Sample records for siem reap cambodia

  1. Social and behavioural factors associated with condom use among direct sex workers in Siem Reap, Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Wong, M; Lubek, I; Dy, B; Pen, S; Kros, S; Chhit, M

    2003-01-01

    Methods: Using a structured behavioural questionnaire, interviews were conducted with 140 direct sex workers attending a health centre in Siem Reap for HIV screening. Results: Consistent condom use with their clients was reported by 78% of sex workers compared to only 20% with their non-paying partners. Consistent condom use with clients was significantly higher among higher income than lower income sex workers (adjusted prevalence ratio: 1.91, 95% CI: 1.15 to 3.18) and those with good rather than poor negotiation skills (adjusted prevalence ratio: 1.51, 95% CI: 1.01 to 2.26), after adjustment for age, educational level, marital status, number of sexual encounters per week, and knowledge of AIDS/HIV and sexually transmitted infections. The most frequently reported reason for not using condoms with clients was not being able to persuade them (66.7%), while for non-paying partners, the reason was that they loved them (60.0%). Conclusion: To complement the government's current programme of client education, 100% condom policy and brothel administrative measures, additional strategies to increase condom use among clients and non-paying partners should be directed at (i) the social policy and community levels to address sex workers' economic and cultural barriers to condom use, and (ii) personal level empowerment through developing sex workers' condom negotiation skills. PMID:12690144

  2. MEKONG RIVER CRUISE From Siem Reap to Saigon

    E-print Network

    Toronto, University of

    MEKONG RIVER CRUISE From Siem Reap to Saigon An exclusive charter deluxe cruise for the Canadian University Alumni Community OVERVIEW Enjoy a deluxe Mekong River cruise with the added fillip of Cambodia Mekong River, ending in vibrant Hanoi. Reminiscent in design of the French colonial-era, manor homes

  3. COLLABORATIVELY CONFRONTING THE CURRENT CAMBODIAN HIV\\/AIDS CRISIS IN SIEM REAP: A CROSS-DISCIPLINARY, CROSS-CULTURAL \\

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ian Lubek; Mee Lian Wong; Meghan McCourt; Kenglee Chew; Bun Chhem Dy; Sarath Kros; Sary Pen; Maryan Chhit; Savoen Touch; Teck Ngee Lee; Vanna Mok

    We describe recent cr oss-cultural ef forts among psychologists, medica l pr actitioners, students, and local citizens to initiate additional health-related behaviour-change interventions in Siem Reap, Cambodia, designed to r educe the spr ead of sexually transmitted infections (STIs),including HIV\\/AIDS. The model of Participatory Action Research, originally proposed by Kurt Lewin(1946) as \\

  4. HIV/AIDS, beersellers and critical community health psychology in Cambodia: a case study.

    PubMed

    Lubek, Ian; Lee, Helen; Kros, Sarath; Wong, Mee Lian; Van Merode, Tiny; Liu, James; McCreanor, Tim; Idema, Roel; Campbell, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    This case study illustrates a participatory framework for confronting critical community health issues using 'grass-roots' research-guided community-defined interventions. Ongoing work in Cambodia has culturally adapted research, theory and practice for particular, local health-promotion responses to HIV/AIDS, alcohol abuse and other challenges in the community of Siem Reap. For resource-poor communities in Cambodia, we recycle such 'older' concepts as 'empowerment' and 'action research'. We re-imagine community health psychology, when confronted with 'critical', life-and-death issues, as adjusting its research and practices to local, particular ontological and epistemological urgencies of trauma, morbidity and mortality. PMID:24058105

  5. Towards resolving a problem of the identity of the Aethus species (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Cydnidae) occurring in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Lis, Jerzy A; Lis, Barbara; Ziaja, Dariusz J; Nakatani, Yukinobu

    2014-01-01

    The genus Aethus in Cambodia is known only from a single species collected in the 1950s that was originally identified as A. indicus. However, what was regarded as A. indicus in the Oriental and Australian regions appeared to consist of three sibling species, recognizable only on the basis of male genital structures, i.e., A. philippinensis, A. pseudindicus, and true A. indicus. To date, the lack of males representing this genus from Cambodia made it impossible to verify which species actually occur in this country. The present study, based on eight males collected at the same locality in Cambodia where the specimens were originally identified as A. indicus more than 50 years ago (i.e., Siem Reap), confirmed the occurrence of A. pseudindicus, not A. indicus, as previously reported. Male genitalia, i.e. the paramere, the opening of genital capsule, and the apex of aedeagus, are described and their photographs are provided for both species. PMID:25543581

  6. Cambodia.

    PubMed

    1987-04-01

    The population of Cambodia stood at 6.25 million in 1986, with an average annual growth rate of 2.1%. Life expectancy is presently 42 years for men and 44.9 years for women. The government is currently disputed between resistance groups and Vietnamese-installed authorities in Phnom Penh. No single authority controls the entire country. The urban population increased sharply during the 1970-75 war, but after seizing power the Khmer Rouge forced most urban residents to return to rural areas as peasants. Massive numbers of people were executed for political reasons or died of starvation and disease during the Khmer Rouge period and after the dislocations caused by the Vietnamese invasion: an estimated 1.5-3 million people are estimated to have died out of a 1975 population of 7.3 million. The resistance forces have grown in size and effectiveness since 1985 and now challenge Vietnam's position in Cambodia. The Cambodian economy, badly damaged by the war and the Khmer Rouge regime, has only slowly begun to recover. Per capita gross national product (GNP) is estimated at less than US$100. The food situation remains precarious, with shortages of rice, meat, vegetables, sugar, flour, and dairy products. Extensive damage to the country's irrigation system, on which rice production depends, has only begun to be repaired. Basic services such as electricity and water are erratic. Although literacy and primary education campaigns have achieved success, health conditions remain poor. PMID:12177940

  7. Angkor, Cambodia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This is an image of the area around the city of Angkor, Cambodia. The city houses an ancient complex of more than 60 temples dating back to the 9th century. The principal complex, Angkor Wat, is the bright square just left of the center of the image. It is surrounded by a reservoir that appears in this image as a thick black line. The larger bright square above Angkor Wat is another temple complex called Angkor Thom. Archeologists studying this image believe the blue-purple area slightly north of Angkor Thom may be previously undiscovered structures. In the lower right is a bright rectangle surrounded by a dark reservoir, which houses the temple complex Chau Srei Vibol. In its heyday, Angkor had a population of 1 million residents and was the spiritual center for the Khmer people until it was abandoned in the 15th century. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) on the 15th orbit of the space shuttle Endeavour on September 30, 1994. The image shows an area approximately 55 kilometers by 85 kilometers (34 miles by 53 miles) that is centered at 13.43 degrees north latitude and 103.9 degrees east longitude. The colors in this image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received); green represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received); blue represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received). The body of water in the south-southwest corner is Tonle Sap, Cambodia's great central lake. The urban area at the lower left of the image is the present-day town of Siem Reap. The adjoining lines are both modern and ancient roads and the remains of Angkor's vast canal system that was used for both irrigation and transportation. The large black rectangles are ancient reservoirs. Today the Angkor complex is hidden beneath a dense rainforest canopy, making it difficult for researchers on the ground to study the ancient city. The SIR-C/X-SAR data are being used by archaeologists at the World Monuments Fund and the Royal Angkor Foundation to understand how the city grew, flourished and later fell into disuse over an 800-year period. The data are also being used to help reconstruct the vast system of hydrological works, canals and reservoirs, which have gone out of use over time. Research teams from more than 11 countries will be using this data to study the Angkor complex.

    Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtangelegenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI).

  8. Prevalence of intestinal helminths among inhabitants of Cambodia (2006-2011).

    PubMed

    Yong, Tai-Soon; Chai, Jong-Yil; Sohn, Woon-Mok; Eom, Keeseon S; Jeoung, Hoo-Gn; Hoang, Eui-Hyug; Yoon, Cheong-Ha; Jung, Bong-Kwang; Lee, Soon-Hyung; Sinuon, Muth; Socheat, Duong

    2014-12-01

    In order to investigate the status of intestinal helminthic infections in Cambodia, epidemiological surveys were carried out on a national scale, including 19 provinces. A total of 32,201 fecal samples were collected from schoolchildren and adults between 2006 and 2011 and examined once by the Kato-Katz thick smear technique. The overall egg positive rate of intestinal helminths was 26.2%. The prevalence of hookworms was the highest (9.6%), followed by that of Opisthorchis viverrini/minute intestinal flukes (Ov/MIF) (5.7%), Ascaris lumbricoides (4.6%), and Trichuris trichiura (4.1%). Other types of parasites detected were Enterobius vermicularis (1.1%), Taenia spp. (0.4%), and Hymenolepis spp. (0.2%). The northwestern regions such as the Siem Reap, Oddar Meanchey, and Banteay Meanchey Provinces showed higher prevalences (17.4-22.3%) of hookworms than the other localities. The southwestern areas, including Koh Kong and Preah Sihanouk Provinces showed higher prevalences of A. lumbricoides (17.5-19.2%) and T. trichiura (6.1-21.0%). Meanwhile, the central and southern areas, in particular, Takeo and Kampong Cham Provinces, showed high prevalences of Ov/MIF (23.8-24.0%). The results indicate that a considerably high prevalence of intestinal helminths has been revealed in Cambodia, and thus sustained national parasite control projects are necessary to reduce morbidity due to parasitic infections in Cambodia. PMID:25548418

  9. Urinary antibiotic activity in paediatric patients attending an outpatient department in north-western Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Emary, Katherine R W; Carter, Michael J; Pol, Sreymom; Sona, Soeng; Kumar, Varun; Day, Nicholas P J; Parry, Christopher M; Moore, Catrin E

    2015-01-01

    Objective Antibiotic resistance is a prominent public and global health concern. We investigated antibiotic use in children by determining the proportion of unselected children with antibacterial activity in their urine attending a paediatric outpatient department in Siem Reap, Cambodia. Methods Caregiver reports of medication history and presence of possible infection symptoms were collected in addition to urine samples. Urine antibiotic activity was estimated by exposing bacteria to urine specimens, including assessment against multiresistant bacteria previously isolated from patients in the hospital (a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a multiresistant Salmonella typhi and an extended-spectrum ?-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli isolate). Results Medication information and urine were collected from 775 children. Caregivers reported medication use in 69.0% of children in the preceding 48 h. 31.7% samples showed antibacterial activity; 16.3% showed activity against a local multiresistant organism. No specimens demonstrated activity against an ESBL-producing E. coli. Conclusions Antibiotics are widely used in the community setting in Cambodia. Parents are often ill-informed about drugs given to treat their children. Increasing the regulation and training of private pharmacies in Cambodia may be necessary. Regional surveillance of antibiotic use and resistance is also essential in devising preventive strategies against further development of antibiotic resistance, which would have both local and global consequences. PMID:25324202

  10. Prevalence of Intestinal Helminths among Inhabitants of Cambodia (2006-2011)

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Tai-Soon; Sohn, Woon-Mok; Eom, Keeseon S.; Jeoung, Hoo-Gn; Hoang, Eui-Hyug; Yoon, Cheong-Ha; Jung, Bong-Kwang; Lee, Soon-Hyung; Sinuon, Muth; Socheat, Duong

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate the status of intestinal helminthic infections in Cambodia, epidemiological surveys were carried out on a national scale, including 19 provinces. A total of 32,201 fecal samples were collected from schoolchildren and adults between 2006 and 2011 and examined once by the Kato-Katz thick smear technique. The overall egg positive rate of intestinal helminths was 26.2%. The prevalence of hookworms was the highest (9.6%), followed by that of Opisthorchis viverrini/minute intestinal flukes (Ov/MIF) (5.7%), Ascaris lumbricoides (4.6%), and Trichuris trichiura (4.1%). Other types of parasites detected were Enterobius vermicularis (1.1%), Taenia spp. (0.4%), and Hymenolepis spp. (0.2%). The northwestern regions such as the Siem Reap, Oddar Meanchey, and Banteay Meanchey Provinces showed higher prevalences (17.4-22.3%) of hookworms than the other localities. The southwestern areas, including Koh Kong and Preah Sihanouk Provinces showed higher prevalences of A. lumbricoides (17.5-19.2%) and T. trichiura (6.1-21.0%). Meanwhile, the central and southern areas, in particular, Takeo and Kampong Cham Provinces, showed high prevalences of Ov/MIF (23.8-24.0%). The results indicate that a considerably high prevalence of intestinal helminths has been revealed in Cambodia, and thus sustained national parasite control projects are necessary to reduce morbidity due to parasitic infections in Cambodia. PMID:25548418

  11. Qualitative understanding of an international learning experience: what Australian undergraduate nurses and midwives said about a Cambodia placement?

    PubMed

    Tuckett, Anthony; Crompton, Peta

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study is to report the experiences of three groups of Australian undergraduate nursing and midwifery students undertaking an international learning experience in Cambodia. Relying on an interpretative research design using qualitative content analysis, data were drawn from a sub-group of undergraduate third-year bachelor and dual degree nursing/midwifery students at a Queensland university, Australia. Students from a clinical placement in Siem Reap, Cambodia for a 4-week period in the January of 2010-2012 completed a formal expression of interest, and at three time intervals a questionnaire comprising open-ended questions. The evaluation by the undergraduate nursing/midwifery students of the clinical experience in Cambodia is understood through two core themes: global citizen/better citizen, personal/professional development. The findings have implications for university curriculum developers interested in the internationalization of nursing and midwifery programmes to ensure students are well equipped to practice in diverse multicultural and global health systems. PMID:24713009

  12. A Prospective Study of the Causes of Febrile Illness Requiring Hospitalization in Children in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Chheng, Kheng; Carter, Michael J.; Emary, Kate; Chanpheaktra, Ngoun; Moore, Catrin E.; Stoesser, Nicole; Putchhat, Hor; Sona, Soeng; Reaksmey, Sin; Kitsutani, Paul; Sar, Borann; van Doorn, H. Rogier; Uyen, Nguyen Hanh; Van Tan, Le; Paris, Daniel; Blacksell, Stuart D.; Amornchai, Premjit; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Parry, Christopher M.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Kumar, Varun

    2013-01-01

    Background Febrile illnesses are pre-eminent contributors to morbidity and mortality among children in South-East Asia but the causes are poorly understood. We determined the causes of fever in children hospitalised in Siem Reap province, Cambodia. Methods and Findings A one-year prospective study of febrile children admitted to Angkor Hospital for Children, Siem Reap. Demographic, clinical, laboratory and outcome data were comprehensively analysed. Between October 12th 2009 and October 12th 2010 there were 1225 episodes of febrile illness in 1180 children. Median (IQR) age was 2.0 (0.8–6.4) years, with 850 (69%) episodes in children <5 years. Common microbiological diagnoses were dengue virus (16.2%), scrub typhus (7.8%), and Japanese encephalitis virus (5.8%). 76 (6.3%) episodes had culture-proven bloodstream infection, including Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (22 isolates, 1.8%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (13, 1.1%), Escherichia coli (8, 0.7%), Haemophilus influenzae (7, 0.6%), Staphylococcus aureus (6, 0.5%) and Burkholderia pseudomallei (6, 0.5%). There were 69 deaths (5.6%), including those due to clinically diagnosed pneumonia (19), dengue virus (5), and melioidosis (4). 10 of 69 (14.5%) deaths were associated with culture-proven bloodstream infection in logistic regression analyses (odds ratio for mortality 3.4, 95% CI 1.6–6.9). Antimicrobial resistance was prevalent, particularly in S. enterica Typhi, (where 90% of isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin, and 86% were multi-drug resistant). Comorbid undernutrition was present in 44% of episodes and a major risk factor for acute mortality (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.1–4.2), as were HIV infection and cardiac disease. Conclusion We identified a microbiological cause of fever in almost 50% of episodes in this large study of community-acquired febrile illness in hospitalized children in Cambodia. The range of pathogens, antimicrobial susceptibility, and co-morbidities associated with mortality described will be of use in the development of rational guidelines for infectious disease treatment and control in Cambodia and South-East Asia. PMID:23593267

  13. Determinants of adherence to iron/folate supplementation during pregnancy in two provinces in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Lacerte, Pierre; Pradipasen, Mandhana; Temcharoen, Paradee; Imamee, Nirat; Vorapongsathorn, Thavatchai

    2011-05-01

    Iron supplementation can effectively control and prevent anemia in pregnancy. However, limited adherence is thought to be a major reason for the low effectiveness of iron supplementation programs.This research describes the factors influencing the adherence to iron/folate supplementation during pregnancy in Siem Reap and Kampong Cham provinces in Cambodia.Triangulation method, combining the quantitative and qualitative data collection methods, was performed for this study. A total of 177 women who gave birth during the year prior to the interview were selected for the quantitative survey. Ten women who gave birth during the year prior to the interview and 10 pregnant women were interviewed in-depth for the qualitative data.The ?2 test and binary logistic regression were used for statistical analysis. The findings showed an adherence rate of 47%. The logistic regression revealed that the number of supplements received, number of prenatal visits, and access to antenatal care were determinants of adherence (P<.05). In conclusion, access to and follow-up of antenatal care were considered elements essential to improve iron/folate supplementation. Community-based interventions, such as nutrition education and distribution of supplements, should be prioritized in the interventions to improve adherence in Cambodia. PMID:21593006

  14. Emergence of Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Associated with Pediatric Infection in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Chheng, Kheng; Tarquinio, Sarah; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Sin, Lina; Thaipadungpanit, Janjira; Amornchai, Premjit; Chanpheaktra, Ngoun; Tumapa, Sarinna; Putchhat, Hor; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Peacock, Sharon J.

    2009-01-01

    Background The incidence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) infection is rising in the developed world but appears to be rare in developing countries. One explanation for this difference is that resource poor countries lack the diagnostic microbiology facilities necessary to detect the presence of CA-MRSA carriage and infection. Methodology and Principal Findings We developed diagnostic microbiology capabilities at the Angkor Hospital for Children, Siem Reap, western Cambodia in January 2006 and in the same month identified a child with severe community-acquired impetigo caused by CA-MRSA. A study was undertaken to identify and describe additional cases presenting between January 2006 and December 2007. Bacterial isolates underwent molecular characterization using multilocus sequence typing, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing, and PCR for the presence of the genes encoding Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL). Seventeen children were identified with CA-MRSA infection, of which 11 had skin and soft tissue infection and 6 had invasive disease. The majority of cases were unrelated in time or place. Molecular characterization identified two independent MRSA clones; fifteen isolates were sequence type (ST) 834, SCCmec type IV, PVL gene-negative, and two isolates were ST 121, SCCmec type V, PVL gene-positive. Conclusions This represents the first ever report of MRSA in Cambodia, spread of which would pose a significant threat to public health. The finding that cases were mostly unrelated in time or place suggests that these were sporadic infections in persons who were CA-MRSA carriers or contacts of carriers, rather than arising in the context of an outbreak. PMID:19675670

  15. Pediatric suppurative parotitis in Cambodia between 2007 and 2011.

    PubMed

    Stoesser, Nicole; Pocock, Joanna; Moore, Catrin E; Soeng, Sona; Chhat, Hor P; Sar, Poda; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Day, Nicholas; Thy, Vann; Sar, Vuthy; Parry, Christopher M

    2012-08-01

    The causes of suppurative parotitis in Cambodian children are not known. We describe 39 cases at the Angkor Hospital for Children, Siem Reap, between January 2007 and July 2011 (0.07/1000 hospital attendances). The median age was 5.7 years with no neonates affected. Burkholderia pseudomallei was cultured in 29 (74%) cases. No deaths occurred; 1 child developed facial nerve palsy. PMID:22531239

  16. Annual Report: 0433787 Page 1 of 7

    E-print Network

    Binford, Michael W.

    characteristics of the Siem Reap River in Cambodia. Name: Selover, Michael Worked for more than 160 Hours: Yes-governmental, not-for-profit organization dedicated to study, teaching and research on the cultures of the Mekong

  17. Rural Districts REAP New Money.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kusler, Mary Conk

    2003-01-01

    Rural Education Achievement Program (REAP) grants give rural districts a new source of federal funds. REAP has two separate programs that address the specific needs of rural districts. The first is the Small and Rural Schools Achievement Program; the second is the Rural and Low Income Schools Program. Explains the differences in the programs and…

  18. Rabies Situation in Cambodia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sowath Ly; Philippe Buchy; Nay Yim Heng; Sivuth Ong; Nareth Chhor; Hervé Bourhy; Sirenda Vong

    2009-01-01

    BackgroundRabies, a fatal but preventable zoonosis, is a major public health problem in developing countries. In Cambodia the disease burden is largely underestimated because patients with encephalitis following dog bites are rarely hospitalized and die at home. Since 1998 Institut Pasteur in Cambodia (IPC), Phnom Penh has been the only source of free post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) and post-mortem diagnosis.MethodsThe 1998–2007

  19. Reaping benefits from intellectual capital.

    PubMed

    Weston, Marla J; Estrada, Nicolette A; Carrington, Jane

    2007-01-01

    The wealth and value of organizations are increasingly based on intellectual capital. Although acquiring talented individuals and investing in employee learning adds value to the organization, reaping the benefits of intellectual capital involves translating the wisdom of employees into reusable and sustained actions. This requires a culture that creates employee commitment, encourages learning, fosters sharing, and involves employees in decision making. An infrastructure to recognize and embed promising and best practices through social networks, evidence-based practice, customization of innovations, and use of information technology results in increased productivity, stronger financial performance, better patient outcomes, and greater employee and customer satisfaction. PMID:17198112

  20. Reaping Energy Savings from Petroleum Refining

    E-print Network

    Deng, A.; Cascone, R.

    2006-01-01

    REAPING ENERGY SAVINGS FROM PETROLEUM REFINING Alan Deng, Project Manager, San Francisco, CA, Ron Cascone, Project Manager, White Plains, NY, Nexant, Inc. ABSTRACT The refining industry is one of the largest energy users in Pacific Gas.... Market barriers include lack of standards and perceptions of unproven reliability for new technologies in petroleum refining, lack of understanding of the refining process by energy efficiency professionals, lack of capital investment, high up...

  1. Revisiting Primary School Dropout in Rural Cambodia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    No, Fata; Sam, Chanphirun; Hirakawa, Yukiko

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies on school dropout in Cambodia often used data from subjects after they already dropped out or statistics from education-related institutions. Using data from children in two rural provinces before they dropped out, this study examines four main factors in order to identify their influence on primary school dropout in Cambodia

  2. Group Proposal Vietnam-Cambodia tour

    E-print Network

    Sorin, Eric J.

    Group Proposal Vietnam-Cambodia tour #12;Brief from Kristen Powers To propose a 2-week itinerary Psychology conference in Hanoi, Vietnam in August 2014. The trip will take place following the conference.KayaVolunteer.com Telephone 1 413 517 0266 | Email info@KayaVolunteer.com Vietnam-Cambodia #12;Itinerary 1 - Vietnam

  3. Continuous CS Analysis of Using the SIEM to Introduction to Computer Programming Education in the School of Engineering Evening Division at the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohi, Shinichi; Miyakawa, Osamu; Konno, Noriko

    In order to improve students’ motivation, the SIEM (School of Information Environment Method) which is the education method for the introduction of the computer programming education was developed. We focus on students’ motivation, and we have measured students’ motivation as the educational effects. After the SIEM was developed in the School of Information Environment, it applied to introduction to the computer programming education in the School of Engineering Evening Division at the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering. It is effective for the improvement of students’ motivation. By adding the Customer Satisfaction Analysis to the SIEM Analysis, it was able to clarify the priority level of the SIEM assessment item. In this paper, we describe results of the Customer Satisfaction Analysis.

  4. Vietnam, Cambodia November 5 20, 2012

    E-print Network

    Connor, Ed

    's water puppet show is followed by dinner at the Press Club. Meals BLD noV. 7 ­ pagoda & perfume Fly sites in the country, before your boat cruise along the Perfume River. Meals BLD #12;CAMBODIA THAILAND

  5. Migrant Interactions with Elderly Parents in Rural Cambodia and Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmer, Zachary; Korinek, Kim; Knodel, John; Chayovan, Napaporn

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines interactions between older adults living in rural areas of Thailand and Cambodia and their adult children. Thai data come from the Survey of the Welfare of the Elderly (N = 3,202 older adults and 17,517 adult children). Cambodia data are from the Survey of the Elderly in Cambodia (N = 777 older adults and 3,751 adult children).…

  6. STUDY ABROAD IN VIETNAM AND CAMBODIA Sociology 491/UH347

    E-print Network

    Tennessee, University of

    STUDY ABROAD IN VIETNAM AND CAMBODIA Sociology 491/UH347 (Petition for Global Studies or Foreign Studies Credits) Seminar on Vietnam and Cambodia in the 20th Century and Beyond Mini-Term Session ­ May 8 economic, political and cultural history of Vietnam and Cambodia, countries that have a long history of war

  7. iREAP: Improving Reading, Writing, and Thinking in the Wired Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manzo, Anthony; Manzo, Ula; Albee, Julie Jackson

    2002-01-01

    Notes that the REAP system (Read, Encode, Annotate, Ponder) improves reading, writing, and thinking. Describes how the "i" in iREAP represents its currency and connection to Internet community building. Presents applications to help students internalize REAP "spectrum thinking," or thinking from different perspectives, so that it becomes a habit…

  8. Abortion incidence in Cambodia, 2005 and 2010.

    PubMed

    Fetters, Tamara; Samandari, Ghazaleh

    2015-04-01

    Although Cambodia now permits elective abortion, scarcity of research on this topic means that information on abortion incidence is limited to regional estimates. This estimation model combines national survey data from Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) with national prospective data of abortion procedures from government health facilities, collected in 2005 and 2010, to calculate the national incidence of safe and unsafe abortion. According to DHS, the proportion of all induced abortions that took place in a health facility in the five years preceding each survey increased from almost 52% to 60%. Projecting from facility-based abortions to national estimates, the national abortion rate increased from 21 to 28 per 1000 women aged 15-44. The abortion ratio also increased from 19 to 28 per 100 live births. This research quantifies an increase in safely induced abortions in Cambodia and provides a deeper understanding of induced abortion trends in Cambodia. PMID:25649162

  9. Mercury Contamination of Skin Whiteners in Cambodia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas Murphy; Darell G. Slotton; Kim Irvine; Kom Sukontason; Charles R. Goldman

    2009-01-01

    Eleven of 41 brands of skin whiteners that were collected in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, and processed with a screening kit contained more than 2000 ?g\\/g mercury. Risk analysis indicates that these 11 brands were toxic. Nine of 19 of these skin whiteners analyzed with cold vapor atomic absorption (CVAA) spectrophotometry exceeded Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) guidelines for cosmetic

  10. Area Handbook for the KHMER Republic (Cambodia).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Donald P.; And Others

    This handbook, one of a series designed to be useful to the military and others with an interest in foreign affairs, contains basic facts about the social, economic, political, and military institutions and practices of Cambodia. There are four major sections to the handbook. Section one describes the general character of the society and examines…

  11. Policing in Cambodia: legitimacy in the making?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rod Broadhurst; Thierry Bouhours

    2009-01-01

    Analyses of police statistics, newspaper reports, and United Nations International Crime Victim Surveys (UNICVS) are used to describe trends in crime and changes in perceptions of security, corruption and confidence in police in post-conflict Cambodia. These data show that both violent crimes (including homicides and police or vigilante killings) and property crimes have declined. Modest reductions in fear of crime

  12. English in Cambodia: Changes and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Stephen H.; Bounchan, Suksiri

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports research undertaken at a prestigious university in Phnom Penh in late 2007. The views of lecturers who teach the BEd (TEFL) degree and their students were canvassed in relation to the status of English in Cambodia. The students completed a questionnaire probing their views on the notion of a Cambodian English, as well as their…

  13. Travelers' Health: Japanese Encephalitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Takeo, Kampong Cham, Battambang, Svay Rieng, and Siem Reap; case reported recently in a traveler who visited Phnom Penh and Angkor Wat/Siem Reap only China Human cases reported from all provinces ...

  14. Harm reduction in Cambodia: a disconnect between policy and practice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In 2003 the Government of Cambodia officially began to recognise that harm reduction was an essential approach to preventing HIV among people who use drugs and their sexual partners. Several programs aiming to control and prevent HIV among drug users have been implemented in Cambodia, mostly in the capital, Phnom Penh. However, there have been ongoing tensions between law enforcement and harm reduction actors, despite several advocacy efforts targeting law enforcement. This study attempts to better understand the implementation of harm reduction in Cambodia and how the policy environment and harm reduction program implementation has intersected with the role of law enforcement officials in Cambodia. PMID:22770124

  15. UNTAC, CEAT, other international actions and the restoration of Cambodia`s forestry policy

    SciTech Connect

    Mareth, M. [Secretariat of State for Environment of Cambodia, Phnom Penh (Cambodia); Vanderstighelen, D.; Bann, C.; Ngongi, M.I. [Cambodian Environmental Advisory Team, Phnom Penh (Cambodia); Aertgeerts, R. [Office for Project Services United Nations Development Program, New York, NY (United States); Eav, B.B. [Dept. of Agriculture, Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Although no verifiable hard data regarding the rate of nation-wide deforestation in Cambodia exists, it is understood that on account of increasing logging activities, uncontrolled forest fires, increased demand for agricultural land and fuel wood for charcoal production and other domestic usage, the rates of deforestation and the degradation of existing forests will continue to be on the rise if no effective policy and management plans are established soon. There now seems to be international recognition and acceptance of the fact that unless the impact of human activities are incorporated into forestry management plans, the problems of deforestation in the world`s poorest regions will continue unabated. The depletion of this natural resource brings about complex changes in the environment which results in such phenomenon as global warming. Sound forest policies and management practices are central to the global warming solution. Without these, human survival remains, potentially, threatened. An essential key to the development of such policies and management practices lies in the identification of the problems related to the forests. In this process of identification and subsequent concrete actions in restoring Cambodia`s forest policies and management practices, the Royal government of Cambodia has been assisted and supported by the international community through organizations and agencies. The examine and appraisal of such assistance and the strategies and efforts of the Royal Government of Cambodia, is the main theme of this paper.

  16. Education Reform Context and Process in Cambodia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sitha Chhinh; Sideth S. Dy

    Despite Cambodia's long history of education development (Clayton 1995; Dy and Ninomiya 2003), the discussion of the country's\\u000a contemporary education sector usually begins with the destructive Khmer Rouge regime (Chhinh 2004; Keng and Clayton 2007).\\u000a This analytical chapter of politics and economics of education reform begins with a discussion of the Khmer Rouge regime during\\u000a which almost two million people

  17. Reaping the benefits of biomedical research: partnerships required.

    PubMed

    Portilla, Lili M; Alving, Barbara

    2010-06-01

    Reaping the benefits of investments in biomedical research can be achieved most efficiently through active collaboration among industry, academia, government, and nonprofit organizations. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) are exploring multiple ways in which to increase the efficiency of the translational process. Investigators involved in the NIH-funded Clinical and Translational Science Awards are developing public-private partnerships, addressing the barriers to collaboration, training the next generation of interdisciplinary team-oriented researchers, and producing open-source tools for collaboration. NIH is engaging with industry through the Foundation for the NIH and the Small Business Innovation Research Awards. PMID:20538616

  18. ASCO 2013: Extended Education Session: Reaping the Rewards of The Cancer Genome Atlas Project

    Cancer.gov

    Home News and Events Events ASCO 2013: Reaping the Rewards of TCGA ASCO 2013: Extended Education Session: Reaping the Rewards of The Cancer Genome Atlas Project Friday, May 31, 2013, 3:45 PM - 6:00 PMMcCormick Place, Chicago, Ill.Chairperson: Andrea

  19. Evaluation of Flexibility Under "No Child Left Behind": Volume III--The Rural Education Achievement Program (REAP Flex)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Gayle S.; Amerikaner, Ary; Klasik, Daniel; Cohodes, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    This study focuses on flexibility provisions in the Rural Education Achievement Program (REAP) provision of NCLB. Specifically, it addresses REAP Flex, a program that allows rural districts additional control over how to spend portions of their federal funding. REAP Flex is part of a series of NCLB flexibility initiatives aimed at rural schools.…

  20. Cambodia's recent history has major population impact.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    This article describes major demographic patterns and programs for reducing fertility in Cambodia, based on the 1996 Demographic Survey. A population census will be undertaken in 1998. Cambodia has a very low sex ratio among persons aged 40-44 years, and a loss of population aged 35-39 years. This population pattern is accounted for by the number of men who died during the war period of 1975-79. Over 24% of households are headed by women. Population is about 10.8 million. Population will double in about 25 years. The rate of natural increase was 2.6% annually. The Royal Government Public Investment Program for 1996-2000, will increase investment in family planning and birth spacing to increase contraceptive supplies, improve distribution, and expand the scope of IEC. In 1995, a KAP survey estimated that the total fertility rate was 4.9 children/woman. The 1996 Demographic Survey estimated a rate of 5.2 children/woman. Only 12.6% of currently married women used contraception, and only 6.9% were using modern contraception. With a child mortality rate of 181/1000, Cambodia is a country with one of the highest rates in the world. A national maternal mortality survey based on the sisterhood method estimated maternal mortality at 473 maternal deaths/100,000 live births. The National Maternal and Child Health Centers offers birth spacing services nationwide. The UNFPA funded program offers birth spacing and sexually transmitted disease services in 13 provinces and extensive technical and management training. Regular meetings are held between governmental and nongovernmental groups. PMID:12293629

  1. The Rocket Engine Advancement Program 2 (REAP2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, Brent (Technical Monitor); Hawk, Clark W.

    2004-01-01

    The Rocket Engine Advancement Program (REAP) 2 program is being conducted by a university propulsion consortium consisting of the University of Alabama in Huntsville, Penn State University, Purdue University, Tuskegee University and Auburn University. It has been created to bring their combined skills to bear on liquid rocket combustion stability and thrust chamber cooling. The research team involves well established and known researchers in the propulsion community. The cure team provides the knowledge base, research skills, and commitment to achieve an immediate and continuing impact on present and future propulsion issues. through integrated research teams composed of analysts, diagnosticians, and experimentalists working together in an integrated multi-disciplinary program. This paper provides an overview of the program, its objectives and technical approaches. Research on combustion instability and thrust chamber cooling are being accomplished

  2. Digging a Vegetarian Diet: Plant-Based Eating Can Reap Rewards

    MedlinePLUS

    ... please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Digging a Vegetarian Diet Plant-Based Eating Can Reap Rewards Vegetarians miss ... economic reasons or are concerned about animal welfare. “Vegetarian diets are also more sustainable and environmentally sound than ...

  3. Cambodia: the women want justice and peace.

    PubMed

    1999-01-01

    Refugees and internally displaced people are an unfortunate and inevitable consequence of war. Among these, women refugees are most vulnerable to sexual violence as they go through various stages of displacement. During the war in Cambodia, women refugees experienced sexual violence in the form of rape, gang rape, sexual exploitation, and forced prostitution. This report presents a summary of a testimony by Yi Leang Eng, a Cambodian woman refugee, on her experiences during the war. According to her, violations of rape happened inside and outside the refugee camps everyday, relegating the violence as a normal occurrence. In this regard, nongovernmental organizations and governments are urged to cooperate and insist that perpetrators of such crimes must be punished and such practices must be immediately stopped. In addition, the issue of supporting women survivors and ensuring that they are given justice should also be discussed. Moreover, for the women survivors themselves, the welfare of their families should be top priority. PMID:12179106

  4. Analysis of Radar Images of Angkor, Cambodia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Anthony; Hensley, Scott; Moore, Elizabeth

    2000-01-01

    During the 1996 AIRSAR Pacific Rim Deployment, data were collected over Angkor in Cambodia. The temples of Angkor date the succession of cities to the 9th-13th century AD, but little is known of its prehistoric habitation. A related area of archaeological debate has been the origin, spiritual meaning and use of the hydraulic constructions in the urban zone. The high resolution, multi-channel capability of AIRSAR, together with the unprecedentedly accurate topography provided by TOPSAR, offer identification and delineation of these features. Examples include previously unrecorded circular earthworks around circular village sites, detection of unrecorded earthwork dykes, reservoirs and canal features, and of temple sites located some distance from the main temple complex at Angkor.

  5. Pulmonary melioidosis in Cambodia: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Melioidosis is a disease caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei and considered endemic in South-East Asia but remains poorly documented in Cambodia. We report the first series of hospitalized pulmonary melioidosis cases identified in Cambodia describing clinical characteristics and outcomes. Methods We characterized cases of acute lower respiratory infections (ALRI) that were identified through surveillance in two provincial hospitals. Severity was defined by systolic blood pressure, cardiac frequency, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation and body temperature. B. pseudomallei was detected in sputum or blood cultures and confirmed by API20NE gallery. We followed up these cases between 6 months and 2 years after hospital discharge to assess the cost-of-illness and long-term outcome. Results During April 2007 - January 2010, 39 ALRI cases had melioidosis, of which three aged ?2 years; the median age was 46 years and 56.4% were males. A close contact with soil and water was identified in 30 patients (76.9%). Pneumonia was the main radiological feature (82.3%). Eleven patients were severe cases. Twenty-four (61.5%) patients died including 13 who died within 61 days after discharge. Of the deceased, 23 did not receive any antibiotics effective against B. pseudomallei. Effective drugs that were available did not include ceftazidime. Mean total illness-related costs was of US$65 (range $25-$5000). Almost two-thirds (61.5%) incurred debt and 28.2% sold land or other belongings to pay illness-related costs. Conclusions The observed high fatality rate is likely explained by the lack or limited access to efficient antibiotics and under-recognition of the disease among clinicians, which led to inappropriate therapy. PMID:21569563

  6. 78 FR 56832 - Extension of Import Restrictions Imposed on Archaeological Material From Cambodia From the Bronze...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-16

    ...Preventing the Illicit Import, Export and Transfer of Ownership of Cultural Property. CBP...the United States entered into a bilateral agreement with Cambodia on September...international-cultural-property-protection/bilateral-agreements/cambodia. The...

  7. 31 CFR 500.565 - Family remittances to nationals of Vietnam and Cambodia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...false Family remittances to nationals of Vietnam and Cambodia. 500.565 Section 500...565 Family remittances to nationals of Vietnam and Cambodia. (a) The remittances...provided that the relative is a national of Vietnam or Cambodia, is a resident of...

  8. Changing patterns of gastrointestinal parasite infections in Cambodian children: 2006-2011.

    PubMed

    Moore, Catrin E; Hor, Put Chhat; Soeng, Sona; Sun, Sopheary; Lee, Sue J; Parry, Christopher M; Day, Nicholas P J; Stoesser, Nicole

    2012-12-01

    We studied gastrointestinal parasites in symptomatic Cambodian children attending a provincial hospital in Siem Reap, Cambodia between 2006 and 2011. A total of 16?372 faecal samples were examined by direct microscopy. Parasites were detected in 3121 (19.1%) samples and most common were Giardia lamblia (8.0% of samples; 47.6% disease episodes), hookworm (5.1%; 30.3%) and Strongyloides stercoralis (2.6%; 15.6%). The proportion of infected children increased, and the number of disease episodes effectively treated with a single dose of mebendazole decreased, over the 5-year period. PMID:22723077

  9. Academic Achievement among Adolescents in Cambodia: Does Caregiver Trauma Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eng, Sothy; Mulsow, Miriam; Cleveland, Harrington; Hart, Sybil L.

    2009-01-01

    How will hostilities occurring around today's world influence future generations in affected areas? Cambodia may be one place where this question can be answered, and academic achievement is one way to measure these effects. Cambodian adolescent/caregiver dyads (n=288) were examined for links between caregiver trauma history and adolescent…

  10. Decentralization and Community Participation: School Clusters in Cambodia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arnaldo Pellini

    Globalisation and the support for more localised decision-making and the general pressure for democratisation and participation have been arguments for decentralization and community participation. The important role that world models attribute to Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) in education is evident in Cambodia, where school clusters are being introduced. The chapter is based on findings from action research with an NGO in

  11. Species diversity and ecology of Tonle Sap Great Lake, Cambodia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ian C. Campbell; Colin Poole; Wim Giesen; John Valbo-Jorgensen

    2006-01-01

    Tonle Sap Great Lake in Cambodia, the largest natural freshwater lake in southeast Asia, is situated within the fl oodplain of the Mekong River. Water levels in the lake vary by about 8 m between the dry season minimum and the wet season maximum when waters from the Mekong River back up the Tonle Sap River. The lake is highly

  12. The Holocene history and development of the Tonle Sap, Cambodia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dan Penny

    2006-01-01

    The Tonle Sap, the ‘Great Lake’ of central Cambodia, is the central component of wetland ecosystems in the lower Mekong River basin, and is of enormous conservation value. The lake's unusual hydraulic relationship with the Mekong River, and its consequent sensitivity to monsoon variability, makes the Tonle Sap sensitive to climate change. Exploring the dynamics and development of this system

  13. Counselling in Cambodia: cultural competence and contextual costs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Willem van de Put; Guus van der Veer

    2005-01-01

    The term 'counselling' is often used to describe psy- chosocial interventions. The concept appears to have different meanings to different people. In this contri- bution to this journal, we will describe an attempt to introduce a classical type of counselling, 'individ- ual talk-therapy', in a psychosocial and mental health program in Cambodia. We use this example to explore two different

  14. Outdoor malaria transmission in forested villages of Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite progress in malaria control, malaria remains an important public health concern in Cambodia, mostly linked to forested areas. Large-scale vector control interventions in Cambodia are based on the free distribution of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs), targeting indoor- and late-biting malaria vectors only. The present study evaluated the vector density, early biting activity and malaria transmission of outdoor-biting malaria vectors in two forested regions in Cambodia. Methods In 2005 two entomological surveys were conducted in 12 villages and their related forest plots in the east and west of Cambodia. Mosquitoes were collected outdoors by human landing collections and subjected to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect Plasmodium sporozoites after morphological identification. Blood samples were collected in the same villages for serological analyses. Collected data were analysed by the classification and regression tree (CART) method and linear regression analysis. Results A total of 11,826 anophelines were recorded landing in 787 man-night collections. The majority (82.9%) were the known primary and secondary vectors. Most of the variability in vector densities and early biting rates was explained by geographical factors, mainly at village level. Vector densities were similar between forest and village sites. Based on ELISA results, 29% out of 17 Plasmodium-positive bites occurred before sleeping time, and 65% in the forest plots. The entomological inoculation rates of survey 1 were important predictors of the respective seroconversion rates in survey 2, whereas the mosquito densities were not. Discussion In Cambodia, outdoor malaria transmission in villages and forest plots is important. In this context, deforestation might result in lower densities of the primary vectors, but also in higher densities of secondary vectors invading deforested areas. Moreover, higher accessibility of the forest could result in a higher man-vector contact. Therefore, additional vector control measures should be developed to target outdoor- and early-biting vectors. PMID:24044424

  15. Self-Assessment in the REAP Tutor: Knowledge, Interest, Motivation, & Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dela Rosa, Kevin; Eskenazi, Maxine

    2013-01-01

    Self-assessment questionnaires have long been used in tutoring systems to help researchers measure and evaluate various aspects of a student's performance during learning activities. In this paper, we chronicle the efforts made in the REAP project, a language tutor developed to teach vocabulary to ESL students through reading activities, to…

  16. Reserve Educational Assistance Program (REAP), Chapter 1607 Title 10, U.S. Code

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Veterans Affairs, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The Reserve Education Assistance Program, or REAP (Chapter 1607 of title 10, U.S. Code), is a new benefit providing educational assistance to members of the reserve components--Selected Reserve (Sel Res) and Individual Ready Reserve (IRR)--who are called or ordered to active service in response to a war or national emergency, as declared by the…

  17. Reap What You Sow: Spare Cells for Post-Silicon Metal Fix Kai-hui Chang

    E-print Network

    Bertacco, Valeria

    Reap What You Sow: Spare Cells for Post-Silicon Metal Fix Kai-hui Chang University of Michigan EECS taped-out with latent bugs, and forced the manufacturers to resort to addi- tional design revisions increase in design complexity, more and more bugs escape pre-silicon validation and are found post

  18. E-Government challenges in Least Developed Countries (LDCs): A case of Cambodia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sinawong Sang; Jeong-Dong Lee; Jongsu Lee

    2009-01-01

    So far there have been few studies dealing with e-Government in Cambodia, one of the least developed countries (LDCs) with an emerging economy. This study can be considered as an opening pace in the examination of e-Government challenges in Cambodia. Government administration information system (GAIS), one of the leading e-Government projects in Cambodia, is a main setting for this study.

  19. Anemia in Cambodia: prevalence, etiology and research needs.

    PubMed

    Charles, Christopher V; Summerlee, Alastair J S; Dewey, Cate E

    2012-01-01

    Anemia is a severe global public health problem with serious consequences for both the human and socio-economic health. This paper presents a situation analysis of the burden of anemia in Cambodia, including a discussion of the country-specific etiologies and future research needs. All available literature on the prevalence and etiology of anemia in Cambodia was collected using standard search protocols. Prevalence data was readily identified for pre-school aged children and women of reproductive age, but there is a dearth of information for school-aged children, men and the elderly. Despite progress in nation-wide programming over the past decade, anemia remains a significant public health problem in Cambodia, especially for women and children. Anemia is a multifaceted disease and both nutritional and non-nutritional etiologies were identified, with iron deficiency accounting for the majority of the burden of disease. The current study highlights the need for a national nutrition survey, including collection of data on the iron status and prevalence of anemia in all population groups. It is impossible to develop effective intervention programs without a clear picture of the burden and cause of disease in the country. PMID:22507602

  20. Effectiveness of community forestry in Prey Long forest, Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Lambrick, Frances H; Brown, Nick D; Lawrence, Anna; Bebber, Daniel P

    2014-04-01

    Cambodia has 57% forest cover, the second highest in the Greater Mekong region, and a high deforestation rate (1.2%/year, 2005-2010). Community forestry (CF) has been proposed as a way to reduce deforestation and support livelihoods through local management of forests. CF is expanding rapidly in Cambodia. The National Forests Program aims to designate one million hectares of forest to CF by 2030. However, the effectiveness of CF in conservation is not clear due to a global lack of controlled comparisons, multiple meanings of CF, and the context-specific nature of CF implementation. We assessed the effectiveness of CF by comparing 9 CF sites with paired controls in state production forest in the area of Prey Long forest, Cambodia. We assessed forest condition in 18-20 randomly placed variable-radius plots and fixed-area regeneration plots. We surveyed 10% of households in each of the 9 CF villages to determine the proportion that used forest products, as a measure of household dependence on the forest. CF sites had fewer signs of anthropogenic damage (cut stems, stumps, and burned trees), higher aboveground biomass, more regenerating stems, and reduced canopy openness than control areas. Abundance of economically valuable species, however, was higher in control sites. We used survey results and geographic parameters to model factors affecting CF outcomes. Interaction between management type, CF or control, and forest dependence indicated that CF was more effective in cases where the community relied on forest products for subsistence use and income. PMID:24400672

  1. he Documentation Center of Cambodia (DC-Cam) seeks several exceptional law students to serve as Summer Legal

    E-print Network

    Carter, John

    . The Cambodia Law and Policy Journal Mission Statement The mission of the Cambodia Law and Policy Journal (CLPJ, democracy, and the rule of law by way of building the capacity of Cambodia's legal profession. Community will serve as research assistants to the Director, Deputy Director, and Editor-in-Chief of the Journal

  2. 8 CFR 245.21 - Adjustment of status of certain nationals of Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos (section 586 of Public...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...Adjustment of status of certain nationals of Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos (section 586 of...Adjustment of status of certain nationals of Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos (section 586 of...permanent resident, a native or citizen of Vietnam, Cambodia, or Laos who: (1)...

  3. 8 CFR 245.21 - Adjustment of status of certain nationals of Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos (section 586 of Public...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...Adjustment of status of certain nationals of Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos (section 586 of...Adjustment of status of certain nationals of Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos (section 586 of...permanent resident, a native or citizen of Vietnam, Cambodia, or Laos who: (1)...

  4. 8 CFR 245.21 - Adjustment of status of certain nationals of Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos (section 586 of Public...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...Adjustment of status of certain nationals of Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos (section 586 of...Adjustment of status of certain nationals of Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos (section 586 of...permanent resident, a native or citizen of Vietnam, Cambodia, or Laos who: (1)...

  5. 8 CFR 1245.21 - Adjustment of status of certain nationals of Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos (section 586 of Public...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...Adjustment of status of certain nationals of Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos (section 586 of...Adjustment of status of certain nationals of Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos (section 586 of...permanent resident, a native or citizen of Vietnam, Cambodia, or Laos who: (1)...

  6. FuREAP: a Fuzzy-Rough Estimator of Algae Populations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Qiang Shen; Alexios Chouchoulas

    2001-01-01

    Concern for environmental issues has increased in recent years. Waste production influences humanity's future. The alga, an ubiquitous single-celled plant, can thrive on industrial waste, to the detriment of water clarity and human activities. To avoid this, biologists need to isolate the chemical parameters of these rapid population fluctuations. This paper proposes a Fuzzy–Rough Estimator of Algae Populations (FuREAP), a

  7. HPLC analysis of Stephania rotunda extracts and correlation with antiplasmodial activity.

    PubMed

    Bory, Sothavireak; Bun, Sok-Siya; Baghdikian, Béatrice; Dumètre, Aurélien; Hutter, Sébastien; Mabrouki, Fathi; Bun, Hot; Elias, Riad; Azas, Nadine; Ollivier, Evelyne

    2013-02-01

    Stephania rotunda (Menispermaceae), a creeper commonly found in the mountainous areas of Cambodia, has been mainly used for the treatment of fever and malaria. Thus, the aim of this study is to investigate the chemical composition and antiplasmodial activity of different samples of S. rotunda and compare their antiplasmodial activity with their alkaloid content. Sixteen samples from different parts (roots, stem, and tuber) of S. rotunda were collected from four regions of Cambodia (Battambang, Pailin, Siem Reap, and Kampot). Reversed-phase HPLC was used to determine the content of three bioactive alkaloids (cepharanthine, tetrahydropalmatine, and xylopinine). These three alkaloids have been found in all samples from Battambang and Pailin (samples I-IX), whereas only tetrahydropalmatine was present in samples from Siem Reap and Kampot (samples X-XVI). The analyzed extracts were evaluated for their antiplasmodial activity on W2 strain of Plasmodium falciparum. Among them, 13 extracts were significantly active with inhibitory concentration 50 (IC(50) ) from 1.2 to 3.7?µg/mL and 2 extracts were moderately active (IC(50) ?=?6.1 and 10?µg/mL, respectively), whereas sample XI was not active (IC(50) ?=?19.6?µg/mL). A comparison between antiplasmodial activity and concentration of the three bioactive alkaloids in S. rotunda extracts has been realized. PMID:22566106

  8. Ensuring Gender Equity in Education for All: Is Cambodia on Track?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velasco, Esther

    2004-01-01

    Gender-equity goals in Cambodia are intimately linked with socio-economic and cultural biases that are embedded in the very system of education and in the society as a whole. There are, however, strong indicators that the vicious cycle in Cambodia's education system could be broken, and here the commitment of key stakeholders and partnership modes…

  9. Surveillance on chronic arsenic exposure in the Mekong River basin of Cambodia using different biomarkers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kongkea Phan; Suthipong Sthiannopkao; Kyoung-Woong Kim

    Thousands of Cambodia populations are currently at high risks of both toxic and carcinogenic effects through drinking arsenic-rich groundwater. In order to determine and assess the use of arsenic contents in different biological samples as biomarkers of chronic arsenic exposure from drinking arsenic-rich groundwater in Cambodia, individual scalp hair, fingernail and toenail were collected from three different provinces in the

  10. Cost and disease burden of Dengue in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Dengue is endemic in Cambodia (pop. estimates 14.4 million), a country with poor health and economic indicators. Disease burden estimates help decision makers in setting priorities. Using recent estimates of dengue incidence in Cambodia, we estimated the cost of dengue and its burden using disability adjusted life years (DALYs). Methods Recent population-based cohort data were used to calculate direct and productive costs, and DALYs. Health seeking behaviors were taken into account in cost estimates. Specific age group incidence estimates were used in DALYs calculation. Results The mean cost per dengue case varied from US$36 - $75 over 2006-2008 respectively, resulting in an overall annual cost from US$3,327,284 in 2008 to US$14,429,513 during a large epidemic in 2007. Patients sustain the highest share of costs by paying an average of 78% of total costs and 63% of direct medical costs. DALY rates per 100,000 individuals ranged from 24.3 to 100.6 in 2007-2008 with 80% on average due to premature mortality. Conclusion Our analysis confirmed the high societal and individual family burden of dengue. Total costs represented between 0.03 and 0.17% of Gross Domestic Product. Health seeking behavior has a major impact on costs. The more accurate estimate used in this study will better allow decision makers to account for dengue costs particularly among the poor when balancing the benefits of introducing a potentially effective dengue vaccine. PMID:20807395

  11. Reaping Rocks

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is an activity about collecting, describing and classifying terrestrial and lunar rocks. Learners will collect and describe rocks of varying texture, color and shapes. Descriptors will include color, presence or absence of grains and grain size, textures, banding and other patterns. From the descriptions, learners will classify their collected rocks and extend their knowledge to classify lunar rocks. This activity is in Unit 1 of the Exploring the Moon teacher's guide and is designed for use especially, but not exclusively, with the Lunar Sample Disk program.

  12. Highlanders of Central Vietnam and Cambodia: Economic and socio-cultural changes between 1975 and 20071

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    to Cambodia. Some were granted a refugee status by UNHCR and were able to settle in a third country, mainly the United States of America, others were sent back to Vietnam. The 2001 and 2004 protest movement alerted

  13. Magnitude of arsenic pollution in the Mekong and Red River Deltas — Cambodia and Vietnam

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Berg; Caroline Stengel; P TRANG; P HUNGVIET; M SAMPSON; M LENG; S SAMRETH; D FREDERICKS

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Large alluvial deltas of the Mekong,River in southern Vietnam and Cambodia and the Red River in northern Vietnam have groundwaters that are exploited for drinking water by private tube-wells, which are of increasing demand since the mid-1990s. This paperpresentsanoverviewofgroundwaterarsenicpollutionintheMekongdelta:arsenicconcentrationsrangedfrom1–1610 ?g\\/Lin Cambodia (average 217 ?g\\/L) and 1–845 ?g\\/L in southern Vietnam (average 39 ?g\\/L), respectively. It also evaluates the situation

  14. Multiple populations of artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Miotto, Olivo; Almagro-Garcia, Jacob; Manske, Magnus; MacInnis, Bronwyn; Campino, Susana; Rockett, Kirk A; Amaratunga, Chanaki; Lim, Pharath; Suon, Seila; Sreng, Sokunthea; Anderson, Jennifer M; Duong, Socheat; Nguon, Chea; Chuor, Char Meng; Saunders, David; Se, Youry; Lon, Chantap; Fukuda, Mark M; Amenga-Etego, Lucas; Hodgson, Abraham VO; Asoala, Victor; Imwong, Mallika; Takala-Harrison, Shannon; Nosten, Francois; Su, Xin-zhuan; Ringwald, Pascal; Ariey, Frédéric; Dolecek, Christiane; Hien, Tran Tinh; Boni, Maciej F; Thai, Cao Quang; Amambua-Ngwa, Alfred; Conway, David J; Djimdé, Abdoulaye A; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Zongo, Issaka; Ouedraogo, Jean-Bosco; Alcock, Daniel; Drury, Eleanor; Auburn, Sarah; Koch, Oliver; Sanders, Mandy; Hubbart, Christina; Maslen, Gareth; Ruano-Rubio, Valentin; Jyothi, Dushyanth; Miles, Alistair; O’Brien, John; Gamble, Chris; Oyola, Samuel O; Rayner, Julian C; Newbold, Chris I; Berriman, Matthew; Spencer, Chris CA; McVean, Gilean; Day, Nicholas P; White, Nicholas J; Bethell, Delia; Dondorp, Arjen M; Plowe, Christopher V; Fairhurst, Rick M; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P

    2013-01-01

    We describe an analysis of genome variation in 825 Plasmodium falciparum samples from Asia and Africa that reveals an unusual pattern of parasite population structure at the epicentre of artemisinin resistance in western Cambodia. Within this relatively small geographical area we have discovered several distinct but apparently sympatric parasite subpopulations with extremely high levels of genetic differentiation. Of particular interest are three subpopulations, all associated with clinical resistance to artemisinin, which have skewed allele frequency spectra and remarkably high levels of haplotype homozygosity, indicative of founder effects and recent population expansion. We provide a catalogue of SNPs that show high levels of differentiation in the artemisinin-resistant subpopulations, including codon variants in various transporter proteins and DNA mismatch repair proteins. These data provide a population genetic framework for investigating the biological origins of artemisinin resistance and for defining molecular markers to assist its elimination. PMID:23624527

  15. Bolstering medical education to enhance critical care capacity in cambodia.

    PubMed

    Albert, Tyler J; Fassier, Thomas; Chhuoy, Meng; Bounchan, Youttiroung; Tan, Sokhak; Ku, No; Chhor, Nareth; LoGerfo, James P; West, T Eoin

    2015-04-01

    The capacity to care for the critically ill has long been viewed as a fundamental element of established and comprehensive health care systems. Extending this capacity to health care systems in low- and middle-income countries is important given the burden of disease in these regions and the significance of critical care in overall health system strengthening. However, many practicalities of improving access and delivery of critical care in resource-limited settings have yet to be elucidated. We have initiated a program to build capacity for the care of critically ill patients in one low-income Southeast Asian country, Cambodia. We are leveraging existing international academic partnerships to enhance postgraduate critical care education in Cambodia. After conducting a needs assessment and literature review, we developed a three-step initiative targeting training in mechanical ventilation. First, we assessed and revised the current resident curriculum pertaining to mechanical ventilation. We addressed gaps in training, incorporated specific goals and learning objectives, and decreased the hours of lectures in favor of additional bedside training. Second, we are incorporating e-learning, e-teaching, and e-assessment into the curriculum, with both live, interactive and independent, self-paced online instruction. Third, we are developing a train-the-trainer program defined by bidirectional international faculty exchanges to provide hands-on, case-based, and bedside training to achieve competency-based outcomes. In targeting specific educational needs and a key population-the next generation of Cambodian intensivists-this carefully designed approach should address some existing gaps in the health care system and hopefully yield a lasting impact. PMID:25751194

  16. Epilepsy: some controversies, some knowledge and some experience from Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Hun, Chamroeun; Hok, Tola; Ros, Sina; Chan, Samleng; Bhalla, Devender

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy-related health outcomes remain unacceptably low in much of the developing world. According to us, it is because of the failure since long to see, and address, epilepsy beyond its preset conventional image. The objective of this paper was to highlight the presence, and influence, of these conventional practices and also to demonstrate what happened when a bold unconventional approach to address epilepsy was taken in Cambodia. Data are taken from existing published literature on epilepsy as well as our field experience during several population-based surveys conducted in Cambodia. We complimented this with our knowledge gained over this long period. It is demonstrated that epilepsy is far more important in Asia that it is currently considered to be, and also vis-à-vis other geographic regions. Pregnancy and birth-related factors carry far higher odds for epilepsy than several "highly vocal" infections. A refocus in epilepsy is required to help move from its traditional negative image to an image where epilepsy is considered a "positive-looking" disorder that is full of "opportunities;" such as availability of safe effective inexpensive treatment, etc. Stigma is a two-side entity (i.e., it is present, and it is influential), and diligence should be therefore practiced before using the stigma label. Nevertheless, psychosocial aspects shouldn't be limited to stigma or Jacoby stigma scale alone. Quality of life is a subjective phenomenon, and patients should determine directly what affects them. It is highly desirable that if we want to find newer answers to old problems in epilepsy, we need to shed our conventional approach and preset conclusions. We should choose to move toward "opportunities" visibly present in epilepsy. Our Cambodian experience demonstrates more intimately that opportunities do get identified when preset conclusions are questioned, and an approach that goes beyond expected and by default is taken. PMID:25591671

  17. "Scholarships provide us with the opportunity to attend a university such as this. We reap what we sow; thus, hard

    E-print Network

    Lyubomirsky, Ilya

    #12;"Scholarships provide us with the opportunity to attend a university such as this. We reap what we sow; thus, hard work and dedication pays off. I've been blessed with scholarships and if not for them, I would be unable to attend UCR." -Christina Hwee Ruth F. Lewis Endowed Scholarship College

  18. "Deaf Health Talks" DHCC is a community partner of the NCDHR, working with RRCD's R.E.A.P

    E-print Network

    Goldman, Steven A.

    "Deaf Health Talks" DHCC is a community partner of the NCDHR, working with RRCD's R.E.A.P Health. NCDHRNational Center for Deaf Health Research Working for a Healthy Deaf Community #12; Topic: Women's Health: Stay Healthy at Any Age" Presenter: Kim Kelstone, CI/CT Date: Thursday, Feb. 28

  19. Capitalizing on Nigeria’s demographic dividend: reaping the benefits and diminishing the burdens

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Holly E.; Mberu, Blessing U.

    2015-01-01

    Nigeria is the most populous country in Africa and the eighth most populous country in the world, yet there is a dearth of published research about its demography. As Nigeria enters a period of potentially rapid economic growth due to the increase in the working-age population, it is critical to understand the demographic trends in the country. This paper examines the age and sex composition of Nigeria as it relates to various population characteristics using the two most recent Demographic and Health Surveys for Nigeria (2003 and 2008), as well as some data from the 2006 Census. It also highlights Nigeria’s demographic composition and trends using United Nations population projection data, and its implications for the country reaping the demographic dividend. Finally, it draws some conclusions and makes some policy recommendations based on the findings. PMID:25705077

  20. Introducing the GRACEnet/REAP Data Contribution, Discovery, and Retrieval System.

    PubMed

    Del Grosso, S J; White, J W; Wilson, G; Vandenberg, B; Karlen, D L; Follett, R F; Johnson, J M F; Franzluebbers, A J; Archer, D W; Gollany, H T; Liebig, M A; Ascough, J; Reyes-Fox, M; Pellack, L; Starr, J; Barbour, N; Polumsky, R W; Gutwein, M; James, D

    2013-07-01

    Difficulties in accessing high-quality data on trace gas fluxes and performance of bioenergy/bioproduct feedstocks limit the ability of researchers and others to address environmental impacts of agriculture and the potential to produce feedstocks. To address those needs, the GRACEnet (Greenhouse gas Reduction through Agricultural Carbon Enhancement network) and REAP (Renewable Energy Assessment Project) research programs were initiated by the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS). A major product of these programs is the creation of a database with greenhouse gas fluxes, soil carbon stocks, biomass yield, nutrient, and energy characteristics, and input data for modeling cropped and grazed systems. The data include site descriptors (e.g., weather, soil class, spatial attributes), experimental design (e.g., factors manipulated, measurements performed, plot layouts), management information (e.g., planting and harvesting schedules, fertilizer types and amounts, biomass harvested, grazing intensity), and measurements (e.g., soil C and N stocks, plant biomass amount and chemical composition). To promote standardization of data and ensure that experiments were fully described, sampling protocols and a spreadsheet-based data-entry template were developed. Data were first uploaded to a temporary database for checking and then were uploaded to the central database. A Web-accessible application allows for registered users to query and download data including measurement protocols. Separate portals have been provided for each project (GRACEnet and REAP) at nrrc.ars.usda.gov/slgracenet/#/Home and nrrc.ars.usda.gov/slreap/#/Home. The database architecture and data entry template have proven flexible and robust for describing a wide range of field experiments and thus appear suitable for other natural resource research projects. PMID:24216379

  1. Coping Methods: Personal and Community Resources Used among Cambodians in Cambodia and Cambodian-Americans in Lowell, Massachusetts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    pierSath, Chath

    This qualitative research assesses mental health resources from the perspective of providers in Cambodia and in Lowell, Massachusetts. The research documents culturally relevant coping strategies available to Cambodians for combating the effects of trauma and stress. Interviews were conducted with 11 caregivers in Cambodia and with 6 providers in…

  2. Strengthening community participation at health centers in rural Cambodia: role of local non-governmental organizations (NGOs)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Ui; L. Heng; H. Yatsuya; L. Kawaguichi; H. Akashi; A. Aoyana

    2010-01-01

    Cambodia's health policy emphasizes community participation to improve health services. This study identifies factors facilitating community participation in health center management in rural Cambodia, focusing on roles of local NGOs. We conducted a questionnaire survey of 50 local NGOs regarding their understanding of new health systems and policies and NGO collaboration with health centers. Eight local NGOs and their partner

  3. Radar Image with Color as Height, Ancharn Kuy, Cambodia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This image of Ancharn Kuy, Cambodia, was taken by NASA's Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR). The image depicts an area northwest of Angkor Wat. The radar has highlighted a number of circular village mounds in this region, many of which have a circular pattern of rice fields surrounding the slightly elevated site. Most of them have evidence of what seems to be pre-Angkor occupation, such as stone tools and potsherds. Most of them also have a group of five spirit posts, a pattern not found in other parts of Cambodia. The shape of the mound, the location in the midst of a ring of rice fields, the stone tools and the current practice of spirit veneration have revealed themselves through a unique 'marriage' of radar imaging, archaeological investigation, and anthropology.

    Ancharn Kuy is a small village adjacent to the road, with just this combination of features. The region gets slowly higher in elevation, something seen in the shift of color from yellow to blue as you move to the top of the image.

    The small dark rectangles are typical of the smaller water control devices employed in this area. While many of these in the center of Angkor are linked to temples of the 9th to 14th Century A.D., we cannot be sure of the construction date of these small village tanks. They may pre-date the temple complex, or they may have just been dug ten years ago!

    The image dimensions are approximately 4.75 by 4.3 kilometers (3 by 2.7 miles) with a pixel spacing of 5 meters (16.4 feet). North is at top. Image brightness is from the C-band (5.6 centimeters, or 2.2 inches) wavelength radar backscatter, which is a measure of how much energy the surface reflects back toward the radar. Color is used to represent elevation contours. One cycle of color; that is going from blue to red to yellow to green and back to blue again; corresponds to 10 meters (32.8 feet) of elevation change.

    AIRSAR flies aboard a NASA DC-8 based at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. In the TOPSAR mode, AIRSAR collects radar interferometry data from two spatially separated antennas (2.6 meters, or 8.5 feet). Information from the two antennas is used to form radar backscatter imagery and to generate highly accurate elevation data. Built, operated and managed by JPL, AIRSAR is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise program. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  4. Seroprevalence of foot-and-mouth disease in the southern provinces of Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Tum, Sothyra; Robertson, Ian Ducan; Edwards, John; Abila, Ronello; Morzaria, Subhash

    2015-03-01

    A serological surveillance study was conducted between March and June 2006 in the southern provinces of Cambodia to determine the prevalence and distribution of foot-and-mouth disease. Cattle and buffalo originating from eight provinces and 69 villages were sampled. The results revealed that the village level prevalence of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in the southern provinces of Cambodia was 87 % with an overall individual animal prevalence of 30 %. Three serotypes: O, A and Asia 1 were detected in this region with a prevalence of 28.5, 9.5 and 9.3 %, respectively. However, as the antibody level to FMDV serotypes A and Asia 1 were generally low, it is likely that serotype O is responsible for most of the recent outbreaks of FMD in Cambodia. Seropositive animals were older than seronegative animals, especially with serotype O. PMID:25616981

  5. Environmental arsenic epidemiology in the Mekong river basin of Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Phan, Kongkea; Kim, Kyoung-Woong; Hashim, Jamal Hisham

    2014-11-01

    We investigated relationship of arsenicosis symptoms with total blood arsenic (BAs) and serum albumin (SAlb) of residents in the Mekong River basin of Cambodia. We found that arsenicosis patients had significantly higher BAs and lower SAlb than asymptomatic villagers (Mann-Whitney U test, p<0.01). Arsenicosis symptoms were found to be 76.4% (1.764 times) more likely to develop among individuals having an SAlb?44.3gL(-1) than among those who had an SAlb>44.3gL(-1) (OR=1.764, 95% CI=0.999-3.114) and 117.6% (2.176 times) as likely to occur among those with BAs>5.73µgL(-1) than for those having BAs?5.73µgL(-1) (OR=2.176, 95% CI=1.223-3.872). Furthermore, a significant negative correlation was also found between BAs and SAlb (rs (199)=-0.354, p<0.0001). As such, this study suggests that people with low SAlb and/or high BAs are likely to rapidly develop arsenicosis symptoms. PMID:25262072

  6. Douching practices among female sex workers in Phnom Penh, Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Bui, Thanh Cong; Tran, Ly T H; Ross, Michael W; Markham, Christine M

    2015-03-01

    Several studies indicate that douching has few benefits but numerous adverse health outcomes, including increased risk for sexually transmitted infections and HIV. No published study explores douching practices among Cambodian female sex workers. This report provides preliminary data about the prevalence and frequency of douching among female sex workers in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Survey data were obtained from 81 female sex workers who were taken into custody due to engagement in commercial sex from March to June 2011. Results showed that 91% of participants douched. The mean numbers of times douched before sex and after sex per 10 sex episodes were 4.43 (SD?=?3.87) and 4.63 (SD?=?3.94), respectively. Half of the participants thought that douching could help to prevent sexually transmitted infections including HIV; 24% were unsure about this. Usually, douching after sex was associated with ever obtaining an HIV test (p?=?.012) and was marginally associated (although not statistically significant) with a higher average number of clients per week (p?=.?063) and consistent condom use with clients (p?=?.053). This suggests that these practices may be related to individual perceptions of sexually transmitted infections/HIV risk or susceptibility. Given the commonness of douching and related misperceptions among Cambodian female sex workers, future studies and interventions are needed to prevent adverse health problems. PMID:24810219

  7. Paleoenvironmental history of the West Baray, Angkor (Cambodia).

    PubMed

    Day, Mary Beth; Hodell, David A; Brenner, Mark; Chapman, Hazel J; Curtis, Jason H; Kenney, William F; Kolata, Alan L; Peterson, Larry C

    2012-01-24

    Angkor (Cambodia) was the seat of the Khmer Empire from the 9th to 15th century AD. The site is noted for its monumental architecture and complex hydro-engineering systems, comprised of canals, moats, embankments, and large reservoirs, known as barays. We infer a 1,000-y, (14)C-dated paleoenvironmental record from study of an approximately 2-m sediment core taken in the largest Khmer reservoir, the West Baray. The baray was utilized and managed from the time of construction in the early 11th century, through the 13th century. During that time, the West Baray received relatively high rates of detrital input. In the 14th century, linear sedimentation rates diminished by an order of magnitude, yielding a condensed section that correlates temporally with episodes of regional monsoon failure during the late 14th and early 15th century, recorded in tree ring records from Vietnam. Our results demonstrate that changes in the water management system were associated with the decline of the Angkorian kingdom during that period. By the 17th century, the West Baray again functioned as a limnetic system. Ecologic and sedimentologic changes over the last millennium, detected in the baray deposits, are attributed to shifts in regional-scale Khmer water management, evolving land use practices in the catchment, and regional climate change. PMID:22215582

  8. Paleoenvironmental history of the West Baray, Angkor (Cambodia)

    PubMed Central

    Day, Mary Beth; Hodell, David A.; Brenner, Mark; Chapman, Hazel J.; Curtis, Jason H.; Kenney, William F.; Kolata, Alan L.; Peterson, Larry C.

    2012-01-01

    Angkor (Cambodia) was the seat of the Khmer Empire from the 9th to 15th century AD. The site is noted for its monumental architecture and complex hydro-engineering systems, comprised of canals, moats, embankments, and large reservoirs, known as barays. We infer a 1,000-y, 14C-dated paleoenvironmental record from study of an approximately 2-m sediment core taken in the largest Khmer reservoir, the West Baray. The baray was utilized and managed from the time of construction in the early 11th century, through the 13th century. During that time, the West Baray received relatively high rates of detrital input. In the 14th century, linear sedimentation rates diminished by an order of magnitude, yielding a condensed section that correlates temporally with episodes of regional monsoon failure during the late 14th and early 15th century, recorded in tree ring records from Vietnam. Our results demonstrate that changes in the water management system were associated with the decline of the Angkorian kingdom during that period. By the 17th century, the West Baray again functioned as a limnetic system. Ecologic and sedimentologic changes over the last millennium, detected in the baray deposits, are attributed to shifts in regional-scale Khmer water management, evolving land use practices in the catchment, and regional climate change. PMID:22215582

  9. Dynamic of H5N1 virus in Cambodia and emergence of a novel endemic sub-clade.

    PubMed

    Sorn, San; Sok, Touch; Ly, Sovann; Rith, Sareth; Tung, Nguyen; Viari, Alain; Gavotte, Laurent; Holl, Davun; Seng, Heng; Asgari, Nima; Richner, Beat; Laurent, Denis; Chea, Nora; Duong, Veasna; Toyoda, Tetsuya; Yasuda, Chadwick Y; Kitsutani, Paul; Zhou, Paul; Bing, Sun; Deubel, Vincent; Donis, Ruben; Frutos, Roger; Buchy, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    In Cambodia, the first detection of HPAI H5N1 virus in birds occurred in January 2004 and since then there have been 33 outbreaks in poultry while 21 human cases were reported. The origin and dynamics of these epizootics in Cambodia remain unclear. In this work we used a range of bioinformatics methods to analyze the Cambodian virus sequences together with those from neighboring countries. Six HA lineages belonging to clades 1 and 1.1 were identified since 2004. Lineage 1 shares an ancestor with viruses from Thailand and disappeared after 2005, to be replaced by lineage 2 originating from Vietnam and then by lineage 3. The highly adapted lineage 4 was seen only in Cambodia. Lineage 5 is circulating both in Vietnam and Cambodia since 2008 and was probably introduced in Cambodia through unregistered transboundary poultry trade. Lineage 6 is endemic to Cambodia since 2010 and could be classified as a new clade according to WHO/OIE/FAO criteria for H5N1 virus nomenclature. We propose to name it clade 1.1A. There is a direct filiation of lineages 2 to 6 with a temporal evolution and geographic differentiation for lineages 4 and 6. By the end of 2011, two lineages, i.e. lineages 5 and 6, with different transmission paths cocirculate in Cambodia. The presence of lineage 6 only in Cambodia suggests the existence of a transmission specific to this country whereas the presence of lineage 5 in both Cambodia and Vietnam indicates a distinct way of circulation of infected poultry. PMID:22683363

  10. Media reporting of tenofovir trials in Cambodia and Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Edward; Rachlis, Beth; Wu, Ping; Wong, Elaine; Wilson, Kumanan; Singh, Sonal

    2005-01-01

    Background Two planned trials of pre-exposure prophylaxis tenofovir in Cambodia and Cameroon to prevent HIV infection in high-risk populations were closed due to activist pressure on host country governments. The international news media contributed substantially as the primary source of knowledge transfer regarding the trials. We aimed to characterize the nature of reporting, specifically focusing on the issues identified by media reports regarding each trial. Methods With the aid of an information specialist, we searched 3 electronic media databases, 5 electronic medical databases and extensively searched the Internet. In addition we contacted stakeholder groups. We included media reports addressing the trial closures, the reasons for the trial closures, and who was interviewed. We extracted data using content analysis independently, in duplicate. Results We included 24 reports on the Cambodian trial closure and 13 reports on the Cameroon trial closure. One academic news account incorrectly reported that it was an HIV vaccine trial that closed early. The primary reasons cited for the Cambodian trial closure were: a lack of medical insurance for trial related injuries (71%); human rights considerations (71%); study protocol concerns (46%); general suspicions regarding trial location (37%) and inadequate prevention counseling (29%). The primary reasons cited for the Cameroon trial closure were: inadequate access to care for seroconverters (69%); participants not sufficiently informed of risks (69%); inadequate number of staff (46%); participants being exploited (46%) and an unethical study design (38%). Only 3/23 (13%) reports acknowledged interviewing research personnel regarding the Cambodian trial, while 4/13 (30.8%) reports interviewed researchers involved in the Cameroon trial. Conclusion Our review indicates that the issues addressed and validity of the media reports of these trials is highly variable. Given the potential impact of the media in formulation of health policy related to HIV, efforts are needed to effectively engage the media during periods of controversy in the HIV/AIDS epidemic. PMID:16120208

  11. Minehound TM trials in Cambodia, Bosnia, and Angola

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, David J.; Curtis, Paul

    2006-05-01

    This paper describes the trials of the MINEHOUND TM dual sensor, land mine detector carried out in Cambodia, Bosnia and Angola. MINEHOUND TM has been developed for use in humanitarian demining as a means of improving the efficiency of clearance operations. The trials were sponsored by the UK Department for International Development (DFID). ERA Technology Ltd conducted the trials, which were monitored by staff drawn from the countries participating in the International Test and Evaluation Programme (ITEP) for humanitarian de-mining. Experienced deminers from the Mines Advisory Group (MAG) and Norwegian Peoples Aid (NPA) used the pre-production units in live minefields. The objectives of the trial were: 1. To record information on the performance of MINEHOUND TM when used in a live minefield. 2. To determine the reduction in False Alarm Rate (FAR) that could be achieved using a dual sensor mine detector. The trials were conducted in three mine-affected countries for a period of eight weeks per country; the programme of trials ran from July 2005 to December 2005, with an additional smaller trial in late February 2006. The results of the trials showed that MINEHOUND TM achieved 100% detection of the mines encountered and an improvement in FAR of better than 5:1 compared with a basic metal detector. The trials enabled optimisation of the production design and clearly demonstrated that new technology can be brought to humanitarian clearance operations in a safe and controlled manner. As a result of the highly successful trials, Vallon and ERA will produce the MINEHOUND TM (Type number VMR1) starting in Q3 of 2006.

  12. Influenza A(H5N1) virus surveillance at live poultry markets, Cambodia, 2011.

    PubMed

    Horm, Srey Viseth; Sorn, San; Allal, Lotfi; Buchy, Philippe

    2013-02-01

    In Cambodia, influenza A(H5N1) virus surveillance at live poultry markets (LPMs) relies on virus isolation from poultry specimens; however, virus is rarely detected by this method. We tested 502 environmental LPM samples: 90 were positive by PCR, 10 by virus isolation. Virus circulation could be better monitored by environmental sampling of LPMs. PMID:23347451

  13. The Balance of Power in Rural Marketing Networks: A Case Study of Snake Trading in Cambodia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sharon E. Brooks; Bereket Kebede; Edward H. Allison; John D. Reynolds

    2010-01-01

    Producers in small-scale rural markets often receive unfavourable prices for their goods as a result of more powerful market participants. This study uses a combination of price analysis and interview data to assess the position of snake hunters in the aquatic snake market from Tonle Sap Lake in Cambodia. Despite the hunters' dependence on intermediary traders for market access and

  14. Development of Indicators for Educational Planning: Brazil, Cambodia, Estonia, Gambia, Lithuania, Thailand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). International Inst. for Educational Planning.

    This publication presents the outcomes of a distance education course on development and dissemination of indicators used for educational planning. The course took place from November 2000 to February 2001 and was attended by representatives from the ministries of education of Brazil, Cambodia, Estonia, Gambia, Lithuania, and Thailand. The overall…

  15. Analysis of WWW Traffic in Cambodia and Ghana Computer Science Division

    E-print Network

    Sanders, Seth

    Analysis of WWW Traffic in Cambodia and Ghana Bowei Du Computer Science Division University and Ghana. This paper has two main contributions. The first contribution is a anal- ysis, Dynamic content, Ghana, Hyper- text Transfer Protocol, HTTP, Measurement, Performance analysis, Proxy

  16. Challenges of Adopting the Use of Technology in Less Developed Countries: The Case of Cambodia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Jayson W.

    2011-01-01

    Drawing on Everett Rogers's theory of the diffusion of innovations, this article identifies the barriers, challenges, and successes in the adoption of technology training by teacher trainers in Cambodia. The analysis was based on data collected from an open-ended survey, face-to-face interviews, and document analysis. Findings reveal that the…

  17. Student Transition from Primary to Lower Secondary School in Cambodia: Narrative Insights into Complex Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, D. Brent, Jr.; Zimmermann, Thomas; Sitha, Chhinh; Williams, James H.; Kitamura, Yuto

    2014-01-01

    This article has three purposes. First, it presents findings from a study of student retention and dropout in Cambodia, as pupils transition from primary to lower secondary school. Second, it aims to understand from an in-depth, emic perspective the dynamics of this process and the challenges that individual families and their students face around…

  18. Educational Financing and Budgeting in Cambodia. Financial Management of Education Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pheng, Duy; Sovonn, Hang; Soly, Yos

    This book contains a detailed description of the challenges faced by educational finance and budgeting in Cambodia. Until recently, educational financing took the form of emergency budgets and was limited to government planning for teacher salaries and costs of examinations. There has been a general lack of coordination between provinces and the…

  19. Has the kouprey ( Bos sauveli Urbain, 1937) been domesticated in Cambodia?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexandre Hassanin; Anne Ropiquet; Raphaël Cornette; Michel Tranier; Pierre Pfeffer; Philippe Candegabe; Michèle Lemaire

    2006-01-01

    The kouprey (Bos sauveli Urbain, 1937) is a very rare bovid species of Cambodia, which may be extinct in the wild, as no living specimen has been observed for a long time. Here, we describe a complete taxidermy mount, which presents astonishing morphological similarities with the kouprey. The animal was mounted in 1871 at the National Museum of Natural History

  20. Influenza A(H5N1) Virus Surveillance at Live Poultry Markets, Cambodia, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Horm, Srey Viseth; Sorn, San; Allal, Lotfi

    2013-01-01

    In Cambodia, influenza A(H5N1) virus surveillance at live poultry markets (LPMs) relies on virus isolation from poultry specimens; however, virus is rarely detected by this method. We tested 502 environmental LPM samples: 90 were positive by PCR, 10 by virus isolation. Virus circulation could be better monitored by environmental sampling of LPMs. PMID:23347451

  1. State of Cybersecurity and the Roadmap to Secure Cyber Community in Cambodia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sopheak Cheang; Sinawong Sang

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents background information and the progress of the government effort on Cyber Security in Cambodia. Firstly, this study establishes a framework to assess the current effort of Cambodian government on cybersecurity. Secondly, the results of the assessment are used to develop policy implication, serving as roadmap to secure national online community. Furthermore, this paper discusses the process to

  2. Mercury contamination in human hair and fish from Cambodia: levels, specific accumulation and risk assessment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tetsuro Agusa; Takashi Kunito; Hisato Iwata; Touch Seang Tana; Annamalai Subramanian; Shinsuke Tanabe

    2005-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) concentrations in human hair and fish samples from Phnom Penh, Kien Svay, Tomnup Rolork and Batrong, Cambodia, collected in November 1999 and December 2000 were determined to understand the status of contamination, and age- and sex-dependent accumulation in humans and to assess the intake of mercury via fish consumption. Mercury concentrations in human hair ranged from 0.54 to

  3. 7 Industrial Agglomeration, Production Networks, and Foreign Direct Investment Promotion: Cambodia's Experience

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sau Sisovanna

    The key strategy of the Royal Government of Cambodia (RGC) with its industry policies is to expand the economic linkages between agriculture and industry to improve the industrial sector and to lessen its dependence on the textile industry. The Royal Government continues to provide the necessary physical infrastructure and highly qualified support services to enhance the investment climate, promote transfer

  4. Using local knowledge to inventory deep pools, important fish habitats in Cambodia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Chan; S. Putrea; K. Sean; K. G. Hortle

    The Mekong River is the largest river in Southeast Asia and it supports a major inland fishery. The river flows through Cambodia for about 500 kms, traversing four provinces. Important fisheries habitats include deep pools, rapids, floodplains and associated wetlands. Deep pools (un loong in Khmer) have been mentioned by several researchers as important refuge habitats for fish. The definition

  5. Health risk assessment of inorganic arsenic intake of Cambodia residents through groundwater drinking pathway

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kongkea Phan; Suthipong Sthiannopkao; Kyoung-Woong Kim; Ming Hung Wong; Vibol Sao; Jamal Hisham Hashim; Mohamed Salleh Mohamed Yasin; Syed Mohamed Aljunid

    2010-01-01

    In order to compare the magnitudes and health impacts of arsenic and other toxic trace elements in well water, groundwater and hair samples were collected from three areas with different arsenic exposure scenarios in the Mekong River basin of Cambodia. Ampil commune in Kampong Cham province was selected as an uncontaminated area, Khsarch Andaet commune in Kratie province was selected

  6. Violence, Democracy, and the Neoliberal “Order”: The Contestation of Public Space in Posttransitional Cambodia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Simon Springer

    2009-01-01

    Neoliberal policies explain why authoritarianism and violence remain the principal modes of governance among many ruling elites in posttransitional settings. Using Cambodia as an empirical case to illustrate the neoliberalizing process, the promotion of intense marketization is revealed as a foremost causal factor in a country's inability to consolidate democracy following political transition. Neoliberalization effectively acts to suffocate an indigenous

  7. Where is the Poverty–Environment Nexus? Evidence from Cambodia, Lao PDR, and Vietnam

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susmita Dasgupta; Uwe Deichmann; Craig Meisner; David Wheeler

    2005-01-01

    Summary. — This paper investigates the poverty-environment nexus at the provincial and district levels in Cambodia, Lao PDR, and Vietnam. The analysis focuses on spatial associations between poverty populations and five environmental problems: deforestation, fragile soils, indoor air pollu- tion, contaminated water, and outdoor air pollution. The results suggest that the nexus is quite dif- ferent in each country. We

  8. Dengue Incidence in Urban and Rural Cambodia: Results from Population-Based Active Fever Surveillance, 2006

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Dengue Incidence in Urban and Rural Cambodia: Results from Population-Based Active Fever Cham, we conducted community-based active dengue fever surveillance among the 0-to-19­year age group combined with weekly home visits to identify persons with fever. An investigation team visited families

  9. Benefit-Cost Analysis of Foot and Mouth Disease Control in Large Ruminants in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Young, J R; Suon, S; Rast, L; Nampanya, S; Windsor, P A; Bush, R D

    2014-11-10

    Foot and mouth disease (FMD) is endemic in Cambodia and throughout the Greater Mekong Subregion and causes significant losses to rural smallholders owning the majority of the national large ruminant population. However, due to underreporting, paucity of knowledge of FMD impacts, limited veterinary capacity and deficits of data available for analysis, the quantifiable benefits of a national FMD control programme are unknown. To address this deficit, existing literature and research data from the 'Best practice health and husbandry of cattle, Cambodia' project conducted between 2007 and 2012, were used to develop a three-phase analysis framework to: assess the impacts of the recent widespread FMD epizootic in Cambodia in 2010, conduct a value chain analysis of the large ruminant market and estimate the costs and benefits for a national large ruminant biannual FMD vaccination programme. A trader survey conducted in 2010-2011 provided cattle and buffalo value chain information and was matched to village herd structure data to calculate a total large ruminant farm-gate value of USD 1.271 billion in 2010. Monte Carlo simulation modelling that implemented a 5-year biannual vaccination programme at a cost of USD 6.3 an animal per year identified a benefit-cost ratio of 1.40 (95% CI 0.96-2.20) when accounting for recent prices of cattle and buffalo in Cambodia and based on an expected annual incidence of 0.2 (assuming one major epizootic in the 5-year vaccination programme). Given that the majority of the large ruminants are owned by rural smallholders, and mostly the poor are involved in agricultural employment, the successful implementation of an FMD control programme in Cambodia would be expected to avoid estimated losses of USD 135 million; equivalent to 10.6% of the 2010 farm-gate value and contributing to important reductions in rural poverty and food insecurity. PMID:25382391

  10. Farm-level bureaucrats in action (and inaction) : the distribution of veterinary services in Laos and Cambodia

    E-print Network

    Ballard, Brett M

    2005-01-01

    In this study, I analyze several dimensions of the institutional environment that govern contractual exchange between veterinary service providers and farmers in Laos and Cambodia. I hypothesize that the negotiation, ...

  11. "Almost a role model of what we would like to do everywhere": British American Tobacco in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    MacKenzie, R; Collin, J; Sopharo, C; Sopheap, Y

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To examine British American Tobacco's (BAT's) renewed interest in Cambodia from the early 1990s, reviewing negotiations to establish a joint venture and the subsequent conduct of BAT Cambodia (BATC). Methods: Analysis of previously confidential BAT documents relevant to the Cambodian market. Results: With the advent of comparative political stability in the early 1990s, BAT was quick to explore the possibilities for investment. The Cambodian government urgently required foreign investment, offering inducements and assistance to investors. In developing a joint venture, BAT saw a cost effective opportunity to dominate the local market and to defend its regional interests, Cambodia being viewed as strategically located to support smuggling. Given minimal advertising regulation, BATC have undertaken wide ranging promotions and sought to prevent advances in tobacco control. Conclusions: BATC is presented as a contribution to Cambodia's regeneration, but the documents highlight its exploitation of state incapacity and an escalating threat to public health. PMID:15564213

  12. Transpiration characteristics of a rubber plantation in central Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Nakako; Kumagai, Tomo'omi; Miyazawa, Yoshiyuki; Matsumoto, Kazuho; Tateishi, Makiko; Lim, Tiva K; Mudd, Ryan G; Ziegler, Alan D; Giambelluca, Thomas W; Yin, Song

    2014-03-01

    The rapid and widespread expansion of rubber plantations in Southeast Asia necessitates a greater understanding of tree physiology and the impacts of water consumption on local hydrology. Sap flow measurements were used to study the intra- and inter-annual variations in transpiration rate (Et) in a rubber stand in the low-elevation plain of central Cambodia. Mean stand sap flux density (JS) indicates that rubber trees actively transpire in the rainy season, but become inactive in the dry season. A sharp, brief drop in JS occurred simultaneously with leaf shedding in the middle of the dry season in January. Although the annual maxima of JS were approximately the same in the two study years, the maximum daily stand Et of ?2.0 mm day(-1) in 2010 increased to ?2.4 mm day(-1) in 2011. Canopy-level stomatal response was well explained by changes in solar radiation, vapor pressure deficit, soil moisture availability, leaf area, and stem diameter. Rubber trees had a relatively small potential to transpire at the beginning of the study period, compared with average diffuse-porous species. After 2 years of growth in stem diameter, transpiration potential was comparable to other species. The sensitivity of canopy conductance (gc) to atmospheric drought indicates isohydric behavior of rubber trees. Modeling also predicted a relatively small sensitivity of gc to the soil moisture deficit and a rapid decrease in gc under extreme drought conditions. However, annual observations suggest the possibility of a change in leaf characteristics with tree maturity and/or initiation of latex tapping. The estimated annual stand Et was 469 mm year(-1) in 2010, increasing to 658 mm year(-1) in 2011. Diagnostic analysis using the derived gc model showed that inter-annual change in stand Et in the rapidly growing young rubber stand was determined mainly by tree growth rate, not by differences in air and soil variables in the surrounding environment. Future research should focus on the potentially broad applicability of the relationship between Et and tree size as well as environmental factors at stands different in terms of clonal type and age. PMID:24646689

  13. Unusual increase in reported cases of paratyphoid A fever among travellers returning from Cambodia, January to September 2013.

    PubMed

    Tourdjman, M; Le Hello, S; Gossner, C; Delmas, G; Tubiana, S; Fabre, L; Kerléguer, A; Tarantola, A; Fruth, A; Friesema, I; Thorstensen Brandal, L; Lawrence, J; Fisher, I; Dufour, M; Weill, F X; de Valk, H

    2013-01-01

    From January to September 2013, a marked increase in notifications of Salmonella Paratyphi A infections among travellers returning from Cambodia occurred in France. An investigation revealed 35 cases without a common source: 21 in France, five in Germany, three in the Netherlands, one in Norway, one in the United Kingdom, four in New-Zealand. Data suggest an ongoing event that should trigger further investigation. Travellers to Cambodia should observe preventive measures including good personal hygiene and food handling practices. PMID:24094059

  14. Water-Borne Diseases and Extreme Weather Events in Cambodia: Review of Impacts and Implications of Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Grace I.; McIver, Lachlan; Kim, Yoonhee; Hashizume, Masahiro; Iddings, Steven; Chan, Vibol

    2014-01-01

    Cambodia is prone to extreme weather events, especially floods, droughts and typhoons. Climate change is predicted to increase the frequency and intensity of such events. The Cambodian population is highly vulnerable to the impacts of these events due to poverty; malnutrition; agricultural dependence; settlements in flood-prone areas, and public health, governance and technological limitations. Yet little is known about the health impacts of extreme weather events in Cambodia. Given the extremely low adaptive capacity of the population, this is a crucial knowledge gap. A literature review of the health impacts of floods, droughts and typhoons in Cambodia was conducted, with regional and global information reviewed where Cambodia-specific literature was lacking. Water-borne diseases are of particular concern in Cambodia, in the face of extreme weather events and climate change, due to, inter alia, a high pre-existing burden of diseases such as diarrhoeal illness and a lack of improved sanitation infrastructure in rural areas. A time-series analysis under quasi-Poisson distribution was used to evaluate the association between floods and diarrhoeal disease incidence in Cambodian children between 2001 and 2012 in 16 Cambodian provinces. Floods were significantly associated with increased diarrhoeal disease in two provinces, while the analysis conducted suggested a possible protective effect from toilets and piped water. Addressing the specific, local pre-existing vulnerabilities is vital to promoting population health resilience and strengthening adaptive capacity to extreme weather events and climate change in Cambodia. PMID:25546280

  15. Water-borne diseases and extreme weather events in Cambodia: review of impacts and implications of climate change.

    PubMed

    Davies, Grace I; McIver, Lachlan; Kim, Yoonhee; Hashizume, Masahiro; Iddings, Steven; Chan, Vibol

    2015-01-01

    Cambodia is prone to extreme weather events, especially floods, droughts and typhoons. Climate change is predicted to increase the frequency and intensity of such events. The Cambodian population is highly vulnerable to the impacts of these events due to poverty; malnutrition; agricultural dependence; settlements in flood-prone areas, and public health, governance and technological limitations. Yet little is known about the health impacts of extreme weather events in Cambodia. Given the extremely low adaptive capacity of the population, this is a crucial knowledge gap. A literature review of the health impacts of floods, droughts and typhoons in Cambodia was conducted, with regional and global information reviewed where Cambodia-specific literature was lacking. Water-borne diseases are of particular concern in Cambodia, in the face of extreme weather events and climate change, due to, inter alia, a high pre-existing burden of diseases such as diarrhoeal illness and a lack of improved sanitation infrastructure in rural areas. A time-series analysis under quasi-Poisson distribution was used to evaluate the association between floods and diarrhoeal disease incidence in Cambodian children between 2001 and 2012 in 16 Cambodian provinces. Floods were significantly associated with increased diarrhoeal disease in two provinces, while the analysis conducted suggested a possible protective effect from toilets and piped water. Addressing the specific, local pre-existing vulnerabilities is vital to promoting population health resilience and strengthening adaptive capacity to extreme weather events and climate change in Cambodia. PMID:25546280

  16. Comparative study between REAP 200 and FEP171 CAR with 50-kV raster e-beam system for sub-100-nm technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baik, Ki-Ho; Lem, Homer Y.; Dean, Robert L.; Osborne, Stephen; Mueller, Mark; Abboud, Frank E.

    2003-08-01

    In this paper, a process established with a positive-tone chemically amplified resist (CAR) from TOK REAP200 and Fujifilm Arch FEP171 and 50kV MEBES system is discussed. This TOK resist is developed for raster scan 50 kV e-beam systems. It has high contrast, good coating characteristics, good dry etch selectivity, and high environmental stability. In the mask industries, the most popular positive tone CAR is FEP171, which is a high activation energy type CAR. REAP (Raster E-beam Advanced Process) 200 is low activation energy type and new acetal protecting polymer. In this study, we compared to these different type resists in terms of contrast, PAB and PEB latitude, resist profile, footing, T-topping, PED stability, LER, Global CDU (Critical Dimension Uniformity) and resolution. The REAP200 Resist obtained 75nm isolated lines and spaces, 90nm dense patterns with vertical profile, and a good stability of delay time.

  17. Radar Image with Color as Height, Hariharalaya, Cambodia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Hariharalaya, the ancient 9th Century A.D. capitol of the Khmer in Cambodia, is shown in the upper center portion of this NASA Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) image. The image was acquired during the 1996 PACRIM mission with AIRSAR operating in the TOPSAR mode. At the center of the image is the terraced sandstone temple mountain of the King Indravarman, the Bakong. The smaller enclosed rectangular feature just to the north is Preah Ko. Further to the south are more rectangular features, temples and water reservoirs attributed to other kings in the earlier part of the 9th Century A.D. and maybe even earlier. Just visible at the top on the image is a long linear feature that forms the southern border of the immense water reservoir, at the center of which is the Lolei temple. The city was the first capitol of the Khmer after the 802 A.D. ceremony consecrating the king as 'Devaraja'. This usually translated as 'god who was king' or 'king who was god'. In the next century, the center of power shifted to the northwest, to the area known today as Angkor.

    Thus this early capital is unique both in being the first after the historical 'founding' of the Khmer Empire, and for being inhabited for a relatively short time. Although kings returned from Angkor in the 11th and 12th Centuries A.D. to build the temple known as the Lolei and to construct the tower in the center of Bakong, the city of Hariharalaya remained on the perimeter of royal power. It was revered, however, as part of a longstanding and important custom of ancestral veneration. This manifested itself in a complex set of rituals honoring one's forebears--also ensuring legitimacy for one's claim to the throne. So behind this seemingly simple patterning of rectangles on the radar image lies many layers of history, ritual and meaning for the Khmer people, past and present.

    Image dimensions are approximately 6 by 4.8 kilometers (3.7 by 3 miles) with a pixel spacing of 5 meters (16.4 feet). North is at top. Image brightness is from the C-band (5.6 centimeters, or 2.2 inches wavelength) radar backscatter, which is a measure of how much energy the surface reflects back toward the radar. Color is used to represent elevation contours. One cycle of color--from blue to red to yellow to green and back to blue again--represents 10 meters (32.8 feet) of elevation change.

    AIRSAR flies aboard a NASA DC-8 based at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. In the TOPSAR mode, AIRSAR collects radar interferometry data from two spatially separated antennas (2.6 meters, or 8.5 feet). Information from the two antennas is used to form radar backscatter imagery and to generate highly accurate elevation data. Built, operated and managed by JPL, AIRSAR is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise program. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  18. Radar Image with Color as Height, Lovea, Cambodia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This image of Lovea, Cambodia, was acquired by NASA's Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR). Lovea, the roughly circular feature in the middle-right of the image, rises some 5 meters (16.4 feet) above the surrounding terrain. Lovea is larger than many of the other mound sites with a diameter of greater than 300 meters (984.3 feet). However, it is one of a number highlighted by the radar imagery. The present-day village of Lovea does not occupy all of the elevated area. However, at the center of the mound is an ancient spirit post honoring the legendary founder of the village. The mound is surrounded by earthworks and has vestiges of additional curvilinear features. Today, as in the past, these harnessed water during the rainy season, and conserved it during the long dry months of the year.

    The village of Lovea located on the mound was established in pre-Khmer times, probably before 500 A.D. In the lower left portion of the image is a large trapeng and square moat. These are good examples of construction during the historical 9th to 14th Century A.D. Khmer period; construction that honored and protected earlier circular villages. This suggests a cultural and technical continuity between prehistoric circular villages and the immense urban site of Angkor. This connection is one of the significant finds generated by NASA's radar imaging of Angkor. It shows that the city of Angkor was a particularly Khmer construction. The temple forms and water management structures of Angkor were the result of pre-existing Khmer beliefs and methods of water management.

    Image dimensions are approximately 6.3 by 4.7 kilometers (3.9 by 2.9 miles). North is at top. Image brightness is from the C-band (5.6 centimeters, or 2.2 inches wavelength) radar backscatter, which is a measure of how much energy the surface reflects back toward the radar. Color is used to represent elevation contours. One cycle of color represents 20 meters (65.6 feet) of elevation change; that is, going from blue to red to yellow to green and back to blue again corresponds to 20 meters (65.6 feet) of elevation change.

    AIRSAR flies aboard a NASA DC-8 based at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. In the TOPSAR mode, AIRSAR collects radar interferometry data from two spatially separated antennas (2.6 meters, or 8.5 feet). Information from the two antennas is used to form radar backscatter imagery and to generate highly accurate elevation data. Built, operated and managed by JPL, AIRSAR is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise program. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  19. Molecular identification of Taenia tapeworms by Cox1 gene in Koh Kong, Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hyeong-Kyu; Yong, Tai-Soon; Sohn, Woon-Mok; Chai, Jong-Yil; Hong, Sung-Jong; Han, Eun-Taek; Jeong, Hoo-Gn; Chhakda, Tep; Sinuon, Muth; Socheat, Duong; Eom, Keeseon S

    2011-06-01

    We collected fecal samples from 21 individuals infected with Taenia tapeworms in Koh Kong Province, Cambodia, and performed nucleotide sequencing of the cox1 gene and multiplex PCR on the eggs for DNA differential diagnosis of human Taenia tapeworms. Genomic DNA was extracted from the eggs of a minimum number of 10 isolated from fecal samples. Using oligonucleotide primers Ta7126F, Ts7313F, Tso7466F, and Rev7915, the multiplex PCR assay proved useful for differentially diagnosing Taenia solium, Taenia saginata, and Taenia asiatica based on 706, 629, and 474 bp bands, respectively. All of the Taenia specimens from Kho Kong, Cambodia, were identified as either T. saginata (n=19) or T. solium (n=2) by cox1 sequencing and multiplex PCR. PMID:21738280

  20. Assessing arsenic intake from groundwater and rice by residents in Prey Veng province, Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Phan, Kongkea; Phan, Samrach; Heng, Savoeun; Huoy, Laingshun; Kim, Kyoung-Woong

    2014-02-01

    We investigated total daily intake of As by residents in Prey Veng province in the Mekong River basin of Cambodia. Groundwater (n = 11), rice (n = 11) and fingernail (n = 23) samples were randomly collected from the households and analyzed for total As by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Calculation indicated that daily dose of inorganic As was greater than the lower limits on the benchmark dose for a 0.5% increased incidence of lung cancer (BMDL0.5 equals to 3.0 ?g d(-1) kg(-1)body wt.). Moreover, positive correlation between As in fingernail and daily dose of As from groundwater and rice and total daily dose of As were found. These results suggest that the Prey Veng residents are exposed to As in groundwater. As in rice is an additional source which is attributable to high As accumulation in human bodies in the Mekong River basin of Cambodia. PMID:24231403

  1. Molecular characterization of sympatrically distributed Neotricula aperta-like snails in the Mekong River, Kratie, Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chennan; Saijuntha, Weerachai; Kirinoki, Masashi; Hayashi, Naoko; Chigusa, Yuichi; Muth, Sinuon; Meng, Chuor Char; Ai, Yingchun; Agatsuma, Takeshi

    2014-06-18

    Abstract Fifty-six samples of Neotricula aperta-like snails were collected from six locations in Cambodia. Their mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) sequences were examined using haplotype network and neighbor-joining (NJ) tree analysis. Twenty-seven haplotypes (H1-H27) were observed and were divided into two different groups/lineages. Of 27, 17 haplotypes (H11-H27) were clustered with the reference samples of the ?-race N. aperta. The remaining 10 haplotypes (H1-H10) were clustered in a separate group/lineage, differing from the reference samples of the ?-, ?-, and ?-race N. aperta, suggesting a new lineage belonging the genus Neotricula. Our results show that both the ?-race and a new lineage were sympatrically present approximately 60?km upstream of the Mekong River near the Kratie port, Cambodia. Further morphological and molecular studies are required to confirm the taxonomic status of this new, unidentified lineage. PMID:24938095

  2. A first assessment of the genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cambodia is among the 22 high-burden TB countries, and has one of the highest rates of TB in South-East Asia. This study aimed to describe the genetic diversity among clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) isolates collected in Cambodia and to relate these findings to genetic diversity data from neighboring countries. Methods We characterized by 24 VNTR loci genotyping and spoligotyping 105 Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates collected between 2007 and 2008 in the region of Phnom-Penh, Cambodia, enriched in multidrug-resistant (MDR) isolates (n = 33). Results Classical spoligotyping confirmed that the East-African Indian (EAI) lineage is highly prevalent in this area (60%-68% respectively in whole sample and among non-MDR isolates). Beijing lineage is also largely represented (30% in whole sample, 21% among non-MDR isolates, OR = 4.51, CI95% [1.77, 11.51]) whereas CAS lineage was absent. The 24 loci MIRU-VNTR typing scheme distinguished 90 patterns with only 13 multi-isolates clusters covering 28 isolates. The clustering of EAI strains could be achieved with only 8 VNTR combined with spoligotyping, which could serve as a performing, easy and cheap genotyping standard for this family. Extended spoligotyping suggested relatedness of some unclassified "T1 ancestors" or "Manu" isolates with modern strains and provided finer resolution. Conclusions The genetic diversity of MTC in Cambodia is driven by the EAI and the Beijing families. We validate the usefulness of the extended spoligotyping format in combination with 8 VNTR for EAI isolates in this region. PMID:21299851

  3. Influenza A\\/H5N1 virus infection in humans in Cambodia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philippe Buchy; Sek Mardy; Sirenda Vong; Tetsuya Toyoda; Jean-Thierry Aubin; Megge Miller; Jean-Baptiste Dufourcq; Phan Van Tu; Sylvie Van der Werf

    2007-01-01

    Background: Between January 2005 and April 2006, six patients of influenza A\\/H5N1 virus infection were reported in Cambodia, all with fatal outcome. Objectives: We describe the virological findings of these six H5N1 patients in association with clinical and epidemiologic findings. Study design: Broncho-alveolar lavage, nasopharyngeal, throat and rectal swabs and sera were cultured for virus isolation and viral load quantified

  4. Year-Round Observation of Evapotranspiration in an Evergreen Broadleaf Forest in Cambodia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tatsuhiko Nobuhiro; Akira Shimizu; Naoki Kabeya; Yoshio Tsuboyama; Tayoko Kubota; Toshio Abe; Makoto Araki; Koji Tamai; Sophal Chann; Nang Keth

    We conducted a year-round observation of meteorological elements using a meteorological observation tower 60 m in height to\\u000a evaluate evapotranspiration in an evergreen broadleaf forest watershed in central Cambodia. The period of observation was\\u000a from November 2003 to October 2004. Solar radiation was consistent throughout the year. The integrated values of net radiation\\u000a and downward and upward shortwave radiation were

  5. Assessment of management of direct seeded rice production under different water conditions in Cambodia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hiroyuki Ikeda; Akihiko Kamoshita; Junko Yamagishi; Makara Ouk; Bunna Lor

    2008-01-01

    In order to assess direct seeding of rice technology to cope with future agricultural labor shortage in Cambodia, agronomic\\u000a experiments were conducted in 2005 and 2006 to compare direct seeding with transplanting under three water conditions (non-flooded,\\u000a shallow flooded, and deep flooded conditions) with\\/without weed control by herbicides (bentazone and cyhalofop-butyl) for\\u000a two Cambodian rice varieties (shorter stature and early

  6. Identification of multidrug resistance in previously treated tuberculosis patients: a mixed methods study in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Royce, S; Khann, S; Yadav, RP; Mao, ET; Cattamanchi, A; Sam, S; Handley, MA

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Setting Previously treated tuberculosis (TB) patients are a priority for drug susceptibility testing (DST) to identify cases with multidrug resistance (MDR). In Cambodia, a recent study found that only one-third of smear-positive previously treated patients had DST results. Objective To quantify the gaps in detecting MDR in previously treated TB patients in Cambodia, and describe health workers’ perspectives on barriers, facilitators and potential interventions. Design We analyzed case notifications in Cambodia (2004–2012) and conducted semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders Results The proportion of previously treated notifications varied significantly across provinces 2010–12, in the context of longer term trends of decreasing relapse and increasing “other” retreatment notifications. Correct classification of patients’ TB treatment history and ensuring specimens from previously-treated patients are collected and reach the laboratory could nearly double the number of detected MDR-TB cases. Identified barriers include patients’ reluctance to disclose and staff difficulty eliciting treatment history, partly due to availability of streptomycin only in hospitals. Facilitators include trained health workers, collection of sputum for DST even if previously treated patients are not taking streptomycin, streamlining sputum transportation and promptly reporting results. Conclusion Improved monitoring, supportive supervision, and correctly classifying previously treated patients are essential for improving detection of MDR-TB. PMID:25299861

  7. Poverty, Wealth Inequality and Health among Older Adults in Rural Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Zachary

    2007-01-01

    Little research exists on health determinants among adults living in economically deprived regions despite the fact that these areas comprise a good part of the world. This paper examines the distribution of wealth then tests associations between wealth inequality and a variety of health outcomes, among older adults, in one of the world's poorest regions – rural Cambodia. Data from the 2004 Survey of the Elderly in Cambodia are employed. Using a disablement framework to conceptualize health, associations between four health components and a wealth inequality measure are tested. The wealth inequality measure is based on an index that operationalizes wealth as ownership of household assets and household structural components. Results confirm difficult economic conditions in rural Cambodia. The lowest wealth quintile lives in households that own nothing, while the next quintiles are only slightly better off. Nevertheless, logistic regressions that adjust for other covariates indicate heterogeneity in health across quintiles that appear qualitatively similar, with the bottom quintiles reporting the most health problems. An exception is disability, which presents a U-shaped association. It is difficult to determine mechanisms behind the relationship using cross-sectional data, but the paper speculates on possible causal directions, both from wealth to health and vice-versa. The analysis suggests the ability to generalize the relationship between wealth inequality and health to extremely poor populations as a very small difference in wealth makes a relatively large difference with respect to health associations among those in meager surroundings. PMID:17913320

  8. Towards safe abortion access: an exploratory study of medical abortion in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Petitet, Pascale Hancart; Ith, Leakhena; Cockroft, Melissa; Delvaux, Thérèse

    2015-02-01

    In 2010, following its approval by the Ministry of Health, the medical abortion combination pack Medabon (containing mifepristone and misoprostol) was made available at pharmacies and in a restricted number of health facilities in Cambodia. The qualitative study presented in this paper was conducted in 2012 as a follow-up to longer-term ethnographical research related to reproductive health and fertility regulation between 2008 and 2012. Observations were carried out at several clinic and pharmacy sites and in-depth interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 20 women who attended two MSI Cambodia centres and 10 women identified through social networks; six men (women's male partners); eight health care providers at the two MSI centres and four pill sellers at private or informal pharmacies (who also provided health care services in private clinics). Although the level of training among the drug sellers and providers varied, their knowledge about medical abortion regimens, correct usage and common side effects was good. Overall, women were satisfied with the services provided. Medical abortion was not always a women-only process in this study as some male partners were also involved in the care process. The study illustrates positive steps forward being taken in making abortion safe and preventing and reducing unsafe abortion practices in Cambodia. PMID:25702068

  9. Distribution of selected healthcare resources for influenza pandemic response in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Human influenza infection poses a serious public health threat in Cambodia, a country at risk for the emergence and spread of novel influenza viruses with pandemic potential. Prior pandemics demonstrated the adverse impact of influenza on poor communities in developing countries. Investigation of healthcare resource distribution can inform decisions regarding resource mobilization and investment for pandemic mitigation. Methods A health facility survey performed across Cambodia obtained data on availability of healthcare resources important for pandemic influenza response. Focusing on five key resources considered most necessary for treating severe influenza (inpatient beds, doctors, nurses, oseltamivir, and ventilators), resource distributions were analyzed at the Operational District (OD) and Province levels, refining data analysis from earlier studies. Resources were stratified by respondent type (hospital vs. District Health Office [DHO]). A summary index of distribution inequality was calculated using the Gini coefficient. Indices for local spatial autocorrelation were measured at the OD level using geographical information system (GIS) analysis. Finally, a potential link between socioeconomic status and resource distribution was explored by mapping resource densities against poverty rates. Results Gini coefficient calculation revealed variable inequality in distribution of the five key resources at the Province and OD levels. A greater percentage of the population resides in areas of relative under-supply (28.5%) than over-supply (21.3%). Areas with more resources per capita showed significant clustering in central Cambodia while areas with fewer resources clustered in the northern and western provinces. Hospital-based inpatient beds, doctors, and nurses were most heavily concentrated in areas of the country with the lowest poverty rates; however, beds and nurses in Non-Hospital Medical Facilities (NHMF) showed increasing concentrations at higher levels of poverty. Conclusions There is considerable heterogeneity in healthcare resource distribution across Cambodia. Distribution mapping at the local level can inform policy decisions on where to stockpile resources in advance of and for reallocation in the event of a pandemic. These findings will be useful in determining future health resource investment, both for pandemic preparedness and for general health system strengthening, and provide a foundation for future analyses of equity in health services provision for pandemic mitigation planning in Cambodia. PMID:24090286

  10. Achieving universal access and moving towards elimination of new HIV infections in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Vun, Mean Chhi; Fujita, Masami; Rathavy, Tung; Eang, Mao Tang; Sopheap, Seng; Sovannarith, Samreth; Chhorvann, Chhea; Vanthy, Ly; Sopheap, Oum; Welle, Emily; Ferradini, Laurent; Sedtha, Chin; Bunna, Sok; Verbruggen, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In the mid-1990s, Cambodia faced one of the fastest growing HIV epidemics in Asia. For its achievement in reversing this trend, and achieving universal access to HIV treatment, the country received a United Nations millennium development goal award in 2010. This article reviews Cambodia’s response to HIV over the past two decades and discusses its current efforts towards elimination of new HIV infections. Methods A literature review of published and unpublished documents, including programme data and presentations, was conducted. Results and discussion Cambodia classifies its response to one of the most serious HIV epidemics in Asia into three phases. In Phase I (1991–2000), when adult HIV prevalence peaked at 1.7% and incidence exceeded 20,000 cases, a nationwide HIV prevention programme targeted brothel-based sex work. Voluntary confidential counselling and testing and home-based care were introduced, and peer support groups of people living with HIV emerged. Phase II (2001–2011) observed a steady decline in adult prevalence to 0.8% and incidence to 1600 cases by 2011, and was characterized by: expanding antiretroviral treatment (coverage reaching more than 80%) and continuum of care; linking with tuberculosis and maternal and child health services; accelerated prevention among key populations, including entertainment establishment-based sex workers, men having sex with men, transgender persons, and people who inject drugs; engagement of health workers to deliver quality services; and strengthening health service delivery systems. The third phase (2012–2020) aims to attain zero new infections by 2020 through: sharpening responses to key populations at higher risk; maximizing access to community and facility-based testing and retention in prevention and care; and accelerating the transition from vertical approaches to linked/integrated approaches. Conclusions Cambodia has tailored its prevention strategy to its own epidemic, established systematic linkages across different services and communities, and achieved nearly universal coverage of HIV services nationwide. Still, the programme must continually (re)prioritize the most effective and efficient interventions, strengthen synergies between programmes, contribute to health system strengthening, and increase domestic funding so that the gains of the previous two decades are sustained, and the goal of zero new infections is reached. PMID:24950749

  11. Magnitude of arsenic pollution in the Mekong and Red River Deltas--Cambodia and Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Berg, Michael; Stengel, Caroline; Pham, Thi Kim Trang; Pham, Hung Viet; Sampson, Mickey L; Leng, Moniphea; Samreth, Sopheap; Fredericks, David

    2007-01-01

    Large alluvial deltas of the Mekong River in southern Vietnam and Cambodia and the Red River in northern Vietnam have groundwaters that are exploited for drinking water by private tube-wells, which are of increasing demand since the mid-1990s. This paper presents an overview of groundwater arsenic pollution in the Mekong delta: arsenic concentrations ranged from 1-1610 microg/L in Cambodia (average 217 microg/L) and 1-845 microg/L in southern Vietnam (average 39 microg/L), respectively. It also evaluates the situation in Red River delta where groundwater arsenic concentrations vary from 1-3050 microg/L (average 159 microg/L). In addition to rural areas, the drinking water supply of the city of Hanoi has elevated arsenic concentrations. The sediments of 12-40 m deep cores from the Red River delta contain arsenic levels of 2-33 microg/g (average 7 microg/g, dry weight) and show a remarkable correlation with sediment-bound iron. In all three areas, the groundwater arsenic pollution seem to be of natural origin and caused by reductive dissolution of arsenic-bearing iron phases buried in aquifers. The population at risk of chronic arsenic poisoning is estimated to be 10 million in the Red River delta and 0.5-1 million in the Mekong delta. A subset of hair samples collected in Vietnam and Cambodia from residents drinking groundwater with arsenic levels >50 microg/L have a significantly higher arsenic content than control groups (<50 microg/L). Few cases of arsenic related health problems are recognized in the study areas compared to Bangladesh and West Bengal. This difference probably relates to arsenic contaminated tube-well water only being used substantially over the past 7 to 10 years in Vietnam and Cambodia. Because symptoms of chronic arsenic poisoning usually take more than 10 years to develop, the number of future arsenic related ailments in Cambodia and Vietnam is likely to increase. Early mitigation measures should be a high priority. PMID:17081593

  12. CARDI Soil and Water Science Technical Note No. 3 Soil and Landscapes of Basaltic Terrain in Ou Reang Ov District, Kampong Cham Province, Kingdom of Cambodia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hin Sarith; Noel Schoknecht; Wendy Vance; Richard Bell; Seng Vang

    Cambodia has an old national soil map and a more recent map of rice soils, but little is known about soil distribution and properties in the uplands. Such soil information is needed to support moves towards crop diversification in Cambodia in particular for the production of crops other than rice. This investigation was to identify the range and distribution of

  13. Decreasing pfmdr1 Copy Number Suggests that Plasmodium falciparum in Western Cambodia Is Regaining In Vitro Susceptibility to Mefloquine.

    PubMed

    Lim, Pharath; Dek, Dalin; Try, Vorleak; Sreng, Sokunthea; Suon, Seila; Fairhurst, Rick M

    2015-05-01

    Dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine is the current frontline artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) for Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Cambodia but is now failing in several western provinces. To investigate artesunate plus mefloquine (AS+MQ) as a replacement ACT, we measured the prevalence of multiple pfmdr1 copies-a molecular marker for MQ resistance-in 844 P. falciparum clinical isolates collected in 2008 to 2013. The pfmdr1 copy number is decreasing in Western Cambodia, suggesting that P. falciparum is regaining in vitro susceptibility to MQ. PMID:25712365

  14. Acute Undifferentiated Febrile Illness in Rural Cambodia: A 3-Year Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Tara C.; Siv, Sovannaroth; Khim, Nimol; Kim, Saorin; Fleischmann, Erna; Ariey, Frédéric; Buchy, Philippe; Guillard, Bertrand; González, Iveth J.; Christophel, Eva-Maria; Abdur, Rashid; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Bell, David; Menard, Didier

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade, malaria control has been successfully implemented in Cambodia, leading to a substantial decrease in reported cases. Wide-spread use of malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) has revealed a large burden of malaria-negative fever cases, for which no clinical management guidelines exist at peripheral level health facilities. As a first step towards developing such guidelines, a 3-year cross-sectional prospective observational study was designed to investigate the causes of acute malaria-negative febrile illness in Cambodia. From January 2008 to December 2010, 1193 febrile patients and 282 non-febrile individuals were recruited from three health centers in eastern and western Cambodia. Malaria RDTs and routine clinical examination were performed on site by health center staff. Venous samples and nasopharyngeal throat swabs were collected and analysed by molecular diagnostic tests. Blood cultures and blood smears were also taken from all febrile individuals. Molecular testing was applied for malaria parasites, Leptospira, Rickettsia, O. tsutsugamushi, Dengue- and Influenza virus. At least one pathogen was identified in 73.3% (874/1193) of febrile patient samples. Most frequent pathogens detected were P. vivax (33.4%), P. falciparum (26.5%), pathogenic Leptospira (9.4%), Influenza viruses (8.9%), Dengue viruses (6.3%), O. tsutsugamushi (3.9%), Rickettsia (0.2%), and P. knowlesi (0.1%). In the control group, a potential pathogen was identified in 40.4%, most commonly malaria parasites and Leptospira. Clinic-based diagnosis of malaria RDT-negative cases was poorly predictive for pathogen and appropriate treatment. Additional investigations are needed to understand their impact on clinical disease and epidemiology, and the possible role of therapies such as doxycycline, since many of these pathogens were seen in non-febrile subjects. PMID:24755844

  15. A cross-sectional investigation of the quality of selected medicines in Cambodia in 2010

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Access to good-quality medicines in many countries is largely hindered by the rampant circulation of spurious/falsely labeled/falsified/counterfeit (SFFC) and substandard medicines. In 2006, the Ministry of Health of Cambodia, in collaboration with Kanazawa University, Japan, initiated a project to combat SFFC medicines. Methods To assess the quality of medicines and prevalence of SFFC medicines among selected products, a cross-sectional survey was carried out in Cambodia. Cefixime, omeprazole, co-trimoxazole, clarithromycin, and sildenafil were selected as candidate medicines. These medicines were purchased from private community drug outlets in the capital, Phnom Penh, and Svay Rieng and Kandal provinces through a stratified random sampling scheme in July 2010. Results In total, 325 medicine samples were collected from 111 drug outlets. Non-licensed outlets were more commonly encountered in rural than in urban areas (p?Cambodia: newer-generation medicines are also targeted. Concerted efforts by both domestic and foreign manufacturers, wholesalers, retailers, and regulatory authorities should help improve the quality of medicines. PMID:24593851

  16. Surveillance on chronic arsenic exposure in the Mekong River basin of Cambodia using different biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Phan, Kongkea; Sthiannopkao, Suthipong; Kim, Kyoung-Woong

    2011-12-01

    Thousands of Cambodia populations are currently at high risks of both toxic and carcinogenic effects through drinking arsenic-rich groundwater. In order to determine and assess the use of arsenic contents in different biological samples as biomarkers of chronic arsenic exposure from drinking arsenic-rich groundwater in Cambodia, individual scalp hair, fingernail and toenail were collected from three different provinces in the Mekong River basin of Cambodia. After washing and acid-digestion, digestate was analyzed for total arsenic by an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Chemical analysis of the acid-digested hair revealed that among 270 hair samples cut from Kandal, 78.1% had arsenic content in scalp hair (As(h)) greater than the typical As(h) (1.00 ?g g(-1)), indicating possible arsenic toxicity. Concurrently, 1.2% and 0.6% were found elevated in Kratie (n=84) and Kampong Cham (n=173), respectively. Similarly, the upper end of the ranges for arsenic contents in fingernail (As(fn)) and toenail (As(tn)) clipped from Kandal (fingernail n=241; toenail n=187) were higher than the normal arsenic content in nail (0.43-1.08 ?g g(-1)), however, none was observed elevated in both Kratie (fingernail n=76, toenail n=42) and Kampong Cham (fingernail n=83; toenail n=52). Significant positive intercorrelations between groundwater arsenic concentration (As(w)), average daily dose (ADD) of arsenic, As(h), As(fn) and As(tn) suggest that As(h), As(fn) and As(tn) can be used as biomarkers of chronic arsenic exposure from drinking arsenic-rich groundwater, in which As(h) is more favorable than As(fn) and As(tn) due to the ease of sample processing and analytical measurements, respectively. PMID:21820958

  17. Beliefs about tobacco, health, and addiction among adults in Cambodia: findings from a national survey.

    PubMed

    Yel, Daravuth; Bui, Anthony; Job, Jayakaran S; Knutsen, Synnove; Singh, Pramil N

    2013-09-01

    There remains a very high rate of smoked and smokeless tobacco use in the Western Pacific Region. The most recent findings from national adult tobacco surveys indicate that very few daily users of tobacco intend to quit tobacco use. In Cambodia, a nation that is predominantly Buddhist, faith-based tobacco control programs have been implemented where, under the fifth precept of Buddhism that proscribes addictive behaviors, monks were encouraged to quit tobacco and temples have been declared smoke-free. In the present study, we included items on a large national tobacco survey to examine the relation between beliefs (faith-based, other) about tobacco, health, and addiction among adults (18 years and older). In a stratified, multistage cluster sample (n=13,988) of all provinces of Cambodia, we found that (1) 88-93% believe that Buddhist monks should not use tobacco, buy tobacco, or be offered tobacco during a religious ceremony; (2) 86-93% believe that the Wat (temple) should be a smoke-free area; (3) 93-95% believe that tobacco is addictive in the same way as habits (opium, gambling, alcohol) listed under the fifth precept of Buddhism; and (4) those who do not use tobacco are significantly more likely to cite a Buddhist principle as part of their anti-tobacco beliefs. These data indicate that anti-tobacco sentiments are highly prevalent in the Buddhist belief system of Cambodian adults and are especially evident among non-users of tobacco. Our findings indicate that faith-based initiatives could be an effective part of anti-tobacco campaigns in Cambodia. PMID:21948146

  18. Gendered Motivations, Sociocultural Constraints, and Psychobehavioral Consequences of Transnational Partnerships in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Hoefinger, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    Global flows of people, information and capital have created transnational spaces in Cambodia. Within those spaces exists the formation of complex and multilayered interpersonal relationships between people attempting to capitalize on the opportunities created by these flows. The purpose of this article is to describe these transnational relationships, namely between young women employed in the entertainment sectors in Phnom Penh, and their western male partners, while highlighting the racialized and gendered motivations of the global actors, the inevitable sociocultural conflicts/constraints/ misunderstandings that arise within the partnerships, and the resulting challenges and psychobehavioral consequences experienced by the mobile and differentiated individuals involved in these postcolonial relational formations. PMID:25221438

  19. DO MARRIAGES FORGET THEIR PAST? MARITAL STABILITY IN POST–KHMER ROUGE CAMBODIA*

    PubMed Central

    HEUVELINE, PATRICK; POCH, BUNNAK

    2014-01-01

    This paper assesses the impact of three main destabilizing factors on marital stability in Cambodia: the radical reformation of marriage under the Khmers Rouges (KR); the imbalanced gender ratio among marriageable adults resulting from gendered mortality during the KR regime; and, after decades of isolation from the West, a period of rapid social change. Although there is evidence of declining marital stability in the most recent period, marriages contracted under the KR appear as stable as adjacent marriage cohorts. These findings suggest that the conditions under which spouses were initially paired matter less for marital stability than does their contemporaneous environment. PMID:16579210

  20. High Prevalence and Spatial Distribution of Strongyloides stercoralis in Rural Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Khieu, Virak; Schär, Fabian; Forrer, Armelle; Hattendorf, Jan; Marti, Hanspeter; Duong, Socheat; Vounatsou, Penelope; Muth, Sinuon; Odermatt, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background The threadworm, Strongyloides stercoralis, endemic in tropical and temperate climates, is a neglected tropical disease. Its diagnosis requires specific methods, and accurate information on its geographic distribution and global burden are lacking. We predicted prevalence, using Bayesian geostatistical modeling, and determined risk factors in northern Cambodia. Methods From February to June 2010, we performed a cross-sectional study among 2,396 participants from 60 villages in Preah Vihear Province, northern Cambodia. Two stool specimens per participant were examined using Koga agar plate culture and the Baermann method for detecting S. stercoralis infection. Environmental data was linked to parasitological and questionnaire data by location. Bayesian mixed logistic models were used to explore the spatial correlation of S. stercoralis infection risk. Bayesian Kriging was employed to predict risk at non-surveyed locations. Principal Findings Of the 2,396 participants, 44.7% were infected with S. stercoralis. Of 1,071 strongyloidiasis cases, 339 (31.6%) were among schoolchildren and 425 (39.7%) were found in individuals under 16 years. The incidence of S. stercoralis infection statistically increased with age. Infection among male participants was significantly higher than among females (OR: 1.7; 95% CI: 1.4–2.0; P<0.001). Participants who defecated in latrines were infected significantly less than those who did not (OR: 0.6; 95% CI: 0.4–0.8; P?=?0.001). Strongyloidiasis cases would be reduced by 39% if all participants defecated in latrines. Incidence of S. stercoralis infections did not show a strong tendency toward spatial clustering in this province. The risk of infection significantly decreased with increasing rainfall and soil organic carbon content, and increased in areas with rice fields. Conclusions/Significance Prevalence of S. stercoralis in rural Cambodia is very high and school-aged children and adults over 45 years were the most at risk for infection. Lack of access to adequate treatment for chronic uncomplicated strongyloidiasis is an urgent issue in Cambodia. We would expect to see similar prevalence rates elsewhere in Southeast Asia and other tropical resource poor countries. PMID:24921627

  1. Reduced polymorphism in the Kelch propeller domain in Plasmodium vivax isolates from Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Popovici, Jean; Kao, Sokheng; Eal, Leanghor; Bin, Sophalai; Kim, Saorin; Ménard, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Polymorphism in the ortholog gene of the Plasmodium falciparum K13 gene was investigated in Plasmodium vivax isolates collected in Cambodia. All of them were Sal-1 wild-type alleles except two (2/284, 0.7%), and P. vivax K12 polymorphism was reduced compared to that of the P. falciparum K13 gene. Both mutant allele isolates had the same nonsynonymous mutation at codon 552 (V552I) and were from Ratanak Kiri province. These preliminary data should encourage additional studies for associating artemisinin or chloroquine resistance and K12 polymorphism. PMID:25385109

  2. Cardiologist in the shadow of Angkor Wat: A medical mission to Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In a medical mission to Cambodia, our team of doctors, dentists, and nurses saw over 1000 patients during 4 days of clinics. The most common cardiovascular problems were hypertension (11%) and heart murmurs (3%). Obesity and a history of diabetes were very rare. Unlike the cardiac patients I typically see in my Atlanta office, the Cambodians were trim and muscular from their predominantly farming and, less often, construction jobs. They are a gentle, seemingly happy people, appreciative of whatever limited medical help we could offer. Tuberculosis was the most prevalent serious illness noted. PMID:24688208

  3. Reaping the Benefits of Pursuing Self-Esteem Without the Costs?: Reply to DuBois and Flay (2004), Sheldon (2004), and Pyszczynski and Cox (2004)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jennifer Crocker; Lora E. Park

    2004-01-01

    The commentaries on J. Crocker and L. E. Park's (2004) review suggested that Crocker and Park exaggerated the costs of pursuing self-esteem (K. M. Sheldon, 2004), that it is impossible not to pursue self-esteem (T. Pyszczynski & C. Cox, 2004), and that it is possible to pursue self-esteem in healthy ways, reaping the benefits without the costs (D. L. DuBois

  4. Arsenic in hair and nails of individuals exposed to arsenic-rich groundwaters in Kandal province, Cambodia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew G. Gault; Helen. A. L. Rowland; John M. Charnock; Roy A. Wogelius; Inma Gomez-Morilla; Sovathana Vong; Moniphea Leng; Sopheap Samreth; Mickey L. Sampson; David A. Polya

    2008-01-01

    The health implications of the consumption of high arsenic groundwater in Bangladesh and West Bengal are well-documented, however, little is known about the level of arsenic exposure elsewhere in Southeast Asia, where widespread exploitation of groundwater resources is less well established. We measured the arsenic concentrations of nail and hair samples collected from residents of Kandal province, Cambodia, an area

  5. The Killing Fields on TV: A Critical Analysis of Network Coverage of Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ted J., III; Grassmick, David E.

    In an effort to determine the nature of American network television news coverage of the Khmer Rouge rule in Cambodia, a study examined the television evening news from April 16, 1975, the date on which the Lon Nol government first offered to capitulate to the Khmer Rouge, through January 8, 1979, when news of the fall of Phnom Penh to the…

  6. Distortions and Dichotomies in Inclusive Education for Children with Disabilities in Cambodia in the Context of Globalisation and International Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalyanpur, Maya

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the consequences of transferring technical information on disability and inclusive education from the North to the South within the context of international development. Based on data from the author's experiences as a US-trained Indian international consultant in Cambodia, it analyses how problems with translation and…

  7. Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus (H5N1) Outbreak in Captive Wild Birds and Cats, Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Marx, Nick; Ong, Sivuth; Gaidet, Nicolas; Hunt, Matt; Manuguerra, Jean-Claude; Sorn, San; Peiris, Malik; Van der Werf, Sylvie; Reynes, Jean-Marc

    2009-01-01

    From December 2003 through January 2004, the Phnom Tamao Wildlife Rescue Centre, Cambodia, was affected by the highly pathogenic influenza virus (H5N1). Birds from 26 species died. Influenza virus subtype H5N1 was detected in 6 of 7 species tested. Cats from 5 of 7 species were probably infected; none died. PMID:19239769

  8. CARDI Soil and Water Science Technical Note No. 5 Soil and Landscapes of Banan District, Battambang Province, Kingdom of Cambodia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hin Sarith; Noel Schoknecht; Wendy Vance; Richard Bell; Seng Vang

    Rapid expansion of cropping is occurring in Cambodia outside of the areas traditionally used for lowland rice. Soils and landscapes in these areas are poorly described at present, hampering efforts to develop sustainable soils management and crop production systems. In the present project, soils and landscapes in Banan district Battambag province were investigated by a semi-detailed soil survey. A soil-landscape

  9. Balancing effectiveness, side-effects and work: women's perceptions and experiences with modern contraceptive technology in Cambodia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ritu Sadana; Rachel Snow

    1999-01-01

    This community-based study presents the results of 17 focus-group discussions primarily among poor married women of reproductive age in urban and rural Cambodia regarding their experiences with modern contraceptive methods and their preferences for different technical attributes, including effectiveness, mode of administration, secrecy and rapid return of fertility. Key findings indicate that women who use modern contraceptive technologies desire highly

  10. Poverty, user fees and ability to pay for health care for children with suspected dengue in rural Cambodia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sokrin Khun; Lenore Manderson

    2008-01-01

    User fees were introduced in public health facilities in Cambodia in 1997 in order to inject funds into the health system to enhance the quality of services. Because of inadequate health insurance, a social safety net scheme was introduced to ensure that all people were able to attend the health facilities. However, continuing high rates of hospitalization and mortality from

  11. Arsenic levels in human hair, Kandal Province, Cambodia: The influences of groundwater arsenic, consumption period, age and gender

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Suthipong Sthiannopkao; Kyoung-Woong Kim; Kyung Hwa Cho; Kitirote Wantala; Sieng Sotham; Choup Sokuntheara; Joon Ha Kim

    2010-01-01

    This study focused on the analysis of As levels in human hair samples collected from six villages in the Kandal Province of Cambodia. Of interest were the influence of, and interactions among, certain factors affecting As intake into the human body: As concentrations in groundwater, period of groundwater consumption, age and gender. The results revealed As levels in human hair

  12. Arsenic concentration in rice, fish, meat and vegetables in Cambodia: a preliminary risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Sheng; Sthiannopkao, Suthipong; Chen, Zhuo-Jia; Man, Yu-Bon; Du, Jun; Xing, Guang-Hua; Kim, Kyoung-Woong; Mohamed Yasin, Mohamed Salleh; Hashim, Jamal Hisham; Wong, Ming-Hung

    2013-12-01

    To assess arsenic contaminations and its possible adverse health effects, food samples were collected from Kandal, Kratie and Kampong Cham in Cambodia. The highest and the lowest concentrations were observed in fish (mean 2,832 ng g(-1), ww) collected from Kandal province and cattle stomach (1.86 ± 1.10 ng g(-1), ww) collected from Kratie, respectively. The daily intake of arsenic via food consumption was 604, 9.70 and 136 ?g day(-1) in Kandal, Kratie and Kampong Cham, respectively. The arsenic dietary intake in Kandal ranked No. 1 among all the 17 compared countries or regions. Fish consumption contributed the greatest proportion of total arsenic daily intake in Kandal (about 63.0 %) and Kampong Cham (about 69.8 %). It is revealed to be a much more important exposure pathway than drinking water for residents in Kampong Cham. The results of risk assessment suggested that the residents in Cambodia, particularly for people in Kandal province, suffer high public health risks due to consuming arsenic-contaminated food. PMID:23728998

  13. Dietary exposure and risk assessment of mercury via total diet study in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhang; Wang, Hong-Sheng; Du, Jun; Sthiannopkao, Suthipong; Xing, Guang-Hua; Kim, Kyoung-Woong; Yasin, Mohamed Salleh Mohamed; Hashim, Jamal Hisham; Wong, Ming-Hung

    2013-06-01

    To assess the daily intakes of total mercury (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) and the possible adverse health impacts, different food groups including fish, meat, vegetable and rice were collected from three areas in Cambodia. The concentrations of THg and MeHg ranged from 0.16 to 171 ng g(-1) and not detected (ND) to 82.3 ng g(-1) wet weight (ww), respectively. The concentrations of THg and MeHg in fish were approximately three to four orders of magnitude greater than that in fruit and vegetable. Fish had the highest contribution to the total daily intakes of THg and MeHg. The estimated daily intake (EDI) of THg for the general population in Kampong Cham, Kratie and Kandal was 0.24, 1.38 and 0.22 ?g kg(-1) bw d(-1), and 0.11, 0.45 and 0.06 ?g kg(-1) bw d(-1) for MeHg, respectively. The dietary daily intakes of MeHg in Kratie and Kampong Cham were greater than the reference dose (RfD) imposed by The United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and in Kratie was also exceed the provisional tolerable weekly intake (PTWI) imposed by World Health Organization (WHO). To our knowledge, this the first study to evaluate the daily intakes of THg and MeHg in Cambodia. PMID:23499220

  14. Female garment factory workers in Cambodia: migration, sex work and HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Nishigaya, Kasumi

    2002-01-01

    Female garment factory workers in Cambodia are more exposed to HIV/AIDS than previously thought. Although HIV/AIDS epidemics are fast spreading in Cambodia, relatively little is known about the sexual health of women other than those perceived as commercial sex workers or married women of reproductive age. In-depth interviews with 20 unmarried female garment factory workers, who reported to have engaged in multi-partnered sex through direct or discretionary commercial sex occupations, demonstrate that they are exposed to HIV-risk created along the gradients of power. Low socioeconomic status (low education, meager factory wage and high dependency rate at their rural households) and obligations as daughters to provide for the family mainly determine their entry into sex work. At the location of sex work, they are subjected to physical violence, alcohol and drug use, both self-taken and forced, and receive meager wages. In a society where women are expected to be virtuous and obedient to parents and husbands, these workers are motivated to identify male sex partners in paid sex as "sweethearts" rather than "guests." These factors contribute to low consistency of condom use. This paper demonstrates the complex interrelationships between power, cultural definitions of intimacy and economic dependency, which structure sexual relationships and the risk of HIV/AIDS. PMID:12216990

  15. Health seeking and access to care for children with suspected dengue in Cambodia: An ethnographic study

    PubMed Central

    Khun, Sokrin; Manderson, Lenore

    2007-01-01

    Background The continuing contribution of dengue fever to the hospitalization and deaths in hospital of infants and small children in Cambodia is associated with delays in presentation for medical attention, diagnosis and appropriate care. It is important to identify the reasons that influence these delays, in order to develop appropriate interventions to redress the impact of dengue. Methods Data on health seeking were collected during an ethnographic study conducted in two villages in the eastern province of Kampong Cham, Cambodia in 2004. Interviews were conducted with mothers whose children had been infected with suspected dengue fever, or who had been sick for other reasons, in 2003 and 2004. Results Women selected a therapeutic option based on perceptions of the severity of the child's condition, confidence in the particular modality, service or practitioner, and affordability of the therapy. While they knew what type of health care was required, poverty in combination with limited availability and perceptions of the poor quality of care at village health centers and public referral hospitals deterred them from doing so. Women initially used home remedies, then sought advice from public and private providers, shifting from one sector to another in a pragmatic response to the child's illness. Conclusion The lack of availability of financial resources for poor people and their continuing lack of confidence in the care provided by government centres combine to delay help seeking and inappropriate treatment of children sick with dengue. PMID:17892564

  16. Fairness of utilizing health care facilities and out-of-pocket payment burden: evidence from Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Koustuv; Aremu, Olatunde

    2013-05-01

    Catastrophic spending on health care through out-of-pocket payment is a huge problem in most low- and middle-income countries all over the world. The collapse of health systems and poverty have resulted in the proliferation of the private health sector in Cambodia, but very few studies have examined the fairness in ease of utilization of these services based on mode of payment. This study examined the utilization of health services for sickness or injury and identified its relationship with people's ability to pay for treatment seeking at various instances. Based on cross-sectional data from the Cambodian 2007 Demographic and Health Survey, the economic index estimated through principal component analysis and Lorenz curve was used to quantify the degree of fairness and equality in utilization and payment burden among the respondents. A distinct level of fairness was found in health care utilization and out-of-pocket payments. Specifically, use of private health care facilities and over-the-counter remedies dominate, and out-of-pocket payments cut across all socioeconomic strata. As many countries in low- and middle-income regions, and most importantly those in transition such as Cambodia, are repositioning their health systems, efforts should be made towards maintaining equitable access through adoption of finance mechanisms that make utilization of health care services fair and equitable. PMID:22958391

  17. Strongyloides stercoralis is a cause of abdominal pain, diarrhea and urticaria in rural Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We document clinical manifestations of 21 patients heavily infected with S. stercoralis (more than 250 larvae in a single Baermann test) from a community in rural Cambodia, both before and three weeks after ivermectin (200 ?g/kg BW, single oral dose) treatment. Findings Out of 21 patients, 20 (95.2%), 18 (85.7%) and 14 (66.7%) reported frequent abdominal pain, diarrhea and periods of sensation of itching, respectively, during the previous six months; epigastric (11, 55.0%) and peri-umbilical (13, 65.0%) pains were most frequent. Five patients (23.8%) reported having experienced urticaria the week preceding the examination. One patient suffered from extended urticaria. Three weeks after treatment, most symptoms had been almost entirely resolved. Conclusions In rural communities of Cambodia, strongyloidiasis with high parasite load is endemic. It is associated with substantial symptoms and clinical signs, particularly abdominal pain, diarrhea and urticaria. Access to adequate diagnosis and treatment is a pressing issue that needs attention. PMID:23688049

  18. Can Human Movements Explain Heterogeneous Propagation of Dengue Fever in Cambodia?

    PubMed Central

    Teurlai, Magali; Huy, Rekol; Cazelles, Bernard; Duboz, Raphaël; Baehr, Christophe; Vong, Sirenda

    2012-01-01

    Background Determining the factors underlying the long-range spatial spread of infectious diseases is a key issue regarding their control. Dengue is the most important arboviral disease worldwide and a major public health problem in tropical areas. However the determinants shaping its dynamics at a national scale remain poorly understood. Here we describe the spatial-temporal pattern of propagation of annual epidemics in Cambodia and discuss the role that human movements play in the observed pattern. Methods and Findings We used wavelet phase analysis to analyse time-series data of 105,598 hospitalized cases reported between 2002 and 2008 in the 135 (/180) most populous districts in Cambodia. We reveal spatial heterogeneity in the propagation of the annual epidemic. Each year, epidemics are highly synchronous over a large geographic area along the busiest national road of the country whereas travelling waves emanate from a few rural areas and move slowly along the Mekong River at a speed of ?11 km per week (95% confidence interval 3–18 km per week) towards the capital, Phnom Penh. Conclusions We suggest human movements – using roads as a surrogate – play a major role in the spread of dengue fever at a national scale. These findings constitute a new starting point in the understanding of the processes driving dengue spread. PMID:23236536

  19. Zoonotic trematode metacercariae in fish from Phnom Penh and Pursat, Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Chai, Jong-Yil; Sohn, Woon-Mok; Na, Byoung-Kuk; Yong, Tai-Soon; Eom, Keeseon S; Yoon, Cheong-Ha; Hoang, Eui-Hyug; Jeoung, Hoo-Gn; Socheat, Duong

    2014-02-01

    A survey was performed to investigate the infection status of freshwater fish with zoonotic trematode metacercariae in Phnom Penh and Pursat Province, Cambodia. All collected fish with ice were transferred to our laboratory and examined using the artificial digestion method. In fish from Phnom Penh, 2 kinds of metacercariae (Opisthorchis viverrini and Haplorchis yokogawai) were detected. O. viverrini metacercariae were positive in 37 (50.0%) of 74 fish in 11 species (average no. metacercariae/fish, 18.6). H. yokogawai metacercariae were detected in 23 (57.5%) of 40 fish in 5 species (average no. metacercariae/fish, 21.0). In fish from Pursat Province, 5 kinds of metacercariae (O. viverrini, H. yokogawai, Haplorchis pumilio, Centrocestus formosanus, and Procerovum sp.) were detected; O. viverrini metacercariae (n=3) in 2 fish species (Henicorhynchus lineatus and Puntioplites falcifer), H. yokogawai metacercariae (n=51) in 1 species (P. falcifer), H. pumilio metacercariae (n=476) in 2 species (H. lineatus and Pristolepis fasciata), C. formosanus metacercariae (n=1) in 1 species (H. lineatus), and Procerovum sp. metacercariae (n=63) in 1 species (Anabas testudineus). From the above results, it has been confirmed that various freshwater fish play the role of a second intermediate host for zoonotic trematodes (O. viverrini, H. yokogawai, H. pumilio, C. formosanus, and Procerovum sp.) in Cambodia. PMID:24623879

  20. Prevalence of Opisthorchis viverrini infection in humans and fish in Kratie Province, Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Woon-Mok; Yong, Tai-Soon; Eom, Keeseon S; Pyo, Kyoung-Ho; Lee, Mi Youn; Lim, Hyemi; Choe, Seongjun; Jeong, Hoo-Gn; Sinuon, Muth; Socheat, Duong; Chai, Jong-Yil

    2012-12-01

    Opisthorchis viverrini is a medically important foodborne parasite in the Indochina Peninsula. In Cambodia, the prevalence of this trematode has been reported in Takeo Province, but not in other areas. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of O. viverrini infection among people in seven riparian villages along the Mekong River, Kratie Province. We also examined the status of metacercarial infection in fish hosts. Fecal specimens were collected from 2101 residents and schoolchildren, and were examined by the Kato-Katz technique. The average O. viverrini egg positive rate was 4.6%, with the highest prevalence found in Roka Kandal A village (10.4%) followed by Talous village (5.9%). In these villages, adult residents showed higher prevalences (19.4% and 9.0%, respectively) than schoolchildren (6.4% and 1.4%, respectively). O. viverrini adult worms were recovered from 2 egg-positive cases (18 and 4 specimens) after praziquantel treatment and purgation. In addition, three of seven freshwater fish species caught near the villages were positive for O. viverrini metacercariae. A total of 367 metacercariae were harvested from 19 infected fish (metacercarial density; 19 per fish). The species of the metacercariae was confirmed through adult worm recovery by experimental infection to hamsters. The results provide evidence that the surveyed areas of Kratie Province, Cambodia, are endemic for O. viverrini infection. PMID:22935318

  1. High prevalence of Opisthorchis viverrini infection in a riparian population in Takeo Province, Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Yong, Tai-Soon; Shin, Eun-Hee; Chai, Jong-Yil; Sohn, Woon-Mok; Eom, Keeseon S; Lee, Dong-Min; Park, Keunhee; Jeoung, Hoo-Gn; Hoang, Eui-Hyug; Lee, Yoon-Hee; Woo, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Ji-Hwa; Kang, Sin-Il; Cha, Jae-Ku; Lee, Keon-Hoon; Yoon, Cheong-Ha; Sinuon, Muth; Socheat, Duong

    2012-06-01

    Opisthorchis viverrini infection was found to be highly prevalent in 3 riverside villages (Ang Svay Chek A, B, and C) of the Prey Kabas District, Takeo Province. This area is located in the southern part of Cambodia, where the recovery of adult O. viverrini worms was recently reported. From May 2006 until May 2010, fecal examinations were performed on a total of 1,799 villagers using the Kato-Katz thick smear technique. In the 3 villages, the overall positive rate for helminth eggs ranged from 51.7 to 59.0% (av. 57.4%), and the percentage positive for O. viverrini was 46.4-50.6% (47.5%). Other helminths detected included hookworms (13.2%), echinostomes (2.9%), Trichuris trichiura (1.3%), Ascaris lumbricoides (0.6%), and Taenia spp. (0.06%). The prevalence of O. viverrini eggs appeared to reflect a lower infection in younger individuals (<20 years) than in the adult population (>20 years). Men (50.4%) revealed a significantly higher (P=0.02) prevalence than women (44.3%). The Ang Svay Chek villages of the Prey Kabas District, Takeo Province, Cambodia have been confirmed to be a highly endemic area for human O. viverrini infection. PMID:22711932

  2. Long-term psychiatric consequences of exposure to trauma in Cambodia: a regional household survey.

    PubMed

    Cantor-Graae, Elizabeth; Chak, Thida; Sunbaunat, Ka; Jarl, Johan; Larsson, Charlotte A

    2014-12-01

    The long-term psychiatric consequences of exposure to war and/or mass conflict continue to be of great concern and particularly in Cambodia. The current cross-sectional study examined the relationship between history of trauma and current psychiatric and functional morbidity in 3200 randomly selected adults aged 18-60 in Cambodia. Structured interviews were conducted from November 2011 until May 2012 in two predominantly rural regions purposively selected for differing duration of exposure to the Khmer Rouge occupation. Information was also collected regarding ongoing daily stressors and intimate partner violence. Despite high prevalence rates of conflict/war-related trauma, current rates of psychiatric disorders (depression, post-traumatic stress disorder) were relatively low, suggesting that the effects of trauma and extreme hardship in civilian populations may be modified by contextual factors and/or the passage of time. Poor to fair physical health was, however, reported by nearly 60% of the sample. Daily stressors were more important for current morbidity levels than history of trauma, especially in the region with shorter Khmer Rouge occupation. The results suggest that a focus exclusively on past trauma may overlook the contribution of adverse daily life circumstances towards current levels of well-being in civilian populations affected by war and/or mass conflict. PMID:25462614

  3. Epidemiological and Virological Characteristics of Influenza Viruses Circulating in Cambodia from 2009 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Sovann; Heng, Seng; Vong, Sirenda; Kitsutani, Paul; Ieng, Vannra; Tarantola, Arnaud; Ly, Sowath; Sar, Borann; Chea, Nora; Sokhal, Buth; Barr, Ian; Kelso, Anne; Horwood, Paul F.; Timmermans, Ans; Hurt, Aeron; Lon, Chanthap; Saunders, David; Ung, Sam An; Asgari, Nima; Roces, Maria Concepcion; Touch, Sok; Komadina, Naomi; Buchy, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Background The Cambodian National Influenza Center (NIC) monitored and characterized circulating influenza strains from 2009 to 2011. Methodology/Principal Findings Sentinel and study sites collected nasopharyngeal specimens for diagnostic detection, virus isolation, antigenic characterization, sequencing and antiviral susceptibility analysis from patients who fulfilled case definitions for influenza-like illness, acute lower respiratory infections and event-based surveillance. Each year in Cambodia, influenza viruses were detected mainly from June to November, during the rainy season. Antigenic analysis show that A/H1N1pdm09 isolates belonged to the A/California/7/2009-like group. Circulating A/H3N2 strains were A/Brisbane/10/2007-like in 2009 before drifting to A/Perth/16/2009-like in 2010 and 2011. The Cambodian influenza B isolates from 2009 to 2011 all belonged to the B/Victoria lineage represented by the vaccine strains B/Brisbane/60/2008 and B/Malaysia/2506/2004. Sequences of the M2 gene obtained from representative 2009–2011 A/H3N2 and A/H1N1pdm09 strains all contained the S31N mutation associated with adamantanes resistance except for one A/H1N1pdm09 strain isolated in 2011 that lacked this mutation. No reduction in the susceptibility to neuraminidase inhibitors was observed among the influenza viruses circulating from 2009 to 2011. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that A/H3N2 strains clustered each year to a distinct group while most A/H1N1pdm09 isolates belonged to the S203T clade. Conclusions/Significance In Cambodia, from 2009 to 2011, influenza activity occurred throughout the year with peak seasonality during the rainy season from June to November. Seasonal influenza epidemics were due to multiple genetically distinct viruses, even though all of the isolates were antigenically similar to the reference vaccine strains. The drug susceptibility profile of Cambodian influenza strains revealed that neuraminidase inhibitors would be the drug of choice for influenza treatment and chemoprophylaxis in Cambodia, as adamantanes are no longer expected to be effective. PMID:25340711

  4. Working With Small Companies in Cambodia to Teach Lean Manufacturing Principles to Undergraduate Students

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Hawks, Val D.

    Teaching lean manufacturing in the university environment is becoming more common, with many schools in the United States offering "lean" undergraduate courses in various technology and engineering programs. This trend is driven by companies who have implemented or are trying to implement lean as a manufacturing strategy, and who prefer graduates with some level of practical lean knowledge. Our approach to teaching lean has used experiential learning as a method of improving student understanding, as many others have done in various disciplines. To this end we have augmented university classroom lectures with industry-based projects, recognizing that lab exercises are useful, but can have limited utility in demonstrating lean principles. We have used this approach for a number of years in two graduate courses. And more recently we used this method in the context of an international internship in Cambodia, during the summer of 2004. The experience gained in that internship is the focus of this paper. Five junior and senior level students and two professors were involved in a five week project, where the first three weeks were spent gathering information about the challenges and opportunities of running a manufacturing company in Cambodia. A total of 37 companies were surveyed on a variety of topics, including the practical details of operating their businesses, of which most were small, family-run concerns. After completion of the initial three-week phase of studying the practical, social, and historical difficulties they face in this developing country, two small firms were chosen for a more in-depth study of manufacturing performance. The exercises that were carried out at these firms, and the results of evaluations conducted by 5 undergraduate students, will be discussed as a method for teaching lean manufacturing principles. Some background on the companies with whom we worked and a discussion of the business environment in Cambodia will also be provided. The entrepreneurial spirit and determination we found in these companies was a great lesson for us and our students, demonstrating that hard work and creativity can produce good results, even in difficult circumstances.

  5. Geostatistical modelling of soil-transmitted helminth infection in Cambodia: do socioeconomic factors improve predictions?

    PubMed

    Karagiannis-Voules, Dimitrios-Alexios; Odermatt, Peter; Biedermann, Patricia; Khieu, Virak; Schär, Fabian; Muth, Sinuon; Utzinger, Jürg; Vounatsou, Penelope

    2015-01-01

    Soil-transmitted helminth infections are intimately connected with poverty. Yet, there is a paucity of using socioeconomic proxies in spatially explicit risk profiling. We compiled household-level socioeconomic data pertaining to sanitation, drinking-water, education and nutrition from readily available Demographic and Health Surveys, Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys and World Health Surveys for Cambodia and aggregated the data at village level. We conducted a systematic review to identify parasitological surveys and made every effort possible to extract, georeference and upload the data in the open source Global Neglected Tropical Diseases database. Bayesian geostatistical models were employed to spatially align the village-aggregated socioeconomic predictors with the soil-transmitted helminth infection data. The risk of soil-transmitted helminth infection was predicted at a grid of 1×1km covering Cambodia. Additionally, two separate individual-level spatial analyses were carried out, for Takeo and Preah Vihear provinces, to assess and quantify the association between soil-transmitted helminth infection and socioeconomic indicators at an individual level. Overall, we obtained socioeconomic proxies from 1624 locations across the country. Surveys focussing on soil-transmitted helminth infections were extracted from 16 sources reporting data from 238 unique locations. We found that the risk of soil-transmitted helminth infection from 2000 onwards was considerably lower than in surveys conducted earlier. Population-adjusted prevalences for school-aged children from 2000 onwards were 28.7% for hookworm, 1.5% for Ascaris lumbricoides and 0.9% for Trichuris trichiura. Surprisingly, at the country-wide analyses, we did not find any significant association between soil-transmitted helminth infection and village-aggregated socioeconomic proxies. Based also on the individual-level analyses we conclude that socioeconomic proxies might not be good predictors at an aggregated large-scale analysis due to their large between- and within-village heterogeneity. Specific information of both the infection risk and potential predictors might be needed to obtain any existing association. The presented soil-transmitted helminth infection risk estimates for Cambodia can be used for guiding and evaluating control and elimination efforts. PMID:25205492

  6. Enteric fever in Cambodian children is dominated by multidrug-resistant H58 Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi with intermediate susceptibility to ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Emary, Kate; Moore, Catrin E; Chanpheaktra, Ngoun; An, Khun Peng; Chheng, Kheng; Sona, Soeng; Duy, Pham Thanh; Nga, Tran Vu Thieu; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Amornchai, Premjit; Kumar, Varun; Wijedoru, Lalith; Stoesser, Nicole E; Carter, Michael J; Baker, Stephen; Day, Nicholas P J; Parry, Christopher M

    2012-12-01

    Infections with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi isolates that are multidrug resistant (MDR: resistant to chloramphenicol, ampicillin, trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole) with intermediate ciprofloxacin susceptibility are widespread in Asia but there is little information from Cambodia. We studied invasive salmonellosis in children at a paediatric hospital in Siem Reap, Cambodia. Between 2007 and 2011 Salmonella was isolated from a blood culture in 162 children. There were 151 children with enteric fever, including 148 serovar Typhi and three serovar Paratyphi A infections, and 11 children with a non-typhoidal Salmonella infection. Of the 148 serovar Typhi isolates 126 (85%) were MDR and 133 (90%) had intermediate ciprofloxacin susceptibility. Inpatient antimicrobial treatment was ceftriaxone alone or initial ceftriaxone followed by a step-down to oral ciprofloxacin or azithromycin. Complications developed in 37/128 (29%) children admitted with enteric fever and two (1.6%) died. There was one confirmed relapse. In a sample of 102 serovar Typhi strains genotyped by investigation of a subset of single nucleotide polymorphisms, 98 (96%) were the H58 haplotype, the majority of which had the common serine to phenylalanine substitution at codon 83 in the DNA gyrase. We conclude that antimicrobial-resistant enteric fever is common in Cambodian children and therapeutic options are limited. PMID:23122884

  7. The tyranny of taste: the case of organic rice in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Thavat, Maylee

    2011-01-01

    Fair-trade and organic products are often sold at price premiums justified by smaller production volumes that are associated with greater social and environmental responsibility. The consumption of these products confers on the consumer a greater sense of morality – and usually a claim to better taste. This paper tells the story of attempts to promote organic/fair-trade rice production by de facto organic Cambodian farmers for export to North American and European markets in order to assist poor farmers to trade their way out of poverty. It demonstrates that instead of promoting sustainable agriculture and fair trade between developed and developing markets, organic/fair-trade projects may impose First World consumer ideals and tastes that are out of step with the larger realities of agrarian transition in Cambodia and the wider region of developing Southeast Asia. PMID:22216476

  8. Climate as a contributing factor in the demise of Angkor, Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Brendan M.; Anchukaitis, Kevin J.; Penny, Daniel; Fletcher, Roland; Cook, Edward R.; Sano, Masaki; Nam, Le Canh; Wichienkeeo, Aroonrut; Minh, Ton That; Hong, Truong Mai

    2010-01-01

    The “hydraulic city” of Angkor, the capitol of the Khmer Empire in Cambodia, experienced decades-long drought interspersed with intense monsoons in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries that, in combination with other factors, contributed to its eventual demise. The climatic evidence comes from a seven-and-a-half century robust hydroclimate reconstruction from tropical southern Vietnamese tree rings. The Angkor droughts were of a duration and severity that would have impacted the sprawling city’s water supply and agricultural productivity, while high-magnitude monsoon years damaged its water control infrastructure. Hydroclimate variability for this region is strongly and inversely correlated with tropical Pacific sea surface temperature, indicating that a warm Pacific and El Niño events induce drought at interannual and interdecadal time scales, and that low-frequency variations of tropical Pacific climate can exert significant influence over Southeast Asian climate and society. PMID:20351244

  9. Stakeholder perceptions of a pharmacy-initiated tuberculosis referral program in cambodia, 2005-2012.

    PubMed

    Bell, Carolyn Anne; Duncan, Gregory J; Eang, Rothmony; Saini, Bandana

    2015-03-01

    Intensifying detection of tuberculosis (TB) symptomatic patients is a priority for Cambodia's National Tuberculosis Program, in a country where two-thirds of the population has latent TB infection. In 2005, the National Tuberculosis Program initiated a public-private mix (PPM) collaborative program with external and local stakeholders to identify and refer persons with TB symptoms from private sector pharmacies to public sector clinics for diagnosis and treatment. This qualitative study conducted in-depth interviews with organizational stakeholders to assess their perceptions of PPM program collaboration and its sustainability in the long term. Results showed that stakeholders perceived that collaboration and efficient management had contributed to positive program performance. However, stakeholders expressed anxiety over program sustainability should external resources be reduced. Recent developments in pharmacy undergraduate education and recognition of pharmacy providers' contribution to public health interventions may challenge PPM stakeholders to shift the paradigm from dependence on external agencies to confidence in local expertise and infrastructure. PMID:24097929

  10. Financial protection of patients through compensation of providers: the impact of Health Equity Funds in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Flores, Gabriela; Ir, Por; Men, Chean R; O'Donnell, Owen; van Doorslaer, Eddy

    2013-12-01

    Public providers have no financial incentive to respect their legal obligation to exempt the poor from user fees. Health Equity Funds (HEFs) aim to make exemptions effective by giving NGOs responsibility for assessing eligibility and compensating providers for lost revenue. We use the geographic spread of HEFs over time in Cambodia to identify their impact on out-of-pocket (OOP) payments. Among households with some OOP payment, HEFs reduce the amount paid by 35%, on average. The effect is larger for households that are poorer and mainly use public health care. Reimbursement of providers through a government operated scheme also reduces household OOP payments but the effect is not as well targeted on the poor. Both compensation models raise household non-medical consumption but have no impact on health-related debt. HEFs reduce the probability of primarily seeking care in the private sector. PMID:24189447

  11. Removing arsenic from groundwater in Cambodia using high performance iron adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Kang, Y; Takeda, R; Nada, A; Thavarith, L; Tang, S; Nuki, K; Sakurai, K

    2014-09-01

    In Cambodia, groundwater has been contaminated with arsenic, and purification of the water is an urgent issue. From 2010 to 2012, an international collaborative project between Japan and Cambodia for developing arsenic-removing technology from well water was conducted and supported by the foundation of New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization, Japan. Quality of well water was surveyed in Kandal, Prey Veng, and Kampong Cham Provinces, and a monitoring trial of the arsenic removal equipment using our patented amorphous iron (hydr)oxide adsorbent was performed. Of the 37 wells surveyed, arsenic concentration of 24 exceeded the Cambodian guideline value (50 ?g L(-1)), and those of 27 exceeded the WHO guideline for drinking water (10 ?g L(-1)). Levels of arsenic were extremely high in some wells (>1,000-6,000 ?g L(-1)), suggesting that arsenic pollution of groundwater is serious in these areas. Based on the survey results, 16 arsenic removal equipments were installed in six schools, three temples, two health centers, four private houses, and one commune office. Over 10 months of monitoring, the average arsenic concentrations of the treated water were between 0 and 10 ?g L(-1) at four locations, 10-50 ?g L(-1) at eight locations, and >50 ?g L(-1) at four locations. The arsenic removal rate ranged in 83.1-99.7%, with an average of 93.8%, indicating that the arsenic removal equipment greatly lower the risk of arsenic exposure to the residents. Results of the field trial showed that As concentration of the treated water could be reduced to <10 µg L(-1) by managing the As removal equipment properly, suggesting that the amorphous iron (hydr)oxide adsorbent has high adsorbing capacity for As not only in the laboratory environment but also in the field condition. This is one of the succeeding As removal techniques that could reduce As concentration of water below the WHO guideline value for As in situ. PMID:24894910

  12. Tropical tree water use under seasonal waterlogging and drought in central Cambodia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazawa, Yoshiyuki; Tateishi, Makiko; Komatsu, Hikaru; Ma, Vuthy; Kajisa, Tsuyoshi; Sokh, Heng; Mizoue, Nobuya; Kumagai, Tomo'omi

    2014-07-01

    In central Cambodia, rapid growing non-endemic species are planted for future timber production. However, less is understood about the impact of the introduction of non-endemic species on the transpiration characteristics of the forest, which has been composed of native species that adapted to the highly seasonal environments. Sap flux of two native and one non-endemic tree species in central Cambodia was measured to reveal its seasonal trends and variability in the Monsoon Asia region. Measurements were carried out in a 10- to 15-year-old forest in the dry and rainy seasons that were defined by differing rainfall patterns. The seasonal trend in depth to water table differed from that of rainfall; groundwater table depth reached zero late in the rainy season and increased gradually after the onset of the dry season. The ratio of sap flux to an equilibrium evaporation condition of the native species, Popel (Shorea roxburghii), showed a sharp decline at the end of the dry season, whereas that of a non-endemic species, eucalyptus (Eucalyptus camaldulensis), decreased in the mid rainy season while Tbeng (Dipterocarpus obtusifolius) did not show a clear trend. The ratio of sap flux to an equilibrium evaporation was negatively correlated with the depth to water table in Popel, but was positively correlated in eucalyptus, possibly because of the negative effects of flooding. In addition to the large seasonal variation, intra-species variation in sap flux was also large and was a major controlling factor for tree-level water uptake at this young forest site in both dry and rainy seasons. In conclusion, the transpiration characteristics of this forest were species-specific and were controlled more by the fluctuating depths to groundwater rather than the onset of the rainy/dry seasons defined by rainfall events.

  13. Large-scale malaria survey in Cambodia: Novel insights on species distribution and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Incardona, Sandra; Vong, Sirenda; Chiv, Lim; Lim, Pharath; Nhem, Sina; Sem, Rithy; Khim, Nimol; Doung, Socheat; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Fandeur, Thierry

    2007-01-01

    Background In Cambodia, estimates of the malaria burden rely on a public health information system that does not record cases occurring among remote populations, neither malaria cases treated in the private sector nor asymptomatic carriers. A global estimate of the current malaria situation and associated risk factors is, therefore, still lacking. Methods A large cross-sectional survey was carried out in three areas of multidrug resistant malaria in Cambodia, enrolling 11,652 individuals. Fever and splenomegaly were recorded. Malaria prevalence, parasite densities and spatial distribution of infection were determined to identify parasitological profiles and the associated risk factors useful for improving malaria control programmes in the country. Results Malaria prevalence was 3.0%, 7.0% and 12.3% in Sampovloun, Koh Kong and Preah Vihear areas. Prevalences and Plasmodium species were heterogeneously distributed, with higher Plasmodium vivax rates in areas of low transmission. Malaria-attributable fevers accounted only for 10–33% of malaria cases, and 23–33% of parasite carriers were febrile. Multivariate multilevel regression analysis identified adults and males, mostly involved in forest activities, as high risk groups in Sampovloun, with additional risks for children in forest-fringe villages in the other areas along with an increased risk with distance from health facilities. Conclusion These observations point to a more complex malaria situation than suspected from official reports. A large asymptomatic reservoir was observed. The rates of P. vivax infections were higher than recorded in several areas. In remote areas, malaria prevalence was high. This indicates that additional health facilities should be implemented in areas at higher risk, such as remote rural and forested parts of the country, which are not adequately served by health services. Precise malaria risk mapping all over the country is needed to assess the extensive geographical heterogeneity of malaria endemicity and risk populations, so that current malaria control measures can be reinforced accordingly. PMID:17389041

  14. Tobacco use among adults in Cambodia: evidence for a tobacco epidemic among women

    PubMed Central

    Yel, Daravuth; Sin, Sovann; Khieng, Sothy; Lopez, Jaime; Job, Jayakaran; Ferry, Linda; Knutsen, Synnove

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Objective To identify the demographic characteristics of current tobacco users in Cambodia, particularly women, and to explore the reasons for current tobacco use in demographic subgroups of the Cambodian population. Methods We used a stratified three-stage cluster sample of 13 988 adults aged 18 years and older from all provinces in 2005–2006. Participants completed an interviewer-administered survey that contained items on all forms of tobacco use and on health and lifestyle variables. Multivariable regression analysis was performed to identify demographic predictors of tobacco use. Findings Cigarette smoking occurred among 48.0% of men and 3.6% of women. We estimated that 560 482 women (95% confidence interval, CI: 504 783 to 616 180) currently chewed tobacco (typically as a component of betel quid) and that the prevalence more than doubles with each decade of adulthood up to the point that about half of all older women chew tobacco. Both men and women cited the influence of older relatives as their primary reason for starting to use tobacco. About one out of five rural women who used chewing tobacco started their habit for relief from morning sickness. The highest prevalence of chewing tobacco among women was seen among midwives (67.9%) and traditional healers (47.2%). High rates (66.8%) of cigarette and pipe tobacco use occurred among ethnic minorities who represent hill tribes found throughout south-east Asia. Conclusion The tobacco epidemic in Cambodia extends far beyond cigarette smoking in men. Tobacco control that focuses only on cigarettes will not address the health burden from smokeless tobacco use in women that may be an integral part of cultural, familial, and traditional medicine practices. PMID:20454481

  15. Has the kouprey (Bos sauveli Urbain, 1937) been domesticated in Cambodia?

    PubMed

    Hassanin, Alexandre; Ropiquet, Anne; Cornette, Raphaël; Tranier, Michel; Pfeffer, Pierre; Candegabe, Philippe; Lemaire, Michèle

    2006-02-01

    The kouprey (Bos sauveli Urbain, 1937) is a very rare bovid species of Cambodia, which may be extinct in the wild, as no living specimen has been observed for a long time. Here, we describe a complete taxidermy mount, which presents astonishing morphological similarities with the kouprey. The animal was mounted in 1871 at the National Museum of Natural History in Paris, where it was referenced as No. 1871-576. It was deposited at the Natural History Museum of Bourges, France, in 1931, where it is still conserved today. To clarify the taxonomic status of the specimen of Bourges, DNA was extracted from a piece of bone taken on the mandible, and two different fragments of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene were independently amplified and sequenced. The phylogenetic analyses show that the specimen of Bourges is robustly associated with the holotype of the kouprey, and that both are related to other wild species of Bos found in Indochina, i.e., banteng (B. javanicus) and gaur (B. frontalis). Because of doubts for sexing the animal, we applied a molecular test based on the PCR amplification of a DNA fragment specific to the Y chromosome. The results indicate that the specimen of Bourges is a male. The comparisons with male kouprey previously described in the literature reveal important differences concerning the body size, general coloration and horns. As these differences involve phenotypic traits that are strongly selected in case of domestication, we suggest that the specimen of Bourges was a domestic ox. This implies therefore that the kouprey may have been domesticated in Cambodia, and that several extant local races may be directly related to the kouprey. PMID:16439342

  16. Characterization and observation of animals responsible for rabies post-exposure treatment in Phnom Penh, Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Reynes, J M; Soares, J L; Keo, C; Ong, S; Heng, N Y; Vanhoye, B

    1999-06-01

    In order to provide relevant therapeutic answers to human patients exposed to risk of rabies infection who visit the Institut Pasteur du Cambodge for post-exposure treatment and to improve control of rabies in Cambodia, a pilot study was carried out in Phnom Penh Province in November and December 1997 with three objectives: characterization of the population of animals responsible for the exposure to rabies, observation of the animals concerned, and confirmation of the presence of rabies virus in the province. Between 18 November 1997 and 19 December 1997, 409 of the 741 patients treated at the Institut Pasteur du Cambodge because of an exposure to a known rabies vector were included in the study. The animals concerned were: 401 dogs (98%), six monkeys (1.5%) and two cats (0.5%). Three-hundred-and-seventy of the animals (90.5%) were owned, 4 (1%) were unowned but were available for characterization and observation, and 35 (8.6%) had an unknown ownership status and were not available for further study. The exposures occurred on private property in 84% of the cases, and 80 of the 370 owned animals (22%) lived in the same home as had the patient. The 374 animals with known ownership status were examined. Five were already dead and two of these five dogs had presented clinical signs typical of those of rabies. The male:female sex ratio of the dogs was 2.1:1. The 369 live animals were placed under observation for 10 d immediately after exposure of the humans had taken place. At the end of the period none of the animals had developed clinical signs of rabies, three had died of diseases other than rabies, and one was lost. Tests for the rabies nucleocapsid antigen were positive in two cases (the two suspected rabid dogs), confirming the presence of rabies in Phnom Penh Province. Consequently, we recommend measures to improve the control of rabies in Cambodia. PMID:10486830

  17. Prevalence and risk factors of Strongyloides stercoralis in Takeo Province, Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The threadworm Strongyloides stercoralis, the most neglected helminth, affects an estimated 30-100 million people worldwide. Information on S. stercoralis infection is scarce in tropical and sub-tropical resource poor countries, including Cambodia. We determined S. stercoralis infection prevalence and risk factors for infection in the general population in Southern Cambodia. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out between January and April 2011 among 2,861 participants living in 60 villages of Takeo province, using Koga-agar plate culture, the Baermann technique and the Kato-Katz technique on a single stool sample. Results Eight intestinal helminth species were diagnosed. Hookworm (31.4%) and S. stercoralis (21.0%) occurred most frequently. Prevalence of S. stercoralis infection increased with age. In all age groups a higher prevalence was found among males than among females (OR: 1.7; 95% CI: 1.4 – 2.0; P

  18. Betel quid use in relation to infectious disease outcomes in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pramil N.; Natto, Zuhair; Yel, Daravuth; Job, Jayakaran; Knutsen, Synnove

    2012-01-01

    Summary Objectives The habitual chewing of betel quid (areca nut, betel leaf, tobacco) is estimated to occur among 600 million persons in Asia and the Asia-Pacific Region. Emerging data from rural Asia indicate that the betel quid is part of traditional medicine practices that promote its use for a wide range of ailments, including infectious disease. In the present study, we examined the association between betel quid, traditional medicine, and infectious disease outcomes. Methods For the purpose of a nationwide, interviewer-administered, cross-sectional survey of tobacco use (including betel quid), we conducted a stratified three-stage cluster sampling of 13 988 adults aged 18 years and older from all provinces of Cambodia. Results We found an association between the intensity of betel quid use and HIV/AIDS (odds ratio (OR) 2.06, 95% CI 1.09–3.89), dengue fever (OR 2.40, 95% CI 1.55–2.72), tuberculosis (OR 1.50, 95% CI 0.96–2.36), and typhoid (OR 1.48, 95% CI 0.95–2.30). These associations were even stronger in women – the primary users of betel quid in Cambodia. Multivariable analyses that controlled for age, gender, income, education, urban versus rural dwelling, receiving care from traditional medicine practitioners, and cigarette smoking did not alter the betel quid–infectious disease association. Conclusions Our findings raise the possibility of a role of betel quid use in the transmission of infectious disease through pathways such as immunosuppression, oral route of entry for a pathogen (i.e., through injury to the oral mucosa), and contamination (i.e., fecal–oral) of the betel quid ingredients. PMID:22296863

  19. Unfitness to stand trial decision-making in the extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Freckelton, Ian; Karagiannakis, Magda

    2014-06-01

    In the small number of trials for matters such as genocide and crimes against humanity that have taken place before the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia, by 2014 three occasions had arisen in which the fitness of the accused persons to participate in their trials had become contentious. This is hardly surprising given that the key period of Khmer Rouge government occurred a very long while ago--between 1975 and 1979. The accused persons are all aged. In two instances, the Trial Chamber of the Courts of its own motion sought expert evaluations of the accused persons' fitness to stand trial and, promptly, upon receipt of such reports, determined them to be fit by reference to criteria utilised by the Appeal Chamber of the International Criminal Court for the Former Yugoslavia (the ICTY). In the other instance an accused person, leng Thirith, was found unfit to stand trial and a range of important issues was traversed as to the measures that can properly be taken to try to render a person fit for trial and how legitimate the imposition of detention for that purpose is, and then how legitimate encroachments on a person's civil liberties are to monitor them if there is only a remote possibility that their mental state might improve. It is likely that the balance adopted by the Supreme Court Chamber in the Courts of Cambodia in making significant efforts to render an accused person fit for trial and then in continuing to monitor their mental state when such efforts do not bear fruit, instead of simply releasing them back into the community, will stand as an important precedent for future occasions under international criminal law when issues of fitness to stand trial and how they should be handled arise. PMID:25087364

  20. Genetic variability of human metapneumovirus amongst an all ages population in Cambodia between 2007 and 2009.

    PubMed

    Arnott, Alicia; Vong, Sirenda; Sek, Mardy; Naughtin, Monica; Beauté, Julien; Rith, Sareth; Guillard, Bertrand; Deubel, Vincent; Buchy, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    First identified in 2001, human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a novel pathogen and causative agent of acute respiratory tract infection. Re-infection with HMPV is common, and currently there is no available vaccine against HMPV infection. Two genotypes of HMPV have been identified, A and B, both of which can be divided further into at least two distinct sub-genotypes. Here we report the results of the first study to investigate the genetic variability of HMPV strains circulating within Cambodia. The overall incidence of HMPV infection amongst an all-ages population of patients hospitalised with ALRI in Cambodia during 3 consecutive years, between 2007 and 2009, was 1.7%. The incidence of HMPV infection was highest amongst children less than 5 years of age, with pneumonia or bronchopneumonia the most frequent clinical diagnoses across all age groups. The incidence of HMPV infection varied annually. As anticipated, genetic diversity was low amongst the conserved F gene sequences but very high amongst G gene sequences, some strains sharing as little as 56.3% and 34.2% homology at the nucleotide and amino acid levels, respectively. Simultaneous co-circulation of strains belonging to the HMPV sub-genotypes B1, B2 and lineage A2b, amongst patients recruited at 2 geographically distinct provincial hospitals, was detected. Sub-genotype B2 strains were responsible for the majority of the infections detected, and a significant (p=0.013) association between infection with lineage A2b strains and disease severity was observed. PMID:21292032

  1. A new species of wolf snake (Colubridae: Lycodon Fitzinger, 1826) from Phnom Samkos Wildlife Sanctuary, Cardamom Mountains, southwest Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Neang, Thy; Hartmann, Timo; Hun, Seiha; Souter, Nicholas J; Furey, Neil M

    2014-01-01

    A new species of the genus Lycodon Fitzinger, 1826 is described from the Cardamom Mountains of southwest Cambodia. Lycodon zoosvictoriae distinctly differs from all other species of Lycodon in Southeast Asia by a combination of its morphometric characters and unique coloration. The new species has 17 dorsal scales at midbody; 2+2 temporals; 8 supralabials; 10 infralabials; loreal separated from internasal and orbit; 213 ventrals; 85 subcaudals; pale tan brown ground color; irregular dark brown blotches on anterior part, 31 transverse blotches on posterior part of body and 26 blotches on tail. Given its submontane type locality, the new species could prove to be endemic to the Cardamom Mountains of southwest Cambodia and probably Southeast Thailand. PMID:24943413

  2. Microbial Community Analysis of Fresh and Old Microbial Biofilms on Bayon Temple Sandstone of Angkor Thom, Cambodia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wensheng Lan; Hui Li; Wei-Dong Wang; Yoko Katayama; Ji-Dong Gu

    2010-01-01

    The temples of Angkor monuments including Angkor Thom and Bayon in Cambodia and surrounding countries were exclusively constructed\\u000a using sandstone. They are severely threatened by biodeterioration caused by active growth of different microorganisms on the\\u000a sandstone surfaces, but knowledge on the microbial community and composition of the biofilms on the sandstone is not available\\u000a from this region. This study investigated

  3. Gender differences in suicidal expressions and their determinants among young people in Cambodia, a post-conflict country

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bhoomikumar Jegannathan; Gunnar Kullgren

    2011-01-01

    Background  Suicide among young people is a global public health problem, but adequate information on determinants of suicidal expression\\u000a is lacking in middle and low income countries. Young people in transitional economies are vulnerable to psychosocial stressors\\u000a and suicidal expressions. This study explores the suicidal expressions and their determinants among high school students in\\u000a Cambodia, with specific focus on gender differences.

  4. Injections, Cocktails and Diviners: Therapeutic Flexibility in the Context of Malaria Elimination and Drug Resistance in Northeast Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Gryseels, Charlotte; Uk, Sambunny; Erhart, Annette; Gerrets, René; Sluydts, Vincent; Durnez, Lies; Muela Ribera, Joan; Hausmann Muela, Susanna; Menard, Didier; Heng, Somony; Sochantha, Tho; D’Alessandro, Umberto; Coosemans, Marc; Peeters Grietens, Koen

    2013-01-01

    Background Adherence to effective malaria medication is extremely important in the context of Cambodia’s elimination targets and drug resistance containment. Although the public sector health facilities are accessible to the local ethnic minorities of Ratanakiri province (Northeast Cambodia), their illness itineraries often lead them to private pharmacies selling “cocktails” and artemether injections, or to local diviners prescribing animal sacrifices to appease the spirits. Methods The research design consisted of a mixed methods study, combining qualitative (in-depth interviews and participant observation) and quantitative methods (household and cross-sectional survey). Results Three broad options for malaria treatment were identified: i) the public sector; ii) the private sector; iii) traditional treatment based on divination and ceremonial sacrifice. Treatment choice was influenced by the availability of treatment and provider, perceived side effects and efficacy of treatments, perceived etiology of symptoms, and patient-health provider encounters. Moreover, treatment paths proved to be highly flexible, changing mostly in relation to the perceived efficacy of a chosen treatment. Conclusions Despite good availability of anti-malarial treatment in the public health sector, attendance remained low due to both structural and human behavioral factors. The common use and under-dosage of anti-malaria monotherapy in the private sector (single-dose injections, single-day drug cocktails) represents a threat not only for individual case management, but also for the regional plan of drug resistance containment and malaria elimination. PMID:24244678

  5. Is importing second-hand products a good thing? The cases of computers and tires in Cambodia

    SciTech Connect

    Chanthy, Lay, E-mail: Lay.Chanthy@ait.ac.th; Nitivattananon, Vilas, E-mail: vilasn@ait.ac.t

    2011-04-15

    Is importing second-hand products (SHPs) good for Cambodia? To answer this question, one must seriously consider environmental and social effects. The main objective of this study is to identify and assess the economic, social, and environmental impacts of imported SHPs to determine whether or not Cambodia benefits. Imported second-hand computers (SHPCs) and second-hand tires (SHTs) were selected as cases for the study. The study used a scaling checklist to identify significant impacts of these two imported items. Significant impacts were ranked and rated into a single value (score) for integration. Integrated impact assessment showed that imported SHPCs create a very small positive impact (+ 0.1 of + 5) and imported SHTs generate a large negative impact (- 2.83 of - 5). These scores are mainly the result of environmental impact, predominantly waste issues. Thus, current imports of SHPCs and SHTs do not really benefit Cambodia, but instead cause serious environmental problems from their waste issues. The import serves as a channel to transfer waste into developing countries.

  6. Rotating Responsibility Reaps Rewards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Barbara; Schullery, Nancy

    2000-01-01

    Describes a process used for group assignments in a business communication course which holds all group members accountable by using a structure of rotating responsibility. Discusses selecting assignments and implementing the process, noting how this structure requires equivalent advance preparation from all members and provides opportunities for…

  7. Human H5N1 influenza infections in Cambodia 2005–2011: case series and cost-of-illness

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Southeast Asia has been identified as a potential epicentre of emerging diseases with pandemic capacity, including highly pathogenic influenza. Cambodia in particular has the potential for high rates of avoidable deaths from pandemic influenza due to large gaps in health system resources. This study seeks to better understand the course and cost-of-illness for cases of highly pathogenic avian influenza in Cambodia. Methods We studied the 18 laboratory-confirmed cases of avian influenza subtype H5N1 identified in Cambodia between January 2005 and August 2011. Medical records for all patients were reviewed to extract information on patient characteristics, travel to hospital, time to admission, diagnostic testing, treatment and disease outcomes. Further data related to costs was collected through interviews with key informants at district and provincial hospitals, the Ministry of Health and non-governmental organisations. An ingredient-based approach was used to estimate the total economic cost for each study patient. Costing was conducted from a societal perspective and included both financial and opportunity costs to the patient or carer. Sensitivity analysis was undertaken to evaluate potential change or variation in the cost-of-illness. Results Of the 18 patients studied, 11 (61%) were under the age of 18 years. The majority of patients (16, 89%) died, eight (44%) within 24 hours of hospital admission. There was an average delay of seven days between symptom onset and hospitalisation with patients travelling an average of 148 kilometres (8-476 km) to the admitting hospital. Five patients were treated with oseltamivir of whom two received the recommended dose. For the 16 patients who received all their treatment in Cambodia the average per patient cost of H5N1 influenza illness was US$300 of which 85.0% comprised direct medical provider costs, including diagnostic testing (41.2%), pharmaceuticals (28.4%), hospitalisation (10.4%), oxygen (4.4%) and outpatient consultations (0.6%). Patient or family costs were US$45 per patient (15.0%) of total economic cost. Conclusion Cases of avian influenza in Cambodia were characterised by delays in hospitalisation, deficiencies in some aspects of treatment and a high fatality rate. The costs associated with medical care, particularly diagnostic testing and pharmaceutical therapy, were major contributors to the relatively high cost-of-illness. PMID:23738818

  8. Selling sex in unsafe spaces: sex work risk environments in Phnom Penh, Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The risk environment framework provides a valuable but under-utilised heuristic for understanding environmental vulnerability to HIV and other sexually transmitted infections among female sex workers. Brothels have been shown to be safer than street-based sex work, with higher rates of consistent condom use and lower HIV prevalence. While entertainment venues are also assumed to be safer than street-based sex work, few studies have examined environmental influences on vulnerability to HIV in this context. Methods As part of the Young Women's Health Study, a prospective observational study of young women (15-29 years) engaged in sex work in Phnom Penh, we conducted in-depth interviews (n = 33) to explore vulnerability to HIV/STI and related harms. Interviews were conducted in Khmer by trained interviewers, transcribed and translated into English and analysed for thematic content. Results The intensification of anti-prostitution and anti-trafficking efforts in Cambodia has increased the number of women working in entertainment venues and on the street. Our results confirm that street-based sex work places women at risk of HIV/STI infection and identify significant environmental risks related to entertainment-based sex work, including limited access to condoms and alcohol-related intoxication. Our data also indicate that exposure to violence and interactions with the police are mediated by the settings in which sex is sold. In particular, transacting sex in environments such as guest houses where there is little or no oversight in the form of peer or managerial support or protection, may increase vulnerability to HIV/STI. Conclusions Entertainment venues may also provide a high risk environment for sex work. Our results indicate that strategies designed to address HIV prevention among brothel-based FSWs in Cambodia have not translated well to street and entertainment-based sex work venues in which increasing numbers of women are working. There is an urgent need for targeted interventions, supported by legal and policy reforms, designed to reduce the environmental risks of sex work in these settings. Future research should seek to investigate sex work venues as risk environments, explore the role of different business models in mediating these environments, and identify and quantify exposure to risk in different occupational settings. PMID:22099449

  9. Estimation of methane and nitrous oxide emissions from rice field with rice straw management in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Vibol, S; Towprayoon, S

    2010-02-01

    To estimate the greenhouse gas emissions from paddy fields of Cambodia, the methodology of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) guidelines, IPCC coefficients, and emission factors from the experiment in Thailand and another country were used. Total area under rice cultivation during the years 2005-2006 was 2,048,360 ha in the first crop season and 298,529 ha in the second crop season. The emission of methane from stubble incorporation with manure plus fertilizer application areas in the first crop season was estimated to be 192,783.74 ton higher than stubble with manure, stubble with fertilizer, and stubble without fertilizer areas. The fields with stubble burning emitted the highest emission of methane (75,771.29 ton) followed by stubble burning with manure (22,251.08 ton), stubble burning with fertilizer (13,213.27 ton), and stubble burning with fertilizer application areas (3,222.22 ton). The total emission of methane from rice field in Cambodia for the years 2005-2006 was approximately 342,649.26 ton (342.65 Gg) in the first crop season and 36,838.88 ton (36.84 Gg) in the second crop season. During the first crop season in the years 2005-2006, Battambang province emitted the highest amount of CH(4) (38,764.48 ton) and, in the second crop season during the years 2005-2006, the highest emission (8,262.34 ton) was found in Takeo province (8,262.34 ton). Nitrous oxide emission was between 2.70 and 1,047.92 ton in the first crop season and it ranged from 0 to 244.90 ton in the second crop season. Total nitrous oxide emission from paddy rice field was estimated to be 9,026.28 ton in the first crop season and 1,091.93 ton in the second crop season. Larger area under cultivation is responsible for higher emission of methane and nitrous oxide. Total emission of nitrous oxide by using IPCC default emission coefficient was approximately 2,328.85 ton. The total global warming potential of Cambodian paddy rice soil is 11,723,217.03 ton (11,723 Gg) equivalents of CO(2). PMID:19259777

  10. Neurobehavioral effects of arsenic exposure among secondary school children in the Kandal Province, Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Vibol, Sao; Hashim, Jamal Hisham; Sarmani, Sukiman

    2015-02-01

    The research was carried out at 3 study sites with varying groundwater arsenic (As) levels in the Kandal Province of Cambodia. Kampong Kong Commune was chosen as a highly contaminated site (300-500?g/L), Svay Romiet Commune was chosen as a moderately contaminated site (50-300?g/L) and Anlong Romiet Commune was chosen as a control site. Neurobehavioral tests on the 3 exposure groups were conducted using a modified WHO neurobehavioral core test battery. Seven neurobehavioral tests including digit symbol, digit span, Santa Ana manual dexterity, Benton visual retention, pursuit aiming, trail making and simple reaction time were applied. Children's hair samples were also collected to investigate the influence of hair As levels on the neurobehavioral test scores. The results from the inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analyses of hair samples showed that hair As levels at the 3 study sites were significantly different (p<0.001), whereby hair samples from the highly contaminated site (n=157) had a median hair As level of 0.93?g/g, while the moderately contaminated site (n=151) had a median hair As level of 0.22?g/g, and the control site (n=214) had a median hair As level of 0.08?g/g. There were significant differences among the 3 study sites for all the neurobehavioral tests scores, except for digit span (backward) test. Multiple linear regression clearly shows a positive significant influence of hair As levels on all the neurobehavioral test scores, except for digit span (backward) test, after controlling for hair lead (Pb), manganese (Mn) and cadmium (Cd). Children with high hair As levels experienced 1.57-4.67 times greater risk of having lower neurobehavioral test scores compared to those with low hair As levels, after adjusting for hair Pb, Mn and Cd levels and BMI status. In conclusion, arsenic-exposed school children from the Kandal Province of Cambodia with a median hair As level of 0.93µg/g among those from the highly contaminated study site, showed clear evidence of neurobehavioral effects. PMID:25601736

  11. Klebsiella pneumoniae related community-acquired acute lower respiratory infections in Cambodia: Clinical characteristics and treatment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In many Asian countries, Klebsiella pneumoniae (KP) is the second pathogen responsible for community-acquired pneumonia. Yet, very little is known about KP etiology in ALRI in Cambodia, a country that has one of the weakest medical infrastructures in the region. We present here the first clinico-radiological description of KP community-acquired ALRI in hospitalized Cambodian patients. Methods Through ALRI surveillance in two provincial hospitals, KP was isolated from sputum and blood cultures, and identified by API20E gallery from patients ? 5 years-old with fever and respiratory symptoms onset ?14 days. Antibiotics susceptibility testing was provided systematically to clinicians when bacteria were isolated. We collected patients' clinical, radiological and microbiological data and their outcome 3 months after discharge. We also compared KP-related with other bacteria-related ALRI to determine risk factors for KP infection. Results From April 2007 to December 2009, 2315 ALRI patients ? 5 years-old were enrolled including 587 whose bacterial etiology could be assigned. Of these, 47 (8.0%) had KP infection; their median age was 55 years and 68.1% were females. Reported prior medication was high (42.5%). Patients' chest radiographs showed pneumonia (61.3% including 39% that were necrotizing), preexisting parenchyma lesions (29.5%) and pleural effusions alone (4.5%) and normal parenchyma (4.5%). Five patients had severe conditions on admission and one patient died during hospitalization. Of the 39 patients that were hospital discharged, 14 died including 12 within 1 month after discharge. Only 13 patients (28%) received an appropriate antibiotherapy. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL) - producing strains were found in 8 (17.0%) patients. Female gender (Odds ratio (OR) 2.1; p = 0.04) and diabetes mellitus (OR 3.1; p = 0.03) were independent risk factors for KP-related ALRI. Conclusions KP ALRI in Cambodia has high fatality rate, are more frequently found in women, and should be considered in diabetic patients. The extremely high frequency of ESBL-producing strains in the study is alarming in the context of uncontrolled antibiotic consumption and in absence of microbiology capacity in most public-sector hospitals. PMID:22233322

  12. Computational Pathology and Telepathology: SY05-2 PATHOLOGY AND TELEPATHOLOGY IN CAMBODIA.

    PubMed

    Vathana, Chhut Serey; Stauch, Gerhard

    2014-10-01

    Cambodia is one of underserved countries in Southeast Asia and is still suffering from its terrible history in the last 30 years when no pathologist survived from the genocide of Khmer Rouge regime. Today only 8 pathologists, mostly under qualified, are on service for more than 14 million inhabitants. There are 8 laboratories diagnosing 25,000 to 27,000 histological specimens and non-gynecological cytology, and 24,000 to 25,000 Pap smear screening per year. All laboratories are commonly providing routine histology with most on HE, Giemsa, PAP, and PAS staining. Two laboratories have a capability to provide some immunohistochemistry staining, mostly for only some markers to differentiate lymphomas and carcinomas. At present, no frozen section and no autopsy can be done in Cambodia. All these 8 laboratories are concentrated in the capital city and there is no pathology laboratory in provinces. Four laboratories have established a telepathology or personally have connection to outside world via E-mail. We have two intentions to send the cases to experts: one is to confirm our own diagnosis, second is to discuss the difficult and complex cases with senior experts to get a hint of reliable diagnosis. One lab has built up a clinico-pathological teleconference (CPC) in order to get a good connection and discussion for difficult cases. However, we still have challenging to the limits of teleconsultation due to the available experts time even the optimal clinical information, macro-images, X-rays, CT-scans, MRI are together submitted with microscopic images. There is a gap between newly established therapeutic facility, (e.g., hormone therapy in breast cancer, chemotherapy in soft tissue tumor) and the poor histological and immunohistochemistry methods in the country. Another problem is a personal isolation of Cambodian pathologists with low economic situation who cannot frequently attend international meeting outside of the country. Therefore the training level of Cambodian pathologists cannot be adapted to the standard which is demanded worldwide for sufficient tumor therapy. PMID:25188194

  13. The epidemiology of pediatric bone and joint infections in Cambodia, 2007-11.

    PubMed

    Stoesser, Nicole; Pocock, Joanna; Moore, Catrin E; Soeng, Sona; Hor, PutChhat; Sar, Poda; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Day, Nicholas; Kumar, Varun; Khan, Sophy; Sar, Vuthy; Parry, Christopher M

    2013-02-01

    There are limited data on osteoarticular infections from resource-limited settings in Asia. A retrospective study of patients presenting to the Angkor Hospital for Children, Cambodia, January 2007-July 2011, identified 81 cases (28% monoarticular septic arthritis, 51% single-limb osteomyelitis and 15% multisite infections). The incidence was 13.8/100 000 hospital attendances. The median age was 7.3 years, with a male/female ratio of 1.9:1; 35% presented within 5 days of symptom onset (median 7 days). Staphylococcus aureus was cultured in 29 (36%) cases (52% of culture-positive cases); one isolate was methicillin-resistant (MRSA). Median duration of antimicrobial treatment was 29 days (interquartile range 21-43); rates of surgical intervention were 96%, and 46% of children had sequelae, with one fatality. In this setting osteoarticular infections are relatively common with high rates of surgical intervention and sequelae. Staphylococcus aureus is the commonest culturable cause, but methicillin-resistant S. aureus is not a major problem, unlike in other Asian centers. PMID:22977206

  14. Evidence of an ‘invitation’ effect in feeding sylvatic Stegomyia albopicta from Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Orientation of haematophagous insects towards a potential host is largely mediated by kairomones that, in some groups or species may include chemicals produced during feeding by the insects themselves, the so called ‘invitation’ effect. Methods The ‘invitation’ effect in blood-feeding diurnally active Stegomyia albopicta was investigated over 33 days in secondary forest in Mondolkiri Province, Cambodia. Two human volunteers sitting inside a shelter collected mosquitoes and noted where and when they landed. A 10% emanator of a synthetic pyrethroid with high vapour action was in use on alternate days. Results Overall, 2726 mosquitoes were collected, 1654 of which had the landing site recorded. The heads of the volunteers were the locations with the highest density of landings per surface area whilst the knees and elbows accounted for most of the landings received on the arms and legs. Landings recorded within three minutes of each other on a collector were about 2.5 times more likely to be on the same body part than on a random body part, weighted for landing site preference. This preference did not vary with collector or pyrethroid. Conclusions The ‘invitation’ effect may be due to a semio-chemical produced early in the feeding process. Incorporation of such a chemical into traps designed to control this important vector of dengue and chikungunya viruses might potentially improve their attractiveness. PMID:25015104

  15. Risk aversion, time preference and health production: Theory and empirical evidence from Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Rieger, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    This paper quantifies the relationship between risk aversion and discount rates on the one hand and height and weight on the other. It studies this link in the context of poor households in Cambodia. Evidence is based on an original dataset that contains both experimental measures of risk taking and impatience along with anthropometric measurements of children and adults. The aim of the paper is to (i) explore the importance of risk and time preferences in explaining undernutrition and (ii) compare the evidence stemming from poor households to strikingly similar findings from industrialized countries. It uses an inter-generational approach to explain observed correlations in adults and children that is inspired by the height premium on labor markets. Parents can invest in the health capital of their child to increase future earnings and their consumption when old: better nutrition during infancy translates into better human capital and better wages, and ultimately better financial means to take care of elderly parents. However this investment is subject to considerable uncertainty, since parents neither perfectly foresee economic conditions when the child starts earning nor fully observe the ability to transform nutritional investments into long-term health capital. As a result, risk taking households have taller and heavier children. Conversely, impatience does not affect child health. In the case of adults, only weight and the body mass index (BMI), but not height, are positively and moderately correlated with risk taking and impatience. PMID:25589376

  16. Poverty, economic growth, deprivation, and water: the cases of Cambodia and Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Varis, Olli

    2008-05-01

    Poverty reduction decorates all development agendas, but the complexity of the poverty issue is too often hidden behind simplistic indicators and development goals. Here, a closer look is taken at the concepts of "deprivation" and "vulnerability" as outcomes of poverty. Deprivation leads typically to social exclusion and marginalization; such groups are particularly weak in getting themselves out of poverty by "self-help," and economic growth does not trickle down to these people. When looking at the connections between poverty reduction and economic growth, special emphasis should be put on the differences between modern and more traditional sectors: development of the modern sector should not marginalize and exclude those dependent on more traditional livelihoods. Two case studies--The Tonle Sap area, Cambodia, and the Mekong Delta, Vietnam--reveal that investment in education, empowerment of small-scale entrepreneurship and other means of microeconomic environment, along with good governance, infrastructure, and income distribution can ensure that economic growth includes the poorer echelons of society. PMID:18595279

  17. Arsenic Concentrations in Rice and Associated Health Risks Along the Upper Mekong Delta, Cambodia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barragan, L.; Seyfferth, A.; Fendorf, S.

    2011-12-01

    The consumption of arsenic contaminated food, such as rice, can be a significant portion of daily arsenic exposure, even for populations already exposed through drinking water. While arsenic contamination of rice grains has been documented in parts of Southern Asia, (e.g. Bangladesh), little research has been conducted on arsenic contamination of Cambodian-grown rice. We collected rice plant samples at various locations within the upper Mekong River Delta near Phnom Penh, Cambodia, and we analyzed total arsenic concentrations in plant digests of grains, husk, and straw. In addition, we used CaCl2-, DTPA-, and oxalate-extractable arsenic to define plant-available soil pools. We found variability of arsenic concentration in the plants, with grain arsenic ranging from 0.046 to 0.214 ?g g-1; other researchers have shown that concentrations higher than 0.1 ?g g-1 could be a concern for human health. Although more extensive sampling is needed to assess the risk of arsenic exposure from rice consumption on a country-wide basis, our work clearly illustrates the risk within regions of the Mekong Delta.

  18. Municipal solid waste management in Phnom Penh, capital city of Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Seng, Bunrith; Kaneko, Hidehiro; Hirayama, Kimiaki; Katayama-Hirayama, Keiko

    2011-05-01

    This paper presents an overview of municipal solid waste management (MSWM) for both technical and regulatory arrangements in the municipality of Phnom Penh (MPP), Cambodia. Problems with the current MSWM are identified, and challenges and recommendations for future improvement are also given in this paper. MPP is a small city with a total area of approximately 374 km(2) and an urban population of about 1.3 million in 2008. For the last 14 years, average annual municipal solid waste (MSW) generated in MPP has increased rapidly from 0.136 million tons in 1995 to 0.361 million tons in 2008. The gross generation rate of MSW per capita was 0.74 kg day(-1). However, the per capita household waste generation was 0.487 kg day(- 1). At 63.3%, food waste is the predominant portion of generated waste, followed by plastics (15.5%), grass and wood (6.8%), and paper and cardboard (6.4%). The remaining waste, including metals, glass, rubber/leather, textiles, and ceramic/ stone, accounted for less than 3%. Waste recycling through informal sectors is very active; recycled waste accounted for about 9.3% of all waste generated in 2003. Currently, the overall technical arrangement, including storage and discharge, collection and transport, and disposal, is still in poor condition, which leads to environmental and health risks. These problems should be solved by improving legislation, environmental education, solid waste management facilities, and management of the waste scavengers. PMID:20813763

  19. Using Social Network Analysis to Evaluate Health-Related Adaptation Decision-Making in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Kathryn J.; Alexander, Damon; Miller, Fiona; Dany, Va

    2014-01-01

    Climate change adaptation in the health sector requires decisions across sectors, levels of government, and organisations. The networks that link these different institutions, and the relationships among people within these networks, are therefore critical influences on the nature of adaptive responses to climate change in the health sector. This study uses social network research to identify key organisational players engaged in developing health-related adaptation activities in Cambodia. It finds that strong partnerships are reported as developing across sectors and different types of organisations in relation to the health risks from climate change. Government ministries are influential organisations, whereas donors, development banks and non-government organisations do not appear to be as influential in the development of adaptation policy in the health sector. Finally, the study highlights the importance of informal partnerships (or ‘shadow networks’) in the context of climate change adaptation policy and activities. The health governance ‘map’ in relation to health and climate change adaptation that is developed in this paper is a novel way of identifying organisations that are perceived as key agents in the decision-making process, and it holds substantial benefits for both understanding and intervening in a broad range of climate change-related policy problems where collaboration is paramount for successful outcomes. PMID:24487452

  20. Using social network analysis to evaluate health-related adaptation decision-making in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Kathryn J; Alexander, Damon; Miller, Fiona; Dany, Va

    2014-02-01

    Climate change adaptation in the health sector requires decisions across sectors, levels of government, and organisations. The networks that link these different institutions, and the relationships among people within these networks, are therefore critical influences on the nature of adaptive responses to climate change in the health sector. This study uses social network research to identify key organisational players engaged in developing health-related adaptation activities in Cambodia. It finds that strong partnerships are reported as developing across sectors and different types of organisations in relation to the health risks from climate change. Government ministries are influential organisations, whereas donors, development banks and non-government organisations do not appear to be as influential in the development of adaptation policy in the health sector. Finally, the study highlights the importance of informal partnerships (or 'shadow networks') in the context of climate change adaptation policy and activities. The health governance 'map' in relation to health and climate change adaptation that is developed in this paper is a novel way of identifying organisations that are perceived as key agents in the decision-making process, and it holds substantial benefits for both understanding and intervening in a broad range of climate change-related policy problems where collaboration is paramount for successful outcomes. PMID:24487452

  1. Risk factors for hepatitis C transmission in HIV patients, Hepacam study, ANRS 12267 Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Goyet, Sophie; Lerolle, Nathalie; Fournier-Nicolle, Isabelle; Ken, Sreymom; Nouhin, Janin; Sowath, Ly; Barennes, Hubert; Hak, Chanroeurn; Ung, Chakravuth; Viretto, Gérald; Delfraissy, Jean-François; Khuon, Pichit; Segeral, Olivier

    2014-03-01

    In 2009, we conducted a case-control study to explore the routes of HCV transmission in people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV) in Cambodia. Cases were HCV/HIV co-infected patients (who tested RT-PCR positive for HCV-RNA or had confirmed presence of HCV antibodies) (n = 44). Controls were HIV mono-infected patients, with no HCV antibodies (n = 160). They were recruited among the PLHIV presenting at one national reference centre of HIV/AIDS. Multivariate analysis showed that factors associated with the co-infection were the age older than 50 years (OR 5.4, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.5-19.6), the exposure to multiple parenteral infusions before the year 2000 (OR 3.4, 95 % CI 1.5-7.6), to surgery (OR 2.6, 95 % CI 1.2-5.7) and to fibroscopy (OR 2.4, 95 % CI 1.0-5.7). These results show the need to implement HCV screening in PLHIV, to support the implementation of national infection control guidelines, and to reinforce public awareness on the risks linked to parenteral medications. PMID:23612943

  2. Parental styles in the intergenerational transmission of trauma stemming from the Khmer Rouge regime in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Field, Nigel P; Muong, Sophear; Sochanvimean, Vannavuth

    2013-10-01

    The impact of parental styles in intergenerational transmission of trauma among mothers who survived the Khmer Rouge regime in Cambodia, in power from 1975 to 1979, and their teenaged children was examined in 2 studies. In Study 1, 46 Cambodian female high school students and their mothers were recruited. Each daughter completed anxiety and depression measures as well as assessment of her mother's role-reversing, overprotective, and rejecting parental styles, whereas the mothers completed measures of their trauma exposure during the Khmer Rouge regime and PTSD symptoms. In support of trauma transmission, the mother's PTSD symptoms were predictive of her daughter's anxiety. Moreover, the mother's role-reversing parental style was shown to mediate the relationship between her own and her daughter's symptoms. In support of their generalizability, the results were replicated in Study 2 in a Cambodian-American refugee sample comparing 15 mental health treatment-seeking mothers and their teenaged children with 17 nontreatment-seeking mother-child pairs. The implications of the findings within the larger literature on intergenerational trauma transmission stemming from genocide are discussed. PMID:24164520

  3. Evidence for Avian H9N2 Influenza Virus Infections among Rural Villagers in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Patrick J.; Putnam, Shannon D.; Krueger, Whitney S.; Chum, Channimol; Wierzba, Thomas F.; Heil, Gary L.; Yasuda, Chadwick Y.; Williams, Maya; Kasper, Matthew R.; Friary, John A.; Capuano, Ana W.; Saphonn, Vonthanak; Peiris, Malik; Shao, Hongxia; Perez, Daniel R.; Gray, Gregory C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Southeast Asia remains a critical region for the emergence of novel and/or zoonotic influenza, underscoring the importance of extensive sampling in rural areas where early transmission is most likely to occur. Methods In 2008, 800 adult participants from eight sites were enrolled in a prospective population-based study of avian influenza (AI) virus transmission where highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus had been reported in humans and poultry from 2006 to 2008. From their enrollment sera and questionnaires, we report risk factor findings for serologic evidence of previous infection with 18 AI virus strains. Results Serologic assays revealed no evidence of previous infection with 13 different low-pathogenic AI viruses or with HPAI avian-like A/Cambodia/R0404050/2007(H5N1). However, 21 participants had elevated antibodies against avian-like A/Hong Kong/1073/1999(H9N2), validated with a monoclonal antibody blocking ELISA assay specific for avian H9. Conclusions Although cross-reaction from antibodies against human influenza viruses cannot be completely excluded, the study data suggest that a number of participants were previously infected with the avian-like A/Hong Kong/1073/1999(H9N2) virus, likely due to as yet unidentified environmental exposures. Prospective data from this cohort will help us better understand the serology of zoonotic influenza infection in a rural cohort in SE Asia. PMID:23537819

  4. Preventing highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) at the rural community level: a case study from Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Dilip P; Wollen, Terry S; Lohani, Mahendra N

    2011-08-01

    Poultry is an integral part of the rural livelihoods in Cambodia, with more than half of the households keeping poultry in their small-scale, traditional, and extensive backyards. More than 20 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) outbreaks have been reported since 2004 with deaths of over 21,000 birds. During the HPAI outbreaks, some of the flocks in the rural areas were culled without compensation and producers were not allowed to sell outside of the community. Heifer International worked with 2,000 rural families through local project partners in the target communities to develop an effective intervention mechanism to mitigate the impact of the HPAI crisis. Heifer International provided training, public education, and networking as well as promoting model farms based on improved scavenging poultry management. Each community selected one farm family to serve as a model farm. They were trained in Heifer's working approach and committed to practicing integrated farming systems based on scavenging poultry management. One Village Animal Health Worker (VAHW) in each community participated during the project implementation, playing a key role in the information exchange and the interaction between the communities and the avian influenza experts. Formal and informal trainings were conducted for all project partners and project recipients through experts and VAHWs, respectively. There have been no outbreaks reported in the communities in the project areas. Farmers have started using appropriate techniques to maintain biosecurity. They are passing on the knowledge and the skills to the surrounding communities. This participatory approach in educating rural farmers can serve as a model to mitigate HPAI in the developing countries around the world. PMID:21442155

  5. Entrenched Geographical and Socioeconomic Disparities in Child Mortality: Trends in Absolute and Relative Inequalities in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Soto, Eliana; Durham, Jo; Hodge, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Cambodia has made considerable improvements in mortality rates for children under the age of five and neonates. These improvements may, however, mask considerable disparities between subnational populations. In this paper, we examine the extent of the country's child mortality inequalities. Methods Mortality rates for children under-five and neonates were directly estimated using the 2000, 2005 and 2010 waves of the Cambodian Demographic Health Survey. Disparities were measured on both absolute and relative scales using rate differences and ratios, and where applicable, slope and relative indices of inequality by levels of rural/urban location, regions and household wealth. Findings Since 2000, considerable reductions in under-five and to a lesser extent in neonatal mortality rates have been observed. This mortality decline has, however, been accompanied by an increase in relative inequality in both rates of child mortality for geography-related stratifying markers. For absolute inequality amongst regions, most trends are increasing, particularly for neonatal mortality, but are not statistically significant. The only exception to this general pattern is the statistically significant positive trend in absolute inequality for under-five mortality in the Coastal region. For wealth, some evidence for increases in both relative and absolute inequality for neonates is observed. Conclusion Despite considerable gains in reducing under-five and neonatal mortality at a national level, entrenched and increased geographical and wealth-based inequality in mortality, at least on a relative scale, remain. As expected, national progress seems to be associated with the period of political and macroeconomic stability that started in the early 2000s. However, issues of quality of care and potential non-inclusive economic growth might explain remaining disparities, particularly across wealth and geography markers. A focus on further addressing key supply and demand side barriers to accessing maternal and child health care and on the social determinants of health will be essential in narrowing inequalities. PMID:25295528

  6. Linking Hydrologic Drivers to Arsenic Contamination in Asia, Results From a Field Site in Cambodia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benner, S. G.; Polizzotto, M. L.; Kocar, B. D.; Sampson, M.; Fendorf, S.

    2008-12-01

    Attempts to resolve the specific release mechanisms associated with arsenic contamination on the deltas of Asia have been hampered, especially in Bangladesh, by the difficulty of linking geochemical mechanisms with hydrologic drivers. At an arsenic-contaminated (100-1200 ug/L) aquifer in Cambodia, where pumping for irrigation is limited and the hydrologic system is much less complex than in Bangladesh, we have developed a conceptual model of arsenic behavior that integrates the system hydrology and depositional history, providing strong evidence that arsenic release is sensitive to human activities. Specifically, the hydrogeologic regime is dominated by seasonally-variable head gradients between the river and adjacent wetland basins but the net annual flow is from the wetlands downwards into the aquifer (0.04-0.4 m/a) followed by discharge to the river (1-13 m/a). These flow rates produce aquifer residence times on the order of 100-1000 years. When coupled with elevated concentrations throughout the aquifer, this indicates that arsenic contamination predates recent human activities. Within this flow regime, it is possible to track spatial changes in arsenic concentrations along specific flow lines: The greatest increases in dissolved arsenic concentrations (150 ug/L/m) occur in shallow sediments along the first 2-10 m of the flow path, consistent with the depth at which reducing conditions are no longer seasonally disrupted by fluctuating water levels. Estimates of arsenic delivery to the wetlands by flood deposition (1,300,000 kg/a) are of a similar magnitude to the estimated flux, via groundwater, out of the aquifer (1,000,000 kg/a), indicating that arsenic delivery, release, and transport are in approximate steady-state. Given the dependency of arsenic release and transport on hydrologic drivers, human activities that alter the hydrology (inclusive of pumping for irrigation, soil excavation, and upstream river damming) will likely also alter arsenic behavior.

  7. Redeeming qualities: exploring factors that affect women’s use of reproductive health vouchers in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background One approach to delivering healthcare in developing countries is through voucher programs, where vouchers are distributed to a specific population for free or subsidized health care. Recent evaluations suggest that vouchers have the potential to extend coverage of priority health services to the poor in developing countries. In Cambodia, a reproductive health voucher program was implemented in January 2011. This study aims to explore women’s early experiences accessing health services with their vouchers at accredited clinics. Methods This qualitative exploratory study used focus group methodology to gather information from five groups of older (>25 years) and four groups of younger (18–25 years) women who were eligible for the voucher program in three rural provinces. Focus groups were digitally recorded, transcribed and translated from Khmer into English. Data analysis was an iterative process, which comprised of open coding to find commonalities that reflected categories or themes and axial coding to relate initial themes to each other. Next, a basic framework for analysis was formed by integrating the themes into the framework. Results Two overarching themes were identified in the data: 1) factors that facilitate voucher use and 2) factors that inhibit voucher use. Within each of these themes, three subthemes were identified: 1) pre-existing factors, 2) distribution factors, and 3) redemption factors. Overall, women expressed positive feelings towards the voucher program, while several areas for program improvement were identified including the importance of addressing pre-existing demand-side barriers to using reproductive health services, the need for more comprehensive counselling during voucher distribution, and the persistent cost of unofficial payments expected by midwives after delivery irrespective of voucher use. Conclusions Early information from program beneficiaries can lead to timely and responsive changes that can help to maximize program success. This study highlights the importance of tailoring voucher programs to specific community needs, a strategy that can lead to better program uptake. PMID:23442446

  8. Scenario analysis of the benefit of municipal organic-waste composting over landfill, Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Seng, Bunrith; Hirayama, Kimiaki; Katayama-Hirayama, Keiko; Ochiai, Satoru; Kaneko, Hidehiro

    2013-01-15

    This paper presents insight into the benefits of organic waste recycling through composting over landfill, in terms of landfill life extension, compost product, and mitigation of greenhouse gases (GHGs). Future waste generation from 2003 to 2020 was forecast, and five scenarios of organic waste recycling in the municipality of Phnom Penh (MPP), Cambodia, were carried out. Organic waste-specifically food and garden waste-was used for composting, and the remaining waste was landfilled. The recycling scenarios were set based on organic waste generated from difference sources: households, restaurants, shops, markets, schools, hotels, offices, and street sweeping. Through the five scenarios, the minimum volume reductions of waste disposal were about 56, 123, and 219 m(3) d(-1) in 2003, 2012, and 2020, respectively, whereas the maximum volume reductions in these years were about 325, 643, and 1025 m(3) d(-1). These volume reductions reflect a landfill life extension of a minimum of half a year and a maximum of about four years. Compost product could be produced at a minimum of 14, 30, and 54 tons d(-1) in 2003, 2012, and 2020, respectively, and at a maximum in those years of about 80, 158, and 252 tons d(-1). At the same time benefit is gained in compost product, GHG emissions could be reduced by a minimum of 12.8% and a maximum of 65.0% from 2003 to 2020. This means about 3.23 (minimum) and 5.79 million tons CO(2)eq (maximum) contributed to GHG mitigation. In this regard, it is strongly recommended that MPP should try to initiate an organic-waste recycling strategy in a best fit scenario. PMID:23168253

  9. Late Quaternary floodplain development along the Stung Sen River in the Lower Mekong Basin, Cambodia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagumo, Naoko; Sugai, Toshihiko; Kubo, Sumiko

    2013-09-01

    The Stung Sen River, the biggest tributary to Lake Tonle Sap in the Lower Mekong Basin in Cambodia, is characterized by large seasonal changes of water discharge under the Asian monsoon climate and seasonal changes in water level that reach at least 7 m and are controlled by the water level of the lake. The Stung Sen River floodplain consists of two geomorphic units: meander belt along the river channel and backmarsh. Coupled observations of outcrops along the river channel and arrays of sediment cores across the floodplain north of Kampong Chheuteal village and Kampong Thom City, c. 150 km and c. 70 km, respectively, reveal that floodplain environmental changes at c. 11 ka were possibly associated with the Holocene onset of the southeast Asian monsoon and probably with the emergence of Lake Tonle Sap. These observations also show that the present backmarsh-meander belt system was established about 5.5 ka along with the unique Mekong-Tonle Sap connection, characterized by a reversal in flow direction during the monsoon season. The meander belt materials are replaced as the river channel shifts on a decadal to centennial timescale. Backmarsh sediments at sites Kampong Chheuteal and Kampong Thom had a constant accumulation rate of about 0.5 mm/y during the Holocene, contrasting with rates of 0.1 mm/y during the late Pleistocene. At around 11 ka, a sand layer was deposited over all of the valley around Kampong Chheuteal, while wetlands enlarged around Kampong Thom, probably because of increased rainfall triggered by an enhancement of the Asian summer monsoon. This 11 ka horizon has since been covered by clayey sediments keeping pace with the accumulation of lacustrine sediments in Lake Tonle Sap.

  10. Reconstruction of the past flow channels in the early Holocene at Lake Tonle Sap, Cambodia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haraguchi, T.; Yonenobu, H.; Tokunaga, T.; Shimoda, I.

    2013-05-01

    Lake Tonle Sap is located at the central part of Cambodia, South-East Asia. In rainy season, the water body swells with the water depth accordingly increasing from 1 up to 10 meters due to a pulsive intrusion from the Mekong River. The lake is therefore a vital reservoir that protects the region from flooding. It is paleolimnologically important to better understand how the lake has gained the function controlling water balance of this region. We undertook an extensive echo-sounding exploration at the lake in order to clarify the subsurface structure of Lake Tonle Sap. The survey was conducted in rainy seasons from 2009 to 2012. Sediment cores were collected at three sites at the middle part of the lake. Echo sounding was undertaken over the whole part of the lake using a single-channel sub-bottom profiling system (Stratabox, SyQwest Inc.). A prominent sound frequency of 10 KHz was selected in order to observe structure of reflectance planes up to the 40-m depth. In consequence, we discovered deposited valleys forming a complex network of past flow channels. The subsurface structure of the lake bed was mostly complacent showing a strongly reflecting plane observed at the depth of 1-2 meters; the sediments mainly consisted of mud. A number of valley-shaped reflecting planes were observed at the depth of 10-14 meters. Radiocarbon dates of carbonaceous materials collected at the vally bottom were around 10 ka calBP. A 3-D reconstruction presented a complex network of deposited flow channels.

  11. The Socioeconomic Impacts of Clinically Diagnosed Haemorrhagic Septicaemia on Smallholder Large Ruminant Farmers in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, M; Young, J R; Suon, S; Bush, R D; Windsor, P A

    2013-10-01

    Haemorrhagic septicaemia (HS) is an acute fatal infectious disease of mainly cattle and buffalo and outbreaks occur commonly in Cambodia. Disease outbreak reports were examined to select five villages from three provinces for a retrospective investigation of HS epidemiology and socioeconomic impact on smallholders, with an aim of identifying potential benefits from improving disease prevention through biosecurity and vaccination. The Village Animal Health Worker (VAHW) or Chief in each village and 66 affected smallholders were surveyed. At the village level, 24% of all households were affected with an estimated mean village herd morbidity of 10.1% and mortality of 28.8%. Affected farmers reported HS disease morbidity and mortality at 42.7% and 63.6% respectively. Buffalo had a higher morbidity (OR = 2.3; P = 0.003) and mortality (OR = 6.9; P < 0.001) compared with cattle, and unvaccinated large ruminants a higher morbidity (OR = 2.9; P = 0.001). The financial impact varied depending on whether the animal survived, provision of treatment, draught replacement and lost secondary income. The mean cost per affected household was USD 952.50 based on ownership of five large ruminants. The impact per affected animal was USD 375.00, reducing the pre-disease value by 66.1%. A partial budget revealed an overwhelming incentive for farmers to practice biannual vaccination, with a net benefit of USD 951.58 per household based on an annual disease incidence rate of 1. Sensitivity analysis showed that a net benefit of USD 32.42 remained based on an outbreak every 20 years. This study indicates HS can cause a catastrophic financial shock to smallholders and remains a critical constraint to improving large ruminant productivity and profitability. Addressing HS disease control requires a focus on improving smallholder farmer knowledge of biosecurity and vaccination and should be priority to stakeholders interested in addressing regional food insecurity and poverty reduction. PMID:24750574

  12. Situation Report--Australia, Burundi, Cambodia, Mexico, Montserrat, Nicaragua, Papua & New Guinea, Republic of Vietnam, Sabah, Sarawak, Sierra Leone, Tahiti, Tonga.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

    Data relating to population and family planning in fourteen foreign countries are presented in these situation reports. Countries included are Australia, Burundi, Cambodia, Mexico, Montserrat, Nicaragua, Papua and New Guines, Republic of Vietnam, Sabah, Sarawak, Sierra Leone, Tahiti (French Polynesia), and Tonga. Information is provided under two…

  13. Exposure, metabolism, and health effects of arsenic in residents from arsenic-contaminated groundwater areas of Vietnam and Cambodia: a review.

    PubMed

    Agusa, Tetsuro; Kunito, Takashi; Kubota, Reiji; Inoue, Suguru; Fujihara, Junko; Minh, Tu Binh; Ha, Nguyen Ngoc; Tu, Nguyen Phuc Cam; Trang, Pham Thi Kim; Chamnan, Chhoun; Takeshita, Haruo; Iwata, Hisato; Tuyen, Bui Cach; Viet, Pham Hung; Tana, Touch Seang; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on exposure, metabolism, and health effects of arsenic (As) in residents from As-contaminated groundwater areas of Vietnam and Cambodia based on our findings from 2000 and other studies. The health effects of As in humans include severe gastrointestinal disorders, hepatic and renal failure, cardiovascular disturbances, skin pigmentation, hyperkeratosis, and cancers in the lung, bladder, liver, kidney, and skin. Arsenic contamination in groundwater is widely present at Vietnam and Cambodia and the highest As levels are frequently found in groundwater from Cambodia. Sand filter system can reduce As concentration in raw groundwater. The results of hair and urine analyses indicate that residents from these As-contaminated areas are exposed to As. In general, sex, age, body mass index, and As exposure level are significantly associated with As metabolism. Genetic polymorphisms in arsenic (+III) methyltransferase and glutathione-S-transferase isoforms may be influenced As metabolism and accumulation in a Vietnamese population. It is suggested oxidative DNA damage is caused by exposure to As in groundwater from residents in Cambodia. An epidemiologic study on an association of As exposure with human health effects is required in these areas. PMID:21038756

  14. Use of Appropriate and Affordable Technology for Water Quality Improvement in a Community Managed Water Supply Demonstration Project in Phnom Penh, Cambodia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ranjith Perera

    Water supply is a major problem that local authorities find difficult to handle. Communities in peri-urban areas are often not served by the municipal systems due to limited capacities of local authorities. This paper presents the experience and lessons gained in implementing a community-built and managed water quality improvement demonstration project in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. The project attempted to demonstrate

  15. ORAL HEALTH STATUS AMONG 12YEAROLD CHILDREN IN PRIMARY SCHOOLS PARTICIPATING IN AN ORAL HEALTH PREVENTIVE SCHOOL PROGRAM IN PHNOM PENH CITY, CAMBODIA, 2002

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O Teng; K Narksawat; J Podang

    A cross-sectional survey was undertaken to assess dental caries status, knowledge, attitude and practice in oral health among 12-year-old primary schoolchildren participating in the Oral Health Preventive School Program (OHPSP) conducted since 1998 in Phnom Penh City, Cambodia. Schools were stratified into 3 groups by levels of cooperation (good, partial, and poor ) with the OHPS pro- gram and samples

  16. Arsenic concentrations in paddy soil and rice and health implications for major rice-growing regions of Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Seyfferth, Angelia L; McCurdy, Sarah; Schaefer, Michael V; Fendorf, Scott

    2014-05-01

    Despite the global importance of As in rice, research has primarily focused on Bangladesh, India, China, and the United States with limited attention given to other countries. Owing to both indigenous As within the soil and the possible increases arising from the onset of irrigation with groundwater, an assessment of As in rice within Cambodia is needed, which offers a "base-case" comparison against sediments of similar origin that comprise rice paddy soils where As-contaminated water is used for irrigation (e.g., Bangladesh). Here, we evaluated the As content of rice from five provinces (Kandal, Prey Veng, Battambang, Banteay Meanchey, and Kampong Thom) in the rice-growing regions of Cambodia and coupled that data to soil-chemical factors based on extractions of paddy soil collected and processed under anoxic conditions. At total soil As concentrations ranging 0.8 to 18 ?g g(-1), total grain As concentrations averaged 0.2 ?g g(-1) and ranged from 0.1 to 0.37 with Banteay Meanchey rice having significantly higher values than Prey Veng rice. Overall, soil-extractable concentrations of As, Fe, P, and Si and total As were poor predictors of grain As concentrations. While biogeochemical factors leading to reduction of As(V)-bearing Fe(III) oxides are likely most important for predicting plant-available As, husk and straw As concentrations were the most significant predictors of grain-As levels among our measured parameters. PMID:24712677

  17. System-level factors as predictors of adherence to clinical appointment schedules in antiretroviral therapy in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Daigle, Gary T; Jolly, Pauline E; Chamot, Eric A M; Ehiri, John; Zhang, Kui; Khan, Edward; Sou, Sanith

    2015-07-01

    Adherence to clinical appointment schedules by patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) is necessary for the prevention of medication interruptions, viral rebound, and the development of drug resistance. An observational study conducted in 2010, Enablers and Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy in Cambodia, sought to identify factors that predict on-time clinical appointment attendance by patients on ART. Clinical data, including appointment attendance across five consecutive visits, were collected from hospital records on a random sample of ART patients at government referral hospitals (RHs) in Battambang Province, Cambodia. Interviews were conducted to obtain quantitative information from patients on their experiences of support services provided by local NGOs and RHs. This information was used to identify ART patient care and support system factors that could potentially enable patients to adhere to clinical appointment schedules. These factors included adherence counseling, support groups, home-based care (HBC) services, and support provided for transportation to ART appointments. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression analysis was done to assess relationships between system variables and the ART appointment adherence outcome. Of the 289 study participants, 20.4% had missed at least one of the five appointments in the study period. The hospital source of ART services, participation in a hospital-based support group, receiving a loan from a microfinance institution, and the frequency of adherence counseling were found to be associated with ART appointment adherence. No significant associations were found between other support system factors such as HBC, transportation support, food/monetary support, and appointment adherence. PMID:25803006

  18. Breastfeeding Trends in Cambodia, and the Increased Use of Breast-Milk Substitute—Why Is It a Danger?

    PubMed Central

    Prak, Sophonneary; Iuell Dahl, Miriam; Oeurn, Sam; Conkle, Joel; Wise, Aaron; Laillou, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    A cross-sectional analysis of the Cambodia Demographic Health Surveys from 2000, 2005 and 2010 was conducted to observe the national trends in infant and young child feeding practices. The results showed that rates of exclusive breastfeeding among infants aged 0–5.9 months have increased substantially since 2000, concurrent with an increase in the rates of early initiation of breastfeeding and a reduction in the giving of pre-lacteal feeds. However, the proportion of infants being fed with breast-milk substitutes (BMS) during 0–5.9 months doubled in 5 years (3.4% to 7.0%) from 2000 to 2005, but then did not increase from 2005, likely due to extensive public health campaigns on exclusive breastfeeding. BMS use increased among children aged 6–23.9 months from 2000 to 2010 (4.8% to 9.3%). 26.1% of women delivering in a private clinic provided their child with breast-milk substitute at 0–5.9 months, which is five times more than women delivering in the public sector (5.1%), and the greatest increase in bottle use happened among the urban poor (5.8% to 21.7%). These findings are discussed with reference to the increased supply and marketing of BMS that is occurring in Cambodia. PMID:25054552

  19. Effects of logging and recruitment on community phylogenetic structure in 32 permanent forest plots of Kampong Thom, Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Toyama, Hironori; Kajisa, Tsuyoshi; Tagane, Shuichiro; Mase, Keiko; Chhang, Phourin; Samreth, Vanna; Ma, Vuthy; Sokh, Heng; Ichihashi, Ryuji; Onoda, Yusuke; Mizoue, Nobuya; Yahara, Tetsukazu

    2015-02-19

    Ecological communities including tropical rainforest are rapidly changing under various disturbances caused by increasing human activities. Recently in Cambodia, illegal logging and clear-felling for agriculture have been increasing. Here, we study the effects of logging, mortality and recruitment of plot trees on phylogenetic community structure in 32 plots in Kampong Thom, Cambodia. Each plot was 0.25 ha; 28 plots were established in primary evergreen forests and four were established in secondary dry deciduous forests. Measurements were made in 1998, 2000, 2004 and 2010, and logging, recruitment and mortality of each tree were recorded. We estimated phylogeny using rbcL and matK gene sequences and quantified phylogenetic ? and ? diversity. Within communities, logging decreased phylogenetic diversity, and increased overall phylogenetic clustering and terminal phylogenetic evenness. Between communities, logging increased phylogenetic similarity between evergreen and deciduous plots. On the other hand, recruitment had opposite effects both within and between communities. The observed patterns can be explained by environmental homogenization under logging. Logging is biased to particular species and larger diameter at breast height, and forest patrol has been effective in decreasing logging. PMID:25561669

  20. Molecular epidemiology of Blastocystis in pigs and their in-contact humans in Southeast Queensland, Australia, and Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenqi; Owen, Helen; Traub, Rebecca J; Cuttell, Leigh; Inpankaew, Tawin; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle

    2014-07-14

    Blastocystis, an intestinal protist commonly found in humans and animals worldwide, has been implicated by some as a causative agent in irritable bowel syndrome in humans. In pigs, infection with Blastocystis is commonly reported, with most pigs shown to harbour subtypes (ST) 1 or 5, suggesting that these animals are potentially natural hosts for Blastocystis. Although ST5 is considered rare in humans, it has been reported to be a potential zoonosis from pigs in rural China. To test these hypotheses, we conducted molecular analysis of faecal samples from pigs and in-contact humans from commercial intensive piggeries in Southeast Queensland (SEQ), Australia, and a village in rural Cambodia. The prevalence of Blastocystis in SEQ and Cambodian pigs was 76.7% and 45.2%, respectively, with all positive pigs harbouring ST5. It appears likely that pigs are natural hosts of Blastocystis with a high prevalence of ST5 that is presumably the pig-adapted ST in these regions. Amongst the SEQ piggery staff, 83.3% were Blastocystis carriers in contrast to only 55.2% of Cambodian villagers. The predominant STs found in humans were STs 1, 2 (Cambodia only) and 3. Interestingly, ST5 which is usually rare in humans was present in the SEQ piggery staff but not in the Cambodian villagers. We conclude that in intensive piggeries, close contact between pigs and their handlers may increase the risks of zoonotic transmission of Blastocystis. PMID:24785292

  1. PALSAR 50 m Mosaic Data Based National Level Biomass Estimation in Cambodia for Implementation of REDD+ Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Avtar, Ram; Suzuki, Rikie; Takeuchi, Wataru; Sawada, Haruo

    2013-01-01

    Tropical countries like Cambodia require information about forest biomass for successful implementation of climate change mitigation mechanism related to Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation (REDD+). This study investigated the potential of Phased Array-type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar Fine Beam Dual (PALSAR FBD) 50 m mosaic data to estimate Above Ground Biomass (AGB) in Cambodia. AGB was estimated using a bottom-up approach based on field measured biomass and backscattering (?o) properties of PALSAR data. The relationship between the PALSAR ?o HV and HH/HV with field measured biomass was strong with R2?=?0.67 and 0.56, respectively. PALSAR estimated AGB show good results in deciduous forests because of less saturation as compared to dense evergreen forests. The validation results showed a high coefficient of determination R2?=?0.61 with RMSE ?=?21 Mg/ha using values up to 200 Mg/ha biomass. There were some uncertainties because of the uncertainty in the field based measurement and saturation of PALSAR data. AGB map of Cambodian forests could be useful for the implementation of forest management practices for REDD+ assessment and policies implementation at the national level. PMID:24116012

  2. Trends and Barriers to HIV Testing Among Tuberculosis Patients in Prey Kabas Operational District, Takeo Province, Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Samrith, Wannak; Rahman, Mahbubur; Harun-Or-Rashid, Md; Sakamoto, Junichi

    2015-03-01

    Data for this study were obtained from 2375 tuberculosis (TB) patients registered during 2007-2009 and 43 health providers to examine the trend of TB patient referral for HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) testing and to investigate provider-associated barriers to the referral in Prey Kabas operational district, Takeo province, Cambodia. Referral rate for HIV testing was 4.4% (30/684) in 2007, 15.4% (116/751) in 2008, and 30.1% (283/940) in 2009, with a significant upward trend over the period of time (P = .009). The main barriers perceived by health providers were poor knowledge about TB/HIV, lack of communication skills, absence of any target plan for TB patient referral for HIV testing, and fear associated with informing positive test results to the TB patients and the associated stigma. Strategies to raise awareness about HIV/AIDS/TB among TB patients and their providers may improve the current state of low referral and its barriers in Cambodia. PMID:22593219

  3. Testimony ceremonies in Asia: Integrating spirituality in testimonial therapy for torture survivors in India, Sri Lanka, Cambodia, and the Philippines

    PubMed Central

    Agger, Inger; Igreja, Victor; Kiehle, Rachel; Polatin, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the therapeutic implications of including culturally adapted spiritual ceremonies in the process of testimonial therapy for torture survivors in India, Sri Lanka, Cambodia, and the Philippines. Data were collected through an action research process with Asian mental health and human rights organizations, during which the testimonial method was reconceptualized and modified to include four sessions. In the first two sessions, community workers assist survivors in the writing of their testimony, which is their narrative about the human rights violations they have suffered. In the third session, survivors participate in an honour ceremony in which they are presented with their testimony documents. In the fourth session, the community workers meet with the survivors for a reevaluation of their well-being. The honour ceremonies developed during the action research process came to employ different kinds of symbolic language at each site: human rights (India), religious/Catholic (Sri Lanka), religious/Buddhist (Cambodia), and religious/Moslem (Philippines). They all used embodied spirituality in various forms, incorporating singing, dancing, and religious purification rituals in a collective gathering. We suggest that these types of ceremonies may facilitate an individual’s capacity to contain and integrate traumatic memories, promote restorative self-awareness, and engage community support. Additional research is needed to determine the method’s applicability in other sociopolitical contexts governed by more Western-oriented medical traditions. PMID:22637721

  4. Poverty, user fees and ability to pay for health care for children with suspected dengue in rural Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Khun, Sokrin; Manderson, Lenore

    2008-01-01

    User fees were introduced in public health facilities in Cambodia in 1997 in order to inject funds into the health system to enhance the quality of services. Because of inadequate health insurance, a social safety net scheme was introduced to ensure that all people were able to attend the health facilities. However, continuing high rates of hospitalization and mortality from dengue fever among infants and children reflect the difficulties that women continue to face in finding sufficient cash in cases of medical emergency, resulting in delays in diagnosis and treatment. In this article, drawing on in-depth interviews conducted with mothers of children infected with dengue in eastern Cambodia, we illustrate the profound economic consequences for households when a child is ill. The direct costs for health care and medical services, and added indirect costs, deterred poor women from presenting with sick children. Those who eventually sought care often had to finance health spending through out-of-pocket payments and loans, or sold property, goods or labour to meet the costs. Costs were often catastrophic, exacerbating the extreme poverty of those least able to afford it. PMID:18439268

  5. Evaluation of real-time PCR for Strongyloides stercoralis and hookworm as diagnostic tool in asymptomatic schoolchildren in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Schär, Fabian; Odermatt, Peter; Khieu, Virak; Panning, Marcus; Duong, Socheat; Muth, Sinuon; Marti, Hanspeter; Kramme, Stefanie

    2013-05-01

    Diagnosis of soil-transmitted helminths such as Strongyloides stercoralis and hookworms (Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus) is challenging due to irregular larval and egg output in infected individuals and insensitive conventional diagnostic procedures. Sensitive novel real-time PCR assays have been developed. Our study aimed to evaluate the real-time PCR assays as a diagnostic tool for detection of Strongyloides spp. and hookworms in a random stool sample of 218 asymptomatic schoolchildren in Cambodia. Overall prevalence of 17.4% (38/218) and 34.9% (76/218) were determined by real-time PCR for S. stercoralis and hookworms, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity of S. stercoralis specific real-time PCR as compared to the combination of Baermann/Koga Agar as gold standard were 88.9% and 92.7%, respectively. For hookworm specific real-time PCR a sensitivity of 78.9% and specificity of 78.9% were calculated. Co-infections were detectable by PCR in 12.8% (28/218) of individuals. S. stercoralis real-time PCR applied in asymptomatic cases showed a lower sensitivity compared to studies undertaken with symptomatic patients with the same molecular tool, yet it proved to be a valid supplement in the diagnosis of STH infection in Cambodia. PMID:23298731

  6. Breastfeeding trends in Cambodia, and the increased use of breast-milk substitute-why is it a danger?

    PubMed

    Prak, Sophonneary; Dahl, Miriam Iuell; Oeurn, Sam; Conkle, Joel; Wise, Aaron; Laillou, Arnaud

    2014-07-01

    A cross-sectional analysis of the Cambodia Demographic Health Surveys from 2000, 2005 and 2010 was conducted to observe the national trends in infant and young child feeding practices. The results showed that rates of exclusive breastfeeding among infants aged 0-5.9 months have increased substantially since 2000, concurrent with an increase in the rates of early initiation of breastfeeding and a reduction in the giving of pre-lacteal feeds. However, the proportion of infants being fed with breast-milk substitutes (BMS) during 0-5.9 months doubled in 5 years (3.4% to 7.0%) from 2000 to 2005, but then did not increase from 2005, likely due to extensive public health campaigns on exclusive breastfeeding. BMS use increased among children aged 6-23.9 months from 2000 to 2010 (4.8% to 9.3%). 26.1% of women delivering in a private clinic provided their child with breast-milk substitute at 0-5.9 months, which is five times more than women delivering in the public sector (5.1%), and the greatest increase in bottle use happened among the urban poor (5.8% to 21.7%). These findings are discussed with reference to the increased supply and marketing of BMS that is occurring in Cambodia. PMID:25054552

  7. Epilepsy in Cambodia–Treatment Aspects and Policy Implications: A Population-Based Representative Survey

    PubMed Central

    Bhalla, Devender; Chea, Kimly; Hun, Chamroeun; Chan, Vichea; Huc, Pierre; Chan, Samleng; Sebbag, Robert; Gérard, Daniel; Dumas, Michel; Oum, Sophal; Druet-Cabanac, Michel; Preux, Pierre-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Introduction We tested two treatment strategies to determine: treatment (a) prognosis (seizure frequency, mortality, suicide, and complications), (b) safety and adherence of treatment, (c) self-reported satisfaction with treatment and self-reported productivity, and policy aspects (a) number of required tablets for universal treatment (NRT), (b) cost of management, (c) manpower-gap and requirements for scaling-up of epilepsy care. Methods We performed a random-cluster survey (N?=?16510) and identified 96 cases (?1 year of age) in 24 villages. They were screened by using a validated instrument and diagnosed by the neurologists. International guidelines were used for defining and classifying epilepsy. All were given phenobarbital or valproate (cost-free) in two manners patient’s door-steps (March 2009-March 2010, primary-treatment-period, PTP) and treatment through health-centers (March 2010-June 2011, treatment-continuation-period, TCP). The emphasis was to start on a minimum dosage and regime, without any polytherapy, according to the age of the recipients. No titration was done. Seizure-frequency was monthly and self-reported. Results The number of seizures reduced from 12.6 (pre-treatment) to 1.2 (end of PTP), following which there was an increase to 3.4 (end of TCP). Between start of PTP and end of TCP, >60.0% became and remained seizure-free. During TCP, ?26.0% went to health centers to collect their treatment. Complications reduced from 12.5% to 4.2% between start and end of PTP and increased to 17.2% between start and end of TCP. Adverse events reduced from 46.8% to 16.6% between start and end of PTP. Nearly 33 million phenobarbital 100 mg tablets are needed in Cambodia. Conclusions Epilepsy responded sufficiently well to the conventional treatment, even when taken at a minimal dosage and a simple daily regimen, without any polytherapy. This is yet another confirmation that it is possible to substantially reduce direct burden of epilepsy through means that are currently available to us. PMID:24040345

  8. A community-based education trial to improve backyard poultry biosecurity in rural Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Conan, Anne; Ponsich, Aurélia; Luce Goutard, Flavie; Khiev, Ratana; Tarantola, Arnaud; Sorn, San; Vong, Sirenda

    2013-03-01

    The emergence and spread of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N1 has caused substantial poultry-related economic losses and public health concerns in relation to a potential pandemic. While biosecurity measures for commercial poultry industry are of the highest standards, these measures are difficult to implement and often unaffordable for backyard poultry farming, particularly in tropical and low-income settings. We designed a feasible biosecurity intervention to improve flock hygiene in Cambodia, - based on community hygiene, cleaning of poultry flock areas and human and poultry movement control. We conducted a cluster randomized and controlled intervention trial in 18 villages in Takeo province to evaluate improvements in biosecurity-related knowledge and practices. The intervention relied on community involvement and community education using special information dissemination tools. We trained village teams (VT) to assist villagers in implementing the intervention using a cascade training approach, in which a few individuals were trained, who in turn trained a larger group of people. During the 14 month follow up, we conducted observational and interview-based surveys (baseline vs. final surveys, VT supervision visits, monitoring surveys) to assess VTs' motivation, intervention messages dissemination and the implementation of recommended measures. Most of villagers (95%, confidence interval: 87.8-100.0%) in intervention villages received general information about how to raise poultry. Farmers in intervention villages reported to have made more changes (?1 biosecurity related practice during the study period) compared with that of control villages (70.0% (260/372) vs. 22.6% (85/377), p value<0.01). When observing biosecurity-related practices in intervention villages, overall scores increased significantly (p<0.05). Practices such as use of quarantine cages for new and sick birds, limitation of people movement in backyards and waste management reached high scores during the 15-months period within five of the nine intervention villages. Cascade training managed to reach out to almost all villagers and significantly influence changes in biosecurity practices in the community. However, further follow-ups are needed to assess whether practices-related changes persist over a longer period of time. PMID:23262213

  9. Community action for preventing HIV in Cambodia: evaluation of a 3-year project.

    PubMed

    Sopheab, Heng; Fylkesnes, Knut; Lim, Yi; Godwin, Peter

    2008-07-01

    The 'Community Action for Preventing HIV/AIDS Project' was implemented in four provinces in Cambodia (2001-04) to support a comprehensive set of HIV prevention efforts. Implementation was strictly monitored in terms of inputs, outputs and outcomes. We examine changes in these variables during the project period to assess the extent to which they were related to the project. Inputs and outputs were monitored regularly by supervision and quarterly project reports. Baseline and follow-up surveys were conducted on 10 target groups to measure changes in outcome indicators related to sexual risk behaviours, uses of HIV voluntary counselling and testing (VCT), self-reported sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and other indicators. The analyses use data from surveys and from project monitoring. Spending on HIV-related work at provincial level increased markedly, including investments in VCT, STI facilities and staff training. Yearly expenditure increased about 7-fold compared with years immediately preceding the project. VCT centres increased from 3 to 12, numbers of counsellors from 10 to 27, and numbers of client visits more than doubled. STI laboratory facilities increased from 0 to 6 with coverage of STI check-ups among sex workers increasing from 70% to 93% and a decline in men attending STI clinics. The survey results indicate significant changes in a number of major outcome indicators such as consistent condom use related to sex work (>80%), HIV testing and counselling after HIV tests, especially among police (42 to 72%, P < 0.001) and brothel-based sex workers (48 to 89%, P < 0.001). Self-reported STIs declined in most groups. Finally, the programmatic systems for planning, managing and monitoring implementation of activities at both central and provincial level, as well as technical guidelines, developed under the project have become the standard for the national programme. In conclusion, the project appears to have been comprehensive and a number of favourable changes in output and outcome indicators occurred. It seems likely that the project made a substantial contribution to these positive outcomes, though the extent is not clear. The project is likely to have powerful long-term effects through strengthening of capacity and establishment of systems for the national programme. PMID:18562460

  10. Transpiration by trees under seasonal water logging and drought in monsoon central Cambodia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazawa, Y.; Tateishi, M.; Kajisa, T.; Ma, V.; Heng, S.; Kumagai, T.; Mizoue, N.

    2012-04-01

    Cambodia is situated in the center of Indochina Peninsula and experiences severe drought for 5 months of dry season and subsequent rainy season. Around the Tonlesap Lake where both natural and secondary forests exist without intensive destruction by human activity, forest hydrology is characterized by seasonal water logging in mid rainy season. Tree- and stand-scale transpiration is thought to be influenced by the changing soil water conditions and trees' site-specific adaptation to the environment, but less is measured about transpiration and leaf ecophysiological traits in this region. The objectives of this study is to reveal the ecophysiology of the two native (Dipterocarpus obtusifolius and Shorea roxburghii) and two exotic species (Acacia auriculiformis and Eucalyptus camaldulensis) and to detect the effects of soil water conditions on day to week scale transpiration in mid rainy and dry season. Seasonal leaf-level photosynthesis measurements suggested that photosynthetic capacity (Vcmax25) showed no clear seasonal change in each species without clear interspecific variation. Two native species had stomatal control in response to the environment different from previous studies and showed stomatal conductance higher than most woody species in other seasonal tropical forests, suggesting the species- and site-specific adaptation to the easy access to the ground water. Sap flow rate per leaf area was expressed in two parameters: measured transpiration rate based on the continuous sap flow measurements (Esap) and modeled transpiration rate (Emod) using a multilayer model based on the measured data of atmospheric environments, radiation and the leaf ecophysiological traits. Esap was lower in rainy season than those in dry season, with short but pronounced drop near the end of the dry season, although Emod was higher in rainy season than in dry season. In dry season, Emod well fit the diurnal and day to day trend of Esap, suggesting that soil drought did not limit transpiration. On the other hand, in rainy season, Emod overestimated Esap under high light intensities but not at low Emod conditions, suggesting that leaf water demand exceeded the water supply capacity, possibly due to the water logging effects on root activity. This study provided us new insights into the site specific transpiration patterns in this region, and the usefulness of the comparison between modeled and measured transpiration rate to detect the environmental and biological influence on transpiration for successful model prediction of forest transpiration at large time and spatial scales.

  11. Little Evidence of Subclinical Avian Influenza Virus Infections among Rural Villagers in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Gregory C.; Krueger, Whitney S.; Chum, Channimol; Putnam, Shannon D.; Wierzba, Thomas F.; Heil, Gary L.; Anderson, Benjamin D.; Yasuda, Chadwick Y.; Williams, Maya; Kasper, Matthew R.; Saphonn, Vonthanak; Blair, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    In 2008, 800 adults living within rural Kampong Cham Province, Cambodia were enrolled in a prospective cohort study of zoonotic influenza transmission. After enrollment, participants were contacted weekly for 24 months to identify acute influenza-like illnesses (ILI). Follow-up sera were collected at 12 and 24 months. A transmission substudy was also conducted among the family contacts of cohort members reporting ILI who were influenza A positive. Samples were assessed using serological or molecular techniques looking for evidence of infection with human and avian influenza viruses. Over 24 months, 438 ILI investigations among 284 cohort members were conducted. One cohort member was hospitalized with a H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus infection and withdrew from the study. Ninety-seven ILI cases (22.1%) were identified as influenza A virus infections by real-time RT-PCR; none yielded evidence for AIV. During the 2 years of follow-up, 21 participants (3.0%) had detectable antibody titers (?1?10) against the studied AIVs: 1 against an avian-like A/Migratory duck/Hong Kong/MPS180/2003(H4N6), 3 against an avian-like A/Teal/Hong Kong/w312/97(H6N1), 9 (3 of which had detectible antibody titers at both 12- and 24-month follow-up) against an avian-like A/Hong Kong/1073/1999(H9N2), 6 (1 detected at both 12- and 24-month follow-up) against an avian-like A/Duck/Memphis/546/74(H11N9), and 2 against an avian-like A/Duck/Alberta/60/76(H12N5). With the exception of the one hospitalized cohort member with H5N1 infection, no other symptomatic avian influenza infections were detected among the cohort. Serological evidence for subclinical infections was sparse with only one subject showing a 4-fold rise in microneutralization titer over time against AvH12N5. In summary, despite conducting this closely monitored cohort study in a region enzootic for H5N1 HPAI, we were unable to detect subclinical avian influenza infections, suggesting either that these infections are rare or that our assays are insensitive at detecting them. PMID:24819948

  12. Hydrogeologic reconnaissance of the Mekong Delta in South Vietnam and Cambodia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, Henry R.

    1978-01-01

    The present report describes the results of a hydrogeologic reconnaissance in the Mekong Delta region by the writer, a hydrogeologist of the U.S. Geological Survey, while on assignment as an adviser to the Vietnamese Directorate of Water Supply from October 1968 to April 1970 under the auspices of the U.s. Agency for International Development. The delta of the Mekong River, comprising an area of about 70,000 square kilometres in South Vietnam and Cambodia, is an almost featureless plain rising gradually from sea level to about 5 metres above sea level at its apex 300 kilometres inland. Most of the shallow ground water in the Holocene Alluvium of the delta in Vietnam is brackish or saline down to depths of 50 to 100 metres. Moreover, in the Dong Thap Mu?oi (Plain of Reeds) the shallow ground water is alum-bearing. Locally, however, perched bodies of fresh ground water occur in ancient beach and dune ridges and are tapped by shallow dug wells or pits for village and domestic water supply. The Old Alluvium beneath the lower delta contains freshwater in some areas, notably in the Ca Mau Peninsula and adjacent areas, in the viciniy of Bau Xau near Saigon, and in the Tinh Long An area. Elsewhere in the lower delta both the Holocene and Old Alluvium may contain brackish or saline water from the land surface to depths of as much as 568 metres, as for example in Tinh Vinh Binh. Ground water in the outcrop area of Old Alluvium northwest of Saigon is generally fresh and potable, but high iron and low pH are locally troublesome. Although considerable exploratory drilling for ground water down to depths of as much as 568 metres has already been completed, large areas of the delta remain yet to be explored before full development of the ground-water potential can be realized. With careful development and controlled management to avoid saltwater contamination, however, it is estimated that freshwater aquifers could provide approximately 80 percent of existing needs for village and small municipal supplies in the delta.

  13. Cost-Effectiveness of Primary Prophylaxis of AIDS Associated Cryptococcosis in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Micol, Romain; Tajahmady, Ayden; Lortholary, Olivier; Balkan, Suna; Quillet, Catherine; Dousset, Jean-Philippe; Chanroeun, Hak; Madec, Yoann; Fontanet, Arnaud; Yazdanpanah, Yazdan

    2010-01-01

    Background Cryptococcal infection is a frequent cause of mortality in Cambodian HIV-infected patients with CD4+ count ?100 cells/µl. This study assessed the cost-effectiveness of three strategies for cryptococcosis prevention in HIV-infected patients. Methods A Markov decision tree was used to compare the following strategies at the time of HIV diagnosis: no intervention, one time systematic serum cryptococcal antigen (CRAG) screening and treatment of positive patients, and systematic primary prophylaxis with fluconazole. The trajectory of a hypothetical cohort of HIV-infected patients with CD4+ count ?100 cells/µl initiating care was simulated over a 1-year period (cotrimoxazole initiation at enrollment; antiretroviral therapy within 3 months). Natural history and cost data (US$ 2009) were from Cambodia. Efficacy data were from international literature. Results In a population in which 81% of patients had a CD4+ count ?50 cells/ µl and 19% a CD4+ count between 51–100 cells/µl, the proportion alive 1 year after enrolment was 61% (cost $ 472) with no intervention, 70% (cost $ 483) with screening, and 72% (cost $ 492) with prophylaxis. After one year of follow-up, the cost-effectiveness of screening vs. no intervention was US$ 180/life year gained (LYG). The cost-effectiveness of prophylaxis vs. screening was $ 511/LYG. The cost-effectiveness of prophylaxis vs. screening was estimated at $1538/LYG if the proportion of patients with CD4+ count ?50 cells/µl decreased by 75%. Conclusion In a high endemic area of cryptococcosis and HIV infection, serum CRAG screening and prophylaxis are two cost effective strategies to prevent AIDS associated cryptococcosis in patients with CD4+ count ?100 cells/µl, at a short-term horizon, screening being more cost-effective but less effective than prophylaxis. Systematic primary prophylaxis may be preferred in patients with CD4+ below 50 cells/µl while systematic serum CRAG screening for early targeted treatment may be preferred in patients with CD4+ between 51–100 cells/µl. PMID:21085478

  14. Diagnosis, Treatment and Risk Factors of Strongyloides stercoralis in Schoolchildren in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Khieu, Virak; Schär, Fabian; Marti, Hanspeter; Sayasone, Somphou; Duong, Socheat; Muth, Sinuon; Odermatt, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background Worldwide, an estimated 30 to 100 million people are infected with Strongyloides stercoralis, a soil-transmitted helminth. Information on the parasite is scarce in most settings. In semi-rural Cambodia, we determined infection rates and risk factors; compared two diagnostic methods (Koga agar plate [KAP] culture and Baermann technique) for detecting S. stercoralis infections, using a multiple stool examination approach; and assessed efficacy of ivermectin treatment. Methods/Principal Findings We performed a cross-sectional study in 458 children from four primary schools in semi-rural villages in Kandal province, using three diagnostic procedures (Kato-Katz, KAP culture and Baermann technique) on three stool samples. Infected children were treated with ivermectin (100 µg/kg/day for two days) and re-examined three weeks after treatment. Hookworm, S. stercoralis, Trichuris trichiura, and small trematode eggs were most prevalent, with 24.4% of children being infected with S. stercoralis. The sensitivity of KAP culture and Baermann technique was 88.4% and 75.0%, respectively and their negative predictive values were 96.4% and 92.5%, respectively. The cumulative prevalence of S. stercoralis increased from 18.6% to 24.4%, after analyzing three stool samples, which was close to the modeled ‘true’ prevalence of 24.8%. Children who reported defecating in latrines were significantly less infected with S. stercoralis than those who did not use latrines (p<0.001). Itchy skin and diarrhea were significantly associated with S. stercoralis infection. The cure rate of ivermectin was 98.3%. Conclusions/Significance S. stercoralis infection is highly prevalent among semi-rural Cambodian schoolchildren. The sensitivity of KAP culture is higher than that of the Baermann technique. In the absence of a “gold standard”, analysis of multiple stool samples by different diagnostic methods is required to achieve a satisfactory level of sensitivity. Almost three-quarters of the infections could have been avoided by proper sanitation. Ivermectin is highly efficacious against S. stercoralis but prohibitive costs render the drug inaccessible to most Cambodians. PMID:23409200

  15. Patterns of ecosystem metabolism in the Tonle Sap Lake, Cambodia with links to capture fisheries.

    PubMed

    Holtgrieve, Gordon W; Arias, Mauricio E; Irvine, Kim N; Lamberts, Dirk; Ward, Eric J; Kummu, Matti; Koponen, Jorma; Sarkkula, Juha; Richey, Jeffrey E

    2013-01-01

    The Tonle Sap Lake in Cambodia is a dynamic flood-pulsed ecosystem that annually increases its surface area from roughly 2,500 km(2) to over 12,500 km(2) driven by seasonal flooding from the Mekong River. This flooding is thought to structure many of the critical ecological processes, including aquatic primary and secondary productivity. The lake also has a large fishery that supports the livelihoods of nearly 2 million people. We used a state-space oxygen mass balance model and continuous dissolved oxygen measurements from four locations to provide the first estimates of gross primary productivity (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (ER) for the Tonle Sap. GPP averaged 4.1±2.3 g O2 m(-3) d(-1) with minimal differences among sites. There was a negative correlation between monthly GPP and lake level (r?=?0.45) and positive correlation with turbidity (r?=?0.65). ER averaged 24.9±20.0 g O2 m(-3) d(-1) but had greater than six-fold variation among sites and minimal seasonal change. Repeated hypoxia was observed at most sampling sites along with persistent net heterotrophy (GPP

  16. Improvement in smallholder farmer knowledge of cattle production, health and biosecurity in Southern Cambodia between 2008 and 2010.

    PubMed

    Nampanya, S; Suon, S; Rast, L; Windsor, P A

    2012-04-01

    Farmer knowledge surveys were conducted in 2008 and 2010 in Cambodia to evaluate the impact of a research project studying interventions that can improve cattle production and health, including biosecurity and practices relating to risks of transmission of transboundary diseases. The project hypothesis is that by increasing the value of smallholder-owned large ruminants through nutritional interventions and improved marketing, knowledge-based interventions including risk management for infectious diseases such as foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) can be implemented into a more sustainable pathway for rural development. Between 2008 and 2010, significant improvements in farmer knowledge and attitudes were recorded in three villages in three provinces of southern Cambodia. This was achieved through participatory 'applied field research', 'on the job' training plus 'formal' training programmes. No cases of FMD were recorded during the study period in the 'high-intervention' (HI) villages despite the common occurrence of the disease in a nearby 'low-intervention' and many other villages in the three provinces. Whilst it is likely that protection of these villages from FMD infection was from increasing the herd immunity by vaccination, it could also have been partly because of a decrease in risk behaviours by farmers as a result of their increasing knowledge of biosecurity. The research indicates that smallholder farmers are motivated by nutritional interventions that improve the value of their cattle 'bank' and offer better marketing opportunities. This provides a more receptive environment for introduction of disease risk management for infectious and other production limiting diseases, best implemented for smallholder farmers in Cambodia by intensive training programmes. In lieu of a widespread public awareness programme to deliver mass education of smallholder farmers in disease prevention and biosecurity, livestock development projects in South-East Asia should be encouraged to include training in disease risk management as an important intervention if the current momentum for trade in large ruminant livestock and large ruminant meat is to continue to progress and contribute to addressing global food security concerns. PMID:21791034

  17. Sero-epidemiological evaluation of changes in Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax transmission patterns over the rainy season in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In Cambodia, malaria transmission is low and most cases occur in forested areas. Sero-epidemiological techniques can be used to identify both areas of ongoing transmission and high-risk groups to be targeted by control interventions. This study utilizes repeated cross-sectional data to assess the risk of being malaria sero-positive at two consecutive time points during the rainy season and investigates who is most likely to sero-convert over the transmission season. Methods In 2005, two cross-sectional surveys, one in the middle and the other at the end of the malaria transmission season, were carried out in two ecologically distinct regions in Cambodia. Parasitological and serological data were collected in four districts. Antibodies to Plasmodium falciparum Glutamate Rich Protein (GLURP) and Plasmodium vivax Merozoite Surface Protein-119 (MSP-119) were detected using Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). The force of infection was estimated using a simple catalytic model fitted using maximum likelihood methods. Risks for sero-converting during the rainy season were analysed using the Classification and Regression Tree (CART) method. Results A total of 804 individuals participating in both surveys were analysed. The overall parasite prevalence was low (4.6% and 2.0% for P. falciparum and 7.9% and 6.0% for P. vivax in August and November respectively). P. falciparum force of infection was higher in the eastern region and increased between August and November, whilst P. vivax force of infection was higher in the western region and remained similar in both surveys. In the western region, malaria transmission changed very little across the season (for both species). CART analysis for P. falciparum in the east highlighted age, ethnicity, village of residence and forest work as important predictors for malaria exposure during the rainy season. Adults were more likely to increase their antibody responses to P. falciparum during the transmission season than children, whilst members of the Charay ethnic group demonstrated the largest increases. Discussion In areas of low transmission intensity, such as in Cambodia, the analysis of longitudinal serological data enables a sensitive evaluation of transmission dynamics. Consecutive serological surveys allow an insight into spatio-temporal patterns of malaria transmission. The use of CART enabled multiple interactions to be accounted for simultaneously and permitted risk factors for exposure to be clearly identified. PMID:22443375

  18. Border Malaria Associated with Multidrug Resistance on Thailand-Myanmar and Thailand-Cambodia Borders: Transmission Dynamic, Vulnerability, and Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Bhumiratana, Adisak; Intarapuk, Apiradee; Sorosjinda-Nunthawarasilp, Prapa; Maneekan, Pannamas; Koyadun, Surachart

    2013-01-01

    This systematic review elaborates the concepts and impacts of border malaria, particularly on the emergence and spread of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax multidrug resistance (MDR) malaria on Thailand-Myanmar and Thailand-Cambodia borders. Border malaria encompasses any complex epidemiological settings of forest-related and forest fringe-related malaria, both regularly occurring in certain transmission areas and manifesting a trend of increased incidence in transmission prone areas along these borders, as the result of interconnections of human settlements and movement activities, cross-border population migrations, ecological changes, vector population dynamics, and multidrug resistance. For regional and global perspectives, this review analyzes and synthesizes the rationales pertaining to transmission dynamics and the vulnerabilities of border malaria that constrain surveillance and control of the world's most MDR falciparum and vivax malaria on these chaotic borders. PMID:23865048

  19. Mercury in hair and blood from residents of Phnom Penh (Cambodia) and possible effect on serum hormone levels.

    PubMed

    Agusa, Tetsuro; Kunito, Takashi; Iwata, Hisato; Monirith, In; Chamnan, Chhoun; Tana, Touch Seang; Subramanian, Annamalai; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2007-06-01

    High concentration of mercury (Hg) in hair has been reported for Cambodians. To confirm the Hg contamination occurring through intake, Hg concentrations were determined in both hair and blood of residents (n=20) from Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Mercury concentrations in the hair and blood were 0.69-190microg g(-1) dry wt and 5.2-58microg l(-1), respectively, which were lower than those from Hg contaminated or high fish intake regions, but were higher than those from non-contaminated regions. Some female subjects had hair and blood Hg levels exceeding the threshold values for neurotoxic effects. Interestingly, serum estrone and estradiol levels were positively correlated with blood Hg level for both males and females, indicating possible induction of female hormones by Hg exposure in Cambodians. PMID:17292448

  20. Assessing mixed trace elements in groundwater and their health risk of residents living in the Mekong River basin of Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Phan, Kongkea; Phan, Samrach; Huoy, Laingshun; Suy, Bunseang; Wong, Ming Hung; Hashim, Jamal Hisham; Mohamed Yasin, Mohamed Salleh; Aljunid, Syed Mohamed; Sthiannopkao, Suthipong; Kim, Kyoung-Woong

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the potential contamination of trace elements in shallow Cambodian groundwater. Groundwater and hair samples were collected from three provinces in the Mekong River basin of Cambodia and analyzed by ICP-MS. Groundwater from Kandal (n = 46) and Kraite (n = 12) were enriched in As, Mn, Ba and Fe whereas none of tube wells in Kampong Cham (n = 18) had trace elements higher than Cambodian permissible limits. Risk computations indicated that 98.7% and 12.4% of residents in the study areas of Kandal (n = 297) and Kratie (n = 89) were at risk of non-carcinogenic effects from exposure to multiple elements, yet none were at risk in Kampong Cham (n = 184). Arsenic contributed 99.5%, 60.3% and 84.2% of the aggregate risk in Kandal, Kratie and Kampong Cham, respectively. Sustainable and appropriate treatment technologies must therefore be implemented in order for Cambodian groundwater to be used as potable water. PMID:23906558

  1. The prevalence and psychological costs of household violence by family members against women with disabilities in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Astbury, Jill; Walji, Fareen

    2014-11-01

    Women with disabilities (WWDs) are at triple jeopardy due to the combined risks associated with gender, disability, and violence. Not only are WWDs marginalized socially but the violence against them in their own homes is largely neglected in domestic violence research. Evidence from developing countries is particularly sparse. A cross-sectional survey conducted in Cambodia found rates of violence by household members besides intimate partners were significantly higher among WWDs than non-disabled women. This violence engendered increased levels of psychological distress and higher rates of physical injury but low rates of disclosure to health workers and other formal sources of potential support. Community-based strategies are recommended to radically change social and cultural attitudes, beliefs, and responses to WWDs who are victims of household violence to reduce negative social reactions toward them and to make it safer for them to disclose and receive psychosocial, legal, and other necessary support for this underreported type of violence. PMID:24879651

  2. When social networking is not working: individuals with low self-esteem recognize but do not reap the benefits of self-disclosure on Facebook.

    PubMed

    Forest, Amanda L; Wood, Joanne V

    2012-03-01

    The popular media have publicized the idea that social networking Web sites (e.g., Facebook) may enrich the interpersonal lives of people who struggle to make social connections. The opportunity that such sites provide for self-disclosure-a necessary component in the development of intimacy--could be especially beneficial for people with low self-esteem, who are normally hesitant to self-disclose and who have difficulty maintaining satisfying relationships. We suspected that posting on Facebook would reduce the perceived riskiness of self-disclosure, thus encouraging people with low self-esteem to express themselves more openly. In three studies, we examined whether such individuals see Facebook as a safe and appealing medium for self-disclosure, and whether their actual Facebook posts enabled them to reap social rewards. We found that although people with low self-esteem considered Facebook an appealing venue for self-disclosure, the low positivity and high negativity of their disclosures elicited undesirable responses from other people. PMID:22318997

  3. Identifying Conservation Successes, Failures and Future Opportunities; Assessing Recovery Potential of Wild Ungulates and Tigers in Eastern Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    O'Kelly, Hannah J.; Evans, Tom D.; Stokes, Emma J.; Clements, Tom J.; Dara, An; Gately, Mark; Menghor, Nut; Pollard, Edward H. B.; Soriyun, Men; Walston, Joe

    2012-01-01

    Conservation investment, particularly for charismatic and wide-ranging large mammal species, needs to be evidence-based. Despite the prevalence of this theme within the literature, examples of robust data being generated to guide conservation policy and funding decisions are rare. We present the first published case-study of tiger conservation in Indochina, from a site where an evidence-based approach has been implemented for this iconic predator and its prey. Despite the persistence of extensive areas of habitat, Indochina's tiger and ungulate prey populations are widely supposed to have precipitously declined in recent decades. The Seima Protection Forest (SPF), and broader Eastern Plains Landscape, was identified in 2000 as representing Cambodia's best hope for tiger recovery; reflected in its designation as a Global Priority Tiger Conservation Landscape. Since 2005 distance sampling, camera-trapping and detection-dog surveys have been employed to assess the recovery potential of ungulate and tiger populations in SPF. Our results show that while conservation efforts have ensured that small but regionally significant populations of larger ungulates persist, and density trends in smaller ungulates are stable, overall ungulate populations remain well below theoretical carrying capacity. Extensive field surveys failed to yield any evidence of tiger, and we contend that there is no longer a resident population within the SPF. This local extirpation is believed to be primarily attributable to two decades of intensive hunting; but importantly, prey densities are also currently below the level necessary to support a viable tiger population. Based on these results and similar findings from neighbouring sites, Eastern Cambodia does not currently constitute a Tiger Source Site nor meet the criteria of a Global Priority Tiger Landscape. However, SPF retains global importance for many other elements of biodiversity. It retains high regional importance for ungulate populations and potentially in the future for Indochinese tigers, given adequate prey and protection. PMID:23077476

  4. Arsenic contamination in the food chain and its risk assessment of populations residing in the Mekong River basin of Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Phan, Kongkea; Sthiannopkao, Suthipong; Heng, Savoeun; Phan, Samrach; Huoy, Laingshun; Wong, Ming Hung; Kim, Kyoung-Woong

    2013-11-15

    In the present study, we investigated the potential arsenic exposure of Cambodian residents from their daily food consumption. Environmental and ecological samples such as paddy soils, paddy rice (unhusked), staple rice (uncooked and cooked), fish and vegetables were collected from Kandal, Kratie and Kampong Cham provinces in the Mekong River basin of Cambodia. After acid-digestion, digestates were chemically analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Results revealed that the means of total arsenic concentration ([As]tot) in paddy soils and paddy rice from Kandal were significantly higher than those from Kampong Cham province (t-test, p<0.05). Moreover, a significant positive correlation between the [As]tot in paddy soils and paddy rice was found (r(14) = 0.826, p<0.01). Calculations of arsenic intake from food consumption indicated that the upper end of the range of the daily dose of inorganic arsenic for Kandal residents (0.089-8.386 ?g d(-1) kg(-1) body wt.) was greater than the lower limits on the benchmark dose for a 0.5% increased incidence of lung cancer (BMDL0.5 is equal to 3.0 ?g d(-1) kg(-1) body wt.). The present study suggests that the residents in Kandal are at risk of arsenic intake from their daily food consumption. However, the residents in Kratie and Kampong Cham provinces are less likely to be exposed to arsenic through their daily dietary intake. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report estimating the daily intake and daily dose of inorganic arsenic from food consumption in the Mekong River basin of Cambodia. PMID:22818591

  5. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Oral Artesunate Monotherapy in Patients with Uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum Malaria in Western Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Khemawoot, Phisit; Vanachayangkul, Pattaraporn; Siripokasupkul, Raveewan; Bethell, Delia; Tyner, Stuart; Se, Youry; Rutvisuttinunt, Wiriya; Sriwichai, Sabaithip; Chanthap, Lon; Lin, Jessica; Timmermans, Ans; Socheat, Doung; Ringwald, Pascal; Noedl, Harald; Smith, Bryan; Fukuda, Mark; Teja-isavadharm, Paktiya

    2012-01-01

    Artemisinin-resistant malaria along the Thailand-Cambodian border is an important public health concern, yet mechanisms of drug action and their contributions to the development of resistance are poorly understood. The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of oral artesunate monotherapy were explored in a dose-ranging trial in an area of emerging artesunate resistance in western Cambodia. We enrolled 143 evaluable subjects with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in an open label study of directly observed artesunate monotherapy at 3 dose levels (2, 4, and 6 mg/kg of body weight/day) for 7 days at Tasanh Health Center, Tasanh, Cambodia. Clinical outcomes were similar among the 3 groups. Wide variability in artesunate and dihydroartemisinin concentrations in plasma was observed. No significant dose-effect or concentration-effect relationships between pharmacokinetic (PK) and parasite clearance parameters were observed, though baseline parasitemia was modestly correlated with increased parasite clearance times. The overall parasite clearance times were prolonged compared with the clearance times in a previous study at this site in 2006 to 2007, but this did not persist when the evaluation was limited to subjects with a comparable artesunate dose (4 mg/kg/day) and baseline parasitemia from the two studies. Reduced plasma drug levels with higher presentation parasitemias, previously hypothesized to result from partitioning into infected red blood cells, was not observed in this population with uncomplicated malaria. Neither in vitro parasite susceptibility nor plasma drug concentrations appeared to have a direct relationship with the pharmacodynamic (PD) effects of oral artesunate on malaria parasites. While direct concentration-effect relationships were not found, it remains possible that a population PK modeling approach that allows modeling of greater dose separation might discern more-subtle relationships. PMID:22869581

  6. Uptake of interventions for preventing mother-to-child HIV transmission in 11 operational districts in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Sovannarith, Samreth; Sokleng, Sun; Romaing, Tep; Sovanna, Tuon; Welle, Emily; Poudel, Krishna C.; Barr–DiChiara, Magdalena; Bora, Ngauv; Sopheap, Seng; Sovatha, Mam; Campbell, Penelope; Vun, Mean Chhi

    2012-01-01

    Introduction To achieve the global goal of eliminating mother-to-child transmission of HIV, retention of HIV-positive women and their babies throughout the cascade of prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) services is necessary. Little evidence has been published on coverage of the cascade in resource-limited settings. Along with PMTCT service expansion in Cambodia, a national routine reporting system was developed. This study examines coverage of six PMTCT interventions to improve our understanding of retention throughout the cascade. Method We developed indicators to monitor coverage of the six key interventions: (1) maternal antiretroviral treatment or prophylaxis; (2) delivery in a health facility; (3) infant ARV prophylaxis at birth; (4) infant co-trimoxazole prophylaxis at six weeks; (5) first infant DNA-PCR test at six weeks; and (6) second infant DNA-PCR test at 30 weeks. Programme data from April 2008 to December 2011 in 11 operational districts were used to identify those eligible for each intervention. Results Women eligible for maternal antiretroviral treatment or prophylaxis in the study were aged 18 to 48 with a median age of 30 years. Coverage of the six interventions were: (1) 79.9% (258/323); (2) 92.2% (236/256); (3) 69.9% (179/256); (4) 73.3% (184/251); (5) 85.7% (215/251); and (6) 61.6% (135/219). Among those eligible, 29.7% (65/219) received all six interventions. Discussion This study revealed critical gaps in PMTCT service delivery under routine conditions in Cambodia. Service optimization by reducing gaps will help eliminate HIV infection among infants and improve maternal survival. Further operational studies are needed to identify determinants of service uptake. PMID:23908918

  7. Angkor site monitoring and evaluation by radar remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fulong; Jiang, Aihui; Ishwaran, Natarajan

    2014-11-01

    Angkor, in the northern province of Siem Reap, Cambodia, is one of the most important world heritage sites of Southeast Asia. Seasonal flood and ground sinking are two representative hazards in Angkor site. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) remote sensing has played an important role for the Angkor site monitoring and management. In this study, 46 scenes of TerraSAR data acquired in the span of February, 2011 to December, 2013 were used for the time series analysis and hazard evaluation; that is, two-fold classification for flood area extracting and Multi-Temporal SAR Interferometry (MT-InSAR) for ground subsidence monitoring. For the flood investigation, the original Single Look Complex (SLC) TerraSAR-X data were transferred into amplitude images. Water features in dry and flood seasons were firstly extracted using a proposed mixed-threshold approach based on the backscattering; and then for the correlation analysis between water features and the precipitation in seasonally and annually. Using the MT-InSAR method, the ground subsidence was derived with values ranging from -50 to +12 mm/yr in the observation period of February, 2011 to June, 2013. It is clear that the displacement on the Angkor site was evident, implying the necessity of continuous monitoring.

  8. Validation of satellite precipitation product GSMaP/NRT with ground rain gauges in Cambodia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujimoto, Kumiko; Ohta, Tetsu; Koike, Toshio

    2014-05-01

    The Global Satellite Mapping of Precipitation Near Real Time data (GSMaP/NRT) is one of the satellite precipitation datasets which is produced by Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency with time resolution of 1 hour and spatial resolution of 0.1 degrees. Since it is published approximately 4 hours after the observation, it is expected to contribute to the early warning of floods and water resource management in developing countries as well which have poor ground observation network. Our target area, Cambodia in the Indochina Peninsula, is one of such countries. However, there had been few ground rain gauges so that it had been impossible to validate GSMaP/NRT. Thus, the accuracy of GSMaP/NRT in this area had been unclear. One of the major characteristics of this area is that it has a vast lake area with water surface temperature of more than 30 degrees all year round. With this lake surface, it has been relieved that a unique local atmospheric circulation and its associated precipitation occur in this area. In order to validate the rainfall amount in this area, we rehabilitated and newly installed rain gauges. As a result, we have 34 automatic rain-gauges now and data is available from September 2009. Using this data as well as hourly rainfall amount from GSMaP/NRT and brightness temperature (TB) from Multi-functional Transport Satellite Infrared 1 channel (MTSAT/IR1), we analyzed the error tendency of the GSMaP/NRT product. The analysis showed that the relationship between rain gauges and GSMaP/NRT were very poor. Especially, strong rainfall events in full-monsoon season over land with 208K < TB < 253K and those in post-monsoon season over the lake with TB < 208K were very much underestimated by GSMaP/NRT. The results suggest that it is still difficult to use GSMaP/NRT data for hydrological applications to get soil moisture distribution and river discharge in this area, especially at small river basins. In addition, although many rainfall events were produced by GSMaP/NRT when TB < 208K in full-monsoon season, almost no rainfall were actually recorded by rain gauges. Most of the rainfall events in full-monsoon season were found to be occurred under TB > 208K, sometimes even TB > 273K, but rainfalls with TB > 253K were poorly captured by GSMaP/NRT. When we take 720-hour (~1-month) -moving-average, post-monsoon rainfall with 253K < TB < 273K over and around the lake has almost linear relationship between the two and the slope is about 1. This tendency can be used to assess the available water resources and grasp the climatological characteristics.

  9. Therapeutic efficacy of fixed dose artesunate-mefloquine for the treatment of acute, uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Kampong Speu, Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cambodia stopped using co-blistered, non-fixed, artesunate-mefloquine (ASMQ) in 2008 when treatment failure rates approximated 20%. Fixed dose combination (FDC) ASMQ is efficacious against acute uncomplicated, drug resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Southeast Asia but has not been tested in Cambodia. Methods A 42-day WHO therapeutic efficacy study (TES) was conducted in 2010 in Oral, Kampong Speu province, south-west Cambodia, in patients with acute uncomplicated P. falciparum. Daily administered FDC ASMQ for three days was dosed by age. Genotyping of isolates at day 0 and day of recrudescence by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) classified post-treatment recurrent falciparum parasitaemia. Ex vivo drug sensitivity testing ([3H] hypoxanthine method) was performed on baseline parasites and reported as the drug concentration inhibiting 50% parasite growth vs no drug (IC50). Results Recruited patients numbered 45; five aged <15 years. On day 3, five of 45 [11.1 (3.7-24.05)] % patients were still parasite-positive; one of whom later failed treatment on day 21. There were 5/45 (11.1%) late treatment failures on day 21, 28 and 35; all were PCR diagnosed recrudescent infections. The day 0 MQ IC50s ranged from 11.5-238.9 (median 58.6) nM. Conclusions This TES demonstrated reasonable efficacy in an area of possible reduced artemisinin sensitivity and high MQ IC50s. Efficacy testing of FDC ASMQ should continue in Cambodia and be considered for reintroduction if efficacy returns. PMID:24060207

  10. Although only recently reopened, Angkor Wat already facing growing pains

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Grinnell, Max

    2006-01-01

    Tourism official proposes elephant ban at Angkorhttp://english.people.com.cn/200609/20/eng20060920_304606.htmlAPSARA [Macromedia Flash Player]http://www.autoriteapsara.org/Is Angkor Wat too touristy?http://travel.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,18409-2363554,00.htmlGreat Buildings Online: Angkor Wathttp://www.greatbuildings.com/buildings/Angkor_Wat.htmlInteractive Map of World Heritage Properties [Macromedia Flash Player]http://whc.unesco.org/en/mapCambodia Posthttp://www.cambodiajournal.com/Rulers have long sought to create lasting landmarks through grand buildings and public works projects, and Angkor Wat is certainly one of the most well known places in South East Asia, if not the entire world. Initially built in the early 12th century, the temple and its surrounding grounds have long been popular tourist destinations, and they have survived a number of potential threats, including the long civil war in Cambodia that engulfed the entire country and the region for several decades. However, another threat is looming that could have even more dire consequences, namely the arrival of millions of tourists. Tourism officials recently reported that close to two million tourists will visit the temples this year, and almost 500,000 of them will arrive in November and December. In the town of Siem Reap, which serves as the gateway to the Angkor complex, the bureau chief of the townâ??s tourism department remarked that â??There are too many people, and itâ??s difficult to supply and feed them.â? The situation is also rather complex due to the fact that Cambodia as a whole is heavily reliant on tourism, and a number of government officials are hard pressed to reign in this booming sector of the nationâ??s economy. In the meantime, there are plans in place to improve the local infrastructure problems around Siem Reap, but it remains to be seen what sustainable measures might need to be taken to ensure the integrity of these important elements of the historical and cultural landscape.The first link will take users to piece on the issues raised by increased tourism around Angkor Wat from the Christian Science Monitorâ??s Adam Piore. The second link leads to a news story from the Peopleâ??s Daily Online that talks about the proposal offered by one tourism official which would ban elephants from the grounds. The third link leads to the website of the APSARA agency, which is responsible for providing stewardship of the buildings and the grounds. Here, visitor can learn about the areaâ??s history and art, and see maps of each monument. The fourth link whisks users away to a piece in the Sunday Times that offers some expert advice (along with the observations of other tourists) about whether or not Angkor Wat has become â??too touristyâ?. The fifth link leads to the entry from Great Buildings Online on Angkor Wat, which includes some basic history of the complex, along with a number of aerial photographs. The sixth link leads to the interactive map of World Heritage properties. Finally, the last link leads to a nice site that culls news stories about Cambodia and the region into one nice package for visitors who would like to stay abreast of ongoing events in the area.

  11. Socially-marketed rapid diagnostic tests and ACT in the private sector: ten years of experience in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Shunmay; Patouillard, Edith; Allen, Henrietta; Socheat, Duong

    2011-01-01

    Whilst some populations have recently experienced dramatic declines in malaria, the majority of those most at risk of Plasmodium falciparum malaria still lack access to effective treatment with artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) and others are already facing parasites resistant to artemisinins.In this context, there is a crucial need to improve both access to and targeting of ACT through greater availability of good quality ACT and parasitological diagnosis. This is an issue of increasing urgency notably in the private commercial sector, which, in many countries, plays an important role in the provision of malaria treatment. The Affordable Medicines Facility for malaria (AMFm) is a recent initiative that aims to increase the provision of affordable ACT in public, private and NGO sectors through a manufacturer-level subsidy. However, to date, there is little documented experience in the programmatic implementation of subsidized ACT in the private sector. Cambodia is in the unique position of having more than 10 years of experience not only in implementing subsidized ACT, but also rapid diagnostic tests (RDT) as part of a nationwide social marketing programme. The programme includes behaviour change communication and the training of private providers as well as the sale and distribution of Malarine, the recommended ACT, and Malacheck, the RDT. This paper describes and evaluates this experience by drawing on the results of household and provider surveys conducted since the start of the programme. The available evidence suggests that providers' and consumers' awareness of Malarine increased rapidly, but that of Malacheck much less so. In addition, improvements in ACT and RDT availability and uptake were relatively slow, particularly in more remote areas.The lack of standardization in the survey methods and the gaps in the data highlight the importance of establishing a clear system for monitoring and evaluation for similar initiatives. Despite these limitations, a number of important lessons can still be learnt. These include the importance of a comprehensive communications strategy and of a sustained and reliable supply of products, with attention to the geographical reach of both. Other important challenges relate to the difficulty in incentivising providers and consumers not only to choose the recommended drug, but to precede this with a confirmatory blood test and ensure that providers adhere to the test results and patients to the treatment regime. In Cambodia, this is particularly complicated due to problems inherent to the drug itself and the emergence of artemisinin resistance. PMID:21851625

  12. AIDS-Related Stigma and Mental Disorders among People Living with HIV: A Cross-Sectional Study in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Siyan; Chhoun, Pheak; Suong, Samedy; Thin, Kouland; Brody, Carinne; Tuot, Sovannary

    2015-01-01

    Background AIDS-related stigma and mental disorders are the most common conditions in people living with HIV (PLHIV). We therefore conducted this study to examine the association of AIDS-related stigma and discrimination with mental disorders among PLHIV in Cambodia. Methods A two-stage cluster sampling method was used to select 1,003 adult PLHIV from six provinces. The People Living with HIV Stigma Index was used to measure stigma and discrimination, and a short version of general health questionnaire (GHQ-12) was used to measure mental disorders. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted. Results The reported experiences of discrimination in communities in the past 12 months ranged from 0.8% for reports of being denied health services to 42.3% for being aware of being gossiped about. Internal stigma was also common ranging from 2.8% for avoiding going to a local clinic and/or hospital to 59.6% for deciding not to have (more) children. The proportions of PLHIV who reported fear of stigma and discrimination ranged from 13.9% for fear of being physically assaulted to 34.5% for fear of being gossiped about. The mean score of GHQ-12 was 3.2 (SD = 2.4). After controlling for several potential confounders, higher levels of mental disorders (GHQ-12? 4) remained significantly associated with higher levels of experiences of stigma and discrimination in family and communities (AOR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.4–2.6), higher levels of internal stigma (AOR = 1.7, 95% CI = 1.2–2.3), and higher levels of fear of stigma and discrimination in family and communities (AOR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.1–2.2). Conclusions AIDS-related stigma and discrimination among PLHIV in Cambodia are common and may have potential impacts on their mental health conditions. These findings indicate a need for community-based interventions to reduce stigma and discrimination in the general public and to help PLHIV to cope with this situation. PMID:25806534

  13. Socially-marketed rapid diagnostic tests and ACT in the private sector: ten years of experience in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Whilst some populations have recently experienced dramatic declines in malaria, the majority of those most at risk of Plasmodium falciparum malaria still lack access to effective treatment with artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) and others are already facing parasites resistant to artemisinins. In this context, there is a crucial need to improve both access to and targeting of ACT through greater availability of good quality ACT and parasitological diagnosis. This is an issue of increasing urgency notably in the private commercial sector, which, in many countries, plays an important role in the provision of malaria treatment. The Affordable Medicines Facility for malaria (AMFm) is a recent initiative that aims to increase the provision of affordable ACT in public, private and NGO sectors through a manufacturer-level subsidy. However, to date, there is little documented experience in the programmatic implementation of subsidized ACT in the private sector. Cambodia is in the unique position of having more than 10 years of experience not only in implementing subsidized ACT, but also rapid diagnostic tests (RDT) as part of a nationwide social marketing programme. The programme includes behaviour change communication and the training of private providers as well as the sale and distribution of Malarine, the recommended ACT, and Malacheck, the RDT. This paper describes and evaluates this experience by drawing on the results of household and provider surveys conducted since the start of the programme. The available evidence suggests that providers' and consumers' awareness of Malarine increased rapidly, but that of Malacheck much less so. In addition, improvements in ACT and RDT availability and uptake were relatively slow, particularly in more remote areas. The lack of standardization in the survey methods and the gaps in the data highlight the importance of establishing a clear system for monitoring and evaluation for similar initiatives. Despite these limitations, a number of important lessons can still be learnt. These include the importance of a comprehensive communications strategy and of a sustained and reliable supply of products, with attention to the geographical reach of both. Other important challenges relate to the difficulty in incentivising providers and consumers not only to choose the recommended drug, but to precede this with a confirmatory blood test and ensure that providers adhere to the test results and patients to the treatment regime. In Cambodia, this is particularly complicated due to problems inherent to the drug itself and the emergence of artemisinin resistance. PMID:21851625

  14. Linking Organic Matter Deposition And Iron Mineral Transformations to Groundwater Arsenic Levels in the Mekong Delta, Cambodia

    SciTech Connect

    Quicksall, A.N.; Bostick, B.C.; Sampson, M.L.

    2009-05-21

    Enriched As in drinking water wells in south and Southeast Asia has increased the risk of cancer for nearly 100 million people. This enrichment is generally attributed to the reductive dissolution of Fe oxides; however, the complex expression of As enrichment in these areas is not yet well understood. Here, the coupled sedimentological and geochemical factors that contribute to the extent and spatial distribution of groundwater As concentrations in the Mekong River delta, Cambodia in an avulsed scroll bar sequence are examined. X-Ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was used to determine Fe and As speciation in redox preserved sediment collected from drilled cores. Dissolved As, Fe and S solution concentrations in existing and newly drilled wells (cores) differed considerably depending on their source sedimentology. The rapid burial of organic matter in the scroll bar sequence facilitated the development of extensive Fe-reducing conditions, and As release into the aquifer. In older features organic C levels are high enough to sustain extensive Fe reduction and provide ample SO{sub 4} which is reduced to sulfide. This S reduction impacts As levels; As is sequestered in sulfide minerals outside of the scrollbar sequence, decreasing pore water concentrations. In contrast, As is depleted in sediments from the scroll sequence, and associated with elevated pore water aqueous concentrations. The concentration and form of organic C in the scrollbar sequence is related to depositional environment, and can facilitate Fe and S mineral transformations, distinct sedimentary environments explain a portion of the inherent heterogeneity of aquifer As concentrations.

  15. Bacterial Communities in Pigmented Biofilms Formed on the Sandstone Bas-Relief Walls of the Bayon Temple, Angkor Thom, Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Kusumi, Asako; Li, Xianshu; Osuga, Yu; Kawashima, Arata; Gu, Ji-Dong; Nasu, Masao; Katayama, Yoko

    2013-01-01

    The Bayon temple in Angkor Thom, Cambodia has shown serious deterioration and is subject to the formation of various pigmented biofilms. Because biofilms are damaging the bas-reliefs, low reliefs engraved on the surface of sandstone, information about the microbial community within them is indispensable to control biofilm colonization. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of biofilm samples from the pigmented sandstone surfaces showed that the bacterial community members in the biofilms differed clearly from those in the air and had low sequence similarity to database sequences. Non-destructive sampling of biofilm revealed novel bacterial groups of predominantly Rubrobacter in salmon pink biofilm, Cyanobacteria in chrome green biofilm, Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexi in signal violet biofilm, Chloroflexi in black gray biofilm, and Deinococcus-Thermus, Cyanobacteria, and Rubrobacter in blue green biofilm. Serial peeling-off of a thick biofilm by layers with adhesive sheets revealed a stratified structure: the blue–green biofilm, around which there was serious deterioration, was very rich in Cyanobacteria near the surface and Chloroflexi in deep layer below. Nitrate ion concentrations were high in the blue–green biofilm. The characteristic distribution of bacteria at different biofilm depths provides valuable information on not only the biofilm formation process but also the sandstone weathering process in the tropics. PMID:24334526

  16. Technology, Culture and the Manufacturing Engineer: How Studying SME's in Cambodia Can Teach Manufacturing Students About Global Enterprise

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Hawks, Val D.

    In his book The World is Flat, Thomas Friedman describes what he calls "the quiet crisis" as the "erosion of Americas science and engineering base, which has always been the source of Americas innovation and our standard of living." The crisis is the increasing penetration of global competition on the economic output of the United States, now an issue to which engineering education is paying serious attention. However, it is not a crisis of just technical issues. What is needed with respect to global learning and experience is more than just technical competence and expertise. Bill Wulf said "engineering is now practiced in a global, holistic business context, and engineers must design under constraints that reflect that context. In the future, understanding other cultures, speaking other languages, and communicating with people from marketing and finance will be just as fundamental to the practice of engineering as physics and calculus." For faculty and students and BYU, a recent project of studying manufacturing in Cambodia also became a study of Cambodian history, government, and culture. As a result it became, for both students and faculty, a learning experience in the broader, more holistic context of manufacturing, engineering, technology, and global issues.

  17. A matter of good taste: Investigating preferences for in-house water treatment in peri-urban communities in Cambodia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeuland, M. A.; Orgill, J.; Brown, J.; Shaheed, A.

    2012-12-01

    It is commonly argued that low demand for in-house water treatment technologies is not simply due to their cost, but also results from their other unfavorable features, notably distaste or convenience problems. This research considers household preferences for in-house water treatment in two peri-urban communes around Phnom Penh, Cambodia, with a particular focus on taste. In an effort to measure sensitivity to taste problems, respondents from more than 900 households were given water samples treated with randomly assigned levels of chlorine, as well as a bottled water placebo, and were asked to compare their favorite samples with their existing drinking water source. Households were also asked to complete a series of conjoint tasks in which they selected their preferred drinking water alternative among options that varied in terms of cost, taste, effectiveness against diarrheal disease and quantity of water treated. Our findings suggest that households do perceive distaste for water treated with chlorine products, and that taste is an important feature of their selection of water treatment alternatives. Better understanding of the taste preferences of households in communities without access to safe water is thus critical to interventions seeking to promote in-house water treatment.

  18. Bacterial communities in pigmented biofilms formed on the sandstone bas-relief walls of the Bayon Temple, Angkor Thom, Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Kusumi, Asako; Li, Xianshu; Osuga, Yu; Kawashima, Arata; Gu, Ji-Dong; Nasu, Masao; Katayama, Yoko

    2013-01-01

    The Bayon temple in Angkor Thom, Cambodia has shown serious deterioration and is subject to the formation of various pigmented biofilms. Because biofilms are damaging the bas-reliefs, low reliefs engraved on the surface of sandstone, information about the microbial community within them is indispensable to control biofilm colonization. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of biofilm samples from the pigmented sandstone surfaces showed that the bacterial community members in the biofilms differed clearly from those in the air and had low sequence similarity to database sequences. Non-destructive sampling of biofilm revealed novel bacterial groups of predominantly Rubrobacter in salmon pink biofilm, Cyanobacteria in chrome green biofilm, Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexi in signal violet biofilm, Chloroflexi in black gray biofilm, and Deinococcus-Thermus, Cyanobacteria, and Rubrobacter in blue green biofilm. Serial peeling-off of a thick biofilm by layers with adhesive sheets revealed a stratified structure: the blue-green biofilm, around which there was serious deterioration, was very rich in Cyanobacteria near the surface and Chloroflexi in deep layer below. Nitrate ion concentrations were high in the blue-green biofilm. The characteristic distribution of bacteria at different biofilm depths provides valuable information on not only the biofilm formation process but also the sandstone weathering process in the tropics. PMID:24334526

  19. Condom negotiation across different relationship types by young women engaged in sex work in Phnom Penh, Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Lisa; Mooney-Somers, Julie; Phlong, Pisith; Couture, Marie-Claude; Kien, Serey Phal; Stein, Ellen; Bates, Anna Juong; Sansothy, Neth; Page, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    Cambodia's 100% Condom Use Programme is credited with an increase in consistent condom use in commercial sexual interactions and a decrease in HIV prevalence among female sex workers (FSWs). There has been little improvement in condom use between FSWs and non-commercial partners, prompting calls for more innovative approaches to increasing condom use in these relationships. To understand why condoms are used or not used in sexual interactions involving FSWs, we examined condom negotiation across different types of relationships. We conducted 33 in-depth interviews with young (15 to 29 years) women engaged in sex work in Phnom Penh. There was an important interplay between the meanings of condom use and the meanings of women's relationships. Commercial relationships were characterised as inherently risky and necessitated condom use. Despite a similar lack of sexual fidelity, sweetheart relationships were rarely construed as risky and typically did not involve condom use. Husbands and wives constructed their sexual interactions with each other differently, making agreement on condom use difficult. The lack of improvement in condom use in FSWs' non-commercial sexual relationships needs to be understood in relation to both sex work and the broader Cambodian sexual culture within which these relationships are embedded. PMID:23432108

  20. Arsenic in groundwater and its influence on exposure risks through traditionally cooked rice in Prey Vêng Province, Cambodia.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, A; Phillips, D H; Kok, S; Chea, E; Seng, B; Sen Gupta, B

    2013-11-15

    Arsenic (As) contamination of communal tubewells in Prey Vêng, Cambodia, has been observed since 2000. Many of these wells exceed the WHO As in drinking water standard of 10 ?g/L by a factor of 100. The aim of this study was to assess how cooking water source impacts dietary As intake in a rural community in Prey Vêng. This aim was fulfilled by (1) using geostatistical analysis techniques to examine the extent of As contaminated groundwater in Prey Vêng and identify a suitable study site, (2) conducting an on-site study in two villages to measure As content in cooked rice prepared with water collected from tubewells and locally harvested rainwater, and (3) determining the dietary intake of As from consuming this rice. Geostatistical analysis indicated that high risk tubewells (>50 ?g As/L) are concentrated along the Mekong River's east bank. Participants using high risk tubewells are consuming up to 24 times more inorganic As daily than recommended by the previous FAO/WHO provisional tolerable daily intake value (2.1 ?g/kg BW/day). However, As content in rice cooked in rainwater was significantly reduced, therefore, it is considered to be a safer and more sustainable option for this region. PMID:23643198

  1. Mid-Holocene mangrove succession and its response to sea-level change in the upper Mekong River delta, Cambodia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen; Saito, Yoshiki; Mao, Limi; Tamura, Toru; Li, Zhen; Song, Bing; Zhang, Yulan; Lu, Anqing; Sieng, Sotham; Li, Jie

    2012-09-01

    Middle Holocene vegetation and mangrove successions are clearly evident in the palynological records of two cores from the upper Mekong River delta in Cambodia. Spanning from ~ 9.4 to 6.3 cal ka BP, the cores mainly record a transgressive sequence from floodplain freshwater marsh to tidal flat, which was overlain by mangrove. Corresponding to the decelerated sea-level rise at ~ 8.3 cal ka BP, pioneer mangrove species Sonneratia alba and Sonneratia caseolaris appeared in the sediments, and then was replaced by regressive mangrove succession containing upward-increasing abundances of Rhizophora apiculata and Bruguiera spp. High salinity- and flooding-tolerant community S. alba was developed at the western core site PSG at ~ 8.2 cal ka BP, and the eastern core site PK at ~ 7.5 cal ka BP. The time difference of S. alba appearance between the two sites might be resulted from the complexity of sedimentary environment, where a higher sediment supply was provided to the western floodplain than to the eastern floodplain. After 7.5 cal ka BP, aggradational stacking of intertidal sediments, of which the thickness is larger than the present maximum tidal range, may have resulted from continuous sea-level rise during 7.5-7.0 cal ka BP.

  2. ‘Plue plun’ male, ‘kath klei’ female: gender differences in suicidal behavior as expressed by young people in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Jegannathan, Bhoomikumar; Dahlblom, Kjerstin; Kullgren, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    Few studies from low- and middle-income countries use qualitative methodology to explore suicidal behavior among young people. In Cambodia, young people face the challenge of rapidly changing times and are vulnerable for suicidal behavior as revealed by research in transitional economies. This study seeks to gain a deeper understanding of the suicidal phenomena from a gender, psychosocial and cultural perspective. Six focus-group discussions were conducted among boys and girls, aged 15–19 years, in two secondary schools in a suburban area close to Phnom Penh, the capital city. The data was analyzed using thematic analysis approach. The participants highlighted the gender difference in suicidal behavior by describing the suicide-prone, acting-out male as ‘plue plun’, while suicide-prone females were described as caught in constricted, tunneled-thinking behavior, expressed as ‘kath klei’. Parental attitude and family environment were also pointed out as the chief causes of discontent and there was a strong wish on the part of young people to find space for modern values within the traditional family. The young people's awareness of their challenges in everyday life suggests that school-based programs to prevent suicidal behavior ought to be gender-sensitive and peer-focused. PMID:24999370

  3. Comparing the microbial risks associated with household drinking water supplies used in peri-urban communities of Phnom Penh, Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Thomas, K; McBean, E; Shantz, A; Murphy, H M

    2015-03-01

    Most Cambodians lack access to a safe source of drinking water. Piped distribution systems are typically limited to major urban centers in Cambodia, and the remaining population relies on a variety of surface, rain, and groundwater sources. This study examines the household water supplies available to Phnom Penh's resettled peri-urban residents through a case-study approach of two communities. A quantitative microbial risk assessment is performed to assess the level of diarrheal disease risk faced by community members due to microbial contamination of drinking water. Risk levels found in this study exceed those associated with households consuming piped water. Filtered and boiled rain and tank water stored in a kettle, bucket/cooler, bucket with spigot or a 500 mL bottle were found to provide risk levels within one order-of-magnitude to the piped water available in Phnom Penh. Two primary concerns identified are the negation of the risk reductions gained by boiling due to prevailing poor storage practices and the use of highly contaminated source water. PMID:25719483

  4. Microbial Community Analysis of Fresh and Old Microbial Biofilms on Bayon Temple Sandstone of Angkor Thom, Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Wensheng; Li, Hui; Wang, Wei-Dong; Katayama, Yoko

    2010-01-01

    The temples of Angkor monuments including Angkor Thom and Bayon in Cambodia and surrounding countries were exclusively constructed using sandstone. They are severely threatened by biodeterioration caused by active growth of different microorganisms on the sandstone surfaces, but knowledge on the microbial community and composition of the biofilms on the sandstone is not available from this region. This study investigated the microbial community diversity by examining the fresh and old biofilms of the biodeteriorated bas-relief wall surfaces of the Bayon Temple by analysis of 16S and 18S rRNA gene sequences. The results showed that the retrieved sequences were clustered in 11 bacterial, 11 eukaryotic and two archaeal divisions with disparate communities (Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria; Alveolata, Fungi, Metazoa, Viridiplantae; Crenarchaeote, and Euyarchaeota). A comparison of the microbial communities between the fresh and old biofilms revealed that the bacterial community of old biofilm was very similar to the newly formed fresh biofilm in terms of bacterial composition, but the eukaryotic communities were distinctly different between these two. This information has important implications for understanding the formation process and development of the microbial diversity on the sandstone surfaces, and furthermore to the relationship between the extent of biodeterioration and succession of microbial communities on sandstone in tropic region. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00248-010-9707-5) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20593173

  5. "Bad Boys", Big Trouble: Subcultural Formation and Resistance in a Cambodian Village

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czymoniewicz-Klippel, Melina T.

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the experiences of adolescent males in Cambodia who, simultaneous to their maltreatment and marginalization within the family and community, have reduced opportunities to produce identities of sociomoral value through access to cultural capital. It draws on ethnographic data gathered from adolescents boys aged 9 to 16 in Siem…

  6. REAP: Recycled Erbium Amplifier Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delavaux, J.-M. P.; Nuyts, R. J.; Mizuhara, O.; Nagel, J. A.; Digiovanni, D. J.

    1994-03-01

    We report a novel erbium doped fiber preamplifier design with a combination of high gain (greater than 40 dB) and low noise figure (3 dB) at 1556 nm for 80 mW of 980 nm pump power. The co-directional single pumped amplifier employs a composite two stage arrangement in which the second stage is pumped with recycled pump not used in the first stage. In addition, we contrast the amplifier performance trade-offs with the insertions of an isolator or a band pass filter or both in between the two amplifier sections. Finally, we demonstrate a receiver sensitivity of -37 dBm (156 photons/bit) with a 10 Gb/s optical preamplifier regenerator.

  7. Embracing Technology is Reaping Rewards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odem, Margaret; Griffin, Richard A.

    1999-01-01

    Reviews several studies focusing on technology-related student achievement gains and profiles programs that successfully use technology in teaching. Two benchmark studies by Houston's American Productivity and Quality Center document the effectiveness of total-immersion approaches, a focus on teaching and learning issues, and sufficient planning…

  8. Reaping Recruits On-Line.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Gary K.; Simpson, George

    2001-01-01

    A consortium of St. Louis-area school districts, college career officers, and consultants developed an online teacher and administrator recruitment/job-application system that has gone statewide and is being used by nine other states. Next is a nationwide job bank to help districts recruit educators. (MLH)

  9. How well are infant and young child World Health Organization (WHO) feeding indicators associated with growth outcomes? An example from Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Marriott, Bernadette P; White, Alan J; Hadden, Louise; Davies, Jayne C; Wallingford, John C

    2010-10-01

    We assessed eight World Health Organization (WHO) core child feeding indicators for their association with stunting and underweight in Cambodia in 2000 and 2005. We compared the feeding data from the Cambodian Demographic and Health Surveys for 2000 with 2005 for 0-24 months children using the WHO feeding indicators, with stunting and underweight as outcomes. Prevalence of stunting and underweight was significantly less in 2005 than in 2000 among children aged 0-5 and 6-11 months, but stunting among children 18-23 months remained >50%. Prevalence of compliance with seven of the eight core healthy feeding indicators was higher in 2005. Exclusive breastfeeding among 0-5 months infants increased more than fivefold; among 6-11 and 12-17 months children, prevalence of feeding diversity and meeting a minimally acceptable diet, while improved, remained ?25%. Modelling showed compliance with breastfeeding indicators was associated with reduced risk of underweight in 0-5 months infants, no association between compliance with feeding indicators and growth outcomes in other ages, and a significant association of higher relative wealth with growth outcomes overall. Between 2000 and 2005, Cambodia stabilized and focused resources on infant feeding. Prevalence of meeting the WHO feeding indicators improved, but modelling indicated that, in general, relative wealth, not feeding practices, was associated with improved growth outcomes. Yet, over 50% of children 18-23 months were stunted in 2005. Similar to the success with breastfeeding, focus on complementary feeding of 6-23 months children may reduce the risk of stunting in Cambodia. PMID:21050390

  10. Prevalence of Human Leukocyte Antigen-B*5701 Among HIV-infected Children in Thailand and Cambodia: Implications for Abacavir Use

    PubMed Central

    Puthanakit, Thanyawee; Bunupuradah, Torsak; Kosalaraksa, Pope; Vibol, Ung; Hansudewechakul, Rawiwan; Ubolyam, Sasiwimol; Suwanlerk, Tulathip; Kanjanavanit, Suparat; Ngampiyaskul, Chaiwat; Wongsawat, Jurai; Luesomboon, Wicharn; Vonthanak, Saphonn; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Ruxrungtham, Kiat

    2014-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B*5701 allele is associated with abacavir hypersensitivity. Limited data among Asians showed lower rates of HLA-B*5701 compared with Caucasians. In 296 children with HIV in Thailand and Cambodia, the prevalence of HLA-B*5701 was 4.0% (95% confidence interval: 1.6–8.0%) among Thai and 3.4% (95% confidence interval: 0.9–8.5%) among Cambodian children. HLA-B*5701 carriage is not uncommon among Thai and Cambodian children; it is close to the prevalence found in European and higher than the prevalence found in East Asian and African studies. PMID:22986704

  11. Cicada genus Pomponia Stål, 1866 (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) from Vietnam and Cambodia, with a new species, a new record, and a key to the species.

    PubMed

    Pham, Hong-Thai; Lee, Young June; Constant, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    The genus Pomponia Stål, 1866 from Vietnam and Cambodia is reviewed . Pomponia brevialata Lee & Pham, sp. nov. is described from Vietnam. Pomponia backanensis Pham & Yang, 2009 is added to the Cambodian cicada fauna. A key to the seven Vietnamese and Cambodian species of the genus Pomponia Stål, 1866 is provided: P. linearis (Walker, 1850), P. backanensis Pham & Yang, 2009, P. brevialata Lee & Pham, sp. nov., P. subtilita Lee, 2009, P. piceata Distant, 1905, P. daklakensis Sanborn, 2009, and P. orientalis (Distant, 1912). Synonymic lists, information on geographical distributions, and material examined for the Vietnamese and Cambodian species of Pomponia are provided. PMID:25781761

  12. Amphetamine-type stimulant use and HIV/STI risk behaviour among young female sex workers in Phnom Penh, Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Maher, L; Phlong, P; Mooney-Somers, J; Keo, S; Stein, E; Page, K

    2011-01-01

    Background Use of amphetamine-type substances (ATS) has been linked to increased risk of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STI) worldwide. In Cambodia, recent ATS use is independently associated with incident STI infection among young female sex workers (FSW). Methods We conducted 33 in-depth interviews with women (15–29 years old) engaged in sex work to explore ATS use and vulnerability to HIV/STI. Results Participants reported that ATS, primarily methamphetamine in pill and crystalline forms (yama), were cheap, widely available and commonly used. Yama was described as a “power drug” (thnam kamlang) which enabled women to work long hours and serve more customers. Use of ATS by clients was also common, with some providing drugs for women and/or encouraging their use, often resulting in prolonged sexual activity. Requests for unprotected sex were also more common among intoxicated clients and strategies typically employed to negotiate condom use were less effective. Conclusion ATS use was highly functional for young women engaged in sex work, facilitating a sense of power and agency and highlighting the occupational significance and normalization of ATS in this setting. This highly gendered dynamic supports the limited but emerging literature on women’s use of ATS, which to date has been heavily focused on men. Results indicate an urgent need to increase awareness of the risks associated with ATS use, to provide women with alternative and sustainable options for income generation, to better regulate the conditions of sex work, and to work with FSWs and their clients to develop and promote culturally appropriate harm reduction interventions. PMID:21316935

  13. Inter- and intra-annual variations of transpiration at a rubber stand in lowland of central Cambodia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Nakako; Kumagai, Tomo'omi; Miyazawa, Yoshiyuki; Matsumoto, Kazuho; Tateishi, Makiko; Tiva, Lim Khan; Mudd, Ryan; Giambelluca, Thomas; Song, Yin

    2013-04-01

    In Southeast Asia, rubber plantation is rapidly expanding, and thus understanding the level of water consumption and tree physiology is a matter of importance to know the impacts on the local hydrology. Intra- and inter-annual variations in transpiration rate (Et) at a rubber stand, growing in lowland of central Cambodia, were examined during two years based on sap flow measurements. As for seasonality, Et was generally large in the rainy season and small in the dry season, showing sharp short-time drop in synchronization with the shedding in late January. Daily stand Et was ~ 2.0 mm day-1 in 2010 and ~ 2.4 mm day-1 in 2011 at the maximum. An analysis of non-linear multiple regression for the canopy conductance (gc) in the two years showed that the stomatal response of rubber trees was well explained by the changes in solar radiation, vapour pressure deficit, soil moisture availability, leaf area, and tree diameter. Sensitivity of gc to the atmospheric drought indicates isohydric behavior of rubber trees, while the same analysis for each year showed possibility of change in leaf characteristics due to tree maturity and/or initiation of latex tapping. The best fit model also predicted relatively small sensitivity of gc to the soil moisture deficit and rapid decrease in gc under extreme drought conditions. Annual stand Et estimated with the gc obtained in the present analysis was 469 mm yr-1 in 2010, while it increased up to 658 mm yr-1 in 2011. To find out the most important environmental variables, we examined the effect of each variable by keeping the others unchanged. This hypothesis analysis showed that in the young rubber stand which were growing very rapidly, inter-annual change of stand Et was determined mainly by the tree growth rate, not by the change of surrounding environments in the air and the soil.

  14. Ex Vivo Activity of Endoperoxide Antimalarials, Including Artemisone and Arterolane, against Multidrug-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum Isolates from Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Chaorattanakawee, Suwanna; Lon, Chanthap; Saunders, David L.; Rutvisuttinunt, Wiriya; Yingyuen, Kritsanai; Bathurst, Ian; Ding, Xavier C.; Tyner, Stuart D.

    2014-01-01

    Novel synthetic endoperoxides are being evaluated as new components of artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs) to treat artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria. We conducted blinded ex vivo activity testing of fully synthetic (OZ78 and OZ277) and semisynthetic (artemisone, artemiside, artesunate, and dihydroartemisinin) endoperoxides in the histidine-rich protein 2 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay against 200 P. falciparum isolates from areas of artemisinin-resistant malaria in western and northern Cambodia in 2009 and 2010. The order of potency and geometric mean (GM) 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) were as follows: artemisone (2.40 nM) > artesunate (8.49 nM) > dihydroartemisinin (11.26 nM) > artemiside (15.28 nM) > OZ277 (31.25 nM) > OZ78 (755.27 nM). Ex vivo activities of test endoperoxides positively correlated with dihydroartemisinin and artesunate. The isolates were over 2-fold less susceptible to dihydroartemisinin than the artemisinin-sensitive P. falciparum W2 clone and showed sensitivity comparable to those with test endoperoxides and artesunate, with isolate/W2 IC50 susceptibility ratios of <2.0. All isolates had P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter mutations, with negative correlations in sensitivity to endoperoxides and chloroquine. The activities of endoperoxides (artesunate, dihydroartemisinin, OZ277, and artemisone) significantly correlated with that of the ACT partner drug, mefloquine. Isolates had mutations associated with clinical resistance to mefloquine, with 35% prevalence of P. falciparum multidrug resistance gene 1 (pfmdr1) amplification and 84.5% occurrence of the pfmdr1 Y184F mutation. GM IC50s for mefloquine, lumefantrine, and endoperoxides (artesunate, dihydroartemisinin, OZ277, OZ78, and artemisone) correlated with pfmdr1 copy number. Given that current ACTs are failing potentially from reduced sensitivity to artemisinins and partner drugs, newly identified mutations associated with artemisinin resistance reported in the literature and pfmdr1 mutations should be examined for their combined contributions to emerging ACT resistance. PMID:25049252

  15. Impacts on rural livelihoods in Cambodia following adoption of best practice health and husbandry interventions by smallholder cattle farmers.

    PubMed

    Young, J R; O'Reilly, R A; Ashley, K; Suon, S; Leoung, I V; Windsor, P A; Bush, R D

    2014-08-01

    To better understand how smallholder farmers whom own the majority of Cambodian cattle can contribute to efforts to address food security needs in the Mekong region, a five-year research project investigating methods to improve cattle health and husbandry practices was conducted. Cattle production in Cambodia is constrained by transboundary animal diseases (TADs) including foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) and haemorrhagic septicaemia (HS) plus poor nutrition, reproduction and marketing knowledge. The project worked in six villages in Kandal, Takeo and Kampong Cham province during 2007-12. Farmers from three 'high intervention' (HI) villages incrementally received a participatory extension programme that included FMD and HS vaccination, forage development and husbandry training. Evaluation of project impacts on livelihoods was facilitated by comparison with three 'low intervention' (LI) villages where farmers received vaccinations only. Results of knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) and socio-economic surveys conducted in 2012 of 120 participating farmers identified that farmer knowledge in the HI project sites exceeded LI sites on the topics of biosecurity, internal parasites, nutrition and reproduction. HI farmers adopted biosecurity practices including a willingness to vaccinate for FMD and HS at their own cost, separate sick from healthy cattle, grow and feed forages and displayed awareness of the benefits of building fattening pens. HI farmers that grew forages observed time savings exceeding two hours per day each for men, women and children, enabling expansion of farm enterprises, secondary employment and children's schooling. Logistic regression analysis revealed that farmers in the HI group significantly increased annual household income (P < 0.001), with 53% reporting an increase of 100% or more. We conclude that improving smallholder KAP of cattle health and production can lead to improved livelihoods. This strategy should be of interest to policymakers, donors, researchers and extension workers interested in addressing TAD control, food insecurity and rural poverty in Southeast Asia. PMID:24393407

  16. Evaluation of community-based systems for the surveillance of day three-positive Plasmodium falciparum cases in Western Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Delayed clearance of Plasmodium falciparum parasites is used as an operational indicator of potential artemisinin resistance. Effective community-based systems to detect P. falciparum cases remaining positive 72 hours after initiating treatment would be valuable for guiding case follow-up in areas of known resistance risk and for detecting areas of emerging resistance. Methods Systems incorporating existing networks of village malaria workers (VMWs) to monitor day three-positive P. falciparum cases were piloted in three provinces in western Cambodia. Quantitative and qualitative data were used to evaluate the wider feasibility and sustainability of community-based surveillance of day three-positive P. falciparum cases. Results Of 294 day-3 blood slides obtained across all sites (from 297 day-0 positives), 63 were positive for P. falciparum, an overall day-3 positivity rate of 21%. There were significant variations in the systems implemented by different partners. Full engagement of VMWs and health centre staff is critical. VMWs are responsible for a range of individual tasks including preparing blood slides on day-0, completing forms, administering directly observed therapy (DOT) on days 0–2, obtaining follow-up slides on day-3 and transporting slides and paperwork to their supervising health centre. When suitably motivated, unsalaried VMWs are willing and able to produce good quality blood smears and achieve very high rates of DOT and day-3 follow-up. Conclusions Community-based surveillance of day-3 P. falciparum cases is feasible, but highly intensive, and as such needs strong and continuous support, particularly supervision and training. The purpose and role of community-based day-3 surveillance should be assessed in the light of resource requirements; scaling-up would need to be systematic and targeted, based on clearly defined epidemiological criteria. To be truly comprehensive, the system would need to be extended beyond VMWs to other public and private health providers. PMID:25052222

  17. Impact of payments for environmental services and protected areas on local livelihoods and forest conservation in northern Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Clements, Tom; Milner-Gulland, E J

    2015-02-01

    The potential impacts of payments for environmental services (PES) and protected areas (PAs) on environmental outcomes and local livelihoods in developing countries are contentious and have been widely debated. The available evidence is sparse, with few rigorous evaluations of the environmental and social impacts of PAs and particularly of PES. We measured the impacts on forests and human well-being of three different PES programs instituted within two PAs in northern Cambodia, using a panel of intervention villages and matched controls. Both PES and PAs delivered additional environmental outcomes relative to the counterfactual: reducing deforestation rates significantly relative to controls. PAs increased security of access to land and forest resources for local households, benefiting forest resource users but restricting households' ability to expand and diversify their agriculture. The impacts of PES on household well-being were related to the magnitude of the payments provided. The two higher paying market-linked PES programs had significant positive impacts, whereas a lower paying program that targeted biodiversity protection had no detectable effect on livelihoods, despite its positive environmental outcomes. Households that signed up for the higher paying PES programs, however, typically needed more capital assets; hence, they were less poor and more food secure than other villagers. Therefore, whereas the impacts of PAs on household well-being were limited overall and varied between livelihood strategies, the PES programs had significant positive impacts on livelihoods for those that could afford to participate. Our results are consistent with theories that PES, when designed appropriately, can be a powerful new tool for delivering conservation goals whilst benefiting local people. PMID:25492724

  18. What health service support do families need for optimal breastfeeding? An in-depth exploration of young infant feeding practices in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Bazzano, Alessandra N; Oberhelman, Richard A; Potts, Kaitlin Storck; Taub, Leah D; Var, Chivorn

    2015-01-01

    Background Appropriate and timely breastfeeding practices markedly improve lifelong health outcomes for newborns, children, and mothers. Exclusive breastfeeding is reported to be widely practiced in Cambodia, and important progress has been made toward achieving improved child health outcomes, but newborn mortality has been slow to reduce and breastfeeding practices remain suboptimal. Methods Formative research was conducted in Takeo province, Cambodia to describe the practical, cultural, and social factors underlying current breastfeeding behaviors to inform the design of a newborn survival intervention that may improve breastfeeding. In-depth interviews, observations, a collection of visual media, and focus groups were employed to gather qualitative data. Results The results revealed knowledge and practice gaps in behavior that likely contribute to breastfeeding barriers, particularly in the areas of infant latch, milk production, feeding frequency, and the use of breast milk substitutes. The predominant theme identified in the research was a dearth of detailed information, advice, and counseling for mothers beyond the message to exclusively breastfeed for 6 months. Conclusion Future newborn survival interventions and postnatal care counseling in this area must go beyond the exclusive breastfeeding message. To achieve further impact, it will be necessary to disseminate comprehensive and locally appropriate information on breastfeeding and to improve counseling in order to support successful breastfeeding and to contribute to population-level health gains. PMID:25733931

  19. Protocol for REducing Anti-Psychotic use in residential care-Huntington Disease (REAP-HD): a pilot cluster randomised controlled trial of a multifaceted intervention for health professionals

    PubMed Central

    Loy, Clement T; Hayen, Andrew; McKinnon, Colleen

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Antipsychotics are commonly used for management of behavioural symptoms in dementia, among people in residential care. This continues to occur despite their modest effectiveness, potential harms including increased risk of death and stroke, and absence of detrimental effect when people with dementia were randomised to antipsychotic withdrawal. This study aims to test the hypothesis that the multifaceted REducing Anti-Psychotic use in residential care-Huntington Disease (REAP-HD) programme is more effective than standard staff education (SSE) in reducing antipsychotic use for people with HD in residential care facilities (RCF). Methods and analysis this is a cluster randomised controlled trial with blinded outcome assessment. The study population is healthcare professionals looking after people with HD in individual RCF, in the state of New South Wales. Each RCF will be centrally randomised to the REAP-HD programme or the comparator, SSE. Blinded outcome assessment will be performed by examining drug charts and using the Neuropsychiatric Inventory-Q (NPI-Q). Primary outcome is the proportion of people with HD who have had a reduction in antipsychotic use 4?months after the intervention. Secondary outcome measures are (1) change in severity of behavioural symptoms, as measured by the NPI-Q at 4?months (to ensure antipsychotic reduction has not lead to worsening behavioural symptoms), and (2) proportion of people with HD who have had a reduction in antipsychotic dosage at 4?months for each strategy, compared to 4?months prior to enrolment (to capture the possibility that both arms reduced antipsychotic use). Analysis will be by Intention-To-Treat and take into account the clustering. Recruitment is ongoing, as of July 2014. Ethics and dissemination This protocol has been approved by the Western Sydney Local Health District Human Research Ethics Committee, trial registration ACTRN12614000083695. Study results will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publication in an anonymous manner. Trial registration number ACTRN12614000083695, the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry. PMID:25468506

  20. Field Trial Evaluation of the Performances of Point-of-Care Tests for Screening G6PD Deficiency in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Roca-Feltrer, Arantxa; Khim, Nimol; Kim, Saorin; Chy, Sophy; Canier, Lydie; Kerleguer, Alexandra; Tor, Pety; Chuor, Char Meng; Kheng, Sim; Siv, Sovannaroth; Kachur, Patrick S.; Taylor, Walter R. J.; Hwang, Jimee; Menard, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Background User-friendly, accurate, point-of-care rapid tests to detect glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PDd) are urgently needed at peripheral level to safely recommend primaquine for malaria elimination. Methods The CareStart G6PD RDT (AccessBio, New Jersey, USA), a novel rapid diagnostic test and the most commonly used test, the fluorescent spot test (FST) were assessed against the quantitatively measured G6PD enzyme activity for detecting G6PDd. Subjects were healthy males and non-pregnant females aged 18 years or older residing in six villages in Pailin Province, western Cambodia. Findings Of the 938 subjects recruited, 74 (7.9%) were severe and moderately severe G6PD deficient (enzyme activity <30%), mostly in male population; population median G6PD activity was 12.0 UI/g Hb. The performances of the CareStart G6PD RDT and the FST, according to different cut-off values used to define G6PDd were very similar. For the detection of severe and moderately severe G6PDd (enzyme activity <30%, <3.6 UI/g Hb) in males and females, sensitivity and negative (normal status) predictive value were 100% for both point-of-care tools. When the G6PDd cut-off value increased (from <40% to <60%), the sensitivity for both PoCs decreased: 93.3% to 71.7% (CareStart G6PD RDT, p?=?10?6) and 95.5% to 73.2% (FST, p?=?10?6) while the specificity for both PoCs remained similar: 97.4% to 98.3% (CareStart G6PD RDT, p?=?0.23) and 98.7% to 99.6% (FST, p?=?0.06). The cut-off values for classifying individuals as normal were 4.0 UI/g Hb and 4.3 UI/g Hb for the CareStart G6PD RDT and the FST, respectively. Conclusions The CareStart G6PD RDT reliably detected moderate and severe G6PD deficient individuals (enzyme activity <30%), suggesting that this novel point-of-care is a promising tool for tailoring appropriate primaquine treatment for malaria elimination by excluding individuals with severe G6PDd for primaquine treatment. PMID:25541721

  1. Community-Based Active Tuberculosis Case Finding in Poor Urban Settlements of Phnom Penh, Cambodia: A Feasible and Effective Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Lorent, Natalie; Choun, Kimcheng; Thai, Sopheak; Kim, Tharin; Huy, Sopheaktra; Pe, Reaksmey; van Griensven, Johan; Buyze, Jozefien; Colebunders, Robert; Rigouts, Leen; Lynen, Lutgarde

    2014-01-01

    Background In light of the limitations of the current case finding strategies and the global urgency to improve tuberculosis (TB) case-detection, a renewed interest in active case finding (ACF) has risen. The WHO calls for more evidence on innovative ways of TB screening, especially from low-income countries, to inform global guideline development. We aimed to assess the feasibility of community-based ACF for TB among the urban poor in Cambodia and determine its impact on case detection, treatment uptake and outcome. Methods Between 9/2/2012-31/3/2013 the Sihanouk Hospital Center of HOPE conducted a door-to-door survey for TB in deprived communities of Phnom Penh. TB workers and community health volunteers performed symptom screening, collected sputum and facilitated specimen transport to the laboratories. Fluorescence microscopy was introduced at three referral hospitals. The GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay (Xpert) was performed at tertiary level for individuals at increased risk of HIV-associated, drug-resistant or smear-negative TB. Mobile phone/short message system (SMS) was used for same-day issuing of positive results. TB workers contacted diagnosed patients and referred them for care at their local health centre. Results In 14 months, we screened 315.874 individuals; we identified 12.201 aged ?15 years with symptoms suggestive of TB; 84% provided sputum. We diagnosed 783, including 737 bacteriologically confirmed, TB cases. Xpert testing yielded 41% and 48% additional diagnoses among presumptive HIV-associated and multidrug-resistant TB cases, respectively. The median time from sputum collection to notification (by SMS) of the first positive (microscopy or Xpert) result was 3 days (IQR 2–6). Over 94% commenced TB treatment and 81% successfully completed it. Conclusion Our findings suggest that among the urban poor ACF for TB, using a sensitive symptom screen followed by smear-microscopy and targeted Xpert, contributed to improved case detection of drug-susceptible and drug-resistant TB, shortening the diagnostic delay, and successfully bringing patients into care. PMID:24675985

  2. “Souls of the ancestor that knock us out” and other tales. A qualitative study to identify demand-side factors influencing malaria case management in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Appropriate case management of suspected malaria in Cambodia is critical given anti-malarial drug resistance in the region. Improving diagnosis and the use of recommended malarial treatments is a challenge in Cambodia where self-treatment and usage of drug cocktails is widespread, a notable difference from malaria treatment seeking in other countries. This qualitative study adds to the limited evidence base on Cambodian practices, aiming to understand the demand-side factors influencing treatment-seeking behaviour, including the types of home treatments, perceptions of cocktail medicines and reasons for diagnostic testing. The findings may help guide intervention design. Methods The study used in-depth interviews (IDIs) (N?=?16) and focus group discussions (FGDs) (N?=?12) with Cambodian adults from malaria-endemic areas who had experienced malaria fever in the previous two weeks. Data were analysed using NVivo software. Results Findings suggest that Cambodians initially treat suspected malaria at home with home remedies and traditional medicines. When seeking treatment outside the home, respondents frequently reported receiving a cocktail of medicines from trusted providers. Cocktails are perceived as less expensive and more effective than full-course, pre-packaged medicines. Barriers to diagnostic testing include a belief in the ability to self-diagnose based on symptoms, cost and reliance on providers to recommend a test. Factors that facilitate testing include recommendation by trusted providers and a belief that anti-malarial treatment for illnesses other than malaria can be harmful. Conclusions Treatment-seeking behaviour for malaria in Cambodia is complex, driven by cultural norms, practicalities and episode-related factors. Effective malaria treatment programmes will benefit from interventions and communication materials that leverage these demand-side factors, promoting prompt visits to facilities for suspected malaria and challenging patients’ misconceptions about the effectiveness of cocktails. Given the importance of the patient-provider interaction and the pivotal role that providers play in ensuring the delivery of appropriate malaria care, future research and interventions should also focus on the supply side factors influencing provider behaviour. PMID:23039260

  3. Detection of Burkholderia pseudomallei in Sputum using Selective Enrichment Broth and Ashdown’s Medium at Kampong Cham Provincial Hospital, Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Nhem, Somary; Letchford, Joanne; Meas, Chea; Thann, Sovanndeth; McLaughlin, James C.; Baron, Ellen Jo; West, T. Eoin

    2014-01-01

    Melioidosis infection, caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei, is increasingly reported in Cambodia. We hypothesized that implementation of an enhanced sputum testing protocol in a provincial hospital diagnostic microbiology laboratory would increase detection of B. pseudomallei. We tested 241 sputum specimens that were deemed acceptable for culture, comparing culture in selective enrichment broth followed by sub-culture on Ashdown’s medium to standard culture methods. Two specimens (0.8%) were positive for B. pseudomallei using the enhanced protocol whereas one specimen (0.4%) was positive using standard methods. These findings demonstrate that B. pseudomallei is rarely detected in sputum at this hospital. The low frequency of B. pseudomallei in sputum specimens precludes drawing any conclusions about the relative benefits of an enhanced sputum testing protocol at this site. Promoting clinician awareness of the infection and encouraging utilization of diagnostic microbiology services are likely to be important factors in facilitating identification of melioidosis. PMID:25717370

  4. Focused Screening and Treatment (FSAT): A PCR-Based Strategy to Detect Malaria Parasite Carriers and Contain Drug Resistant P. falciparum, Pailin, Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Hoyer, Stefan; Nguon, Sokomar; Kim, Saorin; Habib, Najibullah; Khim, Nimol; Sum, Sarorn; Christophel, Eva-Maria; Bjorge, Steven; Thomson, Andrew; Kheng, Sim; Chea, Nguon; Yok, Sovann; Top, Samphornarann; Ros, Seyha; Sophal, Uth; Thompson, Michelle M.; Mellor, Steve; Ariey, Frédéric; Witkowski, Benoit; Yeang, Chhiang; Yeung, Shunmay; Duong, Socheat; Newman, Robert D.; Menard, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites in Pailin province, along the border between Thailand and Cambodia, have become resistant to artemisinin derivatives. To better define the epidemiology of P. falciparum populations and to assess the risk of the possible spread of these parasites outside Pailin, a new epidemiological tool named “Focused Screening and Treatment” (FSAT), based on active molecular detection of asymptomatic parasite carriers was introduced in 2010. Cross-sectional malariometric surveys using PCR were carried out in 20 out of 109 villages in Pailin province. Individuals detected as P. falciparum carriers were treated with atovaquone-proguanil combination plus a single dose of primaquine if the patient was non-G6PD deficient. Interviews were conducted to elicit history of cross-border travel that might contribute to the spread of artemisinin-resistant parasites. After directly observed treatment, patients were followed up and re-examined on day 7 and day 28. Among 6931 individuals screened, prevalence of P. falciparum carriers was less than 1%, of whom 96% were asymptomatic. Only 1.6% of the individuals had a travel history or plans to go outside Cambodia, with none of those tested being positive for P. falciparum. Retrospective analysis, using 2010 routine surveillance data, showed significant differences in the prevalence of asymptomatic carriers discovered by FSAT between villages classified as “high risk” and “low risk” based on malaria incidence data. All positive individuals treated and followed-up until day 28 were cured. No mutant-type allele related to atovaquone resistance was found. FSAT is a potentially useful tool to detect, treat and track clusters of asymptomatic carriers of P. falciparum along with providing valuable epidemiological information regarding cross-border movements of potential malaria parasite carriers and parasite gene flow. PMID:23049687

  5. Epidemiological characteristics, clinical presentation and diagnosis at point-of-care during the first wave of the H1N1 influenza pandemic in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Chadwick; Sovann, Ly; Kasper, Matthew; Williams, Maya; Wierzba, Thomas F

    2012-01-01

    We conducted clinic-based surveillance for influenza virus among cases with acute febrile illness at 9 medical clinics in south-central Cambodia during 2006-2009. Patients greater than or equal to 24 months old presenting with acute fever (> 38 degrees C) were enrolled. In late July 2009, the study identified its first case of pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) influenza virus infection. The prevalence of pH1N1 infections increased rapidly during August and September and by October, pH1N1 infections had peaked replacing H3N2 as the dominant subtype. The incidence of pH1N1 subsequently decreased, with only one case identified in late December. From late July through December 2009, 42.4% of all influenza cases were caused by pH1N1. Except for headache, less frequently reported among pH1N1-infected patients, patients infected with the pH1N1 reported symptoms (eg, cough, diarrhea, vomiting and nausea) similar to seasonal H3N2 and B virus infections. Among children 6 to 12 years old, there was a higher number of hospitalizations campared to other age groups. Identification of influenza virus types A and B using the QuickVue rapid diagnostic test was found to be equally sensitive for pH1N1 (50.4%), H3N2 (51.7%) and influenza B (53.9%) viruses, although the sensitivity was low among all subtypes. The pH1N1 virus rapidly became the dominant virus subtype in 2009 in Cambodia, but no symptoms consistently distinguished the pandemic strain from other influenza virus subtypes. The QuickVue test was as sensitive for detecting pH1N1 viral as well as other circulating seasonal influenza viruses. PMID:23082556

  6. Development of the Khao Khwang Fold and Thrust Belt: Implications for the geodynamic setting of Thailand and Cambodia during the Indosinian Orogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morley, C. K.; Ampaiwan, P.; Thanudamrong, S.; Kuenphan, N.; Warren, J.

    2013-01-01

    The Indosinian Orogeny in Thailand is often viewed as having developed between strongly linear terranes, which today trend approximately N-S. The terranes were subsequently disrupted by later tectonics, particularly NW-SE trending Cenozoic strike-slip faults. The ENE-WSW to NE-SW striking thrusts and folds in the Khao Khwang Platform area of the Saraburi Group on the SW margin of the Indochina Terrane are not easily explained in the context of this traditional view. Reversal of the clockwise rotation shown to have affected the block north of the Mae Ping Fault zone only enhances the E-W orientation of structures in the fold and thrust belt, and moves the belt further east towards Cambodia. One solution for the trend that fits better with regional understanding from hydrocarbon exploration of the Khorat Plateau is that the Indochina Terrane was actually a series of continental blocks, separated by Permian rifting. During the Early Triassic the early stages of collision (South China-Cathaysian Terrane collision with Vietnam Indochina) resulted in the amalgamation of disparate blocks that now form the Indochina Terrane by closure along the rifts. At the same time or following on from the collision there was closure of the back-arc area between Indochina and the Sukhothai zone. The rift basins, were thrusted and inverted during the early stages of the Indosinian orogeny, and only underwent minor reactivated when later Sibumasu collided with Sukhothai Zone-Indochina Terrane margin during the Late Triassic. The scenario described above requires the presence of a (minor) E-W trending suture in NW Cambodia. Evidence for this suture is suggested by the presence of Permo-Triassic calc-alkaline volcanism.

  7. Impact of payments for environmental services and protected areas on local livelihoods and forest conservation in northern Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Clements, Tom; Milner-Gulland, E J

    2015-01-01

    The potential impacts of payments for environmental services (PES) and protected areas (PAs) on environmental outcomes and local livelihoods in developing countries are contentious and have been widely debated. The available evidence is sparse, with few rigorous evaluations of the environmental and social impacts of PAs and particularly of PES. We measured the impacts on forests and human well-being of three different PES programs instituted within two PAs in northern Cambodia, using a panel of intervention villages and matched controls. Both PES and PAs delivered additional environmental outcomes relative to the counterfactual: reducing deforestation rates significantly relative to controls. PAs increased security of access to land and forest resources for local households, benefiting forest resource users but restricting households’ ability to expand and diversify their agriculture. The impacts of PES on household well-being were related to the magnitude of the payments provided. The two higher paying market-linked PES programs had significant positive impacts, whereas a lower paying program that targeted biodiversity protection had no detectable effect on livelihoods, despite its positive environmental outcomes. Households that signed up for the higher paying PES programs, however, typically needed more capital assets; hence, they were less poor and more food secure than other villagers. Therefore, whereas the impacts of PAs on household well-being were limited overall and varied between livelihood strategies, the PES programs had significant positive impacts on livelihoods for those that could afford to participate. Our results are consistent with theories that PES, when designed appropriately, can be a powerful new tool for delivering conservation goals whilst benefiting local people. El Impacto de los Pagos por Servicios Ambientales y Áreas Protegidas sobre la Subsistencia Local y la Conservación del Bosque en el Norte de Camboya Resumen Los impactos potenciales de los pagos por servicios ambientales (PSA) y áreas protegidas (APs) sobre los resultados ambientales y las subsistencias locales en los países en desarrollo son polémicos y se han debatido ampliamente. La evidencia disponible es escasa; ha habido pocas evaluaciones rigurosas de los impactos ambientales y sociales de las APs y particularmente los PSA. Medimos el impacto sobre los bosques y el bienestar humano en tres diferentes programas de PSA que se llevan a cabo dentro de dos APs en el norte de Camboya usando un panel de aldeas de intervención y controles emparejados. Tanto los PSA como las APs brindaron resultados ambientales adicionales en relación a los contrafácticos, esto quiere decir que redujeron las tasas de deforestación significativamente en relación a los controles. Las áreas protegidas incrementaron el acceso seguro a los recursos del suelo y el bosque para las viviendas locales, beneficiando a los usuarios de los recursos del bosque pero restringiendo la habilidad de las viviendas para expandirse y diversificar su agricultura. Los impactos de los pagos por servicios ambientales sobre el bienestar de las viviendas estuvieron relacionados con la magnitud de los pagos proporcionados. Los dos programas de PSA de mayor paga y con conexión al mercado tuvieron impactos positivos significativos, mientras que un programa de menor paga con el objetivo de proteger a la biodiversidad no tuvo un efecto detectable sobre las viviendas, a pesar de sus resultados ambientales positivos. Las viviendas que se inscribieron a los programas de PSA con mayor paga, sin embargo, necesitaban típicamente más bienes capitales, por lo que eran menos pobres y tenían mayor seguridad alimentaria que otros aldeanos. Por esto, mientras los impactos de las APs sobre el bienestar de las viviendas fueron limitados en general y variaron dependiendo de las estrategias de subsistencia, los programas de PSA tuvieron impactos positivos significativos sobre las viviendas para aquellos que podían co

  8. Depositional facies and radiocarbon ages of a drill core from the Mekong River lowland near Phnom Penh, Cambodia: Evidence for tidal sedimentation at the time of Holocene maximum flooding

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Toru Tamura; Yoshiki Saito; Sotham Sieng; Bunnarin Ben; Meng Kong; Sokuntheara Choup; Shinji Tsukawaki

    2007-01-01

    The depositional facies and radiocarbon ages of a long Holocene sediment core (KS) from Cambodia are reported here to clarify the sedimentary environments of the Mekong River delta system at the time of Holocene maximum flooding by the sea. The 30.7-m-long KS core, from the upper Mekong River lowland about 20 km southeast of Phnom Penh, penetrated five depositional facies,

  9. Virological Failure and HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations among Naive and Antiretroviral Pre-Treated Patients Entering the ESTHER Program of Calmette Hospital in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Limsreng, Setha; Him, Sovanvatey; Nouhin, Janin; Hak, Chanroeurn; Srun, Chanvatey; Viretto, Gerald; Ouk, Vara; Delfraissy, Jean Francois; Ségéral, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In resource limited settings, patients entering an antiretroviral therapy (ART) program comprise ART naive and ART pre-treated patients who may show differential virological outcomes. Methods This retrospective study, conducted in 2010–2012 in the HIV clinic of Calmette Hospital located in Phnom Penh (Cambodia) assessed virological failure (VF) rates and patterns of drug resistance of naive and pre-treated patients. Naive and ART pre-treated patients were included when a Viral Load (VL) was performed during the first year of ART for naive subjects or at the first consultation for pre-treated individuals. Patients showing Virological failure (VF) (>1,000 copies/ml) underwent HIV DR genotyping testing. Interpretation of drug resistance mutations was done according to 2013 version 23 ANRS algorithms. Results On a total of 209 patients, 164 (78.4%) were naive and 45 (21.5%) were ART pre-treated. Their median initial CD4 counts were 74 cells/mm3 (IQR: 30–194) and 279 cells/mm3 (IQR: 103–455) (p<0.001), respectively. Twenty seven patients (12.9%) exhibited VF (95% CI: 8.6–18.2%), including 10 naive (10/164, 6.0%) and 17 pre-treated (17/45, 37.8%) patients (p<0.001). Among these viremic patients, twenty-two (81.4%) were sequenced in reverse transcriptase and protease coding regions. Overall, 19 (86.3%) harbored ?1 drug resistance mutations (DRMs) whereas 3 (all belonging to pre-treated patients) harbored wild-types viruses. The most frequent DRMs were M184V (86.3%), K103N (45.5%) and thymidine analog mutations (TAMs) (40.9%). Two (13.3%) pre-treated patients harbored viruses that showed a multi-nucleos(t)ide resistance including Q151M, K65R, E33A/D, E44A/D mutations. Conclusion In Cambodia, VF rates were low for naive patients but the emergence of DRMs to NNRTI and 3TC occurred relatively quickly in this subgroup. In pre-treated patients, VF rates were much higher and TAMs were relatively common. HIV genotypic assays before ART initiation and for ART pre-treated patients infection should be considered as well. PMID:25166019

  10. From public to private and back again: sustaining a high service-delivery level during transition of management authority: a Cambodia case study.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Bart; Thomé, Jean-Marc; Overtoom, Rob; Sam, Sam Oeun; Indermühle, Lorenz; Price, Neil

    2010-05-01

    Contracting non-governmental organizations (NGOs) has been shown to increase health service delivery output considerably over relatively short time frames in low-income countries, especially when applying performance-related pay as a stimulus. A key concern is how to manage the transition back to government-operated systems while maintaining health service delivery output levels. In this paper we describe and analyse the transition from NGO-managed to government-managed health services over a 3-year period in a health district in Cambodia with a focus on the level of health service delivery. Data are derived from four sources, including cross-sectional surveys and health management and financial information systems. The transition was achieved by focusing on all the building blocks of the health care system and ensuring an acceptable financial remuneration for the staff members of contracted health facilities. The latter was attained through performance subsidies derived from financial commitment by the central government, and revenue from user fees. Performance management had a crucial role in the gradual handover of responsibilities. Not all responsibilities were handed back to government over the case study period-notably the development of performance indicators and targets and the performance monitoring. PMID:19917650

  11. Simulation of Canopy CO2/H2O Fluxes for a Rubber (Hevea Brasiliensis) Plantation in Central Cambodia: The Effect of the Regular Spacing of Planted Trees

    SciTech Connect

    Kumagai, Tomo'omi; Mudd, Ryan; Miyazawa, Yoshiyuki; Liu, Wen; Giambelluca, Thomas; Kobayashi, N.; Lim, Tiva Khan; Jomura, Mayuko; Matsumoto, Kazuho; Huang, Maoyi; Chen, Qi; Ziegler, Alan; Yin, Song

    2013-09-10

    We developed a soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer (SVAT) model applicable to simulating CO2 and H2O fluxes from the canopies of rubber plantations, which are characterized by distinct canopy clumping produced by regular spacing of plantation trees. Rubber (Hevea brasiliensis Müll. Arg.) plantations, which are rapidly expanding into both climatically optimal and sub-optimal environments throughout mainland Southeast Asia, potentially change the partitioning of water, energy, and carbon at multiple scales, compared with traditional land covers it is replacing. Describing the biosphere-atmosphere exchange in rubber plantations via SVAT modeling is therefore essential to understanding the impacts on environmental processes. The regular spacing of plantation trees creates a peculiar canopy structure that is not well represented in most SVAT models, which generally assumes a non-uniform spacing of vegetation. Herein we develop a SVAT model applicable to rubber plantation and an evaluation method for its canopy structure, and examine how the peculiar canopy structure of rubber plantations affects canopy CO2 and H2O exchanges. Model results are compared with measurements collected at a field site in central Cambodia. Our findings suggest that it is crucial to account for intensive canopy clumping in order to reproduce observed rubber plantation fluxes. These results suggest a potentially optimal spacing of rubber trees to produce high productivity and water use efficiency.

  12. Poverty Does Not Limit Tobacco Consumption in Cambodia: Quantitative Estimate of Tobacco Use Under Conditions of No Income and Adult Malnutrition

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pramil N.; Washburn, Dawn; Yel, Daravuth; Kheam, They; Job, Jayakaran S.

    2014-01-01

    Current data indicate that under conditions of poverty, tobacco is consumed at the expense of basic needs. In a large national sample from Cambodia, we sought to determine whether tobacco consumption declines under extreme conditions of no income and malnutrition. Our major findings are as follows: (1) Among men, there was no significant difference in the number of cigarettes smoked for no income (425, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 395-456) versus >US$2 per day (442, 95% CI = 407-477); (2) among women, there was no significant difference in the amount of loose tobacco (ie, betel quid) consumed for no income (539 g, 95% CI = 441-637) versus >US$2 per day (558 g, 95% CI = 143-973); (3) for the contrast of no income + malnutrition versus >US$2 per day + no malnutrition in a linear model, there was no significant difference for men who smoked (462 vs 517 cigarettes/month, P = .82) or women who chewed (316 vs 404 g tobacco/month, P = .34), adjusting for confounders. Among the poorest and malnourished Cambodian adults, lack of resources did not appear to prevent them from obtaining smoked or smokeless tobacco. PMID:23666843

  13. 2005/6 2004/5 Table 1. The seasonal nature of snake trade

    E-print Network

    Reynolds, John D.

    J nuary February M ar hc 2005/6 2004/5 Table 1. The seasonal nature of snake trade based on the quantity landed at Chong Khneas port, Siem Reap. waTeR SnaKe TRade by ShaRon e. bRooKS, edwaRd h. alliSon, John d. ReynoldS, TouCh bunThang, PRoKRoTey Khoy There are a number of different markets for the snakes of Tonle

  14. Identification of molecular markers associated with alteration of receptor-binding specificity in a novel genotype of highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N1) viruses detected in Cambodia in 2013.

    PubMed

    Rith, Sareth; Davis, C Todd; Duong, Veasna; Sar, Borann; Horm, Srey Viseth; Chin, Savuth; Ly, Sovann; Laurent, Denis; Richner, Beat; Oboho, Ikwo; Jang, Yunho; Davis, William; Thor, Sharmi; Balish, Amanda; Iuliano, A Danielle; Sorn, San; Holl, Davun; Sok, Touch; Seng, Heng; Tarantola, Arnaud; Tsuyuoka, Reiko; Parry, Amy; Chea, Nora; Allal, Lotfi; Kitsutani, Paul; Warren, Dora; Prouty, Michael; Horwood, Paul; Widdowson, Marc-Alain; Lindstrom, Stephen; Villanueva, Julie; Donis, Ruben; Cox, Nancy; Buchy, Philippe

    2014-12-01

    Human infections with influenza A(H5N1) virus in Cambodia increased sharply during 2013. Molecular characterization of viruses detected in clinical specimens from human cases revealed the presence of mutations associated with the alteration of receptor-binding specificity (K189R, Q222L) and respiratory droplet transmission in ferrets (N220K with Q222L). Discovery of quasispecies at position 222 (Q/L), in addition to the absence of the mutations in poultry/environmental samples, suggested that the mutations occurred during human infection and did not transmit further. PMID:25210193

  15. A child feeding index is superior to WHO IYCF indicators in explaining length-for-age Z-scores of young children in rural Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Reinbott, Anika; Kuchenbecker, Judith; Herrmann, Johannes; Jordan, Irmgard; Muehlhoff, Ellen; Kevanna, Ou; Krawinkel, Michael

    2014-09-16

    Background: Adequate young child feeding practices are influenced by a multitude of factors which affect growth and development. A combination of indicators is needed to explain the role of complementary feeding practices in growth retardation. Methods: A cross-sectional nutrition baseline survey was conducted in rural Cambodia in September 2012. Villages in pre-selected communes were randomly selected using stunting as a primary indicator. Data were collected from 803 randomly selected households with children aged 6-23 months, based on a standardised questionnaire and on length/height and weight measurements of mother and child. WHO Infant and Young Child Feeding (IYCF) indicators [minimum dietary diversity (MDD), minimum meal frequency (MMF), minimum acceptable diet (MAD)] and a child feeding index (CFI) were created. The latter consisted of five components: breastfeeding, use of bottle, dietary diversity, food frequency and meal frequency which were adjusted for three age groups: 6-8, 9-11 and 12-23 months. The highest possible score was 10. Associations between length-for-age Z-scores (LAZ) and WHO indicators or CFI were explored. Results: Mean (SD) LAZ was -1·25 (1·14) (n ?=? 801). Mean (range) CFI was 6·7 (1-10) (n ?=? 797). Mean CFI was highest in the 9-11-months age group (7·93) and lowest for those aged 12-23 months (5·96). None of the WHO IYCF indicators was associated with LAZ, whereas CFI showed significant association with LAZ (P < 0·01). The association between higher CFI scores and LAZ became weaker as age increased. Conclusion: The results highlight the need to include a wide range of information in the analysis in order to understand the association between appropriate infant feeding practices and child growth. PMID:25226288

  16. Acute lower respiratory infections in ?5 year -old hospitalized patients in Cambodia, a low-income tropical country: clinical characteristics and pathogenic etiology

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Few data exist on viral and bacterial etiology of acute lower respiratory infections (ALRI) in ?5 year –old persons in the tropics. Methods We conducted active surveillance of community-acquired ALRI in two hospitals in Cambodia, a low-income tropical country. Patients were tested for acid-fast bacilli (AFB) by direct sputum examination, other bacteria by blood and/or sputum cultures, and respiratory viruses using molecular techniques on nasopharyngeal/throat swabs. Pulmonologists reviewed clinical/laboratory data and interpreted chest X-rays (CXR) to confirm ALRI. Results Between April 2007 - December 2009, 1,904 patients aged ?5 years were admitted with acute pneumonia (50.4%), lung sequelae-associated ALRI (24.3%), isolated pleural effusions (8.9%) or normal CXR-related ALRI (17.1%); 61 (3.2%) died during hospitalization. The two former diagnoses were predominantly due to bacterial etiologies while viral detection was more frequent in the two latter diagnoses. AFB-positive accounted for 25.6% of acute pneumonia. Of the positive cultures (16.8%), abscess-prone Gram-negative bacteria (39.6%) and Haemophilus influenzae (38.0%) were most frequent, followed by Streptococcus pneumoniae (17.7%). Of the identified viruses, the three most common viruses included rhinoviruses (49.5%), respiratory syncytial virus (17.7%) and influenza viruses (12.1%) regardless of the diagnostic groups. Wheezing was associated with viral identification (31.9% vs. 13.8%, p?

  17. Early Followers Reap Benefits and Lower Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Deborah; Alphonce, Carl; Kershner, Helene; Burhans, Debra

    2001-01-01

    This case study evaluated restructuring by a faculty team of a large-enrollment computer fluency course at the University of Buffalo. It found that using existing online materials (acting as "early followers" rather than "early adopters") gave students multiple ways to learn and kept costs down. (EV)

  18. Reaping the Systemic Benefits of Lesson Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chokshi, Sonal; Fernandez, Clea

    2005-01-01

    Most readers of the Kappan will know that lesson study is a Japanese approach to teacher professional development that has recently become popular in the U.S. Indeed, lesson study activity has been spreading rapidly for several years and continues to proliferate today. However, to date, most of the discussion and research about U.S.-based lesson…

  19. Focus: who reaps the benefits of biodiversity?

    PubMed Central

    Karasov, C

    2001-01-01

    The search for wild plant and animal products of potential value to medicine, agriculture, and other uses has been going on for hundreds, possibly thousands, of years. Many commonly prescribed medicines in the United States include ingredients derived from natural products, and roughly 80% of the world's people rely on natural products for their primary medical needs. Until the past decade, all of these natural products were collected without compensating the source countries. But the rules of collecting changed in 1992 with the establishment of the Convention on Biological Diversity, which offers financial compensation for natural products and seeks to conserve biological diversity, use natural products sustainably, and fairly share products made from gene stocks. Questions remain, however, as to how to share the benefits of biodiversity equitably, as well as whether the lack of both U.S. support for the agreement and enforceability render the convention impotent. PMID:11748021

  20. Local Area Networks: Reaping the Benefits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raymond, Chadwick; Anderson, Charles

    1987-01-01

    Description of the planning and implementation of a microcomputer-based local area network in the Northbrook (Illinois) Public Library highlights: (1) applying for a grant; (2) network design; (3) the bidding process; (4) installation; (5) implementing the network; and (6) problems and cautions. (MES)

  1. Efficacy of Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis, VectoBac WG and DT, formulations against dengue mosquito vectors in cement potable water jars in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Setha, To; Chantha, Ngan; Socheat, Doung

    2007-03-01

    This study reports the evaluation of Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti), a biological larvicide, in cement jars holding river, well and rain water. Two Bti formulations, VectoBac WG and VectoBac DT, were evaluated in a village in Phnom Penh. Thirty-one households with cement jars supporting the colonization of Ae.aegypti immatures were chosen. In each house 3 jars were aligned next to each another and filled with the same type of water. One of the 3 jars was treated with VectoBac WG at 0.4 g per 50 liters, a second jar was treated with VectoBac DT at 1 tablet per 50 liters, and a third jar was an untreated control (UTC). The jars were not covered, kept outdoors and not subjected to water exchange activity. The efficacy of VectoBac to control natural Ae.aegypti infestation was measured by Ae.aegypti pupae surveillance, conducted 3 days per week for 3 months post-treatment (June-September 2004). All pupae were removed, allowed to emerge in the Cambodia National Malaria Center insectarium and the emerged adults were identified and counted. The VectoBac treatments were more effective in river water, followed by well and rain water. The VectoBac treatments significantly reduced the pupae numbers for a minimum of 3 months in the river water and 2.5 months in the well water (p < 0.05). In the rain water, the pupae densities in the VectoBac WG and DT treated jars were not significantly different from the untreated jars, although the treated jars yielded 2.0 to 5.2 fold less pupae, respectively, than in the untreated jars during the 3 months post-treatment. The efficacy of VectoBac WG to control Ae.aegypti was similar to the efficacy of VectoBac DT in the 3 water types (p > 0.05). It was also observed that VectoBac WG and DT were target specific, without any adverse effects on aquatic predatory insects common in well and rain water. VectoBac WG and DT were found to be easy-to-use formulations, with no need to repackage them prior to use in the containers. The amounts of VectoBac WG and DT used were 12.5 fold less by weight than temephos (Abate 1.0% SG). PMID:17539275

  2. Facilitators and barriers to accessing reproductive health care for migrant beer promoters in Cambodia, Laos, Thailand and Vietnam: A mixed methods study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of the research was to assess access to sexual and reproductive health services for migrant women who work as beer promoters. This mixed methods research was conducted in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, Bangkok, Thailand, Vientiane, Laos, and Hanoi, Vietnam during 2010 to 2011. Methods Focus groups were held with beer promoters and separate focus groups or interviews with key informants to explore the factors affecting beer promoters’ access to health care institutions for reproductive health care. The findings of the focus groups were used to develop a survey for beer promoters. This survey was conducted in popular health institutions for these women in each of the four Asian cities. Results Several common themes were evident. Work demands prevented beer promoters from accessing health care. Institutional factors affecting care included cost, location, environmental factors (e.g. waiting times, cleanliness and confidentiality) and service factors (e.g. staff attitudes, clinic hours, and availability of medications). Personal factors affecting access were shyness and fear, lack of knowledge, and support from family and friends. The survey of the beer promoters confirmed that cost, location and both environmental and service factors impact on access to health care services for beer promoters. Many beer promoters are sexually active, and a significant proportion of those surveyed rely on sex work to supplement their income. Many also drink with their clients. Despite a few differences amongst the surveyed population, the findings were remarkably similar across the four research sites. Conclusions Recommendations from the research include the provision of evening and weekend clinic hours to facilitate access, free or low cost clinics, and health insurance through employer or government plans which are easy to access for migrants. Other improvements that would facilitate the access of beer promoters to these services include increased funding to hire more staff (reducing waiting times) and to stock more needed medications, mobile clinics to come to the workplace or free transportation for beer promoters to the clinics, improved training to reduce health care provider stigma against beer promoters, and public education about the importance of reproductive health care, including preventative services. PMID:22747607

  3. Quantifying changes in flooding and habitats in the Tonle Sap Lake (Cambodia) caused by water infrastructure development and climate change in the Mekong Basin.

    PubMed

    Arias, Mauricio E; Cochrane, Thomas A; Piman, Thanapon; Kummu, Matti; Caruso, Brian S; Killeen, Timothy J

    2012-12-15

    The economic value of the Tonle Sap Lake Floodplain to Cambodia is arguably among the highest provided to a nation by a single ecosystem around the world. Nonetheless, the Mekong River Basin is changing rapidly due to accelerating water infrastructure development (hydropower, irrigation, flood control, and water supply) and climate change, bringing considerable modifications to the flood pulse of the Tonle Sap Lake in the foreseeable future. This paper presents research conducted to determine how the historical flooding regime, together with human action, influenced landscape patterns of habitats in the Tonle Sap Lake, and how these habitats might shift as a result of hydrological changes. Maps of water depth, annual flood duration, and flood frequency were created for recent historical hydrological conditions and for simulated future scenarios of water infrastructure development and climate change. Relationships were then established between the historical flood maps and land cover, and these were subsequently applied to assess potential changes to habitat cover in future decades. Five habitat groups were clearly distinguishable based on flood regime, physiognomic patterns, and human activity: (1) Open water, flooded for 12 months in an average hydrological year; (2) Gallery forest, with flood duration of 9 months annually; (3) Seasonally flooded habitats, flooded 5-8 months and dominated by shrublands and grasslands; (4) transitional habitats, flooded 1-5 months and dominated by abandoned agricultural fields, receding rice/floating rice, and lowland grasslands; and (5) Rainfed habitats, flooded up to 1 month and consisting mainly of wet season rice fields and village crops. It was found that water infrastructure development could increase the area of open water (+18 to +21%) and the area of rainfed habitats (+10 to +14%), while reducing the area covered with seasonally flooded habitats (-13 to -22%) and gallery forest (-75 to -83%). Habitat cover shifts as a result of climate change include a net increase of open water (2-21%), as well as a reduction of rainfed habitats by 2-5% and seasonally flooded habitats by 5-11%. Findings from this study will help guide on-going and future conservation and restoration efforts throughout this unique and critical ecosystem. PMID:22877742

  4. Development of a real-time hydrological cycle - rice growth coupled simulation system as a tool for farmers' decision making in an ungauged basin in Cambodia for the better agricultural water resources management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujimoto, K.; Ohta, T.; Yasukawa, M.; Koike, T.; Kitsuregawa, M.; Homma, K.

    2013-12-01

    The entire country of Cambodia depends on agriculture for its economy. Rice is the staple food, making it the major agricultural product (roughly 80% of total national production). The target area of this study is western Cambodia, where rice production is the greatest in the country and most land is rainfed. Since most farmers rely only on their (non-science-based) experience, they would not adjust to changing rainfall and degraded water resources under climate change, so food security in the region would be seriously threatened (Monichoth et al., 2013). Under this condition, irrigation master plans are being considered by several ODA projects. This study aims to contribute to the design of such irrigation plans through the development of a real-time hydrological cycle - rice growth coupled simulation system. The purpose of the development of this system is to support decision making 1) for determining the necessary agricultural water resources and 2) for allocating limited water resources to various sectors. Rice growing condition as affected by water stress due to the water shortage is supposed to be shown for both of the cases with and without irrigation for several rainfall patterns. A dynamically coupled model of a distributed hydrological model (WEB-DHM., Wang et al., 2009) and a rice growth model (SIMRIW-rainfed, Homma et al., 2009) has been developed with a simple irrigation model. The target basin, a small basin in western Cambodia, is basically an ungauged basin and the model was validated by soil moisture, LAI, dry matter production of the rice crop, and rice yield, using both intensive field observation and satellite observations. Calibrating hourly satellite precipitation dataset (GSMaP/NRT) using ground rain gauges, hydrological cycle (soil moisture at three layers, river discharge, irrigatable water amount, water level of each paddy field, water demand of each paddy field, etc.) and rice growth (LAI, developmental index of the rice crop, dry matter production of the rice crop, etc.) are being calculated on near real time basis and opened to the Cambodian governmental staff by a website with only 5-hour delay. This system enables the Cambodian local government to virtually experience the effectiveness of irrigation and to get qualitative information for the examination on whether or how much they will investigate for irrigation.

  5. Cambodia: Getting Away with Authoritarianism?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Duncan McCargo

    2005-01-01

    What if a country holds an election but it proves not to matter? Cambodians voted nationwide in July 2003, only to see their polity’s three main political parties take almost a year to form a new administration. The long-ruling Cambodian People’s Party (CPP) of Prime Minister Hun Sen won 47.4 percent of the popular vote but gained 59.3 percent of

  6. Randomized trials of artemisinin-piperaquine, dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine phosphate and artemether-lumefantrine for the treatment of multi-drug resistant falciparum malaria in Cambodia-Thailand border area

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Drug resistance of falciparum malaria is a global problem. Sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine-resistant and mefloquine-resistant strains of falciparum malaria have spread in Southeast Asia at lightning speed in 1980s-1990s, and the Cambodia-Thailand border is one of the malaria epidemic areas with the most severe forms of multi-drug resistant falciparum malaria. Methods Artemisinin-piperaquine (AP), dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine phosphate (DHP) and artemether-lumefantrine (AL) were used to treat 110, 55 and 55 uncomplicated malaria patients, respectively. The total dosage for adults is 1,750 mg (four tablets, twice over 24 hours) of AP, 2,880 mg (eight tablets, four times over two days) of DHP, and 3,360 mg (24 tablets, six times over three days) of AL. The 28-day cure rate, parasite clearance time, fever clearance time, and drug tolerance of patients to the three drugs were compared. All of the above methods were consistent with the current national guidelines. Results The mean parasite clearance time was similar in all three groups (66.7 ± 21.9 hrs, 65.6 ± 27.3 hrs, 65.3 ± 22.5 hrs in AP, DHP and AL groups, respectively), and there was no remarkable difference between them; the fever clearance time was also similar (31.6 ± 17.7 hrs, 34.6 ± 21.8 hrs and 36.9 ± 15.4 hrs, respectively). After following up for 28-days, the cure rate was 95.1%(97/102), 98.2%(54/55) and 82.4%(42/51); and the recrudescence cases was 4.9%(5/102), 1.8%(1/55) and 17.6%(9/51), respectively. Therefore, the statistical data showed that 28-day cure rate in AP and DHP groups was superior to AL group obviously. The patients had good tolerance to all the three drugs, and some side effects (anoxia, nausea, vomiting, headache and dizziness) could be found in every group and they were self-limited; patients in control groups also had good tolerance to DHP and AL, there was no remarkable difference in the three groups. Conclusions AP, DHP and AL all remained efficacious treatments for the treatment of falciparum malaria in Cambodia-Thailand border area. However, in this particular setting, the AP regimen turned out to be favourable in terms of efficacy and effectiveness, simplicity of administration, cost and compliance. Trial Registration The trial was registered at Chinese Clinical Trial Register under identifier 2005L01041. PMID:21827706

  7. Drug packaging in 2013: small changes would reap big benefits.

    PubMed

    2014-05-01

    Drug packaging is important both in protecting and informing patients. Some improvements were made in 2013, but many of the products examined by Prescrire still had poor-quality or even dangerous packaging. Problem packaging is a major concern for patients who are more vulnerable to adverse effects, particularly children and pregnant women. Several problems were noted with products intended for self-medication (umbrella brands), oral solutions sold with dosing devices, and injectable drugs. Looking back at 20 years of Red Cards that Prescrire has issued to products with dangerous packaging reveals several improvements, but too many dangers persist. Urgent action needs to be taken by regulatory agencies and drug companies: patient leaflets must be more explicit with regard to adverse effects, especially those of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs during pregnancy; accidental ingestion by children must be prevented; and companies must design safer dosing devices. Healthcare professionals and patients must remain vigilant and report all packaging issues to the relevant authorities. PMID:24926522

  8. Are Universities Reaping the Available Benefits Internship Programs Offer?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weible, Rick

    2010-01-01

    Many research studies have examined the benefits student internships offer students and employers, but few looked at the benefits internships might lend to educational institutions. A survey instrument was developed and sent to 619 deans of all U.S. business programs. In all, 29% replied. The results indicate some institutions are gaining the…

  9. Who sows? Who reaps? Women and land rights in India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bina Agarwal

    1988-01-01

    Noting the significance of direct access to land, and not just access mediated via male members, for the economic and social well?being of women and their families, this article traces women's past and existing rights to land in law and in customary practice, across communities and regions; examines changes in these rights among communities traditionally practising matrilineal inheritance; and seeks

  10. Reap what you sow: harvesting the deep Web

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Norm Medeiros

    2002-01-01

    This article examines the growth of the invisible Web, and efforts underway to make its contents more accessible. Dynamic Web publishing is described. The Open Archives Metadata Harvesting Protocol is reviewed, as are projects related to OCLC’s implementation of the Open Archives Initiative. Recent Dublin Core activities are reported.

  11. Panopticon: Reaping the benefits of Incremental SDN Deployment in

    E-print Network

    Schmid, Stefan

    restricted to Solitary Confinement Trees A B C D E F Per-port spanning trees that ensure waypoint enforcement The SDN ArchitecturePANOPTICON #12;Traffic restricted to Solitary Confinement Trees A B C D E F The SDN

  12. Hydrological change: reaping prosperity and pain in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunin, F. X.; Smith, C. J.; Denmead, O. T.

    2007-01-01

    The adage: “There is no such thing as a free lunch”, is relevant to land-use hydrology in Australia. Changes in land use to achieve greater productivity of food and fibre may have an adverse effect on the water balance and hence on the natural resource capital of a catchment. An altered regime of catchment outflow accompanies those land-use changes which, together with land degradation, impairs available water resources in quantity and quality and threatens enterprise sustainability, notwithstanding the initial improvement in productivity. Central to any hydrological change is an altered pattern of seasonal and annual water use by vegetation that has become modified in function with an amended transpiration fraction of daily evapotranspiration. In Australia, since measurement of evapotranspiration became feasible, the hydrological consequences of changes in land use have been determined, allowing the benefits in terms of plant productivity achieved through enhanced water use efficiency to be weighed against changed catchment outflows, diminished in either quantity or quality. Four case studies are presented as examples of ecological and hydrological changes: two deal with the upland forest environment and two with arable lowlands. In an upland eucalypt forest, following wildfire with subsequent regeneration from natural seedling establishment, substantial reduction in water yield occurred throughout a 50-year period of succession in the even-aged stand. In comparison, the effect of converting eucalypt forest to pine plantations was less detrimental to the yield of water from the catchments, with substantial growth increases over 30 years. In the lowlands, agricultural productivity, both as annual pasture and as crop, far exceeds that of natural perennial grassland and woodland. This increase in productivity comes not so much from any change to the yield of total water outflow but at the expense of water quality, compromised with increased material transport in suspension and solution resulting from accelerated erosion in association with outbreaks of soil salinity and acidity. The present study is aimed at optimising management to give plant production outcomes that ensure environmental protection through resource conservation. In the uplands, harvesting of water is the dominant consideration so that conservative management with limited plant productivity is sought. In the lowlands, the objective is to devise novel ecosystems with profitable plant production that exercises due control on outflow in maintaining the chemical and physical integrity of the edaphic environment.

  13. Persuasive GERONtechnology: Reaping Technology's Coaching Benefits at Older Age

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James L. Fozard; William D. Kearns

    2006-01-01

    \\u000a The keynote speaker for this conference, Dr. B.J. Fogg, defines persuasive technology as, “interactive computing systems designed\\u000a to change people’s attitudes and behaviors.” [1]. Such changes find their origin in changes in people’s motivation. The coaching\\u000a possibilities of technology may be viewed as an embellishment of conditioning and behavior therapy.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a With respect to aging, most people want to live a

  14. A quarter century of reaping what we SOE.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Ichiro

    2013-03-01

    Gene Splicing by Overlap Extension (SOE), described in a BioTechniques Research Report 23 years ago, is still widely used today in spite of changes in technology and scientific fashion. The history of SOE offers practical lessons for those who seek the best techniques, and for those who strive to develop them. PMID:23477381

  15. REAP Briefings Management Briefing Paper 3 http://www.reap.ac.uk Assessment as a driver for institutional transformation

    E-print Network

    Azzopardi, Leif

    brought about by increasing class sizes and resource constraints (ii) the shift from teacher-driven models some key process within higher education that, if harnessed, could act as a lever to manage all three. Thirdly, the application of new technologies should produce positive benefits. Assessment is arguably one

  16. Rafter beekeeping in Cambodia with Apis dorsata

    Microsoft Academic Search

    CLAIRE WARING; DANIEL R JUMP

    In the UK, it can be difficult to explain to non-beekeepers the differences between honey bees, bumble bees and wasps, let alone complicating the matter further with the mention of solitary bees. Visiting Asia adds a whole new dimension to the equation with the opportunity to see several different species of honey bee. The thought of bees that build comb

  17. Domestic Violence against Married Women in Cambodia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yount, Kathryn M.; Carrera, Jennifer S.

    2006-01-01

    We evaluate the effects of marital resources and early-life experiences on recent domestic violence and attitudes about wife abuse among 2,074 married Cambodian women. Household standard of living was negatively associated with physical domestic violence. Women with 8-13 fewer years of schooling than their husbands more often experienced physical…

  18. Mercury Contamination Along the Mekong River, Cambodia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. P. Murphy; M. Sampson; J. Guo; T. Parr; M. Gilbert; K. Irvine

    One of ten dolphins that died in the Mekong River had a high concentration of mercury (67 µg\\/g) in its liver. The mercury content of fish at Kratie was on average 103 ng\\/g (n=153) but in some species it was up to six fold higher. People located in the drainage basin with gold mines (Ratanakirri) had significantly more mercury in

  19. Paediatric Chromobacterium violaceum in Cambodia: the first documented case.

    PubMed

    Ke, Lov; An, Khun Peng; Heng, Sing; Riley, Maria; Sona, Soeng; Moore, Catrin E; Parry, Christopher M; Stoesser, Nicole; Chanpheaktra, Ngoun

    2012-07-01

    Chromobacterium violaceum infection is rarely described in Southeast Asian children, which may be due partly to the lack of access to adequate microbiology facilities in many areas. This case report describes the first documented case to occur in a Cambodian child. An awareness of the disease and its manifestations is important as treatment can be difficult and may require prolonged courses of antimicrobials and surgery. PMID:22785546

  20. Scholastic Achievement of Adolescent Refugees from Cambodia and Central America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rousseau, Cecile; Drapeau, Aline

    2000-01-01

    Central American and Cambodian students in six Canadian high schools and their parents were interviewed to assess the students' emotional problems and pre- and postmigration family environment. Findings indicate that the relationship between the emotional problems and scholastic achievement of teenaged refugees was tenuous. (Author/MKA)

  1. Building peace through participatory health training: a case from Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Ui, S; Leng, K; Aoyama, A

    2007-01-01

    This qualitative study examines the significance and effectiveness of participatory health training as a tool for peace building. It does so by analysing a case of training for 'health promoters' run by a Cambodian government health agency. The authors observed participants during the training and interviewed those involved in the courses. A developing capacity for coexistence and reconciliation between individuals who had been on opposite sides during the years of Khmer Rouge terror and continuous internal war was observed among both participants and trainers. Factors embodied in the training that facilitated favourable changes in self and in relations with others were identified as: (1) 'space for dialogue' was created by concrete common public health interests and urgent needs; (2) training took place 'live-in' style in a rural setting; (3) course contents and methods were consistent with peace education; (4) trainers had a conscious function as role models; and (5) there was continuity of effort and consequent accumulation of experience. To build peace, as well as conducting training directly on a technical topic, these essential factors need to be incorporated in the training programmes. PMID:19283628

  2. Child Labour, Education Policy and Governance in Cambodia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Chae-Young

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers how the issue of child labour is located in Cambodian education policy debates and how it is affected by the major constraints surrounding the Cambodian education sector. In particular, it asks why Cambodian policy makers have not sought to address the issue explicitly despite its considerable, and adverse, impact on…

  3. Radar Image with Color as Height, Nokor Pheas Trapeng, Cambodia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Nokor Pheas Trapeng is the name of the large black rectangular feature in the center-bottom of this image, acquired by NASA's Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR). Its Khmer name translates as 'Tank of the City of Refuge'. The immense tank is a typical structure built by the Khmer for water storage and control, but its size is unusually large. This suggests, as does 'city' in its name, that in ancient times this area was far more prosperous than today.

    A visit to this remote, inaccessible site was made in December 1998. The huge water tank was hardly visible. From the radar data we knew that the tank stretched some 500 meters (1,640 feet) from east to west. However, between all the plants growing on the surface of the water and the trees and other vegetation in the area, the water tank blended with the surrounding topography. Among the vegetation, on the northeast of the tank, were remains of an ancient temple and a spirit shrine. So although far from the temples of Angkor, to the southeast, the ancient water structure is still venerated by the local people.

    The image covers an area approximately 9.5 by 8.7 kilometers (5.9 by 5.4 miles) with a pixel spacing of 5 meters (16.4 feet). North is at top. Image brightness is from the C-band (5.6 centimeters, or 2.2 inches) wavelength radar backscatter, which is a measure of how much energy the surface reflects back toward the radar. Color is used to represent elevation contours. One cycle of color represents 20 meters (65.6 feet) of elevation change; that is, going from blue to red to yellow to green and back to blue again corresponds to 20 meters (65.6 feet) of elevation change.

    AIRSAR flies aboard a NASA DC-8 based at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. In the TOPSAR mode, AIRSAR collects radar interferometry data from two spatially separated antennas (2.6 meters, or 8.5 feet). Information from the two antennas is used to form radar backscatter imagery and to generate highly accurate elevation data. Built, operated and managed by JPL, AIRSAR is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise program. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  4. Seattle University School of Law Cambodia Legal Internship

    E-print Network

    Carter, John

    Documents Team provides a role for genocide survivors by encouraging them to become involved in the tribunal project. DC Cam brings them to genocide memorial centers and the ECCC. In Pursat, DC-Cam's Living

  5. US Policy toward Kosovo: Sowing the Wind in the Balkans, Reaping the Whirlwind in the Caucasus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Doug Bandow

    2009-01-01

    For the past decade, the United States has been promoting national transformation in the Balkans. In pushing the independence of Kosovo, Washington policy makers apparently believed that Serbia would acquiesce, most nations would recognize the newest independent state, and Russia would accept America's decision. None of these assumptions came to pass. Unfortunately, the war in the Caucasus was an inadvertent

  6. Sustainable Production of Crop Residue as a Cellulosic Ethanol Feedstock: REAP – Renewable Energy Assessment Project

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Domestic ethanol production is a strategy for reducing dependence on imported energy and release of greenhouse gases from use of fossil-energy-derived motor vehicle fuel. Federal and state governments are encouraging the use of ethanol. Initially energy crops, such as switchgrass, willow, and poplar...

  7. Introducing the GRACEnet/REAP data contribution, discovery and retrieval system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Difficulties in accessing high quality data on trace gas fluxes and performance of bioenergy/bio-product feedstocks limit the ability of researchers and others to address environmental impacts of agriculture and the potential to produce feedstocks. To address those needs, the GRACEnet (Greenhouse ga...

  8. The Place of Formative Evaluations in Assessment and Ways to Reap their Benefits

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Edward Nuhfer

    This paper presents several methods used in undergraduate geology classes to obtain mid-course improvements. These include teaching practices evaluation, consultation, in-class videotapes, student management teams, knowledge surveys, and classroom assessment techniques (CATs). The abstract is available on-line and the full paper can be downloaded.

  9. REAPING THE MOST NUTRIENTS: WORKING WITH STARCH AND NONFIBER CARBOHYDRATE DIGESTIBILITY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cows survive, grow, produce milk, reproduce, and store energy reserves based on the amount of digestible nutrients they obtain from their diets. There is consensus that cows do not have a starch requirement, but starch has been a staple source of digestible nutrients in dairy cattle diets. With conc...

  10. Reap the rewards of a non-targeted HIV screening program.

    PubMed

    2012-10-01

    Administrative hurdles, costs, and provider resistance have prevented many EDs from implementing the kind of nontargeted HIV screening that the CDC recommends. However, some of the hospitals that have successfully negotiated through these obstacles are having a positive impact on their communities, identifying cases of HIV at a time when many of the downstream complications and costs can be prevented. Further, once an infrastructure is in place to support HIV screening, it can be used for other purposes as well. Since the ED at the University of Alabama at Birmingham implemented non-targeted HIV screening a year ago, the process has identified 72 patients with HIV and linked them into care. Administrators caution that it is imperative to identify resources for follow-up care before HIV testing begins; otherwise the benefits of testing will be lost. Experts advise EDs to make testing as routine as possible so that patients will agree to undergo HIV tests. At UAB, triage nurses explain to all patients that the HIV test will be conducted unless they choose to decline the test.The decline rate is only 13%. New, fourth-generation testing platforms have reduced the per-test costs by more than half, and can deliver results within 30 minutes. PMID:23045764

  11. A time to reap, a time to sow: mitophagy and biogenesis in cardiac pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Andres, Allen M; Stotland, Aleksandr; Queliconi, Bruno B; Gottlieb, Roberta A

    2015-01-01

    Balancing mitophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis is essential for maintaining a healthy population of mitochondria and cellular homeostasis. Coordinated interplay between these two forces that govern mitochondrial turnover plays an important role as an adaptive response against various cellular stresses that can compromise cell survival. Failure to maintain the critical balance between mitophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis or homeostatic turnover of mitochondria results in a population of dysfunctional mitochondria that contribute to various disease processes. In this review we outline the mechanics and relationships between mitophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis, and discuss the implications of a disrupted balance between these two forces, with an emphasis on cardiac physiology. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Mitochondria: From Basic Mitochondrial Biology to Cardiovascular Disease". PMID:25444712

  12. Reaping What We Sow: Emerging Issues and Policy Implications of Agricultural Biotechnology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lee Ann Jackson; Michele T. Villinski

    2002-01-01

    This essay assesses the U.S. government's role in managing rapid biotechnological change in agriculture. Many scientists hail recent agricultural biotechnology developments as steps toward solving the health, nutrition, and environmental problems that have plagued the world for decades. At the same time, some fear these biotechnological advances will leave a legacy of environmental threats, health problems, and ethical dilemmas for

  13. Implementation and optimization of smart infusion systems: are we reaping the safety benefits?

    PubMed

    Trbovich, Patricia L; Cafazzo, Joseph A; Easty, Anthony C

    2013-01-01

    To address the high incidence of infusion errors, manufacturers have replaced the development of standard infusion pumps with smart pump systems. The implementation and ongoing optimization processes for smart pumps are more complex, as they require larger coordinated efforts with stakeholders throughout the medication process. If improper implementation/optimization processes are followed, hospitals invest in this technology while extracting minimal benefit. We assessed the processes hospitals employed when migrating from standard to smart infusion systems, and the extent to which they leveraged their investments from both a systems and resource perspective. Twenty-nine hospitals in Ontario, Canada, were surveyed that had either implemented smart pump systems or were in the process of implementing, representing a response rate of 69%. Results demonstrated that hospitals purchased smart pumps for reasons other than safety, did not involve a multidisciplinary team during implementation, made little effort to standardize drug concentrations or develop drug libraries and dosing limits, seldom monitored how nurses use the pumps, and failed to ensure wireless connectivity to upgrade protocols and download use data. Consequently, they are failing to realize the safety benefits these systems can provide. PMID:22103759

  14. Patella Fracture Fixation with Suture and Wire: you Reap what you Sew

    PubMed Central

    Egol, Kenneth; Howard, Daniel; Monroy, Alexa; Crespo, Alexander; Tejwani, Nirmal; Davidovitch, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Operative fixation of displaced inferior pole patella fractures has now become the standard of care. This study aims to quantify clinical, radiographic and functional outcomes, as well as identify complications in a cohort of patients treated with non-absorbable braided suture fixation for inferior pole patellar fractures. These patients were then compared to a control group of patients treated for mid-pole fractures with K-wires or cannulated screws with tension band wiring. Methods In this IRB approved study, we identified a cohort of patients who were diagnosed and treated surgically for a displaced patella fracture. Demographic, injury, and surgical information were recorded. All patients were treated with a standard surgical technique utilizing non-absorbable braided suture woven through the patellar tendon and placed through drill holes to achieve reduction and fracture fixation. All patients were treated with a similar post-operative protocol and followed up at standard intervals. Data were collected concurrently at follow up visits. For purpose of comparison, we identified a control cohort with middle third patella fractures treated with either k-wires or cannulated screws and tension band technique. Patients were followed by the treating surgeon at regular follow-up intervals. Outcomes included self-reported function and knee range of motion compared to the uninjured side. Results Forty-nine patients with 49 patella fractures identified retrospectively were treated over 9 years. This cohort consisted of 31 females (63.3%) and 18 males (36.7%) with an average age of 57.1 years (range 26 - 88 years). Patients had an average BMI of 26.48 (range 19 - 44.08). Thirteen patients with inferior pole fractures underwent suture fixation and 36 patients with mid-pole fractures underwent tension band fixation (K-wire or cannulated screws with tension band). In the suture cohort, one fracture failed open repair (7.6%), which was revised again with sutures and progressed to union. Of the 36 fractures repaired with a tension band fixation, 11 underwent secondary surgery due to hardware pain or fixation failure (30.6%). At one year, no difference was seen in knee range of motion between cohorts. All fractures healed radiographically. Those patients who required reoperation or removal of hardware had significantly diminished range of motion about their injured knee (p > 0.005). Conclusions Patients who sustain inferior pole patella fractures have limited options for fracture fixation. Suture repair is clinically acceptable, yielding similar results to patella fractures repaired with metal implants. Importantly, patients undergoing suture repair appear to have fewer hardware related postoperative complications than those receiving wire fixation for midpole fractures. PMID:25328461

  15. VentureStar(trademark) Reaping the Benefits of the X-33 Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumrall, J.; Lane, C.

    1998-01-01

    Major X-33 flight hardware has been delivered, and assembly of the vehicle is well underway in anticipation of its flight test program commencing in the summer of 1999. Attention has now turned to the operational VentureStar(trademark), the first single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) reusable launch vehicle. Activities are grouped under two broad categories: (1) vehicle development and (2) market/business planning, each of which is discussed. The mission concept is presented for direct payload delivery to the International Space Station and to low Earth orbit, as well as payload delivery with an upper stage to Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit (GTO) and other high energy orbits. System requirements include flight segment and ground segment. Vehicle system sizing and design status is provided including the application of X-33 traceability and lessons learned. Technology applications to the VentureStar(trademark) are described including the structure, propellant tanks, thermal protection system, aerodynamics, subsystems, payload bay and propulsion. Developing a market driven low cost launch services system for the 21 st Century requires traditional and non-traditional ways of being able to forecast the evolution of the potential market. The challenge is balancing both the technical and financial assumptions of the market. This involves the need to provide a capability to meet market segments that in some cases are very speculative, while at the same time providing the financial community with a credible revenue stream.

  16. Reaping the space investment. [Shuttle era geosynchronous satellite based technological trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calio, A. J.

    1979-01-01

    By 1999 operational space systems will be implemented routinely on a worldwide scale in many areas vital to human survival and life quality. Geosynchronous-based monitoring and observation will be extensively used. The Shuttle era will bring in the capability to allow monitoring and identifying pollution sources which fail to stay within required limits. Remotely sensed data over land masses will provide needed facts on renewable and nonrenewable earth resources. New instruments and techniques will have been developed to provide geologists with clues to the declining number of deposits of fuels and minerals. Also, practical methods for predicting earthquakes will have been elaborated by 1999. Communications will see implementation of many of the technological goals of 1978.

  17. Reap what you sow: spare cells for post-silicon metal fix

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kai-hui Chang; Igor L. Markov; Valeria Bertacco

    2008-01-01

    Post-silicon validation has recently become a major bottleneck in IC design. Several high prole IC designs have been taped-out with latent bugs, and forced the manufacturers to resort to addi- tional design revisions. Such changes can be applied through metal x; however, this is impractical without carefully pre-placed spare cells. In this work we perform the rst comprehensive analysis of

  18. What You Sow Is What You Reap: Violence and the Construction of Male Identity in Jamaica

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barry Chevannes

    Of the over 380 murders committed in Jamaica in 1996 and the nearly 500 in 1997, for which arrests were made, nearly eight out of every ten the police believed were committed by persons--males we assume--thirty years old and younger. Some of them were as young as a thirteen year old Grade 8 or Grade 9 student. We may assume

  19. Weed 'Em and Reap: The Art of Weeding to Avoid Criticism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    Today media centers provide students the opportunity to learn and explore subjects of their interest in depth. The media center is the largest classroom in the school providing service to every student and every teacher in all curricular areas. The library should be a place to encourage students' interests and a place to broaden their horizons by…

  20. Reaping the Return on Agricultural Research and Education in Virginia. Information Series 93-3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, George W.; Paczkowski, Remi

    This report focuses upon the economic and other contributions that agricultural research and education have made to Virginia over the past 40 years. Agricultural research, extension, and classroom instruction contribute in the following ways to Virginia's citizens: increased supplies and reduced costs, improved competitiveness, multiplier effects…

  1. Frequently Asked Questions about REAP Policy Briefs Last update: Jan 14, 2013

    E-print Network

    Straight, Aaron

    process. Ever since the end of the Great Leap Forward and Cultural Revolution, Chinese leaders, like Deng and recommendations to top policymakers. Q: Why do Chinese top leaders care about policy briefs? A: The policy brief holds especial significance to Chinese top leaders because they rely heavily on evidence

  2. Reaping the Benefits of Task Conflict in Teams: The Critical Role of Team Psychological Safety Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Bret H.; Postlethwaite, Bennett E.; Klotz, Anthony C.; Hamdani, Maria R.; Brown, Kenneth G.

    2012-01-01

    Past research suggests that task conflict may improve team performance under certain conditions; however, we know little about these specific conditions. On the basis of prior theory and research on conflict in teams, we argue that a climate of psychological safety is one specific context under which task conflict will improve team performance.…

  3. The Outsider: Advancement Staffs Can Reap the Benefits When Campuses Hire a President from Outside Academia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConnellogue, Ken

    2000-01-01

    Suggests that colleges and universities may gain financially when an outsider, i.e., not an academic, is hired as college president. Examples of presidents from fields such as law, business, and politics are offered to show that a business-minded approach attracts business-minded donors, that broad experience lends credibility with alumni, and…

  4. Reaping between the Lines: Non-Verbal Cues to the Journalistic Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, J. J.

    Maintaining that the nonverbal elements of communication are ultimately more significant than the verbal elements in determining the eventual success or failure of the journalistic interview, this paper attempts to assist journalists in understanding the complex and subtle nonverbal characteristics of the interview environment. Based on the…

  5. Restoring Coastal Plants to Improve Global Carbon Storage: Reaping What We Sow

    PubMed Central

    Irving, Andrew D.; Connell, Sean D.; Russell, Bayden D.

    2011-01-01

    Long-term carbon capture and storage (CCS) is currently considered a viable strategy for mitigating rising levels of atmospheric CO2 and associated impacts of global climate change. Until recently, the significant below-ground CCS capacity of coastal vegetation such as seagrasses, salt marshes, and mangroves has largely gone unrecognized in models of global carbon transfer. However, this reservoir of natural, free, and sustainable carbon storage potential is increasingly jeopardized by alarming trends in coastal habitat loss, totalling 30–50% of global abundance over the last century alone. Human intervention to restore lost habitats is a potentially powerful solution to improve natural rates of global CCS, but data suggest this approach is unlikely to substantially improve long-term CCS unless current restoration efforts are increased to an industrial scale. Failure to do so raises the question of whether resources currently used for expensive and time-consuming restoration projects would be more wisely invested in arresting further habitat loss and encouraging natural recovery. PMID:21479244

  6. How to Sow and Reap as You Go: a Simple Model of Cyclical Endogenous Growth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adriaan van Zon; Emmanuelle Fortune; Tobias Kronenberg

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we present a simple endogenous growth model that allows for the occurrence of innovations that can develop into General Purpose Technologies (GPTs), which are the result of basic R&D. The model incorporates the main features of the Romer (1990) model and the Aghion and Howitt (1992) model by using multi-level Ethier functions on the one hand, and

  7. (Almost) Word for Word: As Voice Recognition Programs Improve, Students Reap the Benefits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Voice recognition software is hardly new--attempts at capturing spoken words and turning them into written text have been available to consumers for about two decades. But what was once an expensive and highly unreliable tool has made great strides in recent years, perhaps most recognized in programs such as Nuance's Dragon NaturallySpeaking…

  8. Addressing the human resources crisis: a case study of Cambodia’s efforts to reduce maternal mortality (1980–2012)

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Noriko; Abe, Kimiko; Rotem, Arie; Tung, Rathavy; Keat, Phuong; Robins, Ann; Zwi, Anthony B

    2013-01-01

    Objective To identify factors that have contributed to the systematic development of the Cambodian human resources for health (HRH) system with a focus on midwifery services in response to high maternal mortality in fragile resource-constrained countries. Design Qualitative case study. Review of the published and grey literature and in-depth interviews with key informants and stakeholders using an HRH system conceptual framework developed by the authors (‘House Model’; Fujita et al, 2011). Interviews focused on the perceptions of respondents regarding their contributions to strengthening midwifery services and the other external influences which may have influenced the HRH system and reduction in the maternal mortality ratio (MMR). Setting Three rounds of interviews were conducted with senior and mid-level managers of the Ministries of Health (MoH) and Education, educational institutes and development partners. Participants A total of 49 interviewees, who were identified through a snowball sampling technique. Main outcome measures Scaling up the availability of 24?h maternal health services at all health centres contributing to MMR reduction. Results The incremental development of the Cambodian HRH system since 2005 focused on the production, deployment and retention of midwives in rural areas as part of a systematic strategy to reduce maternal mortality. The improved availability and access to midwifery services contributed to significant MMR reduction. Other contributing factors included improved mechanisms for decision-making and implementation; political commitment backed up with necessary resources; leadership from the top along with a growing capacity of mid-level managers; increased MoH capacity to plan and coordinate; and supportive development partners in the context of a conducive external environment. Conclusions Lessons from this case study point to the importance of a systemic and comprehensive approach to health and HRH system strengthening and of ongoing capacity enhancement and leadership development to ensure effective planning, implementation and monitoring of HRH policies and strategies. PMID:23674446

  9. REAP is an apprenticeship experience designed for highly motivated, first-year students in the Honors Program. The REAP experience will provide a fast-track for talented students, enabling them to explore topics of interest,

    E-print Network

    Pringle, James "Jamie"

    Sciences #12;Topic: Is Mortalin Involved in Cytoplasmic Sequestration of p53 in Human SKBR32 Breast Cancer, and Biomedical Sciences Topic: The Flavor of Animal Life: Molecular Cloning and Expression of an Evolutionary: Human-Wetland Interactions and Changing Maya Landscapes in Belize: A Comparative Habitat

  10. Areawide suppression of European corn borer with Bt maize reaps savings to non-Bt maize growers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transgenic maize, engineered to express insecticidal proteins from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) has become one of the most widely adopted pest management technologies in U.S. agriculture. In 2009, Bt maize was planted on more than 22.2 million ha, comprising 63% of the U.S. crop. The te...

  11. "You reap what you sow"--a case of heterotopic ossification within a fasciocutaneous radial forearm free flap reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Gangidi, S R; Courtney, D

    2013-04-01

    Heterotopic ossification is the formation of new bone outside of the skeleton. We describe a previously unreported case of heterotopic ossification occurring within a fasciocutaneous radial forearm free flap for reconstruction following tongue squamous cell carcinoma resection. Although this is a benign condition, it is important to consider and exclude a neoplastic recurrence. PMID:23433474

  12. Bilingual Toddlers Reap the Language They Sow: Ethnic Minority Toddlers' Childcare Attendance Increases Maternal Host Language Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prevoo, Marielle J. L.; Mesman, Judi; Van Ijzendoorn, Marinus H.; Pieper, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the development and correlates of language use in bilingual Turkish-Dutch immigrant mothers and their toddlers. In this short-term longitudinal study 87 mothers completed questionnaires on their Dutch and Turkish language use, ethnic identity and use of childcare. Observational data were obtained for maternal supportive…

  13. Digitization and the Creation of Virtual Libraries: The Princeton University Image Card Catalog--Reaping the Benefits of Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henthorne, Eileen

    1995-01-01

    Describes a project at the Princeton University libraries that converted the pre-1981 public card catalog, using digital imaging and optical character recognition technology, to fully tagged and indexed records of text in MARC format that are available on an online database and will be added to the online catalog. (LRW)

  14. As you reap, so shall you sow: coupling of harvesting and inoculating stabilizes the mutualism between termites and fungi

    PubMed Central

    Aanen, Duur K

    2006-01-01

    At present there is no consensus theory explaining the evolutionary stability of mutualistic interactions. However, the question is whether there are general ‘rules’, or whether each particular mutualism needs a unique explanation. Here, I address the ultimate evolutionary stability of the ‘agricultural’ mutualism between fungus-growing termites and Termitomyces fungi, and provide a proximate mechanism for how stability is achieved. The key to the proposed mechanism is the within-nest propagation mode of fungal symbionts by termites. The termites suppress horizontal fungal transmission by consuming modified unripe mushrooms (nodules) for food. However, these nodules provide asexual gut-resistant spores that form the inoculum of new substrate. This within-nest propagation has two important consequences: (i) the mutualistic fungi undergo severe, recurrent bottlenecks, so that the fungus is likely to be in monoculture and (ii) the termites ‘artificially’ select for high nodule production, because their fungal food source also provides the inoculum for the next harvest. I also provide a brief comparison of the termite–fungus mutualism with the analogous agricultural mutualism between attine ants and fungi. This comparison shows that—although common factors for the ultimate evolutionary stability of mutualisms can be identified—the proximate mechanisms can be fundamentally different between different mutualisms. PMID:17148364

  15. You Reap What You Sow: Parental Investment in Language Learning and Its Reflection in a Seven-Year-Old's World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celik, Servet

    2007-01-01

    According to the 2000 Census, 329 different languages, including English, are spoken in the United States today. With the increasing number of immigrant and international groups, a number of topics such as language learning, language loss and maintenance, and bilingual education have started to follow an important line of investigation in the past…

  16. Just Doing What They Gotta Do: Single Black Custodial Fathers Coping with the Stresses and Reaping the Rewards of Parenting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coles, Roberta L.

    2009-01-01

    For single African American custodial fathers, parenting stress is exacerbated by the cultural expectation that Black fathers are "normally" absent and by the clustering of stresses that Black men are more likely to encounter. This sample of African American fathers have used a repertoire of problem-focused and cognitive coping strategies,…

  17. Adolescent survivors of massive childhood trauma in Cambodia: Life events and current symptoms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    George M. Realmuto; Ann Masten; Linda Flies Carole; Jon Hubbard; Andrea Groteluschen; Bunkhean Chhun

    1992-01-01

    Cambodian adolescents who survived massive trauma as children were studied to examine the relation of current trauma symptoms to sex, age, trauma exposure, and other current symptoms. Exposure to traumatic life events was expected to be very high, to relate to age and to other symptoms of current psychological functioning. Questionnaires assessed traumatic life events, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and

  18. Payments for biodiversity conservation in the context of weak institutions: Comparison of three programs from Cambodia

    E-print Network

    Foster, William A.

    contribution to local livelihoods, and rapidly protected globally significant species. However, this program also failed to build local management organisations or understanding of conservation goals. By contrast). These programs conform to the Coasean view: land ownership or resource tenure is clearly defined, these rights

  19. 72 FR 32869 - Combating Exploitive Child Labor Through Education in Bolivia, Cambodia, Colombia, the Democratic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2007-06-14

    ...and that address poverty--a major factor that increases the likelihood that...funding to target poverty reduction, increase access to basic services...living below the poverty line, and the increase in the...

  20. Cultural Orientation for Vietnamese Montagnard Refugees: A Special Project of IOM Cambodia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timko, Leslie

    In 2002, the International Organization for Migration provided pre-arrival cultural orientation training to 905 Vietnamese Montagnard refugees living in a transit processing facility on the outskirts of Phnom Penh. The training was specifically designed to prepare the refugees for third country resettlement to the United States. It provided tools…

  1. Implementing Quality Assurance at Royal University of Phnom Penh, Cambodia: Perceptions, Practices and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ros, Soveacha

    2010-01-01

    Quality Assurance in higher education has been an ongoing international issue for discussion. As higher education institutions move toward an era of accountability and accreditation, groups of stakeholders require proof of high-quality academic programs and services from higher education providers. Since the mid-1990s, most providers have strived…

  2. Professional Education Programme for Land Management and Land Administration in Cambodia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Setha, Vung; Mund, Jan-Peter

    2008-01-01

    Land management and land administration are defined as a system of planning, management and administration methods and techniques that aims to integrate ecological with social, economic and legal principles in the management of land for urban and rural development purposes. The main objective is to meet changing and developing human needs, while…

  3. Contemporary Immigration: First-Person Fiction from Cuba, Haiti, Korea, and Cambodia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandmann, Alexa

    2004-01-01

    The topic of immigration is frequently taught in middle school classrooms as part of the history of America, for this country is indeed a "land of immigrants." Special emphasis is usually given to immigration that occurred a century or more ago, but contemporary immigration may prove to be a more compelling way to view this concept. Middle school…

  4. GENOCIDE PREVENTION: GENOCIDE EDUCATION PROJECT NATIONAL TEACHER TRAINING FOR LOWER AND UPPER SECONDARY SCHOOL OF CAMBODIA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JEAN PIAGET

    Piaget has been identified as a constructivist as well as an interactionist. His interest in cognitive development came from his interest in the origin of knowledge and his training in the natural sciences. Piaget was very interested in how children come to know and understand their world. He developed his cognitive theory by actually observing and studying children (some of

  5. Prediction of contamination potential of groundwater arsenic in Cambodia, Laos, and Thailand using artificial neural network

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The arsenic (As) contamination of groundwater has increasingly been recognized as a major global issue of concern. As groundwater resources are one of most important freshwater sources for water supplies in Southeast Asian countries, it is important to investigate the spatial distribution of As cont...

  6. Environmental Factors and WASH Practices in the Perinatal Period in Cambodia: Implications for Newborn Health.

    PubMed

    Bazzano, Alessandra N; Oberhelman, Richard A; Potts, Kaitlin Storck; Gordon, Anastasia; Var, Chivorn

    2015-01-01

    Infection contributes to a significant proportion of neonatal death and disability worldwide, with the major burden occurring in the first week of life. Environmental conditions and gaps in water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) practices may contribute to the risk of infection, particularly in settings where health centers are expanding to meet the growing demand for skilled care at birth and homes do not have adequate access to water and sanitation. A qualitative approach was used to understand the environmental context for infection prevention and control (IPC) and WASH associated behaviors in health centers where women give birth, and in homes of newborns, in a rural Cambodian province. Structured observations and focus group discussions revealed important gaps in optimal practices, and both structural and social barriers to maintaining IPC during delivery and post-partum. Solutions are available to address the issues identified, and tackling these could result in marked environmental improvement for quality of care and neonatal outcomes. Water, sanitation and hygiene in home and health center environments are likely to be important contributors to health and should be addressed in strategies to improve neonatal survival. PMID:25711360

  7. Vitamin A supplementation in Cambodia: program coverage and association with greater maternal formal education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Davinder S Grover; Saskia de Pee; Kai Sun; V K Raju

    Vitamin A supplementation reduces morbidity, mortality, and blindness among children in developing countries. The objective of this study is to characterize the coverage of the Cambodian national vitamin A program among preschool children and to identify risk factors for not receiving vitamin A supplementation. The study subjects were preschool children and their families who participated in the 2005 Cambodian Demographic

  8. Starting from Nowhere? Popular Music in Cambodia after the Khmer Rouge

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen Mamula

    2008-01-01

    illuminates the power of culture. By “culture,” I denote a traditional way of life, a rubric of familiar phenomena that include indigenous ritual, ideology, belief systems, and the spatial and temporal rhythms to which these systems move and integrate. Yet, also revealed in such a study is the power of cultural change—change fueled by a growing market economy, tourism, and

  9. Chemical analysis of black crust on the Angkor sandstone at the Bayon temple, Cambodia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wonsuh; Oguchi, Chiaki; Waragai, Tetsuya

    2014-05-01

    The Angkor complex is the one of the greatest cultural heritages in the world. It is constructed in the early 12th century, designated as a world cultural heritage by UNESCO in 1992. The temples at the Angkor complex are mainly made of sandstone and laterite. However, due to the tropical climate, plants, lichens and various microorganisms are growing well on the rock surface. Black crusts are also easily found on the stone surface. The 21st technical session of the International Coordinating Committee for the Safeguarding and Development of the Historic Site of Angkor (ICC-Angkor) held in 2012 recommended that to preserve both the biofilms and the forest cover and to prohibit the biocides (chlorine-based) and organic biocides. However, there are many reports that lichens and microorganisms accelerate rock weathering. It is important to clarify that how the biofilm on the Angkor temples affect Angkor sandstones. We sampled Angkor sandstone covered by black crust at the Bayon temple, Angkor complex, and observed the section and the surface of the rock sample by using SEM. Surfaces of the samples are not polished in order to observe the original condition. The samples are coated with gold for 180 seconds. The depth of the black crust is up to 1 mm. Many filamentous materials were found on the black crust. Average energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy data of the five areas of ca. 20 ?m ×15 ?m in the black crusts shows that over 80 % of the filamentous materials are compounds of carbon. It seems that these materials are hyphae. The shape of the hypha is like a thread and its size is few ?m in diameter and up to several centimeters in length. Black crusts are consisted of elements and compounds of carbon, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Cl, K, Ca, and Fe. Further research has to be done to find out the better and proper way of conservation for the Angkor complex.

  10. Asian values and its political consequences: Is Cambodia the first domino?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joakim Öjendal; Hans Antlöv

    1998-01-01

    The coincidence of the ‘third wave of democratization’ and the vanishing Cold War seemed in the early 1990s to pave the way for a global democratization. But there are pockets of resistance and backlashes. Southeast Asia has been labelled as the region in the world most resilient to democracy. The Southeast Asian challenge to liberal democracy has been articulated as

  11. The Environmental Impact of Cambodia's Ancient City of Mahendraparvata (Phnom Kulen)

    PubMed Central

    Penny, Dan; Chevance, Jean-Baptiste; Tang, David; De Greef, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    The Khmer kingdom, whose capital was at Angkor from the 9th to the 14th-15th century, was founded in 802 by king Jayavarman II in a city called Mahandraparvata, on Phnom Kulen. Virtually nothing more is known of Mahandraparvata from the epigraphic sources, but systematic archaeological survey and excavation have identified an array of cultural features that point to a more extensive and enduring settlement than the historical record indicates. Recent remote sensing data have revolutionized our view, revealing the remains of a city with a complex and spatially extensive network of urban infrastructure. Here, we present a record of vegetation change and soil erosion from within that urban network, dating from the 8th century CE. Our findings indicate approximately 400 years of intensive land use, punctuated by discrete periods of intense erosion beginning in the mid 9th century and ending in the late 11th century. A marked change in water management practices is apparent from the 12th century CE, with implications for water supply to Angkor itself. This is the first indication that settlement on Mahendraparvata was not only extensive, but also intensive and enduring, with a marked environmental impact. PMID:24416206

  12. The Distribution of Pedagogical Content Knowledge in Cambodia: Gaps and Thresholds in Math Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngo, Federick J.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing teacher quality is a major objective of recent Cambodian education policy. In mathematics education literature, pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) has emerged as a critical component of teacher quality that is strongly linked to student achievement. In this study I use data from a large survey of Cambodian schools to investigate the…

  13. Utilization of Tum Nub (Embankment) for Expanding Double Rice Cropping Area in the Mekong Delta, Cambodia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Miho; Goto, Akira; Mizutani, Masakazu; Khem, Sothea

    This study aims to examine the effect of embankments for expanding double rice cropping area in the Cambodian Mekong Delta, where many traditional embankments called Tum Nub. For realizing double rice cropping in the flood plain, securing the cropping period and irrigation water during non-submerged days is essential, for which utilization of Tum Nub is considered to be effective. The field investigation revealed that some villages are practicing double rice cropping by introducing early rainy season rice. Hence, for introducing early rainy season rice, the effect of combination of two types of embankments was simulated for a target area selected: Type 1 embankment is making a reservoir for storing water, but single rice cropping is allowed in the inside of the reservoir after consuming stored water; and Type 2 is that for delaying the start of inundation. The result of the simulation showed that the combination of the embankments can increase rice production of the target area by 24-30% from the current level.

  14. Diversity of Orientia tsutsugamushi clinical isolates in Cambodia reveals active selection and recombination process.

    PubMed

    Duong, Veasna; Blassdell, Kim; May, Thinh Thi Xuan; Sreyrath, Lay; Gavotte, Laurent; Morand, Serge; Frutos, Roger; Buchy, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    Orientia tsutsugamushi, the causative agent of scrub typhus in South East Asia and Pacific, is an obligate intracellular bacterium closely related to the Rickettsia. The pathogen is transmitted to humans through the bites of infected larvae of trombiculid mites of the genus Leptotrombidium in which is maintained trough vertical transmission mechanism. The infection in rodents has been described in over 20 species. Scrub typhus is commonly confused with other tropical fevers and late diagnosis and treatment can lead to severe organ failures and a strain-dependent mortality rate of up to 50%. A MLST scheme associating seven core function genes: adk, lepB, lipA, lipB, secY, sodB and sucA was developed and validated on seven Cambodian strains detected in patients and two complete reference genomes from Korea and Japan. Sequence data were analyzed both with respect to sequence type (ST) diversity and DNA polymorphism. Differing trends were revealed. DNA polymorphism and phylogeny of individual gene loci indicated a significant level of recombination and genetic diversity. However, the ST distribution is clearly clonal and the clinical situation can be summarized by the formula: one patient, one strain, one ST. This contradiction is only apparent and is most likely the consequence of the unique life cycle of O. tsutsugamushi. The quasi exclusive vertical transmission mode in mites generates repeated bottlenecks and small-size populations and strongly limits genetic diversity. O. tsutsugamushi has developed specific mechanisms for generating genetic diversity which include recombination, duplication and conjugation. Recombination and other mechanisms for increasing genetic diversity are likely to occur in rodents which can act as maintenance hosts, although occurrence in mites cannot be excluded. Consequences for the epidemiology of scrub typhus are discussed. PMID:20854933

  15. Land-lake breezes at low latitudes: The case of Tonle Sap Lake in Cambodia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujimoto, Kumiko; Koike, Toshio

    2013-07-01

    Tonle Sap Lake is the largest freshwater lake in Southeast Asia. During the postmonsoon season, a small linear cloud system has been observed over this lake in early morning, while the sky above the surrounding land is clear. Although this cloud system is apparently generated by land breezes, previous studies on land-lake (sea) circulation have suggested that environmental factors at low latitudes inhibit development of nocturnal land breezes. In this study, we investigate the mechanism of these early morning clouds through numerical simulation. The simulations show a linear updraft system over the lake, forming along the southwest lakeshore around 22:00 and moving northeast to the middle of the lake. The heavier air mass from the land meets the extraordinarily warm and humid air mass over the lake, triggering updrafts under the conditionally convective instability. The characteristic high surface water temperature was favorable for generation of the land breeze and updraft systems. That high surface water temperature of the lake is produced by the tropical climate along with efficient energy absorption because of the shallowness of the water body. This unique feature can generate a clear nocturnal land breeze circulation accompanying a migrating updraft system over the lake despite its low latitude.

  16. January 27 February 14, 2013 Aboard the Clipper Odyssey VIETNAM & CAMBODIA BY SEA

    E-print Network

    Williams, Brian C.

    Sihanoukville Con Son Nha Trang Van Phong Bay Qui Nhon Hanoi Haiphong Vinh Lan Ha Bay Da Nang Hue Hoi An Vinh Minh City (Saigon)Phu Quoc Sihanoukville Con Son Nha Trang Van Phong Bay Qui Nhon Hanoi Haiphong Vinh

  17. Paradigm and Paradox: Education for All and the Inclusion of Children with Disabilities in Cambodia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalyanpur, Maya

    2011-01-01

    In keeping with international guidelines and to meet the target of Education for All (EFA) by 2015, the Cambodian government, with assistance from non-government and aid organisations, has instituted several initiatives towards including children with disabilities in the educational mainstream. This paper examines these efforts within the context…

  18. The challenge of assessing social dimensions of avoided deforestation: Examples from Cambodia

    SciTech Connect

    Pasgaard, M., E-mail: mase@life.ku.dk

    2013-01-15

    Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation in developing countries (REDD +) has moved to the central stage of the climate change debate by being promoted as a significant, cheap, and quick win-win strategy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and thereby mitigate climate change. In order to be successful in reducing emissions while providing the projected social and environmental co-benefits, REDD + needs to overcome key challenges of insecure forest tenure and inequity in the distribution of benefits. Such challenges threaten to affect the livelihoods and well-being in the local communities and in turn the effectiveness of REDD+. While REDD + programs will affect the participating communities, there is limited knowledge as to what social impacts these projects may bring to the local population. Similarly, assessment of these social dimensions has received little attention until recently, and is consequently out of sync with the realities of REDD + projects. The present paper aims to shed light on the methodological and contextual challenges in the assessment of the social dimensions of REDD+. Some of the main social concerns of REDD + are outlined with an emphasis on the uniqueness and complexity of REDD + interventions. Recently proposed approaches to assess social impacts in REDD + are critically assessed in terms of the diversity of frameworks proposed, choice of social indicators, and data collection requirements. Specifically, these methodological implications are further discussed in the light of the social dimensions and the prescribed regulations of REDD + in a Cambodian context. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Insecure tenure and inequitable benefit sharing are main social concerns in REDD +. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two guides to social assessments in REDD + are critically reviewed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mismatch between social assessment requirements and the reality of REDD + is analyzed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concrete, topical examples from Cambodian REDD + are used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Support the claim to add qualitative assessment of social dimensions in REDD +.

  19. SHIPBOARD LABORATORY SAFETY PROGRAM

    E-print Network

    SHIPBOARD LABORATORY SAFETY PROGRAM INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM U.S. IMPLEMENTING ................................................................................................................................7 Other TAMU and SIEM Offshore Policies and Programs

  20. 78 FR 19183 - Notice of Funding Availability for the Rural Energy for America Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ...the Rural Energy for America Program (REAP) for Fiscal Year 2013 for financial assistance...Year 2013 budget authority to fund these REAP activities, which will support up to...www.rurdev.usda.gov/BCP_Reap.html. I. Funding Opportunity...

  1. 77 FR 54555 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ...the Rural Energy for America Program (REAP). OMB Control Number: 0570-0061...eligible for financial assistance under the REAP. Agricultural producers and rural small...funds), statements of intent to seek REAP funds for the renewable energy...

  2. 78 FR 26747 - Amendment to Notice of Funding Availability for the Rural Energy for America Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-08

    ...the Rural Energy for America Program (REAP) for Fiscal Year 2013. The Consolidated...113-6), provides additional funding for REAP. To provide the public additional opportunity...published to amend the funding available under REAP. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  3. 76 FR 22608 - Notice of a Public Meeting on the Rural Energy for America Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-22

    ...Webinars for the Rural Energy for America Program (REAP) associated with the recently published REAP interim rule and Notice of Funds Availability...720-9812. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The REAP interim rule and the NOFA were published in...

  4. 75 FR 47525 - Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA) for Renewable Energy Feasibility Studies Grants Under the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-06

    ...implementing the Rural Energy for America Program (REAP) for Fiscal Year 2010 through the publication of three REAP notices: Renewable energy system and energy...Renewable energy feasibility study grants. This REAP Notice announces the availability...

  5. 78 FR 34978 - Amendment to Notice of Funding Availability for the Rural Energy for America Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-11

    ...the Rural Energy for America Program (REAP) for Fiscal Year 2013. The Consolidated...2013, provides additional funding for REAP. This Notice announces the availability...Fiscal Year 2013 budget authority to fund REAP activities, which will support...

  6. 77 FR 59888 - Notice of Request for Revision of a Currently Approved Information Collection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ...the Rural Energy for America Program (REAP). DATES: Comments on this notice must...approved information collection. Abstract: REAP provides grants and loan guarantees to...implementation of energy efficiency improvements. REAP also provides grants for renewable...

  7. Investments reap dividends for many universities, but access and quality of higher education across the United States continues to lag behind

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    A number of noteworthy items related to the landscape of higher education found their way into major newspapers this week, including the announcement that Harvard University's endowment reported a 21.1 percent gain on its investments for the fiscal year 2004. This was the best performing year for Harvard's university fund since 2000, although the school also announced that the projected returns during the coming decade will be significantly lower than the past 10 years. Across the wide world of higher education throughout the United States, the news was not nearly as optimistic, at least in terms of access and affordability for those seeking higher education opportunities. A report issued this week from the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education on the state of higher education across the country noted that only three states (California, Utah, and Minnesota) scored higher than a "D" in terms of providing affordable options for attending college. The report essentially grades affordability by comparing net college costs with the average family income in each state, and by this measure, the Center has concluded that college is becoming less affordable in most states. Commenting on the report, David Breneman (dean of the Curry School of Education at the University of Virginia) remarked that "For at least another five to eight years we're looking at a real denial of opportunity." In conclusion, it should also be noted that the report also notes that the nation's high schools have improved over the past decade.The first link leads to an article on the spectacular performance by Harvard's endowment from this Wednesday's Boston Globe. The second link leads to a like-minded piece written by Alvin Powell of the Harvard News Office. The third link leads to a well-written piece in The Salt Lake Tribune that discusses the national affordable education report's comments on the state of Utah's higher education system. Visitors to the fourth link will find an article from The Sacramento Bee that discusses the generally fine performance of California's higher education system, but still offering the potential specter of increased tuition costs that may hinder efforts to increase accessibility and maintain affordability. The fifth link whisks visitors away to a piece from The Capital Times of Madison, Wisconsin, which discusses the ramifications of this national report throughout the state of Wisconsin, a place long lauded for its extensive and much-studied system of higher education. Finally, the last link leads to the homepage of the recently released National Report Card on Higher Education. Here visitors can view individual state reports, peruse a broad overview of national trends, and also compare states in terms of their overall performance during the past few years.

  8. Commentary: the five Ws of a Fracture Liaison Service: why, who, what, where, and how? In osteoporosis, we reap what we sow.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Jeffrey R; Silverman, Stuart L

    2013-12-01

    Establishing a Fracture Liaison Service (FLS) to identify and treat patients with a recent fragility fracture has been shown to be effective, save money, useful to document high quality of care, and makes good clinical sense. A FLS starts with an osteoporosis champion and encompasses identification of patients with a recent fracture, diagnostic workup, treatment, and follow-up. A FLS is most effective when it is able to function in multiple settings: the hospital, emergency department, and outpatient clinic. Implementation may be somewhat easier in a closed healthcare system but can be feasible even in an open system. There are many barriers to implementation which can be addressed. The future of FLS care lies in a collaborative systems-based approach with appropriate stakeholder engagement, leading to seamless integration of osteoporosis care. PMID:24104520

  9. REAP (raster e-beam advanced process) using 50-kV raster e-beam system for sub-100-nm node mask technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baik, Ki-Ho; Dean, Robert L.; Mueller, Mark; Lu, Maiying; Lem, Homer Y.; Osborne, Stephen; Abboud, Frank E.

    2002-07-01

    A chemically amplified resist (CAR) process has been recognized as an approach to meet the demanding critical dimension (CD) specifications of 100nm node technology and beyond. Recently, significant effort has been devoted to optimizing CAR materials, which offer the characteristics required for next generation photomask fabrication. In this paper, a process established with a positive-tone CAR from TOK and 50kV MEBES eXara system is discussed. This resist is developed for raster scan 50 kV e-beam systems. It has high contrast, good coating characteristics, good dry etch selectivity, and high environmental stability. The coating process is conducted in an environment with amine concentration less than 2 ppb. A nitrogen environment is provided during plate transfer steps. Resolution using a 60nm writing grid is 90nm line and space patterns. CD linearity is maintained down to 240nm for isolated lines or spaces by applying embedded proximity effect correction (emPEC). Optimizations of post-apply bake (PAB) and post-expose bake (PEB) time, temperature, and uniformity are completed to improve adhesion, coating uniformity, and resolution. A puddle develop process is optimized to improve line edge roughness, edge slope, and resolution. Dry etch process is optimized on a TetraT system to transfer the resist image into the chrome layer with minimum etch bias.

  10. Setting up a CFO Trust Fund: Forging a Bond with Your Director of Finance Will Reap Rewards for Your Institution--And Your Department

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2011-01-01

    While it would be naive to think that every CIO can achieve a rapport with his CFO, understanding the importance of a solid relationship with the head of finance is critical to success, both for the IT department and the institution as a whole. Never has this been truer than in today's bleak economy, as CFOs become increasingly cautious about…

  11. REAP (Raster E-Beam Advanced Process) Using 50kV Raster E-beam System for Sub100nm Node Mask Technology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ki-Ho Baik; Robert Dean; Mark Mueller; Maiying Lu; Homer Lem; Stephen Osborne; Frank Abboud

    A chemically amplified resist (CAR) process has been recognized as an approach to meet the demanding critical dimension (CD) specifications of 100nm node technology and beyond. Recently, significant effort has been devoted to optimizing CAR materials, which offer the characteristics required for next generation photomask fabrication. In this paper, a process established with a positive-tone CAR from TOK and 50kV

  12. Gambling on change. Five big systems buy into a venture capital fund to try to reap profits from the transformation of healthcare.

    PubMed

    Evans, Melanie

    2011-01-31

    Five healthcare systems have financed a venture-capital fund with hopes for a financial and operational return. Executives say the investment is a way to influence technological developments and evaluate products and software. James Bosscher, chief investment officer at Trinity Health, left, said Heritage fund investments will target health information technology. PMID:21370624

  13. You reap what you sow – or do you? – volunteers in organic row-sown and broadcast-sown oilseed rape fields

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Naja Steen Andersen; Jesper Rasmussen; Rikke Bagger Jørgensen

    2010-01-01

    The frequency and origin of oilseed rape volunteers in organic row and broadcast-sown oilseed rape fields was evaluated using DNA markers (ISSR) for analysis of potential volunteers in nine organic oilseed rape fields with different history. Using the software AFLPOP, the potential volunteers were assigned to variety by comparing their ISSR fingerprints with those of present and previous varieties. Results

  14. Strong performance. Healthcare executives reaped big rewards in 2010, with returning hospital CEOs seeing a 58.2% gain in compensation.

    PubMed

    Galloro, Vince

    2011-08-15

    Healthcare CEOs saw their compensation slip relative to other industries but still earned big paydays last year. "2010 was a great year for corporate earnings and stock performance," says Steve Kaplan, left, a professor of finance and entrepreneurship. "Part of the reason for the increase in pay is that the CEOs delivered in 2010." PMID:21882381

  15. Dismantling the Justice Silos: avoiding the pitfalls and reaping the benefits of information-sharing between forensic science, medicine and law.

    PubMed

    Kelty, Sally F; Julian, Roberta; Ross, Alastair

    2013-07-10

    Forensic science is increasingly relied on by police and the courts to exonerate the innocent and to establish links to crime. With this increased reliance the potential for unjust outcomes increases, especially in serious matters for two reasons. The more serious the matter, the more likely that evidence mishandling can lead to wrongful imprisonment, and the more likely the personnel involved will be multi-disciplinary (police, medicine, law, forensic science), and multi-organisational (Health, Justice, private legal/medical, police). The importance of identifying effective multi-organisational interactions was highlighted in the recent wrongful imprisonment of an Australian male for a sexual assault he did not commit. One factor that led to this unjust outcome was the justice silo effect: where forensic practitioners from different agencies operate in isolation (rarely communicating or sharing information/knowledge). In this paper we discuss findings from the Interfaces Project designed to assess the extent of the justice silos within Australia. We interviewed 103 police, forensic scientists, lawyers, judges, coroners, pathologists and forensic physicians Australian-wide. Five main themes were identified in the data: the silo effect was only partial and in each jurisdiction some form of inter-agency communication was actively occurring; inter-agency meetings were more common in homicide than sexual assault cases; forensic physicians were semi-invisible; there had been considerable momentum over the past ten years for practice improvement groups, and; practitioners gain more benefits than pitfalls from inter-agency information-sharing. Based on these findings, five recommendations are made for improving practice. PMID:23159340

  16. Beating the Odds: Parents Choose to Expand Their Family--Despite the Risks--And Reap The Rewards of Their Strength in The Face of Adversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Cindy

    2006-01-01

    In the fall of 1995, Cindy Cook and her husband were anxiously awaiting the arrival of their first child. They were thrilled, excited and a little nervous about this new person that would be changing their lives. During a routine ultrasound around the fourth month of pregnancy, doctors noticed the walls of the baby's heart appeared thickened.…

  17. Prevalence, numbers and antimicrobial susceptibilities of Salmonella serovars and Campylobacter spp. in retail poultry in Phnom Penh, Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Lay, Kruy Sun; Vuthy, Yith; Song, Ping; Phol, Khem; Sarthou, Jean Louis

    2011-03-01

    Salmonella and Campylobacter are common bacterial pathogens associated with human gastro-enteritis; and raw poultry is considered to be an important source of these bacteria. To evaluate whether the Salmonella serovars and Campylobacter spp. bacteria could be monitored for the purpose of microbial presence, enumeration and antimicrobial resistance in raw poultry, 152 poultry carcasses were randomly selected from 10 markets in retail outlets of Phnom Penh during March 2006 to February 2007. The majority of poultry samples was contaminated by Salmonella serovars (88.2%) and Campylobacter spp. (80.9%). A very high contamination of Salmonella was found at 3-4 log?? CFU/g for 22.4% of samples and of Campylobacter at 7-8 log?? CFU/g for 1.3% of samples. Fifty nine different Salmonella serovars contaminated 134 poultry carcasses; five most prevalent serovars covered 29.1% of serovars isolates (Anatum, Typhimurium, Corvallis, Stanley and Enteritidis). Three Campylobacter species contaminating 123 raw poultry were Campylobacter jejuni (50.0%), Campylobacter coli (29.0%) and Campylobacter lari (21.0%). High antibiotic resistance percentages were found among Salmonella serovars and Campylobacter spp. isolates. This study revealed that raw poultry at the retail outlets in Phnom Penh markets are contaminated with high prevalences of food-borne pathogens, and communicating the importance of minimizing this risk in reducing human infections. PMID:21060246

  18. Case Studies of Integrated Pedagogy in Vocational Education: A Three-Tier Approach to Empowering Vulnerable Youth in Urban Cambodia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, I-Hsuan

    2010-01-01

    This paper starts with the real-life issues pertaining to the educational, economic and socio-cultural vulnerability of young Cambodians; and the latter in turn has called for greater integrated stance in vocational education. A multiple-case study of nine educational NGOs located in four cities was conducted, whereby what constitutes an…

  19. Dams on Mekong tributaries as significant contributors of hydrological alterations to the Tonle Sap Floodplain in Cambodia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, M. E.; Piman, T.; Lauri, H.; Cochrane, T. A.; Kummu, M.

    2014-02-01

    River tributaries have a key role in the biophysical functioning of the Mekong Basin. Of particular attention are the Sesan, Srepok, and Sekong (3S) rivers, which contribute nearly a quarter of the total Mekong discharge. Forty two dams are proposed in the 3S, and once completed they will exceed the active storage of China's large dam cascade in the upper Mekong. Given their proximity to the lower Mekong floodplains, the 3S dams could alter the flood-pulse hydrology driving the productivity of downstream ecosystems. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to quantify how hydropower development in the 3S would alter the hydrology of the Tonle Sap floodplain, the largest wetland in the Mekong and home to one of the most productive inland fisheries in the world. We coupled results from four numerical models representing the basin's surface hydrology, water resources development, and floodplain hydrodynamics. The scale of alterations caused by hydropower in the 3S was compared with the basin's definite future development scenario (DF) driven by the upper Mekong dam cascade. The DF or the 3S development scenarios could independently increase Tonle Sap's 30 day minimum water levels by 30 ± 5 cm and decrease annual water level fall rates by 0.30 ± 0.05 cm d-2. When analyzed together (DF + 3S), these scenarios are likely to eliminate all baseline conditions (1986-2000) of extreme low water levels, a particularly important component of Tonle Sap's environmental flows. Given the ongoing trends and large economic incentives in the hydropower business in the region, there is a high possibility that most of the 3S hydropower potential will actually be exploited and that dams would be built even in locations where there is a high risk of ecological disruptions. Hence, retrofitting current designs and operations to promote sustainable hydropower practices that optimize multiple river services - rather than just maximize hydropower generation - appear to be the most feasible alternative to mitigate hydropower-related disruptions in the Mekong.

  20. 8 CFR 1245.21 - Adjustment of status of certain nationals of Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos (section 586 of Public...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Form G-325A) if the applicant is between 14 and 79 years of age; a report of medical examination (Form I-693 and vaccination supplement) specified in § 1245.5; and, if needed, an application for waiver of inadmissibility. Under Part 2,...

  1. 8 CFR 1245.21 - Adjustment of status of certain nationals of Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos (section 586 of Public...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Form G-325A) if the applicant is between 14 and 79 years of age; a report of medical examination (Form I-693 and vaccination supplement) specified in § 1245.5; and, if needed, an application for waiver of inadmissibility. Under Part 2,...

  2. 8 CFR 245.21 - Adjustment of status of certain nationals of Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos (section 586 of Public...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Form G-325A) if the applicant is between 14 and 79 years of age; a report of medical examination (Form I-693 and vaccination supplement) specified in § 245.5; and, if needed, an application for waiver of inadmissibility. Under Part 2,...

  3. 8 CFR 245.21 - Adjustment of status of certain nationals of Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos (section 586 of Public...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Form G-325A) if the applicant is between 14 and 79 years of age; a report of medical examination (Form I-693 and vaccination supplement) specified in § 245.5; and, if needed, an application for waiver of inadmissibility. Under Part 2,...

  4. Benefits of tropical forest management under the new climate change agreement—a case study in Cambodia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nophea Sasaki; Atsushi Yoshimoto

    2010-01-01

    Promoting sustainable forest management as part of the reduced emissions from deforestation and degradation in developing countries (REDD)-plus mechanism in the Copenhagen Accord of December 2009 implies that tropical forests will no longer be ignored in the new climate change agreement. As new financial incentives are pledged, costs and revenues on a 1-ha tract of tropical forestland being managed or

  5. Simplified Assessment of Antiretroviral Adherence and Prediction of Virological Efficacy in HIV-Infected Patients in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Segeral, Olivier; Madec, Yoann; Ban, Boroath; Ouk, Vara; Hak, Chan Roeurn; Le Tiec, Clotilde; Nerrienet, Eric; Goujard, Cécile; Taburet, Anne Marie; Delfraissy, Jean Francois; Fontanet, Arnaud

    2010-01-01

    Background. Adherence to antiviral therapy is important for HIV-infected people living in low- and middle-income countries, because of poor access to alternative regimens. Methods. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of adherence in Cambodian patients enrolled in the ESTHER program and treated with WHO first-line regimen for at least 6 months. The survey was based on a self-report questionnaire, drug assay, MCV measurement, visual analog scale, and viral load HIV RNA. Results. Two hundred fifty-nine patients treated for a median of 16 months participated in the survey. At inclusion in the program, 158 patients (61%) were ARV-naïve. The virological success rate was 71% overall and 81% in previously ARV-naive patients. Considered individually, the measures suggested perfect adherence in 71% to 93% of patients. In multivariate analysis adjusted for sex and therapeutic status before HAART initiation, only the biological markers were associated with virological efficacy. Self-funded treatment before entry to the program was highly predictive of virological failure. Conclusion. Adherence was excellent in these Cambodian patients. Biological markers were predictive of virological efficacy. MCV might thus serve as a simple alternative for assessing adherence and predicting virological efficacy among patients receiving AZT- or d4T-based regimens. PMID:21490902

  6. Simplified Assessment of Antiretroviral Adherence and Prediction of Virological Efficacy in HIV-Infected Patients in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Segeral, Olivier; Madec, Yoann; Ban, Boroath; Ouk, Vara; Hak, Chan Roeurn; Le Tiec, Clotilde; Nerrienet, Eric; Goujard, Cécile; Taburet, Anne Marie; Delfraissy, Jean Francois; Fontanet, Arnaud

    2010-01-01

    Background. Adherence to antiviral therapy is important for HIV-infected people living in low- and middle-income countries, because of poor access to alternative regimens. Methods. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of adherence in Cambodian patients enrolled in the ESTHER program and treated with WHO first-line regimen for at least 6 months. The survey was based on a self-report questionnaire, drug assay, MCV measurement, visual analog scale, and viral load HIV RNA. Results. Two hundred fifty-nine patients treated for a median of 16 months participated in the survey. At inclusion in the program, 158 patients (61%) were ARV-naïve. The virological success rate was 71% overall and 81% in previously ARV-naive patients. Considered individually, the measures suggested perfect adherence in 71% to 93% of patients. In multivariate analysis adjusted for sex and therapeutic status before HAART initiation, only the biological markers were associated with virological efficacy. Self-funded treatment before entry to the program was highly predictive of virological failure. Conclusion. Adherence was excellent in these Cambodian patients. Biological markers were predictive of virological efficacy. MCV might thus serve as a simple alternative for assessing adherence and predicting virological efficacy among patients receiving AZT- or d4T-based regimens. PMID:21490902

  7. Dams on Mekong tributaries as significant contributors of hydrological alterations to the Tonle Sap Floodplain in Cambodia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, M. E.; Piman, T.; Lauri, H.; Cochrane, T. A.; Kummu, M.

    2014-12-01

    River tributaries have a key role in the biophysical functioning of the Mekong Basin. Of particular interest are the Sesan, Srepok, and Sekong (3S) rivers, which contribute nearly a quarter of the total Mekong discharge. Forty two dams are proposed in the 3S, and once completed they will exceed the active storage of China's large dam cascade in the Upper Mekong. Given their proximity to the Lower Mekong floodplains, the 3S dams could alter the flood-pulse hydrology driving the productivity of downstream ecosystems. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to quantify how hydropower development in the 3S, together with definite future (DF) plans for infrastructure development through the basin, would alter the hydrology of the Tonle Sap's Floodplain, the largest wetland in the Mekong and home to one of the most productive inland fisheries in the world. We coupled results from four numerical models representing the basin's surface hydrology, water resources development, and floodplain hydrodynamics. The scale of alterations caused by hydropower in the 3S was compared with the basin's DF scenario driven by the Upper Mekong dam cascade. The DF or the 3S development scenarios could independently increase Tonle Sap's 30-day minimum water levels by 30 ± 5 cm and decrease annual water level fall rates by 0.30 ± 0.05 cm day-1. When analyzed together (DF + 3S), these scenarios are likely to eliminate all baseline conditions (1986-2000) of extreme low water levels, a particularly important component of Tonle Sap's environmental flows. Given the ongoing trends and large economic incentives in the hydropower business in the region, there is a high possibility that most of the 3S hydropower potential will be exploited and that dams will be built even in locations where there is a high risk of ecological disruption. Hence, retrofitting current designs and operations to promote sustainable hydropower practices that optimize multiple river services - rather than just maximize hydropower generation - appear to be the most feasible alternative to mitigate hydropower-related disruptions in the Mekong.

  8. 8 CFR 1245.21 - Adjustment of status of certain nationals of Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos (section 586 of Public...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...Form G-325A) if the applicant is between 14 and 79 years of age; a report of medical examination (Form I-693 and vaccination supplement) specified in § 1245.5; and, if needed, an application for waiver of inadmissibility. Under Part 2,...

  9. 8 CFR 1245.21 - Adjustment of status of certain nationals of Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos (section 586 of Public...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...Form G-325A) if the applicant is between 14 and 79 years of age; a report of medical examination (Form I-693 and vaccination supplement) specified in § 1245.5; and, if needed, an application for waiver of inadmissibility. Under Part 2,...

  10. Hydrographic survey of Chaktomuk, the confluence of the Mekong, Tonlé Sap, and Bassac Rivers near Phnom Penh, Cambodia, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dietsch, Benjamin J.; Densmore, Brenda K.; Wilson, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Detailed hydrographic maps of Mekong, Tonlé Sap, and Bassac Rivers showing the riverbed elevations surveyed April 21–May 2, 2012, referenced to Ha Tien 1960 were produced. The surveyed area included a 2-km stretch of the Mekong River between the confluence with the Tonlé Sap and Bassac Rivers, and extended 4 km upstream and 3.6 km downstream from the 2,000-m confluence stretch of the Mekong River. In addition, 0.7 km of the Bassac River downstream and 3.5 km of the Tonlé Sap River (from the confluence to Chroy Changvar Bridge) upstream from their confluence with the Mekong River were surveyed. Riverbed features (such as dunes, shoals, and the effects of sediment mining, which were observed during data collection) are visible on the hydrographic maps. All surveys were completed at low annual water levels as referenced to nearby Mekong River Commission streamflow-gaging stations. Riverbed elevations surveyed ranged from 24.08 m below to 1.54 m above Ha Tien 1960.

  11. Coping with America: Refugees from Vietnam, Cambodia,and Laos in the 1970s and 1980s

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gail P. Kelly

    1986-01-01

    This article focuses on the refugees from former French Indochina—who they are, where they have resettled in the United States, and their integration into the American work force. Most of the data reported here are on the Vietnamese, who are by far the largest number of refugees from Indochina in the United States. Vietnamese entering the country were, for the

  12. Using an ounce of prevention: does it reduce health care expenditures and reap pounds of profits? A study of the financial impact of wellness and health risk screening programs.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Janet F

    2009-01-01

    As we are all well aware, health care expenditures in the United States are out of control and growing at epic proportions. Since private industry shoulders a significant burden of paying these rising health care costs, the huge and ever increasing sum paid by these corporations continues to impact the US economy translating into higher prices of services and manufactured goods and reduced job opportunities when companies outsource jobs or locate manufacturing facilities to avoid paying health care benefits for workers. As a result, health care expenditures have become a centerpiece of an enormous public policy debate as Congress is currently working on several versions of a bill to completely revise health care from the ground up. This research project was accomplished to examine the effectiveness of one approach to control rising health care costs and contain corporate financial responsibility--the establishment of wellness and health risk screening programs to improve the health of employees. Total health care cost per insured individual was gathered through an online survey directly from health care benefit administrators. The survey also asked information about wellness and health risk screening programs and the related responses were used to determine if there were a relationship between health care costs and health prevention programs. While statistical analysis was hampered in the current study because of the small sample size, some valid conclusions were reached. The study was successful in identifying a benchmark of Average Total Health Care Cost per Individual from $5,100 to $5,800 for 2005 through 2007. This is especially interesting in light of the fact that an average of $7,026 was spent on health care per person in 2006 in the United States. The study was also able to contribute an estimate of the increase realized in these expenditures of 6 percent in 2007 over 2006, and 4 percent in 2006 over 2005, which were in fact similar to the national average. The final contribution of the study is to suggest an explanation for the costs which appear to be holding their own in terms of the national average. While this cannot be statistically verified, it does seem that the active participation of these companies in wellness programs could be a factor. Wellness programs were very popular in this sample of companies as 82 percent of the respondents answered "YES" when asked if the company funds their own employee wellness program. This is an impressive number of companies that have recognized wellness programs as a potential means to reduce employee health care costs. In regards to specific programs, at least 50 percent of respondents answered that they have smoking cessation, employee fitness, counseling, health risk screening, and bio-metric screening programs. The existence of health screening variables show an impressive 73 percent of respondents do practice some sort of health care screening, 50 percent offer biometric screening while 18 percent have onsite clinics and 23 percent run annual employee fairs. PMID:20499716

  13. 75 FR 34754 - Privacy Act; Notification of a New Privacy Act System of Records, Title Eight Automated Paperless...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-18

    ...for use in HUD's Resource Estimation and Allocation Process/Total Estimation and Allocation Mechanism (REAP/TEAM). REAP is a resource management initiative used throughout HUD as a methodology for defining and estimating required...

  14. 75 FR 65340 - Secretarial Review and Publication of the Annual Report to Congress Submitted by the Contracted...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-22

    ...States. We are confident that in 2010 and beyond, Americans will reap the benefits of our healthcare quality infrastructure. 1. Executive...infrastructure. In 2010 and beyond, the United States will reap significant benefits from investments in this quality...

  15. 78 FR 9357 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-08

    ...Act) that established the Rural Energy for America Program (REAP) under Title IX, Section 9007. The Act requires the Secretary...renewable energy systems and make energy efficiency improvements. REAP is designed to help agricultural producers and rural small...

  16. 75 FR 9423 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Impact of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-02

    ...Emphasis Panel (SEP): Impact of Japanese Encephalitis Vaccination in Cambodia, Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) CK10-003...received in response to ``Impact of Japanese Encephalitis Vaccination in Cambodia, FOA CK10-003.'' Contact Person for...

  17. LehighUniversity UnitedNations

    E-print Network

    Napier, Terrence

    · Ambassadors from Iraq, South Korea, Pakistan, Sudan, Bangladesh, Israel, Palestine, Syria, and Afghanistan Center for Peace, Israel · Darfur Rehabilitation Project, Sudan/USA · Caring for Cambodia, Cambodia

  18. 31 CFR 500.560 - Bank accounts of official representatives of foreign governments in North Korea, North Viet-Nam...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...of official representatives of foreign governments in North Korea, North Viet-Nam, Cambodia, or South Viet-Nam. 500...of official representatives of foreign governments in North Korea, North Viet-Nam, Cambodia, or South...

  19. 31 CFR 500.554 - Gifts of North Korean, North Vietnamese, Cambodian, or South Vietnamese origin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...of such goods to the donors in countries other than North Korea, North Viet-Nam, Cambodia, or South Viet-Nam. ...licenses are issued for the importation directly from North Korea, North Viet-Nam, Cambodia, or South...

  20. 31 CFR 500.558 - Accounts of blocked partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...unblocking partnerships established under the laws of North Korea, North Viet-Nam, Cambodia, or South Viet-Nam, as follows...and limited partners, if any, have emigrated from North Korea, North Viet-Nam, Cambodia, or South...

  1. 31 CFR 500.559 - Accounts of North Korean, North Vietnamese, Cambodian or South Vietnamese sole proprietorships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...unblocking sole proprietorships established under the laws of North Korea, North Viet-Nam, Cambodia, or South Viet-Nam if the...indebtedness of the proprietorship due to persons in North Korea, North Viet-Nam, Cambodia, or South...

  2. A new agreement between Rutgers-Newark and a Cambodian human rights

    E-print Network

    Hanson, Stephen José

    comprehensive archive on the Khmer Rouge regime ­ and its four-year reign of terror and genocide in Cambodia a record of the Khmer Rouge- orchestrated genocide from 1975-1979 that claimed almost a quarter of Cambodia

  3. Revision of the Palaearctic and Oriental species of the genus Naarda Walker, 1866 (Lepidoptera: Erebidae, Hypeninae). Part 5. Description of 13 new species from Asia.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Balázs; Ronkay, László

    2015-01-01

    Descriptions of 13 new Naarda species, N. cingulata (Thailand), N. imitata (Cambodia), N. hallasana (Korea), N. calligrapha (India, Burma and Indonesia: Buru Island), N. felinopsis (Vietnam), N. furcipalpa (Brunei), N. uthanti (Burma), N. capreola (Cambodia), N. leptosigna (Sri Lanka), N. nigrissima (Cambodia, Thailand and Taiwan), N. bicolora (Cambodia), N. gigaloba (Sri Lanka) and N. numismata (India) spp. n. are given. With 50 figures. PMID:25781738

  4. Identifying live bird markets with the potential to act as reservoirs of avian influenza A (H5N1) virus: a survey in northern Viet Nam and Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Fournié, Guillaume; Guitian, Javier; Desvaux, Stéphanie; Mangtani, Punam; Ly, Sowath; Cong, Vu Chi; San, Sorn; Dung, Do Huu; Holl, Davun; Pfeiffer, Dirk U; Vong, Sirenda; Ghani, Azra C

    2012-01-01

    Wet markets are common in many parts of the world and may promote the emergence, spread and maintenance of livestock pathogens, including zoonoses. A survey was conducted in order to assess the potential of Vietnamese and Cambodian live bird markets (LBMs) to sustain circulation of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus subtype H5N1 (HPAIV H5N1). Thirty Vietnamese and 8 Cambodian LBMs were visited, and structured interviews were conducted with the market managers and 561 Vietnamese and 84 Cambodian traders. Multivariate and cluster analysis were used to construct a typology of traders based on their poultry management practices. As a result of those practices and large poultry surplus (unsold poultry reoffered for sale the following day), some poultry traders were shown to promote conditions favorable for perpetuating HPAIV H5N1 in LBMs. More than 80% of these traders operated in LBMs located in the most densely populated areas, Ha Noi and Phnom Penh. The profiles of sellers operating at a given LBM could be reliably predicted using basic information about the location and type of market. Consequently, LBMs with the largest combination of risk factors for becoming virus reservoirs could be easily identified, potentially allowing control strategies to be appropriately targeted. These findings are of particular relevance to resource-scarce settings with extensively developed LBM systems, commonly found in South-East Asia. PMID:22675502

  5. Emergence of highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (HP-PRRS) in medium-scale swine farms in southeastern Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Tornimbene, B; Frossard, J-P; Chhim, V; Sorn, S; Guitian, J; Drew, T W

    2015-01-01

    Since 2006, reports from China and Viet Nam have alerted of an emergent highly pathogenic variant of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (HP-PRRSV) in that region. The frequent occurrence of outbreaks in these countries puts Cambodian pig farms at high risk of infection, but no study had been conducted to investigate the presence of HP-PRRS in Cambodian farms. We investigated the presence of HP-PRRS in medium-scale (semi-commercial) swine farms in the Cambodian southeastern region. Specifically, one province bordering Viet Nam (Takeo) was selected due to the concentration of most semi-commercial farms in that province. A cross-sectional study was carried out, between July and September 2010 to assess whether the prevalence of infection in these farms was indicative of recent spread of PPRSV and to identify risk factors for infection. The number of farms to be sampled was established using methods for Lot Quality Assurance Surveys (LQAS), in order to achieve a pre-established ability to discriminate between two different prevalence settings. The target population comprised all semi-commercial farms in Takeo province from which a random sample of 35 farms was selected. Selected farms were visited and questionnaires administered to gather information on farm characteristics and husbandry practices. Blood samples from individual pigs were collected in each of the study farms and tested for PRRSV, along with a number of other swine respiratory pathogens in order to investigate potential interactions. Our results showed that the virus was already present in Takeo semi-commercial pig population (LQAS herd prevalence ?85%) at the time of sampling. The presence of sows in the farm and farm density were significantly associated (P<0.05) with the introduction and the presence of PRRS - but this was an unadjusted association as small sample size precluded multivariate analysis. Spatiotemporal description of the supposed pattern of infection revealed that the 1st farms infected were closely located to major national and provincial roads, connecting the Cambodian capital Phnom Penh to Viet Nam. PMID:25179789

  6. Plasma Concentrations, Efficacy and Safety of Efavirenz in HIV-Infected Adults Treated for Tuberculosis in Cambodia (ANRS 1295-CIPRA KH001 CAMELIA Trial)

    PubMed Central

    Borand, Laurence; Madec, Yoann; Laureillard, Didier; Chou, Monidarin; Marcy, Olivier; Pheng, Phearavin; Prak, Narom; Kim, Chindamony; Lak, Khemarin Kim; Hak, Chanroeun; Dim, Bunnet; Nerrienet, Eric; Fontanet, Arnaud; Sok, Thim; Goldfeld, Anne E.; Blanc, François-Xavier; Taburet, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess efavirenz plasma concentrations and their association with treatment efficacy and tolerance of efavirenz 600 mg daily in HIV-tuberculosis co-infected patients. Methods HIV-infected adults with CD4+ T cell count ?200/mm3 received standard 6-month tuberculosis treatment and antiretroviral therapy including a daily-dose of 600 mg of efavirenz, irrespective of their body weight. Mid-dose blood samples were drawn both on tuberculosis treatment (week +2 and week +6 after antiretroviral therapy initiation, and week 22 of follow-up) and off tuberculosis treatment (week 50 of follow-up). Considered therapeutic range was 1,000 to 4,000 ng/mL. Multivariate analysis was performed to evaluate the association between efavirenz concentration below 1,000 ng/mL and virological failure. Linear regression was used to test the association between efavirenz exposure and CD4+ T cell gain. Severe side effects potentially related to efavirenz were described and their association with efavirenz exposure was tested by multivariate analysis. Results Efavirenz plasma concentrations were available in 540 patients. Median [interquartile range] efavirenz concentrations were 2,674 ng/mL [1,690–4,533], 2,667 ng/mL [1,753–4,494] and 2,799 ng/mL [1,804–4,744] at week +2, week +6, week 22, respectively, and 2,766 ng/mL [1,941–3,976] at week 50. Efavirenz concentrations were lower at week 50 (off rifampicin) compared to week 22 (on rifampicin) (p<0.001). Late attendance to study visit and low hemoglobinemia were the only factors associated with an increased risk of efavirenz concentration below 1,000 ng/mL. Efavirenz concentration below 1,000 ng/mL was not associated with treatment failure. Efavirenz concentration above 4,000 ng/mL was associated with higher risk of central nervous system side effects (p<0.001) and of hepatotoxicity (p<0.001). Conclusion Body weight and tuberculosis treatment were not associated with low efavirenz concentrations or treatment failure, supporting the 600 mg daily-dose of efavirenz in HIV-tuberculosis co-infected patients. High efavirenz concentrations were related to a higher risk of central nervous system side effects and hepatotoxicity. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01300481 PMID:24608960

  7. Identifying Live Bird Markets with the Potential to Act as Reservoirs of Avian Influenza A (H5N1) Virus: A Survey in Northern Viet Nam and Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Fournié, Guillaume; Guitian, Javier; Desvaux, Stéphanie; Mangtani, Punam; Ly, Sowath; Cong, Vu Chi; San, Sorn; Dung, Do Huu; Holl, Davun; Pfeiffer, Dirk U.; Vong, Sirenda; Ghani, Azra C.

    2012-01-01

    Wet markets are common in many parts of the world and may promote the emergence, spread and maintenance of livestock pathogens, including zoonoses. A survey was conducted in order to assess the potential of Vietnamese and Cambodian live bird markets (LBMs) to sustain circulation of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus subtype H5N1 (HPAIV H5N1). Thirty Vietnamese and 8 Cambodian LBMs were visited, and structured interviews were conducted with the market managers and 561 Vietnamese and 84 Cambodian traders. Multivariate and cluster analysis were used to construct a typology of traders based on their poultry management practices. As a result of those practices and large poultry surplus (unsold poultry reoffered for sale the following day), some poultry traders were shown to promote conditions favorable for perpetuating HPAIV H5N1 in LBMs. More than 80% of these traders operated in LBMs located in the most densely populated areas, Ha Noi and Phnom Penh. The profiles of sellers operating at a given LBM could be reliably predicted using basic information about the location and type of market. Consequently, LBMs with the largest combination of risk factors for becoming virus reservoirs could be easily identified, potentially allowing control strategies to be appropriately targeted. These findings are of particular relevance to resource-scarce settings with extensively developed LBM systems, commonly found in South-East Asia. PMID:22675502

  8. Fate and risks of potentially toxic elements in wastewater-fed food production systems—the examples of Cambodia and Vietnam

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter E. Holm; Helle Marcussen; Anders Dalsgaard

    2010-01-01

    Non-treated wastewater is used for irrigation of aquatic food production systems in the peri-urban areas of the major cities\\u000a in Southeast Asia. This paper complement the knowledge on agricultural soil-based crops irrigated with low quality water,\\u000a by reviewing the research findings on the wastewater-fed aquatic productions with special focus on heavy metals and other\\u000a potentially toxic elements (PTEs) in the

  9. SHORT REPORT: EVALUATION OF A BOOSTED-P24 ANTIGEN ASSAY FOR THE EARLY DIAGNOSIS OF PEDIATRIC HIV-1 INFECTION IN CAMBODIA

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . The HIV-1 p24-antigen boosted ELISA assay has been de- scribed as an alternate low-cost and easySHORT REPORT: EVALUATION OF A BOOSTED-P24 ANTIGEN ASSAY FOR THE EARLY DIAGNOSIS OF PEDIATRIC HIV-1 serologic tests. We observed that boosted-p24-antigen profile assay, with performances similar to viral

  10. Sex workers self-organizing and empowerment : the experience of Women’s Network for Unity (WNU) in Cambodia : article produced as part of the KIC Project

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Womyn's Agenda for Change

    2007-01-01

    Many organizations that are working with sex workers have learned that it is ineffective to provide HIV and other health services to them if they do not consider – and address – sex workers’ work environments, where many cases of human rights violations can be found. Thus, they gradually move into rights-based activities. By reframing sex workers’ health as a

  11. Prolonged grief following the recent death of a daughter among mothers who experienced distal losses during the Khmer Rouge era: Validity of the prolonged grief construct in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Field, Nigel P; Strasser, Judith; Taing, Sopheap; Horiuchi, Shoko; Chhim, Sotheara; Packman, Wendy

    2014-09-30

    This study addressed the validity of the prolonged grief (PG) construct in a Cambodian context. Eighty mothers who lost a young adult daughter stemming from a crowd stampede incident during the annual water festival were interviewed at the six-month post-loss point along with a control group of similarly aged women who were not recently bereaved. Both groups were assessed for PG, PTSD, anxiety, and depression symptoms and well as for the number of distal losses experienced during the Khmer Rouge (KR) regime - knowing that all the women were old enough to have lived through the KR regime. Support for the discriminant validity of PG was shown in a factor analysis in which its core symptoms were distinguished from anxiety, depression, and PTSD symptoms. Also, support was found for its incremental validity as shown in the unique sensitivity of PG in distinguishing the two groups when controlling for the other symptoms. Lastly, a positive relationship was found between the number of distal deaths experienced during the KR regime and PG symptom severity among the group of recently bereaved mothers, providing support for the predictive validity of PG. Implications as well as study limitations are discussed. PMID:24863868

  12. 77 FR 261 - Notice of Request for Extension of a Currently Approved Information Collection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-04

    ...the Rural Energy for America Program (REAP). DATES: Comments on this notice must...anticipates publishing a proposed rule for REAP in calendar year 2012. This proposed rule...well as combine all associated burden for REAP into one paperwork burden package....

  13. 78 FR 1166 - Service Rules for the Advanced Wireless Services in the H Block-Implementing Section 6401 of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ...AWS licensees entering the band would reap the benefits of UTAM's efforts and...efforts, other entrants in the band will reap the benefits of Sprint's efforts. Accordingly...Block licensees and not Sprint itself will reap the benefits of Sprint's...

  14. 75 FR 19348 - Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA): Section 515 Rural Rental Housing Program for New...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-14

    ...set-aside for Rural Economic Area Partnership (REAP), and the set-aside for the most Underserved...Colonias......... 3,475,587 REAP Zones available until June 30, 2010...or Rural Economic Area Partnership (REAP) community, or in a place...

  15. 32 CFR 65.6 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...were eligible for MGIB, MGIB-SR, or REAP, and elect to use benefits under the...benefit rate for MGIB, MGIB-SR, or REAP, as appropriate. (3) Benefits for...assistance under EATP, MGIB-SR, or REAP, and has used, but retains unused,...

  16. 76 FR 63702 - Petition for Waiver of the Terms of the Order Limiting Scheduled Operations at LaGuardia Airport

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ...therefore the Joint Applicants should not reap financial benefit at the expense of LCCs...repercussions of allowing air carriers to reap financial reward from the sale of slots...incentivizing air carriers by allowing airlines to reap financial reward in exchange for...

  17. 76 FR 20943 - Notice of Funds Availability (NOFA) Inviting Applications for the Rural Energy for America Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-14

    ...the Rural Energy for America Program (REAP) for Fiscal Year 2011 for financial assistance...Year 2011 budget authority to fund these REAP activities, which will support at least...cannot be submitted in Fiscal Year 2011 if a REAP feasibility study grant application...

  18. 75 FR 41599 - Reasonable Contract or Arrangement Under Section 408(b)(2)-Fee Disclosure

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-16

    ...conflicts. Meanwhile service providers may reap excess profits. Under ERISA, fiduciaries...quality of plan services. And vendors can reap excess profit by concealing indirect compensation...his purchase, if the value he expects to reap is sufficient to offset his...

  19. 77 FR 2948 - Notice of Funding Availability for the Rural Energy for America Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-20

    ...the Rural Energy for America Program (REAP) for Fiscal Year 2012 for financial assistance...Year 2012 budget authority to fund these REAP activities, which will support at least...cannot be submitted in Fiscal Year 2012 if a REAP feasibility study grant application...

  20. 77 FR 260 - Notice of Request for Extension of a Currently Approved Information Collection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-04

    ...the Rural Energy for America Program (REAP). DATES: Comments on this notice must...anticipates publishing a proposed rule for REAP in calendar year 2012. This proposed rule...well as combine all associated burden for REAP into one paperwork burden package....

  1. 76 FR 41196 - Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA): Section 515 Rural Rental Housing Program for New...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ...set-aside for Rural Economic Area Partnership (REAP), and the set-aside for the most Underserved...2,000,000.00 Set-aside for REAP Zones...or Rural Economic Area Partnership (REAP) Community The units to be developed...

  2. ASSESSING IMPACTS OF THE MEKONG DEVELOPMENT IN THE TONLE SAP LAKE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matti Kummu; Jorma Koponen; Juha Sarkkula

    Natural resources are vital to people along the Mekong as the livelihood of most of the people depend to large extent on natural ecosystems, especially in the poorest countries Cambodia and Lao PDR. One of the most important parts of the Mekong system is the Tonle Sap Lake in Cambodia being the main source of animal protein for Cambodia and

  3. Forecasting Bank Failure: A NonParametric Frontier Estimation Approach +

    E-print Network

    Barr, Richard

    . Siems Financial Industry Studies Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas Dallas, TX 75201USA Abstract. Computer Science and Engineering Southern Methodist University Dallas, TX 75275 USA Lawrence M. Seiford Industrial Engineering and Operations Research University of Massachusetts Amherst, MA 01003 USA Thomas F

  4. Forecasting Bank Failure: A Non-Parametric Frontier Estimation Approach

    E-print Network

    Barr, Richard

    . Siems Financial Industry Studies Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas Dallas, TX 75201USA Abstract. Computer Science and Engineering Southern Methodist University Dallas, TX 75275 USA Lawrence M. Seiford Industrial Engineering and Operations Research University of Massachusetts Amherst, MA 01003 USA Thomas F

  5. Original article Blue-stain fungi associated

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , Hormonema dematioides, Leptographium wingfieldii and Ophiostoma minus. The latter 2 species were most active dematioides, Leptographium wingfieldii, et Ophiostoma minus. Les 2 der- nières nommées se sont avérées les (L) and the blue-stain fungus Ophiostoma polonicum Siem (Horntvedt et al, 1983; Christiansen

  6. Generalized Path Analysis and Generalized Simultaneous Equations Model for Recursive Systems with Responses of Mixed Types

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Tien-Lung; Shau, Wen-Yi; Hu, Fu-Chang

    2006-01-01

    This article generalizes linear path analysis (PA) and simultaneous equations models (SiEM) to deal with mixed responses of different types in a recursive or triangular system. An efficient instrumental variable (IV) method for estimating the structural coefficients of a 2-equation partially recursive generalized path analysis (GPA) model and…

  7. Alcohol consumption is controlled by angiotensin II1 BJOERN MAUL,2

    E-print Network

    Hoehe, Margret

    Alcohol consumption is controlled by angiotensin II1 BJOERN MAUL,2 WOLF-EBERHARD SIEMS, MARGRET R in alcohol-consuming behavior and investigated the alcohol intake of mice harboring a rat angiotensino- gen- ther explain the effects in the transgenic mice. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS 1. Alcohol consumption is directly

  8. Securing the Data in Big Data Security Analytics Kevin D. Bowers

    E-print Network

    Event Monitoring (SIEM) system. Further afield, a SAS could be a dedicated Network Intrusion Detection to intrusion detection at the scale of a large organization. It involves a combi- nation of automated into a massive ("big") data repository. Many of these sources are host facilities, such as intrusion-detection

  9. Exploring Crown Ethers as Shift Reagents for Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    E-print Network

    Clemmer, David E.

    .; Valentine, S. J.; Counterman, A. E.; Clemmer, D. E. Anal. Chem. 1999, 71, 291-301. (2) Valentine, S. J.; Schultz, A. J. Anal. Chem. 2000, 72, 3965-3971. (5) Wu, C.; Siems, W. F.; Klasmeier, J.; Hill, H. H., Jr. Anal. Chem. 2000, 72, 391. (6) Guevremont, R.; Barnett, D. A.; Purves, R. W.; Vandermey, J. Anal. Chem

  10. 15 CFR 768.1 - Introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Bulgaria, Cambodia, Cuba, Estonia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Latvia, Lithuania, Moldova, Mongolia, North Korea, Romania, Russia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Vietnam and the People's Republic of...

  11. 15 CFR 736.2 - General prohibitions and determination of applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...Eight applies to Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Cambodia, Cuba, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Mongolia, North Korea, Russia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Vietnam. (9) General Prohibition...

  12. 15 CFR 736.2 - General prohibitions and determination of applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...Eight applies to Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Cambodia, Cuba, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Mongolia, North Korea, Russia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Vietnam. (9) General Prohibition...

  13. 15 CFR 768.1 - Introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...Bulgaria, Cambodia, Cuba, Estonia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Latvia, Lithuania, Moldova, Mongolia, North Korea, Romania, Russia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Vietnam and the People's Republic of...

  14. 15 CFR 736.2 - General prohibitions and determination of applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...Eight applies to Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Cambodia, Cuba, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Mongolia, North Korea, Russia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Vietnam. (9) General Prohibition...

  15. 15 CFR 736.2 - General prohibitions and determination of applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Eight applies to Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Cambodia, Cuba, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Mongolia, North Korea, Russia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Vietnam. (9) General Prohibition...

  16. 15 CFR 736.2 - General prohibitions and determination of applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Eight applies to Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Cambodia, Cuba, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Mongolia, North Korea, Russia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Vietnam. (9) General Prohibition...

  17. 15 CFR 768.1 - Introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Bulgaria, Cambodia, Cuba, Estonia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Latvia, Lithuania, Moldova, Mongolia, North Korea, Romania, Russia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Vietnam and the People's Republic of...

  18. 15 CFR 768.1 - Introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...Bulgaria, Cambodia, Cuba, Estonia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Latvia, Lithuania, Moldova, Mongolia, North Korea, Romania, Russia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Vietnam and the People's Republic of...

  19. 15 CFR 768.1 - Introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...Bulgaria, Cambodia, Cuba, Estonia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Latvia, Lithuania, Moldova, Mongolia, North Korea, Romania, Russia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Vietnam and the People's Republic of...

  20. Effect of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Cytochrome P450 Isoenzyme and N-Acetyltransferase 2 Genes on the Metabolism of Artemisinin-Based Combination Therapies in Malaria Patients from Cambodia and Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Staehli Hodel, Eva Maria; Csajka, Chantal; Ariey, Frédéric; Guidi, Monia; Kabanywanyi, Abdunoor Mulokozi; Duong, Socheat; Decosterd, Laurent Arthur; Olliaro, Piero; Genton, Blaise

    2013-01-01

    The pharmacogenetics of antimalarial agents are poorly known, although the application of pharmacogenetics might be critical in optimizing treatment. This population pharmacokinetic-pharmacogenetic study aimed at assessing the effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in cytochrome P450 isoenzyme genes (CYP, namely, CYP2A6, CYP2B6, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP3A4, and CYP3A5) and the N-acetyltransferase 2 gene (NAT2) on the pharmacokinetics of artemisinin-based combination therapies in 150 Tanzanian patients treated with artemether-lumefantrine, 64 Cambodian patients treated with artesunate-mefloquine, and 61 Cambodian patients treated with dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine. The frequency of SNPs varied with the enzyme and the population. Higher frequencies of mutant alleles were found in Cambodians than Tanzanians for CYP2C9*3, CYP2D6*10 (100C?T), CYP3A5*3, NAT2*6, and NAT2*7. In contrast, higher frequencies of mutant alleles were found in Tanzanians for CYP2D6*17 (1023C?T and 2850C?T), CYP3A4*1B, NAT2*5, and NAT2*14. For 8 SNPs, no significant differences in frequencies were observed. In the genetic-based population pharmacokinetic analyses, none of the SNPs improved model fit. This suggests that pharmacogenetic data need not be included in appropriate first-line treatments with the current artemisinin derivatives and quinolines for uncomplicated malaria in specific populations. However, it cannot be ruled out that our results represent isolated findings, and therefore more studies in different populations, ideally with the same artemisinin-based combination therapies, are needed to evaluate the influence of pharmacogenetic factors on the clearance of antimalarials. PMID:23229480

  1. Quantitative bedrock geology of east and Southeast Asia (Brunei, Cambodia, eastern and southeastern China, East Timor, Indonesia, Japan, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, North Korea, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, far-eastern Russia, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, Vietnam)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peucker-Ehrenbrink, Bernhard; Miller, Mark W.

    2004-01-01

    We quantitatively analyze the area-age distribution of sedimentary, igneous and metamorphic bedrock based on data from the most recent digital geologic maps of East and Southeast Asia (Coordinating Committee for Coastal and Offshore Geosciences Programmes in East and Southeast Asia (CCOP) and the Geologic Survey of Japan, 1997; 1:2,000,000), published as Digital Geoscience Map G-2 by the Geological Survey of Japan. Sedimentary rocks, volcanic rocks, plutonic rocks, ultramafic rocks and metamorphic rocks cover 73.3%, 8.5%, 8.8%, 0.9%, and 8.6% of the surface area, respectively. The average ages of major lithologic units, weighted according to bedrock area, are as follows: sedimentary rocks (average stratigraphic age of 123 Myr/median age of 26 Myr), volcanic rocks (84 Myr/20 Myr), intrusive rocks (278 Myr/195 Myr), ultramafic rocks (unknown) and metamorphic rocks (1465 Myr/1118 Myr). The variability in lithologic composition and age structure of individual countries reflects the complex tectonic makeup of this region that ranges from Precambrian cratons (e.g., northeast China and North Korea) to Mesozoic-Cenozoic active margins (e.g., Japan, the Philippines, Indonesia and New Guinea). The spatial resolution of the data varies from 44 km2 per polygon (Japan) to 1659 km2 per polygon (Taiwan) and is, on average (490 km2/polygon), similar to our previous analyses of the United States of America and Canada. The temporal and spatial resolution is sufficiently high to perform age-area analyses of individual river basins larger than ˜10,000 km2 and to quantitatively evaluate the relationship between bedrock geology and river chemistry. As many rivers draining tropical, mountainous islands of East and Southeast Asia have a disproportionate effect on the dissolved and particulate load delivered to the world oceans, bedrock geology in such river drainage basins disproportionately affect ocean chemistry.

  2. Personalization of Reading Passages Improves Vocabulary Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heilman, Michael; Collins-Thompson, Kevyn; Callan, Jamie; Eskenazi, Maxine; Juffs, Alan; Wilson, Lois

    2010-01-01

    The REAP tutoring system provides individualized and adaptive English as a Second Language vocabulary practice. REAP can automatically personalize instruction by providing practice readings about topics that match interests as well as domain-based, cognitive objectives. While most previous research on motivation in intelligent tutoring…

  3. Balancing Feedstock Production and Soil Resource Protection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Renewable Energy Assessment Project (REAP) is a multi-location research endeavor designed to determine the impact of harvesting corn stover and other crop residues on soil, water, and air quality. This poster provides conference attendees an overview of REAP activities and initial findings....

  4. 76 FR 43666 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-21

    ...Reserve and 38 U.S.C., Chapter 30--Active Duty), the REAP educational benefit (Title 10 U.S.C, Chapter 1607), and...Reserve and 38 U.S.C., Chapter 30--Active Duty), the REAP educational benefit (Title 10 U.S.C, Chapter 1607),...

  5. 78 FR 51559 - Commercial Operations in the 1695-1710 MHz, 1755-1780 MHz, and 2155-2180 MHz Bands

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-20

    ...from its band clearing efforts, other entrants in the band will reap the benefits of Sprint's efforts. Accordingly, we find no...though 2020-2025 MHz band licensees and not Sprint itself will reap the benefits of Sprint's relocation of...

  6. 75 FR 75393 - Schools and Libraries Universal Service Support Mechanism and A National Broadband Plan for Our...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-03

    ...communities prepare for the high-skilled jobs of the future and reap the full benefits of the Internet. The Commission received extensive...communities prepare for the high-skilled jobs of the future and reap the full benefits of the Internet. In this Report and...

  7. Development of Sustainable Corn Stover Feedstock Supply Strategies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rising global energy demand has increased the importance of developing sustainable land management strategies. In response, the Renewable Energy Assessment Project (REAP) was begun to quantify the sustainability of harvesting corn (Zea mays L.) stover and other materials for bio-energy. REAP obj...

  8. BioMed Central Page 1 of 6

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    in Cambodia 5 Boulevard Monivong BP983, Phnom Penh, Kingdom of Cambodia, 2Division of Cell and Molecular Abstract Background: Malaria diagnosis is vital to efficient control programmes and the recent advent sensitivity. Methods: Plasmodial lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH) gene of wild isolates of the four human species

  9. Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus (H5N1) Outbreak in Captive Wild Birds and Cats, Cambodia Tamao Wildlife Rescue Centre, Cambodia, was affected by the highly pathogenic influenza virus (H5N1). Birds from 26 species died. Influenza virus subtype H5N1 was detected in 6 of 7 species tested. Cats

  10. Fisheries production in Southeast Asian farmer managed aquatic systems (FMAS) I. Characterisation of systems

    E-print Network

    Lorenzen, Kai

    -recruiting species Rice farming landscape Agro-ecosystem Southeast Asian rice farmers often manage aquatic habitats and capture fisheries and character- ize FMAS in contrasting agro-ecosystems of Cambodia, Thailand and Vietnam. More than 90% of rice farming households in the study areas of Cambodia and Thailand harvested aquatic

  11. Lessons Learnt in the Use of "Contract" Teachers. Synthesis Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duthilleul, Yael

    2005-01-01

    This report sheds light on the use of contract teachers with a particular focus on Cambodia, Nicaragua and India--countries that have all relied on contract teachers at some point. The report documents the use of contract teachers in Cambodia, Nicaragua and India and outlines the experience of contract teachers in West Africa. It also discusses…

  12. Acculturation Difficulties of the Khmer in New York City.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruno, Ellen

    The intent of this paper is to provide a historical and cultural overview of the Khmer refugee movement and to outline problems the refugees face upon resettlement in New York City. The paper begins by describing the land and people of Cambodia, the social structure of Khmer society, the role of Buddhism in that society, Cambodia's recent history,…

  13. 31 CFR 500.549 - Proof of origin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...licenses for importation of goods the origin of which is North Korea, North Viet-Nam, Cambodia, or South Viet-Nam are...documentary proof of the location of the goods outside North Korea, North Viet-Nam, Cambodia, or South...

  14. Translating the sign of dumb person using ARM processor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Nijusekar; A. Brindhu Kumari

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the blabbering voice-to-Speech Translation research is to enable real-time, interpersonal communication via natural spoken language for people who do not share a common language. The Multilingual Automatic blabbering voice-to-Speech Translator (MASTOR) system is the first Speech-to-Speech system that allows for bidirectional (blabbering voice Tamil) free-form speech input and output. The speech interactivity embedded module (SIEM) that is

  15. The Bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki Historical Documents

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Christopher Griffith

    Documents about the atomic boming of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. There are two sets of documents and reports. The first covers before the bombing and includes the scienctists petitions to prevent the bombing, the bombing order, and the Potsdam Declaration. The second covers the aftermath of the bombings. These documents include: White House Press Release on Hiroshima, Eyewitness Account of Atomic Bomb Over Nagasaki, Eyewitness Account of Hiroshima By Father John A. Siemes, and Truman's Reflections on the Atomic Bombings.

  16. Hiroshima-Remembered.com: Documents about the Bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Christopher Griffith

    Documents about the atomic boming of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. These include: Potsdam Declaration, White House Press Release on Hiroshima, an Eyewitness Account of Atomic Bomb Over Nagasaki, Eyewitness Account of Hiroshima By Father John A. Siemes, The Voice of Hibakusha, The Atomic Bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki by The Manhattan Engineer District, The Yields of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki Nuclear Explosions , On My Participation In The Atom Bomb Project - Albert Einstein, and Truman's Reflections on the Atomic Bombings.

  17. Engineering proteins by reconstructing evolutionary adaptive paths.

    PubMed

    Cox, Vanessa E; Gaucher, Eric A

    2014-01-01

    Reconstructing evolutionary adaptive paths (REAP) is a low-throughput technique used to design protein libraries that can be assayed for specific properties such as catalytic function or thermostability. This approach takes advantage of natural selection by using theoretical ancestral proteins as the foundation for library variants. REAP gives rise to smaller libraries but with a higher ratio of viable proteins than other high-throughput techniques. REAP uses analyses of ancestral sequences and signatures of functional divergence to modify extant protein sequences. This allows the experimenter to statistically evaluate which amino acid mutations in which sites within the protein are most likely to produce functional proteins having varied phenotypes. PMID:25055790

  18. 77 FR 11101 - Applications for New Awards; Native Hawaiian Education Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ...programs by referring to information on the Department's Web Site at http://www2.ed.gov/nclb/freedom/local/reap.html. Program Authority: 20 U.S.C. 7515. Applicable Regulations: (a) The Education Department General...

  19. 76 FR 73829 - Connect America Fund; A National Broadband Plan for Our Future; Establishing Just and Reasonable...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-29

    ...Both recovery mechanisms provide carriers with significantly more revenue certainty than the status quo, enabling carriers to reap the benefits of efficiencies and reduced switching costs, while giving providers stable support for investment as they...

  20. 78 FR 12381 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; New York Stock Exchange LLC; Notice of Filing of Proposed Rule...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-22

    ...to investors, and to the brokerage firms offering this kind of account. At the same time, it seems clear that issuers also reap some benefit from inclusion in managed account portfolios. Most obviously, of course, the issuer benefits from...

  1. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 24 - Additional Information

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...affected. Therefore, property owners should not be penalized because of a decrease in value caused by the proposed project nor reap a windfall at public expense because of increased value created by the proposed project. Section...

  2. 76 FR 18716 - Manoj Bhayana, Respondent; Final Decision and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-05

    ...accorded, mitigation credit relating to the subject of those false statements. In short, a respondent should not be allowed to reap any benefit from such false or misleading statements. With this clarification, I affirm the...

  3. 76 FR 44309 - Applications for New Awards; Charter Schools Program Grants to Non-State Educational Agencies for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-25

    ...programs by referring to information on the Department's Web site at https://www2.ed.gov/nclb/freedom/local/reap.html. Requirements: Applicants approved for funding under this competition must attend an in-person, two-day...

  4. 75 FR 16739 - EDA Participation in the Energy Efficient Building Systems Regional Innovation Cluster Initiative

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-02

    ...the diverse populations of America, including the most disadvantaged and historically underrepresented, to contribute to and reap the benefits of these funding priorities. EDA-specific Evaluation Criteria for EDA Co-applicant EDA will use the...

  5. 78 FR 71377 - United States et al. v. US Airways Group, Inc. and AMR Corporation; Proposed Final Judgment and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-27

    ...Competitors.'' The structural change to ``fewer and larger competitors'' has allowed ``[t]he industry'' to ``reap the benefits.'' Those benefits to the industry are touted by US Airways in the same presentation as including...

  6. 77 FR 39516 - Notice of a Public Meeting of the Advisory Committee on Apprenticeship (ACA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-03

    ...21st Century Registered Apprenticeship as follows: An increasing number of businesses and additional industries will use and reap the advantages of the Registered Apprenticeship model. Americans will seek and find Registered Apprenticeship as a...

  7. 14 CFR 1274.208 - Intellectual property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...recognize that private companies entering into cooperative agreements bring resources to that relationship and must be allowed to reap an appropriate benefit for the expenditure of those resources. However, since serving a public purpose is a major...

  8. 75 FR 74049 - Notice of Public Information Collection(s) Being Submitted for Review and Approval to the Office...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-30

    ...eligibility for designated entity benefits. The information collected will be used to ensure that only legitimate small businesses reap the benefits of the Commission's designated entity program. Further, this information will assist the Commission in...

  9. 77 FR 11087 - Applications for New Awards; Investing in Innovation Fund, Development Grants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ...programs by referring to information on the Department's Web site at http://www2.ed.gov/nclb/freedom/local/reap.html. Program Authority: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, Division A, Section 14007, Public Law...

  10. 75 FR 42134 - United States v. Keyspan Corporation; Public Comments and Response on Proposed Final Judgment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-20

    ...capacity market auctions, a single seller who achieves a higher clearing price through an unlawful scheme ensures that all sellers reap the benefit of that inflated price, with the consequence that every megawatt of electric capacity sold, even by those...

  11. 75 FR 6560 - Financial Crimes Enforcement Network; Expansion of Special Information Sharing Procedures To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-10

    ...program, and for the reasons outlined elsewhere in this rulemaking, believes that its expansion to include other requesters will reap benefits that far outweigh the additional obligations on financial institutions. This is particularly true in the case of...

  12. 77 FR 20781 - Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA) for the Rural Energy for America Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ...on January 20, 2012, at 77 FR 2948 to announce the acceptance of applications under the Rural Energy for America Program (REAP) for Fiscal Year 2012 for financial assistance as follows: Grants, guaranteed loans, and combined grants and guaranteed...

  13. 78 FR 52527 - Information Collection(s) Being Reviewed by the Federal Communications Commission, Comments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-23

    ...eligibility for designated entity benefits. The information collected will be used to ensure that only legitimate small businesses reap the benefits of the Commission's designated entity program. Further, this information will assist the Commission in...

  14. 77 FR 8845 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-15

    ...Education Type of Review: Extension. Title of Collection: Application Package for the Rural Education Achievement Program (REAP) Small, Rural School Achievement Program. OMB Control Number: 1810-0646. Total Estimated Number of Annual...

  15. 76 FR 68759 - GSA Approves Renewal of North American Numbering Council Charter Through September 23, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ...industry and to the American public cannot be overstated. Telephone numbers are the means by which consumers gain access to, and reap the benefits of, the public switched telephone network. The Council's recommendations to the Commission will facilitate...

  16. 12 CFR 262.2 - Procedure for regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...prevent the action from becoming effective as promptly as necessary in the public interest, would permit speculators or others to reap unfair profits or to interfere with the Board's actions taken with a view to accommodating commerce and business...

  17. 77 FR 18216 - Applications for New Awards; Investing in Innovation Fund, Scale-Up Grants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-27

    ...programs by referring to information on the Department's Web site at http://www2.ed.gov/nclb/freedom/local/reap.html. Program Authority: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, Division A, Section 14007, Pub. L....

  18. The Embedded Researcher Method for Involving Undergraduates in Research: New Data and Observations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Darrin L.; Kranz, Peter L.; Ferguson, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Undergraduate research provides multiple educational advantages, and Hispanic students may reap particular benefits. The "embedded researcher" method avoids difficulties inherent in traditional apprenticeship models, providing meaningful research experience to multiple students within a standard didactic course structure while yielding…

  19. 75 FR 15406 - Inviting Applications for Rural Business Opportunity Grants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-29

    ...Anticipated Award Date: September 15, 2010. Specially designated places: Tribal lands, Rural Economic Area Partnership (REAP) Zones. III. Eligibility Information A. Eligible Applicants Grants may be made to public bodies, nonprofit...

  20. 77 FR 22298 - Applications for New Awards: Charter Schools Program (CSP) Grants to Non-State Educational Agency...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-13

    ...programs by referring to information on the Department's Web site at http://www2.ed.gov/nclb/freedom/local/reap.html. Requirements: Applicants approved for funding under this competition must attend an in-person, two-day...