Sample records for shrimps pandalus borealis

  1. Microbiological quality of Icelandic cooked-peeled shrimp ( Pandalus borealis)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Grimur Valdimarsson; Hjörleifur Einarsson; Birna Gudbjörnsdottir; Hannes Magnusson

    1998-01-01

    Iceland is a major producer of cold water shrimp, Pandalus borealis. In recent years considerable attention has been given to improve hygiene in the factories producing cooked, peeled and frozen shrimp. To keep track of the bacteriological status of the end product, shrimp from most of the factories is routinely analysed bacteriologically by the request of shrimp exporters. This paper

  2. DESCRIPTION OF LARVAE OF THE NORTHERN SHRIMP, PANDALUS BOREALIS, REARED IN SITU IN KACHEMAK BAY, ALASKA

    E-print Network

    DESCRIPTION OF LARVAE OF THE NORTHERN SHRIMP, PANDALUS BOREALIS, REARED IN SITU IN KACHEMAK BAY, ALASKA EVAN HAYNES' ABSTRACT Northern shrimp, Pandalus borealis, were reared in situ in Kachemak Bay juvenile stage. Apparently larvae of P. borealis in Alaska waters have at least one less stage than larvae

  3. Utilization of chitosan for preservation of raw shrimp (Pandalus borealis)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. K. Simpson; N. Gagné; I. N. A. Ashie; E. Noroozi

    1997-01-01

    Whole and headless shrimp (Pandalus borealis) were dipped in various concentrations of chitosan solution and stored for 20 days at 4–7°C. The effects of chitosan on microbial proliferation, total volatile bases, nucleotide breakdown, and blackspot formation were monitored over this period. Chitosan showed strong antimicrobial properties inhibiting several microorganisms at concentrations ranging between 0.0075 ? 0.01%. The Pseudomonads, however, were

  4. PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL CHANGES OF PINK SHRIMP, PANDALUS BOREALIS, HELD IN CARBON DIOXIDE MODIFIED REFRIGERATED

    E-print Network

    PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL CHANGES OF PINK SHRIMP, PANDALUS BOREALIS, HELD IN CARBON DIOXIDE MODIFIED ahrimp,PandaluB borealis, were held in carbon dioxide modified refrigerated seawater for 12.5 days and in ice for 11.5 days. Chemical tests for spoilage indicated that shrimp held in carbon dioxide modified

  5. Population structure of the deep-sea shrimp (Pandalus borealis) in the north-east Atlantic based on allozyme variation

    E-print Network

    Vincent, Warwick F.

    Population structure of the deep-sea shrimp (Pandalus borealis) in the north-east Atlantic based 21 February 2000 Abstract -- In order to elucidate the population structure of the deep-sea shrimp Elsevier SAS Genetic diversity / population genetics / enzymes / deep-sea shrimp / Pandalus borealis Résumé

  6. Calcium carbonate crystallization in the ?-chitin matrix of the shell of pink shrimp, Pandalus borealis, during frozen storage

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Mikkelsen; S. B. Engelsen; H. C. B. Hansen; O. Larsen; L. H. Skibsted

    1997-01-01

    Calcium carbonate precipitates in the shell of pink shrimp, Pandalus borealis, during frozen storage (investigated for temperatures above ? 30°C), and as a result white spots appear in the shell. During continued frozen storage the white spots grow in size and eventually cover the entire, originally transparent, shell. Material isolated from shrimp shells was dried and subjected to infrared and

  7. Egg survival, embryonic development, and larval characteristics of northern shrimp ( Pandalus borealis ) females subject to different temperature and feeding conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sophie Brillon; Yvan Lambert; Julian Dodson

    2005-01-01

    Laboratory experiments on ovigerous females of northern shrimp (Pandalus borealis) were used to assess the effects of temperature and food ration on female condition during incubation and examine how combined effects of temperature and female condition influenced egg survival, embryonic development, and larval characteristics. Ovigerous females were maintained at 2°C, 5°C, and 8°C and fed on a low (three times\\/week;

  8. Buffered random sampling: a sequential inhibited spatial point process applied to sampling in a trawl survey for northern shrimp Pandalus borealis in West Greenland waters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. C. S. Kingsley; P. Kanneworff; D. M. Carlsson

    2004-01-01

    A stratified random sample survey has been carried out since 1988 as a component of the assessment of the stock of northern shrimp Pandalus borealis in offshore West Greenland waters. In 1999, the placing of stations independently and randomly was replaced by buffered random sampling, in which stations were randomly placed but prevented from being closer together than a prescribed

  9. Characterization of Shrimp Oil from Pandalus borealis by High Performance Liquid Chromatography and High Resolution Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Guangling; Hui, Joseph P M; Burton, Ian W; Thibault, Marie-Hélène; Pelletier, Claude; Boudreau, Josée; Tchoukanova, Nadia; Subramanian, Balaji; Djaoued, Yahia; Ewart, Stephen; Gagnon, Jacques; Ewart, Kathryn Vanya; Zhang, Junzeng

    2015-01-01

    Northern shrimp (Pandalus borealis) oil, which is rich in omega-3 fatty acids, was recovered from the cooking water of shrimp processing facilities. The oil contains significant amounts of omega-3 fatty acids in triglyceride form, along with substantial long-chain monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs). It also features natural isomeric forms of astaxanthin, a nutritional carotenoid, which gives the oil a brilliant red color. As part of our efforts in developing value added products from waste streams of the seafood processing industry, we present in this paper a comprehensive characterization of the triacylglycerols (TAGs) and astaxanthin esters that predominate in the shrimp oil by using HPLC-HRMS and MS/MS, as well as 13C-NMR. This approach, in combination with FAME analysis, offers direct characterization of fatty acid molecules in their intact forms, including the distribution of regioisomers in TAGs. The information is important for the standardization and quality control, as well as for differentiation of composition features of shrimp oil, which could be sold as an ingredient in health supplements and functional foods. PMID:26096274

  10. Characterization of Shrimp Oil from Pandalus borealis by High Performance Liquid Chromatography and High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Guangling; Hui, Joseph P. M.; Burton, Ian W.; Thibault, Marie-Hélène; Pelletier, Claude; Boudreau, Josée; Tchoukanova, Nadia; Subramanian, Balaji; Djaoued, Yahia; Ewart, Stephen; Gagnon, Jacques; Ewart, Kathryn Vanya; Zhang, Junzeng

    2015-01-01

    Northern shrimp (Pandalus borealis) oil, which is rich in omega-3 fatty acids, was recovered from the cooking water of shrimp processing facilities. The oil contains significant amounts of omega-3 fatty acids in triglyceride form, along with substantial long-chain monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs). It also features natural isomeric forms of astaxanthin, a nutritional carotenoid, which gives the oil a brilliant red color. As part of our efforts in developing value added products from waste streams of the seafood processing industry, we present in this paper a comprehensive characterization of the triacylglycerols (TAGs) and astaxanthin esters that predominate in the shrimp oil by using HPLC-HRMS and MS/MS, as well as 13C-NMR. This approach, in combination with FAME analysis, offers direct characterization of fatty acid molecules in their intact forms, including the distribution of regioisomers in TAGs. The information is important for the standardization and quality control, as well as for differentiation of composition features of shrimp oil, which could be sold as an ingredient in health supplements and functional foods. PMID:26096274

  11. Physiological responses of a cold-water shrimp, Pandalus borealis to bacterial lipopolysaccharide and synthetic double-stranded RNA, poly I:C

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher Marlowe A. Caipang; Amod Kulkarni; Viswanath Kiron

    The effects of two pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), namely, bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and double-stranded RNA, poly I:C on selected physiological response parameters in the hemolymph of a cold-water shrimp, Pandalus borealis were studied. Most of the tested immune factors were affected after intramuscular injection with the PAMPs. Total protein concentration in the hemolymph was significantly upregulated upon injection with the

  12. Chromactivating hormones of Pandalus borealis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Fernlund

    1968-01-01

    Dose-response relationship in eyestalk-less Palaemon adspersus was studied with a reference standard preparation of red-pigment-concentrating hormone from eyestalks of Pandalus borealis. The response, which is an expression for the degree of concentration of pigment in the small red integumentary chromatophores during a 60 min period following injection of hormone, was recorded using the Hogben and Slome system for quantitating chromatophore

  13. Genetically distinct populations of northern shrimp, Pandalus borealis, in the North Atlantic: adaptation to different temperatures as an isolation factor.

    PubMed

    Jorde, Per Erik; Søvik, Guldborg; Westgaard, Jon-Ivar; Albretsen, Jon; André, Carl; Hvingel, Carsten; Johansen, Torild; Sandvik, Anne Dagrun; Kingsley, Michael; Jørstad, Knut Eirik

    2015-04-01

    The large-scale population genetic structure of northern shrimp, Pandalus borealis, was investigated over the species' range in the North Atlantic, identifying multiple genetically distinct groups. Genetic divergence among sample localities varied among 10 microsatellite loci (range: FST = -0.0002 to 0.0475) with a highly significant average (FST = 0.0149; P < 0.0001). In contrast, little or no genetic differences were observed among temporal replicates from the same localities (FST = 0.0004; P = 0.33). Spatial genetic patterns were compared to geographic distances, patterns of larval drift obtained through oceanographic modelling, and temperature differences, within a multiple linear regression framework. The best-fit model included all three factors and explained approximately 29% of all spatial genetic divergence. However, geographic distance and larval drift alone had only minor effects (2.5-4.7%) on large-scale genetic differentiation patterns, whereas bottom temperature differences explained most (26%). Larval drift was found to promote genetic homogeneity in parts of the study area with strong currents, but appeared ineffective across large temperature gradients. These findings highlight the breakdown of gene flow in a species with a long pelagic larval phase (up to 3 months) and indicate a role for local adaptation to temperature conditions in promoting evolutionary diversification and speciation in the marine environment. PMID:25782085

  14. Biology of the Northern Shrimp, Pandalus borealis, in the Gulf of Maine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Evan B. Haynes; Roland L. Wigley

    1969-01-01

    Northern shrimp from offshore waters in the Gulf of Maine were studied to determine their occurrence and to learn some major features of their life history. The area sampled extends from Nova Scotia, Canada, to Long Island, New York. Northern shrimp were found only in the western portion of the Gulf of Maine, where they were present throughout the year,

  15. Effect of modified atmosphere packaging on oxidative changes in frozen stored cold water shrimp ( Pandalus borealis)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. S Bak; A. B Andersen; E. M Andersen; G Bertelsen

    1999-01-01

    Shrimps caught at sea were boiled in seawater, air blast or nitrogen frozen, glazed and then packed in plastic bags with a low oxygen transmission rate. The bags were either flushed with nitrogen (modified atmosphere packaging) or with atmospheric air before sealing. The shrimps were then stored for up to 12 months in a freezer cabinet at ?17°C with fluctuating

  16. Biopreservation of Brined Shrimp (Pandalus borealis) by Bacteriocins from Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Einarsson, H.; Lauzon, H. L.

    1995-01-01

    In brined shrimp (ca. 3% NaCl), the effects of three different lactic acid bacteria bacteriocins (crude [6.54 x 10(sup10) U of bacteriocin activity {BU}/g] and purified [8.13 x 10(sup23) BU/g] nisin Z, carnocin UI49 [2.32 x 10(sup4) BU/g], and crude bavaricin A [2.78 BU/g]) on bacterial growth and shelf life were compared with those of a benzoate-sorbate solution (0.1% each [wt/wt]) and a control with no preservatives. The shelf life of shrimp subjected to the control treatment was found to be 10 days. Carnocin UI49 did not extend the shelf life, while crude bavaricin A (a cell-free supernatant of Lactobacillus bavaricus MI 401) resulted in a shelf life of 16 days, as opposed to 31 days with nisin Z for both its crude and purified forms. The benzoate-sorbate solution preserved the brined shrimp for the whole storage period (59 days). In the control, carnocin UI49, and crude bavaricin A treatments, a gram-positive flora dominated towards the end of the storage period while in the nisin Z treatment a gram-negative flora was more pronounced. PMID:16534936

  17. Introduction The Pacific ocean shrimp, Pandalus

    E-print Network

    71(2) 1 Introduction The Pacific ocean shrimp, Pandalus jordani, usually referred to as pink shrimp, is a commercially important pandalid shrimp species harvested with bottom-trawl gear off the Pacific coast of the United States and Canada. They are sold as cocktail or salad shrimp, after being machine cooked, peeled

  18. Temperature dependence of ionic and acid-base regulation in boreal and arctic Crangon crangon and Pandalus borealis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. J. Sartoris; H. O. Pörtner

    1997-01-01

    The effects of temperature on intracellular pH were investigated in the abdominal muscle tissue of two latitudinally separated populations of the euryhaline and eurythermic common sand shrimp Crangon crangon and in the stenohaline and stenothermic deep water shrimp Pandalus borealis. The contribution of passive mechanisms (due to the physico-chemical responses of intracellular buffers) and active mechanisms (due to ion exchange)

  19. Microbiological characteristics of Pacific shrimp (Pandalus jordani).

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J S; Pfeifer, D K

    1977-01-01

    Microorganisms associated with Pacific shrimp (Pandalus jordani) were isolated and identified. Those on the iced raw shrimp, which yielded an average count of 1.6 x 10(6), were predominantly Moraxella, Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Arthrobacter, and Flavobacterium-Cytophaga spp. The blanching and peeling reduced the microbial level to 3.3 x 10(4) and also selectively eliminated Moraxella spp. The microbial flora changed after each processing sequence, and the heat sensitivity and growth characteristics of the representative microbial groups suggested that the presence of Arthrobacter and Acinetobacter spp. in peeled shrimp may indicate inadequate cleaning of raw shrimp or a shorter blanching time. The presence of Moraxella and Flavobacterium-Cytophaga spp. would indicate the degree of secondary contamination, and the presence of Pseudomonas spp. would indicate the shelf-age of the processed shrimp. PMID:869532

  20. DESCRIPTION OF LARVAE OF THE HUMPY SHRIMP, PANDALUS GONIURUS, REARED IN SITU

    E-print Network

    DESCRIPTION OF LARVAE OF THE HUMPY SHRIMP, PANDALUS GONIURUS, REARED IN SITU IN KACHEMAK BAY stages of P. goniurus given by other authors. Studies on the early life history of pandalid shrimp of describing pandalid shrimp larvae reared in the laboratory from known par- entage. I have reported on larvae

  1. DESCRIPTION OF ZOEAE OF COONSTRIPE SHRIMP, PANDALUS HYPSINOTUS, REARED IN THE LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    DESCRIPTION OF ZOEAE OF COONSTRIPE SHRIMP, PANDALUS HYPSINOTUS, REARED IN THE LABORATORY EVAN stages ofP. hypsinotus given by other authora. Although pandalid shrimp form a major fishery resource mentioned briefly the growth and distribution ofthe zoeae. 0f14 species of pandalid shrimps known to occur

  2. Recruitment of the ocean shrimp, Pandalus jordani, to the fishery in

    E-print Network

    482 Recruitment of the ocean shrimp, Pandalus jordani, to the fishery in waters off Oregon has been, is strongly negatively correlated with recruit- ment of age-1 shrimp to the fishery the following year (Hannah shrimp larvae inhabit the near- surface waters shortly after release, occupying progressively deeper

  3. Effectiveness of bycatch reduction devices (BRDs) in the ocean shrimp ( Pandalus jordani) trawl fishery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert W. Hannah; Stephen A. Jones

    2007-01-01

    The requirement, in 2003, that trawl vessels fishing for ocean shrimp (Pandalus jordani) use bycatch reduction devices (BRDs) has reduced fish bycatch by between 66% and 88% from historical (pre-BRD) levels. Prior to BRD requirements, bycatch was composed by weight mostly of adult and juvenile Pacific hake (Merluccius productus), various smelts (Osmeridae), yellowtail rockfish (Sebastes flavidus), sablefish (Anoplopoma fimbria) and

  4. Definition and characterization of data needs to describe the potential effects of increased atmospheric CO2 on marine fisheries from the northeast Pacific Ocean. [Theragra chalcogramma; Clupea harengus pallasi; Pandalus borealis; Limanda aspera

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, R.M.; Grosse, D.J.; Stubin, A.I.; Ostrander, G.K.; Sibley, T.H.

    1985-12-01

    Four northeast Pacific region case study species were studied to determine individual fishery responses to climate change. These fishes (Alaska pollock, Theragra chalcogramma; Pacific herring, Clupea harengus pallasi; pink shrimp, Pandalus borealis; and yellowfin sole, Limanda aspera) represent a spectrum of habitats and life cycles among commercially important species, and the northeast Pacific (including the eastern Bering Sea) is relatively well-studied and representative of subpolar continental shelf areas that also are important in the North Atlantic. In addition to the general effects of climate, these fisheries have specific climate-related environmental sensitivities: (a) pollock sensitivity to ice extent, cannibalism, and bird and mammal predation in the Bering Sea, and to coastal currents in the Gulf of Alaska; (b) sensitivity of herring to waves, dessication, and probably currents in the immediate vicinity of discrete spawning beaches along the British Columbia coast; (c) the relative insensitivity of bottom-dwelling shrimp to temperature changes; and (d) the probable sensitivity of yellowfin sole to ice extent and to associated changes in food supply caused by alterations in plankton species composition. It is difficult to extrapolate from the results of the present case studies to other fisheries. These results are particularly inapplicable to other major categories of fisheries, including open-ocean, upwelling, and tropical and subtropical shelf fisheries. Such fisheries should be the focus of additional case studies. Possible temperature effects on the incidence of disease and parasitism in fish also should be investigated.

  5. The stability of adenosine deaminase and adenosine monophosphate (AMP) deaminase as potential spoilage indicators for postmortem ice stored shrimp

    E-print Network

    Cheuk, Wai Lun

    1978-01-01

    (Pandalus borealis), caught in Canada, at a level of 92 pmole/100 g of shrimp tissue. Since the activity of the enzymes involved at each step of the metabolic pathway are temperature dependent, Arai (1966b) observed an accumulation and sub- sequent...-life of shrimp from various locations on the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. J. Milk Food Technol. 36(9):463. Collins, J. and Kelley, C. 1969. Alaska pink shrimp, Pandalus borealis: Effects of heat treatment on color and machine peelability. U. S. Fish. Wi' dl...

  6. An investigation into mechanical strength of exoskeleton of hydrothermal vent shrimp (Rimicaris exoculata) and shallow water shrimp (Pandalus platyceros) at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Verma, Devendra; Tomar, Vikas

    2015-04-01

    This investigation reports a comparison of the exoskeleton mechanical strength of deep sea shrimp species Rimicaris exoculata and shallow water shrimp species Pandalus platyceros at temperatures ranging from 25°C to 80°C using nanoindentation experiments. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) observations suggest that both shrimp exoskeletons have the Bouligand structure. Differences in the structural arrangement and chemical composition of both shrimps are highlighted by SEM and EDX (Energy Dispersive X-ray) analyses. The variation in the elastic moduli with temperature is found to be correlated with the measured compositional differences. The reduced modulus of R. exoculata is 8.26±0.89GPa at 25°C that reduces to 7.61±0.65GPa at 80°C. The corresponding decrease in the reduced modulus of P. platyceros is from 27.38±2.3GPa at 25°C to 24.58±1.71GPa at 80°C. The decrease in reduced moduli as a function of temperature is found to be dependent on the extent of calcium based minerals in exoskeleton of both types of shrimp exoskeletons. PMID:25686945

  7. DIET OF PACIFIC COD, GADUS MACROCEPHALUS, AND PREDATION ON THE NORTHERN PINK SHRIMp,

    E-print Network

    DIET OF PACIFIC COD, GADUS MACROCEPHALUS, AND PREDATION ON THE NORTHERN PINK SHRIMp, PANDALUS BOREALIS, IN PAVLOF BAY, ALASKA W. D. ALBERS AND P. J. ANDERSON! ABSTRACf Analysis of 455 Pacific cod more frequently with increasing cod size (30-69 cm fork length). Euphausids decreased in frequency

  8. Spatial distribution of extractable organohalogens in northern pink shrimp in the North Atlantic

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christina S. Bottaro; Joe W. Kiceniuk; Amares Chatt

    1999-01-01

    Extractable organohalogens (EOX) are organic compounds that contain chlorine, bromine and\\/or iodine, which can be separated\\u000a from the matrix by liquid\\/liquid or liquid\\/solid extraction. A combination of instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA)\\u000a and solvent extraction methods has been developed for the determination of EOX from the shrimpPandalus borealis. Levels of EOX were evaluated for spatial trends for shrimp caught in

  9. FECUNDITY OF NORTHERN SHRIMp, PANDALUS BOREALIS, (CRUSTACEA, DECAPODA) IN AREAS OF

    E-print Network

    .1 mm using Vernier calipers. This measurement is the distance between the posterior margin of the orbit of the eye and the posterodorsal margin of the carapace (Rasmussen 1953). All eggs were removed from

  10. LIFE HISTORY CHARACTERISTICS OF PANDALUS MONTAGUI AND DICHELOPANDALUS LEPTOCERUS

    E-print Network

    20 species. Four species (Pandalus borealis, P. montagui, P. propinquus, and Dichelopandalus leptocerus) are common in offshore waters of the Gulf of Maine (Wigley 1960). Of these, P. borealis 10 cm or 4 in), which are harvested incidentally with P. borealis in the Gulf of lZoology Department

  11. Adsorption of tropomyosin from pink shrimp ( Pandalus eous) on stainless steel surface

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Thammathongchat; T. Hagiwara; T. Sakiyama

    2010-01-01

    Cross contamination of allergen to other food products is a serious problem in the food plant where many products shared the same equipment or processing lines. In order to decide a suitable cleaning method, understanding on adsorption of allergen onto the food-contact surface is required. In this study, the adsorption behavior of tropomyosin, a major allergen in shrimp, on stainless

  12. An investigation into environment dependent nanomechanical properties of shallow water shrimp (Pandalus platyceros) exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Verma, Devendra; Tomar, Vikas

    2014-11-01

    The present investigation focuses on understanding the influence of change from wet to dry environment on nanomechanical properties of shallow water shrimp exoskeleton. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) based measurements suggest that the shrimp exoskeleton has Bouligand structure, a key characteristic of the crustaceans. As expected, wet samples are found to be softer than dry samples. Reduced modulus values of dry samples are found to be 24.90 ± 1.14 GPa as compared to the corresponding values of 3.79 ± 0.69 GPa in the case of wet samples. Hardness values are found to be 0.86 ± 0.06 GPa in the case of dry samples as compared to the corresponding values of 0.17 ± 0.02 GPa in the case of wet samples. In order to simulate the influence of underwater pressure on the exoskeleton strength, constant load creep experiments as a function of wet and dry environments are performed. The switch in deformation mechanism as a function of environment is explained based on the role played by water molecules in assisting interface slip and increased ductility of matrix material in wet environment in comparison to the dry environment. PMID:25280717

  13. META-ANALYSIS OF COD–SHRIMP INTERACTIONS REVEALS TOP-DOWN CONTROL IN OCEANIC FOOD WEBS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Boris Worm; Ransom A. Myers

    2003-01-01

    Here we present a meta-analytic approach to analyzing population interac- tions across the North Atlantic Ocean. We assembled all available biomass time series for a well-documented predator-prey couple, Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and northern shrimp (Pandalus borealis), to test whether the temporal dynamics of these populations are con- sistent with the ''top-down'' or the ''bottom-up'' hypothesis. Eight out of nine

  14. MFR REPRINT 974 The spot shrimp is the largest

    E-print Network

    MFR REPRINT 974 The spot shrimp is the largest in the North Pacific, mature individuals reaching 12 Shrimp, Pandalus platyceras, at Little Port Walter, Alaska LOUIS BARR The spot shrimp, Pandalus platyceras, is the largest shrimp found in the North Pacific- large individuals may reach 30 cm (12 inches

  15. Basin-scale coherence in phenology of shrimps and phytoplankton in the North Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Koeller, P; Fuentes-Yaco, C; Platt, T; Sathyendranath, S; Richards, A; Ouellet, P; Orr, D; Skúladóttir, U; Wieland, K; Savard, L; Aschan, M

    2009-05-01

    Climate change could lead to mismatches between the reproductive cycles of marine organisms and their planktonic food. We tested this hypothesis by comparing shrimp (Pandalus borealis) egg hatching times and satellite-derived phytoplankton bloom dynamics throughout the North Atlantic. At large spatial and long temporal (10 years or longer) scales, hatching was correlated with the timing of the spring phytoplankton bloom. Annual egg development and hatching times were determined locally by bottom water temperature. We conclude that different populations of P. borealis have adapted to local temperatures and bloom timing, matching egg hatching to food availability under average conditions. This strategy is vulnerable to interannual oceanographic variability and long-term climatic changes. PMID:19423827

  16. AN APPLICATION OF YIELD MODELS TO A CALIFORNIA OCEAN SHRIMP POPULATION

    E-print Network

    AN APPLICATION OF YIELD MODELS TO A CALIFORNIA OCEAN SHRIMP POPULATION NORMAN J. ABRAMSON California's northern- most bed of ocean shrimp, Pandalus jordani. The Schaefer form of stock production system was proposed. The fishery for ocean shrimp, Pandalus jordani, in California has a unique

  17. Utility of Stable Isotope and Cytochrome Oxidase I Gene Sequencing Analyses in Inferring Origin and Authentication of Hairtail Fish and Shrimp.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heejoong; Kumar, K Suresh; Hwang, Seung Yong; Kang, Byeong-Chul; Moon, Hyo-Bang; Shin, Kyung-Hoon

    2015-06-10

    Mislabeling of fishery products continues to be a serious threat to the global market. Consequently, there is an urgent necessity to develop tools for authenticating and establishing their true origin. This investigation evaluates the suitability of stable isotopes and cytochrome oxidase I (COI) sequencing in identifying and tracing the origin of hairtail fish and shrimp. By use of COI sequencing, the hairtail fish samples were identified as Trichiurus japonicus and Trichiurus lepturus, while the shrimp samples were identified as Pandalus borealis, Marsupenaeus japonicus, Fenneropenaeus chinensis, Litopenaeus vannamei, Penaeus monodon, and Solenocera crassicornis. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) of stable isotopes further categorized the individuals of the same species based on the country of origin. Natural and farmed shrimp (from the same country) were distinctly differentiated on the basis of stable isotope values. Therefore, these two methods could be cooperatively utilized to identify and authenticate fishery products, the utilization of which would enhance transparency and fair trade. PMID:25980806

  18. RECENT TRENDS IN THE FISHERY

    E-print Network

    . 1969. The Northern Shrimp, Pandalus borealis, in the Gulf of Maine. Project Completion Report, Project. Wigley. 1969. Biology of the onhern Shnmp, Pandalus borealis, In the Gulf of Maine. Trans. Am. Fish. Soc

  19. Inlet) areas in 1971. T he Kachemak Bay quota was set at 5 million pounds an-

    E-print Network

    of Pandalus borealis, the chief shrimp species in the Alaskan catch. had to b stopped because of water have been done on Pandallis borealis. the most impor- tant commercial specie, there ha\\ e been limited

  20. Paul J. Anderson Kodiak Laboratory. Alaska Fisheries Science Center

    E-print Network

    Panda/us borealis Kroyer in Pavlof Bay, Alaska Abstract.-Northern shrimp Pan- dalus borealis carapace. and mortality of two year- classes from a stock of northern shrimp Pandalus borealis Kroyer. the major commercial species in the region. The Pavlof Bay (Fig. 1) stock ofP. borealis was chosen for this study be

  1. Corona Borealis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    (the Northern Crown; abbrev. CrB, gen. Coronae Borealis; area 179 sq. deg.) A northern constellation which lies between Boötes and Hercules, and culminates at midnight in mid-May. It represents the crown that in Greek mythology was made by Hephaestus, god of fire, and worn by Princess Ariadne of Crete. Its brightest stars were cataloged by Ptolemy (c. AD 100-175) in the Almagest....

  2. Aurora Borealis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Warington Stock

    1892-01-01

    HAVE any of your readers observed the display of aurora borealis to-night (Wednesday)? I regret that insufficient knowledge of astronomical technicalities does not permit me to describe more exactly the size and position of the display. It appeared between 11 and 11.30 p.m., as white streaks or bands of light, varying in width and intensity, now shooting up a considerable

  3. Spatial distribution of extractable organohalogens in northern pink shrimp in the north Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Bottaro, C S; Kiceniuk, J W; Chatt, A

    1999-01-01

    Extractable organohalogens (EOX) are organic compounds that contain chlorine, bromine and/or iodine, which can be separated from the matrix by liquid/liquid or liquid/solid extraction. A combination of instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and solvent extraction methods has been developed for the determination of EOX from the shrimp Pandalus borealis. Levels of EOX were evaluated for spatial trends for shrimp caught in several areas off the Labrador coast, off the coast of Nova Scotia, and off the coast of Maine. Muscle contained 1.09-6.05 micrograms EOCl/g tissue and 105-498 micrograms extractable organochlorine (EOCl)/g lipid; 0.0607-0.288 microgram extractable organobromine (EOB)r/g tissue and 4.74-10.5 micrograms EOBr/g lipid; and 0.014-0.048 microgram extractable organoiodine (EOI)/g tissue and 1.03-1.76 micrograms EOI/g lipid, respectively. The levels of EOCl in roe were 1.60-12.34 micrograms/g tissue and 39.0-146 micrograms/g lipid. In roe, the EOBr levels were 0.707-1.03 micrograms/g tissue and 6.96-13.5 micrograms/g lipid; and EOI levels were 0.123-0.349 microgram/g tissue and 1.42-4.11 micrograms/g lipid. The EOCl, EOBr, and EOI levels in roe increased noticeably from north to south along the coast of Labrador. Samples taken from the coast of Maine and from Canso Hole were typically higher in EOCl levels than those taken from Labrador. The results for EOBr and EOI were in the same range as those from Labrador. PMID:10676489

  4. Simulating the Aurora Borealis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gladimir V. G. Baranoski; Peter Shirley; Jon G. Rokne; Trond Trondsen; Rui Bastos

    2000-01-01

    We present an algorithm to simulate the aurora borealis, commonly known as the “northern lights”, a natural phenomenon of great visual beauty and considerable scientific interest. The algorithm is based on the current understanding of the physical origin of the aurora. This natural display is mainly caused by high-energy electrons originating in the Sun and entering the Earth's atmosphere in

  5. Photographing the Aurora Borealis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carl Siewers

    1885-01-01

    I SHOULD be obliged if I might be permitted to state, with reference to the negative of the aurora borealis obtained by Mr. Tromholt in Christiania on March 15 (NATURE, vol. xxxi. p. 479)-the first ever obtained-that he now informs me that, although the plate was exposed for eight and a half minutes, the said impression is so faint and

  6. The Aurora Borealis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. J. B. Thompson

    1871-01-01

    THERE was a brilliant display of aurora borealis visible from this place on Sunday the 9th inst. I first noticed it about 10.45 P.M.; there was then a considerable luminosity in the N. W. with a magnificent red glow and streamers springing from the W. extending to within 20° of the eastern horizon, also radiation from other parts in the

  7. The Aurora Borealis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Henry R. Proctor

    1870-01-01

    ON the night of the 25th a most gorgeous aurora borealis was visible at North Shields. I first observed it about 6 P.M., when it formed a splendid boreal crown, of which the centre was about 25° south-east of the zenith. Rays of brilliant crimson converged to it from all directions, especially from N.E., S., and S.W. To the north

  8. The Aurora Borealis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. W. Philips

    1870-01-01

    HAVING read the two accounts of Aurora Borealis in this week's number of NATURE, I hope the following brief account of the very beautiful one that occurred here may not prove uninteresting. On Friday, the 14th Oct. at 8.15 p.m., I noticed a bright appearance towards the north-west, somewhat resembling the moon rising, and on going to the front of

  9. The Sei Whale, Balaenoptera borealis

    E-print Network

    ), which makes it the third largest whale in the family Balaenopteridae, following the blue, B. musculusThe Sei Whale, Balaenoptera borealis SALLY A. MIZROCH, DALE W. RICE, and JEFFREY M. BREIWICK Introduction The sei whale, Balaenoptera borealis Lesson, 1828, can range in length up to 18.5 m (60 feet

  10. WINDS IN CORONAE BOREALIS STARS Geoffrey Clayton,

    E-print Network

    Bianchi, Luciana

    WINDS IN CORONAE BOREALIS STARS Geoffrey Clayton, 1 Geballe, Luciana Bianchi Received February accepted 2003 ABSTRACT present spectroscopic observations the i #10830 line Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars small group of hydrogen­deficient, carbon­rich supergiants

  11. Nebula around R Corona Borealis

    E-print Network

    Rao, N Kameswara

    2011-01-01

    The star R Corona Borealis (R CrB) shows forbidden lines of [O II], [N II], and [S II] during the deep minimum when the star is fainter by about 8 to 9 magnitudes from normal brightness, suggesting the presence of nebular material around it. We present low and high spectral resolution observations of these lines during the ongoing deep minimum of R CrB, which started in July 2007. These emission lines show double peaks with a separation of about 170 km/s. The line ratios of [S II] and [O II] suggest an electron density of about 100 cm$^{-3}$. We discuss the physical conditions and possible origins of this low density gas. These forbidden lines have also been seen in other R Coronae Borealis stars during their deep light minima and this is a general characteristic of these stars, which might have some relevance to their origins.

  12. Aurora borealis lag during the Maunder minimum

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ludwig Schlamminger

    1991-01-01

    Observations of 121 occurrences of the aurora borealis recorded in Central Europe from 1645 to 1712 C.E. are compared with known phase relationships between auroral activity and sunspot cycles in modern times. A remarkable analogy of the aurora borealis cycles during the Maunder minimum is found, both with respect to phase-dependent frequency and to delayed maxima, with aurorae during the

  13. Aurora borealis lags during the Middle Ages

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Schlamminger

    1992-01-01

    Dated observations of the Northern Lights from the 13th-18th centuries are analyzed in terms of the relationship between sunspot cycles and aurora borealis cycles. Aurora borealis was recorded in circumpolar latitudes south of the auroral oval surrounding the magnetic south pole on 1500 days during the epoch studied. The phase relationship by Fritz (1864) relating sunspot and auroral cycles is

  14. Aurora Borealis: What Causes the Northern Lights?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This color brochure answers common questions about the aurora borealis, including its cause, as well as explanations of its colors, shapes, and location. It also lists resources for further study. The brochure may be downloaded in PDF format.

  15. Punching Shrimp

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Science Update

    2004-06-28

    Legendary boxer Muhammad Ali used to brag that he could "float like a butterfly and sting like a bee." But to be a true champion, a prizefighter should really try to "punch like a mantis shrimp." This Science Update examines the research behind copying this mechanism for application to machinery design.

  16. Operator Allocation in Borealis with Integrated Sensor Network Query Processors

    E-print Network

    Lindner, Wolfgang

    Aurora [1]. For the examples in this paper the following subset ( = {F, M, U, A}) of Borealis operatorsOperator Allocation in Borealis with Integrated Sensor Network Query Processors Wolfgang Lindner heuristics are introduced. Finally, it is shown how the op- erator allocation process fits into the Borealis

  17. Distributed Operation in the Borealis Stream Processing Engine

    E-print Network

    Tatbul, Nesime

    ]. The Borealis design is driven by our experience in using Aurora and Medusa, in developing several stream- ingDistributed Operation in the Borealis Stream Processing Engine Yanif Ahmad yna, Providence, RI. Brandeis University, Waltham, MA. ABSTRACT Borealis is a distributed stream processing

  18. The Aurora and Borealis Stream Processing Ugur Cetintemel1

    E-print Network

    Balazinska, Magdalena

    The Aurora and Borealis Stream Processing Engines Ugur C¸etintemel1 , Daniel Abadi2 , Yanif Ahmad1 project is hard at work on a complete redesign of Aurora, which we call Borealis. Borealis on an SPE. The Aurora stream-processing engine, motivated by these three tenets, is currently operational

  19. Exxon Valdez oil spill. State/federal natural resource damage assessment. Injury to Prince William Sound spot shrimp. Subtidal study number 5. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1992-12-01

    Since the grounding of the T/V Exxon Valdez caused an oil spill on March 24, 1989, four surveys have been conducted by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) to assess possible damage done by the oil spill to spot shrimp Pandalus platyceros. The surveys were conducted November 1989, March 1990, and November 1990 as Fish/Shellfish Study 15, then November 1991 as Subtidal Study 5. The report incorporates results of all surveys, but emphasizes November surveys and their analysis.

  20. Anaerobiosis in the Overwintering Beetle Pelophila borealis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Else-Margrete Conradi-Larsen; Lauritz Sømme

    1973-01-01

    AT Finse, situated at 1,200 m above sea level in the mountain plateau of Hardangervidda, Norway, adult Pelophila borealis (Coleoptera, Carabidae) overwinter in the soil of a sedimentation flat1. During the winter the flat is periodically flooded by the adjacent river, and consequently covered by a layer of ice. Sixty to 120 cm of snow covers the ground from late

  1. The Aurora Borealis of September 9

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Kaulbars

    1898-01-01

    I HAVE read, with much interest, in NATURE of September 15, the article concerning the aurora borealis of September 9, and it may be of interest to your readers to know that this beautiful phenomenon displayed its splendours the same evening in all parts of Finland territory.

  2. The peculiar Rosetta stone - beta Coronae Borealis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. J. Adelman; B. A. Boytim; S. N. Shore; D. H. Pyper

    1981-01-01

    Spectrophotometric and spectral observations of the spectroscopic binary beta Coronae Borealis, one of the brightest cooler Ap stars, are discussed in relation to the oblique rotator model. Spectrophotometry carried out between 1972 and 1977 indicates the presence of a weak 4200 A and a moderate 5200 A feature, with no convincing evidence for cyclic variations. The spectrophotometric variability is phase

  3. Foreign Fishery Developments Thailand's Shrimp

    E-print Network

    Foreign Fishery Developments Thailand's Shrimp Culture Growing Pondcultivationofblacktigerprawns-intensive ponds for shrimp raising. Theyhavealsodeveloped animpressiveinfrastructureofelectrical and watersupplies, feeder roads, shrimp hatcheries, shrimp nurseries, feed mills, cold storage, and processing plants

  4. Shortraker rockfish, Sebastes borea-lis, and rougheye rockfish, S. aleu-

    E-print Network

    of shortraker rockfish, Sebastes borealis, and rougheye rockfish, S. aleutianus, determined from a manned distributions and habitats of shortraker rockfish, Sebastes borealis, and rougheye rock- fish, S. aleutianus

  5. The Design of the Borealis Stream Processing Engine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Abadi; Y. Ahmad; H. Balakrishnan

    2004-01-01

    Borealis is a second-generation distributed stream pro-cessing engine that is being developed at Brandeis Uni-versity, Brown University, and MIT. Borealis inherits core stream processing functionality from Aurora [14] and distribution functionality from Medusa [51]. Bo-realis modifies and extends both systems in non-trivial and critical ways to provide advanced capabilities that are commonly required by newly-emerging stream pro-cessing applications. In this

  6. Distributed operation in the Borealis stream processing engine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yanif Ahmad; Bradley Berg; U?ur Cetintemel; Mark Humphrey; Jeong-Hyon Hwang; Anjali Jhingran; Anurag Maskey; Olga Papaemmanouil; Alexander Rasin; Nesime Tatbul; Wenjuan Xing; Ying Xing

    2005-01-01

    Borealis is a distributed stream processing engine that is being developed at Brandeis University, Brown University, and MIT. Borealis inherits core stream processing functionality from Aurora and inter-node communication functionality from Medusa.We propose to demonstrate some of the key aspects of distributed operation in Borealis, using a multi-player network game as the underlying application. The demonstration will illustrate the dynamic

  7. Fluorine in R Coronae Borealis Stars

    E-print Network

    Pandey, Gajendra; Rao, N Kameswara

    2007-01-01

    Neutral fluorine (F I) lines are identified in the optical spectra of several R Coronae Borealis stars (RCBs) at maximum light. These lines provide the first measurement of the fluorine abundance in these stars. Fluorine is enriched in some RCBs by factors of 800 to 8000 relative to its likely initial abundance. The overabundances of fluorine are evidence for the synthesis of fluorine. These results are discussed in the light of the scenario that RCBs are formed by accretion of an He white dwarf by a C-O white dwarf. Sakurai's object (V4334 Sgr), a final He-shell flash product, shows no detectable F I lines.

  8. Model for R Coronae Borealis stars

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, B.A.; Soker, N.; Clayton, G.C. (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (USA) Colorado, University, Boulder (USA))

    1991-07-01

    An evolutionary model is proposed in which R Coronae Borealis stars are in a second common-envelope phase, with a low-mass companion orbiting well inside the envelope. The high mass-loss rate in the first common-envelope phase turns the massive star into a hydrogen-deficient star. In the second common-envelope phase, as a result of shear induced by the inner envelope rotation and possibly by excited gravity-wave-induced turbulence, carbon and oxygen are being dredged up from the core into the envelope. This evolutionary scenario smoothly connects R CrB stars to the double-mass-loss-episodes evolutionary scenario of hydrogen-deficient binaries suggested by Plavec (1973). This model may have consequences for the nature of mass loss in R Coronae Borealis stars: the orbiting companion breaks spherical symmetry allowing for nonradial pulsations and asymmetric mass loss. The optical polarization and IR observations may point to axisymmetric mass loss with the same axis of symmetry for the different mass-loss episodes. 38 refs.

  9. Diapause traits in Melanoplus sanguinipes and M. borealis (Orthoptera: Acrididae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A thorough understanding of diapause is needed for prediction of population responses to climate change, for realistic simulation models, and for the development of effective pest management. In Melanoplus sanguinipes (Fabricius) and M. borealis (Fieber) (Orthoptera: Acrididae), diapause typically o...

  10. The Design of the Borealis Stream Processing Engine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel J. Abadi; Yanif Ahmad; Magdalena Balazinska; Ugur Çetintemel; Mitch Cherniack; Jeong-hyon Hwang; Wolfgang Lindner; Anurag Maskey; Alex Rasin; Esther Ryvkina; Nesime Tatbul; Ying Xing

    2005-01-01

    Borealis is a second-generation distributed stream pro- cessing engine that is being developed at Brandeis Uni- versity, Brown University, and MIT. Borealis inherits core stream processing functionality from Aurora (14) and distribution functionality from Medusa (51). Bo- realis modifies and extends both systems in non-trivial and critical ways to provide advanced capabilities that are commonly required by newly-emerging stream pro-

  11. NOAAINMFS Developments Shrimp 1980: Consumption

    E-print Network

    NOAAINMFS Developments Shrimp 1980: Consumption Is Up in a Difficult Year Table 1.-Supplles and uses 01 all shrimp, 1974-78 s.ersge, 1979, anil 1980, hesds oil weight. Data are preliminary shrimp rose to 139 million pounds in 1980, up 12 percent from 1979. Imports of peeled raw shrimp fell 23

  12. Cancer borealis stomatogastric nervous system dissection.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Gabrielle J; Grashow, Rachel G

    2009-01-01

    The stomatogastric ganglion (STG) is an excellent model for studying cellular and network interactions because it contains a relatively small number of cells (approximately 25 in C. borealis) which are well characterized. The cells in the STG exhibit a broad range of outputs and are responsible for the motor actions of the stomach. The stomach contains the gastric mill which breaks down food with three internal teeth, and the pylorus which filters the food before it reaches the midgut. The STG produces two rhythmic outputs to control the gastric mill and pylorus known as central pattern generators (CPGs). Each cell in the STG can participate in one or both of these rhythms. These CPGs allow for the study of neuromodulation, homeostasis, cellular and network variability, network development, and network recovery. The dissection of the stomatogastric nervous system (STNS) from the Jonah crab (Cancer borealis) is done in two parts; the gross and fine dissection. In the gross dissection the entire stomach is dissected from the crab. During the fine dissection the STNS is extracted from the stomach using a dissection microscope and micro-dissection tools (see figure 1). The STNS includes the STG, the oesophageal ganglion (OG), and the commissural ganglia (CoG) as well as the nerves that innervate the stomach muscles. Here, we show how to perform a complete dissection of the STNS in preparation for an electrophysiology experiment where the cells in the STG would be recorded from intracellularly and the peripheral nerves would be used for extracellular recordings. The proper technique for finding the desired nerves is shown as well as our technique of desheathing the ganglion to reveal the somata and neuropil. PMID:19308017

  13. AN XMM-NEWTON STUDY OF THE CORONAE OF 2 CORONAE BOREALIS

    E-print Network

    Audard, Marc

    AN XMM-NEWTON STUDY OF THE CORONAE OF 2 CORONAE BOREALIS Jin A. Suh and Marc Audard1 Columbia present results of XMM-Newton Guaranteed Time observations of the RS CVn binary 2 Coronae Borealis headinggs: stars: activity -- stars: coronae -- stars: flare -- stars: individual (2 Coronae Borealis

  14. Load Management and High Availability in the Borealis Distributed Stream Processing Engine

    E-print Network

    Tatbul, Nesime

    Load Management and High Availability in the Borealis Distributed Stream Processing Engine Nesime of Computer Science, Providence, RI, USA {yna, ugur, jhhwang, yx, sbz}@cs.brown.edu Abstract. Borealis and high availability in Borealis. We describe our al- gorithms for balanced and resilient load

  15. The Design of the Borealis Stream Processing Engine Daniel J. Abadi1

    E-print Network

    Lindner, Wolfgang

    , Brown University, and MIT. Borealis inherits core stream processing functionality from Aurora [14 in terms of our own design considera- tions for Borealis, the successor to Aurora, but it should PermissionThe Design of the Borealis Stream Processing Engine Daniel J. Abadi1 , Yanif Ahmad2 , Magdalena

  16. SHRIMP MATURATION AND SPAWNING

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Granvil D. Treece

    The lack of a reliable supply of disease-resistant postlarvae (PL) continues to contribute to the uncertainty, inefficiency, and economic loss facing shrimp farmers worldwide. Many of the world's estimated 375 913 shrimp farms rely heavily on wild stocks (for brood and seed to stock ponds) and many of the 5777 hatcheries (Rosenberry 1999) rely on ready-to-spawn adult females from the

  17. What are the R Coronae Borealis Stars?

    E-print Network

    Clayton, Geoffrey C

    2012-01-01

    The R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars are rare hydrogen-deficient, carbon-rich, supergiants, best known for their spectacular declines in brightness at irregular intervals. Efforts to discover more RCB stars have more than doubled the number known in the last few years and they appear to be members of an old, bulge population. Two evolutionary scenarios have been suggested for producing an RCB star, a double degenerate merger of two white dwarfs, or a final helium shell flash in a planetary nebula central star. The evidence pointing toward one or the other is somewhat contradictory, but the discovery that RCB stars have large amounts of 18O has tilted the scales towards the merger scenario. If the RCB stars are the product of white dwarf mergers, this would be a very exciting result since RCB stars would then be low-mass analogs of type Ia supernovae. The predicted number of RCB stars in the Galaxy is consistent with the predicted number of He/CO WD mergers. But, so far, only about 65 of the predicted 5000 RCB s...

  18. Shrimp Farming in the Classroom

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Lovelle Ruggiero

    2000-01-01

    In inquiry-based instruction, discovery and learning belong to the students. In this exploration, jumbo shrimp are the source of inspiration. The magic in this project lies not in successfully culturing these shrimp, known as Macrobrachium rosenbergii

  19. Fishery Notes Texas' Brown Shrimp

    E-print Network

    Fishery Notes Texas' Brown Shrimp and 1983-84 Indices National Marine Fisheries Service scientists have concluded that the brown shrimp season offTexas will be poor and the catch for July 1983-June 1984 their historical averages. In the Gulf of Mexico, brown shrimp postlarvae enter the bays and passes when

  20. Substratum preference of the caddisfly Helicopsyche borealis (Hagen) (Trichoptera: Helicopsychidae)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Caryn C. Vaughn

    1987-01-01

    The position of Helicopsyche borealis (Hagen) (Trichoptera: Helicopsychidae) larvae on the substratum surface is dependent on the current regime but varies with larval size. All size classes of larvae chose significantly different positions on the substratum under high versus low current velocities. All size classes preferred exposed surfaces under low current velocities. Small larvae preferred the upper surfaces of substrata

  1. Chemical composition of R Coronae Borealis and XX Camelopardalis

    SciTech Connect

    Cottrell, P.L.; Lambert, D.

    1982-10-15

    Three R Coronae Borealis stars (R CrB, XX Cam, and RY Sgr) have been examined using extensive, high resolution, high signal-to-noise Reticon data. From He- and C-rich models and an appropriate model atmosphere code, the following atmospheric parameters were derived

  2. Some appearances of the aurora borealis in Greece

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leon N. Carapiperis

    1956-01-01

    Summary Some observations of the aurora borealis in Greece are given with the sources from which they were taken. It was found that the appearances of this phenomenon are not exceptionally rare. These appearances coincide with the years of maximun of solar activity and especially 1–2 years after it, while in the years of minimum of solar activity or near

  3. The Design of the Borealis Stream Processing Engine

    E-print Network

    Loo, Boon Thau

    1 The Design of the Borealis Stream Processing Engine CIDR 2005 Brandeis University, Brown, query languages Efficient single-site processing [STREAM, TelegraphCQ, NiagaraCQ, Gigascope, Aurora] Basic distributed systems Servers [TelegraphCQ, Medusa/Aurora] or sensor networks [TinyDB, Cougar

  4. Interspecific aggression by a rabid eastern red bat (Lasiurus borealis).

    PubMed

    Sasse, D Blake; Weinstein, Susan; Saugey, David A

    2014-07-01

    On 16 March 2012 a rabid eastern red bat (Lasiurus borealis) was found attached to an evening bat (Nycticeius humeralis) in Randolph County, Arkansas, USA. This appears to be the first confirmed case of a rabid bat attacking a bat of another species. PMID:24807361

  5. SHRIMP FARMING by Donald M. Allen

    E-print Network

    ) I ,... SHRIMP FARMING l by Donald M. Allen CONTENTS Introduction···...···.·.. General life history of shrimp Culture methods··...·.·. Page Pond site and construction ··.·····.·.···.···.·. Preparation for stocking··..·.·.·.·...·..··...·....·. Acquisition of seed shrimp

  6. Aggregation pheromones in Drosophila borealis and Drosophila littoralis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert J. Bartelt; Angela M. Schaner; Larry L. Jackson

    1988-01-01

    Mature males ofDrosophila borealis andD. littoralis (Diptera: Drosophilidae) produce pheromones that attract both males and females in a wind-tunnel bioassay. Ethyl tiglate is a major pheromone component in both species. Isopropyl tiglate is a minor component, as active as ethyl tiglate on an equal-weight basis, but less abundant in the flies. Both species respond to (Z)-9-heneicosene, a compound they do

  7. Aurorae: The earliest datable observation of the aurora borealis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Richard Stephenson; David M. Willis; Thomas J. Hallinan

    2004-01-01

    The Late Babylonian astronomical texts, discovered at the site of Babylon (32.5°N, 44.4°E) more than a century ago, contain what is probably the earliest reliable account of the aurora borealis. A clay tablet recording numerous celestial observations made by the official astronomers during the 37th year of King Nebuchadnezzar II (568\\/567 BC) describes an unusual ``red glow'' in the sky

  8. THE SHRIMP AND THE SHRIMP INDUSTRY OF THE SOUTHERN UNIT,ED STATES

    E-print Network

    THE SHRIMP AND THE SHRIMP INDUSTRY OF THE SOUTHERN UNIT,ED STATES FISHERY LEAFLET No. 472 UNITED, D. C. #12;THE SHRIMP AND THE SHRIMP INDUSTRY OF THE SOUTHERN UNITED STATES by William W. Anderson Fishery Research Biologist The shrimp fishery of the United States is centered primarily in the eight

  9. MICROBIOLOGICAL STUDY OF ICED SHRIMP: Excerpts from the 1965 Iced-Shrimp Symposium

    E-print Network

    MICROBIOLOGICAL STUDY OF ICED SHRIMP: Excerpts from the 1965 Iced-Shrimp Symposium UNITED STATES of Iced Shrimp: Excerpts from the 1965 Iced-Shrimp Symposium by B. Jo CARROLL, G. Bo REESE, and B o Qo for members of the iced- shrimp industry. The industry representatives participated actively in discus- sions

  10. Color Control in Shrimp

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mary-Jane O'Halloran (Dalhousie University; )

    1989-06-06

    Sand shrimp, Crangon septemspinosus, are capable of varying their color or shading in response to several environmental changes (background color, light intensity, light wavelength, and temperature). The degree of color change can be determined quantitatively by examining the chromatophores under a dissecting microscope and staging the amount of pigment dispersion, (b) the location or type of receptors involved, and (c) the type of communication between receptors and effectors.

  11. Characteristics of the Texas Shrimp Fleet, 197982

    E-print Network

    Characteristics of the Texas Shrimp Fleet, 1979·82 JUDITH T KRAUTHAMER, WILLIAM E. GRANT, and WADE L. GRIFFIN Introduction The shrimp fishery is the most valu- able commercial fishery in Texas. In the inshore sector fishermen har- vest small, juvenile brown shrimp, Penaeus aztecus, and white shrimp, P

  12. FOREIGN SHRIMP FISHERIES Other Than Central

    E-print Network

    «l FOREIGN SHRIMP FISHERIES Other Than Central and South America Marine Biological Laboratory and Oceania: 66 Australia 67 111 #12;#12;INTRODUCTION The growth of the domestic shrimp industry since World regarding the shrimp fisheries of foreign countries. Special interest in information about the shrimp

  13. NOAAlNMFS Developments Shrimp 1981

    E-print Network

    NOAAlNMFS Developments Shrimp 1981 The u.s. shrimp industry in 1981 experienced another difficult year fol- lowing a poor year in 1980. There were some encouraging factors like the rec- ord shrimp, catches of shrimp in the south Atlantic and Pacific were off substantially. Fuel prices were about 20

  14. GABA AND RESPONSES TO GABA IN THE STOMATOGASTRIC GANGLION OF THE CRAB CANCER BOREALIS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ANDREW M. SWENSEN; JORGE GOLOWASCH; ANDREW E. CHRISTIE; MELISSA J. COLEMAN; MICHAEL P. NUSBAUM; EVE MARDER

    The multifunctional neural circuits in the crustacean stomatogastric ganglion (STG) are influenced by many small-molecule transmitters and neuropeptides that are co- localized in identified projection neurons to the STG. We describe the pattern of ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) immunoreactivity in the stomatogastric nervous system of the crab Cancer borealis and demonstrate biochemically the presence of authentic GABA in C. borealis. No

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Sclerotinia borealis, a Psychrophilic Plant Pathogenic Fungus.

    PubMed

    Mardanov, Andrey V; Beletsky, Alexey V; Kadnikov, Vitaly V; Ignatov, Alexander N; Ravin, Nikolai V

    2014-01-01

    Sclerotinia borealis is a necrotrophic phytopathogenic fungus notable for its wide host range and environmental persistence. It grows at low temperatures, causing snow mold disease of crop plants. To understand the molecular mechanisms of its pathogenesis and adaptation to the psychrophilic lifestyle, we determined the 39.3-Mb draft genome sequence of S. borealis F-4128. PMID:24459262

  16. What were the effects of the formation of the Borealis basin, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, Kenneth L.

    1991-01-01

    The progress that has been made in the study of the Borealis basin in the Northern Hemisphere of Mars is presented in this two page report. The effect of the runoff of ground water into the Borealis basin on the climate of Mars is discussed.

  17. AURORA BOREALIS - European Research Icebreaker With Drilling Capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biebow, N.; Lembke-Jene, L.; Kunz-Pirrung, M.; Thiede, J.

    2008-12-01

    The polar oceans are the least known areas of the globe, in although they hold the key to many of our climate´s secrets. How does the sea ice coverage and the sea water properties change? How do plants and animals survive under the most extreme conditions of the earth? Which information of past climate change can be read from the sediments at the sea-floor and how can the future changing climate be predicted? In order to answer such and further questions, for the moment a hypermodern research vessel, the AURORA BOREALIS, is planned, which can handle the cool summers and freezing winters of the polar oceans and which can drill deep into the sea floor. AURORA BOREALIS will be the most advanced Research Icebreaker in the world with a multi-functional role of drilling in deep ocean basins and supporting climate/environmental research and decision support for stakeholder governments for the next 35-40 years. It will have a high icebreaking capacity to penetrate autonomously (single ship operation) into the central Arctic Ocean with more than 2.5 meters of ice cover, during all seasons of the year. The new technological features will include dynamic positioning in closed sea- ice cover, satellite navigation and ice-management support and the deployment and operation of Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV) and Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) from the twin moon-pools. A unique feature of the vessel is the deep-sea drilling rig, which will enable sampling of the ocean floor and sub-sea up to 5000 m water and 1000 m penetration at the most inhospitable places on earth. The drilling capability will be deployed in both Polar Regions on the long run and AURORA BOREALIS will be the only vessel worldwide that could undertake this type of scientific investigation.

  18. Fluorine in R Coronae Borealis and Extreme Helium Stars

    E-print Network

    Pandey, Gajendra; Rao, N Kameswara

    2007-01-01

    Neutral fluorine lines are identified in the optical spectra of several R Coronae Borealis stars (RCBs) at maximum light. These lines provide the first measurement of the fluorine abundance in these stars. Fluorine is enriched in some RCBs by factors of 800 to 8000 relative to its likely initial abundance. The overabundances of fluorine are evidence for the synthesis of fluorine. These results are discussed in the light of the scenario that RCBs are formed by accretion of an He white dwarf by a C-O white dwarf. Sakurai's object (V4334 Sgr), a final He-shell flash product, shows no detectable neutral fluorine lines.

  19. Substrate Selection by Ghost Shrimp

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Sue Diggs (Monterey High School)

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of this experiment is to determine if ghost shrimp show a preference for a particular substrate surface under artificial conditions. Ghost shrimp are geographically widespread. They are an important source of food for many fish, mammals, and birds. Ghost shrimp are omnivorous, seldom predaceous. Their preferred food is aquatic vegetation. Ecologically, they are considered scavengers. Therefore, they contribute to an efficient flow of energy within aquatic habitats. Economically, they have become a favorite source of live food for aquarium fish and are sold in pet stores and are harvested for bait for sport fishing.

  20. A comparison of host-defense peptides in skin secretions of female Xenopus laevis × Xenopus borealis and X. borealis × X. laevis F1 hybrids.

    PubMed

    Mechkarska, Milena; Prajeep, Manju; Leprince, Jérôme; Vaudry, Hubert; Meetani, Mohammed A; Evans, Ben J; Conlon, J Michael

    2013-07-01

    Peptidomic analysis was used to compare the diversity of host-defense peptides in norepinephrine-stimulated skin secretions from laboratory-generated female F1 hybrids of Xenopus laevis and Xenopus borealis (Pipidae). Skin secretions of hybrids with maternal X. laevis (XLB) contained 12 antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), comprising 8 from X. laevis and 4 from X. borealis. Magainin-B1, XPF-B1, PGLa-B1 CPF-B2, CPF-B3 and CPF-B4 from X. borealis and XPF-1, XPF-2, and CPF-6 from X. laevis were not detected and CPF-1 and CPF-7 were present in low concentration. The secretions contained caerulein and caerulein-B1 derived from both parents but lacked X. laevis xenopsin and X. borealis caerulein-B2. Skin secretions of hybrids with maternal X. borealis (XBL) contained 14 AMPs comprising 6 from X. borealis and 8 from X. laevis. Magainin-B1, XPF-B1, PGLa-B1, CPF-B2, XPF-1, CPF-5, and CPF-7 were absent and CPF-B3, CPF-B4, CPF-1 and CPF-6 were present only in low concentration. Xenopsin and caerulein were identified in the secretions but caerulein-B2 was absent and caerulein-B1 was present in low concentration. No peptides were identified in secretions of either XLB or XBL hybrids that were not present in the parental species. The data indicate that hybridization between X. laevis and X. borealis results in increased diversity of host-defense peptides in skin secretions but point to extensive AMP gene silencing compared with previously studied female X. laevis×X. muelleri F1 hybrids and no novel peptide expression. PMID:23624316

  1. Science Nation: Disappearing Red Shrimp

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Along the shore in Hawaii, the ponds imbedded in lava rocks contain organisms found only in that environment. Among the marine life in these pools are hundreds of tiny red shrimp. With support from the National Science Foundation (NSF), molecular biologist Scott Santos and his team at Auburn University are studying how the shrimp, along with other organisms, thrive in harsh, brackish pools of water.

  2. Monodon baculovirus of shrimp.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, K V; Makesh, M; Karunasagar, I

    2012-09-01

    Among the viruses infecting penaeid shrimp, monodon-type baculovirus (MBV) otherwise known as Penaeus monodon singly enveloped nuclear polyhedrosis virus (PmSNPV), is one of the widely reported and well described viruses. It is a rod-shaped, enveloped, double-stranded DNA virus, and considered till recently, as the type A baculovirus. Besides MBV, two strains of SNPV are reported-plebejus baculovirus and bennettae baculovirus. MBV was reported to be originated from Taiwan and has wide geographic distribution and is reported to be enzootic in wild penaeids of the Indo-pacific coasts of Asia. The virus also has diverse host-range including a variety of cultured and captured shrimp species and freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii. MBV has been reported in all life stages of P. monodon with late larval, postlarval and young juvenile as the most susceptible stages/ages. However, MBV has not been documented in early larval stages. Although MBV has been reported to be tolerated well by shrimp, the infection has been attributed to decreased productivity. The target organs or tissues of MBV are the hepatopancreatic tubules and duct epithelium of postlarvae, juveniles and adults, and the anterior midgut epithelium of very young postlarvae. The prominent clinical sign of infection is the presence of multiple spherical inclusion bodies in the hepatopancreas and midgut epithelial cells. The major mode of transmission of the virus is horizontal through oral exposure to occlusion bodies, contaminated tissues or fomites. Minor morphometric variation of the virus has been reported among different isolates. The rod-shaped enveloped virus particles range from 265-324 nm in length and 42-77 nm in diameter. Although complete genome sequence of MBV is not available, nucleic acid of MBV is circular, double-stranded DNA with a genome size ranging from 80 to 160 kbp. The virus codes for a 53 kDa major polyhedrin polypeptide and two minor 47 and 49 kDa polypeptides. A variety of diagnostic tools have been reported for this virus including real-time PCR and LAMP-based detection. Taxonomic position is still uncertain and International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses lists MBV as a tentative species named PemoNPV in the genus Nucleopolyhedrovirus. However, according to the latest genomic information on the virus, it has been suggested to create a new group of non-occluded bacilliform viruses called nudiviruses with MBV as one of the members. The aim of the current work is to describe the knowledge on the status, distribution and host-range, pathology, transmission, virus structure and morphogenesis, genomic characteristics, diagnosis and the latest taxonomic position of MBV. PMID:23997439

  3. Movements of Brown Shrimp, Penaeus aztecus, and Pink Shrimp, P. duorarum, Relative to the

    E-print Network

    Movements of Brown Shrimp, Penaeus aztecus, and Pink Shrimp, P. duorarum, Relative to the U. EMILIANI Introduction The major fishery for brown shrimp, Penaeus aztecus, occurs in the western Gulf of Mexico. Annual U.S. landings of brown shrimp off Texas averaged 13,800 metric tons (t) between 1970

  4. Inshore Environmental Effects on Brown Shrimp, Penaeus aztecus, and White Shrimp, P. setiferus,

    E-print Network

    Inshore Environmental Effects on Brown Shrimp, Penaeus aztecus, and White Shrimp, P. setiferus, the two commercial species of penaeid shrimp, the brown, Penaeus aztecus, and the white, P. seti- ferus life stages of penaeid shrimp to particular environmental fac- tors and interactions. Table I (brown

  5. Prevalence, persistence and control of Salmonella and Listeria in shrimp and shrimp products: A review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. N. Wan Norhana; Susan E. Poole; Hilton C. Deeth; Gary A. Dykes

    2010-01-01

    Shrimp are an important commodity in the international fisheries trade and there is an indication of an increase in worldwide consumption of this crustacean. Salmonella and Listeria have been isolated from shrimps and shrimp products on a regular basis since the 1980s. The continued reporting of the presence of these pathogens in fresh and frozen shrimps, and even in the

  6. 5. Aurora Borealis Pass over the United States at Night - Duration: 21 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video of the United States at night and the Aurora Borealis was taken by the crew of Expedition 29 on board the International Space Station. This sequence of shots was taken September 29, 2011...

  7. Migration and molt patterns of red bats, Lasiurus borealis (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae), in Illinois

    E-print Network

    Timm, Robert M.

    1989-01-01

    Red bats, Lasiurus borealis (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae), are widespread in North America, but many aspects of their biology are poorly known. In an attempt to elucidate patterns of migration and molt in red bats, data were collected over...

  8. Debris from Borealis Basin Formation as the Primary Impactor Population of Late Heavy Bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minton, D. A.; Jackson, A. P.; Asphaug, E.; Fassett, C. I.; Richardson, J. E.

    2015-02-01

    Here we investigate a novel Giant Impact Debris (GID) hypothesis to explain a number of observations regarding the LHB. In the GID hypothesis, the formation of the crustal dichotomy on Mars (Borealis Basin) generates LHB impactors.

  9. Topographic and Roughness Characteristics of the Vastitas Borealis Formation on Mars Described by Fractal Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garneau, S.; Plaut, J. J.

    2000-01-01

    The surface roughness of the Vastitas Borealis Formation on Mars was analyzed with fractal statistics. Root mean square slopes and fractal dimensions were calculated for 74 topographic profiles. Results have implications for radar scattering models.

  10. Marine Fisheries On the cover: Spot shrimp

    E-print Network

    Marine Fisheries ~~WD~~ On the cover: Spot shrimp photograph by William L. High, NMFS North- west NOAA/NMFS Developments Foreign Fishery Developments Publications Shrimp 1980, NOAA Awards, Satellite Data, Taggart Named, Compensation Changes, Pomfret Eyed, and Bering Sea Fish Charts 27 Japan: Shrimp

  11. STUDIES ON THE MARKING OF COMMERCIAL SHRIMP

    E-print Network

    STUDIES ON THE MARKING OF COMMERCIAL SHRIMP WITH BIOLOGICAL STAINS ...J Biological DECU -1957 WOODS of the Interior, Fred A. Seaton, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service STUDIES ON THE MARKING OF COMMERCIAL SHRIMP To determine the effectiveness of biological stains as marking agents for the commercial shrimp Penaeus

  12. Foreign Fishery Developments Japanese Shrimp Import

    E-print Network

    Foreign Fishery Developments Japanese Shrimp Import Trends for 1963·80 Told Japanese imports of frozen shrimp in 1980 amounted to 143,256 metric tons (t), valued at ¥240,353 million ($1,073 million. This was the first decline in shrimp imports since 1974 and the lowest imports in the past 3 years. The decline

  13. Shrimp, Crabs, and Marine Game Fish Records

    E-print Network

    Shrimp, Crabs, and Marine Game Fish Records · ... With high salinities, low rainfall, and no cold spells, 1976 was hailed an "excellent year for shrimp production" by the Texas Parks and Wildlife De- partment. Brown shrimp in Texas bays grew so fast last spring that the de- partment closed the Gulf

  14. Introduction The primary pink shrimp, Farfante-

    E-print Network

    74(1) 1 Introduction The primary pink shrimp, Farfante- penaeus duorarum, fishing grounds con- sist in part by the establishment of sanctuaries which The U.S. Gulf of Mexico Pink Shrimp, Farfantepenaeus.hart@noaa.gov). ABSTRACT--U.S. Gulf of Mexico, pink shrimp, Farfantepenaeus duorarum, catch statistics have been collected

  15. Foreign Fishery Developments Japanese Frozen Shrimp

    E-print Network

    Foreign Fishery Developments Japanese Frozen Shrimp Imports Continue to Climb Japanese imports of frozen shrimp in 1978 amounted to 143,962 t, a new all-time high surpassing by 15 percent the previous import value. The unit import price of shrimp in yen fell in 1978 due to the rise in the value of the yen

  16. Streptomyces graminifolii sp. nov., isolated from bamboo (Sasa borealis) litter.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyo-Jin; Whang, Kyung-Sook

    2014-08-01

    The taxonomic position of strain JL-22(T), isolated from litter of a bamboo (Sasa borealis) forest, was determined using a polyphasic approach. The organism had phenotypic and morphological properties consistent with it being a member of the genus Streptomyces. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that strain JL-22(T) was closely related to Streptomyces prunicolor NRRL B-12281(T) (99.2%), Streptomyces galilaeus JCM 4757(T) (99.0%) and Streptomyces chartreusis NBRC 12753(T) (99.0%). However, the results of DNA-DNA hybridization and physiological and biochemical tests showed that strain JL-22(T) could be differentiated from its closest phylogenetic relatives both genotypically and phenotypically. Based on phenotypic and genotypic data, strain JL-22(T) represents a novel species of the genus Streptomyces, for which the name Streptomyces graminifolii sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is JL-22(T) (?=?KACC 17180(T)?=?NBRC 109806(T)). PMID:24812360

  17. Variable Winds and Dust Formation in R Coronae Borealis Stars

    E-print Network

    Clayton, Geoffrey C; Zhang, Wanshu

    2013-01-01

    We have observed P-Cygni and asymmetric, blue-shifted absorption profiles in the He I 10830 lines of twelve R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars over short (1 month) and long (3 year) timescales to look for variations linked to their dust-formation episodes. In almost all cases, the strengths and terminal velocities of the line vary significantly and are correlated with dust formation events. Strong absorption features with blue-shifted velocities ~400 km/s appear during declines in visible brightness and persist for about 100 days after recovery to maximum brightness. Small residual winds of somewhat lower velocity are present outside of the decline and recovery periods. The correlations support models in which recently formed dust near the star is propelled outward at high speed by radiation pressure and drags the gas along with it.

  18. Mid-Infrared Variations of R Coronae Borealis Stars

    E-print Network

    Rao, N Kameswara

    2014-01-01

    Mid-infrared photometry of R Coronae Borealis stars obtained from various satellites from IRAS to WISE has been utilized in studying the variations of the circumstellar dust's contributions to the spectral energy distribution of these stars. The variation of the fractional coverage (R) of dust clouds and their blackbody temperatures (T$_d$) have been used in trying to understand the dust cloud evolution over the three decades spanned by the satellite observations. In particular, it is shown that a prediction R $ \\propto T_d^4$ developed in this paper is satisfied, especially by those stars for which a single collection of cloud dominates the IR fluxes. Correlations of R with photospheric abundance and luminosity of the stars are explored.

  19. A Dynamical Analysis of the Corona Borealis Supercluster

    E-print Network

    Batiste, Merida

    2013-01-01

    Using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey we assess the current dynamical state of the Corona Borealis Supercluster (CSC), a highly dense and compact supercluster at z = 0.07. The Fundamental Plane relation is used to determine redshift independent distances to six clusters in the densest region of the supercluster, with mean accuracy in the relative distance estimates of 4 per cent. Peculiar velocities determined from these distance estimates indicate that the clusters have broken from the Hubble Flow, suggesting that the CSC likely contains two regions that have reached turnaround and are currently undergoing gravitational collapse. These results provide the strongest observational evidence to date that the CSC is a bound system similar to the much more extensive Shapley Supercluster, which is the most extensive confirmed bound supercluster yet identified in the Universe. When compared with simulations of the CSC our results require substantially more mass than is contained within the clusters, possibly ...

  20. Aurora Borealis Experiment (ABX): A Planeterrella for Education and Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNulty, Michael; Carpe, Andy; Zwicker, Andrew

    2013-10-01

    The Planeterrella is an experiment invented by Jean Lilensten of the Laboratoire de Planetologie de Grenoble in France designed to simulate aurorae of various planets. It is done by placing two differently sized aluminum spheres in a bell jar with a pressure of approximately 75 mTorr. Each sphere has magnets inside and is electrically biased. An electrode with the opposite electrical bias is inserted into the bell jar so that the voltage between them is on the order of 300 V. A plasma is then created and an aurora is formed around the magnetic poles of the spheres or near the edge of the electrode. We have made a modified version of the planeterrella, called the Aurora Borealis Experiment (ABX), based upon Lilensten's plans. We will present the technical details of the experiment and preliminary results of its use with a variety of different audiences.

  1. VARIABLE WINDS AND DUST FORMATION IN R CORONAE BOREALIS STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Zhang Wanshu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Geballe, T. R., E-mail: gclayton@fenway.phys.lsu.edu, E-mail: wzhan21@lsu.edu, E-mail: tgeballe@gemini.edu [Gemini Observatory, 670 N. A'ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States)

    2013-08-01

    We have observed P-Cygni and asymmetric, blue-shifted absorption profiles in the He I {lambda}10830 lines of 12 R Coronae Borealis stars over short (1 month) and long (3 yr) timescales to look for variations linked to their dust-formation episodes. In almost all cases, the strengths and terminal velocities of the line vary significantly and are correlated with dust formation events. Strong absorption features with blue-shifted velocities {approx}400 km s{sup -1} appear during declines in visible brightness and persist for about 100 days after recovery to maximum brightness. Small residual winds of somewhat lower velocity are present outside of the decline and recovery periods. The correlations support models in which recently formed dust near the star is propelled outward at high speed by radiation pressure and drags the gas along with it.

  2. What Is the Shell Around R Coronae Borealis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montiel, Edward J.; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Marcello, Dominic C.; Lockman, Felix J.

    2015-07-01

    The hydrogen-deficient, carbon-rich R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars are known for being prolific producers of dust which causes their large iconic declines in brightness. Several RCB stars, including R Coronae Borealis (R CrB), itself, have large extended dust shells seen in the far-infrared. The origin of these shells is uncertain but they may give us clues to the evolution of the RCB stars. The shells could form in three possible ways. (1) They are fossil Planetary Nebula (PN) shells, which would exist if RCB stars are the result of a final, helium-shell flash, (2) they are material left over from a white-dwarf (WD) merger event which formed the RCB stars, or (3) they are material lost from the star during the RCB phase. Arecibo 21 cm observations establish an upper limit on the column density of H I in the R CrB shell implying a maximum shell mass of ?0.3 M?. A low-mass fossil PN shell is still a possible source of the shell although it may not contain enough dust. The mass of gas lost during a WD merger event will not condense enough dust to produce the observed shell, assuming a reasonable gas-to-dust ratio. The third scenario where the shell around R CrB has been produced during the star’s RCB phase seems most likely to produce the observed mass of dust and the observed size of the shell. But this means that R CrB has been in its RCB phase for ?104 years.

  3. OXYGEN CONSUMPTION AND HEMOLYMPH OSMOLALITY OF BROWN SHRIMp, PENAEUS AZTECUS

    E-print Network

    OXYGEN CONSUMPTION AND HEMOLYMPH OSMOLALITY OF BROWN SHRIMp, PENAEUS AZTECUS JAMES M. BISHOP shrimp was measured under conditions appli- cable to their natural environment orculture. Shrimp were wet m -, . h-'); however, disturbed shrimp consumedoxygennearly four times faster than shrimp at rest

  4. THE BAIT SHRIMP INDUSTRY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO

    E-print Network

    THE BAIT SHRIMP INDUSTRY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO FISHERY LEAFLET No. 480 Revision of Fishery Leaflet FISHERIES WASHINGTON 25, D. C. #12;THE BAIT SHRIMP INDUSTRY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO Introduction, Texas CO TE TS Kinds of shrimp in the bait fishery General life history of the white shrimp Bait shrimp

  5. OUSEHOlD CONSUMER PREFERENCES ~EADED SHRIMP & BREADED FISH STICKS

    E-print Network

    OUSEHOlD CONSUMER PREFERENCES for ~EADED SHRIMP & BREADED FISH STICKS PART 1 NATIONAL AND REGIONAL·· Contents Introduction · · . . . · · · · · · . . . · · · · · · · · S~. . . · . . . . . . Breaded Shrimp consumer prefe rences for breaded shrimp and breaded fi8h sticks. The survey ",as made by national Family

  6. Development of the mesendoderm in the dendrobranchiate shrimp Sicyonia ingentis

    E-print Network

    Hertzler, Philip L.

    Development of the mesendoderm in the dendrobranchiate shrimp Sicyonia ingentis Philip L. Hertzler Received 2 February 2002; accepted 5 April 2002 Abstract Dendrobranchiate shrimp embryos form a 4-cell reserved. Keywords: Dendrobranchiata; Sicyonia ingentis; Shrimp; Cell lineage; Mesoteloblasts

  7. Sasa borealis extract exerts an antidiabetic effect via activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Nam, Jung Soo; Chung, Hee Jin; Jang, Min Kyung; Jung, In Ah; Park, Seong Ha; Cho, Su In; Jung, Myeong Ho

    2013-02-01

    Leaf of Sasa borealis, a species of bamboo, has been reported to exhibit anti-hyperglycemic effect. However, its antidiabetic mechanism is not fully understood. In this study, we examined whether an extract of S. borealis activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and exerts anti-hyperglycemic effects. Treatment with the S. borealis extract increased insulin signaling and phosphorylation of AMPK and stimulated the expression of its downstream targets, including PPAR?, ACO, and CPT-1 in C2C12 cells and PPAR? in HepG2 cells. However, inhibition of AMPK activation attenuated insulin signaling and prevented the stimulation of AMPK target genes. The S. borealis extract increased glucose uptake in C2C12 cells and suppressed expression of the gluconeogenic gene, PEPCK in HepG2 cells. The extract significantly reduced blood glucose and triglyceride levels in STZ-induced diabetic mice. The extract enhanced AMPK phosphorylation and increased Glut-4 expression in the skeletal muscle of the mice. These findings demonstrated that the S. borealis extract exerts its anti-hyperglycemic effect through activation of AMPK and enhancement of insulin signaling. PMID:23423690

  8. AURORA BOREALIS: a polar-dedicated European Research Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff-Boenisch, Bonnie; Egerton, Paul; Thiede, Joern; Roberto, Azzolini; Lembke-Jene, Lester

    2010-05-01

    Polar research and in particular the properties of northern and southern high latitude oceans are currently a subject of intense scientific debate and investigations, because they are subject to rapid and dramatic climatic variations. Polar regions react more rapidly and intensively to global change than other regions of the earth. A shrinking of the Arctic sea-ice cover, potentially leading to an opening of sea passages to the north of North America and Eurasia, on the long to a "blue" Arctic Ocean would additionally have a strong impact on transport, commerce and tourism bearing potential risk for humans and complex ecosystems in the future. In spite of their critical role processes and feedbacks, especially in winter but not exclusively, are virtually unknown: The Arctic Ocean for example, it is the only basin of the world's oceans that has essentially not been sampled by the drill ships of the Deep-Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) or the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) and its long-term environmental history and tectonic structure is therefore poorly known. Exceptions are the ODP Leg 151 and the more recent very successful ACEX-expedition of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) in 2004. To help to address the most pressing questions regarding climate change and related processes, a Pan-European initiative in the field of Earth system science has been put in place: AURORA BOREALIS is the largest environmental research infrastructure on the ESFRI roadmap of the European Community. AURORA BOREALIS is a very powerful research icebreaker, which will enable year-round operations in the Arctic and the Antarctic as well as in the adjacent ocean basins. Equipped with its drilling rig, the vessel is also capable to explore the presently completely unknown Arctic deep-sea floor. Last but not least, the ship is a floating observatory and mobile monitoring platform that permits to measure on a long-term basis comprehensive time series in all research fields relevant to global climate change. Chances and challenges rest in securing the construction and operation costs that need a dedicated consortium of interested countries and institutions to help tackling the biggest challenges of the next decades.

  9. Recent population expansion and connectivity in the hydrothermal shrimp

    E-print Network

    Teixeira, Sara

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Recent population expansion and connectivity in the hydrothermal shrimp Rimicaris of the shrimp Rimicaris exoculata, which forms high-density local populations on hydrothermal vents along

  10. Biological treatment of shrimp production wastewater

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Raj Boopathy

    2009-01-01

    Over the last few decades, there has been an increase in consumer demand for shrimp, which has resulted in its worldwide aquaculture\\u000a production. In the United States, the stringent enforcement of environmental regulations encourages shrimp farmers to develop\\u000a new technologies, such as recirculating raceway systems. This is a zero-water exchange system capable of producing high-density\\u000a shrimp yields. The system also

  11. Mining R Coronae Borealis stars from Catalina surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.-H.

    2015-03-01

    Aims: R Coronae Borealis stars (RCBs) are rare carbon stars that lack of hydrogen in their photospheresand are most likely products of white dwarf mergers. A census of RCBs can shed light on the progenitors of SNe Ia in the context of a double degenerate scenario. Methods: Traditionally, RCBs are identified by their unpredictable photometric variation with dimmings up to 9 mag, and thus discoveries of RCBs are heavily biased to the limited regions monitored by long-term microlensing experiments. However, recent studies of galactic RCBs have shown that they exhibit distinct mid-infrared colors originating from their cool circumstellar shells, and the all-sky WISE survey facilitates the identification of RCB candidates. Therefore, combining the WISE colors with large area time-domain surveys will enable us to discover more RCBs. Results: This study presents the results of 26 RCB candidates from the Catalina surveys, where five of them are spectroscopically confirmed RCBs and seven of them are previously known carbon stars. This demonstrates the efficacy of this kind of an approach and the potential to discover uncharted RCBs in ongoing and future synoptic surveys.

  12. What is the Shell Around R Coronae Borealis?

    E-print Network

    Montiel, Edward J; Marcello, Dominic C; Lockman, Felix J

    2015-01-01

    The hydrogen-deficient, carbon-rich R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars are known for being prolific producers of dust which causes their large iconic declines in brightness. Several RCB stars, including R CrB, itself, have large extended dust shells seen in the far-infrared. The origin of these shells is uncertain but they may give us clues to the evolution of the RCB stars. The shells could form in three possible ways. 1) they are fossil Planetary Nebula (PN) shells, which would exist if RCB stars are the result of a final, helium-shell flash, 2) they are material left over from a white-dwarf merger event which formed the RCB stars, or 3) they are material lost from the star during the RCB phase. Arecibo 21-cm observations establish an upper limit on the column density of H I in the R CrB shell implying a maximum shell mass of $\\lesssim$0.3 M$_{\\odot}$. A low-mass fossil PN shell is still a possible source of the shell although it may not contain enough dust. The mass of gas lost during a white-dwarf merger even...

  13. How Many R Coronae Borealis Stars Are There Really? (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, G. C.

    2014-12-01

    (Abstract only) The R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars are rare hydrogen-deficient, carbon-rich supergiants. Two evolutionary scenarios have been suggested, a double degenerate merger of two white dwrfs (WDs), or a final helium shell flash in a planetary nebula central star. Only about 100 of the predicted 3,000 RCB stars in the Galaxy have been discovered. But the pace of discovery of new RCB stars in the Milky Way has been accelerating. We recently discovered over twenty new RCB stars by examining ASAS-e light curves. Using the recent release of the WISE All-Sky Catalog, a series of IR color-color cuts have produced a sample of candidates that may yield over 200 new RCB stars. We are trying to obtain spectra of these stars to confirm their identifications. The evidence pointing toward a WD merger or a final-flash origin for RCB stars is contradictory. Increasing the sample of known RCB stars, so that we can better study their spatial distribution in the Galaxy, can give us clues to their origins. Their number and distribution may be consistent with WD mergers. If so, this would be an exciting result since RCB stars may be low-mass analogs of Type Ia supernovae.

  14. V532 Oph is a New R Coronae Borealis Star

    E-print Network

    Clayton, Geoffrey C; Wils, P; Welch, D L

    2009-01-01

    V532 Oph has been found to be a member of the rare, hydrogen-deficient R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars from new photometric and spectroscopic data reported in this paper. The lightcurve of V532 Oph shows the sudden, deep, irregularly spaced declines characteristic of RCB stars. Its optical spectrum is typical of a warm (T(eff)~7000 K) RCB star, showing weak or absent hydrogen lines, the C2 Swan bands, and no evidence for 13C. In addition, the star shows small pulsations typical of an RCB star and an infrared excess due to circum- stellar dust. It also appears to be significantly reddened by foreground dust. The distance to V532 Oph is estimated to be 5.5-8.7 kpc. These new data show that this star was misclassified as an eclipsing binary in the General Catalog of Variable Stars. The new data presented here for V532 Oph reveal the power of high-quality, high-cadence all-sky photometric surveys, such as ASAS-3, to identify new RCB candidates on the basis of lightcurve data alone, now that they have been collecti...

  15. NSV 11154 Is a New R Coronae Borealis Star

    E-print Network

    Kijbunchoo, Nutsinee; Vieux, Timothy C; Dickerman, N; Hillwig, T C; Welch, D L; Pagnotta, Ashley; Tang, Sumin; Grindlay, J E; Henden, A

    2011-01-01

    NSV 11154 has been confirmed as a new member of the rare hydrogen deficient R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars based on new photometric and spectroscopic data. Using new photometry, as well as archival plates from the Harvard archive, we have constructed the historical lightcurve of NSV 11154 from 1896 to the present. The lightcurve shows the sudden, deep, irregularly spaced declines characteristic of RCB stars. The visible spectrum is typical of a cool (Teff < 5000 K) RCB star showing no hydrogen lines, strong C2 Swan bands, and no evidence of 13C. In addition, the star shows small pulsations typical of an RCB star, and an infrared excess due to circumstellar dust with a temperature of ~800 K. The distance to NSV 11154 is estimated to be ~14.5 kpc. RCB stars are very rare in the Galaxy so each additional star is important to population studies leading to a better understanding the origins of these mysterious stars. Among the known sample of RCB stars, NSV 11154 is unusual in that it lies well above the Galact...

  16. Oxygen isotopic ratios in cool R Coronae Borealis stars

    E-print Network

    Garcia-Hernandez, D Anibal; Rao, N Kameswara; Hinkle, Ken H; Eriksson, Kjell

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars and hydrogen-deficient carbon (HdC) stars by measuring precise 16O/18O ratios for five cool RCB stars. The 16O/18O ratios are derived by spectrum synthesis from high-resolution (R=50,000) K-band spectra. Lower limits to the 16O/17O and 14N/15}N ratios as well as Na and S abundances (when possible) are also given. RCB stars in our sample generally display less 18O than HdC stars - the derived 16O/18O ratios range from 3 to 20. The only exception is the RCB star WX CrA, which seems to be a HdC-like star with 16O/18O=0.3. Our result of a higher 16O/18O ratio for the RCB stars must be accounted for by a theory of the formation and evolution of HdC and RCB stars. We speculate that a late dredge-up of products of He-burning, principally 12C and 16O, may convert a 18O-rich HdC star into a 18O-poor RCB star as the H-deficient star begins its final evolution from a cool supergiant to the top of the white dwarf cooling track.

  17. Aurorae: The earliest datable observation of the aurora borealis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, F. Richard; Willis, David M.; Hallinan, Thomas J.

    2004-12-01

    The Late Babylonian astronomical texts, discovered at the site of Babylon (32.5°N, 44.4°E) more than a century ago, contain what is probably the earliest reliable account of the aurora borealis. A clay tablet recording numerous celestial observations made by the official astronomers during the 37th year of King Nebuchadnezzar II (568/567 BC) describes an unusual ``red glow'' in the sky at night; the exact date of this observation corresponds to the night of 12/13 March in 567 BC. The most likely interpretation of the phenomenon is an auroral display. This event occurred several centuries before the first clearly identifiable observation of the aurora from elsewhere in the world, namely China in 193 BC. The Babylonian auroral observation is remarkable in the sense that it is one of a series of carefully recorded astronomical observations, for each of which the year, month and day are known precisely. This observation occurred at a time when the geomagnetic (dipole) latitude of Babylon was about 41°N compared with the present value of 27.5°N, suggesting a higher auroral incidence at Babylon in 567 BC than at present.

  18. High-resolution spectroscopy of the R Coronae Borealis and Other Hydrogen Deficient Stars

    E-print Network

    Rao, N Kameswara

    2010-01-01

    High-resolution spectroscopy is a very important tool for studying stellar physics, perhaps, particularly so for such enigmatic objects like the R Coronae Borealis and related Hydrogen deficient stars that produce carbon dust in addition to their peculiar abundances. Examples of how high-resolution spectroscopy is used in the study of these stars to address the two major puzzles are presented: (i) How are such rare H-deficient stars created? and (ii) How and where are the obscuring soot clouds produced around the R Coronae Borealis stars?

  19. The hot R Coronae Borealis star DY Centauri is a binary

    E-print Network

    Rao, N Kameswara; Garcia-Hernandez, D A; Jeffery, C Simon; Woolf, Vincent M; McArthur, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    The remarkable hot R Coronae Borealis star DY Cen is revealed to be the first and only binary system to be found among the R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars and their likely relatives, including the Extreme Helium stars and the hydrogen-deficient carbon stars. Radial velocity determinations from 1982-2010 have shown DY Cen is a single-lined spectroscopic binary in an eccentric orbit with a period of 39.67 days. It is also one of the hottest and most H-rich member of the class of RCB stars. The system may have evolved from a common-envelope to its current form.

  20. Aploparaksis borealis sp. n. (Cestoda: Hymenolepididae) from passeriform and charadriiform birds in Chukotka and Alaska.

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, S K; Rausch, R L

    1977-02-01

    Aploparaksis borealis sp. n. (Cestoda: Hymenolepididae), from the long-tailed jaeger, Stercorarisu longicaudus Vieillot, on the Seward Peninsula, Alaska, and from the red-throated pipit, Anthus cervinus (Pallas), and the Lapland longspur, Calcarius lapponicus (Linnaeus), in Chukotka, northestern Siberia, is described. This cestode is distinguished by the structure of the cirrus and other morphologic characters from other species of Aploparaksis Clerc 1903 in which there are 10 rostellar hooks and the vitelline gland is aporal to the ovary. A. borealis is the first species of Aploparaksis to be reported from birds representing 2 orders (Passeriformes and Charadriiformes). PMID:845746

  1. OXYGEN ISOTOPIC RATIOS IN COOL R CORONAE BOREALIS STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Hernandez, D. A. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias (IAC), C/Via Lactea s/n, 38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Lambert, David L. [W. J. McDonald Observatory, University of Texas at Austin. 1 University Station, C1400. Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Rao, N. Kameswara [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore 560 034 (India); Hinkle, Ken H. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), Tucson, AZ 85726 (United States); Eriksson, Kjell, E-mail: agarcia@iac.e, E-mail: dll@astro.as.utexas.ed, E-mail: nkrao@iiap.res.i, E-mail: hinkle@noao.ed, E-mail: Kjell.Eriksson@astro.uu.s [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 515, 75120 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2010-05-01

    We investigate the relationship between R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars and hydrogen-deficient carbon (HdC) stars by measuring precise {sup 16}O/{sup 18}O ratios for five cool RCB stars. The {sup 16}O/{sup 18}O ratios are derived by spectrum synthesis from high-resolution (R {approx} 50, 000) K-band spectra. Lower limits to the {sup 16}O/{sup 17}O and {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N ratios as well as Na and S abundances (when possible) are also given. RCB stars in our sample generally display less {sup 18}O than HdC stars-the derived {sup 16}O/{sup 18}O ratios range from 3 to 20. The only exception is the RCB star WX CrA, which seems to be an HdC-like star with {sup 16}O/{sup 18}O = 0.3. Our result of a higher {sup 16}O/{sup 18}O ratio for the RCB stars must be accounted for by a theory of the formation and evolution of HdC and RCB stars. We speculate that a late dredge-up of products of He burning, principally {sup 12}C and {sup 16}O, may convert an {sup 18}O-rich HdC star into an {sup 18}O-poor RCB star as the H-deficient star begins its final evolution from a cool supergiant to the top of the white dwarf cooling track.

  2. R Coronae Borealis Stars formed from Double White Dwarf Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staff, Jan E.; Herwig, F.; Menon, A.; Even, W.; Tohline, J.; Clayton, G.; Motl, P.; Fryer, C.; Geballe, T.

    2011-01-01

    R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars are hydrogen-deficient variable stars that suddenly fade by several magnitudes at irregular intervals whereafter they gradually return to their original brightness over a period of some months. The origin of RCBs remain a mystery. It is often thought that they are the result of the merger of a He and a CO white dwarf, while the fading is thought to be due to the formation of dust blocking light from the star. We are working on revealing the secrets behind the origin of RCBs. Here we present the results of 3 dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the merger of a double white dwarf system where total mass is 0.9 M? and initial mass ratio is q=0.7. We use a zero-temperature plus ideal gas equation of state that allows for heating through shocks. These simulations allow us to follow the evolution of the system for 10-20 initial orbital periods (1000-2000 seconds), from the onset of mass-transfer to a point after merger when the combined object has settled into a nearly axisymmetric, rotationally flattened configuration. The final merged object from the hydrodynamics simulation is then used as input for a stellar evolution code where the object's evolution can be followed over a much longer (thermal and/or nuclear) timescale. A preliminary post-merger stellar evolution simulation shows how an initial configuration of a 0.7 CO WD surrounded by 0.3 M? of dynamically accreted He evolves on a time scale of 105 years to the location of the RCB stars in the H-R diagram at an effective temperature Teff<7000 K and log L 4. We acknowledge support from NASA Astrophysics Theory Program grant number NNX10AC72G.

  3. NORMAL POSTMORTEM CHANGES IN THE BROWN SHRIMP, PENAEUS AZTECUSI

    E-print Network

    NORMAL POSTMORTEM CHANGES IN THE BROWN SHRIMP, PENAEUS AZTECUSI DONALD V. LIGHTNER2 ABSTRACT changes in the brown shrimp (Penaells a~.le(,lIs Ives). Experimental shrimp were held at 10°, 20°, or 30°C and cuticular tissue elements. In all tissues the rate of autolysis was temperature-dependent. Shrimp from

  4. EXPLORATORY SHRIMP FISHING IN THE GULF OF MEXICO

    E-print Network

    EXPLORATORY SHRIMP FISHING IN THE GULF OF MEXICO 1950 -51 FISHERY LEAFLET 406 FISB AND WILDLIFE ··········································· ······· Dragging Data and Shrimp Fishing Methods ········ ········ · ·· Some Observations on the Oregon Fishing Log, 1950-51······· Whit e Shrimp....·.·......·.........·····..·· ···.········ Bro'Wl1-grooved Shrimp

  5. Proceedings of the Latin American Shrimp Culture Congress

    E-print Network

    Proceedings of the 1st Latin American Shrimp Culture Congress Panama, October 6-10, 1998 Environmental factors affecting burrowing of brown shrimp Farfantepenaeus aztecus and white shrimp Litopenaeus Burrowing in the substrate by penaeid shrimps is a common behavior that appears to increase survival rates

  6. MFR PAPER 1267 Development of a Selective Shrimp Trawl

    E-print Network

    MFR PAPER 1267 Development of a Selective Shrimp Trawl for the Southeastern United States Penaeid Shrimp Fisheries JOHN W. WATSON, Jr. and CHARLES McVEA, Jr. ABSTRACT-Preliminary designs and evaluations are presented of experimental selective shrimp trawls for use in the southeastern United States penaeid shrimp

  7. Shrimp diseases and current diagnostic methods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. V Lightner; R. M Redman

    1998-01-01

    In less than 30 yr, the penaeid shrimp culture industries of the world developed from their experimental beginnings into major industries providing hundreds of thousands of jobs, billions of U.S. dollars in revenue, and augmentation of the world's food supply with a high value crop. Concomitant with the growth of the shrimp culture industry has been the recognition of the

  8. Molecular mechanisms of the shrimp clotting system.

    PubMed

    Maningas, Mary Beth B; Kondo, Hidehiro; Hirono, Ikuo

    2013-04-01

    Shrimp, like other invertebrates, relies solely on its innate immune system, to combat invading pathogens. The invertebrate immune system has ancient origins that involve cellular and humoral responses. The clotting system of the humoral immune response is the first line of defense against pathogens and also serves to prevent blood loss during injury and wound healing. Tranglutaminase and clotting protein are molecules involved in the blood clotting system of crayfish and shrimp. Studies have shown that the shrimp clotting system is linked with the activation of antimicrobial peptides, similar to that of the horseshoe crab. Unlike the horseshoe crab and crayfish blood coagulation which are well studied systems, blood clotting in shrimp remains poorly understood. Here we review the shrimp clotting system and its involvement in innate immunity. PMID:23044383

  9. The biology of Oikopleura dioica and Fritillaria borealis in the Southern Bight

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Wyatt; J. G. K. Harris

    1973-01-01

    The biology of populations of Oikopleura dioica Fol and Fritillaria borealis Lohmann in the Southern Bight of the North Sea is deseribed on the basis of plankton collections made in 1962, 1963, and 1968. The distribution of appendicularians is related to the hydrography of the region, and it has been possible to follow the history of individual patches through several

  10. The membrane systems of the cardiac muscle cell of Cirolana borealis Lilljeborg (Crustacea, Isopoda)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Tjønneland; R. Myklebust; H. Jensen

    1975-01-01

    The membrane systems of the cardiac muscle cell of the isopod Cirolana borealis Lilljeborg are described. The sarcolemma invaginates at the level of the Z band, forming transverse tubules. Narrow tubules branch off in a longitudinal direction from these transverse and radially arranged TZ-tubules forming a transverse collar at each A-I level, where dyadic and triadic junctions are formed with

  11. Archaeorhizomyces borealis sp. nov. and a sequence-based classification of related soil fungal species.

    PubMed

    Menkis, Audrius; Urbina, Hector; James, Timothy Y; Rosling, Anna

    2014-12-01

    The class Archaeorhizomycetes (Taphrinomycotina, Ascomycota) was introduced to accommodate an ancient lineage of soil-inhabiting fungi found in association with plant roots. Based on environmental sequencing data Archaeorhizomycetes may comprise a significant proportion of the total fungal community in soils. Yet the only species described and cultivated in this class is Archaeorhizomyces finlayi. In this paper, we describe a second species from a pure culture, Archaeorhizomyces borealis NS99-600(T) (=CBS138755(ExT)) based on morphological, physiological, and multi-locus molecular characterization. Archaeorhizomyces borealis was isolated from a root tip of a Pinus sylvestris seedling grown in a forest nursery in Lithuania. Analysis of Archaeorhizomycete species from environmental samples shows that it has a Eurasian distribution and is the most commonly observed species. Archaeorhizomyces borealis shows slow growth in culture and forms yellowish creamy colonies, characteristics that distinguish A. borealis from its closest relative A. finlayi. Here we also propose a sequence-based taxonomic classification of Archaeorhizomycetes and predict that approximately 500 species in this class remain to be isolated and described. PMID:25457942

  12. The MACHO Project LMC Variable Star Inventory. X. The R Coronae Borealis Stars

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Alcock; R. A. Allsman; D. R. Alves; T. S. Axelrod; A. Becker; D. P. Bennett; Geoffrey C. Clayton; K. H. Cook; N. Dalal; A. J. Drake; K. C. Freeman; M. Geha; K. D. Gordon; K. Griest; D. Kilkenny; S. L. Marshall; D. Minniti; K. A. Misselt; C. A. Nelson; B. A. Peterson; P. Popowski; M. R. Pratt; P. J. Quinn; C. W. Stubbs; W. Sutherland; A. Tomaney; T. Vandehei; D. L. Welch

    2001-01-01

    We report the discovery of eight new R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using the MACHO project photometry database. The discovery of these new stars increases the number of known RCB stars in the LMC to thirteen. We have also discovered four stars similar to the Galactic variable DY Per. These stars decline much more

  13. Self-Correlation Analysis of R Coronae Borealis Stars: A Pilot Project

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John R. Percy; Kaushala Bandara; J. Donald Fernie; P. L. Cottrell; Ljiljana Skuljan

    2004-01-01

    R. Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars are peculiar yellow supergiant stars which suddenly and unpredictably decrease in brightness by up to several magnitudes, then slowly return to normal. Most (perhaps all) RCB stars also pulsate, and the pulsations may be related to the ejection of the dust clouds which produce the fadings. As a pilot project, we have applied self-correlation analysis

  14. HEARING AND HUNTING IN RED BATS (LASIURUS BOREALIS, VESPERTILIONIDAE): AUDIOGRAM AND EAR PROPERTIES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MARTIN K. OBRIST; JEFFREY J. WENSTRUP

    We examined aspects of hearing in the red bat (Lasiurus borealis) related to its use of biosonar. Evoked potential audiograms, obtained from volume-conducted auditory brainstem responses, were obtained in two bats, and the sound pressure transformation of the pinna was measured in three specimens. Field-recorded echolocation signals were analysed for comparison. The fundamental sonar search calls sweep from 45 to

  15. R Coronae Borealis stars in the Galactic bulge discovered by EROS2

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Tisserand; J. B. Marquette; P. R. Wood; É. Lesquoy; J. P. Beaulieu; A. Milsztajn; C. Hamadache; C. Afonso; J. N. Albert; J. Andersen; R. Ansari; É. Aubourg; P. Bareyre; X. Charlot; C. Coutures; R. Ferlet; P. Fouqué; J. F. Glicenstein; B. Goldman; A. Gould; M. Gros; J. Haissinski; J. de Kat; L. Le Guillou; C. Loup; C. Magneville; É. Maurice; A. Maury; M. Moniez; N. Palanque-Delabrouille; O. Perdereau; Y. Rahal; J. Rich; M. Spiro; A. Vidal-Madjar; S. Zylberajch

    2008-01-01

    Context: Rare types of variable stars may provide unique insight into short-lived stages of stellar evolution. The systematic monitoring of millions of stars and advanced light curve analysis techniques of microlensing surveys make them ideal for discovering such rare variable stars. One example is the R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars, a rare type of evolved carbon-rich supergiant. Aims: We have

  16. The Fate of Outflow Channel Effluents in the Northern Lowlands of Mars: The Vastitas Borealis Formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. A. Kreslavsky; J. W. Head

    2001-01-01

    We study the morphology of the Northern Lowlands of Mars primarily with MGS MOLA data. Most of the Northern Lowlands is covered with the Vastitas Borealis Formation (VBF), which has a distinctive kilometer-scale roughness signature. It has sharp boundaries clearly seen in the map of kilometer-scale roughness. We suggest that the VBF was formed of sediments brought by the water

  17. Phytophthora borealis and Phytophthora riparia, new species in Phytophthora ITS Clade 6.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Everett M; Reeser, Paul W; Sutton, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    Phytophthora borealis and Phytophthora riparia, identified in recent Phytophthora surveys of forest streams in Oregon, California and Alaska, are described as new species in Phytophthora ITS Clade 6. They are similar in growth form and morphology to P. gonapodyides and are predominantly sterile. They present unique DNA sequences, however, and differ in temperature/growth relations and geographic distribution. PMID:22778166

  18. The Norris Survey of the Corona Borealis Supercluster: III. Structure and Mass of the Supercluster

    E-print Network

    Todd A. Small; Chung-Pei Ma; Wallace L. W. Sargent; Donald Hamilton

    1997-08-16

    (Abridged) We present a study of the structure and dynamics of the Corona Borealis Supercluster (z ~ 0.07) based on the redshifts for 528 galaxies in the supercluster. The galaxy distribution within Corona Borealis is clumpy and appears overall to be far from relaxed. A background supercluster at z ~ 0.11 makes a substantial contribution to the projected surface density of galaxies in the Corona Borealis field. In order to estimate the mass of the supercluster, we have assumed that the mass of the supercluster is proportional to v^2r, where v and r are suitable scale velocity and radius, respectively, and we have used N-body simulations of both critical- and low-density universes to determine the applicability of standard mass estimators based on this assumption. Although superclusters are obviously not in equilibrium, our simulations demonstrate that the virial mass estimator yields mass estimates with an insignificant bias and a dispersion of only ~25% for objects with overdensities >~ 5. Non-uniform spatial sampling can, however, cause systematic underestimates by as much as 30%. All of our simulated superclusters turn out to be bound, and based on the overdensity of the Corona Borealis supercluster, we believe it is also very likely to be bound and may well have started to collapse. The mass of Corona Borealis is at least 3 x 10^16 solar masses, which yields a B(AB)-band mass-to-light ratio of 564h (M/L)_solar on scales of ~20 h^-1 Mpc. The background supercluster has a mass-to-light ratio of 726h (M/L)_solar. By comparing the supercluster mass-to-light ratios with the critical mass-to-light ratio required to close the universe, we determine that Omega_0 >~ 0.4 on supercluster scales.

  19. THE EFFECTS OF SDRNFLRFamide AND TNRNFLRFamide ON THE MOTOR PATTERNS OF THE STOMATOGASTRIC GANGLION OF THE CRAB CANCER BOREALIS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JAMES M. WEIMANN; EVE MARDER

    Summary TNRNFLRFamide was isolated and sequenced from the stomatogastric nervous system of the crab Cancer borealis by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography followed by automated Edman degradation. An SDRNFLRFamide-like peptide that exactly co-migrated with SDRNFLRFamide was also observed. The effects of TNRNFLRFamide and SDRNFLRFamide on the gastric and pyloric rhythms of the stomatogastric nervous system of the crab Cancer borealis

  20. MFR PAPER 103 0 An important shrimp

    E-print Network

    . The last mentioned method . wh ich is conduct- ed on a large scale along the east coast of Sumatra increas- in g activities in the local shrimp fish- eries along the north coast of J a\\ a and south Sumatra

  1. Characterization of shrimp Drosha in virus infection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tianzhi; Xu, Dandan; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2012-09-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) mediated by microRNA (miRNA) is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of posttranscriptional gene regulation in all eukaryotes, involving in natural antiviral immunity. The RNAase III Drosha is a key component for miRNA maturation. To date, however, the roles of Drosha in virus infection remain to be addressed. In this study, the Drosha was characterized in Marsupenaeus japonicus shrimp. The sequence analysis revealed that the shrimp Drosha gene encoded a 1081-amino-acid peptide, which comprised two tandem ribonuclease III C terminal domains and a double-stranded RNA binding motif. The shrimp Drosha was homologous with those of other animal species. The quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that the Drosha gene was highly expressed in lymphoid organ and was significantly up-regulated in response to WSSV challenge, suggesting that the Drosha was involved in the antiviral immunity of shrimp. The results showed that the knock down of Drosha gene led to the defect of miRNA maturation, and subsequent higher virus loads in shrimp. Our study presented that Drosha played important roles in the antiviral defense of shrimp. PMID:22796424

  2. Global Changes Impact the Texas Shrimp Changes in the global shrimp industry have created a

    E-print Network

    Global Changes Impact the Texas Shrimp Industry Changes in the global shrimp industry have created of Agriculture again offered the Trade Adjustment Assistance Program (TAA) for those industries, including to maintain their eligibility. Agents then scheduled 26 Intensive Training (IT) meetings so approved

  3. THE SHRIMP AND THE SHRIMP FISHERY OF THE SOUTHERN UNITED STATES

    E-print Network

    . --Gulf of Mexico medium sized shrimp trawler. ~h ree s p e cies of shrimp, all members of fam ily (Penae rimp have t he t th ree pairs of thoracic or w a lking leg s which there are f ive pairs in all) ending

  4. Shrimp Antimicrobial Testing. II. Toxicity Testing and Safety Determination for Twelve Antimicrobials with Penaeid Shrimp Larvae

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rodney R. Williams; Thomas A. Bell; Donald V. Lightner

    1992-01-01

    The need for federally approved chemotherapeutants for use in domestic shrimp culture in the USA is acute. A summary of toxicity testing of 12 antimicrobials against penaeid shrimp larvae is presented. In addition, the toxicity data are examined in concert with previously reported data on minimum inhibitory concentrations to establish a therapeutic index (a measure of margin of safety) for

  5. Expression and localization of an ice nucleating protein from a soil bacterium, Pseudomonas borealis.

    PubMed

    Vanderveer, Tara L; Choi, Julie; Miao, Denian; Walker, Virginia K

    2014-08-01

    An ice nucleating protein (INP) coding region with 66% sequence identity to the INP of Pseudomonas syringae was previously cloned from P. borealis, a plant beneficial soil bacterium. Ice nucleating activity (INA) in the P. borealis DL7 strain was highest after transfer of cultures to temperatures just above freezing. The corresponding INP coding sequence (inaPb or ina) was used to construct recombinant plasmids, with recombinant expression visualized using a green fluorescent protein marker (gfp encoding GFP). Although the P. borealis strain was originally isolated by ice-affinity, bacterial cultures with membrane-associated INP-GFP did not adsorb to pre-formed ice. Employment of a shuttle vector allowed expression of ina-gfp in both Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas cells. At 27 °C, diffuse fluorescence appeared throughout the cells and was associated with low INA. However, after transfer of cultures to 4 °C, the protein localized to the poles coincident with high INA. Transformants with truncated INP sequences ligated to either gfp, or an antifreeze protein-gfp fusion showed that the repetitive ice-nucleation domain was not necessary for localization. Such localization is consistent with the flanking residues of the INP associating with a temperature-dependent secretion apparatus. A polar location would facilitate INP-INP interactions resulting in the formation of larger aggregates, serving to increase INA. Expression of INPs by P. borealis could function as an efficient atmospheric dispersal mechanism for these soil bacteria, which are less likely to use these proteins for nutrient procurement, as has been suggested for P. syringae. PMID:24930584

  6. White dwarf mergers and the origin of R Coronae Borealis stars

    E-print Network

    Lorén-Aguilar, P; José, J; García-Berro, E; Althaus, L G; Isern, J

    2011-01-01

    We present a nucleosynthesis study of the merger of a 0.4 solar masses helium white dwarf with a 0.8 solar masses carbon-oxygen white dwarf, coupling the thermodynamic history of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics particles with a post-processing code. The resulting chemical abundance pattern, particularly for oxygen and fluorine, is in qualitative agreement with the observed abundances in R Coronae Borealis stars.

  7. EROS 2 photometry of probable R Coronae Borealis stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Tisserand; J. B. Marquette; J. P. Beaulieu; P. de Laverny; É. Lesquoy; A. Milsztajn; C. Afonso; J. N. Albert; J. Andersen; R. Ansari; É. Aubourg; P. Bareyre; F. Bauer; G. Blanc; X. Charlot; C. Coutures; F. Derue; R. Ferlet; P. Fouqué; J. F. Glicenstein; B. Goldman; A. Gould; D. Graff; M. Gros; J. Haissinski; C. Hamadache; J. de Kat; T. Lasserre; L. Le Guillou; C. Loup; C. Magneville; B. Mansoux; É. Maurice; A. Maury; M. Moniez; N. Palanque-Delabrouille; O. Perdereau; L. Prévot; Y. Rahal; N. Regnault; J. Rich; M. Spiro; A. Vidal-Madjar; L. Vigroux; S. Zylberajch

    2004-01-01

    EROS 2 (Expérience de Recherche d'Objets Sombres) conducted a survey of the SMC between July 1996 and February 2003 in two EROS broad-band colours, VE and RE. The photometric data of 4.2 million stars have been searched for behaviour typical of R Coronae Borealis (RCB) candidates such as drastic changes in magnitude. Five objects have been found, four of them

  8. REVISION OF THE PENAEID SHRIMP GENUS PENAEOPSIS (CRUSTACEA: DECAPODA)

    E-print Network

    REVISION OF THE PENAEID SHRIMP GENUS PENAEOPSIS (CRUSTACEA: DECAPODA) IsABEL PEREZ FARFANTE1 ABSTJ is restricted to the Atlantic, where it is present on both the eastern and west- ern slopes. These shrimps

  9. Investment in Gulf of Mexico Shrimp Vessels, 1965-77

    E-print Network

    . In the 1970's, a few vessels built ofconcrete, aluminum, and metallic alloys were introduced, but they have, cast nets, and traps to harvest shrimp. Today's shrimp vessels, built of wood, steel, or fiberglass

  10. SPATIAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF BURROWING SHRIMP POPULATIONS IN TWO OREGON ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thalassinid burrowing shrimp (Neotrypaea californiensis and Upogebia pugettensis) inhabit large expanses of Pacific estuarine tide flats, from British Columbia to Baja California. The spatial distribution of shrimp populations within estuaries has rarely been quantified because ...

  11. A new process for advanced utilisation of shrimp waste

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Asbjørn Gildberg; Even Stenberg

    2001-01-01

    A high quality chitosan for application in cosmetics can be produced from the processing waste of Northern shrimp (Pandalusborealis). A major fraction of the shrimp waste is protein tissues, which are normally wasted during conventional chitosan preparation. The present work shows that the shrimp waste proteins can be hydrolysed by a commercially available protease (Alcalase) and recovered as a protein

  12. INTERSEX ANOMALIES IN SHRIMP OF THE GENUS PENAEOPSIS (CRUSTACEA: PENAEIDAE)

    E-print Network

    NOTES INTERSEX ANOMALIES IN SHRIMP OF THE GENUS PENAEOPSIS (CRUSTACEA: PENAEIDAE) excavate, blunt of the fifth pair of pereopods. The shrimps were poorly preserved-the exoskeletons were soft, rostrums distinct and the external genitalia intact. The discovery of these shrimp elicits several questions

  13. DISTRIBUTION AND YIELD OF THE DEEPWATER SHRIMP HETEROCARPUS RESOURCE

    E-print Network

    DISTRIBUTION AND YIELD OF THE DEEPWATER SHRIMP HETEROCARPUS RESOURCE IN THE MARIANAS ROBERT B. MOFFITT AND JEFFREY J. POLOVINA! ABSTRACf A shrimp trapping survey was conducted at 22 islands and banks in the Mariana Archipelago during a 2-year field period. Three species of deepwater shrimp were found

  14. SURVEY OF SHRIMP FISHERIES OF CENTRAL AND SOUTH AMERICA

    E-print Network

    SURVEY OF SHRIMP FISHERIES OF CENTRAL AND SOUTH AMERICA Marine Biological Laboratory LIBH A.R.7br Department of the Interior, Fred A. Seaton, Secretaiy Fish and Wildlife Service SURVEY OF SHRIMP FISHERIES- tialities of the shrimp fisheries of Latin America as a source of supply for the United States market

  15. ELECTROPHORETIC COMPARISON OF FIVE SPECIES OF PANDALID SHRIMP FROM

    E-print Network

    ELECTROPHORETIC COMPARISON OF FIVE SPECIES OF PANDALID SHRIMP FROM THE NORTHEASTERN PACIFIC OCEAN ALLYN G. JOHNSON, FRED M. UTTER, AND HAROLD O. HODGINS' ABSTRACT Pandalid shrimp from o~ Alaska speCIes mvestIgated. The increase of commercial fishing for shrimp along the Pacific coast of North

  16. Penaeid shrimp fisheries and hatcheries have undergone an accelerated devel-

    E-print Network

    674 Penaeid shrimp fisheries and hatcheries have undergone an accelerated devel- opment during, etc.) countries. Business based on penaeid shrimp trading may be considered as having two components the consumption of imported shrimp has long exceeded landings from their domestic fisheries (Lightner et al., 1997

  17. LENGTH-WEIGHT RELATION IN THE COMMON OR WHITE SHRIMP

    E-print Network

    LENGTH-WEIGHT RELATION IN THE COMMON OR WHITE SHRIMP PENAEUS SETIFERUS Marine Biological, Arnie J. Suomela, Commissioner LENGTH-WEIGHT RELATION IN THE COMMON OR WHITE SHRIMP, PENAEUS SETIFERUS. C. May 1958 #12;#12;LENGTH-WEIGHT RELATION IN THE COMMON OR WHITE SHRIMP , PENAEUS SETIFERUS

  18. Diel and Seasonal Occurrence of Pink Shrimp, Penaeus duorarum

    E-print Network

    Diel and Seasonal Occurrence of Pink Shrimp, Penaeus duorarum Burkenroad, in Two Divergent Habitats, Director Diel and Seasonal Occurrence of Pink Shrimp, Penaeus duorarum Burkenroad, in Two Divergent and equipment 2 Diel fluctuations of catch and size of pink shrimp in relation to light 2 Seasonal changes

  19. SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF PINK SHRIMP, Penaeus duorarum, AND FLEET

    E-print Network

    56 SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF PINK SHRIMP, Penaeus duorarum, AND FLEET CONCENTRATIONS ON THE TORTUGAS of Commercial Fisheries, Donald L. McKernan, Director SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF PINK SHRIMP, Penaeus duorarum Acknowledgments 3 Methods and materials 3 Vessels and gear 3 Observations of fleet activity 5 Shrimp discards 6

  20. Review article Emerging viral diseases of fish and shrimp

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Review article Emerging viral diseases of fish and shrimp Peter J. WALKER 1*, James R. WINTON 2 1 and characteristics of aquaculture, the major viral pathogens of fish and shrimp and their impacts, and the particular the challenges presented by climate change. disease emergence / shrimp / fish / virus Table of contents 1

  1. ,SHRIMP RESEARCH ABOARD SOVIET SHIP IN GULF OF ALASKA

    E-print Network

    ,SHRIMP RESEARCH ABOARD SOVIET SHIP IN GULF OF ALASKA Robert J . Wolotira Jr . One r esult- gate the shrimp resources in the Gulf of Alaska. The Soviet re s earch ves s e l 'Krill ' surveyed the shrimp species from south of the Alaska Peninsula near Kodiak Island. In 1970, this area yielded

  2. Sanitation Guidelines for the Breaded-Shrimp Industry

    E-print Network

    Sanitation Guidelines for the Breaded-Shrimp Industry UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH for the Breaded-Shrimp Industry By JOE P. CLEM and E. SPENCER GARRETT Circular 308 Washington, D.C. November 1968 Dress 12 Habits 13 Supervision 14 in #12;#12;Sanitation Guidelines for the Breaded-Shrimp Industry

  3. Correlation of winter temperature and landings of pink shrimp

    E-print Network

    Correlation of winter temperature and landings of pink shrimp Penaeus duorarum in North Carolina model was retained. The new re- gression to determine spring pink shrimp landings in North Carolina shrimp Penaeus duorarum in the North Carolina spring fishery, February-July, based on average water

  4. In northern South America, the ghost shrimp Lepidophthalmus

    E-print Network

    526 In northern South America, the ghost shrimp Lepidophthalmus sinuensis Lemaitre and Rodrigues), this adaptation also includes sediments of tropical, estuarine ponds in which penaeid shrimp are cultured. Dense accumulations of ghost shrimp in these penaeid culture ponds are favored by their abbrevi- ated larval

  5. DOUBLE-RIG SHRIMP TRAWLING IN THE GULF OF MEXICO

    E-print Network

    DOUBLE-RIG SHRIMP TRAWLING IN THE GULF OF MEXICO , , FISB AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Vaited Sial, Commissioner Bureau of Commercial Fisheries, Donald L. McKernan, Director DOUBLE-RIG SHRIMP TRAWLING . . . . . · . . . · Figure 1 2 3 4 lUUSTRATIONS Details of the rigging arrangements req ired for double-rig shrimp trawl ing

  6. Surface-to-Bottom Pot Fishing for Pandalid Shrimp

    E-print Network

    560 Surface-to-Bottom Pot Fishing for Pandalid Shrimp Marlr aboralory library FEB 1 2 1968 WOODS Fisheries, H. E. Crowther, Director Surface-to-Bottom Pot Fishing for Pandalid Shrimp By LOUIS BARR fishing 6 Literature cited 6 #12;#12;Surface-to-Bottom Pot Fishing for Pandalid Shrimp By LOUIS BARR

  7. SHORT COMMUNICATION Nitrogen recovery from shrimp pond efuent

    E-print Network

    Lorenzen, Kai

    SHORT COMMUNICATION Nitrogen recovery from shrimp pond ef¯uent: dissolved nitrogen removal has nutrients is widely seen as a key environmental management problem in intensive shrimp farming and other, for example, is incorporated into shrimp tissue, while the remain- der is lost to the pond and, ultimately

  8. Difficult Economic Times Continue for the Shrimp Industry

    E-print Network

    Difficult Economic Times Continue for the Shrimp Industry Calendar year 2011 marked the 10th consecutive year of an industry-wide economic crisis across the Gulf and South Atlantic shrimp industry. In addition to continued low prices for shrimp, the cost of diesel fuel remains relatively high

  9. JANUARY TO APRIL DISTRIBUTION OF THE COMMON SHRIMP ON THE

    E-print Network

    JANUARY TO APRIL DISTRIBUTION OF THE COMMON SHRIMP ON THE SOUTH ATLANTIC CONTINENTAL SHELF Marine L. Farley, Director JANUARY TO APRIL DISTRIBUTION OF THE COMMON SHRIMP ON THE SOUTH ATLANTIC Coast of the United States, are summarized with respect to distribution of Peneid shrimp. It appears

  10. DYNAMICS OF A PENAEID SHRIMP POPULATION AND MANAGEMENT IMPLICATIONS

    E-print Network

    DYNAMICS OF A PENAEID SHRIMP POPULATION AND MANAGEMENT IMPLICATIONS By JOSEPH H. KUTKUHN, Fishery utilization of a stock of pink shrimp (Penaeidae) that supports an important com- mercial fishery or not the fishery's production could be improved by postponing the start of fishing until the shrimp reach a size

  11. Burrowing shrimp as foundation species in NE Pacific estuaries

    EPA Science Inventory

    My talk will be about the my research to characterize the role that burrowing shrimp play as foundation/engineering species in Pacific NW estuaries. My research has focused on measuring the abundance & distribution of two species (ghost shrimp & mud shrimp) at ecosystem scales, ...

  12. Simulation of nitrogen dynamics and shrimp growth in an intensive shrimp culture system: effects of feed and feeding parameters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ruby A. Montoya; A. L. Lawrence; W. E. Grant; M. Velaso

    1999-01-01

    Worldwide increases in shrimp culture have caused concern about potential environmental impacts, particularly water pollution resulting from discharge of nitrogenous wastes from shrimp farms. This study describes development of a simulation model representing the effect of feed nutritional quality, feed physical characteristics, and feeding strategies on nitrogen dynamics and growth of the Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei, in intensive systems

  13. Participation of U. S. Trawlers in the Offshore Shrimp Fisheries of

    E-print Network

    Participation of U. S. Trawlers in the Offshore Shrimp Fisheries of French Guiana, Surinam working group met in Panama in 1979 and reviewed the existing knowledge of the Gui- anas-Brazil shrimp-Brazil shrimp grounds (Fig. 1), harbor four commercial species of shrimp: Brown shrimp, Penaeus subti/is; pink

  14. Alkanes in shrimp from the Buccaneer Oil Field

    SciTech Connect

    Middleditch, B.S.; Basile, B.; Chang, E.S.

    1982-07-01

    A total of 36 samples of shrimp were examined from the region of the Buccaneer oil field, eighteen of which were representatives of the commercial species Penaeus aztecus and the rest were various other species: Penaeus duorarum (pink shrimp), Trachypenaeus duorarum (sugar shrimp), Squilla empusa (mantis shrimp), and Sicyonia dorsalis (chevron shrimp). The alkanes and deuteriated alkanes were completely separated by GC, so a mass spectrometer was not required for their detection and quantitation. To confirm the identities of individual compounds, however, some samples were examined by combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results show that only thirteen of the forty shrimp collected from the region of the Buccaneer oil field contained petroleum alkanes, and the majority of these were obtained from trawls immediately adjacent to the production platforms. It appears that shrimp caught in the region of the Buccaneer oil field are not appreciably tainted with hydrocarbons discharged from the production platforms. (JMT)

  15. Antibiotic-Resistant Vibrios in Farmed Shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque Costa, Renata; Araújo, Rayza Lima; Souza, Oscarina Viana; Vieira, Regine Helena Silva dos Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern was determined in 100 strains of Vibrio isolated from the Litopenaeus vannamei shrimp and identified phenotypically. A high antibiotic-resistance index (75%) was observed, with the following phenotypic profiles: monoresistance (n = 42), cross-resistance to ?-lactams (n = 20) and multiple resistance (n = 13). Plasmid resistance was characterized for penicillin (n = 11), penicillin + ampicillin (n = 1), penicillin + aztreonam (n = 1), and ampicillin (n = 1). Resistance to antimicrobial drugs by the other strains (n = 86) was possibly mediated by chromosomal genes. The findings of this study support the conclusion that the cultured shrimps can be vehicles of vibrios resistant to ?-lactam and tetracycline. PMID:25918714

  16. Pathogenicity of Bacillus thuringiensis for penaeid shrimp

    E-print Network

    Lehrer, Janis Ellen

    1979-01-01

    PATHOGENICITY OF BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS FOR PENAEID SHRIMP A Thesis by JANIS ELLEN LEHRER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SC1ENCE August 1979... Major Subject: Biology PATHOGENICITY OF BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS FOR PENAEID SHRIMP A Thesis by JANIS ELLEN LEHRER Approved as to style and content by: r. ohn R. Schwarz (C Chairman of Committee) P4Lf. ks~ Dr. S. M. (C5-Chai n of C 'ttee) Dr...

  17. Drilling Polar Oceans with the European Research Icebreaker AURORA BOREALIS: the IODP Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lembke-Jene, Lester; Wolff-Boenisch, Bonnie; Azzolini, Roberto; Thiede, Joern; Biebow, Nicole; Eldholm, Olav; Egerton, Paul

    2010-05-01

    Polar oceans are characterized by extreme environmental conditions for humans and materials, and have remained the least accessible regions to scientists of the IODP. DSDP and ODP have for long faced specific technical and logistical problems when attempting to drill in ice-covered polar deep-sea basins. The Arctic Ocean and large areas of the high-latitude Southern Ocean remained largely un-sampled by ODP and remain one of the major scientific and technological challenges for IODP. Drilling in these regions has been discussed and anticipated for decades and the scientific rationales are reflected in the science plans of the international Nansen Arctic Drilling Program (NAD) or the Arctic Program Planning Group (APPG) of ODP/IODP, amongst others. More recently, the rationale to investigate the polar oceans in a holistic approach has been outlined by workshops, leading to strategic assessments of the scientific potential and new drilling proposals. The European Polar Board took the initiative to develop a plan for a novel and dedicated research icebreaker with technical capabilities hitherto unrealised. This research icebreaker will enable autonomous operations in the central Arctic Ocean and the Southern Ocean, even during the severest ice conditions in the deep winter, serving all marine disciplines of polar research including scientific drilling: The European Research Icebreaker and Deep-Sea Drilling Vessel AURORA BOREALIS. AURORA BOREALIS is presently planned as a multi-purpose vessel. The ship can be deployed as a research icebreaker in all polar waters during any season of the year, as it shall meet the specifications of the highest ice-class attainable (IACS Polar Code 1) for icebreakers. During the times when it is not employed for drilling, it will operate as the most technically advanced multi-disciplinary research vessel in the Arctic or polar Southern Ocean. AURORA BOREALIS will be a "European scientific flagship facility" (fully open to non-European partners), a multidisciplinary platform for studies ranging from the sub-seafloor into the atmosphere. AURORA BOREALIS was planned for her role in deep-sea drilling in consultation with engineers and technical experts familiar with the program and the operation of these vessels. All techniques currently deployed on IODP expeditions can be implemented onboard the vessel under polar weather and ice conditions, including the full range of re-entry, casing and cementing, and instrumentation options and the entire suite of downhole logging tools. Due to sufficient laboratory space, a full analytical workflow can be easily established comparable to existing permanent platforms, including clean rooms, diverse scanning and logging or incubation facilities. While the vessel is equipped with a dedicated deep-sea drilling rig, other coring and drilling techniques can be employed if needed (e.g. Rockdrill, MEBO, large diameter Kasten cores). AURORA BOREALIS is fitted to operate a CALYPSO Piston Coring System in polar waters. Future mud-return systems under consideration and testing for IODP to provide controlled borehole conditions in difficult facies are compatible with the layout of AURORA BOREALIS. The berthing capacity of 120 personnel total (scientists, technical support and crew) allows to accommodate a sufficient number of science party members offshore. The present scientific implementation documents plan for about one polar scientific drilling expedition per year in a to-be-determined configuration. As the vessel is a multi-dsiciplinary platform, operations for the entire year are not dependant on drilling operations alone. While principal access to the vessel will be based on a competitive proposal review and evaluation system, the allocation of timeslots specifically for drilling would preferably be given over to IODP handling and planning systems in a cooperative mode using the strengths and capacitites of the future program. Depending on interests and needs of the scientific communities a preferential focus in non-drilling expedition planning could be e

  18. Species profiles: Life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (Pacific Northwest): Ghost shrimp and blue mud shrimp

    SciTech Connect

    Horning, S.; Sterling, A.; Smith, S.D.

    1989-01-01

    Species profiles are literature summaries of the taxonomy, morphology, range, life history, and environmental requirements of coastal aquatic species. The profiles are prepared to assist in environmental impact assessments. The ghost shrimp (Callianassa californiensis) and blue mud shrimp (Upogebia pugettensis) are common residents of intertidal mudflats of the Pacific Northwest, as well as of the entire West Coast of the contiguous United States. These species are decapod crustaceans, but not true shrimp. They are harvested as bait by recreational and commercial oyster-growing operations. Ghost shrimp larvae develop in summer in nearshore coastal waters and settle to the substrate surface, where they rapidly metamorphose; the life cycle of the blue mud shrimp is presumed to be similar. Both species spend their lives in burrows in the mudflat, where the ghost shrimp is primarily a deposit feeder and the blue mud shrimp is a suspension feeder.

  19. AURORA BOREALIS - Icebreaker, Drilling Platform and Multi-Purpose Research Vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz-Pirrung, M.; Biebow, N.; Lembke-Jene, L.; Thiede, J.; Egerton, P.

    2007-12-01

    In spite of the critical role of the Arctic Ocean in climate evolution, it is the only sub-basin of the world's oceans that has essentially not been sampled by the drill ships of the Deep-Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) or the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP), and its long-term environmental history and tectonic structure is therefore poorly known. Exceptions are the ODP Leg 151 and the more recent very successful ACEX-expedition of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP). This lack of data represents one of the largest gaps of information in modern Earth Science. Therefore, the new research icebreaker AURORA BOREALIS will be equipped with drilling facilities to fulfil the needs of the IODP for a -Mission-Specific Platform- to drill in deep, permanently ice-covered ocean basins. This icebreaker must be also powerful enough to maintain station against the drifting sea-ice cover and will have to be equipped with a dynamic positioning system. This new icebreaker would be conceived as an optimized science platform from the keel up and will allow conducting long, international and interdisciplinary expeditions into the central Arctic Ocean during all seasons of the year. In a long-term perspective the AURORA BOREALIS will also be used to address Antarctic research targets, both in its mode as a regular research vessel as well as a polar drill ship. The construction of AURORA BOREALIS requires several new technical implementations, such as advanced dynamic positioning and deep-sea drilling under a closed sea-ice cover and two moon pools (7 x 7 m), and will provide an extended technical potential and knowledge for marine technology. The scientific and technical details will be presented.

  20. AURORA BOREALIS - Development of a New Research Icebreaker with Drilling Capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiede, J.; Biebow, N.; Egerton, P.; Kunz-Pirrung, M.; Lembke-Jene, L.

    2007-12-01

    Polar research both on land and in the sea cannot achieve the needed progress without novel and state of the art technologies and infrastructure. In addition, we have the obligation to equip the upcoming young and courageous generation of polar researchers with the most modern and safest research platforms the 21st century can provide. This effort will require major investments, both in terms of generating new tools, as well as maintaining and renovating existing infrastructure. There are many different novel tools under development for polar research, we will concentrate on the presently largest one, the planning for a new type of research icebreaker, the AURORA BOREALIS with an all-season capability of operations in permanently ice-covered waters and with the possibility to carry out deep-sea drilling in ice-covered deep-sea basins. AURORA BOREALIS will be the most advanced Polar Research Vessel in the world with a multi-functional role of drilling in deep ocean basins and supporting climate and environmental research and decision support for stakeholder governments for the next 35 to 40 years. The vessel is planned as a large research icebreaker with 44,000 tons displacement and a length of up to 196 m, with about 50 Megawatt propulsion power. Advanced technological features will include azimuth propulsion systems, extensive instrumental and airborne ice- management support, and the routine operation of Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV) and Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) from two moon-pools. An unique feature of this icebreaker will be the drilling rig that will enable sampling of the ocean floor and sub-sea down to 5000 m water depth and 1000 m penetration at the most inhospitable places on earth. The possibility to flexibly equip the ship with laboratory and supply containers, and the variable arrangement of other modular infrastructure (in particular, winches, cranes, etc.), free deck- space, and separate protected deck areas, will allow the planned research vessel to cover the needs of most disciplines in marine research. aurora-borealis.eu/en/about_aurora_borealis/

  1. Probes of large-scale structure in the Corona Borealis region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postman, M.; Huchra, J. P.; Geller, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    The present redshift survey of the Corona Borealis region encompasses redshifts, magnitudes and positions for 83 galaxies covering a 16.4 sq deg region; a complementary survey covers 39.2 sq deg, is complete to m(B)0 of 15.5, and encompasses 37 galaxies. The combined survey furnishes further support for the 'bubble-like' geometry revealed by the shallower CfA survey. The redshift distribution obtained is noted to be very similar to that in the neighboring Bootes region. The structure of voids and surfaces in the galaxy distribution is insensitive to luminosity for M(B)0 of less than about -17.4.

  2. Lysozyme gene expression by hemocytes of Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei, after injection with Vibrio

    E-print Network

    Burnett, Louis E.

    Lysozyme gene expression by hemocytes of Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei, after antibacterial protein produced by shrimp hemocytes, within tissues of Litopenaeus vannamei Boone in response rights reserved. Keywords: Litopenaeus vannamei; Shrimp; Hemocyte; Vibrio; Lysozyme; Gene expression

  3. 78 FR 33347 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From Ecuador: Preliminary Negative Countervailing Duty Determination

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-04

    ...Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From Ecuador: Preliminary Negative Countervailing...of certain frozen warmwater shrimp from Ecuador. The period of investigation is January...of Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp from Ecuador,'' dated concurrently with this...

  4. 78 FR 50389 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From Ecuador: Final Affirmative Countervailing Duty Determination

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ...Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From Ecuador: Final Affirmative Countervailing Duty...warmwater shrimp (frozen shrimp) from Ecuador. For information on the estimated subsidy...this investigation are the Government of Ecuador (the GOE), and two...

  5. 50 CFR 622.201 - South Atlantic rock shrimp limited access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false South Atlantic rock shrimp limited access. 622.201 Section...Atlantic Region § 622.201 South Atlantic rock shrimp limited access. (a) Commercial Vessel Permits for Rock Shrimp (South Atlantic EEZ)....

  6. 50 CFR 622.201 - South Atlantic rock shrimp limited access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false South Atlantic rock shrimp limited access. 622.201 Section...Atlantic Region § 622.201 South Atlantic rock shrimp limited access. (a) Commercial Vessel Permits for Rock Shrimp (South Atlantic EEZ)....

  7. Cobalt-60 gamma irradiation of shrimp

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, N.L.B.

    1993-01-01

    Meta- and ortho-tyrosine were measured using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in conjunction with electrochemical detection in shrimp irradiated using cobalt-60 gamma radiation in the absorbed dose range 0.8 to 6.0 kGy, in nonirradiated shrimp, and in bovine serum albumin (BSA) irradiated in dilute aqueous solution at 25.0 kGy. Ortho-tyrosine was measured in nonirradiated BSA. Para-, meta-, and ortho-tyrosine was measured using HPLC in conjunction with uv-absorption detection in dilute aqueous solutions of phenylalanine irradiated in the absorbed dose range 16.0 to 195.0 kGy. The measured yields of tyrosine isomers were approximately linear as a function of absorbed dose in shrimp, and in irradiated solutions of phenylalanine up to 37.0 kGy. The occurrence of meta- and ortho-tyrosine, which had formerly been considered unique radiolytic products, has not previously been reported in nonirradiated shrimp or BSA. The conventional hydrolyzation and analytical techniques used in the present study to measure meta- and ortho-tyrosine may provide the basis for a method to detect and determine the dose used in food irradiation.

  8. MFR PAPER 1171 Shrimp taste and vitamin

    E-print Network

    MFR PAPER 1171 Shrimp taste and vitamin content did not differ markedly in thermal and microwave been done on vitamin anal '>es of \\egetables cooked b) micro~\\ ave and ~onven ti )nalmean hot spot. by employing peliodic stilTing. Vitamin selected for thi "tud) \\~e;e those \\\\ hich had been

  9. Microbial flora of fresh and stored shrimp 

    E-print Network

    Mroz, Eva

    1970-01-01

    of microorganisms from "pond shrimp" sample 1 plated on media with different waters Genus percenta e distribution of isolates from lates with Seawater Dist. water Achromobacter 0 Alcaligenes Bacillus Coryneform Flavobacterium 0 0 32. 5 47. 5 5. 1 28. 2...

  10. GLUCOSE OXIDASE REDUCES OXIDATION IN FROZEN SHRIMP

    E-print Network

    role oxygen can have during storage of foods (Scott, 1958). Glucose oxidase-catalase preparations are used to carry out the net reaction: 2 glucose + oxygen glucose oxidase > 2 gluconic acid. catalase of glucose oxidase -catalase would probably be more obvious in shrimp, which were packed in transparent bags

  11. Probiotics in shrimp aquaculture: avenues and challenges.

    PubMed

    Ninawe, A S; Selvin, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    As an alternative strategy to antibiotic use in aquatic disease management, probiotics have recently attracted extensive attention in aquaculture. However, the use of terrestrial bacterial species as probiotics for aquaculture has had limited success, as bacterial strain characteristics are dependent upon the environment in which they thrive. Therefore, isolating potential probiotic bacteria from the marine environment in which they grow optimally is a better approach. Bacteria that have been used successfully as probiotics belong to the genus Vibrio and Bacillus, and the species Thalassobacter utilis. Most researchers have isolated these probiotic strains from shrimp culture water, or from the intestine of different penaeid species. The use of probiotic bacteria, based on the principle of competitive exclusion, and the use of immunostimulants are two of the most promising preventive methods developed in the fight against diseases during the last few years. It also noticed that probiotic bacteria could produce some digestive enzymes, which might improve the digestion of shrimp, thus enhancing the ability of stress resistance and health of the shrimp. However, the probiotics in aquatic environment remain to be a controversial concept, as there was no authentic evidence / real environment demonstrations on the successful use of probiotics and their mechanisms of action in vivo. The present review highlights the potential sources of probiotics, mechanism of action, diversity of probiotic microbes and challenges of probiotic usage in shrimp aquaculture. PMID:19514908

  12. Haemolymph parameters of Pacific white shrimp ( Litopenaeus vannamei ) infected with Taura syndrome virus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yen-Ling Song; Chun-I Yu; Tzu-Wen Lien; Chih-Cheng Huang; Min-Nan Lin

    2003-01-01

    Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) were injected with Taura syndrome virus (TSV) to assess shrimp immune responses and survival. TSV-infected shrimp suffered high mortality, but mock-infected and untreated shrimp experienced no mortality. Moribund shrimp were a pale, reddish colour and were lethargic and soft-shelled. Their haemolymph was clear red and coagulated poorly. In TSV-infected shrimp, the total haemocyte count (THC),

  13. High-resolution spectroscopy of the R Coronae Borealis Star V Coronae Australis

    E-print Network

    N. Kameswara Rao; David L. Lambert

    2007-10-26

    Optical high-resolution spectra of the R Coronae Borealis star V CrA at light maximum and during minimum light arediscussed. Abundance analysis confirms previous results showing that V CrA has the composition of the small subclass of R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars know as `minority' RCBs, i.e., the Si/Fe and S/Fe ratios are 100 times their solar values. A notable novel result for RCBs is the detection of the 1-0 Swan system $^{12}$C$^{13}$C bandhead indicating that $^{13}$C is abundant: spectrum synthesis shows that $^{12}$C/$^{13}$C is about 3 to 4. Absorption line profiles are variable at maximum light with some lines showing evidence of splitting by about 10 km s$^{-1}$. A spectrum obtained as the star was recovering from a deep minimum shows the presence of cool C$_2$ molecules with a rotational temperature of about 1200K, a temperature suggestive of gas in which carbon is condensing into soot. The presence of rapidly outflowing gas is shown by blue-shifted absorption components of the Na {\\sc i} D and K {\\sc i} 7698 \\AA resonance lines.

  14. Mass spectrometric measurement of neuropeptide secretion in the crab, Cancer borealis, by in vivo microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhidan; Schmerberg, Claire M; Li, Lingjun

    2015-05-18

    Neuropeptides (NPs), a unique and highly important class of signaling molecules across the animal kingdom, have been extensively characterized in the neuronal tissues of various crustaceans. Because many NPs are released into circulating fluid (hemolymph) and travel to distant sites in order to exhibit physiological effects, it is important to measure the secretion of these NPs from living animals. In this study, we report on extensive characterization of NPs released in the crab Cancer borealis by utilizing in vivo microdialysis to sample NPs from the hemolymph. We determined the necessary duration for collection of microdialysis samples, enabling more comprehensive identification of NP content while maintaining the temporal resolution of sampling. Analysis of in vivo microdialysates using a hybrid quadrupole-Orbitrap™ Q-Exactive mass spectrometer revealed that more than 50 neuropeptides from 9 peptide families-including the allatostatin, RFamide, orcokinin, tachykinin-related peptide and RYamide families - were released into the circulatory system. The presence of these peptides both in neuronal tissues as well as in hemolymph indicates their putative hormonal roles, a finding that merits further investigation. Preliminary quantitative measurement of these identified NPs suggested several potential candidates that maybe associated with the circadian rhythm in Cancer borealis. PMID:25537886

  15. Mass spectrometric investigation of the neuropeptide complement and release in the pericardial organs of the crab, Cancer borealis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lingjun Li; Wayne P. Kelley; Cyrus P. Billimoria; Andrew E. Christie; Stefan R. Pulver; Jonathan V. Sweedler; Eve Marder

    2003-01-01

    The crustacean stomatogastric ganglion (STG) is modulated by both locally released neuroactive compounds and circula- ting hormones. This study presents mass spectrometric characterization of the complement of peptide hormones present in one of the major neurosecretory structures, the pericardial organs (POs), and the detection of neurohormones released from the POs. Direct peptide profiling of Cancer borealis PO tissues using matrix-assisted

  16. The innervation of the pyloric region of the crab, Cancer borealis : Homologous muscles in decapod species are differently innervated

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Scott L. Hooper; Michael B. O'Neil; Robert Wagner; John Ewer; Jorge Golowasch; Eve Marder

    1986-01-01

    The muscles of the pyloric region of the stomach of the crab,Cancer borealis, are innervated by motorneurons found in the stomatogastric ganglion (STG). Electrophysiological recording and stimulating techniques were used to study the detailed pattern of innervation of the pyloric region muscles. Although there are two Pyloric Dilator (PD) motorneurons in lobsters, previous work reported four PD motorneurons in the

  17. Prosorhynchoides borealis Bartoli, Gibson & Bray, 2006 (Digenea: Bucephalidae) cercariae from Abra prismatica (Mollusca: Bivalvia) in Icelandic waters.

    PubMed

    Eydal, M; Freeman, M A; Kristmundsson, Á; Bambir, S H; Jónsson, P M; Helgason, S

    2013-03-01

    This paper reports the adult stage of Prosorhynchoides borealis (Digenea) from Lophius piscatorius in Icelandic waters and infections with the larval stages (sporocysts and cercariae) found for the first time in the bivalve Abra prismatica (Semelidae). The previously known first intermediate host was Abra alba (Semelidae). Ribosomal DNA sequencing studies on all three life stages of the parasite (cercariae, metacercariae, adults) were performed to confirm their identites. Morphometric measurements confirmed that the adult worms belong to the newly described species P. borealis. Prosorhynchoides borealis sporocysts filled with cercariae were found in 16% of A. prismatica bivalves sampled at depths between 34 and 93 m off South Iceland. Prevalence ranged from 0 to 44% between different localities. The parasite was found only in the larger bivalves. Extensive sporocyst infection in the haemocoel of the foot caused mechanical muscle damage with subsequent degeneration and necrosis. Other tissues, including the digestive gland, nephridia, gills and intestine, were less heavily infected. Only focal necrosis was observed in the digestive gland, nephridia and gills, and local atrophy in the intestine. Cercariae were also observed in the lumen of both the stomach and intestine. This is the first report of A. prismatica as an alternative first intermediate host for P. borealis. Ribosomal DNA sequence data reveals 100% homology in the data between cercariae, metacercariae and adult digeneans, supporting the morphological data suggesting that all stages belong to the same species. PMID:22217433

  18. The 203 kbp mitochondrial genome of the phytopathogenic fungus Sclerotinia borealis reveals multiple invasions of introns and genomic duplications.

    PubMed

    Mardanov, Andrey V; Beletsky, Alexey V; Kadnikov, Vitaly V; Ignatov, Alexander N; Ravin, Nikolai V

    2014-01-01

    Here we report the complete sequence of the mitochondrial (mt) genome of the necrotrophic phytopathogenic fungus Sclerotinia borealis, a member of the order Helotiales of Ascomycetes. The 203,051 bp long mtDNA of S. borealis represents one of the largest sequenced fungal mt genomes. The large size is mostly determined by the presence of mobile genetic elements, which include 61 introns. Introns contain a total of 125,394 bp, are scattered throughout the genome, and are found in 12 protein-coding genes and in the ribosomal RNA genes. Most introns contain complete or truncated ORFs that are related to homing endonucleases of the LAGLIDADG and GIY-YIG families. Integrations of mobile elements are also evidenced by the presence of two regions similar to fragments of inverton-like plasmids. Although duplications of some short genome regions, resulting in the appearance of truncated extra copies of genes, did occur, we found no evidences of extensive accumulation of repeat sequences accounting for mitochondrial genome size expansion in some other fungi. Comparisons of mtDNA of S. borealis with other members of the order Helotiales reveal considerable gene order conservation and a dynamic pattern of intron acquisition and loss during evolution. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that horizontal DNA transfer has played a significant role in the evolution and size expansion of the S. borealis mt genome. PMID:25216190

  19. Choosing between darkness and light: The ecological genetics of photic behaviour in the planktonic larva of Spirorbis borealis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. W. Doyle

    1974-01-01

    The light-dark preference of individual Spirorbis borealis larvae was measured by the relative amount of time spent in the lighted half of a container. Specimens taken from a tidal pool were 20% more photonegative than those obtained outside the pool, probably because of natural selection against being washed out of the pool at high tide. The between-population behavioural difference was

  20. The 203 kbp Mitochondrial Genome of the Phytopathogenic Fungus Sclerotinia borealis Reveals Multiple Invasions of Introns and Genomic Duplications

    PubMed Central

    Mardanov, Andrey V.; Beletsky, Alexey V.; Kadnikov, Vitaly V.; Ignatov, Alexander N.; Ravin, Nikolai V.

    2014-01-01

    Here we report the complete sequence of the mitochondrial (mt) genome of the necrotrophic phytopathogenic fungus Sclerotinia borealis, a member of the order Helotiales of Ascomycetes. The 203,051 bp long mtDNA of S. borealis represents one of the largest sequenced fungal mt genomes. The large size is mostly determined by the presence of mobile genetic elements, which include 61 introns. Introns contain a total of 125,394 bp, are scattered throughout the genome, and are found in 12 protein-coding genes and in the ribosomal RNA genes. Most introns contain complete or truncated ORFs that are related to homing endonucleases of the LAGLIDADG and GIY-YIG families. Integrations of mobile elements are also evidenced by the presence of two regions similar to fragments of inverton-like plasmids. Although duplications of some short genome regions, resulting in the appearance of truncated extra copies of genes, did occur, we found no evidences of extensive accumulation of repeat sequences accounting for mitochondrial genome size expansion in some other fungi. Comparisons of mtDNA of S. borealis with other members of the order Helotiales reveal considerable gene order conservation and a dynamic pattern of intron acquisition and loss during evolution. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that horizontal DNA transfer has played a significant role in the evolution and size expansion of the S. borealis mt genome. PMID:25216190

  1. Selection of diurnal roosts by red bats ( Lasiurus borealis) in an intensively managed pine forest in Mississippi

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leslie W. Elmore; Darren A. Miller; Francisco J. Vilella

    2004-01-01

    Forest managers are increasingly expected to incorporate biodiversity objectives within forest landscapes devoted to timber production. However, data on which to base management recommendations for bats within these systems are limited. Although the red bat (Lasiurus borealis) is a widespread and common species in temperate forests of North America, little is known of its ecology within intensively managed pine (Pinus

  2. Phenological features of the antler fly Booponus borealis parasitizing antler deer and prognosis of the timing of its development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Yu. Raabe

    2008-01-01

    The antler fly Booponus borealis Rohd (Diptera, Calliphoridae), as well as the Siberian stag, its main host, is a relict form of the fauna of the Altai and Western Sayan mountains. The disease caused by invasion of its larvae, named booponuosis, occurs in all regions inhabited by domesticated and wild Siberian stags and other species of the family Cercidae, inflicting

  3. Development of the brine shrimp Artemia is accelerated during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spooner, B. S.; Metcalf, J.; DeBell, L.; Paulsen, A.; Noren, W.; Guikema, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    Developmentally arrested brine shrimp cysts have been reactivated during orbital spaceflight on two different Space Shuttle missions (STS-50 and STS-54), and their subsequent development has been compared with that of simultaneously reactivated ground controls. Flight and control brine shrimp do not significantly differ with respect to hatching rates or larval morphology at the scanning and transmission EM levels. A small percentage of the flight larvae had defective nauplier eye development, but the observation was not statistically significant. However, in three different experiments on two different flights, involving a total of 232 larvae that developed in space, a highly significant difference in degree of flight to control development was found. By as early as 2.25 days after reactivation of development, spaceflight brine shrimp were accelerated, by a full instar, over ground control brine shrimp. Although developing more rapidly, flight shrimp grew as long as control shrimp at each developmental instar or stage.

  4. Hydrocarbon analysis of shrimp from oil polluted waters 

    E-print Network

    DeWitt, Bernard John

    1982-01-01

    ), serious pollution problems are caused by crude oils, residual fuel oils, lubricating oils and miscel- laneous tank washings, sludges and tarsi known collectively as persis- tant oils, to distinguish them from light fuel oils such as gasoline, kerosene... evaluation by taste was conducted on shrimp boiled in water for three minutes. Each member of the panel was given five sets of three different, color tagged shrimp for each phase (raw and cooked). The shrimp were selected at random, however each set...

  5. Progress in the development of shrimp cell cultures in Thailand

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Kasornchandra; R. Khongpradit; U. Ekpanithanpong; S. Boonyaratpalin

    1999-01-01

    Primary shrimp cell cultures were developed from lymphoid organ and ovaries of black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon, in double-strength Leibovitz's L-15 medium supplemented with 15% fetal bovine serum, 1% glucose, 5 g\\/L NaCl, 15% shrimp meat extract. The optimum conditions for primary culture in vitro were obtained in L-15 medium with an osmolality of approximately 730 ± 10 mmol\\/kg, a

  6. Marine shrimp aquaculture and natural resource degradation in Thailand

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark Flaherty; Choomjet Karnjanakesorn

    1995-01-01

    Rising demand for shrimp in the developed nations has helped to foster a dramatic growth in marine shrimp aquaculture, particularly\\u000a in South America and South Asia. In Thailand, Marine shrimp aquaculture is now an important earmer of foreign exchange. The\\u000a growth in Production has been achieved through the expansion of the culture area and the adoption of intensive production\\u000a methods.

  7. Sound production by white shrimp (Penaeus setiferus) analysis of another crustacean-like sound from the Gulf of Mexico, and the possible use of passive sonar for dedication and stock assessment of shrimp 

    E-print Network

    Berk, Ilona M.

    1997-01-01

    , no studies have been done to characterize stridulation in the penaeids or solenocerids. The 4 primary species of the Texas Gulf shrimp fishery, the penaeid brown shrimp (Penaeus aztecus), white shrimp (P. setiferus), and pink shrimp (P. duorarum), and a... deep-water solenocerid, the royal red shrimp (Pleoticus robustus), do not have snapping claws, nor are they among the species of stridulating shrimp. Based on the results of acoustic experiments with individual and small groups of pink shrimp...

  8. Microbial flora of fresh and stored shrimp

    E-print Network

    Mroz, Eva

    1970-01-01

    primarily by the appearance in some samples of high percentages of Bacillus, Lactobacillus and Flavobacterium species. Based upon limited data, sample preparation of shrimp by washing gave somewhat higher viable counts as compared with blending. iv AC... will consist of the following genera: Pseudomonas, Achromo- bacter Co ebacterium, Flavobacterium, Micrococcus, Bacillus and Uibrio $1, 4, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15) . The level of these bacteria depends on freshness of fish, sanitary conditions during handling...

  9. WSSV infection activates STAT in shrimp

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wei Yu Chen; Kun Chin Ho; Jiann Horng Leu; Kuan Fu Liu; Han Ching Wang; Guang Hsiung Kou; Chu Fang Lo

    2008-01-01

    Summary Although the JAK\\/STAT signaling pathway is usually involved in antiviral defense, a recent study suggested that STAT might be annexed by WSSV (white spot syndrome virus) to enhance the expression of a viral immediate early gene in infected shrimps. In the present study, we clone and report the first full-length cDNA sequence for a crustacean STAT from Penaeus monodon.

  10. A field survey of chemicals and biological products used in shrimp farming

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S Gräslund; K Holmström; A Wahlström

    2003-01-01

    This study documented the use of chemicals and biological products in marine and brackish water shrimp farming in Thailand, the world’s top producer of farmed shrimp. Interviews were conducted with 76 shrimp farmers in three major shrimp producing regions, the eastern Gulf coast, the southern Gulf coast and the Andaman coast area. Farmers in the study used on average 13

  11. DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION OF NX MESSAGE PASSING USING SHRIMP VIRTUAL MEMORY MAPPED COMMUNICATION

    E-print Network

    DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION OF NX MESSAGE PASSING USING SHRIMP VIRTUAL MEMORY MAPPED COMMUNICATION on the Shrimp multicomputer. Unlike traditional methods, our implementation, exploiting Shrimp's virtual memory the bandwidth limit imposed by the Shrimp hardware. 1 INTRODUCTION NX has been a common message

  12. Brown shrimp (Farfantepenaeus az-tecus) have an estuarine-depen-

    E-print Network

    147 Brown shrimp (Farfantepenaeus az- tecus) have an estuarine-depen- dent life history; recent shrimp studies in estuaries have focused on loss of marsh nurs- ery habitats (Peterson and Turner shrimp migrations and decrease overall habi- tat area for brown shrimp (Craig et al., 2005). The brown

  13. The NMFS laboratory in Miami is engaged in studies of the shrimp

    E-print Network

    The NMFS laboratory in Miami is engaged in studies of the shrimp fisheries off Mexico, in the Caribbea n, and off South America. Shrimp Research Program at Southeast Fisheries Center Shrimp research at the utheast Fi heries Center, Miami, concerns shrimp stocks off foreign coasts. The United States ha important

  14. Analysis of impulsive biological noise due to snapping shrimp as a point process in time

    E-print Network

    Analysis of impulsive biological noise due to snapping shrimp as a point process in time Matthew W-- Impulsive biological noise produced by snapping shrimp provides an important contribution to the ambient of shrimp noise to reduce its impact on sonar and underwater acoustic telemetry systems. Shrimp snaps

  15. Observations of Deepwater Shrimp, Heterocarpus ensifer, From a Submersible off the Island of Hawaii

    E-print Network

    Observations of Deepwater Shrimp, Heterocarpus ensifer, From a Submersible off the Island caridean shrimps of the genus Het erocarpus. Exploratory trapping surveys have shown that deepwater shrimps ducted surveys of deepwater shrimp re sources in Hawaii (Gooding, 1984) and the Mariana Islands (Ralston

  16. Stream Sockets on SHRIMP Stefanos N. Damianakis, Cezary Dubnicki, Edward W. Felten

    E-print Network

    Stream Sockets on SHRIMP Stefanos N. Damianakis, Cezary Dubnicki, Edward W. Felten Department,dubnicki,felteng@cs.princeton.edu Abstract. This paper describes an implementation of stream sockets for the SHRIMP multicomputer. SHRIMP and for detecting errors. In this paper, we describe an implementation of the sockets interface on the SHRIMP

  17. Physiological and immune responses of white shrimp ( Litopenaeus vannamei) infected with necrotizing hepatopancreatitis bacterium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luz Angélica Ávila-Villa; Diana Fimbres-Olivarria; Guillermina García-Sánchez; Teresa Gollas-Galván; Jorge Hernández-López; Marcel Martínez-Porchas

    An eighteen day trial was performed to evaluate the effect of necrotizing hepatopancreatitis (NHP) disease on the physiological, nutritional and immunological status of adult white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei). Shrimp were divided into infected and non-infected groups; infected shrimp were fed with hepatopancreas homegenates positive to NHP bacterium, while non-infected shrimp were fed with healthy hepatopancreas. No significant differences were observed

  18. Natronococcus jeotgali sp. nov., a halophilic archaeon isolated from shrimp jeotgal, a traditional

    E-print Network

    Bae, Jin-Woo

    Natronococcus jeotgali sp. nov., a halophilic archaeon isolated from shrimp jeotgal, a traditional Natronococcus was isolated from shrimp jeotgal, a traditional fermented food from Korea. Colonies of this strain ). Shrimp jeotgal, a traditional fermented food from Korea, is made by combining fresh, tiny shrimps

  19. GEAR MODIFICATION TO REDUCE BY-CATCH IN THE TANZANIAN SHRIMP FISHERY

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Damian Boniface Chando; Einar Hreinsson

    There has been a need to improve the selectivity for shrimp and fish in tropical shrimp fisheries areas like Tanzania to reduce by-catch in coastal fisheries. The reduction of juvenile shrimp and fish can constitute a strategy to minimise discard. A study was done to review the literature and to evaluate possible solutions for the Tanzanian shrimp fishery. In this

  20. Improved Shrimp Growout Systems for Disease Prevention and Environmental Sustainability in Asia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Piamsak Menasveta

    2002-01-01

    Although a large portion of the world's farmed shrimp is produced in Asia, shrimp culture operations do not succeed over the entire area. There have been several problems and impediments that are yet to be resolved. One of these problems is disease. Several shrimp diseases have threatened shrimp production, but the most devastating ones are the viral diseases, namely, yellow-head

  1. An Economic Analysis of Texas Shrimp Season Closures WADE GRIFFIN, HOLLY HENDRICKSON, CHRIS OLIVER, GARY MATLOCK,

    E-print Network

    20,000 fishermen (Cody et aI., 1989). The Texas shrimp fishery relies primarily on brown shrimp aspect of the inshore fishery relates to the function of bays in the life cycle of shrimp. Penaeid shrimp to them is partially a function of the inshore harvest. Since 1960, Texas has enacted a 45 to 60-day

  2. Status of the red-cockaded woodpecker on federal lands in the South. [Picoides borealis

    SciTech Connect

    Lennartz, M.R.; Geissler, P.H.; Harlow, R.F.; Long, R.C.; Chitwood, K.M.; Jackson, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    A census of red-cockaded woodpecker (Picoides borealis) colonies conducted from 1980 to 1982 on 37 national forests, national wildlife refuges and military installations throughout the South resulted in an estimated total of 2677 (+/-456) active colonies. Considering the known or estimated number of colonies on federal lands not included in the census, the total number on all federal lands probably exceeds 3000. Only 3 of the 37 properties censused had populations of 250 or more colonies. Because the majority of red-cockaded populations censused were relatively small, and federal lands are patchily distributed and isolated from each other, habitat fragmentation and population isolation seriously threaten the genetic variability and viability of most extant red-cockaded populations. 8 references, 1 table.

  3. Stiptognathus new genus (Conodonta: Ibexian, Lower Ordovician), and the apparatus of Stiptognathus borealis (Repetski, 1982)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ethington, Raymond L.; Lehnert, O.; Repetski, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    Collections from upper Ibexian (Tulean Stage) rocks of western United States, from the Canning Basin in western Australia, and from the Argentine Precordillera contain a seximembrate apparatus of multidenticulate conodonts whose elements have been included by authors in species of Prioniodus Pander, 1986, and Reunerodus Serpagli, 1974. The individual elements as well as the complete apparatus are not consistent with assignment of the species to either of these genera or to any other extant genus. A new generic name, Stiptognathus Ethington, Lehnert, and Repetski, is proposed with Reutterodus borealis Repetski, 1982, as type species. The apparatus consists of Pa, Pb, Sa-c, and M elements; the genus represents either the Prioniodontidae or the Periodontidae.

  4. EROS 2 photometry of probable R Coronae Borealis stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    E-print Network

    P. Tisserand; J. B. Marquette; J. P. Beaulieu; P. de Laverny

    2004-05-27

    EROS 2 (Experience de Recherche d'Objets Sombres) conducted a survey of the SMC between July 1996 and February 2003 in two EROS broad-band colours, V_E and R_E. The photometric data of 4.2 million stars have been searched for behaviour typical of R Coronae Borealis (RCB) candidates such as drastic changes in magnitude. Five objects have been found, four of them being catalogued in the Simbad database as RAW 21, RAW 233, RAW 476, and [MH95] 431 with confirmed carbon-rich atmospheres, characteristic of RCB. From the EROS 2 light curve of RAW 21 and its spectrum reported by Morgan et al. (2003), we confirm that it is the first RCB to be found in the SMC. The other objects are new RCB candidates with absolute luminosity and colour close to those found for RCBs in the LMC. We propose that 2 of them are DY Per-like RCBs.

  5. Discovery of Five New R. Coronae Borealis Stars in the MACHO Galactic Bulge Database

    SciTech Connect

    Zaniewshi, A; Clayton, G C; Welch, D; Gordon, K D; Minniti, D; Cook, K

    2005-06-16

    We have identified five new R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars in the Galactic bulge using the MACHO Project photometry database, raising the total number of known Galactic RCB stars to about 40. We have obtained spectra to confirm the identifications. The fact that four out of the five newly identified RCB stars are ''cool'' (T{sub eff} < 6000 K) rather than ''warm'' (T{sub eff} > 6000 K) suggests that the preponderance of warm RCB stars among the existing sample is a selection bias. These cool RCB stars are redder and fainter than their warm counterparts and may have been missed in surveys done with blue plates. Based on the number of new RCB stars discovered in the MACHO bulge fields, there may be {approx}250 RCB stars in the reddened ''exclusion'' zone toward the bulge.

  6. The changing nebula around the hot R Coronae Borealis star DY Centauri

    E-print Network

    Rao, N Kameswara; Garcia-Hernandez, D A; Manchado, A

    2013-01-01

    Among the distinguishing characteristics of the remarkable hot R Coronae Borealis star DY Cen, which was recently found to be a spectroscopic binary, is the presence of nebular forbidden lines in its optical spectrum. A compilation of photometry from 1970 to the present suggests that the star has evolved to higher effective temperatures. Comparison of spectra from 2010 with earlier spectra show that between 2003 and 2010, the 6717 and 6730 A emission lines of [S II] underwent a dramatic change in their fluxes suggesting an increase in the nebula's electron density of 290 cm-3 to 3140 cm-3 from 1989 to 2010 while the stellar temperature increased from 19500 K to 25000 K. The nebular radius is about 0.02 pc, 60000 times bigger than the semimajor axis of DY Cen binary system. Rapid changes of stellar temperature and its response by the nebula demonstrate stellar evolution in action.

  7. Photometric analysis of Magellanic Cloud R Coronae Borealis Stars in the recovery phase of their declines

    E-print Network

    Woollands, Robyn M; Udalski, A

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the initial results of a multi-site photometric programme to examine the extraordinary behaviour displayed by 18 R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars in the Magellanic Clouds (MCs). RCB stars exhibit a unique variability whereby they undergo rapid declines of up to several magnitudes. These are thought to be caused by the formation of dust in the stellar environment which reduces the brightness. The monitoring programme comprised the collection of UBVRI photometric data using five telescopes located at three different southern hemisphere longitudes (Las Campanas Observatory in Chile, Mount Joun University Observatory in New Zealand, and the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) in South Africa). Examination of the data acquired in the V and I filters resulted in the identification of a total of 18 RCB declines occurring in four stars. Construction of colour-magnitude diagrams (V vs V-I), during the recovery to maximum light were undertaken in order to study the unique colour behaviour associat...

  8. Nucleosynthesis during the Merger of White Dwarfs and the Origin of R Coronae Borealis Stars

    E-print Network

    Longland, R; José, J; García-Berro, E; Althaus, L G; Isern, J

    2011-01-01

    Many hydrogen deficient stars are characterised by surface abundance patterns that are hard to reconcile with conventional stellar evolution. Instead, it has been suggested that they may represent the result of a merger episode between a helium and a carbon-oxygen white dwarf. In this Letter, we present a nucleosynthesis study of the merger of a 0.4 M_sol helium white dwarf with a 0.8 M_sol carbon-oxygen white dwarf, by coupling the thermodynamic history of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics particles with a post-processing code. The resulting chemical abundance pattern, particularly for oxygen and fluorine, is in qualitative agreement with the observed abundances in R Coronae Borealis stars.

  9. Are C60 molecules detectable in circumstellar shells of R Coronae Borealis stars?

    E-print Network

    Garcia-Hernandez, D A; Lambert, D L

    2011-01-01

    The hydrogen-poor, helium-rich and carbon-rich character of the gas around R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars has been suggested to be a site for formation of C60 molecules. This suggestion is not supported by observations reported here showing that infrared transitions of C60 are not seen in a large sample of RCB stars observed with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. The infrared C60 transitions are seen, however, in emission and blended with PAH-features in spectra of DY Cen and possibly also of V854 Cen, the two least hydrogen-deficient (hydrogen deficiency of only ~10-100) RCB stars. The speculation is offered that C60 (and the PAHs) in the moderately H-deficient circumstellar envelopes may be formed by the decomposition of hydrogenated amorphous carbon but fullerene formation is inefficient in the highly H-deficient environments of most RCBs.

  10. The Aurora Borealis: a plasma physics and environmental laboratory in the sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Alfred Y.

    1997-04-01

    The auroral Borealis is Nature's most colorful display of plasma physics = in the polar region. This talk will describe the free energy sources in = terms of particle precipitation and associated current in the polar magnetic = field responsible for such phenomena. A "High Power Auroral Stimulation" = (HIPAS) facility in Alaska has been used to actively probe this auroral region by exciting plasma resonances remotely. This laboratory without walls = allows large-scale controlled perturbations to be created and monitored. The auroral current and particle distribution can be the sources of = excitation or enhancement of plasma waves which are detected by satellites, lidars , holographic arrays, space-borne and ground-based optical and = electromagnetic sensors. The science and application of this active interaction method to environmental monitoring and remediation will be discussed. ^1. A.Y. Wong et al. Phys Rev Lett v63, 271 ( 1989). Work supported by ONR and NSF.

  11. Aurora Borealis: stochastic cellular automata simulations of the excited-state dynamics of oxygen atoms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seybold, P. G.; Kier, L. B.; Cheng, C.-K.

    1999-12-01

    Emissions from the 1S and 1D excited states of atomic oxygen play a prominent role in creating the dramatic light displays (aurora borealis) seen in the skies over polar regions of the Northern Hemisphere. A probabilistic asynchronous cellular automaton model described previously has been applied to the excited-state dynamics of atomic oxygen. The model simulates the time-dependent variations in ground (3P) and excited-state populations that occur under user-defined probabilistic transition rules for both pulse and steady-state conditions. Although each trial simulation is itself an independent "experiment", deterministic values for the excited-state emission lifetimes and quantum yields emerge as limiting cases for large numbers of cells or large numbers of trials. Stochastic variations in the lifetimes and emission yields can be estimated from repeated trials.

  12. Caryospora uptoni n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis borealis).

    PubMed

    Lindsay, D S; Blagburn, B L

    1986-10-01

    Oocysts of Caryospora uptoni n. sp. were described from the feces of red-tailed hawks, Buteo jamaicensis borealis. Sporulated oocysts were spherical or subspherical and measured 28.1 by 26.4 micron. The oocyst wall was composed of a yellowish outer layer and brownish inner layer and was about 1.5 micron thick. Neither micropyle, polar granules, nor oocyst residuum were present. A single, spherical sporocyst 18.2 by 17.9 micron was present; a Stieda body was absent. A spherical eccentrically located sporocyst residuum was present in many sporocysts, but it degenerated to form a dispersed granular residuum in other sporocysts. Eight randomly arranged sporozoites, 12.6 by 4.2 micron, were present in each sporocyst; they contained a centrally or slightly posteriorly located nucleus. PMID:3806324

  13. Nutrient budgets in intensive shrimp ponds: implications for sustainability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Simon J Funge-Smith; Matthew R. P Briggs

    1998-01-01

    Serious production losses have occurred in shrimp producing countries around the world, principally due to poor rearing environments and pathogenic disease. In response to this, shrimp farmers are changing their culture methods. To understand the source and sink of nutrients which affect pondwater quality and effluent impact, the nitrogen, phosphorus and solids budget have been constructed for water exchange systems.

  14. Shrimp monitor/locator for conservation of fuel. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    A demonstration project of a new type Shrimp Detector/Monitor has been completed. The test project proved the efficiency of the Shrimp Monitor/Detector in detecting shrimp, in identifying the number and size, in real time, but indicated that improvement could be effected which would enhance the operation. Data obtained from the test cruises indicate significant savings in diesel fuel will occur for those trawlers using the Shrimp Monitor/Detector in place of the usual trynet operation; 25% savings for the series model number 400, (the prototype tested) and expected 35%+ if the advanced series model number 500 were used. Fabrication and operational costs for the Shrimp Monitor/Detector are reasonable and well within the financial abilities of the usual large offshore trawler. Research and testing during this program resulted in the design of an advanced model incorporating significant improvements, and fabrication was commenced but the extra cost involved beyond the set value of this contract made the further experiments non-viable. Recommendations have been submitted for an extended program to fabricate and test the advanced model series number 500 which may be of more value and interest, market use, to the operating offshore shrimp trawlers. A marketing/sales program will be instituted to place the Shrimp Monitor/Detector in the commercial area serving the shrimp fleet.

  15. Alternative diets for the Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elkin Amaya; D. Allen Davis; David B. Rouse

    2007-01-01

    Future use of animal protein sources in shrimp feeds is expected to be considerably reduced as a consequence of increasing economical, environmental and safety issues. Of main concern has been the use of expensive marine protein sources, such as fish meal. Hence, shrimp research has recently focused on the development of practical feeds with minimal levels of fish meal and

  16. Characterization of Sterol Oxidation Products in Two Breaded Shrimp Products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two breaded shrimp products were examined for the changes in cholesterol, phytosterols, and fatty acids that occurred during cooking. The products were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) in the raw, baked, and fried states after separation into breading and shrimp components. Cholesterol, campest...

  17. Study of Shrimp Distributions by Means of Locally Weighted Regression

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yimin Ye; Adel H. Alsaffar

    2001-01-01

    The distribution of shrimp is modeled through the use of locally weighted regression based on survey data. Multivariate local regression was successfully employed to generate distributional surfaces and to construct approximate F-tests for three shrimp species found in waters off Kuwait: Penaeus semisulcatus, Metapenaeus affinis, and Parapenaeopsis stylifera. Distributional differences among the three species can be clearly visualized with local

  18. 21 CFR 161.175 - Frozen raw breaded shrimp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...percentage of shrimp material for those forms...p.m. (iv) Balance accurate to 0...availability of this material at NARA, call...Forceps, blunt points. (viii) Shallow...remove the breading material that may remain...add to shrimp on balance pan and...

  19. 21 CFR 161.175 - Frozen raw breaded shrimp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...percentage of shrimp material for those forms...p.m. (iv) Balance accurate to 0...availability of this material at NARA, call...Forceps, blunt points. (viii) Shallow...remove the breading material that may remain...add to shrimp on balance pan and...

  20. Establishing a role for shrimp fortilin in preventing cell death

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Potchanapond Graidist; Kenichi Fujise; Warapond Wanna; Kallaya Sritunyalucksana; Amornrat Phongdara

    2006-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a highly virulent and infectious virus to farmed shrimps and represents a serious threat to aquatic industries. Fortilin, also known as translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP), protects mammalian cells under stress from cell death. A subtraction hybridization screening in our laboratory between healthy and moribund WSSV-infected Penaeus mondon shrimps has identified a fortilin gene

  1. An Economical, Portable System for Hatching Brine Shrimp Artemia spp

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard S. Fulford; D. Allen Rutherford

    1998-01-01

    Design and construction of a portable, inexpensive hatching system for brine shrimp Artemia spp. is described. The system design is based on batch culture methodology, which is easily customized to the feeding requirements of a larval system and optimizes the nutritional value of brine shrimp. This system can be set up quickly and provides stable temperature and aeration under a

  2. CUTICULAR LESIONS INDUCED IN GRASS SHRIMP EXPOSED TO HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adult grass shrimp were exposed to four concentrations (0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 ppm) of hexavalent chromium for 38 days. At the end of the exposure period, over 50% of the surviving shrimp possessed cuticular lesions that had many of the gross characteristics of 'shell disease.' Th...

  3. The Norris Survey of the Corona Borealis Supercluster: II. Galaxy Evolution with Redshift and Environment

    E-print Network

    Todd A. Small; Wallace L. W. Sargent; Donald Hamilton

    1997-05-05

    We measure the field galaxy luminosity function (LF) as a function of color and redshift from z = 0 to z = 0.5 using galaxies from the Norris Survey of the Corona Borealis Supercluster. We find that our local r-band LF, when normalized to counts in high galactic latitude fields, agrees well with the local LF measured in the Las Campanas Redshift Survey. Our B-band local LF, however, does not match the B-band LF from the Stromlo/APM survey, having a normalization 1.6 times higher. We see compelling evidence that B-band field galaxy LF evolves with redshift. The evolution is strongest for the population of star-forming galaxies with [OII]3727 rest-frame equivalent widths greater than 10A. The population of red, quiescent galaxies shows no sign of evolution to z = 0.5. The evolution of the LF which we observe is consistent with the findings of other faint galaxy redshift surveys. The fraction of galaxies with [OII] emission increases rapidly with redshift, but the fraction of galaxies with strong Hdelta 4101 absorption, a signature of a burst of star formation, does not. We thus conclude that the star formation in distant galaxies is primarily long-lived. We also compute the LFs of the Corona Borealis supercluster and the A2069 supercluster. The shapes of the two supercluster LFs are broadly similar to the shape of the local LF. However, there are important differences. Both supercluster LFs have an excess of very bright galaxies. In addition, there is a suggestion of an upturn in the LF for galaxies fainter than M(B) = -17 mag. (Abridged from the abstract in the paper.)

  4. Scientific ballooning on a shoestring budget: The Montana Space Grant Consortium's BOREALIS program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klumpar, D.; Kirn, S.; Hiscock, W.

    High altitude ballooning using Latex weather balloons provides frequent and low cost opportunities to carry small meaningful scientific payloads to well in excess of 100,000 feet. Maximizing payload scientific capability requires utilization of the newest available miniature, low-power, light-weight technologies to minimize system mass and size. The Balloon Outreach, Research, Exploration And Land Imaging System (BOREALIS) program of the Montana Space Grant Consortium has provided for undergraduate student teams to build payload systems up to 5.4 kg to conduct high altitude flight experiments. In the university setting such a program provides direct experience to students in the fabrication and operation of (near)space flight systems and payloads, and subsequent analysis of the scientific data. Over the course of the past three years 19 successful balloon flights have been conducted, with full payload recovery, reaching altitudes in excess of 110,000 feet, providing rewarding and exciting developmental test flights for satellite subsystems and mini-science missions to the edge of space. Missions have included measurement of Ozone altitude profiles, UV and Cosmic Ray fluxes, and atmospheric temperature and pressure soundings. In addition to providing hands on training at our colleges and universities for future scientists and engineers; by involving the public, a much larger audience is exposed to the scientific research process. In this paper we describe our methodologies and program accomplishments, including the design of a payload support system utilizing commercially available subsystems. More information may be found at http://spacegrant.montana.edu/borealis/index.asp

  5. Marine shrimp aquaculture and natural resource degradation in Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaherty, Mark; Karnjanakesorn, Choomjet

    1995-01-01

    Rising demand for shrimp in the developed nations has helped to foster a dramatic growth in marine shrimp aquaculture, particularly in South America and South Asia. In Thailand, Marine shrimp aquaculture is now an important earmer of foreign exchange. The growth in Production has been achieved through the expansion of the culture area and the adoption of intensive production methods. The conversion of near-shore areas to shrimp culture, however, is proving to have many consequences that impinge on the environmental integrity of coastal areas. This paper reviews the development of Thailand's marine shrimp culture industry and examines the nature of the environmental impacts that are emerging. It then discusses the implications these have for rural poor and the long-term viability of the culture industry.

  6. Prey exoskeletons influence the course of gastric evacuation in Atlantic cod Gadus morhua.

    PubMed

    Couturier, C S; Andersen, N G; Audet, C; Chabot, D

    2013-03-01

    This study examined the effects of prey exoskeleton characteristics on gastric evacuation patterns in Atlantic cod Gadus morhua. Three distinct stages were highlighted in the gastric evacuation of crustacean prey characterized by a robust exoskeleton. The experiments confirmed that the three shrimp species, Pandalus borealis, Pandalus montagui and Eualus macilentus, and the crab Chionoecetes opilio, were evacuated from the stomach at different rates. The duration of all stages increased with increasing ash (and carbonate) content of the fresh prey. Thickness, chemical composition and morphology of the prey exoskeleton all affected gastric evacuation: duration of initial delay, overall evacuation rate and a decreased evacuation rate at the end of the process. The power exponential function (PEF), with its shape parameter, described the course of evacuation for these prey types well, especially the initial delay. The PEF does not, however, allow describing evacuation by the current stomach content mass independent of meal size, which limits its usefulness in estimating consumption rates of wild G. morhua. To predict and describe gastric evacuation of prey with a robust exoskeleton, it is therefore suggested that the square-root function be expanded with an initial lag phase, coupled to the mechanistically based cylinder model of gastric evacuation. PMID:23464544

  7. Suppression of shrimp melanization during white spot syndrome virus infection.

    PubMed

    Sutthangkul, Jantiwan; Amparyup, Piti; Charoensapsri, Walaiporn; Senapin, Saengchan; Phiwsaiya, Kornsunee; Tassanakajon, Anchalee

    2015-03-01

    The melanization cascade, activated by the prophenoloxidase (proPO) system, plays a key role in the production of cytotoxic intermediates, as well as melanin products for microbial sequestration in invertebrates. Here, we show that the proPO system is an important component of the Penaeus monodon shrimp immune defense toward a major viral pathogen, white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). Gene silencing of PmproPO(s) resulted in increased cumulative shrimp mortality after WSSV infection, whereas incubation of WSSV with an in vitro melanization reaction prior to injection into shrimp significantly increased the shrimp survival rate. The hemolymph phenoloxidase (PO) activity of WSSV-infected shrimp was extremely reduced at days 2 and 3 post-injection compared with uninfected shrimp but was fully restored after the addition of exogenous trypsin, suggesting that WSSV probably inhibits the activity of some proteinases in the proPO cascade. Using yeast two-hybrid screening and co-immunoprecipitation assays, the viral protein WSSV453 was found to interact with the proPO-activating enzyme 2 (PmPPAE2) of P. monodon. Gene silencing of WSSV453 showed a significant increase of PO activity in WSSV-infected shrimp, whereas co-silencing of WSSV453 and PmPPAE2 did not, suggesting that silencing of WSSV453 partially restored the PO activity via PmPPAE2 in WSSV-infected shrimp. Moreover, the activation of PO activity in shrimp plasma by PmPPAE2 was significantly decreased by preincubation with recombinant WSSV453. These results suggest that the inhibition of the shrimp proPO system by WSSV partly occurs via the PmPPAE2-inhibiting activity of WSSV453. PMID:25572398

  8. SHRiMP: Accurate Mapping of Short Color-space Reads

    E-print Network

    Toronto, University of

    SHRiMP: Accurate Mapping of Short Color-space Reads Stephen M. Rumble, Phil Lacroute, Adrian V () SHRiMP Feb 3, 2010 1 / 17 #12;Features SHRiMP features: 1 Both Color-Space and Letter-Space reads () SHRiMP Feb 3, 2010 2 / 17 #12;SHRiMP Pipeline 1 Spaced-seed matching 2 Smith-Waterman Algorithm

  9. Proper use of sodium bisulfite with minimal salt penetration during brine immersion freezing of shrimp 

    E-print Network

    Broussard, Suzanne Rene

    1988-01-01

    produced undesirable shrimp. Acceptability of flavor, texture and overall acceptability as determined by consumer taste tests for shrimp frozen in calcium/sodium chloride mixtures decreased with storage time. Shrimp frozen in calcium/sodium chloride.... Preliminary data indicates shrimp may absorb up to 3% salt from the brine during freezing, decreasing the sodium chloride concentration of the brine. uptake of salt by shrimp is important not only organoleptically because of the salty taste, but also...

  10. Aurora Borealis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Maitland Baird Glennill

    1882-01-01

    WHAT was, probably, the termination of the aurora seen at Worcester and Dublin on May 14 was observed here, by me, between midnight and 1 a.m. of the morning of the 18th. At that time, and for some time after, I saw along the northwest horizon a strong, green, auroral glow. The evening of the 14th was bitterly cold; the

  11. Aurora Borealis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. Pullinger

    1882-01-01

    THE auroral display mentioned by your two correspondents was particularly brilliant at Oldham on the evening of the 14th inst., at 11.10. I observed at 11.15 one very fine streamer reaching quite to the Pole Star; it was of a ruddy hue, dull, and changing to purple. The horizon was cloudy, the cloud being fringed with white light, changing to

  12. DEVELOPMENT AND EARLY LIFE HISTORY OF THE NORTHERN SENNET, Sphyraena borealis DeKAY (PISCES: SPHYRAENIDAE) REARED IN THE LABORATORY

    Microsoft Academic Search

    EDWARD D. HOUDE

    Eggs and larvae of the northern sennet, Sphyraena borealis DeKay, are described from laboratory­ reared specimens. Fertilized eggs were collected on the edge of the Florida Current near Miami in December 1969. Larvae were 2.6 mm SL (standard length) at hatching and 13.5 mm SL at 21 days after hatching. Head and snout length increased rapidly relative to standard length

  13. Delayed induced resistance and increase in leaf fluctuating asymmetry as responses of Salix borealis to insect herbivory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elena L. Zvereva; Mikhail V. Kozlov; Pekka Niemelä; Erkki Haukioja

    1997-01-01

    An outbreak of leaf beetle Melasoma lapponica in two localities around the Severonikel smelter in Kola Peninsula, north-west Russia, resulted in severe defoliation of\\u000a Salix borealis, observed for the first time in August 1993 and then again in 1994 and 1995. Before the first severe defoliation, in July\\u000a 1993, performance of M. lapponica larvae in plots with a high beetle

  14. The effect of Echinorhynchus borealis (Acanthocephala) infection on the anti-predator behavior of a benthic amphipod.

    PubMed

    Benesh, D P; Kitchen, J; Pulkkinen, K; Hakala, I; Valtonen, E T

    2008-04-01

    In benthic habitats, predators can generally not be detected visually, so olfaction may be particularly important for inducing anti-predation behaviors in prey organisms. Manipulative parasites infecting benthic hosts could suppress these responses so as to increase the probability of predation and thus trophic transmission. We studied how infection with the acanthocephalan Echinorhynchus borealis affects the response of the benthic amphipod Pallasea quadrispinosa to water conditioned by burbot (Lota lota), the parasite's definitive host. In normal lake water, refuge use by infected and uninfected amphipods was similar, but when exposed to burbot-conditioned water, uninfected amphipods spent much more time hiding than infected amphipods. Thus, rather than affecting ambient hiding behavior, E. borealis infection seems to alter host response to a predator. A group of amphipods sampled from a postglacial spring that is devoid of fish predators exhibited only a weak response to burbot-conditioned water, perhaps suggesting these anti-predator behaviors are costly to maintain. The hiding behavior of spring and infected amphipods was very similar. If the reduced refuge use by the spring amphipods reflects adaptation to a predator-free environment, this indicates that E. borealis severely weakens its host's anti-predator behavior. Presumably this increases the likelihood of parasite transmission. PMID:18564759

  15. On the sound of snapping shrimp

    E-print Network

    Versluis, Michel; von der Heydt, Anna; Lohse, Detlef

    2007-01-01

    Fluid dynamics video: Snapping shrimp produce a snapping sound by an extremely rapid closure of their snapper claw. Our high speed imaging of the claw closure has revealed that the sound is generated by the collapse of a cavitation bubble formed in a fast flowing water jet forced out from the claws during claw closure. The produced sound originates from the cavitation collapse of the bubble. At collapse a short flash of light is emitted, just as in single bubble sonoluminescence. A model based on the Rayleigh-Plesset equation can quantitatively account for the visual and acoustical observations.

  16. Pathogenicity of Bacillus thuringiensis for penaeid shrimp 

    E-print Network

    Lehrer, Janis Ellen

    1979-01-01

    of borax ranged from 8. 1 to 8. 4 for the metacresol purple indicator to 9. 5 to 9. 7 for the nile blue A indi- cator. Corresponding readings were 7. 6 to 8. 1 for meta- cresol purple and 9. 3 to 9. 6 for nile blue A when 1. 3% borax was added... Major Subject: Biology PATHOGENICITY OF BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS FOR PENAEID SHRIMP A Thesis by JANIS ELLEN LEHRER Approved as to style and content by: r. ohn R. Schwarz (C Chairman of Committee) P4Lf. ks~ Dr. S. M. (C5-Chai n of C 'ttee) Dr...

  17. Transglutaminase regulates immune-related genes in shrimp.

    PubMed

    Fagutao, Fernand F; Maningas, Mary Beth B; Kondo, Hidehiro; Aoki, Takashi; Hirono, Ikuo

    2012-05-01

    Transglutaminase (TGase) is known to be involved in blood coagulation, a conserved defence mechanism among invertebrates. Gene silencing of TGase was previously shown to render shrimp susceptible to both bacterial and viral infections suggesting that TGase is an essential component of the shrimp immune system. Here, we examine the effects of the absence of TGase on the transcriptomic profile of kuruma shrimp by microarray analysis, focussing on genes that are involved in shrimp immunity. Total RNAs from shrimp haemocytes injected with dsRNA specific for TGase and control samples were isolated at 3 and 7 days p.i. and analyzed by microarray. Results revealed that TGase silencing affects the expression of genes in shrimp and caused significant down-regulation of the expressions of crustin and lysozyme. Furthermore, TGase-depleted samples were found to have lower haemocyte counts and higher total bacterial counts in their haemolymph. These results suggest that TGase is an important component of the shrimp immune response and is involved in the regulation of some immune-related genes particularly antimicrobial peptides. PMID:22306779

  18. Beyond Symbiosis: Cleaner Shrimp Clean Up in Culture

    PubMed Central

    Militz, Thane A.; Hutson, Kate S.

    2015-01-01

    Cleaner organisms exhibit a remarkable natural behaviour where they consume ectoparasites attached to “client” organisms. While this behaviour can be utilized as a natural method of parasitic disease control (or biocontrol), it is not known whether cleaner organisms can also limit reinfection from parasite eggs and larvae within the environment. Here we show that cleaner shrimp, Lysmata amboinensis, consume eggs and larvae of a harmful monogenean parasite, Neobenedenia sp., in aquaculture. Shrimp consumed parasite eggs under diurnal (63%) and nocturnal (14%) conditions as well as infectious larvae (oncomiracidia) diurnally (26%). Furthermore, we trialled the inclusion of cleaner shrimp for preventative parasite management of ornamental fish, Pseudanthias squamipinnis, and found shrimp reduced oncomiracidia infection success of host fish by half compared to controls (held without shrimp). Fish held without cleaner shrimp exhibited pigmentation changes as a result of infection, possibly indicative of a stress response. These results provide the first empirical evidence that cleaner organisms reduce parasite loads in the environment through non-symbiotic cleaning activities. Our research findings have relevance to aquaculture and the marine ornamental trade, where cleaner shrimp could be applied for prophylaxis and control of ectoparasite infections. PMID:25706952

  19. Description of three ecology studies on brown shrimp Penaeus aztecus and white shrimp P. setiferus conducted by the National Marine Fisheries Service, Galveston, Texas 

    E-print Network

    Diego, Maria Eugenia de

    1984-01-01

    Description of three ecology studies on brown shrimp Penaeus aztecus and white shrimp'P; setiferus conducted by the Mational Marine Fisheries Service, Galveston, Texas. A professional paper by Maria Eugenia de Diego Submitted to the College... shrimp Penaeus aztecus and white shrimp P, set1ferus conducted by the Nat1onal Marine F1sheries Ser- v1ce, Galveston, Texas. (December, 19843 Maria Eugenia de Diego, B. S. , Universidad de Panama Chairman of Adv1sory Committee: Dr. Addison L...

  20. AURORA BOREALIS - Icebreaking Deep-Sea Drilling Platform and Multi-Purpose Research Vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lembke-Jene, L.; Biebow, N.; Kunz-Pirrung, M.; Thiede, J.; Egerton, P.; Azzolini, R.

    2009-04-01

    Future breakthroughs in scientific deep-sea drilling critically depend on our ability to perform field expeditions with state-of-the-art technologies and modern infrastructures. This will require major investments, both in terms of generating new, as well as maintaining and renovating existing infrastructure. Diverse models for science operations are presently projected, also within the context of scientific needs after the current phase of the IODP will come to an end. In spite of its critical role in global climate and tectonic evolution, the Arctic Ocean is one of the most unexplored ocean basins of the world, its geologic and paleo-environmental history remaining largely unknown. Restricted by circulating sea ice, scientific drilling has been slow to arrive in the Arctic Ocean. This lack of data remains and represents one of the largest gaps of information in modern Earth Science. We here report on the finalised technical planning of a new European research icebreaker and deep-sea drilling vessel, the AURORA BOREALIS, designed with an all-season capability of endurance in permanently ice-covered waters. The icebreaker will be able to carry out deep-sea drilling in ice-covered deep-sea basins primarily during the more favorable summer seasons in order to fulfill the needs of the IODP or its eventual successor as a Mission-Specific Platform. AURORA BOREALIS will be the most advanced polar research vessel in the world with a multi-functional role of drilling in deep ocean basins and supporting climate and environmental research and decision support for stakeholder governments within the next 35-40 years. It will feature the highest attainable icebreaker classification, considerably surpassing in performance all currently operating research icebreakers. New technological features to be implemented include a novel hull design and specialized dynamic positioning systems for operations under closed sea-ice cover conditions with up to 2.5 m ice thickness, combined with advanced ice-forecasting support. The vessel is planned to operate routinely without ice management support by additional icebreakers, thus reducing operational costs for scientific drilling in polar regions considerably. Two moon-pools (7x7 m each) will allow routine deployment of Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV) and Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUV) in ice conditions. A dedicated deep-sea drilling rig with full weather protection will enable sampling of the ocean floor in water depths between 100 and 5000 m with more than 1000 m penetration under polar conditions. The modular arrangement of science space with hangars, the possibility to flexibly equip the ship with laboratory or supply containers and with helicopters, addresses the needs of diverse disciplines in marine research. This icebreaker will allow to stage long international, interdisciplinary drilling expeditions in the central Arctic. In a long-term perspective, AURORA BOREALIS will also be used to address Antarctic research targets, both in its mode as a regular research and a scientific drilling vessel.

  1. COMPARISON OF CARBON AND NITROGEN FLUXES IN TIDEFLAT FOOD WEBS DOMINATED BY BURROWING SHRIMP OR BY CULTURED OYSTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two species of indigenous, thalassinid burrowing shrimps are pests to the benthic culture of Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) because deposition of sediment excavated by the shrimps buries or smothers the oysters. Carbaryl pesticide is used to reduce burrowing shrimp densitie...

  2. Improved methodology for the estimation of sulfur dioxide in shrimp

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, B.J. III

    1987-01-01

    A large portion of the shrimp harvested in the Gulf of Mexico are treated with sodium bisulfite to prevent melanosis. The Food and Drug Administration recognizes the need for this additive and regards a one minute dip in a 1.2% sodium bisulfite solution as current good manufacturing practice. Recently, sulfites have come under close scrutiny by regulatory authorities because they have been implicated as causing severe reaction in asthmatics. The objective of this study was to develop a rapid, efficient method for determining SO/sub 2/ in shrimp and to determine the stability of SO/sub 2/ in shrimp during frozen storage.

  3. Economic feasibility of commercial shrimp farming in Texas 

    E-print Network

    Williams, Robert James

    1973-01-01

    with some supplemental help during harvesting. While the manager oversees the operations, the la'borer is occupied pri- marily with maintenance except during harvest period. s. The investor may wish to manage the shrimp farm himself if he feels he has...-sufficient in this regard. . Feed. In the Texas ASH facility water is cir- culated through the pond system on a continual 'basis; thus food. must be supplied. for the shrimp. The amount of food required. is a function of the size of the shrimp farm, the stocking...

  4. Economic and financial implications of shrimp farming in West Texas

    E-print Network

    Britt, David Westbrook

    1995-01-01

    and Parker 1974) as well as single crop production (Johns et al. 1985; Anderson and Tabb 1970; and Hanson et al. 1985). Juan (1989) has compared the profitability of producing two crops per year to producing one crop per year. Several additional studies...) for the production of pink shrimp (Penaeus duorarum) and concluded that shrimp farming was not profitable. Hanson et al. (1985) studied the economic feasibility of shrimp farming on the coast of Texas for several farm sizes. The analysis determined that higher...

  5. GENETIC CHARACTERIZATION OF A BURROWING SHRIMP (NEOTRYPAEA CALIFORNIENSIS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ghost shrimp, (Neotypaea californiensis) are burrowers, whose bioturbation and sediment destabilizations have a negative effect on mariculture of the commercially important oyster (Crassostrea gigas). Oyster farmers in Washington and Oregon estuaries have been poisoning these shr...

  6. Antimicrobial Interventions to Reduce Listeria spp. Contamination on Shrimp 

    E-print Network

    Wong, Tsui-Yin

    2010-01-14

    The effects of selected antimicrobials, applied singularly or in combination, and frozen or refrigerated storage conditions on the survival of Listeria spp. on inoculated shrimp was evaluated in this study. A combination ...

  7. MAPPING BURROWING SHRIMP AND SEAGRASS IN YAQUINA ESTUARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Burrowing shrimp and seagrasses create extensive intertidal and shallow subtidal habitats within Pacific NW estuaries. Maps of their populations are useful to inform estuarine managers of locations that deserve special consideration for conservation, and to inform oyster farmers...

  8. Mictomys borealis (northern bog lemming) and the Wisconsin paleoecology of the east-central Great Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, Jim I.; Bell, Christopher J.; Murray, Lyndon K.

    1992-03-01

    Teeth of northern bog lemming, Mictomys borealis, are reported from Cathedral and Smith Creek caves and represent the first Wisconsin remains of the genus from the Great Basin. Specimens from Cathedral Cave, Snake Range, are associated with U-series ages of 24,000 to 15,000 yr B.P. Previous work with pollen and packrat middens, dating to the same age as the Mictomys, indicate that Smith Creek Canyon contained a riparian, locally mesic community, including Picea engelmannii (spruce), Betula sp. (birch), Cercocarpus sp. (mountain mahogany), and Artemisia sp. (sagebrush) among other species. Exposed canyon slopes and the adjacent valley apparently contained a more xeric steppe community including sagebrush and Chenopodiineae species; rocky outcrop permitted Pinus flexilis (limber pine) and P. longaeva (bristlecone pine) to grow adjacent to Lake Bonneville or low in the canyon. The region apparently experienced a dry climate (not necessarily drier than today); however, Smith Creek Canyon was fed by glacial meltwater from Mt. Moriah. The northern bog lemming probably lived only in the riparian community and possibly on the north-facing slope below Cathedral Cave. Few canyons of the Snake Range would have had the unusually mesic conditions found in Smith Creek Canyon.

  9. Neuropeptidomic analysis of the brain and thoracic ganglion from the Jonah crab, Cancer borealis.

    PubMed

    Huybrechts, Jurgen; Nusbaum, Michael P; Bosch, Luc Vanden; Baggerman, Geert; De Loof, Arnold; Schoofs, Liliane

    2003-08-29

    Mass spectrometric methods were applied to determine the peptidome of the brain and thoracic ganglion of the Jonah crab (Cancer borealis). Fractions obtained by high performance liquid chromatography were characterized using MALDI-TOF MS and ESI-Q-TOF MS/MS. In total, 28 peptides were identified within the molecular mass range 750-3000Da. Comparison of the molecular masses obtained with MALDI-TOF MS with the calculated molecular masses of known crustacean peptides revealed the presence of at least nine allatostatins, three orcokinin precursor derived peptides, namely FDAFTTGFGHS, [Ala(13)]-orcokinin, and [Val(13)]-orcokinin, and two kinins, a tachykinin-related peptide and four FMRFamide-related peptides. Eight other peptides were de novo sequenced by collision induced dissociation on the Q-TOF system and yielded AYNRSFLRFamide, PELDHVFLRFamide or EPLDHVFLRFamide, APQRNFLRFamide, LNPFLRFamide, DVRTPALRLRFamide, and LRNLRFamide, which belong to the FMRFamide related peptide family, as well as NFDEIDRSGFA and NFDEIDRSSFGFV, which display high sequence similarity to peptide sequences within the orcokinin precursor of Orconectes limosus. Our paper is the first (neuro)peptidomic analysis of the crustacean nervous system. PMID:12914784

  10. Zeta^2 Coronae Borealis, a Spectroscopic Triple System Including an Asynchronous Close Binary

    E-print Network

    K. D. Gordon; C. L. Mulliss

    1996-11-12

    Using the 1-m telescope at Ritter Observatory, we took 36 observations of zeta^2 Coronae Borealis with a fiber-fed echelle spectrograph. From these observations, zeta^2 CrB was found to be a triple system and a new spectroscopic orbit was calculated. This orbit has two periods, a 1.72357 day period for the inner binary composed of zeta^2 CrB A & B and a 251 day period for the outer binary composed of zeta^2 CrB AB & C. The inner binary is a double-lined spectroscopic binary composed of two B7 V stars. The inner binary's center of mass (zeta^2 CrB AB) describes a long-period single-lined variation identified with the outer binary. The inner binary period is significantly shorter than the 12.5842 day period previously calculated by Abhyankar & Sarma (1966). The inner binary possesses an essentially circular orbit (e = 0.01) while the outer binary has an eccentric orbit (e = 0.48). From the widths of their Si II 6371 A lines, the vsini's were calculated to be 46 +/- 7 km s^-1 for zeta^2 CrB A and 7.5 +/- 2 km s^-1 for zeta^2 CrB B. As zeta^2 CrB A & B have similar masses, their different rotational velocities make this system a sensitive test of synchronization theories.

  11. The MACHO Project LMC Variable Star Inventory: III. New R Coronae Borealis Stars

    E-print Network

    C. Alcock; R. A. Allsman; D. R. Alves; T. S. Axelrod; A. Becker; D. P. Bennett; G. C. Clayton; K. H. Cook; K. C. Freeman; K. Griest; J. A. Guern; D. Kilkenny; M. J. Lehner; S. L. Marshall; B. A. Peterson; M. R. Pratt; P. J. Quinn; A. W. Rodgers; C. W. Stubbs; W. Sutherland; D. L. Welch

    1996-05-07

    We report the discovery of two new R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using the MACHO project photometry database. The identification of both stars has been confirmed spectroscopically. One is a cool RCB star (T_eff about 5000 K) characterized by very strong Swan bands of C_2 and violet bands of CN, and weak or absent Balmer lines, G-band and 12C-13C bands. The second star is an example of a hot RCB star of which only 3 were previously known to exist in the Galaxy and none in the LMC. Its spectrum is characterized by several C II lines in emission. Both stars have shown deep declines of Delta V > 4 mag in brightness. The new stars are significantly fainter at maximum light than the three previously known LMC RCB stars. The amount of reddening toward these stars is somewhat uncertain but both seem to have absolute magnitudes, M_V, about half a magnitude fainter than the other three stars. Estimates of M_Bol find that the hot RCB star lies in the range of the other three stars while the cool RCB star is fainter. The two cool LMC RCB stars are the faintest at M_Bol. The discovery of these two new stars brings to five the number of known RCB stars in the LMC and demonstrates the utility of the MACHO photometric database for the discovery of new RCB stars.

  12. Detection of Near-IR CO Absorption Bands in R Coronae Borealis Stars

    E-print Network

    Emily D. Tenenbaum; Geoffrey C. Clayton; Martin Asplund; C. W. Engelbracht; Karl D. Gordon; M. M. Hanson; Richard J. Rudy; David K. Lynch; S. Mazuk; Catherine C. Venturini; R. C. Puetter

    2005-03-23

    R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars are hydrogen-deficient, carbon-rich pulsating post-AGB stars that experience massive irregular declines in brightness caused by circumstellar dust formation. The mechanism of dust formation around RCB stars is not well understood. It has been proposed that CO molecules play an important role in cooling the circumstellar gas so that dust may form. We report on a survey for CO in a sample of RCB stars. We obtained H- and K-band spectra including the first and second overtone CO bands for eight RCB stars, the RCB-like star, DY Per and the final-helium-flash star, FG Sge. The first and second overtone CO bands were detected in the cooler (T(eff)6000 K) RCB stars, R CrB, RY Sgr, SU Tau, XX Cam. In addition, first overtone bands are seen in FG Sge, a final-helium-flash star that is in an RCB-like phase at present. Effective temperatures of the eight RCB stars range from 4000 to 7250 K. The observed photospheric CO absorption bands were compared to line-blanketed model spectra of RCB stars. As predicted by the models, the CO bands are strongest in the coolest RCB stars and not present in the warmest. No correlation was found between the presence or strength of the CO bands and dust formation activity in the stars.

  13. Population structure of red-cockaded woodpeckers (Picoides borealis) in south Florida: RAPDs revisited

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haig, Susan M.; Bowman, R.; Mullins, Thomas D.

    1996-01-01

    Six south Florida populations of the endangered red-cockaded woodpecker (Picoides borealis) were sampled to examine genetic diversity and population structure in the southernmost portion of the species' range relative to 14 previously sampled populations from throughout the species range. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analyses were used to evaluate the populations (n= 161 individuals, 13 primers, one band/primer). Results suggested that south Florida populations have significant among-population genetic differentiation (FST= 0.17, P < 0.000), although gene flow may be adequate to offset drift (Nm= 1.26). Comparison of Florida populations with others sampled indicated differentiation was less in Florida (FST for all populations = 0.21). Cluster analyses of all 20 populations did not reflect complete geographical predictions, although clustering of distant populations resulted in a significant correlation between genetic distance and geographical distance. Overall, results suggest populations in south Florida, similar to the remainder of the species, have low genetic diversity and high population fragmentation. Exact clustering of distant populations supports the ability of RAPDs to differentiate populations accurately. Our results further support past management recommendations that translocations of birds among geographically proximate populations is preferable to movement of birds between distant populations.

  14. The MACHO Project LMC Variable Star Inventory: X. The R Coronae Borealis Stars

    E-print Network

    C. Alcock; R. A. Allsman; D. R. Alves; T. S. Axelrod; A. Becker; D. P. Bennett; Geoffrey C. Clayton; K. H. Cook; N. Dalal; A. J. Drake; K. C. Freeman; M. Geha; K. D. Gordon; K. Griest; D. Kilkenny; M. J. Lehner; S. L. Marshall; D. Minniti; K. A. Misselt; C. A. Nelson; B. A. Peterson; P. Popowski; M. R. Pratt; P. J. Quinn; C. W. Stubbs; W. Sutherland; A. Tomaney; T. Vandehei; D. L. Welch

    2001-02-15

    We report the discovery of eight new R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using the MACHO project photometry database. The discovery of these new stars increases the number of known RCB stars in the LMC to thirteen. We have also discovered four stars similar to the Galactic variable DY Per. These stars decline much more slowly and are cooler than the RCB stars. The absolute luminosities of the Galactic RCB stars are unknown since there is no direct measurement of the distance to any Galactic RCB star. Hence, the importance of the LMC RCB stars. We find a much larger range of absolute magnitudes (M(V) = -2.5 to -5 mag) than inferred from the small pre-MACHO sample of LMC RCB stars. It is likely that there is a temperature - M(V)relationship with the cooler stars being intrinsically fainter. Cool (~5000 K) RCB stars are much more common than previously thought based on the Galactic RCB star sample. Using the fairly complete sample of RCB stars discovered in the MACHO fields, we have estimated the likely number of RCB stars in the Galaxy to be ~3,200. The SMC MACHO fields were also searched for RCB stars but none were found.

  15. Do R Coronae Borealis Stars Form from Double White Dwarf Mergers?

    E-print Network

    Staff, Jan E; Herwig, Falk; Even, Wesley; Fryer, Chris L; Motl, Patrick M; Geballe, Tom; Pignatari, Marco; Clayton, Geoffrey C; Tohline, Joel E

    2012-01-01

    A leading formation scenario for R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars invokes the merger of degenerate He and CO white dwarfs (WD) in a binary. The observed ratio of 16O/18O for RCB stars is in the range of 0.3-20 much smaller than the solar value of ~500. In this paper, we investigate whether such a low ratio can be obtained in simulations of the merger of a CO and a He white dwarf. We present the results of five 3-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the merger of a double white dwarf system where the total mass is 0.9 Mdot and the initial mass ratio (q) varies between 0.5 and 0.99. We identify in simulations with $q\\lesssim0.7$ a feature around the merged stars where the temperatures and densities are suitable for forming 18O. However, more 16O is being dredged-up from the C- and O-rich accretor during the merger than the amount of 18O that is produced. Therefore, on a dynamical time scale over which our hydrodynamics simulation runs, a 16O/18O ratio of ~2000 in the "best" case is found. If the conditions fou...

  16. VLTI observations of the dust geometry around R Coronae Borealis stars

    E-print Network

    Bright, S N; Clayton, G C; De Marco, O; Leão, I C; Nordhaus, J; Gallagher, J S

    2011-01-01

    We are investigating the formation and evolution of dust around the hydrogen-deficient supergiants known as R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars. We aim to determine the connection between the probable merger past of these stars and their current dust-production activities. We carried out high-angular resolution interferometric observations of three RCB stars, namely RY Sgr, V CrA, and V854 Cen with the mid-IR interferometer, MIDI on the VLTI, using two telescope pairs. The baselines ranged from 30 to 60 m, allowing us to probe the dusty environment at very small spatial scales (~ 50 mas or 400 stellar radii). The observations of the RCB star dust environments were interpreted using both geometrical models and one-dimensional radiative transfer codes. From our analysis we find that asymmetric circumstellar material is apparent in RY Sgr, may also exist in V CrA, and is possible for V854 Cen. Overall, we find that our observations are consistent with dust forming in clumps ejected randomly around the RCB star so tha...

  17. The Circumstellar Environment of R Coronae Borealis: White Dwarf Merger or Final Helium Shell Flash?

    E-print Network

    Clayton, Geoffrey C; Stanford, S Adam; Whitney, B A; Honor, J; Babler, B; Barlow, M J; Gordon, K D; Andrews, J E; Geballe, T R; Bond, Howard E; De Marco, O; Lawson, W A; Sibthorpe, B; Olofsson, G; Polehampton, E; Gomez, H L; Matsuura, M; Hargrave, P C; Ivison, R J; Wesson, R; Leeks, S J; Swinyard, B M; Lim, T L

    2011-01-01

    In 2007, R Coronae Borealis (R CrB) went into an historically deep and long decline. In this state, the dust acts like a natural coronagraph at visible wavelengths, allowing faint nebulosity around the star to be seen. Imaging has been obtained from 0.5 to 500 micron with Gemini/GMOS, HST/WFPC2, Spitzer/MIPS, and Herschel/SPIRE. Several of the structures around R CrB are cometary globules caused by wind from the star streaming past dense blobs. The estimated dust mass of the knots is consistent with their being responsible for the R CrB declines if they form along the line of sight to the star. In addition, there is a large diffuse shell extending up to 4 pc away from the star containing cool 25 K dust that is detected all the way out to 500 micron. The SED of R CrB can be well fit by a 150 AU disk surrounded by a very large diffuse envelope which corresponds to the size of the observed nebulosity. The total masses of the disk and envelope are 10^-4 and 10^2 M(Sun), respectively, assuming a gas-to-dust ratio ...

  18. The spatial distribution of galaxies within the CMB cold spot in the Corona Borealis supercluster

    E-print Network

    Padilla-Torres, C P; Rebolo, R; Genova-Santos, R; Rubiño-Martín, J A

    2009-01-01

    We study the spatial distribution and colours of galaxies within the region covered by the cold spot in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) recently detected by the Very Small Array (VSA; Genova-Santos et al. 2005, 2008) towards the Corona Borealis supercluster (CrB-SC). The spot is in the northern part of a region with a radius ~1 degree (~5 Mpc at the redshift of CrB-SC) enclosing the clusters Abell 2056, 2065, 2059 and 2073, and where the density of galaxies, excluding the contribution from those clusters, is ~2 times higher than the mean value in typical intercluster regions of the CrB-SC. Two of such clusters (Abell 2056 and 2065) are members of the CrB-SC, while the other two are in the background. This high density intercluster region is quite inhomogeneous, being the most remarkable feature a large concentration of galaxies in a narrow filament running from Abell 2065 with a length of ~35 arcmin (~3 Mpc at the redshift of CrB-SC) in the SW-NE direction. This intercluster population of galaxies proba...

  19. The Largest Gravitationally Bound Structures: The Corona Borealis Supercluster - Mass and Bound Extent

    E-print Network

    Pearson, David W; Batuski, David J

    2014-01-01

    Recent simulations of the densest portion of the Corona Borealis supercluster (A2061, A2065, A2067, and A2089) have shown virtually no possibility of extended gravitationally bound structure without inter-cluster matter (Pearson & Batuski). In contrast, recent analyses of the dynamics found that the clusters had significant peculiar velocities towards the supercluster centroid (Batiste & Batuski). In this paper we present the results of a thorough investigation of the CSC: we determine redshifts and virial masses for all 8 clusters associated with the CSC; repeat the analysis of Batiste & Batuski with the inclusion of A2056 and CL1529+29; estimate the mass of the supercluster by applying the virial theorem on the supercluster scale (e.g. Small et al.), the caustics method (e.g. Reisenegger et al.), and a new procedure using the spherical collapse model (SCM) with the results of the dynamical analysis (SCM+FP); and perform a series of simulations to assess the likelihood of the CSC being a gravitat...

  20. R Coronae Borealis Stars in M31 from the Palomar Transient Factory

    E-print Network

    Tang, Sumin; Bildsten, Lars; Nugent, Peter; Bellm, Eric; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R; Laher, Russ; Levitan, David; Masci, Frank; Ofek, Eran O; Prince, Thomas A; Sesar, Branimir; Surace, Jason

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery of R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars in the Andromeda galaxy (M31) using the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). RCB stars are rare hydrogen-deficient, carbon-rich supergiant variables, most likely the merger products of two white dwarfs. These new RCBs, including two confirmed ones and two candidates, are the first to be found beyond the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds. All of M31 RCBs showed >1.5 mag irregular declines over timescales of weeks to months. Due to the limiting magnitude of our data (R~21-22 mag), these RCB stars have R~19.5 to 20.5 mag at maximum light, corresponding to M_R= -4 to -5, making them some of the most luminous RCBs known. Spectra of two objects show that they are warm RCBs, similar to the Milky Way RCBs RY Sgr and V854 Cen. We consider these results, derived from a pilot study of M31 variables, as an important proof-of-concept for the study of rare bright variables in nearby galaxies with the PTF or other synoptic surveys.

  1. Discovery of Bright Galactic R Coronae Borealis and DY Persei Variables: Rare Gems Mined from ASAS

    E-print Network

    Miller, A A; Bloom, J S; Cenko, S B; Silverman, J M; Starr, D L; Stassun, K G

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a machine-learning (ML) based search for new R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars and DY Persei-like stars (DYPers) in the Galaxy using cataloged light curves obtained by the All-Sky Automated Survey (ASAS). RCB stars - a rare class of hydrogen-deficient carbon-rich supergiants - are of great interest owing to the insights they can provide on the late stages of stellar evolution. DYPers are possibly the low-temperature, low-luminosity analogs to the RCB phenomenon, though additional examples are needed to fully establish this connection. While RCB stars and DYPers are traditionally identified by epochs of extreme dimming that occur without regularity, the ML search framework more fully captures the richness and diversity of their photometric behavior. We demonstrate that our ML method recovers ASAS candidates that would have been missed by traditional search methods employing hard cuts on amplitude and periodicity. Our search yields 13 candidates that we consider likely RCB stars/DYPers: n...

  2. Tracking down R Coronae Borealis stars from their mid-infrared WISE colours

    E-print Network

    Tisserand, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    R Coronae Borealis stars (RCBs) are hydrogen-deficient and carbon-rich supergiant stars. They are very rare, as only $\\sim50$ are actually known in our Galaxy. Interestingly, RCBs are strongly suspected to be the evolved merger product of two white dwarfs and could therefore be an important tool to understand Supernovae type Ia in the double degenerate scenario. Constraints on the spatial distribution and the formation rate of such stars are needed to picture their origin and test it in the context of actual population synthesis results. To do so, it is crucial to increase significantly the number of known RCBs. With an absolute magnitude $\\mathrm{M_V\\sim-5}$ and a bright/hot circumstellar shell made of amorphous carbon grains, RCBs are really distinctive stars. Mono-epoch mid-infrared data can help us to discriminate RCBs among other dust-producing stars. The aim is to produce from the WISE and 2MASS infrared catalogues a new catalogue of reasonable size, enriched with RCB stars. Colour-Colour cuts used on a...

  3. Double white dwarf mergers and elemental surface abundances in extreme helium and R Coronae Borealis stars

    E-print Network

    Jeffery, C Simon; Saio, Hideyuki

    2011-01-01

    The surface abundances of extreme helium (EHe) and R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars are discussed in terms of the merger of a carbon-oxygen white dwarf with a helium white dwarf. The model is expressed as a linear mixture of the individual layers of both constituent white dwarfs, taking account of the specific evolution of each star. In developing this recipe from previous versions, particular attention has been given to the inter-shell abundances of the asymptotic giant branch star which evolved to become the carbon-oxygen white dwarf. Thus the surface composition of the merged star is estimated as a function of the initial mass and metallicity of its progenitor. The question of whether additional nucleosynthesis occurs during the white dwarf merger has been examined. The high observed abundances of carbon and oxygen must either originate by dredge-up from the core of the carbon-oxygen white dwarf during a cold merger or be generated directly by alpha-burning during a hot merger. The presence of large quantiti...

  4. Dust around R Coronae Borealis stars: II. Infrared emission features in a H-poor environment

    E-print Network

    Garcia-Hernandez, D A; Lambert, D L

    2013-01-01

    Residual Spitzer/IRS spectra for a sample of 31 R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars are presented and discussed in terms of narrow emission features superimposed on the quasi-blackbody continuous infrared emission. A broad ~6-10 um dust emission complex is seen in the RCBs showing an extreme H-deficiency. A secondary and much weaker ~11.5-15 um broad emission feature is detected in a few RCBs with the strongest ~6-10 um dust complex. The Spitzer infrared spectra reveal for the first time the structure within the ~6-10 um dust complex, showing the presence of strong C-C stretching modes at ~6.3 and 8.1 um as well as of other dust features at ~5.9, 6.9, and 7.3 um, which are attributable to amorphous carbonaceous solids with little or no hydrogen. The few RCBs with only moderate H-deficiencies display the classical 'unidentified infrared bands (UIRs)' and mid-infrared features from fullerene-related molecules. In general, the characteristics of the RCB infrared emission features are not correlated with the stellar a...

  5. Dust around R Coronae Borealis stars: I. Spitzer/IRS observations

    E-print Network

    Garcia-Hernandez, D A; Lambert, David L

    2011-01-01

    Spitzer/IRS spectra from 5 to 37 um for a complete sample of 31 R Coronae Borealis stars (RCBs) are presented. These spectra are combined with optical and near-infrared photometry of each RCB at maximum light to compile a spectral energy distribution (SED). The SEDs are fitted with blackbody flux distributions and estimates made of the ratio of the infrared flux from circumstellar dust to the flux emitted by the star. Comparisons for 29 of the 31 stars are made with the IRAS fluxes from three decades earlier: Spitzer and IRAS fluxes at 12 um and 25 um are essentially equal for all but a minority of the sample. For this minority, the IRAS to Spitzer flux ratio exceeds a factor of three. The outliers are suggested to be stars where formation of a dust cloud or dust puff is a rare event. A single puff ejected prior to the IRAS observations may have been reobserved by Spitzer as a cooler puff at a greater distance from the RCB. RCBs which experience more frequent optical declines have, in general, a circumstellar...

  6. Long-term Spatial and Temporal Variations of Aurora Borealis Events in the Period 1700 - 1905

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, M.; Vaquero, J. M.; Gallego, M. C.

    2014-05-01

    Catalogues and other records of aurora-borealis events were used to study the long-term spatial and temporal variation of these phenomena in the period from 1700 to 1905 in the Northern Hemisphere. For this purpose, geographic and geomagnetic coordinates were assigned to approximately 27 000 auroral events with more than 80 000 observations. They were analyzed separately in three large-scale areas: i) Europe and North Africa, ii) North America, and iii) Asia. There was a clear need to fill some gaps existing in the records so as to have a reliable proxy of solar activity, especially during the 18th century. In order to enhance the long-term variability, an 11-year smoothing window was applied to the data. Variations in the cumulative numbers of auroral events with latitude (in both geographic and geomagnetic coordinates) were used to discriminate between the two main solar sources: coronal mass ejections and high-speed streams from coronal holes. The characteristics of the associated auroras correlate differently with the solar-activity cycle.

  7. Streptomyces graminisoli sp. nov. and Streptomyces rhizophilus sp. nov., isolated from bamboo (Sasa borealis) rhizosphere soil.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyo-Jin; Whang, Kyung-Sook

    2014-05-01

    Four strains of actinomycete, designated strains JR-19T, JR-12, JR-29 and JR-41T were isolated from bamboo (Sasa borealis) rhizosphere soil. Phylogenetic, morphological, chemotaxonomic and phenotypic analysis demonstrated that the four strains belong to the genus Streptomyces. Microscopic observation revealed that the four strains produced spirales spore chains with spiny surfaces. The cell-wall peptidoglycan of the four strains contained ll-diaminopimelic acid, glutamic acid, alanine and glycine. Whole-cell hydrolysates mainly contained glucose and ribose. The predominant menaquinones were MK-9 (H6) and MK-9 (H8). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons revealed that these strains and the members of the genus Streptomyces exhibited moderately high 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities of 98.3-99.3%, with the most closely related strains being Streptomyces shenzhenensis 172115T and Streptomyces gramineus JR-43T. Based on the phenotypic and genotypic data, the four strains are considered to represent two novel species of the genus Streptomyces, for which the names Streptomyces graminisoli sp. nov. [to accommodate strains JR-19T (type strain; =KACC 16472T=NBRC 108883T), JR-12 (=KACC 16471) and JR-29 (=KACC 16473)] and Streptomyces rhizophilus sp. nov. [for strain JR-41T (=KACC 16580T=NBRC 108885T)] are proposed. PMID:24478213

  8. The ongoing pursuit of R Coronae Borealis stars: ASAS-3 survey strikes again

    E-print Network

    Tisserand, P; Welch, D L; Pilecki, B; Wyrzykowski, L; Kilkenny, D

    2012-01-01

    R Coronae Borealis stars (RCBs) are rare, hydrogen-deficient, carbon-rich supergiant variable stars that are likely the evolved merger products of pairs of CO and He white dwarfs. Only 55 RCB stars are known in our galaxy and their distribution on the sky is weighted heavily by microlensing survey field positions. A less-biased wide-area survey would provide the ability to test competing evolutionary scenarios, understand the population or populations that produce RCBs and constraint their formation rate. The ASAS-3 survey monitored the sky south of declination +28 deg since 2000 to a limiting magnitude of V=14. We searched ASAS-3 for RCB variables using a number of different methods to ensure that the probability of RCB detection was as high as possible and to reduce selection biases based on luminosity, temperature, dust production activity and shell brightness. Candidates whose light curves were visually inspected were pre-selected based on their infrared excesses due to warm dust in their circumstellar sh...

  9. R Coronae Borealis stars in the Galactic Bulge discovered by EROS-2

    E-print Network

    Tisserand, P; Wood, P R; Lesquoy, E; Beaulieu, J P; Milsztajn, A; Hamadache, C; Afonso, C; Albert, J N; Andersen, J; Ansari, R; Aubourg, E; Bareyre, P; Charlot, X; Coutures, C; Ferlet, R; Fouqué, P; Glicenstein, J F; Goldman, B; Gould, A; Gros, M; Haïssinski, J; De Kat, J; Guillou, L Le; Loup, C; Magneville, C; Maurice, E; Maury, A; Moniez, M; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Perdereau, O; Rahal, Y; Rich, J; Spiro, M; Vidal-Madjar, A; Zylberajch, S

    2008-01-01

    Rare types of variable star may give unique insight into short-lived stages of stellar evolution. The systematic monitoring of millions of stars and advanced light curve analysis techniques of microlensing surveys make them ideal for discovering also such rare variable stars. One example is the R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars, a rare type of evolved carbon-rich supergiant. We have conducted a systematic search of the EROS-2 database for the Galactic catalogue Bulge and spiral arms to find Galactic RCB stars. The light curves of $\\sim$100 million stars, monitored for 6.7 years (from July 1996 to February 2003), have been analysed to search for the main signature of RCB stars, large and rapid drops in luminosity. Follow-up spectroscopy has been used to confirm the photometric candidates. We have discovered 14 new RCB stars, all in the direction of the Galactic Bulge, bringing the total number of confirmed Galactic RCB stars to about 51. After reddening correction, the colours and absolute magnitudes of at least ...

  10. Photometric Analysis of Magellanic Cloud R Coronae Borealis Stars in the Recovery Phases of Their Declines*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woollands, R. M.; Cottrell, P. L.; Udalski, A.

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents the initial results of a multi-site photometric programme to examine the extraordinary behaviour displayed by 18 R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars in the Magellanic Clouds (MCs). RCB stars exhibit a unique variability whereby they undergo rapid declines of up to several magnitudes. These are thought to be caused by the formation of dust in the stellar environment which reduces the brightness. The monitoring programme comprised the collection of UBVRI photometric data using five telescopes located at three different southern hemisphere longitudes (Las Campanas Observatory in Chile, Mount John University Observatory in New Zealand, and the Southern African Large Telescope, SALT, in South Africa). Examination of the data acquired in the V and I filters resulted in the identification of a total of 18 RCB declines occurring in four stars. Construction of colour-magnitude diagrams (V versus V - I), during the recovery to maximum light were undertaken in order to study the unique colour behaviour associated with the RCB declines. The combined recovery slope for the four stars was determined to be 3.37 +/- 0.24, which is similar to the value of 3.1 +/- 0.1 calculated for galactic RCB stars (Skuljan et al. 2003). These results may imply that the nature of the dust (i.e. the particle size) is similar in both our Galaxy and the MCs.

  11. R Coronae Borealis Stars in M31 from the Palomar Transient Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Sumin; Cao, Yi; Bildsten, Lars; Nugent, Peter; Bellm, Eric; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Laher, Russ; Levitan, David; Masci, Frank; Ofek, Eran O.; Prince, Thomas A.; Sesar, Branimir; Surace, Jason

    2013-04-01

    We report the discovery of R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars in the Andromeda galaxy (M31) using the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). RCB stars are rare hydrogen-deficient, carbon-rich supergiant variables, most likely the merger products of two white dwarfs. These new RCBs, including two confirmed ones and two candidates, are the first to be found beyond the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds. All of M31 RCBs showed >1.5 mag irregular declines over timescales of weeks to months. Due to the limiting magnitude of our data (R ? 21-22 mag), these RCB stars have R ? 19.5-20.5 mag at maximum light, corresponding to MR = -4 to -5, making them some of the most luminous RCBs known. Spectra of two objects show that they are warm RCBs, similar to the Milky Way RCBs RY Sgr and V854 Cen. We consider these results, derived from a pilot study of M31 variables, as an important proof-of-concept for the study of rare bright variables in nearby galaxies with the PTF or other synoptic surveys.

  12. Millimetric observation of the SZ effect in the Corona Borealis supercluster

    E-print Network

    E. S. Battistelli; M. De Petris; L. Lamagna; R. A. Watson; R. Rebolo; F. Melchiorri; R. Génova-Santos; G. Luzzi; S. De Gregori; J. A. Rubiño-Martin; R. D. Davies; R. J. Davis; K. Grainge; M. P. Hobson; R. D. E. Saunders; P. F. Scott

    2006-12-20

    We have observed the Corona Borealis Supercluster with the Millimeter and Infrared Testa grigia Observatory (MITO), located in the Italian Alps, at 143, 214, 272, and 353 GHz. We present a description of the measurements, data analysis, and results of the observations together with a comparison with observations performed at 33 GHz with the Very Small Array (VSA) interferometer situated at the Teide Observatory (Tenerife-Spain). Observations have been made in the direction of the supercluster towards one Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) cold spot previously detected in a VSA temperature map. Observational strategy and data analysis are described in detail, explaining the procedures used to disentangle primary and secondary anisotropies in the resulting maps. From a first level of data analysis we find evidence in MITO data of primary anisotropy, however still with room for the presence of secondary anisotropy, especially when VSA results are included. With a second level of data analysis using map-making and the maximum entropy method we claim a weak detection of a faint signal compatible with a SZ effect characterized at most by a Comptonization parameter $y=(7.8^{+5.3}_{-4.4})\\times10^{-6}$ 68% CL. The low level of confidence in the presence of a SZ signal invite us to study this sky region with higher sensitivity and angular resolution experiments like the already planned upgraded versions of VSA and MITO.

  13. Shrimp and redfish studies, bryan mound brine disposal site off Freeport, Texas, 1979-1981. Volume IV. Interview sampling survey of shrimp catch and effort. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.F.

    1981-06-01

    An interview sampling survey of shrimp catch and fishing effort was conducted at specified ports along the Texas coast to strengthen the information base required to determine the effect of the disposal of brine from the Bryan Mound salt dome off Freeport, Texas on commercial brown shrimp (Penaeus aztecus) and white shrimp (Penaeus setiferus) populations in the Gulf of Mexico. The data recorded included port number, vessel name, official vessel number, shrimp dealer number, date of landing, area fished, depth of capture, days fished, and pounds of shrimp caught by species and size categories.

  14. Enhanced Cellular Immunity in Shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) after ‘Vaccination’

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Emily C.; Shields, Robin J.; Wardle, Robin; Rowley, Andrew F.

    2011-01-01

    It has long been viewed that invertebrates rely exclusively upon a wide variety of innate mechanisms for protection from disease and parasite invasion and lack any specific acquired immune mechanisms comparable to those of vertebrates. Recent findings, however, suggest certain invertebrates may be able to mount some form of specific immunity, termed ‘specific immune priming’, although the mechanism of this is not fully understood (see Textbox S1). In our initial experiments, either formalin-inactivated Vibrio harveyi or sterile saline were injected into the main body cavity (haemocoel) of juvenile shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei). Haemocytes (blood cells) from V. harveyi-injected shrimp were collected 7 days later and incubated with a 1?1 mix of V. harveyi and an unrelated Gram positive bacterium, Bacillus subtilis. Haemocytes from ‘vaccinated’ shrimp showed elevated levels of phagocytosis of V. harveyi, but not B. subtilis, compared with those from saline-injected (non-immunised) animals. The increased phagocytic activity was characterised by a significant increase in the percentage of phagocytic cells. When shrimp were injected with B. subtilis rather than vibrio, there was no significant increase in the phagocytic activity of haemocytes from these animals in comparison to the non-immunised (saline injected) controls. Whole haemolymph (blood) from either ‘immunised’ or non-immunised’ shrimp was shown to display innate humoral antibacterial activity against V. harveyi that was absent against B. subtilis. However, there was no difference in the potency of antibacterial activity between V. harveyi-injected shrimp and control (saline injected) animals showing that ‘vaccination’ has no effect on this component of the shrimp's immune system. These results imply that the cellular immune system of shrimp, particularly phagocytosis, is capable of a degree of specificity and shows the phenomenon of ‘immune priming’ reported by other workers. However, in agreement with other studies, this phenomenon is not universal to all potential pathogens. PMID:21698190

  15. Induction of Shrimp Tropomyosin-Specific Hypersensitivity in Mice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patrick S. C. Leung; Yuen Shan Lee; Chi Yan Tang; Wing Yee Kung; Ya-Hui Chuang; Bor-Luen Chiang; Ming Chiu Fung; Ka Hou Chu

    2008-01-01

    Background: Shellfish hypersensitivity is amongst the most common food allergies. The major shellfish allergen was identified as tropomyosin. Here, we investigated the immediate hypersensitivity responses, IgE and cell-mediated immune response in mice sensitized with recombinant shrimp tropomyosin. Methods: Shrimp tropomyosin was cloned and expressed as a His-tagged fusion recombinant protein in Escherichia coli. Three- to 4-week-old BALB\\/c mice were sensitized

  16. Diurnal and nocturnal catchability of Kuwait's commercial shrimps

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M. Bishop; Y. Ye; A. H. Alsaffar; H. M. Al-Foudari; S. Al-Jazzaf

    2008-01-01

    In descending order of importance, the shrimps Penaeus semisulcatus De Haan, 1844; Metapenaeus affinis (H. Milne-Edwards, 1837); and Parapenaeopsis stylifera (H. Milne-Edwards, 1837) account for over 95% of Kuwait's commercial landings. Throughout its range, P. semisulcatus is nocturnal, but Kuwait trawlers are active 24h a day during season. Historically, all scientific shrimp surveys in Kuwait have been conducted during daylight

  17. Detection of virus in shrimp using digital color correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Borrego, Josue; Chavez-Sanchez, Cristina; Bueno-Ibarra, Mario A.

    1999-07-01

    Detection of virus in shrimp tissue using digital color correlation is presented. Phase filters in three channels (red, green and blue) were used in order to detect HPV virus like target. These first results obtained showed that is possible to detect virus in shrimp tissue. More research must be made with color correlation in order to consider natural morphology of the virus, color, scale and rotation and noise in the samples.

  18. How Snapping Shrimp Snap: Through Cavitating Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versluis, Michel; Schmitz, Barbara; von der Heydt, Anna; Lohse, Detlef

    2000-09-01

    The snapping shrimp (Alpheus heterochaelis) produces a loud snapping sound by an extremely rapid closure of its snapper claw. One of the effects of the snapping is to stun or kill prey animals. During the rapid snapper claw closure, a high-velocity water jet is emitted from the claw with a speed exceeding cavitation conditions. Hydrophone measurements in conjunction with time-controlled high-speed imaging of the claw closure demonstrate that the sound is emitted at the cavitation bubble collapse and not on claw closure. A model for the bubble dynamics based on a Rayleigh-Plesset-type equation quantitatively accounts for the time dependence of the bubble radius and for the emitted sound.

  19. Performance Monitoring in a Myrinet-Connected Shrimp Cluster Cheng Liao Margaret Martonosi Douglas W. Clark

    E-print Network

    Martonosi, Margaret

    Performance Monitoring in a Myrinet-Connected Shrimp Cluster Cheng Liao Margaret Martonosi Douglas. We present a firmware-based performance monitor we de- signed for a Myrinet-connected Shrimp cluster

  20. UPb SHRIMP zircon geochronology and Ttd history of the Kampa Dome, southern Tibet

    E-print Network

    Sandiford, Mike

    U­Pb SHRIMP zircon geochronology and T­t­d history of the Kampa Dome, southern Tibet M.C. Quigley a­Pb SHRIMP geochronology; Himalaya; Tibet 1. Introduction The North Himalayan gneiss domes (NHGD) in southern

  1. The SHRIMP Performance Monitor: Design and Applications Margaret Martonosi Douglas W. Clark Malena Mesarina

    E-print Network

    Clark, Douglas W.

    The SHRIMP Performance Monitor: Design and Applications Margaret Martonosi Douglas W. Clark Malena a performance monitoring sys­ tem for the SHRIMP multicomputer. The system's core is a hardware monitor

  2. Polyculture of indigenous marine fishes stocked with penaeid shrimp in thermally enriched brackish water ponds 

    E-print Network

    Rossberg, Karen Sue

    1979-01-01

    the suitability of cultured shrimp and fishes for human consumption, tissue samples were assayed for concentrations of heavy metals (Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, As, Hg, Pb) and pesticides (pp'DDE, dieldrin, toxaphene, PCB) Shrimp and pompano samples...

  3. RESPONSE OF GHOST SHRIMP (NEOTRYPAEA CALIFORNIENSIS) BIOTURBATION TO ORGANIC MATTER ENRICHMENT OF ESTUARINE INTERTIDAL SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Populations of burrowing shrimp (Neotrypaea californiensis and Upogebia p;ugettensis) are the dominant invertebrate fauna on Pacific estuarine tide flats, occupying >80% of intertidal area in some estuaries. Burrowing shrimp are renowned for their bioturbation of intertidal sedi...

  4. 75 FR 844 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From the Socialist Republic of Vietnam: Extension of Preliminary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-06

    ...Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From the Socialist Republic of Vietnam: Extension of Preliminary Results of Antidumping...shrimp'') from the Socialist Republic of Vietnam (``Vietnam''). This review covers the period February...

  5. 76 FR 36519 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From the Socialist Republic of Vietnam: Extension of Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ...Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From the Socialist Republic of Vietnam: Extension of Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative...frozen warmwater shrimp from the Socialist Republic of Vietnam (``Vietnam''). The review covers the period February...

  6. 75 FR 55740 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From the Socialist Republic of Vietnam: Extension of Preliminary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-14

    ...Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From the Socialist Republic of Vietnam: Extension of Preliminary Results of Antidumping...frozen warmwater shrimp from the Socialist Republic of Vietnam (``Vietnam''). The review covers the period February...

  7. 78 FR 50385 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp from India: Final Affirmative Countervailing Duty Determination

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ...Import Administration, ``Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp from Ecuador, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, People's Republic of China...Duty Investigation on Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp from Ecuador (C- 331-803)--Request for Scope...

  8. Viral resistance in shrimp that express an antisense Taura syndrome virus coat protein gene.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuanan; Sun, Piera S

    2005-09-01

    Taura syndrome virus (TSV) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in shrimp, and has a profound economic impact on commercial U.S. shrimp farming. This paper describes the stable expression of an antisense Taura syndrome virus-coat protein (TSV-CP) gene construct in shrimp zygotes, via transfection using jetPEI reagent, over a period of at least 236 days. The transgenic shrimp showed no statistically significant difference from normal control shrimp in terms of weight gain or their appearance, morphology, swimming and eating activities. When challenged with live TSV, the transgenic shrimp exhibited increased resistance to the TSV infection (83% survival rate) as compared to control animals (44% survival rate). This work demonstrates that transgenic shrimp, which stably express an antisense transcript from the TSV-CP gene, are partially resistant to TSV infection. These data may have an important implication for commercial shrimp farming. PMID:16129499

  9. PHYSIOLOGICAL AND HISTOPATHOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF DITHIOCARBAMATE TOXICITY TO THE GRASS SHRIMP, 'PALAEMONETES PUGIO'

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory tests were conducted to determine the acute toxicity of dithiocarbamates (Aquatreat and Busan) to molting grass shrimp and the effects of these fungicides on regenerative limb growth in grass shrimp. Results indicate that both dithiocarbamate formulations caused a dose...

  10. 78 FR 54912 - Frozen Warmwater Shrimp from Indonesia and Thailand; Termination of Investigations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-06

    ...Final)] Frozen Warmwater Shrimp from Indonesia and Thailand; Termination of Investigations...the subject investigations concerning Indonesia (78 FR 50379) and Thailand (78 FR...concerning frozen warmwater shrimp from Indonesia and Thailand (investigation Nos....

  11. MORE THAN JUST BAIT: BURROWING SHRIMP AS ECOSYSTEM ENGINEERS IN OREGON ESTUARIES - SEPTEMBER 2006

    EPA Science Inventory

    Burrowing shrimp may be most widely known as excellent fishing bait, but they also play important roles in estuaries of the Pacific Northwest. These shrimps strongly affect carbon and nutrient cycling, phytoplankton abundance, food web structure and dynamics, sediment stability,...

  12. SHRIMP zircon UPb age constraints on Neoproterozoic Quruqtagh diamictites in NW China

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    SHRIMP zircon U­Pb age constraints on Neoproterozoic Quruqtagh diamictites in NW China Bei Xua) in the Quruqtagh Group using the SHRIMP (sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe) zircon U­Pb method. Volcanic bed

  13. Infrared Space Observatory Spectra of R Coronae Borealis Stars. I. Emission Features in the Interval 3 - 25 microns

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David L. Lambert; N. Kameswara Rao; Gajendra Pandey; Inese I. Ivans

    2001-01-01

    Infrared Space Observatory 3 - 25 $\\\\mu$m spectra of the R Coronae Borealis\\u000astars V854 Cen, R CrB, and RY Sgr are presented and discussed. Sharp emission\\u000afeatures coincident in wavelengths with the well known Unidentified Emission\\u000aFeatures are present in the spectrum of V854 Cen but not of R CrB or RY Sgr.\\u000aSince V854 Cen is not particularly

  14. Activation of the prophenoloxidase system of the brown shrimp Penaeus californiensis Holmes)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jorge Hernández-López; Teresa Gollas-Galván; Francisco Vargas-Albores

    1996-01-01

    The prophenoloxidase (proPO) system of the brown shrimp Penaeus californiensis was activated using different preparations and inductors. In shrimp, this system is confined inside the hemocytes and can be obtained by lysing or centrifuging the cells. In both cases, the shrimp proPO system showed a high spontaneous activation because the proPO activating enzyme was also released. In addition, the shrimp

  15. Effect of water temperature on the immune response of white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei to Vibrio alginolyticus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Winton Cheng; Long-Uong Wang; Jiann-Chu Chen

    2005-01-01

    White shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei held in 25‰ seawater at 27 °C or 28 °C were injected with TSB-grown Vibrio alginolyticus at 1×104 colony-forming units (cfu) shrimp?1 or 1×105 cfu shrimp?1, and then cultivated onward at water temperatures varying from 20 to 34 °C. Over 24–144 h, mortality of V. alginolyticus-injected shrimp held at 34 °C or 32 °C was significantly

  16. Molecular cloning and characterisation of prophenoloxidase from haemocytes of the white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ching-Yi Lai; Winton Cheng; Ching-Ming Kuo

    2005-01-01

    cDNA encoding prophenoloxidase (proPO) of the white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei was obtained from haemocytes by a reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA using oligonucleotide primers based on the proPO sequence of tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon, freshwater crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus, green tiger shrimp Penaeus semisulcatus (accession no.: AF521949) and kuruma shrimp Marsupenaeus japonicus (accession no.: AB0733223). proPO

  17. The use of indole as a potential quality index for fresh, frozen, cooked and canned shrimp

    E-print Network

    Chang, Olivia Hui-Fen

    1981-01-01

    , E. 1956. Effect of storage on decomposed canned shrimp. J. Assoc. Off. Agric. Chem. 39:801. Beacham, L, M. 19&. A study of decomposition in canned oysters and clams. J. Assoc. Off. Agric. Chem. 29:89. Bethea, C. and Ambrose, M. E. 1962... in the canned shrimp. This study concludes that the absence of indole could not insure good quality in either fresh, frozen, cooked or canned shrimp. How- ever, the presence of indole indicates mishandling of shrimp before processing, eventhough...

  18. Viral resistance in shrimp that express an antisense Taura syndrome virus coat protein gene

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yuanan Lu; Piera S. Sun

    2005-01-01

    Taura syndrome virus (TSV) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in shrimp, and has a profound economic impact on commercial U.S. shrimp farming. This paper describes the stable expression of an antisense Taura syndrome virus-coat protein (TSV-CP) gene construct in shrimp zygotes, via transfection using jetPEI reagent, over a period of at least 236 days. The transgenic shrimp

  19. Quality perceptions of stakeholders in Beninese export-oriented shrimp chain.

    PubMed

    Dabade, D Sylvain; den Besten, Heidy M W; Azokpota, Paulin; Nout, M J Rob; Hounhouigan, D Joseph; Zwietering, Marcel H

    2014-09-01

    In recent years, the Beninese shrimp sector has faced a ban on export to the European Union due to lack of compliance with food safety standards. The present study aimed at obtaining insight into the factors that determine shrimp quality and safety in Benin. A survey was conducted to investigate the relationships between stakeholders, the conditions under which shrimps are handled at fishing areas and processed at shrimp plants, and the stakeholders' perceptions of quality. A total of 325 fishermen, 128 intermediate traders, 12 collectors, and 3 shrimp processing plant managers were interviewed face to face. The results showed that various specific relations existed between the stakeholders. For example, loyalty was ensured by family relationships, or incentives were provided to ensure a supply of shrimps between stakeholders. Shrimp handling practices during the steps prior to shrimp processing at the plants were not in agreement with the requirements of the European regulations. For example, shrimps were kept at ambient temperature (28 ± 1°C) by 94.1% of fishermen and 60.9% of intermediate traders. Shrimps were also stored in inappropriate holding containers and washed with nonpotable water. Fishermen, intermediate traders, and collectors considered shrimp size and texture their priority quality attributes, whereas plant managers considered shrimp appearance (freshness) and texture their priority quality attributes. This survey demonstrated that the steps prior to shrimp processing at the plants are the critical steps for shrimp quality and safety because of temperature abuse and inappropriate hygienic conditions. There is a need to communicate and provide incentives for the stakeholders in the first part of the chain to give priority to shrimp freshness. Moreover, training in Good Fishing Practices and safe food handling practices and evaluation of compliance with the practices through monitoring will contribute to better shrimp quality and safety management. PMID:25198861

  20. Signalling by the cleaner shrimp Periclimenes longicarpus Lucille Chapuis a,*, Redouan Bshary b,1

    E-print Network

    Lehmann, Laurent

    Signalling by the cleaner shrimp Periclimenes longicarpus Lucille Chapuis a,*, Redouan Bshary b,1-00586 Keywords: cleaner shrimp cooperative interaction mutualism Periclimenes longicarpus partner control and demand. In this context, a recent laboratory experiment demonstrated that cleaner shrimps may advertise

  1. Localization and bacteriostasis of Vibrio introduced into the Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei

    E-print Network

    Burnett, Louis E.

    Localization and bacteriostasis of Vibrio introduced into the Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus a major role in bacterial uptake and bacteriostasis in penaeid shrimp. q 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Lymphoid organ; Vibrio; Real-time PCR; Penaeid shrimp; Decapod crustaceans

  2. Kin structure, ecology and the evolution of social organization in shrimp: a

    E-print Network

    Duffy, J. Emmett

    Kin structure, ecology and the evolution of social organization in shrimp: a comparative analysis J evolved independently in insects, mole-rats and symbiotic shrimp. Historically, eusociality has been species of sponge-dwelling shrimp (Synalpheus) in Belize. Consistent with hypotheses that cooperative

  3. CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE BIOLOGY OF THE ROYAL RED SHRIMP, Hymenopenaeus robustus SMITH'

    E-print Network

    CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE BIOLOGY OF THE ROYAL RED SHRIMP, Hymenopenaeus robustus SMITH' WILLIAM W. ANDERSON' AND MILTON J. LINDNER" ABSTRACf The royal red shrimp, HymenopenaeuB robuBtus, has been located collections of the M/V Theodore N. Gill. Juveniles under 50 mm total length were not caught. Size of shrimp

  4. Fast RPC on the SHRIMP Virtual Memory Mapped Network Interface Angelos Bilas and Edward W. Felten

    E-print Network

    Fast RPC on the SHRIMP Virtual Memory Mapped Network Interface Angelos Bilas and Edward W. Felten and Network­based Computing, Feb. '97. 1 #12; Fast RPC on the SHRIMP Virtual Memory Mapped Network Interface. This paper evaluates the SHRIMP virtual memory mapped network interface by using it to build two fast

  5. Fishes Taken During Shrimp Trawling Along the South Atlantic Coast of

    E-print Network

    570 Fishes Taken During Shrimp Trawling Along the South Atlantic Coast of the United States, 1931 FISHERIES Fishes Taken During Shrimp Trawling Along the South Atlantic Coast of the United States, 1931, and Florida, Outside Combined 16 Literature Cited 16 Tables 1-13 16-62 #12;Fishes Taken During Shrimp Trawling

  6. Decapsulating Brine Shrimp Eggs 1 Craig Watson and Roy P.E. Yanong2

    E-print Network

    Watson, Craig A.

    FA18 Decapsulating Brine Shrimp Eggs 1 Craig Watson and Roy P.E. Yanong2 1. This document is FA18 Introduction Brine shrimp eggs are used throughout the world as a food for small fish in hatcheries. These eggs as the eggs are exposed to water, the hatching process begins. When hatching brine shrimp eggs, we not only

  7. Cleavage and gastrulation of the dendrobranchiate shrimp Penaeus monodon (Crustacea, Malacostraca, Decapoda)

    E-print Network

    Alwes, Frederike

    Cleavage and gastrulation of the dendrobranchiate shrimp Penaeus monodon (Crustacea, Malacostraca of the black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon was analyzed from the first division until gastrulation. Observations for stereotypic develop- ment is the cleavage pattern in dendrobranchiate shrimps among the Decapoda. Starting

  8. AN INTENSIVE FISHING EXPERIMENT FOR THE CARIDEAN SHRIMp, HETEROCARPUS LAEVIGATUS, AT

    E-print Network

    AN INTENSIVE FISHING EXPERIMENT FOR THE CARIDEAN SHRIMp, HETEROCARPUS LAEVIGATUS, AT ALAMAGAN experiment for the deepwater caridean shrimp, Heterocn.rpus lMl'igatll.8. was conducted near Alamagan Island in the Mariana Archipelago. Twenty standard shrimp traps were set daily, producing a significant decline

  9. DUAL STRUcrURAL EQUILIBRIUM IN THE FLORIDA SHRIMP PROCESSING INDUSTRY

    E-print Network

    DUAL STRUcrURAL EQUILIBRIUM IN THE FLORIDA SHRIMP PROCESSING INDUSTRY JOSE ALVAREZ, CHRIS O. ANDREW of firms in Florida shrimp processing industry for the 1959-71 period were studied by utilizing Markov will be achieved by 1985. The forecasted changes in firm distribution suggest that Florida shrimp industry sales

  10. ASPECTS OF BROWN SHRIMP, PENAEUS AZTECUS, GROWTH IN THE NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO

    E-print Network

    ASPECTS OF BROWN SHRIMP, PENAEUS AZTECUS, GROWTH IN THE NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO MICHAEL L. PARRACK' ABSTRACT The growth of brown shrimp, PelU1eus aztecus, was studied by utilizing fonns of growth models in weight. Linear functions are apparently inadequate growth models for brown shrimp. Estimated size

  11. Shrimp Loss Associated with Turtle Excluder Devices: Are the Historical Estimates Statistically Biased?

    E-print Network

    Shrimp Loss Associated with Turtle Excluder Devices: Are the Historical Estimates Statistically Office Box 1125, West Columbia, Texas 77465, USA Abstract.--Estimates of penaeid shrimp losses associated. Comparison of the mean catch rates from the TED and control nets provided an estimate of shrimp loss. However

  12. VERTICAL MIGRATION AND ITS EFFECT ON DISPERSAL OF PENAEID SHRIMP LARVAE IN THE GULF OF CARPENTARIA,

    E-print Network

    VERTICAL MIGRATION AND ITS EFFECT ON DISPERSAL OF PENAEID SHRIMP LARVAE IN THE GULF OF CARPENTARIA, AUSTRALIA PETER C. ROTHLISBERG1 ABSTRACT Penaeid shrimp larvae in the GulfofCarpentaria, Australia, sampled mechanism that brings postlar- val and juvenile penaeid shrimp into shallow- water coastal and estuarine

  13. Mitochondrial Pseudogenes Are Pervasive and Often Insidious in the Snapping Shrimp Genus Alpheus

    E-print Network

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    Mitochondrial Pseudogenes Are Pervasive and Often Insidious in the . Snapping Shrimp Genus Alpheus shrimp from total genomic DNA (gDNA), only one sequence was amplified from cDNA. These results are best been repeatedly transferred from the mtDNA to the nuclear genome of snapping shrimp. Unrecognized

  14. Modeling nitrogen dynamics in intensive shrimp ponds: the role of sediment remineralization

    E-print Network

    Lorenzen, Kai

    Modeling nitrogen dynamics in intensive shrimp ponds: the role of sediment remineralization M on nitrogen (N) dynamics in intensive shrimp culture ponds. The model describes the key processes involved, impact negatively on the shrimp or the adjacent aquatic environment when water is discharged from ponds

  15. Cleavage and gastrulation in the shrimp Penaeus (Litopenaeus) vannamei (Malacostraca, Decapoda, Dendrobranchiata)

    E-print Network

    Hertzler, Philip L.

    Cleavage and gastrulation in the shrimp Penaeus (Litopenaeus) vannamei (Malacostraca, Decapoda, and Dendrobranchiata (Decapoda) cleavage is complete. Euphausiaceans and dendrobranchiate shrimp share a similar early in the Dendrobranchiata, embryos of the Pacific white shrimp Penaeus (Litopenaeus) vannamei were stained with Sytox Green

  16. Abstract--The variability in the supply of pink shrimp (Farfante-

    E-print Network

    60 Abstract--The variability in the supply of pink shrimp (Farfante- penaeus duorarum) postlarvae. Simulation Variability in supply and cross-shelf transport of pink shrimp (Farfantepenaeus duorarum response become incorporated into the behavior of pink shrimp. Manuscript submitted 16 September 2003

  17. Population genetic structure of Brazilian shrimp species (Farfantepenaeus sp., F. brasiliensis, F. paulensis and

    E-print Network

    Solé-Cava, Antonio M.

    Population genetic structure of Brazilian shrimp species (Farfantepenaeus sp., F. brasiliensis, F and Evolutionary Biology, Port Erin Marine Laboratory, Isle of Man, United Kingdom. Abstract Penaeid shrimps, allozymes. Received: September 25, 2003; Accepted: July 19, 2004. Introduction Penaeid shrimps are important

  18. SHRIMP -Solving Collision and Out of Vocabulary Problems in Mobile Predictive Input with Motion Gesture

    E-print Network

    O'Brien, James F.

    SHRIMP - Solving Collision and Out of Vocabulary Problems in Mobile Predictive Input with Motion-of-vocabulary (OOV) words. In this paper, we present SHRIMP, a system and method that addresses these two problems or movement gesture. SHRIMP (Small Handheld Rapid Input with Motion and Prediction) runs on camera phones

  19. A Review of the Offshore Shrimp Fishery and the 1981 Texas Closure

    E-print Network

    A Review of the Offshore Shrimp Fishery and the 1981 Texas Closure EDWARD F. KLIMA, KENNETH N of the brown shrimp fishery for the first time from the coastline to 200 miles off Texas and was in effect from- view the Texas and Louisiana offshore shrimp fisheries and describe the catch, relative abundance

  20. Experimental Design and Estimation of Growth Rate Distributions in Size-Structured Shrimp Populations

    E-print Network

    Experimental Design and Estimation of Growth Rate Distributions in Size-Structured Shrimp-structured shrimp populations and discuss a computational methodology for the design of exper- iments to validate the model and estimate growth rate distributions in shrimp pop- ulations. Parameter estimation findings

  1. Immune assessment of farm-reared Penaeus vannamei shrimp naturally infected by IMNV in NE Brazil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrezza M. Costa; Celso C. Buglione; Fabiana L. Bezerra; Pedro C. C. Martins; Margherita A. Barracco

    2009-01-01

    Farm-reared shrimp production was growing intensely in Brazil until 2002, when an outbreak of a new disease, caused by the infectious myonecrosis virus (IMNV), disrupted the production in the northeast region. The aim of this study was to evaluate some hemato–immunological parameters in Penaeus vannamei shrimp during the progress of the disease caused by IMNV. Affected shrimp were separated into

  2. Halalkalicoccus jeotgali sp. nov., a halophilic archaeon from shrimp jeotgal, a traditional Korean

    E-print Network

    Bae, Jin-Woo

    Halalkalicoccus jeotgali sp. nov., a halophilic archaeon from shrimp jeotgal, a traditional Korean isolated another novel species of this genus from shrimp jeotgal; a traditional fermented food from Korea, designated B3T , was isolated from shrimp jeotgal using the dilution plating technique. It grew slowly

  3. 50 CFR 622.208 - Minimum mesh size applicable to rock shrimp off Georgia and Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...false Minimum mesh size applicable to rock shrimp off Georgia and Florida. 622...208 Minimum mesh size applicable to rock shrimp off Georgia and Florida. (a) The minimum mesh size for the cod end of a rock shrimp trawl net in the South...

  4. 50 CFR 622.19 - South Atlantic rock shrimp limited access off Georgia and Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false South Atlantic rock shrimp limited access off Georgia and Florida...Limitations § 622.19 South Atlantic rock shrimp limited access off Georgia and Florida...For a person aboard a vessel to fish for rock shrimp in the South Atlantic EEZ off...

  5. 50 CFR 622.208 - Minimum mesh size applicable to rock shrimp off Georgia and Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...false Minimum mesh size applicable to rock shrimp off Georgia and Florida. 622...208 Minimum mesh size applicable to rock shrimp off Georgia and Florida. (a) The minimum mesh size for the cod end of a rock shrimp trawl net in the South...

  6. Wickliffe & Jodice: Seabirds at shrimp trawlers near South Carolina 31 Marine Ornithology 38: 3139 (2010)

    E-print Network

    Jodice, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Wickliffe & Jodice: Seabirds at shrimp trawlers near South Carolina 31 Marine Ornithology 38: 31 in such systems. South Carolina has a long history of shrimp trawling. Despite an economic decline in the shrimp and South Carolina Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, G-27 Lehotsky Hall, Clemson University

  7. METHOD OF DETERMINING CAROTENOID CONTENTS OF ALASKA PINK SHRIMP AND REPRESENTATIVE VALVES FOR

    E-print Network

    METHOD OF DETERMINING CAROTENOID CONTENTS OF ALASKA PINK SHRIMP AND REPRESENTATIVE VALVES is described for estimating the amount of carotenoids in pink shrimp. The carot- enoid index is useful are reported. The carotenoid content of Alaska pink shrimp is affected by many conditions and can be used

  8. Effects of southern flying squirrels Glaucomys volans on red-cockaded woodpecker Picoides borealis reproductive success

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laves, K.S.; Loeb, S.C.

    1999-01-01

    Anecdotal data gathered from many populations suggest that southern flying squirrel (SFS, Glaucomys volans) use of the endangered red-cockaded woodpecker's (RCW, Picoides borealis) nest and roost cavities may negatively affect RCW populations. We conducted a controlled experiment to determine the effects of SFSs on RCW reproductive success. During the 1994 and 1995 breeding seasons, SFSs were removed from 30 RCW clusters and 32 clusters served as controls. SFSs were the most frequently encountered occupants of RCW cavities and used 20-33% of RCW cavities in control and treatment clusters over both years. Treatment groups produced significantly more successful nests (??? 1 fledgling) than control groups in 1994. In 1995 however, there was no difference in the number of successful nests. In both years, RCW groups nesting in treatment clusters produced significantly more fledglings than groups in control clusters in each of four experimental areas, averaging approximately 0.7 additional fledglings per nesting group. Loss of entire clutches or broods, possibly as a result of predation or abandonment, was a major factor limiting reproduction in control groups in 1994. In contrast, differences in partial brood loss appeared to be the cause of differential fledging success in 1995 Usurpation of RCW roost cavities by SFSs may have placed greater energetic demands on RCWs for cavity defence or thermoregulation, thus reducing energy available for reproduction. Our results show that SFS use of RCW cavities during the breeding season has a significant impact on RCWs and that management of RCW populations should include activities that either minimize SFS populations in RCW clusters or limit access of SFSs to RCW cavities.

  9. Interactions among benthic insects, algae, and bacteria in a geothermally influenced stream. [Helicopsyche borealis (Hagen)

    SciTech Connect

    Lamberti, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    This dissertation examines the interactions between benthic macroinvertebrates and microorganisms in stream habitats that were exposed to varying levels of geothermal contamination. Stream microcosms were used in situ to evaluate the separate effects of the thermal and chemical components of geothermal effluents on aquatic biota in Big Sulphur Creek, a third-order stream at the Geysers. The thermal component of those effluents had greater influence than the chemical component in determining benthic community structure. The effects of grazing by the herbivorous caddisfly Helicopsyche borealis (Hagen) on benthic algae and bacteria were experimentally studied in an undisturbed segment of Big Sulphur Creek. Exclusion of Helicopsyche larvae from introduced substrates resulted in high standing crops of algae and bacteria, but a low algal turnover rate. On substrate that was grazed by natural densities of Helicopsyche larvae, algal and bacterial standing crops were reduced by 83-98%, but the turnover rate of algae was substantially increased. Thus, grazing by Helicopsyche resulted in a low-biomass algal community that, because of a high turnover rate, was able to support a high biomass of consumers. These results emphasize the importance of consumer-producer interactions in stream ecosystems; disturbance of either component during geothermal development may result in substantial changes at other trophic levels as well. Complementary studies to those summarized above include (1) comparison of introduced and natural substrates for sampling benthic organisms, (2) distributional analysis of benthic biota along a geothermal gradient, and (3) evaluation of seasonal dynamics of suspended microorganisms in three streams that have different geothermal characteristics. This dissertation concludes with a review of primary consumption patterns in aquatic insects.

  10. DISCOVERY OF BRIGHT GALACTIC R CORONAE BOREALIS AND DY PERSEI VARIABLES: RARE GEMS MINED FROM ACVS

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, A. A.; Richards, J. W.; Bloom, J. S.; Cenko, S. B.; Silverman, J. M.; Starr, D. L. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Stassun, K. G., E-mail: amiller@astro.berkeley.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States)

    2012-08-20

    We present the results of a machine-learning (ML)-based search for new R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars and DY Persei-like stars (DYPers) in the Galaxy using cataloged light curves from the All-Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) Catalog of Variable Stars (ACVS). RCB stars-a rare class of hydrogen-deficient carbon-rich supergiants-are of great interest owing to the insights they can provide on the late stages of stellar evolution. DYPers are possibly the low-temperature, low-luminosity analogs to the RCB phenomenon, though additional examples are needed to fully establish this connection. While RCB stars and DYPers are traditionally identified by epochs of extreme dimming that occur without regularity, the ML search framework more fully captures the richness and diversity of their photometric behavior. We demonstrate that our ML method can use newly discovered RCB stars to identify additional candidates within the same data set. Our search yields 15 candidates that we consider likely RCB stars/DYPers: new spectroscopic observations confirm that four of these candidates are RCB stars and four are DYPers. Our discovery of four new DYPers increases the number of known Galactic DYPers from two to six; noteworthy is that one of the new DYPers has a measured parallax and is m Almost-Equal-To 7 mag, making it the brightest known DYPer to date. Future observations of these new DYPers should prove instrumental in establishing the RCB connection. We consider these results, derived from a machine-learned probabilistic classification catalog, as an important proof-of-concept for the efficient discovery of rare sources with time-domain surveys.

  11. DUST AROUND R CORONAE BOREALIS STARS. I. SPITZER/INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Anibal Garcia-Hernandez, D. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, C/Via Lactea s/n, E-38200 La Laguna (Spain); Kameswara Rao, N. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore 560 034 (India); Lambert, David L., E-mail: agarcia@iac.es, E-mail: nkrao@iiap.res.in, E-mail: dll@astro.as.utexas.edu [W. J. McDonald Observatory, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States)

    2011-09-20

    Spitzer/infrared spectrograph (IRS) spectra from 5 to 37 {mu}m for a complete sample of 31 R Coronae Borealis stars (RCBs) are presented. These spectra are combined with optical and near-infrared photometry of each RCB at maximum light to compile a spectral energy distribution (SED). The SEDs are fitted with blackbody flux distributions and estimates are made of the ratio of the infrared flux from circumstellar dust to the flux emitted by the star. Comparisons for 29 of the 31 stars are made with the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) fluxes from three decades earlier: Spitzer and IRAS fluxes at 12 {mu}m and 25 {mu}m are essentially equal for all but a minority of the sample. For this minority, the IRAS to Spitzer flux ratio exceeds a factor of three. The outliers are suggested to be stars where formation of a dust cloud or dust puff is a rare event. A single puff ejected prior to the IRAS observations may have been reobserved by Spitzer as a cooler puff at a greater distance from the RCB. RCBs which experience more frequent optical declines have, in general, a circumstellar environment containing puffs subtending a larger solid angle at the star and a quasi-constant infrared flux. Yet, the estimated subtended solid angles and the blackbody temperatures of the dust show a systematic evolution to lower solid angles and cooler temperatures in the interval between IRAS and Spitzer. Dust emission by these RCBs and those in the LMC is similar in terms of total 24 {mu}m luminosity and [8.0]-[24.0] color index.

  12. The MACHO project large Magellanic Cloud variable star inventory. IV. New R Coronae Borealis stars

    SciTech Connect

    Alcock, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); [Center for Particle Astrophysics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Allsman, R.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Alves, D.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Axelrod, T.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Becker, A. [Center for Particle Astrophysics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Center for Particle Astrophysics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Bennett, D.P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); [Center for Particle Astrophysics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Clayton, G.C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Cook, K.H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); [Center for Particle Astrophysics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Freeman, K.C. [Mount Stromlo and Siding Spring Observatories, Australian National University, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia)] [Mount Stromlo and Siding Spring Observatories, Australian National University, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia); Griest, K.; Guern, J.A. [Center of Particle Astrophysics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Center of Particle Astrophysics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Kilkenny, D. [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, Observatory 7935 (South Africa)] [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, Observatory 7935 (South Africa); Lehner, M.J. [Center for Particle Astrophysics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Center for Particle Astrophysics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    1996-10-01

    We report the discovery of two new R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars in the LMC using the MACHO project photometry database. The identification of both stars has been confirmed spectroscopically. One is a cool RCB star ({ital T}{sub eff}{approximately}5000 K), characterized by very strong Swan bands of C{sub 2} and violet bands of CN, and weak or absent Balmer lines, G band, and {sup 12}C{sup 13}C bands. The second star is an example of a hot RCB star, of which only three were previously known to exist in the Galaxy and none in the LMC. Its spectrum is characterized by several CII lines in emission. Both stars have shown deep declines of {Delta}{ital V}{ge}4 mag in brightness. The new stars are significantly fainter at maximum light than the three previously known LMC RCB stars. The amount of reddening toward these stars is somewhat uncertain, but both seem to have absolute magnitudes, {ital M}{sub {ital V}}, {approximately}0.5 mag fainter than the other three stars. Estimates of {ital M}{sub bol} find that the hot RCB star lies in the range of the other three stars, while the cool RCB star is fainter. The two cool LMC RCB stars are the faintest at {ital M}{sub bol}. The discovery of these two new stars brings to five the number of known RCB stars in the LMC, and it demonstrates the utility of the MACHO photometric database for the discovery of new RCB stars. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Astronomical Society.}

  13. The R Coronae Borealis stars - carbon abundances from forbidden carbon lines

    E-print Network

    Gajendra Pandey; David L. Lambert; N. Kameswara Rao; Bengt Gustafsson; Nils Ryde; David Yong

    2004-05-29

    Spectra of several R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars at maximum light were examined for the [C I] 9850 A and 8727 A absorption lines. The 9850 A line is variously blended with a Fe II and CN lines but positive identifications of the [C I] line are made for R CrB and SU Tau. The 8727 A line is detected in the spectrum of the five stars observed in this wavelength region. Carbon abundances are derived from the [C I] lines using the model atmospheres and atmospheric parameters used by Asplund et al. (2000). Although the observed strength of a C I line is constant from cool to hot RCB stars, the strength is weaker than predicted by an amount equivalent to a factor of four reduction of a line's gf-value. Asplund et al. dubbed this 'the carbon problem' and discussed possible solutions. The [C I] 9850 A line seen clearly in R CrB and SU Tau confirms the magnitude of the carbon problem revealed by the C I lines. The [C I] 8727 A line measured in five stars shows an enhanced carbon problem. The gf-value required to fit the observed [C I] 8727 A line is a factor of 15 less than the well-determined theoretical gf-value. We suggest that the carbon problem for all lines may be alleviated to some extent by a chromospheric-like temperature rise in these stars. The rise far exceeds that predicted by our non-LTE calculations, and requires a substantial deposition of mechanical energy.

  14. DO R CORONAE BOREALIS STARS FORM FROM DOUBLE WHITE DWARF MERGERS?

    SciTech Connect

    Staff, Jan. E.; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Tohline, Joel E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States); Menon, Athira; Herwig, Falk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8P5C2 (Canada); Even, Wesley; Fryer, Chris L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Motl, Patrick M. [Department of Science, Mathematics and Informatics, Indiana University Kokomo, Kokomo, IN 46904-9003 (United States); Geballe, Tom [Gemini Observatory, 670 North A'ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Pignatari, Marco [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

    2012-09-20

    A leading formation scenario for R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars invokes the merger of degenerate He and CO white dwarfs (WDs) in a binary. The observed ratio of {sup 16}O/{sup 18}O for RCB stars is in the range of 0.3-20 much smaller than the solar value of {approx}500. In this paper, we investigate whether such a low ratio can be obtained in simulations of the merger of a CO and a He WD. We present the results of five three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the merger of a double WD system where the total mass is 0.9 M{sub Sun} and the initial mass ratio (q) varies between 0.5 and 0.99. We identify in simulations with q {approx}< 0.7 a feature around the merged stars where the temperatures and densities are suitable for forming {sup 18}O. However, more {sup 16}O is being dredged up from the C- and O-rich accretor during the merger than the amount of {sup 18}O that is produced. Therefore, on the dynamical timescale over which our hydrodynamics simulation runs, an {sup 16}O/{sup 18}O ratio of {approx}2000 in the 'best' case is found. If the conditions found in the hydrodynamic simulations persist for 10{sup 6} s the oxygen ratio drops to 16 in one case studied, while in a hundred years it drops to {approx}4 in another case studied, consistent with the observed values in RCB stars. Therefore, the merger of two WDs remains a strong candidate for the formation of these enigmatic stars.

  15. Stable hydrogen isotopes record the summering grounds of eastern red bats (Lasiurus borealis).

    PubMed

    Pylant, Cortney L; Nelson, David M; Keller, Stephen R

    2014-01-01

    Bats face numerous threats associated with global environmental change, including the rapid expansion of wind-energy facilities, emerging infectious disease, and habitat loss. An understanding of the movement and migration patterns of these highly dispersive animals would help reveal how spatially localized the impacts from these threats are likely to be on bat populations, thus aiding in their conservation. Stable hydrogen isotope ratios (? (2)H) can be used to infer regions where bats have foraged during the summer molt season, thus allowing an assessment of summering location and distance of movement of bats sampled during other times of year. However, a major impediment to the application of ? (2)H for inference of bat movements is that the relationship between ? (2)H of bat hair and precipitation tends to be species specific and is still unknown for some key species of conservation concern. We addressed this issue by using geo-referenced museum specimens to calibrate the relationship between ? (2)H of hair (? (2)Hhair) and long-term ? (2)H of growing-season precipitation (? (2)HGSprecip) at the site of collection for eastern red bats (Lasiurus borealis), one of the main species of bats experiencing large numbers of fatalities at wind-energy facilities in North America. Based on comparison of ? (2)Hhair and ? (2)HGSprecip values for males we estimated a period of molt of June 14-August 7. Within this period, male and female red bats exhibited a significant positive relationship between ? (2)Hhair and ? (2)HGSprecip. These results establish the relationship between ? (2)Hhair and ? (2)HGSprecip for red bats, which is necessary for the use of ? (2)Hhair to infer the movement and migration patterns of this important species. These results provide a critical resource to conservation biologists working to assess the impacts of environmental change on bat populations. PMID:25337458

  16. Hearing and hunting in red bats (Lasiurus borealis, Vespertilionidae): audiogram and ear properties.

    PubMed

    Obrist, M K; Wenstrup, J J

    1998-01-01

    We examined aspects of hearing in the red bat (Lasiurus borealis) related to its use of biosonar. Evoked potential audiograms, obtained from volume-conducted auditory brainstem responses, were obtained in two bats, and the sound pressure transformation of the pinna was measured in three specimens. Field-recorded echolocation signals were analysed for comparison. The fundamental sonar search calls sweep from 45 to 30 kHz (peak energy at 35 kHz), approach-phase calls sweep from 65 to 35 kHz (peak 40 kHz) and terminal calls sweep from 70 to 30 kHz (peak 45 kHz). The most sensitive region of the audiogram extended from 10 kHz to 45-55 kHz, with maximum sensitivity as low as 20 dB SPL occurring between 25 and 30 kHz. A relative threshold minimum occurred between 40 and 50 kHz. With increasing frequency, the acoustic axis of the pinna moves upwards and medially. The sound pressure transformation was noteworthy near 40-45 kHz; the acoustic axis was closest to the midline, the -3 dB acceptance angles showed local minima, and the pinna gain and interaural intensity difference were maximal. These results are related to the known echolocation and foraging behavior of this species and match the spectral components of approach- and final-phase calls. We conclude that co-evolution with hearing prey has put a higher selective pressure on optimizing localization and tracking of prey than on improving detection performance. PMID:9390945

  17. Stable hydrogen isotopes record the summering grounds of eastern red bats (Lasiurus borealis)

    PubMed Central

    Pylant, Cortney L.; Keller, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    Bats face numerous threats associated with global environmental change, including the rapid expansion of wind-energy facilities, emerging infectious disease, and habitat loss. An understanding of the movement and migration patterns of these highly dispersive animals would help reveal how spatially localized the impacts from these threats are likely to be on bat populations, thus aiding in their conservation. Stable hydrogen isotope ratios (?2H) can be used to infer regions where bats have foraged during the summer molt season, thus allowing an assessment of summering location and distance of movement of bats sampled during other times of year. However, a major impediment to the application of ?2H for inference of bat movements is that the relationship between ?2H of bat hair and precipitation tends to be species specific and is still unknown for some key species of conservation concern. We addressed this issue by using geo-referenced museum specimens to calibrate the relationship between ?2H of hair (?2Hhair) and long-term ?2H of growing-season precipitation (?2HGSprecip) at the site of collection for eastern red bats (Lasiurus borealis), one of the main species of bats experiencing large numbers of fatalities at wind-energy facilities in North America. Based on comparison of ?2Hhair and ?2HGSprecip values for males we estimated a period of molt of June 14–August 7. Within this period, male and female red bats exhibited a significant positive relationship between ?2Hhair and ?2HGSprecip. These results establish the relationship between ?2Hhair and ?2HGSprecip for red bats, which is necessary for the use of ?2Hhair to infer the movement and migration patterns of this important species. These results provide a critical resource to conservation biologists working to assess the impacts of environmental change on bat populations. PMID:25337458

  18. R Coronae Borealis stars in the Galactic Bulge discovered by EROS-2

    E-print Network

    P. Tisserand; J. B. Marquette; P. R. Wood; E. Lesquoy; J. P. Beaulieu; A. Milsztajn; C. Hamadache; C. Afonso; J. N. Albert; J. Andersen; R. Ansari; E. Aubourg; P. Bareyre; X. Charlot; C. Coutures; R. Ferlet; P. Fouqué; J. F. Glicenstein; B. Goldman; A. Gould; M. Gros; J. Haissinski; J. de Kat; L. Le Guillou; C. Loup; C. Magneville; E. Maurice; A. Maury; M. Moniez; N. Palanque-Delabrouille; O. Perdereau; Y. Rahal; J. Rich; M. Spiro; A. Vidal-Madjar; S. Zylberajch

    2008-01-11

    Rare types of variable star may give unique insight into short-lived stages of stellar evolution. The systematic monitoring of millions of stars and advanced light curve analysis techniques of microlensing surveys make them ideal for discovering also such rare variable stars. One example is the R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars, a rare type of evolved carbon-rich supergiant. We have conducted a systematic search of the EROS-2 database for the Galactic catalogue Bulge and spiral arms to find Galactic RCB stars. The light curves of $\\sim$100 million stars, monitored for 6.7 years (from July 1996 to February 2003), have been analysed to search for the main signature of RCB stars, large and rapid drops in luminosity. Follow-up spectroscopy has been used to confirm the photometric candidates. We have discovered 14 new RCB stars, all in the direction of the Galactic Bulge, bringing the total number of confirmed Galactic RCB stars to about 51. After reddening correction, the colours and absolute magnitudes of at least 9 of the stars are similar to those of Magellanic RCB stars. This suggests that these stars are in fact located in the Galactic Bulge, making them the first RCB stars discovered in the Bulge. The localisation of the 5 remaining RCBs is more uncertain: 4 are either located behind the Bulge at an estimated maximum distance of 14 kpc or have an unusual thick circumstellar shell; the other is a DY Per RCB which may be located in the Bulge, even if it is fainter than the known Magellanic DY Per. From the small scale height found using the 9 new Bulge RCBs, $61

  19. R Coronae Borealis stars in the Galactic bulge discovered by EROS-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisserand, P.; Marquette, J. B.; Wood, P. R.; Lesquoy, É.; Beaulieu, J. P.; Milsztajn, A.; Hamadache, C.; Afonso, C.; Albert, J. N.; Andersen, J.; Ansari, R.; Aubourg, É.; Bareyre, P.; Charlot, X.; Coutures, C.; Ferlet, R.; Fouqué, P.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Goldman, B.; Gould, A.; Gros, M.; Haissinski, J.; de Kat, J.; Le Guillou, L.; Loup, C.; Magneville, C.; Maurice, É.; Maury, A.; Moniez, M.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Perdereau, O.; Rahal, Y.; Rich, J.; Spiro, M.; Vidal-Madjar, A.; Zylberajch, S.

    2008-04-01

    Context: Rare types of variable stars may provide unique insight into short-lived stages of stellar evolution. The systematic monitoring of millions of stars and advanced light curve analysis techniques of microlensing surveys make them ideal for discovering such rare variable stars. One example is the R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars, a rare type of evolved carbon-rich supergiant. Aims: We have conducted a systematic search of the EROS-2 database for the Galactic catalogue Bulge and spiral arms to find Galactic RCB stars. Methods: The light curves of ~100 million stars, monitored for 6.7 years (from July 1996 to February 2003), have been analysed to search for the main signature of RCB stars, large and rapid drops in luminosity. Follow-up spectroscopy has been used to confirm the photometric candidates. Results: We have discovered 14 new RCB stars, all in the direction of the Galactic Bulge, bringing the total number of confirmed Galactic RCB stars to about 51. Conclusions: After reddening correction, the colours and absolute magnitudes of at least 9 of the stars are similar to those of Magellanic RCB stars. This suggests that these stars are in fact located in the Galactic Bulge, making them the first RCB stars discovered in the Bulge. The localisation of the 5 remaining RCBs is more uncertain: 4 are either located behind the Bulge at an estimated maximum distance of 14 kpc or have an unusual thick circumstellar shell; the other is a DY Per RCB which may be located in the Bulge, even if it is fainter than the known Magellanic DY Per. From the small scale height found using the 9 new Bulge RCBs, 61

  20. An XMM-Newton Study of the Coronae of $?^2$ Coronae Borealis

    E-print Network

    J. A. Suh; M. Audard; M. Guedel; F. B. S. Paerels

    2005-06-10

    (Abridged) We present results of XMM-Newton observations of the RS CVn binary $\\sigma^2$ Coronae Borealis. The RGS and EPIC MOS2 spectra were simultaneously fitted with collisional ionization equilibrium plasma models to determine coronal abundances of various elements. Contrary to the solar first ionization potential (FIP) effect in which elements with a low FIP are overabundant in the corona compared to the solar photosphere, and contrary to the ``inverse'' FIP effect observed in several active RS CVn binaries, coronal abundance ratios in $\\sigma^2$ CrB show a complex pattern as supported by similar findings in the Chandra HETGS analysis of $\\sigma^2$ CrB with a different methodology (Osten et al. 2003). Low-FIP elements ($<10$ eV) have their abundance ratios relative to Fe consistent with the solar photospheric ratios, whereas high-FIP elements have their abundance ratios increase with increasing FIP. We find that the coronal Fe abundance is consistent with the stellar photospheric value, indicating that there is no metal depletion in $\\sigma^2$ CrB. However, we obtain a higher Fe absolute abundance than in Osten et al. (2003). Except for Ar and S, our absolute abundances are about 1.5 times larger than those reported by Osten et al. (2003). However, a comparison of their model with our XMM-Newton data (and vice versa) shows that both models work adequately in general. We find, therefore, no preference for one methodology over the other to derive coronal abundances. Despite the systematic discrepancy in absolute abundances, our abundance ratios are very close to those obtained by Osten et al. (2003). Finally, we confirm the measurement of a low density in \\ion{O}{7} ($< 4 \\times 10^{10}$ cm$^{-3}$), but could not confirm the higher densities measured in spectral lines formed at higher temperatures.

  1. A VSA search for the extended Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect in the Corona Borealis Supercluster

    E-print Network

    Ricardo Genova-Santos; Jose Alberto Rubino-Martin; Rafael Rebolo; Kieran Cleary; Rod D. Davies; Richard J. Davis; Clive Dickinson; Nelson Falcon; Keith Grainge; Carlos M. Gutierrez; Michael P. Hobson; Michael E. Jones; Ruediger Kneissl; Katy Lancaster; Carmen P. Padilla-Torres; Richard D. E. Saunders; Paul F. Scott; Angela C. Taylor; Robert A. Watson

    2005-07-12

    We present interferometric imaging at 33 GHz of the Corona Borealis supercluster, using the extended configuration of the Very Small Array. A total area of 24 deg^2 has been imaged, with an angular resolution of 11 arcmin and a sensitivity of 12 mJy/beam. The aim of these observations is to search for Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) detections from known clusters of galaxies in this supercluster and for a possible extended SZ decrement due to diffuse warm/hot gas in the intercluster medium. We measure negative flux values in the positions of the ten richest clusters in the region. Collectively, this implies a 3.0-sigma detection of the SZ effect. In the clusters A2061 and A2065 we find decrements of approximately 2-sigma. Our main result is the detection of two strong and resolved negative features at -70+-12 mJy/beam (-157+-27 microK) and -103+-10 mJy/beam (-230+-23 microK), respectively, located in a region with no known clusters, near the centre of the supercluster. We discuss their possible origins in terms of primordial CMB anisotropies and/or SZ signals related to either unknown clusters or to a diffuse extended warm/hot gas distribution. Our analyses have revealed that a primordial CMB fluctuation is a plausible explanation for the weaker feature (probability of 37.82%). For the stronger one, neither primordial CMB (probability of 0.33%) nor SZ can account alone for its size and total intensity. The most reasonable explanation, then, is a combination of both primordial CMB and SZ signal. Finally, we explore what characteristics would be required for a filamentary structure consisting of warm/hot diffuse gas in order to produce a significant contribution to such a spot taking into account the constraints set by X-ray data.

  2. Experimental evaluation of co-culture of juvenile sea cucumbers, Holothuria scabra (Jaeger), with juvenile blue shrimp, Litopenaeus stylirostris (Stimpson)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven W Purcell; Jacques Patrois; Nicolas Fraisse

    2006-01-01

    The co-culture of juvenile sea cucumber Holothuria scabra (Jaeger), or 'sandfish', with juvenile blue shrimp Litopenaeus. stylirostris (Stimpson) was tested by growing groups in co-culture and monoculture for 3 weeks in tanks with enriched sand substratum. Feed was supplied on trays, accessible only to shrimp. Survival of shrimp and sandfish was high in all treatments (73^ 100%). Growth of shrimp

  3. ClientServer Computing on the SHRIMP Multicomputer Stefanos N. Damianakis, Angelos Bilas, Cezary Dubnicki, and Edward W. Felten

    E-print Network

    Client­Server Computing on the SHRIMP Multicomputer Stefanos N. Damianakis, Angelos Bilas, Cezary and one of stream sockets for the SHRIMP multicom­ puter. SHRIMP supports protected, user­level data to user appli­ cations. The SHRIMP project [?, ?, ?] at Princeton University supports user level

  4. An Assessment of the Economic Importance of the San Carlos Island Shrimp Processing Industry to the Lee County Economy

    E-print Network

    Florida, University of

    An Assessment of the Economic Importance of the San Carlos Island Shrimp Processing Industry the shrimp processing industry on San Carlos Island contributes to the Lee County economy. Most of the shrimp offloading, grading, packing, and processing in Lee County occurs on San Carlos Island. Shrimp-laden vessels

  5. Requirement for shrimp caspase in apoptosis against virus infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Zhi, Bin; Wu, Wenlin; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2008-01-01

    Caspases are central effectors in apoptosis. In this investigation, a novel caspase gene (designated as PjCaspase) obtained from the marine shrimp Marsupenaeus japonicus was found to be significantly upregulated in survivors of WSSV-challenged shrimp, suggesting that it might be involved in shrimp antiviral immunity. As revealed by RNAi assays, when the PjCaspase gene was silenced by gene-specific siRNA, the WSSV-induced apoptosis was significantly inhibited. The results showed that the PjCaspase gene was essential in the virus-induced apoptosis of shrimp. Based on the quantitative PCR detection, it was shown that the PjCaspase gene silencing resulted in the increase of virus copies, indicating that apoptosis played a key role in antiviral process of shrimp. As well known, caspase-3 and -8 are crucial caspases in apoptosis. The discovery of PjCaspase in this study would contribute another essential caspase involved in apoptosis against virus infection, which might reveal an ancient mechanism of caspase activation in invertebrate immunity against viruses. PMID:18068223

  6. New R Coronae Borealis stars discovered in OGLE-III Galactic Bulge fields from their mid- and near- infrared properties

    E-print Network

    Tisserand, P; Wood, P R; Udalski, A; Szyma?ski, M K; Kubiak, M; Pietrzy?ski, G; Soszy?ski, I; Szewczyk, O; Ulaczyk, K; Poleski, R

    2010-01-01

    An R Coronae Borealis (RCB) star is a rare type of supergiant star that is increasingly thought to be the evolved merger product of two white dwarfs. Recently, many of them have been found distributed in a thin disk structure embedded inside the Galactic Bulge. This unexpected high density can give us more insight into the nature and age of RCB stars. We applied and tested successfully a new technique to find RCB stars based on the particular infrared emission. We demonstrated that RCB stars can now be found without the need of a light curve analysis, and therefore outside optically monitored fields. The selection of RCB candidates was based on their near-infrared excess and on particular mid-infrared emission of RCB shells, using photometric data from the 2MASS and Spitzer/GLIMPSE surveys. The OGLE light curves of all RCB candidates were then inspected visually and the ones presenting large and fast declines were followed-up spectroscopically . We discovered two new R Coronae Borealis stars, but also propose...

  7. Geometric Comparisons of Selected Small Topographically Fresh Volcanoes in the Borealis and Elysium Planitia Volcanic Fields, Mars: Implications for Eruptive Styles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, K.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Mitchell, D.

    2002-01-01

    MOLA (Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter) data from small, topographically fresh volcanoes from the Elysium and Borealis regions were gridded and analyzed using GMT (Generic Mapping Tools) programs. Results compare eruptive styles of the two regions, and draw conclusions about the different volcanic regions. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  8. A NEURONAL ROLE FOR A CRUSTACEAN RED PIGMENT CONCENTRATING HORMONE-LIKE PEPTIDE: NEUROMODULATION OF THE PYLORIC RHYTHM IN THE CRAB, CANCER BOREALIS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MICHAEL P. NUSBAUM; EVE MARDER

    SUMMARY The distribution of red pigment concentrating hormone (RPCH)-like immuno- reactivity (RPLI) in the stomatogastric nervous system of the crab, Cancer borealis, was studied using whole-mount immunocytochemistry. RPLI was seen in neuropilar processes in the stomatogastric ganglion (STG), and in somata in the oesophageal ganglion and commissural ganglia. Staining was blocked by preincubating the antiserum with RPCH, as well as

  9. Substance P-like immunoreactivity in the stomatogastric nervous systems of the crab Cancer borealis and the lobsters Panulirus interruptus and Homarus americanus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Diane Goldberg; Michael P. Nusbaum; Eve Marder

    1988-01-01

    The distribution of substance P-like immunoreactivity in the stomatogastric nervous systems of three decapod crustacean species, Cancer borealis, Homarus americanus, and Panulirus interruptus, was studied. The stomatogastric ganglion showed dense staining in the neuropil, but none in the somata. A single neuron stained in the esophageal ganglion. Lucifer yellow backfills and intracellular injections followed by incubation with the substance P

  10. Some radar observations of meteors and aurorae at 300 and 500 Mc\\/s using a large radio telescope--II Observations of the aurora borealis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Barber; H. K. Sutcliffe; C. D. Watkins

    1962-01-01

    Radar echoes from the aurora borealis have been obtained at frequencies of 300 and 500 Mc\\/s using a 250 ft radio telescope. Strong echoes detected during the afternoon hours originated from a layer of ionization at a mean height of 110 km and less than a few kilometres thick. Isolated weak echoes observed at other times originated from localized regions

  11. Polyculture of penaeid shrimp in ponds receiving brackish heated effluent from a power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Ojeda, J.L.W.

    1983-01-01

    White shrimp Penaeus setiferus, were grown in monoculture or in polyculture with blue shrimp P. stylirostris, or striped mullet Mugil cephalus in 0.1-ha earthen ponds receiving heated effluent from the Houston Lighting and Power Company's Cedar Bayou Generating Station east of Baytown, Texas during 1978 and 1979. No detrimental effect of either species on white shrimp survival or yield was found. Blue shrimp was greater than that of white shrimp in the same ponds. Total yield was increased by polyculture. An experiment was performed in which blue shrimp were stocked conventionally into ponds, or stocked in three successive increments (staggered stocking study). A preliminary experiment was made in 1978, followed by a more expanded version in 1979. Staggered stocking increased pond yields compared to expected values from the control pond yields. There was no detrimental effect of staggered stocking on shrimp survival. Pond salinities were much lower in 1979 than in 1978, associated with lower shrimp growth, survival and yield. A distribution study performed in the staggered stocking study ponds revealed that blue shrimp in mixed-size culture tend to segregate by size, and that small shrimp show somewhat different distribution patterns and temporal activity patterns than large shrimp. All the organisms used also served as biological monitors of water quality. No detectable levels of pesticides were found in any of the cultured animals. The only heavy metal found in higher concentrations than in previous years at this site was chromium.

  12. Immune gene discovery by expressed sequence tag analysis of hemocytes and hepatopancreas in the Pacific White Shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei, and the Atlantic White Shrimp, L. setiferus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. S. Gross; T. C. Bartlett; C. L. Browdy; R. W. Chapman; G. W. Warr

    2001-01-01

    A pilot program was undertaken in immune gene discovery in two sister species of litopenaeid shrimp, the Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei and the Atlantic white shrimp, L. setiferus. RNA from the hemocytes and hepatopancreas of single individuals from each species was recovered, 4 cDNA libraries (one from each tissue\\/species) were made by a PCR-based method and a total of

  13. Effect of AquaVac TM Vibromax TM on size and health of post larva stage of Pacific White shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei and Black Tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Wongtavatchai; M. V. López-Dóriga; M. J. Francis

    2010-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of AquaVac™ Vibromax™, an inactivated Vibrio bacterin product, to promote health and resistance to vibriosis in penaeid shrimp post larva (PL). Black Tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) and Pacific White shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) were fed ad libitum with VibromaxTM- enriched Artemia for 10 consecutive days, PL5–PL14. Artemia nauplii were enriched by incubating 150g

  14. Emerging viral diseases of fish and shrimp

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winton, James R.; Walker, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    The rise of aquaculture has been one of the most profound changes in global food production of the past 100 years. Driven by population growth, rising demand for seafood and a levelling of production from capture fisheries, the practice of farming aquatic animals has expanded rapidly to become a major global industry. Aquaculture is now integral to the economies of many countries. It has provided employment and been a major driver of socio-economic development in poor rural and coastal communities, particularly in Asia, and has relieved pressure on the sustainability of the natural harvest from our rivers, lakes and oceans. However, the rapid growth of aquaculture has also been the source of anthropogenic change on a massive scale. Aquatic animals have been displaced from their natural environment, cultured in high density, exposed to environmental stress, provided artificial or unnatural feeds, and a prolific global trade has developed in both live aquatic animals and their products. At the same time, over-exploitation of fisheries and anthropogenic stress on aquatic ecosystems has placed pressure on wild fish populations. Not surprisingly, the consequence has been the emergence and spread of an increasing array of new diseases. This review examines the rise and characteristics of aquaculture, the major viral pathogens of fish and shrimp and their impacts, and the particular characteristics of disease emergence in an aquatic, rather than terrestrial, context. It also considers the potential for future disease emergence in aquatic animals as aquaculture continues to expand and faces the challenges presented by climate change.

  15. Cost and returns budgets for penaeid shrimp culture operations

    E-print Network

    Johns, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    the method of Primavera (1978). Maturation animals are fed a diet of fresh frozen squid (~Loli o ~s . ), fresh frozen juvenile shrimp (Penaeus ~s . ), and fresh frozen bloodworms (Glycera dibranchiata) in a 2:1:1 ratio. Production per tank 21 td bit b P... for each piece of equipment. The maturation ration for broodstock consists of squid, juven- ile shrimp, and bloodworms and have per kilogram prices of $1. 65, $2. 75, and $22. 00, respectively. Squid are fed twice a day at ap- proximately 150g per...

  16. Issues, Impacts, and Implications of Shrimp Aquaculture in Thailand

    PubMed

    Dierberg; Kiattisimkul

    1996-09-01

    Water quality impacts to and from intensive shrimp aquaculture in Thailand are substantial. Besides the surface and subsurface salinization of freshwaters, loadings of solids, oxygen-consuming organic matter, and nutrients to receiving waters are considerable when the cumulative impacts from water exchange during the growout cycle, pond drainage during harvesting, and illegal pond sediment disposal are taken into account. Although just beginning to be considered in Thailand, partial recirculating and integrated intensive farming systems are producing promising, if somewhat limited, results. By providing on-site treatment of the effluent from the shrimp growout ponds, there is less reliance on using outside water supplies, believed to be the source of the contamination.The explosion in the number of intensively operated shrimp farms has not only impacted the coastal zone of Thailand, but has also resulted in an unsustainable aquaculture industry. Abandonment of shrimp ponds due to either drastic, disease-caused collapses or more grandual, year-to-year reductions in the productivity of the pond is common. To move Thailand towards a more sustainable aquaculture industry and coastal zone environment, integrated aquaculture management is needed. Components of integrated aquaculture management are technical and institutional. The technical components involve deployment of wastewater treatment and minimal water-use systems aimed at making aquaculture operations more hydraulically closed. Before this is possible, technical and economic feasibility studies on enhanced nitrification systems and organic solids removal by oxidation between production cycles and/or the utilization of plastic pond liners need to be conducted. The integration of semi-intensive aquaculture within mangrove areas also should be investigated since mangrove losses attributable to shrimp aquaculture are estimated to be between 16 and 32 % of the total mangrove area destroyed betweeen 1979 and 1993.Government policy needs to devote as much attention to sustainability issues as it has on promoting intensive pond culture. Such a balanced policy would include training and education monitoring and enforcement, rehabilitating abandoned ponds, managing land use within the coastal zone, more community involvement, and government reorganization to eliminate overlapping jurisdictions among agencies.As integrated aquaculture management becomes more the practice than the exception, less risk of crop failure to the industry and reduced discharge loadings from intensively managed shrimp ponds to receiving waters can be expected. Projected limitations on growing and marketing shrimp in the future, such as scarcity of land and broodstock, continued disease outbreaks, negative publicity, regulatory enforcement, water treatment and solids disposal costs, and increased competition from growers in other Asian countries will also drive the government and the industry towards adopting integrated aquaculture management.KEY WORDS: Shrimp aquaculture; Thailand; Historical practices; Environmental impacts; Sustainability; Integrated management; Water treatment; Institutional aspects PMID:8703103

  17. A bio-economic model for penaeid shrimp mariculture systems

    E-print Network

    Adams, Charles M

    1978-01-01

    ). The chief candi- date for culture has been the native white shrimp (Penaeus setiferus), with Parker and Holcomb having demonstrated production of up to 1171 pounds per acre at stocking densities of 40, 000 per grow-out s, cres. How'ever, much research... guidelines in decision making in terms of the most, efficient use of fixed resources and in terms of actual mani- pulation and. management of the shrimp crop. The application of such managerial aids to an environment controlled intensive cultural system...

  18. Characterization of some fish and shrimp spoiling bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kitty J. A. van Spreekens

    1977-01-01

    The classification of some important groups of bacteria involved in fish and shrimp spoilage was studied.\\u000a \\u000a Trimethylamine is produced byPseudomonas putrefaciens, a “non-defined” group resemblingPs. putrefaciens, Photobacterium spp. and someMoraxella-like bacteria.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Hypoxanthine is produced by the same groups of bacteria except the last named and also by the “typical shrimp spoilers” (presumptiveAlteromonas).\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Strong off-odours are produced on fresh fish byPs.

  19. The ongoing pursuit of R Coronae Borealis stars: the ASAS-3 survey strikes again

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisserand, P.; Clayton, G. C.; Welch, D. L.; Pilecki, B.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Kilkenny, D.

    2013-03-01

    Context. R Coronae Borealis stars (RCBs) are rare, hydrogen-deficient, carbon-rich supergiant variable stars that are likely the evolved merger products of pairs of CO and He white dwarfs. Only 55 RCB stars have been found in our galaxy and their distribution on the sky is weighted heavily by microlensing survey field positions. A less biased wide-area survey would enable us to test competing evolutionary scenarios, understand the population or populations that produce RCBs, and constrain their formation rate. Aims: The ASAS-3 survey monitored the sky south of declination +28 deg between 2000 and 2010 to a limiting magnitude of V = 14. We searched ASAS-3 for RCB variables using several different methods to ensure that the probability of RCB detection was as high as possible and to reduce selection biases based on luminosity, temperature, dust production activity and shell brightness. Methods: Candidates whose light curves were visually inspected were pre-selected based on their infrared (IR) excesses due to warm dust in their circumstellar shells using the WISE and/or 2MASS catalogues. Criteria on light curve variability were also applied when necessary to minimise the number of objects. Initially, we searched for RCB stars among the ASAS-3 ACVS1.1 variable star catalogue, then among the entire ASAS-3 south source catalogue, and finally directly interrogated the light curve database for objects that were not catalogued in either of those. We then acquired spectra of 104 stars to determine their real nature using the SSO/WiFeS spectrograph. Results: We report 21 newly discovered RCB stars and 2 new DY Per stars. Two previously suspected RCB candidates were also spectroscopically confirmed. Our methods allowed us to extend our detection efficiency to fainter magnitudes that would not have been easily accessible to discovery techniques based on light curve variability. The overall detection efficiency is about 90% for RCBs with maximum light brighter than V ~ 13. Conclusions: With these new discoveries, 76 RCBs are now known in our Galaxy and 22 in the Magellanic Clouds. This growing sample is of great value to constrain the peculiar and disparate atmosphere composition of RCBs. Most importantly, we show that the spatial distribution and apparent magnitudes of Galactic RCB stars is consistent with RCBs being part of the Galactic bulge population.

  20. What is the True Population of R Coronae Borealis Stars in the Galaxy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Tisserand, P.; Welch, D. L.; Zhang, W.

    2013-01-01

    The R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars are rare hydrogen-deficient, carbon-rich supergiants. Two evolutionary scenarios have been suggested, a double degenerate merger of two white dwarfs (WDs), or a final helium shell flash in a PN central star. The evidence pointing toward a WD merger or a FF origin for RCB stars is contradictory. The distribution on the sky and radial velocities of the RCB stars tend toward those of the bulge population but a much larger sample of stars is needed to determine the true population. We need to discover RCB much more efficiently. In order to do this we are pursuing three lines of attack: 1. Light Curves: Using the traditional technique of identifying RCB stars from their characteristic large and irregular light variations, we have we have investigated the stars in the ASAS-3 south survey. We have discovered 21 new RCB stars. The different analysis applied allowed us to extend our detection efficiency to fainter magnitudes that would not have been easily accessible to classical analysis based on light-curve variability. 2. Color-Color Diagrams: All RCB stars have IR excesses. Using the recent release of the WISE All-Sky Catalog, a series of IR color-color cuts have produced a sample of candidates 1600) that may yield over 200 new RCB star identifications. A pilot project to get spectra of the 200 brighter candidates has yielded an unexpectedly high new discovery rate 20%) based on photometric colors alone. 3. Spectral Classification: We are attempting to develop a quantitative spectral classification system for the RCB stars so that they can perhaps be identified without an accompanying light curve. The cooler RCB stars look like carbon stars with strong C2 bands, but they can be differentiated from carbon stars by their extreme hydrogen deficiency and very low 13C/12C ratio. Also, the red CN bands are much weaker in RCB stars than in carbon stars. The number of RCB stars in the Galaxy may be consistent with the predicted number of He/CO WD mergers. Solving the mystery of how the RCB stars evolve would be a watershed event in the study of stellar evolution that will lead to a better understanding of other important types of stellar merger events such as Type Ia SNe.

  1. Larviculture of native white shrimp, Penaeus setiferus, and exotic white shrimp, P. vannanmei at Continental Fisheries, Limited, Panama City, Florida 

    E-print Network

    Aranyakananda, Porcham

    1985-01-01

    V1 V111 iX ALGAE Source of Penaeus setiferus broodstocks Source of P. vannamei nauplii Algal Species Grown Algal Culture Methods Environmental Control BRINE SHRIMP Incubation of Artemia cysts 13 14 15 ( con ) TABLE OF CONTENTS Page... Penaeid Shrimp Life Cycle Typical growth of cultured algae 33 34 35 36 LIST OF TABLES Table page I Classes and species of microalgae presently under culture 30 2 Composition of Gui1 I ard ' s enrichment ' f/2 3 Composition of Zeigl er diet...

  2. Fish and opossum shrimp entrainment in the Mt. Elbert Pumped-Storage Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Maiolie, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    Impacts of operating the Mt. Elbert Pumped-Storage Power Plant on fish and opossum shrimp (mysis relicta) were investigated from 1981 to 1985 at Twin Lakes, Colorado to determine any negative effects on the Twin Lakes fishery. Daytime generation cycles entrained shrimp at densities averaging 0.05 to 0.23 shrimp/m/sup 3/ of discharge. Eight hour daytime generation cycles would entrain 50,000 to 300,000 shrimp at these rates. Generation cycles which occurred after dark entrained many times more shrimp with densities as high as 1.21 shrimp/m/sup 3/ of discharge. Entrainment density during nighttime pump-back cycles was much greater; averaging 2 to 17 shrimp/m/sup 3/ discharged. Six to 44 million shrimp were entrained during typical 8 h pump-back cycles. Differences between daytime and nighttime entrainment rates appeared to be caused by migration of shrimp into the water column at night making them more vulnerable to entrainment. Losses were estimated to have reduced Lower Twin Lake shrimp abundance by 39% in 1985.

  3. Design Choices in the SHRIMP System: An Empirical Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthias A. Blumrich; Richard D. Alpert; Yuqun Chen; Douglas W. Clark; Stefanos N. Damianakis; Cezary Dubnicki; Edward W. Felten; Liviu Iftode; Kai Li; Margaret Martonosi; Robert A. Shillner

    1998-01-01

    The SHRIMP cluster-computing system has progressed to a point of relative maturity; a variety of applications are running on a 16-node system. We have enough experience to understand what we did right and wrong in designing and building the system. In this paper we discuss some of the lessons we learned about computer architecture, and about the challenges involved in

  4. Early Experience with Message-Passing on the SHRIMP Multicomputer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edward W. Felten; Richard D. Alpert; Angelos Bilas; Matthias A. Blumrich; Douglas W. Clark; Stefanos N. Damianakis; Cezary Dubnicki; Liviu Iftode; Kai Li

    1996-01-01

    The SHRIMP multicomputer provides virtual memory-mapped communication (VMMC), which supports protected, user-level message passing, allows user programs to perform their own buffer management, and separates data transfers from control transfers so that a data transfer can be done without the intervention of the receiving node CPU. An important question is whether such a mechanism can indeed deliver all of the

  5. Microbiological Profile of Pacific Shrimp, Panda/us jordani, Stowed

    E-print Network

    Spray J. S LEE and EDWARD KOLBE Introduction Mechanically refrigerated seawater spray (RSWS) has these effects. Kolbe (1979a, 1980) has described shrimp cooling characteristics and workable sprayer designs. In a companion paper, Kolbe (1979b) described a RSWS system design model that can be used to select ade- quate

  6. Soybean meal, distillers grains replace fishmeal in experimental shrimp diets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate inclusion of distiller’s dried grains with solubles (DDGS) as partial replacement of commercial, solvent-extracted soybean meal (SBM) in fish meal-free diets for Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei. Aquaria connected to a recirculating biofiltratio...

  7. SHRIMP zircon dating of the Permian System of eastern Australia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Roberts; C. B. Foster

    1996-01-01

    SHRIMP zircon dates from Permian ignimbrites and tuffs associated with fossiliferous strata within the Sydney?Bowen Basin and New England Orogen are used to establish a time scale for the Permian System in eastern Australia. For the first time this enables direct correlation of the eastern Australian Lower Permian succession with similarly measured ages in the Permian type sections in the

  8. Characterization of myosin light chain in shrimp hemocytic phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Han, Fang; Wang, Zhiyong; Wang, Xiaoqing

    2010-11-01

    Myosin light chain, a well-known cytoskeleton gene, regulates multiple processes that are involved in material transport, muscle shrink and cell division. However, its function in phagocytosis against invading pathogens in crustacean remains unknown. In this investigation, a myosin light chain gene was obtained from Marsupenaeus japonicus shrimp. The full-length cDNA of this gene was of 766 bp and an open reading frame (ORF) of 462 bp encoding a polypeptide of 153 amino acids. The myosin light chain protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Subsequently the specific antibody was raised using the purified GST fusion protein. As revealed by immuno-electron microscopy, the myosin light chain protein was only expressed in the dark bands of muscle. In the present study, the myosin light chain gene was up-regulated in the WSSV-resistant shrimp as revealed by real-time PCR and western blot. And the phagocytic percentage and phagocytic index using FITC-labeled Vibrio parahemolyticus were remarkably increased in the WSSV-resistant shrimp, suggesting that the myosin light chain protein was essential in hemocytic phagocytosis. On the other hand, RNAi assays indicated that the phagocytic percentage and phagocytic index were significantly decreased when the myosin light chain gene was silenced by sequence-specific siRNA. These findings suggested that myosin light chain protein was involved in the regulation of hemocytic phagocytosis of shrimp. PMID:20691789

  9. Introducing foreign DNA into tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) by electroporation.

    PubMed

    Tseng, F S; Tsai, H J; Liao, I C; Song, Y L

    2000-12-01

    Electroporation was used to introduce pFLAG-CMV-1-BAP, a DNA fragment that includes a bacterial alkaline phosphatase gene driven by a human cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter, into Penaeus monodon zygotes. The transgenic tiger shrimp was achievedby using 10kV, 28 pulses, 120 g sec pulse time, 10 cycles, and a DNA concentration of 37.5 microg/mL. The hatching rate of electroporated zygotes (46%) was significantly lower than that of zygotes in the untreated group (89%). The survival rate of postlarvae in the electroporated group using a DNA concentration of 37.5 microg/mL decreased from 0.6% for postlarva 45 to 0.4% for postlarva 120. Based on dot blot analysis, the rate of gene transfer was 37% in mysis-stage, 23% postlarva 15(PL15), 19% postlarva 45(PL45), and 21% 4-month-old (about PL120). Genomic Southern blotting demonstrated that DNA from transgenic tiger shrimp contained fragments of exogenous DNA that were smaller, larger and of the same molecular size as pFLAG-CMV-1-BAP. Transferred DNA fragments were integrated into the genomes of 31% of the transgenic tiger shrimp. The exogenous DNA was mosaically distributed in a wide variety of tissues. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that the FLAG-BAP fused-protein encoded by pFLAG-CMV-1-BAP was present in the ovaries of some transgenic tiger shrimp. PMID:11191866

  10. Cost and returns budgets for penaeid shrimp culture operations 

    E-print Network

    Johns, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    the method of Primavera (1978). Maturation animals are fed a diet of fresh frozen squid (~Loli o ~s . ), fresh frozen juvenile shrimp (Penaeus ~s . ), and fresh frozen bloodworms (Glycera dibranchiata) in a 2:1:1 ratio. Production per tank 21 td bit b P...

  11. Antimicrobial Interventions to Reduce Listeria spp. Contamination on Shrimp

    E-print Network

    Wong, Tsui-Yin

    2010-01-14

    Chloride) with a water wash at room temperature and freezing of the shrimp at -22.3 degrees C was the only treatment that had a significant antimicrobial effect on the Listeria spp. Antimicrobial effects and the mode of action of PEF (Pulsed Electric Field...

  12. Halogenated contaminants in farmed salmon, trout, tilapia, pangasius, and shrimp.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, S P J; van Velzen, M J M; Swart, C P; van der Veen, I; Traag, W A; de Boer, J

    2009-06-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzo-p-furans (PCDD/Fs), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecane diastereomers (HBCDs), and perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) were analyzed in popular farmed fish such as salmon, trout, tilapia, and pangasius and in farmed shrimp. The samples originated from southeast Asia, Europe, and South America. Results show the following: (i) Carnivorous species contained higher contaminant concentrations than omnivorous species. (ii) Contaminant concentrations generally decreased per species in the following order of salmon > trout > tilapia approximately equal to pangasius approximately equal to shrimp. (iii) Most contaminant concentrations decreased in the following order of PCBs approximately equal to dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethanes (DDTs) > hexachlorobenzene approximately equal to pentachlorobenzene approximately equal to dieldrin approximately equal to PBDEs approximately equal to alpha-HBCD approximately equal to perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) > World Health Organization toxic equivalents (WHO-TEQ) [PCDD/Fs and dioxin-like (dl)-PCBs]. (iv) Contaminant concentrations were very low (mostly <1 ng/g wet weight) and far below the European and Dutch legislative limits. (v) Contaminant concentrations in farmed shrimp, pangasius, and tilapia were lower than those in wild fish, whereas contaminant concentrations in farmed salmon and trout were higher than those in lean wild marine fish. From the five species investigated, salmon is predominantly responsible (97%) for human exposure to the sum of the investigated contaminants. The contribution of trout, tilapia, pangasius, and shrimp is small (3%) because contaminant concentrations and consumption volumes were much lower. PMID:19569323

  13. CO2 Efflux from Shrimp Ponds in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Sidik, Frida; Lovelock, Catherine E.

    2013-01-01

    The conversion of mangrove forest to aquaculture ponds has been increasing in recent decades. One of major concerns of this habitat loss is the release of stored ‘blue’ carbon from mangrove soils to the atmosphere. In this study, we assessed carbon dioxide (CO2) efflux from soil in intensive shrimp ponds in Bali, Indonesia. We measured CO2 efflux from the floors and walls of shrimp ponds. Rates of CO2 efflux within shrimp ponds were 4.37 kg CO2 m?2 y?1 from the walls and 1.60 kg CO2 m?2 y?1 from the floors. Combining our findings with published data of aquaculture land use in Indonesia, we estimated that shrimp ponds in this region result in CO2 emissions to the atmosphere between 5.76 and 13.95 Tg y?1. The results indicate that conversion of mangrove forests to aquaculture ponds contributes to greenhouse gas emissions that are comparable to peat forest conversion to other land uses in Indonesia. Higher magnitudes of CO2 emission may be released to atmosphere where ponds are constructed in newly cleared mangrove forests. This study indicates the need for incentives that can meet the target of aquaculture industry without expanding the converted mangrove areas, which will lead to increased CO2 released to atmosphere. PMID:23755306

  14. Alaska 's shrimp landings have increased 40-fold in

    E-print Network

    - prO\\ed processing techniques and .t steadil] increasing domestic market. Because the rapid expansion coupled with emergency orders of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game reduced fi hing time. Over Commercial fishing for pandalid shrimp in Alaska began in 1916 in the southeastern area near Petersburg

  15. POLYCYCLIC MUSK FRAGRANCES IN SEDIMENTS AND SHRIMP TISSUES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yelena Sapozhnikova; Dan Liebert; Edward Wirth; Michael Fulton

    2010-01-01

    Polycyclic musk fragrances are widely used as ingredients in personal care products, shampoos, lotions, and household cleaning agents. These chemicals have relatively high octanol-water partition coefficients, and therefore tend to accumulate in sediments, sludge, and biological tissues. We analyzed shrimp and sediment samples for the presence of synthetic musks. Samples were extracted using accelerated solvent extraction. Gel permeation chromatography and

  16. Morphometric differentiation in small juveniles of the pink spotted shrimp

    E-print Network

    is also reported from Mauritania to Angola in the eastern Atlantic Ocean (Pérez- Farfante, 1969; Pérez the population (Dall et al., 1990; Pérez-Castañeda and Defeo, 2001). In the western Atlantic Ocean, Pérez environments of the Atlantic Ocean. The pink spot- ted shrimp is distributed within the western Atlantic from

  17. Comparison of NIMS and MALDI platforms for neuropeptide and lipid mass spectrometric imaging in C. borealis brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Robert M; Greer, Tyler; Chen, Ruibing; Hensen, Broderick; Li, Lingjun

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS) is a recently developed matrix-free laser desorption/ionization technique that has shown promise for peptide analyses. It is also useful in mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) studies of small molecule drugs, metabolites, and lipids, minimizing analyte diffusion caused by matrix application. In this study, NIMS and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) MSI of a crustacean model organism Cancer borealis brain were compared. MALDI was found to perform better than NIMS in these neuropeptide imaging experiments. Twelve neuropeptides were identified in MALDI MSI experiments whereas none were identified in NIMS MSI experiments. In addition, lipid profiles were compared using each ionization method. Both techniques provided similar lipid profiles in the m/z range 700 - 900. PMID:23544036

  18. Beppo-SAX temperature maps of galaxy clusters in the Corona Borealis supercluster: A2061, A2067 and A2124

    E-print Network

    F. Marini; S. Bardelli; E. Zucca; S. De Grandi; A. Cappi; S. Ettori; L. Moscardini; G. Tormen; A. Diaferio

    2004-06-24

    In this paper we present the analysis of Beppo-SAX observations of the cluster pairs A2061-A2067 and A2122-A2124, located in the Corona Borealis supercluster, which have been selected as candidate merging clusters. The aim of this work is to study the physics of the intracluster medium and to look for the possible presence of merging signatures. We derived the global temperatures and abundances and the temperature profiles and maps for these clusters. We do not find any significant evidence of interaction between the clusters forming the pairs, but we detect a candidate shock inside A2061. On the basis of the X-ray and optical properties of this cluster we propose a scenario in which a group is falling inside A2061. This interaction is in the phase in which the cores have not encountered yet and in which the formation of a shock is expected.

  19. Infrared Space Observatory Spectra of R Coronae Borealis Stars. I. Emission Features in the Interval 3 - 25 microns

    E-print Network

    David L. Lambert; N. Kameswara Rao; Gajendra Pandey; Inese I. Ivans

    2001-03-23

    Infrared Space Observatory 3 - 25 $\\mu$m spectra of the R Coronae Borealis stars V854 Cen, R CrB, and RY Sgr are presented and discussed. Sharp emission features coincident in wavelengths with the well known Unidentified Emission Features are present in the spectrum of V854 Cen but not of R CrB or RY Sgr. Since V854 Cen is not particularly H-poor and has a 1000 times more H than the other stars, the emission features are probably from a carrier containing hydrogen. There is a correspondence between the features and emission from laboratory samples of hydrogenated amorphous carbon. A search for C$_{60}$ in emission or absorption proved negative. Amorphous carbon particles account for the broad emission features seen between 6 - 14 $\\mu$m in the spectrum of each star.

  20. High-resolution optical spectroscopy of the R Coronae Borealis star V532 Ophiuchi at maximum light

    E-print Network

    Rao, N Kameswara; Woolf, Vincent M; Hema, B P

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution optical spectra of the R Coronae Borealis (RCB) star V532 Oph at light maximum are discussed. The absolute visual magnitude M_V of the star is found to be -4.9 \\pm 0.5. The elemental abundances suggest the star belongs to the majority class of RCB stars but is among the most O-poor of this class with mild enhancements of heavy elements Y, Zr, Ba and La. The C_2 Swan bands are weak in V532 Oph relative to R CrB. Other aspects of the high-resolution spectrum confirm that V532 Oph is representative of majority RCBs, i.e., the radial velocity is variable, circumstellar material is present and the photosphere feeds a high-velocity stellar wind.

  1. Energetic consequences of flight speeds of foraging red and hoary bats (Lasiurus borealis and Lasiurus cinereus; Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae)

    PubMed

    Salcedo; Fenton; Hickey; Blake

    1995-01-01

    We used Doppler radar readings of the flight speeds of foraging, lactating female Lasiurus borealis (N=826) and Lasiurus cinereus (N=544) to test morphologically based predictions about their flight performance. Both species flew at speeds (V=6.7 and 7.7 m s-1, respectively) that differed significantly from predicted minimum power speed (Vmp; 4.0 and 5.08 m s-1, respectively) or predicted maximum range speed (Vmr; 5.25 and 6.69 m s-1, respectively), perhaps reflecting the active pursuit of moths performing evasive manoeuvres. Estimates of costs of flight and lactation are combined with data on prey size together with encounter and capture rates to illustrate the energetic benefits accruing to these species when they forage in concentrations of insects. PMID:9320162

  2. Issues, impacts, and implications of shrimp aquaculture in Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dierberg, Forrest E.; Kiattisimkul, Woraphan

    1996-09-01

    Water quality impacts to and from intensive shrimp aquaculture in Thailand are substantial. Besides the surface and subsurface salinization of freshwaters, loadings of solids, oxygen-consuming organic matter, and nutrients to receiving waters are considerable when the cumulative impacts from water exchange during the growout cycle, pond drainage during harvesting, and illegal pond sediment disposal are taken into account. Although just beginning to be considered in Thailand, partial recirculating and integrated intensive farming systems are producing promising, if somewhat limited, results. By providing on-site treatment of the effluent from the shrimp growout ponds, there is less reliance on using outside water supplies, believed to be the source of the contamination. The explosion in the number of intensively operated shrimp farms has not only impacted the coastal zone of Thailand, but has also resulted in an unsustainable aquaculture industry. Abandonment of shrimp ponds due to either drastic, disease-caused collapses or more grandual, year-to-year reductions in the productivity of the pond is common. To move Thailand towards a more sustainable aquaculture industry and coastal zone environment, integrated aquaculture management is needed. Components of integrated aquaculture management are technical and institutional. The technical components involve deployment of wastewater treatment and minimal water-use systems aimed at making aquaculture operations more hydraulically closed. Before this is possible, technical and economic feasibility studies on enhanced nitrification systems and organic solids removal by oxidation between production cycles and/or the utilization of plastic pond liners need to be conducted. The integration of semi-intensive aquaculture within mangrove areas also should be investigated since mangrove losses attributable to shrimp aquaculture are estimated to be between 16 and 32% of the total mangrove area destroyed betweeen 1979 and 1993. Government policy needs to devote as much attention to sustainability issues as it has on promoting intensive pond culture. Such a balanced policy would include training and education monitoring and enforcement, rehabilitating abandoned ponds, managing land use within the coastal zone, more community involvement, and government reorganization to eliminate overlapping jurisdictions among agencies. As integrated aquaculture management becomes more the practice than the exception, less risk of crop failure to the industry and reduced discharge loadings from intensively managed shrimp ponds to receiving waters can be expected. Projected limitations on growing and marketing shrimp in the future, such as scarcity of land and broodstock, continued disease outbreaks, negative publicity, regulatory enforcement, water treatment and solids disposal costs, and increased competition from growers in other Asian countries will also drive the government and the industry towards adopting integrated aquaculture management.

  3. Evaluation of Difloxacin for Shrimp Aquaculture: In Vitro Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations, Medicated Feed Palatability, and Toxicity to the Shrimp Penaeus vannamei

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eric D. Park; Donald V. Lightner; Rodney R. Williams; Leone L. Mohney; John M. Stamm

    1995-01-01

    Standard in vitro minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined for difloxacin and compared with the MICs of several other antimicrobials, against a standardized battery of 13 gram-negative bacterial isolates associated with shrimp disease. The palatability and safety (toxicity) of difloxacin to the shrimp Penaeus vannamei were also evaluated during 15 d of medicated feeding at 1× (100 mg\\/kg of feed),

  4. Vaccination Enhances Early Immune Responses in White Shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei after Secondary Exposure to Vibrio alginolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yong-Chin; Chen, Jiann-Chu; Morni, Wan Zabidii W.; Putra, Dedi Fazriansyah; Huang, Chien-Lun; Li, Chang-Che; Hsieh, Jen-Fang

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent work suggested that the presence of specific memory or some form of adaptive immunity occurs in insects and shrimp. Hypervariable pattern recognition molecules, known as Down syndrome cell adhesion molecules, are able to mount specific recognition, and immune priming in invertebrates. In the present study, we attempted to understand the immune response pattern of white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei which received primary (PE) and secondary exposure (SE) to Vibrio alginolyticus. Methodology Immune parameters and proliferation of haematopoietic tissues (HPTs) of shrimp which had received PE and SE to V. alginolyticus were measured. In the PE trial, the immune parameters and proliferation of HPTs of shrimp that received heat-killed V. alginolyticus (HVa) and formalin-inactivated V. alginolyticus (FVa) were measured. Mortality, immune parameters and proliferation of HPTs of 7-day-HVa-PE shrimp (shrimp that received primary exposure to HVa after 7 days) and 7-day-FVa-PE shrimp (shrimp that received primary exposure to FVa after 7 days) following SE to live V. alginolyticus (LVa) were measured. Phagocytic activity and clearance efficiency were examined for the 7?35-day-HVa-PE and FVa-PE shrimp. Results HVa-receiving shrimp showed an earlier increase in the immune response on day 1, whereas FVa-receiving shrimp showed a late increase in the immune response on day 5. The 7-day-FVa-PE shrimp showed enhancement of immunity when encountering SE to LVa, whereas 7-day-HVa-PE shrimp showed a minor enhancement in immunity. 7-day-FVa-PE shrimp showed higher proliferation and an HPT mitotic index. Both phagocytic activity and clearance maintained higher for both HVa-PE and FVa-PE shrimp after 28 days. Conclusions HVa- and FVa-receiving shrimp showed the bacteria agglutinated prior to being phagocytised. FVa functions as a vaccine, whereas HVa functions as an inducer and can be used as an immune adjuvant. A combined mixture of FVa and HVa can serve as a “vaccine component” to modulate the immunity of shrimp. PMID:23894531

  5. The culture of Penaeid shrimp in ponds receiving heated discharge water from a steam electric generating station, and their use as indicators of water quality 

    E-print Network

    Reitsema, Lawrence Alan

    1975-01-01

    shrimp in pond 6 stocked at 5, 000 shrimp/ha with a survaval of 80. 6% 48 Growth and condition data for fed brown shrimp in pond 7 stocked at 5, 000 shrimp/ha with a survival of 81. 0% . . 49 Type and composition of food used in all experiments... at 500 shrimp/ha with a survival of 100m 65 17 Growth and condition data for fed white shrimp in pond 7 stocked at 500 shrimp/ha with a survival of 100% 66 18 Summary of results of the white shrimp experiment based on data collected on October 17...

  6. Identification of the Major Brown Shrimp (Penaeus aztecus) Allergen as the Muscle Protein Tropomyosin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. B. Daul; M. Slattery; G. Reese; S. B. Lehrer

    1994-01-01

    Shrimp, a major seafood allergen, was investigated as a model food allergen. Extracts from both shrimp (Penaeus aztecus) meat and cooking fluid contain a substantial and similar amount of allergenic activity. A 36-kD allergen, demonstrated in both extracts by SDS-PAGE\\/Western blot analysis, reacted with 28\\/34 (82%) sera from shrimp-sensitive, skin test and RAST-positive, individuals. This allergen, named Pen a I,

  7. The Bait Shrimp Industry of the Gulf of Mexico UNITED STATES DEPART MENT OF THE INTERIOR

    E-print Network

    The Bait Shrimp Industry of the Gulf of Mexico UNITED STATES DEPART MENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH(NII"II, {J lT/riM The Bait Shrimp Industry of the Gulf of Mexico By ANTHONY INGLIS and EDWARD CHIN "ashin on, D.C . lay 1Q #12;The Bait Shrimp Industry of the Gulf of Mexico by ANTHONY 1 GLlS 1 A ' D E

  8. Ecological limitations and appropriation of ecosystem support by shrimp farming in Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Jonas; Folke, Carl; Kautsky, Nils

    1994-09-01

    Shrimp farming in mangrove areas has grown dramatically in Asia and Latin America over the past decade. As a result, demand for resources required for farming, such as feed, seed, and clean water, has increased substantially. This study focuses on semiintensive shrimp culture as practiced on the Caribbean coast of Colombia. We estimated the spatial ecosystem support that is required to produce the food inputs, nursery areas, and clean water to the shrimp farms, as well as to process wastes. We also made an estimate of the natural and human-made resources necessary to run a typical semiintensive shrimp farm. The results show that a semiintensive shrimp farm needs a spatial ecosystem support—the ecological footprint—that is 35-190 times larger than the surface area of the farm. A typical such shrimp farm appropriates about 295 J of ecological work for each joule of edible shrimp protein produced. The corresponding figure for industrial energy is 40:1. More than 80% of the ecological primary production required to feed the shrimps is derived from external ecosystems. In 1990 an area of 874-2300 km2 of mangrove was required to supply shrimp postlarvae to the farms in Colombia, corresponding to a total area equivalent to about 20-50% of the country’s total mangrove area. The results were compared with similar estimates for other food production systems, particularly aquacultural ones. The comparison indicates that shrimp farming ranks as one of the most resource-intensive food production systems, characterizing it as an ecologically unsustainable throughput system. Based on the results, we discuss local, national, and regional appropriation of ecological support by the semiintensive shrimp farms. Suggestions are made for how shrimp farming could be transformed into a food production system that is less environmentally degrading and less dependent on external support areas.

  9. Replacement of Marine Animal Protein with Peanut Meal in Diets for Juvenile White Shrimp, Penaeus vannamei

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chhorn Lim

    1997-01-01

    Six isonitrogenous, isocaloric diets containing 0,11.7, 23.4, 35.1, 46.8, and 58.5% peanut meal as substitutes, on an equal nitrogen basis, for 0,20,40,60,80, and 100% of animal protein mix (53% menhaden fish meal, 34% shrimp waste meal, and 13% squid meal) were fed to juvenile white shrimp, Penaeus vannamei, to satiation four times daily for 8 weeks. Shrimp fed the two

  10. Spawning and Larval Survival of the Pink Shrimp, Penaeus duorarum, in a Small Culture Facility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Geraldine M. Cripe

    1997-01-01

    Eye-enucleated pink shrimp, Penaeus duorarum, were successfully matured, mated, and spawned in 1.23-m diameter tanks. Broodstock of five to six female shrimp spawned, on average, 50% of days during which expanded ovaries were observed. Average daily spawn of viable eggs ranged from 2,750 (September) to 11,026 (March). In a preliminary experiment, shrimp fed the bloodworm, Glycera dibranchiata, as well as

  11. Toxicity and Residue Studies of Cultured Blue Shrimp Treated with the Algicide Cutrine-Plus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rodney R. Williams; J. E. Hose; Donald V. Lightner

    1982-01-01

    Laboratory bioassays on the blue shrimp (Penaeus stylirostris) were conducted with Cutrine-Plus, a chelated copper algicide registered for use in fish hatcheries but not for shrimp culture facilities. The 24- and 96-h LC50's for blue shrimp were found to be 151.3 and 19.5 mg\\/L copper as Cutrine-Plus, respectively. Cutrine-Plus was found to be safe (i.e., produced no statistical mortality) at

  12. Histones H2A\\/H2B Inhibit the Interaction of Transcription Factor IIIA with the Xenopus borealis Somatic 5S RNA Gene in a Nucleosome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeffrey J. Hayes; Alan P. Wolffe

    1992-01-01

    A Xenopus borealis somatic 5S RNA gene was assembled with either the complete octamer of histones, (H2A\\/H2B\\/H3\\/H4)_2, or the (H3\\/H4)_2 tetramer of histones that comprises the central protein kernel of the nucleosome. Gel-mobility shifts, DNase I protection, and immunoblotting assays demonstrate that the class III transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA) readily interacts with 5S DNA associated with the tetramer but that

  13. Production of somatic hybrid tissues following chemical and electrical fusion of protoplasts from albino cell suspensions of Medicago sativa and M. borealis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. M. Gilmour; M. R. Davey; E. C. Cocking

    1989-01-01

    Protoplasts isolated from cell suspensions of albinoMedicago borealis andM. sativa were fused chemically, using two methods, and electrically. Although a small scale method of chemical fusion gave the highest fusion frequency, electrofusion was the superior technique on the basis of throughput of green somatic hybrid cell colonies. Chlorophyll-containing tissues were confirmed as being somatic hybrid by isoenzyme and cytological analyses.

  14. An individual-based, spatially-explicit simulation model of the population dynamics of the endangered red-cockaded woodpecker, Picoides borealis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Benjamin H. Letcher; Jeffery A. Priddy; Jeffrey R. Walters; Larry B. Crowder

    1998-01-01

    Spatially-explicit population models allow a link between demography and the landscape. We developed a spatially-explicit simulation model for the red-cockaded woodpecker, Picoides borealis, an endangered and territorial cooperative breeder endemic to the southeastern United States. This kind of model is especially appropriate for this species because it can incorporate the spatial constraints on dispersal of helpers, and because territory locations

  15. Mark Tercelro Josef S. Idolne

    E-print Network

    /us borealis Survey Data Abstract. - We applied Shep- herd's length composition analysis (SRLCA) to research trawl survey catches of Gulf of Maine northern shrimp Pa:ndcdus borealis to test the efficiency

  16. A freshwater shrimp (Paratya compressa improvisa) as a sensitive test organism to pesticides.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, S; Sugaya, Y

    1989-01-01

    The susceptibility of 2-week-old individuals of the freshwater shrimp, Paratya compressa improvisa, to five kinds of insecticide and five kinds of herbicide was examined in comparison with that of two species of Cladocera, Daphnia magna and Moina macrocopa. The shrimp was especially sensitive to two organophosphorus insecticides. The 48-h LC50 values for fenitrothion and fenthion to the shrimp were 1.15 and 1.04 microg litre(-1) (mean value, n=2), in contrast with 37.8 and 35.3 microg litre(-1) in the case of M. macrocopa, and more than 50 microg litre(-1) with D. magna. The shrimp also showed the higher susceptibility to other insecticides, diazinon, carbaryl (NAC) and BPMC, apart from D. magna to diazinon and NAC. The shrimp also showed higher susceptibility to herbicides. The 48-h LC50 values of CNP, benthiocarb, oxadiazon, butachlor, and symetryne to the shrimp were two to eight times lower than those of two species of Cladocera, except for the LC50 value of oxadiazon to M. macrocopa, which was very slightly higher. However, the shrimp showed a somewhat lower susceptibility to heavy metals than the two species of Cladocera, especially to copper, and to cadmium and zinc in comparison with D. magna. A bioassay using the shrimp with river water, collected from the river adjacent to the paddy field, showed clearly the high mortality of the shrimp following the aerial spraying with pesticides. PMID:15092400

  17. Simulated gastrointestinal digestion reduces the allergic reactivity of shrimp extract proteins and tropomyosin.

    PubMed

    Gámez, Cristina; Zafra, Ma Paz; Sanz, Verónica; Mazzeo, Carla; Ibáñez, Ma Dolores; Sastre, Joaquín; del Pozo, Victoria

    2015-04-15

    Shrimp are highly allergenic foods. Current management are limited to the avoidance of foods. Therefore, there is an unmet need for a safe and effective therapy using modified allergens. This study focuses on assessing the potential for modification of the allergenicity of shrimp proteins following heat treatment or simulated gastric digestion. Shrimp proteins do not reduce their IgE reactivity after heat treatment but it is reduced by simulated gastric digestion in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Tropomyosin in shrimp extract is worse digested than purified tropomyosin. After 60 min of 10 U/?g pepsin digestion, a strong inhibition was produced in the in vivo skin reactivity of shrimp extracts and in activation of basophils from allergic patients. Immunisation experiments performed in rabbits demonstrated that digested boiled shrimp extract is able to induce IgG antibodies that block the IgE binding to the untreated boiled shrimp extract in shrimp-allergic patients. Building on our observations, digestion treatment could be an effective method for reducing shrimp allergenicity while maintaining the immunogenicity. PMID:25466048

  18. Uncovering the mechanisms of shrimp innate immune response by RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Hirono, Ikuo; Fagutao, Fernand F; Kondo, Hidehiro; Aoki, Takashi

    2011-08-01

    Because of the importance of shrimp in world aquaculture, there is much interest in understanding their immune system in order to improve their resistance to pathogenic microorganisms. An effective tool in studying genes involved in the immune response in shrimp is RNA interference (RNAi). RNAi, first recognized as an antiviral response against RNA viruses, is a cellular mechanism that is triggered by double-stranded RNAs and results in the degradation of homologous genes. In this review, we describe the current studies of genes in shrimp that employed RNAi technology to elucidate or confirm their functions. We also review the potential of RNAi to elicit antiviral response in shrimp. PMID:20396922

  19. Alterations in prey capture and induction of metallothioneins in grass shrimp fed cadmium-contaminated prey

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, W.G.; Hoexum Brouwer, T.M.; Brouwer, M.; Lopez, G.R.

    2000-04-01

    The aquatic oligochaete Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri from a Cd-contaminated cove on the Hudson River, Foundry Cove, New York, USA, has evolved Cd resistance. Past studies have focused on how the mode of detoxification of Cd by these Cd-resistant worms influences Cd trophic transfer to the grass shrimp Palaemonetes pugio. In the present study, the authors investigate reductions in prey capture in grass shrimp fed Cd-contaminated prey. They also investigate the induction of metal-binding proteins, metallothioneins, in these Cd-exposed shrimp. Grass shrimp were fed field-exposed Cd-contaminated Foundry Cove oligochaetes or laboratory-exposed Cd-contaminated Artemia salina. Following these exposures, the ability of Cd- dosed and control shrimp to capture live A. salina was compared. Results show that shrimp fed laboratory-exposed Cd-contaminated A. salina for 2 weeks exhibit significant reductions in their ability to successfully capture prey (live A. salina). Reductions in prey capture were also apparent, though not as dramatic in shrimp fed for 1 week on field-exposed Cd-contained Foundry Cove oligochaetes. Shrimp were further investigated for their subcellular distribution of Cd to examine if alterations in prey capture could be linked to saturation of Cd-metallothionein. Cd-dosed shrimp produced a low molecular weight CD-binding metallothionein protein in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Most importantly, successful prey capture decreased with increased Cd body burdens and increased Cd concentration bound to high molecular weight proteins.

  20. 75 FR 20548 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Shrimp Fishery of the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-20

    ...0648-AY58 Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Shrimp Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic; Revisions...Plan for the Shrimp Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico (Gulf FMP) and the Fishery...

  1. Mating behaviour, epibiotic growth, and the effect of salinity on grooming activity in the hermaphroditic shrimp Lysmata wurdemanni 

    E-print Network

    Giri, Tuhin

    2004-09-30

    Many species of caridean shrimp are protandrous hermaphrodites, maturing initially as males but developing into females as they age and grow. A unique sexual system was recently discovered in the peppermint shrimp, Lysmata ...

  2. 76 FR 56158 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From the Socialist Republic of Vietnam: Final Results and Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-12

    ...and UTXI Aquatic Products Processing Corporation (collectively...coldwater shrimp, in any state of processing; (3) fresh shrimp and prawns...a ``dusting'' layer of rice or wheat flour of at least...Ltd., Kien Cuong Seafood Processing Import Export...

  3. DISTRIBUTION AND ABUNDANCE OF BURROWING SHRIMP IN TWO OREGON ESTUARIES AND IMPLICATIONS FOR ESTUARINE-SCALE NITROGEN DYNAMICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thalassinid burrowing shrimp (Neotrypaea californiensis and Upogebia pugettensis) inhabit large expanses of Pacific estuarine tide flats, from British Columbia to Baja California. The spatial distribution of shrimp populations within estuaries has rarely been quantified because ...

  4. IMPACT OF BURROWING SHRIMP POPULATIONS ON NITROGEN CYCLING AND WATER QUALITY IN WESTERN NORTH AMERICAN TEMPERATE ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thalassinid burrowing shrimp (predominantly, Neotrypaea californiensis and Upogebia pugettensis) inhabit large expanses of tide flats in North American Pacific estuaries, from British Columbia to Baja California. Feeding, burrowing, and burrow irrigation by burrowing shrimp can ...

  5. IMPACT OF BURROWING SHRIMP POPULATIONS ON C, N CYCLING AND WATER QUALITY IN WESTERN NORTH AMERICAN TEMPERATE ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thalassinid burrowing shrimp (predominantly, Neotrypaea californiensis and Upogebia pugettensis) inhabit large expanses of tide flats in North American Pacific estuaries, from British Columbia to Baja California. Feeding, burrowing, and burrow irrigation by burrowing shrimp can ...

  6. The contribution of flocculated material to shrimp ( Litopenaeus vannamei) nutrition in a high-intensity, zero-exchange system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michele A Burford; Peter J Thompson; Robins P McIntosh; Robert H Bauman; Doug C Pearson

    2004-01-01

    High-intensity, zero-exchange shrimp ponds contain a high density of flocculated particles, rich in bacteria and phytoplankton, compared with flow-through systems. The flocculated particles provide a potential food source for shrimp. Short-term tank experiments were conducted to determine the retention of nitrogen (N) from natural biota, dominated by flocculated particles, in white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) at a high-intensity, zero-exchange shrimp farm

  7. The immune response of white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei and its susceptibility to Vibrio alginolyticus at different salinity levels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Long-Uong Wang; Jiann-Chu Chen

    2005-01-01

    White shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei held in 25‰ seawater were injected with TSB-grown Vibrio alginolyticus (1×104cfushrimp?1), and then transferred to 5, 15, 25 (control) and 35‰. Over 24–96h, the mortality of V. alginolyticus-injected shrimp held in 5‰ and 15‰ was significantly higher than that of shrimp held in 25‰ and 35‰, and the mortality of V. alginolyticus-injected shrimp held in 5‰

  8. Evolution of neural computations: Mantis shrimp and human color decoding

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Qasim; Marshall, Justin; Thoen, Hanne; Conway, Bevil R.

    2014-01-01

    Mantis shrimp and primates both possess good color vision, but the neural implementation in the two species is very different, a reflection of the largely unrelated evolutionary lineages of these creatures. Mantis shrimp have scanning compound eyes with 12 classes of photoreceptors, and have evolved a system to decode color information at the front-end of the sensory stream. Primates have image-focusing eyes with three classes of cones, and decode color further along the visual-processing hierarchy. Despite these differences, we report a fascinating parallel between the computational strategies at the color-decoding stage in the brains of stomatopods and primates. Both species appear to use narrowly tuned cells that support interval decoding color identification.

  9. An improved brine shrimp larvae lethality microwell test method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Mu, Jun; Han, Jinyuan; Gu, Xiaojie

    2012-01-01

    This article described an improved brine shrimp larvae lethality microwell test method. A simply designed connecting vessel with alternative photoperiod was used to culture and collect high yield of active Artemia parthenogenetica nauplii for brine shrimp larvae lethality microwell test. Using this method, pure A. parthenogenetica nauplii suspension was easily cultured and harvested with high density about 100-150 larvae per milliliter and the natural mortality was reduced to near zero by elimination of unnecessary artificial disturbance. And its sensitivity was validated by determination of LC(50)-24 h of different reference toxicants including five antitumor agents, two pesticides, three organic pollutants, and four heavy metals salts, most of which exhibited LC(50)-24 h between 0.07 and 58.43 mg/L except for bleomycin and mitomycin C with LC(50)-24 h over 300 mg/L. PMID:21859360

  10. RNA interference-based therapeutics for shrimp viral diseases.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, P; Gireesh-Babu, P; Rajendran, K V; Chaudhari, Aparna

    2009-11-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has emerged as a powerful tool to manipulate gene expression in the laboratory. The presence of a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) in eukaryotic cells triggers this post-transcriptional gene-silencing mechanism, leading to a sequence-specific degradation of the target mRNA. Among its many potential biomedical applications, silencing of viral genes stands out as a promising therapeutic strategy. Marine shrimp viral diseases, especially white spot disease (WSD), represents one of the most attractive targets for the development of therapeutic RNAi owing to its widespread economic impact. This review summarizes the current knowledge in the therapeutic application of RNAi for combating viral diseases in shrimp. The basic principles of RNAi are described, focusing on features important for its therapeutic manipulation. Subsequently, a stepwise strategy for the development of therapeutic RNAi is presented. PMID:20066961

  11. Shrimp Lipids: A Source of Cancer Chemopreventive Compounds

    PubMed Central

    López-Saiz, Carmen-María; Suárez-Jiménez, Guadalupe-Miroslava; Plascencia-Jatomea, Maribel; Burgos-Hernández, Armando

    2013-01-01

    Shrimp is one of the most popular seafoods worldwide, and its lipids have been studied for biological activity in both, muscle and exoskeleton. Free fatty acids, triglycerides, carotenoids, and other lipids integrate this fraction, and some of these compounds have been reported with cancer chemopreventive activities. Carotenoids and polyunsaturated fatty acids have been extensively studied for chemopreventive properties, in both in vivo and in vitro studies. Their mechanisms of action depend on the lipid chemical structure and include antioxidant, anti-proliferative, anti-mutagenic, and anti-inflammatory activities, among others. The purpose of this review is to lay groundwork for future research about the properties of the lipid fraction of shrimp. PMID:24135910

  12. Antimicrobials in shrimp aquaculture in the United States: regulatory status and safety concerns.

    PubMed

    Park, E D; Lightner, D V; Park, D L

    1994-01-01

    The consumption of seafood, especially shrimp, increases yearly in the U.S. The U.S. is the second largest importer of shrimp in the world, consuming more than 11% of the total world production. Aquaculture is becoming an increasingly important source of the world's shrimp, currently accounting for approximately 30% of the world's supply. Unfortunately, in this era of international trade deficits, U.S. production of aquacultured shrimp is insignificant (< 0.1%) compared with world production. As shrimp aquaculture expands in the U.S., so does the use of intensive farming techniques. Shrimp aquaculture is like any other animal husbandry industry in that shrimp are subject to disease, especially under intensive farming methods. In penaeid shrimp, the primary diseases associated with mortalities are usually viral or bacterial. The majority of bacterial infections in penaeid shrimp are attributable to Vibrio species, with mortalities ranging from insignificant to 100%. However, the rapid growth of this industry has outpaced efforts by researchers, pharmaceutical companies, and federal regulatory agencies to provide approved therapeutants for shrimp disease management. Approval of drugs and their surveillance for compliance with regulations applicable to seafoods, including aquacultured goods, is the responsibility of the FDA. There are three general areas of concern regarding human health when chemotherapeutants are used in aquaculture: (1) residues of drugs in fish destined for human consumption; (2) development of drug resistance in human pathogenic bacteria; and (3) direct toxic effects to humans from handling of drugs. Currently, there are no antibacterials approved for shrimp aquaculture in the U.S. One of the major obstacles in the development and approval of new drugs for aquaculture is the cost of conducting the required studies. The high cost to pharmaceutical companies discourages investment in shrimp chemotherapeutant research, since the current U.S. market for such products is small. Unfortunately, the U.S. shrimp aquaculture industry will remain small without legal availability of chemotherapeutants. Oxytetracycline (OTC) and Romet-30 are two antibacterials currently approved in the U.S. for catfish and salmonid aquaculture. Shrimp aquaculture facilities outside of the U.S. routinely use these drugs, as well as others, in the treatment of bacterial disease outbreaks. Much of the work required for OTC approval by the FDA for penaeid shrimp has been completed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:7938783

  13. Virtual memory mapped network interface for the SHRIMP multicomputer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthias A. Blumrich; Kai Li; Richard Alpert; Cezary Dubnicki; Edward W. Felten; Jonathan Sandberg

    1994-01-01

    The network interfaces of existing multicomputers require a significant amount of software overhead to provide protection and to implement message passing protocols. This paper describes the design of a low-latency, high-bandwidth, virtual memory-mapped network interface for the SHRIMP multicomputer project at Princeton University. Without sacrificing protection, the network interface achieves low latency by using virtual memory mapping and write-latency hiding

  14. Molecular Phylogeny and Biogeography of the Marine Shrimp Penaeus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John D. Baldwin; Anna L. Bass; Brian W. Bowen; Wallis H. Clark

    1998-01-01

    The evolutionary relationships among 13 species representing all six subgenera of the shrimp genusPenaeuswere examined using 558 bp of mitochondrial (mt) DNA from the cytochrome oxidase subunit I gene. Analyses of this sequence revealed high genetic divergence between species (d=8–24%), a finding which contrasts with previous work, which indicated that genetic diversity, based on electrophoretic analysis of allozymes, was extremely

  15. Virtual memory mapped network interface for the SHRIMP multicomputer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthias A. Blumrich; Kai Li; Richard Alpert; Cezary Dubnicki; Edward W. Felten; Jonathan Sandberg

    1998-01-01

    The network interfaces of existing multicomputers require a significant amount of software overhead to provide protection and to implement message passing protocols. This paper describes the design of a low-latency, high-bandwidth, virtual memory-mapped network interface for the SHRIMP multicomputer project at Princeton University. Without sacrificing protection, the network interface achieves low latency by using virtual memory mapping and write-latency hiding

  16. U-Pb SHRIMP dating of uraniferous opals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nemchin, A.A.; Neymark, L.A.; Simons, S.L.

    2006-01-01

    U-Pb and U-series analyses of four U-rich opal samples using sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) demonstrate the potential of this technique for the dating of opals with ages ranging from several tens of thousand years to millions of years. The major advantages of the technique, compared to the conventional thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS), are the high spatial resolution (???20 ??m), the ability to analyse in situ all isotopes required to determine both U-Pb and U-series ages, and a relatively short analysis time which allows obtaining a growth rate of opal as a result of a single SHRIMP session. There are two major limitations to this method, determined by both current level of development of ion probes and understanding of ion sputtering processes. First, sufficient secondary ion beam intensities can only be obtained for opal samples with U concentrations in excess of ???20 ??g/g. However, this restriction still permits dating of a large variety of opals. Second, U-Pb ratios in all analyses drifted with time and were only weakly correlated with changes in other ratios (such as U/UO). This drift, which is difficult to correct for, remains the main factor currently limiting the precision and accuracy of the U-Pb SHRIMP opal ages. Nevertheless, an assumption of similar behaviour of standard and unknown opals under similar analytical conditions allowed successful determination of ages with precisions of ???10% for the samples investigated in this study. SHRIMP-based U-series and U-Pb ages are consistent with TIMS dating results of the same materials and known geological timeframes. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Introducing foreign DNA into tiger shrimp ( Penaeus monodon ) by electroporation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. S. Tseng; H. J. Tsai; I. C. Liao; Y. L. Song

    2000-01-01

    Electroporation was used to introduce pFLAG-CMV-1-BAP, a DNA fragment that includes a bacterial alkaline phosphatase gene driven by a human cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter, into Penaeusmonodon zygotes. The transgenic tiger shrimp was achieved by using 10kV, 28 pulses, 120 ? sec pulse time, 10 cycles, and a DNA concentration of 37.5 ?g\\/mL. The hatching rate of electroporated zygotes (46%) was significantly

  18. Molecular cloning and characterization of tiger shrimp ( Penaeus monodon) transglutaminase

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chih-Cheng Huang; Kallaya Sritunyalucksana; Kenneth Söderhäll; Yen-Ling Song

    2004-01-01

    Transglutaminases (TG) are important for blood coagulation and post-translation remodeling of proteins. Using a plaque screening assay, we isolated cDNA encoding a novel TG from a shrimp (Penaeus monodon) hemocyte cDNA library. The TG cDNA consists of 2988 bp with an open reading frame of 2271 bp. The deduced protein has 757 amino acid residues, a calculated molecular mass of

  19. Turtle captures in shrimp trawl nets in Bahrain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ebrahim A. A. Abdulqader

    2010-01-01

    Based on fishermen logbooks, this study assessed turtle captures in Bahrain's shrimp trawl fishery for five fishing seasons during 1998–2003. Estimated total turtle captures were 298 ±184, 264 ±171, 433 ± 243, 394 ± 227, and 234 ± 177 cases which were caught during 39,147 ± 1,269, 35,761 ± 12,400, 42,747 ± 13,637, 37,071 ± 11,781, 43,923 ± 11,994 fishing

  20. Variation of shrimp texture with rigor-mortis 

    E-print Network

    Wilaichon, Wunwiboon

    1976-01-01

    of shear (place) . In each. lot at a given position of shear and storage temperature postmortem time and postmortem pH had a significant effect on stress. Proximate composition and collagen content of fresh and spoiled shrimp tails was determined... (NPN) varied from 0. 64 to 0. 68%. Total nitrogen and non-protein nitrogen increased during room temperature storage and decreased during ice storage. No consistent pattern was observed for change in solu- bility of collagen during room and ice...

  1. An environmental simulation of a shrimp mariculture pond 

    E-print Network

    Whitson, John Lee

    1989-01-01

    Model Trophic Structure Nutrient Pool Dissolved Oxygen . Discussion 16 16 17 BASELINE SIMULATIONS 18 Semi-Intensive Stocking Density Empty Pond (No shrimp) . Comparison Discussion 18 25 25 29 SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS 30 Primary Producers... . Zooplankton 30 33 EVALUATION OF MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES . . 46 Evaluation of Stocking Densities and Feeding Rates 46 SUMMARY . REFERENCES 59 60 VITA 67 vss LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page 1 Pond Model Biomass Flows 2 Dissolved Oxygen and Population...

  2. Issues, impacts, and implications of shrimp aquaculture in Thailand

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Forrest E. Dierberg; Woraphan Kiattisimkul

    1996-01-01

    Water quality impacts to and from intensive shrimp aquaculture in Thailand are substantial. Besides the surface and subsurface\\u000a salinization of freshwaters, loadings of solids, oxygen-consuming organic matter, and nutrients to receiving waters are considerable\\u000a when the cumulative impacts from water exchange during the growout cycle, pond drainage during harvesting, and illegal pond\\u000a sediment disposal are taken into account. Although just

  3. Evolution of specific immunity in shrimp - a vaccination perspective against white spot syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Syed Musthaq, Syed Khader; Kwang, Jimmy

    2014-10-01

    Invertebrates lack true adaptive immunity and it solely depends on the primitive immunity called innate immunity. However, various innate immune molecules and mechanisms are identified in shrimp that plays potential role against invading bacterial, fungal and viral pathogens. Perceiving the shrimp innate immune mechanisms will contribute in developing effective vaccine strategies against major shrimp pathogens. Hence this review intends to explore the innate immune molecules of shrimp with suitable experimental evidences together with the evolution of "specific immune priming" of invertebrates. In addition, we have emphasized on the development of an effective vaccine strategy against major shrimp pathogen, white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). The baculovirus displayed rVP28 (Bac-VP28), a major envelope protein of WSSV was utilized to study its vaccine efficacy by oral route. A significant advantage of this baculovirus expression cassette is the use of WSSV-immediate early 1 (ie1) promoter that derived the abundant expression of rVP28 protein at the early stage of the infection in insect cell. The orally vaccinated shrimp with Bac-VP28 transduced successfully in the shrimp cells as well as provided highest survival rate. In support to our vaccine efficacy we analysed Pattern Recognition Proteins (PRPs) ?-1,3 glucan lipopolysaccharides (LGBP) and STAT gene profiles in the experimental shrimp. Indeed, the vaccination of shrimp with Bac-VP28 demonstrated some degree of specificity with enhanced survival rate when compared to control vaccination with Bac-wt. Hence it is presumed that the concept of "specific immune priming" in relevant to shrimp immunity is possible but may not be common to all shrimp pathogens. PMID:24780624

  4. Reprint of "evolution of specific immunity in shrimp - a vaccination perspective against white spot syndrome virus".

    PubMed

    Syed Musthaq, Syed Khader; Kwang, Jimmy

    2015-02-01

    Invertebrates lack true adaptive immunity and it solely depends on the primitive immunity called innate immunity. However, various innate immune molecules and mechanisms are identified in shrimp that plays potential role against invading bacterial, fungal and viral pathogens. Perceiving the shrimp innate immune mechanisms will contribute in developing effective vaccine strategies against major shrimp pathogens. Hence this review intends to explore the innate immune molecules of shrimp with suitable experimental evidences together with the evolution of "specific immune priming" of invertebrates. In addition, we have emphasized on the development of an effective vaccine strategy against major shrimp pathogen, white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). The baculovirus displayed rVP28 (Bac-VP28), a major envelope protein of WSSV was utilized to study its vaccine efficacy by oral route. A significant advantage of this baculovirus expression cassette is the use of WSSV-immediate early 1 (ie1) promoter that derived the abundant expression of rVP28 protein at the early stage of the infection in insect cell. The orally vaccinated shrimp with Bac-VP28 transduced successfully in the shrimp cells as well as provided highest survival rate. In support to our vaccine efficacy we analysed Pattern Recognition Proteins (PRPs) ?-1,3 glucan lipopolysaccharides (LGBP) and STAT gene profiles in the experimental shrimp. Indeed, the vaccination of shrimp with Bac-VP28 demonstrated some degree of specificity with enhanced survival rate when compared to control vaccination with Bac-wt. Hence it is presumed that the concept of "specific immune priming" in relevant to shrimp immunity is possible but may not be common to all shrimp pathogens. PMID:25083808

  5. Abundance and size of Gulf shrimp in Louisiana's coastal estuaries following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

    PubMed

    van der Ham, Joris L; de Mutsert, Kim

    2014-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill impacted Louisiana's coastal estuaries physically, chemically, and biologically. To better understand the ecological consequences of this oil spill on Louisiana estuaries, we compared the abundance and size of two Gulf shrimp species (Farfantepeneus aztecus and Litopeneus setiferus) in heavily affected and relatively unaffected estuaries, before and after the oil spill. Two datasets were used to conduct this study: data on shrimp abundance and size before the spill were available from Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF). Data on shrimp abundance and size from after the spill were independently collected by the authors and by LDWF. Using a Before-After-Control-Impact with Paired sampling (BACIP) design with monthly samples of two selected basins, we found brown shrimp to become more abundant and the mean size of white shrimp to become smaller. Using a BACIP with data on successive shrimp year-classes of multiple basins, we found both species to become more abundant in basins that were affected by the spill, while mean shrimp size either not change after the spill, or increased in both affected and unaffected basins. We conclude that following the oil spill abundances of both species increased within affected estuaries, whereas mean size may have been unaffected. We propose two factors that may have caused these results: 1) exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) may have reduced the growth rate of shrimp, resulting in a delayed movement of shrimp to offshore habitats, and an increase of within-estuary shrimp abundance, and 2) fishing closures established immediately after the spill, may have resulted in decreased fishing effort and an increase in shrimp abundance. This study accentuates the complexities in determining ecological effects of oil spills, and the need of studies on the organismal level to reveal cause-and-effect relationships of such events. PMID:25272142

  6. Abundance and Size of Gulf Shrimp in Louisiana's Coastal Estuaries following the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    PubMed Central

    van der Ham, Joris L.; de Mutsert, Kim

    2014-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill impacted Louisiana's coastal estuaries physically, chemically, and biologically. To better understand the ecological consequences of this oil spill on Louisiana estuaries, we compared the abundance and size of two Gulf shrimp species (Farfantepeneus aztecus and Litopeneus setiferus) in heavily affected and relatively unaffected estuaries, before and after the oil spill. Two datasets were used to conduct this study: data on shrimp abundance and size before the spill were available from Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF). Data on shrimp abundance and size from after the spill were independently collected by the authors and by LDWF. Using a Before-After-Control-Impact with Paired sampling (BACIP) design with monthly samples of two selected basins, we found brown shrimp to become more abundant and the mean size of white shrimp to become smaller. Using a BACIP with data on successive shrimp year-classes of multiple basins, we found both species to become more abundant in basins that were affected by the spill, while mean shrimp size either not change after the spill, or increased in both affected and unaffected basins. We conclude that following the oil spill abundances of both species increased within affected estuaries, whereas mean size may have been unaffected. We propose two factors that may have caused these results: 1) exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) may have reduced the growth rate of shrimp, resulting in a delayed movement of shrimp to offshore habitats, and an increase of within-estuary shrimp abundance, and 2) fishing closures established immediately after the spill, may have resulted in decreased fishing effort and an increase in shrimp abundance. This study accentuates the complexities in determining ecological effects of oil spills, and the need of studies on the organismal level to reveal cause-and-effect relationships of such events. PMID:25272142

  7. SHRiMP: Accurate Mapping of Short Color-space Reads Stephen M. Rumble1,2

    E-print Network

    Levis, Philip

    SHRiMP: Accurate Mapping of Short Color-space Reads Stephen M. Rumble1,2 , Phil Lacroute3 genomic studies of non-model species. In this paper we present SHRiMP - the SHort Read Mapping Package hits. We use SHRiMP to map reads from a newly sequenced Ciona savignyi individual to the reference

  8. Metal and metalloid bioaccumulation in the Pacific blue shrimp Litopenaeus stylirostris (Stimpson) from New Caledonia: laboratory and field studies

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Metal and metalloid bioaccumulation in the Pacific blue shrimp Litopenaeus stylirostris (Stimpson and metalloid bioaccumulation in the edible Pacific blue shrimp Litopenaeus stylirostris, using both laboratory investigated in shrimp exposed via seawater and food, using the corresponding - emitting radiotracers (110m Ag

  9. Design Choices in the SHRIMP System: An Empirical Study Matthias A. Blumrich # , Richard D. Alpert + , Yuqun Chen # , Douglas W. Clark # ,

    E-print Network

    Clark, Douglas W.

    Design Choices in the SHRIMP System: An Empirical Study Matthias A. Blumrich # , Richard D. Alpert # , Liviu Iftode # , Kai Li # , Margaret Martonosi § , and Robert A. Shillner # Abstract The SHRIMP cluster and physical addresses, perform buffer management, create packets, and set up DMA transfers. The SHRIMP project

  10. New insigths on the metabolic diversity among the epibiotic microbial communitiy of the1 hydrothermal shrimp Rimicaris exoculata.2

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    hydrothermal shrimp Rimicaris exoculata.2 3 Magali Zbindena, , Bruce Shillitoa , Nadine Le Brisb , Constance de: high pressure experiments, hydrothermal vent shrimp, intracellular granules,15 iron, methane, sulfur16 The shrimp Rimicaris exoculata (Williams and Rona, 1986) dominates the megafauna of19 some of the Mid

  11. SurfBoard --A Hardware Performance Monitor for SHRIMP Princeton University Technical Report TR--596--99

    E-print Network

    SurfBoard -- A Hardware Performance Monitor for SHRIMP Princeton University Technical Report TR, implementation, and case studies of a performance moni­ toring system for the SHRIMP multicomputer. This system implemented on the SHRIMP multicomputer. 1 Introduction This technical report describes a performance

  12. IL NUOVO CIMENTO VOL. 109 B, N. 4 Aprile 1994 The Shrimp Strategy in the Treatment of Cosmological Equations

    E-print Network

    Scudellaro, Paolo

    IL NUOVO CIMENTO VOL. 109 B, N. 4 Aprile 1994 The Shrimp Strategy in the Treatment of Cosmological which exhibit the required features and then going back like a shrimp to reconstruct the potential The Klein-Gordon equation is (2.3) ~ + 3H~ + V'(~) = 0, #12;THE SHRIMP STRATEGY IN THE TREATMENT ETC. 405

  13. Inactivation of natural microflora and Listeria innocua on raw whole shrimp by ozonated water, antimicrobial coatings, and cryogenic freezing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shrimp have been associated with foodborne illness outbreaks. A survey was conducted to investigate the microbiological safety and quality of frozen raw whole shrimp in local US markets. Results from 32 brands of raw whole shrimp samples available in local retail markets representing 9 countries of ...

  14. 76 FR 26241 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From Thailand: Notice of Court Decision Not in Harmony With Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ...Warmwater Shrimp From Thailand: Notice of Court Decision...warmwater shrimp from Thailand covering the period of...FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Kate Johnson, AD...warmwater shrimp from Thailand covering the POR of February...Chanthaburi Frozen Food Co., Ltd.,...

  15. The effect of feeding frequency on water quality and growth of the black tiger shrimp ( Penaeus monodon)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. M. Smith; M. A. Burford; S. J. Tabrett; S. J. Irvin; L. Ward

    2002-01-01

    The feeding strategy used in the commercial culture of shrimp can have a significant impact on pond water quality and hence growth, health and survival of the shrimp, as well as the efficiency of feed utilization. These factors contribute to the profitability of production and to the environmental impact of shrimp farming. The effect of four different feeding frequencies (3,

  16. Predictive Computer Modeling of Growth and Feeding Rates for Pacific White Shrimp, Penaeus vanammei, in Hard Freshwater

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anthony F. Pegel; J. Richard Booth

    If the United States is to find its niche in shrimp aquaculture production, non-traditional methods of shrimp farming must be used to overcome the climatic incompatibility and strict environmental regulations. Non-traditional shrimp production must also find ways to significantly reduce capital and operational costs. Recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS), which support high population densities and precise control of the suitable growth

  17. Effects of the 1981 Closure on the Texas Shrimp Fishery ALBERT C. JONES, EDWARD F. KLIMA, and JOHN R. POFFENBERGER

    E-print Network

    R. POFFENBERGER Introduction Shrimp fisheries in the Fishery Con- servation Zone (FCZ) in the Gulf of Mexico are federally managed by the Shrimp Fishery Management Plan, which was implemented by the Secre coastal areas. It was anticipated that the closure of these areas when juvenile shrimp are migrating

  18. Managing the development of sustainable shrimp farming in Australia: the role of sedimentation ponds in treatment of farm discharge water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher J. Jackson; Nigel Preston; Michele A. Burford; Peter J. Thompson

    2003-01-01

    In Australia, the shrimp farming industry operates within strict environmental guidelines applied at national and state government levels. In this paper, we briefly review the current status of the development of an ecologically sustainable shrimp farming industry in Australia and the future research priorities to assist in maintaining sustainable development. The broad objectives of the current regulations governing shrimp aquaculture

  19. Predation by native brown shrimp on invasive Pacific oyster spat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weerman, E. J.; Eriksson, B. K.; Olff, H.; van der Heide, T.

    2014-01-01

    In the last decades, the invasive Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) increased dramatically in the Wadden Sea. One of the driving mechanisms for the success of the Pacific oyster could be a relatively low predation pressure by epibenthic predators and shore birds on oyster spat. Nevertheless, observations and experiments on predation rates on early life-stages of the Pacific oyster are rare. Therefore, we examined predation rates of brown shrimps on Pacific oyster spat in a number of laboratory experiments. Our results demonstrate that spat of Pacific oysters are most susceptible to predation by brown shrimps (Crangon crangon) in the first days after settlement, when attachment to the substrate (unglazed tiles in our study) is still absent or weak. At this stage the shell length of oyster spat is around ~ 300 ?m, and around 50% of the individuals in the experiment were consumed in the two hour trials. Predation rates decreased rapidly as the spat grew larger and reached zero within 10 days after settlement of the spat (shell length > 700 ?m). Additional experiments revealed that the attachment of oysters is probably limiting predation by brown shrimps rather than the size of the spat. This indicates that Pacific oyster spat may limit predation loss faster compared to native bivalves, which commonly depend on size to reduce predation rates. Overall, our results suggest that the invasive success of Pacific oysters may in part be explained by relatively low predation rates throughout their life stages.

  20. Shrimps that pay attention: saccadic eye movements in stomatopod crustaceans

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, N. J.; Land, M. F.; Cronin, T. W.

    2014-01-01

    Discovering that a shrimp can flick its eyes over to a fish and follow up by tracking it or flicking back to observe something else implies a ‘primate-like’ awareness of the immediate environment that we do not normally associate with crustaceans. For several reasons, stomatopods (mantis shrimp) do not fit the general mould of their subphylum, and here we add saccadic, acquisitional eye movements to their repertoire of unusual visual capabilities. Optically, their apposition compound eyes contain an area of heightened acuity, in some ways similar to the fovea of vertebrate eyes. Using rapid eye movements of up to several hundred degrees per second, objects of interest are placed under the scrutiny of this area. While other arthropod species, including insects and spiders, are known to possess and use acute zones in similar saccadic gaze relocations, stomatopods are the only crustacean known with such abilities. Differences among species exist, generally reflecting both the eye size and lifestyle of the animal, with the larger-eyed more sedentary species producing slower saccades than the smaller-eyed, more active species. Possessing the ability to rapidly look at and assess objects is ecologically important for mantis shrimps, as their lifestyle is, by any standards, fast, furious and deadly. PMID:24395969

  1. Suspended solids removal to improve shrimp ( Litopenaeus vannamei) production and an evaluation of a plant-based feed in minimal-exchange, superintensive culture systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew J. Ray; Beth L. Lewis; Craig L. Browdy; John W. Leffler

    2010-01-01

    In minimal-exchange, superintensive culture systems, the flocculated (biofloc) particles that accumulate may provide benefits for cultured shrimp; however, excessive particle accumulation can hinder shrimp performance. Also, the shrimp aquaculture industry is reliant on marine fish-based feeds. Using these products can lead to exploitation of marine resources, the introduction of contaminants to cultured shrimp, and unstable production costs. This study examined

  2. Arsenic speciation in shrimp and mussel from the Mid-Atlantic hydrothermal vents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erik H. Larsen; Christophe R. Quétel; Riansares Munoz; Aline Fiala-Medioni; Olivier F. X. Donard

    1997-01-01

    Specimens of shrimp (Rimicaris exoculata) and mussel (Bathymodiolus puteoserpentis) were collected 3500 m below the ocean surface at the hydrothermal vents of the mid-Atlantic Ridge (TAG and Snake Pit sites, respectively). Arsenic, a potentially toxic element, is among the substances emitted by the hydrothermal vents. The hydrothermal vent shrimp, which are known to be a primary consumer of the primary

  3. Mitochondrial Pseudogenes Are Pervasive and Often Insidious in the Snapping Shrimp Genus Alpheus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. T. Williams; N. Knowlton

    2002-01-01

    Here we show that multiple DNA sequences, similar to the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) gene, occur within single individuals in at least 10 species of the snapping shrimp genus Alpheus. Cloning of amplified products revealed the presence of copies that differed in length and (more frequently) in base substitutions. Although multiple copies were amplified in individual shrimp from total

  4. 75 FR 20563 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp from the Socialist Republic of Vietnam: Extension of Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-20

    The Department of Commerce (``Department'') is extending the time limit for the final results of the new shipper review of certain frozen warmwater shrimp (``shrimp'') from the Socialist Republic of Vietnam (``Vietnam''). This review covers the period February 1, 2008 through January 31,...

  5. Species profiles: Life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (South Atlantic): Brown shrimp

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, S.C.; Van Den Avyle, M.J.; Bozeman, E.L. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Species profiles are literature summaries of the life history, distribution, and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates. Profiles are prepared to assist with environmental impact assessment. Brown shrimp (Penaeus aztecus) account for about one-third of the commercial shrimp harvest in the South Atlantic Region; the landing were worth $20 million in 1982. In the South Atlantic Region, commercially importance brown shrimp fishing grounds extend from Fort Pierce, Florida, to Pamlico Sound and Ocracoke Inlet, North Carolina. Most of the commercial harvest is taken inside the 10-fathom contour. Brown shrimp are omnivorous and eat food items ranging from detritus to small invertebrates and fishes. Many predators, including fishes and crustaceans, feed on brown shrimp. Brown shrimp survival is reduced by adverse temperature or salinities. Intertidal vegetation is an important characteristic of brown shrimp nursery areas. The suitability of some estuaries as nursery areas may be reduced by bulkheading, ditching, disposal of dredged materials, and drainage from agricultural and silvicultural areas. Existing estuarine areas must be preserved to ensure the continued production of brown shrimp. 57 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. 77 FR 2958 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From the Socialist Republic of Vietnam: Extension of Preliminary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-20

    The Department of Commerce (the ``Department'') is extending the time limit for the preliminary results of the sixth administrative review of the antidumping duty order on certain frozen warmwater shrimp (``shrimp'') from the Socialist Republic of Vietnam (``Vietnam'') to February 28, 2012. The period of review (``POR'') is February 1, 2010, through January 31,...

  7. Superoxide dismutase as modulator of immune function in American white shrimp ( Litopenaeus vannamei)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. I Campa-Córdova; N. Y Hernández-Saavedra; F Ascencio

    2002-01-01

    The immunomodulatory action of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and its possible use as an indicator of immune responses in American white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) were studied. Juvenile shrimp were immersed in aerated ?-glucan and sulfated polysaccharide solutions for 6 h. SOD activity in haemocytes and muscle was quantified to evaluate whether ?-glucan and sulfated polysaccharide induce immunostimulatory activity. Haemocytes and muscle

  8. Sperm quality in relation to age and weight of white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. P. Ceballos-Vázquez; C. Rosas; I. S. Racotta

    2003-01-01

    Optimal sperm quality is an important feature for management of shrimp broodstock. The understanding of the sperm quality in relation to age and weight of shrimp is useful to select male broodstock. To evaluate the effect of age and weight on sperm quality, Litopenaeus vannamei males from the same cohort at ages of 6, 8, 10, and 12 months were

  9. METALS, PESTICIDES, AND PCBS: TOXICITIES TO SHRIMP SINGLY AND IN COMBINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of the study was to assess potential deleterious effects of certain toxicants, singly and in combination, to penaeid shrimp. In nature, these shrimp are exposed to combinations of toxicants from industrial and municipal out-falls, from agricultural runoff or from dr...

  10. FEEDING RATES OF THE MUD SHRIMP UPOGEBIA PUGETTENSIS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR ESTUARINE PHYTOPLANKTON ABUNDANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The burrowing shrimp Upogebia pugettensis is an abundant inhabitant of Pacific Northwest bays and estuaries where it lives commensally with the clam Cryptomya californica. Suspension-feeding activities of the shrimp and its commensal clam, as well as particle settlement within t...

  11. Effect of cryogenic freezing on salmonella and listeria recovery from inoculated shrimp

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the United States, shrimp is number one in seafood consumption. Shrimp is usually imported frozen, and the Food and Drug Administration has isolated Salmonella spp. from this frozen product. This research was conducted to determine the effect of two cryogenic freezing protocols (time and tempe...

  12. Biochemical, physiological and hematological changes in white spot syndrome virus-infected shrimp, Penaeus indicus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Yoganandhan; S. Thirupathi; A. S. Sahul Hameed

    2003-01-01

    The biochemical and hematological changes provoked by white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) in hemolymph, hepatopancreas and muscle of Penaeus indicus were examined. Total carbohydrate, glucose, total protein, amino acids, fatty acids and hemocyanin were measured in healthy and WSSV-infected shrimp. There was a significant increase in glucose and total carbohydrate levels in the hemolymph of WSSV-infected shrimp in comparison to

  13. Metabolic and immune responses in Pacific whiteleg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei exposed to a repeated handling stress

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laurence Mercier; Elena Palacios; Ángel I. Campa-Córdova; Dariel Tovar-Ramírez; Roberto Hernández-Herrera; Ilie S. Racotta

    2006-01-01

    Juvenile Pacific whiteleg shrimp reared in either outdoor concrete tanks or indoor plastic tanks were exposed to a repeated stress induced by daily handling for 4 weeks. Metabolic responses (glucose, lactate, total protein, cholesterol, triglyceride, total lipid, hemocyanin, and carotenoid content) and immune responses (total hemocyte count, superoxide anion production, and superoxide dismutase activity) were compared with unstressed shrimp. Metabolic responses

  14. Hydraulic activities by ghost shrimp Neotrypaea californiensis induce oxic-anoxic oscillations in sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    We applied porewater pressure sensing, time-lapse photography and planar optode imaging of oxygen to investigate hydraulic behaviors of the Thalassinidean ghost shrimp Neotrypaea californiensis and the associated dynamics of oxygen in and around their burrows. Ghost shrimp were h...

  15. Disease resistance of Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei, following the dietary

    E-print Network

    Burnett, Louis E.

    feed supplement (Diamond V XP Yeast CultureR, Diamond V Mills, Cedar Rapids, Iowa [IA]) was assessed for its impact on disease resistance in the Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei. Animals were fed a standard shrimp pellet diet supplemented with 0% (control with 1% grain carrier), 0.5% (with 0.5% carrier

  16. Comparing the efficiency of chitosan with chlorine for reducing Vibrio parahaemolyticus in shrimp

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Chaiyakosa; W. Charernjiratragul; K. Umsakul; V. Vuddhakul

    2007-01-01

    Thailand is one of the leading exporters of frozen shrimp to many countries. Chlorine is the decontaminating agent most frequently used in the frozen shrimp industries to kill potential pathogens. However, long time contact to chlorine causes severe respiratory tract damage. In this study, chitosan was compared to chlorine for reducing Vibrio parahaemolyticus. In vitro investigation, chitosan could reduce more

  17. Effect of Bacillus subtilis on the growth and survival rate of shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hadi Zokaei Far; Roos B. Saad; Hassan Mohd Daud; Sharr Azni Harmin

    2009-01-01

    The effect of Bacillus subtilis, isolated from digestive tract of Macrobrachium rosenbergii was investigated on growth and survival rate of Litopenaeus vannamei during 60 days of culture. Sixteen aquaria with four replicates were used for treatments and controls. Treatment groups were consisted of ?) shrimp fed diet with B. subtilis (T1), and ii) shrimp fed diet mixed with B. subtilis

  18. An integrated pest management program for burrowing shrimp control in oyster aquaculture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brett R. Dumbauld; Steven Booth; Daniel Cheney; Andrew Suhrbier; Hector Beltran

    2006-01-01

    Integrated pest management is widely applied in terrestrial agriculture, but less so in aquaculture. Parallels to insect control in agricultural fields were exploited in this application of integrated pest management principles to control burrowing shrimp Neotrypaea californiensis and Upogebia pugettensis in Pacific Northwest U.S.A. oyster aquaculture. The pesticide carbaryl has been applied to oyster aquaculture tracts to control burrowing shrimp

  19. Daily energy requirements and trophic positioning of the sand shrimp Crangon septemspinosa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. L. Taylor; M. A. Peck

    2004-01-01

    Sand shrimp, Crangon septemspinosa Say, are important to the trophic dynamics of coastal systems in the northwestern Atlantic. To evaluate predatory impacts of sand shrimp, daily energy requirements (J ind.?1 day?1) were calculated for this species from laboratory estimates of energy losses due to routine (RR), active (RA), and feeding (RSDA) oxygen consumption rates (J ind.?1 h?1), coupled with measurements

  20. Homologous genetic recombination in the yellow head complex of nidoviruses infecting Penaeus monodon shrimp

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Priyanjalie K. M. Wijegoonawardane; Nusra Sittidilokratna; Natthida Petchampai; Jeff A. Cowley; Nicholas Gudkovs; Peter J. Walker

    2009-01-01

    Yellow head virus (YHV) is a highly virulent pathogen of Penaeus monodon shrimp. It is one of six known genotypes in the yellow head complex of nidoviruses which also includes mildly pathogenic gill-associated virus (GAV, genotype 2) and four other genotypes (genotypes 3–6) that have been detected only in healthy shrimp. In this study, comparative phylogenetic analyses conducted on replicase-