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Sample records for shower exposure model

  1. An in-premise model for Legionella exposure during showering events

    EPA Science Inventory

    An exposure model was constructed to predict the critical Legionella densities in an engineered water system that might result in infection from inhalation of aerosols containing the pathogen while showering. The model predicted the Legionella densities in the shower air, water ...

  2. An in-premise model for Legionella exposure during showering events.

    PubMed

    Schoen, Mary E; Ashbolt, Nicholas J

    2011-11-15

    An exposure model was constructed to predict the critical Legionella densities in an engineered water system that result in infection from inhalation of aerosols containing the pathogen while showering. The model predicted the Legionella densities in the shower air, water and in-premise plumbing biofilm that might result in a deposited dose of Legionella in the alveolar region of the lungs associated with infection for a routine showering event. Processes modeled included the detachment of biofilm-associated Legionella from the in-premise plumbing biofilm during a showering event, the partitioning of the pathogen from the shower water to the air, and the inhalation and deposition of particles in the lungs. The range of predicted critical Legionella densities in the air and water was compared to the available literature. The predictions were generally within the limited set of observations for air and water, with the exception of Legionella density within in-premise plumbing biofilms, for which there remains a lack of observations for comparison. Sensitivity analysis of the predicted results to possible changes in the uncertain input parameters identified the target deposited dose associated with infections, the pathogen air-water partitioning coefficient, and the quantity of detached biofilm from in-premise pluming surfaces as important parameters for additional data collection. In addition, the critical density of free-living protozoan hosts in the biofilm required to propagate the infectious Legionella was estimated. Together, this evidence can help to identify critical conditions that might lead to infection derived from pathogens within the biofilms of any plumbing system from which humans may be exposed to aerosols. PMID:21924754

  3. Estimating risk during showering exposure to VOCs of workers in a metal-degreasing facility.

    PubMed

    Franco, Amaya; Costoya, Miguel Angel; Roca, Enrique

    2007-04-01

    The incremental risk of workers in a metal-degreasing facility exposed to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) present in the water supply during showering was estimated. A probabilistic and worst-case approach using specific-site concentration data and a generalized multipathway exposure model was applied. Estimates of hazard index and lifetime cancer risk were analyzed for each chemical and each route of exposure (inhalation and dermal absorption). The results showed that dermal exposure to trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, PCE) represented the main contribution to total risk. Although the inhalation route did not produce significant exposure, it was mainly influenced by the liquid flow rate of the shower. Lower values of this parameter during showering resulted in a significant reduction of both carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic risk, while decreasing water temperature produced a minimal effect on exposure by this pathway. The results obtained in the present study indicated that significant exposures of workers may be produced during showering in metal degreasing installations where releases to water of VOCs occur. A sensitivity analysis was developed for investigating the effect of scenario parameters on exposure. Although site-specific data were employed, the exposure of workers was assessed in a model scenario and thus the quantification of risk is associated with uncertainty. Considering that occupational exposure to organic solvents of workers in metal-degreasing facilities may also be significant, risk assessment must be included in the planning of this kind of industrial installation. PMID:17365617

  4. Determining human exposure and sensory detection of odorous compounds released during showering.

    PubMed

    Omür-Ozbek, Pinar; Gallagher, Daniel L; Dietrich, Andrea M

    2011-01-15

    Modeling of human exposure to aqueous algal odorants geosmin (earthy), 2-methylisoborneol (musty), and (trans,cis)-2,6-nonadienal (cucumber, fishy), and the solvent trichloroethylene (sweet chemical), was investigated to improve the understanding of water-air transfer by including humans as sensors to detect contaminants. A mass-transfer model was employed to determine indoor air concentrations when water was used for showering under varying conditions (shower stall volume, water and air flow rate, temperature, aqueous odorant concentration, shower duration). Statistical application of multiple linear regression and tree regression were employed to determine critical model parameters. The model predicted that concentrations detectable to the human senses were controlled by temperature, odor threshold, and aqueous concentration for the steady-state model, whereas shower volume, air flow, and water flow are also important for the dynamic model and initial detection of the odorant immediately after the showering is started. There was excellent agreement of model predictions with literature data for human perception of algal odorants in their homes and complaints to water utilities. TCE performed differently than the algal odorants due to its higher Henry's law constant, in spite of similar gas and liquid diffusivities. The use of nontoxic odorants offers an efficient tool to calibrate indoor air/water shower models. PMID:21141853

  5. Recent meteor showers - models and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koten, P.; Vaubaillon, J.

    2015-10-01

    A number of meteor shower outbursts and storms occurred in recent years starting with several Leonid storms around 2000 [1]. The methods of modeling meteoroid streams became better and more precise. An increasing number of observing systems enabled better coverage of such events. The observers provide modelers with an important feedback on precision of their models. Here we present comparison of several observational results with the model predictions.

  6. Phenomenological model of nuclear primary air showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, D. R., Jr.; Saterlie, S. F.

    1976-01-01

    The development of proton primary air showers is described in terms of a model based on a hadron core plus an electromagnetic cascade. The muon component is neglected. The model uses three parameters: a rate at which hadron core energy is converted into electromagnetic cascade energy and a two-parameter sea-level shower-age function. By assuming an interaction length for the primary nucleus, the model is extended to nuclear primaries. Both models are applied over the energy range from 10 to the 13th power to 10 to the 21st power eV. Both models describe the size and age structure (neglecting muons) from a depth of 342 to 2052 g/sq cm.

  7. HOUSEHOLD EXPOSURES TO BENZENE FROM SHOWERING WITH GASOLINE CONTAMINATED GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    In a private residence using benzene contaminated groundwater (= 300 ug/l), a series of experiments were performed to assess the benzene exposures that occur in the shower stall, bathroom, master bedroom, and living room as a result of a single 20 minute shower. Sampling methodol...

  8. Monte Carlo modeling and meteor showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulikova, N. V.

    1987-01-01

    Prediction of short lived increases in the cosmic dust influx, the concentration in lower thermosphere of atoms and ions of meteor origin and the determination of the frequency of micrometeor impacts on spacecraft are all of scientific and practical interest and all require adequate models of meteor showers at an early stage of their existence. A Monte Carlo model of meteor matter ejection from a parent body at any point of space was worked out by other researchers. This scheme is described. According to the scheme, the formation of ten well known meteor streams was simulated and the possibility of genetic affinity of each of them with the most probable parent comet was analyzed. Some of the results are presented.

  9. Monte Carlo modeling and meteor showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikova, N. V.

    1987-08-01

    Prediction of short lived increases in the cosmic dust influx, the concentration in lower thermosphere of atoms and ions of meteor origin and the determination of the frequency of micrometeor impacts on spacecraft are all of scientific and practical interest and all require adequate models of meteor showers at an early stage of their existence. A Monte Carlo model of meteor matter ejection from a parent body at any point of space was worked out by other researchers. This scheme is described. According to the scheme, the formation of ten well known meteor streams was simulated and the possibility of genetic affinity of each of them with the most probable parent comet was analyzed. Some of the results are presented.

  10. A Complex Exposure History of the Gold Basin L4-Chondrite Shower from Cosmogenic Radionuclides and Noble Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Welten, K.C.; Nishiizumi, K.; Caffee, M.; Masarik, J.; Wieler, R.

    2001-04-30

    Gold Basin is a large L4 chondrite shower, that was recently discovered in the Mojave Desert, Arizona [1]. Based on {sup 109}Be and {sup 14}C concentrations in several fragments, the pre-atmospheric radius of this shower was estimated to be 3-4 meters [2]. Among chondrites, Gold Basin is one of the largest, thus providing a unique opportunity for comparing measured cosmogenic nuclide concentrations with model calculations for large objects. Noble gas measurements combined with {sup 10}Be data of most Gold Basin samples suggest a single-stage exposure of 15-30 Myr, although a few samples may require a complex exposure history [3]. We selected eight samples of the Gold Basin shower that were analyzed for noble gases; these samples represent a wide range of shielding depths.

  11. Household exposure models

    SciTech Connect

    McKone, T.E.

    1988-01-01

    Human exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in tap water is often assumed to be dominated by ingestion of drinking water. This paper addresses the relative importance of inhalation and dermal exposures in a typical household. A three-compartment model is used to simulate the 24-h concentration history of VOCs in the shower, bathroom, and remaining household volumes as a result of tap water use. Mass transfers from water to air are derived from measured data for radon and used to estimate mass-transfer properties for VOCs. The model is used to calculate a range of concentrations and human exposures in US dwellings. The estimated ratio of household- inhalation uptake to ingestion uptake is in the range of 1 to 6 for VOCs. We use a dermal absorption model to assess exposure across the skin boundary during baths and showers. The ratio of dermal exposure to ingestion exposure is in the range 0.6 to 1. 24 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  12. Assessing human exposure and odor detection during showering with crude 4-(methylcyclohexyl)methanol (MCHM) contaminated drinking water.

    PubMed

    Sain, Amanda E; Dietrich, Andrea M; Smiley, Elizabeth; Gallagher, Daniel L

    2015-12-15

    In 2014, crude (4-methylcyclohexyl)methanol (MCHM) spilled, contaminating the drinking water of 300,000 West Virginians and requiring "do not use" orders to protect human health. When the spill occurred, known crude MCHM physicochemical properties were insufficient to predict human inhalation and ingestion exposures. Objectives are (1) determine Henry's Law Constants (HLCs) for 4-MCHM isomers at 7, 25, 40, and 80°C using gas chromatography; (2) predict air concentrations of 4-MCHM and methyl-4-methylcyclohexanecarboxylate (MMCHC) during showering using an established shower model; (3) estimate human ingestion and inhalation exposure to 4-MCHM and MMCHC; and (4) determine if predicted air 4-MCHM exceeded odor threshold concentrations. Dimensionless HLCs of crude cis- and trans-4-MCHM were measured to be 1.42×10(-4)±6% and 3.08×10(-4)±3% at 25°C, respectively, and increase exponentially with temperature as predicted by the van't Hoff equation. Shower air concentrations for cis- and trans-4-MCHM are predicted to be 0.089 and 0.390ppm-v respectively after 10min, exceeding the US EPA's 0.01ppm-v air screening level during initial spill conditions. Human exposure doses were predicted using measured drinking water and predicted shower air concentrations and found to greatly exceed available guidance levels in the days directly following the spill. Odors would be rapidly detected by 50% of individuals at aqueous concentrations below analytical gas chromatographic detection limits. MMCHC, a minor odorous component (0.935%) of crude MCHM, is also highly volatile and therefore is predicted to contribute to inhalation exposures and odors experienced by consumers. PMID:26311585

  13. The influence of physicochemical properties on the internal dose of trihalomethanes in humans following a controlled showering exposure.

    PubMed

    Silva, Lalith K; Backer, Lorraine C; Ashley, David L; Gordon, Sydney M; Brinkman, Marielle C; Nuckols, John R; Wilkes, Charles R; Blount, Benjamin C

    2013-01-01

    Although disinfection of domestic water supply is crucial for protecting public health from waterborne diseases, this process forms potentially harmful by-products, such as trihalomethanes (THMs). We evaluated the influence of physicochemical properties of four THMs (chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane, and bromoform) on the internal dose after showering. One hundred volunteers showered for 10 min in a controlled setting with fixed water flow, air flow, and temperature. We measured THMs in shower water, shower air, bathroom air, and blood samples collected at various time intervals. The geometric mean (GM) for total THM concentration in shower water was 96.2 μg/l. The GM of total THM in air increased from 5.8 μg/m(3) pre shower to 351 μg/m(3) during showering. Similarly, the GM of total-blood THM concentration increased from 16.5 ng/l pre shower to 299 ng/l at 10 min post shower. THM levels were significantly correlated between different matrices (e.g. dibromochloromethane levels) in water and air (r=0.941); blood and water (r=0.845); and blood and air (r=0.831). The slopes of best-fit lines for THM levels in water vs air and blood vs air increased with increasing partition coefficient of water/air and blood/air. The slope of the correlation plot of THM levels in water vs air decreased in a linear (r=0.995) fashion with increasing Henry's law constant. The physicochemical properties (volatility, partition coefficients, and Henry's law constant) are useful parameters for predicting THM movement between matrices and understanding THM exposure during showering. PMID:22829048

  14. Estimation of endotoxin inhalation from shower and humidifier exposure reveals potential risk to human health.

    PubMed

    Anderson, William B; George Dixon, D; Mayfield, Colin I

    2007-12-01

    This paper investigates potential exposure to endotoxin in drinking water through the inhalation of aerosols generated by showers and humidifiers. Adverse health effects attributable to the inhalation of airborne endotoxin in various occupational settings are summarized, as are controlled laboratory inhalation studies. Data from investigations estimating aerosolization of particulate matter by showers and humidifiers provide a basis for similar analyses with endotoxin, which like minerals in water, is nonvolatile. A theoretical assessment of the inhalation of aerosolized endotoxin showed that while the likelihood of an acute response while showering is minimal, the same is not true for humidifiers. Ultrasonic and impeller (cool mist) humidifiers efficiently produce large numbers of respirable particles. It is predicted that airway inflammation can occur if humidifier reservoirs are filled with tap water, sometimes even at typical drinking-water distribution-system endotoxin concentrations. Higher endotoxin levels occasionally found in drinking water (>1,000 EU/ml) are very likely to induce symptoms such as chills and fever if used as humidifier feed water. While it is unlikely that treated drinking water would contain extremely high endotoxin levels occasionally observed in cyanobacterial blooms (>35,000 EU/ml), the potential for serious acute health consequences exist if used in humidifiers. PMID:17878567

  15. Latest news on the modeling of meteor showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaubaillon, J. J.; Neslusan, L.; Hajdukova, M.; Sekhar, A.; Asher, D.; Segon, D.; Rudawska, R.

    2015-10-01

    This talk will provide a review of the techniques used for the modeling of meteoroid streams in the Solar System. New features induced by resonances will be presented. Consequences for the forecasting of the meteor showers will be presented. Similarly, the multiplication of meteor orbit determination allows for the finding of new parent bodies. Exploration of the past allows us to better know the today Earth meteoroid environment. Special focus will be provided for the Perseid stream as well as comet C/1917 Mellish. The finding of new parent bodies is an ongoing process and latest confirmed bodies will be presented.

  16. A Complex Exposure History of the Gold Basin L4-Chondrite Shower from Cosmogenic Radionuclides and Noble Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welten, K. C.; Nishiizumi, K.; Caffee, M. W.; Masarik, J.; Wieler, R.

    2001-01-01

    Cosmogenic radionuclides and noble gases in samples of the Gold Basin L-chondrite shower indicate a complex exposure history, with a first stage exposure on the parent body, followed by a second stage of approx. 19 Myr in a meteoroid 3-4 m in radius. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  17. Gamma-rays from dark showers with twin Higgs models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freytsis, Marat; Knapen, Simon; Robinson, Dean J.; Tsai, Yuhsin

    2016-05-01

    We consider a twin WIMP scenario whose twin sector contains a full dark copy of the SM hadrons, where the lightest twin particles are twin pions. By analogy to the standard WIMP paradigm, the dark matter (DM) freezes out through twin electroweak interactions, and annihilates into a dark shower of light twin hadrons. These are either stable or decay predominantly to standard model (SM) photons. We show that this `hadrosymmetric' scenario can be consistent with all applicable astrophysical, cosmological and collider constraints. In order to decay the twin hadrons before the big-bang nucleosynthesis epoch, an additional portal between the SM and twin sector is required. In most cases we find this additional mediator is within reach of either the LHC or future intensity frontier experiments. Furthermore, we conduct simulations of the dark shower and consequent photon spectra. We find that fits of these spectra to the claimed galactic center gamma-ray excess seen by Fermi -LAT non-trivially coincide with regions of parameter space that both successfully generate the observed DM abundance and exhibit minimal fine-tuning.

  18. Air shower simulation for WASAVIES: warning system for aviation exposure to solar energetic particles.

    PubMed

    Sato, T; Kataoka, R; Yasuda, H; Yashiro, S; Kuwabara, T; Shiota, D; Kubo, Y

    2014-10-01

    WASAVIES, a warning system for aviation exposure to solar energetic particles (SEPs), is under development by collaboration between several institutes in Japan and the USA. It is designed to deterministically forecast the SEP fluxes incident on the atmosphere within 6 h after flare onset using the latest space weather research. To immediately estimate the aircrew doses from the obtained SEP fluxes, the response functions of the particle fluxes generated by the incidence of monoenergetic protons into the atmosphere were developed by performing air shower simulations using the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code system. The accuracy of the simulation was well verified by calculating the increase count rates of a neutron monitor during a ground-level enhancement, combining the response function with the SEP fluxes measured by the PAMELA spectrometer. The response function will be implemented in WASAVIES and used to protect aircrews from additional SEP exposure. PMID:24344351

  19. Investigation of human exposure to triclocarban after showering, and preliminary evaluation of its biological effects

    PubMed Central

    Schebb, Nils Helge; Inceoglu, Bora; Ahn, Ki Chang; Morisseau, Christophe; Gee, Shirley; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2012-01-01

    The antibacterial soap additive triclocarban (TCC) is widely used in personal care products. TCC has a high environmental persistence. We developed and validated a sensitive online solid phase extraction-LC-MS/MS method to rapidly analyze TCC and its major metabolites in urine and other biological samples to assess human exposure. We measured human urine concentrations 0–72 h after showering with a commercial bar soap containing 0.6% TCC. The major route of renal elimination was excretion as N-glucuronides. The absorption was estimated at 0.6% of the 70±15 mg TCC in the soap used. The TCC N-glucuronide urine concentration varied widely among the subjects and continuous daily use of the soap led to steady state levels of excretion. In order to assess potential biological effects arising from this exposure we screened TCC for the inhibition of human enzymes in vitro. We demonstrate that TCC is a potent inhibitor of the enzyme soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), whereas TCC′s major metabolites lack strong inhibitory activity. Topical administration of TCC at similar levels to rats in a preliminary in vivo study however failed to alter plasma biomarkers of sEH activity. Overall the analytical strategy described here revealed that use of TCC soap causes exposure levels that warrant further evaluation. PMID:21381656

  20. Investigation of human exposure to triclocarban after showering and preliminary evaluation of its biological effects.

    PubMed

    Schebb, Nils Helge; Inceoglu, Bora; Ahn, Ki Chang; Morisseau, Christophe; Gee, Shirley J; Hammock, Bruce D

    2011-04-01

    The antibacterial soap additive triclocarban (TCC) is widely used in personal care products. TCC has a high environmental persistence. We developed and validated a sensitive online solid-phase extraction-LC-MS/MS method to rapidly analyze TCC and its major metabolites in urine and other biological samples to assess human exposure. We measured human urine concentrations 0-72 h after showering with a commercial bar soap containing 0.6% TCC. The major route of renal elimination was excretion as N-glucuronides. The absorption was estimated at 0.6% of the 70±15 mg of TCC in the soap used. The TCC-N-glucuronide urine concentration varied widely among the subjects, and continuous daily use of the soap led to steady state levels of excretion. In order to assess potential biological effects arising from this exposure, we screened TCC for the inhibition of human enzymes in vitro. We demonstrate that TCC is a potent inhibitor of the enzyme soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), whereas TCC's major metabolites lack strong inhibitory activity. Topical administration of TCC at similar levels to rats in a preliminary in vivo study, however, failed to alter plasma biomarkers of sEH activity. Overall the analytical strategy described here revealed that use of TCC soap causes exposure levels that warrant further evaluation. PMID:21381656

  1. The Complex Exposure History of a Very Large L/LL5 Chondrite Shower: Queen Alexandra Range 90201

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welten, K. C.; Nishiizumi, K.; Caffee, M. W.; Hillegonds, D. J.; Leya, I.; Wieler, R.; Mararik, J.

    2004-01-01

    Compared to iron meteorites, large stony meteorites (less than 100 kg) are relatively rare. Most large stony meteoroids fragment during atmospheric entry, producing large meteorite showers. Interestingly, many of these large chondrites, such as Bur Gheluai, Gold Basin, Jilin and Tsarev appear to have a complex exposure history with a first-stage exposure on the parent body. The question is whether complex exposure histories are simply more readily detected in large objects or large objects are more likely to experience a complex exposure. Investigation of these two hypotheses is the motivation for this work in which we report on the exposure history of QUE 90201, a large L/LL5 chondrite shower found near Queen Alexandra Range, Antarctica. Previous cosmogenic nuclide studies have led to the consensus that most of the approx. 2000 L5 and LL5 chondrites from the QUE area are derived from a single object with a pre-atmospheric radius of 1-2 m. The terrestrial age of the QUE 90201 shower was determined at 125 20 kyr. Here, we present a more complete set of cosmogenic radionuclide results in the metal and stone fractions of eleven L/LL5 chondrites from the QUE stranding area, as well as noble gases in seven of these samples. The main goal of this work is to unravel the cosmic-ray exposure history of the QUE 90201 meteoroid. In addition, we will discuss the pre-atmospheric size and exposure history of QUE 93013 (H5) and 93081 (H4) with similar shielding conditions as the QUE 90201 shower and a terrestrial age of 145 +/- 25 kyr.

  2. Opportunistic Pathogens Mycobacterium Avium Complex (MAC) and Legionella spp. Colonise Model Shower

    PubMed Central

    Whiley, Harriet; Giglio, Steven; Bentham, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Legionella spp. and Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) are opportunistic pathogens of public health concern. Hot water systems, including showers, have been identified as a potential source of infection. This paper describes the colonization of Legionella and MAC on the flexible tubing within a model potable shower system, utilizing thermostatic mixing and a flexible shower head. A MAC qPCR method of enumeration was also developed. MAC and Legionella spp. were detected within the biofilm at maximum concentrations of 7.0 × 104 and 2.0 × 103 copies/cm2 PVC tubing respectively. No significant changes were observed between sample of the flexible shower tubing that dried between uses and those that remained filled with water. This suggested the “unhooking” showerheads and allowing them to dry is not an effective method to reduce the risk of Legionella or MAC colonisation. PMID:26213977

  3. Electrons, muons and hadrons in extensive air showers and how do they depend on nuclear interaction model, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrotniak, J. A.; Yodh, G. B.

    1985-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of extensive air showers were performed using a couple of different nuclear interaction models and obtaining a variety of shower characteristics. The discussion of these shows that the sensitivity of observables to the primary mass spectrum is significantly stronger than to the interaction model, the latter being quite weak.

  4. Ice surface roughness modeling for effect on radio signals from UHE particle showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockham, Jessica

    2014-03-01

    For radio antenna detectors located in or above the Antarctic ice sheet, the reconstruction of both ultra-high energy (UHE) neutrino and cosmic ray air shower events requires understanding the transmission and reflection properties of the air-ice interface. To this end, surface and volume scattering from granular materials in the microwave frequency range are measured and stereoscopic images of the ice surface, obtained by the Antarctric Geophysics Along the Vostok Expedition (AGAVE), are used to determine the 3D surface structure. This data is implemented to determine an appropriate model for use in simulation and data analysis of the shower events. ANtarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna.

  5. A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model assessment of methyl t-butyl ether in groundwater for a bathing and showering determination.

    PubMed

    Rao, H V; Ginsberg, G L

    1997-10-01

    Methyl t-butyl ether (MTBE) is a gasoline additive that has appeared in private wells as a result of leaking underground storage tanks. Neurological symptoms (headache, dizziness) have been reported from household use of MTBE-affected water, consistent with animal studies showing acute CNS depression from MTBE exposure. The current research evaluates acute CNS effects during bathing/showering by application of physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) techniques to compare internal doses in animal toxicity studies to human exposure scenarios. An additional reference point was the delivered dose associated with the acute Minimum Risk Level (MRL) for MTBE established by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. A PBPK model for MTBE and its principal metabolite, t-butyl alcohol (TBA) was developed and validated against published data in rats and humans. PBPK analysis of animal studies showed that acute CNS toxicity after MTBE exposure can be attributed principally to the parent compound since the metabolite (TBA) internal dose was below that needed for CNS effects. The PBPK model was combined with an exposure model for bathing and showering which integrates inhalation and dermal exposures. This modeling indicated that bathing or showering in water containing MTBE at 1 mg/L would produce brain concentrations approximately 1000-fold below the animal effects level and twofold below brain concentrations associated with the acute MRL. These findings indicate that MTBE water concentrations of 1 mg/L or below are unlikely to trigger acute CNS effects during bathing and showering. However, MTBE's strong odor may be a secondary but deciding factor regarding the suitability of such water for domestic uses. PMID:9404048

  6. Test of the hadronic interaction model EPOS with KASCADE air shower data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hörandel, J. R.; Apel, W. D.; Arteaga, J. C.; Badea, F.; Bekk, K.; Bertaina, M.; Blümer, J.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I. M.; Brüggemann, M.; Buchholz, P.; Cantoni, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Cossavella, F.; Daumiller, K.; de Souza, V.; di Pierro, F.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Engler, J.; Finger, M.; Fuhrmann, D.; Ghia, P. L.; Gils, H. J.; Glasstetter, R.; Grupen, C.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Huege, T.; Isar, P. G.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kang, D.; Kickelbick, D.; Klages, H. O.; Kolotaev, Y.; Łuczak, P.; Mathes, H. J.; Mayer, H. J.; Milke, J.; Mitrica, B.; Morello, C.; Navarra, G.; Nehls, S.; Oehlschläger, J.; Ostapchenko, S.; Over, S.; Petcu, M.; Pierog, T.; Rebel, H.; Roth, M.; Schieler, H.; Schröder, F.; Sima, O.; Stümpert, M.; Toma, G.; Trinchero, G.; Ulrich, H.; Walkowiak, W.; Weindl, A.; Wochele, J.; Wommer, M.; Zabierowski, J.; KASCADE-Grande Collaboration

    2009-12-01

    Predictions of the hadronic interaction model EPOS 1.61 as implemented in the air shower simulation program CORSIKA are compared to observations with the KASCADE experiment. The investigations reveal that the predictions of EPOS are not compatible with KASCADE measurements. The discrepancies seen are most likely due to use of a set of inelastic hadronic cross sections that are too high.

  7. A test of the hadronic interaction model EPOS with air shower data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apel, W. D.; Arteaga, J. C.; Badea, F.; Bekk, K.; Bertaina, M.; Blümer, J.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I. M.; Brüggemann, M.; Buchholz, P.; Cantoni, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Cossavella, F.; Daumiller, K.; de Souza, V.; Di Pierro, F.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Engler, J.; Finger, M.; Fuhrmann, D.; Ghia, P. L.; Gils, H. J.; Glasstetter, R.; Grupen, C.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Hörandel, J. R.; Huege, T.; Isar, P. G.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kang, D.; Kickelbick, D.; Klages, H. O.; Kolotaev, Y.; Luczak, P.; Mathes, H. J.; Mayer, H. J.; Milke, J.; Mitrica, B.; Morello, C.; Navarra, G.; Nehls, S.; Oehlschläger, J.; Ostapchenko, S.; Over, S.; Petcu, M.; Pierog, T.; Rebel, H.; Roth, M.; Schieler, H.; Schröder, F.; Sima, O.; Stümpert, M.; Toma, G.; Trinchero, G. C.; Ulrich, H.; van Buren, J.; Walkowiak, W.; Weindl, A.; Wochele, J.; Wommer, M.; Zabierowski, J.

    2009-03-01

    Predictions of the hadronic interaction model EPOS 1.61 as implemented in the air shower simulation program CORSIKA are compared to observations with the KASCADE experiment. The investigations reveal that the predictions of EPOS are not compatible with KASCADE measurements. The discrepancies seen are most likely due to use of a set of inelastic hadronic cross sections that are too high.

  8. Air Shower Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Alania, Marco; Gomez, Adolfo V. Chamorro; Araya, Ignacio J.; Huerta, Humberto Martinez; Flores, Alejandra Parra; Knapp, Johannes

    2009-04-30

    Air shower simulations are a vital part of the design of air shower experiments and the analysis of their data. We describe the basic features of air showers and explain why numerical simulations are the appropriate approach to model the shower simulation. The CORSIKA program, the standard simulation program in this field, is introduced and its features, performance and limitations are discussed. The basic principles of hadronic interaction models and some gerneral simulation techniques are explained. Also a brief introduction to the installation and use of CORSIKA is given.

  9. Diphoton production in the ADD model to NLO + parton shower accuracy at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederix, R.; Mandal, Manoj K.; Mathews, Prakash; Ravindran, V.; Seth, Satyajit; Torrielli, P.; Zaro, M.

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we present the next-to-leading order predictions for diphoton production in the ADD model, matched to the HERWIG parton shower using the MC@NLO formalism. A selection of the results is presented for d = 2-6 extra dimensions, using generic cuts as well as analysis cuts mimicking the search strategies as pursued by the ATLAS and CMS experiments.

  10. Modeling an enhancement of the lunar sodium tail during the Leonid Meteor Shower of 1998

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Jody K.; Smith, Steven M.; Baumgardner, Jeffrey; Mendillo, Michael

    A region of non-terrestrial sodium emission seen in the sky on the nights of November 18-20, 1998, has been interpreted as the Moon's distant sodium tail, possibly enhanced by micrometeor impact vaporization of the lunar regolith by the Leonid meteor shower. We show that the location and morphology of the spot can be explained by standard steady-state models of the Moon's sodium atmosphere. Moreover, using a new time-dependent simulation of the lunar atmosphere, we find that the Na escape rate from the Moon increased to 2 or 3 times its normal level during the most intense period of the 1998 Leonid meteor shower on November 16th and 17th.

  11. INTEGRATED PROBABILISTIC AND DETERMINISTIC MODELING TECHNIQUES IN ESTIMATING EXPOSURE TO WATER-BORNE CONTAMINANTS: PART 2 PHARMACOKINETIC MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Total Exposure Model (TEM) uses deterministic and stochastic methods to estimate the exposure of a person performing daily activities of eating, drinking, showering, and bathing. There were 250 time histories generated, by subject with activities, for the three exposure ro...

  12. Meteor Showers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kronk, Gary W.

    1988-01-01

    Described are the history, formation, and observing techniques of meteors and comets. Provided are several pictures, diagrams, meteor organizations and publications, and meteor shower observation tables. (YP)

  13. Meteor storms and showers with the IMEX model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soja, R. H.; Herzog, J. T.; Sommer, M.; Rodmann, J.; Vaubaillon, J.; Strub, P.; Albin, T.; Sterken, V.; Hornig, A.; Bausch, L.; Grün, E.; Srama, R.

    2015-01-01

    The Interplanetary Meteoroid Environment for Exploration (IMEX) provides a model of meteoroid streams in the inner solar system. It is primarily designed to provide hazard estimations for interplanetary spacecraft. However, such a model is also suited for studying the impact of recently created meteoroid streams at the Earth. It also allows us to study meteor storms, and to automatically determine the streams that can be observed at the Earth at any time. Here we describe the application to Leonid meteor storms of 1999-2002, and provide the results of the automatic stream determination for 2015.

  14. MODEL DEVELOPMENT - EXPOSURE MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Humans are exposed to mixtures of chemicals from multiple pathways and routes. These exposures may result from a single event or may accumulate over time if multiple exposure events occur. The traditional approach of assessing risk from a single chemical and a single route of e...

  15. Cleaning patient shower facilities: a novel approach to reducing patient exposure to aerosolized Aspergillus species and other opportunistic molds.

    PubMed

    Anaissie, Elias J; Stratton, Shawna L; Dignani, Maria Cecilia; Lee, Choon-Kee; Mahfouz, Tahsine H; Rex, John H; Summerbell, Richard C; Walsh, Thomas J

    2002-10-15

    We previously have demonstrated that the hospital water-distribution system could be a reservoir for airborne molds that leads to secondary aerosolization of these molds in patient shower facilities. In this report, we show that cleaning the floors of patient shower facilities in a bone marrow transplantation unit reduced the mean air concentrations of molds, including Aspergillus species (from 12 cfu/m3 to 4 cfu/m3; P=.0047). PMID:12355397

  16. Showering effectiveness for human hair decontamination of the nerve agent VX.

    PubMed

    Josse, Denis; Wartelle, Julien; Cruz, Catherine

    2015-05-01

    In this work, our goals were to establish whether hair decontamination by showering one hour post-exposure to the highly toxic organophosphate nerve agent VX was effective, whether it required the addition of a detergent to water and, if it could be improved by using the adsorbent Fuller's Earth (FE) or the Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion (RSDL) 30 min prior to showering. Hair exposure to VX and decontamination was performed by using an in vitro model. Hair showering led to 72% reduction of contamination. Addition of detergent to water slightly increased the decontamination effectiveness. Hair treatment with FE or RSDL improved the decontamination rate. Combination of FE use and showering, which yielded a decontamination factor of 41, was demonstrated to be the most effective hair decontamination procedure. Hair wiping after showering was shown to contribute to hair decontamination. Altogether, our results highlighted the importance of considering hair decontamination as an important part of body surface decontamination protocols. PMID:25791764

  17. Human respiratory uptake of chloroform and haloketones during showering.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xu; Weisel, Clifford P

    2005-01-01

    Inhalation is an important exposure route for volatile water contaminants, including disinfection by-products (DBPs). A controlled human study was conducted on six subjects to determine the respiratory uptake of haloketones (HKs) and chloroform, a reference compound, during showering. Breath and air concentrations of the DBPs were measured using gas chromatography and electron capture detector during and following the inhalation exposures. A lower percentage of the HKs (10%) is released from shower water to air than that of chloroform (56%) under the experiment conditions due to the lower volatility of the HKs. Breath concentrations of the DBPs were elevated during the inhalation exposure, while breath concentrations decreased rapidly after the exposure. Approximately 85-90% of the inhaled HKs were absorbed, whereas only 70% of the inhaled chloroform was absorbed for the experiment conditions used. The respiratory uptake of the DBPs was estimated using a linear one-compartment model coupled with a plug flow stream model for the shower system. The internal dose of chloroform normalized to its water concentration was approximately four times that of the HKs after a 30-min inhalation exposure. Approximately 0.3-0.4% of the absorbed HKs and 2-9% of the absorbed chloroform were expired through lung excretion after the 30-min exposure. The inhalation exposure from a typical 10-15 min shower contributes significantly to the total dose for chloroform in chlorinated drinking water but only to a moderate extent for HKs. PMID:15138448

  18. Minor meteor shower activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendtel, J.

    2016-01-01

    Video meteor observations provide us with data to analyze structures in minor meteor showers or weak features in flux profiles. Samples obtained independently by other techniques allow to calibrate the data sets and to improve the confidence of results as demonstrated with a few results. Both, the confirmation of events predicted by model calculation and the input of observational data to improve the modelling results may help to better understand meteoroid stream evolution processes. Furthermore, calibrated data series can be used for studies of the long-term evolution of meteor shower activity.

  19. EXPOSURE ANALYSIS MODELING SYSTEM (EXAMS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Exposure Analysis Modeling System (EXAMS), first published in 1982 (EPA-600/3-82-023), provides interactive computer software for formulating aquatic ecosystem models and rapidly evaluating the fate, transport, and exposure concentrations of synthetic organic chemicals--pesti...

  20. Measuring and Modeling Cosmic Ray Showers with an MBL System: An Undergraduate Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, David P.; Welker, Matthew T.

    2001-01-01

    Describes a novel method for inducing and measuring cosmic ray showers using a low-cost, microcomputer-based laboratory system. Uses low counting-rate radiation monitors in the reproduction of Bruno Rossi's classic experiment. (Contains 16 references.) (Author/YDS)

  1. Electrons, muons and hadrons in extensive air showers and how do they depend on nuclear interaction model, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrotniak, J. A.; Yodh, G. B.

    1985-01-01

    Some of the results of Monte Carlo simulations of extensive air showers for nuclear interactions models are presented. The most significant part of scaling violation effect is generated by the inclusion of rising cross-section. Among the models considered the lowest value for Eo/N(max) is obtained when rapidly rising cross-section and charge exchange are both included (model R-F01). The value is still 1.38 GeV/electron. Except at the highest energies, the sensitivity to atomic mass of the primary is greater than to specific assumptions about multiple production.

  2. Modeling exposure to particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Moschandreas, Demetrios J; Saksena, Sumeet

    2002-12-01

    Exposure assessment, a component of risk assessment, links sources of pollution with health effects. Exposure models are scientific tools used to gain insights into the processes affecting exposure assessment. The purpose of this paper is to review the process and methodology of estimating inhalation exposure to particulate matter (PM) using various types of models. Three types of models are discussed in the paper. Indirect type of models are physical models that employ inventories of outdoor and indoor sources and their emission rates to identify major sources contributing to exposure to PM, and use fate and transport and indoor air quality models to estimate PM concentrations at receptor sites. PM concentrations and time spent by a subject at each receptor site are input variables to the conventional exposure model that estimates the desired exposure levels. Direct type models use measured exposure or exposure concentrations in conjunction with information obtained from questionnaires to formulate exposure regression models. Stochastic models use exposure measurements, estimates can also be used, to formulate exposure population distributions and investigate associated uncertainty and variability. Since models developed using databases from western countries are not necessarily applicable in developing countries, the difference in requirements among western and developing countries is highlighted in the paper. Employment of exposure modeling methods in developing countries requires development of local information. Such information includes local outdoor and indoor source inventories, local or regional meteorological conditions, adjustment of indoor models to reflect local building construction conditions, and use of questionnaires to obtain local time budget and activity patterns of the subject population. PMID:12492168

  3. AIR TOXICS HUMAN EXPOSURE MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project aims to improve the scientific basis for the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) assessments of human exposures to air toxics by developing improved human exposure models. The research integrates the major components of the exposure paradigm, i.e., sources, tr...

  4. Low Temperature Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Sterilization Shower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhiraman, R. P.; Beeler, D.; Meyyappan, M.; Khare, B. N.

    2012-10-01

    Low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasma sterilization shower to address both forward and backward biological contamination issues is presented. The molecular effects of plasma exposure required to sterilize microorganisms is also analysed.

  5. MULTIMEDIA EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT MODEL (MULTIMED)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Multimedia Exposure Assessment Model (MULTIMED) for exposure assessment simulates the movement of contaminants leaching from a waste disposal facility. The model consists of a number of modules which predict concentrations at a receptor due to transport in the subsurface, sur...

  6. Muon production in extended air shower simulations.

    PubMed

    Pierog, T; Werner, K

    2008-10-24

    Whereas air shower simulations are very valuable tools for interpreting cosmic ray data, there is a long-standing problem: it is difficult to accommodate at the same time the longitudinal development of air showers and the number of muons measured on the ground. Using a new hadronic interaction model (EPOS) in air shower simulations produces much more muons, in agreement with results from the HiRes-MIA experiment. We find that this is mainly due to a better description of (anti) baryon production in hadronic interactions. This is an aspect of air shower physics which has been neglected so far. PMID:18999734

  7. Reweighting parton showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellm, Johannes; Plätzer, Simon; Richardson, Peter; Siódmok, Andrzej; Webster, Stephen

    2016-08-01

    We report on the possibility of reweighting parton-shower Monte Carlo predictions for scale variations in the parton-shower algorithm. The method is based on a generalization of the Sudakov veto algorithm. We demonstrate the feasibility of this approach using example physical distributions. Implementations are available for both of the parton-shower modules in the Herwig 7 event generator.

  8. A Bayesian population PBPK model for multiroute chloroform exposure

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yuching; Xu, Xu; Georgopoulos, Panos G.

    2011-01-01

    A Bayesian hierarchical model was developed to estimate the parameters in a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for chloroform using prior information and biomarker data from different exposure pathways. In particular, the model provides a quantitative description of the changes in physiological parameters associated with hot-water bath and showering scenarios. Through Bayesian inference, uncertainties in the PBPK parameters were reduced from the prior distributions. Prediction of biomarker data with the calibrated PBPK model was improved by the calibration. The posterior results indicate that blood flow rates varied under two different exposure scenarios, with a two-fold increase of the skin's blood flow rate predicted in the hot-bath scenario. This result highlights the importance of considering scenario-specific parameters in PBPK modeling. To demonstrate the application of a probability approach in toxicological assessment, results from the posterior distributions from this calibrated model were used to predict target tissue dose based on the rate of chloroform metabolized in liver. This study demonstrates the use of the Bayesian approach to optimize PBPK model parameters for typical household exposure scenarios. PMID:19471319

  9. Strong interactions in air showers

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, Dennis D.

    2015-03-02

    We study the role new gauge interactions in extensions of the standard model play in air showers initiated by ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays. Hadron-hadron events remain dominated by quantum chromodynamics, while projectiles and/or targets from beyond the standard model permit us to see qualitative differences arising due to the new interactions.

  10. Development and application of a human PBPK model for bromodichloromethane to investigate the impacts of multi-route exposure.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, Elaina M; Eklund, Christopher; Leavens, Teresa; Pegram, Rex A

    2016-09-01

    As a result of its presence in water as a volatile disinfection byproduct, bromodichloromethane (BDCM), which is mutagenic, poses a potential health risk from exposure via oral, dermal and inhalation routes. We developed a refined human physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for BDCM (including new chemical-specific human parameters) to evaluate the impact of BDCM exposure during showering and bathing on important measures of internal dose compared with oral exposure. The refined model adequately predicted data from the published literature for oral, dermal and bathing/showering exposures. A liter equivalency approach (L-eq) was used to estimate BDCM concentration in a liter of water consumed by the oral route that would be required to produce the same internal dose of BDCM resulting from a 20-min bath or a 10-min shower in water containing 10 µg l(-1) BDCM. The oral liter equivalent concentrations for the bathing scenario were 605, 803 and 5 µg l(-1) BDCM for maximum venous blood concentration (Cmax), the area under the curve (AUCv) and the amount metabolized in the liver per hour (MBDCM), respectively. For a 10-min showering exposure, the oral L-eq concentrations were 282, 312 and 2.1 µg l(-1) for Cmax, AUC and MBDCM, respectively. These results demonstrate large contributions of dermal and inhalation exposure routes to the internal dose of parent chemical reaching the systemic circulation, which could be transformed to mutagenic metabolites in extrahepatic target tissues. Thus, consideration of the contribution of multiple routes of exposure when evaluating risks from water-borne BDCM is needed, and this refined human model will facilitate improved assessment of internal doses from real-world exposures. Published 2015. This article has been contributed to by US Government employees and their work is in the public domain in the USA. PMID:26649444

  11. MULTIMEDIA EXPOSURE MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This task addresses a number of issues that arise in multimedia modeling with an emphasis on interactions among the atmosphere and multiple other environmental media. Approaches for working with multiple types of models and the data sets are being developed. Proper software tool...

  12. Dietary Exposure Potential Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Existing food consumption and contaminant residue databases, typically products of nutrition and regulatory monitoring, contain useful information to characterize dietary intake of environmental chemicals. A PC-based model with resident database system, termed the Die...

  13. Inhalation exposure model for volatile chemicals from indoor uses of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkes, Charles R.; Small, Mitchell J.; Andelman, Julian B.; Giardino, Nicholas J.; Marshall, Joy

    An indoor air quality model, MAVRIQ, has been developed for use with a personal computer (PC) to simulate the air concentration of organic compounds due to volatilization of chemicals originating in the domestic water supply. MAVRIQ also simulates the inhalation exposure of individuals based on their location and water use behavior. An application of MAVRIQ, presented in this paper, demonstrates the effect of various water uses on the air concentrations in a test house, and on the inhalation exposure of the inhabitants. The occupants' activities, location and water-use patterns are shown to affect their inhalation exposure. In the case of a person who spends the majority of his or her time in a home (such as the primary child-care adult) with contaminated water supply, the daily inhalation exposure is likely to exceed the exposure from ingestion of the same water. A large part of the inhalation exposure occurs during showering and post-showering activities, but other water uses also contribute. In addition, it is shown that a simple remedial action, the installation of a bathroom exhaust fan, can result in significant reductions of the inhalation exposure.

  14. Extensive Air Shower Characteristics as Functions of Shower Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giller, Maria; Stojek, Hubert; Wieczorek, Grzegorz

    We show that extensive air showers (EAS) are all very similar when described by shower age and Molière length unit. This allows to analyze fluorescence and Cherenkov light emitted by showers in a unified and simple way.

  15. Simulation of gamma-initiated showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vancov, K.; Vodenicharova, T.; Stamenov, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The main average characteristics of muon, electron and hadron components of extensive air showers were calculate using a standard model of nuclear interaction. The obtained results are in good agreement with Tien Shan experimental data.

  16. Muons in gamma showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanev, T.; Vankov, C. P.; Halzen, F.

    1985-01-01

    Muon production in gamma-induced air showers, accounting for all major processes. For muon energies in the GeV region the photoproduction is by far the most important process, while the contribution of micron + micron pair creation is not negligible for TeV muons. The total rate of muons in gamma showers is, however, very low.

  17. A new study of shower age distribution in near vertical showers by EAS air shower array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaudhuri, N.; Goswami, G. C.; Basak, D. K.; Ghosh, B.

    1984-01-01

    The air shower array has been developed since it started operation in 1931. The array covering an area of 900 sq m now incorporates 21 particle density sampling detectors around two muon magnetic spectrographs. The air showers are detected in the size range 10 to the 4th power to 10 to the 6th power particles. A total of 11000 showers has so far been detected. Average values of shower age have been obtained in various shower size ranges to study the dependence of shower age on shower size. The core distance dependence of shower age parameter has also been analyzed for presentation.

  18. Radiation Effects Investigations Based on Atmospheric Radiation Model (ATMORAD) Considering GEANT4 Simulations of Extensive Air Showers and Solar Modulation Potential.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Guillaume; Cheminet, Adrien

    2015-07-01

    The natural radiative atmospheric environment is composed of secondary cosmic rays produced when primary cosmic rays hit the atmosphere. Understanding atmospheric radiations and their dynamics is essential for evaluating single event effects, so that radiation risks in aviation and the space environment (space weather) can be assessed. In this article, we present an atmospheric radiation model, named ATMORAD (Atmospheric Radiation), which is based on GEANT4 simulations of extensive air showers according to primary spectra that depend only on the solar modulation potential (force-field approximation). Based on neutron spectrometry, solar modulation potential can be deduced using neutron spectrometer measurements and ATMORAD. Some comparisons between our methodology and standard approaches or measurements are also discussed. This work demonstrates the potential for using simulations of extensive air showers and neutron spectroscopy to monitor solar activity. PMID:26151172

  19. Photoproduction total cross section and shower development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornet, F.; García Canal, C. A.; Grau, A.; Pancheri, G.; Sciutto, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    The total photoproduction cross section at ultrahigh energies is obtained using a model based on QCD minijets and soft-gluon resummation and the ansatz that infrared gluons limit the rise of total cross sections. This cross section is introduced into the Monte Carlo system AIRES to simulate extended air showers initiated by cosmic ray photons. The impact of the new photoproduction cross section on common shower observables, especially those related to muon production, is compared with previous results.

  20. Human health risk assessment from exposure to trihalomethanes in Canadian cities.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Shakhawat; Hall, Kevin

    2010-07-01

    Lifetime exposure to trihalomethanes (THMs) through ingestion, inhalation and dermal contacts may pose risks to human health. Current approaches may under predict THMs exposure by using THMs in cold water during showering and bathing. Warming of chlorinated water during showering may increase THMs formation through reactions between organics and residual chlorine, which can increase human health risks. In this study, THMs concentrations in shower water were estimated using THMs rate increase model. Using cold water THMs, exposure through ingestion was estimated, while THMs exposure during showering was estimated using THMs in warm water. Human health cancer risks and additional expenses for 20 most populated Canadian cities from exposure to THMs were estimated. Inhalation and dermal contact during showering contributed 30% to 50% of total cancer risks, while risks from inhalation and dermal contacts were comparable for all cities. Overall cancer risks were estimated between 7.2 x 10(-6) and 6.4 x 10(-5) for these cities. Cancer incidents were estimated highest for Montreal (94/year) followed by Toronto (53/year), which may require additional medical expenses of 18.8 and 10.7 million dollars/year for Montreal and Toronto respectively. Cancer risks from exposure to THMs can be controlled by reducing THMs in water supply and varying shower stall volume, shower duration and air exchange rate in shower stall. PMID:20434775

  1. Particle Size Distribution and Inhalation Dose of Shower Water Under Selected Operating Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yue; Benson, Janet M.; Irvin, Clinton; Irshad, Hammad; Cheng, Yung-Sung

    2010-01-01

    Showering produces respirable droplets that may serve to deposit pollutants such as trihalomethane decontamination products, heavy metals, inorganic salts, microbes, or cyanoacterial toxins within the respiratory tract. The extent and importance of this route of indoor exposure depend on the physical characteristics of the aerosol as well as the pollutant profile of the source water. The purpose of this study was to characterize shower-generated aerosols as a function of water flow rate, temperature, and bathroom location. Aerosols were generated within a shower stall containing a mannequin to simulate the presence of a human. Using hot water, the mass median diameter (MMD) of the droplets inside the shower and in the bathroom were 6.3–7.5 um and 5.2–6 µm, respectively. Size was independent of water flow rate. The particle concentration inside the shower ranged from 5 to 14 mg/m3. Aerosols generated using cold water were smaller (2.5–3.1 µm) and concentrations were lower (0.02–0.1 mg/m3) inside the shower stall. No aerosols were detected in the bathroom area when cold water was used. The International Commission on Radiological Protection model was used to estimate water deposition in the respiratory tract. For hot water, total deposition ranged from 11 to 14 mg, depending on water flow rate, with approximately 50% of this deposited in the extrathoracic region during assumed mouth breathing, and greater than 86% when nose breathing was assumed. Alveolar deposition was 6–10% and 0.9% assuming oral and nasal breathing, respectively. The consequences deposition of shower water droplets will depend on the nature and extent of any pollutants in the source water. PMID:17365038

  2. Particle size distribution and inhalation dose of shower water under selected operating conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yue; Benson, Janet M; Irvin, Clinton; Irshad, Hammad; Cheng, Yung-Sung

    2007-04-01

    Showering produces respirable droplets that may serve to deposit pollutants such as trihalomethane decontamination products, heavy metals, inorganic salts, microbes, or cyanoacterial toxins within the respiratory tract. The extent and importance of this route of indoor exposure depend on the physical characteristics of the aerosol as well as the pollutant profile of the source water. The purpose of this study was to characterize shower-generated aerosols as a function of water flow rate, temperature, and bathroom location. Aerosols were generated within a shower stall containing a mannequin to simulate the presence of a human. Using hot water, the mass median diameter (MMD) of the droplets inside the shower and in the bathroom were 6.3-7.5 um and 5.2-6 microm, respectively. Size was independent of water flow rate. The particle concentration inside the shower ranged from 5 to 14 mg/m3. Aerosols generated using cold water were smaller (2.5-3.1 microm) and concentrations were lower (0.02-0.1 mg/m3) inside the shower stall. No aerosols were detected in the bathroom area when cold water was used. The International Commission on Radiological Protection model was used to estimate water deposition in the respiratory tract. For hot water, total deposition ranged from 11 to 14 mg, depending on water flow rate, with approximately 50% of this deposited in the extrathoracic region during assumed mouth breathing, and greater than 86% when nose breathing was assumed. Alveolar deposition was 6-10% and 0.9% assuming oral and nasal breathing, respectively. The consequences deposition of shower water droplets will depend on the nature and extent of any pollutants in the source water. PMID:17365038

  3. Using Joyce/Showers Teaching Models in the High School Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moeschl, Sue H.; Costello, Ronald W.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the use of three teaching models in an Indianapolis high school: concept attainment, Taba (inductive thinking), and synectics. Describes each model, its use in the classroom, and the effect on the classroom climate. (MS)

  4. 75 FR 859 - Exposure Modeling Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-06

    ... AGENCY Exposure Modeling Public Meeting AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of Cancellation and Rescheduling of meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces that the Exposure Modeling Public... Facility telephone number is (703) 305-5805. II. Background The purpose of the Exposure Modeling...

  5. Shower counter resolution scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, T.B.W.

    1991-10-14

    The EM shower counter for the SDC detector has a resolution expression containing two stochastic terms plus a constant term. Recent measurements clarifying the sources of these terms are presented here. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Chapter three: methodology of exposure modeling.

    PubMed

    Moschandreas, Demetrios J; Watson, John; D'Abreton, Peter; Scire, Joseph; Zhu, Tan; Klein, Werner; Saksena, Sumeet

    2002-12-01

    In this chapter, the concept of exposure assessment and its evolution is introduced, and evaluated by critically appraising the pertinent literature as it applies to exposures to Particulate Matter (PM). Exposure measurement or estimation methodologies and models are reviewed. Three exposure/measurement methodologies are assessed. Estimation methods focus on source evaluation and attribution, sources include those outdoors and indoors as well as in occupational and in-transit environments. Fate and transport models and their inputs are addressed to estimate concentrations outdoors and indoors; source attribution techniques help focus on the contributing sources. Activity pattern techniques are also reviewed and their use in exposure models to estimate inhalation exposure to PM is presented. Deterministic, regression and other stochastic models of exposure to PM are reviewed and evaluated. Strengths, limitations, assumptions and affirmations of the use of exposure assessment as an integral component of risk assessment and risk management are discussed in the conclusions and discussions section of this work. PMID:12492158

  7. EPA CENTER FOR EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT MODELING (CEAM)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA Center for Exposure Assessment Modeling (CEAM) supports the Agency and professional community in environmental, risk-based decision-making by expanding their applications expertise for quantitatively assessing pollutant exposure via aquatic, terrestrial, and multimedia pa...

  8. EXPOSURE MODELING OF ACID AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is conducting an intensive characterization and human exposure monitoring program of acid species and related air pollutants in an urban environment. he EPA's Atmospheric Research and Exposure Assessment Laboratory (AREAL) in coopera...

  9. DIETARY EXPOSURE METHODS AND MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research reported in this task description constitutes the MCEARD base dietary exposure research program and is conducted to complement the NERL aggregate and cumulative exposure program. Its purpose is to reduce the level of uncertainty in exposure assessment by improving N...

  10. Measurement of parton shower observables with OPAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, N.; Gieseke, S.; Kluth, S.; Plätzer, S.; Skands, P.

    2016-07-01

    A study of QCD coherence is presented based on a sample of about 397,000 e+e- hadronic annihilation events collected at √s = 91 GeV with the OPAL detector at LEP. The study is based on four recently proposed observables that are sensitive to coherence effects in the perturbative regime. The measurement of these observables is presented, along with a comparison with the predictions of different parton shower models. The models include both conventional parton shower models and dipole antenna models. Different ordering variables are used to investigate their influence on the predictions.

  11. Exogenous and Endogenous Determinants of Blood Trihalomethane Levels after Showering

    PubMed Central

    Backer, Lorraine C.; Lan, Qing; Blount, Benjamin C.; Nuckols, J.R.; Branch, Robert; Lyu, Christopher W.; Kieszak, Stephanie M.; Brinkman, Marielle C.; Gordon, Sydney M.; Flanders, W. Dana; Romkes, Marjorie; Cantor, Kenneth P.

    2008-01-01

    Background We previously conducted a study to assess whether household exposures to tap water increased an individual’s internal dose of trihalomethanes (THMs). Increases in blood THM levels among subjects who showered or bathed were variable, with increased levels tending to cluster in two groups. Objectives Our goal was to assess the importance of personal characteristics, previous exposures, genetic polymorphisms, and environmental exposures in determining THM concentrations in blood after showering. Methods One hundred study participants completed a health symptom questionnaire, a 48-hr food and water consumption diary, and took a 10-min shower in a controlled setting. We examined THM levels in blood samples collected at baseline and 10 and 30 min after the shower. We assessed the significance of personal characteristics, previous exposures to THMs, and specific gene polymorphisms in predicting postshower blood THM concentrations. Results We did not observe the clustering of blood THM concentrations observed in our earlier study. We found that environmental THM concentrations were important predictors of blood THM concentrations immediately after showering. For example, the chloroform concentration in the shower stall air was the most important predictor of blood chloroform levels 10 min after the shower (p < 0.001). Personal characteristics, previous exposures to THMs, and specific polymorphisms in CYP2D6 and GSTT1 genes were significant predictors of both baseline and postshowering blood THM concentrations as well as of changes in THM concentrations associated with showering. Conclusion The inclusion of information about individual physiologic characteristics and environmental measurements would be valuable in future studies to assess human health effects from exposures to THMs in tap water. PMID:18197300

  12. Hadronic multiparticle production at ultrahigh energies and extensive air showers

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, Ralf; Engel, Ralph; Unger, Michael

    2011-03-01

    Studies of the nature of cosmic ray particles at the highest energies are based on the measurement of extensive air showers. Most cosmic ray properties can therefore be obtained only from the interpretation of air shower data and are thus dependent on predictions of hadronic interaction models at ultrahigh energies. We discuss different scenarios of model extrapolations from accelerator data to air shower energies and investigate their impact on the corresponding air shower predictions. To explore the effect of different extrapolations by hadronic interaction models we developed an ad hoc model. This model is based on the modification of the output of standard hadronic interaction event generators within the air shower simulation process and allows us to study the impact of changing interaction features on the air shower development. In a systematic study we demonstrate the resulting changes of important air shower observables and also discuss them in terms of the predictions of the Heitler model of air shower cascades. It is found that the results of our ad hoc modifications are, to a large extent, independent of the choice of the underlying hadronic interaction model.

  13. Showering on Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A close up view of astronaut Jack R. Lousma, Skylab 3 pilot taking a hot bath in the crew quarters of the Orbital Workshop (OWS) of the Skylab space station cluster in Earth Orbit. This picture was taken with a hand-held 35mm Nikon camera. Astronaut Lousma, Alan Bean and Owen K. Garriott remained within the Skylab space station in orbit for 59 days conducting numerous medical, scientific and technological expierments. In deploying the shower facility the shower curtain is pulled up from the floor and attached to the ceiling. The water comes through a push-button shower head attached to a flexible hose. Water is drawn off by a vacuum system.

  14. The search for extended air showers at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, D.; Chau, J.; Galindo, F.; Huaman, A.; Solano, C. J.

    2009-04-30

    This paper presents the status of the project to detect extended air showers at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory. We report on detected anomalous signals and present a toy model to estimate at what altitudes we might expect to see air shower signals. According to this model, a significant number of high altitude horizontal air showers could be observed by radar techniques.

  15. PM POPULATION EXPOSURE AND DOSE MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The overall objective of this study is the development of a refined probabilistic exposure and dose model for particulate matter (PM) suitable for predicting PM10 and PM2.5 population exposures. This modeling research will be conducted both in-house by EPA scientists and through...

  16. NEXT GENERATION MULTIMEDIA/MULTIPATHWAY EXPOSURE MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation model for pesticides (SHEDS-Pesticides) supports the efforts of EPA to better understand human exposures and doses to multimedia, multipathway pollutants. It is a physically-based, probabilistic computer model that predicts, for u...

  17. 75 FR 22401 - Exposure Modeling Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-28

    ... AGENCY Exposure Modeling Public Meeting AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: An Exposure Modeling Public Meeting (EMPM) will be held for one day on July 27, 2010. This notice... to the meeting, to give EPA as much time as possible to process your request. ADDRESSES: The...

  18. 76 FR 365 - Exposure Modeling Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-04

    ... AGENCY Exposure Modeling Public Meeting AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: An Exposure Modeling Public Meeting (EMPM) will be held for one day on January 11, 2011. This... meeting, to give EPA as much time as possible to process your request. ] ADDRESSES: The meeting will...

  19. 78 FR 60870 - Exposure Modeling Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... AGENCY Exposure Modeling Public Meeting AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: An Exposure Modeling Public Meeting (EMPM) will be held for 1 day on October 8... days prior to the meeting, to give EPA as much time as possible to process your request. ADDRESSES:...

  20. Uncertainties in energy reconstruction of cosmic rays for ANITA III caused by differences in models of radio emission in atmospheric showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugaev, Viatcheslav; Rauch, Brian; Schoorlemmer, Harm; Lam, Joe; Urdaneta, David; Wissel, Stephanie; Belov, Konstantin; Romero-Wolf, Andrew; Anita Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The third flight of the high-altitude balloon-borne Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA III) was launched on a high-altitude balloon from McMurdo, Antarctica on December 17th, 2014 and flew for 22 days. It was optimized for the measurement of impulsive radio signals from the charged component of extensive air showers initiated by ultra-high energy cosmic rays in the frequency range ~ 180 - 1200 MHz. In addition it is designed to detect radio impulses initiated by high-energy neutrinos interacting in the Antarctic ice, which was the primary objective of the first two ANITA flights. Based on an extensive set of Monte Carlo simulations of radio emissions from cosmic rays (CR) with the ZHAireS and CoREAS simulation packages, we estimate uncertainties in the electric fields at the payload due to different models used in the two packages. The uncertainties in the emission are then propagated through an algorithm for energy reconstruction of individual CR showers to assess uncertainties in the energy reconstruction. We also discuss optimization of this algorithm. This research is supported by NASA under Grant # NNX11AC49G.

  1. Modeling Particle Exposure in US Trucking Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Davis, ME; Smith, TJ; Laden, F; Hart, JE; Ryan, LM; Garshick, E

    2007-01-01

    Multi-tiered sampling approaches are common in environmental and occupational exposure assessment, where exposures for a given individual are often modeled based on simultaneous measurements taken at multiple indoor and outdoor sites. The monitoring data from such studies is hierarchical by design, imposing a complex covariance structure that must be accounted for in order to obtain unbiased estimates of exposure. Statistical methods such as structural equation modeling (SEM) represent a useful alternative to simple linear regression in these cases, providing simultaneous and unbiased predictions of each level of exposure based on a set of covariates specific to the exposure setting. We test the SEM approach using data from a large exposure assessment of diesel and combustion particles in the US trucking industry. The exposure assessment includes data from 36 different trucking terminals across the United States sampled between 2001 and 2005, measuring PM2.5 and its elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC) components, by personal monitoring, and sampling at two indoor work locations and an outdoor “background” location. Using the SEM method, we predict: 1) personal exposures as a function of work related exposure and smoking status; 2) work related exposure as a function of terminal characteristics, indoor ventilation, job location, and background exposure conditions; and 3) background exposure conditions as a function of weather, nearby source pollution, and other regional differences across terminal sites. The primary advantage of SEMs in this setting is the ability to simultaneously predict exposures at each of the sampling locations, while accounting for the complex covariance structure among the measurements and descriptive variables. The statistically significant results and high R2 values observed from the trucking industry application supports the broader use of this approach in exposure assessment modeling. PMID:16856739

  2. The Orbital Workshop Shower Compartment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This photograph shows technicians performing a checkout of the Metabolic Analyzer (center background) and the Ergometer (foreground) in the Orbital Workshop (OWS). The shower compartment is at right. The Ergometer (Skylab Experiment M171) evaluated man's metabolic effectiveness and cost of work in space environment. Located in the experiment and work area of the OWS, the shower compartment was a cylindrical cloth enclosure that was folded flat when not in use. The bottom ring of the shower was fastened to the floor and contained foot restraints. The upper ring contained the shower head and hose. To use the shower, the astronaut filled a pressurized portable bottle with heated water and attached the bottle to the ceiling. A flexible hose cornected the water bottle to a handheld shower head. The astronaut pulled the cylindrical shower wall up into position and bathed, using liquid soap. Both soap and water were carefully rationed, having been premeasured for economical use.

  3. The Orbital Workshop Shower Compartment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    In this photograph, the Orbital Workshop shower compartment was unfolded by technicians for inspection. The shower compartment was a cylindrical cloth enclosure that was folded flat when not in use. The bottom ring of the shower was fastened to the floor and contained foot restraints. The upper ring contained the shower head and hose. To use the shower, the astronaut filled a pressurized portable bottle with heated water and attached the bottle to the ceiling. A flexible hose cornected the water bottle to a handheld shower head. The astronaut pulled the cylindrical shower wall up into position and bathed, using liquid soap. Both soap and water were carefully rationed, having been premeasured for economical use.

  4. A project to predict meteor showers from all potential parent comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajdukova, M.; Neslusan, L.; Tomko, D.; Jakubik, M.; Kanuchova, Z.

    2015-10-01

    In this project, new meteor showers associated with known periodic comets have been predicted, new parent bodies associated with known meteor showers have been suggested, and new relationships among the meteor showers that belong to the same complex have been found. Here, we present an overview of our results from the modelling of diverse meteorshower complexes [1].

  5. Jet fragmentation via recombination of parton showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Kyong Chol; Fries, Rainer J.; Ko, Che Ming

    2016-04-01

    We propose to model hadronization of parton showers in QCD jets through a hybrid approach involving quark recombination and string fragmentation. This is achieved by allowing gluons at the end of the perturbative shower evolution to undergo a nonperturbative splitting into quark and antiquark pairs, then applying a Monte Carlo version of instantaneous quark recombination, and finally subjecting remnant quarks (those which have not found a recombination partner) to Lund string fragmentation. When applied to parton showers from the pythia Monte Carlo event generator, the final hadron spectra from our calculation compare quite well to pythia jets that have been hadronized with the default Lund string fragmentation. Our new approach opens up the possibility to generalize hadronization to jets embedded in a quark gluon plasma.

  6. The Upsilon Pegasid Meteor Shower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povenmire, H.

    1995-09-01

    ]. These events showed a confirmed shower at least 20 days in length. The radiant appears to be approximately 3 degrees in diameter. Computer modeling using the D-criterion developed by Southworth and Hawkins [8] indicate that it could be much larger [3]. It is likely an old shower that is still intact, not disrupted by planetary perturbations due to its high inclination. These meteors cross the Earth's orbit while approaching the Sun. They arrive at perihelion about September 16.0 at a perihelion distance of 0.19 AU, half that of Mercury's orbit. The Earth travels through this nearly vertically inclined stream in almost the shortest possible interval. A shower duration as noted indicates a diameter of approximately 0.6 AU. References: [1] Povenmire H. (1980) Fireballs, Meteors and Meteorites, J.S.B. Enterprises Indian Harbour Beach, Florida, 215 pp. [2] Ceplecha Z. (1982) S.E.A.N. Bulletin, 7, 13-14. [3] Kronk G. (1988) Meteor Showers; A Descriptive Catalog, Enslow, Hillside, New Jersey, 281 pp. [4] Olivier C. P. (1937) Astrophys. J., 46, 41-56. [5] Simakina E. G. (1967) Solar System Res., 1, 96-121. [6] Babadzhanov P.B. (1963) Smithson. Contrib. Astrophys., 7, 287-291. [7] McCroskey R. and Posen A. (1961) Smithson. Contrib. Astrophys., 4, 15-84. [8] Southworth R. B. and Hawkins G. S. (1963) Smithson. Contrib. Astrophys., 7, 261-285.

  7. Portable shower apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grenier, Francis E. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A multipurpose, collapsible, shower apparatus for use almost anywhere but especially adapted for use in places somewhat remote from civilization such as recreational vehicles, campers, the outdoors, space vehicles and the like where there may be a limited amount of water or other liquid. The collapsible shower apparatus includes a curtain assembly having an inner wall, an outer wall and a porous element for separating the inner and outer walls; a series of spaced hollow hoops connected by one or more sets of hollow tubes (manifolds); one or more nozzles connected to and in communication with at least one of the hollow hoops; a source of fluid under pressure in communication with at least one of the hollow hoops; and a suction pump for withdrawing fluid from the interior of the curtain assembly.

  8. THE RETURN OF THE ANDROMEDIDS METEOR SHOWER

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegert, Paul A.; Brown, Peter G.; Weryk, Robert J.; Wong, Daniel K.

    2013-03-15

    back five Lyapunov times (which is only 25 yr for the highly perturbed parent). As a result, the stream evolution is somewhat uncertain and some discrepancy with the observations is to be expected: the radiant is 8 Degree-Sign off, the inclination 3 Degree-Sign higher, and the peak of the shower occurs a day earlier than predicted. Predictions are made regarding other appearances of the shower in the years 2000-2047 based on our numerical model. We note that the details of the 2011 return can, in principle, be used to better constrain the orbit of 3D/Biela prior to the comets first recorded return in 1772 and we address this issue briefly as well.

  9. RECENT ENHANCEMENTS TO THE DIETARY EXPOSURE POTENTIAL MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation describes recent enhancements & new applications of the Dietary Exposure Potential Model (DEPM), a model developed to assist in design & interpretation of dietary exposure measurements. Model is an interactive system that provides dietary exposure estimates using dat...

  10. Modeling and Predicting Pesticide Exposures

    EPA Science Inventory

    Models provide a means for representing a real system in an understandable way. They take many forms, beginning with conceptual models that explain the way a system works, such as delineation of all the factors and parameters of how a pesticide particle moves in the air after a s...

  11. HYDROCARBON SPILL EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrocarbon spills impact drinking water supplies at down gradient locations. onventional finite difference and finite element models of multiphase, multicomponent flow have extreme requirements for both computer time and site data. ite data and the intent of the modeling often d...

  12. New survey of meteor showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenniskens, P.

    2014-07-01

    In order to confirm the many showers listed in the IAU Working List of Meteor Showers in need of verification, a 60-camera three-station video surveillance of the night sky is being conducted in the San Francisco Bay Area in California (http://cams.seti.org), called the Cameras for Allsky Meteor Surveillance (CAMS) project [1]. Now, the first 2.5 years of observations were reduced and analyzed, comprised of 112,024 meteoroid trajectories from mostly +4 to -2 magnitude meteors. The trajectories were calculated with a mean precision of 0.24° in radiant direction and 2 % in speed. An interactive tool was developed to study the distribution of meteoroid radiant and speed after correction for Earth's motion around the Sun. A report was submitted for publication in Icarus [2]. Our team assigned 30,801 meteors to 320 showers (27.5 %). This included 72 established showers and 64 known but now confirmed showers. An additional 24 previously reported showers were tentatively detected, but need further study. This study adds 105 potential new showers and 23 newly identified components of established showers to the IAU Working List of Meteor Showers. Another 32 showers previously reported based all or in part on CAMS data were detected again. The Northern and Southern Taurids, especially, are found to be composed of a series of individual streams. In this presentation, I will summarize statistical aspects of these shower detections and their relation to parent body near-Earth objects to shed light on the role of mostly dormant comets in contributing dust to the inner solar system.

  13. COMET SHOWERS ARE NOT INDUCED BY INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, D.E.

    1985-11-01

    Encounters with interstellar clouds (IC) have been proposed by Rampino and Stothers as a cause of quasi-periodic intense comet showers leading to earth impacts, in order to explain the periodicity in marine mass extinctions found by Raup and Sepkoski. The model was described further, criticized and defended. The debate has centered on the question of whether the scale height of the clouds is small enough (in comparison to the amplitude of the oscillation of the solar system about the plane of the Galaxy) to produce a modulation in the rate of encounters. We wish to point out another serious, we believe fatal, defect in this model - the tidal fields of ICs are not strong enough to produce intense comet showers leading to earth impacts by bringing comets of the postulated inner Oort cloud into earth crossing orbits, except possibly during very rare encounters with very dense clouds. We will show that encounters with abundant clouds of low density cannot produce comet showers; cloud density N > 10{sup 3} atoms cm{sup -3} is needed to produce an intense comet shower leading to earth impacts. Furthermore, the tidal field of a dense cloud during a distant encounter is too weak to produce such showers. As a consequence, comet showers induced by ICs will be far less frequent than showers caused by passing stars. This conclusion is independent of assumptions about the radial distribution of comets in the inner Oort cloud.

  14. EPA EXPOSURE MODELS LIBRARY AND INTEGRATED MODEL EVALUATION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The third edition of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agencys (EPA) EML/IMES (Exposure Models Library and Integrated Model Evaluation System) on CD-ROM is now available. The purpose of the disc is to provide a compact and efficient means to distribute exposure models, documentat...

  15. E.M. and Hadronic Shower Simulation with FLUKA

    SciTech Connect

    Battistoni, G.; Fasso, A.; Ferrari, A.; Ranft, J.; Rubbia, A.; Sala, P.R.; /INFN, Milan /SLAC /CERN /Siegen U. /Zurich, ETH

    2005-10-03

    A description of the main features of e.m. and hadronic shower simulation models used in the FLUKA code is summarized and some recent applications are discussed. The general status of the FLUKA project is also reported.

  16. The muon content of gamma-ray showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, P. G.; Protheroe, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The result of a calculation of the expected number of muons in gamma ray initiated and cosmic ray initiated air showers using a realistic model of hadronic collisions in an effort to understand the available experimental results and to assess the feasibility of using the muon content of showers as a veto to reject cosmic ray initiated showers in ultra-high energy gamma ray astronomy are reported. The possibility of observing very-high energy gamma-ray sources by detecting narrow angle anisotropies in the high energy muon background radiation are considered.

  17. DEVELOPING MEANINGFUL COHORTS FOR HUMAN EXPOSURE MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper summarizes numerous statistical analyses focused on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Consolidated Human Activity Database (CHAD), used by many exposure modelers as the basis for data on what people do and where they spend their time. In doing so, modelers ...

  18. POPULATION-BASED EXPOSURE MODELING FOR AIR POLLUTANTS AT EPA'S NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LABORATORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) has been developing, applying, and evaluating population-based exposure models to improve our understanding of the variability in personal exposure to air pollutants. Estimates of population variability are needed for E...

  19. Modeling Human Exposure to Indoor Contaminants: External Source to Body Tissues.

    PubMed

    Webster, Eva M; Qian, Hua; Mackay, Donald; Christensen, Rebecca D; Tietjen, Britta; Zaleski, Rosemary

    2016-08-16

    Information on human indoor exposure is necessary to assess the potential risk to individuals from many chemicals of interest. Dynamic indoor and human physicologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models of the distribution of nonionizing, organic chemical concentrations in indoor environments resulting in delivered tissue doses are developed, described and tested. The Indoor model successfully reproduced independently measured, reported time-dependent air concentrations of chloroform released during showering and of 2-butyoxyethanol following use of a volatile surface cleaner. The Indoor model predictions were also comparable to those from a higher tier consumer model (ConsExpo 4.1) for the surface cleaner scenario. The PBPK model successful reproduced observed chloroform exhaled air concentrations resulting from an inhalation exposure. Fugacity based modeling provided a seamless description of the partitioning, fluxes, accumulation and release of the chemical in indoor media and tissues of the exposed subject. This has the potential to assist in health risk assessments, provided that appropriate physical/chemical property, usage characteristics, and toxicological information are available. PMID:27434742

  20. INHALATION EXPOSURE AND INTAKE DOSE MODEL IMPROVEMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation highlights recent human exposure model improvements and products developed by the EMRB in coordination with scientists in the OAQPS and provides insight into how these products are used by the OAQPS in its regulatory process. Besides providing a status report of...

  1. MEXAMS (METALS EXPOSURE ANALYSIS MODELING SYSTEM)

    EPA Science Inventory

    MEXAMS, the Metals Exposure Analysis Modeling System, provides an enhanced capability for assessing the impact of priority pollutant metals on aquatic systems. It allows the user to consider the complex chemistry affecting the behavior of metals in conjunction with the transport ...

  2. Various meteor scenes III: Recurrent showers and some minor showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koseki, Masahiro

    2015-02-01

    Meteor activities vary widely from year to year. We study here the June Bootids (JBO), τ-Herculids (TAH), and Andromedids (AND) which are basic examples for the recurrent nature of meteor showers. Half a century has passed since well-known photographic or radar meteor showers were detected. It is necessary to note that some `established' IAU showers are historical ones and we cannot always see them. We find the historical trace of AND by video and four distinct activities in the area of JBC (=JBO+TAH). Meteor showers look different by different observational techniques. Many minor showers in the IAU list have been detected only by observations stored for many days and many years; visual observations in a single night cannot perceive them naturally. We studied the φ-Piscids (PPS), χ-Taurids (CTA), γ-Ursae Minorids (GUM), η-Pegasids (ETP), and α-Sextantids (ASX) as examples and found they have not been recognized by visual observers at all. It is noteworthy that some of them have possible identifications in the IAU list and in preceding observations or reports. The difference in search methods makes the situations much more complicated. The five minor showers we studied here do not have confirmations by all observational techniques. Geobased search (radiant point, time of the observation, and possibly geocentric velocity) may overlook showers which are dispersed in radiant position. A search using the D-criterion is dependent on the presumption of a spherical distribution in the orbital space and may not represent the real distribution, or may overestimate the accuracy of the observations and lead to subdividing the showers into several parts. We must use these search methods properly.

  3. Modeling thermal protection outfits for fire exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Guowen

    2002-01-01

    A numerical model has been developed that successfully predicts heat transfer through thermally protective clothing materials and garments exposed to intense heat. The model considers the effect of fire exposure to the thermophysical properties of materials as well as the air layers between the clothing material and skin surface. These experiments involved characterizing the flash fire surrounding the manikin by measuring the temperature of the flame above each thermal sensor in the manikin surface. An estimation method is used to calculate the heat transfer coefficient for each thermal sensor in a 4 second exposure to an average heat flux of 2.00cal/cm2sec. A parameter estimation method was used to estimate heat induced change in fabric thermophysical properties. The skin-clothe air gap distribution of different garments was determined using three-dimensional body scanning technology. Multi-layer skin model and a burn prediction method were used to predict second and third degree burns. The integrated generalized model developed was validated using the "Pyroman" Thermal Protective Clothing Analysis System with Kevlar/PBIRTM and NomexRTMIIIA coverall garments with different configuration and exposure time. A parametric study conducted using this numerical model indicated the influencing parameters on garment thermal protective performance in terms of skin burn damage subjected to 4 second flash fire exposure. The importance of these parameters is analyzed and distinguished. These parameters includes fabric thermophysical properties, PyromanRTM chamber flash fire characteristics, garment shrinkage and fit factors, as well as garment initial and test ambient temperature. Different skin models and their influence on burn prediction were also investigated using this model.

  4. Electromagnetic Showers at High Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loos, J. S.; Dawson, S. L.

    1978-01-01

    Some of the properties of electromagnetic showers observed in an experimental study are illustrated. Experimental data and results from quantum electrodynamics are discussed. Data and theory are compared using computer simulation. (BB)

  5. Modeling residential exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klepeis, Neil E.; Nazaroff, William W.

    We apply a simulation model to explore the effect of a house's multicompartment character on a nonsmoker's inhalation exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke (SHS). The model tracks the minute-by-minute movement of people and pollutants among multiple zones of a residence and generates SHS pollutant profiles for each room in response to room-specific smoking patterns. In applying the model, we consider SHS emissions of airborne particles, nicotine, and carbon monoxide in two hypothetical houses, one with a typical four-room layout and one dominated by a single large space. We use scripted patterns of room-to-room occupant movement and a cohort of 5000 activity patterns sampled from a US nationwide survey. The results for scripted and cohort simulation trials indicate that the multicompartment nature of homes, manifested as inter-room differences in pollutant levels and the movement of people among zones, can cause substantial variation in nonsmoker SHS exposure.

  6. Particles Production in Extensive Air Showers: GEANT4 vs CORSIKA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabra, M. S.; Watts, J. W.; Christl, M. J.

    2014-09-01

    Air shower simulations are essential tools for the interpretation of the Extensive Air Shower (EAS) measurements. The reliability of these codes is evaluated by comparisons with equivalent simulation calculations, and with experimental data (when available). In this work, we present GEANT4 calculations of particles production in EAS induced by primary protons and Iron in the PeV (1015 eV) energy range. The calculations, using different hadronic models, are compared with the results from the well-known air shower simulation code CORSIKA, and the results of this comparison will be discussed. Air shower simulations are essential tools for the interpretation of the Extensive Air Shower (EAS) measurements. The reliability of these codes is evaluated by comparisons with equivalent simulation calculations, and with experimental data (when available). In this work, we present GEANT4 calculations of particles production in EAS induced by primary protons and Iron in the PeV (1015 eV) energy range. The calculations, using different hadronic models, are compared with the results from the well-known air shower simulation code CORSIKA, and the results of this comparison will be discussed. This work is supported by the NASA Postdoctoral Program administered by Oak Ridge Associated Universities.

  7. Exposure Modeling of Residential Air Exchange Rates for NEXUS Participants.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to cost and participant burden of personal measurements, air pollution health studies often estimate exposures using local ambient air monitors. Since outdoor levels do not necessarily reflect personal exposures, we developed the Exposure Model for Individuals (EMI) to improv...

  8. Exposure Modeling of Residential Air Exchange Rates for NEXUS Participants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to cost and participant burden of personal measurements, air pollution health studies often estimate exposures using local ambient air monitors. Since outdoor levels do not necessarily reflect personal exposures, we developed the Exposure Model for Individuals (EMI) to improv...

  9. Reconstructing Exposures from Biomarkers using Exposure-Pharmacokinetic Modeling - A Case Study with Carbaryl

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sources of uncertainty involved in exposure reconstruction for a short half-life chemical, carbaryl, were characterized using the Cumulative and Aggregate Risk Evaluation System (CARES), an exposure model, and a human physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. CARES was...

  10. Exposure Space: Integrating Exposure Data and Modeling with Toxicity Information

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent advances have been made in high-throughput (HTP) toxicity testing, e.g. from ToxCast, which will ultimately be combined with HTP predictions of exposure potential to support next-generation chemical safety assessment. Rapid exposure methods are essential in selecting chemi...

  11. POPULATION EXPOSURES TO PARTICULATE MATTER: A COMPARISON OF EXPOSURE MODEL PREDICTIONS AND MEASUREMENT DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) is currently developing an integrated human exposure source-to-dose modeling system (HES2D). This modeling system will incorporate models that use a probabilistic approach to predict population exposures to environmental ...

  12. Precise determination of muon and electromagnetic shower contents from a shower universality property

    SciTech Connect

    Yushkov, A.; Ambrosio, M.; Aramo, C.; D'Urso, D.; Valore, L.; Guarino, F.

    2010-06-15

    We consider two new aspects of extensive air shower development universality allowing to make an accurate estimation of muon and electromagnetic (EM) shower contents in two independent ways. In the first case, to get the muon (or EM) signal in water Cherenkov tanks or in scintillator detectors, it is enough to know the vertical depth of the shower maximum X{sub max}{sup v} and the total signal in the ground detector. In the second case, the EM signal can be calculated from the primary particle energy and the zenith angle. In both cases, the parametrizations of muon and EM signals are almost independent on the primary particle nature, energy and zenith angle. Implications of the considered properties for mass composition and hadronic interaction studies are briefly discussed. The present study is performed on 28 000 proton, oxygen, and iron showers, generated with CORSIKA 6.735 for the E{sup -1} spectrum in the energy range lg (E/eV)=18.5-20 and uniformly distributed in cos{sup 2{theta}} in the zenith angle interval {theta}=0 deg. - 65 deg. for QGSJET II/Fluka interaction models.

  13. The Mbale meteorite shower

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenniskens, Peter; Betlem, Hans; Betlem, Jan; Barifaijo, Erasmus; Schluter, Thomas; Hampton, Craig; Laubenstien, Matthias; Kunz, Joachim; Heusser, Gerd

    1994-01-01

    On 1992 August 14 at 12:40 UTC, an ordinary chondrite of type L5/6 entered the atmosphere over Mbale, Uganda, broke up, and caused a strewn field of size 3 x 7 km. Shortly after the fall, an expedition gathered eye witness accounts and located the position of 48 impacts of masses between 0.19 and 27.4 kg. Short-lived radionuclide data were measured for two specimens, one of which was only 12 days after the fall. Subsequent recoveries of fragements has resulted in a total of 863 mass estimates by 1993 October. The surfaces of all fragments contain fusion crust. The meteorite shower caused some minor inconveniences. Most remarkably, a young boy was hit on the head by a small specimen. The data interpreted as to indicate that the meteorite had an initial mass between 400-1000 kg (most likely approximately 1000 kg) and approached Mbale from AZ = 185 +/- 15, H = 55 +/- 15, and V(sub infinity) = 13.5 +/- 1.5/s. Orbital elements are given. Fragmentation of the initial mass started probably above 25 km altitude, but the final catastrophic breakup occurred at an altitude of 10-14 km. An estimated 190 +/- 40 kg reached the Earth's surface minutes after the final breakup of which 150 kg of material has been recovered.

  14. EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT MODELING: A STATE-OF-THE-ART REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    The state-of-the-art review of exposure assessment modeling describes currently available models that simulate the environmental fate of substances, the exposure to such substances, and the effects of such exposure. The focus is first on exposure and effects, where relatively lit...

  15. Operation of the computer model for microenvironment atomic oxygen exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourassa, R. J.; Gillis, J. R.; Gruenbaum, P. E.

    1995-01-01

    A computer model for microenvironment atomic oxygen exposure has been developed to extend atomic oxygen modeling capability to include shadowing and reflections. The model uses average exposure conditions established by the direct exposure model and extends the application of these conditions to treat surfaces of arbitrary shape and orientation.

  16. Comet C/1917 F1 (Mellish) meteor shower complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajdukova, M.; Neslusan, L.

    2014-07-01

    In this study, we mapped the whole meteor complex of the long-period comet C/1917 F1 (Mellish), using a procedure of proven reliability when investigating the 96P/Machholz and 2003 EH1 streams (Neslusan et al., 2013a; 2013b). For five perihelion passages of the comet C/1917 F1 in the past, we modeled associated theoretical streams, each consisting of 10000 test particles, and followed their dynamical evolution until the present. Subsequently, we analyzed the orbital characteristics of the parts of a stream that approach the Earth's orbit. These particles were used to predict the corresponding meteor showers. The predicted showers were searched for in the databases of actually observed meteors. According to our modeling, the meteoroid stream of the comet Mellish can be split into 4 filaments (F1 to F4), with 4 distinct radiant areas. The most numerous shower that originates in the comet nucleus of C/1917 F1 corresponds to theoretical filament F3. The meteoroids of this filament approach to the Earth's orbit relatively soon after their ejection from the nucleus. We identified this filament as the December Monocerotids (No. 19 in the IAU MDC list of the established showers). In the phase space of orbital elements, the shower occurs in the vicinity of another established shower, 250 November Orionids. However, shower No. 250 is obviously not related to C/1917 F1 since no single theoretical particle, in all five models, is in an orbit similar to the mean orbit of this shower. Filament F1 might be identified to 348 April rho-Cygnids, the meteoroid stream that was recently discovered by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (Brown et al., 2010). In our models, this filament is numerous and, hence, the shower is well predicted. The particles of filament F1 and, therefore, the real April rho-Cygnids originating in C/1917 F1 can approach the Earth's orbit and collide with our planet not earlier than about 20 millennia after their release from the parent-comet nucleus. Despite this

  17. Shoot-the-Shower: real-time observations for astroparticle physics using the FRAM robotic telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebr, J.; Janeček, P.; Prouza, M.; Kubánek, P.; Jelínek, M.; Mašek, M.; Ebrová, I.; Černý, J.

    2014-12-01

    The FRAM telescope operates as an atmospheric monitoring device for the Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina. In addition to regular photometric observations aimed to determine the overall aerosol content and characteristic in the atmosphere above the Observatory, FRAM is also a part of the rapid monitoring program. When a ultra-high energy shower is detected by the fluorescence telescopes of the Observatory, the FRAM telescope takes a series of images to measure atmospheric transparency along the trajectory of the shower. These observations are critical for the identification of showers with anomalous profiles. If such showers were clearly observed, they can significantly constrain the hadronic interaction models at very high energies.

  18. DIETARY EXPOSURES OF YOUNG CHILDREN, PART 3: MODELLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    A deterministic model was used to model dietary exposure of young children. Parameters included pesticide residue on food before handling, surface pesticide loading, transfer efficiencies and children's activity patterns. Three components of dietary pesticide exposure were includ...

  19. Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation Model for Pesticides

    EPA Science Inventory

    SHEDS-Pesticides (Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation Model for Pesticides) is a physically-based stochastic model developed to quantify exposure and dose of humans to multimedia, multipathway pollutants. Probabilistic inputs are combined in physical/mechanistic algorit...

  20. EXPOSURE ANALYSIS MODELING SYSTEM (EXAMS): USER MANUAL AND SYSTEM DOCUMENTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Exposure Analysis Modeling System, first published in 1982 (EPA-600/3-82-023), provides interactive computer software for formulating aquatic ecosystem models and rapidly evaluating the fate, transport, and exposure concentrations of synthetic organic chemicals - pesticides, ...

  1. MULTIMEDIA CONTAMINANT FATE, TRANSPORT, AND EXPOSURE MODEL (MMSOILS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Multimedia Contaminant Fate, Transport, and Exposure Model (MMSOILS) estimates the human exposure and health risk associated with releases of contamination from hazardous waste sites. The methodology consists of a multimedia model that addresses the transport of a chemical in...

  2. Modeling Impaired Hippocampal Neurogenesis after Radiation Exposure.

    PubMed

    Cacao, Eliedonna; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2016-03-01

    Radiation impairment of neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus is one of several factors associated with cognitive detriments after treatment of brain cancers in children and adults with radiation therapy. Mouse models have been used to study radiation-induced changes in neurogenesis, however the models are limited in the number of doses, dose fractions, age and time after exposure conditions that have been studied. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel predictive mathematical model of radiation-induced changes to neurogenesis using a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODEs) to represent the time, age and dose-dependent changes to several cell populations participating in neurogenesis as reported in mouse experiments exposed to low-LET radiation. We considered four compartments to model hippocampal neurogenesis and, consequently, the effects of radiation treatment in altering neurogenesis: (1) neural stem cells (NSCs), (2) neuronal progenitor cells or neuroblasts (NB), (3) immature neurons (ImN) and (4) glioblasts (GB). Because neurogenesis is decreasing with increasing mouse age, a description of the age-related dynamics of hippocampal neurogenesis is considered in the model, which is shown to be an important factor in comparisons to experimental data. A key feature of the model is the description of negative feedback regulation on early and late neuronal proliferation after radiation exposure. The model is augmented with parametric descriptions of the dose and time after irradiation dependences of activation of microglial cells and a possible shift of NSC proliferation from neurogenesis to gliogenesis reported at higher doses (∼10 Gy). Predictions for dose-fractionation regimes and for different mouse ages, and prospects for future work are then discussed. PMID:26943452

  3. The maximum depth of shower with E sub 0 larger than 10(17) eV on average characteristics of EAS different components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pravdin, M. I.; Glushkov, A. V.; Efimov, N. N.; Makarov, I. T.; Dedenko, L. G.

    1985-01-01

    The extensive air shower (EAS) development model independent method of the determination of a maximum depth of shower (X sub m) is considered. X sub m values obtained on various EAS parameters are in a good agreement.

  4. 1997 Leonid Shower From Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenniskens, Peter; Nugent, David; Murthy, Jayant; Tedesco, Ed; DeVincenzi, Donal L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    In November 1997, the Midcourse Space Experiment satellite (MSX) was deployed to observe the Leonid shower from space. The shower lived up to expectations, with abundant bright fireballs. Twenty-nine meteors were detected by a wide-angle, visible wavelength, camera near the limb of the Earth in a 48-minute interval, and three meteors by the narrow field camera. This amounts to a meteoroid influx of 5.5 +/- 0.6 10(exp -5)/sq km hr for masses greater than 0.3 gram. The limiting magnitude for limb observations of Leonid meteors was measured at M(sub v) = -1.5 magn The Leonid shower magnitude population index was 1.6 +/- 0.2 down to M(sub v) = -7 magn., with no sign of an upper mass cut-off.

  5. 1997 Leonid Shower from Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenniskens, Peter; Nugent, David; Tedesco, Ed; Murthy, Jayant

    In November 1997, the Midcourse Space Experiment satellite (MSX) was deployed to observe the Leonid shower from space. The shower lived up to expectations, with abundant bright fireballs. Twenty-nine meteors were detected by a wide-angle, visible wavelength, camera near the limb of the Earth in a 48-minute interval, and three meteors by the narrow field camera. This amounts to a meteoroid influx of 5.5 +/- 0.6 10^-5 km^-2 hr^-1 for masses > 0.3 gram. The limiting magnitude for limb observations of Leonid meteors was measured at M_v = -1.5 magn. The Leonid shower magnitude population index was 1.6 +/- 0.2 down to M_v = -7 magn., with no sign of an upper mass cut-off.

  6. 49 CFR 228.321 - Showering facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... and cold running potable water must be provided for showering purposes. The water supplied to a shower... provided with hot and cold water feeding a common discharge line. (3) Unless otherwise provided by...

  7. The 2014 May Camelopardalid Meteor Shower

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, Bill; Moser, Danielle

    2014-01-01

    On May 24, 2014 Earth will encounter multiple streams of debris laid down by Comet 209P LINEAR. This will likely produce a new meteor shower, never before seen. Rates predicted to be from 100 to 1000 meteors per hour between 2 and 4 AM EDT, so we are dealing with a meteor outburst, potentially a storm. Peak rate of 200 per hour best current estimate. Difficult to calibrate models due to lack of past observations. Models indicate mm size particles in stream, so potential risk to Earth orbiting spacecraft.

  8. 46 CFR 154.1410 - Decontamination shower.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Decontamination shower. 154.1410 Section 154.1410... Equipment § 154.1410 Decontamination shower. When Table 4 references this section, a vessel carrying the listed cargo must have a decontamination shower and an eye wash that: (a) Are on the weatherdeck; and...

  9. 46 CFR 154.1410 - Decontamination shower.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Decontamination shower. 154.1410 Section 154.1410... Equipment § 154.1410 Decontamination shower. When Table 4 references this section, a vessel carrying the listed cargo must have a decontamination shower and an eye wash that: (a) Are on the weatherdeck; and...

  10. 46 CFR 154.1410 - Decontamination shower.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Decontamination shower. 154.1410 Section 154.1410... Equipment § 154.1410 Decontamination shower. When Table 4 references this section, a vessel carrying the listed cargo must have a decontamination shower and an eye wash that: (a) Are on the weatherdeck; and...

  11. 46 CFR 154.1410 - Decontamination shower.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Decontamination shower. 154.1410 Section 154.1410... Equipment § 154.1410 Decontamination shower. When Table 4 references this section, a vessel carrying the listed cargo must have a decontamination shower and an eye wash that: (a) Are on the weatherdeck; and...

  12. 46 CFR 154.1410 - Decontamination shower.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Decontamination shower. 154.1410 Section 154.1410... Equipment § 154.1410 Decontamination shower. When Table 4 references this section, a vessel carrying the listed cargo must have a decontamination shower and an eye wash that: (a) Are on the weatherdeck; and...

  13. A POPULATION EXPOSURE MODEL FOR PARTICULATE MATTER: SHEDS-PM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) has developed a population exposure and dose model for particulate matter (PM) that will be publicly available in Fall 2002. The Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation (SHEDS-PM) model uses a probabilistic approach ...

  14. Summary of the 2006 Hadronic Shower Simulation Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, Laurie S.

    2007-03-19

    The 2006 Hadronic Shower Simulation Workshop, held September 6-8, 2006 at Fermi National Laboratory brought together an international assembly of experts in the field of hadronic shower development. The overall goal was to present the current understanding of the physics of hadronic showers, and to study examples of how this is measured in particle-physics calorimetry. The modeling of such events is critical, and the major Monte Carlo codes, FLUKA, GEANT, MARS, MCNPX, and PHTS were represented at the workshop. A wide range of physics, much of which is used by the simulation codes was also discussed, ranging from the hadronic CEM, LAQGSM, and DTUJET models, down to low energy neutronics capabilities. Special purpose codes and methodologies used for specific applications such as muon and neutrino physics were also shown. The results of a code benchmarking exercises were presented and extensively discussed. This paper summarizes the key topics presented in the workshop.

  15. SUMMARY OF THE 2006 HADRONIC SHOWER SIMULATION WORKSHOP

    SciTech Connect

    WATERS, LAURIE S.

    2007-01-19

    The 2006 Hadronic Shower Simulation Workshop, held September 6-8, 2006 at Fermi National Laboratory brought together an international assembly of experts in the field of hadronic shower development. The overall goal was to present the current understanding of the physics of hadronic showers, and to study examples of how this is measured in particle-physics calorimetry. The modeling of such events is critical, and the major Monte Carlo codes, FLUKA, GEANT, MARS, MCNPX, and PHTS were represented at the workshop. A wide range of physics, much of which is used by the simulation codes was also discussed, ranging from the hadronic CEM, LAQGSM, and DTUJET models, down to low energy neutronics capabilities. Special purpose codes and methodologies used for specific applications such as muon and neutrino physics were also shown. The results of a code benchmarking exercises were presented and extensively discussed. This paper summarizes the key topics presented in the workshop.

  16. A NEW METHOD OF LONGITUDINAL DIARY ASSEMBLY FOR EXPOSURE MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many stochastic human exposure models require the construction of longitudinal time-activity diaries to evaluate the time sequence of concentrations encountered, and hence, the pollutant exposure for the simulated individuals. However, most of the available data on human activiti...

  17. A PROBABILISTIC MODELING FRAMEWORK FOR PREDICTING POPULATION EXPOSURES TO BENZENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is modifying their probabilistic Stochastic Human Exposure Dose Simulation (SHEDS) model to assess aggregate exposures to air toxics. Air toxics include urban Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPS) such as benzene from mobile sources, part...

  18. Evaluating Rapid Models for High-Throughput Exposure Forecasting (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    High throughput exposure screening models can provide quantitative predictions for thousands of chemicals; however these predictions must be systematically evaluated for predictive ability. Without the capability to make quantitative, albeit uncertain, forecasts of exposure, the ...

  19. Results on reuse of reclaimed shower water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verostko, Charles E.; Garcia, Rafael; Pierson, Duane L.; Reysa, Richard P.; Irbe, Robert

    1986-01-01

    The Waste Water Recovery System that has been used in conjunction with a microgravity whole body shower to test a closed loop shower water reclamation system applicable to the NASA Space Station employs a Thermoelectric Integrated Hollow Fiber Membrane Evaporation Subsystem. Attention is given to the suitability of a Space Shuttle soap for such crew showers, the effects of shower water on the entire system, and the purification qualities of the recovered water. The chemical pretreatment of the shower water for microorganism control involved activated carbon, mixed ion exchange resin beds, and iodine bactericide dispensing units. The water was recycled five times, demonstrating the feasibility of reuse.

  20. HUMAN EXPOSURE MODELING: CONCEPTS, METHODS, AND TOOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding human exposure is critical when estimating the occurrence of deleterious effects that could follow contact with environmental contaminants. For many pollutants, the intensity, duration, frequency, route, and timing of exposure is highly variable, particularly whe...

  1. CAMS confirmation of previously reported meteor showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenniskens, P.; Nénon, Q.; Gural, P. S.; Albers, J.; Haberman, B.; Johnson, B.; Holman, D.; Morales, R.; Grigsby, B. J.; Samuels, D.; Johannink, C.

    2016-03-01

    Leading up to the 2015 IAU General Assembly, the International Astronomical Union's Working List of Meteor Showers included 486 unconfirmed showers, showers that are not certain to exist. If confirmed, each shower would provide a record of past comet or asteroid activity. Now, we report that 41 of these are detected in the Cameras for Allsky Meteor Surveillance (CAMS) video-based meteor shower survey. They manifest as meteoroids arriving at Earth from a similar direction and orbit, after removing the daily radiant drift due to Earth's motion around the Sun. These showers do exist and, therefore, can be moved to the IAU List of Established Meteor Showers. This adds to 31 previously confirmed showers from CAMS data. For each shower, finding charts are presented based on 230,000 meteors observed up to March of 2015, calculated by re-projecting the drift-corrected Sun-centered ecliptic coordinates into more familiar equatorial coordinates. Showers that are not detected, but should have, and duplicate showers that project to the same Sun-centered ecliptic coordinates, are recommended for removal from the Working List.

  2. Electromagnetic Shower Reconstruction in Emulsion Cloud Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, L. S.

    2006-04-01

    Atmospheric neutrino data from the MACRO, Soudan II and Super-Kamiokande experiments are consistent with the hypothesis of νμ → ντ oscillations. The OPERA experiment aims to prove definitively this hypothesis with the direct observation of ντ neutrinos in the νμ beam produced at CERN (CNGS). The apparatus, in construction at the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory, is equipped with electronic detectors and a sensitive target. The target is highly segmented in units, bricks, composed of alternate nuclear emulsion plates and lead sheets. An algorithm to reconstruct electromagnetic showers in a brick was developed. The algorithm was optimized using experimental data from 1, 3 and 6 GeV electron exposures and cross-checked with detailed Monte Carlo simulations. Finally, a neural network was used as electron/pion separator.

  3. Atmospheric effects on extensive air showers observed with the surface detector of the Pierre Auger observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre Auger Collaboration; Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E. J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Argirò, S.; Arisaka, K.; Arneodo, F.; Arqueros, F.; Asch, T.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Bäcker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Beau, T.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellétoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; Benzvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bernardini, P.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Carvalho, W.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Chye, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Conceição, R.; Connolly, B.; Contreras, F.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Domenico, M.; de Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; de La Vega, G.; de Mello, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; de Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Decerprit, G.; Del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dornic, D.; Dorofeev, A.; Dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; Duvernois, M. A.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferrer, F.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fleck, I.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fulgione, W.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; García Gámez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Goggin, L. M.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonçalves Do Amaral, M.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Góra, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Gutiérrez, J.; Hague, J. D.; Halenka, V.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Healy, M. D.; Hebbeker, T.; Hebrero, G.; Heck, D.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Hussain, M.; Iarlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jiraskova, S.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Karova, T.; Kasper, P.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Krieger, A.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Lautridou, P.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, J.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Leuthold, M.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lucero, A.; Luna García, R.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Martello, D.; Martínez, J.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McEwen, M.; McNeil, R. R.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Meyhandan, R.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miele, G.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Newton, D.; Nhung, P. T.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliva, P.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Ortolani, F.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Pastor, S.; Patel, M.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; PeĶala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pinto, T.; Pirronello, V.; Pisanti, O.; Platino, M.; Pochon, J.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Redondo, A.; Reucroft, S.; Revenu, B.; Rezende, F. A. S.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Rivière, C.; Rizi, V.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-D'Orfeuil, A.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovánek, P.; Schroeder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schüssler, F.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Semikoz, D.; Settimo, M.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Siffert, B. B.; Smiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Smith, B. E.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Tamashiro, A.; Tamburro, A.; Tarutina, T.; Taşcău, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tcherniakhovski, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Ticona, R.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torres, I.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tuci, V.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Velarde, A.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Voyvodic, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Wileman, C.; Winnick, M. G.; Wu, H.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2009-09-01

    Atmospheric parameters, such as pressure (P), temperature (T) and density (ρ∝P/T), affect the development of extensive air showers initiated by energetic cosmic rays. We have studied the impact of atmospheric variations on extensive air showers by means of the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The rate of events shows a ˜10% seasonal modulation and ˜2% diurnal one. We find that the observed behaviour is explained by a model including the effects associated with the variations of P and ρ. The former affects the longitudinal development of air showers while the latter influences the Molière radius and hence the lateral distribution of the shower particles. The model is validated with full simulations of extensive air showers using atmospheric profiles measured at the site of the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF A DIETARY EXPOSURE POTENTIAL MODEL FOR EVALUATING DIETARY EXPOSURE TO CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Dietary Exposure Potential Model (DEPM) is a computer-based model developed for estimating dietary exposure to chemical residues in food. The DEPM is based on food consumption data from the 1987-1988 Nationwide Food Consumption Survey (NFCS) administered by the United States ...

  5. Extraction of exposure modeling parameters of thick resist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chi; Du, Jinglei; Liu, Shijie; Duan, Xi; Luo, Boliang; Zhu, Jianhua; Guo, Yongkang; Du, Chunlei

    2004-12-01

    Experimental and theoretical analysis indicates that many nonlinear factors existing in the exposure process of thick resist can remarkably affect the PAC concentration distribution in the resist. So the effects should be fully considered in the exposure model of thick resist, and exposure parameters should not be treated as constants because there exists certain relationship between the parameters and resist thickness. In this paper, an enhanced Dill model for the exposure process of thick resist is presented, and the experimental setup for measuring exposure parameters of thick resist is developed. We measure the intensity transmittance curve of thick resist AZ4562 under different processing conditions, and extract the corresponding exposure parameters based on the experiment results and the calculations from the beam propagation matrix of the resist films. With these modified modeling parameters and enhanced Dill model, simulation of thick-resist exposure process can be effectively developed in the future.

  6. Meteor Shower Forecast Improvements from a Survey of All-Sky Network Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorhead, Althea V.; Sugar, Glenn; Brown, Peter G.; Cooke, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Meteoroid impacts are capable of damaging spacecraft and potentially ending missions. In order to help spacecraft programs mitigate these risks, NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO) monitors and predicts meteoroid activity. Temporal variations in near-Earth space are described by the MEO's annual meteor shower forecast, which is based on both past shower activity and model predictions. The MEO and the University of Western Ontario operate sister networks of all-sky meteor cameras. These networks have been in operation for more than 7 years and have computed more than 20,000 meteor orbits. Using these data, we conduct a survey of meteor shower activity in the "fireball" size regime using DBSCAN. For each shower detected in our survey, we compute the date of peak activity and characterize the growth and decay of the shower's activity before and after the peak. These parameters are then incorporated into the annual forecast for an improved treatment of annual activity.

  7. Composition of primary cosmic rays near the bend from a study of hadrons in air showers at sea level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mincer, A. I.; Freudenreich, H. T.; Goodman, J. A.; Tonwar, S. C.; Yodh, G. B.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Berley, D.

    1985-01-01

    Data on hadrons in air showers arriving at sea level were studied to find sensitivity to primary cosmic ray composition. The rate of showers which satisfy minimum shower density and hadron energy requirements as well as the rate of showers containing hadrons delayed with respect to the electron shower front are compared to Monte Carlo simulations. The data on the rate of total triggers and delayed hadrons are compared to predicted rates for two models of primary composition. The data are consistent with models which require an increasing heavy nuclei fraction near 10 to the 15th power eV. The spectra which are consistent with the observed rate are also compared to the observed shower size spectrum at sea level and mountain level.

  8. Exposure-Based Cat Modeling, Available data, Advantages, & Limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Gero; Hosoe, Taro; Schrah, Mike; Saito, Keiko

    2010-05-01

    This paper discusses the advantages and disadvantages of exposure data for cat-modeling and considers concepts of scale as well as the completeness of data and data scoring using field/model examples. Catastrophe modeling based on exposure data has been considered the panacea for insurance-related cat modeling since the late 1980's. Reasons for this include: • The ability to extend risk modeling to consider data beyond historical losses, • Usability across many relevant scales, • Flexibility in addressing complex structures and policy conditions, and • Ability to assess dependence of risk results on exposure-attributes and exposure-modifiers, such as lines of business, occupancy types, and mitigation features, at any given scale. In order to calculate related risk, monetary exposure is correlated to vulnerabilities that have been calibrated with historical results, plausibility concepts, and/or physical modeling. While exposure based modeling is widely adopted, we also need to be aware of its limitations which include: • Boundaries in our understanding of the distribution of exposure, • Spatial interdependence of exposure patterns and the time-dependence of exposure, • Incomplete availability of loss information to calibrate relevant exposure attributes/structure with related vulnerabilities and losses, • The scale-dependence of vulnerability, • Potential for missing or incomplete communication of assumptions made during model calibration, • Inefficiencies in the aggregation or disaggregation of vulnerabilities, and • Factors which can influence losses other than exposure, vulnerability, and hazard. Although we might assume that the higher the resolution the better, regional model calibration is often limited to lower than street level resolution with higher resolution being achieved by disaggregating results using topographic/roughness features with often loosely constrained and/or varying effects on losses. This suggests that higher accuracy

  9. Monte Carlo Shower Counter Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, H. David

    1991-01-01

    Activities and accomplishments related to the Monte Carlo shower counter studies are summarized. A tape of the VMS version of the GEANT software was obtained and installed on the central computer at Gallaudet University. Due to difficulties encountered in updating this VMS version, a decision was made to switch to the UNIX version of the package. This version was installed and used to generate the set of data files currently accessed by various analysis programs. The GEANT software was used to write files of data for positron and proton showers. Showers were simulated for a detector consisting of 50 alternating layers of lead and scintillator. Each file consisted of 1000 events at each of the following energies: 0.1, 0.5, 2.0, 10, 44, and 200 GeV. Data analysis activities related to clustering, chi square, and likelihood analyses are summarized. Source code for the GEANT user subprograms and data analysis programs are provided along with example data plots.

  10. A possible new shower on Eridanus-Orion border

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šegon, Damir; Gural, Peter; Andreić, Željko; Vida, Denis; Skokić, Ivica; Novoselnik, Filip; Gržinić, Luciano

    2014-02-01

    Three showers on the border between constellations of Eridanus and Orion were found during extensive search for new showers in SonotaCo and CMN video meteor orbit databases. Our results suggest that two of these three showers represent  Eridanids shower (337 NUE), while third one represents separate possible new shower which has been named 6 Orionids (552 PSO).

  11. Measure Guideline: Water Management at Tub and Shower Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, B.

    2011-12-01

    Due to the high concentrations of water and the consequential risk of water damage to the home's structure a comprehensive water management system is imperative to protect the building assemblies underlying the finish surround of tub and shower areas. This guide shows how to install fundamental waterproofing strategies to prevent water related issues at shower and tub areas. When conducting a total gut rehab of a structure or constructing a new home, best practice installation and detailing for effective waterproofing are critically important at bathtub and shower assemblies. Water management issues in a structure may go unrecognized for long periods, so that when they are finally observed, the damage from long-term water exposure is extensive. A gut rehab is often undertaken when a home has experienced a natural disaster or when the homeowners are interested in converting an old, high-energy-use building into a high-quality, efficient structure that meets or exceeds one of the national energy standards, such as ENERGY STAR or LEED for homes. During a gut rehab, bath areas need to be replaced with diligent attention to detail. Employing effective water management practices in the installation and detailing of tub and shower assemblies will minimize or eliminate water issues within the building cavities and on the finished surfaces. A residential tub-and-shower surround or shower-stall assembly is designed to handle a high volume of water - 2.5 gallons per minute, with multiple baths occurring during a typical day. Transitions between dissimilar materials and connections between multiple planes must be installed with care to avoid creating a pathway for water to enter the building assemblies. Due to the high volume of water and the consequential risk of water damage to the home's structure, a comprehensive water management system is imperative to protect the building assemblies underlying the finish surround of tub and shower areas. At each stage of construction

  12. Modelling anxiety disorders following chemical exposures.

    PubMed

    Adamec, R

    1994-01-01

    The effects of kindling and inverse benzodiazepine receptor agonist beta-carbolines on animal models of anxiety are briefly reviewed in relation to affective disorder associated with chemical exposure. Recent experimental results are described. In the present study, cats were given the inverse benzodiazepine receptor agonist, FG-7142, a powerful anxiogenic compound in humans and animals. Neural transmission in pathways involved in defensive behavior in the cat was monitored using evoked potential techniques. Change in these pathways was related to behavioral changes induced by the drug. It was found that a single dose of FG-7142 lastingly increased defensive response to rodents for at least 40 days after drug administration. Behavioral change was specific to defensive response, since approach-attack behavior remained unchanged, replicating previous studies. The benzodiazepine receptor antagonist, Flumazenil, reversed the increase in defensiveness in a drug-dependent manner, replicating previous findings. Increased defensiveness was paralleled by a delayed onset potentiation of neural transmission between the amygdala and the medial hypothalamus of the left hemisphere. Potentiation in the left hemisphere was transient, decaying between 6 and 12 days after the drug. There was a longer lasting potentiation (LTP) of activity evoked in the left and right amygdalo-periacqueductal gray pathways and in the right amygdalo-medial hypothalamic pathway. Potentiation in these pathways appeared at the time of behavioral change. Potentiation of the right amygdalo-periacqueductal gray and right amygdalo-medial hypothalamic pathways persisted until the end of the experiment. In contrast, potentiation of the left amygdalo-periacqueductal gray pathway faded by 40 days after the drug. Flumazenil decreased potentiation ony in the right amygdalo-periacqueductal gray pathway. These data strongly suggest that lasting affective change is mediated by lasting changes in particular efferents

  13. An overview of human exposure modeling activities at the USEPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Furtaw, E J

    2001-06-01

    The computational modeling of human exposure to environmental pollutants is one of the primary activities of the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)s National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL). Assessment of human exposures is a critical part of the overall risk assessment paradigm. In exposure assessment, we analyze the source-to-dose sequence of processes, in which pollutants are released from sources into the environment, where they may move through multiple environmental media, and to human receptors via multiple pathways. Exposure occurs at the environment-human interface, where pollutants are contacted in the course of human activities. Exposure may result in a dose, by which chemicals enter the body through multiple portals of entry, primarily inhalation, ingestion, and dermal absorption. Within the body, absorbed pollutants are distributed to, metabolized within, and eliminated from various organs and tissues, where they may cause toxicologic responses or adverse health effects. The NERL's modeling efforts are directed at improving our understanding of this sequence of processes, by characterizing the various factors influencing exposures and dose, and their associated variabilities and uncertainties. Modeling at the NERL is one of three essential programmatic elements, along with measurements and methods development. These are pursued interactively to advance our understanding of exposure-related processes. Exposure models are developed and run using the best currently available measurement data to simulate and predict population exposure and dose distributions, and to identify the most important factors and their variabilities and uncertainties. This knowledge is then used to guide the development of improved methods and measurements needed to obtain better data to improve the assessment and reduce critical uncertainties. These models and measurement results are tools that can be used in risk assessments and in risk management decisions in order

  14. The IAU Meteor Shower Nomenclature Rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenniskens, Peter

    2008-06-01

    The International Astronomical Union at its 2006 General Assembly in Prague has adopted a set of rules for meteor shower nomenclature, a working list with designated names (with IAU numbers and three-letter codes), and established a Task Group for Meteor Shower Nomenclature in Commission 22 (Meteors and Interplanetary Dust) to help define which meteor showers exist from well defined groups of meteoroids from a single parent body.

  15. MODELING CARBON MONOXIDE (CO) EXPOSURES WITHIN MICROENVIRONMENTS GIVEN PERSONAL EXPOSURE MONITORING DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data collected at ambient fixed sites may not adequately reflect personal CO exposures, as they most often miss exposures resulting from CO emissions from sources in the immediate physical surroundings of individuals, such as within automobiles. he SHAPE model was proposed to acc...

  16. EVALUATION OF OZONE EXPOSURE INDICES IN EXPOSURE-RESPONSE MODELING (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In exposure-response modeling, a major concern is the numerical definition of exposure in relating crop loss to O3, yet few indices have been considered. The paper addresses research in which plant growth was regressed for soybean, wheat, cotton, corn, and sorghum against 613 num...

  17. Fast Shower Simulation in the ATLAS Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Barberio, E.; Boudreau, J.; Butler, B.; Cheung, S.L.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Di Simone, A.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Gallas, M.V.; Glazov, A.; Marshall, Z.; Mueller, J.; Placakyte, R.; Rimoldi, A.; Savard, P.; Tsulaia, V.; Waugh, A.; Young, C.C.; /SLAC

    2011-11-08

    The time to simulate pp collisions in the ATLAS detector is largely dominated by the showering of electromagnetic particles in the heavy parts of the detector, especially the electromagnetic barrel and endcap calorimeters. Two procedures have been developed to accelerate the processing time of electromagnetic particles in these regions: (1) a fast shower parameterisation and (2) a frozen shower library. Both work by generating the response of the calorimeter to electrons and positrons with Geant 4, and then reintroduce the response into the simulation at runtime. In the fast shower parameterisation technique, a parameterization is tuned to single electrons and used later by simulation. In the frozen shower technique, actual showers from low-energy particles are used in the simulation. Full Geant 4 simulation is used to develop showers down to {approx} 1 GeV, at which point the shower is terminated by substituting a frozen shower. Judicious use of both techniques over the entire electromagnetic portion of the ATLAS calorimeter produces an important improvement of CPU time. We discuss the algorithms and their performance in this paper.

  18. Data Sources Available for Modeling Environmental Exposures in Older Adults

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report, “Data Sources Available for Modeling Environmental Exposures in Older Adults,” focuses on information sources and data available for modeling environmental exposures in the older U.S. population, defined here to be people 60 years and older, with an emphasis on those...

  19. Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation Model for Wood Preservatives

    EPA Science Inventory

    SHEDS-Wood (Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation Model for Wood Preservatives) is a physically-based stochastic model that was developed to quantify exposure and dose of children to wood preservatives on treated playsets and residential decks. Probabilistic inputs are co...

  20. USEPA SHEDS MODEL: METHODOLOGY FOR EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT FOR WOOD PRESERVATIVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physically-based, Monte Carlo probabilistic model (SHEDS-Wood: Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation model for wood preservatives) has been applied to assess the exposure and dose of children to arsenic (As) and chromium (Cr) from contact with chromated copper arsenat...

  1. MODELING ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURES TO PARTICULATE MATTER AND PESTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation describes initial results from on-going research at EPA on modeling human exposures to particulate matter and residential pesticides. A first generation probabilistic population exposure model for Particulate Matter (PM), specifically for predicting PM1o and P...

  2. Operation of the computer model for microenvironment solar exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillis, J. R.; Bourassa, R. J.; Gruenbaum, P. E.

    1995-01-01

    A computer model for microenvironmental solar exposure was developed to predict solar exposure to satellite surfaces which may shadow or reflect on one another. This document describes the technical features of the model as well as instructions for the installation and use of the program.

  3. MODELING MULTIPATHWAY EXPOSURES OF CHILDREN AND ADULTS TO PESTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A probabilistic model of individual exposure to chlorpyrifos has been developed in support of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) National Human Exposure Assessment Survey (NHEXAS) and the Food Quality Protection Act (FQPA) program. The model examines a v...

  4. Advanced REACH Tool: a Bayesian model for occupational exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    McNally, Kevin; Warren, Nicholas; Fransman, Wouter; Entink, Rinke Klein; Schinkel, Jody; van Tongeren, Martie; Cherrie, John W; Kromhout, Hans; Schneider, Thomas; Tielemans, Erik

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes a Bayesian model for the assessment of inhalation exposures in an occupational setting; the methodology underpins a freely available web-based application for exposure assessment, the Advanced REACH Tool (ART). The ART is a higher tier exposure tool that combines disparate sources of information within a Bayesian statistical framework. The information is obtained from expert knowledge expressed in a calibrated mechanistic model of exposure assessment, data on inter- and intra-individual variability in exposures from the literature, and context-specific exposure measurements. The ART provides central estimates and credible intervals for different percentiles of the exposure distribution, for full-shift and long-term average exposures. The ART can produce exposure estimates in the absence of measurements, but the precision of the estimates improves as more data become available. The methodology presented in this paper is able to utilize partially analogous data, a novel approach designed to make efficient use of a sparsely populated measurement database although some additional research is still required before practical implementation. The methodology is demonstrated using two worked examples: an exposure to copper pyrithione in the spraying of antifouling paints and an exposure to ethyl acetate in shoe repair. PMID:24665110

  5. Advanced REACH Tool: A Bayesian Model for Occupational Exposure Assessment

    PubMed Central

    McNally, Kevin; Warren, Nicholas; Fransman, Wouter; Entink, Rinke Klein; Schinkel, Jody; van Tongeren, Martie; Cherrie, John W.; Kromhout, Hans; Schneider, Thomas; Tielemans, Erik

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a Bayesian model for the assessment of inhalation exposures in an occupational setting; the methodology underpins a freely available web-based application for exposure assessment, the Advanced REACH Tool (ART). The ART is a higher tier exposure tool that combines disparate sources of information within a Bayesian statistical framework. The information is obtained from expert knowledge expressed in a calibrated mechanistic model of exposure assessment, data on inter- and intra-individual variability in exposures from the literature, and context-specific exposure measurements. The ART provides central estimates and credible intervals for different percentiles of the exposure distribution, for full-shift and long-term average exposures. The ART can produce exposure estimates in the absence of measurements, but the precision of the estimates improves as more data become available. The methodology presented in this paper is able to utilize partially analogous data, a novel approach designed to make efficient use of a sparsely populated measurement database although some additional research is still required before practical implementation. The methodology is demonstrated using two worked examples: an exposure to copper pyrithione in the spraying of antifouling paints and an exposure to ethyl acetate in shoe repair. PMID:24665110

  6. A statistical framework for the validation of a population exposure model based on personal exposure data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Delphy; Valari, Myrto; Markakis, Konstantinos; Payan, Sébastien

    2016-04-01

    Currently, ambient pollutant concentrations at monitoring sites are routinely measured by local networks, such as AIRPARIF in Paris, France. Pollutant concentration fields are also simulated with regional-scale chemistry transport models such as CHIMERE (http://www.lmd.polytechnique.fr/chimere) under air-quality forecasting platforms (e.g. Prev'Air http://www.prevair.org) or research projects. These data may be combined with more or less sophisticated techniques to provide a fairly good representation of pollutant concentration spatial gradients over urban areas. Here we focus on human exposure to atmospheric contaminants. Based on census data on population dynamics and demographics, modeled outdoor concentrations and infiltration of outdoor air-pollution indoors we have developed a population exposure model for ozone and PM2.5. A critical challenge in the field of population exposure modeling is model validation since personal exposure data are expensive and therefore, rare. However, recent research has made low cost mobile sensors fairly common and therefore personal exposure data should become more and more accessible. In view of planned cohort field-campaigns where such data will be available over the Paris region, we propose in the present study a statistical framework that makes the comparison between modeled and measured exposures meaningful. Our ultimate goal is to evaluate the exposure model by comparing modeled exposures to monitor data. The scientific question we address here is how to downscale modeled data that are estimated on the county population scale at the individual scale which is appropriate to the available measurements. To assess this question we developed a Bayesian hierarchical framework that assimilates actual individual data into population statistics and updates the probability estimate.

  7. Comparing prediction models for radiographic exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ching, W.; Robinson, J.; McEntee, M. F.

    2015-03-01

    During radiographic exposures the milliampere-seconds (mAs), kilovoltage peak (kVp) and source-to-image distance can be adjusted for variations in patient thicknesses. Several exposure adjustment systems have been developed to assist with this selection. This study compares the accuracy of four systems to predict the required mAs for pelvic radiographs taken on a direct digital radiography system (DDR). Sixty radiographs were obtained by adjusting mAs to compensate for varying combinations of source-to-image distance (SID), kVp and patient thicknesses. The 25% rule, the DuPont Bit System and the DigiBit system were compared to determine which of these three most accurately predicted the mAs required for an increase in patient thickness. Similarly, the 15% rule, the DuPont Bit System and the DigiBit system were compared for an increase in kVp. The exposure index (EI) was used as an indication of exposure to the DDR. For each exposure combination the mAs was adjusted until an EI of 1500+/-2% was achieved. The 25% rule was the most accurate at predicting the mAs required for an increase in patient thickness, with 53% of the mAs predictions correct. The DigiBit system was the most accurate at predicting mAs needed for changes in kVp, with 33% of predictions correct. This study demonstrated that the 25% rule and DigiBit system were the most accurate predictors of mAs required for an increase in patient thickness and kVp respectively. The DigiBit system worked well in both scenarios as it is a single exposure adjustment system that considers a variety of exposure factors.

  8. EFFECTS OF CORRELATED PROBABILISTIC EXPOSURE MODEL INPUTS ON SIMULATED RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In recent years, more probabilistic models have been developed to quantify aggregate human exposures to environmental pollutants. The impact of correlation among inputs in these models is an important issue, which has not been resolved. Obtaining correlated data and implementi...

  9. ASSESSING RESIDENTIAL EXPOSURE USING THE STOCHASTIC HUMAN EXPOSURE AND DOSE SIMULATION (SHEDS) MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a workshop sponsored by the Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Research and Development and Office of Pesticide Programs, the Aggregate Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation (SHEDS) Model was used to assess potential aggregate residential pesticide e...

  10. Exposures from indoor powder releases: models and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, D.W.; Horowitz, M.

    1986-04-01

    Two models of the dispersion of a solid contaminant in a room were compared. The first model was the perfect mixing model. widely used in room air modeling to predict concentration, thus exposure (the integral of concentration over time). The second model was the turbulent puff diffusion model, sometimes used in atmospheric dispersion modeling. The models predicted different consequences from a solid contaminant release in a room, such as from a bulk-loading operation or a spill. The predicted exposures from a release were evaluated for both models. The models also were compared against data from an illustrative set of experimental measurements with the use of powder spill as a source. In the room, the exposures decreased almost inversely with distance, behavior more in accord with the turbulent puff model than with the perfect mixing model.

  11. Air-shower spectroscopy at horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargion, D.

    2006-07-01

    Downward cosmic rays are mostly revealed on the ground by their air-showers diluted and filtered secondary μμ traces and/or by their (Cerenkov - Fluorescent) light because of the high altitude numerous and luminous electromagnetic ee,γ shower component. Horizontal and upward air-showers are even more suppressed by deeper atmosphere opacity and by the Earth shadows. In such noise-free horizontal and upward directions rare Ultra High Cosmic rays and rarer neutrino induced air-showers may shine, mostly mediated by resonant PeV ν¯+e→W interactions in air or by higher energy tau air-showers originated by ν skimming the Earth. At high altitude (mountains, planes, balloons) the air density is so rarefied that nearly all common air-showers might be observed at their maximal growth at a tuned altitude and direction. The arrival angle samples different distances and the corresponding most probable primary cosmic ray energy. The larger and larger distances (between observer and C.R. interaction) make wider and wider the shower area and it enlarges the probability of being observed (up to three orders of magnitude more than vertical showers); the observation of a maximal electromagnetic shower development may amplify the signal by two three orders of magnitude (with respect to a suppressed shower at sea level); the peculiar altitude angle range (ten twenty km height and ≃80 90 zenith angle) may disentangle at best the primary cosmic ray energy and composition. Even from existing mountain observatories the up-going air-showers may trace, above the horizons, PeV EeV high energy cosmic rays and, below the horizons, PeV EeV neutrino astronomy: their early signals may be captured in already existing gamma telescopes such as Magic at Canarie, while facing the Earth edges during (useless) cloudy nights.

  12. A dermatotoxicokinetic model of human exposures to jet fuel.

    PubMed

    Kim, David; Andersen, Melvin E; Nylander-French, Leena A

    2006-09-01

    Workers, both in the military and the commercial airline industry, are exposed to jet fuel by inhalation and dermal contact. We present a dermatotoxicokinetic (DTK) model that quantifies the absorption, distribution, and elimination of aromatic and aliphatic components of jet fuel following dermal exposures in humans. Kinetic data were obtained from 10 healthy volunteers following a single dose of JP-8 to the forearm over a surface area of 20 cm2. Blood samples were taken before exposure (t = 0 h), after exposure (t = 0.5 h), and every 0.5 h for up to 3.5 h postexposure. The DTK model that best fit the data included five compartments: (1) surface, (2) stratum corneum (SC), (3) viable epidermis, (4) blood, and (5) storage. The DTK model was used to predict blood concentrations of the components of JP-8 based on dermal-exposure measurements made in occupational-exposure settings in order to better understand the toxicokinetic behavior of these compounds. Monte Carlo simulations of dermal exposure and cumulative internal dose demonstrated no overlap among the low-, medium-, and high-exposure groups. The DTK model provides a quantitative understanding of the relationship between the mass of JP-8 components in the SC and the concentrations of each component in the systemic circulation. The model may be used for the development of a toxicokinetic modeling strategy for multiroute exposure to jet fuel. PMID:16801332

  13. Radiation exposure modeling and project schedule visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Jaquish, W.R.; Enderlin, V.R.

    1995-10-01

    This paper discusses two applications using IGRIP (Interactive Graphical Robot Instruction Program) to assist environmental remediation efforts at the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. In the first application, IGRIP is used to calculate the estimated radiation exposure to workers conducting tasks in radiation environments. In the second, IGRIP is used as a configuration management tool to detect interferences between equipment and personnel work areas for multiple projects occurring simultaneously in one area. Both of these applications have the capability to reduce environmental remediation costs by reducing personnel radiation exposure and by providing a method to effectively manage multiple projects in a single facility.

  14. IMPACT OF EMISSION REDUCTIONS ON EXPOSURES AND EXPOSURE DISTRIBUTIONS: APPLICATION OF A GEOGRAPHIC EXPOSURE MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anticipated results include the following. (1) We will estimate intake fraction (i.e., the fraction of emissions that are inhaled) for major source categories, over time, and by spatial location. Higher intake fraction indicates a greater exposure reduction per emission reduct...

  15. Don Quixote --- a possible parent body of a meteor shower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudawska, R.; Vaubaillon, J.

    2014-07-01

    This talk addresses the topic of meteoroid stream parent body in relation to meteor showers observed on the Earth. We carry out a further search to investigate the possibility of meteor shower observations caused by particles ejected from (3552) Don Quixote. The (3552) Don Quixote asteroid was discovered in 1983 as an Amor asteroid. The Tisserand parameter for the orbit has a value of 2.315 with respect to Jupiter, which indicates a comet-like orbit. The diameter of the object calculated from the absolute magnitude, is in the range of 12.3--24.5 km. It all makes Don Quixote a good candidate for a short-period comet among known near-Earth objects, which the recently observed cometary activity confirms [1]. We have investigated the orbital evolution of the meteoroid stream originated from Don Quixote. If the object was active in the past, it might be a parent body for a meteor shower observed on the Earth. The model for the generation and evolution of the meteoroid stream in the Solar System is taken from [2]. The asteroid's orbital elements and physical properties are taken from the JPL horizons website. The ejections of meteoroids from the asteroid surface took place when the asteroid was passing its perihelion between 5000 B.C. and 2013 A.D. Next, the orbits of ejected meteoroids were integrated to the year 2050. If a meteoroid is sufficiently close to the Earth, its orbital parameters are saved and compared with known showers.

  16. Assessment of relative potential for Legionella species or surrogates inhalation exposure from common water uses.

    PubMed

    Hines, Stephanie A; Chappie, Daniel J; Lordo, Robert A; Miller, Brian D; Janke, Robert J; Lindquist, H Alan; Fox, Kim R; Ernst, Hiba S; Taft, Sarah C

    2014-06-01

    The Legionella species have been identified as important waterborne pathogens in terms of disease morbidity and mortality. Microbial exposure assessment is a tool that can be utilized to assess the potential of Legionella species inhalation exposure from common water uses. The screening-level exposure assessment presented in this paper developed emission factors to model aerosolization, quantitatively assessed inhalation exposures of aerosolized Legionella species or Legionella species surrogates while evaluating two generalized levels of assumed water concentrations, and developed a relative ranking of six common in-home uses of water for potential Legionella species inhalation exposure. Considerable variability in the calculated exposure dose was identified between the six identified exposure pathways, with the doses differing by over five orders of magnitude in each of the evaluated exposure scenarios. The assessment of exposure pathways that have been epidemiologically associated with legionellosis transmission (ultrasonic and cool mist humidifiers) produced higher estimated inhalation exposure doses than pathways where epidemiological evidence of transmission has been less strong (faucet and shower) or absent (toilets and therapy pool). With consideration of the large uncertainties inherent in the exposure assessment process used, a relative ranking of exposure pathways from highest to lowest exposure doses was produced using culture-based measurement data and the assumption of constant water concentration across exposure pathways. In this ranking, the ultrasonic and cool mist humidifier exposure pathways were estimated to produce the highest exposure doses, followed by the shower and faucet exposure pathways, and then the toilet and therapy pool exposure pathways. PMID:24681377

  17. MULTIMEDIA HUMAN EXPOSURE AND RISK ASSESSMENT MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposures and health risk comparisons from different sites may be used for allocating limited resources available for remedial action. It is important that comparisons between different sites use similar levels of site-specific data and/or screening level data. Risk assessment c...

  18. 49 CFR 228.321 - Showering facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... remove waste water and facilitate cleaning; (3) All junctions of the curbing and the floor must be sealed... shower room must be smooth and impervious to the height of splash. (d) Water. An adequate supply of hot and cold running potable water must be provided for showering purposes. The water supplied to a...

  19. Search for excess showers from Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirov, I. N.; Stamenov, J. N.; Ushev, S. Z.; Janminchev, V. D.; Aseikin, V. S.; Nikolsky, S. I.; Nikolskaja, N. M.; Yakovlev, V. I.; Morozov, A. E.

    1985-01-01

    The arrival directions of muon poor showers registrated in the Tien Shan experiment during an effective running time about I,8.IO(4)h were analyzed. It is shown that there is a significant excess of these showers coming the direction of Crab Nebula.

  20. Extensive Air Showers in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badala, A.; Blanco, F.; La Rocca, P.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pulvirenti, A.; Riggi, F.

    2007-01-01

    The basic properties of extensive air showers of particles produced in the interaction of a high-energy primary cosmic ray in the Earth's atmosphere are discussed in the context of educational cosmic ray projects involving undergraduate students and high-school teams. Simulation results produced by an air shower development code were made…

  1. Introduction to Parton-Shower Event Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höche, Stefan

    This lecture discusses the physics implemented by Monte Carlo event generators for hadron colliders. It details the construction of parton showers and the matching of parton showers to fixed-order calculations at higher orders in perturbative QCD. It also discusses approaches to merge calculations for a varying number of jets, the interface to the underlying event and hadronization.

  2. Searching for mini black holes signatures in cosmic rays air shower

    SciTech Connect

    Lamri, S.; Kalli, S.; Mimouni, J.

    2012-06-27

    Theories with extra dimensions at low Planck scale, offer the exciting possibility of mini black holes production in ultra high-energy particles interactions. In particular, cosmic neutrinos interaction can produce black holes deep in the Earth's atmosphere. These mini black holes then decay and produce 'characteristic' air showers. In this paper, we examine the properties of the mini black holes (mBH) air showers and compare them to the standard model (mSM) ones. We point out to some possible criteria that help distinguishing mBH air showers.

  3. Don Quixote-A possible parent body of a meteor shower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudawska, Regina; Vaubaillon, Jeremie

    2015-12-01

    Asteroid 3552 Don Quixote (1983 SA) orbits the Sun on an orbit that resembles that of a short-period comet. This, together with its recently observed cometary activity, makes it a good candidate for a parent body of a meteor shower. Model calculations show that the particles originated from Don Quixote pass close enough to Earth orbit to search for a meteor shower activity. Corresponding meteor showers were found in CAMS (Rudawska and Jenniskens, 2014) and EDMOND (Kornoš et al., 2014) video observations. The κ Lyrids and August μ Draconids (IAU#464 and IAU#470, respectively), a similarly inclined stream active in the summer, are associated with 3552 Don Quixote.

  4. Theory of fluctuations of extended air showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dedenko, L. G.

    1975-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method was used to calculate the probability distribution functions of shower characteristics for primary protons at sea level. The calculation was based on the following model of the elementary event: the interaction paths are 90 g/sq cm for nucleons and 120 g/sq cm for pions. The nonelasticity coefficient for nucleons is uniformly distributed between 0.1 and 0.9, and for pions it is equal to 1. Isobaric pions are taken into account. The spectra of secondary particles were determined using Cocconi's approximation formula. The calculation for the nuclei was carried out on the assumption of a breakup of the nucleus into component nucleons. The mean number of particles and the variances of the distributions for electrons when the number of muons was fixed, and for muons when the number of electrons was fixed, were calculated.

  5. Meteor showers associated with 2003EH1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babadzhanov, P. B.; Williams, I. P.; Kokhirova, G. I.

    2008-06-01

    Using the Everhart RADAU19 numerical integration method, the orbital evolution of the near-Earth asteroid 2003EH1 is investigated. This asteroid belongs to the Amor group and is moving on a comet-like orbit. The integrations are performed over one cycle of variation of the perihelion argument ω. Over such a cycle, the orbit intersect that of the Earth at eight different values of ω. The orbital parameters are different at each of these intersections and so a meteoroid stream surrounding such an orbit can produce eight different meteor showers, one at each crossing. The geocentric radiants and velocities of the eight theoretical meteor showers associated with these crossing points are determined. Using published data, observed meteor showers are identified with each of the theoretically predicted showers. The character of the orbit and the existence of observed meteor showers associated with 2003EH1 confirm the supposition that this object is an extinct comet.

  6. Meteor Shower Identification and Characterization with Python

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorhead, Althea

    2015-01-01

    The short development time associated with Python and the number of astronomical packages available have led to increased usage within NASA. The Meteoroid Environment Office in particular uses the Python language for a number of applications, including daily meteor shower activity reporting, searches for potential parent bodies of meteor showers, and short dynamical simulations. We present our development of a meteor shower identification code that identifies statistically significant groups of meteors on similar orbits. This code overcomes several challenging characteristics of meteor showers such as drastic differences in uncertainties between meteors and between the orbital elements of a single meteor, and the variation of shower characteristics such as duration with age or planetary perturbations. This code has been proven to successfully and quickly identify unusual meteor activity such as the 2014 kappa Cygnid outburst. We present our algorithm along with these successes and discuss our plans for further code development.

  7. MODELING AGGREGATE CHLORPYRIFOS EXPOSURE AND DOSE TO CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    To help address the aggregate exposure assessment needs of the Food Quality Protection Act, a physically-based probabilistic model (SHEDS-Pesticides, version 3) has been applied to estimate aggregate chlorpyrifos exposure and dose to children. Two age groups (0-4, 5-9 years) a...

  8. Development of a standard documentation protocol for communicating exposure models.

    PubMed

    Ciffroy, P; Altenpohl, A; Fait, G; Fransman, W; Paini, A; Radovnikovic, A; Simon-Cornu, M; Suciu, N; Verdonck, F

    2016-10-15

    An important step in building a computational model is its documentation; a comprehensive and structured documentation can improve the model applicability and transparency in science/research and for regulatory purposes. This is particularly crucial and challenging for environmental and/or human exposure models that aim to establish quantitative relationships between personal exposure levels and their determinants. Exposure models simulate the transport and fate of a contaminant from the source to the receptor and may involve a large set of entities (e.g. all the media the contaminants may pass though). Such complex models are difficult to be described in a comprehensive, unambiguous and accessible way. Bad communication of assumptions, theory, structure and/or parameterization can lead to lack of confidence by the user and it may be source of errors. The goal of this paper is to propose a standard documentation protocol (SDP) for exposure models, i.e. a generic format and a standard structure by which all exposure models could be documented. For this purpose, a CEN (European Committee for Standardisation) workshop was set up with objective to agree on minimum requirements for the amount and type of information to be provided on exposure models documentation along with guidelines for the structure and presentation of the information. The resulting CEN workshop agreement (CWA) was expected to facilitate a more rigorous formulation of exposure models description and the understanding by users. This paper intends to describe the process followed for defining the SDP, the standardisation approach, as well as the main components of the SDP resulting from a wide consultation of interested stakeholders. The main outcome is a CEN CWA which establishes terms and definitions for exposure models and their elements, specifies minimum requirements for the amount and type of information to be documented, and proposes a structure for communicating the documentation to different

  9. Reconstructing exposures from biomarkers using exposure-pharmacokinetic modeling--A case study with carbaryl.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kathleen; Phillips, Martin; Grulke, Christopher; Yoon, Miyoung; Young, Bruce; McDougall, Robin; Leonard, Jeremy; Lu, Jingtao; Lefew, William; Tan, Yu-Mei

    2015-12-01

    Sources of uncertainty involved in exposure reconstruction for short half-life chemicals were characterized using computational models that link external exposures to biomarkers. Using carbaryl as an example, an exposure model, the Cumulative and Aggregate Risk Evaluation System (CARES), was used to generate time-concentration profiles for 500 virtual individuals exposed to carbaryl. These exposure profiles were used as inputs into a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to predict urinary biomarker concentrations. These matching dietary intake levels and biomarker concentrations were used to (1) compare three reverse dosimetry approaches based on their ability to predict the central tendency of the intake dose distribution; and (2) identify parameters necessary for a more accurate exposure reconstruction. This study illustrates the trade-offs between using non-iterative reverse dosimetry methods that are fast, less precise and iterative methods that are slow, more precise. This study also intimates the necessity of including urine flow rate and elapsed time between last dose and urine sampling as part of the biomarker sampling collection for better interpretation of urinary biomarker data of short biological half-life chemicals. Resolution of these critical data gaps can allow exposure reconstruction methods to better predict population-level intake doses from large biomonitoring studies. PMID:26545325

  10. Modeling of In-vehicle PM2.5 Exposure Using the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation Model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaozhen; Frey, H. Christopher; Cao, Ye; Deshpande, Bela

    2010-01-01

    Factors that influence in-vehicle PM2.5 exposure are indentified and assessed. The methodology used in the current version of Stochastic Exposure and Dose Simulation model for Particulate Matter (SHEDS-PM) for in-vehicle PM2.5 concentration is reviewed, and alternative modeling approaches are identified and evaluated. SHEDS-PM uses a linear regression model to estimate in-vehicle PM2.5 concentration based on ambient PM2.5 concentration, such as from a fixed site monitor (FSM) or a grid cell average concentration estimate from an air quality model. The ratio of in-vehicle to FSM concentration varies substantially with respect to location, vehicle type and other factors. SHEDS-PM was used to estimate PM2.5 exposure for 1% of people living in Wake County, NC in order to assess the importance of in-vehicle exposures. In-vehicle PM2.5 exposure can be as much as half of the total exposure for some individuals, depending on employment status and the time spent in-vehicle during commuting. An alternative modeling approach is explored based on the use of a dispersion model to estimate near-road PM2.5 concentration based on FSM data and a mass balance model for estimating in-vehicle concentration. Recommendations for updating the input data to the existing model, and implementation of the alternative modeling approach are made. PMID:21209848

  11. EXPOSURE ANALYSIS MODELING SYSTEM: REFERENCE MANUAL FOR EXAMS 2

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Exposure Analysis Modeling System (EXAMS), published in 1982 (EPA-600/3-82-023), provides rapid evaluations of the behavior of synthetic organic chemicals in aquatic ecosystems. EXAMS combines laboratory data describing reactivity and thermodynamic properties of chemicals wit...

  12. Studies of Cosmic Ray Composition and Air Shower Structure with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, : J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E.J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.

    2009-06-01

    These are presentations to be presented at the 31st International Cosmic Ray Conference, in Lodz, Poland during July 2009. It consists of the following presentations: (1) Measurement of the average depth of shower maximum and its fluctuations with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (2) Study of the nuclear mass composition of UHECR with the surface detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory; (3) Comparison of data from the Pierre Auger Observatory with predictions from air shower simulations: testing models of hadronic interactions; (4) A Monte Carlo exploration of methods to determine the UHECR composition with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (5) The delay of the start-time measured with the Pierre Auger Observatory for inclined showers and a comparison of its variance with models; (6) UHE neutrino signatures in the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory; and (7) The electromagnetic component of inclined air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  13. Comprehensive European dietary exposure model (CEDEM) for food additives.

    PubMed

    Tennant, David R

    2016-05-01

    European methods for assessing dietary exposures to nutrients, additives and other substances in food are limited by the availability of detailed food consumption data for all member states. A proposed comprehensive European dietary exposure model (CEDEM) applies summary data published by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) in a deterministic model based on an algorithm from the EFSA intake method for food additives. The proposed approach can predict estimates of food additive exposure provided in previous EFSA scientific opinions that were based on the full European food consumption database. PMID:26987377

  14. Modeling of exposure to carbon monoxide in fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cagliostro, D. E.

    1980-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed to predict carboxyhemoglobin concentrations in regions of the body for short exposures to carbon monoxide levels expected during escape from aircraft fires. The model includes the respiratory and circulatory dynamics of absorption and distribution of carbon monoxide and carboxyhemoglobin. Predictions of carboxyhemoglobin concentrations are compared to experimental values obtained for human exposures to constant high carbon monoxide levels. Predictions are within 20% of experimental values. For short exposure times, transient concentration effects are predicted. The effect of stress is studied and found to increase carboxyhemoglobin levels substantially compared to a rest state.

  15. Assessing total exposures to gasoline vapor using the source exposure model.

    PubMed

    Edgerton, S A; Shah, J J

    1992-01-01

    Recent developments in source apportionment modeling of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) include receptor modeling (RM) applications to "total" (indoor and outdoor) exposure assessment for source of VOC. Source fingerprints are available for major VOC sources such as gasoline vapor, automobile exhaust, refinery emissions, cleaning solvent vapors, printing inks, and waste-water treatment facilities. The relative proportion of each VOC species in the source fingerprint enables the RM method, through a least squares analysis, to identify each source's presence and quantify its contribution to ambient air concentrations. Sampling periods and locations may be selected to represent microenvironmental exposures. Receptor modeling has direct applicability to determining the relative contribution of gasoline vapors to VOC exposures in the general population. PMID:1504631

  16. Stoffenmanager exposure model: company-specific exposure assessments using a Bayesian methodology.

    PubMed

    van de Ven, Peter; Fransman, Wouter; Schinkel, Jody; Rubingh, Carina; Warren, Nicholas; Tielemans, Erik

    2010-04-01

    The web-based tool "Stoffenmanager" was initially developed to assist small- and medium-sized enterprises in the Netherlands to make qualitative risk assessments and to provide advice on control at the workplace. The tool uses a mechanistic model to arrive at a "Stoffenmanager score" for exposure. In a recent study it was shown that variability in exposure measurements given a certain Stoffenmanager score is still substantial. This article discusses an extension to the tool that uses a Bayesian methodology for quantitative workplace/scenario-specific exposure assessment. This methodology allows for real exposure data observed in the company of interest to be combined with the prior estimate (based on the Stoffenmanager model). The output of the tool is a company-specific assessment of exposure levels for a scenario for which data is available. The Bayesian approach provides a transparent way of synthesizing different types of information and is especially preferred in situations where available data is sparse, as is often the case in small- and medium sized-enterprises. Real-world examples as well as simulation studies were used to assess how different parameters such as sample size, difference between prior and data, uncertainty in prior, and variance in the data affect the eventual posterior distribution of a Bayesian exposure assessment. PMID:20146134

  17. Hadronic Shower Validation Experience for the ATLAS End-Cap Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Kiryunin, A. E.; Salihagic, D.

    2007-03-19

    Validation of GEANT4 hadronic physics models is carried out by comparing experimental data from beam tests of modules of the ATLAS end-cap calorimeters with GEANT4 based simulations. Two physics lists (LHEP and QGSP) for the simulation of hadronic showers are evaluated. Calorimeter performance parameters like the energy resolution and response for charged pions and shapes of showers are studied. Comparison with GEANT3 predictions is done as well.

  18. Probing Atmospheric Electric Fields in Thunderstorms through Radio Emission from Cosmic-Ray-Induced Air Showers.

    PubMed

    Schellart, P; Trinh, T N G; Buitink, S; Corstanje, A; Enriquez, J E; Falcke, H; Hörandel, J R; Nelles, A; Rachen, J P; Rossetto, L; Scholten, O; Ter Veen, S; Thoudam, S; Ebert, U; Koehn, C; Rutjes, C; Alexov, A; Anderson, J M; Avruch, I M; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Bonafede, A; Breitling, F; Broderick, J W; Brüggen, M; Butcher, H R; Ciardi, B; de Geus, E; de Vos, M; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Fallows, R A; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; Grießmeier, J; Gunst, A W; Heald, G; Hessels, J W T; Hoeft, M; Holties, H A; Juette, E; Kondratiev, V I; Kuniyoshi, M; Kuper, G; Mann, G; McFadden, R; McKay-Bukowski, D; McKean, J P; Mevius, M; Moldon, J; Norden, M J; Orru, E; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Reich, W; Röttgering, H; Scaife, A M M; Schwarz, D J; Serylak, M; Smirnov, O; Steinmetz, M; Swinbank, J; Tagger, M; Tasse, C; Toribio, M C; van Weeren, R J; Vermeulen, R; Vocks, C; Wise, M W; Wucknitz, O; Zarka, P

    2015-04-24

    We present measurements of radio emission from cosmic ray air showers that took place during thunderstorms. The intensity and polarization patterns of these air showers are radically different from those measured during fair-weather conditions. With the use of a simple two-layer model for the atmospheric electric field, these patterns can be well reproduced by state-of-the-art simulation codes. This in turn provides a novel way to study atmospheric electric fields. PMID:25955053

  19. Modeling Exposure to Persistent Chemicals in Hazard and Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan-Ellsberry, Christina E.; McLachlan, Michael S.; Arnot, Jon A.; MacLeod, Matthew; McKone, Thomas E.; Wania, Frank

    2008-11-01

    Fate and exposure modeling has not thus far been explicitly used in the risk profile documents prepared to evaluate significant adverse effect of candidate chemicals for either the Stockholm Convention or the Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution. However, we believe models have considerable potential to improve the risk profiles. Fate and exposure models are already used routinely in other similar regulatory applications to inform decisions, and they have been instrumental in building our current understanding of the fate of POP and PBT chemicals in the environment. The goal of this paper is to motivate the use of fate and exposure models in preparing risk profiles in the POP assessment procedure by providing strategies for incorporating and using models. The ways that fate and exposure models can be used to improve and inform the development of risk profiles include: (1) Benchmarking the ratio of exposure and emissions of candidate chemicals to the same ratio for known POPs, thereby opening the possibility of combining this ratio with the relative emissions and relative toxicity to arrive at a measure of relative risk. (2) Directly estimating the exposure of the environment, biota and humans to provide information to complement measurements, or where measurements are not available or are limited. (3) To identify the key processes and chemical and/or environmental parameters that determine the exposure; thereby allowing the effective prioritization of research or measurements to improve the risk profile. (4) Predicting future time trends including how quickly exposure levels in remote areas would respond to reductions in emissions. Currently there is no standardized consensus model for use in the risk profile context. Therefore, to choose the appropriate model the risk profile developer must evaluate how appropriate an existing model is for a specific setting and whether the assumptions and input data are relevant in the context of the application

  20. Modeling exposure to persistent chemicals in hazard and risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Cowan-Ellsberry, Christina E; McLachlan, Michael S; Arnot, Jon A; Macleod, Matthew; McKone, Thomas E; Wania, Frank

    2009-10-01

    Fate and exposure modeling has not, thus far, been explicitly used in the risk profile documents prepared for evaluating the significant adverse effect of candidate chemicals for either the Stockholm Convention or the Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution. However, we believe models have considerable potential to improve the risk profiles. Fate and exposure models are already used routinely in other similar regulatory applications to inform decisions, and they have been instrumental in building our current understanding of the fate of persistent organic pollutants (POP) and persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic (PBT) chemicals in the environment. The goal of this publication is to motivate the use of fate and exposure models in preparing risk profiles in the POP assessment procedure by providing strategies for incorporating and using models. The ways that fate and exposure models can be used to improve and inform the development of risk profiles include 1) benchmarking the ratio of exposure and emissions of candidate chemicals to the same ratio for known POPs, thereby opening the possibility of combining this ratio with the relative emissions and relative toxicity to arrive at a measure of relative risk; 2) directly estimating the exposure of the environment, biota, and humans to provide information to complement measurements or where measurements are not available or are limited; 3) to identify the key processes and chemical or environmental parameters that determine the exposure, thereby allowing the effective prioritization of research or measurements to improve the risk profile; and 4) forecasting future time trends, including how quickly exposure levels in remote areas would respond to reductions in emissions. Currently there is no standardized consensus model for use in the risk profile context. Therefore, to choose the appropriate model the risk profile developer must evaluate how appropriate an existing model is for a specific setting and

  1. Neutrons in extensive air showers

    SciTech Connect

    Stenkin, Yu. V.; Djappuev, D. D.; Valdes-Galicia, J. F.

    2007-06-15

    The main properties of the so-called neutron bursts produced by the passage of extensive air showers (EASs) through a detector array and the properties of these EASs are considered using the experiments that are being or have been carried out previously with the Carpet-2 array at Baksan Neutrino Observatory of the Institute for Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, and at Cosmic-Ray Station of UNAM in Mexico as examples. We show that no exotic processes are required to explain the nature of neutron bursts. Based on a working prototype of the previously proposed MULTICOM array, we also show that this phenomenon can be successfully used in studying the EAS hadronic component and that adding special thermal neutron detectors can improve significantly the capabilities of the array for EAS study.

  2. The angular resolution of air shower gamma ray telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morello, C.; Navarra, G.; Periale, L.; Vallania, P.

    1985-01-01

    A crucial charactristic of air shower arrays in the field of high energy gamma-ray astronomy is their angular resolving power, the arrival directions being obtained by the time of flight measurements. A small air shower array-telescope is used to study the resolution in the definition of the shower front as a function of the shower size.

  3. TOTAL HUMAN EXPOSURE MODEL (THEM) FOR RESPIRABLE SUSPENDED PARTICLES (RSP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Total Human Exposure Model (THEM) has been developed that calculates 24-hour profiles using real human activity patterns and indoor air models derived from actual measurements of pollutants. HEM was designed for implementation on personal computers. urrently, the model uses the...

  4. Conceptual model for assessment of inhalation exposure: defining modifying factors.

    PubMed

    Tielemans, Erik; Schneider, Thomas; Goede, Henk; Tischer, Martin; Warren, Nick; Kromhout, Hans; Van Tongeren, Martie; Van Hemmen, Joop; Cherrie, John W

    2008-10-01

    The present paper proposes a source-receptor model to schematically describe inhalation exposure to help understand the complex processes leading to inhalation of hazardous substances. The model considers a stepwise transfer of a contaminant from the source to the receptor. The conceptual model is constructed using three components, i.e. (i) the source, (ii) various transmission compartments and (iii) the receptor, and describes the contaminant's emission and its pattern of transport. Based on this conceptual model, a list of nine mutually independent principal modifying factors (MFs) is proposed: activity emission potential, substance emission potential, localized control, separation, segregation, dilution, worker behavior, surface contamination and respiratory protection. These MFs describe the exposure process at a high level of abstraction so that the model can be generically applicable. A list of exposure determinants underlying each of these principal MFs is proposed to describe the exposure process at a more detailed level. The presented conceptual model is developed in conjunction with an activity taxonomy as described in a separate paper. The proposed conceptual model and MFs should be seen as 'building blocks' for development of higher tier exposure models. PMID:18787181

  5. High energy hadrons in extensive air showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tonwar, S. C.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental data on the high energy hadronic component in extensive air showers of energies approx. 10 to the 14 to 10 to the 16 eV when compared with expectations from Monte Carlo simulations have shown the observed showers to be deficient in high energy hadrons relative to simulated showers. An attempt is made to understand these anomalous features with more accurate comparison of observations with expectations, taking into account the details of the experimental system. Results obtained from this analysis and their implications for the high energy physics of particle interactions at energy approx. 10 to the 15 eV are presented.

  6. Modelling survival: exposure pattern, species sensitivity and uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashauer, Roman; Albert, Carlo; Augustine, Starrlight; Cedergreen, Nina; Charles, Sandrine; Ducrot, Virginie; Focks, Andreas; Gabsi, Faten; Gergs, André; Goussen, Benoit; Jager, Tjalling; Kramer, Nynke I.; Nyman, Anna-Maija; Poulsen, Veronique; Reichenberger, Stefan; Schäfer, Ralf B.; van den Brink, Paul J.; Veltman, Karin; Vogel, Sören; Zimmer, Elke I.; Preuss, Thomas G.

    2016-07-01

    The General Unified Threshold model for Survival (GUTS) integrates previously published toxicokinetic-toxicodynamic models and estimates survival with explicitly defined assumptions. Importantly, GUTS accounts for time-variable exposure to the stressor. We performed three studies to test the ability of GUTS to predict survival of aquatic organisms across different pesticide exposure patterns, time scales and species. Firstly, using synthetic data, we identified experimental data requirements which allow for the estimation of all parameters of the GUTS proper model. Secondly, we assessed how well GUTS, calibrated with short-term survival data of Gammarus pulex exposed to four pesticides, can forecast effects of longer-term pulsed exposures. Thirdly, we tested the ability of GUTS to estimate 14-day median effect concentrations of malathion for a range of species and use these estimates to build species sensitivity distributions for different exposure patterns. We find that GUTS adequately predicts survival across exposure patterns that vary over time. When toxicity is assessed for time-variable concentrations species may differ in their responses depending on the exposure profile. This can result in different species sensitivity rankings and safe levels. The interplay of exposure pattern and species sensitivity deserves systematic investigation in order to better understand how organisms respond to stress, including humans.

  7. Modelling survival: exposure pattern, species sensitivity and uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Ashauer, Roman; Albert, Carlo; Augustine, Starrlight; Cedergreen, Nina; Charles, Sandrine; Ducrot, Virginie; Focks, Andreas; Gabsi, Faten; Gergs, André; Goussen, Benoit; Jager, Tjalling; Kramer, Nynke I; Nyman, Anna-Maija; Poulsen, Veronique; Reichenberger, Stefan; Schäfer, Ralf B; Van den Brink, Paul J; Veltman, Karin; Vogel, Sören; Zimmer, Elke I; Preuss, Thomas G

    2016-01-01

    The General Unified Threshold model for Survival (GUTS) integrates previously published toxicokinetic-toxicodynamic models and estimates survival with explicitly defined assumptions. Importantly, GUTS accounts for time-variable exposure to the stressor. We performed three studies to test the ability of GUTS to predict survival of aquatic organisms across different pesticide exposure patterns, time scales and species. Firstly, using synthetic data, we identified experimental data requirements which allow for the estimation of all parameters of the GUTS proper model. Secondly, we assessed how well GUTS, calibrated with short-term survival data of Gammarus pulex exposed to four pesticides, can forecast effects of longer-term pulsed exposures. Thirdly, we tested the ability of GUTS to estimate 14-day median effect concentrations of malathion for a range of species and use these estimates to build species sensitivity distributions for different exposure patterns. We find that GUTS adequately predicts survival across exposure patterns that vary over time. When toxicity is assessed for time-variable concentrations species may differ in their responses depending on the exposure profile. This can result in different species sensitivity rankings and safe levels. The interplay of exposure pattern and species sensitivity deserves systematic investigation in order to better understand how organisms respond to stress, including humans. PMID:27381500

  8. Modelling survival: exposure pattern, species sensitivity and uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Ashauer, Roman; Albert, Carlo; Augustine, Starrlight; Cedergreen, Nina; Charles, Sandrine; Ducrot, Virginie; Focks, Andreas; Gabsi, Faten; Gergs, André; Goussen, Benoit; Jager, Tjalling; Kramer, Nynke I.; Nyman, Anna-Maija; Poulsen, Veronique; Reichenberger, Stefan; Schäfer, Ralf B.; Van den Brink, Paul J.; Veltman, Karin; Vogel, Sören; Zimmer, Elke I.; Preuss, Thomas G.

    2016-01-01

    The General Unified Threshold model for Survival (GUTS) integrates previously published toxicokinetic-toxicodynamic models and estimates survival with explicitly defined assumptions. Importantly, GUTS accounts for time-variable exposure to the stressor. We performed three studies to test the ability of GUTS to predict survival of aquatic organisms across different pesticide exposure patterns, time scales and species. Firstly, using synthetic data, we identified experimental data requirements which allow for the estimation of all parameters of the GUTS proper model. Secondly, we assessed how well GUTS, calibrated with short-term survival data of Gammarus pulex exposed to four pesticides, can forecast effects of longer-term pulsed exposures. Thirdly, we tested the ability of GUTS to estimate 14-day median effect concentrations of malathion for a range of species and use these estimates to build species sensitivity distributions for different exposure patterns. We find that GUTS adequately predicts survival across exposure patterns that vary over time. When toxicity is assessed for time-variable concentrations species may differ in their responses depending on the exposure profile. This can result in different species sensitivity rankings and safe levels. The interplay of exposure pattern and species sensitivity deserves systematic investigation in order to better understand how organisms respond to stress, including humans. PMID:27381500

  9. Underwater Sound Propagation Modeling Methods for Predicting Marine Animal Exposure.

    PubMed

    Hamm, Craig A; McCammon, Diana F; Taillefer, Martin L

    2016-01-01

    The offshore exploration and production (E&P) industry requires comprehensive and accurate ocean acoustic models for determining the exposure of marine life to the high levels of sound used in seismic surveys and other E&P activities. This paper reviews the types of acoustic models most useful for predicting the propagation of undersea noise sources and describes current exposure models. The severe problems caused by model sensitivity to the uncertainty in the environment are highlighted to support the conclusion that it is vital that risk assessments include transmission loss estimates with statistical measures of confidence. PMID:26610982

  10. Simplified pregnant woman models for the fetus exposure assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jala, Marjorie; Conil, Emmanuelle; Varsier, Nadège; Wiart, Joe; Hadjem, Abdelhamid; Moulines, Éric; Lévy-Leduc, Céline

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we introduce a study that we carried out in order to validate the use of a simplified pregnant woman model for the assessment of the fetus exposure to radio frequency waves. This simplified model, based on the use of a homogeneous tissue to replace most of the inner organs of the virtual mother, would allow us to deal with many issues that are raised because of the lack of pregnant woman models for numerical dosimetry. Using specific absorption rate comparisons, we show that this model could be used to estimate the fetus exposure to plane waves.

  11. Exposure assessment for trihalomethanes in municipal drinking water and risk reduction strategy.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Shakhawat

    2013-10-01

    Lifetime exposure to disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in municipal water may pose risks to human health. Current approaches of exposure assessments use DBPs in cold water during showering, while warming of chlorinated water during showering may increase trihalomethane (THM) formation in the presence of free residual chlorine. Further, DBP exposure through dermal contact during showering is estimated using steady-state condition between the DBPs in shower water impacting on human skin and skin exposed to shower water. The lag times to achieve steady-state condition between DBPs in shower water and human skin can vary in the range of 9.8-391.2 min, while shower duration is often less than the lag times. Assessment of exposure without incorporating these factors might have misinterpreted DBP exposure in some previous studies. In this study, exposure to THMs through ingestion was estimated using cold water THMs, while THM exposure through inhalation and dermal contact during showering was estimated using THMs in warm water. Inhalation of THMs was estimated using THM partition into the shower air, while dermal uptake was estimated by incorporating lag times (e.g., unsteady and steady-state phases of exposure) during showering. Probabilistic approach was followed to incorporate uncertainty in the assessment. Inhalation and dermal contact during showering contributed 25-60% of total exposure. Exposure to THMs during showering can be controlled by varying shower stall volume, shower duration and air exchange rate following power law equations. The findings might be useful in understanding exposure to THMs, which can be extended to other volatile compounds in municipal water. PMID:23872246

  12. The center of lateral iso-density contours for inclined cosmic air showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanus, J. M. C.

    2016-02-01

    The horizontal lateral density of a cosmic air shower with a non-zero zenith angle is asymmetric. The asymmetry consist of a stretching of the iso-density contours to ellipses and to a shift of the center of the elliptic contours with respect to the core of the shower. The shift is caused by atmospheric attenuation. The modeling of the attenuation results in an equation for the shift as a function of zenith angle and the size of the iso-density contours. A more accurate equation is obtained by investigating the shift in lateral densities of simulated showers. It is shown how the shift can be incorporated in an elliptic lateral density function. A linear approximation for the shift allows for an analytical solution for the shifted elliptic density. Its predictions for the polar variations of the density are compared with data of simulated showers.

  13. New method to measure the attenuation of hadrons in extensive air showers

    SciTech Connect

    Apel, W. D.; Badea, F.; Bekk, K.; Bozdog, H.; Daumiller, K.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Engler, J.; Finger, M.; Gils, H. J.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Huege, T.; Isar, P. G.; Klages, H. O.; Mathes, H. J.; Mayer, H. J.; Milke, J.; Nehls, S.; Oehlschlaeger, J.

    2009-07-15

    Extensive air showers are generated through interactions of high-energy cosmic rays impinging the Earth's atmosphere. A new method is described to infer the attenuation of hadrons in air showers. The numbers of electrons and muons, registered with the scintillator array of the KASCADE experiment, are used to estimate the energy of the shower inducing primary particle. A large hadron calorimeter is used to measure the hadronic energy reaching observation level. The ratio of energy reaching ground level to the energy of the primary particle is used to derive an attenuation length of hadrons in air showers. In the energy range from 10{sup 6} to 3x10{sup 7} GeV the attenuation length obtained increases from 170 to 210 g/cm{sup 2}. The experimental results are compared to predictions of simulations based on contemporary high-energy interaction models.

  14. New method to measure the attenuation of hadrons in extensive air showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apel, W. D.; Arteaga, J. C.; Badea, F.; Bekk, K.; Bertaina, M.; Blümer, J.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I. M.; Brüggemann, M.; Buchholz, P.; Cantoni, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Cossavella, F.; Daumiller, K.; de Souza, V.; di Pierro, F.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Engler, J.; Finger, M.; Fuhrmann, D.; Ghia, P. L.; Gils, H. J.; Glasstetter, R.; Grupen, C.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Hildebrand, D.; Hörandel, J. R.; Huege, T.; Isar, P. G.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kang, D.; Kickelbick, D.; Klages, H. O.; Kolotaev, Y.; Łuczak, P.; Mathes, H. J.; Mayer, H. J.; Milke, J.; Mitrica, B.; Morello, C.; Navarra, G.; Nehls, S.; Oehlschläger, J.; Ostapchenko, S.; Over, S.; Petcu, M.; Pierog, T.; Rebel, H.; Roth, M.; Schieler, H.; Schröder, F.; Sima, O.; Stümpert, M.; Toma, G.; Trinchero, G. C.; Ulrich, H.; van Buren, J.; Walkowiak, W.; Weindl, A.; Wochele, J.; Wommer, M.; Zabierowski, J.

    2009-07-01

    Extensive air showers are generated through interactions of high-energy cosmic rays impinging the Earth’s atmosphere. A new method is described to infer the attenuation of hadrons in air showers. The numbers of electrons and muons, registered with the scintillator array of the KASCADE experiment, are used to estimate the energy of the shower inducing primary particle. A large hadron calorimeter is used to measure the hadronic energy reaching observation level. The ratio of energy reaching ground level to the energy of the primary particle is used to derive an attenuation length of hadrons in air showers. In the energy range from 106 to 3×107GeV the attenuation length obtained increases from 170 to 210g/cm2. The experimental results are compared to predictions of simulations based on contemporary high-energy interaction models.

  15. EXPOSURE RELATED DOSE ESTIMATING MODEL (ERDEM)

    EPA Science Inventory

    ERDEM is a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model with a graphical user interface (GUI) front end. Such a mathematical model was needed to make reliable estimates of the chemical dose to organs of animals or humans because of uncertainties of making route-to route, lo...

  16. Modeling tribal exposures to methyl mercury from fish consumption.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jianping; Zartarian, Valerie; Mintz, Bruce; Weber, Marc; Bailey, Ken; Geller, Andrew

    2015-11-15

    Exposure assessment and risk management considerations for tribal fish consumption are different than for the general U.S. population because of higher fish intake from subsistence fishing and/or from unique cultural practices. This research summarizes analyses of available data and methodologies for estimating tribal fish consumption exposures to methyl mercury (MeHg). Large MeHg fish tissue data sets from the Environmental Protections Agency's (EPA's) Office of Water, USGS's EMMMA program, and other data sources, were integrated, analyzed, and combined with fish intake (consumption) data for exposure analyses using EPA's SHEDS-Dietary model. Results were mapped with GIS tools to depict spatial distributions of the MeHg in fish tissues and fish consumption exposure patterns. Contribution analyses indicates the major sources for those exposures, such as type and length of fish, geographical distribution (water bodies), and dietary exposure patterns. Sensitivity analyses identify the key variables and exposure pathways. Our results show that MeHg exposure of tribal populations from fish are about 3 to 10 times higher than the US general population and that exposure poses potential health risks. The estimated risks would be reduced as much as 50%, especially for high percentiles, just by avoiding consumption of fish species with higher MeHg concentrations such as walleye and bowfin, even without changing total fish intake. These exposure assessment methods and tools can help inform decisions regarding meal sizes and frequency, types of fish and water bodies to avoid, and other factors to minimize exposures and potential health risks from contaminated fish on tribal lands. PMID:26151654

  17. Inhalational model of cocaine exposure in mice: neuroteratological effects.

    PubMed

    He, Fang; Lidow, Irina A; Lidow, Michael S

    2006-01-01

    We developed a novel inhalation-based mouse model of prenatal cocaine exposure. This model approximates cocaine abuse via smoking, the preferred route of cocaine administration by heavy drug users. The model is also characterized by (i) absence of procedural stress from drug administration, (ii) long-term drug exposure starting weeks before pregnancy and continuing throughout the entire gestation, and (iii) self-administration of cocaine in multi-hour daily sessions reminiscent of drug binges, which allows animals to set up the levels of their own drug consumption. The offspring of female mice inhaling cocaine in our model displayed no gross alterations in their cortical cytoarchitecture. These offspring, however, showed significant impairments in sustained attention and spatial working memory. We hope that the introduction of the present model will lead to a significant increase in our understanding of outcomes of prenatal cocaine exposure. PMID:16414242

  18. A Meteor Shower Origin for Martian Methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fries, M.; Christou, A.; Archer, D.; Conrad, P.; Cooke, W.; Eigenbrode, J.; ten Kate, I. L.; Matney, M.; Niles, P.; Sykes, M.; Steele, A.; Treiman, A.

    2015-07-01

    We present and discuss the hypothesis that martian methane arises from a meteor shower source. Infall material produces methane by UV photolysis, generating localized plumes that occur after Mars/comet orbit interactions. This hypothesis is testable.

  19. 49 CFR 228.321 - Showering facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... provided with hot and cold water feeding a common discharge line. (3) Unless otherwise provided by a... and cold running potable water must be provided for showering purposes. The water supplied to a...

  20. Exposure to traffic related air pollutants: self reported traffic intensity versus GIS modelled exposure

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, J; Gehring, U; Cyrys, J; Brauer, M; Hoek, G; Fischer, P; Bellander, T; Brunekreef, B

    2005-01-01

    Background: In epidemiological studies of the potential health effects of traffic related air pollution, self reported traffic intensity is a commonly used, but rarely validated, exposure variable. Methods: As part of a study on the impact of Traffic Related Air Pollution on Childhood Asthma (TRAPCA), data from 2633 and 673 infants from the Dutch and the German-Munich cohorts, respectively, were available. Parents subjectively assessed traffic intensity at the home address. Objective exposures were estimated by a combination of spatial air pollution measurements and geographic information system (GIS) based modelling using an identical method for both cohorts. Results: The agreement rates between self reported and GIS modelled exposure—accumulated over the three strata of self assessed traffic intensity—were 55–58% for PM2.5, filter absorbance (PM2.5 abs), and nitrogen dioxide in Munich and 39–40% in the Netherlands. Of the self reported low traffic exposed group, 71–73% in Munich and 45–47% in the Netherlands had low modelled exposure to these three air pollutants. Of the self assessed high exposed subgroups in Munich (15% of the total population) and the Netherlands (22% of the total population), only 22–33% and 30–32% respectively had high modelled exposure to the three air pollutants. The subjective assessments tend to overestimate the modelled estimates for PM2.5 and NO2 in both study areas. When analysis was restricted to the portion of the Dutch cohort living in non-urban areas, the agreement rates were even lower. Conclusions: Self reported and modelled assessment of exposure to air pollutants are only weakly associated. PMID:16046603

  1. Development of physiologically based toxicokinetic models for improving the human indoor exposure assessment to water contaminants: trichloroethylene and trihalomethanes.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Sami; Tardif, Ginette-Charest; Tardif, Robert

    2006-12-01

    Generally, ingestion is the only route of exposure that is considered in the risk assessment of drinking water contaminants. However, it is well known that a number of these contaminants are volatile and lipophilic and therefore highly susceptible to being absorbed through other routes, mainly inhalation and dermal. The objective of this study was to develop physiologically based human toxicokinetic (PBTK) models for trihalomethanes (THM) and trichloroethylene (TCE) that will facilitate (1) the estimation of internal exposure to these chemicals for various multimedia indoor exposure scenarios, and (2) consideration of the impact of biological variability in the estimation of internal doses. Five PBTK models describing absorption through ingestion, inhalation and skin were developed for these contaminants. Their concentrations in ambient air were estimated from their respective tap water concentrations and their physicochemical characteristics. Algebraic descriptions of the physiological parameters, varying as a function of age, gender and diverse anthropometric parameters, allow the prediction of the influence of interindividual variations on absorbed dose and internal dosimetry. Simulations for various scenarios were done for a typical human (i.e., 70 kg, 1.7 m) as well as for humans of both genders varying in age from 1 to 90 years. Simulations show that ingestion contributes to less than 50% of the total absorbed dose or metabolized dose for all chemicals. This contribution to internal dosimetry, such as maximal venous blood concentrations (Cmax) and the area under the venous blood concentration time curve (AUC), decreases markedly (e.g., as low as 0.9% of Cmax for bromodichloromethane). The importance of this contribution varies mainly as a function of shower duration. Moreover, model simulations indicate that multimedia exposure is more elevated in children than adults (i.e., up to 200% of the adult internal dose). The models developed in this study allow

  2. RECEPTOR MODELING OF AMBIENT AND PERSONAL EXPOSURE SAMPLES: 1998 BALTIMORE PARTICULATE MATTER EPIDEMIOLOGY-EXPOSURE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sources of particulate matter exposure for an elderly population in a city north of Baltimore, MD were evaluated using advanced factor analysis models. Data collected with Versatile Air Pollutant Samplers (VAPS) positioned at a community site, outside and inside of an elderly ...

  3. Modeling Population Exposures to Silver Nanoparticles Present in Consumer Products

    PubMed Central

    Royce, Steven G.; Mukherjee, Dwaipayan; Cai, Ting; Xu, Shu S.; Alexander, Jocelyn A.; Mi, Zhongyuan; Calderon, Leonardo; Mainelis, Gediminas; Lee, KiBum; Lioy, Paul J.; Tetley, Teresa D.; Chung, Kian Fan; Zhang, Junfeng; Georgopoulos, Panos G.

    2014-01-01

    Exposures of the general population to manufactured nanoparticles (MNPs) are expected to keep rising due to increasing use of MNPs in common consumer products (PEN 2014). The present study focuses on characterizing ambient and indoor population exposures to silver MNPs (nAg). For situations where detailed, case-specific exposure-related data are not available, as in the present study, a novel tiered modeling system, Prioritization/Ranking of Toxic Exposures with GIS (Geographic Information System) Extension (PRoTEGE), has been developed: it employs a product Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) approach coupled with basic human Life Stage Analysis (LSA) to characterize potential exposures to chemicals of current and emerging concern. The PRoTEGE system has been implemented for ambient and indoor environments, utilizing available MNP production, usage, and properties databases, along with laboratory measurements of potential personal exposures from consumer spray products containing nAg. Modeling of environmental and microenvironmental levels of MNPs employs Probabilistic Material Flow Analysis combined with product LCA to account for releases during manufacturing, transport, usage, disposal, etc. Human exposure and dose characterization further employs screening Microenvironmental Modeling and Intake Fraction methods combined with LSA for potentially exposed populations, to assess differences associated with gender, age, and demographics. Population distributions of intakes, estimated using the PRoTEGE framework, are consistent with published individual-based intake estimates, demonstrating that PRoTEGE is capable of capturing realistic exposure scenarios for the US population. Distributions of intakes are also used to calculate biologically-relevant population distributions of uptakes and target tissue doses through human airway dosimetry modeling that takes into account product MNP size distributions and age-relevant physiological parameters. PMID:25745354

  4. Note on the 1972 Giacobinid meteor shower.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, G. A.

    1973-01-01

    It is shown that the 1972 Giacobinid meteor shower was extremely weak with a peak activity of two to three visual meteors per hour. Only two meteor spectra were obtained from the 17 slitless spectrograph systems operated by the Langley Research Center. The largely unexpected, essentially null results of the 1972 Giacobinid meteor shower observations are indicative of the present limited understanding and predictability of cosmic dust storms.

  5. Structural peculiarities of the Quadrantid meteor shower

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isamutdinov, Sh. O.; Chebotarev, R. P.

    1987-01-01

    Systematic radio observations to investigate the Quadrantid meteor shower structure are regularly carried out. They have now been conducted annually in the period of its maximum activity, January 1 to 6, since 1966. The latest results of these investigations are presented, on the basis of 1981 to 1984 data obtained using new equipment with a limiting sensitivity of +7.7 sup m which make it possible to draw some conclusions on the Quadrantids shower structure both for transverse and lengthwise directions.

  6. Lateral distribution of electrons of air showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asakimori, K.; Maeda, T.; Kameda, T.; Mizushima, K.; Misaki, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The lateral distribution of electrons (LDE) of the air showers of size 10 to the 5th power to 10 to the 6th power was studied within one MU. It was found that the LDE of the air showers observed is well represented by NKG function except for vicinity of the core. It was also found that LDE measured by thin scintillators does not differ from that measured by thick ones of 50mm thickness.

  7. Continuous monitoring of particle emissions during showering.

    PubMed

    Cowen, Kenneth A; Ollison, Will M

    2006-12-01

    Particle formation from showering may be attributed to dissolved mineral aerosols remaining after evaporation of micron-sized satellite droplets produced by the showerhead or from splashing of larger shower water droplets on surfaces. Duplicate continuous particle monitors measured particle size distributions in a ventilated residential bathroom under various showering conditions, using a full-size mannequin in the shower to simulate splashing effects during showering. Particle mass concentrations were estimated from measured shower particle number densities and used to develop emission factors for inhalable particles. Emission source strengths of 2.7-41.3 microg/ m3/min were estimated under the various test conditions using residential tap water in Columbus, OH. Calculated fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations in the bathroom reached several hundred micrograms per cubic meter; calculated coarse particulate matter (PM10) levels approached 1000 microg/m3. Rates of particle formation tended to be highest for coarse shower spray settings with direct impact on the mannequin. No consistent effects of water temperature, water pressure, or spray setting on overall emission rates were apparent, although water temperature and spray setting did have an effect when varied within a single shower sampling run. Salt solutions were injected into the source water during some tests to assess the effects of total dissolved solids on particle emission rates. Injection of salts was shown to increase the PM2.5 particle formation rate by approximately one third, on average, for a doubling in tap water-dissolved solids content; PM10 source strengths approximately doubled under these conditions, because very few particles >10 microm were formed. PMID:17195485

  8. Microwave detection of air showers with MIDAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facal San Luis, P.; Alekotte, I.; Alvarez, J.; Berlin, A.; Bertou, X.; Bogdan, M.; Bohacova, M.; Bonifazi, C.; Carvalho, W. R.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; Genat, J. F.; Mills, E.; Monasor, M.; Privitera, P.; Reyes, I. C.; Rouille D'Orfeuil, B.; Santos, E. M.; Wayne, S.; Williams, C.; Zas, E.

    2012-01-01

    MIDAS (MIcrowave Detector of Air Showers) is a prototype of a microwave telescope to detect extensive air showers: it images a 20°×10° region of the sky with a 4.5 m parabolic reflector and 53 feeds in the focal plane. It has been commissioned in March 2010 and is currently taking data. We present the design, performance and first results of MIDAS.

  9. Radio signals from very large showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suga, K.; Kakimoto, F.; Nishi, K.

    1985-01-01

    Radio signals from air showers with electron sizes in the range 1 x 10 to the 7th power to 2 x 10 to the 9th power were detected at 50kHz, 170kHz, and 1,647kHz at large core distances in the Akeno square kilometers air-shower array. The field strength is higher than that expected from any mechanisms hitherto proposed.

  10. Montecarlo simulation of photon induced air showers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ettorre Piazzoli, B.; di Sciascio, G.

    The EPAS code (Electron Photon induced Air Showers) is a three dimensional Montecarlo simulation developed to study the properties of extensive air showers generated by the interaction of high energy photons (or electrons) in the atmosphere. Results of the present simulation concern the longitudinal, lateral, temporal and angular distributions of electrons in atmospheric cascades initiated by photons of energies up to 100 TeV.

  11. Exploiting the geomagnetic distortion of inclined atmospheric showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billoir, Pierre; Settimo, Mariangela; Blanco, Miguel

    2016-02-01

    We propose a novel approach to the determination of the nature of ultra-high energy cosmic rays by exploiting the geomagnetic deviation of muons in nearly horizontal showers. The distribution of muons at ground level is well described by a simple parameterization providing a few shape parameters tightly correlated to Xmaxμ, the depth of maximal muon production, which is a mass indicator tightly correlated to the usual parameter Xmax, the depth of maximal development of the shower. We show that some constraints can be set on the predictions of hadronic models, especially by combining the geomagnetic distortion with standard measurements of the longitudinal profile. We discuss the precision needed to obtain significant results, and we propose a schematic layout of a detector.

  12. Frequency and intensity of comet showers from the Oort cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Heisler, J.; Alcock, C.; Tremaine, S.

    1987-05-01

    The nature of new comets and the frequency and intensity of comet showers are presently studied by means of a simulation in which an ensemble of one million comets is perturbed at random times by the Bahcall-Soneira (1980) Galaxy model's population of main sequence stars and white dwarfs. The time-integrated flux is dominated by the showers for comets whose semimajor axes are less than about 30,000 AU. The inclusion of tidal effects increases the loss rate of comets with semimajor axes between 10,000 and 20,000 AU by a factor of about 4, so that the Galactic tide, rather than individual stellar perturbations, is the dominant Oort cloud evolution-driving mechanism. 44 references.

  13. User's manual for the Human Exposure Model (HEM). Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-06-01

    This document describes the Human Exposure Model, furnishes contact personnel to establish access to the UNIVAC System, and provides step-by-step instructions for operating both the SHED and SHEAR portions of the model. The manual also lists caveats that should be considered when using the HEM and criteria to distinguish situations that are appropriately modeled by each portion of HEM. The intended audience ranges from someone with limited knowledge of modeling to someone well acquainted with the UNIVAC.

  14. Source-to-Outcome Microbial Exposure and Risk Modeling Framework

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment (QMRA) is a computer-based data-delivery and modeling approach that integrates interdisciplinary fate/transport, exposure, and impact models and databases to characterize potential health impacts/risks due to pathogens. As such, a QMRA ex...

  15. OZONE SUB-CANOPY EXPOSURE MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A long term goal of multimedia environmental management is to achieve sustainable ecological resources. Progress towards this goal rests on a foundation of science-based methods and data integrated into predictive multimedia, multi-stressor open architecture modeling systems. The...

  16. EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT MODELING FOR ALDICARB IN FLORIDA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A modeling study was performed to assess aldicarb concentrations in drinking water wells in the vicinity of citrus groves in Florida. Areas in the citrus growing region were identified, with respect to the unsaturated and saturated zones, in which transport and transformation of ...

  17. The average longitudinal air shower profile: exploring the shape information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conceição, R.; Andringa, S.; Diogo, F.; Pimenta, M.

    2015-08-01

    The shape of the extensive air shower (EAS) longitudinal profile contains information about the nature of the primary cosmic ray. However, with the current detection capabilities, the assessment of this quantity in an event-by-event basis is still very challenging. In this work we show that the average longitudinal profile can be used to characterise the average behaviour of high energy cosmic rays. Using the concept of universal shower profile it is possible to describe the shape of the average profile in terms of two variables, which can be already measured by the current experiments. These variables present sensitivity to both average primary mass composition and to hadronic interaction properties in shower development. We demonstrate that the shape of the average muon production depth profile can be explored in the same way as the electromagnetic profile having a higher power of discrimination for the state of the art hadronic interaction models. The combination of the shape variables of both profiles provides a new powerful test to the existing hadronic interaction models, and may also provide important hints about multi-particle production at the highest energies.

  18. Modelling of occupational respirable crystalline silica exposure for quantitative exposure assessment in community-based case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Peters, Susan; Vermeulen, Roel; Portengen, Lützen; Olsson, Ann; Kendzia, Benjamin; Vincent, Raymond; Savary, Barbara; Lavoué, Jérôme; Cavallo, Domenico; Cattaneo, Andrea; Mirabelli, Dario; Plato, Nils; Fevotte, Joelle; Pesch, Beate; Brüning, Thomas; Straif, Kurt; Kromhout, Hans

    2011-11-01

    We describe an empirical model for exposure to respirable crystalline silica (RCS) to create a quantitative job-exposure matrix (JEM) for community-based studies. Personal measurements of exposure to RCS from Europe and Canada were obtained for exposure modelling. A mixed-effects model was elaborated, with region/country and job titles as random effect terms. The fixed effect terms included year of measurement, measurement strategy (representative or worst-case), sampling duration (minutes) and a priori exposure intensity rating for each job from an independently developed JEM (none, low, high). 23,640 personal RCS exposure measurements, covering a time period from 1976 to 2009, were available for modelling. The model indicated an overall downward time trend in RCS exposure levels of -6% per year. Exposure levels were higher in the UK and Canada, and lower in Northern Europe and Germany. Worst-case sampling was associated with higher reported exposure levels and an increase in sampling duration was associated with lower reported exposure levels. Highest predicted RCS exposure levels in the reference year (1998) were for chimney bricklayers (geometric mean 0.11 mg m(-3)), monument carvers and other stone cutters and carvers (0.10 mg m(-3)). The resulting model enables us to predict time-, job-, and region/country-specific exposure levels of RCS. These predictions will be used in the SYNERGY study, an ongoing pooled multinational community-based case-control study on lung cancer. PMID:22001827

  19. Consumer exposure modelling under REACH: Assessing the defaults.

    PubMed

    Oltmanns, J; Neisel, F; Heinemeyer, G; Kaiser, E; Schneider, K

    2015-07-01

    Consumer exposure to chemicals from products and articles is rarely monitored. Since an assessment of consumer exposure has become particularly important under the European REACH Regulation, dedicated modelling approaches with exposure assessment tools are applied. The results of these tools are critically dependent on the default input values embedded in the tools. These inputs were therefore compiled for three lower tier tools (ECETOC TRA (version 3.0), EGRET and REACT)) and benchmarked against a higher tier tool (ConsExpo (version 4.1)). Mostly, conservative input values are used in the lower tier tools. Some cases were identified where the lower tier tools used less conservative values than ConsExpo. However, these deviations only rarely resulted in less conservative exposure estimates compared to ConsExpo, when tested in reference scenarios. This finding is mainly due to the conservatism of (a) the default value for the thickness of the product layer (with complete release of the substance) used for the prediction of dermal exposure and (b) the complete release assumed for volatile substances (i.e. substances with a vapour pressure ⩾10Pa) for inhalation exposure estimates. The examples demonstrate that care must be taken when changing critical defaults in order to retain conservative estimates of consumer exposure to chemicals. PMID:25908511

  20. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models in human exposure assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, K.

    1995-12-31

    The potential dose received by an individual during defined exposure situations can be determined using personal dosimeters or estimated by combining information on exposure scenarios with the environmental concentration (C.) of chemicals. With the latter approach, not only the potential dose but also the internal dose (i.e., amount of chemical that has been absorbed and available for interaction with receptors) and biologically-effective dose (i.e., amount of chemical that actually reaches the cellular sites where interaction with macromolecules occur) can be estimated if C. is provided as an input to PBPK models. These models are mathematical representations of the interrelationships among the critical determinants of the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of chemicals in biota. Since the compartments in this model correspond to biologically relevant tissues or tissue groups, the amount of chemical reaching specific target organ(s) can be estimated. Further, the PBPK models permit the use of biological monitoring data such as urinary levels of metabolites, hemoglobin adduct levels, and alveolar air concentrations, to reconstruct the exposure levels and scenarios for specific subgroups of populations. These models are also useful in providing estimates of target tissue dose in humans simultaneously exposed to chemicals in various media (air, water, soil, food) by different routes (oral, dermal, inhalation). Several examples of exposure assessment for volatile organic chemicals using PBPK models for mammals will be presented, and the strategies for development of these models for other classes of chemicals highlighted.

  1. Spatial aspects of building and population exposure data and their implications for global earthquake exposure modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dell’Acqua, F.; Gamba, P.; Jaiswal, K.

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses spatial aspects of the global exposure dataset and mapping needs for earthquake risk assessment. We discuss this in the context of development of a Global Exposure Database for the Global Earthquake Model (GED4GEM), which requires compilation of a multi-scale inventory of assets at risk, for example, buildings, populations, and economic exposure. After defining the relevant spatial and geographic scales of interest, different procedures are proposed to disaggregate coarse-resolution data, to map them, and if necessary to infer missing data by using proxies. We discuss the advantages and limitations of these methodologies and detail the potentials of utilizing remote-sensing data. The latter is used especially to homogenize an existing coarser dataset and, where possible, replace it with detailed information extracted from remote sensing using the built-up indicators for different environments. Present research shows that the spatial aspects of earthquake risk computation are tightly connected with the availability of datasets of the resolution necessary for producing sufficiently detailed exposure. The global exposure database designed by the GED4GEM project is able to manage datasets and queries of multiple spatial scales.

  2. Global Exposure Modelling of Semivolatile Organic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guglielmo, F.; Lammel, G.; Maier-Reimer, E.

    2008-12-01

    Organic compounds which are persistent and toxic as the agrochemicals γ-hexachlorocyclohexane (γ-HCH, lindane) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) pose a hazard for the ecosystems. These compounds are semivolatile, hence multicompartmental substances and subject to long-range transport (LRT) in atmosphere and ocean. Being lipophilic, they accumulate in exposed organism tissues and biomagnify along food chains. The multicompartmental global fate and LRT of DDT and lindane in the atmosphere and ocean have been studied using application data for 1980, on a decadal scale using a model based on the coupling of atmosphere and (for the first time for these compounds) ocean General Circulation Models (ECHAM5 and MPI-OM). The model system encompasses furthermore 2D terrestrial compartments (soil and vegetation) and sea ice, a fully dynamic atmospheric aerosol (HAM) module and an ocean biogeochemistry module (HAMOCC5). Large mass fractions of the compounds are found in soil. Lindane is also found in comparable amount in ocean. DDT has the longest residence time in almost all compartments. The sea ice compartment locally almost inhibits volatilization from the sea. The air/sea exchange is also affected , up to a reduction of 35 % for DDT by partitioning to the organic phases (suspended and dissolved particulate matter) in the global oceans. Partitioning enhances vertical transport in the sea. Ocean dynamics are found to be more significant for vertical transport than sinking associated with particulate matter. LRT in the global environment is determined by the fast atmospheric circulation. Net meridional transport taking place in the ocean is locally effective mostly via western boundary currents, upon applications at mid- latitudes. The pathways of the long-lived semivolatile organic compounds studied include a sequence of several cycles of volatilisation, transport in the atmosphere, deposition and transport in the ocean (multihopping substances). Multihopping is

  3. High sensitive X-ray films to detect electron showers in 100 GeV region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taira, T.; Kazuno, M.; Shirai, T.; Tateyama, N.; Torii, S.; Nishimura, J.; Fujii, M.; Yoshida, A.; Aizu, H.; Nomura, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Nonscreen type X-ray films were used in emulsion chamber experiments to detect high energy showers in cosmic rays. Ranges of the detection threshold is from about 1 to 2 TeV depending on the exposure conditions. Different types of X-ray films and sheets i.e. high sensitive screen type X-ray films and luminescence sheets were tested. The threshold of the shower detection is found to be about 200 GeV, which is much lower than that of nonscreen type X-ray films. These films are useful to detect showers in the medium energy range, a few hundred GeV, of the cosmic ray electrons.

  4. AVAILABLE MICRO-ACTIVITY DATA AND THEIR APPLICABILITY TO AGGREGATE EXPOSURE MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several human exposure models have been developed in recent years to address children's aggregate and cumulative exposures to pesticides under the Food Quality Protection Act of 1996. These models estimate children's exposures via all significant routes and pathways including ...

  5. The primary composition beyond 10 to the 5th power GeV as deduced from high energy hadrons and muons in air showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grieder, P. K. F.

    1985-01-01

    Data obtained from a large set of air shower simulation calculations with use of highly refined hadronic interaction and shower simulation model are presented, in an attempt to solve the problem of primary chemical composition beyond 100,000 GeV total energy. It is rated that high energy hadrons in air showers offer a rather unique primary mass signature and show that the interpretation of high energy muon data is much more ambiguous. Predictions are compared with experimental data.

  6. Model of spacecraft atomic oxygen and solar exposure microenvironments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourassa, R. J.; Pippin, H. G.

    1993-01-01

    Computer models of environmental conditions in Earth orbit are needed for the following reasons: (1) derivation of material performance parameters from orbital test data, (2) evaluation of spacecraft hardware designs, (3) prediction of material service life, and (4) scheduling spacecraft maintenance. To meet these needs, Boeing has developed programs for modeling atomic oxygen (AO) and solar radiation exposures. The model allows determination of AO and solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposures for spacecraft surfaces (1) in arbitrary orientations with respect to the direction of spacecraft motion, (2) overall ranges of solar conditions, and (3) for any mission duration. The models have been successfully applied to prediction of experiment environments on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) and for analysis of selected hardware designs for deployment on other spacecraft. The work on these models has been reported at previous LDEF conferences. Since publication of these reports, a revision has been made to the AO calculation for LDEF, and further work has been done on the microenvironments model for solar exposure.

  7. Assessing exposure metrics for PM and birth weight models.

    PubMed

    Gray, Simone C; Edwards, Sharon E; Miranda, Marie Lynn

    2010-07-01

    The link between air pollution exposure and adverse birth outcomes is of public health concern due to the relationship between poor pregnancy outcomes and the onset of childhood and adult diseases. As personal exposure measurements are difficult and expensive to obtain, proximate measures of air pollution exposure are traditionally used. We explored how different air pollution exposure metrics affect birth weight regression models. We examined the effect of maternal exposure to ambient levels of particulate matter <10, <2.5 mum in aerodynamic diameter (PM(10), PM(2.5)) on birth weight among infants in North Carolina. We linked maternal residence to the closest monitor during pregnancy for 2000-2002 (n=350,754). County-level averages of air pollution concentrations were estimated for the entire pregnancy and each trimester. For a finer spatially resolved metric, we calculated exposure averages for women living within 20, 10, and 5 km of a monitor. Multiple linear regression was used to determine the association between exposure and birth weight, adjusting for standard covariates. In the county-level model, an interquartile increase in PM(10) and PM(2.5) during the entire gestational period reduced the birth weight by 5.3 g (95% CI: 3.3-7.4) and 4.6 g (95% CI: 2.3-6.8), respectively. This model also showed a reduction in birth weight for PM(10) (7.1 g, 95% CI: 1.0-13.2) and PM(2.5) (10.4 g, 95% CI: 6.4-14.4) during the third trimester. Proximity models for 20, 10, and 5 km distances showed results similar to the county-level models. County-level models assume that exposure is spatially homogeneous over a larger surface area than proximity models. Sensitivity analysis showed that at varying spatial resolutions, there is still a stable and negative association between air pollution and birth weight, despite North Carolina's consistent attainment of federal air quality standards. PMID:19773814

  8. AN OVERVIEW OF HUMAN EXPOSURE MODELING ACTIVITIES AT THE U.S. EPA'S NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LABORATORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The computational modeling of human exposure to environmental pollutants is one of the primary activities of the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)'s National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL). Assessment of human exposures is a critical part of the overall risk assessm...

  9. Probabilistic modeling of financial exposure to flood in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moncoulon, David; Quantin, Antoine; Leblois, Etienne

    2014-05-01

    CCR is a French reinsurance company which offers natural catastrophe covers with the State guarantee. Within this framework, CCR develops its own models to assess its financial exposure to floods, droughts, earthquakes and other perils, and thus the exposure of insurers and the French State. A probabilistic flood model has been developed in order to estimate the financial exposure of the Nat Cat insurance market to flood events, depending on their annual occurrence probability. This presentation is organized in two parts. The first part is dedicated to the development of a flood hazard and damage model (ARTEMIS). The model calibration and validation on historical events are then described. In the second part, the coupling of ARTEMIS with two generators of probabilistic events is achieved: a stochastic flow generator and a stochastic spatialized precipitation generator, adapted from the SAMPO model developed by IRSTEA. The analysis of the complementary nature of these two generators is proposed: the first one allows generating floods on the French hydrological station network; the second allows simulating surface water runoff and Small River floods, even on ungauged rivers. Thus, the simulation of thousands of non-occured, but possible events allows us to provide for the first time an estimate of the financial exposure to flooding in France at different scales (commune, department, country) and from different points of view (hazard, vulnerability and damages).

  10. Multimedia transport of organic contaminants and exposure modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Layton, D.W.; McKone, T.E.

    1988-01-01

    Human exposures to organic contaminants in the environment are a complex function of human factors, physicochemical properties of the contaminants, and characteristics of the environmental media in which the contaminants reside. One subject of interest in the screening of organic chemicals for the purpose of identifying exposure pathways of potential concern is the relationship between exposures and contaminant properties. To study such relationships, a multimedia environmental model termed GEOTOX is used to predict the equilibrium partitioning and transport of ''reference'' organic chemicals between compartments representing different media (i.e., soil layers, ground water, air, biota, etc.) of a contaminated landscape. Reference chemicals, which are added to the surface soil of a landscape, are defined by properties consisting of the Henry's law constant, soil water-soil organic carbon partition coefficient, and bioconcentration factors. The steady-state concentrations of the chemical in the GEOTOX compartments are then used to estimate lifetime exposures (in mg/kg-d) to the compartments for individuals living in the contaminated landscape. Exposure pathways addressed include ingestion, inhalation, and dermal absorption. Local sensitivity analyses are performed to determine which chemical and landscape properties have the greatest effect on the exposure estimates. 9 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Stoffenmanager exposure model: development of a quantitative algorithm.

    PubMed

    Tielemans, Erik; Noy, Dook; Schinkel, Jody; Heussen, Henri; Van Der Schaaf, Doeke; West, John; Fransman, Wouter

    2008-08-01

    In The Netherlands, the web-based tool called 'Stoffenmanager' was initially developed to assist small- and medium-sized enterprises to prioritize and control risks of handling chemical products in their workplaces. The aim of the present study was to explore the accuracy of the Stoffenmanager exposure algorithm. This was done by comparing its semi-quantitative exposure rankings for specific substances with exposure measurements collected from several occupational settings to derive a quantitative exposure algorithm. Exposure data were collected using two strategies. First, we conducted seven surveys specifically for validation of the Stoffenmanager. Second, existing occupational exposure data sets were collected from various sources. This resulted in 378 and 320 measurements for solid and liquid scenarios, respectively. The Spearman correlation coefficients between Stoffenmanager scores and exposure measurements appeared to be good for handling solids (r(s) = 0.80, N = 378, P < 0.0001) and liquid scenarios (r(s) = 0.83, N = 320, P < 0.0001). However, the correlation for liquid scenarios appeared to be lower when calculated separately for sets of volatile substances with a vapour pressure >10 Pa (r(s) = 0.56, N = 104, P < 0.0001) and non-volatile substances with a vapour pressure < or =10 Pa (r(s) = 0.53, N = 216, P < 0.0001). The mixed-effect regression models with natural log-transformed Stoffenmanager scores as independent parameter explained a substantial part of the total exposure variability (52% for solid scenarios and 76% for liquid scenarios). Notwithstanding the good correlation, the data show substantial variability in exposure measurements given a certain Stoffenmanager score. The overall performance increases our confidence in the use of the Stoffenmanager as a generic tool for risk assessment. The mixed-effect regression models presented in this paper may be used for assessment of so-called reasonable worst case exposures. This evaluation is

  12. Analyses of School Commuting Data for Exposure Modeling Purposes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposure models often make the simplifying assumption that school children attend school in the same Census tract where they live. This paper analyzes that assumption and provides information on the temporal and spatial distributions associated with school commuting. The d...

  13. EXPOSURE ANALYSIS MODELING SYSTEM (EXAMS): USER MANUAL AND SYSTEM DOCUMENTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Exposure Analysis Modeling System (EXAMS) was designed for rapid evaluation of the behavior of synthetic organic chemicals in aquatic ecosystems. From the chemistry of a compound and the relevant transport and physical/chemical characteristics of the ecosystem, EXAMS computes...

  14. Sex Differences in Adolescent Depression: Stress Exposure and Reactivity Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hankin, Benjamin L.; Mermelstein, Robin; Roesch, Linda

    2007-01-01

    Stress exposure and reactivity models were examined as explanations for why girls exhibit greater levels of depressive symptoms than boys. In a multiwave, longitudinal design, adolescents' depressive symptoms, alcohol usage, and occurrence of stressors were assessed at baseline, 6, and 12 months later (N=538; 54.5% female; ages 13-18, average…

  15. REGRESSION MODELS OF RESIDENTIAL EXPOSURE TO CHLORPYRIFOS AND DIAZINON

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examines the ability of regression models to predict residential exposures to chlorpyrifos and diazinon, based on the information from the NHEXAS-AZ database. The robust method was used to generate "fill-in" values for samples that are below the detection l...

  16. Analysis of inclined showers measured with LOPES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes Collaboration; Saftoiu, A.; Apel, W. D.; Arteaga, J. C.; Asch, T.; Auffenberg, J.; Badea, F.; Bähren, L.; Bekk, K.; Bertaina, M.; Biermann, P. L.; Blümer, J.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I. M.; Brüggemann, M.; Buchholz, P.; Buitink, S.; Cantoni, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Cossavella, F.; Daumiller, K.; de Souza, V.; di Pierro, F.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Falcke, H.; Finger, M.; Fuhrmann, D.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Glasstetter, R.; Grupen, C.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Huege, T.; Isar, P. G.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kang, D.; Kickelbick, D.; Kolotaev, Y.; Krömer, O.; Kuijpers, J.; Lafebre, S.; Łuczak, P.; Mathes, H. J.; Mayer, H. J.; Milke, J.; Mitrica, B.; Morello, C.; Navarra, G.; Nehls, S.; Nigl, A.; Oehlschläger, J.; Over, S.; Petcu, M.; Pierog, T.; Rautenberg, J.; Rebel, H.; Roth, M.; Schieler, H.; Schmidt, A.; Schröder, F.; Sima, O.; Singh, K.; Stümpert, M.; Toma, G.; Trinchero, G. C.; Ulrich, H.; Walkowiak, W.; Weindl, A.; Wochele, J.; Wommer, M.; Zabierowski, J.; Zensus, J. A.; LOPES Collaboration

    2009-06-01

    In the present study, we analyze the radio signal from inclined air showers recorded by LOPES-30 in coincidence with KASCADE-Grande. LOPES-30 consists of 30 East-West oriented digital antennas, which are amplitude calibrated by an external source. Radio emission from air showers is considered a geomagnetic effect. Inclined events provide a larger range of values for geomagnetic angle (angle between shower axis and geomagnetic field direction) than vertical showers and thus more information on the emission processes can be gathered. In order to have the geometry of the air shower we use the reconstruction provided by the KASCADE-Grande particle detectors array. Analyzing events observed by both LOPES and the extended part of the KASCADE array, Grande, gives the possibility to test in particular the capability and efficiency of radio detection of more distant events. The results are compared with a previous analysis of inclined events recorded by the initial 10 antenna set-up, LOPES-10, in coincidence with the Grande array.

  17. Parameterization models for pesticide exposure via crop consumption.

    PubMed

    Fantke, Peter; Wieland, Peter; Juraske, Ronnie; Shaddick, Gavin; Itoiz, Eva Sevigné; Friedrich, Rainer; Jolliet, Olivier

    2012-12-01

    An approach for estimating human exposure to pesticides via consumption of six important food crops is presented that can be used to extend multimedia models applied in health risk and life cycle impact assessment. We first assessed the variation of model output (pesticide residues per kg applied) as a function of model input variables (substance, crop, and environmental properties) including their possible correlations using matrix algebra. We identified five key parameters responsible for between 80% and 93% of the variation in pesticide residues, namely time between substance application and crop harvest, degradation half-lives in crops and on crop surfaces, overall residence times in soil, and substance molecular weight. Partition coefficients also play an important role for fruit trees and tomato (Kow), potato (Koc), and lettuce (Kaw, Kow). Focusing on these parameters, we develop crop-specific models by parametrizing a complex fate and exposure assessment framework. The parametric models thereby reflect the framework's physical and chemical mechanisms and predict pesticide residues in harvest using linear combinations of crop, crop surface, and soil compartments. Parametric model results correspond well with results from the complex framework for 1540 substance-crop combinations with total deviations between a factor 4 (potato) and a factor 66 (lettuce). Predicted residues also correspond well with experimental data previously used to evaluate the complex framework. Pesticide mass in harvest can finally be combined with reduction factors accounting for food processing to estimate human exposure from crop consumption. All parametric models can be easily implemented into existing assessment frameworks. PMID:23136826

  18. MODELING EXPOSURES TO PESTICIDES APPROACHES AND MODELING NEEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estimation of exposures of children to pesticides requires careful consideration of sources and concentrations of pesticides that may be present in different environmental media and in foods and beverages consumed by children, as well as the different routes and pathways of exp...

  19. An universal description of the particle flux distributions in extended air showers

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Aaron S.; Arisaka, Katsushi; Pernas, Maximo David Ave; Barnhill, David; Billoir, Pierre; Tripathi, Arun; Yamamoto, Tokonatsu; /Fermilab /UCLA /KICP, Chicago /Paris U., VI-VII

    2005-08-01

    It is shown that the electromagnetic and muonic fluxes in extended air showers (EAS) can be described using a simple model incorporating attenuation and geometrical dispersion. The model uses a reduced set of parameters including the primary energy E, the position of shower maximum X{sub max} relative to the ground, and a muon flux normalization N{sub {mu}}. To a good approximation, this set of three physical parameters is sufficient to predict the variability of the particle fluxes due to systematic differences between different models of composition and hadronic interactions, and due to statistical event-by-event differences in shower development. Measurements of these three physical observables are therefore unbiased and very nearly model-independent, in contrast with standard measurement techniques. The theoretical problem of determining primary composition is thus deconvolved from the measurement procedure, and may be approached in a subsequent analysis of the measured distributions of (E, X{sub max}, N{sub {mu}}).

  20. Four possible new high-declination showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šegon, Damir; Gural, Peter; Andreiæ, Željko; Vida, Denis; Skokiæ, Ivica; Novoselnik, Filip

    2015-10-01

    Four possible new meteor showers described in this paper are last ones resulting from our search for new meteor showers. All four of them seem to be connected to known parent bodies, currently classified as asteroids. All orbits from which associations had been done are orbits calculated by UFOOrbit software. Mean orbital parameters were computed using simple arithmetic average in an iterative way until stable set of orbits was found. Catalogues from 2007 to 2011 (SonotaCo) and 2007 to 2010 (CMN) were used in calculations. The radiants' dispersion is in all cases large and no clear radiant drift may be seen, possibly due to the fact that meteoroid streams from these parent bodies suffer from significant perturbations and we see these showers at different solar longitudes from year to year.

  1. ASSESSING A COMPUTER MODEL FOR PREDICTING HUMAN EXPOSURE TO PM2.5

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper compares outputs of a model for predicting PM2.5 exposure with experimental data obtained from exposure studies of selected subpopulations. The exposure model is built on a WWW platform called pCNEM, "A PC Version of pNEM." Exposure models created by pCNEM are sim...

  2. Evaluating biomarkers to model cancer risk post cosmic ray exposure.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Deepa M; Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Blattnig, Steve R; Costes, Sylvain V; Doetsch, Paul W; Dynan, William S; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Hlatky, Lynn; Kidane, Yared; Kronenberg, Amy; Naidu, Mamta D; Peterson, Leif E; Plante, Ianik; Ponomarev, Artem L; Saha, Janapriya; Snijders, Antoine M; Srinivasan, Kalayarasan; Tang, Jonathan; Werner, Erica; Pluth, Janice M

    2016-06-01

    Robust predictive models are essential to manage the risk of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. Chronic exposure to cosmic rays in the context of the complex deep space environment may place astronauts at high cancer risk. To estimate this risk, it is critical to understand how radiation-induced cellular stress impacts cell fate decisions and how this in turn alters the risk of carcinogenesis. Exposure to the heavy ion component of cosmic rays triggers a multitude of cellular changes, depending on the rate of exposure, the type of damage incurred and individual susceptibility. Heterogeneity in dose, dose rate, radiation quality, energy and particle flux contribute to the complexity of risk assessment. To unravel the impact of each of these factors, it is critical to identify sensitive biomarkers that can serve as inputs for robust modeling of individual risk of cancer or other long-term health consequences of exposure. Limitations in sensitivity of biomarkers to dose and dose rate, and the complexity of longitudinal monitoring, are some of the factors that increase uncertainties in the output from risk prediction models. Here, we critically evaluate candidate early and late biomarkers of radiation exposure and discuss their usefulness in predicting cell fate decisions. Some of the biomarkers we have reviewed include complex clustered DNA damage, persistent DNA repair foci, reactive oxygen species, chromosome aberrations and inflammation. Other biomarkers discussed, often assayed for at longer points post exposure, include mutations, chromosome aberrations, reactive oxygen species and telomere length changes. We discuss the relationship of biomarkers to different potential cell fates, including proliferation, apoptosis, senescence, and loss of stemness, which can propagate genomic instability and alter tissue composition and the underlying mRNA signatures that contribute to cell fate decisions. Our goal is to highlight factors that are important in choosing

  3. Evaluating biomarkers to model cancer risk post cosmic ray exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, Deepa M.; Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Blattnig, Steve R.; Costes, Sylvain V.; Doetsch, Paul W.; Dynan, William S.; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Hlatky, Lynn; Kidane, Yared; Kronenberg, Amy; Naidu, Mamta D.; Peterson, Leif E.; Plante, Ianik; Ponomarev, Artem L.; Saha, Janapriya; Snijders, Antoine M.; Srinivasan, Kalayarasan; Tang, Jonathan; Werner, Erica; Pluth, Janice M.

    2016-06-01

    Robust predictive models are essential to manage the risk of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. Chronic exposure to cosmic rays in the context of the complex deep space environment may place astronauts at high cancer risk. To estimate this risk, it is critical to understand how radiation-induced cellular stress impacts cell fate decisions and how this in turn alters the risk of carcinogenesis. Exposure to the heavy ion component of cosmic rays triggers a multitude of cellular changes, depending on the rate of exposure, the type of damage incurred and individual susceptibility. Heterogeneity in dose, dose rate, radiation quality, energy and particle flux contribute to the complexity of risk assessment. To unravel the impact of each of these factors, it is critical to identify sensitive biomarkers that can serve as inputs for robust modeling of individual risk of cancer or other long-term health consequences of exposure. Limitations in sensitivity of biomarkers to dose and dose rate, and the complexity of longitudinal monitoring, are some of the factors that increase uncertainties in the output from risk prediction models. Here, we critically evaluate candidate early and late biomarkers of radiation exposure and discuss their usefulness in predicting cell fate decisions. Some of the biomarkers we have reviewed include complex clustered DNA damage, persistent DNA repair foci, reactive oxygen species, chromosome aberrations and inflammation. Other biomarkers discussed, often assayed for at longer points post exposure, include mutations, chromosome aberrations, reactive oxygen species and telomere length changes. We discuss the relationship of biomarkers to different potential cell fates, including proliferation, apoptosis, senescence, and loss of stemness, which can propagate genomic instability and alter tissue composition and the underlying mRNA signatures that contribute to cell fate decisions. Our goal is to highlight factors that are important in choosing

  4. PQ/PMMA photopolymer: Modelling post-exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yue; Li, Haoyu; Tolstik, Elen; Guo, Jinxin; Gleeson, Michael R.; Sheridan, John T.

    2015-03-01

    Phenanthrenequinone (PQ) doped poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) photopolymer material is currently being actively investigated. A previously developed 1-D Nonlocal Photo-polymerization Driven Diffusion (NPDD) model is applied to further examine the behavior of the material post-exposure. The use of the nonlocal parameter when examining PQ/PMMA is discussed. The resulting predicted evolution of the first harmonic refractive index modulation is simulated both: (i) a long time post-exposure, and (ii) in the case of thermal treatment post-exposure. The convergence of the numerical simulations is examined, when both 12 and 4 spatial concentration harmonics are retained in the Fourier series expansions describing the various component material distributions. Several physical processes are studied, including the nonlocal material response and the effects of the diffusion of both the ground state and excited states PQ molecules (during and post-exposure). The effects of the use of different exposing intensities on the final grating formed are studied. The size of the higher grating harmonic concentration amplitudes in this final distribution is also discussed. Thus in this paper for the first time the effects/treatments taking place post-exposure are systematically studied. Our aim is to characterize the final stable grating. We show that both the nonlocal effect and the diffusion of the PQ excited states tend to weaken the PQ-PMMA grating but lead to higher fidelity of the recorded pattern. It is also shown that higher harmonic gratings are generated when higher exposing intensity is applied.

  5. Study and models of total lead exposures of battery workers.

    PubMed

    Chavalitnitikul, C; Levin, L; Chen, L C

    1984-12-01

    In an attempt to establish a more realistic and reliable model for relating environmental exposure measurements to the biological indices of exposure, a study was undertaken to quantify the total sources of lead exposure among lead storage battery workers. In addition to the usual personal and area lead air sampling, quantitative and repeatable measurements of removable lead from work surfaces and the workers' hands and faces were obtained daily for ten consecutive work days in the pasting and battery assembly departments. Mathematical correlations of blood lead and zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) levels as the dependent variable with the lead exposure sources were derived and demonstrated most strongly as log-log relationships. Statistical analyses by computer programming indicated that the airborne, hand, facial and work surface levels have a high degree of inter-correlation with a very significant positive individual correlation with blood lead levels and a somewhat lower correlation with ZPP. The results suggest that contaminated personal and work surfaces may play a more significant role in toxic occupational and environmental exposures, generally, than had heretofore been demonstrated or suspected. PMID:6517025

  6. MODELING HUMAN EXPOSURES AND DOSE USING A 2-DIMENSIONAL MONTE-CARLO MODEL (SHEDS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since 1998, US EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) has been developing the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation (SHEDS) model for various classes of pollutants. SHEDS is a physically-based probabilistic model intended for improving estimates of human ex...

  7. Modeling responses to respiratory house dust mite exposure.

    PubMed

    Cates, Elizabeth C; Fattouh, Ramzi; Johnson, Jill R; Llop-Guevara, Alba; Jordana, Manel

    2007-01-01

    House dust mite (HDM) is the most pervasive indoor aeroallergen source worldwide. Allergens derived from HDM are associated with sensitization and allergic asthma. Allergic asthma is an immunologically driven disease characterized by a Th2-polarized immune response, eosinophilic inflammation, airway hyperreactivity, and remodeling. Animal models of asthma utilizing ovalbumin (OVA) exposure have afforded us considerable insight with respect to the mediators and cell types involved in allergic airway inflammation. However, OVA preparations and HDM are two vastly different materials. This chapter is specifically concerned with modeling responses to HDM exposure in mice. These studies have furnished new information and unlocked new lines of inquiry regarding biological responses to common aeroallergens. The complexity of HDM as an allergen source, with its plethora of protein and nonprotein immunogenic components, may influence the mechanisms underlying sensitization, inflammation and remodeling. Here, we will discuss this issue, along with giving critical thought to the use of experimental models. PMID:17684332

  8. USE OF EXPOSURE-RELATED DOSE ESTIMATING MODEL (ERDEM) FOR ASSESSMENT OF AGGREGATE EXPOSURE OF INFANT AND CHILDREN TO N-METHYL CARBAMATE INSECTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed within the Exposure Related Dose Estimating Model (ERDEM) framework to investigate selected exposure inputs related to recognized exposure scenarios of infants and children to N-methyl carbamate pesticides as spec...

  9. Correlation of angular and lateral distributions of electrons in extensive air showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giller, Maria; Śmiałkowski, Andrzej; Legumina, Remigiusz

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to explain the weak correlation of the angular and lateral deflections of electrons in extensive air showers in the primary energy range 1016-1019 eV, when compared with that in some models of electron propagation. We derive analytical formulae for the correlation coefficient in the multiple scattering model with energy losses and show a strong role of the ionisation in diminishing the correlation. By considering a Heitler-like model of an electromagnetic cascade we show also that the presence of photons, parent to electrons, causes a decrease of the correlation, roughly explaining quantitatively the small correlation in air showers.

  10. OVERVIEW OF THE U.S. EPA NERL'S HUMAN EXPOSURE MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computational modeling of human exposure to environmental pollutants is one of the primary activities of the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL). Assessment of human exposures is a critical part of the overall risk assessment para...

  11. Exposure Modeling of Residential Infiltration of Black Carbon for NEXUS Participants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to cost and participant burden of personal measurements, air pollution health studies often estimate exposures using outdoor concentrations. Since outdoor levels do not necessarily reflect personal exposures, we developed the Exposure Model for Individuals (EMI) to improve ex...

  12. Using transportation demand models to assess regional noise exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaliski, Kenneth

    2005-09-01

    In the United States, most metropolitan areas run some type of transportation demand model to estimate regional travel patterns, and, to some extent, air pollution. The more advanced of these models accurately represent the geographic contours of the roadways (in contrast to the older straight-line node and link models). This allows an almost seamless integration of these new transportation demand models into noise prediction models. Combined with the locations of individual homes from a separate E911 database, we can readily make estimates of the noise exposure of populations over large areas. In this paper, the regional traffic noise exposure of residences of Chittenden County, VT is estimated and mapped. It was found that 30% of the residences are exposed to noise levels exceeding the WHO sleep disturbance level of 45 dB LAeq(8) and 20% of residences are exposed to levels exceeding the WHO ``serious annoyance'' level of 55 dB LAeq(16). Maps show noise contours as well as individual homes color coded based on relative day and night noise exposure levels. Measured sound level data are given for particular locations to validate the predictions.

  13. Muons in Air Showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unger, M.

    We present measurements of muons in air showers at ultra-high energies with the Pierre Auger Observatory. The number of muons at the ground in air showers detected at large zenith angles is determined as a function of energy and the results are compared to air shower simulations. Furthermore, using data collected at zenith angles smaller than 60°, rescaling factors are derived that quantify the deficit of muon production in air shower simulations.

  14. Portable Water-Saving Shower For Emergencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grenier, Francis E.

    1991-01-01

    Stowable compact unit sprays from many directions. Proposed portable emergency fogging shower rinses harmful chemicals from person. Includes double-walled transparent, approximately cylindrical curtain containing sets of interior nozzles on regularly spaced loops. Sealed at top and bottom. Victim of contamination enters through longitudinal zippered opening. Pressurized mixture of air and water flows through selected nozzles, creating foglike spray scrubbing contaminants from skin and clothing. Intended for use on Space Station, also used in laboratories and factories on Earth, or for routine shower bathing in areas with limited water supplies.

  15. MODELING ENERGY EXPENDITURE AND OXYGEN CONSUMPTION IN HUMAN EXPOSURE MODELS: ACCOUNTING FOR FATIGUE AND EPOC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposure and dose models often require a quantification of oxygen consumption for a simulated individual. Oxygen consumption is dependent on the modeled Individual's physical activity level as described in an activity diary. Activity level is quantified via standardized val...

  16. Modeling flight attendants' exposures to pesticide in disinsected aircraft cabins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Isukapalli, Sastry; Georgopoulos, Panos; Weisel, Clifford

    2013-12-17

    Aircraft cabin disinsection is required by some countries to kill insects that may pose risks to public health and native ecological systems. A probabilistic model has been developed by considering the microenvironmental dynamics of the pesticide in conjunction with the activity patterns of flight attendants, to assess their exposures and risks to pesticide in disinsected aircraft cabins under three scenarios of pesticide application. Main processes considered in the model are microenvironmental transport and deposition, volatilization, and transfer of pesticide when passengers and flight attendants come in contact with the cabin surfaces. The simulated pesticide airborne mass concentration and surface mass loadings captured measured ranges reported in the literature. The medians (means ± standard devitions) of daily total exposure intakes were 0.24 (3.8 ± 10.0), 1.4 (4.2 ± 5.7), and 0.15 (2.1 ± 3.2) μg day(-1) kg(-1) of body weight for scenarios of residual application, preflight, and top-of-descent spraying, respectively. Exposure estimates were sensitive to parameters corresponding to pesticide deposition, body surface area and weight, surface-to-body transfer efficiencies, and efficiency of adherence to skin. Preflight spray posed 2.0 and 3.1 times higher pesticide exposure risk levels for flight attendants in disinsected aircraft cabins than top-of-descent spray and residual application, respectively. PMID:24251734

  17. Assessing risk from dangerous meteoroids in main meteor showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murtazov, A.

    2015-01-01

    The risk from dangerous meteoroids in main meteor showers is calculated. The showers were: Quadrantids-2014; Eta Aquariids-2013, Perseids-2014 and Geminids-2014. The computed results for the risks during the shower periods of activity and near the maximum are provided.

  18. A mini-array for large air showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, L. K.; Chan, S. K.; Hazen, W. E.; Hazen, E. S.

    1985-01-01

    A mini-array that utilizes the Linsley effect is proposed for the measurement of large air showers. An estimate of the detectable shower rates for various shower sizes is made. Details of the detection and data collection systems are also described.

  19. 46 CFR 153.216 - Shower and eyewash fountains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Vessel Requirements § 153.216 Shower and eyewash fountains. (a) Each non-self-propelled ship must have a fixed or portable shower and eyewash fountain that operates during cargo transfer and meets paragraph (c... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Shower and eyewash fountains. 153.216 Section...

  20. Inhalation Exposure Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    SciTech Connect

    M. Wasiolek

    2006-06-05

    This analysis is one of the technical reports that support the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), referred to in this report as the biosphere model. ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes in detail the conceptual model as well as the mathematical model and its input parameters. This report documents development of input parameters for the biosphere model that are related to atmospheric mass loading and supports the use of the model to develop biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs). The biosphere model is one of a series of process models supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for a Yucca Mountain repository. ''Inhalation Exposure Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model'' is one of five reports that develop input parameters for the biosphere model. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the biosphere model is presented in Figure 1-1 (based on BSC 2006 [DIRS 176938]). This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling and how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling. This analysis report defines and justifies values of atmospheric mass loading for the biosphere model. Mass loading is the total mass concentration of resuspended particles (e.g., dust, ash) in a volume of air. Mass loading values are used in the air submodel of the biosphere model to calculate concentrations of radionuclides in air inhaled by a receptor and concentrations in air surrounding crops. Concentrations in air to which the receptor is exposed are then used in the inhalation submodel to calculate the dose contribution to the receptor from inhalation of contaminated airborne particles. Concentrations in air surrounding plants are used in the plant submodel to calculate the concentrations of radionuclides in foodstuffs contributed from uptake by foliar interception. This report is concerned primarily with the

  1. Human lead metabolism: Chronic exposure, bone lead and physiological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, David Eric Berkeley

    Exposure to lead is associated with a variety of detrimental health effects. After ingestion or inhalation, lead may be taken up from the bloodstream and retained by bone tissue. X-ray fluorescence was used to make in vivo measurements of bone lead concentration at the tibia and calcaneus for 367 active and 14 retired lead smelter workers. Blood lead levels following a labour disruption were used in conjunction with bone lead readings to examine the endogenous release of lead from bone. Relations between bone lead and a cumulative blood lead index differed depending on time of hiring. This suggests that the transfer of lead from blood to bone has changed over time, possibly as a result of varying exposure conditions. A common polymorphism in the δ-aminolevulinate dehydratase (ALAD) enzyme may influence the distribution of lead in humans. Blood lead levels were higher for smelter workers expressing the more rare ALAD2 allele. Bone lead concentrations, however, were not significantly different. This implies that a smaller proportion of lead in blood is distributed to tissue for individuals expressing the ALAD2 allele. The O'Flaherty physiological model of lead metabolism was modified slightly and tested with input from the personal exposure histories of smelter workers. The model results were consistent with observation in tern of endogenous exposure to lead and accumulation of lead in cortical bone. Modelling the calcaneus as a trabecular bone site did not reproduce observed trends. variations in lead metabolism between different trabecular sites may therefore be significant. The model does not incorporate a genetic component, and its output did not reflect observed differences in this respect. This result provides further support for the influence of the ALAD polymorphism on lead metabolism. Experimental trials with a digital spectrometer revealed superior energy resolution and count throughput relative to the conventional X-ray fluorescence system. The associated

  2. High Throughput Exposure Prioritization of Chemicals Using a Screening-Level Probabilistic SHEDS-Lite Exposure Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    These novel modeling approaches for screening, evaluating and classifying chemicals based on the potential for biologically-relevant human exposures will inform toxicity testing and prioritization for chemical risk assessment. The new modeling approach is derived from the Stocha...

  3. Model simulation of atrazine exposure to aquatic nontarget organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, W.M.; Cheplick, J.M.; Balu, K.

    1996-10-01

    Pesticide fate and transport models have been identified by a number of regulatory work groups, including the Aquatic Risk Assessment and Mitigation Dialogue Group (ARAMDG) and the FIFRA Exposure Modeling Work Group (EMWG), as potential valuable tools in improving regulatory decisions for pesticide registration. To date, models uses have been limited to preliminary screening evaluations because the predictive capabilities of candidate models have not been adequately characterized and because procedures for scenario identification have not been tested. This paper presents an overview of a comprehensive modeling study that was conducted to evaluate exposure concentrations of atrazine to nontarget organisms and their ecosystems that may result from usage patterns of the herbicide throughout the United States. Simulations were conducted using the Pesticide Root Zone Model (PRZM-2.3) and the Riverine Environments Water Quality Model (RIVWQ-2.0). Included are procedures used for scenario identification, model comparisons to field runoff and aquatic monitoring studies, and the statistical compilation of results for risk assessment use.

  4. ISSUES AND CHALLENGES IN MODELING CHILDREN'S LONGITUDINAL EXPOSURES: AN OZONE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling children's exposures is a complicated, data-intensive process. Modeling longitudinal exposures, which are important for regulatory decision making, especially for most air toxics, adds another level of complexity and data requirements. Because it is difficult to model in...

  5. A critical analysis of air shower structure functions and size spectrum measurements with the NBU air shower array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaudhuri, N.; Basak, D. K.

    1985-01-01

    A total of 11,000 showers in the size range 10 to the 4 to 10 to the 6 particles so far detected by the NBU air shower array has been analyzed using five different structure functions. A comparison of structure functions in terms: (1) of shower size; and (2) electron density at various core distances has been discussed to indicate the present status of structure functions in air shower analysis.

  6. Air pollution dispersion models for human exposure predictions in London.

    PubMed

    Beevers, Sean D; Kitwiroon, Nutthida; Williams, Martin L; Kelly, Frank J; Ross Anderson, H; Carslaw, David C

    2013-01-01

    The London household survey has shown that people travel and are exposed to air pollutants differently. This argues for human exposure to be based upon space-time-activity data and spatio-temporal air quality predictions. For the latter, we have demonstrated the role that dispersion models can play by using two complimentary models, KCLurban, which gives source apportionment information, and Community Multi-scale Air Quality Model (CMAQ)-urban, which predicts hourly air quality. The KCLurban model is in close agreement with observations of NO(X), NO(2) and particulate matter (PM)(10/2.5), having a small normalised mean bias (-6% to 4%) and a large Index of Agreement (0.71-0.88). The temporal trends of NO(X) from the CMAQ-urban model are also in reasonable agreement with observations. Spatially, NO(2) predictions show that within 10's of metres of major roads, concentrations can range from approximately 10-20 p.p.b. up to 70 p.p.b. and that for PM(10/2.5) central London roadside concentrations are approximately double the suburban background concentrations. Exposure to different PM sources is important and we predict that brake wear-related PM(10) concentrations are approximately eight times greater near major roads than at suburban background locations. Temporally, we have shown that average NO(X) concentrations close to roads can range by a factor of approximately six between the early morning minimum and morning rush hour maximum periods. These results present strong arguments for the hybrid exposure model under development at King's and, in future, for in-building models and a model for the London Underground. PMID:23443237

  7. Mobile phone model with metamaterials to reduce the exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Yenny; Begaud, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    This work presents a terminal mobile model where an Inverted-F Antenna (IFA) is associated with three different kinds of metamaterials: artificial magnetic conductor (AMC), electromagnetic band gap (EBG) and resistive high-impedance surface (RHIS). The objective was to evaluate whether some metamaterials may be used to reduce exposure while preserving the antenna performances. The exposure has been evaluated using a simplified phantom model. Two configurations, antenna in front of the phantom and antenna hidden by the ground plane, have been evaluated. Results show that using an optimized RHIS, the SAR 10 g is reduced and the antenna performances are preserved. With RHIS solution, the SAR 10 g peak is reduced by 8 % when the antenna is located in front of the phantom and by 6 % when the antenna is hidden by ground plane.

  8. Biology Based Lung Cancer Model for Chronic Low Radon Exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Truta-Popa, Lucia-Adina; Hofmann, Werner; Fakir, Hatim; Cosma, Constantin

    2008-08-07

    Low dose effects of alpha particles at the tissue level are characterized by the interaction of single alpha particles, affecting only a small fraction of the cells within that tissue. Alpha particle intersections of bronchial target cells during a given exposure period were simulated by an initiation-promotion model, formulated in terms of cellular hits within the cycle time of the cell (dose-rate) and then integrated over the whole exposure period (dose). For a given average number of cellular hits during the lifetime of bronchial cells, the actual number of single and multiple hits was selected from a Poisson distribution. While oncogenic transformation is interpreted as the primary initiation step, stimulated mitosis by killing adjacent cells is assumed to be the primary radiological promotion event. Analytical initiation and promotion functions were derived from experimental in vitro data on oncogenic transformation and cellular survival.To investigate the shape of the lung cancer risk function at chronic, low level exposures in more detail, additional biological factors describing the tissue response and operating specifically at low doses were incorporated into the initiation-promotion model. These mechanisms modifying the initial response at the cellular level were: adaptive response, genomic instability, induction of apoptosis by surrounding cells, and detrimental as well as protective bystander mechanisms. To quantify the effects of these mechanisms as functions of dose, analytical functions were derived from the experimental evidence presently available. Predictions of lung cancer risk, including these mechanisms, exhibit a distinct sublinear dose-response relationship at low exposures, particularly for very low exposure rates.

  9. Biology Based Lung Cancer Model for Chronic Low Radon Exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    TruÅ£ǎ-Popa, Lucia-Adina; Hofmann, Werner; Fakir, Hatim; Cosma, Constantin

    2008-08-01

    Low dose effects of alpha particles at the tissue level are characterized by the interaction of single alpha particles, affecting only a small fraction of the cells within that tissue. Alpha particle intersections of bronchial target cells during a given exposure period were simulated by an initiation-promotion model, formulated in terms of cellular hits within the cycle time of the cell (dose-rate) and then integrated over the whole exposure period (dose). For a given average number of cellular hits during the lifetime of bronchial cells, the actual number of single and multiple hits was selected from a Poisson distribution. While oncogenic transformation is interpreted as the primary initiation step, stimulated mitosis by killing adjacent cells is assumed to be the primary radiological promotion event. Analytical initiation and promotion functions were derived from experimental in vitro data on oncogenic transformation and cellular survival. To investigate the shape of the lung cancer risk function at chronic, low level exposures in more detail, additional biological factors describing the tissue response and operating specifically at low doses were incorporated into the initiation-promotion model. These mechanisms modifying the initial response at the cellular level were: adaptive response, genomic instability, induction of apoptosis by surrounding cells, and detrimental as well as protective bystander mechanisms. To quantify the effects of these mechanisms as functions of dose, analytical functions were derived from the experimental evidence presently available. Predictions of lung cancer risk, including these mechanisms, exhibit a distinct sublinear dose-response relationship at low exposures, particularly for very low exposure rates.

  10. Econometric model for age- and population-dependent radiation exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Sandquist, G.M.; Slaughter, D.M. ); Rogers, V.C.

    1991-01-01

    The economic impact associated with ionizing radiation exposures in a given human population depends on numerous factors including the individual's mean economic status as a function age, the age distribution of the population, the future life expectancy at each age, and the latency period for the occurrence of radiation-induced health effects. A simple mathematical model has been developed that provides an analytical methodology for estimating the societal econometrics associated with radiation effects are to be assessed and compared for economic evaluation.

  11. Extensive Air Showers and Cosmic Ray Physics above 1017 eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertaina, Mario

    2016-07-01

    Cosmic Rays above 1017 eV allow studying hadronic interactions at energies that can not be attained at accelerators yet. At the same time hadronic interaction models have to be applied to the cosmic-ray induced air-shower cascades in atmosphere to infer the nature of cosmic rays. The reliability of air-shower simulations has become the source of one of the largest systematic uncertainty in the interpretation of cosmic-ray data due to the uncertainties in modeling the hadronic interaction driving the air-shower development. This paper summarises in the first part the recent results on the cosmic ray energy spectrum, composition and anisotropy from the knee region to the GZK cutoff [1, 2] of the spectrum by means of ground-based experiments. Most of the information reported in this contribution is taken from [3-5]. Aspects interconnecting cosmic ray and particle physics are reviewed in the second part of the paper.

  12. Prediction of meteor shower associated with Comet 122P/de Vico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomko, Dusan; Neslusan, Lubos

    2013-01-01

    We model, for a far past, a theoretical stream associated with Comet 122P/de Vico and follow its dynamical evolution until present. Selecting the modeled particles approaching the Earth's orbit at the present, we predict the characteristics of a potential meteor shower and try to identify these particles with the meteors in three databases (photo, radar, and video). Our overall prediction is, however, negative because only the particles released from the comet nucleus before approximately 37 000 years ago are found to evolve into a collision course with the Earth and, therefore, form a possible shower. Meteoroids are known to survive a much shorter time in interplanetary space, unfortunately.

  13. Modelling of aircrew radiation exposure during solar particle events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Anid, Hani Khaled

    show a very different response during anisotropic events, leading to variations in aircrew radiation doses that may be significant for dose assessment. To estimate the additional exposure due to solar flares, a model was developed using a Monte-Carlo radiation transport code, MCNPX. The model transports an extrapolated particle spectrum based on satellite measurements through the atmosphere using the MCNPX analysis. This code produces the estimated flux at a specific altitude where radiation dose conversion coefficients are applied to convert the particle flux into effective and ambient dose-equivalent rates. A cut-off rigidity model accounts for the shielding effects of the Earth's magnetic field. Comparisons were made between the model predictions and actual flight measurements taken with various types of instruments used to measure the mixed radiation field during Ground Level Enhancements 60 and 65. An anisotropy analysis that uses neutron monitor responses and the pitch angle distribution of energetic solar particles was used to identify particle anisotropy for a solar event in December 2006. In anticipation of future commercial use, a computer code has been developed to implement the radiation dose assessment model for routine analysis. Keywords: Radiation Dosimetry, Radiation Protection, Space Physics.

  14. The new July meteor shower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoladek, Przemyslaw; Wisniewski, Mariusz

    2012-12-01

    A new meteor stream was found after an activity outburst observed on 2005 July 15. The radiant was located five degrees west of the possible early Perseid radiant, close to the star Zeta Cassiopeiae. Numerous bright meteors and fireballs were observed during this maximum. Analysis of the IMO Video Database and the SonotaCo orbital database revealed an annual stream which is active just before the appearance of the first Perseids, with a clearly visible maximum at solar longitude 113°1. Activity of the stream was estimated as two times higher than activity of the Alpha Capricornids at the same time. The activity period extends from July 12 to 17, during maximum the radiant is visible at coordinates alpha = 5°9, delta = +50°5, and observed meteors are fast, with Vg = 57.4 km/s. The shower was reported to the IAU Meteor Data Center and recognized as a new discovery. According to IAU nomenclature the new stream should be named the Zeta Cassiopeiids (ZCS). %z Arlt R. (1992). WGN, Journal of the IMO, 20:2, 62-69. Drummond J. D. (1981). Icarus, 45, 545-553. Kiraga M. and Olech A. (2001). In Arlt R., Triglav M., and Trayner C., editors, Proceedings of the International Meteor Conference, Pucioasa, Romania, 21-24 September 2000, pages 45-51. IMO. Molau S. (2007). In Bettonvil F. and Kac J., editors, Proceedings of the International Meteor Conference, Roden, The Netherlands, 14-17 September 2006, pages 38-55. IMO. Molau S. and Rendtel J. (2009). WGN, Journal of the IMO, 37:4, 98-121. Olech A., Zoladek P., Wisniewski M., Krasnowski M., Kwinta M., Fajfer T., Fietkiewicz K., Dorosz D., Kowalski L., Olejnik J., Mularczyk K., and Zloczewski K. (2006). In Bastiaens L., Verbert J., Wislez J.-M., and Verbeeck C., editors, Proceedings of the International Meteor Conference, Oostmalle, Belgium, 15-18 September 2005, pages 53-62. IMO. Poleski R. and Szaruga K. (2006). In Bastiaens L., Verbert J., Wislez J.-M., and Verbeeck C., editors, Proceedings of the International Meteor

  15. Quark matter induced extensive air showers

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, Kyle

    2011-05-15

    If the dark matter of our Galaxy is composed of nuggets of quarks or antiquarks in a color superconducting phase there will be a small but nonzero flux of these objects through the Earth's atmosphere. A nugget of quark matter will deposit only a small fraction of its kinetic energy in the atmosphere and is likely to be undetectable. If however the impacting object is composed of antiquarks, the energy deposited can be quite large. In this case nuclear annihilations within the nugget will trigger an extensive air shower the particle content of which is similar to that produced by an ultrahigh energy cosmic ray. This paper gives a qualitative description of the basic properties of such a shower. Several distinctions from an air shower initiated by a single ultrahigh energy nucleus will be described, allowing these events to be distinguished from the cosmic ray background. The subtlety of these features may mean that some fraction of the high energy cosmic ray spectrum may in fact be due to this type of dark matter interaction. The estimated flux of dark matter nuggets and the energy deposited in the atmosphere are such that the Pierre Auger Observatory may prove an ideal facility to place constraints on the flux of heavy quark matter objects. This paper attempts to highlight the best techniques to search for a quark matter signature through an extensive air shower signal.

  16. Search for bursts in air shower data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruce, T. E. G.; Clay, R. W.; Dawson, B. R.; Protheroe, R. J.; Blair, D. G.; Cinquini, P.

    1985-01-01

    There have been reports in recent years of the possible observation of bursts in air shower data. If such events are truly of an astrophysical nature then, they represent an important new class of phemonenon since no other bursts have been observed above the MeV level. The spectra of conventional gamma ray bursts are unknown at higher energies but their observed spectra at MeV energies appear generally to exhibit a steepening in the higher MeV range and are thus unlikely to extrapolate to measurable fluxes at air shower energies. An attempt has been made to look for deviations from randomness in the arrival times of air showers above approx. 10 to the 14th power eV with a number of systems and results so far are presented here. This work will be continued for a substantial period of ime with a system capable of recording bursts with multiple events down to a spacing of 4 microns. Earlier data have also been searched for the possible association of air shower events with a glitch of the Vela pulsar.

  17. Systematic Improvement of QCD Parton Showers

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, Jan; Hoeche, Stefan; Hoeth, Hendrik; Krauss, Frank; Schonherr, Marek; Zapp, Korinna; Schumann, Steffen; Siegert, Frank; /Freiburg U.

    2012-05-17

    In this contribution, we will give a brief overview of the progress that has been achieved in the field of combining matrix elements and parton showers. We exemplify this by focusing on the case of electron-positron collisions and by reporting on recent developments as accomplished within the SHERPA event generation framework.

  18. Comet outbursts and the meteor showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guliyev, A. S.; Kokhirova, G. I.; Poladova, U. D.

    2014-07-01

    The features of 116 comets that have shown an outbursts in their brightness, are considered in the paper. The hypothesis on that the outburst in activity of comets are caused by their passing through meteoroid streams is studied. For this purpose the orbital elements of such comets relative to the planes of motion of 68 meteor showers from Cook's catalogue are analyzed. It was found that four of the nearest and distant nodes of comet orbits relative to the planes of motion of nine meteor showers exceeds the average statistical background with confidence probability from 0.90 to 0.95, and more than 0.95, respectively. The October Draconids, Aurigids, kappa-Serpentids, delta-Draconids, sigma-Hydrids}, Coma Berenicids, Leonids, Leo Minorids, and Perseids showers are the most effective. The results of calculation show that often, the comets outbursts may be caused by collisions of comets with meteoroids under the passing through the meteoroid streams that are producing listed meteor showers as well as solar activity.

  19. POPULATION EXPOSURE AND DOSE MODEL FOR AIR TOXICS: A BENZENE CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) is developing a human exposure and dose model called the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation model for Air Toxics (SHEDS-AirToxics) to characterize population exposure to air toxics in support of the National Air ...

  20. Accelerator Measurements of Magnetically Induced Radio Emission from Particle Cascades with Applications to Cosmic-Ray Air Showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, K.; Mulrey, K.; Romero-Wolf, A.; Wissel, S. A.; Zilles, A.; Bechtol, K.; Borch, K.; Chen, P.; Clem, J.; Gorham, P. W.; Hast, C.; Huege, T.; Hyneman, R.; Jobe, K.; Kuwatani, K.; Lam, J.; Liu, T. C.; Nam, J.; Naudet, C.; Nichol, R. J.; Rauch, B. F.; Rotter, B.; Saltzberg, D.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Seckel, D.; Strutt, B.; Vieregg, A. G.; Williams, C.; T-510 Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    For 50 years, cosmic-ray air showers have been detected by their radio emission. We present the first laboratory measurements that validate electrodynamics simulations used in air shower modeling. An experiment at SLAC provides a beam test of radio-frequency (rf) radiation from charged particle cascades in the presence of a magnetic field, a model system of a cosmic-ray air shower. This experiment provides a suite of controlled laboratory measurements to compare to particle-level simulations of rf emission, which are relied upon in ultrahigh-energy cosmic-ray air shower detection. We compare simulations to data for intensity, linearity with magnetic field, angular distribution, polarization, and spectral content. In particular, we confirm modern predictions that the magnetically induced emission in a dielectric forms a cone that peaks at the Cherenkov angle and show that the simulations reproduce the data within systematic uncertainties.

  1. Accelerator Measurements of Magnetically Induced Radio Emission from Particle Cascades with Applications to Cosmic-Ray Air Showers.

    PubMed

    Belov, K; Mulrey, K; Romero-Wolf, A; Wissel, S A; Zilles, A; Bechtol, K; Borch, K; Chen, P; Clem, J; Gorham, P W; Hast, C; Huege, T; Hyneman, R; Jobe, K; Kuwatani, K; Lam, J; Liu, T C; Nam, J; Naudet, C; Nichol, R J; Rauch, B F; Rotter, B; Saltzberg, D; Schoorlemmer, H; Seckel, D; Strutt, B; Vieregg, A G; Williams, C

    2016-04-01

    For 50 years, cosmic-ray air showers have been detected by their radio emission. We present the first laboratory measurements that validate electrodynamics simulations used in air shower modeling. An experiment at SLAC provides a beam test of radio-frequency (rf) radiation from charged particle cascades in the presence of a magnetic field, a model system of a cosmic-ray air shower. This experiment provides a suite of controlled laboratory measurements to compare to particle-level simulations of rf emission, which are relied upon in ultrahigh-energy cosmic-ray air shower detection. We compare simulations to data for intensity, linearity with magnetic field, angular distribution, polarization, and spectral content. In particular, we confirm modern predictions that the magnetically induced emission in a dielectric forms a cone that peaks at the Cherenkov angle and show that the simulations reproduce the data within systematic uncertainties. PMID:27104694

  2. Chloroform: exposure estimation, hazard characterization, and exposure-response analysis.

    PubMed

    Meek, M E; Beauchamp, R; Long, G; Moir, D; Turner, L; Walker, M

    2002-01-01

    Chloroform has been assessed as a Priority Substance under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act. The general population in Canada is exposed to chloroform principally through inhalation of indoor air, particularly during showering, and through ingestion of tap water. Data on concentrations of chloroform in various media were sufficient to serve as the basis for development of deterministic and probabilistic estimates of exposure for the general population in Canada. On the basis of data acquired principally in studies in experimental animals, chloroform causes hepatic and renal tumors in mice and renal tumors in rats. The weight of evidence indicates that chloroform is likely carcinogenic only at concentrations that induce the obligatory precursor lesions of cytotoxicity and proliferative regenerative response. Since this cytotoxicity is primarily related to rates of formation of reactive, oxidative metabolites, dose response has been characterized in the context of rates of formation of reactive metabolites in the target tissue. Results presented here are from a "hybrid" physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) animal model that was revised to permit its extension to humans. The relevant measure of exposure response, namely, the mean rate of metabolism in humans associated with a 5% increase in tumor risk (TC05), was estimated on the basis of this PBPK model and compared with tissue dose measures resulting from 24-h multimedia exposure scenarios for Canadians based on midpoint and 95th percentiles for concentrations in outdoor air, indoor air, air in the shower compartment, air in the bathroom after showering, tap water, and food. Nonneoplastic effects observed most consistently at lowest concentrations or doses following repeated exposures of rats and mice to chloroform are cytotoxicity and regenerative proliferation. As for cancer, target organs are the liver and kidney. In addition, chloroform has induced nasal lesions in rats and mice exposed by both

  3. Geographical modeling of exposure risk to cyanobacteria for epidemiological purposes.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Tania; Dupas, Rémi; Upegui, Erika; Buscail, Camille; Grimaldi, Catherine; Viel, Jean François

    2015-08-01

    The cyanobacteria-derived neurotoxin β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) represents a plausible environmental trigger for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a debilitating and fatal neuromuscular disease. With the eutrophication of water bodies, cyanobacterial blooms and their toxins are becoming increasingly prevalent in France, especially in the Brittany region. Cyanobacteria are monitored at only a few recreational sites, preventing an estimation of exposure of the human population. By contrast, phosphorus, a limiting nutrient for cyanobacterial growth and thus considered a good proxy for cyanobacteria exposure, is monitored in many but not all surface water bodies. Our goal was to develop a geographic exposure indicator that could be used in epidemiological research. We considered the total phosphorus (TP) concentration (mg/L) of samples collected between October 2007 and September 2012 at 179 monitoring stations distributed throughout the Brittany region. Using readily available spatial data, we computed environmental descriptors at the watershed level with a Geographic Information System. Then, these descriptors were introduced into a backward stepwise linear regression model to predict the median TP concentration in unmonitored surface water bodies. TP concentrations in surface water follow an increasing gradient from West to East and inland to coast. The empirical concentration model included five predictor variables with a fair coefficient of determination (R(2) = 0.51). The specific total runoff and the watershed slope correlated negatively with the TP concentrations (p = 0.01 and p< 10(-9), respectively), whereas positive associations were found for the proportion of built-up area, the upstream presence of sewage treatment plants, and the algae volume as indicated by the Landsat red/green reflectance ratio (p < 0.01, p < 10(-6) and p < 0.01, respectively). Complementing the monitoring networks, this geographical modeling can help estimate TP concentrations

  4. Identifiability of PBPK models with applications to dimethylarsinic acid exposure.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ramon I; Ibrahim, Joseph G; Wambaugh, John F; Kenyon, Elaina M; Setzer, R Woodrow

    2015-12-01

    Any statistical model should be identifiable in order for estimates and tests using it to be meaningful. We consider statistical analysis of physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models in which parameters cannot be estimated precisely from available data, and discuss different types of identifiability that occur in PBPK models and give reasons why they occur. We particularly focus on how the mathematical structure of a PBPK model and lack of appropriate data can lead to statistical models in which it is impossible to estimate at least some parameters precisely. Methods are reviewed which can determine whether a purely linear PBPK model is globally identifiable. We propose a theorem which determines when identifiability at a set of finite and specific values of the mathematical PBPK model (global discete identifiability) implies identifiability of the statistical model. However, we are unable to establish conditions that imply global discrete identifiability, and conclude that the only safe approach to analysis of PBPK models involves Bayesian analysis with truncated priors. Finally, computational issues regarding posterior simulations of PBPK models are discussed. The methodology is very general and can be applied to numerous PBPK models which can be expressed as linear time-invariant systems. A real data set of a PBPK model for exposure to dimethyl arsinic acid (DMA(V)) is presented to illustrate the proposed methodology. PMID:26194069

  5. EXPOSURE RELATED DOSE ESTIMATING MODEL ( ERDEM ) A PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC AND PHARMACODYNAMIC ( PBPK/PD ) MODEL FOR ASSESSING HUMAN EXPOSURE AND RISK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Exposure Related Dose Estimating Model (ERDEM) is a PBPK/PD modeling system that was developed by EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL). The ERDEM framework provides the flexibility either to use existing models and to build new PBPK and PBPK/PD models to address...

  6. MODELS AND MODELING METHODS FOR ASSESSING HUMAN EXPOSURE AND DOSE TO TOXIC CHEMICALS AND POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project aims to strengthen the general scientific foundation of EPA's exposure and risk assessment, management, and policy processes by developing state-of-the-art exposure to dose mathematical models and solution methods. The results of this research will be to produce a mo...

  7. Structure of air shower disc near the core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inoue, N.; Kawamoto, M.; Misaki, Y.; Maeda, T.; Takeuchi, T.; Toyoda, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The longitudinal structure of the air shower disk is studied by measuring the arrival time distributions of air shower particles for showers with electron size in the range 3.2 x 10 to the 5.5. power to 3.2 x 10 to the 7.5 power in the Akeno air-shower array (930 gcm squared atmospheric depth). The average FWHM as a parameter of thickness of air shower disk increases with core distances at less than 50m. AT the present stage, dependence on electron size, zenith angle and air shower age is not apparent. The average thickness of the air shower disk within a core distance of 50m could be determined by an electromagnetic cascade starting from the lower altitude.

  8. Activity and observability of meteor showers throughout the year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimnikoval, Peter

    2014-02-01

    Diagrams on the poster present the activity periods of meteor showers as well as the rising and setting times of meteor shower radiants. Plotted are sunrises, sunsets and the period of twilight. It was constructed according to data from the IMO Meteor Shower Working List. More active showers are displayed in red and less active showers in green. The diagrams are calculated for geographic latitudes of 40° N, 0° and 40° S. The time scale is given as local time at the relevant zonal meridian and supplemented by local daylight saving time. The diagrams contain rounded values of solar longitude J2000. The star chart shows the radiant positions and drift of IMO meteor showers while the other diagrams display shower activity and date of maximum.

  9. Predictive modeling of terrestrial radiation exposure from geologic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haber, Daniel A.

    Aerial gamma ray surveys are an important tool for national security, scientific, and industrial interests in determining locations of both anthropogenic and natural sources of radioactivity. There is a relationship between radioactivity and geology and in the past this relationship has been used to predict geology from an aerial survey. The purpose of this project is to develop a method to predict the radiologic exposure rate of the geologic materials in an area by creating a model using geologic data, images from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), geochemical data, and pre-existing low spatial resolution aerial surveys from the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Survey. Using these data, geospatial areas, referred to as background radiation units, homogenous in terms of K, U, and Th are defined and the gamma ray exposure rate is predicted. The prediction is compared to data collected via detailed aerial survey by our partner National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), allowing for the refinement of the technique. High resolution radiation exposure rate models have been developed for two study areas in Southern Nevada that include the alluvium on the western shore of Lake Mohave, and Government Wash north of Lake Mead; both of these areas are arid with little soil moisture and vegetation. We determined that by using geologic units to define radiation background units of exposed bedrock and ASTER visualizations to subdivide radiation background units of alluvium, regions of homogeneous geochemistry can be defined allowing for the exposure rate to be predicted. Soil and rock samples have been collected at Government Wash and Lake Mohave as well as a third site near Cameron, Arizona. K, U, and Th concentrations of these samples have been determined using inductively coupled mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and laboratory counting using radiation detection equipment. In addition, many sample locations also have

  10. MEPAS exposure model updates to meet current EPA guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Strenge, D.L.; Droppo, J.G. Jr.

    1993-12-01

    The Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS) is a software package developed for the US Department of Energy (DOE) as a management tool to screen the many potential hazardous waste problems at DOE facilities across the country. The program considers both radioactive and chemical pollutants in estimating potential human health risks based on site-specific waste, environmental transport, and exposure characteristics. To support various DOE programs, recent modifications have been made to MEPAS to increase its applicability in analyzing the problems of mixed hazardous waste. Such analyses are needed to evaluate remediation options for mixed hazardous waste sites. This paper presents an overview of the MEPAS program and summarizes the current models used to translate environmental concentration values into projected intake by humans and, finally, into estimates of health risk. The recent modifications are described consistent with current EPA guidance for exposure and human health impact assessment.

  11. SOURCE APPORTIONMENT OF EXPOSURES TO VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS: I. EVALUATION OF RECEPTOR MODELS USING SIMULATED EXPOSURE DATA. (R826788)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four receptor-oriented source apportionment models were evaluated by applying them to simulated personal exposure data for select volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that were generated by Monte Carlo sampling from known source contributions and profiles. The exposure sources mo...

  12. High Throughput Modeling of Indoor Exposures to Chemicals (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Risk due to chemical exposure is a function of both chemical hazard and exposure. Proximate sources of exposure due to the presence of a chemical in consumer products (i.e. near-field exposure) are identified as key drivers of exposure and yet are not well quantified or understo...

  13. Prediction of evolution of meteor shower associated with comet 122P/de Vico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomko, D.

    2014-04-01

    We deal with a theoretical meteoroid stream of the comet 122P/de Vico. For five perihelion passages in the distant past, we model a theoretical stream and follow its dynamical evolution until the present. We predict the characteristics of potential a meteor shower approaching the Earth's orbit and we make also the identification of the particles of the predicted shower with the real meteors in three databases (photo, radar, and video). Our overall prediction is, however, negative because only the particles released from the comet nucleus before approximately 37 000 years are found to evolve into a collision course with the Earth and, therefore, form a possible shower. Many meteoroids do not survive such a long time in interplanetary space.

  14. MAVEN IUVS observations of the aftermath of the Comet Siding Spring meteor shower on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, N. M.; Deighan, J. I.; Stewart, A. I. F.; McClintock, W. E.; Jain, S. K.; Chaffin, M. S.; Stiepen, A.; Crismani, M.; Plane, J. M. C.; Carrillo-Sánchez, J. D.; Evans, J. S.; Stevens, M. H.; Yelle, R. V.; Clarke, J. T.; Holsclaw, G. M.; Montmessin, F.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2015-06-01

    We report the detection of intense emission from magnesium and iron in Mars' atmosphere caused by a meteor shower following Comet Siding Spring's close encounter with Mars. The observations were made with the Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph, a remote sensing instrument on the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN spacecraft orbiting Mars. Ionized magnesium caused the brightest emission from the planet's atmosphere for many hours, resulting from resonant scattering of solar ultraviolet light. Modeling suggests a substantial fluence of low-density dust particles 1-100 µm in size, with the large amount and small size contrary to predictions. The event created a temporary planet-wide ionospheric layer below Mars' main dayside ionosphere. The dramatic meteor shower response at Mars is starkly different from the case at Earth, where a steady state metal layer is always observable but perturbations caused by even the strongest meteor showers are challenging to detect.

  15. Response of microchannel plates to single particles and to electromagnetic showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brianza, L.; Cavallari, F.; Del Re, D.; Gelli, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Gotti, C.; Govoni, P.; Jorda Lopez, C.; Martelli, A.; Marzocchi, B.; Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Pernié, L.; Pigazzini, S.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Trevisani, N.

    2015-10-01

    We report on the response of microchannel plates (MCPs) to single relativistic particles and to electromagnetic showers. Particle detection by means of secondary emission of electrons at the MCP surface has long been proposed and is used extensively in ion time-of-flight mass spectrometers. What has not been investigated in depth is their use to detect the ionizing component of showers. The time resolution of MCPs exceeds anything that has been previously used in calorimeters and, if exploited effectively, could aid in the event reconstruction at high luminosity colliders. Several prototypes of photodetectors with the amplification stage based on MCPs were exposed to cosmic rays and to 491 MeV electrons at the INFN-LNF Beam-Test Facility. The time resolution and the efficiency of the MCPs are measured as a function of the particle multiplicity, and the results used to model the response to high-energy showers.

  16. Reconstruction of inclined air showers detected with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Aab, Alexander; et al.

    2014-08-08

    We describe the method devised to reconstruct inclined cosmic-ray air showers with zenith angles greater than 60° detected with the surface array of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The measured signals at the ground level are fitted to muon density distributions predicted with atmospheric cascade models to obtain the relative shower size as an overall normalization parameter. The method is evaluated using simulated showers to test its performance. The energy of the cosmic rays is calibrated using a sub-sample of events reconstructed with both the fluorescence and surface array techniques. The reconstruction method described here provides the basis of complementary analyses including an independent measurement of the energy spectrum of ultra-high energy cosmic rays using very inclined events collected by the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  17. Reconstruction of inclined air showers detected with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Collaboration: Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2014-08-01

    We describe the method devised to reconstruct inclined cosmic-ray air showers with zenith angles greater than 60° detected with the surface array of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The measured signals at the ground level are fitted to muon density distributions predicted with atmospheric cascade models to obtain the relative shower size as an overall normalization parameter. The method is evaluated using simulated showers to test its performance. The energy of the cosmic rays is calibrated using a sub-sample of events reconstructed with both the fluorescence and surface array techniques. The reconstruction method described here provides the basis of complementary analyses including an independent measurement of the energy spectrum of ultra-high energy cosmic rays using very inclined events collected by the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  18. High performance interactive graphics for shower reconstruction in HPC, the DELPHI barrel electromagnetic calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Stanescu, C. )

    1990-08-01

    Complex software for shower reconstruction in DELPHI barrel electromagnetic calorimeter which deals, for each event, with great amounts of information, due to the high spatial resolution of this detector, needs powerful verification tools. An interactive graphics program, running on high performance graphics display system Whizzard 7555 from Megatek, was developed to display the logical steps in showers and their axes reconstruction. The program allows both operations on the image in real-time (rotation, translation and zoom) and the use of non-geometrical criteria to modify it (as the use of energy) thresholds for the representation of the elements that compound the showers (or of the associated lego plots). For this purpose graphics objects associated to user parameters were defined. Instancing and modelling features of the native graphics library were extensively used.

  19. The 2011 Draconid Shower Risk to Earth-Orbiting Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, William J.; Moser, Danielle E.

    2010-01-01

    Current meteor shower forecast models project a strong Draconid outburst, possibly a storm, on October 8, 2011, with a duration of approximately 7 hours and peaking between 19 and 21 hours UT. Predicted rates span an order of magnitude, with maximum Zenithal Hourly Rates (ZHRs) ranging from a few tens to several hundred. Calibration of the NASA MSFC Meteoroid Stream Model 1 to radar and optical observations of past apparitions, particularly the 2005 Draconid outburst 2, suggest that the maximum rate will be several hundreds per hour. Given the high spatial density of the Draconid stream, this implies a maximum meteoroid flux of 5-10 Draconids km(exp -2)/hr (to a limiting diameter of 1 mm), some 25-50 times greater than the normal sporadic flux of 0.2 km(exp -2)/ hr for particles of this size. Total outburst fluence, assuming a maximum ZHR of 750, is 15.5 Draconids km(exp -2), resulting in an overall 10x risk increase to spacecraft surfaces vulnerable to hypervelocity impacts by 1 mm particles. It is now established that a significant fraction of spacecraft anomalies produced by shower meteoroids (e.g. OLYMPUS and LandSat 5) are caused by electrostatic discharges produced by meteoroid impacts. In these cases, the charge generated is roughly proportional to v(exp 3.5(4)), giving a Draconid moving at 20 km/s approximately 1/80th the electrical damage potential of a Leonid of the same mass. In other words, a Draconid outburst with a maximum ZHR of 800 presents the same electrical risk as a normal Leonid shower with a ZHR of 15, assuming the mass indices and shower durations are the same. This is supported by the fact that no spacecraft electrical anomalies were reported during the strong Draconid outbursts of 1985 and 1998. However, the lack of past anomalies should not be taken as carte blanche for satellite operators to ignore the 2011 Draconids, as the upcoming outburst will constitute a period of enhanced risk for vehicles in near-Earth space. Each spacecrft is

  20. MODELED ESTIMATES OF CHLORPYRIFOS EXPOSURE AND DOSE FOR THE MINNESOTA AND ARIZONA NHEXAS POPULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents a probabilistic, multimedia, multipathway exposure model and assessment for chlorpyrifos developed as part of the National Human Exposure Assessment Survey (NHEXAS). The model was constructed using available information prior to completion of the NHEXAS stu...

  1. ASSESSING MULTIMEDIA/MULTIPATHWAY EXPOSURE TO ARSENIC USING A MECHANISTIC SOURCE-TO-DOSE MODELING FRAMEWORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of case studies is presented focusing on multimedia/multipathway population exposures to arsenic, employing the Population Based Modeling approach of the MENTOR (Modeling Environment for Total Risks) framework. This framework considers currently five exposure routes: i...

  2. Predictive modeling of nanomaterial exposure effects in biological systems

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiong; Tang, Kaizhi; Harper, Stacey; Harper, Bryan; Steevens, Jeffery A; Xu, Roger

    2013-01-01

    Background Predictive modeling of the biological effects of nanomaterials is critical for industry and policymakers to assess the potential hazards resulting from the application of engineered nanomaterials. Methods We generated an experimental dataset on the toxic effects experienced by embryonic zebrafish due to exposure to nanomaterials. Several nanomaterials were studied, such as metal nanoparticles, dendrimer, metal oxide, and polymeric materials. The embryonic zebrafish metric (EZ Metric) was used as a screening-level measurement representative of adverse effects. Using the dataset, we developed a data mining approach to model the toxic endpoints and the overall biological impact of nanomaterials. Data mining techniques, such as numerical prediction, can assist analysts in developing risk assessment models for nanomaterials. Results We found several important attributes that contribute to the 24 hours post-fertilization (hpf) mortality, such as dosage concentration, shell composition, and surface charge. These findings concur with previous studies on nanomaterial toxicity using embryonic zebrafish. We conducted case studies on modeling the overall effect/impact of nanomaterials and the specific toxic endpoints such as mortality, delayed development, and morphological malformations. The results show that we can achieve high prediction accuracy for certain biological effects, such as 24 hpf mortality, 120 hpf mortality, and 120 hpf heart malformation. The results also show that the weighting scheme for individual biological effects has a significant influence on modeling the overall impact of nanomaterials. Sample prediction models can be found at http://neiminer.i-a-i.com/nei_models. Conclusion The EZ Metric-based data mining approach has been shown to have predictive power. The results provide valuable insights into the modeling and understanding of nanomaterial exposure effects. PMID:24098077

  3. Influence of atmospheric electric fields on the radio emission from extensive air showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, T. N. G.; Scholten, O.; Buitink, S.; van den Berg, A. M.; Corstanje, A.; Ebert, U.; Enriquez, J. E.; Falcke, H.; Hörandel, J. R.; Köhn, C.; Nelles, A.; Rachen, J. P.; Rossetto, L.; Rutjes, C.; Schellart, P.; Thoudam, S.; ter Veen, S.; de Vries, K. D.

    2016-01-01

    The atmospheric electric fields in thunderclouds have been shown to significantly modify the intensity and polarization patterns of the radio footprint of cosmic-ray-induced extensive air showers. Simulations indicated a very nonlinear dependence of the signal strength in the frequency window of 30-80 MHz on the magnitude of the atmospheric electric field. In this work we present an explanation of this dependence based on Monte Carlo simulations, supported by arguments based on electron dynamics in air showers and expressed in terms of a simplified model. We show that by extending the frequency window to lower frequencies, additional sensitivity to the atmospheric electric field is obtained.

  4. Inhalation Exposure Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    SciTech Connect

    K. Rautenstrauch

    2004-09-10

    This analysis is one of 10 reports that support the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN) biosphere model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes in detail the conceptual model as well as the mathematical model and its input parameters. This report documents development of input parameters for the biosphere model that are related to atmospheric mass loading and supports the use of the model to develop biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs). The biosphere model is one of a series of process models supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for a Yucca Mountain repository. Inhalation Exposure Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model is one of five reports that develop input parameters for the biosphere model. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling, and the plan for development of the biosphere abstraction products for TSPA, as identified in the Technical Work Plan for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]). This analysis report defines and justifies values of mass loading for the biosphere model. Mass loading is the total mass concentration of resuspended particles (e.g., dust, ash) in a volume of air. Mass loading values are used in the air submodel of ERMYN to calculate concentrations of radionuclides in air inhaled by a receptor and concentrations in air surrounding crops. Concentrations in air to which the receptor is exposed are then used in the inhalation submodel to calculate the dose contribution to the receptor from inhalation of contaminated airborne particles. Concentrations in air surrounding plants are used in the plant submodel to calculate the concentrations of radionuclides in foodstuffs contributed from uptake by foliar interception.

  5. FATE AND EXPOSURE MODELING IN TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS: A PROCESS APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pathways for exposure of birds to pesticides include soil, water, air, soil-dwelling organisms, and insects. rocess approach to avian exposure calculates transport and transformation of agricultural chemicals through each of the exposure media. ifferential equations calculating t...

  6. Dietary Exposure Evaluation Model – Food Commodity Intake Database

    EPA Science Inventory

    DEEM is a dietary exposure analysis system for performing chronic and acute exposure assessments. DEEM employs Monte Carlo Analysis (MCA) techniques in order to provide probabilistic assessments of dietary pesticide exposures when residue data for targeted foods are available as ...

  7. Analysis of School Commuting Data for Exposure Modeling Purposes

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Jianping; McCurdy, Thomas; Burke, Janet; Bhaduri, Budhendra L; Liu, Cheng; Nutaro, James J; Patterson, Lauren A

    2010-01-01

    Human exposure models often make the simplifying assumption that school children attend school in the same census tract where they live. This paper analyzes that assumption and provides information on the temporal and spatial distributions associated with school commuting. The data were obtained using Oak Ridge National Laboratory s LandScan USA population distribution model (Bhaduri et al., 2007) applied to Philadelphia PA. It is a high-resolution model used to allocate individual school-aged children to both a home and school location, and to devise a minimum-time home-to school commuting path (called a trace) between the two locations. LandScan relies heavily on Geographic Information System (GIS) data. Our GIS analyses found that in Philadelphia: (1) about 32% of the students walk across 2 or more census tracts and 40% of them walk across 4 or more census blocks; (2) 60% drive across 4 or more census tracts going to school and 50% drive across 10 or more census blocks; (3) five-minute commuting time intervals result in misclassification as high as 90% for census blocks, 70% for block groups, and 50% for census tracts; (4) a one-minute time interval is needed to reasonably resolve time spent in the various census unit designations; (5) approximately 50% of both schoolchildren s homes and schools are located within 160 m of highly-traveled roads, and 64% of the schools are located within 200 m. These findings are very important when modeling school children s exposures, especially when ascertaining the impacts of near-roadway concentrations on their total daily body burden. Since many school children also travel along these streets and roadways to get to school, a majority of children in Philadelphia are in mobile-source dominated locations most of the day. We hypothesize that exposures of school children in Philadelphia to benzene and particulate matter will be much higher than if home and school locations and commuting paths at a 1-minute time resolution are

  8. Results of Lunar Impact Observations During Geminid Meteor Shower Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suggs, R. J.; Suggs, R. M.

    2015-01-01

    the lunar environment associated with larger lunar impactors, but also provides statistical data for verification and improving meteoroid prediction models. Current meteoroid models indicate that the Moon is struck by a sporadic meteoroid with a mass greater than 1 kg over 260 times per year. This number is very uncertain since observations for objects in this mass range are few. Factors of several times, higher or lower, are easily possible. Meteor showers are also present to varying degrees at certain times of the year. The Earth experiences meteor showers when encountering the debris left behind by comets, which is also the case with 2 the Moon. During such times, the rate of shower meteoroids can greatly exceed that of the sporadic background rate for larger meteoroids. Looking for meteor shower impacts on the Moon at about the same time as they occur on Earth will yield important data that can be fed into meteor shower forecasting models, which can then be used to predict times of greater meteoroid hazard on the Moon. The Geminids are one such meteor shower of interest. The Geminids are a major meteor shower that occur in December with a peak intensity occurring usually during the 13th and 14th of the month and appearing to come from a radiant in the constellation Gemini. The Geminids are interesting in that the parent body of the debris stream is an asteroid, which along with the Quadrantids, are the only major meteor showers not originating from a comet. The Geminids parent body, 3200 Phaethon, is about 5 km in diameter and has an orbit that has a 22deg inclination which intersects the main asteroid belt and has a perihelion less than half of Mercury's perihelion distance. Thus, its orbit crosses those of Mars, Earth, Venus, and Mercury. The Geminid debris stream is by far the most massive as compared to the others. When the Earth passes through the stream in mid-December, a peak intensity of approx. equal 120 meteors per hour can be seen. Because of the

  9. Lyssavirus infection: 'low dose, multiple exposure' in the mouse model.

    PubMed

    Banyard, Ashley C; Healy, Derek M; Brookes, Sharon M; Voller, Katja; Hicks, Daniel J; Núñez, Alejandro; Fooks, Anthony R

    2014-03-01

    The European bat lyssaviruses (EBLV-1 and EBLV-2) are zoonotic pathogens present within bat populations across Europe. The maintenance and transmission of lyssaviruses within bat colonies is poorly understood. Cases of repeated isolation of lyssaviruses from bat roosts have raised questions regarding the maintenance and intraspecies transmissibility of these viruses within colonies. Furthermore, the significance of seropositive bats in colonies remains unclear. Due to the protected nature of European bat species, and hence restrictions to working with the natural host for lyssaviruses, this study analysed the outcome following repeat inoculation of low doses of lyssaviruses in a murine model. A standardized dose of virus, EBLV-1, EBLV-2 or a 'street strain' of rabies (RABV), was administered via a peripheral route to attempt to mimic what is hypothesized as natural infection. Each mouse (n=10/virus/group/dilution) received four inoculations, two doses in each footpad over a period of four months, alternating footpad with each inoculation. Mice were tail bled between inoculations to evaluate antibody responses to infection. Mice succumbed to infection after each inoculation with 26.6% of mice developing clinical disease following the initial exposure across all dilutions (RABV, 32.5% (n=13/40); EBLV-1, 35% (n=13/40); EBLV-2, 12.5% (n=5/40)). Interestingly, the lowest dose caused clinical disease in some mice upon first exposure ((RABV, 20% (n=2/10) after first inoculation; RABV, 12.5% (n=1/8) after second inoculation; EBLV-2, 10% (n=1/10) after primary inoculation). Furthermore, five mice developed clinical disease following the second exposure to live virus (RABV, n=1; EBLV-1, n=1; EBLV-2, n=3) although histopathological examination indicated that the primary inoculation was the most probably cause of death due to levels of inflammation and virus antigen distribution observed. All the remaining mice (RABV, n=26; EBLV-1, n=26; EBLV-2, n=29) survived the tertiary and

  10. SHEDS-HT: An Integrated Probabilistic Exposure Model for Prioritizing Exposures to Chemicals with Near-Field and Dietary Sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) researchers are developing a strategy for highthroughput (HT) exposure-based prioritization of chemicals under the ExpoCast program. These novel modeling approaches for evaluating chemicals based on their potential for biologi...

  11. Extensive air shower simulations with the CORSIKA program

    SciTech Connect

    Capdevielee, J.N.; Gabriel, P.; Gils, H.J.; Grieder, P.; Heck, D.; Knapp, J.; Mayer, H.J.; Oehlschlaeger, J.; Rebel, H.; Schatz, G.; Thouw, T. )

    1993-06-15

    CORSIKA is a detailed Monte Carlo program to study the development of extensive air showers in the atmosphere initiated by photons, protons, or nuclei of energies up to 10[sup 17] eV. Wherever possible experimentally accessible data have been used to model the high energy interactions of primary and secondary particles with the nuclei of the atmosphere. The CORSIKA code is based essentially on the Dual Parton Model to describe the hadronic interactions at high energies, the isobar model for hadronic reactions at low energies, and EGS4 for a detailed simulation of the electromagnetic part. The nucleus-nucleus interaction model follows the considerations of Klar and Huefner. Heuristic nucleus fragment models are implemented. Diffractive and charge exchange reactions are possible. Photoproduction of muon pairs and hadrons has been introduced into the electromagnetic part. The gross features of the program are presented and some results are given.

  12. KREAM: Korean Radiation Exposure Assessment Model for Aviation Route Dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, J.; Dokgo, K.; Choi, E. J.; Kim, K. C.; Kim, H. P.; Cho, K. S. F.

    2014-12-01

    Since Korean Air has begun to use the polar route from Seoul/ICN airport to New York/JFK airport on August 2006, there are explosive needs for the estimation and prediction against cosmic radiation exposure for Korean aircrew and passengers in South Korea from public. To keep pace with those needs of public, Korean government made the law on safety standards and managements of cosmic radiation for the flight attendants and the pilots in 2013. And we have begun to develop our own Korean Radiation Exposure Assessment Model (KREAM) for aviation route dose since last year funded by Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA). GEANT4 model and NRLMSIS 00 model are used for calculation of the energetic particles' transport in the atmosphere and for obtaining the background atmospheric neutral densities depending on altitude. For prediction the radiation exposure in many routes depending on the various space weather effects, we constructed a database from pre-arranged simulations using all possible combinations of R, S, and G, which are the space weather effect scales provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). To get the solar energetic particles' spectrum at the 100 km altitude which we set as a top of the atmospheric layers in the KREAM, we use ACE and GOES satellites' proton flux observations. We compare the results between KREAM and the other cosmic radiation estimation programs such as CARI-6M which is provided by the Federal Aviation Agency (FAA). We also validate KREAM's results by comparison with the measurement from Liulin-6K LET spectrometer onboard Korean commercial flights and Korean Air Force reconnaissance flights.

  13. Laser thresholds in pulp exposure: a rat animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Joel M.; Goodis, Harold E.; Kudler, Joel J.

    1995-05-01

    Laser technology is now being clinically investigated for the removal of carious enamel and dentin. This study used an animal model to evaluate histological pulpal effects from laser exposure. The molars of 24 Sprague-Dawley rats (n equals 264) were exposed to either a pulsed 1.06 micrometers Nd:YAG laser (120 microseconds, 320 micrometer diameter fiber), air rotor drill preparation or left untreated as controls. The following treatment conditions were investigated: control group (n equals 54); high speed drill with carbide bur (n equals 39); laser exposure at 50 mJ/p at 10 Hz (n equals 27), 100 mJ/p at 10 Hz (n equals 66) and 100 mJ/p at 20 Hz (n equals 39). A sixth treatment condition was investigated: root surface hypersensitivity, which included incremental laser exposure from 30 to 100 mJ/p at 10 Hz (n equals 39). The animals were euthanized either immediately after treatment, at one week, or at one month. The jaws were fixed and bioprepared. Remaining dentin thickness was measured, and ranged from 0.17 +/- 0.04 mm to 0.35 +/- 0.09 mm. The pulp tissue was examined for histologic inflammatory response. No evidence of pulpal involvement or adverse pulpal effects were found at any time period in teeth receiving 50 mJ/p. When histologic samples were compared with controls, all observations were similar. Of the 210 exposed teeth, 2 teeth receiving 100 mJ/p demonstrated abscess formation and were exfoliated. Further, in the rat molar when remaining dentin thickness was less than 0.5 mm, exposed to 100 mJ/p, threshold pulpal effects occurred. The response of rat pulp to laser exposure indicated no histologically measurable response to pulsed laser energy at 50 mJ/p.

  14. Long and short-term atmospheric radiation analyses based on coupled measurements at high altitude remote stations and extensive air shower modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, G.; Federico, C. A.; Pazianotto, M. T.; Gonzales, O. L.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper are described the ACROPOL and OPD high-altitude stations devoted to characterize the atmospheric radiation fields. The ACROPOL platform, located at the summit of the Pic du Midi in the French Pyrenees at 2885 m above sea level, exploits since May 2011 some scientific equipment, including a BSS neutron spectrometer, detectors based on semiconductor and scintillators. In the framework of a IEAv and ONERA collaboration, a second neutron spectrometer was simultaneously exploited since February 2015 at the summit of the Pico dos Dias in Brazil at 1864 m above the sea level. The both high station platforms allow for investigating the long period dynamics to analyze the spectral variation of cosmic-ray- induced neutron and effects of local and seasonal changes, but also the short term dynamics during solar flare events. This paper presents long and short-term analyses, including measurement and modeling investigations considering the both high altitude stations data. The modeling approach, based on ATMORAD computational platform, was used to link the both station measurements.

  15. Meteor radar wind over Chung-Li (24.9°N, 121°E), Taiwan, for the period 10-25 November 2012 which includes Leonid meteor shower: Comparison with empirical model and satellite measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, C. L.; Chen, H. C.; Chu, Y. H.; Chung, M. Z.; Kuong, R. M.; Lin, T. H.; Tzeng, K. J.; Wang, C. Y.; Wu, K. H.; Yang, K. F.

    2014-08-01

    The neutral winds in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) region are measured by a newly installed meteor trail detection system (or meteor radar) at Chung-Li, Taiwan, for the period 10-25 November 2012, which includes the Leonid meteor shower period. In this study, we use the 3 m field-aligned plasma irregularities in the sporadic E (Es) region in combination with the International Geomagnetic Reference Field model to calibrate the system phase biases such that the true positions of the meteor trails can be correctly determined with interferometry technique. The horizontal wind velocities estimated from the radial velocities of the meteor trails and their locations by using a least squares method show that the diurnal tide dominates the variation of the MLT neutral wind with time over Chung-Li, which is in good agreement with the horizontal wind model (HWM07) prediction. However, harmonic analysis reveals that the amplitudes of the mean wind, diurnal, and semidiurnal tides of the radar-measured winds in height range 82-100 km are systematically larger than those of the model-predicted winds by up to a factor of 3. A comparison shows that the overall pattern of the height-local time distribution of the composite radar-measured meteor wind is, in general, consistent with that of the TIMED Doppler Interferometer-observed wind, which is dominated by a diurnal oscillation with downward phase progression at a rate of about 1.3 km/h. The occurrences of the Es layers retrieved from fluctuations of the amplitude and excess phase of the GPS signal received by the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC satellites during the GPS radio occultation (RO) process are compared with the shear zones of the radar-measured meteor wind and HWM07 wind. The result shows that almost all of the RO-retrieved Es layers occur within the wind shear zones that favor the Es layer formation based on the wind shear theory, suggesting that the primary physical process responsible for the Es layer events

  16. Reducing uncertainty in risk modeling for methylmercury exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Ponce, R.; Egeland, G.; Middaugh, J.; Lee, R.

    1995-12-31

    The biomagnification and bioaccumulation of methylmercury in marine species represents a challenge for risk assessment related to the consumption of subsistence foods in Alaska. Because of the profound impact that food consumption advisories have on indigenous peoples seeking to preserve a way of life, there is a need to reduce uncertainty in risk assessment. Thus, research was initiated to reduce the uncertainty in assessing the health risks associated with the consumption of subsistence foods. Because marine subsistence foods typically contain elevated levels of methylmercury, preliminary research efforts have focused on methylmercury as the principal chemical of concern. Of particular interest are the antagonistic effects of selenium on methylmercury toxicity. Because of this antagonism, methylmercury exposure through the consumption of marine mammal meat (with high selenium) may not be as toxic as comparable exposures through other sources of dietary intake, such as in the contaminated bread episode of Iraq (containing relatively low selenium). This hypothesis is supported by animal experiments showing reduced toxicity of methylmercury associated with marine mammal meat, by the antagonistic influence of selenium on methylmercury toxicity, and by negative clinical findings in adult populations exposed to methylmercury through a marine diet not subject to industrial contamination. Exploratory model development is underway to identify potential improvements and applications of current deterministic and probabilistic models, particularly by incorporating selenium as an antagonist in risk modeling methods.

  17. Exposure estimates using urban plume dispersion and traffic microsimulation models

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.J.; Mueller, C.; Bush, B.; Stretz, P.

    1997-12-01

    The goal of this research effort was to demonstrate a capability for analyzing emergency response issues resulting from accidental or mediated airborne toxic releases in an urban setting. In the first year of the program, the authors linked a system of fluid dynamics, plume dispersion, and vehicle transportation models developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory to study the dispersion of a plume in an urban setting and the resulting exposures to vehicle traffic. This research is part of a larger laboratory-directed research and development project for studying the relationships between urban infrastructure elements and natural systems.

  18. A Simple shower and matching algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Giele, Walter T.; Kosower, David A.; Skands, Peter Z.; /Fermilab

    2007-07-01

    We present a simple formalism for parton-shower Markov chains. As a first step towards more complete 'uncertainty bands', we incorporate a comprehensive exploration of the ambiguities inherent in such calculations. To reduce this uncertainty, we then introduce a matching formalism which allows a generated event sample to simultaneously reproduce any infrared safe distribution calculated at leading or next-to-leading order in perturbation theory, up to sub-leading corrections. To enable a more universal definition of perturbative calculations, we also propose a more general definition of the hadronization cutoff. Finally, we present an implementation of some of these ideas for final-state gluon showers, in a code dubbed VINCIA.

  19. A new study of muons in air showers by NBU air shower array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaudhuri, N.; Mukherjee, N.; Sarkar, S.; Basak, D. K.; Ghosh, B.

    1985-01-01

    The North Bengal University (NBU) air shower array has been in operation in conjunction with two muon magnetic spectrographs. The array incorporates 21 particle density sampling detectors around the magnetic spectrographs covering an area of 900 sq m. The layout of the array is based on the arrangement of detectors in a square symmetry. The array set up on the ground level is around a 10 m high magnetic spectrograph housing. This magnetic spectrograph housing limits the zenith angular acceptance of the incident showers to a few degrees. Three hundred muons in the fitted showers of size range 10 to the 4th power to 10 to the 5th power particles have so far been scanned and the momenta determined in the momentum range 2 - 440 GeV/c. More than 1500 recorded showers are now in the process of scanning and fitting. A lateral distribution of muons of energy greater than 300 MeV in the shower size range 10 to the 5th power to 7 x 10 to the 5th power has been obtained.

  20. Delayed muons in extensive air showers and double-front showers

    SciTech Connect

    Beisembaev, R. U.; Vavilov, Yu. N. Vildanov, N. G.; Kruglov, A. V.; Stepanov, A. V.; Takibaev, J. S.

    2009-11-15

    The results of a long-term experiment performed in the period between 1995 and 2006 with the aid of the MUON-T underground (20 mwe) scintillation facility arranged at the Tien Shan mountain research station at an altitude of 3340 m above sea level are presented. The time distribution of delayed muons with an energy in excess of 5 GeV in extensive air showers of energy not lower than 106 GeV with respect to the shower front was obtained with a high statistical significance in the delay interval between 30 and 150 ns. An effect of the geomagnetic field in detecting delayed muons in extensive air showers was discovered. This effect leads to the asymmetry of their appearance with respect to the north-south direction. The connection between delayed muons and extensive air showers featuring two fronts separated by a time interval of several tens of to two hundred nanoseconds is discussed. This connection gives sufficient grounds to assume that delayed muons originate from the decays of pions and kaons produced in the second, delayed, front of extensive air showers.

  1. CASE STUDIES AND MODEL TESTING OF THE METALS EXPOSURE ANALYSIS MODELING SYSTEM (MEXAMS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Metals Exposure Analysis Modeling System (MEXAMS), linking a complex speciation model with an aquatic transport/fate model, should help discriminate between the fraction of metal that is dissolved and in bioavailable form and the fraction that is complexed and rendered relati...

  2. Acoustic detection of air shower cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, X.; Liu, Y.; Du, S.

    1985-01-01

    At an altitude of 1890m, a pre-test with an Air shower (AS) core selector and a small acoustic array set up in an anechoic pool with a volume of 20x7x7 cu m was performed, beginning in Aug. 1984. In analyzing the waveforms recorded during the effective working time of 186 hrs, three acoustic signals which cannot be explained as from any source other than AS cores were obtained, and an estimation of related parameters was made.

  3. The midpoint between dipole and parton showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höche, Stefan; Prestel, Stefan

    2015-09-01

    We present a new parton-shower algorithm. Borrowing from the basic ideas of dipole cascades, the evolution variable is judiciously chosen as the transverse momentum in the soft limit. This leads to a very simple analytic structure of the evolution. A weighting algorithm is implemented that allows one to consistently treat potentially negative values of the splitting functions and the parton distributions. We provide two independent, publicly available implementations for the two event generators P ythia and S herpa.

  4. The midpoint between dipole and parton showers

    SciTech Connect

    Höche, Stefan; Prestel, Stefan

    2015-09-28

    We present a new parton-shower algorithm. Borrowing from the basic ideas of dipole cascades, the evolution variable is judiciously chosen as the transverse momentum in the soft limit. This leads to a very simple analytic structure of the evolution. A weighting algorithm is implemented that allows one to consistently treat potentially negative values of the splitting functions and the parton distributions. Thus, we provide two independent, publicly available implementations for the two event generators PYTHIA and SHERPA.

  5. UNITED STATES METEOROLOGICAL DATA - DAILY AND HOURLY FILES TO SUPPORT PREDICTIVE EXPOSURE MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    ORD numerical models for pesticide exposure include a model of spray drift (AgDisp), a cropland pesticide persistence model (PRZM), a surface water exposure model (EXAMS), and a model of fish bioaccumulation (BASS). A unified climatological database for these models has been asse...

  6. Influence of the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal effect on the features of extensive air showers

    SciTech Connect

    Kalmykov, N.N.; Ostapchenko, S.S.; Pavlov, A.I.

    1995-10-01

    The influence of the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal (LPM) effect on the features of extensive air showers (EAS) is studied. The development of hadronic cascades is described in the quark-gluon string model. It is shown that the LPM effect does not exert a significant influence on EAS features up to energies of 10{sup 20} eV. 19 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Astronaut EVA exposure estimates from CAD model spacesuit geometry.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, Giovanni; Anderson, Brooke M; Atwell, William; Nealy, John E; Qualls, Garry D; Wilson, John W

    2004-03-01

    Ongoing assembly and maintenance activities at the International Space Station (ISS) require much more extravehicular activity (EVA) than did the earlier U.S. Space Shuttle missions. It is thus desirable to determine and analyze, and possibly foresee, as accurately as possible what radiation exposures crew members involved in EVAs will experience in order to minimize risks and to establish exposure limits that must not to be exceeded. A detailed CAD model of the U.S. Space Shuttle EVA Spacesuit, developed at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), is used to represent the directional shielding of an astronaut; it has detailed helmet and backpack structures, hard upper torso, and multilayer space suit fabric material. The NASA Computerized Anatomical Male and Female (CAM and CAF) models are used in conjunction with the space suit CAD model for dose evaluation within the human body. The particle environments are taken from the orbit-averaged NASA AP8 and AE8 models at solar cycle maxima and minima. The transport of energetic particles through space suit materials and body tissue is calculated by using the NASA LaRC HZETRN code for hadrons and a recently developed deterministic transport code, ELTRN, for electrons. The doses within the CAM and CAF models are determined from energy deposition at given target points along 968 directional rays convergent on the points and are evaluated for several points on the skin and within the body. Dosimetric quantities include contributions from primary protons, light ions, and electrons, as well as from secondary brehmsstrahlung and target fragments. Directional dose patterns are displayed as rays and on spherical surfaces by the use of a color relative intensity representation. PMID:15133283

  8. Cometary showers and unseen solar companions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, P. R.

    1984-01-01

    The possibility that an invisible solar companion passing through the Oort cloud every 28 Myr precipitates a sufficiently high rate of cometary collisions with the earth to account for periodic mass species extinctions recorded in the fossil record is discussed. A Monte Carlo simulation shows that any hypothesized 'death star' with a 28 Myr orbit would experience an average 10 percent change in period per orbit. Production of an 18-fold increase in cometary impacts would be associated with a 0.055 probability that a 10 km nucleus would hit the earth in a shower once every 510 Myr, longer than the proposed extinction periodicity. However, if the death star orbit has a 0.6 eccentricity and the Oort cloud is sufficiently densely populated, a 2 billion comet shower may be possible. A survey of large terrestrial impact craters indicates that 6-12 craters with diameters over 10 km originated in periodic showers. The extinctions in any case occur at 26 Myr periods and cannot be correlated with the 33 Myr period of recrossing the galactic plane, or with any other known phenomena.

  9. Radar observations of the Volantids meteor shower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younger, J.; Reid, I.; Murphy, D.

    2016-01-01

    A new meteor shower occurring for the first time on 31 December 2015 in the constellation Volans was identified by the CAMS meteor video network in New Zealand. Data from two VHF meteor radars located in Australia and Antarctica have been analyzed using the great circle method to search for Volantids activity. The new shower was found to be active for at least three days over the period 31 December 2015 - 2 January 2016, peaking at an apparent radiant of R.A. = 119.3 ± 3.7, dec. = -74.5 ± 1.9 on January 1st. Measurements of meteoroid velocity were made using the Fresnel transform technique, yielding a geocentric shower velocity of 28.1 ± 1.8 km s-1. The orbital parameters for the parent stream are estimated to be a = 2.11 AU, e = 0.568, i = 47.2°, with a perihelion distance of q = 0.970 AU.

  10. Probabilistic modelling of European consumer exposure to cosmetic products.

    PubMed

    McNamara, C; Rohan, D; Golden, D; Gibney, M; Hall, B; Tozer, S; Safford, B; Coroama, M; Leneveu-Duchemin, M C; Steiling, W

    2007-11-01

    In this study, we describe the statistical analysis of the usage profile of the European population to seven cosmetic products. The aim of the study was to construct a reliable model of exposure of the European population from use of the selected products: body lotion, shampoo, deodorant spray, deodorant non-spray, facial moisturiser, lipstick and toothpaste. The first step in this process was to gather reliable data on consumer usage patterns of the products. These data were sourced from a combination of market information databases and a controlled product use study by the trade association Colipa. The market information study contained a large number of subjects, in total 44,100 households and 18,057 habitual users (males and females) of the studied products, in five European countries. The data sets were then combined to generate a realistic distribution of frequency of use of each product, combined with distribution of the amount of product used at each occasion using the CREMe software. A Monte Carlo method was used to combine the data sets. This resulted in a new model of European exposure to cosmetic products being constructed. PMID:17804138

  11. Exposure to inhaled THM: comparison of continuous and event-specific exposure assessment for epidemiologic purposes.

    PubMed

    Thiriat, N; Paulus, H; Le Bot, B; Glorennec, P

    2009-10-01

    Trihalomethanes (THMs) (chloroform, bromoform, dibromochloromethane, and bromodichloromethane) are the most abundant by-products of chlorination. People are exposed to THMs through ingestion, dermal contact and inhalation. The objective of this study was to compare two methods for assessing THM inhalation: a direct method with personal monitors assessing continuous exposure and an indirect one with microenvironmental sampling and collection of time-activity data during the main event exposures: bathing, showering and swimming. This comparison was conducted to help plan a future epidemiologic study of the effects of THMs on the upper airways of children. 30 children aged from 4 to 10 years were included. They wore a 3M 3520 organic vapor monitor for 7 days. We sampled air in their bathrooms (during baths or showers) and in the indoor swimming pools they visited and recorded their time-activity patterns. We used stainless steel tubes full of Tenax to collect air samples. All analyses were performed with Gas Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS). Chloroform was the THM with the highest concentrations in the air of both bathrooms and indoor swimming pools. Its continuous and event exposure measurements were significantly correlated (r(s)=0.69 p<0.001). Continuous exposures were higher than event exposures, suggesting that the event exposure method does not take into account some influential microenvironments. In an epidemiologic study, this might lead to random exposure misclassification, thus underestimation of the risk, and reduced statistical power. The continuous exposure method was difficult to implement because of its poor acceptability and the fragility of the personal monitors. These two points may also reduce the statistical power of an epidemiologic study. It would be useful to test the advantages and disadvantages of a second sample in the home or of modeling the baseline concentration of THM in the home to improve the event exposure method. PMID

  12. Use of an aggregate exposure model to estimate consumer exposure to fragrance ingredients in personal care and cosmetic products.

    PubMed

    Safford, B; Api, A M; Barratt, C; Comiskey, D; Daly, E J; Ellis, G; McNamara, C; O'Mahony, C; Robison, S; Smith, B; Thomas, R; Tozer, S

    2015-08-01

    Ensuring the toxicological safety of fragrance ingredients used in personal care and cosmetic products is essential in product development and design, as well as in the regulatory compliance of the products. This requires an accurate estimation of consumer exposure which, in turn, requires an understanding of consumer habits and use of products. Where ingredients are used in multiple product types, it is important to take account of aggregate exposure in consumers using these products. This publication investigates the use of a newly developed probabilistic model, the Creme RIFM model, to estimate aggregate exposure to fragrance ingredients using the example of 2-phenylethanol (PEA). The output shown demonstrates the utility of the model in determining systemic and dermal exposure to fragrances from individual products, and aggregate exposure. The model provides valuable information not only for risk assessment, but also for risk management. It should be noted that data on the concentrations of PEA in products used in this article were obtained from limited sources and not the standard, industry wide surveys typically employed by the fragrance industry and are thus presented here to illustrate the output and utility of the newly developed model. They should not be considered an accurate representation of actual exposure to PEA. PMID:26071898

  13. Modeling Exposures to the Oxidative Potential of PM10

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Differences in the toxicity of ambient particulate matter (PM) due to varying particle composition across locations may contribute to variability in results from air pollution epidemiologic studies. Though most studies have used PM mass concentration as the exposure metric, an alternative which accounts for particle toxicity due to varying particle composition may better elucidate whether PM from specific sources is responsible for observed health effects. The oxidative potential (OP) of PM < 10 μm (PM10) was measured as the rate of depletion of the antioxidant reduced glutathione (GSH) in a model of human respiratory tract lining fluid. Using a database of GSH OP measures collected in greater London, U.K. from 2002 to 2006, we developed and validated a predictive spatiotemporal model of the weekly GSH OP of PM10 that included geographic predictors. Predicted levels of OP were then used in combination with those of weekly PM10 mass to estimate exposure to PM10 weighted by its OP. Using cross-validation (CV), brake and tire wear emissions of PM10 from traffic within 50 m and tailpipe emissions of nitrogen oxides from heavy-goods vehicles within 100 m were important predictors of GSH OP levels. Predictive accuracy of the models was high for PM10 (CV R2=0.83) but only moderate for GSH OP (CV R2 = 0.44) when comparing weekly levels; however, the GSH OP model predicted spatial trends well (spatial CV R2 = 0.73). Results suggest that PM10 emitted from traffic sources, specifically brake and tire wear, has a higher OP than that from other sources, and that this effect is very local, occurring within 50–100 m of roadways. PMID:22731499

  14. Depth Distribution Of The Maxima Of Extensive Air Shower

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. H.; Howell, L. W.

    2003-01-01

    Observations of the extensive air showers from space can be free from interference by low altitude clouds and aerosols if the showers develop at a sufficiently high altitude. In this paper we explore the altitude distribution of shower maxima to determine the fraction of all showers that will reach their maxima at sufficient altitudes to avoid interference from these lower atmosphere phenomena. Typically the aerosols are confined within a planetary boundary layer that extends from only 2-3 km above the Earth's surface. Cloud top altitudes extend above 15 km but most are below 4 km. The results reported here show that more than 75% of the showers that will be observed by EUSO have maxima above the planetary boundary layer. The results also show that more than 50% of the showers that occur on cloudy days have their maxima above the cloud tops.

  15. An Evaluation of the Accuracy of Meteor Shower Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, W.; Moser, D.

    2004-01-01

    Brought into being by the recent Leonid meteor storms, meteor shower forecasts are now regarded by many spacecraft projects as necessary inputs into the planning of spacecraft operations. We compare the shower forecasts made by various researchers over the past six years to actual shower observations in an attempt to create an overall picture of forecast accuracy, specifically focusing on the three aspects most important to space vehicles: 1) the time of shower maximum, 2) the half-width (duration), and 3) the maximum Zenith Hourly Rate (ZHR). It will be noted that, while the times of maxima are generally predicted to within several minutes, the peak ZHRs are often overestimated and shower half-widths are frequently not even calculated. The difficulties involved in converting shower ZHRs into the meteoroid fluxes needed to assess spacecraft risk are also discussed.

  16. Evaluation of recommended REACH exposure modeling tools and near-field, far-field model in assessing occupational exposure to toluene from spray paint.

    PubMed

    Hofstetter, Elizabeth; Spencer, John W; Hiteshew, Kathleen; Coutu, Michelle; Nealley, Mark

    2013-03-01

    Predictive modeling is an available tool to assess worker exposures to a variety of chemicals in different industries and product-use scenarios. The European Chemical Agency (ECHA)'s guidelines for manufacturers to fulfill the European Union's legal requirements pursuant to the Registration, Evaluation, Authorization, and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) initiative include recommendations for the use of modeling to predict worker exposures. ECHA recommends different models for different target populations (i.e. workers, consumers, environment) and routes of exposure (i.e. skin absorption, ingestion, inhalation), and presents them hierarchically, with Tier 1 models presented as the most simplistic, conservative models and Tier 2 models recommended for further intensive evaluation of substances or preparations. In order to assess these models for one exposure (product-use) scenario, a simulation of the scenario was completed in a controlled environment and the measured results were compared with the modeling outputs. The authors predicted, based on the design of the modeling tools, that all models would overestimate worker exposures under the simulated product-use scenario, with the lower-tiered model producing the most conservative estimate of exposure. In this study, a Tier 1 model and a Tier 2 model were evaluated for comparison with the near-field, far-field (NF-FF) deterministic model and measured experimental results in a real-time worker inhalation exposure assessment. Modeling was conducted prior to actual air monitoring. The exposure scenario that was evaluated involved the application of a toluene-containing spray paint to a work surface. Air samples were collected to evaluate short-term (15-min) and long-term (240-min) exposures. Eight-hour time-weighted averages (8-h TWAs) were calculated and compared with the modeling outputs from the recommended REACH modeling tools and the NF-FF model. A comparison of each of the modeling tools with measured

  17. Measurement of the muon content in air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veberič, Darko

    2016-07-01

    The muon content of extensive air showers produced by ultra-high energy cosmic rays is an observable sensitive to the composition of primary particles and to the properties of hadronic interactions governing the evolution of air-shower cascades. We present different methods for estimation of the number of muons at the ground and the muon production depth. These methods use measurements of the longitudinal, lateral, and temporal distribution of particles in air showers recorded by the detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The results, obtained at about 140 TeV center-of-mass energy for proton primaries, are compared to the predictions of LHC-tuned hadronic-interaction models used in simulations with different primary masses. The models exhibit a deficitin the predicted muon content. The combination of these results with other independent mass composition analyses, such as those involving the depth of shower maximum observablemax, provide additional constraints on hadronic-interaction models for energies beyond the reach of the LHC.

  18. Adapted cold shower as a potential treatment for depression.

    PubMed

    Shevchuk, Nikolai A

    2008-01-01

    Depression is a debilitating mood disorder that is among the top causes of disability worldwide. It can be characterized by a set of somatic, emotional, and behavioral symptoms, one of which is a high risk of suicide. This work presents a hypothesis that depression may be caused by the convergence of two factors: (A) A lifestyle that lacks certain physiological stressors that have been experienced by primates through millions of years of evolution, such as brief changes in body temperature (e.g. cold swim), and this lack of "thermal exercise" may cause inadequate functioning of the brain. (B) Genetic makeup that predisposes an individual to be affected by the above condition more seriously than other people. To test the hypothesis, an approach to treating depression is proposed that consists of adapted cold showers (20 degrees C, 2-3 min, preceded by a 5-min gradual adaptation to make the procedure less shocking) performed once or twice daily. The proposed duration of treatment is several weeks to several months. The following evidence appears to support the hypothesis: Exposure to cold is known to activate the sympathetic nervous system and increase the blood level of beta-endorphin and noradrenaline and to increase synaptic release of noradrenaline in the brain as well. Additionally, due to the high density of cold receptors in the skin, a cold shower is expected to send an overwhelming amount of electrical impulses from peripheral nerve endings to the brain, which could result in an anti-depressive effect. Practical testing by a statistically insignificant number of people, who did not have sufficient symptoms to be diagnosed with depression, showed that the cold hydrotherapy can relieve depressive symptoms rather effectively. The therapy was also found to have a significant analgesic effect and it does not appear to have noticeable side effects or cause dependence. In conclusion, wider and more rigorous studies would be needed to test the validity of the

  19. Inhalation Exposure Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    SciTech Connect

    M. A. Wasiolek

    2003-09-24

    This analysis is one of the nine reports that support the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain Nevada (ERMYN) biosphere model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2003a) describes in detail the conceptual model as well as the mathematical model and its input parameters. This report documents a set of input parameters for the biosphere model, and supports the use of the model to develop biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs). The biosphere model is one of a series of process models supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for a Yucca Mountain repository. This report, ''Inhalation Exposure Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model'', is one of the five reports that develop input parameters for the biosphere model. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling, and the plan for development of the biosphere abstraction products for TSPA, as identified in the ''Technical Work Plan: for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (BSC 2003b). It should be noted that some documents identified in Figure 1-1 may be under development at the time this report is issued and therefore not available at that time. This figure is included to provide an understanding of how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling in support of the license application, and is not intended to imply that access to the listed documents is required to understand the contents of this analysis report. This analysis report defines and justifies values of mass loading, which is the total mass concentration of resuspended particles (e.g., dust, ash) in a volume of air. Measurements of mass loading are used in the air submodel of ERMYN to calculate concentrations of radionuclides in air surrounding crops and concentrations in air inhaled by a receptor. Concentrations in air to which the

  20. Transition effect of air shower particles in plastic scintillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asakimori, K.; Maeda, T.; Kameda, T.; Mizushima, K.; Misaki, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The transition effect of air shower particles in the plastic scintillators near the core was measured by scintillators of various thickness. The air showers selected for the measurement were of 10,000. Results obtained are as follows: (1) the multiplication of shower particles in the scintillators is less than 20% for that of 50 mm thickness; (2) dependence of the transition effect on age parameter is not recognized within the experimental errors.

  1. The I.A.U. meteor shower nomenclature rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenniskens, Peter

    2006-10-01

    The International Astronomical Union at its 2006 General Assembly in Prague has adopted a set of rules for meteor shower nomenclature, a working list with designated names (with IAU numbers and three-letter codes), and established a Task Group for Meteor Shower Nomenclature in Commission 22 (Meteors and Interplanetary Dust) to help define which meteor showers exist from well defined groups of meteoroids from a single parent body.

  2. Implications of a utility model for ultraviolet exposure behavior.

    PubMed

    Feldman, S R; Dempsey, J R; Grummer, S; Chen, J G; Fleischer, A B

    2001-11-01

    Over the past several decades, the incidence of skin cancer has reached epidemic proportions. Despite numerous efforts to increase public awareness of the risks associated with solar radiation, people continue to sunbathe, use indoor tanning facilities, avoid photoprotective clothing, and fail to use sunscreen. We propose using an economic model, the utility model, to better understand how to reduce tanning behaviors. This model has been widely applied in financial decision-making as well as in analysis of risk-taking behaviors such as smoking. The model takes into account both the current perceived benefits of tanning and the future long-term risks. People tend to discount the future; they tend to weigh current benefits more heavily than future risks. As predicted by the model, past prevention efforts that have focused on long-term benefits gained by sun-protective behavior have been largely ineffective. In the current social environment, we cannot expect tanning reduction measures based solely on health education to be very effective. Only by changing public perceptions of a tan will efforts to decrease ultraviolet exposure behavior likely be successful. PMID:11606922

  3. A PROBABILISTIC POPULATION EXPOSURE MODEL FOR PM10 AND PM 2.5

    EPA Science Inventory

    A first generation probabilistic population exposure model for Particulate Matter (PM), specifically for predicting PM10, and PM2.5, exposures of an urban, population has been developed. This model is intended to be used to predict exposure (magnitude, frequency, and duration) ...

  4. Shower disc sampling and the angular resolution of gamma-ray shower detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, A.; Lloyd-Evans, J.

    1985-01-01

    As part of the design study for the new UHE gamma ray detector being constsructed at Haverah Park, a series of experiments using scintillators operated side-by-side in 10 to the 15th power eV air showers are undertaken. Investigation of the rms sampling fluctuations in the shower disc arrival time yields an upper limit to the intrinsic sampling uncertainty, sigma sub rms = (1.1 + or - 0.1)ns, implying an angular resolution capability 1 deg for an inter-detector spacing of approximately 25 m.

  5. Electromagnetic Shower Reconstruction for theSilicon Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, N.

    2005-12-08

    This report presents a two-pass reconstruction algorithm for electromagnetic showers, based on studies with simulated photons in the highly segmented Silicon Tungsten calorimeter of the Silicon Detector concept for the International Linear Collider. It is shown that the initial reconstruction and identification of the dense shower cores allows shower separation down to 3 cm distance between two photons on the calorimeter surface. First results are shown for the subsequent collection of unassociated hits around the shower cores necessary to reconstruct complete energy deposits by individual particles.

  6. The longitudinal thickness of air-shower fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clay, R. W.; Elton, S. D.; Wild, N. R.; Brissenden, R. J. V.

    1985-01-01

    Linsely (1983) has proposed a technique for the detection and analysis of air showers at large distances from the shower axis based on a measurement of the shower front thickness and the assumption that this thickness is closely related to the core distance. Some of the problems involved with realizing such a technique were investigated, and some related observations are reported. The practical problems of how consistent the measurements of the shower front would be, how one would use the measurement, and how the rate of triggered events would depend on the minimum pulse width required are studied.

  7. Design, development, and operation of a zero gravity shower

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, R. L.; Krupnick, A. C.; Reily, J. C.; Schrick, B. J.

    1974-01-01

    The high mission penalty associated with water and electrical power usage constrained the shower configuration concept for the Skylab project to a procedure in which water is sprayed on the body to wet down and soaping is accomplished without water flow. The soap is then finally rinsed off. Initial concept confirmation tests are discussed along with details of the flight shower configuration, the shower water bottle, the shower stall assembly, the liquid-gas separator, the collection box and bag assembly, the hydrophobic filter assembly, and the soap dispenser. Aspects of microbial evaluation of flight qualification hardware are also considered.

  8. ENVIRONMENTAL SOFTWARE AT THE U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S CENTER FOR EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Center for Exposure Assessment Modeling (CEAM) was established to meet the scientific and technical exposure assessment needs of the United States Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Progrsm and Regional Offices and the various state environmental agencies. o support envi...

  9. ASSESSING POPULATION EXPOSURES TO MULTIPLE AIR POLLUTANTS USING A MECHANISTIC SOURCE-TO-DOSE MODELING FRAMEWORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Modeling Environment for Total Risks studies (MENTOR) system, combined with an extension of the SHEDS (Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation) methodology, provide a mechanistically consistent framework for conducting source-to-dose exposure assessments of multiple pol...

  10. MODEL DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION FOR ASSESSING HUMAN EXPOSURE AND DOSE TO TOXIC CHEMICALS AND POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project aims to strengthen the general scientific foundation of EPA's exposure and risk assessment processes by developing state-of-the-art exposure to dose computational models. This research will produce physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) and pharmacodynamic (PD)...

  11. An empirical assessment of exposure measurement error and effect attenuation in bi-pollutant epidemiologic models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Using multipollutant models to understand combined health effects of exposure to multiple pollutants is becoming more common. However, complex relationships between pollutants and differing degrees of exposure error across pollutants can make health effect estimates f...

  12. PRELIMINARY TESTING, EVALUATION, AND SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS FOR THE TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEM EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents an initial testing and sensitivity analysis of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Exposure Assessment Model (TEEAM). TEEAM calculates the exposure concentrations of contaminants in plants and animals in terrestrial ecosystems. he project was performed in two phases. ...

  13. An empirical assessment of exposure measurement errors and effect attenuation in bi-pollutant epidemiologic models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using multipollutant models to understand the combined health effects of exposure to multiple pollutants is becoming more common. However, the complex relationships between pollutants and differing degrees of exposure error across pollutants can make health effect estimates from ...

  14. APPLICATION OF THE EXPOSURE DOSE ESTIMATING MODEL (ERDEM) TO ASSESSMENT OF DERMAL EXPOSURE IN THE RAT TO MALATHION

    EPA Science Inventory

    APPLICATION OF THE EXPOSURE DOSE ESTIMATING MODEL (ERDEM) TO ASSESSMENT OF DERMAL EXPOSURE IN THE RAT TO MALATHION.
    Evans, M.V1., Power, F.W2., Dary, C.C2., Tornero-Velez, R2., and Blancato, J.N2.
    1 NHEERL, US EPA, ORD, ETD, RTP, NC; 2 NERL, US EPA, ORD, EDRB, LV, NV
    Re...

  15. MODELING POPULATION EXPOSURES TO OUTDOOR SOURCES OF HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate assessment of human exposures is an important part of environmental health effects research. However, most air pollution epidemiology studies rely upon imperfect surrogates of personal exposures, such as information based on available central-site outdoor concentration ...

  16. Probing Atmospheric Electric Fields through Radio Emission from Cosmic-Ray-Induced Air Showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholten, Olaf; Trinh, Gia; Buitink, Stijn; Corstanje, Arthur; Ebert, Ute; Enriquez, Emilio; Falcke, Heino; Hoerandel, Joerg; Nelles, Anna; Schellart, Pim; Rachen, Joerg; Rutjes, Casper; ter Veen, Sander; Rossetto, Laura; Thoudam, Satyendra

    2016-04-01

    Energetic cosmic rays impinging on the atmosphere create a particle avalanche called an extensive air shower. In the leading plasma of this shower electric currents are induced that generate coherent radio wave emission that has been detected with LOFAR, a large and dense array of simple radio antennas primarily developed for radio-astronomy observations. Our measurements are performed in the 30-80 MHz frequency band. For fair weather conditions the observations are in excellent agreement with model calculations. However, for air showers measured under thunderstorm conditions we observe large differences in the intensity and polarization patterns from the predictions of fair weather models. We will show that the linear as well as the circular polarization of the radio waves carry clear information on the magnitude and orientation of the electric fields at different heights in the thunderstorm clouds. We will show that from the measured data at LOFAR the thunderstorm electric fields can be reconstructed. We thus have established the measurement of radio emission from extensive air showers induced by cosmic rays as a new tool to probe the atmospheric electric fields present in thunderclouds in a non-intrusive way. In part this presentation is based on the work: P. Schellart et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 165001 (2015).

  17. Stratospheric Sampling and In Situ Atmospheric Chemical Element Analysis During Meteor Showers: A Resource Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.

    2000-01-01

    Resources studies for asteroidal mining evaluation have depended historically on remote sensing analysis for chemical elements. During the November 1998 Leonids meteor shower, a stratospheric balloon and various low-density capture media were used to sample fragments from Comet Tempel-Tuttle debris during a peak Earth crossing. The analysis not only demonstrates how potential sampling strategies may improve the projections for metals or rare elements in astromining, but also benchmarks materials during low temperature (-60 F), high dessication environments as seen during atmospheric exposure. The results indicate high aluminum, magnesium and iron content for various sampled particles recovered, but generalization to the sporadic meteors expected from asteroidal sources will require future improvements in larger sampling volumes before a broad-use strategy for chemical analysis can be described. A repeat of the experimental procedure is planned for the November 1999 Leonids' shower, and various improvements for atmospheric sampling will be discussed.

  18. POPULATION-BASED EXPOSURE AND DOSE MODELING FOR AIR POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This task will address EPA's need to better understand the variability in personal exposure to air pollutants for the purpose of assessing what populations are at risk for adverse health outcomes due to air pollutant exposures. To improve our understanding of exposures to air po...

  19. Modeling the dietary pesticide exposures of young children.

    PubMed

    Pennycook, Frank R; Diamand, Emily M; Watterson, Andrew; Howard, C Vyvyan

    2004-01-01

    A stepped approach was used to assess the exposures of 1 1/2-4 1/2-year-old children in the United Kingdom to residues of pesticides (dithiocarbamates; phosmet; carbendazim) found in apples and pears. The theoretical possibility that the acute reference dose (ARD) was being exceeded for a particular pesticide/fruit was tested by applying a combination of maximal variability and maximum measured residue relative to an average-body-weight consumer. The actual risk was then quantified by stochastically modeling consumption, from dietary survey data, with individual body weights, against published residue results for 2000-2002 and the variability of residue distribution within batches. The results, expressed as numbers of children per day likely to ingest more than the ARD, were in the range of 10-226.6 children per day, depending upon the pesticide and year of sampling. The implications for regulatory action are discussed. PMID:15473085

  20. AMBIENT PARTICULATE MATTER EXPOSURES: A COMPARISON OF SHEDS-PM EXPOSURE MODEL PREDICTIONS AND ESTIMATES DERIVED FROM MEASUREMENTS COLLECTED DURING NERL'S RTP PM PANEL STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) is currently refining and evaluating a population exposure model for particulate matter (PM), called the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation (SHEDS-PM) model. The SHEDS-PM model estimates the population distribu...

  1. Predictive Modeling of Terrestrial Radiation Exposure from Geologic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Malchow, Russell L.; Haber, Daniel University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Burnley, Pamela; Marsac, Kara; Hausrath, Elisabeth; Adcock, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Aerial gamma ray surveys are important for those working in nuclear security and industry for determining locations of both anthropogenic radiological sources and natural occurrences of radionuclides. During an aerial gamma ray survey, a low flying aircraft, such as a helicopter, flies in a linear pattern across the survey area while measuring the gamma emissions with a sodium iodide (NaI) detector. Currently, if a gamma ray survey is being flown in an area, the only way to correct for geologic sources of gamma rays is to have flown the area previously. This is prohibitively expensive and would require complete national coverage. This project’s goal is to model the geologic contribution to radiological backgrounds using published geochemical data, GIS software, remote sensing, calculations, and modeling software. K, U and Th are the three major gamma emitters in geologic material. U and Th are assumed to be in secular equilibrium with their daughter isotopes. If K, U, and Th abundance values are known for a given geologic unit the expected gamma ray exposure rate can be calculated using the Grasty equation or by modeling software. Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport software (MCNP), developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory, is modeling software designed to simulate particles and their interactions with matter. Using this software, models have been created that represent various lithologies. These simulations randomly generate gamma ray photons at energy levels expected from natural radiologic sources. The photons take a random path through the simulated geologic media and deposit their energy at the end of their track. A series of nested spheres have been created and filled with simulated atmosphere to record energy deposition. Energies deposited are binned in the same manner as the NaI detectors used during an aerial survey. These models are used in place of the simplistic Grasty equation as they take into account absorption properties of the lithology which the

  2. 'Stoffenmanager', a web-based control banding tool using an exposure process model.

    PubMed

    Marquart, Hans; Heussen, Henri; Le Feber, Maaike; Noy, Dook; Tielemans, Erik; Schinkel, Jody; West, John; Van Der Schaaf, Doeke

    2008-08-01

    In the scope of a Dutch programme to reinforce the working conditions policy on hazardous substances, an internet-based tool was developed to help small- and medium-sized companies to handle hazardous substances with more care. The heart of this tool, called the Stoffenmanager, is a risk banding scheme. It combines a hazard banding scheme similar to that of COSHH Essentials and an exposure banding scheme based on an exposure model originally presented by Cherrie et al. (1996) and further developed by Cherrie and Schneider (1999). The exposure model has been modified to allow non-expert users to understand and use the model. Exposure scores are calculated based on categorization of determinants of emission, transmission and immission. These exposure scores are assigned to exposure bands. The comparison of exposure bands and hazard bands leads to a risk band or priority band. Following the evaluation of the priority of tasks done with products, generic exposure control measures can be evaluated for their possibility to lower the risks. Relevant control measures can be put into an action plan and into workplace instruction cards. The tool has several other functionalities regarding registration and storage of products. The exposure model in the Stoffenmanager leads to exposure scores. These have been compared with measured exposure levels. The exposure scores correlated well with measured exposure levels. The development of the Stoffenmanager has facilitated a whole range of further developments of useful tools for small- and medium-sized enterprises. PMID:18587140

  3. Validation of Aircraft Noise Models at Lower Levels of Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, Juliet A.; Plotkin, Kenneth J.; Carey, Jeffrey N.; Bradley, Kevin A.

    1996-01-01

    Noise levels around airports and airbases in the United States arc computed via the FAA's Integrated Noise Model (INM) or the Air Force's NOISEMAP (NMAP) program. These models were originally developed for use in the vicinity of airports, at distances which encompass a day night average sound level in decibels (Ldn) of 65 dB or higher. There is increasing interest in aircraft noise at larger distances from the airport. including en-route noise. To evaluate the applicability of INM and NMAP at larger distances, a measurement program was conducted at a major air carrier airport with monitoring sites located in areas exposed to an Ldn of 55 dB and higher. Automated Radar Terminal System (ARTS) radar tracking data were obtained to provide actual flight parameters and positive identification of aircraft. Flight operations were grouped according to aircraft type. stage length, straight versus curved flight tracks, and arrival versus departure. Sound exposure levels (SEL) were computed at monitoring locations, using the INM, and compared with measured values. While individual overflight SEL data was characterized by a high variance, analysis performed on an energy-averaging basis indicates that INM and similar models can be applied to regions exposed to an Ldn of 55 dB with no loss of reliability.

  4. Estimation of exposure to toxic releases using spatial interaction modeling

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The United States Environmental Protection Agency's Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) data are frequently used to estimate a community's exposure to pollution. However, this estimation process often uses underdeveloped geographic theory. Spatial interaction modeling provides a more realistic approach to this estimation process. This paper uses four sets of data: lung cancer age-adjusted mortality rates from the years 1990 through 2006 inclusive from the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database, TRI releases of carcinogens from 1987 to 1996, covariates associated with lung cancer, and the EPA's Risk-Screening Environmental Indicators (RSEI) model. Results The impact of the volume of carcinogenic TRI releases on each county's lung cancer mortality rates was calculated using six spatial interaction functions (containment, buffer, power decay, exponential decay, quadratic decay, and RSEI estimates) and evaluated with four multivariate regression methods (linear, generalized linear, spatial lag, and spatial error). Akaike Information Criterion values and P values of spatial interaction terms were computed. The impacts calculated from the interaction models were also mapped. Buffer and quadratic interaction functions had the lowest AIC values (22298 and 22525 respectively), although the gains from including the spatial interaction terms were diminished with spatial error and spatial lag regression. Conclusions The use of different methods for estimating the spatial risk posed by pollution from TRI sites can give different results about the impact of those sites on health outcomes. The most reliable estimates did not always come from the most complex methods. PMID:21418644

  5. Modelling and simulation of concrete leaching under outdoor exposure conditions.

    PubMed

    Schiopu, Nicoleta; Tiruta-Barna, Ligia; Jayr, Emmanuel; Méhu, Jacques; Moszkowicz, Pierre

    2009-02-15

    Recently, a demand regarding the assessment of release of dangerous substances from construction products was raised by European Commission which has issued the Mandate M/366 addressed to CEN. This action is in relation with the Essential Requirement No. 3 "Hygiene, Health and Environment" of the Construction Products Directive (89/106/EC). The potential hazard for environment and health may arise in different life cycle stages of a construction product. During the service life stage, the release of substances due to contact with the rain water is the main potential hazard source, as a consequence of the leaching phenomenon. The objective of this paper is to present the development of a coupled chemical-transport model for the case of a concrete based construction product, i.e. concrete paving slabs, exposed to rain water under outdoor exposure conditions. The development of the model is based on an iterative process of comparing the experimental results with the simulated results up to an acceptable fit. The experiments were conducted at laboratory scale (equilibrium and dynamic leaching tests) and field scale. The product was exposed for one year in two types of leaching scenarios under outdoor conditions, "runoff" and "stagnation", and the element release was monitored. The model was calibrated using the experimental data obtained at laboratory scale and validated against measured field data, by taking into account the specific rain water balance and the atmospheric CO2 uptake as input parameters. The numerical tool used in order to model and simulate the leaching behaviour was PHREEQC, coupled with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) thermodynamic data base. The simulation results are satisfying and the paper demonstrates the feasibility of the modelling approach for the leaching behaviour assessment of concrete type construction materials. PMID:19118868

  6. Surveys of Microwave Emission from Air Showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuramoto, Kazuyuki; Ogio, Shoichi; Iijima, Takashi; Yamamoto, Tokonatsu

    2011-09-01

    A possibility of detection of microwave molecular bremsstrahlung radiation from Extensive Air Showers was reported by AMBER group [1] [2]. This method has a potential to provide a high duty cycle and a new technique for measuring longitudinal profile of EAS. To survey this microwave emission from EAS, we built prototype detectors using parabolic antenna dishes for broadcasting satellites, and we are operating detectors with a small EAS array at Osaka City Univercity. Here, we report our detector configurations and the current experimental status.

  7. The history of meteors and meteor showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, David W.

    The history of meteors and meteor showers can effectively start with the work of Edmond Halley who overcome the Aristotelean view of meteors as being an upper atmospheric phenomenon and introduced their extraterrestrial nature. Halley also estimated their height and velocity. The observations of the Leonids in 1799, 1833 and 1866 established meteoroids as cometary debris. Two red herrings were caught — fixed radiants and hyperbolic velocities. But the 1890 to 1950 period with two-station meteor photography, meteor spectroscopy and the radar detection of meteors saw the subject well established.

  8. Circular polarization of radio emission from air showers probes atmospheric electric fields in thunderclouds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gia Trinh, Thi Ngoc; Scholten, Olaf; Buitink, Stijn; Corstanje, Arthur; Ebert, Ute; Enriquez, Emilio; Falcke, Heino; Horandel, Jörg R.; Nelles, Anna; Schellart, Pim; Rachen, Jorg; Rossetto, Laura; Rutjes, Casper; ter Veen, Sander; Thoudam, Satyendra

    2016-04-01

    When a high-energy cosmic-ray particle enters the upper layer of the atmosphere, it generates many secondary high-energy particles and forms a cosmic-ray-induced air shower. In the leading plasma of this shower electric currents are induced that emit electromagnetic radiation. These radio waves can be detected with LOw-Frequency ARray (LOFAR) radio telescope. Events have been collected under fair-weather conditions as well as under atmospheric conditions where thunderstorms occur. For the events under the fair weather conditions the emission process is well understood by present models. For the events measured under the thunderstorm conditions, we observe a large fraction of the circular polarization near the core of the shower which is not shown in the events under the fair-weather conditions. This can be explained by the change of direction of the atmospheric electric fields with altitude. Therefore, measuring the circular polarization of radio emission from cosmic ray extensive air showers during the thunderstorm conditions helps to have a better understanding about the structure of atmospheric electric fields in the thunderclouds.

  9. Calibrating the absolute amplitude scale for air showers measured at LOFAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelles, A.; Hörandel, J. R.; Karskens, T.; Krause, M.; Buitink, S.; Corstanje, A.; Enriquez, J. E.; Erdmann, M.; Falcke, H.; Haungs, A.; Hiller, R.; Huege, T.; Krause, R.; Link, K.; Norden, M. J.; Rachen, J. P.; Rossetto, L.; Schellart, P.; Scholten, O.; Schröder, F. G.; ter Veen, S.; Thoudam, S.; Trinh, T. N. G.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Wijnholds, S. J.; Anderson, J.; Bähren, L.; Bell, M. E.; Bentum, M. J.; Best, P.; Bonafede, A.; Bregman, J.; Brouw, W. N.; Brüggen, M.; Butcher, H. R.; Carbone, D.; Ciardi, B.; de Gasperin, F.; Duscha, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Fallows, R. A.; Frieswijk, W.; Garrett, M. A.; van Haarlem, M. P.; Heald, G.; Hoeft, M.; Horneffer, A.; Iacobelli, M.; Juette, E.; Karastergiou, A.; Kohler, J.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Kuper, G.; van Leeuwen, J.; Maat, P.; McFadden, R.; McKay-Bukowski, D.; Orru, E.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pandey, V. N.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A. G.; Reich, W.; Röttgering, H.; Schwarz, D.; Serylak, M.; Sluman, J.; Smirnov, O.; Tasse, C.; Toribio, M. C.; Vermeulen, R.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Wucknitz, O.; Zarka, P.

    2015-11-01

    Air showers induced by cosmic rays create nanosecond pulses detectable at radio frequencies. These pulses have been measured successfully in the past few years at the LOw-Frequency ARray (LOFAR) and are used to study the properties of cosmic rays. For a complete understanding of this phenomenon and the underlying physical processes, an absolute calibration of the detecting antenna system is needed. We present three approaches that were used to check and improve the antenna model of LOFAR and to provide an absolute calibration of the whole system for air shower measurements. Two methods are based on calibrated reference sources and one on a calibration approach using the diffuse radio emission of the Galaxy, optimized for short data-sets. An accuracy of 19% in amplitude is reached. The absolute calibration is also compared to predictions from air shower simulations. These results are used to set an absolute energy scale for air shower measurements and can be used as a basis for an absolute scale for the measurement of astronomical transients with LOFAR.

  10. Meteor shower forecast improvements from a survey of all-sky network observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorhead, Althea V.; Sugar, Glenn; Brown, Peter G.; Cooke, William J.

    2015-11-01

    Meteoroid impacts are capable of damaging spacecraft and potentially ending missions. In order to help spacecraft programs mitigate these risks, NASA’s Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO) monitors and predicts meteoroid activity. Temporal variations in near-Earth space are described by the MEO’s annual meteor shower forecast, which is based on both past shower activity and model predictions.The MEO and the University of Western Ontario operate sister networks of all-sky meteor cameras. These networks have been in operation for more than 7 years and have computed more than 20,000 meteor orbits. Using these data, we conduct a survey of meteor shower activity in the “fireball” size regime using DBSCAN. For each shower detected in our survey, we compute the date of peak activity and characterize the growth and decay of the shower’s activity before and after the peak. These parameters are then incorporated into the annual forecast for an improved treatment of annual activity.

  11. MESSENGER observations of a flux-transfer-event shower at Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavin, James A.; Imber, Suzanne M.; Boardsen, Scott A.; DiBraccio, Gina A.; Sundberg, Torbjorn; Sarantos, Menelaos; Nieves-Chinchilla, Teresa; Szabo, Adam; Anderson, Brian J.; Korth, Haje; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Raines, Jim M.; Johnson, Catherine L.; Winslow, Reka M.; Killen, Rosemary M.; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2012-10-01

    Analysis of MESSENGER magnetic field observations taken in the southern lobe of Mercury's magnetotail and the adjacent magnetosheath on 11 April 2011 indicates that a total of 163 flux transfer events (FTEs) occurred within a 25 min interval. Each FTE had a duration of ˜2-3 s and was separated in time from the next by ˜8-10 s. A range of values have been reported at Earth, with mean values near ˜1-2 min and ˜8 min, respectively. We term these intervals of quasiperiodic flux transfer events “FTE showers.” The northward and sunward orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field during this shower strongly suggests that the FTEs observed during this event formed just tailward of Mercury's southern magnetic cusp. The point of origin for the shower was confirmed with the Cooling model of FTE motion. Modeling of the individual FTE-type flux ropes in the magnetosheath indicates that these flux ropes had elliptical cross sections, a mean semimajor axis of 0.15 RM (where RM is Mercury's radius, or 2440 km), and a mean axial magnetic flux of 1.25 MWb. The lobe magnetic field was relatively constant until the onset of the FTE shower, but thereafter the field magnitude decreased steadily until the spacecraft crossed the magnetopause. This decrease in magnetic field intensity is frequently observed during FTE showers. Such a decrease may be due to the diamagnetism of the new magnetosheath plasma being injected into the tail by the FTEs.

  12. Applicability of western chemical dietary exposure models to the Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shizhen; Price, Oliver; Liu, Zhengtao; Jones, Kevin C; Sweetman, Andrew J

    2015-07-01

    A range of exposure models, which have been developed in Europe and North America, are playing an increasingly important role in priority setting and the risk assessment of chemicals. However, the applicability of these tools, which are based on Western dietary exposure pathways, to estimate chemical exposure to the Chinese population to support the development of a risk-based environment and exposure assessment, is unclear. Three frequently used modelling tools, EUSES, RAIDAR and ACC-HUMANsteady, have been evaluated in terms of human dietary exposure estimation by application to a range of chemicals with different physicochemical properties under both model default and Chinese dietary scenarios. Hence, the modelling approaches were assessed by considering dietary pattern differences only. The predicted dietary exposure pathways were compared under both scenarios using a range of hypothetical and current emerging contaminants. Although the differences across models are greater than those between dietary scenarios, model predictions indicated that dietary preference can have a significant impact on human exposure, with the relatively high consumption of vegetables and cereals resulting in higher exposure via plants-based foodstuffs under Chinese consumption patterns compared to Western diets. The selected models demonstrated a good ability to identify key dietary exposure pathways which can be used for screening purposes and an evaluative risk assessment. However, some model adaptations will be required to cover a number of important Chinese exposure pathways, such as freshwater farmed-fish, grains and pork. PMID:25863589

  13. The structure of the shower disk observed at Mt. Norikura

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohmori, N.; Horiki, T.; Sasaki, H.; Nishioka, A.; Kusumose, M.; Nakatsuka, T.; Hatano, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The structure of the EAS shower disk, the arrival time distribution of charged particles at the core of the small or middle size shower, is measured at Mt. Norikura in Japan. Four fast scintillation counters with an area of 0.25 sq m and a fast trigger system are added to the Mt. Norikura EAS array for the study.

  14. AIR TOXICS EMISSIONS FROM A VINYL SHOWER CURTAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper reports results of both static and dynamic chamber tests conducted to evaluate emission characteristics of air toxics from a vinyl shower Curtain. (NOTE: Due to the relatively low price and ease of installation, vinyl shower curtains have been widely used in bathrooms i...

  15. Romanian Observational Campaign on Summer Meteor Showers in 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berinde, S.; Grigore, V.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we summarize the most important results of a summer observational campaign dedicated to the observation of the entire spectrum of active meteor showers on this period. Our results are enriched by the determination of two possible new radiants in Cygnus, not related to any other known meteor shower.

  16. Meteor Showers of the Earth-crossing Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulat, Babadzhanov; Gulchekhra, Kokhirova

    2015-03-01

    The results of search for meteor showers associated with the asteroids crossing the Earthfs orbit and moving on comet-like orbits are given. It was shown that among 2872 asteroids discovered till 1.01.2005 and belonging to the Apollo and Amor groups, 130 asteroids have associated meteor showers and, therefore, are the extinct cometary nuclei.

  17. Measure Guideline. Water Management at Tub and Shower Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, Bruce

    2011-12-01

    Due to the high concentrations of water and the consequential risk of water damage to the home’s structure a comprehensive water management system is imperative to protect the building assemblies underlying the finish surround of tub and shower areas. This guide shows how to install fundamental waterproofing strategies to prevent water related issues at shower and tub areas.

  18. The development of air shower in the iron absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazama, M.; Dake, S.; Harada, K.; Kawamoto, M.; Sakata, M.; Yamamoto, Y.; Sugihara, T.

    1985-01-01

    The iron open-sandwich experiments to observe one dimensional development of individual air showers were carried out at Akeno Observatory. One dimensional energy flow, incident energy and production height of shower is estimated using the data of size and age obtained from the above experiment and simple calculation.

  19. Modeling marine exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls from sunken ships

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, C.; Larcom, B.; Shelley, M.; Bleckmann, C.

    1995-12-31

    On December 6, 1994, the US Environmental Protection Agency proposed a revision of the PCB ruling under Toxic Substances Control Act which would significantly impact Navy O and M costs and limit options for disposal of ships and submarines. If the proposed rule changes regarding exportation were to be accepted, the Navy would no longer be allowed to sink ships for artificial reefs or use ships for target exercises. PCBs are found in open systems such as heat resistant pint, hull insulation, wool felt ventilation gasket, and electronic cable insulation on ships and submarines. Prior to sinking ships any transformers and bulk material containing PCBs have been removed, however some materials have remained as a potential source for environmental exposure. There is a concern of potential ecological impact due to persistence, bioaccumulation in the food web and biomagnification of PCBs. An ecological risk assessment model was developed for sunken contaminated ships and the impact on marine environment. This fate and transport model was developed to address the impact on shallow water ecosystems. Parameters that were considered included: relevant species, rate of transfer between groups, system boundary, and anaerobic biodegradation. The level of risk is hypothesized to be determined by the remaining PCBs, which are capable of leaching from the felt material. Deep sea sampling is planned to validate the proposal that sinking in waters 6,000 ft. or greater shows little chance of physical or biological transport to surface waters.

  20. ANALYSIS OF HUMAN ACTIVITY DATA FOR USE IN MODELING ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human activity data are a critical part of exposure models being developed by the US EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL). An analysis of human activity data within NERL's Consolidated Human Activity Database (CHAD) was performed in two areas relevant to exposure ...

  1. IN-RESIDENCE, MULTIPLE ROUTE EXPOSURES TO CHLORPYRIFOS AND DIAZINON ESTIMATED BY INDIRECT METHOD MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of the objectives of the National Human Exposure Assessment Survey (NHEXAS) is to estimate exposures to several pollutants in multiple media and determine their distributions for the population of Arizona. This paper presents modeling methods used to estimate exposure dist...

  2. Strategies for Controlling Item Exposure in Computerized Adaptive Testing with the Generalized Partial Credit Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Laurie Laughlin

    2004-01-01

    Choosing a strategy for controlling item exposure has become an integral part of test development for computerized adaptive testing (CAT). This study investigated the performance of six procedures for controlling item exposure in a series of simulated CATs under the generalized partial credit model. In addition to a no-exposure control baseline…

  3. An Empirical Assessment of Exposure Measurement Error and Effect Attenuation in Bipollutant Epidemiologic Models

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Lisa K.; Chang, Howard H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Using multipollutant models to understand combined health effects of exposure to multiple pollutants is becoming more common. However, complex relationships between pollutants and differing degrees of exposure error across pollutants can make health effect estimates from multipollutant models difficult to interpret. Objectives: We aimed to quantify relationships between multiple pollutants and their associated exposure errors across metrics of exposure and to use empirical values to evaluate potential attenuation of coefficients in epidemiologic models. Methods: We used three daily exposure metrics (central-site measurements, air quality model estimates, and population exposure model estimates) for 193 ZIP codes in the Atlanta, Georgia, metropolitan area from 1999 through 2002 for PM2.5 and its components (EC and SO4), as well as O3, CO, and NOx, to construct three types of exposure error: δspatial (comparing air quality model estimates to central-site measurements), δpopulation (comparing population exposure model estimates to air quality model estimates), and δtotal (comparing population exposure model estimates to central-site measurements). We compared exposure metrics and exposure errors within and across pollutants and derived attenuation factors (ratio of observed to true coefficient for pollutant of interest) for single- and bipollutant model coefficients. Results: Pollutant concentrations and their exposure errors were moderately to highly correlated (typically, > 0.5), especially for CO, NOx, and EC (i.e., “local” pollutants); correlations differed across exposure metrics and types of exposure error. Spatial variability was evident, with variance of exposure error for local pollutants ranging from 0.25 to 0.83 for δspatial and δtotal. The attenuation of model coefficients in single- and bipollutant epidemiologic models relative to the true value differed across types of exposure error, pollutants, and space. Conclusions: Under a

  4. Monte Carlo simulations of electron lateral distributions in the core region of 10(13) - 10(16) eV air showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, A. G.

    1985-01-01

    This paper contains details of computer models of shower development which have been used to investigate the experimental data on shower cores observed in the Leeds 35 sq m and Sacramento Peak (New Mexico) 20 sq m arrays of current limited spark (discharge) chambers. The simulations include predictions for primaries ranging from protons to iron nuclei (with heavy nuclei treated using both superposition and fragmentation models).

  5. Feasibility of radar detection of extensive air showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stasielak, J.; Engel, R.; Baur, S.; Neunteufel, P.; Šmída, R.; Werner, F.; Wilczyński, H.

    2016-01-01

    Reflection of radio waves off the short-lived plasma produced by the high-energy shower particles in the air is simulated, considering various radar setups and shower geometries. We show that the plasma produced by air showers has to be treated always as underdense. Therefore, we use the Thomson cross-section for scattering of radio waves corrected for molecular quenching and we sum coherently contributions of the reflected radio wave over the volume of the plasma disk to obtain the time evolution of the signal arriving at the receiver antenna. The received power and the spectral power density of the radar echo are analyzed. Based on the obtained results, we discuss possible modes of radar detection of extensive air showers. We conclude that the scattered signal is too weak for the radar method to provide an efficient and inexpensive method of air shower detection.

  6. Showering cosmogenic muons in a large liquid scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassi, Marco; Evslin, Jarah; Ciuffoli, Emilio; Zhang, Xinmin

    2014-09-01

    We present the results of FLUKA simulations of the propagation of cosmogenic muons in a 20 kton spherical liquid scintillator detector underneath 700 to 900 meters of rock. A showering muon is one which deposits at least 3 GeV in the detector in addition to ionization energy. We find that 20 percent of muons are showering and a further 11 percent of muon events are muon bundles, of which more than one muon enters the detector. In this range the showering and bundle fractions are robust against changes in the depth and topography, thus the total shower and bundle rate for a given experiment can be obtained by combining our results with an estimate for the total muon flux. One consequence is that a straightforward adaptation of the full detector showering muon cuts used by KamLAND to JUNO or RENO 50 would yield a nearly vanishing detector efficiency.

  7. On sampling fractions and electron shower shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Peryshkin, Alexander; Raja, Rajendran; /Fermilab

    2011-12-01

    We study the usage of various definitions of sampling fractions in understanding electron shower shapes in a sampling multilayer electromagnetic calorimeter. We show that the sampling fractions obtained by the conventional definition (I) of (average observed energy in layer)/(average deposited energy in layer) will not give the best energy resolution for the calorimeter. The reason for this is shown to be the presence of layer by layer correlations in an electromagnetic shower. The best resolution is obtained by minimizing the deviation from the total input energy using a least squares algorithm. The 'sampling fractions' obtained by this method (II) are shown to give the best resolution for overall energy. We further show that the method (II) sampling fractions are obtained by summing the columns of a non-local {lambda} tensor that incorporates the correlations. We establish that the sampling fractions (II) cannot be used to predict the layer by layer energies and that one needs to employ the full {lambda} tensor for this purpose. This effect is again a result of the correlations.

  8. SHEDS-PM: A POPULATION EXPOSURE MODEL FOR PREDICTING DISTRIBUTIONS OF PM EXPOSURE AND DOSE FROM BOTH OUTDOOR AND INDOOR SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) has developed a population exposure and dose model for particulate matter (PM), called the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation (SHEDS) model. SHEDS-PM uses a probabilistic approach that incorporates both variabi...

  9. THE CONTRIBUTION OF AMBIENT PM2.5 TO TOTAL PERSONAL EXPOSURES: RESULTS FROM A POPULATION EXPOSURE MODEL FOR PHILADELPHIA, PA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) is currently developing an integrated human exposure source-to-dose modeling system (HES2D). This modeling system will incorporate population exposure modules that use a probabilistic approach to predict population exposu...

  10. MicroExposure Monte Carlo analysis modeling PCB exposures through fish ingestion from the Upper Hudson River

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, E.S.; Price, P.S.; McCrodden, J.L.; Ducey, J.S.; Keenan, R.E.

    1995-12-31

    The risks associated with exposures to mixtures of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from the consumption of fish in the vicinity of Superfund sites traditionally have been evaluated by using simple algebraic equations to calculate the dose received by a highly successful angler. A Lifetime Average Daily Dose (LADD) is estimated using default assumptions concerning the quantity of fish consumed, an angler`s body weight, an angler`s exposure duration, and a static measure of PCB levels in fish. Recent changes in EPA`s policies and guidelines, however, have focused on improving the management of environmental risks by providing decision-makers with a distribution of possible risks rather than a single point estimate. MicroExposure Monte Carlo analysis is a recent development in probabilistic exposure assessment in which a LADD for a given angler is calculated as the sum of many individual doses received over the course of a lifetime from individual exposure events. Data on concentrations of PCBs in individual fish are thereby incorporated into the analysis as are other temporal changes in the various exposure parameters. In this paper, the MicroExposure Monte Carlo model is applied to characterize the distribution of PCB dose rates in a hypothetical population of recreational anglers who might potentially consume fish from the Upper Hudson River in the absence of a fishing ban. The analysis uses probabilistic techniques to account for temporal and age-related changes in exposure parameters and as a means of properly considering meal-to-meal variation in fish concentrations, cooking practices, and fish species.

  11. UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS OF TCE USING THE DOSE EXPOSURE ESTIMATING MODEL (DEEM) IN ACSL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ACSL-based Dose Exposure Estimating Model(DEEM) under development by EPA is used to perform art uncertainty analysis of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PSPK) model of trichloroethylene (TCE). This model involves several circulating metabolites such as trichloroacet...

  12. Overview of EPA CSS Intramural Research on Life Cycle and Human Exposure Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Improved human exposure modeling in life cycle assessmentsModeling and assessment for chemicals/products with less extensive dataMore rapid and higher throughput assessmentsLife Cycle-Human Exposure Modeling (LC-HEM) tool usable by Offices/Regions and by external stakeholders

  13. Enhancing Air Pollution Exposure Assessment in the 21st Century by Measurement and Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure assessments may be conducted using measurement data, modeling results, or through a combination of measurements and models. Models are required to estimate exposure when measurement data is insufficient due to spatial or temporal gaps (e.g., for refined local scale asses...

  14. CAREX Canada: an enhanced model for assessing occupational carcinogen exposure

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Cheryl E; Ge, Calvin B; Hall, Amy L; Davies, Hugh W; Demers, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the numbers of workers exposed to known and suspected occupational carcinogens in Canada, building on the methods of CARcinogen EXposure (CAREX) projects in the European Union (EU). Methods CAREX Canada consists of estimates of the prevalence and level of exposure to occupational carcinogens. CAREX Canada includes occupational agents evaluated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer as known, probable or possible human carcinogens that were present and feasible to assess in Canadian workplaces. A Canadian Workplace Exposure Database was established to identify the potential for exposure in particular industries and occupations, and to create exposure level estimates among priority agents, where possible. CAREX EU data were reviewed for relevance to the Canadian context and the proportion of workers likely to be exposed by industry and occupation in Canada was assigned using expert assessment and agreement by a minimum of two occupational hygienists. These proportions were used to generate prevalence estimates by linkage with the Census of Population for 2006, and these estimates are available by industry, occupation, sex and province. Results CAREX Canada estimated the number of workers exposed to 44 known, probable and suspected carcinogens. Estimates of levels of exposure were further developed for 18 priority agents. Common exposures included night shift work (1.9 million exposed), solar ultraviolet radiation exposure (1.5 million exposed) and diesel engine exhaust (781 000 exposed). Conclusions A substantial proportion of Canadian workers are exposed to known and suspected carcinogens at work. PMID:24969047

  15. Exposure Modeling for Polychlorinated Biphenyls in School Buildings

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is limited research on characterizing exposures from PCB sources for occupants of school buildings. PCB measurement results from six schools were used to estimate potential exposure distributions for four age groups (4-5, 6-10, 11-14, 14-18 year-olds) using the Stochastic...

  16. INTEGRATED HUMAN EXPOSURE SOURCE-TO-DOSE MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The NERL human exposure research program is designed to provide a sound, scientifically-based approach to understanding how people are actually exposed to pollutants and the factors and pathways influencing exposure and dose. This research project serves to integrate and incorpo...

  17. MODELING INHALATION AND MULTIMEDIA MULTIPATHWAY HUMAN EXPOSURES TO ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estimation of exposures of children and adults to air toxics or multimedia pollutants require careful consideration of sources and concentrations of pollutants that may be present in different media, as well as various routes and pathways of exposures associated with age-specif...

  18. MIXED MODELS ANALYSIS OR URBANIZATION LEVEL ON CHLORPYRIFOS EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Human Exposure Assessment Survey (NHEXAS) pilot studies were conducted from 1995 through 1997 to examine human population exposure to a wide range of environmental contaminants. In one of the studies, NHEXAS-Maryland, a longitudinal design was used to repeatedly m...

  19. Evaluating environmental modeling and sampling data with biomarker data to identify sources and routes of exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Hyeong-Moo; McKone, Thomas E.; Bennett, Deborah H.

    2013-04-01

    Exposure to environmental chemicals results from multiple sources, environmental media, and exposure routes. Ideally, modeled exposures should be compared to biomonitoring data. This study compares the magnitude and variation of modeled polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) exposures resulting from emissions to outdoor and indoor air and estimated exposure inferred from biomarker levels. Outdoor emissions result in both inhalation and food-based exposures. We modeled PAH intake doses using U.S. EPA's 2002 National Air Toxics Assessment (NATA) county-level emissions data for outdoor inhalation, the CalTOX model for food ingestion (based on NATA emissions), and indoor air concentrations from field studies for indoor inhalation. We then compared the modeled intake with the measured urine levels of hydroxy-PAH metabolites from the 2001-2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) survey as quantifiable human intake of PAH parent-compounds. Lognormal probability plots of modeled intakes and estimated intakes inferred from biomarkers suggest that a primary route of exposure to naphthalene, fluorene, and phenanthrene for the U.S. population is likely inhalation from indoor sources. For benzo(a)pyrene, the predominant exposure route is likely from food ingestion resulting from multi-pathway transport and bioaccumulation due to outdoor emissions. Multiple routes of exposure are important for pyrene. We also considered the sensitivity of the predicted exposure to the proportion of the total naphthalene production volume emitted to the indoor environment. The comparison of PAH biomarkers with exposure variability estimated from models and sample data for various exposure pathways supports that both indoor and outdoor models are needed to capture the sources and routes of exposure to environmental contaminants.

  20. Uses and limits of empirical data in measuring and modeling human lead exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Mushak, P

    1998-01-01

    This paper examines the uses and limits of empirical data in evaluating measurement and modeling approaches to human lead exposure. Empirical data from experiment or observation or both have been used in studies of lead exposure. For example, experimental studies have elucidated and quantified physiologic or biokinetic parameters of lead exposure under controlled conditions. Observation, i.e., epidemiology, has been widely applied to study population exposures to lead. There is growing interest in the use of lead exposure prediction models and their evaluation before use in risk assessment. Empirical studies of lead exposure must be fully understood, especially their limits, before they are applied as "standards" or reference information for evaluation of exposure models, especially the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's lead biokinetic model that is a focus of this article. Empirical and modeled datasets for lead exposure may not agree due to a) problems with the observational data or b) problems with the model; caution should be exercised before either a model or observational data are rejected. There are at least three sources of discordance in cases where there is lack of agreement: a) empirical data are accurate but the model is flawed; b) the model is valid but reference empirical data are inaccurate; or c) neither empirical data nor model is accurate, and each is inaccurate in different ways. This paper evaluates some of the critical empirical input to biokinetic models, especially lead bioavailability. Images Figure 3 PMID:9860906

  1. A study of spatial resolution in pollution exposure modelling

    PubMed Central

    Stroh, Emilie; Harrie, Lars; Gustafsson, Susanna

    2007-01-01

    Background This study is part of several ongoing projects concerning epidemiological research into the effects on health of exposure to air pollutants in the region of Scania, southern Sweden. The aim is to investigate the optimal spatial resolution, with respect to temporal resolution, for a pollutant database of NOx-values which will be used mainly for epidemiological studies with durations of days, weeks or longer periods. The fact that a pollutant database has a fixed spatial resolution makes the choice critical for the future use of the database. Results The results from the study showed that the accuracy between the modelled concentrations of the reference grid with high spatial resolution (100 m), denoted the fine grid, and the coarser grids (200, 400, 800 and 1600 meters) improved with increasing spatial resolution. When the pollutant values were aggregated in time (from hours to days and weeks) the disagreement between the fine grid and the coarser grids were significantly reduced. The results also illustrate a considerable difference in optimal spatial resolution depending on the characteristic of the study area (rural or urban areas). To estimate the accuracy of the modelled values comparison were made with measured NOx values. The mean difference between the modelled and the measured value were 0.6 μg/m3 and the standard deviation 5.9 μg/m3 for the daily difference. Conclusion The choice of spatial resolution should not considerably deteriorate the accuracy of the modelled NOx values. Considering the comparison between modelled and measured values we estimate that an error due to coarse resolution greater than 1 μg/m3 is inadvisable if a time resolution of one day is used. Based on the study of different spatial resolutions we conclude that for urban areas a spatial resolution of 200–400 m is suitable; and for rural areas the spatial resolution could be coarser (about 1600 m). This implies that we should develop a pollutant database that allows

  2. Comparison of Modeling Approaches to Prioritize Chemicals Based on Estimates of Exposure and Exposure Potential

    EPA Science Inventory

    While only limited data are available to characterize the potential toxicity of over 8 million commercially available chemical substances, there is even less information available on the exposure and use-scenarios that are required to link potential toxicity to human and ecologic...

  3. Arrival directions of large air showers, low-mu showers and old-age low-mu air showers observed at St. Chacaltaya

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagiwara, K.; Yoshii, H.; Martinic, N.; Siles, L.; Miranda, P.; Kakimoto, F.; Obara, T.; Suga, K.; Kaneko, T.; Inoue, N.

    1985-01-01

    Arrival directions of air showers with primary energies in the range 10 to the 16.5 power eV to 10 to the 18th power eV show the first harmonic in right ascension (RA) with amplitude of 2.7 + or - 1.0% and phase of 13-16h. However, the second harmonic in RA slightly seen for showers in the range 10 to the 18th power eV to 10 to the 19th power eV disappeared by accumulation of observed showers. The distribution of arrival directions of low-mu air showers with primary energies around 10 to the 15th power eV observed at Chacaltaya from 1962 to 1967 is referred to, relating to the above-mentioned first harmonic. Also presented in this paper are arrival directions of old-age low-mu air showers observed at Chacaltaya from 1962 to 1967, for recent interest in gamma-ray air showers.

  4. Combining regional- and local-scale air quality models with exposure models for use in environmental health studies.

    PubMed

    Isakov, Vlad; Touma, Jawad S; Burke, Janet; Lobdell, Danelle T; Palma, Ted; Rosenbaum, Arlene; Ozkaynak, Halûk

    2009-04-01

    Population-based human exposure models predict the distribution of personal exposures to pollutants of outdoor origin using a variety of inputs, including air pollution concentrations; human activity patterns, such as the amount of time spent outdoors versus indoors, commuting, walking, and indoors at home; microenvironmental infiltration rates; and pollutant removal rates in indoor environments. Typically, exposure models rely upon ambient air concentration inputs from a sparse network of monitoring stations. Here we present a unique methodology for combining multiple types of air quality models (the Community Multi-Scale Air Quality [CMAQ] chemical transport model added to the AERMOD dispersion model) and linking the resulting hourly concentrations to population exposure models (the Hazardous Air Pollutant Exposure Model [HAPEM] or the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation [SHEDS] model) to enhance estimates of air pollution exposures that vary temporally (annual and seasonal) and spatially (at census-block-group resolution) in an urban area. The results indicate that there is a strong spatial gradient in the predicted mean exposure concentrations near roadways and industrial facilities that can vary by almost a factor of 2 across the urban area studied. At the high end of the exposure distribution (95th percentile), exposures are higher in the central district than in the suburbs. This is mostly due to the importance of personal mobility factors whereby individuals living in the central area often move between microenvironments with high concentrations, as opposed to individuals residing at the outskirts of the city. Also, our results indicate 20-30% differences due to commuting patterns and almost a factor of 2 difference because of near-roadway effects. These differences are smaller for the median exposures, indicating the highly variable nature of the reflected ambient concentrations. In conjunction with local data on emission sources

  5. Evaluating indoor exposure modeling alternatives for LCA: A case study in the vehicle repair industry

    SciTech Connect

    Demou, Evangelia; Hellweg, Stefanie; Wilson, Michael P.; Hammond, S. Katharine; McKone, Thomas E.

    2009-05-01

    We evaluated three exposure models with data obtained from measurements among workers who use"aerosol" solvent products in the vehicle repair industry and with field experiments using these products to simulate the same exposure conditions. The three exposure models were the: 1) homogeneously-mixed-one-box model, 2) multi-zone model, and 3) eddy-diffusion model. Temporally differentiated real-time breathing zone volatile organic compound (VOC) concentration measurements, integrated far-field area samples, and simulated experiments were used in estimating parameters, such as emission rates, diffusivity, and near-field dimensions. We assessed differences in model input requirements and their efficacy for predictive modeling. The One-box model was not able to resemble the temporal profile of exposure concentrations, but it performed well concerning time-weighted exposure over extended time periods. However, this model required an adjustment for spatial concentration gradients. Multi-zone models and diffusion-models may solve this problem. However, we found that the reliable use of both these models requires extensive field data to appropriately define pivotal parameters such as diffusivity or near-field dimensions. We conclude that it is difficult to apply these models for predicting VOC exposures in the workplace. However, for comparative exposure scenarios in life-cycle assessment they may be useful.

  6. Modelling ecological and human exposure to POPs in Venice lagoon - Part II: Quantitative uncertainty and sensitivity analysis in coupled exposure models.

    PubMed

    Radomyski, Artur; Giubilato, Elisa; Ciffroy, Philippe; Critto, Andrea; Brochot, Céline; Marcomini, Antonio

    2016-11-01

    The study is focused on applying uncertainty and sensitivity analysis to support the application and evaluation of large exposure models where a significant number of parameters and complex exposure scenarios might be involved. The recently developed MERLIN-Expo exposure modelling tool was applied to probabilistically assess the ecological and human exposure to PCB 126 and 2,3,7,8-TCDD in the Venice lagoon (Italy). The 'Phytoplankton', 'Aquatic Invertebrate', 'Fish', 'Human intake' and PBPK models available in MERLIN-Expo library were integrated to create a specific food web to dynamically simulate bioaccumulation in various aquatic species and in the human body over individual lifetimes from 1932 until 1998. MERLIN-Expo is a high tier exposure modelling tool allowing propagation of uncertainty on the model predictions through Monte Carlo simulation. Uncertainty in model output can be further apportioned between parameters by applying built-in sensitivity analysis tools. In this study, uncertainty has been extensively addressed in the distribution functions to describe the data input and the effect on model results by applying sensitivity analysis techniques (screening Morris method, regression analysis, and variance-based method EFAST). In the exposure scenario developed for the Lagoon of Venice, the concentrations of 2,3,7,8-TCDD and PCB 126 in human blood turned out to be mainly influenced by a combination of parameters (half-lives of the chemicals, body weight variability, lipid fraction, food assimilation efficiency), physiological processes (uptake/elimination rates), environmental exposure concentrations (sediment, water, food) and eating behaviours (amount of food eaten). In conclusion, this case study demonstrated feasibility of MERLIN-Expo to be successfully employed in integrated, high tier exposure assessment. PMID:27432731

  7. Assessing exposure to allied ground troops in the Vietnam War: a quantitative evaluation of the Stellman Exposure Opportunity Index model.

    PubMed

    Ginevan, Michael E; Watkins, Deborah K; Ross, John H; O'Boyle, Randy A

    2009-06-01

    The Exposure Opportunity Index (EOI) is a proximity-based model developed to estimate relative exposure of ground troops in Vietnam to aerially applied herbicides. We conducted a detailed quantitative evaluation of the EOI model by using actual herbicide spray missions isolated in time and space. EOI scores were calculated for each of 36 hypothetical receptor location points associated with each spray mission for 30 herbicide missions for two time periods - day of herbicide application and day 2-3 post-application. Our analysis found an enormous range of EOI predictions with 500-1000-fold differences across missions directly under the flight path. This quantitative examination of the EOI suggests that extensive testing of the model's code is warranted. Researchers undertaking development of a proximity-based exposure model for epidemiologic studies of either Vietnam veterans or the Vietnamese population should conduct a thorough and realistic analysis of how precise and accurate the model results are likely to be and then assess whether the model results provide a useful basis for their planned epidemiologic studies. PMID:19278712

  8. Measurement of shower electrons and muons using a small air shower array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, S. K.; Ng, L. K.

    1985-01-01

    A small air shower array has been used to measure the size spectrum of air showers at sea level in the size range 6.10 to the 3rd power to 10 to the 6th power. The result fitted with the power law gives an index 2.79 + or - 0.11 for the differential spectrum. Lateral distribution of electrons fitted with the well known NKG function results in an age parameter s = 1.35 for core distances less than 30m and s = 0.8 for longer core distances. Lateral distribution of muons follows the general shape of Greisen's relation but is much higher in intensity. Muon and electron densities at the same observation point are also compared.

  9. INTEGRATED PROBABILISTIC AND DETERMINISTIC MODELING TECHNIQUES IN ESTIMATING EXPOSURE TO WATER-BORNE CONTAMINANTS: PART 1 EXPOSURE MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to contaminants originating in the domestic water supply is influenced by a number of factors, including human activities, water use behavior, and physical and chemical processes. The key role of human activities is very apparent in exposure related to volatile water-...

  10. Polarized radio emission from extensive air showers measured with LOFAR

    SciTech Connect

    Schellart, P.; Buitink, S.; Corstanje, A.; Enriquez, J.E.; Falcke, H.; Hörandel, J.R.; Krause, M.; Nelles, A.; Rachen, J.P.; Veen, S. ter; Thoudam, S.

    2014-10-01

    We present LOFAR measurements of radio emission from extensive air showers. We find that this emission is strongly polarized, with a median degree of polarization of nearly 99%, and that the angle between the polarization direction of the electric field and the Lorentz force acting on the particles, depends on the observer location in the shower plane. This can be understood as a superposition of the radially polarized charge-excess emission mechanism, first proposed by Askaryan and the geomagnetic emission mechanism proposed by Kahn and Lerche. We calculate the relative strengths of both contributions, as quantified by the charge-excess fraction, for 163 individual air showers. We find that the measured charge-excess fraction is higher for air showers arriving from closer to the zenith. Furthermore, the measured charge-excess fraction also increases with increasing observer distance from the air shower symmetry axis. The measured values range from (3.3± 1.0)% for very inclined air showers at 25 m to (20.3± 1.3)% for almost vertical showers at 225 m. Both dependencies are in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions.

  11. Air Pollution Exposure Model for Individuals (EMI) in Health Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    In health studies, traffic-related air pollution is associated with adverse respiratory effects. Due to cost and participant burden of personal measurements, health studies often estimate exposures using local ambient air monitors. Since outdoor levels do not necessarily reflect ...

  12. MODELING OF MACROSCALE AGRICULTURAL ELEMENTS IN PESTICIDE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Yuma County, Arizona, is the site of year around agriculture. To understand the role of agricultural pesticide exposures experienced by children, urinary metabolite concentrations were compared with agricultural use of pesticides. The urinary metabolite and household data wer...

  13. Fast Simulation of Electromagnetic Showers in the ATLAS Calorimeter: Frozen Showers

    SciTech Connect

    Barberio, E.; Boudreau, J.; Butler, B.; Cheung, S.L.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Di Simone, A.; Ehrenfeld, E.; Gallas, M.V.; Glazov, A.; Marshall, Z.; Mueller, J.; Placakyte, R.; Rimoldi, A.; Savard, P.; Tsulaia, V.; Waugh, A.; Young, C.C.; /SLAC

    2011-11-29

    One of the most time consuming process simulating pp interactions in the ATLAS detector at LHC is the simulation of electromagnetic showers in the calorimeter. In order to speed up the event simulation several parametrisation methods are available in ATLAS. In this paper we present a short description of a frozen shower technique, together with some recent benchmarks and comparison with full simulation. An expected high rate of proton-proton collisions in ATLAS detector at LHC requires large samples of simulated events (Monte Carlo) to study various physics processes. A detailed simulation of particle reactions ('full simulation') in the ATLAS detector is based on GEANT4 and is very accurate. However, due to complexity of the detector, high particle multiplicity and GEANT4 itself, the average CPU time spend to simulate typical QCD event in pp collision is 20 or more minutes for modern computers. During detector simulation the largest time is spend in the calorimeters (up to 70%) most of which is required for electromagnetic particles in the electromagnetic (EM) part of the calorimeters. This is the motivation for fast simulation approaches which reduce the simulation time without affecting the accuracy. Several of fast simulation methods available within the ATLAS simulation framework (standard Athena based simulation program) are discussed here with the focus on the novel frozen shower library (FS) technique. The results obtained with FS are presented here as well.

  14. Air Quality Modeling in Support of the Near-Road Exposures and Effects of Urban Air Pollutants Study (NEXUS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A major challenge in traffic-related air pollution exposure studies is the lack of information regarding pollutant exposure characterization. Air quality modeling can provide spatially and temporally varying exposure estimates for examining relationships between traffic-related a...

  15. Silica exposure during construction activities: statistical modeling of task-based measurements from the literature.

    PubMed

    Sauvé, Jean-François; Beaudry, Charles; Bégin, Denis; Dion, Chantal; Gérin, Michel; Lavoué, Jérôme

    2013-05-01

    Many construction activities can put workers at risk of breathing silica containing dusts, and there is an important body of literature documenting exposure levels using a task-based strategy. In this study, statistical modeling was used to analyze a data set containing 1466 task-based, personal respirable crystalline silica (RCS) measurements gathered from 46 sources to estimate exposure levels during construction tasks and the effects of determinants of exposure. Monte-Carlo simulation was used to recreate individual exposures from summary parameters, and the statistical modeling involved multimodel inference with Tobit models containing combinations of the following exposure variables: sampling year, sampling duration, construction sector, project type, workspace, ventilation, and controls. Exposure levels by task were predicted based on the median reported duration by activity, the year 1998, absence of source control methods, and an equal distribution of the other determinants of exposure. The model containing all the variables explained 60% of the variability and was identified as the best approximating model. Of the 27 tasks contained in the data set, abrasive blasting, masonry chipping, scabbling concrete, tuck pointing, and tunnel boring had estimated geometric means above 0.1mg m(-3) based on the exposure scenario developed. Water-fed tools and local exhaust ventilation were associated with a reduction of 71 and 69% in exposure levels compared with no controls, respectively. The predictive model developed can be used to estimate RCS concentrations for many construction activities in a wide range of circumstances. PMID:23223272

  16. pp interactions in extended air showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendi Kohara, A.; Ferreira, Erasmo; Kodama, Takeshi

    2015-08-01

    Applying the recently constructed analytic representation for the pp scattering amplitudes, we present a study of p-air cross sections, with comparison to the data from Extensive Air Shower (EAS) measurements. The amplitudes describe with precision all available accelerator data at ISR, SPS and LHC energies, and its theoretical basis, together with the very smooth energy dependence of parameters controlled by unitarity and dispersion relations, permit reliable extrapolation to higher energies and to asymptotic ranges. The comparison with cosmic ray data is very satisfactory in the whole pp energy interval from 1 to 100 TeV. High energy asymptotic behaviour of cross sections is investigated in view of the geometric scaling property of the amplitudes. The amplitudes predict that the proton does not behave as a black disk even at asymptotically high enegies, and we discuss possible non-trivial consequences of this fact for pA collision cross sections at higher energies.

  17. Small air showers and collider physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capdevielle, J. N.; Gawin, J.; Grochalska, B.

    1985-01-01

    At energies lower than 2.5 X 10 to the 5 GeV (in Lab. system), more accurate information on nucleon-nucleon collision (p-p collider and on primary composition now exist. The behavior of those both basic elements in cosmic ray phenomenology from ISR energy suggests some tendencies for reasonable extrapolation in the next decade 2.0x10 to the 5 to 2.0x10 to the 6 GeV. Small showers in altitude, recorded in the decade 2 X 10 to the 4 to 2 X 10 to the 5 GeV offers a good tool to testify the validity of all the Monte-Carlo simulation analysis and appreciate how nucleon-air collision are different from nucleon-nucleon collisions.

  18. NLO matrix elements and truncated showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höche, Stefan; Krauss, Frank; Schönherr, Marek; Siegert, Frank

    2011-08-01

    In this publication, an algorithm is presented that combines the ME+PS approach to merge sequences of tree-level matrix elements into inclusive event samples [1] with the P owheg method, which combines exact next-to-leading order matrix element results with the parton shower [2, 3]. It was developed in parallel to the ME nloPS technique discussed in [4] and has been implemented in the event generator S herpa [5, 6]. The benefits of this approach are exemplified by some first predictions for a number of processes, namely the production of jets in e + e --annihilation, in deep-inelastic ep scattering, in association with single W, Z or Higgs bosons, and with vector boson pairs at hadron colliders.

  19. A Comparison of Item Exposure Control Procedures with the Generalized Partial Credit Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Edgar Isaac

    2008-01-01

    To enhance test security of high stakes tests, it is vital to understand the way various exposure control strategies function under various IRT models. To that end the present dissertation focused on the performance of several exposure control strategies under the generalized partial credit model with an item pool of 100 and 200 items. These…

  20. 77 FR 15099 - Exposure Modeling Public Meeting; Notice of Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-14

    ... AGENCY Exposure Modeling Public Meeting; Notice of Public Meeting AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: An Exposure Modeling Public Meeting (EMPM) will be held for one day on... prior to the meeting, to give EPA as much time as possible to process your request. ADDRESSES:...

  1. 75 FR 39014 - Exposure Modeling Public Meeting; Notice of Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-07

    ... AGENCY Exposure Modeling Public Meeting; Notice of Public Meeting AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: An Exposure Modeling Public Meeting (EMPM) will be held for 1 day on... at least 10 days prior to the meeting, to give EPA as much time as possible to process your...

  2. 78 FR 13338 - Exposure Modeling Public Meeting; Notice of Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-27

    ... AGENCY Exposure Modeling Public Meeting; Notice of Public Meeting AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: An Exposure Modeling Public Meeting (EMPM) will be held for one day on... days prior to the meeting, to give EPA as much time as possible to process your request. ADDRESSES:...

  3. 77 FR 61604 - Exposure Modeling Public Meeting; Notice of Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-10

    ... AGENCY Exposure Modeling Public Meeting; Notice of Public Meeting AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: An Exposure Modeling Public Meeting (EMPM) will be held for one day on... days prior to the meeting, to give EPA as much time as possible to process your request. ADDRESSES:...

  4. 76 FR 53454 - Exposure Modeling Public Meeting; Notice of Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-26

    ... AGENCY Exposure Modeling Public Meeting; Notice of Public Meeting AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: An Exposure Modeling Public Meeting (EMPM) will be held for one day on... days prior to the meeting, to give EPA as much time as possible to process your request. ADDRESSES:...

  5. Detection of very inclined showers with the Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Nellen, Lukas; /Mexico U., ICN

    2005-07-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory can detect air showers with high efficiency at large zenith angles with both the fluorescence and surface detectors. Since half the available solid angle corresponds to zeniths between 60 and 90 degrees, a large number of inclined events can be expected and are indeed observed. In this paper, we characterize the inclined air showers detected by the Observatory and we present the aperture for inclined showers and an outlook of the results that can be obtained in future studies of the inclined data set.

  6. Angular resolution of air-shower array-telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsley, J.

    1985-01-01

    A fundamental limit on the angular resolution of air shower array-telescopes is set by the finite number of shower particles coupled with the finite thickness of the particle swarm. Consequently the angular resolution which can be achieved in practice depends in a determinant manner on the size and number of detectors in an array-telescope, as well as on the detector separation and the timing resolution. It is also necessary to examine the meaning of particle density in whatever type of detector is used. Results are given which can be used to predict the angular resolution of a given instrument for showers of various sizes, and to compare different instruments.

  7. Correlation of high energy muons with primary composition in extensive air shower

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, C.; Higashi, S.; Hiraoka, N.; Ozaki, S.; Sato, T.; Suwada, T.; Takahasi, T.; Umeda, H.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental investigation of high energy muons above 200 GeV in extensive air showers has been made for studying high energy interaction and primary composition of cosmic rays of energies in the range 10 to the 14th power approx. 10 to the 15th power eV. The muon energies are estimated from the burst sizes initiated by the muons in the rock, which are measured by four layers of proportional counters, each of area 5 x 2.6 sq m, placed at 30 m.w.e. deep, Funasaka tunnel vertically below the air shower array. These results are compared with Monte Carlo simulations based on the scaling model and the fireball model for two primary compositions, all proton and mixed.

  8. Clinical and pathological manifestations of cardiovascular disease in rat models: the influence of acute ozone exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper shows that rat models of cardiovascular diseases have differential degrees of underlying pathologies at a young age. Rodent models of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and metabolic disorders are used for examining susceptibility variations to environmental exposures. How...

  9. ADDRESSING HUMAN EXPOSURES TO AIR POLLUTANTS AROUND BUILDINGS IN URBAN AREAS WITH COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the status and application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models to address challenges for modeling human exposures to air pollutants around urban building microenvironments. There are challenges for more detailed understanding of air pollutant sour...

  10. USE OF PHARMACOKINETIC MODELS TO ASSESS OCCUPATIONAL AND RESIDENTIAL PESTICIDE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Urinary biomarker measurements were analyzed using a dynamic pharmacokinetic model. The dynamic model provided the structure to link spot urine samples with corresponding exposure and absorbed dose. Data from both occupational and residential studies were analyzed. In the Agri...

  11. Cosmogenic Nuclides in Metal and Stone Separates of an Antarctic L5/LL5 Chondrite Shower with a Large Pre-Atmospheric Size: QUE 90201

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welten, K. C.; Nishiizumi, K.; Caffee, M. W.; Masarik, J.; Leya, I.; Wieler, R.

    2002-01-01

    Based on cosmogenic radionuclides in stone and metal fractions, we identified six members of a large Antarctic L5/LL5 chondrite shower. The radionuclides suggest a pre-atmospheric radius of 100-200 cm and a cosmic-ray exposure age of at least 5 Myr. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  12. Initiation-promotion model of tumor prevalence in mice from space radiation exposures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    Exposures in space consist of low-level background components from galactic cosmic rays (GCR), occasional intense-energetic solar-particle events, periodic passes through geomagnetic-trapped radiation, and exposure from possible onboard nuclear-propulsion engines. Risk models for astronaut exposure from such diverse components and modalities must be developed to assure adequate protection in future NASA missions. The low-level background exposures (GCR), including relativistic heavy ions (HZE), will be the ultimate limiting factor for astronaut career exposure. We consider herein a two-mutation, initiation-promotion, radiation-carcinogenesis model in mice in which the initiation stage is represented by a linear kinetics model of cellular repair/misrepair, including the track-structure model for heavy ion action cross-sections. The model is validated by comparison with the harderian gland tumor experiments of Alpen et al. for various ion beams. We apply the initiation-promotion model to exposures from galactic cosmic rays, using models of the cosmic-ray environment and heavy ion transport, and consider the effects of the age of the mice prior to and after the exposure and of the length of time in space on predictions of relative risk. Our results indicate that biophysical models of age-dependent radiation hazard will provide a better understanding of GCR risk than models that rely strictly on estimates of the initial slopes of these radiations.

  13. Initiation-promotion model of tumor prevalence in mice from space radiation exposures.

    PubMed

    Cucinotta, F A; Wilson, J W

    1995-08-01

    Exposures in space consist of low-level background components from galactic cosmic rays (GCR), occasional intense-energetic solar-particle events, periodic passes through geomagnetic-trapped radiation, and exposure from possible onboard nuclear-propulsion engines. Risk models for astronaut exposure from such diverse components and modalities must be developed to assure adequate protection in future NASA missions. The low-level background exposures (GCR), including relativistic heavy ions (HZE), will be the ultimate limiting factor for astronaut career exposure. We consider herein a two-mutation, initiation-promotion, radiation-carcinogenesis model in mice in which the initiation stage is represented by a linear kinetics model of cellular repair/misrepair, including the track-structure model for heavy ion action cross-sections. The model is validated by comparison with the harderian gland tumor experiments of Alpen et al. for various ion beams. We apply the initiation-promotion model to exposures from galactic cosmic rays, using models of the cosmic-ray environment and heavy ion transport, and consider the effects of the age of the mice prior to and after the exposure and of the length of time in space on predictions of relative risk. Our results indicate that biophysical models of age-dependent radiation hazard will provide a better understanding of GCR risk than models that rely strictly on estimates of the initial slopes of these radiations. PMID:7480628

  14. Refinement of a model for evaluating the population exposure in an urban area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, J.; Kousa, A.; Kukkonen, J.; Matilainen, L.; Kangas, L.; Kauhaniemi, M.; Riikonen, K.; Jalkanen, J.-P.; Rasila, T.; Hänninen, O.; Koskentalo, T.; Aarnio, M.; Hendriks, C.; Karppinen, A.

    2014-04-01

    A mathematical model is presented for the determination of human exposure to ambient air pollution in an urban area; the model is a refined version of a previously developed mathematical model EXPAND (EXposure model for Particulate matter And Nitrogen oxiDes). The model combines predicted concentrations, information on people's activities and location of the population to evaluate the spatial and temporal variation of average exposure of the urban population to ambient air pollution in different microenvironments. The revisions of the modelling system containing the EXPAND model include improvements of the associated urban emission and dispersion modelling system, an improved treatment of the time-use of population, and better treatment for the infiltration coefficients from outdoor to indoor air. The revised model version can also be used for evaluating intake fractions for various pollutants, source categories and population subgroups. We present numerical results on annual spatial concentration, time activity and population exposures to PM2.5 in the Helsinki Metropolitan Area and Helsinki for 2008 and 2009, respectively. Approximately 60% of the total exposure occurred at home, 17% at work, 4% in traffic and 19% in other micro-environments. The population exposure originated from the long range transported background concentrations was responsible for a major fraction, 86%, of the total exposure. The largest local contributors were vehicular emissions (12%) and shipping (2%).

  15. Refinement of a model for evaluating the population exposure in an urban area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, J.; Kousa, A.; Kukkonen, J.; Matilainen, L.; Kangas, L.; Kauhaniemi, M.; Riikonen, K.; Jalkanen, J.-P.; Rasila, T.; Hänninen, O.; Koskentalo, T.; Aarnio, M.; Hendriks, C.; Karppinen, A.

    2014-09-01

    A mathematical model is presented for the determination of human exposure to ambient air pollution in an urban area; the model is a refined version of a previously developed mathematical model EXPAND (EXposure model for Particulate matter And Nitrogen oxiDes). The model combines predicted concentrations, information on people's activities and location of the population to evaluate the spatial and temporal variation of average exposure of the urban population to ambient air pollution in different microenvironments. The revisions of the modelling system containing the EXPAND model include improvements of the associated urban emission and dispersion modelling system, an improved treatment of the time use of population, and better treatment for the infiltration coefficients from outdoor to indoor air. The revised model version can also be used for estimating intake fractions for various pollutants, source categories and population subgroups. We present numerical results on annual spatial concentration, time activity and population exposures to PM2.5 in the Helsinki Metropolitan Area and Helsinki for 2008 and 2009, respectively. Approximately 60% of the total exposure occurred at home, 17% at work, 4% in traffic and 19% in other microenvironments in the Helsinki Metropolitan Area. The population exposure originating from the long-range transported background concentrations was responsible for a major fraction, 86%, of the total exposure in Helsinki. The largest local contributors were vehicular emissions (12%) and shipping (2%).

  16. Estimating Margin of Exposure to Thyroid Peroxidase Inhibitors Using High-Throughput in vitro Data, High-Throughput Exposure Modeling, and Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Modeling.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Jeremy A; Tan, Yu-Mei; Gilbert, Mary; Isaacs, Kristin; El-Masri, Hisham

    2016-05-01

    Some pharmaceuticals and environmental chemicals bind the thyroid peroxidase (TPO) enzyme and disrupt thyroid hormone production. The potential for TPO inhibition is a function of both the binding affinity and concentration of the chemical within the thyroid gland. The former can be determined through in vitro assays, and the latter is influenced by pharmacokinetic properties, along with environmental exposure levels. In this study, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was integrated with a pharmacodynamic (PD) model to establish internal doses capable of inhibiting TPO in relation to external exposure levels predicted through exposure modeling. The PBPK/PD model was evaluated using published serum or thyroid gland chemical concentrations or circulating thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) hormone levels measured in rats and humans. After evaluation, the model was used to estimate human equivalent intake doses resulting in reduction of T4 and T3 levels by 10% (ED10) for 6 chemicals of varying TPO-inhibiting potencies. These chemicals were methimazole, 6-propylthiouracil, resorcinol, benzophenone-2, 2-mercaptobenzothiazole, and triclosan. Margin of exposure values were estimated for these chemicals using the ED10 and predicted population exposure levels for females of child-bearing age. The modeling approach presented here revealed that examining hazard or exposure alone when prioritizing chemicals for risk assessment may be insufficient, and that consideration of pharmacokinetic properties is warranted. This approach also provides a mechanism for integrating in vitro data, pharmacokinetic properties, and exposure levels predicted through high-throughput means when interpreting adverse outcome pathways based on biological responses. PMID:26865668

  17. Radio signal correlation at 32 MHz with extensive air showers parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knurenko, Stanislav; Petrov, Igor

    2015-08-01

    The paper presents correlations of radio signals measured at the Yakutsk array with air shower parameters: the shower energy E0 and the depth of maximum Xmax. It is shown that from radio emission measurements of air showers one can obtain individual shower parameters and hence, the mass composition of cosmic rays. In addition, we also derived a generalized formula for calculating the primary energy of the air showers.

  18. Modeling Of In-Vehicle Human Exposure to Ambient Fine Particulate Matter

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaozhen; Frey, H. Christopher

    2012-01-01

    A method for estimating in-vehicle PM2.5 exposure as part of a scenario-based population simulation model is developed and assessed. In existing models, such as the Stochastic Exposure and Dose Simulation model for Particulate Matter (SHEDS-PM), in-vehicle exposure is estimated using linear regression based on area-wide ambient PM2.5 concentration. An alternative modeling approach is explored based on estimation of near-road PM2.5 concentration and an in-vehicle mass balance. Near-road PM2.5 concentration is estimated using a dispersion model and fixed site monitor (FSM) data. In-vehicle concentration is estimated based on air exchange rate and filter efficiency. In-vehicle concentration varies with road type, traffic flow, windspeed, stability class, and ventilation. Average in-vehicle exposure is estimated to contribute 10 to 20 percent of average daily exposure. The contribution of in-vehicle exposure to total daily exposure can be higher for some individuals. Recommendations are made for updating exposure models and implementation of the alternative approach. PMID:23101000

  19. Modeling the Cumulative Effects of Social Exposures on Health: Moving beyond Disease-Specific Models

    PubMed Central

    White, Heather L.; O’Campo, Patricia; Moineddin, Rahim; Matheson, Flora I.

    2013-01-01

    The traditional explanatory models used in epidemiology are “disease specific”, identifying risk factors for specific health conditions. Yet social exposures lead to a generalized, cumulative health impact which may not be specific to one illness. Disease-specific models may therefore misestimate social factors’ effects on health. Using data from the Canadian Community Health Survey and Canada 2001 Census we construct and compare “disease-specific” and “generalized health impact” (GHI) models to gauge the negative health effects of one social exposure: socioeconomic position (SEP). We use logistic and multinomial multilevel modeling with neighbourhood-level material deprivation, individual-level education and household income to compare and contrast the two approaches. In disease-specific models, the social determinants under study were each associated with the health conditions of interest. However, larger effect sizes were apparent when outcomes were modeled as compound health problems (0, 1, 2, or 3+ conditions) using the GHI approach. To more accurately estimate social exposures’ impacts on population health, researchers should consider a GHI framework. PMID:23528813

  20. 16. Oblique, guard quarters; shower stalls at left; view to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Oblique, guard quarters; shower stalls at left; view to south-southwest, 65mm lens with electronic flash illumination. - Tule Lake Project Jail, Post Mile 44.85, State Route 139, Newell, Modoc County, CA

  1. Systematic improvement of parton showers with effective theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgart, Matthew; Marcantonini, Claudio; Stewart, Iain W.

    2011-02-01

    We carry out a systematic classification and computation of next-to-leading order kinematic power corrections to the fully differential cross section in the parton shower. To do this we devise a map between ingredients in a parton shower and operators in a traditional effective field theory framework using a chain of soft-collinear effective theories. Our approach overcomes several difficulties including avoiding double counting and distinguishing approximations that are coordinate choices from true power corrections. Branching corrections can be classified as hard-scattering, that occur near the top of the shower, and jet-structure, that can occur at any point inside it. Hard-scattering corrections include matrix elements with additional hard partons, as well as power suppressed contributions to the branching for the leading jet. Jet-structure corrections require simultaneous consideration of potential 1→2 and 1→3 branchings. The interference structure induced by collinear terms with subleading powers remains localized in the shower.

  2. Interior view of shower room 216 with original marble surround ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of shower room 2-16 with original marble surround and double sash windows, facing east. - Marine Barracks, Panama Canal, Barracks Building, 100' North of Thatcher Highway, Balboa, Former Panama Canal Zone, CZ

  3. Multiple shell shower fronts in EAS with ARGO-YBJ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsella, G.

    2015-08-01

    The ARGO-YBJ experiment is an Extensive Air Shower array that has been operated at the high altitude Yangbajing Cosmic Ray Laboratory (Tibet, P.R. China 4300 m a.s.l.) in its final configuration since December 2007 until February 2013. The detector consists of a dense layer of Resistive Plate Counters (RPCs) covering an area of about 11000 m2. It has been designed to measure the temporal and spatial structure of Extensive Air Showers (EAS) with high space-time resolution. The detector gives a quite highly detailed picture of shower footprints at ground. It is perfectly suitable to understand the EAS morphology. These detector characteristics have been used for seeking particles of large rest mass produced in cosmic rays by measuring the Multiple Shell Shower Fronts relative delays. The technique and preliminary results will be illustrated in the present work.

  4. Test results of a shower water recovery system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verostko, Charles E.; Price, Donald F.; Garcia, Rafael; Pierson, Duane L.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1987-01-01

    A shower test was conducted recently at NASA-JSC in which waste water was reclaimed and reused. Test subjects showered in a prototype whole body shower following a protocol similar to that anticipated for Space Station. The waste water was purified using reverse osmosis followed by filtration through activated carbon and ion exchange resin beds. The reclaimed waste water was maintained free of microorganisms by using both heat and iodine. This paper discusses the test results, including the limited effectiveness of using iodine as a disinfectant and the evaluation of a Space Station candidate soap for showering. In addition, results are presented on chemical and microbial impurity content of water samples obtained from various locations in the water recovery process.

  5. 27. OVERHEAD TOILET, SHOWER, CHANGE ROOM STRUCTURE. VIEW TO NORTHNORTHEAST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. OVERHEAD TOILET, SHOWER, CHANGE ROOM STRUCTURE. VIEW TO NORTH-NORTHEAST. - Ford Motor Company Long Beach Assembly Plant, Assembly Building, 700 Henry Ford Avenue, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  6. FACILITY 846, TOILET AND SHOWER WINGS, QUADRANGLE J, OBLIQUE VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 846, TOILET AND SHOWER WINGS, QUADRANGLE J, OBLIQUE VIEW FACING WEST. - Schofield Barracks Military Reservation, Quadrangles I & J Barracks Type, Between Wright-Smith & Capron Avenues near Williston Avenue, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  7. 10. NEEDLE SHOWER IN COOLING ROOM. Hot Springs National ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. NEEDLE SHOWER IN COOLING ROOM. - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Fordyce Bathhouse: Mechanical & Piping Systems, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  8. 9. NEEDLE SHOWER IN MEN'S PACK ROOM. Hot Springs ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. NEEDLE SHOWER IN MEN'S PACK ROOM. - Hot Springs National Park Bathhouse Row, Maurice Bathhouse: Mechanical & Piping Systems, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  9. "Shower head" water connection for servicing railroad locomotives, perspective view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    "Shower head" water connection for servicing railroad locomotives, perspective view looking NW across ATSF railyard. - Grand Canyon Village Utilities, Grand Canyon National Park, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  10. Simulation of Population-Based Commuter Exposure to NO2 Using Different Air Pollution Models

    PubMed Central

    Ragettli, Martina S.; Tsai, Ming-Yi; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte; de Nazelle, Audrey; Schindler, Christian; Ineichen, Alex; Ducret-Stich, Regina E.; Perez, Laura; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Künzli, Nino; Phuleria, Harish C.

    2014-01-01

    We simulated commuter routes and long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution during commute in a representative population sample in Basel (Switzerland), and evaluated three air pollution models with different spatial resolution for estimating commute exposures to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) as a marker of long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution. Our approach includes spatially and temporally resolved data on actual commuter routes, travel modes and three air pollution models. Annual mean NO2 commuter exposures were similar between models. However, we found more within-city and within-subject variability in annual mean (±SD) NO2 commuter exposure with a high resolution dispersion model (40 ± 7 µg m−3, range: 21–61) than with a dispersion model with a lower resolution (39 ± 5 µg m−3; range: 24–51), and a land use regression model (41 ± 5 µg m−3; range: 24–54). Highest median cumulative exposures were calculated along motorized transport and bicycle routes, and the lowest for walking. For estimating commuter exposure within a city and being interested also in small-scale variability between roads, a model with a high resolution is recommended. For larger scale epidemiological health assessment studies, models with a coarser spatial resolution are likely sufficient, especially when study areas include suburban and rural areas. PMID:24823664

  11. Simulation of population-based commuter exposure to NO₂ using different air pollution models.

    PubMed

    Ragettli, Martina S; Tsai, Ming-Yi; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte; de Nazelle, Audrey; Schindler, Christian; Ineichen, Alex; Ducret-Stich, Regina E; Perez, Laura; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Künzli, Nino; Phuleria, Harish C

    2014-05-01

    We simulated commuter routes and long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution during commute in a representative population sample in Basel (Switzerland), and evaluated three air pollution models with different spatial resolution for estimating commute exposures to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) as a marker of long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution. Our approach includes spatially and temporally resolved data on actual commuter routes, travel modes and three air pollution models. Annual mean NO2 commuter exposures were similar between models. However, we found more within-city and within-subject variability in annual mean (±SD) NO2 commuter exposure with a high resolution dispersion model (40 ± 7 µg m(-3), range: 21-61) than with a dispersion model with a lower resolution (39 ± 5 µg m(-3); range: 24-51), and a land use regression model (41 ± 5 µg m(-3); range: 24-54). Highest median cumulative exposures were calculated along motorized transport and bicycle routes, and the lowest for walking. For estimating commuter exposure within a city and being interested also in small-scale variability between roads, a model with a high resolution is recommended. For larger scale epidemiological health assessment studies, models with a coarser spatial resolution are likely sufficient, especially when study areas include suburban and rural areas. PMID:24823664

  12. A new tool for radiation exposure calculations in aircraft flights during disturbed solar activity periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paschalis, Pavlos; Tezari, Anastasia; Gerontidou, Maria; Mavromichalaki, Helen

    2016-04-01

    Galactic cosmic rays and solar energetic particles can penetrate the Earth's atmosphere and interact with its molecules, which can cause atmospheric showers of secondary particles that are detected by ground based neutron monitor detectors. The cascades are of great importance for the study of the radiation exposure of aircraft crews. A new Geant4 software application is presented based on DYASTIMA (Dynamic Atmospheric Shower Tracking Interactive Model Application), which calculates the effective dose that aviators may receive in different flight scenarios characterized by different altitudes and different flight routes, during quiet and disturbed solar and cosmic ray activity. The concept is based on Monte Carlo simulations by using phantoms for the aircraft and the aviator and experimenting with different shielding materials.

  13. Harmonization of future needs for dermal exposure assessment and modeling: a workshop report.

    PubMed

    Marquart, H; Maidment, S; McClaflin, J L; Fehrenbacher, M C

    2001-02-01

    Dermal exposure assessment and modeling is still in early phases of development. This article presents the results of a workshop organized to harmonize the future needs in this field. Methods for dermal exposure assessment either assess the mass of contaminant that is transferred to the skin, or the transfer of contaminant through the skin. Models for dermal exposure are either knowledge-based or deterministic. Any method or model should be transparent, validated, and open to further development. Some (partly) validated and standardized methods are available for measuring or modeling permeation of the skin or of personal protective equipment (PPE). Further validation and standardization is necessary. More research is needed on permeation of dusts and aerosols and more realistic tests should be developed and used for PPE. Several methods have been developed to measure contamination of surfaces or skin, but they are not validated or standardized. A number of non-validated models exist to assess dermal exposure. A clear need exists for more studies of dermal exposure, regarding measurement methods, models and actual exposure levels. A running four-year European study will greatly expand the knowledge in this field. Simple tools to assess and control the risks of dermal exposure in small and medium sized enterprises are also needed. Increasing the general knowledge of practitioners (e.g., safety professionals, occupational hygienists and physicians) in the field of dermal exposure is a first requirement. Available data, for example, on the permeation of PPE, should be made more readily available, using modern information technology. When information on dermal exposure is gathered and stored, the core information needs are partly the same as those for inhalation exposure. Some elements of process and activity, substance and product or worker, specific for dermal exposure, have been suggested by the workshop. PMID:11217714

  14. Bayesian Hierarchical Modeling of Cardiac Response to Particulate Matter Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies have linked increased levels of particulate air pollution to decreased autonomic control, as measured by heart rate variability (HRV), particularly in populations such as the elderly. In this study, we use data obtained from the 1998 USEPA epidemiology-exposure longitudin...

  15. BAYESIAN HIERARCHICAL MODELING OF PERSONAL EXPOSURE TO PARTICULATE MATTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the US EPA's 1998 Baltimore Epidemiology-Exposure Panel Study, a group of 21 residents of a single building retirement community wore personal monitors recording personal fine particulate air pollution concentrations (PM2.5) for 27 days, while other monitors recorde...

  16. POPULATION EXPOSURE AND DOSE MODELING FOR PM AND ITS COMPONENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    As research toward identifying the specific toxic agents of PM and the mechanisms that lead to health effects proceeds, an understanding of how people are exposed to these compounds and their levels of exposure is needed. The overall objective of this research is to develop, app...

  17. Modeling tribal exposures to methyl mercury from fish consumption

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure assessment and risk management considerations for tribal fish consumption are different than for the general U.S. population because of higher fish intake from subsistence fishing and/or from unique cultural practices. This research summarizes analyses of available data ...

  18. Modeling Tribal Exposures to PCBs from Fish Consumption

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies have shown that U.S. population continues to be exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), despite the ban ~40 years ago. Fish intake is a major pathway, especially, for high fish-consumption groups. Exposure assessment and risk management considerations for tribal fish...

  19. Parameter uncertainty and variability in evaluative fate and exposure models.

    PubMed

    Hertwich, E G; McKone, T E; Pease, W S

    1999-12-01

    The human toxicity potential, a weighting scheme used to evaluate toxic emissions for life cycle assessment and toxics release inventories, is based on potential dose calculations and toxicity factors. This paper evaluates the variance in potential dose calculations that can be attributed to the uncertainty in chemical-specific input parameters as well as the variability in exposure factors and landscape parameters. A knowledge of the uncertainty allows us to assess the robustness of a decision based on the toxicity potential; a knowledge of the sources of uncertainty allows us to focus our resources if we want to reduce the uncertainty. The potential dose of 236 chemicals was assessed. The chemicals were grouped by dominant exposure route, and a Monte Carlo analysis was conducted for one representative chemical in each group. The variance is typically one to two orders of magnitude. For comparison, the point estimates in potential dose for 236 chemicals span ten orders of magnitude. Most of the variance in the potential dose is due to chemical-specific input parameters, especially half-lives, although exposure factors such as fish intake and the source of drinking water can be important for chemicals whose dominant exposure is through indirect routes. Landscape characteristics are generally of minor importance. PMID:10765456

  20. Microwave detection of air showers with the MIDAS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privitera, Paolo; Alekotte, I.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Berlin, A.; Bertou, X.; Bogdan, M.; Boháčová, M.; Bonifazi, C.; Carvalho, W. R.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; Facal San Luis, P.; Genat, J. F.; Hollon, N.; Mills, E.; Monasor, M.; Reyes, L. C.; Rouille d'Orfeuil, B.; Santos, E. M.; Wayne, S.; Williams, C.; Zas, E.

    2011-03-01

    Microwave emission from Extensive Air Showers could provide a novel technique for ultra-high energy cosmic rays detection over large area and with 100% duty cycle. We describe the design, performance and first results of the MIDAS (MIcrowave Detection of Air Showers) detector, a 4.5 m parabolic dish with 53 feeds in its focal plane, currently installed at the University of Chicago.

  1. Monte Carlo simulation of photon-induced air showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ettorre Piazzoli, B.; di Sciascio, G.

    1994-05-01

    The EPAS code (Electron Photon-induced Air Showers) is a three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulation developed to study the properties of extensive air showers (EAS) generated by the interaction of high energy photons (or electrons) in the atmosphere. Results of the present simulation concern the longitudinal, lateral, temporal and angular distributions of electrons in atmospheric cascades initiated by photons of energies up to 10^3 TeV.

  2. Multi-Year CMOR Observations of the Geminid Meteor Shower

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, A. R.; Jones, J.

    2011-01-01

    The three-station Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR) is used here to examine the Geminid meteor shower with respect to variation in the stream properties including the flux and orbital elements over the period of activity in each of the consecutive years 2005 2008 and the variability from year to year. Attention is given to the appropriate choice and use of the D-criterion in the separating the shower meteors from the sporadic background.

  3. CAMS newly detected meteor showers and the sporadic background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenniskens, P.; Nénon, Q.; Gural, P. S.; Albers, J.; Haberman, B.; Johnson, B.; Morales, R.; Grigsby, B. J.; Samuels, D.; Johannink, C.

    2016-03-01

    The Cameras for Allsky Meteor Surveillance (CAMS) video-based meteoroid orbit survey adds 60 newly identified showers to the IAU Working List of Meteor Showers (numbers 427, 445-446, 506-507, and part of 643-750). 28 of these are also detected in the independent SonotaCo survey. In total, 230 meteor showers and shower components are identified in CAMS data, 177 of which are detected in at least two independent surveys. From the power-law size frequency distribution of detected showers, we extrapolate that 36% of all CAMS-observed meteors originated from ∼700 showers above the N = 1 per 110,000 shower limit. 71% of mass falling to Earth from streams arrives on Jupiter-family type orbits. The transient Geminids account for another 15%. All meteoroids not assigned to streams form a sporadic background with highest detected numbers from the apex source, but with 98% of mass falling in from the antihelion source. Even at large ∼7-mm sizes, a Poynting-Robertson drag evolved population is detected, which implies that the Grün et al. collisional lifetimes at these sizes are underestimated by about a factor of 10. While these large grains survive collisions, many fade on a 104-y timescale, possibly because they disintegrate into smaller particles by processes other than collisions, leaving a more resilient population to evolve. The meteors assigned to the various showers are identified in the CAMS Meteoroid Orbit Database 2.0 submitted to the IAU Meteor Data Center, and can be accessed also at

  4. Bisphenol A exposure pathways in early childhood: Reviewing the need for improved risk assessment models.

    PubMed

    Healy, Bridget F; English, Karin R; Jagals, Paul; Sly, Peter D

    2015-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a plasticiser found in a number of household plastics, electronics, and food-packaging materials. Over the past 5 years, several human epidemiological studies have reported a positive association between BPA exposure and adverse health outcomes in children, including obesity, asthma, preterm birth, and neuro-behavioural disturbances. These findings are in conflict with international environmental risk assessment models, which predict daily exposure levels to BPA should not pose a risk to child health. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the evidence for different exposure sources and potential exposure pathways of BPA in early childhood. By collating the findings from experimental models and exposure associations observed in human bio-monitoring studies, we affirm the potential for non-dietary sources to make a substantial contribution to total daily exposure in young children. Infants and toddlers have distinctive exposure sources, physiology, and metabolism of endocrine-disrupting chemicals. We recommend risk-assessment models implement new frameworks, which specifically address exposure and hazard in early childhood. This is particularly important for BPA, which is present in numerous products in the home and day-care environments, and for which animal studies report contradictory findings on its safety at environmentally relevant levels of exposure. PMID:26350983

  5. Use of biocidal products (insect sprays and electro-vaporizer) in indoor areas--exposure scenarios and exposure modeling.

    PubMed

    Berger-Preiss, Edith; Koch, Wolfgang; Gerling, Susanne; Kock, Heiko; Appel, Klaus E

    2009-09-01

    Five commercially available insect sprays were applied in a model room. Spraying was performed in accordance with the manufacturers' instructions and in an overdosed manner in order to simulate worst-case conditions or an unforeseeable misuse. In addition, we examined electro-vaporizers. The Respicon aerosol monitoring system was applied to determine inhalation exposure. During normal spraying (10 seconds) and during the following 2-3 minutes, exposure concentrations ranged from 70 to 590 microg/m3 for the pyrethroids tetramethrin, d-phenothrin, cyfluthrin, bioallethrin, and the pyrethrins. Calculated inhalable doses were 2-16 microg. A concentration of approximately 850 microg chlorpyrifos/m(3) (inhalable dose: approximately 20 microg) was determined when the "Contra insect fly spray" was applied. Highest exposure concentrations (1100-2100 microg/m3) were measured for piperonyl butoxide (PBO), corresponding to an inhalation intake of 30-60microg. When simulating worst-case conditions, exposure concentrations of 200-3400microg/m3 and inhalable doses of 10-210microg were determined for the various active substances. Highest concentrations (4800-8000 microg/m3) were measured for PBO (inhalable: 290-480 microg). By applying the electro-vaporizer "Nexa Lotte" plug-in mosquito killer concentrations for d-allethrin were in the range of 5-12microg/m3 and 0.5-2 microg/m3 for PBO while with the "Paral" plug-in mosquito killer concentrations of 0.4-5microg/m3 for pyrethrins and 1-7 microg/m3 for PBO were measured. Potential dermal exposures were determined using exposure pads. Between 80 and 1000microg active substance (tetramethrin, phenothrin, cyfluthrin, bioallethrin, pyrethrins, chlorpyrifos) were deposited on the clothing of the total body surface area of the spray user. Highest levels (up to 3000 microg) were determined for PBO. Worst-case uses of the sprays led to 5-9 times higher concentrations. Also a 2-hour stay nearby an operating electro-vaporizer led to a

  6. Investigation of meteor shower parent bodies using various metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitru, B. A.; Birlan, M.; Nedelcu, A.; Popescu, M.

    2016-01-01

    The present knowledge of meteor showers identifies the small bodies of our Solar System as supply sources for meteor streams. Both comets and asteroids are considered as the origin of meteor showers. The new paradigm of "active asteroids" opens up a large field of investigation regarding the relationships between asteroids and meteors. Processes like ejection and disaggregation at impacts, rotational instabilities, electrostatic repulsion, radiation pressure, dehydration stress followed by thermal fractures, sublimation of ices are sources of matter loss from asteroids. Our objective is to find genetic relationships between asteroids and meteor showers using metrics based on orbital elements. For this objective we selected three metrics (Southworth and Hawkins, 1963; Asher et al. 1993, and Jopek, 1993, respectively), the recent MPC database and the more recent IAU meteor shower database. From our analysis, 41 of the meteor showers have probabilities of being produced (or to be fueled) by asteroids. Our sample of asteroids contains more than 1000 objects, all of them belonging to the Near-Earth Asteroid population. The systematic approach performed, based on the physical properties of our sample, reinforced the link between asteroids and their associated meteor shower.

  7. Simulation of anomalous extensive air showers initiated by strong neutrino-quark interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Mrenna, S. )

    1992-04-01

    The observation of extensive air showers (EAS) in the atmosphere initiated by ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays offers a test of new physics. In particular, some showers, initiated by neutral particles from point sources, contain a larger number of muons than can be explained by the standard model. A strong interaction between quarks and neutrinos, induced by some new physics, is presented as an explanation. For definiteness, the new physics is assumed to be the manifestation of a composite structure of quarks and leptons, though the general features of the interaction are common to many new physics scenarios. The consequences of such an interaction on the generation and development of EAS are studied with a phenomenological model incorporated into the Monte Carlo program SHOWERSIM. Properties of the electromagnetic, muonic, and hadronic components of simulated EAS for neutrino-induced and ordinary proton-induced showers are presented for the observation level of the CYGNUS experiment at Los Alamos. Some features of these components display distinctive signals of new physics.

  8. Measurements of the muon content of air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valiño, I.; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory offers a unique window to study cosmic rays and particle physics at energies above 3 EeV (corresponding to a centre-of-mass energy of 75 TeV in proton-proton collisions) inaccessible to accelerator experiments. We discuss the different methods of estimating the number of muons in showers recorded at the Pierre Auger Observatory, which is an observable sensitive to primary mass composition and to properties of the hadronic interactions in the shower. The muon content, derived from data with these methods, is presented and compared to predictions from the post-LHC hadronic interaction models for different primary composition. We find that models do not reproduce well the Auger observations, displaying a deficit of muons at the ground. In the light of these results, a better understanding of ultra-high energy extensive air showers and hadronic interactions is crucial to determine the composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. We report on the upgrade plans of the Pierre Auger Observatory to achieve this science goal.

  9. Toxicity models of pulsed copper exposure to Pimephales promelas and Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Jonathan; Diamond, Jerry; Bearr, Jonathan; Latimer, Henry; Klaine, T Stephen J; Hoang, Tham; Bowersox, Marcus

    2006-09-01

    Semiempirical models are useful for interpreting the response of aquatic organisms to toxicants as a function of exposure concentration and duration. Most applications predict cumulative mortality at the end of the test for constant exposure concentrations. Summary measures, such as the median lethal concentration, are then estimated as a function of concentration. Real-world exposures are not constant. Effects may depend on pulse timing, and cumulative analysis based only on integrated exposure concentration is not sufficient to interpret results. We undertook a series of pulsed-exposure experiments using standard toxicological protocols and interpreted the results (mortality, biomass, and reproduction) using a dynamic generalization of a Mancini/Breck--type model that includes two compartments, one for internal concentration as a function of exposure and one for site-of-action concentration or accumulated damage as a function of the internal dose. At exposure concentrations near the effects level, the model explained approximately 50% of the variability in the observed time history of survival, 43% of the change in biomass, and 83% of the variability in net reproduction. Unexplained variability may result from differences in organism susceptibility, amplified by the effects of small sample sizes in standard tests. The results suggest that response is sensitive to prior conditions and that constant-exposure experiments can underestimate the risk from intermittent exposures to the same concentration. For pulsed exposures, neither the average nor the maximum concentration alone is an adequate index of risk, which depends on both the magnitude, duration, and timing of exposure pulses. Better understanding about the impacts of pulsed exposures will require use of experimental protocols with significantly greater numbers of replicates. PMID:16986811

  10. Comparing population recovery after insecticide exposure for four aquatic invertebrate species using models of different complexity.

    PubMed

    Baveco, J M Hans; Norman, Steve; Roessink, Ivo; Galic, Nika; Van den Brink, Paul J

    2014-07-01

    Population models, in particular individual-based models (IBMs), are becoming increasingly important in chemical risk assessment. They can be used to assess recovery of spatially structured populations after chemical exposure that varies in time and space. The authors used an IBM coupled to a toxicokinetic-toxicodynamic model, the threshold damage model (TDM), to assess recovery times for 4 aquatic organisms, after insecticide application, in a nonseasonal environment and in 3 spatial settings (pond, stream, and ditch). The species had different life histories (e.g., voltinism, reproductive capacity, mobility). Exposure was derived from a pesticide fate model, following standard European Union scenarios. The results of the IBM-TDM were compared with results from simpler models: one in which exposure was linked to effects by means of concentration-effect relationships (IBM-CE) and one in which the IBM was replaced by a nonspatial, logistic growth model (logistic). For the first, exposure was based on peak concentrations only; for the second, exposure was spatially averaged as well. By using comparisons between models of different complexity and species with different life histories, the authors obtained an understanding of the role spatial processes play in recovery and the conditions under which the full time-varying exposure needs to be considered. The logistic model, which is amenable to an analytic approach, provided additional insights into the sensitivity of recovery times to density dependence and spatial dimensions. PMID:24733666

  11. EPA's SHEDS-multimedia model: children's cumulative pyrethroid exposure estimates and evaluation against NHANES biomarker data

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA's SHEDS-Multimedia model was applied to enhance the understanding of children's exposures and doses to multiple pyrethroid pesticides, including major contributing chemicals and pathways. This paper presents combined dietary and residential exposure estimates and cum...

  12. DEVELOMENT AND EVALUATION OF A MODEL FOR ESTIMATING LONG-TERM AVERAGE OZONE EXPOSURES TO CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Long-term average exposures of school-age children can be modelled using longitudinal measurements collected during the Harvard Southern California Chronic Ozone Exposure Study over a 12-month period: June, 1995-May, 1996. The data base contains over 200 young children with perso...

  13. OVERVIEW OF EPA'S HUMAN EXPOSURE AND SOURCE-TO-DOSE MODELING PROGRAM: HEADSUP

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's human exposure and source-to-dose modeling program is designed to provide a scientifically sound approach to understanding how people are actually exposed to pollutants and the magnitude of predicted exposures and dose. The objective of this research project is to develo...

  14. A Comparison of Exposure Control Procedures in CATs Using the 3PL Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leroux, Audrey J.; Lopez, Myriam; Hembry, Ian; Dodd, Barbara G.

    2013-01-01

    This study compares the progressive-restricted standard error (PR-SE) exposure control procedure to three commonly used procedures in computerized adaptive testing, the randomesque, Sympson-Hetter (SH), and no exposure control methods. The performance of these four procedures is evaluated using the three-parameter logistic model under the…

  15. OZONE-INDUCED RESPIRATORY SYMPTOMS: EXPOSURE-RESPONSE MODELS AND ASSOCIATION WITH LUNG FUNCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone-induced respiratory symptoms are known to be functions of concentration, minute ventilation, and duration of exposure. The purposes of this study were to identify an exposure-response model for symptoms, to determine whether response was related to age, and to assess the re...

  16. A NEW METHOD OF LONGITUDINAL DIARY ASSEMBLY FOR HUMAN EXPOSURE MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposure time-series modeling requires longitudinal time-activity diaries to evaluate the sequence of concentrations encountered, and hence, pollutant exposure for the simulated individuals. However, most of the available data on human activities are from cross-sectional su...

  17. A Comparison of Exposure Control Procedures in CATS Using the GPC Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leroux, Audrey J.; Dodd, Barbara G.

    2016-01-01

    The current study compares the progressive-restricted standard error (PR-SE) exposure control method with the Sympson-Hetter, randomesque, and no exposure control (maximum information) procedures using the generalized partial credit model with fixed- and variable-length CATs and two item pools. The PR-SE method administered the entire item pool…

  18. USE OF PBPK MODELING TO ASSESS CYPERMETHRIN EXPOSURE IN YOUNG AFTER A RESIDENTIAL APPLICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    PBPK modeling was used to interpret exposure to cypermethrin among children in a small community of Jacksonville,FL. Sock loadings of cypermethin were used as a measure of exposure to cypermethrin. Urinary markers served as a measure of absorbed dose. In a comparison of presum...

  19. A DYNAMIC NONLINEAR MODEL OF OZONE-INDUCED FEV1 RESPONSE UNDER CHANGING EXPOSURE CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Dynamic Nonlinear Model of Ozone-induced FEV1 Response under Changing Exposure Conditions. 1WF McDonnell, 2PW Stewart, 3MV Smith. 1Human Studies Division, NHEERL, U.S. EPA, RTP, NC. 2University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC. 3ASI, Durham, NC.

    Ozone exposure result...

  20. A study to improve the past orbit of comet C/1917 F1 (Mellish) on the basis of its observed meteor showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neslušan, L.; Vaubaillon, J.; Hajduková, M.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Periodic comets are known to be the parent bodies of meteoroid streams. The stream of a given comet can split into several filaments. These can be observed in the Earth's atmosphere as more than just a single meteor shower. One such comet is C/1917 F1 (Mellish), which associates at least two, possibly four, meteor showers that have been recorded in the meteor databases. In a recent study, the dynamical evolution of the C/1917 F1's theoretical stream was followed by only considering the gravitational perturbations. The properties of individual filaments of this stream, corresponding to the appropriate meteor showers, were not predicted perfectly. Aims: To reach better agreement between theory and observation, we repeatedly model the theoretical stream of C/1917 F1. In the modeling, we also include the Poynting-Robertson drag acting on meteoroids and assume an action of the non-gravitational effects on the parent comet dynamics. If success was achieved, the modeling could become a tool that would enable us to recover the past orbital history of the parent comet. Methods: Considering the nominal orbit, as well as several cloned orbits, of the comet C/1917 F1, we modeled its theoretical streams. The modeling was performed for several past perihelion passages. Each modeled stream consists of 10 000 test particles that are influenced by the Poynting-Robertson drag of various strengths. Results: We achieve a partial improvement in the prediction of the properties of all four meteor showers. The Poynting-Robertson drag helps to improve the match between the theory and observation of three of the four showers. However, when considering the nominal orbit of the parent comet, a perfect match seems to be impossible. A close match in the case of the most problematic shower is achieved using a cloned orbit, but this is not applicable to reality because the simultaneous predictions of the properties of the other three showers fail.