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Sample records for showing upper arm

  1. 22. View showing main anchor arm, as viewed from main ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. View showing main anchor arm, as viewed from main cantilever arm looking south. Note upper chord eyebar arrangement. - Williamstown-Marietta Bridge, Spanning Ohio River between Williamstown & Marietta, Williamstown, Wood County, WV

  2. 21. DETAIL VIEW OF SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATE ARM, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. DETAIL VIEW OF SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATE ARM, GATE PIER, TRUNNION PIN AND GATE GAUGE, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 9, Lynxville, Crawford County, WI

  3. 20. DETAIL VIEW OF SUBMERSIBLE GATE, SHOWING GATE ARMS, GATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. DETAIL VIEW OF SUBMERSIBLE GATE, SHOWING GATE ARMS, GATE PIERS, TRUNNION PIN AND GATE GAUGE, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 8, On Mississippi River near Houston County, MN, Genoa, Vernon County, WI

  4. 19. DETAIL VIEW OF SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATE ARM, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. DETAIL VIEW OF SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATE ARM, PIER, TRUNNION PIN AND GATE GAUGE, LOOKING NORTH - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 8, On Mississippi River near Houston County, MN, Genoa, Vernon County, WI

  5. 4. SHOWING BRIDGE AT UPPER LEFT, UPPER FALLS AND TOP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. SHOWING BRIDGE AT UPPER LEFT, UPPER FALLS AND TOP OF MAIN WATERFALL, FACING NORTHEAST - Paradise River First Crossing Bridge, Spanning Paradise River at Narada Falls on Service Road, Longmire, Pierce County, WA

  6. 34. View of pier 3, showing supporting main anchor arm ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. View of pier 3, showing supporting main anchor arm and cantilever arm spans, as seen from shore near pier 4, looking north - Williamstown-Marietta Bridge, Spanning Ohio River between Williamstown & Marietta, Williamstown, Wood County, WV

  7. Forearm and upper-arm oscillometric blood pressure comparison in acutely ill adults.

    PubMed

    Schell, Kathleen; Morse, Kate; Waterhouse, Julie K

    2010-04-01

    When patients' upper arms are not accessible and/or when cuffs do not fit large upper arms, the forearm site is often used for blood pressure (BP) measurement. The purpose of this study is to compare forearm and upper-arm BPs in 70 acutely ill adults, admitted to a community hospital's 14-bed ICU. Using Philips oscillometric monitors, three repeated measures of forearm and upper-arm BPs are obtained with head of bed flat and with head of bed elevated at 30 degrees. Arms are resting on the bed. Paired t tests show statistically significant differences in systolic BPs, diastolic BPs, and mean arterial pressures in the supine and head-elevated positions. Bland-Altman analyses indicate that forearm and upper-arm oscillometric BPs are not interchangeable in acutely ill adults. PMID:20581399

  8. 43. DETAIL OF PINNED UPPER CHORD CONNECTION BETWEEN ANCHOR ARM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. DETAIL OF PINNED UPPER CHORD CONNECTION BETWEEN ANCHOR ARM AND SUSPENDED (PANEL 67). VIEW TO NORTH. - Blue Water Bridge, Spanning St. Clair River at I-69, I-94, & Canadian Route 402, Port Huron, St. Clair County, MI

  9. 7. DETAIL VIEW OF ROCKER ARM, SHOWING POCKETS, LUGS, INCLINED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL VIEW OF ROCKER ARM, SHOWING POCKETS, LUGS, INCLINED STOPPING BLOCK AT SHOREWARD END OF TRACK GIRDER - Seddon Island Scherzer Rolling Lift Bridge, Spanning Garrison Channel from Tampa to Seddon Island, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

  10. 8. 320 FOOT LEVEL, SWING ARM NINE SHOWING BACK SIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. 320 FOOT LEVEL, SWING ARM NINE SHOWING BACK SIDE OF ENVIRONMENTAL CHAMBER (WHITE ROOM). WHITE ROOM MADE CONNECTION WITH CAPSULE ON LAUNCH VEHICLE. - Mobile Launcher One, Kennedy Space Center, Titusville, Brevard County, FL

  11. Kinematic strategies for upper arm-forearm coordination in three dimensions.

    PubMed

    Medendorp, W P; Crawford, J D; Henriques, D Y; Van Gisbergen, J A; Gielen, C C

    2000-11-01

    This study addressed the question of how the three-dimensional (3-D) control strategy for the upper arm depends on what the forearm is doing. Subjects were instructed to point a laser-attached in line with the upper arm-toward various visual targets, such that two-dimensional (2-D) pointing directions of the upper arm were held constant across different tasks. For each such task, subjects maintained one of several static upper arm-forearm configurations, i. e., each with a set elbow angle and forearm orientation. Upper arm, forearm, and eye orientations were measured with the use of 3-D search coils. The results confirmed that Donders' law (a behavioral restriction of 3-D orientation vectors to a 2-D "surface") does not hold across all pointing tasks, i.e., for a given pointing target, upper arm torsion varied widely. However, for any one static elbow configuration, torsional variance was considerably reduced and was independent of previous arm position, resulting in a thin, Donders-like surface of orientation vectors. More importantly, the shape of this surface (which describes upper arm torsion as a function of its 2-D pointing direction) depended on both elbow angle and forearm orientation. For pointing with the arm fully extended or with the elbow flexed in the horizontal plane, a Listing's-law-like strategy was observed, minimizing shoulder rotations to and from center at the cost of position-dependent tilts in the forearm. In contrast, when the arm was bent in the vertical plane, the surface of best fit showed a Fick-like twist that increased continuously as a function of static elbow flexion, thereby reducing position-dependent tilts of the forearm with respect to gravity. In each case, the torsional variance from these surfaces remained constant, suggesting that Donders' law was obeyed equally well for each task condition. Further experiments established that these kinematic rules were independent of gaze direction and eye orientation, suggesting that

  12. 10. UPSTREAM SIDE OF UPPER MITER GATES SHOWING STOWED LEFT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. UPSTREAM SIDE OF UPPER MITER GATES SHOWING STOWED LEFT WING OF UPPER GUARD GATE (FAR LEFT). VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Starved Rock Locks & Dam, Illinois Waterway River mile 231, Peru, La Salle County, IL

  13. 19. DETAIL VIEW OF UPPER EAST WALL CONTROL STATION, SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. DETAIL VIEW OF UPPER EAST WALL CONTROL STATION, SHOWING EMERGENCY BULKHEAD STIFFLEG DERRICK TO RIGHT, LOOKING WEST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam 27, Granite City, Madison County, IL

  14. Comparison of upper arm and forearm blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Domiano, Kathy L; Hinck, Susan M; Savinske, Debra L; Hope, Kathryn L

    2008-11-01

    The upper arm is the primary site used to obtain a blood pressure measurement (BPM); however, when it is not possible to use the upper arm, the forearm is a commonly used alternate site. This study determines if there is a significant difference between upper arm and forearm BPMs among adults and examines the relationship of participant characteristics to the BPM difference. A convenience sample was recruited from a low-income, independent-living, 104-apartment complex in the Midwest. Of the 106 participants, 64% were female and 89% were White. Ages ranged from 20 to 85 years (M = 50.7). The investigators calculated the BMIs (range = 18 to 42, M = 29.3, SD = 5.4) for the 89% (n = 94) of participants who reported their weight. The forearm tended to have higher BPMs than the upper arm (M difference = 4.0 mm Hg systolic, 2.3 mm Hg diastolic). However, site differences were greatest for men, obese adults, and middle aged (36 to 65) adults. PMID:18927258

  15. The effect of arm weight support on upper limb muscle synergies during reaching movements

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Compensating for the effect of gravity by providing arm-weight support (WS) is a technique often utilized in the rehabilitation of patients with neurological conditions such as stroke to facilitate the performance of arm movements during therapy. Although it has been shown that, in healthy subjects as well as in stroke survivors, the use of arm WS during the performance of reaching movements leads to a general reduction, as expected, in the level of activation of upper limb muscles, the effects of different levels of WS on the characteristics of the kinematics of motion and of the activity of upper limb muscles have not been thoroughly investigated before. Methods In this study, we systematically assessed the characteristics of the kinematics of motion and of the activity of 14 upper limb muscles in a group of 9 healthy subjects who performed 3-D arm reaching movements while provided with different levels of arm WS. We studied the hand trajectory and the trunk, shoulder, and elbow joint angular displacement trajectories for different levels of arm WS. Besides, we analyzed the amplitude of the surface electromyographic (EMG) data collected from upper limb muscles and investigated patterns of coordination via the analysis of muscle synergies. Results The characteristics of the kinematics of motion varied across WS conditions but did not show distinct trends with the level of arm WS. The level of activation of upper limb muscles generally decreased, as expected, with the increase in arm WS. The same eight muscle synergies were identified in all WS conditions. Their level of activation depended on the provided level of arm WS. Conclusions The analysis of muscle synergies allowed us to identify a modular organization underlying the generation of arm reaching movements that appears to be invariant to the level of arm WS. The results of this study provide a normative dataset for the assessment of the effects of the level of arm WS on muscle synergies in stroke

  16. Amputation for tumor of the upper arm.

    PubMed

    Blåder, S; Gunterberg, B; Markhede, G

    1983-04-01

    In a 10-year period 35 patients underwent a proximal amputation of the upper limb because of a malignant tumor. In 27 patients a forequarter amputation was made, in one a humeroscapular disarticulation and in seven an amputation through the humerus. The observed 5-year survival was 23 per cent. Twelve out of 23 patients followed for at least 3 years also survived 3 years. Fifteen living patients were questioned concerning prosthetic use and social and psychologic factors. Only three patients used a functional (mechanical) prosthesis and only five used a cosmetic prosthesis. The other seven patients rejected the use of a prosthesis. Half of the patients had the same occupation postoperatively as preoperatively. Activities of daily living did not constitute any major problem. One of three housekeepers needed daily help. One patient seemed to have suffered obvious psychologic damage. PMID:6845999

  17. 15. DETAIL VIEW OF UPPER CHORD ON 1886 TRUSS, SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. DETAIL VIEW OF UPPER CHORD ON 1886 TRUSS, SHOWING ENDPOST, PORTAL STRUT, LATERAL BRACING, HIP VERTICAL AND DIAGONAL, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Sixth Street Viaduct, Spanning Burlington Northern Railroad & Valley Street, Burlington, Des Moines County, IA

  18. 16. DETAIL VIEW OF UPPER CHORD ON 1886 TRUSS, SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. DETAIL VIEW OF UPPER CHORD ON 1886 TRUSS, SHOWING TYPICAL VERTICAL, STRUT, LATERAL BRACING AND DIAGONAL, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Sixth Street Viaduct, Spanning Burlington Northern Railroad & Valley Street, Burlington, Des Moines County, IA

  19. 8. Detail of upper half of E wall showing crenellated ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Detail of upper half of E wall showing crenellated parapet. - Central of Georgia Railway, Savannah Repair Shops & Terminal Facilities, Engine Boiler & Pattern Building, Bounded by West Broad, Jones, West Boundary & Hull Streets, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  20. 5. DETAIL VIEW OF UPPER CHORD MEMBER, SHOWING MAKER'S PLATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. DETAIL VIEW OF UPPER CHORD MEMBER, SHOWING MAKER'S PLATE STATING 'KING IRON BRIDGE & MFG. CO., K & F & Z KING PATENT, CLEVELAND, O.' - Smith Road Bowstring Arch Bridge, Spanning Sycamore Creek at Smith Road (TR 62), Lykens, Crawford County, OH

  1. 9. VIEW OF UPPER LEVEL OF FILTRATION ROOM SHOWING TANKS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW OF UPPER LEVEL OF FILTRATION ROOM SHOWING TANKS AND CONTROL VALVES, LOOKING NORTH - Presidio Water Treatment Plant, Filtration Plant, East of Lobos Creek at Baker Beach, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  2. 5. UPPER CHORD UNDERSIDE VIEW SHOWING CHANNEL IRON AND LATTICE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. UPPER CHORD UNDERSIDE VIEW SHOWING CHANNEL IRON AND LATTICE WORK CONSTRUCTION AND TENSION MEMBER CONNECTION. DECK VIEW LOOKING EAST. - Cunningham Lane Bridge, Spanning Pine River on Cunningham Lane near Highway 80, Rockbridge, Richland County, WI

  3. 8. TURBINE DECK (UPPER FLOOR) INSIDE STEAM PLANT, SHOWING STEAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. TURBINE DECK (UPPER FLOOR) INSIDE STEAM PLANT, SHOWING STEAM TURBINES AND GENERATORS, LOOKING NORTH. November 13, 1990 - Crosscut Steam Plant, North side Salt River near Mill Avenue & Washington Street, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  4. 6. CREST ROAD ON UPPER EMBANKMENT, SHOWING MASONRY UPSTREAM PARAPET ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. CREST ROAD ON UPPER EMBANKMENT, SHOWING MASONRY UPSTREAM PARAPET WALL (LEFT) AND ENTRANCE TO DEER FLAT NAMPA CANAL HEADWORKS (ALSO LEFT). VIEW TO WEST. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  5. INTERIOR OF BUILDING 4, FROM UPPER CATWALK SHOWING BOILERS AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF BUILDING 4, FROM UPPER CATWALK SHOWING BOILERS AND VENTS, FACING EAST - Roosevelt Base, Central Heating Plant, Corner of Colorado Street & Reeves Avenue, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  6. Detail of upper portion of southeast corner showing exposed rafters ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of upper portion of southeast corner showing exposed rafters at eaves; camera facing northwest. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Supply Building, Walnut Avenue, southeast corner of Walnut Avenue & Fifth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  7. 38. DETAIL OF CYLINDER LEVELING SYSTEM SHOWING TYPICAL UPPER AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. DETAIL OF CYLINDER LEVELING SYSTEM SHOWING TYPICAL UPPER AND LOWER PULLEY BRACKET. F.C. TORKELSON DRAWING NUMBER 842-ARVFS-701-S-8. INEL INDEX CODE - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  8. 9. VIEW OF UPPER LOCK RECESS SHOWING SUBMERGED GATE TRACKS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW OF UPPER LOCK RECESS SHOWING SUBMERGED GATE TRACKS, LOOKING WEST. - Ohio Slack Water Dams, Lock & Dam No. 4, East bank of Ohio River at mile point 18.6, along State Route 65, Ambridge, Beaver County, PA

  9. Reverse-loop upper arm arteriovenous graft for chronic hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen-Shin; Chen, Tzu-Chun; Chen, Jer-Shen; Chan, Chih-Yang

    2009-01-01

    Options for an upper arm arteriovenous graft (AVG) commonly include the placement of a straight prosthetic graft connecting the brachial artery to the axillary vein. However, such configuration leads to underutilization of the upper arm veins, resulting in the loss of venous capital in the upper arm for future secondary fistula creation. In this retrospective analysis, we evaluated seven patients who had upper-arm AVGs created in a reverse-loop configuration. The prosthetic graft was created by connecting the brachial artery close to the cubital fossa and tunneled subcutaneously in a looped fashion distally thereby connecting the basilic or deep brachial vein just above the elbow. Endpoints were interventions, thrombosis, and loss of access at the last examination. The brachial vein was used in two patients and the basilic vein in the other five. The median duration of follow-up with 100% patency of the AVGs was 10.0 (range, 3.0-25.0) months. Patients were able to achieve a target hemodialysis dose with a (K(urea) x t(d))/V(urea) value of 1.4 (range, 1.2-1.5). The median flow rates achieved were 205.0 (range, 203.3-236.7) and 266.7 (range, 203.3-276.7) ml/minute at the first and 3-month dialysis sessions, respectively. The median dialysis venous pressures were 128.0 (range, 108.3-178.0) and 131.0 (range, 116.7-148.7) mmHg at the first and third month after operation, respectively. The median peak systolic velocity ratios of artery-graft and vein-graft junctions were 2.1 (range, 1.4-2.4) and 3.0 (range, 2.3-3.8) cm/second, respectively. In conclusion, this is a logical approach for patients who have exhausted their forearm vessels for AVG creation. In addition, it also provides a platform for future creation of a secondary fistula in the upper arm. PMID:19799753

  10. 3D Measurement of Forearm and Upper Arm during Throwing Motion using Body Mounted Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koda, Hideharu; Sagawa, Koichi; Kuroshima, Kouta; Tsukamoto, Toshiaki; Urita, Kazutaka; Ishibashi, Yasuyuki

    The aim of this study is to propose the measurement method of three-dimensional (3D) movement of forearm and upper arm during pitching motion of baseball using inertial sensors without serious consideration of sensor installation. Although high accuracy measurement of sports motion is achieved by using optical motion capture system at present, it has some disadvantages such as the calibration of cameras and limitation of measurement place. Whereas the proposed method for 3D measurement of pitching motion using body mounted sensors provides trajectory and orientation of upper arm by the integration of acceleration and angular velocity measured on upper limb. The trajectory of forearm is derived so that the elbow joint axis of forearm corresponds to that of upper arm. Spatial relation between upper limb and sensor system is obtained by performing predetermined movements of upper limb and utilizing angular velocity and gravitational acceleration. The integration error is modified so that the estimated final position, velocity and posture of upper limb agree with the actual ones. The experimental results of the measurement of pitching motion show that trajectories of shoulder, elbow and wrist estimated by the proposed method are highly correlated to those from the motion capture system within the estimation error of about 10 [%].

  11. 25. VIEW OF MILL FROM UPPER TAILINGS POND. SHOWS ROASTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. VIEW OF MILL FROM UPPER TAILINGS POND. SHOWS ROASTER ON LEFT EDGE OF VIEW. THE SECONDARY THICKENER No. 7 IS OFF VIEW TO THE RIGHT. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  12. View southeast, stone sluice, top of upper standing section, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View southeast, stone sluice, top of upper standing section, showing cement piers over arch in foreground, foot of break at third drop in center, retaining wall to left, barge canal sluice to right - Glens Falls Feeder, Sluice, Along south side of Glens Falls Feeder between locks 10 & 20, Hudson Falls, Washington County, NY

  13. Aerial view northwest from center of square showing upper portion ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Aerial view northwest from center of square showing upper portion of rear walls of 519 Eleventh Street, 521 Eleventh Street, 523 Eleventh Street, 525 Eleventh Street, 1008-1010 F Street, and 1012 F Street - Square 347 (Commercial Buildings), Tenth, Eleventh, E, & F Streets, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  14. 3. SHOWING STREAM, STORE BUILDING (UPPER LEFT), SPRING HOUSE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. SHOWING STREAM, STORE BUILDING (UPPER LEFT), SPRING HOUSE AND BATH HOUSE (NEAR STREAM), SOUTHEAST FRONTS AND SOUTHWEST SIDES (4 x 5 negative; 5 x 7 print) - Salt Sulpher Springs, U.S. Route 219, Salt Sulphur Springs, Monroe County, WV

  15. MASTER BEDROOM SHOWING THE WINDOWS IN THE UPPER PORTION OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MASTER BEDROOM SHOWING THE WINDOWS IN THE UPPER PORTION OF THE EXTERIOR WALL AND THE SLIDING CLOSET DOORS. VIEW FACING WEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, U-Shaped Two-Bedroom Single-Family Type 6, Birch Circle, Elm Drive, Elm Circle, and Date Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  16. View of the upper part of the Inverted Siphon showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of the upper part of the Inverted Siphon showing sandbox at the top of the slope before dropping into the Hot Water (or White) Canyon. Looking northeast - Childs-Irving Hydroelectric Project, Irving System, Inverted Siphon, Forest Service Road 708/502, Camp Verde, Yavapai County, AZ

  17. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE PANTRY. SHOWING GLAZED UPPER CABINETS. NOTE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF THE PANTRY. SHOWING GLAZED UPPER CABINETS. NOTE THE FLOUR BIN IN FOREGROUND (SLIGHTLY AJAR) AND THE WINDOWS AT THE TOP OF THE EXTERIOR WALL. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST. - Hickam Field, Fort Kamehameha Officers' Housing Type Z, 19 Worchester Avenue, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  18. 7. DETAIL OF UPPER SECTIONS OF WEST SIDE SHOWING WHITE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL OF UPPER SECTIONS OF WEST SIDE SHOWING WHITE INSULATED DUCTWORK VENTILATING CLEAN ROOM AT TOP LEVELS OF MOBILE SERVICE STRUCTURE; VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Cape Canaveral Air Station, Launch Complex 17, Facility 28417, East end of Lighthouse Road, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  19. 17. VIEW SHOWING CAPTION AT UPPER RIGHT THAT READS, 'HORSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. VIEW SHOWING CAPTION AT UPPER RIGHT THAT READS, 'HORSE MESA DAM -5/15/27FLOATING 2-YD. ELECTRICALLY-OPERATED CLAM-SHELL DERRICK UNLOADING GRAVEL SCOWS' May 15, 1927 - Horse Mesa Dam, Salt River, 65 miles East of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  20. Henry Hudson Bridge upper deck and pedestrian walkway showing parapets ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Henry Hudson Bridge upper deck and pedestrian walkway showing parapets with pipe rails. View of Inwood Hill Park in background, with a faint view of the Empire State Building amidst distant highrises at left, looking south. - Henry Hudson Parkway, Extending 11.2 miles from West 72nd Street to Bronx-Westchester border, New York County, NY

  1. Estimation Method of Body Temperature from Upper Arm Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Arata; Ryu, Kazuteru; Kanai, Nobuyuki

    This paper proposes a method for estimation of a body temperature by using a relation between the upper arm temperature and the atmospheric temperature. Conventional method has measured by armpit or oral, because the body temperature from the body surface is influenced by the atmospheric temperature. However, there is a correlation between the body surface temperature and the atmospheric temperature. By using this correlation, the body temperature can estimated from the body surface temperature. Proposed method enables to measure body temperature by the temperature sensor that is embedded in the blood pressure monitor cuff. Therefore, simultaneous measurement of blood pressure and body temperature can be realized. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified through the actual body temperature experiment. The proposed method might contribute to reduce the medical staff's workloads in the home medical care, and more.

  2. [A man with an abnormality of the upper arm on an X-ray of the chest].

    PubMed

    van Deudekom, Floor J A; Kuper, Ingeborg M J A; Groote, Maureen E

    2015-01-01

    A 82-year-old man was referred to our hospital because of a history of falling. Routine radiography of the chest accidentally showed an abnormality of the left upper arm. The x-ray showed calcifications - rings and arcs - also known as popcorn calcifications. This is a typical radiological sign which may indicate a tumour of the condroid matrix. PMID:26556494

  3. Cycle of earthquake-induced aggradation and related tidal channel shifting, upper Turnagain Arm, Alaska, USA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartsch-Winkler, S.

    1988-01-01

    At the head of the Arm, decrease in percent sand of surface sediments with time and return of rodents, pulmonate gastropods, trees, bushes and grasses to the intertidal region, indicate that the rate of sediment deposition has slowed and the Upper Turnagain Arm area has returned to a state of preearthquake equilibrium only 17 years after the event. -Author

  4. Rare case of upper arm compartment syndrome following biceps tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Fung, Daniel A; Frey, Steven; Grossman, Robert B

    2008-05-01

    We present a case of upper arm compartment syndrome following a biceps tendon rupture in a 77-year old man on warfarin sodium. Compartment syndrome is common in the forearm and leg, but rare in the upper arm with only a handful of cases reported in the literature. Our patient's anticoagulated state predisposed him to the development of compartment syndrome. To the best of our knowledge there has been only one other case reported in the literature of upper arm compartment syndrome following biceps tendon rupture in a patient on warfarin sodium. Compartment syndrome of the upper arm is a rare occurrence. Previous cases have occurred due to malposition of blood pressure cuffs, injections, venepuncture, trauma, tourniquets, shoulder dislocation, surgical complication, subatmospheric pressure induced, biceps rupture, and triceps rupture. The fascia of the upper arm is relatively thinner and more distensible than the fascia of the leg or forearm. This creates more room for the compartment to swell before pressures builds up to a significant level. Thus, a significantly increased amount of pressure needs to build up before compartment syndrome will occur in the upper arm. Once the diagnosis was formed, the patient was treated with emergent fasciotomy and evacuation of hematoma. After a prolonged hospital stay, the patient was released with minor neurological deficits. At final follow-up, the patient was neurovascularly intact with no complaints of numbness or tingling, and he had regained full motor function throughout. PMID:19292309

  5. Analysis of upper arm muscle activation using surface electromyography signals during drum playing.

    PubMed

    Chong, Hyun Ju; Kwon, Chun-Ki; Kang, Hyun-Joo; Kim, Soo Ji

    2016-06-01

    This study measured surface electromyography of the biceps brachii and triceps brachii during repeated drum playing with and without a drumstick to better understand activation of the upper arm muscles and inform the use of instrument playing for motor rehabilitation. A total of 40 healthy college students participated in this study. All participants were asked to strike a drum with their hand and with a drumstick at three different levels of stroke: soft, medium, and strong. The stroke order was randomly assigned to participants. A sound level meter was used to record the intensity of the drum playing. Surface electromyography signals were recorded at every hit during drum playing both with and without the drumstick in each of the three stroke conditions. The results demonstrated that the highest muscle activation was observed in both biceps brachii and triceps brachii with strong drum playing with and without the drumstick. A two-way repeated measures analysis of variance showed that there was a significant main effect for stroke intensity in muscle activation and produced sound level. While higher activation of the triceps brachii was observed for drum playing without a drumstick, no significant differences were found between the biceps brachii and sound level. This study demonstrated via surface electromyography data that greater muscle activation of the biceps brachii and triceps brachii does not occur with the use of drumsticks in drum playing. With the drum sound controlled, drum playing by hand can be an effective therapeutic intervention for the upper arm muscles. PMID:27419114

  6. Use of mid upper arm circumference for evaluation of nutritional status of OSMF patients

    PubMed Central

    Yallamraju, Suryanarayana R.; Mehrotra, Rachit; Sinha, Abhishek; Gattumeedhi, Shashank Reddy; Gupta, Abhishek; Khadse, Smita V.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) is always associated with juxtaepithelial inflammatory reaction followed by fibroblastic changes in lamina propria, with epithelial atrophy leading to stiffness of oral mucosa and causing trismus and inability to eat. Mid upper arm circumference (MUAC) is a useful tool for a fast assessment of the nutritional status. Aims: The study was undertaken to evaluate the correlation of MUAC as a nutritional status indicator in OSMF patients. Patients and Methods: The study group comprised 50 clinically diagnosed and histopathologically confirmed cases of OSMF. MUAC was recorded using a plastic measuring tape. The right upper arm was measured at the midpoint between the tip of the shoulder and the tip of the elbow (olecranon process and the acromium). Results: Out of 50 subjects, 76% (38) were having MUAC value <23 cm, which shows an inverse relation between MUAC and clinical staging. The relation of MUAC with clinical staging was significant. Conclusion: The patient with OSMF becomes unable to eat due to burning, ulcers, and inability to open mouth, which affects the health of the individual. Thus, it is crucial to access the nutritional status to improve the survival rate of patients. PMID:25558452

  7. Analysis of upper arm muscle activation using surface electromyography signals during drum playing

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Hyun Ju; Kwon, Chun-Ki; Kang, Hyun-Joo; Kim, Soo Ji

    2016-01-01

    This study measured surface electromyography of the biceps brachii and triceps brachii during repeated drum playing with and without a drumstick to better understand activation of the upper arm muscles and inform the use of instrument playing for motor rehabilitation. A total of 40 healthy college students participated in this study. All participants were asked to strike a drum with their hand and with a drumstick at three different levels of stroke: soft, medium, and strong. The stroke order was randomly assigned to participants. A sound level meter was used to record the intensity of the drum playing. Surface electromyography signals were recorded at every hit during drum playing both with and without the drumstick in each of the three stroke conditions. The results demonstrated that the highest muscle activation was observed in both biceps brachii and triceps brachii with strong drum playing with and without the drumstick. A two-way repeated measures analysis of variance showed that there was a significant main effect for stroke intensity in muscle activation and produced sound level. While higher activation of the triceps brachii was observed for drum playing without a drumstick, no significant differences were found between the biceps brachii and sound level. This study demonstrated via surface electromyography data that greater muscle activation of the biceps brachii and triceps brachii does not occur with the use of drumsticks in drum playing. With the drum sound controlled, drum playing by hand can be an effective therapeutic intervention for the upper arm muscles. PMID:27419114

  8. Analysis of reaching movements of upper arm in robot assisted exercises. Kinematic assessment of robot assisted upper arm reaching single-joint movements.

    PubMed

    Iuppariello, Luigi; D'Addio, Giovanni; Romano, Maria; Bifulco, Paolo; Lanzillo, Bernardo; Pappone, Nicola; Cesarelli, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Robot-mediated therapy (RMT) has been a very dynamic area of research in recent years. Robotics devices are in fact capable to quantify the performances of a rehabilitation task in treatments of several disorders of the arm and the shoulder of various central and peripheral etiology. Different systems for robot-aided neuro-rehabilitation are available for upper limb rehabilitation but the biomechanical parameters proposed until today, to evaluate the quality of the movement, are related to the specific robot used and to the type of exercise performed. Besides, none study indicated a standardized quantitative evaluation of robot assisted upper arm reaching movements, so the RMT is still far to be considered a standardised tool. In this paper a quantitative kinematic assessment of robot assisted upper arm reaching movements, considering also the effect of gravity on the quality of the movements, is proposed. We studied a group of 10 healthy subjects and results indicate that our advised protocol can be useful for characterising normal pattern in reaching movements. PMID:27459844

  9. Coordination of human upper arm and forearm motion in rapid extensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahvi, Mahmood

    1991-01-01

    In many movements of the upper limb such as reaching, positioning, and displacing the objects, the hand moves smoothly along a uni-directional planar trajectory with a bell-shaped speed profile. Because of variability of the load, gravitational and velocity interaction forces between its segments, the dynamics of the arm during the motion is very complex. Motion of the upper arm and the forearm are coordinated to produce smooth movements despite such complex dynamics. This coordination constitutes an important organizational feature of arm movement. The present paper describes some experimental results related to the above and interprets their role in producing smooth motion of the hand. Trajectories of the right upper limb in vertical plane and the simultaneous muscles' EMG activities were recorded for extensions of various amplitudes under four loads. The forearm trajectories are smooth with bell-shaped speed profiles. The upper arm trajectories may have bimodal speed profiles and three segments, resembling an inverted 'Z.' Segmentation is sharper for the points near the shoulder joint, and is accentuated by load. As one moves from the central points near the shoulder joint to the peripheral points near the hand, the three segments merge and result in smooth curves with single-peaked speed profiles. The three segments have a coherent time course and can be identified rather accurately and non-ambiguously. The observed trajectories and the EMG patterns reveal an effective coordination strategy which utilizes the structure and the dynamics of the moving arm to produce smooth movement.

  10. MRI features of calcifying aponeurotic fibroma in the upper arm: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Shim, Sang Woo; Kang, Byeong Seong; Lee, Chae-Chil; Suh, Jae Hee; Shim, Hyun Seok

    2016-08-01

    Calcifying aponeurotic fibroma is a rare soft tissue tumor that occurs in the distal extremities of children and adolescents. We report a case of pathologically proven calcifying aponeurotic fibroma in the left upper arm of a 23-year-old female. Radiographs revealed increased soft tissue density with multiple stippled calcifications in the mid-portion of the patient's left upper arm. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a well-defined soft tissue mass with low to intermediate signal intensity on T1-weighted images, heterogeneously low signal intensity on T2-weighted images, and heterogeneous enhancement on fat-suppressed, contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. Histologically, spindle cell proliferation with scattered calcifications and hyalinization was present. Seven years after surgery, there was no evidence of local recurrence. This is the first report of MRI findings of calcifying aponeurotic fibroma in the upper arm. We also summarize the MRI findings of 16 previously reported cases of calcifying aponeurotic fibroma originating in the upper or lower extremities. PMID:27236326

  11. Numerical analysis of stress distribution in the upper arm tissues under an inflatable cuff: Implications for noninvasive blood pressure measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zhipeng; Liang, Fuyou

    2016-07-01

    An inflatable cuff wrapped around the upper arm is widely used in noninvasive blood pressure measurement. However, the mechanical interaction between cuff and arm tissues, a factor that potentially affects the accuracy of noninvasive blood pressure measurement, remains rarely addressed. In the present study, finite element (FE) models were constructed to quantify intra-arm stresses generated by cuff compression, aiming to provide some theoretical evidence for identifying factors of importance for blood pressure measurement or explaining clinical observations. Obtained results showed that the simulated tissue stresses were highly sensitive to the distribution of cuff pressure on the arm surface and the contact condition between muscle and bone. In contrast, the magnitude of cuff pressure and small variations in elastic properties of arm soft tissues had little influence on the efficiency of pressure transmission in arm tissues. In particular, it was found that a thickened subcutaneous fat layer in obese subjects significantly reduced the effective pressure transmitted to the brachial artery, which may explain why blood pressure overestimation occurs more frequently in obese subjects in noninvasive blood pressure measurement.

  12. Radiesse®: a novel rejuvenation treatment for the upper arms

    PubMed Central

    Amselem, Moisés

    2016-01-01

    Nonsurgical esthetic improvement of the upper arms is a desirable goal for many individuals. Radiesse® (calcium hydroxylapatite) is an effective dermal filler for a number of indications because of its volumizing effect and the ability to stimulate neocollagenesis. No studies have reported on its safety and effectiveness for the treatment of the upper arm. In a prospective, open-label study, 30 subjects seeking improvement in the esthetic appearance of their upper arms received injections with Radiesse® (1.5 mL/arm) at two separate visits, 1 month apart. Subjects returned for a follow-up visit 4 months after the second treatment. The primary endpoint was the degree of overall subject and evaluator (investigators and study nurses) satisfaction assessed using the 5-point Global Satisfaction Scale (ranging from “1” very dissatisfied to “5” very satisfied). Secondary endpoints included assessments of skin quality (flaccidity and volume distribution) using a new Visual Analog Scale for upper arms and overall assessment of treatment using the Global Aesthetic Improvement Scale. All (100%) of both subjects and evaluators were “satisfied” or “very satisfied” with treatment. The mean Global Satisfaction Score for investigators and study nurses was 4.60 and for subjects 4.53 (satisfied to very satisfied). Assessments of flaccidity and volume improved significantly compared with baseline at the post-treatment visit and also between visits. Compared with baseline, 77% of subjects were rated as considerably improved (good or great improvement) by the investigator and study nurse; 73% of subjects rated themselves as considerably improved and 43% of these rated a “great improvement.” All stated they would repeat the treatment and recommend it to others. No adverse events were reported. Radiesse® is an effective minimally invasive treatment option for improving upper arm contours and was associated with a 100% satisfaction rate for both subjects and

  13. The effects of task-oriented versus repetitive bilateral arm training on upper limb function and activities of daily living in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gui Bin

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of task-oriented bilateral arm training and repetitive bilateral arm training on upper limb function and activities of daily living in stroke patients. [Subjects] Forty patients with hemiplegia resulting from stroke were divided into a task orientied bilateral arm training group (n=20) and a repetitive bilateral arm training group (n=20). [Methods] The task-oriented group underwent bilateral arm training with 5 functional tasks, and the repetitive group underwent bilateral arm training with rhythmin auditory cueing for 30 minutes/day, 5 times/week, for 12 weeks. [Results] The upper limb function and the ability to perform activities of daily living improved significantly in both groups. Although there were significant differences between the groups, the task-oriented group showed greater improvement in upper limb function and activities of daily living. [Conclusion] We recommend bilateral arm training as well as adding functional task training as a clinical intervention to improve upper limb function activities of daily living in patients with hemiplegia. PMID:26157217

  14. Two-dimensional myoelectric control of a robotic arm for upper limb amputees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Celani, Natalia M.; Soria, Carlos M.; Orosco, Eugenio C.; di Sciascio, Fernando A.; Valentinuzzi, Max E.

    2007-11-01

    Rehabilitation engineering and medicine have become integral and significant parts of health care services, particularly and unfortunately in the last three or four decades, because of wars, terrorism and large number of car accidents. Amputees show a high rate of rejection to wear prosthetic devices, often because of lack of an adequate period of adaptation. A robotic arm may appear as a good preliminary stage. To test the hypothesis, myoelectric signals from two upper limb amputees and from four normal volunteers were fed, via adequate electronic conditioning and using MATLAB, to an industrial robotic arm. Proportional strength control was used for two degrees of freedom (x-y plane) by means of eight signal features of control (four traditional statistics plus energy, integral of the absolute value, Willison's amplitude, waveform length and envelope) for comparison purposes, and selecting the best of them as final reference. Patients easily accepted the system and learned in short time how to operate it. Results were encouraging so that valuable training, before prosthesis is implanted, appears as good feedback; besides, these patients can be hired as specialized operators in semi-automatized industry.

  15. Isometric Arm Strength and Subjective Rating of Upper Limb Fatigue in Two-Handed Carrying Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kai Way; Chiu, Wen-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Sustained carrying could result in muscular fatigue of the upper limb. Ten male and ten female subjects were recruited for measurements of isometric arm strength before and during carrying a load for a period of 4 minutes. Two levels of load of carrying were tested for each of the male and female subjects. Exponential function based predictive equations for the isometric arm strength were established. The mean absolute deviations of these models in predicting the isometric arm strength were in the range of 3.24 to 17.34 N. Regression analyses between the subjective ratings of upper limb fatigue and force change index (FCI) for the carrying were also performed. The results indicated that the subjective rating of muscular fatigue may be estimated by multiplying the FCI with a constant. The FCI may, therefore, be adopted as an index to assess muscular fatigue for two-handed carrying tasks. PMID:25794159

  16. Optimality of Upper-Arm Reaching Trajectories Based on the Expected Value of the Metabolic Energy Cost.

    PubMed

    Taniai, Yoshiaki; Nishii, Jun

    2015-08-01

    When we move our body to perform a movement task, our central nervous system selects a movement trajectory from an infinite number of possible trajectories under constraints that have been acquired through evolution and learning. Minimization of the energy cost has been suggested as a potential candidate for a constraint determining locomotor parameters, such as stride frequency and stride length; however, other constraints have been proposed for a human upper-arm reaching task. In this study, we examined whether the minimum metabolic energy cost model can also explain the characteristics of the upper-arm reaching trajectories. Our results show that the optimal trajectory that minimizes the expected value of energy cost under the effect of signal-dependent noise on motor commands expresses not only the characteristics of reaching movements of typical speed but also those of slower movements. These results suggest that minimization of the energy cost would be a basic constraint not only in locomotion but also in upper-arm reaching. PMID:26079750

  17. Movement analysis of upper limb during resistance training using general purpose robot arm "PA10"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Yoshifumi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Suzuki, Takahiro; Hirose, Akinori; Ukai, Hiroyuki; Matsui, Nobuyuki

    2005-12-01

    In this paper we perform movement analysis of an upper limb during resistance training. We selected sanding training, which is one type of resistance training for upper limbs widely performed in occupational therapy. Our final aims in the future are to quantitatively evaluate the therapeutic effect of upper limb motor function during training and to develop a new rehabilitation training support system. For these purposes, first of all we perform movement analysis using a conventional training tool. By measuring upper limb motion during the sanding training we perform feature abstraction. Next we perform movement analysis using the simulated sanding training system. This system is constructed using the general purpose robot arm "PA10". This system enables us to measure the force/torque exerted by subjects and to easily change the load of resistance. The control algorithm is based on impedance control. We found these features of the upper limb motion during the sanding training.

  18. [Hand-arm vibration syndrome and upper limbs diseases in the forest workers of Italia meridionale].

    PubMed

    Fenga, C; Rapisarda, V; Valentino, M; Cacciola, A; Deboli, R; Calvo, A; Germanò, D

    2007-01-01

    Vibration exposure of the hand-arm system is associated with an increased risk of upper-limb vascular, neurological and musculoskeletal lesions, or hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS). The prevalence of occupational HAVS and upper-limb disorders was studied among 278 Forestry Service workers in Sicily and Calabria. Subjects who used chain-saws (18 weeks/year) had a greater prevalence of peripheral sensory-neural disturbances (28%), upper-limb musculoskeletal disorders (33%) and carpal tunnel syndrome (19%) compared with 260 manual workers from the same Corps not exposed to hand-transmitted vibration. Raynaud's phenomenon was comparable in exposed and control subjects (5.3% vs. 4.7%.) Upper-limb neuropathies were significantly associated with energy-equivalent frequency-weighted acceleration; exposure duration; and cumulative vibration dose (m2/s4h). The variable "years of work with vibrating tools" was strongly associated with peripheral neuropathies; carpal tunnel syndrome; and upper-limb musculotendinous syndromes. Data suggest that in Sicily and Calabria, where the climate is milder than in other areas of Italy, forestry work with hand-held vibrating tools does not entail a greater prevalence of peripheral vascular disorders (Raynaud's phenomenon), while the prevalence of occupational upper-limb neurological and musculoskeletal disorders, in which combined ergonomic and mechanical risk factors have a large pathogenic role, is significantly increased. PMID:18409849

  19. 20. DETaIL VIEW OF UPPER EAST WALL CONTROL STATION, SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. DETaIL VIEW OF UPPER EAST WALL CONTROL STATION, SHOWING EMERGENCY BULKHEAD STIFFLEG DERRICK, MAIN LOCK PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE, RECESSES FOR MAIN LOCK LIFT GATE, AND TILE GAUGES, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam 27, Granite City, Madison County, IL

  20. Validating ArmAssist Assessment as outcome measure in upper-limb post-stroke telerehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-de-Pablo, Cristina; Balasubramanian, Sivakumar; Savic, Andrej; Tomic, Tijana D; Konstantinovic, Ljubica; Keller, Thierry

    2015-08-01

    The ArmAssist is a low-cost robotic system for post-stroke upper-limb telerehabilitation based on serious games. The system incorporates a set of games for the assessment of arm function, the ArmAssist Assessment (AAA), which allows a remote monitoring of the progress of the patient and an automatic adaptation of the therapy. In this study, different components of the AAA are compared against three widely-used clinical tests, the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) [1], the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) [2] and the Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT) [3] in order to select the most clinically meaningful ones for the final score provided to patients and therapist, and evaluate their capability to predict or even improve some aspects of these standard scales. All four tests were performed in 38 separate sessions in 19 post-stroke individuals in their sub-acute phase, as part of a broader study. Statistically significant correlation could be shown with the three clinical tests. These preliminary results are promising for the validation of AAA as a fast, automatic and clinically meaningful tool for remote progress assessment and therapy adaptation; however, more data and further analysis is needed to confirm this. PMID:26737324

  1. Bedding types in Holocene tidal channel sequences, Knik Arm, Upper Cook Inlet, Alaska.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartsch-Winkler, S.; Schmoll, H.R.

    1984-01-01

    Uplifted convoluted and horizontal to subhorizontal beds of varying thickness in intertidal silt as old as 3280 +- 90 yr BP are exposed in the banks of tidal channels of unknown depth in the intertidal zone in Knik Arm of Upper Cook Inlet. Internal discordances may occur both within convoluted beds and between convoluted and horizontal to subhorizontal beds. At the base of many convoluted beds, there is a rapid gradation upward into laminae which are severely deformed; that is, in some places, the contortions appear to have originated along a single bedding plane. Where the convoluted sequences are truncated by nearly horizontal sequences, the distortion must have resulted from syndepositional or postdepositional events prior to their burial by the overlying beds. Various forms of gravitational and tidal processes caused the deformation of the Knik Arm deposits. -from Authors

  2. Satellite Measurement of Upper Tropospheric Water Vapor: Development and Applications and Applications for the ARM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Brian J. Soden

    2005-01-11

    Upper tropospheric humidity (UTH) measurements from the 6.7 micron channel on GOES (8, 9, 12) and GMS-5 satellites were employed to develop a near real-time UTH product that is now available from the ARM External Data Center (XDC). The UTH product is available in either gridded format (2.0 x 2.0 lat-lon resolution), full-disk pixel resolution, or individual pixel resolution for both the SGP and TWP sites. This product provides the basis for the instrument intercomparison and validation activities (Section 0.2), diurnal analysis and model evaluation (0.3), and cloud lifecycle studies (0.5); and is also an important component of the research proposed here. Full details regarding the retrieval algorithm for the ARM sites can be found in Soden et al. (2004a) and references therein.

  3. Quantitative assessment of upper limb motor function in Multiple Sclerosis using an instrumented Action Research Arm Test

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Arm impairment in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is commonly assessed with clinical scales, such as Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) which evaluates the ability to handle and transport smaller and larger objects. ARAT provides a complete upper limb assessment, as it considers both proximal arm and hand, but suffers from subjectivity and poor sensitivity to mild impairment. In this study an instrumented ARAT is proposed to overcome these limitations and supplement the assessment of arm function in MS. Methods ARAT was executed by 12 healthy volunteers and 21 MS subjects wearing a single inertial sensor on the wrist. Accelerometers and gyroscopes signals were used to calculate the duration of each task and its sub-phases (reaching, manipulation, transport, release and return). A jerk index was computed to quantify movement smoothness. For each parameter, z-scores were calculated to analyze the deviation from normative data. MS subjects were clinically assessed with ARAT score, Nine-Hole Peg test (9HPT) and Fahn Tremor Rating Scale (FTRS). Results ARAT tasks executed by MS patients were significantly slower (duration increase: 70%) and less smooth (jerk increase: 16%) with respect to controls. These anomalies were mainly related to manipulation, transport and release sub-movements, with the former showing the greatest alterations. A statistically significant decrease in movement velocity and smoothness was also noticed in patients with normal ARAT score. Z-scores related to duration and jerk were strongly correlated with ARAT rating (r < -0.80, p < 0.001) and 9HPT (r < -0.75, p < 0.001) and were significantly different among MS sub-groups with different levels of arm impairments (p < 0.001). Moreover, Z-score related to manipulation-phase jerk was significantly correlated with the FTRS rating of intention tremor (r = 0.84, p < 0.001). Conclusions The present study showed that the proposed method is able to discriminate between control

  4. SEMG analysis of astronaut upper arm during isotonic muscle actions with normal standing posture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qianxiang, Zhou; Chao, Ma; Xiaohui, Zheng

    sEMG analysis of astronaut upper arm during isotonic muscle actions with normal standing posture*1 Introduction Now the research on the isotonic muscle actions by using Surface Electromyography (sEMG) is becoming a pop topic in fields of astronaut life support training and rehabilitations. And researchers paid more attention on the sEMG signal processes for reducing the influence of noise which is produced during monitoring process and the fatigue estimation of isotonic muscle actions with different force levels by using the parameters which are obtained from sEMG signals such as Condition Velocity(CV), Median Frequency(MDF), Mean Frequency(MNF) and so on. As the lucubrated research is done, more and more research on muscle fatigue issue of isotonic muscle actions are carried out with sEMG analysis and subjective estimate system of Borg scales at the same time. In this paper, the relationship between the variable for fatigue based on sEMG and the Borg scale during the course of isotonic muscle actions of the upper arm with different contraction levels are going to be investigated. Methods 13 young male subjects(23.4±2.45years, 64.7±5.43Kg, 171.7±5.41cm) with normal standing postures were introduced to do isotonic actions of the upper arm with different force levels(10% MVC, 30%MVC and 50%MVC). And the MVC which means maximal voluntary contraction was obtained firstly in the experiment. Also the sEMG would be recorded during the experiments; the Borg scales would be recorded for each contraction level. By using one-third band octave method, the fatigue variable (p) based on sEMG were set up and it was expressed as p = i g(fi ) · F (fi ). And g(fi ) is defined as the frequent factor which was 0.42+0.5 cos(π fi /f0 )+0.08 cos(2π fi /f0 ), 0 < FI fi 0, orf0 ≤> f0 . According to the equations, the p could be computed and the relationship between variable p and the Borg scale would be investigated. Results In the research, three kinds of fitted curves between

  5. Detecting Elementary Arm Movements by Tracking Upper Limb Joint Angles With MARG Sensors.

    PubMed

    Mazomenos, Evangelos B; Biswas, Dwaipayan; Cranny, Andy; Rajan, Amal; Maharatna, Koushik; Achner, Josy; Klemke, Jasmin; Jobges, Michael; Ortmann, Steffen; Langendorfer, Peter

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports an algorithm for the detection of three elementary upper limb movements, i.e., reach and retrieve, bend the arm at the elbow and rotation of the arm about the long axis. We employ two MARG sensors, attached at the elbow and wrist, from which the kinematic properties (joint angles, position) of the upper arm and forearm are calculated through data fusion using a quaternion-based gradient-descent method and a two-link model of the upper limb. By studying the kinematic patterns of the three movements on a small dataset, we derive discriminative features that are indicative of each movement; these are then used to formulate the proposed detection algorithm. Our novel approach of employing the joint angles and position to discriminate the three fundamental movements was evaluated in a series of experiments with 22 volunteers who participated in the study: 18 healthy subjects and four stroke survivors. In a controlled experiment, each volunteer was instructed to perform each movement a number of times. This was complimented by a seminaturalistic experiment where the volunteers performed the same movements as subtasks of an activity that emulated the preparation of a cup of tea. In the stroke survivors group, the overall detection accuracy for all three movements was 93.75% and 83.00%, for the controlled and seminaturalistic experiment, respectively. The performance was higher in the healthy group where 96.85% of the tasks in the controlled experiment and 89.69% in the seminaturalistic were detected correctly. Finally, the detection ratio remains close ( ±6%) to the average value, for different task durations further attesting to the algorithms robustness. PMID:25966489

  6. Treatment of postburn ear defect with expanded upper arm flap and consequent expansion without skin grafting.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jintian; Liu, Tun; Zhou, Xu; Zhang, Yong-Biao; Zhang, Qingguo

    2014-04-01

    Total ear reconstruction in the postburn auricle is one of the most challenging procedures for plastic surgeons. Adverse factors associated with these procedures include reduced or damaged blood supply, poor elasticity of scar tissue, increased risk of infection, and the possible destruction of skin, temporoparietal fascia, or retroauricular fascia. In cases where patients are severely burned, free flaps, such as radial forearm flaps, contralateral temporoparietal fascial flaps, or omental flaps, can be used as framework envelopes. In this work, we introduced a novel method of expanded upper arm flap transfer, followed by an expansion method of total ear reconstruction without skin grafting. PMID:24589517

  7. Postanesthesia patients with large upper arm circumference: is use of an "extra-long" adult cuff or forearm cuff placement accurate?

    PubMed

    Watson, Sheri; Aguas, Marita; Bienapfl, Tracy; Colegrove, Pat; Foisy, Nancy; Jondahl, Bonnie; Yosses, Mary Beth; Yu, Larissa; Anastas, Zoe

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if blood pressure (BP) measured in the forearm or with an extra-long BP cuff in the upper arm accurately reflects BP measured in the upper arm with an appropriately sized BP cuff in patients with large upper arm circumference. A method-comparison design was used with a convenience sample of 49 PACU patients. Noninvasive blood pressures were obtained in two different locations (forearm; upper arm) and in the upper arm with an extra-long adult and recommended large adult cuff sizes. Data were analyzed by calculating bias and precision for the BP cuff size and location and Student's t-tests, with P < .0125 considered significant. Significantly higher forearm systolic (P < .0001) and diastolic (P < .0002) BP measurements were found compared to BP obtained in the upper arm with the reference standard BP cuff. Significantly higher systolic (t(48df) = 5.38, P < .0001), but not diastolic (t(48df) = 4.11, P < .019), BP differences were found for BP measured with the extra-long cuff at the upper arm site compared to the upper arm, reference standard BP. Findings suggest that the clinical practice of using the forearm or an extra-long cuff in the upper arm for BP measurement in post anesthesia patients with large upper arm circumferences may result in inaccurate BP values. PMID:21641528

  8. A safe and simple technique using the distal pedicled reversed upper arm flap to cover large elbow defects.

    PubMed

    Prantl, L; Schreml, S; Schwarze, H; Eisenmann-Klein, M; Nerlich, M; Angele, P; Jung, M; Füchtmeier, B

    2008-01-01

    The reconstruction of large soft-tissue defects at the elbow is hard to achieve by conventional techniques and is complicated by the difficulty of transferring sufficient tissue with adequate elasticity and sensate skin. Surgical treatment should permit early mobilisation to avoid permanent functional impairment. Clinical experience with the distal pedicled reversed upper arm flap in 10 patients suffering from large elbow defects is presented (seven male, three female; age 40-70 years). The patient sample included six patients with chronic ulcer, two with tissue defects due to excision of a histiocytoma, and one patient with burn contracture. In the two cases of histiocytoma, defect closure of the elbow's ulnar area was achieved by using a recurrent medial upper arm flap. In the eight other patients we used a flap from the lateral upper arm with a flap rotation of 180 degrees. Average wound size ranged from 4 to 10 cm, average wound area from 30 to 80 cm(2). Flap dimensions ranged from 15 x 8 cm for the lateral upper arm flap to 29 x 8 cm for the medial upper arm flap. The inferior posterior radial and ulnar collateral arteries are the major nutrient vessels of the reversed lateral and medial upper arm flaps. Perforating vessels are identified preoperatively using colour Doppler ultrasonography. Flap failure did not occur. Secondary wound closure became necessary due to initial wound healing difficulties in one patient. Mean operation time was 1.5 h and mean follow-up period 12 months. Good defect coverage with tension-free wound closure was achieved in all cases. Stable defect coverage led to long-term wound stability without any restriction of elbow movement. The lateral and medial upper arm flaps represent a safe and reliable surgical treatment option for large elbow defects. The surgical technique is comparatively simple and quick. PMID:17618845

  9. SEMG analysis of astronaut upper arm during isotonic muscle actions with normal standing posture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qianxiang, Zhou; Chao, Ma; Xiaohui, Zheng

    sEMG analysis of astronaut upper arm during isotonic muscle actions with normal standing posture*1 Introduction Now the research on the isotonic muscle actions by using Surface Electromyography (sEMG) is becoming a pop topic in fields of astronaut life support training and rehabilitations. And researchers paid more attention on the sEMG signal processes for reducing the influence of noise which is produced during monitoring process and the fatigue estimation of isotonic muscle actions with different force levels by using the parameters which are obtained from sEMG signals such as Condition Velocity(CV), Median Frequency(MDF), Mean Frequency(MNF) and so on. As the lucubrated research is done, more and more research on muscle fatigue issue of isotonic muscle actions are carried out with sEMG analysis and subjective estimate system of Borg scales at the same time. In this paper, the relationship between the variable for fatigue based on sEMG and the Borg scale during the course of isotonic muscle actions of the upper arm with different contraction levels are going to be investigated. Methods 13 young male subjects(23.4±2.45years, 64.7±5.43Kg, 171.7±5.41cm) with normal standing postures were introduced to do isotonic actions of the upper arm with different force levels(10% MVC, 30%MVC and 50%MVC). And the MVC which means maximal voluntary contraction was obtained firstly in the experiment. Also the sEMG would be recorded during the experiments; the Borg scales would be recorded for each contraction level. By using one-third band octave method, the fatigue variable (p) based on sEMG were set up and it was expressed as p = i g(fi ) · F (fi ). And g(fi ) is defined as the frequent factor which was 0.42+0.5 cos(π fi /f0 )+0.08 cos(2π fi /f0 ), 0 < FI fi 0, orf0 ≤> f0 . According to the equations, the p could be computed and the relationship between variable p and the Borg scale would be investigated. Results In the research, three kinds of fitted curves between

  10. Mid-upper arm circumference is associated with biochemically determined nutritional status indicators among adolescent girls in Central Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Kulathinal, Sangita; Freese, Riitta; Korkalo, Liisa; Ismael, Carina; Mutanen, Marja

    2016-08-01

    Biochemically determined nutritional status measurements in low-income countries are often too expensive. Therefore, we hypothesized that some anthropometrical or functional measurements (handgrip) could reflect nutritional status measured by specific biochemical indicators. We did a population-based study from 1 urban area and 2 rural districts in Zambézia Province of Mozambique. The participants (n=386) were non-pregnant adolescent girls between 15 and 18 years of age. 96% had a normal BMI-for-age score. Weight and mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) were highly correlated (r>0.8) with each other and with total body muscle mass, body mass index (BMI), and with waist circumference, as well as with skinfolds (r>0.6). Upper and total arm lengths were correlated (r>0.7) with height and with each other, and right and left handgrip were correlated only with each other, as were triceps and subscapular skinfolds (r>0.7). Serum albumin correlated negatively with waist circumference (P<.001) and positively with MUAC (P=.007). Stepwise regressions showed that waist circumference, MUAC, weight, and handgrip were important nutritional status indicators in the models using hemoglobin, serum albumin, ferritin, zinc, and plasma retinol concentrations as dependent variables. MUAC could be a valuable anthropometric marker of the overall nutritional status of adolescent girls in low-income countries. When nutrition transition proceeds, waist circumference together with MUAC could form tools for the prediction of worsening of nutritional status. PMID:27440538

  11. CROCKETT BARN’S UPPER LEVEL, LOOKING NORTHEAST. This image shows the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CROCKETT BARN’S UPPER LEVEL, LOOKING NORTHEAST. This image shows the construction of the three interior bents, the south end of the loft and stairs, the ladder leading to the cupola, and the dance floor added in 2006. - Crockett Farm, Barn, 1056 Fort Casey Road, Coupeville, Island County, WA

  12. FAST CHOPPER BUILDING, TRA665. DETAIL SHOWS UPPER AND LOWER LEVEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FAST CHOPPER BUILDING, TRA-665. DETAIL SHOWS UPPER AND LOWER LEVEL WALLS OF DIFFERING MATERIALS. NOTE DOORWAY TO MTR TO RIGHT OF CHOPPER BUILDING'S CLIPPED CORNER. CAMERA FACING WEST. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD42-1. Mike Crane, Photographer, 3/2004 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  13. The effects of arm movement on reaction time in patients with latent and active upper trapezius myofascial trigger point

    PubMed Central

    Yassin, Marzieh; Talebian, Saeed; Ebrahimi Takamjani, Ismail; Maroufi, Nader; Ahmadi, Amir; Sarrafzadeh, Javad; Emrani, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Background: Myofascial pain syndrome is a significant source of mechanical pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of arm movement on reaction time in females with latent and active upper trapezius myofascial trigger point. Methods: In this interventional study, a convenience sample of fifteen women with one active MTP, fifteen women with one latent MTP in the upper trapezius, and fifteen normal healthy women were participated. Participants were asked to stand for 10 seconds in an erect standing position. Muscle reaction times were recorded including anterior deltoid (AD), cervical paraspinal (CP) lumbar paraspinal (LP), both of upper trapezius (UT), sternocleidomastoid (SCM) and medial head of gastrocnemius (GcM). Participants were asked to flex their arms in response to a sound stimulus preceded by a warning sound stimulus. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA Test. Results: There was significant differences in motor time and reaction time between active and control groups (p< 0.05) except for GcM. There was no significant difference in motor time between active and passive groups except for UT without MTP and SCM (p< 0.05). Also, there were no significant differences in motor times between latent MTP and control groups. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in premotor times between the three groups. Conclusion: The present study shows that patients with active MTP need more time to react to stimulus, but patients with latent MTP are similar to healthy subjects in the reaction time. Patients with active MTP had less compatibility with environmental stimulations, and they responded to a specific stimulation with variability in Surface Electromyography (SEMG). PMID:26913258

  14. Radiobasilic Versus Brachiobasilic Transposition on the Upper Arm to Avoid Steal Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Karaca, Okay Guven; Basal, Ahmet Nihat; Ecevit, Ata Niyazi; Kalender, Mehmet; Darcin, Osman Tansel; Sungur, Mehmet Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background Although the proximal radial artery has been reported as an alternative inflow to prevent steal syndrome, brachiobasilic fistula has been reported to be associated with steal syndrome in 10–20% of cases. We aimed to compare proximal radiobasilic arteriovenous fistula (AVF) with brachiobasilic AVFs on the upper arm in terms of steal syndrome and outcomes. Material/Method We used our institutional operative record database to identify 94 patients in whom brachiobasilic AVF (n=40) and radiobasilic AVF (n=54) were placed between January 2009 and December 2013. Postoperative complications such as steal syndrome, venous hypertension, and aneurysm were recorded. Results Steal syndrome was determined to occur less frequently in the radiobasilic AVF group (0% vs. 10%, P=0.03). The rates of other complications (bleeding, aneurysm, venous hypertension) between the 2 groups were similar, as were the patency rates. Conclusions Radiobasilic AVF was effective in reducing steal syndrome, with similar early and late outcomes. PMID:26713498

  15. Study of an upper arm exoskeleton for gravity balancing and minimization of transmitted forces.

    PubMed

    Dubey, V N; Agrawal, S K

    2011-11-01

    An upper-arm wearable exoskeleton has been designed for the assistance and functional training of humans. One of the goals of this design is to provide passive assistance to a user by gravity balancing, while keeping the transmitted forces to the shoulder joints at a minimum. Consistent with this goal, this paper discusses: analytical gravity balancing design conditions for the structure of the exoskeleton; a possible implementation of these conditions into practical designs; the minimization of transmitted joint forces to the shoulder while satisfying the gravity balancing conditions; the numerical optimization of the system for gravity balancing and minimization of transmitted forces; and the effect of parameter variation on joint moments and joint forces via numerical optimization. An implementation of the design was undertaken using zero-free-length springs. The design idea presented in this paper may be useful in relieving the actuators effort of exoskeletons to support the weight of the arm and therefore the possibility of using small actuators and making the system light and portable or even a stand-alone passive support device can be developed based on these gravity balancing conditions. PMID:22292201

  16. Are occupational repetitive movements of the upper arm associated with rotator cuff calcific tendinopathies?

    PubMed

    Sansone, Valerio C; Meroni, Roberto; Boria, Paola; Pisani, Salvatore; Maiorano, Emanuele

    2015-02-01

    Calcifying tendinopathy (CT) of the shoulder is a common painful disorder, although the etiology and pathogenesis remain largely unknown. Recent theories about the role of excessive mechanical load in the genesis of CT have been proposed. Driven by the interest for these new theories, we investigated the hypothesis of a relationship between work-related repetitive movements of the upper arm, considered a potential cause of shoulder overload, and the presence of shoulder CT. A secondary aim was to obtain data on CT prevalence in a female sample from the working-age general population, as little data currently exist. 199 supermarket cashiers and 304 female volunteers recruited from the general population underwent a high-resolution ultrasonography of the rotator cuffs of both shoulders, and the presence of tendinopathies, with or without calcification, was recorded. The prevalence of calcific tendinopathy was 22.6 % in the cashiers group and 24.4 % in the control group. There were no statistically significant differences in the prevalence of calcifications between the two groups (p = 0.585), either for the dominant shoulder [OR = 0.841 (95 % CI 0.534-1.326)] or for the non-dominant shoulder [OR = 0.988 (95 % CI 0.582-1.326)]. We observed bilateral calcifications in 8.5 % of cashiers, and 9.6 % of controls, and an increase in prevalence of CT with age in both groups. Work-related repetitive movements of the upper arm did not induce a higher prevalence of shoulder CT compared with the female sample from the general population. If CT etiopathogenesis is related to mechanical load, CT onset may be influenced not only by loading history, but also by individual factors. Level of evidence Prognosis study, Level II. PMID:25000922

  17. Maps showing thermal maturity of Upper Cretaceous marine shales in the Wind River Basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finn, Thomas M.; Pawlewicz, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    The Wind River Basin is a large Laramide (Late Cretaceous through Eocene) structural and sedimentary basin that encompasses about 7,400 square miles in central Wyoming. The basin is bounded by the Washakie Range, Owl Creek, and southern Bighorn Mountains on the north, the Casper arch on the east and northeast, the Granite Mountains on the south, and the Wind River Range on the west. Important conventional and unconventional oil and gas resources have been discovered and produced from reservoirs ranging in age from Mississippian through Tertiary. It has been suggested that various Upper Cretaceous marine shales are the principal hydrocarbon source rocks for many of these accumulations. Numerous source rock studies of various Upper Cretaceous marine shales throughout the Rocky Mountain region have led to the conclusion that these rocks have generated, or are capable of generating, oil and (or) gas. With recent advances and success in horizontal drilling and multistage fracture stimulation there has been an increase in exploration and completion of wells in these marine shales in other Rocky Mountain Laramide basins that were traditionally thought of only as hydrocarbon source rocks. Important parameters that control hydrocarbon production from shales include: reservoir thickness, amount and type of organic matter, and thermal maturity. The purpose of this report is to present maps and a structural cross section showing levels of thermal maturity, based on vitrinite reflectance (Ro), for Upper Cretaceous marine shales in the Wind River Basin.

  18. Effects of Arm Weight Support Training to Promote Recovery of Upper Limb Function for Subacute Patients after Stroke with Different Levels of Arm Impairments

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Irene H. L.; Chan, Dora Y. L.; Wang, Apple Q. L.; Cheng, Eddy K. N.; Chau, Pinky H. Y.; Chow, Kathy K. Y.; Cheung, Hobby K. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of arm weight support training using the ArmeoSpring for subacute patients after stroke with different levels of hemiplegic arm impairments. Methods. 48 inpatients with subacute stroke, stratified into 3 groups from mild to severe upper extremity impairment, were engaged in ArmeoSpring training for 45 minutes daily, 5 days per week for 3 weeks, in addition to conventional rehabilitation. Evaluations were conducted at three measurement occasions: immediately before training (T1); immediately after training (T2); and at a 3-week follow-up (T3) by a blind rater. Results. Shoulder flexion active range of motion, Upper Extremity Scores in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA), and Vertical Catch had the greatest differences in gain scores for patients between severe and moderate impairments, whereas FMA Hand Scores had significant differences in gain scores between moderate and mild impairments. There was no significant change in muscle tone or hand-path ratios between T1, T2, and T3 within the groups. Conclusion. Arm weight support training is beneficial for subacute stroke patients with moderate to severe arm impairments, especially to improve vertical control such as shoulder flexion, and there were no adverse effects in muscle tone. PMID:27517053

  19. Effects of Arm Weight Support Training to Promote Recovery of Upper Limb Function for Subacute Patients after Stroke with Different Levels of Arm Impairments.

    PubMed

    Chan, Irene H L; Fong, Kenneth N K; Chan, Dora Y L; Wang, Apple Q L; Cheng, Eddy K N; Chau, Pinky H Y; Chow, Kathy K Y; Cheung, Hobby K Y

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of arm weight support training using the ArmeoSpring for subacute patients after stroke with different levels of hemiplegic arm impairments. Methods. 48 inpatients with subacute stroke, stratified into 3 groups from mild to severe upper extremity impairment, were engaged in ArmeoSpring training for 45 minutes daily, 5 days per week for 3 weeks, in addition to conventional rehabilitation. Evaluations were conducted at three measurement occasions: immediately before training (T1); immediately after training (T2); and at a 3-week follow-up (T3) by a blind rater. Results. Shoulder flexion active range of motion, Upper Extremity Scores in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA), and Vertical Catch had the greatest differences in gain scores for patients between severe and moderate impairments, whereas FMA Hand Scores had significant differences in gain scores between moderate and mild impairments. There was no significant change in muscle tone or hand-path ratios between T1, T2, and T3 within the groups. Conclusion. Arm weight support training is beneficial for subacute stroke patients with moderate to severe arm impairments, especially to improve vertical control such as shoulder flexion, and there were no adverse effects in muscle tone. PMID:27517053

  20. 16 CFR Figure 6 to Part 1633 - Burner Assembly Showing Arms and Pivots (Shoulder Screws), in Relation to, Portable Frame...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Burner Assembly Showing Arms and Pivots (Shoulder Screws), in Relation to, Portable Frame Allowing Burner Height Adjustment 6 Figure 6 to Part 1633... FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt. 1633, Fig. 6 Figure 6 to Part 1633—Burner Assembly Showing...

  1. 16 CFR Figure 6 to Part 1633 - Burner Assembly Showing Arms and Pivots (Shoulder Screws), in Relation to, Portable Frame...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Burner Assembly Showing Arms and Pivots (Shoulder Screws), in Relation to, Portable Frame Allowing Burner Height Adjustment 6 Figure 6 to Part 1633... FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt. 1633, Fig. 6 Figure 6 to Part 1633—Burner Assembly Showing...

  2. Effectiveness of Functional Electrical Stimulation in Improving Clinical Outcomes in the Upper Arm following Stroke: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vafadar, Amir K.; Côté, Julie N.; Archambault, Philippe S.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Different therapeutic methods are being used to prevent or decrease long-term impairments of the upper arm in stroke patients. Functional electrical stimulation (FES) is one of these methods, which aims to stimulate the nerves of the weakened muscles so that the resulting muscle contractions resemble those of a functional task. Objectives. The objective of this study was to review the evidence for the effect of FES on (1) shoulder subluxation, (2) pain, and (3) upper arm motor function in stroke patients, when added to conventional therapy. Methods. From the 727 retrieved articles, 10 (9 RCTs, 1 quasi-RCT) were selected for final analysis and were rated based on the PEDro (Physiotherapy Evidence Database) scores and the Sackett's levels of evidence. A meta-analysis was performed for all three considered outcomes. Results. The results of the meta-analyses showed a significant difference in shoulder subluxation in experimental groups compared to control groups, only if FES was applied early after stroke. No effects were found on pain or motor function outcomes. Conclusion. FES can be used to prevent or reduce shoulder subluxation early after stroke. However, it should not be used to reduce pain or improve upper arm motor function after stroke. PMID:25685805

  3. Seismic tomography shows that upwelling beneath Iceland is confined to the upper mantle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foulger, G.R.; Pritchard, M.J.; Julian, B.R.; Evans, J.R.; Allen, R.M.; Nolet, G.; Morgan, W.J.; Bergsson, B.H.; Erlendsson, P.; Jakobsdottir, S.; Ragnarsson, S.; Stefansson, R.; Vogfjord, K.

    2001-01-01

    range ??? 100-300 km beneath east-central Iceland. The anomalous body is approximately cylindrical in the top 250 km but tabular in shape at greater depth, elongated north-south and generally underlying the spreading plate boundary. Such a morphological change and its relationship to surface rift zones are predicted to occur in convective upwellings driven by basal heating, passive upwelling in response to plate separation and lateral temperature gradients. Although we cannot resolve structure deeper than ??? 450 km, and do not detect a bottom to the anomaly, these models suggest that it extends no deeper than the mantle transition zone. Such models thus suggest a shallow origin for the Iceland hotspot rather than a deep mantle plume, and imply that the hotspot has been located on the spreading ridge in the centre of the north Atlantic for its entire history, and is not fixed relative to other Atlantic hotspots. The results are consistent with recent, regional full-thickness mantle tomography and whole-mantle tomography images that show a strong, low-wave-speed anomaly beneath the Iceland region that is confined to the upper mantle and thus do not require a plume in the lower mantle. Seismic and geochemical observations that are interpreted as indicating a lower mantle, or core-mantle boundary origin for the North Atlantic Igneous Province and the Iceland hotspot should be re-examined to consider whether they are consistent with upper mantle processes.

  4. 16 CFR Figure 6 to Part 1633 - Burner Assembly Showing Arms and Pivots (Shoulder Screws), in Relation to, Portable Frame...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Burner Assembly Showing Arms and Pivots (Shoulder Screws), in Relation to, Portable Frame Allowing Burner Height Adjustment 6 Figure 6 to Part 1633... and Pivots (Shoulder Screws), in Relation to, Portable Frame Allowing Burner Height...

  5. Intuitive wireless control of a robotic arm for people living with an upper body disability.

    PubMed

    Fall, C L; Turgeon, P; Campeau-Lecours, A; Maheu, V; Boukadoum, M; Roy, S; Massicotte, D; Gosselin, C; Gosselin, B

    2015-08-01

    Assistive Technologies (ATs) also called extrinsic enablers are useful tools for people living with various disabilities. The key points when designing such useful devices not only concern their intended goal, but also the most suitable human-machine interface (HMI) that should be provided to users. This paper describes the design of a highly intuitive wireless controller for people living with upper body disabilities with a residual or complete control of their neck and their shoulders. Tested with JACO, a six-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) assistive robotic arm with 3 flexible fingers on its end-effector, the system described in this article is made of low-cost commercial off-the-shelf components and allows a full emulation of JACO's standard controller, a 3 axis joystick with 7 user buttons. To do so, three nine-degree-of-freedom (9-DOF) inertial measurement units (IMUs) are connected to a microcontroller and help measuring the user's head and shoulders position, using a complementary filter approach. The results are then transmitted to a base-station via a 2.4-GHz low-power wireless transceiver and interpreted by the control algorithm running on a PC host. A dedicated software interface allows the user to quickly calibrate the controller, and translates the information into suitable commands for JACO. The proposed controller is thoroughly described, from the electronic design to implemented algorithms and user interfaces. Its performance and future improvements are discussed as well. PMID:26737270

  6. Integrated vision-based robotic arm interface for operators with upper limb mobility impairments.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hairong; Wachs, Juan P; Duerstock, Bradley S

    2013-06-01

    An integrated, computer vision-based system was developed to operate a commercial wheelchair-mounted robotic manipulator (WMRM). In this paper, a gesture recognition interface system developed specifically for individuals with upper-level spinal cord injuries (SCIs) was combined with object tracking and face recognition systems to be an efficient, hands-free WMRM controller. In this test system, two Kinect cameras were used synergistically to perform a variety of simple object retrieval tasks. One camera was used to interpret the hand gestures to send as commands to control the WMRM and locate the operator's face for object positioning. The other sensor was used to automatically recognize different daily living objects for test subjects to select. The gesture recognition interface incorporated hand detection, tracking and recognition algorithms to obtain a high recognition accuracy of 97.5% for an eight-gesture lexicon. An object recognition module employing Speeded Up Robust Features (SURF) algorithm was performed and recognition results were sent as a command for "coarse positioning" of the robotic arm near the selected daily living object. Automatic face detection was also provided as a shortcut for the subjects to position the objects to the face by using a WMRM. Completion time tasks were conducted to compare manual (gestures only) and semi-manual (gestures, automatic face detection and object recognition) WMRM control modes. The use of automatic face and object detection significantly increased the completion times for retrieving a variety of daily living objects. PMID:24187264

  7. Independently evolved upper jaw protrusion mechanisms show convergent hydrodynamic function in teleost fishes.

    PubMed

    Staab, Katie Lynn; Holzman, Roi; Hernandez, L Patricia; Wainwright, Peter C

    2012-05-01

    A protrusible upper jaw has independently evolved multiple times within teleosts and has been implicated in the success of two groups in particular: Acanthomorpha and Cypriniformes. We use digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) to compare suction feeding flow dynamics in a representative of each of these clades: goldfish and bluegill. Using DPIV, we contrast the spatial pattern of flow, the temporal relationship between flow and head kinematics, and the contribution of jaw protrusion to the forces exerted on prey. As expected, the spatial patterns of flow were similar in the two species. However, goldfish were slower to reach maximal kinematic excursions, and were more flexible in the relative timing of jaw protrusion, other jaw movements and suction flows. Goldfish were also able to sustain flow speeds for a prolonged period of time as compared with bluegill, in part because goldfish generate lower peak flow speeds. In both species, jaw protrusion increased the force exerted on the prey. However, slower jaw protrusion in goldfish resulted in less augmentation of suction forces. This difference in force exerted on prey corresponds with differences in trophic niches and feeding behavior of the two species. The bluegill uses powerful suction to capture insect larvae whereas the goldfish uses winnowing to sort through detritus and sediment. The kinethmoid of goldfish may permit jaw protrusion that is independent of lower jaw movement, which could explain the ability of goldfish to decouple suction flows (due to buccal expansion) from upper jaw protrusion. Nevertheless, our results show that jaw protrusion allows both species to augment the force exerted on prey, suggesting that this is a fundamental benefit of jaw protrusion to suction feeders. PMID:22496281

  8. Blood pressure self-measurement in upper arm and in wrist for treatment control of arterial hypertension compared to ABPM.

    PubMed

    Eckert, S; Gleichmann, S; Gleichmann, U

    1996-01-01

    Automatic 24 h Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring (ABPM) has become an established method in the diagnosis and treatment control of arterial hypertension. Fully automatic blood pressure devices for blood pressure self-measurement (BPSM) in the upper arm and in the wrist using the oscillometric measuring technique have been available in Germany for several years. After evaluating the blood pressure devices boso Oscillomat (upper arm) and Omron HEM-601 (wrist) by means of simultaneous invasive measurements, we studied the suitability of this new method for the control of treated hypertension. Using the device Space Labs 90207, we had ABPM carried out in 100 men (aged 58 +/- 8 years) with mild to moderate hypertension. They recorded hourly blood pressure measurements in the wrist between 6 a.m. and 6 p.m., in the same arm as the blood pressure monitoring using the device Omron HEM-601, or in the other arm using the device boso Oscillomat. The values of systolic and diastolic blood pressure were measured using both methods. Since the random samples probably consisted of non-standard distribution differences, we applied the Wilcoxon matched pairs signed rank test for statistical analysis. No significant differences were recorded between the daily mean systolic (p < .07) and diastolic (p < .97) blood pressure values determined by ABPM and by frequent blood pressure self-measurement. Multiple blood pressure readings obtained using blood pressure self-measurement in the upper arm as well as in the wrist are an alternative to the established, automatic 24-h, ambulatory blood pressure measurement for the treatment control of arterial hypertension, that nightly blood pressure measurement can be omitted. It has advantage of unrestricted and desired frequent use under standardized conditions. PMID:8896310

  9. Can we regrow a human arm? A negative perspective from an upper-limb surgeon.

    PubMed

    Merolli, Antonio

    2013-11-01

    If we would like to devote time and money to the task of regrowing a human arm, we should feel free to do it, in principle. However, if we recognize a purpose in biomedical research, we must scrutinize this task in the light of a possible clinical application. We will then discover that regrowing a human arm is not only likely to be not possible, but also not required in the clinic. Bionic arms and better reconstructive surgery already provide a different, simpler and easier solution to the loss of a human arm, and should be promoted. Probably, ‘‘can we regrow a human arm?’’ is not the right question. Instead, we should ask, ‘‘can we restore the function of a lost human arm?’’. PMID:24077994

  10. CXCL11-Armed oncolytic poxvirus elicits potent antitumor immunity and shows enhanced therapeutic efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zuqiang; Ravindranathan, Roshni; Li, Jun; Kalinski, Pawel; Guo, Z. Sheng; Bartlett, David L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have armed a tumor-selective oncolytic vaccinia virus (vvDD) with the chemokine (CK) CXCL11, in order to enhance its ability to attract CXCR3+ antitumor CTLs and possibly NK cells to the tumor microenvironment (TME) and improve its therapeutic efficacy. As expected, vvDD-CXCL11 attracted high numbers of tumor-specific T cells to the TME in a murine AB12 mesothelioma model. Intratumoral virus-directed CXCL11 expression enhanced local numbers of CD8+ CTLs and levels of granzyme B, while reducing expression of several suppressive molecules, TGF-β, COX2, and CCL22 in the TME. Unexpectedly, we observed that vvDD-CXCL11, but not parental vvDD, induced a systemic increase in tumor-specific IFNγ-producing CD8+ T cells in the spleen and other lymph organs, indicating the induction of systemic antitumor immunity. This effect was associated with enhanced therapeutic efficacy and a survival benefit in tumor-bearing mice treated with vvDD-CXCL11, mediated by CD8+ T cells and IFNγ, but not CD4+ T cells. These results demonstrate that intratumoral expression of CXCL11, in addition to promoting local trafficking of T cells and to a lesser extent NK cells, has a novel function as a factor eliciting systemic immunity to cancer-associated antigens. Our data provide a rationale for expressing CXCL11 to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of oncolytic viruses (OVs) and cancer vaccines. PMID:27141352

  11. A method to determine the orientation of the upper arm about its longitudinal axis during dynamic motions.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Brian J; Dapena, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    Inaccuracy in determining the orientation of the upper arm about its longitudinal axis (twist orientation) has been a pervasive problem in sport biomechanics research. The purpose of this study was to develop a method to improve the calculation of the upper arm twist orientation in dynamic sports activities. The twist orientation of the upper arm is defined by the orientation of its mediolateral axis. The basis for the new method is that at any angle in the flexion/extension range of an individual's elbow, it is possible to define a true mediolateral axis and also a surrogate mediolateral axis perpendicular to the plane containing the shoulder, elbow and wrist joints. The difference between the twist orientations indicated by these two versions of the mediolateral axis will vary from one elbow angle to another, but if the elbow joint deforms equally in different activities, for any given subject the difference should be constant at any given value of the elbow angle. Application of the new method required individuals to execute sedate elbow extension trials prior to the dynamic trials. Three-dimensional motion analysis of the sedate extension trials allowed quantification of the difference between the true and surrogate mediolateral axes for all angles in the entire flexion/extension range of an individual's elbow. This made it possible to calculate in any dynamic trial the twist orientation defined by the true mediolateral axis from the twist orientation defined by the surrogate mediolateral axis. The method was tested on a wooden model of the arm. PMID:23141956

  12. Effects of handgrip training and intermittent compression of upper arm veins on forearm vessels in patients with end-stage renal failure.

    PubMed

    Rus, Rina; Ponikvar, Rafael; Kenda, Rajko B; Buturović-Ponikvar, Jadranka

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of our study was to assess the influence of handgrip training and intermittent compression of the upper arm veins on forearm arteries and veins. Eighteen chronic hemodialysis patients performed daily handgrip training for 8 weeks using a rubber ring, together with daily intermittent compression of the upper arm veins by elastic band. The forearm circumference, maximal handgrip strength, and arterial and vein parameters, including endothelium-dependent vasodilatation, were measured at the beginning, and after 4 and 8 weeks (using ultrasound scanning). The maximal handgrip strength and forearm circumference increased significantly. The radial artery diameters were significantly higher after 8 weeks of training (1.89 mm +/- 0.10 at the beginning, 1.95 +/- 0.10 mm after 8 weeks, P = 0.007), and endothelium-dependent vasodilatation was also found to be increased after 4 and 8 weeks of both activities. The venous parameters before tourniquet placement increased significantly after 8 weeks (2.40 +/- 0.16 mm at the beginning, 2.62 +/- 0.17 mm after 8 weeks, P = 0.014), and the venous parameters after tourniquet placement increased significantly after 4 and 8 weeks (3.36 +/- 0.17 mm at the beginning, 3.51 +/- 0.18 mm after 4 weeks, P = 0.009), 3.68 +/- 0.18 mm after 8 weeks, P < 0.001). The distensibility of veins was preserved. Our results showed that handgrip training and intermittent compression of the upper arm veins, performed daily, increase the diameter of forearm arteries and veins and improve endothelium-dependent vasodilatation. PMID:15966998

  13. Relationship between Mid-Upper Arm Circumference and Body Mass Index in Inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Benítez Brito, Néstor; Suárez Llanos, José Pablo; Fuentes Ferrer, Manuel; Oliva García, Jose Gregorio; Delgado Brito, Irina; Pereyra-García Castro, Francisca; Caracena Castellanos, Nieves; Acevedo Rodríguez, Candelaria Xiomara; Palacio Abizanda, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Nutritional screening is a fundamental aspect of the initial evaluation of the hospitalised patient. Body Mass Index (BMI) in association with other parameters is a good marker of malnutrition (<18.5 kg/m2), but it presents the handicap that the great majority of patients cannot be weighed and measured. For this reason it is necessary to find other indicators that can be measured in these patients. Objectives 1) Analyse the relationship between BMI and Mid-Upper Arm Circumference (MUAC); 2) establish a cut-off point of MUAC equivalent to BMI <18.5 kg/m2. Materials and Methods The anthropometric data of patients hospitalised over the period 2004–2013 were retrospectively revised. The following variables were collected: weight, height, BMI, MUAC, sex and age. Results 1373 patients were evaluated, who presented a mean weight of: 65.04±15.51 kg; height: 1.66±0.09 m; BMI: 23.48±5.03 kg/m2; MUAC: 26.95±4.50 cm; age: 56.24±16.77. MUAC correlates suitably to BMI by means of the following equation (simple linear regression): BMI = − 0.042 + 0.873 x MUAC (cm) (R2 = 0.609), with a Pearson r value of 0.78 (p<0.001). The area under the curve of MUAC for the diagnosis of malnutrition was 0.92 (95% CI: 0.90–0.94; p<0.001). The MUAC value ≤22.5 cm presented a sensitivity of 67.7%, specificity of 94.5%, and a correct classification of 90%. No significant statistical differences were found in the cut-off point of MUAC for the diagnosis of malnutrition based on sex (p = 0.115) and age (p = 0.694). Conclusions 1) MUAC correlates positively and significantly with BMI. 2) MUAC ≤ 22.5 cm correlates properly with a BMI of <18.5 kg/m2, independent of the age or sex of the patient, although there are other alternatives. MUAC constitutes a useful tool as a marker of malnutrition, fundamentally in patients for whom weight and height cannot be determined. PMID:27494612

  14. Residual Upper Arm Motor Function Primes Innervation of Paretic Forearm Muscles in Chronic Stroke after Brain-Machine Interface (BMI) Training

    PubMed Central

    Curado, Marco Rocha; Cossio, Eliana Garcia; Broetz, Doris; Agostini, Manuel; Cho, Woosang; Brasil, Fabricio Lima; Yilmaz, Oezge; Liberati, Giulia; Lepski, Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    Background Abnormal upper arm-forearm muscle synergies after stroke are poorly understood. We investigated whether upper arm function primes paralyzed forearm muscles in chronic stroke patients after Brain-Machine Interface (BMI)-based rehabilitation. Shaping upper arm-forearm muscle synergies may support individualized motor rehabilitation strategies. Methods Thirty-two chronic stroke patients with no active finger extensions were randomly assigned to experimental or sham groups and underwent daily BMI training followed by physiotherapy during four weeks. BMI sessions included desynchronization of ipsilesional brain activity and a robotic orthosis to move the paretic limb (experimental group, n = 16). In the sham group (n = 16) orthosis movements were random. Motor function was evaluated with electromyography (EMG) of forearm extensors, and upper arm and hand Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA) scores. Patients performed distinct upper arm (e.g., shoulder flexion) and hand movements (finger extensions). Forearm EMG activity significantly higher during upper arm movements as compared to finger extensions was considered facilitation of forearm EMG activity. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to test inter-session reliability of facilitation of forearm EMG activity. Results Facilitation of forearm EMG activity ICC ranges from 0.52 to 0.83, indicating fair to high reliability before intervention in both limbs. Facilitation of forearm muscles is higher in the paretic as compared to the healthy limb (p<0.001). Upper arm FMA scores predict facilitation of forearm muscles after intervention in both groups (significant correlations ranged from R = 0.752, p = 0.002 to R = 0.779, p = 0.001), but only in the experimental group upper arm FMA scores predict changes in facilitation of forearm muscles after intervention (R = 0.709, p = 0.002; R = 0.827, p<0.001). Conclusions Residual upper arm motor function primes recruitment of paralyzed forearm muscles in chronic stroke

  15. Upper limb joint space modeling of stroke induced synergies using isolated and voluntary arm perturbations.

    PubMed

    Simkins, Matt; Al-Refai, Aimen H; Rosen, Jacob

    2014-05-01

    Among other diminished motor capabilities, survivors of a stroke often exhibit joint synergies. These synergies are stereotypically characterized by involuntary joint co-activation. With respect to the upper limbs, such synergies diminish coordination in reaching, pointing, and other daily tasks. The primary goal of this research is to model synergy and quantify it in a comprehensive and mathematically tractable form. A motion capture system was used to measure joint rotations from stroke survivors and control subjects. These data showed that joint synergies are nonunique and asymmetric. The model also provided a way to calculate joint combinations that result in maximum and minimum synergy. Beyond providing a more complete view of synergies, this approach could facilitate new ways to evaluate and treat stroke survivors. In particular, this approach may have applications in diagnostic and treatment algorithms for use in rehabilitation robots. PMID:23912501

  16. Efficacy of mid-upper arm circumference in identification, follow-up and discharge of malnourished children during nutrition rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    De Steur, Hans; Gellynck, Xavier; Saeed, Hibbah Araba; Makokha, Anselimo

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Although it is crucial to identify those children likely to be treated in an appropriate nutrition rehabilitation programme and discharge them at the appropriate time, there is no golden standard for such identification. The current study examined the appropriateness of using Mid-Upper Arm Circumference for the identification, follow-up and discharge of malnourished children. We also assessed its discrepancy with the Weight-for-Height based diagnosis, the rate of recovery, and the discharge criteria of the children during nutrition rehabilitation. SUBJECTS/METHODS The study present findings from 156 children (aged 6-59 months) attending a supplementary feeding programme at Makadara and Jericho Health Centres, Eastern District of Nairobi, Kenya. Records of age, weight, height and mid-upper arm circumference were selected at three stages of nutrition rehabilitation: admission, follow-up and discharge. The values obtained were then used to calculate z-scores as defined by WHO Anthro while estimating different diagnostic indices. RESULTS Mid-upper arm circumference single cut-off (< 12.5 cm) was found to exhibit high values of sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, positive likelihood ratio, negative likelihood ratio at both admission and discharge. Besides, children recorded higher rate of recovery at 86 days, an average increment of 0.98 cm at the rate of 0.14mm/day, and a weight gain of 13.49gm/day, albeit higher in female than their male counterparts. Nevertheless, children admitted on basis of low MUAC had a significantly higher MUAC gain than WH at 0.19mm/day and 0.13mm/day respectively. CONCLUSIONS Mid-upper arm circumference can be an appropriate tool for identifying malnourished children for admission to nutrition rehabilitation programs. Our results confirm the appropriateness of this tool for monitoring recovery trends and discharging the children thereafter. In principle the tool has potential

  17. A standard set of upper extremity tasks for evaluating rehabilitation interventions for individuals with complete arm paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Cornwell, Andrew S.; Liao, James Y.; Bryden, Anne M.; Kirsch, Robert F.

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a set of upper extremity functional tasks to guide the design and test the performance of rehabilitation technologies that restore arm motion in people with high tetraplegia. Our goal was to develop a short set of tasks that would be representative of a much larger set of activities of daily living while also being feasible for a unilateral user of an implanted Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) system. To compile this list of tasks, we reviewed existing clinical outcome measures related to arm and hand function, and were further informed by surveys of patient desires. We ultimately selected a set of five tasks that captured the most common components of movement seen in these tasks, making them highly relevant for assessing FES-restored unilateral arm function in individuals with high cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). The tasks are intended to be used when setting design specifications and for evaluation and standardization of rehabilitation technologies under development. While not unique, this set of tasks will provide a common basis for comparing different interventions (e.g., FES, powered orthoses, robotic assistants) and testing different user command interfaces (e.g., sip-and-puff, head joysticks, brain-computer interfaces). PMID:22773199

  18. A study on effects of backrest thickness on the upper arm and trunk muscle load during wheelchair propulsion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joo-Hyun; Yoo, In-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the thickness of a wheelchair backrest provided for support and comfort on upper arm and trunk muscle load during wheelchair propulsion by using accelerometers. [Subjects and Methods] The Fourteen healthy participants were enrolled in this study. The study compared effects of three backrest conditions including no pad, a 3-cm-thick lumbar pad, and a 6-cm-thick lumbar pad. The instruments used for measurement were used two accelerometers. The participants were asked to propel their wheelchairs, which had been equipped with two accelerometers, 30 times. [Results] The intensity of muscle movement with the 3-cm-thick lumbar pad was significantly lower than the intensities with no lumbar pad and the 6-cm-thick lumbar pad. The muscle intensity did not differ significantly between the no pad and 6-cm-thick lumbar pad conditions. [Conclusion] An appropriately thick backrest has good effects on upper arm and trunk muscles during wheelchair propulsion. In the future, we must consider the appropriate backrest thickness for providing wheelchair users with a comfortable wheelchair. PMID:27313357

  19. The Appropriateness of the Length of Insulin Needles Based on Determination of Skin and Subcutaneous Fat Thickness in the Abdomen and Upper Arm in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Kang Hee; Kim, Sun Young; Lee, Hye Mi; Chang, Ji Yeun; Lee, Moon Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Background Longer needle and complicated insulin injection technique such as injecting at a 45-degree angle and making skinfolds may decrease patient compliance to insulin injection therapy. In this light, shorter insulin needles have been recently developed. However, it is necessary to ascertain that such shorter needles are appropriate for Korean patients with diabetes as well. Methods First, the diverse demographic and diabetic features of 156 Korean adults with diabetes were collected by a questionnaire and a device unit of body fat measurement. The skin and subcutaneous fat thicknesses of each subject were measured by Ultrasound device with a 7- to 12-MHz probe. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance and multiple linear regression. Results The mean skin thickness was 2.29±0.37 mm in the abdomen and 2.00±0.34 mm in the upper arms, and the mean subcutaneous fat thickness was to 10.15±6.54 mm in the abdomen and 5.50±2.68 mm in the upper arms. Our analysis showed that the factors affecting the skin thickness of the abdomen and upper arms were gender and body mass index (BMI), whereas the factors influencing the subcutaneous fat thickness in the abdomen were gender and BMI, and the factors influencing the subcutaneous fat thickness in the upper arms were gender, BMI, and age. Insulin fluids may not appear to be intradermally injected into the abdomen and upper arms at any needle lengths. The risk of intramuscular injection is likely to increase with longer insulin needles and lower BMI. Conclusion It is recommended to fully inform the patients about the lengths of needles for insulin injections. As for the recommended needle length, the findings of this study indicate that needles as short as 4 mm are sufficient to deliver insulin for Korean patients with diabetes. PMID:24851206

  20. Adaptive training algorithm for robot-assisted upper-arm rehabilitation, applicable to individualised and therapeutic human-robot interaction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    towards’ movements irrespective of the influence of the gravity on the direction of the movement. Conclusions The GENTLE/A system was able to adapt so that the duration required to execute point-to-point movement was according to the leading or lagging performance of the user with respect to the robot. This adaptability could be useful in the clinical settings when stroke subjects interact with the system and could also serve as an assessment parameter across various interaction sessions. As the system adapts to user input, and as the task becomes easier through practice, the robot would auto-tune for more demanding and challenging interactions. The improvement in performance of the participants in an embedded environment when compared to a virtual environment also shows promise for clinical applicability, to be tested in due time. Studying the physiology of upper arm to understand the muscle groups involved, and their influence on various movements executed during this study forms a key part of our future work. PMID:24073670

  1. Observer performance in estimating upper arm elevation angles under ideal viewing conditions when assisted by posture matching software.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Jennie A; Mathiassen, Svend Erik; Liv, Per

    2016-07-01

    Selecting a suitable body posture measurement method requires performance indices of candidate tools. Such data are lacking for observational assessments made at a high degree of resolution. The aim of this study was to determine the performance (bias and between- and within-observer variance) of novice observers estimating upper arm elevation postures assisted by posture matching software to the nearest degree from still images taken under ideal conditions. Estimates were minimally biased from true angles: the mean error across observers was less than 2°. Variance between observers was minimal. Considerable variance within observers, however, underlined the risk of relying on single observations. Observers were more proficient at estimating 0° and 90° postures, and less proficient at 60°. Thus, under ideal visual conditions observers, on average, proved proficient at high resolution posture estimates; further investigation is required to determine how non-optimal image conditions, as would be expected from occupational data, impact proficiency. PMID:26995050

  2. Shotgun injury to the arm: a staged protocol for upper limb salvage.

    PubMed

    Nikica, Darabos; Marijan, Cesarec; Denis, Grgurovic; Zeljko, Rutic; Anela, Darabos; Egol, Kenneth

    2010-03-01

    Low-energy shotgun fractures involving the arm are complex injuries. Previously published reports have emphasized various problems associated with these injuries. This case report describes a low-energy shotgun wound managed by a staged treatment protocol involving: (1) a spanning external fixator and immediate soft tissue management, followed by (2) osteosynthesis and autogenous bone grafting and (3) epineural suturing of injured radial nerve, with a successful outcome. Although adequate debridement of the fracture and soft tissue wound is the key to open fracture management, some difference of opinion exists with regard to the timing of bone reconstruction and grafting. In severe type III open fractures, or in wounds that are marginal, it may be best to delay cancellous bone grafting until soft tissue has stabilized following acute trauma when the risk of infection has been minimized. If early coverage of vital structures is not possible, local or remote flap coverage may be necessary. PMID:20358713

  3. Validity of a small low-cost triaxial accelerometer with integrated logger for uncomplicated measurements of postures and movements of head, upper back and upper arms.

    PubMed

    Dahlqvist, Camilla; Hansson, Gert-Åke; Forsman, Mikael

    2016-07-01

    Repetitive work and work in constrained postures are risk factors for developing musculoskeletal disorders. Low-cost, user-friendly technical methods to quantify these risks are needed. The aims were to validate inclination angles and velocities of one model of the new generation of accelerometers with integrated data loggers against a previously validated one, and to compare meaurements when using a plain reference posture with that of a standardized one. All mean (n = 12 subjects) angular RMS-differences in 4 work tasks and 4 body parts were <2.5° and all mean median angular velocity differences <5.0 °/s. The mean correlation between the inclination signal-pairs was 0.996. This model of the new generation of triaxial accelerometers proved to be comparable to the validated accelerometer using a data logger. This makes it well-suited, for both researchers and practitioners, to measure postures and movements during work. Further work is needed for validation of the plain reference posture for upper arms. PMID:26995040

  4. Monitoring the adequacy of catch-up growth among moderately malnourished children receiving home-based therapy using mid-upper arm circumference in Southern Malawi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Each year more children die from moderate than severe malnutrition. Home-based therapy (HBT) using Ready-to-Use Therapeutic Foods (RUTF) has proven to successfully treat uncomplicated childhood malnutrition on an outpatient basis. This study attempts to discern if Mid-upper Arm Circumference (MUAC) ...

  5. Oncolytic Adenoviruses Armed with Thymidine Kinase Can Be Traced by PET Imaging and Show Potent Antitumoural Effects by Ganciclovir Dosing

    PubMed Central

    Abate-Daga, Daniel; Andreu, Nuria; Camacho-Sánchez, Juan; Alemany, Ramon; Herance, Raúl; Millán, Olga; Fillat, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    Replication-competent adenoviruses armed with thymidine kinase (TK) combine the concepts of virotherapy and suicide gene therapy. Moreover TK-activity can be detected by noninvasive positron emission-computed tomography (PET) imaging, what could potentially facilitate virus monitoring in vivo. Here, we report the generation of a novel oncolytic adenovirus that incorporates the Tat8-TK gene under the control of the Major Late Promoter in a highly selective backbone thus providing selectivity by targeting the retinoblastoma pathway. The selective oncolytic TK virus, termed ICOVIR5-TK-L, showed reduced potency compared to a non-selective counterpart. However the combination of ICOVIR5-TK-L with ganciclovir (GCV) induced a potent antitumoural effect similar to that of wild type adenovirus in a preclinical model of pancreatic cancer. Although the treatment with GCV provoked a reduction in the viral yield, both in vitro and in vivo, a two-cycle treatment of virus and GCV resulted in an enhanced antitumoral response that correlated with high TK-activity, based on microPET measurements. Thus, TK-expressing oncolytic adenoviruses can be traced by PET imaging providing real time information on the activity of the virus and its antitumoral potency can be optimized by GCV dosing. PMID:22028820

  6. Upper Arm Basilic Vein Transposition for Hemodialysis: A Single Center Study for 300 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yunhee; Song, Dan; Kim, Myung Jin; Yun, Sang Chul

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The population of end-stage renal failure patients dependent on hemodialysis continues to expand with an increasing number of patients having an unsuitable cephalic vein or failed radio- and brachio-cephalic fistula. In these patients, the transposed basilic vein to brachial artery arteriovenous fistula (BaVT) provides autologous choice for hemodialysis. The results of basilic vein transposition arteriovenous fistula were assessed. Materials and Methods: Three hundred cases of BaVT performed at a single center during the period of January 2005 to December 2011 were reviewed retrospectively. Data including demographics and postoperative complications were collected. Primary and secondary patency rates were determined by using Kaplan-Meier methods. Results: The median age of patients was 57.4±13.1 years, and 154 patients were male. Renal failure was associated with hypertension in 88.7%, and with diabetes in 34.0%. The mean follow-up was 27.4±20.0 (12 to 72) months. There was no operation-related death. Eighteen patients required prosthetic graft interposition because of short vein. Thirty-five postoperative complications developed in 41 patients (148 cases), including thrombosis, stenosis, hematoma, seroma, arm swelling, steal syndrome, infection and aneurysm formation. Primary patency of BaVT was 69%, 60%, 53%, 52%, 44%, and 22% at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 years, respectively. Secondary patency was 99%, 97%, 97%, 97%, 95%, and 95%, respectively. Conclusion: Chronic renal failure patients with hemodialysis may benefit from BaVT, because of high patency, less radiologic procedure, and less infection rate. The BaVT fistula should be used in preference to polytetrafluoroethylene grafts for secondary access. PMID:27386452

  7. 16 CFR Figure 6 to Part 1633 - Burner Assembly Showing Arms and Pivots (Shoulder Screws) in Relation to Portable Frame Allowing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Burner Assembly Showing Arms and Pivots (Shoulder Screws) in Relation to Portable Frame Allowing Burner Height Adjustment 6 Figure 6 to Part 1633... FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt.1633, Fig. 6 Figure 6 to Part 1633—Burner Assembly Showing...

  8. 16 CFR Figure 6 to Part 1633 - Burner Assembly Showing Arms and Pivots (Shoulder Screws) in Relation to, Portable Frame Allowing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Burner Assembly Showing Arms and Pivots (Shoulder Screws) in Relation to, Portable Frame Allowing Burner Height Adjustment 6 Figure 6 to Part 1633... FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt.1633, Fig. 6 Figure 6 to Part 1633—Burner Assembly Showing...

  9. Changes in blood flow in conduit artery and veins of the upper arm during leg exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Ooue, Anna; Ichinose, Tomoko K; Inoue, Yoshimitsu; Nishiyasu, Takeshi; Koga, Shunsaku; Kondo, Narihiko

    2008-06-01

    This study investigated changes in blood flow in the conduit artery, superficial vein, and deep vein of the upper arm during increase in internal temperature due to leg cycling. Additionally, we sought to demonstrate the contributions of blood velocity and vessel diameter on blood flow responses. Fourteen subjects performed supine cycling exercise at 60-69% maximal oxygen uptake for 30 min at an ambient temperature of 28 degrees C and relative humidity of 50%. Blood velocity and diameter in the brachial artery, basilic vein (superficial vein), and brachial vein (deep vein) were measured using ultrasound Doppler, and blood flow was calculated. Blood flow in the artery and superficial vein increased linearly with rising oesophageal temperature (DeltaT (oes)) after DeltaT (oes) was about 0.3 degrees C (within threshold), as well as cutaneous vascular conductance on the forearm. Changes in blood velocity in these vessels were similar to those in blood flow. Conversely, the brachial artery and superficial vein diameter did not affect the blood flow response. Blood flow variables in the deep vein did not change remarkably with rising DeltaT (oes). These results suggest that blood flow response, by an increase in velocity, in the conduit artery with rising DeltaT (oes) during exercise is similar to that in the superficial vein, but not deep vein. Also, it is indicated that these increases in blood flow relate to the increase in skin blood flow on the forearm with the rise in body temperature during exercise. PMID:18369659

  10. High-density surface EMG maps from upper-arm and forearm muscles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background sEMG signal has been widely used in different applications in kinesiology and rehabilitation as well as in the control of human-machine interfaces. In general, the signals are recorded with bipolar electrodes located in different muscles. However, such configuration may disregard some aspects of the spatial distribution of the potentials like location of innervation zones and the manifestation of inhomogineties in the control of the muscular fibers. On the other hand, the spatial distribution of motor unit action potentials has recently been assessed with activation maps obtained from High Density EMG signals (HD-EMG), these lasts recorded with arrays of closely spaced electrodes. The main objective of this work is to analyze patterns in the activation maps, associating them with four movement directions at the elbow joint and with different strengths of those tasks. Although the activation pattern can be assessed with bipolar electrodes, HD-EMG maps could enable the extraction of features that depend on the spatial distribution of the potentials and on the load-sharing between muscles, in order to have a better differentiation between tasks and effort levels. Methods An experimental protocol consisting of isometric contractions at three levels of effort during flexion, extension, supination and pronation at the elbow joint was designed and HD-EMG signals were recorded with 2D electrode arrays on different upper-limb muscles. Techniques for the identification and interpolation of artifacts are explained, as well as a method for the segmentation of the activation areas. In addition, variables related to the intensity and spatial distribution of the maps were obtained, as well as variables associated to signal power of traditional single bipolar recordings. Finally, statistical tests were applied in order to assess differences between information extracted from single bipolar signals or from HD-EMG maps and to analyze differences due to type of task and

  11. Intersegmental dynamics of 3D upper arm and forearm longitudinal axis rotations during baseball pitching.

    PubMed

    Naito, Kozo; Takagi, Hiroyasu; Yamada, Norimasa; Hashimoto, Shinichi; Maruyama, Takeo

    2014-12-01

    The shoulder internal rotation (IR) and forearm pronation (PR) are important elements for baseball pitching, however, how rapid rotations of IR and PR are produced by muscular torques and inter-segmental forces is not clear. The aim of this study is to clarify how IR and PR angular velocities are maximized, depending on muscular torque and interactive torque effects, and gain a detailed knowledge about inter-segmental interaction within a multi-joint linked chain. The throwing movements of eight collegiate baseball pitchers were recorded by a motion capture system, and induced-acceleration analysis was used to assess the respective contributions of the muscular (MUS) and interactive torques associated with gyroscopic moment (GYR), and Coriolis (COR) and centrifugal forces (CEN) to maximum angular velocities of IR (MIRV) and PR (MPRV). The results showed that the contribution of MUS account for 98.0% of MIRV, while that contribution to MPRV was indicated as negative (-48.1%). It was shown that MPRV depends primarily on the interactive torques associated with GYR and CEN, but the effects of GYR, COR and CEN on MIRV are negligible. In conclusion, rapid PR motion during pitching is created by passive-effect, and is likely a natural movement which arises from 3D throwing movement. Applying the current analysis to IR and PR motions is helpful in providing the implications for improving performance and considering conditioning methods for pitchers. PMID:25303496

  12. Hybrid Neuroprosthesis for the Upper Limb: Combining Brain-Controlled Neuromuscular Stimulation with a Multi-Joint Arm Exoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Florian; Walter, Armin; Spüler, Martin; Naros, Georgios; Rosenstiel, Wolfgang; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Brain-machine interface-controlled (BMI) neurofeedback training aims to modulate cortical physiology and is applied during neurorehabilitation to increase the responsiveness of the brain to subsequent physiotherapy. In a parallel line of research, robotic exoskeletons are used in goal-oriented rehabilitation exercises for patients with severe motor impairment to extend their range of motion (ROM) and the intensity of training. Furthermore, neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is applied in neurologically impaired patients to restore muscle strength by closing the sensorimotor loop. In this proof-of-principle study, we explored an integrated approach for providing assistance as needed to amplify the task-related ROM and the movement-related brain modulation during rehabilitation exercises of severely impaired patients. For this purpose, we combined these three approaches (BMI, NMES, and exoskeleton) in an integrated neuroprosthesis and studied the feasibility of this device in seven severely affected chronic stroke patients who performed wrist flexion and extension exercises while receiving feedback via a virtual environment. They were assisted by a gravity-compensating, seven degree-of-freedom exoskeleton which was attached to the paretic arm. NMES was applied to the wrist extensor and flexor muscles during the exercises and was controlled by a hybrid BMI based on both sensorimotor cortical desynchronization (ERD) and electromyography (EMG) activity. The stimulation intensity was individualized for each targeted muscle and remained subthreshold, i.e., induced no overt support. The hybrid BMI controlled the stimulation significantly better than the offline analyzed ERD (p = 0.028) or EMG (p = 0.021) modality alone. Neuromuscular stimulation could be well integrated into the exoskeleton-based training and amplified both the task-related ROM (p = 0.009) and the movement-related brain modulation (p = 0.019). Combining a hybrid BMI with neuromuscular stimulation

  13. Hybrid Neuroprosthesis for the Upper Limb: Combining Brain-Controlled Neuromuscular Stimulation with a Multi-Joint Arm Exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Florian; Walter, Armin; Spüler, Martin; Naros, Georgios; Rosenstiel, Wolfgang; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Brain-machine interface-controlled (BMI) neurofeedback training aims to modulate cortical physiology and is applied during neurorehabilitation to increase the responsiveness of the brain to subsequent physiotherapy. In a parallel line of research, robotic exoskeletons are used in goal-oriented rehabilitation exercises for patients with severe motor impairment to extend their range of motion (ROM) and the intensity of training. Furthermore, neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is applied in neurologically impaired patients to restore muscle strength by closing the sensorimotor loop. In this proof-of-principle study, we explored an integrated approach for providing assistance as needed to amplify the task-related ROM and the movement-related brain modulation during rehabilitation exercises of severely impaired patients. For this purpose, we combined these three approaches (BMI, NMES, and exoskeleton) in an integrated neuroprosthesis and studied the feasibility of this device in seven severely affected chronic stroke patients who performed wrist flexion and extension exercises while receiving feedback via a virtual environment. They were assisted by a gravity-compensating, seven degree-of-freedom exoskeleton which was attached to the paretic arm. NMES was applied to the wrist extensor and flexor muscles during the exercises and was controlled by a hybrid BMI based on both sensorimotor cortical desynchronization (ERD) and electromyography (EMG) activity. The stimulation intensity was individualized for each targeted muscle and remained subthreshold, i.e., induced no overt support. The hybrid BMI controlled the stimulation significantly better than the offline analyzed ERD (p = 0.028) or EMG (p = 0.021) modality alone. Neuromuscular stimulation could be well integrated into the exoskeleton-based training and amplified both the task-related ROM (p = 0.009) and the movement-related brain modulation (p = 0.019). Combining a hybrid BMI with neuromuscular stimulation

  14. Reliability and Effects of Arm Dominance on Upper Extremity Isokinetic Force, Work, and Power Using the Closed Chain Rider System

    PubMed Central

    Kovaleski, John E.; Heitman, Robert J.; Gurchiek, Larry R.; Trundle, Terry L.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of our study was to assess the reliability of the Closed Chain Rider System between exercise sessions and to determine the effects of arm dominance using muscle force, work, and power measures during closed chain chest-press exercise. Design and Setting: Sitting subjects underwent identical testing on 2 occasions and performed 5 reciprocal chest-press movements at speeds of 51 and 76 cm/s. Subjects: Thirty-eight healthy college students. Measurements: Average force, total work, average power, and linear range of motion were recorded. Reliability was evaluated by calculating intraclass correlation coefficients. Mean differences between the dominant and nondominant arms for the measured variables were analyzed by dependent t tests. Results: For both the dominant and nondominant arms at the 51 and 76 cm/s speeds, reliabilities of average force (range = 0.85 to 0.91), total work (range = 0.88 to 0.92), and average power (range = 0.86 to 0.89) were clinically acceptable. The dominant arm produced significantly greater average force, total work, and average power compared with the nondominant arm. Conclusions: Our results provide clinically useful information about the reliability of force, work, and power measures during multijoint bilateral chest-press movement. Clinicians should be aware of measured differences between dominant and nondominant arms. Imagesp359-a PMID:16558589

  15. 18. DETAIL VIEW OF NONSUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATES, GATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. DETAIL VIEW OF NON-SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATES, GATE ARMS, PIERS AND DAM BRIDGE, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 9, Lynxville, Crawford County, WI

  16. 17. DETAIL VIEW OF NONSUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATES, GATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. DETAIL VIEW OF NON-SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATES, GATE ARMS, PIERS AND DAM BRIDGE, WITH ROLLER GATE HEADHOUSE IN BACKGROUND, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 9, Lynxville, Crawford County, WI

  17. 20. DETAIL VIEW OF NONSUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATE, GATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. DETAIL VIEW OF NONSUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATE, GATE ARM, TRUNNION PIN, PIER AND GATE GAUGE, LOOKING WEST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 10, Guttenberg, Clayton County, IA

  18. 22. DETAIL VIEW OF NONSUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING TRUNNION PIN, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. DETAIL VIEW OF NONSUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING TRUNNION PIN, GATE ARM AND GATE GAUGE, LOOKING NORTHWEST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 10, Guttenberg, Clayton County, IA

  19. 23. DETAIL VIEW OF SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING TRUNNION PIN, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. DETAIL VIEW OF SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING TRUNNION PIN, GATE ARM AND GATE GAUGE, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 10, Guttenberg, Clayton County, IA

  20. 16. DETAIL VIEW OF SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATE, GATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. DETAIL VIEW OF SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATE, GATE ARM, TRUNNION PIN AND PIER, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 8, On Mississippi River near Houston County, MN, Genoa, Vernon County, WI

  1. 15. DETAIL VIEW OF SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATES AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. DETAIL VIEW OF SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATES AND GATE ARMS, PIERS AND DAM BRIDGE, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 8, On Mississippi River near Houston County, MN, Genoa, Vernon County, WI

  2. 21. DETAIL VIEW OF SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATE, GATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. DETAIL VIEW OF SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATE, GATE ARM, TRUNNION PIN, PIER AND GATE GAUGE, LOOKING EAST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 10, Guttenberg, Clayton County, IA

  3. 28. VIEW OF MITER GATE OPERATING MACHINERY, SHOWING MITER GATE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. VIEW OF MITER GATE OPERATING MACHINERY, SHOWING MITER GATE, GATE STRUT, AND SECTOR ARM, LOOKING EAST - Upper Mississippi River Nine-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam No. 25, Cap au Gris, Lincoln County, MO

  4. Using Mid-Upper Arm Circumference to End Treatment of Severe Acute Malnutrition Leads to Higher Weight Gains in the Most Malnourished Children

    PubMed Central

    Dale, Nancy M.; Myatt, Mark; Prudhon, Claudine; Briend, André

    2013-01-01

    Objective The World Health Organization recommends discharging children admitted to nutrition programs treating severe acute malnutrition, with a low mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC <115 mm) when weight gain is >15%. When this recommendation is followed, the most severely malnourished children receive a shorter treatment compared to children that are less severely malnourished. This study assesses whether using MUAC >125 mm as discharge criteria eliminates this effect. Methods and Findings Data from 753 children cured from a Médecins Sans Frontières outpatient nutrition program in Gedaref, North Sudan were analyzed. MUAC >125 mm was used as discharge criteria. Length of stay and percent weight gain of children were compared in relation to nutritional status on admission. Children with low MUAC on admission had a longer duration of treatment (p = 0.000) and also a higher percent weight gain (p = 0.000) than children with higher MUAC. Similar results with weight-for-height z-scores categories were shown with both duration of treatment (p = 0.000) and percent weight gain (p = 0.000). Conclusion This study shows that using MUAC as the discharge criteria eliminates the effect of shorter treatment in most severely malnourished children compared to least severely malnourished, as is observed with percent weight gain. The findings directly address the main concern that has been identified with the current WHO recommendation of using percent weight gain. MUAC could be used as discharge criteria, instead of percent weight gain, as having a longer duration of treatment and a higher percent weight gain for the most malnourished is highly desirable. PMID:23418442

  5. Assessment of Under Nutrition of Bangladeshi Adults Using Anthropometry: Can Body Mass Index Be Replaced by Mid-Upper-Arm-Circumference?

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, Tania; Karim, Md. Nazmul; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Hossain, Md. Iqbal

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective Body-mass-index (BMI) is widely accepted as an indicator of nutritional status in adults. Mid-upper-arm-circumference (MUAC) is another anthropometric-measure used primarily among children. The present study attempted to evaluate the use of MUAC as a simpler alternative to BMI cut-off <18.5 to detect adult undernutrition, and thus to suggest a suitable cut-off value. Methods A cross-sectional study in 650 adult attendants of the patients of Dhaka-Hospital, of the International Centre for Diarrheal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b) was conducted during 2012. Height, weight and MUAC of 260 male and 390 female aged 19–60 years were measured. Curve estimation was done to assess the linearity and correlation of BMI and MUAC. Sensitivity and specificity of MUAC against BMI<18.5 was determined. Separate Receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) analyses were performed for male and female. Area under ROC curve and Youden's index were generated to aid selection of the most suitable cut-off value of MUAC for undernutrition. A value with highest Youden's index was chosen for cut-off. Results Our data shows strong significant positive correlation (linear) between MUAC and BMI, for males r = 0.81, (p<0.001) and for females r = 0.828, (p<0.001). MUAC cut-off <25.1 cm in males (AUC 0.930) and <23.9 cm in females (AUC 0.930) were chosen separately based on highest corresponding Youden's index. These values best correspond with BMI cut-off for under nutrition (BMI <18.5) in either gender. Conclusion MUAC correlates closely with BMI. For the simplicity and easy to remember MUAC <25 cm for male and <24 cm for female may be considered as a simpler alternative to BMI cut-off <18.5 to detect adult undernutrition. PMID:25875397

  6. Maps showing ground-water conditions in the upper Verde River area, Yavapai and Coconino counties, Arizona; 1978

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levings, Gary W.; Mann, Larry J.

    1980-01-01

    The upper Verde River area includes about 3,600 square miles in north-central Arizona. The area is underlain by a regional aquifer that consists of several formations. In places ground water also is present in the igneous rocks and basalt flows and in the alluvium along the channels and flood plains of the streams. Ground-water development has been slight; in 1978 about 8,000 acre-feet of ground water was withdrawn for domestic, public-supply, industrial, and irrigation uses. Information on the maps includes the principal geologic formation that furnishes water to wells and springs, depth to water, altitude of the water level, and chemical quality of the water. Scale 1:125,000. (USGS)

  7. Culture and molecular-based profiles show shifts in bacterial communities of the upper respiratory tract that occur with age

    PubMed Central

    Stearns, Jennifer C; Davidson, Carla J; McKeon, Suzanne; Whelan, Fiona J; Fontes, Michelle E; Schryvers, Anthony B; Bowdish, Dawn M E; Kellner, James D; Surette, Michael G

    2015-01-01

    The upper respiratory tract (URT) is a crucial site for host defense, as it is home to bacterial communities that both modulate host immune defense and serve as a reservoir of potential pathogens. Young children are at high risk of respiratory illness, yet the composition of their URT microbiota is not well understood. Microbial profiling of the respiratory tract has traditionally focused on culturing common respiratory pathogens, whereas recent culture-independent microbiome profiling can only report the relative abundance of bacterial populations. In the current study, we used both molecular profiling of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene and laboratory culture to examine the bacterial diversity from the oropharynx and nasopharynx of 51 healthy children with a median age of 1.1 years (range 1–4.5 years) along with 19 accompanying parents. The resulting profiles suggest that in young children the nasopharyngeal microbiota, much like the gastrointestinal tract microbiome, changes from an immature state, where it is colonized by a few dominant taxa, to a more diverse state as it matures to resemble the adult microbiota. Importantly, this difference in bacterial diversity between adults and children accompanies a change in bacterial load of three orders of magnitude. This indicates that the bacterial communities in the nasopharynx of young children have a fundamentally different structure from those in adults and suggests that maturation of this community occurs sometime during the first few years of life, a period that includes ages at which children are at the highest risk for respiratory disease. PMID:25575312

  8. Occupational musculoskeletal disorders in the neck and upper limbs of forestry workers exposed to hand-arm vibration.

    PubMed

    Bovenzi, M; Zadini, A; Franzinelli, A; Borgogni, F

    1991-05-01

    An epidemiologic and clinical study of neck and upper limb musculoskeletal disorders was carried out on 65 vibration-exposed forestry operators using chain-saws and 31 comparable control subjects (maintenance workers) performing manual activity and not exposed to vibration. Upper limb function was evaluated by measuring finger and wrist circumference size, maximal hand grip strength and range of motion manoeuvres in both the controls and the exposed workers. Vibration from two chain-saws was measured, and vibration exposure for each forestry worker was assessed in terms of 4 h energy-equivalent frequency-weighted acceleration according to ISO 5349. Job analysis indicated a slight excess risk of upper extremity cumulative trauma disorders (CTDs) in the forestry operators compared with the control workers. After adjustment for age and body constitution, significantly higher prevalence rates of persistent upper limb pain, muscle-tendon syndromes and carpal tunnel syndrome were observed among the forestry workers than among the controls. In the forestry operators, the occurrence of upper limb musculoskeletal disorders increased with increasing vibration exposure. Upper limb function was found to be impaired in the forestry workers compared with the controls. Vibration exposure was significantly related to increased finger circumference size, diminished muscle force and reduced joint function. Even though it is difficult to establish the relative importance of vibration and ergonomic factors in the aetiology of CTDs, nevertheless the results of this study indicate that musculoskeletal impairment to the upper limbs was more severe in the forestry operators than in the controls who did solely manual work. This finding and the observed dose-effect relationships suggest that vibration stress is an important contributor to the development of musculoskeletal disorders in workers using hand-held vibrating tools. PMID:1653132

  9. The Effect of High-Intensity Interval Cycling Sprints Subsequent to Arm-Curl Exercise on Upper-Body Muscle Strength and Hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Naoki; Yoshida, Shou; Okuyama, Mizuki; Nakazato, Koichi

    2016-08-01

    Kikuchi, N, Yoshida, S, Okuyama, M, and Nakazato, K. The effect of high-intensity interval cycling sprints subsequent to arm-curl exercise on upper-body muscle strength and hypertrophy. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2318-2323, 2016-The purpose of this study was to examine whether lower limb sprint interval training (SIT) after arm resistance training (RT) influences training response of arm muscle strength and hypertrophy. Twenty men participated in this study. We divided subjects into RT group (n = 6) and concurrent training group (CT, n = 6). The RT program was designed to induce muscular hypertrophy (3 sets × 10 repetitions [reps] at 80% 1 repetition maximum [1RM] of arm-curl exercise) and was performed in an 8-week training schedule performed 3 times per week on nonconsecutive days. Subjects assigned to the CT group performed identical protocols as strength training and modified SIT (4 sets of 30-s maximal effort, separated in 4 m 30-s rest intervals) on the same day. Pretest and posttest maximal oxygen consumption (V[Combining Dot Above]O2max), muscle cross-sectional area (CSA), and 1RM were measured. Significant increase in V[Combining Dot Above]O2max from pretest to posttest was observed in the CT group (p = 0.010, effect size [ES] = 1.84) but not in the RT group (p = 0.559, ES = 0.35). Significant increase in CSA from pretest to posttest was observed in the RT group (p = 0.030, ES = 1.49) but not in the CT group (p = 0.110, ES = 1.01). Significant increase in 1RM from pretest to posttest was observed in the RT group (p = 0.021, ES = 1.57) but not in the CT group (p = 0.065, ES = 1.19). In conclusion, our data indicate that concurrent lower limb SIT interferes with arm muscle hypertrophy and strength. PMID:26694501

  10. Macrotidal subarctic environment of Turnagain and Knik Arms, Upper Cook Inlet, Alaska: sedimentology of the intertidal zone.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartsch-Winkler, S.; Ovenshine, A.T.

    1984-01-01

    An extensive sheet of silty sand crossed by tidal channels is exposed at low tide in Turnagain and Knik Arms, Alaska. Transportation and deposition of sediment composing this sheet is the result of strong tidal currents due to the maximum spring tidal range of approximately 11.4m. The initiation of the floodtide is accompanied by the occurrence of a tidal bore that travels at a speed of 4 m/sec or more up the tide channels. Virtually no macrofauna exist, and so the area provides an opportunity to study depositional processes and sedimentary structures without the masking effects of bioturbation. The intertidal deposits in Turnagain Arm contain a transitional upward-fining sequence which is analogous to point-bar and channel-bar successions described by other workers. This suite of sedimentary features and textures indicates changing current velocities and directions as bars emerge or are modified during ebb tide, and the vertical sequences could potentially be used to record intertidal bar erosion and aggradation by point- and channel-bar migration, a process carried out primarily by bed-load currents.-from Authors

  11. Effects of concurrent physical and cognitive demands on arm movement kinematics in a repetitive upper-extremity precision task.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Divya; Mathiassen, Svend Erik; Samani, Afshin; Madeleine, Pascal

    2015-08-01

    The effect of concurrent physical and cognitive demands on arm motor control is poorly understood. This exploratory study compared movement kinematics in a repetitive high-precision pipetting task with and without additional concurrent cognitive demands in the form of instructions necessary to locate the correct target tube. Thirty-five healthy female subjects performed a standardized pipetting task, transferring liquid repeatedly from one pick-up tube to different target tubes. In the reference condition, lights indicated the target tube in each movement cycle, while the target tube had to be deciphered from a row and column number on a computer screen in the condition with additional cognitive demands. Kinematics of the dominant arm was assessed using the central tendency and variability of the pipette-tip end-point trajectory and joint kinematics properties of the shoulder and elbow. Movements slowed down (lower velocities and higher area under the movement curves) and trajectory variability increased in the condition with additional cognitive demands, but there were no changes in the kinematics properties such as joint range of motion, times of acceleration and deceleration (as indicated by the time to peak velocity), average angles, or phase relationships between angle and angular velocity of shoulder or elbow movements between the two conditions. Further, there were also no differences in the size or structure of variability of the shoulder and elbow joint angles, suggesting that subjects could maintain the motor repertoire unaltered in the presence of these specific additional cognitive demands. Further studies should address motor control at other levels of concurrent cognitive demands, and with motor tasks that are less automated than the pipetting task used in the present study, so as to gain an increased understanding of the effect of concurrent cognitive demands for other activities of relevance to daily life. PMID:26024788

  12. VO2 Max in Variable Type Exercise Among Well-Trained Upper Body Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seals, Douglas R.; Mullin, John P.

    1982-01-01

    The maximal oxygen consumption (VO2 max) of well-trained upper body athletes was compared to that of untrained individuals in four types of exercise: arm cranking, legs only cycling, graded treadmill running, and combined arm cranking and leg cycling. Results of the study showed that well-trained upper body athletes attained a significantly higher…

  13. A new mechanical arm trainer to intensify the upper limb rehabilitation of severely affected patients after stroke: design, concept and first case series.

    PubMed

    Hesse, S; Schmidt, H; Werner, C; Rybski, C; Puzich, U; Bardeleben, A

    2007-12-01

    Description and case series on a new mechanical arm trainer with three degrees of freedom (DoF), the REHA-SLIDE (RS), for stroke rehabilitation are presented. Similar to a rolling pin, it consists of two handles at either side of a connecting rod, the handles are bilaterally moved forward and backward, sideways, and rotated, the base plate is inclinable. A computer mouse attached to the rod enables playing games offering computer-biofeedback. Two patients, 6 and 5 weeks after a first-time supratentorial stroke, suffering from a flaccid non-functional upper extremity have been studied. Interventions performed were additional 30 min of RS-training every workday for 6 weeks; one session included 400 repetitions evenly distributed between the forward backward movement and drawing a circle clock- and counter clockwise. Afterwards the patients could play games. Upper extremity portion of the Fugl-Meyer Motor Assessment Score (FM, 0-66), and muscle strength by a Medical Research Council (MRC) sum score (0-45), the FM assessment was blinded. In the 2 patients, the FM (0-66) improved from 7 to 37, and from 17 to 43, their initial (terminal) MRC sum scores were 6 (36) and 13 (31). With the REHA-Slide (RS), severely affected patients practiced a bilateral 3 DoF movement. No conclusions can be drawn so far and a controlled clinical study must be the next step. PMID:18084168

  14. A Short-Armed Troodontid Dinosaur from the Upper Cretaceous of Inner Mongolia and Its Implications for Troodontid Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xing; Tan, Qingwei; Sullivan, Corwin; Han, Fenglu; Xiao, Dong

    2011-01-01

    Background The Troodontidae represents one of the most bird-like theropod groups and plays an important role in our understanding of avian origins. Although troodontids have been known for over 150 years, few known derived troodontid specimens preserve significant portions of both the forelimb and the hindlimb. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we report a new troodontid taxon, Linhevenator tani gen. et sp. nov., based on a partial, semi-articulated skeleton recovered from the Upper Cretaceous Wulansuhai Formation of Wulatehouqi, Inner Mongolia, China. L. tani has an unusual combination of primitive and derived character states, though our phylogenetic analysis places it in a derived clade within the Troodontidae. As a derived taxon, L. tani has a dromaeosaurid-like pedal digit II, and this species also possesses a humerus that is proportionally much shorter and more robust than those of most other troodontids. Conclusion/Significance The combination of features present in Linhevenator indicates a complex pattern of character evolution within the Troodontidae. In particular, the discovery of Linhevenator suggests that derived troodontids have independently evolved a highly specialized pedal digit II and have significantly shortened the forelimb over the course of their evolution. PMID:21915256

  15. Robotic Arm Unwrapped

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image, taken shortly after NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander touched down on the surface of Mars, shows the spacecraft's robotic arm in its stowed configuration, with its biobarrier successfully unpeeled. The 'elbow' of the arm can be seen at the top center of the picture, and the biobarrier is the shiny film seen to the left of the arm.

    The biobarrier is an extra precautionary measure for protecting Mars from contamination with any bacteria from Earth. While the whole spacecraft was decontaminated through cleaning, filters and heat, the robotic arm was given additional protection because it is the only spacecraft part that will directly touch the ice below the surface of Mars.

    Before the arm was heated, it was sealed in the biobarrier, which is made of a trademarked film called Tedlar that holds up to baking like a turkey-basting bag. This ensures that any new bacterial spores that might have appeared during the final steps before launch and during the journey to Mars will not contact the robotic arm.

    After Phoenix landed, springs were used to pop back the barrier, giving it room to deploy.

    The base of the lander's Meteorological Station can be seen in this picture on the upper left. Because only the base of the station is showing, this image tells engineers that the instrument deployed successfully.

    The image was taken on landing day, May 25, 2008, by the spacecraft's Surface Stereo Imager.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  16. Ultrasound-Guided Myofascial Trigger Point Injection Into Brachialis Muscle for Rotator Cuff Disease Patients With Upper Arm Pain: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Mi Ri; Chang, Won Hyuk; Choi, Hyo Seon

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the efficacy of trigger point injection into brachialis muscle for rotator cuff disease patients with upper arm pain. Methods A prospective, randomized, and single-blinded clinical pilot trial was performed at university rehabilitation hospital. Twenty-one patients clinically diagnosed with rotator cuff disease suspected of having brachialis myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) were randomly allocated into two groups. Effect of ultrasound (US)-guided trigger point injection (n=11) and oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) (n=10) was compared by visual analog scale (VAS). Results US-guided trigger point injection of brachialis muscle resulted in excellent outcome compared to the oral NSAID group. Mean VAS scores decreased significantly after 2 weeks of treatment compared to the baseline in both groups (7.3 vs. 4.5 in the injection group and 7.4 vs. 5.9 in the oral group). The decrease of the VAS score caused by injection (ДVAS=-2.8) was significantly larger than caused by oral NSAID (ДVAS=-1.5) (p<0.05). Conclusion In patients with rotator cuff disease, US-guided trigger point injection of the brachialis muscle is safe and effective for both diagnosis and treatment when the cause of pain is suspected to be originated from the muscle. PMID:25379497

  17. Arm MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... arm MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan uses strong magnets to create pictures of the upper and lower ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  18. Patterns of landscape form in the upper Rhône basin, Central Swiss Alps, predominantly show lithologic controls despite multiple glaciations and variations in rock uplift rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutenbecker, L. A.; Costa, A.; Schlunegger, F.

    2015-10-01

    The development of topography is mainly dependent on the interplay of uplift and erosion, which are in term controlled by various factors including climate, glaciers, lithology, seismic activity and short-term variables such as anthropogenic impact. While most studies have focused on the role of tectonics and climate on the landscape form and underlying processes, less attention has been paid on exploring the controls of lithology on erosion. The Central European Alps are characterized by a large spatial variability in exposed lithologies and as such offer an ideal laboratory to investigate the lithological controls on erosion and landscape form. Here, we focus on the ca. 5400 km2-large upper Rhône basin situated in the Central Swiss Alps to explore how the lithological architecture of the bedrock conditions the Alpine landscape. To this extent, we extract geomorphological parameters along the channels of ca. 50 tributary basins, whose catchments are located in either granitic basement rocks (External massifs), oceanic meta-sedimentary and ophiolitic rocks (Penninic nappes) or fine-grained continental-margin sediments (Helvetic nappes). The analysis of longitudinal river profiles show that all tributary rivers within the Rhône basin are in topographic transient state as testified by mainly convex or concave-convex longitudinal stream channel profiles with several knickpoints of either tectonic or glacial origin. In addition, although the entire Rhône basin shows a strong glacial inheritance (and is still partly glaciated) and some of the highest uplift rates recently measured in the Alps, the river network has responded differently to those perturbations as revealed by the morphometric data. In particular, tributary basins in the Helvetic nappes are the most equilibrated (concave river profiles, overall lower elevations, less steep slope gradients and lowest hypsometric integrals), while the tributaries located in the External massifs are least equilibrated

  19. 6. MOBILE LAUNCHER SIDE 4, SHOWING MILK STOOL AND LUT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. MOBILE LAUNCHER SIDE 4, SHOWING MILK STOOL AND LUT. PROTRUSION ON UPPER RIGHT HAND SIDE OF LUT IS SWING ARM NINE WHICH PROVIDED ACCESS TO CAPSULE OF LAUNCH VEHICLE WHILE ON LAUNCHER. - Mobile Launcher One, Kennedy Space Center, Titusville, Brevard County, FL

  20. 18. DETAIL VIEW OF NONSUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. DETAIL VIEW OF NON-SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATE AND GATE ARMS, GATE PIER AND DAM BRIDGE, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 8, On Mississippi River near Houston County, MN, Genoa, Vernon County, WI

  1. 17. DETAIL VIEW OF NONSUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. DETAIL VIEW OF NON-SUBMERSIBLE TAINTER GATE, SHOWING GATE AND GATE ARM, GATE PIER AND DAM BRIDGE, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 8, On Mississippi River near Houston County, MN, Genoa, Vernon County, WI

  2. Satellite observations and modelling of transport in the upper troposphere through the lower mesosphere during the 2006 major stratospheric sudden arming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manney, G. L.; Harwood, R. S.; MacKenzie, I. A.; Minschwaner, K.; Allen, D. R.; Santee, M. L.; Walker, K. A.; Hegglin, M. I.; Lambert, A.; Pumphrey, H. C.; Bernath, P. F.; Boone, C. D.; Schwartz, M. J.; Livesey, N. J.; Daffer, W. H.; Fuller, R. A.

    2009-04-01

    An unusually strong and prolonged stratospheric sudden warming (SSW) in January 2006 was the first major SSW for which globally distributed long-lived trace gas data are available covering the upper troposphere through the lower mesosphere. We use Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) data, the SLIMCAT Chemistry Transport Model (CTM), and assimilated meteorological analyses to provide a comprehensive picture of transport during this event. The upper tropospheric ridge that triggered the SSW was associated with an elevated tropopause and layering in trace gas profiles in conjunction with stratospheric and tropospheric intrusions. Anomalous poleward transport (with corresponding quasi-isentropic troposphere-to-stratosphere exchange at the lowest levels studied) in the region over the ridge extended well into the lower stratosphere. In the middle and upper stratosphere, the breakdown of the polar vortex transport barrier was seen in a signature of rapid, widespread mixing in trace gases, including CO, H2O, CH4 and N2O. The vortex broke down slightly later and more slowly in the lower than in the middle stratosphere. In the middle and lower stratosphere, small remnants with trace gas values characteristic of the pre-SSW vortex lingered through the weak and slow recovery of the vortex. The upper stratospheric vortex quickly reformed, and, as enhanced diabatic descent set in, CO descended into this strong vortex, echoing the fall vortex development. Trace gas evolution in the SLIMCAT CTM agrees well with that in the satellite trace gas data from the upper troposphere through the middle stratosphere. In the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere, the SLIMCAT simulation does not capture the strong descent of mesospheric CO and H2O values into the reformed vortex; poor CTM performance in the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere results primarily from biases in the diabatic descent in assimilated

  3. 68. VIEW, LOOKING NORTH (UPSTREAM) FROM LOWER ARM OF COFFERDAM, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    68. VIEW, LOOKING NORTH (UPSTREAM) FROM LOWER ARM OF COFFERDAM, SHOWING STATUS OF CONSTRUCTION. NOTE CONCRETE FORMS IN DISTANCE, TIMBER PILES FOR INTERMEDIATE WALL IN CENTER, AND CONCRETE MIXING PLANT ON RIGHT. Taken September 4, 1934. - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 10, Guttenberg, Clayton County, IA

  4. The communities of helminth parasites of Heterandria bimaculata (Teleostei: Poeciliidae) from the upper Río La Antigua basin, east-central Mexico show a predictable structure.

    PubMed

    Salgado-Maldonado, Guillermo; Novelo-Turcotte, María Teresa; Vazquez, Gabriela; Caspeta-Mandujano, Juan Manuel; Quiroz-Martínez, Benjamín; Favila, Mario

    2014-06-01

    We investigated a basic generalization in parasite community ecology stating that stochastic processes played a major part in determining the composition of helminth communities of freshwater fish, or on the contrary, if these communities are predictable, diverse and structured species assemblages. We determined the species pool of helminth parasites of a tropical freshwater fish Heterandria bimaculata in its heartland, the upper Río La Antigua basin in east-central Mexico. Approaching our data from the metapopulation standpoint we studied the spatial patterns, and examined the variation in composition and richness of the component communities across different locations. We tested the prediction that helminth species may be recognized as common or rare; and also two hypotheses anticipating depauperate communities and decay of similarity between component communities with increasing distance. We found these communities composed by a highly structured and predictable set of specialist autogenic helminth species that are constant and abundant, dominating all components throughout space. The prediction that it is possible to recognize common and rare species was met. Richer than expected communities were found, as well as highly homogeneous component communities, where neighbouring components were more similar than distant ones. We speculated that the processes shaping the development of these component communities include stable, predictable habitats through time, allowing for a slow gradual dispersion process limited by host and parasite species capabilities. Our study suggests that metapopulation theory can assist in the prediction of community composition and in the understanding of spatial and temporal community variability. PMID:24598076

  5. Pediatric Arm Function Test

    PubMed Central

    Uswatte, Gitendra; Taub, Edward; Griffin, Angi; Rowe, Jan; Vogtle, Laura; Barman, Joydip

    2012-01-01

    Objective Although there are several validated upper-extremity measures in young children with cerebral palsy (CP), none primarily assess capacity to carry out actions and tasks with the more-affected arm. To address this need, we developed the Pediatric Arm Function Test (PAFT), which involves behavioral observation of how children use their more-affected arm during structured play in the laboratory or clinic. This paper evaluates the reliability and validity of the PAFT Functional Ability scale. Design In Study 1, 20 children between 2–8 years with a wide range of upper-extremity hemiparesis due to CP completed the PAFT on two occasions separated by three weeks. In Study 2, 41 children between 2–6 years with similar characteristics completed the PAFT and received a grade reflecting severity of more-affected arm motor impairment. Results In Study 1, the PAFT test-retest reliability correlation coefficient was 0.74. In Study 2, convergent validity was supported by a strong, inverse correlation (r = −0.6, p < .001) between PAFT scores and grade of impairment. Conclusions The PAFT Functional Ability scale is a reliable and valid measure of more-affected arm motor capacity in children with CP between 2–6 years. It can be employed to measure upper-extremity neurorehabilitation outcome. PMID:23103486

  6. Use of ARM data to test an improved parameterization of upper tropospheric clouds for use in climate models. Final report, December 1, 1991--May 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, D.A.; Xu, KuanMan

    1995-03-01

    We have developed new cloud parameterizations, and tested them in an SCM, a CEM, and a full three-dimensional GCM. We have demonstrated the ability to drive the SCM and the CEM with observations similar to those that we are about to receive from ARM. We have used the three-dimensional GCM to investigate some aspects of the role of clouds in climate. The climate simulation, and especially the Earth`s radiation budget, has been substantially improved through use of the new parameterizations.

  7. An arm for a leg: Adapting a robotic arm for gait rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Franchi, Giulia; Viereck, Ulrich; Platt, Robert; Yen, Sheng-Che; Hasson, Christopher J

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to adapt a multipurpose robotic arm for gait rehabilitation. An advantage of this approach is versatility: a robotic arm can be attached to almost any point on the body to assist with lower- and upper-extremity rehabilitation. This may be more cost-effective than purchasing and training rehabilitation staff to use several specialized rehabilitation robots. Robotic arms also have a more human-like morphology, which may make them less intimidating or alien to patients. In this study a mechanical interface was developed that allows a fast, secure, and safe attachment between a robotic arm and a human limb. The effectiveness of this interface was assessed by having two healthy subjects walk on a treadmill with and without a robotic arm attached to their legs. The robot's ability to follow the subjects' swinging legs was evaluated at slow and fast walking speeds. Two different control schemes were evaluated: one using the standard manufacturer-provided control algorithm, and another using a custom algorithm that actively compensated for robot-human interaction forces. The results showed that both robot control schemes performed well for slow walking. There were negligible differences between subjects' gait kinematics with and without the robot. During fast walking with the robot, similar results were obtained for one subject; however, the second subject demonstrated noticeable gait modifications. Together, these results show the feasibility of adapting a multipurpose robotic arm for gait rehabilitation. PMID:26737153

  8. Vascular Access Effects on Motor Performance and Anthropometric Indices of Upper Extremities.

    PubMed

    Bučar Pajek, Maja; Čuk, Ivan; Pajek, Jernej

    2016-06-01

    A decrement of upper extremity motor performance is a concern with vascular access creation. We analyzed differences in handgrip strength, tapping test and anthropometric indices of arms with and without vascular access (N = 87) and compared them to bilateral differences in control subjects (N = 140). Fistula harboring arms had weaker grip strength than contralateral arms of 2.7 kg and this difference was statistically marginally larger than the difference between non-dominant and dominant arms in controls of 1.6 kg (mean difference 1.1 kg, P = 0.06). No difference in the magnitude of inferiority of fistula arms compared to control non-dominant arms was present in the tapping test. Absolute results of both motor tests on any side were significantly worse in dialysis patients. Although weaker and slower, fistula arms showed larger mean upper-arm and forearm circumferences of 0.4-0.6 cm. Our results show no significant negative effect of arteriovenous access on motor performance of upper extremities. PMID:27312918

  9. The Influence of Dopaminergic Striatal Innervation on Upper Limb Locomotor Synergies

    PubMed Central

    Isaias, Ioannis U.; Volkmann, Jens; Marzegan, Alberto; Marotta, Giorgio; Cavallari, Paolo; Pezzoli, Gianni

    2012-01-01

    To determine the role of striatal dopaminergic innervation on upper limb synergies during walking, we measured arm kinematics in 13 subjects with Parkinson disease. Patients were recruited according to several inclusion criteria to represent the best possible in vivo model of dopaminergic denervation. Of relevance, we included only subjects with normal spatio-temporal parameters of the stride and gait speed to avoid an impairment of upper limbs locomotor synergies as a consequence of gait impairment per se. Dopaminergic innervation of the striatum was measured by FP-CIT and SPECT. All patients showed a reduction of gait-associated arms movement. No linear correlation was found between arm ROM reduction and contralateral dopaminergic putaminal innervation loss. Still, a partition analysis revealed a 80% chance of reduced arm ROM when putaminal dopamine content loss was >47%. A significant correlation was described between the asymmetry indices of the swinging of the two arms and dopaminergic striatal innervation. When arm ROM was reduced, we found a positive correlation between upper-lower limb phase shift modulation (at different gait velocities) and striatal dopaminergic innervation. These findings are preliminary evidence that dopaminergic striatal tone plays a modulatory role in upper-limb locomotor synergies and upper-lower limb coupling while walking at different velocities. PMID:23236504

  10. [Two-point discrimination for phantom pain: effect of a 4-week therapy in an upper arm amputee with phantom pain].

    PubMed

    Koller, T; Luomajoki, H

    2013-06-01

    There is evidence that phantom pain is associated with a disrupted organization of the sensory cortex and that this organization can be normalized by training with two-point discrimination (TPD). In this case study a reduction in all three phantom modalities (i.e. phantom pain, phantom feeling and painful phantom sensation) and a reduction in pain level from m= 4.13/10 visual analogue scale (VAS) to m= 0.67/10 (VAS) could be observed in a patient with an upper limb amputation during a test period of 28 days with TPD. The quality of life and performance increased significantly. This can be a promising indication for a better social and work reintegration. PMID:23685501

  11. Robotic arm

    SciTech Connect

    Kwech, H.

    1989-04-18

    A robotic arm positionable within a nuclear vessel by access through a small diameter opening and having a mounting tube supported within the vessel and mounting a plurality of arm sections for movement lengthwise of the mounting tube as well as for movement out of a window provided in the wall of the mounting tube is disclosed. An end effector, such as a grinding head or welding element, at an operating end of the robotic arm, can be located and operated within the nuclear vessel through movement derived from six different axes of motion provided by mounting and drive connections between arm sections of the robotic arm. The movements are achieved by operation of remotely-controllable servo motors, all of which are mounted at a control end of the robotic arm to be outside the nuclear vessel. 23 figs.

  12. Robotic arm

    SciTech Connect

    Kwech, Horst

    1989-04-18

    A robotic arm positionable within a nuclear vessel by access through a small diameter opening and having a mounting tube supported within the vessel and mounting a plurality of arm sections for movement lengthwise of the mounting tube as well as for movement out of a window provided in the wall of the mounting tube. An end effector, such as a grinding head or welding element, at an operating end of the robotic arm, can be located and operated within the nuclear vessel through movement derived from six different axes of motion provided by mounting and drive connections between arm sections of the robotic arm. The movements are achieved by operation of remotely-controllable servo motors, all of which are mounted at a control end of the robotic arm to be outside the nuclear vessel.

  13. An elastica arm scale.

    PubMed

    Bosi, F; Misseroni, D; Dal Corso, F; Bigoni, D

    2014-09-01

    The concept of a 'deformable arm scale' (completely different from a traditional rigid arm balance) is theoretically introduced and experimentally validated. The idea is not intuitive, but is the result of nonlinear equilibrium kinematics of rods inducing configurational forces, so that deflection of the arms becomes necessary for equilibrium, which would be impossible for a rigid system. In particular, the rigid arms of usual scales are replaced by a flexible elastic lamina, free to slide in a frictionless and inclined sliding sleeve, which can reach a unique equilibrium configuration when two vertical dead loads are applied. Prototypes designed to demonstrate the feasibility of the system show a high accuracy in the measurement of load within a certain range of use. Finally, we show that the presented results are strongly related to snaking of confined beams, with implications for locomotion of serpents, plumbing and smart oil drilling. PMID:25197248

  14. An elastica arm scale

    PubMed Central

    Bosi, F.; Misseroni, D.; Dal Corso, F.; Bigoni, D.

    2014-01-01

    The concept of a ‘deformable arm scale’ (completely different from a traditional rigid arm balance) is theoretically introduced and experimentally validated. The idea is not intuitive, but is the result of nonlinear equilibrium kinematics of rods inducing configurational forces, so that deflection of the arms becomes necessary for equilibrium, which would be impossible for a rigid system. In particular, the rigid arms of usual scales are replaced by a flexible elastic lamina, free to slide in a frictionless and inclined sliding sleeve, which can reach a unique equilibrium configuration when two vertical dead loads are applied. Prototypes designed to demonstrate the feasibility of the system show a high accuracy in the measurement of load within a certain range of use. Finally, we show that the presented results are strongly related to snaking of confined beams, with implications for locomotion of serpents, plumbing and smart oil drilling. PMID:25197248

  15. Arm Swing Magnitude and Asymmetry During Gait in the Early Stages of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lewek, Michael D.; Poole, Roxanne; Johnson, Julia; Halawa, Omar; Huang, Xuemei

    2009-01-01

    The later stages of Parkinson's disease (PD) are characterized by altered gait patterns. Although decreased arm swing during gait is the most frequently reported motor dysfunction in individuals with PD, quantitative descriptions of gait in early PD have largely ignored upper extremity movements. This study was designed to perform a quantitative analysis of arm swing magnitude and asymmetry that might be useful in the assessment of early PD. Twelve individuals with early PD (in “off” state) and eight controls underwent gait analysis using an optically-based motion capture system. Participants were instructed to walk at normal and fast velocities, and then on heels (to minimize push-off). Arm swing was measured as the excursion of the wrist with respect to the pelvis. Arm swing magnitude for each arm, and inter-arm asymmetry, were compared between groups. Both groups had comparable gait velocities (p=0.61), and there was no significant difference between the groups in the magnitude of arm swing in all walking conditions for the arm that swung more (p=0.907) or less (p=0.080). Strikingly, the PD group showed significantly greater arm swing asymmetry (asymmetry angle: 13.9±7.9%) compared to the control group (asymmetry angle: 5.1±4.0%; p=0.003). Unlike arm swing magnitude, arm swing asymmetry unequivocally differs between people with early PD and controls. Such quantitative evaluation of arm swing, especially its asymmetry, may have utility for early and differential diagnosis, and for tracking disease progression in patients with later PD. PMID:19945285

  16. Gesture Recognition Based on the Probability Distribution of Arm Trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Khairunizam; Sawada, Hideyuki

    The use of human motions for the interaction between humans and computers is becoming an attractive alternative to verbal media, especially through the visual interpretation of the human body motion. In particular, hand gestures are used as non-verbal media for the humans to communicate with machines that pertain to the use of the human gestures to interact with them. This paper introduces a 3D motion measurement of the human upper body for the purpose of the gesture recognition, which is based on the probability distribution of arm trajectories. In this study, by examining the characteristics of the arm trajectories given by a signer, motion features are selected and classified by using a fuzzy technique. Experimental results show that the use of the features extracted from arm trajectories effectively works on the recognition of dynamic gestures of a human, and gives a good performance to classify various gesture patterns.

  17. How to Take a Picture of A Robotic Arm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation

    This movie first shows an artist's animation of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander snapping a picture of its arm, then transitions to the actual picture of the arm in its stowed configuration, with its biobarrier unpeeled.

    The arm is still folded up, with its 'elbow' shown at upper left and its scoop at bottom right. The biobarrier is the shiny film seen to the left of the arm in this view.

    The barrier is an extra precaution to protect Mars from contamination with any bacteria from Earth. While the whole spacecraft was decontaminated through cleaning, filters and heat, the robotic arm was given additional protection because it is the only spacecraft part that will directly touch the ice below the surface of Mars.

    Before the arm was heated, it was sealed in the biobarrier, which is made of a trademarked film called Tedlar that holds up to baking like a turkey-basting bag. This ensures that any new bacterial spores that might have come about during the final steps before launch, and during the journey to Mars, will not contact the robotic arm.

    After Phoenix landed, springs were used to pop back the barrier, giving it room to deploy. The arm is scheduled to begin to unlatch on the third Martian day of the mission, or Sol 3 (May 28, 2008).

    This image was taken on Sol 1 (May 26, 2008) by the spacecraft's Surface Stereo Imager.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  18. [A case of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease presenting with arm levitation as an initial symptom].

    PubMed

    Kamogawa, Kenji; Ninomiya, Satoko; Okuda, Shinya; Matsumoto, Yushi; Tomita, Hitomi; Okamoto, Kensho; Okuda, Bungo

    2014-01-01

    A 74-year-old, right handed man, developed insidiously with levitation and clumsiness of the right upper limb. His right arm tended to levitate spontaneously, when he was examined. He could put the elevated arm down on command, while the arm resumed to antigravity posture when his attention was diverted. His right arm also exhibited unwilled elevation when performing complex finger movements on the right side. He had a feeling of strangeness of the elevated limb, especially with the eyes closed. In addition to asymmetric limb-kinetic apraxia, combined sensations such as stereognosis were disturbed on the right side. Brain MRI showed high signal lesions predominantly in the left cerebral cortices and basal ganglia. SPECT with (123)I-IMP revealed asymmetric hypoperfusion, predominantly in the left medial frontal and parietal regions. Two months after the onset, levitation of the arm gradually disappeared, with the development of rapidly progressive dementia, frontal signs, dystonia and generalized myoclonus. The diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) was made based on the clinical features and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers. The early manifestation of the patient mimicked corticobasal degeneration which presents with arm levitation or alien hand syndrome. It is suggested that CJD can represent involuntary movements with higher brain dysfunction resembling corticobasal degeneration at the early stage of the illness. Although the underlying mechanism of arm levitation is still unknown, frontal disinhibition and parietal cortical sensory disturbance may contribute to the development of involuntary arm levitation in our patient. PMID:25342014

  19. Foot Length, Chest Circumference, and Mid Upper Arm Circumference Are Good Predictors of Low Birth Weight and Prematurity in Ethnic Minority Newborns in Vietnam: A Hospital-Based Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Thi, Hai Nguyen; Khanh, Dung Khu Thi; Thu, Ha Le Thi; Thomas, Emma G.; Lee, Katherine J.; Russell, Fiona M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The evaluation of tools to accurately identify low birth weight (LBW) and/or premature newborns in resource-limited countries is a research priority. We explored the use of foot length, chest circumference, and mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) measured within 24 h as diagnostic tools for identifying newborns who are LBW, premature, or both; and compared measurements taken at birth with those taken at five days of age. Materials and Methods An observational study was undertaken in Hoa Binh Province General Hospital, Vietnam, in ethnic minority newborns. Birth weight, foot length, chest circumference, and MUAC were measured within 24 h of birth and in a subset of 200, were repeated on day five of life. Gestational age was estimated using the New Ballard Score. Receiver Operating Characteristic curves and optimal cut-points (the point with the highest sensitivity and specificity where the sensitivity was at least 0.8) were calculated, for predicting prematurity, LBW, and both. Measurements within 24 h and at five days of life were compared. Results 485 newborns were recruited. Chest circumference and MUAC measured within 24 h of birth were found to be highly predictive of LBW (both yielding area under the curve [AUC] of 0.98, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.96–0.99), and performed marginally better than foot length (AUC 0.94, 95%CI 0.92–0.96). The optimal cut-points for measurements within 24 h of birth were ≤7.4cm for foot length; ≤30.4cm for chest circumference; and ≤ 9.0cm for MUAC. There was statistical evidence that anthropometric measurements taken within 24 h of birth were higher than measurements on day five (p<0.02 for all anthropometric measurements) but the magnitude of these differences was small (at most 2mm). Conclusions All measurements taken within 24 h of birth were good predictors of LBW, prematurity and both. Differences in measurements taken within 24 h and on day five were not clinically relevant. Further research will ensure

  20. Vibration transmissibility characteristics of the human hand-arm system under different postures, hand forces and excitation levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adewusi, S. A.; Rakheja, S.; Marcotte, P.; Boutin, J.

    2010-07-01

    Biodynamic responses of the hand-arm system have been mostly characterized in terms of driving-point force-motion relationships, which have also served as the primary basis for developing the mechanical-equivalent models. The knowledge of localized vibration responses of the hand-arm segments could help derive more effective biodynamic models. In this study, the transmission of z h-axis handle vibration to the wrist, elbow and the shoulder of the human hand and arm are characterized in the laboratory for the bent-arm and extended arm postures. The experiments involved six subjects grasping a handle subject to two different magnitudes of broad-band random vibration, and nine different combinations of hand grip and push forces. The vibration transmissibility data were acquired in the z h- and y h-axis at the wrist and shoulder, and along all the three axes around the elbow joint. The results show that the human hand-arm system in an extended arm posture amplifies the vibration transmitted to the upper-arm and the whole-body at frequencies below 25 Hz, but attenuates the vibration above 25 Hz more effectively than the bent-arm posture, except at the shoulder. The magnitudes of transmitted vibration under an extended arm posture along the y h-axis were observed to be nearly twice those for the bent-arm posture in the low frequency region. The results further showed that variations in the grip force mostly affect vibration transmissibility and characteristic frequencies of the forearm, while changes in the push force influenced the dynamic characteristics of the entire hand-arm system. The magnitudes of transmitted vibration in the vicinity of the characteristic frequencies were influenced by the handle vibration magnitude.

  1. Arm position constraints when throwing in three dimensions.

    PubMed

    Hore, J; Watts, S; Tweed, D

    1994-09-01

    1. Overarm throwing is a skilled multijoint movement with potentially many degrees of freedom. Considering only the arm > or = 7 degrees of freedom are involved (shoulder 3, elbow 2, wrist 2). For each arm segment 3 degrees of freedom are potentially required to specify its angular position (orientation) at any moment during a throw. Simplification of the control problem for the CNS would occur if there were constraints on these degrees of freedom. The objective was to determine whether such constraints exist at ball release when throwing at targets in different directions using only the arm. 2. The angular positions in three dimensions of the distal phalanx of the middle finger, the hand, the forearm, and the upper arm were simultaneously recorded with search coils as subjects sat with a fixed trunk and threw balls at nine targets in an approximate +/- 40 degree work space. Ball release was signaled by microswitches on the proximal and distal phalanges of the middle finger (proximal and distal triggers). 3. On throwing at any one target the hand at ball release adopted a similar orientation for each throw, i.e., for a particular vertical and horizontal angular position the hand adopted a similar torsional position. On throwing at targets throughout the work space, angular position (rotation) vectors describing hand positions in space at ball release were confined to a two-dimensional surface rather than a three-dimensional volume. This constraint in hand torsion occurred near and at ball release but not throughout the entire throw. It was not due to mechanical factors because such a surface was not obtained when subjects deliberately twisted their arms when throwing. Thus at ball release during a "natural" throw the hand was constrained to 2 of its possible 3 angular degrees of freedom. 4. The same constraint was also found for finger, forearm, and upper arm angular positions in space at ball release as determined at both the proximal and distal triggers. A

  2. Phoenix Stretches its Arm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation

    The Phoenix spacecraft is scheduled to begin raising its robotic arm up and out of its stowed configuration on the third Martian day, or Sol 3 (May 28, 2008) of the mission. This artist's animation, based on engineering models, shows how Phoenix will accomplish this task. First, its wrist actuator will rotate, releasing its launch-restraint pin. Next, the forearm moves up, releasing the elbow launch-restraint pin. The elbow will then move up and over in small steps, a process referred to as 'staircasing.' This ensures that the arm's protective biobarrier wrap, now unpeeled and lying to the side of the arm, will not get in the way of the arm's deployment.

    The arm is scheduled to straighten all the way out on Sol 4 (May 29, 2008), after engineers have reviewed images and telemetry data from the spacecraft showing that the biobarrier material has been cleared.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  3. Listing's law for eye, head and arm movements and their synergistic control.

    PubMed

    Straumann, D; Haslwanter, T; Hepp-Reymond, M C; Hepp, K

    1991-01-01

    We have recorded eye, head, and upper arm rotations in five healthy human subjects using the three-dimensional search coil technique. Our measurements show that the coordination of eye and head movements during gaze shifts within +/- 25 deg relative to the forward direction is organized by restricting the rotatory trajectories of the two systems to almost parallel planes. These so-called "Listing planes" for eye-in-space and head-in-space rotations are workspace-oriented, not body-fixed. Eye and head trajectories in their respective planes are closely related in direction and amplitude. For pointing or grasping, the rotatory trajectories of the arm are also restricted to a workspace-oriented Listing plane. During visually guided movements, arm follows gaze, and the nine-dimensional rotatory configuration space for eye-head-arm-synergies (three degrees of freedom for each system) is reduced to a two-dimensional plane in the space of quaternion vectors. PMID:1756791

  4. Meat supplementation increases arm muscle area in Kenyan schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Charlotte G; Jiang, Luohua; Weiss, Robert E; Grillenberger, Monika; Gewa, Constance A; Siekmann, Jonathan H; Murphy, Suzanne P; Bwibo, Nimrod O

    2013-04-14

    The present study examines the effect of animal-source-food (ASF) intake on arm muscle area growth as part of a larger study examining causal links between ASF intake, growth rate, physical activity, cognitive function and micronutrient status in Kenyan schoolchildren. This randomised, controlled feeding intervention study was designed with three isoenergetic feeding interventions of meat, milk, and plain traditional vegetable stew (githeri), and a control group receiving no snack. A total of twelve elementary schools were randomly assigned to interventions, with three schools per group, and two cohorts of 518 and 392 schoolchildren were enrolled 1 year apart. Children in each cohort were given feedings at school and studied for three school terms per year over 2 years, a total of 9 months per year: cohort I from 1998 to 2000 and cohort II from 1999 to 2001. Food intake was assessed by 24 h recall every 1-2 months and biochemical analysis for micronutrient status conducted annually (in cohort I only). Anthropometric measurements included height, weight, triceps skinfold (TSF) and mid-upper-arm circumference (MUAC). Mid-upper-arm muscle area (MAMA) and mid-upper-arm fat area (MAFA) were calculated. The two cohorts were combined for analyses. The meat group showed the steepest rates of gain in MUAC and MAMA over time, and the milk group showed the next largest significant MUAC and MAMA gain compared with the plain githeri and control groups (P< 0.05). The meat group showed the least increase in TSF and MAFA of all groups. These findings have implications for increasing micronutrient intake and lean body mass in primary schoolchildren consuming vegetarian diets. PMID:22856533

  5. Arm CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - arm; Computed axial tomography scan - arm; Computed tomography scan - arm; CT scan - arm ... Mosby; 2013:chap 57. Shaw AS, Prokop M. Computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ...

  6. Upper extremity myoelectric prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Uellendahl, J E

    2000-08-01

    Myoelectric control of upper limb prostheses has proven to be an effective and efficient means of controlling prosthetic components. This means of control has been used extensively for over 30 years, during which time these systems have become reliable and durable in most situations. Myoelectric control, or any other prosthetic control scheme, should not be considered as the optimal control for arm prostheses, but rather as one of the several effective ways of producing desired function. Advanced clinical practice calls for a blending of all control schemes, as appropriate, to allow the prosthesis to serve the intentions of the user efficiently and with little mental effort. Technology continues to change, bringing with it new and sometimes better ways of fitting amputees. Microprocessors and programmable controllers have opened new and exciting avenues for improvement in function. New, and as of yet unidentified, electronic and mechanical advances are certainly on the horizon. There is much work to be done before upper limb prostheses rightfully are called arm replacements. But progress is occurring and advances are being made toward the goal of replacing the function and appearance of that marvelous tool, the human arm. PMID:10989484

  7. Forearm vascular responses to combined muscle metaboreceptor activation in the upper and lower limbs in humans.

    PubMed

    Tokizawa, Ken; Mizuno, Masaki; Muraoka, Isao

    2006-07-01

    Our previous studies showed that venous occlusion or passive stretch of the lower limb, assuming a mechanical stimulus, attenuates the vasoconstriction in the non-exercised forearm during postexercise muscle ischaemia (PEMI) of the upper limb. In this study, we investigated whether a metabolic stimulus to the lower limb induces a similar response. Eight subjects performed a 2 min static handgrip exercise at 30% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) followed by 3 min PEMI of the upper limb, concomitant with or without 2 min static ankle dorsiflexion at 30% MVC followed by 2 min PEMI of the lower limb. During PEMI of the upper limb alone, forearm blood flow (FBF) and forearm vascular conductance (FVC) in the non-exercised arm decreased significantly, whereas during combined PEMI of the upper and lower limbs, the decreases in FBF and FVC produced by PEMI of the upper limb was attenuated. Forearm blood flow and FVC were significantly greater during combined PEMI of the upper and lower limbs than during PEMI of the upper limb alone. When PEMI of the lower limb was released after combined PEMI of the upper and lower limbs (only PEMI of the upper limb was maintained continuously), the attenuated decreases in FBF and FVC observed during combined PEMI of the upper and lower limbs was not observed. Thus, forearm vascular responses differ when muscle metaboreceptors are activated in the upper limb and when there is combined activation of muscle metaboreceptors in both the upper and lower limbs. PMID:16644795

  8. Core Muscle Activation in One-Armed and Two-Armed Kettlebell Swing.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Vidar; Fimland, Marius S; Gunnarskog, Aril; Jungård, Georg-Andrè; Slåttland, Roy-Andrè; Vraalsen, Øyvind F; Saeterbakken, Atle H

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the electromyographic activity of rectus abdominis, oblique external, and lower and upper erector spinae at both sides of the truncus in 1-armed and 2-armed kettlebell swing. Sixteen healthy men performed 10 repetitions of both exercises using a 16-kg kettlebell in randomized order. For the upper erector spinae, the activation of the contralateral side during 1-armed swing was 24% greater than that of the ipsilateral side during 1-armed swing (p < 0.001) and 11% greater during 2-armed swing (p = 0.026). Furthermore, the activation in 2-armed swing was 12-16% greater than for the ipsilateral side in 1-armed swing (p < 0.001). For rectus abdominis, however, 42% lower activation of the contralateral side was observed during 1-armed swing compared with ipsilateral sides during 2-armed swing (p = 0.038) and 48% compared with the ipsilateral side during 1-armed swing (p = 0.044). Comparing the different phases of the swing, most differences in the upper erector spinae were found in the lower parts of the movement, whereas for the rectus abdominis, the differences were found during the hip extension. In contrast, similar muscle activity in the lower erector spinae and external oblique between the different conditions was observed (p = 0.055-0.969). In conclusion, performing the kettlebell swing with 1 arm resulted in greater neuromuscular activity for the contralateral side of the upper erector spinae and ipsilateral side of the rectus abdominis, and lower activation of the opposite side of the respective muscles. PMID:26473519

  9. "The Show"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehring, John

    2004-01-01

    For the past 16 years, the blue-collar city of Huntington, West Virginia, has rolled out the red carpet to welcome young wrestlers and their families as old friends. They have come to town chasing the same dream for a spot in what many of them call "The Show". For three days, under the lights of an arena packed with 5,000 fans, the state's best…

  10. Sensory-Feedback Exoskeletal Arm Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    An, Bin; Massie, Thomas H.; Vayner, Vladimir

    2004-01-01

    An electromechanical exoskeletal arm apparatus has been designed for use in controlling a remote robotic manipulator arm. The apparatus, called a force-feedback exoskeleton arm master (F-EAM) is comfortable to wear and easy to don and doff. It provides control signals from the wearer s arm to a robot arm or a computer simulator (e.g., a virtual-reality system); it also provides force and torque feedback from sensors on the robot arm or from the computer simulator to the wearer s arm. The F-EAM enables the wearer to make the robot arm gently touch objects and finely manipulate them without exerting excessive forces. The F-EAM features a lightweight design in which the motors and gear heads that generate force and torque feedback are made smaller than they ordinarily would be: this is achieved by driving the motors to power levels greater than would ordinarily be used in order to obtain higher torques, and by providing active liquid cooling of the motors to prevent overheating at the high drive levels. The F-EAM (see figure) includes an assembly that resembles a backpack and is worn like a backpack, plus an exoskeletal arm mechanism. The FEAM has five degrees of freedom (DOFs) that correspond to those of the human arm: 1. The first DOF is that of the side-to-side rotation of the upper arm about the shoulder (rotation about axis 1). The reflected torque for this DOF is provided by motor 1 via drum 1 and a planar four-bar linkage. 2. The second DOF is that of the up-and-down rotation of the arm about the shoulder. The reflected torque for this DOF is provided by motor 2 via drum 2. 3. The third DOF is that of twisting of the upper arm about its longitudinal axis. This DOF is implemented in a cable remote-center mechanism (CRCM). The reflected torque for this DOF is provided by motor 3, which drives the upper-arm cuff and the mechanism below it. A bladder inflatable by gas or liquid is placed between the cuff and the wearer s upper arm to compensate for misalignment

  11. Anomalous Arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    In this composite image of spiral galaxy M106 (NGC 4258), optical data from the Digitized Sky Survey is shown as yellow, radio data from the Very Large Array appears as purple, X-ray data from Chandra is coded blue, and infrared data from the Spitzer Space Telescope appears red. Two anomalous arms, which aren't visible at optical wavelengths, appear as purple and blue emission.

  12. Surface Sampler Arm Acquiring Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Operation of the surface sampler in obtaining Martian soil for Viking 2's molecular analysis experiment last Saturday (September 25) was closely monitored by one of the Lander cameras because of the precision required in trenching the small area--8 by 9 inches-surrounded by rocks. Dubbed 'Bonneville Salt Flats,' the exposure of thin crust appeared unique in contrast with surrounding materials and became a prime target for organic analysis in spite of potential hazards. Large rock in foreground is 8 inches high. At left, the sampler scoop has touched the surface, missing the rock at upper left by a comfortable 6 inches, and the backhoe has penetrated the surface about one-half inch. The scoop was then pulled back to sample the desired point and (second photo) the backhoe furrowed the surface pulling a piece of thin crust toward the spacecraft. The initial touchdown and retraction sequence was used to avoid a collision between a rock in the shadow of the arm and a plate joining the arm and scoop. The rock was cleared by 2 to 3 inches. The third picture was taken 8 minutes after the scoop touched the surface and shows that the collector head has acquired a quantity of soil. With surface sampler withdrawn (right), the foot-long trench is seen between the rocks. The trench is three inches wide and about 1 1/2 to 2 inches deep. The scoop reached to within 3 inches of the rock at far end of trench. Penetration appears to have left a cavernous opening roofed by the crust and only about one inch of undisturbed crust separates the deformed surface and the rock.

  13. Vibration training for upper body: transmission of platform vibrations through cables.

    PubMed

    Tankisheva, Ekaterina; Boonen, Steven; Delecluse, Christophe; Druyts, Hans Lj; Verschueren, Sabine M P

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the vibration transmission from a vibration platform through Vectran cables to the upper body and its relationship to induced muscular activation. Fifteen clinically healthy participants performed 3 different arm exercises-biceps curl, triceps curl, and lateral raise. Vibration transmission to the upper body was assessed over a wide range of accelerations (from 1.90 to 5.98 g) and frequencies (from 25 to 40 Hz). To assess the vibration transmission, 7 triaxial accelerometers were attached from the hand up to the head, and the root-mean-square of acceleration signal of each site-specific body point was calculated. Muscular activity of biceps brachii, triceps brachii, deltoid, and upper trapezius was recorded. The results showed a significant attenuation of the platform accelerations transmitted through the Vectran cables to the upper body. Handle vibration ranged between 27 and 44% of the acceleration delivered by the platform depending on platform vibration parameters (acceleration/frequency). Vibration increased the muscle activity of biceps brachii, triceps brachii, deltoid, and upper trapezius muscles significantly only during biceps curl exercises. No frequency or acceleration effect was found on the size of the muscle response. The results of the present study suggest that a cable-pulley resistance system on a vibration platform channels the vibration safely from the platform to the arms and induces additional muscle activation in some arm muscles when biceps curl exercises are performed. PMID:24077381

  14. A virtual reality system for arm and hand rehabilitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhiqiang; Lim, Chee Kian; Chen, I.-Ming; Yeo, Song Huat

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents a virtual reality (VR) system for upper limb rehabilitation. The system incorporates two motion track components, the Arm Suit and the Smart Glove which are composed of a range of the optical linear encoders (OLE) and the inertial measurement units (IMU), and two interactive practice applications designed for driving users to perform the required functional and non-functional motor recovery tasks. We describe the technique details about the two motion track components and the rational to design two practice applications. The experiment results show that, compared with the marker-based tracking system, the Arm Suit can accurately track the elbow and wrist positions. The repeatability of the Smart Glove on measuring the five fingers' movement can be satisfied. Given the low cost, high accuracy and easy installation, the system thus promises to be a valuable complement to conventional therapeutic programs offered in rehabilitation clinics and at home.

  15. ASSEMBLY AND CHARACTERIZATION OF 8-ARM AND 12-ARM DNA BRANCHED JUNCTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xing

    2012-01-01

    Branched DNA molecules can be assembled into objects and networks directed by sticky-ended cohesion. The connectivity of these species is limited by the number of arms flanking the branch point. To date, the only branched junctions constructed contain six or fewer arms. We report the construction of DNA branched junctions that contain either 8 or 12 double helical arms surrounding a branch point. The design of the 8-arm junction expoits the limits of a previous approach to thwart branch migration, but the design of the 12-arm junction uses a new to principle achieve this end. The 8-arm junction is stable with 16 nucleotide pairs per arm, but the 12-arm junction has been stabilized by 24 nucleotide pairs per arm. Ferguson analysis of these junctions in combination with three, four, five, and six-arm junctions indicates a linear increase in friction constant as the number of arms increases; the four-arm junction migrates anomalously at 4°C., suggesting stacking of its domains. All strands in both the 8-arm and 12-arm junctions show similar responses to hydroxyl radical autofootprinting analysis, indicating that they lack any dominant stacking structures. The stability of the 12-arm junction demonstrates that the number of arms in a junction is not limited to the case of having adjacent identical base pairs flanking the junction. The ability to construct eight-arm and twelve-arm junctions increases the number of objects, graphs and networks that can be built from branched DNA components. In principle, the stick structure corresponding to cubic close packing is now a possible target for assembly by DNA nanotechnology. PMID:17564446

  16. The Influences of Arm Resist Motion on a CAR Crash Test Using Hybrid III Dummy with Human-Like Arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yongchul; Youm, Youngil; Bae, Hanil; Choi, Hyeonki

    Safety of the occupant during the crash is very essential design element. Many researches have been investigated in reducing the fatal injury of occupant. They are focusing on the development of a dummy in order to obtain the real human-like motion. However, they have not considered the arm resist motion during the car accident. In this study, we would like to suggest the importance of the reactive force of the arm in a car crash. The influences of reactive force acting on the human upper extremity were investigated using the impedance experimental method with lumped mass model of hand system and a Hybrid III dummy with human-like arm. Impedance parameters (e.g. inertia, spring constant and damping coefficient) of the elbow joint in maximum activation level were measured by free oscillation test using single axis robot. The results showed that without seat belt, the reactive force of human arm reduced the head, chest, and femur injury, and the flexion moment of the neck is higher than that of the conventional dummy.

  17. Korean arms control: Arms control policies of the two Koreas

    SciTech Connect

    Park, T.H.

    1991-01-01

    This study examines the arms control proposals suggested by South and North Korea since the end of the Korean War and suggests some arms control measures that would be applied to the Korean Peninsula. Pyongyang has persistently proposed arms reduction measures since 1953, but Seoul has refused to discuss the issue because it suspected the North's true motive. The study points out that the objective reality of the two Koreas does not show any strong possibility of a war on the Peninsula. The most destabilizing factor in the South-North military relations is the possibility of misperception and miscalculation about the military capabilities and intentions of the other side. The study recommends that Seoul government not entirely adhere to the European CSBM model centered on the transparency of military activities. There are many other policy options for Seoul. The area between Seoul and Pyongyang can be made into a [open quotes]limited forces area[close quotes] as experienced by Egypt and Israel on the Sinai Peninsula. The study notes the utility of applying Charles Osgood's GRIT strategy to the Korean situation, a unilateral arms control approach. Among the structural arms control issues, the withdrawal of the US forces and its nuclear weapons are the most important ones which have to be dealt with before seriously negotiating arms reductions between the two Koreas. Considering the increasing capability of the South Korean armed forces and the availability of the US air and naval forces in and around South Korea, the US ground forces and the nuclear weapons would best be withdrawn from the South. Although these withdrawals cannot be used as bargaining chips by the South in the arms control negotiations with the North, these can be effectively utilized as GRIT measures. The South needs to persuade the North to reduce its redundant offensive weapons including chemical weapons and SCUD missiles as priority targets for arms reduction.

  18. Performance of arm locking in LISA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Kirk; Spero, Robert E.; Shaddock, Daniel A.

    2009-11-01

    , without degrading stability. With a time-delay error of 3 ns (equivalent of 1 m interspacecraft ranging error), time-delay interferometry (TDI) is capable of suppressing 300Hz/Hz of laser frequency noise to the required level. We show that if no interspacecraft laser links fail, arm locking alone surpasses this noise performance for the entire mission. If one interspacecraft laser link fails, arm locking alone will achieve this performance for all but approximately 1 h per year, when the arm length mismatch of the two remaining arms passes through zero. Therefore, the LISA sensitivity can be realized with arm locking and time-delay interferometry only, without any form of prestabilization.

  19. Worldwide report, arms control

    SciTech Connect

    1987-03-18

    This report contains translations/transcriptions of articles and/or broadcasts on Arms Control. Titles include: USSR Journal Review of French Book on SDI; Moscow Talk Show Considers Possibility of Dealing with U.S.; Thatcher, Gorbachev Talks Anticipated; U.S. Presents Draft Treaty to Eliminate INF from Europe; TASS: White House Rejects Treaty of Tatotonga; Soviet Paper on Congressional Divisions on Moratorium; Turkish Officials on Deployment of Nuclear Weapons; and others.

  20. 8. VIEW LOOKING UPSTREAM FROM THE RIVER ARM OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW LOOKING UPSTREAM FROM THE RIVER ARM OF THE COFFERDAM NEAR STATION (September 1936) - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam No. 13, Upper Mississippi River, Fulton, Whiteside County, IL

  1. [Oversized patient arms: a problem with blood pressure measurements].

    PubMed

    Meyer, Fritz; Meyer, Thomas; Klein, Reinhold

    2006-01-01

    The increase in the worldwide prevalence of obesity systematically leads to a higher number of individuals who may be wrongly diagnosed as hypertensive because their arms are too large for standard blood pressure cuffs, which are ordinarily appropriate in patients with normal sized arms. The aim was to gain real data of upper arm and wrist circumferences in 327 elected subjects with larger arms (upper arm circumference >32.5 cm) from two Bavarian general practices. We found that 93.9% of all patients had an upper arm circumference of a maximum of 41.0 cm and a wrist circumference of at most 20.5 cm. These data were then compared with the approved size ranges of six wrist blood pressure measurement devices, one special three-in-one cuff for different sizes and the two large adult cuffs recommended by the German Hypertension Society. Availability of one large cuff and one wrist blood measurement device (either used at the upper arm or at the wrist depending on patient dimensions) seems to be sufficient. This should allow for true blood pressure readings to be obtained in at least 96% of all patients with arms of more than normal circumference. PMID:16955625

  2. Correlations of Handgrip Strength with Selected Hand-Arm-Anthropometric Variables in Indian Inter-university Female Volleyball Players

    PubMed Central

    Koley, Shyamal; Pal Kaur, Satinder

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to estimate the dominant handgrip strength and its correlations with some hand and arm anthropometric variables in 101 randomly selected Indian inter-university female volleyball players aged 18-25 years (mean age 20.52±1.40) from six Indian universities. Methods Three anthropometric variables, i.e. height, weight, BMI, two hand anthropometric variables, viz. right and left hand width and length, four arm anthropometric variables, i.e. upper arm length, lower arm length, upper extremity length, upper arm circumference and dominant right and non-dominant handgrip strength were measured among Indian inter-university female volleyball players by standard anthropometric techniques. Results The findings of the present study indicated that Indian female volleyball players had higher mean values in eleven variables and lesser mean values in two variables than their control counterparts, showing significant differences (P<0.032-0.001) in height (t=2.63), weight (t=8.66), left hand width (t=2.10), left and right hand length (t=9.99 and 10.40 respectively), right upper arm length (t=8.48), right forearm length (t=5.41), dominant (right) and non-dominant (left) handgrip strength (t=9.37 and 6.76 respectively). In female volleyball players, dominant handgrip strength had significantly positive correlations (P=0.01) with all the variables studied. Conclusion It may be concluded that dominant handgrip strength had strong positive correlations with all the variables studied in Indian inter-university female volleyball players. PMID:22375242

  3. Characterization of Upper Troposphere Water Vapor Measurements during AFWEX using LASE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, R. A.; Browell, E. V.; Ismail, S.; Kooi, S.; Brasseur, L. H.; Brackett, V. G.; Clayton, M.; Barrick, J.; Linne, H.; Lammert, A.

    2002-01-01

    Water vapor profiles from NASA's Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) system acquired during the ARM/FIRE Water Vapor Experiment (AFWEX) are used to characterize upper troposphere water vapor (UTWV) measured by ground-based Raman lidars, radiosondes, and in situ aircraft sensors. Initial comparisons showed the average Vaisala radiosonde measurements to be 5-15% drier than the average LASE, Raman lidar, and DC-8 in situ diode laser hygrometer measurements. We show that corrections to the Raman lidar and Vaisala measurements significantly reduce these differences. Precipitable water vapor (PWV) derived from the LASE water vapor profiles agrees within 3% on average with PWV derived from the ARM ground-based microwave radiometer (MWR). The agreement among the LASE, Raman lidar, and MWR measurements demonstrates how the LASE measurements can be used to characterize both profile and column water vapor measurements and that ARM Raman lidar, when calibrated using the MWR PWV, can provide accurate UTWV measurements.

  4. The Effect of Restricted Arm Swing on Energy Expenditure in Healthy Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yizhar, Ziva; Boulos, Spiro; Inbar, Omri; Carmeli, Eli

    2009-01-01

    Arm swing in human walking is an active natural motion involving the upper extremities. Earlier studies have described the interrelationship between arms and legs during walking, but the effect of arm swing on energy expenditure and dynamic parameters during normal gait, is inconclusive. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of…

  5. The position of the tourniquet on the upper limb.

    PubMed

    Odinsson, A; Finsen, V

    2002-03-01

    Our aim was to determine if a tourniquet placed on the forearm has any advantage in clinical practice over the usual position on the upper arm. We randomised 50 patients who were undergoing an open operation for carpal tunnel syndrome under local anaesthesia into two groups. One had a tourniquet on the upper arm and the other on the forearm. The blood pressure, pulse, and level of pain were recorded at intervals of five minutes during the operation. The surgeons were also asked to evaluate the quality of the anaesthesia, the bloodless field, and the site of the tourniquet. The patients tolerated the tourniquet on the upper arm and forearm equally well. The surgeons had some difficulties when it was placed on the forearm. We therefore recommend placement of a tourniquet on the upper arm for operations on the hand and wrist which are carried out under local anaesthesia. PMID:11922360

  6. 32. VERTICAL / STRUT / UPPER CHORD DETAIL AT PINCONNECTED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. VERTICAL / STRUT / UPPER CHORD DETAIL AT PIN-CONNECTED EXPANSION JOINT BETWEEN CANTILEVER ARM AND SUSPENDED SPAN. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - MacArthur Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River on Highway 34 between IA & IL, Burlington, Des Moines County, IA

  7. The spiral arms of the Milky Way: The relative location of each different arm tracer within a typical spiral arm width

    SciTech Connect

    Vallée, Jacques P.

    2014-07-01

    From the Sun's location in the Galactic disk, different arm tracers (CO, H I, hot dust, etc.) have been employed to locate a tangent to each spiral arm. Using all various and different observed spiral arm tracers (as published elsewhere), we embark on a new goal, namely the statistical analysis of these published data (data mining) to statistically compute the mean location of each spiral arm tracer. We show for a typical arm cross-cut, a separation of 400 pc between the mid-arm and the dust lane (at the inner edge of the arm, toward the Galactic center). Are some arms major and others minor? Separating arms into two sets, as suggested by some, we find the same arm widths between the two sets. Our interpretation is that we live in a multiple (four-arm) spiral (logarithmic) pattern (around a pitch angle of 12°) for the stars and gas in the Milky Way, with a sizable interarm separation (around 3 kpc) at the Sun's location and the same arm width for each arm (near 400 pc from mid-arm to dust lane).

  8. Arms control and the arms race

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    A collection of 16 articles from the Scientific American discusses the evolution of nuclear weapons since 1945 and the attempts to control the nuclear arms race through national action and international negotiations. The articles and commentaries by political scientists Bruce M. Russett and Fred Chernoff combine technical information on weapons and deployment systems with political analysis of current arms strategies and diplomacy. The articles are grouped under three major topics: SALT and the history of arms control negotiations, current strategic arms negotiations, and European security. A separate abstract was written for each of the 16 articles selected for the Energy Data Base. 226 references.

  9. Phoenix Robotic Arm Rasp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This photograph shows the rasp protruding from the back of the scoop on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Robotic Arm engineering model in the Payload Interoperability Testbed at the University of Arizona, Tucson.

    This is the position the rasp will assume when it drills into the Martian soil to acquire an icy soil sample for analysis.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is led by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  10. Estimation of Human Arm Joints Using Two Wireless Sensors in Robotic Rehabilitation Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Bertomeu-Motos, Arturo; Lledó, Luis D.; Díez, Jorge A.; Catalan, Jose M.; Ezquerro, Santiago; Badesa, Francisco J.; Garcia-Aracil, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel kinematic reconstruction of the human arm chain with five degrees of freedom and the estimation of the shoulder location during rehabilitation therapy assisted by end-effector robotic devices. This algorithm is based on the pseudoinverse of the Jacobian through the acceleration of the upper arm, measured using an accelerometer, and the orientation of the shoulder, estimated with a magnetic angular rate and gravity (MARG) device. The results show a high accuracy in terms of arm joints and shoulder movement with respect to the real arm measured through an optoelectronic system. Furthermore, the range of motion (ROM) of 50 healthy subjects is studied from two different trials, one trying to avoid shoulder movements and the second one forcing them. Moreover, the shoulder movement in the second trial is also estimated accurately. Besides the fact that the posture of the patient can be corrected during the exercise, the therapist could use the presented algorithm as an objective assessment tool. In conclusion, the joints’ estimation enables a better adjustment of the therapy, taking into account the needs of the patient, and consequently, the arm motion improves faster. PMID:26690160

  11. Arm Anthropometry Indices in Turkish Children and Adolescents: Changes Over a Three-Year Period

    PubMed Central

    Çiçek, Betül; Öztürk, Ahmet; Mazıcıoğlu, Mustafa Mümtaz; Kurtoğlu, Selim

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Time-related changes and comparisons for mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC), triceps skinfold thickness (TSF), arm fat area (AFA) are lacking for Turkish children and adolescents. To determine the arm anthropometry indices (MUAC, TSF, AFA) in children and adolescents and to also assess the changes in these indices over a 3-year time period. Methods: The data of the Anthropometry of Turkish Children Aged 0-6 Years (ATCA-06) study and the Second Study of Determination of the Anthropometric Measurements of Turkish Children and Adolescents (DAMTCA-II) were used to calculate the arm anthropometry percentiles in a total group of 6982 children and adolescents aged 28 days to 17 years. The 3rd-97th percentiles were computed by the LMS method. Results: In girls, 50th percentile MUAC values linearly increased with age. In boys, 50th percentile TSF values linearly increased until 10 years of age and decreased after age 11 years, while in girls, TSF values increased linearly with age. 50th percentile values for AFA showed a linear increase in both genders with age. Significant differences were found between the 5th, 50th and 95th percentile values for MUAC and AFA obtained in the two studies (DAMTCA-II and DAMTCA-I) in both boys and girls. Conclusions: The prominent finding was the significant and alarming increase in arm anthropometry indices in both genders within as short period of time as three years. PMID:25541892

  12. Estimation of Human Arm Joints Using Two Wireless Sensors in Robotic Rehabilitation Tasks.

    PubMed

    Bertomeu-Motos, Arturo; Lledó, Luis D; Díez, Jorge A; Catalan, Jose M; Ezquerro, Santiago; Badesa, Francisco J; Garcia-Aracil, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel kinematic reconstruction of the human arm chain with five degrees of freedom and the estimation of the shoulder location during rehabilitation therapy assisted by end-effector robotic devices. This algorithm is based on the pseudoinverse of the Jacobian through the acceleration of the upper arm, measured using an accelerometer, and the orientation of the shoulder, estimated with a magnetic angular rate and gravity (MARG) device. The results show a high accuracy in terms of arm joints and shoulder movement with respect to the real arm measured through an optoelectronic system. Furthermore, the range of motion (ROM) of 50 healthy subjects is studied from two different trials, one trying to avoid shoulder movements and the second one forcing them. Moreover, the shoulder movement in the second trial is also estimated accurately. Besides the fact that the posture of the patient can be corrected during the exercise, the therapist could use the presented algorithm as an objective assessment tool. In conclusion, the joints' estimation enables a better adjustment of the therapy, taking into account the needs of the patient, and consequently, the arm motion improves faster. PMID:26690160

  13. Improved orthopedic arm joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dane, D. H.

    1971-01-01

    Joint permits smooth and easy movement of disabled arm and is smaller, lighter and less expensive than previous models. Device is interchangeable and may be used on either arm at the shoulder or at the elbow.

  14. Arm Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... of muscles, joints, tendons and other connective tissue. Injuries to any of these parts of the arm ... a fall or an accident. Types of arm injuries include Tendinitis and bursitis Sprains Dislocations Broken bones ...

  15. Osteomyelitis of Myositis Ossificans in Arm – First Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Pankaj Kumar; Singhal, Prakhar; Shukla, Jiten; Maravi, Deepak Singh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Myositis ossificans [MO] is a benign heterotropic bone forming (often- self resolving) pathology of bone and soft tissue. Here we are reporting the first time in literature for osteomyelitis of myositis ossificans in arm of a male due to trauma as a perusal of rare entity. Case Report: It is a case report of a 25 years old male presented to us in out-patient department with chief complaint of discharging wounds over mid part of left arm since six months. Clinically provisional diagnosis of chronic osteomylitis of left humerus made and his x-ray sought. X- Ray showed geographic appearance of myositis ossificans around the upper two third of left arm. Sinuses curetted and infected bone (part of myositis ossificans) removed and sent for biopsy. Now the patient is discharge and sinus free, and has resumed his work. Conclusion: Osteomyleitis of myositis ossificans should be recognized as a possible differential diagnosis chronic discharging sinus. This type of presentation of myositis ossificans is rarest. PMID:27299005

  16. Neural control of rhythmic, cyclical human arm movement: task dependency, nerve specificity and phase modulation of cutaneous reflexes

    PubMed Central

    Zehr, E Paul; Kido, Aiko

    2001-01-01

    The organization and pattern of cutaneous reflex modulation during rhythmic cyclical movements of the human upper limbs has received much less attention than that afforded the lower limb. Our working hypothesis is that control mechanisms underlying the modulation of cutaneous reflex amplitude during rhythmic arm movement are similar to those that control reflex modulation in the leg. Thus, we hypothesized that cutaneous reflexes would show task dependency and nerve specificity in the upper limb during rhythmic cyclical arm movement as has been demonstrated in the human lower limb. EMG was recorded from 10 muscles crossing the human shoulder, elbow and wrist joints while bilateral whole arm rhythmic cyclical movements were performed on a custom-made, hydraulic apparatus. Cutaneous reflexes were evoked with trains (5× 1.0 ms pulses at 300 Hz) of electrical stimulation delivered at non-noxious intensities (∼2× threshold for radiating parasthesia) to the superficial radial, median and ulnar nerves innervating the hand. Cutaneous reflexes were typically modulated with the movement cycle (i.e. phase dependency was observed). There was evidence for nerve specificity of cutaneous reflexes during rhythmic movement of the upper limbs. Task-dependent modulation was also seen as cutaneous reflexes were of larger amplitude or inhibitory (reflex reversal) during arm cycling as compared to static contraction. While there are some differences in the patterns of cutaneous reflex modulation seen between the arms and legs, it is concluded that cutaneous reflexes are modulated similarly in the upper and lower limbs implicating similar motor control mechanisms. PMID:11744775

  17. A method for measuring vertical forces applied to the upper limb during sit-to-stand.

    PubMed

    Turner, H C; Yate, R M; Giddins, G E B; Miles, A W

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a basic measurement system to estimate the vertical loading of the upper limb during the sit-to-stand activity, with a view to increasing the understanding of the loading of the wrist in daily living activities. A chair was adapted and instrumented with strain gauges and position sensors so that the force applied through the upper limbs to the arms of the chair could be calculated. Four aspects of the chair's geometry could be varied. A force plate was positioned on the floor between the legs of the chair to record the corresponding foot loading. Twenty normal subjects (22-56 years, mean 32.7 years) participated in a pilot study in which loading through the upper and lower limbs was recorded for a range of chair geometries. The vertical force transmitted through each upper limb was typically 20-30 per cent of bodyweight. The vertical upper limb load averaged across all subjects showed a small reduction when either the seat height or the height of the chair arms was increased. PMID:15648670

  18. The ARM unpiloted aerospace vehicle (UAV) program

    SciTech Connect

    Sowle, D.

    1995-09-01

    Unmanned aerospace vehicles (UAVs) are an important complement to the DOE`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. ARM is primarily a ground-based program designed to extensively quantify the radiometric and meteorological properties of an atmospheric column. There is a need for airborne measurements of radiative profiles, especially flux at the tropopause, cloud properties, and upper troposphere water vapor. There is also a need for multi-day measurements at the tropopause; for example, in the tropics, at 20 km for over 24 hours. UAVs offer the greatest potential for long endurance at high altitudes and may be less expensive than piloted flights. 2 figs.

  19. Advances in upper extremity prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Zlotolow, Dan A; Kozin, Scott H

    2012-11-01

    Until recently, upper extremity prostheses had changed little since World War II. In 2006, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency responded to an increasing number of military amputees with the Revolutionizing Prosthetics program. The program has yielded several breakthroughs both in the engineering of new prosthetic arms and in the control of those arms. Direct brain-wave control of a limb with 22° of freedom may be within reach. In the meantime, advances such as individually powered digits have opened the door to multifunctional full and partial hand prostheses. Restoring sensation to the prosthetic limb remains a major challenge to full integration of the limb into a patient's self-image. PMID:23101609

  20. Two-point discrimination of the upper extremities of healthy Koreans in their 20's.

    PubMed

    Koo, Ja-Pung; Kim, Soon-Hee; An, Ho-Jung; Moon, Ok-Gon; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Yun, Young-Dae; Park, Joo-Hyun; Min, Kyoung-Ok

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] The present study attempted to measure two-point discrimination in the upper extremities of healthy Koreans in their 20's. [Subjects and Methods] Using a three-point esthesiometer, we conducted an experiment with a group of 256 college students (128 male and 128 female), attending N University in Chonan, Republic of Korea. [Results] Females showed two-point discrimination at a shorter distance than males at the following points: (i) 5 cm above the elbow joint, the middle part, and 5 cm below the shoulder joint of the anterior upper arm; (ii) 5 cm above the elbow joint and 5 cm below the shoulder joint of the posterior upper arm; (iii) 5 cm above the front of the wrist joint of the forearm; 5 cm below the elbow joint, the palmar part of the distal interphalangeal joint of the thumb, the dorsal part of the distal interphalangeal joint of the middle and little fingers. It was also found that females showed greater two-point discrimination than males in distal regions rather than proximal regions. [Conclusion] The findings of this study will help establish normal values for two-point discrimination of upper extremities of young Koreans in their 20's. PMID:27134375

  1. The future of arms control

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, D.; Mack, A.

    1987-01-01

    This collection of essays examines the issues involved in the arms negotiations between the Superpowers, and the potential for developing effective arms control in the future. Contents (partial): Preface; Reagan administration and arms control; Superpowers Arms Control: The Soviet perspective; Nuclear disengagement zones and no first use doctrines as arms control measures; Regional arms control in the South Pacific; Arms control and the Indian Ocean; Preventing Proliferation: The role of Australian uranium.

  2. Packaging Of Control Circuits In A Robot Arm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kast, William

    1994-01-01

    Packaging system houses and connects control circuitry mounted on circuit boards within shoulder, upper section, and lower section of seven-degree-of-freedom robot arm. Has modular design that incorporates surface-mount technology, multilayer circuit boards, large-scale integrated circuits, and multi-layer flat cables between sections for compactness. Three sections of robot arm contain circuit modules in form of stardardized circuit boards. Each module contains two printed-circuit cards, one of each face.

  3. Robotic Arm Biobarrier Cable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image, taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander on the 14th Martian day of the mission (June 7, 2008), shows the cable that held the Robotic Arm's biobarrier in place during flight has snapped. The cable's springs retracted to release the biobarrier right after landing.

    To the lower right of the image a spring is visible. Extending from that spring is a length of cable that snapped during the biobarrier's release. A second spring separated from the cable when it snapped and has been photographed on the ground under the lander near one of the legs.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  4. Radial arm strike rail

    DOEpatents

    McKeown, Mark H.; Beason, Steven C.

    1991-01-01

    The radial arm strike rail assembly is a system for measurement of bearings, directions, and stereophotography for geologic mapping, particularly where magnetic compasses are not appropriate. The radial arm, pivoting around a shaft axis, provides a reference direction determination for geologic mapping and bearing or direction determination. The centerable and levelable pedestal provide a base for the radial arm strike rail and the telescoping camera pedestal. The telescoping feature of the radial arm strike rail allows positioning the end of the rail for strike direction or bearing measurement with a goniometer.

  5. Upper limb functional electrical stimulation devices and their man-machine interfaces.

    PubMed

    Venugopalan, L; Taylor, P N; Cobb, J E; Swain, I D

    2015-01-01

    Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) is a technique that uses electricity to activate the nerves of a muscle that is paralysed due to hemiplegia, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease or spinal cord injury (SCI). FES has been widely used to restore upper limb functions in people with hemiplegia and C5-C7 tetraplegia and has improved their ability to perform their activities of daily living (ADL). At the time of writing, a detailed literature review of the existing upper limb FES devices and their man-machine interfaces (MMI) showed that only the NESS H200 was commercially available. However, the rigid arm splint doesn't fit everyone and prevents the use of a tenodesis grip. Hence, a robust and versatile upper limb FES device that can be used by a wider group of people is required. PMID:26508077

  6. Decompression of Neglected Compartment Syndrome of the Arm

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Matt DA

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Compartment syndrome of the arm is rare, and delay in diagnosis or treatment can be devastating. A case is reported of compartment syndrome of the whole arm occurring in a remote location and arrival at hospital 15 hours after injury with good results despite delayed treatment. Case Report: A 26 year old male presented with a combined crush injury and compartment syndrome of the arm, with delay in presentation due to remote injury and delay in rescue. Late (>16 hours)fasciotomy was performed with retention of the upper arm, elbow and proximal forearm with good residual function. Conclusion: Despite significant delay in treatment of compartment syndrome of the arm, useful function and tissue can be preserved with adequate decompression. PMID:27299052

  7. Validity and inter-observer reliability of subjective hand-arm vibration assessments.

    PubMed

    Coenen, Pieter; Formanoy, Margriet; Douwes, Marjolein; Bosch, Tim; de Kraker, Heleen

    2014-07-01

    Exposure to mechanical vibrations at work (e.g., due to handling powered tools) is a potential occupational risk as it may cause upper extremity complaints. However, reliable and valid assessment methods for vibration exposure at work are lacking. Measuring hand-arm vibration objectively is often difficult and expensive, while often used information provided by manufacturers lacks detail. Therefore, a subjective hand-arm vibration assessment method was tested on validity and inter-observer reliability. In an experimental protocol, sixteen tasks handling powered tools were executed by two workers. Hand-arm vibration was assessed subjectively by 16 observers according to the proposed subjective assessment method. As a gold standard reference, hand-arm vibration was measured objectively using a vibration measurement device. Weighted κ's were calculated to assess validity, intra-class-correlation coefficients (ICCs) were calculated to assess inter-observer reliability. Inter-observer reliability of the subjective assessments depicting the agreement among observers can be expressed by an ICC of 0.708 (0.511-0.873). The validity of the subjective assessments as compared to the gold-standard reference can be expressed by a weighted κ of 0.535 (0.285-0.785). Besides, the percentage of exact agreement of the subjective assessment compared to the objective measurement was relatively low (i.e., 52% of all tasks). This study shows that subjectively assessed hand-arm vibrations are fairly reliable among observers and moderately valid. This assessment method is a first attempt to use subjective risk assessments of hand-arm vibration. Although, this assessment method can benefit from some future improvement, it can be of use in future studies and in field-based ergonomic assessments. PMID:24721008

  8. The clinical aspects of the upper extremity exoskeleton "EXAR" use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobiev, A. A.; Krivonozhkina, P. S.; Andryushchenko, F. A.; Zasypkina, O. A.

    2015-11-01

    The article considers some of indications and contraindications for the use of the exoskeleton "EXAR". Our experience with the present construction use shows that the exoskeleton "EXAR" is able to make up the following lost or disturbed muscle functions:- an arm raise; a drawing of the arm aside from the trunk;- a bending of the arm in shoulder or elbow joints.

  9. Human cervical spinal cord circuitry activated by tonic input can generate rhythmic arm movements.

    PubMed

    Solopova, I A; Selionov, V A; Zhvansky, D S; Gurfinkel, V S; Ivanenko, Y

    2016-02-01

    The coordination between arms and legs during human locomotion shares many features with that in quadrupeds, yet there is limited evidence for the central pattern generator for the upper limbs in humans. Here we investigated whether different types of tonic stimulation, previously used for eliciting stepping-like leg movements, may evoke nonvoluntary rhythmic arm movements. Twenty healthy subjects participated in this study. The subject was lying on the side, the trunk was fixed, and all four limbs were suspended in a gravity neutral position, allowing unrestricted low-friction limb movements in the horizontal plane. The results showed that peripheral sensory stimulation (continuous muscle vibration) and central tonic activation (postcontraction state of neuronal networks following a long-lasting isometric voluntary effort, Kohnstamm phenomenon) could evoke nonvoluntary rhythmic arm movements in most subjects. In ∼40% of subjects, tonic stimulation elicited nonvoluntary rhythmic arm movements together with rhythmic movements of suspended legs. The fact that not all participants exhibited nonvoluntary limb oscillations may reflect interindividual differences in responsiveness of spinal pattern generation circuitry to its activation. The occurrence and the characteristics of induced movements highlight the rhythmogenesis capacity of cervical neuronal circuitries, complementing the growing body of work on the quadrupedal nature of human gait. PMID:26683072

  10. Upper ministernotomy.

    PubMed

    Reser, Diana; Holubec, Tomas; Scherman, Jacques; Yilmaz, Murat; Guidotti, Andrea; Maisano, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    During the past 50 years, median sternotomy has been the gold standard approach in cardiac surgery with excellent long-term outcomes. However, since the 1990 s, minimally invasive cardiac surgery (MICS) has gained wide acceptance due to patient and economic demand. The advantages include less surgical trauma, less bleeding, less wound infections, less pain and faster recovery of the patients. One of these MICS approaches is the J-shaped upper ministernotomy which results in favourable long-term outcomes even in elderly and redo patients when compared with conventional sternotomy. Owing to its similarity to a full midline sternotomy, it has become the most popular MICS approach besides a mini-thoracotomy. It is a safe and feasible access, but certain recognized principles are mandatory to minimize complications. After identification of the landmarks, the 5-cm skin incision is performed in the midline between the second and fourth rib. The third or fourth right intercostal space is located and dissected laterally off the sternum. After osteotomy, the pericardium is pulled up with stay sutures which allow excellent exposure. The surgical procedures are performed in a standard fashion with central cannulation. Continuous CO2 insufflation is used to minimize the risk of air embolism. Epicardial pacing wires are placed before the removal of the aortic cross-clamp and one chest tube is used. Sternal closure is achieved with three to five stainless steel wires. The pectoral muscle, subcutaneous tissue and skin are adapted with resorbable running sutures. When performed properly, complications are rare (conversion, bleeding and wound infection) and well manageable. PMID:26530961

  11. ARM Mentor Selection Process

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2015-10-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program was created in 1989 with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop several highly instrumented ground stations to study cloud formation processes and their influence on radiative transfer. In 2003, the ARM Program became a national scientific user facility, known as the ARM Climate Research Facility. This scientific infrastructure provides for fixed sites, mobile facilities, an aerial facility, and a data archive available for use by scientists worldwide through the ARM Climate Research Facility—a scientific user facility. The ARM Climate Research Facility currently operates more than 300 instrument systems that provide ground-based observations of the atmospheric column. To keep ARM at the forefront of climate observations, the ARM infrastructure depends heavily on instrument scientists and engineers, also known as lead mentors. Lead mentors must have an excellent understanding of in situ and remote-sensing instrumentation theory and operation and have comprehensive knowledge of critical scale-dependent atmospheric processes. They must also possess the technical and analytical skills to develop new data retrievals that provide innovative approaches for creating research-quality data sets. The ARM Climate Research Facility is seeking the best overall qualified candidate who can fulfill lead mentor requirements in a timely manner.

  12. Robotic Arm Comprising Two Bending Segments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehling, Joshua S.; Difler, Myron A.; Ambrose, Robert O.; Chu, Mars W.; Valvo, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    The figure shows several aspects of an experimental robotic manipulator that includes a housing from which protrudes a tendril- or tentacle-like arm 1 cm thick and 1 m long. The arm consists of two collinear segments, each of which can be bent independently of the other, and the two segments can be bent simultaneously in different planes. The arm can be retracted to a minimum length or extended by any desired amount up to its full length. The arm can also be made to rotate about its own longitudinal axis. Some prior experimental robotic manipulators include single-segment bendable arms. Those arms are thicker and shorter than the present one. The present robotic manipulator serves as a prototype of future manipulators that, by virtue of the slenderness and multiple- bending capability of their arms, are expected to have sufficient dexterity for operation within spaces that would otherwise be inaccessible. Such manipulators could be especially well suited as means of minimally invasive inspection during construction and maintenance activities. Each of the two collinear bending arm segments is further subdivided into a series of collinear extension- and compression-type helical springs joined by threaded links. The extension springs occupy the majority of the length of the arm and engage passively in bending. The compression springs are used for actively controlled bending. Bending is effected by means of pairs of antagonistic tendons in the form of spectra gel spun polymer lines that are attached at specific threaded links and run the entire length of the arm inside the spring helix from the attachment links to motor-driven pulleys inside the housing. Two pairs of tendons, mounted in orthogonal planes that intersect along the longitudinal axis, are used to effect bending of each segment. The tendons for actuating the distal bending segment are in planes offset by an angle of 45 from those of the proximal bending segment: This configuration makes it possible to

  13. Effects of Age, Gender and Level of Co-contraction on Elbow and Shoulder Rotational Stiffness and Damping in the Impulsively End-Loaded Upper Extremity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yunju; Ashton-Miller, James A

    2015-05-01

    Whether an arm will buckle under an impulsive end-load should partly depend on the elastic and viscous properties of the pretensed arm muscles. In measuring these properties we hypothesized that neither age, gender, nor muscle pre-contraction level would affect the bilinear elbow or shoulder lumped rotational stiffness or damping parameters in the impulsively end-loaded upper extremity of 38 healthy men and women. Subjects were instructed to preactivate triceps to either 25, 50 or 75% of maximum myoelectric activity levels. Then a standardized impulsive end-load was applied via a 6-axis load cell to the wrist of the slightly flexed arm in the prone posture. Arm kinematic responses were acquired at 280 Hz and an inverse dynamics analysis was used to estimate the bilinear rotational stiffnesses and damping parameters at the elbow and shoulder. The results show that pre-contraction level affected normalized joint rotational stiffness and damping coefficients (p < 0.02). Age affected the initial stiffness for the elbow (p < 0.05), and gender affected that of the shoulder in the sagittal plane (p < 0.006). Arm muscle strength was positively related to normalized stiffness at the elbow, but not the shoulder. We conclude that age, gender and pre-contraction level each affect the viscoelastic behavior of the end-loaded upper extremity in healthy adults. PMID:25395216

  14. Robot-based methodology for a kinematic and kinetic analysis of unconstrained, but reproducible upper extremity movement.

    PubMed

    Popovic, Nikica; Williams, Sybele; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Rau, Günter; Disselhorst-Klug, Cantherine

    2009-07-22

    Although arm movements play an important role in everyday life, there is still a lack of procedures for the analysis of upper extremity movement. The main problems for standardizing the procedure are the variety of arm movements and the difficult assessment of external hand forces. The first problem requires the predefinition of motions, and the second one is the prerequisite for calculation of net joint forces and torques arising during motion. A new methodology for measuring external forces during prespecified, reproducible upper extremity movement has been introduced and validated. A robot-arm has been used to define the motion and 6 degrees of freedom (DoF) force sensor has been attached to it for acquiring the external loads acting on the arm. Additionally, force feedback has been used to help keeping external loads constant. Intra-individual reproducibility of joint angles was estimated by using correlation coefficients to compare a goal-directed movement with robot-guided task. Inter-individual reproducibility has been evaluated by using the mean standard deviation of joint angles for both types of movement. The results showed that both inter- and intra-individual reproducibility have significantly improved by using the robot. Also, the effectiveness of using force feedback for keeping a constant external load has been shown. This makes it possible to estimate net joint forces and torques which are important biomechanical information in motion analysis. PMID:19442979

  15. Upper limb joint muscle/tendon injury and anthropometric adaptations in French competitive tennis players.

    PubMed

    Rogowski, Isabelle; Creveaux, Thomas; Genevois, Cyril; Klouche, Shahnaz; Rahme, Michel; Hardy, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the upper limb anthropometric dimensions and a history of dominant upper limb injury in tennis players. Dominant and non-dominant wrist, forearm, elbow and arm circumferences, along with a history of dominant upper limb injuries, were assessed in 147 male and female players, assigned to four groups based on location of injury: wrist (n = 9), elbow (n = 25), shoulder (n = 14) and healthy players (n = 99). From anthropometric dimensions, bilateral differences in circumferences and in proportions were calculated. The wrist group presented a significant bilateral difference in arm circumference, and asymmetrical bilateral proportions between wrist and forearm, as well as between elbow and arm, compared to the healthy group (6.6 ± 3.1% vs. 4.9 ± 4.0%, P < 0.01; -3.6 ± 3.0% vs. -0.9 ± 2.9%, P < 0.05; and -2.2 ± 2.2% vs. 0.1 ± 3.4%, P < 0.05, respectively). The elbow group displayed asymmetrical bilateral proportions between forearm and arm compared to the healthy group (-0.4 ± 4.3% vs. 1.5 ± 4.0%, P < 0.01). The shoulder group showed significant bilateral difference in elbow circumference, and asymmetrical bilateral proportions between forearm and elbow when compared to the healthy group (5.8 ± 4.7% vs. 3.1 ± 4.8%, P < 0.05 and -1.7 ± 4.5% vs. 1.4 ± 4.3%, P < 0.01, respectively). These findings suggest that players with a history of injury at the upper limb joint present altered dominant upper limb proportions in comparison with the non-dominant side, and such asymmetrical proportions would appear to be specific to the location of injury. Further studies are needed to confirm the link between location of tennis injury and asymmetry in upper limb proportions using high-tech measurements in symptomatic tennis players. PMID:25881663

  16. Predictive factors of hypertonia in the upper extremity of chronic stroke survivors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, GyuChang; An, SeungHeon; Lee, YunBok; Lee, DongGeon; Park, Dong-sik

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Muscle tone is known to predict the motor function of the upper extremity within 12 months after onset in stroke survivors. The aim of this study was to investigate whether motor function of the upper extremity can predict the risk of hypertonia in chronic stroke survivors, and to analyze the correlation between the two variables to determine the predictive validity. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-three chronic stroke survivors were assessed using the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) for elbow flexor tone, the Fugl-Meyer assessment of the upper extremity (FM-UE), and the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) for upper extremity motor recovery and function. [Results] Elbow flexor tone (MAS≥1+) increased by 0.246 compared with the baseline muscle tone even at month 12 and appeared to negatively affect the motor function of the upper extremity. The cutoff value for predicting muscle tone (MAS≥1+) was 24 for FM-UE and 15.5 for ARAT. FM-UE had the biggest impact on elbow flexor tone (MAS≥1+), and the risk of elbow flexor hypertonia (MAS≥1+) increased 0.764-fold for a cutoff value of FM-UE≤24 compared with a cutoff value of FM-UE>24. [Conclusion] The results show that the most important variable for predicting muscle tone of the elbow flexor in stroke survivors is the FM assessment of the upper extremity. PMID:26357437

  17. Arm swing in human walking: what is their drive?

    PubMed

    Goudriaan, Marije; Jonkers, Ilse; van Dieen, Jaap H; Bruijn, Sjoerd M

    2014-06-01

    Although previous research has studied arm swing during walking, to date, it remains unclear what the contribution of passive dynamics versus active muscle control to arm swing is. In this study, we measured arm swing kinematics with 3D-motion analysis. We used a musculoskeletal model in OpenSim and generated dynamic simulations of walking with and without upper limb muscle excitations. We then compared arm swing amplitude and relative phase during both simulations to verify the extent to which passive dynamics contribute to arm swing. The results confirm that passive dynamics are partly responsible for arm swing during walking. However, without muscle activity, passive swing amplitude and relative phase decrease significantly (both p<0.05), the latter inducing a more in-phase swing pattern of the arms. Therefore, we conclude that muscle activity is needed to increase arm swing amplitude and modify relative phase during human walking to obtain an out-phase movement relative to the legs. PMID:24865637

  18. Anchoring the "floating arm": Use of proprioceptive and mirror visual feedback from one arm to control involuntary displacement of the other arm.

    PubMed

    Brun, C; Guerraz, M

    2015-12-01

    Arm movement control takes advantage of multiple inputs, including those originating from the contralateral arm. In the mirror paradigm, it has been suggested that control of the unseen arm, hidden by the mirror, is facilitated by the reflection of the other, moving arm. Although proprioceptive feedback originating from the moving arm, (the image of which is reflected in the mirror), is always coupled with visual feedback in the mirror paradigm, the former has received little attention. We recently showed that the involuntary arm movement following a sustained, isometric contraction, known as the "floating arm" or "Kohnstamm phenomenon", was adjusted to the passive-motorized displacement of the other arm. However, provision of mirror feedback, that is, the reflection in the mirror of the passively moved arm, did not add to this coupling effect. Therefore, the interlimb coupling in the mirror paradigm may to a large extent have a proprioceptive origin rather than a visual origin. The objective of the present study was to decouple mirror feedback and proprioceptive feedback from the reflected, moving arm and evaluate their respective contributions to interlimb coupling in the mirror paradigm. First (in Experiment 1, under eyes-closed conditions), we found that masking the proprioceptive afferents of the passively moved arm (by co-vibrating the antagonistic biceps and triceps muscles) suppressed the interlimb coupling between involuntary displacement of one arm and passive displacement of the other. Next (in Experiment 2), we masked proprioceptive afferents of the passively moved arm and specifically evaluated mirror feedback. We found that interlimb coupling through mirror feedback (though significant) was weaker than interlimb coupling through proprioceptive feedback. Overall, the present results show that in the mirror paradigm, proprioceptive feedback is stronger and more consistent than visual-mirror feedback in terms of the impact on interlimb coupling. PMID

  19. A model of the upper extremity for simulating musculoskeletal surgery and analyzing neuromuscular control.

    PubMed

    Holzbaur, Katherine R S; Murray, Wendy M; Delp, Scott L

    2005-06-01

    Biomechanical models of the musculoskeletal system are frequently used to study neuromuscular control and simulate surgical procedures. To be broadly applicable, a model must be accessible to users, provide accurate representations of muscles and joints, and capture important interactions between joints. We have developed a model of the upper extremity that includes 15 degrees of freedom representing the shoulder, elbow, forearm, wrist, thumb, and index finger, and 50 muscle compartments crossing these joints. The kinematics of each joint and the force-generating parameters for each muscle were derived from experimental data. The model estimates the muscle-tendon lengths and moment arms for each of the muscles over a wide range of postures. Given a pattern of muscle activations, the model also estimates muscle forces and joint moments. The moment arms and maximum moment-generating capacity of each muscle group (e.g., elbow flexors) were compared to experimental data to assess the accuracy of the model. These comparisons showed that moment arms and joint moments estimated using the model captured important features of upper extremity geometry and mechanics. The model also revealed coupling between joints, such as increased passive finger flexion moment with wrist extension. The computer model is available to researchers at http://nmbl.stanford.edu. PMID:16078622

  20. Nonspecific Arm Pain

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Ali; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad H; Ring, David

    2013-01-01

    Nonspecific activity-related arm pain is characterized by an absence of objective physical findings and symptoms that do not correspond with objective pathophysiology. Arm pain without strict diagnosis is often related to activity, work-related activity in particular, and is often seen in patients with physically demanding work. Psychological factors such as catastrophic thinking, symptoms of depression, and heightened illness concern determine a substantial percentage of the disability associated with puzzling hand and arm pains. Ergonomic modifications can help to control symptoms, but optimal health may require collaborative management incorporating psychosocial and psychological elements of illness. PMID:25207288

  1. MVACS Robotic Arm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonitz, R.; Slostad, J.; Bon, B.; Braun, D.; Brill, R.; Buck, C.; Fleischner, R.; Haldeman, A.; Herman, J.; Hertzel, M.; Noon, D.; Pixler, G.; Schenker, P.; Ton, T.; Tucker, C.; Zimmerman, W.

    2000-01-01

    The primary purpose of the Mars Volatiles and Climate Surveyor (MVACS) Robotic Arm is to support to the other MVACS science instruments by digging trenches in the Martian soil; acquiring and dumping soil samples into the thermal evolved gas analyzer (TEGA); positioning the Soil Temperature Probe (STP) in the soil: positioning the Robotic Arm Air Temperature Sensor (RAATS) at various heights above the surface, and positioning the Robotic Arm Camera (RAC) for taking images of the surface, trench, soil samples, magnetic targets and other objects of scientific interest within its workspace.

  2. Kinematically redundant arm formulations for coordinated multiple arm implementations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Robert W.; Quiocho, Leslie J.; Cleghorn, Timothy F.

    1990-01-01

    Although control laws for kinematically redundant robotic arms were presented as early as 1969, redundant arms have only recently become recognized as viable solutions to limitations inherent to kinematically sufficient arms. The advantages of run-time control optimization and arm reconfiguration are becoming increasingly attractive as the complexity and criticality of robotic systems continues to progress. A generalized control law for a spatial arm with 7 or more degrees of freedom (DOF) based on Whitney's resolved rate formulation is given. Results from a simulation implementation utilizing this control law are presented. Furthermore, results from a two arm simulation are presented to demonstrate the coordinated control of multiple arms using this formulation.

  3. An arm-first approach to cleavable mikto-arm star polymers by RAFT polymerization.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaohu; Moad, Graeme; Muir, Benjamin W; Rizzardo, Ezio; Rosselgong, Julien; Yang, Wantai; Thang, San H

    2014-04-01

    Redox-cleavable mikto-arm star polymers are prepared by an "arm-first" approach involving copolymerization of a dimethacrylate mediated by a mixture of macroRAFT agents. Thus, RAFT copolymerization of the monomers BMA, DMAEMA, and OEGMA, with the disulfide dimethacrylate cross-linker (DSDMA), bis(2-methacryloyl)oxyethyl disulfide, mediated by a 1:1:1 mixture of three macroRAFT agents with markedly different properties [hydrophilic, poly[oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate]-P(OEGMA)8-9 ; cationizable, poly[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate]-P(DMAEMA); hydrophobic, poly(n-butyl methacrylate)-P(BMA)] provides low dispersity mikto-arm star polymers. Good control (Đ < 1.3) is observed for the target P(DMAEMA)/P(OEGMA)/P(BMA) (3:3:1) mikto-arm star, a double hydrophilic P(DMAEMA)/P(OEGMA) (3:3) mikto-arm star and a hydrophobic P(BMA) homo-arm star. However, Đ for the target mikto-arm stars increases with an increase in either the ratio [DSDMA]:[total macroRAFT] or the fraction of hydrophobic P(BMA) macroRAFT agent. The quaternized mikto-arm star in dilute aqueous solution shows a monomodal particle size distribution and an average size of ≈145 nm. PMID:24504709

  4. Reanimating the arm and hand with intraspinal microstimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Jonas B.; Seki, Kazuhiko; Jackson, Andrew

    2011-10-01

    To date, there is no effective therapy for spinal cord injury, and many patients could benefit dramatically from at least partial restoration of arm and hand function. Despite a substantial body of research investigating intraspinal microstimulation (ISMS) in frogs, rodents and cats, little is known about upper-limb responses to cervical stimulation in the primate. Here, we show for the first time that long trains of ISMS delivered to the macaque spinal cord can evoke functional arm and hand movements. Complex movements involving coordinated activation of multiple muscles could be elicited from a single electrode, while just two electrodes were required for independent control of reaching and grasping. We found that the motor responses to ISMS were described by a dual exponential model that depended only on stimulation history. We demonstrate that this model can be inverted to generate stimulus trains capable of eliciting arbitrary, graded motor responses, and could be used to restore volitional movements in a closed-loop brain-machine interface.

  5. One regional ARM guide for climatic evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.M.

    1990-04-01

    One of the early tasks of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Program is to provide climatic guides for site selection purposes including possible continental, regional, local and on-site locations. The first guide A Preliminary ARM Guide for Climatic Evaluations'' provided some climate data on a continental scale; this one is an attempt to show the variability that exists over a region. Kansas was chosen for this particular guide because it satisfies most of the requirements given in the ARM Program Plan, i.e., climatic significance, potential for synergism with other programs and scientific and logistical viability. Kansas has extreme climatic variations, is centrally located, is compatible with other large scale programs (Fife), has good airfields and accommodations to minimize time and effort in planning and operating an ARM site for continuous use and special campaigns.

  6. One regional ARM guide for climatic evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.M.

    1990-04-01

    One of the early tasks of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Program is to provide climatic guides for site selection purposes including possible continental, regional, local and on-site locations. The first guide ``A Preliminary ARM Guide for Climatic Evaluations`` provided some climate data on a continental scale; this one is an attempt to show the variability that exists over a region. Kansas was chosen for this particular guide because it satisfies most of the requirements given in the ARM Program Plan, i.e., climatic significance, potential for synergism with other programs and scientific and logistical viability. Kansas has extreme climatic variations, is centrally located, is compatible with other large scale programs (Fife), has good airfields and accommodations to minimize time and effort in planning and operating an ARM site for continuous use and special campaigns.

  7. The Resonating Arm Exerciser: design and pilot testing of a mechanically passive rehabilitation device that mimics robotic active assistance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Robotic arm therapy devices that incorporate actuated assistance can enhance arm recovery, motivate patients to practice, and allow therapists to deliver semi-autonomous training. However, because such devices are often complex and actively apply forces, they have not achieved widespread use in rehabilitation clinics or at home. This paper describes the design and pilot testing of a simple, mechanically passive device that provides robot-like assistance for active arm training using the principle of mechanical resonance. Methods The Resonating Arm Exerciser (RAE) consists of a lever that attaches to the push rim of a wheelchair, a forearm support, and an elastic band that stores energy. Patients push and pull on the lever to roll the wheelchair back and forth by about 20 cm around a neutral position. We performed two separate pilot studies of the device. In the first, we tested whether the predicted resonant properties of RAE amplified a user’s arm mobility by comparing his or her active range of motion (AROM) in the device achieved during a single, sustained push and pull to the AROM achieved during rocking. In a second pilot study designed to test the therapeutic potential of the device, eight participants with chronic stroke (35 ± 24 months since injury) and a mean, stable, initial upper extremity Fugl-Meyer (FM) score of 17 ± 8 / 66 exercised with RAE for eight 45 minute sessions over three weeks. The primary outcome measure was the average AROM measured with a tilt sensor during a one minute test, and the secondary outcome measures were the FM score and the visual analog scale for arm pain. Results In the first pilot study, we found people with a severe motor impairment after stroke intuitively found the resonant frequency of the chair, and the mechanical resonance of RAE amplified their arm AROM by a factor of about 2. In the second pilot study, AROM increased by 66% ± 20% (p = 0.003). The mean FM score increase was 8.5 ± 4 pts (p = 0

  8. Bruising Hands and Arms

    MedlinePlus

    ... and arms is common. Dermatologists call it 'actinic purpura', 'solar purpura' or 'Bateman's purpura'. These flat blotches start out red, then turn ... flimsy looking. Mostly seen in older individuals, actinic purpura is due to the weakened state of blood ...

  9. Two-point discrimination of the upper extremities of healthy Koreans in their 20’s

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Ja-Pung; Kim, Soon-Hee; An, Ho-Jung; Moon, Ok-Gon; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Yun, Young-Dae; Park, Joo-Hyun; Min, Kyoung-Ok

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The present study attempted to measure two-point discrimination in the upper extremities of healthy Koreans in their 20’s. [Subjects and Methods] Using a three-point esthesiometer, we conducted an experiment with a group of 256 college students (128 male and 128 female), attending N University in Chonan, Republic of Korea. [Results] Females showed two-point discrimination at a shorter distance than males at the following points: (i) 5 cm above the elbow joint, the middle part, and 5 cm below the shoulder joint of the anterior upper arm; (ii) 5 cm above the elbow joint and 5 cm below the shoulder joint of the posterior upper arm; (iii) 5 cm above the front of the wrist joint of the forearm; 5 cm below the elbow joint, the palmar part of the distal interphalangeal joint of the thumb, the dorsal part of the distal interphalangeal joint of the middle and little fingers. It was also found that females showed greater two-point discrimination than males in distal regions rather than proximal regions. [Conclusion] The findings of this study will help establish normal values for two-point discrimination of upper extremities of young Koreans in their 20’s. PMID:27134375

  10. Upper extremity injuries in golf.

    PubMed

    Bayes, Matthew C; Wadsworth, L Tyler

    2009-04-01

    Golf is an asymmetric sport with unique patterns of injury depending upon the skill level. Higher handicap players typically experience injuries that result from swing mechanics, whereas lower handicap and professional players have overuse as the major cause of their injuries. The majority of shoulder injuries affecting golfers occur in the nondominant shoulder. Common shoulder injuries include subacromial impingement, rotator cuff pathology, glenohumeral instability, and arthritis involving the acromioclavicular and/or glenohumeral joints. Lead arm elbow pain resulting from lateral epicondylosis (tennis elbow) is the leading upper extremity injury in amateur golfers. Tendon injury is the most common problem seen in the wrist and forearm of the golfer. Rehabilitation emphasizing improvement in core muscle streng is important in the treatment of golf injury. Emerging treatments for tendinopathy include topical nitrates, ultrasound-guided injection of therapeutic substances, and eccentric rehabilitation. There is evidence supporting physiotherapy, and swing modification directed by a teaching professional, for treatment of upper extremity golf injuries. This article focuses on upper extremity injuries in golf, including a discussion of the epidemiology, causes, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of injuries occurring in the shoulder, elbow, wrist, and hand. PMID:20048492

  11. ARM for Platform Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patte, Mathieu; Poupat, Jean-Luc; Le Meur, Patrick

    2015-09-01

    The activities described in this paper are part of the CNES R&T “Study of a Cortex-R ARM based architecture” performed by Airbus DS Space System & Electronics in 2014. With the support of CNES, Airbus DS has performed the porting of a representative space application software on an ARM based demonstration platform. This paper presents the platform itself, the activities performed at software level and the first results on this evaluation study.

  12. Blockage of upper airway

    MedlinePlus

    ... Airway obstruction - acute upper Images Throat anatomy Choking Respiratory system References Cukor J, Manno M. Pediatric respiratory emergencies: upper airway obstruction and infections. In: Marx ...

  13. Hello to Arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This image highlights the hidden spiral arms (blue) that were discovered around the nearby galaxy NGC 4625 by the ultraviolet eyes of NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer.

    The image is composed of ultraviolet and visible-light data, from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer and the California Institute of Technology's Digitized Sky Survey, respectively. Near-ultraviolet light is colored green; far-ultraviolet light is colored blue; and optical light is colored red.

    As the image demonstrates, the lengthy spiral arms are nearly invisible when viewed in optical light while bright in ultraviolet. This is because they are bustling with hot, newborn stars that radiate primarily ultraviolet light.

    The youthful arms are also very long, stretching out to a distance four times the size of the galaxy's core. They are part of the largest ultraviolet galactic disk discovered so far.

    Located 31 million light-years away in the constellation Canes Venatici, NGC 4625 is the closest galaxy ever seen with such a young halo of arms. It is slightly smaller than our Milky Way, both in size and mass. However, the fact that this galaxy's disk is forming stars very actively suggests that it might evolve into a more massive and mature galaxy resembling our own.

    The armless companion galaxy seen below NGC 4625 is called NGC 4618. Astronomers do not know why it lacks arms but speculate that it may have triggered the development of arms in NGC 4625.

  14. Accuracy of KinectOne to quantify kinematics of the upper body.

    PubMed

    Kuster, Roman P; Heinlein, Bernd; Bauer, Christoph M; Graf, Eveline S

    2016-06-01

    Motion analysis systems deliver quantitative information, e.g. on the progress of rehabilitation programs aimed at improving range of motion. Markerless systems are of interest for clinical application because they are low-cost and easy to use. The first generation of the Kinect™ sensor showed promising results in validity assessment compared to an established marker-based system. However, no literature is available on the validity of the new 'Kinect™ for Xbox one' (KinectOne) in tracking upper body motion. Consequently, this study was conducted to analyze the accuracy and reliability of the KinectOne in tracking upper body motion. Twenty subjects performed shoulder abduction in frontal and scapula plane, flexion, external rotation and horizontal flexion in two conditions (sitting and standing). Arm and trunk motion were analyzed using the KinectOne and compared to a marker-based system. Comparisons were made using Bland Altman statistics and Coefficient of Multiple Correlation. On average, differences between systems of 3.9±4.0° and 0.1±3.8° were found for arm and trunk motion, respectively. Correlation was higher for the arm than for the trunk motion. Based on the observed bias, the accuracy of the KinectOne was found to be adequate to measure arm motion in a clinical setting. Although trunk motion showed a very low absolute bias between the two systems, the KinectOne was not able to track small changes over time. Before the KinectOne can find clinical application, further research is required analyzing whether validity can be improved using a customized tracking algorithm or other sensor placement, and to analyze test-retest reliability. PMID:27264408

  15. 4. Exterior, detail south elevation, showing jointing of logs on ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Exterior, detail south elevation, showing jointing of logs on later extension. Sept. 12, 1940. Mixon. - Upper Swedish Log Cabin, Darby Creek vicinity, Clifton Heights (Upper Darby Township), Darby, Delaware County, PA

  16. 3. Exterior, detail view of north elevation, from northeast, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Exterior, detail view of north elevation, from northeast, showing joint of addition. Sept. 12, 1940. Mixon. - Upper Swedish Log Cabin, Darby Creek vicinity, Clifton Heights (Upper Darby Township), Darby, Delaware County, PA

  17. A method for measurement of static lever arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xianglu; Qin, Shiqiao; Wang, Xingshu; Wu, Wei; Hu, Feng; Zheng, JiaXing

    2016-01-01

    Lever arm effect has to be considered in transfer alignment technology. Between static lever arm and dynamic lever arm, the former has larger amplitude, and it is the major error source in transfer alignment. How to measure and solve it become an important problem. This paper takes vehicle as a rigid body. Assume that static lever arm does not change in a short time, based on two inertial measurement units(IMU), data are measured and constituted several matrixes properly. After that, by using least square method, static lever arm is solved finally. Simulation experiments are implemented, results show that static lever arm can be solved effectively. Further study shows that, the precision of the method can be improved by preprocessing low pass filter.

  18. [Distalization of the upper second molar: biomechanics].

    PubMed

    Castaldo, A

    1991-01-01

    The Author shows a system to dystalize the second upper molars and, if necessary, the third upper molars. This system, easy to be adapted, is made up by a palatal bar inserted between the first upper molars, by a sectional and a 100 grams precalibrated open Sentalloy coil spring used as an active force. PMID:1784296

  19. Targeted Muscle Reinnervation and Advanced Prosthetic Arms

    PubMed Central

    Cheesborough, Jennifer E.; Smith, Lauren H.; Kuiken, Todd A.; Dumanian, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted muscle reinnervation (TMR) is a surgical procedure used to improve the control of upper limb prostheses. Residual nerves from the amputated limb are transferred to reinnervate new muscle targets that have otherwise lost their function. These reinnervated muscles then serve as biological amplifiers of the amputated nerve motor signals, allowing for more intuitive control of advanced prosthetic arms. Here the authors provide a review of surgical techniques for TMR in patients with either transhumeral or shoulder disarticulation amputations. They also discuss how TMR may act synergistically with recent advances in prosthetic arm technologies to improve prosthesis controllability. Discussion of TMR and prosthesis control is presented in the context of a 41-year-old man with a left-side shoulder disarticulation and a right-side transhumeral amputation. This patient underwent bilateral TMR surgery and was fit with advanced pattern-recognition myoelectric prostheses. PMID:25685105

  20. The effects of bilateral movement training on upper limb function in chronic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kyoung Ju; Kim, Jin Young

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the functional and kinematic changes associated with two rehabilitation protocols: bilateral and unilateral movement training. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-five patients with chronic stroke were randomly assigned to two training protocols for four weeks of training. Each training session consisted of three tasks. The tasks were performed with either the impaired and unimpaired arms moving synchronously (bilateral training) or with the impaired arm alone (unilateral training). To compare the changes associated with each rehabilitation protocol, functional and kinematic assessments were performed before and after the interventions. The functional state of each patient was measured by the Box and Block Test, and the kinematic variables were assessed by three-dimensional motion analysis. The Box and Block Test was used to assess the functional abilities of the affected upper limb. Kinematic measurements of upper limb movement were measured with a 3-dimensional motion analysis system. [Results] Results showed that the bilateral movement group had significantly improved motion of the shoulder compared to the unilateral movement group. [Conclusion] Bilateral movement training should be used to improve upper limb function in patients with chronic stroke.

  1. Multibody system of the upper limb including a reverse shoulder prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Quental, C; Folgado, J; Ambrósio, J; Monteiro, J

    2013-11-01

    The reverse shoulder replacement, recommended for the treatment of several shoulder pathologies such as cuff tear arthropathy and fractures in elderly people, changes the biomechanics of the shoulder when compared to the normal anatomy. Although several musculoskeletal models of the upper limb have been presented to study the shoulder joint, only a few of them focus on the biomechanics of the reverse shoulder. This work presents a biomechanical model of the upper limb, including a reverse shoulder prosthesis, to evaluate the impact of the variation of the joint geometry and position on the biomechanical function of the shoulder. The biomechanical model of the reverse shoulder is based on a musculoskeletal model of the upper limb, which is modified to account for the properties of the DELTA® reverse prosthesis. Considering two biomechanical models, which simulate the anatomical and reverse shoulder joints, the changes in muscle lengths, muscle moment arms, and muscle and joint reaction forces are evaluated. The muscle force sharing problem is solved for motions of unloaded abduction in the coronal plane and unloaded anterior flexion in the sagittal plane, acquired using video-imaging, through the minimization of an objective function related to muscle metabolic energy consumption. After the replacement of the shoulder joint, significant changes in the length of the pectoralis major, latissimus dorsi, deltoid, teres major, teres minor, coracobrachialis, and biceps brachii muscles are observed for a reference position considered for the upper limb. The shortening of the teres major and teres minor is the most critical since they become unable to produce active force in this position. Substantial changes of muscle moment arms are also observed, which are consistent with the literature. As expected, there is a significant increase of the deltoid moment arms and more fibers are able to elevate the arm. The solutions to the muscle force sharing problem support the

  2. Commentary: Utility of the O-Arm in spinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: More studies report the intraoperative benefits vs. risks of utilizing the O-Arm in performing pedicle screw insertion in spinal surgery. Methods/Results: Several studies document the utility of CT-guided O-arm placement of pedicle/lateral mass screws. Singh et al. documented the efficacy of CT guided-O Arm placement of pedicle screws and lateral mass screws in the upper cervical spine.[4] Specifically, 10 patients with unstable hangman's fractures (ages 17-80) required 52 screws; C2 pedicle screws (20), C3 lateral mass screws (20), C4 lateral mass screws (12) and one C2 pedicle screw. Of these only 5% were misplaced, and none had new neuorlogical deficits. Kim et al. demonstrated the safety/efficacy of the CT/O-arm in minimally invasive spine surgery (MIS) (posterior percutaneous spinal fusions).[1] Of 290 pedicle screws, 280 (96.6%) were acceptably placed. Kotani et al. compared the placement of 222 pedicle screws (29 patients operated upon with CT-based navigation) vs. 416 screws (32 having surgery using O-arm-based navigation); postoperative CT studies confirmed the accuracy of screw placement, and no significant differences in the frequency of grade 2-3 perforations between the two groups. Nelson et al. analyzed the radiation exposure delivered to the operating room staff utilizing C-arm fluoroscopy (C-arm), portable X-ray (XR) radiography, and portable cone-beam computed tomography (O-arm); the surgeon and assistant were exposed to higher levels of scatter radiation from the C-arm, with a 7.7-fold increase in radiation exposure on the tube vs. detector sides.[3] Conclusion: There are several pros and a few cons (radiation dosage) for the use of the O-arm in spine surgery. PMID:25593769

  3. 6. DETAIL VIEW OF NORTHEAST END OF BRIDGE, SHOWING ROCKER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DETAIL VIEW OF NORTHEAST END OF BRIDGE, SHOWING ROCKER ARM PORTION OF BASCULE - Seddon Island Scherzer Rolling Lift Bridge, Spanning Garrison Channel from Tampa to Seddon Island, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

  4. INTERIOR FIFTH FLOOR, LOOKING WEST SHOWING MONITOR. ROOM MOST RECENTLY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR FIFTH FLOOR, LOOKING WEST SHOWING MONITOR. ROOM MOST RECENTLY USED FOR ART STUDIO. - Colt Fire Arms Company, North Armory, 36-150 Huyshope Avenue, 17-170 Van Dyke Avenue, 49 Vredendale Avenue, Hartford, Hartford County, CT

  5. 7. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHEAST, SHOWING SOUTH HALF OF EAST CORRIDOR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHEAST, SHOWING SOUTH HALF OF EAST CORRIDOR, RANGE 5, WITH CENTRAL ROOF SUPPORTS, Interior - Winchester Repeating Arms Company, Tract K Shooting Range, 125 Munson Street (rear section), New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  6. 3. VIEW, LOOKING EAST, SHOWING OPEN SPACE AT RANGE BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW, LOOKING EAST, SHOWING OPEN SPACE AT RANGE BUILDING AT NORTH END, Interior - Winchester Repeating Arms Company, Tract K Shooting Range, 125 Munson Street (rear section), New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  7. 6. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHEAST, SHOWING DETAIL OF RANGE 1 TARGET ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHEAST, SHOWING DETAIL OF RANGE 1 TARGET END, Interior - Winchester Repeating Arms Company, Tract K Shooting Range, 125 Munson Street (rear section), New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  8. 5. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHEAST, SHOWING DETAIL OF FIRING PORT AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHEAST, SHOWING DETAIL OF FIRING PORT AND WEST CORRIDOR OPENING, RANGE 5, Interior - Winchester Repeating Arms Company, Tract K Shooting Range, 125 Munson Street (rear section), New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  9. 8. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHEAST, SHOWING DETAIL OF RANGE 3 TARGET ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHEAST, SHOWING DETAIL OF RANGE 3 TARGET END, Interior - Winchester Repeating Arms Company, Tract K Shooting Range, 125 Munson Street (rear section), New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  10. 2. Side view of producer #9 showing coal feed chute, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Side view of producer #9 showing coal feed chute, rabble arm drive assembly located on top of producer, and rachet wheel assembly. (Ryan and Harms) - Holston Army Ammunition Plant, Producer Gas Plant, Kingsport, Sullivan County, TN