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Sample records for showed high genetic

  1. X-chromosome SNP analyses in 11 human Mediterranean populations show a high overall genetic homogeneity except in North-west Africans (Moroccans)

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Due to its history, with a high number of migration events, the Mediterranean basin represents a challenging area for population genetic studies. A large number of genetic studies have been carried out in the Mediterranean area using different markers but no consensus has been reached on the genetic landscape of the Mediterranean populations. In order to further investigate the genetics of the human Mediterranean populations, we typed 894 individuals from 11 Mediterranean populations with 25 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located on the X-chromosome. Results A high overall homogeneity was found among the Mediterranean populations except for the population from Morocco, which seemed to differ genetically from the rest of the populations in the Mediterranean area. A very low genetic distance was found between populations in the Middle East and most of the western part of the Mediterranean Sea. A higher migration rate in females versus males was observed by comparing data from X-chromosome, mt-DNA and Y-chromosome SNPs both in the Mediterranean and a wider geographic area. Multilocus association was observed among the 25 SNPs on the X-chromosome in the populations from Ibiza and Cosenza. Conclusion Our results support both the hypothesis of (1) a reduced impact of the Neolithic Wave and more recent migration movements in NW-Africa, and (2) the importance of the Strait of Gibraltar as a geographic barrier. In contrast, the high genetic homogeneity observed in the Mediterranean area could be interpreted as the result of the Neolithic wave caused by a large demic diffusion and/or more recent migration events. A differentiated contribution of males and females to the genetic landscape of the Mediterranean area was observed with a higher migration rate in females than in males. A certain level of background linkage disequilibrium in populations in Ibiza and Cosenza could be attributed to their demographic background. PMID:18312628

  2. Courtship and genetic quality: asymmetric males show their best side

    E-print Network

    Gross, Mart

    's genetic quality and health. However, the relationship between an individual's FA and behaviourCourtship and genetic quality: asymmetric males show their best side Mart R. Gross1,*, Ho Young Suk the quantity of their orange signal. This appears to be a strictly behavioural male response to cues provided

  3. Variation in the peacock's train shows a genetic component.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Marion; Cotgreave, Peter; Pike, Thomas W

    2009-01-01

    Female peafowl (Pavo cristatus) show a strong mating preference for males with elaborate trains. This, however, poses something of a paradox because intense directional selection should erode genetic variation in the males' trains, so that females will no longer benefit by discriminating among males on the basis of these traits. This situation is known as the 'lek paradox', and leads to the theoretical expectation of low heritability in the peacock's train. We used two independent breeding experiments, involving a total of 42 sires and 86 of their male offspring, to estimate the narrow sense heritabilities of male ornaments and other morphometric traits. Contrary to expectation, we found significant levels of heritability in a trait known to be used by females during mate choice (train length), while no significant heritabilities were evident for other, non-fitness related morphological traits (tarsus length, body weight or spur length). This study adds to the building body of evidence that high levels of additive genetic variance can exist in secondary sexual traits under directional selection, but further emphasizes the main problem of what maintains this variation. PMID:17922297

  4. Courtship and genetic quality: asymmetric males show their best side.

    PubMed

    Gross, Mart R; Suk, Ho Young; Robertson, Cory T

    2007-09-01

    Fluctuating asymmetry (FA), the small random deviations from perfect morphological symmetry that result during development, is ubiquitous throughout the animal kingdom. In many species, FA seems to play a role in mate choice, perhaps because it signals an individual's genetic quality and health. However, the relationship between an individual's FA and behaviour is generally unknown: what do more asymmetric individuals do about their own asymmetry? We now show for the first time that individuals respond behaviourally to their own morphological FA in what appears to be an adaptive manner. During courtship, male guppies exhibiting high FA in ornamental colour, bias their displays towards their more colourful body side, thus potentially increasing their attractiveness by exaggerating the quantity of their orange signal. This appears to be a strictly behavioural male response to cues provided by females, as it does not occur when males court a non-reactive model female. Whether inferior males realize any mating advantage remains uncertain, but our study clearly demonstrates a behavioural response to random morphological asymmetries that appears to be adaptive. We propose that the tendency to show or otherwise use a 'best side' is common in nature, with implications for sexual signalling and the evolution of more pronounced asymmetries. PMID:17580294

  5. High Points of Human Genetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, Curt

    1975-01-01

    Discusses such high points of human genetics as the study of chromosomes, somatic cell hybrids, the population formula: the Hardy-Weinberg Law, biochemical genetics, the single-active X Theory, behavioral genetics and finally how genetics can serve humanity. (BR)

  6. Greenlandic Inuit show genetic signatures of diet and climate adaptation.

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, Matteo; Moltke, Ida; Grarup, Niels; Racimo, Fernando; Bjerregaard, Peter; Jørgensen, Marit E; Korneliussen, Thorfinn S; Gerbault, Pascale; Skotte, Line; Linneberg, Allan; Christensen, Cramer; Brandslund, Ivan; Jørgensen, Torben; Huerta-Sánchez, Emilia; Schmidt, Erik B; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Albrechtsen, Anders; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2015-09-18

    The indigenous people of Greenland, the Inuit, have lived for a long time in the extreme conditions of the Arctic, including low annual temperatures, and with a specialized diet rich in protein and fatty acids, particularly omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). A scan of Inuit genomes for signatures of adaptation revealed signals at several loci, with the strongest signal located in a cluster of fatty acid desaturases that determine PUFA levels. The selected alleles are associated with multiple metabolic and anthropometric phenotypes and have large effect sizes for weight and height, with the effect on height replicated in Europeans. By analyzing membrane lipids, we found that the selected alleles modulate fatty acid composition, which may affect the regulation of growth hormones. Thus, the Inuit have genetic and physiological adaptations to a diet rich in PUFAs. PMID:26383953

  7. New Genetic and Linguistic Analyses Show Ancient Human Influence on Baobab Evolution and Distribution in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Rangan, Haripriya; Bell, Karen L.; Baum, David A.; Fowler, Rachael; McConvell, Patrick; Saunders, Thomas; Spronck, Stef; Kull, Christian A.; Murphy, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the role of human agency in the gene flow and geographical distribution of the Australian baobab, Adansonia gregorii. The genus Adansonia is a charismatic tree endemic to Africa, Madagascar, and northwest Australia that has long been valued by humans for its multiple uses. The distribution of genetic variation in baobabs in Africa has been partially attributed to human-mediated dispersal over millennia, but this relationship has never been investigated for the Australian species. We combined genetic and linguistic data to analyse geographic patterns of gene flow and movement of word-forms for A. gregorii in the Aboriginal languages of northwest Australia. Comprehensive assessment of genetic diversity showed weak geographic structure and high gene flow. Of potential dispersal vectors, humans were identified as most likely to have enabled gene flow across biogeographic barriers in northwest Australia. Genetic-linguistic analysis demonstrated congruence of gene flow patterns and directional movement of Aboriginal loanwords for A. gregorii. These findings, along with previous archaeobotanical evidence from the Late Pleistocene and Holocene, suggest that ancient humans significantly influenced the geographic distribution of Adansonia in northwest Australia. PMID:25830225

  8. Genome-Wide Association Scan Shows Genetic Variants in the FTO Gene

    E-print Network

    Abecasis, Goncalo

    that in European Americans, Hispanic Americans, and African Americans, homozygotes for the rare ``A'' allele wereGenome-Wide Association Scan Shows Genetic Variants in the FTO Gene Are Associated with Obesity-Related disease. The disease is the result not only of several environmental risk factors, but also of genetic

  9. 5. View showing Crooked River High Bridge in background and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. View showing Crooked River High Bridge in background and Ralph Modjeski railroad bridge in foreground - Crooked River High Bridge, Spanning Crooked River Gorge at Dalles-California Highway, Terrebonne, Deschutes County, OR

  10. Slc:Wistar outbred rats show close genetic similarity with F344 inbred rats

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Satoshi; Serikawa, Tadao; Kuramoto, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Although Slc:Wistar rats are used widely in biomedical research as outbred rats, close similarities in growth curves, survival rates, and immunological and biochemical phenotypes have been reported between Slc:Wistar and F344 inbred rats. We reported previously that nine genetic variations that were fixed in Slc:Wistar rats had identical genotypes in F344 rats. Here, we examined the genetic characteristics of Slc:Wistar rats using 27 simple-sequence length polymorphism (SSLP) markers and compared them with other Wistar stocks available in Japan and with some F344 strains. Among 27 SSLP loci, 23 (85%) were fixed in the Slc:Wistar rats, which was the highest among the other Wistar stocks. The 23 fixed loci shared identical genotypes with corresponding loci in F344 rats. Further, the predominant allele types in the unfixed loci had allele frequencies as high as 80%, and these alleles were identical in the F344 rats. When the nine genetic variations reported previously are added, a total of 32 (89%) out of the 36 loci examined were fixed and identical in the Slc:Wistar and F344 rat genomes. These findings indicate the low genetic variation in Slc:Wistar rats and the high genetic similarity between the Slc:Wistar and F344 inbred rats. This study demonstrates the importance of characterizing outbred rats and the need to pay ample attention to the genetic characteristics the Slc:Wistar rats for their proper use. PMID:25195633

  11. Amphibian DNA shows marked genetic structure and tracks pleistocene climate change in northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Carnaval, Ana Carolina; Bates, John M

    2007-12-01

    The glacial refugia paradigm has been broadly applied to patterns of species dynamics and population diversification. However, recent geological studies have demonstrated striking Pleistocene climate changes in currently semiarid northeastern Brazil at time intervals much more frequent than the climatic oscillations associated with glacial and interglacial periods. These geomorphic data documented recurrent pulses of wet regimes in the past 210,000 years that correlate with climate anomalies affecting multiple continents. While analyzing DNA sequences of two mitochondrial genes (cytochrome b and NADH-dehydrogenase subunit 2) and one nuclear marker (cellular-myelocytomatosis proto-oncogene) in the forest-associated frogs Proceratophrys boiei and Ischnocnema gr. ramagii, we found evidence of biological responses consistent with these pluvial maxima events. Sampled areas included old, naturally isolated forest enclaves within the semiarid Caatinga, as well as recent man-made fragments of humid coastal Atlantic forest. Results show that mtDNA lineages in enclave populations are monophyletic or nearly so, whereas nonenclave populations are polyphyletic and more diverse. The studied taxa show evidence of demographic expansions at times that match phases of pluvial maxima inferred from geological data. Divergence times between several populations fall within comparatively drier intervals suggested by geomorphology. Mitochondrial and nuclear data show local populations to be genetically structured, with some high levels of differentiation that suggest the need of further taxonomic work. PMID:17941838

  12. Added Value Measures in Education Show Genetic as Well as Environmental Influence

    PubMed Central

    Haworth, Claire M. A.; Asbury, Kathryn; Dale, Philip S.; Plomin, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Does achievement independent of ability or previous attainment provide a purer measure of the added value of school? In a study of 4000 pairs of 12-year-old twins in the UK, we measured achievement with year-long teacher assessments as well as tests. Raw achievement shows moderate heritability (about 50%) and modest shared environmental influences (25%). Unexpectedly, we show that for indices of the added value of school, genetic influences remain moderate (around 50%), and the shared (school) environment is less important (about 12%). The pervasiveness of genetic influence in how and how much children learn is compatible with an active view of learning in which children create their own educational experiences in part on the basis of their genetic propensities. PMID:21311598

  13. Genetics Show Current Decline and Pleistocene Expansion in Northern Spotted Owls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Funk, W. Chris; Forsman, Eric D.; Mullins, Thomas D.; Haig, Susan M.

    2008-01-01

    The northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) is one of the most controversial threatened subspecies ever listed under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. Because of concern for persistence of the subspecies, logging on Federal lands in the U.S. Pacific Northwest was dramatically reduced under the Northwest Forest Plan in 1994. Despite protection of its remaining forest habitat, recent field studies show continued demographic declines of northern spotted owls. One potential threat to northern spotted owls that has not yet been shown is loss of genetic variation from population bottlenecks that can increase inbreeding depression and decrease adaptive potential. Here, we show recent genetic bottlenecks in northern spotted owls using a large genetic dataset (352 individuals from across the subspecies' range and 11 microsatellite loci). The signature of bottlenecks was strongest in Washington State, in agreement with field data. Interestingly, we also found a genetic signature of Pleistocene expansion in the same study areas where recent bottlenecks were shown. Our results provide independent evidence that northern spotted owls have recently declined, and suggest that loss of genetic variation is an emerging threat to the subspecies' persistence. Reduced effective population size (Ne), shown here in addition to field evidence for demographic decline, highlights the increasing vulnerability of this bird to extinction.

  14. 13. VIEW, LOOKING WEST FROM LEFT TO RIGHT, SHOWING HIGH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. VIEW, LOOKING WEST FROM LEFT TO RIGHT, SHOWING HIGH PRESSURE AIR FLASK ROOM AND PUMP ROOM - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  15. 20. SOUTH ELEVATION, SHOWING ORIGINAL HIGH VOLTAGE GETAWAYS. SCE negative ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. SOUTH ELEVATION, SHOWING ORIGINAL HIGH VOLTAGE GETAWAYS. SCE negative no. 10340, November 1, 1923. Photograph by G. Haven Bishop. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-3 Powerhouse, San Bernardino National Forest, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  16. Human genetic affinities for Y-chromosome P49a,f/TaqI haplotypes show strong correspondence with linguistics.

    PubMed Central

    Poloni, E S; Semino, O; Passarino, G; Santachiara-Benerecetti, A S; Dupanloup, I; Langaney, A; Excoffier, L

    1997-01-01

    Numerous population samples from around the world have been tested for Y chromosome-specific p49a,f/TaqI restriction polymorphisms. Here we review the literature as well as unpublished data on Y-chromosome p49a,f/TaqI haplotypes and provide a new nomenclature unifying the notations used by different laboratories. We use this large data set to study worldwide genetic variability of human populations for this paternally transmitted chromosome segment. We observe, for the Y chromosome, an important level of population genetics structure among human populations (FST = .230, P < .001), mainly due to genetic differences among distinct linguistic groups of populations (FCT = .246, P < .001). A multivariate analysis based on genetic distances between populations shows that human population structure inferred from the Y chromosome corresponds broadly to language families (r = .567, P < .001), in agreement with autosomal and mitochondrial data. Times of divergence of linguistic families, estimated from their internal level of genetic differentiation, are fairly concordant with current archaeological and linguistic hypotheses. Variability of the p49a,f/TaqI polymorphic marker is also significantly correlated with the geographic location of the populations (r = .613, P < .001), reflecting the fact that distinct linguistic groups generally also occupy distinct geographic areas. Comparison of Y-chromosome and mtDNA RFLPs in a restricted set of populations shows a globally high level of congruence, but it also allows identification of unequal maternal and paternal contributions to the gene pool of several populations. PMID:9346874

  17. 26. VIEW OF PUMP ROOM, SHOWING PORTIONS OF HIGH PRESSURE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. VIEW OF PUMP ROOM, SHOWING PORTIONS OF HIGH PRESSURE AIR SYSTEM AT LEFT AND CENTER AND OVERFLOW STORAGE TANK AT RIGHT, LOOKING NORTHWEST - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  18. Graphene oxide immobilized enzymes show high thermal and solvent stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanová, So?a; Zarevúcká, Marie; Bouša, Daniel; Pumera, Martin; Sofer, Zden?k

    2015-03-01

    The thermal and solvent tolerance of enzymes is highly important for their industrial use. We show here that the enzyme lipase from Rhizopus oryzae exhibits exceptionally high thermal stability and high solvent tolerance and even increased activity in acetone when immobilized onto a graphene oxide (GO) nanosupport prepared by Staudenmaier and Brodie methods. We studied various forms of immobilization of the enzyme: by physical adsorption, covalent attachment, and additional crosslinking. The activity recovery was shown to be dependent on the support type, enzyme loading and immobilization procedure. Covalently immobilized lipase showed significantly better resistance to heat inactivation (the activity recovery was 65% at 70 °C) in comparison with the soluble counterpart (the activity recovery was 65% at 40 °C). Physically adsorbed lipase achieved over 100% of the initial activity in a series of organic solvents. These findings, showing enhanced thermal stability and solvent tolerance of graphene oxide immobilized enzyme, will have a profound impact on practical industrial scale uses of enzymes for the conversion of lipids into fuels.The thermal and solvent tolerance of enzymes is highly important for their industrial use. We show here that the enzyme lipase from Rhizopus oryzae exhibits exceptionally high thermal stability and high solvent tolerance and even increased activity in acetone when immobilized onto a graphene oxide (GO) nanosupport prepared by Staudenmaier and Brodie methods. We studied various forms of immobilization of the enzyme: by physical adsorption, covalent attachment, and additional crosslinking. The activity recovery was shown to be dependent on the support type, enzyme loading and immobilization procedure. Covalently immobilized lipase showed significantly better resistance to heat inactivation (the activity recovery was 65% at 70 °C) in comparison with the soluble counterpart (the activity recovery was 65% at 40 °C). Physically adsorbed lipase achieved over 100% of the initial activity in a series of organic solvents. These findings, showing enhanced thermal stability and solvent tolerance of graphene oxide immobilized enzyme, will have a profound impact on practical industrial scale uses of enzymes for the conversion of lipids into fuels. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00438a

  19. Graphene oxide immobilized enzymes show high thermal and solvent stability.

    PubMed

    Hermanová, So?a; Zarevúcká, Marie; Bouša, Daniel; Pumera, Martin; Sofer, Zden?k

    2015-03-19

    The thermal and solvent tolerance of enzymes is highly important for their industrial use. We show here that the enzyme lipase from Rhizopus oryzae exhibits exceptionally high thermal stability and high solvent tolerance and even increased activity in acetone when immobilized onto a graphene oxide (GO) nanosupport prepared by Staudenmaier and Brodie methods. We studied various forms of immobilization of the enzyme: by physical adsorption, covalent attachment, and additional crosslinking. The activity recovery was shown to be dependent on the support type, enzyme loading and immobilization procedure. Covalently immobilized lipase showed significantly better resistance to heat inactivation (the activity recovery was 65% at 70 °C) in comparison with the soluble counterpart (the activity recovery was 65% at 40 °C). Physically adsorbed lipase achieved over 100% of the initial activity in a series of organic solvents. These findings, showing enhanced thermal stability and solvent tolerance of graphene oxide immobilized enzyme, will have a profound impact on practical industrial scale uses of enzymes for the conversion of lipids into fuels. PMID:25757536

  20. A framework genetic map for Miscanthus sinensis from RNAseq-based markers shows recent tetraploidy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Miscanthus (subtribe Saccharinae, tribe Andropogoneae, family Poaceae) is a genus of temperate perennial C4 grasses whose high biomass production makes it, along with its close relatives sugarcane and sorghum, attractive as a biofuel feedstock. The base chromosome number of Miscanthus (x = 19) is different from that of other Saccharinae and approximately twice that of the related Sorghum bicolor (x = 10), suggesting large-scale duplications may have occurred in recent ancestors of Miscanthus. Owing to the complexity of the Miscanthus genome and the complications of self-incompatibility, a complete genetic map with a high density of markers has not yet been developed. Results We used deep transcriptome sequencing (RNAseq) from two M. sinensis accessions to define 1536 single nucleotide variants (SNVs) for a GoldenGate™ genotyping array, and found that simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers defined in sugarcane are often informative in M. sinensis. A total of 658 SNP and 210 SSR markers were validated via segregation in a full sibling F1 mapping population. Using 221 progeny from this mapping population, we constructed a genetic map for M. sinensis that resolves into 19 linkage groups, the haploid chromosome number expected from cytological evidence. Comparative genomic analysis documents a genome-wide duplication in Miscanthus relative to Sorghum bicolor, with subsequent insertional fusion of a pair of chromosomes. The utility of the map is confirmed by the identification of two paralogous C4-pyruvate, phosphate dikinase (C4-PPDK) loci in Miscanthus, at positions syntenic to the single orthologous gene in Sorghum. Conclusions The genus Miscanthus experienced an ancestral tetraploidy and chromosome fusion prior to its diversification, but after its divergence from the closely related sugarcane clade. The recent timing of this tetraploidy complicates discovery and mapping of genetic markers for Miscanthus species, since alleles and fixed differences between paralogs are comparable. These difficulties can be overcome by careful analysis of segregation patterns in a mapping population and genotyping of doubled haploids. The genetic map for Miscanthus will be useful in biological discovery and breeding efforts to improve this emerging biofuel crop, and also provide a valuable resource for understanding genomic responses to tetraploidy and chromosome fusion. PMID:22524439

  1. Histidine decarboxylase knockout mice, a genetic model of Tourette syndrome, show repetitive grooming after induced fear.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meiyu; Li, Lina; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Pittenger, Christopher

    2015-05-19

    Tics, such as are seen in Tourette syndrome (TS), are common and can cause profound morbidity, but they are poorly understood. Tics are potentiated by psychostimulants, stress, and sleep deprivation. Mutations in the gene histidine decarboxylase (Hdc) have been implicated as a rare genetic cause of TS, and Hdc knockout mice have been validated as a genetic model that recapitulates phenomenological and pathophysiological aspects of the disorder. Tic-like stereotypies in this model have not been observed at baseline but emerge after acute challenge with the psychostimulant d-amphetamine. We tested the ability of an acute stressor to stimulate stereotypies in this model, using tone fear conditioning. Hdc knockout mice acquired conditioned fear normally, as manifested by freezing during the presentation of a tone 48h after it had been paired with a shock. During the 30min following tone presentation, knockout mice showed increased grooming. Heterozygotes exhibited normal freezing and intermediate grooming. These data validate a new paradigm for the examination of tic-like stereotypies in animals without pharmacological challenge and enhance the face validity of the Hdc knockout mouse as a pathophysiologically grounded model of tic disorders. PMID:25841792

  2. Resistance to oxidative stress shows low heritability and high common environmental variance in a wild bird.

    PubMed

    Losdat, S; Helfenstein, F; Blount, J D; Richner, H

    2014-09-01

    Oxidative stress was recently demonstrated to affect several fitness-related traits and is now well recognized to shape animal life-history evolution. However, very little is known about how much resistance to oxidative stress is determined by genetic and environmental effects and hence about its potential for evolution, especially in wild populations. In addition, our knowledge of phenotypic sexual dimorphism and cross-sex genetic correlations in resistance to oxidative stress remains extremely limited despite important evolutionary implications. In free-living great tits (Parus major), we quantified heritability, common environmental effect, sexual dimorphism and cross-sex genetic correlation in offspring resistance to oxidative stress by performing a split-nest cross-fostering experiment where 155 broods were split, and all siblings (n = 791) translocated and raised in two other nests. Resistance to oxidative stress was measured as both oxidative damage to lipids and erythrocyte resistance to a controlled free-radical attack. Both measurements of oxidative stress showed low additive genetic variances, high common environmental effects and phenotypic sexual dimorphism with males showing a higher resistance to oxidative stress. Cross-sex genetic correlations were not different from unity, and we found no substantial heritability in resistance to oxidative stress at adult age measured on 39 individuals that recruited the subsequent year. Our study shows that individual ability to resist to oxidative stress is primarily influenced by the common environment and has a low heritability with a consequent low potential for evolution, at least at an early stage of life. PMID:25040169

  3. Thinking positively: The genetics of high intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Shakeshaft, Nicholas G.; Trzaskowski, Maciej; McMillan, Andrew; Krapohl, Eva; Simpson, Michael A.; Reichenberg, Avi; Cederlöf, Martin; Larsson, Henrik; Lichtenstein, Paul; Plomin, Robert

    2015-01-01

    High intelligence (general cognitive ability) is fundamental to the human capital that drives societies in the information age. Understanding the origins of this intellectual capital is important for government policy, for neuroscience, and for genetics. For genetics, a key question is whether the genetic causes of high intelligence are qualitatively or quantitatively different from the normal distribution of intelligence. We report results from a sibling and twin study of high intelligence and its links with the normal distribution. We identified 360,000 sibling pairs and 9000 twin pairs from 3 million 18-year-old males with cognitive assessments administered as part of conscription to military service in Sweden between 1968 and 2010. We found that high intelligence is familial, heritable, and caused by the same genetic and environmental factors responsible for the normal distribution of intelligence. High intelligence is a good candidate for “positive genetics” — going beyond the negative effects of DNA sequence variation on disease and disorders to consider the positive end of the distribution of genetic effects. PMID:25593376

  4. The ARMC5 gene shows extensive genetic variance in primary macronodular adrenocortical hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Ricardo; Zilbermint, Mihail; Berthon, Annabel; Espiard, Stephanie; Batsis, Maria; Papadakis, Georgios Z.; Xekouki, Paraskevi; Lodish, Maya B.; Bertherat, Jerome; Faucz, Fabio R.; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Primary macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (PMAH) is a rare type of Cushing’s syndrome (CS) that results in increased cortisol production and bilateral enlargement of the adrenal glands. Recent work showed that the disease may be caused by germline and somatic mutations in the ARMC5 gene, a likely tumor-suppressor gene (TSG). We investigated 20 different adrenal nodules from one patient with PMAH for ARMC5 somatic sequence changes. Design All of the nodules where obtained from a single patient who underwent bilateral adrenalectomy. DNA was extracted by standard protocols and the ARMC5 sequence was determined by the Sanger method. Results Sixteen of 20 adrenocortical nodules harbored, in addition to what appeared to be the germline mutation, a second somatic variant. The p.Trp476* sequence change was present in all 20 nodules, as well as in normal tissue from the adrenal capsule, identifying it as the germline defect; each of the 16 other variants were found in different nodules: 6 were frame shift, 4 were missense, 3 were nonsense, and 1 was a splice site variation. Allelic losses were confirmed in 2 of the nodules. Conclusion This is the most genetic variance of the ARMC5 gene ever described in a single patient with PMAH: each of 16 adrenocortical nodules had a second new, “private”, and -in most cases- completely inactivating ARMC5 defect, in addition to the germline mutation. The data support the notion that ARMC5 is a TSG that needs a second, somatic hit, to mediate tumorigenesis leading to polyclonal nodularity; however, the driver of this extensive genetic variance of the second ARMC5 allele in adrenocortical tissue in the context of a germline defect and PMAH remains a mystery. PMID:26162405

  5. A Genetic Mouse Model of Parkinson's Disease Shows Involuntary Movements and Increased Postsynaptic Sensitivity to Apomorphine.

    PubMed

    Brehm, N; Bez, F; Carlsson, T; Kern, B; Gispert, S; Auburger, G; Cenci, M A

    2015-12-01

    Alpha-synuclein (SNCA) protein aggregation plays a causal role in Parkinson's disease (PD). The SNCA protein modulates neurotransmission via the SNAP receptor (SNARE) complex assembly and presynaptic vesicle trafficking. The striatal presynaptic dopamine deficit is alleviated by treatment with levodopa (L-DOPA), but postsynaptic plastic changes induced by this treatment lead to a development of involuntary movements (dyskinesia). While this process is currently modeled in rodents harboring neurotoxin-induced lesions of the nigrostriatal pathway, we have here explored the postsynaptic supersensitivity of dopamine receptor-mediated signaling in a genetic mouse model of early PD. To this end, we used mice with prion promoter-driven overexpression of A53T-SNCA in the nigrostriatal and corticostriatal projections. At a symptomatic age (18 months), mice were challenged with apomorphine (5 mg/kg s.c.) and examined using both behavioral and molecular assays. After the administration of apomorphine, A53T-transgenic mice showed more severe stereotypic and dystonic movements in comparison with wild-type controls. Molecular markers of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, and Fos messenger RNA (mRNA), were examined in striatal tissue at 30 and 100 min after apomorphine injection. At 30 min, wild-type and transgenic mice showed a similar induction of phosphorylated ERK1/2, Dusp1, and Dusp6 mRNA (two MAPK phosphatases). At the same time point, Fos mRNA was induced more strongly in mutant mice than in wild-type controls. At 100 min after apomorphine treatment, the induction of both Fos, Dusp1, and Dusp6 mRNA was significantly larger in mutant mice than wild-type controls. At this time point, apomorphine caused a reduction in phospho-ERK1/2 levels specifically in the transgenic mice. Our results document for the first time a disturbance of ERK1/2 signaling regulation associated with apomorphine-induced involuntary movements in a genetic mouse model of synucleinopathy. This mouse model will be useful to identify novel therapeutic targets that can counteract abnormal dopamine-dependent striatal plasticity during both prodromal and manifest stages of PD. PMID:25307288

  6. DNA methylation in Arabidopsis has a genetic basis and shows evidence of local adaptation.

    PubMed

    Dubin, Manu J; Zhang, Pei; Meng, Dazhe; Remigereau, Marie-Stanislas; Osborne, Edward J; Paolo Casale, Francesco; Drewe, Philipp; Kahles, André; Jean, Geraldine; Vilhjálmsson, Bjarni; Jagoda, Joanna; Irez, Selen; Voronin, Viktor; Song, Qiang; Long, Quan; Rätsch, Gunnar; Stegle, Oliver; Clark, Richard M; Nordborg, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Epigenome modulation potentially provides a mechanism for organisms to adapt, within and between generations. However, neither the extent to which this occurs, nor the mechanisms involved are known. Here we investigate DNA methylation variation in Swedish Arabidopsis thaliana accessions grown at two different temperatures. Environmental effects were limited to transposons, where CHH methylation was found to increase with temperature. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) revealed that the extensive CHH methylation variation was strongly associated with genetic variants in both cis and trans, including a major trans-association close to the DNA methyltransferase CMT2. Unlike CHH methylation, CpG gene body methylation (GBM) was not affected by growth temperature, but was instead correlated with the latitude of origin. Accessions from colder regions had higher levels of GBM for a significant fraction of the genome, and this was associated with increased transcription for the genes affected. GWAS revealed that this effect was largely due to trans-acting loci, many of which showed evidence of local adaptation. PMID:25939354

  7. Silazane polymers show promise for high- temperature application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Several silazane intermediate compounds and polymers have been prepared which are potentially useful as high temperature coatings and elastomers. These silazane polymers exhibit stability in a temperature range of 300 to 400 degrees C.

  8. High genetic diversity is not essential for successful introduction

    PubMed Central

    Rollins, Lee A; Moles, Angela T; Lam, Serena; Buitenwerf, Robert; Buswell, Joanna M; Brandenburger, Claire R; Flores-Moreno, Habacuc; Nielsen, Knud B; Couchman, Ellen; Brown, Gordon S; Thomson, Fiona J; Hemmings, Frank; Frankham, Richard; Sherwin, William B

    2013-01-01

    Some introduced populations thrive and evolve despite the presumed loss of diversity at introduction. We aimed to quantify the amount of genetic diversity retained at introduction in species that have shown evidence of adaptation to their introduced environments. Samples were taken from native and introduced ranges of Arctotheca populifolia and Petrorhagia nanteuilii. Using microsatellite data, we identified the source for each introduction, estimated genetic diversity in native and introduced populations, and calculated the amount of diversity retained in introduced populations. These values were compared to those from a literature review of diversity in native, confamilial populations and to estimates of genetic diversity retained at introduction. Gene diversity in the native range of both species was significantly lower than for confamilials. We found that, on average, introduced populations showing evidence of adaptation to their new environments retained 81% of the genetic diversity from the native range. Introduced populations of P. nanteuilii had higher genetic diversity than found in the native source populations, whereas introduced populations of A. populifolia retained only 14% of its native diversity in one introduction and 1% in another. Our literature review has shown that most introductions demonstrating adaptive ability have lost diversity upon introduction. The two species studied here had exceptionally low native range genetic diversity. Further, the two introductions of A. populifolia represent the largest percentage loss of genetic diversity in a species showing evidence of substantial morphological change in the introduced range. While high genetic diversity may increase the likelihood of invasion success, the species examined here adapted to their new environments with very little neutral genetic diversity. This finding suggests that even introductions founded by small numbers of individuals have the potential to become invasive. PMID:24340190

  9. Natural Selection and Evolution: Using Multimedia Slide Shows to Emphasize the Role of Genetic Variation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malone, Molly

    2012-01-01

    Most middle school students comprehend that organisms have adaptations that enable their survival and that successful adaptations prevail in a population over time. Yet they often miss that those bird beaks, moth-wing colors, or whatever traits are the result of random, normal genetic variations that just happen to confer a negative, neutral, or…

  10. Two invasive populations of the dry rot fungus Serpula lacrymans show divergent population genetic structures

    E-print Network

    Laudal, Arnfinn

    . In this study, we compare the genetic structures of two invasive populations from Europe and Japan that there has been a higher level of gene flow from the Asian source populations to Japan than to Europe bottlenecks prior to population expansion. No identical multi-locus genotypes were observed within Japan

  11. Highly structured genetic diversity of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis population in

    E-print Network

    Choisy, Marc

    Highly structured genetic diversity of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis population in Djibouti S, Djibouti Ville, Djibouti Abstract Djibouti is an East African country with a high tuberculosis incidence with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) were included. Genetic characterization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, using

  12. Genetic structure and demographic history should inform conservation: Chinese cobras currently treated as homogenous show population divergence.

    PubMed

    Lin, Long-Hui; Qu, Yan-Fu; Li, Hong; Zhou, Kai-Ya; Ji, Xiang

    2012-01-01

    An understanding of population structure and genetic diversity is crucial for wildlife conservation and for determining the integrity of wildlife populations. The vulnerable Chinese cobra (Naja atra) has a distribution from the mouth of the Yangtze River down to northern Vietnam and Laos, within which several large mountain ranges and water bodies may influence population structure. We combined 12 microsatellite loci and 1117 bp of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene to explore genetic structure and demographic history in this species, using 269 individuals from various localities in Mainland China and Vietnam. High levels of genetic variation were identified for both mtDNA and microsatellites. mtDNA data revealed two main (Vietnam + southern China + southwestern China; eastern + southeastern China) and one minor (comprising only two individuals from the westernmost site) clades. Microsatellite data divided the eastern + southeastern China clade further into two genetic clusters, which include individuals from the eastern and southeastern regions, respectively. The Luoxiao and Nanling Mountains may be important barriers affecting the diversification of lineages. In the haplotype network of cytchrome b, many haplotypes were represented within a "star" cluster and this and other tests suggest recent expansion. However, microsatellite analyses did not yield strong evidence for a recent bottleneck for any population or genetic cluster. The three main clusters identified here should be considered as independent management units for conservation purposes. The release of Chinese cobras into the wild should cease unless their origin can be determined, and this will avoid problems arising from unnatural homogenization. PMID:22558439

  13. Am. J. Hum. Genet. 69:820830, 2001 Seven Regions of the Genome Show Evidence of Linkage to Type 1

    E-print Network

    Cox, Nancy J.

    -9297/2001/6904-0015$02.00 T1D has a long history of studies evaluating candi- date genes for allelic association with diseaseAm. J. Hum. Genet. 69:820­830, 2001 820 Seven Regions of the Genome Show Evidence of Linkage-secreting cells of the pancreas. Two previous whole-genome scans for linkage to T1D in 187 and 356 families

  14. Young Adult Female Fragile X Premutation Carriers Show Age- and Genetically-Modulated Cognitive Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodrich-Hunsaker, Naomi J.; Wong, Ling M.; McLennan, Yingratana; Srivastava, Siddharth; Tassone, Flora; Harvey, Danielle; Rivera, Susan M.; Simon, Tony J.

    2011-01-01

    The high frequency of the fragile X premutation in the general population and its emerging neurocognitive implications highlight the need to investigate the effects of the premutation on lifespan cognitive development. Until recently, cognitive function in fragile X premutation carriers (fXPCs) was presumed to be unaffected by the mutation. Here…

  15. Anatomical and genetic study of an ancient animal tooth showing brachyodont and hypsodont mixed taxonomical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Monteagudo, L V; Obón, J A; Whyte, A; Tejedor, M T; Whyte, J; Cisneros, A

    2013-05-01

    A non-human dental piece was found in a Roman Empire tomb dated the 3rd century A.C. in Zaragoza (Spain). The morphology of this piece showed mixed brachyodont (carnivores) and hypsodont (herbivores) characteristics. As a result, the taxonomical assignation of the piece was impossible. Therefore, a protocol based on the DNA sequence of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 mitochondrial region (COI) was applied. For this purpose, a pair of primers able to amplify this region in a large variety of animals was designed. The results point to a species of the Genus Bos (Family Bovidae). This assignation was later confirmed by these quencing of a short fragment of the mitochondrial D-loop region. A complete morphological description of the tooth is presented together with the DNA sequence study and comparison protocol. PMID:23740506

  16. HIGH LEVELS OF GENETIC DIVERSITY AND LOW LEVELS OF GENETIC DIFFERENTIATION IN NORTH SEA PSEUDO-NITZSCHIA PUNGENS

    E-print Network

    HIGH LEVELS OF GENETIC DIVERSITY AND LOW LEVELS OF GENETIC DIFFERENTIATION IN NORTH SEA PSEUDO of P. pungens. Key index words: diatom; genetic differentiation; genetic diversity; genetic structure). Consequently, our understanding of levels of genetic diversity and its par- titioning, both spatially

  17. PROCEEDINGS Open Access High-resolution genetic mapping with pooled

    E-print Network

    Williams, Brian C.

    . A robust method for determining the genetic ele- ments that underlie a phenotype is to gather and group progeny with extreme phenotypes should elucidate the genetic basis of the trait. The main ideaPROCEEDINGS Open Access High-resolution genetic mapping with pooled sequencing Matthew D Edwards1

  18. Genetic influence on brain catecholamines: high brain norepinephrine in salt-sensitive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Iwai, J.; Friedman, R.; Tassinari, L.

    1980-01-01

    Rats genetically sensitive to salt-induced hypertension evinced higher levels of plasma norepinephrine and epinephrine than rats genetically resistant to hypertension. The hypertension-sensitive rats showed higher hypothalamic norepinephrine and lower epinephrine than resistant rats. In response to a high salt diet, brain stem norepinephrine increased in sensitive rats while resistant rats exhibited a decrease on the same diet.

  19. Chicken skin virome analyzed by high-throughput sequencing shows a composition highly different from human skin.

    PubMed

    Denesvre, Caroline; Dumarest, Marine; Rémy, Sylvie; Gourichon, David; Eloit, Marc

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies show that human skin at homeostasis is a complex ecosystem whose virome include circular DNA viruses, especially papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses. To determine the chicken skin virome in comparison with human skin virome, a chicken swabs pool sample from fifteen indoor healthy chickens of five genetic backgrounds was examined for the presence of DNA viruses by high-throughput sequencing (HTS). The results indicate a predominance of herpesviruses from the Mardivirus genus, coming from either vaccinal origin or presumably asymptomatic infection. Despite the high sensitivity of the HTS method used herein to detect small circular DNA viruses, we did not detect any papillomaviruses, polyomaviruses, or circoviruses, indicating that these viruses may not be resident of the chicken skin. The results suggest that the turkey herpesvirus is a resident of chicken skin in vaccinated chickens. This study indicates major differences between the skin viromes of chickens and humans. The origin of this difference remains to be further studied in relation with skin physiology, environment, or virus population dynamics. PMID:26223320

  20. Student Problem Solving in High School Genetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, James

    1983-01-01

    Describes set of specific steps (procedural knowledge) used when solving monohybrid/dihybrid cross problems and extent to which students could justify execution of each step in terms of their conceptual knowledge of genetics and meiosis. Implications for genetics instruction are discussed. (JN)

  1. The genetic landscape of high-risk neuroblastoma

    Cancer.gov

    Published on Office of Cancer Genomics (http://ocg.cancer.gov) Home > The genetic landscape of high-risk neuroblastoma The genetic landscape of high-risk neuroblastoma [1] Pugh TJ, Morozova O, Attiyeh EF, Asgharzadeh S, Wei JS, Auclair D, Carter SL,

  2. The genetic landscape of high-risk neuroblastoma

    Cancer.gov

    Published on Office of Cancer Genomics (https://ocg.cancer.gov) Home > The genetic landscape of high-risk neuroblastoma The genetic landscape of high-risk neuroblastoma [1] Pugh TJ, Morozova O, Attiyeh EF, Asgharzadeh S, Wei JS, Auclair D, Carter SL,

  3. MUTANT SCREEN REPORT A Genetic Screen for High Copy Number

    E-print Network

    Sharan, Roded

    MUTANT SCREEN REPORT A Genetic Screen for High Copy Number Suppressors of the Synthetic Lethality a high copy number suppressor screen to search for genes that, when overexpressed, suppress the synthetic

  4. Very High-Calorie Diets Show How Overeating May Lead to Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_154544.html Very High-Calorie Diets Show How Overeating May Lead to Diabetes ... 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Everyone knows that high-calorie diets are tied to obesity and, too often, ...

  5. Construction and characterization of an infectious clone of coxsackievirus A6 that showed high virulence in neonatal mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lisheng; Li, Shuxuan; Liu, Yajing; Hou, Wangheng; Lin, Qiaona; Zhao, Huan; Xu, Longfa; He, Delei; Ye, Xiangzhong; Zhu, Hua; Cheng, Tong; Xia, Ningshao

    2015-12-01

    Atypical hand, foot, and mouth disease (aHFMD) outbreaks have been frequently reported worldwide in recent years. It is believed that coxsackievirus A6 (CA6) is the major pathogen for aHFMD. Studies regarding CA6 infection are limited and the genetic mechanism for the high pathogenicity of some new CA6 variants is still unclear. Infectious clones are powerful tools for studying the genetic mechanisms of RNA viruses. In this study, we describe the construction of a full-length cDNA clone of CA6 strain TW-2007-00141. The whole genome of CA6 was amplified in a single step and ligated into a plasmid vector through an efficient cloning method, Gibson assembly. The whole genome sequence of CA6 strain TW-2007-00141 was determined and phylogenetic analysis indicated that it shared a high degree of similarity (?94%) with the CA6 strains found in Taiwan in 2009. The infectious clone of CA6 viruses were recovered by transfection into 293FT cells and showed similar biological properties to the parental virus. Viral particles were purified by CsCl isopycnic centrifugation, and two types of viral particles were observed under transmission electron microscopy. The rescued virus showed high virulence in one-day-old suckling mice. This clone may be useful for establishing animal models for the evaluation of CA6 vaccine efficiency in future. PMID:26272672

  6. High-Throughput Sequencing and Rare Genetic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Makrythanasis, P.; Antonarakis, S.E.

    2012-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing has drastically changed the research of genes responsible for genetic disorders and is now gradually introduced as an additional genetic diagnostic testing in clinical practice. The current debates on the emerging technical, medical and ethical issues as well as the potential optimum use of the available technology are discussed. PMID:23293577

  7. Stem and progenitor cells in myelodysplastic syndromes show aberrant stage-specific expansion and harbor genetic and epigenetic alterations.

    PubMed

    Will, Britta; Zhou, Li; Vogler, Thomas O; Ben-Neriah, Susanna; Schinke, Carolina; Tamari, Roni; Yu, Yiting; Bhagat, Tushar D; Bhattacharyya, Sanchari; Barreyro, Laura; Heuck, Christoph; Mo, Yonkai; Parekh, Samir; McMahon, Christine; Pellagatti, Andrea; Boultwood, Jacqueline; Montagna, Cristina; Silverman, Lewis; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw; Greally, John M; Ye, B Hilda; List, Alan F; Steidl, Christian; Steidl, Ulrich; Verma, Amit

    2012-09-01

    Even though hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) dysfunction is presumed in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), the exact nature of quantitative and qualitative alterations is unknown. We conducted a study of phenotypic and molecular alterations in highly fractionated stem and progenitor populations in a variety of MDS subtypes. We observed an expansion of the phenotypically primitive long-term HSCs (lineage(-)/CD34(+)/CD38(-)/CD90(+)) in MDS, which was most pronounced in higher-risk cases. These MDS HSCs demonstrated dysplastic clonogenic activity. Examination of progenitors revealed that lower-risk MDS is characterized by expansion of phenotypic common myeloid progenitors, whereas higher-risk cases revealed expansion of granulocyte-monocyte progenitors. Genome-wide analysis of sorted MDS HSCs revealed widespread methylomic and transcriptomic alterations. STAT3 was an aberrantly hypomethylated and overexpressed target that was validated in an independent cohort and found to be functionally relevant in MDS HSCs. FISH analysis demonstrated that a very high percentage of MDS HSC (92% ± 4%) carry cytogenetic abnormalities. Longitudinal analysis in a patient treated with 5-azacytidine revealed that karyotypically abnormal HSCs persist even during complete morphologic remission and that expansion of clonotypic HSCs precedes clinical relapse. This study demonstrates that stem and progenitor cells in MDS are characterized by stage-specific expansions and contain epigenetic and genetic alterations. PMID:22753872

  8. Hybrid Mice as Genetic Models of High Alcohol Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Ozburn, A. R.; Walker, D.; Ahmed, S.; Belknap, J. K.; Harris, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    We showed that F1 hybrid genotypes may provide a broader variety of ethanol drinking phenotypes than the inbred progenitor strains used to create the hybrids (Blednov et al. in Alcohol Clin Exp Res 29:1949–1958–2005). To extend this work, we characterized alcohol consumption as well as intake of other tastants (saccharin, quinine and sodium chloride) in five inbred strains of mice (FVB, SJL, B6, BUB, NZB) and in their reciprocal F1 hybrids with B6 (FVBxB6; B6xFVB; NZBxB6; B6xNZB; BUBxB6; B6xBUB; SJLxB6; B6xSJL). We also compared ethanol intake in these mice for several concentrations before and after two periods of abstinence. F1 hybrid mice derived from the crosses of B6 and FVB and also B6 and SJL drank higher levels of ethanol than their progenitor strains, demonstrating overdominance for two-bottle choice drinking test. The B6 and NZB hybrid showed additivity in two-bottle choice drinking, whereas the hybrid of B6 and BUB demonstrated full or complete dominance. Genealogical origin, as well as non-alcohol taste preferences (sodium chloride), predicted ethanol consumption. Mice derived from the crosses of B6 and FVB showed high sustained alcohol preference and the B6 and NZB hybrids showed reduced alcohol preference after periods of abstinence. These new genetic models offer some advantages over inbred strains because they provide high, sustained, alcohol intake, and should allow mapping of loci important for the genetic architecture of these traits. PMID:19798565

  9. Research shows that many successful high school students do not maintain the same level

    E-print Network

    Sun, Yi

    BACKGROUND Research shows that many successful high school students do not maintain the same level successfully complete the program will receive one elective high school credit depending on the courses OF THE STEM INSTITUTE The STEM Institute is offered during the New York City Public High School summer session

  10. South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com Palm Beach County high schools show improvement in latest grades

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com Palm Beach County high schools show improvement in latest grades ratings awarded to the local high schools, these areas gained some of the bragging rights associated there." High schools across Florida on Tuesday received report cards for the 2009-10 school year, based

  11. Modulation of microRNAs in two genetically disparate chicken lines showing different necrotic enteritis disease susceptibility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) play a critical role in post-transcriptional regulation by influencing the 3'-UTR of target genes. Using two inbred White Leghorn chicken lines, line 6.3 and line 7.2 showing Marek’s disease-resistant and -susceptible phenotypes, respectively, we used small RNA high-throughput sequ...

  12. Mice fed on a diet enriched with genetically engineered multivitamin corn show no sub-acute toxic effects and no sub-chronic toxicity.

    PubMed

    Arjó, Gemma; Capell, Teresa; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Zhu, Changfu; Christou, Paul; Piñol, Carme

    2012-12-01

    Multivitamin corn is a novel genetically engineered variety that simultaneously produces high levels of ?-carotene, ascorbate and folate, and therefore has the potential to address simultaneously multiple micronutrient deficiencies caused by the lack of vitamins A, B9 and C in developing country populations. As part of the development process for genetically engineered crops and following European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) recommendations, multivitamin corn must be tested in whole food/feed sub-chronic animal feeding studies to ensure there are no adverse effects, and potential allergens must be identified. We carried out a 28-day toxicity assessment in mice, which showed no short-term sub-acute evidence of diet-related adverse health effects and no difference in clinical markers (food consumption, body weight, organ/tissue weight, haematological and biochemical blood parameters and histopathology) compared to mice fed on a control diet. A subsequent 90-day sub-chronic feeding study again showed no indications of toxicity compared to mice fed on control diets. Our data confirm that diets enriched with multivitamin corn have no adverse effects on mice, do not induce any clinical signs of toxicity and do not contain known allergens. PMID:22928600

  13. Computational methods for high-throughput pooled genetic experiments

    E-print Network

    Edwards, Matthew Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Advances in high-throughput DNA sequencing have created new avenues of attack for classical genetics problems. This thesis develops and applies principled methods for analyzing DNA sequencing data from multiple pools of ...

  14. Executive deficits in Individuals at High Genetic Risk of Schizophrenia 

    E-print Network

    Dimitrova, R

    2012-11-28

    Background. Studies of individuals at high genetic risk (HR) of schizophrenia have shown subtle deficits in the domains of executive functions. However, executive abilities also depend on working memory, which is one of ...

  15. Genetic variants associated with arsenic metabolism within human arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase show wide variation across multiple populations.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, Junko; Yasuda, Toshihiro; Kato, Hideaki; Yuasa, Isao; Panduro, Arturo; Kunito, Takashi; Takeshita, Haruo

    2011-02-01

    Human arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) is known to catalyze the methylation of arsenite. The objective of this study was to investigate the diversity of the AS3MT gene in Mexican and German populations. The distribution of 18 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in AS3MT was assessed on healthy individuals: 38 Mestizo, 69 Nahuas, 50 Huicholes, and 32 Germans. All 18 SNPs were polymorphic in the German and Mexican populations. Of the three Mexican populations, a minor allele frequency was the highest in the Mestizo, followed by the Nahuas and Huicholes. In the German and three Mexican groups, haplotype #1(TATAGAAGTCTTCATGAC) was the most predominant. Seven haplotypes were newly found in the German and three Mexican populations. The D' values between SNP pairs were high in the German and Nahua populations; they had a similar pattern. The pattern of the Mestizo was more similar to the African than to the other Mexican populations. Huicholes had a moderate pattern of the African and German/Nahua populations. The network had three clusters. One originated in the African population and another may have originated in an Asian (Chinese and/or Japanese) population. The third one may have originated among Caucasians. This study is the first to demonstrate the existence of genetic heterogeneity in the distribution of 18 SNPs in AS3MT of German and Mexican populations. PMID:20571777

  16. High genetic variability and polychromatism in Pachycoris torridus (Heteroptera: Scutelleridae).

    PubMed

    Souza-Firmino, T S; Alevi, K C C; Pereira, L L V; Souza, E R S; Júnior, F C S; Banho, C A; Carmo, G O; Itoyama, M M

    2015-01-01

    The stink bug Pachycoris torridus is listed among the most polyphagous insects in the world and it is a major pest of diverse crops, in particular the physic nut Jatropha curcas, which is used as a raw material for biodiesel production. A peculiar characteristic of this species is its high phenotypic variability, a characteristic that makes identification difficult: P. torridus has been described as a new species eight times. Thus, to aid in identification, genetic characterization of this insect was performed. We verified that, due to the high genetic variability of P. torridus, several genetic patterns exist that result in the same phenotype. PMID:26600488

  17. High volume molecular genetic identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms using Genetic Bit Analysis Application to human genetic diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Boyce-Jacino, M.T.; Reynolds, J.; Nikiforov, T.

    1994-09-01

    The most common type of genetic disease-associated mutation is the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). Because most genetic diseases can be caused by multiple SNPs in the same gene, effective routine diagnosis of complex genetic diseases is dependent on a simple and reliable method of interrogating SNP sites. Molecular Tool`s solid phase assay capable of direct genotyping (single base sequencing) of SNP sites, Genetic Bit Analysis (GBA), involves hybridization-capture of a single-stranded PCR product to a sequence-specific, microtiter plate-bound oligonucleotide primer. The captured PCR product then acts as template for single-base extension of the capture primer across the polymorphic site, enabling direct determination of the base composition of the polymorphism through a simple colormetric assay. Genotyping in a high volume, semi-automated, processing system with a current capacity of 100 SNP interrogations per technician per day enables the screening of candidate mutations rapidly and cost-effectively, critically important to comprehensive genetic diagnosis. Using this gel-free technology, we have developed prototype diagnostic tests for CFTR and ApoE polymorphisms which enable direct sequencing of the polymorphic base at each site of interest. Routine clinical diagnosis of genetically complex diseases such as cystic fibrosis is dependent on this combination of robust biochemistry and simple format. Additionally, the ability to transfer the format and biochemistry to any disease gene of interest enables the broad application of this technology to clinical diagnostics, especially for genetically complex diseases.

  18. High genetic diversity and population structure in the endangered Canarian endemic Ruta oreojasme (Rutaceae).

    PubMed

    Meloni, Marilena; Reid, Andrea; Caujapé-Castells, Juli; Soto, Moisés; Fernández-Palacios, José María; Conti, Elena

    2015-10-01

    Insular species are expected to have low genetic diversity, for their populations are often small and isolated, and characterized by restricted gene flow and increased incidence of inbreeding. However, empirical results do not always match this expectation. For example, population genetic analyses of several Canarian endemics, based mainly on allozymes, show levels of genetic diversity exceptionally high for insular species. To investigate whether genetic variation in rare species endemic to Canary Islands is low, as predicted by theoretical expectations, or high, as documented in some previous studies, we analysed genetic diversity of the endangered Ruta oreojasme, a rare endemic of the island of Gran Canaria, using microsatellite markers, which are more variable than allozymes. Our analyses identified very high levels of genetic diversity (A = 7.625, P = 0.984, H o = 0.558, H e = 0.687) for R. oreojasme. Even though the distribution of the species is restricted to the South of Gran Canaria, only one population shows low genetic diversity, isolation and signs of a recent bottleneck/founder event. Some intrinsic characteristics of R. oreojasme (hermaphroditism, proterandry and polyploidy), the relative climatic stability of the Canarian archipelago during Quaternary glacials/interglacials, the size of most populations (thousands of individuals), its age, and the relative proximity of the archipelago to the mainland might have contributed to the high diversity that characterises this endemic. As expected, given the marked topographic complexity of Gran Canaria, we found marked genetic structure in R. oreojasme populations. Our results support the observation that Canarian endemics are characterised by unexpectedly high genetic diversity and provides important insights for potential applications to the conservation of R. oreojasme. PMID:26139026

  19. Application of Genetic Programming to High Energy Physics Event Selection

    E-print Network

    Link, J M; Anjos, J C; Bediaga, I; Castromonte, C; Göbel, C; Machado, A A; Magnin, J; Massafferri, A; De Miranda, J M; Pepe, I M; Polycarpo, E; Dos Reis, A C; Carrillo, S; Casimiro, E; Cuautle, E; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Uribe, C; Vázquez, F; Agostino, L; Cinquini, L; Cumalat, J P; O'Reilly, B; Segoni, I; Stenson, K; Butler, J N; Cheung, H W K; Chiodini, G; Gaines, I; Garbincius, P H; Garren, L A; Gottschalk, E; Kasper, P H; Kreymer, A E; Kutschke, R; Wang, M; Benussi, L; Bertani, M; Bianco, S; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Pacetti, S; Zallo, A; Reyes, M; Cawlfield, C; Kim, D Y; Rahimi, A; Wiss, J; Gardner, R; Kryemadhi, A; Chung, Y S; Kang, J S; Ko, B R; Kwak, J W; Lee, K B; Cho, K; Park, H; Alimonti, G; Barberis, S; Boschini, M; Cerutti, A; D'Angelo, P; Di Corato, M; Dini, P; Edera, L; Erba, S; Inzani, P; Leveraro, F; Malvezzi, S; Menasce, D; Mezzadri, M; Moroni, L; Pedrini, D; Pontoglio, C; Prelz, F; Rovere, M; Sala, S; Davenport, T F; Arena, V; Boca, G; Bonomi, G; Gianini, G; Liguori, G; Lopes-Pegna, D; Merlo, M M; Pantea, D; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Vitulo, P; Hernández, H; López, A M; Méndez, H; Paris, A; Quinones, J; Ramírez, J E; Zhang, Y; Wilson, J R; Handler, T; Mitchell, R; Engh, D; Hosack, M; Johns, W E; Luiggi, E; Moore, J E; Nehring, M; Sheldon, P D; Vaandering, E W; Webster, M; Sheaff, M

    2005-01-01

    We review genetic programming principles, their application to FOCUS data samples, and use the method to study the doubly Cabibbo suppressed decay D+ -> K+ pi+ pi- relative to its Cabibbo favored counterpart, D+ -> K- pi+ pi+. We find that this technique is able to improve upon more traditional analysis methods. To our knowledge, this is the first application of the genetic programming technique to High Energy Physics data.

  20. DNA Barcode Detects High Genetic Structure within Neotropical Bird Species

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Erika Sendra; Gonçalves, Priscila; Miyaki, Cristina Yumi; Baker, Allan J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Towards lower latitudes the number of recognized species is not only higher, but also phylogeographic subdivision within species is more pronounced. Moreover, new genetically isolated populations are often described in recent phylogenies of Neotropical birds suggesting that the number of species in the region is underestimated. Previous COI barcoding of Argentinean bird species showed more complex patterns of regional divergence in the Neotropical than in the North American avifauna. Methods and Findings Here we analyzed 1,431 samples from 561 different species to extend the Neotropical bird barcode survey to lower latitudes, and detected even higher geographic structure within species than reported previously. About 93% (520) of the species were identified correctly from their DNA barcodes. The remaining 41 species were not monophyletic in their COI sequences because they shared barcode sequences with closely related species (N?=?21) or contained very divergent clusters suggestive of putative new species embedded within the gene tree (N?=?20). Deep intraspecific divergences overlapping with among-species differences were detected in 48 species, often with samples from large geographic areas and several including multiple subspecies. This strong population genetic structure often coincided with breaks between different ecoregions or areas of endemism. Conclusions The taxonomic uncertainty associated with the high incidence of non-monophyletic species and discovery of putative species obscures studies of historical patterns of species diversification in the Neotropical region. We showed that COI barcodes are a valuable tool to indicate which taxa would benefit from more extensive taxonomic revisions with multilocus approaches. Moreover, our results support hypotheses that the megadiversity of birds in the region is associated with multiple geographic processes starting well before the Quaternary and extending to more recent geological periods. PMID:22163311

  1. Multilocus Phylogenetics Show High Levels of Endemic Fusaria Inhabiting Sardinian Soils (Tyrrhenian Islands)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Mediterranean island of Sardinia is well known for high levels of vascular plant diversity and endemism, but little is known about its microbial diversity. Under the hypothesis that Fusarium species would show similar patterns, we estimated variability in Fusarium species composition among ten ...

  2. A Twin Study of ADHD Symptoms in Early Adolescence: Hyperactivity-Impulsivity and Inattentiveness Show Substantial Genetic Overlap but Also Genetic Specificity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greven, Corina U.; Rijsdijk, Fruhling V.; Plomin, Robert

    2011-01-01

    A previous paper in this journal revealed substantial genetic overlap between the ADHD dimensions of hyperactivity-impulsivity and inattentiveness in a sample of 8-year old twins drawn from a UK-representative population sample. Four years later, when the twins were 12 years old, more than 5,500 pairs drawn from the same sample were rated again on…

  3. Georgian and kurd mtDNA sequence analysis shows a lack of correlation between languages and female genetic lineages.

    PubMed

    Comas, D; Calafell, F; Bendukidze, N; Fañanás, L; Bertranpetit, J

    2000-05-01

    Mitochondrial DNA sequences from Georgians and Kurds were analyzed in order to test the possible correlation between female lineages and languages in these two neighboring West Eurasian groups. Mitochondrial sequence pools in both populations are very similar despite their different linguistic and prehistoric backgrounds. Both populations present mtDNA lineages that clearly belong to the European gene pool, as shown by 1) similar nucleotide and sequence diversities; 2) a large number of sequences shared with the rest of European samples; 3) nonsignificant genetic distances; and 4) classification of the present lineages into the major European mtDNA haplogroups already described. The outlier position of the populations from the Caucasus according to classical genetic markers is not recognized in the present Georgian mtDNA sequence pool. This result suggests that the differentiation of mtDNA sequences in West Eurasia and the outlier features of Caucasian populations should be attributed to different processes. Moreover, the putative linguistic relationship between Caucasian groups and the Basques, another outlier population within Europe for classical genetic markers, is not detected by the analysis of mtDNA sequences. PMID:10766939

  4. Genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maintaining genetic variation in wild populations of Arctic organisms is fundamental to the long-term persistence of high latitude biodiversity. Variability is important because it provides options for species to respond to changing environmental conditions and novel challenges such as emerging path...

  5. Genetic analysis shows low levels of hybridization between African wildcats (Felis silvestris lybica) and domestic cats (F. s. catus) in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Le Roux, Johannes J; Foxcroft, Llewellyn C; Herbst, Marna; MacFadyen, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Hybridization between domestic and wild animals is a major concern for biodiversity conservation, and as habitats become increasingly fragmented, conserving biodiversity at all levels, including genetic, becomes increasingly important. Except for tropical forests and true deserts, African wildcats occur across the African continent; however, almost no work has been carried out to assess its genetic status and extent of hybridization with domestic cats. For example, in South Africa it has been argued that the long-term viability of maintaining pure wildcat populations lies in large protected areas only, isolated from human populations. Two of the largest protected areas in Africa, the Kgalagadi Transfrontier and Kruger National Parks, as well as the size of South Africa and range of landscape uses, provide a model situation to assess how habitat fragmentation and heterogeneity influences the genetic purity of African wildcats. Using population genetic and home range data, we examined the genetic purity of African wildcats and their suspected hybrids across South Africa, including areas within and outside of protected areas. Overall, we found African wildcat populations to be genetically relatively pure, but instances of hybridization and a significant relationship between the genetic distinctiveness (purity) of wildcats and human population pressure were evident. The genetically purest African wildcats were found in the Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park, while samples from around Kruger National Park showed cause for concern, especially combined with the substantial human population density along the park's boundary. While African wildcat populations in South Africa generally appear to be genetically pure, with low levels of hybridization, our genetic data do suggest that protected areas may play an important role in maintaining genetic purity by reducing the likelihood of contact with domestic cats. We suggest that approaches such as corridors between protected areas are unlikely to remain effective for wildcat conservation, as the proximity to human settlements around these areas is projected to increase the wild/domestic animal interface. Thus, large, isolated protected areas will become increasingly important for wildcat conservation and efforts need to be made to prevent introduction of domestic cats into these areas. PMID:25691958

  6. Student Understanding in a High School Genetics Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Susan

    1997-01-01

    Relates activities implemented in a high school genetics course that enable students to experience "science in the making" (Latour, 1987). Students work in research groups, build explanatory models of observed natural phenomena, present models at class conferences, revise models based on peer feedback or new observational information, and win…

  7. Efficient micropropagation and assessment of genetic fidelity of Boerhaavia diffusa L- High trade medicinal plant.

    PubMed

    Patil, Kapil S; Bhalsing, Sanjivani R

    2015-07-01

    Boerhaavia diffusa L is a medicinal herb with immense pharmaceutical significance. The plant is used by many herbalist, Ayurvedic and pharmaceutical industries for production biopharmaceuticals. It is among the 46 medicinal plant species in high trade sourced mainly from wastelands and generally found in temperate regions of the world. However, the commercial bulk of this plant shows genetic variations which are the main constraint to use this plant as medicinal ingredient and to obtain high value products of pharmaceutical interest from this plant. In this study, we have regenerated the plant of Boerhaavia diffusa L through nodal explants and evaluated genetic fidelity of the micropropagated plants of Boerhaavia diffusa L with the help of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers. The results obtained using RAPD showed monomorphic banding pattern revealing genetic stability among the mother plant and in vitro regenerated plants of Boerhaavia diffusa L. PMID:26261407

  8. European Invasion of North American Pinus strobus at Large and Fine Scales: High Genetic Diversity and Fine-Scale Genetic Clustering over Time in the Adventive Range

    PubMed Central

    Mandák, Bohumil; Hadincová, V?roslava; Mahelka, Václav; Wildová, Radka

    2013-01-01

    Background North American Pinus strobus is a highly invasive tree species in Central Europe. Using ten polymorphic microsatellite loci we compared various aspects of the large-scale genetic diversity of individuals from 30 sites in the native distribution range with those from 30 sites in the European adventive distribution range. To investigate the ascertained pattern of genetic diversity of this intercontinental comparison further, we surveyed fine-scale genetic diversity patterns and changes over time within four highly invasive populations in the adventive range. Results Our data show that at the large scale the genetic diversity found within the relatively small adventive range in Central Europe, surprisingly, equals the diversity found within the sampled area in the native range, which is about thirty times larger. Bayesian assignment grouped individuals into two genetic clusters separating North American native populations from the European, non-native populations, without any strong genetic structure shown over either range. In the case of the fine scale, our comparison of genetic diversity parameters among the localities and age classes yielded no evidence of genetic diversity increase over time. We found that SGS differed across age classes within the populations under study. Old trees in general completely lacked any SGS, which increased over time and reached its maximum in the sapling stage. Conclusions Based on (1) the absence of difference in genetic diversity between the native and adventive ranges, together with the lack of structure in the native range, and (2) the lack of any evidence of any temporal increase in genetic diversity at four highly invasive populations in the adventive range, we conclude that population amalgamation probably first happened in the native range, prior to introduction. In such case, there would have been no need for multiple introductions from previously isolated populations, but only several introductions from genetically diverse populations. PMID:23874648

  9. Genome-wide meta-analysis of observational studies shows common genetic variants associated with macronutrient intake1234

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Toshiko; Ngwa, Julius S; van Rooij, Frank JA; Zillikens, M Carola; Wojczynski, Mary K; Frazier-Wood, Alexis C; Houston, Denise K; Kanoni, Stavroula; Lemaitre, Rozenn N; Luan, Jian'an; Mikkilä, Vera; Renstrom, Frida; Sonestedt, Emily; Zhao, Jing Hua; Chu, Audrey Y; Qi, Lu; Chasman, Daniel I; de Oliveira Otto, Marcia C; Dhurandhar, Emily J; Feitosa, Mary F; Johansson, Ingegerd; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Lohman, Kurt K; Manichaikul, Ani; McKeown, Nicola M; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Singleton, Andrew; Stirrups, Kathleen; Viikari, Jorma; Ye, Zheng; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barroso, Inês; Deloukas, Panos; Forouhi, Nita G; Hofman, Albert; Liu, Yongmei; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; North, Kari E; Dimitriou, Maria; Hallmans, Goran; Kähönen, Mika; Langenberg, Claudia; Ordovas, Jose M; Uitterlinden, André G; Hu, Frank B; Kalafati, Ioanna-Panagiota; Raitakari, Olli; Franco, Oscar H; Johnson, Andrew; Emilsson, Valur; Schrack, Jennifer A; Semba, Richard D; Siscovick, David S; Arnett, Donna K; Borecki, Ingrid B; Franks, Paul W; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Lehtimäki, Terho; Loos, Ruth JF; Orho-Melander, Marju; Rotter, Jerome I; Wareham, Nicholas J; Witteman, Jacqueline CM; Ferrucci, Luigi; Dedoussis, George; Cupples, L Adrienne; Nettleton, Jennifer A

    2013-01-01

    Background: Macronutrient intake varies substantially between individuals, and there is evidence that this variation is partly accounted for by genetic variants. Objective: The objective of the study was to identify common genetic variants that are associated with macronutrient intake. Design: We performed 2-stage genome-wide association (GWA) meta-analysis of macronutrient intake in populations of European descent. Macronutrients were assessed by using food-frequency questionnaires and analyzed as percentages of total energy consumption from total fat, protein, and carbohydrate. From the discovery GWA (n = 38,360), 35 independent loci associated with macronutrient intake at P < 5 × 10?6 were identified and taken forward to replication in 3 additional cohorts (n = 33,533) from the DietGen Consortium. For one locus, fat mass obesity-associated protein (FTO), cohorts with Illumina MetaboChip genotype data (n = 7724) provided additional replication data. Results: A variant in the chromosome 19 locus (rs838145) was associated with higher carbohydrate (? ± SE: 0.25 ± 0.04%; P = 1.68 × 10?8) and lower fat (? ± SE: ?0.21 ± 0.04%; P = 1.57 × 10?9) consumption. A candidate gene in this region, fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), encodes a fibroblast growth factor involved in glucose and lipid metabolism. The variants in this locus were associated with circulating FGF21 protein concentrations (P < 0.05) but not mRNA concentrations in blood or brain. The body mass index (BMI)–increasing allele of the FTO variant (rs1421085) was associated with higher protein intake (? ± SE: 0.10 ± 0.02%; P = 9.96 × 10?10), independent of BMI (after adjustment for BMI, ? ± SE: 0.08 ± 0.02%; P = 3.15 × 10?7). Conclusion: Our results indicate that variants in genes involved in nutrient metabolism and obesity are associated with macronutrient consumption in humans. Trials related to this study were registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00005131 (Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities), NCT00005133 (Cardiovascular Health Study), NCT00005136 (Family Heart Study), NCT00005121 (Framingham Heart Study), NCT00083369 (Genetic and Environmental Determinants of Triglycerides), NCT01331512 (InCHIANTI Study), and NCT00005487 (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis). PMID:23636237

  10. Facial emotion perception differs in young persons at genetic and clinical high-risk for psychosis.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Christian G; Richard, Jan A; Brensinger, Colleen M; Borgmann-Winter, Karin E; Conroy, Catherine G; Moberg, Paul J; Gur, Ruben C; Gur, Raquel E; Calkins, Monica E

    2014-05-15

    A large body of literature has documented facial emotion perception impairments in schizophrenia. More recently, emotion perception has been investigated in persons at genetic and clinical high-risk for psychosis. This study compared emotion perception abilities in groups of young persons with schizophrenia, clinical high-risk, genetic risk and healthy controls. Groups, ages 13-25, included 24 persons at clinical high-risk, 52 first-degree relatives at genetic risk, 91 persons with schizophrenia and 90 low risk persons who completed computerized testing of emotion recognition and differentiation. Groups differed by overall emotion recognition abilities and recognition of happy, sad, anger and fear expressions. Pairwise comparisons revealed comparable impairments in recognition of happy, angry, and fearful expressions for persons at clinical high-risk and schizophrenia, while genetic risk participants were less impaired, showing reduced recognition of fearful expressions. Groups also differed for differentiation of happy and sad expressions, but differences were mainly between schizophrenia and control groups. Emotion perception impairments are observable in young persons at-risk for psychosis. Preliminary results with clinical high-risk participants, when considered along findings in genetic risk relatives, suggest social cognition abilities to reflect pathophysiological processes involved in risk of schizophrenia. PMID:24582775

  11. Spatial Heterogeneity as a Genetic Mixing Mechanism in Highly Philopatric Colonial Seabirds

    PubMed Central

    Cristofari, Robin; Trucchi, Emiliano; Whittington, Jason D.; Vigetta, Stéphanie; Gachot-Neveu, Hélène; Stenseth, Nils Christian; Le Maho, Yvon; Le Bohec, Céline

    2015-01-01

    How genetic diversity is maintained in philopatric colonial systems remains unclear, and understanding the dynamic balance of philopatry and dispersal at all spatial scales is essential to the study of the evolution of coloniality. In the King penguin, Aptenodytes patagonicus, return rates of post-fledging chicks to their natal sub-colony are remarkably high. Empirical studies have shown that adults return year after year to their previous breeding territories within a radius of a few meters. Yet, little reliable data are available on intra- and inter-colonial dispersal in this species. Here, we present the first fine-scale study of the genetic structure in a king penguin colony in the Crozet Archipelago. Samples were collected from individual chicks and analysed at 8 microsatellite loci. Precise geolocation data of hatching sites and selective pressures associated with habitat features were recorded for all sampling locations. We found that despite strong natal and breeding site fidelity, king penguins retain a high degree of panmixia and genetic diversity. Yet, genetic structure appears markedly heterogeneous across the colony, with higher-than-expected inbreeding levels, and local inbreeding and relatedness hotspots that overlap predicted higher-quality nesting locations. This points towards heterogeneous population structure at the sub-colony level, in which fine-scale environmental features drive local philopatric behaviour, while lower-quality patches may act as genetic mixing mechanisms at the colony level. These findings show how a lack of global genetic structuring can emerge from small-scale heterogeneity in ecological parameters, as opposed to the classical model of homogeneous dispersal. Our results also emphasize the importance of sampling design for estimation of population parameters in colonial seabirds, as at high spatial resolution, basic genetic features are shown to be location-dependent. Finally, this study stresses the importance of understanding intra-colonial dispersal and genetic mixing mechanisms in order to better estimate species-wide gene flows and population dynamics. PMID:25680103

  12. Spatial heterogeneity as a genetic mixing mechanism in highly philopatric colonial seabirds.

    PubMed

    Cristofari, Robin; Trucchi, Emiliano; Whittington, Jason D; Vigetta, Stéphanie; Gachot-Neveu, Hélène; Stenseth, Nils Christian; Le Maho, Yvon; Le Bohec, Céline

    2015-01-01

    How genetic diversity is maintained in philopatric colonial systems remains unclear, and understanding the dynamic balance of philopatry and dispersal at all spatial scales is essential to the study of the evolution of coloniality. In the King penguin, Aptenodytes patagonicus, return rates of post-fledging chicks to their natal sub-colony are remarkably high. Empirical studies have shown that adults return year after year to their previous breeding territories within a radius of a few meters. Yet, little reliable data are available on intra- and inter-colonial dispersal in this species. Here, we present the first fine-scale study of the genetic structure in a king penguin colony in the Crozet Archipelago. Samples were collected from individual chicks and analysed at 8 microsatellite loci. Precise geolocation data of hatching sites and selective pressures associated with habitat features were recorded for all sampling locations. We found that despite strong natal and breeding site fidelity, king penguins retain a high degree of panmixia and genetic diversity. Yet, genetic structure appears markedly heterogeneous across the colony, with higher-than-expected inbreeding levels, and local inbreeding and relatedness hotspots that overlap predicted higher-quality nesting locations. This points towards heterogeneous population structure at the sub-colony level, in which fine-scale environmental features drive local philopatric behaviour, while lower-quality patches may act as genetic mixing mechanisms at the colony level. These findings show how a lack of global genetic structuring can emerge from small-scale heterogeneity in ecological parameters, as opposed to the classical model of homogeneous dispersal. Our results also emphasize the importance of sampling design for estimation of population parameters in colonial seabirds, as at high spatial resolution, basic genetic features are shown to be location-dependent. Finally, this study stresses the importance of understanding intra-colonial dispersal and genetic mixing mechanisms in order to better estimate species-wide gene flows and population dynamics. PMID:25680103

  13. Disproportionate Cochlear Length in Genus Homo Shows a High Phylogenetic Signal during Apes’ Hearing Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Braga, J.; Loubes, J-M.; Descouens, D.; Dumoncel, J.; Thackeray, J. F.; Kahn, J-L.; de Beer, F.; Riberon, A.; Hoffman, K.; Balaresque, P.; Gilissen, E.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in lifestyles and body weight affected mammal life-history evolution but little is known about how they shaped species’ sensory systems. Since auditory sensitivity impacts communication tasks and environmental acoustic awareness, it may have represented a deciding factor during mammal evolution, including apes. Here, we statistically measure the influence of phylogeny and allometry on the variation of five cochlear morphological features associated with hearing capacities across 22 living and 5 fossil catarrhine species. We find high phylogenetic signals for absolute and relative cochlear length only. Comparisons between fossil cochleae and reconstructed ape ancestral morphotypes show that Australopithecus absolute and relative cochlear lengths are explicable by phylogeny and concordant with the hypothetized ((Pan,Homo),Gorilla) and (Pan,Homo) most recent common ancestors. Conversely, deviations of the Paranthropus oval window area from these most recent common ancestors are not explicable by phylogeny and body weight alone, but suggest instead rapid evolutionary changes (directional selection) of its hearing organ. Premodern (Homo erectus) and modern human cochleae set apart from living non-human catarrhines and australopiths. They show cochlear relative lengths and oval window areas larger than expected for their body mass, two features corresponding to increased low-frequency sensitivity more recent than 2 million years ago. The uniqueness of the “hypertrophied” cochlea in the genus Homo (as opposed to the australopiths) and the significantly high phylogenetic signal of this organ among apes indicate its usefulness to identify homologies and monophyletic groups in the hominid fossil record. PMID:26083484

  14. Disproportionate Cochlear Length in Genus Homo Shows a High Phylogenetic Signal during Apes' Hearing Evolution.

    PubMed

    Braga, J; Loubes, J-M; Descouens, D; Dumoncel, J; Thackeray, J F; Kahn, J-L; de Beer, F; Riberon, A; Hoffman, K; Balaresque, P; Gilissen, E

    2015-01-01

    Changes in lifestyles and body weight affected mammal life-history evolution but little is known about how they shaped species' sensory systems. Since auditory sensitivity impacts communication tasks and environmental acoustic awareness, it may have represented a deciding factor during mammal evolution, including apes. Here, we statistically measure the influence of phylogeny and allometry on the variation of five cochlear morphological features associated with hearing capacities across 22 living and 5 fossil catarrhine species. We find high phylogenetic signals for absolute and relative cochlear length only. Comparisons between fossil cochleae and reconstructed ape ancestral morphotypes show that Australopithecus absolute and relative cochlear lengths are explicable by phylogeny and concordant with the hypothetized ((Pan,Homo),Gorilla) and (Pan,Homo) most recent common ancestors. Conversely, deviations of the Paranthropus oval window area from these most recent common ancestors are not explicable by phylogeny and body weight alone, but suggest instead rapid evolutionary changes (directional selection) of its hearing organ. Premodern (Homo erectus) and modern human cochleae set apart from living non-human catarrhines and australopiths. They show cochlear relative lengths and oval window areas larger than expected for their body mass, two features corresponding to increased low-frequency sensitivity more recent than 2 million years ago. The uniqueness of the "hypertrophied" cochlea in the genus Homo (as opposed to the australopiths) and the significantly high phylogenetic signal of this organ among apes indicate its usefulness to identify homologies and monophyletic groups in the hominid fossil record. PMID:26083484

  15. Pinus pinaster seedlings and their fungal symbionts show high plasticity in phosphorus acquisition in acidic soils.

    PubMed

    Ali, M A; Louche, J; Legname, E; Duchemin, M; Plassard, C

    2009-12-01

    Young seedlings of maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Soland in Aït.) were grown in rhizoboxes using intact spodosol soil samples from the southwest of France, in Landes of Gascogne, presenting a large variation of phosphorus (P) availability. Soils were collected from a 93-year-old unfertilized stand and a 13-year-old P. pinaster stand with regular annual fertilization of either only P or P and nitrogen (N). After 6 months of culture in controlled conditions, different morphotypes of ectomycorrhiza (ECM) were used for the measurements of acid phosphatase activity and molecular identification of fungal species using amplification of the ITS region. Total biomass, N and P contents were measured in roots and shoots of plants. Bicarbonate- and NaOH-available inorganic P (Pi), organic P (Po) and ergosterol concentrations were measured in bulk and rhizosphere soil. The results showed that bulk soil from the 93-year-old forest stand presented the highest Po levels, but relatively higher bicarbonate-extractable Pi levels compared to 13-year-old unfertilized stand. Fertilizers significantly increased the concentrations of inorganic P fractions in bulk soil. Ergosterol contents in rhizosphere soil were increased by fertilizer application. The dominant fungal species was Rhizopogon luteolus forming 66.6% of analysed ECM tips. Acid phosphatase activity was highly variable and varied inversely with bicarbonate-extractable Pi levels in the rhizosphere soil. Total P or total N in plants was linearly correlated with total plant biomass, but the slope was steep only between total P and biomass in fertilized soil samples. In spite of high phosphatase activity in ECM tips, P availability remained a limiting nutrient in soil samples from unfertilized stands. Nevertheless young P. pinaster seedlings showed a high plasticity for biomass production at low P availability in soils. PMID:19840995

  16. Mannosylerythritol lipid, a yeast extracellular glycolipid, shows high binding affinity towards human immunoglobulin G

    PubMed Central

    Im, Jae Hong; Nakane, Takashi; Yanagishita, Hiroshi; Ikegami, Toru; Kitamoto, Dai

    2001-01-01

    Background There have been many attempts to develop new materials with stability and high affinity towards immunoglobulins. Some of glycolipids such as gangliosides exhibit a high affinity toward immunoglobulins. However, it is considerably difficult to develop these glycolipids into the practical separation ligand due to their limited amounts. We thus focused our attention on the feasible use of "mannosylerythritol lipid A", a yeast glycolipid biosurfactant, as an alternative ligand for immunoglobulins, and undertook the investigation on the binding between mannosylerythritol lipid A (MEL-A) and human immunoglobulin G (HIgG). Results In ELISA assay, MEL-A showed nearly the same binding affinity towards HIgG as that of bovine ganglioside GM1. Fab of human IgG was considered to play a more important role than Fc in the binding of HIgG by MEL-A. The bound amount of HIgG increased depending on the attached amount of MEL-A onto poly (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (polyHEMA) beads, whereas the amount of human serum albumin slightly decreased. Binding-amount and -selectivity of HIgG towards MEL-A were influenced by salt species, salt concentration and pH in the buffer solution. The composite of MEL-A and polyHEMA, exhibited a significant binding constant of 1.43 × 106 (M-1) for HIgG, which is approximately 4-fold greater than that of protein A reported. Conclusions MEL-A shows high binding-affinity towards HIgG, and this is considered to be due to "multivalent effect" based on the binding molar ratio. This is the first report on the binding of a natural human antibody towards a yeast glycolipid. PMID:11604104

  17. Biological Invasions: Paradox Lost and Paradise Gained A new study shows how an invasive snail species accrues elevated genetic

    E-print Network

    Hufbauer, Ruth A.

    Dispatches Biological Invasions: Paradox Lost and Paradise Gained A new study shows how an invasive human interference in animal and plant dispersal, biological invasions are wreaking havoc that can become economically and ecologically threatening. Recent studies of biological invasions, however

  18. Ghrelin O-acyltransferase knockout mice show resistance to obesity when fed high-sucrose diet.

    PubMed

    Kouno, Tetsuya; Akiyama, Nobuteru; Ito, Takahito; Okuda, Tomohiko; Nanchi, Isamu; Notoya, Mitsuru; Oka, Shogo; Yukioka, Hideo

    2016-02-01

    Ghrelin is an appetite-stimulating hormone secreted from stomach. Since the discovery that acylation of the serine-3 residue by ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) is essential for exerting its functions, GOAT has been regarded as an therapeutic target for attenuating appetite, and thus for the treatment of obesity and diabetes. However, contrary to the expectations, GOAT-knockout (KO) mice have not shown meaningful body weight reduction, under high-fat diet. Here, in this study, we sought to determine whether GOAT has a role in body weight regulation and glucose metabolism with a focus on dietary sucrose, because macronutrient composition of diet is important for appetite regulation. We found that peripherally administered acylated-ghrelin, but not unacylated one, stimulated sucrose consumption in a two-bottle-drinking test. The role of acylated-ghrelin in sucrose preference was further supported by the finding that GOAT KO mice consumed less sucrose solution compared with WT littermates. Then, we investigated the effect of dietary composition of sucrose on food intake and body weight in GOAT KO and WT mice. As a result, when fed on high-fat diet, food intake and body weight were similar between GOAT KO and WT mice. However, when fed on high-fat, high-sucrose diet, GOAT KO mice showed significantly reduced food intake and marked resistance to obesity, leading to amelioration of glucose metabolism. These results suggest that blockade of acylated-ghrelin production offers therapeutic potential for obesity and metabolic disorders caused by overeating of palatable food. PMID:26645250

  19. Assessment of first and second degree relatives of individuals with bipolar disorder shows increased genetic risk scores in both affected relatives and young At-Risk Individuals.

    PubMed

    Fullerton, Janice M; Koller, Daniel L; Edenberg, Howard J; Foroud, Tatiana; Liu, Hai; Glowinski, Anne L; McInnis, Melvin G; Wilcox, Holly C; Frankland, Andrew; Roberts, Gloria; Schofield, Peter R; Mitchell, Philip B; Nurnberger, John I

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies have revealed the polygenic nature of bipolar disorder (BP), and identified common risk variants associated with illness. However, the role of common polygenic risk in multiplex families has not previously been examined. The present study examined 249 European-ancestry families from the NIMH Genetics Initiative sample, comparing subjects with narrowly defined BP (excluding bipolar II and recurrent unipolar depression; n = 601) and their adult relatives without BP (n = 695). Unrelated adult controls (n = 266) were from the NIMH TGEN control dataset. We also examined a prospective cohort of young (12-30 years) offspring and siblings of individuals with BPI and BPII disorder (at risk; n = 367) and psychiatrically screened controls (n = 229), ascertained from five sites in the US and Australia and assessed with standardized clinical protocols. Thirty-two disease-associated SNPs from the PGC-BP Working Group report (2011) were genotyped and additive polygenic risk scores (PRS) derived. We show increased PRS in adult cases compared to unrelated controls (P = 3.4 × 10(-5) , AUC = 0.60). In families with a high-polygenic load (PRS score ?32 in two or more subjects), PRS distinguished cases with BPI/SAB from other relatives (P = 0.014, RR = 1.32). Secondly, a higher PRS was observed in at-risk youth, regardless of affected status, compared to unrelated controls (GEE-?(2) = 5.15, P = 0.012). This report is the first to explore common polygenic risk in multiplex families, albeit using only a small number of robustly associated risk variants. We show that individuals with BP have a higher load of common disease-associated variants than unrelated controls and first-degree relatives, and illustrate the potential utility of PRS assessment in a family context. PMID:26178159

  20. Male and female secondary sexual traits show different patterns of quantitative genetic and environmental variation in the horned beetle Onthophagus sagittarius.

    PubMed

    Watson, N L; Simmons, L W

    2010-11-01

    The expression of secondary sexual traits in females has often been attributed to a correlated response to selection on male traits. In rare cases, females have secondary sexual traits that are not homologous structures to secondary sexual traits in males and are thus less likely to have evolved in females because of correlated selection. In this study, we used the dung beetle Onthophagus sagittarius, a species with sex-specific horns, to examine the environmental and quantitative genetic control of horn expression in males and females. Offspring subjected to different brood mass manipulations (dung addition/removal) were found to differ significantly in body size. Brood mass manipulation also had a significant effect on the length of male horns; however, female horn length was found to be relatively impervious to the treatment, showing stronger patterns of additive genetic variance than males. We found no correlations between horn expression in males and females. We therefore conclude that the horns of O. sagittarius females are unlikely to result from genetic correlations between males and females. Rather, our data suggest that they may be under independent genetic control. PMID:20831732

  1. High yielding biomass genotypes of willow (Salix spp.) show differences in below ground biomass allocation

    PubMed Central

    Cunniff, Jennifer; Purdy, Sarah J.; Barraclough, Tim J.P.; Castle, March; Maddison, Anne L.; Jones, Laurence E.; Shield, Ian F.; Gregory, Andrew S.; Karp, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Willows (Salix spp.) grown as short rotation coppice (SRC) are viewed as a sustainable source of biomass with a positive greenhouse gas (GHG) balance due to their potential to fix and accumulate carbon (C) below ground. However, exploiting this potential has been limited by the paucity of data available on below ground biomass allocation and the extent to which it varies between genotypes. Furthermore, it is likely that allocation can be altered considerably by environment. To investigate the role of genotype and environment on allocation, four willow genotypes were grown at two replicated field sites in southeast England and west Wales, UK. Above and below ground biomass was intensively measured over two two-year rotations. Significant genotypic differences in biomass allocation were identified, with below ground allocation differing by up to 10% between genotypes. Importantly, the genotype with the highest below ground biomass also had the highest above ground yield. Furthermore, leaf area was found to be a good predictor of below ground biomass. Growth environment significantly impacted allocation; the willow genotypes grown in west Wales had up to 94% more biomass below ground by the end of the second rotation. A single investigation into fine roots showed the same pattern with double the volume of fine roots present. This greater below ground allocation may be attributed primarily to higher wind speeds, plus differences in humidity and soil characteristics. These results demonstrate that the capacity exists to breed plants with both high yields and high potential for C accumulation. PMID:26339128

  2. Chromosome painting shows that skunks (Mephitidae, Carnivora) have highly rearranged karyotypes.

    PubMed

    Perelman, P L; Graphodatsky, A S; Dragoo, J W; Serdyukova, N A; Stone, G; Cavagna, P; Menotti, A; Nie, W; O'Brien, P C M; Wang, J; Burkett, S; Yuki, K; Roelke, M E; O'Brien, S J; Yang, F; Stanyon, R

    2008-01-01

    The karyotypic relationships of skunks (Mephitidae) with other major clades of carnivores are not yet established. Here, multi-directional chromosome painting was used to reveal the karyological relationships among skunks and between Mephitidae (skunks) and Procyonidae (raccoons). Representative species from three genera of Mephitidae (Mephitis mephitis, 2n = 50; Mephitis macroura, 2n = 50; Conepatus leuconotus, 2n = 46; Spilogale gracilis, 2n = 60) and one species of Procyonidae (Procyon lotor, 2n = 38) were studied. Chromosomal homology was mapped by hybridization of five sets of whole-chromosome paints derived from stone marten (Martes foina, 2n = 38), cat, skunks (M. mephitis; M. macroura) and human. The karyotype of the raccoon is highly conserved and identical to the hypothetical ancestral musteloid karyotype, suggesting that procyonids have a particular importance for establishing the karyological evolution within the caniforms. Ten fission events and five fusion events are necessary to generate the ancestral skunk karyotype from the ancestral carnivore karyotype. Our results show that Mephitidae joins Canidae and Ursidae as the third family of carnivores that are characterized by a high rate of karyotype evolution. Shared derived chromosomal fusion of stone marten chromosomes 6 and 14 phylogenetically links the American hog-nosed skunk and eastern spotted skunk. PMID:19051045

  3. A novel lectin from Agrocybe aegerita shows high binding selectivity for terminal N-acetylglucosamine.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shuai; Chen, Yijie; Wang, Man; Yin, Yalin; Pan, Yongfu; Gu, Bianli; Yu, Guojun; Li, Yamu; Wong, Barry Hon Cheung; Liang, Yi; Sun, Hui

    2012-04-15

    A novel lectin was isolated from the mushroom Agrocybe aegerita (designated AAL-2) by affinity chromatography with GlcNAc (N-acetylglucosamine)-coupled Sepharose 6B after ammonium sulfate precipitation. The AAL-2 coding sequence (1224 bp) was identified by performing a homologous search of the five tryptic peptides identified by MS against the translated transcriptome of A. aegerita. The molecular mass of AAL-2 was calculated to be 43.175 kDa from MS, which was consistent with the data calculated from the amino acid sequence. To analyse the carbohydrate-binding properties of AAL-2, a glycan array composed of 465 glycan candidates was employed, and the result showed that AAL-2 bound with high selectivity to terminal non-reducing GlcNAc residues, and further analysis revealed that AAL-2 bound to terminal non-reducing GlcNAc residues with higher affinity than previously well-known GlcNAc-binding lectins such as WGA (wheatgerm agglutinin) and GSL-II (Griffonia simplicifolia lectin-II). ITC (isothermal titration calorimetry) showed further that GlcNAc bound to AAL-2 in a sequential manner with moderate affinity. In the present study, we also evaluated the anti-tumour activity of AAL-2. The results showed that AAL-2 could bind to the surface of hepatoma cells, leading to induced cell apoptosis in vitro. Furthermore, AAL-2 exerted an anti-hepatoma effect via inhibition of tumour growth and prolongation of survival time of tumour-bearing mice in vivo. PMID:22268569

  4. Culturable associated-bacteria of the sponge Theonella swinhoei show tolerance to high arsenic concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Keren, Ray; Lavy, Adi; Mayzel, Boaz; Ilan, Micha

    2015-01-01

    Sponges are potent filter feeders and as such are exposed to high fluxes of toxic trace elements, which can accumulate in their body over time. Such is the case of the Red Sea sponge Theonella swinhoei, which has been shown to accumulate up to 8500 mg/Kg of the highly toxicelement arsenic. T. swinhoei is known to harbor a multitude of sponge-associated bacteria, so it is hypothesized that the associated-bacteria will be tolerant to high arsenic concentration. This study also investigates the fate of the arsenic accumulated in the sponge to test if the associated-bacteria have an important role in the arsenic accumulation process of their host, since bacteria are key players in the natural arsenic cycle. Separation of the sponge to sponge cells and bacteria enriched fractions showed that arsenic is accumulated by the bacteria. Sponge-associated, arsenic-tolerant bacteria were cultured in the presence of 5 mM of either arsenate or arsenite (equivalent to 6150 mg/Kg arsenic, dry weight). The 54 isolated bacteria were grouped to 15 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and isolates belonging to 12 OTUs were assessed for tolerance to arsenate at increased concentrations up to 100 mM. Eight of the 12 OTUs tolerated an order of magnitude increase in the concentration of arsenate, and some exhibited external biomineralization of arsenic–magnesium salts. The biomineralization of this unique mineral was directly observed in bacteria for the first time. These results may provide an explanation for the ability of the sponge to accumulate considerable amounts of arsenic. Furthermore arsenic-mineralizing bacteria can potentially be used for the study of bioremediation, as arsenic toxicity affects millions of people worldwide. PMID:25762993

  5. High-throughput oncogene mutation profiling shows demographic differences in BRAF mutation rates among melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    van den Hurk, Karin; Balint, Balazs; Toomey, Sinead; O'Leary, Patrick C; Unwin, Louise; Sheahan, Kieran; McDermott, Enda W; Murphy, Ian; van den Oord, Joost J; Rafferty, Mairin; FitzGerald, Dara M; Moran, Julie; Cummins, Robert; MacEneaney, Owen; Kay, Elaine W; O'Brien, Cathal P; Finn, Stephen P; Heffron, Cynthia C B B; Murphy, Michelle; Yela, Ruben; Power, Derek G; Regan, Padraic J; McDermott, Clodagh M; O'Keeffe, Allan; Orosz, Zsolt; Donnellan, Paul P; Crown, John P; Hennessy, Bryan T; Gallagher, William M

    2015-06-01

    Because of advances in targeted therapies, the clinical evaluation of cutaneous melanoma is increasingly based on a combination of traditional histopathology and molecular pathology. Therefore, it is necessary to expand our knowledge of the molecular events that accompany the development and progression of melanoma to optimize clinical management. The central objective of this study was to increase our knowledge of the mutational events that complement melanoma progression. High-throughput genotyping was adapted to query 159 known single nucleotide mutations in 33 cancer-related genes across two melanoma cohorts from Ireland (n=94) and Belgium (n=60). Results were correlated with various clinicopathological characteristics. A total of 23 mutations in 12 genes were identified, that is--BRAF, NRAS, MET, PHLPP2, PIK3R1, IDH1, KIT, STK11, CTNNB1, JAK2, ALK, and GNAS. Unexpectedly, we discovered significant differences in BRAF, MET, and PIK3R1 mutations between the cohorts. That is, cases from Ireland showed significantly lower (P<0.001) BRAF mutation rates (19%) compared with the mutation frequency observed in Belgian patients (43%). Moreover, MET mutations were detected in 12% of Irish cases, whereas none of the Belgian patients harbored these mutations, and Irish patients significantly more often (P=0.027) had PIK3R1-mutant (33%) melanoma versus 17% of Belgian cases. The low incidence of BRAF-mutant melanoma among Irish patients was confirmed in five independent Irish cohorts, and in total, only 165 of 689 (24%) Irish cases carried mutant BRAF. Together, our data show that melanoma-driving mutations vary by demographic area, which has important implications for the clinical management of this disease. PMID:25746038

  6. High pressure spray with water shows similar efficiency to trimming in controlling microorganisms on poultry carcasses.

    PubMed

    Giombelli, Audecir; Hammerschmitt, Dandara; Cerutti, Marisete F; Chiarini, Eb; Landgraf, Mariza; Franco, Bernardete D G M; Destro, Maria T

    2015-10-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate a high pressure spray (HPS) with water as an alternative to trimming to remove gastrointestinal contamination on poultry carcasses and improve microbiological quality. The study was conducted under commercial conditions in 5 slaughter plants with one plant presenting approximately 5% of carcasses with visible gastrointestinal contamination (VGC), and the others showing approximately 12% of VGC. In all 5 plants, carcasses were sampled from the slaughter line and separated into 6 groups corresponding to 3 different treatments: A) carcasses with VGC before and after trimming; B) carcasses with VGC before and after HPS; and C) carcasses with no VGC before and after HPS. At the end of Trial A and prior to Trials B and C, an HPS equipment was installed before the end of the slaughter line. The HPS equipment was operated with 10 kgf/cm² of pressure and 1.5 L of potable water per carcass. Carcasses were analyzed using a rinsing procedure, and the following microbiological parameters were evaluated: the prevalence of Salmonella and Campylobacter, the abundance of Escherichia coli (EC), Enterobacteriaceae (EB), and the Total Viable Count (TVC). Salmonella was found in all plants at a prevalence ranging from 0.8% (plant 1) to 17.3% (plant 5), and the difference between plants was significant (P < 0.05%). The prevalence of Campylobacter ranged from 2.1 (plant 1) to 18.6% (plant 4) (P < 0.05%). The prevalence of Campylobacter was similar in plants 2, 3, and 5, and a significant difference (P < 0.05%) was observed compared to plants 1 and 4. In all plants, the EC, EB, and TVC counts did not show a significant difference (P > 0.05%) in any treatments. These results demonstrate that HPS with water is an alternative method for removing VGC and improving or maintaining the microbiological quality and safety of broiler carcasses. PMID:26286999

  7. Interdisciplinarity, Debate And Movie Clips As Highly Motivating Factors In Live Shows - Five Years Of Success

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stengler, E.; Sirera, J. M.

    2011-09-01

    A live show on any subject that includes experiments and continuous interaction with the audience is a well known approach for EPO activities that many are carrying out all over. We present such an initiative with some added ingredients such as interdisciplinarity, the use of movie clips, and especially the debate between the two presenters, a debate that is all the more attractive to the public if it not fully staged but closely represents their actual points of view. José Montesinos, from the "Orotava" Canarian Foundation for the History of Science, is and plays the role of the more mature math professor who has grown weary of the overrated value given in science to mathematics and its consequences. This poses a constant challenge to his colleague, Erik Stengler, from the Science Museum of Tenerife, the young down-to-earth hands-on scientist, who defends the usual view that science and technology are to be judged by their achievements, which have brought about the advancement of modern society. With this approach and as a collaboration between our institutions, we have produced and toured highly successful activities on: Einstein and Relativity (from 2005 to 2008, "Einstein Goes To School," including a theatre play); circularity, the number ?, forces of inertia and the Newtonian revolution (in 2008/2009, "The Tension Between Circularity and The Straight Line"); and the foundations of modern astronomy (in 2009/2010 "Kepler and Galileo, Messengers of the Stars"). Audiences were very varied - students, adult students, general public, prison inmates, teachers - and all appreciated the presentations as fun, thought-provoking and highly motivating, and valued especially the interdisciplinary character of the activity. Movie clips have shown to be especially useful to recover the attention of the young when they lose the thread due to the short attention spans they presently have.

  8. High and Distinct Range-Edge Genetic Diversity despite Local Bottlenecks

    PubMed Central

    Assis, Jorge; Castilho Coelho, Nelson; Alberto, Filipe; Valero, Myriam; Raimondi, Pete; Reed, Dan; Alvares Serrão, Ester

    2013-01-01

    The genetic consequences of living on the edge of distributional ranges have been the subject of a largely unresolved debate. Populations occurring along persistent low latitude ranges (rear-edge) are expected to retain high and unique genetic diversity. In contrast, currently less favourable environmental conditions limiting population size at such range-edges may have caused genetic erosion that prevails over past historical effects, with potential consequences on reducing future adaptive capacity. The present study provides an empirical test of whether population declines towards a peripheral range might be reflected on decreasing diversity and increasing population isolation and differentiation. We compare population genetic differentiation and diversity with trends in abundance along a latitudinal gradient towards the peripheral distribution range of Saccorhizapolyschides, a large brown seaweed that is the main structural species of kelp forests in SW Europe. Signatures of recent bottleneck events were also evaluated to determine whether the recently recorded distributional shifts had a negative influence on effective population size. Our findings show decreasing population density and increasing spatial fragmentation and local extinctions towards the southern edge. Genetic data revealed two well supported groups with a central contact zone. As predicted, higher differentiation and signs of bottlenecks were found at the southern edge region. However, a decrease in genetic diversity associated with this pattern was not verified. Surprisingly, genetic diversity increased towards the edge despite bottlenecks and much lower densities, suggesting that extinctions and recolonizations have not strongly reduced diversity or that diversity might have been even higher there in the past, a process of shifting genetic baselines. PMID:23967038

  9. High Risks of Losing Genetic Diversity in an Endemic Mauritian Gecko: Implications for Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Buckland, Steeves; Cole, Nik C.; Groombridge, Jim J.; Küpper, Clemens; Burke, Terry; Dawson, Deborah A.; Gallagher, Laura E.; Harris, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Genetic structure can be a consequence of recent population fragmentation and isolation, or a remnant of historical localised adaptation. This poses a challenge for conservationists since misinterpreting patterns of genetic structure may lead to inappropriate management. Of 17 species of reptile originally found in Mauritius, only five survive on the main island. One of these, Phelsuma guimbeaui (lowland forest day gecko), is now restricted to 30 small isolated subpopulations following severe forest fragmentation and isolation due to human colonisation. We used 20 microsatellites in ten subpopulations and two mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) markers in 13 subpopulations to: (i) assess genetic diversity, population structure and genetic differentiation of subpopulations; (ii) estimate effective population sizes and migration rates of subpopulations; and (iii) examine the phylogenetic relationships of haplotypes found in different subpopulations. Microsatellite data revealed significant population structure with high levels of genetic diversity and isolation by distance, substantial genetic differentiation and no migration between most subpopulations. MtDNA, however, showed no evidence of population structure, indicating that there was once a genetically panmictic population. Effective population sizes of ten subpopulations, based on microsatellite markers, were small, ranging from 44 to 167. Simulations suggested that the chance of survival and allelic diversity of some subpopulations will decrease dramatically over the next 50 years if no migration occurs. Our DNA-based evidence reveals an urgent need for a management plan for the conservation of P. guimbeaui. We identified 18 threatened and 12 viable subpopulations and discuss a range of management options that include translocation of threatened subpopulations to retain maximum allelic diversity, and habitat restoration and assisted migration to decrease genetic erosion and inbreeding for the viable subpopulations. PMID:24963708

  10. Genetics

    MedlinePLUS

    Homozygous; Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  11. High genetic load in an old isolated butterfly population.

    PubMed

    Mattila, Anniina L K; Duplouy, Anne; Kirjokangas, Malla; Lehtonen, Rainer; Rastas, Pasi; Hanski, Ilkka

    2012-09-11

    We investigated inbreeding depression and genetic load in a small (N(e) ? 100) population of the Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia), which has been completely isolated on a small island [Pikku Tytärsaari (PT)] in the Baltic Sea for at least 75 y. As a reference, we studied conspecific populations from the well-studied metapopulation in the Åland Islands (ÅL), 400 km away. A large population in Saaremaa, Estonia, was used as a reference for estimating genetic diversity and N(e). We investigated 58 traits related to behavior, development, morphology, reproductive performance, and metabolism. The PT population exhibited high genetic load (L = 1 - W(PT)/W(ÅL)) in a range of fitness-related traits including adult weight (L = 0.12), flight metabolic rate (L = 0.53), egg viability (L = 0.37), and lifetime production of eggs in an outdoor population cage (L = 0.70). These results imply extensive fixation of deleterious recessive mutations, supported by greatly reduced diversity in microsatellite markers and immediate recovery (heterosis) of egg viability and flight metabolic rate in crosses with other populations. There was no significant inbreeding depression in most traits due to one generation of full-sib mating. Resting metabolic rate was significantly elevated in PT males, which may be related to their short lifespan (L = 0.25). The demographic history and the effective size of the PT population place it in the part of the parameter space in which models predict mutation accumulation. This population exemplifies the increasingly common situation in fragmented landscapes, in which small and completely isolated populations are vulnerable to extinction due to high genetic load. PMID:22908265

  12. The Drosophila bag of marbles Gene Interacts Genetically with Wolbachia and Shows Female-Specific Effects of Divergence.

    PubMed

    Flores, Heather A; Bubnell, Jaclyn E; Aquadro, Charles F; Barbash, Daniel A

    2015-08-01

    Many reproductive proteins from diverse taxa evolve rapidly and adaptively. These proteins are typically involved in late stages of reproduction such as sperm development and fertilization, and are more often functional in males than females. Surprisingly, many germline stem cell (GSC) regulatory genes, which are essential for the earliest stages of reproduction, also evolve adaptively in Drosophila. One example is the bag of marbles (bam) gene, which is required for GSC differentiation and germline cyst development in females and for regulating mitotic divisions and entry to spermatocyte differentiation in males. Here we show that the extensive divergence of bam between Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans affects bam function in females but has no apparent effect in males. We further find that infection with Wolbachia pipientis, an endosymbiotic bacterium that can affect host reproduction through various mechanisms, partially suppresses female sterility caused by bam mutations in D. melanogaster and interacts differentially with bam orthologs from D. melanogaster and D. simulans. We propose that the adaptive evolution of bam has been driven at least in part by the long-term interactions between Drosophila species and Wolbachia. More generally, we suggest that microbial infections of the germline may explain the unexpected pattern of evolution of several GSC regulatory genes. PMID:26291077

  13. The Drosophila bag of marbles Gene Interacts Genetically with Wolbachia and Shows Female-Specific Effects of Divergence

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Heather A.; Bubnell, Jaclyn E.; Aquadro, Charles F.; Barbash, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Many reproductive proteins from diverse taxa evolve rapidly and adaptively. These proteins are typically involved in late stages of reproduction such as sperm development and fertilization, and are more often functional in males than females. Surprisingly, many germline stem cell (GSC) regulatory genes, which are essential for the earliest stages of reproduction, also evolve adaptively in Drosophila. One example is the bag of marbles (bam) gene, which is required for GSC differentiation and germline cyst development in females and for regulating mitotic divisions and entry to spermatocyte differentiation in males. Here we show that the extensive divergence of bam between Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans affects bam function in females but has no apparent effect in males. We further find that infection with Wolbachia pipientis, an endosymbiotic bacterium that can affect host reproduction through various mechanisms, partially suppresses female sterility caused by bam mutations in D. melanogaster and interacts differentially with bam orthologs from D. melanogaster and D. simulans. We propose that the adaptive evolution of bam has been driven at least in part by the long-term interactions between Drosophila species and Wolbachia. More generally, we suggest that microbial infections of the germline may explain the unexpected pattern of evolution of several GSC regulatory genes. PMID:26291077

  14. X-ray survival characteristics and genetic analysis for nine saccharomyces deletion mutants that show altered radiation sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Game, John C.; Williamson, Marsha S.; Baccari, Clelia

    2004-01-07

    The availability of a genome-wide set of Saccharomyces deletion mutants provides a chance to identify all the yeast genes involved in DNA repair. Using X-rays, we are screening these mutants to identify additional genes that show increased sensitivity to the lethal effects of ionizing radiation. For each mutant identified as sensitive, we are confirming that the sensitivity phenotype co-segregates with the deletion allele and are obtaining multipoint survival-versus-dose assays in at least two haploid and one homozygous diploid strains. We present data for deletion mutants involving the genes DOT1, MDM20, NAT3, SPT7, SPT20, GCN5, HFI1, DCC1 and VID21/EAF1, and discuss their potential roles in repair. Eight of these genes have a clear radiation-sensitive phenotype when deleted, but the ninth, GCN5, has at most a borderline phenotype. None of the deletions confer substantial sensitivity to ultra-violet radiation, although one or two may confer marginal sensitivity. The DOT1 gene is of interest because its only known function is to methylate one lysine residue in the core of the histone H3 protein. We find that histone H3 mutants (supplied by K. Struhl) in which this residue is replaced by other amino-acids are also X-ray sensitive, seeming to confirm that methylation of the lysine-79 residue is required for effective repair of radiation damage.

  15. A high fuel consumption efficiency management scheme for PHEVs using an adaptive genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wah Ching; Tsang, Kim Fung; Chi, Hao Ran; Hung, Faan Hei; Wu, Chung Kit; Chui, Kwok Tai; Lau, Wing Hong; Leung, Yat Wah

    2015-01-01

    A high fuel efficiency management scheme for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) has been developed. In order to achieve fuel consumption reduction, an adaptive genetic algorithm scheme has been designed to adaptively manage the energy resource usage. The objective function of the genetic algorithm is implemented by designing a fuzzy logic controller which closely monitors and resembles the driving conditions and environment of PHEVs, thus trading off between petrol versus electricity for optimal driving efficiency. Comparison between calculated results and publicized data shows that the achieved efficiency of the fuzzified genetic algorithm is better by 10% than existing schemes. The developed scheme, if fully adopted, would help reduce over 600 tons of CO2 emissions worldwide every day. PMID:25587974

  16. A High Fuel Consumption Efficiency Management Scheme for PHEVs Using an Adaptive Genetic Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wah Ching; Tsang, Kim Fung; Chi, Hao Ran; Hung, Faan Hei; Wu, Chung Kit; Chui, Kwok Tai; Lau, Wing Hong; Leung, Yat Wah

    2015-01-01

    A high fuel efficiency management scheme for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) has been developed. In order to achieve fuel consumption reduction, an adaptive genetic algorithm scheme has been designed to adaptively manage the energy resource usage. The objective function of the genetic algorithm is implemented by designing a fuzzy logic controller which closely monitors and resembles the driving conditions and environment of PHEVs, thus trading off between petrol versus electricity for optimal driving efficiency. Comparison between calculated results and publicized data shows that the achieved efficiency of the fuzzified genetic algorithm is better by 10% than existing schemes. The developed scheme, if fully adopted, would help reduce over 600 tons of CO2 emissions worldwide every day. PMID:25587974

  17. In Vivo High-Resolution 7 Tesla MRI Shows Early and Diffuse Cortical Alterations in CADASIL

    PubMed Central

    De Guio, François; Reyes, Sonia; Vignaud, Alexandre; Duering, Marco; Ropele, Stefan; Duchesnay, Edouard; Chabriat, Hugues; Jouvent, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Recent data suggest that early symptoms may be related to cortex alterations in CADASIL (Cerebral Autosomal-Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy), a monogenic model of cerebral small vessel disease (SVD). The aim of this study was to investigate cortical alterations using both high-resolution T2* acquisitions obtained with 7 Tesla MRI and structural T1 images with 3 Tesla MRI in CADASIL patients with no or only mild symptomatology (modified Rankin’s scale ?1 and Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) ?24). Methods Complete reconstructions of the cortex using 7 Tesla T2* acquisitions with 0.7 mm isotropic resolution were obtained in 11 patients (52.1±13.2 years, 36% male) and 24 controls (54.8±11.0 years, 42% male). Seven Tesla T2* within the cortex and cortical thickness and morphology obtained from 3 Tesla images were compared between CADASIL and control subjects using general linear models. Results MMSE, brain volume, cortical thickness and global sulcal morphology did not differ between groups. By contrast, T2* measured by 7 Tesla MRI was significantly increased in frontal, parietal, occipital and cingulate cortices in patients after correction for multiple testing. These changes were not related to white matter lesions, lacunes or microhemorrhages in patients having no brain atrophy compared to controls. Conclusions Seven Tesla MRI, by contrast to state of the art post-processing of 3 Tesla acquisitions, shows diffuse T2* alterations within the cortical mantle in CADASIL whose origin remains to be determined. PMID:25165824

  18. High-Performance, Parallel, Stack-Based Genetic Programming by Kilian Stoffel and Lee Spector

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Thomas

    , flexible, and easily portable genetic programming engine with a clear and efficient parallel implementationHigh-Performance, Parallel, Stack-Based Genetic Programming by Kilian Stoffel and Lee Spector Full citation: Stoffel, K., and L. Spector. 1996. High-Performance, Parallel, Stack-Based Genetic Programming

  19. High levels of genetic diversity and cryptic recombination is widespread in introduced Diplodia pinea populations

    E-print Network

    High levels of genetic diversity and cryptic recombination is widespread in introduced Diplodia of the fungal tree pathogen Diplodia pinea have been shown to have high levels of genetic diversity, even influenced population structure. Keywords Diplodia pinea . Simple sequence repeat marker. Genetic diversity

  20. High and Distinct Range-Edge Genetic Diversity despite Local Bottlenecks

    E-print Network

    Borges, Rita

    High and Distinct Range-Edge Genetic Diversity despite Local Bottlenecks Jorge Assis1* , Nelson to retain high and unique genetic diversity. In contrast, currently less favourable environmental conditions on decreasing diversity and increasing population isolation and differentiation. We compare population genetic

  1. HighPerformance, Parallel, StackBased Genetic Programming by Kilian Stoffel and Lee Spector

    E-print Network

    Spector, Lee

    , flexible, and easily portable genetic programming engine with a clear and efficient parallel implementationHigh­Performance, Parallel, Stack­Based Genetic Programming by Kilian Stoffel and Lee Spector Full citation: Stoffel, K., and L. Spector. 1996. High­Performance, Parallel, Stack­Based Genetic Programming

  2. A common genetic influence on human intensity ratings of sugars and high-potency sweeteners.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Liang-Dar; Zhu, Gu; Breslin, Paul A S; Reed, Danielle R; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J

    2015-08-01

    The perception of sweetness varies among individuals but the sources of this variation are not fully understood. Here, in a sample of 1,901 adolescent and young adults (53.8% female; 243 MZ and 452 DZ twin pairs, 511 unpaired individuals; mean age 16.2±2.8, range 12–26 years), we studied the variation in the perception of sweetness intensity of two monosaccharides and two high-potency sweeteners: glucose, fructose, neohesperidine dihydrochalcone (NHDC), and aspartame. Perceived intensity for all sweeteners decreased with age (2–5% per year) and increased with the history of otitis media (6–9%). Males rated aspartame slightly stronger than females (7%). We found similar heritabilities for sugars (glucose: h2=0.31, fructose: h2=0.34) and high-potency sweeteners (NHDC: h2=0.31, aspartame: h2=0.30); all were in the modest range. Multivariate modeling showed that a common genetic factor accounted for >75% of the genetic variance in the four sweeteners, suggesting that individual differences in perceived sweet intensity, which are partly due to genetic factors, may be attributed to a single set of genes. This study provided evidence of the shared genetic pathways between the perception of sugars and high-potency sweeteners. PMID:26181574

  3. High-throughput neuroimaging-genetics computational infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Dinov, Ivo D; Petrosyan, Petros; Liu, Zhizhong; Eggert, Paul; Hobel, Sam; Vespa, Paul; Woo Moon, Seok; Van Horn, John D; Franco, Joseph; Toga, Arthur W

    2014-01-01

    Many contemporary neuroscientific investigations face significant challenges in terms of data management, computational processing, data mining, and results interpretation. These four pillars define the core infrastructure necessary to plan, organize, orchestrate, validate, and disseminate novel scientific methods, computational resources, and translational healthcare findings. Data management includes protocols for data acquisition, archival, query, transfer, retrieval, and aggregation. Computational processing involves the necessary software, hardware, and networking infrastructure required to handle large amounts of heterogeneous neuroimaging, genetics, clinical, and phenotypic data and meta-data. Data mining refers to the process of automatically extracting data features, characteristics and associations, which are not readily visible by human exploration of the raw dataset. Result interpretation includes scientific visualization, community validation of findings and reproducible findings. In this manuscript we describe the novel high-throughput neuroimaging-genetics computational infrastructure available at the Institute for Neuroimaging and Informatics (INI) and the Laboratory of Neuro Imaging (LONI) at University of Southern California (USC). INI and LONI include ultra-high-field and standard-field MRI brain scanners along with an imaging-genetics database for storing the complete provenance of the raw and derived data and meta-data. In addition, the institute provides a large number of software tools for image and shape analysis, mathematical modeling, genomic sequence processing, and scientific visualization. A unique feature of this architecture is the Pipeline environment, which integrates the data management, processing, transfer, and visualization. Through its client-server architecture, the Pipeline environment provides a graphical user interface for designing, executing, monitoring validating, and disseminating of complex protocols that utilize diverse suites of software tools and web-services. These pipeline workflows are represented as portable XML objects which transfer the execution instructions and user specifications from the client user machine to remote pipeline servers for distributed computing. Using Alzheimer's and Parkinson's data, we provide several examples of translational applications using this infrastructure. PMID:24795619

  4. High-throughput neuroimaging-genetics computational infrastructure

    PubMed Central

    Dinov, Ivo D.; Petrosyan, Petros; Liu, Zhizhong; Eggert, Paul; Hobel, Sam; Vespa, Paul; Woo Moon, Seok; Van Horn, John D.; Franco, Joseph; Toga, Arthur W.

    2014-01-01

    Many contemporary neuroscientific investigations face significant challenges in terms of data management, computational processing, data mining, and results interpretation. These four pillars define the core infrastructure necessary to plan, organize, orchestrate, validate, and disseminate novel scientific methods, computational resources, and translational healthcare findings. Data management includes protocols for data acquisition, archival, query, transfer, retrieval, and aggregation. Computational processing involves the necessary software, hardware, and networking infrastructure required to handle large amounts of heterogeneous neuroimaging, genetics, clinical, and phenotypic data and meta-data. Data mining refers to the process of automatically extracting data features, characteristics and associations, which are not readily visible by human exploration of the raw dataset. Result interpretation includes scientific visualization, community validation of findings and reproducible findings. In this manuscript we describe the novel high-throughput neuroimaging-genetics computational infrastructure available at the Institute for Neuroimaging and Informatics (INI) and the Laboratory of Neuro Imaging (LONI) at University of Southern California (USC). INI and LONI include ultra-high-field and standard-field MRI brain scanners along with an imaging-genetics database for storing the complete provenance of the raw and derived data and meta-data. In addition, the institute provides a large number of software tools for image and shape analysis, mathematical modeling, genomic sequence processing, and scientific visualization. A unique feature of this architecture is the Pipeline environment, which integrates the data management, processing, transfer, and visualization. Through its client-server architecture, the Pipeline environment provides a graphical user interface for designing, executing, monitoring validating, and disseminating of complex protocols that utilize diverse suites of software tools and web-services. These pipeline workflows are represented as portable XML objects which transfer the execution instructions and user specifications from the client user machine to remote pipeline servers for distributed computing. Using Alzheimer's and Parkinson's data, we provide several examples of translational applications using this infrastructure1. PMID:24795619

  5. Using Show Homes (and Sponsorships) to Persuade Commissioning Relevancy and Factory Crafted High Performance Modular Homes 

    E-print Network

    Thomas-Rees, S.; Chasar, D.; Beal, D.; Chandra, S.

    2007-01-01

    The International Builders' Show (IBS) sponsored by the National Association of Home Builders is a venue attracting over 100,000 builders and building related professionals every year. The increased attendances each year ...

  6. Population genetics of the understory fishtail palm Chamaedorea ernesti-augusti in Belize: high genetic connectivity with local differentiation

    E-print Network

    Cibrian-Jaramillo, Angelica; Bacon, Christine D.; Garwood, Nancy C.; Bateman, Richard M.; Thomas, Meredith M.; Russell, Steven R.; Bailey, Donovan C.; Hahn, William J.; Bridgewater, Samuel G. M.; DeSalle, Rob

    2009-10-09

    Abstract Background Developing a greater understanding of population genetic structure in lowland tropical plant species is highly relevant to our knowledge of increasingly fragmented forests and to the conservation of threatened species. Specific...

  7. Study Shows Aspirin Reduces Colorectal Cancer in Those at High Risk

    Cancer.gov

    Findings from the first large clinical trial of its kind indicate that taking high doses of aspirin daily for at least 2 years substantially reduces the risk of colorectal cancer among people at increased risk of the disease.

  8. High Speed Genetic Lips Detection by Dynamic Search Domain Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akashi, Takuya; Wakasa, Yuji; Tanaka, Kanya; Karungaru, Stephen; Fukumi, Minoru

    In this paper, high-speed size and orientation invariant lips detection of a talking person in an active scene using template matching and genetic algorithms is proposed. As part of the objectives, we also try to acquire numerical parameters to represent the lips. The information is very important for many applications, where high performance is required, such as audio-visual speech recognition, speaker identification systems, robot perception and personal mobile devices interfaces. The difficulty in lips detection is mainly due to deformations and geometric changes of the lips during speech and the active scene by free camera motion. In order to enhance the performance in speed and accuracy, initially, the performance is improved on a single still image, that is, the base of video processing. Our proposed system is based on template matching using genetic algorithms (GA). Only one template is prepared per experiment. The template is the closed mouth of a subject, because the application is for personal devices. In our previous study, the main problem was trade-off between search accuracy and search speed. To overcome this problem, we use two methods: scaling window and dynamic search domain control (SD-Control). We therefore focus on the population size of the GA, because it has a direct effect on search accuracy and speed. The effectiveness of the proposed system is demonstrated by performing computer simulations. We achieved a lips detection accuracy of 91.33% at an average processing time of 33.70 milliseconds per frame.

  9. Improving AFLP analysis of large-scale patterns of genetic variation--a case study with the Central African lianas Haumania spp (Marantaceae) showing interspecific gene flow.

    PubMed

    Ley, A C; Hardy, O J

    2013-04-01

    AFLP markers are often used to study patterns of population genetic variation and gene flow because they offer a good coverage of the nuclear genome, but the reliability of AFLP scoring is critical. To assess interspecific gene flow in two African rainforest liana species (Haumania danckelmaniana, H. liebrechtsiana) where previous evidence of chloroplast captures questioned the importance of hybridization and species boundaries, we developed new AFLP markers and a novel approach to select reliable bands from their degree of reproducibility. The latter is based on the estimation of the broad-sense heritability of AFLP phenotypes, an improvement over classical scoring error rates, which showed that the polymorphism of most AFLP bands was affected by a substantial nongenetic component. Therefore, using a quantitative genetics framework, we also modified an existing estimator of pairwise kinship coefficient between individuals correcting for the limited heritability of markers. Bayesian clustering confirms the recognition of the two Haumania species. Nevertheless, the decay of the relatedness between individuals of distinct species with geographic distance demonstrates that hybridization affects the nuclear genome. In conclusion, although we showed that AFLP markers might be substantially affected by nongenetic factors, their analysis using the new methods developed considerably advanced our understanding of the pattern of gene flow in our model species. PMID:23398575

  10. Breeding for improved potato nutrition: High amylose starch potatoes show promise as fiber source

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato starch is composed of approximately 75% amylopectin and 25% amylose. We are interested in breeding for higher amylose content, which would increase the fiber content of potato and decrease glycemic index. In order to make progress in a breeding program, we have developed a high throughput ass...

  11. Discovery in Genetic Skin Disease: The Impact of High Throughput Genetic Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Maruthappu, Thiviyani; Scott, Claire A.; Kelsell, David P.

    2014-01-01

    The last decade has seen considerable advances in our understanding of the genetic basis of skin disease, as a consequence of high throughput sequencing technologies including next generation sequencing and whole exome sequencing. We have now determined the genes underlying several monogenic diseases, such as harlequin ichthyosis, Olmsted syndrome, and exfoliative ichthyosis, which have provided unique insights into the structure and function of the skin. In addition, through genome wide association studies we now have an understanding of how low penetrance variants contribute to inflammatory skin diseases such as psoriasis vulgaris and atopic dermatitis, and how they contribute to underlying pathophysiological disease processes. In this review we discuss strategies used to unravel the genes underlying both monogenic and complex trait skin diseases in the last 10 years and the implications on mechanistic studies, diagnostics, and therapeutics. PMID:25093584

  12. Development and characterization of highly polymorphic long TC repeat microsatellite markers for genetic analysis of peanut

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) is a crop of economic and social importance, mainly in tropical areas, and developing countries. Its molecular breeding has been hindered by a shortage of polymorphic genetic markers due to a very narrow genetic base. Microsatellites (SSRs) are markers of choice in peanut because they are co-dominant, highly transferrable between species and easily applicable in the allotetraploid genome. In spite of substantial effort over the last few years by a number of research groups, the number of SSRs that are polymorphic for A. hypogaea is still limiting for routine application, creating the demand for the discovery of more markers polymorphic within cultivated germplasm. Findings A plasmid genomic library enriched for TC/AG repeats was constructed and 1401 clones sequenced. From the sequences obtained 146 primer pairs flanking mostly TC microsatellites were developed. The average number of repeat motifs amplified was 23. These 146 markers were characterized on 22 genotypes of cultivated peanut. In total 78 of the markers were polymorphic within cultivated germplasm. Most of those 78 markers were highly informative with an average of 5.4 alleles per locus being amplified. Average gene diversity index (GD) was 0.6, and 66 markers showed a GD of more than 0.5. Genetic relationship analysis was performed and corroborated the current taxonomical classification of A. hypogaea subspecies and varieties. Conclusions The microsatellite markers described here are a useful resource for genetics and genomics in Arachis. In particular, the 66 markers that are highly polymorphic in cultivated peanut are a significant step towards routine genetic mapping and marker-assisted selection for the crop. PMID:22305491

  13. Biochemical Characterization of a First Fungal Esterase from Rhizomucor miehei Showing High Efficiency of Ester Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Xu, Haibo; Yan, Qiaojuan; Yang, Shaoqing; Duan, Xiaojie; Jiang, Zhengqiang

    2013-01-01

    Background Esterases with excellent merits suitable for commercial use in ester production field are still insufficient. The aim of this research is to advance our understanding by seeking for more unusual esterases and revealing their characterizations for ester synthesis. Methodology/Principal Findings A novel esterase-encoding gene from Rhizomucor miehei (RmEstA) was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Sequence analysis revealed a 975-bp ORF encoding a 324-amino-acid polypeptide belonging to the hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) family IV and showing highest similarity (44%) to the Paenibacillus mucilaginosus esterase/lipase. Recombinant RmEstA was purified to homogeneity: it was 34 kDa by SDS-PAGE and showed optimal pH and temperature of 6.5 and 45°C, respectively. The enzyme was stable to 50°C, under a broad pH range (5.0–10.6). RmEstA exhibited broad substrate specificity toward p-nitrophenol esters and short-acyl-chain triglycerols, with highest activities (1,480 U mg?1 and 228 U mg?1) for p-nitrophenyl hexanoate and tributyrin, respectively. RmEstA efficiently synthesized butyl butyrate (92% conversion yield) when immobilized on AOT-based organogel. Conclusion RmEstA has great potential for industrial applications. RmEstA is the first reported esterase from Rhizomucor miehei. PMID:24204998

  14. A novel satellite DNA isolated in Pecten jacobaeus shows high sequence similarity among molluscs.

    PubMed

    Petraccioli, Agnese; Odierna, Gaetano; Capriglione, Teresa; Barucca, Marco; Forconi, Mariko; Olmo, Ettore; Biscotti, Maria Assunta

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the sequence conservation and the evolution of repeated DNA in related species. Satellite DNA is a component of eukaryotic genomes and is made up of tandemly repeated sequences. These sequences are affected by high rates of mutation that lead to the occurrence of species-specific satellite DNAs, which are different in terms of both quantity and quality. In this work, a novel repetitive DNA family, named PjHhaI sat, is described in Pecten jacobaeus. The quantitative analyses revealed a different abundance of this element in the molluscan species investigated in agreement with the "library hypothesis" even if, in this case, at a high taxonomic level. In addition, the qualitative analysis demonstrated an astonishing sequence conservation not only among scallops but also in six other molluscan species belonging to three classes. These findings suggest that the PjHhaI sat may be considered as the most ancients of DNA described so far, which remained "frozen" during molluscan evolution. The widespread distribution of this sat DNA in molluscs as well as its long evolutionary preservation open up questions on the functional role of this element. A future challenge might be the identification of proteins or molecules which interact with the PjHhaI sat. PMID:25832354

  15. Awareness of Societal Issues among High School Biology Teachers Teaching Genetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarowitz, Reuven; Bloch, Ilit

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how aware high school biology teachers are of societal issues (values, moral, ethic, and legal issues) while teaching genetics, genetics engineering, molecular genetics, human heredity, and evolution. The study includes a short historical review of World War II atrocities during the Holocaust when…

  16. High fidelity of RecA-catalyzed recombination: a watchdog of genetic diversity

    E-print Network

    Tlusty, Tsvi

    High fidelity of RecA-catalyzed recombination: a watchdog of genetic diversity Dror Sagi, Tsvi recombination plays a key role in generating genetic diversity, while maintaining protein functionality for the creation of genetic diversity (1,2). By reassembling sequences from homologous but not identical DNA

  17. New applications of the genetic algorithm for the interpretation of high-resolution spectra1

    E-print Network

    Nijmegen, University of

    804 New applications of the genetic algorithm for the interpretation of high-resolution spectra1 W. An alternative approach is unassigned fits of the spectra using genetic algorithms (GAs) with special cost, genetic algorithm, biomolecules, structure, van der Waals clusters. Résumé : La spectroscopie électronique

  18. Decarbonizing urban transport in European cities: four cases show possibly high co-benefits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creutzig, Felix; Mühlhoff, Rainer; Römer, Julia

    2012-12-01

    Cities worldwide are increasingly becoming agents of climate change mitigation, while simultaneously aiming for other goals, such as improved accessibility and clean air. Based on stakeholder interviews and data analysis, we assess the current state of urban mobility in the four European cities of Barcelona, Malmö, Sofia and Freiburg. We then provide scenarios of increasingly ambitious policy packages, reducing greenhouse gas emissions from urban transport by up to 80% from 2010 to 2040. We find significant concurrent co-benefits in cleaner air, reduced noise ambience, fewer traffic-related injuries and deaths, more physical activity, less congestion and monetary fuel savings. Our scenarios suggest that non-motorized transport, especially bicycles, can occupy high modal shares, particularly in cities with less than 0.5 million inhabitants. We think that this kind of multi-criteria assessment of social costs and benefits is a useful complement to cost-benefit analysis of climate change mitigation measures.

  19. Indigenous Aphid Predators Show High Levels of Preadaptation to a Novel Prey, Melanaphis sacchari (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    PubMed

    Colares, Felipe; Michaud, J P; Bain, Clint L; Torres, Jorge B

    2015-12-01

    The performance of four aphid predators, Hippodamia convergens Guerin-Meneville, Coleomegilla maculata DeGeer, Chrysoperla carnea Stephens and Orius insidiosus Say was compared on three prey species: Schizaphis graminum Rondani, Melanaphis sacchari (Zehntner), and Ephestia kuehniella Zeller eggs. Species predatory in both life stages (all except Ch. carnea) were reared on E. kuehniella eggs and switched to aphid prey for assessment of reproduction. Differences were greater between the E. kuehniella and aphid diets than between the two aphid species. Juvenile survival was high for all predators on all prey, except for O. insidiosus, which had survival on E. kuehniella?>?S. graminum?>?M. sacchari. The fastest development of Ch. carnea and O. insidiosus was obtained on E. kuehniella, whereas H. convergens developed fastest on S. graminum, and C. maculata did not differ among diets. S. graminum also yielded the largest H. convergens adults, whereas the largest adults of other predators were obtained on E. kuehniella. Female fecundity and egg viability were similarly high on both aphid diets for H. convergens and C. maculata, whereas, on E. kuehniella, 50% of the former entered reproductive diapause and the latter species had reduced fecundity. Reproductive success of Ch. carnea was S. graminum?=?M. sacchari?>?E. kuehniella, but it was similar among treatments for O. insidiosus, although female infertility ranged from 25 to 37.5%. We concluded that all the predators studied are preadapted to utilize sugarcane aphid as prey and have excellent potential to provide sustainable biological control of this newly invasive pest. PMID:26470381

  20. High-precision radiocarbon dating shows recent and rapid initial human colonization of East Polynesia

    PubMed Central

    Wilmshurst, Janet M.; Hunt, Terry L.; Lipo, Carl P.; Anderson, Atholl J.

    2011-01-01

    The 15 archipelagos of East Polynesia, including New Zealand, Hawaii, and Rapa Nui, were the last habitable places on earth colonized by prehistoric humans. The timing and pattern of this colonization event has been poorly resolved, with chronologies varying by >1000 y, precluding understanding of cultural change and ecological impacts on these pristine ecosystems. In a meta-analysis of 1,434 radiocarbon dates from the region, reliable short-lived samples reveal that the colonization of East Polynesia occurred in two distinct phases: earliest in the Society Islands A.D. ?1025–1120, four centuries later than previously assumed; then after 70–265 y, dispersal continued in one major pulse to all remaining islands A.D. ?1190–1290. We show that previously supported longer chronologies have relied upon radiocarbon-dated materials with large sources of error, making them unsuitable for precise dating of recent events. Our empirically based and dramatically shortened chronology for the colonization of East Polynesia resolves longstanding paradoxes and offers a robust explanation for the remarkable uniformity of East Polynesian culture, human biology, and language. Models of human colonization, ecological change and historical linguistics for the region now require substantial revision. PMID:21187404

  1. Hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acids from the Pacific krill show high ligand activities for PPARs.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hidetoshi; Oshiro, Eriko; Kikuchi, Sayaka; Hakozaki, Mayuka; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Kimura, Ken-Ichi

    2014-05-01

    PPARs regulate the expression of genes for energy metabolism in a ligand-dependent manner. PPARs can influence fatty acid oxidation, the level of circulating triglycerides, glucose uptake and insulin sensitivity. Here, we demonstrate that 5-hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acid (HEPE), 8-HEPE, 9-HEPE, 12-HEPE and 18-HEPE (hydroxylation products of EPA) obtained from methanol extracts of Pacific krill (Euphausia pacifica) can act as PPAR ligands. Two of these products, 8-HEPE and 9-HEPE, enhanced the transcription levels of GAL4-PPARs to a significantly greater extent than 5-HEPE, 12-HEPE, 18-HEPE, EPA, and EPA ethyl-ester. 8-HEPE also activated significantly higher transcription of GAL4-PPAR?, GAL4-PPAR?, and GAL4-PPAR? than EPA at concentrations greater than 4, 64, and 64 ?M, respectively. We also demonstrated that 8-HEPE increased the expression levels of genes regulated by PPARs in FaO, 3T3-F442A, and C2C12 cells. Furthermore, 8-HEPE enhanced adipogenesis and glucose uptake. By contrast, at the same concentrations, EPA showed weak or little effect, indicating that 8-HEPE was the more potent inducer of physiological effects. PMID:24668940

  2. Genetic mapping of high caries experience on human chromosome 13

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Our previous genome-wide linkage scan mapped five loci for caries experience. The purpose of this study was to fine map one of these loci, the locus 13q31.1, in order to identify genetic contributors to caries. Methods Seventy-two pedigrees from the Philippines were studied. Caries experience was recorded and DNA was extracted from blood samples obtained from all subjects. Sixty-one single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 13q31.1 were genotyped. Association between caries experience and alleles was tested. We also studied 1,481 DNA samples obtained from saliva of subjects from the USA, 918 children from Brazil, and 275 children from Turkey, in order to follow up the results found in the Filipino families. We used the AliBaba2.1 software to determine if the nucleotide changes of the associated SNPs changed the prediction of the presence of transcription-binding site sequences and we also analyzed the gene expression of the genes selected based on binding predictions. Mutation analysis was also performed in 33 Filipino individuals of a segment of 13q31.1 that is highly conserved in mammals. Results Statistically significant association with high caries experience was found for 11 markers in 13q31.1 in the Filipino families. Haplotype analysis also confirmed these results. In the populations used for follow-up purposes, associations were found between high caries experience and a subset of these markers. Regarding the prediction of the transcription-binding site, the base change of the SNP rs17074565 was found to change the predicted-binding of genes that could be involved in the pathogenesis of caries. When the sequence has the allele C of rs17074565, the potential transcription factors binding the sequence are GR and GATA1. When the subject carries the G allele of rs17074565, the potential transcription factor predicted to bind to the sequence is GATA3. The expression of GR in whole saliva was higher in individuals with low caries experience when compared to individuals with high caries experience (p =?0.046). No mutations were found in the highly conserved sequence. Conclusions Genetic factors contributing to caries experience may exist in 13q31.1. The rs17074565 is located in an intergenic region and is predicted to disrupt the binding sites of two different transcription factors that might be involved with caries experience. GR expression in saliva may be a biomarker for caries risk and should be further explored. PMID:24192446

  3. Population Genetic Structure of a Centipede Species with High Levels of Developmental Instability

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Giuseppe; Le?niewska, Ma?gorzata; Congiu, Leonardo; Bertorelle, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    European populations of the geophilomorph centipede Haplophilus subterraneus show a high proportion of individuals with morphological anomalies, suggesting high levels of developmental instability. The broad geographic distribution of this phenomenon seems to exclude local environmental causes, but the source of instability is still to be identified. The goal of the present study was to collect quantitative data on the occurrence of phenodeviants in different populations, along with data on the patterns of genetic variation within and between populations, in order to investigate possible association between developmental instability and genetic features. In a sample of 11 populations of H. subterraneus, distributed in western and central Europe, we looked for phenodeviants, in particular with respect to trunk morphology, and studied genetic variation through the genotyping of microsatellite loci. Overall, no support was found to the idea that developmental instability in H. subterraneus is related to a specific patterns of genetic variation, including inbreeding estimates. We identified a major genetic partition that subdivides French populations from the others, and a low divergence among northwestern areas, which are possibly related to the post-glacial recolonization from southern refugia and/or to recent anthropogenic soil displacements. A weak correlation between individual number of leg bearing segments and the occurrence of trunk anomalies seems to support a trade-off between these two developmental traits. These results, complemented by preliminary data on developmental stability in two related species, suggest that the phenomenon has not a simple taxonomic distribution, while it exhibits an apparent localization in central and eastern Europe. PMID:26029915

  4. A Comprehensive Analysis of High School Genetics Standards: Are States Keeping Pace with Modern Genetics?

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, M.J.; Pleasants, C.; Solow, L.; Wong, A.; Zhang, H.

    2011-01-01

    Science education in the United States will increasingly be driven by testing and accountability requirements, such as those mandated by the No Child Left Behind Act, which rely heavily on learning outcomes, or “standards,” that are currently developed on a state-by-state basis. Those standards, in turn, drive curriculum and instruction. Given the importance of standards to teaching and learning, we investigated the quality of life sciences/biology standards with respect to genetics for all 50 states and the District of Columbia, using core concepts developed by the American Society of Human Genetics as normative benchmarks. Our results indicate that the states’ genetics standards, in general, are poor, with more than 85% of the states receiving overall scores of Inadequate. In particular, the standards in virtually every state have failed to keep pace with changes in the discipline as it has become genomic in scope, omitting concepts related to genetic complexity, the importance of environment to phenotypic variation, differential gene expression, and the differences between inherited and somatic genetic disease. Clearer, more comprehensive genetics standards are likely to benefit genetics instruction and learning, help prepare future genetics researchers, and contribute to the genetic literacy of the U.S. citizenry. PMID:21885828

  5. High Quality Typhoon Cloud Image Restoration by Combining Genetic Algorithm with Contourlet Transform

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Changjiang; Wang Xiaodong

    2008-11-06

    An efficient typhoon cloud image restoration algorithm is proposed. Having implemented contourlet transform to a typhoon cloud image, noise is reduced in the high sub-bands. Weight median value filter is used to reduce the noise in the contourlet domain. Inverse contourlet transform is done to obtain the de-noising image. In order to enhance the global contrast of the typhoon cloud image, in-complete Beta transform (IBT) is used to determine non-linear gray transform curve so as to enhance global contrast for the de-noising typhoon cloud image. Genetic algorithm is used to obtain the optimal gray transform curve. Information entropy is used as the fitness function of the genetic algorithm. Experimental results show that the new algorithm is able to well enhance the global for the typhoon cloud image while well reducing the noises in the typhoon cloud image.

  6. AFLP analysis reveals high genetic diversity but low population structure in Coccidioides posadasii isolates from Mexico and Argentina

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Coccidioides immitis and C. posadasii cause coccidioidomycosis, a disease that is endemic to North and South America, but for Central America, the incidence of coccidioidomycosis has not been clearly established. Several studies suggest genetic variability in these fungi; however, little definitive information has been discovered about the variability of Coccidioides fungi in Mexico (MX) and Argentina (AR). Thus, the goals for this work were to study 32 Coccidioides spp. isolates from MX and AR, identify the species of these Coccidioides spp. isolates, analyse their phenotypic variability, examine their genetic variability and investigate the Coccidioides reproductive system and its level of genetic differentiation. Methods Coccidioides spp. isolates from MX and AR were taxonomically identified by phylogenetic inference analysis using partial sequences of the Ag2/PRA gene and their phenotypic characteristics analysed. The genetic variability, reproductive system and level of differentiation were estimated using AFLP markers. The level of genetic variability was assessed measuring the percentage of polymorphic loci, number of effective allele, expected heterocygosity and Index of Association (IA). The degree of genetic differentiation was determined by AMOVA. Genetic similarities among isolates were estimated using Jaccard index. The UPGMA was used to contsruct the corresponding dendrogram. Finally, a network of haplotypes was built to evaluate the genealogical relationships among AFLP haplotypes. Results All isolates of Coccidioides spp. from MX and AR were identified as C. posadasii. No phenotypic variability was observed among the C. posadasii isolates from MX and AR. Analyses of genetic diversity and population structure were conducted using AFLP markers. Different estimators of genetic variability indicated that the C. posadasii isolates from MX and AR had high genetic variability. Furthermore, AMOVA, dendrogram and haplotype network showed a small genetic differentiation among the C. posadasii populations analysed from MX and AR. Additionally, the IA calculated for the isolates suggested that the species has a recombinant reproductive system. Conclusions No phenotypic variability was observed among the C. posadasii isolates from MX and AR. The high genetic variability observed in the isolates from MX and AR and the small genetic differentiation observed among the C. posadasii isolates analysed, suggest that this species could be distributed as a single genetic population in Latin America. PMID:24004977

  7. Phylogenetic Analysis of a Dataset of Fungal 5.8S rDNA Sequences Shows That Highly Divergent

    E-print Network

    Bruns, Tom

    Phylogenetic Analysis of a Dataset of Fungal 5.8S rDNA Sequences Shows That Highly Divergent Copies, Dulieu, Hubert, and Sanders, Ian R. 1999. Phylogenetic analysis of a dataset of fungal 5.8S rDNA.8S rDNA sequences from a wide range of fungi, we show that some sequences reported recently from

  8. Cytogenetic studies on two F1 hybrids of autotetraploid rice varieties showing extremely high level of heterosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mechanisms of two F1 hybrids (D46AxDTP-4 and D46Ax Dminghui63) of auototetraploid rice (2n=4x=48) showing extremely high pollen fertility 87.40% and 85.97%, respectively, seed set 82.00% and 79%, respectively and extremely high level of heterosis were analyzed cytologically. Chromosome pairing of th...

  9. Abstract Recent studies show that SouthEast Indian Ocean (SEIO) SSTs are a highly significant precursor

    E-print Network

    Abstract Recent studies show that SouthEast Indian Ocean (SEIO) SSTs are a highly significant. These modeling evi- dences confirm that subtropical Indian Ocean SST anomalies generated by Mascarene high pulses later. 1 Introduction There is now abundant evidence that Indian Ocean Sea Surface Temperature (SST

  10. High School Students' Use of Meiosis When Solving Genetics Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wynne, Cynthia F.; Stewart, Jim; Passmore, Cindy

    2001-01-01

    Paints a different picture of students' reasoning with meiosis as they solved complex, computer-generated genetics problems, some of which required them to revise their understanding of meiosis in response to anomalous data. Students were able to develop a rich understanding of meiosis and can utilize that knowledge to solve genetics problems.…

  11. A Web-Based Genetic Polymorphism Learning Approach for High School Students and Science Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amenkhienan, Ehichoya; Smith, Edward J.

    2006-01-01

    Variation and polymorphism are concepts that are central to genetics and genomics, primary biological disciplines in which high school students and undergraduates require a solid foundation. From 1998 through 2002, a web-based genetics education program was developed for high school teachers and students. The program included an exercise on using…

  12. A genetically encoded, high-signal-to-noise maltose sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Marvin, Jonathan S.; Schreiter, Eric R.; Echevarría, Ileabett M.; Looger, Loren L.

    2012-10-23

    We describe the generation of a family of high-signal-to-noise single-wavelength genetically encoded indicators for maltose. This was achieved by insertion of circularly permuted fluorescent proteins into a bacterial periplasmic binding protein (PBP), Escherichia coli maltodextrin-binding protein, resulting in a four-color family of maltose indicators. The sensors were iteratively optimized to have sufficient brightness and maltose-dependent fluorescence increases for imaging, under both one- and two-photon illumination. We demonstrate that maltose affinity of the sensors can be tuned in a fashion largely independent of the fluorescent readout mechanism. Using literature mutations, the binding specificity could be altered to moderate sucrose preference, but with a significant loss of affinity. We use the soluble sensors in individual E. coli bacteria to observe rapid maltose transport across the plasma membrane, and membrane fusion versions of the sensors on mammalian cells to visualize the addition of maltose to extracellular media. The PBP superfamily includes scaffolds specific for a number of analytes whose visualization would be critical to the reverse engineering of complex systems such as neural networks, biosynthetic pathways, and signal transduction cascades. We expect the methodology outlined here to be useful in the development of indicators for many such analytes.

  13. Population Genetic Studies Revealed Local Adaptation in a High Gene-Flow Marine Fish, the Small Yellow Croaker (Larimichthys polyactis)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Le; Liu, Shufang; Zhuang, Zhimeng; Guo, Liang; Meng, Zining; Lin, Haoran

    2013-01-01

    The genetic differentiation of many marine fish species is low. Yet local adaptation may be common in marine fish species as the vast and changing marine environment provides more chances for natural selection. Here, we used anonymous as well as known protein gene linked microsatellites and mitochondrial DNA to detect the population structure of the small yellow croaker (Larimichthys polyactis) in the Northwest Pacific marginal seas. Among these loci, we detected at least two microsatellites, anonymous H16 and HSP27 to be clearly under diversifying selection in outlier tests. Sequence cloning and analysis revealed that H16 was located in the intron of BAHCC1 gene. Landscape genetic analysis showed that H16 mutations were significantly associated with temperature, which further supported the diversifying selection at this locus. These marker types presented different patterns of population structure: (i) mitochondrial DNA phylogeny showed no evidence of genetic divergence and demonstrated only one glacial linage; (ii) population differentiation using putatively neutral microsatellites presented a pattern of high gene flow in the L. polyactis. In addition, several genetic barriers were identified; (iii) the population differentiation pattern revealed by loci under diversifying selection was rather different from that revealed by putatively neutral loci. The results above suggest local adaptation in the small yellow croaker. In summary, population genetic studies based on different marker types disentangle the effects of demographic history, migration, genetic drift and local adaptation on population structure and also provide valuable new insights for the design of management strategies in L. polyactis. PMID:24349521

  14. Distinct and diverse: range-wide phylogeography reveals ancient lineages and high genetic variation in the endangered okapi (Okapia johnstoni).

    PubMed

    Stanton, David W G; Hart, John; Galbusera, Peter; Helsen, Philippe; Shephard, Jill; Kümpel, Noëlle F; Wang, Jinliang; Ewen, John G; Bruford, Michael W

    2014-01-01

    The okapi is an endangered, evolutionarily distinctive even-toed ungulate classified within the giraffidae family that is endemic to the Democratic Republic of Congo. The okapi is currently under major anthropogenic threat, yet to date nothing is known about its genetic structure and evolutionary history, information important for conservation management given the species' current plight. The distribution of the okapi, being confined to the Congo Basin and yet spanning the Congo River, also makes it an important species for testing general biogeographic hypotheses for Congo Basin fauna, a currently understudied area of research. Here we describe the evolutionary history and genetic structure of okapi, in the context of other African ungulates including the giraffe, and use this information to shed light on the biogeographic history of Congo Basin fauna in general. Using nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequence analysis of mainly non-invasively collected samples, we show that the okapi is both highly genetically distinct and highly genetically diverse, an unusual combination of genetic traits for an endangered species, and feature a complex evolutionary history. Genetic data are consistent with repeated climatic cycles leading to multiple Plio-Pleistocene refugia in isolated forests in the Congo catchment but also imply historic gene flow across the Congo River. PMID:25007188

  15. Distinct and Diverse: Range-Wide Phylogeography Reveals Ancient Lineages and High Genetic Variation in the Endangered Okapi (Okapia johnstoni)

    PubMed Central

    Stanton, David W. G.; Hart, John; Galbusera, Peter; Helsen, Philippe; Shephard, Jill; Kümpel, Noëlle F.; Wang, Jinliang; Ewen, John G.; Bruford, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    The okapi is an endangered, evolutionarily distinctive even-toed ungulate classified within the giraffidae family that is endemic to the Democratic Republic of Congo. The okapi is currently under major anthropogenic threat, yet to date nothing is known about its genetic structure and evolutionary history, information important for conservation management given the species' current plight. The distribution of the okapi, being confined to the Congo Basin and yet spanning the Congo River, also makes it an important species for testing general biogeographic hypotheses for Congo Basin fauna, a currently understudied area of research. Here we describe the evolutionary history and genetic structure of okapi, in the context of other African ungulates including the giraffe, and use this information to shed light on the biogeographic history of Congo Basin fauna in general. Using nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequence analysis of mainly non-invasively collected samples, we show that the okapi is both highly genetically distinct and highly genetically diverse, an unusual combination of genetic traits for an endangered species, and feature a complex evolutionary history. Genetic data are consistent with repeated climatic cycles leading to multiple Plio-Pleistocene refugia in isolated forests in the Congo catchment but also imply historic gene flow across the Congo River. PMID:25007188

  16. High genetic diversity and structured populations of the oriental fruit moth in its range of origin.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yan; Peng, Xiong; Liu, Gaoming; Pan, Hongyan; Dorn, Silvia; Chen, Maohua

    2013-01-01

    The oriental fruit moth Grapholita (?=?Cydia) molesta is a key fruit pest globally. Despite its economic importance, little is known about its population genetics in its putative native range that includes China. We used five polymorphic microsatellite loci and two mitochondrial gene sequences to characterize the population genetic diversity and genetic structure of G. molesta from nine sublocations in three regions of a major fruit growing area of China. Larval samples were collected throughout the season from peach, and in late season, after host switch by the moth to pome fruit, also from apple and pear. We found high numbers of microsatellite alleles and mitochondrial DNA haplotypes in all regions, together with a high number of private alleles and of haplotypes at all sublocations, providing strong evidence that the sampled area belongs to the origin of this species. Samples collected from peach at all sublocations were geographically structured, and a significant albeit weak pattern of isolation-by-distance was found among populations, likely reflecting the low flight capacity of this moth. Interestingly, populations sampled from apple and pear in the late season showed a structure differing from that of populations sampled from peach throughout the season, indicating a selective host switch of a certain part of the population only. The recently detected various olfactory genotypes in G. molesta may underly this selective host switch. These genetic data yield, for the first time, an understanding of population dynamics of G. molesta in its native range, and of a selective host switch from peach to pome fruit, which may have a broad applicability to other global fruit production areas for designing suitable pest management strategies. PMID:24265692

  17. Transcriptome sequencing for high throughput SNP development and genetic mapping in Pea

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pea has a complex genome of 4.3 Gb for which only limited genomic resources are available to date. Although SNP markers are now highly valuable for research and modern breeding, only a few are described and used in pea for genetic diversity and linkage analysis. Results We developed a large resource by cDNA sequencing of 8 genotypes representative of modern breeding material using the Roche 454 technology, combining both long reads (400 bp) and high coverage (3.8 million reads, reaching a total of 1,369 megabases). Sequencing data were assembled and generated a 68 K unigene set, from which 41 K were annotated from their best blast hit against the model species Medicago truncatula. Annotated contigs showed an even distribution along M. truncatula pseudochromosomes, suggesting a good representation of the pea genome. 10 K pea contigs were found to be polymorphic among the genetic material surveyed, corresponding to 35 K SNPs. We validated a subset of 1538 SNPs through the GoldenGate assay, proving their ability to structure a diversity panel of breeding germplasm. Among them, 1340 were genetically mapped and used to build a new consensus map comprising a total of 2070 markers. Based on blast analysis, we could establish 1252 bridges between our pea consensus map and the pseudochromosomes of M. truncatula, which provides new insight on synteny between the two species. Conclusions Our approach created significant new resources in pea, i.e. the most comprehensive genetic map to date tightly linked to the model species M. truncatula and a large SNP resource for both academic research and breeding. PMID:24521263

  18. A genetic mechanism for Tibetan high-altitude adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo, Felipe R; Huff, Chad; Myllymäki, Mikko; Olenchock, Benjamin; Swierczek, Sabina; Tashi, Tsewang; Gordeuk, Victor; Wuren, Tana; Ri-Li, Ge; McClain, Donald A; Khan, Tahsin M; Koul, Parvaiz A; Guchhait, Prasenjit; Salama, Mohamed E; Xing, Jinchuan; Semenza, Gregg L; Liberzon, Ella; Wilson, Andrew; Simonson, Tatum S; Jorde, Lynn B; Kaelin, William G; Koivunen, Peppi; Prchal, Josef T

    2015-01-01

    Tibetans do not exhibit increased hemoglobin concentration at high altitude. We describe a high-frequency missense mutation in the EGLN1 gene, which encodes prolyl hydroxylase 2 (PHD2), that contributes to this adaptive response. We show that a variant in EGLN1, c.[12C>G; 380G>C], contributes functionally to the Tibetan high-altitude phenotype. PHD2 triggers the degradation of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs), which mediate many physiological responses to hypoxia, including erythropoiesis. The PHD2 p.[Asp4Glu; Cys127Ser] variant exhibits a lower Km value for oxygen, suggesting that it promotes increased HIF degradation under hypoxic conditions. Whereas hypoxia stimulates the proliferation of wild-type erythroid progenitors, the proliferation of progenitors with the c.[12C>G; 380G>C] mutation in EGLN1 is significantly impaired under hypoxic culture conditions. We show that the c.[12C>G; 380G>C] mutation originated ~8,000 years ago on the same haplotype previously associated with adaptation to high altitude. The c.[12C>G; 380G>C] mutation abrogates hypoxia-induced and HIF-mediated augmentation of erythropoiesis, which provides a molecular mechanism for the observed protection of Tibetans from polycythemia at high altitude. PMID:25129147

  19. Bacillus cereus from the environment is genetically related to the highly pathogenic B. cereus in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    OGAWA, Hirohito; OHNUMA, Miyuki; SQUARRE, David; MWEENE, Aaron Simanyengwe; EZAKI, Takayuki; FUJIKURA, Daisuke; OHNISHI, Naomi; THOMAS, Yuka; HANG’OMBE, Bernard Mudenda; HIGASHI, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    To follow-up anthrax in Zambia since the outbreak in 2011, we have collected samples from the environment and the carcasses of anthrax-suspected animals, and have tried to isolate Bacillus anthracis. In the process of identification of B. anthracis, we collected two isolates, of which colonies were similar to B. anthracis; however, from the results of identification using the molecular-based methods, two isolates were genetically related to the highly pathogenic B. cereus, of which clinical manifestation is severe and fatal (e.g., pneumonia). In this study, we showed the existence of bacteria suspected to be highly pathogenic B. cereus in Zambia, indicating the possibility of an outbreak caused by highly pathogenic B. cereus. PMID:25797134

  20. Bacillus cereus from the environment is genetically related to the highly pathogenic B. cereus in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Hirohito; Ohnuma, Miyuki; Squarre, David; Mweene, Aaron Simanyengwe; Ezaki, Takayuki; Fujikura, Daisuke; Ohnishi, Naomi; Thomas, Yuka; Hang'ombe, Bernard Mudenda; Higashi, Hideaki

    2015-08-01

    To follow-up anthrax in Zambia since the outbreak in 2011, we have collected samples from the environment and the carcasses of anthrax-suspected animals, and have tried to isolate Bacillus anthracis. In the process of identification of B. anthracis, we collected two isolates, of which colonies were similar to B. anthracis; however, from the results of identification using the molecular-based methods, two isolates were genetically related to the highly pathogenic B. cereus, of which clinical manifestation is severe and fatal (e.g., pneumonia). In this study, we showed the existence of bacteria suspected to be highly pathogenic B. cereus in Zambia, indicating the possibility of an outbreak caused by highly pathogenic B. cereus. PMID:25797134

  1. MHC ANTIGEN-BINDING LOCUS SHOWS STRONG SIGNAL OF SELECTION AND HIGH VARIABILITY IN FUNDULUS HETEROCLITUS POPULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The major histocompatibility system provides a unique genetic locus in vertebrates to assess genetic diversity and to look for the effects of selecti.on on the immune system. Fish population studies using MHC are fairly new, and thus far they have focused on endangered population...

  2. MHC ANTIGEN BINDING LOCUS DRB1 SHOWS STRONG SIGNAL OF SELECTION AND HIGH VARIABILITY IN FUNDULUS HETERCLITUS POPULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The major histocompatibility system provides a unique complex of genetic loci in vertebrates to assess genetic diversity and to look for the effects of selection on the adaptive immune system. Studies using mammals and birds
    have demonstrated relationships between MHC genotyp...

  3. Baculovirus expression system and method for high throughput expression of genetic material

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Robin (Benecia, CA); Davies, Anthony (Mill Valley, CA)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides novel recombinant baculovirus expression systems for expressing foreign genetic material in a host cell. Such expression systems are readily adapted to an automated method for expression foreign genetic material in a high throughput manner. In other aspects, the present invention features a novel automated method for determining the function of foreign genetic material by transfecting the same into a host by way of the recombinant baculovirus expression systems according to the present invention.

  4. Optimized design on condensing tubes high-speed TIG welding technology magnetic control based on genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Lin; Chang, Yunlong; Li, Yingmin; Lu, Ming

    2013-05-01

    An orthogonal experiment was conducted by the means of multivariate nonlinear regression equation to adjust the influence of external transverse magnetic field and Ar flow rate on welding quality in the process of welding condenser pipe by high-speed argon tungsten-arc welding (TIG for short). The magnetic induction and flow rate of Ar gas were used as optimum variables, and tensile strength of weld was set to objective function on the base of genetic algorithm theory, and then an optimal design was conducted. According to the request of physical production, the optimum variables were restrained. The genetic algorithm in the MATLAB was used for computing. A comparison between optimum results and experiment parameters was made. The results showed that the optimum technologic parameters could be chosen by the means of genetic algorithm with the conditions of excessive optimum variables in the process of high-speed welding. And optimum technologic parameters of welding coincided with experiment results.

  5. Isolation of thermophilic L-lactic acid producing bacteria showing homo-fermentative manner under high aeration condition.

    PubMed

    Tongpim, Saowanit; Meidong, Ratchanu; Poudel, Pramod; Yoshino, Satoshi; Okugawa, Yuki; Tashiro, Yukihiro; Taniguchi, Masayuki; Sakai, Kenji

    2014-03-01

    By applying non-sterile open fermentation of food waste, various thermotolerant l-lactic acid-producing bacteria were isolated and identified. The predominant bacterial isolates showing higher accumulation of l-lactic acid belong to 3 groups of Bacillus coagulans, according to their 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities. B. coagulans strains M21 and M36 produced high amounts of l-lactic acid of high optical purity and lactic acid selectivity in model kitchen refuse medium and glucose-yeast extract-peptone medium. Other thermotolerant isolates resembling to Bacillus humi, B. ruris, B. subtilis, B. niacini and B. soli were also identified. These bacteria produced low amounts of l-lactic acid of more than 99% optical purity. All isolated strains showed the highest growth rate at temperatures around 55-60°C. They showed unique responses to various oxygen supply conditions. The majority of isolates produced l-lactic acid at a low overall oxygen transfer coefficient (KLa); however, acetic acid was produced instead of l-lactic acid at a high KLa. B. coagulans M21 was the only strain that produced high, consistent, and reproducible amounts of optically pure l-lactic acid (>99% optical purity) under high and low KLa conditions in a homo-fermentative manner. PMID:24119530

  6. Population genetics of the understory fishtail palm Chamaedorea ernesti-augusti in Belize: high genetic connectivity with local differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Cibrián-Jaramillo, Angélica; Bacon, Christine D; Garwood, Nancy C; Bateman, Richard M; Thomas, Meredith M; Russell, Steve; Bailey, C Donovan; Hahn, William J; Bridgewater, Samuel GM; DeSalle, Rob

    2009-01-01

    Background Developing a greater understanding of population genetic structure in lowland tropical plant species is highly relevant to our knowledge of increasingly fragmented forests and to the conservation of threatened species. Specific studies are particularly needed for taxa whose population dynamics are further impacted by human harvesting practices. One such case is the fishtail or xaté palm (Chamaedorea ernesti-augusti) of Central America, whose wild-collected leaves are becoming progressively more important to the global ornamental industry. We use microsatellite markers to describe the population genetics of this species in Belize and test the effects of climate change and deforestation on its recent and historical effective population size. Results We found high levels of inbreeding coupled with moderate or high allelic diversity within populations. Overall high gene flow was observed, with a north and south gradient and ongoing differentiation at smaller spatial scales. Immigration rates among populations were more difficult to discern, with minimal evidence for isolation by distance. We infer a tenfold reduction in effective population size ca. 10,000 years ago, but fail to detect changes attributable to Mayan or contemporary deforestation. Conclusion Populations of C. ernesti-augusti are genetically heterogeneous demes at a local spatial scale, but are widely connected at a regional level in Belize. We suggest that the inferred patterns in population genetic structure are the result of the colonization of this species into Belize following expansion of humid forests in combination with demographic and mating patterns. Within populations, we hypothesize that low aggregated population density over large areas, short distance pollen dispersal via thrips, low adult survival, and low fruiting combined with early flowering may contribute towards local inbreeding via genetic drift. Relatively high levels of regional connectivity are likely the result of animal-mediated long-distance seed dispersal. The greatest present threat to the species is the potential onset of inbreeding depression as the result of increased human harvesting activities. Future genetic studies in understory palms should focus on both fine-scale and landscape-level genetic structure. PMID:19818141

  7. Detecting Genetic Association of Common Human Facial Morphological Variation Using High Density 3D Image Registration

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Sile; Zhou, Hang; Guo, Jing; Jin, Li; Tang, Kun

    2013-01-01

    Human facial morphology is a combination of many complex traits. Little is known about the genetic basis of common facial morphological variation. Existing association studies have largely used simple landmark-distances as surrogates for the complex morphological phenotypes of the face. However, this can result in decreased statistical power and unclear inference of shape changes. In this study, we applied a new image registration approach that automatically identified the salient landmarks and aligned the sample faces using high density pixel points. Based on this high density registration, three different phenotype data schemes were used to test the association between the common facial morphological variation and 10 candidate SNPs, and their performances were compared. The first scheme used traditional landmark-distances; the second relied on the geometric analysis of 15 landmarks and the third used geometric analysis of a dense registration of ?30,000 3D points. We found that the two geometric approaches were highly consistent in their detection of morphological changes. The geometric method using dense registration further demonstrated superiority in the fine inference of shape changes and 3D face modeling. Several candidate SNPs showed potential associations with different facial features. In particular, one SNP, a known risk factor of non-syndromic cleft lips/palates, rs642961 in the IRF6 gene, was validated to strongly predict normal lip shape variation in female Han Chinese. This study further demonstrated that dense face registration may substantially improve the detection and characterization of genetic association in common facial variation. PMID:24339768

  8. Genetic selection of mice for high voluntary wheel running: effect on skeletal muscle glucose uptake

    E-print Network

    Saltzman, Wendy

    Genetic selection of mice for high voluntary wheel running: effect on skeletal muscle glucose: effect on skeletal muscle glucose uptake. J Appl Physiol 91: 1289­1297, 2001.--Effects of genetic glucose uptake were stud- ied in mice with the following treatments for 8 wk: 1) access to unlocked wheels

  9. Robust and highly informative microsatellite-based genetic identity kit for potato

    E-print Network

    Spooner, David

    Robust and highly informative microsatellite-based genetic identity kit for potato Marc Ghislain Æ The fingerprinting of 742 potato landraces with 51 simple sequence repeat (SSR, or microsatel- lite) markers resulted in improving a previously constructed potato genetic identity kit. All SSR marker loci were assayed

  10. Spatio-temporal Genetic Structure of a Tropical Bee Species Suggests High Dispersal Over a Fragmented Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Suni, Sevan S.; Bronstein, Judith L.; Brosi, Berry J.

    2014-01-01

    Habitat destruction threatens biodiversity by reducing the amount of available resources and connectivity among geographic areas. For organisms living in fragmented habitats, population persistence may depend on dispersal, which maintains gene flow among fragments and can prevent inbreeding within them. It is centrally important to understand patterns of dispersal for bees living in fragmented areas given the importance of pollination systems and recently documented declines in bee populations. We used population and landscape genetic techniques to characterize patterns of dispersal over a large fragmented area in southern Costa Rica for the orchid bee species Euglossa championi. First, we estimated levels of genetic differentiation among forest fragments as ?pt, an analog to the traditional summary statistic Fst, as well as two statistics that may more adequately represent levels of differentiation, G’st and Dest. Second, we used a Bayesian approach to determine the number and composition of genetic groups in our sample. Third we investigated how genetic differentiation changes with distance. Fourth, we determined the extent to which deforested areas restrict dispersal. Finally, we estimated the extent to which there were temporal differences in allele frequencies within the same forest fragments. Within years we found low levels of differentiation even over 80 km, and no effect of land use type on level of genetic differentiation. However, we found significant genetic differentiation between years. Taken together our results suggest that there are high levels of gene flow over this geographic area, and that individuals show low site fidelity over time. PMID:24659825

  11. Genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Capsicum represents one of several well characterized Solanaceous genera. A wealth of classical and molecular genetics research is available for the genus. Information gleaned from its cultivated relatives, tomato and potato, provide further insight for basic and applied studies. Early ...

  12. New high density genetic marker technology for use in breeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent advances in genetic marker technology have enhanced our ability to evaluate rice breeding materials more quickly and with greater coverage. In 2005, as a result of an international collaboration, the japonica rice variety, Nipponbare, was the first crop plant to be completely sequenced. Subse...

  13. MOLECULAR EVIDENCE FOR HIGH LEVELS OF INTRAPOPULATION GENETIC DIVERSITY IN

    E-print Network

    Strauss, Richard E.

    . However, we also were interested in testing the definition of Pritchard et al. (2000) of a population history of a population (549 individuals) of the southern plains woodrat (Neotoma micropus). Observed suggested that all sampled individuals belonged to a single population, albeit genetically diverse. However

  14. Breeding high-yielding drought-tolerant rice: genetic variations and conventional and molecular approaches

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arvind; Dixit, Shalabh; Ram, T.; Yadaw, R. B.; Mishra, K. K.; Mandal, N. P.

    2014-01-01

    The increased occurrence and severity of drought stress have led to a high yield decline in rice in recent years in drought-affected areas. Drought research at the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) over the past decade has concentrated on direct selection for grain yield under drought. This approach has led to the successful development and release of 17 high-yielding drought-tolerant rice varieties in South Asia, Southeast Asia, and Africa. In addition to this, 14 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) showing a large effect against high-yielding drought-susceptible popular varieties were identified using grain yield as a selection criterion. Six of these (qDTY 1.1, qDTY 2.2, qDTY 3.1, qDTY 3.2, qDTY 6.1, and qDTY 12.1) showed an effect against two or more high-yielding genetic backgrounds in both the lowland and upland ecosystem, indicating their usefulness in increasing the grain yield of rice under drought. The yield of popular rice varieties IR64 and Vandana has been successfully improved through a well-planned marker-assisted backcross breeding approach, and QTL introgression in several other popular varieties is in progress. The identification of large-effect QTLs for grain yield under drought and the higher yield increase under drought obtained through the use of these QTLs (which has not been reported in other cereals) indicate that rice, because of its continuous cultivation in two diverse ecosystems (upland, drought tolerant, and lowland, drought susceptible), has benefited from the existence of larger genetic variability than in other cereals. This can be successfully exploited using marker-assisted breeding. PMID:25205576

  15. High-Density Genetic Mapping with Interspecific Hybrids of Two Sea Urchins, Strongylocentrotus nudus and S. intermedius, by RAD Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zunchun; Liu, Shikai; Dong, Ying; Gao, Shan; Chen, Zhong; Jiang, Jingwei; Yang, Aifu; Sun, Hongjuan; Guan, Xiaoyan; Jiang, Bei; Wang, Bai

    2015-01-01

    Sea urchins have long been used as research model organisms for developmental biology and evolutionary studies. Some of them are also important aquaculture species in East Asia. In this work, we report the construction of RAD-tag based high-density genetic maps by genotyping F1 interspecific hybrids derived from a crossing between a female sea urchin Strongylocentrotus nudus and a male Strongylocentrotus intermedius. With polymorphisms present in these two wild individuals, we constructed a female meiotic map containing 3,080 markers for S. nudus, and a male meiotic map for S. intermedius which contains 1,577 markers. Using the linkage maps, we were able to anchor a total of 1,591 scaffolds (495.9 Mb) accounting for 60.8% of the genome assembly of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. A genome-wide scan resulted in the identification of one putative QTL for body size which spanned from 25.3 cM to 30.3 cM. This study showed the efficiency of RAD-Seq based high-density genetic map construction using F1 progenies for species with no prior genomic information. The genetic maps are essential for QTL mapping and are useful as framework to order and orientate contiguous scaffolds from sea urchin genome assembly. The integration of the genetic map with genome assembly would provide an unprecedented opportunity to conduct QTL analysis, comparative genomics, and population genetics studies. PMID:26398139

  16. High-Density Genetic Mapping with Interspecific Hybrids of Two Sea Urchins, Strongylocentrotus nudus and S. intermedius, by RAD Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ying; Gao, Shan; Chen, Zhong; Jiang, Jingwei; Yang, Aifu; Sun, Hongjuan; Guan, Xiaoyan; Jiang, Bei; Wang, Bai

    2015-01-01

    Sea urchins have long been used as research model organisms for developmental biology and evolutionary studies. Some of them are also important aquaculture species in East Asia. In this work, we report the construction of RAD-tag based high-density genetic maps by genotyping F1 interspecific hybrids derived from a crossing between a female sea urchin Strongylocentrotus nudus and a male Strongylocentrotus intermedius. With polymorphisms present in these two wild individuals, we constructed a female meiotic map containing 3,080 markers for S. nudus, and a male meiotic map for S. intermedius which contains 1,577 markers. Using the linkage maps, we were able to anchor a total of 1,591 scaffolds (495.9 Mb) accounting for 60.8% of the genome assembly of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. A genome-wide scan resulted in the identification of one putative QTL for body size which spanned from 25.3 cM to 30.3 cM. This study showed the efficiency of RAD-Seq based high-density genetic map construction using F1 progenies for species with no prior genomic information. The genetic maps are essential for QTL mapping and are useful as framework to order and orientate contiguous scaffolds from sea urchin genome assembly. The integration of the genetic map with genome assembly would provide an unprecedented opportunity to conduct QTL analysis, comparative genomics, and population genetics studies. PMID:26398139

  17. Sex-stratified genome-wide association studies including 270,000 individuals show sexual dimorphism in genetic loci for anthropometric traits.

    PubMed

    Randall, Joshua C; Winkler, Thomas W; Kutalik, Zoltán; Berndt, Sonja I; Jackson, Anne U; Monda, Keri L; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Esko, Tõnu; Mägi, Reedik; Li, Shengxu; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Feitosa, Mary F; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C; Day, Felix R; Fall, Tove; Ferreira, Teresa; Gustafsson, Stefan; Locke, Adam E; Mathieson, Iain; Scherag, Andre; Vedantam, Sailaja; Wood, Andrew R; Liang, Liming; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; Dimas, Antigone S; Karpe, Fredrik; Min, Josine L; Nicholson, George; Clegg, Deborah J; Person, Thomas; Krohn, Jon P; Bauer, Sabrina; Buechler, Christa; Eisinger, Kristina; Bonnefond, Amélie; Froguel, Philippe; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Prokopenko, Inga; Waite, Lindsay L; Harris, Tamara B; Smith, Albert Vernon; Shuldiner, Alan R; McArdle, Wendy L; Caulfield, Mark J; Munroe, Patricia B; Grönberg, Henrik; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Li, Guo; Beckmann, Jacques S; Johnson, Toby; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Teder-Laving, Maris; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas J; Zhao, Jing Hua; Amin, Najaf; Oostra, Ben A; Kraja, Aldi T; Province, Michael A; Cupples, L Adrienne; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; Kaprio, Jaakko; Ripatti, Samuli; Surakka, Ida; Collins, Francis S; Saramies, Jouko; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Jula, Antti; Salomaa, Veikko; Erdmann, Jeanette; Hengstenberg, Christian; Loley, Christina; Schunkert, Heribert; Lamina, Claudia; Wichmann, H Erich; Albrecht, Eva; Gieger, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A; Johansson, Asa; Pramstaller, Peter P; Kathiresan, Sekar; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Penninx, Brenda; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Gyllensten, Ulf; Boomsma, Dorret I; Campbell, Harry; Wilson, James F; Chanock, Stephen J; Farrall, Martin; Goel, Anuj; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Estrada, Karol; Uitterlinden, André G; Hofman, Albert; Zillikens, M Carola; den Heijer, Martin; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Maschio, Andrea; Hall, Per; Tyrer, Jonathan; Teumer, Alexander; Völzke, Henry; Kovacs, Peter; Tönjes, Anke; Mangino, Massimo; Spector, Tim D; Hayward, Caroline; Rudan, Igor; Hall, Alistair S; Samani, Nilesh J; Attwood, Antony Paul; Sambrook, Jennifer G; Hung, Joseph; Palmer, Lyle J; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Sinisalo, Juha; Boucher, Gabrielle; Huikuri, Heikki; Lorentzon, Mattias; Ohlsson, Claes; Eklund, Niina; Eriksson, Johan G; Barlassina, Cristina; Rivolta, Carlo; Nolte, Ilja M; Snieder, Harold; Van der Klauw, Melanie M; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Gejman, Pablo V; Shi, Jianxin; Jacobs, Kevin B; Wang, Zhaoming; Bakker, Stephan J L; Mateo Leach, Irene; Navis, Gerjan; van der Harst, Pim; Martin, Nicholas G; Medland, Sarah E; Montgomery, Grant W; Yang, Jian; Chasman, Daniel I; Ridker, Paul M; Rose, Lynda M; Lehtimäki, Terho; Raitakari, Olli; Absher, Devin; Iribarren, Carlos; Basart, Hanneke; Hovingh, Kees G; Hyppönen, Elina; Power, Chris; Anderson, Denise; Beilby, John P; Hui, Jennie; Jolley, Jennifer; Sager, Hendrik; Bornstein, Stefan R; Schwarz, Peter E H; Kristiansson, Kati; Perola, Markus; Lindström, Jaana; Swift, Amy J; Uusitupa, Matti; Atalay, Mustafa; Lakka, Timo A; Rauramaa, Rainer; Bolton, Jennifer L; Fowkes, Gerry; Fraser, Ross M; Price, Jackie F; Fischer, Krista; Krjutå Kov, Kaarel; Metspalu, Andres; Mihailov, Evelin; Langenberg, Claudia; Luan, Jian'an; Ong, Ken K; Chines, Peter S; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Saaristo, Timo E; Edkins, Sarah; Franks, Paul W; Hallmans, Göran; Shungin, Dmitry; Morris, Andrew David; Palmer, Colin N A; Erbel, Raimund; Moebus, Susanne; Nöthen, Markus M; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Hveem, Kristian; Narisu, Narisu; Hamsten, Anders; Humphries, Steve E; Strawbridge, Rona J; Tremoli, Elena; Grallert, Harald; Thorand, Barbara; Illig, Thomas; Koenig, Wolfgang; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Peters, Annette; Boehm, Bernhard O; Kleber, Marcus E; März, Winfried; Winkelmann, Bernhard R; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Arveiler, Dominique; Cesana, Giancarlo; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Virtamo, Jarmo; Yarnell, John W G; Kuh, Diana; Wong, Andrew; Lind, Lars; de Faire, Ulf; Gigante, Bruna; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Pedersen, Nancy L; Dedoussis, George; Dimitriou, Maria; Kolovou, Genovefa; Kanoni, Stavroula; Stirrups, Kathleen; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Njølstad, Inger; Wilsgaard, Tom; Ganna, Andrea; Rehnberg, Emil; Hingorani, Aroon; Kivimaki, Mika; Kumari, Meena; Assimes, Themistocles L; Barroso, Inês; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B; Deloukas, Panos; Fox, Caroline S; Frayling, Timothy; Groop, Leif C; Haritunians, Talin; Hunter, David; Ingelsson, Erik; Kaplan, Robert; Mohlke, Karen L; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Schlessinger, David; Strachan, David P

    2013-06-01

    Given the anthropometric differences between men and women and previous evidence of sex-difference in genetic effects, we conducted a genome-wide search for sexually dimorphic associations with height, weight, body mass index, waist circumference, hip circumference, and waist-to-hip-ratio (133,723 individuals) and took forward 348 SNPs into follow-up (additional 137,052 individuals) in a total of 94 studies. Seven loci displayed significant sex-difference (FDR<5%), including four previously established (near GRB14/COBLL1, LYPLAL1/SLC30A10, VEGFA, ADAMTS9) and three novel anthropometric trait loci (near MAP3K1, HSD17B4, PPARG), all of which were genome-wide significant in women (P<5×10(-8)), but not in men. Sex-differences were apparent only for waist phenotypes, not for height, weight, BMI, or hip circumference. Moreover, we found no evidence for genetic effects with opposite directions in men versus women. The PPARG locus is of specific interest due to its role in diabetes genetics and therapy. Our results demonstrate the value of sex-specific GWAS to unravel the sexually dimorphic genetic underpinning of complex traits. PMID:23754948

  18. Sex-stratified Genome-wide Association Studies Including 270,000 Individuals Show Sexual Dimorphism in Genetic Loci for Anthropometric Traits

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Anne U.; Monda, Keri L.; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O.; Esko, Tõnu; Mägi, Reedik; Li, Shengxu; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Feitosa, Mary F.; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C.; Day, Felix R.; Fall, Tove; Ferreira, Teresa; Gustafsson, Stefan; Locke, Adam E.; Mathieson, Iain; Scherag, Andre; Vedantam, Sailaja; Wood, Andrew R.; Liang, Liming; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Dimas, Antigone S.; Karpe, Fredrik; Min, Josine L.; Nicholson, George; Clegg, Deborah J.; Person, Thomas; Krohn, Jon P.; Bauer, Sabrina; Buechler, Christa; Eisinger, Kristina; Bonnefond, Amélie; Froguel, Philippe; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Prokopenko, Inga; Waite, Lindsay L.; Harris, Tamara B.; Smith, Albert Vernon; Shuldiner, Alan R.; McArdle, Wendy L.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Grönberg, Henrik; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Li, Guo; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Johnson, Toby; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Teder-Laving, Maris; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Amin, Najaf; Oostra, Ben A.; Kraja, Aldi T.; Province, Michael A.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Ripatti, Samuli; Surakka, Ida; Collins, Francis S.; Saramies, Jouko; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Jula, Antti; Salomaa, Veikko; Erdmann, Jeanette; Hengstenberg, Christian; Loley, Christina; Schunkert, Heribert; Lamina, Claudia; Wichmann, H. Erich; Albrecht, Eva; Gieger, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A.; Johansson, Åsa; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Penninx, Brenda; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Gyllensten, Ulf; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Campbell, Harry; Wilson, James F.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Farrall, Martin; Goel, Anuj; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Estrada, Karol; Uitterlinden, André G.; Hofman, Albert; Zillikens, M. Carola; den Heijer, Martin; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Maschio, Andrea; Hall, Per; Tyrer, Jonathan; Teumer, Alexander; Völzke, Henry; Kovacs, Peter; Tönjes, Anke; Mangino, Massimo; Spector, Tim D.; Hayward, Caroline; Rudan, Igor; Hall, Alistair S.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Attwood, Antony Paul; Sambrook, Jennifer G.; Hung, Joseph; Palmer, Lyle J.; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Sinisalo, Juha; Boucher, Gabrielle; Huikuri, Heikki; Lorentzon, Mattias; Ohlsson, Claes; Eklund, Niina; Eriksson, Johan G.; Barlassina, Cristina; Rivolta, Carlo; Nolte, Ilja M.; Snieder, Harold; Van der Klauw, Melanie M.; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Gejman, Pablo V.; Shi, Jianxin; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Wang, Zhaoming; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Mateo Leach, Irene; Navis, Gerjan; van der Harst, Pim; Martin, Nicholas G.; Medland, Sarah E.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Yang, Jian; Chasman, Daniel I.; Ridker, Paul M.; Rose, Lynda M.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Raitakari, Olli; Absher, Devin; Iribarren, Carlos; Basart, Hanneke; Hovingh, Kees G.; Hyppönen, Elina; Power, Chris; Anderson, Denise; Beilby, John P.; Hui, Jennie; Jolley, Jennifer; Sager, Hendrik; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Schwarz, Peter E. H.; Kristiansson, Kati; Perola, Markus; Lindström, Jaana; Swift, Amy J.; Uusitupa, Matti; Atalay, Mustafa; Lakka, Timo A.; Rauramaa, Rainer; Bolton, Jennifer L.; Fowkes, Gerry; Fraser, Ross M.; Price, Jackie F.; Fischer, Krista; KrjutÅ¡kov, Kaarel; Metspalu, Andres; Mihailov, Evelin; Langenberg, Claudia; Luan, Jian'an; Ong, Ken K.; Chines, Peter S.; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M.; Saaristo, Timo E.; Edkins, Sarah; Franks, Paul W.; Hallmans, Göran; Shungin, Dmitry; Morris, Andrew David; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Erbel, Raimund; Moebus, Susanne; Nöthen, Markus M.; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Hveem, Kristian; Narisu, Narisu; Hamsten, Anders; Humphries, Steve E.; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Tremoli, Elena; Grallert, Harald; Thorand, Barbara; Illig, Thomas; Koenig, Wolfgang; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Peters, Annette; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Kleber, Marcus E.; März, Winfried; Winkelmann, Bernhard R.; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Arveiler, Dominique; Cesana, Giancarlo; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Virtamo, Jarmo; Yarnell, John W. G.; Kuh, Diana; Wong, Andrew; Lind, Lars; de Faire, Ulf; Gigante, Bruna; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Dedoussis, George; Dimitriou, Maria; Kolovou, Genovefa; Kanoni, Stavroula; Stirrups, Kathleen; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Njølstad, Inger; Wilsgaard, Tom; Ganna, Andrea; Rehnberg, Emil; Hingorani, Aroon; Kivimaki, Mika; Kumari, Meena; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Barroso, Inês; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Deloukas, Panos; Fox, Caroline S.; Frayling, Timothy; Groop, Leif C.; Haritunians, Talin; Hunter, David

    2013-01-01

    Given the anthropometric differences between men and women and previous evidence of sex-difference in genetic effects, we conducted a genome-wide search for sexually dimorphic associations with height, weight, body mass index, waist circumference, hip circumference, and waist-to-hip-ratio (133,723 individuals) and took forward 348 SNPs into follow-up (additional 137,052 individuals) in a total of 94 studies. Seven loci displayed significant sex-difference (FDR<5%), including four previously established (near GRB14/COBLL1, LYPLAL1/SLC30A10, VEGFA, ADAMTS9) and three novel anthropometric trait loci (near MAP3K1, HSD17B4, PPARG), all of which were genome-wide significant in women (P<5×10?8), but not in men. Sex-differences were apparent only for waist phenotypes, not for height, weight, BMI, or hip circumference. Moreover, we found no evidence for genetic effects with opposite directions in men versus women. The PPARG locus is of specific interest due to its role in diabetes genetics and therapy. Our results demonstrate the value of sex-specific GWAS to unravel the sexually dimorphic genetic underpinning of complex traits. PMID:23754948

  19. High genome heterozygosity and endemic genetic recombination in the wheat stripe rust fungus

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Wenming; Huang, Lili; Huang, Jinqun; Wang, Xiaojie; Chen, Xianming; Zhao, Jie; Guo, Jun; Zhuang, Hua; Qiu, Chuangzhao; Liu, Jie; Liu, Huiquan; Huang, Xueling; Pei, Guoliang; Zhan, Gangming; Tang, Chunlei; Cheng, Yulin; Liu, Minjie; Zhang, Jinshan; Zhao, Zhongtao; Zhang, Shijie; Han, Qingmei; Han, Dejun; Zhang, Hongchang; Zhao, Jing; Gao, Xiaoning; Wang, Jianfeng; Ni, Peixiang; Dong, Wei; Yang, Linfeng; Yang, Huanming; Xu, Jin-Rong; Zhang, Gengyun; Kang, Zhensheng

    2013-01-01

    Stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), is one of the most destructive diseases of wheat. Here we report a 110-Mb draft sequence of Pst isolate CY32, obtained using a ‘fosmid-to-fosmid’ strategy, to better understand its race evolution and pathogenesis. The Pst genome is highly heterozygous and contains 25,288 protein-coding genes. Compared with non-obligate fungal pathogens, Pst has a more diverse gene composition and more genes encoding secreted proteins. Re-sequencing analysis indicates significant genetic variation among six isolates collected from different continents. Approximately 35% of SNPs are in the coding sequence regions, and half of them are non-synonymous. High genetic diversity in Pst suggests that sexual reproduction has an important role in the origin of different regional races. Our results show the effectiveness of the ‘fosmid-to-fosmid’ strategy for sequencing dikaryotic genomes and the feasibility of genome analysis to understand race evolution in Pst and other obligate pathogens. PMID:24150273

  20. High Genetic Diversity among Community-Associated Staphylococcus aureus in Europe: Results from a Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Rolo, Joana; Miragaia, Maria; Turlej-Rogacka, Agata; Empel, Joanna; Bouchami, Ons; Faria, Nuno A.; Tavares, Ana; Hryniewicz, Waleria; Fluit, Ad C.; de Lencastre, Hermínia

    2012-01-01

    Background Several studies have addressed the epidemiology of community-associated Staphylococcus aureus (CA-SA) in Europe; nonetheless, a comprehensive perspective remains unclear. In this study, we aimed to describe the population structure of CA-SA and to shed light on the origin of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in this continent. Methods and Findings A total of 568 colonization and infection isolates, comprising both MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), were recovered in 16 European countries, from community and community-onset infections. The genetic background of isolates was characterized by molecular typing techniques (spa typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing) and the presence of PVL and ACME was tested by PCR. MRSA were further characterized by SCCmec typing. We found that 59% of all isolates were associated with community-associated clones. Most MRSA were related with USA300 (ST8-IVa and variants) (40%), followed by the European clone (ST80-IVc and derivatives) (28%) and the Taiwan clone (ST59-IVa and related clonal types) (15%). A total of 83% of MRSA carried Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) and 14% carried the arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME). Surprisingly, we found a high genetic diversity among MRSA clonal types (ST-SCCmec), Simpson’s index of diversity?=?0.852 (0.788–0.916). Specifically, about half of the isolates carried novel associations between genetic background and SCCmec. Analysis by BURP showed that some CA-MSSA and CA-MRSA isolates were highly related, suggesting a probable local acquisition/loss of SCCmec. Conclusions Our results imply that CA-MRSA origin, epidemiology and population structure in Europe is very dissimilar from that of USA. PMID:22558099

  1. The genetic architecture of Down syndrome phenotypes revealed by high-resolution analysis

    E-print Network

    Gerstein, Mark

    The genetic architecture of Down syndrome phenotypes revealed by high-resolution analysis of human, CA, and approved May 29, 2009 (received for review December 30, 2008) Down syndrome (DS), or trisomy

  2. Extending glacial refugia for a European tree: genetic markers show that Iberian populations of white elm are native relicts and not introductions

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes-Utrilla, P; Venturas, M; Hollingsworth, P M; Squirrell, J; Collada, C; Stone, G N; Gil, L

    2014-01-01

    Conservation policies usually focus on in situ protection of native populations, a priority that requires accurate assessment of population status. Distinction between native and introduced status can be particularly difficult (and at the same time, is most important) for species whose natural habitat has become both rare and highly fragmented. Here, we address the status of the white elm (Ulmus laevis Pallas), a European riparian tree species whose populations have been fragmented by human activity and is protected wherever it is considered native. Small populations of this species are located in Iberia, where they are unprotected because they are considered introductions due to their rarity. However, Iberia and neighbouring regions in southwestern France have been shown to support discrete glacial refuge populations of many European trees, and the possibility remains that Iberian white elms are native relicts. We used chloroplast RFLPs and nuclear microsatellites to establish the relationship between populations in Iberia and the Central European core distribution. Bayesian approaches revealed significant spatial structure across populations. Those in Iberia and southwestern France shared alleles absent from Central Europe, and showed spatial population structure within Iberia common in recognized native taxa. Iberian populations show a demographic signature of ancient population bottlenecks, while those in Central European show a signature of recent population bottlenecks. These patterns are not consistent with historical introduction of white elm to Iberia, and instead strongly support native status, arguing for immediate implementation of conservation measures for white elm populations in Spain and contiguous areas of southern France. PMID:24022495

  3. Population genetics of purple saxifrage (Saxifraga oppositifolia) in the high Arctic archipelago of Svalbard

    PubMed Central

    Pietiläinen, Maria; Korpelainen, Helena

    2013-01-01

    We investigated patterns of genetic variability in Saxifraga oppositifolia in the isolated Arctic Svalbard archipelago. The genetic analysis included genotyping using nine polymorphic microsatellite markers and sequencing of the nuclear internal transcribed spacer region. Among populations, mean allele numbers per microsatellite locus ranged from 2.0 to 2.6, and 9 % of alleles were unique. Observed (HO) and expected (HE) heterozygosities averaged 0.522 and 0.445, respectively. Typically negative but non-significant FIS values (mean ?0.173) were found in S. oppositifolia populations. FST values were relatively low (mean 0.123). The Bayesian structure analysis provided additional information on population genetic structures. Seven out of 11 studied populations, including populations located both near each other and far apart (distances 5–210 km), showed relatively homogeneous clustering patterns, while one population located on a slope in the main settlement of Longyearbyen possessed a unique genetic structure. The Mantel test proved that there is no significant correlation between genetic and geographical distances. Different growth habits (compact, trailing and intermediate) did not possess distinct genetic compositions based on microsatellite variation. Internal transcribed spacer sequencing revealed 12 polymorphic sites. Among 24 sequenced Svalbard samples, eight haplotypes were detected, none shared by the mainland samples. Population genetic structures of S. oppositifolia in Svalbard show that both genetic variation and differentiation levels are modest, outcrossing is the main mating system, and dispersal and gene flow are important, probably attributable to strong winds and human and animal vectors. PMID:23700503

  4. High-velocity Frictional Behavior of Dunite, Biotite Gneiss, Phyllite and Coal Show Evidence for Melting and Thermal Degasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hara, K. D.; Mizoguchi, K.; Shimamoto, T.

    2004-12-01

    We conducted high-velocity frictional experiments on dunite, biotite gneiss, phyllite gouge and coal gouge at Kyoto University using a rotary high-velocity frictional testing machine. The purpose was to examine the effect of frictional melting in various rock types and to explore the effect of thermal degassing using coal as an analogue for a volatile fault zone. Experiments were conducted dry at equivalent slip rates of 1 m/s (1200 rpm) at normal stresses of 0.6-16 MPa for distances up to 90 m. Solid cylinders (25 mm diameter) of dunite and biotite gneiss were sheared with aluminum-alloy jackets at high stress, whereas phyllite and coal gouges were sheared with Teflon sleeves at low stress. The metal jackets allow high stress experiments to be performed and are inferred to melt before rock melting occurs. Dunite sheared at 10-16 MPa shows a weakening-strengthening followed by second weakening on melting, similar to previous experiments on gabbro without a metal jacket. Dunite melting is confirmed by, as yet unidentified, dendritic microlites, and a rapid reduction of steady-state frictional strength to 0.15. Under similar conditions, biotite gneiss shows apparent melting, but undergoes continuous strengthening without reaching steady state. Bituminous coal gouge sheared at 0.6 MPa undergoes a highly reproducible rapid weakening from 0.75 to 0.2, with odorous white gas emissions, sometimes accompanied by liquid hydrocarbons. Shear stress decreases prior to gasification and rapidly oscillating sample shortening/elongation occurs during gas emission. A slowly sheared sample (15 rpm) did not show weakening or gas emission. This is the first experimental demonstration of weakening associated with devolatilization during rapid slip. Vitrinite reflectance measurements on sheared coal samples may provide constraints on the temperature during gasification. Phyllite gouge sheared under the same conditions shows a gradual weakening to a steady-state strength of about 0.2; the weakening mechanism is not yet understood. Video presentations with mechanical and petrological data will illustrate these different behaviors.

  5. Adaptive Color Polymorphism and Unusually High Local Genetic Diversity in the Side-Blotched Lizard, Uta stansburiana

    PubMed Central

    Micheletti, Steven; Parra, Eliseo; Routman, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, studies of adaptive color variation have become popular as models for examining the genetics of natural selection. We examined color pattern polymorphism and genetic variation in a population of side-blotched lizards (Uta stansburiana) that is found in habitats with both dark (lava) and light colored (granite) substrates. We conducted a limited experiment for adult phenotypic plasticity in laboratory conditions. We recorded both substrate and lizard color patterns in the field to determine whether lizards tended to match their substrate. Finally we examined genetic variation in a gene (melanocortin 1 receptor) that has been shown to affect lizard color in other species and in a presumably neutral gene (mitochondrial cytochrome b). Populations were sampled in the immediate area of the lava flows as well as from a more distant site to examine the role of population structure. Our captive Uta did not change color to match their background. We show that side-blotched lizards tend to match the substrate on which it was caught in the field and that variation in the melanocortin 1 receptor gene does not correlate well with color pattern in this population. Perhaps the most remarkable result is that this population of side-blotched lizards shows extremely high levels of variation at both genetic markers, in the sense of allele numbers, with relatively low levels of between-allele sequence variation. Genetic variation across this small region was as great or greater than that seen in samples of pelagic fish species collected worldwide. Statistical analysis of genetic variation suggests rapid population expansion may be responsible for the high levels of variation. PMID:23133520

  6. The Norwegian PMS2 founder mutation c.989-1G?>?T shows high penetrance of microsatellite instable cancers with normal immunohistochemistry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Using immunohistochemistry (IHC) to select cases for mismatch repair (MMR) genetic testing, we failed to identify a large kindred with the deleterious PMS2 mutation c.989-1G?>?T. The purpose of the study was to examine the sensitivity of IHC and microsatellite instability-analysis (MSI) to identify carriers of the mutation, and to estimate its penetrance and expressions. Methods All carriers and obligate carriers of the mutation were identified. All cancer diagnoses were confirmed. IHC and MSI-analysis were performed on available tumours. Penetrances of cancers included in the Amsterdam and the Bethesda Criteria, for MSI-high tumours and MSI-high and low tumours were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier algorithm. Results Probability for co-segregation of the mutation and cancers by chance was 0.000004. Fifty-six carriers or obligate carriers were identified. There was normal staining for PMS2 in 15/18 (83.3%) of tumours included in the AMS1/AMS2/Bethesda criteria. MSI-analysis showed that 15/21 (71.4%) of tumours were MSI-high and 4/21 (19.0%) were MSI-low. Penetrance at 70 years was 30.6% for AMS1 cancers (colorectal cancers), 42.8% for AMS2 cancers, 47.2% for Bethesda cancers, 55.6% for MSI-high and MSI-low cancers and 52.2% for MSI-high cancers. Conclusions The mutation met class 5 criteria for pathogenicity. IHC was insensitive in detecting tumours caused by the mutation. Penetrance of cancers that displayed MSI was 56% at 70 years. Besides colorectal cancers, the most frequent expressions were carcinoma of the endometrium and breast in females and stomach and prostate in males. PMID:24790682

  7. Topology of genetic associations between regional gray matter volume and intellectual ability: Evidence for a high capacity network.

    PubMed

    Bohlken, Marc M; Brouwer, Rachel M; Mandl, René C W; Hedman, Anna M; van den Heuvel, Martijn P; van Haren, Neeltje E M; Kahn, René S; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E

    2016-01-01

    Intelligence is associated with a network of distributed gray matter areas including the frontal and parietal higher association cortices and primary processing areas of the temporal and occipital lobes. Efficient information transfer between gray matter regions implicated in intelligence is thought to be critical for this trait to emerge. Genetic factors implicated in intelligence and gray matter may promote a high capacity for information transfer. Whether these genetic factors act globally or on local gray matter areas separately is not known. Brain maps of phenotypic and genetic associations between gray matter volume and intelligence were made using structural equation modeling of 3T MRI T1-weighted scans acquired in 167 adult twins of the newly acquired U-TWIN cohort. Subsequently, structural connectivity analyses (DTI) were performed to test the hypothesis that gray matter regions associated with intellectual ability form a densely connected core. Gray matter regions associated with intellectual ability were situated in the right prefrontal, bilateral temporal, bilateral parietal, right occipital and subcortical regions. Regions implicated in intelligence had high structural connectivity density compared to 10,000 reference networks (p=0.031). The genetic association with intelligence was for 39% explained by a genetic source unique to these regions (independent of total brain volume), this source specifically implicated the right supramarginal gyrus. Using a twin design, we show that intelligence is genetically represented in a spatially distributed and densely connected network of gray matter regions providing a high capacity infrastructure. Although genes for intelligence have overlap with those for total brain volume, we present evidence that there are genes for intelligence that act specifically on the subset of brain areas that form an efficient brain network. PMID:26424180

  8. Genetic Consequences of Forest Fragmentation for a Highly Specialized Arboreal Mammal - the Edible Dormouse

    PubMed Central

    Fietz, Joanna; Tomiuk, Jürgen; Loeschcke, Volker; Weis-Dootz, Tanja; Segelbacher, Gernot

    2014-01-01

    Habitat loss and fragmentation represent the most serious extinction threats for many species and have been demonstrated to be especially detrimental for mammals. Particularly, highly specialized species with low dispersal abilities will encounter a high risk of extinction in fragmented landscapes. Here we studied the edible dormouse (Glis glis), a small arboreal mammal that is distributed throughout Central Europe, where forests are mostly fragmented at different spatial scales. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of habitat fragmentation on genetic population structures using the example of edible dormouse populations inhabiting forest fragments in south western Germany. We genotyped 380 adult individuals captured between 2001 and 2009 in four different forest fragments and one large continuous forest using 14 species-specific microsatellites. We hypothesised, that populations in small forest patches have a lower genetic diversity and are more isolated compared to populations living in continuous forests. In accordance with our expectations we found that dormice inhabiting forest fragments were isolated from each other. Furthermore, their genetic population structure was more unstable over the study period than in the large continuous forest. Even though we could not detect lower genetic variability within individuals inhabiting forest fragments, strong genetic isolation and an overall high risk to mate with close relatives might be precursors to a reduced genetic variability and the onset of inbreeding depression. Results of this study highlight that connectivity among habitat fragments can already be strongly hampered before genetic erosion within small and isolated populations becomes evident. PMID:24505390

  9. Ocean circulation model predicts high genetic structure observed in a long-lived pelagic developer.

    PubMed

    Sunday, J M; Popovic, I; Palen, W J; Foreman, M G G; Hart, M W

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the movement of genes and individuals across marine seascapes is a long-standing challenge in marine ecology and can inform our understanding of local adaptation, the persistence and movement of populations, and the spatial scale of effective management. Patterns of gene flow in the ocean are often inferred based on population genetic analyses coupled with knowledge of species' dispersive life histories. However, genetic structure is the result of time-integrated processes and may not capture present-day connectivity between populations. Here, we use a high-resolution oceanographic circulation model to predict larval dispersal along the complex coastline of western Canada that includes the transition between two well-studied zoogeographic provinces. We simulate dispersal in a benthic sea star with a 6-10 week pelagic larval phase and test predictions of this model against previously observed genetic structure including a strong phylogeographic break within the zoogeographical transition zone. We also test predictions with new genetic sampling in a site within the phylogeographic break. We find that the coupled genetic and circulation model predicts the high degree of genetic structure observed in this species, despite its long pelagic duration. High genetic structure on this complex coastline can thus be explained through ocean circulation patterns, which tend to retain passive larvae within 20-50 km of their parents, suggesting a necessity for close-knit design of Marine Protected Area networks. PMID:25231198

  10. High levels of genetic diversity of Plasmodium falciparum populations in Papua New Guinea despite variable infection prevalence.

    PubMed

    Barry, Alyssa E; Schultz, Lee; Senn, Nicholas; Nale, Joe; Kiniboro, Benson; Siba, Peter M; Mueller, Ivo; Reeder, John C

    2013-04-01

    High levels of genetic diversity in Plasmodium falciparum populations are an obstacle to malaria control. Here, we investigate the relationship between local variation in malaria epidemiology and parasite genetic diversity in Papua New Guinea (PNG). Cross-sectional malaria surveys were performed in 14 villages spanning four distinct malaria-endemic areas on the north coast, including one area that was sampled during the dry season. High-resolution msp2 genotyping of 2,147 blood samples identified 761 P. falciparum infections containing a total of 1,392 clones whose genotypes were used to measure genetic diversity. Considerable variability in infection prevalence and mean multiplicity of infection was observed at all of the study sites, with the area sampled during the dry season showing particularly striking local variability. Genetic diversity was strongly associated with multiplicity of infection but not with infection prevalence. In highly endemic areas, differences in infection prevalence may not translate into a decrease in parasite population diversity. PMID:23400571

  11. High Levels of Genetic Diversity of Plasmodium falciparum Populations in Papua New Guinea despite Variable Infection Prevalence

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Alyssa E.; Schultz, Lee; Senn, Nicholas; Nale, Joe; Kiniboro, Benson; Siba, Peter M.; Mueller, Ivo; Reeder, John C.

    2013-01-01

    High levels of genetic diversity in Plasmodium falciparum populations are an obstacle to malaria control. Here, we investigate the relationship between local variation in malaria epidemiology and parasite genetic diversity in Papua New Guinea (PNG). Cross-sectional malaria surveys were performed in 14 villages spanning four distinct malaria-endemic areas on the north coast, including one area that was sampled during the dry season. High-resolution msp2 genotyping of 2,147 blood samples identified 761 P. falciparum infections containing a total of 1,392 clones whose genotypes were used to measure genetic diversity. Considerable variability in infection prevalence and mean multiplicity of infection was observed at all of the study sites, with the area sampled during the dry season showing particularly striking local variability. Genetic diversity was strongly associated with multiplicity of infection but not with infection prevalence. In highly endemic areas, differences in infection prevalence may not translate into a decrease in parasite population diversity. PMID:23400571

  12. High genetic diversity in the endangered and narrowly distributed amphibian species Leptobrachium leishanense.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Luo, Zhenhua; Zhao, Mian; Wu, Hua

    2015-09-01

    Threatened species typically have a small or declining population size, which make them highly susceptible to loss of genetic diversity through genetic drift and inbreeding. Genetic diversity determines the evolutionary potential of a species; therefore, maintaining the genetic diversity of threatened species is essential for their conservation. In this study, we assessed the genetic diversity of the adaptive major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes in an endangered and narrowly distributed amphibian species, Leptobrachium leishanense in Southwest China. We compared the genetic variation of MHC class I genes with that observed in neutral markers (5 microsatellite loci and cytochrome b gene) to elucidate the relative roles of genetic drift and natural selection in shaping the current MHC polymorphism in this species. We found a high level of genetic diversity in this population at both MHC and neutral markers compared with other threatened amphibian species. Historical positive selection was evident in the MHC class I genes. The higher allelic richness in MHC markers compared with that of microsatellite loci suggests that selection rather than genetic drift plays a prominent role in shaping the MHC variation pattern, as drift can affect all the genome in a similar way but selection directly targets MHC genes. Although demographic analysis revealed no recent bottleneck events in L. leishanense, additional population decline will accelerate the dangerous status for this species. We suggest that the conservation management of L. leishanense should concentrate on maximizing the retention of genetic diversity through preventing their continuous population decline. Protecting their living habitats and forbidding illegal hunting are the most important measures for conservation of L. leishanense. PMID:26037662

  13. DRD4 Long Allele Carriers Show Heightened Attention to High-Priority Items Relative to Low-Priority Items

    PubMed Central

    Gorlick, Marissa A.; Worthy, Darrell A.; Knopik, Valerie S.; McGeary, John E.; Beevers, Christopher G.; Maddox, W. Todd

    2014-01-01

    Humans with 7 or more repeats in exon III of the DRD4 gene (long DRD4 carriers) sometimes demonstrate impaired attention, as seen in ADHD, and at other times demonstrate heightened attention, as seen in addictive behavior. Though the clinical effects of DRD4 are the focus of much work, this gene may not necessarily serve as a ‘risk’ gene for attentional deficits, but as a plasticity gene where attention is heightened for priority items in the environment and impaired for minor items. Here we examine the role of DRD4 in two tasks that benefit from selective attention to high-priority information. We examine a category learning task where performance is supported by focusing on features and updating verbal rules. Here selective attention to the most salient features is associated with good performance. In addition, we examine the Operation Span Task (OSPAN), a working memory capacity task that relies on selective attention to update and maintain items in memory while also performing a secondary task. Long DRD4 carriers show superior performance relative to short DRD4 homozygotes (six or less tandem repeats) in both the category learning and OSPAN tasks. These results suggest that DRD4 may serve as a ‘plasticity’ gene where individuals with the long allele show heightened selective attention to high-priority items in the environment, which can be beneficial in the appropriate context. PMID:25244120

  14. Awareness of Societal Issues Among High School Biology Teachers Teaching Genetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarowitz, Reuven; Bloch, Ilit

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how aware high school biology teachers are of societal issues (values, moral, ethic, and legal issues) while teaching genetics, genetics engineering, molecular genetics, human heredity, and evolution. The study includes a short historical review of World War II atrocities during the Holocaust when scientists from all the above-mentioned disciplines had been involved in trying to support and develop the eugenics theories. It investigates pre- and postwar theories of the eugenics movement in the United States which were implemented successfully in Germany and a literature survey of the studies of societal issues related to these subjects. The sample consisted of 30 male and female biology teachers. Enclosed are teachers' answers in favor or against including debates about societal issues in their classrooms while teaching the disciplines mentioned above. Teachers' answers were analyzed in relation to three variables: years of teaching experience, gender, and religion faith. Data were collected from questionnaires and personal interviews and analyzed according to qualitative and quantitative methods. The results show that amongst the teachers there is a medium to low level of awareness of societal issues, while mainly emphasizing scientific subjects in preparation of matriculation examinations. The majority of the teachers do not include societal issues in their teaching, but if students raise these issues, teachers claimed to address them. No differences in teachers' opinions to societal issues were found in relation to gender or religious faith. Teachers with more years of teaching experience tend to teach with a more Science, Technology, and Society (STS) approach than novice teachers. The results are discussed in relation to teachers' professional development and teaching strategies are suggested to be used in their classrooms based on a STS approach, which includes the societal issues as a main goal.

  15. Fractionation of bovine caseins by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography: identification of a genetic variant.

    PubMed

    Carles, C

    1986-02-01

    Samples of reduced whole casein from genetically typed individual cows were quantitatively separated into their main components, alpha s1-, alpha s2-, beta- and kappa-caseins by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) using a mobile phase of phosphate-buffered aqueous propan-2-ol containing sodium dodecyl sulphate and an octadecylsilyl stationary phase. One casein sample was found to give two peaks of beta-casein of approximately equal areas. RP-HPLC of tryptic digests of the two separated peak fractions gave identical patterns with the exception of one peptide peak with different retention times. Amino acid analyses performed on both fractions showed that they corresponded to peptide 114-169 of beta-casein A1. The atypical beta-casein differed from the typical one by a Pro----Leu substitution in region 114-169. PMID:3958291

  16. High Urban Breeding Densities Do Not Disrupt Genetic Monogamy in a Bird Species

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Martínez, Sol; Carrete, Martina; Roques, Séverine; Rebolo-Ifrán, Natalia; Tella, José L.

    2014-01-01

    Urbanization causes widespread endangerment of biodiversity worldwide. However, some species successfully colonize cities reaching higher densities than in their rural habitats. In these cases, although urban city dwellers may apparently be taking advantage of these new environments, they also face new ecological conditions that may induce behavioural changes. For example, the frequency of alternative reproductive behaviours such as extra-pair paternity and intraspecific brood parasitism might increase with breeding densities. Here, using a panel of 17 microsatellites, we tested whether increments in breeding densities such as those associated with urban invasion processes alter genetic monogamy in the burrowing owl Athene cunicularia. Our results show low rates of extra-pair paternity (1.47%), but relatively high levels of intraspecific brood parasitism (8.82%). However, we were not able to detect differences in the frequency at which either alternative reproductive behaviour occurs along a strong breeding density gradient. Further research is needed to properly ascertain the role of other social and ecological factors in the frequency at which this species presents alternative reproductive strategies. Meanwhile, our results suggest that genetic monogamy is maintained despite the increment in conspecific density associated with a recent urban invasion process. PMID:24614308

  17. High urban breeding densities do not disrupt genetic monogamy in a bird species.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Martínez, Sol; Carrete, Martina; Roques, Séverine; Rebolo-Ifrán, Natalia; Tella, José L

    2014-01-01

    Urbanization causes widespread endangerment of biodiversity worldwide. However, some species successfully colonize cities reaching higher densities than in their rural habitats. In these cases, although urban city dwellers may apparently be taking advantage of these new environments, they also face new ecological conditions that may induce behavioural changes. For example, the frequency of alternative reproductive behaviours such as extra-pair paternity and intraspecific brood parasitism might increase with breeding densities. Here, using a panel of 17 microsatellites, we tested whether increments in breeding densities such as those associated with urban invasion processes alter genetic monogamy in the burrowing owl Athene cunicularia. Our results show low rates of extra-pair paternity (1.47%), but relatively high levels of intraspecific brood parasitism (8.82%). However, we were not able to detect differences in the frequency at which either alternative reproductive behaviour occurs along a strong breeding density gradient. Further research is needed to properly ascertain the role of other social and ecological factors in the frequency at which this species presents alternative reproductive strategies. Meanwhile, our results suggest that genetic monogamy is maintained despite the increment in conspecific density associated with a recent urban invasion process. PMID:24614308

  18. High affinity and covalent-binding microtubule stabilizing agents show activity in chemotherapy-resistant acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Pera, Benet; Calvo-Vidal, M Nieves; Ambati, Srikanth; Jordi, Michel; Kahn, Alissa; Díaz, J Fernando; Fang, Weishuo; Altmann, Karl-Heinz; Cerchietti, Leandro; Moore, Malcolm A S

    2015-11-01

    Treatment failure in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is frequently due to the persistence of a cell population resistant to chemotherapy through different mechanisms, in which drug efflux via ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins, specifically P-glycoprotein, is one of the most recognized. However, disappointing results from clinical trials employing inhibitors for these transporters have demonstrated the need to adopt different strategies. We hypothesized that microtubule targeting compounds presenting high affinity or covalent binding could overcome the effect of ABC transporters. We therefore evaluated the activity of the high-affinity paclitaxel analog CTX-40 as well as the covalent binder zampanolide (ZMP) in AML cells. Both molecules were active in chemosensitive as well as in chemoresistant cell lines overexpressing P-glycoprotein. Moreover, ZMP or CTX-40 in combination with daunorubicin showed synergistic killing without increased in vitro hematopoietic toxicity. In a primary AML sample, we further demonstrated that ZMP and CTX-40 are active in progenitor and differentiated leukemia cell populations. In sum, our data indicate that high affinity and covalent-binding anti-microtubule agents are active in AML cells otherwise chemotherapy resistant. PMID:26277539

  19. "The Show"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehring, John

    2004-01-01

    For the past 16 years, the blue-collar city of Huntington, West Virginia, has rolled out the red carpet to welcome young wrestlers and their families as old friends. They have come to town chasing the same dream for a spot in what many of them call "The Show". For three days, under the lights of an arena packed with 5,000 fans, the state's best…

  20. Genetic Structure Is Associated with Phenotypic Divergence in Floral Traits and Reproductive Investment in a High-Altitude Orchid from the Iron Quadrangle, Southeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Leles, Bruno; Chaves, Anderson V.; Russo, Philip; Batista, João A. N.; Lovato, Maria Bernadete

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the role of Neotropical montane landscapes in shaping genetic connectivity and local adaptation is essential for understanding the evolutionary processes that have shaped the extraordinary species diversity in these regions. In the present study, we examined the landscape genetics, estimated genetic diversity, and explored genetic relationships with morphological variability and reproductive strategies in seven natural populations of Cattleya liliputana (Orchidaceae). Nuclear microsatellite markers were used for genetic analyses. Spatial Bayesian clustering and population-based analyses revealed significant genetic structuring and high genetic diversity (He = 0.733 ± 0.03). Strong differentiation was found between populations over short spatial scales (FST = 0.138, p < 0.001), reflecting the landscape discontinuity and isolation. Monmonier´s maximum difference algorithm, Bayesian analysis on STRUCTURE and principal component analysis identified one major genetic discontinuity between populations. Divergent genetic groups showed phenotypic divergence in flower traits and reproductive strategies. Increased sexual reproductive effort was associated with rock outcrop type and may be a response to adverse conditions for growth and vegetative reproduction. Here we discuss the effect of restricted gene flow, local adaptation and phenotypic plasticity as drivers of population differentiation in Neotropical montane rock outcrops. PMID:25756994

  1. Construction of High-Density Genetic Map in Barley through Restriction-Site Associated DNA Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Gaofeng; Zhang, Qisen; Zhang, Xiao-Qi; Tan, Cong; Li, Chengdao

    2015-01-01

    Genetic maps in barley are usually constructed from a limited number of molecular markers such as SSR (simple sequence repeat) and DarT (diversity arrays technology). These markers must be first developed before being used for genotyping. Here, we introduce a new strategy based on sequencing progeny of a doubled haploid population from Baudin × AC Metcalfe to construct a genetic map in barley. About 13,547 polymorphic SNP tags with >93% calling rate were selected to construct the genetic map. A total of 12,998 SNP tags were anchored to seven linkage groups which spanned a cumulative 967.6 cM genetic distance. The high-density genetic map can be used for QTL mapping and the assembly of WGS and BAC contigs. The genetic map was evaluated for its effectiveness and efficiency in QTL mapping and candidate gene identification. A major QTL for plant height was mapped at 105.5 cM on chromosome 3H. This QTL with LOD value of 13.01 explained 44.5% of phenotypic variation. This strategy will enable rapid and efficient establishment of high-density genetic maps in other species. PMID:26182149

  2. Construction of High-Density Genetic Map in Barley through Restriction-Site Associated DNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Gaofeng; Zhang, Qisen; Zhang, Xiao-qi; Tan, Cong; Li, Chengdao

    2015-01-01

    Genetic maps in barley are usually constructed from a limited number of molecular markers such as SSR (simple sequence repeat) and DarT (diversity arrays technology). These markers must be first developed before being used for genotyping. Here, we introduce a new strategy based on sequencing progeny of a doubled haploid population from Baudin × AC Metcalfe to construct a genetic map in barley. About 13,547 polymorphic SNP tags with >93% calling rate were selected to construct the genetic map. A total of 12,998 SNP tags were anchored to seven linkage groups which spanned a cumulative 967.6 cM genetic distance. The high-density genetic map can be used for QTL mapping and the assembly of WGS and BAC contigs. The genetic map was evaluated for its effectiveness and efficiency in QTL mapping and candidate gene identification. A major QTL for plant height was mapped at 105.5 cM on chromosome 3H. This QTL with LOD value of 13.01 explained 44.5% of phenotypic variation. This strategy will enable rapid and efficient establishment of high-density genetic maps in other species. PMID:26182149

  3. High Genetic Diversity and Novelty in Eukaryotic Plankton Assemblages Inhabiting Saline Lakes in the Qaidam Basin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiali; Wang, Fang; Chu, Limin; Wang, Hao; Zhong, Zhiping; Liu, Zhipei; Gao, Jianyong; Duan, Hairong

    2014-01-01

    Saline lakes are intriguing ecosystems harboring extremely productive microbial communities in spite of their extreme environmental conditions. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the genetic diversity (18S rRNA gene) of the planktonic microbial eukaryotes (nano- and picoeukaryotes) in six different inland saline lakes located in the Qaidam Basin. The novelty level are high, with about 11.23% of the whole dataset showing <90% identity to any previously reported sequence in GenBank. At least 4 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in mesosaline lakes, while up to eighteen OTUs in hypersaline lakes show very low CCM and CEM scores, indicating that these sequences are highly distantly related to any existing sequence. Most of the 18S rRNA gene sequence reads obtained in investigated mesosaline lakes is closely related to Holozoa group (48.13%), whereas Stramenopiles (26.65%) and Alveolates (10.84%) are the next most common groups. Hypersaline lakes in the Qaidam Basin are also dominated by Holozoa group, accounting for 26.65% of the total number of sequence reads. Notably, Chlorophyta group are only found in high abundance in Lake Gasikule (28.00%), whereas less represented in other hypersaline lakes such as Gahai (0.50%) and Xiaochaidan (1.15%). Further analysis show that the compositions of planktonic eukaryotic assemblages are also most variable between different sampling sites in the same lake. Out of the parameters, four show significant correlation to this CCA: altitude, calcium, sodium and potassium concentrations. Overall, this study shows important gaps in the current knowledge about planktonic microbial eukaryotes inhabiting Qaidam Basin (hyper) saline water bodies. The identified diversity and novelty patterns among eukaryotic plankton assemblages in saline lake are of great importance for understanding and interpreting their ecology and evolution. PMID:25401703

  4. Genetic algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Lui; Bayer, Steven E.

    1991-01-01

    Genetic algorithms are mathematical, highly parallel, adaptive search procedures (i.e., problem solving methods) based loosely on the processes of natural genetics and Darwinian survival of the fittest. Basic genetic algorithms concepts are introduced, genetic algorithm applications are introduced, and results are presented from a project to develop a software tool that will enable the widespread use of genetic algorithm technology.

  5. A case of heat stroke showing abnormal diffuse high intensity of the cerebral and cerebellar cortices in diffusion weighted image.

    PubMed

    Kuzume, Daisuke; Inoue, Shin; Takamatsu, Masahiro; Sajima, Kazuaki; Kon-No, Yuko; Yamasaki, Masahiro

    2015-11-21

    Cerebellar ataxia is most neurological sequelae in heat stroke. Heat stroke with cerebral cortical lesions is very rare. A 39-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of coma, shock status and hyperthermia on arrival and developed disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Hypotension was transient and all vital signs were resumed to normal within a week. Though normal vital sign, his coma state continued throughout. A diffusion weighted image (DWI) on MRI disclosed abnormal diffuse high intensity in the cerebral and cerebellar cortex without decreased apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). These cortical changes were supported to the vasogenic edema induced by heat stroke. Four months later after the onset, the abnormal signal intensity in the cerebral and cerebellar cortex disappeared and cortical atrophy with ventricular enlargement developed. Electroencephalogram (EEG) of several times showed no electrical activities. The brain SPECT ((123)I-IMP) disclosed all over decreased blood flow. His vegetative state continued. PMID:26399667

  6. Population structure and genetic diversity of black redhorse (Moxostoma duquesnei) in a highly fragmented watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reid, S.M.; Wilson, C.C.; Mandrak, N.E.; Carl, L.M.

    2008-01-01

    Dams have the potential to affect population size and connectivity, reduce genetic diversity, and increase genetic differences among isolated riverine fish populations. Previous research has reported adverse effects on the distribution and demographics of black redhorse (Moxostoma duquesnei), a threatened fish species in Canada. However, effects on genetic diversity and population structure are unknown. We used microsatellite DNA markers to assess the number of genetic populations in the Grand River (Ontario) and to test whether dams have resulted in a loss of genetic diversity and increased genetic differentiation among populations. Three hundred and seventy-seven individuals from eight Grand River sites were genotyped at eight microsatellite loci. Measures of genetic diversity were moderately high and not significantly different among populations; strong evidence of recent population bottlenecks was not detected. Pairwise FST and exact tests identified weak (global FST = 0.011) but statistically significant population structure, although little population structuring was detected using either genetic distances or an individual-based clustering method. Neither geographic distance nor the number of intervening dams were correlated with pairwise differences among populations. Tests for regional equilibrium indicate that Grand River populations were either in equilibrium between gene flow and genetic drift or that gene flow is more influential than drift. While studies on other species have identified strong dam-related effects on genetic diversity and population structure, this study suggests that barrier permeability, river fragment length and the ecological characteristics of affected species can counterbalance dam-related effects. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  7. Dictyostelium discoideum has a highly Q/N-rich proteome and shows an unusual resilience to protein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Malinovska, Liliana; Palm, Sandra; Gibson, Kimberley; Verbavatz, Jean-Marc; Alberti, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Many protein-misfolding diseases are caused by proteins carrying prion-like domains. These proteins show sequence similarity to yeast prion proteins, which can interconvert between an intrinsically disordered and an aggregated prion state. The natural presence of prions in yeast has provided important insight into disease mechanisms and cellular proteostasis. However, little is known about prions in other organisms, and it is not yet clear whether the findings in yeast can be generalized. Using bioinformatics tools, we show that Dictyostelium discoideum has the highest content of prion-like proteins of all organisms investigated to date, suggesting that its proteome has a high overall aggregation propensity. To study mechanisms regulating these proteins, we analyze the behavior of several well-characterized prion-like proteins, such as an expanded version of human huntingtin exon 1 (Q103) and the prion domain of the yeast prion protein Sup35 (NM), in D. discoideum. We find that these proteins remain soluble and are innocuous to D. discoideum, in contrast to other organisms, where they form cytotoxic cytosolic aggregates. However, when exposed to conditions that compromise molecular chaperones, these proteins aggregate and become cytotoxic. We show that the disaggregase Hsp101, a molecular chaperone of the Hsp100 family, dissolves heat-induced aggregates and promotes thermotolerance. Furthermore, prion-like proteins accumulate in the nucleus, where they are targeted by the ubiquitin–proteasome system. Our data suggest that D. discoideum has undergone specific adaptations that increase the proteostatic capacity of this organism and allow for an efficient regulation of its prion-like proteome. PMID:25941378

  8. Dictyostelium discoideum has a highly Q/N-rich proteome and shows an unusual resilience to protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Malinovska, Liliana; Palm, Sandra; Gibson, Kimberley; Verbavatz, Jean-Marc; Alberti, Simon

    2015-05-19

    Many protein-misfolding diseases are caused by proteins carrying prion-like domains. These proteins show sequence similarity to yeast prion proteins, which can interconvert between an intrinsically disordered and an aggregated prion state. The natural presence of prions in yeast has provided important insight into disease mechanisms and cellular proteostasis. However, little is known about prions in other organisms, and it is not yet clear whether the findings in yeast can be generalized. Using bioinformatics tools, we show that Dictyostelium discoideum has the highest content of prion-like proteins of all organisms investigated to date, suggesting that its proteome has a high overall aggregation propensity. To study mechanisms regulating these proteins, we analyze the behavior of several well-characterized prion-like proteins, such as an expanded version of human huntingtin exon 1 (Q103) and the prion domain of the yeast prion protein Sup35 (NM), in D. discoideum. We find that these proteins remain soluble and are innocuous to D. discoideum, in contrast to other organisms, where they form cytotoxic cytosolic aggregates. However, when exposed to conditions that compromise molecular chaperones, these proteins aggregate and become cytotoxic. We show that the disaggregase Hsp101, a molecular chaperone of the Hsp100 family, dissolves heat-induced aggregates and promotes thermotolerance. Furthermore, prion-like proteins accumulate in the nucleus, where they are targeted by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Our data suggest that D. discoideum has undergone specific adaptations that increase the proteostatic capacity of this organism and allow for an efficient regulation of its prion-like proteome. PMID:25941378

  9. Tree Rings Show Recent High Summer-Autumn Precipitation in Northwest Australia Is Unprecedented within the Last Two Centuries.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Alison J; Cook, Edward R; Palmer, Jonathan G; Turney, Chris S M; Page, Gerald F M; Grierson, Pauline F

    2015-01-01

    An understanding of past hydroclimatic variability is critical to resolving the significance of recent recorded trends in Australian precipitation and informing climate models. Our aim was to reconstruct past hydroclimatic variability in semi-arid northwest Australia to provide a longer context within which to examine a recent period of unusually high summer-autumn precipitation. We developed a 210-year ring-width chronology from Callitris columellaris, which was highly correlated with summer-autumn (Dec-May) precipitation (r = 0.81; 1910-2011; p < 0.0001) and autumn (Mar-May) self-calibrating Palmer drought severity index (scPDSI, r = 0.73; 1910-2011; p < 0.0001) across semi-arid northwest Australia. A linear regression model was used to reconstruct precipitation and explained 66% of the variance in observed summer-autumn precipitation. Our reconstruction reveals inter-annual to multi-decadal scale variation in hydroclimate of the region during the last 210 years, typically showing periods of below average precipitation extending from one to three decades and periods of above average precipitation, which were often less than a decade. Our results demonstrate that the last two decades (1995-2012) have been unusually wet (average summer-autumn precipitation of 310 mm) compared to the previous two centuries (average summer-autumn precipitation of 229 mm), coinciding with both an anomalously high frequency and intensity of tropical cyclones in northwest Australia and the dominance of the positive phase of the Southern Annular Mode. PMID:26039148

  10. Tree Rings Show Recent High Summer-Autumn Precipitation in Northwest Australia Is Unprecedented within the Last Two Centuries

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Alison J.; Cook, Edward R.; Palmer, Jonathan G.; Turney, Chris S. M.; Page, Gerald F. M.; Grierson, Pauline F.

    2015-01-01

    An understanding of past hydroclimatic variability is critical to resolving the significance of recent recorded trends in Australian precipitation and informing climate models. Our aim was to reconstruct past hydroclimatic variability in semi-arid northwest Australia to provide a longer context within which to examine a recent period of unusually high summer-autumn precipitation. We developed a 210-year ring-width chronology from Callitris columellaris, which was highly correlated with summer-autumn (Dec–May) precipitation (r = 0.81; 1910–2011; p < 0.0001) and autumn (Mar–May) self-calibrating Palmer drought severity index (scPDSI, r = 0.73; 1910–2011; p < 0.0001) across semi-arid northwest Australia. A linear regression model was used to reconstruct precipitation and explained 66% of the variance in observed summer-autumn precipitation. Our reconstruction reveals inter-annual to multi-decadal scale variation in hydroclimate of the region during the last 210 years, typically showing periods of below average precipitation extending from one to three decades and periods of above average precipitation, which were often less than a decade. Our results demonstrate that the last two decades (1995–2012) have been unusually wet (average summer-autumn precipitation of 310 mm) compared to the previous two centuries (average summer-autumn precipitation of 229 mm), coinciding with both an anomalously high frequency and intensity of tropical cyclones in northwest Australia and the dominance of the positive phase of the Southern Annular Mode. PMID:26039148

  11. Apolipoprotein E-knockout mice on high-fat diet show autoimmune injury on kidney and aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuehai; Lu, Huixia; Huang, Ziyang; Lin, Huili; Lei, Zhenmin; Tang, Mengxiong; Gao, Fei; Dong, Mei; Li, Rongda; Lin, Ling

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Titers of ANA and anti-dsDNA antibodies were similar in ApoE{sup ?/?} and Fas{sup ?/?} mice. • The spleen weights and glomerular areas were similar in ApoE{sup ?/?} and Fas{sup ?/?} mice. • Expressions of IgG and C3 in glomeruli were similar in ApoE{sup ?/?} and Fas{sup ?/?} mice. • IgG, C3 and macrophage infiltration in aortic plaques were found in ApoE{sup ?/?} mice. - Abstract: Background: Apolipoprotein E-knockout (ApoE{sup ?/?}) mice is a classic model of atherosclerosis. We have found that ApoE{sup ?/?} mice showed splenomegaly, higher titers of serum anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) and anti-dsDNA antibody compared with C57B6/L (B6) mice. However, whether ApoE{sup ?/?} mice show autoimmune injury remains unclear. Methods and results: Six females and six males in each group, ApoE{sup ?/?}, Fas{sup ?/?} and B6 mice, were used in this study. The titers of serum ANA, anti-dsDNA antibody and creatinine and urine protein were measured by ELISA after 4 months of high-fat diet. The spleen weight and the glomerular area were determined. The expressions of IgG, C3 and macrophage in kidney and atherosclerotic plaque were detected by immunostaining followed by morphometric analysis. Similar to the characteristics of Fas{sup ?/?} mice, a model of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), ApoE{sup ?/?} mice, especially female, displayed significant increases of spleen weight and glomerular area when compared to B6 mice. Also, elevated titers of serum ANA, anti-dsDNA antibody and creatinine and urine protein. Moreover, the expressions of IgG, C3 and macrophage in glomeruli and aortic plaques were found in ApoE{sup ?/?} mice. In addition, the IgG and C3 expressions in glomeruli and plaques significantly increased (or a trend of increase) in female ApoE{sup ?/?} mice compared with males. Conclusions: Apolipoprotein E-knockout mice on high-fat diet show autoimmune injury on kidney and aorta.

  12. Maternal Style Selectively Shapes Amygdalar Development and Social Behavior in Rats Genetically Prone to High Anxiety.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Joshua L; Glover, Matthew E; Pugh, Phyllis C; Fant, Andrew D; Simmons, Rebecca K; Akil, Huda; Kerman, Ilan A; Clinton, Sarah M

    2015-01-01

    The early-life environment critically influences neurodevelopment and later psychological health. To elucidate neural and environmental elements that shape emotional behavior, we developed a rat model of individual differences in temperament and environmental reactivity. We selectively bred rats for high versus low behavioral response to novelty and found that high-reactive (bred high-responder, bHR) rats displayed greater risk-taking, impulsivity and aggression relative to low-reactive (bred low-responder, bLR) rats, which showed high levels of anxiety/depression-like behavior and certain stress vulnerability. The bHR/bLR traits are heritable, but prior work revealed bHR/bLR maternal style differences, with bLR dams showing more maternal attention than bHRs. The present study implemented a cross-fostering paradigm to examine the contribution of maternal behavior to the brain development and emotional behavior of bLR offspring. bLR offspring were reared by biological bLR mothers or fostered to a bLR or bHR mother and then evaluated to determine the effects on the following: (1) developmental gene expression in the hippocampus and amygdala and (2) adult anxiety/depression-like behavior. Genome-wide expression profiling showed that cross-fostering bLR rats to bHR mothers shifted developmental gene expression in the amygdala (but not hippocampus), reduced adult anxiety and enhanced social interaction. Our findings illustrate how an early-life manipulation such as cross-fostering changes the brain's developmental trajectory and ultimately impacts adult behavior. Moreover, while earlier studies highlighted hippocampal differences contributing to the bHR/bLR phenotypes, our results point to a role of the amygdala as well. Future work will pursue genetic and cellular mechanisms within the amygdala that contribute to bHR/bLR behavior either at baseline or following environmental manipulations. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel. PMID:25791846

  13. Combined analyses of kinship and FST suggest potential drivers of chaotic genetic patchiness in high gene-flow populations

    PubMed Central

    Iacchei, Matthew; Ben-Horin, Tal; Selkoe, Kimberly A; Bird, Christopher E; García-Rodríguez, Francisco J; Toonen, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    We combine kinship estimates with traditional F-statistics to explain contemporary drivers of population genetic differentiation despite high gene flow. We investigate range-wide population genetic structure of the California spiny (or red rock) lobster (Panulirus interruptus) and find slight, but significant global population differentiation in mtDNA (?ST = 0.006, P = 0.001; Dest_Chao = 0.025) and seven nuclear microsatellites (FST = 0.004, P < 0.001; Dest_Chao = 0.03), despite the species’ 240- to 330-day pelagic larval duration. Significant population structure does not correlate with distance between sampling locations, and pairwise FST between adjacent sites often exceeds that among geographically distant locations. This result would typically be interpreted as unexplainable, chaotic genetic patchiness. However, kinship levels differ significantly among sites (pseudo-F16,988 = 1.39, P = 0.001), and ten of 17 sample sites have significantly greater numbers of kin than expected by chance (P < 0.05). Moreover, a higher proportion of kin within sites strongly correlates with greater genetic differentiation among sites (Dest_Chao, R2 = 0.66, P < 0.005). Sites with elevated mean kinship were geographically proximate to regions of high upwelling intensity (R2 = 0.41, P = 0.0009). These results indicate that P. interruptus does not maintain a single homogenous population, despite extreme dispersal potential. Instead, these lobsters appear to either have substantial localized recruitment or maintain planktonic larval cohesiveness whereby siblings more likely settle together than disperse across sites. More broadly, our results contribute to a growing number of studies showing that low FST and high family structure across populations can coexist, illuminating the foundations of cryptic genetic patterns and the nature of marine dispersal. PMID:23802550

  14. High-Density SNP Genotyping of Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) Reveals Patterns of Genetic Variation

    E-print Network

    Douches, David S.

    High-Density SNP Genotyping of Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) Reveals Patterns of Genetic using a high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. 7,720 SNPs were genotyped a large number of polymorphic SNP markers across each sub-population, ranging from 3,159 in the vintage

  15. Efficient photoinduced charge accumulation in reduced graphene oxide coupled with titania nanosheets to show highly enhanced and persistent conductance.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xingke; Sakai, Nobuyuki; Ozawa, Tadashi C; Funatsu, Asami; Ma, Renzhi; Ebina, Yasuo; Sasaki, Takayoshi

    2015-06-01

    Tuning of the electrical properties of graphene via photoexcitation of a heteroassembled material has started to attract attention for electronic and optoelectronic applications. Actually photoinduced carrier doping from the hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) substrate greatly modulated the transport property of the top layer graphene, showing promising potential for this approach. However, for practical applications, the large scale production of this two-dimensional heterostructure is needed. Here, a superlattice film constructed from reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and photoactive titania nanosheets (Ti0.87O2(0.52-)) was employed as a channel to construct a field effect transistor (FET) device, and its UV light response on the electrical transport property was examined. The UV light illumination induced significant improvement of the electrical conductance by ?7 times on the basis of simultaneous enhancements of the electron carrier concentration and its mobility in rGO. Furthermore, the polarity of the FET response changed from ambipolar to n-type unipolar. Such modulated properties persisted in vacuum even after the UV light was turned off. These interesting behaviors may be explained in terms of photomodulation effects from Ti0.87O2(0.52-) nanosheets. The photoexcited electrons in Ti0.87O2(0.52-) are injected into rGO to increase the electron carrier concentration as high as 7.6×10(13) cm(-2). On the other hand, the holes are likely trapped in the Ti0.87O2(0.52-) nanosheets. These photocarriers undergo reduction and oxidation of oxygen and water molecules adsorbed in the film, respectively, which act as carrier scattering centers, contributing to the enhancement of the carrier mobility. Since the film likely contains more water molecules than oxygen, upon extinction of UV light, a major portion of electrons (?80% of the concentration at the UV off) survives in rGO, showing the highly enhanced conductance for days. This surpassing photomodulated FET response and its persistency observed in the present superlattice system of rGO/Ti0.87O2(0.52-) are noteworthy compared with previous studies such as the device with a heteroassembly of graphene/h-BN. PMID:25945510

  16. Tongue Epithelium Cells from shRNA Mediated Transgenic Goat Show High Resistance to Foot and Mouth Disease Virus.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenting; Wang, Kejun; Kang, Shimeng; Deng, Shoulong; Han, Hongbing; Lian, Ling; Lian, Zhengxing

    2015-01-01

    Foot and mouth disease induced by foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) is severe threat to cloven-hoofed domestic animals. The gene 3Dpol in FMDV genome encodes the viral RNA polymerase, a vital element for FMDV replication. In this study, a conserved 3D-7414shRNA targeting FMDV-3Dpol gene was designed and injected into pronuclear embryos to produce the transgenic goats. Sixty-one goats were produced, of which, seven goats positively integrated 3D-7414shRNA. Loss of function assay demonstrated that siRNA effectively knockdown 3Dpol gene in skin epithelium cells of transgenic goats. Subsequently, the tongue epithelium cells from transgenic and non-transgenic goats were infected with FMDV O/YS/CHA/05 strain. A significant decrease of virus titres and virus copy number was observed in cells of transgenic goats compared with that of non-transgenic goats, which indicated that 3D-7414siRNA inhibited FMDV replication by interfering FMDV-3Dpol gene. Furthermore, we found that expression of TLR7, RIG-I and TRAF6 was lower in FMDV infected cells from transgenic goats compared to that from non-transgenic goats, which might result from lower virus copy number in transgenic goats' cells. In conclusion, we successfully produced transgenic goats highly expressing 3D-7414siRNA targeting 3Dpol gene, and the tongue epithelium cells from the transgenic goats showed effective resistance to FMDV. PMID:26671568

  17. Tongue Epithelium Cells from shRNA Mediated Transgenic Goat Show High Resistance to Foot and Mouth Disease Virus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenting; Wang, Kejun; Kang, Shimeng; Deng, Shoulong; Han, Hongbing; Lian, Ling; Lian, Zhengxing

    2015-01-01

    Foot and mouth disease induced by foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) is severe threat to cloven-hoofed domestic animals. The gene 3Dpol in FMDV genome encodes the viral RNA polymerase, a vital element for FMDV replication. In this study, a conserved 3D-7414shRNA targeting FMDV-3Dpol gene was designed and injected into pronuclear embryos to produce the transgenic goats. Sixty-one goats were produced, of which, seven goats positively integrated 3D-7414shRNA. Loss of function assay demonstrated that siRNA effectively knockdown 3Dpol gene in skin epithelium cells of transgenic goats. Subsequently, the tongue epithelium cells from transgenic and non-transgenic goats were infected with FMDV O/YS/CHA/05 strain. A significant decrease of virus titres and virus copy number was observed in cells of transgenic goats compared with that of non-transgenic goats, which indicated that 3D-7414siRNA inhibited FMDV replication by interfering FMDV-3Dpol gene. Furthermore, we found that expression of TLR7, RIG-I and TRAF6 was lower in FMDV infected cells from transgenic goats compared to that from non-transgenic goats, which might result from lower virus copy number in transgenic goats’ cells. In conclusion, we successfully produced transgenic goats highly expressing 3D-7414siRNA targeting 3Dpol gene, and the tongue epithelium cells from the transgenic goats showed effective resistance to FMDV. PMID:26671568

  18. High Genetic Diversity of Plasmodium vivax on the North Coast of Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Arnott, Alicia; Barnadas, Celine; Senn, Nicolas; Siba, Peter; Mueller, Ivo; Reeder, John C.; Barry, Alyssa E.

    2013-01-01

    Despite having the highest Plasmodium vivax burden in the world, molecular epidemiological data from Papua New Guinea (PNG) for this parasite remain limited. To investigate the molecular epidemiology of P. vivax in PNG, 574 isolates collected from four catchment sites in East Sepik (N = 1) and Madang (N = 3) Provinces were genotyped using the markers MS16 and msp1F3. Genetic diversity and prevalence of P. vivax was determined for all sites. Despite a P. vivax infection prevalence in the East Sepik (15%) catchments less than one-half the prevalence of the Madang catchments (27–35%), genetic diversity was similarly high in all populations (He = 0.77–0.98). High genetic diversity, despite a marked difference in infection prevalence, suggests a large reservoir of diversity in P. vivax populations of PNG. Significant reductions in transmission intensity may, therefore, be required to reduce the diversity of parasite populations in highly endemic countries such as PNG. PMID:23690553

  19. High genetic diversity of Plasmodium vivax on the north coast of Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Arnott, Alicia; Barnadas, Celine; Senn, Nicolas; Siba, Peter; Mueller, Ivo; Reeder, John C; Barry, Alyssa E

    2013-07-01

    Despite having the highest Plasmodium vivax burden in the world, molecular epidemiological data from Papua New Guinea (PNG) for this parasite remain limited. To investigate the molecular epidemiology of P. vivax in PNG, 574 isolates collected from four catchment sites in East Sepik (N = 1) and Madang (N = 3) Provinces were genotyped using the markers MS16 and msp1F3. Genetic diversity and prevalence of P. vivax was determined for all sites. Despite a P. vivax infection prevalence in the East Sepik (15%) catchments less than one-half the prevalence of the Madang catchments (27-35%), genetic diversity was similarly high in all populations (He = 0.77-0.98). High genetic diversity, despite a marked difference in infection prevalence, suggests a large reservoir of diversity in P. vivax populations of PNG. Significant reductions in transmission intensity may, therefore, be required to reduce the diversity of parasite populations in highly endemic countries such as PNG. PMID:23690553

  20. Detection and partial genetic characterisation of a novel variant of Avian nephritis virus in Indian poultry flocks showing diverse clinical signs.

    PubMed

    Gowthaman, Vasudevan; Singh, Sambu; Dhama, Kuldeep; Barathidasan, Rajamani; Srinivasan, Palani; Saravanan, Sellappan; Gopalakrishnamurthy, Thippichettypalayam; Deb, Rajib; Mathapati, Basavaraj; Ramakrishnan, Muthannan

    2015-12-01

    Avian nephritis virus (ANV) infects poultry flocks worldwide, but no confirmed cases have been reported from India so far. In the current study, disease investigation was carried out in 21 broiler flocks at different parts of India with clinical signs of nephritis, uneven and stunted growth, diarrhoea, reduced body weight, and mortality up to 9.72%. Out of the 21 flocks screened, two were found positive for ANV in RT-PCR assay. BLAST analysis revealed that the ANV of Indian origin was closely related to ANV-1 strains reported from Japan, Hungary and China. However, comparison of a small portion (~12% of nucleotides, i.e. ~60 nts, common site for ANV-1 and ANV-3, position 2200-2260 of ORF 1a gene) of the Indian ANV sequence with ANV-3 sequences revealed 89-93% identities with different ANV-3 isolates. Phylogenetically, ANV-1 forms three clades, and the Indian ANV clustered under clade II. This study confirms the existence of ANV in Indian poultry flocks and is the first report on the molecular detection and genetic characterisation of ANV from India. PMID:26599096

  1. Endophytic Bacteria Isolated from Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) Exhibiting High Variability Showed Antimicrobial Activity and Quorum Sensing Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Ralf Bruno Moura; Costa, Leonardo Emanuel de Oliveira; Vanetti, Maria Cristina Dantas; de Araújo, Elza Fernandes; de Queiroz, Marisa Vieira

    2015-10-01

    Endophytic bacteria play a key role in the biocontrol of phytopathogenic microorganisms. In this study, genotypic diversity was analyzed via repetitive element PCR (rep-PCR) of endophytic isolates of the phylum Actinobacteria that were previously collected from leaves of cultivars of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Considerable variability was observed, which has not been reported previously for this phylum of endophytic bacteria of the common bean. Furthermore, the ethanol extracts from cultures of various isolates inhibited the growth of pathogenic bacteria in vitro, especially Gram-positive pathogens. Extracts from cultures of Microbacterium testaceum BAC1065 and BAC1093, which were both isolated from the 'Talismã' cultivar, strongly inhibited most of the pathogenic bacteria tested. Bean endophytic bacteria were also demonstrated to have the potential to inhibit the quorum sensing of Gram-negative bacteria. This mechanism may regulate the production of virulence factors in pathogens. The ability to inhibit quorum sensing has also not been reported previously for endophytic microorganisms of P. vulgaris. Furthermore, M. testaceum with capacity to inhibit quorum sensing appears to be widespread in common bean. The genomic profiles of M. testaceum were also analyzed via pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and greater differentiation was observed using this method than rep-PCR; in general, no groups were formed based on the cultivar of origin. This study showed for the first time that endophytic bacteria from common bean plants exhibit high variability and may be useful for the development of strategies for the biological control of diseases in this important legume plant. PMID:26202846

  2. High genetic diversity at the regional scale and possible speciation in Sebacina epigaea and S. incrustans

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Phylogenetic studies, particularly those based on rDNA sequences from plant roots and basidiomata, have revealed a strikingly high genetic diversity in the Sebacinales. However, the factors determining this genetic diversity at higher and lower taxonomic levels within this order are still unknown. In this study, we analysed patterns of genetic variation within two morphological species, Sebacina epigaea and S. incrustans, based on 340 DNA haplotype sequences of independent genetic markers from the nuclear (ITS?+?5.8S?+?D1/D2, RPB2) and mitochondrial (ATP6) genomes for 98 population samples. By characterising the genetic population structure within these species, we provide insights into species boundaries and the possible factors responsible for genetic diversity at a regional geographic scale. Results We found that recombination events are relatively common between natural populations within Sebacina epigaea and S. incrustans, and play a significant role in generating intraspecific genetic diversity. Furthermore, we also found that RPB2 and ATP6 genes display higher levels of intraspecific synonymous polymorphism. Phylogenetic and demographic analyses based on nuclear and mitochondrial loci revealed three distinct phylogenetic lineages within of each of the morphospecies S. epigaea and S. incrustans: one major and widely distributed lineage, and two geographically restricted lineages, respectively. We found almost no differential morphological or ecological characteristics that could be used to discriminate between these lineages. Conclusions Our results suggest that recombination and negative selection have played significant roles in generating genetic diversity within these morphological species at small geographical scales. Concordance between gene genealogies identified lineages/cryptic species that have evolved independently for a relatively long period of time. These putative species were not associated with geographic provenance, geographic barrier, host preference or distinct phenotypic innovations. PMID:23697379

  3. The Genetic and Environmental Etiology of High Math Performance in 10-Year-Old Twins

    PubMed Central

    Kovas, Yulia; Hart, Sara A.; Thompson, Lee A.; Plomin, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The genetic and environmental etiology of high math performance (at or above the 85%tile) was examined in a population-based sample of 10-year-old twins (nMZ = 1,279, nDZ = 2,305). Math skills were assessed using a web-based battery of math performance tapping skills related to the UK National Math Curriculum. Probandwise concordance rates and liability threshold models indicated that genetic and shared environmental influences were significant, and that these estimates were generally similar to those obtained across the normal range of ability and did not vary significantly by gender. These results suggest that the genetic and environmental influences at the high end of ability are likely to be continuous with those that affect the entire range of math performance across all children irrespective of gender. PMID:19247827

  4. Genetic basis of high level aminoglycoside resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii from Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Lu; Lv, Yuemeng; Yuan, Min; Hu, Xinxin; Nie, Tongying; Yang, Xinyi; Li, Guoqing; Pang, Jing; Zhang, Jingpu; Li, Congran; Wang, Xiukun; You, Xuefu

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the genetic basis of high level aminoglycoside resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates from Beijing, China. 173 A. baumannii clinical isolates from hospitals in Beijing from 2006 to 2009 were first subjected to high level aminoglycoside resistance (HLAR, MIC to gentamicin and amikacin>512 µg/mL) phenotype selection by broth microdilution method. The strains were then subjected to genetic basis analysis by PCR detection of the aminoglycoside modifying enzyme genes (aac(3)-I, aac(3)-IIc, aac(6?)-Ib, aac(6?)-II, aph(4)-Ia, aph(3?)-I, aph(3?)-IIb, aph(3?)-IIIa, aph(3?)-VIa, aph(2?)-Ib, aph(2?)-Ic, aph(2?)-Id, ant(2?)-Ia, ant(3?)-I and ant(4?)-Ia) and the 16S rRNA methylase genes (armA, rmtB and rmtC). Correlation analysis between the presence of aminoglycoside resistance gene and HLAR phenotype were performed by SPSS. Totally 102 (58.96%) HLAR isolates were selected. The HLAR rates for year 2006, 2007, 2008 and 2009 were 52.63%, 65.22%, 51.11% and 70.83%, respectively. Five modifying enzyme genes (aac(3)-I, detection rate of 65.69%; aac(6?)-Ib, detection rate of 45.10%; aph(3?)-I, detection rate of 47.06%; aph(3?)-IIb, detection rate of 0.98%; ant(3?)-I, detection rate of 95.10%) and one methylase gene (armA, detection rate of 98.04%) were detected in the 102 A. baumannii with aac(3)-I+aac(6?)-Ib+ant(3?)-I+armA (detection rate of 25.49%), aac(3)-I+aph(3?)-I+ant(3?)-I+armA (detection rate of 21.57%) and ant(3?)-I+armA (detection rate of 12.75%) being the most prevalent gene profiles. The values of chi-square tests showed correlation of armA, ant(3?)-I, aac(3)-I, aph(3?)-I and aac(6?)-Ib with HLAR. armA had significant correlation (contingency coefficient 0.685) and good contingency with HLAR (kappa 0.940). The high rates of HLAR may cause a serious problem for combination therapy of aminoglycoside with ?-lactams against A. baumannii infections. As armA was reported to be able to cause high level aminoglycoside resistance to most of the clinical important aminoglycosides (gentamicin, amikacin, tobramycin, etc), the function of aminoglycoside modifying enzyme gene(s) in A. baumannii carrying armA deserves further investigation.

  5. A Systems Genetic Analysis of High Density Lipoprotein Metabolism and Network Preservation across Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Langfelder, Peter; Castellani, Lawrence W.; Zhou, Zhiqiang; Paul, Eric; Davis, Richard; Schadt, Eric E.; Lusis, Aldons J.; Horvath, Steve; Mehrabian, Margarete

    2011-01-01

    We report a systems genetics analysis of high density lipoproteins (HDL) levels in an F2 intercross between inbred strains CAST/EiJ and C57BL/6J. We previously showed that there are dramatic differences in HDL metabolism in a cross between these strains, and we now report co-expression network analysis of HDL that integrates global expression data from liver and adipose with relevant metabolic traits. Using data from a total of 293 F2 intercross mice, we constructed weighted gene co-expression networks and identified modules (subnetworks) associated with HDL and clinical traits. These were examined for genes implicated in HDL levels based on large human genome-wide associations studies (GWAS) and examined with respect to conservation between tissue and sexes in a total of 9 data sets. We identify genes that are consistently ranked high by association with HDL across the 9 data sets. We focus in particular on two genes, Wfdc2 and Hdac3, that are located in close proximity to HDL QTL peaks where causal testing indicates that they may affect HDL. Our results provide a rich resource for studies of complex metabolic interactions involving HDL. PMID:21807117

  6. Lumbar spinal stenosis is a highly genetic condition partly mediated by disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Battié, Michele C.; Ortega-Alonso, Alfredo; Niemelainen, Riikka; Gill, Kevin; Levalahti, Esko; Videman, Tapio; Kaprio, Jaakko

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Lumbar spinal stenosis is one of the most commonly diagnosed spinal disorders in older adults. Although the pathophysiology of the clinical syndrome is not well understood, a narrow central canal or intervertebral foramen is an essential or defining feature. The aim of the present study was to estimate the magnitude of genetic versus environmental influences on central lumbar spinal stenosis, and investigate disc degeneration and stature or bone development as possible genetic pathways. Methods A classic twin study with multivariate analyses considering lumbar level and other covariates was conducted. The study sample comprised 598 male twins (147 monozygotic and 152 dizygotic pairs), 35-70 years of age, from the population-based Finnish Twin Cohort. Primary phenotypes were central lumbar stenosis assessed qualitatively on MRI and quantitatively measured dural sac cross-sectional area. Additional phenotypes to examine possible genetic pathways included disc bulging and standing height, as an indicator of overall skeletal size or development. Results The heritability estimate (h2) for qualitatively assessed central lumbar spinal stenosis on MRI was 67% (95%CI: 56.8-74.5). The broad sense heritability estimate for dural sac cross-sectional area was 81.2% (95%CI: 74.5 – 86.1%), with a similar magnitude of genetic influences across lumbar levels (h2=72.4-75.6). The additive genetic correlation of quantitatively assessed stenosis and disc bulging was extremely high. There was no indication of shared genetic influences between stenosis and stature. Conclusion Central lumbar spinal stenosis and associated dural sac dimensions are highly genetic, and disc degeneration (bulging) appears to be one pathway through which genes influence spinal stenosis. PMID:25155712

  7. The HapMap project has raised high hopes for mapping genetic determinants of complex human

    E-print Network

    Rosenberg, Noah

    The HapMap project has raised high hopes for mapping genetic determinants of complex human disease for mapping studies in human populations around the world. The HapMap project has characterized haplotype structures across the genome for four human populations with the goal of enabling genome-wide sets of SNPs

  8. Unusually high genetic diversity in COI sequences of Chimarra obscura (Trichoptera: Philopotamidae)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chimarra obscura (Walker 1852) is a philopotamid caddisfly found throughout much of North America. Using the COI DNA barcode locus, we have found unexpectedly high amounts of genetic diversity and distances within C. obscura. Of the approximately 150 specimens sampled, we have fo...

  9. Surviving climate changes: high genetic diversity and transoceanic gene flow in

    E-print Network

    Taylor, Lee

    the future of arctic biodiversity. The most serious threats are accelerating climate change and human impact in the changing Arctic. Keywords Arctic, biodiversity, climate change, coalescent methods, dispersal, fungiORIGINAL ARTICLE Surviving climate changes: high genetic diversity and transoceanic gene flow

  10. A high resolution genetic map anchoring scaffolds of the sequenced watermelon genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As part of our ongoing efforts to sequence and map the watermelon (Citrullus spp.) genome, we have constructed a high-density genetic linkage map. The map positioned 234 watermelon genome sequence scaffolds (an average size of 1.41 Mb) that cover about 330 Mb and account for 93.5% of the 353 Mb of ...

  11. AFLP Polymorphisms Allow High Resolution Genetic Analysis of American Tegumentary Leishmaniasis Agents Circulating in Panama and Other Members of the Leishmania Genus

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo, Carlos M.; De La Guardia, Carolina; Sousa, Octavio E.; Calzada, José E.; Fernández, Patricia L.; Lleonart, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    American Tegumentary Leishmaniasis is caused by parasites of the genus Leishmania, and causes significant health problems throughout the Americas. In Panama, Leishmania parasites are endemic, causing thousands of new cases every year, mostly of the cutaneous form. In the last years, the burden of the disease has increased, coincident with increasing disturbances in its natural sylvatic environments. The study of genetic variation in parasites is important for a better understanding of the biology, population genetics, and ultimately the evolution and epidemiology of these organisms. Very few attempts have been made to characterize genetic polymorphisms of parasites isolated from Panamanian patients of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Here we present data on the genetic variability of local isolates of Leishmania, as well as specimens from several other species, by means of Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphisms (AFLP), a technique seldom used to study genetic makeup of parasites. We demonstrate that this technique allows detection of very high levels of genetic variability in local isolates of Leishmania panamensis in a highly reproducible manner. The analysis of AFLP fingerprints generated by unique selective primer combinations in L. panamensis suggests a predominant clonal mode of reproduction. Using fluorescently labeled primers, many taxon-specific fragments were identified which may show potential as species diagnostic fragments. The AFLP permitted a high resolution genetic analysis of the Leishmania genus, clearly separating certain groups among L. panamensis specimens and highly related species such as L. panamensis and L. guyanensis. The phylogenetic networks reconstructed from our AFLP data are congruent with established taxonomy for the genus Leishmania, even when using single selective primer combinations. Results of this study demonstrate that AFLP polymorphisms can be informative for genetic characterization in Leishmania parasites, at both intra and inter-specific levels. PMID:24039881

  12. A chemical-genetic interaction map of small molecules using high-throughput imaging in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Breinig, Marco; Klein, Felix A; Huber, Wolfgang; Boutros, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Small molecules often affect multiple targets, elicit off-target effects, and induce genotype-specific responses. Chemical genetics, the mapping of the genotype dependence of a small molecule's effects across a broad spectrum of phenotypes can identify novel mechanisms of action. It can also reveal unanticipated effects and could thereby reduce high attrition rates of small molecule development pipelines. Here, we used high-content screening and image analysis to measure effects of 1,280 pharmacologically active compounds on complex phenotypes in isogenic cancer cell lines which harbor activating or inactivating mutations in key oncogenic signaling pathways. Using multiparametric chemical-genetic interaction analysis, we observed phenotypic gene-drug interactions for more than 193 compounds, with many affecting phenotypes other than cell growth. We created a resource termed the Pharmacogenetic Phenome Compendium (PGPC), which enables exploration of drug mode of action, detection of potential off-target effects, and the generation of hypotheses on drug combinations and synergism. For example, we demonstrate that MEK inhibitors amplify the viability effect of the clinically used anti-alcoholism drug disulfiram and show that the EGFR inhibitor tyrphostin AG555 has off-target activity on the proteasome. Taken together, this study demonstrates how combining multiparametric phenotyping in different genetic backgrounds can be used to predict additional mechanisms of action and to reposition clinically used drugs. PMID:26700849

  13. Unexpected genetic differentiation between recently recolonized populations of a long-lived and highly vagile marine mammal.

    PubMed

    Bonin, Carolina A; Goebel, Michael E; Forcada, Jaume; Burton, Ronald S; Hoffman, Joseph I

    2013-10-01

    Many species have been heavily exploited by man leading to local extirpations, yet few studies have attempted to unravel subsequent recolonization histories. This has led to a significant gap in our knowledge of the long-term effects of exploitation on the amount and structure of contemporary genetic variation, with important implications for conservation. The Antarctic fur seal provides an interesting case in point, having been virtually exterminated in the nineteenth century but subsequently staged a dramatic recovery to recolonize much of its original range. Consequently, we evaluated the hypothesis that South Georgia (SG), where a few million seals currently breed, was the main source of immigrants to other locations including Livingston Island (LI), by genotyping 366 individuals from these two populations at 17 microsatellite loci and sequencing a 263 bp fragment of the mitochondrial hypervariable region 1. Contrary to expectations, we found highly significant genetic differences at both types of marker, with 51% of LI individuals carrying haplotypes that were not observed in 246 animals from SG. Moreover, the youngest of three sequentially founded colonies at LI showed greater similarity to SG at mitochondrial DNA than microsatellites, implying temporal and sex-specific variation in recolonization. Our findings emphasize the importance of relict populations and provide insights into the mechanisms by which severely depleted populations can recover while maintaining surprisingly high levels of genetic diversity. PMID:24198934

  14. Unexpected genetic differentiation between recently recolonized populations of a long-lived and highly vagile marine mammal

    PubMed Central

    Bonin, Carolina A; Goebel, Michael E; Forcada, Jaume; Burton, Ronald S; Hoffman, Joseph I

    2013-01-01

    Many species have been heavily exploited by man leading to local extirpations, yet few studies have attempted to unravel subsequent recolonization histories. This has led to a significant gap in our knowledge of the long-term effects of exploitation on the amount and structure of contemporary genetic variation, with important implications for conservation. The Antarctic fur seal provides an interesting case in point, having been virtually exterminated in the nineteenth century but subsequently staged a dramatic recovery to recolonize much of its original range. Consequently, we evaluated the hypothesis that South Georgia (SG), where a few million seals currently breed, was the main source of immigrants to other locations including Livingston Island (LI), by genotyping 366 individuals from these two populations at 17 microsatellite loci and sequencing a 263 bp fragment of the mitochondrial hypervariable region 1. Contrary to expectations, we found highly significant genetic differences at both types of marker, with 51% of LI individuals carrying haplotypes that were not observed in 246 animals from SG. Moreover, the youngest of three sequentially founded colonies at LI showed greater similarity to SG at mitochondrial DNA than microsatellites, implying temporal and sex-specific variation in recolonization. Our findings emphasize the importance of relict populations and provide insights into the mechanisms by which severely depleted populations can recover while maintaining surprisingly high levels of genetic diversity. PMID:24198934

  15. Patients with type 1 diabetes show signs of vascular dysfunction in response to multiple high-fat meals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A high-fat diet promotes postprandial systemic inflammation and metabolic endotoxemia. We investigated the effects of three consecutive high-fat meals on endotoxemia, inflammation, vascular function, and postprandial lipid metabolism in patients with type 1 diabetes. Methods Non-diabetic controls (n?=?34) and patients with type 1 diabetes (n?=?37) were given three high-caloric, fat-containing meals during one day. Blood samples were drawn at fasting (8:00) and every two hours thereafter until 18:00. Applanation tonometry was used to assess changes in the augmentation index during the investigation day. Results Three consecutive high-fat meals had only a modest effect on serum LPS-activity levels and inflammatory markers throughout the day in both groups. Of note, patients with type 1 diabetes were unable to decrease the augmentation index in response to the high-fat meals. The most profound effects of the consecutive fat loads were seen in chylomicron and HDL-metabolism. The triglyceride-rich lipoprotein remnant marker, apoB-48, was elevated in patients compared to controls both at fasting (p?=?0.014) and postprandially (p?=?0.035). The activities of the HDL-associated enzymes PLTP (p?high-fat meals, early signs of vascular dysfunction alongside accumulation of chylomicron remnants, higher augmentation index, and decreased PON-1 activity were observed in patients with type 1 diabetes. The high-fat meals had no significant impact on postprandial LPS-activity in non-diabetic subjects or patients with type 1 diabetes suggesting that metabolic endotoxemia may be more central in patients with chronic metabolic disturbances such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, or diabetic kidney disease. PMID:24959195

  16. Spatial genetic analysis reveals high connectivity of tiger (Panthera tigris) populations in the Satpura–Maikal landscape of Central India

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sandeep; Dutta, Trishna; Maldonado, Jesús E; Wood, Thomas C; Panwar, Hemendra Singh; Seidensticker, John

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the spatial genetic structure of the tiger meta-population in the Satpura–Maikal landscape of central India using population- and individual-based genetic clustering methods on multilocus genotypic data from 273 individuals. The Satpura–Maikal landscape is classified as a global-priority Tiger Conservation Landscape (TCL) due to its potential for providing sufficient habitat that will allow the long-term persistence of tigers. We found that the tiger meta-population in the Satpura–Maikal landscape has high genetic variation and very low genetic subdivision. Individual-based Bayesian clustering algorithms reveal two highly admixed genetic populations. We attribute this to forest connectivity and high gene flow in this landscape. However, deforestation, road widening, and mining may sever this connectivity, impede gene exchange, and further exacerbate the genetic division of tigers in central India. PMID:23403813

  17. A scalable pipeline for highly effective genetic modification of a malaria parasite

    PubMed Central

    Pfander, Claudia; Anar, Burcu; Schwach, Frank; Otto, Thomas D.; Brochet, Mathieu; Volkmann, Katrin; Quail, Michael A.; Pain, Arnab; Rosen, Barry; Skarnes, William; Rayner, Julian C.; Billker, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    In malaria parasites the systematic experimental validation of drug and vaccine targets by reverse genetics is constrained by the inefficiency of homologous recombination and by the difficulty of manipulating adenine and thymine (AT) rich Plasmodium DNA in E. coli. We overcome these roadblocks by demonstrating that a high integrity library of P. berghei genomic DNA (>77% AT) in a bacteriophage N15-based vector can be modified efficiently using the lambda Red method of recombineering. We built a pipeline for generating Plasmodium berghei genetic modification vectors at genome scale in serial liquid cultures on 96-well plates. Vectors have long homology arms, which increase recombination frequency up to 10-fold over conventional designs. The feasibility of efficient genetic modification at scale will stimulate collaborative, genome-wide knockout and tagging programs for P. berghei. PMID:22020067

  18. Genetic Characterization of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (H5N8) Virus from Domestic Ducks, England, November 2014

    PubMed Central

    Banks, Jill; Marston, Denise A.; Ellis, Richard J.; Brookes, Sharon M.; Brown, Ian H.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic sequences of a highly pathogenic avian influenza (H5N8) virus in England have high homology to those detected in mainland Europe and Asia during 2014. Genetic characterization suggests this virus is an avian-adapted virus without specific affinity for zoonoses. Spatio-temporal detections of H5N8 imply a role for wild birds in virus spread. PMID:25898126

  19. Effects of voluntary exercise and genetic selection for high activity levels on HSP72 expression in house mice

    E-print Network

    Saltzman, Wendy

    Effects of voluntary exercise and genetic selection for high activity levels on HSP72 expression. Effects of voluntary exercise and genetic selection for high activity levels on HSP72 expression in house of their increased wheel running. adaptation; artificial selection; exercise physiology; stress proteins; wheel

  20. High degree of genetic differentiation in marine three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus).

    PubMed

    Defaveri, Jacquelin; Shikano, Takahito; Shimada, Yukinori; Merilä, Juha

    2013-09-01

    Populations of widespread marine organisms are typically characterized by a low degree of genetic differentiation in neutral genetic markers, but much less is known about differentiation in genes whose functional roles are associated with specific selection regimes. To uncover possible adaptive population divergence and heterogeneous genomic differentiation in marine three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus), we used a candidate gene-based genome-scan approach to analyse variability in 138 microsatellite loci located within/close to (<6 kb) functionally important genes in samples collected from ten geographic locations. The degree of genetic differentiation in markers classified as neutral or under balancing selection-as determined with several outlier detection methods-was low (F(ST) = 0.033 or 0.011, respectively), whereas average FST for directionally selected markers was significantly higher (F(ST) = 0.097). Clustering analyses provided support for genomic and geographic heterogeneity in selection: six genetic clusters were identified based on allele frequency differences in the directionally selected loci, whereas four were identified with the neutral loci. Allelic variation in several loci exhibited significant associations with environmental variables, supporting the conjecture that temperature and salinity, but not optic conditions, are important drivers of adaptive divergence among populations. In general, these results suggest that in spite of the high degree of physical connectivity and gene flow as inferred from neutral marker genes, marine stickleback populations are strongly genetically structured in loci associated with functionally relevant genes. PMID:23947683

  1. Genetic Diversity Analysis of Highly Incomplete SNP Genotype Data with Imputations: An Empirical Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yong-Bi

    2014-01-01

    Genotyping by sequencing (GBS) recently has emerged as a promising genomic approach for assessing genetic diversity on a genome-wide scale. However, concerns are not lacking about the uniquely large unbalance in GBS genotype data. Although some genotype imputation has been proposed to infer missing observations, little is known about the reliability of a genetic diversity analysis of GBS data, with up to 90% of observations missing. Here we performed an empirical assessment of accuracy in genetic diversity analysis of highly incomplete single nucleotide polymorphism genotypes with imputations. Three large single-nucleotide polymorphism genotype data sets for corn, wheat, and rice were acquired, and missing data with up to 90% of missing observations were randomly generated and then imputed for missing genotypes with three map-independent imputation methods. Estimating heterozygosity and inbreeding coefficient from original, missing, and imputed data revealed variable patterns of bias from assessed levels of missingness and genotype imputation, but the estimation biases were smaller for missing data without genotype imputation. The estimates of genetic differentiation were rather robust up to 90% of missing observations but became substantially biased when missing genotypes were imputed. The estimates of topology accuracy for four representative samples of interested groups generally were reduced with increased levels of missing genotypes. Probabilistic principal component analysis based imputation performed better in terms of topology accuracy than those analyses of missing data without genotype imputation. These findings are not only significant for understanding the reliability of the genetic diversity analysis with respect to large missing data and genotype imputation but also are instructive for performing a proper genetic diversity analysis of highly incomplete GBS or other genotype data. PMID:24626289

  2. Genetic identification of Theobroma cacao L. trees with high Criollo ancestry in Soconusco, Chiapas, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Ovando, J A; Molina-Freaner, F; Nuñez-Farfán, J; Ovando-Medina, I; Salvador-Figueroa, M

    2014-01-01

    Criollo-type cacao trees are an important pool of genes with potential to be used in cacao breeding and selection programs. For that reason, we assessed the diversity and population structure of Criollo-type trees (108 cultivars with Criollo phenotypic characteristics and 10 Criollo references) using 12 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Cultivars were selected from 7 demes in the Soconusco region of southern Mexico. SSRs amplified 74 alleles with an average of 3.6 alleles per population. The overall populations showed an average observed heterozygosity of 0.28, indicating heterozygote deficiency (average fixation index F = 0.50). However, moderate allelic diversity was found within populations (Shannon index for all populations I = 0.97). Bayesian method analysis determined 2 genetic clusters (K = 2) within individuals. In concordance, an assignment test grouped 37 multilocus genotypes (including 10 references) into a first cluster (Criollo), 54 into a second (presumably Amelonado), and 27 admixed individuals unassigned at the 90% threshold likely corresponding to the Trinitario genotype. This classification was supported by the principal coordinate analysis and analysis of molecular variance, which showed 12% of variation among populations (FST = 0.123, P < 0.0001). Sampled demes sites (1- 7) in the Soconusco region did not show any evidence of clustering by geographic location, and this was supported by the Mantel test (Rxy = 0.54, P = 0.120). Individuals with high Criollo lineage planted in Soconusco farms could be an important reservoir of genes for future breeding programs searching for fine, taste, flavor, and aroma cocoa. PMID:25511024

  3. Investigating Population Genetic Structure in a Highly Mobile Marine Organism: The Minke Whale Balaenoptera acutorostrata acutorostrata in the North East Atlantic

    PubMed Central

    Quintela, María; Skaug, Hans J.; Øien, Nils; Haug, Tore; Seliussen, Bjørghild B.; Solvang, Hiroko K.; Pampoulie, Christophe; Kanda, Naohisa; Pastene, Luis A.; Glover, Kevin A.

    2014-01-01

    Inferring the number of genetically distinct populations and their levels of connectivity is of key importance for the sustainable management and conservation of wildlife. This represents an extra challenge in the marine environment where there are few physical barriers to gene-flow, and populations may overlap in time and space. Several studies have investigated the population genetic structure within the North Atlantic minke whale with contrasting results. In order to address this issue, we analyzed ten microsatellite loci and 331 bp of the mitochondrial D-loop on 2990 whales sampled in the North East Atlantic in the period 2004 and 2007–2011. The primary findings were: (1) No spatial or temporal genetic differentiations were observed for either class of genetic marker. (2) mtDNA identified three distinct mitochondrial lineages without any underlying geographical pattern. (3) Nuclear markers showed evidence of a single panmictic population in the NE Atlantic according STRUCTURE's highest average likelihood found at K?=?1. (4) When K?=?2 was accepted, based on the Evanno's test, whales were divided into two more or less equally sized groups that showed significant genetic differentiation between them but without any sign of underlying geographic pattern. However, mtDNA for these individuals did not corroborate the differentiation. (5) In order to further evaluate the potential for cryptic structuring, a set of 100 in silico generated panmictic populations was examined using the same procedures as above showing genetic differentiation between two artificially divided groups, similar to the aforementioned observations. This demonstrates that clustering methods may spuriously reveal cryptic genetic structure. Based upon these data, we find no evidence to support the existence of spatial or cryptic population genetic structure of minke whales within the NE Atlantic. However, in order to conclusively evaluate population structure within this highly mobile species, more markers will be required. PMID:25268591

  4. Highly resolved early Eocene food webs show development of modern trophic structure after the end-Cretaceous extinction

    PubMed Central

    Dunne, Jennifer A.; Labandeira, Conrad C.; Williams, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Generalities of food web structure have been identified for extant ecosystems. However, the trophic organization of ancient ecosystems is unresolved, as prior studies of fossil webs have been limited by low-resolution, high-uncertainty data. We compiled highly resolved, well-documented feeding interaction data for 700 taxa from the 48 million-year-old latest early Eocene Messel Shale, which contains a species assemblage that developed after an interval of protracted environmental and biotal change during and following the end-Cretaceous extinction. We compared the network structure of Messel lake and forest food webs to extant webs using analyses that account for scale dependence of structure with diversity and complexity. The Messel lake web, with 94 taxa, displays unambiguous similarities in structure to extant webs. While the Messel forest web, with 630 taxa, displays differences compared to extant webs, they appear to result from high diversity and resolution of insect–plant interactions, rather than substantive differences in structure. The evidence presented here suggests that modern trophic organization developed along with the modern Messel biota during an 18 Myr interval of dramatic post-extinction change. Our study also has methodological implications, as the Messel forest web analysis highlights limitations of current food web data and models. PMID:24648225

  5. Highly resolved early Eocene food webs show development of modern trophic structure after the end-Cretaceous extinction.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Jennifer A; Labandeira, Conrad C; Williams, Richard J

    2014-05-01

    Generalities of food web structure have been identified for extant ecosystems. However, the trophic organization of ancient ecosystems is unresolved, as prior studies of fossil webs have been limited by low-resolution, high-uncertainty data. We compiled highly resolved, well-documented feeding interaction data for 700 taxa from the 48 million-year-old latest early Eocene Messel Shale, which contains a species assemblage that developed after an interval of protracted environmental and biotal change during and following the end-Cretaceous extinction. We compared the network structure of Messel lake and forest food webs to extant webs using analyses that account for scale dependence of structure with diversity and complexity. The Messel lake web, with 94 taxa, displays unambiguous similarities in structure to extant webs. While the Messel forest web, with 630 taxa, displays differences compared to extant webs, they appear to result from high diversity and resolution of insect-plant interactions, rather than substantive differences in structure. The evidence presented here suggests that modern trophic organization developed along with the modern Messel biota during an 18 Myr interval of dramatic post-extinction change. Our study also has methodological implications, as the Messel forest web analysis highlights limitations of current food web data and models. PMID:24648225

  6. Genetic diversity of high-elevation populations of an endangered medicinal plant

    PubMed Central

    Nag, Akshay; Ahuja, Paramvir Singh; Sharma, Ram Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Intraspecific genetic variation in natural populations governs their potential to overcome challenging ecological and environmental conditions. In addition, knowledge of this variation is critical for the conservation and management of endangered plant taxa. Found in the Himalayas, Podophyllum hexandrum is an endangered high-elevation plant species that has great medicinal importance. Here we report on the genetic diversity analysis of 24 P. hexandrum populations (209 individuals), representing the whole of the Indian Himalayas. In the present study, seven amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) primer pairs generated 1677 fragments, of which 866 were found to be polymorphic. Neighbour joining clustering, principal coordinate analysis and STRUCTURE analysis clustered 209 individuals from 24 populations of the Indian Himalayan mountains into two major groups with a significant amount of gene flow (Nm = 2.13) and moderate genetic differentiation Fst(0.196), G?st(0.20). This suggests that, regardless of geographical location, all of the populations from the Indian Himalayas are intermixed and are composed broadly of two types of genetic populations. High variance partitioned within populations (80 %) suggests that most of the diversity is restricted to the within-population level. These results suggest two possibilities about the ancient population structure of P. hexandrum: either all of the populations in the geographical region of the Indian Himalayas are remnants of a once-widespread ancient population, or they originated from two types of genetic populations, which coexisted a long time ago, but subsequently separated as a result of long-distance dispersal and natural selection. High variance partitioned within the populations indicates that these populations have evolved in response to their respective environments over time, but low levels of heterozygosity suggest the presence of historical population bottlenecks. PMID:25416728

  7. High genetic diversity declines towards the geographic range periphery of Adonis vernalis, a Eurasian dry grassland plant.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, H; Wagner, V; Danihelka, J; Ruprecht, E; Sánchez-Gómez, P; Seifert, M; Hensen, I

    2015-11-01

    Genetic diversity is important for species' fitness and evolutionary processes but our knowledge on how it varies across a species' distribution range is limited. The abundant centre hypothesis (ACH) predicts that populations become smaller and more isolated towards the geographic range periphery - a pattern that in turn should be associated with decreasing genetic diversity and increasing genetic differentiation. We tested this hypothesis in Adonis vernalis, a dry grassland plant with an extensive Eurasian distribution. Its life-history traits and distribution characteristics suggest a low genetic diversity that decreases and a high genetic differentiation that increases towards the range edge. We analysed AFLP fingerprints in 28 populations along a 4698-km transect from the geographic range core in Russia to the western range periphery in Central and Western Europe. Contrary to our expectation, our analysis revealed high genetic diversity (range of proportion of polymorphic bands = 56-81%, He = 0.168-0.238) and low genetic differentiation across populations (?ST  = 0.18). However, in congruence with the genetic predictions of the ACH, genetic diversity decreased and genetic differentiation increased towards the range periphery. Spanish populations were genetically distinct, suggesting a divergent post-glacial history in this region. The high genetic diversity and low genetic differentiation in the remaining A. vernalis populations is surprising given the species' life-history traits and points to the possibility that the species has been widely distributed in the studied region or that it has migrated from a diverse source in an East-West direction, in the past. PMID:26122089

  8. Durable Pt Electrocatalyst Supported on a 3D Nanoporous Carbon Shows High Performance in a High-Temperature Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zehui; Moriguchi, Isamu; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2015-05-13

    In this paper, we used a 3D nanoporous carbon (NanoPC) with a high specific surface area of 1037 m(2)/g as a carbon support for high-temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell, and fabricated an electrocatalyst (NanoPC/PyPBI/Pt) having platinum nanoparticles of ?2.2 nm diameter deposited on the NanoPC that was wrapped by poly[2,2'-(2,6-pyridine)-5,5'-bibenzimidazole] (PyPBI). Even after 10,000 start-up/shutdown cycles in the range of 1.0 to 1.5 V vs. RHE, the NanoPC/PyPBI/Pt showed almost no loss in electrochemical surface area (ECSA), which indicated much higher durability than those of a CB/PyPBI/Pt (?32% loss), in which conventional carbon black (CB) was used in place of the NanoPC, and conventional CB/Pt (?46% loss). The power density of the NanoPC/PyPBI/Pt was 342 mW/cm(2), which was much higher than those of the CB/PyPBI/Pt (183 mW/cm(2)) and CB/Pt (115 mW/cm(2)). PMID:25902007

  9. Pancreatic islets of bank vole show signs of dysfunction after prolonged exposure to high glucose concentrations in vitro.

    PubMed

    Blixt, Martin; Niklasson, Bo; Sandler, Stellan

    2010-07-01

    Bank voles develop glucose intolerance/diabetes mellitus when kept in captivity. We have characterized beta-cell function of glucose intolerant/diabetic animals, and found that this animal model has features of both human type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to study the functional alterations of islets isolated from glucose tolerant bank voles after a prolonged exposure to various glucose concentrations in vitro. For this purpose, pancreatic islets from normal (glucose tolerant) male and female bank voles were cultured at different glucose concentrations (5.6, 11.1 (control), or 28 mM) whereupon islet functions were examined. Overall, islet insulin output was lowered at 5.6 mM glucose, and similar to control, or enhanced after culture in 28 mM glucose. High glucose culture led to decreased insulin contents, but there was no change in islet DNA content and in morphological assessments of cell death, with the latter findings suggesting that the so-called glucotoxicity had not evolved. A slight gender difference was observed in that islets isolated from females exhibited a glucose-regulated (pro)insulin biosynthesis rate and insulin gene expression. In conclusion, we have found that islets isolated from female and male bank voles are affected by glucose concentrations in vitro in that some signs of dysfunction were observed upon high glucose exposure. A minor gender difference was observed suggesting that the islets of the females may more readily adapt to the elevated glucose concentration than islets of the male bank voles. It could be that these in vitro gender differences observed may represent a mechanism underlying the gender difference in diabetes development observed among bank voles. PMID:20453078

  10. Chicken W: a genetically uniform chromosome in a highly variable genome.

    PubMed

    Berlin, Sofia; Ellegren, Hans

    2004-11-01

    The Y chromosome of organisms with male heterogamety is expected to show reduced levels of genetic diversity, because the effective population size is one-fourth that of autosomes. However, studies in mammals, flies, and plants show that Y chromosome diversity is lower than expected even when differences in effective population size are taken into account. This may be explained by skewed reproductive success among males, leading to low male effective population size, or by a strong role of selection in shaping levels of nucleotide diversity in nonrecombining chromosomes. We tested these hypotheses in a system with female heterogamety by estimating nucleotide diversity in the female-specific W chromosome of the domestic chicken by resequencing of 7,643 base pairs in 47 birds from 10 highly divergent breeds. The screening revealed only one single segregating site, which is in sharp contrast to our previous observation, using a similar panel of birds of, on average, one segregating site every 39 base pairs in autosomal sequence. When taking sex-specific mutation rates and differences in effective population size into account, the observed degree of W chromosome polymorphism is 28-fold lower than expected for the frequency of segregating sites and 13-fold lower than expected for estimates of nucleotide diversity (autosomes, 6.5 x 10(-3); W, 7.0 x 10(-5)). We note that selection is the only factor that can explain the reduced diversity in the sex-limited chromosome irrespective of mode of reproduction or whether there is male or female heterogamety. Reduced variability in female-specific W chromosomes is not easily explained by sexual selection. PMID:15520382

  11. Genetic profiles of cervical tumors by high-throughput sequencing for personalized medical care

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Etienne; Brault, Baptiste; Holmes, Allyson; Legros, Angelina; Jeannot, Emmanuelle; Campitelli, Maura; Rousselin, Antoine; Goardon, Nicolas; Frébourg, Thierry; Krieger, Sophie; Crouet, Hubert; Nicolas, Alain; Sastre, Xavier; Vaur, Dominique; Castéra, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Cancer treatment is facing major evolution since the advent of targeted therapies. Building genetic profiles could predict sensitivity or resistance to these therapies and highlight disease-specific abnormalities, supporting personalized patient care. In the context of biomedical research and clinical diagnosis, our laboratory has developed an oncogenic panel comprised of 226 genes and a dedicated bioinformatic pipeline to explore somatic mutations in cervical carcinomas, using high-throughput sequencing. Twenty-nine tumors were sequenced for exons within 226 genes. The automated pipeline used includes a database and a filtration system dedicated to identifying mutations of interest and excluding false positive and germline mutations. One-hundred and seventy-six total mutational events were found among the 29 tumors. Our cervical tumor mutational landscape shows that most mutations are found in PIK3CA (E545K, E542K) and KRAS (G12D, G13D) and others in FBXW7 (R465C, R505G, R479Q). Mutations have also been found in ALK (V1149L, A1266T) and EGFR (T259M). These results showed that 48% of patients display at least one deleterious mutation in genes that have been already targeted by the Food and Drug Administration approved therapies. Considering deleterious mutations, 59% of patients could be eligible for clinical trials. Sequencing hundreds of genes in a clinical context has become feasible, in terms of time and cost. In the near future, such an analysis could be a part of a battery of examinations along the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, helping to detect sensitivity or resistance to targeted therapies and allow advancements towards personalized oncology. PMID:26155992

  12. Genetic profiles of cervical tumors by high-throughput sequencing for personalized medical care.

    PubMed

    Muller, Etienne; Brault, Baptiste; Holmes, Allyson; Legros, Angelina; Jeannot, Emmanuelle; Campitelli, Maura; Rousselin, Antoine; Goardon, Nicolas; Frébourg, Thierry; Krieger, Sophie; Crouet, Hubert; Nicolas, Alain; Sastre, Xavier; Vaur, Dominique; Castéra, Laurent

    2015-10-01

    Cancer treatment is facing major evolution since the advent of targeted therapies. Building genetic profiles could predict sensitivity or resistance to these therapies and highlight disease-specific abnormalities, supporting personalized patient care. In the context of biomedical research and clinical diagnosis, our laboratory has developed an oncogenic panel comprised of 226 genes and a dedicated bioinformatic pipeline to explore somatic mutations in cervical carcinomas, using high-throughput sequencing. Twenty-nine tumors were sequenced for exons within 226 genes. The automated pipeline used includes a database and a filtration system dedicated to identifying mutations of interest and excluding false positive and germline mutations. One-hundred and seventy-six total mutational events were found among the 29 tumors. Our cervical tumor mutational landscape shows that most mutations are found in PIK3CA (E545K, E542K) and KRAS (G12D, G13D) and others in FBXW7 (R465C, R505G, R479Q). Mutations have also been found in ALK (V1149L, A1266T) and EGFR (T259M). These results showed that 48% of patients display at least one deleterious mutation in genes that have been already targeted by the Food and Drug Administration approved therapies. Considering deleterious mutations, 59% of patients could be eligible for clinical trials. Sequencing hundreds of genes in a clinical context has become feasible, in terms of time and cost. In the near future, such an analysis could be a part of a battery of examinations along the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, helping to detect sensitivity or resistance to targeted therapies and allow advancements towards personalized oncology. PMID:26155992

  13. Pathways and barriers to genetic testing and screening: Molecular genetics meets the high-risk family. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Duster, T.

    1998-11-01

    The proliferation of genetic screening and testing is requiring increasing numbers of Americans to integrate genetic knowledge and interventions into their family life and personal experience. This study examines the social processes that occur as families at risk for two of the most common autosomal recessive diseases, sickle cell disease (SC) and cystic fibrosis (CF), encounter genetic testing. Each of these diseases is found primarily in a different ethnic/racial group (CF in Americans of North European descent and SC in Americans of West African descent). This has permitted them to have a certain additional lens on the role of culture in integrating genetic testing into family life and reproductive planning. A third type of genetic disorder, the thalassemias was added to the sample in order to extent the comparative frame and to include other ethnic and racial groups.

  14. Metabolic characterization of a strain (BM90) of Delftia tsuruhatensis showing highly diversified capacity to degrade low molecular weight phenols.

    PubMed

    Juárez-Jiménez, Belén; Manzanera, Maximino; Rodelas, Belén; Martínez-Toledo, Maria Victoria; Gonzalez-López, Jesus; Crognale, Silvia; Pesciaroli, Chiara; Fenice, Massimiliano

    2010-06-01

    A novel bacterium, strain BM90, previously isolated from Tyrrhenian Sea, was metabolically characterized testing its ability to use 95 different carbon sources by the Biolog system. The bacterium showed a broad capacity to use fatty-, organic- and amino-acids; on the contrary, its ability to use carbohydrates was extremely scarce. Strain BM90 was identified and affiliated to Delftia tsuruhatensis by molecular techniques based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing. D. tsuruhatensis BM90, cultivated in shaken cultures, was able to grow on various phenolic compounds and to remove them from its cultural broth. The phenols used, chosen for their presence in industrial or agro-industrial effluents, were grouped on the base of their chemical characteristics. These included benzoic acid derivatives, cinnamic acid derivatives, phenolic aldehyde derivatives, acetic acid derivatives and other phenolic compounds such as catechol and p-hydroxyphenylpropionic acid. When all the compounds (24) were gathered in the same medium (total concentration: 500 mg/l), BM90 caused the complete depletion of 18 phenols and the partial removal of two others. Only four phenolic compounds were not removed. Flow cytometry studies were carried out to understand the physiological state of BM90 cells in presence of the above phenols in various conditions. At the concentrations tested, a certain toxic effect was exerted only by the four compounds that were not metabolized by the bacterium. PMID:19946734

  15. High Drinking in the Dark Mice: A genetic model of drinking to intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Barkley-Levenson, Amanda M.; Crabbe, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Drinking to intoxication is a critical component of risky drinking behaviors in humans, such as binge drinking. Previous rodent models of alcohol consumption largely failed to demonstrate that animals were patterning drinking in such a way as to experience intoxication. Therefore, few rodent models of binge-like drinking and no specifically genetic models were available to study possible predisposing genes. The High Drinking in the Dark (HDID) selective breeding project was started to help fill this void, with HDID mice selected for reaching high blood alcohol levels in a limited access procedure. HDID mice now represent a genetic model of drinking to intoxication and can be used to help answer questions regarding predisposition toward this trait as well as potential correlated responses. They should also prove useful for the eventual development of better therapeutic strategies. PMID:24360287

  16. Human high-altitude adaptation: forward genetics meets the HIF pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bigham, Abigail W.

    2014-01-01

    Humans have adapted to the chronic hypoxia of high altitude in several locations, and recent genome-wide studies have indicated a genetic basis. In some populations, genetic signatures have been identified in the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway, which orchestrates the transcriptional response to hypoxia. In Tibetans, they have been found in the HIF2A (EPAS1) gene, which encodes for HIF-2?, and the prolyl hydroxylase domain protein 2 (PHD2, also known as EGLN1) gene, which encodes for one of its key regulators, PHD2. High-altitude adaptation may be due to multiple genes that act in concert with one another. Unraveling their mechanism of action can offer new therapeutic approaches toward treating common human diseases characterized by chronic hypoxia. PMID:25319824

  17. Phenotypic plasticity and genetic adaptation to high-altitude hypoxia in vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Storz, Jay F.; Scott, Graham R.; Cheviron, Zachary A.

    2010-01-01

    High-altitude environments provide ideal testing grounds for investigations of mechanism and process in physiological adaptation. In vertebrates, much of our understanding of the acclimatization response to high-altitude hypoxia derives from studies of animal species that are native to lowland environments. Such studies can indicate whether phenotypic plasticity will generally facilitate or impede adaptation to high altitude. Here, we review general mechanisms of physiological acclimatization and genetic adaptation to high-altitude hypoxia in birds and mammals. We evaluate whether the acclimatization response to environmental hypoxia can be regarded generally as a mechanism of adaptive phenotypic plasticity, or whether it might sometimes represent a misdirected response that acts as a hindrance to genetic adaptation. In cases in which the acclimatization response to hypoxia is maladaptive, selection will favor an attenuation of the induced phenotypic change. This can result in a form of cryptic adaptive evolution in which phenotypic similarity between high- and low-altitude populations is attributable to directional selection on genetically based trait variation that offsets environmentally induced changes. The blunted erythropoietic and pulmonary vasoconstriction responses to hypoxia in Tibetan humans and numerous high-altitude birds and mammals provide possible examples of this phenomenon. When lowland animals colonize high-altitude environments, adaptive phenotypic plasticity can mitigate the costs of selection, thereby enhancing prospects for population establishment and persistence. By contrast, maladaptive plasticity has the opposite effect. Thus, insights into the acclimatization response of lowland animals to high-altitude hypoxia can provide a basis for predicting how altitudinal range limits might shift in response to climate change. PMID:21112992

  18. Ecological opportunities and specializations shaped genetic divergence in a highly mobile marine top predator.

    PubMed

    Louis, Marie; Fontaine, Michael C; Spitz, Jérôme; Schlund, Erika; Dabin, Willy; Deaville, Rob; Caurant, Florence; Cherel, Yves; Guinet, Christophe; Simon-Bouhet, Benoit

    2014-11-22

    Environmental conditions can shape genetic and morphological divergence. Release of new habitats during historical environmental changes was a major driver of evolutionary diversification. Here, forces shaping population structure and ecotype differentiation ('pelagic' and 'coastal') of bottlenose dolphins in the North-east Atlantic were investigated using complementary evolutionary and ecological approaches. Inference of population demographic history using approximate Bayesian computation indicated that coastal populations were likely founded by the Atlantic pelagic population after the Last Glacial Maxima probably as a result of newly available coastal ecological niches. Pelagic dolphins from the Atlantic and the Mediterranean Sea likely diverged during a period of high productivity in the Mediterranean Sea. Genetic differentiation between coastal and pelagic ecotypes may be maintained by niche specializations, as indicated by stable isotope and stomach content analyses, and social behaviour. The two ecotypes were only weakly morphologically segregated in contrast to other parts of the World Ocean. This may be linked to weak contrasts between coastal and pelagic habitats and/or a relatively recent divergence. We suggest that ecological opportunity to specialize is a major driver of genetic and morphological divergence. Combining genetic, ecological and morphological approaches is essential to understanding the population structure of mobile and cryptic species. PMID:25297864

  19. Ecological opportunities and specializations shaped genetic divergence in a highly mobile marine top predator

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Marie; Fontaine, Michael C.; Spitz, Jérôme; Schlund, Erika; Dabin, Willy; Deaville, Rob; Caurant, Florence; Cherel, Yves; Guinet, Christophe; Simon-Bouhet, Benoit

    2014-01-01

    Environmental conditions can shape genetic and morphological divergence. Release of new habitats during historical environmental changes was a major driver of evolutionary diversification. Here, forces shaping population structure and ecotype differentiation (‘pelagic’ and ‘coastal’) of bottlenose dolphins in the North-east Atlantic were investigated using complementary evolutionary and ecological approaches. Inference of population demographic history using approximate Bayesian computation indicated that coastal populations were likely founded by the Atlantic pelagic population after the Last Glacial Maxima probably as a result of newly available coastal ecological niches. Pelagic dolphins from the Atlantic and the Mediterranean Sea likely diverged during a period of high productivity in the Mediterranean Sea. Genetic differentiation between coastal and pelagic ecotypes may be maintained by niche specializations, as indicated by stable isotope and stomach content analyses, and social behaviour. The two ecotypes were only weakly morphologically segregated in contrast to other parts of the World Ocean. This may be linked to weak contrasts between coastal and pelagic habitats and/or a relatively recent divergence. We suggest that ecological opportunity to specialize is a major driver of genetic and morphological divergence. Combining genetic, ecological and morphological approaches is essential to understanding the population structure of mobile and cryptic species. PMID:25297864

  20. High-resolution genetic maps of Eucalyptus improve Eucalyptus grandis genome assembly.

    PubMed

    Bartholomé, Jérôme; Mandrou, Eric; Mabiala, André; Jenkins, Jerry; Nabihoudine, Ibouniyamine; Klopp, Christophe; Schmutz, Jeremy; Plomion, Christophe; Gion, Jean-Marc

    2015-06-01

    Genetic maps are key tools in genetic research as they constitute the framework for many applications, such as quantitative trait locus analysis, and support the assembly of genome sequences. The resequencing of the two parents of a cross between Eucalyptus urophylla and Eucalyptus grandis was used to design a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array of 6000 markers evenly distributed along the E. grandis genome. The genotyping of 1025 offspring enabled the construction of two high-resolution genetic maps containing 1832 and 1773 markers with an average marker interval of 0.45 and 0.5 cM for E. grandis and E. urophylla, respectively. The comparison between genetic maps and the reference genome highlighted 85% of collinear regions. A total of 43 noncollinear regions and 13 nonsynthetic regions were detected and corrected in the new genome assembly. This improved version contains 4943 scaffolds totalling 691.3 Mb of which 88.6% were captured by the 11 chromosomes. The mapping data were also used to investigate the effect of population size and number of markers on linkage mapping accuracy. This study provides the most reliable linkage maps for Eucalyptus and version 2.0 of the E. grandis genome. PMID:25385325

  1. High-resolution deep Northeast Pacific radiocarbon record shows little change in ventilation rate during the last deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, D. C.; Mix, A. C.

    2010-12-01

    The rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide during the last deglaciation is thought to be driven by release of carbon sequestered in the abyssal ocean. This mechanism requires a poorly ventilated deep Pacific during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and enhanced ventilation during the deglaciation. Here we evaluate the plausibility of this scenario using planktonic and benthic foraminiferal radiocarbon data from a high-sedimentation rate core (~25 cm/kyr) collected in the deep (2700 m) Northeast Pacific. We estimate that the mean benthic-planktonic (B-P) age was 1620±190 years during the LGM (n=10 pairs). This value is indistinguishable from the mean B-P difference for the deglaciation (1500±230; n=20 pairs) and the difference between surface and deep water 14C ages today (1560±70 years). Furthermore, our time series of benthic ?14C parallels atmospheric ?14C with an offset of 300±50‰ from 22 to 10 kyr BP. These data suggest the ventilation rate of the deep NE Pacific remained nearly constant during the deglaciation, consistent with lower resolution data from this region (Okazaki et al., 2010). Between 22 and 16 kyr BP, ?14C in the deep NE Pacific varied between 0 and 100‰, well above the -200‰ values estimated at intermediate depths off of Baja California during the Mystery Interval (Marchitto et al., 2007). The deep NE Pacific apparently did not contain water of adequate age to source deglacial ?14C anomalies shallower in the water column. Given that Antarctic Intermediate Water is also an unlikely source (de Pol-Holz et al., 2010; Rose et al., 2010), an alternative explanation is necessary for the extreme 14C depletions in the eastern tropical Pacific. De Pol-Holz, R. D., et al. 2010. No signature of abyssal carbon in intermediate waters off Chile during deglaciation. Nature Geoscience 3, 192-195. Marchitto, T., Lehman, S., Ortiz, J., Fluckiger, J. & van Geen, A. 2007. Marine radiocarbon evidence for the mechanism of deglacial atmospheric CO2 rise. Science 316, 1456-1459. Okazaki et al. 2010. Deepwater formation in the North Pacific during the Last Glacial Termination. Science 329, 200-204. Rose, K. A., et al. 2010. Upper-ocean-to-atmosphere offsets imply fast deglacial radiocarbon release, Nature 466, 1093-1097.

  2. High Genetic Diversity and Adaptive Potential of Two Simian Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses in a Wild Primate Population

    PubMed Central

    Weiler, Andrea; Sibley, Samuel D.; Dinis, Jorge M.; Bergman, Zachary; Nelson, Chase W.; Correll, Michael; Gleicher, Michael; Hyeroba, David; Tumukunde, Alex; Weny, Geoffrey; Chapman, Colin; Kuhn, Jens H.; Hughes, Austin L.; Friedrich, Thomas C.; Goldberg, Tony L.; O'Connor, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Key biological properties such as high genetic diversity and high evolutionary rate enhance the potential of certain RNA viruses to adapt and emerge. Identifying viruses with these properties in their natural hosts could dramatically improve disease forecasting and surveillance. Recently, we discovered two novel members of the viral family Arteriviridae: simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV)-krc1 and SHFV-krc2, infecting a single wild red colobus (Procolobus rufomitratus tephrosceles) in Kibale National Park, Uganda. Nearly nothing is known about the biological properties of SHFVs in nature, although the SHFV type strain, SHFV-LVR, has caused devastating outbreaks of viral hemorrhagic fever in captive macaques. Here we detected SHFV-krc1 and SHFV-krc2 in 40% and 47% of 60 wild red colobus tested, respectively. We found viral loads in excess of 106–107 RNA copies per milliliter of blood plasma for each of these viruses. SHFV-krc1 and SHFV-krc2 also showed high genetic diversity at both the inter- and intra-host levels. Analyses of synonymous and non-synonymous nucleotide diversity across viral genomes revealed patterns suggestive of positive selection in SHFV open reading frames (ORF) 5 (SHFV-krc2 only) and 7 (SHFV-krc1 and SHFV-krc2). Thus, these viruses share several important properties with some of the most rapidly evolving, emergent RNA viruses. PMID:24651479

  3. Relocation, high-latitude warming and host genetic identity shape the foliar fungal microbiome of poplars.

    PubMed

    Bálint, Miklós; Bartha, László; O'Hara, Robert B; Olson, Matthew S; Otte, Jürgen; Pfenninger, Markus; Robertson, Amanda L; Tiffin, Peter; Schmitt, Imke

    2015-01-01

    Micro-organisms associated with plants and animals affect host fitness, shape community structure and influence ecosystem properties. Climate change is expected to influence microbial communities, but their reactions are not well understood. Host-associated micro-organisms are influenced by the climate reactions of their hosts, which may undergo range shifts due to climatic niche tracking, or may be actively relocated to mitigate the effects of climate change. We used a common-garden experiment and rDNA metabarcoding to examine the effect of host relocation and high-latitude warming on the complex fungal endophytic microbiome associated with leaves of an ecologically dominant boreal forest tree (Populus balsamifera L.). We also considered the potential effects of poplar genetic identity in defining the reactions of the microbiome to the treatments. The relocation of hosts to the north increased the diversity of the microbiome and influenced its structure, with results indicating enemy release from plausible pathogens. High-latitude warming decreased microbiome diversity in comparison with natural northern conditions. The warming also caused structural changes, which made the fungal communities distinct in comparison with both low-latitude and high-latitude natural communities, and increased the abundance of plausible pathogens. The reactions of the microbiome to relocation and warming were strongly dependent on host genetic identity. This suggests that climate change effects on host-microbiome systems may be mediated by the interaction of environmental factors and the population genetic processes of the hosts. PMID:25443313

  4. High-throughput genomic technology in research and clinical management of breast cancer. Evolving landscape of genetic epidemiological studies

    PubMed Central

    Low, Yen-Ling; Wedrén, Sara; Liu, Jianjun

    2006-01-01

    Candidate polymorphism-based genetic epidemiological studies have yielded little success in the search for low-penetrance breast cancer susceptibility genes. The lack of progress is partially due to insufficient coverage of genomic regions with genetic markers, as well as economic constraints, limiting both the number of genetic targets and the number of individuals being studied. Recent rapid advances in high-throughput genotyping technology and our understanding of genetic variation patterns across the human genome are now revolutionizing the way in which genetic epidemiological studies are being designed and conducted. Genetic epidemiological studies are quickly progressing from candidate gene studies to comprehensive pathway investigation and, further, to genomic epidemiological studies where the whole human genome is being interrogated to identify susceptibility alleles. This paper reviews the evolving approaches in the search for low-penetrance breast cancer susceptibility gene variants and discusses their potential promises and pitfalls. PMID:16834767

  5. High genetic diversity in a small population: the case of Chilean blue whales

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Florez, Juan P; Hucke-Gaete, Rodrigo; Rosenbaum, Howard; Figueroa, Christian C

    2014-01-01

    It is generally assumed that species with low population sizes have lower genetic diversities than larger populations and vice versa. However, this would not be the case for long-lived species with long generation times, and which populations have declined due to anthropogenic effects, such as the blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus). This species was intensively decimated globally to near extinction during the 20th century. Along the Chilean coast, it is estimated that at least 4288 blue whales were hunted from an apparently pre-exploitation population size (k) of a maximum of 6200 individuals (Southeastern Pacific). Thus, here, we describe the mtDNA (control region) and nDNA (microsatellites) diversities of the Chilean blue whale aggregation site in order to verify the expectation of low genetic diversity in small populations. We then compare our findings with other blue whale aggregations in the Southern Hemisphere. Interestingly, although the estimated population size is small compared with the pre-whaling era, there is still considerable genetic diversity, even after the population crash, both in mitochondrial (N = 46) and nuclear (N = 52) markers (Hd = 0.890 and Ho = 0.692, respectively). Our results suggest that this diversity could be a consequence of the long generation times and the relatively short period of time elapsed since the end of whaling, which has been observed in other heavily-exploited whale populations. The genetic variability of blue whales on their southern Chile feeding grounds was similar to that found in other Southern Hemisphere blue whale feeding grounds. Our phylogenetic analysis of mtDNA haplotypes does not show extensive differentiation of populations among Southern Hemisphere blue whale feeding grounds. The present study suggests that although levels of genetic diversity are frequently used as estimators of population health, these parameters depend on the biology of the species and should be taken into account in a monitoring framework study to obtain a more complete picture of the conservation status of a population. PMID:24834336

  6. Colored polydimethylsiloxane micropillar arrays for high throughput measurements of forces applied by genetic model organisms.

    PubMed

    Khare, Siddharth M; Awasthi, Anjali; Venkataraman, V; Koushika, Sandhya P

    2015-01-01

    Measuring forces applied by multi-cellular organisms is valuable in investigating biomechanics of their locomotion. Several technologies have been developed to measure such forces, for example, strain gauges, micro-machined sensors, and calibrated cantilevers. We introduce an innovative combination of techniques as a high throughput screening tool to assess forces applied by multiple genetic model organisms. First, we fabricated colored Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micropillars where the color enhances contrast making it easier to detect and track pillar displacement driven by the organism. Second, we developed a semi-automated graphical user interface to analyze the images for pillar displacement, thus reducing the analysis time for each animal to minutes. The addition of color reduced the Young's modulus of PDMS. Therefore, the dye-PDMS composite was characterized using Yeoh's hyperelastic model and the pillars were calibrated using a silicon based force sensor. We used our device to measure forces exerted by wild type and mutant Caenorhabditis elegans moving on an agarose surface. Wild type C. elegans exert an average force of ?1??N on an individual pillar and a total average force of ?7.68??N. We show that the middle of C. elegans exerts more force than its extremities. We find that C. elegans mutants with defective body wall muscles apply significantly lower force on individual pillars, while mutants defective in sensing externally applied mechanical forces still apply the same average force per pillar compared to wild type animals. Average forces applied per pillar are independent of the length, diameter, or cuticle stiffness of the animal. We also used the device to measure, for the first time, forces applied by Drosophila melanogaster larvae. Peristaltic waves occurred at 0.4?Hz applying an average force of ?1.58??N on a single pillar. Our colored microfluidic device along with its displacement tracking software allows us to measure forces applied by multiple model organisms that crawl or slither to travel through their environment. PMID:25713693

  7. High Prevalence and Genetic Heterogeneity of Rodent-Borne Bartonella Species on Heixiazi Island, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong-Mei; Hou, Yong; Song, Xiu-Ping; Fu, Ying-Qun; Li, Gui-Chang; Li, Ming; Eremeeva, Marina E; Wu, Hai-Xia; Pang, Bo; Yue, Yu-Juan; Huang, Ying; Lu, Liang; Wang, Jun; Liu, Qi-Yong

    2015-12-01

    We performed genetic analysis of Bartonella isolates from rodent populations from Heixiazi Island in northeast China. Animals were captured at four sites representing grassland and brushwood habitats in 2011 and examined for the prevalence and genetic diversity of Bartonella species, their relationship to their hosts, and geographic distribution. A high prevalence (57.7%) and a high diversity (14 unique genotypes which belonged to 8 clades) of Bartonella spp. were detected from 71 rodents comprising 5 species and 4 genera from 3 rodent families. Forty-one Bartonella isolates were recovered and identified, including B. taylorii, B. japonica, B. coopersplainsensis, B. grahamii, B. washoensis subsp. cynomysii, B. doshiae, and two novel Bartonella species, by sequencing of four genes (gltA, the 16S rRNA gene, ftsZ, and rpoB). The isolates of B. taylorii and B. grahamii were the most prevalent and exhibited genetic difference from isolates identified elsewhere. Several isolates clustered with strains from Japan and far-eastern Russia; strains isolated from the same host typically were found within the same cluster. Species descriptions are provided for Bartonella heixiaziensis sp. nov. and B. fuyuanensis sp. nov. PMID:26362983

  8. Defining population structure and genetic signatures of decline in the giant garter snake (Thamnophis gigas): implications for conserving threatened species within highly altered landscapes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Dustin A.; Halstead, Brian J.; Casazza, Michael L.; Hansen, Eric C.; Wylie, Glenn D.; Vandergast, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic habitat fragmentation can disrupt the ability of species to disperse across landscapes, which can alter the levels and distribution of genetic diversity within populations and negatively impact long-term viability. The giant gartersnake (Thamnophis gigas) is a state and federally threatened species that historically occurred in the wetland habitats of California’s Great Central Valley. Despite the loss of 93 % of historic wetlands throughout the Central Valley, giant gartersnakes continue to persist in relatively small, isolated patches of highly modified agricultural wetlands. Gathering information regarding genetic diversity and effective population size represents an essential component for conservation management programs aimed at this species. Previous mitochondrial sequence studies have revealed historical patterns of differentiation, yet little is known about contemporary population structure and diversity. On the basis of 15 microsatellite loci, we estimate population structure and compare indices of genetic diversity among populations spanning seven drainage basins within the Central Valley. We sought to understand how habitat loss may have affected genetic differentiation, genetic diversity and effective population size, and what these patterns suggest in terms of management and restoration actions. We recovered five genetic clusters that were consistent with regional drainage basins, although three northern basins within the Sacramento Valley formed a single genetic cluster. Our results show that northern drainage basin populations have higher connectivity than among central and southern basins populations, and that greater differentiation exists among the more geographically isolated populations in the central and southern portion of the species’ range. Genetic diversity measures among basins were significantly different, and were generally lower in southern basin populations. Levels of inbreeding and evidence of population bottlenecks were detected in about half the populations we sampled, and effective population size estimates were well below recommended minimum thresholds to avoid inbreeding. Efforts focused on maintaining and enhancing existing wetlands to facilitate dispersal between basins and increase local effective population sizes may be critical for these otherwise isolated populations.

  9. Ultra-High Density, Transcript-Based Genetic Maps of Pepper Define Recombination in the Genome and Synteny Among Related Species.

    PubMed

    Hill, Theresa; Ashrafi, Hamid; Chin-Wo, Sebastian Reyes; Stoffel, Kevin; Truco, Maria-Jose; Kozik, Alexander; Michelmore, Richard; Van Deynze, Allen

    2015-01-01

    Our ability to assemble complex genomes and construct ultradense genetic maps now allows the determination of recombination rates, translocations, and the extent of genomic collinearity between populations, species, and genera. We developed two ultradense genetic linkage maps for pepper from single-position polymorphisms (SPPs) identified de novo with a 30,173 unigene pepper genotyping array. The Capsicum frutescens × C. annuum interspecific and the C. annuum intraspecific genetic maps were constructed comprising 16,167 and 3,878 unigene markers in 2108 and 783 genetic bins, respectively. Accuracies of marker groupings and orders are validated by the high degree of collinearity between the two maps. Marker density was sufficient to locate the chromosomal breakpoint resulting in the P1/P8 translocation between C. frutescens and C. annuum to a single bin. The two maps aligned to the pepper genome showed varying marker density along the chromosomes. There were extensive chromosomal regions with suppressed recombination and reduced intraspecific marker density. These regions corresponded to the pronounced nonrecombining pericentromeric regions in tomato, a related Solanaceous species. Similar to tomato, the extent of reduced recombination appears to be more pronounced in pepper than in other plant species. Alignment of maps with the tomato and potato genomes shows the presence of previously known translocations and a translocation event that was not observed in previous genetic maps of pepper. PMID:26355020

  10. Ultra-High Density, Transcript-Based Genetic Maps of Pepper Define Recombination in the Genome and Synteny Among Related Species

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Theresa; Ashrafi, Hamid; Chin-Wo, Sebastian Reyes; Stoffel, Kevin; Truco, Maria-Jose; Kozik, Alexander; Michelmore, Richard; Van Deynze, Allen

    2015-01-01

    Our ability to assemble complex genomes and construct ultradense genetic maps now allows the determination of recombination rates, translocations, and the extent of genomic collinearity between populations, species, and genera. We developed two ultradense genetic linkage maps for pepper from single-position polymorphisms (SPPs) identified de novo with a 30,173 unigene pepper genotyping array. The Capsicum frutescens × C. annuum interspecific and the C. annuum intraspecific genetic maps were constructed comprising 16,167 and 3,878 unigene markers in 2108 and 783 genetic bins, respectively. Accuracies of marker groupings and orders are validated by the high degree of collinearity between the two maps. Marker density was sufficient to locate the chromosomal breakpoint resulting in the P1/P8 translocation between C. frutescens and C. annuum to a single bin. The two maps aligned to the pepper genome showed varying marker density along the chromosomes. There were extensive chromosomal regions with suppressed recombination and reduced intraspecific marker density. These regions corresponded to the pronounced nonrecombining pericentromeric regions in tomato, a related Solanaceous species. Similar to tomato, the extent of reduced recombination appears to be more pronounced in pepper than in other plant species. Alignment of maps with the tomato and potato genomes shows the presence of previously known translocations and a translocation event that was not observed in previous genetic maps of pepper. PMID:26355020

  11. Hyperplane Ranking in Simple Genetic Algorithms

    E-print Network

    Whitley, Darrell

    Hyperplane Ranking in Simple Genetic Algorithms D. Whitley, K. Mathias, and L. Pyeatt Department of a function. We show that the degree of dynamic ranking induced by a simple genetic algorithm is highly cor algorithms by developing a theory of how genetic algorithms process hyperplanes repre­ sented by schemata

  12. SYMPOSIUM: MOLECULAR GENETICS IN SARCOMA Synovial Sarcoma

    E-print Network

    Capecchi, Mario R.

    SYMPOSIUM: MOLECULAR GENETICS IN SARCOMA Synovial Sarcoma From Genetics to Genetic-based Animal Surgeons 2008 Abstract Synovial sarcomas are highly aggressive mesenchymal cancers that show modest protein in effectively all cases of synovial sarcoma suggests a role in the etiology. Other nonspecific

  13. NOTCH1 mutations identify a genetic subgroup of chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients with high risk of transformation and poor outcome.

    PubMed

    Villamor, N; Conde, L; Martínez-Trillos, A; Cazorla, M; Navarro, A; Beà, S; López, C; Colomer, D; Pinyol, M; Aymerich, M; Rozman, M; Abrisqueta, P; Baumann, T; Delgado, J; Giné, E; González-Díaz, M; Hernández, J M; Colado, E; Payer, A R; Rayon, C; Navarro, B; José Terol, M; Bosch, F; Quesada, V; Puente, X S; López-Otín, C; Jares, P; Pereira, A; Campo, E; López-Guillermo, A

    2013-04-01

    NOTCH1 has been found recurrently mutated in a subset of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). To analyze biological features and clinical impact of NOTCH1 mutations in CLL, we sequenced this gene in 565 patients. NOTCH1 mutations, found in 63 patients (11%), were associated with unmutated IGHV, high expression of CD38 and ZAP-70, trisomy 12, advanced stage and elevated lactate dehydrogenase. Sequential analysis in 200 patients demonstrated acquisition of mutation in one case (0.5%) and disappearance after treatment in two. Binet A and B patients with NOTCH1-mutated had a shorter time to treatment. NOTCH1-mutated patients were more frequently refractory to therapy and showed shorter progression-free and overall survival after complete remission. Overall survival was shorter in NOTCH1-mutated patients, although not independently from IGHV. NOTCH1 mutation increased the risk of transformation to diffuse large B-cell lymphoma independently from IGHV, with this being validated in resampling tests of replicability. In summary, NOTCH1 mutational status, that was rarely acquired during the course of the disease, identify a genetic subgroup with high risk of transformation and poor outcome. This recently identified genetic subgroup of CLL patients deserves prospective studies to define their best management. PMID:23295735

  14. http://www.tcd.ie/Genetics/staff/Miguel_DeArce_Bioinf_01/bioinformatics_01/htm/air.htm Name; The links show a rotable 3D model of each molecule.

    E-print Network

    Morante, Silvia

    #12;#12;#12;#12;#12;http://www.tcd.ie/Genetics/staff/Miguel_DeArce_Bioinf_01/bioinformatics_01/htm with the side chain projecting downwards. Codons; This is the Standard Genetic Code. The codon usage reported

  15. Genetic Pool Information Reflects Highly Suitable Areas: The Case of Two Parapatric Endangered Species of Tuco-tucos (Rodentia: Ctenomiydae)

    PubMed Central

    Galiano, Daniel; Bernardo-Silva, Jorge; de Freitas, Thales R. O.

    2014-01-01

    Conservation of small mammals requires knowledge of the genetically and ecologically meaningful spatial scales at which species respond to habitat modifications. Conservation strategies can be improved through the use of ecological niche models and genetic data to classify areas of high environmental suitability. In this study, we applied a Maxent model integrated with genetic information (nucleotide diversity, haplotype diversity and Fu's Fs neutrality tests) to evaluate potential genetic pool populations with highly suitable areas for two parapatric endangered species of tuco-tucos (Ctenomys minutus and C. lami). Our results demonstrated that both species were largely influenced by vegetation and soil variables at a landscape scale and inhabit a highly specific niche. Ctenomys minutus was also influenced by the variable altitude; the species was associated with low altitudes (sea level). Our model of genetic data associated with environmental suitability indicate that the genetic pool data were associated with highly suitable areas for C. minutus. This pattern was not evident for C. lami, but this outcome could be a consequence of the restricted range of the species. The preservation of species requires not only detailed knowledge of their natural history and genetic structure but also information on the availability of suitable areas where species can survive, and such knowledge can aid significantly in conservation planning. This finding reinforces the use of these two techniques for planning conservation actions. PMID:24819251

  16. High-Voltage Electroporation of Bacteria: Genetic Transformation of Campylobacter jejuni with Plasmid DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jeff F.; Dower, William J.; Tompkins, Lucy S.

    1988-02-01

    Electroporation permits the uptake of DNA by mammalian cells and plant protoplasts because it induces transient permeability of the cell membrane. We investigated the utility of high-voltage electroporation as a method for genetic transformation of intact bacterial cells by using the enteric pathogen Campylobacter jejuni as a model system. This report demonstrates that the application of high-voltage discharges to bacterial cells permits genetic transformation. Our method involves exposure of a Campylobacter cell suspension to a high-voltage exponential decay discharge (5-13 kV/cm) for a brief period of time (resistance-capacitance time constant = 2.4-26 msec) in the presence of plasmid DNA. Electrical transformation of C. jejuni results in frequencies as high as 1.2 × 106 transformants per ? g of DNA. We have investigated the effects of pulse amplitude and duration, cell growth conditions, divalent cations, and DNA concentration on the efficiency of transformation. Transformants of C. jejuni obtained by electroporation contained structurally intact plasmid molecules. In addition, evidence is presented that indicates that C. jejuni possesses DNA restriction and modification systems. The use of electroporation as a method for transforming other bacterial species and guidelines for its implementation are also discussed.

  17. Genetic adaptations of the plateau zokor in high-elevation burrows

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yong; Li, Jin-Xiu; Ge, Ri-Li; Zhong, Li; Irwin, David M.; Murphy, Robert W.; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2015-01-01

    The plateau zokor (Myospalax baileyi) spends its entire life underground in sealed burrows. Confronting limited oxygen and high carbon dioxide concentrations, and complete darkness, they epitomize a successful physiological adaptation. Here, we employ transcriptome sequencing to explore the genetic underpinnings of their adaptations to this unique habitat. Compared to Rattus norvegicus, genes belonging to GO categories related to energy metabolism (e.g. mitochondrion and fatty acid beta-oxidation) underwent accelerated evolution in the plateau zokor. Furthermore, the numbers of positively selected genes were significantly enriched in the gene categories involved in ATPase activity, blood vessel development and respiratory gaseous exchange, functional categories that are relevant to adaptation to high altitudes. Among the 787 genes with evidence of parallel evolution, and thus identified as candidate genes, several GO categories (e.g. response to hypoxia, oxygen homeostasis and erythrocyte homeostasis) are significantly enriched, are two genes, EPAS1 and AJUBA, involved in the response to hypoxia, where the parallel evolved sites are at positions that are highly conserved in sequence alignments from multiple species. Thus, accelerated evolution of GO categories, positive selection and parallel evolution at the molecular level provide evidences to parse the genetic adaptations of the plateau zokor for living in high-elevation burrows. PMID:26602147

  18. Genetic adaptations of the plateau zokor in high-elevation burrows.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yong; Li, Jin-Xiu; Ge, Ri-Li; Zhong, Li; Irwin, David M; Murphy, Robert W; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2015-01-01

    The plateau zokor (Myospalax baileyi) spends its entire life underground in sealed burrows. Confronting limited oxygen and high carbon dioxide concentrations, and complete darkness, they epitomize a successful physiological adaptation. Here, we employ transcriptome sequencing to explore the genetic underpinnings of their adaptations to this unique habitat. Compared to Rattus norvegicus, genes belonging to GO categories related to energy metabolism (e.g. mitochondrion and fatty acid beta-oxidation) underwent accelerated evolution in the plateau zokor. Furthermore, the numbers of positively selected genes were significantly enriched in the gene categories involved in ATPase activity, blood vessel development and respiratory gaseous exchange, functional categories that are relevant to adaptation to high altitudes. Among the 787 genes with evidence of parallel evolution, and thus identified as candidate genes, several GO categories (e.g. response to hypoxia, oxygen homeostasis and erythrocyte homeostasis) are significantly enriched, are two genes, EPAS1 and AJUBA, involved in the response to hypoxia, where the parallel evolved sites are at positions that are highly conserved in sequence alignments from multiple species. Thus, accelerated evolution of GO categories, positive selection and parallel evolution at the molecular level provide evidences to parse the genetic adaptations of the plateau zokor for living in high-elevation burrows. PMID:26602147

  19. Abandoning the common law: medical negligence, genetic tests and wrongful life in the Australian High Court.

    PubMed

    Faunce, Thomas; Jefferys, Susannah

    2007-05-01

    The Australian High Court recently found that the common law could allow parents to claim tortious damages when medical negligence was proven to have led to the birth of an unplanned, but healthy, baby (Cattanach v Melchior (2003) 215 CLR 1). In Harriton v Stephens (2006) 80 ALJR 791; [2006] HCA 15 and Waller v James; Waller v Hoolahan (2006) 80 ALJR 846; [2006] HCA 16 the High Court in a six-to-one decision (Kirby J dissenting) decided that no such claim could be made by a child when medical negligence in failing to order an in utero genetic test caused the child severe disability. In an era when almost all pregnancies will soon require patented fetal genetic tests as part of the professional standard of care, the High Court, by barring so-called "wrongful life" (better termed "wrongful suffering") claims, may have created a partial immunity from suit for their corporate manufacturers and the doctors who administer them. What lessons can be learnt from this case about how the Australian High Court is, or should be, approaching medical negligence cases and its role as guardian of the Australian common law? PMID:17571781

  20. Differences in foraging ecology align with genetically divergent ecotypes of a highly mobile marine top predator.

    PubMed

    Jeglinski, Jana W E; Wolf, Jochen B W; Werner, Christiane; Costa, Daniel P; Trillmich, Fritz

    2015-12-01

    Foraging differentiation within a species can contribute to restricted gene flow between ecologically different groups, promoting ecological speciation. Galapagos sea lions (Zalophus wollebaeki) show genetic and morphological divergence between the western and central archipelago, possibly as a result of an ecologically mediated contrast in the marine habitat. We use global positioning system (GPS) data, time-depth recordings (TDR), stable isotope and scat data to compare foraging habitat characteristics, diving behaviour and diet composition of Galapagos sea lions from a western and a central colony. We consider both juvenile and adult life stages to assess the potential role of ontogenetic shifts that can be crucial in shaping foraging behaviour and habitat choice for life. We found differences in foraging habitat use, foraging style and diet composition that aligned with genetic differentiation. These differences were consistent between juvenile and adult sea lions from the same colony, overriding age-specific behavioural differences. Our study contributes to an understanding of the complex interaction of ecological condition, plastic behavioural response and genetic make-up of interconnected populations. PMID:26307593

  1. Analysis of genetic variation and diversity of Rice stripe virus populations through high-throughput sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lingzhe; Li, Zefeng; Wu, Jianxiang; Xu, Yi; Yang, Xiuling; Fan, Longjiang; Fang, Rongxiang; Zhou, Xueping

    2015-01-01

    Plant RNA viruses often generate diverse populations in their host plants through error-prone replication and recombination. Recent studies on the genetic diversity of plant RNA viruses in various host plants have provided valuable information about RNA virus evolution and emergence of new diseases caused by RNA viruses. We analyzed and compared the genetic diversity of Rice stripe virus (RSV) populations in Oryza sativa (a natural host of RSV) and compared it with that of the RSV populations generated in an infection of Nicotiana benthamiana, an experimental host of RSV, using the high-throughput sequencing technology. From infected O. sativa and N. benthamiana plants, a total of 341 and 1675 site substitutions were identified in the RSV genome, respectively, and the average substitution ratio in these sites was 1.47 and 7.05 %, respectively, indicating that the RSV populations from infected N. benthamiana plant are more diverse than those from infected O. sativa plant. Our result gives a direct evidence that virus might allow higher genetic diversity for host adaptation. PMID:25852724

  2. High genetic similarity of ciprofloxacin-resistant Campylobacter jejuni in central Europe

    PubMed Central

    Kova?, Jasna; ?adež, Neža; Stessl, Beatrix; Stingl, Kerstin; Gruntar, Igor; Ocepek, Matjaž; Trkov, Marija; Wagner, Martin; Smole Možina, Sonja

    2015-01-01

    Campylobacteriosis is the leading zoonosis in the European Union with the majority of cases attributed to Campylobacter jejuni. Although the disease is usually self-limiting, some severe cases need to be treated with antibiotics, primarily macrolides and quinolones. However, the resistance to the latter is reaching alarming levels in most of the EU countries. To shed light on the expansion of antibiotic resistance in central Europe, we have investigated genetic similarity across 178 ciprofloxacin-resistant C. jejuni mostly isolated in Slovenia, Austria and Germany. We performed comparative genetic similarity analyses using allelic types of seven multilocus sequence typing housekeeping genes, and single nucleotide polymorphisms of a quinolone resistance determining region located within the DNA gyrase subunit A gene. This analysis revealed high genetic similarity of isolates from clonal complex ST-21 that carry gyrA allelic type 1 in all three of these central-European countries, suggesting these ciprofloxacin resistant isolates arose from a recent common ancestor and are spread clonally. PMID:26557112

  3. USF-1 genetic polymorphisms confer a high risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Wang, Bai-Fang; Tong, Jing; Chang, Bing; Wang, Bing-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in upstream transcription factor 1 (USF1) were investigated for their links to increased risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in Chinese population. Between January 2013 and April 2014, 174 patients with NAFLD in the First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University were selected for this study. A group of 100 healthy subjects were identified as the control group. The MALDI-TOF-MS, a mass spectrometry based technique, was used to detect USF-1 genetic polymorphisms using PCR amplified DNA products. Furthermore, Automatic Chemistry Analyzer (ACA) was used to determine the clinical indicators. Genotypes, allele frequencies and clinical indicators were measured to assess NAFLD risk in relation to the SNPs. USF-1 rs6427573 genetic polymorphisms were associated with an increased risk of NAFLD (AA vs. GG: OR = 3.16, 95% CI = 1.56-6.43, P = 0.001; GA + AA vs. GG: OR = 1.87, 95% CI = 1.13-3.09, P = 0.015; GG + AA vs. AA: OR = 2.96, 95% CI = 1.49-5.88, P = 0.001; G vs. A: OR = 2.10, 95% CI = 1.43-3.09, P < 0.001). Similarly, rs2516839 polymorphisms also conferred a risk for NAFLD (AA vs. GG: OR = 2.49, 95% CI = 1.43-4.34, P = 0.001; GA + AA vs. GG: OR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.02-2.78, P = 0.041). On the other hand, rs3737787 and rs2774279 showed no statistical significances in the NAFLD group and control group (P > 0.05). Two USF-1 genetic polymorphisms, rs6427573 and rs2516839, may present an increased risk of NAFLD. PMID:25932200

  4. Microsatellites reveal genetic differentiation among populations in an insect species with high genetic variability in dispersal, the codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    PubMed

    Chen, M H; Dorn, S

    2010-02-01

    Little is known about genetic differentiation and gene flow in populations of insect species that have a high genetic variability in dispersal but lack morphologically visible morphs that disperse. These characteristics apply to the codling moth, Cydia pomonella L. (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), a major pest of fruits and nuts. Larvae were collected from three orchards each of pome fruits, stone fruits and nut trees in a major fruit growing area of Switzerland (Valais) and from six further (mainly apple) orchards throughout this country. Nine microsatellite loci were used to investigate genetic differentiation and the amount of gene flow among the sampled populations. All the loci were shown to be polymorphic in all populations. The number of alleles ranged from five to 15 over nine loci for the 15 populations. Significant genetic differentiation was noted among the populations from apple, apricot and walnut in the Valais region. Furthermore, among the eight populations sampled from apple in different geographic regions throughout Switzerland, AMOVA and pairwise FST analysis revealed significant population genetic differentiation even between populations collected from orchards 10 km apart. These results indicate that a distinct prevailing characteristic, in the present case the sedentary behaviour of the moth, can shape population architecture. PMID:19366473

  5. Long-term isolation and stability explain high genetic diversity in the Eastern Himalaya.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yanhua; Ericson, Per G P; Quan, Qing; Song, Gang; Zhang, Ruiying; Gao, Bin; Lei, Fumin

    2014-02-01

    China's Southwest Mountainous Region in Eastern Himalaya is a ‘biodiversity hotspot’ of global interest for conservation. Yet little is known about what has driven this unique diversity. The dramatic topography of the Southwest Mountainous Region resulting from the tectonic uplift during the late Pliocene leads to dramatic ecological stratification, which creates physical barriers to migration and isolates organisms into different subregions and mountain systems. This agrees with the observation that the phylogeographical patterns found in four species of birds (Alcippe morrisonia, Stachyridopsis ruficeps, Parus monticolus and Aegithalos concinnus) distributed in this region are characterized by deep splits between lineages that coalesce between 0.8 and 2.1 Ma. Unlike other regions at this latitude, the Southwest Mountainous Region was largely unaffected by the Pleistocene glaciations. Genetically isolated populations of these birds could thus be maintained throughout the Pleistocene in these rather stable montane environments. In comparison, we found radically different phylogeographical patterns in populations of the same four species distributed in the adjacent lowland, the Central China region. This region has a distinctly different geological history with dramatic, climate-induced shifts in vegetation during the Pleistocene. Here, we found a considerably less geographical structure in the genetic variation and a much younger coalescence time (0.3-0.7 Ma). We also found evidence of genetic bottlenecks during the glacial periods and gene flow during the interglacial expansions. We conclude that the high genetic diversity in the Southwest Mountainous Region results from a long-term in situ diversification within these evolutionary isolated and environment stable montane habitats. PMID:24600707

  6. High-precision genetic mapping of behavioral traits in the diversity outbred mouse population

    PubMed Central

    Logan, R W; Robledo, R F; Recla, J M; Philip, V M; Bubier, J A; Jay, J J; Harwood, C; Wilcox, T; Gatti, D M; Bult, C J; Churchill, G A; Chesler, E J

    2013-01-01

    Historically our ability to identify genetic variants underlying complex behavioral traits in mice has been limited by low mapping resolution of conventional mouse crosses. The newly developed Diversity Outbred (DO) population promises to deliver improved resolution that will circumvent costly fine-mapping studies. The DO is derived from the same founder strains as the Collaborative Cross (CC), including three wild-derived strains. Thus the DO provides more allelic diversity and greater potential for discovery compared to crosses involving standard mouse strains. We have characterized 283 male and female DO mice using open-field, light–dark box, tail-suspension and visual-cliff avoidance tests to generate 38 behavioral measures. We identified several quantitative trait loci (QTL) for these traits with support intervals ranging from 1 to 3 Mb in size. These intervals contain relatively few genes (ranging from 5 to 96). For a majority of QTL, using the founder allelic effects together with whole genome sequence data, we could further narrow the positional candidates. Several QTL replicate previously published loci. Novel loci were also identified for anxiety- and activity-related traits. Half of the QTLs are associated with wild-derived alleles, confirming the value to behavioral genetics of added genetic diversity in the DO. In the presence of wild-alleles we sometimes observe behaviors that are qualitatively different from the expected response. Our results demonstrate that high-precision mapping of behavioral traits can be achieved with moderate numbers of DO animals, representing a significant advance in our ability to leverage the mouse as a tool for behavioral genetics PMID:23433259

  7. Genetic highthroughput screening in retinitis pigmentosa based on high resolution melting (HRM) analysis.

    PubMed

    Anasagasti, Ander; Barandika, Olatz; Irigoyen, Cristina; Benitez, Bruno A; Cooper, Breanna; Cruchaga, Carlos; López de Munain, Adolfo; Ruiz-Ederra, Javier

    2013-10-24

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) involves a group of genetically determined retinal diseases caused by a large number of mutations that result in rod photoreceptor cell death followed by gradual death of cone cells. Most cases of RP are monogenic, with more than 80 associated genes identified so far. The high number of genes and variants involved in RP, among other factors, is making the molecular characterization of RP a real challenge for many patients. Although HRM has been used for the analysis of isolated variants or single RP genes, as far as we are concerned, this is the first study that uses HRM analysis for a high-throughput screening of several RP genes. Our main goal was to test the suitability of HRM analysis as a genetic screening technique in RP, and to compare its performance with two of the most widely used NGS platforms, Illumina and PGM-Ion Torrent technologies. RP patients (n=96) were clinically diagnosed at the Ophthalmology Department of Donostia University Hospital, Spain. We analyzed a total of 16 RP genes that meet the following inclusion criteria: 1) size: genes with transcripts of less than 4 kb; 2) number of exons: genes with up to 22 exons; and 3) prevalence: genes reported to account for, at least, 0.4 % of total RP cases worldwide. For comparison purposes, RHO gene was also sequenced with Illumina (GAII; Illumina), Ion semiconductor technologies (PGM; Life Technologies) and Sanger sequencing (ABI 3130xl platform; Applied Biosystems). Detected variants were confirmed in all cases by Sanger sequencing and tested for co-segregation in the family of affected probands. We identified a total of 65 genetic variants, 15 of which (23%) were novel, in 49 out of 96 patients. Among them, 14 (4 novel) are probable disease-causing genetic variants in 7 RP genes, affecting 15 patients. Our HRM analysis-based study, proved to be a cost-effective and rapid method that provides an accurate identification of genetic RP variants. This approach is effective for medium sized (<4 kb transcript) RP genes, which constitute over 80% of the total of known RP genes. PMID:24512775

  8. Multivariate genetic analysis of plant responses to water deficit and high temperature revealed contrasting adaptive strategies

    PubMed Central

    Vasseur, François; Bontpart, Thibaut; Dauzat, Myriam; Granier, Christine; Vile, Denis

    2014-01-01

    How genetic factors control plant performance under stressful environmental conditions is a central question in ecology and for crop breeding. A multivariate framework was developed to examine the genetic architecture of performance-related traits in response to interacting environmental stresses. Ecophysiological and life history traits were quantified in the Arabidopsis thaliana Ler×Cvi mapping population exposed to constant soil water deficit and high air temperature. The plasticity of the genetic variance–covariance matrix (G-matrix) was examined using mixed-effects models after regression into principal components. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis was performed on the predictors of genotype effects and genotype by environment interactions (G×E). Three QTLs previously identified for flowering time had antagonistic G×E effects on carbon acquisition and the other traits (phenology, growth, leaf morphology, and transpiration). This resulted in a size-dependent response of water use efficiency (WUE) to high temperature but not soil water deficit, indicating that most of the plasticity of carbon acquisition and WUE to temperature is controlled by the loci that control variation of development, size, growth, and transpiration. A fourth QTL, MSAT2.22, controlled the response of carbon acquisition to specific combinations of watering and temperature irrespective of plant size and development, growth, and transpiration rate, which resulted in size-independent plasticity of WUE. These findings highlight how the strategies to optimize plant performance may differ in response to water deficit and high temperature (or their combination), and how different G×E effects could be targeted to improve plant tolerance to these stresses. PMID:25246443

  9. Multivariate genetic analysis of plant responses to water deficit and high temperature revealed contrasting adaptive strategies.

    PubMed

    Vasseur, François; Bontpart, Thibaut; Dauzat, Myriam; Granier, Christine; Vile, Denis

    2014-12-01

    How genetic factors control plant performance under stressful environmental conditions is a central question in ecology and for crop breeding. A multivariate framework was developed to examine the genetic architecture of performance-related traits in response to interacting environmental stresses. Ecophysiological and life history traits were quantified in the Arabidopsis thaliana Ler × Cvi mapping population exposed to constant soil water deficit and high air temperature. The plasticity of the genetic variance-covariance matrix (G-matrix) was examined using mixed-effects models after regression into principal components. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis was performed on the predictors of genotype effects and genotype by environment interactions (G × E). Three QTLs previously identified for flowering time had antagonistic G × E effects on carbon acquisition and the other traits (phenology, growth, leaf morphology, and transpiration). This resulted in a size-dependent response of water use efficiency (WUE) to high temperature but not soil water deficit, indicating that most of the plasticity of carbon acquisition and WUE to temperature is controlled by the loci that control variation of development, size, growth, and transpiration. A fourth QTL, MSAT2.22, controlled the response of carbon acquisition to specific combinations of watering and temperature irrespective of plant size and development, growth, and transpiration rate, which resulted in size-independent plasticity of WUE. These findings highlight how the strategies to optimize plant performance may differ in response to water deficit and high temperature (or their combination), and how different G × E effects could be targeted to improve plant tolerance to these stresses. PMID:25246443

  10. Can crayfish take the heat? Procambarus clarkii show nociceptive behaviour to high temperature stimuli, but not low temperature or chemical stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Sakshi; Faulkes, Zen

    2015-01-01

    Nociceptors are sensory neurons that are tuned to tissue damage. In many species, nociceptors are often stimulated by noxious extreme temperatures and by chemical agonists that do not damage tissue (e.g., capsaicin and isothiocyanate). We test whether crustaceans have nociceptors by examining nociceptive behaviours and neurophysiological responses to extreme temperatures and potentially nocigenic chemicals. Crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) respond quickly and strongly to high temperatures, and neurons in the antenna show increased responses to transient high temperature stimuli. Crayfish showed no difference in behavioural response to low temperature stimuli. Crayfish also showed no significant changes in behaviour when stimulated with capsaicin or isothiocyanate compared to controls, and neurons in the antenna did not change their firing rate following application of capsaicin or isothiocyanate. Noxious high temperatures appear to be a potentially ecologically relevant noxious stimulus for crayfish that can be detected by sensory neurons, which may be specialized nociceptors. PMID:25819841

  11. A Genome-Wide CRISPR Library for High-Throughput Genetic Screening in Drosophila Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bassett, Andrew R.; Kong, Lesheng; Liu, Ji-Long

    2015-01-01

    The simplicity of the CRISPR/Cas9 system of genome engineering has opened up the possibility of performing genome-wide targeted mutagenesis in cell lines, enabling screening for cellular phenotypes resulting from genetic aberrations. Drosophila cells have proven to be highly effective in identifying genes involved in cellular processes through similar screens using partial knockdown by RNAi. This is in part due to the lower degree of redundancy between genes in this organism, whilst still maintaining highly conserved gene networks and orthologs of many human disease-causing genes. The ability of CRISPR to generate genetic loss of function mutations not only increases the magnitude of any effect over currently employed RNAi techniques, but allows analysis over longer periods of time which can be critical for certain phenotypes. In this study, we have designed and built a genome-wide CRISPR library covering 13,501 genes, among which 8989 genes are targeted by three or more independent single guide RNAs (sgRNAs). Moreover, we describe strategies to monitor the population of guide RNAs by high throughput sequencing (HTS). We hope that this library will provide an invaluable resource for the community to screen loss of function mutations for cellular phenotypes, and as a source of guide RNA designs for future studies. PMID:26165496

  12. Two Different High Throughput Sequencing Approaches Identify Thousands of De Novo Genomic Markers for the Genetically Depleted Bornean Elephant

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Reeta; Goossens, Benoit; Kun-Rodrigues, Célia; Teixeira, Tatiana; Othman, Nurzhafarina; Boone, Jason Q.; Jue, Nathaniel K.; Obergfell, Craig; O'Neill, Rachel J.; Chikhi, Lounès

    2012-01-01

    High throughput sequencing technologies are being applied to an increasing number of model species with a high-quality reference genome. The application and analyses of whole-genome sequence data in non-model species with no prior genomic information are currently under way. Recent sequencing technologies provide new opportunities for gathering genomic data in natural populations, laying the empirical foundation for future research in the field of conservation and population genomics. Here we present the case study of the Bornean elephant, which is the most endangered subspecies of Asian elephant and exhibits very low genetic diversity. We used two different sequencing platforms, the Roche 454 FLX (shotgun) and Illumina, GAIIx (Restriction site associated DNA, RAD) to evaluate the feasibility of the two methodologies for the discovery of de novo markers (single nucleotide polymorphism, SNPs and microsatellites) using low coverage data. Approximately, 6,683 (shotgun) and 14,724 (RAD) SNPs were detected within our elephant sequence dataset. Genotyping of a representative sample of 194 SNPs resulted in a SNP validation rate of ? 83 to 94% and 17% of the loci were polymorphic with a low diversity (Ho?=?0.057). Different numbers of microsatellites were identified through shotgun (27,226) and RAD (868) techniques. Out of all di-, tri-, and tetra-microsatellite loci, 1,706 loci had sufficient flanking regions (shotgun) while only 7 were found with RAD. All microsatellites were monomorphic in the Bornean but polymorphic in another elephant subspecies. Despite using different sample sizes, and the well known differences in the two platforms used regarding sequence length and throughput, the two approaches showed high validation rate. The approaches used here for marker development in a threatened species demonstrate the utility of high throughput sequencing technologies as a starting point for the development of genomic tools in a non-model species and in particular for a species with low genetic diversity. PMID:23185354

  13. Novel genetic male sterility developed in (Capsicum annuum x C. chinense) x C. pubescens and induced by HNO2 showing Mendelian inheritance and aborted at telophase of microspore mother cell stage.

    PubMed

    Huang, W; Ji, J-J; Li, C; Li, G-Q; Yin, C-C; Chai, W-G; Gong, Z-H

    2015-01-01

    A novel genetic male sterile germplasm was developed by successively crossing of (C. annuum x C. chinense) x C. pubescens and by chemical mutagenesis in pepper. The sterile anthers showed morphological abnormalities, but pistils developed normally with fine pollination capability. We investigated fertility segregation through sib-crossing of the same strains and test crossing by male sterile plants with 6 advanced inbred lines. The results showed that male fertility in the pepper was dominant in the F1 generation and segregated at a rate of 3:1 in the F2 generation, suggesting that monogenic male sterility was recessive and conformed to Mendelian inheritance. Cyto-anatomy analysis revealed that microspore abortion of sterile anthers occurred during telophase in the microspore mother cell stage when tapetal cells showed excessive vacuolation, resulting in occupation of the loculi. The microspore mother cells self-destructed and autolyzed with the tapetum so that meiosis in pollen mother cells could not proceed past the tetrad stage. PMID:25966098

  14. Showing What They Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cech, Scott J.

    2008-01-01

    Having students show their skills in three dimensions, known as performance-based assessment, dates back at least to Socrates. Individual schools such as Barrington High School--located just outside of Providence--have been requiring students to actively demonstrate their knowledge for years. The Rhode Island's high school graduating class became…

  15. Expression of genes controlling fat deposition in two genetically diverse beef cattle breeds fed high or low silage diets

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Both genetic background and finishing system can alter fat deposition, thus indicating their influence on adipogenic and lipogenic factors. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying fat deposition and fatty acid composition in beef cattle are not fully understood. This study aimed to assess the effect of breed and dietary silage level on the expression patterns of key genes controlling lipid metabolism in subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and longissimus lumborum (LL) muscle of cattle. To that purpose, forty bulls from two genetically diverse Portuguese bovine breeds with distinct maturity rates, Alentejana and Barrosã, were selected and fed either low (30% maize silage/70% concentrate) or high silage (70% maize silage/30% concentrate) diets. Results The results suggested that enhanced deposition of fatty acids in the SAT from Barrosã bulls, when compared to Alentejana, could be due to higher expression levels of lipogenesis (SCD and LPL) and ?-oxidation (CRAT) related genes. Our results also indicated that SREBF1 expression in the SAT is increased by feeding the low silage diet. Together, these results point out to a higher lipid turnover in the SAT of Barrosã bulls when compared to Alentejana. In turn, lipid deposition in the LL muscle is related to the expression of adipogenic (PPARG and FABP4) and lipogenic (ACACA and SCD) genes. The positive correlation between ACACA expression levels and total lipids, as well trans fatty acids, points to ACACA as a major player in intramuscular deposition in ruminants. Moreover, results reinforce the role of FABP4 in intramuscular fat development and the SAT as the major site for lipid metabolism in ruminants. Conclusions Overall, the results showed that SAT and LL muscle fatty acid composition are mostly dependent on the genetic background. In addition, dietary silage level impacted on muscle lipid metabolism to a greater extent than on that of SAT, as evaluated by gene expression levels of adipogenic and lipogenic factors. Moreover, the response to diet composition evaluated through mRNA levels and fatty acid composition showed interesting differences between Alentejana and Barrosã bulls. These findings provide evidence that the genetic background should be taken into account while devising diet-based strategies to manipulate fatty acid composition of beef cattle tissues. PMID:23767408

  16. High Levels of Genetic Connectivity among Populations of Yellowtail Snapper, Ocyurus chrysurus (Lutjanidae – Perciformes), in the Western South Atlantic Revealed through Multilocus Analysis

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Raimundo; Veneza, Ivana; Sampaio, Iracilda; Araripe, Juliana; Schneider, Horacio; Gomes, Grazielle

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, five loci (mitochondrial and nuclear) were sequenced to determine the genetic diversity, population structure, and demographic history of populations of the yellowtail snapper, Ocyurus chrysurus, found along the coast of the western South Atlantic. O. chrysurus is a lutjanid species that is commonly associated with coral reefs and exhibits an ample geographic distribution, and it can therefore be considered a good model for the investigation of phylogeographic patterns and genetic connectivity in marine environments. The results reflected a marked congruence between the mitochondrial and nuclear markers as well as intense gene flow among the analyzed populations, which represent a single genetic stock along the entire coast of Brazil between the states of Pará and Espírito Santo. Our data also showed high levels of genetic diversity in the species (mainly mtDNA), as well a major historic population expansion, which most likely coincided with the sea level oscillations at the end of the Pleistocene. In addition, this species is intensively exploited by commercial fisheries, and data on the genetic structure of its populations will be essential for the development of effective conservation and management plans. PMID:25769032

  17. Mutation scanning in a single and a stacked genetically modified (GM) event by real-time PCR and high resolution melting (HRM) analysis.

    PubMed

    Ben Ali, Sina-Elisabeth; Madi, Zita Erika; Hochegger, Rupert; Quist, David; Prewein, Bernhard; Haslberger, Alexander G; Brandes, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Genetic mutations must be avoided during the production and use of seeds. In the European Union (EU), Directive 2001/18/EC requires any DNA construct introduced via transformation to be stable. Establishing genetic stability is critical for the approval of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). In this study, genetic stability of two GMOs was examined using high resolution melting (HRM) analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) employing Scorpion primers for amplification. The genetic variability of the transgenic insert and that of the flanking regions in a single oilseed rape variety (GT73) and a stacked maize (MON88017×MON810) was studied. The GT73 and the 5' region of MON810 showed no instabilities in the examined regions. However; two out of 100 analyzed samples carried a heterozygous point mutation in the 3' region of MON810 in the stacked variety. These results were verified by direct sequencing of the amplified PCR products as well as by sequencing of cloned PCR fragments. The occurrence of the mutation suggests that the 5' region is more suitable than the 3' region for the quantification of MON810. The identification of the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in a stacked event is in contrast to the results of earlier studies of the same MON810 region in a single event where no DNA polymorphism was found. PMID:25365178

  18. Mutation Scanning in a Single and a Stacked Genetically Modified (GM) Event by Real-Time PCR and High Resolution Melting (HRM) Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ben Ali, Sina-Elisabeth; Madi, Zita Erika; Hochegger, Rupert; Quist, David; Prewein, Bernhard; Haslberger, Alexander G.; Brandes, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Genetic mutations must be avoided during the production and use of seeds. In the European Union (EU), Directive 2001/18/EC requires any DNA construct introduced via transformation to be stable. Establishing genetic stability is critical for the approval of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). In this study, genetic stability of two GMOs was examined using high resolution melting (HRM) analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) employing Scorpion primers for amplification. The genetic variability of the transgenic insert and that of the flanking regions in a single oilseed rape variety (GT73) and a stacked maize (MON88017 × MON810) was studied. The GT73 and the 5' region of MON810 showed no instabilities in the examined regions. However; two out of 100 analyzed samples carried a heterozygous point mutation in the 3' region of MON810 in the stacked variety. These results were verified by direct sequencing of the amplified PCR products as well as by sequencing of cloned PCR fragments. The occurrence of the mutation suggests that the 5' region is more suitable than the 3' region for the quantification of MON810. The identification of the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in a stacked event is in contrast to the results of earlier studies of the same MON810 region in a single event where no DNA polymorphism was found. PMID:25365178

  19. Blacktip reef sharks, Carcharhinus melanopterus, have high genetic structure and varying demographic histories in their Indo-Pacific range.

    PubMed

    Vignaud, Thomas M; Mourier, Johann; Maynard, Jeffrey A; Leblois, Raphael; Spaet, Julia; Clua, Eric; Neglia, Valentina; Planes, Serge

    2014-11-01

    For free-swimming marine species like sharks, only population genetics and demographic history analyses can be used to assess population health/status as baseline population numbers are usually unknown. We investigated the population genetics of blacktip reef sharks, Carcharhinus melanopterus; one of the most abundant reef-associated sharks and the apex predator of many shallow water reefs of the Indian and Pacific Oceans. Our sampling includes 4 widely separated locations in the Indo-Pacific and 11 islands in French Polynesia with different levels of coastal development. Four-teen microsatellite loci were analysed for samples from all locations and two mitochondrial DNA fragments, the control region and cytochrome b, were examined for 10 locations. For microsatellites, genetic diversity is higher for the locations in the large open systems of the Red Sea and Australia than for the fragmented habitat of the smaller islands of French Polynesia. Strong significant structure was found for distant locations with FST values as high as ~0.3, and a smaller but still significant structure is found within French Polynesia. Both mitochondrial genes show only a few mutations across the sequences with a dominant shared haplotype in French Polynesia and New Caledonia suggesting a common lineage different to that of East Australia. Demographic history analyses indicate population expansions in the Red Sea and Australia that may coincide with sea level changes after climatic events. Expansions and flat signals are indicated for French Polynesia as well as a significant recent bottleneck for Moorea, the most human-impacted lagoon of the locations in French Polynesia. PMID:25251515

  20. A screening on Specific Learning Disorders in an Italian speaking high genetic homogeneity area.

    PubMed

    Cappa, Claudia; Giulivi, Sara; Schilirò, Antonino; Bastiani, Luca; Muzio, Carlo; Meloni, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present research is to investigate the prevalence of Specific Learning Disorders (SLD) in Ogliastra, an area of the island of Sardinia, Italy. Having experienced centuries of isolation, Ogliastra has become a high genetic homogeneity area, and is considered particularly interesting for studies on different kinds of pathologies. Here we are going to describe the results of a screening carried out throughout 2 consecutive years in 49 second grade classes (24 considered in the first year and 25 in the second year of the study) of the Ogliastra region. A total of 610 pupils (average age 7.54 years; 293 female, 317 male) corresponding to 68.69% of all pupils who were attending second grade in the area, took part in the study. The tool used for the screening was "RSR-DSA. Questionnaire for the detection of learning difficulties and disorders", which allowed the identification of 83 subjects at risk (13.61% of the whole sample involved in the study). These subjects took part in an enhancement training program of about 6 months. After the program, pupils underwent assessment for reading, writing and calculation abilities, as well as cognitive assessment. According to the results of the assessment, the prevalence of SLDs is 6.06%. For what concerns dyslexia, 4.75% of the total sample manifested this disorder either in isolation or in comorbidity with other disorders. According to the first national epidemiological investigation carried out in Italy, the prevalence of dyslexia is 3.1-3.2%, which is lower than the prevalence obtained in the present study. Given the genetic basis of SLDs, this result, together with the presence of several cases of SLD in isolation (17.14%) and with a 3:1 ratio of males to females diagnosed with a SLD, was to be expected in a sample coming from a high genetic homogeneity area. PMID:26296080

  1. The high heritability of educational achievement reflects many genetically influenced traits, not just intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Krapohl, Eva; Rimfeld, Kaili; Shakeshaft, Nicholas G.; Trzaskowski, Maciej; McMillan, Andrew; Pingault, Jean-Baptiste; Asbury, Kathryn; Harlaar, Nicole; Kovas, Yulia; Dale, Philip S.; Plomin, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Because educational achievement at the end of compulsory schooling represents a major tipping point in life, understanding its causes and correlates is important for individual children, their families, and society. Here we identify the general ingredients of educational achievement using a multivariate design that goes beyond intelligence to consider a wide range of predictors, such as self-efficacy, personality, and behavior problems, to assess their independent and joint contributions to educational achievement. We use a genetically sensitive design to address the question of why educational achievement is so highly heritable. We focus on the results of a United Kingdom-wide examination, the General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE), which is administered at the end of compulsory education at age 16. GCSE scores were obtained for 13,306 twins at age 16, whom we also assessed contemporaneously on 83 scales that were condensed to nine broad psychological domains, including intelligence, self-efficacy, personality, well-being, and behavior problems. The mean of GCSE core subjects (English, mathematics, science) is more heritable (62%) than the nine predictor domains (35–58%). Each of the domains correlates significantly with GCSE results, and these correlations are largely mediated genetically. The main finding is that, although intelligence accounts for more of the heritability of GCSE than any other single domain, the other domains collectively account for about as much GCSE heritability as intelligence. Together with intelligence, these domains account for 75% of the heritability of GCSE. We conclude that the high heritability of educational achievement reflects many genetically influenced traits, not just intelligence. PMID:25288728

  2. The high heritability of educational achievement reflects many genetically influenced traits, not just intelligence.

    PubMed

    Krapohl, Eva; Rimfeld, Kaili; Shakeshaft, Nicholas G; Trzaskowski, Maciej; McMillan, Andrew; Pingault, Jean-Baptiste; Asbury, Kathryn; Harlaar, Nicole; Kovas, Yulia; Dale, Philip S; Plomin, Robert

    2014-10-21

    Because educational achievement at the end of compulsory schooling represents a major tipping point in life, understanding its causes and correlates is important for individual children, their families, and society. Here we identify the general ingredients of educational achievement using a multivariate design that goes beyond intelligence to consider a wide range of predictors, such as self-efficacy, personality, and behavior problems, to assess their independent and joint contributions to educational achievement. We use a genetically sensitive design to address the question of why educational achievement is so highly heritable. We focus on the results of a United Kingdom-wide examination, the General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE), which is administered at the end of compulsory education at age 16. GCSE scores were obtained for 13,306 twins at age 16, whom we also assessed contemporaneously on 83 scales that were condensed to nine broad psychological domains, including intelligence, self-efficacy, personality, well-being, and behavior problems. The mean of GCSE core subjects (English, mathematics, science) is more heritable (62%) than the nine predictor domains (35-58%). Each of the domains correlates significantly with GCSE results, and these correlations are largely mediated genetically. The main finding is that, although intelligence accounts for more of the heritability of GCSE than any other single domain, the other domains collectively account for about as much GCSE heritability as intelligence. Together with intelligence, these domains account for 75% of the heritability of GCSE. We conclude that the high heritability of educational achievement reflects many genetically influenced traits, not just intelligence. PMID:25288728

  3. Optimisation of a high speed rotating composite drive shaft using a genetic algorithm - Hybrid high modulus-high resistance carbon solutions

    E-print Network

    Montagnier, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    This study deals with the optimisation of subcritical and supercritical laminated composite drive shafts, based on a genetic algorithm. The first part focuses on the modelling of a composite drive shaft. Flexural vibrations in a simply supported composite drive shaft mounted on viscoelastic supports, including shear effects are studied. In particular, an analytic stability criterion is developed to ensure the integrity of the system. The torsional strength is then computed with the maximum stress criterion, assuming the coupling effects to be null. Torsional buckling of thin walled composite tubes is modelled using a combination between laminate theory and Fl\\"ugge theory. In the second part, the genetic algorithm is developed. The last part presents a comparative study between various composite materials solutions on a helicopter tail rotor driveline. In particular, hybrid tubes consisting of high modulus and high resistance carbon/epoxy plies are studied. These solutions make it possible to replace the conv...

  4. In many cases, tsunami waveheights and effects show a high variability along the coast. The possible causes are insecurities about the tectonic

    E-print Network

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    In many cases, tsunami waveheights and effects show a high variability along the coast area in propagation direction of a tsunami wave can produce largely amplified waves by near coast tsunami waveguiding, see [1]. The waveguiding is caused by the fact that different propagation speeds

  5. Genome survey and high-density genetic map construction provide genomic and genetic resources for the Pacific White Shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Zhang, Xiaojun; Yuan, Jianbo; Li, Fuhua; Chen, Xiaohan; Zhao, Yongzhen; Huang, Long; Zheng, Hongkun; Xiang, Jianhai

    2015-01-01

    The Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei is the dominant crustacean species in global seafood mariculture. Understanding the genome and genetic architecture is useful for deciphering complex traits and accelerating the breeding program in shrimp. In this study, a genome survey was conducted and a high-density linkage map was constructed using a next-generation sequencing approach. The genome survey was used to identify preliminary genome characteristics and to generate a rough reference for linkage map construction. De novo SNP discovery resulted in 25,140 polymorphic markers. A total of 6,359 high-quality markers were selected for linkage map construction based on marker coverage among individuals and read depths. For the linkage map, a total of 6,146 markers spanning 4,271.43?cM were mapped to 44 sex-averaged linkage groups, with an average marker distance of 0.7?cM. An integration analysis linked 5,885 genome scaffolds and 1,504 BAC clones to the linkage map. Based on the high-density linkage map, several QTLs for body weight and body length were detected. This high-density genetic linkage map reveals basic genomic architecture and will be useful for comparative genomics research, genome assembly and genetic improvement of L. vannamei and other penaeid shrimp species. PMID:26503227

  6. Genome survey and high-density genetic map construction provide genomic and genetic resources for the Pacific White Shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Zhang, Xiaojun; Yuan, Jianbo; Li, Fuhua; Chen, Xiaohan; Zhao, Yongzhen; Huang, Long; Zheng, Hongkun; Xiang, Jianhai

    2015-01-01

    The Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei is the dominant crustacean species in global seafood mariculture. Understanding the genome and genetic architecture is useful for deciphering complex traits and accelerating the breeding program in shrimp. In this study, a genome survey was conducted and a high-density linkage map was constructed using a next-generation sequencing approach. The genome survey was used to identify preliminary genome characteristics and to generate a rough reference for linkage map construction. De novo SNP discovery resulted in 25,140 polymorphic markers. A total of 6,359 high-quality markers were selected for linkage map construction based on marker coverage among individuals and read depths. For the linkage map, a total of 6,146 markers spanning 4,271.43?cM were mapped to 44 sex-averaged linkage groups, with an average marker distance of 0.7?cM. An integration analysis linked 5,885 genome scaffolds and 1,504 BAC clones to the linkage map. Based on the high-density linkage map, several QTLs for body weight and body length were detected. This high-density genetic linkage map reveals basic genomic architecture and will be useful for comparative genomics research, genome assembly and genetic improvement of L. vannamei and other penaeid shrimp species. PMID:26503227

  7. Historical and biological determinants of genetic diversity in the highly endemic triploid sea lavender Limonium dufourii (Plumbaginaceae).

    PubMed

    Palop-Esteban, M; Segarra-Moragues, J G; González-Candelas, F

    2007-09-01

    Microsatellite markers were used to evaluate the genetic diversity and population genetic structure in the critically endangered Limonium dufourii (Plumbaginaceae), a highly endemic triploid species from the coasts of eastern Spain. Sixty-five alleles from 13 microsatellite regions were amplified in a sample of 122 individuals collected from the six extant populations. Microsatellite patterns were consistent with the triploid nature of L. dufourii. Alleles were unambiguously assigned to two different parental subgenomes in this hybrid species and the greater contribution of the diploid parental subgenome was confirmed. Eleven, 25 and 26 multilocus genotypes were recorded from the haploid, diploid and from the combined information of both subgenomes, respectively. Genetic diversity was mostly distributed among populations (72.06% of the total genetic variation). Genotypes from Marjal del Moro populations grouped into two highly structured clusters (88.41% of the total variance). The observed patterns of distribution of genetic diversity are interpreted to result from multiple hybridization events and isolation between populations. Threats to this species are mainly anthropogenic (urbanization and tourism pressure), although stochastic risks cannot be ignored. Therefore, in order to preserve extant genetic variation of L. dufourii, in situ strategies such as the preservation of its habitat are a high priority. Several recommendations in order to assist ex situ measures to guarantee the success of conservation strategies and maintain the relationships between individuals and populations are proposed. PMID:17850548

  8. Construction of a high-density, high-resolution genetic map and its integration with BAC-based physical map in channel catfish.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun; Liu, Shikai; Qin, Zhenkui; Waldbieser, Geoff; Wang, Ruijia; Sun, Luyang; Bao, Lisui; Danzmann, Roy G; Dunham, Rex; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2015-02-01

    Construction of genetic linkage map is essential for genetic and genomic studies. Recent advances in sequencing and genotyping technologies made it possible to generate high-density and high-resolution genetic linkage maps, especially for the organisms lacking extensive genomic resources. In the present work, we constructed a high-density and high-resolution genetic map for channel catfish with three large resource families genotyped using the catfish 250K single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. A total of 54,342 SNPs were placed on the linkage map, which to our knowledge had the highest marker density among aquaculture species. The estimated genetic size was 3,505.4 cM with a resolution of 0.22 cM for sex-averaged genetic map. The sex-specific linkage maps spanned a total of 4,495.1 cM in females and 2,593.7 cM in males, presenting a ratio of 1.7 : 1 between female and male in recombination fraction. After integration with the previously established physical map, over 87% of physical map contigs were anchored to the linkage groups that covered a physical length of 867 Mb, accounting for ?90% of the catfish genome. The integrated map provides a valuable tool for validating and improving the catfish whole-genome assembly and facilitates fine-scale QTL mapping and positional cloning of genes responsible for economically important traits. PMID:25428894

  9. Construction of a high-density, high-resolution genetic map and its integration with BAC-based physical map in channel catfish

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yun; Liu, Shikai; Qin, Zhenkui; Waldbieser, Geoff; Wang, Ruijia; Sun, Luyang; Bao, Lisui; Danzmann, Roy G.; Dunham, Rex; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2015-01-01

    Construction of genetic linkage map is essential for genetic and genomic studies. Recent advances in sequencing and genotyping technologies made it possible to generate high-density and high-resolution genetic linkage maps, especially for the organisms lacking extensive genomic resources. In the present work, we constructed a high-density and high-resolution genetic map for channel catfish with three large resource families genotyped using the catfish 250K single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. A total of 54,342 SNPs were placed on the linkage map, which to our knowledge had the highest marker density among aquaculture species. The estimated genetic size was 3,505.4 cM with a resolution of 0.22 cM for sex-averaged genetic map. The sex-specific linkage maps spanned a total of 4,495.1 cM in females and 2,593.7 cM in males, presenting a ratio of 1.7 : 1 between female and male in recombination fraction. After integration with the previously established physical map, over 87% of physical map contigs were anchored to the linkage groups that covered a physical length of 867 Mb, accounting for ?90% of the catfish genome. The integrated map provides a valuable tool for validating and improving the catfish whole-genome assembly and facilitates fine-scale QTL mapping and positional cloning of genes responsible for economically important traits. PMID:25428894

  10. A High-Density Simple Sequence Repeat-Based Genetic Linkage Map of Switchgrass

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Linglong; Wu, Yanqi; Wang, Yunwen; Samuels, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) has been identified as a promising cellulosic biofuel crop in the United States. Construction of a genetic linkage map is fundamental for switchgrass molecular breeding and the elucidation of its genetic mechanisms for economically important traits. In this study, a novel population consisting of 139 selfed progeny of a northern lowland genotype, NL 94 LYE 16X13, was used to construct a linkage map. A total of 2493 simple sequence repeat markers were screened for polymorphism. Of 506 polymorphic loci, 80.8% showed a goodness-of-fit of 1:2:1 segregation ratio. Among 469 linked loci on the framework map, 241 coupling vs. 228 repulsion phase linkages were detected that conformed to a 1:1 ratio, confirming disomic inheritance. A total of 499 loci were mapped to 18 linkage groups (LG), of which the cumulative length was 2085.2 cM, with an average marker interval of 4.2 cM. Nine homeologous LG pairs were identified based on multi-allele markers and comparative genomic analysis. Two clusters of segregation-distorted loci were identified on LG 5b and 9b, respectively. Comparative analysis indicated a one-to-one relationship between nine switchgrass homeologous groups and nine foxtail millet (Setaria italica) chromosomes, suggesting strong homology between the two species. The linkage map derived from selfing a heterozygous parent, instead of two separate maps usually constructed for a cross-fertilized species, provides a new genetic framework to facilitate genomics research, quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping, and marker-assisted breeding. PMID:22413090

  11. Foraging segregation and genetic divergence between geographically proximate colonies of a highly mobile seabird

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiley, Anne E.; Welch, Andreanna J.; Ostrom, P.H.; James, Helen F.; Stricker, C.A.; Fleischer, R.C.; Gandhi, H.; Adams, J.; Ainley, D.G.; Duvall, F.; Holmes, N.; Hu, D.; Judge, S.; Penniman, J.; Swindle, K.A.

    2012-01-01

    Foraging segregation may play an important role in the maintenance of animal diversity, and is a proposed mechanism for promoting genetic divergence within seabird species. However, little information exists regarding its presence among seabird populations. We investigated genetic and foraging divergence between two colonies of endangered Hawaiian petrels (Pterodroma sandwichensis) nesting on the islands of Hawaii and Kauai using the mitochondrial Cytochrome b gene and carbon, nitrogen and hydrogen isotope values (?? 13C, ?? 15N and ??D, respectively) of feathers. Genetic analyses revealed strong differentiation between colonies on Hawaii and Kauai, with ?? ST = 0. 50 (p < 0. 0001). Coalescent-based analyses gave estimates of <1 migration event per 1,000 generations. Hatch-year birds from Kauai had significantly lower ?? 13C and ?? 15N values than those from Hawaii. This is consistent with Kauai birds provisioning chicks with prey derived from near or north of the Hawaiian Islands, and Hawaii birds provisioning young with prey from regions of the equatorial Pacific characterized by elevated ?? 15N values at the food web base. ?? 15N values of Kauai and Hawaii adults differed significantly, indicating additional foraging segregation during molt. Feather ??D varied from -69 to 53???. This variation cannot be related solely to an isotopically homogeneous ocean water source or evaporative water loss. Instead, we propose the involvement of salt gland excretion. Our data demonstrate the presence of foraging segregation between proximately nesting seabird populations, despite high species mobility. This ecological diversity may facilitate population coexistence, and its preservation should be a focus of conservation strategies. ?? 2011 Springer-Verlag (outside the USA).

  12. Effects of recent and past climatic shifts on the genetic structure of the high mountain yellow-spotted ringlet butterfly Erebia manto (Lepidoptera, Satyrinae): a conservation problem.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Thomas; Habel, Jan Christian; Rödder, Dennis; Louy, Dirk

    2014-07-01

    Mountain species have evolved important genetic differentiation due to past climatic fluctuations. The genetic uniqueness of many of these lineages is now at risk due to global warming. Here, we analyse allozyme polymorphisms of 1306 individuals (36 populations) of the mountain butterfly Erebia manto and perform Species Distribution Models (SDMs). As a consensus of analyses, we obtained six most likely genetic clusters: (i) Pyrenees with Massif Central; (ii) Vosges; (iii-v) Alps including the Slovakian Carpathians; (vi) southern Carpathians. The Vosges population showed the strongest genetic split from all other populations, being almost as strong as the split between E. manto and its sister species Erebia eriphyle. The distinctiveness of the Pyrenees-Massif Central group and of the southern Carpathians group from all other groups is also quite high. All three groups are assumed to have survived more than one full glacial-interglacial cycle close to their current distributions with up-hill and down-slope shifts conforming climatic conditions. In contrast with these well-differentiated groups, the three groups present in the Alps and the Slovakian Carpathians show a much shallower genetic structure and thus also should be of a more recent origin. As predicted by our SDM projections, rising temperatures will strongly impact the distribution of E. manto. While the populations in the Alps are predicted to shrink, the survival of the three lineages present here should not be at risk. The situation of the three other lineages is quite different. All models predict the extinction of the Vosges lineage in the wake of global warming, and also the southern Carpathians and Pyrenees-Massif Central lineages might be at high risk to disappear. Thus, albeit global warming will therefore be unlikely to threaten E. manto as a species, an important proportion of the species' intraspecific differentiation and thus uniqueness might be lost. PMID:24753365

  13. Schizophrenics 'show new mutations' -Health News -NHS Choices http://www.nhs.uk/news/2011/08August/Pages/sporadic-genetic-mutation-schizophrenia.aspx[8/9/2011 10:05:12 AM

    E-print Network

    Food/diet (400) Lifestyle/exercise (393) Pregnancy/child (385) Cancer (342) Medication (312) Heart/lungs (282) Neurology (248) Medical practice (240) Genetics/stem cells (188) Older people (181) Obesity (139 mouse sperm from stem cells (August 5 2011) Music therapy for depression (August 1 2011) Genetic clue

  14. Isolation of Bacillus subtilis (chungkookjang), a poly-gamma-glutamate producer with high genetic competence.

    PubMed

    Ashiuchi, M; Kamei, T; Baek, D H; Shin, S Y; Sung, M H; Soda, K; Yagi, T; Misono, H

    2001-12-01

    A bacterium with high poly-gamma-glutamate (PGA) productivity was isolated from the traditional Korean seasoning, Chung-Kook-Jang. This bacterium could be classified as a Bacillus subtilis, but sporulation in culture was infrequent in the absence of Mn2+. It was judged to be a variety of B. subtilis and designated B. subtilis (chungkookjang). L-Glutamate significantly induced PGA production, and highly elongated PGAs were synthesized. The volumetric yield reached 13.5 mg ml(-1) in the presence of 2% L-glutamate. The D-glutamate content was over 50% in every PGA produced under the conditions used. During PGA production, glutamate racemase activity was found in the cells, suggesting that the enzyme is involved in the D-glutamate supply. Molecular sizes of PGAs were changed by the salt concentration in the medium; PGAs with comparatively low molecular masses were produced in culture media containing high concentrations of NaCl. B. subtilis (chungkookjang) harbors no plasmid and is the first B. subtilis strain reported with both naturally high PGA productivity and high genetic competence. PMID:11778891

  15. Relation of the multilocus genetic composite reflecting high dopamine signaling capacity to future increases in BMI.

    PubMed

    Yokum, Sonja; Marti, C Nathan; Smolen, Andrew; Stice, Eric

    2015-04-01

    Because food intake exerts its rewarding effect by increasing dopamine (DA) signaling in reward circuitry, it theoretically follows that individuals with a greater number of genotypes putatively associated with high DA signaling capacity are at increased risk for overeating and subsequent weight gain. We tested the association between the multilocus genetic composite risk score, defined by the total number of genotypes putatively associated with greater DA signaling capacity (i.e. TaqIA A2 allele, DRD2-141C Ins/Del and Del/Del genotypes, DRD4-S allele, DAT1-S allele, and COMT Val/Val genotype), and future increases in Body Mass Index (BMI) in three prospective studies. Participants in Study 1 (N?=?30; M age?=?15.2; M baseline BMI?=?26.9), Study 2 (N?=?34; M age?=?20.9; M baseline BMI?=?28.2), and Study 3 (N?=?162; M age?=?15.3, M baseline BMI?=?20.8) provided saliva samples from which epithelial cells were collected, permitting DNA extraction. The multilocus genetic composite risk score was associated with future increases in BMI in all three studies (Study 1, r?=?0.37; Study 2, r?=?0.22; Study 3, r?=?0.14) and the overall sample (r?=?0.19). DRD4-S was associated with increases in BMI in Study 1 (r?=?0.42), Study 2 (r?=?0.27), and in the overall sample (r?=?0.17). DAT1-S was associated with increases in BMI in Study 3 (r?=?0.17) and in the overall sample (r?=?0.12). There were no associations between the other genotypes (TaqIA, COMT, and DRD2-141C) and change in BMI over 2-year follow-up. Data suggest that individuals with a genetic propensity for greater DA signaling capacity are at risk for future weight gain and that combining alleles that theoretically have a similar function may provide a more reliable method of modeling genetic risk associated with future weight gain than individual genotypes. PMID:25523644

  16. High-density interspecific genetic maps of kiwifruit and the identification of sex-specific markers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiong; Liu, Chunyan; Liu, Yifei; VanBuren, Robert; Yao, Xiaohong; Zhong, Caihong; Huang, Hongwen

    2015-10-01

    Kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis Planchon) is an important specialty fruit crop that suffers from narrow genetic diversity stemming from recent global commercialization and limited cultivar improvement. Here, we present high-density RAD-seq-based genetic maps using an interspecific F1 cross between Actinidia rufa 'MT570001' and A. chinensis 'Guihai No4'. The A. rufa (maternal) map consists of 2,426 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers with a total length of 2,651 cM in 29 linkage groups (LGs) corresponding to the 29 chromosomes. The A. chinensis (paternal) map consists of 4,214 SNP markers over 3,142 cM in 29 LGs. Using these maps, we were able to anchor an additional 440 scaffolds from the kiwifruit draft genome assembly. Kiwifruit is functionally dioecious, which presents unique challenges for breeding and production. Three sex-specific simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers can be used to accurately sex type male and female kiwifruit in breeding programmes. The sex-determination region (SDR) in kiwifruit was narrowed to a 1-Mb subtelomeric region on chromosome 25. Localizing the SDR will expedite the discovery of genes controlling carpel abortion in males and pollen sterility in females. PMID:26370666

  17. High-density interspecific genetic maps of kiwifruit and the identification of sex-specific markers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiong; Liu, Chunyan; Liu, Yifei; VanBuren, Robert; Yao, Xiaohong; Zhong, Caihong; Huang, Hongwen

    2015-01-01

    Kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis Planchon) is an important specialty fruit crop that suffers from narrow genetic diversity stemming from recent global commercialization and limited cultivar improvement. Here, we present high-density RAD-seq-based genetic maps using an interspecific F1 cross between Actinidia rufa ‘MT570001’ and A. chinensis ‘Guihai No4’. The A. rufa (maternal) map consists of 2,426 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers with a total length of 2,651 cM in 29 linkage groups (LGs) corresponding to the 29 chromosomes. The A. chinensis (paternal) map consists of 4,214 SNP markers over 3,142 cM in 29 LGs. Using these maps, we were able to anchor an additional 440 scaffolds from the kiwifruit draft genome assembly. Kiwifruit is functionally dioecious, which presents unique challenges for breeding and production. Three sex-specific simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers can be used to accurately sex type male and female kiwifruit in breeding programmes. The sex-determination region (SDR) in kiwifruit was narrowed to a 1-Mb subtelomeric region on chromosome 25. Localizing the SDR will expedite the discovery of genes controlling carpel abortion in males and pollen sterility in females. PMID:26370666

  18. Genetic Profile of Adenoid Cystic Carcinomas (ACC) with High-Grade Transformation versus Solid Type

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Ana Flávia; Altemani, Albina; Vékony, Hedy; Bloemena, Elisabeth; Fresno, Florentino; Suárez, Carlos; Llorente, José Luis; Hermsen, Mario

    2010-01-01

    Background: ACC can occasionally undergo dedifferentiation also referred to as high-grade transformation (ACC-HGT). However, ACC-HGT can also undergo transformation to adenocarcinomas which are not poorly differentiated. ACC-HGT is generally considered to be an aggressive variant of ACC, even more than solid ACC. This study was aimed to describe the genetic changes of ACC-HGT in relation to clinico-pathological features and to compare results to solid ACC. Methods: Genome-wide DNA copy number changes were analyzed by microarray CGH in ACC-HGT, 4 with transformation into moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma (MDA) and two into poorly differentiated carcinoma (PDC), 5 solid ACC. In addition, Ki-67 index and p53 immunopositivity was assessed. Results: ACC-HGT carried fewer copy number changes compared to solid ACC. Two ACC-HGT cases harboured a breakpoint at 6q23, near the cMYB oncogene. The complexity of the genomic profile concurred with the clinical course of the patient. Among the ACC-HGT, p53 positivity significantly increased from the conventional to the transformed (both MDA and PDC) component. Conclusion: ACC-HGT may not necessarily reflect a more advanced stage of tumor progression, but rather a transformation to another histological form in which the poorly differentiated forms (PDC) presents a genetic complexity similar to the solid ACC. PMID:20978318

  19. Mark-recapture using tetracycline and genetics reveal record-high bear density

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peacock, E.; Titus, K.; Garshelis, D.L.; Peacock, M.M.; Kuc, M.

    2011-01-01

    We used tetracycline biomarking, augmented with genetic methods to estimate the size of an American black bear (Ursus americanus) population on an island in Southeast Alaska. We marked 132 and 189 bears that consumed remote, tetracycline-laced baits in 2 different years, respectively, and observed 39 marks in 692 bone samples subsequently collected from hunters. We genetically analyzed hair samples from bait sites to determine the sex of marked bears, facilitating derivation of sex-specific population estimates. We obtained harvest samples from beyond the study area to correct for emigration. We estimated a density of 155 independent bears/100 km2, which is equivalent to the highest recorded for this species. This high density appears to be maintained by abundant, accessible natural food. Our population estimate (approx. 1,000 bears) could be used as a baseline and to set hunting quotas. The refined biomarking method for abundance estimation is a useful alternative where physical captures or DNA-based estimates are precluded by cost or logistics. Copyright ?? 2011 The Wildlife Society.

  20. Social Engagement with Parents in 11-Month-Old Siblings at High and Low Genetic Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Susan B.; Leezenbaum, Nina B.; Mahoney, Amanda S.; Day, Taylor N.; Schmidt, Emily N.

    2015-01-01

    Infant siblings of children with an autism spectrum disorder are at heightened genetic risk to develop autism spectrum disorder. We observed high risk (n?=?35) and low risk (n?=?27) infants at 11?months during free play with a parent. Children were assessed for autism spectrum disorder in toddlerhood. High-risk infants with a later diagnosis…

  1. High-Throughput Genetic Identification of Functionally Important Regions of the Yeast DEAD-Box Protein Mss116p

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, Georg; Del Campo, Mark; Turner, Kathryn G.; Gilman, Benjamin; Wolf, Rachel Z.; Lambowitz, Alan M.

    2012-03-15

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae DEAD-box protein Mss116p is a general RNA chaperone that functions in splicing mitochondrial group I and group II introns. Recent X-ray crystal structures of Mss116p in complex with ATP analogs and single-stranded RNA show that the helicase core induces a bend in the bound RNA, as in other DEAD-box proteins, while a C-terminal extension (CTE) induces a second bend, resulting in RNA crimping. Here, we illuminate these structures by using high-throughput genetic selections, unigenic evolution, and analyses of in vivo splicing activity to comprehensively identify functionally important regions and permissible amino acid substitutions throughout Mss116p. The functionally important regions include those containing conserved sequence motifs involved in ATP and RNA binding or interdomain interactions, as well as previously unidentified regions, including surface loops that may function in protein-protein interactions. The genetic selections recapitulate major features of the conserved helicase motifs seen in other DEAD-box proteins but also show surprising variations, including multiple novel variants of motif III (SAT). Patterns of amino acid substitutions indicate that the RNA bend induced by the helicase core depends on ionic and hydrogen-bonding interactions with the bound RNA; identify a subset of critically interacting residues; and indicate that the bend induced by the CTE results primarily from a steric block. Finally, we identified two conserved regions - one the previously noted post II region in the helicase core and the other in the CTE - that may help displace or sequester the opposite RNA strand during RNA unwinding.

  2. High-Throughput Genetic Identification of Functionally Important Regions of the Yeast DEAD-box Protein Mss116p

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Georg; Campo, Mark Del; Turner, Kathryn G.; Gilman, Benjamin; Wolf, Rachel Z.; Lambowitz, Alan M.

    2011-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae DEAD-box protein Mss116p is a general RNA chaperone that functions in splicing mitochondrial group I and group II introns. Recent X-ray crystal structures of Mss116p in complex with ATP analogs and single-stranded RNA show that the helicase core induces a bend in the bound RNA, as in other DEAD-box proteins, while a C-terminal extension induces a second bend, resulting in RNA crimping. Here, we illuminate these structures by using high-throughput genetic selections, unigenic evolution, and analyses of in vivo splicing activity to comprehensively identify functionally important regions and permissible amino acid substitutions throughout Mss116p. The functionally important regions include those containing conserved sequence motifs involved in ATP and RNA binding or interdomain interactions, as well as previously unidentified regions, including surface loops that may function in protein-protein interactions. The genetic selections recapitulate major features of the conserved helicase motifs seen in other DEAD-box proteins, but also show surprising variations, including multiple novel variants of motif III (SAT). Patterns of amino acid substitutions indicate that the RNA bend induced by the helicase core depends upon ionic and hydrogen-bonding interactions with the bound RNA; identify a subset of critically interacting residues; and indicate that the bend induced by the C-terminal extension results primarily from a steric block. Finally, we identified two conserved regions, one the previously noted post-II region in the helicase core and the other in the C-terminal extension, which may help displace or sequester the opposite RNA strand during RNA unwinding. PMID:21945532

  3. Structured Parenting of Toddlers at High versus Low Genetic Risk: Two Pathways to Child Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leve, Leslie D.; Harold, Gordon T.; Ge, Xiaojia; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.; Shaw, Daniel; Scaramella, Laura V.; Reiss, David

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Little is known about how parenting might offset genetic risk to prevent the onset of child problems during toddlerhood. We used a prospective adoption design to separate genetic and environmental influences and test whether associations between structured parenting and toddler behavior problems were conditioned by genetic risk for…

  4. How Not to Be a BlackBox: Evolution and GeneticEngineering of HighLevel Behaviours \\Lambda Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL)

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Thomas

    How Not to Be a Black­Box: Evolution and Genetic­Engineering of High­Level Behaviours \\Lambda Ik thalmann@lig.di.epfl.ch Abstract In spite of many success stories in various do­ mains, Genetic Algorithm and Genetic Program­ ming still suffer from some significant pitfalls. Those evolved programs often lack

  5. How Not to Be a Black-Box: Evolution and Genetic-Engineering of High-Level Behaviours Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL)

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Thomas

    How Not to Be a Black-Box: Evolution and Genetic-Engineering of High-Level Behaviours Ik Soo Lim thalmann@lig.di.epfl.ch Abstract In spite of many success stories in various do- mains, Genetic Algorithm and Genetic Program- ming still suffer from some significant pitfalls. Those evolved programs often lack

  6. R. D. Field TU Talk Genetic AlgorithmsGenetic Algorithms

    E-print Network

    Field, Richard

    ): · Very Slow! Genetic Algorithms (model of genetics & evolution): · Combine the good features of both y yR. D. Field TU Talk Genetic AlgorithmsGenetic Algorithms andand Neural NetworksNeural Networks asas genetics and evolution (Genetic Algorithms). · Show an example of the use of a genetic algorithm

  7. Genetic characterization of HIV-1 strains in Togo reveals a high genetic complexity and genotypic drug-resistance mutations in ARV naive patients.

    PubMed

    Yaotsè, Dagnra Anoumou; Nicole, Vidal; Roch, Niama Fabien; Mireille, Prince-David; Eric, Delaporte; Martine, Peeters

    2009-07-01

    In this study, the genetic diversity of HIV-1 and the presence of genotypic drug-resistance mutations in ARV naive patients in Lomé, the capital city of Togo, was documented for the first time. Between June 2006 and January 2007, 83 plasma samples were collected in Lomé from HIV-1 positive and antiretroviral (ARV) naive individuals. Pol (protease+RT) and env (V3-V5) regions were amplified and sequenced. Phylogenetic and recombination analyses were done to identify the HIV-1 variants. Pol sequences were then inspected to identify presence of drug-resistance mutations based on the WHO list recommended for epidemiological studies. A total of 75 plasma samples were amplified and sequenced in both genomic regions. The phylogenetic analysis showed that CRF02 (48.7% and 51.2%) and G (12.8% and 16.2%) were predominant, followed by A3 (6.4% and 6.2%) and CRF06 (3.8% and 12.5%) in pol and env, respectively. One strain was identified as CRF05 in pol and env. Two divergent subtype A strains in env were undetermined (U) in pol but clustered with a previously described complex recombinant strain, 99GR303. Overall, at least 23/83 (27.7%) strains were recombinant, 19 had a unique recombinant structure in pol, and 4 had discordant subtype/CRF designations between pol and env. The subtypes/CRFs involved in the recombination events corresponded to those already circulating as non-recombinant strains in the country. A total of 8 patients harbored strains with mutations associated to drug resistance: L90M (n=1), K103N (n=1), T69N (n=1), T215S (n=1), M41L (n=4). In this study we showed the complexity of the HIV-1 strains circulating in Togo and documented a relative high proportion of ARV naive patients with drug-resistance mutations. The high number of resistant strains observed in Togo needs further attention and additional studies are needed to confirm this trend especially because the national ART program experienced major problems to provide drugs on a regular base. PMID:19460333

  8. RPL39L is an example of a recently evolved ribosomal protein paralog that shows highly specific tissue expression patterns and is upregulated in ESCs and HCC tumors.

    PubMed

    Wong, Queenie Wing-Lei; Li, Jia; Ng, Sheng Rong; Lim, Seng Gee; Yang, Henry; Vardy, Leah A

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomal proteins (RPs) have been shown to be able to impart selectivity on the translating ribosome implicating them in gene expression control. Many ribosomal proteins are highly conserved and recently a number of ribosomal protein paralogs have been described in mammals. We examined the expression pattern of RPs in differentiating mouse Embryonic Stem Cells (ESCs), paying particular attention to the RP paralogs. We find the RP paralog Rpl39l is highly expressed in ESC and its expression strongly correlates with hepatocellular carcinoma tumor (HCC) samples with high tumor grading and alpha-fetoprotein level giving it diagnostic potential. We further screen the expression pattern of all RPs and their paralogs across 22 different tissues. We find that the more recently evolved RP paralogs show a much greater level of tissue-specific expression. We propose that these RP paralogs evolved more recently to provide a greater level of gene expression control to higher eukaryotes. PMID:24452241

  9. Association between Genetic Subgroups of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Defined by High Density 500 K SNP-Arrays and Tumor Histopathology

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, María Laura; Muñoz-Bellvis, Luís; Abad, María del Mar; Bengoechea, Oscar; González-González, María

    2011-01-01

    The specific genes and genetic pathways associated with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma are still largely unknown partially due to the low resolution of the techniques applied so far to their study. Here we used high-density 500 K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-arrays to define those chromosomal regions which most commonly harbour copy number (CN) alterations and loss of heterozygozity (LOH) in a series of 20 PDAC tumors and we correlated the corresponding genetic profiles with the most relevant clinical and histopathological features of the disease. Overall our results showed that primary PDAC frequently display (>70%) extensive gains of chromosomes 1q, 7q, 8q and 20q, together with losses of chromosomes 1p, 9p, 12q, 17p and 18q, such chromosomal regions harboring multiple cancer- and PDAC-associated genes. Interestingly, these alterations clustered into two distinct genetic profiles characterized by gains of the 2q14.2, 3q22.1, 5q32, 10q26.13, 10q26.3, 11q13.1, 11q13.3, 11q13.4, 16q24.1, 16q24.3, 22q13.1, 22q13.31 and 22q13.32 chromosomal regions (group 1; n?=?9) versus gains at 1q21.1 and losses of the 1p36.11, 6q25.2, 9p22.1, 9p24.3, 17p13.3 and Xp22.33 chromosomal regions (group 2; n?=?11). From the clinical and histopathological point of view, group 1 cases were associated with smaller and well/moderately-differentiated grade I/II PDAC tumors, whereas and group 2 PDAC displayed a larger size and they mainly consisted of poorly-differentiated grade III carcinomas. These findings confirm the cytogenetic complexity and heterogenity of PDAC and provide evidence for the association between tumor cytogenetics and its histopathological features. In addition, we also show that the altered regions identified harbor multiple cancer associate genes that deserve further investigation to determine their relevance in the pathogenesis of PDAC. PMID:21811587

  10. Unexpected absence of genetic separation of a highly diverse population of hookworms from geographically isolated hosts.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Benjamin T; Marcus, Alan D; Higgins, Damien P; Gongora, Jaime; Gray, Rachael; Šlapeta, Jan

    2014-12-01

    The high natal site fidelity of endangered Australian sea lions (Neophoca cinerea) along the southern Australian coast suggests that their maternally transmitted parasitic species, such as hookworms, will have restricted potential for dispersal. If this is the case, we would expect to find a hookworm haplotype structure corresponding to that of the host mtDNA haplotype structure; that is, restricted among geographically separated colonies. In this study, we used a fragment of the cytochrome c oxidase I mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) gene to investigate the diversity of hookworms (Uncinaria sanguinis) in N. cinerea to assess the importance of host distribution and ecology on the evolutionary history of the parasite. High haplotype (h=0.986) and nucleotide diversity (?=0.013) were seen, with 45 unique hookworm mtDNA haplotypes across N. cinerea colonies; with most of the variation (78%) arising from variability within hookworms from individual colonies. This is supported by the low genetic differentiation co-efficient (GST=0.007) and a high gene flow (Nm=35.25) indicating a high migration rate between the populations of hookworms. The haplotype network demonstrated no clear distribution and delineation of haplotypes according to geographical location. Our data rejects the vicariance hypothesis; that female host natal site fidelity and the transmammary route of infection restrict hookworm gene flow between N. cinerea populations and highlights the value of studies of parasite diversity and dispersal to challenge our understanding of parasite and host ecology. PMID:25262830

  11. High-resolution raster scan optoacoustic mesoscopy of genetically modified drosophila pupae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, Murad; Gateau, Jérôme; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2014-03-01

    Optoacoutic mesoscopy aims to bridge the gap between optoacoustic microscopy and optoacoustic tomography. We have developed a setup for optoacoustic mesoscopy where we use a high frequency, high numerical aperture spherically focused ultrasound transducer, with a wide bandwidth of 25-125 MHz. The excitation is performed using a diode laser capable of >500 ?J/pulse, 1.8ns pulse width, 1.4 kHz pulse repetition rate, at 515 nm. The system is capable to penetrate more than 5 mm with a resolution of 7 ?m axially and 30 ?m transversally. Using high-speed stages and scanning the transducer in a quasi-continuous mode, a field of view of 2×2 mm2 is scanned in less than 2 minutes. The system is suitable for imaging biological samples that have a diameter of 1-5 mm; zebrafish, drosophila melanogaster, and thin biological samples such as the mouse ear and mouse extremities. We have used our mesoscopic setup to generate 3- dimensional images of genetically modified drosophila fly, and drosophila pupae expressing GFP from the wings, high resolution images were generated in both cases, in the fly we can see the wings, the legs, the eyes, and the shape of the body. In the pupae the outline of the pupae, the spiracles at both ends and a strong signal corresponding to the location of the future wings are observed.

  12. A High-Performance Genetic Algorithm: Using Traveling Salesman Problem as a Case

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chun-Wei; Tseng, Shih-Pang; Yang, Chu-Sing

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a simple but efficient algorithm for reducing the computation time of genetic algorithm (GA) and its variants. The proposed algorithm is motivated by the observation that genes common to all the individuals of a GA have a high probability of surviving the evolution and ending up being part of the final solution; as such, they can be saved away to eliminate the redundant computations at the later generations of a GA. To evaluate the performance of the proposed algorithm, we use it not only to solve the traveling salesman problem but also to provide an extensive analysis on the impact it may have on the quality of the end result. Our experimental results indicate that the proposed algorithm can significantly reduce the computation time of GA and GA-based algorithms while limiting the degradation of the quality of the end result to a very small percentage compared to traditional GA. PMID:24892038

  13. High-resolution mapping and genetic characterization of the Lazy-2 gravitropic mutant of tomato

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behringer, F. J.; Lomax, T. L.

    1999-01-01

    Mutation of the Lazy-2 (Lz-2) gene in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum mill.) produces a phytochrome-dependent reversal of shoot gravitropism, providing a unique genetic resource for investigating how signals from light modulate gravitropism. We mapped the Lz-2 gene using RFLPs and a PCR-based technique to assess the feasibility of positional cloning. Analysis of a 1338 plant backcross population between L. esculentum and L. pennellii placed Lz-2 within a 1.2 cM interval on chromosome 5, 0.4 cM from TG504-CT201A interval. The inabililty to resolve these markers indicates that Lz-2 resides in a centromeric region in which recombination is highly suppressed. Lazy-2 is tightly linked to but does not encode the gene for ACC4, an enzyme involved in ethylene biosynthesis. We also observed that Lz-2 is partially dominant under certain conditions and stages of development.

  14. Genetic alterations activating kinase and cytokine receptor signaling in high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Kathryn G.; Morin, Ryan D.; Zhang, Jinghui; Hirst, Martin; Zhao, Yongjun; Su, Xiaoping; Chen, Shann-Ching; Payne-Turner, Debbie; Churchman, Michelle; Harvey, Richard C.; Chen, Xiang; Kasap, Corynn; Yan, Chunhua; Becksfort, Jared; Finney, Richard P.; Teachey, David T.; Maude, Shannon L.; Tse, Kane; Moore, Richard; Jones, Steven; Mungall, Karen; Birol, Inanc; Edmonson, Michael N.; Hu, Ying; Buetow, Kenneth E.; Chen, I-Ming; Carroll, William L.; Wei, Lei; Ma, Jing; Kleppe, Maria; Levine, Ross L.; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Larsen, Eric; Shah, Neil P.; Devidas, Meenakshi; Reaman, Gregory; Smith, Malcolm; Paugh, Steven W.; Evans, William E.; Grupp, Stephan A.; Jeha, Sima; Pui, Ching-Hon; Gerhard, Daniela S.; Downing, James R.; Willman, Cheryl L.; Loh, Mignon; Hunger, Stephen P.; Marra, Marco; Mullighan, Charles G.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Genomic profiling has identified a subtype of high-risk B-progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) with alteration of IKZF1, a gene expression profile similar to BCR-ABL1-positive ALL and poor outcome (Ph-like ALL). The genetic alterations that activate kinase signaling in Ph-like ALL are poorly understood. We performed transcriptome and whole genome sequencing on 15 cases of Ph-like ALL, and identified rearrangements involving ABL1, JAK2, PDGFRB, CRLF2 and EPOR, activating mutations of IL7R and FLT3, and deletion of SH2B3, which encodes the JAK2 negative regulator LNK. Importantly, several of these alterations induce transformation that is attenuated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, suggesting the treatment outcome of these patients may be improved with targeted therapy. PMID:22897847

  15. High genetic diversity and connectivity in a common mesopelagic fish of the Southern Ocean: The myctophid Electrona antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van de Putte, A. P.; Van Houdt, J. K. J.; Maes, G. E.; Hellemans, B.; Collins, M. A.; Volckaert, F. A. M.

    2012-01-01

    Many marine pelagic fish species are characterized by subtle but complex genetic structures and dynamics, depending on the balance between current-mediated larval dispersal and adult active homing behavior. The circumantarctic continuous hydrodynamics of the Southern Ocean is a prime example of a system with a potentially great homogenizing effect among distant populations. We tested this hypothesis by analyzing the contemporary genetic relatedness among populations of a common and endemic mesopelagic fish of the Southern Ocean, Electrona antarctica. Seven newly developed species-specific microsatellite markers were used to investigate patterns of neutral genetic variation in 11 geographically widespread samples ( n=400) collected between 2006 and 2007. We detected a very high level of genetic diversity, but a striking lack of genetic differentiation on a circumantarctic scale, indicating large effective population sizes complemented with high levels of admixture. These findings underscore the large scale homogenizing effect of the Southern Coastal Current, leading to a high level of connectivity of our model species in the Southern Ocean, which is congruent with its huge biomass and central role in marine food webs. As an important Antarctic marine living resource this species may as such be managed on a circumantarctic level, although the demographic stability of this stock should be estimated urgently.

  16. Biology 4250 Evolutionary Genetics

    E-print Network

    Innes, David J.

    individuals Facultative sexual/asexual sexual + vegetative reproduction Sexual ­ high genotypic diversity connections among more distantly related taxa Sexual reproduction + genetic variation = large amount unique individuals Asexual clones of genetically identicalAsexual clones of genetically identical

  17. A Twin Study of the Genetics of High Cognitive Ability Selected from 11,000 Twin Pairs in Six Studies from Four Countries

    PubMed Central

    Haworth, Claire M.A.; Wright, Margaret J.; Martin, Nicolas W.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Boomsma, Dorret I; Bartels, Meike; Posthuma, Danielle; Davis, Oliver S.P.; Brant, Angela M.; Corley, Robin P.; Hewitt, John K.; Iacono, William G.; McGue, Matthew; Thompson, Lee A.; Hart, Sara A.; Petrill, Stephen A.; Lubinski, David; Plomin, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Although much genetic research has addressed normal variation in intelligence, little is known about the etiology of high cognitive abilities. Using data from 11,000 twin pairs (age range = 6 – 71 years) from the Genetics of High Cognitive Abilities (GHCA) Consortium, we investigated the genetic and environmental etiologies of high general cognitive ability (g). Age-appropriate psychometric cognitive tests were administered to the twins and used to create g scores standardized within each study. Liability-threshold model fitting was used to estimate genetic and environmental parameters for the top 15% of the distribution of g. Genetic influence for high g was substantial (0.50, with a 95% confidence interval of 0.41 – 0.60). Shared environmental influences were moderate (0.28, 0.19 – 0.37). We conclude that genetic variation contributes substantially to high g in Australia, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and the United States. PMID:19381794

  18. High altitude genetic adaptation in Tibetans: no role of increased hemoglobin-oxygen affinity

    PubMed Central

    Tashi, Tsewang; Feng, Tang; Koul, Parvaiz; Amaru, Ricardo; Hussey, Dottie; Lorenzo, Felipe R.; RiLi, Ge; Prchal, Josef T.

    2014-01-01

    High altitude exerts selective evolutionary pressure primarily due to its hypoxic environment, resulting in multiple adaptive responses. High hemoglobin-oxygen affinity is postulated to be one such adaptive change, which has been reported in Sherpas of the Himalayas. Tibetans have lived on the Qinghai-Tibetan plateau for thousands of years and have developed unique phenotypes, such as protection from polycythemia which has been linked to PDH2 mutation, resulting in downregulation of HIF pathway. In order to see if Tibetans also developed high hemoglobin-oxygen affinity as a part of their genetic adaptation, we conducted this study assessing hemoglobin-oxygen affinity and their fetal hemoglobin levels in Tibetan subjects from 3 different altitudes. We found normal hemoglobin-oxygen affinity in all subjects, fetal hemoglobin levels were normal in all except one and no hemoglobin variants in any of the subjects. We conclude that increased hemoglobin-oxygen affinity or increased fetal hemoglobin are not adaptive phenotypes of the Tibetan highlanders. PMID:24618341

  19. Genetic Signatures Reveal High-Altitude Adaptation in a Set of Ethiopian Populations

    PubMed Central

    Huerta-Sánchez, Emilia; DeGiorgio, Michael; Pagani, Luca; Tarekegn, Ayele; Ekong, Rosemary; Antao, Tiago; Cardona, Alexia; Montgomery, Hugh E.; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Robbins, Peter A.; Weale, Michael E.; Bradman, Neil; Bekele, Endashaw; Kivisild, Toomas; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2013-01-01

    The Tibetan and Andean Plateaus and Ethiopian highlands are the largest regions to have long-term high-altitude residents. Such populations are exposed to lower barometric pressures and hence atmospheric partial pressures of oxygen. Such “hypobaric hypoxia” may limit physical functional capacity, reproductive health, and even survival. As such, selection of genetic variants advantageous to hypoxic adaptation is likely to have occurred. Identifying signatures of such selection is likely to help understanding of hypoxic adaptive processes. Here, we seek evidence of such positive selection using five Ethiopian populations, three of which are from high-altitude areas in Ethiopia. As these populations may have been recipients of Eurasian gene flow, we correct for this admixture. Using single-nucleotide polymorphism genotype data from multiple populations, we find the strongest signal of selection in BHLHE41 (also known as DEC2 or SHARP1). Remarkably, a major role of this gene is regulation of the same hypoxia response pathway on which selection has most strikingly been observed in both Tibetan and Andean populations. Because it is also an important player in the circadian rhythm pathway, BHLHE41 might also provide insights into the mechanisms underlying the recognized impacts of hypoxia on the circadian clock. These results support the view that Ethiopian, Andean, and Tibetan populations living at high altitude have adapted to hypoxia differently, with convergent evolution affecting different genes from the same pathway. PMID:23666210

  20. Noncanonical Self-Assembly of Highly Asymmetric Genetically Encoded Polypeptide Amphiphiles into Cylindrical Micelles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) are a class of biopolymers consisting of the pentameric repeat (VPG?G)n based on the sequence of mammalian tropoelastin that display a thermally induced soluble-to-insoluble phase transition in aqueous solution. We have discovered a remarkably simple approach to driving the spontaneous self-assembly of high molecular weight ELPs into nanostructures by genetically fusing a short 1.5 kDa (XGy)z assembly domain to one end of the ELP. Classical theories of self-assembly based on the geometric mass balance of hydrophilic and hydrophobic block copolymers suggest that these highly asymmetric polypeptides should form spherical micelles. Surprisingly, when sufficiently hydrophobic amino acids (X) are presented in a periodic sequence such as (FGG)8 or (YG)8, these highly asymmetric polypeptides self-assemble into cylindrical micelles whose length can be tuned by the sequence of the morphogenic tag. These nanostructures were characterized by light scattering, tunable resistive pulse sensing, fluorescence spectrophotometry, and thermal turbidimetry, as well as by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). These short assembly domains provide a facile strategy to control the size, shape, and stability of stimuli responsive polypeptide nanostructures. PMID:25268037

  1. High-level DNA amplifications are common genetic aberrations in B-cell neoplasms.

    PubMed Central

    Werner, C. A.; Döhner, H.; Joos, S.; Trümper, L. H.; Baudis, M.; Barth, T. F.; Ott, G.; Möller, P.; Lichter, P.; Bentz, M.

    1997-01-01

    Gene amplification is one of the molecular mechanisms resulting in the up-regulation of gene expression. In non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, such gene amplifications have been identified rarely. Using comparative genomic hybridization, a technique that has proven to be very sensitive for the detection of high-level DNA amplifications, we analyzed 108 cases of B-cell neoplasms (42 chronic B-cell leukemias, 5 mantle cell lymphomas, and 61 aggressive B-cell lymphomas). Twenty-four high-level amplifications were identified in 13% of the patients and mapped to 15 different genomic regions. Regions most frequently amplified were bands Xq26-28, 2p23-24, and 2p14-16 as well as 18q21 (three times each). Amplification of several proto-oncogenes and a cell cycle control gene (N-MYC (two cases), BCL2, CCND2, and GLI) located within the amplified regions was demonstrated by Southern blot analysis or fluorescence in situ hybridization to interphase nuclei of tumor cells. These data demonstrate that gene amplifications in B-cell neoplasms are much more frequent than previously assumed. The identification of highly amplified DNA regions and genes included in the amplicons provides important information for further analyses of genetic events involved in lymphomagenesis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9250147

  2. Construction of a high-density DArTseq SNP-based genetic map and identification of genomic regions with segregation distortion in a genetic population derived from a cross between feral and cultivated-type watermelon.

    PubMed

    Ren, Runsheng; Ray, Rumiana; Li, Pingfang; Xu, Jinhua; Zhang, Man; Liu, Guang; Yao, Xiefeng; Kilian, Andrzej; Yang, Xingping

    2015-08-01

    Watermelon [Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai] is an economically important vegetable crop grown extensively worldwide. To facilitate the identification of agronomically important traits and provide new information for genetic and genomic research on this species, a high-density genetic linkage map of watermelon was constructed using an F2 population derived from a cross between elite watermelon cultivar K3 and wild watermelon germplasm PI 189225. Based on a sliding window approach, a total of 1,161 bin markers representing 3,465 SNP markers were mapped onto 11 linkage groups corresponding to the chromosome pair number of watermelon. The total length of the genetic map is 1,099.2 cM, with an average distance between bins of 1.0 cM. The number of markers in each chromosome varies from 62 in chromosome 07 to 160 in chromosome 05. The length of individual chromosomes ranged between 61.8 cM for chromosome 07 and 140.2 cM for chromosome 05. A total of 616 SNP bin markers showed significant (P < 0.05) segregation distortion across all 11 chromosomes, and 513 (83.3 %) of these distorted loci showed distortion in favor of the elite watermelon cultivar K3 allele and 103 were skewed toward PI 189225. The number of SNPs and InDels per Mb varied considerably across the segregation distorted regions (SDRs) on each chromosome, and a mixture of dense and sparse SNPs and InDel SDRs coexisted on some chromosomes suggesting that SDRs were randomly distributed throughout the genome. Recombination rates varied greatly among each chromosome, from 2.0 to 4.2 centimorgans per megabase (cM/Mb). An inconsistency was found between the genetic and physical positions on the map for a segment on chromosome 11. The high-density genetic map described in the present study will facilitate fine mapping of quantitative trait loci, the identification of candidate genes, map-based cloning, as well as marker-assisted selection (MAS) in watermelon breeding programs. PMID:25702268

  3. Construction of a high-density integrated genetic linkage map of rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) using genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS)

    PubMed Central

    Pootakham, Wirulda; Ruang-Areerate, Panthita; Jomchai, Nukoon; Sonthirod, Chutima; Sangsrakru, Duangjai; Yoocha, Thippawan; Theerawattanasuk, Kanikar; Nirapathpongporn, Kanlaya; Romruensukharom, Phayao; Tragoonrung, Somvong; Tangphatsornruang, Sithichoke

    2015-01-01

    Construction of linkage maps is crucial for genetic studies and marker-assisted breeding programs. Recent advances in next generation sequencing technologies allow for the generation of high-density linkage maps, especially in non-model species lacking extensive genomic resources. Here, we constructed a high-density integrated genetic linkage map of rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis), the sole commercial producer of high-quality natural rubber. We applied a genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) technique to simultaneously discover and genotype single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers in two rubber tree populations. A total of 21,353 single nucleotide substitutions were identified, 55% of which represented transition events. GBS-based genetic maps of populations P and C comprised 1704 and 1719 markers and encompassed 2041 cM and 1874 cM, respectively. The average marker densities of these two maps were one SNP in 1.23–1.25 cM. A total of 1114 shared SNP markers were used to merge the two component maps. An integrated linkage map consisted of 2321 markers and spanned the cumulative length of 2052 cM. The composite map showed a substantial improvement in marker density, with one SNP marker in every 0.89 cM. To our knowledge, this is the most saturated genetic map in rubber tree to date. This integrated map allowed us to anchor 28,965 contigs, covering 135 Mb or 12% of the published rubber tree genome. We demonstrated that GBS is a robust and cost-effective approach for generating a common set of genome-wide SNP data suitable for constructing integrated linkage maps from multiple populations in a highly heterozygous agricultural species. PMID:26074933

  4. Rats perinatally exposed to food restriction and high-fat diet show differences in adipose tissue gene expression under chronic caloric restriction

    PubMed Central

    MacKay, Harry; Khazall, Rim; Patterson, Zachary R; Wellman, Martin; Abizaid, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze how maternal diet during the lactational period influences the adipose tissue response to chronic caloric restriction in offspring. Lactating dams were subjected to one of three treatments: 50% food restriction (FR), ad lib standard chow (AL), or ad lib high-fat diet (HF). Juveniles were first weaned onto standard chow, then in adulthood 50% calorically restricted and maintained at 90% of normal body weight for 60 d. HF animals showed increased percent body fat compared with AL and FR animals despite equivalent body weights. HF animals showed alterations in the balance of adipose tissue lipogenic (FAS, LPL) and lipolytic (HSL) gene expression that may underlie their propensity to maintain fat stores under caloric restriction. PMID:24052899

  5. High-Density SNP Genotyping of Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) Reveals Patterns of Genetic Variation Due to Breeding

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Sung-Chur; Van Deynze, Allen; Stoffel, Kevin; Douches, David S.; Zarka, Daniel; Ganal, Martin W.; Chetelat, Roger T.; Hutton, Samuel F.; Scott, John W.; Gardner, Randolph G.; Panthee, Dilip R.; Mutschler, Martha; Myers, James R.; Francis, David M.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of selection on genome variation were investigated and visualized in tomato using a high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. 7,720 SNPs were genotyped on a collection of 426 tomato accessions (410 inbreds and 16 hybrids) and over 97% of the markers were polymorphic in the entire collection. Principal component analysis (PCA) and pairwise estimates of Fst supported that the inbred accessions represented seven sub-populations including processing, large-fruited fresh market, large-fruited vintage, cultivated cherry, landrace, wild cherry, and S. pimpinellifolium. Further divisions were found within both the contemporary processing and fresh market sub-populations. These sub-populations showed higher levels of genetic diversity relative to the vintage sub-population. The array provided a large number of polymorphic SNP markers across each sub-population, ranging from 3,159 in the vintage accessions to 6,234 in the cultivated cherry accessions. Visualization of minor allele frequency revealed regions of the genome that distinguished three representative sub-populations of cultivated tomato (processing, fresh market, and vintage), particularly on chromosomes 2, 4, 5, 6, and 11. The PCA loadings and Fst outlier analysis between these three sub-populations identified a large number of candidate loci under positive selection on chromosomes 4, 5, and 11. The extent of linkage disequilibrium (LD) was examined within each chromosome for these sub-populations. LD decay varied between chromosomes and sub-populations, with large differences reflective of breeding history. For example, on chromosome 11, decay occurred over 0.8 cM for processing accessions and over 19.7 cM for fresh market accessions. The observed SNP variation and LD decay suggest that different patterns of genetic variation in cultivated tomato are due to introgression from wild species and selection for market specialization. PMID:23029069

  6. RNA-Seq bulked segregant analysis enables the identification of high-resolution genetic markers for breeding in hexaploid wheat.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Gonzalez, Ricardo H; Segovia, Vanesa; Bird, Nicholas; Fenwick, Paul; Holdgate, Sarah; Berry, Simon; Jack, Peter; Caccamo, Mario; Uauy, Cristobal

    2015-06-01

    The identification of genetic markers linked to genes of agronomic importance is a major aim of crop research and breeding programmes. Here, we identify markers for Yr15, a major disease resistance gene for wheat yellow rust, using a segregating F2 population. After phenotyping, we implemented RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) of bulked pools to identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) associated with Yr15. Over 27 000 genes with SNPs were identified between the parents, and then classified based on the results from the sequenced bulks. We calculated the bulk frequency ratio (BFR) of SNPs between resistant and susceptible bulks, selecting those showing sixfold enrichment/depletion in the corresponding bulks (BFR > 6). Using additional filtering criteria, we reduced the number of genes with a putative SNP to 175. The 35 SNPs with the highest BFR values were converted into genome-specific KASP assays using an automated bioinformatics pipeline (PolyMarker) which circumvents the limitations associated with the polyploid wheat genome. Twenty-eight assays were polymorphic of which 22 (63%) mapped in the same linkage group as Yr15. Using these markers, we mapped Yr15 to a 0.77-cM interval. The three most closely linked SNPs were tested across varieties and breeding lines representing UK elite germplasm. Two flanking markers were diagnostic in over 99% of lines tested, thus providing a reliable haplotype for marker-assisted selection in these breeding programmes. Our results demonstrate that the proposed methodology can be applied in polyploid F2 populations to generate high-resolution genetic maps across target intervals. PMID:25382230

  7. A physical map of the highly heterozygous Populus genome: integration with the genome sequence and genetic map

    SciTech Connect

    Kelleher, Colin; CHIU, Dr. R.; Shin, Dr. H.; Krywinski, Martin; Fjell, Chris; Wilkin, Jennifer; Yin, Tongming; Difazio, Stephen P.

    2007-01-01

    As part of a larger project to sequence the Populus genome and generate genomic resources for this emerging model tree, we constructed a physical map of the Populus genome, representing one of the few such maps of an undomesticated, highly heterozygous plant species. The physical map, consisting of 2802 contigs, was constructed from fingerprinted bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones. The map represents approximately 9.4-fold coverage of the Populus genome, which has been estimated from the genome sequence assembly to be 485 {+-} 10 Mb in size. BAC ends were sequenced to assist long-range assembly of whole-genome shotgun sequence scaffolds and to anchor the physical map to the genome sequence. Simple sequence repeat-based markers were derived from the end sequences and used to initiate integration of the BAC and genetic maps. A total of 2411 physical map contigs, representing 97% of all clones assigned to contigs, were aligned to the sequence assembly (JGI Populus trichocarpa, version 1.0). These alignments represent a total coverage of 384 Mb (79%) of the entire poplar sequence assembly and 295 Mb (96%) of linkage group sequence assemblies. A striking result of the physical map contig alignments to the sequence assembly was the co-localization of multiple contigs across numerous regions of the 19 linkage groups. Targeted sequencing of BAC clones and genetic analysis in a small number of representative regions showed that these co-aligning contigs represent distinct haplotypes in the heterozygous individual sequenced, and revealed the nature of these haplotype sequence differences.

  8. Measurement of the half-life of (198)Au in a nonmetal: High-precision measurement shows no host-material dependence 

    E-print Network

    Goodwin, J. R.; Nica, N.; Iacob, V. E.; Dibidad, A.; Hardy, John C.

    2010-01-01

    REVIEW C 82, 044320 (2010) Measurement of the half-life of 198Au in a nonmetal: High-precision measurement shows no host-material dependence J. R. Goodwin, N. Nica, V. E. Iacob, A. Dibidad,* and J. C. Hardy? Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University... to use neutron *Research Experience for Undergraduates summer student from Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, FL 32307, USA. ?hardy@comp.tamu.edu activation again and sought a suitable gold compound that is also an insulator. Although strictly...

  9. Quartz-Seq: a highly reproducible and sensitive single-cell RNA sequencing method, reveals non-genetic gene-expression heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Development of a highly reproducible and sensitive single-cell RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) method would facilitate the understanding of the biological roles and underlying mechanisms of non-genetic cellular heterogeneity. In this study, we report a novel single-cell RNA-seq method called Quartz-Seq that has a simpler protocol and higher reproducibility and sensitivity than existing methods. We show that single-cell Quartz-Seq can quantitatively detect various kinds of non-genetic cellular heterogeneity, and can detect different cell types and different cell-cycle phases of a single cell type. Moreover, this method can comprehensively reveal gene-expression heterogeneity between single cells of the same cell type in the same cell-cycle phase. PMID:23594475

  10. Enhanced characteristics of genetically modified switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) for high biofuel production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lignocellulosic biomass is one of the most promising renewable and clean energy resources to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and dependence on fossil fuels. However, the resistance to accessibility of sugars embedded in plant cell walls (so-called recalcitrance) is a major barrier to economically viable cellulosic ethanol production. A recent report from the US National Academy of Sciences indicated that, “absent technological breakthroughs”, it was unlikely that the US would meet the congressionally mandated renewable fuel standard of 35 billion gallons of ethanol-equivalent biofuels plus 1 billion gallons of biodiesel by 2022. We here describe the properties of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) biomass that has been genetically engineered to increase the cellulosic ethanol yield by more than 2-fold. Results We have increased the cellulosic ethanol yield from switchgrass by 2.6-fold through overexpression of the transcription factor PvMYB4. This strategy reduces carbon deposition into lignin and phenolic fermentation inhibitors while maintaining the availability of potentially fermentable soluble sugars and pectic polysaccharides. Detailed biomass characterization analyses revealed that the levels and nature of phenolic acids embedded in the cell-wall, the lignin content and polymer size, lignin internal linkage levels, linkages between lignin and xylans/pectins, and levels of wall-bound fucose are all altered in PvMYB4-OX lines. Genetically engineered PvMYB4-OX switchgrass therefore provides a novel system for further understanding cell wall recalcitrance. Conclusions Our results have demonstrated that overexpression of PvMYB4, a general transcriptional repressor of the phenylpropanoid/lignin biosynthesis pathway, can lead to very high yield ethanol production through dramatic reduction of recalcitrance. MYB4-OX switchgrass is an excellent model system for understanding recalcitrance, and provides new germplasm for developing switchgrass cultivars as biomass feedstocks for biofuel production. PMID:23651942

  11. High-Throughput Transcriptome Sequencing Identifies Candidate Genetic Modifiers of Vulnerability to Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Garic, Ana; Berres, Mark E.; Smith, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction FASD is a leading cause of neurodevelopmental disability. Genetic factors can modify vulnerability to FASD, but these elements are poorly characterized. Methods We performed high-throughput transcriptional profiling to identify gene candidates that could potentially modify vulnerability to ethanol’s neurotoxicity. We interrogated a unique genetic resource, neuroprogenitor cells from two closely-related Gallus gallus lines having well-characterized robust or attenuated ethanol responses with respect to intracellular calcium mobilization and CaMKII / ?-catenin-dependent apoptosis. Samples were not exposed to ethanol prior to analysis. Results We identified 363 differentially expressed genes in neuroprogenitors from these two lines. KEGG analysis revealed several gene clusters having significantly differential enrichment in gene expression. The largest and most significant cluster comprised ribosomal proteins (38 genes, p = 1.85 × 10?47). Other significantly enriched gene clusters included metabolism (25 genes, p = 0.0098), oxidative phosphorylation (18 genes, p = 1.10 × 10?11), spliceosome (13 genes, p = 7.02 × 10?8) and protein processing in the endoplasmic reticulum (9 genes, p = 0.0011). Inspection of GO-terms identified 24 genes involved in the calcium/?-catenin signals that mediate ethanol's neurotoxicity in this model, including ?-catenin itself and both calmodulin isoforms. Conclusions Four of the identified pathways with altered transcript abundance mediate the flow of cellular information from RNA to protein. Importantly, ribosome biogenesis also senses nucleolar stress and regulates p53-mediated apoptosis in neural crest. Human ribosomopathies produce craniofacial malformations and eleven known ribosomopathy genes were differentially expressed in this model of neural crest apoptosis. Rapid changes in ribosome expression are consistently observed in ethanol-treated mouse embryo neural folds, a model that is developmentally similar to ours. The recurring identification of ribosome biogenesis suggests it is a candidate modifier of ethanol vulnerability. These results highlight this approach’s efficacy to formulate new, mechanistic hypotheses regarding ethanol’s developmental damage. PMID:24962712

  12. Post Genome-Wide Association Studies of Novel Genes Associated with Type 2 Diabetes Show Gene-Gene Interaction and High Predictive Value

    PubMed Central

    Cauchi, Stéphane; Meyre, David; Durand, Emmanuelle; Proença, Christine; Marre, Michel; Hadjadj, Samy; Choquet, Hélène; De Graeve, Franck; Gaget, Stefan; Allegaert, Frederic; Delplanque, Jérôme; Permutt, Marshall Alan; Wasson, Jon; Blech, Ilana; Charpentier, Guillaume; Balkau, Beverley; Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Czernichow, Sébastien; Patsch, Wolfgang; Chikri, Mohamed; Glaser, Benjamin; Sladek, Robert; Froguel, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    Background Recently, several Genome Wide Association (GWA) studies in populations of European descent have identified and validated novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), highly associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Our aims were to validate these markers in other European and non-European populations, then to assess their combined effect in a large French study comparing T2D and normal glucose tolerant (NGT) individuals. Methodology/Principal Findings In the same French population analyzed in our previous GWA study (3,295 T2D and 3,595 NGT), strong associations with T2D were found for CDKAL1 (ORrs7756992?=?1.30[1.19–1.42], P?=?2.3×10?9), CDKN2A/2B (ORrs10811661?=?0.74[0.66–0.82], P?=?3.5×10?8) and more modestly for IGFBP2 (ORrs1470579?=?1.17[1.07–1.27], P?=?0.0003) SNPs. These results were replicated in both Israeli Ashkenazi (577 T2D and 552 NGT) and Austrian (504 T2D and 753 NGT) populations (except for CDKAL1) but not in the Moroccan population (521 T2D and 423 NGT). In the overall group of French subjects (4,232 T2D and 4,595 NGT), IGFBP2 and CXCR4 synergistically interacted with (LOC38776, SLC30A8, HHEX) and (NGN3, CDKN2A/2B), respectively, encoding for proteins presumably regulating pancreatic endocrine cell development and function. The T2D risk increased strongly when risk alleles, including the previously discovered T2D-associated TCF7L2 rs7903146 SNP, were combined (8.68-fold for the 14% of French individuals carrying 18 to 30 risk alleles with an allelic OR of 1.24). With an area under the ROC curve of 0.86, only 15 novel loci were necessary to discriminate French individuals susceptible to develop T2D. Conclusions/Significance In addition to TCF7L2, SLC30A8 and HHEX, initially identified by the French GWA scan, CDKAL1, IGFBP2 and CDKN2A/2B strongly associate with T2D in French individuals, and mostly in populations of Central European descent but not in Moroccan subjects. Genes expressed in the pancreas interact together and their combined effect dramatically increases the risk for T2D, opening avenues for the development of genetic prediction tests. PMID:18461161

  13. Modified high-density lipoproteins by artificial sweetener, aspartame, and saccharin, showed loss of anti-atherosclerotic activity and toxicity in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Yong; Park, Ki-Hoon; Kim, Jihoe; Choi, Inho; Cho, Kyung-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Safety concerns have been raised regarding the association of chronic consumption of artificial sweeteners (ASs) with metabolic disorders, especially in the heart and brain. There has been no information on the in vivo physiological effects of AS consumption in lipoprotein metabolism. High-dosage treatment (final 25, 50, and 100 mM) with AS (aspartame, acesulfame K, and saccharin) to human high-density lipoprotein (HDL) induced loss of antioxidant ability along with elevated atherogenic effects. Aspartame-treated HDL3 (final 100 mM) almost all disappeared due to putative proteolytic degradation. Aspartame- and saccharin-treated HDL3 showed more enhanced cholesteryl ester transfer activity, while their antioxidant ability was disappeared. Microinjection of the modified HDL3 exacerbated the inflammatory death in zebrafish embryos in the presence of oxLDL. These results show that AS treatment impaired the beneficial functions of HDL, resulting in loss of antioxidant and anti-atherogenic activities. These results suggest that aspartame and saccharin could be toxic to the human circulation system as well as embryonic development via impairment of lipoprotein function. PMID:25142179

  14. Hedgehog Signaling Pathway Is Active in GBM with GLI1 mRNA Expression Showing a Single Continuous Distribution Rather than Discrete High/Low Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Nidhan K.; Rote, Sarang; Chatterjee, Uttara; Ghosh, Samarendra N.; Deb, Sumit; Saha, Suniti K.; Chowdhury, Anup K.; Ghosh, Subhashish; Rudin, Charles M.; Mukherjee, Ankur; Basu, Analabha; Dhara, Surajit

    2015-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is a valid therapeutic target in a wide range of malignancies. We focus here on glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), a lethal malignancy of the central nervous system (CNS). By analyzing RNA-sequencing based transcriptomics data on 149 clinical cases of TCGA-GBM database we show here a strong correlation (r = 0.7) between GLI1 and PTCH1 mRNA expression—as a hallmark of the canonical Hh-pathway activity in this malignancy. GLI1 mRNA expression varied in 3 orders of magnitude among the GBM patients of the same cohort showing a single continuous distribution—unlike the discrete high/low-GLI1 mRNA expressing clusters of medulloblastoma (MB). When compared with MB as a reference, the median GLI1 mRNA expression in GBM appeared 14.8 fold lower than that of the “high-Hh” cluster of MB but 5.6 fold higher than that of the “low-Hh” cluster of MB. Next, we demonstrated statistically significant up- and down-regulation of GLI1 mRNA expressions in GBM patient-derived low-passage neurospheres in vitro by sonic hedgehog ligand-enriched conditioned media (shh-CM) and by Hh-inhibitor drug vismodegib respectively. We also showed clinically achievable dose (50 ?M) of vismodegib alone to be sufficient to induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in these low-passage GBM neurospheres in vitro. Vismodegib showed an effect on the neurospheres, both by down-regulating GLI1 mRNA expression and by inducing apoptosis/cell cycle arrest, irrespective of their relative endogenous levels of GLI1 mRNA expression. We conclude from our study that this single continuous distribution pattern of GLI1 mRNA expression technically puts almost all GBM patients in a single group rather than discrete high- or low-clusters in terms of Hh-pathway activity. That is suggestive of therapies with Hh-pathway inhibitor drugs in this malignancy without a need for further stratification of patients on the basis of relative levels of Hh-pathway activity among them. PMID:25775002

  15. High prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine use in patients with genetically proven mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Franik, Sebastian; Huidekoper, Hidde H; Visser, Gepke; de Vries, Maaike; de Boer, Lonneke; Hermans-Peters, Marion; Rodenburg, Richard; Verhaak, Chris; Vlieger, Arine M; Smeitink, Jan A M; Janssen, Mirian C H; Wortmann, Saskia B

    2015-05-01

    Despite major advances in understanding the pathophysiology of mitochondrial diseases, clinical management of these conditions remains largely supportive, and no effective treatment is available. We therefore assumed that the burden of disease combined with the lack of adequate treatment leaves open a big market for complementary and alternative medicine use. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use and perceived effectiveness of complementary and alternative medicine in children and adults with genetically proven mitochondrial disease. The reported use was surprisingly high, with 88% of children and 91% of adults having used some kind of complementary and alternative medicine in the last 2 years. Also, the mean cost of these treatments was impressive, being 489/year for children and 359/year for adult patients. Over-the-counter remedies (e.g., food supplements, homeopathy) and self-help techniques (e.g., Reiki, yoga) were the most frequently used complementary and alternative therapies in our cohort: 54% of children and 60% of adults reported the various complementary and alternative medicine therapies to be effective. Given the fact that currently no effective treatment exists, further research toward the different therapies is needed, as our study clearly demonstrates that such therapies are highly sought after by affected patients. PMID:25303853

  16. Unique Features of High-Density Lipoproteins in the Japanese: In Population and in Genetic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Despite its gradual increase in the past several decades, the prevalence of atherosclerotic vascular disease is low in Japan. This is largely attributed to difference in lifestyle, especially food and dietary habits, and it may be reflected in certain clinical parameters. Plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels, a strong counter risk for atherosclerosis, are indeed high among the Japanese. Accordingly, lower HDL seems to contribute more to the development of coronary heart disease (CHD) than an increase in non-HDL lipoproteins at a population level in Japan. Interestingly, average HDL levels in Japan have increased further in the past two decades, and are markedly higher than in Western populations. The reasons and consequences for public health of this increase are still unknown. Simulation for the efficacy of raising HDL cholesterol predicts a decrease in CHD of 70% in Japan, greater than the extent by reducing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol predicted by simulation or achieved in a statin trial. On the other hand, a substantial portion of hyperalphalipoproteinemic population in Japan is accounted for by genetic deficiency of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), which is also commonly unique in East Asian populations. It is still controversial whether CETP mutations are antiatherogenic. Hepatic Schistosomiasis is proposed as a potential screening factor for historic accumulation of CETP deficiency in East Asia. PMID:25849946

  17. High-throughput microfluidics and ultrafast optics for in vivo compound/genetic discoveries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohde, Christopher B.; Gilleland, Cody; Samara, Chrysanthi; Yanik, M. Fatih

    2010-02-01

    Therapeutic treatment of spinal cord injuries, brain trauma, stroke, and neurodegenerative diseases will greatly benefit from the discovery of compounds that enhance neuronal regeneration following injury. We previously demonstrated the use of femtosecond laser microsurgery to induce precise and reproducible neural injury in C. elegans, and have developed microfluidic on-chip technologies that allow automated and rapid manipulation, orientation, and non-invasive immobilization of animals for sub-cellular resolution two-photon imaging and femtosecond-laser nanosurgery. These technologies include microfluidic whole-animal sorters, as well as integrated chips containing multiple addressable incubation chambers for exposure of individual animals to compounds and sub-cellular time-lapse imaging of hundreds of animals on a single chip. Our technologies can be used for a variety of highly sophisticated in vivo high-throughput compound and genetic screens, and we performed the first in vivo screen in C. elegans for compounds enhancing neuronal regrowth following femtosecond microsurgery. The compounds identified interact with a wide variety of cellular targets, such as cytoskeletal components, vesicle trafficking, and protein kinases that enhance neuronal regeneration.

  18. Development of a Large SNP Genotyping Array and Generation of High-Density Genetic Maps in Tomato

    E-print Network

    Douches, David S.

    Development of a Large SNP Genotyping Array and Generation of High-Density Genetic Maps in Tomato * 1 Department of Horticulture and Crop Science, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center Agricultural Research and Development Center, The Ohio State University, Wooster, Ohio, United States

  19. Optimization of high-order harmonic generation by genetic algorithm and wavelet time-frequency analysis of quantum dipole emission

    E-print Network

    Chu, Xi; Chu, Shih-I

    2001-07-13

    We present an ab initio three-dimensional quantum study of the coherent control of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) processes in intense pulsed laser fields by means of the genetic algorithm optimization of the laser-pulse amplitude and phase...

  20. Am. J. Hum. Genet. 74:482494, 2004 Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A High-Resolution Genome Scan

    E-print Network

    Abecasis, Goncalo

    Am. J. Hum. Genet. 74:482­494, 2004 482 Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A High-Resolution Genome, Philadelphia Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a complex multifactorial disease that affects for disease-associated sequence variants. Introduction Age-related macular degeneration (AMD [MIM 603075

  1. High 222Rn levels in a show cave (Castañar de Ibor, Spain): Proposal and application of management measures to minimize the effects on guides and visitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lario, J.; Sánchez-Moral, S.; Cuezva, S.; Taborda, M.; Soler, V.

    Castañar de Ibor (Caceres, Spain) is a low energy cave showing very high micro-environmental stability throughout the annual cycle and minimum rates of energy exchange with the atmosphere. The radon ( 222Rn) levels monitored inside Castañar cave reached 50,462 Bq m -3 in April 2005 and had an annual average of 32,246 Bq m -3. Annual variations in Rn concentration seem mainly related to differences in internal and external temperature. The highest values of 222Rn concentration occur during winter and early spring when air-cave temperature surpasses the external air temperature, evidencing very low air exchange rate. These values are the highest recorded in any Spanish cave, either natural or show, and are much higher than the average in most caves around the world. The calculation of the effective dose received by guides during 2004 showed values higher than the maximum effective dose recommended by authorities. Two management measurements were applied to reduce these doses: reduction of the time of visit to a maximum of 60 min, and opening the cave door 1 hour before the entrance of the guides and visitors. These management measures were effective, as they led to a decrease of 10-12% in 222Rn in the cave atmosphere during visits and prevented the guides from being exposed to higher than recommended doses of radiation.

  2. Direct 2-Arm Comparison Shows Benefit of High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Boost vs External Beam Radiation Therapy Alone for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Khor, Richard; Duchesne, Gillian; Monash University, Melbourne ; Tai, Keen-Hun; Foroudi, Farshad; Chander, Sarat; Van Dyk, Sylvia; Garth, Margaret; Williams, Scott

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes of patients treated for intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer with a single schedule of either external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) boost or EBRT alone. Methods and Materials: From 2001-2006, 344 patients received EBRT with HDRB boost for definitive treatment of intermediate- or high-risk prostate cancer. The prescribed EBRT dose was 46 Gy in 23 fractions, with a HDR boost of 19.5 Gy in 3 fractions. This cohort was compared to a contemporaneously treated cohort who received EBRT to 74 Gy in 37 fractions, using a matched pair analysis. Three-dimensional conformal EBRT was used. Matching was performed using a propensity score matching technique. High-risk patients constituted 41% of the matched cohorts. Five-year clinical and biochemical outcomes were analyzed. Results: Initial significant differences in prognostic indicators between the unmatched treatment cohorts were rendered negligible after matching, providing a total of 688 patients. Median biochemical follow-up was 60.5 months. The 5-year freedom from biochemical failure was 79.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 74.3%-85.0%) and 70.9% (95% CI, 65.4%-76.0%) for the HDRB and EBRT groups, respectively, equating to a hazard ratio of 0.59 (95% CI, 0.43-0.81, P=.0011). Interaction analyses showed no alteration in HDR efficacy when planned androgen deprivation therapy was administered (P=.95), but a strong trend toward reduced efficacy was shown compared to EBRT in high-risk cases (P=.06). Rates of grade 3 urethral stricture were 0.3% (95% CI, 0%-0.9%) and 11.8% (95% CI, 8.1%-16.5%) for EBRT and HDRB, respectively (P<.0001). No differences in clinical outcomes were observed. Conclusions: This comparison of 2 individual contemporaneously treated HDRB and EBRT approaches showed improved freedom from biochemical progression with the HDR approach. The benefit was more pronounced in intermediate- risk patients but needs to be weighed against an increased risk of urethral toxicity.

  3. Topography of genetic loci in tissue samples: towards new diagnostic tool using interphase FISH and high-resolution image analysis techniques.

    PubMed

    Koutná, I; Kozubek, S; Zaloudík, J; Kozubek, M; Lukásová, E; Matula, P; Bártová, E; Skalníková, M; Cafourková, A; Jirsová, P

    2000-01-01

    Using single and dual colour fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) combined with image analysis techniques the topographic characteristics of genes and centromeres in nuclei of human colon tissue cells were investigated. The distributions of distances from the centre-of-nucleus to genes (centromeres) and from genes to genes (centromeres to centromeres) were studied in normal colon tissue cells found in the neighbourhood of tumour samples, in tumour cell line HT-29 and in promyelocytic HL-60 cell line for comparison. Our results show that the topography of genetic loci determined in 3D-fixed cell tissue corresponds to that obtained for 2D-fixed cells separated from the tissue. The distributions of the centre-of-nucleus to gene (centromere) distances and gene to gene (centromere to centromere) distances and their average values are different for various genetic loci but similar for normal colon tissue cells, HT-29 colon tumour cell line and HL-60 promyelocytic cell line. It suggests that the arrangement of genetic loci in cell nucleus is conserved in different types of human cells. The investigations of trisomic loci in HT-29 cells revealed that the location of the third genetic element is not different from the location of two homologues in diploid cells. We have shown that the topographic parameters used in our experiments for different genetic elements are not tissue or tumour specific. In order to validate high-resolution cytometry for oncology, further investigations should include more precise parameters reflecting the state of chromatin in the neighbourhood of critical oncogenes or tumour suppresser genes. PMID:11205320

  4. High genetic diversity and predominance of Rhinovirus A and C from Panamanian hospitalized children under five years with respiratory infections

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Human Rhinoviruses (HRVs) have high genetic diversity and three species have been described: HRV-A, HRV-B, and the recently recognized HRV-C, which has been rapidly identified worldwide. Findings In the present study, we report the frequency and diversity of Human Rhinovirus (HRV) strains circulating in Panama from children hospitalized with respiratory infections. Conclusions HRVs of species A, B and C have been identified with a predominance of HRV-A and HRV-C over HRV-B, and marked genetic diversity within each species. PMID:23116216

  5. Molecular genetic variation in cultivated peanut cultivars and breeding lines revealed by highly informative SSR markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Groundnut or peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) is an economically important crop worldwide as a source of protein and cooking oil, particularly in developing countries. Because of its narrow genetic background and shortage of polymorphic genetic markers, molecular characterization of cultivated peanuts e...

  6. Robust and Highly Informative Microsatellite-Based Genetic Identity Kit for Potato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fingerprinting of 742 potato landraces with 51 simple sequence repeat (SSR, microsatellite) markers resulted in improving a previously constructed potato genetic identity (PGI) kit. In addition, we mapped 27 new SSR markers on at least one of three potato genetic linkage maps. All SSR marker loc...

  7. Using the Eastern Hellbender Salamander in a High School Genetics & Ecological Conservation Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chudyk, Sarah; McMillan, Amy; Lange, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    This article contains an original 5E lesson plan developed from conservation genetics research on the giant North American hellbender salamander, Cryptobranchus alleganiensis alleganiensis. The lesson plan provides background information on the hellbender, reviews basic genetics, and exposes students to the scientific process that is used during…

  8. Spatial and Temporal Genetic Analyses Show High Gene Flow Among European Corn Borer (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) Populations Across the Central U.S. Corn Belt

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis, were sampled at 13 sites along two perpendicular 720 km transects intersecting in central Iowa, and two generations later at 4 of the same sites separated by 150-km in the cardinal directions. More than 50 moths from each sample location and time were genoty...

  9. A Novel Candidate Region for Genetic Adaptation to High Altitude in Andean Populations

    PubMed Central

    Lippold, Sebastian; de Filippo, Cesare; Tang, Kun; López Herráez, David; Li, Jing; Stoneking, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Humans living at high altitude (?2,500 meters above sea level) have acquired unique abilities to survive the associated extreme environmental conditions, including hypoxia, cold temperature, limited food availability and high levels of free radicals and oxidants. Long-term inhabitants of the most elevated regions of the world have undergone extensive physiological and/or genetic changes, particularly in the regulation of respiration and circulation, when compared to lowland populations. Genome scans have identified candidate genes involved in altitude adaption in the Tibetan Plateau and the Ethiopian highlands, in contrast to populations from the Andes, which have not been as intensively investigated. In the present study, we focused on three indigenous populations from Bolivia: two groups of Andean natives, Aymara and Quechua, and the low-altitude control group of Guarani from the Gran Chaco lowlands. Using pooled samples, we identified a number of SNPs exhibiting large allele frequency differences over 900,000 genotyped SNPs. A region in chromosome 10 (within the cytogenetic bands q22.3 and q23.1) was significantly differentiated between highland and lowland groups. We resequenced ~1.5 Mb surrounding the candidate region and identified strong signals of positive selection in the highland populations. A composite of multiple signals like test localized the signal to FAM213A and a related enhancer; the product of this gene acts as an antioxidant to lower oxidative stress and may help to maintain bone mass. The results suggest that positive selection on the enhancer might increase the expression of this antioxidant, and thereby prevent oxidative damage. In addition, the most significant signal in a relative extended haplotype homozygosity analysis was localized to the SFTPD gene, which encodes a surfactant pulmonary-associated protein involved in normal respiration and innate host defense. Our study thus identifies two novel candidate genes and associated pathways that may be involved in high-altitude adaptation in Andean populations. PMID:25961286

  10. Shallow gene pools in the high intertidal: extreme loss of genetic diversity in viviparous sea stars (Parvulastra).

    PubMed

    Keever, Carson C; Puritz, Jonathan B; Addison, Jason A; Byrne, Maria; Grosberg, Richard K; Toonen, Robert J; Hart, Michael W

    2013-10-23

    We document an extreme example of reproductive trait evolution that affects population genetic structure in sister species of Parvulastra cushion stars from Australia. Self-fertilization by hermaphroditic adults and brood protection of benthic larvae causes strong inbreeding and range-wide genetic poverty. Most samples were fixed for a single allele at nearly all nuclear loci; heterozygotes were extremely rare (0.18%); mitochondrial DNA sequences were more variable, but few populations shared haplotypes in common. Isolation-with-migration models suggest that these patterns are caused by population bottlenecks (relative to ancestral population size) and low gene flow. Loss of genetic diversity and low potential for dispersal between high-intertidal habitats may have dire consequences for extinction risk and potential for future adaptive evolution in response to climate and other selective agents. PMID:23925835

  11. Construction of the High-Density Genetic Linkage Map and Chromosome Map of Large Yellow Croaker (Larimichthys crocea).

    PubMed

    Ao, Jingqun; Li, Jia; You, Xinxin; Mu, Yinnan; Ding, Yang; Mao, Kaiqiong; Bian, Chao; Mu, Pengfei; Shi, Qiong; Chen, Xinhua

    2015-01-01

    High-density genetic maps are essential for genome assembly, comparative genomic analysis and fine mapping of complex traits. In this study, 31,191 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) evenly distributed across the large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea) genome were identified using restriction-site associated DNA sequencing (RAD-seq). Among them, 10,150 high-confidence SNPs were assigned to 24 consensus linkage groups (LGs). The total length of the genetic linkage map was 5451.3 cM with an average distance of 0.54 cM between loci. This represents the densest genetic map currently reported for large yellow croaker. Using 2889 SNPs to target specific scaffolds, we assigned 533 scaffolds, comprising 421.44 Mb (62.04%) of the large yellow croaker assembled sequence, to the 24 linkage groups. The mapped assembly scaffolds in large yellow croaker were used for genome synteny analyses against the stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) and medaka (Oryzias latipes). Greater synteny was observed between large yellow croaker and stickleback. This supports the hypothesis that large yellow croaker is more closely related to stickleback than to medaka. Moreover, 1274 immunity-related genes and 195 hypoxia-related genes were mapped to the 24 chromosomes of large yellow croaker. The integration of the high-resolution genetic map and the assembled sequence provides a valuable resource for fine mapping and positional cloning of quantitative trait loci associated with economically important traits in large yellow croaker. PMID:26540048

  12. Construction of the High-Density Genetic Linkage Map and Chromosome Map of Large Yellow Croaker (Larimichthys crocea)

    PubMed Central

    Ao, Jingqun; Li, Jia; You, Xinxin; Mu, Yinnan; Ding, Yang; Mao, Kaiqiong; Bian, Chao; Mu, Pengfei; Shi, Qiong; Chen, Xinhua

    2015-01-01

    High-density genetic maps are essential for genome assembly, comparative genomic analysis and fine mapping of complex traits. In this study, 31,191 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) evenly distributed across the large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea) genome were identified using restriction-site associated DNA sequencing (RAD-seq). Among them, 10,150 high-confidence SNPs were assigned to 24 consensus linkage groups (LGs). The total length of the genetic linkage map was 5451.3 cM with an average distance of 0.54 cM between loci. This represents the densest genetic map currently reported for large yellow croaker. Using 2889 SNPs to target specific scaffolds, we assigned 533 scaffolds, comprising 421.44 Mb (62.04%) of the large yellow croaker assembled sequence, to the 24 linkage groups. The mapped assembly scaffolds in large yellow croaker were used for genome synteny analyses against the stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) and medaka (Oryzias latipes). Greater synteny was observed between large yellow croaker and stickleback. This supports the hypothesis that large yellow croaker is more closely related to stickleback than to medaka. Moreover, 1274 immunity-related genes and 195 hypoxia-related genes were mapped to the 24 chromosomes of large yellow croaker. The integration of the high-resolution genetic map and the assembled sequence provides a valuable resource for fine mapping and positional cloning of quantitative trait loci associated with economically important traits in large yellow croaker. PMID:26540048

  13. Breeding loggerhead marine turtles Caretta caretta in Dry Tortugas National Park, USA, show high fidelity to diverse habitats near nesting beaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hart, Kristen M.; Zawada, David G.; Sartain, Autumn R.; Fujisaki, Ikuko

    2014-01-01

    We used satellite telemetry to identify in-water habitat used by individuals in the smallest North-west Atlantic subpopulation of adult nesting loggerhead turtles Caretta caretta during the breeding season. During 2010, 2011 and 2012 breeding periods, a total of 20 adult females used habitats proximal to nesting beaches with various levels of protection within Dry Tortugas National Park. We then used a rapid, high-resolution, digital imaging system to map habitat adjacent to nesting beaches, revealing the diversity and distribution of available benthic cover. Turtle behaviour showing measurable site-fidelity to these diverse habitats has implications for managing protected areas and human activities within them. Protecting diverse benthic areas adjacent to loggerhead turtle nesting beaches here and elsewhere could provide benefits for overall biodiversity conservation.

  14. Obesity in show cats.

    PubMed

    Corbee, R J

    2014-12-01

    Obesity is an important disease with a high prevalence in cats. Because obesity is related to several other diseases, it is important to identify the population at risk. Several risk factors for obesity have been described in the literature. A higher incidence of obesity in certain cat breeds has been suggested. The aim of this study was to determine whether obesity occurs more often in certain breeds. The second aim was to relate the increased prevalence of obesity in certain breeds to the official standards of that breed. To this end, 268 cats of 22 different breeds investigated by determining their body condition score (BCS) on a nine-point scale by inspection and palpation, at two different cat shows. Overall, 45.5% of the show cats had a BCS > 5, and 4.5% of the show cats had a BCS > 7. There were significant differences between breeds, which could be related to the breed standards. Most overweight and obese cats were in the neutered group. It warrants firm discussions with breeders and cat show judges to come to different interpretations of the standards in order to prevent overweight conditions in certain breeds from being the standard of beauty. Neutering predisposes for obesity and requires early nutritional intervention to prevent obese conditions. PMID:24612018

  15. Effects of the aspartic protease inhibitor from Lupinus bogotensis seeds on the growth and development of Hypothenemus hampei: an inhibitor showing high homology with storage proteins.

    PubMed

    Molina, Diana; Patiño, Luisa; Quintero, Mónica; Cortes, José; Bastos, Sara

    2014-02-01

    The coffee berry borer Hypothenemus hampei is a pest that causes great economic damage to coffee grains worldwide. Because the proteins consumed are digested by aspartic proteases in the insect's midgut, the inhibition of these proteases by transferring a gene encoding an aspartic protease inhibitor from Lupinus bogotensis Benth. to coffee plants could provide a promising strategy to control this pest. Five aspartic protease inhibitors from L. bogotensis (LbAPI) were accordingly purified and characterized. The gene encoding the L. bogotensis aspartic protease inhibitor (LbAPI), with the highest inhibitory activity against H. hampei, was expressed in Escherichia coli and the purified recombinant protein (rLbAPI), with a molecular mass of 15 kDa, was subsequently assessed for its ability to inhibit the aspartic protease activity present in the H. hampei midgut in vitro, as well as its effects on the growth and development of H. hampei in vivo. The in vitro experiments showed that rLbAPI was highly effective against aspartic proteases from H. hampei guts, with a half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 2.9 ?g. The in vivo experiments showed that the concentration of rLbAPI (w/w) in the artificial diet necessary to cause 50% mortality (LD50) of the larvae was 0.91%. The amino acid sequence of LbAPI had high homology (52-80%) to the seed storage proteins, vicilin and ?-conglutin, suggesting that this protein was generated by evolutionary events from a ?-conglutin precursor. Based on these results, LbAPI may have a dual function as storage protein, and as defense protein against H. hampei. These results provide a promising alternative to obtain a coffee plant resistant to H. hampei. PMID:24314849

  16. Pyrogallol[4]arenes show highly variable amphiphilic behavior at the air-water interface dependent upon side chain length and branching.

    PubMed

    Daschbach, Megan M; Kulikov, Oleg V; Long, Elizabeth F; Gokel, George W

    2011-08-01

    The behavior of pyrogallol[4]arenes (Pgs) substituted with normal and branched alkyl side chains at the air-water interface was examined on a Langmuir trough. The amphiphilic systems studied form stable monolayers when the straight chains are as short as n-propyl. Remarkably, n-propylpyrogallol[4]arene shows a behavior at the air-water interface that is indistinguishable from that of pyrogallolarenes bearing n-hexyl, n-nonyl, and n-dodecyl side chains. There is no report of amphiphilic side-chain-length dependence or Langmuir trough behavior for families of branched alkyl chain calixarenes or resorcinarenes. In the Pg family reported here, Pgs with straight chains (except for methyl and ethyl) behave very similarly to each other and very differently from symmetrical branched chain analogues having the same total number of carbon atoms. For example, the shortest possible branched side chain of a Pg, isopropyl-Pg, forms stable monolayers by a unique molecular subduction mechanism. Isopropyl-Pg (dimethylmethyl side chain, iPrPg) and 3-pentyl-Pg (diethylmethyl side chain, 3-pentylPg) both show high levels of organization, albeit by quite different mechanisms, at the air-water interface. Both iPrPg and 3-pentylPg differ in behavior from 4-heptylPg. Brewster angle microscopy revealed differences in organization of the Pgs that supports the mechanistic suggestions offered herein. PMID:21688332

  17. Very early/early relapses of acute lymphoblastic leukemia show unexpected changes of clonal markers and high heterogeneity in response to initial and relapse treatment.

    PubMed

    Eckert, C; Flohr, T; Koehler, R; Hagedorn, N; Moericke, A; Stanulla, M; Kirschner-Schwabe, R; Cario, G; Stackelberg, Av; Bartram, C R; Henze, G; Schrappe, M; Schrauder, A

    2011-08-01

    Minimal residual disease (MRD) quantified after induction treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) predicts risk of relapse. It has been assumed that early relapses derive from a residual population of leukemic cells, which is still present after induction and that relapsed disease will consequently be more resistant to treatment. To test these hypotheses, we performed a prospective study on patients treated according to the frontline-trial ALL-BFM 2000, which used MRD response for risk-group stratification. Patients (n=45) showed a median time to relapse of 1.5 years. In 89% of patients at least one T-cell-receptor/immunoglobulin gene rearrangement chosen for initial MRD quantification remained stable; however, at least one of the preferred markers for MRD stratification at relapse was different to diagnosis in 50% of patients. A similar proportion of very early, early and late relapses appeared to gain a marker at relapse although backtracking-analysis revealed that in 77% of cases, the gained markers were present as small sub-clones at initial diagnosis. Comparing initial and relapse MRD response to induction, 38% of patients showed a similar, 38% a better and 25% a poorer response after relapse. These data demonstrate an unexpectedly high clonal heterogeneity among very early/early relapses and challenge some current assumptions about relapsed ALL. PMID:21546902

  18. The First High-Density Genetic Map Construction in Tree Peony (Paeonia Sect. Moutan) using Genotyping by Specific-Locus Amplified Fragment Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Cai, Changfu; Cheng, Fang-Yun; Wu, Jing; Zhong, Yuan; Liu, Gaixiu

    2015-01-01

    Genetic linkage maps, permitting the elucidation of genome structure, are one of most powerful genomic tools to accelerate marker-assisted breeding. However, due to a lack of sufficient user-friendly molecular markers, no genetic linkage map has been developed for tree peonies (Paeonia Sect. Moutan), a group of important horticultural plants worldwide. Specific-locus amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) is a recent molecular marker development technology that enable the large-scale discovery and genotyping of sequence-based marker in genome-wide. In this study, we performed SLAF sequencing of an F1 population, derived from the cross P. ostti 'FenDanBai' × P. × suffruticosa 'HongQiao', to identify sufficient high-quality markers for the construction of high-density genetic linkage map in tree peonies. After SLAF sequencing, a total of 78 Gb sequencing data and 285,403,225 pair-end reads were generated. We detected 309,198 high-quality SLAFs from these data, of which 85,124 (27.5%) were polymorphic. Subsequently, 3518 of the polymorphic markers, which were successfully encoded in to Mendelian segregation types, and were in conformity with the criteria of high-quality markers, were defined as effective markers and used for genetic linkage mapping. Finally, we constructed an integrated genetic map, which comprised 1189 markers on the five linkage groups, and spanned 920.699 centiMorgans (cM) with an average inter-marker distance of 0.774 cM. There were 1115 'SNP-only' markers, 18 'InDel-only' markers, and 56 'SNP&InDel' markers on the map. Among these markers, 450 (37.85%) showed significant segregation distortion (P < 0.05). In conclusion, this investigation reported the first large-scale marker development and high-density linkage map construction for tree peony. The results of this study will serve as a solid foundation not only for marker-assisted breeding, but also for genome sequence assembly for tree peony. PMID:26010095

  19. The First High-Density Genetic Map Construction in Tree Peony (Paeonia Sect. Moutan) using Genotyping by Specific-Locus Amplified Fragment Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Changfu; Cheng, Fang-Yun; Wu, Jing; Zhong, Yuan; Liu, Gaixiu

    2015-01-01

    Genetic linkage maps, permitting the elucidation of genome structure, are one of most powerful genomic tools to accelerate marker-assisted breeding. However, due to a lack of sufficient user-friendly molecular markers, no genetic linkage map has been developed for tree peonies (Paeonia Sect. Moutan), a group of important horticultural plants worldwide. Specific-locus amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) is a recent molecular marker development technology that enable the large-scale discovery and genotyping of sequence-based marker in genome-wide. In this study, we performed SLAF sequencing of an F1 population, derived from the cross P. ostti ‘FenDanBai’ × P. × suffruticosa ‘HongQiao’, to identify sufficient high-quality markers for the construction of high-density genetic linkage map in tree peonies. After SLAF sequencing, a total of 78 Gb sequencing data and 285,403,225 pair-end reads were generated. We detected 309,198 high-quality SLAFs from these data, of which 85,124 (27.5%) were polymorphic. Subsequently, 3518 of the polymorphic markers, which were successfully encoded in to Mendelian segregation types, and were in conformity with the criteria of high-quality markers, were defined as effective markers and used for genetic linkage mapping. Finally, we constructed an integrated genetic map, which comprised 1189 markers on the five linkage groups, and spanned 920.699 centiMorgans (cM) with an average inter-marker distance of 0.774 cM. There were 1115 ‘SNP-only’ markers, 18 ‘InDel-only’ markers, and 56 ‘SNP&InDel’ markers on the map. Among these markers, 450 (37.85%) showed significant segregation distortion (P < 0.05). In conclusion, this investigation reported the first large-scale marker development and high-density linkage map construction for tree peony. The results of this study will serve as a solid foundation not only for marker-assisted breeding, but also for genome sequence assembly for tree peony. PMID:26010095

  20. Why do satellite imageries show exceptionally high chlorophyll in the Gulf of Mannar and the Palk Bay during the Norteast Monsoon?

    PubMed

    Jyothibabu, R; Madhu, N V; Jagadeesan, L; Anjusha, A; Mohan, Arya P; Ullas, N; Sudheesh, K; Karnan, C

    2014-11-01

    The Gulf of Mannar (GoM) and the Palk Bay (PB) are two least studied marine environments located between India and Sri Lanka. Exceptionally high chlorophyll a concentration in the GoM and the PB during the Northeast Monsoon (November-February) is a consistent feature in satellite imageries, which has been attributed to the intrusion of the Bay of Bengal (BoB) waters. The analyses of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and field chlorophyll data collected from 30 locations in the Indian sector of the GoM and the PB in January 2011 showed significant overestimations in the satellite data. This error was much higher in the PB (60-80 %) as compared to the GoM (18-28 %). The multivariate analyses evidenced that the exceptionally high satellite chlorophyll in the PB is contributed largely by turbidity, colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM), and bottom reflectance. The paper cautions that though MODIS is superior in estimating chlorophyll a in optically complex waters, there are still chances of overestimations in regions like the PB. PMID:25142503

  1. Male rats with same sex preference show high experimental anxiety and lack of anxiogenic-like effect of fluoxetine in the plus maze test.

    PubMed

    García-Cárdenas, Nallely; Olvera-Hernández, Sandra; Gómez-Quintanar, Blanca Nelly; Fernández-Guasti, Alonso

    2015-08-01

    Homosexual men show a 2-4 higher risk to suffer anxiety in comparison with heterosexuals. It is unknown if biological factors collaborate to increase such incidence. Fluoxetine produces differential brain activation in homosexuals as compared with heterosexuals, suggesting that it may produce a divergent behavioral effect dependant on sex-preference. The first aim was to evaluate experimental anxiety in male rats that show same-sex preference in the elevated plus maze (EPM). The second goal explored the putative differential effect of fluoxetine (10mg/kg) in male rats with female and same-sex preference in the EPM. To induce same-sex preference males were prenatally treated with letrozole (0.56?g/kg, 10-20 gestation days), while controls were males prenatally treated with letrozole that retain female-preference or which mothers received oil. In both groups we found animals with male preference, but the proportion was higher in males that prenatally received letrozole (10 vs. 27%). Males with same-sex preference spent less time and showed lower number of entries to the open arms of the EPM than males that prefer females, regardless of the prenatal treatment. In males with female preference, fluoxetine reduced the time spent and number of entries to the open arms that was absent in males with same-sex preference. These data suggest that biological factors contribute to the high levels of anxiety in subjects with same-sex preference and that fluoxetine in men may produce a divergent action depending on sexual orientation. PMID:26044966

  2. High prevalence of genetic variants previously associated with Brugada syndrome in new exome data.

    PubMed

    Risgaard, B; Jabbari, R; Refsgaard, L; Holst, A G; Haunsø, S; Sadjadieh, A; Winkel, B G; Olesen, M S; Tfelt-Hansen, J

    2013-11-01

    More than 300 variants in 12 genes have been associated with Brugada syndrome (BrS) which has a prevalence ranging between 1:2000 and 1:100,000. Until recently, there has been little knowledge regarding the distribution of genetic variations in the general population. This problem was partly solved, when exome data from the NHLI GO Exome Sequencing Project (ESP) was published. In this study, we aimed to report the prevalence of previously BrS-associated variants in the ESP population. We performed a search in ESP for variants previously associated with BrS. In addition, four variants in ESP were genotyped in a second Danish control population (n?=?536) with available electrocardiograms. In ESP, we identified 38 of 355 (10%) variants, distributed on 272 heterozygote carriers and two homozygote carriers. The genes investigated were on average screened in 6258 individuals. This corresponds to a surprisingly high genotype prevalence of 1:23 (274:6258). Genotyping the four common ESP-derived variants CACNA2D1 S709N, SCN5A F2004L, CACNB2 S143F, and CACNB2 T450I in the Danish controls, we found a genotype prevalence comparable with that found in ESP. We suggest that exome data are used in research, as an additive tool to predict the pathogenicity of variants in patients suspected for BrS. PMID:23414114

  3. High variance in reproductive success generates a false signature of a genetic bottleneck in populations of constant size: a simulation study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Demographic bottlenecks can severely reduce the genetic variation of a population or a species. Establishing whether low genetic variation is caused by a bottleneck or a constantly low effective number of individuals is important to understand a species’ ecology and evolution, and it has implications for conservation management. Recent studies have evaluated the power of several statistical methods developed to identify bottlenecks. However, the false positive rate, i.e. the rate with which a bottleneck signal is misidentified in demographically stable populations, has received little attention. We analyse this type of error (type I) in forward computer simulations of stable populations having greater than Poisson variance in reproductive success (i.e., variance in family sizes). The assumption of Poisson variance underlies bottleneck tests, yet it is commonly violated in species with high fecundity. Results With large variance in reproductive success (Vk ? 40, corresponding to a ratio between effective and census size smaller than 0.1), tests based on allele frequencies, allelic sizes, and DNA sequence polymorphisms (heterozygosity excess, M-ratio, and Tajima’s D test) tend to show erroneous signals of a bottleneck. Similarly, strong evidence of population decline is erroneously detected when ancestral and current population sizes are estimated with the model based method MSVAR. Conclusions Our results suggest caution when interpreting the results of bottleneck tests in species showing high variance in reproductive success. Particularly in species with high fecundity, computer simulations are recommended to confirm the occurrence of a population bottleneck. PMID:24131797

  4. Genetic Affinities between Trans-Oceanic Populations of Non-Buoyant Macroalgae in the High Latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Ceridwen I.; Zuccarello, Giuseppe C.; Spencer, Hamish G.; Salvatore, Laura C.; Garcia, Gabriella R.; Waters, Jonathan M.

    2013-01-01

    Marine biologists and biogeographers have long been puzzled by apparently non-dispersive coastal taxa that nonetheless have extensive transoceanic distributions. We here carried out a broad-scale phylogeographic study to test whether two widespread Southern Hemisphere species of non-buoyant littoral macroalgae are capable of long-distance dispersal. Samples were collected from along the coasts of southern Chile, New Zealand and several subAntarctic islands, with the focus on high latitude populations in the path of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current or West Wind Drift. We targeted two widespread littoral macroalgal species: the brown alga Adenocystisutricularis (Ectocarpales, Heterokontophyta) and the red alga Bostrychiaintricata (Ceramiales, Rhodophyta). Phylogenetic analyses were performed using partial mitochondrial (COI), chloroplast (rbcL) and ribosomal nuclear (LSU / 28S) DNA sequence data. Numerous deeply-divergent clades were resolved across all markers in each of the target species, but close phylogenetic relationships – even shared haplotypes – were observed among some populations separated by large oceanic distances. Despite not being particularly buoyant, both Adenocystisutricularis and Bostrychiaintricata thus show genetic signatures of recent dispersal across vast oceanic distances, presumably by attachment to floating substrata such as wood or buoyant macroalgae. PMID:23894421

  5. High-density lipoprotein deficiency in genetically modified mice deeply affects skin morphology: A structural and ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Arnaboldi, Francesca; Busnelli, Marco; Cornaghi, Laura; Manzini, Stefano; Parolini, Cinzia; Dellera, Federica; Ganzetti, Giulia Sara; Sirtori, Cesare Riccardo; Donetti, Elena; Chiesa, Giulia

    2015-10-15

    Cutaneous lipids, endogenously synthetized and transported by lipoproteins, play a pivotal role in maintaining skin barrier. An impairment of extracutaneous lipid trafficking leads to the development of xanthomas, mostly arising in hyperlipidemic patients, but also in subjects with high-density lipoprotein (HDL) deficiency. The aim of this work was to evaluate, in a genetically modified mouse model, lacking two protein components of HDL particles, apolipoprotein(apo)E and apoA-I, the effect of HDL deficiency on skin morphology. Control mice (C57BL/6), apoE deficient mice (EKO), apoA-I deficient mice (A-IKO) and apoA-I/apoE double knockout mice (A-IKO/EKO) were maintained on a low-fat/low-cholesterol diet up to 30 weeks of age. At sacrifice, skin biopsies were processed for light (LM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Whereas the skin of EKO, A-IKO, and C57BL/6 mice was comparable, LM analysis in A-IKO/EKO mice showed an increase in dermal thickness and the presence of foam cells and T lymphocytes in reticular dermis. TEM analysis revealed the accumulation of cholesterol clefts in the papillary dermis and of cholesterol crystals within foam cells. In conclusion, A-IKO/EKO mice represent an experimental model for investigating the cutaneous phenotype of human HDL deficiency, thus mimicking a condition in which human xanthomatous lesions can develop. PMID:26241937

  6. Genetic evidence supports larval retention in the Western Caribbean for an invertebrate with high dispersal capability ( Ophiothrix suensonii: Echinodermata, Ophiuroidea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, V. P.; DeBiasse, M. B.; Shivji, M. S.

    2015-03-01

    The brittle star Ophiothrix suensonii is a common coral reef sponge commensal with high dispersal potential. Here, we utilize COI sequence data from 264 O. suensonii individuals collected from 10 locations throughout Florida and the Caribbean to investigate dispersal dynamics and demographic history. Locations separated by up to 1,700 km lacked genetic differentiation, confirming the ability for long-range dispersal. However, significant differentiation was detected among other regions. Samples from Utila, Honduras showed the greatest differentiation, suggesting that the circulation of the Mesoamerican gyre could be a significant factor restricting gene flow in this region. Demographic analyses provided strong evidence for a population expansion, possibly out of Florida, through the Caribbean, and into Honduras, which commenced in the early Pleistocene. However, the presence of a clade of rare haplotypes, which split much earlier (mid-Pliocene), indicates that O. suensonii persisted long before its recent expansion, suggesting a cyclic history of population contraction and expansion. Finally, patterns of gene flow are not concordant with contemporary surface currents; rather, they reflect historical movements possibly linked with changes in circulation during periods of Pleistocene climate change.

  7. Genetic Convergence in the Adaptation of Dogs and Humans to the High-Altitude Environment of the Tibetan Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guo-Dong; Fan, Ruo-Xi; Zhai, Weiwei; Liu, Fei; Wang, Lu; Zhong, Li; Wu, Hong; Yang, He-Chuan; Wu, Shi-Fang; Zhu, Chun-Ling; Li, Yan; Gao, Yun; Ge, Ri-Li; Wu, Chung-I; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2014-01-01

    The high-altitude hypoxic environment represents one of the most extreme challenges for mammals. Previous studies of humans on the Tibetan plateau and in the Andes Mountains have identified statistical signatures of selection in different sets of loci. Here, we first measured the hemoglobin levels in village dogs from Tibet and those from Chinese lowlands. We found that the hemoglobin levels are very similar between the two groups, suggesting that Tibetan dogs might share similar adaptive strategies as the Tibetan people. Through a whole-genome sequencing approach, we have identified EPAS1 and HBB as candidate genes for the hypoxic adaptation on the Tibetan plateau. The population genetic analysis shows a significant convergence between humans and dogs in Tibet. The similarities in the sets of loci that exhibit putative signatures of selection and the hemoglobin levels between humans and dogs of the same environment, but not between human populations in different regions, suggests an extraordinary landscape of convergent evolution between human beings and their best friend on the Tibetan plateau. PMID:25091388

  8. Incorporating Known Genetic Variants Does Not Improve the Accuracy of PSA Testing to Identify High Risk Prostate Cancer on Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Rebecca; Martin, Richard M.; Evans, David M.; Tilling, Kate; Davey Smith, George; Kemp, John P.; Lane, J. Athene; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Neal, David E.; Donovan, Jenny L.; Metcalfe, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing is a widely accepted screening method for prostate cancer, but with low specificity at thresholds giving good sensitivity. Previous research identified four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) principally associated with circulating PSA levels rather than with prostate cancer risk (TERT rs2736098, FGFR2 rs10788160, TBX3 rs11067228, KLK3 rs17632542). Removing the genetic contribution to PSA levels may improve the ability of the remaining biologically-determined variation in PSA to discriminate between high and low risk of progression within men with identified prostate cancer. We investigate whether incorporating information on the PSA-SNPs improves the discrimination achieved by a single PSA threshold in men with raised PSA levels. Materials and Methods Men with PSA between 3-10ng/mL and histologically-confirmed prostate cancer were categorised as high or low risk of progression (Low risk: Gleason score?6 and stage T1-T2a; High risk: Gleason score 7–10 or stage T2C). We used the combined genetic effect of the four PSA-SNPs to calculate a genetically corrected PSA risk score. We calculated the Area under the Curve (AUC) to determine how well genetically corrected PSA risk scores distinguished men at high risk of progression from low risk men. Results The analysis includes 868 men with prostate cancer (Low risk: 684 (78.8%); High risk: 184 (21.2%)). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves indicate that including the 4 PSA-SNPs does not improve the performance of measured PSA as a screening tool for high/low risk prostate cancer (measured PSA level AU C = 59.5% (95% CI: 54.7,64.2) vs additionally including information from the 4 PSA-SNPs AUC = 59.8% (95% CI: 55.2,64.5) (p-value = 0.40)). Conclusion We demonstrate that genetically correcting PSA for the combined genetic effect of four PSA-SNPs, did not improve discrimination between high and low risk prostate cancer in men with raised PSA levels (3-10ng/mL). Replication and gaining more accurate estimates of the effects of the 4 PSA-SNPs and additional variants associated with PSA levels and not prostate cancer could be obtained from subsequent GWAS from larger prospective studies. PMID:26431041

  9. Identification of genetic variants of lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase in individuals with high HDL?C levels.

    PubMed

    Naseri, Mohsen; Hedayati, Mehdi; Daneshpour, Maryam Sadat; Bandarian, Fatemeh; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2014-07-01

    Among the most common lipid abnormalities, a low level of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL?C) is one of the first risk factors identified for coronary heart disease. Lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) has a pivotal role in the formation and maturation of HDL-C and in reverse cholesterol transport. To identify genetic loci associated with low HDL-C in a population-based cohort in Tehran, the promoter, coding regions and exon/intron boundaries of LCAT were amplified and sequenced in consecutive individuals (n=150) who had extremely low or high HDL-C levels but no other major lipid abnormalities. A total of 14 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified, of which 10 were found to be novel; the L393L, S232T and 16:67977696 C>A polymorphisms have been previously reported in the SNP Database (as rs5923, rs4986970 and rs11860115, respectively) and the non-synonymous R47M mutation has been reported in the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSM972635). Three of the SNPs identified in the present study (position 6,531 in exon 5, position 6,696 in exon 5 and position 5,151 in exon 1) led to an amino acid substitution. The most common variants were L393L (4886C/T) in exon 6 and Q177E, a novel mutation, in exon 5, and the prevalence of the heterozygous genotype of these two SNPs was significantly higher in the low HDL-C groups. Univariate conditional logistic regression odds ratios (ORs) were nominally significant for Q177E (OR, 5.64; P=0.02; 95% confidence interval, 1.2?26.2). However, this finding was attenuated following adjustment for confounders. Further studies using a larger sample size may enhance the determination of the role of these SNPs. PMID:24789697

  10. High resolution genetic mapping by genome sequencing reveals genome duplication and tetraploid genetic structure of the diploid Miscanthus sinensis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xue-Feng; Jensen, Elaine; Alexandrov, Nickolai; Troukhan, Maxim; Zhang, Liping; Thomas-Jones, Sian; Farrar, Kerrie; Clifton-Brown, John; Donnison, Iain; Swaller, Timothy; Flavell, Richard

    2012-01-01

    We have created a high-resolution linkage map of Miscanthus sinensis, using genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS), identifying all 19 linkage groups for the first time. The result is technically significant since Miscanthus has a very large and highly heterozygous genome, but has no or limited genomics information to date. The composite linkage map containing markers from both parental linkage maps is composed of 3,745 SNP markers spanning 2,396 cM on 19 linkage groups with a 0.64 cM average resolution. Comparative genomics analyses of the M. sinensis composite linkage map to the genomes of sorghum, maize, rice, and Brachypodium distachyon indicate that sorghum has the closest syntenic relationship to Miscanthus compared to other species. The comparative results revealed that each pair of the 19 M. sinensis linkages aligned to one sorghum chromosome, except for LG8, which mapped to two sorghum chromosomes (4 and 7), presumably due to a chromosome fusion event after genome duplication. The data also revealed several other chromosome rearrangements relative to sorghum, including two telomere-centromere inversions of the sorghum syntenic chromosome 7 in LG8 of M. sinensis and two paracentric inversions of sorghum syntenic chromosome 4 in LG7 and LG8 of M. sinensis. The results clearly demonstrate, for the first time, that the diploid M. sinensis is tetraploid origin consisting of two sub-genomes. This complete and high resolution composite linkage map will not only serve as a useful resource for novel QTL discoveries, but also enable informed deployment of the wealth of existing genomics resources of other species to the improvement of Miscanthus as a high biomass energy crop. In addition, it has utility as a reference for genome sequence assembly for the forthcoming whole genome sequencing of the Miscanthus genus. PMID:22439001

  11. Metapopulations in temporary streams - the role of drought-flood cycles in promoting high genetic diversity in a critically endangered freshwater fish and its consequences for the future.

    PubMed

    Sousa-Santos, Carla; Robalo, Joana I; Francisco, Sara M; Carrapato, Carlos; Cardoso, Ana Cristina; Doadrio, Ignacio

    2014-11-01

    Genetic factors have direct and indirect impacts in the viability of endangered species. Assessing their genetic diversity levels and population structure is thus fundamental for conservation and management. In this paper we use mitochondrial and nuclear markers to address phylogeographic and demographic data on the critically endangered Anaecypris hispanica, using a broad sampling set which covered its known distribution area in the Iberian Peninsula. Our results showed that the populations of A. hispanica are strongly differentiated (high and significant ?ST and FST values, corroborated by the results from AMOVA and SAMOVA) and genetically diversified. We suggest that the restricted gene flow between populations may have been potentiated by ecological, hydrological and anthropogenic causes. Bayesian skyline plots revealed a signal for expansion for all populations (tMRCA between 68kya and 1.33Mya) and a genetic diversity latitudinal gradient was detected between the populations from the Upper (more diversified) and the Lower (less diversified) Guadiana river basin. We postulate a Pleistocenic westwards colonization route for A. hispanica in the Guadiana river basin, which is in agreement with the tempo and mode of paleoevolution of this drainage. The colonization of River Guadalquivir around 60kya with migrants from the Upper Guadiana, most likely by stream capture, is also suggested. This study highlights the view that critically endangered species facing range retreats (about 47% of its known populations have disappeared in the last 15years) are not necessarily small and genetically depleted. However, the extinction risk is not negligible since A. hispanica faces the combined effect of several deterministic and stochastic negative factors and, moreover, recolonization events after localized extinctions are very unlikely to occur due to the strong isolation of populations and to the patchily ecologically-conditioned distribution of fish. The inferred species distribution models highlight the significant contribution of temperature seasonality and isothermality to A. hispanica occurrence in Guadiana environments and emphasize the importance of stable climatic conditions for the preservation of this species. Given the strong population structure, high percentage of private haplotypes and virtual absence of inter-basin gene flow we suggest that each A. hispanica population should be considered as an independent Operational Conservation Unit and that ex-situ and in-situ actions should be conducted in parallel to allow for the long-term survival of the species and the preservation of the genetic integrity of its populations. PMID:25132127

  12. Genetic Characterization of Toxoplasma gondii Revealed Highly Diverse Genotypes for Isolates from Newborns with Congenital Toxoplasmosis in Southeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Ana Carolina Aguiar Vasconcelos; Andrade, Gláucia Manzan; Costa, Júlia Gatti Ladeia; Pinheiro, Breno Veloso; Vasconcelos-Santos, Daniel Vitor; Ferreira, Adriana Melo; Su, Chunlei; Januário, José Nélio

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies of Toxoplasma gondii isolates from animals in Brazil have revealed high genetic diversity. Many of these isolates are virulent to mice. It is speculated that these isolates may also be virulent to humans. However, there is very limited data regarding T. gondii strains from human infection. Therefore, it is not clear whether there is any association between parasite genotypes and disease phenotypes. In this study, a total of 27 T. gondii strains were isolated from humans with congenital toxoplasmosis in Minas Gerais state, Brazil. The genetic variability was assessed by restricted fragment length polymorphism in 11 loci (SAG1, 5? plus 3? SAG2, alternative [alt.] SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1, and Apico). Genetic analysis of 24 strains revealed 14 different genotypes, including 7 previously identified from animals and 7 new types. The widespread genotype BrII accounted for 29% (7/24) of the isolates and was the dominant genotype involved in this study. This is the first report of genotyping of T. gondii isolates obtained from blood samples from newborns with congenital toxoplasmosis. Genotypic characterization of these isolates suggests high genetic diversity of T. gondii in this human population in Brazil. Future studies are needed to determine the source of contamination of this human population. PMID:23284022

  13. Genetic differentiation in spite of high gene flow in the dominant rainforest tree of southeastern Australia, Nothofagus cunninghamii.

    PubMed

    Duncan, C J; Worth, J R P; Jordan, G J; Jones, R C; Vaillancourt, R E

    2016-01-01

    Nothofagus cunninghamii is a long-lived, wind-pollinated tree species that dominates the cool temperate rainforests of southeastern Australia. The species' distribution is more or less continuous in western Tasmania but is fragmented elsewhere. However, it is unknown whether this fragmentation has affected the species' genetic architecture. Thus, we examined N. cunninghamii using 12 nuclear microsatellites and 633 individuals from 18 populations spanning the species' natural range. Typical of wind-pollinated trees, there was low range-wide genetic structure (FST=0.04) consistent with significant gene flow across most of the species' range. However, gene flow was not high enough to overcome the effects of drift across some disjunctions. Victorian populations (separated from Tasmania by the 240?km wide Bass Strait) formed a genetic group distinct from Tasmanian populations, had lower diversity (mean allelic richness (Ar)=5.4 in Victoria versus 6.9 in Tasmania) and were significantly more differentiated from one another than those in Tasmania (FST=0.045 in Victoria versus 0.012 in Tasmania). Evidence for bottlenecking was found in small populations that were at least 20?km from other populations. Interestingly, we found little divergence in microsatellite markers between the extremes of genetically based morphological and physiological altitudinal clines suggesting adaptive differentiation is strongly driven by selection because it is likely to be occurring in the presence of gene flow. Even though the cool temperate rainforests of Australia are highly relictual, the species is relatively robust to population fragmentation due to high levels of genetic diversity and gene flow, especially in Tasmania. PMID:26350630

  14. An ultra-high throughput mutational spectrometer for human genetic diagnostics

    E-print Network

    Forest, Craig Richard, 1978-

    2007-01-01

    Discovering the genetic causes of common diseases may require scanning for mutations in all of the genes in a million people, a significant undertaking. Such discoveries would revolutionize biotechnology, potentially ...

  15. High-performance genetically targetable optical neural silencing by proton pumps

    E-print Network

    Chow, Brian Y.

    The ability to silence the activity of genetically specified neurons in a temporally precise fashion would provide the opportunity to investigate the causal role of specific cell classes in neural computations, behaviours ...

  16. Using a hybrid Monte Carlo/Genetic Algorithm Slip Estimator to produce high resolution models of paleoearthquakes from geodetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, A.; McCloskey, J.; Nalbant, S. S.; Simao, N.; Murphy, S.; NicBhloscaidh, M.; Steacy, S.

    2013-12-01

    Identifying fault sections where slip deficits have accumulated may provide a means for understanding sequences of large megathrust earthquakes. Stress accumulated during the interseismic period on locked sections of an active fault is stored as potential slip. Where this potential slip remains unreleased during earthquakes, a slip deficit can be said to have accrued. Analysis of the spatial distribution of slip during antecedent events along the fault will show where the locked plate has spent its stored slip and indicate where the potential for large events remains. The location of recent earthquakes and their distribution of slip can be estimated instrumentally. To develop the idea of long-term slip-deficit modelling it is necessary to constrain the size and distribution of slip for pre-instrumental events dating back hundreds of years covering more than one ';seismic cycle'. This requires the exploitation of proxy sources of data. Coral microatolls, growing in the intertidal zone of the outer island arc of the Sunda trench, present the possibility of producing high resolution reconstructions of slip for a number of pre-instrumental earthquakes. Their growth is influenced by tectonic flexing of the continental plate beneath them allows them to act as long term geodetic recorders. However, the sparse distribution of data available using coral geodesy results in a under determined problem with non-unique solutions. Instead of producing one definite model satisfying the observed corals displacements, a Monte Carlo Slip Estimator based on a Genetic Algorithm (MCSE-GA) accelerating the rate of convergence is used to identify a suite of models consistent with the data. Successive iterations of the MCSE-GA sample different displacements at each coral location, from within the spread of associated uncertainties, producing a catalog of models from the full range of possibilities. The suite of best slip distributions are weighted according to their fitness and stacked to produce a final estimate of the distribution of slip for a particular earthquake. Examination of the slip values in the stacked models allows areas of high confidence to be identified where the standard deviation is low. Similarly, areas of low confidence will be found where standard deviations are high. These high resolution models can be used to reconstruct a history of slip along the fault, both identifying and quantifying of slip deficits and constraining confidence in the accuracy of the modelled information. This presentation will demonstrate the ability of the MCSE-GA to produce accurate models of slip for instrumentally recorded earthquakes and show estimates for slip during paleoearthquakes along the Sunda Megathrust.

  17. High genetic differentiation among French populations of the Orsini's viper (Vipera ursinii ursinii) based on mitochondrial and microsatellite data: implications for conservation management.

    PubMed

    Ferchaud, Anne-Laure; Lyet, Arnaud; Cheylan, Marc; Arnal, Véronique; Baron, Jean-Pierre; Montgelard, Claudine; Ursenbacher, Sylvain

    2011-01-01

    The Orsini's viper (Vipera ursinii) is one of the most threatened snakes in Europe due to its highly fragmented distribution and specific open environment (steppic habitat) requirement. French populations are isolated on top of mountain massifs of the southern Prealps/Alps. Mitochondrial sequences (cytochrome b) and 6 microsatellite loci have been used to estimate the levels of genetic diversity and isolation within and among 11 French fragmented populations (a total of 157 individuals). Eleven cytochrome b haplotypes with a limited divergence were observed (mean divergence between haplotypes: 0.31%). However, we detected considerable genetic differentiation among populations (global F(ST) = 0.76 and 0.26 for mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, respectively). Results indicate that 3 populations possibly went through a bottleneck and 1 population showed low genetic diversity compared with the others. Although a significant isolation by distance was detected for both markers, strong differentiation was also observed between geographically close populations, probably due to the ragged landscape that constitutes a serious barrier to gene flow owing to the limited dispersal capability of the viper. Despite some discrepancies between the 2 markers, 8 Management Units have been identified and should be considered for future management projects. PMID:20841316

  18. MEG-measured auditory steady-state oscillations show high test-retest reliability: A sensor and source-space analysis.

    PubMed

    Tan, H-R M; Gross, J; Uhlhaas, P J

    2015-11-15

    Stability of oscillatory signatures across magnetoencephalography (MEG) measurements is an important prerequisite for basic and clinical research that has been insufficiently addressed. Here, we evaluated the test-retest reliability of auditory steady-state responses (ASSRs) over two MEG sessions. The study required participants (N=13) to detect the rare occurrence of pure tones interspersed within a stream of 5Hz or 40Hz amplitude-modulated (AM) tones. Intraclass correlations (ICC; Shrout and Fleiss, 1979) were derived to assess stability of spectral power changes and the inter-trial phase coherence (ITPC) of task-elicited neural responses. ASSRs source activity was estimated using eLORETA beamforming from bilateral auditory cortex. ASSRs to 40Hz AM stimuli evoked stronger power modulation and phase-locking than 5Hz stimulation. Overall, spectral power and ITPC values at both sensor- and source-level showed robust ICC values. Notably, ITPC measures yielded higher ICCs (~0.86-0.96) between sessions compared to the assessment of spectral power change (~0.61-0.82). Our data indicate that spectral modulations and phase consistency of ASSRs in MEG data are highly reproducible, providing support for MEG-measured oscillatory parameters in basic and clinical research. PMID:26216274

  19. Three glycosylated polypeptides secreted by several embryogenic cell cultures of pine show highly specific serological affinity to antibodies directed against the wheat germin apoprotein monomer.

    PubMed Central

    Domon, J M; Dumas, B; Lainé, E; Meyer, Y; David, A; David, H

    1995-01-01

    Embryogenic tissues of Pinus caribaea Morelet var hondurensis produce extracellular proteins; among them germins have been identified. Two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by electroblotting onto a polyvinylidene difluoride membrane allowed isolation and N-terminal amino acid sequencing of extracellular GP111, which is present within the five embryogenic cell lines studied. The amino acid sequence showed strong homologies with the sequences of germins deduced from cDNA sequencing, starting at the same amino acid position but one, compared with other sequences of mature germins deduced from protein sequencing. Immunoblots of embryogenic and nonembryogenic extracellular proteins indicated that the polypeptide GP111 plus two others with similar relative molecular mass values are present in embryogenic cell lines but not in nonembryogenic ones. They were recognized by an antiserum raised against the nonglycosylated monomer of wheat germin. The cross-reaction between pine and wheat apoproteins was highly specific. An antiserum against the glycosylated pentameric germin-like protein (an oxalate oxidase) of barley cross-reacted with all three, as well as with several other glycosylated polypeptides. PMID:7784502

  20. Construction of a High-Density Genetic Map and Quantitative Trait Locus Mapping in the Sea Cucumber Apostichopus japonicus

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Meilin; Li, Yangping; Jing, Jing; Mu, Chuang; Du, Huixia; Dou, Jinzhuang; Mao, Junxia; Li, Xue; Jiao, Wenqian; Wang, Yangfan; Hu, Xiaoli; Wang, Shi; Wang, Ruijia; Bao, Zhenmin

    2015-01-01

    Genetic linkage maps are critical and indispensable tools in a wide range of genetic and genomic research. With the advancement of genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) methods, the construction of a high-density and high-resolution linkage maps has become achievable in marine organisms lacking sufficient genomic resources, such as echinoderms. In this study, high-density, high-resolution genetic map was constructed for a sea cucumber species, Apostichopus japonicus, utilizing the 2b-restriction site-associated DNA (2b-RAD) method. A total of 7839 markers were anchored to the linkage map with the map coverage of 99.57%, to our knowledge, this is the highest marker density among echinoderm species. QTL mapping and association analysis consistently captured one growth-related QTL located in a 5?cM region of linkage group (LG) 5. An annotated candidate gene, retinoblastoma-binding protein 5 (RbBP5), which has been reported to be an important regulator of cell proliferation, was recognized in the QTL region. This linkage map represents a powerful tool for research involving both fine-scale QTL mapping and marker assisted selection (MAS), and will facilitate chromosome assignment and improve the whole-genome assembly of sea cucumber in the future. PMID:26439740

  1. Construction of a High-Density Genetic Map and Quantitative Trait Locus Mapping in the Sea Cucumber Apostichopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Tian, Meilin; Li, Yangping; Jing, Jing; Mu, Chuang; Du, Huixia; Dou, Jinzhuang; Mao, Junxia; Li, Xue; Jiao, Wenqian; Wang, Yangfan; Hu, Xiaoli; Wang, Shi; Wang, Ruijia; Bao, Zhenmin

    2015-01-01

    Genetic linkage maps are critical and indispensable tools in a wide range of genetic and genomic research. With the advancement of genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) methods, the construction of a high-density and high-resolution linkage maps has become achievable in marine organisms lacking sufficient genomic resources, such as echinoderms. In this study, high-density, high-resolution genetic map was constructed for a sea cucumber species, Apostichopus japonicus, utilizing the 2b-restriction site-associated DNA (2b-RAD) method. A total of 7839 markers were anchored to the linkage map with the map coverage of 99.57%, to our knowledge, this is the highest marker density among echinoderm species. QTL mapping and association analysis consistently captured one growth-related QTL located in a 5?cM region of linkage group (LG) 5. An annotated candidate gene, retinoblastoma-binding protein 5 (RbBP5), which has been reported to be an important regulator of cell proliferation, was recognized in the QTL region. This linkage map represents a powerful tool for research involving both fine-scale QTL mapping and marker assisted selection (MAS), and will facilitate chromosome assignment and improve the whole-genome assembly of sea cucumber in the future. PMID:26439740

  2. The genetic signatures of pediatric high-grade glioma: no longer a one-act play

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Alexander K.; Baker, Suzanne J.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in understanding pediatric high-grade glioma (pHGG) genetics have revealed key differences between pediatric and adult high-grade gliomas (aHGGs), and have uncovered unique molecular drivers among subgroups within pHGG. The three core aHGG pathways, the receptor tyrosine kinase(RTK)/Ras/Phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), p53, and retinoblastoma (RB) networks, are also disrupted in pHGG, but they exhibit a different spectrum of effectors targeted by mutation. There are also similarities and differences in the genomic landscape of diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) and pediatric non-brainstem high-grade glioma (pNBS-HGG). In 2012, histone H3 mutations were identified in nearly 80% of DIPGs and ?35% of pNBS-HGG. These were the first reports of histone mutations in human cancer, implicating novel biology in pediatric gliomagenesis. Additionally, DIPG and midline pNBS-HGG vary in the frequency and specific histone H3 amino acid substitution compared to pNBS-HGGs arising in the cerebral hemispheres, demonstrating a molecular difference among pHGG subgroups. The gene expression signatures as well as DNA methylation signatures of these tumors also carry distinctive signatures, reflecting a combination of the driving mutations and the developmental context from which they arise. These data collectively highlight unique selective pressures within the developing brainstem and solidify DIPG as a specific molecular and biological entity among pHGGs. Emerging studies continue to identify novel mutations that distinguish subgroups of pHGG. The molecular heterogeneity among pHGGs will undoubtedly have clinical implications moving forward. The discovery of unique oncogenic drivers is a critical first step in providing patients with appropriate, targeted therapies. Despite these insights, our vantage point has been largely limited to an in-depth analysis of protein coding sequences. Given the clear importance of histone mutations in pHGG, it will be interesting to see how aberrant epigenetic regulation contributes to tumorigenesis in the pediatric context. New mechanistic insights may allow for the identification of distinct vulnerabilities in this devastating spectrum of childhood tumors. PMID:25219808

  3. Genetic interaction analysis of point mutations enables interrogation of gene function at a residue-level resolution: exploring the applications of high-resolution genetic interaction mapping of point mutations.

    PubMed

    Braberg, Hannes; Moehle, Erica A; Shales, Michael; Guthrie, Christine; Krogan, Nevan J

    2014-07-01

    We have achieved a residue-level resolution of genetic interaction mapping - a technique that measures how the function of one gene is affected by the alteration of a second gene - by analyzing point mutations. Here, we describe how to interpret point mutant genetic interactions, and outline key applications for the approach, including interrogation of protein interaction interfaces and active sites, and examination of post-translational modifications. Genetic interaction analysis has proven effective for characterizing cellular processes; however, to date, systematic high-throughput genetic interaction screens have relied on gene deletions or knockdowns, which limits the resolution of gene function analysis and poses problems for multifunctional genes. Our point mutant approach addresses these issues, and further provides a tool for in vivo structure-function analysis that complements traditional biophysical methods. We also discuss the potential for genetic interaction mapping of point mutations in human cells and its application to personalized medicine. PMID:24842270

  4. Detecting genetic introgression: high levels of intersubspecific recombination found in Xylella fastidiosa in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nunney, Leonard; Yuan, Xiaoli; Bromley, Robin E; Stouthamer, Richard

    2012-07-01

    Documenting the role of novel mutation versus homologous recombination in bacterial evolution, and especially in the invasion of new hosts, is central to understanding the long-term dynamics of pathogenic bacteria. We used multilocus sequence typing (MLST) to study this issue in Xylella fastidiosa subsp. pauca from Brazil, a bacterium causing citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC) and coffee leaf scorch (CLS). All 55 citrus isolates typed (plus one coffee isolate) defined three similar sequence types (STs) dominated by ST11 (85%), while the remaining 22 coffee isolates defined two STs, mainly ST16 (74%). This low level of variation masked unusually large allelic differences (>1% divergence with no intermediates) at five loci (leuA, petC, malF, cysG, and holC). We developed an introgression test to detect whether these large differences were due to introgression via homologous recombination from another X. fastidiosa subspecies. Using additional sequencing around these loci, we established that the seven randomly chosen MLST targets contained seven regions of introgression totaling 2,172 bp of 4,161 bp (52%), only 409 bp (10%) of which were detected by other recombination tests. This high level of introgression suggests the hypothesis that X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca became pathogenic on citrus and coffee (crops cultivated in Brazil for several hundred years) only recently after it gained genetic variation via intersubspecific recombination, facilitating a switch from native hosts. A candidate donor is the subspecies infecting plum in the region since 1935 (possibly X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex). This hypothesis predicts that nonrecombinant native X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca (not yet isolated) does not cause disease in citrus or coffee. PMID:22544234

  5. Genetic alterations of chromosomes, p53 and p16 genes in low- and high-grade bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    ABAT, DENIZ; DEMIRHAN, OSMAN; INANDIKLIOGLU, NIHAL; TUNC, ERDAL; ERDOGAN, SEYDA; TASTEMIR, DENIZ; USLU, INAYET NUR; TANSUG, ZUHTU

    2014-01-01

    A majority of patients with bladder cancer present with superficial disease and subsequently, some patients show progression to muscle invasive or metastatic disease. Bladder cancer has a complex genetic process and identification of the genetic alterations which occur during progression may lead to the understanding of the nature of the disease and provide the possibility of early treatment. The aim of the present study was to compare the structural and numerical chromosomal differences and changes in the p16 and p53 genes between low-grade (LG) and high-grade (HG) bladder cancer (BC) using cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic methods. Between March 2009 and March 2010, cytogenetic analyses were carried out on tumor and blood samples in 34 patients with transitional cell type BC, and on blood samples of 34 healthy patients as a control group. Fluorescence in situ hybridization probes for the p16 and p53 genes were also used to screen the alterations in these genes in 32 patients with BC. The patients were divided into two groups (LG and HG) and the findings were compared. A total of 11 (32.3%) patients exhibited LGBC, 22 (64.7%) exhibited HGBC and one (3%) patient exhibited carcinoma in situ. There were no differences between the LGBC and HGBC groups according to the number of chromosomal aberrations (P=0.714); however, differences between alterations of the p16 and p53 genes were significant (P=0.002 and P=0.039). Almost all structural abnormalities were found to be located to the 1q21, 1q32, 3p21 and 5q31 regions in patients with HG tumors. In conclusion, the p16 and p53 genes were altered more prominently in patients with HG tumors compared with LG tumors. The structural abnormalities in the 1q21, 1q32, 3p21 and 5q31 regions were observed more frequently in patients with HG tumors. These regions may play significant roles in the progression of BC, but further studies are required to find candidate genes for a panel of BC. PMID:24959214

  6. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practice Regarding Genetic Testing and Genetic Counselors in Jordan: A Population-Based Survey.

    PubMed

    Ahram, Mamoun; Soubani, Majd; Abu Salem, Lana; Saker, Haneen; Ahmad, Muayyad

    2015-12-01

    Genetic testing has a potential in the prevention of genetic diseases, particularly in communities with high rates of consanguineous marriage. Therefore, knowledge, practice, and attitudes of the public in Jordan regarding genetic testing were investigated. Individuals (N?=?3,196) were questioned about the concepts of genetic testing and genetic counselors, if they underwent any genetic tests, the type of test, the method of consenting to the test, as well as their level of satisfaction with the privacy of the genetic testing service. The likelihood of pursuing predictive genetic testing for cancer was also investigated. Although almost 70 % of respondents knew the term "genetic testing," only 18 % had undergone genetic testing, primarily the mandatory premarital test. In addition, there was a lack of general knowledge about genetic counselors. Many of those who had genetic testing (45 %) indicated they did not go through a consent process, and a lack of consent was significantly related to dissatisfaction with the privacy of the service. Approximately 55 % of respondents indicated they would potentially pursue predictive genetic testing for cancer. Going for routine health checkups was not significantly correlated with either actual or potential uptake of genetic testing, suggesting health care providers do not play an influential role in patients' testing decisions. Our results show a gap between the knowledge and uptake of genetic testing and may help to guide the design of effective strategies to initiate successful genetic counseling and testing services. PMID:25851945

  7. Prevalent Ciliate Symbiosis on Copepods: High Genetic Diversity and Wide Distribution Detected Using Small Subunit Ribosomal RNA Gene

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhiling; Liu, Sheng; Hu, Simin; Li, Tao; Huang, Yousong; Liu, Guangxing; Zhang, Huan; Lin, Senjie

    2012-01-01

    Toward understanding the genetic diversity and distribution of copepod-associated symbiotic ciliates and the evolutionary relationships with their hosts in the marine environment, we developed a small subunit ribosomal RNA gene (18S rDNA)-based molecular method and investigated the genetic diversity and genotype distribution of the symbiotic ciliates on copepods. Of the 10 copepod species representing six families collected from six locations of Pacific and Atlantic Oceans, 9 were found to harbor ciliate symbionts. Phylogenetic analysis of the 391 ciliate 18S rDNA sequences obtained revealed seven groups (ribogroups), six (containing 99% of all the sequences) belonging to subclass Apostomatida, the other clustered with peritrich ciliate Vorticella gracilis. Among the Apostomatida groups, Group III were essentially identical to Vampyrophrya pelagica, and the other five groups represented the undocumented ciliates that were close to Vampyrophrya/Gymnodinioides/Hyalophysa. Group VI ciliates were found in all copepod species but one (Calanus sinicus), and were most abundant among all ciliate sequences obtained, indicating that they are the dominant symbiotic ciliates universally associated with copepods. In contrast, some ciliate sequences were found only in some of the copepods examined, suggesting the host selectivity and geographic differentiation of ciliates, which requires further verification by more extensive sampling. Our results reveal the wide occurrence and high genetic diversity of symbiotic ciliates on marine copepods and highlight the need to systematically investigate the host- and geography-based genetic differentiation and ecological roles of these ciliates globally. PMID:23024768

  8. High genetic diversity and geographic subdivision of three lance nematode species (Hoplolaimus spp.) in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Holguin, Claudia M; Baeza, Juan A; Mueller, John D; Agudelo, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Lance nematodes (Hoplolaimus spp.) feed on the roots of a wide range of plants, some of which are agronomic crops. Morphometric values of amphimictic lance nematode species overlap considerably, and useful morphological characters for their discrimination require high magnification and significant diagnostic time. Given their morphological similarity, these Hoplolaimus species provide an interesting model to investigate hidden diversity in crop agroecosystems. In this scenario, H. galeatus may have been over-reported and the related species that are morphologically similar could be more widespread in the United States that has been recognized thus far. The main objectives of this study were to delimit Hoplolaimus galeatus and morphologically similar species using morphology, phylogeny, and a barcoding approach, and to estimate the genetic diversity and population structure of the species found. Molecular analyses were performed using sequences of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (Cox1) and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS1) on 23 populations. Four morphospecies were identified: H. galeatus, H. magnistylus, H. concaudajuvencus, and H. stephanus, along with a currently undescribed species. Pronounced genetic structure correlated with geographic origin was found for all species, except for H. galeatus. Hoplolaimus galeatus also exhibited low genetic diversity and the shortest genetic distances among populations. In contrast, H. stephanus, the species with the fewest reports from agricultural soils, was the most common and diverse species found. Results of this project may lead to better delimitation of lance nematode species in the United States by contributing to the understanding the diversity within this group. PMID:26306177

  9. The high Andes, gene flow and a stable hybrid zone shape the genetic structure of a wide-ranging South American parrot

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background While the gene flow in some organisms is strongly affected by physical barriers and geographical distance, other highly mobile species are able to overcome such constraints. In southern South America, the Andes (here up to 6,900 m) may constitute a formidable barrier to dispersal. In addition, this region was affected by cycles of intercalating arid/moist periods during the Upper/Late Pleistocene and Holocene. These factors may have been crucial in driving the phylogeographic structure of the vertebrate fauna of the region. Here we test these hypotheses in the burrowing parrot Cyanoliseus patagonus (Aves, Psittaciformes) across its wide distributional range in Chile and Argentina. Results Our data show a Chilean origin for this species, with a single migration event across the Andes during the Upper/Late Pleistocene, which gave rise to all extant Argentinean mitochondrial lineages. Analyses suggest a complex population structure for burrowing parrots in Argentina, which includes a hybrid zone that has remained stable for several thousand years. Within this zone, introgression by expanding haplotypes has resulted in the evolution of an intermediate phenotype. Multivariate regressions show that present day climatic variables have a strong influence on the distribution of genetic heterogeneity, accounting for almost half of the variation in the data. Conclusions Here we show how huge barriers like the Andes and the regional environmental conditions imposed constraints on the ability of a parrot species to colonise new habitats, affecting the way in which populations diverged and thus, genetic structure. When contact between divergent populations was re-established, a stable hybrid zone was formed, functioning as a channel for genetic exchange between populations. PMID:21672266

  10. [Genetic resources of nodule bacteria].

    PubMed

    Rumiantseva, M L

    2009-09-01

    Nodule bacteria (rhizobia) form highly specific symbiosis with leguminous plants. The efficiency of accumulation of biological nitrogen depends on molecular-genetic interaction between the host plant and rhizobia. Genetic characteristics of microsymbiotic strains are crucial in developing highly productive and stress-resistant symbiotic pairs: rhizobium strain-host plant cultivar (species). The present review considers the issue of studying genetic resources of nodule bacteria to identify genes and their blocks, responsible for the ability of rhizobia to form highly effective symbiosis in various agroecological conditions. The main approaches to investigation of intraspecific and interspecific genetic and genomic diversity of nodule bacteria are considered, from MLEE analysis to the recent methods of genomic DNA analysis using biochips. The data are presented showing that gene centers of host plants are centers of genetic diversification of nodule bacteria, because the intraspecific polymorphism of genetic markers of the core and the accessory rhizobial genomes is extremely high in them. Genotypic features of trapped and nodule subpopulations of alfalfa nodule bacteria are discussed. A survey of literature showed that the genomes of natural strains in alfalfa gene centers exhibit significant differences in genes involved in control of metabolism, replication, recombination, and the formation of defense response (hsd genes). Natural populations of rhizobia are regarded as a huge gene pool serving as a source of evolutionary innovations. PMID:19824536

  11. Genome-wide association study of triglyceride response to a high-fat meal among participants of the NHLBI genetics of lipid lowering drugs and diet network (GOLDN)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: The triglyceride (TG) response to a high-fat meal (postprandial lipemia, PPL) affects cardiovascular disease risk and is influenced by genes and environment. Genes involved in lipid metabolism have dominated genetic studies of PPL TG response. We sought to elucidate common genetic variant...

  12. A novel and highly efficient method for genetic transformation of fungi employing shock waves.

    PubMed

    Magaña-Ortíz, Denis; Coconi-Linares, Nancy; Ortiz-Vazquez, Elizabeth; Fernández, Francisco; Loske, Achim M; Gómez-Lim, Miguel A

    2013-07-01

    Genetic transformation of filamentous fungi is an essential tool in many areas such as biotechnology, medicine, phytopathology and genetics. However, available protocols to transform fungi are inefficient, laborious and have low reproducibility. We report the use of underwater shock waves as a novel method to transform filamentous fungi. An experimental piezoelectric shock wave generator was designed to expose fungal conidia to heterologous DNA. The device was successfully tested in Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporum, Trichoderma reesei and Phanerochaete chrysosporium. The transformation frequency per number of conidia was between two and four orders of magnitude higher in comparison to previously published methods. For example, the frequency of transformation in A. niger was improved up to 5400-fold as compared with Agrobacterium protocols. Transformation was verified by expression of the green fluorescent protein, PCR and Southern blot. Our method offers new possibilities for fast, easy and efficient genetic manipulation of diverse fungal species. PMID:23583899

  13. Next Generation Statistical Genetics: Modeling, Penalization, and Optimization in High-Dimensional Data

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Kenneth; Papp, Jeanette C.; Sinsheimer, Janet S.; Sobel, Eric M.

    2014-01-01

    Statistical genetics is undergoing the same transition to big data that all branches of applied statistics are experiencing. With the advent of inexpensive DNA sequencing, the transition is only accelerating. This brief review highlights some modern techniques with recent successes in statistical genetics. These include: (a) lasso penalized regression and association mapping, (b) ethnic admixture estimation, (c) matrix completion for genotype and sequence data, (d) the fused lasso and copy number variation, (e) haplotyping, (f) estimation of relatedness, (g) variance components models, and (h) rare variant testing. For more than a century, genetics has been both a driver and beneficiary of statistical theory and practice. This symbiotic relationship will persist for the foreseeable future. PMID:24955378

  14. Extremely high genetic diversity in a single tumor points to prevalence of non-Darwinian cell evolution.

    PubMed

    Ling, Shaoping; Hu, Zheng; Yang, Zuyu; Yang, Fang; Li, Yawei; Lin, Pei; Chen, Ke; Dong, Lili; Cao, Lihua; Tao, Yong; Hao, Lingtong; Chen, Qingjian; Gong, Qiang; Wu, Dafei; Li, Wenjie; Zhao, Wenming; Tian, Xiuyun; Hao, Chunyi; Hungate, Eric A; Catenacci, Daniel V T; Hudson, Richard R; Li, Wen-Hsiung; Lu, Xuemei; Wu, Chung-I

    2015-11-24

    The prevailing view that the evolution of cells in a tumor is driven by Darwinian selection has never been rigorously tested. Because selection greatly affects the level of intratumor genetic diversity, it is important to assess whether intratumor evolution follows the Darwinian or the non-Darwinian mode of evolution. To provide the statistical power, many regions in a single tumor need to be sampled and analyzed much more extensively than has been attempted in previous intratumor studies. Here, from a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tumor, we evaluated multiregional samples from the tumor, using either whole-exome sequencing (WES) (n = 23 samples) or genotyping (n = 286) under both the infinite-site and infinite-allele models of population genetics. In addition to the many single-nucleotide variations (SNVs) present in all samples, there were 35 "polymorphic" SNVs among samples. High genetic diversity was evident as the 23 WES samples defined 20 unique cell clones. With all 286 samples genotyped, clonal diversity agreed well with the non-Darwinian model with no evidence of positive Darwinian selection. Under the non-Darwinian model, MALL (the number of coding region mutations in the entire tumor) was estimated to be greater than 100 million in this tumor. DNA sequences reveal local diversities in small patches of cells and validate the estimation. In contrast, the genetic diversity under a Darwinian model would generally be orders of magnitude smaller. Because the level of genetic diversity will have implications on therapeutic resistance, non-Darwinian evolution should be heeded in cancer treatments even for microscopic tumors. PMID:26561581

  15. Fabricating genetically engineered high-power lithium-ion batteries using multiple virus genes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun Jung; Yi, Hyunjung; Kim, Woo-Jae; Kang, Kisuk; Yun, Dong Soo; Strano, Michael S; Ceder, Gerbrand; Belcher, Angela M

    2009-05-22

    Development of materials that deliver more energy at high rates is important for high-power applications, including portable electronic devices and hybrid electric vehicles. For lithium-ion (Li+) batteries, reducing material dimensions can boost Li+ ion and electron transfer in nanostructured electrodes. By manipulating two genes, we equipped viruses with peptide groups having affinity for single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on one end and peptides capable of nucleating amorphous iron phosphate(a-FePO4) fused to the viral major coat protein. The virus clone with the greatest affinity toward SWNTs enabled power performance of a-FePO4 comparable to that of crystalline lithium iron phosphate (c-LiFePO4) and showed excellent capacity retention upon cycling at 1C. This environmentally benign low-temperature biological scaffold could facilitate fabrication of electrodes from materials previously excluded because of extremely low electronic conductivity. PMID:19342549

  16. Fabricating Genetically Engineered High-Power Lithium-Ion Batteries Using Multiple Virus Genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yun Jung; Yi, Hyunjung; Kim, Woo-Jae; Kang, Kisuk; Yun, Dong Soo; Strano, Michael S.; Ceder, Gerbrand; Belcher, Angela M.

    2009-05-01

    Development of materials that deliver more energy at high rates is important for high-power applications, including portable electronic devices and hybrid electric vehicles. For lithium-ion (Li+) batteries, reducing material dimensions can boost Li+ ion and electron transfer in nanostructured electrodes. By manipulating two genes, we equipped viruses with peptide groups having affinity for single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on one end and peptides capable of nucleating amorphous iron phosphate(a-FePO4) fused to the viral major coat protein. The virus clone with the greatest affinity toward SWNTs enabled power performance of a-FePO4 comparable to that of crystalline lithium iron phosphate (c-LiFePO4) and showed excellent capacity retention upon cycling at 1C. This environmentally benign low-temperature biological scaffold could facilitate fabrication of electrodes from materials previously excluded because of extremely low electronic conductivity.

  17. Genomic expression catalogue of a global collection of BCG vaccine strains show evidence for highly diverged metabolic and cell-wall adaptations

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Abdallah M.; Hill-Cawthorne, Grant A.; Otto, Thomas D.; Coll, Francesc; Guerra-Assunção, José Afonso; Gao, Ge; Naeem, Raeece; Ansari, Hifzur; Malas, Tareq B.; Adroub, Sabir A.; Verboom, Theo; Ummels, Roy; Zhang, Huoming; Panigrahi, Aswini Kumar; McNerney, Ruth; Brosch, Roland; Clark, Taane G.; Behr, Marcel A.; Bitter, Wilbert; Pain, Arnab

    2015-01-01

    Although Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccines against tuberculosis have been available for more than 90 years, their effectiveness has been hindered by variable protective efficacy and a lack of lasting memory responses. One factor contributing to this variability may be the diversity of the BCG strains that are used around the world, in part from genomic changes accumulated during vaccine production and their resulting differences in gene expression. We have compared the genomes and transcriptomes of a global collection of fourteen of the most widely used BCG strains at single base-pair resolution. We have also used quantitative proteomics to identify key differences in expression of proteins across five representative BCG strains of the four tandem duplication (DU) groups. We provide a comprehensive map of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), copy number variation and insertions and deletions (indels) across fourteen BCG strains. Genome-wide SNP characterization allowed the construction of a new and robust phylogenic genealogy of BCG strains. Transcriptional and proteomic profiling revealed a metabolic remodeling in BCG strains that may be reflected by altered immunogenicity and possibly vaccine efficacy. Together, these integrated-omic data represent the most comprehensive catalogue of genetic variation across a global collection of BCG strains. PMID:26487098

  18. Genomic expression catalogue of a global collection of BCG vaccine strains show evidence for highly diverged metabolic and cell-wall adaptations.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Abdallah M; Hill-Cawthorne, Grant A; Otto, Thomas D; Coll, Francesc; Guerra-Assunção, José Afonso; Gao, Ge; Naeem, Raeece; Ansari, Hifzur; Malas, Tareq B; Adroub, Sabir A; Verboom, Theo; Ummels, Roy; Zhang, Huoming; Panigrahi, Aswini Kumar; McNerney, Ruth; Brosch, Roland; Clark, Taane G; Behr, Marcel A; Bitter, Wilbert; Pain, Arnab

    2015-01-01

    Although Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccines against tuberculosis have been available for more than 90 years, their effectiveness has been hindered by variable protective efficacy and a lack of lasting memory responses. One factor contributing to this variability may be the diversity of the BCG strains that are used around the world, in part from genomic changes accumulated during vaccine production and their resulting differences in gene expression. We have compared the genomes and transcriptomes of a global collection of fourteen of the most widely used BCG strains at single base-pair resolution. We have also used quantitative proteomics to identify key differences in expression of proteins across five representative BCG strains of the four tandem duplication (DU) groups. We provide a comprehensive map of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), copy number variation and insertions and deletions (indels) across fourteen BCG strains. Genome-wide SNP characterization allowed the construction of a new and robust phylogenic genealogy of BCG strains. Transcriptional and proteomic profiling revealed a metabolic remodeling in BCG strains that may be reflected by altered immunogenicity and possibly vaccine efficacy. Together, these integrated-omic data represent the most comprehensive catalogue of genetic variation across a global collection of BCG strains. PMID:26487098

  19. PTEN mutation analysis in two genetic subtypes of high-grade oligodendroglial tumors. PTEN is only occasionally mutated in one of the two genetic subtypes.

    PubMed

    Jeuken, J W; Nelen, M R; Vermeer, H; van Staveren, W C; Kremer, H; van Overbeeke, J J; Boerman, R H

    2000-05-01

    We recently identified two genetic subtypes of high-grade oligodendroglial tumors (HG-OT): 1p-/19q- HG-OT are characterized by a loss of chromosome 1p32-36 (del(1)(p32-p36) and/or a del(19)(q13. 3); whereas +7/-10 HG-OT harbor a gain of chromosome 7 (+7) and/or a -10 without a loss of 1p32-36 and 19q13.3. Because a -10 and a +7 are most frequently detected in glioblastomas (GBM), the genotype of +7/-10 HG-OT suggests that these tumors are GBM with a prominent oligodendroglial phenotype rather than anaplastic oligodendrogliomas. PTEN is a tumor suppressor gene, located at 10q23.3, which is involved in tumor progression of GBM and other neoplasms. In this study, we screened for PTEN mutations in six low-grade oligodendroglial tumors (LG-OT), five 1p-/19q- HG-OT, seven +7/-10 HG-OT, and nine xenografted GBM. PTEN mutations were detected in none of the LG-OT and 1p-/19q- HG-OT, once in +7/-10 HG-OT, and frequently in GBM. As one of the +7/-10 HG-OT harbored a PTEN mutation, this demonstrates that PTEN can be involved in the oncogenesis of this genetic subtype of HG-OT. The lower frequency of PTEN mutations in +7/-10 HG-OT compared to GBM suggests that these tumors are of a distinct tumor type rather than GBM. Published by Elsevier Science Inc. PMID:10812170

  20. Genetic Mapping

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Fact Sheets Genetic Mapping En Español: Mapeo Genético Genetic Mapping What is genetic mapping? How do researchers ... genetic map? What are genetic markers? What is genetic mapping? Among the main goals of the Human ...

  1. Genetic map of the human pseudoautosomal region reveals a high rate of recombination in female meiosis at the Xp telomere

    SciTech Connect

    Henke, A.; Fischer, C.; Rappold, G.A. )

    1993-12-01

    This paper describes the genetic map of the pseudoautosomal region bounded by the telomere of the short arms of the X and Y chromosomes. In males, meiotic exchange on Xp/Yp is confined to this region, leading to highly elevated recombination rates. The map was constructed using 11 pseudoautosomal probes (six of which are new) and typing individuals from 38 CEPH families. All markers have been physically mapped, thus providing the opportunity to compare genetic distance to physical distance through all intervals of the map. This comparison reveals an unexpected high rate of recombination in female meiosis between loci DXYS20 and DXYS78, within 20-80 kb from the telomere. Within this telemore-adjacent region no differences in male and female recombination rates are seen. Furthermore, data from this genetic map support the hypothesis of a linear gradient of recombination across most of the region in male meiosis and provide densely spaced anchor points for linkage studies especially in the telomeric portion of the pseudoautosomal region. 34 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Candidate genetic analysis of plasma high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and severity of coronary atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Suet Nee; Cilingiroglu, Mehmet; Todd, Josh; Lombardi, Raffaella; Willerson, James T; Gotto, Antonio M; Ballantyne, Christie M; Marian, AJ

    2009-01-01

    Background Plasma level of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), a heritable trait, is an important determinant of susceptibility to atherosclerosis. Non-synonymous and regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes implicated in HDL-C synthesis and metabolism are likely to influence plasma HDL-C, apolipoprotein A-I (apo A-I) levels and severity of coronary atherosclerosis. Methods We genotyped 784 unrelated Caucasian individuals from two sets of populations (Lipoprotein and Coronary Atherosclerosis Study- LCAS, N = 333 and TexGen, N = 451) for 94 SNPs in 42 candidate genes by 5' nuclease assays. We tested the distribution of the phenotypes by the Shapiro-Wilk normality test. We used Box-Cox regression to analyze associations of the non-normally distributed phenotypes (plasma HDL-C and apo A-I levels) with the genotypes. We included sex, age, body mass index (BMI), diabetes mellitus (DM), and cigarette smoking as covariates. We calculated the q values as indicators of the false positive discovery rate (FDR). Results Plasma HDL-C levels were associated with sex (higher in females), BMI (inversely), smoking (lower in smokers), DM (lower in those with DM) and SNPs in APOA5, APOC2, CETP, LPL and LIPC (each q ?0.01). Likewise, plasma apo A-I levels, available in the LCAS subset, were associated with SNPs in CETP, APOA5, and APOC2 as well as with BMI, sex and age (all q values ?0.03). The APOA5 variant S19W was also associated with minimal lumen diameter (MLD) of coronary atherosclerotic lesions, a quantitative index of severity of coronary atherosclerosis (q = 0.018); mean number of coronary artery occlusions (p = 0.034) at the baseline and progression of coronary atherosclerosis, as indicated by the loss of MLD. Conclusion Putatively functional variants of APOA2, APOA5, APOC2, CETP, LPL, LIPC and SOAT2 are independent genetic determinants of plasma HDL-C levels. The non-synonymous S19W SNP in APOA5 is also an independent determinant of plasma apo A-I level, severity of coronary atherosclerosis and its progression. PMID:19878569

  3. High genetic diversity in a remote island population system: sans Eric F. Karlin1

    E-print Network

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    words: allopolyploid, bryophyte, clone, genetic diversity, Hawaii, long-distance dispersal, Sphagnum reproduction is absent in the Hawaiian plants. In addi- tion, all samples of Hawaiian S. palustre share that the Hawaiian population was proba- bly founded 49­51 kyr ago. · It appears that all Hawaiian plants of S

  4. High-throughput genetic characterization of a cohort of Brugada syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Di Resta, Chiara; Pietrelli, Alessandro; Sala, Simone; Della Bella, Paolo; De Bellis, Gianluca; Ferrari, Maurizio; Bordoni, Roberta; Benedetti, Sara

    2015-10-15

    Brugada syndrome (BrS) is an inherited cardiac arrhythmic disorder that can lead to sudden death, with a prevalence of 1:5000 in Caucasian population and affecting mainly male patients in their third to fourth decade of life. BrS is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait; however, to date genetic bases have been only partially understood. Indeed most mutations are located in the SCN5A gene, encoding the alpha-subunit of the Na(+) cardiac channel, but >70% BrS patients still remain genetically undiagnosed. Although 21 other genes have been associated with BrS susceptibility, their pathogenic role is still unclear. A recent next-generation sequencing study investigated the contribution of 45 arrhythmia susceptibility genes in BrS pathogenesis, observing a significant enrichment only for SCN5A. In our study, we evaluated the distribution of putative functional variants in a wider panel of 158 genes previously associated with arrhythmic and cardiac defects in a cohort of 91 SCN5A-negative BrS patients. In addition, to identify genes significantly enriched in BrS, we performed a mutation burden test by using as control dataset European individuals selected from the 1000Genomes project. We confirmed BrS genetic heterogeneity and identified new potential BrS candidates such as DSG2 and MYH7, suggesting a possible genetic overlap between different cardiac disorders. PMID:26220970

  5. HIGH-RESOLUTION GENETIC MAP OF BOVINE CHROMOSOME 29 THROUGH FOCUSED MARKER DEVELOPMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chromosome-specific libraries aid in the development of genetic maps and focus marker development in areas of the genome with identified QTL. A small-insert BTA29 library constructed by microdissection of a 1:29 Rb-fusion cell line, was screened for dinucleotide repeats (CA) 15 and/or (GA) 15. App...

  6. Investigating the Impact of Video Games on High School Students' Engagement and Learning about Genetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annetta, Leonard A.; Minogue, James; Holmes, Shawn Y.; Cheng, Meng-Tzu

    2009-01-01

    The popularity of video games has transcended entertainment crossing into the world of education. While the literature base on educational gaming is growing, there is still a lack of systematic study of this emerging technology's efficacy. This quasi-experimental study evaluated a teacher created video game on genetics in terms of its affective…

  7. Symbiodinium sp. associations in the gorgonian Pseudopterogorgia elisabethae in the Bahamas: high levels of genetic variability

    E-print Network

    Buffalo, State University of New York

    levels of genetic variability and population structure in symbiotic dinoflagellates Received: 7 October. populations inhabiting particular invertebrate species, including the gorgonian corals, which are prevalent that zooxanthellae comprise a heterogeneous group of many species and strains (reviewed by Rowan 1998). To date, 10

  8. Inbred and furious: negative association between aggression and genetic diversity in highly inbred fish.

    PubMed

    Ellison, Amy; de Leaniz, Carlos Garcia; Consuegra, Sofia

    2013-04-01

    Aggressive behaviour plays an important role in securing resources, defending against predators and shaping social interactions. Although aggression can have positive effects on growth and reproductive success, it is also energetically costly and may increase injury and compromise survival. Individual genetic diversity has been positively associated with aggression, but the cause for such an association is not clear, and it might be related to the ability to recognize kin. To disentangle the relationships between genetic diversity, kinship and aggression, we quantified aggressive behaviour in a wild, self-fertilizing fish (Kryptolebias marmoratus) with naturally variable degrees of genetic diversity, relatedness and familiarity. We found that in contrast to captive fish, levels of aggression among wild K. marmoratus are positively associated with individual homozygosity, but not with relatedness or familiarity. We suggest that the higher aggression shown by homozygous fish could be related to better kin discrimination and may be facilitated by hermaphrodite competition for scarce males, given the fitness advantages provided by outcrossing in terms of parasite resistance. It seems likely that the relationship between aggression and genetic diversity is largely influenced by both the environment and population history. PMID:23402293

  9. Genetic Algorithm for Innovative Device Designs in High-Efficiency III–V Nitride Light-Emitting Diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Di; Schubert, Martin F.; Cho, Jaehee; Schubert, E. Fred; Crawford, Mary H.; Koleske, Daniel D.; Shim, Hyunwook; Sone, Cheolsoo

    2012-01-01

    Light-emitting diodes are becoming the next-generation light source because of their prominent benefits in energy efficiency, versatility, and benign environmental impact. However, because of the unique polarization effects in III–V nitrides and the high complexity of light-emitting diodes, further breakthroughs towards truly optimized devices are required. Here we introduce the concept of artificial evolution into the device optimization process. Reproduction and selection are accomplished by means of an advanced genetic algorithm and device simulator, respectively. We demonstrate that this approach can lead to new device structures that go beyond conventional approaches. The innovative designs originating from the genetic algorithm and the demonstration of the predicted results by implementing structures suggested by the algorithm establish a new avenue for complex semiconductor device design and optimization.

  10. Brooding crustaceans in a highly fragmented habitat: the genetic structure of Mediterranean marine cave-dwelling mysid populations.

    PubMed

    Lejeusne, C; Chevaldonné, P

    2006-11-01

    Habitat fragmentation and climate change are two major threats on biodiversity. Fragmentation limits the number of patches and their decreased connectivity cannot always maintain populations at dynamic equilibrium. The natural extreme fragmentation of marine cave habitats represents an opportunity to understand how these processes interact. The hypothesis of a low gene flow among populations due to a high level of fragmentation was tested by analysing sequence variation in a fragment of the mitochondrial gene of the cytochrome oxidase subunit I in 170 individuals (23 localities across the NW Mediterranean) of two marine cave-dwelling mysids of the genus Hemimysis. The species Hemimysis margalefi recently replaced its congener Hemimysis speluncola, a species shift that could be related to the warming of the Mediterranean Sea and to differences in their thermal tolerances. There were too few H. speluncola samples to further discuss their genetic structuring, but for H. margalefi, the present study revealed high levels of genetic diversity and genetic structuring, as shown by the eight genetically distinct groups identified. The Croatian group might constitute a sibling species due to a strong divergence (15%). Nevertheless, these groups present reduced but orientated gene flow according to the general circulation in the Mediterranean, and fit a stepping-stone model. At local scale (Marseille area, France), gene flow among caves is dependent on unexpected local hydrodynamic barriers, that determine metapopulation sizes. Through the example of mysid species inhabiting marine caves, the present work confirms the strong influence of habitat disjunction (natural fragmentation) on population structure, and stresses the importance of coastal geomorphological features in inducing complex interactions between the circulation of water masses and the circulation of genes. PMID:17054507

  11. High frequency regeneration via direct somatic embryogenesis and efficient Agrobacterium- mediated genetic transformation of tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Pathi, Krishna Mohan; Tula, Suresh; Tuteja, Narendra

    2013-01-01

    A direct somatic embryogenesis protocol was developed for four cultivars of Nicotiana species, by using leaf disc as an explant. Direct somatic embryogenesis of Nicotiana by using BAP and IAA has not been investigated so far. This method does not require formation of callus tissues which leads to somaclonal variations. The frequency of somatic embryogenesis was strongly influenced by the plant growth hormones. The somatic embryos developing directly from explant tissue were noticed after 6 d of culture. Somatic embryogenesis of a high frequency (87–96%) was observed in cultures of the all four genotypes (Nicotiana tabacum, N. benthamiyana, N. xanthi, N. t cv petihavana). The results showed that the best medium for direct somatic embryogenesis was MS supplemented with 2.5 mg/l, 0.2 mg/l IAA and 2% sucrose. Subculture of somatic embryos onto hormone free MS medium resulted in their conversion into plants for all genotypes. About 95% of the regenerated somatic embryos germinated into complete plantlets. The plants showed morphological and growth characteristics similar to those of seed-derived plants. Explants were transformed using Agrobacterium tumifacious LBA4404 plasmid pCAMBIA1301 harboring the GUS gene. The regenerated transgenic plants were confirmed by PCR analysis and histochemical GUS assay. The transformation efficiency obtained by using the Agrobacterium- mediated transformation was more than 95%. This method takes 6 wk to accomplish complete transgenic plants through direct somatic embryogenesis. The transgenic plantlets were acclimatized successfully with 98% survival in greenhouse and they showed normal morphological characteristics and were fertile. The regeneration and transformation method described herein is very simple, highly efficient and fast for the introduction of any foreign gene directly in tobacco through direct somatic embryogenesis. PMID:23518589

  12. High frequency regeneration via direct somatic embryogenesis and efficient Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation of tobacco.

    PubMed

    Pathi, Krishna Mohan; Tula, Suresh; Tuteja, Narendra

    2013-06-01

    A direct somatic embryogenesis protocol was developed for four cultivars of Nicotiana species, by using leaf disc as an explant. Direct somatic embryogenesis of Nicotiana by using BAP and IAA has not been investigated so far. This method does not require formation of callus tissues which leads to somaclonal variations. The frequency of somatic embryogenesis was strongly influenced by the plant growth hormones. The somatic embryos developing directly from explant tissue were noticed after 6 d of culture. Somatic embryogenesis of a high frequency (87-96%) was observed in cultures of the all four genotypes (Nicotiana tabacum, N. benthamiyana, N. xanthi, N. t cv petihavana). The results showed that the best medium for direct somatic embryogenesis was MS supplemented with 2.5 mg/l, 0.2 mg/l IAA and 2% sucrose. Subculture of somatic embryos onto hormone free MS medium resulted in their conversion into plants for all genotypes. About 95% of the regenerated somatic embryos germinated into complete plantlets. The plants showed morphological and growth characteristics similar to those of seed-derived plants. Explants were transformed using Agrobacterium tumifacious LBA4404 plasmid pCAMBIA1301 harboring the GUS gene. The regenerated transgenic plants were confirmed by PCR analysis and histochemical GUS assay. The transformation efficiency obtained by using the Agrobacterium- mediated transformation was more than 95%. This method takes 6 wk to accomplish complete transgenic plants through direct somatic embryogenesis. The transgenic plantlets were acclimatized successfully with 98% survival in greenhouse and they showed normal morphological characteristics and were fertile. The regeneration and transformation method described herein is very simple, highly efficient and fast for the introduction of any foreign gene directly in tobacco through direct somatic embryogenesis. PMID:23518589

  13. Genetic compensation of high dose radiation-induced damage in an anhydrobiotic insect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, Oleg; Nakahara, Yuichi; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Kikawada, Takahiro; Okuda, Takashi

    Anhydrobiotic larvae of African chironomid Polypedilum vanderplanki are known to show an extremely high tolerance against a range of stresses. The tolerance against various extreme environments exhibited by that insect might be due to being almost completely desiccated replacing water with trehalose, a state where little or no chemical reactions occur. From 2005 dried larvae of this insect are being used in a number of space experiments, both inside and outside of ISS as a model organism for estimation the limits of higher organisms' resistance to space environment stresses and long-term storage of the alive anhydrobiotic organisms during continues spaceflight. We have shown previously that both hydrated and dried larvae of Polypedilum vanderplanki have very higher tolerance against both highand low-linear energy transfer (LET), surviving after 7000Gy irradiation. It was suggested that the larvae would have effective DNA-reparation system in addition to artificial protection provided by glass-stage without water. In the present study we conducted analysis of stress-related gene expression in the larvae after 70-2000 Gy irradiations. Both DNA damage level and activity of DNA-reparation, anti-apoptotic and protein-damage related genes were analyzed. Direct visualization of DNA damage in the larvae fat body cells using Comet Assay showed that fragmented by radiation DNA is re-arranged within 76-98 hours after exposure. We found that massive overexpression of hsp and anti-oxidant genes occur in larvae entering anhydrobiosis , and provides refolding of proteins after rehydration. In the irradiated larvae overexpression of DNA-reparation enzymes anti-apoptotic genes was confirmed, suggesting that survival after high-dose irradiation is a result of combination of highly effective blocking of entering the apoptosis after severe DNA damage and DNA reparation.

  14. A multiple-alignment based primer design algorithm for genetically highly variable DNA targets

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Primer design for highly variable DNA sequences is difficult, and experimental success requires attention to many interacting constraints. The advent of next-generation sequencing methods allows the investigation of rare variants otherwise hidden deep in large populations, but requires attention to population diversity and primer localization in relatively conserved regions, in addition to recognized constraints typically considered in primer design. Results Design constraints include degenerate sites to maximize population coverage, matching of melting temperatures, optimizing de novo sequence length, finding optimal bio-barcodes to allow efficient downstream analyses, and minimizing risk of dimerization. To facilitate primer design addressing these and other constraints, we created a novel computer program (PrimerDesign) that automates this complex procedure. We show its powers and limitations and give examples of successful designs for the analysis of HIV-1 populations. Conclusions PrimerDesign is useful for researchers who want to design DNA primers and probes for analyzing highly variable DNA populations. It can be used to design primers for PCR, RT-PCR, Sanger sequencing, next-generation sequencing, and other experimental protocols targeting highly variable DNA samples. PMID:23965160

  15. On-chip whole-animal manipulation for high-throughput subcellular-resolution in-vivo drug/genetic screening

    E-print Network

    Yanik, Mehmet Fatih

    Techniques for rapid and automated small-animal manipulation and immobilization are necessary for high-throughput in vivo genetic/drug screens using cellular and sub-cellular features in multicellular organisms. We present ...

  16. The Great Cometary Show

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-01-01

    The ESO Very Large Telescope Interferometer, which allows astronomers to scrutinise objects with a precision equivalent to that of a 130-m telescope, is proving itself an unequalled success every day. One of the latest instruments installed, AMBER, has led to a flurry of scientific results, an anthology of which is being published this week as special features in the research journal Astronomy & Astrophysics. ESO PR Photo 06a/07 ESO PR Photo 06a/07 The AMBER Instrument "With its unique capabilities, the VLT Interferometer (VLTI) has created itself a niche in which it provide answers to many astronomical questions, from the shape of stars, to discs around stars, to the surroundings of the supermassive black holes in active galaxies," says Jorge Melnick (ESO), the VLT Project Scientist. The VLTI has led to 55 scientific papers already and is in fact producing more than half of the interferometric results worldwide. "With the capability of AMBER to combine up to three of the 8.2-m VLT Unit Telescopes, we can really achieve what nobody else can do," added Fabien Malbet, from the LAOG (France) and the AMBER Project Scientist. Eleven articles will appear this week in Astronomy & Astrophysics' special AMBER section. Three of them describe the unique instrument, while the other eight reveal completely new results about the early and late stages in the life of stars. ESO PR Photo 06b/07 ESO PR Photo 06b/07 The Inner Winds of Eta Carinae The first results presented in this issue cover various fields of stellar and circumstellar physics. Two papers deal with very young solar-like stars, offering new information about the geometry of the surrounding discs and associated outflowing winds. Other articles are devoted to the study of hot active stars of particular interest: Alpha Arae, Kappa Canis Majoris, and CPD -57o2874. They provide new, precise information about their rotating gas envelopes. An important new result concerns the enigmatic object Eta Carinae. Using AMBER with its high spatial and spectral resolution, it was possible to zoom into the very heart of this very massive star. In this innermost region, the observations are dominated by the extremely dense stellar wind that totally obscures the underlying central star. The AMBER observations show that this dense stellar wind is not spherically symmetric, but exhibits a clearly elongated structure. Overall, the AMBER observations confirm that the extremely high mass loss of Eta Carinae's massive central star is non-spherical and much stronger along the poles than in the equatorial plane. This is in agreement with theoretical models that predict such an enhanced polar mass-loss in the case of rapidly rotating stars. ESO PR Photo 06c/07 ESO PR Photo 06c/07 RS Ophiuchi in Outburst Several papers from this special feature focus on the later stages in a star's life. One looks at the binary system Gamma 2 Velorum, which contains the closest example of a star known as a Wolf-Rayet. A single AMBER observation allowed the astronomers to separate the spectra of the two components, offering new insights in the modeling of Wolf-Rayet stars, but made it also possible to measure the separation between the two stars. This led to a new determination of the distance of the system, showing that previous estimates were incorrect. The observations also revealed information on the region where the winds from the two stars collide. The famous binary system RS Ophiuchi, an example of a recurrent nova, was observed just 5 days after it was discovered to be in outburst on 12 February 2006, an event that has been expected for 21 years. AMBER was able to detect the extension of the expanding nova emission. These observations show a complex geometry and kinematics, far from the simple interpretation of a spherical fireball in extension. AMBER has detected a high velocity jet probably perpendicular to the orbital plane of the binary system, and allowed a precise and careful study of the wind and the shockwave coming from the nova. The stream of results from the VLTI and AMBER

  17. OP20BLOOD SERUM AND CSF ANALYTES SHOW POTENTIAL FOR USE AS A DIAGNOSTIC BIOMARKER FOR LOW AND HIGH GRADE GLIOMA

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Peter

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There is a need for a biomarker with high sensitivity and specificity to aid glioma diagnosis. Current methods of diagnosis are invasive with the diagnostic test requiring hospitalisation. A rapid diagnostic based upon blood serum and CSF samples would allow for a relatively non-invasive test and open up the possibility of screening for glioma METHOD: Serum from 110 high grade and 44 low grade glioma patients, were analysed along with 33 control sera from non-cancerous patients. CSF was also analysed from 8 high grade glioma patients taken with lumbar puncture. The analysis was performed using a luminex immunoassay measuring 36 cancer-associated analytes simultaneously. RESULTS: There were significant differences in several analytes between sera and CSF of glioma patients of low and high grade and non-cancerous control patients. These were Angiopoietin, Follistatin, FGF, G-CSF, sHER2neu, HGF, sIL-6R, Leptin, PDGF-BB, PECAM-1, Prolactin and sVEGFR-1. CSF level differences confirmed and correlated with serum level differences in the majority of cases. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that specific protein levels in different media can be used to detect and confirm a glioma diagnosis as well as to distinguish between low and high grade gliomas. There was an interesting up-regulation of several receptor analytes that may have masked the presence of their associated ligand indicating that a masking effect may be taking place for certain potential biomarkers.

  18. Development and validation of a 48-target analytical method for high-throughput monitoring of genetically modified organisms.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofei; Wu, Yuhua; Li, Jun; Li, Yunjing; Long, Likun; Li, Feiwu; Wu, Gang

    2015-01-01

    The rapid increase in the number of genetically modified (GM) varieties has led to a demand for high-throughput methods to detect genetically modified organisms (GMOs). We describe a new dynamic array-based high throughput method to simultaneously detect 48 targets in 48 samples on a Fludigm system. The test targets included species-specific genes, common screening elements, most of the Chinese-approved GM events, and several unapproved events. The 48 TaqMan assays successfully amplified products from both single-event samples and complex samples with a GMO DNA amount of 0.05?ng, and displayed high specificity. To improve the sensitivity of detection, a preamplification step for 48 pooled targets was added to enrich the amount of template before performing dynamic chip assays. This dynamic chip-based method allowed the synchronous high-throughput detection of multiple targets in multiple samples. Thus, it represents an efficient, qualitative method for GMO multi-detection. PMID:25556930

  19. Sro9, a Multicopy Suppressor of the Bud Growth Defect in the Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Rho3-Deficient Cells, Shows Strong Genetic Interactions with Tropomyosin Genes, Suggesting Its Role in Organization of the Actin Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Kagami, M.; Toh-e, A.; Matsui, Y.

    1997-01-01

    RHO3 encodes a Rho-type small GTPase in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is involved in the proper organization of the actin cytoskeleton required for bud growth. SRO9 (YCL37c) was isolated as a multicopy suppressor of a rho3? mutation. An Sro9p domain required for function is similar to a domain in the La protein (an RNA-binding protein). Disruption of SRO9 did not affect vegetative growth, even with the simultaneous disruption of an SRO9 homologue, SRO99. However, sro9? was synthetically lethal with a disruption of TPM1, which encodes tropomyosin; sro9? tpm1? cells did not distribute cortical actin patches properly and lysed. We isolated TPM2, the other gene for tropomyosin, as a multicopy suppressor of a tpm1? sro9? double mutant. Genetic analysis suggests that TPM2 is functionally related to TPM1 and that tropomyosin is important but not essential for cell growth. Overexpression of SRO9 suppressed the growth defect in tpm1? tpm2? cells, disappearance of cables of actin filaments in both rho3? cells and tpm1? cells, and temperature sensitivity of actin mutant cells (act1-1 cells), suggesting that Sro9p has a function that overlaps or is related to tropomyosin function. Unlike tropomyosin, Sro9p does not colocalize with actin cables but is diffusely cytoplasmic. These results suggest that Sro9p is a new cytoplasmic factor involved in the organization of actin filaments. PMID:9383048

  20. BI-01BLOOD SERUM AND C.S.F. ANALYTES SHOW POTENTIAL FOR USE AS A DIAGNOSTIC BIOMARKER FOR LOW AND HIGH GRADE GLIOMA

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Peter

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There is a need for a biomarker with high sensitivity and specificity to aid glioma diagnosis. Current methods of diagnosis are invasive with the diagnostic test requiring hospitalisation. A rapid diagnostic based upon blood serum and CSF samples would allow for a relatively non-invasive test and open up the possibility of screening for glioma as well as effective treatment monotoring and prediction of tumour recurrance. Analysis of the source of the proteins may reveal information regarding the mechanism of immunosuppression in these tumours. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Serum from 110 high grade and 44 low grade glioma patients, were analysed along with 33 control sera from non-cancerous patients. CSF was also analysed from 8 high grade glioma patients taken with lumbar puncture. The analysis was performed using a luminex immunoassay measuring 36 cancer-associated analytes simultaneously. Immunohistochemistry was also performed on tumour tissue from the same patients. RESULTS: There were significant differences in several analytes between sera and CSF of glioma patients of low and high grade and non-cancerous control patients. These were Angiopoietin, Follistatin, FGF, G-CSF, sHER2neu, HGF, sIL-6R, Leptin, PDGF-BB, PECAM-1, Prolactin and sVEGFR-1. CSF level differences confirmed and correlated with serum level differences in the majority of cases. Tumour tissue also revealed increased expression of several of the proteins. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that specific protein levels in different media can be used to detect and confirm a glioma diagnosis as well as to distinguish between low and high grade gliomas. These results may also be used to predict tumour recurrance and transformation between low and high grade gliomas. There was an interesting up-regulation of several receptor analytes that may have masked the presence of their associated ligand indicating that some potential biomarkers may be obscured. Modification of the capture antibody could reveal more potential biomarkers with greater clinical usefulness.

  1. Genetic Mapping Identifies Novel Highly Protective Antigens for an Apicomplexan Parasite

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Damer P.; Billington, Karen J.; Copestake, Susan L.; Oakes, Richard D.; Quail, Michael A.; Wan, Kiew-Lian; Shirley, Martin W.; Smith, Adrian L.

    2011-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites are responsible for a myriad of diseases in humans and livestock; yet despite intensive effort, development of effective sub-unit vaccines remains a long-term goal. Antigenic complexity and our inability to identify protective antigens from the pool that induce response are serious challenges in the development of new vaccines. Using a combination of parasite genetics and selective barriers with population-based genetic fingerprinting, we have identified that immunity against the most important apicomplexan parasite of livestock (Eimeria spp.) was targeted against a few discrete regions of the genome. Herein we report the identification of six genomic regions and, within two of those loci, the identification of true protective antigens that confer immunity as sub-unit vaccines. The first of these is an Eimeria maxima homologue of apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1) and the second is a previously uncharacterised gene that we have termed ‘immune mapped protein-1’ (IMP-1). Significantly, homologues of the AMA-1 antigen are protective with a range of apicomplexan parasites including Plasmodium spp., which suggest that there may be some characteristic(s) of protective antigens shared across this diverse group of parasites. Interestingly, homologues of the IMP-1 antigen, which is protective against E. maxima infection, can be identified in Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum. Overall, this study documents the discovery of novel protective antigens using a population-based genetic mapping approach allied with a protection-based screen of candidate genes. The identification of AMA-1 and IMP-1 represents a substantial step towards development of an effective anti-eimerian sub-unit vaccine and raises the possibility of identification of novel antigens for other apicomplexan parasites. Moreover, validation of the parasite genetics approach to identify effective antigens supports its adoption in other parasite systems where legitimate protective antigen identification is difficult. PMID:21347348

  2. Storytelling Slide Shows to Improve Diabetes and High Blood Pressure Knowledge and Self-Efficacy: Three-Year Results among Community Dwelling Older African Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertera, Elizabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    This study combined the African American tradition of oral storytelling with the Hispanic medium of "Fotonovelas." A staggered pretest posttest control group design was used to evaluate four Storytelling Slide Shows on health that featured community members. A total of 212 participants were recruited for the intervention and 217 for the…

  3. A High-Definition View of Functional Genetic Variation from Natural Yeast Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Bergström, Anders; Simpson, Jared T.; Salinas, Francisco; Barré, Benjamin; Parts, Leopold; Zia, Amin; Nguyen Ba, Alex N.; Moses, Alan M.; Louis, Edward J.; Mustonen, Ville; Warringer, Jonas; Durbin, Richard; Liti, Gianni

    2014-01-01

    The question of how genetic variation in a population influences phenotypic variation and evolution is of major importance in modern biology. Yet much is still unknown about the relative functional importance of different forms of genome variation and how they are shaped by evolutionary processes. Here we address these questions by population level sequencing of 42 strains from the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its closest relative S. paradoxus. We find that genome content variation, in the form of presence or absence as well as copy number of genetic material, is higher within S. cerevisiae than within S. paradoxus, despite genetic distances as measured in single-nucleotide polymorphisms being vastly smaller within the former species. This genome content variation, as well as loss-of-function variation in the form of premature stop codons and frameshifting indels, is heavily enriched in the subtelomeres, strongly reinforcing the relevance of these regions to functional evolution. Genes affected by these likely functional forms of variation are enriched for functions mediating interaction with the external environment (sugar transport and metabolism, flocculation, metal transport, and metabolism). Our results and analyses provide a comprehensive view of genomic diversity in budding yeast and expose surprising and pronounced differences between the variation within S. cerevisiae and that within S. paradoxus. We also believe that the sequence data and de novo assemblies will constitute a useful resource for further evolutionary and population genomics studies. PMID:24425782

  4. A boron difluoride dye showing the aggregation-induced emission feature and high sensitivity to intra- and extra-cellular pH changes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Shao, Li; Li, Yang; Hu, Qinglian; Huang, Feihe; Yu, Guocan; Tang, Guping

    2016-01-11

    A novel AIE-active boron difluoride fluorescent probe P3T was designed and synthesized. P3T exhibited high sensitivity to intra- and extra-cellular pH changes. Furthermore, a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) system was constructed, where P3T acted as a donor fluorophore and DOX as the acceptor. PMID:26537000

  5. Mobile robot localization from large-scale appearance mosaics has been showing increasing promise as a low-cost, high-perfor-

    E-print Network

    Nourbakhsh, Illah

    increasing promise as a low-cost, high-perfor- mance and infrastructure-free solution to vehicle guidance gener- ates consistent maps at low computational cost, while fully exploiting the topology of images for mapping loop-rich vehicle guidepaths in factories, and demands a time- efficient solution

  6. Glycinergic inhibition to the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body shows prominent facilitation and can sustain high levels of ongoing activity

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Florian; Albrecht, Otto; Dondzillo, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Neurons in the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) are well known for their prominent excitatory inputs, mediated by the calyx of Held. Less attention has been paid to the prominent inhibitory inputs that MNTB neurons also receive. Because of their auditory nature, both excitatory and inhibitory synapses are highly active in vivo. These high levels of activity are known to reduce excitatory synaptic currents considerably, such that in vivo synaptic currents produced by the calyx are smaller than typically measured in standard brain slice experiments. The goal of this study was to investigate the properties of the inhibitory inputs in the Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus) under activity levels that correspond to those in the intact brain to facilitate a direct comparison between the two inputs. Our results suggest that inhibitory inputs to MNTB are largely mediated by a fast and phasic glycinergic component, and to a lesser degree by a GABAergic component. The glycinergic component can sustain prolonged high levels of activity. Even when challenged with stimulus patterns consisting of thousands of stimuli over tens of minutes, glycinergic inputs to MNTB maintain large conductances and fast decays and even facilitate substantially when the stimulation frequency is increased. The inhibition is mediated by a relatively small number of independent input fibers. The data presented here suggest that inhibitory inputs to MNTB sustain high levels of activity and need to be considered for a full understanding of mechanisms underlying processing of auditory information in MNTB. PMID:25185813

  7. The Art Show

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scolarici, Alicia

    2004-01-01

    This article describes what once was thought to be impossible--a formal art show extravaganza at an elementary school with 1,000 students, a Department of Defense Dependent School (DODDS) located overseas, on RAF Lakenheath, England. The dream of this this event involved the transformation of the school cafeteria into an elegant art show

  8. Gibberellin 2-oxidases from seedlings of adzuki bean (Vigna angularis) show high gibberellin-binding activity in the presence of 2-oxoglutarate and Co2+.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung-Hyun; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Sakane, Masayuki; Xu, Zheng-Jun; Tomioka, Katsushi; Yamaguchi, Isomaro

    2005-08-01

    Five full-length cDNA encoding gibberellin 2-oxidases, VaGA2oxA1, VaGA2oxA2, VaGA2oxB1, VaGA2oxB2, and VaGA2oxB3, were cloned from etiolated adzuki bean (Vigna angularis cv. Dainagon) seedlings, and their enzymatic characteristics were examined using recombinant enzymes fused with glutathione S-transferase (GST). Recombinant VaGA2oxA1 (rVaGA2oxA1) and rVaGA2oxA2 showed 2beta-hydroxylation activity by converting GA1, GA4, GA9, GA20, GA4-methyl ester, and 16,17-dihydro-GA4 to the corresponding 2beta-hydroxylated gibberellins, which were identified by GC/MS. rVaGA2oxB1, rVaGA2oxB2, and rVaGA2oxB3 showed similar activity by converting [3H4]-16,17-dihydro-GA4 to a metabolite showing an Rf value of 16,17-dihydro-GA34. RNA-blot analysis showed that VaGA2oxA1 and VaGA2oxA2 were the major ones expressed in etiolated hypocotyls. The addition of Co2+ instead of Fe2+ to the assay medium apparently reduced the enzymatic activity, but increased the binding of [3H4]-16,17-dihydro-GA4 to rVaGA2oxA1, indicating the possibility that VaGA2oxs can be detected as gibberellin-binding proteins under certain conditions. PMID:16116277

  9. Ratios of Record High to Record Low Temperatures in Europe Show an Accelerating Trend Since 2000 Despite a Slowdown in Mean Temperature Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beniston, M.

    2014-12-01

    The present study has examined the behavior of extreme high and low temperatures in Euirope since the mid-20th century, in terms of the ratio of number of days per year with record Tmax and record Tmin. The investigations have shown that there has been a clear and massive increase in the number of high Tmax: low Tmin ratios in the most recent decade of the 1951-2013 temperature record for 30 selected observation stations in Europe. This sharp increase is seen to occur despite an apparent hiatus - or at least a reduction in the rate of warming - since the early 2000s, as observed not only in Europe but on a hemispheric basis too. The «explosion» of record high:record low temperature ratios since 2000, despite relatively small increases in mean temperatures in the last 10-15 years of the observational record, can be explained by a non-linear (quadratic) relation between mean temperatures and the Tmax:Tmin record ratios. It is suggested here that the increases are probably a consequence of increasing dryness during the summer in the Mediterranean region (where today there are on average 30 more dry days than in the 1950s), and a reduction in the cold season conducive to snow days in Arctic summers and Northern European springs (with up to 40 days less freezing days than 60 years previously). Both effects can serve to amplify positive temperature feedbacks in the lower atmosphere that result in strong increases in the number of Tmax record high temperatures and correspondingly strong reductions in the number of Tmin record low temperatures.

  10. Superoxide reductase from Giardia intestinalis: structural characterization of the first SOR from a eukaryotic organism shows an iron centre that is highly sensitive to photoreduction.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Cristiana M; Carpentier, Philippe; Matias, Pedro M; Testa, Fabrizio; Pinho, Filipa; Sarti, Paolo; Giuffrè, Alessandro; Bandeiras, Tiago M; Romão, Célia V

    2015-11-01

    Superoxide reductase (SOR), which is commonly found in prokaryotic organisms, affords protection from oxidative stress by reducing the superoxide anion to hydrogen peroxide. The reaction is catalyzed at the iron centre, which is highly conserved among the prokaryotic SORs structurally characterized to date. Reported here is the first structure of an SOR from a eukaryotic organism, the protozoan parasite Giardia intestinalis (GiSOR), which was solved at 2.0?Å resolution. By collecting several diffraction data sets at 100?K from the same flash-cooled protein crystal using synchrotron X-ray radiation, photoreduction of the iron centre was observed. Reduction was monitored using an online UV-visible microspectrophotometer, following the decay of the 647?nm absorption band characteristic of the iron site in the glutamate-bound, oxidized state. Similarly to other 1Fe-SORs structurally characterized to date, the enzyme displays a tetrameric quaternary-structure arrangement. As a distinctive feature, the N-terminal loop of the protein, containing the characteristic EKHxP motif, revealed an unusually high flexibility regardless of the iron redox state. At variance with previous evidence collected by X-ray crystallography and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of prokaryotic SORs, iron reduction did not lead to dissociation of glutamate from the catalytic metal or other structural changes; however, the glutamate ligand underwent X-ray-induced chemical changes, revealing high sensitivity of the GiSOR active site to X-ray radiation damage. PMID:26527141

  11. The mitochondrial genomes of Campodea fragilis and C. lubbocki(Hexapoda: Diplura): high genetic divergence in a morphologically uniformtaxon

    SciTech Connect

    Podsiadlowski, L.; Carapelli, A.; Nardi, F.; Dallai, R.; Koch,M.; Boore, J.L.; Frati, F.

    2005-12-01

    Mitochondrial genomes from two dipluran hexapods of the genus Campodea have been sequenced. Gene order is the same as in most other hexapods and crustaceans. Secondary structures of tRNAs reveal specific structural changes in tRNA-C, tRNA-R, tRNA-S1 and tRNA-S2. Comparative analyses of nucleotide and amino acid composition, as well as structural features of both ribosomal RNA subunits, reveal substantial differences among the analyzed taxa. Although the two Campodea species are morphologically highly uniform, genetic divergence is larger than expected, suggesting a long evolutionary history under stable ecological conditions.

  12. Combining high-throughput phenotyping and genome-wide association studies to reveal natural genetic variation in rice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wanneng; Guo, Zilong; Huang, Chenglong; Duan, Lingfeng; Chen, Guoxing; Jiang, Ni; Fang, Wei; Feng, Hui; Xie, Weibo; Lian, Xingming; Wang, Gongwei; Luo, Qingming; Zhang, Qifa; Liu, Qian; Xiong, Lizhong

    2014-01-01

    Even as the study of plant genomics rapidly develops through the use of high-throughput sequencing techniques, traditional plant phenotyping lags far behind. Here we develop a high-throughput rice phenotyping facility (HRPF) to monitor 13 traditional agronomic traits and 2 newly defined traits during the rice growth period. Using genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of the 15 traits, we identify 141 associated loci, 25 of which contain known genes such as the Green Revolution semi-dwarf gene, SD1. Based on a performance evaluation of the HRPF and GWAS results, we demonstrate that high-throughput phenotyping has the potential to replace traditional phenotyping techniques and can provide valuable gene identification information. The combination of the multifunctional phenotyping tools HRPF and GWAS provides deep insights into the genetic architecture of important traits. PMID:25295980

  13. Using High-Throughput Sequencing to Leverage Surveillance of Genetic Diversity and Oseltamivir Resistance: A Pilot Study during the 2009 Influenza A(H1N1) Pandemic

    PubMed Central

    Téllez-Sosa, Juan; Rodríguez, Mario Henry; Gómez-Barreto, Rosa E.; Valdovinos-Torres, Humberto; Hidalgo, Ana Cecilia; Cruz-Hervert, Pablo; Luna, René Santos; Carrillo-Valenzo, Erik; Ramos, Celso; García-García, Lourdes; Martínez-Barnetche, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    Background Influenza viruses display a high mutation rate and complex evolutionary patterns. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has been widely used for qualitative and semi-quantitative assessment of genetic diversity in complex biological samples. The “deep sequencing” approach, enabled by the enormous throughput of current NGS platforms, allows the identification of rare genetic viral variants in targeted genetic regions, but is usually limited to a small number of samples. Methodology and Principal Findings We designed a proof-of-principle study to test whether redistributing sequencing throughput from a high depth-small sample number towards a low depth-large sample number approach is feasible and contributes to influenza epidemiological surveillance. Using 454-Roche sequencing, we sequenced at a rather low depth, a 307 bp amplicon of the neuraminidase gene of the Influenza A(H1N1) pandemic (A(H1N1)pdm) virus from cDNA amplicons pooled in 48 barcoded libraries obtained from nasal swab samples of infected patients (n ?=? 299) taken from May to November, 2009 pandemic period in Mexico. This approach revealed that during the transition from the first (May-July) to second wave (September-November) of the pandemic, the initial genetic variants were replaced by the N248D mutation in the NA gene, and enabled the establishment of temporal and geographic associations with genetic diversity and the identification of mutations associated with oseltamivir resistance. Conclusions NGS sequencing of a short amplicon from the NA gene at low sequencing depth allowed genetic screening of a large number of samples, providing insights to viral genetic diversity dynamics and the identification of genetic variants associated with oseltamivir resistance. Further research is needed to explain the observed replacement of the genetic variants seen during the second wave. As sequencing throughput rises and library multiplexing and automation improves, we foresee that the approach presented here can be scaled up for global genetic surveillance of influenza and other infectious diseases. PMID:23843978

  14. Novel H7N9 Influenza Virus Shows Low Infectious Dose, High Growth Rate, and Efficient Contact Transmission in the Guinea Pig Model

    PubMed Central

    Gabbard, Jon D.; Dlugolenski, Daniel; Van Riel, Debby; Marshall, Nicolle; Galloway, Summer E.; Howerth, Elizabeth W.; Campbell, Patricia J.; Jones, Cheryl; Johnson, Scott; Byrd-Leotis, Lauren; Steinhauer, David A.; Kuiken, Thijs; Tompkins, S. Mark; Tripp, Ralph; Lowen, Anice C.

    2014-01-01

    The zoonotic outbreak of H7N9 subtype avian influenza virus that occurred in eastern China in the spring of 2013 resulted in 135 confirmed human cases, 44 of which were lethal. Sequencing of the viral genome revealed a number of molecular signatures associated with virulence or transmission in mammals. We report here that, in the guinea pig model, a human isolate of novel H7N9 influenza virus, A/Anhui/1/2013 (An/13), is highly dissimilar to an H7N1 avian isolate and instead behaves similarly to a human seasonal strain in several respects. An/13 was found to have a low 50% infectious dose, grow to high titers in the upper respiratory tract, and transmit efficiently among cocaged guinea pigs. The pH of fusion of the hemagglutinin (HA) and the binding of virus to fixed guinea pig tissues were also examined. The An/13 HA displayed a relatively elevated pH of fusion characteristic of many avian strains, and An/13 resembled avian viruses in terms of attachment to tissues. One important difference was seen between An/13 and both the H3N2 human and the H7N1 avian viruses: when inoculated intranasally at a high dose, only the An/13 virus led to productive infection of the lower respiratory tract of guinea pigs. In sum, An/13 was found to retain fusion and attachment properties of an avian influenza virus but displayed robust growth and contact transmission in the guinea pig model atypical of avian strains and indicative of mammalian adaptation. PMID:24227867

  15. "Black" TiO2 Nanotubes Formed by High-Energy Proton Implantation Show Noble-Metal-co-Catalyst Free Photocatalytic H2-Evolution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Häublein, Volker; Zhou, Xuemei; Venkatesan, Umamaheswari; Hartmann, Martin; Ma?kovi?, Mirza; Nakajima, Tomohiko; Spiecker, Erdmann; Osvet, Andres; Frey, Lothar; Schmuki, Patrik

    2015-10-14

    We apply high-energy proton ion-implantation to modify TiO2 nanotubes selectively at their tops. In the proton-implanted region, we observe the creation of intrinsic cocatalytic centers for photocatalytic H2-evolution. We find proton implantation to induce specific defects and a characteristic modification of the electronic properties not only in nanotubes but also on anatase single crystal (001) surfaces. Nevertheless, for TiO2 nanotubes a strong synergetic effect between implanted region (catalyst) and implant-free tube segment (absorber) can be obtained. PMID:26340509

  16. A Holographic Road Show.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkpatrick, Larry D.; Rugheimer, Mac

    1979-01-01

    Describes the viewing sessions and the holograms of a holographic road show. The traveling exhibits, believed to stimulate interest in physics, include a wide variety of holograms and demonstrate several physical principles. (GA)

  17. High-affinity potassium uptake system in Bacillus acidocaldarius showing immunological cross-reactivity with the Kdp system from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Bakker, E P; Borchard, A; Michels, M; Altendorf, K; Siebers, A

    1987-01-01

    During growth with low levels of K+, Bacillus acidocaldarius expressed a high-affinity K+ uptake system. The following observations indicate that this system strongly resembles the Kdp-ATPase of Escherichia coli: (i) its high affinity for K+ (Km of 20 microM or below); (ii) its poor transport of Rb+; (iii) the enhanced ATPase activity of membranes derived from cells grown with low levels of K+ (this activity was stimulated by K+ and inhibited by vanadate); (iv) the expression of an extra protein with a molecular weight of 70,000 in cells grown with low levels of K+; and (v) the immunological cross-reactivity of this 70,000-molecular-weight protein with antibodies against the catalytic subunit B of the E. coli Kdp system. Antibodies against the complete E. coli Kdp system, which immunoprecipitated the whole E. coli KdpABC complex, almost exclusively precipitated the 70,000-molecular-weight protein from detergent-solubilized B. acidocaldarius membranes. The possibility that the B. acidocaldarius Kdp system consists of a single, KdpB-type subunit is discussed. Images PMID:2957359

  18. Genetic alterations activating kinase and cytokine receptor signaling in high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Cancer.gov

    Activated kinase-like B-ALL does not harbor the BCR-ABL translocation, but it exhibits a very similar gene expression profile. The genetic alterations discovered in this study, which were validated by recurrence testing in a larger cohort, specifically affect cytokine receptors and regulators of kinase signaling. Moreover, several of the novel or rare alterations identified in this study induced cancerous phenotypes in cell lines and mouse xenograft models, and demonstrated sensitivity to tyrosine kinase inhibitors that are already used in the clinic.

  19. Prepulse inhibition predicts spatial working memory performance in the inbred Roman high- and low-avoidance rats and in genetically heterogeneous NIH-HS rats: relevance for studying pre-attentive and cognitive anomalies in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Oliveras, Ignasi; Río-Álamos, Cristóbal; Cañete, Toni; Blázquez, Gloria; Martínez-Membrives, Esther; Giorgi, Osvaldo; Corda, Maria G.; Tobeña, Adolf; Fernández-Teruel, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Animal models of schizophrenia-relevant symptoms are increasingly important for progress in our understanding of the neurobiological basis of the disorder and for discovering novel and more specific treatments. Prepulse inhibition (PPI) and working memory, which are impaired in schizophrenic patients, are among the symptoms/processes modeled in those animal analogs. We have evaluated whether a genetically-selected rat model, the Roman high-avoidance inbred strain (RHA-I), displays PPI deficits as compared with its Roman low-avoidance (RLA-I) counterpart and the genetically heterogeneous NIH-HS rat stock. We have investigated whether PPI deficits predict spatial working memory impairments (in the Morris water maze; MWM) in these three rat types (Experiment 1), as well as in a separate sample of NIH-HS rats stratified according to their extreme (High, Medium, Low) PPI scores (Experiment 2). The results from Experiment 1 show that RHA-I rats display PPI and spatial working memory deficits compared to both RLA-I and NIH-HS rats. Likewise, in Experiment 2, “Low-PPI” NIH-HS rats present significantly impaired working memory with respect to “Medium-PPI” and “High-PPI” NIH-HS subgroups. Further support to these results comes from correlational, factorial, and multiple regression analyses, which reveal that PPI is positively associated with spatial working memory performance. Conversely, cued learning in the MWM was not associated with PPI. Thus, using genetically-selected and genetically heterogeneous rats, the present study shows, for the first time, that PPI is a positive predictor of performance in a spatial working memory task. These results may have translational value for schizophrenia symptom research in humans, as they suggest that either by psychogenetic selection or by focusing on extreme PPI scores from a genetically heterogeneous rat stock, it is possible to detect a useful (perhaps “at risk”) phenotype to study cognitive anomalies linked to schizophrenia. PMID:26347624

  20. Human Genetics in Rheumatoid Arthritis Guides a High-Throughput Drug Screen of the CD40 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Diogo, Dorothée; Wu, Di; Spoonamore, Jim; Dancik, Vlado; Franke, Lude; Kurreeman, Fina; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Duclos, Grant; Hartland, Cathy; Zhou, Xuezhong; Li, Kejie; Liu, Jun; De Jager, Philip L.; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Bowes, John; Eyre, Steve; Padyukov, Leonid; Gregersen, Peter K.; Worthington, Jane; Gupta, Namrata; Clemons, Paul A.; Stahl, Eli; Tolliday, Nicola; Plenge, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Although genetic and non-genetic studies in mouse and human implicate the CD40 pathway in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there are no approved drugs that inhibit CD40 signaling for clinical care in RA or any other disease. Here, we sought to understand the biological consequences of a CD40 risk variant in RA discovered by a previous genome-wide association study (GWAS) and to perform a high-throughput drug screen for modulators of CD40 signaling based on human genetic findings. First, we fine-map the CD40 risk locus in 7,222 seropositive RA patients and 15,870 controls, together with deep sequencing of CD40 coding exons in 500 RA cases and 650 controls, to identify a single SNP that explains the entire signal of association (rs4810485, P?=?1.4×10?9). Second, we demonstrate that subjects homozygous for the RA risk allele have ?33% more CD40 on the surface of primary human CD19+ B lymphocytes than subjects homozygous for the non-risk allele (P?=?10?9), a finding corroborated by expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 1,469 healthy control individuals. Third, we use retroviral shRNA infection to perturb the amount of CD40 on the surface of a human B lymphocyte cell line (BL2) and observe a direct correlation between amount of CD40 protein and phosphorylation of RelA (p65), a subunit of the NF-?B transcription factor. Finally, we develop a high-throughput NF-?B luciferase reporter assay in BL2 cells activated with trimerized CD40 ligand (tCD40L) and conduct an HTS of 1,982 chemical compounds and FDA–approved drugs. After a series of counter-screens and testing in primary human CD19+ B cells, we identify 2 novel chemical inhibitors not previously implicated in inflammation or CD40-mediated NF-?B signaling. Our study demonstrates proof-of-concept that human genetics can be used to guide the development of phenotype-based, high-throughput small-molecule screens to identify potential novel therapies in complex traits such as RA. PMID:23696745

  1. Exendin-4 shows no effects on the prostatic index in high-fat-diet-fed rat with benign prostatic hyperplasia by improving insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Zheng, J-X; Xiao, Y-C; Hu, Y-R; Hao, M; Kuang, H-Y

    2015-03-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a prevalent disease globally, and accumulating evidence has indicated an association between BPH, insulin resistance (IR) and diabetes. Exendin-4 is widely used in clinics, which could enhance the proliferation of pancreatic ? cells. The ability of exendin-4 to promote tumorigenesis has been of concern, and whether exendin-4 would enhance the propagation of BPH is not fully understood. We aimed to determine whether glucagon-like peptide-1 receptors (GLP-1Rs) were expressed in rat prostate and to determine the effect of exendin-4 on prostate of BPH. Male Wistar rats were used and assigned to six groups: normal diet (ND), high-fat diet (HFD), HFD + exendin-4, HFD + BPH, HFD + BPH + exendin-4 and HFD + BPH + rosiglitazone group. After castration, steroids were injected subcutaneously for 4 weeks to induce BPH. Rats were kept on high-fat diet to induce IR. Treatment groups were treated with exendin-4 and rosiglitazone. Prostatic index and HOMA-IR index were used to evaluate the prostatic hyperplasia status and the degree of IR respectively. The expression of GLP-1R was indicated not only by immunohistochemistry, but also by Western blot analysis. The expression of GLP-1R was significantly higher, and HOMA-IR index and body weight significantly decreased after administration of exendin-4. However, no significant differences in the prostatic index were observed between exendin-4 treatment groups and non-exendin-4 treatment groups. Prostatic index was not influenced by exendin-4 maybe by improving IR and weight loss. PMID:24605934

  2. Exome sequencing reveals a high genetic heterogeneity on familial Hirschsprung disease.

    PubMed

    Luzón-Toro, Berta; Gui, Hongsheng; Ruiz-Ferrer, Macarena; Sze-Man Tang, Clara; Fernández, Raquel M; Sham, Pak-Chung; Torroglosa, Ana; Kwong-Hang Tam, Paul; Espino-Paisán, Laura; Cherny, Stacey S; Bleda, Marta; Enguix-Riego, María Del Valle; Dopazo, Joaquín; Antiñolo, Guillermo; García-Barceló, María-Mercé; Borrego, Salud

    2015-01-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR; OMIM 142623) is a developmental disorder characterized by aganglionosis along variable lengths of the distal gastrointestinal tract, which results in intestinal obstruction. Interactions among known HSCR genes and/or unknown disease susceptibility loci lead to variable severity of phenotype. Neither linkage nor genome-wide association studies have efficiently contributed to completely dissect the genetic pathways underlying this complex genetic disorder. We have performed whole exome sequencing of 16 HSCR patients from 8 unrelated families with SOLID platform. Variants shared by affected relatives were validated by Sanger sequencing. We searched for genes recurrently mutated across families. Only variations in the FAT3 gene were significantly enriched in five families. Within-family analysis identified compound heterozygotes for AHNAK and several genes (N?=?23) with heterozygous variants that co-segregated with the phenotype. Network and pathway analyses facilitated the discovery of polygenic inheritance involving FAT3, HSCR known genes and their gene partners. Altogether, our approach has facilitated the detection of more than one damaging variant in biologically plausible genes that could jointly contribute to the phenotype. Our data may contribute to the understanding of the complex interactions that occur during enteric nervous system development and the etiopathology of familial HSCR. PMID:26559152

  3. High output genetic mapping of polyploids using PCR-generated markers.

    PubMed

    Sobral, B W; Honeycutt, R J

    1993-03-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with arbitrarily selected primers has been established as an efficient method to generate fingerprints that are useful in genetic mapping and genomic fingerprinting. To further increase the productivity of mapping and fingerprinting efforts, we have altered existing protocols to include the use of the Stoffel fragment, which is derived from genetically engineered Taq polymerase. We also optimized the thermal profile of the reaction to increase the number of useful primers. In mapping of the genome of Saccharum spontaneum 'SES 208', a polyploid wild relative of sugarcane, these modifications allowed for an increase of 30% in the number of loci screened per primer, and an 80% increase in the number of polymorphisms per primer. Furthermore, the enzyme cost per reaction was decreased approximately 1.6-fold. Finally, there was an increase from about 70% to about 97% in the number of primers that were useful (i.e., gave a reproducible fingerprint) using our protocol. We have placed some of these markers into linkage groups. PMID:24193389

  4. Exome sequencing reveals a high genetic heterogeneity on familial Hirschsprung disease

    PubMed Central

    Luzón-Toro, Berta; Gui, Hongsheng; Ruiz-Ferrer, Macarena; Sze-Man Tang, Clara; Fernández, Raquel M.; Sham, Pak-Chung; Torroglosa, Ana; Kwong-Hang Tam, Paul; Espino-Paisán, Laura; Cherny, Stacey S.; Bleda, Marta; Enguix-Riego, María del Valle; Dopazo, Joaquín; Antiñolo, Guillermo; García-Barceló, María-Mercé; Borrego, Salud

    2015-01-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR; OMIM 142623) is a developmental disorder characterized by aganglionosis along variable lengths of the distal gastrointestinal tract, which results in intestinal obstruction. Interactions among known HSCR genes and/or unknown disease susceptibility loci lead to variable severity of phenotype. Neither linkage nor genome-wide association studies have efficiently contributed to completely dissect the genetic pathways underlying this complex genetic disorder. We have performed whole exome sequencing of 16 HSCR patients from 8 unrelated families with SOLID platform. Variants shared by affected relatives were validated by Sanger sequencing. We searched for genes recurrently mutated across families. Only variations in the FAT3 gene were significantly enriched in five families. Within-family analysis identified compound heterozygotes for AHNAK and several genes (N?=?23) with heterozygous variants that co-segregated with the phenotype. Network and pathway analyses facilitated the discovery of polygenic inheritance involving FAT3, HSCR known genes and their gene partners. Altogether, our approach has facilitated the detection of more than one damaging variant in biologically plausible genes that could jointly contribute to the phenotype. Our data may contribute to the understanding of the complex interactions that occur during enteric nervous system development and the etiopathology of familial HSCR. PMID:26559152

  5. The auditory ossicles as a DNA source for genetic identification of highly putrefied cadavers.

    PubMed

    Schwark, Thorsten; Modrow, Jan-Hendrik; Steinmeier, Elena; Poetsch, Micaela; Hasse, Johannes; Fischer, Hartmut; von Wurmb-Schwark, Nicole

    2015-05-01

    Genetic identification of putrefied bodies is a common task in forensic medicine. With advancing putrefaction, however, DNA integrity is rapidly decreasing and genetic typing of tissue might be impaired or impossible. Since DNA stability is generally higher in hard tissues, bones or teeth are frequently used as DNA source in such cases. However, isolation of DNA from hard tissues is usually very time-consuming and labor-intensive. This can be especially important in (forensic) cases where time is short and identification has to be carried out as fast as possible. Here, we present the identification of dead bodies by analyzing DNA from the auditory ossicles. These minuscule bones provided DNA of sufficient quality and quantity for identification purposes in all 40 investigated cases. Additionally, processing of the bones proved to be amazingly easy and fast, and a successful extraction is possible using a variety of different methods. We present a detailed protocol, results, and cases in which this new method has been successfully applied. PMID:25794688

  6. High genetic diversity of HIV-1 was found in men who have sex with men in Shijiazhuang, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Lu, Xinli; Li, Hanping; Chen, Lili; Wang, Zheng; Liu, Yongjian; Bao, Zuoyi; Li, Tianyi; Tian, Chong; Liu, Hongxin; Zhuang, Daomin; Liu, Siyang; Li, Jingyun

    2011-08-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) have become one of the populations with severely HIV prevalence in China. However, very few genetic studies have been done on HIV-1 spreading in this population. In this study, the genetic characterization of HIV-1 strains prevalent in the MSM in Shijiazhuang, China, was analyzed basing on the HIV-1 full-length gag, pol, and partial env gene. 21 drug-naïve HIV-1 sero-positive patients were enrolled into the study. Full length gag, pol, partial env genes and some near full length genomes were amplified with nest RT-PCR followed by sequencing. Multiple subtypes, including CRF01_AE (52.9%), subtype B (35.3%) and CRF07_BC (11.8%), were found in the population. Phylogenetic analysis showed close relationship between our strains with those from Beijing MSM but not those from paid blood donors of local area. Drug resistance surveillance evaluation showed no transmitted drug resistance (TDR). However, some drug-resistance related polymorphism sites (V181I and V106I) were popularly found in B subtype strains. The findings will contribute to understanding the distribution and evolution of HIV-1 in MSM and also help the behavior change intervention. PMID:21645646

  7. A High Resolution Case Study of a Patient with Recurrent Plasmodium vivax Infections Shows That Relapses Were Caused by Meiotic Siblings

    PubMed Central

    Bright, Andrew Taylor; Manary, Micah J.; Tewhey, Ryan; Arango, Eliana M.; Wang, Tina; Schork, Nicholas J.; Yanow, Stephanie K.; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax infects a hundred million people annually and endangers 40% of the world's population. Unlike Plasmodium falciparum, P. vivax parasites can persist as a dormant stage in the liver, known as the hypnozoite, and these dormant forms can cause malaria relapses months or years after the initial mosquito bite. Here we analyze whole genome sequencing data from parasites in the blood of a patient who experienced consecutive P. vivax relapses over 33 months in a non-endemic country. By analyzing patterns of identity, read coverage, and the presence or absence of minor alleles in the initial polyclonal and subsequent monoclonal infections, we show that the parasites in the three infections are likely meiotic siblings. We infer that these siblings are descended from a single tetrad-like form that developed in the infecting mosquito midgut shortly after fertilization. In this natural cross we find the recombination rate for P. vivax to be 10 kb per centimorgan and we further observe areas of disequilibrium surrounding major drug resistance genes. Our data provide new strategies for studying multiclonal infections, which are common in all types of infectious diseases, and for distinguishing P. vivax relapses from reinfections in malaria endemic regions. This work provides a theoretical foundation for studies that aim to determine if new or existing drugs can provide a radical cure of P. vivax malaria. PMID:24901334

  8. High Genetic Diversity Detected in Olives beyond the Boundaries of the Mediterranean Sea

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh-Hassani, Massoma; Ataei, Saeedeh; Cultrera, Nicolò G. M.; Pandolfi, Saverio; Baldoni, Luciana

    2014-01-01

    Background Olive trees (Olea europaea subsp. europaea var. europaea) naturally grow in areas spanning the Mediterranean basin and towards the East, including the Middle East. In the Iranian plateau, the presence of olives has been documented since very ancient times, though the early history of the crop in this area is shrouded in uncertainty. Methods The varieties presently cultivated in Iran and trees of an unknown cultivation status, surviving under extreme climate and soil conditions, were sampled from different provinces and compared with a set of Mediterranean cultivars. All samples were analyzed using SSR and chloroplast markers to establish the relationships between Iranian olives and Mediterranean varieties, to shed light on the origins of Iranian olives and to verify their contribution to the development of the current global olive variation. Results Iranian cultivars and ecotypes, when analyzed using SSR markers, clustered separately from Mediterranean cultivars and showed a high number of private alleles, on the contrary, they shared the same single chlorotype with the most widespread varieties cultivated in the Mediterranean. Conclusion We hypothesized that Iranian and Mediterranean olive trees may have had a common origin from a unique center in the Near East region, possibly including the western Iranian area. The present pattern of variation may have derived from different environmental conditions, distinct levels and selection criteria, and divergent breeding opportunities found by Mediterranean and Iranian olives.These unexpected findings emphasize the importance of studying the Iranian olive germplasm as a promising but endangered source of variation. PMID:24709858

  9. Cholesterol oxidase with high catalytic activity from Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Screening, molecular genetic analysis, expression and characterization.

    PubMed

    Doukyu, Noriyuki; Nihei, Shyou

    2015-07-01

    An extracellular cholesterol oxidase producer, Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA157, was isolated by a screening method to detect 6?-hydroperoxycholest-4-en-3-one-forming cholesterol oxidase. On the basis of a putative cholesterol oxidase gene sequence in the genome sequence data of P. aeruginosa strain PAO1, the cholesterol oxidase gene from strain PA157 was cloned. The mature form of the enzyme was overexpressed in Escherichia coli cells. The overexpressed enzyme formed inclusion bodies in recombinant E. coli cells grown at 20 °C and 30 °C. A soluble and active PA157 enzyme was obtained when the recombinant cells were grown at 10 °C. The purified enzyme was stable at pH 5.5 to 10 and was most active at pH 7.5-8.0, showing optimal activity at pH 7.0 and 70 °C. The enzyme retained about 90% of its activity after incubation for 30 min at 70 °C. The enzyme oxidized 3?-hydroxysteroids such as cholesterol, ?-cholestanol, and ?-sitosterol at high rates. The Km value and Vmax value for the cholesterol were 92.6 ?M and 15.9 ?mol/min/mg of protein, respectively. The Vmax value of the enzyme was higher than those of commercially available cholesterol oxidases. This is the first report to characterize a cholesterol oxidase from P. aeruginosa. PMID:25573142

  10. Nanocomposites of tantalum-based pyrochlore and indium hydroxide showing high and stable photocatalytic activities for overall water splitting and carbon dioxide reduction.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Meng-Chun; Wu, Guan-Chang; Liu, Wei-Guang; Goddard, William A; Yang, Chia-Min

    2014-12-15

    Nanocomposites of tantalum-based pyrochlore nanoparticles and indium hydroxide were prepared by a hydrothermal process for UV-driven photocatalytic reactions including overall water splitting, hydrogen production from photoreforming of methanol, and CO2 reduction with water to produce CO. The best catalyst was more than 20?times more active than sodium tantalate in overall water splitting and 3?times more active than Degussa P25 TiO2 in CO2 reduction. Moreover, the catalyst was very stable while generating stoichiometric products of H2 (or CO) and O2 throughout long-term photocatalytic reactions. After the removal of In(OH)3, the pyrochlore nanoparticles remained highly active for H2 production from pure water and aqueous methanol solution. Both experimental studies and density functional theory calculations suggest that the pyrochlore nanoparticles catalyzed the water reduction to produce H2, whereas In(OH)3 was the major active component for water oxidation to produce O2. PMID:25384922

  11. High porous titanium scaffolds showed higher compatibility than lower porous beta-tricalcium phosphate scaffolds for regulating human osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Makoto; Hayakawa, Tohru; Shima, Takaki; Ametani, Akihiro; Tohnai, Iwai

    2015-04-01

    We compared osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation when using beta-tricalcium phosphate (?TCP) and titanium scaffolds by investigating human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and osteoclast progenitor cell activities. hMSCs were cultured for 7, 14, and 21days on titanium scaffolds with 60%, 73%, and 87% porosity and on ?TCP scaffolds with 60% and 75% porosity. Human osteoclast progenitor cells were cultured with osteoblast for 14 and 21days on 87% titanium and 75% ?TCP scaffolds. Viable cell numbers with 60% and 73% titanium were higher than with 87% titanium and ?TCP scaffolds (P<0.05). An 87% titanium scaffold resulted in the highest osteocalcin production with calcification on day 14 (P<0.01) in titanium scaffolds. All titanium scaffolds resulted in higher osteocalcin production on days 7 and 14 compared to ?TCP scaffolds (P<0.01). Osteoblasts cultured on 87% titanium scaffolds suppressed osteoclast differentiation on day 7 but enhanced osteoclast differentiation on day 14 compared to 75% ?TCP scaffolds (P<0.01). These findings concluded that high porosity titanium scaffolds could enhance progression of hMSC/osteoblast differentiation and regulated osteoclast differentiation cooperating with osteoblast differentiation for calcification as compared with lower porous ?TCP. PMID:25686991

  12. Show Me the Way

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dicks, Matthew J.

    2005-01-01

    Because today's students have grown up steeped in video games and the Internet, most of them expect feedback, and usually gratification, very soon after they expend effort on a task. Teachers can get quick feedback to students by showing them videotapes of their learning performances. The author, a 3rd grade teacher describes how the seemingly…

  13. Stage a Water Show

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frasier, Debra

    2008-01-01

    In the author's book titled "The Incredible Water Show," the characters from "Miss Alaineus: A Vocabulary Disaster" used an ocean of information to stage an inventive performance about the water cycle. In this article, the author relates how she turned the story into hands-on science teaching for real-life fifth-grade students. The author also…

  14. The Ozone Show.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathieu, Aaron

    2000-01-01

    Uses a talk show activity for a final assessment tool for students to debate about the ozone hole. Students are assessed on five areas: (1) cooperative learning; (2) the written component; (3) content; (4) self-evaluation; and (5) peer evaluation. (SAH)

  15. High genetic compatibility and increased pathogenicity of reassortants derived from avian H9N2 and pandemic H1N1/2009 influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yipeng; Qin, Kun; Wang, Jingjing; Pu, Juan; Tang, Qingdong; Hu, Yanxin; Bi, Yuhai; Zhao, Xueli; Yang, Hanchun; Shu, Yuelong; Liu, Jinhua

    2011-01-01

    H9N2 influenza viruses have been circulating worldwide in multiple avian species and repeatedly infecting mammals, including pigs and humans, posing a significant threat to public health. The coexistence of H9N2 and pandemic influenza H1N1/2009 viruses in pigs and humans provides an opportunity for these viruses to reassort. To evaluate the potential public risk of the reassortant viruses derived from these viruses, we used reverse genetics to generate 127 H9 reassortants derived from an avian H9N2 and a pandemic H1N1 virus, and evaluated their compatibility, replication ability, and virulence in mice. These hybrid viruses showed high genetic compatibility and more than half replicated to a high titer in vitro. In vivo studies of 73 of 127 reassortants revealed that all viruses were able to infect mice without prior adaptation and 8 reassortants exhibited higher pathogenicity than both parental viruses. All reassortants with higher virulence than parental viruses contained the PA gene from the 2009 pandemic virus, revealing the important role of the PA gene from the H1N1/2009 virus in generating a reassortant virus with high public health risk. Analyses of the polymerase activity of the 16 ribonucleoprotein combinations in vitro suggested that the PA of H1N1/2009 origin also enhanced polymerase activity. Our results indicate that some avian H9-pandemic reassortants could emerge with a potentially higher threat for humans and also highlight the importance of monitoring the H9-pandemic reassortant viruses that may arise, especially those that possess the PA gene of H1N1/2009 origin. PMID:21368167

  16. Not So Giants: Mice Lacking Both Somatostatin and Cortistatin Have High GH Levels but Show No Changes in Growth Rate or IGF-1 Levels.

    PubMed

    Pedraza-Arévalo, S; Córdoba-Chacón, J; Pozo-Salas, A I; L-López, F; de Lecea, L; Gahete, M D; Castaño, J P; Luque, R M

    2015-06-01

    Somatostatin (SST) and cortistatin (CORT) are two highly related neuropeptides involved in the regulation of various endocrine secretions. In particular, SST and CORT are two primary negative regulators of GH secretion. Consequently, single SST or CORT knockout mice exhibit elevated GH levels; however, this does not lead to increased IGF-1 levels or somatic growth. This apparent lack of correspondence has been suggested to result from compensatory mechanisms between both peptides. To test this hypothesis, in this study we explored, for the first time, the consequences of simultaneously deleting endogenous SST and CORT by generating a double SST/CORT knockout mouse model and exploring its endocrine and metabolic phenotype. Our results demonstrate that simultaneous deletion of SST and CORT induced a drastic elevation of endogenous GH levels, which, surprisingly, did not lead to changes in growth rate or IGF-1 levels, suggesting the existence of additional factors/systems that, in the absence of endogenous SST and CORT, could counteract GH actions. Notably, elevation in circulating GH levels were not accompanied by changes in pituitary GH expression or by alterations in the expression of its main regulators (GHRH and ghrelin) or their receptors (GHRH receptor, GHS receptor, or SST/CORT receptors) at the hypothalamic or pituitary level. However, although double-SST/CORT knockout male mice exhibited normal glucose and insulin levels, they had improved insulin sensitivity compared with the control mice. Therefore, these results suggest the existence of an intricate interplay among the known (SST/CORT), and likely unknown, inhibitory components of the GH/IGF-1 axis to regulate somatic growth and glucose/insulin homeostasis. PMID:25830706

  17. Responders to Wide-Pulse, High-Frequency Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation Show Reduced Metabolic Demand: A 31P-MRS Study in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Wegrzyk, Jennifer; Fouré, Alexandre; Le Fur, Yann; Maffiuletti, Nicola A.; Vilmen, Christophe; Guye, Maxime; Mattei, Jean-Pierre; Place, Nicolas; Bendahan, David; Gondin, Julien

    2015-01-01

    Conventional (CONV) neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) (i.e., short pulse duration, low frequencies) induces a higher energetic response as compared to voluntary contractions (VOL). In contrast, wide-pulse, high-frequency (WPHF) NMES might elicit–at least in some subjects (i.e., responders)–a different motor unit recruitment compared to CONV that resembles the physiological muscle activation pattern of VOL. We therefore hypothesized that for these responder subjects, the metabolic demand of WPHF would be lower than CONV and comparable to VOL. 18 healthy subjects performed isometric plantar flexions at 10% of their maximal voluntary contraction force for CONV (25 Hz, 0.05 ms), WPHF (100 Hz, 1 ms) and VOL protocols. For each protocol, force time integral (FTI) was quantified and subjects were classified as responders and non-responders to WPHF based on k-means clustering analysis. Furthermore, a fatigue index based on FTI loss at the end of each protocol compared with the beginning of the protocol was calculated. Phosphocreatine depletion (?PCr) was assessed using 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Responders developed four times higher FTI’s during WPHF (99 ± 37 ×103 N.s) than non-responders (26 ± 12 ×103 N.s). For both responders and non-responders, CONV was metabolically more demanding than VOL when ?PCr was expressed relative to the FTI. Only for the responder group, the ?PCr/FTI ratio of WPHF (0.74 ± 0.19 M/N.s) was significantly lower compared to CONV (1.48 ± 0.46 M/N.s) but similar to VOL (0.65 ± 0.21 M/N.s). Moreover, the fatigue index was not different between WPHF (-16%) and CONV (-25%) for the responders. WPHF could therefore be considered as the less demanding NMES modality–at least in this subgroup of subjects–by possibly exhibiting a muscle activation pattern similar to VOL contractions. PMID:26619330

  18. Randomised controlled trial shows that glyceryl trinitrate heals anal fissures, higher doses are not more effective, and there is a high recurrence rate

    PubMed Central

    Carapeti, E; Kamm, M; McDonald, P; Chadwick, S; Melville, D; Phillips, R

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Topical application of glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) ointment heals chronic anal fissures, providing an alternative to the traditional first line treatment of surgical sphincterotomy. ?AIMS—To determine the most effective dose of topical GTN for treatment of chronic anal fissures and to assess long term results. ?METHODS—Seventy consecutive patients with chronic anal fissure, were randomly allocated to eight weeks treatment with placebo, 0.2% GTN three times daily, or GTN starting at 0.2% with weekly 0.1% increments to a maximum of 0.6%, in a double blind study. ?RESULTS—After eight weeks fissure had healed in 67% of patients treated with GTN compared with 32% with placebo (p=0.008). No significant difference was seen between the two active treatments. Headaches were reported by 72% of patients on GTN compared with 27% on placebo (p<0.001). Maximum anal sphincter pressure reduced significantly from baseline by GTN treatment (p=0.02), but not placebo (p=0.8). Mean pain scores were lower after treatment with GTN compared with placebo (NS). Of fissures healed with placebo 43% recurred, compared with 33% of those healed with 0.2% GTN and 25% healed with escalating dose GTN (p=0.7). ?CONCLUSIONS—GTN is a good first line treatment for two thirds of patients with anal fissure. An escalating dose of GTN does not result in earlier healing. Significant recurrence of symptomatic fissures and a high incidence of headaches are limitations of the treatment. ?? Keywords: glyceryl trinitrate; anal fissures PMID:10205213

  19. The sodium-bicarbonate cotransporter NBCe2 (slc4a5) expressed in human renal proximal tubules shows increased apical expression under high-salt conditions.

    PubMed

    Gildea, John J; Xu, Peng; Carlson, Julia M; Gaglione, Robert T; Bigler Wang, Dora; Kemp, Brandon A; Reyes, Camellia M; McGrath, Helen E; Carey, Robert M; Jose, Pedro A; Felder, Robin A

    2015-12-01

    The electrogenic sodium bicarbonate cotransporter (NBCe2) is encoded by SLC4A5, variants of which have been associated with salt sensitivity of blood pressure, which affects 25% of the adult population. NBCe2 is thought to mediate sodium bicarbonate cotransport primarily in the renal collecting duct, but NBCe2 mRNA is also found in the rodent renal proximal tubule (RPT). The protein expression or function of NBCe2 has not been demonstrated in the human RPT. We validated an NBCe2 antibody by shRNA and Western blot analysis, as well as overexpression of an epitope-tagged NBCe2 construct in both RPT cells (RPTCs) and human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells. Using this validated NBCe2 antibody, we found NBCe2 protein expression in the RPT of fresh and frozen human kidney slices, RPTCs isolated from human urine, and isolated RPTC apical membrane. Under basal conditions, NBCe2 was primarily found in the Golgi, while NBCe1 was primarily found at the basolateral membrane. Following an acute short-term increase in intracellular sodium, NBCe2 expression was increased at the apical membrane in cultured slices of human kidney and polarized, immortalized RPTCs. Sodium bicarbonate transport was increased by monensin and overexpression of NBCe2, decreased by NBCe2 shRNA, but not by NBCe1 shRNA, and blocked by 2,2'-(1,2-ethenediyl)bis[5-isothiocyanato-benzenesulfonic acid]. NBCe2 could be important in apical sodium and bicarbonate cotransport under high-salt conditions; the implication of the ex vivo studies to the in vivo situation when salt intake is increased remains unclear. Therefore, future studies will examine the role of NBCe2 in mediating increased renal sodium transport in humans whose blood pressures are elevated by an increase in sodium intake. PMID:26447209

  20. Genetic diversity, asymmetrical aggression, and recognition in a widespread invasive species

    E-print Network

    Grosberg, Rick

    Genetic diversity, asymmetrical aggression, and recognition in a widespread invasive species Neil D a high cost. Here we provide evidence that selection against individuals from genetically diverse groups showed that individuals from less genetically diverse colonies attack individuals from more diverse

  1. An Escherichia coli Strain, PGB01, Isolated from Feral Pigeon Faeces, Thermally Fit to Survive in Pigeon, Shows High Level Resistance to Trimethoprim

    PubMed Central

    Kachhap, Sangita; Nanda, Ashis Kumar; Chakraborty, Ranadhir

    2015-01-01

    In this study, of the hundred Escherichia coli strains isolated from feral Pigeon faeces, eighty five strains were resistant to one or more antibiotics and fifteen sensitive to all the antibiotics tested. The only strain (among all antibiotic-resistant E. coli isolates) that possessed class 1 integron was PGB01. The dihydrofolate reductase gene of the said integron was cloned, sequenced and expressed in E. coli JM109. Since PGB01 was native to pigeon’s gut, we have compared the growth of PGB01 at two different temperatures, 42°C (normal body temperature of pigeon) and 37°C (optimal growth temperature of E. coli; also the human body temperature), with E. coli K12. It was found that PGB01 grew better than the laboratory strain E. coli K12 at 37°C as well as at 42°C. In the thermal fitness assay, it was observed that the cells of PGB01 were better adapted to 42°C, resembling the average body temperature of pigeon. The strain PGB01 also sustained more microwave mediated thermal stress than E. coli K12 cells. The NMR spectra of the whole cells of PGB01 varied from E. coli K12 in several spectral peaks relating some metabolic adaptation to thermotolerance. On elevating the growth temperature from 37°C to 42°C, susceptibility to kanamycin (both strains were sensitive to it) of E. coli K12 was increased, but in case of PGB01 no change in susceptibility took place. We have also attempted to reveal the basis of trimethoprim resistance phenotype conferred by the dfrA7 gene homologue of PGB01. Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation study of docked complexes, PGB01-DfrA7 and E. coli TMP-sensitive-Dfr with trimethoprim (TMP) showed loss of some of the hydrogen and hydrophobic interaction between TMP and mutated residues in PGB01-DfrA7-TMP complex compared to TMP-sensitive-Dfr-TMP complex. This loss of interaction entails decrease in affinity of TMP for PGB01-DfrA7 compared to TMP-sensitive-Dfr. PMID:25750990

  2. Genes showing altered expression in the medial preoptic area in the highly social maternal phenotype are related to autism and other disorders with social deficits

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The mother-child relationship is the most fundamental social bond in mammals, and previous studies indicate that the medial preoptic area (MPOA) contributes to this increase in sociability. It is possible that the same genes that lead to elevated sociability in one condition (the maternal state) might also be dysregulated in some disorders with social deficits (e.g. autism). In this study, we examined whether there was enrichment (greater than chance overlap) for social deficit disorder related genes in MPOA microarray results between virgin and postpartum female mice. We utilized microarrays to assess large scale gene expression changes in the MPOA of virgin and postpartum mice. The Modular Single Set Enrichment Test (MSET) was used to determine if mental health disorder related genes were enriched in significant microarray results. Additional resources, such as ToppCluster, NIH DAVID, and weighted co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) were used to analyze enrichment for specific gene clusters or indirect relationships between significant genes of interest. Finally, a subset of microarray results was validated using quantitative PCR. Results Significant postpartum MPOA microarray results were enriched for multiple disorders that include social deficits, including autism, bipolar disorder, depression, and schizophrenia. Together, 98 autism-related genes were identified from the significant microarray results. Further, ToppCluser and NIH DAVID identified a large number of postpartum genes related to ion channel activity and CNS development, and also suggested a role for microRNAs in regulating maternal gene expression. WGCNA identified a module of genes associated with the postpartum phenotype, and identified indirect links between transcription factors and other genes of interest. Conclusion The transition to the maternal state involves great CNS plasticity and increased sociability. We identified multiple novel genes that overlap between the postpartum MPOA (high sociability) and mental health disorders with low sociability. Thus, the activity or interactions of the same genes may be altering social behaviors in different directions in different conditions. Maternity also involves elevated risks for disorders, including depression, psychosis, and BPD, so identification of maternal genes common to these disorders may provide insights into the elevated vulnerability of the maternal brain. PMID:24423034

  3. Alternative to the soft-agar assay that permits high-throughput drug and genetic screens for cellular transformation

    PubMed Central

    Rotem, Asaf; Janzer, Andreas; Izar, Benjamin; Ji, Zhe; Doench, John G.; Garraway, Levi A.; Struhl, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Colony formation in soft agar is the gold-standard assay for cellular transformation in vitro, but it is unsuited for high-throughput screening. Here, we describe an assay for cellular transformation that involves growth in low attachment (GILA) conditions and is strongly correlated with the soft-agar assay. Using GILA, we describe high-throughput screens for drugs and genes that selectively inhibit or increase transformation, but not proliferation. Such molecules are unlikely to be found through conventional drug screening, and they include kinase inhibitors and drugs for noncancer diseases. In addition to known oncogenes, the genetic screen identifies genes that contribute to cellular transformation. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability of Food and Drug Administration-approved noncancer drugs to selectively kill ovarian cancer cells derived from patients with chemotherapy-resistant disease, suggesting this approach may provide useful information for personalized cancer treatment. PMID:25902495

  4. Mars Slide Show

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    15 September 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a landslide that occurred off of a steep slope in Tithonium Chasma, part of the vast Valles Marineris trough system.

    Location near: 4.8oS, 84.6oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Autumn

  5. Keeping Show Pigs Healthy 

    E-print Network

    Lawhorn, D. Bruce

    2006-10-13

    ? are approved antibiotics commonly used in rations. For more information on feed med- ication for specific diseases, check these Extension publications: Diarrheal Disease in Show Swine, L-5320; and Swine Pneumonia, L-5203. taking care dUring and after... requiring anesthesia, such as removal of a retained testicle (cryptorchidism), removal of an infected and enlarged urine pocket (preputial diverticulum removal), repair of scrotal or umbil- ical hernia, and removal of tumors. Before a sur- geon...

  6. Genetic analysis of long-lived families reveals novel variants influencing high density-lipoprotein cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Feitosa, Mary F.; Wojczynski, Mary K.; Straka, Robert; Kammerer, Candace M.; Lee, Joseph H.; Kraja, Aldi T.; Christensen, Kaare; Newman, Anne B.; Province, Michael A.; Borecki, Ingrid B.

    2014-01-01

    The plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) have an inverse relationship to the risks of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD), and have also been associated with longevity. We sought to identify novel loci for HDL that could potentially provide new insights into biological regulation of HDL metabolism in healthy-longevous subjects. We performed a genome-wide association (GWA) scan on HDL using a mixed model approach to account for family structure using kinship coefficients. A total of 4114 subjects of European descent (480 families) were genotyped at ~2.3 million SNPs and ~38 million SNPs were imputed using the 1000 Genome Cosmopolitan reference panel in MACH. We identified novel variants near-NLRP1 (17p13) associated with an increase of HDL levels at genome-wide significant level (p < 5.0E-08). Additionally, several CETP (16q21) and ZNF259-APOA5-A4-C3-A1 (11q23.3) variants associated with HDL were found, replicating those previously reported in the literature. A possible regulatory variant upstream of NLRP1 that is associated with HDL in these elderly Long Life Family Study (LLFS) subjects may also contribute to their longevity and health. Our NLRP1 intergenic SNPs show a potential regulatory function in Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE); however, it is not clear whether they regulate NLRP1 or other more remote gene. NLRP1 plays an important role in the induction of apoptosis, and its inflammasome is critical for mediating innate immune responses. Nlrp1a (a mouse ortholog of human NLRP1) interacts with SREBP-1a (17p11) which has a fundamental role in lipid concentration and composition, and is involved in innate immune response in macrophages. The NLRP1 region is conserved in mammals, but also has evolved adaptively showing signals of positive selection in European populations that might confer an advantage. NLRP1 intergenic SNPs have also been associated with immunity/inflammasome disorders which highlights the biological importance of this chromosomal region. PMID:24917880

  7. High Prevalence and Genetic Diversity of Campylobacter jejuni in Wild Crows and Pigeons.

    PubMed

    Ramonait?, Sigita; Novoslavskij, Aleksandr; Zakarien?, Gintar?; Aksomaitien?, Jurgita; Malakauskas, Mindaugas

    2015-11-01

    The occurrence, seasonal variation and genetic diversity of Campylobacter spp. in pigeons and crows over a 1-year period were evaluated. Campylobacter spp. were isolated from 166 (34.6 %) out of 480 wild bird faecal samples. The occurrence of Campylobacter spp. in faecal samples was higher among crows (39.2 %) than pigeons (30.0 %), (P < 0.05). Campylobacter jejuni was the most common species detected among wild bird faecal samples (98.2 %). Meanwhile, Campylobacter coli prevalence in wild bird faecal samples was low-6 %. The Simpson's diversity index of C. jejuni flaA RFLP types was lower in pigeons (D = 0.88) compared with C. jejuni isolates detected in crows (D = 0.97). Obtained results revealed that C. jejuni are widely prevalent among crows and pigeons, indicating these wild birds as potential infection sources to humans. Further studies are required to determine crows and pigeons role in zoonotic transmission of Campylobacter. PMID:26228635

  8. Highly impulsive rats: modelling an endophenotype to determine the neurobiological, genetic and environmental mechanisms of addiction

    PubMed Central

    Jupp, Bianca; Caprioli, Daniele; Dalley, Jeffrey W.

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity describes the tendency of an individual to act prematurely without foresight and is associated with a number of neuropsychiatric co-morbidities, including drug addiction. As such, there is increasing interest in the neurobiological mechanisms of impulsivity, as well as the genetic and environmental influences that govern the expression of this behaviour. Tests used on rodent models of impulsivity share strong parallels with tasks used to assess this trait in humans, and studies in both suggest a crucial role of monoaminergic corticostriatal systems in the expression of this behavioural trait. Furthermore, rodent models have enabled investigation of the causal relationship between drug abuse and impulsivity. Here, we review the use of rodent models of impulsivity for investigating the mechanisms involved in this trait, and how these mechanisms could contribute to the pathogenesis of addiction. PMID:23355644

  9. Optimization of high speed pipelining in FPGA-based FIR filter design using genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer-Baese, Uwe; Botella, Guillermo; Romero, David E. T.; Kumm, Martin

    2012-06-01

    This paper compares FPGA-based full pipelined multiplierless FIR filter design options. Comparison of Distributed Arithmetic (DA), Common Sub-Expression (CSE) sharing and n-dimensional Reduced Adder Graph (RAG-n) multiplierless filter design methods in term of size, speed, and A*T product are provided. Since DA designs are table-based and CSE/RAG-n designs are adder-based, FPGA synthesis design data are used for a realistic comparison. Superior results of a genetic algorithm based optimization of pipeline registers and non-output fundamental coefficients are shown. FIR filters (posted as open source by Kastner et al.) for filters in the length from 6 to 151 coefficients are used.

  10. Personalized prostate cancer screening among men with high risk genetic predisposition- study protocol for a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer screening among the general population is highly debatable. Nevertheless, screening among high-risk groups is appealing. Prior data suggests that men carrying mutations in the BRCA1& 2 genes may be at increased risk of developing prostate cancer. Additionally, they appear to develop prostate cancer at a younger age and with a more aggressive course. However, prior studies did not systematically perform prostate biopsies and thus cannot determine the true prevalence of prostate cancer in this population. Methods This will be a prospective diagnostic trial of screening for prostate cancer among men with genetic predisposition. The target population is males (40–70 year old) carrying a BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 germ line mutation. They will be identified via our Genetic counseling unit. All men after signing an informed consent will undergo the following tests: PSA, free to total PSA, MRI of prostate and prostate biopsy. The primary endpoint will be to estimate the prevalence, stage and grade of prostate cancer in this population. Additionally, the study aims to estimate the impact of these germ line mutations on benign prostatic hyperplasia. Furthermore, this study aims to create a bio-bank of tissue, urine and serum of this unique cohort for future investigations. Finally, this study will identify an inception cohort for future interventional studies of primary and secondary prevention. Discussion The proposed research is highly translational and focuses not only on the clinical results, but on the future specimens that will be used to advance our understanding of prostate cancer patho-physiology. Most importantly, these high-risk germ-line mutation carriers are ideal candidates for primary and secondary prevention initiatives. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02053805. PMID:25047061

  11. A High-Throughput Regeneration and Transformation Platform for Production of Genetically Modified Banana

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Jaindra N.; Oduor, Richard O.; Tripathi, Leena

    2015-01-01

    Banana (Musa spp.) is an important staple food as well as cash crop in tropical and subtropical countries. Various bacterial, fungal, and viral diseases and pests such as nematodes are major constraints in its production and are currently destabilizing the banana production in sub-Saharan Africa. Genetic engineering is a complementary option used for incorporating useful traits in banana to bypass the long generation time, polyploidy, and sterility of most of the cultivated varieties. A robust transformation protocol for farmer preferred varieties is crucial for banana genomics and improvement. A robust and reproducible system for genetic transformation of banana using embryogenic cell suspensions (ECS) has been developed in this study. Two different types of explants (immature male flowers and multiple buds) were tested for their ability to develop ECS in several varieties of banana locally grown in Africa. ECS of banana varieties “Cavendish Williams” and “Gros Michel” were developed using multiple buds, whereas ECS of “Sukali Ndiizi” was developed using immature male flowers. Regeneration efficiency of ECS was about 20,000–50,000 plantlets per ml of settled cell volume (SCV) depending on variety. ECS of three different varieties were transformed through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation using gusA reporter gene and 20–70 independent transgenic events per ml SCV of ECS were regenerated on selective medium. The presence and integration of gusA gene in transgenic plants was confirmed by PCR, dot blot, and Southern blot analysis and expression by histochemical GUS assays. The robust transformation platform was successfully used to generate hundreds of transgenic lines with disease resistance. Such a platform will facilitate the transfer of technologies to national agricultural research systems (NARS) in Africa. PMID:26635849

  12. A High-Throughput Regeneration and Transformation Platform for Production of Genetically Modified Banana.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Jaindra N; Oduor, Richard O; Tripathi, Leena

    2015-01-01

    Banana (Musa spp.) is an important staple food as well as cash crop in tropical and subtropical countries. Various bacterial, fungal, and viral diseases and pests such as nematodes are major constraints in its production and are currently destabilizing the banana production in sub-Saharan Africa. Genetic engineering is a complementary option used for incorporating useful traits in banana to bypass the long generation time, polyploidy, and sterility of most of the cultivated varieties. A robust transformation protocol for farmer preferred varieties is crucial for banana genomics and improvement. A robust and reproducible system for genetic transformation of banana using embryogenic cell suspensions (ECS) has been developed in this study. Two different types of explants (immature male flowers and multiple buds) were tested for their ability to develop ECS in several varieties of banana locally grown in Africa. ECS of banana varieties "Cavendish Williams" and "Gros Michel" were developed using multiple buds, whereas ECS of "Sukali Ndiizi" was developed using immature male flowers. Regeneration efficiency of ECS was about 20,000-50,000 plantlets per ml of settled cell volume (SCV) depending on variety. ECS of three different varieties were transformed through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation using gusA reporter gene and 20-70 independent transgenic events per ml SCV of ECS were regenerated on selective medium. The presence and integration of gusA gene in transgenic plants was confirmed by PCR, dot blot, and Southern blot analysis and expression by histochemical GUS assays. The robust transformation platform was successfully used to generate hundreds of transgenic lines with disease resistance. Such a platform will facilitate the transfer of technologies to national agricultural research systems (NARS) in Africa. PMID:26635849

  13. A Massively Parallel Sequencing Approach Uncovers Ancient Origins and High Genetic Variability of Endangered Przewalski's Horses

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Hiroki; Ryder, Oliver A.; Fisher, Allison R.; Schultz, Bryant; Nekrutenko, Anton; Makova, Kateryna D.

    2011-01-01

    The endangered Przewalski's horse is the closest relative of the domestic horse and is the only true wild horse species surviving today. The question of whether Przewalski's horse is the direct progenitor of domestic horse has been hotly debated. Studies of DNA diversity within Przewalski's horses have been sparse but are urgently needed to ensure their successful reintroduction to the wild. In an attempt to resolve the controversy surrounding the phylogenetic position and genetic diversity of Przewalski's horses, we used massively parallel sequencing technology to decipher the complete mitochondrial and partial nuclear genomes for all four surviving maternal lineages of Przewalski's horses. Unlike single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing usually affected by ascertainment bias, the present method is expected to be largely unbiased. Three mitochondrial haplotypes were discovered—two similar ones, haplotypes I/II, and one substantially divergent from the other two, haplotype III. Haplotypes I/II versus III did not cluster together on a phylogenetic tree, rejecting the monophyly of Przewalski's horse maternal lineages, and were estimated to split 0.117–0.186 Ma, significantly preceding horse domestication. In the phylogeny based on autosomal sequences, Przewalski's horses formed a monophyletic clade, separate from the Thoroughbred domestic horse lineage. Our results suggest that Przewalski's horses have ancient origins and are not the direct progenitors of domestic horses. The analysis of the vast amount of sequence data presented here suggests that Przewalski's and domestic horse lineages diverged at least 0.117 Ma but since then have retained ancestral genetic polymorphism and/or experienced gene flow. PMID:21803766

  14. Genetic covariation between theAuthor Recognition Test and reading and verbal abilities: what can we learn from the analysis of high performance?

    PubMed

    Martin, Nicolas W; Hansell, Narelle K; Wainwright, Mark A; Shekar, Sri N; Medland, Sarah E; Bates, Timothy C; Burt, Jennifer S; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J

    2009-07-01

    The Author Recognition Test (ART) measures print exposure and is a unique predictor of phonological and orthographic processes in reading. In a sample of adolescent and young adult twins and siblings (216 MZ/430 DZ pairs, 307 singletons; aged 11-29 years) ART scores were moderately heritable (67%) and correlated with reading and verbal abilities, with genes largely accounting for the covariance. We also examine whether high (and low) (i.e. 1SD above the mean) represents a quantitative extreme of the normal distribution. Heritability for high ART was of similar magnitude to the full sample, but, a specific genetic factor, independent from both low ART performance and high reading ability, accounted for 53-58% of the variance. This suggests a distinct genetic etiology for high ART ability and we speculate that the specific genetic influence is on orthographical processing, a critical factor in developing word recognition skills. PMID:19418212

  15. Producing Turkeys for Show 

    E-print Network

    Thornberry, Fredrick D.

    2005-12-14

    feed consumption and growth. Small amounts of feed moistened with milk and cooking oil and fed several times during the day may stimulate older birds to eat more and increase growth. This practice can be particularly helpful in hot weather with turkeys... on the label and do not over-medicate. Vaccinate poults for fowl pox at 8 to 10 weeks of age. In areas with high mosquito populations, poults should be vaccinated ini- tially at 3 to 4 weeks followed by a second vaccination at 12 weeks of age to ensure last...

  16. Genetic screening

    PubMed Central

    Andermann, Anne; Blancquaert, Ingeborg

    2010-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To provide a primer for primary care professionals who are increasingly called upon to discuss the growing number of genetic screening services available and to help patients make informed decisions about whether to participate in genetic screening, how to interpret results, and which interventions are most appropriate. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE As part of a larger research program, a wide literature relating to genetic screening was reviewed. PubMed and Internet searches were conducted using broad search terms. Effort was also made to identify the gray literature. MAIN MESSAGE Genetic screening is a type of public health program that is systematically offered to a specified population of asymptomatic individuals with the aim of providing those identified as high risk with prevention, early treatment, or reproductive options. Ensuring an added benefit from screening, as compared with standard clinical care, and preventing unintended harms, such as undue anxiety or stigmatization, depends on the design and implementation of screening programs, including the recruitment methods, education and counseling provided, timing of screening, predictive value of tests, interventions available, and presence of oversight mechanisms and safeguards. There is therefore growing apprehension that economic interests might lead to a market-driven approach to introducing and expanding screening before program effectiveness, acceptability, and feasibility have been demonstrated. As with any medical intervention, there is a moral imperative for genetic screening to do more good than harm, not only from the perspective of individuals and families, but also for the target population and society as a whole. CONCLUSION Primary care professionals have an important role to play in helping their patients navigate the rapidly changing terrain of genetic screening services by informing them about the benefits and risks of new genetic and genomic technologies and empowering them to make more informed choices. PMID:20393090

  17. Genetic structure analysis of a highly inbred captive population of the African antelope Addax nasomaculatus. Conservation and management implications.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, E; Leizagoyen, C; Martínez, A M; González, S; Delgado, J V; Postiglioni, A

    2011-01-01

    The African antelope Addax nasomaculatus is a rare mammal at high risk of extinction, with no more than 300 individuals in the wild and 1,700 captive animals distributed in zoos around the world. In this work, we combine genetic data and genealogical information to assess the structure and genetic diversity of a captive population located at Parque Lecocq Zoo (N=27), originated from only two founders. We amplified 39 microsatellites previously described in other Artiodactyls but new to this species. Seventeen markers were polymorphic, with 2-4 alleles per locus (mean=2.71). Mean expected heterozygosity (He) per locus was between 0.050 (marker ETH3) and 0.650 (marker D5S2), with a global He of 0.43. The mean inbreeding coefficient of the population computed from pedigree records of all registered individuals (N=53) was 0.222. The mean coancestry of the population was 0.298 and F(IS) index was -0.108. These results reflect the importance of an adequate breeding management on a severely bottlenecked captive population, which would benefit by the incorporation of unrelated individuals. Thanks to