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Sample records for signaling regulates actin

  1. TOR complex 2-Ypk1 signaling regulates actin polarization via reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Niles, Brad J; Powers, Ted

    2014-12-01

    The evolutionarily conserved mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2) signaling pathway is an important regulator of actin cytoskeletal architecture and, as such, is a candidate target for preventing cancer cell motility and invasion. Remarkably, the precise mechanism(s) by which mTORC2 regulates the actin cytoskeleton have remained elusive. Here we show that in budding yeast, TORC2 and its downstream kinase Ypk1 regulate actin polarization by controlling reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. Specifically, we find that TORC2-Ypk1 regulates actin polarization both by vacuole-related ROS, controlled by the phospholipid flippase kinase Fpk1 and sphingolipids, and by mitochondria-mediated ROS, controlled by the PKA subunit Tpk3. In addition, we find that the protein kinase C (Pkc1)/MAPK cascade, a well-established regulator of actin, acts downstream of Ypk1 to regulate ROS, in part by promoting degradation of the oxidative stress responsive repressor, cyclin C. Furthermore, we show that Ypk1 regulates Pkc1 activity through proper localization of Rom2 at the plasma membrane, which is also dependent on Fpk1 and sphingolipids. Together these findings demonstrate important links between TORC2/Ypk1 signaling, Fpk1, sphingolipids, Pkc1, and ROS as regulators of actin and suggest that ROS may play an important role in mTORC2-dependent dysregulation of the actin cytoskeleton in cancer cells. PMID:25253719

  2. Kindlin-2 directly binds actin and regulates integrin outside-in signaling.

    PubMed

    Bledzka, Kamila; Bialkowska, Katarzyna; Sossey-Alaoui, Khalid; Vaynberg, Julia; Pluskota, Elzbieta; Qin, Jun; Plow, Edward F

    2016-04-11

    Reduced levels of kindlin-2 (K2) in endothelial cells derived from K2(+/-)mice or C2C12 myoblastoid cells treated with K2 siRNA showed disorganization of their actin cytoskeleton and decreased spreading. These marked changes led us to examine direct binding between K2 and actin. Purified K2 interacts with F-actin in cosedimentation and surface plasmon resonance analyses and induces actin aggregation. We further find that the F0 domain of K2 binds actin. A mutation, LK(47)/AA, within a predicted actin binding site (ABS) of F0 diminishes its interaction with actin by approximately fivefold. Wild-type K2 and K2 bearing the LK(47)/AA mutation were equivalent in their ability to coactivate integrin αIIbβ3 in a CHO cell system when coexpressed with talin. However, K2-LK(47)/AA exhibited a diminished ability to support cell spreading and actin organization compared with wild-type K2. The presence of an ABS in F0 of K2 that influences outside-in signaling across integrins establishes a new foundation for considering how kindlins might regulate cellular responses. PMID:27044892

  3. Nodal signaling regulates endodermal cell motility and actin dynamics via Rac1 and Prex1

    PubMed Central

    Housley, Michael P.; Weiner, Orion D.

    2012-01-01

    Embryo morphogenesis is driven by dynamic cell behaviors, including migration, that are coordinated with fate specification and differentiation, but how such coordination is achieved remains poorly understood. During zebrafish gastrulation, endodermal cells sequentially exhibit first random, nonpersistent migration followed by oriented, persistent migration and finally collective migration. Using a novel transgenic line that labels the endodermal actin cytoskeleton, we found that these stage-dependent changes in migratory behavior correlated with changes in actin dynamics. The dynamic actin and random motility exhibited during early gastrulation were dependent on both Nodal and Rac1 signaling. We further identified the Rac-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor Prex1 as a Nodal target and showed that it mediated Nodal-dependent random motility. Reducing Rac1 activity in endodermal cells caused them to bypass the random migration phase and aberrantly contribute to mesodermal tissues. Together, our results reveal a novel role for Nodal signaling in regulating actin dynamics and migration behavior, which are crucial for endodermal morphogenesis and cell fate decisions. PMID:22945937

  4. Regulation of T cell receptor signaling by the actin cytoskeleton and poroelastic cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Beemiller, Peter; Krummel, Matthew F.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The actin cytoskeleton plays essential roles in modulating T-cell activation. Most models of T-cell receptor (TCR) triggering, signalosome assembl, y and immune synapse formation invoke actin-dependent mechanisms. As T cells are constitutively motile cells, TCR triggering and signaling occur against a cytoskeletal backdrop that is constantly remodeling. While the interplay between actin dynamics and TCR signaling have been the focus of research for many years, much of the work in T cells has considered actin largely for its ‘scaffolding’ function. We examine the roles of the actin cytoskeleton in TCR signaling and immune synapse formation with an emphasis on how poroelasticity, an ensemble feature of actin dynamics with the cytosol, relates to how T cells respond to stimulation. PMID:24117819

  5. Regulation of T-cell receptor signaling by the actin cytoskeleton and poroelastic cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Beemiller, Peter; Krummel, Matthew F

    2013-11-01

    The actin cytoskeleton plays essential roles in modulating T-cell activation. Most models of T-cell receptor (TCR) triggering signalosome assembly and immune synapse formation invoke actin-dependent mechanisms. As T cells are constitutively motile cells, TCR triggering and signaling occur against a cytoskeletal backdrop that is constantly remodeling. While the interplay between actin dynamics and TCR signaling have been the focus of research for many years, much of the work in T cells has considered actin largely for its 'scaffolding' function. We examine the roles of the actin cytoskeleton in TCR signaling and immune synapse formation with an emphasis on how poroelasticity, an ensemble feature of actin dynamics with the cytosol, relates to how T cells respond to stimulation. PMID:24117819

  6. Actin-Regulator Feedback Interactions during Endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinxin; Galletta, Brian J; Cooper, John A; Carlsson, Anders E

    2016-03-29

    Endocytosis mediated by clathrin, a cellular process by which cells internalize membrane receptors and their extracellular ligands, is an important component of cell signaling regulation. Actin polymerization is involved in endocytosis in varying degrees depending on the cellular context. In yeast, clathrin-mediated endocytosis requires a pulse of polymerized actin and its regulators, which recruit and activate the Arp2/3 complex. In this article, we seek to identify the main protein-protein interactions that 1) cause actin and its regulators to appear in pulses, and 2) determine the effects of key mutations and drug treatments on actin and regulator assembly. We perform a joint modeling/experimental study of actin and regulator dynamics during endocytosis in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We treat both a stochastic model that grows an explicit three-dimensional actin network, and a simpler two-variable Fitzhugh-Nagumo type model. The models include a negative-feedback interaction of F-actin onto the Arp2/3 regulators. Both models explain the pulse time courses and the effects of interventions on actin polymerization: the surprising increase in the peak F-actin count caused by reduced regulator branching activity, the increase in F-actin resulting from slowing of actin disassembly, and the increased Arp2/3 regulator lifetime resulting from latrunculin treatment. In addition, they predict that decreases in the regulator branching activity lead to increases in accumulation of regulators, and we confirmed this prediction with experiments on yeast harboring mutations in the Arp2/3 regulators, using quantitative fluorescence microscopy. Our experimental measurements suggest that the regulators act quasi-independently, in the sense that accumulation of a particular regulator is most strongly affected by mutations of that regulator, as opposed to the others. PMID:27028652

  7. TrkB-T1 regulates the RhoA signaling and actin cytoskeleton in glioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Koji; Homma, Koichi J.; Hirai, Hirohisa; Nakamura, Shun; Hayashi, Motoharu . E-mail: hayashi@pri.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2006-04-14

    Recently, the truncated TrkB receptor, T1, has been reported to be involved in the control of cell morphology via the regulation of Rho proteins, through which T1 binds Rho guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (Rho GDI) 1 and dissociates it in a brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-dependent manner. However, it is unclear whether T1 signaling regulates the downstream of Rho signaling and the actin cytoskeleton. In this study, we investigated this question using C6 rat glioma cells, which express T1 endogenously. Rho GDI1 was dissociated from T1 in a BDNF-dependent manner, which also causes decreases in the activities of Rho-signaling molecules such as RhoA, Rho-associated kinase, p21-activated kinase, and extracellular-signal regulated kinase1/2. Moreover, BDNF treatment resulted in the disappearance of stress fibers in the cells treated with lysophosphatidic acid, an activator of RhoA, and in morphological changes in cells. Furthermore, a competitive assay with cyan fluorescent protein fusion proteins of T1-specific sequences reduced the effects of BDNF. These results suggest that T1 regulates the Rho-signaling pathways and the actin cytoskeleton.

  8. Extracellular signaling cues for nuclear actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Plessner, Matthias; Grosse, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Contrary to cytoplasmic actin structures, the biological functions of nuclear actin filaments remain largely enigmatic. Recent progress in the field, however, has determined nuclear actin structures in somatic cells either under steady state conditions or in response to extracellular signaling cues. These actin structures differ in size and shape as well as in their temporal appearance and dynamics. Thus, a picture emerges that suggests that mammalian cells may have different pathways and mechanisms to assemble nuclear actin filaments. Apart from serum- or LPA-triggered nuclear actin polymerization, integrin activation by extracellular matrix interaction was recently implicated in nuclear actin polymerization through the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex. Some of these extracellular cues known so far appear to converge at the level of nuclear formin activity and subsequent regulation of myocardin-related transcription factors. Nevertheless, as the precise signaling events are as yet unknown, the regulation of nuclear actin polymerization may be of significant importance for different cellular functions as well as disease conditions caused by altered nuclear dynamics and architecture. PMID:26059398

  9. Rho, nuclear actin, and actin-binding proteins in the regulation of transcription and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Rajakylä, Eeva Kaisa; Vartiainen, Maria K

    2014-01-01

    Actin cytoskeleton is one of the main targets of Rho GTPases, which act as molecular switches on many signaling pathways. During the past decade, actin has emerged as an important regulator of gene expression. Nuclear actin plays a key role in transcription, chromatin remodeling, and pre-mRNA processing. In addition, the “status” of the actin cytoskeleton is used as a signaling intermediate by at least the MKL1-SRF and Hippo-pathways, which culminate in the transcriptional regulation of cytoskeletal and growth-promoting genes, respectively. Rho GTPases may therefore regulate gene expression by controlling either cytoplasmic or nuclear actin dynamics. Although the regulation of nuclear actin polymerization is still poorly understood, many actin-binding proteins, which are downstream effectors of Rho, are found in the nuclear compartment. In this review, we discuss the possible mechanisms and key proteins that may mediate the transcriptional regulation by Rho GTPases through actin. PMID:24603113

  10. Rho, nuclear actin, and actin-binding proteins in the regulation of transcription and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Rajakylä, Eeva Kaisa; Vartiainen, Maria K

    2014-01-01

    Actin cytoskeleton is one of the main targets of Rho GTPases, which act as molecular switches on many signaling pathways. During the past decade, actin has emerged as an important regulator of gene expression. Nuclear actin plays a key role in transcription, chromatin remodeling, and pre-mRNA processing. In addition, the "status" of the actin cytoskeleton is used as a signaling intermediate by at least the MKL1-SRF and Hippo-pathways, which culminate in the transcriptional regulation of cytoskeletal and growth-promoting genes, respectively. Rho GTPases may therefore regulate gene expression by controlling either cytoplasmic or nuclear actin dynamics. Although the regulation of nuclear actin polymerization is still poorly understood, many actin-binding proteins, which are downstream effectors of Rho, are found in the nuclear compartment. In this review, we discuss the possible mechanisms and key proteins that may mediate the transcriptional regulation by Rho GTPases through actin. PMID:24603113

  11. Direct dynamin–actin interactions regulate the actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Changkyu; Yaddanapudi, Suma; Weins, Astrid; Osborn, Teresia; Reiser, Jochen; Pollak, Martin; Hartwig, John; Sever, Sanja

    2010-01-01

    The large GTPase dynamin assembles into higher order structures that are thought to promote endocytosis. Dynamin also regulates the actin cytoskeleton through an unknown, GTPase-dependent mechanism. Here, we identify a highly conserved site in dynamin that binds directly to actin filaments and aligns them into bundles. Point mutations in the actin-binding domain cause aberrant membrane ruffling and defective actin stress fibre formation in cells. Short actin filaments promote dynamin assembly into higher order structures, which in turn efficiently release the actin-capping protein (CP) gelsolin from barbed actin ends in vitro, allowing for elongation of actin filaments. Together, our results support a model in which assembled dynamin, generated through interactions with short actin filaments, promotes actin polymerization via displacement of actin-CPs. PMID:20935625

  12. Intranuclear Actin Regulates Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Buer; Xie, Zhihui; Uzer, Gunes; Thompson, William R.; Styner, Maya; Wu, Xin; Rubin, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Depolymerization of the actin cytoskeleton induces nuclear trafficking of regulatory proteins and global effects on gene transcription. We here show that in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), cytochalasin D treatment causes rapid cofilin-/importin-9-dependent transfer of G-actin into the nucleus. The continued presence of intranuclear actin, which forms rod-like structures that stain with phalloidin, is associated with induction of robust expression of the osteogenic genes osterix and osteocalcin in a Runx2-dependent manner, and leads to acquisition of osteogenic phenotype. Adipogenic differentiation also occurs, but to a lesser degree. Intranuclear actin leads to nuclear export of Yes-associated protein (YAP); maintenance of nuclear YAP inhibits Runx2 initiation of osteogenesis. Injection of cytochalasin into the tibial marrow space of live mice results in abundant bone formation within the space of 1 week. In sum, increased intranuclear actin forces MSC into osteogenic lineage through controlling Runx2 activity; this process may be useful for clinical objectives of forming bone. PMID:26140478

  13. PTP1B-dependent regulation of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling by the actin-binding protein Mena.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Shannon K; Oudin, Madeleine J; Tadros, Jenny; Neil, Jason; Del Rosario, Amanda; Joughin, Brian A; Ritsma, Laila; Wyckoff, Jeff; Vasile, Eliza; Eddy, Robert; Philippar, Ulrike; Lussiez, Alisha; Condeelis, John S; van Rheenen, Jacco; White, Forest; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Gertler, Frank B

    2015-11-01

    During breast cancer progression, alternative mRNA splicing produces functionally distinct isoforms of Mena, an actin regulator with roles in cell migration and metastasis. Aggressive tumor cell subpopulations express Mena(INV), which promotes tumor cell invasion by potentiating EGF responses. However, the mechanism by which this occurs is unknown. Here we report that Mena associates constitutively with the tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B and mediates a novel negative feedback mechanism that attenuates receptor tyrosine kinase signaling. On EGF stimulation, complexes containing Mena and PTP1B are recruited to the EGFR, causing receptor dephosphorylation and leading to decreased motility responses. Mena also interacts with the 5' inositol phosphatase SHIP2, which is important for the recruitment of the Mena-PTP1B complex to the EGFR. When Mena(INV) is expressed, PTP1B recruitment to the EGFR is impaired, providing a mechanism for growth factor sensitization to EGF, as well as HGF and IGF, and increased resistance to EGFR and Met inhibitors in signaling and motility assays. In sum, we demonstrate that Mena plays an important role in regulating growth factor-induced signaling. Disruption of this attenuation by Mena(INV) sensitizes tumor cells to low-growth factor concentrations, thereby increasing the migration and invasion responses that contribute to aggressive, malignant cell phenotypes. PMID:26337385

  14. Guanine Nucleotides in the Meiotic Maturation of Starfish Oocytes: Regulation of the Actin Cytoskeleton and of Ca2+ Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kyozuka, Keiichiro; Chun, Jong T.; Puppo, Agostina; Gragnaniello, Gianni; Garante, Ezio; Santella, Luigia

    2009-01-01

    Background Starfish oocytes are arrested at the first prophase of meiosis until they are stimulated by 1-methyladenine (1-MA). The two most immediate responses to the maturation-inducing hormone are the quick release of intracellular Ca2+ and the accelerated changes of the actin cytoskeleton in the cortex. Compared with the later events of oocyte maturation such as germinal vesicle breakdown, the molecular mechanisms underlying the early events involving Ca2+ signaling and actin changes are poorly understood. Herein, we have studied the roles of G-proteins in the early stage of meiotic maturation. Methodology/Principal Findings By microinjecting starfish oocytes with nonhydrolyzable nucleotides that stabilize either active (GTPγS) or inactive (GDPβS) forms of G-proteins, we have demonstrated that: i) GTPγS induces Ca2+ release that mimics the effect of 1-MA; ii) GDPβS completely blocks 1-MA-induced Ca2+; iii) GDPβS has little effect on the amplitude of the Ca2+ peak, but significantly expedites the initial Ca2+ waves induced by InsP3 photoactivation, iv) GDPβS induces unexpectedly striking modification of the cortical actin networks, suggesting a link between the cytoskeletal change and the modulation of the Ca2+ release kinetics; v) alteration of cortical actin networks with jasplakinolide, GDPβS, or actinase E, all led to significant changes of 1-MA-induced Ca2+ signaling. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, these results indicate that G-proteins are implicated in the early events of meiotic maturation and support our previous proposal that the dynamic change of the actin cytoskeleton may play a regulatory role in modulating intracellular Ca2+ release. PMID:19617909

  15. Anti-Tumor Activity of Yuanhuacine by Regulating AMPK/mTOR Signaling Pathway and Actin Cytoskeleton Organization in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye-Jung; Bae, Song Yi; Jung, Cholomi; Park, Hyen Joo; Lee, Sang Kook

    2015-01-01

    Yuanhuacine (YC), a daphnane diterpenoid from the flowers of Daphne genkwa, exhibited a potential growth inhibitory activity against human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. YC also suppressed the invasion and migration of lung cancer cells. However, the precise molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we report that YC significantly activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathway and suppressed mTORC2-mediated downstream signaling pathway in H1993 human NSCLC cells. AMPK plays an important role in energy metabolism and cancer biology. Therefore, activators of AMPK signaling pathways can be applicable to the treatment of cancer. YC enhanced the expression of p-AMPKα. The co-treatment of YC and compound C (an AMPK inhibitor) or metformin (an AMPK activator) also confirmed that YC increases p-AMPKα. YC also suppressed the activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) expression, a downstream target of AMPK. Further study revealed that YC modulates mTORC2-associated downstream signaling pathways with a decreased expressions of p-Akt, p-protein kinase C alpha (PKCα), p-ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) and filamentous actin (F-actin) that are known to activate cell growth and organize actin cytoskeleton. In addition, YC inhibited the tumor growth in H1993 cell-implanted xenograft nude mouse model. These data suggest the YC could be a potential candidate for cancer chemotherapeutic agents derived from natural products by regulating AMPK/mTORC2 signaling pathway and actin cytoskeleton organization. PMID:26656173

  16. Wnt Signalling Promotes Actin Dynamics during Axon Remodelling through the Actin-Binding Protein Eps8

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Patricia C.

    2015-01-01

    Upon arrival at their synaptic targets, axons slow down their growth and extensively remodel before the assembly of presynaptic boutons. Wnt proteins are target-derived secreted factors that promote axonal remodelling and synaptic assembly. In the developing spinal cord, Wnts secreted by motor neurons promote axonal remodelling of NT-3 responsive dorsal root ganglia neurons. Axon remodelling induced by Wnts is characterised by growth cone pausing and enlargement, processes that depend on the re-organisation of microtubules. However, the contribution of the actin cytoskeleton has remained unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that Wnt3a regulates the actin cytoskeleton by rapidly inducing F-actin accumulation in growth cones from rodent DRG neurons through the scaffold protein Dishevelled-1 (Dvl1) and the serine-threonine kinase Gsk3β. Importantly, these changes in actin cytoskeleton occurs before enlargement of the growth cones is evident. Time-lapse imaging shows that Wnt3a increases lamellar protrusion and filopodia velocity. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of actin assembly demonstrates that Wnt3a increases actin dynamics. Through a yeast-two hybrid screen, we identified the actin-binding protein Eps8 as a direct interactor of Dvl1, a scaffold protein crucial for the Wnt signalling pathway. Gain of function of Eps8 mimics Wnt-mediated axon remodelling, whereas Eps8 silencing blocks the axon remodelling activity of Wnt3a. Importantly, blockade of the Dvl1-Eps8 interaction completely abolishes Wnt3a-mediated axonal remodelling. These findings demonstrate a novel role for Wnt-Dvl1 signalling through Eps8 in the regulation of axonal remodeling. PMID:26252776

  17. Cortactin Branches Out: Roles in Regulating Protrusive Actin Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ammer, Amanda Gatesman; Weed, Scott A.

    2008-01-01

    Since its discovery in the early 1990’s, cortactin has emerged as a key signaling protein in many cellular processes, including cell adhesion, migration, endocytosis, and tumor invasion. While the list of cellular functions influenced by cortactin grows, the ability of cortactin to interact with and alter the cortical actin network is central to its role in regulating these processes. Recently, several advances have been made in our understanding of the interaction between actin and cortactin, providing insight into how these two proteins work together to provide a framework for normal and altered cellular function. This review examines how regulation of cortactin through post-translational modifications and interactions with multiple binding partners elicits changes in cortical actin cytoskeletal organization, impacting the regulation and formation of actin-rich motility structures. PMID:18615630

  18. Regulation of water flow by actin-binding protein-induced actin gelatin.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, T; Suzuki, A; Stossel, T P

    1992-01-01

    Actin filaments inhibit osmotically driven water flow (Ito, T., K.S. Zaner, and T.P. Stossel. 1987. Biophys. J. 51: 745-753). Here we show that the actin gelation protein, actin-binding protein (ABP), impedes both osmotic shrinkage and swelling of an actin filament solution and reduces markedly the concentration of actin filaments required for this inhibition. These effects depend on actin filament immobilization, because the ABP concentration that causes initial impairment of water flow by actin filaments corresponds to the gel point measured viscometrically and because gelsolin, which noncovalently severs actin filaments, solates actin gels and restores water flow in a solution of actin cross-linked by ABP. Since ABP gels actin filaments in the periphery of many eukaryotic cells, such actin networks may contribute to physiological cell volume regulation. PMID:1318095

  19. Regulation of cell proliferation by ERK and signal-dependent nuclear translocation of ERK is dependent on Tm5NM1-containing actin filaments

    PubMed Central

    Schevzov, Galina; Kee, Anthony J.; Wang, Bin; Sequeira, Vanessa B.; Hook, Jeff; Coombes, Jason D.; Lucas, Christine A.; Stehn, Justine R.; Musgrove, Elizabeth A.; Cretu, Alexandra; Assoian, Richard; Fath, Thomas; Hanoch, Tamar; Seger, Rony; Pleines, Irina; Kile, Benjamin T.; Hardeman, Edna C.; Gunning, Peter W.

    2015-01-01

    ERK-regulated cell proliferation requires multiple phosphorylation events catalyzed first by MEK and then by casein kinase 2 (CK2), followed by interaction with importin7 and subsequent nuclear translocation of pERK. We report that genetic manipulation of a core component of the actin filaments of cancer cells, the tropomyosin Tm5NM1, regulates the proliferation of normal cells both in vitro and in vivo. Mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking Tm5NM1, which have reduced proliferative capacity, are insensitive to inhibition of ERK by peptide and small-molecule inhibitors, indicating that ERK is unable to regulate proliferation of these knockout (KO) cells. Treatment of wild-type MEFs with a CK2 inhibitor to block phosphorylation of the nuclear translocation signal in pERK resulted in greatly decreased cell proliferation and a significant reduction in the nuclear translocation of pERK. In contrast, Tm5NM1 KO MEFs, which show reduced nuclear translocation of pERK, were unaffected by inhibition of CK2. This suggested that it is nuclear translocation of CK2-phosphorylated pERK that regulates cell proliferation and this capacity is absent in Tm5NM1 KO cells. Proximity ligation assays confirmed a growth factor–stimulated interaction of pERK with Tm5NM1 and that the interaction of pERK with importin7 is greatly reduced in the Tm5NM1 KO cells. PMID:25971798

  20. Yersinia effector YopO uses actin as bait to phosphorylate proteins that regulate actin polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wei Lin; Grimes, Jonathan M; Robinson, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic Yersinia species evade host immune systems through the injection of Yersinia outer proteins (Yops) into phagocytic cells. One Yop, YopO, also known as YpkA, induces actin-filament disruption, impairing phagocytosis. Here we describe the X-ray structure of Yersinia enterocolitica YopO in complex with actin, which reveals that YopO binds to an actin monomer in a manner that blocks polymerization yet allows the bound actin to interact with host actin-regulating proteins. SILAC-MS and biochemical analyses confirm that actin-polymerization regulators such as VASP, EVL, WASP, gelsolin and the formin diaphanous 1 are directly sequestered and phosphorylated by YopO through formation of ternary complexes with actin. This leads to a model in which YopO at the membrane sequesters actin from polymerization while using the bound actin as bait to recruit, phosphorylate and misregulate host actin-regulating proteins to disrupt phagocytosis. PMID:25664724

  1. Regulators of Actin Dynamics in Gastrointestinal Tract Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Steinestel, Konrad; Wardelmann, Eva; Hartmann, Wolfgang; Grünewald, Inga

    2015-01-01

    Reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton underlies cell migration in a wide variety of physiological and pathological processes, such as embryonic development, wound healing, and tumor cell invasion. It has been shown that actin assembly and disassembly are precisely regulated by intracellular signaling cascades that respond to changes in the cell microenvironment, ligand binding to surface receptors, or oncogenic transformation of the cell. Actin-nucleating and actin-depolymerizing (ANFs/ADFs) and nucleation-promoting factors (NPFs) regulate cytoskeletal dynamics at the leading edge of migrating cells, thereby modulating cell shape; these proteins facilitate cellular movement and mediate degradation of the surrounding extracellular matrix by secretion of lytic proteases, thus eliminating barriers for tumor cell invasion. Accordingly, expression and activity of these actin-binding proteins have been linked to enhanced metastasis and poor prognosis in a variety of malignancies. In this review, we will summarize what is known about expression patterns and the functional role of actin regulators in gastrointestinal tumors and evaluate first pharmacological approaches to prevent invasion and metastatic dissemination of malignant cells. PMID:26345720

  2. Regulators of Actin Dynamics in Gastrointestinal Tract Tumors.

    PubMed

    Steinestel, Konrad; Wardelmann, Eva; Hartmann, Wolfgang; Grünewald, Inga

    2015-01-01

    Reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton underlies cell migration in a wide variety of physiological and pathological processes, such as embryonic development, wound healing, and tumor cell invasion. It has been shown that actin assembly and disassembly are precisely regulated by intracellular signaling cascades that respond to changes in the cell microenvironment, ligand binding to surface receptors, or oncogenic transformation of the cell. Actin-nucleating and actin-depolymerizing (ANFs/ADFs) and nucleation-promoting factors (NPFs) regulate cytoskeletal dynamics at the leading edge of migrating cells, thereby modulating cell shape; these proteins facilitate cellular movement and mediate degradation of the surrounding extracellular matrix by secretion of lytic proteases, thus eliminating barriers for tumor cell invasion. Accordingly, expression and activity of these actin-binding proteins have been linked to enhanced metastasis and poor prognosis in a variety of malignancies. In this review, we will summarize what is known about expression patterns and the functional role of actin regulators in gastrointestinal tumors and evaluate first pharmacological approaches to prevent invasion and metastatic dissemination of malignant cells. PMID:26345720

  3. The actin binding protein adseverin regulates osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hassanpour, Siavash; Jiang, Hongwei; Wang, Yongqiang; Kuiper, Johannes W P; Glogauer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Adseverin (Ads), a member of the Gelsolin superfamily of actin binding proteins, regulates the actin cytoskeleton architecture by severing and capping existing filamentous actin (F-actin) strands and nucleating the assembly of new F-actin filaments. Ads has been implicated in cellular secretion, exocytosis and has also been shown to regulate chondrogenesis and megakaryoblastic leukemia cell differentiation. Here we report for the first time that Ads is involved in regulating osteoclastogenesis (OCG). Ads is induced during OCG downstream of RANK-ligand (RANKL) stimulation and is highly expressed in mature osteoclasts. The D5 isoform of Ads is not involved in regulating OCG, as its expression is not induced in response to RANKL. Three clonal Ads knockdown RAW264.7 (RAW) macrophage cell lines with varying degrees of Ads expression and OCG deficiency were generated. The most drastic OCG defect was noted in the clonal cell line with the greatest degree of Ads knockdown as indicated by a lack of TRAcP staining and multinucleation. RNAi mediated knockdown of Ads in osteoclast precursors resulted in distinct morphological changes characterized by altered F-actin distribution and increased filopodia formation. Ads knockdown precursor cells experienced enhanced migration while fusion of knockdown precursors cells was limited. Transient reintroduction of de novo Ads back into the knockdown system was capable of rescuing TRAcP expression but not osteoclast multinucleation most likely due to the transient nature of Ads expression. This preliminary study allows us to conclude that Ads is a RANKL induced early regulator of OCG with a potential role in pre-osteoclast differentiation and fusion. PMID:25275604

  4. The Actin Binding Protein Adseverin Regulates Osteoclastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongqiang; Kuiper, Johannes W. P.; Glogauer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Adseverin (Ads), a member of the Gelsolin superfamily of actin binding proteins, regulates the actin cytoskeleton architecture by severing and capping existing filamentous actin (F-actin) strands and nucleating the assembly of new F-actin filaments. Ads has been implicated in cellular secretion, exocytosis and has also been shown to regulate chondrogenesis and megakaryoblastic leukemia cell differentiation. Here we report for the first time that Ads is involved in regulating osteoclastogenesis (OCG). Ads is induced during OCG downstream of RANK-ligand (RANKL) stimulation and is highly expressed in mature osteoclasts. The D5 isoform of Ads is not involved in regulating OCG, as its expression is not induced in response to RANKL. Three clonal Ads knockdown RAW264.7 (RAW) macrophage cell lines with varying degrees of Ads expression and OCG deficiency were generated. The most drastic OCG defect was noted in the clonal cell line with the greatest degree of Ads knockdown as indicated by a lack of TRAcP staining and multinucleation. RNAi mediated knockdown of Ads in osteoclast precursors resulted in distinct morphological changes characterized by altered F-actin distribution and increased filopodia formation. Ads knockdown precursor cells experienced enhanced migration while fusion of knockdown precursors cells was limited. Transient reintroduction of de novo Ads back into the knockdown system was capable of rescuing TRAcP expression but not osteoclast multinucleation most likely due to the transient nature of Ads expression. This preliminary study allows us to conclude that Ads is a RANKL induced early regulator of OCG with a potential role in pre-osteoclast differentiation and fusion. PMID:25275604

  5. Differential regulation of actin microfilaments by human MICAL proteins

    PubMed Central

    Giridharan, Sai Srinivas Panapakkam; Rohn, Jennifer L.; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve

    2012-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster MICAL protein is essential for the neuronal growth cone machinery that functions through plexin- and semaphorin-mediated axonal signaling. Drosophila MICAL is also involved in regulating myofilament organization and synaptic structures, and serves as an actin disassembly factor downstream of plexin-mediated axonal repulsion. In mammalian cells there are three known isoforms, MICAL1, MICAL2 and MICAL3, as well as the MICAL-like proteins MICAL-L1 and MICAL-L2, but little is known of their function, and information comes almost exclusively from neural cells. In this study we show that in non-neural cells human MICALs are required for normal actin organization, and all three MICALs regulate actin stress fibers. Moreover, we provide evidence that the generation of reactive oxygen species by MICAL proteins is crucial for their actin-regulatory function. However, although MICAL1 is auto-inhibited by its C-terminal coiled-coil region, MICAL2 remains constitutively active and affects stress fibers. These data suggest differential but complementary roles for MICAL1 and MICAL2 in actin microfilament regulation. PMID:22331357

  6. p53-mediated transcriptional regulation and activation of the actin cytoskeleton regulatory RhoC to LIMK2 signaling pathway promotes cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Croft, Daniel R; Crighton, Diane; Samuel, Michael S; Lourenco, Filipe C; Munro, June; Wood, Jenifer; Bensaad, Karim; Vousden, Karen H; Sansom, Owen J; Ryan, Kevin M; Olson, Michael F

    2011-01-01

    The central arbiter of cell fate in response to DNA damage is p53, which regulates the expression of genes involved in cell cycle arrest, survival and apoptosis. Although many responses initiated by DNA damage have been characterized, the role of actin cytoskeleton regulators is largely unknown. We now show that RhoC and LIM kinase 2 (LIMK2) are direct p53 target genes induced by genotoxic agents. Although RhoC and LIMK2 have well-established roles in actin cytoskeleton regulation, our results indicate that activation of LIMK2 also has a pro-survival function following DNA damage. LIMK inhibition by siRNA-mediated knockdown or selective pharmacological blockade sensitized cells to radio- or chemotherapy, such that treatments that were sub-lethal when administered singly resulted in cell death when combined with LIMK inhibition. Our findings suggest that combining LIMK inhibitors with genotoxic therapies could be more efficacious than single-agent administration, and highlight a novel connection between actin cytoskeleton regulators and DNA damage-induced cell survival mechanisms. PMID:21079653

  7. Regulation of actin nucleation and autophagosome formation.

    PubMed

    Coutts, Amanda S; La Thangue, Nicholas B

    2016-09-01

    Autophagy is a process of self-eating, whereby cytosolic constituents are enclosed by a double-membrane vesicle before delivery to the lysosome for degradation. This is an important process which allows for recycling of nutrients and cellular components and thus plays a critical role in normal cellular homeostasis as well as cell survival during stresses such as starvation or hypoxia. A large number of proteins regulate various stages of autophagy in a complex and still incompletely understood series of events. In this review, we will discuss recent studies which provide a growing body of evidence that actin dynamics and proteins that influence actin nucleation play an important role in the regulation of autophagosome formation and maturation. PMID:27147468

  8. A p21-activated kinase (PAK1) signaling cascade coordinately regulates F-actin remodeling and insulin granule exocytosis in pancreatic β cells

    PubMed Central

    Kalwat, Michael A.; Yoder, Stephanie M.; Wang, Zhanxiang; Thurmond, Debbie C.

    2012-01-01

    Human islet studies implicate an important signaling role for the Cdc42 effector protein p21-activated kinase (PAK1) in the sustained/second-phase of insulin secretion. Because human islets from type 2 diabetic donors lack ~80% of normal PAK1 protein levels, the mechanistic requirement for PAK1 signaling in islet function was interrogated. Similar to MIN6 β cells, human islets elicited glucose-stimulated PAK1 activation that was sensitive to the PAK1 inhibitor, IPA3. Given that sustained insulin secretion has been correlated with glucose-induced filamentous actin (F-actin) remodeling, we tested the hypothesis that a Cdc42-activated PAK1 signaling cascade is required to elicit F-actin remodeling to mobilize granules to the cell surface. Live-cell imaging captured the glucose-induced cortical F-actin remodeling in MIN6 β cells; IPA3-mediated inhibition of PAK1 abolished this remodeling. IPA3 also ablated glucose-stimulated insulin granule accumulation at the plasma membrane, consistent with its role in sustained/second-phase insulin release. Both IPA3 and a selective inhibitor of the Cdc42 GTPase, ML-141, blunted the glucose-stimulated activation of Raf-1, suggesting Raf-1 to be downstream of Cdc42→PAK1. IPA3 also inhibited MEK1/2 activation, implicating the MEK1/2→ERK1/2 cascade to occur downstream of PAK1. Importantly, PD0325901, a new selective inhibitor of MEK1/2→ERK1/2 activation, impaired F-actin remodeling and the sustained/amplification pathway of insulin release. Taken together, these data suggest that glucose-mediated activation of Cdc42 leads to activation of PAK1 and prompts activation of its downstream targets Raf-1, MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 to elicit F-actin remodeling and recruitment of insulin granules to the plasma membrane to support the sustained phase of insulin release. PMID:23246867

  9. MICAL-Family Proteins: Complex Regulators of the Actin Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Giridharan, Sai Srinivas Panapakkam

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The molecules interacting with CasL (MICAL) family members participate in a multitude of activities, including axonal growth cone repulsion, membrane trafficking, apoptosis, and bristle development in flies. An interesting feature of MICAL proteins is the presence of an N-terminal flavo-mono-oxygenase domain. This mono-oxygenase domain generates redox potential with which MICALs can either oxidize proteins or produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). Actin is one such protein that is affected by MICAL function, leading to dramatic cytoskeletal rearrangements. This review describes the MICAL-family members, and discusses their mechanisms of actin-binding and regulation of actin cytoskeleton organization. Recent Advances: Recent studies show that MICALs directly induce oxidation of actin molecules, leading to actin depolymerization. ROS production by MICALs also causes oxidation of collapsin response mediator protein-2, a microtubule assembly promoter, which subsequently undergoes phosphorylation. Critical Issues: MICAL proteins oxidize proteins through two mechanisms: either directly by oxidizing methionine residues or indirectly via the production of ROS. It remains unclear whether MICAL proteins employ both mechanisms or whether the activity of MICAL-family proteins might vary with different substrates. Future Directions: The identification of additional substrates oxidized by MICAL will shed new light on MICAL protein function. Additional directions include expanding studies toward the MICAL-like homologs that lack flavin adenine dinucleotide domains and oxidation activity. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2059–2073. PMID:23834433

  10. Regulation of cellular actin architecture by S100A10.

    PubMed

    Jung, M Juliane; Murzik, Ulrike; Wehder, Liane; Hemmerich, Peter; Melle, Christian

    2010-04-15

    Actin structures are involved in several biological processes and the disruption of actin polymerisation induces impaired motility of eukaryotic cells. Different factors are involved in regulation and maintenance of the cytoskeletal actin architecture. Here we show that S100A10 participates in the particular organisation of actin filaments. Down-regulation of S100A10 by specific siRNA triggered a disorganisation of filamentous actin structures without a reduction of the total cellular actin concentration. In contrast, the formation of cytoskeleton structures containing tubulin was unhindered in S100A10 depleted cells. Interestingly, the cellular distribution of annexin A2, an interaction partner of S100A10, was unaffected in S100A10 depleted cells. Cells lacking S100A10 showed an impaired migration activity and were unable to close a scratched wound. Our data provide first insights of S100A10 function as a regulator of the filamentous actin network. PMID:20100475

  11. Regulation of actin polymerization by tropomodulin-3 controls megakaryocyte actin organization and platelet biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sui, Zhenhua; Nowak, Roberta B; Sanada, Chad; Halene, Stephanie; Krause, Diane S; Fowler, Velia M

    2015-07-23

    The actin cytoskeleton is important for platelet biogenesis. Tropomodulin-3 (Tmod3), the only Tmod isoform detected in platelets and megakaryocytes (MKs), caps actin filament (F-actin) pointed ends and binds tropomyosins (TMs), regulating actin polymerization and stability. To determine the function of Tmod3 in platelet biogenesis, we studied Tmod3(-/-) embryos, which are embryonic lethal by E18.5. Tmod3(-/-) embryos often show hemorrhaging at E14.5 with fewer and larger platelets, indicating impaired platelet biogenesis. MK numbers are moderately increased in Tmod3(-/-) fetal livers, with only a slight increase in the 8N population, suggesting that MK differentiation is not significantly affected. However, Tmod3(-/-) MKs fail to develop a normal demarcation membrane system (DMS), and cytoplasmic organelle distribution is abnormal. Moreover, cultured Tmod3(-/-) MKs exhibit impaired proplatelet formation with a wide range of proplatelet bud sizes, including abnormally large proplatelet buds containing incorrect numbers of von Willebrand factor-positive granules. Tmod3(-/-) MKs exhibit F-actin disturbances, and Tmod3(-/-) MKs spreading on collagen fail to polymerize F-actin into actomyosin contractile bundles. Tmod3 associates with TM4 and the F-actin cytoskeleton in wild-type MKs, and confocal microscopy reveals that Tmod3, TM4, and F-actin partially colocalize near the membrane of proplatelet buds. In contrast, the abnormally large proplatelets from Tmod3(-/-) MKs show increased F-actin and redistribution of F-actin and TM4 from the cortex to the cytoplasm, but normal microtubule coil organization. We conclude that F-actin capping by Tmod3 regulates F-actin organization in mouse fetal liver-derived MKs, thereby controlling MK cytoplasmic morphogenesis, including DMS formation and organelle distribution, as well as proplatelet formation and sizing. PMID:25964668

  12. Tropomyosin - master regulator of actin filament function in the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Gunning, Peter W; Hardeman, Edna C; Lappalainen, Pekka; Mulvihill, Daniel P

    2015-08-15

    Tropomyosin (Tpm) isoforms are the master regulators of the functions of individual actin filaments in fungi and metazoans. Tpms are coiled-coil parallel dimers that form a head-to-tail polymer along the length of actin filaments. Yeast only has two Tpm isoforms, whereas mammals have over 40. Each cytoskeletal actin filament contains a homopolymer of Tpm homodimers, resulting in a filament of uniform Tpm composition along its length. Evidence for this 'master regulator' role is based on four core sets of observation. First, spatially and functionally distinct actin filaments contain different Tpm isoforms, and recent data suggest that members of the formin family of actin filament nucleators can specify which Tpm isoform is added to the growing actin filament. Second, Tpms regulate whole-organism physiology in terms of morphogenesis, cell proliferation, vesicle trafficking, biomechanics, glucose metabolism and organ size in an isoform-specific manner. Third, Tpms achieve these functional outputs by regulating the interaction of actin filaments with myosin motors and actin-binding proteins in an isoform-specific manner. Last, the assembly of complex structures, such as stress fibers and podosomes involves the collaboration of multiple types of actin filament specified by their Tpm composition. This allows the cell to specify actin filament function in time and space by simply specifying their Tpm isoform composition. PMID:26240174

  13. Actin is required for IFT regulation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Avasthi, Prachee; Onishi, Masayuki; Karpiak, Joel; Yamamoto, Ryosuke; Mackinder, Luke; Jonikas, Martin C.; Sale, Winfield S.; Shoichet, Brian; Pringle, John R.; Marshall, Wallace F.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Assembly of cilia and flagella requires intraflagellar transport (IFT), a highly regulated kinesin-based transport system that moves cargo from the basal body to the tip of flagella [1]. The recruitment of IFT components to basal bodies is a function of flagellar length, with increased recruitment in rapidly growing short flagella [2]. The molecular pathways regulating IFT are largely a mystery. Since actin network disruption leads to changes in ciliary length and number, actin has been proposed to have a role in ciliary assembly. However, the mechanisms involved are unknown. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, conventional actin is found in both the cell body and the inner dynein arm complexes within flagella [3, 4]. Previous work showed that treating Chlamydomonas cells with the actin-depolymerizing compound cytochalasin D resulted in reversible flagellar shortening [5], but how actin is related to flagellar length or assembly remains unknown. Here, we utilize small-molecule inhibitors and genetic mutants to analyze the role of actin dynamics in flagellar assembly in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We demonstrate that actin plays a role in IFT recruitment to basal bodies during flagellar elongation, and that when actin is perturbed, the normal dependence of IFT recruitment on flagellar length is lost. We also find that actin is required for sufficient entry of IFT material into flagella during assembly. These same effects are recapitulated with a myosin inhibitor suggesting actin may act via myosin in a pathway by which flagellar assembly is regulated by flagellar length. PMID:25155506

  14. Actin is required for IFT regulation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Avasthi, Prachee; Onishi, Masayuki; Karpiak, Joel; Yamamoto, Ryosuke; Mackinder, Luke; Jonikas, Martin C; Sale, Winfield S; Shoichet, Brian; Pringle, John R; Marshall, Wallace F

    2014-09-01

    Assembly of cilia and flagella requires intraflagellar transport (IFT), a highly regulated kinesin-based transport system that moves cargo from the basal body to the tip of flagella [1]. The recruitment of IFT components to basal bodies is a function of flagellar length, with increased recruitment in rapidly growing short flagella [2]. The molecular pathways regulating IFT are largely a mystery. Because actin network disruption leads to changes in ciliary length and number, actin has been proposed to have a role in ciliary assembly. However, the mechanisms involved are unknown. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, conventional actin is found in both the cell body and the inner dynein arm complexes within flagella [3, 4]. Previous work showed that treating Chlamydomonas cells with the actin-depolymerizing compound cytochalasin D resulted in reversible flagellar shortening [5], but how actin is related to flagellar length or assembly remains unknown. Here we utilize small-molecule inhibitors and genetic mutants to analyze the role of actin dynamics in flagellar assembly in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We demonstrate that actin plays a role in IFT recruitment to basal bodies during flagellar elongation and that when actin is perturbed, the normal dependence of IFT recruitment on flagellar length is lost. We also find that actin is required for sufficient entry of IFT material into flagella during assembly. These same effects are recapitulated with a myosin inhibitor, suggesting that actin may act via myosin in a pathway by which flagellar assembly is regulated by flagellar length. PMID:25155506

  15. Cutting Edge: Drebrin-Regulated Actin Dynamics Regulate IgE-Dependent Mast Cell Activation and Allergic Responses.

    PubMed

    Law, Mankit; Lee, YongChan; Morales, J Luis; Ning, Gang; Huang, Weishan; Pabon, Jonathan; Kannan, Arun K; Jeong, Ah-Reum; Wood, Amie; Carter, Chavez; Mohinta, Sonia; Song, Jihong; August, Avery

    2015-07-15

    Mast cells play critical roles in allergic responses. Calcium signaling controls the function of these cells, and a role for actin in regulating calcium influx into cells has been suggested. We have previously identified the actin reorganizing protein Drebrin as a target of the immunosuppressant 3,5-bistrifluoromethyl pyrazole, which inhibits calcium influx into cells. In this study, we show that Drebrin(-/-) mice exhibit reduced IgE-mediated histamine release and passive systemic anaphylaxis, and Drebrin(-/-) mast cells also exhibit defects in FcεRI-mediated degranulation. Drebrin(-/-) mast cells exhibit defects in actin cytoskeleton organization and calcium responses downstream of the FcεRI, and agents that relieve actin reorganization rescue mast cell FcεRI-induced degranulation. Our results indicate that Drebrin regulates the actin cytoskeleton and calcium responses in mast cells, thus regulating mast cell function in vivo. PMID:26056254

  16. Ca2+-calmodulin regulates fesselin-induced actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Schroeter, Mechthild; Chalovich, Joseph M

    2004-11-01

    Fesselin is a proline-rich actin-binding protein that was isolated from avian smooth muscle. Fesselin bundles actin and accelerates actin polymerization by facilitating nucleation. We now show that this polymerization of actin can be regulated by Ca(2+)-calmodulin. Fesselin was shown to bind to immobilized calmodulin in the presence of Ca(2+). The fesselin-calmodulin interaction was confirmed by a Ca(2+)-dependent increase in 2-(4-maleimidoanilino)naphthalene-6-sulfonic acid (MIANS) fluorescence upon addition of fesselin to MIANS-labeled wheat germ calmodulin. The affinity was estimated to be approximately 10(9) M(-1). The affinity of Ca(2+)-calmodulin to the fesselin F-actin complex was approximately 10(8) M(-1). Calmodulin binding to fesselin appeared to be functionally significant. In the presence of fesselin and calmodulin, the polymerization of actin was Ca(2+)-dependent. Ca(2+)-free calmodulin either had no effect or enhanced the ability of fesselin to accelerate actin polymerization. Ca(2+)-calmodulin not only reversed the stimulatory effect of fesselin but reduced the rate of polymerization below that observed in the absence of fesselin. While Ca(2+)-calmodulin had a large effect on the interaction of fesselin with G-actin, the effect on F-actin was small. Neither the binding of fesselin to F-actin nor the subsequent bundling of F-actin was greatly affected by Ca(2+)-calmodulin. Fesselin may function as an actin-polymerizing factor that is regulated by Ca(2+) levels. PMID:15504050

  17. Dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton mediates receptor cross talk: An emerging concept in tuning receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Mattila, Pieta K.; Batista, Facundo D.

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence implicates the actin cytoskeleton in the control of receptor signaling. This may be of particular importance in the context of immune receptors, such as the B cell receptor, where dysregulated signaling can result in autoimmunity and malignancy. Here, we discuss the role of the actin cytoskeleton in controlling receptor compartmentalization, dynamics, and clustering as a means to regulate receptor signaling through controlling the interactions with protein partners. We propose that the actin cytoskeleton is a point of integration for receptor cross talk through modulation of protein dynamics and clustering. We discuss the implication of this cross talk via the cytoskeleton for both ligand-induced and low-level constitutive (tonic) signaling necessary for immune cell survival. PMID:26833785

  18. Spatiotemporal regulation of chemical reaction kinetics of cell surface molecules by active remodeling of cortical actin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Bhaswati; Chaudhuri, Abhishek; Gowrishankar, Kripa; Mayor, Satyajit; Rao, Madan

    2010-03-01

    Cell surface proteins such as lipid tethered GPI-anchored proteins and Ras-proteins are distributed as monomers and nanoclusters on the surface of living cells. Recent work from our laboratory suggests that the spatial distribution and dynamics of formation and breakup of these nanoclusters is controlled by the active remodeling dynamics of the underlying cortical actin. To explain these observations, we propose a novel mechanism of nanoclustering, involving the transient binding to and advection along constitutively occuring ``asters'' of cortical actin. Here we study the consequences of such active actin based clustering, in the context of chemical reactions involving conformational changes of cell surface proteins. We find that active remodeling of cortical actin, can give rise to a dramatic increase in the reaction efficiency and output levels. In general, such actin driven clustering of membrane proteins could be a cellular mechanism to spatiotemporally regulate and amplify local chemical reaction rates, in the context of signalling and endocytosis.

  19. Interaction between Calcium and Actin in Guard Cell and Pollen Signaling Networks

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dong-Hua; Acharya, Biswa R.; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) plays important roles in plant growth, development, and signal transduction. It is a vital nutrient for plant physical design, such as cell wall and membrane, and also serves as a counter-cation for biochemical, inorganic, and organic anions, and more particularly, its concentration change in cytosol is a ubiquitous second messenger in plant physiological signaling in responses to developmental and environmental stimuli. Actin cytoskeleton is well known for its importance in cellular architecture maintenance and its significance in cytoplasmic streaming and cell division. In plant cell system, the actin dynamics is a process of polymerization and de-polymerization of globular actin and filamentous actin and that acts as an active regulator for calcium signaling by controlling calcium evoked physiological responses. The elucidation of the interaction between calcium and actin dynamics will be helpful for further investigation of plant cell signaling networks at molecular level. This review mainly focuses on the recent advances in understanding the interaction between the two aforementioned signaling components in two well-established model systems of plant, guard cell, and pollen. PMID:27137395

  20. Actin dynamics tune the integrated stress response by regulating eukaryotic initiation factor 2α dephosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Joseph E; Dalton, Lucy E; Clarke, Hanna J; Malzer, Elke; Dominicus, Caia S; Patel, Vruti; Moorhead, Greg; Ron, David; Marciniak, Stefan J

    2015-01-01

    Four stress-sensing kinases phosphorylate the alpha subunit of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α) to activate the integrated stress response (ISR). In animals, the ISR is antagonised by selective eIF2α phosphatases comprising a catalytic protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) subunit in complex with a PPP1R15-type regulatory subunit. An unbiased search for additional conserved components of the PPP1R15-PP1 phosphatase identified monomeric G-actin. Like PP1, G-actin associated with the functional core of PPP1R15 family members and G-actin depletion, by the marine toxin jasplakinolide, destabilised the endogenous PPP1R15A-PP1 complex. The abundance of the ternary PPP1R15-PP1-G-actin complex was responsive to global changes in the polymeric status of actin, as was its eIF2α-directed phosphatase activity, while localised G-actin depletion at sites enriched for PPP1R15 enhanced eIF2α phosphorylation and the downstream ISR. G-actin's role as a stabilizer of the PPP1R15-containing holophosphatase provides a mechanism for integrating signals regulating actin dynamics with stresses that trigger the ISR. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04872.001 PMID:25774599

  1. Fascin links Btl/FGFR signalling to the actin cytoskeleton during Drosophila tracheal morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Okenve-Ramos, Pilar; Llimargas, Marta

    2014-02-01

    A key challenge in normal development and in disease is to elucidate the mechanisms of cell migration. Here we approach this question using the tracheal system of Drosophila as a model. Tracheal cell migration requires the Breathless/FGFR pathway; however, how the pathway induces migration remains poorly understood. We find that the Breathless pathway upregulates singed at the tip of tracheal branches, and that this regulation is functionally relevant. singed encodes Drosophila Fascin, which belongs to a conserved family of actin-bundling proteins involved in cancer progression and metastasis upon misregulation. We show that singed is required for filopodia stiffness and proper morphology of tracheal tip cells, defects that correlate with an abnormal actin organisation. We propose that singed-regulated filopodia and cell fronts are required for timely and guided branch migration and for terminal branching and branch fusion. We find that singed requirements rely on its actin-bundling activity controlled by phosphorylation, and that active Singed can promote tip cell features. Furthermore, we find that singed acts in concert with forked, another actin cross-linker. The absence of both cross-linkers further stresses the relevance of tip cell morphology and filopodia for tracheal development. In summary, our results on the one hand reveal a previously undescribed role for forked in the organisation of transient actin structures such as filopodia, and on the other hand identify singed as a new target of Breathless signal, establishing a link between guidance cues, the actin cytoskeleton and tracheal morphogenesis. PMID:24496629

  2. The Actin Filament-Binding Protein Coronin Regulates Motility in Plasmodium Sporozoites

    PubMed Central

    Bane, Kartik S.; Singer, Mirko; Reinig, Miriam; Klug, Dennis; Heiss, Kirsten; Baum, Jake; Mueller, Ann-Kristin; Frischknecht, Friedrich

    2016-01-01

    Parasites causing malaria need to migrate in order to penetrate tissue barriers and enter host cells. Here we show that the actin filament-binding protein coronin regulates gliding motility in Plasmodium berghei sporozoites, the highly motile forms of a rodent malaria-causing parasite transmitted by mosquitoes. Parasites lacking coronin show motility defects that impair colonization of the mosquito salivary glands but not migration in the skin, yet result in decreased transmission efficiency. In non-motile sporozoites low calcium concentrations mediate actin-independent coronin localization to the periphery. Engagement of extracellular ligands triggers an intracellular calcium release followed by the actin-dependent relocalization of coronin to the rear and initiation of motility. Mutational analysis and imaging suggest that coronin organizes actin filaments for productive motility. Using coronin-mCherry as a marker for the presence of actin filaments we found that protein kinase A contributes to actin filament disassembly. We finally speculate that calcium and cAMP-mediated signaling regulate a switch from rapid parasite motility to host cell invasion by differentially influencing actin dynamics. PMID:27409081

  3. Endocytosis-dependent coordination of multiple actin regulators is required for wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Matsubayashi, Yutaka; Coulson-Gilmer, Camilla

    2015-01-01

    The ability to heal wounds efficiently is essential for life. After wounding of an epithelium, the cells bordering the wound form dynamic actin protrusions and/or a contractile actomyosin cable, and these actin structures drive wound closure. Despite their importance in wound healing, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the assembly of these actin structures at wound edges are not well understood. In this paper, using Drosophila melanogaster embryos, we demonstrate that Diaphanous, SCAR, and WASp play distinct but overlapping roles in regulating actin assembly during wound healing. Moreover, we show that endocytosis is essential for wound edge actin assembly and wound closure. We identify adherens junctions (AJs) as a key target of endocytosis during wound healing and propose that endocytic remodeling of AJs is required to form “signaling centers” along the wound edge that control actin assembly. We conclude that coordination of actin assembly, AJ remodeling, and membrane traffic is required for the construction of a motile leading edge during wound healing. PMID:26216900

  4. Cortical actin regulation modulates vascular contractility and compliance in veins

    PubMed Central

    Saphirstein, Robert J; Gao, Yuan Z; Lin, Qian Qian; Morgan, Kathleen G

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The literature on arterial mechanics is extensive, but far less is known about mechanisms controlling mechanical properties of veins. We use here a multi-scale approach to identify subcellular sources of venous stiffness. Portal vein tissue displays a severalfold decrease in passive stiffness compared to aortic tissues. The α-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine (PE) increased tissue stress and stiffness, both attenuated by cytochalasin D (CytoD) and PP2, inhibitors of actin polymerization and Src activity, respectively. We quantify, for the first time, cortical cellular stiffness in freshly isolated contractile vascular smooth muscle cells using magnetic microneedle technology. Cortical stiffness is significantly increased by PE and CytoD inhibits this increase but, surprisingly, PP2 does not. No detectable change in focal adhesion size, measured by immunofluorescence of FAK and zyxin, accompanies the PE-induced changes in cortical stiffness. Probing with phospho-specific antibodies confirmed activation of FAK/Src and ERK pathways and caldesmon phosphorylation. Thus, venous tissue stiffness is regulated both at the level of the smooth muscle cell cortex, via cortical actin polymerization, and by downstream smooth muscle effectors of Src/ERK signalling pathways. These findings identify novel potential molecular targets for the modulation of venous capacitance and venous return in health and disease. Key points Most cardiovascular research focuses on arterial mechanisms of disease, largely ignoring venous mechanisms. Here we examine ex vivo venous stiffness, spanning tissue to molecular levels, using biomechanics and magnetic microneedle technology, and show for the first time that venous stiffness is regulated by a molecular actin switch within the vascular smooth muscle cell in the wall of the vein. This switch connects the contractile apparatus within the cell to adhesion structures and facilitates stiffening of the vessel wall, regulating blood flow return

  5. Regulates Coupling between Actin Oscillators for Cell Polarity and Directional Migration

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Huaqing; Sun, Yaohui; Huang, Chuan-Hsiang; Freyre, Mariel; Zhao, Min; Devreotes, Peter N.; Weiner, Orion D.

    2016-01-01

    For directional movement, eukaryotic cells depend on the proper organization of their actin cytoskeleton. This engine of motility is made up of highly dynamic nonequilibrium actin structures such as flashes, oscillations, and traveling waves. In Dictyostelium, oscillatory actin foci interact with signals such as Ras and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3) to form protrusions. However, how signaling cues tame actin dynamics to produce a pseudopod and guide cellular motility is a critical open question in eukaryotic chemotaxis. Here, we demonstrate that the strength of coupling between individual actin oscillators controls cell polarization and directional movement. We implement an inducible sequestration system to inactivate the heterotrimeric G protein subunit Gβ and find that this acute perturbation triggers persistent, high-amplitude cortical oscillations of F-actin. Actin oscillators that are normally weakly coupled to one another in wild-type cells become strongly synchronized following acute inactivation of Gβ. This global coupling impairs sensing of internal cues during spontaneous polarization and sensing of external cues during directional motility. A simple mathematical model of coupled actin oscillators reveals the importance of appropriate coupling strength for chemotaxis: moderate coupling can increase sensitivity to noisy inputs. Taken together, our data suggest that Gβ regulates the strength of coupling between actin oscillators for efficient polarity and directional migration. As these observations are only possible following acute inhibition of Gβ and are masked by slow compensation in genetic knockouts, our work also shows that acute loss-of-function approaches can complement and extend the reach of classical genetics in Dictyostelium and likely other systems as well. PMID:26890004

  6. Regulates Coupling between Actin Oscillators for Cell Polarity and Directional Migration.

    PubMed

    Hoeller, Oliver; Toettcher, Jared E; Cai, Huaqing; Sun, Yaohui; Huang, Chuan-Hsiang; Freyre, Mariel; Zhao, Min; Devreotes, Peter N; Weiner, Orion D

    2016-02-01

    For directional movement, eukaryotic cells depend on the proper organization of their actin cytoskeleton. This engine of motility is made up of highly dynamic nonequilibrium actin structures such as flashes, oscillations, and traveling waves. In Dictyostelium, oscillatory actin foci interact with signals such as Ras and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3) to form protrusions. However, how signaling cues tame actin dynamics to produce a pseudopod and guide cellular motility is a critical open question in eukaryotic chemotaxis. Here, we demonstrate that the strength of coupling between individual actin oscillators controls cell polarization and directional movement. We implement an inducible sequestration system to inactivate the heterotrimeric G protein subunit Gβ and find that this acute perturbation triggers persistent, high-amplitude cortical oscillations of F-actin. Actin oscillators that are normally weakly coupled to one another in wild-type cells become strongly synchronized following acute inactivation of Gβ. This global coupling impairs sensing of internal cues during spontaneous polarization and sensing of external cues during directional motility. A simple mathematical model of coupled actin oscillators reveals the importance of appropriate coupling strength for chemotaxis: moderate coupling can increase sensitivity to noisy inputs. Taken together, our data suggest that Gβ regulates the strength of coupling between actin oscillators for efficient polarity and directional migration. As these observations are only possible following acute inhibition of Gβ and are masked by slow compensation in genetic knockouts, our work also shows that acute loss-of-function approaches can complement and extend the reach of classical genetics in Dictyostelium and likely other systems as well. PMID:26890004

  7. Polyphosphoinositides-dependent regulation of the osteoclast actin cytoskeleton and bone resorption

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Rajat S; Baker, De Anna; Hruska, Keith A; Chellaiah, Meenakshi A

    2004-01-01

    Background Gelsolin, an actin capping protein of osteoclast podosomes, has a unique function in regulating assembly and disassembly of the podosome actin filament. Previously, we have reported that osteopontin (OPN) binding to integrin αvβ3 increased the levels of gelsolin-associated polyphosphoinositides, podosome assembly/disassembly, and actin filament formation. The present study was undertaken to identify the possible role of polyphosphoinositides and phosphoinositides binding domains (PBDs) of gelsolin in the osteoclast cytoskeletal structural organization and osteoclast function. Results Transduction of TAT/full-length gelsolin and PBDs containing gelsolin peptides into osteoclasts demonstrated: 1) F-actin enriched patches; 2) disruption of actin ring; 3) an increase in the association polyphosphoinositides (PPIs) with the transduced peptides containing PBDs. The above-mentioned effects were more pronounced with gelsolin peptide containing 2 tandem repeats of PBDs (PBD (2)). Binding of PPIs to the transduced peptides has resulted in reduced levels of PPIs association with the endogenous gelsolin, and thereby disrupted the actin remodeling processes in terms of podosome organization in the clear zone area and actin ring formation. These peptides also exhibited a dominant negative effect in the formation of WASP-Arp2/3 complex indicating the role of phosphoinositides in WASP activation. The TAT-PBD gelsolin peptides transduced osteoclasts are functionally defective in terms of motility and bone resorption. Conclusions Taken together, these data demonstrate that transduction of PBD gelsolin peptides into osteoclasts produced a dominant negative effect on actin assembly, motility, and bone resorption. These findings indicate that phosphoinositide-mediated signaling mechanisms regulate osteoclast cytoskeleton, podosome assembly/disassembly, actin ring formation and bone resorption activity of osteoclasts. PMID:15142256

  8. Multiple roles for the actin cytoskeleton during regulated exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Porat-Shliom, Natalie; Milberg, Oleg; Masedunskas, Andrius; Weigert, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Regulated exocytosis is the main mechanism utilized by specialized secretory cells to deliver molecules to the cell surface by virtue of membranous containers (i.e. secretory vesicles). The process involves a series of highly coordinated and sequential steps, which include the biogenesis of the vesicles, their delivery to the cell periphery, their fusion with the plasma membrane and the release of their content into the extracellular space. Each of these steps is regulated by the actin cytoskeleton. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge regarding the involvement of actin and its associated molecules during each of the exocytic steps in vertebrates, and suggest that the overall role of the actin cytoskeleton during regulated exocytosis is linked to the architecture and the physiology of the secretory cells under examination. Specifically, in neurons, neuroendocrine, endocrine, and hematopoietic cells, which contain small secretory vesicles that undergo rapid exocytosis (on the order of milliseconds), the actin cytoskeleton plays a role in pre-fusion events, where it acts primarily as a functional barrier and facilitates docking. In exocrine and other secretory cells, which contain large secretory vesicles that undergo slow exocytosis (seconds to minutes), the actin cytoskeleton plays a role in post-fusion events, where it regulates the dynamics of the fusion pore, facilitates the integration of the vesicles into the plasma membrane, provides structural support, and promotes the expulsion of large cargo molecules. PMID:22986507

  9. Modest Interference with Actin Dynamics in Primary T Cell Activation by Antigen Presenting Cells Preferentially Affects Lamellal Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Roybal, Kole T.; Mace, Emily M.; Clark, Danielle J.; Leard, Alan D.; Herman, Andrew; Verkade, Paul; Orange, Jordan S.; Wülfing, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic subcellular distributions of signaling system components are critical regulators of cellular signal transduction through their control of molecular interactions. Understanding how signaling activity depends on such distributions and the cellular structures driving them is required for comprehensive insight into signal transduction. In the activation of primary murine T cells by antigen presenting cells (APC) signaling intermediates associate with various subcellular structures, prominently a transient, wide, and actin-associated lamellum extending from an interdigitated T cell:APC interface several micrometers into the T cell. While actin dynamics are well established as general regulators of cellular organization, their role in controlling signaling organization in primary T cell:APC couples and the specific cellular structures driving it is unresolved. Using modest interference with actin dynamics with a low concentration of Jasplakinolide as corroborated by costimulation blockade we show that T cell actin preferentially controls lamellal signaling localization and activity leading downstream to calcium signaling. Lamellal localization repeatedly related to efficient T cell function. This suggests that the transient lamellal actin matrix regulates T cell signaling associations that facilitate T cell activation. PMID:26237588

  10. KIF17 regulates RhoA-dependent actin remodeling at epithelial cell-cell adhesions.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Bipul R; Espenel, Cedric; Libanje, Fotine; Raingeaud, Joel; Morgan, Jessica; Jaulin, Fanny; Kreitzer, Geri

    2016-03-01

    The kinesin KIF17 localizes at microtubule plus-ends where it contributes to regulation of microtubule stabilization and epithelial polarization. We now show that KIF17 localizes at cell-cell adhesions and that KIF17 depletion inhibits accumulation of actin at the apical pole of cells grown in 3D organotypic cultures and alters the distribution of actin and E-cadherin in cells cultured in 2D on solid supports. Overexpression of full-length KIF17 constructs or truncation mutants containing the N-terminal motor domain resulted in accumulation of newly incorporated GFP-actin into junctional actin foci, cleared E-cadherin from cytoplasmic vesicles and stabilized cell-cell adhesions to challenge with calcium depletion. Expression of these KIF17 constructs also increased cellular levels of active RhoA, whereas active RhoA was diminished in KIF17-depleted cells. Inhibition of RhoA or its effector ROCK, or expression of LIMK1 kinase-dead or activated cofilin(S3A) inhibited KIF17-induced junctional actin accumulation. Interestingly, KIF17 activity toward actin depends on the motor domain but is independent of microtubule binding. Together, these data show that KIF17 can modify RhoA-GTPase signaling to influence junctional actin and the stability of the apical junctional complex of epithelial cells. PMID:26759174

  11. Megakaryocytes regulate expression of Pyk2 isoforms and caspase-mediated cleavage of actin in osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Kacena, Melissa A; Eleniste, Pierre P; Cheng, Ying-Hua; Huang, Su; Shivanna, Mahesh; Meijome, Tomas E; Mayo, Lindsey D; Bruzzaniti, Angela

    2012-05-18

    The proliferation and differentiation of osteoblast (OB) precursors are essential for elaborating the bone-forming activity of mature OBs. However, the mechanisms regulating OB proliferation and function are largely unknown. We reported that OB proliferation is enhanced by megakaryocytes (MKs) via a process that is regulated in part by integrin signaling. The tyrosine kinase Pyk2 has been shown to regulate cell proliferation and survival in a variety of cells. Pyk2 is also activated by integrin signaling and regulates actin remodeling in bone-resorbing osteoclasts. In this study, we examined the role of Pyk2 and actin in the MK-mediated increase in OB proliferation. Calvarial OBs were cultured in the presence of MKs for various times, and Pyk2 signaling cascades in OBs were examined by Western blotting, subcellular fractionation, and microscopy. We found that MKs regulate the temporal expression of Pyk2 and its subcellular localization. We also found that MKs regulate the expression of two alternatively spliced isoforms of Pyk2 in OBs, which may regulate OB differentiation and proliferation. MKs also induced cytoskeletal reorganization in OBs, which was associated with the caspase-mediated cleavage of actin, an increase in focal adhesions, and the formation of apical membrane ruffles. Moreover, BrdU incorporation in MK-stimulated OBs was blocked by the actin-polymerizing agent, jasplakinolide. Collectively, our studies reveal that Pyk2 and actin play an important role in MK-regulated signaling cascades that control OB proliferation and may be important for therapeutic interventions aimed at increasing bone formation in metabolic diseases of the skeleton. PMID:22447931

  12. Megakaryocytes Regulate Expression of Pyk2 Isoforms and Caspase-mediated Cleavage of Actin in Osteoblasts*

    PubMed Central

    Kacena, Melissa A.; Eleniste, Pierre P.; Cheng, Ying-Hua; Huang, Su; Shivanna, Mahesh; Meijome, Tomas E.; Mayo, Lindsey D.; Bruzzaniti, Angela

    2012-01-01

    The proliferation and differentiation of osteoblast (OB) precursors are essential for elaborating the bone-forming activity of mature OBs. However, the mechanisms regulating OB proliferation and function are largely unknown. We reported that OB proliferation is enhanced by megakaryocytes (MKs) via a process that is regulated in part by integrin signaling. The tyrosine kinase Pyk2 has been shown to regulate cell proliferation and survival in a variety of cells. Pyk2 is also activated by integrin signaling and regulates actin remodeling in bone-resorbing osteoclasts. In this study, we examined the role of Pyk2 and actin in the MK-mediated increase in OB proliferation. Calvarial OBs were cultured in the presence of MKs for various times, and Pyk2 signaling cascades in OBs were examined by Western blotting, subcellular fractionation, and microscopy. We found that MKs regulate the temporal expression of Pyk2 and its subcellular localization. We also found that MKs regulate the expression of two alternatively spliced isoforms of Pyk2 in OBs, which may regulate OB differentiation and proliferation. MKs also induced cytoskeletal reorganization in OBs, which was associated with the caspase-mediated cleavage of actin, an increase in focal adhesions, and the formation of apical membrane ruffles. Moreover, BrdU incorporation in MK-stimulated OBs was blocked by the actin-polymerizing agent, jasplakinolide. Collectively, our studies reveal that Pyk2 and actin play an important role in MK-regulated signaling cascades that control OB proliferation and may be important for therapeutic interventions aimed at increasing bone formation in metabolic diseases of the skeleton. PMID:22447931

  13. Calcium storage and release properties of F-actin: evidence for the involvement of F-actin in cellular calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Lange, K; Brandt, U

    1996-10-21

    slow rate. Short ultrasonic pulses rapidly elevated free Ca2+ from about 50 nM up to 500 nM. (6) Small amounts of profilin, an actin-binding protein, released Ca2+ both from Ca- and Mg/Ca-F-actin and also inhibited uptake of Ca2+ into Mg/Ca-F-actin. (7) Phalloidin completely inhibited Ca-uptake into Mg/Ca-F-actin even during ultrasonic treatment. These findings suggest that Ca2+ storage may occur by addition of Ca-ATP-actin monomers to reactive ends of the polymer and emptying of this store by profilin-stimulated release of Ca-ADP-actin. Thus, receptor-operated Ca2+ signaling, initiated by phospholipase C activation, may proceed via the well-known phosphatidylinositol phosphate-regulated profilin/gelsolin pathway of actin reorganization/depolymerization. The importance of the proposed microvillar Ca2+ signaling system for living cells remains to be established. PMID:8898081

  14. Hydrogen sulfide modulates actin-dependent auxin transport via regulating ABPs results in changing of root development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Honglei; Hu, Yanfeng; Fan, Tingting; Li, Jisheng

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) signaling has been considered a key regulator of plant developmental processes and defenses. In this study, we demonstrate that high levels of H2S inhibit auxin transport and lead to alterations in root system development. H2S inhibits auxin transport by altering the polar subcellular distribution of PIN proteins. The vesicle trafficking and distribution of the PIN proteins are an actin-dependent process. H2S changes the expression of several actin-binding proteins (ABPs) and decreases the occupancy percentage of F-actin bundles in the Arabidopsis roots. We observed the effects of H2S on F-actin in T-DNA insertion mutants of cpa, cpb and prf3, indicating that the effects of H2S on F-actin are partially removed in the mutant plants. Thus, these data imply that the ABPs act as downstream effectors of the H2S signal and thereby regulate the assembly and depolymerization of F-actin in root cells. Taken together, our data suggest that the existence of a tightly regulated intertwined signaling network between auxin, H2S and actin that controls root system development. In the proposed process, H2S plays an important role in modulating auxin transport by an actin-dependent method, which results in alterations in root development in Arabidopsis. PMID:25652660

  15. Regulators of actin filament barbed ends at a glance.

    PubMed

    Shekhar, Shashank; Pernier, Julien; Carlier, Marie-France

    2016-03-15

    Cells respond to external stimuli by rapidly remodeling their actin cytoskeleton. At the heart of this function lies the intricately controlled regulation of individual filaments. The barbed end of an actin filament is the hotspot for the majority of the biochemical reactions that control filament assembly. Assays performed in bulk solution and with single filaments have enabled characterization of a plethora of barbed-end-regulating proteins. Interestingly, many of these regulators work in tandem with other proteins, which increase or decrease their affinity for the barbed end in a spatially and temporally controlled manner, often through simultaneous binding of two regulators at the barbed ends, in addition to standard mutually exclusive binding schemes. In this Cell Science at a Glance and the accompanying poster, we discuss key barbed-end-interacting proteins and the kinetic mechanisms by which they regulate actin filament assembly. We take F-actin capping protein, gelsolin, profilin and barbed-end-tracking polymerases, including formins and WH2-domain-containing proteins, as examples, and illustrate how their activity and competition for the barbed end regulate filament dynamics. PMID:26940918

  16. Actomyosin contractility spatiotemporally regulates actin network dynamics in migrating cells.

    PubMed

    Okeyo, Kennedy Omondi; Adachi, Taiji; Sunaga, Junko; Hojo, Masaki

    2009-11-13

    Coupling interactions among mechanical and biochemical factors are important for the realization of various cellular processes that determine cell migration. Although F-actin network dynamics has been the focus of many studies, it is not yet clear how mechanical forces generated by actomyosin contractility spatiotemporally regulate this fundamental aspect of cell migration. In this study, using a combination of fluorescent speckle microscopy and particle imaging velocimetry techniques, we perturbed the actomyosin system and examined quantitatively the consequence of actomyosin contractility on F-actin network flow and deformation in the lamellipodia of actively migrating fish keratocytes. F-actin flow fields were characterized by retrograde flow at the front and anterograde flow at the back of the lamellipodia, and the two flows merged to form a convergence zone of reduced flow intensity. Interestingly, activating or inhibiting actomyosin contractility altered network flow intensity and convergence, suggesting that network dynamics is directly regulated by actomyosin contractility. Moreover, quantitative analysis of F-actin network deformation revealed that the deformation was significantly negative and predominant in the direction of cell migration. Furthermore, perturbation experiments revealed that the deformation was a function of actomyosin contractility. Based on these results, we suggest that the actin cytoskeletal structure is a mechanically self-regulating system, and we propose an elaborate pathway for the spatiotemporal self-regulation of the actin cytoskeletal structure during cell migration. In the proposed pathway, mechanical forces generated by actomyosin interactions are considered central to the realization of the various mechanochemical processes that determine cell motility. PMID:19665125

  17. Calponin 3 regulates actin cytoskeleton rearrangement in trophoblastic cell fusion.

    PubMed

    Shibukawa, Yukinao; Yamazaki, Natsuko; Kumasawa, Keiichi; Daimon, Etsuko; Tajiri, Michiko; Okada, Yuka; Ikawa, Masahito; Wada, Yoshinao

    2010-11-15

    Cell-cell fusion is an intriguing differentiation process, essential for placental development and maturation. A proteomic approach identified a cytoplasmic protein, calponin 3 (CNN3), related to the fusion of BeWo choriocarcinoma cells. CNN3 was expressed in cytotrophoblasts in human placenta. CNN3 gene knockdown promoted actin cytoskeletal rearrangement and syncytium formation in BeWo cells, suggesting CNN3 to be a negative regulator of trophoblast fusion. Indeed, CNN3 depletion promoted BeWo cell fusion. CNN3 at the cytoplasmic face of cytoskeleton was dislocated from F-actin with forskolin treatment and diffused into the cytoplasm in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. Phosphorylation sites were located at Ser293/296 in the C-terminal region, and deletion of this region or site-specific disruption of Ser293/296 suppressed syncytium formation. These CNN3 mutants were colocalized with F-actin and remained there after forskolin treatment, suggesting that dissociation of CNN3 from F-actin is modulated by the phosphorylation status of the C-terminal region unique to CNN3 in the CNN family proteins. The mutant missing these phosphorylation sites displayed a dominant negative effect on cell fusion, while replacement of Ser293/296 with aspartic acid enhanced syncytium formation. These results indicated that CNN3 regulates actin cytoskeleton rearrangement which is required for the plasma membranes of trophoblasts to become fusion competent. PMID:20861310

  18. AFAP120 regulates actin organization during neuronal differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaohua; Harder, Jennifer; Flynn, Daniel C.; Lanier, Lorene M.

    2008-01-01

    During development, dynamic changes in the actin cytoskeleton determine both cell motility and morphological differentiation. In most mature tissues, cells are generally minimally motile and have morphologies specialized to their functions. In metastatic cancer, cells generally loose their specialized morphology and become motile. Therefore, proteins that regulate the transition between the motile and morphologically differentiated states can play important roles in determining cancer outcomes. AFAP120 is a neuronal specific protein that binds Src Kinase and Protein Kinase C (PKC) and cross-links actin filaments. Here we report that expression and tyrosine phosphorylation of AFAP120 are developmentally regulated in the cerebellum. In cerebellar cultures, PKC activation induces Src-kinase dependent phosphorylation of AFAP120, indicating that AFAP120 may be a downstream effector of Src. In neuroblastoma cells induced to differentiate by treatment with a PKC activator, tyrosine phosphorylation of AFAP120 appears to regulate the formation of the lamellar actin structures and subsequent neurite initiation. Together, these results indicate that AFAP120 plays a role in organizing dynamic actin structures during neuronal differentiation and suggest that AFAP120 may help regulate the transition from motile precursor to morphologically differentiated neurons. PMID:19281763

  19. Actin Filaments Regulate Exocytosis at the Hair Cell Ribbon Synapse.

    PubMed

    Guillet, Marie; Sendin, Gaston; Bourien, Jérôme; Puel, Jean-Luc; Nouvian, Régis

    2016-01-20

    Exocytosis at the inner hair cell ribbon synapse is achieved through the functional coupling between calcium channels and glutamate-filled synaptic vesicles. Using membrane capacitance measurements, we investigated whether the actin network regulates the exocytosis of synaptic vesicles at the mouse auditory hair cell. Our results suggest that actin network disruption increases exocytosis and that actin filaments may spatially organize a subfraction of synaptic vesicles with respect to the calcium channels. Significance statement: Inner hair cells (IHCs), the auditory sensory cells of the cochlea, release glutamate onto the afferent auditory nerve fibers to encode sound stimulation. To achieve this task, the IHC relies on the recruitment of glutamate-filled vesicles that can be located in close vicinity to the calcium channels or more remotely from them. The molecular determinants responsible for organizing these vesicle pools are not fully identified. Using pharmacological tools in combination with membrane capacitance measurements, we show that actin filament disruption increases exocytosis in IHCs and that actin filaments most likely position a fraction of vesicles away from the calcium channels. PMID:26791198

  20. Anillin Regulates Neuronal Migration and Neurite Growth by Linking RhoG to the Actin Cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Tian, Dong; Diao, Min; Jiang, Yuxiang; Sun, Lingfei; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Zhucheng; Huang, Shanjin; Ou, Guangshuo

    2015-05-01

    Neuronal migration and neurite growth are essential events in neural development, but it remains unclear how guidance cues are transduced through receptors to the actin cytoskeleton, which powers these processes. We report that a cytokinetic scaffold protein, Anillin, is redistributed to the leading edge of the C. elegans Q neuroblast during cell migration and neurite growth. To bypass the requirement for Anillin in cytokinesis, we used the somatic CRISPR-Cas9 technique to generate conditional mutations in Anillin. We demonstrate that Anillin regulates cell migration and growth cone extension by stabilizing the F-actin network at the leading edge. Our biochemical analysis shows that the actin-binding domain of Anillin is sufficient to stabilize F-actin by antagonizing the F-actin severing activity of Cofilin. We further uncover that the active form of RhoG/MIG-2 directly binds to Anillin and recruits it to the leading edge. Our results reveal a novel pathway in which Anillin transduces the RhoG signal to the actin cytoskeleton during neuronal migration and neurite growth. PMID:25843030

  1. Length regulation of mechanosensitive stereocilia depends on very slow actin dynamics and filament-severing proteins.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Praveena; Chatterton, Paul; Ikeda, Akihiro; Ikeda, Sakae; Corey, David P; Ervasti, James M; Perrin, Benjamin J

    2015-01-01

    Auditory sensory hair cells depend on stereocilia with precisely regulated lengths to detect sound. Since stereocilia are primarily composed of crosslinked, parallel actin filaments, regulated actin dynamics are essential for controlling stereocilia length. Here we assessed stereocilia actin turnover by monitoring incorporation of inducibly expressed β-actin-GFP in adult mouse hair cells in vivo and by directly measuring β-actin-GFP turnover in explants. Stereocilia actin incorporation is remarkably slow and restricted to filament barbed ends in a small tip compartment, with minimal accumulation in the rest of the actin core. Shorter rows of stereocilia, which have mechanically gated ion channels, show more variable actin turnover than the tallest stereocilia, which lack channels. Finally, the proteins ADF and AIP1, which both mediate actin filament severing, contribute to stereocilia length maintenance. Altogether, the data support a model whereby stereocilia actin cores are largely static, with dynamic regulation at the tips to maintain a critical length. PMID:25897778

  2. Regulation of Hippo signalling by p38 signalling.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dashun; Li, Xiaojiao; Sun, Li; Huang, Ping; Ying, Hao; Wang, Hui; Wu, Jiarui; Song, Haiyun

    2016-08-01

    The Hippo signalling pathway has a crucial role in growth control during development, and its dysregulation contributes to tumorigenesis. Recent studies uncover multiple upstream regulatory inputs into Hippo signalling, which affects phosphorylation of the transcriptional coactivator Yki/YAP/TAZ by Wts/Lats. Here we identify the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway as a new upstream branch of the Hippo pathway. In Drosophila, overexpression of MAPKK gene licorne (lic), or MAPKKK gene Mekk1, promotes Yki activity and induces Hippo target gene expression. Loss-of-function studies show that lic regulates Hippo signalling in ovary follicle cells and in the wing disc. Epistasis analysis indicates that Mekk1 and lic affect Hippo signalling via p38b and wts We further demonstrate that the Mekk1-Lic-p38b cascade inhibits Hippo signalling by promoting F-actin accumulation and Jub phosphorylation. In addition, p38 signalling modulates actin filaments and Hippo signalling in parallel to small GTPases Ras, Rac1, and Rho1. Lastly, we show that p38 signalling regulates Hippo signalling in mammalian cell lines. The Lic homologue MKK3 promotes nuclear localization of YAP via the actin cytoskeleton. Upregulation or downregulation of the p38 pathway regulates YAP-mediated transcription. Our work thus reveals a conserved crosstalk between the p38 MAPK pathway and the Hippo pathway in growth regulation. PMID:27402810

  3. GLUTAMATE-INDUCED Ca2+ INFLUX IN THIRD-ORDER NEURONS OF SALAMANDER RETINA IS REGULATED BY THE ACTIN CYTOSKELETON

    PubMed Central

    AKOPIAN, A.; SZIKRA, T.; CRISTOFANILLI, M.; KRIZAJ, D.

    2010-01-01

    Ligand-gated ion channels (ionotropic receptors) link to the cortical cytoskeleton via specialized scaffold proteins and thereby to appropriate signal transduction pathways in the cell. We studied the role of filamentous actin in the regulation of Ca influx through glutamate receptor-activated channels in third-order neurons of salamander retina. Staining by Alexa-Fluor 488-phalloidin, to visualize polymerized actin, we show localization of filamentous actin in neurites, and the membrane surrounding the cell soma. With Ca2+ imaging we found that in dissociated neurons, depolymerization of filamentous actin by latrunculin A, or cytochalasin D significantly reduced glutamate-induced intracellular Ca2+ accumulation to 53±7% of control value. Jasplakinolide, a stabilizer of filamentous actin, by itself slightly increased the glutamate-induced Ca2+ signal and completely attenuated the inhibitory effect when applied in combination with actin depolymerizing agents. These results indicate that in salamander retinal neurons the actin cytoskeleton regulates Ca2+ influx through ionotropic glutamate receptor-activated channels, suggesting regulatory roles for filamentous actin in a number of Ca2+-dependent physiological and pathological processes. PMID:16359816

  4. A small molecule inhibitor of tropomyosin dissociates actin binding from tropomyosin-directed regulation of actin dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Bonello, Teresa T.; Janco, Miro; Hook, Jeff; Byun, Alex; Appaduray, Mark; Dedova, Irina; Hitchcock-DeGregori, Sarah; Hardeman, Edna C.; Stehn, Justine R.; Böcking, Till; Gunning, Peter W.

    2016-01-01

    The tropomyosin family of proteins form end-to-end polymers along the actin filament. Tumour cells rely on specific tropomyosin-containing actin filament populations for growth and survival. To dissect out the role of tropomyosin in actin filament regulation we use the small molecule TR100 directed against the C terminus of the tropomyosin isoform Tpm3.1. TR100 nullifies the effect of Tpm3.1 on actin depolymerisation but surprisingly Tpm3.1 retains the capacity to bind F-actin in a cooperative manner. In vivo analysis also confirms that, in the presence of TR100, fluorescently tagged Tpm3.1 recovers normally into stress fibers. Assembling end-to-end along the actin filament is thereby not sufficient for tropomyosin to fulfil its function. Rather, regulation of F-actin stability by tropomyosin requires fidelity of information communicated at the barbed end of the actin filament. This distinction has significant implications for perturbing tropomyosin-dependent actin filament function in the context of anti-cancer drug development. PMID:26804624

  5. Estrogen Regulates Protein Synthesis and Actin Polymerization in Hippocampal Neurons through Different Molecular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Briz, Victor; Baudry, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen rapidly modulates hippocampal synaptic plasticity by activating selective membrane-associated receptors. Reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and stimulation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-mediated protein synthesis are two major events required for the consolidation of hippocampal long-term potentiation and memory. Estradiol regulates synaptic plasticity by interacting with both processes, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are not yet fully understood. Here, we used acute rat hippocampal slices to analyze the mechanisms underlying rapid changes in mTOR activity and actin polymerization elicited by estradiol. Estradiol-induced mTOR phosphorylation was preceded by rapid and transient activation of both extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and protein kinase B (Akt) and by phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) degradation. These effects were prevented by calpain and ERK inhibitors. Estradiol-induced mTOR stimulation did not require activation of classical estrogen receptors (ER), as specific ERα and ERβ agonists (PPT and DPN, respectively) failed to mimic this effect, and ER antagonists could not block it. Estradiol rapidly activated both RhoA and p21-activated kinase (PAK). Furthermore, a specific inhibitor of RhoA kinase (ROCK), H1152, and a potent and specific PAK inhibitor, PF-3758309, blocked estradiol-induced cofilin phosphorylation and actin polymerization. ER antagonists also blocked these effects of estrogen. Consistently, both PPT and DPN stimulated PAK and cofilin phosphorylation as well as actin polymerization. Finally, the effects of estradiol on actin polymerization were insensitive to protein synthesis inhibitors, but its stimulation of mTOR activity was impaired by latrunculin A, a drug that disrupts actin filaments. Taken together, our results indicate that estradiol regulates local protein synthesis and cytoskeletal reorganization via different molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways. PMID:24611062

  6. The role of phosphoinositide-regulated actin reorganization in chemotaxis and cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Wu, C-Y; Lin, M-W; Wu, D-C; Huang, Y-B; Huang, H-T; Chen, C-L

    2014-01-01

    Reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton is essential for cell motility and chemotaxis. Actin-binding proteins (ABPs) and membrane lipids, especially phosphoinositides PI(4,5)P2 and PI(3,4,5)P3 are involved in the regulation of this reorganization. At least 15 ABPs have been reported to interact with, or regulated by phosphoinositides (PIPs) whose synthesis is regulated by extracellular signals. Recent studies have uncovered several parallel intracellular signalling pathways that crosstalk in chemotaxing cells. Here, we review the roles of ABPs and phosphoinositides in chemotaxis and cell migration. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Cytoskeleton, Extracellular Matrix, Cell Migration, Wound Healing and Related Topics. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-24 PMID:25420930

  7. KCC2 regulates actin dynamics in dendritic spines via interaction with β-PIX

    PubMed Central

    Llano, Olaya; Smirnov, Sergey; Soni, Shetal; Golubtsov, Andrey; Guillemin, Isabelle; Hotulainen, Pirta; Medina, Igor; Nothwang, Hans Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Chloride extrusion in mature neurons is largely mediated by the neuron-specific potassium-chloride cotransporter KCC2. In addition, independently of its chloride transport function, KCC2 regulates the development and morphology of dendritic spines through structural interactions with the actin cytoskeleton. The mechanism of this effect remains largely unknown. In this paper, we show a novel pathway for KCC2-mediated regulation of the actin cytoskeleton in neurons. We found that KCC2, through interaction with the b isoform of Rac/Cdc42 guanine nucleotide exchange factor β-PIX, regulates the activity of Rac1 GTPase and the phosphorylation of one of the major actin-regulating proteins, cofilin-1. KCC2-deficient neurons had abnormally high levels of phosphorylated cofilin-1. Consistently, dendritic spines of these neurons exhibited a large pool of stable actin, resulting in reduced spine motility and diminished density of functional synapses. In conclusion, we describe a novel signaling pathway that couples KCC2 to the cytoskeleton and regulates the formation of glutamatergic synapses. PMID:26056138

  8. KCC2 regulates actin dynamics in dendritic spines via interaction with β-PIX.

    PubMed

    Llano, Olaya; Smirnov, Sergey; Soni, Shetal; Golubtsov, Andrey; Guillemin, Isabelle; Hotulainen, Pirta; Medina, Igor; Nothwang, Hans Gerd; Rivera, Claudio; Ludwig, Anastasia

    2015-06-01

    Chloride extrusion in mature neurons is largely mediated by the neuron-specific potassium-chloride cotransporter KCC2. In addition, independently of its chloride transport function, KCC2 regulates the development and morphology of dendritic spines through structural interactions with the actin cytoskeleton. The mechanism of this effect remains largely unknown. In this paper, we show a novel pathway for KCC2-mediated regulation of the actin cytoskeleton in neurons. We found that KCC2, through interaction with the b isoform of Rac/Cdc42 guanine nucleotide exchange factor β-PIX, regulates the activity of Rac1 GTPase and the phosphorylation of one of the major actin-regulating proteins, cofilin-1. KCC2-deficient neurons had abnormally high levels of phosphorylated cofilin-1. Consistently, dendritic spines of these neurons exhibited a large pool of stable actin, resulting in reduced spine motility and diminished density of functional synapses. In conclusion, we describe a novel signaling pathway that couples KCC2 to the cytoskeleton and regulates the formation of glutamatergic synapses. PMID:26056138

  9. CASEIN KINASE1-LIKE PROTEIN2 Regulates Actin Filament Stability and Stomatal Closure via Phosphorylation of Actin Depolymerizing Factor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuangshuang; Jiang, Yuxiang; Zhao, Yang; Huang, Shanjin; Yuan, Ming; Zhao, Yanxiu; Guo, Yan

    2016-06-01

    The opening and closing of stomata are crucial for plant photosynthesis and transpiration. Actin filaments undergo dynamic reorganization during stomatal closure, but the underlying mechanism for this cytoskeletal reorganization remains largely unclear. In this study, we identified and characterized Arabidopsis thaliana casein kinase 1-like protein 2 (CKL2), which responds to abscisic acid (ABA) treatment and participates in ABA- and drought-induced stomatal closure. Although CKL2 does not bind to actin filaments directly and has no effect on actin assembly in vitro, it colocalizes with and stabilizes actin filaments in guard cells. Further investigation revealed that CKL2 physically interacts with and phosphorylates actin depolymerizing factor 4 (ADF4) and inhibits its activity in actin filament disassembly. During ABA-induced stomatal closure, deletion of CKL2 in Arabidopsis alters actin reorganization in stomata and renders stomatal closure less sensitive to ABA, whereas deletion of ADF4 impairs the disassembly of actin filaments and causes stomatal closure to be more sensitive to ABA Deletion of ADF4 in the ckl2 mutant partially recues its ABA-insensitive stomatal closure phenotype. Moreover, Arabidopsis ADFs from subclass I are targets of CKL2 in vitro. Thus, our results suggest that CKL2 regulates actin filament reorganization and stomatal closure mainly through phosphorylation of ADF. PMID:27268429

  10. The Strip-Hippo Pathway Regulates Synaptic Terminal Formation by Modulating Actin Organization at the Drosophila Neuromuscular Synapses.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Chisako; Saito, Yoshie; Umehara, Tomoki; Kamimura, Keisuke; Maeda, Nobuaki; Mosca, Timothy J; Miura, Masayuki; Chihara, Takahiro

    2016-08-30

    Synapse formation requires the precise coordination of axon elongation, cytoskeletal stability, and diverse modes of cell signaling. The underlying mechanisms of this interplay, however, remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that Strip, a component of the striatin-interacting phosphatase and kinase (STRIPAK) complex that regulates these processes, is required to ensure the proper development of synaptic boutons at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction. In doing so, Strip negatively regulates the activity of the Hippo (Hpo) pathway, an evolutionarily conserved regulator of organ size whose role in synapse formation is currently unappreciated. Strip functions genetically with Enabled, an actin assembly/elongation factor and the presumptive downstream target of Hpo signaling, to modulate local actin organization at synaptic termini. This regulation occurs independently of the transcriptional co-activator Yorkie, the canonical downstream target of the Hpo pathway. Our study identifies a previously unanticipated role of the Strip-Hippo pathway in synaptic development, linking cell signaling to actin organization. PMID:27545887

  11. CADM1 Controls Actin Cytoskeleton Assembly and Regulates Extracellular Matrix Adhesion in Human Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Moiseeva, Elena P.; Straatman, Kees R.; Leyland, Mark L.; Bradding, Peter

    2014-01-01

    CADM1 is a major receptor for the adhesion of mast cells (MCs) to fibroblasts, human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) and neurons. It also regulates E-cadherin and alpha6beta4 integrin in other cell types. Here we investigated a role for CADM1 in MC adhesion to both cells and extracellular matrix (ECM). Downregulation of CADM1 in the human MC line HMC-1 resulted not only in reduced adhesion to HASMCs, but also reduced adhesion to their ECM. Time-course studies in the presence of EDTA to inhibit integrins demonstrated that CADM1 provided fast initial adhesion to HASMCs and assisted with slower adhesion to ECM. CADM1 downregulation, but not antibody-dependent CADM1 inhibition, reduced MC adhesion to ECM, suggesting indirect regulation of ECM adhesion. To investigate potential mechanisms, phosphotyrosine signalling and polymerisation of actin filaments, essential for integrin-mediated adhesion, were examined. Modulation of CADM1 expression positively correlated with surface KIT levels and polymerisation of cortical F-actin in HMC-1 cells. It also influenced phosphotyrosine signalling and KIT tyrosine autophosphorylation. CADM1 accounted for 46% of surface KIT levels and 31% of F-actin in HMC-1 cells. CADM1 downregulation resulted in elongation of cortical actin filaments in both HMC-1 cells and human lung MCs and increased cell rigidity of HMC-1 cells. Collectively these data suggest that CADM1 is a key adhesion receptor, which regulates MC net adhesion, both directly through CADM1-dependent adhesion, and indirectly through the regulation of other adhesion receptors. The latter is likely to occur via docking of KIT and polymerisation of cortical F-actin. Here we propose a stepwise model of adhesion with CADM1 as a driving force for net MC adhesion. PMID:24465823

  12. Computational spatiotemporal analysis identifies WAVE2 and cofilin as joint regulators of costimulation-mediated T cell actin dynamics.

    PubMed

    Roybal, Kole T; Buck, Taráz E; Ruan, Xiongtao; Cho, Baek Hwan; Clark, Danielle J; Ambler, Rachel; Tunbridge, Helen M; Zhang, Jianwei; Verkade, Paul; Wülfing, Christoph; Murphy, Robert F

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is one of the most important tools in cell biology research because it provides spatial and temporal information to investigate regulatory systems inside cells. This technique can generate data in the form of signal intensities at thousands of positions resolved inside individual live cells. However, given extensive cell-to-cell variation, these data cannot be readily assembled into three- or four-dimensional maps of protein concentration that can be compared across different cells and conditions. We have developed a method to enable comparison of imaging data from many cells and applied it to investigate actin dynamics in T cell activation. Antigen recognition in T cells by the T cell receptor (TCR) is amplified by engagement of the costimulatory receptor CD28. We imaged actin and eight core actin regulators to generate over a thousand movies of T cells under conditions in which CD28 was either engaged or blocked in the context of a strong TCR signal. Our computational analysis showed that the primary effect of costimulation blockade was to decrease recruitment of the activator of actin nucleation WAVE2 (Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein family verprolin-homologous protein 2) and the actin-severing protein cofilin to F-actin. Reconstitution of WAVE2 and cofilin activity restored the defect in actin signaling dynamics caused by costimulation blockade. Thus, we have developed and validated an approach to quantify protein distributions in time and space for the analysis of complex regulatory systems. PMID:27095595

  13. Activator-inhibitor coupling between Rho signaling and actin assembly make the cell cortex an excitable medium

    PubMed Central

    Bement, William M.; Leda, Marcin; Moe, Alison M.; Kita, Angela M.; Larson, Matthew E.; Golding, Adriana E.; Pfeuti, Courtney; Su, Kuan-Chung; Miller, Ann L.; Goryachev, Andrew B.; von Dassow, George

    2016-01-01

    Animal cell cytokinesis results from patterned activation of the small GTPase Rho, which directs assembly of actomyosin in the equatorial cortex. Cytokinesis is restricted to a portion of the cell cycle following anaphase onset in which the cortex is responsive to signals from the spindle. We show that shortly after anaphase onset oocytes and embryonic cells of frogs and echinoderms exhibit cortical waves of Rho activity and F-actin polymerization. The waves are modulated by cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) activity and require the Rho GEF (guanine nucleotide exchange factor), Ect2. Surprisingly, during wave propagation, while Rho activity elicits F-actin assembly, F-actin subsequently inactivates Rho. Experimental and modeling results show that waves represent excitable dynamics of a reaction diffusion system with Rho as the activator and F-actin the inhibitor. We propose that cortical excitability explains fundamental features of cytokinesis including its cell cycle regulation. PMID:26479320

  14. Activator-inhibitor coupling between Rho signalling and actin assembly makes the cell cortex an excitable medium.

    PubMed

    Bement, William M; Leda, Marcin; Moe, Alison M; Kita, Angela M; Larson, Matthew E; Golding, Adriana E; Pfeuti, Courtney; Su, Kuan-Chung; Miller, Ann L; Goryachev, Andrew B; von Dassow, George

    2015-11-01

    Animal cell cytokinesis results from patterned activation of the small GTPase Rho, which directs assembly of actomyosin in the equatorial cortex. Cytokinesis is restricted to a portion of the cell cycle following anaphase onset in which the cortex is responsive to signals from the spindle. We show that shortly after anaphase onset oocytes and embryonic cells of frogs and echinoderms exhibit cortical waves of Rho activity and F-actin polymerization. The waves are modulated by cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) activity and require the Rho GEF (guanine nucleotide exchange factor), Ect2. Surprisingly, during wave propagation, although Rho activity elicits F-actin assembly, F-actin subsequently inactivates Rho. Experimental and modelling results show that waves represent excitable dynamics of a reaction-diffusion system with Rho as the activator and F-actin the inhibitor. We propose that cortical excitability explains fundamental features of cytokinesis including its cell cycle regulation. PMID:26479320

  15. Actin remodeling by Nck regulates endothelial lumen formation.

    PubMed

    Chaki, Sankar P; Barhoumi, Rola; Rivera, Gonzalo M

    2015-09-01

    Multiple angiogenic cues modulate phosphotyrosine signaling to promote vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. Despite its functional and clinical importance, how vascular cells integrate phosphotyrosine-dependent signaling to elicit cytoskeletal changes required for endothelial morphogenesis remains poorly understood. The family of Nck adaptors couples phosphotyrosine signals with actin dynamics and therefore is well positioned to orchestrate cellular processes required in vascular formation and remodeling. Culture of endothelial cells in three-dimensional collagen matrices in the presence of VEGF stimulation was combined with molecular genetics, optical imaging, and biochemistry to show that Nck-dependent actin remodeling promotes endothelial cell elongation and proper organization of VE-cadherin intercellular junctions. Major morphogenetic defects caused by abrogation of Nck signaling included loss of endothelial apical-basal polarity and impaired lumenization. Time-lapse imaging using a Förster resonance energy transfer biosensor, immunostaining with phospho-specific antibodies, and GST pull-down assays showed that Nck determines spatiotemporal patterns of Cdc42/aPKC activation during endothelial morphogenesis. Our results demonstrate that Nck acts as an important hub integrating angiogenic cues with cytoskeletal changes that enable endothelial apical-basal polarization and lumen formation. These findings point to Nck as an emergent target for effective antiangiogenic therapy. PMID:26157164

  16. Actin remodeling by Nck regulates endothelial lumen formation

    PubMed Central

    Chaki, Sankar P.; Barhoumi, Rola; Rivera, Gonzalo M.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple angiogenic cues modulate phosphotyrosine signaling to promote vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. Despite its functional and clinical importance, how vascular cells integrate phosphotyrosine-dependent signaling to elicit cytoskeletal changes required for endothelial morphogenesis remains poorly understood. The family of Nck adaptors couples phosphotyrosine signals with actin dynamics and therefore is well positioned to orchestrate cellular processes required in vascular formation and remodeling. Culture of endothelial cells in three-dimensional collagen matrices in the presence of VEGF stimulation was combined with molecular genetics, optical imaging, and biochemistry to show that Nck-dependent actin remodeling promotes endothelial cell elongation and proper organization of VE-cadherin intercellular junctions. Major morphogenetic defects caused by abrogation of Nck signaling included loss of endothelial apical-basal polarity and impaired lumenization. Time-lapse imaging using a Förster resonance energy transfer biosensor, immunostaining with phospho-specific antibodies, and GST pull-down assays showed that Nck determines spatiotemporal patterns of Cdc42/aPKC activation during endothelial morphogenesis. Our results demonstrate that Nck acts as an important hub integrating angiogenic cues with cytoskeletal changes that enable endothelial apical-basal polarization and lumen formation. These findings point to Nck as an emergent target for effective antiangiogenic therapy. PMID:26157164

  17. Fimbrin phosphorylation by metaphase Cdk1 regulates actin cable dynamics in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yansong; Han, Xuemei; Zheng, Liangzhen; Xie, Ying; Mu, Yuguang; Yates, John R; Drubin, David G

    2016-01-01

    Actin cables, composed of actin filament bundles nucleated by formins, mediate intracellular transport for cell polarity establishment and maintenance. We previously observed that metaphase cells preferentially promote actin cable assembly through cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) activity. However, the relevant metaphase Cdk1 targets were not known. Here we show that the highly conserved actin filament crosslinking protein fimbrin is a critical Cdk1 target for actin cable assembly regulation in budding yeast. Fimbrin is specifically phosphorylated on threonine 103 by the metaphase cyclin-Cdk1 complex, in vivo and in vitro. On the basis of conformational simulations, we suggest that this phosphorylation stabilizes fimbrin's N-terminal domain, and modulates actin filament binding to regulate actin cable assembly and stability in cells. Overall, this work identifies fimbrin as a key target for cell cycle regulation of actin cable assembly in budding yeast, and suggests an underlying mechanism. PMID:27068241

  18. Fimbrin phosphorylation by metaphase Cdk1 regulates actin cable dynamics in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yansong; Han, Xuemei; Zheng, Liangzhen; Xie, Ying; Mu, Yuguang; Yates, John R.; Drubin, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Actin cables, composed of actin filament bundles nucleated by formins, mediate intracellular transport for cell polarity establishment and maintenance. We previously observed that metaphase cells preferentially promote actin cable assembly through cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) activity. However, the relevant metaphase Cdk1 targets were not known. Here we show that the highly conserved actin filament crosslinking protein fimbrin is a critical Cdk1 target for actin cable assembly regulation in budding yeast. Fimbrin is specifically phosphorylated on threonine 103 by the metaphase cyclin–Cdk1 complex, in vivo and in vitro. On the basis of conformational simulations, we suggest that this phosphorylation stabilizes fimbrin's N-terminal domain, and modulates actin filament binding to regulate actin cable assembly and stability in cells. Overall, this work identifies fimbrin as a key target for cell cycle regulation of actin cable assembly in budding yeast, and suggests an underlying mechanism. PMID:27068241

  19. Regulation of the actin cytoskeleton in Helicobacter pylori-induced migration and invasive growth of gastric epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton is a significant hallmark of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infected gastric epithelial cells leading to cell migration and invasive growth. Considering the cellular mechanisms, the type IV secretion system (T4SS) and the effector protein cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) of H. pylori are well-studied initiators of distinct signal transduction pathways in host cells targeting kinases, adaptor proteins, GTPases, actin binding and other proteins involved in the regulation of the actin lattice. In this review, we summarize recent findings of how H. pylori functionally interacts with the complex signaling network that controls the actin cytoskeleton of motile and invasive gastric epithelial cells. PMID:22044652

  20. Viral Replication Protein Inhibits Cellular Cofilin Actin Depolymerization Factor to Regulate the Actin Network and Promote Viral Replicase Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Kovalev, Nikolay; de Castro Martín, Isabel Fernández; Barajas, Daniel; Risco, Cristina; Nagy, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses exploit host cells by co-opting host factors and lipids and escaping host antiviral responses. Previous genome-wide screens with Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) in the model host yeast have identified 18 cellular genes that are part of the actin network. In this paper, we show that the p33 viral replication factor interacts with the cellular cofilin (Cof1p), which is an actin depolymerization factor. Using temperature-sensitive (ts) Cof1p or actin (Act1p) mutants at a semi-permissive temperature, we find an increased level of TBSV RNA accumulation in yeast cells and elevated in vitro activity of the tombusvirus replicase. We show that the large p33 containing replication organelle-like structures are located in the close vicinity of actin patches in yeast cells or around actin cable hubs in infected plant cells. Therefore, the actin filaments could be involved in VRC assembly and the formation of large viral replication compartments containing many individual VRCs. Moreover, we show that the actin network affects the recruitment of viral and cellular components, including oxysterol binding proteins and VAP proteins to form membrane contact sites for efficient transfer of sterols to the sites of replication. Altogether, the emerging picture is that TBSV, via direct interaction between the p33 replication protein and Cof1p, controls cofilin activities to obstruct the dynamic actin network that leads to efficient subversion of cellular factors for pro-viral functions. In summary, the discovery that TBSV interacts with cellular cofilin and blocks the severing of existing filaments and the formation of new actin filaments in infected cells opens a new window to unravel the way by which viruses could subvert/co-opt cellular proteins and lipids. By regulating the functions of cofilin and the actin network, which are central nodes in cellular pathways, viruses could gain supremacy in subversion of cellular factors for pro-viral functions. PMID:26863541

  1. Alteration of the Cortical Actin Cytoskeleton Deregulates Ca2+ Signaling, Monospermic Fertilization, and Sperm Entry

    PubMed Central

    Puppo, A.; Chun, Jong T.; Gragnaniello, Giovanni; Garante, Ezio; Santella, Luigia

    2008-01-01

    Background When preparing for fertilization, oocytes undergo meiotic maturation during which structural changes occur in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that lead to a more efficient calcium response. During meiotic maturation and subsequent fertilization, the actin cytoskeleton also undergoes dramatic restructuring. We have recently observed that rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton induced by actin-depolymerizing agents, or by actin-binding proteins, strongly modulate intracellular calcium (Ca2+) signals during the maturation process. However, the significance of the dynamic changes in F-actin within the fertilized egg has been largely unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings We have measured changes in intracellular Ca2+ signals and F-actin structures during fertilization. We also report the unexpected observation that the conventional antagonist of the InsP3 receptor, heparin, hyperpolymerizes the cortical actin cytoskeleton in postmeiotic eggs. Using heparin and other pharmacological agents that either hypo- or hyperpolymerize the cortical actin, we demonstrate that nearly all aspects of the fertilization process are profoundly affected by the dynamic restructuring of the egg cortical actin cytoskeleton. Conclusions/Significance Our findings identify important roles for subplasmalemmal actin fibers in the process of sperm-egg interaction and in the subsequent events related to fertilization: the generation of Ca2+ signals, sperm penetration, cortical granule exocytosis, and the block to polyspermy. PMID:18974786

  2. Organization and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton in the pollen tube

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Xiaolu; Jiang, Yuxiang; Chang, Ming; Liu, Xiaonan; Zhang, Ruihui; Huang, Shanjin

    2015-01-01

    Proper organization of the actin cytoskeleton is crucial for pollen tube growth. However, the precise mechanisms by which the actin cytoskeleton regulates pollen tube growth remain to be further elucidated. The functions of the actin cytoskeleton are dictated by its spatial organization and dynamics. However, early observations of the distribution of actin filaments at the pollen tube apex were quite perplexing, resulting in decades of controversial debate. Fortunately, due to improvements in fixation regimens for staining actin filaments in fixed pollen tubes, as well as the adoption of appropriate markers for visualizing actin filaments in living pollen tubes, this issue has been resolved and has given rise to the consensus view of the spatial distribution of actin filaments throughout the entire pollen tube. Importantly, recent descriptions of the dynamics of individual actin filaments in the apical region have expanded our understanding of the function of actin in regulation of pollen tube growth. Furthermore, careful documentation of the function and mode of action of several actin-binding proteins expressed in pollen have provided novel insights into the regulation of actin spatial distribution and dynamics. In the current review, we summarize our understanding of the organization, dynamics, and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton in the pollen tube. PMID:25620974

  3. Gem GTPase acts upstream Gmip/RhoA to regulate cortical actin remodeling and spindle positioning during early mitosis.

    PubMed

    Andrieu, Guillaume; Quaranta, Muriel; Leprince, Corinne; Cuvillier, Olivier; Hatzoglou, Anastassia

    2014-11-01

    Gem is a small guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-binding protein within the Ras superfamily, involved in the regulation of voltage-gated calcium channel activity and cytoskeleton reorganization. Gem overexpression leads to stress fiber disruption, actin and cell shape remodeling and neurite elongation in interphase cells. In this study, we show that Gem plays a crucial role in the regulation of cortical actin cytoskeleton that undergoes active remodeling during mitosis. Ectopic expression of Gem leads to cortical actin disruption and spindle mispositioning during metaphase. The regulation of spindle positioning by Gem involves its downstream effector Gmip. Knockdown of Gmip rescued Gem-induced spindle phenotype, although both Gem and Gmip accumulated at the cell cortex. In addition, we implicated RhoA GTPase as an important effector of Gem/Gmip signaling. Inactivation of RhoA by overexpressing dominant-negative mutant prevented normal spindle positioning. Introduction of active RhoA rescued the actin and spindle positioning defects caused by Gem or Gmip overexpression. These findings demonstrate a new role of Gem/Gmip/RhoA signaling in cortical actin regulation during early mitotic stages. PMID:25173885

  4. Genome-wide RNAi screen for nuclear actin reveals a network of cofilin regulators

    PubMed Central

    Dopie, Joseph; Rajakylä, Eeva K.; Joensuu, Merja S.; Huet, Guillaume; Ferrantelli, Evelina; Xie, Tiao; Jäälinoja, Harri; Jokitalo, Eija; Vartiainen, Maria K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nuclear actin plays an important role in many processes that regulate gene expression. Cytoplasmic actin dynamics are tightly controlled by numerous actin-binding proteins, but regulation of nuclear actin has remained unclear. Here, we performed a genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screen in Drosophila cells to identify proteins that influence either nuclear polymerization or import of actin. We validate 19 factors as specific hits, and show that Chinmo (known as Bach2 in mammals), SNF4Aγ (Prkag1 in mammals) and Rab18 play a role in nuclear localization of actin in both fly and mammalian cells. We identify several new regulators of cofilin activity, and characterize modulators of both cofilin kinases and phosphatase. For example, Chinmo/Bach2, which regulates nuclear actin levels also in vivo, maintains active cofilin by repressing the expression of the kinase Cdi (Tesk in mammals). Finally, we show that Nup98 and lamin are candidates for regulating nuclear actin polymerization. Our screen therefore reveals new aspects of actin regulation and links nuclear actin to many cellular processes. PMID:26021350

  5. Genome-wide RNAi screen for nuclear actin reveals a network of cofilin regulators.

    PubMed

    Dopie, Joseph; Rajakylä, Eeva K; Joensuu, Merja S; Huet, Guillaume; Ferrantelli, Evelina; Xie, Tiao; Jäälinoja, Harri; Jokitalo, Eija; Vartiainen, Maria K

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear actin plays an important role in many processes that regulate gene expression. Cytoplasmic actin dynamics are tightly controlled by numerous actin-binding proteins, but regulation of nuclear actin has remained unclear. Here, we performed a genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screen in Drosophila cells to identify proteins that influence either nuclear polymerization or import of actin. We validate 19 factors as specific hits, and show that Chinmo (known as Bach2 in mammals), SNF4Aγ (Prkag1 in mammals) and Rab18 play a role in nuclear localization of actin in both fly and mammalian cells. We identify several new regulators of cofilin activity, and characterize modulators of both cofilin kinases and phosphatase. For example, Chinmo/Bach2, which regulates nuclear actin levels also in vivo, maintains active cofilin by repressing the expression of the kinase Cdi (Tesk in mammals). Finally, we show that Nup98 and lamin are candidates for regulating nuclear actin polymerization. Our screen therefore reveals new aspects of actin regulation and links nuclear actin to many cellular processes. PMID:26021350

  6. MicroRNAs as key regulators of GTPase-mediated apical actin reorganization in multiciliated epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Mercey, Olivier; Kodjabachian, Laurent; Barbry, Pascal; Marcet, Brice

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Multiciliated cells (MCCs), which are present in specialized vertebrate tissues such as mucociliary epithelia, project hundreds of motile cilia from their apical membrane. Coordinated ciliary beating in MCCs contributes to fluid propulsion in several biological processes. In a previous work, we demonstrated that microRNAs of the miR-34/449 family act as new conserved regulators of MCC differentiation by specifically repressing cell cycle genes and the Notch pathway. Recently, we have shown that miR-34/449 also modulate small GTPase pathways to promote, in a later stage of differentiation, the assembly of the apical actin network, a prerequisite for proper anchoring of centrioles-derived neo-synthesized basal bodies. We characterized several miR-34/449 targets related to small GTPase pathways including R-Ras, which represents a key and conserved regulator during MCC differentiation. Direct RRAS repression by miR-34/449 is necessary for apical actin meshwork assembly, notably by allowing the apical relocalization of the actin binding protein Filamin-A near basal bodies. Our studies establish miR-34/449 as central players that orchestrate several steps of MCC differentiation program by regulating distinct signaling pathways. PMID:27144998

  7. Signaling Network Triggers and Membrane Physical Properties Control the Actin Cytoskeleton-Driven Isotropic Phase of Cell Spreading

    PubMed Central

    Rangamani, Padmini; Fardin, Marc-Antoine; Xiong, Yuguang; Lipshtat, Azi; Rossier, Olivier; Sheetz, Michael P.; Iyengar, Ravi

    2011-01-01

    Cell spreading is regulated by signaling from the integrin receptors that activate intracellular signaling pathways to control actin filament regulatory proteins. We developed a hybrid model of whole-cell spreading in which we modeled the integrin signaling network as ordinary differential equations in multiple compartments, and cell spreading as a three-dimensional stochastic model. The computed activity of the signaling network, represented as time-dependent activity levels of the actin filament regulatory proteins, is used to drive the filament dynamics. We analyzed the hybrid model to understand the role of signaling during the isotropic phase of fibroblasts spreading on fibronectin-coated surfaces. Simulations showed that the isotropic phase of spreading depends on integrin signaling to initiate spreading but not to maintain the spreading dynamics. Simulations predicted that signal flow in the absence of Cdc42 or WASP would reduce the spreading rate but would not affect the shape evolution of the spreading cell. These predictions were verified experimentally. Computational analyses showed that the rate of spreading and the evolution of cell shape are largely controlled by the membrane surface load and membrane bending rigidity, and changing information flow through the integrin signaling network has little effect. Overall, the plasma membrane acts as a damper such that only ∼5% of the actin dynamics capability is needed for isotropic spreading. Thus, the biophysical properties of the plasma membrane can condense varying levels of signaling network activities into a single cohesive macroscopic cellular behavior. PMID:21320428

  8. Model for how retrograde actin flow regulates adhesion traction stresses.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Bhimalapuram, Prabhakar; Dinner, Aaron R

    2010-05-19

    Cells from animals adhere to and exert mechanical forces on their surroundings. Cells must control these forces for many biological processes, and dysfunction can lead to pathologies. How the actions of molecules within a cell are coordinated to regulate the adhesive interaction with the extracellular matrix remains poorly understood. It has been observed that cytoplasmic proteins that link integrin cell-surface receptors with the actin cytoskeleton flow with varying rates from the leading edge toward the center of a cell. Here, we explore theoretically how measurable subcellular traction stresses depend on the local speed of retrograde actin flow. In the model, forces result from the stretching of molecular complexes in response to the drag from the flow; because these complexes break with extension-dependent kinetics, the flow results in a decrease in their number when sufficiently large. Competition between these two effects naturally gives rise to a clutch-like behavior and a nonmonotonic trend in the measured stresses, consistent with recent data for epithelial cells. We use this basic framework to evaluate slip and catch bond mechanisms for integrins; better fits of experimental data are obtained with a catch bond representation. Extension of the model to one comprising multiple molecular interfaces shifts the peak stress to higher speeds. Connections to other models and cell movement are discussed. PMID:21386439

  9. Thromboxane-induced actin polymerization in hypoxic neonatal pulmonary arterial myocytes involves Cdc42 signaling.

    PubMed

    Fediuk, Jena; Sikarwar, Anurag S; Nolette, Nora; Dakshinamurti, Shyamala

    2014-12-01

    In hypoxic pulmonary arterial (PA) myocytes, challenge with thromboxane mimetic U46619 induces marked actin polymerization and contraction, phenotypic features of persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN). Rho GTPases regulate the actin cytoskeleton. We previously reported that U46619-induced actin polymerization in hypoxic PA myocytes occurs independently of the RhoA pathway and hypothesized involvement of the Cdc42 pathway. PA myocytes grown in normoxia or hypoxia for 72 h were stimulated with U46619, then analyzed for Rac/Cdc42 activation by affinity precipitation, phosphatidylinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) activity by phospho-Akt, phospho-p21-activated kinase (PAK) by immunoblot, and association of Cdc42 with neuronal Wiskott Aldrich Syndrome protein (N-WASp) by immunoprecipitation. The effect of Rac or PAK inhibition on filamentous actin was quantified by laser-scanning cytometry and by cytoskeletal fractionation; effects of actin-modifying agents were measured by isometric myography. Basal Cdc42 activity increased in hypoxia, whereas Rac activity decreased. U46619 challenge increased Cdc42 and Rac activity in hypoxic cells, independently of PI3K. Hypoxia increased phospho-PAK, unaltered by U46619. Association of Cdc42 with N-WASp decreased in hypoxia but increased after U46619 exposure. Hypoxia doubled filamentous-to-globular ratios of α- and γ-actin isoforms. Jasplakinolide stabilized γ-filaments, increasing force; cytochalasin D depolymerized all actin isoforms, decreasing force. Rac and PAK inhibition decreased filamentous actin in tissues although without decrease in force. Rho inhibition decreased myosin phosphorylation and force. Hypoxia induces actin polymerization in PA myocytes, particularly increasing filamentous α- and γ-actin, contributing to U46619-induced contraction. Hypoxic PA myocytes challenged with a thromboxane mimetic polymerize actin via the Cdc42 pathway, reflecting increased Cdc42 association with N-WASp. Mechanisms

  10. Kinetic studies of the cooperative binding of subfragment 1 to regulated actin.

    PubMed Central

    Trybus, K M; Taylor, E W

    1980-01-01

    The transient-state kinetics of binding of myosin subfragment 1 (SF-1) to regulated actin in the presence and absence of Ca2+ were investigated. The binding of SF-1 to pure actin, to actin-tropomyosin (actin-TM), or to actin-tropomyosin-troponin (actin-TM-TN) in the presence of Ca2+ was kinetically the same. In each case, the light-scattering transients were biphasic, suggesting a two-step binding of SF-1 to actin. Binding of SF-1 to regulated actin in the absence of Ca2+ was different from binding in its presence and also varied depending on whether SF-1 or regulated actin was in excess. The kinetic results in the absence of CA2+ are explained by a cooperative binding model, in which the initial binding of SF-1 molecules to open (active) actin sites increases the number of open sites. TN-I labeled with the fluorophore 4-(N-iodoacetoxyethyl-N-methyl)-7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3 diazole (TN*) was used to probe the state of the actin-TM-TN complex. Binding of SF-1 or CA2+ to regulated actin (in the absence of Ca2+) decreased the fluorescence of actin-TM-TN* by 30%, suggesting that binding of SF-1 or CA2+ induces a similar change in state. The change in fluorescence of TN* was also used to measure the rate of the transition from the active to the relaxed state in the absence of CA2+, which was 430 sec-1 at 4 degrees C in 0.1 M KCl. The lag prior to association of SF-1 with regulated actin (in the absence of Ca2+) was abolished when three SF-1 molecules were prebound per seven G-actin monomers. Similarly, a titration of actin-TM-TN* (in the absence of Ca2+) with SF-1 or SF-1-ADP showed that most actin sites are open, as measured by the fluorescence change, when the occupancy of actin-TM-TN* by SF-1-ADP or SF-1 is approximately 50%. The evidence shows that partial occupancy of a block of G-actin sites (possibly seven) by SF-1 or SF-1-ADP stabilizes the open (active) conformation. PMID:6938966

  11. Arabidopsis FIM5 decorates apical actin filaments and regulates their organization in the pollen tube

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meng; Zhang, Ruihui; Qu, Xiaolu; Huang, Shanjin

    2016-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is increasingly recognized as a major regulator of pollen tube growth. Actin filaments have distinct distribution patterns and dynamic properties within different regions of the pollen tube. Apical actin filaments are highly dynamic and crucial for pollen tube growth. However, how apical actin filaments are generated and properly constructed remains an open question. Here we showed that Arabidopsis fimbrin5 (FIM5) decorates filamentous structures throughout the entire tube but is apically concentrated. Apical actin structures are disorganized to different degrees in the pollen tubes of fim5 loss-of-function mutants. Further observations suggest that apical actin structures are not constructed properly because apical actin filaments cannot be maintained at the cortex of fim5 pollen tubes. Actin filaments appeared to be more curved in fim5 pollen tubes and this was confirmed by measurements showing that the convolutedness and the rate of change of convolutedness of actin filaments was significantly increased in fim5 pollen tubes. This suggests that the rigidity of the actin filaments may be compromised in fim5 pollen tubes. Further, the apical cell wall composition is altered, implying that tip-directed vesicle trafficking events are impaired in fim5 pollen tubes. Thus, we found that FIM5 decorates apical actin filaments and regulates their organization in order to drive polarized pollen tube growth. PMID:27117336

  12. Ubiquitin ligase TRIM3 controls hippocampal plasticity and learning by regulating synaptic γ-actin levels

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Joerg; Végh, Marlene J.; Dawitz, Julia; Kroon, Tim; Loos, Maarten; Labonté, Dorthe; Li, Ka Wan; Van Nierop, Pim; Van Diepen, Michiel T.; De Zeeuw, Chris I.; Kneussel, Matthias; Meredith, Rhiannon M.; Smit, August B.

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity requires remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. Although two actin isoforms, β- and γ-actin, are expressed in dendritic spines, the specific contribution of γ-actin in the expression of synaptic plasticity is unknown. We show that synaptic γ-actin levels are regulated by the E3 ubiquitin ligase TRIM3. TRIM3 protein and Actg1 transcript are colocalized in messenger ribonucleoprotein granules responsible for the dendritic targeting of messenger RNAs. TRIM3 polyubiquitylates γ-actin, most likely cotranslationally at synaptic sites. Trim3−/− mice consequently have increased levels of γ-actin at hippocampal synapses, resulting in higher spine densities, increased long-term potentiation, and enhanced short-term contextual fear memory consolidation. Interestingly, hippocampal deletion of Actg1 caused an increase in long-term fear memory. Collectively, our findings suggest that temporal control of γ-actin levels by TRIM3 is required to regulate the timing of hippocampal plasticity. We propose a model in which TRIM3 regulates synaptic γ-actin turnover and actin filament stability and thus forms a transient inhibitory constraint on the expression of hippocampal synaptic plasticity. PMID:26527743

  13. Cell Elasticity Is Regulated by the Tropomyosin Isoform Composition of the Actin Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Jalilian, Iman; Heu, Celine; Cheng, Hong; Freittag, Hannah; Desouza, Melissa; Stehn, Justine R.; Bryce, Nicole S.; Whan, Renee M.; Hardeman, Edna C.

    2015-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is the primary polymer system within cells responsible for regulating cellular stiffness. While various actin binding proteins regulate the organization and dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton, the proteins responsible for regulating the mechanical properties of cells are still not fully understood. In the present study, we have addressed the significance of the actin associated protein, tropomyosin (Tpm), in influencing the mechanical properties of cells. Tpms belong to a multi-gene family that form a co-polymer with actin filaments and differentially regulate actin filament stability, function and organization. Tpm isoform expression is highly regulated and together with the ability to sort to specific intracellular sites, result in the generation of distinct Tpm isoform-containing actin filament populations. Nanomechanical measurements conducted with an Atomic Force Microscope using indentation in Peak Force Tapping in indentation/ramping mode, demonstrated that Tpm impacts on cell stiffness and the observed effect occurred in a Tpm isoform-specific manner. Quantitative analysis of the cellular filamentous actin (F-actin) pool conducted both biochemically and with the use of a linear detection algorithm to evaluate actin structures revealed that an altered F-actin pool does not absolutely predict changes in cell stiffness. Inhibition of non-muscle myosin II revealed that intracellular tension generated by myosin II is required for the observed increase in cell stiffness. Lastly, we show that the observed increase in cell stiffness is partially recapitulated in vivo as detected in epididymal fat pads isolated from a Tpm3.1 transgenic mouse line. Together these data are consistent with a role for Tpm in regulating cell stiffness via the generation of specific populations of Tpm isoform-containing actin filaments. PMID:25978408

  14. Lamin A/C and emerin regulate MKL1-SRF activity by modulating actin dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chin Yee; Jaalouk, Diana E; Vartiainen, Maria K; Lammerding, Jan

    2013-05-23

    Laminopathies, caused by mutations in the LMNA gene encoding the nuclear envelope proteins lamins A and C, represent a diverse group of diseases that include Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, and Hutchison-Gilford progeria syndrome. Most LMNA mutations affect skeletal and cardiac muscle by mechanisms that remain incompletely understood. Loss of structural function and altered interaction of mutant lamins with (tissue-specific) transcription factors have been proposed to explain the tissue-specific phenotypes. Here we report in mice that lamin-A/C-deficient (Lmna(-/-)) and Lmna(N195K/N195K) mutant cells have impaired nuclear translocation and downstream signalling of the mechanosensitive transcription factor megakaryoblastic leukaemia 1 (MKL1), a myocardin family member that is pivotal in cardiac development and function. Altered nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of MKL1 was caused by altered actin dynamics in Lmna(-/-) and Lmna(N195K/N195K) mutant cells. Ectopic expression of the nuclear envelope protein emerin, which is mislocalized in Lmna mutant cells and also linked to EDMD and DCM, restored MKL1 nuclear translocation and rescued actin dynamics in mutant cells. These findings present a novel mechanism that could provide insight into the disease aetiology for the cardiac phenotype in many laminopathies, whereby lamin A/C and emerin regulate gene expression through modulation of nuclear and cytoskeletal actin polymerization. PMID:23644458

  15. Lamin A/C and emerin regulate MKL1/SRF activity by modulating actin dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Chin Yee; Jaalouk, Diana E.; Vartiainen, Maria K.; Lammerding, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Laminopathies, caused by mutations in the LMNA gene encoding the nuclear envelope proteins lamins A and C, represent a diverse group of diseases that include Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy (EDMD), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, and Hutchison-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS).1 The majority of LMNA mutations affect skeletal and cardiac muscle by mechanisms that remain incompletely understood. Loss of structural function and disturbed interaction of mutant lamins with (tissue-specific) transcription factors have been proposed to explain the tissue-specific phenotypes.1 We report here that lamin A/C-deficient (Lmna−/−) and Lmna N195K mutant cells have impaired nuclear translocation and downstream signaling of the mechanosensitive transcription factor megakaryoblastic leukaemia 1 (MKL1), a myocardin family member that is pivotal in cardiac development and function.2 Disturbed nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of MKL1 was caused by altered actin dynamics in Lmna−/− and N195K mutant cells. Ectopic expression of the nuclear envelope protein emerin, which is mislocalized in Lmna mutant cells and also linked to EDMD and DCM, restored MKL1 nuclear translocation and rescued actin dynamics in mutant cells. These findings present a novel mechanism that could provide insight into the disease etiology for the cardiac phenotype in many laminopathies, whereby lamins A/C and emerin regulate gene expression through modulation of nuclear and cytoskeletal actin polymerization. PMID:23644458

  16. Changes in actin dynamics are involved in salicylic acid signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Matoušková, Jindřiška; Janda, Martin; Fišer, Radovan; Sašek, Vladimír; Kocourková, Daniela; Burketová, Lenka; Dušková, Jiřina; Martinec, Jan; Valentová, Olga

    2014-06-01

    Changes in actin cytoskeleton dynamics are one of the crucial players in many physiological as well as non-physiological processes in plant cells. Positioning of actin filament arrays is necessary for successful establishment of primary lines of defense toward pathogen attack, depolymerization leads very often to the enhanced susceptibility to the invading pathogen. On the other hand it was also shown that the disruption of actin cytoskeleton leads to the induction of defense response leading to the expression of PATHOGENESIS RELATED proteins (PR). In this study we show that pharmacological actin depolymerization leads to the specific induction of genes in salicylic acid pathway but not that involved in jasmonic acid signaling. Life imaging of leafs of Arabidopsis thaliana with GFP-tagged fimbrin (GFP-fABD2) treated with 1 mM salicylic acid revealed rapid disruption of actin filaments resembling the pattern viewed after treatment with 200 nM latrunculin B. The effect of salicylic acid on actin filament fragmentation was prevented by exogenous addition of phosphatidic acid, which binds to the capping protein and thus promotes actin polymerization. The quantitative evaluation of actin filament dynamics is also presented. PMID:24767113

  17. Arabidopsis RIC1 Severs Actin Filaments at the Apex to Regulate Pollen Tube Growth

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhenzhen; Shi, Haifan; Chen, Binqing; Zhang, Ruihui; Huang, Shanjin; Fu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Pollen tubes deliver sperms to the ovule for fertilization via tip growth. The rapid turnover of F-actin in pollen tube tips plays an important role in this process. In this study, we demonstrate that Arabidopsis thaliana RIC1, a member of the ROP-interactive CRIB motif-containing protein family, regulates pollen tube growth via its F-actin severing activity. Knockout of RIC1 enhanced pollen tube elongation, while overexpression of RIC1 dramatically reduced tube growth. Pharmacological analysis indicated that RIC1 affected F-actin dynamics in pollen tubes. In vitro biochemical assays revealed that RIC1 directly bound and severed F-actin in the presence of Ca2+ in addition to interfering with F-actin turnover by capping F-actin at the barbed ends. In vivo, RIC1 localized primarily to the apical plasma membrane (PM) of pollen tubes. The level of RIC1 at the apical PM oscillated during pollen tube growth. The frequency of F-actin severing at the apex was notably decreased in ric1-1 pollen tubes but was increased in pollen tubes overexpressing RIC1. We propose that RIC1 regulates F-actin dynamics at the apical PM as well as the cytosol by severing F-actin and capping the barbed ends in the cytoplasm, establishing a novel mechanism that underlies the regulation of pollen tube growth. PMID:25804540

  18. F-actin polymerization and retrograde flow drive sustained PLCγ1 signaling during T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Babich, Alexander; Li, Shuixing; O'Connor, Roddy S.; Milone, Michael C.; Freedman, Bruce D.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of T cells by antigen-presenting cells involves assembly of signaling molecules into dynamic microclusters (MCs) within a specialized membrane domain termed the immunological synapse (IS). Actin and myosin IIA localize to the IS, and depletion of F-actin abrogates MC movement and T cell activation. However, the mechanisms that coordinate actomyosin dynamics and T cell receptor signaling are poorly understood. Using pharmacological inhibitors that perturb individual aspects of actomyosin dynamics without disassembling the network, we demonstrate that F-actin polymerization is the primary driver of actin retrograde flow, whereas myosin IIA promotes long-term integrity of the IS. Disruption of F-actin retrograde flow, but not myosin IIA contraction, arrested MC centralization and inhibited sustained Ca2+ signaling at the level of endoplasmic reticulum store release. Furthermore, perturbation of retrograde flow inhibited PLCγ1 phosphorylation within MCs but left Zap70 activity intact. These studies highlight the importance of ongoing actin polymerization as a central driver of actomyosin retrograde flow, MC centralization, and sustained Ca2+ signaling. PMID:22665519

  19. STAR syndrome-associated CDK10/Cyclin M regulates actin network architecture and ciliogenesis.

    PubMed

    Guen, Vincent J; Gamble, Carly; Perez, Dahlia E; Bourassa, Sylvie; Zappel, Hildegard; Gärtner, Jutta; Lees, Jacqueline A; Colas, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    CDK10/CycM is a protein kinase deficient in STAR (toe Syndactyly, Telecanthus and Anogenital and Renal malformations) syndrome, which results from mutations in the X-linked FAM58A gene encoding Cyclin M. The biological functions of CDK10/CycM and etiology of STAR syndrome are poorly understood. Here, we report that deficiency of CDK10/Cyclin M promotes assembly and elongation of primary cilia. We establish that this reflects a key role for CDK10/Cyclin M in regulation of actin network organization, which is known to govern ciliogenesis. In an unbiased screen, we identified the RhoA-associated kinase PKN2 as a CDK10/CycM phosphorylation substrate. We establish that PKN2 is a bone fide regulator of ciliogenesis, acting in a similar manner to CDK10/CycM. We discovered that CDK10/Cyclin M binds and phosphorylates PKN2 on threonines 121 and 124, within PKN2's core RhoA-binding domain. Furthermore, we demonstrate that deficiencies in CDK10/CycM or PKN2, or expression of a non-phosphorylatable version of PKN2, destabilize both the RhoA protein and the actin network architecture. Importantly, we established that ectopic expression of RhoA is sufficient to override the induction of ciliogenesis resulting from CDK10/CycM knockdown, indicating that RhoA regulation is critical for CDK10/CycM's negative effect on ciliogenesis. Finally, we show that kidney sections from a STAR patient display dilated renal tubules and abnormal, elongated cilia. Altogether, these results reveal CDK10/CycM as a key regulator of actin dynamics and a suppressor of ciliogenesis through phosphorylation of PKN2 and promotion of RhoA signaling. Moreover, they suggest that STAR syndrome is a ciliopathy. PMID:27104747

  20. TAGLN2 regulates T cell activation by stabilizing the actin cytoskeleton at the immunological synapse

    PubMed Central

    Na, Bo-Ra; Kim, Hye-Ran; Piragyte, Indre; Oh, Hyun-Mee; Kwon, Min-Sung; Akber, Uroos; Lee, Hyun-Su; Park, Do-Sim; Song, Woo Keun; Park, Zee-Yong; Im, Sin-Hyeog; Rho, Mun-Chual; Hyun, Young-Min; Kim, Minsoo

    2015-01-01

    The formation of an immunological synapse (IS) requires tight regulation of actin dynamics by many actin polymerizing/depolymerizing proteins. However, the significance of actin stabilization at the IS remains largely unknown. In this paper, we identify a novel function of TAGLN2—an actin-binding protein predominantly expressed in T cells—in stabilizing cortical F-actin, thereby maintaining F-actin contents at the IS and acquiring LFA-1 (leukocyte function-associated antigen-1) activation after T cell receptor stimulation. TAGLN2 blocks actin depolymerization and competes with cofilin both in vitro and in vivo. Knockout of TAGLN2 (TAGLN2−/−) reduced F-actin content and destabilized F-actin ring formation, resulting in decreased cell adhesion and spreading. TAGLN2−/− T cells displayed weakened cytokine production and cytotoxic effector function. These findings reveal a novel function of TAGLN2 in enhancing T cell responses by controlling actin stability at the IS. PMID:25869671

  1. Arp2/3-mediated F-actin formation controls regulated exocytosis in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Duy T.; Masedunskas, Andrius; Weigert, Roberto; Ten Hagen, Kelly G.

    2015-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton plays crucial roles in many cellular processes, including regulated secretion. However, the mechanisms controlling F-actin dynamics in this process are largely unknown. Through 3D time-lapse imaging in a secreting organ, we show that F-actin is actively disassembled along the apical plasma membrane at the site of secretory vesicle fusion and re-assembled directionally on vesicle membranes. Moreover, we show that fusion pore formation and PIP2 redistribution precedes actin and myosin recruitment to secretory vesicle membranes. Finally, we show essential roles for the branched actin nucleators Arp2/3- and WASp in the process of secretory cargo expulsion and integration of vesicular membranes with the apical plasma membrane. Our results highlight previously unknown roles for branched actin in exocytosis and provide a genetically tractable system to image the temporal and spatial dynamics of polarized secretion in vivo. PMID:26639106

  2. Arp2/3-mediated F-actin formation controls regulated exocytosis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tran, Duy T; Masedunskas, Andrius; Weigert, Roberto; Ten Hagen, Kelly G

    2015-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton plays crucial roles in many cellular processes, including regulated secretion. However, the mechanisms controlling F-actin dynamics in this process are largely unknown. Through 3D time-lapse imaging in a secreting organ, we show that F-actin is actively disassembled along the apical plasma membrane at the site of secretory vesicle fusion and re-assembled directionally on vesicle membranes. Moreover, we show that fusion pore formation and PIP2 redistribution precedes actin and myosin recruitment to secretory vesicle membranes. Finally, we show essential roles for the branched actin nucleators Arp2/3- and WASp in the process of secretory cargo expulsion and integration of vesicular membranes with the apical plasma membrane. Our results highlight previously unknown roles for branched actin in exocytosis and provide a genetically tractable system to image the temporal and spatial dynamics of polarized secretion in vivo. PMID:26639106

  3. A mitochondria-anchored isoform of the actin-nucleating spire protein regulates mitochondrial division

    PubMed Central

    Manor, Uri; Bartholomew, Sadie; Golani, Gonen; Christenson, Eric; Kozlov, Michael; Higgs, Henry; Spudich, James; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial division, essential for survival in mammals, is enhanced by an inter-organellar process involving ER tubules encircling and constricting mitochondria. The force for constriction is thought to involve actin polymerization by the ER-anchored isoform of the formin protein inverted formin 2 (INF2). Unknown is the mechanism triggering INF2-mediated actin polymerization at ER-mitochondria intersections. We show that a novel isoform of the formin-binding, actin-nucleating protein Spire, Spire1C, localizes to mitochondria and directly links mitochondria to the actin cytoskeleton and the ER. Spire1C binds INF2 and promotes actin assembly on mitochondrial surfaces. Disrupting either Spire1C actin- or formin-binding activities reduces mitochondrial constriction and division. We propose Spire1C cooperates with INF2 to regulate actin assembly at ER-mitochondrial contacts. Simulations support this model's feasibility and demonstrate polymerizing actin filaments can induce mitochondrial constriction. Thus, Spire1C is optimally positioned to serve as a molecular hub that links mitochondria to actin and the ER for regulation of mitochondrial division. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08828.001 PMID:26305500

  4. Plasma Membrane Calcium ATPase Activity Is Regulated by Actin Oligomers through Direct Interaction*

    PubMed Central

    Dalghi, Marianela G.; Fernández, Marisa M.; Ferreira-Gomes, Mariela; Mangialavori, Irene C.; Malchiodi, Emilio L.; Strehler, Emanuel E.; Rossi, Juan Pablo F. C.

    2013-01-01

    As recently described by our group, plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) activity can be regulated by the actin cytoskeleton. In this study, we characterize the interaction of purified G-actin with isolated PMCA and examine the effect of G-actin during the first polymerization steps. As measured by surface plasmon resonance, G-actin directly interacts with PMCA with an apparent 1:1 stoichiometry in the presence of Ca2+ with an apparent affinity in the micromolar range. As assessed by the photoactivatable probe 1-O-hexadecanoyl-2-O-[9-[[[2-[125I]iodo-4-(trifluoromethyl-3H-diazirin-3-yl)benzyl]oxy]carbonyl]nonanoyl]-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, the association of PMCA to actin produced a shift in the distribution of the conformers of the pump toward a calmodulin-activated conformation. G-actin stimulates Ca2+-ATPase activity of the enzyme when incubated under polymerizing conditions, displaying a cooperative behavior. The increase in the Ca2+-ATPase activity was related to an increase in the apparent affinity for Ca2+ and an increase in the phosphoenzyme levels at steady state. Although surface plasmon resonance experiments revealed only one binding site for G-actin, results clearly indicate that more than one molecule of G-actin was needed for a regulatory effect on the pump. Polymerization studies showed that the experimental conditions are compatible with the presence of actin in the first stages of assembly. Altogether, these observations suggest that the stimulatory effect is exerted by short oligomers of actin. The functional interaction between actin oligomers and PMCA represents a novel regulatory pathway by which the cortical actin cytoskeleton participates in the regulation of cytosolic Ca2+ homeostasis. PMID:23803603

  5. Secretagogin affects insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells by regulating actin dynamics and focal adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Seo-Yun; Lee, Jae-Jin; Lee, Jin-Hee; Lee, Kyungeun; Oh, Seung Hoon; Lim, Yu-Mi; Lee, Myung-Shik; Lee, Kong-Joo

    2016-01-01

    Secretagogin (SCGN), a Ca2+-binding protein having six EF-hands, is selectively expressed in pancreatic β-cells and neuroendocrine cells. Previous studies suggested that SCGN enhances insulin secretion by functioning as a Ca2+-sensor protein, but the underlying mechanism has not been elucidated. The present study explored the mechanism by which SCGN enhances glucose-induced insulin secretion in NIT-1 insulinoma cells. To determine whether SCGN influences the first or second phase of insulin secretion, we examined how SCGN affects the kinetics of insulin secretion in NIT-1 cells. We found that silencing SCGN suppressed the second phase of insulin secretion induced by glucose and H2O2, but not the first phase induced by KCl stimulation. Recruitment of insulin granules in the second phase of insulin secretion was significantly impaired by knocking down SCGN in NIT-1 cells. In addition, we found that SCGN interacts with the actin cytoskeleton in the plasma membrane and regulates actin remodelling in a glucose-dependent manner. Since actin dynamics are known to regulate focal adhesion, a critical step in the second phase of insulin secretion, we examined the effect of silencing SCGN on focal adhesion molecules, including FAK (focal adhesion kinase) and paxillin, and the cell survival molecules ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2) and Akt. We found that glucose- and H2O2-induced activation of FAK, paxillin, ERK1/2 and Akt was significantly blocked by silencing SCGN. We conclude that SCGN controls glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and thus may be useful in the therapy of Type 2 diabetes. PMID:27095850

  6. Secretagogin affects insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells by regulating actin dynamics and focal adhesion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Seo-Yun; Lee, Jae-Jin; Lee, Jin-Hee; Lee, Kyungeun; Oh, Seung Hoon; Lim, Yu-Mi; Lee, Myung-Shik; Lee, Kong-Joo

    2016-06-15

    Secretagogin (SCGN), a Ca(2+)-binding protein having six EF-hands, is selectively expressed in pancreatic β-cells and neuroendocrine cells. Previous studies suggested that SCGN enhances insulin secretion by functioning as a Ca(2+)-sensor protein, but the underlying mechanism has not been elucidated. The present study explored the mechanism by which SCGN enhances glucose-induced insulin secretion in NIT-1 insulinoma cells. To determine whether SCGN influences the first or second phase of insulin secretion, we examined how SCGN affects the kinetics of insulin secretion in NIT-1 cells. We found that silencing SCGN suppressed the second phase of insulin secretion induced by glucose and H2O2, but not the first phase induced by KCl stimulation. Recruitment of insulin granules in the second phase of insulin secretion was significantly impaired by knocking down SCGN in NIT-1 cells. In addition, we found that SCGN interacts with the actin cytoskeleton in the plasma membrane and regulates actin remodelling in a glucose-dependent manner. Since actin dynamics are known to regulate focal adhesion, a critical step in the second phase of insulin secretion, we examined the effect of silencing SCGN on focal adhesion molecules, including FAK (focal adhesion kinase) and paxillin, and the cell survival molecules ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2) and Akt. We found that glucose- and H2O2-induced activation of FAK, paxillin, ERK1/2 and Akt was significantly blocked by silencing SCGN. We conclude that SCGN controls glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and thus may be useful in the therapy of Type 2 diabetes. PMID:27095850

  7. Antagonism between Ena/VASP proteins and actin filament capping regulates fibroblast motility.

    PubMed

    Bear, James E; Svitkina, Tatyana M; Krause, Matthias; Schafer, Dorothy A; Loureiro, Joseph J; Strasser, Geraldine A; Maly, Ivan V; Chaga, Oleg Y; Cooper, John A; Borisy, Gary G; Gertler, Frank B

    2002-05-17

    Cell motility requires lamellipodial protrusion, a process driven by actin polymerization. Ena/VASP proteins accumulate in protruding lamellipodia and promote the rapid actin-driven motility of the pathogen Listeria. In contrast, Ena/VASP negatively regulate cell translocation. To resolve this paradox, we analyzed the function of Ena/VASP during lamellipodial protrusion. Ena/VASP-deficient lamellipodia protruded slower but more persistently, consistent with their increased cell translocation rates. Actin networks in Ena/VASP-deficient lamellipodia contained shorter, more highly branched filaments compared to controls. Lamellipodia with excess Ena/VASP contained longer, less branched filaments. In vitro, Ena/VASP promoted actin filament elongation by interacting with barbed ends, shielding them from capping protein. We conclude that Ena/VASP regulates cell motility by controlling the geometry of actin filament networks within lamellipodia. PMID:12086607

  8. Jak3 Enables Chemokine-Dependent Actin Cytoskeleton Reorganization by Regulating Cofilin and Rac/Rhoa GTPases Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ambriz-Peña, Xochitl; García-Zepeda, Eduardo Alberto; Meza, Isaura; Soldevila, Gloria

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that Jak3 is involved in the signaling pathways of CCR7, CCR9 and CXCR4 in murine T lymphocytes and that Jak3−/− lymphocytes display an intrinsic defect in homing to peripheral lymph nodes. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the defective migration observed in Jak3−/− lymphocytes remains elusive. Here, it is demonstrated for the first time, that Jak3 is required for the actin cytoskeleton reorganization in T lymphocytes responding to chemokines. It was found that Jak3 regulates actin polymerization by controlling cofilin inactivation in response to CCL21 and CXCL12. Interestingly, cofilin inactivation was not precluded in PTX- treated cells despite their impaired actin polymerization. Additionally, Jak3 was required for small GTPases Rac1 and RhoA activation, which are indispensable for acquisition of the migratory cell phenotype and the generation of a functional leading edge and uropod, respectively. This defect correlates with data obtained by time-lapse video-microscopy showing an incompetent uropod formation and impaired motility in Jak3-pharmacologically inhibited T lymphocytes. Our data support a new model in which Jak3 and heterotrimeric G proteins can use independent, but complementary, signaling pathways to regulate actin cytoskeleton dynamics during cell migration in response to chemokines. PMID:24498424

  9. Formin-like2 regulates Rho/ROCK pathway to promote actin assembly and cell invasion of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yuanfeng; Xie, Huijun; Qiao, Yudan; Wang, Jianmei; Zhu, Xiling; He, Guoyang; Li, Yuling; Ren, Xiaoli; Wang, Feifei; Liang, Li; Ding, Yanqing

    2015-01-01

    Formin-like2 (FMNL2) is a member of the diaphanous-related formins family, which act as effectors and upstream modulators of Rho GTPases signaling and control the actin-dependent processes, such as cell motility or invasion. FMNL2 has been identified as promoting the motility and metastasis in colorectal carcinoma (CRC). However, whether FMNL2 regulates Rho signaling to promote cancer cell invasion remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated an essential role for FMNL2 in the activations of Rho/ROCK pathway, SRF transcription or actin assembly, and subsequent CRC cell invasion. FMNL2 could activate Rho/ROCK pathway, and required ROCK to promote CRC cell invasion. Moreover, FMNL2 promoted the formation of filopodia and stress fiber, and activated the SRF transcription in a Rho-dependent manner. We also demonstrated that FMNL2 was necessary for LPA-induced invasion, RhoA/ROCK activation, actin assembly and SRF activation. FMNL2 was an essential component of LPA signal transduction toward RhoA by directly interacting with LARG. LARG silence inhibited RhoA/ROCK pathway and CRC cell invasion. Collectively, these data indicate that FMNL2, acting as upstream of RhoA by interacting with LARG, can promote actin assembly and CRC cell invasion through a Rho/ROCK-dependent mechanism. PMID:26258642

  10. Cooperative Regulation of Myosin-Actin Interactions by a Continuous Flexible Chain I: Actin-Tropomyosin Systems

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D. A.; Maytum, R.; Geeves, M. A.

    2003-01-01

    We present a model for cooperative myosin binding to the regulated actin filament, where tropomyosins are treated as a weakly-confined continuous flexible chain covering myosin binding sites. Thermal fluctuations in chain orientation are initially required for myosin binding, leaving kinked regions under which subsequent myosins may bind without further distortion of the chain. Statistical mechanics predicts the fraction of sites with bound myosin-S1 as a function of their affinities. Published S1 binding curves to regulated filaments with different tropomyosin isoforms are fitted by varying the binding constant, chain persistence length ν (in actin monomers), and chain kink energy A from a single bound S1. With skeletal tropomyosin, we find an S1 actin-binding constant of 2.2 × 107 M−1, A = 1.6 kBT and ν = 2.7. Similar persistence lengths are found with yeast tropomyosin. Larger values are found for tropomyosin-troponin in the presence of calcium (ν = 3.7) and tropomyosins from smooth muscle and fibroblasts (ν = 4.5). The relationship of these results to structural information and the rigid-unit model of McKillop and Geeves is discussed. PMID:12719245

  11. Plastins regulate ectoplasmic specialization via its actin bundling activity on microfilaments in the rat testis.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Wong, Chris Kc; Cheng, C Yan

    2016-01-01

    Plastins are a family of actin binding proteins (ABPs) known to cross-link actin microfilaments in mammalian cells, creating actin microfilament bundles necessary to confer cell polarity and cell shape. Plastins also support cell movement in response to changes in environment, involved in cell/tissue growth and development. They also confer plasticity to cells and tissues in response to infection or other pathological conditions (e.g., inflammation). In the testis, the cell-cell anchoring junction unique to the testis that is found at the Sertoli cell-cell interface at the blood-testis barrier (BTB) and at the Sertoli-spermatid (e.g., 8-19 spermatids in the rat testis) is the basal and the apical ectoplasmic specialization (ES), respectively. The ES is an F-actin-rich anchoring junction constituted most notably by actin microfilament bundles. A recent report using RNAi that specifically knocks down plastin 3 has yielded some insightful information regarding the mechanism by which plastin 3 regulates the status of actin microfilament bundles at the ES via its intrinsic actin filament bundling activity. Herein, we provide a brief review on the role of plastins in the testis in light of this report, which together with recent findings in the field, we propose a likely model by which plastins regulate ES function during the epithelial cycle of spermatogenesis via their intrinsic activity on actin microfilament organization in the rat testis. PMID:26608945

  12. ER sheet persistence is coupled to myosin 1c-regulated dynamic actin filament arrays.

    PubMed

    Joensuu, Merja; Belevich, Ilya; Rämö, Olli; Nevzorov, Ilya; Vihinen, Helena; Puhka, Maija; Witkos, Tomasz M; Lowe, Martin; Vartiainen, Maria K; Jokitalo, Eija

    2014-04-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) comprises a dynamic three-dimensional (3D) network with diverse structural and functional domains. Proper ER operation requires an intricate balance within and between dynamics, morphology, and functions, but how these processes are coupled in cells has been unclear. Using live-cell imaging and 3D electron microscopy, we identify a specific subset of actin filaments localizing to polygons defined by ER sheets and tubules and describe a role for these actin arrays in ER sheet persistence and, thereby, in maintenance of the characteristic network architecture by showing that actin depolymerization leads to increased sheet fluctuation and transformations and results in small and less abundant sheet remnants and a defective ER network distribution. Furthermore, we identify myosin 1c localizing to the ER-associated actin filament arrays and reveal a novel role for myosin 1c in regulating these actin structures, as myosin 1c manipulations lead to loss of the actin filaments and to similar ER phenotype as observed after actin depolymerization. We propose that ER-associated actin filaments have a role in ER sheet persistence regulation and thus support the maintenance of sheets as a stationary subdomain of the dynamic ER network. PMID:24523293

  13. Plastins regulate ectoplasmic specialization via its actin bundling activity on microfilaments in the rat testis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Wong, Chris KC; Cheng, C Yan

    2016-01-01

    Plastins are a family of actin binding proteins (ABPs) known to cross-link actin microfilaments in mammalian cells, creating actin microfilament bundles necessary to confer cell polarity and cell shape. Plastins also support cell movement in response to changes in environment, involved in cell/tissue growth and development. They also confer plasticity to cells and tissues in response to infection or other pathological conditions (e.g., inflammation). In the testis, the cell-cell anchoring junction unique to the testis that is found at the Sertoli cell-cell interface at the blood-testis barrier (BTB) and at the Sertoli-spermatid (e.g., 8–19 spermatids in the rat testis) is the basal and the apical ectoplasmic specialization (ES), respectively. The ES is an F-actin-rich anchoring junction constituted most notably by actin microfilament bundles. A recent report using RNAi that specifically knocks down plastin 3 has yielded some insightful information regarding the mechanism by which plastin 3 regulates the status of actin microfilament bundles at the ES via its intrinsic actin filament bundling activity. Herein, we provide a brief review on the role of plastins in the testis in light of this report, which together with recent findings in the field, we propose a likely model by which plastins regulate ES function during the epithelial cycle of spermatogenesis via their intrinsic activity on actin microfilament organization in the rat testis. PMID:26608945

  14. ER sheet persistence is coupled to myosin 1c–regulated dynamic actin filament arrays

    PubMed Central

    Joensuu, Merja; Belevich, Ilya; Rämö, Olli; Nevzorov, Ilya; Vihinen, Helena; Puhka, Maija; Witkos, Tomasz M.; Lowe, Martin; Vartiainen, Maria K.; Jokitalo, Eija

    2014-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) comprises a dynamic three-dimensional (3D) network with diverse structural and functional domains. Proper ER operation requires an intricate balance within and between dynamics, morphology, and functions, but how these processes are coupled in cells has been unclear. Using live-cell imaging and 3D electron microscopy, we identify a specific subset of actin filaments localizing to polygons defined by ER sheets and tubules and describe a role for these actin arrays in ER sheet persistence and, thereby, in maintenance of the characteristic network architecture by showing that actin depolymerization leads to increased sheet fluctuation and transformations and results in small and less abundant sheet remnants and a defective ER network distribution. Furthermore, we identify myosin 1c localizing to the ER-associated actin filament arrays and reveal a novel role for myosin 1c in regulating these actin structures, as myosin 1c manipulations lead to loss of the actin filaments and to similar ER phenotype as observed after actin depolymerization. We propose that ER-associated actin filaments have a role in ER sheet persistence regulation and thus support the maintenance of sheets as a stationary subdomain of the dynamic ER network. PMID:24523293

  15. Regulation of the actin cytoskeleton by the Ndel1-Tara complex is critical for cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ji-Ho; Kwak, Yongdo; Woo, Youngsik; Park, Cana; Lee, Seol-Ae; Lee, Haeryun; Park, Sung Jin; Suh, Yeongjun; Suh, Bo Kyoung; Goo, Bon Seong; Mun, Dong Jin; Sanada, Kamon; Nguyen, Minh Dang; Park, Sang Ki

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear distribution element-like 1 (Ndel1) plays pivotal roles in diverse biological processes and is implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple neurodevelopmental disorders. Ndel1 function by regulating microtubules and intermediate filaments; however, its functional link with the actin cytoskeleton is largely unknown. Here, we show that Ndel1 interacts with TRIO-associated repeat on actin (Tara), an actin-bundling protein, to regulate cell movement. In vitro wound healing and Boyden chamber assays revealed that Ndel1- or Tara-deficient cells were defective in cell migration. Moreover, Tara overexpression induced the accumulation of Ndel1 at the cell periphery and resulted in prominent co-localization with F-actin. This redistribution of Ndel1 was abolished by deletion of the Ndel1-interacting domain of Tara, suggesting that the altered peripheral localization of Ndel1 requires a physical interaction with Tara. Furthermore, co-expression of Ndel1 and Tara in SH-SY5Y cells caused a synergistic increase in F-actin levels and filopodia formation, suggesting that Tara facilitates cell movement by sequestering Ndel1 at peripheral structures to regulate actin remodeling. Thus, we demonstrated that Ndel1 interacts with Tara to regulate cell movement. These findings reveal a novel role of the Ndel1-Tara complex in actin reorganization during cell movement. PMID:27546710

  16. Regulation of the actin cytoskeleton by the Ndel1-Tara complex is critical for cell migration.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ji-Ho; Kwak, Yongdo; Woo, Youngsik; Park, Cana; Lee, Seol-Ae; Lee, Haeryun; Park, Sung Jin; Suh, Yeongjun; Suh, Bo Kyoung; Goo, Bon Seong; Mun, Dong Jin; Sanada, Kamon; Nguyen, Minh Dang; Park, Sang Ki

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear distribution element-like 1 (Ndel1) plays pivotal roles in diverse biological processes and is implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple neurodevelopmental disorders. Ndel1 function by regulating microtubules and intermediate filaments; however, its functional link with the actin cytoskeleton is largely unknown. Here, we show that Ndel1 interacts with TRIO-associated repeat on actin (Tara), an actin-bundling protein, to regulate cell movement. In vitro wound healing and Boyden chamber assays revealed that Ndel1- or Tara-deficient cells were defective in cell migration. Moreover, Tara overexpression induced the accumulation of Ndel1 at the cell periphery and resulted in prominent co-localization with F-actin. This redistribution of Ndel1 was abolished by deletion of the Ndel1-interacting domain of Tara, suggesting that the altered peripheral localization of Ndel1 requires a physical interaction with Tara. Furthermore, co-expression of Ndel1 and Tara in SH-SY5Y cells caused a synergistic increase in F-actin levels and filopodia formation, suggesting that Tara facilitates cell movement by sequestering Ndel1 at peripheral structures to regulate actin remodeling. Thus, we demonstrated that Ndel1 interacts with Tara to regulate cell movement. These findings reveal a novel role of the Ndel1-Tara complex in actin reorganization during cell movement. PMID:27546710

  17. Novel Protein Kinases Ark1p and Prk1p Associate with and Regulate the Cortical Actin Cytoskeleton in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Cope, M.Jamie T.V.; Yang, Shirley; Shang, Ching; Drubin, David G.

    1999-01-01

    Ark1p (actin regulating kinase 1) was identified as a yeast protein that binds to Sla2p, an evolutionarily conserved cortical actin cytoskeleton protein. Ark1p and a second yeast protein, Prk1p, contain NH2-terminal kinase domains that are 70% identical. Together with six other putative kinases from a number of organisms, these proteins define a new protein kinase family that we have named the Ark family. Lack of both Ark1p and Prk1p resulted in the formation of large cytoplasmic actin clumps and severe defects in cell growth. These defects were rescued by wild-type, but not by kinase-dead versions of the proteins. Elevated levels of either Ark1p or Prk1p caused a number of actin and cell morphological defects that were not observed when the kinase-dead versions were overexpressed instead. Ark1p and Prk1p were shown to localize to actin cortical patches, making these two kinases the first signaling proteins demonstrated to be patch components. These results suggest that Ark1p and Prk1p may be downstream effectors of signaling pathways that control actin patch organization and function. Furthermore, results of double-mutant analyses suggest that Ark1p and Prk1p function in overlapping but distinct pathways that regulate the cortical actin cytoskeleton. PMID:10087264

  18. A RhoA and Rnd3 cycle regulates actin reassembly during membrane blebbing.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Kana; Maeda, Fumiyo; Nagasako, Tomoya; Mochizuki, Yuki; Uchida, Seiichi; Ikenouchi, Junichi

    2016-03-29

    The actin cytoskeleton usually lies beneath the plasma membrane. When the membrane-associated actin cytoskeleton is transiently disrupted or the intracellular pressure is increased, the plasma membrane detaches from the cortex and protrudes. Such protruded membrane regions are called blebs. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying membrane blebbing are poorly understood. This study revealed that epidermal growth factor receptor kinase substrate 8 (Eps8) and ezrin are important regulators of rapid actin reassembly for the initiation and retraction of protruded blebs. Live-cell imaging of membrane blebbing revealed that local reassembly of actin filaments occurred at Eps8- and activated ezrin-positive foci of membrane blebs. Furthermore, we found that a RhoA-ROCK-Rnd3 feedback loop determined the local reassembly sites of the actin cortex during membrane blebbing. PMID:26976596

  19. Structural characterization of a capping protein interaction motif defines a family of actin filament regulators

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Valladares, Maria; Kim, Taekyung; Kannan, Balakrishnan; Tung, Alvin; Aguda, Adeleke H; Larsson, Mårten; Cooper, John A; Robinson, Robert C

    2011-01-01

    Capping protein (CP) regulates actin dynamics by binding the barbed ends of actin filaments. Removal of CP may be one means to harness actin polymerization for processes such as cell movement and endocytosis. Here we structurally and biochemically investigated a CP interaction (CPI) motif present in the otherwise unrelated proteins CARMIL and CD2AP. The CPI motif wraps around the stalk of the mushroom-shaped CP at a site distant from the actin-binding interface, which lies on the top of the mushroom cap. We propose that the CPI motif may act as an allosteric modulator, restricting CP to a low-affinity, filament-binding conformation. Structure-based sequence alignments extend the CPI motif–containing family to include CIN85, CKIP-1, CapZIP and a relatively uncharacterized protein, WASHCAP (FAM21). Peptides comprising these CPI motifs are able to inhibit CP and to uncap CP-bound actin filaments. PMID:20357771

  20. Regulation of inflammasome signaling

    PubMed Central

    Rathinam, Vijay A K; Vanaja, Sivapriya Kailasan; Fitzgerald, Katherine A

    2012-01-01

    Innate immune responses have the ability to both combat infectious microbes and drive pathological inflammation. Inflammasome complexes are a central component of these processes through their regulation of interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-18 and pyroptosis. Inflammasomes recognize microbial products or endogenous molecules released from damaged or dying cells both through direct binding of ligands and indirect mechanisms. The potential of the IL-1 family of cytokines to cause tissue damage and chronic inflammation emphasizes the importance of regulating inflammasomes. Many regulatory mechanisms have been identified that act as checkpoints for attenuating inflammasome signaling at multiple steps. Here we discuss the various regulatory mechanisms that have evolved to keep inflammasome signaling in check to maintain immunological balance. PMID:22430786

  1. Membrane Supply and Demand Regulates F-Actin in a Cell Surface Reservoir.

    PubMed

    Figard, Lauren; Wang, Mengyu; Zheng, Liuliu; Golding, Ido; Sokac, Anna Marie

    2016-05-01

    Cells store membrane in surface reservoirs of pits and protrusions. These membrane reservoirs facilitate cell shape change and buffer mechanical stress, but we do not know how reservoir dynamics are regulated. During cellularization, the first cytokinesis in Drosophila embryos, a reservoir of microvilli unfolds to fuel cleavage furrow ingression. We find that regulated exocytosis adds membrane to the reservoir before and during unfolding. Dynamic F-actin deforms exocytosed membrane into microvilli. Single microvilli extend and retract in ∼20 s, while the overall reservoir is depleted in sync with furrow ingression over 60-70 min. Using pharmacological and genetic perturbations, we show that exocytosis promotes microvillar F-actin assembly, while furrow ingression controls microvillar F-actin disassembly. Thus, reservoir F-actin and, consequently, reservoir dynamics are regulated by membrane supply from exocytosis and membrane demand from furrow ingression. PMID:27165556

  2. Emerging roles of actin cytoskeleton regulating enzymes in drug addiction: Actin or reactin’?

    PubMed Central

    Rothenfluh, Adrian; Cowan, Christopher W.

    2013-01-01

    Neurons rely on their cytoskeleton to give them shape and stability, and on cytoskeletal dynamics for growth and synaptic plasticity. Because drug addiction is increasingly seen as the inappropriate learning of strongly reinforcing stimuli, the role of the cytoskeleton in shaping drug memories has been of increasing interest in recent years. Does the cytoskeleton have an active role in shaping these memories, and to what extent do alterations in the cytoskeleton reflect the acute actions of drug exposure, or homeostatic reactions to the chronic exposure to drugs of abuse? Here we will review recent advances in understanding the role of the cytoskeleton in the development of drug addiction, with a focus on actin filaments, as they have been studied in greater detail. PMID:23428655

  3. Mechanisms of leiomodin 2-mediated regulation of actin filament in muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaorui; Ni, Fengyun; Kondrashkina, Elena; Ma, Jianpeng; Wang, Qinghua

    2015-01-01

    Leiomodin (Lmod) is a class of potent tandem-G-actin–binding nucleators in muscle cells. Lmod mutations, deletion, or instability are linked to lethal nemaline myopathy. However, the lack of high-resolution structures of Lmod nucleators in action severely hampered our understanding of their essential cellular functions. Here we report the crystal structure of the actin–Lmod2162–495 nucleus. The structure contains two actin subunits connected by one Lmod2162–495 molecule in a non–filament-like conformation. Complementary functional studies suggest that the binding of Lmod2 stimulates ATP hydrolysis and accelerates actin nucleation and polymerization. The high level of conservation among Lmod proteins in sequence and functions suggests that the mechanistic insights of human Lmod2 uncovered here may aid in a molecular understanding of other Lmod proteins. Furthermore, our structural and mechanistic studies unraveled a previously unrecognized level of regulation in mammalian signal transduction mediated by certain tandem-G-actin–binding nucleators. PMID:26417072

  4. A Role for Nuclear Actin in HDAC 1 and 2 Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Serebryannyy, Leonid A.; Cruz, Christina M.; de Lanerolle, Primal

    2016-01-01

    Class I histone deacetylases (HDACs) are known to remove acetyl groups from histone tails. This liberates positive charges on the histone tail and allows for tighter winding of DNA, preventing transcription factor binding and gene activation. Although the functions of HDAC proteins are becoming apparent both biochemically and clinically, how this class of proteins is regulated remains poorly understood. We identified a novel interaction between nuclear actin and HDAC 1 and HDAC 2. Nuclear actin has been previously shown to interact with a growing list of nuclear proteins including chromatin remodeling complexes, transcription factors and RNA polymerases. We find that monomeric actin is able to bind the class I HDAC complex. Furthermore, increasing the concentration of actin in HeLa nuclear extracts was able to suppress overall HDAC function. Conversely, polymerizing nuclear actin increased HDAC activity and decreased histone acetylation. Moreover, the interaction between class I HDACs and nuclear actin was found to be activity dependent. Together, our data suggest nuclear actin is able to regulate HDAC 1 and 2 activity. PMID:27345839

  5. A hemidesmosomal protein regulates actin dynamics and traction forces in motile keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Hiroyasu, Sho; Colburn, Zachary T; Jones, Jonathan C R

    2016-06-01

    During wound healing of the skin, keratinocytes disassemble hemidesmosomes and reorganize their actin cytoskeletons in order to exert traction forces on and move directionally over the dermis. Nonetheless, the transmembrane hemidesmosome component collagen XVII (ColXVII) is found in actin-rich lamella, situated behind the lamellipodium. A set of actin bundles, along which ColXVII colocalizes with actinin4, is present at each lamella. Knockdown of either ColXVII or actinin4 not only inhibits directed migration of keratinocytes but also relieves constraints on actin bundle retrograde movement at the site of lamella, such that actin bundle movement is enhanced more than 5-fold. Moreover, whereas control keratinocytes move in a stepwise fashion over a substrate by generating alternating traction forces, of up to 1.4 kPa, at each flank of the lamellipodium, ColXVII knockdown keratinocytes fail to do so. In summary, our data indicate that ColXVII-actinin4 complexes at the lamella of a moving keratinocyte regulate actin dynamics, thereby determining the direction of cell movement.-Hiroyasu, S., Colburn, Z. T., Jones, J. C. R. A hemidesmosomal protein regulates actin dynamics and traction forces in motile keratinocytes. PMID:26936359

  6. Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced actin glutathionylation controls actin dynamics in neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Jiro; Li, Jingyu; Subramanian, Kulandayan K.; Mondal, Subhanjan; Bajrami, Besnik; Hattori, Hidenori; Jia, Yonghui; Dickinson, Bryan C.; Zhong, Jia; Ye, Keqiang; Chang, Christopher J; Ho, Ye-Shih; Zhou, Jun; Luo, Hongbo R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The regulation of actin dynamics is pivotal for cellular processes such as cell adhesion, migration, and phagocytosis, and thus is crucial for neutrophils to fulfill their roles in innate immunity. Many factors have been implicated in signal-induced actin polymerization, however the essential nature of the potential negative modulators are still poorly understood. Here we report that NADPH oxidase-dependent physiologically generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) negatively regulate actin polymerization in stimulated neutrophils via driving reversible actin glutathionylation. Disruption of glutaredoxin 1 (Grx1), an enzyme that catalyzes actin deglutathionylation, increased actin glutathionylation, attenuated actin polymerization, and consequently impaired neutrophil polarization, chemotaxis, adhesion, and phagocytosis. Consistently, Grx1-deficient murine neutrophils showed impaired in vivo recruitment to sites of inflammation and reduced bactericidal capability. Together, these results present a physiological role for glutaredoxin and ROS- induced reversible actin glutathionylation in regulation of actin dynamics in neutrophils. PMID:23159440

  7. Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm (TAAD)-causing Mutation in Actin Affects Formin Regulation of Polymerization*

    PubMed Central

    Malloy, Lindsey E.; Wen, Kuo-Kuang; Pierick, Alyson R.; Wedemeyer, Elesa W.; Bergeron, Sarah E.; Vanderpool, Nicole D.; McKane, Melissa; Rubenstein, Peter A.; Bartlett, Heather L.

    2012-01-01

    More than 30 mutations in ACTA2, which encodes α-smooth muscle actin, have been identified to cause autosomal dominant thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection. The mutation R256H is of particular interest because it also causes patent ductus arteriosus and moyamoya disease. R256H is one of the more prevalent mutations and, based on its molecular location near the strand-strand interface in the actin filament, may affect F-actin stability. To understand the molecular ramifications of the R256H mutation, we generated Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells expressing only R256H yeast actin as a model system. These cells displayed abnormal cytoskeletal morphology and increased sensitivity to latrunculin A. After cable disassembly induced by transient exposure to latrunculin A, mutant cells were delayed in reestablishing the actin cytoskeleton. In vitro, mutant actin exhibited a higher than normal critical concentration and a delayed nucleation. Consequently, we investigated regulation of mutant actin by formin, a potent facilitator of nucleation and a protein needed for normal vascular smooth muscle cell development. Mutant actin polymerization was inhibited by the FH1-FH2 fragment of the yeast formin, Bni1. This fragment strongly capped the filament rather than facilitating polymerization. Interestingly, phalloidin or the presence of wild type actin reversed the strong capping behavior of Bni1. Together, the data suggest that the R256H actin mutation alters filament conformation resulting in filament instability and misregulation by formin. These biochemical effects may contribute to abnormal histology identified in diseased arterial samples from affected patients. PMID:22753406

  8. Thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAAD)-causing mutation in actin affects formin regulation of polymerization.

    PubMed

    Malloy, Lindsey E; Wen, Kuo-Kuang; Pierick, Alyson R; Wedemeyer, Elesa W; Bergeron, Sarah E; Vanderpool, Nicole D; McKane, Melissa; Rubenstein, Peter A; Bartlett, Heather L

    2012-08-17

    More than 30 mutations in ACTA2, which encodes α-smooth muscle actin, have been identified to cause autosomal dominant thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection. The mutation R256H is of particular interest because it also causes patent ductus arteriosus and moyamoya disease. R256H is one of the more prevalent mutations and, based on its molecular location near the strand-strand interface in the actin filament, may affect F-actin stability. To understand the molecular ramifications of the R256H mutation, we generated Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells expressing only R256H yeast actin as a model system. These cells displayed abnormal cytoskeletal morphology and increased sensitivity to latrunculin A. After cable disassembly induced by transient exposure to latrunculin A, mutant cells were delayed in reestablishing the actin cytoskeleton. In vitro, mutant actin exhibited a higher than normal critical concentration and a delayed nucleation. Consequently, we investigated regulation of mutant actin by formin, a potent facilitator of nucleation and a protein needed for normal vascular smooth muscle cell development. Mutant actin polymerization was inhibited by the FH1-FH2 fragment of the yeast formin, Bni1. This fragment strongly capped the filament rather than facilitating polymerization. Interestingly, phalloidin or the presence of wild type actin reversed the strong capping behavior of Bni1. Together, the data suggest that the R256H actin mutation alters filament conformation resulting in filament instability and misregulation by formin. These biochemical effects may contribute to abnormal histology identified in diseased arterial samples from affected patients. PMID:22753406

  9. Formin 1 Regulates Ectoplasmic Specialization in the Rat Testis Through Its Actin Nucleation and Bundling Activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Mruk, Dolores D; Wong, Chris K C; Han, Daishu; Lee, Will M; Cheng, C Yan

    2015-08-01

    During spermatogenesis, developing spermatids and preleptotene spermatocytes are transported across the adluminal compartment and the blood-testis barrier (BTB), respectively, so that spermatids line up near the luminal edge to prepare for spermiation, whereas preleptotene spermatocytes enter the adluminal compartment to differentiate into late spermatocytes to prepare for meiosis I/II. These cellular events involve actin microfilament reorganization at the testis-specific, actin-rich Sertoli-spermatid and Sertoli-Sertoli cell junction called apical and basal ectoplasmic specialization (ES). Formin 1, an actin nucleation protein known to promote actin microfilament elongation and bundling, was expressed at the apical ES but limited to stage VII of the epithelial cycle, whereas its expression at the basal ES/BTB stretched from stage III to stage VI, diminished in stage VII, and was undetectable in stage VIII tubules. Using an in vitro model of studying Sertoli cell BTB function by RNA interference and biochemical assays to monitor actin bundling and polymerization activity, a knockdown of formin 1 in Sertoli cells by approximately 70% impeded the tight junction-permeability function. This disruptive effect on the tight junction barrier was mediated by a loss of actin microfilament bundling and actin polymerization capability mediated by changes in the localization of branched actin-inducing protein Arp3 (actin-related protein 3), and actin bundling proteins Eps8 (epidermal growth factor receptor pathway substrate 8) and palladin, thereby disrupting cell adhesion. Formin 1 knockdown in vivo was found to impede spermatid adhesion, transport, and polarity, causing defects in spermiation in which elongated spermatids remained embedded into the epithelium in stage IX tubules, mediated by changes in the spatiotemporal expression of Arp3, Eps8, and palladin. In summary, formin 1 is a regulator of ES dynamics. PMID:25901598

  10. NudC regulates actin dynamics and ciliogenesis by stabilizing cofilin 1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Wen; Lu, Yi; Yan, Xiaoyi; Yan, Xiumin; Zhu, Xueliang; Liu, Wei; Yang, Yuehong; Zhou, Tianhua

    2016-02-01

    Emerging data indicate that actin dynamics is associated with ciliogenesis. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we find that nuclear distribution gene C (NudC), an Hsp90 co-chaperone, is required for actin organization and dynamics. Depletion of NudC promotes cilia elongation and increases the percentage of ciliated cells. Further results show that NudC binds to and stabilizes cofilin 1, a key regulator of actin dynamics. Knockdown of cofilin 1 also facilitates ciliogenesis. Moreover, depletion of either NudC or cofilin 1 causes similar ciliary defects in zebrafish, including curved body, pericardial edema and defective left-right asymmetry. Ectopic expression of cofilin 1 significantly reverses the phenotypes induced by NudC depletion in both cultured cells and zebrafish. Thus, our data suggest that NudC regulates actin cytoskeleton and ciliogenesis by stabilizing cofilin 1. PMID:26704451

  11. Single-filament kinetic studies provide novel insights into regulation of actin-based motility

    PubMed Central

    Shekhar, Shashank; Carlier, Marie-France

    2016-01-01

    Polarized assembly of actin filaments forms the basis of actin-based motility and is regulated both spatially and temporally. Cells use a variety of mechanisms by which intrinsically slower processes are accelerated, and faster ones decelerated, to match rates observed in vivo. Here we discuss how kinetic studies of individual reactions and cycles that drive actin remodeling have provided a mechanistic and quantitative understanding of such processes. We specifically consider key barbed-end regulators such as capping protein and formins as illustrative examples. We compare and contrast different kinetic approaches, such as the traditional pyrene-polymerization bulk assays, as well as more recently developed single-filament and single-molecule imaging approaches. Recent development of novel biophysical methods for sensing and applying forces will in future allow us to address the very important relationship between mechanical stimulus and kinetics of actin-based motility. PMID:26715420

  12. Noise-induced cochlear F-actin depolymerization is mediated via ROCK2/p-ERM signaling

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yu; Wang, Xianren; Chen, Jun; Sha, Su-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Our previous work has suggested that traumatic noise activates Rho-GTPase pathways in cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs), resulting in cell death and noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). In this study, we investigated Rho effectors, Rho-associated kinases (ROCKs), and the targets of ROCKs, the ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) proteins, in the regulation of the cochlear actin cytoskeleton using adult CBA/J mice under conditions of noise-induced temporary threshold shift (TTS) and permanent threshold shift (PTS) hearing loss, which result in changes to the F/G-actin ratio. The levels of cochlear ROCK2 and p-ERM decreased 1 h after either TTS- or PTS-noise exposure. In contrast, ROCK2 and p-ERM in OHCs decreased only after PTS-, not after TTS-noise exposure. Treatment with lysophosphatidic acid, an activator of the Rho pathway, resulted in significant reversal of the F/G-actin ratio changes caused by noise exposure and attenuated OHC death and NIHL. Conversely, the down-regulation of ROCK2 by pretreatment with ROCK2 siRNA reduced the expression of ROCK2 and p-ERM in OHCs, exacerbated TTS to PTS, and worsened OHC loss. Additionally, pretreatment with siRNA against radixin, an ERM protein, aggravated TTS to PTS. Our results indicate that a ROCK2-mediated ERM-phosphorylation signaling cascade modulates noise-induced hair cell loss and NIHL by targeting the cytoskeleton. PMID:25683353

  13. Collapsin Response Mediator Protein-1 Regulates Arp2/3-dependent Actin Assembly.

    PubMed

    Yu-Kemp, Hui-Chia; Brieher, William M

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a bacterial parasite that uses host proteins to assemble an Arp2/3-dependent actin comet tail to power its movement through the host cell. Initiation of comet tail assembly is more efficient in cytosol than it is under defined conditions, indicating that unknown factors contribute to the reaction. We therefore fractionated cytosol and identified CRMP-1 as a factor that facilitates Arp2/3-dependent Listeria actin cloud formation in the presence of Arp2/3 and actin alone. It also scored as an important factor for Listeria actin comet tail formation in brain cytosol. CRMP-1 does not nucleate actin assembly on its own, nor does it directly activate the Arp2/3 complex. Rather, CRMP-1 scored as an auxiliary factor that promoted the ability of Listeria ActA protein to activate the Arp2/3 complex to trigger actin assembly. CRMP-1 is one member of a family of five related proteins that modulate cell motility in response to extracellular signals. Our results demonstrate an important role for CRMP-1 in Listeria actin comet tail formation and open the possibility that CRMP-1 controls cell motility by modulating Arp2/3 activation. PMID:26598519

  14. Alix regulates cortical actin and the spatial distribution of endosomes.

    PubMed

    Cabezas, Alicia; Bache, Kristi G; Brech, Andreas; Stenmark, Harald

    2005-06-15

    Alix/AIP1 is a proline-rich protein that has been implicated in apoptosis, endocytic membrane trafficking and viral budding. To further elucidate the functions of Alix, we used RNA interference to specifically suppress its expression. Depletion of Alix caused a striking redistribution of early endosomes from a peripheral to a perinuclear location. The redistribution of endosomes did not affect transferrin recycling or degradation of endocytosed epidermal growth factor receptors, although the uptake of transferrin was mildly reduced when Alix was downregulated. Quantitative immunoelectron microscopy showed that multivesicular endosomes of Alix-depleted cells contained normal amounts of CD63, whereas their levels of lysobisphosphatidic acid were reduced. Alix depletion also caused an accumulation of unusual actin structures that contained clathrin and cortactin, a protein that couples membrane dynamics to the cortical actin cytoskeleton. Our results suggest that Alix functions in the actin-dependent intracellular positioning of endosomes, but that it is not essential for endocytic recycling or for trafficking of membrane proteins between early and late endosomes in non-polarised cells. PMID:15914539

  15. Signaling and Dynamic Actin Responses of B Cells on Topographical Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketchum, Christina; Sun, Xiaoyu; Fourkas, John; Song, Wenxia; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    B cells become activated upon physical contact with antigen on the surface of antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells. Binding of the B cell receptor with antigen initiates actin-mediated spreading of B cells, signaling cascades and eventually infection fighting antibodies. Lymphocytes, including B cells and T cells, have been shown to be responsive to the physical parameters of the contact surface, such as antigen mobility and substrate stiffness. However the roll of surface topography on lymphocyte function is unknown. Here we investigate the degree to which substrate topography controls actin-mediated spreading and B cell activation using nano-fabricated surfaces and live cell imaging. The model topographical system consists of 600 nanometer tall ridges with spacing varying between 800 nanometers and 5 micrometers. Using TIRF imaging we observe actin dynamics, B cell receptor motion and calcium signaling of B cells as they spread on the ridged substrates. We show that the spacing between ridges had a strong effect on the dynamics of actin and calcium influx on B cells. Our results indicate that B cells are highly sensitive to surface topography during cell spreading and signaling activation.

  16. Intersectin-2L Regulates Caveola Endocytosis Secondary to Cdc42-mediated Actin Polymerization*

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Irene K.; Predescu, Dan N.; Sharma, Tiffany; Knezevic, Ivana; Malik, Asrar B.; Predescu, Sanda

    2009-01-01

    Here we addressed the role of intersectin-2L (ITSN-2L), a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the Rho GTPase Cdc42, in the mechanism of caveola endocytosis in endothelial cells (ECs). Immunoprecipitation and co-localization studies showed that ITSN-2L associates with members of the Cdc42-WASp-Arp2/3 actin polymerization pathway. Expression of Dbl homology-pleckstrin homology (DH-PH) region of ITSN-2L (DH-PHITSN-2L) induced specific activation of Cdc42, resulting in formation of extensive filopodia, enhanced cortical actin, as well as a shift from G-actin to F-actin. The “catalytically dead” DH-PH domain reversed these effects and induced significant stress fiber formation, without a detectable shift in actin pools. A biotin assay for caveola internalization indicated a significant decrease in the uptake of biotinylated proteins in DH-PHITSN-2L-transfected cells compared with control and 1 μm jasplakinolide-treated cells. ECs depleted of ITSN-2L by small interfering RNA, however, showed decreased Cdc42 activation and actin remodeling similar to the defective DH-PH, resulting in 62% increase in caveola-mediated uptake compared with controls. Thus, ITSN-2L, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Cdc42, regulates different steps of caveola endocytosis in ECs by controlling the temporal and spatial actin polymerization and remodeling sub-adjacent to the plasma membrane. PMID:19622753

  17. Intersectin-2L regulates caveola endocytosis secondary to Cdc42-mediated actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Klein, Irene K; Predescu, Dan N; Sharma, Tiffany; Knezevic, Ivana; Malik, Asrar B; Predescu, Sanda

    2009-09-18

    Here we addressed the role of intersectin-2L (ITSN-2L), a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the Rho GTPase Cdc42, in the mechanism of caveola endocytosis in endothelial cells (ECs). Immunoprecipitation and co-localization studies showed that ITSN-2L associates with members of the Cdc42-WASp-Arp2/3 actin polymerization pathway. Expression of Dbl homology-pleckstrin homology (DH-PH) region of ITSN-2L (DH-PH(ITSN-2L)) induced specific activation of Cdc42, resulting in formation of extensive filopodia, enhanced cortical actin, as well as a shift from G-actin to F-actin. The "catalytically dead" DH-PH domain reversed these effects and induced significant stress fiber formation, without a detectable shift in actin pools. A biotin assay for caveola internalization indicated a significant decrease in the uptake of biotinylated proteins in DH-PH(ITSN-2L)-transfected cells compared with control and 1 microM jasplakinolide-treated cells. ECs depleted of ITSN-2L by small interfering RNA, however, showed decreased Cdc42 activation and actin remodeling similar to the defective DH-PH, resulting in 62% increase in caveola-mediated uptake compared with controls. Thus, ITSN-2L, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Cdc42, regulates different steps of caveola endocytosis in ECs by controlling the temporal and spatial actin polymerization and remodeling sub-adjacent to the plasma membrane. PMID:19622753

  18. Neuronal Actin Dynamics, Spine Density and Neuronal Dendritic Complexity Are Regulated by CAP2.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Atul; Paeger, Lars; Kosmas, Kosmas; Kloppenburg, Peter; Noegel, Angelika A; Peche, Vivek S

    2016-01-01

    Actin remodeling is crucial for dendritic spine development, morphology and density. CAP2 is a regulator of actin dynamics through sequestering G-actin and severing F-actin. In a mouse model, ablation of CAP2 leads to cardiovascular defects and delayed wound healing. This report investigates the role of CAP2 in the brain using Cap2(gt/gt) mice. Dendritic complexity, the number and morphology of dendritic spines were altered in Cap2(gt/gt) with increased number of excitatory synapses. This was accompanied by increased F-actin content and F-actin accumulation in cultured Cap2(gt/gt) neurons. Moreover, reduced surface GluA1 was observed in mutant neurons under basal condition and after induction of chemical LTP. Additionally, we show an interaction between CAP2 and n-cofilin, presumably mediated through the C-terminal domain of CAP2 and dependent on cofilin Ser3 phosphorylation. In vivo, the consequences of this interaction were altered phosphorylated cofilin levels and formation of cofilin aggregates in the neurons. Thus, our studies identify a novel role of CAP2 in neuronal development and neuronal actin dynamics. PMID:27507934

  19. Neuronal Actin Dynamics, Spine Density and Neuronal Dendritic Complexity Are Regulated by CAP2

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Atul; Paeger, Lars; Kosmas, Kosmas; Kloppenburg, Peter; Noegel, Angelika A.; Peche, Vivek S.

    2016-01-01

    Actin remodeling is crucial for dendritic spine development, morphology and density. CAP2 is a regulator of actin dynamics through sequestering G-actin and severing F-actin. In a mouse model, ablation of CAP2 leads to cardiovascular defects and delayed wound healing. This report investigates the role of CAP2 in the brain using Cap2gt/gt mice. Dendritic complexity, the number and morphology of dendritic spines were altered in Cap2gt/gt with increased number of excitatory synapses. This was accompanied by increased F-actin content and F-actin accumulation in cultured Cap2gt/gt neurons. Moreover, reduced surface GluA1 was observed in mutant neurons under basal condition and after induction of chemical LTP. Additionally, we show an interaction between CAP2 and n-cofilin, presumably mediated through the C-terminal domain of CAP2 and dependent on cofilin Ser3 phosphorylation. In vivo, the consequences of this interaction were altered phosphorylated cofilin levels and formation of cofilin aggregates in the neurons. Thus, our studies identify a novel role of CAP2 in neuronal development and neuronal actin dynamics. PMID:27507934

  20. Lateral diffusion of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor type 1 is regulated by actin filaments and 4.1N in neuronal dendrites.

    PubMed

    Fukatsu, Kazumi; Bannai, Hiroko; Zhang, Songbai; Nakamura, Hideki; Inoue, Takafumi; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2004-11-19

    Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor type1 (IP3R1) plays an important role in neuronal functions; however, the lateral diffusion of IP3R1 on the endoplasmic reticulum membrane and its regulation in the living neurons remain unknown. We expressed green fluorescent protein-tagged IP3R1 in cultured rat hippocampal neurons and observed the lateral diffusion by the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching technique. IP3R1 showed lateral diffusion with an effective diffusion constant of approximately 0.3 microm2/s. Depletion of actin filaments increased the diffusion constant of IP3R1, suggesting that the diffusion of IP3R1 is regulated negatively through actin filaments. We also found that protein 4.1N, which binds to IP3R1 and contains an actin-spectrin-binding region, was responsible for this actin regulation of the IP3R1 diffusion constant. Overexpression of dominant-negative 4.1N and blockade of 4.1N binding to IP3R1 increased the IP3R1 diffusion constant. The diffusion of IP3R type 3 (IP3R3), one of the isoforms of IP3Rs lacking the binding ability to 4.1N, was not dependent on actin filaments but became dependent on actin filaments after the addition of a 4.1N-binding sequence. These data suggest that 4.1N serves as a linker protein between IP3R1 and actin filaments. This actin filament-dependent regulation of IP3R1 diffusion may be important for the spatiotemporal regulation of intracellular Ca2+ signaling. PMID:15364918

  1. Regulation of myosin IIA and filamentous actin during insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Stall, Richard; Ramos, Joseph; Kent Fulcher, F.; Patel, Yashomati M.

    2014-03-10

    Insulin stimulated glucose uptake requires the colocalization of myosin IIA (MyoIIA) and the insulin-responsive glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) at the plasma membrane for proper GLUT4 fusion. MyoIIA facilitates filamentous actin (F-actin) reorganization in various cell types. In adipocytes F-actin reorganization is required for insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. What is not known is whether MyoIIA interacts with F-actin to regulate insulin-induced GLUT4 fusion at the plasma membrane. To elucidate the relationship between MyoIIA and F-actin, we examined the colocalization of MyoIIA and F-actin at the plasma membrane upon insulin stimulation as well as the regulation of this interaction. Our findings demonstrated that MyoIIA and F-actin colocalized at the site of GLUT4 fusion with the plasma membrane upon insulin stimulation. Furthermore, inhibition of MyoII with blebbistatin impaired F-actin localization at the plasma membrane. Next we examined the regulatory role of calcium in MyoIIA-F-actin colocalization. Reduced calcium or calmodulin levels decreased colocalization of MyoIIA and F-actin at the plasma membrane. While calcium alone can translocate MyoIIA it did not stimulate F-actin accumulation at the plasma membrane. Taken together, we established that while MyoIIA activity is required for F-actin localization at the plasma membrane, it alone is insufficient to localize F-actin to the plasma membrane. - Highlights: • Insulin induces colocalization of MyoIIA and F-actin at the cortex in adipocytes. • MyoIIA is necessary but not sufficient to localize F-actin at the cell cortex. • MyoIIA-F-actin colocalization is regulated by calcium and calmodulin.

  2. Signalling to actin assembly via the WASP (Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein)-family proteins and the Arp2/3 complex.

    PubMed Central

    Millard, Thomas H; Sharp, Stewart J; Machesky, Laura M

    2004-01-01

    The assembly of a branched network of actin filaments provides the mechanical propulsion that drives a range of dynamic cellular processes, including cell motility. The Arp2/3 complex is a crucial component of such filament networks. Arp2/3 nucleates new actin filaments while bound to existing filaments, thus creating a branched network. In recent years, a number of proteins that activate the filament nucleation activity of Arp2/3 have been identified, most notably the WASP (Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein) family. WASP-family proteins activate the Arp2/3 complex, and consequently stimulate actin assembly, in response to extracellular signals. Structural studies have provided a significant refinement in our understanding of the molecular detail of how the Arp2/3 complex nucleates actin filaments. There has also been much progress towards an understanding of the complicated signalling processes that regulate WASP-family proteins. In addition, the use of gene disruption in a number of organisms has led to new insights into the specific functions of individual WASP-family members. The present review will discuss the Arp2/3 complex and its regulators, in particular the WASP-family proteins. Emphasis will be placed on recent developments in the field that have furthered our understanding of actin dynamics and cell motility. PMID:15040784

  3. The pathogen-actin connection: A platform for defense signaling in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Day, B; Henty, Jessica L; Porter, K J; Staiger, Chris J

    2011-09-08

    The cytoskeleton, a dynamic network of cytoplasmic polymers, plays a central role in numerous fundamental processes, such as development, reproduction, and cellular responses to biotic and abiotic stimuli. As a platform for innate immune responses in mammalian cells, the actin cytoskeleton is a central component in the organization and activation of host defenses, including signaling and cellular repair. In plants, our understanding of the genetic and biochemical responses in both pathogen and host that are required for virulence and resistance has grown enormously. Additional advances in live-cell imaging of cytoskeletal dynamics have markedly altered our view of actin turnover in plants. In this review, we outline current knowledge of host resistance following pathogen perception, both in terms of the genetic interactions that mediate defense signaling, as well as the biochemical and cellular processes that are required for defense signaling.

  4. F-actin bundles direct the initiation and orientation of lamellipodia through adhesion-based signaling

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Heath E.; King, Samantha J.; Asokan, Sreeja B.; Rotty, Jeremy D.; Bear, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal cells such as fibroblasts are weakly polarized and reorient directionality by a lamellipodial branching mechanism that is stabilized by phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling. However, the mechanisms by which new lamellipodia are initiated and directed are unknown. Using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to monitor cytoskeletal and signaling dynamics in migrating cells, we show that peripheral F-actin bundles/filopodia containing fascin-1 serve as templates for formation and orientation of lamellipodia. Accordingly, modulation of fascin-1 expression tunes cell shape, quantified as the number of morphological extensions. Ratiometric imaging reveals that F-actin bundles/filopodia play both structural and signaling roles, as they prime the activation of PI3K signaling mediated by integrins and focal adhesion kinase. Depletion of fascin-1 ablated fibroblast haptotaxis on fibronectin but not platelet-derived growth factor chemotaxis. Based on these findings, we conceptualize haptotactic sensing as an exploration, with F-actin bundles directing and lamellipodia propagating the process and with signaling mediated by adhesions playing the role of integrator. PMID:25666809

  5. Formin-Dependent Synaptic Growth; Evidence that Dlar Signals via Diaphanous to Modulate Synaptic Actin and Dynamic Pioneer Microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Pawson, Catherine; Eaton, Benjamin A.; Davis, Graeme W.

    2008-01-01

    The diaphanous gene is the founding member of a family of Diaphanous Related Formin proteins (DRF). We identified diaphanous in a screen for genes that are necessary for the normal growth and stabilization of the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Here we demonstrate that diaphanous mutations perturb synaptic growth at the NMJ. Diaphanous protein is present both pre- and postsynaptically. However, genetic rescue experiments in combination with additional genetic interaction experiments support the conclusion that dia is necessary presynaptically for normal NMJ growth. We then document defects in both the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons in dia mutant nerve terminals. In so doing, we define and characterize a population of dynamic pioneer microtubules within the NMJ that are distinct from the bundled core of microtubules identified by the MAP1b-like protein Futsch. Defects in both synaptic actin and dynamic pioneer MTs are correlated with impaired synaptic growth in dia mutants. Finally, we present genetic evidence that Dia functions downstream of the presynaptic receptor tyrosine phosphatase Dlar and the Rho-type GEF trio to control NMJ growth. Based upon the established function of DRFs as Rho-GTPase dependent regulators of the cell cytoskeleton, we propose a model in which Diaphanous links receptor tyrosine phosphatase signaling at the plasma membrane to growth-dependent modulation of the synaptic actin and microtubule cytoskeletons. PMID:18971454

  6. Actin-Mediated Gene Expression Depends on RhoA and Rac1 Signaling in Proximal Tubular Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Giehl, Klaudia; Keller, Christof; Muehlich, Susanne; Goppelt-Struebe, Margarete

    2015-01-01

    Morphological alterations of cells can lead to modulation of gene expression. An essential link is the MKL1-dependent activation of serum response factor (SRF), which translates changes in the ratio of G- and F-actin into mRNA transcription. SRF activation is only partially characterized in non-transformed epithelial cells. Therefore, the impact of GTPases of the Rho family and changes in F-actin structures were analyzed in renal proximal tubular epithelial cells. Activation of SRF signaling was compared to the regulation of a known MKL1/SRF target gene, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF). In the human proximal tubular cell line HKC-8 overexpression of two actin mutants either favoring or preventing the formation of F-actin fibers regulated SRF-mediated transcription as well as CTGF expression. Only overexpression of constitutively active RhoA activated SRF-dependent gene expression whereas no effect was detected upon overexpression of Rac1 mutants. To elucidate the functional role of Rho kinases as downstream mediators of RhoA, pharmacological inhibition and genetic inhibition by transient siRNA knock down were compared. Upon stimulation with lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) Rho kinase inhibitors partially suppressed SRF-mediated transcription, whereas interference with Rho kinase expression by siRNA reduced activation of SRF, but barely affected CTGF expression. Together with the partial inhibition of CTGF expression by the pharmacological inhibitors Y27432 and H1154, Rho kinases seem to be less important in mediating RhoA signaling related to CTGF expression in HKC-8 epithelial cells. Short term pharmacological inhibition of Rac1 activity by EHT1864 reduced SRF-dependent CTGF expression in HKC-8 cells, but was overcome by a stimulatory effect after prolonged incubation after 4-6 h. Similarly, human primary cells of proximal but not of distal tubular origin showed inhibitory as well as stimulatory effects of Rac1 inhibition. Thus, RhoA signaling activates MKL1-SRF

  7. Theoretical models for cooperative steady-state ATPase activity of myosin subfragment-1 on regulated actin.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, T L; Eisenberg, E; Chalovich, J M

    1981-01-01

    Recent theoretical work on the cooperative equilibrium binding of myosin subfragment-1-ADP to regulated actin, as influenced by Ca2+, is extended here to the cooperative steady-state ATPase activity of myosin subfragment-1 on regulated actin. Exact solution of the general steady-state problem will require Monte Carlo calculations. Three interrelated special cases are discussed in some detail and sample computer (not Monte Carlo) solutions are given. The eventual objective is to apply these considerations to in vitro experimental data and to in vivo muscle models. PMID:6455170

  8. Movement of scallop myosin on Nitella actin filaments: regulation by calcium.

    PubMed Central

    Vale, R D; Szent-Gyorgyi, A G; Sheetz, M P

    1984-01-01

    In order to determine if Ca2+ regulates scallop myosin movement on actin, we have measured motility of scallop myosin along actin filaments using a direct visual assay. This procedure consists of covalently linking myosin to 1-micron beads and pipetting them onto a parallel array of actin filaments located on the cytoplasmic face of a Nitella internodal cell. In the absence of Ca2+, scallop myosin-coated beads exhibit no directed motion; however, in the presence of pCa2+ of greater than 5.84, these beads undergo linear translocations with average velocities of 2.0 micron/s. This Ca2+ -sensitive motility requires the presence of regulatory light chains on the scallop myosin. Removal of regulatory light chains with 10 mM EDTA produces a "desensitized" myosin, no longer sensitive to Ca2+, which moves at rates of 0.09-0.3 micron in the presence or absence of Ca2+. Readdition of regulatory light chains to preparations of desensitized myosin once again confers Ca2+-sensitive motility. The Ca2+ dependence of scallop-myosin motility shows a sharp transition, consistent with the Ca2+ activation sensitivity of the actin-activated ATPase. Furthermore, relative rates of movement of calcium-regulated myosins from various molluscan species are consistent with their respective rates of ATP hydrolysis. Thus, myosin motility along actin filaments provides a sensitive and direct assay of myosin activity and is suitable for studying myosin regulation. PMID:6238334

  9. Identification of a novel actin-dependent signal transducing module allows for the targeted degradation of GLI1.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Philipp; Bayo-Fina, Juan Miguel; Singh, Rajeev; Kumar Dhanyamraju, Pavan; Holz, Philipp; Baier, Aninja; Fendrich, Volker; Ramaswamy, Annette; Baumeister, Stefan; Martinez, Elisabeth D; Lauth, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The Down syndrome-associated DYRK1A kinase has been reported as a stimulator of the developmentally important Hedgehog (Hh) pathway, but cells from Down syndrome patients paradoxically display reduced Hh signalling activity. Here we find that DYRK1A stimulates GLI transcription factor activity through phosphorylation of general nuclear localization clusters. In contrast, in vivo and in vitro experiments reveal that DYRK1A kinase can also function as an inhibitor of endogenous Hh signalling by negatively regulating ABLIM proteins, the actin cytoskeleton and the transcriptional co-activator MKL1 (MAL). As a final effector of the DYRK1A-ABLIM-actin-MKL1 sequence, we identify the MKL1 interactor Jumonji domain demethylase 1A (JMJD1A) as a novel Hh pathway component stabilizing the GLI1 protein in a demethylase-independent manner. Furthermore, a Jumonji-specific small-molecule antagonist represents a novel and powerful inhibitor of Hh signal transduction by inducing GLI1 protein degradation in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26310823

  10. Identification of a novel actin-dependent signal transducing module allows for the targeted degradation of GLI1

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Philipp; Miguel Bayo-Fina, Juan; Singh, Rajeev; Kumar Dhanyamraju, Pavan; Holz, Philipp; Baier, Aninja; Fendrich, Volker; Ramaswamy, Annette; Baumeister, Stefan; Martinez, Elisabeth D.; Lauth, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The Down syndrome-associated DYRK1A kinase has been reported as a stimulator of the developmentally important Hedgehog (Hh) pathway, but cells from Down syndrome patients paradoxically display reduced Hh signalling activity. Here we find that DYRK1A stimulates GLI transcription factor activity through phosphorylation of general nuclear localization clusters. In contrast, in vivo and in vitro experiments reveal that DYRK1A kinase can also function as an inhibitor of endogenous Hh signalling by negatively regulating ABLIM proteins, the actin cytoskeleton and the transcriptional co-activator MKL1 (MAL). As a final effector of the DYRK1A-ABLIM-actin-MKL1 sequence, we identify the MKL1 interactor Jumonji domain demethylase 1A (JMJD1A) as a novel Hh pathway component stabilizing the GLI1 protein in a demethylase-independent manner. Furthermore, a Jumonji-specific small-molecule antagonist represents a novel and powerful inhibitor of Hh signal transduction by inducing GLI1 protein degradation in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26310823

  11. The Plant-Specific Actin Binding Protein SCAB1 Stabilizes Actin Filaments and Regulates Stomatal Movement in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Zhao, Shuangshuang; Mao, Tonglin; Qu, Xiaolu; Cao, Wanhong; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Wei; He, Liu; Li, Sidi; Ren, Sulin; Zhao, Jinfeng; Zhu, Guoli; Huang, Shanjin; Ye, Keqiong; Yuan, Ming; Guo, Yan

    2011-01-01

    Microfilament dynamics play a critical role in regulating stomatal movement; however, the molecular mechanism underlying this process is not well understood. We report here the identification and characterization of STOMATAL CLOSURE-RELATED ACTIN BINDING PROTEIN1 (SCAB1), an Arabidopsis thaliana actin binding protein. Plants lacking SCAB1 were hypersensitive to drought stress and exhibited reduced abscisic acid-, H2O2-, and CaCl2-regulated stomatal movement. In vitro and in vivo analyses revealed that SCAB1 binds, stabilizes, and bundles actin filaments. SCAB1 shares sequence similarity only with plant proteins and contains a previously undiscovered actin binding domain. During stomatal closure, actin filaments switched from a radial orientation in open stomata to a longitudinal orientation in closed stomata. This switch took longer in scab1 plants than in wild-type plants and was correlated with the delay in stomatal closure seen in scab1 mutants in response to drought stress. Our results suggest that SCAB1 is required for the precise regulation of actin filament reorganization during stomatal closure. PMID:21719691

  12. Arabidopsis response to low-phosphate conditions includes active changes in actin filaments and PIN2 polarization and is dependent on strigolactone signalling

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manoj; Pandya-Kumar, Nirali; Dam, Anandamoy; Haor, Hila; Mayzlish-Gati, Einav; Belausov, Eduard; Wininger, Smadar; Abu-Abied, Mohamad; McErlean, Christopher S. P.; Bromhead, Liam J.; Prandi, Cristina; Kapulnik, Yoram; Koltai, Hinanit

    2015-01-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) are plant hormones that regulate the plant response to phosphate (Pi) growth conditions. At least part of SL-signalling execution in roots involves MAX2-dependent effects on PIN2 polar localization in the plasma membrane (PM) and actin bundling and dynamics. We examined PIN2 expression, PIN2 PM localization, endosome trafficking, and actin bundling under low-Pi conditions: a MAX2-dependent reduction in PIN2 trafficking and polarization in the PM, reduced endosome trafficking, and increased actin-filament bundling were detected in root cells. The intracellular protein trafficking that is related to PIN proteins but unassociated with AUX1 PM localization was selectively inhibited. Exogenous supplementation of the synthetic SL GR24 to a SL-deficient mutant (max4) led to depletion of PIN2 from the PM under low-Pi conditions. Accordingly, roots of mutants in MAX2, MAX4, PIN2, TIR3, and ACTIN2 showed a reduced low-Pi response compared with the wild type, which could be restored by auxin (for all mutants) or GR24 (for all mutants except max2-1). Changes in PIN2 polarity, actin bundling, and vesicle trafficking may be involved in the response to low Pi in roots, dependent on SL/MAX2 signalling. PMID:25609825

  13. The IQGAP1 Protein Is a Calmodulin-regulated Barbed End Capper of Actin Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Pelikan-Conchaudron, Andrea; Le Clainche, Christophe; Didry, Dominique; Carlier, Marie-France

    2011-01-01

    IQGAP1 is a large modular protein that displays multiple partnership and is thought to act as a scaffold in coupling cell signaling to the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons in cell migration, adhesion, and cytokinesis. However the molecular mechanisms underlying the activities of IQGAP1 are poorly understood in part because of its large size, poor solubility and lack of functional assays to challenge biochemical properties in various contexts. We have purified bacterially expressed recombinant human IQGAP1. The protein binds Cdc42, Rac1, and the CRIB domain of N-WASP in a calmodulin-sensitive fashion. We further show that in addition to bundling of filaments via a single N-terminal calponin-homology domain, IQGAP1 actually regulates actin assembly. It caps barbed ends, with a higher affinity for ADP-bound terminal subunits (KB = 4 nm). The barbed end capping activity is inhibited by calmodulin, consistent with calmodulin binding to IQGAP1 with a KC of 40 nm, both in the absence and presence of Ca2+ ions. The barbed end capping activity resides in the C-terminal half of IQGAP1. It is possible that the capping activity of IQGAP1 accounts for its stimulation of cell migration. We further find that bacterially expressed recombinant IQGAP1 fragments easily co-purify with nucleic acids that turn out to activate N-WASP protein to branch filaments with Arp2/3 complex. The present results open perspectives for tackling the function of IQGAP1 in more complex reconstituted systems. PMID:21730051

  14. Vesicular trafficking through cortical actin during exocytosis is regulated by the Rab27a effector JFC1/Slp1 and the RhoA-GTPase–activating protein Gem-interacting protein

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jennifer L.; Monfregola, Jlenia; Napolitano, Gennaro; Kiosses, William B.; Catz, Sergio D.

    2012-01-01

    Cytoskeleton remodeling is important for the regulation of vesicular transport associated with exocytosis, but a direct association between granular secretory proteins and actin-remodeling molecules has not been shown, and this mechanism remains obscure. Using a proteomic approach, we identified the RhoA-GTPase–activating protein Gem-interacting protein (GMIP) as a factor that associates with the Rab27a effector JFC1 and modulates vesicular transport and exocytosis. GMIP down-regulation induced RhoA activation and actin polymerization. Importantly, GMIP-down-regulated cells showed impaired vesicular transport and exocytosis, while inhibition of the RhoA-signaling pathway induced actin depolymerization and facilitated exocytosis. We show that RhoA activity polarizes around JFC1-containing secretory granules, suggesting that it may control directionality of granule movement. Using quantitative live-cell microscopy, we show that JFC1-containing secretory organelles move in areas near the plasma membrane deprived of polymerized actin and that dynamic vesicles maintain an actin-free environment in their surroundings. Supporting a role for JFC1 in RhoA inactivation and actin remodeling during exocytosis, JFC1 knockout neutrophils showed increased RhoA activity, and azurophilic granules were unable to traverse cortical actin in cells lacking JFC1. We propose that during exocytosis, actin depolymerization commences near the secretory organelle, not the plasma membrane, and that secretory granules use a JFC1- and GMIP-dependent molecular mechanism to traverse cortical actin. PMID:22438581

  15. Myofibril growth during cardiac hypertrophy is regulated through dual phosphorylation and acetylation of the actin capping protein CapZ.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying-Hsi; Warren, Chad M; Li, Jieli; McKinsey, Timothy A; Russell, Brenda

    2016-08-01

    The mechanotransduction signaling pathways initiated in heart muscle by increased mechanical loading are known to lead to long-term transcriptional changes and hypertrophy, but the rapid events for adaptation at the sarcomeric level are not fully understood. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that actin filament assembly during cardiomyocyte growth is regulated by post-translational modifications (PTMs) of CapZβ1. In rapidly hypertrophying neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) stimulated by phenylephrine (PE), two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DGE) of CapZβ1 revealed a shift toward more negative charge. Consistent with this, mass spectrometry identified CapZβ1 phosphorylation on serine-204 and acetylation on lysine-199, two residues which are near the actin binding surface of CapZβ1. Ectopic expression of dominant negative PKCɛ (dnPKCɛ) in NRVMs blunted the PE-induced increase in CapZ dynamics, as evidenced by the kinetic constant (Kfrap) of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), and concomitantly reduced phosphorylation and acetylation of CapZβ1. Furthermore, inhibition of class I histone deacetylases (HDACs) increased lysine-199 acetylation on CapZβ1, which increased Kfrap of CapZ and stimulated actin dynamics. Finally, we show that PE treatment of NRVMs results in decreased binding of HDAC3 to myofibrils, suggesting a signal-dependent mechanism for the regulation of sarcomere-associated CapZβ1 acetylation. Taken together, this dual regulation through phosphorylation and acetylation of CapZβ1 provides a novel model for the regulation of myofibril growth during cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:27185186

  16. Probing the role of the actin cytoskeleton during regulated exocytosis by intravital microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Milberg, Oleg; Tora, Muhibullah; Shitara, Akiko; Masedunskas, Andrius

    2015-01-01

    Summary The actin cytoskeleton plays a fundamental role in controlling several steps during regulated exocytosis. Here we describe a combination of procedures that are aimed at studying the dynamics and the mechanism of the actin cytoskeleton in the salivary glands of live rodents, a model for exocrine secretion. Our approach relies on intravital microscopy, an imaging technique that enables imaging biological events in live animals at a subcellular resolution, and it is complemented by the use of pharmacological agents and indirect immunofluorescence in the salivary tissue. PMID:24947398

  17. Actin branches out to link pathogen perception and host gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Katie; Day, Brad

    2013-01-01

    Cellular functions of actin, and associated actin binding proteins (ABPs), have been well characterized with respect to their dynamic cytosolic role as components of the complex cytoskeletal network. In this regard, the collective research in this field has vastly expanded our knowledge of the role of actin to more recently identify a key role within the nucleus as an integral part gene organization and expression. Herein, we describe the requirement of the ABP actin depolymerizing factor-4 (ADF4) as a regulator of resistance to Pseudomonas syringae DC3000 expressing the effector AvrPphB via ADF4’s cytosolic and nuclear functions. In total, our work has identified significant alterations in the expression of the resistance protein RPS5 in an ADF4 phosphorylation dependent manner. In this mini-review, we provide compelling evidence in support of both a nuclear function for ADF4, as well as potential targeting of the actin cytoskeleton bythe bacterial effector AvrPphB. PMID:23333960

  18. The actin cytoskeleton coordinates the signal transduction and antigen processing functions of the B cell antigen receptor

    PubMed Central

    LIU, Chaohong; FALLEN, Margaret K.; MILLER, Heather; UPADHYAYA, Arpita; SONG, Wenxia

    2014-01-01

    The B cell antigen receptor (BCR) is the sensor on the B cell surface that surveys foreign molecules (antigen) in our bodies and activates B cells to generate antibody responses upon encountering cognate antigen. The binding of antigen to the BCR induces signaling cascades in the cytoplasm, which provides the first signal for B cell activation. Subsequently, BCRs internalize and target bound antigen to endosomes, where antigen is processed into T cell recognizable forms. T helper cells generate the second activation signal upon binding to antigen presented by B cells. The optimal activation of B cells requires both signals, thereby depending on the coordination of BCR signaling and antigen transport functions. Antigen binding to the BCR also induces rapid remodeling of the cortical actin network of B cells. While being initiated and controlled by BCR signaling, recent studies reveal that this actin remodeling is critical for both the signaling and antigen processing functions of the BCR, indicating a role for actin in coordinating these two pathways. Here we will review previous and recent studies on actin reorganization during BCR activation and BCR-mediated antigen processing, and discuss how actin remodeling translates BCR signaling into rapid antigen uptake and processing while providing positive and negative feedback to BCR signaling. PMID:24999354

  19. Actin cytoskeleton organization regulated by the PAK family of protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Eby, J J; Holly, S P; van Drogen, F; Grishin, A V; Peter, M; Drubin, D G; Blumer, K J

    1998-08-27

    Cdc42, Rac1 and other Rho-type GTPases regulate gene expression, cell proliferation and cytoskeletal architecture [1,2]. A challenge is to identify the effectors of Cdc42 and Rac1 that mediate these biological responses. Protein kinases of the p21-activated kinase (PAK) family bind activated Rac1 and Cdc42, and switch on mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathways; however, their roles in regulating actin cytoskeleton organization have not been clearly established [3-5]. Here, we show that mutants of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking the PAK homologs Ste20 and Cla4 exhibit actin cytoskeletal defects, in vivo and in vitro, that resemble those of cdc42-1 mutants. Moreover, STE20 overexpression suppresses cdc42-1 growth defects and cytoskeletal defects in vivo, and Ste20 kinase corrects the actin-assembly defects of permeabilized cdc42-1 cells in vitro. Thus, PAKs are effectors of Cdc42 in pathways that regulate the organization of the cortical actin cytoskeleton. PMID:9742399

  20. Regulation of muscle force in the absence of actin-myosin-based cross-bridge interaction.

    PubMed

    Leonard, T R; Herzog, W

    2010-07-01

    For the past half century, the sliding filament-based cross-bridge theory has been the cornerstone of our understanding of how muscles contract. According to this theory, active force can only occur if there is overlap between the contractile filaments, actin and myosin. Otherwise, forces are thought to be caused by passive structural elements and are assumed to vary solely because of the length of the muscle. We observed increases in muscle force by a factor of 3 to 4 above the purely passive forces for activated and stretched myofibrils in the absence of actin-myosin overlap. We show that this dramatic increase in force is crucially dependent on the presence of the structural protein titin, cannot be explained with calcium activation, and is regulated by actin-myosin-based cross-bridge forces before stretching. We conclude from these observations that titin is a strong regulator of muscle force and propose that this regulation is based on cross-bridge force-dependent titin-actin interactions. These results suggest a mechanism for stability of sarcomeres on the "inherently unstable" descending limb of the force-length relationship, and they further provide an explanation for the protection of muscles against stretch-induced muscle injuries. PMID:20357181

  1. Phospholipase Cη2 Activation Redirects Vesicle Trafficking by Regulating F-actin*

    PubMed Central

    Yamaga, Masaki; Kielar-Grevstad, D. Michelle; Martin, Thomas F. J.

    2015-01-01

    PI(4,5)P2 localizes to sites of dense core vesicle exocytosis in neuroendocrine cells and is required for Ca2+-triggered vesicle exocytosis, but the impact of local PI(4,5)P2 hydrolysis on exocytosis is poorly understood. Previously, we reported that Ca2+-dependent activation of phospholipase Cη2 (PLCη2) catalyzes PI(4,5)P2 hydrolysis, which affected vesicle exocytosis by regulating the activities of the lipid-dependent priming factors CAPS (also known as CADPS) and ubiquitous Munc13-2 in PC12 cells. Here we describe an additional role for PLCη2 in vesicle exocytosis as a Ca2+-dependent regulator of the actin cytoskeleton. Depolarization of neuroendocrine PC12 cells with 56 or 95 mm KCl buffers increased peak Ca2+ levels to ∼400 or ∼800 nm, respectively, but elicited similar numbers of vesicle exocytic events. However, 56 mm K+ preferentially elicited the exocytosis of plasma membrane-resident vesicles, whereas 95 mm K+ preferentially elicited the exocytosis of cytoplasmic vesicles arriving during stimulation. Depolarization with 95 mm K+ but not with 56 mm K+ activated PLCη2 to catalyze PI(4,5)P2 hydrolysis. The decrease in PI(4,5)P2 promoted F-actin disassembly, which increased exocytosis of newly arriving vesicles. Consistent with its role as a Ca2+-dependent regulator of the cortical actin cytoskeleton, PLCη2 localized with F-actin filaments. The results highlight the importance of PI(4,5)P2 for coordinating cytoskeletal dynamics with vesicle exocytosis and reveal a new role for PLCη2 as a Ca2+-dependent regulator of F-actin dynamics and vesicle trafficking. PMID:26432644

  2. Yeast Eps15-like endocytic protein Pan1p regulates the interaction between endocytic vesicles, endosomes and the actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Toshima, Junko Y; Furuya, Eri; Nagano, Makoto; Kanno, Chisa; Sakamoto, Yuta; Ebihara, Masashi; Siekhaus, Daria Elisabeth; Toshima, Jiro

    2016-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton plays important roles in the formation and internalization of endocytic vesicles. In yeast, endocytic vesicles move towards early endosomes along actin cables, however, the molecular machinery regulating interaction between endocytic vesicles and actin cables is poorly understood. The Eps15-like protein Pan1p plays a key role in actin-mediated endocytosis and is negatively regulated by Ark1 and Prk1 kinases. Here we show that pan1 mutated to prevent phosphorylation at all 18 threonines, pan1-18TA, displayed almost the same endocytic defect as ark1Δ prk1Δ cells, and contained abnormal actin concentrations including several endocytic compartments. Early endosomes were highly localized in the actin concentrations and displayed movement along actin cables. The dephosphorylated form of Pan1p also caused stable associations between endocytic vesicles and actin cables, and between endocytic vesicles and endosomes. Thus Pan1 phosphorylation is part of a novel mechanism that regulates endocytic compartment interactions with each other and with actin cables. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10276.001 PMID:26914139

  3. Actin-dependent mechanisms in AMPA receptor trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Jonathan G.

    2014-01-01

    The precise regulation of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) number and subtype at the synapse is crucial for the regulation of excitatory neurotransmission, synaptic plasticity and the consequent formation of appropriate neural circuits for learning and memory. AMPAR trafficking involves the dynamic processes of exocytosis, endocytosis and endosomal recycling, all of which involve the actin cytoskeleton. The actin cytoskeleton is highly dynamic and highly regulated by an abundance of actin-binding proteins and upstream signaling pathways that modulate actin polymerization and depolymerization. Actin dynamics generate forces that manipulate membranes in the process of vesicle biogenesis, and also for propelling vesicles through the cytoplasm to reach their destination. In addition, trafficking mechanisms exploit more stable aspects of the actin cytoskeleton by using actin-based motor proteins to traffic vesicular cargo along actin filaments. Numerous studies have shown that actin dynamics are critical for AMPAR localization and function. The identification of actin-binding proteins that physically interact with AMPAR subunits, and research into their mode of action is starting to shed light on the mechanisms involved. Such proteins either regulate actin dynamics to modulate mechanical forces exerted on AMPAR-containing membranes, or associate with actin filaments to target or transport AMPAR-containing vesicles to specific subcellular regions. In addition, actin-regulatory proteins that do not physically interact with AMPARs may influence AMPAR trafficking by regulating the local actin environment in the dendritic spine. PMID:25429259

  4. Ezrin: a regulator of actin microfilaments in cell junctions of the rat testis.

    PubMed

    Gungor-Ordueri, N Ece; Celik-Ozenci, Ciler; Cheng, C Yan

    2015-01-01

    Ezrin, radixin, moesin and merlin (ERM) proteins are highly homologous actin-binding proteins that share extensive sequence similarity with each other. These proteins tether integral membrane proteins and their cytoplasmic peripheral proteins (e.g., adaptors, nonreceptor protein kinases and phosphatases) to the microfilaments of actin-based cytoskeleton. Thus, these proteins are crucial to confer integrity of the apical membrane domain and its associated junctional complex, namely the tight junction and the adherens junction. Since ectoplasmic specialization (ES) is an F-actin-rich testis-specific anchoring junction-a highly dynamic ultrastructure in the seminiferous epithelium due to continuous transport of germ cells, in particular spermatids, across the epithelium during the epithelial cycle-it is conceivable that ERM proteins are playing an active role in these events. Although these proteins were first reported almost 25 years and have since been extensively studied in multiple epithelia/endothelia, few reports are found in the literature to examine their role in the actin filament bundles at the ES. Studies have shown that ezrin is also a constituent protein of the actin-based tunneling nanotubes (TNT) also known as intercellular bridges, which are transient cytoplasmic tubular ultrastructures that transport signals, molecules and even organelles between adjacent and distant cells in an epithelium to coordinate cell events that occur across an epithelium. Herein, we critically evaluate recent data on ERM in light of recent findings in the field in particular ezrin regarding its role in actin dynamics at the ES in the testis, illustrating additional studies are warranted to examine its physiological significance in spermatogenesis. PMID:25652626

  5. Drosophila protein kinase N (Pkn) is a negative regulator of actin-myosin activity during oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Tânia; Prudêncio, Pedro; Martinho, Rui Gonçalo

    2014-10-15

    Nurse cell dumping is an actin-myosin based process, where 15 nurse cells of a given egg chamber contract and transfer their cytoplasmic content through the ring canals into the growing oocyte. We isolated two mutant alleles of protein kinase N (pkn) and showed that Pkn negatively-regulates activation of the actin-myosin cytoskeleton during the onset of dumping. Using live-cell imaging analysis we observed that nurse cell dumping rates sharply increase during the onset of fast dumping. Such rate increase was severely impaired in pkn mutant nurse cells due to excessive nurse cell actin-myosin activity and/or loss of tissue integrity. Our work demonstrates that the transition between slow and fast dumping is a discrete event, with at least a five to six-fold dumping rate increase. We show that Pkn negatively regulates nurse cell actin-myosin activity. This is likely to be important for directional cytoplasmic flow. We propose Pkn provides a negative feedback loop to help avoid excessive contractility after local activation of Rho GTPase. PMID:25131196

  6. Regulation of actin assembly by microtubules in fission yeast cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Fred; Feierbach, Becket; Martin, Sophie

    2005-01-01

    It has been speculated that microtubule plus ends function to regulate the actin cytoskeleton in processes such as cytokinesis, cell polarization and cell migration. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, interphase microtubules regulate cell polarity through proteins such as tea1p, a kelch repeat protein, and for3p, a formin that nucleates actin cable assembly at cell tips. Here, we review recent progress on understanding tea1p regulation and function. Microtubules may govern the localization of tea1p by transporting it on the plus ends of microtubules and depositing it directly onto the cell tip when the microtubule catastrophes. The interaction of tea1p with the CLIP170 protein tip1p is responsible for its localization at growing microtubule plus ends. Tea1p may regulate cell polarity by associating with large 'polarisome' complexes that include for3p. For3p is present at both cell tips, but is not on the microtubules. Tea1p is needed to localize the formin to establish polarized cell growth at cell tips that have not grown previously. These studies begin to elucidate a molecular pathway for how microtubules contribute to the proper spatial regulation of actin assembly and polarized cell growth. PMID:16355535

  7. The C-Terminus of Troponin T Is Essential for Maintaining the Inactive State of Regulated Actin

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Andrew J.; Baxley, Tamatha; Kobayashi, Tomoyoshi; Chalovich, Joseph M.

    2012-01-01

    Striated muscle contraction is regulated by the actin binding proteins tropomyosin and troponin. Defects in these proteins lead to myopathies and cardiomyopathies. Deletion of the 14 C-terminal residues of cardiac troponin T leads to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We showed earlier that regulated actin containing Δ14 TnT was more readily activated than wild-type regulated actin. We suggested that the equilibria among the inactive (blocked), intermediate (closed or calcium), and active (open or myosin) states was shifted to the active state. We now show that, in addition, such regulated actin filaments cannot enter the inactive or blocked state. Regulated actin containing Δ14 TnT had ATPase activities in the absence of Ca2+ that were higher than wild-type filaments but far below the fully active rate. The rapid dissociation of S1-ATP from regulated actin filaments containing Δ14 TnT and acrylodan-labeled tropomyosin did not show the fluorescence increase characteristic of moving to the inactive state. Replacing wild-type TnI with S45E TnI, that favors the inactive state, did not restore the fluorescence change. We conclude that TnT has a previously unrecognized role in forming the inactive state of regulated actin. PMID:22713569

  8. Actin Recruitment to the Chlamydia Inclusion Is Spatiotemporally Regulated by a Mechanism That Requires Host and Bacterial Factors

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Elizabeth; Kirker, Kelly; Zuck, Meghan; James, Garth; Hybiske, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    The ability to exit host cells at the end of their developmental growth is a critical step for the intracellular bacterium Chlamydia. One exit strategy, extrusion, is mediated by host signaling pathways involved with actin polymerization. Here, we show that actin is recruited to the chlamydial inclusion as a late event, occurring after 20 hours post-infection (hpi) and only within a subpopulation of cells. This event increases significantly in prevalence and extent from 20 to 68 hpi, and actin coats strongly correlated with extrusions. In contrast to what has been reported for other intracellular pathogens, actin nucleation on Chlamydia inclusions did not ‘flash’, but rather exhibited moderate depolymerization dynamics. By using small molecule agents to selectively disrupt host signaling pathways involved with actin nucleation, modulate actin polymerization dynamics and also to disable the synthesis and secretion of chlamydial proteins, we further show that host and bacterial proteins are required for actin coat formation. Transient disruption of either host or bacterial signaling pathways resulted in rapid loss of coats in all infected cells and a reduction in extrusion formation. Inhibition of Chlamydia type III secretion also resulted in rapid loss of actin association on inclusions, thus implicating chlamydial effector proteins(s) as being central factors for engaging with host actin nucleating factors, such as formins. In conclusion, our data illuminate the host and bacterial driven process by which a dense actin matrix is dynamically nucleated and maintained on the Chlamydia inclusion. This late stage event is not ubiquitous for all infected cells in a population, and escalates in prevalence and extent throughout the developmental cycle of Chlamydia, culminating with their exit from the host cell by extrusion. The initiation of actin recruitment by Chlamydia appears to be novel, and may serve as an upstream determinant of the extrusion mechanism. PMID

  9. CD23 can negatively regulate B-cell receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chaohong; Richard, Katharina; Wiggins, Melvin; Zhu, Xiaoping; Conrad, Daniel H.; Song, Wenxia

    2016-01-01

    CD23 has been implicated as a negative regulator of IgE and IgG antibody responses. However, whether CD23 has any role in B-cell activation remains unclear. We examined the expression of CD23 in different subsets of peripheral B cells and the impact of CD23 expression on the early events of B-cell receptor (BCR) activation using CD23 knockout (KO) mice. We found that in addition to marginal zone B cells, mature follicular B cells significantly down regulate the surface expression level of CD23 after undergoing isotype switch and memory B-cell differentiation. Upon stimulation with membrane-associated antigen, CD23 KO causes significant increases in the area of B cells contacting the antigen-presenting membrane and the magnitude of BCR clustering. This enhanced cell spreading and BCR clustering is concurrent with increases in the levels of phosphorylation of tyrosine and Btk, as well as the levels of F-actin and phosphorylated Wiskott Aldrich syndrome protein, an actin nucleation promoting factor, in the contract zone of CD23 KO B cells. These results reveal a role of CD23 in the negative regulation of BCR signaling in the absence of IgE immune complex and suggest that CD23 down-regulates BCR signaling by influencing actin-mediated BCR clustering and B-cell morphological changes. PMID:27181049

  10. CD23 can negatively regulate B-cell receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chaohong; Richard, Katharina; Wiggins, Melvin; Zhu, Xiaoping; Conrad, Daniel H; Song, Wenxia

    2016-01-01

    CD23 has been implicated as a negative regulator of IgE and IgG antibody responses. However, whether CD23 has any role in B-cell activation remains unclear. We examined the expression of CD23 in different subsets of peripheral B cells and the impact of CD23 expression on the early events of B-cell receptor (BCR) activation using CD23 knockout (KO) mice. We found that in addition to marginal zone B cells, mature follicular B cells significantly down regulate the surface expression level of CD23 after undergoing isotype switch and memory B-cell differentiation. Upon stimulation with membrane-associated antigen, CD23 KO causes significant increases in the area of B cells contacting the antigen-presenting membrane and the magnitude of BCR clustering. This enhanced cell spreading and BCR clustering is concurrent with increases in the levels of phosphorylation of tyrosine and Btk, as well as the levels of F-actin and phosphorylated Wiskott Aldrich syndrome protein, an actin nucleation promoting factor, in the contract zone of CD23 KO B cells. These results reveal a role of CD23 in the negative regulation of BCR signaling in the absence of IgE immune complex and suggest that CD23 down-regulates BCR signaling by influencing actin-mediated BCR clustering and B-cell morphological changes. PMID:27181049

  11. Protein Regulation in Signal Transduction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael J; Yaffe, Michael B

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARYCells must respond to a diverse, complex, and ever-changing mix of signals, using a fairly limited set of parts. Changes in protein level, protein localization, protein activity, and protein-protein interactions are critical aspects of signal transduction, allowing cells to respond highly specifically to a nearly limitless set of cues and also to vary the sensitivity, duration, and dynamics of the response. Signal-dependent changes in levels of gene expression and protein synthesis play an important role in regulation of protein levels, whereas posttranslational modifications of proteins regulate their degradation, localization, and functional interactions. Protein ubiquitylation, for example, can direct proteins to the proteasome for degradation or provide a signal that regulates their interactions and/or location within the cell. Similarly, protein phosphorylation by specific kinases is a key mechanism for augmenting protein activity and relaying signals to other proteins that possess domains that recognize the phosphorylated residues. PMID:27252361

  12. Complex relationship between TCTP, microtubules and actin microfilaments regulates cell shape in normal and cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Bazile, Franck; Pascal, Aude; Arnal, Isabelle; Le Clainche, Christophe; Chesnel, Franck; Kubiak, Jacek Z.

    2009-01-01

    Translationally Controlled Tumor-associated Protein (TCTP) is a ubiquitous and highly conserved protein implicated in cancers. Here we demonstrate that interactions of TCTP with microtubules (MTs) are functionally important but indirect, and we reveal novel interaction of TCTP with the actin cytoskeleton. Firstly, immunofluorescence in Xenopus XL2 cells revealed cytoplasmic fibers stained with TCTP but not with tubulin antibodies, as well as MT-free of TCTP. Furthermore, TCTP localized to a subset of actin-rich fibers in migrating cells. Secondly XlTCTP did not affect in vitro assembly/disassembly of MTs, and lacked MT binding affinity both in pull-down assays and in cell-free extracts. Although TCTP also failed to bind to purified F-actin, it associated with microfilaments in cell-free extracts. Thirdly, TCTP concentrated in mitotic spindle did not colocalize with MTs, and was easily dissociated from these structures except at the poles. Finally, RNAi knockdown of TCTP in XL2 and HeLa cells provoked drastic, MT-dependent, shape change. These data show that although TCTP interacts with MTs it does not behave as classic MT Associated Protein (MAP). Our evidence for an association of TCTP with F-actin structures, and for an involvement in cell shape regulation, implicates this protein in integrating cytoskeletal interations both in interphase and mitosis providing a new avenue to fully understand the role of TCTP. PMID:19168579

  13. Arginyltransferase regulates alpha cardiac actin, myofibril formation and contractility during heart development

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Reena; Wong, Catherine C. L.; Xu, Tao; Leu, N. Adrian; Dong, Dawei W.; Guo, Caiying; McLaughlin, K. John; Yates, John R.; Kashina, Anna

    2008-01-01

    Summary Posttranslational arginylation mediated by arginyltransferase (Ate1) is essential for cardiovascular development and angiogenesis in mammals and directly affects the myocardium structure in the developing heart. We recently showed that arginylation exerts a number of intracellular effects by modifying proteins involved in the functioning of actin cytoskeleton and the events of cell motility. Here we investigate the role of arginylation in the development and function of cardiac myocytes and their actin-containing structures during embryogenesis. Biochemical and mass spectrometry analysis shows that alpha cardiac actin undergoes arginylation on multiple sites during development. Ultrastructural analysis of the myofibrils in wild type and Ate1 knockout mouse hearts shows that the absence of arginylation results in defects in myofibril structure that delay their development and affect the continuity of myofibrils throughout the heart, predicting defects in cardiac contractility. Comparison of cardiac myocytes derived from wild type and Ate1 knockout mouse embryos show that the absence of arginylation results in abnormal beating patterns. Our results demonstrate cell-autonomous cardiac myocyte defects in arginylation knockout mice that lead to severe congenital abnormalities similar to those observed in human disease, and outline a new function of arginylation in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton in cardiac myocytes. PMID:18948421

  14. The actin-binding protein EPS8 binds VE-cadherin and modulates YAP localization and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Disanza, Andrea; Bravi, Luca; Barrios-Rodiles, Miriam; Corada, Monica; Frittoli, Emanuela; Savorani, Cecilia; Lampugnani, Maria Grazia; Boggetti, Barbara; Niessen, Carien; Wrana, Jeff L.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial (VE)–cadherin transfers intracellular signals contributing to vascular hemostasis. Signaling through VE-cadherin requires association and activity of different intracellular partners. Yes-associated protein (YAP)/TAZ transcriptional cofactors are important regulators of cell growth and organ size. We show that EPS8, a signaling adapter regulating actin dynamics, is a novel partner of VE-cadherin and is able to modulate YAP activity. By biochemical and imaging approaches, we demonstrate that EPS8 associates with the VE-cadherin complex of remodeling junctions promoting YAP translocation to the nucleus and transcriptional activation. Conversely, in stabilized junctions, 14–3-3–YAP associates with the VE–cadherin complex, whereas Eps8 is excluded. Junctional association of YAP inhibits nuclear translocation and inactivates its transcriptional activity both in vitro and in vivo in Eps8-null mice. The absence of Eps8 also increases vascular permeability in vivo, but did not induce other major vascular defects. Collectively, we identified novel components of the adherens junction complex, and we introduce a novel molecular mechanism through which the VE-cadherin complex controls YAP transcriptional activity. PMID:26668327

  15. Cdc42/N-WASP signaling links actin dynamics to pancreatic β cell delamination and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kesavan, Gokul; Lieven, Oliver; Mamidi, Anant; Öhlin, Zarah Löf; Johansson, Jenny Kristina; Li, Wan-Chun; Lommel, Silvia; Greiner, Thomas Uwe; Semb, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Delamination plays a pivotal role during normal development and cancer. Previous work has demonstrated that delamination and epithelial cell movement within the plane of an epithelium are associated with a change in cellular phenotype. However, how this positional change is linked to differentiation remains unknown. Using the developing mouse pancreas as a model system, we show that β cell delamination and differentiation are two independent events, which are controlled by Cdc42/N-WASP signaling. Specifically, we show that expression of constitutively active Cdc42 in β cells inhibits β cell delamination and differentiation. These processes are normally associated with junctional actin and cell-cell junction disassembly and the expression of fate-determining transcription factors, such as Isl1 and MafA. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that genetic ablation of N-WASP in β cells expressing constitutively active Cdc42 partially restores both delamination and β cell differentiation. These findings elucidate how junctional actin dynamics via Cdc42/N-WASP signaling cell-autonomously control not only epithelial delamination but also cell differentiation during mammalian organogenesis. PMID:24449844

  16. Isolation and characterization of a regulated form of actin depolymerizing factor.

    PubMed

    Morgan, T E; Lockerbie, R O; Minamide, L S; Browning, M D; Bamburg, J R

    1993-08-01

    Actin depolymerizing factor (ADF) is an 18.5-kD protein with pH-dependent reciprocal F-actin binding and severing/depolymerizing activities. We previously showed developing muscle down-regulates ADF (J. R. Bamburg and D. Bray. 1987. J. Cell Biol. 105: 2817-2825). To further study this process, we examined ADF expression in chick myocytes cultured in vitro. Surprisingly, ADF immunoreactivity increases during the first 7-10 d in culture. This increase is due to the presence of a new ADF species with higher relative molecular weight which reacts identically to brain ADF with antisera raised against either brain ADF or recombinant ADF. We have purified both ADF isoforms from myocytes and have shown by peptide mapping and partial sequence analysis that the new isoform is structurally related to ADF. Immunoprecipitation of both isoforms from extracts of cells prelabeled with [32P]orthophosphate showed that the new isoform is radiolabeled, predominantly on a serine residue, and hence is called pADF. pADF can be converted into a form which comigrates with ADF on 1-D and 2-D gels by treatment with alkaline phosphatase. pADF has been quantified in a number of cells and tissues where it is present from approximately 18% to 150% of the amount of unphosphorylated ADF. pADF, unlike ADF, does not bind to G-actin, or affect the rate or extent of actin assembly. Four ubiquitous protein kinases failed to phosphorylate ADF in vitro suggesting that ADF phosphorylation in vivo is catalyzed by a more specific kinase. We conclude that the ability to regulate ADF activity is important to muscle development since myocytes have both pre- and posttranslational mechanisms for regulating ADF activity. The latter mechanism is apparently a general one for cell regulation of ADF activity. PMID:7687605

  17. Polymerization of actin in RBL-2H3 cells can be triggered through either the IgE receptor or the adenosine receptor but different signaling pathways are used.

    PubMed Central

    Apgar, J R

    1994-01-01

    Crosslinking of the IgE receptor on rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) cells using the multivalent antigen DNP-BSA leads to a rapid and sustained increase in the filamentous actin content of the cells. Stimulation of RBL cells through the adenosine receptor also induces a very rapid polymerization of actin, which peaks in 45-60 s and is equivalent in magnitude to the F-actin response elicited through stimulation of the IgE receptor. However, in contrast to the IgE mediated response, which remains elevated for over 30 min, the F-actin increase induced by the adenosine analogue 5'-(N-ethylcarboxamido)-adenosine (NECA) is relatively transient and returns to baseline values within 5-10 min. While previous work has shown that the polymerization of actin in RBL cells stimulated through the IgE receptor is mediated by protein kinase C (PKC), protein kinase inhibitors have no effect on the F-actin response activated through the adenosine receptor. In contrast, pretreatment of the cells with pertussis toxin completely inhibits the F-actin response to NECA but has relatively little effect on the response induced through the IgE receptor. Stimulation of RBL cells through either receptor causes increased production of phosphatidylinositol mono-phosphate (PIP) and phosphatidylinositol bis-phosphate (PIP2), which correlates with the F-actin response. Production of PIP and PIP2 may be important downstream signals since these polyphosphoinositides are able to regulate the interaction of gelsolin and profilin with actin. Thus the polymerization of actin can be triggered through either the adenosine receptor or the IgE receptor, but different upstream signaling pathways are being used. The IgE mediated response requires the activation of PKC while stimulation through the adenosine receptor is PKC independent but involves a G protein. PMID:8049523

  18. Interaction between MyRIP and the actin cytoskeleton regulates Weibel–Palade body trafficking and exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Conte, Ianina L.; Hellen, Nicola; Bierings, Ruben; Mashanov, Gregory I.; Manneville, Jean-Baptiste; Kiskin, Nikolai I.; Hannah, Matthew J.; Molloy, Justin E.; Carter, Tom

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Weibel–Palade body (WPB)–actin interactions are essential for the trafficking and secretion of von Willebrand factor; however, the molecular basis for this interaction remains poorly defined. Myosin Va (MyoVa or MYO5A) is recruited to WPBs by a Rab27A–MyRIP complex and is thought to be the prime mediator of actin binding, but direct MyRIP–actin interactions can also occur. To evaluate the specific contribution of MyRIP–actin and MyRIP–MyoVa binding in WPB trafficking and Ca2+-driven exocytosis, we used EGFP–MyRIP point mutants with disrupted MyoVa and/or actin binding and high-speed live-cell fluorescence microscopy. We now show that the ability of MyRIP to restrict WPB movement depends upon its actin-binding rather than its MyoVa-binding properties. We also show that, although the role of MyRIP in Ca2+-driven exocytosis requires both MyoVa- and actin-binding potential, it is the latter that plays a dominant role. In view of these results and together with the analysis of actin disruption or stabilisation experiments, we propose that the role of MyRIP in regulating WPB trafficking and exocytosis is mediated largely through its interaction with actin rather than with MyoVa. PMID:26675235

  19. Regulation of blood-testis barrier by actin binding proteins and protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Tang, Elizabeth I; Cheng, C Yan

    2016-03-01

    The blood-testis barrier (BTB) is an important ultrastructure in the testis, since the onset of meiosis and spermiogenesis coincides with the establishment of a functional barrier in rodents and humans. It is also noted that a delay in the assembly of a functional BTB following treatment of neonatal rats with drugs such as diethylstilbestrol or adjudin also delays the first wave of spermiation. While the BTB is one of the tightest blood-tissue barriers, it undergoes extensive remodeling, in particular, at stage VIII of the epithelial cycle to facilitate the transport of preleptotene spermatocytes connected in clones across the immunological barrier. Without this timely transport of preleptotene spermatocytes derived from type B spermatogonia, meiosis will be arrested, causing aspermatogenesis. Yet the biology and regulation of the BTB remains largely unexplored since the morphological studies in the 1970s. Recent studies, however, have shed new light on the biology of the BTB. Herein, we critically evaluate some of these findings, illustrating that the Sertoli cell BTB is regulated by actin-binding proteins (ABPs), likely supported by non-receptor protein kinases, to modulate the organization of actin microfilament bundles at the site. Furthermore, microtubule-based cytoskeleton is also working in concert with the actin-based cytoskeleton to confer BTB dynamics. This timely review provides an update on the unique biology and regulation of the BTB based on the latest findings in the field, focusing on the role of ABPs and non-receptor protein kinases. PMID:26628556

  20. Regulation of blood-testis barrier by actin binding proteins and protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Tang, Elizabeth I.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2016-01-01

    The blood-testis barrier (BTB) is an important ultrastructure in the testis since the onset of spermatogenesis coincides with the establishment of a functional barrier in rodents and humans. It is also noted that a delay in the assembly of a functional BTB following treatment of neonatal rats with drugs such as diethylstilbestrol or adjudin also delays the first wave of spermiation. While the BTB is one of the tightest blood-tissue barriers, it undergoes extensive remodeling, in particular at stage VIII of the epithelial cycle to facilitate the transport of preleptotene spermatocytes connected in clones across the immunological barrier. Without this timely transport of preleptotene spermatocytes derived from type B spermatogonia, meiosis will be arrested, causing aspermatogenesis. Yet the biology and regulation of the BTB remains largely unexplored since the morphological studies in the 1970s. Recent studies, however, have shed new light on the biology of the BTB. Herein, we critically evaluate some of these findings, illustrating that the Sertoli cell BTB is regulated by actin binding proteins (ABPs), likely supported by non-receptor protein kinases, to modulate the organization of actin microfilament bundles at the site. Furthermore, microtubule (MT)-based cytoskeleton is also working in concert with the actin-based cytoskeleton to confer BTB dynamics. This timely review provides an update on the unique biology and regulation of the BTB based on the latest findings in the field, focusing on the role of ABPs and non-receptor protein kinases. PMID:26628556

  1. Papaverine Prevents Vasospasm by Regulation of Myosin Light Chain Phosphorylation and Actin Polymerization in Human Saphenous Vein

    PubMed Central

    Hocking, Kyle M.; Putumbaka, Gowthami; Wise, Eric S.; Cheung-Flynn, Joyce; Brophy, Colleen M.; Komalavilas, Padmini

    2016-01-01

    Objective Papaverine is used to prevent vasospasm in human saphenous veins (HSV) during vein graft preparation prior to implantation as a bypass conduit. Papaverine is a nonspecific inhibitor of phosphodiesterases, leading to increases in both intracellular cGMP and cAMP. We hypothesized that papaverine reduces force by decreasing intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca2+]i) and myosin light chain phosphorylation, and increasing actin depolymerization via regulation of actin regulatory protein phosphorylation. Approach and Results HSV was equilibrated in a muscle bath, pre-treated with 1 mM papaverine followed by 5 μM norepinephrine, and force along with [Ca2+]i levels were concurrently measured. Filamentous actin (F-actin) level was measured by an in vitro actin assay. Tissue was snap frozen to measure myosin light chain and actin regulatory protein phosphorylation. Pre-treatment with papaverine completely inhibited norepinephrine-induced force generation, blocked increases in [Ca2+]i and led to a decrease in the phosphorylation of myosin light chain. Papaverine pre-treatment also led to increased phosphorylation of the heat shock-related protein 20 (HSPB6) and the vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP), as well as decreased filamentous actin (F-actin) levels suggesting depolymerization of actin. Conclusions These results suggest that papaverine-induced force inhibition of HSV involves [Ca2+]i-mediated inhibition of myosin light chain phosphorylation and actin regulatory protein phosphorylation-mediated actin depolymerization. Thus, papaverine induces sustained inhibition of contraction of HSV by the modulation of both myosin cross-bridge formation and actin cytoskeletal dynamics and is a pharmacological alternative to high pressure distention to prevent vasospasm. PMID:27136356

  2. The regulation and function of the striated muscle activator of rho signaling (STARS) protein

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Marita A.; Lamon, Séverine; Russell, Aaron P.

    2012-01-01

    Healthy living throughout the lifespan requires continual growth and repair of cardiac, smooth, and skeletal muscle. To effectively maintain these processes muscle cells detect extracellular stress signals and efficiently transmit them to activate appropriate intracellular transcriptional programs. The striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS) protein, also known as Myocyte Stress-1 (MS1) protein and Actin-binding Rho-activating protein (ABRA) is highly enriched in cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscle. STARS binds actin, co-localizes to the sarcomere and is able to stabilize the actin cytoskeleton. By regulating actin polymerization, STARS also controls an intracellular signaling cascade that stimulates the serum response factor (SRF) transcriptional pathway; a pathway controlling genes involved in muscle cell proliferation, differentiation, and growth. Understanding the activation, transcriptional control and biological roles of STARS in cardiac, smooth, and skeletal muscle, will improve our understanding of physiological and pathophysiological muscle development and function. PMID:23248604

  3. The mtDNA NARP mutation activates the actin-Nrf2 signaling of antioxidant defenses

    SciTech Connect

    Dassa, Emmanuel Philippe; Paupe, Vincent; Goncalves, Sergio; Rustin, Pierre

    2008-04-11

    An efficient handling of superoxides by antioxidant defenses is a crucial issue for cells with respiratory chain deficient mitochondria. We used human cultured skin fibroblasts to delineate the mechanism controlling the expression of antioxidant defenses in the case of a severe ATPase deficiency resulting from an 8993T>G mutation in the mitochondrial ATPase6 gene. We observed the nuclear translocation of the transcription factor Nrf2 associated with thinning of the actin stress fibers. The mobilization of the Nrf2 signaling pathway could be mimicked by a chemical blockade of the ATPase with a specific inhibitor, oligomycin. Interestingly enough, Nrf2 nuclear translocation was not observed in the case of a severe cytochrome oxidase deficiency, indicating that studying the status of this signaling pathway could throw some light on the importance of the oxidative insult associated with different respiratory chain defects.

  4. Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) Protein Vangl2 Regulates Ectoplasmic Specialization Dynamics via Its Effects on Actin Microfilaments in the Testes of Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haiqi; Mruk, Dolores D; Lee, Will M; Cheng, C Yan

    2016-05-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) proteins confer polarization of a field of cells (eg, elongating/elongated spermatids) within the plane of an epithelium such as the seminiferous epithelium of the tubule during spermatogenesis. In adult rat testes, Sertoli and germ cells were found to express PCP core proteins (eg, Van Gogh-like 2 [Vangl2]), effectors, ligands, and signaling proteins. Vangl2 expressed predominantly by Sertoli cells was localized at the testis-specific, actin-rich ectoplasmic specialization (ES) at the Sertoli-spermatid interface in the adluminal compartment and also Sertoli-Sertoli interface at the blood-testis barrier (BTB) and structurally interacted with actin, N-cadherin, and another PCP/polarity protein Scribble. Vangl2 knockdown (KD) by RNA interference in Sertoli cells cultured in vitro with an established tight junction-permeability barrier led to BTB tightening, whereas its overexpression using a full-length cDNA construct perturbed the barrier function. These changes were mediated through an alteration on the organization actin microfilaments at the ES in Sertoli cells, involving actin-regulatory proteins, epidermal growth factor receptor pathway substrate 8, actin-related protein 3, and Scribble, which in turn affected the function of adhesion protein complexes at the ES during the epithelial cycle of spermatogenesis. Using Polyplus in vivo-jetPEI reagent as a transfection medium to silence Vangl2 in the testis in vivo by RNA interference with high efficacy, Vangl2 KD led to changes in F-actin organization at the ES in the epithelium, impeding spermatid and phagosome transport and spermatid polarity, meiosis, and BTB dynamics. For instance, step 19 spermatids remained embedded in the epithelium alongside with step 9 and 10 spermatids in stages IX-X tubules. In summary, the PCP protein Vangl2 is an ES regulator through its effects on actin microfilaments in the testis. PMID:26990065

  5. Reciprocal regulation of actin cytoskeleton remodelling and cell migration by Ca2+ and Zn2+: role of TRPM2 channels.

    PubMed

    Li, Fangfang; Abuarab, Nada; Sivaprasadarao, Asipu

    2016-05-15

    Cell migration is a fundamental feature of tumour metastasis and angiogenesis. It is regulated by a variety of signalling molecules including H2O2 and Ca(2+) Here, we asked whether the H2O2-sensitive transient receptor potential melastatin 2 (TRPM2) Ca(2+) channel serves as a molecular link between H2O2 and Ca(2+) H2O2-mediated activation of TRPM2 channels induced filopodia formation, loss of actin stress fibres and disassembly of focal adhesions, leading to increased migration of HeLa and prostate cancer (PC)-3 cells. Activation of TRPM2 channels, however, caused intracellular release of not only Ca(2+) but also of Zn(2+) Intriguingly, elevation of intracellular Zn(2+) faithfully reproduced all of the effects of H2O2, whereas Ca(2+) showed opposite effects. Interestingly, H2O2 caused increased trafficking of Zn(2+)-enriched lysosomes to the leading edge of migrating cells, presumably to impart polarisation of Zn(2+) location. Thus, our results indicate that a reciprocal interplay between Ca(2+) and Zn(2+) regulates actin remodelling and cell migration; they call for a revision of the current notion that implicates an exclusive role for Ca(2+) in cell migration. PMID:27068538

  6. Dendrosomatic Sonic Hedgehog Signaling in Hippocampal Neurons Regulates Axon Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Petralia, Ronald S.; Ott, Carolyn; Wang, Ya-Xian; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Mattson, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) and its signaling components in the neurons of the hippocampus raises a question about what role the Shh signaling pathway may play in these neurons. We show here that activation of the Shh signaling pathway stimulates axon elongation in rat hippocampal neurons. This Shh-induced effect depends on the pathway transducer Smoothened (Smo) and the transcription factor Gli1. The axon itself does not respond directly to Shh; instead, the Shh signal transduction originates from the somatodendritic region of the neurons and occurs in neurons with and without detectable primary cilia. Upon Shh stimulation, Smo localization to dendrites increases significantly. Shh pathway activation results in increased levels of profilin1 (Pfn1), an actin-binding protein. Mutations in Pfn1's actin-binding sites or reduction of Pfn1 eliminate the Shh-induced axon elongation. These findings indicate that Shh can regulate axon growth, which may be critical for development of hippocampal neurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Although numerous signaling mechanisms have been identified that act directly on axons to regulate their outgrowth, it is not known whether signals transduced in dendrites may also affect axon outgrowth. We describe here a transcellular signaling pathway in embryonic hippocampal neurons in which activation of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) receptors in dendrites stimulates axon growth. The pathway involves the dendritic-membrane-associated Shh signal transducer Smoothened (Smo) and the transcription factor Gli, which induces the expression of the gene encoding the actin-binding protein profilin 1. Our findings suggest scenarios in which stimulation of Shh in dendrites results in accelerated outgrowth of the axon, which therefore reaches its presumptive postsynaptic target cell more quickly. By this mechanism, Shh may play critical roles in the development of hippocampal neuronal circuits. PMID:26658865

  7. RNase L Interacts with Filamin A To Regulate Actin Dynamics and Barrier Function for Viral Entry

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Mohammad Adnan; Dayal, Shubham; Naji, Merna; Ezelle, Heather J.; Zeng, Chun; Zhou, Aimin; Hassel, Bret A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The actin cytoskeleton and its network of associated proteins constitute a physical barrier that viruses must circumvent to gain entry into cells for productive infection. The mechanisms by which the physical signals of infection are sensed by the host to activate an innate immune response are not well understood. The antiviral endoribonuclease RNase L is ubiquitously expressed in a latent form and activated upon binding 2-5A, a unique oligoadenylate produced during viral infections. We provide evidence that RNase L in its inactive form interacts with the actin-binding protein Filamin A to modulate the actin cytoskeleton and inhibit virus entry. Cells lacking either RNase L or Filamin A displayed increased virus entry which was exacerbated in cells lacking both proteins. RNase L deletion mutants that reduced Filamin A interaction displayed a compromised ability to restrict virus entry, supporting the idea of an important role for the RNase L-Filamin A complex in barrier function. Remarkably, both the wild type and a catalytically inactive RNase L mutant were competent to reduce virus entry when transfected into RNase L-deficient cells, indicating that this novel function of RNase L is independent of its enzymatic activity. Virus infection and RNase L activation disrupt its association with Filamin A and release RNase L to mediate its canonical nuclease-dependent antiviral activities. The dual functions of RNase L as a constitutive component of the actin cytoskeleton and as an induced mediator of antiviral signaling and effector functions provide insights into its mechanisms of antiviral activity and opportunities for the development of novel antiviral agents. PMID:25352621

  8. Stem cell differentiation increases membrane-actin adhesion regulating cell blebability, migration and mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Sliogeryte, Kristina; Thorpe, Stephen D.; Lee, David A.; Botto, Lorenzo; Knight, Martin M.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines how differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells regulates the interaction between the cell membrane and the actin cortex controlling cell behavior. Micropipette aspiration was used to measure the pressure required for membrane-cortex detachment which increased from 0.15 kPa in stem cells to 0.71 kPa following chondrogenic differentiation. This effect was associated with reduced susceptibility to mechanical and osmotic bleb formation, reduced migration and an increase in cell modulus. Theoretical modelling of bleb formation demonstrated that the increased stiffness of differentiated cells was due to the increased membrane-cortex adhesion. Differentiated cells exhibited greater F-actin density and slower actin remodelling. Differentiated cells also expressed greater levels of the membrane-cortex ezrin, radixin, moeisin (ERM) linker proteins which was responsible for the reduced blebability, as confirmed by transfection of stem cells with dominant active ezrin-T567D-GFP. This study demonstrates that stem cells have an inherently weak membrane-cortex adhesion which increases blebability thereby regulating cell migration and stiffness. PMID:25471686

  9. rpS6 regulates blood-testis barrier dynamics through Arp3-mediated actin microfilament organization in rat sertoli cells. An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Mok, Ka-Wai; Chen, Haiqi; Lee, Will M; Cheng, C Yan

    2015-05-01

    In the seminiferous epithelium of rat testes, preleptotene spermatocytes residing in the basal compartment are transported across the blood-testis barrier (BTB) to enter the adluminal compartment at stage VIII of the epithelial cycle. This process involves redistribution of tight junction (TJ) proteins via reorganization of actin cytoskeleton in Sertoli cells that serves as attachment site for adhesion protein complexes. Ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6), a downstream molecule of mTORC1 (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1), participates in this process via a yet-to-be defined mechanism. Here, we constructed an rpS6 quadruple phosphomimetic mutant by converting Ser residues at 235, 236, 240, and 244 to Glu via site-directed mutagenesis, making this mutant constitutively active. When this rpS6 mutant was overexpressed in Sertoli cells cultured in vitro with an established TJ barrier mimicking the BTB in vivo, it perturbed the TJ permeability by down-regulating and redistributing TJ proteins at the cell-cell interface. These changes are mediated by a reorganization of actin microfilaments, which was triggered by a redistribution of activated actin-related protein 3 (Arp3) as well as changes in Arp3-neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome protein (N-WASP) interaction. This in turn induced reorganization of actin microfilaments, converting them from a "bundled" to an "unbundled/branched" configuration, concomitant with a reduced actin bundling activity, thereby destabilizing the TJ-barrier function. These changes were mediated by Akt (transforming oncogene of v-akt), because an Akt knockdown by RNA interference was able to mimic the phenotypes of rpS6 mutant overexpression at the Sertoli cell BTB. In summary, this study illustrates a mechanism by which mTORC1 signal complex regulates BTB function through rpS6 downstream by modulating actin organization via the Arp2/3 complex, which may be applicable to other tissue barriers. PMID:25714812

  10. rpS6 Regulates Blood-Testis Barrier Dynamics Through Arp3-Mediated Actin Microfilament Organization in Rat Sertoli Cells. An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Ka-Wai; Chen, Haiqi; Lee, Will M.

    2015-01-01

    In the seminiferous epithelium of rat testes, preleptotene spermatocytes residing in the basal compartment are transported across the blood-testis barrier (BTB) to enter the adluminal compartment at stage VIII of the epithelial cycle. This process involves redistribution of tight junction (TJ) proteins via reorganization of actin cytoskeleton in Sertoli cells that serves as attachment site for adhesion protein complexes. Ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6), a downstream molecule of mTORC1 (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1), participates in this process via a yet-to-be defined mechanism. Here, we constructed an rpS6 quadruple phosphomimetic mutant by converting Ser residues at 235, 236, 240, and 244 to Glu via site-directed mutagenesis, making this mutant constitutively active. When this rpS6 mutant was overexpressed in Sertoli cells cultured in vitro with an established TJ barrier mimicking the BTB in vivo, it perturbed the TJ permeability by down-regulating and redistributing TJ proteins at the cell-cell interface. These changes are mediated by a reorganization of actin microfilaments, which was triggered by a redistribution of activated actin-related protein 3 (Arp3) as well as changes in Arp3-neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome protein (N-WASP) interaction. This in turn induced reorganization of actin microfilaments, converting them from a “bundled” to an “unbundled/branched” configuration, concomitant with a reduced actin bundling activity, thereby destabilizing the TJ-barrier function. These changes were mediated by Akt (transforming oncogene of v-akt), because an Akt knockdown by RNA interference was able to mimic the phenotypes of rpS6 mutant overexpression at the Sertoli cell BTB. In summary, this study illustrates a mechanism by which mTORC1 signal complex regulates BTB function through rpS6 downstream by modulating actin organization via the Arp2/3 complex, which may be applicable to other tissue barriers. PMID:25714812

  11. Wsp1 Is Downstream of Cin1 and Regulates Vesicle Transport and Actin Cytoskeleton as an Effector of Cdc42 and Rac1 in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Gui; Zhou, Erxun; Alspaugh, J. Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Human Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) is a scaffold linking upstream signals to the actin cytoskeleton. In response to intersectin ITSN1 and Rho GTPase Cdc42, WASP activates the Arp2/3 complex to promote actin polymerization. The human pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans contains the ITSN1 homolog Cin1 and the WASP homolog Wsp1, which share more homology with human proteins than those of other fungi. Here we demonstrate that Cin1, Cdc42/Rac1, and Wsp1 function in an effector pathway similar to that of mammalian models. In the cin1 mutant, expression of the autoactivated Wsp1-B-GBD allele partially suppressed the mutant defect in endocytosis, and expression of the constitutively active CDC42Q61L allele restored normal actin cytoskeleton structures. Similar phenotypic suppression can be obtained by the expression of a Cdc42-green fluorescent protein (GFP)-Wsp1 fusion protein. In addition, Rac1, which was found to exhibit a role in early endocytosis, activates Wsp1 to regulate vacuole fusion. Rac1 interacted with Wsp1 and depended on Wsp1 for its vacuolar membrane localization. Expression of the Wsp1-B-GBD allele restored vacuolar membrane fusion in the rac1 mutant. Collectively, our studies suggest novel ways in which this pathogenic fungus has adapted conserved signaling pathways to control vesicle transport and actin organization, likely benefiting survival within infected hosts. PMID:22327008

  12. Subsynaptic AMPA Receptor Distribution Is Acutely Regulated by Actin-Driven Reorganization of the Postsynaptic Density

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Justin M.; Blanpied, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    AMPA receptors (AMPARs) mediate synaptic transmission and plasticity during learning, development, and disease. Mechanisms determining subsynaptic receptor position are poorly understood but are key determinants of quantal size. We used a series of live-cell, high-resolution imaging approaches to measure protein organization within single postsynaptic densities in rat hippocampal neurons. By photobleaching receptors in synapse subdomains, we found that most AMPARs do not freely diffuse within the synapse, indicating they are embedded in a matrix that determines their subsynaptic position. However, time lapse analysis revealed that synaptic AMPARs are continuously repositioned in concert with plasticity of this scaffold matrix rather than simply by free diffusion. Using a fluorescence correlation analysis, we found that across the lateral extent of single PSDs, component proteins were differentially distributed, and this distribution was continually adjusted by actin treadmilling. The C-terminal PDZ ligand of GluA1 did not regulate its mobility or distribution in the synapse. However, glutamate receptor activation promoted subsynaptic mobility. Strikingly, subsynaptic immobility of both AMPARs and scaffold molecules remained essentially intact even after loss of actin filaments. We conclude that receptors are actively repositioned at the synapse by treadmilling of the actin cytoskeleton, an influence which is transmitted only indirectly to receptors via the pliable and surprisingly dynamic internal structure of the PSD. PMID:22238102

  13. Actin capping protein CAPZB regulates cell morphology, differentiation, and neural crest migration in craniofacial morphogenesis†.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Kusumika; Ishii, Kana; Pillalamarri, Vamsee; Kammin, Tammy; Atkin, Joan F; Hickey, Scott E; Xi, Qiongchao J; Zepeda, Cinthya J; Gusella, James F; Talkowski, Michael E; Morton, Cynthia C; Maas, Richard L; Liao, Eric C

    2016-04-01

    CAPZB is an actin-capping protein that caps the growing end of F-actin and modulates the cytoskeleton and tethers actin filaments to the Z-line of the sarcomere in muscles. Whole-genome sequencing was performed on a subject with micrognathia, cleft palate and hypotonia that harbored a de novo, balanced chromosomal translocation that disrupts the CAPZB gene. The function of capzb was analyzed in the zebrafish model. capzb(-/-) mutants exhibit both craniofacial and muscle defects that recapitulate the phenotypes observed in the human subject. Loss of capzb affects cell morphology, differentiation and neural crest migration. Differentiation of both myogenic stem cells and neural crest cells requires capzb. During palate morphogenesis, defective cranial neural crest cell migration in capzb(-/-) mutants results in loss of the median cell population, creating a cleft phenotype. capzb is also required for trunk neural crest migration, as evident from melanophores disorganization in capzb(-/-) mutants. In addition, capzb over-expression results in embryonic lethality. Therefore, proper capzb dosage is important during embryogenesis, and regulates both cell behavior and tissue morphogenesis. PMID:26758871

  14. The Tyrosine Kinase Activity of c-Src Regulates Actin Dynamics and Organization of Podosomes in Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Destaing, Olivier; Sanjay, Archana; Itzstein, Cecile; Horne, William C.; Toomre, Derek

    2008-01-01

    Podosomes are dynamic actin-rich structures composed of a dense F-actin core surrounded by a cloud of more diffuse F-actin. Src performs one or more unique functions in osteoclasts (OCLs), and podosome belts and bone resorption are impaired in the absence of Src. Using Src−/− OCLs, we investigated the specific functions of Src in the organization and dynamics of podosomes. We found that podosome number and the podosome-associated actin cloud were decreased in Src−/− OCLs. Videomicroscopy and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis revealed that the life span of Src−/− podosomes was increased fourfold and that the rate of actin flux in the core was decreased by 40%. Thus, Src regulates the formation, structure, life span, and rate of actin polymerization in podosomes and in the actin cloud. Rescue of Src−/− OCLs with Src mutants showed that both the kinase activity and either the SH2 or the SH3 binding domain are required for Src to restore normal podosome organization and dynamics. Moreover, inhibition of Src family kinase activities in Src−/− OCLs by Src inhibitors or by expressing dominant-negative SrcK295M induced the formation of abnormal podosomes. Thus, Src is an essential regulator of podosome structure, dynamics and organization. PMID:17978100

  15. The Biphasic Increase of PIP2 in the Fertilized Eggs of Starfish: New Roles in Actin Polymerization and Ca2+ Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Jong T.; Puppo, Agostina; Vasilev, Filip; Gragnaniello, Giovanni; Garante, Ezio; Santella, Luigia

    2010-01-01

    Background Fertilization of echinoderm eggs is accompanied by dynamic changes of the actin cytoskeleton and by a drastic increase of cytosolic Ca2+. Since the plasma membrane-enriched phospholipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) serves as the precursor of inositol 1,4,5 trisphosphate (InsP3) and also regulates actin-binding proteins, PIP2 might be involved in these two processes. Methodology/Principal Findings In this report, we have studied the roles of PIP2 at fertilization of starfish eggs by using fluorescently tagged pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of PLC-δ1, which has specific binding affinity to PIP2, in combination with Ca2+ and F-actin imaging techniques and transmission electron microscopy. During fertilization, PIP2 increased at the plasma membrane in two phases rather than continually decreasing. The first increase was quickly followed by a decrease about 40 seconds after sperm-egg contact. However, these changes took place only after the Ca2+ wave had already initiated and propagated. The fertilized eggs then displayed a prolonged increase of PIP2 that was accompanied by the appearance of numerous spikes in the perivitelline space during the elevation of the fertilization envelope (FE). These spikes, protruding from the plasma membrane, were filled with microfilaments. Sequestration of PIP2 by RFP-PH at higher doses resulted in changes of subplasmalemmal actin networks which significantly delayed the intracellular Ca2+ signaling, impaired elevation of FE, and increased occurrences of polyspermic fertilization. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that PIP2 plays comprehensive roles in shaping Ca2+ waves and guiding structural and functional changes required for successful fertilization. We propose that the PIP2 increase and the subsequent formation of actin spikes not only provide the mechanical supports for the elevating FE, but also accommodate increased membrane surfaces during cortical granule exocytosis. PMID:21124897

  16. Actin engine in immunological synapse.

    PubMed

    Piragyte, Indre; Jun, Chang-Duk

    2012-06-01

    T cell activation and function require physical contact with antigen presenting cells at a specialized junctional structure known as the immunological synapse. Once formed, the immunological synapse leads to sustained T cell receptor-mediated signalling and stabilized adhesion. High resolution microscopy indeed had a great impact in understanding the function and dynamic structure of immunological synapse. Trends of recent research are now moving towards understanding the mechanical part of immune system, expanding our knowledge in mechanosensitivity, force generation, and biophysics of cell-cell interaction. Actin cytoskeleton plays inevitable role in adaptive immune system, allowing it to bear dynamic and precise characteristics at the same time. The regulation of mechanical engine seems very complicated and overlapping, but it enables cells to be very sensitive to external signals such as surface rigidity. In this review, we focus on actin regulators and how immune cells regulate dynamic actin rearrangement process to drive the formation of immunological synapse. PMID:22916042

  17. The Early-Onset Myocardial Infarction Associated PHACTR1 Gene Regulates Skeletal and Cardiac Alpha-Actin Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Kelloniemi, Annina; Szabo, Zoltan; Serpi, Raisa; Näpänkangas, Juha; Ohukainen, Pauli; Tenhunen, Olli; Kaikkonen, Leena; Koivisto, Elina; Bagyura, Zsolt; Kerkelä, Risto; Leosdottir, Margret; Hedner, Thomas; Melander, Olle

    2015-01-01

    The phosphatase and actin regulator 1 (PHACTR1) locus is a very commonly identified hit in genome-wide association studies investigating coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction (MI). However, the function of PHACTR1 in the heart is still unknown. We characterized the mechanisms regulating Phactr1 expression in the heart, used adenoviral gene delivery to investigate the effects of Phactr1 on cardiac function, and analyzed the relationship between MI associated PHACTR1 allele and cardiac function in human subjects. Phactr1 mRNA and protein levels were markedly reduced (60%, P<0.01 and 90%, P<0.001, respectively) at 1 day after MI in rats. When the direct myocardial effects of Phactr1 were studied, the skeletal α-actin to cardiac α-actin isoform ratio was significantly higher (1.5-fold, P<0.05) at 3 days but 40% lower (P<0.05) at 2 weeks after adenovirus-mediated Phactr1 gene delivery into the anterior wall of the left ventricle. Similarly, the skeletal α-actin to cardiac α-actin ratio was lower at 2 weeks in infarcted hearts overexpressing Phactr1. In cultured neonatal cardiac myocytes, adenovirus-mediated Phactr1 overexpression for 48 hours markedly increased the skeletal α-actin to cardiac α-actin ratio, this being associated with an enhanced DNA binding activity of serum response factor. Phactr1 overexpression exerted no major effects on the expression of other cardiac genes or LV structure and function in normal and infarcted hearts during 2 weeks’ follow-up period. In human subjects, MI associated PHACTR1 allele was not associated significantly with cardiac function (n = 1550). Phactr1 seems to regulate the skeletal to cardiac α-actin isoform ratio. PMID:26098115

  18. Global architecture of F-actin cytoskeleton regulates cell shape-dependent endothelial mechanotransduction

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yue; Mann, Jennifer M.; Chen, Weiqiang; Fu, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Uniaxial stretch is an important biophysical regulator of cell morphology (or shape) and functions of vascular endothelial cells (ECs). However, it is unclear whether and how cell shape can independently regulate EC mechanotransductive properties under uniaxial stretch. Herein, utilizing a novel uniaxial cell-stretching device integrated with micropost force sensors, we reported the first experimental evidence showing cell shape-dependent EC mechanotransduction via cytoskeleton (CSK) contractile forces in response to uniaxial stretch. Combining experiments and theoretical modeling from first principles, we showed that it was the global architecture of the F-actin CSK that instructed the cell shape-dependent EC mechanotransductive process. Furthermore, a cell shape-dependent nature was relayed in EC mechanotransduction via dynamic focal adhesion (FA) assembly. Our results suggested a novel mechanotransductive process in ECs wherein the global architecture of the F-actin CSK, governed by cell shape, controls mechanotransduction via CSK contractile forces and force-dependent FA assembly under uniaxial stretch. PMID:24435061

  19. Paradoxical Signaling Regulates Structural Plasticity in Dendritic Spines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangamani, Padmini; Levy, Michael; Khan, Shahid; Oster, George

    2016-02-01

    Transient spine enlargement (3-5 min timescale) is an important event associated with the structural plasticity of dendritic spines. Many of the molecular mechanisms associated with transient spine enlargement have been identified experimentally. Here, we use a systems biology approach to construct a mathematical model of biochemical signaling and actin-mediated transient spine expansion in response to calcium-influx due to NMDA receptor activation. We have identified that a key feature of this signaling network is the paradoxical signaling loop. Paradoxical components act bifunctionally in signaling networks and their role is to control both the activation and inhibition of a desired response function (protein activity or spine volume). Using ordinary differential equation (ODE)-based modeling, we show that the dynamics of different regulators of transient spine expansion including CaMKII, RhoA, and Cdc42 and the spine volume can be described using paradoxical signaling loops. Our model is able to capture the experimentally observed dynamics of transient spine volume. Furthermore, we show that actin remodeling events provide a robustness to spine volume dynamics. We also generate experimentally testable predictions about the role of different components and parameters of the network on spine dynamics.

  20. Paradoxical signaling regulates structural plasticity in dendritic spines.

    PubMed

    Rangamani, Padmini; Levy, Michael G; Khan, Shahid; Oster, George

    2016-09-01

    Transient spine enlargement (3- to 5-min timescale) is an important event associated with the structural plasticity of dendritic spines. Many of the molecular mechanisms associated with transient spine enlargement have been identified experimentally. Here, we use a systems biology approach to construct a mathematical model of biochemical signaling and actin-mediated transient spine expansion in response to calcium influx caused by NMDA receptor activation. We have identified that a key feature of this signaling network is the paradoxical signaling loop. Paradoxical components act bifunctionally in signaling networks, and their role is to control both the activation and the inhibition of a desired response function (protein activity or spine volume). Using ordinary differential equation (ODE)-based modeling, we show that the dynamics of different regulators of transient spine expansion, including calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), RhoA, and Cdc42, and the spine volume can be described using paradoxical signaling loops. Our model is able to capture the experimentally observed dynamics of transient spine volume. Furthermore, we show that actin remodeling events provide a robustness to spine volume dynamics. We also generate experimentally testable predictions about the role of different components and parameters of the network on spine dynamics. PMID:27551076

  1. Nuclear F-actin formation and reorganization upon cell spreading.

    PubMed

    Plessner, Matthias; Melak, Michael; Chinchilla, Pilar; Baarlink, Christian; Grosse, Robert

    2015-05-01

    We recently discovered signal-regulated nuclear actin network assembly. However, in contrast to cytoplasmic actin regulation, polymeric nuclear actin structures and functions remain only poorly understood. Here we describe a novel molecular tool to visualize real-time nuclear actin dynamics by targeting the Actin-Chromobody-TagGFP to the nucleus, thus establishing a nuclear Actin-Chromobody. Interestingly, we observe nuclear actin polymerization into dynamic filaments upon cell spreading and fibronectin stimulation, both of which appear to be triggered by integrin signaling. Furthermore, we show that nucleoskeletal proteins such as the LINC (linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton) complex and components of the nuclear lamina couple cell spreading or integrin activation by fibronectin to nuclear actin polymerization. Spreading-induced nuclear actin polymerization results in serum response factor (SRF)-mediated transcription through nuclear retention of myocardin-related transcription factor A (MRTF-A). Our results reveal a signaling pathway, which links integrin activation by extracellular matrix interaction to nuclear actin polymerization through the LINC complex, and therefore suggest a role for nuclear actin polymerization in the context of cellular adhesion and mechanosensing. PMID:25759381

  2. Regulation of structure and function of sarcomeric actin filaments in striated muscle of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Shoichiro

    2014-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been used as a valuable system to study structure and function of striated muscle. The body wall muscle of C. elegans is obliquely striated muscle with highly organized sarcomeric assembly of actin, myosin, and other accessary proteins. Genetic and molecular biological studies in C. elegans have identified a number of genes encoding structural and regulatory components for the muscle contractile apparatuses, and many of them have counterparts in mammalian cardiac and skeletal muscles or striated muscles in other invertebrates. Applicability of genetics, cell biology, and biochemistry has made C. elegans an excellent system to study mechanisms of muscle contractility and assembly and maintenance of myofibrils. This review focuses on the regulatory mechanisms of structure and function of actin filaments in the C. elegans body wall muscle. Sarcomeric actin filaments in C. elegans muscle are associated with the troponin-tropomyosin system that regulates the actin-myosin interaction. Proteins that bind to the side and ends of actin filaments support ordered assembly of thin filaments. Furthermore, regulators of actin dynamics play important roles in initial assembly, growth, and maintenance of sarcomeres. The knowledge acquired in C. elegans can serve as bases to understand the basic mechanisms of muscle structure and function. PMID:25125169

  3. The Actin Binding Domain of βI-Spectrin Regulates the Morphological and Functional Dynamics of Dendritic Spines

    PubMed Central

    Nestor, Michael W.; Cai, Xiang; Stone, Michele R.; Bloch, Robert J.; Thompson, Scott M.

    2011-01-01

    Actin microfilaments regulate the size, shape and mobility of dendritic spines and are in turn regulated by actin binding proteins and small GTPases. The βI isoform of spectrin, a protein that links the actin cytoskeleton to membrane proteins, is present in spines. To understand its function, we expressed its actin-binding domain (ABD) in CA1 pyramidal neurons in hippocampal slice cultures. The ABD of βI-spectrin bundled actin in principal dendrites and was concentrated in dendritic spines, where it significantly increased the size of the spine head. These effects were not observed after expression of homologous ABDs of utrophin, dystrophin, and α-actinin. Treatment of slice cultures with latrunculin-B significantly decreased spine head size and decreased actin-GFP fluorescence in cells expressing the ABD of α-actinin, but not the ABD of βI-spectrin, suggesting that its presence inhibits actin depolymerization. We also observed an increase in the area of GFP-tagged PSD-95 in the spine head and an increase in the amplitude of mEPSCs at spines expressing the ABD of βI-spectrin. The effects of the βI-spectrin ABD on spine size and mEPSC amplitude were mimicked by expressing wild-type Rac3, a small GTPase that co-immunoprecipitates specifically with βI-spectrin in extracts of cultured cortical neurons. Spine size was normal in cells co-expressing a dominant negative Rac3 construct with the βI-spectrin ABD. We suggest that βI-spectrin is a synaptic protein that can modulate both the morphological and functional dynamics of dendritic spines, perhaps via interaction with actin and Rac3. PMID:21297961

  4. Dictyostelium Dock180-related RacGEFs regulate the actin cytoskeleton during cell motility.

    PubMed

    Para, Alessia; Krischke, Miriam; Merlot, Sylvain; Shen, Zhouxin; Oberholzer, Michael; Lee, Susan; Briggs, Steven; Firtel, Richard A

    2009-01-01

    Cell motility of amoeboid cells is mediated by localized F-actin polymerization that drives the extension of membrane protrusions to promote forward movements. We show that deletion of either of two members of the Dictyostelium Dock180 family of RacGEFs, DockA and DockD, causes decreased speed of chemotaxing cells. The phenotype is enhanced in the double mutant and expression of DockA or DockD complements the reduced speed of randomly moving DockD null cells' phenotype, suggesting that DockA and DockD are likely to act redundantly and to have similar functions in regulating cell movement. In this regard, we find that overexpressing DockD causes increased cell speed by enhancing F-actin polymerization at the sites of pseudopod extension. DockD localizes to the cell cortex upon chemoattractant stimulation and at the leading edge of migrating cells and this localization is dependent on PI3K activity, suggesting that DockD might be part of the pathway that links PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) production to F-actin polymerization. Using a proteomic approach, we found that DdELMO1 is associated with DockD and that Rac1A and RacC are possible in vivo DockD substrates. In conclusion, our work provides a further understanding of how cell motility is controlled and provides evidence that the molecular mechanism underlying Dock180-related protein function is evolutionarily conserved. PMID:19037099

  5. Neuroligin 1 regulates spines and synaptic plasticity via LIMK1/cofilin-mediated actin reorganization.

    PubMed

    Liu, An; Zhou, Zikai; Dang, Rui; Zhu, Yuehua; Qi, Junxia; He, Guiqin; Leung, Celeste; Pak, Daniel; Jia, Zhengping; Xie, Wei

    2016-02-15

    Neuroligin (NLG) 1 is important for synapse development and function, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. It is known that at least some aspects of NLG1 function are independent of the presynaptic neurexin, suggesting that the C-terminal domain (CTD) of NLG1 may be sufficient for synaptic regulation. In addition, NLG1 is subjected to activity-dependent proteolytic cleavage, generating a cytosolic CTD fragment, but the significance of this process remains unknown. In this study, we show that the CTD of NLG1 is sufficient to (a) enhance spine and synapse number, (b) modulate synaptic plasticity, and (c) exert these effects via its interaction with spine-associated Rap guanosine triphosphatase-activating protein and subsequent activation of LIM-domain protein kinase 1/cofilin-mediated actin reorganization. Our results provide a novel postsynaptic mechanism by which NLG1 regulates synapse development and function. PMID:26880202

  6. Actin-binding proteins: the long road to understanding the dynamic landscape of cellular actin networks.

    PubMed

    Lappalainen, Pekka

    2016-08-15

    The actin cytoskeleton supports a vast number of cellular processes in nonmuscle cells. It is well established that the organization and dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton are controlled by a large array of actin-binding proteins. However, it was only 40 years ago that the first nonmuscle actin-binding protein, filamin, was identified and characterized. Filamin was shown to bind and cross-link actin filaments into higher-order structures and contribute to phagocytosis in macrophages. Subsequently many other nonmuscle actin-binding proteins were identified and characterized. These proteins regulate almost all steps of the actin filament assembly and disassembly cycles, as well as the arrangement of actin filaments into diverse three-dimensional structures. Although the individual biochemical activities of most actin-regulatory proteins are relatively well understood, knowledge of how these proteins function together in a common cytoplasm to control actin dynamics and architecture is only beginning to emerge. Furthermore, understanding how signaling pathways and mechanical cues control the activities of various actin-binding proteins in different cellular, developmental, and pathological processes will keep researchers busy for decades. PMID:27528696

  7. Spatial Association of Signaling Proteins and F-Actin Effects on Cluster Assembly Analyzed via Photoactivation Localization Microscopy in T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chih-Jung; Baumgart, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    Recognition of antigens by T cell receptors (TCRs) triggers cellular signaling cascades initiated by recruitment to the plasma membrane of numerous effector molecules to form signaling microclusters (MCs). Here we show that the method of high-resolution photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM) imaging can be used to analyze the spatial correlation between kinase ZAP70 and adaptor SLP76 MCs at the cell periphery and the effects of F-actin on MC assembly. We first determined the photophysical rate constants of Dronpa and tdEos fluorescence probes, which allowed us to optimize our dual-color PALM imaging method. We next analyzed the degrees of spatial association through determination of Mander's colocalization coefficients from PALM images, which revealed increasing spatial segregation of ZAP70 and SLP76 MCs at the cell periphery after initiation of signaling. We showed that this spatial segregation at the cell periphery occurred in parallel with the reduction of MC phosphorylation levels. Furthermore, we used Ripley's K function to analyze spatial randomness, and determined average radii of clusters as a function of activation time. The average radii of SLP76 and LAT MCs were found to decrease, whereas ZAP70 MC radii remained relatively constant. Finally, effects of F-actin depolymerization on MC morphology were studied by determining radial distributions of cluster circularity. Our data suggest that MC morphology is affected by actin polymerization. The quantitative analysis of sub-diffraction PALM images may provide a starting point for a molecular interpretation of cluster-cluster interactions and of the regulation of T cell signaling MCs by the cytoskeleton. PMID:21887278

  8. Toll-like receptor ligands sensitize B-cell receptor signalling by reducing actin-dependent spatial confinement of the receptor

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Spencer A.; Jaumouillé, Valentin; Choi, Kate; Hsu, Brian E.; Wong, Harikesh S.; Abraham, Libin; Graves, Marcia L.; Coombs, Daniel; Roskelley, Calvin D.; Das, Raibatak; Grinstein, Sergio; Gold, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Integrating signals from multiple receptors allows cells to interpret the physiological context in which a signal is received. Here we describe a mechanism for receptor crosstalk in which receptor-induced increases in actin dynamics lower the threshold for signalling by another receptor. We show that the Toll-like receptor ligands lipopolysaccharide and CpG DNA, which are conserved microbial molecules, enhance signalling by the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) by activating the actin-severing protein cofilin. Single-particle tracking reveals that increased severing of actin filaments reduces the spatial confinement of the BCR within the plasma membrane and increases BCR mobility. This allows more frequent collisions between BCRs and greater signalling in response to low densities of membrane-bound antigen. These findings implicate actin dynamics as a means of tuning receptor signalling and as a mechanism by which B cells distinguish inert antigens from those that are accompanied by indicators of microbial infection. PMID:25644899

  9. Experimental and computational assessment of F-actin influence in regulating cellular stiffness and relaxation behaviour of fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Fallqvist, Björn; Fielden, Matthew L; Pettersson, Torbjörn; Nordgren, Niklas; Kroon, Martin; Gad, Annica K B

    2016-06-01

    In biomechanics, a complete understanding of the structures and mechanisms that regulate cellular stiffness at a molecular level remain elusive. In this paper, we have elucidated the role of filamentous actin (F-actin) in regulating elastic and viscous properties of the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Specifically, we performed colloidal-probe atomic force microscopy (AFM) on BjhTERT fibroblast cells incubated with Latrunculin B (LatB), which results in depolymerisation of F-actin, or DMSO control. We found that the treatment with LatB not only reduced cellular stiffness, but also greatly increased the relaxation rate for the cytoplasm in the peripheral region and in the vicinity of the nucleus. We thus conclude that F-actin is a major determinant in not only providing elastic stiffness to the cell, but also in regulating its viscous behaviour. To further investigate the interdependence of different cytoskeletal networks and cell shape, we provided a computational model in a finite element framework. The computational model is based on a split strain energy function of separate cellular constituents, here assumed to be cytoskeletal components, for which a composite strain energy function was defined. We found a significant influence of cell geometry on the predicted mechanical response. Importantly, the relaxation behaviour of the cell can be characterised by a material model with two time constants that have previously been found to predict mechanical behaviour of actin and intermediate filament networks. By merely tuning two effective stiffness parameters, the model predicts experimental results in cells with a partly depolymerised actin cytoskeleton as well as in untreated control. This indicates that actin and intermediate filament networks are instrumental in providing elastic stiffness in response to applied forces, as well as governing the relaxation behaviour over shorter and longer time-scales, respectively. PMID:26766328

  10. Regulation of actin dynamics by WNT-5A: implications for human airway smooth muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Koopmans, Tim; Kumawat, Kuldeep; Halayko, Andrew J; Gosens, Reinoud

    2016-01-01

    A defining feature of asthma is airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), which underlies the exaggerated bronchoconstriction response of asthmatics. The role of the airway smooth muscle (ASM) in AHR has garnered increasing interest over the years, but how asthmatic ASM differs from healthy ASM is still an active topic of debate. WNT-5A is increasingly expressed in asthmatic ASM and has been linked with Th2-high asthma. Due to its link with calcium and cytoskeletal remodelling, we propose that WNT-5A may modulate ASM contractility. We demonstrated that WNT-5A can increase maximum isometric tension in bovine tracheal smooth muscle strips. In addition, we show that WNT-5A is preferentially expressed in contractile human airway myocytes compared to proliferative cells, suggesting an active role in maintaining contractility. Furthermore, WNT-5A treatment drives actin polymerisation, but has no effect on intracellular calcium flux. Next, we demonstrated that WNT-5A directly regulates TGF-β1-induced expression of α-SMA via ROCK-mediated actin polymerization. These findings suggest that WNT-5A modulates fundamental mechanisms that affect ASM contraction and thus may be of relevance for AHR in asthma. PMID:27468699

  11. Actin- and microtubule-dependent regulation of Golgi morphology by FHDC1

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, Sarah J.; Thurston, Susan F.; Copeland, John W.

    2016-01-01

    The Golgi apparatus is the central hub of intracellular trafficking and consists of tethered stacks of cis, medial, and trans cisternae. In mammalian cells, these cisternae are stitched together as a perinuclear Golgi ribbon, which is required for the establishment of cell polarity and normal subcellular organization. We previously identified FHDC1 (also known as INF1) as a unique microtubule-binding member of the formin family of cytoskeletal-remodeling proteins. We show here that endogenous FHDC1 regulates Golgi ribbon formation and has an apparent preferential association with the Golgi-derived microtubule network. Knockdown of FHDC1 expression results in defective Golgi assembly and suggests a role for FHDC1 in maintenance of the Golgi-derived microtubule network. Similarly, overexpression of FHDC1 induces dispersion of the Golgi ribbon into functional ministacks. This effect is independent of centrosome-derived microtubules and instead likely requires the interaction between the FHDC1 microtubule-binding domain and the Golgi-derived microtubule network. These effects also depend on the interaction between the FHDC1 FH2 domain and the actin cytoskeleton. Thus our results suggest that the coordination of actin and microtubule dynamics by FHDC1 is required for normal Golgi ribbon formation. PMID:26564798

  12. Rearrangement of Actin Microfilaments in Plant Root Hairs Responding to Rhizobium etli Nodulation Signals1

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas, Luis; Vidali, Luis; Domínguez, Jimena; Pérez, Héctor; Sánchez, Federico; Hepler, Peter K.; Quinto, Carmen

    1998-01-01

    The response of the actin cytoskeleton to nodulation (Nod) factors secreted by Rhizobium etli has been studied in living root hairs of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) that were microinjected with fluorescein isothiocyanate-phalloidin. In untreated control cells or cells treated with the inactive chitin oligomer, the actin cytoskeleton was organized into long bundles that were oriented parallel to the long axis of the root hair and extended into the apical zone. Upon exposure to R. etli Nod factors, the filamentous actin became fragmented, as indicated by the appearance of prominent masses of diffuse fluorescence in the apical region of the root hair. These changes in the actin cytoskeleton were rapid, observed as soon as 5 to 10 min after application of the Nod factors. It was interesting that the filamentous actin partially recovered in the continued presence of the Nod factor: by 1 h, long bundles had reformed. However, these cells still contained a significant amount of diffuse fluorescence in the apical zone and in the nuclear area, presumably indicating the presence of short actin filaments. These results indicate that Nod factors alter the organization of actin microfilaments in root hair cells, and this could be a prelude for the formation of infection threads. PMID:9501120

  13. Regulation of Cell Contraction and Membrane Ruffling by Distinct Signals in Migratory Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheresh, David A.; Leng, Jie; Klemke, Richard L.

    1999-01-01

    Cell migration and wound contraction requires assembly of actin into a functional myosin motor unit capable of generating force. However, cell migration also involves formation of actin-containing membrane ruffles. Evidence is provided that actin-myosin assembly and membrane ruffling are regulated by distinct signaling pathways in the migratory cell. Interaction of cells with extracellular matrix proteins or cytokines promote cell migration through activation of the MAP kinases ERK1 and ERK2 as well as the molecular coupling of the adaptor proteins p130CAS and c-CrkII. ERK signaling is independent of CAS/Crk coupling and regulates myosin light chain phosphorylation leading to actin-myosin assembly during cell migration and cell-mediated contraction of a collagen matrix. In contrast, membrane ruffling, but not cell contraction, requires Rac GTPase activity and the formation of a CAS/Crk complex that functions in the context of the Rac activating protein DOCK180. Thus, during cell migration ERK and CAS/Crk coupling operate as components of distinct signaling pathways that control actin assembly into myosin motors and membrane ruffles, respectively. PMID:10477763

  14. Genome-Wide siRNA Screen Identifies Complementary Signaling Pathways Involved in Listeria Infection and Reveals Different Actin Nucleation Mechanisms during Listeria Cell Invasion and Actin Comet Tail Formation

    PubMed Central

    Kühbacher, Andreas; Emmenlauer, Mario; Rämo, Pauli; Kafai, Natasha; Dehio, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Listeria monocytogenes enters nonphagocytic cells by a receptor-mediated mechanism that is dependent on a clathrin-based molecular machinery and actin rearrangements. Bacterial intra- and intercellular movements are also actin dependent and rely on the actin nucleating Arp2/3 complex, which is activated by host-derived nucleation-promoting factors downstream of the cell receptor Met during entry and by the bacterial nucleation-promoting factor ActA during comet tail formation. By genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) screening for host factors involved in bacterial infection, we identified diverse cellular signaling networks and protein complexes that support or limit these processes. In addition, we could precise previously described molecular pathways involved in Listeria invasion. In particular our results show that the requirements for actin nucleators during Listeria entry and actin comet tail formation are different. Knockdown of several actin nucleators, including SPIRE2, reduced bacterial invasion while not affecting the generation of comet tails. Most interestingly, we observed that in contrast to our expectations, not all of the seven subunits of the Arp2/3 complex are required for Listeria entry into cells or actin tail formation and that the subunit requirements for each of these processes differ, highlighting a previously unsuspected versatility in Arp2/3 complex composition and function. PMID:25991686

  15. The Plant Actin Cytoskeleton Responds to Signals from Microbe-Associated Molecular Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Henty-Ridilla, Jessica L.; Shimono, Masaki; Li, Jiejie; Chang, Jeff H.; Day, Brad; Staiger, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Plants are constantly exposed to a large and diverse array of microbes; however, most plants are immune to the majority of potential invaders and susceptible to only a small subset of pathogens. The cytoskeleton comprises a dynamic intracellular framework that responds rapidly to biotic stresses and supports numerous fundamental cellular processes including vesicle trafficking, endocytosis and the spatial distribution of organelles and protein complexes. For years, the actin cytoskeleton has been assumed to play a role in plant innate immunity against fungi and oomycetes, based largely on static images and pharmacological studies. To date, however, there is little evidence that the host-cell actin cytoskeleton participates in responses to phytopathogenic bacteria. Here, we quantified the spatiotemporal changes in host-cell cytoskeletal architecture during the immune response to pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. Two distinct changes to host cytoskeletal arrays were observed that correspond to distinct phases of plant-bacterial interactions i.e. the perception of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) during pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) and perturbations by effector proteins during effector-triggered susceptibility (ETS). We demonstrate that an immediate increase in actin filament abundance is a conserved and novel component of PTI. Notably, treatment of leaves with a MAMP peptide mimic was sufficient to elicit a rapid change in actin organization in epidermal cells, and this actin response required the host-cell MAMP receptor kinase complex, including FLS2, BAK1 and BIK1. Finally, we found that actin polymerization is necessary for the increase in actin filament density and that blocking this increase with the actin-disrupting drug latrunculin B leads to enhanced susceptibility of host plants to pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria. PMID:23593000

  16. Surface topography regulates wnt signaling through control of primary cilia structure in mesenchymal stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurray, R. J.; Wann, A. K. T.; Thompson, C. L.; Connelly, J. T.; Knight, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    The primary cilium regulates cellular signalling including influencing wnt sensitivity by sequestering β-catenin within the ciliary compartment. Topographic regulation of intracellular actin-myosin tension can control stem cell fate of which wnt is an important mediator. We hypothesized that topography influences mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) wnt signaling through the regulation of primary cilia structure and function. MSCs cultured on grooves expressed elongated primary cilia, through reduced actin organization. siRNA inhibition of anterograde intraflagellar transport (IFT88) reduced cilia length and increased active nuclear β-catenin. Conversely, increased primary cilia assembly in MSCs cultured on the grooves was associated with decreased levels of nuclear active β-catenin, axin-2 induction and proliferation, in response to wnt3a. This negative regulation, on grooved topography, was reversed by siRNA to IFT88. This indicates that subtle regulation of IFT and associated cilia structure, tunes the wnt response controlling stem cell differentiation.

  17. Conditional N-WASP knockout in mouse brain implicates actin cytoskeleton regulation in hydrocephalus pathology.

    PubMed

    Jain, Neeraj; Lim, Lee Wei; Tan, Wei Ting; George, Bhawana; Makeyev, Eugene; Thanabalu, Thirumaran

    2014-04-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is produced by the choroid plexus and moved by multi-ciliated ependymal cells through the ventricular system of the vertebrate brain. Defects in the ependymal layer functionality are a common cause of hydrocephalus. N-WASP (Neural-Wiskott Aldrich Syndrome Protein) is a brain-enriched regulator of actin cytoskeleton and N-WASP knockout caused embryonic lethality in mice with neural tube and cardiac abnormalities. To shed light on the role of N-WASP in mouse brain development, we generated N-WASP conditional knockout mouse model N-WASP(fl/fl); Nestin-Cre (NKO-Nes). NKO-Nes mice were born with Mendelian ratios but exhibited reduced growth characteristics compared to their littermates containing functional N-WASP alleles. Importantly, all NKO-Nes mice developed cranial deformities due to excessive CSF accumulation and did not survive past weaning. Coronal brain sections of these animals revealed dilated lateral ventricles, defects in ciliogenesis, loss of ependymal layer integrity, reduced thickness of cerebral cortex and aqueductal stenosis. Immunostaining for N-cadherin suggests that ependymal integrity in NKO-Nes mice is lost as compared to normal morphology in the wild-type controls. Moreover, scanning electron microscopy and immunofluorescence analyses of coronal brain sections with anti-acetylated tubulin antibodies revealed the absence of cilia in ventricular walls of NKO-Nes mice indicative of ciliogenesis defects. N-WASP deficiency does not lead to altered expression of N-WASP regulatory proteins, Fyn and Cdc42, which have been previously implicated in hydrocephalus pathology. Taken together, our results suggest that N-WASP plays a critical role in normal brain development and implicate actin cytoskeleton regulation as a vulnerable axis frequently deregulated in hydrocephalus. PMID:24462670

  18. [Cytoskeletal actin and its associated proteins. Some examples in Protista].

    PubMed

    Guillén, N; Carlier, M F; Brugerolle, G; Tardieux, I; Ausseil, J

    1998-06-01

    Many processes, cell motility being an example, require cells to remodel the actin cytoskeleton in response to both intracellular and extracellular signals. Reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton involves the rapid disassembly and reassembly of actin filaments, a phenomenon regulated by the action of particular actin-binding proteins. In recent years, an interest in studying actin regulation in unicellular organisms has arisen. Parasitic protozoan are among these organisms and studies of the cytoskeleton functions of these protozoan are relevant related to either cell biology or pathogenicity. To discuss recent data in this field, a symposium concerning "Actin and actin-binding proteins in protists" was held on May 8-11 in Paris, France, during the XXXV meeting of the French Society of Protistology. As a brief summary of the symposium we report here findings concerning the in vitro actin dynamic assembly, as well as the characterization of several actin-binding proteins from the parasitic protozoan Entamoeba histolytica, Trichomonas vaginalis and Plasmodium knowlesi. In addition, localization of actin in non-pathogen protists such as Prorocentrum micans and Crypthecodinium cohnii is also presented. The data show that some actin-binding proteins facilitate organization of filaments into higher order structures as pseudopods, while others have regulatory functions, indicating very particular roles for actin-binding proteins. One of the proteins discussed during the symposium, the actin depolymerizing factor ADF, was shown to enhance the treadmilling rate of actin filaments. In vitro, ADF binds to the ADP-bound forms of G-actin and F-actin, thereby participating in and changing the rate of actin assembly. Biochemical approaches allowed the identification of a protein complex formed by HSP/C70-cap32-34 which might also be involved in depolymerization of F-actin in P. knowlesi. Molecular and cellular approaches were used to identify proteins such as ABP-120 and myosin

  19. Septins Regulate Actin Organization and Cell Cycle Arrest Through SOCS7-Mediated Nuclear Accumulation of NCK

    PubMed Central

    Kremer, Brandon E.; Adang, Laura A.; Macara, Ian G.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Mammalian septins are GTP-binding proteins the functions of which are not well understood. Knockdown of Sept2, 6, and 7 causes stress fibers to disintegrate and the cells to lose polarity. We now show that this phenotype is induced by nuclear accumulation of the adapter protein NCK, as the effects can be reversed or induced by cytoplasmic or nuclear NCK, respectively. NCK is carried into the nucleus by SOCS7 (Suppressor Of Cytokine Signaling-7), which contains nuclear import/export signals. SOCS7 interacts through distinct domains with septins and NCK. DNA damage induces actin and septin rearrangement and rapid nuclear accumulation of NCK and SOCS7. Moreover, NCK expression is essential for cell-cycle arrest. The septin-SOCS7-NCK axis intersects with the canonical DNA damage cascade downstream of ATM/ATR and is essential for p53 Ser15 phosphorylation. These data illuminate an unanticipated connection between septins, SOCS7, NCK signaling, and the DNA damage response. PMID:17803907

  20. Ror2 regulates branching, differentiation, and actin-cytoskeletal dynamics within the mammary epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Roarty, Kevin; Shore, Amy N.; Creighton, Chad J.

    2015-01-01

    Wnt signaling encompasses β-catenin–dependent and –independent networks. How receptor context provides Wnt specificity in vivo to assimilate multiple concurrent Wnt inputs throughout development remains unclear. Here, we identified a refined expression pattern of Wnt/receptor combinations associated with the Wnt/β-catenin–independent pathway in mammary epithelial subpopulations. Moreover, we elucidated the function of the alternative Wnt receptor Ror2 in mammary development and provided evidence for coordination of this pathway with Wnt/β-catenin–dependent signaling in the mammary epithelium. Lentiviral short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated depletion of Ror2 in vivo increased branching and altered the differentiation of the mammary epithelium. Microarray analyses identified distinct gene level alterations within the epithelial compartments in the absence of Ror2, with marked changes observed in genes associated with the actin cytoskeleton. Modeling of branching morphogenesis in vitro defined specific defects in cytoskeletal dynamics accompanied by Rho pathway alterations downstream of Ror2 loss. The current study presents a model of Wnt signaling coordination in vivo and assigns an important role for Ror2 in mammary development. PMID:25624393

  1. The PCH family member MAYP/PSTPIP2 directly regulates F-actin bundling and enhances filopodia formation and motility in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chitu, Violeta; Pixley, Fiona J; Macaluso, Frank; Larson, Daniel R; Condeelis, John; Yeung, Yee-Guide; Stanley, E Richard

    2005-06-01

    Macrophage actin-associated tyrosine phosphorylated protein (MAYP) belongs to the Pombe Cdc15 homology (PCH) family of proteins involved in the regulation of actin-based functions including cell adhesion and motility. In mouse macrophages, MAYP is tyrosine phosphorylated after activation of the colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R), which also induces actin reorganization, membrane ruffling, cell spreading, polarization, and migration. Because MAYP associates with F-actin, we investigated the function of MAYP in regulating actin organization in macrophages. Overexpression of MAYP decreased CSF-1-induced membrane ruffling and increased filopodia formation, motility and CSF-1-mediated chemotaxis. The opposite phenotype was observed with reduced expression of MAYP, indicating that MAYP is a negative regulator of CSF-1-induced membrane ruffling and positively regulates formation of filopodia and directional migration. Overexpression of MAYP led to a reduction in total macrophage F-actin content but was associated with increased actin bundling. Consistent with this, purified MAYP bundled F-actin and regulated its turnover in vitro. In addition, MAYP colocalized with cortical and filopodial F-actin in vivo. Because filopodia are postulated to increase directional motility by acting as environmental sensors, the MAYP-stimulated increase in directional movement may be at least partly explained by enhancement of filopodia formation. PMID:15788569

  2. A 133Cs nuclear magnetic resonance study of endothelial Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity: can actin regulate its activity?

    PubMed Central

    Gruwel, M L; Culíc, O; Schrader, J

    1997-01-01

    Using (133)Cs+ NMR, we developed a technique to repetitively measure, in vivo, Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity in endothelial cells. The measurements were made without the use of an exogenous shift reagent, because of the large chemical shift of 1.36 +/- 0.13 ppm between intra- and extracellular Cs+. Intracellularly we obtained a spin lattice relaxation time (T1) of 2.0 +/- 0.3 s, and extracellular T1 was 7.9 +/- 0.4 s. Na(+)-K+ pump activity in endothelial cells was determined at 12 +/- 3 nmol Cs+ x min(-1) x (mg Prot)[-1] under control conditions. When intracellular ATP was depleted by the addition of 5 mM 2-deoxy-D-glucose (DOG) and NaCN to about 5% of control, the pump rate decreased by 33%. After 80 min of perfusion with 5 mM DOG and NaCN, reperfusion with control medium rapidly reestablished the endothelial membrane Cs+ gradient. Using (133)Cs+ NMR as a convenient tool, we further addressed the proposed role of actin as a regulator of Na(+)-K+ pump activity in intact cells. Two models of actin rearrangement were tested. DOG caused a rearrangement of F-actin and an increase in G-actin, with a simultaneous decrease in ATP concentration. Cytochalasin D, however, caused an F-actin rearrangement different from that observed for DOG and an increase in G-actin, and cellular ATP levels remained unchanged. In both models, the Na(+)-K(+)-pump activity remained unchanged, as measured with (133)Cs NMR. Our results demonstrate that (133)Cs NMR can be used to repetitively measure Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity in endothelial cells. No evidence for a regulatory role of actin on Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase was found. Images FIGURE 6 PMID:9168052

  3. Yeast Actin-Related Protein ARP6 Negatively Regulates Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation of Yeast Cell.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yumei; Chen, Zikai; Zhu, Detu; Tu, Haitao; Pan, Shen Quan

    2015-01-01

    The yeasts, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris, are single-cell eukaryotic organisms that can serve as models for human genetic diseases and hosts for large scale production of recombinant proteins in current biopharmaceutical industry. Thus, efficient genetic engineering tools for yeasts are of great research and economic values. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (AMT) can transfer T-DNA into yeast cells as a method for genetic engineering. However, how the T-DNA is transferred into the yeast cells is not well established yet. Here our genetic screening of yeast knockout mutants identified a yeast actin-related protein ARP6 as a negative regulator of AMT. ARP6 is a critical member of the SWR1 chromatin remodeling complex (SWR-C); knocking out some other components of the complex also increased the transformation efficiency, suggesting that ARP6 might regulate AMT via SWR-C. Moreover, knockout of ARP6 led to disruption of microtubule integrity, higher uptake and degradation of virulence proteins, and increased DNA stability inside the cells, all of which resulted in enhanced transformation efficiency. Our findings have identified molecular and cellular mechanisms regulating AMT and a potential target for enhancing the transformation efficiency in yeast cells. PMID:26425545

  4. Yeast Actin-Related Protein ARP6 Negatively Regulates Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation of Yeast Cell

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yumei; Chen, Zikai; Zhu, Detu; Tu, Haitao; Pan, Shen Quan

    2015-01-01

    The yeasts, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris, are single-cell eukaryotic organisms that can serve as models for human genetic diseases and hosts for large scale production of recombinant proteins in current biopharmaceutical industry. Thus, efficient genetic engineering tools for yeasts are of great research and economic values. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (AMT) can transfer T-DNA into yeast cells as a method for genetic engineering. However, how the T-DNA is transferred into the yeast cells is not well established yet. Here our genetic screening of yeast knockout mutants identified a yeast actin-related protein ARP6 as a negative regulator of AMT. ARP6 is a critical member of the SWR1 chromatin remodeling complex (SWR-C); knocking out some other components of the complex also increased the transformation efficiency, suggesting that ARP6 might regulate AMT via SWR-C. Moreover, knockout of ARP6 led to disruption of microtubule integrity, higher uptake and degradation of virulence proteins, and increased DNA stability inside the cells, all of which resulted in enhanced transformation efficiency. Our findings have identified molecular and cellular mechanisms regulating AMT and a potential target for enhancing the transformation efficiency in yeast cells. PMID:26425545

  5. Modulation of the interaction between G-actin and thymosin beta 4 by the ATP/ADP ratio: possible implication in the regulation of actin dynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Carlier, M F; Jean, C; Rieger, K J; Lenfant, M; Pantaloni, D

    1993-01-01

    The interaction of G-actin with thymosin beta 4 (T beta 4), the major G-actin-sequestering protein in motile and proliferating cells, has been analyzed in vitro. T beta 4 is found to have a 50-fold higher affinity for MgATP-actin than for MgADP-actin. These results imply that in resting platelets and neutrophils, actin is sequestered by T beta 4 as MgATP-G-actin. Kinetic experiments and theoretical calculations demonstrate that this ATP/ADP dependence of T beta 4 affinity for G-actin can generate a mechanism of desequestration of G-actin by ADP, in the presence of physiological concentrations of T beta 4 (approximately 0.1 mM). The desequestration of G-actin by ADP is kinetically enhanced by profilin, which accelerates the dissociation of ATP from G-actin. Whether a local drop in the ATP/ADP ratio can allow local, transient desequestration and polymerization of actin either close to the plasma membrane, following platelet or neutrophil stimulation, or behind the Listeria bacterium in the host cell, while the surrounding cytoplasm contains sequestered ATP-G-actin, is an open issue raised by the present work. PMID:8506348

  6. Bundling actin filaments from membranes: some novel players

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Clément

    2012-01-01

    Progress in live-cell imaging of the cytoskeleton has significantly extended our knowledge about the organization and dynamics of actin filaments near the plasma membrane of plant cells. Noticeably, two populations of filamentous structures can be distinguished. On the one hand, fine actin filaments which exhibit an extremely dynamic behavior basically characterized by fast polymerization and prolific severing events, a process referred to as actin stochastic dynamics. On the other hand, thick actin bundles which are composed of several filaments and which are comparatively more stable although they constantly remodel as well. There is evidence that the actin cytoskeleton plays critical roles in trafficking and signaling at both the cell cortex and organelle periphery but the exact contribution of actin bundles remains unclear. A common view is that actin bundles provide the long-distance tracks used by myosin motors to deliver their cargo to growing regions and accordingly play a particularly important role in cell polarization. However, several studies support that actin bundles are more than simple passive highways and display multiple and dynamic roles in the regulation of many processes, such as cell elongation, polar auxin transport, stomatal and chloroplast movement, and defense against pathogens. The list of identified plant actin-bundling proteins is ever expanding, supporting that plant cells shape structurally and functionally different actin bundles. Here I review the most recently characterized actin-bundling proteins, with a particular focus on those potentially relevant to membrane trafficking and/or signaling. PMID:22936939

  7. A pathogenic bacterium triggers epithelial signals to form a functional bacterial receptor that mediates actin pseudopod formation.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenshine, I; Ruschkowski, S; Stein, M; Reinscheid, D J; Mills, S D; Finlay, B B

    1996-01-01

    Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) belongs to a group of bacterial pathogens that induce actin accumulation beneath adherent bacteria. We found that EPEC adherence to epithelial cells mediates the formation of fingerlike pseudopods (up to 10 microm) beneath bacteria. These actin-rich structures also contain tyrosine phosphorylated host proteins concentrated at the pseudopod tip beneath adherent EPEC. Intimate bacterial adherence (and pseudopod formation) occurred only after prior bacterial induction of tyrosine phosphorylation of an epithelial membrane protein, Hp90, which then associates directly with an EPEC adhesin, intimin. These interactions lead to cytoskeletal nucleation and pseudopod formation. This is the first example of a bacterial pathogen that triggers signals in epithelial cells which activates receptor binding activity to a specific bacterial ligand and subsequent cytoskeletal rearrangement. Images PMID:8654358

  8. Arabidopsis LIM Proteins: A Family of Actin Bundlers with Distinct Expression Patterns and Modes of Regulation[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Papuga, Jessica; Hoffmann, Céline; Dieterle, Monika; Moes, Danièle; Moreau, Flora; Tholl, Stéphane; Steinmetz, André; Thomas, Clément

    2010-01-01

    Recently, a number of two LIM-domain containing proteins (LIMs) have been reported to trigger the formation of actin bundles, a major higher-order cytoskeletal assembly. Here, we analyzed the six Arabidopsis thaliana LIM proteins. Promoter-β-glucuronidase reporter studies revealed that WLIM1, WLIM2a, and WLIM2b are widely expressed, whereas PLIM2a, PLIM2b, and PLIM2c are predominantly expressed in pollen. LIM-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions all decorated the actin cytoskeleton and increased actin bundle thickness in transgenic plants and in vitro, although with different affinities and efficiencies. Remarkably, the activities of WLIMs were calcium and pH independent, whereas those of PLIMs were inhibited by high pH and, in the case of PLIM2c, by high [Ca2+]. Domain analysis showed that the C-terminal domain is key for the responsiveness of PLIM2c to pH and calcium. Regulation of LIM by pH was further analyzed in vivo by tracking GFP-WLIM1 and GFP-PLIM2c during intracellular pH modifications. Cytoplasmic alkalinization specifically promoted release of GFP-PLIM2c but not GFP-WLIM1, from filamentous actin. Consistent with these data, GFP-PLIM2c decorated long actin bundles in the pollen tube shank, a region of relatively low pH. Together, our data support a prominent role of Arabidopsis LIM proteins in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton organization and dynamics in sporophytic tissues and pollen. PMID:20817848

  9. Mutations of the Mouse ELMO Domain Containing 1 Gene (Elmod1) Link Small GTPase Signaling to Actin Cytoskeleton Dynamics in Hair Cell Stereocilia

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kenneth R.; Longo-Guess, Chantal M.; Gagnon, Leona H.

    2012-01-01

    Stereocilia, the modified microvilli projecting from the apical surfaces of the sensory hair cells of the inner ear, are essential to the mechanoelectrical transduction process underlying hearing and balance. The actin-filled stereocilia on each hair cell are tethered together by fibrous links to form a highly patterned hair bundle. Although many structural components of hair bundles have been identified, little is known about the signaling mechanisms that regulate their development, morphology, and maintenance. Here, we describe two naturally occurring, allelic mutations that result in hearing and balance deficits in mice, named roundabout (rda) and roundabout-2J (rda2J). Positional cloning identified both as mutations of the mouse ELMO domain containing 1 gene (Elmod1), a poorly characterized gene with no previously reported mutant phenotypes. The rda mutation is a 138 kb deletion that includes exons 1–5 of Elmod1, and rda2J is an intragenic duplication of exons 3–8 of Elmod1. The deafness associated with these mutations is caused by cochlear hair cell dysfunction, as indicated by conspicuous elongations and fusions of inner hair cell stereocilia and progressive degeneration of outer hair cell stereocilia. Mammalian ELMO-family proteins are known to be involved in complexes that activate small GTPases to regulate the actin cytoskeleton during phagocytosis and cell migration. ELMOD1 and ELMOD2 recently were shown to function as GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) for the Arf family of small G proteins. Our finding connecting ELMOD1 deficiencies with stereocilia dysmorphologies thus establishes a link between the Ras superfamily of small regulatory GTPases and the actin cytoskeleton dynamics of hair cell stereocilia. PMID:22558334

  10. Mutations of the mouse ELMO domain containing 1 gene (Elmod1) link small GTPase signaling to actin cytoskeleton dynamics in hair cell stereocilia.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kenneth R; Longo-Guess, Chantal M; Gagnon, Leona H

    2012-01-01

    Stereocilia, the modified microvilli projecting from the apical surfaces of the sensory hair cells of the inner ear, are essential to the mechanoelectrical transduction process underlying hearing and balance. The actin-filled stereocilia on each hair cell are tethered together by fibrous links to form a highly patterned hair bundle. Although many structural components of hair bundles have been identified, little is known about the signaling mechanisms that regulate their development, morphology, and maintenance. Here, we describe two naturally occurring, allelic mutations that result in hearing and balance deficits in mice, named roundabout (rda) and roundabout-2J (rda(2J)). Positional cloning identified both as mutations of the mouse ELMO domain containing 1 gene (Elmod1), a poorly characterized gene with no previously reported mutant phenotypes. The rda mutation is a 138 kb deletion that includes exons 1-5 of Elmod1, and rda(2J) is an intragenic duplication of exons 3-8 of Elmod1. The deafness associated with these mutations is caused by cochlear hair cell dysfunction, as indicated by conspicuous elongations and fusions of inner hair cell stereocilia and progressive degeneration of outer hair cell stereocilia. Mammalian ELMO-family proteins are known to be involved in complexes that activate small GTPases to regulate the actin cytoskeleton during phagocytosis and cell migration. ELMOD1 and ELMOD2 recently were shown to function as GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) for the Arf family of small G proteins. Our finding connecting ELMOD1 deficiencies with stereocilia dysmorphologies thus establishes a link between the Ras superfamily of small regulatory GTPases and the actin cytoskeleton dynamics of hair cell stereocilia. PMID:22558334

  11. Canonical and noncanonical g-protein signaling helps coordinate actin dynamics to promote macrophage phagocytosis of zymosan.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ning-Na; Becker, Steven; Boularan, Cedric; Kamenyeva, Olena; Vural, Ali; Hwang, Il-Young; Shi, Chong-Shan; Kehrl, John H

    2014-11-15

    Both chemotaxis and phagocytosis depend upon actin-driven cell protrusions and cell membrane remodeling. While chemoattractant receptors rely upon canonical G-protein signaling to activate downstream effectors, whether such signaling pathways affect phagocytosis is contentious. Here, we report that Gαi nucleotide exchange and signaling helps macrophages coordinate the recognition, capture, and engulfment of zymosan bioparticles. We show that zymosan exposure recruits F-actin, Gαi proteins, and Elmo1 to phagocytic cups and early phagosomes. Zymosan triggered an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) that was partially sensitive to Gαi nucleotide exchange inhibition and expression of GTP-bound Gαi recruited Elmo1 to the plasma membrane. Reducing GDP-Gαi nucleotide exchange, decreasing Gαi expression, pharmacologically interrupting Gβγ signaling, or reducing Elmo1 expression all impaired phagocytosis, while favoring the duration that Gαi remained GTP bound promoted it. Our studies demonstrate that targeting heterotrimeric G-protein signaling offers opportunities to enhance or retard macrophage engulfment of phagocytic targets such as zymosan. PMID:25225330

  12. Polycystin-2 (TRPP2) Regulation by Ca2+ Is Effected and Diversified by Actin-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Cantero, María del Rocío; Cantiello, Horacio F.

    2015-01-01

    Calcium regulation of Ca2+-permeable ion channels is an important mechanism in the control of cell function. Polycystin-2 (PC2, TRPP2), a member of the transient receptor potential superfamily, is a nonselective cation channel with Ca2+ permeability. The molecular mechanisms associated with PC2 regulation by Ca2+ remain ill-defined. We recently demonstrated that PC2 from human syncytiotrophoblast (PC2hst) but not the in vitro translated protein (PC2iv), functionally responds to changes in intracellular (cis) Ca2+. In this study we determined the regulatory effect(s) of Ca2+-sensitive and -insensitive actin-binding proteins (ABPs) on PC2iv channel function in a lipid bilayer system. The actin-bundling protein α-actinin increased PC2iv channel function in the presence of cis Ca2+, although instead was inhibitory in its absence. Conversely, filamin that shares actin-binding domains with α-actinin had a strong inhibitory effect on PC2iv channel function in the presence, but no effect in the absence of cis Ca2+. Gelsolin stimulated PC2iv channel function in the presence, but not the absence of cis Ca2+. In contrast, profilin that shares actin-binding domains with gelsolin, significantly increased PC2iv channel function both in the presence and absence of Ca2+. The distinct effect(s) of the ABPs on PC2iv channel function demonstrate that Ca2+ regulation of PC2 is actually mediated by direct interaction(s) with structural elements of the actin cytoskeleton. These data indicate that specific ABP-PC2 complexes would confer distinct Ca2+-sensitive properties to the channel providing functional diversity to the cytoskeletal control of transient receptor potential channel regulation. PMID:25954877

  13. Lipid-linked cell wall precursors regulate membrane association of bacterial actin MreB

    PubMed Central

    Schirner, Kathrin; Eun, Ye-Jin; Dion, Mike; Luo, Yun; Helmann, John D.; Garner, Ethan C.; Walker, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Summary The bacterial actin homolog MreB, which is critical for rod shape determination, forms filaments that rotate around the cell width on the inner surface of the cytoplasmic membrane. What determines filament association with the membranes or with other cell wall elongation proteins is not known. Using specific chemical and genetic perturbations while following MreB filament motion, we find that MreB membrane association is an actively regulated process that depends on the presence of lipid-linked peptidoglycan precursors. When precursors are depleted, MreB filaments disassemble into the cytoplasm and peptidoglycan synthesis becomes disorganized. In cells that lack wall teichoic acids, but continue to make peptidoglycan, dynamic MreB filaments are observed, although their presence is not sufficient to establish a rod shape. We propose that the cell regulates MreB filament association with the membrane, allowing rapid and reversible inactivation of cell wall enzyme complexes in response to the inhibition of cell wall synthesis. PMID:25402772

  14. Vinculin-dependent actin bundling regulates cell migration and traction forces

    PubMed Central

    Jannie, Karry M.; Ellerbroek, Shawn M.; Zhou, Dennis W.; Chen, Sophia; Crompton, David J.; García, Andrés J.; DeMali, Kris A.

    2015-01-01

    Vinculin binding to actin filaments is thought to be critical for force transduction within a cell, but direct experimental evidence to support this conclusion has been limited . In this study, we found mutation (R1049E) of the vinculin tail impairs its ability to bind F-actin, stimulate actin polymerization, and bundle F-actin in vitro. Further , mutant (R1049E) vinculin expressing cells are altered in cell migration, which is accompanied by changes in cell adhesion, cell spreading, and cell generation of traction forces, providing direct evidence for the critical role of vinculin in mechanotransduction at adhesion sites. Lastly, we herein discuss the viability of models detailing the F-actin-binding surface on vinculin in context of our mutational analysis. PMID:25358683

  15. Actin Polymerization is Stimulated by Actin Crosslinking Protein Palladin

    PubMed Central

    Gurung, Ritu; Yadav, Rahul; Brungardt, Joseph G.; Orlova, Albina; Egelman, Edward H.; Beck, Moriah R.

    2016-01-01

    The actin scaffold protein palladin regulates both normal cell migration and invasive cell motility, processes that require the coordinated regulation of actin dynamics. However, the potential effect of palladin on actin dynamics has remained elusive. Here we show that the actin binding immunoglobulin-like domain of palladin, which is directly responsible for both actin binding and bundling, also stimulates actin polymerization in vitro. Palladin eliminated the lag phase that is characteristic of the slow nucleation step of actin polymerization. Furthermore, palladin dramatically reduced depolymerization, slightly enhanced the elongation rate, and did not alter the critical concentration. Microscopy and in vitro crosslinking assays reveal differences in actin bundle architecture when palladin is incubated with actin before or after polymerization. These results suggest a model whereby palladin stimulates a polymerization-competent form of G-actin, akin to metal ions, either through charge neutralization or conformational changes. PMID:26607837

  16. Optogenetic control of PIP3: PIP3 is sufficient to induce the actin-based active part of growth cones and is regulated via endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Kakumoto, Toshiyuki; Nakata, Takao

    2013-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3) is highly regulated in a spatiotemporal manner and plays multiple roles in individual cells. However, the local dynamics and primary functions of PIP3 in developing neurons remain unclear because of a lack of techniques for manipulating PIP3 spatiotemporally. We addressed this issue by combining optogenetic control and observation of endogenous PIP3 signaling. Endogenous PIP3 was abundant in actin-rich structures such as growth cones and "waves", and PIP3-rich plasma membranes moved actively within growth cones. To study the role of PIP3 in developing neurons, we developed a PI3K photoswitch that can induce production of PIP3 at specific locations upon blue light exposure. We succeeded in producing PIP3 locally in mouse hippocampal neurons. Local PIP3 elevation at neurite tips did not induce neurite elongation, but it was sufficient to induce the formation of filopodia and lamellipodia. Interestingly, ectopic PIP3 elevation alone activated membranes to form actin-based structures whose behavior was similar to that of growth-cone-like "waves". We also found that endocytosis regulates effective PIP3 concentration at plasma membranes. These results revealed the local dynamics and primary functions of PIP3, providing fundamental information about PIP3 signaling in neurons. PMID:23951027

  17. Hic-5 Regulates Actin Cytoskeletal Reorganization and Expression of Fibrogenic Markers and Myocilin in Trabecular Meshwork Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pattabiraman, Padmanabhan Paranji; Rao, Ponugoti Vasantha

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To explore the role of inducible focal adhesion (FA) protein Hic-5 in actin cytoskeletal reorganization, FA formation, fibrogenic activity, and expression of myocilin in trabecular meshwork (TM) cells. Methods Using primary cultures of human TM (HTM) cells, the effects of various external factors on Hic-5 protein levels, as well as the effects of recombinant Hic-5 and Hic-5 small interfering RNA (siRNA) on actin cytoskeleton, FAs, myocilin, α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA), and collagen-1 were determined by immunofluorescence and immunoblot analyses. Results Hic-5 distributes discretely to the FAs in HTM cells and throughout the TM and Schlemm's canal of the human aqueous humor (AH) outflow pathway. Transforming growth factor-β2 (TGF-β2), endothelin-1, lysophosphatidic acid, hydrogen peroxide, and RhoA significantly increased Hic-5 protein levels in HTM cells in association with reorganization of actin cytoskeleton and FAs. While recombinant Hic-5 induced actin stress fibers, FAs, αv integrin redistribution to the FAs, increased levels of αSMA, collagen-1, and myocilin, Hic-5 siRNA suppressed most of these responses in HTM cells. Hic-5 siRNA also suppressed TGF-β2-induced fibrogenic activity and dexamethasone-induced myocilin expression in HTM cells. Conclusions Taken together, these results reveal that Hic-5, whose levels were increased by various external factors implicated in elevated intraocular pressure, induces actin cytoskeletal reorganization, FAs, expression of fibrogenic markers, and myocilin in HTM cells. These characteristics of Hic-5 in TM cells indicate its importance in regulation of AH outflow through the TM in both normal and glaucomatous eyes. PMID:26313302

  18. Nuclear RhoA signaling regulates MRTF-dependent SMC-specific transcription

    PubMed Central

    Staus, Dean P.; Weise-Cross, Laura; Mangum, Kevin D.; Medlin, Matt D.; Mangiante, Lee; Taylor, Joan M.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that RhoA-mediated actin polymerization stimulates smooth muscle cell (SMC)-specific transcription by regulating the nuclear localization of the myocardin-related transcription factors (MRTFs). On the basis of the recent demonstration that nuclear G-actin regulates MRTF nuclear export and observations from our laboratory and others that the RhoA effector, mDia2, shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm, we investigated whether nuclear RhoA signaling plays a role in regulating MRTF activity. We identified sequences that control mDia2 nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling and used mDia2 variants to demonstrate that the ability of mDia2 to fully stimulate MRTF nuclear accumulation and SMC-specific gene transcription was dependent on its localization to the nucleus. To test whether RhoA signaling promotes nuclear actin polymerization, we established a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP)-based assay to measure green fluorescent protein-actin diffusion in the nuclear compartment. Nuclear actin FRAP was delayed in cells expressing nuclear-targeted constitutively active mDia1 and mDia2 variants and in cells treated with the polymerization inducer, jasplakinolide. In contrast, FRAP was enhanced in cells expressing a nuclear-targeted variant of mDia that inhibits both mDia1 and mDia2. Treatment of 10T1/2 cells with sphingosine 1-phosphate induced RhoA activity in the nucleus and forced nuclear localization of RhoA or the Rho-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), leukemia-associated RhoGEF, enhanced the ability of these proteins to stimulate MRTF activity. Taken together, these data support the emerging idea that RhoA-dependent nuclear actin polymerization has important effects on transcription and nuclear structure. PMID:24906914

  19. Proper Regulation of Cdc42 Activity is Required for Tight Actin Concentration at the Equator during Cytokinesis in Adherent Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaodong; Wang, Junxia; Moriguchi, Kazuki; Liow, Lu Ting; Ahmed, Sohail; Kaverina, Irina; Murata-Hori, Maki

    2012-01-01

    Cytokinesis in mammalian cells requires actin assembly at the equatorial region. Although functions of RhoA in this process have been well established, additional mechanisms are likely involved. We have examined if Cdc42 is involved in actin assembly during cytokinesis. Depletion of Cdc42 had no apparent effects on the duration of cytokinesis, while overexpression of constitutively active Cdc42 (CACdc42) caused cytokinesis failure in normal rat kidney epithelial cells. Cells depleted of Cdc42 displayed abnormal cell morphology and caused a failure of tight accumulation of actin and RhoA at the equator. In contrast, in cells overexpressing CACdc42, actin formed abnormal bundles and RhoA was largely eliminated from the equator. Our results suggest that accurate regulation of Cdc42 activity is crucial for proper equatorial actin assembly and RhoA localization during cytokinesis. Notably, our observations also suggest that tight actin concentration is not essential for cytokinesis in adherent mammalian cells. PMID:21763307

  20. Polarized Exocytosis Induces Compensatory Endocytosis by Sec4p-Regulated Cortical Actin Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Jesper; Alfaro, Gabriel; Beh, Christopher T

    2016-08-01

    Polarized growth is maintained by both polarized exocytosis, which transports membrane components to specific locations on the cell cortex, and endocytosis, which retrieves these components before they can diffuse away. Despite functional links between these two transport pathways, they are generally considered to be separate events. Using live cell imaging, in vivo and in vitro protein binding assays, and in vitro pyrene-actin polymerization assays, we show that the yeast Rab GTPase Sec4p couples polarized exocytosis with cortical actin polymerization, which induces endocytosis. After polarized exocytosis to the plasma membrane, Sec4p binds Las17/Bee1p (yeast Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome protein [WASp]) in a complex with Sla1p and Sla2p during actin patch assembly. Mutations that inactivate Sec4p, or its guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Sec2p, inhibit actin patch formation, whereas the activating sec4-Q79L mutation accelerates patch assembly. In vitro assays of Arp2/3-dependent actin polymerization established that GTPγS-Sec4p overrides Sla1p inhibition of Las17p-dependent actin nucleation. These results support a model in which Sec4p relocates along the plasma membrane from polarized sites of exocytic vesicle fusion to nascent sites of endocytosis. Activated Sec4p then promotes actin polymerization and triggers compensatory endocytosis, which controls surface expansion and kinetically refines cell polarization. PMID:27526190

  1. An Actin Filament Population Defined by the Tropomyosin Tpm3.1 Regulates Glucose Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Kee, Anthony J.; Yang, Lingyan; Lucas, Christine A.; Greenberg, Michael J.; Martel, Nick; Leong, Gary M.; Hughes, William E.; Cooney, Gregory J.; James, David E.; Ostap, E. Michael; Han, Weiping; Gunning, Peter W.; Hardeman, Edna C.

    2016-01-01

    Actin has an ill-defined role in the trafficking of GLUT4 glucose transporter vesicles to the plasma membrane (PM). We have identified novel actin filaments defined by the tropomyosin Tpm3.1 at glucose uptake sites in white adipose tissue (WAT) and skeletal muscle. In Tpm 3.1-overexpressing mice, insulin-stimulated glucose uptake was increased; while Tpm3.1-null mice they were more sensitive to the impact of high-fat diet on glucose uptake. Inhibition of Tpm3.1 function in 3T3-L1 adipocytes abrogates insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation and glucose uptake. In WAT, the amount of filamentous actin is determined by Tpm3.1 levels and is paralleled by changes in exocyst component (sec8) and Myo1c levels. In adipocytes, Tpm3.1 localizes with MyoIIA, but not Myo1c, and it inhibits Myo1c binding to actin. We propose that Tpm3.1 determines the amount of cortical actin that can engage MyoIIA and generate contractile force, and in parallel limits the interaction of Myo1c with actin filaments. The balance between these actin filament populations may determine the efficiency of movement and/or fusion of GLUT4 vesicles with the PM. PMID:25783006

  2. Polarized Exocytosis Induces Compensatory Endocytosis by Sec4p-Regulated Cortical Actin Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, Jesper; Alfaro, Gabriel; Beh, Christopher T.

    2016-01-01

    Polarized growth is maintained by both polarized exocytosis, which transports membrane components to specific locations on the cell cortex, and endocytosis, which retrieves these components before they can diffuse away. Despite functional links between these two transport pathways, they are generally considered to be separate events. Using live cell imaging, in vivo and in vitro protein binding assays, and in vitro pyrene-actin polymerization assays, we show that the yeast Rab GTPase Sec4p couples polarized exocytosis with cortical actin polymerization, which induces endocytosis. After polarized exocytosis to the plasma membrane, Sec4p binds Las17/Bee1p (yeast Wiskott—Aldrich Syndrome protein [WASp]) in a complex with Sla1p and Sla2p during actin patch assembly. Mutations that inactivate Sec4p, or its guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Sec2p, inhibit actin patch formation, whereas the activating sec4-Q79L mutation accelerates patch assembly. In vitro assays of Arp2/3-dependent actin polymerization established that GTPγS-Sec4p overrides Sla1p inhibition of Las17p-dependent actin nucleation. These results support a model in which Sec4p relocates along the plasma membrane from polarized sites of exocytic vesicle fusion to nascent sites of endocytosis. Activated Sec4p then promotes actin polymerization and triggers compensatory endocytosis, which controls surface expansion and kinetically refines cell polarization. PMID:27526190

  3. Endocannabinoid Signaling Regulates Sleep Stability

    PubMed Central

    Pava, Matthew J.; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Lovinger, David M.

    2016-01-01

    The hypnogenic properties of cannabis have been recognized for centuries, but endogenous cannabinoid (endocannabinoid) regulation of vigilance states is poorly characterized. We report findings from a series of experiments in mice measuring sleep with polysomnography after various systemic pharmacological manipulations of the endocannabinoid system. Rapid, unbiased scoring of vigilance states was achieved using an automated algorithm that we devised and validated. Increasing endocannabinoid tone with a selective inhibitor of monoacyglycerol lipase (JZL184) or fatty acid amide hydrolase (AM3506) produced a transient increase in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep due to an augmentation of the length of NREM bouts (NREM stability). Similarly, direct activation of type 1 cannabinoid (CB1) receptors with CP47,497 increased NREM stability, but both CP47,497 and JZL184 had a secondary effect that reduced NREM sleep time and stability. This secondary response to these drugs was similar to the early effect of CB1 blockade with the antagonist/inverse agonist AM281, which fragmented NREM sleep. The magnitude of the effects produced by JZL184 and AM281 were dependent on the time of day this drug was administered. While activation of CB1 resulted in only a slight reduction in gamma power, CB1 blockade had dramatic effects on broadband power in the EEG, particularly at low frequencies. However, CB1 blockade did not significantly reduce the rebound in NREM sleep following total sleep deprivation. These results support the hypothesis that endocannabinoid signaling through CB1 is necessary for NREM stability but it is not necessary for sleep homeostasis. PMID:27031992

  4. Endocannabinoid Signaling Regulates Sleep Stability.

    PubMed

    Pava, Matthew J; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Lovinger, David M

    2016-01-01

    The hypnogenic properties of cannabis have been recognized for centuries, but endogenous cannabinoid (endocannabinoid) regulation of vigilance states is poorly characterized. We report findings from a series of experiments in mice measuring sleep with polysomnography after various systemic pharmacological manipulations of the endocannabinoid system. Rapid, unbiased scoring of vigilance states was achieved using an automated algorithm that we devised and validated. Increasing endocannabinoid tone with a selective inhibitor of monoacyglycerol lipase (JZL184) or fatty acid amide hydrolase (AM3506) produced a transient increase in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep due to an augmentation of the length of NREM bouts (NREM stability). Similarly, direct activation of type 1 cannabinoid (CB1) receptors with CP47,497 increased NREM stability, but both CP47,497 and JZL184 had a secondary effect that reduced NREM sleep time and stability. This secondary response to these drugs was similar to the early effect of CB1 blockade with the antagonist/inverse agonist AM281, which fragmented NREM sleep. The magnitude of the effects produced by JZL184 and AM281 were dependent on the time of day this drug was administered. While activation of CB1 resulted in only a slight reduction in gamma power, CB1 blockade had dramatic effects on broadband power in the EEG, particularly at low frequencies. However, CB1 blockade did not significantly reduce the rebound in NREM sleep following total sleep deprivation. These results support the hypothesis that endocannabinoid signaling through CB1 is necessary for NREM stability but it is not necessary for sleep homeostasis. PMID:27031992

  5. Erk regulation of actin capping and bundling by Eps8 promotes cortex tension and leader bleb-based migration

    PubMed Central

    Logue, Jeremy S; Cartagena-Rivera, Alexander X; Baird, Michelle A; Davidson, Michael W; Chadwick, Richard S; Waterman, Clare M

    2015-01-01

    Within the confines of tissues, cancer cells can use blebs to migrate. Eps8 is an actin bundling and capping protein whose capping activity is inhibited by Erk, a key MAP kinase that is activated by oncogenic signaling. We tested the hypothesis that Eps8 acts as an Erk effector to modulate actin cortex mechanics and thereby mediate bleb-based migration of cancer cells. Cells confined in a non-adhesive environment migrate in the direction of a very large ‘leader bleb.’ Eps8 bundling activity promotes cortex tension and intracellular pressure to drive leader bleb formation. Eps8 capping and bundling activities act antagonistically to organize actin within leader blebs, and Erk mediates this effect. An Erk biosensor reveals concentrated kinase activity within leader blebs. Bleb contents are trapped by the narrow neck that separates the leader bleb from the cell body. Thus, Erk activity promotes actin bundling by Eps8 to enhance cortex tension and drive the bleb-based migration of cancer cells under non-adhesive confinement. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08314.001 PMID:26163656

  6. Erk regulation of actin capping and bundling by Eps8 promotes cortex tension and leader bleb-based migration.

    PubMed

    Logue, Jeremy S; Cartagena-Rivera, Alexander X; Baird, Michelle A; Davidson, Michael W; Chadwick, Richard S; Waterman, Clare M

    2015-01-01

    Within the confines of tissues, cancer cells can use blebs to migrate. Eps8 is an actin bundling and capping protein whose capping activity is inhibited by Erk, a key MAP kinase that is activated by oncogenic signaling. We tested the hypothesis that Eps8 acts as an Erk effector to modulate actin cortex mechanics and thereby mediate bleb-based migration of cancer cells. Cells confined in a non-adhesive environment migrate in the direction of a very large 'leader bleb.' Eps8 bundling activity promotes cortex tension and intracellular pressure to drive leader bleb formation. Eps8 capping and bundling activities act antagonistically to organize actin within leader blebs, and Erk mediates this effect. An Erk biosensor reveals concentrated kinase activity within leader blebs. Bleb contents are trapped by the narrow neck that separates the leader bleb from the cell body. Thus, Erk activity promotes actin bundling by Eps8 to enhance cortex tension and drive the bleb-based migration of cancer cells under non-adhesive confinement. PMID:26163656

  7. Actin cytoskeleton redox proteome oxidation by cadmium

    PubMed Central

    Go, Young-Mi; Orr, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies associate environmental cadmium (Cd) exposure with the risk of lung diseases. Although mechanisms are not fully elucidated, several studies demonstrate Cd effects on actin and actin-associated proteins. In a recent study of Cd at concentrations similar to environmental exposures, we found that redox-dependent inflammatory signaling by NF-κB was sensitive to the actin-disrupting agent, cytochalasin D. The goal of the present study was to use mass spectrometry-based redox proteomics to investigate Cd effects on the actin cytoskeleton proteome and related functional pathways in lung cells at low environmental concentrations. The results showed that Cd under conditions that did not alter total protein thiols or glutathione redox state caused significant oxidation of peptidyl Cys of proteins regulating actin cytoskeleton. Immunofluorescence microscopy of lung fibroblasts and pulmonary artery endothelial cells showed that low-dose Cd exposure stimulated filamentous actin formation and nuclear localization of destrin, an actin-depolymerizing factor. Taken together, the results show that redox states of peptidyl Cys in proteins associated with actin cytoskeleton pathways are selectively oxidized in lung by Cd at levels thought to occur from environmental exposure. PMID:24077948

  8. Regulation of the Postsynaptic Compartment of Excitatory Synapses by the Actin Cytoskeleton in Health and Its Disruption in Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stefen, Holly; Chaichim, Chanchanok

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of synaptic function at excitatory synapses is one of the earliest pathological changes seen in wide range of neurological diseases. The proper control of the segregation of neurotransmitter receptors at these synapses is directly correlated with the intact regulation of the postsynaptic cytoskeleton. In this review, we are discussing key factors that regulate the structure and dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton, the major cytoskeletal building block that supports the postsynaptic compartment. Special attention is given to the complex interplay of actin-associated proteins that are found in the synaptic specialization. We then discuss our current understanding of how disruption of these cytoskeletal elements may contribute to the pathological events observed in the nervous system under disease conditions with a particular focus on Alzheimer's disease pathology. PMID:27127658

  9. Actinic Keratosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Actinic Keratosis (Solar Keratosis) Information for adults A A A Actinic ... the touch. Overview Actinic keratoses, also known as solar keratoses, are small rough or scaly areas of ...

  10. Polarity protein Crumbs homolog-3 (CRB3) regulates ectoplasmic specialization dynamics through its action on F-actin organization in Sertoli cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ying; Lui, Wing-yee; Lee, Will M.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2016-01-01

    Crumbs homolog 3 (or Crumbs3, CRB3) is a polarity protein expressed by Sertoli and germ cells at the basal compartment in the seminiferous epithelium. CRB3 also expressed at the blood-testis barrier (BTB), co-localized with F-actin, TJ proteins occludin/ZO-1 and basal ES (ectoplasmic specialization) proteins N-cadherin/β-catenin at stages IV-VII only. The binding partners of CRB3 in the testis were the branched actin polymerization protein Arp3, and the barbed end-capping and bundling protein Eps8, illustrating its possible role in actin organization. CRB3 knockdown (KD) by RNAi in Sertoli cells with an established tight junction (TJ)-permeability barrier perturbed the TJ-barrier via changes in the distribution of TJ- and basal ES-proteins at the cell-cell interface. These changes were the result of CRB3 KD-induced re-organization of actin microfilaments, in which actin microfilaments were truncated, and extensively branched, thereby destabilizing F-actin-based adhesion protein complexes at the BTB. Using Polyplus in vivo-jetPEI as a transfection medium with high efficiency for CRB3 KD in the testis, the CRB3 KD testes displayed defects in spermatid and phagosome transport, and also spermatid polarity due to a disruption of F-actin organization. In summary, CRB3 is an actin microfilament regulator, playing a pivotal role in organizing actin filament bundles at the ES. PMID:27358069

  11. Polarity protein Crumbs homolog-3 (CRB3) regulates ectoplasmic specialization dynamics through its action on F-actin organization in Sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ying; Lui, Wing-Yee; Lee, Will M; Cheng, C Yan

    2016-01-01

    Crumbs homolog 3 (or Crumbs3, CRB3) is a polarity protein expressed by Sertoli and germ cells at the basal compartment in the seminiferous epithelium. CRB3 also expressed at the blood-testis barrier (BTB), co-localized with F-actin, TJ proteins occludin/ZO-1 and basal ES (ectoplasmic specialization) proteins N-cadherin/β-catenin at stages IV-VII only. The binding partners of CRB3 in the testis were the branched actin polymerization protein Arp3, and the barbed end-capping and bundling protein Eps8, illustrating its possible role in actin organization. CRB3 knockdown (KD) by RNAi in Sertoli cells with an established tight junction (TJ)-permeability barrier perturbed the TJ-barrier via changes in the distribution of TJ- and basal ES-proteins at the cell-cell interface. These changes were the result of CRB3 KD-induced re-organization of actin microfilaments, in which actin microfilaments were truncated, and extensively branched, thereby destabilizing F-actin-based adhesion protein complexes at the BTB. Using Polyplus in vivo-jetPEI as a transfection medium with high efficiency for CRB3 KD in the testis, the CRB3 KD testes displayed defects in spermatid and phagosome transport, and also spermatid polarity due to a disruption of F-actin organization. In summary, CRB3 is an actin microfilament regulator, playing a pivotal role in organizing actin filament bundles at the ES. PMID:27358069

  12. Impact of the phase defect structure on an actinic dark-field blank inspection signal and wafer printability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amano, Tsuyoshi; Murachi, Tetsunori; Yamane, Takeshi; Arisawa, Yukiyasu; Terasawa, Tsuneo

    2012-03-01

    A variety of phase defects (PDs) such as programmed bump and pit PDs, and native bump and pit PDs were detected by a dark-field ABI (Actinic Blank Inspection) tool. Among the PDs, some of them seemed to grow and propagate in an angular direction, away from substrate surface as was found by a TEM analysis. This presentation reports on the influence of 3-D phase defect on wafer printability, and on defect detection signals of an ABI tool. The result shows that the impact of the inclination angle on printing performance was quite significant when the PDs were not covered with the absorber pattern. On the other hand, the defect detection signal intensity was negligibly small in the case where the inclination angle was less than 9 degrees. However, ABI with its high magnification optics can pinpoint the PD's actual location as defined by the EUV light, rather than the ones that are not so clearly define by the surface topography.

  13. Regulation of Calcium signaling through spatial Organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, Aman; Ullah, Ghanim; Machaca, Khalid; Jung, Peter

    2010-03-01

    Calcium waves and signals in oocytes are produced and sustained by the release of Ca^2+ from the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) through clustered release channels. Changes in the spatial organization of calcium signaling effectors regulate the spatiotemporal features of the calcium signal as is e.g. observed during oocyte maturation. We report here how specific changes in the clustering of the calcium release channels in conjunction with physiologic alterations of other signaling effectors can affect a) the sensitivity of the signaling machinery to external factors, b) the time course of global intracellular signals and c), the speed and propagation range of intracellular calcium waves.

  14. WASH complex regulates Arp2/3 complex for actin-based polar body extrusion in mouse oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Guang-Li; Wang, Zhen-Bo; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Prior to their fertilization, oocytes undergo asymmetric division, which is regulated by actin filaments. Recently, WASH complex were identified as actin nucleation promoting factors (NPF) that activated Arp2/3 complex. However, the roles of WASH complex remain uncertain, particularly for oocyte polarization and asymmetric division. Here, we examined the functions of two important subunits of a WASH complex, WASH1 and Strumpellin, during mouse oocyte meiosis. Depleting WASH1 or disrupting Strumpellin activity by WASH1 morpholino (MO) injection or Strumpellin antibody injection decreased polar body extrusion and caused oocyte symmetric division, and this may have been due to spindle formation and migration defects. Time lapse microscopy showed that actin filaments distribution and relative amount at the membrane and in the cytoplasm of oocytes was significantly decreased after disrupting WASH complex. In addition, Arp2/3 complex expression was reduced after WASH1 depletion. Thus, our data indicated that WASH complex regulated Arp2/3 complex and were required for cytokinesis and following polar body extrusion during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation. PMID:24998208

  15. Nuclear F-actin Formation and Reorganization upon Cell Spreading*♦

    PubMed Central

    Plessner, Matthias; Melak, Michael; Chinchilla, Pilar; Baarlink, Christian; Grosse, Robert

    2015-01-01

    We recently discovered signal-regulated nuclear actin network assembly. However, in contrast to cytoplasmic actin regulation, polymeric nuclear actin structures and functions remain only poorly understood. Here we describe a novel molecular tool to visualize real-time nuclear actin dynamics by targeting the Actin-Chromobody-TagGFP to the nucleus, thus establishing a nuclear Actin-Chromobody. Interestingly, we observe nuclear actin polymerization into dynamic filaments upon cell spreading and fibronectin stimulation, both of which appear to be triggered by integrin signaling. Furthermore, we show that nucleoskeletal proteins such as the LINC (linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton) complex and components of the nuclear lamina couple cell spreading or integrin activation by fibronectin to nuclear actin polymerization. Spreading-induced nuclear actin polymerization results in serum response factor (SRF)-mediated transcription through nuclear retention of myocardin-related transcription factor A (MRTF-A). Our results reveal a signaling pathway, which links integrin activation by extracellular matrix interaction to nuclear actin polymerization through the LINC complex, and therefore suggest a role for nuclear actin polymerization in the context of cellular adhesion and mechanosensing. PMID:25759381

  16. Regulation of Hedgehog signaling by ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Hsia, Elaine Y. C.; Gui, Yirui; Zheng, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway plays crucial roles both in embryonic development and in adult stem cell function. The timing, duration and location of Hh signaling activity need to be tightly controlled. Abnormalities of Hh signal transduction lead to birth defects or malignant tumors. Recent data point to ubiquitination-related posttranslational modifications of several key Hh pathway components as an important mechanism of regulation of the Hh pathway. Here we review how ubiquitination regulates the localization, stability and activity of the key Hh signaling components. PMID:26366162

  17. Regulation of tubulin and actin synthesis and accumulation during Blastocladiella emersonii development.

    PubMed

    da Silva, A M; Juliani, M H

    1988-06-01

    Actin and alpha and beta-tubulin have been identified in Blastocladiella emersonii by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and Western blotting. The kinetics of synthesis of these proteins were compared by pulse-labeling experiments with [35S]methionine and with the accumulation of their corresponding mRNAs, translated in a cell-free system. Large increases occur in the rates of actin and alpha- and beta-tubulin biosynthesis during sporulation and there is an accumulation of the corresponding mRNAs. In parallel to the increased synthesis, these cytoskeletal proteins accumulate during the late stage of sporulation. PMID:3409324

  18. AGD1, a class 1 ARF-GAP, acts in common signaling pathways with phosphoinositide metabolism and the actin cytoskeleton in controlling Arabidopsis root hair polarity.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Cheol-Min; Quan, Li; Cannon, Ashley E; Wen, Jiangqi; Blancaflor, Elison B

    2012-03-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana AGD1 gene encodes a class 1 adenosine diphosphate ribosylation factor-gtpase-activating protein (ARF-GAP). Previously, we found that agd1 mutants have root hairs that exhibit wavy growth and have two tips that originate from a single initiation point. To gain new insights into how AGD1 modulates root hair polarity we analyzed double mutants of agd1 and other loci involved in root hair development, and evaluated dynamics of various components of root hair tip growth in agd1 by live cell microscopy. Because AGD1 contains a phosphoinositide (PI) binding pleckstrin homology (PH) domain, we focused on genetic interactions between agd1 and root hair mutants altered in PI metabolism. Rhd4, which is knocked-out in a gene encoding a phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PI-4P) phosphatase, was epistatic to agd1. In contrast, mutations to PIP5K3 and COW1, which encode a type B phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase 3 and a phosphatidylinositol transfer protein, respectively, enhanced the root hair defects of agd1. Enhanced root hair defects were also observed in double mutants to AGD1 and ACT2, a root hair-expressed vegetative actin isoform. Consistent with our double-mutant studies, targeting of tip growth components involved in PI signaling (PI-4P), secretion (RABA4b) and actin regulation (ROP2), were altered in agd1 root hairs. Furthermore, tip cytosolic calcium ([Ca²⁺](cyt) ) oscillations were disrupted in root hairs of agd1. Taken together, our results indicate that AGD1 links PI signaling to cytoskeletal-, [Ca²⁺](cyt-) , ROP2-, and RABA4b-mediated root hair development. PMID:22098134

  19. Viruses that ride on the coat-tails of actin nucleation.

    PubMed

    Newsome, Timothy P; Marzook, N Bishara

    2015-10-01

    Actin nucleation drives a diversity of critical cellular processes and the motility of a select group of viral pathogens. Vaccinia virus and baculovirus, Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus, recruit and activate the cellular actin nucleator, the Arp2/3 complex, at the surface of virus particles thereby instigating highly localized actin nucleation. The extension of these filaments provides a mechanical force that bestows the ability to navigate the intracellular environment and promote their infectious cycles. This review outlines the viral and cellular proteins that initiate and regulate the signalling networks leading to viral modification of the actin cytoskeleton and summarizes recent insights into the role of actin-based virus transport. PMID:26459972

  20. Regulation of skeletal alpha-actin promoter in young chickens during hypertrophy caused by stretch overload.

    PubMed

    Carson, J A; Yan, Z; Booth, F W; Coleman, M E; Schwartz, R J; Stump, C S

    1995-04-01

    Anterior latissimus dorsi (ALD) muscles of 3-wk-old male chickens were injected with plasmids containing various lengths of the chicken skeletal alpha-actin promoter (ranging from -2,090 to -77 relative to the transcription start site) driving luciferase. Hypertrophy of the left ALD muscle was induced by attaching a weight (11% of body wt) to the left wing of each chicken, with the unweighted contralateral wing serving the control. Six days of stretch overload significantly increased muscle mass 110%. Luciferase activity from the -2,090 actin-luciferase chimeric gene increased 127% compared with the contralateral control ALD muscle. Luciferase activities driven by the -424, -202, and -99 actin promoters were 179, 134, and 378% higher, respectively, in the stretched ALD muscle than in the contralateral control ALD muscle. Luciferase activity from the -77 deletion construct was not different between stretched and control muscles. These data indicate that the gene region responding to stretch is downstream of -99 and imply, but do not conclusively prove, that the region between -99 and -77, which contains serum response element 1, contributes to the stretch-induced increase in skeletal alpha-actin promoter activity in the ALD muscle. PMID:7537453

  1. Sensing actin dynamics: Structural basis for G-actin-sensitive nuclear import of MAL

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Hidemi; Matsuura, Yoshiyuki

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} MAL has a bipartite NLS that binds to Imp{alpha} in an extended conformation. {yields} Mutational analyses verified the functional significance of MAL-Imp{alpha} interactions. {yields} Induced folding and NLS-masking by G-actins inhibit nuclear import of MAL. -- Abstract: The coordination of cytoskeletal actin dynamics with gene expression reprogramming is emerging as a crucial mechanism to control diverse cellular processes, including cell migration, differentiation and neuronal circuit assembly. The actin-binding transcriptional coactivator MAL (also known as MRTF-A/MKL1/BSAC) senses G-actin concentration and transduces Rho GTPase signals to serum response factor (SRF). MAL rapidly shuttles between the cytoplasm and the nucleus in unstimulated cells but Rho-induced depletion of G-actin leads to MAL nuclear accumulation and activation of transcription of SRF:MAL-target genes. Although the molecular and structural basis of actin-regulated nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of MAL is not understood fully, it is proposed that nuclear import of MAL is mediated by importin {alpha}/{beta} heterodimer, and that G-actin competes with importin {alpha}/{beta} for the binding to MAL. Here we present structural, biochemical and cell biological evidence that MAL has a classical bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) in the N-terminal 'RPEL' domain containing Arg-Pro-X-X-X-Glu-Leu (RPEL) motifs. The NLS residues of MAL adopt an extended conformation and bind along the surface groove of importin-{alpha}, interacting with the major- and minor-NLS binding sites. We also present a crystal structure of wild-type MAL RPEL domain in complex with five G-actins. Comparison of the importin-{alpha}- and actin-complexes revealed that the binding of G-actins to MAL is associated with folding of NLS residues into a helical conformation that is inappropriate for importin-{alpha} recognition.

  2. F-actin-rich contractile endothelial pores prevent vascular leakage during leukocyte diapedesis through local RhoA signalling

    PubMed Central

    Heemskerk, Niels; Schimmel, Lilian; Oort, Chantal; van Rijssel, Jos; Yin, Taofei; Ma, Bin; van Unen, Jakobus; Pitter, Bettina; Huveneers, Stephan; Goedhart, Joachim; Wu, Yi; Montanez, Eloi; Woodfin, Abigail; van Buul, Jaap D.

    2016-01-01

    During immune surveillance and inflammation, leukocytes exit the vasculature through transient openings in the endothelium without causing plasma leakage. However, the exact mechanisms behind this intriguing phenomenon are still unknown. Here we report that maintenance of endothelial barrier integrity during leukocyte diapedesis requires local endothelial RhoA cycling. Endothelial RhoA depletion in vitro or Rho inhibition in vivo provokes neutrophil-induced vascular leakage that manifests during the physical movement of neutrophils through the endothelial layer. Local RhoA activation initiates the formation of contractile F-actin structures that surround emigrating neutrophils. These structures that surround neutrophil-induced endothelial pores prevent plasma leakage through actomyosin-based pore confinement. Mechanistically, we found that the initiation of RhoA activity involves ICAM-1 and the Rho GEFs Ect2 and LARG. In addition, regulation of actomyosin-based endothelial pore confinement involves ROCK2b, but not ROCK1. Thus, endothelial cells assemble RhoA-controlled contractile F-actin structures around endothelial pores that prevent vascular leakage during leukocyte extravasation. PMID:26814335

  3. F-actin-rich contractile endothelial pores prevent vascular leakage during leukocyte diapedesis through local RhoA signalling.

    PubMed

    Heemskerk, Niels; Schimmel, Lilian; Oort, Chantal; van Rijssel, Jos; Yin, Taofei; Ma, Bin; van Unen, Jakobus; Pitter, Bettina; Huveneers, Stephan; Goedhart, Joachim; Wu, Yi; Montanez, Eloi; Woodfin, Abigail; van Buul, Jaap D

    2016-01-01

    During immune surveillance and inflammation, leukocytes exit the vasculature through transient openings in the endothelium without causing plasma leakage. However, the exact mechanisms behind this intriguing phenomenon are still unknown. Here we report that maintenance of endothelial barrier integrity during leukocyte diapedesis requires local endothelial RhoA cycling. Endothelial RhoA depletion in vitro or Rho inhibition in vivo provokes neutrophil-induced vascular leakage that manifests during the physical movement of neutrophils through the endothelial layer. Local RhoA activation initiates the formation of contractile F-actin structures that surround emigrating neutrophils. These structures that surround neutrophil-induced endothelial pores prevent plasma leakage through actomyosin-based pore confinement. Mechanistically, we found that the initiation of RhoA activity involves ICAM-1 and the Rho GEFs Ect2 and LARG. In addition, regulation of actomyosin-based endothelial pore confinement involves ROCK2b, but not ROCK1. Thus, endothelial cells assemble RhoA-controlled contractile F-actin structures around endothelial pores that prevent vascular leakage during leukocyte extravasation. PMID:26814335

  4. Annexin 2 Regulates Intestinal Epithelial Cell Spreading and Wound Closure through Rho-Related Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Babbin, Brian A.; Parkos, Charles A.; Mandell, Kenneth J.; Winfree, L. Matthew; Laur, Oskar; Ivanov, Andrei I.; Nusrat, Asma

    2007-01-01

    Epithelial cell migration is a critical event in gastrointestinal mucosal wound healing and is dependent on actin cytoskeletal reorganization. We observed increased expression of an actin regulatory protein, annexin 2, in migrating intestinal epithelial cells. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of annexin 2 expression in Caco-2 epithelial cells resulted in significant reductions in cell spreading and wound closure associated with decreased formation of filamentous actin bundles along the base of migrating cells. Because annexin 2 has been shown to influences actin cytoskeletal remodeling through targeting signaling molecules to membrane domains, we examined the membrane association and activation status of Rho GTPases after annexin 2 knockdown. We observed Rho dissociation from membranes and decreased Rho activity following annexin 2 siRNA transfection. Inhibition of cell spreading and wound closure in annexin 2 siRNA-transfected cells was prevented by expression of constitutively active RhoA. Rho colocalized with annexin 2 in lamellipodia and along the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane. In addition, annexin 2 was observed to co-immunoprecipitate with endogenous Rho and constitutively active RhoA. These findings suggest that annexin 2 plays a role in targeting Rho to cellular membranes, thereby modulating Rho-related signaling events regulating cytoskeletal reorganization during epithelial cell migration. PMID:17322380

  5. p140Cap regulates memory and synaptic plasticity through Src-mediated and citron-N-mediated actin reorganization.

    PubMed

    Repetto, Daniele; Camera, Paola; Melani, Riccardo; Morello, Noemi; Russo, Isabella; Calcagno, Eleonora; Tomasoni, Romana; Bianchi, Federico; Berto, Gaia; Giustetto, Maurizio; Berardi, Nicoletta; Pizzorusso, Tommaso; Matteoli, Michela; Di Stefano, Paola; Missler, Markus; Turco, Emilia; Di Cunto, Ferdinando; Defilippi, Paola

    2014-01-22

    A major challenge in the neuroscience field is the identification of molecules and pathways that control synaptic plasticity and memory. Dendritic spines play a pivotal role in these processes, as the major sites of excitatory synapses in neuronal communication. Previous studies have shown that the scaffold protein p140Cap localizes into dendritic spines and that its knockdown negatively modulates spine shape in culture. However, so far, there is no information on its in vivo relevance. By using a knock-out mouse model, we here demonstrate that p140Cap is a key element for both learning and synaptic plasticity. Indeed, p140Cap(-/-) mice are impaired in object recognition test, as well as in LTP and in LTD measurements. The in vivo effects of p140Cap loss are presumably attenuated by noncell-autonomous events, since primary neurons obtained from p140Cap(-/-) mice show a strong reduction in number of mushroom spines and abnormal organization of synapse-associated F-actin. These phenotypes are most likely caused by a local reduction of the inhibitory control of RhoA and of cortactin toward the actin-depolymerizing factor cofilin. These events can be controlled by p140Cap through its capability to directly inhibit the activation of Src kinase and by its binding to the scaffold protein Citron-N. Altogether, our results provide new insight into how protein associated with dynamic microtubules may regulate spine actin organization through interaction with postsynaptic density components. PMID:24453341

  6. Comparative transcriptomics reveals RhoE as a novel regulator of actin dynamics in bone-resorbing osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Georgess, Dan; Mazzorana, Marlène; Terrado, José; Delprat, Christine; Chamot, Christophe; Guasch, Rosa M.; Pérez-Roger, Ignacio; Jurdic, Pierre; Machuca-Gayet, Irma

    2014-01-01

    The function of osteoclasts (OCs), multinucleated giant cells (MGCs) of the monocytic lineage, is bone resorption. To resorb bone, OCs form podosomes. These are actin-rich adhesive structures that pattern into rings that drive OC migration and into “sealing-zones” (SZs) that confine the resorption lacuna. Although changes in actin dynamics during podosome patterning have been documented, the mechanisms that regulate these changes are largely unknown. From human monocytic precursors, we differentiated MGCs that express OC degradation enzymes but are unable to resorb the mineral matrix. We demonstrated that, despite exhibiting bona fide podosomes, these cells presented dysfunctional SZs. We then performed two-step differential transcriptomic profiling of bone-resorbing OCs versus nonresorbing MGCs to generate a list of genes implicated in bone resorption. From this list of candidate genes, we investigated the role of Rho/Rnd3. Using primary RhoE-deficient OCs, we demonstrated that RhoE is indispensable for OC migration and bone resorption by maintaining fast actin turnover in podosomes. We further showed that RhoE activates podosome component cofilin by inhibiting its Rock-mediated phosphorylation. We conclude that the RhoE-Rock-cofilin pathway, by promoting podosome dynamics and patterning, is central for OC migration, SZ formation, and, ultimately, bone resorption. PMID:24284899

  7. Tropomodulin3 is a novel Akt2 effector regulating insulin-stimulated GLUT4 exocytosis through cortical actin remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chun-Yan; Bi, Xuezhi; Wu, Donghai; Kim, Jae Bum; Gunning, Peter W.; Hong, Wanjin; Han, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    Akt2 and its downstream effectors mediate insulin-stimulated GLUT4-storage vesicle (GSV) translocation and fusion with the plasma membrane (PM). Using mass spectrometry, we identify actin-capping protein Tropomodulin 3 (Tmod3) as an Akt2-interacting partner in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. We demonstrate that Tmod3 is phosphorylated at Ser71 on insulin-stimulated Akt2 activation, and Ser71 phosphorylation is required for insulin-stimulated GLUT4 PM insertion and glucose uptake. Phosphorylated Tmod3 regulates insulin-induced actin remodelling, an essential step for GSV fusion with the PM. Furthermore, the interaction of Tmod3 with its cognate tropomyosin partner, Tm5NM1 is necessary for GSV exocytosis and glucose uptake. Together these results establish Tmod3 as a novel Akt2 effector that mediates insulin-induced cortical actin remodelling and subsequent GLUT4 membrane insertion. Our findings suggest that defects in cytoskeletal remodelling may contribute to impaired GLUT4 exocytosis and glucose uptake. PMID:25575350

  8. Signals regulating dormancy in vegetative buds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dormancy in plants involves a temporary suspension of meristem growth, thus insuring bud survival and maintenance of proper shoot system architecture. Dormancy regulation is a complex process involving interactions of various signals through specific and/or overlapping signal transduction pathways. ...

  9. Cadherin 6 promotes neural crest cell detachment via F-actin regulation and influences active Rho distribution during epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Clay, Matthew R.; Halloran, Mary C.

    2014-01-01

    The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a complex change in cell phenotype that is important for cell migration, morphogenesis and carcinoma metastasis. Loss of epithelial cell adhesion and tight regulation of cadherin adhesion proteins are crucial for EMT. Cells undergoing EMT often display cadherin switching, where they downregulate one cadherin and induce expression of another. However, the functions of the upregulated cadherins and their effects on cell motility are poorly understood. Neural crest cells (NCCs), which undergo EMT during development, lose N-cadherin and upregulate Cadherin 6 (Cdh6) prior to EMT. Cdh6 has been suggested to suppress EMT via cell adhesion, but also to promote EMT by mediating pro-EMT signals. Here, we determine novel roles for Cdh6 in generating cell motility during EMT. We use live imaging of NCC behavior in vivo to show that Cdh6 promotes detachment of apical NCC tails, an important early step of EMT. Furthermore, we show that Cdh6 affects spatiotemporal dynamics of F-actin and active Rho GTPase, and that Cdh6 is required for accumulation of F-actin in apical NCC tails during detachment. Moreover, Cdh6 knockdown alters the subcellular distribution of active Rho, which is known to promote localized actomyosin contraction that is crucial for apical NCC detachment. Together, these data suggest that Cdh6 is an important determinant of where subcellular actomyosin forces are generated during EMT. Our results also identify mechanisms by which an upregulated cadherin can generate cell motility during EMT. PMID:24917505

  10. Fascin 1 is an actin filament-bundling protein that regulates ectoplasmic specialization dynamics in the rat testis

    PubMed Central

    Gungor-Ordueri, N. Ece; Celik-Ozenci, Ciler

    2014-01-01

    In the testis, spermatids are polarized cells, with their heads pointing toward the basement membrane during maturation. This polarity is crucial to pack the maximal number of spermatids in the seminiferous epithelium so that millions of sperms can be produced daily. A loss of spermatid polarity is detected after rodents are exposed to toxicants (e.g., cadmium) or nonhormonal male contraceptives (e.g., adjudin), which is associated with a disruption on the expression and/or localization of polarity proteins. In the rat testis, fascin 1, an actin-bundling protein found in mammalian cells, was expressed by Sertoli and germ cells. Fascin 1 was a component of the ectoplasmic specialization (ES), a testis-specific anchoring junction known to confer spermatid adhesion and polarity. Its expression in the seminiferous epithelium was stage specific. Fascin 1 was localized to the basal ES at the Sertoli cell-cell interface of the blood-testis barrier in all stages of the epithelial cycle, except it diminished considerably at late stage VIII. Fascin 1 was highly expressed at the apical ES at stage VII–early stage VIII and restricted to the step 19 spermatids. Its knockdown by RNAi that silenced fascin 1 by ∼70% in Sertoli cells cultured in vitro was found to perturb the tight junction-permeability barrier via a disruption of F-actin organization. Knockdown of fascin 1 in vivo by ∼60–70% induced defects in spermatid polarity, which was mediated by a mislocalization and/or downregulation of actin-bundling proteins Eps8 and palladin, thereby impeding F-actin organization and disrupting spermatid polarity. In summary, these findings provide insightful information on spermatid polarity regulation. PMID:25159326

  11. Fascin 1 is an actin filament-bundling protein that regulates ectoplasmic specialization dynamics in the rat testis.

    PubMed

    Gungor-Ordueri, N Ece; Celik-Ozenci, Ciler; Cheng, C Yan

    2014-11-01

    In the testis, spermatids are polarized cells, with their heads pointing toward the basement membrane during maturation. This polarity is crucial to pack the maximal number of spermatids in the seminiferous epithelium so that millions of sperms can be produced daily. A loss of spermatid polarity is detected after rodents are exposed to toxicants (e.g., cadmium) or nonhormonal male contraceptives (e.g., adjudin), which is associated with a disruption on the expression and/or localization of polarity proteins. In the rat testis, fascin 1, an actin-bundling protein found in mammalian cells, was expressed by Sertoli and germ cells. Fascin 1 was a component of the ectoplasmic specialization (ES), a testis-specific anchoring junction known to confer spermatid adhesion and polarity. Its expression in the seminiferous epithelium was stage specific. Fascin 1 was localized to the basal ES at the Sertoli cell-cell interface of the blood-testis barrier in all stages of the epithelial cycle, except it diminished considerably at late stage VIII. Fascin 1 was highly expressed at the apical ES at stage VII-early stage VIII and restricted to the step 19 spermatids. Its knockdown by RNAi that silenced fascin 1 by ~70% in Sertoli cells cultured in vitro was found to perturb the tight junction-permeability barrier via a disruption of F-actin organization. Knockdown of fascin 1 in vivo by ~60-70% induced defects in spermatid polarity, which was mediated by a mislocalization and/or downregulation of actin-bundling proteins Eps8 and palladin, thereby impeding F-actin organization and disrupting spermatid polarity. In summary, these findings provide insightful information on spermatid polarity regulation. PMID:25159326

  12. Master Regulators in Plant Glucose Signaling Networks

    PubMed Central

    Sheen, Jen

    2014-01-01

    The daily life of photosynthetic plants revolves around sugar production, transport, storage and utilization, and the complex sugar metabolic and signaling networks integrate internal regulators and environmental cues to govern and sustain plant growth and survival. Although diverse sugar signals have emerged as pivotal regulators from embryogenesis to senescence, glucose is the most ancient and conserved regulatory signal that controls gene and protein expression, cell-cycle progression, central and secondary metabolism, as well as growth and developmental programs. Glucose signals are perceived and transduced by two principal mechanisms: direct sensing through glucose sensors and indirect sensing via a variety of energy and metabolite sensors. This review focuses on the comparative and functional analyses of three glucose-modulated master regulators in Arabidopsis thaliana, the hexokinase1 (HXK1) glucose sensor, the energy sensor kinases KIN10/KIN11 inactivated by glucose, and the glucose-activated target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase. These regulators are evolutionarily conserved, but have evolved universal and unique regulatory wiring and functions in plants and animals. They form protein complexes with multiple partners as regulators or effectors to serve distinct functions in different subcellular locales and organs, and play integrative and complementary roles from cellular signaling and metabolism to development in the plant glucose signaling networks. PMID:25530701

  13. F-actin links Epac-PKC signaling to purinergic P2X3 receptor sensitization in dorsal root ganglia following inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yanping; Wang, Congying; Li, GuangWen

    2016-01-01

    Sensitization of purinergic P2X3 receptors (P2X3Rs) contributes to the production of exaggerated nociceptive responses following inflammatory injury. We showed previously that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) potentiates P2X3R-mediated ATP currents in dorsal root ganglion neurons isolated from both control and complete Freund’s adjuvant-induced inflamed rats. PGE2 potentiation of ATP currents depends only on PKA signaling in control neurons, but it depends on both PKA and PKC signaling in inflamed neurons. We further found that inflammation evokes an increase in exchange proteins directly activated by cAMP (Epacs) in dorsal root ganglions. This increase promotes the activation of PKC to produce a much enhanced PGE2 effect on ATP currents and to elicit Epac-dependent flinch nocifensive behavioral responses in complete Freund’s adjuvant rats. The link between Epac-PKC signaling and P2X3R sensitization remains unexplored. Here, we show that the activation of Epacs promotes the expression of phosphorylated PKC and leads to an increase in the cytoskeleton, F-actin, expression at the cell perimeter. Depolymerization of F-actin blocks PGE2-enhanced ATP currents and inhibits P2X3R-mediated nocifensive responses after inflammation. Thus, F-actin is dynamically involved in the Epac-PKC-dependent P2X3R sensitization. Furthermore, Epacs induce a PKC-dependent increase in the membrane expression of P2X3Rs. This increase is abolished by F-actin depolymerization, suggesting that F-actin mediates Epac-PKC signaling of P2X3R membrane expression. Thus, after inflammation, an Epac-PKC dependent increase in F-actin in dorsal root ganglion neurons enhances the membrane expression of P2X3Rs to bring about sensitization of P2X3Rs and abnormal pain behaviors. PMID:27385722

  14. Wdpcp, a PCP Protein Required for Ciliogenesis, Regulates Directional Cell Migration and Cell Polarity by Direct Modulation of the Actin Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Cheng; Chatterjee, Bishwanath; Lozito, Thomas P.; Zhang, Zhen; Francis, Richard J.; Yagi, Hisato; Swanhart, Lisa M.; Sanker, Subramaniam; Francis, Deanne; Yu, Qing; San Agustin, Jovenal T.; Puligilla, Chandrakala; Chatterjee, Tania; Tansey, Terry; Liu, Xiaoqin; Kelley, Matthew W.; Spiliotis, Elias T.; Kwiatkowski, Adam V.; Tuan, Rocky; Pazour, Gregory J.; Hukriede, Neil A.; Lo, Cecilia W.

    2013-01-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) regulates cell alignment required for collective cell movement during embryonic development. This requires PCP/PCP effector proteins, some of which also play essential roles in ciliogenesis, highlighting the long-standing question of the role of the cilium in PCP. Wdpcp, a PCP effector, was recently shown to regulate both ciliogenesis and collective cell movement, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Here we show Wdpcp can regulate PCP by direct modulation of the actin cytoskeleton. These studies were made possible by recovery of a Wdpcp mutant mouse model. Wdpcp-deficient mice exhibit phenotypes reminiscent of Bardet–Biedl/Meckel–Gruber ciliopathy syndromes, including cardiac outflow tract and cochlea defects associated with PCP perturbation. We observed Wdpcp is localized to the transition zone, and in Wdpcp-deficient cells, Sept2, Nphp1, and Mks1 were lost from the transition zone, indicating Wdpcp is required for recruitment of proteins essential for ciliogenesis. Wdpcp is also found in the cytoplasm, where it is localized in the actin cytoskeleton and in focal adhesions. Wdpcp interacts with Sept2 and is colocalized with Sept2 in actin filaments, but in Wdpcp-deficient cells, Sept2 was lost from the actin cytoskeleton, suggesting Wdpcp is required for Sept2 recruitment to actin filaments. Significantly, organization of the actin filaments and focal contacts were markedly changed in Wdpcp-deficient cells. This was associated with decreased membrane ruffling, failure to establish cell polarity, and loss of directional cell migration. These results suggest the PCP defects in Wdpcp mutants are not caused by loss of cilia, but by direct disruption of the actin cytoskeleton. Consistent with this, Wdpcp mutant cochlea has normal kinocilia and yet exhibits PCP defects. Together, these findings provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, that a PCP component required for ciliogenesis can directly modulate the actin cytoskeleton to

  15. Mena/VASP and αII-Spectrin complexes regulate cytoplasmic actin networks in cardiomyocytes and protect from conduction abnormalities and dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the heart, cytoplasmic actin networks are thought to have important roles in mechanical support, myofibrillogenesis, and ion channel function. However, subcellular localization of cytoplasmic actin isoforms and proteins involved in the modulation of the cytoplasmic actin networks are elusive. Mena and VASP are important regulators of actin dynamics. Due to the lethal phenotype of mice with combined deficiency in Mena and VASP, however, distinct cardiac roles of the proteins remain speculative. In the present study, we analyzed the physiological functions of Mena and VASP in the heart and also investigated the role of the proteins in the organization of cytoplasmic actin networks. Results We generated a mouse model, which simultaneously lacks Mena and VASP in the heart. Mena/VASP double-deficiency induced dilated cardiomyopathy and conduction abnormalities. In wild-type mice, Mena and VASP specifically interacted with a distinct αII-Spectrin splice variant (SH3i), which is in cardiomyocytes exclusively localized at Z- and intercalated discs. At Z- and intercalated discs, Mena and β-actin localized to the edges of the sarcomeres, where the thin filaments are anchored. In Mena/VASP double-deficient mice, β-actin networks were disrupted and the integrity of Z- and intercalated discs was markedly impaired. Conclusions Together, our data suggest that Mena, VASP, and αII-Spectrin assemble cardiac multi-protein complexes, which regulate cytoplasmic actin networks. Conversely, Mena/VASP deficiency results in disrupted β-actin assembly, Z- and intercalated disc malformation, and induces dilated cardiomyopathy and conduction abnormalities. PMID:23937664

  16. PKCα-Mediated Signals Regulate the Motile Responses of Cochlear Outer Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Channy; Kalinec, Federico

    2015-01-01

    There is strong evidence that changes in the actin/spectrin-based cortical cytoskeleton of outer hair cells (OHCs) regulate their motile responses as well as cochlear amplification, the process that optimizes the sensitivity and frequency selectivity of the mammalian inner ear. Since a RhoA/protein kinase C (PKC)-mediated pathway is known to inhibit the actin-spectrin interaction in other cell models, we decided to investigate whether this signaling cascade could also participate in the regulation of OHC motility. We used high-speed video microscopy and confocal microscopy to explore the effects of pharmacological activation of PKCα, PKCβI, PKCβII, PKCδ, PKCε, and PKCζ with lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and their inhibition with bisindolylmaleimide I, as well as inhibition of RhoA and Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) with C3 and Y-27632, respectively. Motile responses were induced in isolated guinea pig OHCs by stimulation with an 8 V/cm external alternating electrical field as 50 Hz bursts of square wave pulses (100 ms on/off). We found that LPA increased expression of PKCα and PKCζ only, with PKCα, but not PKCζ, phosphorylating the cytoskeletal protein adducin of both Ser-726 and Thr-445. Interestingly, however, inhibition of PKCα reduced adducin phosphorylation only at Ser-726. We also determined that LPA activation of a PKCα-mediated signaling pathway simultaneously enhanced OHC electromotile amplitude and cell shortening, and facilitated RhoA/ROCK/LIMK1-mediated cofilin phosphorylation. Altogether, our results suggest that PKCα-mediated signals, probably via adducin-mediated inhibition of actin-spectrin binding and cofilin-mediated depolymerization of actin filaments, play an essential role in the homeostatic regulation of OHC motility and cochlear amplification. PMID:25954875

  17. Acanthamoeba castellanii: proteins involved in actin dynamics, glycolysis, and proteolysis are regulated during encystation.

    PubMed

    Bouyer, Sabrina; Rodier, Marie-Hélène; Guillot, Alain; Héchard, Yann

    2009-09-01

    Acanthamoeba castellanii is a pathogenic free-living amoeba. Cyst forms are particularly important in their pathogenicity, as they are more resistant to treatments and might protect pathogenic intracellular bacteria. However, encystation is poorly understood at the molecular level and global changes at the protein level have not been completely described. In this study, we performed two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to compare protein expression in trophozoite and cyst forms. Four proteins, specifically expressed in trophozoites, and four proteins, specifically expressed in cysts, were identified. Two proteins, enolase and fructose bisphosphate aldolase, are involved in the glycolytic pathway. Three proteins are likely actin-binding proteins, which is consistent with the dramatic morphological modifications of the cells during encystation. One protein belongs to the serine protease family and has been already linked to encystation in A. castellanii. In conclusion, this study found that the proteins whose expression was modified during encystation were likely involved in actin dynamics, glycolysis, and proteolysis. PMID:19523468

  18. Regulation of the human. beta. -actin promoter by upstream and intron domains

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Sunyu )); Gunning, P.; Kedes, L. ); Liu, Shuhui National Tsing Hua Univ., Hsinchu ); Leavitt, J. )

    1989-01-25

    The authors have identified three regulatory domains of the complex human {beta}-actin gene promoter. They span a region of about 3,000 bases, from not more than {minus}2,011 bases upstream of the mRNA cap site to within the 5{prime} intron (832 bases long). A distal upstream domain contains at least one enhancer-like element. A proximal upstream domain, with a CArG (for CC(A+T rich){sub 6}GG) motif found in all known mammalian actin genes, seems to confer serum, but not growth factor, inducibility. The third domain is within the evolutionarily conserved 3{prime} region of the first intron and contains a 13 base-pair sequence, identical to the upstream sequence with the CArG motif. This domain also contains sequences that are both serum and fibroblast growth inducible.

  19. Mst1 Kinase Regulates the Actin-Bundling Protein L-Plastin To Promote T Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaolu; Wang, Xinxin; Todd, Elizabeth M; Jaeger, Emily R; Vella, Jennifer L; Mooren, Olivia L; Feng, Yunfeng; Hu, Jiancheng; Cooper, John A; Morley, Sharon Celeste; Huang, Yina H

    2016-09-01

    Exploring the mechanisms controlling lymphocyte trafficking is essential for understanding the function of the immune system and the pathophysiology of immunodeficiencies. The mammalian Ste20-like kinase 1 (Mst1) has been identified as a critical signaling mediator of T cell migration, and loss of Mst1 results in immunodeficiency disease. Although Mst1 is known to support T cell migration through induction of cell polarization and lamellipodial formation, the downstream effectors of Mst1 are incompletely defined. Mice deficient for the actin-bundling protein L-plastin (LPL) have phenotypes similar to mice lacking Mst1, including decreased T cell polarization, lamellipodial formation, and cell migration. We therefore asked whether LPL functions downstream of Mst1. The regulatory N-terminal domain of LPL contains a consensus Mst1 phosphorylation site at Thr(89) We found that Mst1 can phosphorylate LPL in vitro and that Mst1 can interact with LPL in cells. Removal of the Mst1 phosphorylation site by mutating Thr(89) to Ala impaired localization of LPL to the actin-rich lamellipodia of T cells. Expression of the T89A LPL mutant failed to restore migration of LPL-deficient T cells in vitro. Furthermore, expression of T89A LPL in LPL-deficient hematopoietic cells, using bone marrow chimeras, failed to rescue the phenotype of decreased thymic egress. These results identify LPL as a key effector of Mst1 and establish a novel mechanism linking a signaling intermediate to an actin-binding protein critical to T cell migration. PMID:27465533

  20. Enabled Negatively Regulates Diaphanous-Driven Actin Dynamics In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bilancia, Colleen G.; Winkelman, Jonathan D.; Tsygankov, Denis; Nowotarski, Stephanie H.; Sees, Jennifer A.; Comber, Kate; Evans, Iwan; Lakhani, Vinal; Wood, Will; Elston, Timothy C.; Kovar, David R.; Peifer, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Summary Actin regulators facilitate cell migration by controlling cell protrusion architecture and dynamics. As the behavior of individual actin regulators becomes clear, we must address why cells require multiple regulators with similar functions and how they cooperate to create diverse protrusions. We characterized Diaphanous (Dia) and Enabled (Ena) as a model, using complementary approaches: cell culture, biophysical analysis, and Drosophila morphogenesis. We found that Dia and Ena have distinct biochemical properties that contribute to the different protrusion morphologies each induces. Dia is a more processive, faster elongator, paralleling the long, stable filopodia it induces in vivo, while Ena promotes filopodia with more dynamic changes in number, length, and lifetime. Acting together, Ena and Dia induce protrusions distinct from those induced by either alone, with Ena reducing Dia-driven protrusion length and number. Consistent with this, EnaEVH1 binds Dia directly and inhibits DiaFH1FH2-mediated nucleation in vitro. Finally, Ena rescues hemocyte migration defects caused by activated Dia. PMID:24576424

  1. Calponin isoforms CNN1, CNN2 and CNN3: Regulators for actin cytoskeleton functions in smooth muscle and non-muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rong; Jin, J-P

    2016-07-01

    Calponin is an actin filament-associated regulatory protein expressed in smooth muscle and many types of non-muscle cells. Three homologous genes, CNN1, CNN2 and CNN3, encoding calponin isoforms 1, 2, and 3, respectively, are present in vertebrate species. All three calponin isoforms are actin-binding proteins with functions in inhibiting actin-activated myosin ATPase and stabilizing the actin cytoskeleton, while each isoform executes different physiological roles based on their cell type-specific expressions. Calponin 1 is specifically expressed in smooth muscle cells and plays a role in fine-tuning smooth muscle contractility. Calponin 2 is expressed in both smooth muscle and non-muscle cells and regulates multiple actin cytoskeleton-based functions. Calponin 3 participates in actin cytoskeleton-based activities in embryonic development and myogenesis. Phosphorylation has been extensively studied for the regulation of calponin functions. Cytoskeleton tension regulates the transcription of CNN2 gene and the degradation of calponin 2 protein. This review summarizes our knowledge learned from studies over the past three decades, focusing on the evolutionary lineage of calponin isoform genes, their tissue- and cell type-specific expressions, structure-function relationships, and mechanoregulation. PMID:26970176

  2. Microtubule-dependent transport of vimentin filament precursors is regulated by actin and by the concerted action of Rho- and p21-activated kinases

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Amélie; Herrmann, Harald; Davidson, Michael W.; Gelfand, Vladimir I.

    2014-01-01

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) form a dense and dynamic network that is functionally associated with microtubules and actin filaments. We used the GFP-tagged vimentin mutant Y117L to study vimentin-cytoskeletal interactions and transport of vimentin filament precursors. This mutant preserves vimentin interaction with other components of the cytoskeleton, but its assembly is blocked at the unit-length filament (ULF) stage. ULFs are easy to track, and they allow a reliable and quantifiable analysis of movement. Our results show that in cultured human vimentin-negative SW13 cells, 2% of vimentin-ULFs move along microtubules bidirectionally, while the majority are stationary and tightly associated with actin filaments. Rapid motor-dependent transport of ULFs along microtubules is enhanced ≥5-fold by depolymerization of actin cytoskeleton with latrunculin B. The microtubule-dependent transport of vimentin ULFs is further regulated by Rho-kinase (ROCK) and p21-activated kinase (PAK): ROCK inhibits ULF transport, while PAK stimulates it. Both kinases act on microtubule transport independently of their effects on actin cytoskeleton. Our study demonstrates the importance of the actin cytoskeleton to restrict IF transport and reveals a new role for PAK and ROCK in the regulation of IF precursor transport.—Robert, A., Herrmann, H., Davidson, M. W., and Gelfand, V. I. Microtubule-dependent transport of vimentin filament precursors is regulated by actin and by the concerted action of Rho- and p21-activated kinases. PMID:24652946

  3. Kv3.3 Channels Bind Hax-1 and Arp2/3 to Assemble a Stable Local Actin Network that Regulates Channel Gating.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yalan; Zhang, Xiao-Feng; Fleming, Matthew R; Amiri, Anahita; El-Hassar, Lynda; Surguchev, Alexei A; Hyland, Callen; Jenkins, David P; Desai, Rooma; Brown, Maile R; Gazula, Valeswara-Rao; Waters, Michael F; Large, Charles H; Horvath, Tamas L; Navaratnam, Dhasakumar; Vaccarino, Flora M; Forscher, Paul; Kaczmarek, Leonard K

    2016-04-01

    Mutations in the Kv3.3 potassium channel (KCNC3) cause cerebellar neurodegeneration and impair auditory processing. The cytoplasmic C terminus of Kv3.3 contains a proline-rich domain conserved in proteins that activate actin nucleation through Arp2/3. We found that Kv3.3 recruits Arp2/3 to the plasma membrane, resulting in formation of a relatively stable cortical actin filament network resistant to cytochalasin D that inhibits fast barbed end actin assembly. These Kv3.3-associated actin structures are required to prevent very rapid N-type channel inactivation during short depolarizations of the plasma membrane. The effects of Kv3.3 on the actin cytoskeleton are mediated by the binding of the cytoplasmic C terminus of Kv3.3 to Hax-1, an anti-apoptotic protein that regulates actin nucleation through Arp2/3. A human Kv3.3 mutation within a conserved proline-rich domain produces channels that bind Hax-1 but are impaired in recruiting Arp2/3 to the plasma membrane, resulting in growth cones with deficient actin veils in stem cell-derived neurons. PMID:26997484

  4. Actinic keratosis

    MedlinePlus

    Solar keratosis; Sun-induced skin changes - keratosis; Keratosis - actinic (solar) ... Some actinic keratoses become squamous cell skin cancer . Have your health care provider look at all skin growths as soon as you find them. Your provider will ...

  5. In vivo imaging of cell behaviors and F-actin reveals LIM-HD transcription factor regulation of peripheral versus central sensory axon development

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Development of specific neuronal morphology requires precise control over cell motility processes, including axon formation, outgrowth and branching. Dynamic remodeling of the filamentous actin (F-actin) cytoskeleton is critical for these processes; however, little is known about the mechanisms controlling motile axon behaviors and F-actin dynamics in vivo. Neuronal structure is specified in part by intrinsic transcription factor activity, yet the molecular and cellular steps between transcription and axon behavior are not well understood. Zebrafish Rohon-Beard (RB) sensory neurons have a unique morphology, with central axons that extend in the spinal cord and a peripheral axon that innervates the skin. LIM homeodomain (LIM-HD) transcription factor activity is required for formation of peripheral RB axons. To understand how neuronal morphogenesis is controlled in vivo and how LIM-HD transcription factor activity differentially regulates peripheral versus central axons, we used live imaging of axon behavior and F-actin distribution in vivo. Results We used an F-actin biosensor containing the actin-binding domain of utrophin to characterize actin rearrangements during specific developmental processes in vivo, including axon initiation, consolidation and branching. We found that peripheral axons initiate from a specific cellular compartment and that F-actin accumulation and protrusive activity precede peripheral axon initiation. Moreover, disruption of LIM-HD transcriptional activity has different effects on the motility of peripheral versus central axons; it inhibits peripheral axon initiation, growth and branching, while increasing the growth rate of central axons. Our imaging revealed that LIM-HD transcription factor activity is not required for F-actin based protrusive activity or F-actin accumulation during peripheral axon initiation, but can affect positioning of F-actin accumulation and axon formation. Conclusion Our ability to image the dynamics of

  6. Actin Mechanics and Fragmentation*

    PubMed Central

    De La Cruz, Enrique M.; Gardel, Margaret L.

    2015-01-01

    Cell physiological processes require the regulation and coordination of both mechanical and dynamical properties of the actin cytoskeleton. Here we review recent advances in understanding the mechanical properties and stability of actin filaments and how these properties are manifested at larger (network) length scales. We discuss how forces can influence local biochemical interactions, resulting in the formation of mechanically sensitive dynamic steady states. Understanding the regulation of such force-activated chemistries and dynamic steady states reflects an important challenge for future work that will provide valuable insights as to how the actin cytoskeleton engenders mechanoresponsiveness of living cells. PMID:25957404

  7. Cdc42 and p190RhoGAP activation by CCN2 regulates cell spreading and polarity and induces actin disassembly in migrating keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Kiwanuka, Elizabeth; Lee, Cameron Cy; Hackl, Florian; Caterson, Edward J; Junker, Johan Pe; Gerdin, Bengt; Eriksson, Elof

    2016-06-01

    Cell migration requires spatiotemporal integration of signals that regulate cytoskeletal dynamics. In response to a migration-promoting agent, cells begin to polarise and extend protrusions in the direction of migration. These cytoskeletal rearrangements are orchestrated by a variety of proteins, including focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and the Rho family of GTPases. CCN2, also known as connective tissue growth factor, has emerged as a regulator of cell migration but the mechanism by which CCN2 regulates keratinocyte function is not well understood. In this article, we sought to elucidate the basic mechanism of CCN2-induced cell migration in human keratinocytes. Immunohistochemical staining was used to demonstrate that treatment with CCN2 induces a migratory phenotype through actin disassembly, spreading of lamellipodia and re-orientation of the Golgi. In vitro assays were used to show that CCN2-induced cell migration is dependent on FAK, RhoA and Cdc42, but independent of Rac1. CCN2-treated keratinocytes displayed increased Cdc42 activity and decreased RhoA activity up to 12 hours post-treatment, with upregulation of p190RhoGAP. An improved understanding of how CCN2 regulates cell migration may establish the foundation for future therapeutics in fibrotic and neoplastic diseases. PMID:25185742

  8. CLIC4 regulates apical exocytosis and renal tube luminogenesis through retromer- and actin-mediated endocytic trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Szu-Yi; Hsu, Kuo-Shun; Otsu, Wataru; Hsu, Ya-Chu; Luo, Yun-Cin; Yeh, Celine; Shehab, Syed S.; Chen, Jie; Shieh, Vincent; He, Guo-an; Marean, Michael B.; Felsen, Diane; Ding, Aihao; Poppas, Dix P.; Chuang, Jen-Zen; Sung, Ching-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Chloride intracellular channel 4 (CLIC4) is a mammalian homologue of EXC-4 whose mutation is associated with cystic excretory canals in nematodes. Here we show that CLIC4-null mouse embryos exhibit impaired renal tubulogenesis. In both developing and developed kidneys, CLIC4 is specifically enriched in the proximal tubule epithelial cells, in which CLIC4 is important for luminal delivery, microvillus morphogenesis, and endolysosomal biogenesis. Adult CLIC4-null proximal tubules display aberrant dilation. In MDCK 3D cultures, CLIC4 is expressed on early endosome, recycling endosome and apical transport carriers before reaching its steady-state apical membrane localization in mature lumen. CLIC4 suppression causes impaired apical vesicle coalescence and central lumen formation, a phenotype that can be rescued by Rab8 and Cdc42. Furthermore, we show that retromer- and branched actin-mediated trafficking on early endosome regulates apical delivery during early luminogenesis. CLIC4 selectively modulates retromer-mediated apical transport by negatively regulating the formation of branched actin on early endosomes. PMID:26786190

  9. Dynamic Regulation of Activated Leukocyte Cell Adhesion Molecule–mediated Homotypic Cell Adhesion through the Actin CytoskeletonV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Nelissen, Judith M. D. T.; Peters, Inge M.; de Grooth, Bart G.; van Kooyk, Yvette; Figdor, Carl G.

    2000-01-01

    Restricted expression of activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) by hematopoietic cells suggests an important role in the immune system and hematopoiesis. To get insight into the mechanisms that control ALCAM-mediated adhesion we have investigated homotypic ALCAM–ALCAM interactions. Here, we demonstrate that the cytoskeleton regulates ALCAM-mediated cell adhesion because inhibition of actin polymerization by cytochalasin D (CytD) strongly induces homotypic ALCAM–ALCAM interactions. This induction of cell adhesion is likely due to clustering of ALCAM at the cell surface, which is observed after CytD treatment. Single-particle tracking demonstrated that the lateral mobility of ALCAM in the cell membrane is increased 30-fold after CytD treatment. In contrast, both surface distribution and adhesion of a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored ALCAM mutant are insensitive to CytD, despite the increase in lateral mobility of GPI-ALCAM upon CytD treatment. This demonstrates that clustering of ALCAM is essential for cell adhesion, whereas enhanced diffusion of ALCAM alone is not sufficient for cluster formation. In addition, upon ligand binding, both free diffusion and the freely dragged distance of wild-type ALCAM, but not of GPI-ALCAM, are reduced over time, suggesting strengthening of the cytoskeleton linkage. From these findings we conclude that activation of ALCAM-mediated adhesion is dynamically regulated through actin cytoskeleton-dependent clustering. PMID:10848629

  10. The scaffolding protein IQGAP1 co-localizes with actin at the cytoplasmic face of the nuclear envelope: implications for cytoskeletal regulation

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    IQGAP1 is an important cytoskeletal regulator, known to act at the plasma membrane to bundle and cap actin filaments, and to tether the cortical actin meshwork to microtubules via plus-end binding proteins. Here we describe the novel subcellular localization of IQGAP1 at the cytoplasmic face of the nuclear envelope, where it co-located with F-actin. The IQGAP1 and F-actin staining overlapped that of microtubules at the nuclear envelope, revealing a pattern strikingly similar to that observed at the plasma membrane. In detergent-extracted cells IQGAP1 was retained at cytoskeletal structures at the nuclear envelope. This finding has new implications for involvement of IQGAP1 in cell polarization and migration events and potentially in cell cycle-associated nuclear envelope assembly/disassembly. PMID:22964981

  11. Mechanical force-induced polymerization and depolymerization of F-actin at water/solid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xueqiang; Hu, Xiuyuan; Lei, Haozhi; Hu, Jun; Zhang, Yi

    2016-03-01

    Actin molecules are among the three main cytoskeleton proteins of cells and undergo rapid cycling to regulate critical processes such as endocytosis, cytokinesis, cell polarity, and cell morphogenesis. Although extensive studies have been carried out on the dynamics as well as biological functions of actin polymerization and depolymerization both in vivo and in vitro, the molecular mechanisms by which cells sense and respond to mechanical signals are not fully understood. In particular, little attention has been paid to the effect of a physical force that is exerted directly on the actin cytoskeleton. In this paper, we have explored how the mechanical force affects the actin polymerization and depolymerization behaviors at water/solid interfaces using an atomic force microscope (AFM) operated in liquid. By raster scanning an AFM probe on a substrate surface with a certain load, it was found that actin monomers could polymerize into filaments without the help of actin related proteins (ARPs). Further study indicated that actin monomers were inclined to form filaments only under a small scanning load. The polymerized actin filaments would be depolymerized when the mechanical force was stronger. A possible mechanism has been suggested to explain the mechanical force induced actin polymerization.Actin molecules are among the three main cytoskeleton proteins of cells and undergo rapid cycling to regulate critical processes such as endocytosis, cytokinesis, cell polarity, and cell morphogenesis. Although extensive studies have been carried out on the dynamics as well as biological functions of actin polymerization and depolymerization both in vivo and in vitro, the molecular mechanisms by which cells sense and respond to mechanical signals are not fully understood. In particular, little attention has been paid to the effect of a physical force that is exerted directly on the actin cytoskeleton. In this paper, we have explored how the mechanical force affects the actin

  12. Transcriptional Regulation of Graded Hedgehog Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Falkenstein, Kristin N.; Vokes, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway plays conserved roles in regulating a diverse spectrum of developmental processes. In some developmental contexts, a gradient of Hh protein specifies multiple cell types in a dose-dependent fashion, thereby acting as a morphogen. Hh signaling ultimately acts on the transcriptional level through GLI proteins. In the presence of Hh signaling full length GLI proteins act as transcriptional activators of target genes. Conversely, in the absence of Hh, GLI proteins act as transcriptional repressors. This review will highlight mechanisms contributing to how graded Hh signaling might translate to differential GLI activity and be interpreted into distinct transcriptional responses. PMID:24862856

  13. Neurotrophin signalling pathways regulating neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Miller, F D; Kaplan, D R

    2001-07-01

    Recent evidence indicates that naturally occurring neuronal death in mammals is regulated by the interplay between receptor-mediated prosurvival and proapoptotic signals. The neurotrophins, a family of growth factors best known for their positive effects on neuronal biology, have now been shown to mediate both positive and negative survival signals, by signalling through the Trk and p75 neurotrophin receptors, respectively. The mechanisms whereby these two neurotrophin receptors interact to determine neuronal survival have been difficult to decipher, largely because both can signal independently or coincidentally, depending upon the cell or developmental context. Nonetheless, the past several years have seen significant advances in our understanding of this receptor signalling system. In this review, we focus on the proapoptotic actions of the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), and on the interplay between Trk and p75NTR that determines neuronal survival. PMID:11529497

  14. IFT88 influences chondrocyte actin organization and biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z.; Wann, A.K.T.; Thompson, C.L.; Hassen, A.; Wang, W.; Knight, M.M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objectives Primary cilia are microtubule based organelles which control a variety of signalling pathways important in cartilage development, health and disease. This study examines the role of the intraflagellar transport (IFT) protein, IFT88, in regulating fundamental actin organisation and mechanics in articular chondrocytes. Methods The study used an established chondrocyte cell line with and without hypomorphic mutation of IFT88 (IFT88orpk). Confocal microscopy was used to quantify F-actin and myosin IIB organisation. Viscoelastic cell and actin cortex mechanics were determined using micropipette aspiration with actin dynamics visualised in live cells transfected with LifeACT-GFP. Results IFT88orpk cells exhibited a significant increase in acto-myosin stress fibre organisation relative to wild-type (WT) cells in monolayer and an altered response to cytochalasin D. Rounded IFT88orpk cells cultured in suspension exhibited reduced cortical actin expression with reduced cellular equilibrium modulus. Micropipette aspiration resulted in reduced membrane bleb formation in IFT88orpk cells. Following membrane blebbing, IFT88orpk cells exhibited slower reformation of the actin cortex. IFT88orpk cells showed increased actin deformability and reduced cortical tension confirming that IFT regulates actin cortex mechanics. The reduced cortical tension is also consistent with the reduced bleb formation. Conclusions This study demonstrates for the first time that the ciliary protein IFT88 regulates fundamental actin organisation and the stiffness of the actin cortex leading to alterations in cell deformation, mechanical properties and blebbing in an IFT88 chondrocyte cell line. This adds to the growing understanding of the role of primary cilia and IFT in regulating cartilage biology. PMID:26493329

  15. The actin-binding ERM protein Moesin directly regulates spindle assembly and function during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Vilmos, Péter; Kristó, Ildikó; Szikora, Szilárd; Jankovics, Ferenc; Lukácsovich, Tamás; Kari, Beáta; Erdélyi, Miklós

    2016-06-01

    Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin proteins are highly conserved, actin-binding cytoskeletal proteins that play an essential role in microvilli formation, T-cell activation, and tumor metastasis by linking actin filaments to the plasma membrane. Recent studies demonstrated that the only Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin protein of Drosophila melanogaster, Moesin, is involved in mitotic spindle function through stabilizing cell shape and microtubules at the cell cortex. We previously observed that Moesin localizes to the mitotic spindle; hence, we tested for the biological significance of this surprising localization and investigated whether it plays a direct role in spindle function. To separate the cortical and spindle functions of Moesin during mitosis we combined cell biological and genetic methods. We used early Drosophila embryos, in which mitosis occurs in the absence of a cell cortex, and found in vivo evidence for the direct requirement of Moesin in mitotic spindle assembly and function. We also found that the accumulation of Moesin precedes the construction of the microtubule spindle, and the fusiform structure formed by Moesin persists even after the microtubules have disassembled. PMID:27006187

  16. RhoA Regulates Peroxisome Association to Microtubules and the Actin Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Lay, Dorothee; Wiese, Sebastian; Meyer, Helmut E.; Warscheid, Bettina; Saffrich, Rainer; Peränen, Johan; Gorgas, Karin; Just, Wilhelm W.

    2010-01-01

    The current view of peroxisome inheritance provides for the formation of new peroxisomes by both budding from the endoplasmic reticulum and autonomous division. Here we investigate peroxisome-cytoskeleton interactions and show by proteomics, biochemical and immunofluorescence analyses that actin, non-muscle myosin IIA (NMM IIA), RhoA, Rho kinase II (ROCKII) and Rab8 associate with peroxisomes. Our data provide evidence that (i) RhoA in its inactive state, maintained for example by C. botulinum toxin exoenzyme C3, dissociates from peroxisomes enabling microtubule-based peroxisomal movements and (ii) dominant-active RhoA targets to peroxisomes, uncouples the organelles from microtubules and favors Rho kinase recruitment to peroxisomes. We suggest that ROCKII activates NMM IIA mediating local peroxisomal constrictions. Although our understanding of peroxisome-cytoskeleton interactions is still incomplete, a picture is emerging demonstrating alternate RhoA-dependent association of peroxisomes to the microtubular and actin cytoskeleton. Whereas association of peroxisomes to microtubules clearly serves bidirectional, long-range saltatory movements, peroxisome-acto-myosin interactions may support biogenetic functions balancing peroxisome size, shape, number, and clustering. PMID:21079737

  17. HGAL localization to cell membrane regulates B-cell receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaoqing; Sicard, Renaud; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Stockus, Jessica N.; McNamara, George; Abdulreda, Midhat; Moy, Vincent T.; Landgraf, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Human germinal center–associated lymphoma (HGAL) is specifically expressed only in germinal center (GC) B lymphocytes and GC-derived lymphomas. HGAL protein decreases lymphocyte motility by inhibiting the ability of myosin to translocate actin via direct interaction with F-actin and myosin II and by activating RhoA signaling via direct interactions with RhoA-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factors. HGAL protein also regulates B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling by directly binding to and enhancing Syk kinase activity and activation of its downstream effectors. Herein we demonstrate that HGAL protein can be myristoylated and palmitoylated and that these modifications localize HGAL to cellular membrane raft microdomains with distinct consequences for BCR signaling and chemoattractant-induced cell mobility. In BCR signaling, raft localization of HGAL facilitates interaction with Syk and modulation of the BCR activation and signaling, which induces HGAL phosphorylation and redistribution from lipid raft to bulk membrane and cytoplasm, followed by degradation. In contrast, HGAL myristoylation and palmitoylation avert its inhibitory effects on chemoattractant-induced cell motility. These findings further elucidate the growing and complex role of HGAL in B-cell biology and suggest that membrane-bound and cytoplasmic HGAL protein differently regulates distinct biological processes. PMID:25381061

  18. METABOLISM Wnt Signaling Regulates Hepatic Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongjun; Fergusson, Maria M.; Wu, J. Julie; Rovira, Ilsa I.; Liu, Jie; Gavrilova, Oksana; Lu, Teng; Bao, Jianjun; Han, Donghe; Sack, Michael N.; Finkel, Toren

    2011-01-01

    The contribution of the Wnt pathway has been extensively characterized in embryogenesis, differentiation, and stem cell biology but not in mammalian metabolism. Here, using in vivo gain- and loss-of-function models, we demonstrate an important role for Wnt signaling in hepatic metabolism. In particular, β-Catenin, the downstream mediator of canonical Wnt signaling, altered serum glucose concentrations and regulated hepatic glucose production. β-catenin also modulated hepatic insulin signaling. Furthermore, β-catenin interacted with the transcription factor FoxO1 in livers from mice under starved conditions. The interaction of FoxO1 with β-catenin regulated the transcriptional activation of the genes encoding glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), the two rate-limiting enzymes in hepatic gluconeogenesis. Moreover, starvation induced the hepatic expression of mRNAs encoding different Wnt isoforms. In addition, nutrient deprivation appeared to favor the association of β-catenin with FoxO family members, rather than with members of the T cell factor of transcriptional activators. Notably, in a model of diet-induced obesity, hepatic deletion of β-catenin improved overall metabolic homeostasis. These observations implicate Wnt signaling in the modulation of hepatic metabolism and raise the possibility that Wnt signaling may play a similar role in the metabolic regulation of other tissues. PMID:21285411

  19. Signaling hierarchy regulating human endothelial cell development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our present knowledge of the regulation of mammalian endothelial cell differentiation has been largely derived from studies of mouse embryonic development. However, unique mechanisms and hierarchy of signals that govern human endothelial cell development are unknown and, thus, explored in these stud...

  20. Molecular mechanisms underlying the force-dependent regulation of actin-to-ECM linkage at the focal adhesions.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Hiroaki; Sokabe, Masahiro; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2014-01-01

    The linkage of the actin cytoskeleton to extracellular matrices (ECMs) at focal adhesions provides a physical path for cells to exert traction forces on substrates during cellular processes such as migration and morphogenesis. Mechanical strength of the actin-to-ECM linkage increases in response to forces loaded at this linkage. This is achieved by local accumulations of actin filaments, as well as linker proteins connecting actins to integrins, at force-bearing adhesion sites, which leads to an increase in the number of molecular bonds between the actin cytoskeleton- and ECM-bound integrins. Zyxin-dependent actin polymerization and filamin-mediated actin bundling are seemingly involved in the force-dependent actin accumulation. Each actin-integrin link is primarily mediated by the linker protein talin, which is strengthened by another linker protein vinculin connecting the actin filaments to talin in a force-dependent manner. This eliminates slippage between the actin cytoskeleton and talin (clutch mechanism), thus playing a crucial role in creating cell membrane protrusions mediated by actin polymerization. Finally, each integrin-ECM bond is also strengthened when a force is loaded on it, which ensures force transmission at focal adhesions, contributing to stable cell-substrate adhesion in cell migration. PMID:25081617

  1. Mechanical Regulation of Signaling Pathways in Bone

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, William R.; Rubin, Clinton T.; Rubin, Janet

    2012-01-01

    A wide range of cell types depend on mechanically induced signals to enable appropriate physiological responses. The skeleton is particularly dependent on mechanical information to guide the resident cell population towards adaptation, maintenance and repair. Research at the organ, tissue, cell and molecular levels has improved our understanding of how the skeleton can recognize the functional environment, and how these challenges are translated into cellular information that can site-specifically alter phenotype. This review first considers those cells within the skeleton that are responsive to mechanical signals, including osteoblasts, osteoclasts, osteocytes and osteoprogenitors. This is discussed in light of a range of experimental approaches that can vary parameters such as strain, fluid shear stress, and pressure. The identity of mechanoreceptor candidates is approached, with consideration of integrins, pericellular tethers, focal adhesions, ion channels, cadherins, connexins, and the plasma membrane including caveolar and non-caveolar lipid rafts and their influence on integral signaling protein interactions. Several mechanically regulated intracellular signaling cascades are detailed including activation of kinases (Akt, MAPK, FAK), β-catenin, GTPases, and calcium signaling events. While the interaction of bone cells with their mechanical environment is complex, an understanding of mechanical regulation of bone signaling is crucial to understanding bone physiology, the etiology of diseases such as osteoporosis, and to the development of interventions to improve bone strength. PMID:22575727

  2. Dynamic Redox Regulation of IL-4 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Gaurav; Gran, Margaret A.; Bagchi, Pritha; Kemp, Melissa L.

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying the magnitude and dynamics of protein oxidation during cell signaling is technically challenging. Computational modeling provides tractable, quantitative methods to test hypotheses of redox mechanisms that may be simultaneously operative during signal transduction. The interleukin-4 (IL-4) pathway, which has previously been reported to induce reactive oxygen species and oxidation of PTP1B, may be controlled by several other putative mechanisms of redox regulation; widespread proteomic thiol oxidation observed via 2D redox differential gel electrophoresis upon IL-4 treatment suggests more than one redox-sensitive protein implicated in this pathway. Through computational modeling and a model selection strategy that relied on characteristic STAT6 phosphorylation dynamics of IL-4 signaling, we identified reversible protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) oxidation as the primary redox regulatory mechanism in the pathway. A systems-level model of IL-4 signaling was developed that integrates synchronous pan-PTP oxidation with ROS-independent mechanisms. The model quantitatively predicts the dynamics of IL-4 signaling over a broad range of new redox conditions, offers novel hypotheses about regulation of JAK/STAT signaling, and provides a framework for interrogating putative mechanisms involving receptor-initiated oxidation. PMID:26562652

  3. Dynamic Redox Regulation of IL-4 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Gaurav; Gran, Margaret A; Bagchi, Pritha; Kemp, Melissa L

    2015-11-01

    Quantifying the magnitude and dynamics of protein oxidation during cell signaling is technically challenging. Computational modeling provides tractable, quantitative methods to test hypotheses of redox mechanisms that may be simultaneously operative during signal transduction. The interleukin-4 (IL-4) pathway, which has previously been reported to induce reactive oxygen species and oxidation of PTP1B, may be controlled by several other putative mechanisms of redox regulation; widespread proteomic thiol oxidation observed via 2D redox differential gel electrophoresis upon IL-4 treatment suggests more than one redox-sensitive protein implicated in this pathway. Through computational modeling and a model selection strategy that relied on characteristic STAT6 phosphorylation dynamics of IL-4 signaling, we identified reversible protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) oxidation as the primary redox regulatory mechanism in the pathway. A systems-level model of IL-4 signaling was developed that integrates synchronous pan-PTP oxidation with ROS-independent mechanisms. The model quantitatively predicts the dynamics of IL-4 signaling over a broad range of new redox conditions, offers novel hypotheses about regulation of JAK/STAT signaling, and provides a framework for interrogating putative mechanisms involving receptor-initiated oxidation. PMID:26562652

  4. Rap1 Spatially Controls ArhGAP29 To Inhibit Rho Signaling during Endothelial Barrier Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Post, A.; Pannekoek, W. J.; Ponsioen, B.; Vliem, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    The small GTPase Rap1 controls the actin cytoskeleton by regulating Rho GTPase signaling. We recently established that the Rap1 effectors Radil and Rasip1, together with the Rho GTPase activating protein ArhGAP29, mediate Rap1-induced inhibition of Rho signaling in the processes of epithelial cell spreading and endothelial barrier function. Here, we show that Rap1 induces the independent translocations of Rasip1 and a Radil-ArhGAP29 complex to the plasma membrane. This results in the formation of a multimeric protein complex required for Rap1-induced inhibition of Rho signaling and increased endothelial barrier function. Together with the previously reported spatiotemporal control of the Rap guanine nucleotide exchange factor Epac1, these findings elucidate a signaling pathway for spatiotemporal control of Rho signaling that operates by successive protein translocations to and complex formation at the plasma membrane. PMID:25963656

  5. Deguelin inhibits the migration and invasion of lung cancer A549 and H460 cells via regulating actin cytoskeleton rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Honggang; Jiao, Yan; Zhang, Zuncheng

    2015-01-01

    Deguelin, the main components from Mundulea sericea, was reported to suppress the growth of various cancer cells. However, the effect of Deguelin on tumor cell invasion and metastasis and its mechanism still unclear so far. In this study, we investigated the effects of Deguelin on the cell invasion in human lung cancer A549 and H460 cells. Our results demonstrate that Deguelin can significantly inhibited cell proliferation, cell migration and cell invasion. Moreover, Deguelin could also affected reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and decreased filopodia and lamellipodia formation. Furthermore, deguelin-treated tumors showed decreased the tumor metastasis related genes such as CD44, MMP2 and MMP9 at protein and mRNA levels and the content of CEA, SCC, NSE, CYFAR21-1. In addition, Deguelin down-regulated protein expression of Rac1 and Rock1, which are impotent in actin cytoskeleton rearrangements and cell motility. Together, our results suggest that Deguelin inhibit tumor growth and metastasis of lung cancer cells and might be a candidate compound for curing lung cancer. PMID:26884827

  6. The ZEB1/miR-200c feedback loop regulates invasion via actin interacting proteins MYLK and TKS5

    PubMed Central

    Stemmler, Marc P.; Kleemann, Julia A.; Brabletz, Thomas; Brabletz, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a developmental process which is aberrantly activated during cancer invasion and metastasis. Elevated expression of EMT-inducers like ZEB1 enables tumor cells to detach from the primary tumor and invade into the surrounding tissue. The main antagonist of ZEB1 in controlling EMT is the microRNA-200 family that is reciprocally linked to ZEB1 in a double negative feedback loop. Here, we further elucidate how the ZEB1/miR-200 feedback loop controls invasion of tumor cells. The process of EMT is attended by major changes in the actin cytoskeleton. Via in silico screening of genes encoding for actin interacting proteins, we identified two novel targets of miR-200c - TKS5 and MYLK (MLCK). Co-expression of both genes with ZEB1 was observed in several cancer cell lines as well as in breast cancer patients and correlated with low miR-200c levels. Depletion of TKS5 or MYLK in breast cancer cells reduced their invasive potential and their ability to form invadopodia. Whereas TKS5 is known to be a major component, we could identify MYLK as a novel player in invadopodia formation. In summary, TKS5 and MYLK represent two mediators of invasive behavior of cancer cells that are regulated by the ZEB1/miR-200 feedback loop. PMID:26334100

  7. Actin Dynamics in Growth Cone Motility and Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Timothy M.; Letourneau, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    Motile growth cones lead growing axons through developing tissues to synaptic targets. These behaviors depend on the organization and dynamics of actin filaments that fill the growth cone leading margin (peripheral (P-) domain). Actin filament organization in growth cones is regulated by actin-binding proteins that control all aspects of filament assembly, turnover, interactions with other filaments and cytoplasmic components, and participation in producing mechanical forces. Actin filament polymerization drives protrusion of sensory filopodia and lamellipodia, and actin filament connections to the plasma membrane link the filament network to adhesive contacts of filopodia and lamellipodia with other surfaces. These contacts stabilize protrusions and transduce mechanical forces generated by actomyosin activity into traction that pulls an elongating axon along the path towards its target. Adhesive ligands and extrinsic guidance cues bind growth cone receptors and trigger signaling activities involving Rho GTPases, kinases, phosphatases, cyclic nucleotides and [Ca++] fluxes. These signals regulate actin binding proteins to locally modulate actin polymerization, interactions and force transduction to steer the growth cone leading margin towards the sources of attractive cues and away from repellent guidance cues. PMID:24164353

  8. MODULATION OF N-CADHERIN JUNCTIONS AND THEIR ROLE AS EPICENTERS OF DIFFERENTIATION-SPECIFIC ACTIN REGULATION IN THE DEVELOPING LENS

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Michelle; Zhang, Liping; Zhai, Ni; Cader, Ahmad; Chan, Yim; Nowak, Roberta B.; Fowler, Velia M.; Menko, A. Sue

    2010-01-01

    Extensive elongation of lens fiber cells is a central feature of lens morphogenesis. Our study investigates the role of N-cadherin junctions in this process in vivo. We investigate both the molecular players involved in N-cadherin junctional maturation and the subsequent function of these junctions as epicenters for the assembly of an actin cytoskeleton that drives morphogenesis. We present the first evidence of nascent cadherin junctions in vivo, and show they are a prominent feature along lateral interfaces of undifferentiated lens epithelial cells. Maturation of these N-cadherin junctions, required for lens cell differentiation, preceded organization of a cortical actin cytoskeleton along the cells’ lateral borders, but was linked to recruitment of α-catenin and dephosphorylation of N-cadherin-linked β-catenin. Biochemical analysis revealed differentiation-specific recruitment of actin regulators cortactin and Arp3 to maturing N-cadherin junctions of differentiating cells, linking N-cadherin junctional maturation with actin cytoskeletal assembly during fiber cell elongation. Blocking formation of mature N-cadherin junctions led to reduced association of α-catenin with N-cadherin, prevented organization of actin along lateral borders of differentiating lens fiber cells and blocked their elongation. These studies provide a molecular link between N-cadherin junctions and the organization of an actin cytoskeleton that governs lens fiber cell morphogenesis in vivo. PMID:20969840

  9. Role of Active Contraction and Tropomodulins in Regulating Actin Filament Length and Sarcomere Structure in Developing Zebrafish Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Mazelet, Lise; Parker, Matthew O.; Li, Mei; Arner, Anders; Ashworth, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Whilst it is recognized that contraction plays an important part in maintaining the structure and function of mature skeletal muscle, its role during development remains undefined. In this study the role of movement in skeletal muscle maturation was investigated in intact zebrafish embryos using a combination of genetic and pharmacological approaches. An immotile mutant line (cacnb1ts25) which lacks functional voltage-gated calcium channels (dihydropyridine receptors) in the muscle and pharmacological immobilization of embryos with a reversible anesthetic (Tricaine), allowed the study of paralysis (in mutants and anesthetized fish) and recovery of movement (reversal of anesthetic treatment). The effect of paralysis in early embryos (aged between 17 and 24 hours post-fertilization, hpf) on skeletal muscle structure at both myofibrillar and myofilament level was determined using both immunostaining with confocal microscopy and small angle X-ray diffraction. The consequences of paralysis and subsequent recovery on the localization of the actin capping proteins Tropomodulin 1 & 4 (Tmod) in fish aged from 17 hpf until 42 hpf was also assessed. The functional consequences of early paralysis were investigated by examining the mechanical properties of the larval muscle. The length-force relationship, active and passive tension, was measured in immotile, recovered and control skeletal muscle at 5 and 7 day post-fertilization (dpf). Recovery of muscle function was also assessed by examining swimming patterns in recovered and control fish. Inhibition of the initial embryonic movements (up to 24 hpf) resulted in an increase in myofibril length and a decrease in width followed by almost complete recovery in both moving and paralyzed fish by 42 hpf. In conclusion, myofibril organization is regulated by a dual mechanism involving movement-dependent and movement-independent processes. The initial contractile event itself drives the localization of Tmod1 to its sarcomeric position

  10. Role of Active Contraction and Tropomodulins in Regulating Actin Filament Length and Sarcomere Structure in Developing Zebrafish Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Mazelet, Lise; Parker, Matthew O; Li, Mei; Arner, Anders; Ashworth, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Whilst it is recognized that contraction plays an important part in maintaining the structure and function of mature skeletal muscle, its role during development remains undefined. In this study the role of movement in skeletal muscle maturation was investigated in intact zebrafish embryos using a combination of genetic and pharmacological approaches. An immotile mutant line (cacnb1 (ts25) ) which lacks functional voltage-gated calcium channels (dihydropyridine receptors) in the muscle and pharmacological immobilization of embryos with a reversible anesthetic (Tricaine), allowed the study of paralysis (in mutants and anesthetized fish) and recovery of movement (reversal of anesthetic treatment). The effect of paralysis in early embryos (aged between 17 and 24 hours post-fertilization, hpf) on skeletal muscle structure at both myofibrillar and myofilament level was determined using both immunostaining with confocal microscopy and small angle X-ray diffraction. The consequences of paralysis and subsequent recovery on the localization of the actin capping proteins Tropomodulin 1 & 4 (Tmod) in fish aged from 17 hpf until 42 hpf was also assessed. The functional consequences of early paralysis were investigated by examining the mechanical properties of the larval muscle. The length-force relationship, active and passive tension, was measured in immotile, recovered and control skeletal muscle at 5 and 7 day post-fertilization (dpf). Recovery of muscle function was also assessed by examining swimming patterns in recovered and control fish. Inhibition of the initial embryonic movements (up to 24 hpf) resulted in an increase in myofibril length and a decrease in width followed by almost complete recovery in both moving and paralyzed fish by 42 hpf. In conclusion, myofibril organization is regulated by a dual mechanism involving movement-dependent and movement-independent processes. The initial contractile event itself drives the localization of Tmod1 to its sarcomeric

  11. Rictor/mTORC2 regulates blood-testis barrier dynamics via its effects on gap junction communications and actin filament network

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Ka-Wai; Mruk, Dolores D.; Lee, Will M.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2013-01-01

    In the mammalian testis, coexisting tight junctions (TJs), basal ectoplasmic specializations, and gap junctions (GJs), together with desmosomes near the basement membrane, constitute the blood-testis barrier (BTB). The most notable feature of the BTB, however, is the extensive network of actin filament bundles, which makes it one of the tightest blood-tissue barriers. The BTB undergoes restructuring to facilitate the transit of preleptotene spermatocytes at stage VIII-IX of the epithelial cycle. Thus, the F-actin network at the BTB undergoes cyclic reorganization via a yet-to-be explored mechanism. Rictor, the key component of mTORC2 that is known to regulate actin cytoskeleton, was shown to express stage-specifically at the BTB in the seminiferous epithelium. Its expression was down-regulated at the BTB in stage VIII-IX tubules, coinciding with BTB restructuring at these stages. Using an in vivo model, a down-regulation of rictor at the BTB was also detected during adjudin-induced BTB disruption, illustrating rictor expression is positively correlated with the status of the BTB integrity. Indeed, the knockdown of rictor by RNAi was found to perturb the Sertoli cell TJ-barrier function in vitro and the BTB integrity in vivo. This loss of barrier function was accompanied by changes in F-actin organization at the Sertoli cell BTB in vitro and in vivo, associated with a loss of interaction between actin and α-catenin or ZO-1. Rictor knockdown by RNAi was also found to impede Sertoli cell-cell GJ communication, disrupting protein distribution (e.g., occludin, ZO-1) at the BTB, illustrating that rictor is a crucial BTB regulator.—Mok, K., Mruk, D. D., Lee, W. M., Cheng, C. Y. Rictor/mTORC2 regulates blood-testis barrier dynamics via its effects on gap junction communications and actin filament network. PMID:23288930

  12. Bistability in the Rac1, PAK, and RhoA Signaling Network Drives Actin Cytoskeleton Dynamics and Cell Motility Switches

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Kate M.; Monsefi, Naser; Dawson, John C.; Degasperi, Andrea; Bukowski-Wills, Jimi-Carlo; Volinsky, Natalia; Dobrzyński, Maciej; Birtwistle, Marc R.; Tsyganov, Mikhail A.; Kiyatkin, Anatoly; Kida, Katarzyna; Finch, Andrew J.; Carragher, Neil O.; Kolch, Walter; Nguyen, Lan K.; von Kriegsheim, Alex; Kholodenko, Boris N.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Dynamic interactions between RhoA and Rac1, members of the Rho small GTPase family, play a vital role in the control of cell migration. Using predictive mathematical modeling, mass spectrometry-based quantitation of network components, and experimental validation in MDA-MB-231 mesenchymal breast cancer cells, we show that a network containing Rac1, RhoA, and PAK family kinases can produce bistable, switch-like responses to a graded PAK inhibition. Using a small chemical inhibitor of PAK, we demonstrate that cellular RhoA and Rac1 activation levels respond in a history-dependent, bistable manner to PAK inhibition. Consequently, we show that downstream signaling, actin dynamics, and cell migration also behave in a bistable fashion, displaying switches and hysteresis in response to PAK inhibition. Our results demonstrate that PAK is a critical component in the Rac1-RhoA inhibitory crosstalk that governs bistable GTPase activity, cell morphology, and cell migration switches. PMID:27136688

  13. Bistability in the Rac1, PAK, and RhoA Signaling Network Drives Actin Cytoskeleton Dynamics and Cell Motility Switches.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Kate M; Monsefi, Naser; Dawson, John C; Degasperi, Andrea; Bukowski-Wills, Jimi-Carlo; Volinsky, Natalia; Dobrzyński, Maciej; Birtwistle, Marc R; Tsyganov, Mikhail A; Kiyatkin, Anatoly; Kida, Katarzyna; Finch, Andrew J; Carragher, Neil O; Kolch, Walter; Nguyen, Lan K; von Kriegsheim, Alex; Kholodenko, Boris N

    2016-01-27

    Dynamic interactions between RhoA and Rac1, members of the Rho small GTPase family, play a vital role in the control of cell migration. Using predictive mathematical modeling, mass spectrometry-based quantitation of network components, and experimental validation in MDA-MB-231 mesenchymal breast cancer cells, we show that a network containing Rac1, RhoA, and PAK family kinases can produce bistable, switch-like responses to a graded PAK inhibition. Using a small chemical inhibitor of PAK, we demonstrate that cellular RhoA and Rac1 activation levels respond in a history-dependent, bistable manner to PAK inhibition. Consequently, we show that downstream signaling, actin dynamics, and cell migration also behave in a bistable fashion, displaying switches and hysteresis in response to PAK inhibition. Our results demonstrate that PAK is a critical component in the Rac1-RhoA inhibitory crosstalk that governs bistable GTPase activity, cell morphology, and cell migration switches. PMID:27136688

  14. Auxin signaling modules regulate maize inflorescence architecture

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Mary; Liu, Qiujie; Moss, Britney L.; Malcomber, Simon; Li, Wei; Gaines, Craig; Federici, Silvia; Roshkovan, Jessica; Meeley, Robert; Nemhauser, Jennifer L.; Gallavotti, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    In plants, small groups of pluripotent stem cells called axillary meristems are required for the formation of the branches and flowers that eventually establish shoot architecture and drive reproductive success. To ensure the proper formation of new axillary meristems, the specification of boundary regions is required for coordinating their development. We have identified two maize genes, BARREN INFLORESCENCE1 and BARREN INFLORESCENCE4 (BIF1 and BIF4), that regulate the early steps required for inflorescence formation. BIF1 and BIF4 encode AUXIN/INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID (Aux/IAA) proteins, which are key components of the auxin hormone signaling pathway that is essential for organogenesis. Here we show that BIF1 and BIF4 are integral to auxin signaling modules that dynamically regulate the expression of BARREN STALK1 (BA1), a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcriptional regulator necessary for axillary meristem formation that shows a striking boundary expression pattern. These findings suggest that auxin signaling directly controls boundary domains during axillary meristem formation and define a fundamental mechanism that regulates inflorescence architecture in one of the most widely grown crop species. PMID:26464512

  15. Arp2/3-mediated actin-based motility: a tail of pathogen abuse

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Matthew D.; Way, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular pathogens have developed elaborate mechanisms to exploit the different cellular systems of their unwilling hosts to facilitate their entry, replication and survival. In particular, a diverse range of bacteria and viruses have evolved unique strategies to harness the power of Arp2/3-mediated actin polymerization to enhance their cell-to-cell spread. In this review, we discuss how studying these pathogens has revolutionized our molecular understanding of Arp2/3-dependent actin assembly, and revealed key signalling pathways regulating actin assembly in cells. Further studies with known and newly emerging pathogens will undoubtedly continue to enhance our understanding of the role of the actin cytoskeleton during pathogenesis. Moreover, looking back over the last 20 years, it would be surprising if future analyses of microbe-host interactions did not continue to uncover new mechanisms regulating actin assembly and dynamics, as well as unexpected cellular functions for actin. PMID:24034611

  16. Stretch-dependent smooth muscle differentiation in the portal vein-role of actin polymerization, calcium signaling, and microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Albinsson, Sebastian; Bhattachariya, Anirban; Hellstrand, Per

    2014-04-01

    The mechanical forces acting on SMC in the vascular wall are known to regulate processes such as vascular remodeling and contractile differentiation. However, investigations to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of mechanotransduction in smooth muscle have been hampered by technical limitations associated with mechanical studies on pressurized small arteries, due primarily to the small amount of available tissue. The murine portal vein is a relatively large vessel showing myogenic tone that in many respects recapitulates the properties of small resistance vessels. Studies on stretched portal veins to elucidate mechanisms of mechanotransduction in the vascular wall have shown that stretch-sensitive regulation of contractile differentiation is mediated via Rho-activation and actin polymerization, while stretch-induced growth is regulated by the MAPK pathway. In this review, we have summarized findings on mechanotransduction in the portal vein with focus on stretch-induced contractile differentiation and the role of calcium, actin polymerization and miRNAs in this response. PMID:24238368

  17. Inhibition of invasion by glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta inhibitors through dysregulation of actin re-organisation via down-regulation of WAVE2.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Yuki; Suzuki, Manami; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Ishioka, Chikashi

    2015-08-14

    Cancer cell invasion is a critical phenomenon in cancer pathogenesis. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) has been reported to regulate cancer cell invasion both negatively and positively. Thus, the net effect of GSK-3β on invasion is unclear. In this report, we showed that GSK-3β inhibitors induced dysregulation of the actin cytoskeleton and functional insufficiency of focal adhesion, which resulted in suppressed invasion. In addition, WAVE2, an essential molecule for actin fibre branching, was down-regulated after GSK-3β inhibition. Collectively, we propose that the WAVE2-actin cytoskeleton axis is an important target of GSK-3β inhibitors in cancer cell invasion. PMID:26116771

  18. Nuclear F-actin enhances the transcriptional activity of β-catenin by increasing its nuclear localization and binding to chromatin.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Shota; Yamamoto, Koji; de Lanerolle, Primal; Harata, Masahiko

    2016-04-01

    Actin plays multiple roles both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Cytoplasmic actin, in addition to its structural role in the cytoskeleton, also contributes to the subcellular localization of transcription factors by interacting with them or their partners. The transcriptional cofactor β-catenin, which acts as an intracellular transducer of canonical Wnt signaling, indirectly associates with the cytoplasmic filamentous actin (F-actin). Recently, it has been observed that F-actin is transiently formed within the nucleus in response to serum stimulation and integrin signaling, and also during gene reprogramming. Despite these earlier observations, information about the function of nuclear F-actin is poorly defined. Here, by facilitating the accumulation of nuclear actin artificially, we demonstrate that polymerizing nuclear actin enhanced the nuclear accumulation and transcriptional function of β-catenin. Our results also show that the nuclear F-actin colocalizes with β-catenin and enhances the binding of β-catenin to the downstream target genes of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, including the genes for the cell cycle regulators c-myc and cyclin D, and the OCT4 gene. Nuclear F-actin itself also associated with these genes. Since Wnt/β-catenin signaling has important roles in cell differentiation and pluripotency, our observations suggest that nuclear F-actin formed during these biological processes is involved in regulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:26900020

  19. Impact of Carbon Nanomaterials on Actin Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ying; Sun, Haiyan; Li, Xu; Li, Xin; Zhao, Lina

    2016-03-01

    Many nanomaterials have entered people's daily lives and impact the normal process of biological entities consequently. As one kind of the important nanomaterials, carbon based nanomaterials have invoked a lot of concerns from scientific researches because of their unique physicochemical properties. In eukaryotes, actin is the most abundantly distributed protein in both cytoplasm and cell nucleus, and closely controls the cell proliferation and mobility. Recently, many investigations have found some carbon based nanomaterials can affect actin cytoskeleton remarkably, including fullerenes derivatives, carbon nanotubes, graphene and its derivatives. However, these interaction processes are complicated and the underlying mechanism is far from being understood clearly. In this review, we discussed the different mechanisms of carbon nanomaterials impact on actin polymerization into three pathways, as triggering the signaling pathways from carbon nanomaterials outside of cells, increasing the production of reactive oxygen species from carbon nanomaterials inside of cells and direct interaction from carbon nanomaterials inside of cells. As a result, the dimension and size of carbon nanomaterials play a key role in regulation of actin cytoskeleton. Furthermore, we forecasted the possible investigation strategy for meeting the challenges of the future study on this topic. We hope the findings are helpful in understanding the molecular mechanism in carbon nanomaterials regulating actin polymerization, and provide new insight in novel nanomedicine development for inhibition tumor cell migration. PMID:27455649

  20. Energetic modeling and single-molecule verification of dynamic regulation on receptor complexes by actin corrals and lipid raft domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chien Y.; Huang, Jung Y.; Lo, Leu-Wei

    2014-12-01

    We developed an energetic model by integrating the generalized Langevin equation with the Cahn-Hilliard equation to simulate the diffusive behaviors of receptor proteins in the plasma membrane of a living cell. Simulation results are presented to elaborate the confinement effects from actin corrals and protein-induced lipid domains. Single-molecule tracking data of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) acquired on live HeLa cells agree with the simulation results and the mechanism that controls the diffusion of single-molecule receptors is clarified. We discovered that after ligand binding, EGFR molecules move into lipid nanodomains. The transition rates between different diffusion states of liganded EGFR molecules are regulated by the lipid domains. Our method successfully captures dynamic interactions of receptors at the single-molecule level and provides insight into the functional architecture of both the diffusing EGFR molecules and their local cellular environment.

  1. Common formin-regulating sequences in Smy1 and Bud14 are required for the control of actin cable assembly in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Eskin, Julian A.; Rankova, Aneliya; Johnston, Adam B.; Alioto, Salvatore L.; Goode, Bruce L.

    2016-01-01

    Formins comprise a large family of proteins with diverse roles in remodeling the actin cytoskeleton. However, the spatiotemporal mechanisms used by cells to control formin activities are only beginning to be understood. Here we dissected Smy1, which has dual roles in regulating formins and myosin. Using mutagenesis, we identified specific sequences in Smy1 critical for its in vitro inhibitory effects on the FH2 domain of the formin Bnr1. By integrating smy1 alleles targeting those sequences, we genetically uncoupled Smy1’s functions in regulating formins and myosin. Quantitative imaging analysis further demonstrated that the ability of Smy1 to directly control Bnr1 activity is crucial in vivo for proper actin cable length, shape, and velocity and, in turn, efficient secretory vesicle transport. A Smy1-like sequence motif was also identified in a different Bnr1 regulator, Bud14, and found to be essential for Bud14 functions in regulating actin cable architecture and function in vivo. Together these observations reveal unanticipated mechanistic ties between two distinct formin regulators. Further, they emphasize the importance of tightly controlling formin activities in vivo to generate specialized geometries and dynamics of actin structures tailored to their physiological roles. PMID:26764093

  2. Common formin-regulating sequences in Smy1 and Bud14 are required for the control of actin cable assembly in vivo.

    PubMed

    Eskin, Julian A; Rankova, Aneliya; Johnston, Adam B; Alioto, Salvatore L; Goode, Bruce L

    2016-03-01

    Formins comprise a large family of proteins with diverse roles in remodeling the actin cytoskeleton. However, the spatiotemporal mechanisms used by cells to control formin activities are only beginning to be understood. Here we dissected Smy1, which has dual roles in regulating formins and myosin. Using mutagenesis, we identified specific sequences in Smy1 critical for its in vitro inhibitory effects on the FH2 domain of the formin Bnr1. By integrating smy1 alleles targeting those sequences, we genetically uncoupled Smy1's functions in regulating formins and myosin. Quantitative imaging analysis further demonstrated that the ability of Smy1 to directly control Bnr1 activity is crucial in vivo for proper actin cable length, shape, and velocity and, in turn, efficient secretory vesicle transport. A Smy1-like sequence motif was also identified in a different Bnr1 regulator, Bud14, and found to be essential for Bud14 functions in regulating actin cable architecture and function in vivo. Together these observations reveal unanticipated mechanistic ties between two distinct formin regulators. Further, they emphasize the importance of tightly controlling formin activities in vivo to generate specialized geometries and dynamics of actin structures tailored to their physiological roles. PMID:26764093

  3. MACF1 regulates the migration of pyramidal neurons via microtubule dynamics and GSK-3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Ka, Minhan; Jung, Eui-Man; Mueller, Ulrich; Kim, Woo-Yang

    2014-11-01

    Neuronal migration and subsequent differentiation play critical roles for establishing functional neural circuitry in the developing brain. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate these processes are poorly understood. Here, we show that microtubule actin crosslinking factor 1 (MACF1) determines neuronal positioning by regulating microtubule dynamics and mediating GSK-3 signaling during brain development. First, using MACF1 floxed allele mice and in utero gene manipulation, we find that MACF1 deletion suppresses migration of cortical pyramidal neurons and results in aberrant neuronal positioning in the developing brain. The cell autonomous deficit in migration is associated with abnormal dynamics of leading processes and centrosomes. Furthermore, microtubule stability is severely damaged in neurons lacking MACF1, resulting in abnormal microtubule dynamics. Finally, MACF1 interacts with and mediates GSK-3 signaling in developing neurons. Our findings establish a cellular mechanism underlying neuronal migration and provide insights into the regulation of cytoskeleton dynamics in developing neurons. PMID:25224226

  4. The STARS signaling pathway: a key regulator of skeletal muscle function.

    PubMed

    Lamon, Séverine; Wallace, Marita A; Russell, Aaron P

    2014-09-01

    During the last decade, the striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS), a muscle-specific protein, has been proposed to play an increasingly important role in skeletal muscle growth, metabolism, regeneration and stress adaptation. STARS influences actin dynamics and, as a consequence, regulates the myocardin-related transcription factor A/serum response factor (MRTF-A/SRF) transcriptional program, a well-known pathway controlling skeletal muscle development and function. Muscle-specific stress conditions, such as exercise, positively regulates, while disuse and degenerative muscle diseases are associated with a downregulation of STARS and its downstream partners, suggesting a pivotal role for STARS in skeletal muscle health. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the known role and regulation of STARS and the members of its signaling pathway, RhoA, MRTF-A and SRF, in skeletal muscle. PMID:24557714

  5. Tissue-specific and developmentally regulated expression of a chimeric actin-globin gene in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Shani, M

    1986-01-01

    A chimeric plasmid containing about 2/3 of the rat skeletal muscle actin gene plus 730 base pairs of its 5' flanking sequences fused to the 3' end of a human embryonic globin gene (D. Melloul, B. Aloni, J. Calvo, D. Yaffe, and U. Nudel, EMBO J. 3:983-990, 1984) was inserted into mice by microinjection into fertilized eggs. Eleven transgenic mice carrying the chimeric gene with or without plasmid pBR322 DNA sequences were identified. The majority of these mice transmitted the injected DNA to about 50% of their progeny. However, in transgenic mouse CV1, transmission to progeny was associated with amplification or deletion of the injected DNA sequences, while in transgenic mouse CV4 transmission was distorted, probably as a result of insertional mutagenesis. Tissue-specific expression was dependent on the removal of the vector DNA sequences from the chimeric gene sequences prior to microinjection. None of the transgenic mice carrying the chimeric gene together with plasmid pBR322 sequences expressed the introduced gene in striated muscles. In contrast, the six transgenic mice carrying the chimeric gene sequences alone expressed the inserted gene specifically in skeletal and cardiac muscles. Moreover, expression of the chimeric gene was not only tissue specific, but also developmentally regulated. Similar to the endogenous skeletal muscle actin gene, the chimeric gene was expressed at a relatively high level in cardiac muscle of neonatal mice and at a significantly lower level in adult cardiac muscle. These results indicate that the injected DNA included sufficient cis-acting control elements for its tissue-specific and developmentally regulated expression in transgenic mice. Images PMID:3023942

  6. CFTR regulation in human airway epithelial cells requires integrity of the actin cytoskeleton and compartmentalized cAMP and PKA activity

    PubMed Central

    Monterisi, Stefania; Favia, Maria; Guerra, Lorenzo; Cardone, Rosa A.; Marzulli, Domenico; Reshkin, Stephan J.; Casavola, Valeria; Zaccolo, Manuela

    2012-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mutation ΔF508CFTR still causes regulatory defects when rescued to the apical membrane, suggesting that the intracellular milieu might affect its ability to respond to cAMP regulation. We recently reported that overexpression of the Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor NHERF1 in the cystic fibrosis (CF) airway cell line CFBE41o-rescues the functional expression of ΔF508CFTR by promoting F-actin organization and formation of the NHERF1–ezrin–actin complex. Here, using real-time FRET reporters of both PKA activity and cAMP levels, we find that lack of an organized subcortical cytoskeleton in CFBE41o-cells causes both defective accumulation of cAMP in the subcortical compartment and excessive cytosolic accumulation of cAMP. This results in reduced subcortical levels and increased cytosolic levels of PKA activity. NHERF1 overexpression in CFBE41o-cells restores chloride secretion, subcortical cAMP compartmentalization and local PKA activity, indicating that regulation of ΔF508CFTR function requires not only stable expression of the mutant CFTR at the cell surface but also depends on both generation of local cAMP signals of adequate amplitude and activation of PKA in proximity of its target. Moreover, we found that the knockdown of wild-type CFTR in the non-CF 16HBE14o-cells results in both altered cytoskeletal organization and loss of cAMP compartmentalization, whereas stable overexpression of wt CFTR in CF cells restores cytoskeleton organization and re-establishes the compartmentalization of cAMP at the plasma membrane. This suggests that the presence of CFTR on the plasma membrane influences the cytoskeletal organizational state and, consequently, cAMP distribution. Our data show that a sufficiently high concentration of cAMP in the subcortical compartment is required to achieve PKA-mediated regulation of CFTR activity. PMID:22302988

  7. Live-cell imaging of actin dynamics reveals mechanisms of stereocilia length regulation in the inner ear.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Meghan C; Barzik, Melanie; Bird, Jonathan E; Zhang, Duan-Sun; Lechene, Claude P; Corey, David P; Cunningham, Lisa L; Friedman, Thomas B

    2015-01-01

    The maintenance of sensory hair cell stereocilia is critical for lifelong hearing; however, mechanisms of structural homeostasis remain poorly understood. Conflicting models propose that stereocilia F-actin cores are either continually renewed every 24-48 h via a treadmill or are stable, exceptionally long-lived structures. Here to distinguish between these models, we perform an unbiased survey of stereocilia actin dynamics in more than 500 utricle hair cells. Live-imaging EGFP-β-actin or dendra2-β-actin reveal stable F-actin cores with turnover and elongation restricted to stereocilia tips. Fixed-cell microscopy of wild-type and mutant β-actin demonstrates that incorporation of actin monomers into filaments is required for localization to stereocilia tips. Multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry and live imaging of single differentiating hair cells capture stereociliogenesis and explain uniform incorporation of (15)N-labelled protein and EGFP-β-actin into nascent stereocilia. Collectively, our analyses support a model in which stereocilia actin cores are stable structures that incorporate new F-actin only at the distal tips. PMID:25898120

  8. Metabolic signals in sleep regulation: recent insights

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Charu; Basheer, Radhika

    2016-01-01

    Sleep and energy balance are essential for health. The two processes act in concert to regulate central and peripheral homeostasis. During sleep, energy is conserved due to suspended activity, movement, and sensory responses, and is redirected to restore and replenish proteins and their assemblies into cellular structures. During wakefulness, various energy-demanding activities lead to hunger. Thus, hunger promotes arousal, and subsequent feeding, followed by satiety that promotes sleep via changes in neuroendocrine or neuropeptide signals. These signals overlap with circuits of sleep-wakefulness, feeding, and energy expenditure. Here, we will briefly review the literature that describes the interplay between the circadian system, sleep-wake, and feeding-fasting cycles that are needed to maintain energy balance and a healthy metabolic profile. In doing so, we describe the neuroendocrine, hormonal/peptide signals that integrate sleep and feeding behavior with energy metabolism. PMID:26793010

  9. Targeting the actin cytoskeleton: selective antitumor action via trapping PKCɛ.

    PubMed

    Foerster, F; Braig, S; Moser, C; Kubisch, R; Busse, J; Wagner, E; Schmoeckel, E; Mayr, D; Schmitt, S; Huettel, S; Zischka, H; Mueller, R; Vollmar, A M

    2014-01-01

    Targeting the actin cytoskeleton (CSK) of cancer cells offers a valuable strategy in cancer therapy. There are a number of natural compounds that interfere with the actin CSK, but the mode of their cytotoxic action and, moreover, their tumor-specific mechanisms are quite elusive. We used the myxobacterial compound Chondramide as a tool to first elucidate the mechanisms of cytotoxicity of actin targeting in breast cancer cells (MCF7, MDA-MB-231). Chondramide inhibits cellular actin filament dynamics shown by a fluorescence-based analysis (fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP)) and leads to apoptosis characterized by phosphatidylserine exposure, release of cytochrome C from mitochondria and finally activation of caspases. Chondramide enhances the occurrence of mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) by affecting known MPT modulators: Hexokinase II bound to the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) translocated from the outer mitochondrial membrane to the cytosol and the proapoptotic protein Bad were recruited to the mitochondria. Importantly, protein kinase C-ɛ (PKCɛ), a prosurvival kinase possessing an actin-binding site and known to regulate the hexokinase/VDAC interaction as well as Bad phosphorylation was identified as the link between actin CSK and apoptosis induction. PKCɛ, which was found overexpressed in breast cancer cells, accumulated in actin bundles induced by Chondramide and lost its activity. Our second goal was to characterize the potential tumor-specific action of actin-binding agents. As the nontumor breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A in fact shows resistance to Chondramide-induced apoptosis and notably express low level of PKCɛ, we suggest that trapping PKCɛ via Chondramide-induced actin hyperpolymerization displays tumor cell specificity. Our work provides a link between targeting the ubiquitously occurring actin CSK and selective inhibition of pro-tumorigenic PKCɛ, thus setting the stage for actin-stabilizing agents as

  10. Targeting the actin cytoskeleton: selective antitumor action via trapping PKCɛ

    PubMed Central

    Foerster, F; Braig, S; Moser, C; Kubisch, R; Busse, J; Wagner, E; Schmoeckel, E; Mayr, D; Schmitt, S; Huettel, S; Zischka, H; Mueller, R; Vollmar, A M

    2014-01-01

    Targeting the actin cytoskeleton (CSK) of cancer cells offers a valuable strategy in cancer therapy. There are a number of natural compounds that interfere with the actin CSK, but the mode of their cytotoxic action and, moreover, their tumor-specific mechanisms are quite elusive. We used the myxobacterial compound Chondramide as a tool to first elucidate the mechanisms of cytotoxicity of actin targeting in breast cancer cells (MCF7, MDA-MB-231). Chondramide inhibits cellular actin filament dynamics shown by a fluorescence-based analysis (fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP)) and leads to apoptosis characterized by phosphatidylserine exposure, release of cytochrome C from mitochondria and finally activation of caspases. Chondramide enhances the occurrence of mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) by affecting known MPT modulators: Hexokinase II bound to the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) translocated from the outer mitochondrial membrane to the cytosol and the proapoptotic protein Bad were recruited to the mitochondria. Importantly, protein kinase C-ɛ (PKCɛ), a prosurvival kinase possessing an actin-binding site and known to regulate the hexokinase/VDAC interaction as well as Bad phosphorylation was identified as the link between actin CSK and apoptosis induction. PKCɛ, which was found overexpressed in breast cancer cells, accumulated in actin bundles induced by Chondramide and lost its activity. Our second goal was to characterize the potential tumor-specific action of actin-binding agents. As the nontumor breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A in fact shows resistance to Chondramide-induced apoptosis and notably express low level of PKCɛ, we suggest that trapping PKCɛ via Chondramide-induced actin hyperpolymerization displays tumor cell specificity. Our work provides a link between targeting the ubiquitously occurring actin CSK and selective inhibition of pro-tumorigenic PKCɛ, thus setting the stage for actin-stabilizing agents as

  11. Localized signals that regulate transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Muller, William A

    2016-02-01

    Transendothelial migration (TEM) of leukocytes is the step in leukocyte emigration in which the leukocyte actually leaves the blood vessel to carry out its role in the inflammatory response. It is therefore, arguably the most critical step in emigration. This review focuses on two of the many aspects of this process that have seen important recent developments. The adhesion molecules, PECAM (CD31) and CD99 that regulate two major steps in TEM, do so by regulating specific signals. PECAM initiates the signaling pathway responsible for the calcium flux that is required for TEM. Calcium enters through the cation channel TRPC6 and recruits the first wave of trafficking of membrane from the lateral border recycling compartment (LBRC). CD99 signals through soluble adenylate cyclase to activate protein kinase A to recruit a second wave of LBRC trafficking. Another process that is critical for TEM is transient removal of VE-cadherin from the site of TEM. However, the local signaling pathways that are responsible for this appear to be different from those that open the junctions to increase vascular permeability. PMID:26584476

  12. Actin polymerization is stimulated by actin cross-linking protein palladin.

    PubMed

    Gurung, Ritu; Yadav, Rahul; Brungardt, Joseph G; Orlova, Albina; Egelman, Edward H; Beck, Moriah R

    2016-02-15

    The actin scaffold protein palladin regulates both normal cell migration and invasive cell motility, processes that require the co-ordinated regulation of actin dynamics. However, the potential effect of palladin on actin dynamics has remained elusive. In the present study, we show that the actin-binding immunoglobulin-like domain of palladin, which is directly responsible for both actin binding and bundling, also stimulates actin polymerization in vitro. Palladin eliminated the lag phase that is characteristic of the slow nucleation step of actin polymerization. Furthermore, palladin dramatically reduced depolymerization, slightly enhanced the elongation rate, and did not alter the critical concentration. Microscopy and in vitro cross-linking assays reveal differences in actin bundle architecture when palladin is incubated with actin before or after polymerization. These results suggest a model whereby palladin stimulates a polymerization-competent form of globular or monomeric actin (G-actin), akin to metal ions, either through charge neutralization or through conformational changes. PMID:26607837

  13. TRPV4 Regulates Breast Cancer Cell Extravasation, Stiffness and Actin Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wen Hsin; Choong, Lee Yee; Mon, Naing Naing; Lu, SsuYi; Lin, Qingsong; Pang, Brendan; Yan, Benedict; Krishna, Vedula Sri Ram; Singh, Himanshu; Tan, Tuan Zea; Thiery, Jean Paul; Lim, Chwee Teck; Tan, Patrick Boon Ooi; Johansson, Martin; Harteneck, Christian; Lim, Yoon Pin

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is a significant health issue. The standard mode of care is combination of chemotherapy and targeted therapeutics but the 5-year survival rate remains low. New/better drug targets that can improve outcomes of patients with metastatic disease are needed. Metastasis is a complex process, with each step conferred by a set of genetic aberrations. Mapping the molecular changes associated with metastasis improves our understanding of the etiology of this disease and contributes to the pipeline of targeted therapeutics. Here, phosphoproteomics of a xenograft-derived in vitro model comprising 4 isogenic cell lines with increasing metastatic potential implicated Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid subtype 4 in breast cancer metastasis. TRPV4 mRNA levels in breast, gastric and ovarian cancers correlated with poor clinical outcomes, suggesting a wide role of TRPV4 in human epithelial cancers. TRPV4 was shown to be required for breast cancer cell invasion and transendothelial migration but not growth/proliferation. Knockdown of Trpv4 significantly reduced the number of metastatic nodules in mouse xenografts leaving the size unaffected. Overexpression of TRPV4 promoted breast cancer cell softness, blebbing, and actin reorganization. The findings provide new insights into the role of TRPV4 in cancer extravasation putatively by reducing cell rigidity through controlling the cytoskeleton at the cell cortex. PMID:27291497

  14. Metadherin regulates proliferation and metastasis via actin cytoskeletal remodelling in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Y; Gu, X; Liu, H; Wu, G; Yuan, D; Yang, X; Song, Y

    2014-01-01

    Background: Metaderin (MTDH) protein is a novel component part of tight junction complex. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between MTDH and prognosis of patients and to explore the role of MTDH on NSCLC development and metastasis. Methods: Relative mRNA expression was evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR, and protein expression was detected using immunohistochemistry staining. The role of MTDH in cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion was studied by modulation of MTDH expression in NSCLC cell lines. These functions of MTDH were further confirmed in vivo. Results: In NSCLC, low MTDH protein expression was correlated with lymph node metastasis, TNM stage and decreased OS (P=0.001, 0.011 and 0.013, respectively). Overexpression of MTDH reduced anchorage-independent and -dependent growth through arresting cell cycle, inhibited migration and invasion in vitro and further suppressed tumorigenesis, tumour growth and metastasis in vivo. Knockdown of MTDH expression increased cell invasiveness. MTDH overexpression reversed pro-metastatic actin cytoskeleton remodelling and inhibited EMT, supporting that MTDH has a key role on cancer proliferation and metastasis. Conclusions: MTDH has an important role in NSCLC proliferation and metastasis and provides potential in predicting metastasis and prognosis for patients with NSCLC. PMID:24918821

  15. TRPV4 Regulates Breast Cancer Cell Extravasation, Stiffness and Actin Cortex.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wen Hsin; Choong, Lee Yee; Mon, Naing Naing; Lu, SsuYi; Lin, Qingsong; Pang, Brendan; Yan, Benedict; Krishna, Vedula Sri Ram; Singh, Himanshu; Tan, Tuan Zea; Thiery, Jean Paul; Lim, Chwee Teck; Tan, Patrick Boon Ooi; Johansson, Martin; Harteneck, Christian; Lim, Yoon Pin

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is a significant health issue. The standard mode of care is combination of chemotherapy and targeted therapeutics but the 5-year survival rate remains low. New/better drug targets that can improve outcomes of patients with metastatic disease are needed. Metastasis is a complex process, with each step conferred by a set of genetic aberrations. Mapping the molecular changes associated with metastasis improves our understanding of the etiology of this disease and contributes to the pipeline of targeted therapeutics. Here, phosphoproteomics of a xenograft-derived in vitro model comprising 4 isogenic cell lines with increasing metastatic potential implicated Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid subtype 4 in breast cancer metastasis. TRPV4 mRNA levels in breast, gastric and ovarian cancers correlated with poor clinical outcomes, suggesting a wide role of TRPV4 in human epithelial cancers. TRPV4 was shown to be required for breast cancer cell invasion and transendothelial migration but not growth/proliferation. Knockdown of Trpv4 significantly reduced the number of metastatic nodules in mouse xenografts leaving the size unaffected. Overexpression of TRPV4 promoted breast cancer cell softness, blebbing, and actin reorganization. The findings provide new insights into the role of TRPV4 in cancer extravasation putatively by reducing cell rigidity through controlling the cytoskeleton at the cell cortex. PMID:27291497

  16. Light-Induced Movements of Chloroplasts and Nuclei Are Regulated in Both Cp-Actin-Filament-Dependent and -Independent Manners in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Light-induced chloroplast movement and attachment to the plasma membrane are dependent on actin filaments. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the short actin filaments on the chloroplast envelope, cp-actin filaments, are essential for chloroplast movement and positioning. Furthermore, cp-actin-filament-mediated chloroplast movement is necessary for the strong-light-induced nuclear avoidance response. The proteins CHLOROPLAST UNUSUAL POSITIONING 1 (CHUP1), KINESIN-LIKE PROTEIN FOR ACTIN-BASED CHLOROPLAST MOVEMENT 1 (KAC1) and KAC2 are required for the generation and/or maintenance of cp-actin filaments in Arabidopsis. In land plants, CHUP1 and KAC family proteins play pivotal roles in the proper movement of chloroplasts and their attachment to the plasma membrane. Here, we report similar but distinct phenotypes in chloroplast and nuclear photorelocation movements between chup1 and kac1kac2 mutants. Measurement of chloroplast photorelocation movement indicated that kac1kac2, but not chup1, exhibited a clear strong-light-induced increase in leaf transmittance changes. The chloroplast movement in kac1kac2 depended on phototropin 2, CHUP1 and two other regulators for cp-actin filaments, PLASTID MOVEMENT IMPAIRED 1 and THRUMIN 1. Furthermore, kac1kac2 retained a weak but significant nuclear avoidance response although chup1 displayed a severe defect in the nuclear avoidance response. The kac1kac2chup1 triple mutant was completely defective in both chloroplast and nuclear avoidance responses. These results indicate that CHUP1 and the KACs function somewhat independently, but interdependently mediate both chloroplast and nuclear photorelocation movements. PMID:27310016

  17. SWAP-70 Identifies a Transitional Subset of Actin Filaments in Motile CellsV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Hilpelä, Pirta; Oberbanscheidt, Pia; Hahne, Penelope; Hund, Martin; Kalhammer, Georg; Small, J. Victor; Bähler, Martin

    2003-01-01

    Functionally different subsets of actin filament arrays contribute to cellular organization and motility. We report the identification of a novel subset of loose actin filament arrays through regulated association with the widely expressed protein SWAP-70. These loose actin filament arrays were commonly located behind protruding lamellipodia and membrane ruffles. Visualization of these loose actin filament arrays was dependent on lamellipodial protrusion and the binding of the SWAP-70 PH-domain to a 3′-phosphoinositide. SWAP-70 with a functional pleckstrin homology-domain lacking the C-terminal 60 residues was targeted to the area of the loose actin filament arrays, but it did not associate with actin filaments. The C-terminal 60 residues were sufficient for actin filament association, but they provided no specificity for the subset of loose actin filament arrays. These results identify SWAP-70 as a phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling-dependent marker for a distinct, hitherto unrecognized, array of actin filaments. Overexpression of SWAP-70 altered the actin organization and lamellipodial morphology. These alterations were dependent on a proper subcellular targeting of SWAP-70. We propose that SWAP-70 regulates the actincytoskeletonasaneffectororadaptorproteininresponsetoagoniststimulatedphosphatidylinositol (3,4)-bisphosphate production and cell protrusion. PMID:12925760

  18. Transfer of a Redox-Signal through the Cytosol by Redox-Dependent Microcompartmentation of Glycolytic Enzymes at Mitochondria and Actin Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Wojtera-Kwiczor, Joanna; Groß, Felicitas; Leffers, Hans-Martin; Kang, Minhee; Schneider, Markus; Scheibe, Renate

    2013-01-01

    The cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, EC 1.2.1.12, GapC) plays an important role in glycolysis by providing the cell with ATP and NADH. Interestingly, despite its glycolytic function in the cytosol, GAPDH was reported to possess additional non-glycolytic activities, correlating with its nuclear, or cytoskeletal localization in animal cells. In transiently transformed mesophyll protoplasts from Arabidopsis thaliana colocalization and interaction of the glycolytic enzymes with the mitochondria and with the actin cytoskeleton was visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy (cLSM) using fluorescent protein fusions and by bimolecular fluorescence complementation, respectively. Yeast two-hybrid screens, dot-blot overlay assays, and co-sedimentation assays were used to identify potential protein–protein interactions between two cytosolic GAPDH isoforms (GapC1, At3g04120; GapC2, At1g13440) from A. thaliana with the neighboring glycolytic enzyme, fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase (FBA6, At2g36460), the mitochondrial porin (VDAC3; At5g15090), and actin in vitro. From these experiments, a mitochondrial association is suggested for both glycolytic enzymes, GAPDH and aldolase, which appear to bind to the outer mitochondrial membrane, in a redox-dependent manner. In addition, both glycolytic enzymes were found to bind to F-actin in co-sedimentation assays, and lead to bundling of purified rabbit actin, as visualized by cLSM. Actin-binding and bundling occurred reversibly under oxidizing conditions. We speculate that such dynamic formation of microcompartments is part of a redox-dependent retrograde signal transduction network for adaptation upon oxidative stress. PMID:23316205

  19. Regulation of redox signaling by selenoproteins.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, Wayne Chris; Alkan, Zeynep

    2010-06-01

    The unique chemistry of oxygen has been both a resource and threat for life on Earth for at least the last 2.4 billion years. Reduction of oxygen to water allows extraction of more metabolic energy from organic fuels than is possible through anaerobic glycolysis. On the other hand, partially reduced oxygen can react indiscriminately with biomolecules to cause genetic damage, disease, and even death. Organisms in all three superkingdoms of life have developed elaborate mechanisms to protect against such oxidative damage and to exploit reactive oxygen species as sensors and signals in myriad processes. The sulfur amino acids, cysteine and methionine, are the main targets of reactive oxygen species in proteins. Oxidative modifications to cysteine and methionine can have profound effects on a protein's activity, structure, stability, and subcellular localization. Non-reversible oxidative modifications (oxidative damage) may contribute to molecular, cellular, and organismal aging and serve as signals for repair, removal, or programmed cell death. Reversible oxidation events can function as transient signals of physiological status, extracellular environment, nutrient availability, metabolic state, cell cycle phase, immune function, or sensory stimuli. Because of its chemical similarity to sulfur and stronger nucleophilicity and acidity, selenium is an extremely efficient catalyst of reactions between sulfur and oxygen. Most of the biological activity of selenium is due to selenoproteins containing selenocysteine, the 21st genetically encoded protein amino acid. The most abundant selenoproteins in mammals are the glutathione peroxidases (five to six genes) that reduce hydrogen peroxide and lipid hydroperoxides at the expense of glutathione and serve to limit the strength and duration of reactive oxygen signals. Thioredoxin reductases (three genes) use nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate to reduce oxidized thioredoxin and its homologs, which regulate a plethora of

  20. Phagocytic receptor signaling regulates clathrin and epsin-mediated cytoskeletal remodeling during apoptotic cell engulfment in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Qian; He, Bin; Lu, Nan; Conradt, Barbara; Grant, Barth D.; Zhou, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    The engulfment and subsequent degradation of apoptotic cells by phagocytes is an evolutionarily conserved process that efficiently removes dying cells from animal bodies during development. Here, we report that clathrin heavy chain (CHC-1), a membrane coat protein well known for its role in receptor-mediated endocytosis, and its adaptor epsin (EPN-1) play crucial roles in removing apoptotic cells in Caenorhabditis elegans. Inactivating epn-1 or chc-1 disrupts engulfment by impairing actin polymerization. This defect is partially suppressed by inactivating UNC-60, a cofilin ortholog and actin server/depolymerization protein, further indicating that EPN-1 and CHC-1 regulate actin assembly during pseudopod extension. CHC-1 is enriched on extending pseudopods together with EPN-1, in an EPN-1-dependent manner. Epistasis analysis places epn-1 and chc-1 in the same cell-corpse engulfment pathway as ced-1, ced-6 and dyn-1. CED-1 signaling is necessary for the pseudopod enrichment of EPN-1 and CHC-1. CED-1, CED-6 and DYN-1, like EPN-1 and CHC-1, are essential for the assembly and stability of F-actin underneath pseudopods. We propose that in response to CED-1 signaling, CHC-1 is recruited to the phagocytic cup through EPN-1 and acts as a scaffold protein to organize actin remodeling. Our work reveals novel roles of clathrin and epsin in apoptotic-cell internalization, suggests a Hip1/R-independent mechanism linking clathrin to actin assembly, and ties the CED-1 pathway to cytoskeleton remodeling. PMID:23861060

  1. Energetic modeling and single-molecule verification of dynamic regulation on receptor protein diffusion by actin corrals and lipid raft domains receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chien Yu; Huang, Jung Y.; Lo, Leu-Wei

    2015-03-01

    To faithfully estimate a signal that varies in both space and time, the optimization strategy used by a live cell is to organize a collection of distributed and mobile receptors into a mobile active clustering. However, living eukaryotic cells are highly heterogeneous and stochastically dynamic. It is therefore important to develop an energetic model based on fundamental laws to verify that the underlying processes are energetically favorable. We developed an energetic model based on the generalized Langevin equation and the Cahn-Hilliard equation to simulate the diffusive behaviors of receptor proteins in the plasma membrane with a hierarchical structure of actin corrals, lipid domains, and receptor proteins. Single-molecule tracking data of EGFR acquired on live HeLa cells agrees with the simulation results. We discovered that after ligand binding, EGFR molecules move into lipid nanodomains. The transition rates between different diffusion states of liganded EGFR molecules are regulated by the lipid domains. Our method captures both the sensitivity of single-molecule processes, statistic accuracy of data analysis, and the hierarchical structure of plasma membranes.

  2. Focal Adhesion Kinase Controls pH-Dependent Epidermal Barrier Homeostasis by Regulating Actin-Directed Na+/H+ Exchanger 1 Plasma Membrane Localization

    PubMed Central

    Ilic, Dusko; Mao-Qiang, Man; Crumrine, Debra; Dolganov, Gregory; Larocque, Nicholas; Xu, Pu; Demerjian, Marianne; Brown, Barbara E.; Lim, Ssang-Taek; Ossovskaya, Valeria; Schlaepfer, David D.; Fisher, Susan J.; Feingold, Kenneth R.; Elias, Peter M.; Mauro, Theodora M.

    2007-01-01

    Ubiquitously expressed focal adhesion kinase (FAK), linked to multiple intracellular signaling pathways, has previously been shown to control cell motility, invasion, proliferation, and survival. Using mice with a keratinocyte-restricted deletion of fak (FAKK5 KO), we report here a novel role for FAK: maintenance of adult epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis. Abundant lacunae of unprocessed lipids in stratum corneum (SC) of FAKK5 KO mice and delayed barrier recovery pointed to malfunction of pH-dependent enzymes active in extracellular space of SC. Measuring the SC pH gradient showed significantly more neutral pH values in FAKK5 KO mice, suggesting the importance of FAK for acidification. Moreover, normal functions were restored when FAKK5 KO mice were exposed to a surface pH typical of mouse SC (pH = 5.5). Baseline levels and response to barrier disruption of secretory phospholipase A2 isoforms, enzymes that mediate generation of free fatty acids in epidermis, appeared similar in both FAKK5 KO and control littermates. We found that the critical SC acidification regulator Na+/H+ exchanger 1 failed to localize to the plasma membrane in FAK-deficient keratinocytes both in vivo and in vitro. Thus, for plasma membrane localization in terminally differentiated keratinocytes, Na+/H+ exchanger 1 requires an intact actin cytoskeleton, which is impaired in FAK-deficient cells. PMID:17525272

  3. Actinic keratosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... example, if you work outdoors) Had many severe sunburns early in life Are older Symptoms Actinic keratosis ... and tanning salons. Other things to know about sun exposure: Sun exposure is stronger in or near surfaces ...

  4. Actinic Cheilitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a precancerous condition related to cumulative lifetime sun exposure. The lower lip is most often affected. Individuals ... Wearing barrier clothing (eg, wide-brimmed hats) and sunscreen-containing lip balms can aid in preventing actinic ...

  5. The Cardiomyopathy Mutation, R146G Troponin I, Stabilizes the Intermediate "C" State of Regulated Actin under High- and Low-Free Ca(2+) Conditions.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Dylan; Mathur, Mohit C; Kobayashi, Tomoyoshi; Chalovich, Joseph M

    2016-08-16

    The R146G mutation of troponin I (TnI) is associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in humans. Earlier data pointed to stabilization of the intermediate, C state, of actin-tropomyosin-troponin by this mutant. Because cardiac disorders appear to be linked to changes in regulated actin distributions, we determined the extent to which the R146G TnI mutant alters the distribution of states at low and high Ca(2+) concentrations. We show, from measurements of the kcat for actin-activated ATPase activity at saturating Ca(2+) concentrations, that R146G TnI reduced the population of the active, M, state to 25% of the wild-type level. Together with acrylodan-tropomyosin fluorescence measurements of the B state, it appeared that the C state was populated at ∼91% of the total for the R146G TnI-containing actin filaments. The C state was also more heavily populated at low Ca(2+) concentrations. Acrylodan-tropomyosin fluorescence changes showed a large diminution in the inactive state value relative to the wild-type value without a comparable increase in the active state. Furthermore, the rate of binding of rigor S1 to pyrene-labeled actin filaments containing R146G TnI was faster than the rate of binding to wild-type filaments at low free Ca(2+) concentrations. These results indicate that the inhibitory region of TnI affects the B-C and M-C equilibria of actin-tropomyosin-troponin. The observation that a mutation in the inhibitory region affects the M-C equilibrium may point to a novel regulatory interaction. PMID:27454189

  6. FGF signalling regulates bone growth through autophagy.

    PubMed

    Cinque, Laura; Forrester, Alison; Bartolomeo, Rosa; Svelto, Maria; Venditti, Rossella; Montefusco, Sandro; Polishchuk, Elena; Nusco, Edoardo; Rossi, Antonio; Medina, Diego L; Polishchuk, Roman; De Matteis, Maria Antonietta; Settembre, Carmine

    2015-12-10

    Skeletal growth relies on both biosynthetic and catabolic processes. While the role of the former is clearly established, how the latter contributes to growth-promoting pathways is less understood. Macroautophagy, hereafter referred to as autophagy, is a catabolic process that plays a fundamental part in tissue homeostasis. We investigated the role of autophagy during bone growth, which is mediated by chondrocyte rate of proliferation, hypertrophic differentiation and extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition in growth plates. Here we show that autophagy is induced in growth-plate chondrocytes during post-natal development and regulates the secretion of type II collagen (Col2), the major component of cartilage ECM. Mice lacking the autophagy related gene 7 (Atg7) in chondrocytes experience endoplasmic reticulum storage of type II procollagen (PC2) and defective formation of the Col2 fibrillary network in the ECM. Surprisingly, post-natal induction of chondrocyte autophagy is mediated by the growth factor FGF18 through FGFR4 and JNK-dependent activation of the autophagy initiation complex VPS34-beclin-1. Autophagy is completely suppressed in growth plates from Fgf18(-/-) embryos, while Fgf18(+/-) heterozygous and Fgfr4(-/-) mice fail to induce autophagy during post-natal development and show decreased Col2 levels in the growth plate. Strikingly, the Fgf18(+/-) and Fgfr4(-/-) phenotypes can be rescued in vivo by pharmacological activation of autophagy, pointing to autophagy as a novel effector of FGF signalling in bone. These data demonstrate that autophagy is a developmentally regulated process necessary for bone growth, and identify FGF signalling as a crucial regulator of autophagy in chondrocytes. PMID:26595272

  7. Bioelectric Signaling Regulates Size in Zebrafish Fins

    PubMed Central

    Perathoner, Simon; Daane, Jacob M.; Henrion, Ulrike; Seebohm, Guiscard; Higdon, Charles W.; Johnson, Stephen L.; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane; Harris, Matthew P.

    2014-01-01

    The scaling relationship between the size of an appendage or organ and that of the body as a whole is tightly regulated during animal development. If a structure grows at a different rate than the rest of the body, this process is termed allometric growth. The zebrafish another longfin (alf) mutant shows allometric growth resulting in proportionally enlarged fins and barbels. We took advantage of this mutant to study the regulation of size in vertebrates. Here, we show that alf mutants carry gain-of-function mutations in kcnk5b, a gene encoding a two-pore domain potassium (K+) channel. Electrophysiological analysis in Xenopus oocytes reveals that these mutations cause an increase in K+ conductance of the channel and lead to hyperpolarization of the cell. Further, somatic transgenesis experiments indicate that kcnk5b acts locally within the mesenchyme of fins and barbels to specify appendage size. Finally, we show that the channel requires the ability to conduct K+ ions to increase the size of these structures. Our results provide evidence for a role of bioelectric signaling through K+ channels in the regulation of allometric scaling and coordination of growth in the zebrafish. PMID:24453984

  8. Interactions between plant endomembrane systems and the actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pengwei; Hussey, Patrick J.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane trafficking, organelle movement, and morphogenesis in plant cells are mainly controlled by the actin cytoskeleton. Not all proteins that regulate the cytoskeleton and membrane dynamics in animal systems have functional homologs in plants, especially for those proteins that form the bridge between the cytoskeleton and membrane; the membrane-actin adaptors. Their nature and function is only just beginning to be elucidated and this field has been greatly enhanced by the recent identification of the NETWORKED (NET) proteins, which act as membrane-actin adaptors. In this review, we will summarize the role of the actin cytoskeleton and its regulatory proteins in their interaction with endomembrane compartments and where they potentially act as platforms for cell signaling and the coordination of other subcellular events. PMID:26106403

  9. Formation of long and winding nuclear F-actin bundles by nuclear c-Abl tyrosine kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Aoyama, Kazumasa; Yuki, Ryuzaburo; Horiike, Yasuyoshi; Kubota, Sho; Yamaguchi, Noritaka; Morii, Mariko; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Nakayama, Yuji; Kuga, Takahisa; Hashimoto, Yuuki; Tomonaga, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2013-12-10

    The non-receptor-type tyrosine kinase c-Abl is involved in actin dynamics in the cytoplasm. Having three nuclear localization signals (NLSs) and one nuclear export signal, c-Abl shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Although monomeric actin and filamentous actin (F-actin) are present in the nucleus, little is known about the relationship between c-Abl and nuclear actin dynamics. Here, we show that nuclear-localized c-Abl induces nuclear F-actin formation. Adriamycin-induced DNA damage together with leptomycin B treatment accumulates c-Abl into the nucleus and increases the levels of nuclear F-actin. Treatment of c-Abl-knockdown cells with Adriamycin and leptomycin B barely increases the nuclear F-actin levels. Expression of nuclear-targeted c-Abl (NLS-c-Abl) increases the levels of nuclear F-actin even without Adriamycin, and the increased levels of nuclear F-actin are not inhibited by inactivation of Abl kinase activity. Intriguingly, expression of NLS-c-Abl induces the formation of long and winding bundles of F-actin within the nucleus in a c-Abl kinase activity-dependent manner. Furthermore, NLS-c-AblΔC, which lacks the actin-binding domain but has the full tyrosine kinase activity, is incapable of forming nuclear F-actin and in particular long and winding nuclear F-actin bundles. These results suggest that nuclear c-Abl plays critical roles in actin dynamics within the nucleus. - Highlights: • We show the involvement of c-Abl tyrosine kinase in nuclear actin dynamics. • Nuclear F-actin is formed by nuclear-localized c-Abl and its kinase-dead version. • The c-Abl actin-binding domain is prerequisite for nuclear F-actin formation. • Formation of long nuclear F-actin bundles requires nuclear c-Abl kinase activity. • We discuss a role for nuclear F-actin bundle formation in chromatin regulation.

  10. The Actin Nucleator Cobl Is Controlled by Calcium and Calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Haag, Natja; Kessels, Michael M.; Qualmann, Britta

    2015-01-01

    Actin nucleation triggers the formation of new actin filaments and has the power to shape cells but requires tight control in order to bring about proper morphologies. The regulation of the members of the novel class of WASP Homology 2 (WH2) domain-based actin nucleators, however, thus far has largely remained elusive. Our study reveals signal cascades and mechanisms regulating Cordon-Bleu (Cobl). Cobl plays some, albeit not fully understood, role in early arborization of neurons and nucleates actin by a mechanism that requires a combination of all three of its actin monomer–binding WH2 domains. Our experiments reveal that Cobl is regulated by Ca2+ and multiple, direct associations of the Ca2+ sensor Calmodulin (CaM). Overexpression analyses and rescue experiments of Cobl loss-of-function phenotypes with Cobl mutants in primary neurons and in tissue slices demonstrated the importance of CaM binding for Cobl’s functions. Cobl-induced dendritic branch initiation was preceded by Ca2+ signals and coincided with local F-actin and CaM accumulations. CaM inhibitor studies showed that Cobl-mediated branching is strictly dependent on CaM activity. Mechanistic studies revealed that Ca2+/CaM modulates Cobl’s actin binding properties and furthermore promotes Cobl’s previously identified interactions with the membrane-shaping F-BAR protein syndapin I, which accumulated with Cobl at nascent dendritic protrusion sites. The findings of our study demonstrate a direct regulation of an actin nucleator by Ca2+/CaM and reveal that the Ca2+/CaM-controlled molecular mechanisms we discovered are crucial for Cobl’s cellular functions. By unveiling the means of Cobl regulation and the mechanisms, by which Ca2+/CaM signals directly converge on a cellular effector promoting actin filament formation, our work furthermore sheds light on how local Ca2+ signals steer and power branch initiation during early arborization of nerve cells—a key process in neuronal network formation. PMID

  11. A synthetic mechano-growth factor E peptide promotes rat tenocyte migration by lessening cell stiffness and increasing F-actin formation via the FAK-ERK1/2 signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bingyu; Luo, Qing; Mao, Xinjian; Xu, Baiyao; Yang, Li; Ju, Yang; Song, Guanbin

    2014-03-10

    Tendon injuries are common in sports and are frequent reasons for orthopedic consultations. The management of damaged tendons is one of the most challenging problems in orthopedics. Mechano-growth factor (MGF), a recently discovered growth repair factor, plays positive roles in tissue repair through the improvement of cell proliferation and migration and the protection of cells against injury-induced apoptosis. However, it remains unclear whether MGF has the potential to accelerate tendon repair. We used a scratch wound assay in this study to demonstrate that MGF-C25E (a synthetic mechano-growth factor E peptide) promotes the migration of rat tenocytes and that this promotion is accompanied by an elevation in the expression of the following signaling molecules: focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and extracellular signal regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2). Inhibitors of the FAK and ERK1/2 pathways inhibited the MGF-C25E-induced tenocyte migration, indicating that MGF-C25E promotes tenocyte migration through the FAK-ERK1/2 signaling pathway. The analysis of the mechanical properties showed that the Young's modulus of tenocytes was decreased through treatment of MGF-C25E, and an obvious formation of pseudopodia and F-actin was observed in MGF-C25E-treated tenocytes. The inhibition of the FAK or ERK1/2 signals restored the decrease in Young's modulus and inhibited the formation of pseudopodia and F-actin. Overall, our study demonstrated that MGF-C25E promotes rat tenocyte migration by lessening cell stiffness and increasing pseudopodia formation via the FAK-ERK1/2 signaling pathway. - Highlights: • Mechano-growth factor E peptide (MGF-C25E) promotes migration of rat tenocytes. • MGF-C25E activates the FAK-ERK1/2 pathway in rat tenocytes. • MGF-C25E induces the actin remodeling and the formation of pseudopodia, and decreases the stiffness in rat tenocytes. • MGF-C25E promotes tenocyte migration via altering stiffness and forming pseudopodia by the activation of the FAK-ERK1

  12. Fibroblast Growth Factor Signaling in Metabolic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Nies, Vera J. M.; Sancar, Gencer; Liu, Weilin; van Zutphen, Tim; Struik, Dicky; Yu, Ruth T.; Atkins, Annette R.; Evans, Ronald M.; Jonker, Johan W.; Downes, Michael Robert

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity is a growing health problem. Obesity is strongly associated with several comorbidities, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, certain cancers, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes, which all reduce life expectancy and life quality. Several drugs have been put forward in order to treat these diseases, but many of them have detrimental side effects. The unexpected role of the family of fibroblast growth factors in the regulation of energy metabolism provides new approaches to the treatment of metabolic diseases and offers a valuable tool to gain more insight into metabolic regulation. The known beneficial effects of FGF19 and FGF21 on metabolism, together with recently discovered similar effects of FGF1 suggest that FGFs and their derivatives carry great potential as novel therapeutics to treat metabolic conditions. To facilitate the development of new therapies with improved targeting and minimal side effects, a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of action of FGFs is needed. In this review, we will discuss what is currently known about the physiological roles of FGF signaling in tissues important for metabolic homeostasis. In addition, we will discuss current concepts regarding their pharmacological properties and effector tissues in the context of metabolic disease. Also, the recent progress in the development of FGF variants will be reviewed. Our goal is to provide a comprehensive overview of the current concepts and consensuses regarding FGF signaling in metabolic health and disease and to provide starting points for the development of FGF-based therapies against metabolic conditions. PMID:26834701

  13. ROCK1 via LIM kinase regulates growth, maturation and actin based functions in mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Kapur, Reuben; Shi, Jianjian; Ghosh, Joydeep; Munugalavadla, Veerendra; Sims, Emily; Martin, Holly; Wei, Lei; Mali, Raghuveer Singh

    2016-01-01

    Understanding mast cell development is essential due to their critical role in regulating immunity and autoimmune diseases. Here, we show how Rho kinases (ROCK) regulate mast cell development and can function as therapeutic targets for treating allergic diseases. Rock1 deficiency results in delayed maturation of bone marrow derived mast cells (BMMCs) in response to IL-3 stimulation and reduced growth in response to stem cell factor (SCF) stimulation. Further, integrin-mediated adhesion and migration, and IgE-mediated degranulation are all impaired in Rock1-deficient BMMCs. To understand the mechanism behind altered mast cell development in Rock1−/− BMMCs, we analyzed the activation of ROCK and its downstream targets including LIM kinase (LIMK). We observed reduced activation of ROCK, LIMK, AKT and ERK1/2 in Rock1-deficient BMMCs in response to SCF stimulation. Further, loss of either Limk1 or Limk2 also demonstrated altered BMMC maturation and growth; combined deletion of both Limk1 and Limk2 resulted in further reduction in BMMC maturation and growth. In passive cutaneous anaphylaxis model, deficiency of Rock1 or treatment with ROCK inhibitor Fasudil protected mice against IgE-mediated challenge. Our results identify ROCK/LIMK pathway as a novel therapeutic target for treating allergic diseases involving mast cells. PMID:26943578

  14. Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) 23 gene transcription depends on actin cytoskeleton reorganization.

    PubMed

    Fajol, Abul; Honisch, Sabina; Zhang, Bingbing; Schmidt, Sebastian; Alkahtani, Saad; Alarifi, Saud; Lang, Florian; Stournaras, Christos; Föller, Michael

    2016-03-01

    FGF23 regulates renal phosphate and vitamin D metabolism. Loss of FGF23 results in massive calcification and rapid aging. FGF23 production is stimulated by 1,25(OH)2 D3 and NFκB signaling. Here, we report that treatment of UMR106 osteoblast-like cells with 1,25(OH)2 D3 , inducing Fgf23 transcription, resulted in actin polymerization which was blocked by NFκB inhibitor wogonin. Interestingly, 1,25(OH)2 D3 -induced Fgf23 gene transcription was abolished by the actin microfilament-disrupting agent cytochalasin B, as well as by the inhibition of actin-regulating Rac1/PAK1 signaling. Our results provide strong evidence that actin redistribution regulated by the Rac1/PAK1 pathway participates in 1,25(OH)2 D3 -induced Fgf23 gene transcription. PMID:26878191

  15. MamK, a bacterial actin, forms dynamic filaments in vivo that are regulated by the acidic proteins MamJ and LimJ

    PubMed Central

    Draper, Olga; Byrne, Meghan E.; Li, Zhuo; Keyhani, Sepehr; Cueto Barrozo, Joyce; Jensen, Grant; Komeili, Arash

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacterial actins, in contrast to their eukaryotic counterparts, are highly divergent proteins whose wide-ranging functions are thought to correlate with their evolutionary diversity. One clade, represented by the MamK protein of magnetotactic bacteria, is required for the subcellular organization of magnetosomes, membrane-bound organelles that aid in navigation along the earth’s magnetic field. Using a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching assay in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1, we find that, like traditional actins, MamK forms dynamic filaments that require an intact NTPase motif for their turnover in vivo. We also uncover two proteins, MamJ and LimJ, which perform a redundant function to promote the dynamic behavior of MamK filaments in wildtype cells. The absence of both MamJ and LimJ leads to static filaments, a disrupted magnetosome chain, and an anomalous build-up of cytoskeletal filaments between magnetosomes. Our results suggest that MamK filaments, like eukaryotic actins, are intrinsically stable and rely on regulators for their dynamic behavior, a feature that stands in contrast to some classes of bacterial actins characterized to date. PMID:21883528

  16. Actin cytoskeleton-dependent Rab GTPase-regulated angiotensin type I receptor lysosomal degradation studied by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hewang; Yu, Peiying; Sun, Yuansheng; Felder, Robin A.; Periasamy, Ammasi; Jose, Pedro A.

    2010-09-01

    The dynamic regulation of the cellular trafficking of human angiotensin (Ang) type 1 receptor (AT1R) is not well understood. Therefore, we investigated the cellular trafficking of AT1R-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) (AT1R-EGFP) heterologously expressed in HEK293 cells by determining the change in donor lifetime (AT1R-EGFP) in the presence or absence of acceptor(s) using fluorescence lifetime imaging-fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy. The average lifetime of AT1R-EGFP in our donor-alone samples was ~2.33 ns. The basal state lifetime was shortened slightly in the presence of Rab5 (2.01+/-0.10 ns) or Rab7 (2.11+/-0.11 ns) labeled with Alexa 555, as the acceptor fluorophore. A 5-min Ang II treatment markedly shortened the lifetime of AT1R-EGFP in the presence of Rab5-Alexa 555 (1.78+/-0.31 ns) but was affected minimally in the presence of Rab7-Alexa 555 (2.09+/-0.37 ns). A 30-min Ang II treatment further decreased the AT1R-EGFP lifetime in the presence of both Rab5- and Rab7-Alexa 555. Latrunculin A but not nocodazole pretreatment blocked the ability of Ang II to shorten the AT1R-EGFP lifetime. The occurrence of FRET between AT1R-EGFP (donor) and LAMP1-Alexa 555 (acceptor) with Ang II stimulation was impaired by photobleaching the acceptor. These studies demonstrate that Ang II-induced AT1R lysosomal degradation through its association with LAMP1 is regulated by Rab5/7 via mechanisms that are dependent on intact actin cytoskeletons.

  17. Extracellular Inhibitors, Repellents, and Semaphorin/Plexin/MICAL-mediated Actin Filament Disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ruei-Jiun; Terman, Jonathan R.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple extracellular signals have been identified that regulate actin dynamics within motile cells, but how these instructive cues present on the cell surface exert their precise effects on the internal actin cytoskeleton is still poorly understood. One particularly interesting class of these cues is a group of extracellular proteins that negatively alter the movement of cells and their processes. Over the years, these types of events have been described using a variety of terms and herein we provide an overview of inhibitory/repulsive cellular phenomena and highlight the largest known protein family of repulsive extracellular cues, the Semaphorins. Specifically, the Semaphorins (Semas) utilize Plexin cell-surface receptors to dramatically collapse the actin cytoskeleton and we summarize what is known of the direct molecular and biochemical mechanisms of Sema-triggered actin filament (F-actin) disassembly. We also discuss new observations from our lab that reveal that the multi-domain oxidoreductase (Redox) enzyme MICAL, an important mediator of Sema/Plexin repulsion, is a novel F-actin disassembly factor. Our results indicate that MICAL triggers Sema/Plexin-mediated reorganization of the F-actin cytoskeleton and suggest a role for specific Redox signaling events in regulating actin dynamics. PMID:21800438

  18. Calcium influx through CRAC channels controls actin organization and dynamics at the immune synapse

    PubMed Central

    Hartzell, Catherine A; Jankowska, Katarzyna I; Burkhardt, Janis K; Lewis, Richard S

    2016-01-01

    T cell receptor (TCR) engagement opens Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels and triggers formation of an immune synapse between T cells and antigen-presenting cells. At the synapse, actin reorganizes into a concentric lamellipod and lamella with retrograde actin flow that helps regulate the intensity and duration of TCR signaling. We find that Ca2+ influx is required to drive actin organization and dynamics at the synapse. Calcium acts by promoting actin depolymerization and localizing actin polymerization and the actin nucleation promotion factor WAVE2 to the periphery of the lamellipod while suppressing polymerization elsewhere. Ca2+-dependent retrograde actin flow corrals ER tubule extensions and STIM1/Orai1 complexes to the synapse center, creating a self-organizing process for CRAC channel localization. Our results demonstrate a new role for Ca2+ as a critical regulator of actin organization and dynamics at the synapse, and reveal potential feedback loops through which Ca2+ influx may modulate TCR signaling. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14850.001 PMID:27440222

  19. Calcium influx through CRAC channels controls actin organization and dynamics at the immune synapse.

    PubMed

    Hartzell, Catherine A; Jankowska, Katarzyna I; Burkhardt, Janis K; Lewis, Richard S

    2016-01-01

    T cell receptor (TCR) engagement opens Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels and triggers formation of an immune synapse between T cells and antigen-presenting cells. At the synapse, actin reorganizes into a concentric lamellipod and lamella with retrograde actin flow that helps regulate the intensity and duration of TCR signaling. We find that Ca(2+) influx is required to drive actin organization and dynamics at the synapse. Calcium acts by promoting actin depolymerization and localizing actin polymerization and the actin nucleation promotion factor WAVE2 to the periphery of the lamellipod while suppressing polymerization elsewhere. Ca(2+)-dependent retrograde actin flow corrals ER tubule extensions and STIM1/Orai1 complexes to the synapse center, creating a self-organizing process for CRAC channel localization. Our results demonstrate a new role for Ca(2+) as a critical regulator of actin organization and dynamics at the synapse, and reveal potential feedback loops through which Ca(2+) influx may modulate TCR signaling. PMID:27440222

  20. Novel Coronin7 interactions with Cdc42 and N-WASP regulate actin organization and Golgi morphology.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Kurchi; Swaminathan, Karthic; Peche, Vivek S; Clemen, Christoph S; Knyphausen, Philipp; Lammers, Michael; Noegel, Angelika A; Rastetter, Raphael H

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of the actin cytoskeleton to the unique architecture of the Golgi complex is manifold. An important player in this process is Coronin7 (CRN7), a Golgi-resident protein that stabilizes F-actin assembly at the trans-Golgi network (TGN) thereby facilitating anterograde trafficking. Here, we establish that CRN7-mediated association of F-actin with the Golgi apparatus is distinctly modulated via the small Rho GTPase Cdc42 and N-WASP. We identify N-WASP as a novel interaction partner of CRN7 and demonstrate that CRN7 restricts spurious F-actin reorganizations by repressing N-WASP 'hyperactivity' upon constitutive Cdc42 activation. Loss of CRN7 leads to increased cellular F-actin content and causes a concomitant disruption of the Golgi structure. CRN7 harbours a Cdc42- and Rac-interactive binding (CRIB) motif in its tandem β-propellers and binds selectively to GDP-bound Cdc42N17 mutant. We speculate that CRN7 can act as a cofactor for active Cdc42 generation. Mutation of CRIB motif residues that abrogate Cdc42 binding to CRN7 also fail to rescue the cellular defects in fibroblasts derived from CRN7 KO mice. Cdc42N17 overexpression partially rescued the KO phenotypes whereas N-WASP overexpression failed to do so. We conclude that CRN7 spatiotemporally influences F-actin organization and Golgi integrity in a Cdc42- and N-WASP-dependent manner. PMID:27143109

  1. Novel Coronin7 interactions with Cdc42 and N-WASP regulate actin organization and Golgi morphology

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Kurchi; Swaminathan, Karthic; Peche, Vivek S.; Clemen, Christoph S.; Knyphausen, Philipp; Lammers, Michael; Noegel, Angelika A.; Rastetter, Raphael H.

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of the actin cytoskeleton to the unique architecture of the Golgi complex is manifold. An important player in this process is Coronin7 (CRN7), a Golgi-resident protein that stabilizes F-actin assembly at the trans-Golgi network (TGN) thereby facilitating anterograde trafficking. Here, we establish that CRN7-mediated association of F-actin with the Golgi apparatus is distinctly modulated via the small Rho GTPase Cdc42 and N-WASP. We identify N-WASP as a novel interaction partner of CRN7 and demonstrate that CRN7 restricts spurious F-actin reorganizations by repressing N-WASP ‘hyperactivity’ upon constitutive Cdc42 activation. Loss of CRN7 leads to increased cellular F-actin content and causes a concomitant disruption of the Golgi structure. CRN7 harbours a Cdc42- and Rac-interactive binding (CRIB) motif in its tandem β-propellers and binds selectively to GDP-bound Cdc42N17 mutant. We speculate that CRN7 can act as a cofactor for active Cdc42 generation. Mutation of CRIB motif residues that abrogate Cdc42 binding to CRN7 also fail to rescue the cellular defects in fibroblasts derived from CRN7 KO mice. Cdc42N17 overexpression partially rescued the KO phenotypes whereas N-WASP overexpression failed to do so. We conclude that CRN7 spatiotemporally influences F-actin organization and Golgi integrity in a Cdc42- and N-WASP-dependent manner. PMID:27143109

  2. TGF-β-induced profibrotic signaling is regulated in part by the WNT receptor Frizzled-8.

    PubMed

    Spanjer, Anita I R; Baarsma, Hoeke A; Oostenbrink, Lisette M; Jansen, Sepp R; Kuipers, Christine C; Lindner, Michael; Postma, Dirkje S; Meurs, Herman; Heijink, Irene H; Gosens, Reinoud; Königshoff, Melanie

    2016-05-01

    TGF-β is important in lung injury and remodeling processes. TGF-β and Wingless/integrase-1 (WNT) signaling are interconnected; however, the WNT ligand-receptor complexes involved are unknown. Thus, we aimed to identify Frizzled (FZD) receptors that mediate TGF-β-induced profibrotic signaling. MRC-5 and primary human lung fibroblasts were stimulated with TGF-β1, WNT-5A, or WNT-5B in the presence and absence of specific pathway inhibitors. Specific small interfering RNA was used to knock down FZD8. In vivo studies using bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis were performed in wild-type and FZD8-deficient mice. TGF-β1 induced FZD8 specifically via Smad3-dependent signaling in MRC-5 and primary human lung fibroblasts. It is noteworthy that FZD8 knockdown reduced TGF-β1-induced collagen Iα1, fibronectin, versican, α-smooth muscle (sm)-actin, and connective tissue growth factor. Moreover, bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis was attenuated in FZD8-deficient mice in vivo Although inhibition of canonical WNT signaling did not affect TGF-β1-induced gene expression in vitro, noncanonical WNT-5B mimicked TGF-β1-induced fibroblast activation. FZD8 knockdown reduced both WNT-5B-induced gene expression of fibronectin and α-sm-actin, as well as WNT-5B-induced changes in cellular impedance. Collectively, our findings demonstrate a role for FZD8 in TGF-β-induced profibrotic signaling and imply that WNT-5B may be the ligand for FZD8 in these responses.-Spanjer, A. I. R., Baarsma, H. A., Oostenbrink, L. M., Jansen, S. R., Kuipers, C. C., Lindner, M., Postma, D. S., Meurs, H., Heijink, I. H., Gosens, R., Königshoff, M. TGF-β-induced profibrotic signaling is regulated in part by the WNT receptor Frizzled-8. PMID:26849959

  3. Formin' actin in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Baarlink, Christian; Grosse, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Many if not most proteins can, under certain conditions, change cellular compartments, such as, for example, shuttling from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Thus, many proteins may exert functions in various and very different subcellular locations, depending on the signaling context. A large amount of actin regulatory proteins has been detected in the mammalian cell nucleus, although their potential roles are much debated and are just beginning to emerge. Recently, members of the formin family of actin nucleators were also reported to dynamically localize to the nuclear environment. Here we discuss our findings that specific diaphanous-related formins can promote nuclear actin assembly in a signal-dependent manner. PMID:24637338

  4. Early Signaling in Primary T Cells Activated by Antigen Presenting Cells Is Associated with a Deep and Transient Lamellal Actin Network

    PubMed Central

    Roybal, Kole T.; Mace, Emily M.; Mantell, Judith M.; Verkade, Paul; Orange, Jordan S.; Wülfing, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Cellular signaling transduction critically depends on molecular interactions that are in turn governed by dynamic subcellular distributions of the signaling system components. Comprehensive insight into signal transduction requires an understanding of such distributions and cellular structures driving them. To investigate the activation of primary murine T cells by antigen presenting cells (APC) we have imaged more than 60 signaling intermediates during T cell stimulation with microscopy across resolution limits. A substantial number of signaling intermediates associated with a transient, wide, and actin-associated lamellum extending from an interdigitated T cell:APC interface several micrometers into the T cell, as characterized in detail here. By mapping the more than 60 signaling intermediates onto the spatiotemporal features of cell biological structures, the lamellum and other ones previously described, we also define distinct spatial and temporal characteristics of T cell signal initiation, amplification, and core signaling in the activation of primary T cells by APCs. These characteristics differ substantially from ones seen when T cells are activated using common reductionist approaches. PMID:26237050

  5. Piccolo Directs Activity Dependent F-Actin Assembly from Presynaptic Active Zones via Daam1

    PubMed Central

    Wagh, Dhananjay; Terry-Lorenzo, Ryan; Waites, Clarissa L.; Leal-Ortiz, Sergio A.; Maas, Christoph; Reimer, Richard J.; Garner, Craig C.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic assembly of filamentous (F) actin plays essential roles in the assembly of presynaptic boutons, the fusion, mobilization and recycling of synaptic vesicles (SVs), and presynaptic forms of plasticity. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the temporal and spatial assembly of presynaptic F-actin remain largely unknown. Similar to other F-actin rich membrane specializations, presynaptic boutons contain a set of molecules that respond to cellular cues and trans-synaptic signals to facilitate activity-dependent assembly of F-actin. The presynaptic active zone (AZ) protein Piccolo has recently been identified as a key regulator of neurotransmitter release during SV cycling. It does so by coordinating the activity-dependent assembly of F-Actin and the dynamics of key plasticity molecules including Synapsin1, Profilin and CaMKII. The multidomain structure of Piccolo, its exquisite association with the AZ, and its ability to interact with a number of actin-associated proteins suggest that Piccolo may function as a platform to coordinate the spatial assembly of F-actin. Here we have identified Daam1, a Formin that functions with Profilin to drive F-actin assembly, as a novel Piccolo binding partner. We also found that within cells Daam1 activation promotes Piccolo binding, an interaction that can spatially direct the polymerization of F-Actin. Moreover, similar to Piccolo and Profilin, Daam1 loss of function impairs presynaptic-F-actin assembly in neurons. These data suggest a model in which Piccolo directs the assembly of presynaptic F-Actin from the AZ by scaffolding key actin regulatory proteins including Daam1. PMID:25897839

  6. Actinic reticuloid

    SciTech Connect

    Marx, J.L.; Vale, M.; Dermer, P.; Ragaz, A.; Michaelides, P.; Gladstein, A.H.

    1982-09-01

    A 58-year-old man has his condition diagnosed as actinic reticuloid on the basis of clinical and histologic findings and phototesting data. He had clinical features resembling mycosis fungoides in light-exposed areas. Histologic findings disclosed a bandlike infiltrate with atypical mononuclear cells in the dermis and scattered atypical cells in the epidermis. Electron microscopy disclosed mononuclear cells with bizarre, convoluted nuclei, resembling cerebriform cells of Lutzner. Phototesting disclosed a diminished minimal erythemal threshold to UV-B and UV-A. Microscopic changes resembling actinic reticuloid were reproduced in this patient 24 and 72 hours after exposure to 15 minimal erythemal doses of UV-B.

  7. Myosins, Actin and Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Kruppa, Antonina J; Kendrick-Jones, John; Buss, Folma

    2016-08-01

    Myosin motor proteins working together with the actin cytoskeleton drive a wide range of cellular processes. In this review, we focus on their roles in autophagy - the pathway the cell uses to ensure homeostasis by targeting pathogens, misfolded proteins and damaged organelles for degradation. The actin cytoskeleton regulated by a host of nucleating, anchoring and stabilizing proteins provides the filament network for the delivery of essential membrane vesicles from different cellular compartments to the autophagosome. Actin networks have also been implicated in structurally supporting the expanding phagophore, moving autophagosomes and enabling efficient fusion with the lysosome. Only a few myosins have so far been shown to play a role in autophagy. Non-muscle myosin IIA functions in the early stages delivering membrane for the initial formation of the autophagosome, whereas myosin IC and myosin VI are involved in the final stages providing specific membranes for autophagosome maturation and its fusion with the lysosome. PMID:27146966

  8. An actin cytoskeleton with evolutionarily conserved functions in the absence of canonical actin-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Paredez, Alexander R.; Assaf, Zoe June; Sept, David; Timofejeva, Ljudmilla; Dawson, Scott C.; Wang, Chung-Ju Rachel; Cande, W. Z.

    2011-01-01

    Giardia intestinalis, a human intestinal parasite and member of what is perhaps the earliest-diverging eukaryotic lineage, contains the most divergent eukaryotic actin identified to date and is the first eukaryote known to lack all canonical actin-binding proteins (ABPs). We sought to investigate the properties and functions of the actin cytoskeleton in Giardia to determine whether Giardia actin (giActin) has reduced or conserved roles in core cellular processes. In vitro polymerization of giActin produced filaments, indicating that this divergent actin is a true filament-forming actin. We generated an anti-giActin antibody to localize giActin throughout the cell cycle. GiActin localized to the cortex, nuclei, internal axonemes, and formed C-shaped filaments along the anterior of the cell and a flagella-bundling helix. These structures were regulated with the cell cycle and in encysting cells giActin was recruited to the Golgi-like cyst wall processing vesicles. Knockdown of giActin demonstrated that giActin functions in cell morphogenesis, membrane trafficking, and cytokinesis. Additionally, Giardia contains a single G protein, giRac, which affects the Giardia actin cytoskeleton independently of known target ABPs. These results imply that there exist ancestral and perhaps conserved roles for actin in core cellular processes that are independent of canonical ABPs. Of medical significance, the divergent giActin cytoskeleton is essential and commonly used actin-disrupting drugs do not depolymerize giActin structures. Therefore, the giActin cytoskeleton is a promising drug target for treating giardiasis, as we predict drugs that interfere with the Giardia actin cytoskeleton will not affect the mammalian host. PMID:21444821

  9. Rab11-FIP3 is a Rab11-binding protein that regulates breast cancer cell motility by modulating the actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Jian; Tarbutton, Elizabeth; Wilson, Gayle; Prekeris, Rytis

    2009-01-01

    Cell adhesion and motility are very dynamic processes that require the temporal and spatial coordination of many cellular structures. ADP-ribosylation factor 6 (Arf6) has emerged as master regulator of endocytic membrane traffic and cytoskeletal dynamics during cell movement. Recently, a novel Arf6-binding protein known as FIP3/arfophilin/eferin has been identified. In addition to Arf6, FIP3 also interacts with Rab11, a small monomeric GTPase that regulates endocytic membrane transport. Both Arf6 and Rab11 GTPases have been implicated in regulation of cell motility. Here we test the role of FIP3 in breast carcinoma cell motility. First, we demonstrate that FIP3 is associated with recycling endosomes that are present at the leading edge of motile cells. Second, we show that FIP3 is required for the motility of MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells. Third, we demonstrate that FIP3 regulates Rac1-dependent actin cytoskeleton dynamics and modulates the formation and ruffling of lamellipodia. Finally, we demonstrate that FIP3 regulates the localization of Arf6 at the plasma membrane of MDA-MB-231 cells. Based on our data we propose that FIP3 affects cell motility by regulating Arf6 localization to the plasma membrane of the leading edge, thus regulating polarized Rac1 activation and actin dynamics. PMID:19327867

  10. The regulation of actin polymerization in differentiating U937 cells correlates with increased membrane levels of the pertussis-toxin-sensitive G-protein Gi2.

    PubMed Central

    Sheth, B; Banks, P; Burton, D R; Monk, P N

    1991-01-01

    Undifferentiated U937 cells appear to lack a capacity of increase cellular F-actin. However, electropermeabilized cells gain the ability to respond in this way to a guanine nucleotide analogue, guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]trisphosphate (GTP[S]) after 1 h of treatment with dibutyryl cyclic AMP (db-cAMP). The results reported here show that the levels of membrane association of the G-protein Gi2 alpha increase with a time course identical with that of the GTP[S]-sensitivity of electropermeabilized cells. These results suggest that Gi2 alpha may be involved in the signal-transduction pathway leading to actin polymerization in db-cAMP-differentiated U937 cells. PMID:1645523

  11. A complex of ZO-1 and the BAR-domain protein TOCA-1 regulates actin assembly at the tight junction

    PubMed Central

    Van Itallie, Christina M.; Tietgens, Amber Jean; Krystofiak, Evan; Kachar, Bechara; Anderson, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Assembly and sealing of the tight junction barrier are critically dependent on the perijunctional actin cytoskeleton, yet little is known about physical and functional links between barrier-forming proteins and actin. Here we identify a novel functional complex of the junction scaffolding protein ZO-1 and the F-BAR–domain protein TOCA-1. Using MDCK epithelial cells, we show that an alternative splice of TOCA-1 adds a PDZ-binding motif, which binds ZO-1, targeting TOCA-1 to barrier contacts. This isoform of TOCA-1 recruits the actin nucleation–promoting factor N-WASP to tight junctions. CRISPR-Cas9–mediated knockout of TOCA-1 results in increased paracellular flux and delayed recovery in a calcium switch assay. Knockout of TOCA-1 does not alter FRAP kinetics of GFP ZO-1 or occludin, but longer term (12 h) time-lapse microscopy reveals strikingly decreased tight junction membrane contact dynamics in knockout cells compared with controls. Reexpression of TOCA-1 with, but not without, the PDZ-binding motif rescues both altered flux and membrane contact dynamics. Ultrastructural analysis shows actin accumulation at the adherens junction in TOCA-1–knockout cells but unaltered freeze-fracture fibril morphology. Identification of the ZO-1/TOCA-1 complex provides novel insights into the underappreciated dependence of the barrier on the dynamic nature of cell-to-cell contacts and perijunctional actin. PMID:26063734

  12. Single β-actin mRNA detection in neurons reveals a mechanism for regulating its translatability.

    PubMed

    Buxbaum, Adina R; Wu, Bin; Singer, Robert H

    2014-01-24

    The physical manifestation of learning and memory formation in the brain can be expressed by strengthening or weakening of synaptic connections through morphological changes. Local actin remodeling underlies some forms of plasticity and may be facilitated by local β-actin synthesis, but dynamic information is lacking. In this work, we use single-molecule in situ hybridization to demonstrate that dendritic β-actin messenger RNA (mRNA) and ribosomes are in a masked, neuron-specific form. Chemically induced long-term potentiation prompts transient mRNA unmasking, which depends on factors active during synaptic activity. Ribosomes and single β-actin mRNA motility increase after stimulation, indicative of release from complexes. Hence, the single-molecule assays we developed allow for the quantification of activity-induced unmasking and availability for active translation. Further, our work demonstrates that β-actin mRNA and ribosomes are in a masked state that is alleviated by stimulation. PMID:24458642

  13. Signal Transduction Cascades Regulating Fungal Development and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Lengeler, Klaus B.; Davidson, Robert C.; D'souza, Cletus; Harashima, Toshiaki; Shen, Wei-Chiang; Wang, Ping; Pan, Xuewen; Waugh, Michael; Heitman, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    Cellular differentiation, mating, and filamentous growth are regulated in many fungi by environmental and nutritional signals. For example, in response to nitrogen limitation, diploid cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergo a dimorphic transition to filamentous growth referred to as pseudohyphal differentiation. Yeast filamentous growth is regulated, in part, by two conserved signal transduction cascades: a mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade and a G-protein regulated cyclic AMP signaling pathway. Related signaling cascades play an analogous role in regulating mating and virulence in the plant fungal pathogen Ustilago maydis and the human fungal pathogens Cryptococcus neoformans and Candida albicans. We review here studies on the signaling cascades that regulate development of these and other fungi. This analysis illustrates both how the model yeast S. cerevisiae can serve as a paradigm for signaling in other organisms and also how studies in other fungi provide insights into conserved signaling pathways that operate in many divergent organisms. PMID:11104818

  14. SIGNALS AND REGULATORS THAT GOVERN STREPTOMYCES DEVELOPMENT

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Joseph R.; Flärdh, Klas

    2012-01-01

    Streptomyces coelicolor is the genetically best characterized species of a populous genus belonging to the Gram-positive Actinobacteria. Streptomycetes are filamentous soil organisms, well known for the production of a plethora of biologically active secondary metabolic compounds. The Streptomyces developmental life cycle is uniquely complex, and involves coordinated multicellular development with both physiological and morphological differentiation of several cell types, culminating in production of secondary metabolites and dispersal of mature spores. This review presents a current appreciation of the signaling mechanisms used to orchestrate the decision to undergo morphological differentiation, and the regulators and regulatory networks that direct the intriguing development of multigenomic hyphae, first to form specialized aerial hyphae, and then to convert them into chains of dormant spores. This current view of S. coelicolor development is destined for rapid evolution as data from “-omics” studies shed light on gene regulatory networks, new genetic screens identify hitherto unknown players, and the resolution of our insights into the underlying cell biological processes steadily improve. PMID:22092088

  15. Rho-actin signaling to the MRTF coactivators dominates the immediate transcriptional response to serum in fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Esnault, Cyril; Stewart, Aengus; Gualdrini, Francesco; East, Phil; Horswell, Stuart; Matthews, Nik; Treisman, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor SRF (serum response factor) recruits two families of coactivators, the MRTFs (myocardin-related transcription factors) and the TCFs (ternary complex factors), to couple gene transcription to growth factor signaling. Here we investigated the role of the SRF network in the immediate transcriptional response of fibroblasts to serum stimulation. SRF recruited its cofactors in a gene-specific manner, and virtually all MRTF binding was directed by SRF. Much of SRF DNA binding was serum-inducible, reflecting a requirement for MRTF–SRF complex formation in nucleosome displacement. We identified 960 serum-responsive SRF target genes, which were mostly MRTF-controlled, as assessed by MRTF chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) combined with deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) and/or sensitivity to MRTF-linked signals. MRTF activation facilitates RNA polymerase II (Pol II) recruitment or promoter escape according to gene context. MRTF targets encode regulators of the cytoskeleton, transcription, and cell growth, underpinning the role of SRF in cytoskeletal dynamics and mechanosensing. Finally, we show that specific activation of either MRTFs or TCFs can reset the circadian clock. PMID:24732378

  16. Differential regulation of mast cell degranulation versus cytokine secretion by the actin regulatory proteins Coronin1a and Coronin1b

    PubMed Central

    Föger, Niko; Jenckel, André; Orinska, Zane; Lee, Kyeong-Hee; Chan, Andrew C.; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    Mast cell (MC) activation via aggregation of the high affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI) causes degranulation and release of proinflammatory mediators in a process that involves the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. However, the regulatory pathways and the molecular links between cytoskeletal changes and MC function are incompletely understood. In this study, we provide genetic evidence for a critical role of the actin-regulatory proteins Coronin1a (Coro1a) and Coro1b on exocytic pathways in MCs: Coro1a−/− bone marrow–derived MCs exhibit increased FcεRI-mediated degranulation of secretory lysosomes but significantly reduced secretion of cytokines. Hyperdegranulation of Coro1a−/− MCs is further augmented by the additional loss of Coro1b. In vivo, Coro1a−/−Coro1b−/− mice displayed enhanced passive cutaneous anaphylaxis. Functional reconstitution assays revealed that the inhibitory effect of Coro1a on MC degranulation strictly correlates with cortical localization of Coro1a, requires its filamentous actin–binding activity, and is regulated by phosphorylation of Ser2 of Coro1a. Thus, coronin proteins, and in turn the actin cytoskeleton, exhibit a functional dichotomy as differential regulators of degranulation versus cytokine secretion in MC biology. PMID:21844203

  17. Mechanical force-induced polymerization and depolymerization of F-actin at water/solid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xueqiang; Hu, Xiuyuan; Lei, Haozhi; Hu, Jun; Zhang, Yi

    2016-03-21

    Actin molecules are among the three main cytoskeleton proteins of cells and undergo rapid cycling to regulate critical processes such as endocytosis, cytokinesis, cell polarity, and cell morphogenesis. Although extensive studies have been carried out on the dynamics as well as biological functions of actin polymerization and depolymerization both in vivo and in vitro, the molecular mechanisms by which cells sense and respond to mechanical signals are not fully understood. In particular, little attention has been paid to the effect of a physical force that is exerted directly on the actin cytoskeleton. In this paper, we have explored how the mechanical force affects the actin polymerization and depolymerization behaviors at water/solid interfaces using an atomic force microscope (AFM) operated in liquid. By raster scanning an AFM probe on a substrate surface with a certain load, it was found that actin monomers could polymerize into filaments without the help of actin related proteins (ARPs). Further study indicated that actin monomers were inclined to form filaments only under a small scanning load. The polymerized actin filaments would be depolymerized when the mechanical force was stronger. A possible mechanism has been suggested to explain the mechanical force induced actin polymerization. PMID:26928199

  18. Cyclic AMP-Rap1A signaling mediates cell surface translocation of microvascular smooth muscle α2C-adrenoceptors through the actin-binding protein filamin-2

    PubMed Central

    Motawea, Hanaa K. B.; Jeyaraj, Selvi C.; Eid, Ali H.; Mitra, Srabani; Unger, Nicholas T.; Ahmed, Amany A. E.; Flavahan, Nicholas A.

    2013-01-01

    The second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP) plays a vital role in vascular physiology, including vasodilation of large blood vessels. We recently demonstrated cAMP activation of Epac-Rap1A and RhoA-Rho-associated kinase (ROCK)-F-actin signaling in arteriolar-derived smooth muscle cells increases expression and cell surface translocation of functional α2C-adrenoceptors (α2C-ARs) that mediate vasoconstriction in small blood vessels (arterioles). The Ras-related small GTPAse Rap1A increased expression of α2C-ARs and also increased translocation of perinuclear α2C-ARs to intracellular F-actin and to the plasma membrane. This study examined the mechanism of translocation to better understand the role of these newly discovered mediators of blood flow control, potentially activated in peripheral vascular disorders. We utilized a yeast two-hybrid screen with human microvascular smooth muscle cells (microVSM) cDNA library and the α2C-AR COOH terminus to identify a novel interaction with the actin cross-linker filamin-2. Yeast α-galactosidase assays, site-directed mutagenesis, and coimmunoprecipitation experiments in heterologous human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells and in human microVSM demonstrated that α2C-ARs, but not α2A-AR subtype, interacted with filamin. In Rap1-stimulated human microVSM, α2C-ARs colocalized with filamin on intracellular filaments and at the plasma membrane. Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of filamin-2 inhibited Rap1-induced redistribution of α2C-ARs to the cell surface and inhibited receptor function. The studies suggest that cAMP-Rap1-Rho-ROCK signaling facilitates receptor translocation and function via phosphorylation of filamin-2 Ser2113. Together, these studies extend our previous findings to show that functional rescue of α2C-ARs is mediated through Rap1-filamin signaling. Perturbation of this signaling pathway may lead to alterations in α2C-AR trafficking and physiological function. PMID:23864608

  19. Coordination of Actin- and Microtubule-Based Cytoskeletons Supports Transport of Spermatids and Residual Bodies/Phagosomes During Spermatogenesis in the Rat Testis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Elizabeth I; Lee, Will M; Cheng, C Yan

    2016-04-01

    Germ cell transport across the seminiferous epithelium during spermatogenesis requires the intricate coordination of cell junctions, signaling proteins, and both actin- and microtubule (MT)-based cytoskeletons. Although the involvement of cytoskeletons in germ cell transport has been suggested, the precise mechanism(s) remains elusive. Based on growing evidence that actin and MT interactions underlie fundamental cellular processes, such as cell motility, it is unlikely that actin- and MT-based cytoskeletons work independently to regulate germ cell transport in the testis. Using rats treated with adjudin, a potential male contraceptive that disrupts spermatid adhesion and transport in the testis, as a study model, we show herein that actin- and MT-based cytoskeletons are both necessary for transport of spermatids and residual bodies/phagosomes across the seminiferous epithelium in adult rat testes. Analysis of intratubular expression of F-actin and tubulin revealed disruption of both actin and MT networks, concomitant with misdirected spermatids and phagosomes in rats treated with adjudin. Actin regulatory proteins, epidermal growth factor receptor pathway substrate 8 and actin-related protein 3, were mislocalized and down-regulated at the actin-rich anchoring junction between germ and Sertoli cells (apical ectoplasmic specialization) after adjudin treatment. Nonreceptor tyrosine kinase p-FAK-Tyr(407), known to regulate F-actin nucleation via actin-related protein 3, was also mislocalized and down-regulated at the apical ectoplasmic specialization, corroborating the observation of actin cytoskeleton disruption. Additionally, spatiotemporal expression of MT regulatory protein end-binding protein 1, shown to be involved in MT-actin cross talk herein, was also disrupted after adjudin treatment. In summary, spermatid/phagosome transport across the epithelium during spermatogenesis requires the coordination between actin- and MT-based cytoskeletons. PMID:26894662

  20. In Vivo Imaging and Characterization of Actin Microridges

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Pui-ying; Mangos, Steve; Green, Julie M.; Reiser, Jochen; Huttenlocher, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Actin microridges form labyrinth like patterns on superficial epithelial cells across animal species. This highly organized assembly has been implicated in mucus retention and in the mechanical structure of mucosal surfaces, however the mechanisms that regulate actin microridges remain largely unknown. Here we characterize the composition and dynamics of actin microridges on the surface of zebrafish larvae using live imaging. Microridges contain phospho-tyrosine, cortactin and VASP, but not focal adhesion kinase. Time-lapse imaging reveals dynamic changes in the length and branching of microridges in intact animals. Transient perturbation of the microridge pattern occurs before cell division with rapid re-assembly during and after cytokinesis. Microridge assembly is maintained with constitutive activation of Rho or inhibition of myosin II activity. However, expression of dominant negative RhoA or Rac alters microridge organization, with an increase in distance between microridges. Latrunculin A treatment and photoconversion experiments suggest that the F-actin filaments are actively treadmilling in microridges. Accordingly, inhibition of Arp2/3 or PI3K signaling impairs microridge structure and length. Taken together, actin microridges in zebrafish represent a tractable in vivo model to probe pattern formation and dissect Arp2/3-mediated actin dynamics in vivo. PMID:25629723

  1. Nuclear actin levels as an important transcriptional switch

    PubMed Central

    Huet, Guillaume; Skarp, Kari-Pekka; Vartiainen, Maria K.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear actin levels have recently been linked to different cellular fates, suggesting that actin could act as a switch between altered transcriptional states. Here we discuss our latest results on the mechanisms by which nuclear actin levels are regulated and their implications to the functional significance of nuclear actin. PMID:22771994

  2. Regulation of AMPA receptor GluR1 subunit surface expression by a 4. 1N-linked actin cytoskeletal association.

    PubMed

    Shen, L; Liang, F; Walensky, L D; Huganir, R L

    2000-11-01

    The synaptic localization, clustering, and immobilization of neurotransmitter receptors and ion channels play important roles in synapse formation and synaptic transmission. Although several proteins have been identified that interact with AMPA receptors and that may regulate their synaptic targeting, little is known about the interaction of AMPA receptors with the cytoskeleton. In studies examining the interaction of the AMPA receptor GluR1 subunit with neuronal proteins, we determined that GluR1 interacts with the 4.1G and 4.1N proteins, homologs of the erythrocyte membrane cytoskeletal protein 4.1. Using the yeast two-hybrid system and a heterologous cell system, we demonstrated that both 4.1G and 4.1N bind to a membrane proximal region of the GluR1 C terminus, and that a region within the C-terminal domain of 4.1G or 4.1N is sufficient to mediate the interaction. We also found that 4.1N can associate with GluR1 in vivo and colocalizes with AMPA receptors at excitatory synapses. Disruption of the interaction of GluR1 with 4.1N or disruption of actin filaments decreased the surface expression of GluR1 in heterologous cells. Moreover, disruption of actin filaments in cultured cortical neurons dramatically reduced the level of surface AMPA receptors. These results suggest that protein 4.1N may link AMPA receptors to the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:11050113

  3. p120-catenin differentially regulates cell migration by Rho-dependent intracellular and secreted signals

    PubMed Central

    Epifano, Carolina; Megias, Diego; Perez-Moreno, Mirna

    2014-01-01

    The adherens junction protein p120-catenin is implicated in the regulation of cadherin stability, cell migration and inflammatory responses in mammalian epithelial tissues. How these events are coordinated to promote wound repair is not understood. We show that p120 catenin regulates the intrinsic migratory properties of primary mouse keratinocytes, but also influences the migratory behavior of neighboring cells by secreted signals. These events are rooted in the ability of p120-catenin to regulate RhoA GTPase activity, which leads to a two-tiered control of cell migration. One restrains cell motility via an increase in actin stress fibers, reduction in integrin turnover and an increase in the robustness of focal adhesions. The other is coupled to the secretion of inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-24, which causally enhances randomized cell movements. Taken together, our results indicate that p120-RhoA-GTPase-mediated signaling can differentially regulate the migratory behavior of epidermal cells, which has potential implications for chronic wound responses and cancer. PMID:24639556

  4. p120-catenin differentially regulates cell migration by Rho-dependent intracellular and secreted signals.

    PubMed

    Epifano, Carolina; Megias, Diego; Perez-Moreno, Mirna

    2014-05-01

    The adherens junction protein p120-catenin is implicated in the regulation of cadherin stability, cell migration and inflammatory responses in mammalian epithelial tissues. How these events are coordinated to promote wound repair is not understood. We show that p120 catenin regulates the intrinsic migratory properties of primary mouse keratinocytes, but also influences the migratory behavior of neighboring cells by secreted signals. These events are rooted in the ability of p120-catenin to regulate RhoA GTPase activity, which leads to a two-tiered control of cell migration. One restrains cell motility via an increase in actin stress fibers, reduction in integrin turnover and an increase in the robustness of focal adhesions. The other is coupled to the secretion of inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-24, which causally enhances randomized cell movements. Taken together, our results indicate that p120-RhoA-GTPase-mediated signaling can differentially regulate the migratory behavior of epidermal cells, which has potential implications for chronic wound responses and cancer. PMID:24639556

  5. Nanostructures of Designed Geometry and Functionality Enable Regulation of Cellular Signaling Processes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie-Ren; Shi, Lifang; Deng, Zhao; Lo, Su Hao; Liu, Gang-yu

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrices (ECM) triggered cellular signaling processes often begin with the clustering of the cellular receptors such as integrin and FcεRI. The sizes of these initial protein complexes or clusters are tens to 100 nm in dimension; therefore, engineered nanostructures could provide effective mimics of ECM for investigation and control of the initial and downstream specific signaling process. This current topic discusses recent advances in nanotechnology in the context of design and production of matching chemical functionality and geometry for control of specific cellular signaling processes. Two investigations are reported to demonstrate this concept: (a) how the presentation of antigen at nanometer scale would influence the aggregation of FcεRI, which would impact the formation of activation complexes, leading to rearrangement of actin in cytoskeleton and degranulation or activation of mast cells; (b) how the engineered nanostructure could guide the initial integrin clustering, which would impact the formation of focal adhesion and downstream cell signaling cascades, leading to polarization, migration and morphological changes. Complimentary to engineered ECMs using synthetic ligands or peptides, or topographic control at micrometer scale, nanostructures of designed geometry and chemical functionality provide new and effective biochemical cues for regulation of cellular signaling processes and downstream behaviors. PMID:22783801

  6. MicroRNA-30 family members regulate calcium/calcineurin signaling in podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Junnan; Zheng, Chunxia; Wang, Xiao; Yun, Shifeng; Zhao, Yue; Liu, Lin; Lu, Yuqiu; Ye, Yuting; Zhu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Changming; Shi, Shaolin; Liu, Zhihong

    2015-01-01

    Calcium/calcineurin signaling is critical for normal cellular physiology. Abnormalities in this pathway cause many diseases, including podocytopathy; therefore, understanding the mechanisms that underlie the regulation of calcium/calcineurin signaling is essential. Here, we showed that critical components of calcium/calcineurin signaling, including TRPC6, PPP3CA, PPP3CB, PPP3R1, and NFATC3, are the targets of the microRNA-30 family (miR-30s). We found that these 5 genes are highly expressed as mRNA, but the level of the proteins is low in normal podocytes. Conversely, protein levels were markedly elevated in podocytes from rats treated with puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN) and from patients with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). In both FSGS patients and PAN-treated rats, miR-30s were downregulated in podocytes. In cultured podocytes, PAN or a miR-30 sponge increased TRPC6, PPP3CA, PPP3CB, PPP3R1, and NFATC3 expression; calcium influx; intracellular Ca2+ concentration; and calcineurin activity. Moreover, NFATC3 nuclear translocation, synaptopodin degradation, integrin β3 (ITGB3) activation, and actin fiber loss, which are downstream of calcium/calcineurin signaling, were induced by miR-30 reduction but blocked by the calcineurin inhibitor FK506. Podocyte-specific expression of the miR-30 sponge in mice increased calcium/calcineurin pathway component protein expression and calcineurin activity. The mice developed podocyte foot process effacement and proteinuria, which were prevented by FK506. miR-30s also regulated calcium/calcineurin signaling in cardiomyocytes. Together, our results identify miR-30s as essential regulators of calcium/calcineurin signaling. PMID:26436650

  7. Mechanism of Actin-Based Motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantaloni, Dominique; Le Clainche, Christophe; Carlier, Marie-France

    2001-05-01

    Spatially controlled polymerization of actin is at the origin of cell motility and is responsible for the formation of cellular protrusions like lamellipodia. The pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Shigella flexneri, which undergo actin-based propulsion, are acknowledged models of the leading edge of lamellipodia. Actin-based motility of the bacteria or of functionalized microspheres can be reconstituted in vitro from only five pure proteins. Movement results from the regulated site-directed treadmilling of actin filaments, consistent with observations of actin dynamics in living motile cells and with the biochemical properties of the components of the synthetic motility medium.

  8. Regulation of Latent Membrane Protein 1 Signaling through Interaction with Cytoskeletal Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Holthusen, Kirsten; Talaty, Pooja

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) induces constitutive signaling in EBV-infected cells to ensure the survival of the latently infected cells. LMP1 is localized to lipid raft domains to induce signaling. In the present study, a genome-wide screen based on bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) was performed to identify LMP1-binding proteins. Several actin cytoskeleton-associated proteins were identified in the screen. Overexpression of these proteins affected LMP1-induced signaling. BiFC between the identified proteins and LMP1 was localized to lipid raft domains and was dependent on LMP1-induced signaling. Proximity biotinylation assays with LMP1 induced biotinylation of the actin-associated proteins, which were shifted in molecular mass. Together, the findings of this study suggest that the association of LMP1 with lipid rafts is mediated at least in part through interactions with the actin cytoskeleton. IMPORTANCE LMP1 signaling requires oligomerization, lipid raft partitioning, and binding to cellular adaptors. The current study utilized a genome-wide screen to identify several actin-associated proteins as candidate LMP1-binding proteins. The interaction between LMP1 and these proteins was localized to lipid rafts and dependent on LMP1 signaling. This suggests that the association of LMP1 with lipid rafts is mediated through interactions with actin-associated proteins. PMID:25948738

  9. Brown adipocyte differentiation is regulated by hedgehog signaling during development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During development, brown fat tissue arises from mesenchymal precursor cells under the control of signaling networks that are not yet well understood. The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is one of the major signaling pathways that regulate mesenchymal cell fate. However, whether the Hh pathway contr...

  10. Function and Regulation in MAPK Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Raymond E.; Thorner, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    Signaling pathways that activate different mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) elicit many of the responses that are evoked in cells by changes in certain environmental conditions and upon exposure to a variety of hormonal and other stimuli. These pathways were first elucidated in the unicellular eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast). Studies of MAPK pathways in this organism continue to be especially informative in revealing the molecular mechanisms by which MAPK cascades operate, propagate signals, modulate cellular processes, and are controlled by regulatory factors both internal to and external to the pathways. Here we highlight recent advances and new insights about MAPK-based signaling that have been made through studies in yeast, which provide lessons directly applicable to, and that enhance our understanding of, MAPK-mediated signaling in mammalian cells. PMID:17604854

  11. Proinflammatory signaling regulates hematopoietic stem cell emergence.

    PubMed

    Espín-Palazón, Raquel; Stachura, David L; Campbell, Clyde A; García-Moreno, Diana; Del Cid, Natasha; Kim, Albert D; Candel, Sergio; Meseguer, José; Mulero, Victoriano; Traver, David

    2014-11-20

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) underlie the production of blood and immune cells for the lifetime of an organism. In vertebrate embryos, HSCs arise from the unique transdifferentiation of hemogenic endothelium comprising the floor of the dorsal aorta during a brief developmental window. To date, this process has not been replicated in vitro from pluripotent precursors, partly because the full complement of required signaling inputs remains to be determined. Here, we show that TNFR2 via TNF? activates the Notch and NF-?B signaling pathways to establish HSC fate, indicating a requirement for inflammatory signaling in HSC generation. We determine that primitive neutrophils are the major source of TNF?, assigning a role for transient innate immune cells in establishing the HSC program. These results demonstrate that proinflammatory signaling, in the absence of infection, is utilized by the developing embryo to generate the lineal precursors of the adult hematopoietic system. PMID:25416946

  12. Proinflammatory signaling regulates hematopoietic stem cell emergence

    PubMed Central

    Espín-Palazón, Raquel; Stachura, David L.; Campbell, Clyde A.; García-Moreno, Diana; Cid, Natasha Del; Kim, Albert D.; Candel, Sergio; Meseguer, José; Mulero, Victoriano; Traver, David

    2014-01-01

    Summary Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) underlie the production of blood and immune cells for the lifetime of an organism. In vertebrate embryos, HSCs arise from the unique transdifferentiation of hemogenic endothelium comprising the floor of the dorsal aorta during a brief developmental window. To date, this process has not been replicated in vitro from pluripotent precursors, partly because the full complement of required signaling inputs remains to be determined. Here, we show that TNFR2 via TNFα activates the Notch and NF-κB signaling pathways to establish HSC fate, indicating a requirement for inflammatory signaling in HSC generation. We determine that primitive neutrophils are the major source of TNFα, assigning a role for transient innate immune cells in establishing the HSC program. These results demonstrate that proinflammatory signaling, in the absence of infection, is utilized by the developing embryo to generate the lineal precursors of the adult hematopoietic system. PMID:25416946

  13. Regulation of cholesterol biosynthesis and cancer signaling

    PubMed Central

    Gorin, Andrey; Gabitova, Linara; Astsaturov, Igor

    2012-01-01

    Cellular growth is highly dependent on sustained production of lipids. Sterol composition of cellular membranes determines multiple biochemical and biophysical properties of membrane-based processes including vesicle traffic, receptor signaling and assembly of protein complexes. Lipid biogenesis has become an attractive biochemical target in cancer given the high level of dependency on sterols and lipids in a cancer cell. This review summarized the current knowledge of mechanisms of interaction between the metabolism of sterols and receptor signaling. PMID:22824431

  14. Regulation of neurogenesis by calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Toth, Anna B; Shum, Andrew K; Prakriya, Murali

    2016-03-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) signaling has essential roles in the development of the nervous system from neural induction to the proliferation, migration, and differentiation of neural cells. Ca(2+) signaling pathways are shaped by interactions among metabotropic signaling cascades, intracellular Ca(2+) stores, ion channels, and a multitude of downstream effector proteins that activate specific genetic programs. The temporal and spatial dynamics of Ca(2+) signals are widely presumed to control the highly diverse yet specific genetic programs that establish the complex structures of the adult nervous system. Progress in the last two decades has led to significant advances in our understanding of the functional architecture of Ca(2+) signaling networks involved in neurogenesis. In this review, we assess the literature on the molecular and functional organization of Ca(2+) signaling networks in the developing nervous system and its impact on neural induction, gene expression, proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Particular emphasis is placed on the growing evidence for the involvement of store-operated Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels in these processes. PMID:27020657

  15. Enhanced gravitropism of roots with a disrupted cap actin cytoskeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Guichuan; Mohamalawari, Deepti R.; Blancaflor, Elison B.

    2003-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton has been proposed to be a major player in plant gravitropism. However, understanding the role of actin in this process is far from complete. To address this problem, we conducted an analysis of the effect of Latrunculin B (Lat B), a potent actin-disrupting drug, on root gravitropism using various parameters that included detailed curvature kinetics, estimation of gravitropic sensitivity, and monitoring of curvature development after extended clinorotation. Lat B treatment resulted in a promotion of root curvature after a 90 degrees reorientation in three plant species tested. More significantly, the sensitivity of maize (Zea mays) roots to gravity was enhanced after actin disruption, as determined from a comparison of presentation time of Lat B-treated versus untreated roots. A short 10-min gravistimulus followed by extended rotation on a 1-rpm clinostat resulted in extensive gravitropic responses, manifested as curvature that often exceeded 90 degrees. Application of Lat B to the cap or elongation zone of maize roots resulted in the disruption of the actin cytoskeleton, which was confined to the area of localized Lat B application. Only roots with Lat B applied to the cap displayed the strong curvature responses after extended clinorotation. Our study demonstrates that disrupting the actin cytoskeleton in the cap leads to the persistence of a signal established by a previous gravistimulus. Therefore, actin could function in root gravitropism by providing a mechanism to regulate the proliferation of a gravitropic signal originating from the cap to allow the root to attain its correct orientation or set point angle.

  16. Epidermal wound repair is regulated by the planar cell polarity signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Caddy, Jacinta; Wilanowski, Tomasz; Darido, Charbel; Dworkin, Sebastian; Ting, Stephen B; Zhao, Quan; Rank, Gerhard; Auden, Alana; Srivastava, Seema; Papenfuss, Tony A; Murdoch, Jennifer N; Humbert, Patrick O; Parekh, Vishwas; Boulos, Nidal; Weber, Thomas; Zuo, Jian; Cunningham, John M; Jane, Stephen M

    2010-07-20

    The mammalian PCP pathway regulates diverse developmental processes requiring coordinated cellular movement, including neural tube closure and cochlear stereociliary orientation. Here, we show that epidermal wound repair is regulated by PCP signaling. Mice carrying mutant alleles of PCP genes Vangl2, Celsr1, PTK7, and Scrb1, and the transcription factor Grhl3, interact genetically, exhibiting failed wound healing, neural tube defects, and disordered cochlear polarity. Using phylogenetic analysis, ChIP, and gene expression in Grhl3(-)(/-) mice, we identified RhoGEF19, a homolog of a RhoA activator involved in PCP signaling in Xenopus, as a direct target of GRHL3. Knockdown of Grhl3 or RhoGEF19 in keratinocytes induced defects in actin polymerization, cellular polarity, and wound healing, and re-expression of RhoGEF19 rescued these defects in Grhl3-kd cells. These results define a role for Grhl3 in PCP signaling and broadly implicate this pathway in epidermal repair. PMID:20643356

  17. Abl Kinases Regulate HGF/Met Signaling Required for Epithelial Cell Scattering, Tubulogenesis and Motility

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ran; Knight, Jennifer F.; Park, Morag; Pendergast, Ann Marie

    2015-01-01

    Tight regulation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) is crucial for normal development and homeostasis. Dysregulation of RTKs signaling is associated with diverse pathological conditions including cancer. The Met RTK is the receptor for hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and is dysregulated in numerous human tumors. Here we show that Abl family of non-receptor tyrosine kinases, comprised of Abl (ABL1) and Arg (ABL2), are activated downstream of the Met receptor, and that inhibition of Abl kinases dramatically suppresses HGF-induced cell scattering and tubulogenesis. We uncover a critical role for Abl kinases in the regulation of HGF/Met-dependent RhoA activation and RhoA-mediated actomyosin contractility and actin cytoskeleton remodeling in epithelial cells. Moreover, treatment of breast cancer cells with Abl inhibitors markedly decreases Met-driven cell migration and invasion. Notably, expression of a transforming mutant of the Met receptor in the mouse mammary epithelium results in hyper-activation of both Abl and Arg kinases. Together these data demonstrate that Abl kinases link Met activation to Rho signaling and Abl kinases are required for Met-dependent cell scattering, tubulogenesis, migration, and invasion. Thus, inhibition of Abl kinases might be exploited for the treatment of cancers driven by hyperactivation of HGF/Met signaling. PMID:25946048

  18. Epidermal wound repair is regulated by the planar cell polarity signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Caddy, Jacinta; Wilanowski, Tomasz; Darido, Charbel; Dworkin, Sebastian; Ting, Stephen B.; Zhao, Quan; Rank, Gerhard; Auden, Alana; Srivastava, Seema; Papenfuss, Tony A.; Murdoch, Jennifer N.; Humbert, Patrick O.; Boulos, Nidal; Weber, Thomas; Zuo, Jian; Cunningham, John M.; Jane, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The mammalian PCP pathway regulates diverse developmental processes requiring coordinated cellular movement, including neural tube closure and cochlear stereociliary orientation. Here, we show that epidermal wound repair is regulated by PCP signaling. Mice carrying mutant alleles of PCP genes Vangl2, Celsr1, PTK7, and Scrb1, and the transcription factor Grhl3, interact genetically, exhibiting failed wound healing, neural tube defects and disordered cochlear polarity. Using phylogenetic analysis, ChIP, and gene expression in Grhl3−/− mice, we identified RhoGEF19, a homologue of a RhoA activator involved in PCP signaling in Xenopus, as a direct target of GRHL3. Knockdown of Grhl3 or RhoGEF19 in keratinocytes induced defects in actin polymerisation, cellular polarity and wound healing, and re-expression of RhoGEF19 rescued these defects in Grhl3-kd cells. These results define a role for Grhl3 in PCP signaling, and broadly implicate this pathway in epidermal repair. PMID:20643356

  19. Function and Regulation Domains of a Newly Isolated Putative β-Actin Promoter from Pacific White Shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Jianhai; Lu, Yuanan

    2015-01-01

    Current development of transgenic shrimp research has been hampered due to the lack of the suitable promoters and efficient transfection methods for crustaceans. A 1642 bp sequence, containing 5’-upstream sequence, exon 1, intron 1 and partial exon 2, which is responsible for transcriptional initiation of the newly reported shrimp β-actin (actinT1), has been isolated from the Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) and named as SbaP. To determine its function and potential application in marine biotechnology, the sequence and functional domains were examined by constitutive expression of the luciferase reporter gene. We have identified 5’ regions that play a central role in the expression of the β-actin gene. The proximal promoter (-1642/-1325) contains two highly conserved transcriptional sites, CCAAT box and CArG motif. Two negative (-1140/-924, -222/-21) and one positive (-810/-425) regulatory elements have been identified in intron1. Transient transfection assay with a construct containing proximal promoter and enhancer (SbaPΔ-222/+1Δ-1325/-924) regions of the shrimp β-actin coupled with luciferase and EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) showed that the promoter was not only functional in sf21 cells, but promoter activity was more than 8-fold higher than a viral-origin promoter (ie1, white spot syndrome virus immediate early gene promoter). Furthermore, SbaPΔ-222/+1Δ-1325/-924 drove a successful expression of luciferase injection assay in vivo injection and also showed higher promoter activity than the ie1 promoter, suggesting that the expression vectors constructed with SbaPΔ-222/+1Δ-1325/-924 have important potential in gene transfer studies for shrimp and other crustacean species. PMID:25835297

  20. Redox-dependent regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Heppner, David E; van der Vliet, Albert

    2016-08-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent cell signaling represents a unique feature of multicellular organisms, and is important in regulation of cell differentiation and specialized cell functions. Multicellular organisms also contain a diverse family of NADPH oxidases (NOXs) that have been closely linked with tyrosine kinase-based cell signaling and regulate tyrosine phosphorylation via reversible oxidation of cysteine residues that are highly conserved within many proteins involved in this signaling pathway. An example of redox-regulated tyrosine kinase signaling involves the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a widely studied receptor system with diverse functions in normal cell biology as well as pathologies associated with oxidative stress such as cancer. The purpose of this Graphical Redox Review is to highlight recently emerged concepts with respect to NOX-dependent regulation of this important signaling pathway. PMID:26722841

  1. Redox-dependent regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Heppner, David E.; van der Vliet, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent cell signaling represents a unique feature of multicellular organisms, and is important in regulation of cell differentiation and specialized cell functions. Multicellular organisms also contain a diverse family of NADPH oxidases (NOXs) that have been closely linked with tyrosine kinase-based cell signaling and regulate tyrosine phosphorylation via reversible oxidation of cysteine residues that are highly conserved within many proteins involved in this signaling pathway. An example of redox-regulated tyrosine kinase signaling involves the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a widely studied receptor system with diverse functions in normal cell biology as well as pathologies associated with oxidative stress such as cancer. The purpose of this Graphical Redox Review is to highlight recently emerged concepts with respect to NOX-dependent regulation of this important signaling pathway. PMID:26722841

  2. Crosstalk between intracellular and extracellular signals regulating interneuron production, migration and integration into the cortex

    PubMed Central

    Peyre, Elise; Silva, Carla G.; Nguyen, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    During embryogenesis, cortical interneurons are generated by ventral progenitors located in the ganglionic eminences of the telencephalon. They travel along multiple tangential paths to populate the cortical wall. As they reach this structure they undergo intracortical dispersion to settle in their final destination. At the cellular level, migrating interneurons are highly polarized cells that extend and retract processes using dynamic remodeling of microtubule and actin cytoskeleton. Different levels of molecular regulation contribute to interneuron migration. These include: (1) Extrinsic guidance cues distributed along migratory streams that are sensed and integrated by migrating interneurons; (2) Intrinsic genetic programs driven by specific transcription factors that grant specification and set the timing of migration for different subtypes of interneurons; (3) Adhesion molecules and cytoskeletal elements/regulators that transduce molecular signalings into coherent movement. These levels of molecular regulation must be properly integrated by interneurons to allow their migration in the cortex. The aim of this review is to summarize our current knowledge of the interplay between microenvironmental signals and cell autonomous programs that drive cortical interneuron porduction, tangential migration, and intergration in the developing cerebral cortex. PMID:25926769

  3. Cytoskeletal to Nuclear Strain Transfer Regulates YAP Signaling in Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, Tristan P.; Cosgrove, Brian D.; Heo, Su-Jin; Shurden, Zach E.; Mauck, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical forces transduced to cells through the extracellular matrix are critical regulators of tissue development, growth, and homeostasis, and can play important roles in directing stem cell differentiation. In addition to force-sensing mechanisms that reside at the cell surface, there is growing evidence that forces transmitted through the cytoskeleton and to the nuclear envelope are important for mechanosensing, including activation of the Yes-associated protein (YAP)/transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) pathway. Moreover, nuclear shape, mechanics, and deformability change with differentiation state and have been likewise implicated in force sensing and differentiation. However, the significance of force transfer to the nucleus through the mechanosensing cytoskeletal machinery in the regulation of mesenchymal stem cell mechanobiologic response remains unclear. Here we report that actomyosin-generated cytoskeletal tension regulates nuclear shape and force transmission through the cytoskeleton and demonstrate the differential short- and long-term response of mesenchymal stem cells to dynamic tensile loading based on the contractility state, the patency of the actin cytoskeleton, and the connections it makes with the nucleus. Specifically, we show that while some mechanoactive signaling pathways (e.g., ERK signaling) can be activated in the absence of nuclear strain transfer, cytoskeletal strain transfer to the nucleus is essential for activation of the YAP/TAZ pathway with stretch. PMID:26083918

  4. A Pivotal Role of DELLAs in Regulating Multiple Hormone Signals.

    PubMed

    Davière, Jean-Michel; Achard, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Plant phenotypic plasticity is controlled by diverse hormone pathways, which integrate and convey information from multiple developmental and environmental signals. Moreover, in plants many processes such as growth, development, and defense are regulated in similar ways by multiple hormones. Among them, gibberellins (GAs) are phytohormones with pleiotropic actions, regulating various growth processes throughout the plant life cycle. Previous work has revealed extensive interplay between GAs and other hormones, but the molecular mechanism became apparent only recently. Molecular and physiological studies have demonstrated that DELLA proteins, considered as master negative regulators of GA signaling, integrate multiple hormone signaling pathways through physical interactions with transcription factors or regulatory proteins from different families. In this review, we summarize the latest progress in GA signaling and its direct crosstalk with the main phytohormone signaling, emphasizing the multifaceted role of DELLA proteins with key components of major hormone signaling pathways. PMID:26415696

  5. Kinase active Misshapen regulates Notch signaling in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Abhinava K; Sachan, Nalani; Mutsuddi, Mousumi; Mukherjee, Ashim

    2015-11-15

    Notch signaling pathway represents a principal cellular communication system that plays a pivotal role during development of metazoans. Drosophila misshapen (msn) encodes a protein kinase, which is related to the budding yeast Ste20p (sterile 20 protein) kinase. In a genetic screen, using candidate gene approach to identify novel kinases involved in Notch signaling, we identified msn as a novel regulator of Notch signaling. Data presented here suggest that overexpression of kinase active form of Msn exhibits phenotypes similar to Notch loss-of-function condition and msn genetically interacts with components of Notch signaling pathway. Kinase active form of Msn associates with Notch receptor and regulate its signaling activity. We further show that kinase active Misshapen leads to accumulation of membrane-tethered form of Notch. Moreover, activated Msn also depletes Armadillo and DE-Cadherin from adherens junctions. Thus, this study provides a yet unknown mode of regulation of Notch signaling by Misshapen. PMID:26431585

  6. Neurotrophin signaling endosomes: biogenesis, regulation, and functions.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Naoya; Kuruvilla, Rejji

    2016-08-01

    In the nervous system, communication between neurons and their post-synaptic target cells is critical for the formation, refinement and maintenance of functional neuronal connections. Diffusible signals secreted by target tissues, exemplified by the family of neurotrophins, impinge on nerve terminals to influence diverse developmental events including neuronal survival and axonal growth. Key mechanisms of action of target-derived neurotrophins include the cell biological processes of endocytosis and retrograde trafficking of their Trk receptors from growth cones to cell bodies. In this review, we summarize the molecular mechanisms underlying this endosome-mediated signaling, focusing on the instructive role of neurotrophin signaling itself in directing its own trafficking. Recent studies have linked impaired neurotrophin trafficking to neurodevelopmental disorders, highlighting the relevance of neurotrophin endosomes in human health. PMID:27327126

  7. A statistically inferred microRNA network identifies breast cancer target miR-940 as an actin cytoskeleton regulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhajun, Ricky; Guyon, Laurent; Pitaval, Amandine; Sulpice, Eric; Combe, Stéphanie; Obeid, Patricia; Haguet, Vincent; Ghorbel, Itebeddine; Lajaunie, Christian; Gidrol, Xavier

    2015-02-01

    MiRNAs are key regulators of gene expression. By binding to many genes, they create a complex network of gene co-regulation. Here, using a network-based approach, we identified miRNA hub groups by their close connections and common targets. In one cluster containing three miRNAs, miR-612, miR-661 and miR-940, the annotated functions of the co-regulated genes suggested a role in small GTPase signalling. Although the three members of this cluster targeted the same subset of predicted genes, we showed that their overexpression impacted cell fates differently. miR-661 demonstrated enhanced phosphorylation of myosin II and an increase in cell invasion, indicating a possible oncogenic miRNA. On the contrary, miR-612 and miR-940 inhibit phosphorylation of myosin II and cell invasion. Finally, expression profiling in human breast tissues showed that miR-940 was consistently downregulated in breast cancer tissues

  8. Hypotonicity and cell volume regulation in shark rectal gland: role of organic osmolytes and F-actin.

    PubMed

    Ziyadeh, F N; Mills, J W; Kleinzeller, A

    1992-03-01

    Hypotonic stress (reduction of external tonicity from approximately 900 mosM and 295 mM NaCl to approximately 600 mosM and 135 mM NaCl) produced a relatively slow regulatory volume decrease (RVD) in dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias) rectal gland cells. During the 5-h experiment, cell K+ content remained unchanged; cell content of Na+ and Cl- dropped in the initial swelling phase by some 50% (reflecting the corresponding reduction in medium NaCl), and then remained unchanged during volume recovery phase. Also, cellular fluxes of 86Rb+ and urea were not affected by hypotonic stress. However, hypotonicity enhanced 10- to 20-fold the efflux of organic cell osmolytes taurine, betaine, and trimethyloxamine, and this accounted for the loss of osmotically obliged water during RVD. Enhancement of osmolyte efflux by hypotonic stress was abolished by readjusting the low-Na+ saline to isotonicity (approximately 900 mosM) with innocuous cations (choline+, Li+, or N-methylglucamine+). The results suggest that reduction of medium tonicity may be the determinant for the RVD response to hypotonic stress. The above properties of the observed RVD were also displayed when studying changes on cell F-actin at the basolateral cell face; hypotonic stress (medium with 135 mM NaCl) produced a rapid disappearance of fluorescence related to this cytoskeletal component, whereas no such changes were seen in low-Na+ salines made isotonic with choline or N-methylglucamine chloride nor in a saline made hyposmolar by omitting urea. Hence, hypotonicity is required to affect F-actin organization (depolymerization?). These changes of F-actin fluorescence are transient; they were completed within 5-10 min of hypotonic stress, and afterwards a gradual reconstitution of cell F-actin organization was seen. The above observations are consistent with the assumption that, in shark rectal gland cells, transient loss of cytoskeleton (F-actin) organization at the basolateral cell face, induced by hypotonicity

  9. Mechanosensitive kinetic preference of actin-binding protein to actin filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Yasuhiro; Adachi, Taiji

    2016-04-01

    The kinetic preference of actin-binding proteins to actin filaments is altered by external forces on the filament. Such an altered kinetic preference is largely responsible for remodeling the actin cytoskeletal structure in response to intracellular forces. During remodeling, actin-binding proteins and actin filaments interact under isothermal conditions, because the cells are homeostatic. In such a temperature homeostatic state, we can rigorously and thermodynamically link the chemical potential of actin-binding proteins to stresses on the actin filaments. From this relationship, we can construct a physical model that explains the force-dependent kinetic preference of actin-binding proteins to actin filaments. To confirm the model, we have analyzed the mechanosensitive alternation of the kinetic preference of Arp2/3 and cofilin to actin filaments. We show that this model captures the qualitative responses of these actin-binding proteins to the forces, as observed experimentally. Moreover, our theoretical results demonstrate that, depending on the structural parameters of the binding region, actin-binding proteins can show different kinetic responses even to the same mechanical signal tension, in which the double-helix nature of the actin filament also plays a critical role in a stretch-twist coupling of the filament.

  10. Crystal structure of a nuclear actin ternary complex.

    PubMed

    Cao, Tingting; Sun, Lingfei; Jiang, Yuxiang; Huang, Shanjin; Wang, Jiawei; Chen, Zhucheng

    2016-08-01

    Actin polymerizes and forms filamentous structures (F-actin) in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. It also exists in the nucleus and regulates various nucleic acid transactions, particularly through its incorporation into multiple chromatin-remodeling complexes. However, the specific structure of actin and the mechanisms that regulate its polymeric nature inside the nucleus remain unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of nuclear actin (N-actin) complexed with actin-related protein 4 (Arp4) and the helicase-SANT-associated (HSA) domain of the chromatin remodeler Swr1. The inner face and barbed end of N-actin are sequestered by interactions with Arp4 and the HSA domain, respectively, which prevents N-actin from polymerization and binding to many actin regulators. The two major domains of N-actin are more twisted than those of globular actin (G-actin), and its nucleotide-binding pocket is occluded, freeing N-actin from binding to and regulation by ATP. These findings revealed the salient structural features of N-actin that distinguish it from its cytoplasmic counterpart and provide a rational basis for its functions and regulation inside the nucleus. PMID:27457955

  11. Role of regulator of G protein signaling proteins in bone

    PubMed Central

    Keinan, David; Yang, Shuying; Cohen, Robert E.; Yuan, Xue; Liu, Tongjun; Li, Yi-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins are a family with more than 30 proteins that all contain an RGS domain. In the past decade, increasing evidence has indicated that RGS proteins play crucial roles in the regulation of G protein coupling receptors (GPCR), G proteins, and calcium signaling during cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation in a variety of tissues. In bone, those proteins modulate bone development and remodeling by influencing various signaling pathways such as GPCR-G protein signaling, Wnt, calcium oscillations and PTH. This review summarizes the recent advances in the understanding of the regulation of RGS genes expression, as well as the functions and mechanisms of RGS proteins, especially in regulating GPCR-G protein signaling, Wnt signaling, calcium oscillations signaling and PTH signaling during bone development and remodeling. This review also highlights the regulation of different RGS proteins in osteoblasts, chondrocytes and osteoclasts. The knowledge from the recent advances of RGS study summarized in the review would provide the insights into new therapies for bone diseases. PMID:24389209

  12. Transgelin is a TGFβ-inducible gene that regulates osteoblastic and adipogenic differentiation of human skeletal stem cells through actin cytoskeleston organization.

    PubMed

    Elsafadi, M; Manikandan, M; Dawud, R A; Alajez, N M; Hamam, R; Alfayez, M; Kassem, M; Aldahmash, A; Mahmood, A

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative medicine is a novel approach for treating conditions in which enhanced bone regeneration is required. We identified transgelin (TAGLN), a transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ)-inducible gene, as an upregulated gene during in vitro osteoblastic and adipocytic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived stromal (skeletal) stem cells (hMSC). siRNA-mediated gene silencing of TAGLN impaired lineage differentiation into osteoblasts and adipocytes but enhanced cell proliferation. Additional functional studies revealed that TAGLN deficiency impaired hMSC cell motility and in vitro transwell cell migration. On the other hand, TAGLN overexpression reduced hMSC cell proliferation, but enhanced cell migration, osteoblastic and adipocytic differentiation, and in vivo bone formation. In addition, deficiency or overexpression of TAGLN in hMSC was associated with significant changes in cellular and nuclear morphology and cytoplasmic organelle composition as demonstrated by high content imaging and transmission electron microscopy that revealed pronounced alterations in the distribution of the actin filament and changes in cytoskeletal organization. Molecular signature of TAGLN-deficient hMSC showed that several genes and genetic pathways associated with cell differentiation, including regulation of actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesion pathways, were downregulated. Our data demonstrate that TAGLN has a role in generating committed progenitor cells from undifferentiated hMSC by regulating cytoskeleton organization. Targeting TAGLN is a plausible approach to enrich for committed hMSC cells needed for regenerative medicine application. PMID:27490926

  13. Signal regulators of systemic acquired resistance

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qing-Ming; Zhu, Shifeng; Kachroo, Pradeep; Kachroo, Aardra

    2015-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is an important phytohormone that plays a vital role in a number of physiological responses, including plant defense. The last two decades have witnessed a number of breakthroughs related to biosynthesis, transport, perception and signaling mediated by SA. These findings demonstrate that SA plays a crictical role in both local and systemic defense responses. Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is one such SA-dependent response. SAR is a long distance signaling mechanism that provides broad spectrum and long-lasting resistance to secondary infections throughout the plant. This unique feature makes SAR a highly desirable trait in crop production. This review summarizes the recent advances in the role of SA in SAR and discusses its relationship to other SAR inducers. PMID:25918514

  14. Oncogenic KRAS Regulates Tumor Cell Signaling via Stromal Reciprocation

    PubMed Central

    Tape, Christopher J.; Ling, Stephanie; Dimitriadi, Maria; McMahon, Kelly M.; Worboys, Jonathan D.; Leong, Hui Sun; Norrie, Ida C.; Miller, Crispin J.; Poulogiannis, George; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Jørgensen, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Summary Oncogenic mutations regulate signaling within both tumor cells and adjacent stromal cells. Here, we show that oncogenic KRAS (KRASG12D) also regulates tumor cell signaling via stromal cells. By combining cell-specific proteome labeling with multivariate phosphoproteomics, we analyzed heterocellular KRASG12D signaling in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) cells. Tumor cell KRASG12D engages heterotypic fibroblasts, which subsequently instigate reciprocal signaling in the tumor cells. Reciprocal signaling employs additional kinases and doubles the number of regulated signaling nodes from cell-autonomous KRASG12D. Consequently, reciprocal KRASG12D produces a tumor cell phosphoproteome and total proteome that is distinct from cell-autonomous KRASG12D alone. Reciprocal signaling regulates tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis and increases mitochondrial capacity via an IGF1R/AXL-AKT axis. These results demonstrate that oncogene signaling should be viewed as a heterocellular process and that our existing cell-autonomous perspective underrepresents the extent of oncogene signaling in cancer. Video Abstract PMID:27087446

  15. Oncogenic KRAS Regulates Tumor Cell Signaling via Stromal Reciprocation.

    PubMed

    Tape, Christopher J; Ling, Stephanie; Dimitriadi, Maria; McMahon, Kelly M; Worboys, Jonathan D; Leong, Hui Sun; Norrie, Ida C; Miller, Crispin J; Poulogiannis, George; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Jørgensen, Claus

    2016-05-01

    Oncogenic mutations regulate signaling within both tumor cells and adjacent stromal cells. Here, we show that oncogenic KRAS (KRAS(G12D)) also regulates tumor cell signaling via stromal cells. By combining cell-specific proteome labeling with multivariate phosphoproteomics, we analyzed heterocellular KRAS(G12D) signaling in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) cells. Tumor cell KRAS(G12D) engages heterotypic fibroblasts, which subsequently instigate reciprocal signaling in the tumor cells. Reciprocal signaling employs additional kinases and doubles the number of regulated signaling nodes from cell-autonomous KRAS(G12D). Consequently, reciprocal KRAS(G12D) produces a tumor cell phosphoproteome and total proteome that is distinct from cell-autonomous KRAS(G12D) alone. Reciprocal signaling regulates tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis and increases mitochondrial capacity via an IGF1R/AXL-AKT axis. These results demonstrate that oncogene signaling should be viewed as a heterocellular process and that our existing cell-autonomous perspective underrepresents the extent of oncogene signaling in cancer. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:27087446

  16. PMCA2 regulates HER2 protein kinase localization and signaling and promotes HER2-mediated breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jaekwang; VanHouten, Joshua N; Dann, Pamela; Kim, Wonnam; Sullivan, Catherine; Yu, Herbert; Liotta, Lance; Espina, Virginia; Stern, David F; Friedman, Peter A; Wysolmerski, John J

    2016-01-19

    In the lactating mammary gland, the plasma membrane calcium ATPase2 (PMCA2) transports milk calcium. Its expression is activated in breast cancers, where high tumor levels predict increased mortality. We find that PMCA2 expression correlates with HER2 levels in breast cancers and that PMCA2 interacts with HER2 in specific actin-rich membrane domains. Knocking down PMCA2 increases intracellular calcium, disrupts interactions between HER2 and HSP-90, inhibits HER2 signaling, and results in internalization and degradation of HER2. Manipulating PMCA2 levels regulates the growth of breast cancer cells, and knocking out PMCA2 inhibits the formation of tumors in mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-Neu mice. These data reveal previously unappreciated molecular interactions regulating HER2 localization, membrane retention, and signaling, as well as the ability of HER2 to generate breast tumors, suggesting that interactions between PMCA2 and HER2 may represent therapeutic targets for breast cancer. PMID:26729871

  17. AAMP Regulates Endothelial Cell Migration and Angiogenesis Through RhoA/Rho Kinase Signaling.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianjun; Qiu, Juhui; Zheng, Yiming; Zhang, Tao; Yin, Tieying; Xie, Xiang; Wang, Guixue

    2016-05-01

    Angiogenesis is a complicated process including endothelial cell proliferation, migration and tube formation. AAMP plays a role in regulating cell migration of multiple cell types. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether AAMP regulates angiogenesis, and to clarify the role of AAMP in the VEGF-induced angiogenesis. We found that AAMP expressed in multiple cell types and mainly localized in cytoplasm and membrane in vascular endothelial cells. Using tube formation assay in vitro and aortic ring assay, siRNA-mediated knockdown and antibody blockade of AAMP impaired VEGF-induced endothelial cell tube formation and aortic ring angiogenic sprouting. Mechanistic studies showed that AAMP expression was significantly upregulated by VEGF in a concentration and time-dependent manner. Moreover, VEGF recruited AAMP to the cell membrane protrusions. AAMP regulates angiogenesis by mediating the spreading and migration of vascular endothelial cells. AAMP knock-down reduced VEGF-induced actin stress fibers and collagen gel contraction. Furthermore, we identified RhoA/Rho kinase signaling as an important factor that contributes to the action of AAMP in regulating endothelial cell migration and angiogenesis. Altogether, these data demonstrated the critical role of AAMP in angiogenesis and suggested blocking AAMP could serve as a potential therapeutic strategy for angiogenesis-related diseases. PMID:26350504

  18. BteA Secreted from the Bordetella bronchiseptica Type III Secetion System Induces Necrosis through an Actin Cytoskeleton Signaling Pathway and Inhibits Phagocytosis by Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kuwae, Asaomi; Momose, Fumitaka; Nagamatsu, Kanna; Suyama, Yasuharu; Abe, Akio

    2016-01-01

    BteA is one of the effectors secreted from the Bordetella bronchiseptica type III secretion system. It has been reported that BteA induces necrosis in mammalian cells; however, the roles of BteA during the infection process are largely unknown. In order to investigate the BteA functions, morphological changes of the cells infected with the wild-type B. bronchiseptica were examined by time-lapse microscopy. L2 cells, a rat lung epithelial cell line, spread at 1.6 hours after B. bronchiseptica infection. Membrane ruffles were observed at peripheral parts of infected cells during the cell spreading. BteA-dependent cytotoxicity and cell detachment were inhibited by addition of cytochalasin D, an actin polymerization inhibitor. Domain analyses of BteA suggested that two separate amino acid regions, 200–312 and 400–658, were required for the necrosis induction. In order to examine the intra/intermolecular interactions of BteA, the amino- and the carboxyl-terminal moieties were purified as recombinant proteins from Escherichia coli. The amino-terminal moiety of BteA appeared to interact with the carboxyl-terminal moiety in the pull-down assay in vitro. When we measured the amounts of bacteria phagocytosed by J774A.1, a macrophage-like cell line, the phagocytosed amounts of B. bronchiseptica strains that deliver BteA into the host cell cytoplasm were significantly lower than those of strains that lost the ability to translocate BteA into the host cell cytoplasm. These results suggest that B. bronchiseptica induce necrosis by exploiting the actin polymerization signaling pathway and inhibit macrophage phagocytosis. PMID:26828590

  19. Negative regulation of the hepatic fibrogenic response by suppressor of cytokine signaling 1.

    PubMed

    Kandhi, Rajani; Bobbala, Diwakar; Yeganeh, Mehdi; Mayhue, Marian; Menendez, Alfredo; Ilangumaran, Subburaj

    2016-06-01

    Suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1) is an indispensable regulator of IFNγ signaling and has been implicated in the regulation of liver fibrosis. However, it is not known whether SOCS1 mediates its anti-fibrotic functions in the liver directly, or via modulating IFNγ, which has been implicated in attenuating hepatic fibrosis. Additionally, it is possible that SOCS1 controls liver fibrosis by regulating hepatic stellate cells (HSC), a key player in fibrogenic response. While the activation pathways of HSCs have been well characterized, the regulatory mechanisms are not yet clear. The goals of this study were to dissociate IFNγ-dependent and SOCS1-mediated regulation of hepatic fibrogenic response, and to elucidate the regulatory functions of SOCS1 in HSC activation. Liver fibrosis was induced in Socs1(-/-)Ifng(-/-) mice with dimethylnitrosamine or carbon tetrachloride. Ifng(-/-) and C57BL/6 mice served as controls. Following fibrogenic treatments, Socs1(-/-)Ifng(-/-) mice showed elevated serum ALT levels and increased liver fibrosis compared to Ifng(-/-) mice. The latter group showed higher ALT levels and fibrosis than C57BL/6 controls. The livers of SOCS1-deficient mice showed bridging fibrosis, which was associated with increased accumulation of myofibroblasts and abundant collagen deposition. SOCS1-deficient livers showed increased expression of genes coding for smooth muscle actin, collagen, and enzymes involved in remodeling the extracellular matrix, namely matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases. Primary HSCs from SOCS1-deficient mice showed increased proliferation in response to growth factors such as HGF, EGF and PDGF, and the fibrotic livers of SOCS1-deficient mice showed increased expression of the Pdgfb gene. Taken together, these data indicate that SOCS1 controls liver fibrosis independently of IFNγ and that part of this regulation may occur via regulating HSC proliferation and limiting growth factor availability

  20. Actinic Prurigo.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Carreón, Alma Angélica; Rodríguez-Lobato, Erika; Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, Georgina; Cuevas-González, Juan Carlos; Mancheno-Valencia, Alexandra; Solís-Arias, Martha Patricia; Vega-Memije, María Elisa; Hojyo-Tomoka, María Teresa; Domínguez-Soto, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Actinic prurigo is an idiopathic photodermatosis that affects the skin, as well as the labial and conjunctival mucosa in indigenous and mestizo populations of Latin America. It starts predominantly in childhood, has a chronic course, and is exacerbated with solar exposure. Little is known of its pathophysiology, including the known mechanisms of the participation of HLA-DR4 and an abnormal immunologic response with increase of T CD4+ lymphocytes. The presence of IgE, eosinophils, and mast cells suggests that it is a hypersensitivity reaction (likely type IVa or b). The diagnosis is clinical, and the presence of lymphoid follicles in the mucosal histopathologic study of mucosa is pathognomonic. The best available treatment to date is thalidomide, despite its secondary effects. PMID:26861426

  1. [Actinic Keratosis].

    PubMed

    Dejaco, D; Hauser, U; Zelger, B; Riechelmann, H

    2015-07-01

    Actinic keratosis is a cutaneous lesion characterized by proliferation of atypical epidermal keratinocytes due to prolonged exposure to exogenous factors such as ultraviolet radiation. AKs are in-situ-squamous cell carcinomas (PEC) of the skin. AK typically presents as erythematous, scaly patch or papule (classic AK), occasionally as thick, adherent scale on an erythematous base. Mostly fair-skinned adults are affected. AKs typically occur in areas of frequent sun exposure (balding scalp, face, "H-region", lateral neck, décolleté, dorsum of the hand and lower extremities). Actinic Cheilitis is the term used for AKs appearing on the lips. The diagnosis of AK is based on clinical examination including inspection and palpation. The typical palpable rough surface of AK often precedes a visible lesion. Dermoscopy may provide additional information. If diagnosis is uncertain and invasion suspected, biopsy and histopathologic evaluation should be performed. The potential for progression to invasive PECs mandates therapeutic intervention. Treatment options include topical and systemic therapies. Topical therapies are classified into physical, medical and combined physical-chemical approaches and a sequential combination of treatment modalities is possible. Topical-physical cryotherapy is the treatment of choice for isolated, non-hypertrophic AK. Topical-medical treatment, e. g. 5-fluoruracil (5FU) cream or Imiquomod or Ingenolmebutat application is used for multiple, non-hypertrophic AKs. For hypertrophic AKs, a dehorning pretreatment with salicinated vaseline is recommended. Isolated hypertrophic AKs often need cryotherapy with prolonged freezing time or several consecutive applications. Sequentially combined approaches are recommended for multiple, hypertrophic AKs. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) as example for a combined physical-chemical approach is an established treatment for multiple, non-hypertrophic and hypertrophic AKs. Prevention includes avoidance of sun and

  2. Actin as Deathly Switch? How Auxin Can Suppress Cell-Death Related Defence

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Xiaoli; Riemann, Michael; Liu, Qiong; Nick, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Plant innate immunity is composed of two layers – a basal immunity, and a specific effector-triggered immunity, which is often accompanied by hypersensitive cell death. Initiation of cell death depends on a complex network of signalling pathways. The phytohormone auxin as central regulator of plant growth and development represents an important component for the modulation of plant defence. In our previous work, we showed that cell death is heralded by detachment of actin from the membrane. Both, actin response and cell death, are triggered by the bacterial elicitor harpin in grapevine cells. In this study we investigated, whether harpin-triggered actin bundling is necessary for harpin-triggered cell death. Since actin organisation is dependent upon auxin, we used different auxins to suppress actin bundling. Extracellular alkalinisation and transcription of defence genes as the basal immunity were examined as well as cell death. Furthermore, organisation of actin was observed in response to pharmacological manipulation of reactive oxygen species and phospholipase D. We find that induction of defence genes is independent of auxin. However, auxin can suppress harpin-induced cell death and also counteract actin bundling. We integrate our findings into a model, where harpin interferes with an auxin dependent pathway that sustains dynamic cortical actin through the activity of phospholipase D. The antagonism between growth and defence is explained by mutual competition for signal molecules such as superoxide and phosphatidic acid. Perturbations of the auxin-actin pathway might be used to detect disturbed integrity of the plasma membrane and channel defence signalling towards programmed cell death. PMID:25933033

  3. A novel function of the monomeric CCTε subunit connects the serum response factor pathway to chaperone-mediated actin folding

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Kerryn L.; Svanström, Andreas; Spiess, Matthias; Karlsson, Roger; Grantham, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Correct protein folding is fundamental for maintaining protein homeostasis and avoiding the formation of potentially cytotoxic protein aggregates. Although some proteins appear to fold unaided, actin requires assistance from the oligomeric molecular chaperone CCT. Here we report an additional connection between CCT and actin by identifying one of the CCT subunits, CCTε, as a component of the myocardin-related cotranscription factor-A (MRTF-A)/serum response factor (SRF) pathway. The SRF pathway registers changes in G-actin levels, leading to the transcriptional up-regulation of a large number of genes after actin polymerization. These genes encode numerous actin-binding proteins as well as actin. We show that depletion of the CCTε subunit by siRNA enhances SRF signaling in cultured mammalian cells by an actin assembly-independent mechanism. Overexpression of CCTε in its monomeric form revealed that CCTε binds via its substrate-binding domain to the C-terminal region of MRTF-A and that CCTε is able to alter the nuclear accumulation of MRTF-A after stimulation by serum addition. Given that the levels of monomeric CCTε conversely reflect the levels of CCT oligomer, our results suggest that CCTε provides a connection between the actin-folding capacity of the cell and actin expression. PMID:26063733

  4. Redox Regulation of Interleukin-4 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Pankaj; Chakraborty, Rikhia; Wang, Lu; Min, Booki; Tremblay, Michel L.; Kawahara, Tsukasa; Lambeth, J. David; Haque, S. Jaharul

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY The physiologic control of cytokine receptor activation is primarily mediated by reciprocal activation of receptor-associated protein tyrosine kinases and protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Here, we show that immediately following ligand-dependent activation, IL-4 receptor induces an intracellular calcium flux via IRS-PI3K-PLC-γ pathway which, in turn, induces PKC-dependent activation of NAD(P)H oxidase (NOX)5 that generates reactive oxygen species (ROS). IL-4 also induces NOX1-mediated ROS production via IRS-PI3K-RAC1 pathway. ROS, in turn, promote IL-4 receptor activation by oxidatively inactivating PTP1B that physically associates with and deactivates IL-4 receptor. However, ROS are not required for the initiation of IL-4 receptor activation. ROS generated by activated EPO-, TNF-α- or IL-3 receptor also promote IL-4 signaling. These data reveal that inactivation of receptor-associated PTP-activity by cytokine-generated ROS is a physiologic mechanism for the amplification of cytokine receptor activation in both cis and trans, unfolding a novel means of cytokine signaling cross-talk. PMID:18957266

  5. Microtubule and Actin Interplay Drive Intracellular c-Src Trafficking.

    PubMed

    Arnette, Christopher; Frye, Keyada; Kaverina, Irina

    2016-01-01

    The proto-oncogene c-Src is involved in a variety of signaling processes. Therefore, c-Src spatiotemporal localization is critical for interaction with downstream targets. However, the mechanisms regulating this localization have remained elusive. Previous studies have shown that c-Src trafficking is a microtubule-dependent process that facilitates c-Src turnover in neuronal growth cones. As such, microtubule depolymerization lead to the inhibition of c-Src recycling. Alternatively, c-Src trafficking was also shown to be regulated by RhoB-dependent actin polymerization. Our results show that c-Src vesicles primarily exhibit microtubule-dependent trafficking; however, microtubule depolymerization does not inhibit vesicle movement. Instead, vesicular movement becomes both faster and less directional. This movement was associated with actin polymerization directly at c-Src vesicle membranes. Interestingly, it has been shown previously that c-Src delivery is an actin polymerization-dependent process that relies on small GTPase RhoB at c-Src vesicles. In agreement with this finding, microtubule depolymerization induced significant activation of RhoB, together with actin comet tail formation. These effects occurred downstream of GTP-exchange factor, GEF-H1, which was released from depolymerizing MTs. Accordingly, GEF-H1 activity was necessary for actin comet tail formation at the Src vesicles. Our results indicate that regulation of c-Src trafficking requires both microtubules and actin polymerization, and that GEF-H1 coordinates c-Src trafficking, acting as a molecular switch between these two mechanisms. PMID:26866809

  6. Microtubule and Actin Interplay Drive Intracellular c-Src Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Arnette, Christopher; Frye, Keyada; Kaverina, Irina

    2016-01-01

    The proto-oncogene c-Src is involved in a variety of signaling processes. Therefore, c-Src spatiotemporal localization is critical for interaction with downstream targets. However, the mechanisms regulating this localization have remained elusive. Previous studies have shown that c-Src trafficking is a microtubule-dependent process that facilitates c-Src turnover in neuronal growth cones. As such, microtubule depolymerization lead to the inhibition of c-Src recycling. Alternatively, c-Src trafficking was also shown to be regulated by RhoB-dependent actin polymerization. Our results show that c-Src vesicles primarily exhibit microtubule-dependent trafficking; however, microtubule depolymerization does not inhibit vesicle movement. Instead, vesicular movement becomes both faster and less directional. This movement was associated with actin polymerization directly at c-Src vesicle membranes. Interestingly, it has been shown previously that c-Src delivery is an actin polymerization-dependent process that relies on small GTPase RhoB at c-Src vesicles. In agreement with this finding, microtubule depolymerization induced significant activation of RhoB, together with actin comet tail formation. These effects occurred downstream of GTP-exchange factor, GEF-H1, which was released from depolymerizing MTs. Accordingly, GEF-H1 activity was necessary for actin comet tail formation at the Src vesicles. Our results indicate that regulation of c-Src trafficking requires both microtubules and actin polymerization, and that GEF-H1 coordinates c-Src trafficking, acting as a molecular switch between these two mechanisms. PMID:26866809

  7. SOCS Regulation of the JAK/STAT Signalling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Croker, Ben A.; Kiu, Hiu; Nicholson, Sandra E.

    2008-01-01

    The Suppressor Of Cytokine Signalling (SOCS) proteins were, as their name suggests, first described as inhibitors of cytokine signalling. While their actions clearly now extend to other intracellular pathways, they remain key negative regulators of cytokine and growth factor signalling. In this review we focus on the mechanics of SOCS action and the complexities of the mouse models that have underpinned our current understanding of SOCS biology. PMID:18708154

  8. Phosphatase and Tensin Homologue: Novel Regulation by Developmental Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jerde, Travis J.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) is a critical cell endogenous inhibitor of phosphoinositide signaling in mammalian cells. PTEN dephosphorylates phosphoinositide trisphosphate (PIP3), and by so doing PTEN has the function of negative regulation of Akt, thereby inhibiting this key intracellular signal transduction pathway. In numerous cell types, PTEN loss-of-function mutations result in unopposed Akt signaling, producing numerous effects on cells. Numerous reports exist regarding mutations in PTEN leading to unregulated Akt and human disease, most notably cancer. However, less is commonly known about nonmutational regulation of PTEN. This review focuses on an emerging literature on the regulation of PTEN at the transcriptional, posttranscriptional, translational, and posttranslational levels. Specifically, a focus is placed on the role developmental signaling pathways play in PTEN regulation; this includes insulin-like growth factor, NOTCH, transforming growth factor, bone morphogenetic protein, wnt, and hedgehog signaling. The regulation of PTEN by developmental mediators affects critical biological processes including neuronal and organ development, stem cell maintenance, cell cycle regulation, inflammation, response to hypoxia, repair and recovery, and cell death and survival. Perturbations of PTEN regulation consequently lead to human diseases such as cancer, chronic inflammatory syndromes, developmental abnormalities, diabetes, and neurodegeneration. PMID:26339505

  9. Prostasin may contribute to chemoresistance, repress cancer cells in ovarian cancer, and is involved in the signaling pathways of CASP/PAK2-p34/actin.

    PubMed

    Yan, B-x; Ma, J-x; Zhang, J; Guo, Y; Mueller, M D; Remick, S C; Yu, J J

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the deadliest of gynecologic cancers, largely due to the development of drug resistance in chemotherapy. Prostasin may have an essential role in the oncogenesis. In this study, we show that prostasin is decreased in an ovarian cancer drug-resistant cell line and in ovarian cancer patients with high levels of excision repair cross-complementing 1, a marker for chemoresistance. Our cell cultural model investigation demonstrates prostasin has important roles in the development of drug resistance and cancer cell survival. Forced overexpression of prostasin in ovarian cancer cells greatly induces cell death (resulting in 99% cell death in a drug-resistant cell line and 100% cell death in other tested cell lines). In addition, the surviving cells grow at a much lower rate compared with non-overexpressed cells. In vivo studies indicate that forced overexpression of prostasin in drug-resistant cells greatly inhibits the growth of tumors and may partially reverse drug resistance. Our investigation of the molecular mechanisms suggests that prostasin may repress cancer cells and/or contribute to chemoresistance by modulating the CASP/P21-activated protein kinase (PAK2)-p34 pathway, and thereafter PAK2-p34/JNK/c-jun and PAK2-p34/mlck/actin signaling pathways. Thus, we introduce prostain as a potential target for treating/repressing some ovarian tumors and have begun to identify their relevant molecular targets in specific signaling pathways. PMID:24434518

  10. Prostasin may contribute to chemoresistance, repress cancer cells in ovarian cancer, and is involved in the signaling pathways of CASP/PAK2-p34/actin

    PubMed Central

    Yan, B-x; Ma, J-x; Zhang, J; Guo, Y; Mueller, M D; Remick, S C; Yu, J J

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the deadliest of gynecologic cancers, largely due to the development of drug resistance in chemotherapy. Prostasin may have an essential role in the oncogenesis. In this study, we show that prostasin is decreased in an ovarian cancer drug-resistant cell line and in ovarian cancer patients with high levels of excision repair cross-complementing 1, a marker for chemoresistance. Our cell cultural model investigation demonstrates prostasin has important roles in the development of drug resistance and cancer cell survival. Forced overexpression of prostasin in ovarian cancer cells greatly induces cell death (resulting in 99% cell death in a drug-resistant cell line and 100% cell death in other tested cell lines). In addition, the surviving cells grow at a much lower rate compared with non-overexpressed cells. In vivo studies indicate that forced overexpression of prostasin in drug-resistant cells greatly inhibits the growth of tumors and may partially reverse drug resistance. Our investigation of the molecular mechanisms suggests that prostasin may repress cancer cells and/or contribute to chemoresistance by modulating the CASP/P21-activated protein kinase (PAK2)-p34 pathway, and thereafter PAK2-p34/JNK/c-jun and PAK2-p34/mlck/actin signaling pathways. Thus, we introduce prostain as a potential target for treating/repressing some ovarian tumors and have begun to identify their relevant molecular targets in specific signaling pathways. PMID:24434518

  11. An mDia2/ROCK Signaling Axis Regulates Invasive Egress from Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Pettee, Krista M.; Dvorak, Kaitlyn M.; Nestor-Kalinoski, Andrea L.; Eisenmann, Kathryn M.

    2014-01-01

    Multi-cellular spheroids are enriched in ascites of epithelial ovarian cancer (OvCa) patients. They represent an invasive and chemoresistant cellular population fundamental to metastatic dissemination. The molecular mechanisms triggering single cell invasive egress from spheroids remain enigmatic. mDia formins are Rho GTPase effectors that are key regulators of F-actin cytoskeletal dynamics. We hypothesized that mDia2-driven F-actin dynamics promote single cell invasive transitions in clinically relevant three-dimensional (3D) OvCa spheroids. The current study is a dissection of the contribution of the F-actin assembly factor mDia2 formin in invasive transitions and using a clinically relevant ovarian cancer spheroid model. We show that RhoA-directed mDia2 activity is required for tight spheroid organization, and enrichment of mDia2 in the invasive cellular protrusions of collagen-embedded OVCA429 spheroids. Depleting mDia2 in ES-2 spheroids enhanced invasive dissemination of single amoeboid-shaped cells. This contrasts with spheroids treated with control siRNA, where a mesenchymal invasion program predominated. Inhibition of another RhoA effector, ROCK, had no impact on ES-2 spheroid formation but dramatically inhibited spheroid invasion through induction of a highly elongated morphology. Concurrent inhibition of ROCK and mDia2 blocked single cell invasion from ES-2 spheroids more effectively than inhibition of either protein alone, indicating that invasive egress of amoeboid cells from mDia2-depleted spheroids is ROCK-dependent. Our findings indicate that multiple GTPase effectors must be suppressed in order to fully block invasive egress from ovarian cancer spheroids. Furthermore, tightly regulated interplay between ROCK and mDia2 signaling pathways dictates the invasive capacities and the type of invasion program utilized by motile spheroid-derived ovarian cancer cells. As loss of the gene encoding mDia2, DRF3, has been linked to cancer progression and

  12. Interaptin, an Actin-binding Protein of the α-Actinin Superfamily in Dictyostelium discoideum, Is Developmentally and cAMP-regulated and Associates with Intracellular Membrane Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Rivero, Francisco; Kuspa, Adam; Brokamp, Regine; Matzner, Monika; Noegel, Angelika A.

    1998-01-01

    In a search for novel members of the α-actinin superfamily, a Dictyostelium discoideum genomic library in yeast artificial chromosomes (YAC) was screened under low stringency conditions using the acting-binding domain of the gelation factor as probe. A new locus was identified and 8.6 kb of genomic DNA were sequenced that encompassed the whole abpD gene. The DNA sequence predicts a protein, interaptin, with a calculated molecular mass of 204,300 D that is constituted by an actin-binding domain, a central coiled-coil rod domain and a membrane-associated domain. In Northern blot analyses a cAMP-stimulated transcript of 5.8 kb is expressed at the stage when cell differentiation occurs. Monoclonal antibodies raised against bacterially expressed interaptin polypeptides recognized a 200-kD developmentally and cAMP-regulated protein and a 160-kD constitutively expressed protein in Western blots. In multicellular structures, interaptin appears to be enriched in anterior-like cells which sort to the upper and lower cups during culmination. The protein is located at the nuclear envelope and ER. In mutants deficient in interaptin development is delayed, but the morphology of the mature fruiting bodies appears normal. When starved in suspension abpD− cells form EDTA-stable aggregates, which, in contrast to wild type, dissociate. Based on its domains and location, interaptin constitutes a potential link between intracellular membrane compartments and the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:9700162

  13. The linker histone in Saccharomyces cerevisiae interacts with actin-related protein 4 and both regulate chromatin structure and cellular morphology.

    PubMed

    Georgieva, Milena; Staneva, Dessislava; Uzunova, Katya; Efremov, Toni; Balashev, Konstantin; Harata, Masahiko; Miloshev, George

    2015-02-01

    Chromatin structure promotes important epigenetic mechanisms that regulate cellular fate by organizing, preserving and controlling the way by which the genetic information works. Our understanding of chromatin and its functions is sparse and not yet well defined. The uncertainty comes from the complexity of chromatin and is induced by the existence of a large number of nuclear proteins that influence it. The intricate interaction among all these structural and functional nuclear proteins has been under extensive study in the recent years. Here, we show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae linker histone physically interacts with Arp4p (actin-related protein 4) which is a key subunit of three chromatin modifying complexes - INO80, SWR1 and NuA4. A single - point mutation in the actin - fold domain of Arp4p together with the knock-out of the gene for the linker histone in S. cerevisiae severely abrogates cellular and nuclear morphology and leads to complete disorganizing of the higher levels of chromatin organization. PMID:25542182

  14. Fluorescence single-molecule imaging of actin turnover and regulatory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Naoki

    2012-01-01

    Cells must rapidly remodel the actin filament network to achieve various cellular functions. Actin filament turnover is a dynamic process that plays crucial roles in cell adhesion, locomotion, cytokinesis, endocytosis, phagocytosis, tissue remodeling, etc., and is regulated by cell signaling cascades. Success in elucidating dynamic biological processes such as actin-based motility relies on the means enabling real time monitoring of the process. The invention of live-cell fluorescence single-molecule imaging has opened a window for direct viewing of various actin remodeling processes. In general, assembly and dissociation of actin and its regulators turned out to occur at the faster rates than previously estimated by biochemical and structural analyses. Cells undergo such fast continuous exchange of the components perhaps not only to drive actin remodeling but also to facilitate rapid response in many other cell mechanics and signaling cascades. This chapter describes how epifluorescence single-molecule imaging which visualizes deeper area than the TIRF microscopy is achieved in XTC cells, the currently best platform for this approach. PMID:22289456

  15. Hippocampal Wnt Signaling: Memory Regulation and Hormone Interactions.

    PubMed

    Fortress, Ashley M; Frick, Karyn M

    2016-06-01

    Wnt signaling has emerged in recent years as a major player in both nervous system development and adult synaptic plasticity. Of particular relevance to researchers studying learning and memory, Wnt signaling is critical for normal functioning of the hippocampus, a brain region that is essential for many types of memory formation and whose dysfunction is implicated in numerous neurodegenerative and psychiatric conditions. Impaired hippocampal Wnt signaling is implicated in several of these conditions, however, little is known about how Wnt signaling mediates hippocampal memory formation. This review will provide a general overview of Wnt signaling and discuss evidence demonstrating a key role for Wnt signaling in hippocampal memory formation in both normal and disease states. The regulation of Wnt signaling by ovarian sex steroid hormones will also be highlighted, given that the neuroprotection afforded by Wnt-hormone interactions may have significant implications for cognitive function in aging, neurodegenerative disease, and ischemic injury. PMID:25717070

  16. Regulation of Bone Morphogenetic Protein Signaling by ADP-ribosylation.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yukihide; Papoutsoglou, Panagiotis; Maturi, Varun; Tsubakihara, Yutaro; Hottiger, Michael O; Heldin, Carl-Henrik; Moustakas, Aristidis

    2016-06-10

    We previously established a mechanism of negative regulation of transforming growth factor β signaling mediated by the nuclear ADP-ribosylating enzyme poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) and the deribosylating enzyme poly-(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG), which dynamically regulate ADP-ribosylation of Smad3 and Smad4, two central signaling proteins of the pathway. Here we demonstrate that the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway can also be regulated by the opposing actions of PARP1 and PARG. PARG positively contributes to BMP signaling and forms physical complexes with Smad5 and Smad4. The positive role PARG plays during BMP signaling can be neutralized by PARP1, as demonstrated by experiments where PARG and PARP1 are simultaneously silenced. In contrast to PARG, ectopic expression of PARP1 suppresses BMP signaling, whereas silencing of endogenous PARP1 enhances signaling and BMP-induced differentiation. The two major Smad proteins of the BMP pathway, Smad1 and Smad5, interact with PARP1 and can be ADP-ribosylated in vitro, whereas PARG causes deribosylation. The overall outcome of this mode of regulation of BMP signal transduction provides a fine-tuning mechanism based on the two major enzymes that control cellular ADP-ribosylation. PMID:27129221

  17. Regulation of Hedgehog Signalling Inside and Outside the Cell

    PubMed Central

    Ramsbottom, Simon A.; Pownall, Mary E.

    2016-01-01

    The hedgehog (Hh) signalling pathway is conserved throughout metazoans and plays an important regulatory role in both embryonic development and adult homeostasis. Many levels of regulation exist that control the release, reception, and interpretation of the hedgehog signal. The fatty nature of the Shh ligand means that it tends to associate tightly with the cell membrane, and yet it is known to act as a morphogen that diffuses to elicit pattern formation. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) play a major role in the regulation of Hh distribution outside the cell. Inside the cell, the primary cilium provides an important hub for processing the Hh signal in vertebrates. This review will summarise the current understanding of how the Hh pathway is regulated from ligand production, release, and diffusion, through to signal reception and intracellular transduction. PMID:27547735

  18. Feedback Regulation of Kinase Signaling Pathways by AREs and GREs

    PubMed Central

    Vlasova-St. Louis, Irina; Bohjanen, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    In response to environmental signals, kinases phosphorylate numerous proteins, including RNA-binding proteins such as the AU-rich element (ARE) binding proteins, and the GU-rich element (GRE) binding proteins. Posttranslational modifications of these proteins lead to a significant changes in the abundance of target mRNAs, and affect gene expression during cellular activation, proliferation, and stress responses. In this review, we summarize the effect of phosphorylation on the function of ARE-binding proteins ZFP36 and ELAVL1 and the GRE-binding protein CELF1. The networks of target mRNAs that these proteins bind and regulate include transcripts encoding kinases and kinase signaling pathways (KSP) components. Thus, kinase signaling pathways are involved in feedback regulation, whereby kinases regulate RNA-binding proteins that subsequently regulate mRNA stability of ARE- or GRE-containing transcripts that encode components of KSP. PMID:26821046

  19. Oscillatory Dynamics of the Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Shankaran, Harish; Wiley, H. S.

    2010-12-01

    The extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway is a central signaling pathway in development and disease and is regulated by multiple negative and positive feedback loops. Recent studies have shown negative feedback from ERK to upstream regulators can give rise to biochemical oscillations with a periodicity of between 15-30 minutes. Feedback due to the stimulated transcription of negative regulators of the ERK pathway can also give rise to transcriptional oscillations with a periodicity of 1-2h. The biological significance of these oscillations is not clear, but recent evidence suggests that transcriptional oscillations participate in developmental processes, such as somite formation. Biochemical oscillations are more enigmatic, but could provide a mechanism for encoding different types of inputs into a common signaling pathway.

  20. Feedback Regulation of Kinase Signaling Pathways by AREs and GREs.

    PubMed

    Vlasova-St Louis, Irina; Bohjanen, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    In response to environmental signals, kinases phosphorylate numerous proteins, including RNA-binding proteins such as the AU-rich element (ARE) binding proteins, and the GU-rich element (GRE) binding proteins. Posttranslational modifications of these proteins lead to a significant changes in the abundance of target mRNAs, and affect gene expression during cellular activation, proliferation, and stress responses. In this review, we summarize the effect of phosphorylation on the function of ARE-binding proteins ZFP36 and ELAVL1 and the GRE-binding protein CELF1. The networks of target mRNAs that these proteins bind and regulate include transcripts encoding kinases and kinase signaling pathways (KSP) components. Thus, kinase signaling pathways are involved in feedback regulation, whereby kinases regulate RNA-binding proteins that subsequently regulate mRNA stability of ARE- or GRE-containing transcripts that encode components of KSP. PMID:26821046

  1. Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chory, Joanne

    2006-01-16

    The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplasts that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.

  2. Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chory, Joanne

    2004-12-31

    The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplasts that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.

  3. The Design of MACs (Minimal Actin Cortices)

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Sven K; Heinemann, Fabian; Chwastek, Grzegorz; Schwille, Petra

    2013-01-01

    The actin cell cortex in eukaryotic cells is a key player in controlling and maintaining the shape of cells, and in driving major shape changes such as in cytokinesis. It is thereby constantly being remodeled. Cell shape changes require forces acting on membranes that are generated by the interplay of membrane coupled actin filaments and assemblies of myosin motors. Little is known about how their interaction regulates actin cell cortex remodeling and cell shape changes. Because of the vital importance of actin, myosin motors and the cell membrane, selective in vivo experiments and manipulations are often difficult to perform or not feasible. Thus, the intelligent design of minimal in vitro systems for actin-myosin-membrane interactions could pave a way for investigating actin cell cortex mechanics in a detailed and quantitative manner. Here, we present and discuss the design of several bottom-up in vitro systems accomplishing the coupling of actin filaments to artificial membranes, where key parameters such as actin densities and membrane properties can be varied in a controlled manner. Insights gained from these in vitro systems may help to uncover fundamental principles of how exactly actin-myosin-membrane interactions govern actin cortex remodeling and membrane properties for cell shape changes. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24039068

  4. Neuropilins are positive regulators of Hedgehog signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Hillman, R Tyler; Feng, Brian Y; Ni, Jun; Woo, Wei-Meng; Milenkovic, Ljiljana; Hayden Gephart, Melanie G; Teruel, Mary N; Oro, Anthony E; Chen, James K; Scott, Matthew P

    2011-11-15

    The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway is essential for vertebrate embryogenesis, and excessive Hh target gene activation can cause cancer in humans. Here we show that Neuropilin 1 (Nrp1) and Nrp2, transmembrane proteins with roles in axon guidance and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling, are important positive regulators of Hh signal transduction. Nrps are expressed at times and locations of active Hh signal transduction during mouse development. Using cell lines lacking key Hh pathway components, we show that Nrps mediate Hh transduction between activated Smoothened (Smo) protein and the negative regulator Suppressor of Fused (SuFu). Nrp1 transcription is induced by Hh signaling, and Nrp1 overexpression increases maximal Hh target gene activation, indicating the existence of a positive feedback circuit. The regulation of Hh signal transduction by Nrps is conserved between mammals and bony fish, as we show that morpholinos targeting the Nrp zebrafish ortholog nrp1a produce a specific and highly penetrant Hh pathway loss-of-function phenotype. These findings enhance our knowledge of Hh pathway regulation and provide evidence for a conserved nexus between Nrps and this important developmental signaling system. PMID:22051878

  5. Signaling and transcriptional regulation in osteoblast commitment and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Yang, Shuying; Shao, Jianzhong; Li, Yi-Ping

    2013-01-01

    The major event that triggers osteogenesis is the transition of mesenchymal stem cells into bone forming, differentiating osteoblast cells. Osteoblast differentiation is the primary component of bone formation, exemplified by the synthesis, deposition and mineralization of extracellular matrix. Although not well understood, osteoblast differentiation from mesenchymal stem cells is a well-orchestrated process. Recent advances in molecular and genetic studies using gene targeting in mouse enable a better understanding of the multiple factors and signaling networks that control the differentiation process at a molecular level. Osteoblast commitment and differentiation are controlled by complex activities involving signal transduction and transcriptional regulation of gene expression. We review Wnt signaling pathway and Runx2 regulation network, which are critical for osteoblast differentiation. Many other factors and signaling pathways have been implicated in regulation of osteoblast differentiation in a network manner, such as the factors Osterix, ATF4, and SATB2 and the TGF-beta, Hedgehog, FGF, ephrin, and sympathetic signaling pathways. This review summarizes the recent advances in the studies of signaling transduction pathways and transcriptional regulation of osteoblast cell lineage commitment and differentiation. The knowledge of osteoblast commitment and differentiation should be applied towards the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic alternatives for human bone diseases. PMID:17485283

  6. Chloride channel activity of ClC-2 is modified by the actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, N; Ramjeesingh, M; Wong, S; Varga, A; Garami, E; Bear, C E

    2000-01-01

    The chloride channel ClC-2 has been implicated in essential physiological functions, including cell-volume regulation and fluid secretion by specific epithelial tissues. Although ClC-2 is known to be activated by hyperpolarization and hypo-osmotic shock, the molecular basis for the regulation of this channel remains unclear. Here we show in the Xenopus oocyte expression system that the chloride-channel activity of ClC-2 is enhanced after treatment with the actin-disrupting agents cytochalasin and latrunkulin. These findings suggest that the actin cytoskeleton normally exerts an inhibitory effect on ClC-2 activity. An inhibitory domain was previously defined in the N-terminus of ClC-2, so we sought to determine whether this domain might interact directly with actin in binding assays in vitro. We found that a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein containing the inhibitory domain was capable of binding actin in overlay and co-sedimentation assays. Further, the binding of actin to this relatively basic peptide (pI 8.4) might be mediated through electrostatic interactions because binding was inhibited at high concentrations of NaCl with a half-maximal decrease in signal at 180 mM NaCl. This work suggests that electrostatic interactions between the N-terminus of ClC-2 and the actin cytoskeleton might have a role in the regulation of this channel. PMID:11104687

  7. Cytoskeletal proteins in cortical development and disease: actin associated proteins in periventricular heterotopia

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Gewei; Sheen, Volney L.

    2015-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton regulates many important cellular processes in the brain, including cell division and proliferation, migration, and cytokinesis and differentiation. These developmental processes can be regulated through actin dependent vesicle and organelle movement, cell signaling, and the establishment and maintenance of cell junctions and cell shape. Many of these processes are mediated by extensive and intimate interactions of actin with cellular membranes and proteins. Disruption in the actin cytoskeleton in the brain gives rise to periventricular heterotopia (PH), a malformation of cortical development, characterized by abnormal neurons clustered deep in the brain along the lateral ventricles. This disorder can give rise to seizures, dyslexia and psychiatric disturbances. Anatomically, PH is characterized by a smaller brain (impaired proliferation), heterotopia (impaired initial migration) and disruption along the neuroependymal lining (impaired cell-cell adhesion). Genes causal for PH have also been implicated in actin-dependent processes. The current review provides mechanistic insight into actin cytoskeletal regulation of cortical development in the context of this malformation of cortical development. PMID:25883548

  8. Activation of the cAMP Pathway Induces RACK1-Dependent Binding of β-Actin to BDNF Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Neasta, Jeremie; Fiorenza, Anna; He, Dao-Yao; Phamluong, Khanhky; Kiely, Patrick A.; Ron, Dorit

    2016-01-01

    RACK1 is a scaffolding protein that contributes to the specificity and propagation of several signaling cascades including the cAMP pathway. As such, RACK1 participates in numerous cellular functions ranging from cell migration and morphology to gene transcription. To obtain further insights on the mechanisms whereby RACK1 regulates cAMP-dependent processes, we set out to identify new binding partners of RACK1 during activation of the cAMP signaling using a proteomics strategy. We identified β-actin as a direct RACK1 binding partner and found that the association between β-actin and RACK1 is increased in response to the activation of the cAMP pathway. Furthermore, we show that cAMP-dependent increase in BDNF expression requires filamentous actin. We further report that β-actin associates with the BDNF promoter IV upon the activation of the cAMP pathway and present data to suggest that the association of β-actin with BDNF promoter IV is RACK1-dependent. Taken together, our data suggest that β-actin is a new RACK1 binding partner and that the RACK1 and β-actin association participate in the cAMP-dependent regulation of BDNF transcription. PMID:27505161

  9. Sensory Flask Cells in Sponge Larvae Regulate Metamorphosis via Calcium Signaling.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Nagayasu; Stoupin, Daniel; Degnan, Sandie M; Degnan, Bernard M

    2015-12-01

    The Porifera (sponges) is one of the earliest phyletic lineages to branch off the metazoan tree. Although the body-plan of sponges is among the simplest in the animal kingdom and sponges lack nervous systems that communicate environmental signals to other cells, their larvae have sensory systems that generate coordinated responses to environmental cues. In eumetazoans (Cnidaria and Bilateria), the nervous systems of larvae often regulate metamorphosis through Ca(2+)-dependent signal transduction. In sponges, neither the identity of the receptor system that detects an inductive environmental cue (hereafter "metamorphic cues") nor the signaling system that mediates settlement and metamorphosis are known. Using a combination of behavioral assays and surgical manipulations, we show here that specialized epithelial cells-referred to as flask cells-enriched in the anterior third of the Amphimedon queenslandica larva are most likely to be the sensory cells that detect the metamorphic cues. Surgical removal of the region enriched in flask cells in a larva inhibits the initiation of metamorphosis. The flask cell has an apical sensory apparatus with a cilium surrounded by an apical F-actin-rich protrusion, and numerous vesicles, hallmarks of eumetazoan sensory-neurosecretory cells. We demonstrate that these flask cells respond to metamorphic cues by elevating intracellular Ca(2+) levels, and that this elevation is necessary for the initiation of metamorphosis. Taken together, these analyses suggest that sponge larvae have sensory-secretory epithelial cells capable of converting exogenous cues into internal signals via Ca(2+)-mediated signaling, which is necessary for the initiation of metamorphosis. Similarities in the morphology, physiology, and function of the sensory flask cells in sponge larvae with the sensory/neurosecretory cells in eumetazoan larvae suggest this sensory system predates the divergence of Porifera and Eumetazoa. PMID:25898842

  10. Hydraulic Pressure during Fluid Flow Regulates Purinergic Signaling and Cytoskeleton Organization of Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Gardinier, Joseph D.; Gangadharan, Vimal; Wang, Liyun; Duncan, Randall L.

    2014-01-01

    During physiological activities, osteoblasts experience a variety of mechanical forces that stimulate anabolic responses at the cellular level necessary for the formation of new bone. Previous studies have primarily investigated the osteoblastic response to individual forms of mechanical stimuli. However in this study, we evaluated the response of osteoblasts to two simultaneous, but independently controlled stimuli; fluid flow-induced shear stress (FSS) and static or cyclic hydrostatic pressure (SHP or CHP, respectively). MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts-like cells were subjected to 12dyn/cm2 FSS along with SHP or CHP of varying magnitudes to determine if pressure enhances the anabolic response of osteoblasts during FSS. For both SHP and CHP, the magnitude of hydraulic pressure that induced the greatest release of ATP during FSS was 15 mmHg. Increasing the hydraulic pressure to 50 mmHg or 100 mmHg during FSS attenuated the ATP release compared to 15 mmHg during FSS. Decreasing the magnitude of pressure during FSS to atmospheric pressure reduced ATP release to that of basal ATP release from static cells and inhibited actin reorganization into stress fibers that normally occurred during FSS with 15 mmHg of pressure. In contrast, translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) to the nucleus was independent of the magnitude of hydraulic pressure and was found to be mediated through the activation of phospholipase-C (PLC), but not src kinase. In conclusion, hydraulic pressure during FSS was found to regulate purinergic signaling and actin cytoskeleton reorganization in the osteoblasts in a biphasic manner, while FSS alone appeared to stimulate NFκB translocation. Understanding the effects of hydraulic pressure on the anabolic responses of osteoblasts during FSS may provide much needed insights into the physiologic effects of coupled mechanical stimuli on osteogenesis. PMID:24910719

  11. Stochastic model of profilin-actin polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horan, Brandon; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    A driving factor in cell motility and other processes that involve changes of cell shape is the rapid polymerization of actin subunits into long filaments. This process is regulated by profilin, a protein which binds to actin subunits and regulates elongation of actin filaments. Whether profilin stimulates polymerization by coupling to hydrolysis of ATP-bound actin is debated. Previous studies have proposed indirect coupling to ATP hydrolysis using rate equations, but did not include the effects of fluctuations that are important near the critical concentration. We developed stochastic simulations using the Gillespie algorithm to study single filament elongation at the barbed end in the presence of profilin. We used recently measured rate constants and estimated the rate of profilin binding to the barbed end such that detailed balance is satisfied. Fast phosphate release at the tip of the filament was accounted for. The elongation rate and length diffusivity as functions of profilin and actin concentration were calculated and used to extract the critical concentrations of free actin and of total actin. We show under what conditions profilin leads to an increase in the critical concentration of total actin but a decrease in the critical concentration of free actin.

  12. The interaction of vinculin with actin.

    PubMed

    Golji, Javad; Mofrad, Mohammad R K

    2013-04-01

    Vinculin can interact with F-actin both in recruitment of actin filaments to the growing focal adhesions and also in capping of actin filaments to regulate actin dynamics. Using molecular dynamics, both interactions are simulated using different vinculin conformations. Vinculin is simulated either with only its vinculin tail domain (Vt), with all residues in its closed conformation, with all residues in an open I conformation, and with all residues in an open II conformation. The open I conformation results from movement of domain 1 away from Vt; the open II conformation results from complete dissociation of Vt from the vinculin head domains. Simulation of vinculin binding along the actin filament showed that Vt alone can bind along the actin filaments, that vinculin in its closed conformation cannot bind along the actin filaments, and that vinculin in its open I conformation can bind along the actin filaments. The simulations confirm that movement of domain 1 away from Vt in formation of vinculin 1 is sufficient for allowing Vt to bind along the actin filament. Simulation of Vt capping actin filaments probe six possible bound structures and suggest that vinculin would cap actin filaments by interacting with both S1 and S3 of the barbed-end, using the surface of Vt normally occluded by D4 and nearby vinculin head domain residues. Simulation of D4 separation from Vt after D1 separation formed the open II conformation. Binding of open II vinculin to the barbed-end suggests this conformation allows for vinculin capping. Three binding sites on F-actin are suggested as regions that could link to vinculin. Vinculin is suggested to function as a variable switch at the focal adhesions. The conformation of vinculin and the precise F-actin binding conformation is dependent on the level of mechanical load on the focal adhesion. PMID:23633939

  13. New Insights into How Trafficking Regulates T Cell Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Jieqiong; Rossy, Jérémie; Deng, Qiji; Pageon, Sophie V.; Gaus, Katharina