the action potentials to be recorded faithfully with high signal-to-noise ratios. However, the invasive nature of intracellular methods usually limits the recording time to a few hours, and their complexity makes it difficult to simultaneously record more than a few cells. Extracellular recording methods, such as multielectrode arrays and multitransistor arrays, are non-invasive and allow long-term and multiplexed measurements. However, extracellular recording sacrifices the one-to-one correspondence between the cells and electrodes, and also suffers from significantly reduced signal strength and quality. Extracellular techniques are not, therefore, able to record action potentials with the accuracy needed to explore the properties of ion channels. As a result, the pharmacological screening of ion-channel drugs is usually performed by low-throughput intracellular recording methods. The use of nanowire transistors, nanotube-coupled transistors and micro gold-spine and related electrodes can significantly improve the signal strength of recorded action potentials. Here, we show that vertical nanopillar electrodes can record both the extracellular and intracellular action potentials of cultured cardiomyocytes over a long period of time with excellent signal strength and quality. Moreover, it is possible to repeatedly switch between extracellular and intracellular recording by nanoscale electroporation and resealing processes. Furthermore, vertical nanopillar electrodes can detect subtle changes in action

  6. Intracellular Gene Expression Profile of Listeria monocytogenes †

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Som Subhra; Hossain, Hamid; Otten, Sonja; Kuenne, Carsten; Kuchmina, Katja; Machata, Silke; Domann, Eugen; Chakraborty, Trinad; Hain, Torsten

    2006-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a gram-positive, food-borne microorganism responsible for invasive infections with a high overall mortality. L. monocytogenes is among the very few microorganisms that can induce uptake into the host cell and subsequently enter the host cell cytosol by breaching the vacuolar membrane. We infected the murine macrophage cell line P388D1 with L. monocytogenes strain EGD-e and examined the gene expression profile of L. monocytogenes inside the vacuolar and cytosolic environments of the host cell by using whole-genome microarray and mutant analyses. We found that ∼17% of the total genome was mobilized to enable adaptation for intracellular growth. Intracellularly expressed genes showed responses typical of glucose limitation within bacteria, with a decrease in the amount of mRNA encoding enzymes in the central metabolism and a temporal induction of genes involved in alternative-carbon-source utilization pathways and their regulation. Adaptive intracellular gene expression involved genes that are associated with virulence, the general stress response, cell division, and changes in cell wall structure and included many genes with unknown functions. A total of 41 genes were species specific, being absent from the genome of the nonpathogenic Listeria innocua CLIP 11262 strain. We also detected 25 genes that were strain specific, i.e., absent from the genome of the previously sequenced L. monocytogenes F2365 serotype 4b strain, suggesting heterogeneity in the gene pool required for intracellular survival of L. monocytogenes in host cells. Overall, our study provides crucial insights into the strategy of intracellular survival and measures taken by L. monocytogenes to escape the host cell responses. PMID:16428782

  7. Purification and Characterization of a Novel Intracellular Sucrase Enzyme of Leishmania donovani Promastigotes

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Arpita; Mandal, Debjani

    2016-01-01

    The promastigote stage of Leishmania resides in the sand fly gut, enriched with sugar molecules. Recently we reported that Leishmania donovani possesses a sucrose uptake system and a stable pool of intracellular sucrose metabolizing enzyme. In the present study, we purified the intracellular sucrase nearly to its homogeneity and compared it with the purified extracellular sucrase. The estimated size of intracellular sucrase is ~112 kDa by gel filtration chromatography, native PAGE, and substrate staining. However, in SDS-PAGE, the protein is resolved at ~56 kDa, indicating the possibility of a homodimer in its native state. The kinetics of purified intracellular sucrase shows its higher substrate affinity with a K m of 1.61 mM than the extracellular form having a K m of 4.4 mM. The highly specific activity of intracellular sucrase towards sucrose is optimal at pH 6.0 and at 30°C. In this report the purification and characterization of intracellular sucrase provide evidence that sucrase enzyme exists at least in two different forms in Leishmania donovani promastigotes. This intracellular sucrase may support further intracellular utilization of transported sucrose. PMID:27190649

  8. Determination of Intracellular Vitrification Temperatures for Unicellular Micro Organisms under Conditions Relevant for Cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Fernanda; Meneghel, Julie; Cenard, Stéphanie; Passot, Stéphanie; Morris, G John

    2016-01-01

    During cryopreservation ice nucleation and crystal growth may occur within cells or the intracellular compartment may vitrify. Whilst previous literature describes intracellular vitrification in a qualitative manner, here we measure the intracellular vitrification temperature of bacteria and yeasts under conditions relevant to cryopreservation, including the addition of high levels of permeating and nonpermeating additives and the application of rapid rates of cooling. The effects of growth conditions that are known to modify cellular freezing resistance on the intracellular vitrification temperature are also examined. For bacteria a plot of the activity on thawing against intracellular glass transition of the maximally freeze-concentrated matrix (Tg') shows that cells with the lowest value of intracellular Tg' survive the freezing process better than cells with a higher intracellular Tg'. This paper demonstrates the role of the physical state of the intracellular environment in determining the response of microbial cells to preservation and could be a powerful tool to be manipulated to allow the optimization of methods for the preservation of microorganisms. PMID:27055246

  9. Assembly and composition of intracellular particles formed by Moloney murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, M; Jelinek, L; Jones, R S; Stegeman-Olsen, J; Barklis, E

    1993-01-01

    Assembly of type C retroviruses such as Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV) ordinarily occurs at the plasma membranes of infected cells and absolutely requires the particle core precursor protein, Pr65gag. Previously we have shown that Pr65gag is membrane associated and that at least a portion of intracellular Pr65gag protein appears to be routed to the plasma membrane by a vesicular transport pathway. Here we show that intracellular particle formation can occur in M-MuLV-infected cells. M-MuLV immature particles were observed by electron microscopy budding into and within rough endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, and vacuolar compartments. Biochemical fractionation studies indicated that intracellular Pr65gag was present in nonionic detergent-resistant complexes of greater than 150S. Additionally, viral RNA and polymerase functions appeared to be associated with intracellular particles, as were Gag-beta-galactosidase fusion proteins which have the capacity to be incorporated into virions. Immature intracellular particles in postnuclear lysates could be proteolytically processed in vitro to mature forms, while extracellular immature M-MuLV particles remained immature as long as 10 h during incubations. The occurrence of M-MuLV-derived intracellular particles demonstrates that Pr65gag can associate with intracellular membranes and indicates that if a plasma membrane Pr65gag receptor exists, it also can be found in other membrane compartments. These results support the hypothesis that intracellular particles may serve as a virus reservoir during in vivo infections. Images PMID:8350394

  10. Determination of Intracellular Vitrification Temperatures for Unicellular Micro Organisms under Conditions Relevant for Cryopreservation

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Fernanda; Meneghel, Julie; Cenard, Stéphanie; Passot, Stéphanie; Morris, G. John

    2016-01-01

    During cryopreservation ice nucleation and crystal growth may occur within cells or the intracellular compartment may vitrify. Whilst previous literature describes intracellular vitrification in a qualitative manner, here we measure the intracellular vitrification temperature of bacteria and yeasts under conditions relevant to cryopreservation, including the addition of high levels of permeating and nonpermeating additives and the application of rapid rates of cooling. The effects of growth conditions that are known to modify cellular freezing resistance on the intracellular vitrification temperature are also examined. For bacteria a plot of the activity on thawing against intracellular glass transition of the maximally freeze-concentrated matrix (Tg’) shows that cells with the lowest value of intracellular Tg’ survive the freezing process better than cells with a higher intracellular Tg’. This paper demonstrates the role of the physical state of the intracellular environment in determining the response of microbial cells to preservation and could be a powerful tool to be manipulated to allow the optimization of methods for the preservation of microorganisms. PMID:27055246

  11. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases with Intracellular Pseudokinase Domains

    PubMed Central

    Mendrola, Jeannine M.; Shi, Fumin; Park, Jin H.; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    As with other groups of protein kinases, approximately 10% of the receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) in the human proteome contain intracellular pseudokinases that lack one or more conserved catalytically important residues. These include ErbB3, a member of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family, and a series of unconventional Wnt receptors. We recently showed that, despite its reputation as a pseudokinase, the ErbB3 tyrosine kinase domain (TKD) does retain significant – albeit weak – kinase activity. This led us to suggest that a subgroup of RTKs may be able to signal even with very inefficient kinases. Recent work suggests that this is not the case, however. Other pseudokinase RTKs have not revealed significant kinase activity, and mutations that impair ErbB3’s weak kinase activity have not so far been found to exhibit signaling defects. These findings therefore point to models in which the TKDs of pseudokinase RTKs participate in receptor signaling by allosterically regulating associated kinases (such as ErbB3 regulation of ErbB2) and/or function as regulated ‘scaffolds’ for other intermolecular interactions central to signal propagation. Further structural and functional studies – particularly of the pseudokinase RTKs involved in Wnt signaling – are required to shed new light on these intriguing signaling mechanisms. PMID:23863174

  12. Intracellular Mechanics of Migrating FibroblastsD⃞

    PubMed Central

    Kole, Thomas P.; Tseng, Yiider; Jiang, Ingjye; Katz, Joseph L.; Wirtz, Denis

    2005-01-01

    Cell migration is a highly coordinated process that occurs through the translation of biochemical signals into specific biomechanical events. The biochemical and structural properties of the proteins involved in cell motility, as well as their subcellular localization, have been studied extensively. However, how these proteins work in concert to generate the mechanical properties required to produce global motility is not well understood. Using intracellular microrheology and a fibroblast scratch-wound assay, we show that cytoskeleton reorganization produced by motility results in mechanical stiffening of both the leading lamella and the perinuclear region of motile cells. This effect is significantly more pronounced in the leading edge, suggesting that the mechanical properties of migrating fibroblasts are spatially coordinated. Disruption of the microtubule network by nocodazole treatment results in the arrest of cell migration and a loss of subcellular mechanical polarization; however, the overall mechanical properties of the cell remain mostly unchanged. Furthermore, we find that activation of Rac and Cdc42 in quiescent fibroblasts elicits mechanical behavior similar to that of migrating cells. We conclude that a polarized mechanics of the cytoskelton is essential for directed cell migration and is coordinated through microtubules. PMID:15483053

  13. Coexistence of amplitude and frequency modulations in intracellular calcium dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pittà, Maurizio; Volman, Vladislav; Levine, Herbert; Pioggia, Giovanni; de Rossi, Danilo; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2008-03-01

    The complex dynamics of intracellular calcium regulates cellular responses to information encoded in extracellular signals. Here we study the encoding of these external signals in the context of the Li-Rinzel model. We show that by control of biophysical parameters the information can be encoded in amplitude modulation (AM), frequency modulation (FM), or mixed (AM and FM) modulation. We briefly discuss the possible implications of this role of information encoding for astrocytes.

  14. Short-Duration Spaceflight Does Not Prolong QTc Intervals in Male Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Brett M.; Meck, Janice V.

    2004-01-01

    Although ventricular dysrhythmias are not increased during, and QTc intervals are not prolonged after, short-duration (5 to 16 days) spaceflights, QTc intervals have not previously been reported during these shorter flights. Holter monitor recordings, obtained in 11 male astronauts who flew on shuttle missions ranging from 5 to 10 days, showed that QTc intervals did not change significantly 10 days before launch, on 2 separate days of spaceflight, and 2 days after landing. Taken together, these data and our previous report show that QTc interval prolongation occurs sometime between the 9th and 30th days of spaceflight.

  15. Taking in a Show.

    PubMed

    Boden, Timothy W

    2016-01-01

    Many medical practices have cut back on education and staff development expenses, especially those costs associated with conventions and conferences. But there are hard-to-value returns on your investment in these live events--beyond the obvious benefits of acquired knowledge and skills. Major vendors still exhibit their services and wares at many events, and the exhibit hall is a treasure-house of information and resources for the savvy physician or administrator. Make and stick to a purposeful plan to exploit the trade show. You can compare products, gain new insights and ideas, and even negotiate better deals with representatives anxious to realize returns on their exhibition investments. PMID:27249887

  16. Not a "reality" show.

    PubMed

    Wrong, Terence; Baumgart, Erica

    2013-01-01

    The authors of the preceding articles raise legitimate questions about patient and staff rights and the unintended consequences of allowing ABC News to film inside teaching hospitals. We explain why we regard their fears as baseless and not supported by what we heard from individuals portrayed in the filming, our decade-long experience making medical documentaries, and the full un-aired context of the scenes shown in the broadcast. The authors don't and can't know what conversations we had, what documents we reviewed, and what protections we put in place in each televised scene. Finally, we hope to correct several misleading examples cited by the authors as well as their offhand mischaracterization of our program as a "reality" show. PMID:23631336

  17. Intracellular Zn(2+) Increase in Cardiomyocytes Induces both Electrical and Mechanical Dysfunction in Heart via Endogenous Generation of Reactive Nitrogen Species.

    PubMed

    Tuncay, Erkan; Turan, Belma

    2016-02-01

    Oxidants increase intracellular free Zn(2+) concentration ([Zn(2+)]i) in ventricular myocytes, which contributes to oxidant-induced alterations in excitation-contraction coupling (ECC). However, it is not clear whether increased [Zn(2+)]i in cardiomyocytes via increased reactive nitrogen species (RNS) has a role on heart function under pathological conditions, such as hyperglycemia. In this study, first we aimed to investigate the role of increased [Zn(2+)]i under in vitro condition in the development of both electrical and mechanical dysfunction of isolated papillary muscle strips from rat heart via exposed samples to a Zn(2+)-ionophore (Zn-pyrithione; 1 μM) for 20 min. Under simultaneous measurement of intracellular action potential and contractile activity in these preparations, Zn-pyrithione exposure caused marked prolongation in action potential repolarization phase and slowdown in both contraction and relaxation rates of twitch activity. Second, in order to demonstrate an association between increased [Zn(2+)]i and increased RNS, we monitored intracellular [Zn(2+)]i under an acute exposure of nitric oxide (NO) donor sodium nitroprusside, SNP, in freshly isolated quiescent cardiomyocytes loaded with FluoZin-3. Resting level of free Zn(2+) is significantly higher in cardiomyocytes under hyperglycemic condition compared to those of the controls, which seems to be associated with increased level of RNS production in hyperglycemic cardiomyocytes. Western blot analysis showed that Zn-pyrithione exposure induced a marked decrease in the activity of protein phosphatase 1 and 2A, member of macromolecular protein complex of cardiac ryanodine receptors, RyR2, besides significant increase in the phosphorylation level of extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 as a concentration-dependent manner. Overall, the present data demonstrated that there is a cross-relationship between increased RNS production and increased [Zn(2+)]i level in cardiomyocytes under pathological

  18. Glycolytic inhibition: effects on diastolic relaxation and intracellular calcium handling in hypertrophied rat ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Kagaya, Y; Weinberg, E O; Ito, N; Mochizuki, T; Barry, W H; Lorell, B H

    1995-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that glycolytic inhibition by 2-deoxyglucose causes greater impairment of diastolic relaxation and intracellular calcium handling in well-oxygenated hypertrophied adult rat myocytes compared with control myocytes. We simultaneously measured cell motion and intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) with indo-1 in isolated paced myocytes from aortic-banded rats and sham-operated rats. There was no difference in either the end-diastolic or peak-systolic [Ca2+]i between control and hypertrophied myocytes (97 +/- 18 vs. 105 +/- 15 nM, 467 +/- 92 vs. 556 +/- 67 nM, respectively). Myocytes were first superfused with oxygenated Hepes-buffered solution containing 1.2 mM CaCl2, 5.6 mM glucose, and 5 mM acetate, and paced at 3 Hz at 36 degrees C. Exposure to 20 mM 2-deoxyglucose as substitution of glucose for 15 min caused an upward shift of end-diastolic cell position in both control (n = 5) and hypertrophied myocytes (n = 10) (P < 0.001 vs. baseline), indicating an impaired extent of relaxation. Hypertrophied myocytes, however, showed a greater upward shift in end-diastolic cell position and slowing of relaxation compared with control myocytes (delta 144 +/- 28 vs. 55 +/- 15% of baseline diastolic position, P < 0.02). Exposure to 2-deoxyglucose increased end-diastolic [Ca2+]i in both groups (P < 0.001 vs. baseline), but there was no difference between hypertrophied and control myocytes (218 +/- 38 vs. 183 +/- 29 nM, respectively). The effects of 2-deoxyglucose were corroborated in isolated oxygenated perfused hearts in which glycolytic inhibition which caused severe elevation of isovolumic diastolic pressure and prolongation of relaxation in the hypertrophied hearts compared with controls. In summary, the inhibition of the glycolytic pathway impairs diastolic relaxation to a greater extent in hypertrophied myocytes than in control myocytes even in well-oxygenated conditions. The severe impairment of diastolic relaxation induced by 2

  19. A geometric interpretation of prolongation by means of connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracken, Paul

    2010-11-01

    A geometric interpretation of prolongation can be formulated by using the theory of connections. A fiber bundle can be established which is composed of a base manifold and variables which span a prolongation space. A particular connection is introduced in terms of these coordinates. This provides a very different way of viewing the technique and for introducing prolongation algebras as well as generating integrable equations in a novel way.

  20. Grace's story: prolonged incestuous abuse from childhood into adulthood.

    PubMed

    Salter, Michael

    2013-02-01

    Some sexually abused women in mental health settings are reporting prolonged incest and yet little is known about the circumstances that enable fathers to sexually abuse their daughters over a period of decades. This article draws from the life history of Grace, a woman who survived prolonged incest, in order to document and analyze the interplay of familial, social, and political factors that entrap girls and women within prolonged incestuous abuse. PMID:23420835

  1. Public medical shows.

    PubMed

    Walusinski, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    In the second half of the 19th century, Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893) became famous for the quality of his teaching and his innovative neurological discoveries, bringing many French and foreign students to Paris. A hunger for recognition, together with progressive and anticlerical ideals, led Charcot to invite writers, journalists, and politicians to his lessons, during which he presented the results of his work on hysteria. These events became public performances, for which physicians and patients were transformed into actors. Major newspapers ran accounts of these consultations, more like theatrical shows in some respects. The resultant enthusiasm prompted other physicians in Paris and throughout France to try and imitate them. We will compare the form and substance of Charcot's lessons with those given by Jules-Bernard Luys (1828-1897), Victor Dumontpallier (1826-1899), Ambroise-Auguste Liébault (1823-1904), Hippolyte Bernheim (1840-1919), Joseph Grasset (1849-1918), and Albert Pitres (1848-1928). We will also note their impact on contemporary cinema and theatre. PMID:25273491

  2. Inhibition of spontaneous recovery of fear by mGluR5 after prolonged extinction training.

    PubMed

    Mao, Sheng-Chun; Chang, Chih-Hua; Wu, Chia-Chen; Orejarena, M Juliana; Orejanera, Maria Juliana; Manzoni, Olivier J; Gean, Po-Wu

    2013-01-01

    Fear behavior is vital for survival and involves learning contingent associations of non-threatening cues with aversive stimuli. In contrast, excessive levels of fear can be maladaptive and lead to anxiety disorders. Generally, extensive sessions of extinction training correlates with reduced spontaneous recovery. The molecular mechanisms underlying the long-term inhibition of fear recovery following repeated extinction training are not fully understood. Here we show that in rats, prolonged extinction training causes greater reduction in both fear-potentiated startle and spontaneous recovery. This effect was specifically blocked by metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5), but not by mGluR1 antagonists and by a protein synthesis inhibitor. Similar inhibition of memory recovery following prolonged extinction training was also observed in mice. In agreement with the instrumental role of mGluR5 in the prolonged inhibition of fear recovery, we found that FMR1-/- mice which exhibit enhanced mGluR5-mediated signaling exhibit lower spontaneous recovery of fear after extinction training than wild-type littermates. At the molecular level, we discovered that prolonged extinction training reversed the fear conditioning-induced increase in surface expression of GluR1, AMPA/NMDA ratio, postsynaptic density-95 (PSD-95) and synapse-associated protein-97 (SAP97). Accordingly, delivery of Tat-GluR2(3Y), a synthetic peptide that blocks AMPA receptor endocytosis, inhibited prolonged extinction training-induced inhibition of fear recovery. Together, our results demonstrate that prolonged extinction training results in the mGluR5-dependent long-term inhibition of fear recovery. This effect may involve the degradation of original memory and may explain the beneficial effects of prolonged exposure therapy for the treatment of phobias. PMID:23555716

  3. Slow recovery in desert perennial vegetation following prolonged human disturbance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guo, Q.

    2004-01-01

    The study shows an exceptionally long-term recovery of perennial vegetation from prolonged heavy grazing and other human impacts. Since protection in 1906, overall species richness and habitat heterogeneity at the study site continued to increase until the 1960s when diversity, density and cover stabilized. During the same period, overall plant density and cover also increased. Species turnover increased gradually with time but no significant relation between any of the three community variables and precipitation or Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) was detected. The increases in plant species richness, density, and cover of the perennial vegetation were mostly due to the increase of herbaceous species, especially palatable species. The lack of clear relationship between environment (e.g., precipitation) and community variables suggests that site history and plant life history must be taken into account in examining the nature of vegetation recovery process after disturbances.

  4. Targeting intracellular compartments by magnetic polymeric nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kocbek, Petra; Kralj, Slavko; Kreft, Mateja Erdani; Kristl, Julijana

    2013-09-27

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) show a great promise for a wide specter of bioapplications, due to their characteristic magnetic properties exhibited only in the presence of magnetic field. Their advantages in the fields of magnetic drug targeting and imaging are well established and their safety is assumed, since iron oxide nanoparticles have already been approved for in vivo application, however, according to many literature reports the bare metal oxide nanoparticles may cause toxic effects on treated cells. Therefore, it is reasonable to prevent the direct interactions between metal oxide core and surrounding environment. In the current research ricinoleic acid coated maghemite nanoparticles were successfully synthesized, characterized and incorporated in the polymeric matrix, resulting in nanosized magnetic polymeric particles. The carrier system was shown to exhibit superparamagnetic properties and was therefore responsive towards external magnetic field. Bioevaluation using T47-D breast cancer cells confirmed internalization of magnetic polymeric nanoparticles (MNPs) and their intracellular localization in various subcellular compartments, depending on presence/absence of external magnetic field. However, the number of internalized MNPs observed by fluorescent and transmission electron microscopy was relatively low, making such way of targeting effective only for delivery of highly potent drugs. The scanning electron microscopy of treated cells revealed that MNPs influenced the cell adhesion, when external magnetic field was applied, and that treatment resulted in damaged apical plasma membrane right after exposure to the magnetic carrier. On the other hand, MNPs showed only reversibly reduced cellular metabolic activity in concentrations up to 200 μg/ml and, in the tested concentration the cell cycle distribution was within the normal range, indicating safety of the established magnetic carrier system for the treated cells. PMID:23603023

  5. The Great Cometary Show

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-01-01

    its high spatial and spectral resolution, it was possible to zoom into the very heart of this very massive star. In this innermost region, the observations are dominated by the extremely dense stellar wind that totally obscures the underlying central star. The AMBER observations show that this dense stellar wind is not spherically symmetric, but exhibits a clearly elongated structure. Overall, the AMBER observations confirm that the extremely high mass loss of Eta Carinae's massive central star is non-spherical and much stronger along the poles than in the equatorial plane. This is in agreement with theoretical models that predict such an enhanced polar mass-loss in the case of rapidly rotating stars. ESO PR Photo 06c/07 ESO PR Photo 06c/07 RS Ophiuchi in Outburst Several papers from this special feature focus on the later stages in a star's life. One looks at the binary system Gamma 2 Velorum, which contains the closest example of a star known as a Wolf-Rayet. A single AMBER observation allowed the astronomers to separate the spectra of the two components, offering new insights in the modeling of Wolf-Rayet stars, but made it also possible to measure the separation between the two stars. This led to a new determination of the distance of the system, showing that previous estimates were incorrect. The observations also revealed information on the region where the winds from the two stars collide. The famous binary system RS Ophiuchi, an example of a recurrent nova, was observed just 5 days after it was discovered to be in outburst on 12 February 2006, an event that has been expected for 21 years. AMBER was able to detect the extension of the expanding nova emission. These observations show a complex geometry and kinematics, far from the simple interpretation of a spherical fireball in extension. AMBER has detected a high velocity jet probably perpendicular to the orbital plane of the binary system, and allowed a precise and careful study of the wind and the shockwave

  6. Cell-Permeable MR Contrast Agents with Increased Intracellular Retention

    PubMed Central

    Endres, Paul J.; MacRenaris, Keith W.; Vogt, Stefan; Meade, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a technique used in both clinical and experimental settings to produce high resolution images of opaque organisms without ionizing radiation. Currently, MR imaging is augmented by contrast agents and the vast majority these small molecule Gd(III) chelates are confined to the extracellular regions. As a result, contrast agents are confined to vascular regions reducing their ability to provide information about cell physiology or molecular pathology. We have shown that polypeptides of arginine have the capacity to transport Gd(III) contrast agents across cell membranes. However, this transport is not unidirectional and once inside the cell the arginine-modified contrast agents efflux rapidly, decreasing the intracellular Gd(III) concentration and corresponding MR image intensity. By exploiting the inherent disulfide reducing environment of cells, thiol compounds, Gd(III)-DOTA-SS-Arg8 and Gd(III)-DTPA-SS-Arg8, are cleaved from their cell penetrating peptide transduction domains upon cell internalization. This reaction prolongs the cell-associated lifetime of the chelated Gd(III) by cleaving it from the cell transduction domain. PMID:18803414

  7. Gluteal compartment syndrome after prolonged immobilisation.

    PubMed

    Liu, H L; Wong, David S Y

    2009-04-01

    Muscles in the gluteal region are confined by distinct fascial attachments which can potentially result in compartment syndrome. A 74-year-old chronic drinker was admitted to the medical ward after being found drunk on the street. He noticed acute painful swelling of the right side of his buttock the following morning and recalled a slip and fall prior to his blackout. The whole right half of the buttock was tense with erythematous overlying skin. Examination revealed sciatic nerve palsy and myoglobinuria. Emergency fasciotomy and debridement were performed. Intra-operative pressure measurement confirmed a grossly elevated intra-compartmental pressure. Gluteal compartment syndrome is an extremely rare condition and has only been scantily documented previously in case reports. Early diagnosis is crucial but delay recognition is common from lack of knowledge of the condition and readily results in permanent sciatic nerve injury and acute renal shutdown from myoglobinuria. Awareness of the condition, early diagnosis and prompt exploration provide the only chance of avoiding these devastating consequences. Acute swelling diffusely affecting the whole or one side of the buttock, a history of trauma and prolonged local pressure impingement associated with pain out of proportion to the clinical signs should raise a suspicion of this rare condition. PMID:19423461

  8. Breathing during prolonged exercise in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Kearon, M C; Summers, E; Jones, N L; Campbell, E J; Killian, K J

    1991-01-01

    1. Six normal subjects cycled to endurance or for 60 min at four work rates (WR 1-4): mean of 34% working capacity (93 watts for 60 min); 43% (120 watts for 56 min); 63% (177 watts for 37 min); and 84% (233 watts for 12 min), to determine how breathing pattern and dyspnoea change during prolonged activity. Four to six minutes were allowed to establish steady state and subsequent changes were considered to be endurance related. 2. Dyspnoea (Borg scale, 0-10) increased with the duration of activity at all work rates. 3. Ventilation (VE) did not change at WR1; increased from 44 to 47 l min-1 at WR2; from 60 to 88 l min-1 at WR3; and from 111 to 132 l min-1 at WR4. Dyspnoea was significantly and independently related to ventilation and duration of activity: dyspnoea = 0.004 VE1.36 time 0.25 (r = 0.81; partial F 202 and 26 respectively). 4. Inspiratory resistance did not increase at any work rate. Dynamic elastance remained constant during WR1, WR2 and WR3 but increased from 7.4 to 9.1 cmH2O l-1 during WR4. 5. Peak inspiratory pressure did not increase, and the increase in VE was accomplished by an increased breathing frequency without change in duty cycle. 6. Duration of activity is an important contributor to dyspnoea independent of changes in respiratory muscle contractile activity. PMID:1798038

  9. Prolonged and recurrent fevers in children.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Gary S

    2014-01-01

    Some children referred for prolonged fever are actually not having elevated temperatures; the approach here requires dissection of the history and correction of health misperceptions. Others have well-documented fevers associated with clinical, laboratory, or epidemiologic findings that should point to a specific diagnosis. "Fever-of-Unknown-Origin" (FUO) is the clinical scenario of daily fever for ≥ 14 days that defies explanation after a careful history, physical examination, and basic laboratory tests. The diagnostic approach requires a meticulous fever diary, serial clinical and laboratory evaluations, vigilance for the appearance of new signs and symptoms, and targeted investigations; the pace of the work-up is determined by the severity of the illness. Approximately half of children with FUO will have a self-limited illness and will never have a specific diagnosis made; the other half will ultimately be found to have, in order, infectious, inflammatory, or neoplastic conditions. Irregular, intermittent, recurrent fevers in the well-appearing child are likely to be sequential viral illnesses. Monogenic autoinflammatory diseases should be considered in those who do not fit the picture of recurrent infections and who do not have hallmarks of immune deficiency. Stereotypical febrile illnesses that recur with clockwork periodicity should raise the possibilities of cyclic neutropenia, if the cycle is approximately 21 days, or periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome, the most common periodic fever in childhood. PMID:24120354

  10. Multicomponent Supramolecular Polymers as a Modular Platform for Intracellular Delivery.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Maarten H; Lee, Cameron C; Meijer, E W; Dankers, Patricia Y W; Albertazzi, Lorenzo

    2016-02-23

    Supramolecular polymers are an emerging family of nanosized structures with potential use in materials chemistry and medicine. Surprisingly, application of supramolecular polymers in the field of drug delivery has received only limited attention. Here, we explore the potential of PEGylated 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxamide (BTA) supramolecular polymers for intracellular delivery. Exploiting the unique modular approach of supramolecular chemistry, we can coassemble neutral and cationic BTAs and control the overall properties of the polymer by simple monomer mixing. Moreover, this platform offers a versatile approach toward functionalization. The core can be efficiently loaded with a hydrophobic guest molecule, while the exterior can be electrostatically complexed with siRNA. It is demonstrated that both compounds can be delivered in living cells, and that they can be combined to enable a dual delivery strategy. These results show the advantages of employing a modular system and pave the way for application of supramolecular polymers in intracellular delivery. PMID:26811943

  11. Intracellular pH Modulates Autophagy and Mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Berezhnov, Alexey V; Soutar, Marc P M; Fedotova, Evgeniya I; Frolova, Maria S; Plun-Favreau, Helene; Zinchenko, Valery P; Abramov, Andrey Y

    2016-04-15

    The specific autophagic elimination of mitochondria (mitophagy) plays the role of quality control for this organelle. Deregulation of mitophagy leads to an increased number of damaged mitochondria and triggers cell death. The deterioration of mitophagy has been hypothesized to underlie the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases, most notably Parkinson disease. Although some of the biochemical and molecular mechanisms of mitochondrial quality control are described in detail, physiological or pathological triggers of mitophagy are still not fully characterized. Here we show that the induction of mitophagy by the mitochondrial uncoupler FCCP is independent of the effect of mitochondrial membrane potential but dependent on acidification of the cytosol by FCCP. The ionophore nigericin also reduces cytosolic pH and induces PINK1/PARKIN-dependent and -independent mitophagy. The increase of intracellular pH with monensin suppresses the effects of FCCP and nigericin on mitochondrial degradation. Thus, a change in intracellular pH is a regulator of mitochondrial quality control. PMID:26893374

  12. Estimating the biophysical properties of neurons with intracellular calcium dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jingxin; Rozdeba, Paul J.; Morone, Uriel I.; Daou, Arij; Abarbanel, Henry D. I.

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a conductance-based neuron model coupled to a model of intracellular calcium uptake and release by the endoplasmic reticulum. The intracellular calcium dynamics occur on a time scale that is orders of magnitude slower than voltage spiking behavior. Coupling these mechanisms sets the stage for the appearance of chaotic dynamics, which we observe within certain ranges of model parameter values. We then explore the question of whether one can, using observed voltage data alone, estimate the states and parameters of the voltage plus calcium (V+Ca) dynamics model. We find the answer is negative. Indeed, we show that voltage plus another observed quantity must be known to allow the estimation to be accurate. We show that observing both the voltage time course V (t) and the intracellular Ca time course will permit accurate estimation, and from the estimated model state, accurate prediction after observations are completed. This sets the stage for how one will be able to use a more detailed model of V+Ca dynamics in neuron activity in the analysis of experimental data on individual neurons as well as functional networks in which the nodes (neurons) have these biophysical properties.

  13. Direct measurement of intracellular free Ca2+ in rat peritoneal macrophages: correlation with oxygen-radical production.

    PubMed Central

    Hallett, M B; Campbell, A K

    1983-01-01

    A novel method has been developed, based on osmotic lysis of intracellular pinocytotic vesicles, to introduce the Ca2+-activated photoprotein obelin into the cytoplasm of rat peritoneal macrophages. The change in osmolarity of the incubating medium necessary to induce lysis of the pinocytotic vesicles did not significantly affect the viability or responsiveness of the cells. The method enabled on average 3 fl of external medium to be introduced into each cell. Macrophages loaded with photoprotein had a resting intracellular Ca2+ concentration of 0.24 +/- 0.02 microM, calculated from the obelin consumption rate. The calcium ionophore, A23187, induced a prolonged rise in intracellular Ca2+ and also stimulated oxygen-radical production, monitored by luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. The chemotactic peptide, N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine, 1 microM, produced a transient increase in cytoplasmic Ca2+ which reached a plateau of 1.2 +/- 0.64 microM (n = 7) and declined with a half-time of approximately 40 sec. Unopsonized particles, latex beads (diameter = 1 micron), did not produce any detectable rise in intracellular Ca2+. Incorporation of a calcium chelator EGTA-ethylene-glycol-bis-(aminoethylether) tetra-acetate--into the cytoplasm abolished the transient intracellular Ca2+ rise induced by chemotactic peptide. Oxygen-radical production was also abolished. However, oxygen radical production induced by unopsonized particles was unaffected by intracellular EGTA. It was concluded that oxygen-radical production detected by chemiluminescence can be triggered by a rise in intracellular Ca2+. Chemotactic peptide induces oxygen-radical production by this mechanism. However, unopsonized particles induce oxygen-radical production by a mechanism independent of a rise in intracellular Ca2+. Images Figure 1 PMID:6414943

  14. Intracellular proton access in a Cl(-)/H(+) antiporter.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyun-Ho; Shane, Tania; Miller, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Chloride-transporting membrane proteins of the CLC family appear in two distinct mechanistic flavors: H(+)-gated Cl(-) channels and Cl(-)/H(+) antiporters. Transmembrane H(+) movement is an essential feature of both types of CLC. X-ray crystal structures of CLC antiporters show the Cl(-) ion pathway through these proteins, but the H(+) pathway is known only inferentially by two conserved glutamate residues that act as way-stations for H(+) in its path through the protein. The extracellular-facing H(+) transfer glutamate becomes directly exposed to aqueous solution during the transport cycle, but the intracellular glutamate E203, Glu(in), is buried within the protein. Two regions, denoted "polar" and "interfacial," at the intracellular surface of the bacterial antiporter CLC-ec1 are examined here as possible pathways by which intracellular aqueous protons gain access to Glu(in). Mutations at multiple residues of the polar region have little effect on antiport rates. In contrast, mutation of E202, a conserved glutamate at the protein-water boundary of the interfacial region, leads to severe slowing of the Cl(-)/H(+) antiport rate. An X-ray crystal structure of E202Y, the most strongly inhibited of these substitutions, shows an aqueous portal leading to Glu(in) physically blocked by cross-subunit interactions; moreover, this mutation has only minimal effect on a monomeric CLC variant, which necessarily lacks such interactions. The several lines of experiments presented argue that E202 acts as a water-organizer that creates a proton conduit connecting intracellular solvent with Glu(in). PMID:23239938

  15. Drug- and non-drug-associated QT interval prolongation

    PubMed Central

    van Noord, Charlotte; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Stricker, Bruno H Ch

    2010-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death is among the most common causes of cardiovascular death in developed countries. The majority of sudden cardiac deaths are caused by acute ventricular arrhythmia following repolarization disturbances. An important risk factor for repolarization disturbances is use of QT prolonging drugs, probably partly explained by gene–drug interactions. In this review, we will summarize QT interval physiology, known risk factors for QT prolongation, including drugs and the contribution of pharmacogenetics. The long QT syndrome can be congenital or acquired. The congenital long QT syndrome is caused by mutations in ion channel subunits or regulatory protein coding genes and is a rare monogenic disorder with a mendelian pattern of inheritance. Apart from that, several common genetic variants that are associated with QT interval duration have been identified. Acquired QT prolongation is more prevalent than the congenital form. Several risk factors have been identified with use of QT prolonging drugs as the most frequent cause. Most drugs that prolong the QT interval act by blocking hERG-encoded potassium channels, although some drugs mainly modify sodium channels. Both pharmacodynamic as well as pharmacokinetic mechanisms may be responsible for QT prolongation. Pharmacokinetic interactions often involve drugs that are metabolized by cytochrome P450 enzymes. Pharmacodynamic gene–drug interactions are due to genetic variants that potentiate the QT prolonging effect of drugs. QT prolongation, often due to use of QT prolonging drugs, is a major public health issue. Recently, common genetic variants associated with QT prolongation have been identified. Few pharmacogenetic studies have been performed to establish the genetic background of acquired QT prolongation but additional studies in this newly developing field are warranted. PMID:20642543

  16. Effect of prolonged exposure to organic solvents on the active site environment of subtilisin Carlsberg

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Vibha; Delgado, Yamixa; Fasoli, Ezio; Ferrer, Amaris; Griebenow, Kai; Secundo, Francesco; Barletta, Gabriel L

    2010-01-01

    The potential of enzyme catalysis as a tool for organic synthesis is nowadays indisputable, as is the fact that organic solvents affect an enzyme’s activity, selectivity and stability. Moreover, it was recently realized that an enzyme’s initial activity is substantially decreased after prolonged exposure to organic media, an effect that further hampers their potential as catalysts for organic synthesis. Regrettably, the mechanistic reasons for these effects are still debatable. In the present study we have made an attempt to explain the reasons behind the partial loss of enzyme activity on prolonged exposure to organic solvents. Fluorescence spectroscopic studies of the serine protease subtilisin Carlsberg chemically modified with polyethylene glycol (PEG-SC) and inhibited with a Dancyl fluorophore, and dissolved in two organic solvents (acetonitrile and 1,4-dioxane) indicate that when the enzyme is initially introduced into these solvents, the active site environment is similar to that in water; however prolonged exposure to the organic medium causes this environment to resemble that of the solvent in which the enzyme is dissolved. Furthermore, kinetic studies show a reduction on both Vmax and KM as a result of prolonged exposure to the solvents. One interpretation of these results is that during this prolonged exposure to organic solvents the active-site fluorescent label inhibitor adopts a different binding conformation. Extrapolating this to an enzymatic reaction we argue that substrates bind in a less catalytically favorable conformation after the enzyme has been exposed to organic media for several hours. PMID:20414456

  17. Global warming prolongs the thermal stratification of dimictic lake Mondsee.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blatterer, Hubert; Luger, Martin

    2013-04-01

    The pre-alpine Lake Mondsee is situated at the northern margin of the European Alps (47° 49´N, 13° 24´E) in the Salzkammergut lake district of Upper Austria at a sea level of 481 m. The lake has a surface area of 14,21 km² and a maximum water depth of 68 m (volume is 500 Mio m³ and theoretical water retention time is 1,8 years). Sediment samples confirm oligotrophic conditions as historical reference status of the lake. From 1970 to 1985 the lake suffered from severe eutrophication leading to cyanobacterial blooms (Planctothrix rubescens). Reduction of nutrient load in the course of improved sewage treatment resulted in re-oligotrophication from 1985 to about 2000. Currently, lake Mondsee is assessed mesotrophic and the biological quality elements "phytoplankton" and "macrophytes" classify the lake in the "moderate ecological status". According to the Water Framework Directive, a key initiative throughout the EU, the aim is to improve water quality and reach the "good ecological status". Temperature data of the Lake have been measured since the 30ies of the last century in varying intervals. In the present study (1991 - 2009) water temperature measured at the deepest point of the lake shows an increase in average surface temperature (0 - 5 m) of about 2 °C over the last two decades. The increase is less pronounced in deeper water layers and almost not visible below 15 m depth. Due to global change and rising temperatures stratification is starting earlier in the season and is prolonged from formerly end of November to the middle or even end of December. Thus, between 1999 and 2011 in several years the stratification period was extended for 5 weeks. During stratification oxygen depletion occurs in the depth of lakes and prolonged stratification results in increased areas of oxygen depletion. The oxygen concentration controls the phosphorus release of lake sediments. Therefore prolonged stratification results in increased internal phosphorus load of the lake

  18. Macrophage defense mechanisms against intracellular bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Günter; Schaible, Ulrich E

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages and neutrophils play a decisive role in host responses to intracellular bacteria including the agent of tuberculosis (TB), Mycobacterium tuberculosis as they represent the forefront of innate immune defense against bacterial invaders. At the same time, these phagocytes are also primary targets of intracellular bacteria to be abused as host cells. Their efficacy to contain and eliminate intracellular M. tuberculosis decides whether a patient initially becomes infected or not. However, when the infection becomes chronic or even latent (as in the case of TB) despite development of specific immune activation, phagocytes have also important effector functions. Macrophages have evolved a myriad of defense strategies to combat infection with intracellular bacteria such as M. tuberculosis. These include induction of toxic anti-microbial effectors such as nitric oxide and reactive oxygen intermediates, the stimulation of microbe intoxication mechanisms via acidification or metal accumulation in the phagolysosome, the restriction of the microbe's access to essential nutrients such as iron, fatty acids, or amino acids, the production of anti-microbial peptides and cytokines, along with induction of autophagy and efferocytosis to eliminate the pathogen. On the other hand, M. tuberculosis, as a prime example of a well-adapted facultative intracellular bacterium, has learned during evolution to counter-balance the host's immune defense strategies to secure survival or multiplication within this otherwise hostile environment. This review provides an overview of innate immune defense of macrophages directed against intracellular bacteria with a focus on M. tuberculosis. Gaining more insights and knowledge into this complex network of host-pathogen interaction will identify novel target sites of intervention to successfully clear infection at a time of rapidly emerging multi-resistance of M. tuberculosis against conventional antibiotics. PMID:25703560

  19. Endosomal escape: a bottleneck in intracellular delivery.

    PubMed

    Shete, Harshad K; Prabhu, Rashmi H; Patravale, Vandana B

    2014-01-01

    With advances in therapeutic science, apart from drugs, newer bioactive moieties like oligonucleotides, proteins, peptides, enzymes and antibodies are constantly being introduced for the betterment of therapeutic efficacy. These moieties have intracellular components of the cells like cytoplasm and nucleus as one of their pharmacological sites for exhibiting therapeutic activity. Despite their promising efficacy, their intracellular bioavailability has been critically hampered leading to failure in the treatment of numerous diseases and disorders. The endosomal uptake pathway is known to be a rate-limiting barrier for such systems. Bioactive molecules get trapped in the endosomal vesicles and degraded in the lysosomal compartment, necessitating the need for effective strategies that facilitate the endosomal escape and enhance the cytosolic bioavailability of bioactives. Microbes like viruses and bacteria have developed their innate mechanistic tactics to translocate their genome and toxins by efficiently penetrating the host cell membrane. Understanding this mechanism and exploring it further for intracellular delivery has opened new avenues to surmount the endosomal barrier. These strategies include membrane fusion, pore formation and proton sponge effects. On the other hand, progress in designing a novel smart polymeric carrier system that triggers endosomal escape by undergoing modulations in the intracellular milieu has further led to an improvement in intracellular delivery. These comprise pH, enzyme and temperature-induced modulators, synthetic cationic lipids and photo-induced physical disruption. Each of the aforementioned strategies has its own unique mechanism to escape the endosome. This review recapitulates the numerous strategies designed to surmount the bottleneck of endosomal escape and thereby achieve successful intracellular uptake of bioactives. PMID:24730275

  20. Intracellular potassium stabilizes human ether-à-go-go-related gene channels for export from endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Dennis, Adrienne T; Trieu, Phan; Charron, Francois; Ethier, Natalie; Hebert, Terence E; Wan, Xiaoping; Ficker, Eckhard

    2009-04-01

    Several therapeutic compounds have been identified that prolong the QT interval on the electrocardiogram and cause torsade de pointes arrhythmias not by direct block of the cardiac potassium channel human ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG) but via disruption of hERG trafficking to the cell surface membrane. One example of a clinically important compound class that potently inhibits hERG trafficking are cardiac glycosides. We have shown previously that inhibition of hERG trafficking by cardiac glycosides is initiated via direct block of Na(+)/K(+) pumps and not via off-target interactions with hERG or any other protein. However, it was not known how pump inhibition at the cell surface is coupled to hERG processing in the endoplasmic reticulum. Here, we show that depletion of intracellular K(+)-either indirectly after long-term exposure to cardiac glycosides or directly after exposure to gramicidin in low sodium media-is sufficient to disrupt hERG trafficking. In K(+)-depleted cells, hERG trafficking can be restored by permeating K(+) or Rb(+) ions, incubation at low temperature, exposure to the pharmacological chaperone astemizole, or specific mutations in the selectivity filter of hERG. Our data suggest a novel mechanism for drug-induced trafficking inhibition in which cardiac glycosides produce a [K(+)](i)-mediated conformational defect directly in the hERG channel protein. PMID:19139152

  1. Intracellular Potassium Stabilizes Human Ether-à-go-go-Related Gene Channels for Export from Endoplasmic ReticulumS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu; Dennis, Adrienne T.; Trieu, Phan; Charron, Francois; Ethier, Natalie; Hebert, Terence E.; Wan, Xiaoping; Ficker, Eckhard

    2009-01-01

    Several therapeutic compounds have been identified that prolong the QT interval on the electrocardiogram and cause torsade de pointes arrhythmias not by direct block of the cardiac potassium channel human ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG) but via disruption of hERG trafficking to the cell surface membrane. One example of a clinically important compound class that potently inhibits hERG trafficking are cardiac glycosides. We have shown previously that inhibition of hERG trafficking by cardiac glycosides is initiated via direct block of Na+/K+ pumps and not via off-target interactions with hERG or any other protein. However, it was not known how pump inhibition at the cell surface is coupled to hERG processing in the endoplasmic reticulum. Here, we show that depletion of intracellular K+—either indirectly after long-term exposure to cardiac glycosides or directly after exposure to gramicidin in low sodium media—is sufficient to disrupt hERG trafficking. In K+-depleted cells, hERG trafficking can be restored by permeating K+ or Rb+ ions, incubation at low temperature, exposure to the pharmacological chaperone astemizole, or specific mutations in the selectivity filter of hERG. Our data suggest a novel mechanism for drug-induced trafficking inhibition in which cardiac glycosides produce a [K+]i-mediated conformational defect directly in the hERG channel protein. PMID:19139152

  2. Multiplexed imaging of intracellular protein networks.

    PubMed

    Grecco, Hernán E; Imtiaz, Sarah; Zamir, Eli

    2016-08-01

    Cellular functions emerge from the collective action of a large number of different proteins. Understanding how these protein networks operate requires monitoring their components in intact cells. Due to intercellular and intracellular molecular variability, it is important to monitor simultaneously multiple components at high spatiotemporal resolution. However, inherent trade-offs narrow the boundaries of achievable multiplexed imaging. Pushing these boundaries is essential for a better understanding of cellular processes. Here the motivations, challenges and approaches for multiplexed imaging of intracellular protein networks are discussed. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. PMID:27183498

  3. Peroxisome is a reservoir of intracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Raychaudhury, Bikramjit; Gupta, Shreedhara; Banerjee, Shouvik; Datta, Salil C

    2006-07-01

    We have examined fura 2-loaded purified peroxisomes under confocal microscope to prove that this mammalian organelle is a store of intracellular calcium pool. Presence of calcium channel and vanadate sensitive Ca(2+)-ATPase in the purified peroxisomal membrane has been demonstrated. We have further observed that machineries to maintain calcium pool in this mammalian organelle are impaired during infection caused by Leishmania donovani. Results reveal that peroxisomes have a merit to play a significant role in the metabolism of intracellular calcium. PMID:16713100

  4. Expert position paper on prolonged dual antiplatelet therapy in secondary prevention following myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Thomas W; Aichinger, Josef; Huber, Kurt; Speidl, Walter S; Watzinger, Norbert; Zweiker, Robert; Alber, Hannes F

    2016-06-01

    The protective effect of dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) following acute coronary syndrome is undisputed, but its duration is subject of debate. Several studies show that prolonged therapy provides a clinical benefit in patients following acute coronary syndrome. The aim of this position paper authored by Austrian experts is to outline the current evidence and provide an overview of recent studies. It is also intended to serve as a practical guide to identify those patients who may benefit from prolonged DAPT. PMID:27278134

  5. Development of a Decision Support System for Analysis and Solutions of Prolonged Standing in the Workplace

    PubMed Central

    Halim, Isa; Arep, Hambali; Kamat, Seri Rahayu; Abdullah, Rohana; Omar, Abdul Rahman; Ismail, Ahmad Rasdan

    2014-01-01

    Background Prolonged standing has been hypothesized as a vital contributor to discomfort and muscle fatigue in the workplace. The objective of this study was to develop a decision support system that could provide systematic analysis and solutions to minimize the discomfort and muscle fatigue associated with prolonged standing. Methods The integration of object-oriented programming and a Model Oriented Simultaneous Engineering System were used to design the architecture of the decision support system. Results Validation of the decision support system was carried out in two manufacturing companies. The validation process showed that the decision support system produced reliable results. Conclusion The decision support system is a reliable advisory tool for providing analysis and solutions to problems related to the discomfort and muscle fatigue associated with prolonged standing. Further testing of the decision support system is suggested before it is used commercially. PMID:25180141

  6. Prolonged QTc interval in association with medium-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Wiles, Jason R; Leslie, Nancy; Knilans, Timothy K; Akinbi, Henry

    2014-06-01

    Medium-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency is the most common disorder of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. We report a term male infant who presented at 3 days of age with hypoglycemia, compensated metabolic acidosis, hypocalcemia, and prolonged QTc interval. Pregnancy was complicated by maternal premature atrial contractions and premature ventricular contractions. Prolongation of the QTc interval resolved after correction of metabolic derangements. The newborn screen was suggestive for MCAD deficiency, a diagnosis that was confirmed on genetic analysis that showed homozygosity for the disease-associated missense A985G mutation in the ACADM gene. This is the first report of acquired prolonged QTc in a neonate with MCAD deficiency, and it suggests that MCAD deficiency should be considered in the differential diagnoses of acute neonatal illnesses associated with electrocardiographic abnormality. We review the clinical presentation and diagnosis of MCAD deficiency in neonates. PMID:24799540

  7. Arrhythmogenic consequences of intracellular calcium waves.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lai-Hua; Weiss, James N

    2009-09-01

    Intracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(i)(2+)) waves are known to cause delayed afterdepolarizations (DADs), which have been associated with arrhythmias in cardiac disease states such as heart failure, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, and digitalis toxicity. Here we show that, in addition to DADs, Ca(i)(2+) waves also have other consequences relevant to arrhythmogenesis, including subcellular spatially discordant alternans (SDA, in which the amplitude of the local Ca(i)(2+) transient alternates out of phase in different regions of the same cell), sudden repolarization changes promoting the dispersion of refractoriness, and early afterdepolarizations (EADs). Ca(i)(2+) was imaged using a charge-coupled device-based system in fluo-4 AM-loaded isolated rabbit ventricular myocytes paced at constant or incrementally increasing rates, using either field stimulation, current clamp, or action potential (AP) clamp. Ca(i)(2+) waves were induced by Bay K 8644 (50 nM) + isoproterenol (100 nM), or low temperature. When pacing was initiated during a spontaneous Ca(i)(2+) wave, SDA occurred abruptly and persisted during pacing. Similarly, during rapid pacing, SDA typically arose suddenly from spatially concordant alternans, due to an abrupt phase reversal of the subcellular Ca(i)(2+) transient in a region of the myocyte. Ca(i)(2+) waves could be visualized interspersed with AP-triggered Ca(i)(2+) transients, producing a rich variety of subcellular Ca(i)(2+) transient patterns. With free-running APs, complex Ca(i)(2+) release patterns were associated with DADs, EADs, and sudden changes in AP duration. These findings link Ca(i)(2+) waves directly to a variety of arrhythmogenic phenomena relevant to the intact heart. PMID:19561309

  8. Neuromuscular adaptations during submaximal prolonged cycling.

    PubMed

    Castronovo, A M; De Marchis, C; Bibbo, D; Conforto, S; Schmid, M; D'Alessio, T

    2012-01-01

    This study aims at evaluating the neuromuscular adaptations occurring during submaximal prolonged cycling tasks. In particular, we want to assess changes in surface electromyographic (sEMG) signal recorded during a pedaling task, performed by six subjects on a cycle-simulator at a constant power output, until voluntary exhaustion. Task failure was defined as the instant the subject was no longer able to maintain the required task. Electromyographic activity was recorded from eight muscles of the dominant leg and burst characteristics of sEMG signals were analyzed in order to assess the changes in muscle activity level produced by the occurrence of neuromuscular fatigue. In particular, three features were extracted from the sEMG signal for each burst: amplitude, location of the maxima and mean profile of the burst envelope. We have reported an increase in the amplitude parameter for all subjects only for Vastii while bi-articular muscles presented a high variability among subjects. Also the location of the maximal values of the mean envelope of the bursts was found to change when considering bi-articular or mono-articular muscles. The envelope profile was found not to be subject to alterations when comparing the end of the task with the beginning. We speculated that neuromuscular fatigue induces changes essentially in the mono-articular muscles which produce power. This phenomenon is highly correlated with the adopted pedaling strategy which, being not constrained, induces subjects to express the maximal power in the downstroke phase, related to knee extension and involving mainly mono-articular muscles. PMID:23366709

  9. Changes in Intracellular Free Calcium Concentration during Illumination of Invertebrate Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J. E.; Blinks, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    Aequorin, which luminesces in the presence of calcium, was injected into photoreceptor cells of Limulus ventral eye. A bright light stimulus elicited a large increase in aequorin luminescence, the aequorin response, indicating a rise of intracellular calcium ion concentration, Cai. The aequorin response reached a maximum after the peak of the electrical response of the photoreceptor, decayed during a prolonged stimulus, and returned to an undetectable level in the dark. Reduction of Cao reduced the amplitude of the aequorin response by a factor no greater than 3. Raising Cao increased the amplitude of the aequorin response. The aequorin response became smaller when membrane voltage was clamped to successively more positive values. These results indicate that the stimulus-induced rise of Cai may be due in part to a light-induced influx of Ca and in part to release of Ca from an intracellular store. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that a rise in Cai is a step in the sequence of events underlying light-adaptation in Limulus ventral photoreceptors. Aequorin was also injected into photoreceptors of Balanus. The aequorin responses were similar to those recorded from Limulus cells in all but two ways: (a) A large sustained aequorin luminescence was measured during a prolonged stimulus, and (b) removal of extracellular calcium reduced the aequorin response to an undetectable level. PMID:4155426

  10. Intracellular Zn2+ accumulation enhances suppression of synaptic activity following spreading depolarization.

    PubMed

    Carter, Russell E; Seidel, Jessica L; Lindquist, Britta E; Sheline, Christian T; Shuttleworth, C William

    2013-06-01

    Spreading depolarization (SD) is a feed-forward wave that propagates slowly throughout brain tissue and recovery from SD involves substantial metabolic demand. Presynaptic Zn(2+) release and intracellular accumulation occurs with SD, and elevated intracellular Zn(2+) ([Zn(2+) ]i ) can impair cellular metabolism through multiple pathways. We tested here whether increased [Zn(2+) ]i could exacerbate the metabolic challenge of SD, induced by KCl, and delay recovery in acute murine hippocampal slices. [Zn(2+) ]i loading prior to SD, by transient ZnCl2 application with the Zn(2+) ionophore pyrithione (Zn/Pyr), delayed recovery of field excitatory post-synaptic potentials (fEPSPs) in a concentration-dependent manner, prolonged DC shifts, and significantly increased extracellular adenosine accumulation. These effects could be due to metabolic inhibition, occurring downstream of pyruvate utilization. Prolonged [Zn(2+) ]i accumulation prior to SD was required for effects on fEPSP recovery and consistent with this, endogenous synaptic Zn(2+) release during SD propagation did not delay recovery from SD. The effects of exogenous [Zn(2+) ]i loading were also lost in slices preconditioned with repetitive SDs, implying a rapid adaptation. Together, these results suggest that [Zn(2+) ]i loading prior to SD can provide significant additional challenge to brain tissue, and could contribute to deleterious effects of [Zn(2+) ]i accumulation in a range of brain injury models. PMID:23495967

  11. Prolonged Activity of the Pestiviral RNase Erns as an Interferon Antagonist after Uptake by Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Zürcher, Christoph; Sauter, Kay-Sara; Mathys, Veronika; Wyss, Fabienne

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The RNase activity of the envelope glycoprotein Erns of the pestivirus bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is required to block type I interferon (IFN) synthesis induced by single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) and double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) in bovine cells. Due to the presence of an unusual membrane anchor at its C terminus, a significant portion of Erns is also secreted. In addition, a binding site for cell surface glycosaminoglycans is located within the C-terminal region of Erns. Here, we show that the activity of soluble Erns as an IFN antagonist is not restricted to bovine cells. Extracellularly applied Erns protein bound to cell surface glycosaminoglycans and was internalized into the cells within 1 h of incubation by an energy-dependent mechanism that could be blocked by inhibitors of clathrin-dependent endocytosis. Erns mutants that lacked the C-terminal membrane anchor retained RNase activity but lost most of their intracellular activity as an IFN antagonist. Surprisingly, once taken up into the cells, Erns remained active and blocked dsRNA-induced IFN synthesis for several days. Thus, we propose that Erns acts as an enzymatically active decoy receptor that degrades extracellularly added viral RNA mainly in endolysosomal compartments that might otherwise activate intracellular pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) in order to maintain a state of innate immunotolerance. IMPORTANCE The pestiviral RNase Erns was previously shown to inhibit viral ssRNA- and dsRNA-induced interferon (IFN) synthesis. However, the localization of Erns at or inside the cells, its species specificity, and its mechanism of interaction with cell membranes in order to block the host's innate immune response are still largely unknown. Here, we provide strong evidence that the pestiviral RNase Erns is taken up within minutes by clathrin-mediated endocytosis and that this uptake is mostly dependent on the glycosaminoglycan binding site located within the C-terminal end of the protein

  12. Molecular and photosynthetic responses to prolonged darkness and subsequent acclimation to re-illumination in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    PubMed

    Nymark, Marianne; Valle, Kristin C; Hancke, Kasper; Winge, Per; Andresen, Kjersti; Johnsen, Geir; Bones, Atle M; Brembu, Tore

    2013-01-01

    Photosynthetic diatoms that live suspended throughout the water column will constantly be swept up and down by vertical mixing. When returned to the photic zone after experiencing longer periods in darkness, mechanisms exist that enable the diatoms both to survive sudden light exposure and immediately utilize the available energy in photosynthesis and growth. We have investigated both the response to prolonged darkness and the re-acclimation to moderate intensity white irradiance (E = 100 µmol m(-2) s(-1)) in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, using an integrated approach involving global transcriptional profiling, pigment analyses, imaging and photo-physiological measurements. The responses were studied during continuous white light, after 48 h of dark treatment and after 0.5 h, 6 h, and 24 h of re-exposure to the initial irradiance. The analyses resulted in several intriguing findings. Dark treatment of the cells led to 1) significantly decreased nuclear transcriptional activity, 2) distinct intracellular changes, 3) fixed ratios of the light-harvesting pigments despite a decrease in the total cell pigment pool, and 4) only a minor drop in photosynthetic efficiency (Φ(PSII_max)). Re-introduction of the cells to the initial light conditions revealed 5) distinct expression profiles for nuclear genes involved in photosynthesis and those involved in photoprotection, 6) rapid rise in photosynthetic parameters (α and rETR(max)) within 0.5 h of re-exposure to light despite a very modest de novo synthesis of photosynthetic compounds, and 7) increasingly efficient resonance energy transfer from fucoxanthin chlorophyll a/c-binding protein complexes to photosystem II reaction centers during the first 0.5 h, supporting the observations stated in 6). In summary, the results show that despite extensive transcriptional, metabolic and intracellular changes, the ability of cells to perform photosynthesis was kept intact during the length of the experiment. We conclude

  13. Molecular and Photosynthetic Responses to Prolonged Darkness and Subsequent Acclimation to Re-Illumination in the Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    PubMed Central

    Nymark, Marianne; Valle, Kristin C.; Hancke, Kasper; Winge, Per; Andresen, Kjersti; Johnsen, Geir; Bones, Atle M.; Brembu, Tore

    2013-01-01

    Photosynthetic diatoms that live suspended throughout the water column will constantly be swept up and down by vertical mixing. When returned to the photic zone after experiencing longer periods in darkness, mechanisms exist that enable the diatoms both to survive sudden light exposure and immediately utilize the available energy in photosynthesis and growth. We have investigated both the response to prolonged darkness and the re-acclimation to moderate intensity white irradiance (E = 100 µmol m−2 s−1) in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, using an integrated approach involving global transcriptional profiling, pigment analyses, imaging and photo-physiological measurements. The responses were studied during continuous white light, after 48 h of dark treatment and after 0.5 h, 6 h, and 24 h of re-exposure to the initial irradiance. The analyses resulted in several intriguing findings. Dark treatment of the cells led to 1) significantly decreased nuclear transcriptional activity, 2) distinct intracellular changes, 3) fixed ratios of the light-harvesting pigments despite a decrease in the total cell pigment pool, and 4) only a minor drop in photosynthetic efficiency (ΦPSII_max). Re-introduction of the cells to the initial light conditions revealed 5) distinct expression profiles for nuclear genes involved in photosynthesis and those involved in photoprotection, 6) rapid rise in photosynthetic parameters (α and rETRmax) within 0.5 h of re-exposure to light despite a very modest de novo synthesis of photosynthetic compounds, and 7) increasingly efficient resonance energy transfer from fucoxanthin chlorophyll a/c-binding protein complexes to photosystem II reaction centers during the first 0.5 h, supporting the observations stated in 6). In summary, the results show that despite extensive transcriptional, metabolic and intracellular changes, the ability of cells to perform photosynthesis was kept intact during the length of the experiment. We conclude that

  14. Epidemiology of prolonged testicular infections with bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    PubMed

    Givens, M Daniel; Riddell, Kay P; Edmondson, Misty A; Walz, Paul H; Gard, Julie A; Zhang, Yijing; Galik, Patricia K; Brodersen, Bruce W; Carson, Robert L; Stringfellow, David A

    2009-10-20

    Previously, bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) had been found in prolonged testicular infections following acute infection of immunocompetent bulls. The primary purpose of this research was to evaluate the production and maintenance of prolonged testicular infections after exposure to BVDV of seronegative bulls in varying circumstances. The secondary objective was to initiate assessment of the potential for transmission of BVDV via semen of bulls exhibiting a prolonged testicular infection. In total, 10 research trials were conducted. The first trial examined the duration of detectable virus in semen after intranasal inoculation of peri-pubertal bulls. The second to fifth trials examined the potential for prolonged testicular infections resulting from natural exposure of seronegative bulls to persistently infected heifers. In the last five trials, the potential for viral transmission from bulls exhibiting prolonged testicular infections to a small number of exposed animals (n=28) was evaluated. Results of this research demonstrated that prolonged testicular infections could result in detection of viral RNA in semen for 2.75 years with infectious virus grown from testicular tissue 12.5 months after viral exposure. A type 1b strain of BVDV caused prolonged testicular infection after natural exposure of seronegative bulls to a persistently infected heifer. However, transmission of BVDV to susceptible animals was not detected in the final five trials of this research. In conclusion, BVDV can persist in testicular tissue after acute infection for several years, but the potential for viral transmission from these prolonged testicular infections appears to be low. PMID:19473788

  15. QT prolongation and torsades de pointes with psychotropic agents

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Nagaraj; Venkatesh, Chilkunda Raviprakash; Kumar, Shambu Sunil

    2015-01-01

    The unexpected and catastrophic cardiovascular effects of psychotropic drugs are well described albeit uncommon. The list of drugs which have been associated with prolonging QT interval and hence potentially causing Torsades de pointes is exhaustive. The insight into the plausible mechanisms are largely unclear. However, the practical implications of anticipating and recognizing QT prolongation cannot be overemphasized. PMID:26600587

  16. Prolonged Field Care Working Group Fluid Therapy Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Baker, Benjamin L; Powell, Doug; Riesberg, Jamie; Keenan, Sean

    2016-01-01

    The Prolonged Field Care Working Group concurs that fresh whole blood (FWB) is the fluid of choice for patients in hemorrhagic shock, and the capability to transfuse FWB should be a basic skill set for Special Operations Forces (SOF) Medics. Prolonged field care (PFC) must also address resuscitative and maintenance fluid requirements in nonhemorrhagic conditions. PMID:27045508

  17. Single-Prolonged Stress Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum - Dependent Apoptosis in the Hippocampus in a Rat Model of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Han, Fang; Yan, Shengnan; Shi, YuXiu

    2013-01-01

    Background Our previous research indicated that apoptosis induced atrophy in the hippocampus of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) rats. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced apoptosis has been implicated in the development of several disorder diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate whether endoplasmic reticulum-related pathway is involved in single-prolonged stress (SPS) induces apoptosis in the hippocampus of PTSD rats by examining the expression levels of three important indicators in the ER-related apoptotic pathway: Glucose-regulated protein (GRP) 78, caspase-12 and Ca2+/CaM/CaMkinaseIIα (CaMkIIα). Methods Wistar rats were sacrificed at 1, 4 and 7 days after SPS. SPS is a reliable animal model of PTSD. The apoptotic cells in the hippocampus were assessed by TUNEL method and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Free intracellular Ca2+ concentration was measured. GRP78 expression was examined by immunohistochemistry, western blotting and RT-PCR. mRNA of caspase-12 and CaM/CaMkIIα were determined by RT-PCR. Results Our results showed that apoptotic cells were increased in the SPS rats. TEM analysis revealed characteristic morphological changes of apoptosis in these cells. We observed that GRP78 was significantly up-regulated during early PTSD, and then recovered at 7 days after SPS. By RT-PCR, we observed that the change in caspase-12 expression level was similar to that in GRP78. Moreover, the free intracellular Ca2+ concentration was significantly higher at 1 day after SPS and decreased in 7 days. CaM expression increased significantly, while CaMKIIα expression decreased significantly in the hippocampus at 1 day after SPS. Conclusion SPS induced change in the expression levels of GRP78, caspase-12 and Ca2+/CaM/CaMkIIα in the hippocampus of PTSD rats indicated that the endoplasmic reticulum pathway may be involved in PTSD-induced apoptosis. PMID:23894451

  18. Hypothyroidism prolongs corpus luteum function in the pregnant rat.

    PubMed

    Hapon, María Belén; Motta, Alicia B; Ezquer, Marcelo; Bonafede, Melisa; Jahn, Graciela A

    2007-01-01

    It has been shown that hypothyroidism in the rat produces a prolongation of pregnancy associated with a delay in the fall of circulating progesterone (P4) at term. The aim of the present work is to determine whether the delayed P4 decline in hypothyroid mother rats is due to a retarded induction of P4 degradation to 20alphaOH P4 or to a stimulation of its synthesis, and to investigate the possible mechanisms that may underlie the altered luteal function. We determined by RIA the circulating profile of the hormones (TSH, PRL, LH, P4, PGF2alpha, and PGE2) involved in luteal regulation at the end of pregnancy and, by semiquantitative RT-PCR, the expression of factors involved in P4 synthesis (CytP450scc, StAR, 3betaHSD, PRLR) and metabolism (20alphaHSD, PGF2alphaR, iNOS and COX2). Our results show that the delay in P4 decline and parturition is the resultant of retarded luteal regression, caused by a combination of decreases in luteolytic factors, mainly luteal PGF2alpha, iNOS mRNA expression and also circulating LH, and increased synthesis or action of luteotrophic factors, such as luteal and circulating PGE2 and circulating PRL. All these changes may be direct causes of the decreased 20alphaHSD mRNA and protein (measured by western blot analysis) expression, which in the presence of unchanged expression of the factors involved in P4 synthesis results in elevated luteal and circulating P4 that prolonged pregnancy and also may favor longer survival of the corpus luteum. PMID:17244746

  19. Impact of Prolonged Exacerbation Recovery in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Law, Martin; Kowlessar, Beverly; Singh, Richa; Brill, Simon E.; Allinson, James P.; Wedzicha, Jadwiga A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Exacerbations are important and heterogeneous events in the natural history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Objectives: To examine the consequences of prolonged exacerbation recovery in patients with COPD. Methods: A cohort of 384 patients with COPD (FEV1 % predicted 45.8 [SD, 16.6] and a median exacerbation rate of 2.13 per year [interquartile range, 1.0–3.2]) were followed for 1,039 days (interquartile range, 660–1,814) between October 1995 and January 2013. Patients recorded daily worsening of respiratory symptoms and peak expiratory flow (PEF), and when stable underwent spirometry every 3 months, and completed the St. George’s Respiratory Questionnaire annually. Exacerbations were diagnosed as 2 consecutive days with one major symptom plus another respiratory symptom. Exacerbation duration was defined as the time from onset to the day preceding 2 consecutive symptom-free days and recovery in PEF as return to preexacerbation levels. Measurements and Main Results: A total of 351 patients had one or more exacerbations. Patients with a longer symptom duration (mean, 14.5 d) had a worse St. George’s Respiratory Questionnaire total score (0.2 units per 1 day; P = 0.040). A longer symptomatic duration was associated with a shorter interval between exacerbation recovery and onset of the next exacerbation (hazard ratio, 1.004; P = 0.013). For 257 (7.3%) exacerbations, PEF did not recover within 99 days. These exacerbations were associated with symptoms of a viral infection (cold and sore throat). Patients with these nonrecovered exacerbations showed a 10.8 ml/yr (P < 0.001) faster decline in FEV1. Conclusions: Prolonged exacerbation symptomatic duration is associated with poorer health status and a greater risk of a new event. Exacerbations where lung function does not recover are associated with symptoms of viral infections and accelerated decline in FEV1. PMID:26151174

  20. The Camperdown Program: Outcomes of a New Prolonged-Speech Treatment Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brian, Sue; Onslow, Mark; Cream, Angela; Packman, Ann

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines a prolonged speech treatment model for stuttering, the Camperdown Program. Sixteen participants showed minimal or no stuttering in everyday speaking situations for up to 12 months after entering the program's maintenance phase, with speech rates in the normal range. Results were achieved in a mean of 20 hours of clinic…

  1. Prolonged Exposure Treatment of Chronic PTSD in Juvenile Sex Offenders: Promising Results from Two Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Prolonged exposure (PE) was used to treat chronic PTSD secondary to severe developmental trauma in two adolescent male sex offenders referred for residential sex offender treatment. Both youth were treatment resistant prior to initiation of PE and showed evidence of long-standing irritability and depression/anxiety. Clinical observation and…

  2. Shensong Yangxin capsules prevent ischemic arrhythmias by prolonging action potentials and alleviating Ca2+ overload.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yixiu; Gao, Feng; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Hongtao; Zhu, Jiuxin; Chang, Liping; Du, Zhimin; Zhang, Yan

    2016-06-01

    Shensong Yangxin capsules (SSYX) are an effective traditional Chinese medicine that has been used to treat coronary heart disease clinically. The present study aimed to establish whether SSYX prevent ischemic arrhythmias in rats, and to explore the underlying mechanisms. Male rats were pretreated with distilled water, SSYX and amiodarone for one week. Acute myocardial ischemia (AMI) was performed to induce ischemic arrhythmias. The incidence and severity of ischemic arrhythmias were evaluated. The action potential, transient outward K+ current (Ito) and inward rectifier K+ current (IK1) of rat cardiomyocytes were measured using the patch‑clamp technique. The intracellular Ca2+ concentration of the cardiomyocytes was measured using a laser scanning confocal microscope. The results revealed that SSYX lowered the incidence of arrhythmia markedly during AMI. Furthermore, SSYX delayed the appearance, and reduced the severity, of ischemic arrhythmias compared with the control. In addition, SSYX markedly decreased the ratio of the myocardial infarction region to the whole heart. In an in vitro study, SSYX prolonged the action potential duration of rat cardiomyocytes, and inhibited Ito and IK1 markedly. Additionally, SSYX inhibited Ca2+ elevation induced by KCl in cardiomyocytes. These results suggested that SSYX prevents ischemic arrhythmia, and the underlying mechanism responsible for this process may include prolonging the action potential and alleviating Ca2+ overload. PMID:27122298

  3. Nanoparticle tumor localization, disruption of autophagosomal trafficking, and prolonged drug delivery improve survival in peritoneal mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rong; Colby, Aaron H; Gilmore, Denis; Schulz, Morgan; Zeng, Jialiu; Padera, Robert F; Shirihai, Orian; Grinstaff, Mark W; Colson, Yolonda L

    2016-09-01

    The treatment outcomes for malignant peritoneal mesothelioma are poor and associated with high co-morbidities due to suboptimal drug delivery. Thus, there is an unmet need for new approaches that concentrate drug at the tumor for a prolonged period of time yielding enhanced antitumor efficacy and improved metrics of treatment success. A paclitaxel-loaded pH-responsive expansile nanoparticle (PTX-eNP) system is described that addresses two unique challenges to improve the outcomes for peritoneal mesothelioma. First, following intraperitoneal administration, eNPs rapidly and specifically localize to tumors. The rate of eNP uptake by tumors is an order of magnitude faster than the rate of uptake in non-malignant cells; and, subsequent accumulation in autophagosomes and disruption of autophagosomal trafficking leads to prolonged intracellular retention of eNPs. The net effect of these combined mechanisms manifests as rapid localization to intraperitoneal tumors within 4 h of injection and persistent intratumoral retention for >14 days. Second, the high tumor-specificity of PTX-eNPs leads to delivery of greater than 100 times higher concentrations of drug in tumors compared to PTX alone and this is maintained for at least seven days following administration. As a result, overall survival of animals with established mesothelioma more than doubled when animals were treated with multiple doses of PTX-eNPs compared to equivalent dosing with PTX or non-responsive PTX-loaded nanoparticles. PMID:27343465

  4. Secretory vesicle rebound hyperacidification and increased quantal size due to prolonged methamphetamine exposure

    PubMed Central

    Markov, Dmitriy; Mosharov, Eugene V.; Setlik, Wanda; Gershon, Michael D.; Sulzer, David

    2009-01-01

    Acute exposure to amphetamines collapses secretory vesicle pH gradients, which increases cytosolic catecholamine levels while decreases the quantal size of catecholamine release during fusion events. Amphetamine and methamphetamine, however, are retained in tissues over long durations. We used optical and electron microscopic probes to measure the effects of long-term methamphetamine exposure on secretory vesicle pH, and amperometry and intracellular patch electrochemistry to observe the effects on neurosecretion and cytosolic catecholamines in cultured rat chromaffin cells. In contrast to acute methamphetamine effects, exposure to the drug for 6–48 h at 10 μM and higher concentrations produced a concentration-dependent rebound hyperacidification of secretory vesicles. At 5–10 μM levels, methamphetamine increased the quantal size and reinstated exocytotic catecholamine release, although very high (>100 μM) levels of the drug, while continuing to produce rebound hyperacidification, did not increase quantal size. Secretory vesicle rebound hyperacidification was temperature dependent with optimal response at ~ 37°C, was not blocked by the transcription inhibitor, puromycin, and appears to be a general compensatory response to prolonged exposure with membranophilic weak bases, including amphetamines, methylphenidate, cocaine, and ammonia. Thus, under some conditions of prolonged exposure, amphetamines and other weak bases can enhance, rather than deplete, the vesicular release of catecholamines via a compensatory response resulting in vesicle acidification. PMID:19014382

  5. Directed antigen delivery as a vaccine strategy for an intracellular bacterial pathogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouwer, H. G. Archie; Alberti-Segui, Christine; Montfort, Megan J.; Berkowitz, Nathan D.; Higgins, Darren E.

    2006-03-01

    We have developed a vaccine strategy for generating an attenuated strain of an intracellular bacterial pathogen that, after uptake by professional antigen-presenting cells, does not replicate intracellularly and is readily killed. However, after degradation of the vaccine strain within the phagolysosome, target antigens are released into the cytosol for endogenous processing and presentation for stimulation of CD8+ effector T cells. Applying this strategy to the model intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes, we show that an intracellular replication-deficient vaccine strain is cleared rapidly in normal and immunocompromised animals, yet antigen-specific CD8+ effector T cells are stimulated after immunization. Furthermore, animals immunized with the intracellular replication-deficient vaccine strain are resistant to lethal challenge with a virulent WT strain of L. monocytogenes. These studies suggest a general strategy for developing safe and effective, attenuated intracellular replication-deficient vaccine strains for stimulation of protective immune responses against intracellular bacterial pathogens. CD8+ T cell | replication-deficient | Listeria monocytogenes

  6. Evaluation of Intracellular Signaling Downstream Chimeric Antigen Receptors.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Hannah; Svensson, Emma; Gigg, Camilla; Jarvius, Malin; Olsson-Strömberg, Ulla; Savoldo, Barbara; Dotti, Gianpietro; Loskog, Angelica

    2015-01-01

    CD19-targeting CAR T cells have shown potency in clinical trials targeting B cell leukemia. Although mainly second generation (2G) CARs carrying CD28 or 4-1BB have been investigated in patients, preclinical studies suggest that third generation (3G) CARs with both CD28 and 4-1BB have enhanced capacity. However, little is known about the intracellular signaling pathways downstream of CARs. In the present work, we have analyzed the signaling capacity post antigen stimulation in both 2G and 3G CARs. 3G CAR T cells expanded better than 2G CAR T cells upon repeated stimulation with IL-2 and autologous B cells. An antigen-driven accumulation of CAR+ cells was evident post antigen stimulation. The cytotoxicity of both 2G and 3G CAR T cells was maintained by repeated stimulation. The phosphorylation status of intracellular signaling proteins post antigen stimulation showed that 3G CAR T cells had a higher activation status than 2G. Several proteins involved in signaling downstream the TCR were activated, as were proteins involved in the cell cycle, cell adhesion and exocytosis. In conclusion, 3G CAR T cells had a higher degree of intracellular signaling activity than 2G CARs which may explain the increased proliferative capacity seen in 3G CAR T cells. The study also indicates that there may be other signaling pathways to consider when designing or evaluating new generations of CARs. PMID:26700307

  7. Evaluation of Intracellular Signaling Downstream Chimeric Antigen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Hannah; Svensson, Emma; Gigg, Camilla; Jarvius, Malin; Olsson-Strömberg, Ulla; Savoldo, Barbara; Dotti, Gianpietro; Loskog, Angelica

    2015-01-01

    CD19-targeting CAR T cells have shown potency in clinical trials targeting B cell leukemia. Although mainly second generation (2G) CARs carrying CD28 or 4-1BB have been investigated in patients, preclinical studies suggest that third generation (3G) CARs with both CD28 and 4-1BB have enhanced capacity. However, little is known about the intracellular signaling pathways downstream of CARs. In the present work, we have analyzed the signaling capacity post antigen stimulation in both 2G and 3G CARs. 3G CAR T cells expanded better than 2G CAR T cells upon repeated stimulation with IL-2 and autologous B cells. An antigen-driven accumulation of CAR+ cells was evident post antigen stimulation. The cytotoxicity of both 2G and 3G CAR T cells was maintained by repeated stimulation. The phosphorylation status of intracellular signaling proteins post antigen stimulation showed that 3G CAR T cells had a higher activation status than 2G. Several proteins involved in signaling downstream the TCR were activated, as were proteins involved in the cell cycle, cell adhesion and exocytosis. In conclusion, 3G CAR T cells had a higher degree of intracellular signaling activity than 2G CARs which may explain the increased proliferative capacity seen in 3G CAR T cells. The study also indicates that there may be other signaling pathways to consider when designing or evaluating new generations of CARs. PMID:26700307

  8. Effect of ticlopidine ex vivo on platelet intracellular calcium mobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Derian, C.K.; Friedman, P.A.

    1988-04-01

    The antiplatelet compound ticlopidine exerts its potent inhibitory activity through an as yet undetermined mechanism(s). The goal of this study was to determine the effect, if any, of ticlopidine ex vivo on platelet calcium mobilization. Ticlopidine inhibited ADP-induced platelet aggregation by 50-80%. In the presence of 1 mM EGTA, ticlopidine inhibited ADP- and thrombin-stimulated increases in (Ca2+)i in fura-2 loaded platelets. We evaluated further the effect of ticlopidine on calcium mobilization by examining both agonist-stimulated formation of inositol trisphosphate in intact platelets and the ability of inositol trisphosphate to release /sup 45/Ca from intracellular sites in permeabilized cells. We show here that while ticlopidine significantly affected agonist-induced intracellular calcium mobilization in intact platelets, the drug was without effect on agonist-stimulated formation of inositol trisphosphate in intact platelets and on inositol trisphosphate-induced /sup 45/Ca release in saponin-permeabilized platelets. Our study demonstrates that ticlopidine exerts at least part of its effect via inhibition of intracellular calcium mobilization but that its site of action remains to be determined.

  9. Gamma Band Activity in the RAS-intracellular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rill, E.; Kezunovic, N.; D’Onofrio, S.; Luster, B.; Hyde, J.; Bisagno, V.; Urbano, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Gamma band activity participates in sensory perception, problem solving, and memory. This review considers recent evidence showing that cells in the reticular activating system (RAS) exhibit gamma band activity, and describes the intrinsic membrane properties behind such manifestation. Specifically, we discuss how cells in the mesopontine pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), intralaminar parafascicular nucleus (Pf), and pontine Subcoeruleus nucleus dorsalis (SubCD) all fire in the gamma band range when maximally activated, but no higher. The mechanisms involve high threshold, voltage-dependent P/Q-type calcium channels or sodium-dependent subthreshold oscillations. Rather than participating in the temporal binding of sensory events as in the cortex, gamma band activity in the RAS may participate in the processes of preconscious awareness, and provide the essential stream of information for the formulation of many of our actions. We address three necessary next steps resulting from these discoveries, an intracellular mechanism responsible for maintaining gamma band activity based on persistent G-protein activation, separate intracellular pathways that differentiate between gamma band activity during waking vs during REM sleep, and an intracellular mechanism responsible for the dysregulation in gamma band activity in schizophrenia. These findings open several promising research avenues that have not been thoroughly explored. What are the effects of sleep or REM sleep deprivation on these RAS mechanisms? Are these mechanisms involved in memory processing during waking and/or during REM sleep? Does gamma band processing differ during waking vs REM sleep after sleep or REM sleep deprivation? PMID:24309750

  10. Intracellular replication is essential for the virulence of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Leung, K Y; Finlay, B B

    1991-12-15

    Salmonella typhimurium is a facultative intracellular parasite, capable of penetrating, surviving, and multiplying within diverse eukaryotic cell types, including epithelial and phagocytic cells. We have been studying intracellular replication of S. typhimurium and found that it is essential in the pathogenesis of this bacterium. A total of 45,000 independent mini-Mu MudJ transposon mutants in S. typhimurium SL1344 were screened in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cells with a beta-lactam, cefotaxime, to enrich for mutants defective for intracellular replication. Ten different auxotrophic (purine, pyrimidine, purine/methionine, and valine/isoleucine) and three prototrophic replication-defective mutants (Rep-) were identified. All Rep- mutants showed no differences in aerobic and anaerobic growth patterns, motility, serum sensitivity, mouse macrophage survival, iron uptake, and phosphate requirements. All Rep- mutants were unable to multiply inside MDCK, HeLa, and Caco-2 epithelial cells. When required nutrients for various auxotrophs were supplemented, auxotrophs then replicated inside MDCK cells. Although the parental strain multiplies in large vacuoles inside MDCK cells that distort the host cells, MDCK cells infected with the Rep- mutants appeared relatively normal and few bacteria were seen inside vacuoles. The purine auxotrophs and the three prototrophic Rep- mutants were highly attenuated in mice, and oral and intraperitoneal LD50 levels were 3 to 4 orders of magnitude higher than the wild type level. The three prototrophs were invasive and persisted in the murine organs such as livers and spleens for at least 3 weeks. Therefore, these prototrophic genes are needed for intracellular replication and are essential to the virulence of S. typhimurium. PMID:1763061